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Sample records for buckling retinal detachment

  1. Scleral buckling biomaterials and implants for retinal detachment surgery.

    PubMed

    Baino, Francesco

    2010-11-01

    Scleral buckling is a widely used surgical procedure that aims at repairing retinal detachments. Many materials and procedural techniques have been variously proposed and tested in an attempt to find the best combination for providing optimal results to the patient. This review highlights the evolution of scleral buckling implants and chronicles the main advances that have been made in such a context. Specifically, the limitations of the materials and implants fallen in disuse, as well as the advantages of currently adopted devices are critically examined and discussed. Future directions for the research are considered, underlining in particular the great potential carried by the development of accurate mathematical models for describing the postoperative evolution of buckled eye. These analytical models, supported by a comprehensive data set provided by advanced techniques of medical investigations, may become useful tools for helping surgeons to choose, and to design if necessary, the best buckling material and configuration to be used in each specific clinical case.

  2. Scleral buckling surgery for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment with subretinal proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi Falavarjani, K; Alemzadeh, S A; Modarres, M; Parvaresh, M M; Hashemi, M; Naseripour, M; Nazari Khanamiri, H; Askari, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the outcome of scleral buckling surgery in patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) with subretinal proliferation. Methods In this retrospective study, a chart review of all patients with RRD associated with subretinal proliferation who were primarily treated with scleral buckling procedure, from April 2007 to April 2014, was undertaken. Main outcome measures were anatomical retinal reattachment and visual acuity. Results Forty-four eyes of 43 patients including 24 males and 19 females with a mean age of 26.5±13.1 years were evaluated. Immediately after the surgery, retina was reattached in all eyes. However, five eyes (11.3%) needed additional surgery for retinal redetachment. Single surgery anatomical success rate was 88.7%. Four eyes (9.1%), needed pars plana vitrectomy for the treatment of redetachment associated with proliferative vitreoretinopathy and scleral buckle revision surgery was successfully performed in the other eye. Best corrected visual acuity improved from 1.5±0.9 logMAR before surgery to 1.1±0.7 logMAR after surgery (P<0.001). An improvement in BCVA of >2 lines was found in 23 eyes (52.2%) and worsening of best corrected visual acuity of >2 lines was observed in 2 eyes (4.5%). Conclusions Scleral buckling surgery is highly successful in eyes with RRD associated with subretinal proliferation. PMID:25613841

  3. Scleral Buckling for Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment Associated with Pars Planitis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jae Kyoun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the surgical outcome of scleral buckling (SB) in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) patients associated with pars planitis. Methods. Retrospective review of RRD patients (32 eyes of pars planitis RRD and 180 eyes of primary RRD) who underwent SB. We compared primary and final anatomical success rates and visual outcomes between two groups. Results. Primary and final anatomical success were achieved in 25 (78.1%) and 31 (96.8%) eyes in the pars planitis RRD group and in 167 eyes (92.7%) and 176 eyes (97.7%) in primary RRD group, respectively. Both groups showed significant visual improvement (p < 0.001) and there were no significant differences in final visual acuity. Pars planitis RRD group was associated with higher rate of postoperative proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) development (12.5% versus 2.8%, p = 0.031). Pars planitis and high myopia were significant preoperative risk factors and pseudophakia was borderline risk for primary anatomical failure after adjusting for various clinical factors. Conclusions. Pars planitis associated RRD showed inferior primary anatomical outcome after SB due to postoperative PVR development. However, final anatomical and visual outcomes were favorable. RRD cases associated with pars planitis, high myopia, and pseudophakia might benefit from different surgical approaches, such as combined vitrectomy and SB. PMID:27688907

  4. Scleral Buckling for Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment Associated with Pars Planitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Kyu; Yoon, Wontae; Ahn, Jae Kyoun; Park, Sung Pyo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the surgical outcome of scleral buckling (SB) in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) patients associated with pars planitis. Methods. Retrospective review of RRD patients (32 eyes of pars planitis RRD and 180 eyes of primary RRD) who underwent SB. We compared primary and final anatomical success rates and visual outcomes between two groups. Results. Primary and final anatomical success were achieved in 25 (78.1%) and 31 (96.8%) eyes in the pars planitis RRD group and in 167 eyes (92.7%) and 176 eyes (97.7%) in primary RRD group, respectively. Both groups showed significant visual improvement (p < 0.001) and there were no significant differences in final visual acuity. Pars planitis RRD group was associated with higher rate of postoperative proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) development (12.5% versus 2.8%, p = 0.031). Pars planitis and high myopia were significant preoperative risk factors and pseudophakia was borderline risk for primary anatomical failure after adjusting for various clinical factors. Conclusions. Pars planitis associated RRD showed inferior primary anatomical outcome after SB due to postoperative PVR development. However, final anatomical and visual outcomes were favorable. RRD cases associated with pars planitis, high myopia, and pseudophakia might benefit from different surgical approaches, such as combined vitrectomy and SB. PMID:27688907

  5. Scleral Buckling for Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment Associated with Pars Planitis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jae Kyoun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the surgical outcome of scleral buckling (SB) in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) patients associated with pars planitis. Methods. Retrospective review of RRD patients (32 eyes of pars planitis RRD and 180 eyes of primary RRD) who underwent SB. We compared primary and final anatomical success rates and visual outcomes between two groups. Results. Primary and final anatomical success were achieved in 25 (78.1%) and 31 (96.8%) eyes in the pars planitis RRD group and in 167 eyes (92.7%) and 176 eyes (97.7%) in primary RRD group, respectively. Both groups showed significant visual improvement (p < 0.001) and there were no significant differences in final visual acuity. Pars planitis RRD group was associated with higher rate of postoperative proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) development (12.5% versus 2.8%, p = 0.031). Pars planitis and high myopia were significant preoperative risk factors and pseudophakia was borderline risk for primary anatomical failure after adjusting for various clinical factors. Conclusions. Pars planitis associated RRD showed inferior primary anatomical outcome after SB due to postoperative PVR development. However, final anatomical and visual outcomes were favorable. RRD cases associated with pars planitis, high myopia, and pseudophakia might benefit from different surgical approaches, such as combined vitrectomy and SB.

  6. Retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) is the most common form of retinal detachment, where a retinal "break" allows the ingress of fluid from the vitreous cavity to the subretinal space, resulting in retinal separation. It occurs in about 1 in 10,000 people a year. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to prevent progression from retinal breaks or lattice degeneration to retinal detachment? What are the effects of different surgical interventions in people with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment? What are the effects of interventions to treat proliferative vitreoretinopathy occurring as a complication of retinal detachment or previous treatment for retinal detachment? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 21 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: corticosteroids, cryotherapy, daunorubicin, fluorouracil plus low molecular weight heparin, laser photocoagulation, pneumatic retinopexy, scleral buckling, short-acting or long-acting gas tamponade, silicone oil tamponade, and vitrectomy. PMID:21406128

  7. Drainage of subretinal fluidduring scleral buckling surgery for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    MALAGOLA, R.; PANNARALE, L.; TORTORELLA, P.; ARRICO, L.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective The purpose of the study is to compare the drainage of subretinal fluid (SRF) in a scleral pocket (SP) with incision parallel to the limbus to drainage through a simple radial scleral thinning (ST), during scleral buckling surgery for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). Patients and methods Retrospective cohort study of one hundred sixty-nine consecutive buckling surgery for RRD, where a drainage puncture was performed through SP in eighty-five cases and through previous radial ST in eighty-four cases. Results PT shows significant lower complication rate. The incidence of retinal incarceration or formation of a retinal hole at the first drainage site is lower in PT group (p=0.0285). During surgery choroidal detachment have been observed in a higher percentage of cases in the SP group (p=0.0379). At the end of the surgery a certain amount of SRF behind the buckling was significant in ST group (p=0.0026). Conclusion The SP drainage technique appears to be a useful, effective and safe method to drain SRF. PMID:26188754

  8. Predictive factors for postoperative visual function of primary chronic rhegmatogenous retinal detachment after scleral buckling

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Wei; Li, Jiu-Ke; Jin, Xiao-Hong; Dai, Yuan-Min; Li, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate predictive factors for postoperative visual function of primary chronic rhegmatgenous retinal detachment (RRD) after sclera buckling (SB). METHODS Totally 48 patients (51 eyes) with primary chronic RRD were included in this prospective interventional clinical cases study, which underwent SB alone from June 2008 to December 2014. Age, sex, symptoms duration, detached extension, retinal hole position, size, type, fovea on/off, proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), posterior vitreous detachment (PVD), baseline best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), operative duration, follow up duration, final BCVA were measured. Pearson correlation analysis, Spearman correlation analysis and multivariate linear stepwise regression were used to confirm predictive factors for better final visual acuity. Student's t-test, Wilcoxon two-sample test, Chi-square test and logistic stepwise regression were used to confirm predictive factors for better vision improvement. RESULTS Baseline BCVA was 0.8313±0.6911 logMAR and final BCVA was 0.4761±0.4956 logMAR. Primary surgical success rate was 92.16% (47/51). Correlation analyses revealed shorter symptoms duration (r=0.3850, P=0.0053), less detached area (r=0.5489, P<0.0001), fovea (r=0.4605, P=0.0007), no PVR (r=0.3138, P=0.0250), better baseline BCVA (r=0.7291, P<0.0001), shorter operative duration (r=0.3233, P=0.0207) and longer follow up (r=-0.3358, P=0.0160) were related with better final BCVA, while independent predictive factors were better baseline BCVA [partial R-square (PR2)=0.5316, P<0.0001], shorter symptoms duration (PR2=0.0609, P=0.0101), longer follow up duration (PR2=0.0278, P=0.0477) and shorter operative duration (PR2=0.0338, P=0.0350). Patients with vision improvement took up 49.02% (25/51). Univariate and multivariate analyses both revealed predictive factors for better vision improvement were better baseline vision [odds ratio (OR) =50.369, P=0.0041] and longer follow up duration (OR=1.144, P=0

  9. Comparison of scleral buckling using wide-angle viewing systems and indirect ophthalmoscope for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiu-Juan; Yang, Xiao-Peng; Lyu, Xiao-Bei

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the effects of scleral buckling using wide-angle viewing systems (WAVS) with that using indirect ophthalmoscope for the treatment of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. METHODS The study was a retrospective analyses of the medical records of 94 eyes (94 patients) with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Among them, 47 eyes underwent scleral buckling using WAVS with endoilluminator (Group W), and 47 eyes underwent scleral buckling using indirect ophthalmoscope (Group I). Surgical durations, primary success rate, best-corrected visual acuities (BCVA), delayed subretinal fluid absorptions and surgical complications were compared between the two groups. RESULTS At baseline, there were no statistical differences between the two groups in patient's age (P=0.997), gender (P=0.853), symptom duration (P=0.216), BCVA (P=0.389), refractive error (P=0.167), intraocular pressure (P=0.595), the number of retinal breaks (P=0.832), the extent of retinal detachment (P=0.246), subretinal demarcation line (P=0.801), and macular detachment (P=0.811). The follow-up period was 12mo. The surgical durations in Group W (with or without encircling buckling) were significant shorter than those in Group I (P<0.001 respectively). The primary success rate was 94.27% in Group W, which was similar to that in Group I (92.38%, P = 0.931). The BCVA in Group W was better than that in Group I (P<0.001) at 1-month follow-up visit. However, there were no significant differences between the two groups at 3-month (P=0.221), 6-month (P=0.674), and 12-month (P=0.363) follow-up visits respectively. Delayed subretinal fluid absorptions were more common in Group I than in Group W at 1-month (P=0.045) follow-up visit, but there were no significant differences between the two groups at 3-month (P=0.111), 6-month (P=1.000) and 12-month follow-up visits respectively. CONCLUSION Scleral buckling using WAVS can be an alternative choose for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. PMID:27672597

  10. Comparison of scleral buckling using wide-angle viewing systems and indirect ophthalmoscope for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiu-Juan; Yang, Xiao-Peng; Lyu, Xiao-Bei

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the effects of scleral buckling using wide-angle viewing systems (WAVS) with that using indirect ophthalmoscope for the treatment of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. METHODS The study was a retrospective analyses of the medical records of 94 eyes (94 patients) with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Among them, 47 eyes underwent scleral buckling using WAVS with endoilluminator (Group W), and 47 eyes underwent scleral buckling using indirect ophthalmoscope (Group I). Surgical durations, primary success rate, best-corrected visual acuities (BCVA), delayed subretinal fluid absorptions and surgical complications were compared between the two groups. RESULTS At baseline, there were no statistical differences between the two groups in patient's age (P=0.997), gender (P=0.853), symptom duration (P=0.216), BCVA (P=0.389), refractive error (P=0.167), intraocular pressure (P=0.595), the number of retinal breaks (P=0.832), the extent of retinal detachment (P=0.246), subretinal demarcation line (P=0.801), and macular detachment (P=0.811). The follow-up period was 12mo. The surgical durations in Group W (with or without encircling buckling) were significant shorter than those in Group I (P<0.001 respectively). The primary success rate was 94.27% in Group W, which was similar to that in Group I (92.38%, P = 0.931). The BCVA in Group W was better than that in Group I (P<0.001) at 1-month follow-up visit. However, there were no significant differences between the two groups at 3-month (P=0.221), 6-month (P=0.674), and 12-month (P=0.363) follow-up visits respectively. Delayed subretinal fluid absorptions were more common in Group I than in Group W at 1-month (P=0.045) follow-up visit, but there were no significant differences between the two groups at 3-month (P=0.111), 6-month (P=1.000) and 12-month follow-up visits respectively. CONCLUSION Scleral buckling using WAVS can be an alternative choose for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment.

  11. Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Mar. 01, 2016 How does a detached or torn retina affect your vision? If a retinal tear is occurring, you may ...

  12. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Detached or Torn Retina Sections Retinal Detachment: What Is a Torn ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Diagnosis Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  13. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Detached or Torn Retina Sections Retinal Detachment: What Is a Torn ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Symptoms Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  14. Retinal detachment

    MedlinePlus

    ... separate from the underlying tissues, much like a bubble under wallpaper. This is most often caused by ... small detachment, the doctor may place a gas bubble in the eye. This is called pneumatic retinopexy. ...

  15. Computational Simulation of Scleral Buckling Surgery for Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment: On the Effect of the Band Size on the Myopization

    PubMed Central

    Lanchares, Elena; del Buey, María A.; Cristóbal, José A.; Ascaso, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    A finite element model (FE) of the eye including cornea, sclera, crystalline lens, and ciliary body was created to analyze the influence of the silicone encircling bandwidth and the tightness degree on the myopia induced by scleral buckling (SB) procedure for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was applied to the reference geometry of the FE model and then SB surgery was simulated with encircling bandwidths of 1, 2, and 2.5 mm. Different levels of tightening and three values of IOP were applied. The anterior segment resulted as unaffected by the surgery. The highest value of Cauchy stress appeared in the surroundings of the implant, whereas no increment of stress was observed either in anterior segment or in the optic nerve head. The initial IOP did not appear to play any role in the induced myopia. The wider the band, the greater the induced myopia: 0.44, 0.88, and 1.07 diopters (D) for the 1, 2, and 2.5 mm bandwidth, respectively. Therefore, patients become more myopic with a wider encircling element. The proposed simulations allow determining the effect of the bandwidth or the tightness degree on the axial lengthening, thus predicting the myopic increment caused by the encircling surgery. PMID:27413542

  16. Computational Simulation of Scleral Buckling Surgery for Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment: On the Effect of the Band Size on the Myopization.

    PubMed

    Lanchares, Elena; Del Buey, María A; Cristóbal, José A; Calvo, Begoña; Ascaso, Francisco J; Malvè, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    A finite element model (FE) of the eye including cornea, sclera, crystalline lens, and ciliary body was created to analyze the influence of the silicone encircling bandwidth and the tightness degree on the myopia induced by scleral buckling (SB) procedure for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was applied to the reference geometry of the FE model and then SB surgery was simulated with encircling bandwidths of 1, 2, and 2.5 mm. Different levels of tightening and three values of IOP were applied. The anterior segment resulted as unaffected by the surgery. The highest value of Cauchy stress appeared in the surroundings of the implant, whereas no increment of stress was observed either in anterior segment or in the optic nerve head. The initial IOP did not appear to play any role in the induced myopia. The wider the band, the greater the induced myopia: 0.44, 0.88, and 1.07 diopters (D) for the 1, 2, and 2.5 mm bandwidth, respectively. Therefore, patients become more myopic with a wider encircling element. The proposed simulations allow determining the effect of the bandwidth or the tightness degree on the axial lengthening, thus predicting the myopic increment caused by the encircling surgery.

  17. Computational Simulation of Scleral Buckling Surgery for Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment: On the Effect of the Band Size on the Myopization.

    PubMed

    Lanchares, Elena; Del Buey, María A; Cristóbal, José A; Calvo, Begoña; Ascaso, Francisco J; Malvè, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    A finite element model (FE) of the eye including cornea, sclera, crystalline lens, and ciliary body was created to analyze the influence of the silicone encircling bandwidth and the tightness degree on the myopia induced by scleral buckling (SB) procedure for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was applied to the reference geometry of the FE model and then SB surgery was simulated with encircling bandwidths of 1, 2, and 2.5 mm. Different levels of tightening and three values of IOP were applied. The anterior segment resulted as unaffected by the surgery. The highest value of Cauchy stress appeared in the surroundings of the implant, whereas no increment of stress was observed either in anterior segment or in the optic nerve head. The initial IOP did not appear to play any role in the induced myopia. The wider the band, the greater the induced myopia: 0.44, 0.88, and 1.07 diopters (D) for the 1, 2, and 2.5 mm bandwidth, respectively. Therefore, patients become more myopic with a wider encircling element. The proposed simulations allow determining the effect of the bandwidth or the tightness degree on the axial lengthening, thus predicting the myopic increment caused by the encircling surgery. PMID:27413542

  18. Long-term follow-up of vitrectomy, with or without 360° encircling buckle, for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment due to inferior retinal breaks

    PubMed Central

    Ghoraba, Hamouda Hamdy; Zaky, Adel Galal; Ellakwa, Amin Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to report and compare the anatomic and functional results of primary vitrectomy with and without 360° encircling scleral buckle (SB) for the treatment of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) due to inferior retinal break(s). Background A variety of options, including SB, pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) with or without SB, and pneumatic retinopexy have been described as methods to repair RRDs. The use of additional SB with vitrectomy for RRD associated with inferior breaks has been a recent controversy after the introduction of transconjunctival cannula systems. Patients and methods A retrospective, interventional, comparative case study was performed. In this study, we reviewed 105 consecutive patients who underwent vitrectomy for primary RRD with inferior retinal break(s) at the vitreoretinal center, performed by a single surgeon. Ninety four patients (94 eyes) were followed up for at least 4 months after silicon oil removal (SOR), and were analyzed. They were divided into two groups: group I included 50 patients who underwent PPV alone + silicon oil (SO); and group II included 44 patients who underwent PPV with 360° SB + SO. The essential parameters were single-operation success rate (SOSR) before SOR, incidence of retinal redetachment after SOR, and final visual acuity. Results SOSR was obtained in 89 eyes (47 [94%] in group I and 42 [95.5%] in group II). From overall 59 phakic retinal detachments (RDs), SOSR was obtained in 56 eyes (30 in group I [93.8%] and 26 in group II [96.3%]) while from overall 35 aphakic or pseudophakic RDs, SOSR was obtained in 33 eyes (17 in group I [94.4%] and 16 in group II [94.1%]). Retinal redetachments after SOR occurred in three patients in group I and two patients in group II. Visual acuity improvement was greater in group I than in group II before SOR. Conclusion Both surgical procedures had similar reattachment rates. The addition of 360° SB to PPV + SO might not have additional benefits

  19. Integrating Scleral Buckling, Transscleral Drainage of Subretinal Fluid, Intravitreal Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, and Laser Photocoagulation in Stage 3B Coats' Total Retinal Detachment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Chen; Lai, Chi-Chun; Wu, Wei-Chi

    2016-09-01

    The integration of quadruple therapy in a 13-year-old boy with stage 3B Coats' disease achieved retinal reattachment and visual improvement. Scleral buckling might play a role in retinal detachment in Coats' disease, although it has previously been considered insignificant. Instead of performing vitrectomy and internal drainage with a drainage hole in the retina, less-invasive procedures that do not require retinotomy appear to be beneficial in cases of advanced Coats' disease. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:865-868.]. PMID:27631484

  20. Retinal detachment in pseudophakia.

    PubMed

    Galin, M A; Poole, T A; Obstbaum, S A

    1979-07-01

    In a series of cataract patients excluding myopic individuals, under age 60 years, and cases in which vitreous loss occurred, retinal detachment was no less frequent after intracapsular cataract extraction and Sputnik iris supported lenses than in controls. Both groups were followed up for a minimum of two years. The detachments predominantly occurred from retinal breaks in areas of the retina that looked normal preoperatively. PMID:464014

  1. The mechanics of retinal detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Tom; Siegel, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We present a model of the mechanical and fluid forces associated with exudative retinal detachments where the retinal photoreceptor cells separate typically from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). By computing the total fluid volume flow arising from transretinal, vascular, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) pump currents, we determine the conditions under which the subretinal fluid pressure exceeds the maximum yield stress holding the retina and RPE together, giving rise to an irreversible, extended retinal delamination. We also investigate localized, blister-like retinal detachments by balancing mechanical tension in the retina with both the retina-RPE adhesion energy and the hydraulic pressure jump across the retina. For detachments induced by traction forces, we find a critical radius beyond which the blister is unstable to growth. Growth of a detached blister can also be driven by inflamed tissue within which e.g., the hydraulic conductivities of the retina or choroid increase, the RPE pumps fail, or the adhesion properties change. We determine the parameter regimes in which the blister either becomes unstable to growth, remains stable and finite-sized, or shrinks, allowing possible healing. This work supported by the Army Research Office through grant 58386MA

  2. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment with a pit of the optic nerve head.

    PubMed

    Traboulsi, E I; Pilkerton, A R

    1988-04-01

    A 56-year-old myope developed a retinal detachment of the macular area and the temporal quadrants in his left eye that harbored a temporally-located pit of the optic nerve head. Under anesthesia a small peripheral retinal break was identified, and the retina was reattached successfully using cryotherapy and a limited scleral buckling procedure. Peripheral retinal breaks should be searched for in myopic eyes with optic pits and retinal detachments involving peripheral retinal quadrants.

  3. Bilateral Simultaneous Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment following Laser in situ Keratomileusis

    PubMed Central

    Yumusak, Erhan; Ornek, Kemal; Ozkal, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    A 21-year-old woman developed simultaneous rhegmatogenous retinal detachment after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in both eyes. She underwent pars plana vitrectomy surgery combined with endolaser photocoagulation and silicone oil tamponade in the right eye. A week later, pneumatic retinopexy was done in the left eye. As the retinal tear did not seal, 360° scleral buckling surgery was performed and retina was attached. Bilateral simultaneous rhegmatogenous retinal detachment after LASIK for correction of myopia can be a serious complication. Patients should be informed about the possibility of this complication. PMID:27462264

  4. Bilateral Simultaneous Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment following Laser in situ Keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Yumusak, Erhan; Ornek, Kemal; Ozkal, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    A 21-year-old woman developed simultaneous rhegmatogenous retinal detachment after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in both eyes. She underwent pars plana vitrectomy surgery combined with endolaser photocoagulation and silicone oil tamponade in the right eye. A week later, pneumatic retinopexy was done in the left eye. As the retinal tear did not seal, 360° scleral buckling surgery was performed and retina was attached. Bilateral simultaneous rhegmatogenous retinal detachment after LASIK for correction of myopia can be a serious complication. Patients should be informed about the possibility of this complication. PMID:27462264

  5. Surgical treatment of retinal detachment in the choroidal colobomas.

    PubMed

    Corcostegui, B; Güell, J L; García-Arumí, J

    1992-01-01

    Seven eyes from seven patients with retinal detachment and choroidal coloboma (with or without optic disc involvement) were treated. The retinal break was always inside the colobomatous area, except in the cases with evidence of peripheral retinal breaks. In order to produce reattachment of the retina, vitrectomy procedures with removal of posterior hyaloid were used. Drainage of subretinal fluid was performed through the break in the area of the coloboma, with simultaneous fluid-air exchange. Previously undetected retinal breaks were identified by inspecting for the presence of schlieren in the colobomatous area during fluid-air exchange. A peripheral scleral buckle was then applied. Argon laser endophotocoagulation was performed, but when the coloboma involved the optic disc, red krypton endophotocoagulation was used. Retinal reattachment was achieved in all cases.

  6. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... of these procedures create a scar that helps seal the retina to the back of the eye. ... around the retinal tear. The scarring that results seals the retina to the underlying tissue, helping to ...

  7. Retinal detachment associated with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, M; Suzuma, K; Inaba, I; Ogura, Y; Yoneda, K; Okamoto, H

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Retinal detachment associated with atopic dermatitis, one of the most common forms of dermatitis in Japan, has markedly increased in Japan in the past 10 years. To clarify pathogenic mechanisms of retinal detachment in such cases, we retrospectively studied clinical characteristics of retinal detachment associated with atopic dermatitis. METHODS: We examined the records of 80 patients (89 eyes) who had retinal detachment associated with atopic dermatitis. The patients were classified into three groups according to lens status: group A, eyes with clear lenses (40 eyes); group B, eyes with cataract (38 eyes), and group C, aphakic or pseudophakic eyes (11 eyes). RESULTS: No significant differences were noted in the ratio of males to females, age distribution, refractive error, or characteristic of retinal detachment among the three groups. The types of retinal breaks, however, were different in eyes with and without lens changes. While atrophic holes were dominant in group A, retinal dialysis was mainly seen in groups B and C. CONCLUSION: These findings suggested that anterior vitreoretinal traction may play an important role in the pathogenesis of retinal breaks in eyes with atopic cataract and that the same pathological process may affect the formation of cataract and tractional retinal breaks in patients with atopic dermatitis. PMID:8664234

  8. [Ocular hypertension after surgery for retinal detachment].

    PubMed

    Muşat, O; Cristescu, R; Coman, Corina; Asandi, R

    2012-01-01

    This papers presents a case of a patient with retinal detachement, 3 days ago operated (posterior vitrectomy internal tamponament with silicon oil 1000) who develop increased ocular pressure following silicon oil output in the anterior chamber.

  9. A mechanical model of retinal detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Tom; Siegel, Michael

    2012-08-01

    We present a model of the mechanical and fluid forces associated with exudative retinal detachments where the retinal photoreceptor cells separate, typically from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). By computing the total fluid volume flow arising from transretinal, vascular and RPE pump currents, we determine the conditions under which the subretinal fluid pressure exceeds the maximum yield stress holding the retina and RPE together, giving rise to an irreversible, extended retinal delamination. We also investigate localized, blister-like retinal detachments by balancing mechanical tension in the retina with both the retina-RPE adhesion energy and the hydraulic pressure jump across the retina. For detachments induced by traction forces, we find a critical radius beyond which the blister is unstable to growth. Growth of a detached blister can also be driven by inflamed lesions in which the tissue has a higher choroidal hydraulic conductivity, has insufficient RPE pump activity, or has defective adhesion bonds. We determine the parameter regimes in which the blister either becomes unstable to growth, remains stable and finite-sized, or shrinks, allowing possible healing. The corresponding stable blister radius and shape are calculated. Our analysis provides a quantitative description of the physical mechanisms involved in exudative retinal detachments and can help guide the development of retinal reattachment protocols or preventative procedures.

  10. Evaluation and management of pediatric rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Wenick, Adam S.; Barañano, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric rhegmatogenous retinal detachments are rare, accounting for less than ten percent of all rhegmatogenous retinal detachments. While most retinal detachments in the adult population are related to posterior vitreous detachment, pediatric retinal detachment are often related to trauma or an underlying congenital abnormalities or genetic syndrome. The anatomy of pediatric eyes, the often late presentation of the disease, and the high incidence of bilateral pathology in children all pose significant challenges in the management of these patients. We discuss the epidemiology of pediatric rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, review the genetic syndromes associated with a high incidence of retinal detachment, and examine other common causes of retinal detachment in this age group. We then outline an approach to evaluation and management and describe the expected outcomes of repair of retinal detachment in the pediatric population. PMID:23961003

  11. Shape Change of the Vitreous Chamber Influences Retinal Detachment and Reattachment Processes: Is Mechanical Stress during Eye Rotations a Factor?

    PubMed Central

    Meskauskas, Julia; Repetto, Rodolfo; Siggers, Jennifer H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. We aim to understand how mechanical causation influences retinal detachment and reattachment processes. In particular, myopes suffer retinal detachment more frequently than emmetropes, and following a retinal detachment, scleral buckling promotes retinal reattachment. We test the hypothesis that stresses arising from saccadic eye rotations are involved in the processes, and that the alteration in the stress due to the change in the vitreous chamber geometry is sufficient to explain the phenomena. Methods. The vitreous chamber of the eye has an approximately spherical shape and it is filled with vitreous humor. We developed a mathematical model, treating the vitreous chamber in emmetropic and myopic eyes as a spheroid and in eyes subjected to scleral buckling as a sphere with a circumferential indentation. We assume that the eye performs prescribed small-amplitude, periodic, torsional rotations and we solve semi-analytically for the fluid pressure, velocity, and stress distributions. Results. The shape of the vitreous chamber has a large effect on the retinal stress. The vitreous and the retina of a highly myopic eye continuously experience shear stresses significantly higher than those of an emmetropic eye. An eye fitted with a scleral buckle experiences large stress levels localized around the buckle. Conclusions. Our results provide a mechanical explanation for the more frequent occurrence of posterior vitreous detachment and retinal detachment in myopic eyes. To understand how the stress distribution in a buckled eye facilitates reattachment, an additional model of the details of the reattachment process should be coupled to this model. PMID:22899755

  12. [Retinal detachment with retinoschisis--case report].

    PubMed

    Cristescu, R; Muşat, O; Toma, Oana; Coma, Corina; Gabej, Ioana; Burcea, M

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a 43 year old patient diagnosed with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and retinoschizis, a rare case of disease association. Surgery is recommended and we practice 23 gauge vitrectomy, laser retinopexy, criopexy in the periphery and internal heavy oil tamponade. Postoperatory evolution was favorable.

  13. Retinoschisis transposition following a retinal detachment repair

    PubMed Central

    McVeigh, Katherine; Keller, Johannes; Haynes, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The authors have observed this phenomenon of translocation of the schisis cavity in a few previous cases and aim to report this unusual finding. Method: A patient with known superotemporal retinoschisis developed a distinctly separate inferotemporal retinal detachment in his left eye. This was repaired with a vitrectomy, cryotherapy and C2F6 tamponade under local anaesthetic. Following surgery, the retinoschisis was found in the inferonasal quadrant of the eye and remained stable as the gas dispersed. Result: We hypothesise that the tamponading agent compressed the viscous fluid within the area of schisis, displacing the area of schisis circumferentially. Conclusion: This case emphasises that as long as the retinal breaks are properly sealed, no intervention is required with the schisis during rhegmatogenous retinal detachment surgery.

  14. Central serous choroidopathy with bullous retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, I; Uyama, M

    1978-05-16

    We report here a new type of secondary retinal detachment that has never been clearly defined. The characteristic features of the disease are: (1) prevalence in middle-aged males, (2) bilateral involvement, (3) frequent existence of prodromal lesions that over long periods resemble central serous retinopathy, (4) in the evolution stage, appearance of multiple yellowish white exudative flecks of one-half to one disc in diameter at or near the posterior pole of the fundus, (5) fluorescein studies revealing pronounced leakage of dye from the choroid into the subretinal space at the sites of exudates, (6) retinal detachment of various degrees with shifting subretinal fluid and without tears, (7) no evidence of intraocular inflammation, (8) no filling abnormalities seen in the choroidal fluorescence, (9) no response to medical therapy, including steroids and antibiotics, (10) photocoagulation to leakage sites leading to rapid resolution of retinal detachment; otherwise, spontaneous healing of detachment occurring within about 7-9 months, leaving fibroblastic macular scars and marked visual loss, and (11) no evidence of systemic findings that may be of etiologic significance. From this characteristic clinical picture, the idea of a new clinical entity must be considered. Our findings in 35 eyes from 18 Japanese patients are discussed.

  15. Fluorosilicone oil in the treatment of retinal detachment.

    PubMed Central

    Gremillion, C M; Peyman, G A; Liu, K R; Naguib, K S

    1990-01-01

    We evaluated the use of a heavier-than-water fluorinated silicone oil in the treatment of 30 selected cases of complicated retinal detachment from January 1988 to July 1989. Proliferative vitreoretinopathy grade C-2 or greater accounted for 19 cases, proliferative diabetic retinopathy with traction detachment for two cases, giant retinal tears five, ruptured globe with retinal detachment two, massive choroidal effusion with retinal detachment one, and acute retinal necrosis with retinal detachment one. Initial retinal reattachment was achieved in all cases. Complications included redetachment seven (23%), cataract six (75% of phakic patients), raised intraocular pressure four (13%), hypotony four (13%), keratopathy three (10%), uveitis-synechia formation three (10%), phthisis two (3%), choroidal haemorrhage one (3%), and vitreous haemorrhage one (3%). Postoperative visual acuities with at least six months' follow-up range from no light perception to 20/50, with seven patients (23%) 20/400 or better. Images PMID:2223698

  16. Fluorosilicone oil in the treatment of retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Gremillion, C M; Peyman, G A; Liu, K R; Naguib, K S

    1990-11-01

    We evaluated the use of a heavier-than-water fluorinated silicone oil in the treatment of 30 selected cases of complicated retinal detachment from January 1988 to July 1989. Proliferative vitreoretinopathy grade C-2 or greater accounted for 19 cases, proliferative diabetic retinopathy with traction detachment for two cases, giant retinal tears five, ruptured globe with retinal detachment two, massive choroidal effusion with retinal detachment one, and acute retinal necrosis with retinal detachment one. Initial retinal reattachment was achieved in all cases. Complications included redetachment seven (23%), cataract six (75% of phakic patients), raised intraocular pressure four (13%), hypotony four (13%), keratopathy three (10%), uveitis-synechia formation three (10%), phthisis two (3%), choroidal haemorrhage one (3%), and vitreous haemorrhage one (3%). Postoperative visual acuities with at least six months' follow-up range from no light perception to 20/50, with seven patients (23%) 20/400 or better.

  17. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachments associated to Stickler syndrome in a tertiary eye care center in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alshahrani, Saeed T; Ghazi, Nicola G; Al-Rashaed, Saba

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the clinical findings and outcomes of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) in Stickler syndrome on affected and fellow eyes that underwent prophylactic retinopexy. Patients and methods Chart review of 70 eyes (62 patients). Incidence of RRD, postoperative visual acuity, and risk factors were evaluated. Results Twenty-two patients (35%) had RRD in the fellow eye, 37% of the eyes had cataract, 93% had macular detachment, 50% had proliferative vitreoretinopathy, and 41% had posterior vitreous detachment. Success rates were: 60% of patients after scleral buckling; 57.1% after pars plana vitrectomy; and 75% after combined scleral buckling and pars plana vitrectomy. Sixty-one (93.8%) of patients had successful surgery (including second surgery). Silicone oil tamponade was significantly associated with final anatomic outcome, with a protective odds ratio of 0.11 (P=0.027). Visual acuity improved in 54% of eyes and decreased in 5%. Statistically significant associations were present for eyes with final visual acuity ≥20/200, and total retinal detachment (P<0.001); preoperative cataract (P=0.023); and proliferative vitreoretinopathy (P<0.001). RRD developed in 16/44 eyes despite laser prophylaxis. Conclusion Prophylactic retinopexy was not beneficial for Stickler syndrome patients. Success of primary surgery for RRD remains low. The primary surgery should be vitrectomy combined with scleral buckling and silicone oil tamponade. PMID:26730175

  18. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment: a reappraisal of its pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Ferenc; Aylward, Bill

    2014-01-01

    This article represents a synthesis of an extensive literature review and the authors' decades-long personal experience with both scleral buckling (SB) and vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RD). Presenting a coherent understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment of RD, the authors confirm numerous findings described in earlier publications but also challenge certain long-standing dogmas. The key argument made here is that it is extremely rare for the chain of events leading to an RD to start with a retinal pathology. Rather, the initial pathology is syneresis of the vitreous, which then allows gel movement (intraocular currents). At the point of vitreoretinal adhesion, dynamic traction is exerted on the retina, which may be sufficient to tear it. If the tear is operculated and the dynamic traction overcomes the forces keeping the neuroretina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) together, the heretofore virtual subretinal space becomes accessible through the retinal tear. The intraocular currents allow the free (nonbound) intravitreal fluid to enter the subretinal space, and once the amount of the incoming fluid overwhelms the draining capacity of the RPE, an RD ensues. Detachment of the posterior cortical vitreous (PVD) is not a necessary prerequisite to RD development; furthermore, PVD cannot be diagnosed preoperatively with adequate certainty with current technology such as biomicroscopy, ultrasonography or optical coherence tomography. The surgeon should expect no or only partial (anomalous) PVD at the time of surgical repair in over half of eyes. The treatment's primary goal must thus be weakening (pneumatic retinopexy, SB) or eliminating (vitrectomy) this dynamic traction. If vitrectomy is employed, it must be a truly complete vitreous removal. This includes a surgically induced PVD if one is not present, close shaving at the periphery, and removing the vitreous immediately behind the lens. The vitrectomy is followed by the creation of a

  19. Retinal Detachment due to CrossFit Training Injury.

    PubMed

    Joondeph, Stephanie A; Joondeph, Brian C

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a traumatic retinal detachment occurring as a result of CrossFit training using an elastic exercise band. The patient sustained an ocular injury from an elastic band during CrossFit training, resulting in a giant retinal dialysis and retinal detachment, which were successfully repaired. Trainers and athletes need to be aware of the potential for ocular injury from elastic exercise bands and take appropriate precautions.

  20. Retinal Detachment due to CrossFit Training Injury

    PubMed Central

    Joondeph, Stephanie A.; Joondeph, Brian C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a traumatic retinal detachment occurring as a result of CrossFit training using an elastic exercise band. The patient sustained an ocular injury from an elastic band during CrossFit training, resulting in a giant retinal dialysis and retinal detachment, which were successfully repaired. Trainers and athletes need to be aware of the potential for ocular injury from elastic exercise bands and take appropriate precautions. PMID:24106626

  1. Retinal Detachment due to CrossFit Training Injury.

    PubMed

    Joondeph, Stephanie A; Joondeph, Brian C

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a traumatic retinal detachment occurring as a result of CrossFit training using an elastic exercise band. The patient sustained an ocular injury from an elastic band during CrossFit training, resulting in a giant retinal dialysis and retinal detachment, which were successfully repaired. Trainers and athletes need to be aware of the potential for ocular injury from elastic exercise bands and take appropriate precautions. PMID:24106626

  2. An Unusual Case of Extensive Lattice Degeneration and Retinal Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Saurabh Kumar; Basaiawmoit, Jennifer V.

    2016-01-01

    Lattice degeneration of the retina is not infrequently encountered on a dilated retinal examination and many of them do not need any intervention. We report a case of atypical lattice degeneration variant with peripheral retinal detachment. An asymptomatic 35-year-old lady with minimal refractive error was found to have extensive lattice degeneration, peripheral retinal detachment and fibrotic changes peripherally with elevation of retinal vessels on dilated retinal examination. There were also areas of white without pressure, chorioretinal scarring and retinal breaks. All the changes were limited to beyond the equator but were found to span 360 degrees. She was treated with barrage laser all around to prevent extension of the retinal detachment posteriorly. She remained stable till her latest follow-up two years after the barrage laser. This case is reported for its rarity with a discussion of the probable differential diagnoses. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of such findings in lattice degeneration.

  3. Advantages of diabetic tractional retinal detachment repair

    PubMed Central

    Sternfeld, Amir; Axer-Siegel, Ruth; Stiebel-Kalish, Hadas; Weinberger, Dov; Ehrlich, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the outcomes and complications of patients with diabetic tractional retinal detachment (TRD) treated with pars plana vitrectomy (PPV). Patients and methods We retrospectively studied a case series of 24 eyes of 21 patients at a single tertiary, university-affiliated medical center. A review was carried out on patients who underwent PPV for the management of TRD due to proliferative diabetic retinopathy from October 2011 to November 2013. Preoperative and final visual outcomes, intraoperative and postoperative complications, and medical background were evaluated. Results A 23 G instrumentation was used in 23 eyes (95.8%), and a 25 G instrumentation in one (4.2%). Mean postoperative follow-up time was 13.3 months (4–30 months). Visual acuity significantly improved from logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (LogMAR) 1.48 to LogMAR 1.05 (P<0.05). Visual acuity improved by ≥3 lines in 75% of patients. Intraoperative complications included iatrogenic retinal breaks in seven eyes (22.9%) and vitreal hemorrhage in nine eyes (37.5%). In two eyes, one sclerotomy was enlarged to 20 G (8.3%). Postoperative complications included reoperation in five eyes (20.8%) due to persistent subretinal fluid (n=3), vitreous hemorrhage (n=1), and dislocated intraocular lens (n=1). Thirteen patients (54.2%) had postoperative vitreous hemorrhage that cleared spontaneously, five patients (20.8%) required antiglaucoma medications for increased intraocular pressure, seven patients (29.2%) developed an epiretinal membrane, and two patients (8.3%) developed a macular hole. Conclusion Patients with diabetic TRD can benefit from PPV surgery. Intraoperative and postoperative complications can be attributed to the complexity of this disease. PMID:26604667

  4. Impact of Duration of Macula off Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment on Visual Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Khanzada, Mahtab Alam; Wahab, Shahid; Hargun, Lakhani Das

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess impact of duration of macular detachment on visual outcome after scleral buckling for retinal detachment with macula off. Methods: Prospective, descriptive case series was conducted at Ophthalmology Department Dow University of Health Sciences, Civil Hospital Karachi and Al Noor Eye Clinic Karachi from May 2012 to June 2013. Five groups were made according to period of macular detachment. Best corrected Visual acuity (BCVA) was main outcome measure. P value < 0.001 was considered significant. Results: Mean duration of macula off was 17.0±4.0 (SD) days. Mean pre-operative VA in patients with immediate, early, intermediate, delayed or late group were 2/60, 2/60, Counting figure (CF) 3 meters (m), CF2 m and Hand Movement (HM) respectively. Only 48.48% patients of those repaired within 7 to15 days had significantly better (P < 0.001) BCVA (6/9-6/18) than the other groups. Only 19.35% patients of intermediate group achieved BCVA 6/18-6/24 (P < 0.001) which was comparatively better than the delayed and late group. Conclusions: Scleral buckle surgery for macular-off Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment has good post-operative visual outcomes if repaired within two weeks. PMID:24948972

  5. Visual Recovery after Primary Retinal Detachment Surgery: Biofeedback Rehabilitative Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Vingolo, Enzo M.; Fragiotta, Serena; Domanico, Daniela; Limoli, Paolo G.; Nebbioso, Marcella; Spadea, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate possible speeding up recovery time after retinal detachment (RD) surgery using biofeedback strategy. Methods. A total of 52 eyes were selected. After surgery, patients were divided into two groups: group A, including patients submitted to biofeedback with MP-1 strategy; group B, patients who received common care strategy. Biofeedback strategy was started 15 days after the suspension of cycloplegic eye drops in buckling procedure or after silicone oil removal in the vitrectomized eyes. Controls were scheduled at baseline and 6, 12, and 18 weeks. Results. At baseline, there was no significant difference in BCVA between groups (P = 0.4230). At the end of biofeedback treatment (WK 6) BCVA of group A was significantly better (P < 0.001) than group B and BCVA was still better in group A than group B at WK 12 (P = 0.028) and at WK 18 (P = 0.041). Conclusions. Visual recovery after RD surgery is still unclear, and it does not depend on entity of the RD. Our data demonstrate that in biofeedback group there was a significant recovery in visual performances that still remains evident after 3 months from the baseline. PMID:26998353

  6. Risk factors of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment associated with choroidal detachment in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yong-Hao; Ke, Gen-Jie; Wang, Lin; Gu, Qi-Hong; Zhou, En-Liang; Pan, Hong-Biao; Wang, Shi-Ying

    2016-01-01

    AIM To comprehensively analyze the risk factors of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) associated with choroidal detachment (CD). METHODS A total of 265 eyes of 265 consecutive cases of RRD were retrospectively analyzed. All patients had systemic and ophthalmologic examination. CD was diagnosed by indirect ophthalmoscopy, B-scan ultrasonography, and ultrasound biomicroscope (UBM). Each parameter was compared between patients of RRD and rhegmatogenous retinal detachment associated with choroidal detachment (RRDCD). Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the independent risk factors of CD. RESULTS There were 52 eyes (19.62%) with CD. Pseudophakia was more commonly seen in RRDCD (21.15% vs 6.10%, P=0.002). Intraocular pressure (IOP) was lower (8.60±3.62 vs 12.96±3.55, P<0.001), best-corrected visual acuity was worse [3.00 (2.00 to 3.00) vs 1.92 (1.22 to 3.00), P=0.001], and refractive error was more myopic [-4 (-9 to -2) vs -2 (-6 to 0), P=0.007] in RRDCD. Eyes with RRDCD had larger extent of retinal detachment (P=0.007). In RRDCD, 34.62% of eyes presented with multiple holes (P=0.044) and 25.00% with macular holes (P=0.012), compared with 20.66% and 14.08% in RRD. High myopia (P=0.039), low IOP (P=0.017), and larger extent of retinal detachment (P<0.001) were significant and independent risk factors for developing CD. CONCLUSION For CD in RRD, related factors include BCVA, IOP, lens status, refractive error, extent of retinal detachment, number of holes, and macular hole. Larger extent of retinal detachment, high myopia, and low IOP are significant and independent risk factors. PMID:27500106

  7. Bilateral Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment during External Beam Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Takako; Chuman, Hideki; Nao-I, Nobuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a case of nontraumatic bilateral rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) during external beam radiotherapy for nonocular tumor, presented as an observational case study in conjunction with a review of the relevant literature. A 65-year-old male was referred to our hospital due to bilateral RRD. He underwent a biopsy for a tumor of the left frontal lobe 4 months prior to presentation, and the tumor had been diagnosed as primary central nerve system B-cell type lymphoma. He received chemotherapy and external beam radiotherapy for 1 month. There were no traumatic episodes. Bilateral retinal detachment occurred during a series of radiotherapies. Simultaneous nontraumatic bilateral retinal detachment is rare. The effects of radiotherapy on ocular functionality, particularly in cases involving retinal adhesion and vitreous contraction, may include RRD. Thus, it is necessary to closely monitor the eyes of patients undergoing radiotherapy, particularly those undergoing surgery for retinal detachment and those with a history of photocoagulation for retinal tears, a relevant family history, or risk factors known to be associated with RRD. PMID:27462261

  8. An Unusual Case of Extensive Lattice Degeneration and Retinal Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Saurabh Kumar; Basaiawmoit, Jennifer V.

    2016-01-01

    Lattice degeneration of the retina is not infrequently encountered on a dilated retinal examination and many of them do not need any intervention. We report a case of atypical lattice degeneration variant with peripheral retinal detachment. An asymptomatic 35-year-old lady with minimal refractive error was found to have extensive lattice degeneration, peripheral retinal detachment and fibrotic changes peripherally with elevation of retinal vessels on dilated retinal examination. There were also areas of white without pressure, chorioretinal scarring and retinal breaks. All the changes were limited to beyond the equator but were found to span 360 degrees. She was treated with barrage laser all around to prevent extension of the retinal detachment posteriorly. She remained stable till her latest follow-up two years after the barrage laser. This case is reported for its rarity with a discussion of the probable differential diagnoses. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of such findings in lattice degeneration. PMID:27630875

  9. Serous retinal detachment after trabeculectomy in angle recession glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Avik Kumar; Padhy, Debananda

    2015-01-01

    An 18-year-old male with 360 degree angle recession after blunt trauma in his right eye developed uncontrolled intraocular pressure (IOP) despite four antiglaucoma medications (AGM) with advancing disc damage. He underwent trabeculectomy with intraoperative mitomycin-c (MMC) application. There was an intraoperative vitreous prolapse which was managed accordingly. On post-surgery day 1, he had shallow choroidal detachment superiorly with non-recordable IOP. This was deteriorated 1 week postoperatively as choroidal detachment proceeded to serous retinal detachment. He was started with systemic steroid in addition to topical route. The serous effusions subsided within 2 weeks time. At the last follow up at 3 months, he was enjoying good visual acuity, deep anterior chamber, diffuse bleb, an IOP in low teens off any AGM and attached retina. This case highlights the rare occurrence of serous retinal detachment after surgical management of angle recession glaucoma. PMID:27625959

  10. Serous retinal detachment after trabeculectomy in angle recession glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Avik Kumar; Padhy, Debananda

    2015-01-01

    An 18-year-old male with 360 degree angle recession after blunt trauma in his right eye developed uncontrolled intraocular pressure (IOP) despite four antiglaucoma medications (AGM) with advancing disc damage. He underwent trabeculectomy with intraoperative mitomycin-c (MMC) application. There was an intraoperative vitreous prolapse which was managed accordingly. On post-surgery day 1, he had shallow choroidal detachment superiorly with non-recordable IOP. This was deteriorated 1 week postoperatively as choroidal detachment proceeded to serous retinal detachment. He was started with systemic steroid in addition to topical route. The serous effusions subsided within 2 weeks time. At the last follow up at 3 months, he was enjoying good visual acuity, deep anterior chamber, diffuse bleb, an IOP in low teens off any AGM and attached retina. This case highlights the rare occurrence of serous retinal detachment after surgical management of angle recession glaucoma.

  11. Astrocyte structural reactivity and plasticity in models of retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Luna, Gabriel; Keeley, Patrick W; Reese, Benjamin E; Linberg, Kenneth A; Lewis, Geoffrey P; Fisher, Steven K

    2016-09-01

    Although retinal neurodegenerative conditions such as age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, retinitis pigmentosa, and retinal detachment have different etiologies and pathological characteristics, they also have many responses in common at the cellular level, including neural and glial remodeling. Structural changes in Müller cells, the large radial glia of the retina in retinal disease and injury have been well described, that of the retinal astrocytes remains less so. Using modern imaging technology to describe the structural remodeling of retinal astrocytes after retinal detachment is the focus of this paper. We present both a review of critical literature as well as novel work focusing on the responses of astrocytes following rhegmatogenous and serous retinal detachment. The mouse presents a convenient model system in which to study astrocyte reactivity since the Mϋller cell response is muted in comparison to other species thereby allowing better visualization of the astrocytes. We also show data from rat, cat, squirrel, and human retina demonstrating similarities and differences across species. Our data from immunolabeling and dye-filling experiments demonstrate previously undescribed morphological characteristics of normal astrocytes and changes induced by detachment. Astrocytes not only upregulate GFAP, but structurally remodel, becoming increasingly irregular in appearance, and often penetrating deep into neural retina. Understanding these responses, their consequences, and what drives them may prove to be an important component in improving visual outcome in a variety of therapeutic situations. Our data further supports the concept that astrocytes are important players in the retina's overall response to injury and disease. PMID:27060374

  12. Astrocyte structural reactivity and plasticity in models of retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Luna, Gabriel; Keeley, Patrick W; Reese, Benjamin E; Linberg, Kenneth A; Lewis, Geoffrey P; Fisher, Steven K

    2016-09-01

    Although retinal neurodegenerative conditions such as age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, retinitis pigmentosa, and retinal detachment have different etiologies and pathological characteristics, they also have many responses in common at the cellular level, including neural and glial remodeling. Structural changes in Müller cells, the large radial glia of the retina in retinal disease and injury have been well described, that of the retinal astrocytes remains less so. Using modern imaging technology to describe the structural remodeling of retinal astrocytes after retinal detachment is the focus of this paper. We present both a review of critical literature as well as novel work focusing on the responses of astrocytes following rhegmatogenous and serous retinal detachment. The mouse presents a convenient model system in which to study astrocyte reactivity since the Mϋller cell response is muted in comparison to other species thereby allowing better visualization of the astrocytes. We also show data from rat, cat, squirrel, and human retina demonstrating similarities and differences across species. Our data from immunolabeling and dye-filling experiments demonstrate previously undescribed morphological characteristics of normal astrocytes and changes induced by detachment. Astrocytes not only upregulate GFAP, but structurally remodel, becoming increasingly irregular in appearance, and often penetrating deep into neural retina. Understanding these responses, their consequences, and what drives them may prove to be an important component in improving visual outcome in a variety of therapeutic situations. Our data further supports the concept that astrocytes are important players in the retina's overall response to injury and disease.

  13. Unilateral, recurrent exudative retinal detachment in association with pansinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Osman Saatci, Ali; Ozbek Soylemezoglu, Zeynep; Barut Selver, Ozlem; Cenk Ecevit, M.; Ada, Emel

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To report a patient with unilateral exudative retinal detachment due to pansinusitis. Methods: Case report. Results: A 65-year-old woman with a two-month history of blurred vision, red eye and lid swelling in her left eye was referred to us. Her best-corrected visual acuity was 20/20 in the right eye and 20/200 in the left. Conjunctival vessels were engorged in the OS. Funduscopy revealed a 360° exudative detachment in OS and computerized tomography (CT) imaging revealed pansinusitis. Systemic antibiotic treatment was employed and exudative detachment regressed. However, exudative detachment remitted as soon as antibiotic treatment ceased. Finally she underwent sinus surgery and decompression of the orbita. Her visual acuity improved to 20/100 just two days after the surgery, stabilized at 20/30 and no further recurrences occured during the follow-up of 10 months. Conclusion: Since exudative retinal detachment usually accompanies systemic inflammatory or neoplastic diseases, systemic screening and collaboration with other disciplines are mandatory. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a case that developed exudative retinal detachment due to pansinusitis and only recovered after decompression surgery.

  14. Biostatistical analysis of pseudophakic and aphakic retinal detachments.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Meisy; Kruger, Erik F; Lashkari, Kameran

    2002-01-01

    Removal of the crystalline lens increases the risk of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RD) by creating changes in the ocular environment that predispose to development of retinal breaks. The evolution of cataract surgery from intracapsular cataract extraction (ICCE) to extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) and phacoemulsification has reduced the incidence of RD, while advances in vitreoretinal surgery have resulted in improved outcomes when retinal detachment does occur. The incidence of RD varies between 0.4-3.6% for ICCE and between 0.55-1.65% for ECCE. In eyes having undergone phacoemulsification the incidence is similar to those of ECCE and ranges between 0.75-1.65%. In this article the authors review the incidence and risk factors associated with pseudophakic and aphakic RD. The risk factors discussed include pre-operative risk factors such as age, status of the fellow eye and myopia, and surgical risk factors such as vitreous loss, posterior capsular integrity and Nd : YAG capsulotomy.

  15. Scleral Buckling with Chandelier Illumination

    PubMed Central

    Seider, Michael I.; Nomides, Riikka E. K.; Hahn, Paul; Mruthyunjaya, Prithvi; Mahmoud, Tamer H.

    2016-01-01

    Scleral buckling is a highly successful technique for the repair of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment that requires intra-operative examination of the retina and treatment of retinal breaks via indirect ophthalmoscopy. Data suggest that scleral buckling likely results in improved outcomes for many patients but is declining in popularity, perhaps because of significant advances in vitrectomy instrumentation and visualization systems. Emerging data suggest that chandelier-assisted scleral buckling is safe and has many potential advantages over traditional buckling techniques. By combining traditional scleral buckling with contemporary vitreoretinal visualization techniques, chandelier-assistance may increase the popularity of scleral buckling to treat primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment for surgeons of the next generation, maintaining buckling as an option for appropriate patients in the future. PMID:27621789

  16. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging of subretinal bands associated with chronic retinal detachments

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Nikisha; Kuriyan, Ajay E; Flynn, Harry W

    2016-01-01

    We report three patients with subretinal bands associated with retinal detachment in chronic retinal detachments who underwent successful retinal reattachment. Subretinal bands before and after surgery can be identified on clinical examination and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Removal of subretinal bands is not mandatory to achieve retinal reattachment. PMID:27099457

  17. Regular silicone and fluorosilicone oil in the prevention of retinal detachment caused by experimental proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Alghadyan, A; Peyman, G A; Fizer, C; Tawakol, M; Liu, K R; Yue, B; Peace, J H

    1988-01-01

    The effect of both regular silicone and fluorosilicone in preventing retinal detachment caused by experimental proliferative vitreoretinopathy was studied in rabbit eyes which received 250,000 fibroblasts after vitrectomy and lensectomy. In the control group, 14 out of 20 eyes which received fibroblasts had retinal detachments with disorganization of internal structures. In eyes receiving fibroblast and regular silicone, 4 out of 20 eyes had shallow retinal detachment. In the eyes receiving fibroblasts and fluorosilicone, 5 of 28 eyes had shallow retinal detachment. Our findings indicate that both regular silicone and fluorosilicone were effective in preventing retinal detachments caused by experimental proliferative vitreoretinopathy. There was no statistical difference between the two silicone oils.

  18. Corneal Complications During and After Vitrectomy for Retinal Detachment in Photorefractive Keratectomy Treated Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Tosi, Gian Marco; Baiocchi, Stefano; Balestrazzi, Angelo; Martone, Gianluca; Marigliani, Davide; Neri, Giovanni; Caporossi, Tomaso

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the occurrence of late-onset corneal haze (LOCH) after vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) in photorefractive keratectomy (PRK)-treated eyes. This observational cohort study comprised 13 eyes of 13 patients who underwent vitrectomy for RRD and who had been subjected to PRK years earlier. The occurrence of LOCH was evaluated together with all the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors that could affect final corneal status. LOCH developed in 2 eyes. Both patients had undergone PRK for high myopia—one 3 years and the other 9 years prior to RRD. Both patients presented with RRD due to giant retinal tear and were subjected to scleral buckle, 20-gauge vitrectomy, and silicone oil tamponade. Three months after vitrectomy and 1 month after silicone oil removal they both developed LOCH. During vitreoretinal surgery neither of the 2 patients needed mechanical epithelial debridement. Intraoperative epithelial debridement was performed in 2 of the other patients of the series, who had undergone previous PRK for high myopia and had clear corneas at presentation; in 1 of them this manoeuvre hampered intraoperative visualization. Follow-up after retinal detachment surgery ranged from 6 to 156 months (mean, 37.5 months). Subepithelial corneal scarring may be reactivated many years after PRK. In our series this happened after vitrectomy. PMID:26683931

  19. Retinal Detachment in Down Syndrome: Characteristics and Surgical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    AlAhmadi, Badr O.; Alsulaiman, Sulaiman M.; Arevalo, J. Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the functional and anatomic outcomes of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) surgery in patients with Down syndrome. Methods. A retrospective chart review was performed of patients with Down syndrome who had undergone surgery for RRD at King Khalid Eye Specialist Hospital between 1995 and 2014. Results. A total of 245 patients with Down syndrome were evaluated during the study period. Eighteen eyes of 15 patients (6.1%) with RRD were identified. Three out of 15 patients (20%) presented with bilateral retinal detachment. All eyes presented with macula off retinal detachment. The retina was successfully reattached in 16/18 (88.8%) eyes after a mean follow-up of 48 months. The final postoperative visual acuity ranged from light perception to 20/125 (median: hand motion) (11/18 eyes). Conclusions. The anatomic success rate of retinal reattachment surgery in patients with Down syndrome is comparable to the general population. Patients with Down syndrome should undergo regular ophthalmic examinations for early diagnosis. Despite late diagnosis and the presence of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) in some patients, favorable anatomical outcomes can be achieved. PMID:27123341

  20. Retinal Detachment in Down Syndrome: Characteristics and Surgical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    AlAhmadi, Badr O; Alsulaiman, Sulaiman M; Arevalo, J Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the functional and anatomic outcomes of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) surgery in patients with Down syndrome. Methods. A retrospective chart review was performed of patients with Down syndrome who had undergone surgery for RRD at King Khalid Eye Specialist Hospital between 1995 and 2014. Results. A total of 245 patients with Down syndrome were evaluated during the study period. Eighteen eyes of 15 patients (6.1%) with RRD were identified. Three out of 15 patients (20%) presented with bilateral retinal detachment. All eyes presented with macula off retinal detachment. The retina was successfully reattached in 16/18 (88.8%) eyes after a mean follow-up of 48 months. The final postoperative visual acuity ranged from light perception to 20/125 (median: hand motion) (11/18 eyes). Conclusions. The anatomic success rate of retinal reattachment surgery in patients with Down syndrome is comparable to the general population. Patients with Down syndrome should undergo regular ophthalmic examinations for early diagnosis. Despite late diagnosis and the presence of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) in some patients, favorable anatomical outcomes can be achieved. PMID:27123341

  1. Changes of cone electroretinograms to colour flash stimuli after successful retinal detachment surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, M; Yamamoto, S

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To examine the changes in the short wavelength (S) and mixed long (L) and middle (M) wavelength sensitive cone (L,M-cone) electroretinograms (ERGs) after successful retinal detachment surgery.
METHODS—Cone ERGs elicited by different colour flashes were recorded from 19 eyes with unilateral rhegmatogenous retinal detachment treated successfully by conventional buckling surgery. Ganzfeld colour flashes on a bright white background were used to elicit S-cone and L,M-cone ERGs. The ratio (operated eye/fellow eye) of the S-cone b-wave elicited by a 450 nm stimulus and the ratio (operated eye/fellow eye) of the L,M-cone b-wave elicited by a 633 nm stimulus were evaluated preoperatively and 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery.
RESULTS—Preoperatively, no significant difference was observed between the ratio of the S-cone ERG amplitudes and the ratio of the L,M-cone ERG amplitudes. Postoperatively, the ratio of the L,M-cone ERGs increased significantly over the preoperative value (p=0.001) but the ratio of the S-cone ERG did not improve. There were significant differences between the ratios of the S-cone and the L,M-cone ERGs at 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery. The postoperative recovery of the S-cone ERG was significantly greater in eyes treated within 4 weeks after the onset of the detachment than in eyes treated later than 4 weeks.
CONCLUSIONS—These results indicate that the impairment of the L,M-cone system caused by retinal detachment may be reversible. However, the S-cone system may have more profound permanent damage.

 PMID:11264128

  2. Interventions for asymptomatic retinal breaks and lattice degeneration for preventing retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Charles P

    2015-01-01

    Background Asymptomatic retinal breaks and lattice degeneration are visible lesions that are risk factors for later retinal detachment. Retinal detachments occur when fluid in the vitreous cavity passes through tears or holes in the retina and separates the retina from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium. Creation of an adhesion surrounding retinal breaks and lattice degeneration, with laser photocoagulation or cryotherapy, has been recommended as an effective means of preventing retinal detachment. This therapy is of value in the management of retinal tears associated with the symptoms of flashes and floaters and persistent vitreous traction upon the retina in the region of the retinal break, because such symptomatic retinal tears are associated with a high rate of progression to retinal detachment. Retinal tears and holes unassociated with acute symptoms and lattice degeneration are significantly less likely to be the sites of retinal breaks that are responsible for later retinal detachment. Nevertheless, treatment of these lesions frequently is recommended, in spite of the fact that the effectiveness of this therapy is unproven. Objectives The objective of this review was to assess the effectiveness and safety of techniques used to treat asymptomatic retinal breaks and lattice degeneration for the prevention of retinal detachment. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 2), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to February 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to February 2014), PubMed (January 1948 to February 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in

  3. Retinal Detachment in Southwest Ethiopia: A Hospital Based Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Asaminew, Tsedeke; Gelaw, Yeshigeta; Bekele, Sisay; Solomon, Berhan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The incidence of retinal detachment in Blacks is generally considered to be low though there are few supporting studies in Africa. This study, thus, aimed at describing the clinical profile of patients with retinal detachment in Southwest Ethiopia. Methods A hospital-based study was done on all consecutive retinal detachment patients who presented to Jimma University Hospital over six months period. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect patients’ sociodemographic characteristics and clinical history. Comprehensive anterior and posterior segment eye examinations were done and risk factors were sought for. Statistical tests were considered significant if P < 0.05. Results A total of 94 eyes of 80 patients (1.5%) had retinal detachment (RD) and about 69% of patients were symptomatic for over a month before presentation. The mean age was 41.4 years (SD ±16.5). Fourteen patients (17.5%) had bilateral RD. At presentation, 61 eyes (64.9%) were blind from RD and 11 (13.8%) patients were bilaterally blind from RD. Rhegmatogenous RD was seen in 55 eyes (58.5%) and tractional RD in 22 eyes (23.4%). The most common risk factors were ocular trauma (32 eyes, 34.0%), myopia (23 eyes, 24.5%), posterior uveitis (13 eyes, 13.8%) and diabetic retinopathy (9 eyes, 9.6%). Most retinal breaks (25 eyes, 43.1%) were superotemporal and horse-shoe tear was the most common (19 eyes, 20.2%). Macula was off in 77 eyes (81.9%) and 38 eyes (69.1% of RRD eyes) had grade C proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Macular status was significantly associated with PVR (P=0.011), and duration of symptoms (RR=1.25, 95%CI: 1.059-1.475, P=0.040). Conclusions A significant numbers of patients with ocular problem had retinal detachment, and nearly two third of the patients presented late. Trauma and myopia were the most important risk factors. People should be educated to improve their health seeking behavior and use eye safety precautions to prevent ocular trauma. PMID:24086614

  4. A rare case of traumatic posterior phacocele with retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Sindal, Manavi D; Mourya, Deepesh

    2016-01-01

    Dislocation of crystalline lens into the anterior subconjunctival or subtenon's space is a rare but known complication of blunt trauma. Dislocation into the posterior subtenon's space is even rarer and can be associated with a complication such as occult scleral tear and retinal detachment. We report a case of traumatic posterior subtenon's dislocation of crystalline lens after blunt trauma and its successful surgical management. PMID:26953031

  5. Surgical management of retinal diseases: proliferative diabetic retinopathy and traction retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Iñigo, Yousef J; Acabá, Luis A; Berrocal, Maria H

    2014-01-01

    Current indications for pars plana vitrectomy in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) include vitreous hemorrhage, tractional retinal detachment (TRD), combined tractional and rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (CTRRD), diabetic macular edema associated with posterior hyaloidal traction, and anterior segment neovascularization with media opacities. This chapter will review the indications, surgical objectives, adjunctive pharmacotherapy, microincision surgical techniques, and outcomes of diabetic vitrectomy for PDR, TRD, and CTRRD. With the availability of new microincision vitrectomy technology, wide-angle microscope viewing systems, and pharmacologic agents, vitrectomy can improve visual acuity and achieve long-term anatomic stability in eyes with severe complications from PDR.

  6. Mechanism of traumatic retinal detachment in blunt impact: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Lizhen; Wang, Chao; Sun, Ganyun; Liu, Songyang; Fan, Yubo

    2013-04-26

    Retinal detachment typically occurs when the retina is pulled away from its normal position by blunt trauma. It has been estimated that traumatic retinal detachments account for 10-20% of all detachments. Understanding the mechanism of traumatic retinal detachment is helpful for ophthalmologists to make a more accurate diagnosis before the symptoms develop. A finite element eye model, validated through published data, was used to simulate traumatic retinal detachment. Retinal adhesive force was incorporated into the model using breakable bonded contact. Under BB impact, global deformation was divided into four stages: compression, decompression, overshooting and oscillation. Shockwave propagation in the retina produced high strain in the retina. For an impact speed of 50 m/s, the peak strain of 0.138 in ora serrata exceeded the specified threshold for retinal break. When the eye was decompressed, negative pressure occurred around and anterior to the equator, with a minimum of -663 kPa, leading to retinal detachment. The following relative inertia motions between the retina and its supporting tissue extended the detachment. In addition, the simulations of lower shear modulus of vitreous and increased retinal adhesive force also confirm that the extent of retinal detachment is determined by negative pressure and inertial motion. In conclusion, shockwave and negative pressure contribute to retinal detachment. Shockwave propagation in the retina leads to retinal break, while negative pressure and relative inertial motion could pull the retina away from the supporting tissue. The current work would help understand the basic mechanisms underlying blunt trauma.

  7. Injection of fluorosilicone oil and pars plana vitrectomy for complex retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Peyman, G A; Smith, R T; Charles, H

    1987-08-01

    Pars plana vitrectomy can be combined with injection of fluorosilicone oil to treat complex retinal detachments. We describe three cases to illustrate the technique, which is adapted according to the type and location of the retinal breaks.

  8. Perfluorocarbon liquids in the management of complicated retinal detachments.

    PubMed

    Comaratta, M R; Chang, S

    1991-06-01

    Low viscosity perfluorocarbon liquids have unique physical properties making them ideal for the temporary tamponade, mechanical fixation, and manipulation of the retina. These substances are optically clear, have a specific gravity greater than that of water, and have interfacial tension properties similar to those of silicone oil. The temporary mechanical fixation of the retina by perfluorocarbon liquids facilitates the removal of epiretinal membranes and release of tractional forces. Intraoperative flattening of the retina under perfluorocarbon liquid eliminates the need for a posterior retinotomy. Perfluorocarbon liquids are being used intraoperatively for hydrokinetic manipulation of the retina during vitrectomy for complicated retinal detachments secondary to proliferative vitreoretinopathy, giant retinal tears, and trauma. Additional indications for the intraoperative utilization of perfluorocarbon liquids in vitreous surgery are discussed.

  9. Perfluorocarbon liquids in the management of complicated retinal detachments.

    PubMed

    Comaratta, M R; Chang, S

    1991-06-01

    Low viscosity perfluorocarbon liquids have unique physical properties making them ideal for the temporary tamponade, mechanical fixation, and manipulation of the retina. These substances are optically clear, have a specific gravity greater than that of water, and have interfacial tension properties similar to those of silicone oil. The temporary mechanical fixation of the retina by perfluorocarbon liquids facilitates the removal of epiretinal membranes and release of tractional forces. Intraoperative flattening of the retina under perfluorocarbon liquid eliminates the need for a posterior retinotomy. Perfluorocarbon liquids are being used intraoperatively for hydrokinetic manipulation of the retina during vitrectomy for complicated retinal detachments secondary to proliferative vitreoretinopathy, giant retinal tears, and trauma. Additional indications for the intraoperative utilization of perfluorocarbon liquids in vitreous surgery are discussed. PMID:10149295

  10. Reduction of corneal sensitivity after retinal detachment surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, R A

    1981-01-01

    Corneal sensitivity measurements were performed on both eyes of 57 patients after they were subjected to unilateral retinal detachment surgery, the unoperated eyes acting as controls. A marked decrease in corneal sensitivity was found in eyes that were treated with encircling bands, but no significant change of sensitivity could be detected in eyes in which localised radial or circumferential silicone sponge explants alone had been employed. It would appear that encirclement procedures lower the sensitivity of the cornea, and this may continue as a long-term effect. PMID:7295628

  11. Tamponade in the surgical management of retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, Kamyar; Schwartz, Stephen G; Kishor, Krishna S; Flynn, Harry W

    2016-01-01

    Despite treatment advances, rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RD) can have poor visual outcomes even with prompt and appropriate therapy. Pars plana vitrectomy is a leading management modality for the treatment of RD. This procedure is generally accompanied by the use of internal tamponade. Various gases and silicone oils may yield beneficial outcomes. Heavy silicone oils have been approved in some European nations but are not available in the USA. Different tamponade agents have unique benefits and risks, and choice of the agent should be individualized according to the characteristics of the patient and RD, as well as perioperative and postoperative factors. PMID:27041988

  12. Photoreceptor cell death and rescue in retinal detachment and degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Yusuke; Notomi, Shoji; Hisatomi, Toshio; Nakazawa, Toru; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Miller, Joan W.; Vavvas, Demetrios G.

    2013-01-01

    Photoreceptor cell death is the ultimate cause of vision loss in various retinal disorders, including retinal detachment (RD). Photoreceptor cell death has been thought to occur mainly through apoptosis, which is the most characterized form of programmed cell death. The caspase family of cysteine proteases plays a central role for inducing apoptosis, and in experimental models of RD, dying photoreceptor cells exhibit caspase activation; however, there is a paradox that caspase inhibition alone does not provide a sufficient protection against photoreceptor cell loss, suggesting that other mechanisms of cell death are involved. Recent accumulating evidence demonstrates that non-apoptotic forms of cell death, such as autophagy and necrosis, are also regulated by specific molecular machinery, such as those mediated by autophagy-related proteins and receptor-interacting protein kinases, respectively. Here we summarize the current knowledge of cell death signaling and its roles in photoreceptor cell death after RD and other retinal degenerative diseases. A body of studies indicate that not only apoptotic but also autophagic and necrotic signaling are involved in photoreceptor cell death, and that combined targeting of these pathways may be an effective neuroprotective strategy for retinal diseases associated with photoreceptor cell loss. PMID:23994436

  13. Management of inferior retinal breaks during pars plana vitrectomy for retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, V; Minihan, M; Williamson, T

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—To determine whether it is necessary to support inferior retinal breaks with a scleral explant during pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RD).
METHODS—A prospective study was carried out on nine eyes of nine consecutive patients undergoing PPV for primary RD with associated inferior retinal breaks and no significant proliferative vitreoretinopathy.
RESULTS—Eight eyes were successfully reattached with a single operation. No cases presented with redetachment because of failed closure of the original inferior breaks.
CONCLUSIONS—It is not necessary to support inferior retinal breaks with a scleral explant during PPV for primary RD repair in selected cases.

 PMID:11264142

  14. Success Rates of Vitrectomy in Treatment of Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Kozue; Kinoshita, Hirofumi; Uematsu, Masafumi; Tsuiki, Eiko; Fujikawa, Azusa; Kitaoka, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the anatomical success rates of pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) after primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). Methods. This retrospective study was conducted between December 2008 and October 2014 at Nagasaki University Hospital. The preoperative data recorded included the lens status, location of the retinal tear, whether a tear was visualized, presence of multiple tears, macula status, presence of peripheral lattice retinal degeneration, and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA). The primary outcome measures were anatomical (primary and final) and functional success (visual acuity better than 6/60). Results. This study evaluated 422 eyes of 411 patients with a mean age of 57.7 ± 11.2 years. The single-operation reattachment rate (primary anatomical success) was 89.8%. The final anatomical success rate was 100% after 2–6 operations (mean = 3.14 ± 1.03). Functional success rate after the primary reattachment operation was 96.7%, while it was 97.2% at the end of the follow-up. Multiple logistic regression analysis of the possible risk factors for the primary anatomical failure showed a significant relation with the 25 G instruments (P = 0.002) and the presence of multiple tears (P = 0.01). Conclusion. The primary anatomical success of PPV for primary uncomplicated RRD was 89.8% and the final anatomical success rate was 100%. PMID:27478632

  15. Retrospective Review of Ocular Point-of-Care Ultrasound for Detection of Retinal Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Bradley; Lahham, Sari; Lahham, Shadi; Patel, Amy; Spann, Sophia; Fox, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Retinal detachment is an ocular emergency that commonly presents to the emergency department (ED). Ophthalmologists are able to accurately make this diagnosis with a dilated fundoscopic exam, scleral depression or ophthalmic ultrasound when a view to the retina is obstructed. Emergency physicians (EPs) are not trained to examine the peripheral retina, and thus ophthalmic ultrasound can be used to aid in diagnosis. We assessed the accuracy of ocular point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) in diagnosing retinal detachment. Methods We retrospectively reviewed charts of ED patients with suspected retinal detachment who underwent ocular POCUS between July 2012 and May 2015. Charts were reviewed for patients presenting to the ED with ocular complaints and clinical concern for retinal detachment. We compared ocular POCUS performed by EPs against the criterion reference of the consulting ophthalmologist’s diagnosis. Results We enrolled a total of 109 patients. Of the 34 patients diagnosed with retinal detachment by the ophthalmologists, 31 were correctly identified as having retinal detachment by the EP using ocular POCUS. Of the 75 patients who did not have retinal detachment, 72 were ruled out by ocular POCUS by the EP. This resulted in a POCUS sensitivity of 91% (95% CI [76–98]) and specificity of 96% (95% CI [89–99]). Conclusion This retrospective study suggests that ocular POCUS performed by EPs can aid in the diagnosis of retinal detachment in ED. PMID:26973752

  16. Macula-Sparing Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment: Is Emergent Surgery Necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Sasan; Almony, Arghavan

    2016-01-01

    The status of the macula is a significant factor in determining final visual outcomes in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) and should be considered in the timing of surgical repair. Several studies have shown that macula-involving RRDs attain similar visual and anatomic outcomes when surgery is performed within seven days as compared to emergent surgery (within 24 hours). In contrast, surgery prior to macular detachment in macula-sparing RRDs generally yields the best visual outcomes. In the case of macula-sparing RRDs, it is not clear how long the macula may remain attached, therefore, standard practice dictates emergent surgery. Timing of presentation, examination findings, case complexity, co-existing medical conditions, surgeon expertise, and timing and quality of access to operating facilities and staff, however, should all be considered in determining whether a macula-sparing RRD requires immediate intervention or if equivalent visual and possibly better overall outcomes can be achieved with scheduled surgery within an appropriate time frame. PMID:27195093

  17. Massive Bilateral Serous Retinal Detachment in a Case of Hypertensive Chorioretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Villalba-Pinto, Luis; Hernández-Ortega, M. Ángeles; de los Mozos, F. Javier Lavid; Pascual-Camps, Isabel; Dolz-Marco, Rosa; Arevalo, J. Fernando; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Systemic high blood pressure is related to a variety of retinal manifestations. We present an atypical case of hypertensive chorioretinopathy with massive bilateral serous retinal detachment. Case Report A 26-year-old male with a genitourinary malformation and secondary grade IV chronic kidney failure as well as high blood pressure complained of acute vision loss. Dilated fundus examination evidenced a bilateral serous retinal detachment with macular involvement. The patient was unresponsive to oral antihypertensive therapy and dialysis treatment. The serous retinal detachment progressively decreased after the restoration of dialysis and antihypertensive therapy. The final visual acuity was 0.50 in both eyes. Discussion In cases of serous macular detachment, it is mandatory to rule out different systemic and ocular diseases. The presence of uncontrolled high blood pressure may produce aggressive bilateral retinal changes, thus hypertension must be under early and strict control in order to improve the visual outcomes. PMID:25120474

  18. Traumatic retinal detachment--the difficulty and importance of correct diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hoogewoud, Florence; Chronopoulos, Argyrios; Varga, Zsolt; Souteyrand, Georges; Thumann, Gabriele; Schutz, James S

    2016-01-01

    Accurate characterization of a retinal detachment as traumatic is often difficult, but is important because it may instigate a careful search for occult coexistent traumatic pathology, affect the prognosis and the treatment of both eyes, influence insurance coverage benefits and medical-legal determinations, and is essential for epidemiologic studies. We review the epidemiology and pathophysiology of traumatic retinal detachment, common obstacles to correct diagnosis, diagnostic guidelines, and outline categories of traumatic causal relationships. Because there is no generally accepted definition of traumatic retinal detachment, we offer a practical one. Categorization as traumatic should be based on the particular history and physical examination rather than epidemiologic criteria.

  19. Fibulin 2, a Tyrosine O-Sulfated Protein, Is Up-regulated Following Retinal Detachment*

    PubMed Central

    Kanan, Yogita; Brobst, Daniel; Han, Zongchao; Naash, Muna I.; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal detachment is the physical separation of the retina from the retinal pigment epithelium. It occurs during aging, trauma, or during a variety of retinal disorders such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity, or as a complication following cataract surgery. This report investigates the role of fibulin 2, an extracellular component, in retinal detachment. A major mechanism for detachment resolution is enhancement of cellular adhesion between the retina and the retinal pigment epithelium and prevention of its cellular migration. This report shows that fibulin 2 is mainly present in the retinal pigment epithelium, Bruch membrane, choriocapillary, and to a lesser degree in the retina. In vitro studies revealed the presence of two isoforms for fibulin 2. The small isoform is located inside the cell, and the large isoform is present inside and outside the cells. Furthermore, fibulin 2 is post-translationally modified by tyrosine sulfation, and the sulfated isoform is present outside the cell, whereas the unsulfated pool is internally located. Interestingly, sulfated fibulin 2 significantly reduced the rate of cellular growth and migration. Finally, levels of fibulin 2 dramatically increased in the retinal pigment epithelium following retinal detachment, suggesting a direct role for fibulin 2 in the re-attachment of the retina to the retinal pigment epithelium. Understanding the role of fibulin 2 in enhancing retinal attachment is likely to help improve the current therapies or allow the development of new strategies for the treatment of this sight-threatening condition. PMID:24692557

  20. [Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in a patient with previous penetrating keratoplasty (clinical case)].

    PubMed

    Burcea, M; Muşat, O; Gheorghe, Andreea; Mahdi, Labib; Colta, Diana; Cernat, Corina; Mansour, Agajani

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 54 year old patient diagnosed with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and perforating keratoplasty. Surgery is recommended and we performed posterior vitrectomy, endolaser, and internal heavy oil tamponade. The post-operative course was favorable.

  1. Atypical Presentation of Ocular Toxoplasmosis: A Case Report of Exudative Retinal Detachment and Choroidal Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Al-Zahrani, Yahya A; Al-Dhibi, Hassan A; Al-Abdullah, Abdulelah A

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old healthy male presented with a chief complaint of blurred vision in the right eye for 1-week. Fundus examination indicated right exudative retinal detachment and choroidal ischemia. The patient responded well to anti-toxoplasmosis medications and steroids. Exudative retinal detachment and choroidal ischemia are atypical presentations of ocular toxoplasmosis. However, both conditions responded well to anti.parasitic therapy with steroid. PMID:26957857

  2. Atypical Presentation of Ocular Toxoplasmosis: A Case Report of Exudative Retinal Detachment and Choroidal Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zahrani, Yahya A.; Al-Dhibi, Hassan A.; Al-Abdullah, Abdulelah A.

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old healthy male presented with a chief complaint of blurred vision in the right eye for 1-week. Fundus examination indicated right exudative retinal detachment and choroidal ischemia. The patient responded well to anti-toxoplasmosis medications and steroids. Exudative retinal detachment and choroidal ischemia are atypical presentations of ocular toxoplasmosis. However, both conditions responded well to anti.parasitic therapy with steroid. PMID:26957857

  3. Suprachoroidal Buckling: Technique and Indications

    PubMed Central

    El Rayes, Ehab N; Elborgy, Ebrahim

    2013-01-01

    The authors herein report the feasibility of suprachoroidal buckling (SCB) procedure as a new approach for treating different forms of retinal detachment (RD) by creating suprachoroidal indentation (buckling effect). With this technique, specially designed devices, i.e. a catheter or cannula, are guided in the suprachoroidal space to reach the target area. Then, a suprachoroidal filler (long lasting hyaluronic acid) is injected to indent the choroid creating SCB, thereby closing retinal tears and supporting the overlying retina. This procedure was performed to treat both myopic tractional maculopathy (MTM), including myopic macular holes, as well as peripheral retinal breaks. SCB may be used alone or in conjunction with vitrectomy. In myopic patients, restoration of retinal layers was achieved in all eyes with myopic foveoschisis. Most eyes with macular hole detachments demonstrated closure of the holes. All peripheral retinal breaks were adequately buckled and closed in a single procedure. The buckling effect was long enough in duration to seal the tears and promote adequate chorioretinal scarring. The procedure was safe and relatively simple in terms of reaching the treatment area and injecting the filler. SCB adds to our surgical options for treating selected cases of peripheral retinal tears and rhegmatogenous RD, and avoids potential problems of episcleral buckles. Moreover it may avoid vitrectomy in selected cases of rhegmatogenous RD. PMID:24653830

  4. Preludes to retinal detachment in the aphakic eye.

    PubMed

    Osterlin, S

    1977-01-01

    The author reviews the characteristic differences in primary rhegmatogenous retina detachment occurring in phakic eyes and in aphakic eyes. The preoperative findings in aphakic detachment are explained on the basis of two factors: surgical trauma during cataract extraction and postoperative changes in the macromolecular compostion of the vitreous.

  5. Repair of retinal detachment associated with proliferative vitreoretinopathy using perfluoroperhydrophenanthrene (Vitreon). Vitreon Study Group.

    PubMed

    Carroll, B F; Peyman, G A; Mehta, N J; Millsap, C M; Greve, M D; Dunlap, W A; Lee, K J; Ma, P E

    1994-04-01

    A total of 140 consecutive patients underwent repair of retinal detachment associated with grade C2 to D3 proliferative vitreoretinopathy with perfluoroperhydrophenanthrene (Vitreon) as an intraoperative hydrokinetic tool. In seven patients the Vitreon was left in the eye for extended tamponade. Intraoperative reattachment was obtained in 98% of patients. At the final follow-up examination (mean 7 months) 84% of retinas remained attached, and 92% of patients had stable or improved visual acuity. Vitreon was found to be safe and effective in the repair of complicated retinal detachments. No complications were directly related to Vitreon when used intraoperatively or when left in the eye for extended tamponade.

  6. Repair of retinal detachment associated with proliferative vitreoretinopathy using perfluoroperhydrophenanthrene (Vitreon). Vitreon Study Group.

    PubMed

    Carroll, B F; Peyman, G A; Mehta, N J; Millsap, C M; Greve, M D; Dunlap, W A; Lee, K J; Ma, P E

    1994-04-01

    A total of 140 consecutive patients underwent repair of retinal detachment associated with grade C2 to D3 proliferative vitreoretinopathy with perfluoroperhydrophenanthrene (Vitreon) as an intraoperative hydrokinetic tool. In seven patients the Vitreon was left in the eye for extended tamponade. Intraoperative reattachment was obtained in 98% of patients. At the final follow-up examination (mean 7 months) 84% of retinas remained attached, and 92% of patients had stable or improved visual acuity. Vitreon was found to be safe and effective in the repair of complicated retinal detachments. No complications were directly related to Vitreon when used intraoperatively or when left in the eye for extended tamponade. PMID:8069756

  7. Retinal detachment as a complication of neodymium: yttrium aluminum garnet laser cyclophotocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Geyer, O; Neudorfer, M; Lazar, M

    1993-05-01

    We report a traction retinal detachment that developed within one month of transscleral neodymium: yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser cyclophotocoagulation, a previously unreported complication of the new cyclodestructive procedure. A 17-year-old boy was referred to our department with uncontrolled aphakic glaucoma OD after having undergone cyclocryotherapy twice. Three treatments with transscleral Nd:YAG cyclophotocoagulation were done over nine months to lower his intraocular pressure. Hypotony and traction retinal detachment occurred after the third laser treatment and was managed successfully by vitrectomy with a fluid-gas exchange. Thus, the possibility of this additional complication should be remembered when doing transscleral Nd:YAG cyclophotocoagulation. PMID:8517586

  8. Macrophage- and RIP3-dependent inflammasome activation exacerbates retinal detachment-induced photoreceptor cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, K; Matsumoto, H; Kaneko, H; Notomi, S; Takeuchi, K; Sweigard, J H; Atik, A; Murakami, Y; Connor, K M; Terasaki, H; Miller, J W; Vavvas, D G

    2015-01-01

    Detachment of photoreceptors from the retinal pigment epithelium is seen in various retinal disorders, resulting in photoreceptor death and subsequent vision loss. Cell death results in the release of endogenous molecules that activate molecular platforms containing caspase-1, termed inflammasomes. Inflammasome activation in retinal diseases has been reported in some cases to be protective and in others to be detrimental, causing neuronal cell death. Moreover, the cellular source of inflammasomes in retinal disorders is not clear. Here, we demonstrate that patients with photoreceptor injury by retinal detachment (RD) have increased levels of cleaved IL-1β, an end product of inflammasome activation. In an animal model of RD, photoreceptor cell death led to activation of endogenous inflammasomes, and this activation was diminished by Rip3 deletion. The major source of Il1b expression was found to be infiltrating macrophages in the subretinal space, rather than dying photoreceptors. Inflammasome inhibition attenuated photoreceptor death after RD. Our data implicate the infiltrating macrophages as a source of damaging inflammasomes after photoreceptor detachment in a RIP3-dependent manner and suggest a novel therapeutic target for treatment of retinal diseases. PMID:25906154

  9. Exudative retinal detachment following strabismus surgery in Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Cheol; Lee, Se Yeop; Kim, Kwang Soo

    2015-06-01

    A 15-year-old boy with Sturge-Weber syndrome underwent strabismus surgery (oculus sinister [OS]) for the treatment of exotropia. The patient's visual acuity (OS) decreased to hand motion 10 days after the surgery. One month after the surgery, the patient's visual acuity decreased to light perception, and a fundus examination showed total exudative retinal detachment (OS). PMID:26265655

  10. Controversy over the etiology and therapy of retinal detachment: the struggles of Jules Gonin.

    PubMed

    Gloor, Balder P; Marmor, Michael F

    2013-01-01

    Retinal tears were recognized as soon as ophthalmoscopy became available. They were initially considered to be secondary events, from choroidal exudation and pressure behind the detached retina. This led von Graefe and others to recommend cuts in the retina to drain subretinal fluid into the vitreous cavity. De Wecker (1875, 1879) and Leber (1882) first proposed that intrinsic tears within the retina are the cause of retinal detachment, but they faced extreme and long lasting opposition for this view. Surgical results at this time were uniformly disastrous, and therapeutic nihilism still prevailed when Dufour and Gonin became convinced around 1904-1906 that the retinal tear was indeed the origin of the detachment. It took ten years, however, before Gonin figured out how to close tears by exact placement of heat coagulation ("thermopuncture") and provide therapeutic evidence for his beliefs. When he first presented his results in 1921, colleagues jeered at him, especially Deutschmann and Sourdille who, like the other ophthalmic surgeons, denied the role of the tear (and still made "therapeutic" incisions through the detached retina). Recognition of Gonin's approach finally came at the International Congresses in Amsterdam 1928 and in Madrid in 1933. Sourdille modified his approach when his son Gabriel convinced him to change after 1930, but Deutschmann stuck to his horrific procedure until his death in 1935. Then a new generation of retinal surgeons took over, with subsequent discussion focused on finding the best methods to close the tears. PMID:23257154

  11. Exudative retinal detachment following strabismus surgery in Sturge–Weber syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu Cheol; Lee, Se Yeop; Kim, Kwang Soo

    2015-01-01

    A 15-year-old boy with Sturge–Weber syndrome underwent strabismus surgery (oculus sinister [OS]) for the treatment of exotropia. The patient's visual acuity (OS) decreased to hand motion 10 days after the surgery. One month after the surgery, the patient's visual acuity decreased to light perception, and a fundus examination showed total exudative retinal detachment (OS). PMID:26265655

  12. Combined silicone and fluorosilicone oil tamponade (double filling) in the management of complicated retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Bottoni, F; Arpa, P; Vinciguerra, P; Zenoni, S; De Molfetta, V

    1992-01-01

    We evaluated the use of simultaneous double filling with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and fluorosilicone (FSiO) in the repair of complicated retinal detachment in 12 selected cases. Initial retinal reattachment was achieved in all cases. Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) recurred in 10 patients (83%), 6 of which showed partial retinal detachment. Inferior and superior postoperative residual free spaces were abolished by this procedure, but a new residual fluid space was created, lying horizontally between the bubbles and expanding in a triangular shape nasally to the optic disk and temporally to the macula. Overall, 9 of 10 eyes with postoperative PVR had proliferation involving these areas. These findings support the concept that 'compartmentalization' is of major importance in determining postoperative cell proliferation.

  13. RETINOPATHY OF PREMATURITY: INVOLUTION, FACTORS PREDISPOSING TO RETINAL DETACHMENT, AND EXPECTED UTILITY OF PREEMPTIVE SURGICAL REINTERVENTION

    PubMed Central

    Coats, David K

    2005-01-01

    Purpose To characterize involution of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) following treatment at threshold, to identify findings during involution that portend development of retinal detachment, and to assess the potential utility of preemptive vitrectomy for eyes with high-risk features. Methods The probability of ROP involution and of retinal detachment evolution over time was analyzed in 262 treated eyes of 138 infants in a retrospective observational non–case controlled series. Expected utility of preemptive reintervention in eyes with high-risk features was evaluated using decision analysis. Modifications were devised to enhance classification of advanced ROP. Results ROP fully involuted in approximately 80% of eyes within 28 days of treatment. Vitreous organization meeting the study’s clinically important definition was associated with a 31-fold (5.37 to 183.63; P < .0001) and a 13-fold (2.97 to 58.59; P < .0001) increase in the odds for retinal detachment for right and left eyes, respectively. Vitreous hemorrhage defined as clinically important was associated with a 38-fold (2.69 to 551.19; P = .007) and a 15-fold (1.65 to 144.12; P = .02) increase in the odds for retinal detachment for right and left eyes, respectively. As modeled, an expected utility of 0.85 was calculated for preemptive vitrectomy compared with 0.79 for deferred vitrectomy for eyes with clinically important vitreous organization. Conclusions Acute-phase ROP involuted quickly in most eyes. Vitreous organization and vitreous hemorrhage were predictive of eyes that developed a retinal detachment. Decision analysis suggests that preemptive vitrectomy for eyes with vitreous organization meeting specific criteria is not likely to be worse than deferred vitrectomy, and it could be advantageous in some scenarios. PMID:17057808

  14. [Perfluorodecalin as a hydrokinetic substance in complicated retinal detachment].

    PubMed

    Greber, H

    1991-01-01

    Perfluorodecalin is a clear colourless fluid with high specific gravity. It is immiscible with gas, blood, water, or any other fluid used in vitrectomy. The low viscosity permits easy injection and removal with microsurgical equipment. The high weight displaces subretinal fluid anteriorly through retinal breaks back into the vitreous space. Posterior retinotomies can be avoided. A large bubble of perfluorodecalin in the vitreous cavity stabilizes the retina mechanically during dissection and peeling of epiretinal membranes. Before the procedure is ended the fluid must be completely removed from the eye and replaced by BSS, air, gas, or silicon oil. We present the surgical technique and preliminary results.

  15. [Perfluorodecalin as a hydrokinetic substance in complicated retinal detachment].

    PubMed

    Greber, H

    1991-01-01

    Perfluorodecalin is a clear colourless fluid with high specific gravity. It is immiscible with gas, blood, water, or any other fluid used in vitrectomy. The low viscosity permits easy injection and removal with microsurgical equipment. The high weight displaces subretinal fluid anteriorly through retinal breaks back into the vitreous space. Posterior retinotomies can be avoided. A large bubble of perfluorodecalin in the vitreous cavity stabilizes the retina mechanically during dissection and peeling of epiretinal membranes. Before the procedure is ended the fluid must be completely removed from the eye and replaced by BSS, air, gas, or silicon oil. We present the surgical technique and preliminary results. PMID:1786919

  16. Long-term surgical outcomes of retinal detachment in patients with Stickler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Devasis N; Yonekawa, Yoshihiro; Thomas, Benjamin J; Nudleman, Eric D; Williams, George A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to present the long-term anatomical and visual outcomes of retinal detachment repair in patients with Stickler syndrome. Patients and methods This study is a retrospective, interventional, consecutive case series of patients with Stickler syndrome undergoing retinal reattachment surgery from 2009 to 2014 at the Associated Retinal Consultants, William Beaumont Hospital. Results Sixteen eyes from 13 patients were identified. Patients underwent a mean of 3.1 surgical interventions (range: 1–13) with a mean postoperative follow-up of 94 months (range: 5–313 months). Twelve eyes (75%) developed proliferative vitreoretinopathy. Retinal reattachment was achieved in 100% of eyes, with ten eyes (63%) requiring silicone oil tamponade at final follow-up. Mean preoperative visual acuity (VA) was 20/914, which improved to 20/796 at final follow-up (P=0.81). There was a significant correlation between presenting and final VA (P<0.001), and patients with poorer presenting VA were more likely to require silicone oil tamponade at final follow-up (P=0.04). Conclusion Repair of retinal detachment in patients with Stickler syndrome often requires multiple surgeries, and visual outcomes are variable. Presenting VA is significantly predictive of long-term VA outcomes. PMID:27574392

  17. Occult retinal detachment after mild traumatic brain injury: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Bedgood, Alysia; Rand, Scott E; Major, James

    2015-01-01

    Concussions, or mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI), are on the forefront of sports medicine. There is a spectrum of symptoms associated with mTBI, some of which include blurriness, double vision, and light sensitivity. Further evaluation for nonconcussion-related causes is warranted if vision changes do not improve concurrently with other symptoms. Keeping in mind other less obvious injuries, including retinal detachment, is important when performing an initial evaluation or follow-up of an mTBI.

  18. Serous retinal detachment following panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) using Pattern Scan Laser (PASCAL) photocoagulator

    PubMed Central

    Azar, Georges; Wolff, Benjamin; Cornut, Pierre-Loïc; Mauget-Faÿsse, Martine

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To report a case of serous retinal detachment after Pattern Scan Laser (PASCAL) treatment in a diabetic woman. Methods: A 34-year-old diabetic woman presented with florid diabetic retinopathy after a miscarriage during the 20th week of pregnancy. Her Best Corrected Visual Acuity (BCVA) was 20/40 right eye (OD) and 20/30 left eye (OS). Fundus exam showed multiple microaneurysms, large blot hemorrhages and venous dilation both eyes (OU). Fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) revealed large areas of capillary nonperfusion and panretinal neovascularisation in all quadrants OU. Macular Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography scan (SD-OCT) did not show any foveal thickening. Panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) was immediately performed OU during the same day. Results: Two days after PASCAL treatment, her BCVA decreased to 20/80 OU and worsened to Count Fingers (CF) during the following days. Fundus exam revealed an extensive serous retinal detachment confirmed on SD-OCT. 2 sub-conjunctival injections of 0.1 ml Betamethasone were done OU. One month later, BCVA improved to 20/30 and SD-OCT confirmed regression of retinal detachment. Conclusions: PASCAL is considered to be a safe treatment, but one has to be aware of its potential side effects. It has to be used with caution in pregnant women.

  19. Postoperative Recovery of Visual Function after Macula-Off Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment

    PubMed Central

    van de Put, Mathijs A. J.; Croonen, Danna; Nolte, Ilja M.; Japing, Wouter J.; Hooymans, Johanna M. M.; Los, Leonoor I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine which factors affect the recovery of visual function in macula off rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). Methods In a prospective study of forty-five patients with a primary macula-off RRD of 24 hours to 6 weeks duration, the height of the macular detachment was determined by ultrasonography. At 12 months postoperatively, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), contrast acuity, and color confusion indexes (CCI) were obtained. Results Macular detachment was present for 2–32 (median 7) days before repair. A shorter duration of macular detachment was correlated with a better CCI saturé (p = 0.0026) and lower LogMAR BCVA (better Snellen visual acuity)(p = 0.012). Also, a smaller height of macular detachment was correlated with a lower LogMAR BCVA (p = 0.0034). A younger age and lower pre-operative LogMAR BCVA at presentation were both correlated with better postoperative contrast acuity in the total group (age: p = 1.7×10−4 and pre-operative LogMAR BCVA: p = 0.0034). Conclusion Functional recovery after macula-off RRD is affected by the duration and the height of the macular detachment. Recovery of contrast acuity is also affected by age and BCVA at presentation. Meeting presentation ARVO annual meeting 2013, May 7, Seattle, Washington, United States of America. Trial registration: trialregister.nl NTR839 PMID:24927502

  20. Evaluation of Intravitreal Ranibizumab on the Surgical Outcome for Diabetic Retinopathy With Tractional Retinal Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Feng; Yu, Chenying; Ding, Haiyuan; Shen, Liping; Lou, Dinghua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aims to investigate intravitreal injection of Ranibizumab on the surgical outcome for diabetic patients who had tractional retinal detachment but did not receive any preoperative retinal photocoagulation. Ninety-seven patients (97 eyes) who had diabetic retinopathy with tractional retinal detachment were enrolled to receive 23-G pars plana vitrectomy (PPV). They were assigned to an experimental group (Group I, n = 47 eyes) and a control group (Group II, n = 50 eyes). The patients in Group I were given 1 injection of intravitreal Ranibizumab (Lucentis 0.5 mg/0.05 mL) 1 week before surgery, whereas those in Group II went down to surgery directly. Follow-ups were performed for 6 months to 3 years (16 ± 6 months), and indicators observed included postoperative best-corrected visual acuity, complications, and retinal thickness in the macula measured by optical coherence tomography. In Group I, BCVA improved from logMAR 1.92 ± 0.49 to logMAR 0.81 ± 0.39 following surgery, whereas in Group II, BCVA improved from logMAR 1.91 ± 0.49 to logMAR 0.85 ± 0.41. There was significant postoperative gain in vision, but there was no significant difference between the 2 groups at postoperative follow-up visits. The mean duration of vitrectomy in Group I and Group II was (40 ± 7) minutes and (53 ± 9) minutes, respectively, with significant difference. Iatrogenic breaks were noted in 5 eyes (11%) in the experimental group and 17 eyes (34%) in the control group; the difference was significant. The retinal thickness in the macula measured by OCT was (256 ± 44) μm and (299 ± 84) μm in Group I and Group II respectively with significant difference. Besides, there were significantly more eyes in Group II that required silicone oil tamponade and postoperative retinal photocoagulation. 23-G PPV combined with intravitreal tamponade and panretinal photocoagulation still remains an effective regimen for the

  1. Hypoxia inducible factor 1α contributes to regulation of autophagy in retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Shelby, Shameka J.; Angadi, Pavan S.; Zheng, Qiong-Duon; Yao, Jingyu; Jia, Lin; Zacks, David N.

    2015-01-01

    Photoreceptor (PR) cells receive oxygen and nutritional support from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Retinal detachment results in PR hypoxia and their time-dependent death. Detachment also activates autophagy within the PR, which serves to reduce the rate of PR apoptosis. In this study, we test the hypothesis that autophagy activation in the PR results, at least in part, from the detachment-induced activation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF). Retina-RPE separation was created in Brown-Norway rats and C57BL/6J mice by injection of 1% hyaluronic acid into the subretinal space. Retinas were harvested and assayed for HIF protein levels. Cultured 661W photoreceptor cells were subjected to hypoxic conditions and assayed for induction of HIF and autophagy. The requirement of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in regulating photoreceptor autophagy was tested using siRNA in vitro and in vivo. We observed increased levels of HIF-1α and HIF-2α within 1 day post-detachment, as well as increased levels of BNIP3, a downstream target of HIF-1α that contributes to autophagy activation. Exposing 661W cells to hypoxia resulted in increased HIF-1α and HIF-2α levels and increase in conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II. Silencing of HIF-1α, but not HIF-2α, reduced the hypoxia-induced increase in LC3-II formation and increased cell death in 661W cells. Silencing of HIF-1α in rat retinas prevented the detachment-induced increase in BNIP3 and LC3-II, resulting in increased PR cell death. Our data support the hypothesis that HIF-1α, but not HIF-2α, serves as an early response signal to induce autophagy and reduce photoreceptor cell death. PMID:26093278

  2. N-Acetylcysteine Suppresses Retinal Detachment in an Experimental Model of Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hetian; Velez, Gisela; Cui, Jing; Samad, Arif; Maberley, David; Matsubara, Joanne; Kazlauskas, Andrius

    2010-01-01

    Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is a complication that develops in 5% to 10% of patients who undergo surgery to correct a detached retina. The only treatment option for PVR is surgical intervention, which has a limited success rate that diminishes in patients with recurring PVR. Our recent studies revealed that antioxidants prevented intracellular signaling events that were essential for experimental PVR. The purpose of this study was to test whether N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), an antioxidant used in a variety of clinical settings, was capable of protecting rabbits from PVR. Vitreous-driven activation of PDGFRα and cellular responses intrinsic to PVR (contraction of collagen gels and cell proliferation) were blocked by concentrations of NAC that were well below the maximum tolerated dose. Furthermore, intravitreal injection of NAC effectively protected rabbits from developing retinal detachment, which is the sight-robbing phase of PVR. Finally, these observations with an animal model appear relevant to clinical PVR because NAC prevented human PVR vitreous-induced contraction of primary RPE cells derived from a human PVR membrane. Our observations demonstrate that antioxidants significantly inhibited experimental PVR, and suggest that antioxidants have the potential to function as a PVR prophylactic in patients undergoing retinal surgery to repair a detached retina. PMID:20489144

  3. [Evaluation of the macula which was not involved in retinal detachment after surgical treatment of retinal detachment using scleral indentation. Summary of a doctoral thesis].

    PubMed

    Boduch-Cieślińska, K

    1992-10-01

    The goal of the study was the evaluation of the influence of the nowadays most frequently used surgical methods in cases of retinal detachment on the macula not involved in the detachment. The study takes into account surgical interventions which have the same indications and principles of action. They are based on an extra-scleral indentation--temporary or permanent one--by means of a Lincoff-Kreissig balloon and a meridional silicone sponge implant. The examinations comprised 54 patients. They were divided into 2 groups: 1st group (24 patients) was treated by cryopexy and a Lincoff-Kreissig balloon, the 2nd group (30 patients) by cryopexy and a meridional silicone sponge implant. In all the patients of both groups the retina reattached. During the 5-years observation of patients of the 1st group no macular changes were detected; one did not observe metamorphopsia or disturbances of the color vision. In the 2nd group instead 17 patients claimed metamorphopsia, 20 patients showed disturbances of the color vision and angiography changes involving the macular region (13 patients). PMID:1306534

  4. Late corneal scarring after retinal detachment surgery 42 months after photorefractive keratectomy.

    PubMed

    Tosi, Gian Marco; Baiocchi, Stefano; Caporossi, Tomaso

    2004-05-01

    A 42-year-old man had uneventful bilateral nonsimultaneous photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) for severe myopia. Thirty-nine months after the procedure, the patient presented with a retinal detachment (RD) in the right eye. Cerclage, vitrectomy, endolaser, and intravitreal silicone oil tamponade were performed, and the RD was successfully repaired. Three months after vitrectomy and 42 months after PRK, the patient complained of visual impairment in the right eye and photophobia. On slitlamp examination, marked reticular scarring of the central anterior cornea was observed. The occurrence of late-onset corneal haze highlights the need for special attention to patients who have vitrectomy after PRK.

  5. Biocompatibility of a Synthetic Biopolymer for the Treatment of Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Sarfare, Shanta; Dacquay, Yann; Askari, Syed; Nusinowitz, Steven; Hubschman, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the retinal safety and toxicity of a novel synthetic biopolymer to be used as a patch to treat rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Methods Thirty one adult wild type albino mice were divided in 2 groups. In Group A (n=9) 0.2 μl balanced salt solution (BSS) and in Group B (n=22), 0.2 μl biopolymer was injected in the subretinal space. Trans-scleral subretinal injection was performed in one eye and the fellow eye was used as control. In both groups, in vivo color fundus photography, electroretinogram (ERG), spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) were performed before injection and at days 7 and 14 post-intervention. Histological analysis was performed following euthanization at days 1, 7 and 21 post-injection. Results The biopolymer was visualized in the subretinal space in vivo by SD-OCT and post-life by histology up to 1 week after the injection. There were no significant differences in ERG parameters between the two groups at 1 and 2 weeks post-injection. Minimal inflammatory response and loss of photoreceptor cells was only observed in the immediate proximity of the site of scleral perforation, which was similar in both groups. Overall integrity of the outer, inner retina and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) layers was unaffected by the presence of the biopolymer in the subretinal space. Conclusions Functional and histological evaluation suggests that the synthetic biopolymer is non-inflammatory and non-toxic to the eye. It may represent a safe therapeutic agent in the future, for the treatment of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. PMID:26744635

  6. Topical difluprednate for treatment of serous retinal detachment and panuveitis associated with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Stacey; Taban, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Summary Patients with bilateral serous retinal detachments and panuveitis related to Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease are commonly managed with oral corticosteroids, immunosuppressive agents, and/or intravitreal injections. We present the case of a 56-year-old Hispanic man with Harada disease whose bilateral serous retinal detachments and panuveitis were treated with topical corticosteroid difluprednate alone. Functional and anatomical recoveries were assessed by fluorescein angiograms and optical coherence tomography studies over a period of 9 months. The patient’s serous retinal detachments resolved, and his vision and panuveitis improved dramatically over a period of 2 weeks, after which he was placed on a drop taper and maintenance therapy for the remainder of the 9 months. PMID:27582676

  7. Topical difluprednate for treatment of serous retinal detachment and panuveitis associated with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease.

    PubMed

    Lu, Stacey; Taban, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Patients with bilateral serous retinal detachments and panuveitis related to Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease are commonly managed with oral corticosteroids, immunosuppressive agents, and/or intravitreal injections. We present the case of a 56-year-old Hispanic man with Harada disease whose bilateral serous retinal detachments and panuveitis were treated with topical corticosteroid difluprednate alone. Functional and anatomical recoveries were assessed by fluorescein angiograms and optical coherence tomography studies over a period of 9 months. The patient's serous retinal detachments resolved, and his vision and panuveitis improved dramatically over a period of 2 weeks, after which he was placed on a drop taper and maintenance therapy for the remainder of the 9 months. PMID:27582676

  8. Vitrectomy with or without encircling band for pseudophakic retinal detachment: a multi-centre, three-arm, randomised clinical trial. VIPER Study Report No. 1—design and enrolment

    PubMed Central

    Mazinani, B; Baumgarten, S; Schiller, P; Agostini, H; Helbig, H; Limburg, E; Hellmich, M; Walter, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Scleral buckling is currently used in addition to vitrectomy for the treatment of pseudophakic retinal detachment (PRD) to better support the vitreous base and better visualisation of the periphery. Aims The aims of this study are to evaluate (1) whether the combination of 20 G vitrectomy and scleral buckling is superior to 20 G vitrectomy alone (control) (confirmatory), and (2) whether transconjunctival 23/25 G vitrectomy is non-inferior to 20 G vitrectomy (both without scleral buckling) regarding operation success (exploratory). Methods The VIPER (Vitrectomy Plus Encircling Band Vs. Vitrectomy Alone For The Treatment Of Pseudophakic Retinal Detachment) study is an unmasked, multi-centre, three-arm randomised trial. Patients with PRD were eligible, excluding complicated retinal detachment or otherwise severe ophthalmologic impairment. Patients were randomised to one of three interventions: 20 G vitrectomy alone (control C), combination of 20 G vitrectomy and circumferential scleral buckling (experimental treatment E1) or 23/25 G vitrectomy alone (experimental treatment E2). The primary endpoint is the absence of any indication for a retina re-attaching procedure during 6 months of follow-up. Secondary endpoints include best corrected visual acuity, retina re-attaching procedures, complications and adverse events. Results From June 2011 to August 2013, 257 patients were enrolled in the study. The internet randomisation service assigned 100 patients each to the treatment arms C and E1, and 57 patients to treatment E2. The imbalance is due to the fact that several retinal surgeons did not qualify for performing E2. The random assignment was stratified and balanced (ie, 1:1 or 1:1:1 ratio) by surgeon. Conclusions The described study represents a methodologically rigorous protocol evaluating the benefits of three different vitrectomy approaches to PRD. The projected results will help to establish their overall efficacy and will permit

  9. Retinal detachment post-phacoemulsification in Bichons Frises: A retrospective study of 54 dogs

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, Silvia G.; Bentley, Ellison; McLellan, Gillian J; Giuliano, Elizabeth A; Albaugh, Rachel A; Rankin, Amy J; Labelle, Amber L; Buhr, Kevin A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare rates of retinal detachment (RD) post phacoemulsification in American Bichons Frises with and without prophylactic retinopexy. Procedures Medical records of 54 Bichons Frises undergoing phacoemulsification with or without prophylactic retinopexy between 2003–2013 in one or both eyes were reviewed from five Midwestern university veterinary teaching hospitals. Inclusion criteria were pre-operative ERG, at least 6 months of follow up post phacoemulsification, and absence of pre-existing RD as determined by ophthalmic examination and/or ultrasound. Statistical analyses used chi-squared and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests and Wilson confidence intervals with the p value <0.05 considered significant. Results Phacoemulsification was performed without retinopexy in 79 eyes (42 dogs, non-PR group) and with prophylactic retinopexy in 23 eyes (12 dogs, PR group). Incidence of diabetes mellitus was 10/42 and 3/12 in the non-PR and the PR groups respectively (p=0.93). Intraocular lens implantation was performed in 40/42 non-PR dogs and 11/12 PR dogs, (p=0.63, 73/79 versus 21/23 eyes). At final re-examination, RD occurred in 4/79 eyes without retinopexy, compared to 0/23 RD in the retinopexy group. There was no statistically significant difference in RD rates between the two groups (p=0.27) Conclusions These data provide no statistical evidence to support prophylactic retinopexy in Bichon Frises. Due to the low rate of retinal detachment following phacoemulsification without prophylactic retinopexy, the procedure appears to offer limited benefit to offset cost, procedural risk and risk of extended or repeated anesthesia in Bichons Frises. PMID:26429670

  10. High frequency of latent Chlamydia trachomatis infection in patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Boiko, Ernest V.; Pozniak, Alexei L.; Maltsev, Dmitrii S.; Suetov, Alexei A.; Nuralova, Irina V.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the frequency of detection of ocular and extraocular Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection in non-high myopes with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). METHODS This was a single-center, nonrandomized, prospective, case-control study. One hundred and four patients were divided into a study group with RRD (n=63) and a control group with traumatic retinal detachment (n=41). Samples of subretinal fluid (SFR), conjunctival, urethral/cervical swabs, and blood were collected. The frequency of detection of CT infection in SRF samples was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), direct fluorescence assay (DFA) and cell culture, whereas that in conjunctival swabs was determined by PCR and DFA, and those in urethral/cervical swabs and blood were determined by DFA. Yates Chi-square test (with Bonferroni correction) and two-tailed Student's t-test were used for statistical analysis. RESULTS SRF CT infection was detected more frequently in the study group (50.8%-71.4%) than in the control group (9.8%-12.2%) by all the methods used (P<0.01). The frequency of detection of conjunctival CT infection by DFA was higher in the RRD patients compared with the controls (81.0% vs 24.4%, P=0.004). The PCR detected conjunctival CT infection more often in the study group than in the controls (46.0% vs 9.8%, P=0.007). The DFA detected CT in blood specimens almost as frequently as in urogenital specimens, for the RRD patients (61.2% vs 63.5%) and the controls (7.3% vs 9.8%). CONCLUSION CT infection is detected with high frequency in non-high myopes with RRD. PMID:27366689

  11. Five Year Nationwide Incidence of Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment Requiring Surgery in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Jun; Choi, Nam-Kyoung; Park, Kyu Hyung; Woo, Se Joon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To define the incidence and demographic characteristics of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) requiring surgery in Korea. Design Nationwide population-based retrospective study. Methods Patients who underwent surgery for RRD from 2007 to 2011 were retrospectively identified using the diagnostic code for RRD and the surgical codes for retinal detachment surgeries in the national claim database. The average incidence rate of RRD during the 5-year period was estimated using the population data of the 2010 Census in Korea. Results A total of 24,928 surgically treated RRD cases were identified. The average incidence of surgery requiring RRD was 10.39 cases per 100,000 person-years [95% confidence interval (CI), 10.26–10.52). The incidence in men (11.32 cases per 100,000 person-years; 95% CI: 11.13–11.51) was significantly higher than that in women (9.47 cases per 100,000 person-years; 95% CI: 9.29–9.64) (p<0.001). The incidence of surgery requiring RRD showed a bimodal distribution across age groups, with one peak (28.55 cases per 100,000 person-years; 95% CI: 27.46–29.67) representing patients between 65 and 69 years of age and the second peak (approximately 8.5 per 100,000 person-years) representing patients between 20 and 29 years of age. The male-to-female ratio was approximately 1.0 for the peak-incidence age groups, whereas the ratio was higher for the other age groups. Conclusions The incidence of RRD in the Korean population was similar to that reported previously, with the peak incidence being lower than that in the Caucasian population. The age-specific RRD incidence pattern in Korea followed a bimodal distribution. PMID:24236173

  12. Congenital Bilateral Retinal Detachment in Two Siblings with Osteoporosis-Pseudoglioma Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Welinder, Lotte G; Robitaille, Johane M; Rupps, Rosemarie; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Lyons, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    The birth of a bilaterally blind child is catastrophic for families and a challenging diagnostic and management problem for ophthalmologists. Early identification of the underlying cause and its genetic basis helps initiate possible treatment, delineate prognosis, and identify risks for future pregnancies. In some cases, an early diagnosis can also influence the treatment of other family members. We report two sisters with bilateral retinal detachment and retro-lental masses from birth with no detectable NDP or FZD4 mutations. They were born to parents without detectable retinal anomalies. At 1 year of age, the elder sister had low impact bone fractures, and further evaluation identified severe osteopenia and multiple spinal compression fractures. Molecular testing identified biallelic lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) mutations (NM_002335.3:c. [889dupA]; [2827 + 1G > A]) confirming a diagnosis of osteoporosis-pseudoglioma (OPPG) syndrome. After this diagnosis, the father and mother were found to have low bone mass and the father started on therapy. We conclude that early detection of LRP5 mutations is important for initiation of treatment of reduced bone density in the patients and their carrier relatives. PMID:25945592

  13. Outcome of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment repair: Experience of a tertiary center in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hinai, Ahmed S.; Al-Abri, Mohamed S.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To study the outcome of repair of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) in a tertiary center. Materials and Methods: Review of electronic medical records within a period of 29 months of consecutive patients who underwent surgical repair for RRD in Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH). Results: We included 33 consecutive patients (36 eyes). Males constituted 70% of them. The average age was 47 years. Seven eyes out of the 36 had macula-on RRD at presentation. The primary success rate with a single procedure was 86%. However, redetachment occurred in five eyes (14%). Visual acuity was either same as preoperative or better in 81% of the eyes. Giant retinal tear was found in three eyes (8%). The average follow-up period for all patients was 10.25 months (range: 3-25 months). Conclusion: Rhegmatogenous RD is not uncommon disorder. It occurs more frequently in males. However, it has a good prognosis if an intervention was performed in early stages. PMID:24379553

  14. Surgical outcomes of 25-gauge pars plana vitrectomy for diabetic tractional retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Dikopf, M S; Patel, K H; Setlur, V J; Lim, J I

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the outcomes and complications of 25-gauge (G) pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for repair of diabetic tractional retinal detachment (TRD). Methods Retrospective review of consecutive, single-surgeon 25-G PPV cases between July 2007 and July 2014. Seventy eyes from 55 patients were operated on for diabetic TRD; all eyes were tamponaded with sulfur hexafluoride, octofluoropropane, silicone oil, or balanced salt solution. Mean age at surgery was 47.7 years (range 23–76 years), and mean length of follow-up was 713 days (range 90–2368 days; median 671 days). Primary outcomes included best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), intraocular pressure (IOP), anatomic success, redetachment, and endophthalmitis. Results Preoperatively, 49 eyes (70%) had a concurrent rhegmatogenous component (8 of which also had proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR)). Mean BCVA improved from logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution 1.59 (20/800, SD 0.88) to 0.68 postoperatively (20/100, 0.77), P-value<0.001. Mean IOP increased from 15.9 to 20 mm Hg 1 day after surgery. Elevated postoperative IOP (≥22 mm Hg) occurred in 25 eyes, and low IOP (≤5 mm Hg) occurred in 2 eyes. Primary reattachment was achieved in 63 eyes (90%), and final anatomical success occurred in 69 eyes (99%). There were no cases of endophthalmitis. Conclusions Twenty-five-G PPV repair was safe and effective in the repair of diabetic TRD, including eyes with a combined rhegmatogenous detachment or PVR. Gas, silicone oil, and balanced salt solution tamponading agents all proved to be efficacious in this surgical population. PMID:26183284

  15. Diffuse choroidal hemangioma associated with exudative retinal detachment in a Sturge-Weber syndrome case: photodynamic therapy and intravitreous bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Anaya-Pava, Edwin J; Saenz-Bocanegra, Carlos H; Flores-Trejo, Alejandro; Castro-Santana, Norma A

    2015-03-01

    We report the case of a young female patient with a diffuse choroidal hemangioma (DCH) and glaucoma as part of Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) and symptomatic retinal detachment that was treated successfully with photodynamic therapy (PDT) and intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB). The patient was treated with a single session of PDT, a 689-nm laser was used to deliver 50J/cm(2) with a maximum spot size of 6400μm, for 166s. IVB was administered 3 days later. The exudative retinal detachment (ERD), macular edema and visual acuity improved one week after treatment. The patient was followed for 18 months with no recurrence of ERD, and her visual acuity was preserved. PDT followed by IVB may be an effective treatment option for visual deterioration due to ERD in patients with DCHs, as are found in SWS. PMID:25560419

  16. Missed sclera buckle as a cause of recurrent conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Rostron, Egle; Abdelaziz, Lamis; Barbara, Ramez; Metcalfe, Timothy

    2012-09-07

    A 63-year-old woman was referred to the eye clinic with a 2-year history of unresolving right eye discomfort, irritation and recurrent conjunctivitis, managed by her general practitioner, where frequent use of topical antibiotics and ocular lubricants provided little and transient relief. The right eye was blind following a complicated retinal detachment surgery 30 years ago. Examination revealed an extruding silicone sponge scleral buckle from a previous retinal detachment surgery in the superior conjunctival fornix, under the right upper lid. This was subsequently surgically removed and her symptoms resolved.

  17. Using optical coherence tomography to evaluate macular changes after surgical management for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kai-Chun; Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Cheng, Kai-Hung; Chen, Kuo-Jen; Chen, Chia-Hui; Wu, Wen-Chuan

    2016-05-01

    Incomplete visual recovery, color vision defects, or persistent metamorphopsia may persist even after successful surgery for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD), especially in cases of RD with macula off, suggesting microstructural macular damage that standard fundus biomicroscopy could not detect. We compared spectral-domain optical coherence tomography imaging with preoperative and postoperative visual acuity to evaluate the relationship between morphological changes in the outer retina and visual outcome after successful repair of RRD with macula on or off. We enrolled 43 patients (43 eyes) with successful repair of RRD and a minimum 6-month follow up after surgery in this retrospective research. Patients accepted spectral-domain optical coherence tomography postoperatively and visual acuity examination preoperatively and postoperatively. The mean age of the patients was 48.74 ± 12.68 years (range: 16-77 years). The mean visual acuity (logarithm of minimal angle of resolution) before surgery was 0.87 ± 0.70. Disrupted ellipsoid zone was noted in one of 11 eyes in the macula-on group (9.1%) and 19 of 32 eyes in the macula-off group (59.4%). Disrupted external limiting membrane (ELM) was noted in no eye in the macula-on group (0%) and 11 of 32 eyes in the macula-off group (34.4%). The macula-off group was associated with better postoperative visual gains than the macula-on group (p = 0.013). Patients with integrity of the ellipsoid zone and ELM were associated with significant visual improvement than patients with disruption of the ellipsoid zone or ELM. PMID:27316583

  18. Point-of-care ultrasonography of the orbit for detection of retinal detachment in a patient with hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Gentle Sunder; Rajbhandari, Shayuja; Dhungel, Shashwat; Sharma, Nutan; Poudel, Nimesh; Manandhar, Dhiraj N.

    2016-01-01

    Retinal detachment is a rare, but well-known cause of visual impairment in patients with hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome. With supportive care, patients usually improve, with complete recovery of vision. Bedside ultrasonography of the orbit can be helpful for early detection of retinal detachment in these patients. Here, we present a case of HELLP syndrome presenting with severe visual symptoms. Retinal detachment was detected with point-of-care ocular sonography, which was confirmed with ophthalmoscopic examination. The patient was reassured of the favorable prognosis. Early initiation of aggressive supportive care was followed by progressive improvement of vision, which correlated with sonographic evidence of resolution of detachment. Her vision recovered completely in 2 weeks. PMID:27688632

  19. Point-of-care ultrasonography of the orbit for detection of retinal detachment in a patient with hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Gentle Sunder; Rajbhandari, Shayuja; Dhungel, Shashwat; Sharma, Nutan; Poudel, Nimesh; Manandhar, Dhiraj N

    2016-09-01

    Retinal detachment is a rare, but well-known cause of visual impairment in patients with hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome. With supportive care, patients usually improve, with complete recovery of vision. Bedside ultrasonography of the orbit can be helpful for early detection of retinal detachment in these patients. Here, we present a case of HELLP syndrome presenting with severe visual symptoms. Retinal detachment was detected with point-of-care ocular sonography, which was confirmed with ophthalmoscopic examination. The patient was reassured of the favorable prognosis. Early initiation of aggressive supportive care was followed by progressive improvement of vision, which correlated with sonographic evidence of resolution of detachment. Her vision recovered completely in 2 weeks. PMID:27688632

  20. Minimally invasive curved-micro-drainer (CMD) capable of innocuous drainage of subretinal fluid for the treatment of retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yonghao; Lee, ChangYeol; Li, Cheng Guo; You, Yong Sung; Sung, Ho Lee; Jung, Hyungil

    2016-08-01

    Retinal detachment is a serious vision threatening disease. Current consensus for the treatment of retinal detachment is to reattach the retina onto the choroid layer by drainage of accumulated subretinal fluid. Although several surgical methods have been developed, no satisfactory visual outcome has been obtained without surgical complications such as unintended puncture and hemorrhage of the retina and choroid tissue. In this study, we developed a novel Curved-Micro-Drainer (CMD) for the innocuous drainage of subretinal fluid. It is a curved structure with a 15° beveled tip that is 5 mm in length, with an 80 μm inner diameter and a 100 μm outer diameter. This high inner-to-outer diameter ratio of CMD with a 100 μm outer diameter allows efficient drainage of highly viscous subretinal fluid in a minimally invasive manner. In addition, the curved structure precisely matches the spherical ocular structure, which facilitates the CMD insertion into the subretinal space without choroid tissue damage. We demonstrate that the optimized CMD allows for the innocuous drainage of the viscous subretinal fluid from the porcine eye, whereas the traditional hypodermic needle (31-gauge) induces severe retinal and choroid damage. CMD can overcome a critical safety issue and is a potential alternative to conventional surgical interventions for the innocuous drainage of subretinal fluid. PMID:27412289

  1. Optical Coherence Tomography Follow-up of an Unusual Case of Old Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment With a Hemorrhagic Macrocyst at the Macula.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Koushik; Bypareddy, Ravi; Chawla, Rohan; Kumawat, Babulal

    2015-01-01

    A 32-year-old female presented with visual acuity of hand movement close to face, an old inferior rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD), and a large hemorrhagic macular macrocyst (HMM) in the right eye. After 2 weeks of successful vitreoretinal surgery, the HMM started decreasing in height and resolved by 3 months. On optical coherence tomography, a zone of hyperreflectivity in the outer retinal layers was evident on resolution of the cyst. At final follow-up, the visual acuity improved to 1/60 only. Though HMM resolved completely after retinal reattachment, alteration and thickening of microarchitecture of the outer retinal layers ensued. PMID:26599252

  2. Application Of Laser Coagulation In Retinal Detachment And Open - Angle Glaucoma, On The Basis Of Own Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacz, Olgierd; Karczewicz, Danuta; Owczarska, Wieslawa; Sylwestrzak, Zofia

    1987-10-01

    The first part of the paper presents the results of laser ¬Â¢hotocoaculation treatment involving: 141 patients with retinal detachment , 20 with holes in the macula, and 33 with holes at the eye fundus periphery. At estimating the results, the apposition of retina and the observation time have been taken into account. The second part contains the results of observation of 21 patients, in whom, in 26 eyes laser trabeculoplasty was performed. Normalization of intraocular pressure has been obtained in 76.9% of cases. The outflow coefficient after trabeculoplasty has increased in 57.6% of cases.

  3. Retinal Pigment Epithelium Atrophy 1 (rpea1): A New Mouse Model With Retinal Detachment Caused by a Disruption of Protein Kinase C, θ

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiaojie; Liu, Ye; Hurd, Ron; Wang, Jieping; Fitzmaurice, Bernie; Nishina, Patsy M.; Chang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Retinal detachments (RDs), a separation of the light-sensitive tissue of the retina from its supporting layers in the posterior eye, isolate retinal cells from their normal supply of nourishment and can lead to their deterioration and death. We identified a new, spontaneous murine model of exudative retinal detachment, nm3342 (new mutant 3342, also referred to as rpea1: retinal pigment epithelium atrophy 1), which we characterize herein. Methods The chromosomal position for the recessive nm3342 mutation was determined by DNA pooling, and the causative mutation was discovered by comparison of whole exome sequences of mutant and wild-type controls. The effects of the mutation were examined in longitudinal studies by clinical evaluation, electroretinography (ERG), light microscopy, and marker and Western blot analyses. Results New mutant 3342, nm3342, also referred to as rpea1, causes an early-onset, complete RD on the ABJ/LeJ strain background, and central exudative RD and late-onset RPE atrophy on the C57BL/6J background. The ERG responses were normal at 2 months of age but deteriorate as mice age, concomitant with progressive pan-retinal photoreceptor loss. Genetic analysis localized rpea1 to mouse chromosome 2. By high-throughput sequencing of a whole exome capture library of an rpea1/rpea1 mutant and subsequent sequence analysis, a splice donor site mutation in the Prkcq (protein kinase C, θ) gene, was identified, leading to a skipping of exon 6, frame shift and premature termination. Homozygotes with a Prkcq-targeted null allele (Prkcqtm1Litt) have similar retinal phenotypes as homozygous rpea1 mice. We determined that the PKCθ protein is abundant in the lateral surfaces of RPE cells and colocalizes with both tight and adherens junction proteins. Phalloidin-stained RPE whole mounts showed abnormal RPE cell morphology with aberrant actin ring formation. Conclusions The homozygous Prkcqrpea1 and the null Prkcqtm1Litt mutants are reliable novel mouse

  4. Change in refraction after lens-sparing vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and epiretinal membrane

    PubMed Central

    Iwase, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Yanagida, Kosei; Kobayashi, Misato; Ra, Eimei; Murotani, Kenta; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to compare changes in refraction following lens-sparing vitrectomy between patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) and epiretinal membrane (ERM) and to investigate factors associated with the change in refraction. We reviewed medical records of 49 eyes of 49 patients with RRD (53.6 ± 7.8 years, mean ± standard deviation) and 24 eyes of 24 patients with ERM (50.9 ± 15.7 years) who underwent lens-sparing vitrectomy. Spherical equivalent refractive power was evaluated before and up to 18 months after surgery. The relationship between the change in refraction and several parameters was evaluated. A significant progressive myopic shift in refractive power was observed after vitrectomy in operated RRD and ERM eyes (P < 0.001, P = 0.016, respectively), with no significant difference in fellow eyes. The refraction values observed at ≥3 and ≥12 months following vitrectomy were significantly different as compared with those observed at baseline in the RRD group (P < 0.001) and the ERM group (P < 0.05), respectively. The change in refraction between the RRD and ERM groups was significant (P = 0.030). The multiple linear regression analysis showed that only age was significantly correlated with the change in refraction in RRD (P = 0.018) and ERM (P < 0.001) groups. The change in refraction was significantly and positively correlated with age in RRD (r = −0.461, P = 0.001) and ERM (r = −0.687, P < 0.001) groups. Following lens-sparing vitrectomy, cataract surgery was performed on 30 eyes after 0.89 ± 0.26 years in the RRD group and on 10 eyes after 1.11 ± 0.14 years in the ERM group; there was a significant difference in time to cataract surgery between the groups (P = 0.007). Kaplan–Meier survival analysis demonstrated that there was a significant difference in the rate of cataract surgeries between the RRD and ERM groups (P = 0

  5. Change in refraction after lens-sparing vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and epiretinal membrane.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Yanagida, Kosei; Kobayashi, Misato; Ra, Eimei; Murotani, Kenta; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare changes in refraction following lens-sparing vitrectomy between patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) and epiretinal membrane (ERM) and to investigate factors associated with the change in refraction.We reviewed medical records of 49 eyes of 49 patients with RRD (53.6 ± 7.8 years, mean ± standard deviation) and 24 eyes of 24 patients with ERM (50.9 ± 15.7 years) who underwent lens-sparing vitrectomy. Spherical equivalent refractive power was evaluated before and up to 18 months after surgery. The relationship between the change in refraction and several parameters was evaluated.A significant progressive myopic shift in refractive power was observed after vitrectomy in operated RRD and ERM eyes (P < 0.001, P = 0.016, respectively), with no significant difference in fellow eyes. The refraction values observed at ≥3 and ≥12 months following vitrectomy were significantly different as compared with those observed at baseline in the RRD group (P < 0.001) and the ERM group (P < 0.05), respectively. The change in refraction between the RRD and ERM groups was significant (P = 0.030). The multiple linear regression analysis showed that only age was significantly correlated with the change in refraction in RRD (P = 0.018) and ERM (P < 0.001) groups. The change in refraction was significantly and positively correlated with age in RRD (r = -0.461, P = 0.001) and ERM (r = -0.687, P < 0.001) groups. Following lens-sparing vitrectomy, cataract surgery was performed on 30 eyes after 0.89 ± 0.26 years in the RRD group and on 10 eyes after 1.11 ± 0.14 years in the ERM group; there was a significant difference in time to cataract surgery between the groups (P = 0.007). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated that there was a significant difference in the rate of cataract surgeries between the RRD and ERM groups (P = 0.022).Following lens

  6. Change in refraction after lens-sparing vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and epiretinal membrane.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Yanagida, Kosei; Kobayashi, Misato; Ra, Eimei; Murotani, Kenta; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare changes in refraction following lens-sparing vitrectomy between patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) and epiretinal membrane (ERM) and to investigate factors associated with the change in refraction.We reviewed medical records of 49 eyes of 49 patients with RRD (53.6 ± 7.8 years, mean ± standard deviation) and 24 eyes of 24 patients with ERM (50.9 ± 15.7 years) who underwent lens-sparing vitrectomy. Spherical equivalent refractive power was evaluated before and up to 18 months after surgery. The relationship between the change in refraction and several parameters was evaluated.A significant progressive myopic shift in refractive power was observed after vitrectomy in operated RRD and ERM eyes (P < 0.001, P = 0.016, respectively), with no significant difference in fellow eyes. The refraction values observed at ≥3 and ≥12 months following vitrectomy were significantly different as compared with those observed at baseline in the RRD group (P < 0.001) and the ERM group (P < 0.05), respectively. The change in refraction between the RRD and ERM groups was significant (P = 0.030). The multiple linear regression analysis showed that only age was significantly correlated with the change in refraction in RRD (P = 0.018) and ERM (P < 0.001) groups. The change in refraction was significantly and positively correlated with age in RRD (r = -0.461, P = 0.001) and ERM (r = -0.687, P < 0.001) groups. Following lens-sparing vitrectomy, cataract surgery was performed on 30 eyes after 0.89 ± 0.26 years in the RRD group and on 10 eyes after 1.11 ± 0.14 years in the ERM group; there was a significant difference in time to cataract surgery between the groups (P = 0.007). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated that there was a significant difference in the rate of cataract surgeries between the RRD and ERM groups (P = 0.022).Following lens

  7. Quality assessment of cataract surgery in Denmark - risk of retinal detachment and postoperative endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Bjerrum, Søren Solborg

    2015-03-01

    The main purpose of this thesis was to examine whether the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR) could be used to monitor and assess the quality of cataract surgery in Denmark by studying the risks of two serious postoperative complications following cataract surgery - retinal detachment (RD) and postoperative endophthalmitis (PE). The thesis consists of four retrospective studies. In the first study (paper I), we used data from the NPR in the calendar period 2000-2010 to investigate the risk of pseudophakic retinal detachment (PRD) using the fellow non-operated eyes of the patients as reference. The study showed that over a 10-year study period, the risk of PRD was increased by a factor of 4.2 irrespective of sex and age. The risk of PRD was highest in the first part of the postoperative period and then gradually decreased but remained statistically significantly higher than the risk of RD in non-operated fellow eyes up to 10 years after cataract surgery. The epidemiology of RD in the non-operated fellow eyes was different from the epidemiology of RD in the background population as young men had the highest risk of RD in the non-operated fellow eyes. This means that the absolute risk of PRD was highest for young men because they had a higher risk of RD before they underwent cataract surgery. In the second study (paper II), we used data from the NPR and reviewed patient charts to assess the risk of PE after cataract surgery performed in public eye departments and private hospitals/clinics in the study period 2002-2010. The overall risk of PE among the seven public eye departments was 0.36 per 1000 registered cataract operations, and the PE risk among the departments was homogeneous. The overall risk of PE among the 28 private hospitals/clinics was 0.73 per 1000 registered cataract operations, and the risk among the private hospitals/clinics was heterogeneous. Most private hospitals/clinics had a risk of PE that was lower than or similar to the risk of PE after

  8. Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment Surgery in Elderly People over 70 Years Old: Visual Acuity, Quality of Life, and Cost-Utility Values

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Haidong; Xu, Xiaocheng; Liu, Haiyun; Bai, Lin; Xu, Xun; Zhang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose To evaluate the influence of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) surgery on elderly patients in terms of visual acuity, vision-related quality of life and its cost-effectiveness. Methods Elderly patients over 70 years old, who were diagnosed and underwent RRD surgery at Shanghai First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China, from January 1, 2009, through January 1, 2013. The participants received scleral buckling surgery and vitreous surgery with or without scleral buckling under retrobulbar anesthesia. We followed the patients for 1 year and collected best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), vision-related quality of life, and direct medical costs data. Utility values elicited by time-trade-off were analyzed to determine the quality of life. Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained in life expectancy were calculated and discounted at 3% annually. Costs per QALY gained were reported using the bootstrap method. Further analyses were made for two age groups, age 70–79 and age over 80 years. Sensitivity analyses were performed to test stability of the results. Results 98 patients were included in the study. The BCVA significantly improved by 0.53±0.44 (Logarithm of the Minimum Angle of Resolution (logMAR)) at the 1-year postoperative time point (p<0.001). Utility values increased from 0.77 to 0.84 (p<0.001), and an average of 0.4 QALYs were gained in the life expectancy. Costs per QALY gained from the RRD surgery were 33,186 Chinese Yuan (CNY) (5,276 US dollars (USD))/QALY; 24,535 CNY (3,901 USD)/QALY for the age group of 70–79 years and 71,240 CNY (11,326 USD)/QALY for the age group over 80 years. Conclusions RRD surgery improved the visual acuity and quality of life in the elderly patients over 70 years old. According to the World Health Organization’s recommendation, at a threshold of willingness to pay of 115,062 CNY (18,293 USD)/QALY, RRD surgery is cost effective in the elderly patients. PMID:25330168

  9. Anatomical and functional outcomes after Densiron 68 heavy silicone oil tamponade for complicated retinal detachment in Chinese eyes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Li, Hui; Feng, Le; Wang, Fang

    2014-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the safety and efficacy of Densiron 68 heavy silicone oil (HSO) tamponade for complicated retinal detachment (RD) in Chinese eyes. METHODS Twenty-one eyes of 21 patients with complicated RD were included in this retrospective study. All patients underwent pars plana vitrectomy with an internal tamponade using Densiron 68 HSO. Anatomical and functional results and complications were evaluated, including retinal status, visual acuity (VA), intraocular pressure (IOP), intraocular inflammation, lens opacity, and HSO emulsification. RESULTS All the patients were followed up for 3mo to 1y (5.8±1.16mo). Retinal reattachment was achieved in 19 of 21 patients (90.5%). VA improved in 18 of 21 patients (85.7%), from 1.93 logMAR (±0.48) to 1.52 logMAR (±0.45) (P=0.001). Postoperative complications included early dispersion of HSO in 7 eyes (38.8%), cataract in 10 of 18 phakic eyes (55.5%), moderate postoperative inflammation reaction in 10 eyes (47.6%), and elevated IOP in 5 eyes (23.8%), all of which were controlled by medication or by surgery. CONCLUSION High anatomical and functional success rates can be achieved with primary vitrectomy for complicated RD by using Densiron 68 HSO; however, it should not be ignored that Densiron 68 HSO can cause some complications in the eye. PMID:24967193

  10. Perfluoro-n-octane as a temporary intraocular tamponade in a staged approach to manage complex retinal detachments

    PubMed Central

    Barthelmes, Daniel; Chandra, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate outcomes in patients with complex retinal detachments (RD) with proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) requiring retinectomy using a staged approach utilizing perfluoro-n-octane (PFO) as a short-term postoperative intraocular tamponade. Methods Retrospective analysis. Patients who underwent 23G pars plana vitrectomy for the management of complicated RD where PFO was used as a primary temporary intraocular tamponade. Only eyes with PVR in rhegmatogenous RD or eyes with penetrating injuries or globe ruptures (ocular trauma) and subsequent RD with PVR were included. Analysis of 17 eyes of 17 consecutive patients with a minimum follow-up of 12 months during a period of 5 years. The primary outcome measure was the reattachment rate after at least 12 months of follow-up after the PFO removal. Secondary outcome measures were changes in visual acuity, complications due to PFO use, and necessity for further surgeries. Results Eight eyes with prior penetrating injuries or globe rupture and nine eyes with rhegmatogenous pathology were included. All eyes had PFO as temporary tamponade for 14 days (median), which was replaced by silicon oil. Sixteen eyes (94%) had complete and one eye partial reattachment. No redetachments occurred. All eyes retained or improved visual acuity. On average, only 2.5 procedures, including silicon oil removal, were performed. Two eyes had long-term intraocular pressure of 5 mmHg and no eye had intraocular pressure of ≥21 mmHg. No long-term inflammation was observed. Conclusion PFO seems to be beneficial in a staged approach to repair complex detachments when used as short-term tamponade. A median period of 14 days allowed for both sufficient retinal support plus a reduction in side effects seen in long-term endotamponades. PMID:25784785

  11. Preoperative peribulbar block in patients undergoing retinal detachment surgery under general anesthesia: a randomized double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Morel, Jérôme; Pascal, Jean; Charier, David; De Pasquale, Véronique; Gain, Philippe; Auboyer, Christian; Molliex, Serge

    2006-04-01

    Retinal detachment surgery is frequently associated with significant postoperative pain and emesis in adults. In this randomized, double-blind, controlled study we sought to demonstrate that 1% ropivacaine peribulbar (PB) block in conjunction with general anesthesia (GA) improves operative conditions and postoperative analgesia compared with GA combined with subcutaneous normal saline injection into the inferior eyelid. Thirty-one patients were included in each group. Anesthesia was performed with target-controlled infusion propofol and continuous remifentanil infusion adjusted to maintain bispectral index values between 40 and 50. Postoperative analgesia included fixed-dose IV infusion of propacetamol and IV injection of nefopam via a patient-controlled analgesia device. Tramadol was infused IV as rescue medication. Demographic data were comparable between the groups and bispectral index values were maintained at the objective target. In the PB group, fewer patients presented an oculocardiac reflex (6 versus 17; P < 0.01); bleeding interfering with the surgical field was reduced (1 versus 11 patients; P < 0.01); mean time to first nefopam request was longer (148 +/- 99 versus 46 +/- 58 min; P < 0.01); mean nefopam consumption was diminished during the first 6 h after tracheal extubation (18.9 +/- 13.9 versus 28.5 +/- 14.7 mg; P < 0.05); immediate postoperative pain scores were lower; and fewer patients required rescue medication (5 versus 23; P < 0.01). The two groups were similar with respect to the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting. Overall, PB block combined with GA improved operating conditions and postoperative analgesia in retinal detachment surgery. PMID:16551903

  12. Comparison of retinal detachment surgery outcome among patients undergoing pars plana vitrectomy with and without relaxing retinotomy.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Tal; Moisseiev, Elad; Neudorfer, Meira; Loewenstein, Anat; Barak, Adiel

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this four year retrospective study was to compare the anatomical and functional outcomes of complicated retinal detachment (RD) surgery by pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) with and without retinotomy. The main outcome measures were primary anatomical success (defined as retinal re-attachment at the final follow-up after a single operation, with or without silicone in situ), final anatomical success, final best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and postoperative complications. Baseline characteristics did not differ between the groups, although there was a borderline significant trend for the retinotomy group to be associated with worse pre-surgical ocular pathology. With a mean follow-up of 18 (± 7.8) months, primary anatomical success was achieved in 76.7% (33 of 43) of the retinotomy group eyes vs. 67.8% (40 of 59) of the eyes in the group without retinotomy. Final anatomical success rates for the retinotomy group and no retinotomy group were 100 and 93.2% respectively. The final BCVA was 1.57 LogMAR with retinotomy and 1.38 without retinotomy, an improvement in both groups. The incidence of postoperative complications was similar in the two groups, while the frequency of macular holes was higher in the retinotomy group. A similar degree of improvement in BCVA following both surgeries indicates their similar efficacy and justifies their performance even in complicated eyes in order to improve the patients' quality of life. With neither approach superior to the other, the choice of method should be left to the surgeon. PMID:25142375

  13. Clinical outcomes of 23-gauge vitrectomy may be better than 20-gauge vitrectomy for retinal detachment repair

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ya-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study compared the clinical outcomes between 23-gauge (23-G) vitrectomy and 20-gauge (20-G) vitrectomy for the repair of retinal detachment (RD). Methods A retrospective comparative analysis of 135 RD patients was conducted between January, 2013 and September, 2014 in the Ophthalmology Department of the Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical College. The clinical outcomes of RD patients who underwent 23-G vitrectomy (n = 65) and 20-G vitrectomy (n = 70) were compared. A logistic regression analysis was used for prognostic factors in RD patients. A meta-analysis was performed using the comprehensive Meta-Analysis version 2.0 software. Results Baseline characteristics of RD patients between the 23-G group and the 20-G group were not significantly different (all p>0.05). The postoperative wound closure time was obviously shorter, and postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP; mmHg) and the incidence of macular holes (MH) were evidently lower in the 23-G group than in the 20-G group (all p<0.05). However, no statistical significances in the postoperative retinal reattachment rate or visual acuity improvement in the logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) were detected between the 23-G group and the 20-G group (both p>0.05). The meta-analysis further confirmed a shorter postoperative wound closure time, as well as a lower postoperative IOP and incidence of MH in the 23-G group than in the 20-G group (all p<0.05), while neither the postoperative retinal reattachment rate nor the visual acuity improvement in the logMAR showed statistical significance (all p>0.05). Conclusions Our retrospective comparative study of RD surgery using 20-G or 23-G techniques revealed a shorter postoperative wound closure time, as well as a lower postoperative IOP and incidence of MH in the 23-G group than in the 20-G group, confirming the superiority of 23-G vitrectomy over 20-G vitrectomy. This study provided a better option of 23-G vitrectomy for clinically

  14. Combined Tractional and Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment in Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy in the Anti-VEGF Era

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yi-Ting; Yang, Chung-May

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the clinical features, surgical outcomes, and prognostic factors of combined rhegmatogenous and tractional detachment (combined RD) in proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) in recent years. Methods. Medical records of PDR and combined RD treated with vitrectomy from 2008 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Results. A total of 57 eyes from 49 patients were included. Nine eyes had received panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) and 7 eyes had intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) within 3 months before RD developed. Thirty-eight eyes (66.7%) had ≧3 sites of broad adhesion of fibrovascular proliferation (FVP). Thirty-three eyes (57.9%) showed active FVP. Thirty-four eyes (59.6%) had extent of RD involving 3 or 4 quadrants. The primary reattachment rate was 93.0%, and the final visual acuity (VA) improved by more than 3 lines in 80.7% of eyes. Neovascular glaucoma occurred in 4 eyes postoperatively. Poor preoperative VA, severe vitreoretinal adhesion, and broad extent of RD had significant correlation with poor visual outcomes. Conclusion. PRP or IVB might play a role in provoking combined RD. The anatomical and functional success rates of surgery were high. Poor preoperative VA and severe proliferations predicted poor visual outcomes. PMID:25061523

  15. Associations Between Retinal Pigment Epithelium and Drusen Volume Changes During the Lifecycle of Large Drusenoid Pigment Epithelial Detachments

    PubMed Central

    Balaratnasingam, Chandrakumar; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A.; Curcio, Christine A.; Morgan, William H.; Querques, Giuseppe; Capuano, Vittorio; Souied, Eric; Jung, Jesse; Freund, K. Bailey

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Drusenoid pigment epithelial detachments (PEDs) are a defined path to atrophy in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We analyzed the relationships between retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and drusen volume changes during the PED lifecycle, using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods Twenty-one cases of drusenoid PED tracked using SD-OCT through periods of growth and collapse were evaluated. Volumetric calculations and piece-wise linear regression analysis were used to determine the breakpoint between growth and collapse. Spectral-domain OCT scans were independently evaluated for the appearance of intraretinal hyperreflective foci, acquired vitelliform lesions (AVLs), and disruptions to the RPE+basal lamina band. Timing of these events with respect to the breakpoint was statistically evaluated. Morphometric characteristics of drusenoid PEDs were correlated with rate of PED collapse and final visual acuity. Results Mean age of subjects was 75.3 years and mean period of follow up was 4.1 years (median 4.5 years; range, 0.6–6.6 years). The lifecycle of drusenoid PEDs was asymmetric, in that the rate of collapse (0.199 mm3/month) is significantly faster (P < 0.001) than the rate of growth (0.022 mm3/month). Appearance of intraretinal hyperreflective foci and AVLs preceded the breakpoint (both P < 0.001). The timing of disruptions to the RPE+basal lamina band did not differ from the breakpoint (P = 0.510). Maximal height, volume, and diameter of drusenoid PEDs were inversely correlated with final visual acuity (all P < 0.001) and positively correlated with the rate of PED collapse (all P < 0.001). Conclusions Spectral-domain OCT signatures, plausibly attributable to anteriorly migrated RPE and disintegration of the RPE layer, precede or occur simultaneously with changes in volume of drusenoid PED during the lifecycle of this lesion. PMID:27760262

  16. Valved versus nonvalved cannula small-gauge pars plana vitrectomy for repair of retinal detachments with Grade C proliferative vitreoretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Oellers, Patrick; Stinnett, Sandra; Hahn, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Valved cannulas are a recent addition to small-gauge pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) and provide stable intraocular fluidics. The goal of this study was to compare outcomes and postoperative complication rates of valved vs nonvalved cannula small-gauge PPV for repair of retinal detachments (RDs) complicated by Grade C proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Methods A retrospective chart review of 364 consecutive eyes with either valved or nonvalved cannula PPV for RD repair was performed. The primary outcomes were single surgery and final anatomic success and change in best-corrected visual acuity for repair of RDs complicated by Grade C PVR. Results We identified 36 eyes in the valved group and 31 eyes in the nonvalved group with Grade C PVR RD. The single surgery success was 83% vs 77% (P=0.555) and the final anatomic success was 94% vs 87% (P=0.404) in the valved vs nonvalved eyes, respectively. The mean final visual acuity gain was −0.36 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR; approximate Early Treatment Diabetes Retinopathy Study [ETDRS] score =17 letters) in valved eyes vs −0.33 logMAR (approximate ETDRS score =16 letters) in nonvalved eyes (P=0.81). Postoperative complication rates including postoperative day 1 hypotony, hypertony, and anterior chamber fibrin formation; postoperative retention of intraocular or subretinal perfluorocarbon liquid; and subsequent epiretinal membrane peel were not statistically different between groups. Conclusion Valved cannula PPV yields equivalent visual acuity and anatomic outcomes without increased postoperative complication rates compared to traditional nonvalved cannula PPV for Grade C PVR-associated RD repair. PMID:27313445

  17. Hybrid microincision vitrectomy surgery combined with 20-gauge silicone cannulas for use with 20-gauge horizontal scissors in diabetic tractional retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Keiko; Maeno, Takatoshi; Yamada, Mitsunori

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To verify the utility and preliminary safety of a 20-gauge silicone cannula for use with 20-gauge horizontal scissors delamination during microincision vitrectomy surgery (MIVS). Methods Thirty-eight eyes in 35 consecutive patients with diabetic tractional retinal detachment, who underwent MIVS between April 2010 and March 2012 and were followed for 3–24 months, were retrospectively assessed using a chart review. Twenty-gauge scissors delamination through a silicone cannula, with an additional 20-gauge port as a hybrid, was primarily selected when treating thick and rigid fibrovascular membranes, including fluctuating vessels over the detached retina near the macula. The main outcome measures included the proportion of patients treated with this hybrid method, the postoperative visual acuity, and the incidence of complications. Results Compared with the 26 eyes treated with MIVS only, 12 eyes (32%) required a hybrid technique with the use of 20-gauge instruments through a silicone cannula in addition to MIVS. Two patients underwent additional surgery. Temporary silicone oil tamponade was performed in one case of retinotomy and one case of schizophrenia. The mean visual acuity (logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution [logMAR]) improved from 1.43 ± 0.85 to 0.72 ± 0.47 at the last follow-up visit. No patients exhibited worsening of their visual acuity postoperatively. No sclerotomy-related complications were recorded during the intraoperative or postoperative periods. Conclusion Hybrid MIVS combined with a 20-gauge silicone cannula for use with 20-gauge horizontal scissors in diabetic tractional retinal detachment eyes is useful and safe due to the reduced risk of sclerotomy-related retinal breaks. This procedure is a reasonable option when performing complex surgery for diabetic vitrectomy. PMID:23946642

  18. Nine genes that may contribute to partial trisomy (6)(p22→pter) and unique presentation of persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous with retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Su, Pen-Hua; Lee, Inn-Chi; Yang, Shun-Fa; Ng, Yan-Yan; Liu, Chan-Sheng; Chen, Jia-Yuh

    2012-04-01

    We report on a newborn girl with facial anomalies, a congenital heart defect, severe pre- and postnatal growth retardation, feeding problems, and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. Cytogenetic analysis by high resolution GTG banding showed extra chromosomal material on the short arm of one chromosome 1 of the patient, but neither parent. SKY and CGH analysis demonstrated that the patient had a de novo 46,XX, der(1)t(1;6)(p36.3; p22). Compared with previously reported cases of partial trisomy 6p22 syndrome, this patient exhibited a unique condition for this syndrome: persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV) with retinal detachment. The human genome database was searched for candidate genes and we propose the following nine genes located in the 6p22→6pter region for their potential contribution to the phenotype of partial trisomy 6p22→pter and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV) with retinal detachment: Forkhead box Q1 (FOXQ1), FOXF2, FOXC1, NRN1, EDN1, ATXN1, DEK oncogene, E2F3, and NRNS1. PMID:22407547

  19. Comparison of the Inverted Internal Limiting Membrane Flap Technique and the Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling for Macular Hole with Retinal Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Takehiro; Takamura, Yoshihiro; Tomomatsu, Takeshi; Arimura, Shogo; Gozawa, Makoto; Kobori, Akira; Inatani, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of the inverted internal limiting membrane (ILM) flap technique in vitrectomy for macular hole (MH) with retinal detachment (RD) compared with vitrectomy using ILM peeling. Methods A retrospective case series study was performed. Twenty-two eyes of 22 patients who underwent vitrectomy for MH with RD and followed-up more than 12 months after the surgery were included in this study. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent vitrectomy with inverted ILM flap technique or vitrectomy with ILM peeling. Ten patients who had been treated vitrectomy with inverted ILM flap technique, and 12 patients who had been treated vitrectomy with ILM peeling were analyzed. We evaluated changes in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) before and after surgery, closing rates of MH, and retinal reattachment rates and compared between both groups. Results MH was closed and RD was reattached postoperatively in 9 eyes (90%) in the inverted ILM flap group. In the ILM peeling group, the MH was closed in 4 eyes (33.3%) and the retinas were reattached in 6 eyes (50%) after surgery. Significant improvement in BCVA after surgery (P = 0.0017) was only found in the inverted ILM flap group. Conclusions Higher rates of closed MH and retinal reattachment, and small but significant improvement in BCVA were found in the inverted ILM flap group. Based on our data, the inverted ILM flap technique may be useful in vitrectomy for MH with RD. PMID:27764184

  20. Risk of Tractional Retinal Detachment Following Intravitreal Bevacizumab Along with Subretinal Fluid Drainage and Cryotherapy for Stage 3B Coats’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Vishalakshi; D’Souza, Palmeera; Shah, Parag K.; Narendran, V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To review the surgical outcomes of intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) along with subretinal fluid drainage with cryotherapy in patients with stage 3B Coats’ disease. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of seven cases of stage 3B Coats’ disease, who underwent subretinal fluid drainage with cryopexy, from May 2011 to March 2014. Five eyes received additional IVB at the end of surgery. Green laser therapy was performed on telangiectatic vessels postoperatively. Results: The mean age was 34 months (range, 10-84 months). Mean follow-up was 19 months. Six patients (85.7%) had an attached retina at final follow-up. Three out of four patients (75%) that received IVB developed tractional retinal detachments (TRDs). Two eyes that did not receive bevacizumab did not develop any traction. None progressed to neovascular glaucoma or phthisis bulbi. Conclusion: Simultaneous injection of bevacizumab along with subretinal drainage and cryotherapy for advanced Coats’ disease could not avoid TRD. PMID:27162454

  1. Retinal Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... be serious enough to cause blindness. Examples are Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys your sharp, central vision Diabetic eye disease Retinal detachment - a medical emergency, when the retina is ... children. Macular pucker - scar tissue on the macula Macular hole - ...

  2. F6H8 as an Intraoperative Tool and F6H8/Silicone Oil as a Postoperative Tamponade in Inferior Retinal Detachment with Inferior PVR

    PubMed Central

    Tosi, Gian Marco; Bacci, Tommaso; Romeo, Napoleone; Balestrazzi, Angelo; Martone, Gianluca; Caporossi, Tomaso

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of perfluorohexyloctane (F6H8) for intraoperative flattening of the retina and of F6H8/silicone oil (SO) 1000 cSt as a postoperative tamponade for inferior retinal detachment with inferior proliferative vitreoretinopathy. Methods. This is a retrospective review of 22 patients who underwent pars plana vitrectomy using F6H8 as an intraoperative tool to flatten the retina. At the end of the surgery a direct partial exchange between F6H8 and SO 1000 cSt was performed, tamponing the eye with different ratios of F6H8/SO (70/30, 60/40, 50/50, 40/30, and 30/70). Anatomical and functional results and complications were evaluated over the follow-up period (mean 22.63 months). Results. F6H8 was efficacious for intraoperative flattening of the retina. Twenty-one of the 22 patients achieved a complete retinal reattachment. Postoperative visual acuity (VA) ranged from light perception to 20/70, with 72% of patients obtaining VA better than 20/400. No emulsification/inflammation was observed whatever the ratio of F6H8/SO used. With higher ratios of F6H8/SO (70/30 and 60/40) cloudiness of the tamponade was observed. A transparent mixture was present with all the other ratios. Conclusions. The surgical technique adopted is very simple and safe. The optimal F6H8/SO ratio seems to be between 50/50 and 30/70. PMID:24672710

  3. Disruption of murine Adamtsl4 results in zonular fiber detachment from the lens and in retinal pigment epithelium dedifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Collin, Gayle B; Hubmacher, Dirk; Charette, Jeremy R; Hicks, Wanda L; Stone, Lisa; Yu, Minzhong; Naggert, Jürgen K; Krebs, Mark P; Peachey, Neal S; Apte, Suneel S; Nishina, Patsy M

    2015-12-15

    Human gene mutations have revealed that a significant number of ADAMTS (a disintegrin-like and metalloproteinase (reprolysin type) with thrombospondin type 1 motifs) proteins are necessary for normal ocular development and eye function. Mutations in human ADAMTSL4, encoding an ADAMTS-like protein which has been implicated in fibrillin microfibril biogenesis, cause ectopia lentis (EL) and EL et pupillae. Here, we report the first ADAMTSL4 mouse model, tvrm267, bearing a nonsense mutation in Adamtsl4. Homozygous Adamtsl4(tvrm267) mice recapitulate the EL phenotype observed in humans, and our analysis strongly suggests that ADAMTSL4 is required for stable anchorage of zonule fibers to the lens capsule. Unexpectedly, homozygous Adamtsl4(tvrm267) mice exhibit focal retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) defects primarily in the inferior eye. RPE dedifferentiation was indicated by reduced pigmentation, altered cellular morphology and a reduction in RPE-specific transcripts. Finally, as with a subset of patients with ADAMTSL4 mutations, increased axial length, relative to age-matched controls, was observed and was associated with the severity of the RPE phenotype. In summary, the Adamtsl4(tvrm267) model provides a valuable tool to further elucidate the molecular basis of zonule formation, the pathophysiology of EL and ADAMTSL4 function in the maintenance of the RPE.

  4. [Scleral necrosis after scleral buckling surgery of the patient with pyoderma gangrenosum].

    PubMed

    Kmera-Muszyńska, Maria; Tesla, Piotr; Okruszko, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare skin disease caused by immune dysfunction. The systemic diseases are often associated. The aim of the study was to report necrotic scleritis which developed after scleral buckling procedure in the case of the 64 years old patient suffered from primary retinal detachment and idiopathic PG. The retinal reattachment was achieved. The conjunctival wound dehiscence, necrotising scleritis and marginal keratitis as a manifestation of the patergic reaction were diagnosed. The treatment with corticosteroids locally (Dexamethason) and systematically (Prednison and Sulfasalazine), was administrated. The improvement and stabilisation of the local condition of ocular surface were observed. After reduction of systemic drugs, the exacerbation of local inflammation and vitritis was observed. The prolonged therapy was necessary. The risk of wound healing disturbances of an ocular surface with aggravated necrotic reaction must be expected after ocular surgery of the patient with PG. The adequate immunosupressive prolonged treatment with proper collaboration with the dermatologist is necessary.

  5. Genetic pediatric retinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Say, Emil Anthony T.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary pediatric retinal diseases are a diverse group of disorders with pathologies affecting different cellular structures or retinal development. Many can mimic typical pediatric retinal disease such as retinopathy of prematurity, vitreous hemorrhage, retinal detachment and cystoid macular edema. Multisystem involvement is frequently seen in hereditary pediatric retinal disease. A thorough history coupled with a good physical examination can oftentimes lead the ophthalmologist or pediatrician to the correct genetic test and correct diagnosis. In some instances, evaluation of parents or siblings may be required to determine familial involvement when the history is inconclusive or insufficient and clinical suspicion is high.

  6. Genetic pediatric retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Say, Emil Anthony T

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary pediatric retinal diseases are a diverse group of disorders with pathologies affecting different cellular structures or retinal development. Many can mimic typical pediatric retinal disease such as retinopathy of prematurity, vitreous hemorrhage, retinal detachment and cystoid macular edema. Multisystem involvement is frequently seen in hereditary pediatric retinal disease. A thorough history coupled with a good physical examination can oftentimes lead the ophthalmologist or pediatrician to the correct genetic test and correct diagnosis. In some instances, evaluation of parents or siblings may be required to determine familial involvement when the history is inconclusive or insufficient and clinical suspicion is high. PMID:27625880

  7. Divertor detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikov, Sergei

    2015-11-01

    The heat exhaust is one of the main conceptual issues of magnetic fusion reactor. In a standard operational regime the large heat flux onto divertor target reaches unacceptable level in any foreseeable reactor design. However, about two decades ago so-called ``detached divertor'' regimes were found. They are characterized by reduced power and plasma flux on divertor targets and look as a promising solution for heat exhaust in future reactors. In particular, it is envisioned that ITER will operate in a partly detached divertor regime. However, even though divertor detachment was studied extensively for two decades, still there are some issues requiring a new look. Among them is the compatibility of detached divertor regime with a good core confinement. For example, ELMy H-mode exhibits a very good core confinement, but large ELMs can ``burn through'' detached divertor and release large amounts of energy on the targets. In addition, detached divertor regimes can be subject to thermal instabilities resulting in the MARFE formation, which, potentially, can cause disruption of the discharge. Finally, often inner and outer divertors detach at different plasma conditions, which can lead to core confinement degradation. Here we discuss basic physics of divertor detachment including different mechanisms of power and momentum loss (ionization, impurity and hydrogen radiation loss, ion-neutral collisions, recombination, and their synergistic effects) and evaluate the roles of different plasma processes in the reduction of the plasma flux; detachment stability; and an impact of ELMs on detachment. We also evaluate an impact of different magnetic and divertor geometries on detachment onset, stability, in- out- asymmetry, and tolerance to the ELMs. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-DE-FG02-04ER54739 at UCSD.

  8. Branch retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Sadaf; Mirza, Sajid Ali; Shokh, Ishrat

    2008-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusions (RVO) are the second commonest sight threatening vascular disorder. Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) are the two basic types of vein occlusion. Branch retinal vein occlusion is three times more common than central retinal vein occlusion and- second only to diabetic retinopathy as the most common retinal vascular cause of visual loss. The origin of branch retinal vein occlusion undoubtedly includes both systemic factors such as hypertension and local anatomic factors such as arteriovenous crossings. Branch retinal vein occlusion causes a painless decrease in vision, resulting in misty or distorted vision. Current treatment options don't address the underlying aetiology of branch retinal vein occlusion. Instead they focus on treating sequelae of the occluded venous branch, such as macular oedema, vitreous haemorrhage and traction retinal detachment from neovascularization. Evidences suggest that the pathogenesis of various types of retinal vein occlusion, like many other ocular vascular occlusive disorders, is a multifactorial process and there is no single magic bullet that causes retinal vein occlusion. A comprehensive management of patients with retinal vascular occlusions is necessary to correct associated diseases or predisposing abnormalities that could lead to local recurrences or systemic event. Along with a review of the literature, a practical approach for the management of retinal vascular occlusions is required, which requires collaboration between the ophthalmologist and other physicians: general practitioner, cardiologist, internist etc. as appropriate according to each case. PMID:19385476

  9. Transcorneal Electrical Stimulation Therapy for Retinal Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-03

    Retinitis Pigmentosa; Macula Off; Primary Open Angle Glaucoma; Hereditary Macular Degeneration; Treated Retina Detachment; Retinal Artery Occlusion; Retinal Vein Occlusion; Non-Arthritic-Anterior-Ischemic Optic-Neuropathy; Hereditary Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy; Dry Age Related Macular Degeneration; Ischemic Macula Edema

  10. Progressive outer retinal necrosis-like retinitis in immunocompetent hosts.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Rohan; Tripathy, Koushik; Gogia, Varun; Venkatesh, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    We describe two young immunocompetent women presenting with bilateral retinitis with outer retinal necrosis involving posterior pole with centrifugal spread and multifocal lesions simulating progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) like retinitis. Serology was negative for HIV and CD4 counts were normal; however, both women were on oral steroids at presentation for suspected autoimmune chorioretinitis. The retinitis in both eyes responded well to oral valaciclovir therapy. However, the eye with the more fulminant involvement developed retinal detachment with a loss of vision. Retinal atrophy was seen in the less involved eye with preservation of vision. Through these cases, we aim to describe a unique evolution of PORN-like retinitis in immunocompetent women, which was probably aggravated by a short-term immunosuppression secondary to oral steroids. PMID:27511757

  11. Progressive outer retinal necrosis-like retinitis in immunocompetent hosts.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Rohan; Tripathy, Koushik; Gogia, Varun; Venkatesh, Pradeep

    2016-08-10

    We describe two young immunocompetent women presenting with bilateral retinitis with outer retinal necrosis involving posterior pole with centrifugal spread and multifocal lesions simulating progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) like retinitis. Serology was negative for HIV and CD4 counts were normal; however, both women were on oral steroids at presentation for suspected autoimmune chorioretinitis. The retinitis in both eyes responded well to oral valaciclovir therapy. However, the eye with the more fulminant involvement developed retinal detachment with a loss of vision. Retinal atrophy was seen in the less involved eye with preservation of vision. Through these cases, we aim to describe a unique evolution of PORN-like retinitis in immunocompetent women, which was probably aggravated by a short-term immunosuppression secondary to oral steroids.

  12. Retinitis Pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Action You are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen Retinitis Pigmentosa What is retinitis pigmentosa? What are the symptoms? ... available? Are there any related diseases? What is retinitis pigmentosa? Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a group of ...

  13. Color Doppler imaging of retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Galina; Kato, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    Color Doppler imaging (CDI) is a widely used method for evaluating ocular circulation that has been used in a number of studies on retinal diseases. CDI assesses blood velocity parameters by using ultrasound waves. In ophthalmology, these assessments are mainly performed on the retrobulbar blood vessels: the ophthalmic, the central retinal, and the short posterior ciliary arteries. In this review, we discuss CDI use for the assessment of retinal diseases classified into the following: vascular diseases, degenerations, dystrophies, and detachment. The retinal vascular diseases that have been investigated by CDI include diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusions, retinal artery occlusions, ocular ischemic conditions, and retinopathy of prematurity. Degenerations and dystrophies included in this review are age-related macular degeneration, myopia, and retinitis pigmentosa. CDI has been used for the differential diagnosis of retinal detachment, as well as the evaluation of retrobulbar circulation in this condition. CDI is valuable for research and is a potentially useful diagnostic tool in the clinical setting.

  14. Central retinal artery occlusion by proxy: a cause for sudden blindness in an airline passenger.

    PubMed

    Polk, J D; Rugaber, Christopher; Kohn, Gary; Arenstein, Ronald; Fallon, William F

    2002-04-01

    The use of gas media in ophthalmologic procedures is relatively commonplace. Scleral buckle and pneumatic retinopexy procedures using air-gas mediums are a widely accepted treatment for retinal detachment. We present a patient who had a scleral buckle with pneumatic retinopexy performed and subsequently flew in a commercial airliner 2 wk later. The patient experienced sudden blindness due to central retinal artery occlusion brought about by expansion of the air bubble when the aircraft reached cruise altitude and a cabin pressure of 8000 ft. The intraocular pressure exceeded the central artery pressure thereby collapsing the artery. The patient's symptoms were relieved when an onboard flight surgeon identified the problem and the cabin pressure was reset to 2000 ft. Flying after an ophthalmic procedure that incorporates intraocular gas may have complications due to the bubble expansion in accordance with Boyle's Law. The ophthalmologic surgeon must be diligent in forewarning patients of the potential complications of flying for weeks to months after a procedure that utilizes intraocular gas. PMID:11952061

  15. Central retinal artery occlusion by proxy: a cause for sudden blindness in an airline passenger.

    PubMed

    Polk, J D; Rugaber, Christopher; Kohn, Gary; Arenstein, Ronald; Fallon, William F

    2002-04-01

    The use of gas media in ophthalmologic procedures is relatively commonplace. Scleral buckle and pneumatic retinopexy procedures using air-gas mediums are a widely accepted treatment for retinal detachment. We present a patient who had a scleral buckle with pneumatic retinopexy performed and subsequently flew in a commercial airliner 2 wk later. The patient experienced sudden blindness due to central retinal artery occlusion brought about by expansion of the air bubble when the aircraft reached cruise altitude and a cabin pressure of 8000 ft. The intraocular pressure exceeded the central artery pressure thereby collapsing the artery. The patient's symptoms were relieved when an onboard flight surgeon identified the problem and the cabin pressure was reset to 2000 ft. Flying after an ophthalmic procedure that incorporates intraocular gas may have complications due to the bubble expansion in accordance with Boyle's Law. The ophthalmologic surgeon must be diligent in forewarning patients of the potential complications of flying for weeks to months after a procedure that utilizes intraocular gas.

  16. Buckling instability in arteries.

    PubMed

    Vandiver, Rebecca M

    2015-04-21

    Arteries can become tortuous in response to abnormal growth stimuli, genetic defects and aging. It is suggested that a buckling instability is a mechanism that might lead to artery tortuosity. Here, the buckling instability in arteries is studied by examining asymmetric modes of bifurcation of two-layer cylindrical structures that are residually stressed. These structures are loaded by an axial force, internal pressure and have nonlinear, anisotropic, hyperelastic responses to stresses. Strain-softening and reduced opening angle are shown to lower the critical internal pressure leading to buckling. In addition, the ratio of the media thickness to the adventitia thickness is shown to have a dramatic impact on arterial instability.

  17. Buckling of spherical capsules.

    PubMed

    Knoche, Sebastian; Kierfeld, Jan

    2011-10-01

    We investigate buckling of soft elastic capsules under negative pressure or for reduced capsule volume. Based on nonlinear shell theory and the assumption of a hyperelastic capsule membrane, shape equations for axisymmetric and initially spherical capsules are derived and solved numerically. A rich bifurcation behavior is found, which is presented in terms of bifurcation diagrams. The energetically preferred stable configuration is deduced from a least-energy principle both for prescribed volume and prescribed pressure. We find that buckled shapes are energetically favorable already at smaller negative pressures and larger critical volumes than predicted by the classical buckling instability. By preventing self-intersection for strongly reduced volume, we obtain a complete picture of the buckling process and can follow the shape from the initial undeformed state through the buckling instability into the fully collapsed state. Interestingly, the sequences of bifurcations and stable capsule shapes differ for prescribed volume and prescribed pressure. In the buckled state, we find a relation between curvatures at the indentation rim and the bending modulus, which can be used to determine elastic moduli from experimental shape analysis. PMID:22181297

  18. The progressive outer retinal necrosis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Holland, G N

    1994-01-01

    The progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) syndrome is a recently described clinical variant of necrotizing herpetic retinopathy in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). It is caused by varicellazoster virus infection of the retina. Its course and clinical features distinguish it from the acute retinal necrosis syndrome and CMV retinopathy. Early disease is characterized by multifocal deep retinal opacification. Lesions rapidly coalesce and progress to total retinal necrosis over a short period of time. Despite aggressive therapy with intravenous antivirial drugs, prognosis is poor; disease progression and/or recurrence is common, and the majority of patients develop no light perception vision. Total retinal detachments are common. Prophylaxis against retinal detachment using laser retinopexy has not been useful in most cases. PORN syndrome is an uncommon, but devastating complication of AIDS.

  19. The progressive outer retinal necrosis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Holland, G N

    1994-01-01

    The progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) syndrome is a recently described clinical variant of necrotizing herpetic retinopathy in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). It is caused by varicellazoster virus infection of the retina. Its course and clinical features distinguish it from the acute retinal necrosis syndrome and CMV retinopathy. Early disease is characterized by multifocal deep retinal opacification. Lesions rapidly coalesce and progress to total retinal necrosis over a short period of time. Despite aggressive therapy with intravenous antivirial drugs, prognosis is poor; disease progression and/or recurrence is common, and the majority of patients develop no light perception vision. Total retinal detachments are common. Prophylaxis against retinal detachment using laser retinopexy has not been useful in most cases. PORN syndrome is an uncommon, but devastating complication of AIDS. PMID:7852023

  20. Acquired retinal folds in the cat.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, A D

    1976-06-01

    Retinal folds were found in 5 cats. The apparent cause of the folding was varied: in 1 cat the folds appeared after a localized retinal detachment; in 2 cats the condition accompanied other intraocular abnormalities associated with feline infectious peritonitis; 1 cat had active keratitis, and the retinal changes were thought to have been injury related; and 1 cat, bilaterally affected, had chronic glomerulonephritis. PMID:945253

  1. Simultaneous occlusion of three cilioretinal arteries following scleral buckling surgery under local anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Napoli, Pietro Emanuele; Cuccu, Alberto; Farci, Roberta; Fossarello, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Background Cilioretinal artery (CRA) occlusions are rare in young patients. In these cases, the most commonly associated causes are considered to be the same as those implicated in central retina artery occlusions, such as vasculitic processes, migraine, cardiac disorder, and coagulation abnormality. The aim of this article was to report for the first time the medical records and investigational results of an unusual case of simultaneous occlusion of three CRAs after scleral buckling surgery under local anesthesia. Methods A complete ophthalmic examination, including color fundus image, fundus fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography, visual field, as well as systemic and laboratory assessments, was performed. Results A case of contemporaneous blockage of three CRAs after ab externo surgery for retinal detachment in a 29-year-old Caucasian woman was reported. The interdisciplinary approach and the imaging results have allowed us the clinical definition of such a very rare case. Conclusion Here, we reported that optical coherence tomography is an indispensable tool to better delineate the pathological process and follow atrophic changes in the macula, especially in cases in which fundus fluorescein angiography and systemic tests may be poorly informative. PMID:27695367

  2. Fluid vitreous substitutes in vitreo retinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Saxena, S; Gopal, L

    1996-12-01

    Advances in the surgical instrumentation and vitreoretinal techniques have allowed intraoperative reapproximation of retina to a more normal position. The use of intravitreally injected liquid materials (viscoelastic liquids, liquid perfluorocarbons and silicone oil), as adjunctive agents to vitreo-retinal surgery play an important role in facilitating retinal reattachment. These materials are used as intraoperative instruments to re-establish intraocular volume, assist in separating membranes adherent to the retina, manipulate retinal detachments and mechanically flatten detached retina. Over the longer term, silicone oil maintains intraocular tamponade. One should be cognizant of the potential uses, benefits and risks of each of these vitreous substitutes.

  3. Crust rheology, slab detachment and topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duretz, T.; Gerya, T. V.

    2012-04-01

    The collision between continents following the closure of an ocean can lead to the subduction of continental crust. The introduction of buoyant crust within subduction zones triggers the development of extensional stresses in slabs which eventually result in their detachment. The dynamic consequences of slab detachment affects the development of topography, the exhumation of high-pressure rocks and the geodynamic evolution of collision zones. We employ two-dimensional thermo-mechanical modelling in order to study the importance of crustal rheology on the evolution of spontaneous subduction-collision systems and the occurrence of slab detachment. The modelling results indicate that varying the rheological structure of the crust can results in a broad range of collisional evolutions involving slab detachment, delamination (associated to slab rollback), or the combination of both mechanisms. By enhancing mechanical coupling at the Moho, a strong crust leads to the deep subduction of the crust (180 km). These collisions are subjected to slab detachment and subsequent coherent exhumation of the crust accommodated by eduction (inversion of subduction sense) and thrusting. In these conditions, slab detachment promotes the development of a high (> 4.5 km) and narrow (< 200 km) topographic plateau located in the vicinity of the suture. A contrasting style of collision is obtained by employing a weak crustal rheology. The weak mechanical coupling at the Moho promotes the widespread delamination of the lithosphere, preventing slab detachment to occur. Further shortening leads to buckling and thickening of the crust resulting in the development of topographic bulging on the lower plate. Collisions involving rheologically layered crust are characterised by a decoupling level at mid-crustal depths. These initial condition favours the delamination of the upper crust as well as the deep subduction of the lower crust. These collisions are thus successively affected by delamination

  4. Descemet membrane detachment.

    PubMed

    Mackool, R J; Holtz, S J

    1977-03-01

    Four eyes of three patients had extensive postoperative Descemet membrane (DM) detachment. Blood was present just anterior to the DM in three of the four eyes and later converted to and persisted as pigment. Haziness of the cornea at the level of the DM could be seen with reattachment. Detachments of the DM are classified as planar when there is 1 mm or less separation of the DM from its overlying stroma in all areas. Nonplanar DM detachments exceed 1 mm of separation. Planar detachments have a much better prognosis than nonplanar detachments do, with or without descemetopexy. Repair of DM detachments, when necessary, should include air injection, with the lease possible instrumentation of the DM. PMID:843278

  5. Buckling of a holey column.

    PubMed

    Pihler-Puzović, D; Hazel, A L; Mullin, T

    2016-09-14

    We report the results from a combined experimental and numerical investigation of buckling in a novel variant of an elastic column under axial load. We find that including a regular line of centred holes in the column can prevent conventional, global, lateral buckling. Instead, the local microstructure introduced by the holes allows the column to buckle in an entirely different, internal, mode in which the holes are compressed in alternate directions, but the column maintains the lateral reflection symmetry about its centreline. The internal buckling mode can be accommodated within a smaller external space than the global one; and it is the preferred buckling mode over an intermediate range of column lengths for sufficiently large holes. For very short or sufficiently long columns a modification of the classical, global, lateral buckling is dominant. PMID:27501288

  6. Buckling of dislocation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yin; Wang, Shaofeng; Bai, Jianhui; Wang, Rui

    2016-10-01

    The buckling of dislocation in graphene is discussed through the lattice theory of dislocation and elastic theory. The approximate solution of the buckling is obtained based on the inner stress distribution caused by different structure of dislocations and is proved to be suitable by the simulation. The position of the highest buckling is predicted to be at the vertex of the pentagon far away from the heptagon. The buckling is strongly influenced by the internal stress and the distance between the extrusive area and stretching area, as well as the critical stress σc. The SW defect is proved to be unbuckled due to its strong interaction between extrusion and stretching.

  7. Modeling of Detached Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.; Popov, Dmitri

    1997-01-01

    Our long term goal is to develop techniques to achieve detached solidification reliably and reproducibly, in order to produce crystals with fewer defects. To achieve this goal it is necessary to understand thoroughly the physics of detached solidification. It was the primary objective of the current project to make progress toward this complete understanding. 'Me products of this grant are attached. These include 4 papers and a preliminary survey of the observations of detached solidification in space. We have successfully modeled steady state detached solidification, examined the stability of detachment, and determined the influence of buoyancy-driven convection under different conditions. Directional solidification in microgravity has often led to ingots that grew with little or no contact with the ampoule wall. When this occurred, crystallographic perfection was usually greatly improved -- often by several orders of magnitude. Indeed, under the Soviet microgravity program the major objective was to achieve detached solidification with its resulting improvement in perfection and properties. Unfortunately, until recently the true mechanisms underlying detached solidification were unknown. As a consequence, flight experiments yielded erratic results. Within the past three years, we have developed a new theoretical model that explains many of the flight results. This model gives rise to predictions of the conditions required to yield detached solidification.

  8. The Incidence of Rhegmatogenous Retinal Complications in Macular Surgery After Prophylactic Preoperative Laser Retinopexy

    PubMed Central

    Tosi, Gian Marco; Esposti, Pierluigi; Romeo, Napoleone; Marigliani, Davide; Cevenini, Gabriele; Massimo, Patrizio; Nuti, Elisabetta; Esposti, Giulia; Ripandelli, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to evaluate the clinical characteristics of intraoperative retinal breaks (RBs) and postoperative retinal detachment (RRD) in patients undergoing pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for macular disorders, who were treated preoperatively with prophylactic peripheral laser retinopexy. This observational cohort study comprised of 254 patients who underwent macular surgery and were preoperatively subjected to prophylactic laser retinopexy anterior to the equator. The main outcome measures were the incidence and characteristics of intraoperative RBs and postoperative RRD. Intraoperative RBs occurred in 14 patients (5.5%). Ten patients presented a sclerotomy-related RB (3.9%) and 4 patients a nonsclerotomy-related RB (1.6%). Two patients showed postoperative RRD (0.7%). Neither of the 2 patients with postoperative RRD was macula-off at presentation: one of them was successfully operated on with scleral buckling and the other was managed by observation alone. A significantly increased risk for the intraoperative development of sclerotomy-related RB was found in 20-gauge PPV compared with 23/25-gauge PPV. Preoperative prophylactic peripheral laser retinopexy does not guarantee the prevention of intraopertaive RBs or postoperative RRD. However, it might prevent the involvement of the macula when RRD occurs postoperatively. PMID:27057893

  9. The secondary buckling transition: wrinkling of buckled spherical shells.

    PubMed

    Knoche, Sebastian; Kierfeld, Jan

    2014-07-01

    We theoretically explain the complete sequence of shapes of deflated spherical shells. Decreasing the volume, the shell remains spherical initially, then undergoes the classical buckling instability, where an axisymmetric dimple appears, and, finally, loses its axisymmetry by wrinkles developing in the vicinity of the dimple edge in a secondary buckling transition. We describe the first axisymmetric buckling transition by numerical integration of the complete set of shape equations and an approximate analytic model due to Pogorelov. In the buckled shape, both approaches exhibit a locally compressive hoop stress in a region where experiments and simulations show the development of polygonal wrinkles, along the dimple edge. In a simplified model based on the stability equations of shallow shells, a critical value for the compressive hoop stress is derived, for which the compressed circumferential fibres will buckle out of their circular shape in order to release the compression. By applying this wrinkling criterion to the solutions of the axisymmetric models, we can calculate the critical volume for the secondary buckling transition. Using the Pogorelov approach, we also obtain an analytical expression for the critical volume at the secondary buckling transition: The critical volume difference scales linearly with the bending stiffness, whereas the critical volume reduction at the classical axisymmetric buckling transition scales with the square root of the bending stiffness. These results are confirmed by another stability analysis in the framework of Donnel, Mushtari and Vlasov (DMV) shell theory, and by numerical simulations available in the literature. PMID:25039007

  10. Contractile Units in Disordered Actomyosin Bundles Arise from F-Actin Buckling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Martin; Thoresen, Todd; Gardel, Margaret L.; Dinner, Aaron R.

    2012-06-01

    Bundles of filaments and motors are central to contractility in cells. The classic example is striated muscle, where actomyosin contractility is mediated by highly organized sarcomeres which act as fundamental contractile units. However, many contractile bundles in vivo and in vitro lack sarcomeric organization. Here we propose a model for how contractility can arise in bundles without sarcomeric organization and validate its predictions with experiments on a reconstituted system. In the model, internal stresses in frustrated arrangements of motors with diverse velocities cause filaments to buckle, leading to overall shortening. We describe the onset of buckling in the presence of stochastic motor head detachment and predict that buckling-induced contraction occurs in an intermediate range of motor densities. We then calculate the size of the “contractile units” associated with this process. Consistent with these results, our reconstituted actomyosin bundles show contraction at relatively high motor density, and we observe buckling at the predicted length scale.

  11. Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    The author describes the etiology of retinitis pigmentosa, a visual dysfunction which results from progressive loss of the retinal photoreceptors. Sections address signs and symptoms, ancillary findings, heredity, clinical diagnosis, therapy, and research. (SBH)

  12. Buckling of offshore structures

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, A.C.; Ellinas, C.P.; Supple, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    This new handbook gives detailed design guidance for a wide range of structural components and types of loading related to the buckling of offshore structures. It presents many hundreds of test results that have been examined and collated to give a common base of comparison, and its surveys all the relevant national and international design codes, comparing the relative accuracy of their predictions against the available test results. Contents are: unstiffened cord and bracing elements; ring-stiffened cylinders; stringer-stiffened and orthogonally-stiffened cylinders; flat panels; and end-closures and transition shells.

  13. Buckle up for Interesting Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Miles

    2011-01-01

    Those who are involved in the current Common Core Standards should buckle up for a rocky ride. Some of the same issues that churned within the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) during the standards movement of the 1990s (1989-1997) are here once again. The author's buckle is pulled tight, having already had his standards report…

  14. Osmotic buckling of spherical capsules.

    PubMed

    Knoche, Sebastian; Kierfeld, Jan

    2014-11-01

    We study the buckling of elastic spherical shells under osmotic pressure with the osmolyte concentration of the exterior solution as a control parameter. We compare our results for the bifurcation behavior with results for buckling under mechanical pressure control, that is, with an empty capsule interior. We find striking differences for the buckling states between osmotic and mechanical buckling. Mechanical pressure control always leads to fully collapsed states with opposite sides in contact, whereas uncollapsed states with a single finite dimple are generic for osmotic pressure control. For sufficiently large interior osmolyte concentrations, osmotic pressure control is qualitatively similar to buckling under volume control with the volume prescribed by the osmolyte concentrations inside and outside the shell. We present a quantitative theory which also captures the influence of shell elasticity on the relationship between osmotic pressure and volume. These findings are relevant for the control of buckled shapes in applications. We show how the osmolyte concentration can be used to control the volume of buckled shells. An accurate analytical formula is derived for the relationship between the osmotic pressure, the elastic moduli and the volume of buckled capsules. This also allows use of elastic capsules as osmotic pressure sensors or deduction of elastic properties and the internal osmolyte concentration from shape changes in response to osmotic pressure changes. We apply our findings to published experimental data on polyelectrolyte capsules. PMID:25209240

  15. Buckling of polymerized monomolecular films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdieu, L.; Daillant, J.; Chatenay, D.; Braslau, A.; Colson, D.

    1994-03-01

    The buckling of a two-dimensional polymer network at the air-water interface has been evidenced by grazing incidence x-ray scattering. A comprehensive description of the inhomogeneous octadecyltrichlorosilane polymerized film was obtained by atomic force microscopy and x-ray scattering measurements. The buckling occurs with a characteristic wavelength ~=10 μm.

  16. Buckling failures in insect exoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Parle, Eoin; Herbaj, Simona; Sheils, Fiona; Larmon, Hannah; Taylor, David

    2016-02-01

    Thin walled tubes are often used for load-bearing structures, in nature and in engineering, because they offer good resistance to bending and torsion at relatively low weight. However, when loaded in bending they are prone to failure by buckling. It is difficult to predict the loading conditions which cause buckling, especially for tubes whose cross sections are not simple shapes. Insights into buckling prevention might be gained by studying this phenomenon in the exoskeletons of insects and other arthropods. We investigated the leg segments (tibiae) of five different insects: the locust (Schistocerca gergaria), American cockroach (Periplaneta americana), death's head cockroach (Blaberus discoidalis), stick insect (Parapachymorpha zomproi) and bumblebee (Bombus terrestris audax). These were tested to failure in cantilever bending and modelled using finite element analysis (FEA). The tibiae of the locust and the cockroaches were found to be approximately circular in shape. Their buckling loads were well predicted by linear elastic FEA, and also by one of the analytical solutions available in the literature for elastic buckling. The legs of the stick insect are also circular in cross section but have several prominent longitudinal ridges. We hypothesised that these ridges might protect the legs against buckling but we found that this was not the case: the loads necessary for elastic buckling were not reached in practice because yield occurred in the material, causing plastic buckling. The legs of bees have a non-circular cross section due to a pollen-carrying feature (the corbicula). We found that this did not significantly affect their resistance to buckling. Our results imply that buckling is the dominant failure mode in the tibia of insects; it likely to be a significant consideration for other arthropods and any organisms with stiff exoskeletons. The interactions displayed here between material properties and cross sectional geometry may provide insights for the

  17. Retinitis pigmentosa and retinal oedema.

    PubMed Central

    Spalton, D J; Bird, A C; Cleary, P E

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with retinitis pigmentosa and retinal leakage were investigated. Oedema was present in dominant and X-linked inherited disease and is likely to be present in recessive disease as well. We suggest that this might be a general response seen in many types of tapeto-retinal degeneration to actively degenerating photoreceptors or pigment epithelium. Images PMID:638111

  18. Divertor plasma detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Pshenov, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    Regime with the plasma detached from the divertor targets (detached divertor regime) is a natural continuation of the high recycling conditions to higher density and stronger impurity radiation loss. Both the theoretical considerations and experimental data show clearly that the increase of the impurity radiation loss and volumetric plasma recombination causes the rollover of the plasma flux to the target when the density increases, which is the manifestation of detachment. Plasma-neutral friction (neutral viscosity effects), although important for the sustainment of high density/pressure plasma upstream and providing the conditions for efficient recombination and power loss, is not directly involved in the reduction of the plasma flux to the targets. The stability of detachment is also discussed.

  19. [Intravitreal ganciclovir in cytomegalovirus retinitis in AIDS].

    PubMed

    Olea, J L; Salvat, M; Mateos, J M; Vila, J; Villalonga, C; Riera, M

    1996-04-01

    A retrospective study was made of 26 patients with AIDS who initially presented with retinitis as the only clinical manifestation of cytomegalovirus infection (39 eyes). Sixty-five induction or re-induction therapeutic courses were administered with intravitreal ganciclovir. The efficiency rate of therapy was 93.8%. Thirty-eight maintenance therapeutic courses (200 micrograms/week) were evaluated. The non-compliance rate was 23%. Bilateral retinitis occurred in 44.4% of cases. The systemic administration of therapy had to be substituted for the intravitreal administration in 32% of patients during the clinical course of their conditions. The mean survival rate was 9.5 months. Both retinal detachment and vitreal hemorrhage occurred in 5% of patients. When retinitis is the first clinical manifestation of cytomegalovirus infection, therapy with intravitreal ganciclovir is efficacious to inactivate lesions. Although bilateral retinitis and extraocular dissemination are common, the mean survival rate is high.

  20. The Incidence of Rhegmatogenous Retinal Complications in Macular Surgery After Prophylactic Preoperative Laser Retinopexy: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Tosi, Gian Marco; Esposti, Pierluigi; Romeo, Napoleone; Marigliani, Davide; Cevenini, Gabriele; Massimo, Patrizio; Nuti, Elisabetta; Esposti, Giulia; Ripandelli, Guido

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the clinical characteristics of intraoperative retinal breaks (RBs) and postoperative retinal detachment (RRD) in patients undergoing pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for macular disorders, who were treated preoperatively with prophylactic peripheral laser retinopexy.This observational cohort study comprised of 254 patients who underwent macular surgery and were preoperatively subjected to prophylactic laser retinopexy anterior to the equator. The main outcome measures were the incidence and characteristics of intraoperative RBs and postoperative RRD.Intraoperative RBs occurred in 14 patients (5.5%). Ten patients presented a sclerotomy-related RB (3.9%) and 4 patients a nonsclerotomy-related RB (1.6%). Two patients showed postoperative RRD (0.7%). Neither of the 2 patients with postoperative RRD was macula-off at presentation: one of them was successfully operated on with scleral buckling and the other was managed by observation alone. A significantly increased risk for the intraoperative development of sclerotomy-related RB was found in 20-gauge PPV compared with 23/25-gauge PPV.Preoperative prophylactic peripheral laser retinopexy does not guarantee the prevention of intraopertaive RBs or postoperative RRD. However, it might prevent the involvement of the macula when RRD occurs postoperatively. PMID:27057893

  1. Detached rock evaluation device

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, David R.

    1986-01-01

    A rock detachment evaluation device (10) having an energy transducer unit 1) for sensing vibrations imparted to a subject rock (172) for converting the sensed vibrations into electrical signals, a low band pass filter unit (12) for receiving the electrical signal and transmitting only a low frequency segment thereof, a high band pass filter unit (13) for receiving the electrical signals and for transmitting only a high frequency segment thereof, a comparison unit (14) for receiving the low frequency and high frequency signals and for determining the difference in power between the signals, and a display unit (16) for displaying indicia of the difference, which provides a quantitative measure of rock detachment.

  2. Retinal Macroglial Responses in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Hoz, Rosa; Rojas, Blanca; Ramírez, Ana I.; Salazar, Juan J.; Gallego, Beatriz I.; Triviño, Alberto; Ramírez, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to their permanent and close proximity to neurons, glial cells perform essential tasks for the normal physiology of the retina. Astrocytes and Müller cells (retinal macroglia) provide physical support to neurons and supplement them with several metabolites and growth factors. Macroglia are involved in maintaining the homeostasis of extracellular ions and neurotransmitters, are essential for information processing in neural circuits, participate in retinal glucose metabolism and in removing metabolic waste products, regulate local blood flow, induce the blood-retinal barrier (BRB), play fundamental roles in local immune response, and protect neurons from oxidative damage. In response to polyetiological insults, glia cells react with a process called reactive gliosis, seeking to maintain retinal homeostasis. When malfunctioning, macroglial cells can become primary pathogenic elements. A reactive gliosis has been described in different retinal pathologies, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetes, glaucoma, retinal detachment, or retinitis pigmentosa. A better understanding of the dual, neuroprotective, or cytotoxic effect of macroglial involvement in retinal pathologies would help in treating the physiopathology of these diseases. The extensive participation of the macroglia in retinal diseases points to these cells as innovative targets for new drug therapies. PMID:27294114

  3. [The vitreous and vitreoretinal interface: natural history and associated retinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Giusti, C

    2002-01-01

    Such significant correlations have been found between vitreal changes and retinal breaks that retinal detachment is now considered as a vitreoretinal disease. Concerning this issue, not only the posterior vitreous detachment seems to play an important role in the occurrence of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment but also the vitreoretinal interactions themself seem to be important in the pathogenesis of cystoid and diabetic macular edema, proliferative diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, macular pucker, idiopathic macular hole and macular disease associated with optic disk pit. It seemed therefore useful to the author an updated review on alterations of the vitreoretinal interface and associated ocular diseases.

  4. Examination of postmortem retinal folds: A non-invasive study.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Toru; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Ohtani, Maki; Mimasaka, Sohtaro

    2015-02-01

    The postmortem retinal fold has been previously documented, but its mechanism of formation is not known. All previous studies of the fold involved invasive techniques and the postmortem ocular fundus has yet to be non-invasively examined. Our study used the non-invasive techniques of monocular indirect ophthalmoscopy and ocular echography to examine 79 postmortem eyes of 42 bodies. We examined whether the postmortem retinal fold was associated with postmortem time, position, and/or age. Age was significantly associated with postmortem retinal fold formation (Mann-Whitney U test, P = 0.013), which led us to examine the effect of posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) on retinal folds. The absence of a PVD was statistically associated with the presence of a retinal fold (Fisher's exact test, P < 0.0001). Interestingly, the presence of a PVD was also significantly correlated with retinal fold height (Mann-Whitney U test, P < 0.0001). Therefore, we hypothesized that retinal folds result from postmortem vitreoretinal traction caused by eyeball flaccidity. We also believe that the loss of retinochoroidal hydrostatic pressure plays a role. It is important that forensic pathologists not confuse a postmortem retinal fold with traumatic retinal detachment or perimacular retinal folds caused by child abuse. When child abuse is suspected, forensic pathologists should perform enucleation and a subsequent histological examination for confirmation. PMID:25623189

  5. Prophylactic treatment of retinal breaks--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Blindbaek, Søren; Grauslund, Jakob

    2015-02-01

    Prophylactic treatment of retinal breaks has been examined in several studies and reviews, but so far, no studies have successfully applied a systematic approach. In the present systematic review, we examined the need of follow-up after posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) - diagnosed by slit-lamp biomicroscopy or Goldmann 3-mirror examination - with regard to retinal breaks as well as the indication of prophylactic treatment in asymptomatic and symptomatic breaks. A total of 2941 publications were identified with PubMed and Medline searches. Two manual search strategies were used for papers in English published before 2012. Four levels of screening identified 13 studies suitable for inclusion in this systematic review. No meta-analysis was conducted as no data suitable for statistical analysis were identified. In total, the initial examination after symptomatic PVD identified 85-95% of subsequent retinal breaks. Additional retinal breaks were only revealed at follow-up in patients where a full retinal examination was compromised at presentation by, for example, vitreous haemorrhage. Asymptomatic and symptomatic retinal breaks progressed to rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) in 0-13.8% and 35-47% of cases, respectively. The cumulated incidence of RRD despite prophylactic treatment was 2.1-8.8%. The findings in this review suggest that follow-up after symptomatic PVD is only necessary in cases of incomplete retinal examination at presentation. Prophylactic treatment of symptomatic retinal breaks must be considered, whereas no unequivocal conclusion could be reached with regard to prophylactic treatment of asymptomatic retinal breaks.

  6. Retinal cartography.

    PubMed

    Mosier, M A

    1982-10-01

    This paper analyses retinal cartography in terms of its reflection of anatomic data and its relation to several forms of geographic methods of map-making. It shows that the distances between anatomic landmarks of the eye are reasonably similar to the relative distances on the retinal drawing chart currently used. Two forms of geographic cartography--azimuth equidistant and orthographic--are described and compared with retinal cartography. The retinal drawing chart currently used most closely approximates an azimuth equidistant projection, which suffers from circumferential distortion, a fact that retinal surgeons must keep in mind. It is therefore recommended that the chart be modified to have equally spaced concentric circles and clearer identification of the ora serrata; the present accurate marking of anatomic landmarks, such as the equator and the posterior border of the ciliary body, should be preserved.

  7. Compressive buckling analysis of hat-stiffened panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1991-01-01

    Buckling analysis was performed on a hat-stiffened panel subjected to uniaxial compression. Both local buckling and global buckling were analyzed. It was found that the global buckling load was several times higher than the buckling load. The predicted local buckling loads compared favorably with both experimental data and finite-element analysis.

  8. Retinal Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, James D.; Humayun, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated from the laboratory to the clinical over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives. Improved mobility and object detection are some of the more notable findings from the clinical trials. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. This paper reviews the recent clinical trials, highlights technology breakthroughs that will contribute to next generation of retinal prostheses. PMID:24710817

  9. Artery Buckling: New Phenotypes, Models, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hai-Chao; Chesnutt, Jennifer K. W.; Garcia, Justin R.; Liu, Qin; Wen, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Arteries are under significant mechanical loads from blood pressure, flow, tissue tethering, and body movement. It is critical that arteries remain patent and stable under these loads. This review summarizes the common forms of buckling that occur in blood vessels including cross-sectional collapse, longitudinal twist buckling, and bent buckling. The phenomena, model analyses, experimental measurements, effects on blood flow, and clinical relevance are discussed. It is concluded that mechanical buckling is an important issue for vasculature, in addition to wall stiffness and strength, and requires further studies to address the challenges. Studies of vessel buckling not only enrich vascular biomechanics but also have important clinical applications. PMID:23192265

  10. Buckling modes in pantographic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgio, Ivan; Della Corte, Alessandro; dell'Isola, Francesco; Steigmann, David J.

    2016-07-01

    We study buckling patterns in pantographic sheets, regarded as two-dimensional continua consisting of lattices of continuously distributed fibers. The fibers are modeled as beams endowed with elastic resistance to stretching, shearing, bending and twist. Included in the theory is a non-standard elasticity due to geodesic bending of the fibers relative to the lattice surface. xml:lang="fr"

  11. Optimal stabilization of indefinite plate buckling problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, J. Geoffrey; Bhashyam, Srinivas

    2001-08-01

    Indefinite plate buckling problems arise when the applied load case results in buckling loads which are not all of the same sign. Examples include the important cases of shear buckling and general combinations of tensile and compressive in-plane edge loads. Optimal controllers which actively stabilize these general, indefinite plate buckling problems, by transforming them into a system of definite plate buckling problems, are presented. Important features of this approach include the ability to select the designed closed loop critical buckling load, and to pre-determine what load cases a given controller will stabilize when the exact load combination varies or is unknown. This last result enables the control designer to know exactly, by design, what load combinations will be stabilized. A numerical example is presented where the controllers developed are employed to stabilize multiple, definite and indefinite buckling modes for laminated composite plates similar to aircraft wing skins.

  12. Progressive outer retinal necrosis in a patient with nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, K; Inoue, M; Ishida, S; Kawashima, S; Wakabayashi, T; Suzuki, S; Katsura, H

    2001-01-01

    Progressive outer retinal necrosis syndrome (PORN) is a variant of necrotizing herpetic retinopathy and the majority of the described cases were related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. We present a patient who is HIV negative with nephrotic syndrome and prednisolone use for 4 months who showed clinical features of PORN. Low CD4 counts and lymphocytopenia suggested immunosuppression. In the left eye, tractional retinal detachment at the posterior pole followed by incomplete posterior vitreous detachment developed. In addition to intravenous administration of acyclovir, vitreous surgeries including stripping of the posterior hyaloid and silicone-oil tamponade were successfully performed to repair the retinal detachment in the left eye and to prevent it in the right eye.

  13. Stability of Detached Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.; Croell, A.

    2009-01-01

    Bridgman crystal growth can be conducted in the so-called "detached" solidification regime, where the growing crystal is detached from the crucible wall. A small gap between the growing crystal and the crucible wall, of the order of 100 micrometers or less, can be maintained during the process. A meniscus is formed at the bottom of the melt between the crystal and crucible wall. Under proper conditions, growth can proceed without collapsing the meniscus. The meniscus shape plays a key role in stabilizing the process. Thermal and other process parameters can also affect the geometrical steady-state stability conditions of solidification. The dynamic stability theory of the shaped crystal growth process has been developed by Tatarchenko. It consists of finding a simplified autonomous set of differential equations for the radius, height, and possibly other process parameters. The problem then reduces to analyzing a system of first order linear differential equations for stability. Here we apply a modified version of this theory for a particular case of detached solidification. Approximate analytical formulas as well as accurate numerical values for the capillary stability coefficients are presented. They display an unexpected singularity as a function of pressure differential. A novel approach to study the thermal field effects on the crystal shape stability has been proposed. In essence, it rectifies the unphysical assumption of the model that utilizes a perturbation of the crystal radius along the axis as being instantaneous. It consists of introducing time delay effects into the mathematical description and leads, in general, to stability over a broader parameter range. We believe that this novel treatment can be advantageously implemented in stability analyses of other crystal growth techniques such as Czochralski and float zone methods.

  14. Gene Transcription Profile of the Detached Retina (An AOS Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Zacks, David N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Separation of the neurosensory retina from the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) yields many morphologic and functional consequences, including death of the photoreceptor cells, Müller cell hypertrophy, and inner retinal rewiring. Many of these changes are due to the separation-induced activation of specific genes. In this work, we define the gene transcription profile within the retina as a function of time after detachment. We also define the early activation of kinases that might be responsible for the detachment-induced changes in gene transcription. Methods: Separation of the retina from the RPE was induced in Brown-Norway rats by the injection of 1% hyaluronic acid into the subretinal space. Retinas were harvested at 1, 7, and 28 days after separation. Gene transcription profiles for each time point were determined using the Affymetrix Rat 230A gene microarray chip. Transcription levels in detached retinas were compared to those of nondetached retinas with the BRB-ArrayTools Version 3.6.0 using a random variance analysis of variance (ANOVA) model. Confirmation of the significant transcriptional changes for a subset of the genes was performed using microfluidic quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays. Kinase activation was explored using Western blot analysis to look for early phosphorylation of any of the 3 main families of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK): the p38 family, the Janus kinase family, and the p42/p44 family. Results: Retinas separated from the RPE showed extensive alterations in their gene transcription profile. Many of these changes were initiated as early as 1 day after separation, with significant increases by 7 days. ANOVA analysis defined 144 genes that had significantly altered transcription levels as a function of time after separation when setting a false discovery rate at ≤0.1. Confirmatory RT-PCR was performed on 51 of these 144 genes. Differential transcription detected on the microarray

  15. Dynamic Delamination Buckling In Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Chamis, Christos C.; Aiello, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    Procedure for mathematical modeling of dynamic delamination buckling and propagation of delamination, with plate bending elements and multipoint constraints, developed and incorporated into finite-element computer program. Predicts time at which delamination buckling occurs, shape of dynamic-buckling mode, and strain-energy-release rate due to extension of delamination crack. Method extended to handle such other defects as transply and edge cracks.

  16. Thermal-structural panel buckling tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Randolph C.; Richards, W. Lance

    1991-01-01

    The buckling characteristics of a titanium matrix composite hat-stiffened panel were experimentally examined for various combinations of thermal and mechanical loads. Panel failure was prevented by maintaining the applied loads below real-time critical buckling predictions. The test techniques used to apply the loads, minimize boundary were shown to compare well with a finite-element buckling analysis for previous panels. Comparisons between test predictions and analysis for this panel are ongoing.

  17. Modeling the buckling and delamination of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagla, E. A.

    2007-02-01

    I study numerically the problem of delamination of a thin film elastically attached to a rigid substrate. A nominally flat elastic thin film is modeled using a two-dimensional triangular mesh. Both compression and bending rigidities are included to simulate compression and bending of the film. The film can buckle (i.e., abandon its flat configuration) when enough compressive strain is applied. The buckled configurations of a piece of film with stripe geometry are investigated as a function of the compressive strain. It is found that the stable configuration depends strongly on the applied strain and the Poisson ratio of the film. Next, the film is considered to be attached to a rigid substrate by springs that can break when the detaching force exceeds a threshold value, producing partial delamination of the film. Delamination is induced by a mismatch of the relaxed configurations of film and substrate. The morphology of the delaminated film can be followed and compared with available experimental results as a function of model parameters. “Telephone-cord,” polygonal, and “brainlike” patterns qualitatively similar to experimentally observed configurations are obtained in different parameter regions. The main control parameters that select the different patterns are the strain mismatch between film and substrate and the degree of in-plane relaxation within the unbuckled regions.

  18. And the Variscan Orogen Buckled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor-Galán, D.; Groenewegen, T.; Gutiérrez-Alonso, G.; Langereis, C. G.

    2013-12-01

    Oroclines are the largest scale folds in nature, and as folds can be produced by bending or by buckling. The most commonly invoked bending mechanisms are indentation (the Himalayan syntaxes) and slab roll-back (The Calabria Arc) whereas buckling usually are commonly related with collision of the apex of ribbon continents along strike (Alaskan oroclines). In Western Europe the tectonostratigraphic zonation of Variscan orogen shows a complex 'S' shape pattern recently interpreted as a double orocline consisting of a northern and southern arc. The northern arc, known as Cantabria-Asturias Arc or Cantabrian Orocline, was developed after closure of the Rheic Ocean and the building and collapse of the Variscan orogenic edifice and, therefore, is considered post-Variscan in age. On the other hand, neither the geometry nor the kinematics of the so-called Central Iberian orocline, situated at the south of the Iberian peninsula are properly known. However, it seems reasonable to think that both oroclines developed at the same time as other coupled oroclines, such as the New England oroclines or the Carpathian oroclines. The particular paleogeography of the Variscan belt in Pangea and the kinematics of the oroclinal formation make impossible the mechanisms of indentation or buckling of a ribbon continent. The occurrence of an intense syn- and slightly post-Cantabrian orocline magmatic event (310-290 Ma) has been linked to the development of the orocline(s) due to the particular spatial-temporal distribution of these post-tectonic granitoids and its isotopic signature which would imply that the oroclines (if synchronous) are thick-skinned. This magmatic pulse has also been interpreted as due to slab roll-back. We present widespread evidences of buckling around the whole orocline at different lithospheric levels and new insights of the particular geometry of the southern orocline which is difficult to reconcile with a roll-back related origin. Therefore, a major change in the

  19. Elastic buckling of tapered circular plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. M.; Hong, G. M.; Tan, T. J.

    1995-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the elastic buckling of tapered circular plates. The study is prompted by the fact that results hitherto available are restricted to a narrow range of taper parameters and are somewhat different from each other. For the buckling analysis, a simple and yet accurate numerical method is presented. It is based on the shooting method and the Rayleigh-Ritz approach. Comprehensive generic buckling results of circular plates with linearly and parabolically varying thicknesses are generated. Comparison studies of the buckling results showed that some of the existing results were erroneous. Optimal values of taper parameters for such tapered plates are also given.

  20. Simplified dynamic buckling assessment of steel containments

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Duffey, T.A.; Renick, D.H.

    1993-02-01

    A simplified, three-degree-of-freedom analytical procedure for performing a response spectrum buckling analysis of a thin containment shell is developed. Two numerical examples with R/t values which bound many existing steel containments are used to illustrate the procedure. The role of damping on incipient buckling acceleration level is evaluated for a regulatory seismic spectrum using the two numerical examples. The zero-period acceleration level that causes incipient buckling in either of the two containments increases 31% when damping is increased from 1% to 4% of critical. Comparisons with finite element results on incipient buckling levels are favorable.

  1. Shear buckling analysis of a hat-stiffened panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1994-01-01

    A buckling analysis was performed on a hat-stiffened panel subjected to shear loading. Both local buckling and global buckling were analyzed. The global shear buckling load was found to be several times higher than the local shear buckling load. The classical shear buckling theory for a flat plate was found to be useful in predicting the local shear buckling load of the hat-stiffened panel, and the predicted local shear buckling loads thus obtained compare favorably with the results of finite element analysis.

  2. Retinal holes.

    PubMed

    Foos, R Y

    1978-09-01

    Holes of the peripheral retina, defined as full-thickness breaks of trophic origin with no associated flap or free operculum, were found in 136 (2.4%) eyes from 2,800 autopsied subjects. Primary retinal holes (those with no indication of a proximal causative lesion and with no lattice degeneration in either eye) occurred in only eight of the 5,600 eyes studied; all were unilateral, single, less than 0.25 disk diameter in size, within the basal zone, and in eyes from elderly subjects. Secondary holes were found in 128 (2.3%) of eyes and of these, lattice degeneration was the most common cause (103). Other lesions complicated by hole formation included zonular traction tufts (10), chorioretinitis (9), meridional folds (3), and pavingstone degeneration (2). Retinal holes in surgically aphakic eyes did not differ qualitatively or quantitatively from those in age-matched phakic eyes.

  3. Post-Buckling Analysis of Curved Honeycomb Sandwich Panels Containing Interfacial Disbonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Krivanek, Thomas K.

    2016-01-01

    A numerical study on the effect of facesheet-core disbonds on the post-buckling response of curved honeycomb sandwich panels is presented herein. This work was conducted as part of the development of a damage tolerance plan for the next-generation Space Launch System heavy lift launch vehicle payload fairing. As such, the study utilized full-scale fairing barrel segments as the structure of interest. The panels were composed of carbon fiber reinforced polymer facesheets and aluminum honeycomb core. The panels were analyzed numerically using the finite element method incorporating geometric nonlinearity. In a predetermined circular region, facesheet and core nodes were detached to simulate a disbond, between the outer mold line facesheet and honeycomb core, induced via low-speed impact. Surface-to-surface contact in the disbonded region was invoked to prevent interpenetration of the facesheet and core elements and obtain realistic stresses in the core. The diameter of this disbonded region was varied and the effect of the size of the disbond on the post-buckling response was observed. Significant changes in the slope of the edge load-deflection response were used to determine the onset of global buckling and corresponding buckling load. Finally, several studies were conducted to determine the sensitivity of the numerical predictions to refinement in the finite element mesh.

  4. Buckle propagation in tubular structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nogueira, A.C.; Tassoulas, J.L.

    1995-12-01

    A novel method for the analysis of buckle propagation in tubes such as tendons of tension leg platforms and pipelines for deep-water applications is presented. Results are reported for the propagation pressure and state deformation in tubes of various materials (SS-304, CS-1010 and X-52 steel tubes) with a wide range of values of the diameter-to-thickness ratio (D/t). Not only the method overcomes the prohibitive computational demands of earlier procedures, but also it is in excellent agreement with experimental data for all values of D/t investigated (from D/t = 78 to as low as D/t = 12.8).

  5. Probabilistic Dynamic Buckling of Smart Composite Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abumeri, Galib H.; Chamis, Christos C.

    2003-01-01

    A computational simulation method is presented to evaluate the deterministic and nondeterministic dynamic buckling of smart composite shells. The combined use of composite mechanics, finite element computer codes, and probabilistic analysis enable the effective assessment of the dynamic buckling load of smart composite shells. A universal plot is generated to estimate the dynamic buckling load of composite shells at various load rates and probabilities. The shell structure is also evaluated with smart fibers embedded in the plies right below the outer plies. The results show that, on the average, the use of smart fibers improved the shell buckling resistance by about 10 percent at different probabilities and delayed the buckling occurrence time. The probabilistic sensitivities results indicate that uncertainties in the fiber volume ratio and ply thickness have major effects on the buckling load while uncertainties in the electric field strength and smart material volume fraction have moderate effects. For the specific shell considered in this evaluation, the use of smart composite material is not recommended because the shell buckling resistance can be improved by simply re-arranging the orientation of the outer plies, as shown in the dynamic buckling analysis results presented in this report.

  6. Probabilistic Dynamic Buckling of Smart Composite Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Abumeri, Galib H.

    2007-01-01

    A computational simulation method is presented to evaluate the deterministic and nondeterministic dynamic buckling of smart composite shells. The combined use of intraply hybrid composite mechanics, finite element computer codes, and probabilistic analysis enable the effective assessment of the dynamic buckling load of smart composite shells. A universal plot is generated to estimate the dynamic buckling load of composite shells at various load rates and probabilities. The shell structure is also evaluated with smart fibers embedded in the plies right next to the outer plies. The results show that, on the average, the use of smart fibers improved the shell buckling resistance by about 10% at different probabilities and delayed the buckling occurrence time. The probabilistic sensitivities results indicate that uncertainties in the fiber volume ratio and ply thickness have major effects on the buckling load while uncertainties in the electric field strength and smart material volume fraction have moderate effects. For the specific shell considered in this evaluation, the use of smart composite material is not recommended because the shell buckling resistance can be improved by simply re-arranging the orientation of the outer plies, as shown in the dynamic buckling analysis results presented in this report.

  7. Sequential buckling of an elastic wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bico, Jose; Bense, Hadrien; Keiser, Ludovic; Roman, Benoit; Melo, Francisco; Abkarian, Manouk

    A beam under quasistatic compression classically buckles beyond a critical threshold. In the case of a free beam, the lowest buckling mode is selected. We investigate the case of a long ``wall'' grounded of a compliant base and compressed in the axial compression. In the case of a wall of slender rectangular cross section, the selected buckling mode adopts a nearly fixed wavelength proportional to the height of the wall. Higher compressive loads only increase the amplitude of the buckle. However if the cross section has a sharp shape (such as an Eiffel tower profile), we observe successive buckling modes of increasing wavelength. We interpret this unusual evolution in terms of scaling arguments. At small scales, this variable periodicity might be used to develop tunable optical devices. We thank ECOS C12E07, CNRS-CONICYT, and Fondecyt Grant No. N1130922 for partially funding this work.

  8. Retinal toxicity of intravitreal tenecteplase in the rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, S A; Vijayasekaran, S; Yu, P K; McAllister, I L; Yu, D-Yi

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the retinal toxicity of intravitreal injection of a novel fibrinolytic tenecteplase in rabbit eyes. Methods: Tenecteplase (25–350 μg in 0.1 ml BSS) was injected into the vitreous cavity of normal rabbit eyes. Control (fellow) eyes received 0.1 ml of BSS. One day, 1 week, and 2 months post-injection, the eyes were examined by slit lamp biomicroscopy, indirect ophthalmoscopy, and electroretinography, and then harvested for histopathological examination. Results: No evidence of retinal toxicity was seen with tenecteplase doses up to and including 50 μg. At a dose of 150 μg ophthalmoscopy was normal, but histology showed mild retinal damage in the inner nuclear layer and electroretinography showed a temporary reduction in B-wave amplitude. At doses of 200 μg and above, there was evidence of retinal toxicity on electroretinography, ophthalmoscopy, and histology. Ophthalmoscopic findings included vitreal fibrosis, retinal necrosis and tractional retinal detachment and light microscopy revealed necrosis of retinal pigment epithelium and other retinal layers. Damage was centred around the injection site but was more widespread with the higher doses. Conclusion: A dose of 50 μg tenecteplase appears safe for intravitreal injection in the rabbit. Tenecteplase could have potential applications in the treatment of submacular haemorrhage and retinal vein occlusion. PMID:15031179

  9. Retinopathy of prematurity: understanding ischemic retinal vasculopathies at an extreme of life

    PubMed Central

    Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Joyal, Jean-Sebastien; Rivera, José Carlos; Kermorvant-Duchemin, Elsa; Sennlaub, Florian; Hardy, Pierre; Lachapelle, Pierre; Chemtob, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a major complication of preterm birth. It encompasses a spectrum of pathologies that affect vision, from mild disease that resolves spontaneously to severe disease that causes retinal detachment and subsequent blindness. The pathologies are characterized by an arrest in normal retinal vascular development associated with microvascular degeneration. The resulting ischemia and retinal hypoxia lead to excessive abnormal compensatory blood vessel growth. However, this neovascularization can lead to fibrous scar formation and culminate in retinal detachment. Present therapeutic modalities to limit the adverse consequences of aberrant neovascularization are invasive and/or tissue-destructive. In this Review, we discuss current concepts on retinal microvascular degeneration, neovascularization, and available treatments, as well as present future perspectives toward more profound elucidation of the pathogenesis of ROP. PMID:20811158

  10. Stochastic behavior of nanoscale dielectric wall buckling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Lawrence H.; Levin, Igor; Cook, Robert F.

    2016-03-01

    The random buckling patterns of nanoscale dielectric walls are analyzed using a nonlinear multi-scale stochastic method that combines experimental measurements with simulations. The dielectric walls, approximately 200 nm tall and 20 nm wide, consist of compliant, low dielectric constant (low-k) fins capped with stiff, compressively stressed TiN lines that provide the driving force for buckling. The deflections of the buckled lines exhibit sinusoidal pseudoperiodicity with amplitude fluctuation and phase decorrelation arising from stochastic variations in wall geometry, properties, and stress state at length scales shorter than the characteristic deflection wavelength of about 1000 nm. The buckling patterns are analyzed and modeled at two length scales: a longer scale (up to 5000 nm) that treats randomness as a longer-scale measurable quantity, and a shorter-scale (down to 20 nm) that treats buckling as a deterministic phenomenon. Statistical simulation is used to join the two length scales. Through this approach, the buckling model is validated and material properties and stress states are inferred. In particular, the stress state of TiN lines in three different systems is determined, along with the elastic moduli of low-k fins and the amplitudes of the small-scale random fluctuations in wall properties—all in the as-processed state. The important case of stochastic effects giving rise to buckling in a deterministically sub-critical buckling state is demonstrated. The nonlinear multiscale stochastic analysis provides guidance for design of low-k structures with acceptable buckling behavior and serves as a template for how randomness that is common to nanoscale phenomena might be measured and analyzed in other contexts.

  11. Stochastic behavior of nanoscale dielectric wall buckling

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Lawrence H.; Levin, Igor; Cook, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    The random buckling patterns of nanoscale dielectric walls are analyzed using a nonlinear multi-scale stochastic method that combines experimental measurements with simulations. The dielectric walls, approximately 200 nm tall and 20 nm wide, consist of compliant, low dielectric constant (low-k) fins capped with stiff, compressively stressed TiN lines that provide the driving force for buckling. The deflections of the buckled lines exhibit sinusoidal pseudoperiodicity with amplitude fluctuation and phase decorrelation arising from stochastic variations in wall geometry, properties, and stress state at length scales shorter than the characteristic deflection wavelength of about 1000 nm. The buckling patterns are analyzed and modeled at two length scales: a longer scale (up to 5000 nm) that treats randomness as a longer-scale measurable quantity, and a shorter-scale (down to 20 nm) that treats buckling as a deterministic phenomenon. Statistical simulation is used to join the two length scales. Through this approach, the buckling model is validated and material properties and stress states are inferred. In particular, the stress state of TiN lines in three different systems is determined, along with the elastic moduli of low-k fins and the amplitudes of the small-scale random fluctuations in wall properties—all in the as-processed state. The important case of stochastic effects giving rise to buckling in a deterministically sub-critical buckling state is demonstrated. The nonlinear multiscale stochastic analysis provides guidance for design of low-k structures with acceptable buckling behavior and serves as a template for how randomness that is common to nanoscale phenomena might be measured and analyzed in other contexts. PMID:27330220

  12. Macro stress mapping on thin film buckling

    SciTech Connect

    Goudeau, P.; Villain, P.; Renault, P.-O.; Tamura, N.; Celestre, R.S.; Padmore, H.A.

    2002-11-06

    Thin films deposited by Physical Vapour Deposition techniques on substrates generally exhibit large residual stresses which may be responsible of thin film buckling in the case of compressive stresses. Since the 80's, a lot of theoretical work has been done to develop mechanical models but only a few experimental work has been done on this subject to support these theoretical approaches and nothing concerning local stress measurement mainly because of the small dimension of the buckling (few 10th mm). This paper deals with the application of micro beam X-ray diffraction available on synchrotron radiation sources for stress mapping analysis of gold thin film buckling.

  13. Vibration and buckling of super elliptical plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. M.; Wang, L.; Liew, K. M.

    1994-03-01

    This paper is concerned with the vibration and buckling of a new class of plates, the periphery shape of which is defined by a super elliptical function. Such a plate shape has practical applications, as the advantageous curved corners help to diffuse stress concentrations. The loading considered for the buckling problem is that of in-plane uniform pressure along the periphery. Accurate frequency and buckling factors are tabulated for such plates with either simply supported or clamped edges. The solutions are obtained using the pb - 2 Rayleigh-Ritz method.

  14. Sector mapping method for 3D detached retina visualization.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yi-Ran; Zhao, Yong; Zhong, Jie; Li, Ke; Lu, Cui-Xin; Zhang, Bing

    2016-10-01

    A new sphere-mapping algorithm called sector mapping is introduced to map sector images to the sphere of an eyeball. The proposed sector-mapping algorithm is evaluated and compared with the plane-mapping algorithm adopted in previous work. A simulation that maps an image of concentric circles to the sphere of the eyeball and an analysis of the difference in distance between neighboring points in a plane and sector were used to compare the two mapping algorithms. A three-dimensional model of a whole retina with clear retinal detachment was generated using the Visualization Toolkit software. A comparison of the mapping results shows that the central part of the retina near the optic disc is stretched and its edges are compressed when the plane-mapping algorithm is used. A better mapping result is obtained by the sector-mapping algorithm than by the plane-mapping algorithm in both the simulation results and real clinical retinal detachment three-dimensional reconstruction. PMID:27480739

  15. Carnivorous Utricularia: the buckling scenario.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Olivier; Marmottant, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    We review recent results about the functioning of aquatic carnivorous traps from the genus Utricularia. The use of high speed cameras has helped to elucidate the mechanism at the origin of the ultra fast capture process of Utricularia, at a millisecond time scale. As water is pumped out of the trap, pressure decreases inside the trap and elastic energy is stored due to the change of shape of the trap body. This energy is suddenly released when the trap is fired: the trap door undergoes an elastical instability--buckling--which allows its fast and passive opening and closure. This mechanism is used by Utricularia both to catch preys touching its trigger hairs and to fire spontaneously at regular time intervals. The results leading to this interpretation are reviewed and discussed and suggestions for further work are briefly presented.

  16. Progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) in AIDS patients: a different appearance of varicella-zoster retinitis.

    PubMed

    Pavesio, C E; Mitchell, S M; Barton, K; Schwartz, S D; Towler, H M; Lightman, S

    1995-01-01

    Retinal infections caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) have been reported in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals. Two cases of a VZV-related retinitis are described with the characteristic features of the recently described progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) syndrome. Both patients suffered from the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) with greatly reduced peripheral blood CD4+ T lymphocyte counts, and presented with macular retinitis without vitritis. The disease was bilateral in one case and unilateral in the other. The clinical course was rapidly progressive with widespread retinal involvement and the development of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment with complete loss of vision in the affected eyes despite intensive intravenous antiviral therapy. VZV DNA was identified in vitreous biopsies, by molecular techniques based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in both patients. At present, the use of very high-dose intravenous acyclovir may be the best therapeutic option in these patients for whom the visual prognosis is poor. Intravitreal antiviral drugs could also contribute to the management of these cases.

  17. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging in optic disk pit associated with outer retinal dehiscence

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chee Wai; Wong, Doric; Mathur, Ranjana

    2014-01-01

    A 37-year-old Bangladeshi male presented with an inferotemporal optic disk pit and serous macular detachment in the left eye. Imaging with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed a multilayer macular schisis pattern with a small subfoveal outer retinal dehiscence. This case illustrates a rare phenotype of optic disk maculopathy with macular schisis and a small outer retinal layer dehiscence. Spectral domain OCT was a useful adjunct in delineating the retinal layers in optic disk pit maculopathy, and revealed a small area of outer retinal layer dehiscence that could only have been detected on high-resolution OCT. PMID:25349471

  18. Slab detachment during continental collision: Influence of crustal rheology and interaction with lithospheric delamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duretz, T.; Gerya, T. V.

    2013-08-01

    Collision between continents can lead to the subduction of continental material. If the crust remains coupled to the downgoing slab, a large buoyancy force is generated. This force slows down convergence and promotes slab detachment. If the crust resists to subduction, it may decouple from the downgoing slab and be subjected to buoyant extrusion. We employ two-dimensional thermo-mechanical modelling to study the importance of crustal rheology on the evolution of subduction-collision systems. We propose simple quantifications of the mechanical decoupling between lithospheric levels (σ*) and the potential for buoyant extrusion of the crust (ξ*). The modelling results indicate that a variable crustal rheological structure results in slab detachment, delamination, or the combination of both mechanisms. A strong crust provides coupling at the Moho (low σ*) and remains coherent during subduction (low ξ). It promotes deep subduction of the crust (180 km) and slab detachment. Exhumation occurs in coherent manners via eduction and thrusting. Slab detachment triggers the development of topography (> 4.5 km) close to the suture. A contrasting style of collision occurs using a weak crustal rheology. Mechanical decoupling at the Moho (high σ*) promotes the extrusion of the crust (high ξ), disabling slab detachment. Ongoing shortening leads to buckling of the crust and development of topography on the lower plate. Collisions involving rheologically layered crust allow decoupling at mid-crustal depths. This structure favours both the extrusion of upper crust and the subduction of the lower crust. Such collisions are successively affected by delamination and slab detachment. Topography develops together with the buoyant extrusion of crust onto the foreland and is further amplified by slab detachment. Our results suggest that the occurrence of both delamination (Apennines) and slab detachment (Himalayas) in orogens may indicate differences in the initial crustal structure of

  19. Acute serous macular detachment and cystoid macular edema after uncomplicated phacoemulsification using standard dose subconjunctival cefuroxime.

    PubMed

    Kontos, Andreas; Mitry, Danny; Althauser, Susanne; Jain, Saurabh

    2014-09-01

    Acute toxic serous macular detachment after cataract surgery is very rare, and has been described previously with the use of high concentrations of intra-cameral cefuroxime. We report a case of serous macular detachment and cystoid macular edema 1 day after uncomplicated phacoemulsification using standard dose subconjunctival cefuroxime at the end of surgery. Our case demonstrates that subconjunctival cefuroxime may cause retinal toxicity in a similar fashion to intra-cameral cefuroxime, possibly due to entry of the drug into the anterior chamber through the section or trans-scleral absorption. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this complication with subconjunctival administration of cefuroxime.

  20. Buckling optimisation of sandwich cylindrical panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouhamzeh, M.; Sadighi, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the buckling load optimisation is performed on sandwich cylindrical panels. A finite element program is developed in MATLAB to solve the governing differential equations of the global buckling of the structure. In order to find the optimal solution, the genetic algorithm Toolbox in MATLAB is implemented. Verifications are made for both the buckling finite element code and also the results from the genetic algorithm by comparisons to the results available in literature. Sandwich cylindrical panels are optimised for the buckling strength with isotropic or orthotropic cores with different boundary conditions. Results are presented in terms of stacking sequence of fibers in the face sheets and core to face sheet thickness ratio.

  1. Use of quadratic components for buckling calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Segalman, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    A buckling calculation procedure based on the method of quadratic components is presented. Recently developed for simulating the motion of rotating flexible structures, the method of quadratic components is shown to be applicable to buckling problems with either conservative or nonconservative loads. For conservative loads, stability follows from the positive definiteness of the system`s stiffness matrix. For nonconservative loads, stability is determined by solving a nonsymmetric eigenvalue problem, which depends on both the stiffness and mass distribution of the system. Buckling calculations presented for a cantilevered beam are shown to compare favorably with classical results. Although the example problem is fairly simple and well-understood, the procedure can be used in conjunction with a general-purpose finite element code for buckling calculations of more complex systems.

  2. Thermal-structural panel buckling tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Randolph C.; Richards, W. L.

    A titanium-matrix-composite (TMC) hat-stiffened panel of 61 cm sq area and 3.175 cm thick was nondestructively tested to 649 C to examine its buckling characteristics. Compressive loads were applied to the panel in a 978.6 kN uniaxial load frame system. High-temperature testing was performed using quartz lamp heating. A single-strain-age force/stiffness buckling prediction technique was developed to predict panel buckling loads. For the monolithic panel, these test predictions correlated within 10 percent with a finite-element buckling analyses performed elsewhere. Comparisons between force/stiffness predictions and analyses for the TMC panel are in progress.

  3. Thermal-structural panel buckling tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Randolph C.; Richards, W. L.

    1991-01-01

    A titanium-matrix-composite (TMC) hat-stiffened panel of 61 cm sq area and 3.175 cm thick was nondestructively tested to 649 C to examine its buckling characteristics. Compressive loads were applied to the panel in a 978.6 kN uniaxial load frame system. High-temperature testing was performed using quartz lamp heating. A single-strain-age force/stiffness buckling prediction technique was developed to predict panel buckling loads. For the monolithic panel, these test predictions correlated within 10 percent with a finite-element buckling analyses performed elsewhere. Comparisons between force/stiffness predictions and analyses for the TMC panel are in progress.

  4. Calculating Buckling And Vibrations Of Lattice Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, M. S.; Durling, B. J.; Herstrom, C. L.; Williams, F. W.; Banerjee, J. R.; Kennedy, D.; Warnaar, D. B.

    1989-01-01

    BUNVIS-RG computer program designed to calculate vibration frequencies or buckling loads of prestressed lattice structures used in outer space. For buckling and vibration problems, BUNVIS-RG calculates deadload axial forces caused in members by any combination of externally-applied static point forces and moments at nodes, axial preload or prestrain in members, and such acceleration loads as those due to gravity. BUNVIS-RG is FORTRAN 77 computer program implemented on CDC CYBER and VAX computer.

  5. Buckling transition in long α-helices

    SciTech Connect

    Palenčár, Peter; Bleha, Tomáš

    2014-11-07

    The treatment of bending and buckling of stiff biopolymer filaments by the popular worm-like chain model does not provide adequate understanding of these processes at the microscopic level. Thus, we have used the atomistic molecular-dynamic simulations and the Amber03 force field to examine the compression buckling of α-helix (AH) filaments at room temperature. It was found that the buckling instability occurs in AHs at the critical force f{sub c} in the range of tens of pN depending on the AH length. The decrease of the force f{sub c} with the contour length follows the prediction of the classic thin rod theory. At the force f{sub c} the helical filament undergoes the swift and irreversible transition from the smoothly bent structure to the buckled one. A sharp kink in the AH contour arises at the transition, accompanied by the disruption of the hydrogen bonds in its vicinity. The kink defect brings in an effective softening of the AH molecule at buckling. Nonbonded interactions between helical branches drive the rearrangement of a kinked AH into the ultimate buckled structure of a compact helical hairpin described earlier in the literature.

  6. Buckling condensation in constrained growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dervaux, Julien; Ben Amar, Martine

    2011-03-01

    The multiple complexities inherent to living objects have motivated the search for abiotic substitutes, able to mimic some of their relevant physical properties. Hydrogels provide a highly monitorable counterpart and have thus found many applications in medicine and bioengineering. Recently, it has been recognized that their ability to swell could be used to unravel some of the universal physical processes at work during biological growth. However, it is yet unknown how the microscopic distinctions between swelling and biological growth affect macroscopic changes (shape, stresses) induced by volume variations. To answer this question, we focus on a clinically motivated example of growth. Some solid tumors such as melanoma or glioblastoma undergo a shape transition during their evolution. This bifurcation appears when growth is confined at the periphery of the tumor and is concomitant with the transition from the avascular to the vascular stage of the tumor evolution. To model this phenomenon, we consider in this paper the deformation of an elastic ring enclosing a core of different stiffness. When the volume of the outer ring increases, the system develops a periodic instability. We consider two possible descriptions of the volume variation process: either by imposing a homogeneous volumetric strain (biological growth) or through migration of solvent molecules inside a solid network (swelling). For thin rings, both theories are in qualitative agreement. When the interior is soft, we predict the emergence of a large wavelength buckling. Upon increasing the stiffness of the inner disc, the wavelength of the instability decreases until a condensation of the buckles occurs at the free boundary. This short wavelength pattern is independent of the stiffness of the disc and is only limited by the presence of surface tension. For thicker rings, two scenarios emerge. When a volumetric strain is prescribed, compressive stresses accumulate in the vicinity of the core and the

  7. The intracapsular versus the extracapsular cataract technique in relationship to retinal problems.

    PubMed Central

    Wetzig, P C; Thatcher, D B; Christiansen, J M

    1979-01-01

    Five hundred and sixty-four consecutive eyes after cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation were studied in relationship to the incidence of retinal detachment and cystoid macular edema in the intra vs the extracapsular extraction technique. In 124 eyes undergoing intracapsular cataract extraction, three (2.4%) developed retinal detachment. In 440 eyes undergoing extracapsular cataract extraction two (0.45%) developed retinal detachment. In 87 eyes undergoing intracapsular cataract extraction 7 (8%) developed cystoid macular edema. In 327 eyes undergoing extracapsular cataract extraction 4 (1.2%) developed cystoid macular edema. This study cannot be compared with other series in the literature because high risk cases and those with vitreous loss were excluded. PMID:545830

  8. Screening retinal transplants with Fourier-domain OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Bin

    2009-02-01

    Transplant technologies have been studied for the recovery of vision loss from retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In several rodent retinal degeneration models and in patients, retinal progenitor cells transplanted as layers to the subretinal space have been shown to restore or preserve vision. The methods for evaluation of transplants are expensive considering the large amount of animals. Alternatively, time-domain Stratus OCT was previously shown to be able to image the morphological structure of transplants to some extent, but could not clearly identify laminated transplants. The efficacy of screening retinal transplants with Fourier-domain OCT was studied on 37 S334ter line 3 rats with retinal degeneration 6-67 days after transplant surgery. The transplants were morphologically categorized as no transplant, detachment, rosettes, small laminated area and larger laminated area with both Fourier-domain OCT and histology. The efficacy of Fourier-domain OCT in screening retinal transplants was evaluated by comparing the categorization results with OCT and histology. Additionally, 4 rats were randomly selected for multiple OCT examinations (1, 5, 9, 14 and 21days post surgery) in order to determine the earliest image time of OCT examination since the transplanted tissue may need some time to show its tendency of growing. Finally, we demonstrated the efficacy of Fourier-domain OCT in screening retinal transplants in early stages and determined the earliest imaging time for OCT. Fourier-domain OCT makes itself valuable in saving resource spent on animals with unsuccessful transplants.

  9. Tissue morphogenesis: a surface buckling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Volokh, Konstantin Y

    2006-01-01

    Surface patterns can emerge during growth of anisotropic tissues because of surface buckling. This morphogenetic scenario is examined in the present paper based on a simple phenomenological theory of tissue growth. In particular, we show that constrained growth can lead to tissue compression, which in turn may result in surface buckling of the tissue. The latter means the appearance of wavy patterns on the surface. These patterns decay away from the surface. It is interesting that the critical magnitude of the parameter of mass supply, which corresponds to surface buckling, is independent of the pattern wavelength and various patterns can generally be generated in growth. Results of theoretical analysis show that the surface buckling scenario is realistic if the growing tissue matches the following two conditions. First, compression should appear during tissue growth. Second, the tissue should exhibit strong anisotropy. The former condition does not necessarily mean geometric constraints: inhomogeneous growth or material inhomogeneity and anisotropy can lead to the appearance of compressive stresses. The latter condition is typical of some tissues with fiber reinforcement in planes parallel to the surface. In the latter case, the tissue material is much softer in the out-of-plane direction than in plane. The creation of patterns by restraining tissue growth and forcing the surface to buckle represents a challenging experimental problem.

  10. A Biomechanical Model of Artery Buckling

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hai-Chao

    2010-01-01

    The stability of arteries under blood pressure load is essential to the maintenance of normal arterial function and the loss of stability can lead to tortuosity and kinking that are associated with significant clinical complications. However, mechanical analysis of arterial bent buckling is lacking. To address this issue, this paper presents a biomechanical model of arterial buckling. Using a linear elastic cylindrical arterial model, the mechanical equations for arterial buckling were developed and the critical buckling pressure was found to be a function of the wall stiffness (Young’s modulus), arterial radius, length, wall thickness, and the axial strain. Both the model equations and experimental results demonstrated that the critical pressure is related to the axial strain. Arteries may buckle and become tortuous due to reduced (sub-physiological) axial strain, hypertensive pressure, and a weakened wall. These results are in accordance with, and provide a possible explanation to the clinical observations that these changes are the risk factors for arterial tortuosity and kinking. The current model is also applicable to veins and ureters. PMID:17689541

  11. Buckled diamond-like carbon nanomechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomi, Matti; Isacsson, Andreas; Oksanen, Mika; Lyashenko, Dmitry; Kaikkonen, Jukka-Pekka; Tervakangas, Sanna; Kolehmainen, Jukka; Hakonen, Pertti J.

    2015-08-01

    We have developed capacitively-transduced nanomechanical resonators using sp2-rich diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films as conducting membranes. The electrically conducting DLC films were grown by physical vapor deposition at a temperature of 500 °C. Characterizing the resonant response, we find a larger than expected frequency tuning that we attribute to the membrane being buckled upwards, away from the bottom electrode. The possibility of using buckled resonators to increase frequency tuning can be of advantage in rf applications such as tunable GHz filters and voltage-controlled oscillators.We have developed capacitively-transduced nanomechanical resonators using sp2-rich diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films as conducting membranes. The electrically conducting DLC films were grown by physical vapor deposition at a temperature of 500 °C. Characterizing the resonant response, we find a larger than expected frequency tuning that we attribute to the membrane being buckled upwards, away from the bottom electrode. The possibility of using buckled resonators to increase frequency tuning can be of advantage in rf applications such as tunable GHz filters and voltage-controlled oscillators. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed transmission measurements, discussion about mechanical contacts and surface roughness, derivation of the equations describing the eigenspectrum of a buckled beam under electrostatic load. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02820e

  12. Active control of buckling of flexible beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Tampe, L.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of using the rapidly growing technology of the shape memory alloys actuators in actively controlling the buckling of large flexible structures is investigated. The need for such buckling control systems is becoming inevitable as the design trends of large space structures have resulted in the use of structural members that are long, slender, and very flexible. In addition, as these truss members are subjected mainly to longitudinal loading they become susceptible to structural instabilities due to buckling. Proper control of such instabilities is essential to the effective performance of the structures as stable platforms for communication and observation. Mathematical models are presented that simulate the dynamic characteristics of the shape memory actuator, the compressive structural members, and the associated active control system. A closed-loop computer-controlled system is designed, based on the developed mathematical models, and implemented to control the buckling of simple beams. The performance of the computer-controlled system is evaluated experimentally and compared with the theoretical predictions to validate the developed models. The obtained results emphasize the importance of buckling control and suggest the potential of the shape memory actuators as attractive means for controlling structural deformation in a simple and reliable way.

  13. Detached Growth of Germanium by Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Volz, M. P.; Cobb, S.; Motakef, S.; Szofran, F. R.

    2004-01-01

    The conditions of detached solidification under controlled pressure differential across the meniscus were investigated. Uncoated and graphite- or BN-coated silica and pBN crucibles were used. Detached and partly detached growth was achieved in pBN and BN-coated crucibles, respectively. The results of the experiments are discussed based on the theory of Duffar et al.

  14. Kinematic Fitting of Detached Vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Mattione, Paul

    2007-05-01

    The eg3 experiment at the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector aims to determine the existence of the $\\Xi_{5}$ pentaquarks and investigate the excited $\\Xi$ states. Specifically, the exotic $\\Xi_{5}^{--}$ pentaquark will be sought by first reconstructing the $\\Xi^{-}$ particle through its weak decays, $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ and $\\Lambda\\to\\pi^{-}$. A kinematic fitting routine was developed to reconstruct the detached vertices of these decays, where confidence level cuts on the fits are used to remove background events. Prior to fitting these decays, the exclusive reaction $\\gamma D\\rightarrow pp\\pi^{-}$ was studied in order to correct the track measurements and covariance matrices of the charged particles. The $\\Lambda\\rightarrow p\\pi^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ decays were then investigated to demonstrate that the kinematic fitting routine reconstructs the decaying particles and their detached vertices correctly.

  15. A Numerical Study on the Effect of Facesheet-Core Disbonds on the Buckling Load of Curved Honeycomb Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Myers, David E.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Krivanek, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    A numerical study on the effect of facesheet-core disbonds on the post-buckling response of curved honeycomb sandwich panels is presented herein. This work was conducted as part of the development of a damage tolerance approach for the next-generation Space Launch System heavy lift vehicle payload fairing. As such, the study utilized full-scale fairing barrel segments as the structure of interest. The panels were composed of carbon fiber reinforced polymer facesheets and aluminum honeycomb core. The panels were analyzed numerically using the finite element method. Facesheet and core nodes in a predetermined circular region were detached to simulate a disbond induced via low-speed impact between the outer mold line facesheet and honeycomb core. Surface-to-surface contact in the disbonded region was invoked to prevent interpenetration of the facesheet and core elements. The diameter of this disbonded region was varied and the effect of the size of the disbond on the post-buckling response was observed. A significant change in the slope of the edge load-deflection response was used to determine the onset of global buckling and corresponding buckling load.

  16. Euler buckling of geothermal well casing

    SciTech Connect

    Rechard, R.P.; Schuler, K.W.

    1983-02-01

    Geothermal well operators have expressed concern over the vulnerability of unsupported casing to buckling from thermal elongation. Preliminary numerical and theoretical calculations are presented, which indicate the buckling phenomenon should not be serious in N-80 casing if the string is tension preloaded. Buckling would be detrimental for K-55 casing. The effect of wall contact was found to be beneficial for closely confined pipe strings and of no detriment when hole gaps are large. The weakness of API screw joints in bending appears to be the structural limitation. The analysis assumed stresses above yield constituted failure, that thermal expansion was strain controlled, and that the casing was continuous. Excessive internal pressure instability was ignored. The temperature variation considered was between cementing conditions of 100 to 200/sup 0/F (40 to 95/sup 0/C) and shut-in conditions of 425 to 450/sup 0/F (220 to 230/sup 0/C).

  17. Buckling instability in amorphous carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X. D.; Narumi, K.; Naramoto, H.

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we report the buckling instability in amorphous carbon films on mirror-polished sapphire (0001) wafers deposited by ion beam assisted deposition at various growth temperatures. For the films deposited at 150 °C, many interesting stress relief patterns are found, which include networks, blisters, sinusoidal patterns with π-shape, and highly ordered sinusoidal waves on a large scale. Starting at irregular buckling in the centre, the latter propagate towards the outer buckling region. The maximum length of these ordered patterns reaches 396 µm with a height of ~500 nm and a wavelength of ~8.2 µm. However, the length decreases dramatically to 70 µm as the deposition temperature is increased to 550 °C. The delamination of the film appears instead of sinusoidal waves with a further increase of the deposition temperature. This experimental observation is correlated with the theoretic work of Crosby (1999 Phys. Rev. E 59 R2542).

  18. The Buckling of Curved Tension-field Girders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limpert, G

    1938-01-01

    The present paper reports on experiments made to determine the buckling load under shear of circular curved tension-field webs. The buckling load of the webs may be expressed with reference to the buckling load of the stiffeners. It is found that within the explored range the buckling load is approximately twice as great as that of the identically stiffened flat wall of equal web depth.

  19. Non-isothermal buckling behavior of viscoplastic shell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riff, Richard; Simitses, G. J.

    1988-01-01

    Described are the mathematical model and solution methodologies for analyzing the structural response of thin, metallic elasto-viscoplastic shell structures under large thermomechanical loads and their non-isothermal buckling behavior. Among the system responses associated with these loads and conditions are snap-through, buckling, thermal buckling, and creep buckling. This geometric and material nonlinearities (of high order) can be anticipated and are considered in the model and the numerical treatment.

  20. Buckling Behavior of Individual and Bundled Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Soheilypour, Mohammad; Peyro, Mohaddeseh; Peter, Stephen J.; Mofrad, Mohammad R.K.

    2015-01-01

    As the major structural constituent of the cytoskeleton, microtubules (MTs) serve a variety of biological functions that range from facilitating organelle transport to maintaining the mechanical integrity of the cell. Neuronal MTs exhibit a distinct configuration, hexagonally packed bundles of MT filaments, interconnected by MT-associated protein (MAP) tau. Building on our previous work on mechanical response of axonal MT bundles under uniaxial tension, this study is focused on exploring the compression scenarios. Intracellular MTs carry a large fraction of the compressive loads sensed by the cell and therefore, like any other column-like structure, are prone to substantial bending and buckling. Various biological activities, e.g., actomyosin contractility and many pathological conditions are driven or followed by bending, looping, and buckling of MT filaments. The coarse-grained model previously developed in our lab has been used to study the mechanical behavior of individual and bundled in vivo MT filaments under uniaxial compression. Both configurations show tip-localized, decaying, and short-wavelength buckling. This behavior highlights the role of the surrounding cytoplasm and MAP tau on MT buckling behavior, which allows MT filaments to bear much larger compressive forces. It is observed that MAP tau interconnections improve this effect by a factor of two. The enhanced ability of MT bundles to damp buckling waves relative to individual MT filaments, may be interpreted as a self-defense mechanism because it helps axonal MTs to endure harsher environments while maintaining their function. The results indicate that MT filaments in a bundle do not buckle simultaneously implying that the applied stress is not equally shared among the MT filaments, that is a consequence of the nonuniform distribution of MAP tau proteins along the bundle length. Furthermore, from a pathological perspective, it is observed that axonal MT bundles are more vulnerable to failure in

  1. Handbook of Structural Stability Part I: Buckling of Flat Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerard, George; Becker, Herbert

    1957-01-01

    The various factors governing buckling of flat plates are critically reviewed and the results are summarized in a comprehensive series of charts and tables. Numerical values are presented for buckling coefficients of flat plates with various boundary conditions and applied loadings. The effects of plasticity are incorporated in non dimensional buckling charts utilizing the three-parameter description of stress-strain curves.

  2. Repeated buckling of composite shear panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Josef; Weller, Tanchum

    1990-01-01

    Failures in service of aerospace structures and research at the Technion Aircraft Structures Laboratory have revealed that repeatedly buckled stiffened shear panels might be susceptible to premature fatigue failures. Extensive experimental and analytical studies have been performed at Technion on repeated buckling, far in excess of initial buckling, for both metal and composite shear panels with focus on the influence of the surrounding structure. The core of the experimental investigation consisted of repeated buckling and postbuckling tests on Wagner beams in a three-point loading system under realistic test conditions. The effects of varying sizes of stiffeners, of the magnitude of initial buckling loads, of the panel aspect ratio and of the cyclic shearing force, V sub cyc, were studied. The cyclic to critical shear buckling ratios, (V sub cyc/V sub cr) were on the high side, as needed for efficient panel design, yet all within possible flight envelopes. The experiments were supplemented by analytical and numerical analyses. For the metal shear panels the test and numerical results were synthesized into prediction formulas, which relate the life of the metal shear panels to two cyclic load parameters. The composite shear panels studied were hybrid beams with graphite/epoxy webs bonded to aluminum alloy frames. The test results demonstrated that composite panels were less fatigue sensitive than comparable metal ones, and that repeated buckling, even when causing extensive damage, did not reduce the residual strength by more than 20 percent. All the composite panels sustained the specified fatigue life of 250,000 cycles. The effect of local unstiffened holes on the durability of repeatedly buckled shear panels was studied for one series of the metal panels. Tests on 2024 T3 aluminum panels with relatively small unstiffened holes in the center of the panels demonstrated premature fatigue failure, compared to panels without holes. Preliminary tests on two graphite

  3. Buckling instability of self-assembled colloidal columns.

    PubMed

    Swan, James W; Vasquez, Paula A; Furst, Eric M

    2014-09-26

    Suspended, slender self-assembled domains of magnetically responsive colloids are observed to buckle in microgravity. Upon cessation of the magnetic field that drives their assembly, these columns expand axially and buckle laterally. This phenomenon resembles the buckling of long beams due to thermal expansion; however, linear stability analysis predicts that the colloidal columns are inherently susceptible to buckling because they are freely suspended in a Newtonian fluid. The dominant buckling wavelength increases linearly with column thickness and is quantitatively described using an elastohydrodynamic model and the suspension thermodynamic equation of state. PMID:25302919

  4. Buckling Instability of Self-Assembled Colloidal Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, James W.; Vasquez, Paula A.; Furst, Eric M.

    2014-09-01

    Suspended, slender self-assembled domains of magnetically responsive colloids are observed to buckle in microgravity. Upon cessation of the magnetic field that drives their assembly, these columns expand axially and buckle laterally. This phenomenon resembles the buckling of long beams due to thermal expansion; however, linear stability analysis predicts that the colloidal columns are inherently susceptible to buckling because they are freely suspended in a Newtonian fluid. The dominant buckling wavelength increases linearly with column thickness and is quantitatively described using an elastohydrodynamic model and the suspension thermodynamic equation of state.

  5. Buckling modes of elastic thin films on elastic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Haixia; Huang, Rui; Chung, Jun Young; Stafford, Christopher M.; Yu, Hong-Hui

    2007-04-01

    Two buckling modes have been observed in thin films: buckle delamination and wrinkling. This letter identifies the conditions for selecting the favored buckling modes for elastic films on elastic substrates. Transition from one buckling mode to another is predicted as the stiffness ratio between the substrate and the film or is predicted for variation of the stiffness ratio between the substrate and the film or variation of theinterfacial defect size. The theoretical results are demonstrated experimentally by observing the coexistence of both buckling modes and mode transition in one film-substrate system.

  6. Buckling analysis of spent fuel basket

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A.S.; Bumpas, S.E.

    1995-05-01

    The basket for a spent fuel shipping cask is subjected to compressive stresses that may cause global instability of the basket assemblies or local buckling of the individual members. Adopting the common buckling design practice in which the stability capacity of the entire structure is based on the performance of the individual members of the assemblies, the typical spent fuel basket, which is composed of plates and tubular structural members, can be idealized as an assemblage of columns, beam-columns and plates. This report presents the flexural buckling formulas for five load cases that are common in the basket buckling analysis: column under axial loads, column under axial and bending loads, plate under uniaxial loads, plate under biaxial loadings, and plate under biaxial loads and lateral pressure. The acceptance criteria from the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code are used to determine the adequacy of the basket components. Special acceptance criteria are proposed to address the unique material characteristics of austenitic stainless steel, a material which is frequently used in the basket assemblies.

  7. Unilateral buckling of elastically restrained rectangular mild steel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. T.; Bradford, M. A.; Oehlers, D. J.

    This paper considers the elastic unilateral buckling of rectangular mild steel plates that are restrained elastically and subjected to bending and axial actions. A variational formulation of the Ritz method using linear combinations of harmonic functions for the buckling deformations is used to establish an eigenproblem to determine the plate local buckling coefficients. The motivation for the study is the retrofit of reinforced concrete beams by gluing and then bolting steel plates to the sides of the beam. Such plates, when acting compositely with the concrete beam, are subjected to predominantly bending and axial actions which may cause unilateral local buckling. Whereas the bolts provide complete restraint against buckling at discrete points, the glue may also inhibit local buckling between these nodal points since it acts as a continuous elastic restraint. The influence of the glue stiffness, support conditions and plate proportions on the unilateral buckling of such plates are assessed.

  8. Dealings between Cataract and Retinal Reattachment Surgery in PVR

    PubMed Central

    Deuchler, Svenja; Singh, Pankaj; Müller, Michael; Kohnen, Thomas; Ackermann, Hanns; Iwanczuk, Joerg; Benjilali, Rachid; Koch, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. To evaluate the impact of the eye lens status and oil side effects on the outcome of vitreoretinal surgery in retinal detachment with proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and a temporary silicone oil tamponade (SOT). Methods. 101 eyes were analyzed retrospectively and 103 eyes prospectively in regard to their retinal reattachment success rate and key factors for the outcome. Subgroup analysis of 27 eyes with Scheimpflug lens photography (SLP) before and after retinal reattachment service with SOT was performed. For SLP (65% phakic eyes) a Pentacam densitometry reference body with 3 mm diameter was chosen and 3 segments (anterior/mid/posterior) were evaluated separately after a quality check. Results. The retinal reattachment rate was highest in the prospective pseudophakic group (p = 0.039). Lens transparency loss occurred earlier in middle aged patients than in younger patients. Besides the nucleus, layers posterior and anterior to it showed specific transparency changes. The emulsification rate was higher when eyes had been operated on in the anterior chamber before retinal reattachment service. Conclusions. Retinal reattachment surgery seems to benefit from preoperative cataract removal. We found significant lens changes in the nucleus as well as in the layers anterior and posterior to it. This corresponds to the histology of the lens epithelium published before. PMID:27034821

  9. Influence of cell detachment on the respiration rate of tumor and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Danhier, Pierre; Copetti, Tamara; De Preter, Géraldine; Leveque, Philippe; Feron, Olivier; Jordan, Bénédicte F; Sonveaux, Pierre; Gallez, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Cell detachment is a procedure routinely performed in cell culture and a necessary step in many biochemical assays including the determination of oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in vitro. In vivo, cell detachment has been shown to exert profound metabolic influences notably in cancer but also in other pathologies, such as retinal detachment for example. In the present study, we developed and validated a new technique combining electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry and the use of cytodex 1 and collagen-coated cytodex 3 dextran microbeads, which allowed the unprecedented comparison of the OCR of adherent and detached cells with high sensitivity. Hence, we demonstrated that both B16F10 melanoma cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) experience strong OCR decrease upon trypsin or collagenase treatments. The reduction of cell oxygen consumption was more pronounced with a trypsin compared to a collagenase treatment. Cells remaining in suspension also encounter a marked intracellular ATP depletion and an increase in the lactate production/glucose uptake ratio. These findings highlight the important influence exerted by cell adhesion/detachment on cell respiration, which can be probed with the unprecedented experimental assay that was developed and validated in this study.

  10. Cemented mounds and hydrothermal sediments on the detachment surface at Kane Megamullion: A new manifestation of hydrothermal venting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucholke, Brian E.; Humphris, Susan E.; Dick, Henry J. B.

    2013-09-01

    Long-lived detachment faults are now known to be important in tectonic evolution of slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges, and there is increasing evidence that fluid flow plays a critical role in development of detachment systems. Here we document a new manifestation of low-temperature hydrothermal venting associated with the detachment fault that formed Kane Megamullion ˜3.3-2.1 m.y. ago in the western rift-valley wall of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Hydrothermal effects on the detachment surface include (1) cemented mounds of igneous rock and chalk debris containing hydrothermal Mn oxides and Fe oxyhydroxides, and (2) layered deposits of similar Fe-Mn minerals ± interbedded chalks. Mounds are roughly conical, ˜1-10 m high, and contain primarily basalts with lesser gabbro, serpentinite, and polymict breccia. The layered Fe-Mn-rich sediments are flat-bedded to contorted and locally are buckled into low-relief linear or polygonal ridges. We propose that the mounds formed where hydrothermal fluids discharged through the detachment hanging wall near the active fault trace. Hydrothermal precipitates cemented hanging-wall debris and welded it to the footwall, and this debris persisted as mounds as the footwall was exhumed and surrounding unconsolidated material sloughed off the sloping detachment surface. Some of the layered Fe-Mn-rich deposits may have precipitated from fluids discharging from the hanging-wall vents, but they also precipitated from low-temperature fluids venting from the exposed footwall through overlying chalks. Observed natural disturbance and abnormally thin hydrogenous Fe-Mn crusts on some contorted, hydrothermal Fe-Mn-rich chalks on ˜2.7 Ma crust suggest diffuse venting that is geologically recent. Results of this study imply that there are significant fluid pathways through all parts of detachment systems and that low-temperature venting through fractured detachment footwalls may continue for several million years off-axis.

  11. Retinal remodeling in human retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Jones, B W; Pfeiffer, R L; Ferrell, W D; Watt, C B; Marmor, M; Marc, R E

    2016-09-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) in the human is a progressive, currently irreversible neural degenerative disease usually caused by gene defects that disrupt the function or architecture of the photoreceptors. While RP can initially be a disease of photoreceptors, there is increasing evidence that the inner retina becomes progressively disorganized as the outer retina degenerates. These alterations have been extensively described in animal models, but remodeling in humans has not been as well characterized. This study, using computational molecular phenotyping (CMP) seeks to advance our understanding of the retinal remodeling process in humans. We describe cone mediated preservation of overall topology, retinal reprogramming in the earliest stages of the disease in retinal bipolar cells, and alterations in both small molecule and protein signatures of neurons and glia. Furthermore, while Müller glia appear to be some of the last cells left in the degenerate retina, they are also one of the first cell classes in the neural retina to respond to stress which may reveal mechanisms related to remodeling and cell death in other retinal cell classes. Also fundamentally important is the finding that retinal network topologies are altered. Our results suggest interventions that presume substantial preservation of the neural retina will likely fail in late stages of the disease. Even early intervention offers no guarantee that the interventions will be immune to progressive remodeling. Fundamental work in the biology and mechanisms of disease progression are needed to support vision rescue strategies. PMID:27020758

  12. Genetics Home Reference: retinitis pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions retinitis pigmentosa retinitis pigmentosa Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of related eye disorders that ...

  13. Retinal hemorrhages in newborn.

    PubMed

    Govind, A; Kumari, S; Lath, N K

    1989-02-01

    Two hundred and fifty eight newborn babies were studied for the presence of retinal hemorrhages between 1-3 days of birth. The overall incidence of retinal hemorrhages was found to be 18.9%. It was observed that the incidence of retinal hemorrhages was higher in unassisted vaginal deliveries than in assisted births. Also, a two fold higher incidence was noted in term infants as compared to preterm babies. No association was seen with birth asphyxia.

  14. Thrombin induces Sp1-mediated antiviral effects in cytomegalovirus-infected human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Martin; Vogel, Jens-Uwe; Höver, Gerold; Prösch, Susanna; Kotchetkov, Ruslan; Cinatl, Jaroslav; Koch, Frank; Doerr, Hans Wilhelm; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2004-11-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) retinitis causing retinal detachment and destruction of the blood-retina barrier is closely related to retinal hemorrhage/coagulation. However, the effects of procoagulants on HCMV (re)activation in retinal cells have not been investigated yet. Therefore, we studied whether thrombin modulates the expression of HCMV immediate early (IE) and late (L) genes in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE). Thrombin specifically stimulated the protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) on RPE and, surprisingly, inhibited basal and 12,0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-stimulated HCMV IE gene expression in infected RPE. On the other hand, HCMV strongly induced Sp1 DNA binding activity, which was prevented by thrombin/PAR1-mediated Sp1 hyperphosphorylation. Our data suggest that thrombin/PAR-1 may inhibit Sp1-dependent HCMV replication, which might be an important regulatory mechanism for HCMV persistence and replication in RPE.

  15. Viscoelastic instability and detachment folds in soft elastomer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Mahato, Anirban; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2014-03-01

    Physical contacts between a soft elastomer surface and a hard glassy polymer are largely governed by adhesion at the interface. Under application of sufficiently large tangential stress, relative motion occurs at the interface and compressive and tensile stresses develop at the leading and trailing edges of the contact respectively. This kinematic condition leads to a viscoelastic instability at the leading edge causing the elastomer surface to buckle and readhere -- a process governed both by the viscoelastic relaxation time of the elastomer and the sliding velocity v. Above a critical velocity vc, detachment folds form ahead of the indenter and propagate through the contact region at velocities much greater than v. These are commonly referred to as Schallamach waves, after their discoverer, and are considered to be precursors to failure in soft materials. While their onset can be justified using linear elasticity, not much is known about their subsequent propagation. We present high-speed images of a glass-PDMS contact, and use front-tracking to estimate surface strains and the variation of wave velocity and generation frequency with v. A model for the dynamics of the wavefronts is also discussed, showing the onset and propagation of the instability.

  16. Phenomenology and control of buckling dynamics in multicomponent colloidal droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Binita; Basu, Saptarshi

    2015-06-01

    Self-assembly of nano sized particles during natural drying causes agglomeration and shell formation at the surface of micron sized droplets. The shell undergoes sol-gel transition leading to buckling at the weakest point on the surface and produces different types of structures. Manipulation of the buckling rate with inclusion of surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulphate, SDS) and salt (anilinium hydrochloride, AHC) to the nano-sized particle dispersion (nanosilica) is reported here in an acoustically levitated single droplet. Buckling in levitated droplets is a cumulative, complicated function of acoustic streaming, chemistry, agglomeration rate, porosity, radius of curvature, and elastic energy of shell. We put forward our hypothesis on how buckling occurs and can be suppressed during natural drying of the droplets. Global precipitation of aggregates due to slow drying of surfactant-added droplets (no added salts) enhances the rigidity of the shell formed and hence reduces the buckling probability of the shell. On the contrary, adsorption of SDS aggregates on salt ions facilitates the buckling phenomenon with an addition of minute concentration of the aniline salt to the dispersion. Variation in the concentration of the added particles (SDS/AHC) also leads to starkly different morphologies and transient behaviour of buckling (buckling modes like paraboloid, ellipsoid, and buckling rates). Tuning of the buckling rate causes a transition in the final morphology from ring and bowl shapes to cocoon type of structure.

  17. Dynamic stability of detached solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2016-06-01

    A dynamic stability analysis model is developed for meniscus-defined crystal growth processes. The Young-Laplace equation is used to analyze the response of a growing crystal to perturbations to its radius and a thermal transport model is used to analyze the effect of perturbations on the evolution of the crystal-melt interface. A linearized differential equation is used to analyze radius perturbations but a linear integro-differential equation is required for the height perturbations. The stability model is applied to detached solidification under zero-gravity and terrestrial conditions. A numerical analysis is supplemented with an approximate analytical analysis, valid in the limit of small Bond numbers. For terrestrial conditions, a singularity is found to exist in the capillary stability coefficients where, at a critical value of the pressure differential across the meniscus, there is a transition from stability to instability. For the zero-gravity condition, exact formulas for the capillary stability coefficients are derived.

  18. Buckled silicene formation on Ir(111).

    PubMed

    Meng, Lei; Wang, Yeliang; Zhang, Lizhi; Du, Shixuan; Wu, Rongting; Li, Linfei; Zhang, Yi; Li, Geng; Zhou, Haitao; Hofer, Werner A; Gao, Hong-Jun

    2013-02-13

    Silicene, a two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb structure similar to graphene, has been successfully fabricated on an Ir(111) substrate. It is characterized as a (√7×√7) superstructure with respect to the substrate lattice, as revealed by low energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy. Such a superstructure coincides with the (√3×√3) superlattice of silicene. First-principles calculations confirm that this is a (√3×√3)silicene/(√7×√7)Ir(111) configuration and that it has a buckled conformation. Importantly, the calculated electron localization function shows that the silicon adlayer on the Ir(111) substrate has 2D continuity. This work provides a method to fabricate high-quality silicene and an explanation for the formation of the buckled silicene sheet.

  19. Micro-buckling in the nanocomposite structure of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yewang; Ji, Baohua; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Huang, Yonggang

    2012-10-01

    Nanocomposite structure, consisting of hard mineral and soft protein, is the elementary building block of biological materials, where the mineral crystals are arranged in a staggered manner in protein matrix. This special alignment of mineral is supposed to be crucial to the structural stability of the biological materials under compressive load, but the underlying mechanism is not yet clear. In this study, we performed analytical analysis on the buckling strength of the nanocomposite structure by explicitly considering the staggered alignment of the mineral crystals, as well as the coordination among the minerals during the buckling deformation. Two local buckling modes of the nanostructure were identified, i.e., the symmetric mode and anti-symmetric mode. We showed that the symmetric mode often happens at large aspect ratio and large volume fraction of mineral, while the anti-symmetric happens at small aspect ratio and small volume fraction. In addition, we showed that because of the coordination of minerals with the help of their staggered alignment, the buckling strength of these two modes approached to that of the ideally continuous fiber reinforced composites at large aspect ratio given by Rosen's model, insensitive to the existing "gap"-like flaws between mineral tips. Furthermore, we identified a mechanism of buckling mode transition from local to global buckling with increase of aspect ratio, which was attributed to the biphasic dependence of the buckling strength on the aspect ratio. That is, for small aspect ratio, the local buckling strength is smaller than that of global buckling so that it dominates the buckling behavior of the nanocomposite; for comparatively larger aspect ratio, the local buckling strength is higher than that of global buckling so that the global buckling dominates the buckling behavior. We also found that the hierarchical structure can effectively enhance the buckling strength, particularly, this structural design enables

  20. Torsion and buckling of open sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Herbert

    1936-01-01

    In this paper is a discussion of the general principles for open sections of any shape. In what follows the torsion will be computed and on the basis of the results it will be possible to obtain a proper design of section in each case. The torsion of buckling members for the case where they are centrally loaded, leads to a problem in pure stability and is similar to that of stressed beams.

  1. Experimental results from detached plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.D.; Boody, F.P.; Bush, C.E.; Cohen, S.A.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; Medley, S.S.

    1986-10-01

    Detached plasmas are formed in TFTR which have the principal property of the boundary to the high temperature plasma core being defined by a radiating layer. This paper documents the properties of TFTR ohmic-detached plasmas with a range of plasma densities at two different plasma currents.

  2. Plastic buckling of cylinders under biaxial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giezen, Jurgen J.

    An experimental investigation is carried out to study the effects of nonproportional loading in the plastic range on a buckling load. The discrepancy between experimental and theoretical results points to some principal shortcoming in the analysis. The problem has been simplified by applying axial tensile load and external press to simple cylindrical shell specimen and observing the buckling load for various nonproportional load-paths. Results are compared to numerical predictions (BOSOR5) using classical type plasticity models such as [...] deformation and [...] incremental theory. Significant discrepancy was found an attributed to inadequate modeling of the nonlinear material behavior. The effects of geometrical imperfections and large deflections were found to insignificant, thereby leading to an idea [...] of the discrepancy between test and theory is due to a use of inadequate plastic model. The introduction of the Southwell plot into elastic shell buckling problem reduced the already minor effects of geometric imperfections.The Christoffersen-Hutchinson corner theory model was introduced into BOSAR5 in its simplest form as presented by Poh-Sang Lam. Results obtained with this model, which allows corners to form on an initially smooth yield surface, displayed better agreement with experimental data. However, increased computational time and problems related to abrupt changes in load-path at the corner are a major concern at this present time.

  3. Modern retinal laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Igor; Luttrull, Jeffrey K

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal lasers are a standard source of light to produce retinal tissue photocoagulation to treat retinovascular disease. The Diabetic Retinopathy Study and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study were large randomized clinical trials that have shown beneficial effect of retinal laser photocoagulation in diabetic retinopathy and have dictated the standard of care for decades. However, current treatment protocols undergo modifications. Types of lasers used in treatment of retinal diseases include argon, diode, dye and multicolor lasers, micropulse lasers and lasers for photodynamic therapy. Delivery systems include contact lens slit-lamp laser delivery, indirect ophthalmocope based laser photocoagulation and camera based navigated retinal photocoagulation with retinal eye-tracking. Selective targeted photocoagulation could be a future alternative to panretinal photocoagulation. PMID:25892934

  4. Buckled graphene for efficient energy harvest, storage and conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jin-Wu

    2016-10-01

    Buckling is one of the most common phenomena in atom-thick layered structures like graphene. While the buckling phenomenon usually causes disaster for most nanodevices, we illustrate one positive application of buckled graphene for energy harvest, storage and conversion. More specifically, we perform molecular dynamical simulations to show that buckled graphene can be used to collect wasted mechanical energy and store the energy in the form of internal knotting potential. Through strain engineering, the knotting potential can be converted into useful kinetic (thermal) energy that is highly concentrated at the free edges of buckled graphene. The present study demonstrates potential applications of buckled graphene for converting dispersed wasted mechanical energy into concentrated useful kinetic (thermal) energy.

  5. Thin film buckling : a relation between adhesion and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthel, Etienne; Faou, Jean-Yvon; Grachev, Sergey; Parry, Guillaume

    2013-03-01

    When thin films with low adhesion are compressively stressed, they may buckle. These buckles exhibit interesting morphologies such as the well known telephone cord. However our understanding of this form of buckling is limited because it couples the large displacement nonlinearities of plates with the subtleties of mixed-mode adhesion. Here we investigate the morphology of the thin film buckles as a function of mode mixity by a combination of experiments and simulations. We first exhibit a linear relation between the period of the telephone cord buckles and a characteristic parameter of the mixed mode adhesion. Furthermore we evidence a rich set of new buckle morphologies through experiments, and demonstrate that these morphologies can be reproduced in the simulations. We also show that we can rationalize the transitions between morphologies through a phase diagram. This excellent agreement between experimental results and numerical predictions further validates the simulation method we have developped recently.

  6. Dynamic buckling behavior of thin metal film lines from substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dan; Xie, Huimin; Wang, Heling; Zhang, Jie; Li, Chuanwei

    2014-10-01

    The dynamic buckling behavior of thin films from substrate is studied in this work. The experimental results show that the buckling morphology of the constantan film lines from the polymer substrate is inconsistent and non-sinusoidal, which is different from the sinusoidal form of the buckling morphology under static loads. The plastic deformation of the film lines results in the non-sinusoidal buckling morphology and residual deformation when unloaded. Finite element modeling results with regard to the plastic dissipation of the constantan film lines reveal that the plastic dissipation suppresses the buckling-driven delaminating under impact loads. This study will give some new perspectives on the buckling behavior of thin film from substrate.

  7. Buckled graphene for efficient energy harvest, storage and conversion.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jin-Wu

    2016-10-01

    Buckling is one of the most common phenomena in atom-thick layered structures like graphene. While the buckling phenomenon usually causes disaster for most nanodevices, we illustrate one positive application of buckled graphene for energy harvest, storage and conversion. More specifically, we perform molecular dynamical simulations to show that buckled graphene can be used to collect wasted mechanical energy and store the energy in the form of internal knotting potential. Through strain engineering, the knotting potential can be converted into useful kinetic (thermal) energy that is highly concentrated at the free edges of buckled graphene. The present study demonstrates potential applications of buckled graphene for converting dispersed wasted mechanical energy into concentrated useful kinetic (thermal) energy. PMID:27581194

  8. Buckled graphene for efficient energy harvest, storage and conversion.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jin-Wu

    2016-10-01

    Buckling is one of the most common phenomena in atom-thick layered structures like graphene. While the buckling phenomenon usually causes disaster for most nanodevices, we illustrate one positive application of buckled graphene for energy harvest, storage and conversion. More specifically, we perform molecular dynamical simulations to show that buckled graphene can be used to collect wasted mechanical energy and store the energy in the form of internal knotting potential. Through strain engineering, the knotting potential can be converted into useful kinetic (thermal) energy that is highly concentrated at the free edges of buckled graphene. The present study demonstrates potential applications of buckled graphene for converting dispersed wasted mechanical energy into concentrated useful kinetic (thermal) energy.

  9. Experimental Tests of a Real Building Seismically Retrofitted by Special Buckling-Restrained Braces

    SciTech Connect

    D'Aniello, Mario; Della Corte, Gaetano; Mazzolani, Federico M.

    2008-07-08

    Buckling Restrained Braces (BRBs), differently from conventional braces, do not exhibit appreciable difference between the tensile and compression capacity and no strength degradation of brace capacity under compressive and cyclic loading. Since lateral and local buckling behaviour modes are restrained, large inelastic capacities are attainable. Hence, BRBs may represent an efficient and reliable solution for reducing the seismic vulnerability of buildings. Results of experimental tests on the response of a real two-story reinforced concrete (RC) building equipped with BRBs are presented and discussed. The considered BRBs are a special 'only-steel' version of the more common 'unbonded braces'. In particular, two different BRBs have been tested. Both of them are detachable 'only-steel' devices, consisting in a rectangular steel plate and a restraining steel sleeve. The latter is composed by two omega shapes which are bolted together. The main characteristic of the braces consists in the possibility to hide them within the space between the facing and the backing of masonry infill walls commonly used for RC buildings.

  10. Buckling analysis of planar compression micro-springs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jing; Sui, Li; Shi, Gengchen

    2015-04-15

    Large compression deformation causes micro-springs buckling and loss of load capacity. We analyzed the impact of structural parameters and boundary conditions for planar micro-springs, and obtained the change rules for the two factors that affect buckling. A formula for critical buckling deformation of micro-springs under compressive load was derived based on elastic thin plate theory. Results from this formula were compared with finite element analysis results but these did not always correlate. Therefore, finite element analysis is necessary for micro-spring buckling analysis. We studied the variation of micro-spring critical buckling deformation caused by four structural parameters using ANSYS software under two constraint conditions. The simulation results show that when an x-direction constraint is added, the critical buckling deformation increases by 32.3-297.9%. The critical buckling deformation decreases with increase in micro-spring arc radius or section width and increases with increase in micro-spring thickness or straight beam width. We conducted experiments to confirm the simulation results, and the experimental and simulation trends were found to agree. Buckling analysis of the micro-spring establishes a theoretical foundation for optimizing micro-spring structural parameters and constraint conditions to maximize the critical buckling load.

  11. GBT pre-buckling and buckling analyses of thin-walled members under axial and transverse loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taig, Gerard; Ranzi, Gianluca; Luongo, Angelo

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents an analytical approach for pre-buckling and buckling analyses of thin-walled members implemented within the framework of the Generalised Beam Theory (GBT). With the proposed GBT cross-sectional analysis, the set of deformation modes used in the analysis is represented by the dynamic modes obtained for an unrestrained frame representing the cross-section. In this manner, it is possible to account for the deformability of the cross-section in both pre-buckling and buckling analyses. Different loading conditions, including both axial and transverse arrangements, are considered in the applications to highlight under which circumstances the use of the GBT deformation modes is required for an adequate representation of the pre-buckling and buckling response. The numerical results have been validated against those determined using a shell element model developed in the finite element software ABAQUS.

  12. Residual stress mapping by micro X-ray diffraction: Application to the study of thin film buckling

    SciTech Connect

    Goudeau, P.; Villain, P.; Tamura, N.; Celestre, R.S.; Padmore, H.A.

    2002-11-06

    Thin films deposited by Physical Vapour Deposition techniques on substrates generally exhibit large residual stresses which may be responsible of spontaneous detachment of the film from its substrate and in the case of compressive stresses, thin film buckling. Although these effects are undesirable for future applications, one may take benefit of it for thin film mechanical properties investigation. Since the 80's, a lot of theoretical works have been done to develop mechanical models with the aim to get a better understanding of driven mechanisms giving rise to this phenomenon and thus to propose solutions to avoid such problems. Nevertheless, only a few experimental works have been done on this subject to support these theoretical results and nothing concerning local stress/strain measurement mainly because of the small dimension of the buckling (few tenth mm). This paper deals with the application of micro beam x-ray diffraction available on synchrotron radiation sources for stress/ strain mapping analysis of gold thin film buckling.

  13. Induction of vitreolysis and vitreous detachment with hyaluronidase and perfluoropropane gas.

    PubMed

    Kang, S W; Hyung, S M; Choi, M Y; Lee, J

    1995-12-01

    To simulate the posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) in the rabbit, 1 IU hyaluronidase and/or 0.2 ml of perfluoropropane gas was intravitreally injected. Ophthalmoscopic, light microscopic examination prepared by cryotechnique, electron microscopic examination, and electroretinogram were done on the 3rd and 28th postoperative days. As a result, the eyes undergone simultaneous intravitreal injection of 1 IU hyaluronidase and 0.2 ml perfluoropropane gas showed membranous structure split from the internal limiting membrane of the superior retina in 3 days after injection. The eyes also demonstrated membranous structure separated from the superior retina after 28 days, simulating vitreous detachment. On the contrary, neither agent alone induced vitreous detachment. No toxic retinal changes associated with simultaneous intravitreal injection of 1 IU hyaluronidase and 0.2 ml perfluoropropane gas were observed. Therefore, with a future support by histologic examination other than cryotechnique and by immunohistochemical analysis, the simultaneous intravitreal injection of perfluoropropane gas and hyaluronidase would be a promising method to induce vitreous detachment in non-vitrectomized eye.

  14. Stability of Detached Grown Germanium Single Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweizer, M.; Volz, M. P.; Cobb, S. D.; Vujisic, L.; Szofran, F. R.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Detachment of the melt meniscus from the crucible during semiconductor Bridgman growth experiments has been observed in recent years, especially under microgravity experiments. Under earth conditions, the hydrostatic pressure counteracts the mechanism, whereby it is more difficult to achieve detached Bridgman growth. Attempts to get stable detached growth under terrestrial conditions have been discussed in the literature and have been the subject of recent experiments in our own group. The advantage of crystals grown without wall contact is obvious: In general, they possess a higher crystal quality than conventional Bridgman grown crystals with wall contact. However, due to the interaction of different parameters such as the wetting behavior of the melt with the crucible, and the dependence of the growth angle with the shape of the melt meniscus, the mechanism leading to detachment is very complicated and not completely understood. We have grown several doped and undoped Germanium crystals with the detached Bridgman and the normal Bridgman growth technique. Pyrolytic boron nitride containers were used for all growth experiments. In the detached grown crystals the typical gap thickness between the pBN crucible and the crystal is in the range of 10 to 100 micrometers, which was determined by performing profilometer measurements. Etch pit density measurements were also performed and a comparison between detached and attached grown crystals will be given. An interesting feature was detected on the surface of a detached grown crystal. Strong surface striations with an average axial distance of 0.5 mm were observed around the whole circumference. The maximum fluctuation of the gap thickness is in the range of 5-10 micrometers. These variations of the detached gap along the crystal axis can be explained by a kind of stiction of the melt/crucible interface and thus by a variation of the meniscus shape. This phenomenon leading to the fluctuation of the gap thickness will be

  15. Stability of Detached Grown Germanium Single Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweizer, M.; Volz, M. P.; Cobb, S. D.; Motakef, S.; Szofran, F. R.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Detachment of the melt meniscus from the crucible during semiconductor Bridgman growth experiments has been observed in recent years especially, under microgravity experiments. Under earth conditions, the hydrostatic pressure counteracts the mechanism, whereby it is more difficult to achieve detached Bridgman growth. Attempts to get stable detached growth under terrestrial conditions have been discussed in the literature and have been the subject of recent experiments in our own group. The advantage of crystals grown without wall contact is obvious: In general, they possess a higher crystal quality than conventional Bridgman grown crystals with wall contact. However, due to the interaction of different parameters such as the wetting behavior of the melt with the crucible, and the dependence of the growth angle with the shape of the melt meniscus, the mechanism leading to detachment is very complicated and not completely understood. We have grown several doped and undoped Germanium crystals with the detached Bridgman and the normal Bridgman growth technique. Pyrolytic boron nitride containers were used for all growth experiments. In the detached grown crystals the typical gap thickness between the pBN crucible and the crystal is in the range of 10 to 100 microns, which was determined by performing profilometer measurements. Etch pit density measurements were also performed and a comparison between detached and attached grown crystals will be given. An interesting feature was detected on the surface of a detached grown crystal. Strong surface striations with an average axial distance of 0.5mm were observed around the whole circumference. The maximum fluctuation of the gap thickness is in the range of 5-10 microns. These variations of the detached gap along the crystal axis can be explained by a kind of stiction of the melt/crucible interface and thus by a variation of the meniscus shape. This phenomenon leading to the fluctuation of the gap thickness will be

  16. Retinal and optic nerve diseases.

    PubMed

    Margalit, Eyal; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2003-11-01

    A variety of disease processes can affect the retina and/or the optic nerve, including vascular or ischemic disease, inflammatory or infectious disease, and degenerative disease. These disease processes may selectively damage certain parts of the retina or optic nerve, and the specific areas that are damaged may have implications for the design of potential therapeutic visual prosthetic devices. Outer retinal diseases include age-related macular degeneration, pathologic myopia, and retinitis pigmentosa. Although the retinal photoreceptors may be lost, the inner retina is relatively well-preserved in these diseases and may be a target for retinal prosthetic devices. Inner retinal diseases include retinal vascular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinal venous occlusive disease, and retinopathy of prematurity. Other retinal diseases such as ocular infections (retinitis, endophthalmitis) may affect all retinal layers. Because the inner retinal cells, including the retinal ganglion cells, may be destroyed in these diseases (inner retinal or whole retinal), prosthetic devices that stimulate the inner retina may not be effective. Common optic nerve diseases include glaucoma, optic neuritis, and ischemic optic neuropathy. Because the ganglion cell nerve fibers themselves are damaged, visual prosthetics for these diseases will need to target more distal portions of the visual pathway, such as the visual cortex. Clearly, a sound understanding of retinal and optic nerve disease pathophysiology is critical for designing and choosing the optimal visual prosthetic device.

  17. Rhodopsin regeneration in the normal and in the detached/replaced retina of the skate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Ripps, H

    1992-11-01

    The bleaching and regeneration of rhodopsin in the skate retina was studied by means of fundus reflectometry, both in the normal eyecup preparation and after the retina had been detached and then replaced on the surface of the pigment epithelium (RPE). After bleaching virtually all the rhodopsin in the retinal test area of the normal eyecup, more than 90% of the photopigment was reformed after about 2 hr in darkness; over most of this time course, rhodopsin density rose linearly at a rate of 0.875% min-1 with a half-time of 55 min. Detaching the retina from its pigment epithelium resulted in a number of abnormalities, both structural and functional. Histological examination of the detached/replaced (D/R) retina showed striking alterations in the structural integrity of the RPE cells at their interface with the neural retina. The cells appeared vacuolated and misshapen, and the apical processes of the RPE, which normally ensheath the receptor outer segments, were shredded and free of their association with the visual cells. These morphological changes, as well as dilution of the IRBP content of the subretinal space caused by separation of the tissues, appear to be the main factors contributing to the functional abnormalities in rhodopsin kinetics. But despite these abnormalities and the persistent detachment, the rate of regeneration and the amount of rhodopsin reformed after bleaching were reduced by less than 50% of their normal values. The fact that a significant fraction of the bleached rhodopsin was regenerated under these conditions indicates that 11-cis retinal formed in the RPE was able to traverse a much greater than normal subretinal space to reach the opsin-bearing photoreceptor membranes. PMID:1478278

  18. Automated segmentation of serous pigment epithelium detachment in SD-OCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhuli; Shi, Fei; Xiang, Dehui; Chen, Haoyu; Chen, Xinjian

    2015-03-01

    Pigment epithelium detachment (PED) is an important clinical manifestation of multiple chorio-retinal disease processes, which can cause the loss of central vision. A 3-D method is proposed to automatically segment serous PED in SD-OCT images. The proposed method consists of five steps: first, a curvature anisotropic diffusion filter is applied to remove speckle noise. Second, the graph search method is applied for abnormal retinal layer segmentation associated with retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) deformation. During this process, Bruch's membrane, which doesn't show in the SD-OCT images, is estimated with the convex hull algorithm. Third, the foreground and background seeds are automatically obtained from retinal layer segmentation result. Fourth, the serous PED is segmented based on the graph cut method. Finally, a post-processing step is applied to remove false positive regions based on mathematical morphology. The proposed method was tested on 20 SD-OCT volumes from 20 patients diagnosed with serous PED. The average true positive volume fraction (TPVF), false positive volume fraction (FPVF), dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and positive predictive value (PPV) are 97.19%, 0.03%, 96.34% and 95.59%, respectively. Linear regression analysis shows a strong correlation (r = 0.975) comparing the segmented PED volumes with the ground truth labeled by an ophthalmology expert. The proposed method can provide clinicians with accurate quantitative information, including shape, size and position of the PED regions, which can assist diagnose and treatment.

  19. Retinal vein occlusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... most often caused by hardening of the arteries ( atherosclerosis ) and the formation of a blood clot. Blockage ... arteries that have been thickened or hardened by atherosclerosis cross over and place pressure on a retinal ...

  20. Retinal artery occlusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... eds. Textbook of Family Medicine . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 17. Duker JS. Retinal arterial ... M, Duker JS, eds. Ophthalmology. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2014:chap 6.18. Reiss GR, Sipperley ...

  1. Bending and buckling of wet paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Minhee; Kim, Seungho; Kim, Ho-Young; Mahadevan, L.

    2016-04-01

    Flat paper stained with water buckles and wrinkles as it swells and deforms out of the original plane. Here we quantify the geometry and mechanics of a strip of paper that swells when it imbibes water from a narrow capillary. Characterizing the hygroexpansive nature of paper shows that thickness-wise swelling is much faster than in-plane water imbibition, leading to a simple picture for the process by which the strip of paper bends out of the plane. We model the out-of-plane deformation using a quasi-static theory and show that our results are consistent with quantitative experiments.

  2. Retinal Changes Induced by Epiretinal Tangential Forces

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Mario R.; Comune, Chiara; Ferrara, Mariantonia; Cennamo, Gilda; De Cillà, Stefano; Toto, Lisa; Cennamo, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Two kinds of forces are active in vitreoretinal traction diseases: tangential and anterior-posterior forces. However, tangential forces are less characterized and classified in literature compared to the anterior-posterior ones. Tangential epiretinal forces are mainly due to anomalous posterior vitreous detachment (PVD), vitreoschisis, vitreopapillary adhesion (VPA), and epiretinal membranes (ERMs). Anomalous PVD plays a key role in the formation of the tangential vectorial forces on the retinal surface as consequence of gel liquefaction (synchysis) without sufficient and fast vitreous dehiscence at the vitreoretinal interface. The anomalous and persistent adherence of the posterior hyaloid to the retina can lead to vitreomacular/vitreopapillary adhesion or to a formation of avascular fibrocellular tissue (ERM) resulting from the proliferation and transdifferentiation of hyalocytes resident in the cortical vitreous remnants after vitreoschisis. The right interpretation of the forces involved in the epiretinal tangential tractions helps in a better definition of diagnosis, progression, prognosis, and surgical outcomes of vitreomacular interfaces. PMID:26421183

  3. 49 CFR 179.400-6 - Bursting and buckling pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bursting and buckling pressure. 179.400-6 Section 179.400-6 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS... and 107A) § 179.400-6 Bursting and buckling pressure. (a) (b) The outer jacket of the...

  4. 49 CFR 179.400-6 - Bursting and buckling pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bursting and buckling pressure. 179.400-6 Section 179.400-6 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND... 107A) § 179.400-6 Bursting and buckling pressure. (a) (b) The outer jacket of the required...

  5. 49 CFR 179.400-6 - Bursting and buckling pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bursting and buckling pressure. 179.400-6 Section 179.400-6 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND... 107A) § 179.400-6 Bursting and buckling pressure. (a) (b) The outer jacket of the required...

  6. 49 CFR 179.400-6 - Bursting and buckling pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bursting and buckling pressure. 179.400-6 Section 179.400-6 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND... 107A) § 179.400-6 Bursting and buckling pressure. (a) (b) The outer jacket of the required...

  7. Dynamic buckling of stiffened plates subjected to explosion impact loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Guo, J.; Yao, X. L.; Zhang, A. M.

    2016-03-01

    The dynamic buckling characteristics and criteria of a ship's structural stiffened plate subjected to underwater explosion impact loads are investigated in this study. Using the structural deformations observed in the experiments of underwater explosions against a plated grillage model, the mode shapes of the dynamic buckling were obtained. Through the construction of a computational model of stiffened plates subjected to an underwater explosion shock wave, the impact load was theoretically calculated and transformed into a rectangular pulse. According to the different response patterns of stiffened plates under different impact loads, a dynamic buckling criterion for the stiffened plates subjected to an explosion shock wave was proposed. Additionally, the static buckling phenomenon in the stiffened plates was analysed based on the minimum excess principle. In combination with the dynamic buckling criterion, the effects of various stiffening configurations on the dynamic and static buckling loads are discussed. The calculation results show that when the equivalent rectangular pulse is 2-3 times that of the static buckling load, the responses of the stiffened plates under the original shock load and the equivalent rectangular pulse are virtually identical. The impact load amplitude is the primary influencing factor in the dynamic buckling of stiffened plates subjected to underwater explosive impact loads. The stiffened plate aspect ratio has a substantial influence on the dynamic load factor. The analytical method and results are presented, which can be used to design stiffened optimum hull structures to enhance the dynamic load carrying capacity to withstand underwater shock damage.

  8. Current convective instability in detached divertor plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Smolyakov, A. I.

    2016-09-01

    The asymmetry of inner and outer divertors, which cause the inner divertor to detach first, while the outer one is still attached, results in the large temperature difference between the vicinities of inner and outer targets and the onset of large electric potential drop through detached plasma of the inner divertor. A large potential drop along with the inhomogeneity of the resistivity of detached plasma across the divertor leg drives the current convective instability in the inner divertor and subsequent fluctuations of radiation loss similar to that observed in experiments. The estimates of the frequency of plasma parameter fluctuations due to the current convective instability are in a reasonable agreement with experimental data. Once the outer divertor also detaches, the temperature difference between the vicinities of inner and outer targets disappears, and the driving force for the current convective instability, and resulting oscillations of radiation loss, vanishes. This feature is indeed observed in experiments.

  9. Detached plasma in Saturn's front side magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.

    1983-01-01

    Plasma observations in the outer front side Saturnian magnetosphere are discussed which indicate the existence of dense flux tubes outside the plasma sheets. It is suggested that flux tubes are detached from the plasma sheet by a centifugally driven flute instability. The same instability leads to a dispersal of Titan-injected plasma. It is shown that the detached flux tubes will probably break open as they convect into the nightside magnetotail and lose their content in the form of a planetary wind.

  10. Electrical characterization of a buckling thermal energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trioux, E.; Rufer, L.; Monfray, S.; Skotnicki, T.; Muralt, P.; Basrour, S.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the electrical characterizations of a novel concept for thermal energy harvesting at micro scale. The devices presented here are based on a two-step transduction combining thermo-mechanical and piezoelectric conversion. The piezoelectric layer is directly integrated into a buckling bilayer plate made of aluminium and aluminium nitride. For the first time, we have characterized the structures electrically and we have investigated their output power during the buckling. Firstly, we have used an insulating tip to make the plate buckle in order to have an estimation of the output power due to piezoelectric contribution only, and to eliminate any pyroelectric contribution that might be present during the thermal actuation. Then, we heated up the structure and we collected the output signal with an instrumentation amplifier in order to measure the voltage generated during the buckling. The output power during the mechanical and the thermal buckling is compared in the paper.

  11. Buckling and vibration of flexoelectric nanofilms subjected to mechanical loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xu; Yang, Wenjun; Hu, Shuling; Shen, Shengping

    2016-03-01

    Piezoelectric nanofilms (PNFs) are widely used in microelectromechanical systems, buckling commonly occurs when subjected to compressive mechanical loads in their applications. In this paper we comprehensively study the flexoelectric effect on the buckling and vibrational behaviors of PNFs. The results from the analytical solutions indicate the significance of the flexoelectricity. The critical buckling loads and natural frequency are enhanced by the flexoelectricity. Analytical results indicate that the critical buckling load is not only influenced by the thickness of the PNFs, but also by the in-plane aspect ratio. When the thickness of the PNFs is several micrometers, the critical buckling load predicted by the present model is much higher than the prediction by the classical piezoelectric plate model. And the natural frequency calculated by the current model is much higher than that obtained by the classical piezoelectricity plate theory when the thickness is several tens of nanometers.

  12. Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, James; Mathieson, Keith; Kamins, Ted; Wang, Lele; Galambos, Ludwig; Huie, Philip; Sher, Alexander; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight to patients suffering from retinal degenerative disorders. Implanted electrode arrays apply patterned electrical stimulation to surviving retinal neurons, producing visual sensations. All current designs employ inductively coupled coils to transmit power and/or data to the implant. We present here the design and initial testing of a photovoltaic retinal prosthesis fabricated with a pixel density of up to 177 pixels/mm2. Photodiodes within each pixel of the subretinal array directly convert light to stimulation current, avoiding the use of bulky coil implants, decoding electronics, and wiring, and thereby reducing surgical complexity. A goggles-mounted camera captures the visual scene and transmits the data stream to a pocket processor. The resulting images are projected into the eyes by video goggles using pulsed, near infrared (~900 nm) light. Prostheses with three pixel densities (15, 55, and 177 pix/mm2) are being fabricated, and tests indicate a charge injection limit of 1.62 mC/cm2 at 25Hz. In vitro tests of the photovoltaic retinal stimulation using a 512-element microelectrode array have recorded stimulated spikes from the ganglion cells, with latencies in the 1-100ms range, and with peak irradiance stimulation thresholds varying from 0.1 to 1 mW/mm2. With 1ms pulses at 25Hz the average irradiance is more than 100 times below the IR retinal safety limit. Elicited retinal response disappeared upon the addition of synaptic blockers, indicating that the inner retina is stimulated rather than the ganglion cells directly, and raising hopes that the prosthesis will preserve some of the retina's natural signal processing.

  13. Membrane-bound and soluble Fas ligands have opposite functions in photoreceptor cell death following separation from the retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, H; Murakami, Y; Kataoka, K; Notomi, S; Mantopoulos, D; Trichonas, G; Miller, J W; Gregory, M S; Ksander, B R; Marshak-Rothstein, A; Vavvas, D G

    2015-01-01

    Fas ligand (FasL) triggers apoptosis of Fas-positive cells, and previous reports described FasL-induced cell death of Fas-positive photoreceptors following a retinal detachment. However, as FasL exists in membrane-bound (mFasL) and soluble (sFasL) forms, and is expressed on resident microglia and infiltrating monocyte/macrophages, the current study examined the relative contribution of mFasL and sFasL to photoreceptor cell death after induction of experimental retinal detachment in wild-type, knockout (FasL−/−), and mFasL-only knock-in (ΔCS) mice. Retinal detachment in FasL−/− mice resulted in a significant reduction of photoreceptor cell death. In contrast, ΔCS mice displayed significantly more apoptotic photoreceptor cell death. Photoreceptor loss in ΔCS mice was inhibited by a subretinal injection of recombinant sFasL. Thus, Fas/FasL-triggered cell death accounts for a significant amount of photoreceptor cell loss following the retinal detachment. The function of FasL was dependent upon the form of FasL expressed: mFasL triggered photoreceptor cell death, whereas sFasL protected the retina, indicating that enzyme-mediated cleavage of FasL determines, in part, the extent of vision loss following the retinal detachment. Moreover, it also indicates that treatment with sFasL could significantly reduce photoreceptor cell loss in patients with retinal detachment. PMID:26583327

  14. Buckling of Microtubules on a 2D Elastic Medium

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Arif Md. Rashedul; Inoue, Daisuke; Afrin, Tanjina; Mayama, Hiroyuki; Sada, Kazuki; Kakugo, Akira

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated compression stress induced mechanical deformation of microtubules (MTs) on a two-dimensional elastic medium and investigated the role of compression strain, strain rate, and a MT-associated protein in the deformation of MTs. We show that MTs, supported on a two-dimensional substrate by a MT-associated protein kinesin, undergo buckling when they are subjected to compression stress. Compression strain strongly affects the extent of buckling, although compression rate has no substantial effect on the buckling of MTs. Most importantly, the density of kinesin is found to play the key role in determining the buckling mode of MTs. We have made a comparison between our experimental results and the ‘elastic foundation model’ that theoretically predicts the buckling behavior of MTs and its connection to MT-associated proteins. Taking into consideration the role of kinesin in altering the mechanical property of MTs, we are able to explain the buckling behavior of MTs by the elastic foundation model. This work will help understand the buckling mechanism of MTs and its connection to MT-associated proteins or surrounding medium, and consequently will aid in obtaining a meticulous scenario of the compression stress induced deformation of MTs in cells. PMID:26596905

  15. Cap buckling as a potential mechanism of atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Abdelali, Maria; Reiter, Steven; Mongrain, Rosaire; Bertrand, Michel; L'Allier, Philippe L; Kritikou, Ekaterini A; Tardif, Jean-Claude

    2014-04-01

    Plaque rupture in atherosclerosis is the primary cause of potentially deadly coronary events, yet about 40% of ruptures occur away from the plaque cap shoulders and cannot be fully explained with the current biomechanical theories. Here, cap buckling is considered as a potential destabilizing factor which increases the propensity of the atherosclerotic plaque to rupture and which may also explain plaque failure away from the cap shoulders. To investigate this phenomenon, quasistatic 2D finite element simulations are performed, considering the salient geometrical and nonlinear material properties of diverse atherosclerotic plaques over the range of physiological loads. The numerical results indicate that buckling may displace the location of the peak von Mises stresses in the deflected caps. Plaque buckling, together with its deleterious effects is further observed experimentally in plaque caps using a physical model of deformable mock coronary arteries with fibroatheroma. Moreover, an analytical approach combining quasistatic equilibrium equations with the Navier-Bresse formulas is used to demonstrate the buckling potential of a simplified arched slender cap under intraluminal pressure and supported by foundations. This analysis shows that plaque caps - calcified, fibrotic or cellular - may buckle in specific undulated shapes once submitted to critical loads. Finally, a preliminary analysis of intravascular ultrasonography recordings of patients with atherosclerotic coronary arteries corroborates the numerical, experimental and theoretical findings and shows that various plaque caps buckle in vivo. By displacing the sites of high stresses in the plaque cap, buckling may explain the atherosclerotic plaque cap rupture at various locations, including cap shoulders.

  16. Techniques for Processing Eyes Implanted With a Retinal Prosthesis for Localized Histopathological Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nayagam, David A. X.; McGowan, Ceara; Villalobos, Joel; Williams, Richard A.; Salinas-LaRosa, Cesar; McKelvie, Penny; Lo, Irene; Basa, Meri; Tan, Justin; Williams, Chris E.

    2013-01-01

    With the recent development of retinal prostheses, it is important to develop reliable techniques for assessing the safety of these devices in preclinical studies. However, the standard fixation, preparation, and automated histology procedures are not ideal. Here we describe new procedures for evaluating the health of the retina directly adjacent to an implant. Retinal prostheses feature electrode arrays in contact with eye tissue. Previous methods have not been able to spatially localize the ocular tissue adjacent to individual electrodes within the array. In addition, standard histological processing often results in gross artifactual detachment of the retinal layers when assessing implanted eyes. Consequently, it has been difficult to assess localized damage, if present, caused by implantation and stimulation of an implanted electrode array. Therefore, we developed a method for identifying and localizing the ocular tissue adjacent to implanted electrodes using a (color-coded) dye marking scheme, and we modified an eye fixation technique to minimize artifactual retinal detachment. This method also rendered the sclera translucent, enabling localization of individual electrodes and specific parts of an implant. Finally, we used a matched control to increase the power of the histopathological assessments. In summary, this method enables reliable and efficient discrimination and assessment of the retinal cytoarchitecture in an implanted eye. PMID:23963336

  17. Pseudo-nonlinear dynamic analysis of buckled pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gültekin Sınır, B.

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the post-divergence behavior of fluid-conveying pipes supported at both ends is investigated using the nonlinear equations of motion. The governing equation exhibits a cubic nonlinearity arising from mid-plane stretching. Exact solutions for post-buckling configurations of pipes with fixed-fixed, fixed-hinged, and hinged-hinged boundary conditions are investigated. The pipe is stable at its original static equilibrium position until the flow velocity becomes high enough to cause a supercritical pitchfork bifurcation, and the pipe loses stability by static divergence. In the supercritical fluid velocity regime, the equilibrium configuration becomes unstable and bifurcates into multiple equilibrium positions. To investigate the vibrations that occur in the vicinity of a buckled equilibrium position, the pseudo-nonlinear vibration problem around the first buckled configuration is solved precisely using a new solution procedure. By solving the resulting eigenvalue problem, the natural frequencies and the associated mode shapes of the pipe are calculated. The dynamic stability of the post-buckling configurations obtained in this manner is investigated. The first buckled shape is a stable equilibrium position for all boundary conditions. The buckled configurations beyond the first buckling mode are unstable equilibrium positions. The natural frequencies of the lowest vibration modes around each of the first two buckled configurations are presented. Effects of the system parameters on pipe behavior as well as the possibility of a subcritical pitchfork bifurcation are also investigated. The results show that many internal resonances might be activated among the vibration modes around the same or different buckled configurations.

  18. Retinal diseases in a reference center from a Western Amazon capital city

    PubMed Central

    Malerbi, Fernando Korn; Matsudo, Nilson Hideo; Carneiro, Adriano Biondi Monteiro; Lottenberg, Claudio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To describe retinal diseases found in patients who were waiting for treatment at a tertiary care hospital in Rio Branco, Acre, Brazil. Methods Patients underwent slit lamp biomicroscopy, dilated fundus exam and ocular ultrasound. Patients were classified according to phakic status and retinal disease of the most severely affected eye. Results A total of 138 patients were examined. The mean age was 51.3 years. Diabetes was present in 35.3% and hypertension in 45.4% of these patients. Cataract was found in 23.2% of patients, in at least one eye. Retinal examination was possible in 129 patients. The main retinal diseases identified were rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (n=23; 17.8%) and diabetic retinopathy (n=32; 24.8%). Out of 40 patients evaluated due to diabetes, 13 (32.5%) had absent or mild forms of diabetic retinopathy and did not need further treatment, only observation. Conclusion Diabetic retinopathy was the main retinal disease in this population. It is an avoidable cause of blindness and can be remotely evaluated, in its initial stages, by telemedicine strategies. In remote Brazilian areas, telemedicine may be an important tool for retinal diseases diagnosis and follow-up. PMID:26761550

  19. Retinal pigment epithelial cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Sally

    2015-01-01

    The human retinal pigment epithelium forms early in development and subsequently remains dormant, undergoing minimal proliferation throughout normal life. Retinal pigment epithelium proliferation, however, can be activated in disease states or by removing retinal pigment epithelial cells into culture. We review the conditions that control retinal pigment epithelial proliferation in culture, in animal models and in human disease and interpret retinal pigment epithelium proliferation in context of the recently discovered retinal pigment epithelium stem cell that is responsible for most in vitro retinal pigment epithelial proliferation. Retinal pigment epithelial proliferation-mediated wound repair that occurs in selected macular diseases is contrasted with retinal pigment epithelial proliferation-mediated fibroblastic scar formation that underlies proliferative vitreoretinopathy. We discuss the role of retinal pigment epithelial proliferation in age-related macular degeneration which is reparative in some cases and destructive in others. Macular retinal pigment epithelium wound repair and regression of choroidal neovascularization are more pronounced in younger than older patients. We discuss the possibility that the limited retinal pigment epithelial proliferation and latent wound repair in older age-related macular degeneration patients can be stimulated to promote disease regression in age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26041390

  20. Analysis of the pre-retinal opacities in Gaucher Disease using spectral domain optical coherent tomography.

    PubMed

    Sheck, Leo H N; Wilson, Callum J; Vincent, Andrea L

    2012-12-01

    Fundal opacities have been reported in patients with Gaucher disease, a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease, prior to the advent of optical coherent tomography. This report provides a detailed analysis of the fundal opacities in a 14-year-old girl with genetically proven Gaucher disease using spectral domain optical coherent tomography. It illustrates clearly that these opacities were pre-retinal opacities located at the vitreo-retinal interface associated with localized posterior vitreous detachments, rather than vitreous opacities as previously suggested in the literature. PMID:22950450

  1. Buckling Analysis of Debonded Sandwich Panel Under Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, David W.; Wang, John T.

    1995-01-01

    A sandwich panel with initial through-the-width debonds is analyzed to study the buckling of its faceskin when subject to an in-plane compressive load. The debonded faceskin is modeled as a beam on a Winkler elastic foundation in which the springs of the elastic foundation represent the sandwich foam. The Rayleigh-Ritz and finite-difference methods are used to predict the critical buckling load for various debond lengths and stiffnesses of the sandwich foam. The accuracy of the methods is assessed with a plane-strain finite-element analysis. Results indicate that the elastic foundation approach underpredicts buckling loads for sandwich panels with isotropic foam cores.

  2. Passive control of buckling deformation via Anderson Localization Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elishakoff, Isaac; Li, Y. W.; Starnes, J. H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Buckling problems of two types of multi-span elastic plates with transverse stiffeners are considered using a method based on the finite difference calculus. The discreteness of the stiffeners is accounted for. It is found that the torsional rigidity of the stiffener plays an important role in the buckling mode pattern. When the torsional rigidity is properly adjusted, the stiffener can act as an isolator of deformation for the structure at buckling so that the deflection is only limited to a small area.

  3. Finite-temperature buckling of an extensible rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedi, Deshpreet Singh; Mao, Xiaoming

    2015-12-01

    Thermal fluctuations can play an important role in the buckling of elastic objects at small scales, such as polymers or nanotubes. In this paper, we study the finite-temperature buckling transition of an extensible rod by analyzing fluctuation corrections to the elasticity of the rod. We find that, in both two and three dimensions, thermal fluctuations delay the buckling transition, and near the transition, there is a critical regime in which fluctuations are prominent and make a contribution to the effective force that is of order √{T }. We verify our theoretical prediction of the phase diagram with Monte Carlo simulations.

  4. Buckled cantilevers for out-of-plane platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, R. W.; Ma, A. H.; Sameoto, D.; Parameswaran, M.; Leung, A. M.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, we show how surface-micromachined buckled cantilevers can be used to construct out-of-plane structures. We include the relevant theory necessary to predict the height and angle of plates attached to buckled cantilevers, as well as the mechanical stresses involved in assembly. These platforms can be assembled to any angle between 0° and 90° with respect to the substrate by changing the attachment point and the amount of deflection. Example devices were fabricated using PolyMUMPs™ and assembled. Using these devices, the deflection of the buckled cantilevers was verified, as well as the placement for raised platforms.

  5. Probabilistic retinal vessel segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chang-Hua; Agam, Gady

    2007-03-01

    Optic fundus assessment is widely used for diagnosing vascular and non-vascular pathology. Inspection of the retinal vasculature may reveal hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Due to various imaging conditions retinal images may be degraded. Consequently, the enhancement of such images and vessels in them is an important task with direct clinical applications. We propose a novel technique for vessel enhancement in retinal images that is capable of enhancing vessel junctions in addition to linear vessel segments. This is an extension of vessel filters we have previously developed for vessel enhancement in thoracic CT scans. The proposed approach is based on probabilistic models which can discern vessels and junctions. Evaluation shows the proposed filter is better than several known techniques and is comparable to the state of the art when evaluated on a standard dataset. A ridge-based vessel tracking process is applied on the enhanced image to demonstrate the effectiveness of the enhancement filter.

  6. Bioelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James D.

    2016-05-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated to clinical use over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa and one device is in clinical trials for treatment of age-related macular degeneration. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives to navigate and to detect large objects. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. In particular, current retinal prostheses do not provide peripheral visions due to technical and surgical limitations, thus limiting the effectiveness of the treatment. This paper reviews recent results from human implant patients and presents technical approaches for peripheral vision.

  7. Advances in Shell Buckling: Theory and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. Michael T.

    In a recent feature article in this journal, coauthored by Gert van der Heijden, I described the static-dynamic analogy and its role in understanding the localized post-buckling of shell-like structures, looking exclusively at integrable systems. We showed the true significance of the Maxwell energy criterion load in predicting the sudden onset of "shock sensitivity" to lateral disturbances. The present paper extends the survey to cover nonintegrable systems, such as thin compressed shells. These exhibit spatial chaos, generating a multiplicity of localized paths (and escape routes) with complex snaking and laddering phenomena. The final theoretical contribution shows how these concepts relate to the response and energy barriers of an axially compressed cylindrical shell. After surveying NASA's current shell-testing programme, a new nondestructive technique is proposed to estimate the "shock sensitivity" of a laboratory specimen that is in a compressed metastable state before buckling. A probe is used to measure the nonlinear load-deflection characteristic under a rigidly applied lateral displacement. Sensing the passive resisting force, it can be plotted in real time against the displacement, displaying an equilibrium path along which the force rises to a maximum and then decreases to zero: having reached the free state of the shell that forms a mountain-pass in the potential energy. The area under this graph gives the energy barrier against lateral shocks. The test is repeated at different levels of the overall compression. If a symmetry-breaking bifurcation is encountered on the path, computer simulations show how this can be suppressed by a controlled secondary probe tuned to deliver zero force on the shell.

  8. Detached auroral arcs in the trough region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anger, C. D.; Moshupi, M. C.; Wallis, D. D.; Murphree, J. S.; Brace, L. H.; Shepherd, G. G.

    1978-01-01

    In a previous paper, Moshupi et al. (1977) have reported on the occurrence of rare auroral 'patches' equatorward of the normally well-defined boundary of diffuse aurora. Some less spectacular but more common arclike features were observed in the same 'trough' region (between the plasmapause and the auroral oval) during the period 1972-1975. These 'detached' arcs show some similarities to stable auroral red arcs in terms of their location and occurrence, but are completely different spectroscopically in that the stable auroral red arcs produce almost pure atomic oxygen red line emissions, whereas the detached arcs are deficient in red line emission - a feature implying totally different production mechanisms. The characteristics of the detached lines are described, including their unusual local time/longitude dependence.

  9. [Impact of ozone therapy on the electrophysiological parameters of the retina in patients operated on for its rhegmatogenous detachment].

    PubMed

    Neroev, V V; Sarygina, O I; Zueva, M V; Tsapenko, I V; Egorova, E N

    2007-01-01

    The impact of ozone therapy on changes in the data of maximum combined electroretinography (ERG), macular ERG (MERG), and rhythmic ERG (RERG) at 12, 32, and 40 Hz was studied in the rehabilitative period in patients operated on for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. The integral and local glial indices K(g) and K(c) were calculated. Studies were conducted before, within 1 week and 1 and 2 months after a course of therapy. With ozone therapy, ERG and RERG depended on the specific features of changes available in the fundus of the eye before surgery. In the early rehabilitative period after surgery (circlage with subretinal fluid removal), ozone therapy normalized the glial indices, by decreasing the supernormal activity of Muller's glial cells and drastically increasing their reduced activity. The maximum effect was revealed for the function of phororeceptors (except for the eyes showing pronounced myopic dystrophic changes in the fundus). There were increases in MERG, ERG b-wave, and low-frequency RERG by 12 Hz, i.e. improved functions of the macular region and distal neurons of the retinal rod cell system. A latent period was established for the manifestation of a positive effect of ozonwe therapy on the functional of neurons of the internal retinal nuclear layer, as evidenced by RERG changes. Ozone therapy positively affect retinal electrogenesis in cases of total retinal detachment accompanied by a pronounced reduction in the glial index Kg before surgery. The therapy was found to have a positive impact on the functional activity of the retina of pair eyes, by developing within a one-moth latent period.

  10. Pathway to Retinal Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Beach, James

    2014-01-01

    Events and discoveries in oxygen monitoring over the past two centuries are presented as the background from which oximetry of the human retina evolved. Achievements and the people behind them are discussed, showing parallels between the work in tissue measurements and later in the eye. Developments in the two-wavelength technique for oxygen saturation measurements in retinal vessels are shown to exploit the forms of imaging technology available over time. The last section provides a short summary of the recent research in retinal diseases using vessel oximetry. PMID:25237591

  11. Retinal lesions in septicemia.

    PubMed

    Neudorfer, M; Barnea, Y; Geyer, O; Siegman-Igra, Y

    1993-12-15

    We explored the association between septicemia and specific retinal lesions in a prospective controlled study. Hemorrhages, cotton-wool spots, or Roth's spots were found in 24 of 101 septicemic patients (24%), compared to four of 99 age- and gender-matched control patients (4%) (P = .0002). There was no significant association between types of organisms or focus of infection and the presence of specific lesions. Histologic examination of affected eyes disclosed cytoid bodies in the nerve fiber layer without inflammation. A definite association between septicemia and retinal lesions was found and indicates the need for routine ophthalmoscopy in septicemic patients. PMID:8250076

  12. Detachable microsphere scalpel tips for potential use in ophthalmic surgery with the erbium:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Hutchens, Thomas C; Darafsheh, Arash; Fardad, Amir; Antoszyk, Andrew N; Ying, Howard S; Astratov, Vasily N; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2014-01-01

    Vitreoretinal surgery is performed using mechanical dissection that sometimes results in iatrogenic complications, including vitreous hemorrhage, retinal breaks, incomplete membrane delamination, retinal distortion, microscopic damage, etc. An ultraprecise laser probe would be an ideal tool for cutting away pathologic membranes; however, the depth of surgery should be precisely controlled to protect the sensitive underlying retina. The ultraprecise surgical microprobe formed by chains of dielectric spheres for use with the erbium:YAG laser source (λ=2940  nm), with extremely short optical penetration depth in tissue, was optimized. Numerical modeling demonstrated a potential advantage of five-sphere focusing chains of sapphire spheres with index n=1.71 for ablating the tissue with self-limited depth around 10 to 20 μm. Novel detachable microsphere scalpel tips formed by chains of 300 μm sapphire (or ruby) spheres were tested on ophthalmic tissues, ex vivo. Detachable scalpel tips could allow for reusability of expensive mid-infrared trunk fibers between procedures, and offer more surgical customization by interchanging various scalpel tip configurations. An innovative method for aiming beam integration into the microsphere scalpel to improve the illumination of the surgical site was also shown. Single Er:YAG pulses of 0.2 mJ and 75-μs duration produced ablation craters in cornea epithelium for one, three, and five sphere structures with the latter generating the smallest crater depth (10 μm) with the least amount of thermal damage depth (30 μm). Detachable microsphere laser scalpel tips may allow surgeons better precision and safety compared to mechanical scalpels when operating on delicate or sensitive areas like the retina.

  13. Choroidal ischemia and serous macular detachment associated with severe postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jee Woong; Lee, Dae Young; Nam, Dong Heun

    2008-06-01

    To report the association of a unilateral serous macular detachment with severe postoperative pain. A 71-year-old woman presented with a sudden decrease in vision in the right eye, seven days after a total knee replacement arthroplasty. The patient's history was unremarkable except for a severe pain greater than the visual analog scale of 8 points for about 2 days after surgery. Retinal examination showed a well differentiated serous detachment that was about 3.5 disc diameter in size and located in the macular area. Fluorecein angiography and indocyanine green angiography showed delayed perfusion of the choriocapillaris without leakage points in the early phase and persistent hypofluorescence with pooling of dye in the subretinal space in the late phase. There was a spontaneous resolution of the serous detachment and the choroidal changes with residual pigment epithelial changes. Severe postoperative pain may influence the sympathetic activity and introduce an ischemic injury with a focal, choroidal vascular compromise and secondary dysfunction of overlying RPE cells in select patients.

  14. Effect of grain boundary on the buckling of graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neek-Amal, M.; Peeters, F. M.

    2012-03-01

    The buckling of graphene nano-ribbons containing a grain boundary is studied using atomistic simulations where free and supported boundary conditions are invoked. We consider the buckling transition of two kinds of grain boundaries with special symmetry. When graphene contains a large angle grain boundary with θ = 21.8°, the buckling strains are larger than those of perfect graphene when the ribbons with free (supported) boundary condition are subjected to compressive tension parallel (perpendicular) to the grain boundary. This is opposite for the results of θ = 32.2°. The shape of the deformations of the buckled graphene nanoribbons depends on the boundary conditions, the presence of the particular used grain boundaries, and the direction of applied in-plane compressive tension.

  15. Buckliballs: Buckling-Induced Pattern Transformation of Structured Elastic Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoldi, Katia; Shim, Jongmin; Perdigou, Claude J.; Chen, Elizabeth R.; Reis, Pedro M.

    2012-02-01

    We present a class of continuum shell structures, the buckliball, which, undergo a structural transformation induced by buckling under pressure loading. The geometry of the buckliball comprises a spherical shell patterned with a regular array of circular voids. Moreover, we show that the buckling-induced pattern transformation is possible only with five specific hole arrangements. These voids are covered with a thin membrane, thereby making the ball air tight. Beyond a critical internal pressure, the thin ligaments between the voids buckle leading to a cooperative buckling cascade of the skeleton of the ball. Both precision desktop-scale experiments and finite element simulations are used to explore the underlying mechanics in detail and proof of concept of the proposed structures. We find excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement between experiments and simulations. This pattern transformation induced by a mechanical instability opens the possibility for reversible encapsulation, over a wide range of length scales.

  16. Progressive outer retinal necrosis syndrome: a comprehensive review of its clinical presentation, relationship to immune system status, and management.

    PubMed

    Austin

    2000-12-01

    Progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) syndrome is a form of the Varicella zoster virus (VZV) chorioretinitis found almost exclusively in people with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). This destructive infection has an extremely rapid course that may lead to no light perception in affected eyes within days or weeks. Attempts at its treatment have had limited success. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachments often occur after the development of atrophic retinal holes, and silicone oil temponade has been found to be the most successful reattachment procedure. Unfortunately, cataract formation is common after such surgery. PORN needs to be differentiated from acute retinal necrosis (ARN) syndrome, a necrotizing retinitis that can also be caused by VZV. PORN and ARN are found at opposite ends of the spectrum of necrotizing herpetic retinopathies (NHR), where its clinical presentation depends upon immune system status. After a brief case presentation, the distinguishing clinical characteristics of PORN, its differentiation from ARN, attempts at its treatment, the role of the immune system status on its clinical appearance and treatment, and management of complications such as retinal detachment and subsequent cataracts are discussed.

  17. Buckling and failure characteristics of graphite-polyimide shear panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, M. J.; Hagaman, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    The buckling and failure characteristics of unstiffened, blade stiffened, and hat stiffened graphite-polyimide shear panels are described. The picture frame shear test is used to obtain shear stress-strain data at room temperature and at 316 deg C. The experimental results are compared with a linear buckling analysis, and the specimen failure modes are described. The effect of the 316 deg C test temperature on panel behavior are discussed.

  18. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature an...

  19. Degenerative retinal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Hollyfield, J.G. Anderson, R.E. LaVail, M.M. . Dept. of Anatomy)

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers divided among three sections. Some of the paper titles are: Molecular Genetics of Gyrate Atrophy; Molecular Site of Expression and Genetic Interaction of the rd and the rds Loci in the Retina of the Mouse; and Studies on Abnormal Cyclic GMP Metabolism in Animal Models of Retinal Degeneration: Genetic Relationships and Cellular Compartmentalization.

  20. Electrically induced drop detachment and ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalli, Andrea; Preston, Daniel J.; Tio, Evelyn; Martin, David W.; Miljkovic, Nenad; Wang, Evelyn N.; Blanchette, Francois; Bush, John W. M.

    2016-02-01

    A deformed droplet may leap from a solid substrate, impelled to detach through the conversion of surface energy into kinetic energy that arises as it relaxes to a sphere. Electrowetting provides a means of preparing a droplet on a substrate for lift-off. When a voltage is applied between a water droplet and a dielectric-coated electrode, the wettability of the substrate increases in a controlled way, leading to the spreading of the droplet. Once the voltage is released, the droplet recoils, due to a sudden excess in surface energy, and droplet detachment may follow. The process of drop detachment and lift-off, prevalent in both biology and micro-engineering, has to date been considered primarily in terms of qualitative scaling arguments for idealized superhydrophobic substrates. We here consider the eletrically-induced ejection of droplets from substrates of finite wettability and analyze the process quantitatively. We compare experiments to numerical simulations and analyze how the energy conversion efficiency is affected by the applied voltage and the intrinsic contact angle of the droplet on the substrate. Our results indicate that the finite wettability of the substrate significantly affects the detachment dynamics, and so provide new rationale for the previously reported large critical radius for drop ejection from micro-textured substrates.

  1. Detachment of agglutinin-bonded red blood cells. III. Mechanical analysis for large contact areas.

    PubMed Central

    Berk, D.; Evans, E.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental method and analysis are introduced which provide direct quantitation of the strength of adhesive contact for large agglutinin-bonded regions between macroscopically smooth membrane capsules (e.g., red blood cells). The approach yields intrinsic properties for separation of adherent regions independent of mechanical deformation of the membrane capsules during detachment. Conceptually, the micromechanical method involves one rigid test-capsule surface (in the form of a perfect sphere) held fixed by a micropipette and a second deformable capsule maneuvered with another micropipette to force contact with the test capsule. Only the test capsule is bound with agglutinin so that the maximum number of cross-bridges can be formed without steric interference. Following formation of a large adhesion region by mechanical impingement, the deformable capsule is detached from the rigid capsule surface by progressive aspiration into the micropipette. For the particular case modeled here, the deformable capsule is assumed to be a red blood cell which is preswollen by slight osmotic hydration before the test. The caliber of the detachment pipette is chosen so that the capsule will form a smooth cylindrical "piston" inside the pipette as it is aspirated. Because of the high flexibility of the membrane, the capsule naturally seals against the tube wall by pressurization even though it does not adhere to the glass. This arrangement maintains perfect axial symmetry and prevents the membrane from folding or buckling. Hence, it is possible to rigorously analyze the mechanics of deformation of the cell body to obtain the crucial "transducer" relation between pipette suction force and the membrane tension applied directly at the perimeter of the adhesive contact. Further, the geometry of the cell throughout the detachment process is predicted which provides accurate specification of the contact angle theta c between surfaces at the perimeter of the contact. A full analysis

  2. Buckle Driven Delamination in Thin Hard Film Compliant Substrate Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, N. R.; Reedy, E. D.; Corona, E.; Adams, D. P.; Kennedy, M. S.; Cordill, M. J.; Bahr, D. F.

    2010-06-01

    Deformation and fracture of thin films on compliant substrates are key factors constraining the performance of emerging flexible substrate devices. [1-3] These systems often contain layers of thin polymer, ceramic and metallic films and stretchable interconnects where differing properties induce high normal and shear stresses. [4] As long as the films remain bonded to the substrates, they may deform far beyond their freestanding form. Once debonded, substrate constraint disappears leading to film failure. [3] Experimentally it is very difficult to measure properties in these systems at sub-micron and nanoscales. Theoretically it is very difficult to determine the contributions from the films, interfaces, and substrates. As a result our understanding of deformation and fracture behavior in compliant substrate systems is limited. This motivated a study of buckle driven delamination of thin hard tungsten films on pure PMMA substrates. The films were sputter deposited to thicknesses of 100 nm, 200 nm, and 400 nm with a residual compressive stress of 1.7 GPa. An aluminum oxide interlayer was added on several samples to alter interfacial composition. Buckles formed spontaneously on the PMMA substrates following film deposition. On films without the aluminum oxide interlayer, an extensive network of small telephone cord buckles formed following deposition, interspersed with regions of larger telephone cord buckles. (Figure 1) On films with an aluminum oxide interlayer, telephone cord buckles formed creating a uniform widely spaced pattern. Through-substrate optical observations revealed matching buckle patterns along the film-substrate interface indicating that delamination occurred for large and small buckles with and without an interlayer. The coexistence of large and small buckles on the same substrate led to two distinct behaviors as shown in Figure 2 where normalized buckle heights are plotted against normalized film stress. The behaviors deviate significantly from

  3. Thermal Buckling Analysis of Rectangular Panels Subjected to Humped Temperature Profile Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William I.

    2004-01-01

    This research investigates thermal buckling characteristics of rectangular panels subjected to different types of humped temperature profile heating. Minimum potential energy and finite-element methods are used to calculate the panel buckling temperatures. The two methods give fairly close thermal buckling solutions. 'Buckling temperature magnification factor of the first kind, eta' is established for the fixed panel edges to scale up the buckling solution of uniform temperature loading case to give the buckling solution of the humped temperature profile loading cases. Also, 'buckling temperature magnification factor of the second kind, xi' is established for the free panel edges to scale up the buckling solution of humped temperature profile loading cases with unheated boundary heat sinks to give the buckling solutions when the boundary heat sinks are heated up.

  4. Syneresis and delayed detachment in agar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divoux, Thibaut; Mao, Bosi; Snabre, Patrick

    Biogels made of crosslinked polymers such as proteins or polysaccharides behave as porous soft solids and store large amount of solvent. These gels undergo spontaneous aging, called syneresis that consists in the shrinkage of the gel matrix and the progressive expulsion of the solvent. As a result, a biogel originally casted in a container often lose contact with the container sidewalls, and the detachment time is a priori difficult to anticipate since it may occur over variable time spans (from hours to days). Here we report on the syneresis phenomena in agar plates that consist in Petri dishes filled with a gel mainly composed of agar. Direct observations and speckle pattern correlation analysis allow us to rationalize the delayed detachment of the gel from the sidewall of the Petri dish. The detachment time $t^*$ is surprisingly not controlled by the mass loss as one would intuitively expect. Instead, $t^*$ is strongly correlated to the gel minimum thickness $e_{min}$ measured along the sidewall of the plate, and increases as a robust function of $e_{min}$ independently of the prior mass-loss history. Time-resolved correlation spectroscopy atypically applied to such weakly diffusive media gives access to the local thinning rate of the gel. This technique also allows us to detect the gel micro-displacements that are triggered by the water evaporation prior to the detachment, and even to anticipate the latter from a few hours. Our work provides observables to predict the detachment time of agar gels in dishes, and highlights the relevance of speckle pattern correlation analysis for the quantitative investigation of the syneresis dynamics in biopolymer gels.

  5. Syneresis and delayed detachment in agar plates.

    PubMed

    Divoux, Thibaut; Mao, Bosi; Snabre, Patrick

    2015-05-14

    Biogels made of crosslinked polymers such as proteins or polysaccharides behave as porous soft solids and store large amounts of solvent. These gels undergo spontaneous aging, called syneresis, which consists of the shrinkage of the gel matrix and the progressive expulsion of solvent. As a result, a biogel originally casted in a container often loses contact with the container sidewalls, and the detachment time is difficult to anticipate a priori, since it may occur over variable time spans (from hours to days). Here we report on syneresis phenomena in agar plates, which consist of Petri dishes filled with a gel mainly composed of agar. Direct observations and speckle pattern correlation analysis allow us to rationalize the delayed detachment of the gel from the sidewall of the Petri dish. The detachment time t* is surprisingly not controlled by the mass loss as one would intuitively expect. Instead, t* is strongly correlated to the gel minimum thickness emin measured along the sidewall of the plate, and increases as a robust function of emin, independently of the prior mass-loss history. Time-resolved correlation spectroscopy atypically applied to such weakly diffusive media gives access to the local thinning rate of the gel. This technique also allows us to detect the gel micro-displacements that are triggered by water evaporation prior to the detachment, and even to anticipate the latter from a few hours. Our work provides observables to predict the detachment time of agar gels in dishes, and highlights the relevance of speckle pattern correlation analysis for the quantitative investigation of the syneresis dynamics in biopolymer gels.

  6. Syneresis and delayed detachment in agar plates.

    PubMed

    Divoux, Thibaut; Mao, Bosi; Snabre, Patrick

    2015-05-14

    Biogels made of crosslinked polymers such as proteins or polysaccharides behave as porous soft solids and store large amounts of solvent. These gels undergo spontaneous aging, called syneresis, which consists of the shrinkage of the gel matrix and the progressive expulsion of solvent. As a result, a biogel originally casted in a container often loses contact with the container sidewalls, and the detachment time is difficult to anticipate a priori, since it may occur over variable time spans (from hours to days). Here we report on syneresis phenomena in agar plates, which consist of Petri dishes filled with a gel mainly composed of agar. Direct observations and speckle pattern correlation analysis allow us to rationalize the delayed detachment of the gel from the sidewall of the Petri dish. The detachment time t* is surprisingly not controlled by the mass loss as one would intuitively expect. Instead, t* is strongly correlated to the gel minimum thickness emin measured along the sidewall of the plate, and increases as a robust function of emin, independently of the prior mass-loss history. Time-resolved correlation spectroscopy atypically applied to such weakly diffusive media gives access to the local thinning rate of the gel. This technique also allows us to detect the gel micro-displacements that are triggered by water evaporation prior to the detachment, and even to anticipate the latter from a few hours. Our work provides observables to predict the detachment time of agar gels in dishes, and highlights the relevance of speckle pattern correlation analysis for the quantitative investigation of the syneresis dynamics in biopolymer gels. PMID:25812667

  7. Buckling and vibration of periodic lattice structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, M. S.

    1981-01-01

    Lattice booms and platforms composed of flexible members or large diameter rings which may be stiffened by cables in order to support membrane-like antennas or reflector surfaces are the main components of some large space structures. The nature of these structures, repetitive geometry with few different members, makes possible relatively simple solutions for buckling and vibration of a certain class of these structures. Each member is represented by a stiffness matrix derived from the exact solution of the beam column equation. This transcendental matrix gives the current member stiffness at any end load or frequency. Using conventional finite element techniques, equilibrium equations can be written involving displacements and rotations of a typical node and its neighbors. The assumptions of a simple trigonometric mode shape is found to satisfy these equations exactly; thus the entire problem is governed by just one 6 x 6 matrix equation involving the amplitude of the displacement and rotation mode shapes. The boundary conditions implied by this solution are simple supported ends for the column type configurations.

  8. Buckling instability in ordered bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Denis; Mather, William; Mondragón-Palomino, Octavio; Orozco-Fuentes, Sirio; Danino, Tal; Hasty, Jeff; Tsimring, Lev S.

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial colonies often exhibit complex spatio-temporal organization. This collective behavior is affected by a multitude of factors ranging from the properties of individual cells (shape, motility, membrane structure) to chemotaxis and other means of cell-cell communication. One of the important but often overlooked mechanisms of spatio-temporal organization is direct mechanical contact among cells in dense colonies such as biofilms. While in natural habitats all these different mechanisms and factors act in concert, one can use laboratory cell cultures to study certain mechanisms in isolation. Recent work demonstrated that growth and ensuing expansion flow of rod-like bacteria Escherichia coli in confined environments leads to orientation of cells along the flow direction and thus to ordering of cells. However, the cell orientational ordering remained imperfect. In this paper we study one mechanism responsible for the persistence of disorder in growing cell populations. We demonstrate experimentally that a growing colony of nematically ordered cells is prone to the buckling instability. Our theoretical analysis and discrete-element simulations suggest that the nature of this instability is related to the anisotropy of the stress tensor in the ordered cell colony.

  9. The Retinal Homeobox (Rx) gene is necessary for retinal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-De Luna, Reyna I.; Kelly, Lisa E.; El-Hodiri, Heithem M.

    2011-01-01

    The Retinal Homeobox (Rx) gene is essential for vertebrate eye development. Rx function is required for the specification and maintenance of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs). Loss of Rx function leads to a lack of eye development in a variety of species. Here we show that Rx function is also necessary during retinal regeneration. We performed a thorough characterization of retinal regeneration after partial retinal resection in pre-metamorphic X. laevis. We show that after injury the wound is repopulated with retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) that express Rx and other RPC marker genes. We used an shRNA-based approach to specifically silence Rx expression in vivo in tadpoles. We found that loss of Rx function results in impaired retinal regeneration, including defects in the cells that repopulate the wound and the RPE at the wound site. We show that the regeneration defects can be rescued by provision of exogenous Rx. These results demonstrate for the first time that Rx, in addition to being essential during retinal development, also functions during retinal regeneration. PMID:21334323

  10. Buckling analysis of laminated thin shells in a hot environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Guptil, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of parametric studies to assess the effects of various parameters on the buckling behavior of angle-ply, laminated thin shells in a hot environment. These results were obtained by using a three-dimensional finite element analysis. An angle-ply, laminated thin shell with fiber orientation of (theta/-theta)(sub 2) was subjected to compressive mechanical loads. The laminated thin shell had a cylindrical geometry. The laminate contained T300 graphite fibers embedded in an intermediate-modulus, high-strength (IMHS) matrix. The fiber volume fraction was 55 percent and the moisture content was 2 percent. The residual stresses induced into the laminate structure during the curing were taken into account. Parametric studies were performed to examine the effect on the critical buckling load of the following parameters: cylinder length and thickness, internal hydrostatic pressure, different ply thicknesses, different temperature profiles through the thickness of the structure, and different lay up configurations and fiber volume fractions. In conjunction with these parameters the ply orientation was varied from 0 deg to 90 deg. Seven ply angles were examined: 0 deg, 15 deg, 30 deg, 45 deg, 60 deg, 75 deg, and 90 deg. The results show that the ply angle theta and the laminate thickness had significant effects on the critical buckling load. The fiber volume fraction, the fiber orientations, and the internal hydrostatic pressure had important effects on the critical buckling load. The cylinder length had a moderate influence on the buckling load. The thin shell with (theta/-theta)(sub 2) or (theta/-theta)(sub s) angle-ply laminate had better buckling-load performance than the thin shell with (theta)(sub 4) angle-ply laminate. The temperature profiles through the laminate thickness and various laminates with the different ply thicknesses has insignificant effects on the buckling behavior of the thin shells.

  11. Small Animal Retinal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, WooJhon; Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    Developing and validating new techniques and methods for small animal imaging is an important research area because there are many small animal models of retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma [1-6]. Because the retina is a multilayered structure with distinct abnormalities occurring in different intraretinal layers at different stages of disease progression, there is a need for imaging techniques that enable visualization of these layers individually at different time points. Although postmortem histology and ultrastructural analysis can be performed for investigating microscopic changes in the retina in small animal models, this requires sacrificing animals, which makes repeated assessment of the same animal at different time points impossible and increases the number of animals required. Furthermore, some retinal processes such as neurovascular coupling cannot be fully characterized postmortem.

  12. The peripheral retinal 'map'.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    The condition of the periphery of the retinal field of the human eye is of considerable significance, it is suggested, to those participating in various sporting activities. Its boundaries shrink and expand depending upon the physiological conditions imposed both upon the eye and upon the organism as a whole. Consequently its message to the brain may be impaired under stress with resulting danger owing to delayed response. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:1148574

  13. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    Eye Diseases Hereditary; Retinal Disease; Achromatopsia; Bardet-Biedl Syndrome; Bassen-Kornzweig Syndrome; Batten Disease; Best Disease; Choroidal Dystrophy; Choroideremia; Cone Dystrophy; Cone-Rod Dystrophy; Congenital Stationary Night Blindness; Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome; Fundus Albipunctatus; Goldmann-Favre Syndrome; Gyrate Atrophy; Juvenile Macular Degeneration; Kearns-Sayre Syndrome; Leber Congenital Amaurosis; Refsum Syndrome; Retinitis Pigmentosa; Retinitis Punctata Albescens; Retinoschisis; Rod-Cone Dystrophy; Rod Dystrophy; Rod Monochromacy; Stargardt Disease; Usher Syndrome

  14. Glutamatergic Retinal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous activity patterns propagate through many parts of the developing nervous system and shape the wiring of emerging circuits. Prior to vision, waves of activity originating in the retina propagate through the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of the thalamus to primary visual cortex (V1). Retinal waves have been shown to instruct the wiring of ganglion cell axons in LGN and of thalamocortical axons in V1 via correlation-based plasticity rules. Across species, retinal waves mature in three stereotypic stages (I–III), in which distinct circuit mechanisms give rise to unique activity patterns that serve specific functions in visual system refinement. Here, I review insights into the patterns, mechanisms, and functions of stage III retinal waves, which rely on glutamatergic signaling. As glutamatergic waves spread across the retina, neighboring ganglion cells with opposite light responses (ON vs. OFF) are activated sequentially. Recent studies identified lateral excitatory networks in the inner retina that generate and propagate glutamatergic waves, and vertical inhibitory networks that desynchronize the activity of ON and OFF cells in the wavefront. Stage III wave activity patterns may help segregate axons of ON and OFF ganglion cells in the LGN, and could contribute to the emergence of orientation selectivity in V1. PMID:27242446

  15. Detached Growth of Germanium by Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Volz, M.; Cobb, S.; Motakef, S.; Szofran, F. R.

    2004-01-01

    Detached crystal growth technique (dewetting) offers improvement in the quality of the grown crystals by preventing sticking to the walls of the crucible and thus reducing the possibility of parasitic nucleation and formation of lattice defects upon cooling. One of the factors relevant for the phenomena is the pressure differential across the meniscus at the crystal-melt interface. We investigated this effect experimentally. The growth took place in closed ampoules under the pressure of an inert gas (forming gas: 96% Ar + 4% H2). The pressure above the melt was adjustable and allowed for a control of the pressure difference between the top and bottom menisci. The crystals were characterized, particularly by taking profilometer measurements along the grown crystals surface. The effects of the experimental conditions on the detachment were compared with those predicted based on the theory of Duffar et al.

  16. High and Low Temperature Oceanic Detachment Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titarenko, Sofya; McCaig, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    One of the most important discoveries in Plate Tectonics in the last ten years is a "detachment mode" of seafloor spreading. Up to 50% of the Atlantic seafloor has formed by a combination of magmatism and slip on long-lived, convex-up detachment faults, forming oceanic core complexes (OCC). Two end-member types of OCC can be defined: The Atlantis Bank on the Southwest Indian Ridge is a high temperature OCC sampled by ODP Hole 735b. Deformation was dominated by crystal-plastic flow both above and below the solidus at 800-950 °C, over a period of around 200 ka. In contrast, the Atlantis Massif at 30 °N in the Atlantic, sampled by IODP Hole 1309D, is a low temperature OCC in which crystal plastic deformation of gabbro is very rare and greenschist facies deformation was localised onto talc-tremolite-chlorite schists in serpentinite, and breccia zones in gabbro and diabase. The upper 100m of Hole 1309D contains about 43% diabase intruded into hydrated fault breccias. This detachment fault zone can be interpreted as a dyke-gabbro transition, which was originally (before flexural unroofing) a lateral boundary between active hydrothermal circulation in the fault zone and hangingwall, and intrusion of gabbroic magma in the footwall. Thus a major difference between high and low temperature detachment faults may be cooling of the latter by active hydrothermal circulation. 2-D thermal modelling suggests that if a detachment fault is formed in a magmatically robust segment of a slow spreading ridge, high temperature mylonites can be formed for 1-2 ka provided there is no significant hydrothermal cooling of the fault zone. In contrast, if the fault zone is held at temperatures of 400 °C by fluid circulation, cooling of the upper 1 km of the fault footwall occurs far too rapidly for extensive mylonites to form. Our models are consistent with published cooling rate data from geospeedometry and isotopic closure temperatures. The control on this process is likely a combination of

  17. On Transients in Detached Bridgman Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2011-01-01

    In detached Bridgman growth, a gap exists between the growing crystal and the crucible wall. According to crystal shape stability theory, only specific gap widths will be dynamically stable. Beginning with a crystal diameter that differs from stable conditions, the transient crystal growth process is analyzed. The transient shapes are calculated assuming that the growth angle is constant. Anisotropy and dynamic contact angle effects are considered. In microgravity, dynamic stability depends only on capillary effects and is decoupled from heat transfer. However, heat transfer will influence the crystal-melt interface shape. The local angles and the crystal-melt-vapor triple junction are analyzed and the applicability of the Herring formula is discussed. A potential microgravity experiment is proposed which would enhance our understanding of the detached growth dynamic stability problem.

  18. Responsive systems for cell sheet detachment

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nikul G.; Zhang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Cell sheet engineering has been progressing rapidly during the past few years and has emerged as a novel approach for cell based therapy. Cell sheet harvest technology enables fabrication of viable, transplantable cell sheets for various tissue engineering applications. Currently, the majority of cell sheet studies use thermo-responsive systems for cell sheet detachment. However, other responsive systems began showing their potentials for cell sheet harvest. This review provides an overview of current techniques in creating cell sheets using different types of responsive systems including thermo-responsive, electro-responsive, photo-responsive, pH-responsive and magnetic systems. Their mechanism, approach, as well as applications for cell detachment have been introduced. Further development of these responsive systems will allow efficient cell sheet harvesting and patterning of cells to reconstruct complex tissue for broad clinical applications. PMID:23820033

  19. Mechanism of bubble detachment from vibrating walls

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dongjun; Park, Jun Kwon Kang, Kwan Hyoung; Kang, In Seok

    2013-11-15

    We discovered a previously unobserved mechanism by which air bubbles detach from vibrating walls in glasses containing water. Chaotic oscillation and subsequent water jets appeared when a wall vibrated at greater than a critical level. Wave forms were developed at water-air interface of the bubble by the wall vibration, and water jets were formed when sufficiently grown wave-curvatures were collapsing. Droplets were pinched off from the tip of jets and fell to the surface of the glass. When the solid-air interface at the bubble-wall attachment point was completely covered with water, the bubble detached from the wall. The water jets were mainly generated by subharmonic waves and were generated most vigorously when the wall vibrated at the volume resonant frequency of the bubble. Bubbles of specific size can be removed by adjusting the frequency of the wall's vibration.

  20. Mitochondrial dysfunction in retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Barot, Megha; Gokulgandhi, Mitan R; Mitra, Ashim K

    2011-12-01

    The mitochondrion is a vital intracellular organelle for retinal cell function and survival. There is growing confirmation to support an association between mitochondrial dysfunction and a number of retinal degenerations. Investigations have also unveiled mitochondrial genomic instability as one of the contributing factors for age-related retinal pathophysiology. This review highlights the role of mitochondrial dysfunction originating from oxidative stress in the etiology of retinal diseases including diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Moreover, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage associated with AMD due to susceptibility of mtDNA to oxidative damage and failure of mtDNA repair pathways is also highlighted in this review. The susceptibility of neural retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) mitochondria to oxidative damage with ageing appears to be a major factor in retinal degeneration. It thus appears that the mitochondrion is a weak link in the antioxidant defenses of retinal cells. In addition, failure of mtDNA repair pathways can also specifically contribute towards pathogenesis of AMD. This review will further summarize the prospective role of mitochondria targeting therapeutic agents for the treatment of retinal disease. Mitochondria based drug targeting to diminish oxidative stress or promote repair of mtDNA damage may offer potential alternatives for the treatment of various retinal degenerative diseases.

  1. Detached Growth of Germanium and Germaniumsilicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dold, P.; Schweizer, M.; Szofran, F.; Benz, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    Up to now, detached growth was observed mainly under microgravity, i.e. under the absence of hydrostatic pressure that hinders the formation of a free melt meniscus. the detached growth of germanium doped with gallium was obtained under 1 g conditions, the growth was performed in quartz-glass ampoule. Part of the crystal grew without wall contact, the detached growth was observed in-situ with a CCD-camera as well as after the growth process in form of growth lines and the formation of <111> facets on the crystal surface. GeSi crystal (oriientation: <111>, maximum silicon content: 4 at%, seed material: Ge) was grown in a pBN crucible (excluding the possibility of in-situ monitoring of the growth process). The grown crystal exhibits three growth facets, indicating also wall free growth. Surface analysis of the crystals (NDIC, SEM) and characterization of crystal segregation (EDAX, resistivity measurement) and defect structure (EPD, x-ray diffraction measurements) will be presented.

  2. Molecular dynamics analysis on buckling of defective carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kulathunga, D D T K; Ang, K K; Reddy, J N

    2010-09-01

    Owing to their remarkable mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes have been employed in many diverse areas of applications. However, similar to any of the many man-made materials used today, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are also susceptible to various kinds of defects. Understanding the effect of defects on the mechanical properties and behavior of CNTs is essential in the design of nanotube-based devices and composites. It has been found in various past studies that these defects can considerably affect the tensile strength and fracture of CNTs. Comprehensive studies on the effect of defects on the buckling and vibration of nanotubes is however lacking in the literature. In this paper, the effects of various configurations of atomic vacancy defects, on axial buckling of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), in different thermal environments, is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations (MDS), based on a COMPASS force field. Our findings revealed that even a single missing atom can cause a significant reduction in the critical buckling strain and load of SWCNTs. In general, increasing the number of missing atoms, asymmetry of vacancy configurations and asymmetric distribution of vacancy clusters seemed to lead to higher deterioration in buckling properties. Further, SWCNTs with a single vacancy cluster, compared to SWCNTs with two or more vacancy clusters having the same number of missing atoms, appeared to cause higher deterioration of buckling properties. However, exceptions from the above mentioned trends could be expected due to chemical instabilities of defects. Temperature appeared to have less effect on defective CNTs compared to pristine CNTs.

  3. Buckling and modal analysis of rotationally restrained orthotropic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal, Enrique; Abajo, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes a theoretical approach for the static buckling, eigenfrequency and vibration buckling analysis of typical orthotropic plates used in aeronautical constructions. The plates are constrained with any combination of simply-supported and rotationally restrained edges, and are subjected to biaxial compressive loads. The derivation of closed-form solutions is discussed, and the results are presented in the form of design charts, where the effect of the restraint stiffness is highlighted. The proposed design charts allow a more accurate initial sizing of typical aerospace structural components, like stiffened panels, where both static and dynamic buckling loads are fundamental for the final design. As compared to classical solutions based on simply-supported and clamped edges, the modeling of the edge constraint as an elastic restraint provides a more refined description of the real stringer-stiffened panel. The results demonstrate that, in contrast to the commonly adopted simply-supported boundary condition, a reduction of the design conservativeness can be achieved if the stiffness of the restraint is accounted for. A novel set of results relative to the vibration buckling is derived, illustrating that the dynamic buckling tends to increase for load frequencies higher than the first natural frequency.

  4. Buckling of hybrid nanocomposites with embedded graphene and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Y.; Saavedra Flores, E. I.; Scarpa, F.; Adhikari, S.

    2016-09-01

    With the aid of atomistic multiscale modelling and analytical approaches, buckling strength has been determined for carbon nanofibres/epoxy composite systems. Various nanofibres configurations considered are single walled carbon nano tube (SWCNT) and single layer graphene sheet (SLGS) and SLGS/SWCNT hybrid systems. Computationally, both eigen-value and non-linear large deformation-based methods have been employed to calculate the buckling strength. The non-linear computational model generated here takes into account of complex features such as debonding between polymer and filler (delamination under compression), nonlinearity in the polymer, strain-based damage criteria for the matrix, contact between fillers and interlocking of distorted filler surfaces with polymer. The effect of bridging nanofibres with an interlinking compound on the buckling strength of nano-composites has also been presented here. Computed enhancement in buckling strength of the polymer system due to nano reinforcement is found to be in the range of experimental and molecular dynamics based results available in open literature. The findings of this work indicate that carbon based nanofillers enhance the buckling strength of host polymers through various local failure mechanisms.

  5. Buckling-induced encapsulation of structured elastic shells under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jongmin; Perdigou, Claude; Chen, Elizabeth R.; Bertoldi, Katia; Reis, Pedro M.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a class of continuum shell structures, the Buckliball, which undergoes a structural transformation induced by buckling under pressure loading. The geometry of the Buckliball comprises a spherical shell patterned with a regular array of circular voids. In order for the pattern transformation to be induced by buckling, the possible number and arrangement of these voids are found to be restricted to five specific configurations. Below a critical internal pressure, the narrow ligaments between the voids buckle, leading to a cooperative buckling cascade of the skeleton of the ball. This ligament buckling leads to closure of the voids and a reduction of the total volume of the shell by up to 54%, while remaining spherical, thereby opening the possibility of encapsulation. We use a combination of precision desktop-scale experiments, finite element simulations, and scaling analyses to explore the underlying mechanics of these foldable structures, finding excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement. Given that this folding mechanism is induced by a mechanical instability, our Buckliball opens the possibility for reversible encapsulation, over a wide range of length scales. PMID:22451901

  6. Investigation of Buckling Behavior of Composite Shell Structures with Cutouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbelo, Mariano A.; Herrmann, Annemarie; Castro, Saullo G. P.; Khakimova, Regina; Zimmermann, Rolf; Degenhardt, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Thin-walled cylindrical composite shell structures can be applied in space applications, looking for lighter and cheaper launcher transport system. These structures are prone to buckling under axial compression and may exhibit sensitivity to geometrical imperfections. Today the design of such structures is based on NASA guidelines from the 1960's using a conservative lower bound curve generated from a database of experimental results. In this guideline the structural behavior of composite materials may not be appropriately considered since the imperfection sensitivity and the buckling load of shells made of such materials depend on the lay-up design. It is clear that with the evolution of the composite materials and fabrication processes this guideline must be updated and / or new design guidelines investigated. This need becomes even more relevant when cutouts are introduced to the structure, which are commonly necessary to account for access points and to provide clearance and attachment points for hydraulic and electric systems. Therefore, it is necessary to understand how a cutout with different dimensions affects the buckling load of a thin-walled cylindrical shell structure in combination with other initial geometric imperfections. In this context, this paper present some observations regarding the buckling load behavior vs. cutout size and radius over thickness ratio, of laminated composite curved panels and cylindrical shells, that could be applied in further recommendations, to allow identifying when the buckling of the structure is dominated by the presence of the cutout or by other initial imperfections.

  7. Investigations on Buckling Behaviour of Laminated Curved Composite Stiffened Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N. Jeevan; Babu, P. Ramesh; Pandu, Ratnakar

    2014-04-01

    In Industrial applications structural efficiency is primary concern, this brings about the need of strong and lightweight materials. Due to their high specific strength, fibre reinforced polymers find wide application in these areas. Panels made of composite materials are widely used in aerospace structures, automobile, civil, marine and biomedical industries because of their good mechanical properties, impact resistance, excellent damage tolerance and also low fabrication cost. In this Paper, buckling and post-buckling analysis was performed on composite stiffened panel to obtain the critical load and modes of failures, with different parameters like ply-orientation, different composite materials, and stiffeners and by changing the number of stiffeners was derived. To analyze the post buckling behaviour of composite stiffened panels the nonlinear finite element analysis is employed and substantial investigations are undertaken using finite element (FE) model. Effect of critical parameters on buckling behaviour is studied and parametric studies were conducted with analytical tool to understand the structural behaviour in the post buckling range.

  8. [Application of retinal oximeter in ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Ma, Jianmin; Wang, Ningli

    2015-11-01

    Retinal oximeter is a new machine which has been used in the diagnose, treatment and research of several ophthalmic diseases for recent years. It allows ophthalmologists to gain retinal oxygen saturation directly. Therefore, retinal oximeter might be useful for ophthalmologists to understand ophthalmic diseases more deeper and clarify the impact of ischemia on retinal function. It has been reported in the literatures that retinal oximeter has potentially useful diagnostic and therapeutic indications in various eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, central retinal vein and artery occlusion, retinitis pigmentosa, glaucomatous optic neuropathy, et al. In this thesis, the application of retinal oximeter in ophthalmology is reviewed.

  9. Heavy silicone oil as a long-term endotamponade agent for complicated retinal detachments.

    PubMed

    Prazeres, Juliana; Magalhães, Octaviano; Lucatto, Luiz F A; Navarro, Rodrigo Milan; Moraes, Nilva S; Farah, Michel E; Maia, André; Maia, Maurício

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated a heavy silicone oil (HSO) as a long-term intraocular endotamponade agent to treat complicated RD by inferior PVR in 25 eyes of 25 patients. Patients underwent PPV and injection of Oxane HD as an internal tamponade agent. A comparison of preoperative and postoperative BCVA at month 1, month 6, and last visit was made in the group in which HSO was removed and in the group in which HSO was not removed. Statistical calculations were performed using the Wilcoxon test. The HSO was removed from 11 patients after a mean of 26.55 ± 21.38 months. The HSO remained inside the vitreous cavity in 14 eyes due to a high chance of PVR recurrence (mean follow-up period, 11.07 ± 7.44 months). Anatomic success was achieved in 92%. The BCVA in the group, in which HSO was not removed, improved significantly during the first 6 months. Among the patients who had the oil removed, there was improvement in BCVA after 1 month. Oil emulsification was the most common adverse effect in 52% of eyes. HSO is an effective tamponade in complex rhegmatogenous and tractional RD complicated by PVR. HSO can remain in the eye for long periods with relative tolerability and safety. PMID:24822176

  10. Contact angles of substances used for internal tamponade in retinal detachment surgery.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, I M; Williams, R L; Wong, D

    1994-07-01

    In order to ascertain the tamponade effect of air and silicone oil we examined the contact angles subtended by ex vivo human retina, Teflon and Perspex to find a suitable experimental material which would mimic the surface properties of the retina at a three-phase interface. Using the captive bubble technique to measure the contact angle, it was found that air subtended a larger contact angle (38.8 degrees) with the retina than did silicone oil (18.2 degrees). On coating the Perspex surface with protein (PCP), it was observed that the surface properties were modified such that PCP subtended contact angles with air (43.0 degrees) and silicone oil (16.4 degrees) similar to those subtended by ex vivo human retina. Using PCP as an experimental material that mimics ex vivo human retina, spherical chambers were employed in order to examine qualitatively and to quantify the arc of contact obtained with air and silicone oil. It was found that air gave a greater arc of contact for the same percentage fill than silicone oil. PMID:7926877

  11. [Glaucoma and retinal surgery].

    PubMed

    Müller, M; Geerling, G; Zierhut, M; Klink, T

    2010-05-01

    In the therapeutic approach to complex glaucomas different initial situations were considered: pre-existing glaucoma, induction of glaucoma after vitreoretinal surgery and antiglaucomatous procedures. In pre-existing glaucoma and after filtering surgery maintenance of the filtering bleb requires a vitreoretinal approach for conjunctiva preservation with techniques such as pneumatic retinopexy or small gauge vitrectomy. After vitreoretinal surgery an increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) is common. Secondary glaucoma may occur after scleral buckling and after vitrectomy with or without gas or silicone oil tamponade as well as after application of steroids. Angle closure glaucoma after scleral buckling develops because of congestion and anterior rotation of the ciliary body. Vitreous tamponades with expansive or saturated gases may cause angle-closure glaucoma with or without pupillary blockage and may critically shorten ocular perfusion. Postoperative checks, immediate action and a ban on boarding aircraft over the period of intraocular gas tamponade prevent permanent damage to the eye. The majority of secondary glaucomas can effectively be controlled by topical medication and adequate postoperative posture of the patient. Besides the temporary use of systemic antiglaucomatous medication or laser therapy, very rarely in cases of massive swelling or overfill, a direct intervention, such as partial gas or silicone oil removal is required. A prophylactic inferior peripheral iridectomy prevents pupillary blockage in aphakic eyes with intraocular tamponade. In cases of heavy silicone oil use, the peripheral iridectomy is placed in the superior position. Nd:YAG laser application will regulate IOP in cases of occlusion. Secondary glaucoma due to silicone oil emulsification overload is treated by trabecular meshwork aspiration and lavage. In refractory glaucoma repetitive cyclophotocoagulation and drainage implants represent an approved method for long-term IOP regulation

  12. Intraocular retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Humayun, M S

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: An electronic implant that can bypass the damaged photoreceptors and electrically stimulate the remaining retinal neurons to restore useful vision has been proposed. A number of key questions remain to make this approach feasible. The goal of this thesis is to address the following 2 specific null hypotheses: (1) Stimulus parameters make no difference in the electrically elicited retinal responses. (2) Just as we have millions of photoreceptors, so it will take a device that can generate millions of pixels/light points to create useful vision. METHODS: For electrophysiologic experiments, 2 different setups were used. In the first setup, charge-balanced pulses were delivered to the retinal surface via electrodes inserted through an open sky approach in normal or blind retinal degenerate (rd) mice. In the second setup, the rabbit retina was removed under red light conditions from an enucleated eye and then maintained in a chamber while being superfused with oxygenated, heated Ames media. In both setups, stimulating electrodes and recording electrodes were positioned on the retinal surface to evaluate the effect of varying stimulation parameters on the orthodromic retinal responses (i.e., recording electrode placed between stimulating electrodes and optic nerve head). For psychophysical experiments, visual images were divided into pixels of light that could be projected in a pattern on the retina in up to 8 sighted volunteers. Subjects were asked to perform various tasks ranging from reading and face recognition to various activities of daily living. RESULTS: Electrophysiologic experiments: In a normal mouse, a single cycle of a 1-kHz sine wave was significantly more efficient than a 1-kHz square wave (P < .05), but no such difference was noted in either of the 8- or 16-week-old rd mouse groups (8-week-old, P = .426; 16-week-old, P = .078). Charge threshold was significantly higher in 16-week-old rd mouse versus both 8-week-old rd and normal mouse for every

  13. The Strain Rate Effect on the Buckling of Single-Layer MoS2

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jin-Wu

    2015-01-01

    The Euler buckling theory states that the buckling critical strain is an inverse quadratic function of the length for a thin plate in the static compression process. However, the suitability of this theory in the dynamical process is unclear, so we perform molecular dynamics simulations to examine the applicability of the Euler buckling theory for the fast compression of the single-layer MoS2. We find that the Euler buckling theory is not applicable in such dynamical process, as the buckling critical strain becomes a length-independent constant in the buckled system with many ripples. However, the Euler buckling theory can be resumed in the dynamical process after restricting the theory to an individual ripple in the buckled structure. PMID:25588352

  14. Buckling of structures; Proceedings of the Symposium, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., June 17-21, 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budiansky, B.

    1976-01-01

    The papers deal with such topics as the buckling and post-buckling behavior of plates and shells; methods of calculating critical buckling and collapse loads; finite element representations for thin-shell instability analysis; theory and experiment in the creep buckling of plates and shells; creep instability of thick shell structures; analytical and numerical studies of the influence of initial imperfections on the elastic buckling of columns; mode interaction in stiffened panels under compression; imperfection-sensitivity in the interactive buckling of stiffened plates; buckling of stochastically imperfect structures; and the Liapunov stability of elastic dynamic systems. A special chapter is devoted to design problems, including the design of a Mars entry 'aeroshell', and buckling design in vehicle structures. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  15. Two-Dimensional Island Shape Determined by Detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yukio; Kawasaki, Ryo

    2007-07-01

    Effect of an anisotropic detachment on a heteroepitaxial island shape is studied by means of a kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of a square lattice gas model. Only with molecular deposition followed by surface diffusion, islands grow in a ramified dendritic shape, similar to diffusion-limited aggregate (DLA). Introduction of molecular detachment from edges makes islands compact. To understand an anisotropic island shape observed in the experiment of pentacene growth on a hydrogen-terminated Si(111) vicinal surface, asymmetry in detachment around the substrate step is assumed. Edge molecules detach more to the higher terrace than to the lower terrace. The island edge from which molecules are easy to detach is smooth and the one hard to detach is dendritic. If islands are close to each other, islands tend to align in a line, since detached molecules from the smooth edge of the right island are fed to the dendritic and fast growing edge of the left island.

  16. Shell Buckling Design Criteria Based on Manufacturing Imperfection Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    An analysis-based approach .for developing shell-buckling design criteria for laminated-composite cylindrical shells that accurately accounts for the effects of initial geometric imperfections is presented. With this approach, measured initial geometric imperfection data from six graphite-epoxy shells are used to determine a manufacturing-process-specific imperfection signature for these shells. This imperfection signature is then used as input into nonlinear finite-element analyses. The imperfection signature represents a "first-approximation" mean imperfection shape that is suitable for developing preliminary-design data. Comparisons of test data and analytical results obtained by using several different imperfection shapes are presented for selected shells. Overall, the results indicate that the analysis-based approach presented for developing reliable preliminary-design criteria has the potential to provide improved, less conservative buckling-load estimates, and to reduce the weight and cost of developing buckling-resistant shell structures.

  17. Buckling of Fiber Reinforced Composite Plates with Nanofiber Reinforced Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2010-01-01

    Anisotropic composite plates were evaluated with nanofiber reinforced matrices (NFRM). The nanofiber reinforcement volumes ratio in the matrix was 0.01. The plate dimensions were 20 by 10 by 1.0 in. (508 by 254 by 25.4 mm). Seven different loading condition cases were evaluated: three for uniaxial loading, three for pairs of combined loading, and one with three combined loadings. The anisotropy arose from the unidirectional plates having been at 30 from the structural axis. The anisotropy had a full 6 by 6 rigidities matrix which were satisfied and solved by a Galerkin buckling algorithm. The buckling results showed that the NFRM plates buckled at about twice those with conventional matrix.

  18. Detyrosinated microtubules buckle and bear load in contracting cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Robison, Patrick; Caporizzo, Matthew A; Ahmadzadeh, Hossein; Bogush, Alexey I; Chen, Christina Yingxian; Margulies, Kenneth B; Shenoy, Vivek B; Prosser, Benjamin L

    2016-04-22

    The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton can transmit mechanical signals and resist compression in contracting cardiomyocytes. How MTs perform these roles remains unclear because of difficulties in observing MTs during the rapid contractile cycle. Here, we used high spatial and temporal resolution imaging to characterize MT behavior in beating mouse myocytes. MTs deformed under contractile load into sinusoidal buckles, a behavior dependent on posttranslational "detyrosination" of α-tubulin. Detyrosinated MTs associated with desmin at force-generating sarcomeres. When detyrosination was reduced, MTs uncoupled from sarcomeres and buckled less during contraction, which allowed sarcomeres to shorten and stretch with less resistance. Conversely, increased detyrosination promoted MT buckling, stiffened the myocyte, and correlated with impaired function in cardiomyopathy. Thus, detyrosinated MTs represent tunable, compression-resistant elements that may impair cardiac function in disease. PMID:27102488

  19. Thermomechanical buckling of multilayered composite panels with cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1994-01-01

    A study is made of the thermomechanical buckling of flat unstiffened composite panels with central circular cutouts. The panels are subjected to combined temperature changes and applied edge loading (or edge displacements). The analysis is based on a first-order shear deformation plate theory. A mixed formulation is used with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the generalized displacements and the stress resultants of the plate. Both the stability boundary and the sensitivity coefficients are evaluated. The sensitivity coefficients measure the sensitivity of the buckling response to variations in the different lamination and material parameters of the panel. Numerical results are presented showing the effects of the variations in the hole diameter, laminate stacking sequence, fiber orientation, and aspect ratio of the panel on the thermomechanical buckling response and its sensitivity coefficients.

  20. Thermomechanical buckling of multilayered composite panels with cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1993-01-01

    A study is made of the thermomechanical buckling of flat unstiffened composite panels with central circular cutouts. The panels are subjected to combined temperature changes and applied edge loading (or edge displacements). The analysis is based on a first-order shear deformation plate theory. A mixed formulation is used with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the generalized displacements and the stress resultants of the plate. Both the stability boundary and the sensitivity coefficients are evaluated. The sensitivity coefficients measure the sensitivity of the buckling response to variations in the different lamination and material parameters of the panel. Numerical results are presented showing the effects of the variations in the hole diameter, laminate stacking sequence, fiber orientation, and aspect ratio of the panel on the thermomechanical buckling response and its sensitivity coefficients.

  1. Redeposition of a straight-sided buckle under pressure.

    PubMed

    Colin, Jérôme; Coupeau, Christophe; Durinck, Julien; Cimetière, Alain; Grilhé, Jean

    2014-03-01

    The unilateral buckling of a stressed thin film on a substrate has been investigated theoretically in the framework of the Föppl-von Kármán theory of thin plates when an increasing overpressure is considered onto the upper free surface of the film. It is found that, depending on the initial stress in the film and overpressure, two scenarios of evolution may occur. The snap-through of the one-dimensional buckle leading to the full redeposition should take place for low values of the initial stress. When the initial stress exceeds a critical value, a partial redeposition of the buckle should proceed as the overpressure increases. A snap-through while the redeposition mechanism has taken place should also occur for higher values of the overpressure. PMID:24730855

  2. Retinal Imaging and Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abràmoff, Michael D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of blindness in the industrialized world that includes age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma, the review is devoted to retinal imaging and image analysis methods and their clinical implications. Methods for 2-D fundus imaging and techniques for 3-D optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging are reviewed. Special attention is given to quantitative techniques for analysis of fundus photographs with a focus on clinically relevant assessment of retinal vasculature, identification of retinal lesions, assessment of optic nerve head (ONH) shape, building retinal atlases, and to automated methods for population screening for retinal diseases. A separate section is devoted to 3-D analysis of OCT images, describing methods for segmentation and analysis of retinal layers, retinal vasculature, and 2-D/3-D detection of symptomatic exudate-associated derangements, as well as to OCT-based analysis of ONH morphology and shape. Throughout the paper, aspects of image acquisition, image analysis, and clinical relevance are treated together considering their mutually interlinked relationships. PMID:21743764

  3. Perceptual Fading without Retinal Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Po-Jang; Colas, Jaron T.

    2012-01-01

    A retinally stabilized object readily undergoes perceptual fading and disappears from consciousness. This startling phenomenon is commonly believed to arise from local bottom-up sensory adaptation to edge information that occurs early in the visual pathway, such as in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus or retinal ganglion cells. Here…

  4. High resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, Jim; Dinyari, Rostam; Huie, Phil; Butterwick, Alex; Peumans, Peter; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight in patients with retinal degeneration by delivering pulsed electric currents to retinal neurons via an array of microelectrodes. Most implants use inductive or optical transmission of information and power to an intraocular receiver, with decoded signals subsequently distributed to retinal electrodes through an intraocular cable. Surgical complexity could be minimized by an "integrated" prosthesis, in which both power and data are delivered directly to the stimulating array without any discrete components or cables. We present here an integrated retinal prosthesis system based on a photodiode array implant. Video frames are processed and imaged onto the retinal implant by a video goggle projection system operating at near-infrared wavelengths (~ 900 nm). Photodiodes convert light into pulsed electric current, with charge injection maximized by specially optimized series photodiode circuits. Prostheses of three different pixel densities (16 pix/mm2, 64 pix/mm2, and 256 pix/mm2) have been designed, simulated, and prototyped. Retinal tissue response to subretinal implants made of various materials has been investigated in RCS rats. The resulting prosthesis can provide sufficient charge injection for high resolution retinal stimulation without the need for implantation of any bulky discrete elements such as coils or tethers. In addition, since every pixel functions independently, pixel arrays may be placed separately in the subretinal space, providing visual stimulation to a larger field of view.

  5. Buckling of microtubules: An insight by molecular and continuum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jin; Meguid, S. A.

    2014-10-27

    The molecular structural mechanics method has been extended to investigate the buckling of microtubules (MTs) with various configurations. The results indicate that for relative short MTs the shear deformation effect, rather than the nonlocal effect, is mainly responsible for the limitation of their widely used Euler beam description and the observed length-dependence of their bending stiffness. In addition, the configuration effect of MTs is also studied and considered as an explanation for the large scattering of the critical buckling force and bending stiffness observed in existing experiments. This configuration effect is also found to mainly originate from the geometry of the MTs and is mainly determined by the protofilament number.

  6. Buckling behavior of composite cylinders subjected to compressive loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carri, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Room temperature compressive buckling strengths of eight cylinders, four boron-epoxy and four boron-epoxy reinforced-titanium, with diameter to thickness ratios ranging between 40 and 67 are determined experimentally and compared with analytical predictions. Numerical buckling strengths are presented for Donnell's, Flugge's and Sanders' shell theories for anisotropic and orthotropic material cases. Comparison of analytical predictions with experimental results indicates good agreement and the recommended correlation factor suggested in the literature is applicable for design. For the cylinders tested, the correlation between experiment and theory ranged from 0.73 to 0.97.

  7. Statistical analysis of imperfection effect on cylindrical buckling response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, M. S.; Purbolaksono, J.; Muhammad, N.; Andriyana, A.; Liew, H. L.

    2015-12-01

    It is widely reported that no efficient guidelines for modelling imperfections in composite structures are available. In response, this work evaluates the imperfection factors of axially compressed Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) cylinder with different ply angles through finite element (FE) analysis. The sensitivity of imperfection factors were analysed using design of experiment: factorial design approach. From the analysis it identified three critical factors that sensitively reacted towards buckling load. Furthermore empirical equation is proposed according to each type of cylinder. Eventually, critical buckling loads estimated by empirical equation showed good agreements with FE analysis. The design of experiment methodology is useful in identifying parameters that lead to structures imperfection tolerance.

  8. Buckling-driven delamination of carbon nanotube forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pour Shahid Saeed Abadi, Parisa; Hutchens, Shelby B.; Greer, Julia R.; Cola, Baratunde A.; Graham, Samuel

    2013-06-01

    We report buckling-driven delamination of carbon nanotube (CNT) forests from their growth substrates when subjected to compression. Macroscale compression experiments reveal local delamination at the CNT forest-substrate interface. Results of microscale flat punch indentations indicate that enhanced CNT interlocking at the top surface of the forest accomplished by application of a metal coating causes delamination of the forest from the growth substrate, a phenomenon not observed in indentation of as-grown CNT forests. We postulate that the post-buckling tensile stresses that develop at the base of the CNT forests serve as the driving force for delamination.

  9. Retinal connectivity and primate vision

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Barry B.; Martin, Paul R.; Grünert, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    The general principles of retinal organization are now well known. It may seem surprising that retinal organization in the primate, which has a complex visual behavioral repertoire, appears relatively simple. In this review, we primarily consider retinal structure and function in primate species. Photoreceptor distribution and connectivity are considered as are connectivity in the outer and inner retina. One key issue is the specificity of retinal connections; we suggest that the retina shows connectional specificity but this is seldom complete, and we consider here the functional consequences of imprecise wiring. Finally, we consider how retinal systems can be linked to psychophysical descriptions of different channels, chromatic and luminance, which are proposed to exist in the primate visual system. PMID:20826226

  10. Finite Element Analysis of the Stability (Buckling and Post-Buckling) of Composite Laminated Structures: Well Established Procedures and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietropaoli, Elisa; Riccio, Aniello

    2012-02-01

    Finite element procedures for the analysis of composite structures under compressive loads (buckling and post-buckling) generally are not deployed in books because they are still considered object of research whereas they are deemed as assessed by researchers that focus their papers on restricted audience topics. Therefore, regarding these procedures, a gap exists in literature between what researchers consider as well established and what has been already published. The aim of this paper is to contribute to close this gap by providing an insight in linear and non-linear buckling analyses and in their use with composite structures. Both modelling and analysis considerations are presented and discussed, focusing on what can be considered as best practice when dealing with this kind of problems. Applications (to a stiffened panel and to a wing box) are provided for demonstrating the effectiveness of the procedures presented.

  11. Selective inner retinal layer involvement in early syphilitic retinitis as evidenced by spectral domain OCT

    PubMed Central

    Klemencic, Stephanie A.; Newman, Tricia L.; Messner, Leonard V.

    2011-01-01

    Retinitis as a feature of syphilitic uveitis in immunocompromised individuals is a common finding. We present spectral domain OCT images of early syphilitic retinitis pre and post treatment with penicillin. This case suggests that the inner retinal layers may be selectively involved with early syphilitic retinitis. Early treatment is important to avoid outer layer retinal involvement and to decrease ocular morbidity.

  12. Critical buckling pressure in mouse carotid arteries with altered elastic fibers.

    PubMed

    Luetkemeyer, Callan M; James, Rhys H; Devarakonda, Siva Teja; Le, Victoria P; Liu, Qin; Han, Hai-Chao; Wagenseil, Jessica E

    2015-06-01

    Arteries can buckle axially under applied critical buckling pressure due to a mechanical instability. Buckling can cause arterial tortuosity leading to flow irregularities and stroke. Genetic mutations in elastic fiber proteins are associated with arterial tortuosity in humans and mice, and may be the result of alterations in critical buckling pressure. Hence, the objective of this study is to investigate how genetic defects in elastic fibers affect buckling pressure. We use mouse models of human disease with reduced amounts of elastin (Eln+/-) and with defects in elastic fiber assembly due to the absence of fibulin-5 (Fbln5-/-). We find that Eln+/- arteries have reduced buckling pressure compared to their wild-type controls. Fbln5-/- arteries have similar buckling pressure to wild-type at low axial stretch, but increased buckling pressure at high stretch. We fit material parameters to mechanical test data for Eln+/-, Fbln5-/- and wild-type arteries using Fung and four-fiber strain energy functions. Fitted parameters are used to predict theoretical buckling pressure based on equilibrium of an inflated, buckled, thick-walled cylinder. In general, the theoretical predictions underestimate the buckling pressure at low axial stretch and overestimate the buckling pressure at high stretch. The theoretical predictions with both models replicate the increased buckling pressure at high stretch for Fbln5-/- arteries, but the four-fiber model predictions best match the experimental trends in buckling pressure changes with axial stretch. This study provides experimental and theoretical methods for further investigating the influence of genetic mutations in elastic fibers on buckling behavior and the development of arterial tortuosity.

  13. Vibration and local edge buckling of thermally stressed, wedge airfoil cantilever wings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    The local edge buckling phenomena that can occur along the heated thin edge of a wedge shape airfoil is calculated. Qualitative comparison (qualitative only because the experimental temperature distribution was not measured) is made to the experimentally observed phenomena. The consequences of the assumption of identical vibration and buckling modes is shown by a comparison of results with and without the assumption of mode identity. Computer plots of the elastic surface as local buckling develops with increasing temperature are shown. The calculated, fully developed local edge buckling is compared to a photograph of a fully developed buckling as observed in the laboratory.

  14. Tip enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) as a probe for the buckling distortion in silicene.

    PubMed

    Jose, Deepthi; Nijamudheen, A; Datta, Ayan

    2013-06-14

    Silicene, the all-Si analogue of graphene, is symmetrically buckled in each of the six-membered units and this buckling is periodically translated across the surface. Raman spectra of silicene clusters were calculated using first principles DFT methods to explore the intrinsic buckling in silicene. The presence of metal clusters as a tip over the silicene units affects the intensity of the buckling modes which can be enhanced by increasing the number of atoms in the clusters. The favourable sites of chemisorption of metal clusters over the silicene surface are studied along with the resulting red shift in buckling frequency and chemical enhancement in the Raman intensity.

  15. Telemedicine for retinal care in developing nations: the ORBIS Cyber-Sight programme, 2003-2011.

    PubMed

    Amin, Sarina; Patel, Rikin; Beilan, Jonathan; Helveston, Eugene M; Shaikh, Saad

    2014-05-29

    ORBIS International has provided a web-based ophthalmic disease consultation service, Cyber-Sight, for developing nations since 2003. The system connects partner physicians with mentor physicians. We have reviewed consultations concerning retinal cases submitted from June 2003 to December 2011. Of 943 retinal consultations reviewed, 117 were excluded, mainly for reasons of technical limitations at the partner sites. Of the 826 included cases, 504 patients were male and 322 were female. The average age of the patients was 43 years (range 2 months to 86 years). Cases were submitted from partner physicians in 30 countries, with five countries accounting for 82% of the cases (India, Vietnam, Indonesia, China, Jordan). There was a rise in the case submission rate to a peak of 251 cases in 2010. The mean consultant response time was 5 days (SD 9). The mean time to case closure was 19 days (SD 92). The most common diagnoses were diabetic retinopathy (n = 101), retinal vascular occlusion (n = 75) and retinal detachment (n = 61). The working diagnosis submitted by the partner did not match the mentor's diagnosis in 153 cases (19%). The number of incorrect initial partner diagnoses demonstrates that the teleretinal programme serves a useful diagnostic role for partner physicians. The Cyber-Sight programme is a viable method of delivering advanced retinal expertise to partner institutions and increasing capacity for partner doctors in the developing world.

  16. Retinal functional alterations in mice lacking intermediate filament proteins glial fibrillary acidic protein and vimentin.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Kirsten A; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Grosche, Antje; Zrenner, Eberhart; Pekny, Milos; Reichenbach, Andreas; Seeliger, Mathias W; Pannicke, Thomas; Perez, Maria-Thereza

    2015-12-01

    Vimentin (Vim) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) are important components of the intermediate filament (IF) (or nanofilament) system of astroglial cells. We conducted full-field electroretinogram (ERG) recordings and found that whereas photoreceptor responses (a-wave) were normal in uninjured GFAP(-/-)Vim(-/-) mice, b-wave amplitudes were increased. Moreover, we found that Kir (inward rectifier K(+)) channel protein expression was reduced in the retinas of GFAP(-/-)Vim(-/-) mice and that Kir-mediated current amplitudes were lower in Müller glial cells isolated from these mice. Studies have shown that the IF system, in addition, is involved in the retinal response to injury and that attenuated Müller cell reactivity and reduced photoreceptor cell loss are observed in IF-deficient mice after experimental retinal detachment. We investigated whether the lack of IF proteins would affect cell survival in a retinal ischemia-reperfusion model. We found that although cell loss was induced in both genotypes, the number of surviving cells in the inner retina was lower in IF-deficient mice. Our findings thus show that the inability to produce GFAP and Vim affects normal retinal physiology and that the effect of IF deficiency on retinal cell survival differs, depending on the underlying pathologic condition.

  17. Herpetic (non-cytomegalovirus) retinal infections in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Michael W

    2013-04-01

    Human herpes viruses cause significant morbidity in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Even after the introduction of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), herpes viruses remain the leading causes of blindness in AIDS patients. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis and the closely-related immune reconstitution uveitis syndrome are the most common causes of blindness, but progressive outer retinal necrosis and acute retinal necrosis due to varicella zoster and herpes simplex are also important causes of vision loss. Successful treatment of these conditions requires an aggressive approach with multi-drug intravenous therapy or repeated intravitreal antiviral injections. Since the rate of retinal detachment is alarmingly high despite successful antiviral therapy, internists and ophthalmologists must work closely together to recognize and treat complications as they arise. Fortunately, Epstein-Barr virus is a rare cause of retinal infection and human herpes virus (HHV)-6, HHV-7, and HHV-8 do not appear to be primary pathogens. However, increasing evidence suggests that HHV-6 and HHV-7 play important roles in modulating the immune system and potentiating infection by CMV.

  18. Telemedicine for retinal care in developing nations: the ORBIS Cyber-Sight programme, 2003-2011.

    PubMed

    Amin, Sarina; Patel, Rikin; Beilan, Jonathan; Helveston, Eugene M; Shaikh, Saad

    2014-05-29

    ORBIS International has provided a web-based ophthalmic disease consultation service, Cyber-Sight, for developing nations since 2003. The system connects partner physicians with mentor physicians. We have reviewed consultations concerning retinal cases submitted from June 2003 to December 2011. Of 943 retinal consultations reviewed, 117 were excluded, mainly for reasons of technical limitations at the partner sites. Of the 826 included cases, 504 patients were male and 322 were female. The average age of the patients was 43 years (range 2 months to 86 years). Cases were submitted from partner physicians in 30 countries, with five countries accounting for 82% of the cases (India, Vietnam, Indonesia, China, Jordan). There was a rise in the case submission rate to a peak of 251 cases in 2010. The mean consultant response time was 5 days (SD 9). The mean time to case closure was 19 days (SD 92). The most common diagnoses were diabetic retinopathy (n = 101), retinal vascular occlusion (n = 75) and retinal detachment (n = 61). The working diagnosis submitted by the partner did not match the mentor's diagnosis in 153 cases (19%). The number of incorrect initial partner diagnoses demonstrates that the teleretinal programme serves a useful diagnostic role for partner physicians. The Cyber-Sight programme is a viable method of delivering advanced retinal expertise to partner institutions and increasing capacity for partner doctors in the developing world. PMID:24875929

  19. Induction of Rapid Detachment in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Thormann, Kai M.; Saville, Renée M.; Shukla, Soni; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2005-01-01

    Active detachment of cells from microbial biofilms is a critical yet poorly understood step in biofilm development. We discovered that detachment of cells from biofilms of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can be induced by arresting the medium flow in a hydrodynamic biofilm system. Induction of detachment was rapid, and substantial biofilm dispersal started as soon as 5 min after the stop of flow. We developed a confocal laser scanning microscopy-based assay to quantify detachment. The extent of biomass loss was found to be dependent on the time interval of flow stop and on the thickness of the biofilm. Up to 80% of the biomass of 16-h-old biofilms could be induced to detach. High-resolution microscopy studies revealed that detachment was associated with an overall loosening of the biofilm structure and a release of individual cells or small cell clusters. Swimming motility was not required for detachment. Although the loosening of cells from the biofilm structure was observed evenly throughout thin biofilms, the most pronounced detachment in thicker biofilms occurred in regions exposed to the flow of medium, suggesting a metabolic control of detachability. Deconvolution of the factors associated with the stop of medium flow revealed that a sudden decrease in oxygen tension is the predominant trigger for initiating detachment of individual cells. In contrast, carbon limitation did not trigger any substantial detachment, suggesting a physiological link between oxygen sensing or metabolism and detachment. In-frame deletions were introduced into genes encoding the known and putative global transcriptional regulators ArcA, CRP, and EtrA (FNR), which respond to changes in oxygen tension in S. oneidensis MR-1. Biofilms of null mutants in arcA and crp were severely impacted in the stop-of-flow-induced detachment response, suggesting a role for these genes in regulation of detachment. In contrast, an ΔetrA mutant displayed a variable detachment phenotype. From this genetic

  20. Buckling and dynamic analysis of drill strings for core sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Ziada, H.H., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-15

    This supporting document presents buckling and dynamic stability analyses of the drill strings used for core sampling. The results of the drill string analyses provide limiting operating axial loads and rotational speeds to prevent drill string failure, instability and drill bit overheating during core sampling. The recommended loads and speeds provide controls necessary for Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) programmatic field operations.

  1. Impact. The southwest end is down, as the buckled middle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Impact. The southwest end is down, as the buckled middle section splashes into the river. View is to southeast from confluence of Trinity and South Fork Trinity Rivers - South Fork Trinity River Bridge, State Highway 299 spanning South Fork Trinity River, Salyer, Trinity County, CA

  2. Finite Element Modeling of the Buckling Response of Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Cheryl A.; Moore, David F.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Rankin, Charles C.

    2002-01-01

    A comparative study of different modeling approaches for predicting sandwich panel buckling response is described. The study considers sandwich panels with anisotropic face sheets and a very thick core. Results from conventional analytical solutions for sandwich panel overall buckling and face-sheet-wrinkling type modes are compared with solutions obtained using different finite element modeling approaches. Finite element solutions are obtained using layered shell element models, with and without transverse shear flexibility, layered shell/solid element models, with shell elements for the face sheets and solid elements for the core, and sandwich models using a recently developed specialty sandwich element. Convergence characteristics of the shell/solid and sandwich element modeling approaches with respect to in-plane and through-the-thickness discretization, are demonstrated. Results of the study indicate that the specialty sandwich element provides an accurate and effective modeling approach for predicting both overall and localized sandwich panel buckling response. Furthermore, results indicate that anisotropy of the face sheets, along with the ratio of principle elastic moduli, affect the buckling response and these effects may not be represented accurately by analytical solutions. Modeling recommendations are also provided.

  3. Torque-induced buckling behavior in stretched intertwined DNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahmachari, Sumitabha; Marko, John F.

    Two intertwined DNA molecules (a DNA 'braid') is a common occurrence in the cell and is a relevant substrate for the study of topoisomerase and recombination enzymes. Single molecule experiments have observed the signature of a buckling transition in braids under tensile and torsional stress. We present a free energy model for braided DNA to investigate the mechanical properties of these structures. Our model is based on the semi-flexible polymer model for double helix DNA and is in quantitative accord with the experiments. We identify coexistence of a force-extended state with a plectonemically buckled state, which is reminiscent of single supercoiled DNA behavior. However, the absence of an intrinsic twist modulus in braided DNA results in unique mechanical properties such as non-linear torque in the extended state. At the buckling transition, we predict a jump in the braid extension due to the plectoneme end loop which acts as a nucleation barrier. We investigate the effect of salt concentration on the mechanical response of braids, e.g. we find that buckling starts at a lower linking number for lower salt concentration, the opposite of what is seen for single supercoiled DNAs. Also, concentrations less than 20 mM monovalent salt favor formation of multiple plectoneme domains. NSF Grant: DMR-9734178.

  4. Buckling behavior of long anisotropic plates subjected to combined loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    1995-01-01

    A parametric study is presented of the buckling behavior of infinitely long symmetrically laminated anisotropic plates subjected to combined loads. The study focuses on the interaction of a subcritical (stable) secondary loading state of constant magnitude and a primary destabilizing load that is increased in magnitude until buckling occurs. The loads, considered in this report are uniform axial compression, pure in-plane bending, transverse tension and compression, and shear. Results are presented that were obtained by using a special purpose nondimensional analysis that is well suited for parametric studies of clamped and simply supported plates. In particular, results are presented for a +/- 45(sub S) graphite-epoxy laminate that is highly anisotropic and representative of a laminate used for spacecraft applications. In addition, generic buckling-design charts are presented for a wide range of nondimensional parameters that are applicable to a broad class of laminate constructions. These results show the general behavioral trends of specially orthotropic plates and the effects of flexural anisotropy on plates subjected to various combined loading conditions. An important finding of the present study is that the effects of flexural anisotropy on the buckling resistance of a plate can be significantly more important for plates subjected to combined loads than for plates subjected to single-component loads.

  5. Use of Buckling Instabilities in Micro Pumps, Valves, and Mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakol, Behrouz; Chawan, Aschvin; Holmes, Douglas

    2014-03-01

    We use the buckling of thin, flexible plates for pumping fluids, controlling the flow rate, and mixing different media within a microfluidic channel. A dielectric elastomeric film with a confined geometry buckles out of the plane when exposed to an electric field. Solid or grease electrodes have traditionally been used as conductive materials to aid in voltage application to both sides of the film. In this work, we use an electrolytic fluid solution as the electrode to enable buckling at relatively low voltages, and to enhance the rate of deformation. We show that this mechanism can be implemented as a microvalve that controls flow rate, or as a micropump that operates over a range of frequencies. A similar mechanism can be used to aid diffusion between two adjacent laminar streams and improve mixing. These low-cost micropumps, microvalves, and micromixers rely on the reversible buckling of thin plates, are easily embeddable in a microfluidic chip, and can potentially be used in variety of applications to accurately control and manipulate fluid flow in a microchannel.

  6. Stretchable transistors with buckled carbon nanotube films as conducting channels

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Michael S; Xu, Feng

    2015-03-24

    Thin-film transistors comprising buckled films comprising carbon nanotubes as the conductive channel are provided. Also provided are methods of fabricating the transistors. The transistors, which are highly stretchable and bendable, exhibit stable performance even when operated under high tensile strains.

  7. Skin, Stringer, and Fastener Loads in Buckled Fuselage Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard D.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The results of a numerical study to assess the effect of skin buckling on the internal load distribution in a stiffened fuselage panel, with and without longitudinal cracks, are presented. In addition, the impact of changes in the internal loads on the fatigue life and residual strength of a fuselage panel is assessed. A generic narrow-body fuselage panel is considered. The entire panel is modeled using shell elements and considerable detail is included to represent the geometric-nonlinear response of the buckled skin, cross section deformation of the stiffening components, and details of the skin-string attachment with discrete fasteners. Results are presented for a fixed internal pressure and various combinations of axial tension or compression loads. Results illustrating the effect of skin buckling on the stress distribution in the skin and stringer, and fastener loads are presented. Results are presented for the pristine structure, and for cases where damage is introduced in the form of a longitudinal crack adjacent to the stringer, or failed fastener elements. The results indicate that axial compression loads and skin buckling can have a significant effect on the circumferential stress in the skin, and fastener loads, which will influence damage initiation, and a comparable effect on stress intensity factors for cases with cracks. The effects on stress intensity factors will influence damage propagation rates and the residual strength of the panel.

  8. Buckling of Thin Films in Nano-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Jia, H. K.; Sun, J.; Ren, X. N.; Li, L. A.

    2010-06-01

    Investigation of thin film buckling is important for life prediction of MEMS device which are damaged mainly by the delamination and buckling of thin films. In this paper the mechanical and thermal properties of compressed thin film titanium films with 150 nm thickness deposited on an organic glass substrate under mechanical and thermal loads were measured and characterized. In order to simulate the thin films which subjected to compound loads and the buckle modes the external uniaxial compression and thermal loading were subjected to the specimen by the symmetric loading device and the electrical film in this experiment. The temperature of the thin film deposited on substrate was measured using thermoelectric couple. The range of temperature accords with the temperature range of the MEMS. It is found that the size and number of the delamination and buckling of the film are depended upon the pre-fixed mechanical loading and thermal temperature. The thermal transient conduction and thermal stability of the film and substrate was studied with finite element method.

  9. Buckling Behavior of Long Anisotropic Plates Subjected to Combined Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    1995-01-01

    A parametric study of the buckling behavior of infinitely long symmetrically laminated anisotropic plates subjected to combined loads is presented. The study focuses on the interaction of a stable subcritical secondary loading state of constant magnitude and a primary destabilizing load that is increased in magnitude until buckling occurs. The loads considered are uniform axial compression, pure inplane bending, transverse tension and compression, and shear. Results obtained using a special purpose plates with a significant potential for reducing structural nondimensional analysis that is well suited for parametric studies are presented for clamped and simply supported plates. In particular, results are presented for a (+/- 45)(sub s) graphite-epoxy laminate, and generic buckling design charts are presented for a wide range of non-dimensional parameters that are applicable to a broad class of laminate constructions. These results show the effects of flexural orthotropy and flexural anisotropy on plates subjected to various combined loading conditions. An important finding of the present study is that the effect of flexural anisotropy herein as flexural anisotropy on the buckling resistance of a plate can be increased significantly for certain types of combined loads.

  10. Initial post-buckling of variable-stiffness curved panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. C.; Raju, G.; Weaver, P. M.

    2014-11-01

    Variable-stiffness shells are curved composite structures in which the fibre-reinforcement follow curvilinear paths in space. Having a wider design space than traditional composite shells, they have the potential to improve a wide variety of weight-critical structures. In this paper, a new method for computing the initial post-buckling response of variable-stiffness cylindrical panels is presented, based on the differential quadrature method. Integro-differential governing and boundary equations governing the problem, derived with Koiter's theory (Koiter, 1945), are solved using a mixed generalised differential quadrature (GDQ) and integral quadrature (GIQ) approach. The post-buckling behaviour is determined on the basis of a quadratic expansion of the displacement fields. Orthogonality of the mode-shapes in the expansion series is ensured by a novel use of the Moore-Penrose generalised matrix inverse for solving the GDQ-GIQ equations. The new formulation is validated against benchmark analytical post-buckling results for constant stiffness plates and shells, and compared with non-linear finite-element (FE) analysis for variable-stiffness shells. Stability estimates are found to be in good agreement with incremental FE results in the vicinity of the buckling load, requiring only a fraction of the number of variables used by the current method.

  11. The ironic detachment of Edward Gibbon.

    PubMed

    Trosman, Harry

    2009-06-01

    Edward Gibbon, the author of The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, has been widely recognized as a master of irony. The historian's early life with parents he found self-serving and unreliable, his reaction to the events surrounding the death of his mother at the age of 9 and the decline of his father, left an impact on his personality and played a role in determining his choice of his life work. Irony has been approached from a psychoanalytic perspective as a mode of communication, as a stylistic device, as a modality through which one might view reality and as a way of uncovering the linkage between pretense and aspiration, between the apparent and the real. Gibbon's ironic detachment can be understood as rooted in his life history. He felt detached from his family of origin, in need of a protective device which would enable him to deal with passion. Sexual and aggressive impulses mobilized defensive postures that were later transformed into an attitude of skepticism and an interest in undercutting false beliefs and irrational authority, positions he attributes to religious ideation which served to instigate historical decline.

  12. The Cave Canyon Detachment: A Standard for Deformation Expected of the Sevier Desert Detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, M. H.

    2007-12-01

    The Cave Canyon detachment (CCd)is a Neogene normal fault in the Mineral Mountains of west-central Utah. The Mineral Mountains are located directly south of the Sevier Desert basin. Because of its location, orientation and age constraints the Cave Canyon detachment has been proposed to be a non-active splay of the Sevier Desert detachment. The Sevier Desert detachment (SDd) is thought to be one of the largest displaced active normal faults in North America accruing as much as 47 km of displacement. There are some fundamental differences between the CCd and the SDd, one of those being that the CCd places Paleozoic limestone directly on a granitic pluton whereas the SDd beneath the basin places Neogene terrestrial sediments directly on Paleozoic limestones. Nevertheless, the temperature and depth at the time of movement are similar, thus making the CCd an appropriate analog to what might be expected of material potentially recovered by scientific drilling of the SDd. A suite of samples from above and below the CCd yields a distinctive pattern of brittle deformation. In the lower plate granites deformation is mostly brittle, and in the upper plate there is only a minor zone a few cm thick of mylonitized carbonate. The lower plate granites are characterized by an aureole of healed microfractures that decrease in abundance from the contact to background at over 100 m. Cataclasis is observed well over 100 m from the detachment, and is so intense at the contact that no grain is unaffected. Significant growth of new minerals and cross-cutting quartz veins are observed within a few meters of the detachment. In upper plate carbonate rocks, a cm-thick zone of dynamic recrystallization is observed, above which there is a meter or so of extensive undulose extinction of grains. Outward from this is a zone of strongly preferred oriented twinning. At a distance of 15 m from the contact only minor carbonate veinlets distinguish fault zone rock from unaffected limestone. If the SDd

  13. Investigation on the buckling of steel piers of elevated expressway due to the Great Hanshin Earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Katsuhisa; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Ito, Tomohiro; Iwamoto, Yoichi

    1996-12-01

    In the Great Hanshin Earthquake which occurred in January 1995, extremely serious damages to the elevated expressways were found. Some of those piers are made of steel and many of them buckled and revealed plastic deformations. One of them revealed the circumferentially uniform outward bulge at the middle portion in the axial direction, though the buckling of a long circular cylinder will occur at it`s bottom end accompanied by more complicated deformation patterns typical to the bending buckling. In this study, simple reduced scale models of the pier were fabricated and the dynamic and static buckling tests were performed. The effect of the girder weight or vertical excitation on the buckling phenomena were investigated. In addition to the tests, static buckling analysis using FEM was also performed in order to clarify the causes for this specified buckling phenomena.

  14. Mechanical and thermal buckling analysis of rectangular sandwich panels under different edge conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1994-01-01

    The combined load (mechanical or thermal load) buckling equations were established for orthotropic rectangular sandwich panels under four different edge conditions by using the Rayleigh-Ritz method of minimizing the total potential energy of a structural system. Two-dimensional buckling interaction curves and three-dimensional buckling interaction surfaces were constructed for high-temperature honeycomb-core sandwich panels supported under four different edge conditions. The interaction surfaces provide overall comparison of the panel buckling strengths and the domains of symmetrical and antisymmetrical buckling associated with the different edge conditions. In addition, thermal buckling curves of these sandwich panels are presented. The thermal buckling conditions for the cases with and without thermal moments were found to be identical for the small deformation theory.

  15. Detection of detachments and inhomogeneities in frescos by Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, A.; Cesareo, R.; Buccolieri, G.; Donativi, M.; Palamà, F.; Quarta, S.; De Nunzio, G.; Brunetti, A.; Marabelli, M.; Santamaria, U.

    2005-07-01

    A mobile instrument has been developed for the detection and mapping of detachments in frescos by using Compton back scattered photons. The instrument is mainly composed of a high energy X-ray tube, an X-ray detection system and a translation table. The instrument was first applied to samples simulating various detachment situations, and then transferred to the Vatican Museum to detect detachments and inhomogeneities in the stanza di Eliodoro, one of the "Raphael's stanze".

  16. Controlled localized buckling responses of orthodontic arch wires.

    PubMed

    Nikolai, R J; Chung, A Y

    1999-09-01

    The orthodontic arch wire is often activated locally, in transverse bending and/or longitudinal torsion, to engage an individual malaligned tooth. Arch wires with substantial flexibilities and elastic ranges in bending are available. Several clinical reports of distal displacements of molars with appliances activated by locally buckling the arch wire have appeared in the recent published literature. This article contains an explanation of buckling or "column" action and the postbuckling response of a wire, and a report of the results of a controlled, in-vitro study of a sample of 256 wire segments subjected to activation-deactivation, buckling-postbuckling-unbuckling cycles. Continuous force-displacement diagrams were obtained from mechanical tests run at oral temperature. Four orthodontics-relevant, mechanical characteristics were quantified from each diagram, and each specimen was subjected to posttest evaluation for inelastic behavior. Although the deformation of the buckled wire is, in fact, bending, the force-displacement diagrams obtained differed substantially from their familiar counterparts generated in transverse bending. Judging from the force magnitudes induced as the deactivation half-cycles commenced as well as the deactivation rates, not all of the 8 wires seem to be clinically suitable for activation initiated by buckling. Magnitudes of springback were substantial from activations as large as 6 mm, and only 2 of the 8 wires exhibited full deactivations less than 80% of their activating displacements. This relatively new mode of arch wire activation that enables delivery to the dentition of mesiodistal pushing forces has substantial potential for clinical application from several biomechanical standpoints. PMID:10474103

  17. Intercellular Adhesion-Dependent Cell Survival and ROCK-Regulated Actomyosin-Driven Forces Mediate Self-Formation of a Retinal Organoid.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Albert; Harris, Raven; Bhansali, Punita; Cvekl, Ales; Liu, Wei

    2016-05-10

    In this study we dissected retinal organoid morphogenesis in human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived cultures and established a convenient method for isolating large quantities of retinal organoids for modeling human retinal development and disease. Epithelialized cysts were generated via floating culture of clumps of Matrigel/hESCs. Upon spontaneous attachment and spreading of the cysts, patterned retinal monolayers with tight junctions formed. Dispase-mediated detachment of the monolayers and subsequent floating culture led to self-formation of retinal organoids comprising patterned neuroretina, ciliary margin, and retinal pigment epithelium. Intercellular adhesion-dependent cell survival and ROCK-regulated actomyosin-driven forces are required for the self-organization. Our data supports a hypothesis that newly specified neuroretina progenitors form characteristic structures in equilibrium through minimization of cell surface tension. In long-term culture, the retinal organoids autonomously generated stratified retinal tissues, including photoreceptors with ultrastructure of outer segments. Our system requires minimal manual manipulation, has been validated in two lines of human pluripotent stem cells, and provides insight into optic cup invagination in vivo. PMID:27132890

  18. Evolution of the combat and operational stress control detachment.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Jason I; Ijames, Victoria L

    2014-01-01

    Medical units designed to provide combat and operational stress control services have evolved since World War II into the current Combat and Operational Stress Control (COSC) detachments. Yet the structure of these COSC detachments differ greatly between what is authorized in the table of organization and equipment (TO&E) and what is doctrinally described in the current field manual guiding combat and operational stress control operations. We therefore explore the evolution of the COSC detachment, compare the organizations found in current doctrine with that currently authorized on the TO&E, and conclude with a proposed structure of a modern COSC detachment that is functionally modular with more clear chains of command.

  19. Flexible retinal electrode array

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2006-10-24

    An electrode array which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array can include a large number of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, with electrode tips that can include an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis where the electrodes can be tailored to provide a uniform gentle contact pressure with optional sensing of this contact pressure at one or more of the electrodes.

  20. Resveratrol inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition of retinal pigment epithelium and development of proliferative vitreoretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Keijiro; He, Shikun; Terasaki, Hiroto; Nazari, Hossein; Zhang, Huiming; Spee, Christine; Kannan, Ram; Hinton, David R

    2015-01-01

    Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is a serious complication of retinal detachment and ocular trauma, and its recurrence may lead to irreversible vision loss. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is a critical step in the pathogenesis of PVR, which is characterized by fibrotic membrane formation and traction retinal detachment. In this study, we investigated the potential impact of resveratrol (RESV) on EMT and the fibrotic process in cultured RPE cells and further examined the preventive effect of RESV on PVR development using a rabbit model of PVR. We found that RESV induces mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) and inhibits transforming growth factor-β2(TGF-β2)-induced EMT of RPE cells by deacetylating SMAD4. The effect of RESV on MET was dependent on sirtuin1 activation. RESV suppressed proliferation, migration and fibronectin synthesis induced by platelet-derived growth factor-BB or TGF-β2. In vivo, RESV inhibited the progression of experimental PVR in rabbit eyes. Histological findings showed that RESV reduced fibrotic membrane formation and decreased α-SMA expression in the epiretinal membranes. These results suggest the potential use of RESV as a therapeutic agent to prevent the development of PVR by targeting EMT of RPE. PMID:26552368

  1. Intraocular retinal transplantation: a review.

    PubMed

    Hammer, R M; Yinon, U

    1991-01-01

    This review covers intraocular transplantation of retinal tissue. This has importance both for theoretical understanding of retinal and neural development and for possible future clinical application. Transplantation sites have ranged from the anterior chamber through the retina to the subretinal space. Transplanted tissue has ranged from whole retina to specific retinal layers or specific types of retinal cells. Both within-species and inter-species transplants have been performed, and donor age has ranged from embryonic to adult. The ability of transplanted tissue to be accepted and to differentiate in host eyes has been studied. The conditions under which successful transplants are obtained, host-graft interactions, and transplantation methodologies have been explored. Morphological, and to a small extent, also functional characteristics of the transplants have been studied. PMID:1747393

  2. Detachment of a single water drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.; Prokhorov, V. E.

    2014-01-01

    The detachment process of a single water drop from a nozzle made of poorly wetted material is followed using high-speed video equipment. The formation and motion dynamics of various flow components are investigated. These are the drop itself; a liquid bridge (jumper), which connects the drop with the mother liquid; the primary satellite, which is formed from the jumper; and a microsatellite, which is thrown from the satellite and flies to the mother liquid. The strong influence of surface effects, under which the satellite initially moves upward and only at a certain time starts to fall along the ballistic trajectory, is established. Bounce of the microsatellite from the mother liquid, which precedes its absorption, is fixed. It is shown that a stable connection of the formation mechanism of satellites with the jumper dynamics opens the possibility of obtaining uniform-sized drops.

  3. Crystal Shape Evolution in Detached Bridgman Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    2013-01-01

    Detached (or dewetted) Bridgman crystal growth defines that process in which a gap exists between a growing crystal and the crucible wall. Existence of the gap provides several advantages, including no sticking of the crystal to the crucible wall, reduced thermal and mechanical stresses, reduced dislocations, and no heterogeneous nucleation by the crucible. Numerical calculations are used to determine the conditions in which a gap can exist. According to crystal shape stability theory, only some of these gap widths will be dynamically stable. Beginning with a crystal diameter that differs from stable conditions, the transient crystal growth process is analyzed. In microgravity, dynamic stability depends only on capillary effects and is decoupled from heat transfer. Depending on the initial conditions and growth parameters, the crystal shape will evolve towards the crucible wall, towards a stable gap width, or towards the center of the crucible, collapsing the meniscus. The effect of a tapered crucible on dynamic stability is also described.

  4. Changes in spectral properties of detached leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daughtry, C. S. T.; Biehl, L. L.

    1984-01-01

    If leaf senescence can be delayed for several days without significant changes in spectral properties, then samples of leaves at remote test sites could be prepared and shipped to laboratories to measure spectral properties. The changes in spectral properties of detached leaves were determined. Leaves from red birch and red pine were immersed in water or 0.001 M benzylaminopurine (BAP) and stored in plastic bags in the dark at either 5 or 25 C. Total directional-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance of the adaxial surface of birch leaves were measured over the 400 to 1100 nm wavelength region with a spectroradiometer and integrating sphere. Pine needles were taped together and reflectance of the mat of needles was measured. Spectral properties changed less than 5% of initial values during the first week when leaves were stored at 5 C. Storage at 25 C promoted rapid senescence and large changes in spectral properties. BAP delayed, but did not stop, senescence at 25 C.

  5. Crystal Shape Evolution in Detached Bridgman Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    2013-01-01

    Detached (or dewetted) Bridgman crystal growth defines that process in which a gap exists between a growing crystal and the crucible wall. Existence of the gap provides several advantages, including no sticking of the crystal to the crucible wall, reduced thermal and mechanical stresses, reduced dislocations, and no heterogeneous nucleation by the crucible. Numerical calculations are used to determine the conditions in which a gap can exist. According to crystal shape stability theory, only some of these gap widths will be dynamically stable. Beginning with a crystal diameter that differs from stable conditions, the transient crystal growth process is analyzed. In microgravity, dynamic stability depends only on capillary effects and is decoupled from heat transfer. Depending on the initial conditions and growth parameters, the crystal shape will evolve towards the crucible wall, towards a stable gap width, or towards the center of the crucible, collapsing the meniscus. The effect of a tapered crucible on dynamic stability is also described

  6. DETACHMENT OF BACTERIOPHAGE FROM ITS CARRIER PARTICLES.

    PubMed

    Hetler, D M; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1931-05-20

    The active substance (phage) present in the lytic broth filtrate is distributed through the medium in the form of particles. These particles vary in size within broad limits. The average size of these particles as calculated on the basis of the rate of diffusion approximates 4.4 mmicro in radius. Fractionation by means of ultrafiltration permits partial separation of particles of different sizes. Under conditions of experiments here reported the particles varied in the radius size from 0.6 mmicro to 11.4 mmicro. The active agent apparently is not intimately identified with these particles. It is merely carried by them by adsorption, and under suitable experimental conditions it can be detached from the larger particles and redistributed on smaller particles of the medium.

  7. Microsystems Technology for Retinal Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James

    2005-03-01

    The retinal prosthesis is targeted to treat age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and other outer retinal degenerations. Simulations of artificial vision have predicted that 600-1000 individual pixels will be needed if a retinal prosthesis is to restore function such as reading large print and face recognition. An implantable device with this many electrode contacts will require microsystems technology as part of its design. An implantable retinal prosthesis will consist of several subsystems including an electrode array and hermetic packaging. Microsystems and microtechnology approaches are being investigated as possible solutions for these design problems. Flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate electrode arrays and silicon micromachined electrode arrays are under development. Inactive PDMS electrodes have been implanted in 3 dogs to assess mechanical biocompatibility. 3 dogs were followed for 6 months. The implanted was securely fastened to the retina with a single retinal tack. No post-operative complications were evident. The array remained within 100 microns of the retinal surface. Histological evaluation showed a well preserved retina underneath the electrode array. A silicon device with electrodes suspended on micromachined springs has been implanted in 4 dogs (2 acute implants, 2 chronic implants). The device, though large, could be inserted into the eye and positioned on the retina. Histological analysis of the retina from the spring electrode implants showed that spring mounted posts penetrated the retina, thus the device will be redesigned to reduce the strength of the springs. These initial implants will provide information for the designers to make the next generation silicon device. We conclude that microsystems technology has the potential to make possible a retinal prosthesis with 1000 individual contacts in close proximity to the retina.

  8. Recurrent Annular Peripheral Choroidal Detachment after Trabeculectomy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shaohui; Sun, Lisa L.; Kavanaugh, A. Scott; Langford, Marlyn P.; Liang, Chanping

    2013-01-01

    We report a challenging case of recurrent flat anterior chamber without hypotony after trabeculectomy in a 54-year-old Black male with a remote history of steroid-treated polymyositis, cataract surgery, and uncontrolled open angle glaucoma. The patient presented with a flat chamber on postoperative day 11, but had a normal fundus exam and intraocular pressure (IOP). Flat chamber persisted despite treatment with cycloplegics, steroids, and a Healon injection into the anterior chamber. A transverse B-scan of the peripheral fundus revealed a shallow annular peripheral choroidal detachment. The suprachoroidal fluid was drained. The patient presented 3 days later with a recurrent flat chamber and an annular peripheral choroidal effusion. The fluid was removed and reinforcement of the scleral flap was performed with the resolution of the flat anterior chamber. A large corneal epithelial defect developed after the second drainage. The oral prednisone was tapered quickly and the topical steroid was decreased. One week later, his vision decreased to count fingers with severe corneal stromal edema and Descemet's membrane folds that improved to 20/50 within 24 h of resumption of the oral steroid and frequent topical steroid. The patient's visual acuity improved to 20/20 following a slow withdrawal of the oral and topical steroid. Eight months after surgery, the IOP was 15 mm Hg without glaucoma medication. The detection of a shallow anterior choroidal detachment by transverse B-scan is critical to making the correct diagnosis. Severe cornea edema can occur if the steroid is withdrawn too quickly. Thus, steroids should be tapered cautiously in steroid-dependent patients. PMID:24348402

  9. The Oman Ophiolite from Detachment to Obduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudier, F. I.

    2014-12-01

    An overview model is presented accounting for older and up-dated published data. Detachment of the Oman ophiolite exhumed a 20 km thick fragment of oceanic lithosphere 500 x 100 km2 in extension. This detachment occurred at margin of a fast spreading NeoTethyan Ocean, at P/T conditions ~900°C-200 MPa, 95-95.5 Ma ago. The Hawasinah nappes underlying the ophiolite at present, represent the stacking of the sedimentary cover deposited on the Arabian continental margin, thinned and rifted since Permian time, and extending more than 300 km north from the present shore. The sedimentary record points to the collapse of the continental basement at Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary, 140 Ma ago. Subduction of the rifted continental margin is inferred, as recorded in the Saih Hatat high-pressure rocks whose metamorphic age 80-140 Ma is discussed, as well as the vergence of related subduction. Late Cretaceous time 85-70 Ma marks the emplacement of the Oman ophiolite in the Muti Basin, to its present position inland the Permo-Triassic continental margin. These episodes are not similarly recorded in the northern part of the Oman Mountains, that do not expose any HP metamorphic belt, but granulitic crustal rocks and large development of syn-obduction non-MORB magmatism in the ophiolite crustal section. Collision is achieved at the northern tip, the Musandam area, linked to the opening of the Gulf of Aden 25 Ma ago, and northward drift of the Arabian Plate.

  10. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-10-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy.

  11. Retinal implants: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Alice T; Margo, Curtis E; Greenberg, Paul B

    2014-07-01

    Retinal implants present an innovative way of restoring sight in degenerative retinal diseases. Previous reviews of research progress were written by groups developing their own devices. This systematic review objectively compares selected models by examining publications describing five representative retinal prostheses: Argus II, Boston Retinal Implant Project, Epi-Ret 3, Intelligent Medical Implants (IMI) and Alpha-IMS (Retina Implant AG). Publications were analysed using three criteria for interim success: clinical availability, vision restoration potential and long-term biocompatibility. Clinical availability: Argus II is the only device with FDA approval. Argus II and Alpha-IMS have both received the European CE Marking. All others are in clinical trials, except the Boston Retinal Implant, which is in animal studies. Vision restoration: resolution theoretically correlates with electrode number. Among devices with external cameras, the Boston Retinal Implant leads with 100 electrodes, followed by Argus II with 60 electrodes and visual acuity of 20/1262. Instead of an external camera, Alpha-IMS uses a photodiode system dependent on natural eye movements and can deliver visual acuity up to 20/546. Long-term compatibility: IMI offers iterative learning; Epi-Ret 3 is a fully intraocular device; Alpha-IMS uses intraocular photosensitive elements. Merging the results of these three criteria, Alpha-IMS is the most likely to achieve long-term success decades later, beyond current clinical availability. PMID:24403565

  12. Intravitreal Injection of Bevacizumab in Primary Vitrectomy to Decrease the Rate of Retinal Redetachment: A Randomized Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Tousi, Adib; Hasanpour, Hossein; Soheilian, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) as a surgical adjunct in prevention of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) after retinal detachment surgery. Methods: In this controlled, randomized pilot study, 27 patients with primary retinal detachment undergoing pars plana deep vitrectomy were included. Of these, 12 received IVB at the end of procedure. The anatomic success and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) were compared to the control group at months 3 and 6 postoperatively. Results: At three month follow-up, 3 of 11 eyes (27.3%) had detached retinas in the IVB group versus 6 of 12 (50.0%) in the control group (P = 0.40). At six-month follow-up, 3 of 10 eyes (30%) had detached retinas in the IVB group versus 3 in 8 (37.5%) in the control group (P > 0.99). Mean logMAR BCVA improved significantly in both groups relative to baseline, but did not show a significant difference at three-and six-month follow-ups between the two groups. Conclusion: Our preliminary results show neither a benefit nor any harm from intervention in both anatomic and visual outcomes. Our results support conducting additional studies to evaluate the effect of intravitreal bevacizumab on postoperative PVR. PMID:27621784

  13. Using the Hypergeometric Model to analyze the buckling of drillstrings in curved boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Sampaio, J.H.B. Jr.; Eustes, A.W. III

    1998-12-31

    Current methodologies for analytically determining the onset of buckling of drillstrings within curved boreholes are limited. In this paper, the Hypergeometric Model is shown to be an effective model to determine drillstring buckling within curved boreholes. With the Hypergeometric Model, the analysis of drillstring buckling results in curves expressing the local buckling force versus the angle of inclination. The local buckling force alone, however, does not contain all the information required for a practical analysis. From the local buckling force curve, the positional buckling force is derived. The positional buckling force considers the distributed weight of the drillstring and the friction between the drillstring and the borehole wall. From this curve, the point of minimum resistance to buckling of the drillstring is determined. Using the local and positional buckling force curves, experimental results and simulations are presented. When multiple configurations exist (for example tapered drillstrings, tapered boreholes, multi-curved boreholes, or any combination of these), the analysis procedure uses superposition of two or more single configuration curves and a graphical algorithm. The Hypergeometric Model permits the optimization of the position of the crossing points (cross-over positioning, casing-shoe positioning, and change of curvature) to achieve extended reach with less risk and cost. The procedure for this model and examples are presented in this paper.

  14. Buckling Design and Analysis of a Payload Fairing One-Sixth Cylindrical Arc-Segment Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosareo, Daniel N.; Oliver, Stanley T.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2013-01-01

    Design and analysis results are reported for a panel that is a 16th arc-segment of a full 33-ft diameter cylindrical barrel section of a payload fairing structure. Six such panels could be used to construct the fairing barrel, and, as such, compression buckling testing of a 16th arc-segment panel would serve as a validation test of the buckling analyses used to design the fairing panels. In this report, linear and nonlinear buckling analyses have been performed using finite element software for 16th arc-segment panels composed of aluminum honeycomb core with graphiteepoxy composite facesheets and an alternative fiber reinforced foam (FRF) composite sandwich design. The cross sections of both concepts were sized to represent realistic Space Launch Systems (SLS) Payload Fairing panels. Based on shell-based linear buckling analyses, smaller, more manageable buckling test panel dimensions were determined such that the panel would still be expected to buckle with a circumferential (as opposed to column-like) mode with significant separation between the first and second buckling modes. More detailed nonlinear buckling analyses were then conducted for honeycomb panels of various sizes using both Abaqus and ANSYS finite element codes, and for the smaller size panel, a solid-based finite element analysis was conducted. Finally, for the smaller size FRF panel, nonlinear buckling analysis was performed wherein geometric imperfections measured from an actual manufactured FRF were included. It was found that the measured imperfection did not significantly affect the panel's predicted buckling response

  15. Role of edge turbulence in detached divertor plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, F. Y.; Sigmar, D. J.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    1996-04-01

    The role of edge turbulence in detached divertor plasmas is investigated. It is shown that the edge turbulence, through poloidal transport of parallel momentum, can produce a significant plasma pressure drop along the magnetic field lines toward the divertor plate, a feature that characterizes the detached divertor plasma regime.

  16. Frictional and elastic energy in gecko adhesive detachment.

    PubMed

    Gravish, Nick; Wilkinson, Matt; Autumn, Kellar

    2008-03-01

    Geckos use millions of adhesive setae on their toes to climb vertical surfaces at speeds of over 1 m s(-1). Climbing presents a significant challenge for an adhesive since it requires both strong attachment and easy, rapid removal. Conventional pressure-sensitive adhesives are either strong and difficult to remove (e.g. duct tape) or weak and easy to remove (e.g. sticky notes). We discovered that the energy required to detach adhering tokay gecko setae (W(d)) is modulated by the angle (theta) of a linear path of detachment. Gecko setae resist detachment when dragged towards the animal during detachment (theta = 30 degrees ) requiring W(d) = 5.0+/-0.86(s.e.) J m(-2) to detach, largely due to frictional losses. This external frictional loss is analogous to viscous internal frictional losses during detachment of pressure-sensitive adhesives. We found that, remarkably, setae possess a built-in release mechanism. Setae acted as springs when loaded in tension during attachment and returned elastic energy when detached along the optimal path (theta=130 degrees ), resulting in W(d) = -0.8+/-0.12 J m(-2). The release of elastic energy from the setal shaft probably causes spontaneous release, suggesting that curved shafts may enable easy detachment in natural, and synthetic, gecko adhesives.

  17. Ruptured retinal arterial macroaneurysm: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Speilburg, Ashley M; Klemencic, Stephanie A

    2014-01-01

    Retinal arterial macroaneurysm is an acquired, focal dilation of a retinal artery, typically occurring within the first three bifurcations of the central retinal artery. The clinical presentation of a retinal arterial macroaneurysm is highly variable, making initial diagnosis difficult and differentials many. Identification of retinal arterial macroaneurysms is crucial to appropriately co-manage with the primary care physician for hypertension control. Prognosis is generally good and observation is often an adequate treatment. However, in cases of macular threat or involvement, some treatment options are available and referral to a retinal specialist is indicated.

  18. Spontaneous Solitaire™ AB Thrombectomy Stent Detachment During Stroke Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Akpinar, Suha Yilmaz, Guliz

    2015-04-15

    Spontaneous Solitaire™ stent retriever detachment is a rarely defined entity seen during stroke treatment, which can result in a disastrous clinical outcome if it cannot be solved within a critical stroke treatment time window. Two solutions to this problem are presented in the literature. The first is to leave the stent in place and apply angioplasty to the detached stent, while the second involves surgically removing the stent from the location at which it detached. Here, we present a case of inadvertent stent detachment during stroke treatment for a middle cerebral artery M1 occlusion resulting in progressive thrombosis. The detached stent was removed endovascularly by another Solitaire stent, resulting in the recanalization of the occluded middle cerebral artery.

  19. Droplet detachment by air flow for microstructured superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hao, Pengfei; Lv, Cunjing; Yao, Zhaohui

    2013-04-30

    Quantitative correlation between critical air velocity and roughness of microstructured surface has still not been established systematically until the present; the dynamics of water droplet detachment by air flow from micropillar-like superhydrophobic surfaces is investigated by combining experiments and simulation comparisons. Experimental evidence demonstrates that the onset of water droplet detachment from horizontal micropillar-like superhydrophobic surfaces under air flow always starts with detachment of the rear contact lines of the droplets from the pillar tops, which exhibits a similar dynamic mechanism for water droplet motion under a gravity field. On the basis of theoretical analysis and numerical simulation, an explicit analytical model is proposed for investigating the detaching mechanism, in which the critical air velocity can be fully determined by several intrinsic parameters: water-solid interface area fraction, droplet volume, and Young's contact angle. This model gives predictions of the critical detachment velocity of air flow that agree well with the experimental measurements.

  20. Three-dimensional necking during viscous slab detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tscharner, M.; Schmalholz, S. M.; Duretz, T.

    2014-06-01

    We study the three-dimensional (3-D) deformation during detachment of a lithospheric slab with simple numerical models using the finite element method. An initially vertical layer of power law viscous fluid mimics the slab and is surrounded by a linear or power law viscous fluid representing asthenospheric mantle. We quantify the impact of slab size and shape (symmetric/asymmetric) on slab detachment and identify two processes that control the lateral (i.e., along-trench) slab deformation: (1) the horizontal deflection of the lateral, vertical slab sides (> 100 km with velocities up to 16 mm/yr) and (2) the propagation of localized thinning (necking) inside the slab (with velocities >9 cm/yr). The lateral propagation velocity is approximately constant during slab detachment. Larger slabs (here wider than approximately 300 km) detach with rates similar to those predicted by 2-D models, whereas smaller slabs detach slower. Implications for geodynamic processes and interpretations of seismic tomography are discussed.

  1. Dissociative detachment relates to psychotic symptoms and personality decompensation.

    PubMed

    Allen, J G; Coyne, L; Console, D A

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have addressed the prominence of psychotic symptoms in conjunction with multiple personality disorder (now dissociative identity disorder). The present study examines the relation between psychotic symptoms and a more pervasive form of dissociative disturbance, namely dissociative detachment. Two hundred sixty-six women in inpatient treatment for severe trauma-related disorders completed the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES), and 102 of these patients also completed the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI-III). A factor analysis of the DES yielded two dimensions of dissociative detachment: detachment from one's own actions and detachment from the self and the environment. Each of these DES dimensions relates strongly to the thought disorder and schizotypal personality disorder scales of the MCMI-III. We propose that severe dissociative detachment, by virtue of loosening the moorings in inner and outer reality, is conducive to psychotic symptoms and personality decompensation.

  2. A novel platform for minimally invasive delivery of cellular therapy as a thin layer across the subretina for treatment of retinal degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenstreich, Ygal; Tzameret, Adi; Kalish, Sapir E.; Belkin, Michael; Meir, Amilia; Treves, Avraham J.; Nagler, Arnon; Sher, Ifat

    2015-03-01

    Incurable retinal degenerations affect millions worldwide. Stem cell transplantation rescued visual functions in animal models of retinal degeneration. In those studies cells were transplanted in subretinal "blebs", limited number of cells could be injected and photoreceptor rescue was restricted to areas in proximity to the injection sites. We developed a minimally-invasive surgical platform for drug and cell delivery in a thin layer across the subretina and extravascular spaces of the choroid. The novel system is comprised of a syringe with a blunt-tipped needle and an adjustable separator. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) were transplanted in eyes of RCS rats and NZW rabbits through a longitudinal triangular scleral incision. No immunosuppressants were used. Retinal function was determined by electroretinogram analysis and retinal structure was determined by histological analysis and OCT. Transplanted cells were identified as a thin layer across the subretina and extravascular spaces of the choroid. In RCS rats, cell transplantation delayed photoreceptor degeneration across the entire retina and significantly enhanced retinal functions. No retinal detachment or choroidal hemorrhages were observed in rabbits following transplantation. This novel platform opens a new avenue for drug and cell delivery, placing the transplanted cells in close proximity to the damaged RPE and retina as a thin layer, across the subretina and thereby slowing down cell death and photoreceptor degeneration, without retinal detachment or choroidal hemorrhage. This new transplantation system may increase the therapeutic effect of other cell-based therapies and therapeutic agents. This study is expected to directly lead to phase I/II clinical trials for autologous hBM-MSCs transplantation in retinal degeneration patients.

  3. Propulsion of Microorganisms and Elastic Buckling in Viscous Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Moumita

    Understanding the physics behind systems operating in the low- Reynolds number regime has been a common area explored in the field of fluid mechanics. The realm of low-Reynolds number (Re) encompasses the world of the very small, the very viscous, or the very slow. Typically the inertial forces are dominated by viscous ones in this domain. In my dissertation I discuss two experiments, both of which are in this regime. The first problem discusses a mechanical experimental model of a flexible sheet swimming with a prescribed wave pattern---a Taylor swimmer---through a fluid. Our study is motivated by a need for a fundamental understanding of microorganism locomotion through non-Newtonian fluids. We measure the swimming speed of this cylindrical version of Taylor's swimming sheet in viscoelastic fluids, and find that depending on the rheology, the speed can either increase or decrease relative to the speed in a Newtonian viscous fluid. The swimming stroke of the sheet is a prescribed propagating wave that travels along the sheet in the azimuthal direction. The measurements are performed with the sheet immersed in a fluid inside a cylindrical tank under torque-free conditions. Swimming speeds in the Newtonian case are found to be consistent with calculations using the Stokes equation. A faster swimming speed is found in a viscoelastic fluid that has a viscosity independent of shear rate. By contrast, a slower swimming speed is found with more complex shear-thinning viscoelastic fluids which have multiple relaxation time scales as well. These results are compared with calculations with Oldroyd-B fluids which find a decreasing swimming speed with Deborah number given by the product of the fluid elastic relaxation time scale and the driving frequency. The second problem, investigates the buckling of an elastic filament when immersed in a Newtonian fluid as it undergoes a uniaxial compression. Although there have been investigations of buckling of semi-flexible filaments

  4. Cooperative buckling and the nonlinear mechanics of nematic semiflexible networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucard, L. C.; Price, J. K.; Klug, W. S.; Levine, A. J.

    2015-09-01

    We review the nonlinear mechanics of cross-linked networks of stiff filaments with a quenched anisotropic (nematic) alignment. A combination of numerical simulations and analytic calculations shows that the broken rotational symmetry of the filament orientational distribution leads to a dramatic nonlinear softening of the network at very small strain (on the order of 0.1%). We argue that one can understand this softening in terms of Euler buckling, i.e. the loss of further load-carrying capacity in compression within the network. With increasing shear strain, this source of geometric nonlinearity appears as heterogeneous nucleation (originating in particularly fragile regions, which may be identified by a linear stability analysis) and subsequently grows into ‘buckling scars’ that eventually spread throughout the system. We develop a simple mean-field model for the nonlinear mechanics of such networks and suggest applications of these ideas to a variety of fiber networks and biopolymer systems.

  5. Finite element buckling and postbuckling solutions for multilayered composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1995-01-01

    A study is made of the buckling and postbuckling responses of flat, unstiffened composite panels subjected to various combinations of mechanical and thermal loads. The analysis is based on a first-order shear deformation von Karman-type plate theory. A mixed formulation is used with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the strain components, stress resultants and the generalized displacements of the plate. The stability boundary, postbuckling response and the sensitivity coefficients are evaluated. The sensitivity coefficients measure the sensitivity of the buckling and postbuckling responses to variations in the different lamination and material parameters of the panel. Numerical results are presented for both solid panels and panels with central circular cutouts. The results show the effects of the variations in the fiber orientation angels, aspect ratio of the panel, and the hole diameter (for panels with cutouts) on the stability boundary, postbuckling response and sensitivity coefficients.

  6. Tricuspid valve detachment in closure of congenital ventricular septal defect.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinping; Li, Jun; Wei, Xiang; Zhao, Bo; Sun, Wei

    2003-01-01

    From January 1991 through December 2001, 600 patients underwent closure of a perimembranous ventricular septal defect through a right atrial approach at our institution. In 122 of these patients, the operation included temporary detachment of a tricuspid valve septal leaflet from the annulus to allow complete visualization of a perimembranous ventricular septal defect The mean age of the patients at surgery was 4.6 years in those who underwent leaflet detachment and 4.7 years in the 478 patients who did not (P > 0.05). Preoperatively, all patients were in sinus rhythm. Echocardiography showed trivial tricuspid regurgitation in 21 of the patients undergoing detachment and in 39 of the non-detachment patients. There was no difference in bypass time or aortic cross-clamp time between the 2 groups. Postoperatively, 3 patients in the non-detachment group had heart block; all other patients were in sinus rhythm. Echocardiograms on the 7th postoperative day showed small residual ventricular septal defects in none of the patients who underwent valve detachment and in 10 of the non-detachment patients; mild tricuspid regurgitation was present in 12 non-detachment patients only; and trivial tricuspid regurgitation was present in 19 patients who underwent valve detachment and in 29 who did not. There was no hospital death in either group. Long-term follow-up showed no progression of tricuspid regurgitation or tricuspid stenosis. All patients remained in sinus rhythm. This study suggests that tricuspid valve detachment is a safe, effective technique that improves exposure for ventricular septal defect repair and does not adversely affect valve competence. PMID:12638669

  7. Elastic Buckling of Orthotropic Plates Under Varying Axial Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badir, Ashraf; Hu, Hurang; Diallo, Abdouramane

    1997-01-01

    The elastic buckling load of simply supported rectangular orthotropic plates subjected to a second degree parabolic variation of axial stresses in the longitudinal direction is calculated using analytical methods. The variation of axial stresses is equilibrated by nonuniform shear stresses along the plate edges and transverse normal stresses. The influence of the aspect ratio is examined, and the results are compared with plates subjected to uniform axial stresses.

  8. Qualitative properties of large buckled states of spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, K. G.; Antman, S. S.

    1985-01-01

    A system of 6th-order quasi-linear Ordinary Differential Equations is analyzed to show the global existence of axisymmetrically buckled states. A surprising nodal property is obtained which shows that everywhere along a branch of solutions that bifurcates from a simple eigenvalue of the linearized equation, the number of simultaneously vanishing points of both shear resultant and circumferential bending moment resultant remains invariant, provided that a certain auxiliary condition is satisfied.

  9. Energy harvesting from controlled buckling of piezoelectric beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, M. H.; Karami, M. Amin

    2015-11-01

    A piezoelectric vibration energy harvester is presented that can generate electricity from the weight of passing cars or crowds. The energy harvester consists of a piezoelectric beam, which buckles when the device is stepped on. The energy harvester can have a horizontal or vertical configuration. In the vertical (direct) configuration, the piezoelectric beam is vertical and directly sustains the weight of the vehicles or people. In the horizontal (indirect) configuration, the vertical weight is transferred to a horizontal axial force through a scissor-like mechanism. Buckling of the beam results in significant stresses and, thus, large power production. However, if the beam’s buckling is not controlled, the beam will fracture. To prevent this, the axial deformation is constrained to limit the deformations of the beam. In this paper, the energy harvester is analytically modeled. The considered piezoelectric beam is a general non-uniform beam. The natural frequencies, mode shapes, and the critical buckling force corresponding to each mode shape are calculated. The electro-mechanical coupling and the geometric nonlinearities are included in the model. The design criteria for the device are discussed. It is demonstrated that a device, realized with commonly used piezoelectric patches, can generate tens of milliwatts of power from passing car traffic. The proposed device could also be implemented in the sidewalks or integrated in shoe soles for energy generation. One of the key features of the device is its frequency up-conversion characteristics. The piezoelectric beam undergoes free vibrations each time the weight is applied to or removed from the energy harvester. The frequency of the free vibrations is orders of magnitude larger than the frequency of the load. The device is, thus, both efficient and insensitive to the frequency of the force excitations.

  10. Buckling of structures with uncertain imperfections - Personal perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elishakoff, Isaac

    1998-01-01

    The previous review on stochastic buckling of structures was written by Amazigo in 1976. This review summarizes some of the developments which took place in recent two decades. A brief overview is given of the effect on uncertainty in the initial geometric imperfections, elastic moduli, applied forces, and thickness variation. For the benefit of the thinking reader, the review has a critical nature. It should be noted that this manuscript has yet to be completed.

  11. Strain mapping on gold thin film buckling and siliconblistering

    SciTech Connect

    Goudeau, P.; Tamura, N.; Parry, G.; Colin, J.; Coupeau, C.; Cleymand, F.; Padmore, H.

    2005-09-01

    Stress/Strain fields associated with thin film buckling induced by compressive stresses or blistering due to the presence of gas bubbles underneath single crystal surfaces are difficult to measure owing to the microscale dimensions of these structures. In this work, we show that micro Scanning X-ray diffraction is a well suited technique for mapping the strain/stress tensor of these damaged structures.

  12. Longitudinal Weld Land Buckling in Compression-Loaded Orthogrid Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornburgh, Robert P.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Large stiffened cylinders used in launch vehicles (LV), such as the Space Shuttle External Tank, are manufactured by welding multiple curved panel sections into complete cylinders. The effects of the axial weld lands between the panel sections on the buckling load were studied, along with the interaction between the acreage stiffener arrangement and the weld land geometry. This document contains the results of the studies.

  13. Optoacoustic online temperature determination during retinal laser photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlott, Kerstin; Stalljohann, Jens; Weber, Benjamin; Kandulla, Jochen; Herrmann, Katharina; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2007-07-01

    Retinal photocoagulation is an established treatment of different retinal diseases. The treatment relies on a short, local heating of the tissue which induces a denaturation. The resulting scar formation may for example prevent the further detachment of the retina. The extent of the coagulation is besides other parameters mostly dependent on the induced temperature increase. However, until today a temperature based dosimetry for photocoagulation does not exist. The dosage is rather based on the experience of the treating physicians to achieve visible whitish lesions on the retina. In this work a technique is presented, which allows an online temperature monitoring during photocoagulation. If an absorbing material is irradiated with short laser pulses, a thermoelastic expansion of the absorber induces an acoustic wave. Its amplitude is dependent on the temperature of the absorber. For analyzing the applicability of the optoacoustic temperature determination for dosimetry, measurements were performed on enucleated porcine eye globes. The pressure transients are detected by an ultrasonic transducer, which is embedded in an ophthalmologic contact lens. As long as no strong lesions occur, the determined temperatures are almost proportional to the power of the treatment laser. Using a spot diameter of 200 μm and different laser powers, the temperature rise at the end of the 400 ms irradiation was found to be approximately 0.16 °C/mW. The onset of the denaturation was observed around 50°C. The far aim of this project is an automatic regulation of the treatment laser onto a desired temperature course.

  14. Buckling of a beam extruded into highly viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosselin, F. P.; Neetzow, P.; Paak, M.

    2014-11-01

    Inspired by microscopic Paramecia which use trichocyst extrusion to propel themselves away from thermal aggression, we propose a macroscopic experiment to study the stability of a slender beam extruded in a highly viscous fluid. Piano wires were extruded axially at constant speed in a tank filled with corn syrup. The force necessary to extrude the wire was measured to increase linearly at first until the compressive viscous force causes the wire to buckle. A numerical model, coupling a lengthening elastica formulation with resistive-force theory, predicts a similar behavior. The model is used to study the dynamics at large time when the beam is highly deformed. It is found that at large time, a large deformation regime exists in which the force necessary to extrude the beam at constant speed becomes constant and length independent. With a proper dimensional analysis, the beam can be shown to buckle at a critical length based on the extrusion speed, the bending rigidity, and the dynamic viscosity of the fluid. Hypothesizing that the trichocysts of Paramecia must be sized to maximize their thrust per unit volume as well as avoid buckling instabilities, we predict that their bending rigidity must be about 3 ×10-9N μ m2 . The verification of this prediction is left for future work.

  15. Developing the Next Generation Shell Buckling Design Factors and Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    NASA s Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor (SBKF) Project was established in the spring of 2007 by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) in collaboration with the Constellation Program and Exploration Systems Mission Directorate. The SBKF project has the current goal of developing less-conservative, robust shell buckling design factors (a.k.a. knockdown factors) and design and analysis technologies for light-weight stiffened metallic launch vehicle (LV) structures. Preliminary design studies indicate that implementation of these new knockdown factors can enable significant reductions in mass and mass-growth in these vehicles and can help mitigate some of NASA s LV development and performance risks. In particular, it is expected that the results from this project will help reduce the reliance on testing, provide high-fidelity estimates of structural performance, reliability, robustness, and enable increased payload capability. The SBKF project objectives and approach used to develop and validate new design technologies are presented, and provide a glimpse into the future of design of the next generation of buckling-critical launch vehicle structures.

  16. Buckling of a Flexible Strip Sliding on a Frictional Base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynen, Alexandre; Marck, Julien; Denoel, Vincent; Detournay, Emmanuel

    2013-03-01

    The main motivation for this contribution is the buckling of a drillstring sliding on the bottom of the horizontal section of borehole. The open questions that remain today are related to the determination of the onset of instability, and to the conditions under which different modes of constrained buckling occur. In this presentation, we are concerned by a two-dimensional version of this problem; namely, the sliding of a flexible strip being fed inside a conduit. The ribbon, which has a flexural rigidity EI and a weight per unit length w, is treated as an inextensible elastica of negligible thickness. The contact between the ribbon and the wall of the conduit is characterized by a friction coefficient μ. First, we report the result of a stability analysis that aims at determining the critical inserted length of the ribbon l* (μ) (scaled by the characteristic length λ =(EI / w) 1 / 3) at which there is separation between the strip and the conduit bottom, as well as the buckling mode. Next, the relationship between the feeding force F and the inserted length l after bifurcation is computed. Finally, the results of a ``kitchen table'' experiment involving a strip of silicon rubber being pushed on a plank are reported and compared with predictions.

  17. Dynamic Visco-elastic Buckling Analysis for Airway Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bando, Kiyoshi; Ohba, Kenkichi; Yamanoi, Yuta

    In order to clarify the mechanism by which the lung airway narrows during an asthma attack, dynamic buckling analysis of the wall was conducted. The wall was modeled using a visco-elastic thin-walled circular cylinder of the Voigt model for the planestress state. A governing equation for dynamic buckling was derived, and in the equation, the contraction of smooth muscle was replaced by uniform inward transmural pressure. The non-dimensional parameters for the buckling wave number n were nondimensional retardation time τ, non-dimensional increasing velocity of inward transmural pressure β, thickness radius ratio α2, radius length ratio η, density ratio ζ, and Poisson's ratio ν. The validity of the theoretical model was confirmed by comparing the calculated wave number with that obtained from the experiment, in which a silicone rubber tube blended with silicone potting gel was used as the in vitro airway model. In addition, the wave number n increased with β. It was necessary to consider the damping effect of the tube model or the airway wall, and n increased by 1.5 to 2 due to the additional mass effect of surrounding tissues of the basement membrane in the airway wall.

  18. Nanoindentation of Si Nanostructures: Buckling and Friction at Nanoscales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huai; Li, Bin; Zhao, Qiu; Luo, Zhiquan; Im, Jay; Kang, Min K.; Allen, Richard A.; Cresswell, Michael W.; Huang, Rui; Ho, Paul S.

    2009-06-01

    A nanoindentation system was employed to characterize mechanical properties of silicon nanolines (SiNLs), which were fabricated by an anisotropic wet etching (AWE) process. The SiNLs had the linewidth ranging from 24 nm to 90 nm, having smooth and vertical sidewalls and the aspect ratio (height/linewidth) from 7 to 18. During indentation, a buckling instability was observed at a critical load, followed by a displacement burst without a load increase, men a full recovery of displacement upon unloading. This phenomenon was explained by two bucking modes. It was also found that the difference in friction at the contact between the indenter and SiNLs directly affected buckling response of these nanolines. The friction coefficient was estimated to be in a range of 0.02 to 0.05. For experiments with large indentation displacements, irrecoverable indentation displacements were observed due to fracture of Si nanolines, with the strain to failure estimated to be from 3.8% to 9.7%. These observations indicated that the buckling behavior of SiNLs depended on the combined effects of load, line geometry, and the friction at contact. This study demonstrated a valuable approach to fabrication of well-defined Si nanoline structures and the application of the nanoindentation method for investigation of their mechanical properties at the nanoscale.

  19. Effect of the electric field on buckled and puckered arsenene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, Victor Hugo; Fernandez-Escamilla, Hector Noe; Martínez-Guerra, Edgar

    With the emergence of new 2D materials, more recently phosphorene, arsenene appears as a new candidate to be explored for electronic devices. We have studied the stability of arsenene pristine and the effect of a transversal electric field on its electronic properties. The calculations were performed using the SIESTA code, with the GGA exchange-correlation functional in the PBE form. We have used numerical atomic orbitals as the basis set for the valence wavefunctions employing a double ζ-polarized basis. We use the Perdew-Becke pseudopotential for an As atom that includes the scalar-relativistic effect and Troullier-Martins parametrization. We adopt the Monkhorst-Pack scheme for k-point sampling of Brillouin zone integrations with 25 ×25 ×1 and 25 ×25 ×1 for the buckled/planar and puckered systems, respectively. We found that buckled and puckered arsenenes are stable and posses indirect gap. The effect of the electric field on the electronic structure of the buckled arsenene is the modulation of indirect to direct gap, while in puckered arsenene the gap linearly decreases as electric field is increased. This research was supported by Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (Conacyt) under Grant No. 43830-F.

  20. Substrate compliance effects on buckle driven delamination in thin gold film systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Yeager, John.; Cordill, Megan J.; Adams, David Price; Moody, Neville Reid; Corona, Edmundo; Kennedy, Marian S.; Bahr, David F.; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2010-10-01

    Film durability is a primary factor governing the use of emerging thin film flexible substrate devices where compressive stresses can lead to delamination and buckling. It is of particular concern in gold film systems found in many submicron and nanoscale applications. We are therefore studying these effects in gold on PMMA systems using compressively stressed tungsten overlayers to force interfacial failure and simulations employing cohesive zone elements to model the fracture process. Delamination and buckling occurred spontaneously following deposition with buckle morphologies that differed significantly from existing model predictions. Moreover, use of thin adhesive interlayers had no discernable effect on performance. In this presentation we will use observations and simulations to show how substrate compliance and yielding affects the susceptibility to buckling of gold films on compliant substrates. We will also compare the fracture energies and buckle morphologies of this study with those of gold films on sapphire substrates to show how changing substrate compliance affects buckle formation.

  1. Single-strain-gage force/stiffness buckling prediction techniques on a hat-stiffened panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Larry D.; Thompson, Randolph C.

    1991-01-01

    Predicting the buckling characteristics of a test panel is necessary to ensure panel integrity during a test program. A single-strain-gage buckling prediction method was developed on a hat-stiffened, monolithic titanium buckling panel. The method is an adaptation of the original force/stiffness method which requires back-to-back gages. The single-gage method was developed because the test panel did not have back-to-back gages. The method was used to predict buckling loads and temperatures under various heating and loading conditions. The results correlated well with a finite element buckling analysis. The single-gage force/stiffness method was a valid real-time and post-test buckling prediction technique.

  2. Buckling of Cracked Laminated Composite Cylindrical Shells Subjected to Combined Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahbakhsh, Hamidreza; Shariati, Mahmoud

    2013-10-01

    A series of finite element analysis on the cracked composite cylindrical shells under combined loading is carried out to study the effect of loading condition, crack size and orientation on the buckling behavior of laminated composite cylindrical shells. The interaction buckling curves of cracked laminated composite cylinders subject to different combinations of axial compression, bending, internal pressure and external pressure are obtained, using the finite element method. Results show that the internal pressure increases the critical buckling load of the CFRP cylindrical shells and bending and external pressure decrease it. Numerical analysis show that axial crack has the most detrimental effect on the buckling load of a cylindrical shell and results show that for lower values of the axial compressive load and higher values of the external pressure, the buckling is usually in the global mode and for higher values of axial compressive load and lower levels of external pressure the buckling mode is mostly in the local mode.

  3. Temperature controlled retinal photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlott, Kerstin; Koinzer, Stefan; Baade, Alexander; Birngruber, Reginald; Roider, Johann; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Retinal photocoagulation lacks objective dosage in clinical use, thus the commonly applied lesions are too deep and strong, associated with pain reception and the risk of visual field defects and induction of choroidal neovascularisations. Optoacoustics allows real-time non-invasive temperature measurement in the fundus during photocoagulation by applying short probe laser pulses additionally to the treatment radiation, which excite the emission of ultrasonic waves. Due to the temperature dependence of the Grüneisen parameter, the amplitudes of the ultrasonic waves can be used to derive the temperature of the absorbing tissue. By measuring the temperatures in real-time and automatically controlling the irradiation by feedback to the treatment laser, the strength of the lesions can be defined. Different characteristic functions for the time and temperature dependent lesion sizes were used as rating curves for the treatment laser, stopping the irradiation automatically after a desired lesion size is achieved. The automatically produced lesion sizes are widely independent of the adjusted treatment laser power and individual absorption. This study was performed on anaesthetized rabbits and is a step towards a clinical trial with automatically controlled photocoagulation.

  4. Retinal Endothelial Cell Apoptosis Stimulates Recruitment of Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhatwadekar, Ashay D.; Glenn, Josephine V.; Curtis, Tim M.; Grant, Maria B.; Stitt, Alan W.; Gardiner, Tom A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Bone marrow–derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) contribute to vascular repair although it is uncertain how local endothelial cell apoptosis influences their reparative function. This study was conducted to determine how the presence of apoptotic bodies at sites of endothelial damage may influence participation of EPCs in retinal microvascular repair. Methods Microlesions of apoptotic cell death were created in monolayers of retinal microvascular endothelial cells (RMECs) by using the photodynamic drug verteporfin. The adhesion of early-EPCs to these lesions was studied before detachment of the apoptotic cells or after their removal from the wound site. Apoptotic bodies were fed to normal RMECs and mRNA levels for adhesion molecules were analyzed. Results Endothelial lesions where apoptotic bodies were left attached at the wound site showed a fivefold enhancement in EPC recruitment (P < 0.05) compared with lesions where the apoptotic cells had been removed. In intact RMEC monolayers exposed to apoptotic bodies, expression of ICAM, VCAM, and E-selectin was upregulated by 5- to 15-fold (P < 0.05– 0.001). EPCs showed a characteristic chemotactic response (P < 0.05) to conditioned medium obtained from apoptotic bodies, whereas analysis of the medium showed significantly increased levels of VEGF, IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-α when compared to control medium; SDF-1 remained unchanged. Conclusions The data indicate that apoptotic bodies derived from retinal capillary endothelium mediate release of proangiogenic cytokines and chemokines and induce adhesion molecule expression in a manner that facilitates EPC recruitment. PMID:19474402

  5. Study of hydrogenated silicene: The initialization model of hydrogenation on planar, low buckled and high buckled structures of silicene

    SciTech Connect

    Syaputra, Marhamni Wella, Sasfan Arman; Wungu, Triati Dewi Kencana; Purqon, Acep; Suprijadi

    2015-09-30

    We study the hydrogenation structures possessed by silicene i.e. planar (PL), low buckled (LB) and high buckled (HB). On those structures we found the hydrogenation process occurs with some particular notes. Hydrogen stable position on the silicene surface is determined by its initial configuration. We only considered the fully hydrogenated case with the formula unit (SiH){sub n} for all of these structures. Physical and electronic structure shift after the process are compared with hydrogenated graphene. Moreover, we observed a chemical process in the presence of hydrogen on the PL structure by nudged elastic band (NEB) which illustrates how hydrogen has a significant impact to the force barrier of the PL that changing it from its original structure.

  6. Effects of Stiffening and Mechanical Load on Thermal Buckling of Stiffened Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Card, Michael F.

    1995-01-01

    A study of thermal buckling of stiffened cylindrical shells with the proportions of a preliminary supersonic transport fuselage design (1970) is presented. The buckling analysis is performed using an axisymmetric shell-of-revolution code, BOSOR4. The effects of combined mechanical (axial loading) and thermal loading (heated skins) are investigated. Results indicate that the location of longitudinal eccentric stiffening has a very large effect on the thermal buckling strength of longitudinally stiffened shells, and on longitudinally stiffened shells with rings.

  7. A digital computer study of the buckling of shallow spherical caps and truncated hemispheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stilwell, W. C.; Ball, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    A study of the buckling of thin shells was conducted using a digital computer program for the geometrically nonlinear analysis of arbitrarily loaded shells of revolution. The objective was an evaluation of the program's applicability to bifurcation buckling and imperfection sensitivity analysis. Clamped spherical caps under pressure loading and clamped truncated hemispheres under axial tension were investigated. Buckling loads were determined for axisymmetric and nearly axisymmetric loads and are compared with previously published analytical results based on geometric imperfections.

  8. Thermo-mechanical buckling analysis of FGM plate using generalized plate theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Kanishk; Kumar, Dinesh; Gite, Anil

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the thermo-mechanical buckling behavior of simply-supported FGM plate under the framework of generalized plate theory (GPT), which includes classical plate theory (CPT), first order shear deformation theory (FSDT) and higher order shear deformation theory (HSDT) as special cases. The governing equations for FGM plate under thermal and mechanical loading conditions are derived from the principle of virtual displacements and Navier-type solution is assumed for simply supported boundary condition. The efficiency and applicability of presented methodology is illustrated by considering various examples of thermal and mechanical buckling of FGM plates. The closed form solutions in the form of critical thermal and mechanical buckling loads, predicted by CPT, FSDT and HSDT are compared for different side-to-thickness of FGM plate. Subsequently, the effect of material gradation profile on critical buckling parameters is examined by evaluating the buckling response for a range of power law indexes. The effect of geometrical parameters on mechanical buckling of FGM plate under uni-axial and bi-axial loading conditions are also illustrated by calculating the critical load for various values of slenderness ratios. Furthermore a comparative analysis of critical thermal buckling loads of FGM plate for different temperature profiles is also presented. It is identified that all plate theories predicted approximately same critical buckling loads and critical buckling temperatures for thin FGM plate, however for thick FGM plates, CPT overestimates the critical buckling parameters. Moreover the critical buckling loads and critical buckling temperatures of FGM plate are found to be significantly lower than the corresponding homogenous isotropic ceramic plate (n=0).

  9. Pseudotumoral and Multiple Retinal Pigment Epithelium Proliferation in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Disease.

    PubMed

    Yepez, Juan B; Murati, Felipe; Petitto, Michele; Arevalo, J Fernando

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of pseudotumoral retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) proliferation in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease, in a 50-year-old female who presented with a juxtapapillary and peripheral subretinal hyperpigmented lesions in the left eye and "sunset glow fundus," hyperpigmented striae, and multiple atrophic chorioretinal spots in the periphery. The darkly pigmented exuberant larger subretinal mass extended to the periphery with associated subretinal fibrosis. This patient demonstrated the entire clinical presentation of VKH disease, which tends to course with a chronic, bilateral, granulomatous panuveitis and exudative retinal detachment associated with poliosis, vitiligo, alopecia, and central nervous system and auditory signs. Our case is unique for the presence of exuberant, pseudotumoral RPE proliferation at the juxtapapillary region and peripheral area. Although this complication has rarely been reported, a high index of suspicion is warranted for early diagnosis and avoids unnecessary treatments of a pseudotumor. PMID:26509089

  10. Descemet's Membrane Detachment Management Following Trabeculectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sharifipour, Farideh; Nassiri, Saman; Idan, Aida

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To present a case of total Descemet's membrane detachment (DMD) after trabeculectomy and its surgical management. Case Report: A 68-year-old woman presented with large DMD and corneal edema one day after trabeculectomy. Intracameral air injection on day 3 was not effective. Choroidal effusion complicated the clinical picture with Descemet's membrane (DM) touching the lens. Choroidal tap with air injection on day 6 resulted in DM attachment and totally clear cornea on the next day. However, on day 12 the same scenario was repeated with choroidal effusion, shallow anterior chamber (AC), and DM touching the lens. The third surgery included transconjunctival closure of the scleral flap with 10/0 nylon sutures, choroidal tap, and intracameral injection of 20% sulfur hexafluoride. After the third surgery, DM remained attached with clear cornea. Suture removal and needling bleb revision preserved bleb function. Lens opacity progressed, and the patient underwent uneventful cataract surgery 4 months later. Conclusion: Scleral flap closure using transconjunctival sutures can be used for DMD after trabeculectomy to make the eye a closed system. Surgical drainage of choroidal effusions should be considered to increase the AC depth. PMID:27621793

  11. Descemet's Membrane Detachment Management Following Trabeculectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sharifipour, Farideh; Nassiri, Saman; Idan, Aida

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To present a case of total Descemet's membrane detachment (DMD) after trabeculectomy and its surgical management. Case Report: A 68-year-old woman presented with large DMD and corneal edema one day after trabeculectomy. Intracameral air injection on day 3 was not effective. Choroidal effusion complicated the clinical picture with Descemet's membrane (DM) touching the lens. Choroidal tap with air injection on day 6 resulted in DM attachment and totally clear cornea on the next day. However, on day 12 the same scenario was repeated with choroidal effusion, shallow anterior chamber (AC), and DM touching the lens. The third surgery included transconjunctival closure of the scleral flap with 10/0 nylon sutures, choroidal tap, and intracameral injection of 20% sulfur hexafluoride. After the third surgery, DM remained attached with clear cornea. Suture removal and needling bleb revision preserved bleb function. Lens opacity progressed, and the patient underwent uneventful cataract surgery 4 months later. Conclusion: Scleral flap closure using transconjunctival sutures can be used for DMD after trabeculectomy to make the eye a closed system. Surgical drainage of choroidal effusions should be considered to increase the AC depth.

  12. Stability of Menisci in Detached Bridgman Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2013-01-01

    Detached growth, also referred to as dewetted growth, is a Bridgman crystal growth process in which the melt is in contact with the crucible wall but the crystal is not. A meniscus bridges the gap between the top of the crystal and the crucible wall. The meniscus shape depends on the contact angle of the melt with the crucible wall, the growth angle of the melt with respect to the solidifying crystal, the gas pressure differential, the Weber number describing the rotation rate of the crucible, and the Bond number. Only some of the meniscus shapes are stable and the stability criterion is the sign of the second variation of the potential energy upon admissible meniscus shape perturbations. The effects of confined gas volumes above and below the melt and crucible rotation are evaluated. The analysis is applicable to the non-stationary case where the crystal radius changes during growth. Static stability maps (crystal radius versus pressure differential) are obtained for a series of Bond numbers, growth angles and Weber numbers. Also, the specific cases of Ge and InSb, in both terrestrial and microgravity conditions, are analyzed. Stability was found to depend significantly on whether the interior surface was considered to be microscopically rough or smooth, corresponding to pinned or unpinned states. It was also found that all meniscus shapes are statically stable in a microgravity environment.

  13. Magnetic Nozzle and Plasma Detachment Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavers, Gregory; Dobson, Chris; Jones, Jonathan; Martin, Adam; Bengtson, Roger D.; Briezman, Boris; Arefiev, Alexey; Cassibry, Jason; Shuttpelz, Branwen; Deline, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    High power plasma propulsion can move large payloads for orbit transfer (such as the ISS), lunar missions, and beyond with large savings in fuel consumption owing to the high specific impulse. At high power, lifetime of the thruster becomes an issue. Electrodeless devices with magnetically guided plasma offer the advantage of long life since magnetic fields confine the plasma radially and keep it from impacting the material surfaces. For decades, concerns have been raised about the plasma remaining attached to the magnetic field and returning to the vehicle along the closed magnetic field lines. Recent analysis suggests that this may not be an issue of the magnetic field is properly shaped in the nozzle region and the plasma has sufficient energy density to stretch the magnetic field downstream. An experiment was performed to test the theory regarding the Magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) detachment scenario. Data from this experiment will be presented. The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) being developed by the Ad Astra Rocket Company uses a magnetic nozzle as described above. The VASIMR is also a leading candidate for exploiting an electric propulsion test platform being considered for the ISS.

  14. Using optical coherence tomography to elucidate the impact of fixation on retinal laser pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, Michelle; Harkrider, Curtis J.; Deramo, Vincent; Bailey, Sarah F.; Winter, Katrina P.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Stolarski, David J.; Toth, Cynthia A.

    2001-07-01

    Purpose: The direct comparison of in-vivo OCT images with fixed tissues sections assumes the fixation of tissue has no effect on the size and configuration of final pathology images such as light micrographs. Fixation artifact has been a concern in numerous studies of the pathology of retinal laser lesions. We tested this hypothesis. Methods: The Humphrey OCT model 2000 with a custom mirror and lens assembly was used to scan tissue phantoms and both fresh and fixed ex-vivum tissue samples. The optical configuration was determined by optimization of the contrast and signal strength on tissue phantoms. Fresh porcine retinas were scanned using this optimal configuration, then fixed using either glutaraldehyde or formalin. OCT images were taken of the tissue at various stages during the fixation process. Additionally, we examined fixed retinal tissue containing retinal laser lesions as a part of our study of ultrashort-pulsed laser effects on the macacca mulatta retina. Histologic sections were prepared and evaluated. Results: In this presentation, we describe our optical setup and image optimization process and assess the effects of glutaraldehyde and formalin processing on OCT image quality. The OCT images of glutaraldehyde-fixed laser lesions are compared with similar images of laser lesions in-vivo. Fixation artifacts appeared on OCT at 2 to 24 hours. Opacification of the lumen of large vessels was seen at two hours with both glutaraldehyde and formalin, while fixation induced retinal detachment appeared at 24 hours. Overall, there was a grater delineation of the laser lesions by OCT at 24 hours when compared to at 1 or 2 hours of fixation. Conclusions: Fixations induced changes in OCT scans of retinal tissue are present as early as 2 hours after immersion in fixative. Although both glutaraldehyde and formalin fixation preserve much of the tissue structure, these method of fixation have s significant effect on OCT imaging of both normal retinal tissue and laser

  15. Immediate retinal adhesion by CO2 laser irradiation using a fiberoptic intraocular probe.

    PubMed

    DeRowe, A; Bartov, E; Treister, G; Belkin, M; Katzir, A

    1992-01-01

    Using an experimental fiberoptically guided CO2 laser system, we produced lesions on fresh bovine retinas. These lesions were shown to achieve immediate measurable chorioretinal adhesion. This model provides preliminary data on the use of a fiberoptic CO2 laser probe to produce chorioretinal lesions and possible future use in intraocular surgery for retinal detachment. The advantages of using CO2 laser energy are minimal damage surrounding desired lesion and its versatility as a coagulator and cutter. With modifications, CO2 endolaser may have a role in intraocular surgery. PMID:1453861

  16. [Unusual retinal abnormality: retinal hemorrhages related to scurvy].

    PubMed

    Errera, M-H; Dupas, B; Man, H; Gualino, V; Gaudric, A; Massin, P

    2011-03-01

    A diet restricted to rice and boiled fruit and vegetables leads to vitamin C deficiency. We describe the third case, to our knowledge, of retinal hemorrhages related to scurvy. Reduced bilateral visual acuity in a 50-year-old patient was associated with macrocytic anemia, denutrition, and cutaneous ecchymoses. Oral vitamin C treatment provided subjective clinical improvement and regression of the retinal hemorrhages on fundus examination, with no side effects. Vitamin C plays an important role in collagen stability in vascular and bone walls. PMID:21392843

  17. [Unusual retinal abnormality: retinal hemorrhages related to scurvy].

    PubMed

    Errera, M-H; Dupas, B; Man, H; Gualino, V; Gaudric, A; Massin, P

    2011-03-01

    A diet restricted to rice and boiled fruit and vegetables leads to vitamin C deficiency. We describe the third case, to our knowledge, of retinal hemorrhages related to scurvy. Reduced bilateral visual acuity in a 50-year-old patient was associated with macrocytic anemia, denutrition, and cutaneous ecchymoses. Oral vitamin C treatment provided subjective clinical improvement and regression of the retinal hemorrhages on fundus examination, with no side effects. Vitamin C plays an important role in collagen stability in vascular and bone walls.

  18. Buckling-induced retraction of spherical shells: A study on the shape of aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Sen; Xie, Yi Min; Li, Qing; Huang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Shiwei

    2015-06-01

    Buckling of soft matter is ubiquitous in nature and has attracted increasing interest recently. This paper studies the retractile behaviors of a spherical shell perforated by sophisticated apertures, attributed to the buckling-induced large deformation. The buckling patterns observed in experiments were reproduced in computational modeling by imposing velocity-controlled loads and eigenmode-affine geometric imperfection. It was found that the buckling behaviors were topologically sensitive with respect to the shape of dimple (aperture). The shell with rounded-square apertures had the maximal volume retraction ratio as well as the lowest energy consumption. An effective experimental procedure was established and the simulation results were validated in this study.

  19. Instability signature for detecting snap-through buckling of dome structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Guirong; Duan, Qiuhua; Hua, Xugang

    2016-04-01

    Dome structures have been built as roofs for venues where many people convene. Failure of this type of structure may jeopardize the safety of hundreds or even thousands people. For this type of structure, snap-through buckling may occur in a local area and gradually expand to the entire structure, leading to a failure of the overall structure. Although numerous structural health monitoring techniques and damage detection approaches have been developed, no research on the detection of a snap-through buckling has been reported. The objective of this study is to find a signature that is sensitive to snap-through buckling in dome structures and can be used to detect snap-through buckling. Considering that a snap-through buckling results in a significant deformation in a local area, which can be reflected by the change in tilting angles of members in that local area, the change in tilting angles of members will be proposed to be a signature to detect snap-through buckling. To verify the proposed instability signature, a reticulated dome structure will be investigated. Both an eigenvalue buckling analysis and a nonlinear buckling analysis will be conducted. The significant changes in tilting angles of members in the buckled regions have demonstrated the efficacy of the proposed instability signature. This research will bridge the research gap between structural health monitoring and structural stability research.

  20. A NASTRAN DMAP alter for linear buckling analysis under dynamic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiello, Robert A.; Grady, Joseph E.

    1989-01-01

    A modification to the NASTRAN solution sequence for transient analysis with direct time integration (COSMIC NASTRAN rigid format 9) was developed and incorporated into a DMAP alter. This DMAP alter calculates the buckling stability of a dynamically loaded structure, and is used to predict the onset of structural buckling under stress-wave loading conditions. The modified solution sequence incorporates the linear buckling analysis capability (rigid format 5) of NASTRAN into the existing Transient solution rigid format in such a way as to provide a time dependent eigensolution which is used to assess the buckling stability of the structure as it responds to the impulsive load. As a demonstration of the validity of this modified solution procedure, the dynamic buckling of a prismatic bar subjected to an impulsive longitudinal compression is analyzed and compared to the known theoretical solution. In addition, a dynamic buckling analysis is performed for the analytically less tractable problem of the localized dynamic buckling of an initially flawed composite laminate under transverse impact loading. The addition of this DMAP alter to the transient solution sequence in NASTRAN facilitates the computational prediction of both the time at which the onset of dynamic buckling occurs in an impulsively loaded structure, and the dynamic buckling mode shapes of that structure.

  1. Buckling Reduces eNOS Production and Stimulates Extracellular Matrix Remodeling in Arteries in Organ Culture.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yangming; Liu, Qin; Han, Hai-Chao

    2016-09-01

    Artery buckling alters the fluid shear stress and wall stress in the artery but its temporal effect on vascular wall remodeling is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the early effect of artery buckling on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and extracellular matrix remodeling. Bilateral porcine carotid arteries were maintained in an ex vivo organ culture system with and without buckling while under the same physiological pressure and flow rate for 3-7 days. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, fibronectin, elastin, collagen I, III and IV, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), and eNOS were determined using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that MMP-2 expression level was significantly higher in buckled arteries than in the controls and higher at the inner curve than at the outer curve of buckled arteries, while collagen IV content showed an opposite trend, suggesting that artery buckling increased MMP-2 expression and collagen IV degradation in a site-specific fashion. However, no differences for MMP-9, fibronectin, elastin, collagen I, III, and TIMP-2 were observed among the outer and inner curve sides of buckled arteries and straight controls. Additionally, eNOS expression was significantly decreased in buckled arteries. These results suggest that artery buckling triggers uneven wall remodeling that could lead to development of tortuous arteries. PMID:26913855

  2. Buckling patterns of gold thin films on silicon substrates: Formation of superimposed blisters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, J.; Coupeau, C.; Durinck, J.; Grilhé, J.

    2009-06-01

    Buckling phenomena leading to the formation of superimposed blisters have been experimentally observed with the help of a confocal interferometric microscope onto the surface of gold thin films deposited on silicon substrates. Assuming that residual folding effects resulting from plastic deformation mechanisms take place in the film during its morphological evolution, different probable scenarios for the formation of the observed buckling patterns are elaborated in the framework of the Föppl-von Karman's theory of thin plates. Multi-step buckling with growing interface delamination is considered for the first scenario while a single or multi-step buckling at a given delamination width is assumed for the other ones.

  3. Mechanical and thermal buckling analysis of sandwich panels under different edge conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1993-01-01

    By using the Rayleigh-Ritz method of minimizing the total potential energy of a structural system, combined load (mechanical or thermal load) buckling equations are established for orthotropic rectangular sandwich panels supported under four different edge conditions. Two-dimensional buckling interaction curves and three dimensional buckling interaction surfaces are constructed for high-temperature honeycomb-core sandwich panels supported under four different edge conditions. The interaction surfaces provide easy comparison of the panel buckling strengths and the domains of symmetrical and antisymmetrical buckling associated with the different edge conditions. Thermal buckling curves of the sandwich panels also are presented. The thermal buckling conditions for the cases with and without thermal moments were found to be identical for the small deformation theory. In sandwich panels, the effect of transverse shear is quite large, and by neglecting the transverse shear effect, the buckling loads could be overpredicted considerably. Clamping of the edges could greatly increase buckling strength more in compression than in shear.

  4. Theoretical-experimental correlation for buckling of composite cylinders under combined compression and torsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.

    1978-01-01

    Comparison between theory and experiment for buckling of laminated graphite-epoxy and boron-epoxy cylinders under combined compression and torsion are presented. The experimental results are compared to a theory by Wu. It is shown that there is excellent agreement between theory and experiment for pure torsional loading (positive and negative), experimental buckling loads for pure compression are well below the predicted values, and good correlation is exhibited between theory and experiment for buckling under combined loading when compared in the form of normalized buckling interaction diagrams in axial-torsional load space.

  5. Optical coherence tomography imaging of retinal damage in real time under a stimulus electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Ethan; Agrawal, Anant; Connors, Megan; Hansen, Barry; Charkhkar, Hamid; Pfefer, Joshua

    2011-10-01

    We have developed a novel method to study the effects of electrical stimulation of the local retina directly under an epiretinal stimulus electrode in real time. Using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and a superfused retinal eyecup preparation, we obtained high-resolution images of the rabbit retina directly under an optically transparent saline-filled fluoropolymer stimulation tube electrode. During OCT imaging, 50 Hz trains of biphasic current pulses 1 ms/phase (23-749 µC cm-2 ph-1) were applied to the retinal surface for 5 min. After imaging, the stimulated regions were stained with the dye propidium iodide (PI) to reveal cytotoxic damage. Pulse train stimulation at 44-133 µC cm-2 ph-1 had little effect on the retina; however, trains >=442 µC cm-2 ph-1 caused increases in the reflectance of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and edema. The damage seen in retinal OCT images matched the pattern observed in histological sections, and in the PI staining. With pulse trains >=442 µC cm-2 ph-1, rapid increases in the reflectivity of the IPL could be observed under the stimulus electrode. Below the electrode, we observed a ring-like pattern of retinal detachment in the subretinal space. The OCT imaging method may be useful for analyzing overstimulation of neuronal tissue by electrodes in many brain regions. This paper was originally submitted for the special issue containing contributions from the Sixth Biennial Research Congress of The Eye and the Chip.

  6. COMPPAP - COMPOSITE PLATE BUCKLING ANALYSIS PROGRAM (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Composite Plate Buckling Analysis Program (COMPPAP) was written to help engineers determine buckling loads of orthotropic (or isotropic) irregularly shaped plates without requiring hand calculations from design curves or extensive finite element modeling. COMPPAP is a one element finite element program that utilizes high-order displacement functions. The high order of the displacement functions enables the user to produce results more accurate than traditional h-finite elements. This program uses these high-order displacement functions to perform a plane stress analysis of a general plate followed by a buckling calculation based on the stresses found in the plane stress solution. The current version assumes a flat plate (constant thickness) subject to a constant edge load (normal or shear) on one or more edges. COMPPAP uses the power method to find the eigenvalues of the buckling problem. The power method provides an efficient solution when only one eigenvalue is desired. Once the eigenvalue is found, the eigenvector, which corresponds to the plate buckling mode shape, results as a by-product. A positive feature of the power method is that the dominant eigenvalue is the first found, which is this case is the plate buckling load. The reported eigenvalue expresses a load factor to induce plate buckling. COMPPAP is written in ANSI FORTRAN 77. Two machine versions are available from COSMIC: a PC version (MSC-22428), which is for IBM PC 386 series and higher computers and compatibles running MS-DOS; and a UNIX version (MSC-22286). The distribution medium for both machine versions includes source code for both single and double precision versions of COMPPAP. The PC version includes source code which has been optimized for implementation within DOS memory constraints as well as sample executables for both the single and double precision versions of COMPPAP. The double precision versions of COMPPAP have been successfully implemented on an IBM PC 386 compatible running

  7. COMPPAP - COMPOSITE PLATE BUCKLING ANALYSIS PROGRAM (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Composite Plate Buckling Analysis Program (COMPPAP) was written to help engineers determine buckling loads of orthotropic (or isotropic) irregularly shaped plates without requiring hand calculations from design curves or extensive finite element modeling. COMPPAP is a one element finite element program that utilizes high-order displacement functions. The high order of the displacement functions enables the user to produce results more accurate than traditional h-finite elements. This program uses these high-order displacement functions to perform a plane stress analysis of a general plate followed by a buckling calculation based on the stresses found in the plane stress solution. The current version assumes a flat plate (constant thickness) subject to a constant edge load (normal or shear) on one or more edges. COMPPAP uses the power method to find the eigenvalues of the buckling problem. The power method provides an efficient solution when only one eigenvalue is desired. Once the eigenvalue is found, the eigenvector, which corresponds to the plate buckling mode shape, results as a by-product. A positive feature of the power method is that the dominant eigenvalue is the first found, which is this case is the plate buckling load. The reported eigenvalue expresses a load factor to induce plate buckling. COMPPAP is written in ANSI FORTRAN 77. Two machine versions are available from COSMIC: a PC version (MSC-22428), which is for IBM PC 386 series and higher computers and compatibles running MS-DOS; and a UNIX version (MSC-22286). The distribution medium for both machine versions includes source code for both single and double precision versions of COMPPAP. The PC version includes source code which has been optimized for implementation within DOS memory constraints as well as sample executables for both the single and double precision versions of COMPPAP. The double precision versions of COMPPAP have been successfully implemented on an IBM PC 386 compatible running

  8. Retinal spot size with wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Hammer, Daniel X.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; Eilert, Brent; Druessel, Jeffrey J.; Payne, Dale J.; Phillips, Shana L.; Stolarski, David J.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Cain, Clarence P.

    1997-06-01

    We have made an indirect in-vivo determination of spot size focusing in the rhesus monkey model. Measurement of the laser induced breakdown threshold both in-vitro and in-vivo allow correlation and assignment of a spot size after focusing through the living eye. We discuss and analyze the results and show how trends in minimum visible lesion data should be assessed in light of chromatic aberration. National laser safety standards are based on minimal visual lesion (MVL) threshold studies in different animal models. The energy required for a retinal lesion depends upon may parameters including wavelength and retinal spot size. We attempt to explain trends in reported MVL threshold studies using a model of the eye which allows calculation of changes in retinal spot size due to chromatic aberration.

  9. Clinical Trials in Retinal Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Grob, Seanna R; Finn, Avni; Papakostas, Thanos D; Eliott, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Research development is burgeoning for genetic and cellular therapy for retinal dystrophies. These dystrophies are the focus of many research efforts due to the unique biology and accessibility of the eye, the transformative advances in ocular imaging technology that allows for in vivo monitoring, and the potential benefit people would gain from success in the field - the gift of renewed sight. Progress in the field has revealed the immense complexity of retinal dystrophies and the challenges faced by researchers in the development of this technology. This study reviews the current trials and advancements in genetic and cellular therapy in the treatment of retinal dystrophies and also discusses the current and potential future challenges. PMID:26957839

  10. Exploring the retinal connectome

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, James R.; Jones, Bryan W.; Watt, Carl B.; Shaw, Margaret V.; Yang, Jia-Hui; DeMill, David; Lauritzen, James S.; Lin, Yanhua; Rapp, Kevin D.; Mastronarde, David; Koshevoy, Pavel; Grimm, Bradley; Tasdizen, Tolga; Whitaker, Ross

    2011-01-01

    Purpose A connectome is a comprehensive description of synaptic connectivity for a neural domain. Our goal was to produce a connectome data set for the inner plexiform layer of the mammalian retina. This paper describes our first retinal connectome, validates the method, and provides key initial findings. Methods We acquired and assembled a 16.5 terabyte connectome data set RC1 for the rabbit retina at ≈2 nm resolution using automated transmission electron microscope imaging, automated mosaicking, and automated volume registration. RC1 represents a column of tissue 0.25 mm in diameter, spanning the inner nuclear, inner plexiform, and ganglion cell layers. To enhance ultrastructural tracing, we included molecular markers for 4-aminobutyrate (GABA), glutamate, glycine, taurine, glutamine, and the in vivo activity marker, 1-amino-4-guanidobutane. This enabled us to distinguish GABAergic and glycinergic amacrine cells; to identify ON bipolar cells coupled to glycinergic cells; and to discriminate different kinds of bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells based on their molecular signatures and activity. The data set was explored and annotated with Viking, our multiuser navigation tool. Annotations were exported to additional applications to render cells, visualize network graphs, and query the database. Results Exploration of RC1 showed that the 2 nm resolution readily recapitulated well known connections and revealed several new features of retinal organization: (1) The well known AII amacrine cell pathway displayed more complexity than previously reported, with no less than 17 distinct signaling modes, including ribbon synapse inputs from OFF bipolar cells, wide-field ON cone bipolar cells and rod bipolar cells, and extensive input from cone-pathway amacrine cells. (2) The axons of most cone bipolar cells formed a distinct signal integration compartment, with ON cone bipolar cell axonal synapses targeting diverse cell types. Both ON and OFF bipolar cells receive

  11. Shape Evolution of Detached Bridgman Crystals Grown in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    2015-01-01

    A theory describing the shape evolution of detached Bridgman crystals in microgravity has been developed. A starting crystal of initial radius r0 will evolve to one of the following states: Stable detached gap; Attachment to the crucible wall; Meniscus collapse. Only crystals where alpha plus omega is great than 180 degrees will achieve stable detached growth in microgravity. Results of the crystal shape evolution theory are consistent with predictions of the dynamic stability of crystallization (Tatarchenko, Shaped Crystal Growth, Kluwer, 1993). Tests of transient crystal evolution are planned for ICESAGE, a series of Ge and GeSi crystal growth experiments planned to be conducted on the International Space Station (ISS).

  12. Sensitivity of detachment extent to magnetic configuration and external parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipschultz, Bruce; Parra, Felix I.; Hutchinson, Ian H.

    2016-05-01

    Divertor detachment may be essential to reduce heat loads to magnetic fusion tokamak reactor divertor surfaces. Yet in experiments it is difficult to control the extent of the detached, low pressure, plasma region. At maximum extent the front edge of the detached region reaches the X-point and can lead to degradation of core plasma properties. We define the ‘detachment window’ in a given position control variable C (for example, the upstream plasma density) as the range in C within which the front location can be stably held at any position from the target to the X-point; increased detachment window corresponds to better control. We extend a 1D analytic model [1] to determine the detachment window for the following control variables: the upstream plasma density, the impurity concentration and the power entering the scrape-off layer (SOL). We find that variations in magnetic configuration can have strong effects; increasing the ratio of the total magnetic field at the X-point to that at the target, {{B}×}/{{B}t} , (total flux expansion, as in the super-x divertor configuration) strongly increases the detachment window for all control variables studied, thus strongly improving detachment front control and the capability of the divertor plasma to passively accommodate transients while still staying detached. Increasing flux tube length and thus volume in the divertor, through poloidal flux expansion (as in the snowflake or x-divertor configurations) or length of the divertor, also increases the detachment window, but less than the total flux expansion does. The sensitivity of the detachment front location, z h , to each control variable, C, defined as \\partial {{z}h}/\\partial C , depends on the magnetic configuration. The size of the radiating volume and the total divertor radiation increase \\propto {{≤ft({{B}×}/{{B}t}\\right)}2} and \\propto {{B}×}/{{B}t} , respectively, but not by increasing divertor poloidal flux expansion or field line length. We

  13. Rat retinal transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Kozhevnikova, Oyuna S.; Korbolina, Elena E.; Ershov, Nikita I.; Kolosova, Natalia G.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly, remains poorly understood due to the paucity of animal models that fully replicate the human disease. Recently, we showed that senescence-accelerated OXYS rats develop a retinopathy similar to human AMD. To identify alterations in response to normal aging and progression of AMD-like retinopathy, we compared gene expression profiles of retina from 3- and 18-mo-old OXYS and control Wistar rats by means of high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). We identified 160 and 146 age-regulated genes in Wistar and OXYS retinas, respectively. The majority of them are related to the immune system and extracellular matrix turnover. Only 24 age-regulated genes were common for the two strains, suggestive of different rates and mechanisms of aging. Over 600 genes showed significant differences in expression between the two strains. These genes are involved in disease-associated pathways such as immune response, inflammation, apoptosis, Ca2+ homeostasis and oxidative stress. The altered expression for selected genes was confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis. To our knowledge, this study represents the first analysis of retinal transcriptome from young and old rats with biologic replicates generated by RNA-Seq technology. We can conclude that the development of AMD-like retinopathy in OXYS rats is associated with an imbalance in immune and inflammatory responses. Aging alters the expression profile of numerous genes in the retina, and the genetic background of OXYS rats has a profound impact on the development of AMD-like retinopathy. PMID:23656783

  14. New Wrinkles in Retinal Densitometry

    PubMed Central

    Masella, Benjamin D.; Hunter, Jennifer J.; Williams, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Retinal densitometry provides objective information about retinal function. But, a number of factors, including retinal reflectance changes that are not directly related to photopigment depletion, complicate its interpretation. We explore these factors and suggest a method to minimize their impact. Methods. An adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) was used to measure changes in photoreceptor reflectance in monkeys before and after photopigment bleaching with 514-nm light. Reflectance measurements at 514 nm and 794 nm were recorded simultaneously. Several methods of normalization to extract the apparent optical density of the photopigment were compared. Results. We identified stimulus-related fluctuations in 794-nm reflectance that are not associated with photopigment absorptance and occur in both rods and cones. These changes had a magnitude approaching those associated directly with pigment depletion, precluding the use of infrared reflectance for normalization. We used a spatial normalization method instead, which avoided the fluctuations in the near infrared, as well as a confocal AOSLO designed to minimize light from layers other than the receptors. However, these methods produced a surprisingly low estimate of the apparent rhodopsin density (animal 1: 0.073 ± 0.006, animal 2: 0.032 ± 0.003). Conclusions. These results confirm earlier observations that changes in photopigment absorption are not the only source of retinal reflectance change during dark adaptation. It appears that the stray light that has historically reduced the apparent density of cone photopigment in retinal densitometry arises predominantly from layers near the photoreceptors themselves. Despite these complications, this method provides a valuable, objective measure of retinal function. PMID:25316726

  15. Retinal Image Quality During Accommodation

    PubMed Central

    López-Gil, N.; Martin, J.; Liu, T.; Bradley, A.; Díaz-Muñoz, D.; Thibos, L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We asked if retinal image quality is maximum during accommodation, or sub-optimal due to accommodative error, when subjects perform an acuity task. Methods Subjects viewed a monochromatic (552nm), high-contrast letter target placed at various viewing distances. Wavefront aberrations of the accommodating eye were measured near the endpoint of an acuity staircase paradigm. Refractive state, defined as the optimum target vergence for maximising retinal image quality, was computed by through-focus wavefront analysis to find the power of the virtual correcting lens that maximizes visual Strehl ratio. Results Despite changes in ocular aberrations and pupil size during binocular viewing, retinal image quality and visual acuity typically remain high for all target vergences. When accommodative errors lead to sub-optimal retinal image quality, acuity and measured image quality both decline. However, the effect of accommodation errors of on visual acuity are mitigated by pupillary constriction associated with accommodation and binocular convergence and also to binocular summation of dissimilar retinal image blur. Under monocular viewing conditions some subjects displayed significant accommodative lag that reduced visual performance, an effect that was exacerbated by pharmacological dilation of the pupil. Conclusions Spurious measurement of accommodative error can be avoided when the image quality metric used to determine refractive state is compatible with the focusing criteria used by the visual system to control accommodation. Real focusing errors of the accommodating eye do not necessarily produce a reliably measurable loss of image quality or clinically significant loss of visual performance, probably because of increased depth-of-focus due to pupil constriction. When retinal image quality is close to maximum achievable (given the eye’s higher-order aberrations), acuity is also near maximum. A combination of accommodative lag, reduced image quality, and reduced

  16. Retinal Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    The eye is essentially transparent, transmitting light with only minimal optical attenuation and scattering providing easy optical access to the anterior segment as well as the retina. For this reason, ophthalmic and especially retinal imaging has been not only the first but also most successful clinical application for optical coherence tomography (OCT). This chapter focuses on the development of OCT technology for retinal imaging. OCT has significantly improved the potential for early diagnosis, understanding of retinal disease pathogenesis, as well as monitoring disease progression and response to therapy. Development of ultrabroad bandwidth light sources and high-speed detection techniques has enabled significant improvements in ophthalmic OCT imaging performance, demonstrating the potential of three-dimensional, ultrahigh-resolution OCT (UHR OCT) to perform noninvasive optical biopsy of the living human retina, i.e., the in vivo visualization of microstructural, intraretinal morphology in situ approaching the resolution of conventional histopathology. Significant improvements in axial resolution and speed not only enable three-dimensional rendering of retinal volumes but also high-definition, two-dimensional tomograms, topographic thickness maps of all major intraretinal layers, as well as volumetric quantification of pathologic intraretinal changes. These advances in OCT technology have also been successfully applied in several animal models of retinal pathologies. The development of light sources emitting at alternative wavelengths, e.g., around #1,060 nm, not only enabled three-dimensional OCT imaging with enhanced choroidal visualization but also improved OCT performance in cataract patients due to reduced scattering losses in this wavelength region. Adaptive optics using deformable mirror technology, with unique high stroke to correct higher-order ocular aberrations, with specially designed optics to compensate chromatic aberration of the human eye, in

  17. Comparative retinal physiology in anthropoids.

    PubMed

    Kremers, J; Lee, B B

    1998-11-01

    During the last decade it has become clear that colour vision in platyrrhines (New World monkeys) differs from the uniform trichromatic pattern normally found in catarrhines (Old World monkeys, apes and human). Colour vision in most platyrrhine species is polymorphic, with many dichromatic individuals. The comparison of response properties in retinal ganglion cells and lateral geniculate cells between catarrhines and playrrhines elucidates how the evolution of trichromatic colour vision influenced the post-receptoral processing. We find that spatial and temporal processing is very similar in the platyrrhine and catarrhine retina, strongly suggesting that the retinal structure and function, found in living anthropoids, was already present in their common ancestor. PMID:9893846

  18. Retinitis pigmentosa in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J; Bartmann, L; Ramesar, R; Beighton, P

    1993-11-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal disorders which are a common cause of genetic blindness. The relative frequencies of the different forms of RP in South Africa, as determined from the register at the DNA banking centre for RP at the Department of Human Genetics, University of Cape Town, are presented and discussed. Of the 125 families analysed, 29 (23%) showed autosomal dominant, 33 (27%) autosomal recessive and 3 (3%) X-linked inheritance. In 10 families the pedigree data were insufficient to allow accurate genetic subtyping and a further 50 patients were sporadic without a family history of RP or other syndromic features which would allow categorization.

  19. Carbon dioxide fixation by detached cereal caryopses

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.A.; Duffus, C.M. )

    1988-06-01

    Immature detached cereal caryposes from barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var distichum cv Midas) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Sicco) were shown to be capable of fixing externally supplied {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in the light or dark. Green cross cells and the testa contained the majority of the {sup 14}C-labeled material. Some {sup 14}C-labeled material was also found in the outer, or transparent, layer and in the endosperm/embryo fraction. More {sup 14}C was recovered from caryopses when they were incubated in {sup 14}CO{sub 2} without the transparent layer, thus suggesting that this layer is a barrier to the uptake of CO{sub 2}. In all cases, significant amounts of {sup 14}C-labeled material were found in caryopses after dark incubation with {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. Interestingly, CO{sub 2} fixation in the chlorophyll-less mutant Albino lemma was significantly greater in the light than in the dark. The results indicate that intact caryopses have the ability to translocate {sup 14}C-labeled assimilate derived from external CO{sub 2} to the endosperm/embryo. Carboxylating activity in the transparent layer appears to be confined to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity but that in the chloroplast-containing cross-cells may be accounted for by both ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity. Depending on a number of assumptions, the amount of CO{sub 2} fixed is sufficient to account for about 2% of the weight of starch found in the mature caryposis.

  20. A detachable mobile and adjustable telemetry system

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Tommy S; Persons, William E; Bradley, Joseph G; Gregg, Margaret; Gonzales, Shinelle K; Helton, Jesse S

    2013-01-01

    Many traditional mobile telemetry systems require permanently mounting a rod through the cabin of a vehicle to serve as the mast for a directional antenna. In this article we present an alternative to this configuration by providing a platform that can be placed atop the vehicle in which the antenna mast can be mounted and controlled from the cabin of the vehicle. Thereby making this design a viable option for researchers who share vehicles with others that may not approve of permanent vehicle modifications such as placing a hole in the roof of the vehicle as required by traditional mobile configurations. We tested the precision and accuracy of detachable mobile and adjustable telemetry system (DMATS) in an urban park with varying terrain, tree stands, overhead wires, and other structures that can contribute to signal deflection. We placed three radiocollars 50 m apart and 1.2 m above the ground then established three testing stations ∼280 m from the location of the radiocollars. The DMATS platform required 12 h for completion and cost $1059 USD. Four technicians were randomly assigned radio collars to triangulate using DMATS and a handheld telemetry system. We used a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with a Scheffe post hoc test to compare error ellipses between azimuths taken using DMATS and the hand held system. Average error ellipses for all testers was 1.96 ± 1.22 ha. No significant differences were found between error ellipses of testers (P = 0.292). Our design, the DMATS, does not require any vehicle modification; thereby, making this a viable option for researchers sharing vehicles with others that may not approve of permanent vehicle alterations. PMID:23919133

  1. ACUTE RETINAL ARTERIAL OCCLUSIVE DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2011-01-01

    The initial section deals with basic sciences; among the various topics briefly discussed are the anatomical features of ophthalmic, central retinal and cilioretinal arteries which may play a role in acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Crucial information required in the management of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is the length of time the retina can survive following that. An experimental study shows that CRAO for 97 minutes produces no detectable permanent retinal damage but there is a progressive ischemic damage thereafter, and by 4 hours the retina has suffered irreversible damage. In the clinical section, I discuss at length various controversies on acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Classification of acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders These are of 4 types: CRAO, branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO), cotton wools spots and amaurosis fugax. Both CRAO and BRAO further comprise multiple clinical entities. Contrary to the universal belief, pathogenetically, clinically and for management, CRAO is not one clinical entity but 4 distinct clinical entities – non-arteritic CRAO, non-arteritic CRAO with cilioretinal artery sparing, arteritic CRAO associated with giant cell arteritis (GCA) and transient non-arteritic CRAO. Similarly, BRAO comprises permanent BRAO, transient BRAO and cilioretinal artery occlusion (CLRAO), and the latter further consists of 3 distinct clinical entities - non-arteritic CLRAO alone, non-arteritic CLRAO associated with central retinal vein occlusion and arteritic CLRAO associated with GCA. Understanding these classifications is essential to comprehend fully various aspects of these disorders. Central retinal artery occlusion The pathogeneses, clinical features and management of the various types of CRAO are discussed in detail. Contrary to the prevalent belief, spontaneous improvement in both visual acuity and visual fields does occur, mainly during the first 7 days. The incidence of spontaneous visual

  2. One- and two-photon detachment of O-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Génévriez, Matthieu; Urbain, Xavier; Dochain, Arnaud; Cyr, Alain; Dunseath, Kevin M.; Terao-Dunseath, Mariko

    2016-08-01

    Cross sections for one- and two-photon detachment of O-(1 s22 s22 p5P2o) have been determined in a joint experimental and theoretical study. The absolute measurement is based on the animated-crossed-beam technique, which is extended to the case of pulsed lasers, pulsed ion beams, and multiphoton detachment. The ab initio calculations employ R -matrix Floquet theory, with simple descriptions of the initial bound state and the residual oxygen atom which reproduce well the electron affinity and ground-state polarizability. For one-photon detachment, the measured and computed cross sections are in good mutual agreement, departing significantly from previous reference experiments and calculations. The generalized two-photon detachment cross section, measured at the Nd:YAG laser wavelength, is in good agreement with the R -matrix Floquet calculations. Long-standing discrepancies between theory and experiment are thus resolved.

  3. On Favorable Thermal Fields for Detached Bridgman Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stelian, Carmen; Volz, Martin P.; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2009-01-01

    The thermal fields of two Bridgman-like configurations, representative of real systems used in prior experiments for the detached growth of CdTe and Ge crystals, are studied. These detailed heat transfer computations are performed using the CrysMAS code and expand upon our previous analyses [14] that posited a new mechanism involving the thermal field and meniscus position to explain stable conditions for dewetted Bridgman growth. Computational results indicate that heat transfer conditions that led to successful detached growth in both of these systems are in accordance with our prior assertion, namely that the prevention of crystal reattachment to the crucible wall requires the avoidance of any undercooling of the melt meniscus during the growth run. Significantly, relatively simple process modifications that promote favorable thermal conditions for detached growth may overcome detrimental factors associated with meniscus shape and crucible wetting. Thus, these ideas may be important to advance the practice of detached growth for many materials.

  4. O1 DETACHED GARAGE FRONT ELEVATION. Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    O-1 DETACHED GARAGE FRONT ELEVATION. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Garage for Building O, Sixty-sixth Street between Constitution & Amberjack Streets, behind Building O, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. O1 DETACHED GARAGE FRONT AND SIDE VIEW. Naval Magazine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    O-1 DETACHED GARAGE FRONT AND SIDE VIEW. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Garage for Building O, Sixty-sixth Street between Constitution & Amberjack Streets, behind Building O, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. Prospects of Stem Cells for Retinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tsz Kin; Lam, Dennis S C; Cheung, Herman S

    2013-01-01

    Retinal diseases, including glaucoma, retinitis pigmentosa, diabetic retinopathy, and age-related macular degeneration, are the leading causes of irreversible visual impairment and blindness in developed countries. Traditional and current treatment regimens are based on surgical or medical interventions to slow down the disease progression. However, the number of retinal cells would continue to diminish, and the diseases could not be completely cured. There is an emerging role of stem cells in retinal research. The stem cell therapy on retinal diseases is based on 2 theories: cell replacement therapy and neuroprotective effect. The former hypothesizes that new retinal cells could be regenerated from stem cells to substitute the damaged cells in the diseased retina, whereas the latter believes that the paracrine effects of stem cells modulate the microenvironments of the diseased retina so as to protect the retinal neurons. This article summarizes the choice of stem cells in retinal research. Moreover, the current progress of retinal research on stem cells and the clinical applications of stem cells on retinal diseases are reviewed. In addition, potential challenges and future prospects of retinal stem cell research are discussed.

  7. Simulating Biofilm Deformation and Detachment with the Immersed Boundary Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudarsan, Rangarajan; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Stockie, John M.; Eberl, Hermann J.

    2016-03-01

    We apply the immersed boundary (or IB) method to simulate deformation and detachment of a periodic array of wall-bounded biofilm colonies in response to a linear shear flow. The biofilm material is represented as a network of Hookean springs that are placed along the edges of a triangulation of the biofilm region. The interfacial shear stress, lift and drag forces acting on the biofilm colony are computed by using fluid stress jump method developed by Williams, Fauci and Gaver [Disc. Contin. Dyn. Sys. B 11(2):519-540, 2009], with a modified version of their exclusion filter. Our detachment criterion is based on the novel concept of an averaged equivalent continuum stress tensor defined at each IB point in the biofilm which is then used to determine a corresponding von Mises yield stress; wherever this yield stress exceeds a given critical threshold the connections to that node are severed, thereby signalling the onset of a detachment event. In order to capture the deformation and detachment behaviour of a biofilm colony at different stages of growth, we consider a family of four biofilm shapes with varying aspect ratio. Our numerical simulations focus on the behaviour of weak biofilms (with relatively low yield stress threshold) and investigate features of the fluid-structure interaction such as locations of maximum shear and increased drag. The most important conclusion of this work is that the commonly employed detachment strategy in biofilm models based only on interfacial shear stress can lead to incorrect or inaccurate results when applied to the study of shear induced detachment of weak biofilms. Our detachment strategy based on equivalent continuum stresses provides a unified and consistent IB framework that handles both sloughing and erosion modes of biofilm detachment, and is consistent with strategies employed in many other continuum based biofilm models.

  8. 1. Streetscape with south sides of Medical Detachment Barracks on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Streetscape with south sides of Medical Detachment Barracks on Ramp No. 5. Part of Building No. 9962-A with door is on far right. Also shown are the south A-sides of Buildings Nos. 9963, 9964, 9965, 9966, 9967 and 9968. The new Madigan Army Medical Center, which opened in 1992, is in far distance on right. - Madigan Hospital, Medical Detachment Barracks, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  9. Tracing detached and attached care practices in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Soffer, Ann Katrine B

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of skills labs in Danish nursing education can, in itself, be viewed as a complexity. The students are expected to eventually carry out their work in a situated hospital practice, but they learn their professional skills in a different space altogether, detached and removed from the hospitals and practising on plastic dummies. Despite the apparent artificiality of the skills lab, this article will show that it is possible to analyse some of the fundamental aspects of care in nursing by ethnographically following this phenomenon of simulation-based training. These particular aspects of care are not explicated in the curriculum or textbooks; however, they surfaced once this crooked approach to studying care in a simulated practice was applied. The article start from the assertion that detached engagements are not recognized within the field of nursing education as an equal component to attachments. Yet empirical cases from the skills lab and hospitals illustrate how students sometimes felt emotionally attached to plastic dummies and how experienced nurses sometimes practised a degree of detachment in relation to human patients. Detached engagements will therefore be presented as part of care practices of nurses - rendering the ability to detach in engagement with patients a professional skill that students also need to learn. In the analysis to follow, attached and detached engagements are located on an equal plane by integrating both into the same conceptual framework, rather than imposing a priori notions about their dialectic relation. The analysis shows that it is the particular intertwinement of attachment and detachment that gives care its fundamental meaning. In conclusion, the need for a conceptual shift from a strong emphasis on attached engagement to a more balanced analytical approach to care work, as involving both attached and detached engagement within Danish nursing education, is advocated.

  10. HAMLET binding to α-actinin facilitates tumor cell detachment.

    PubMed

    Trulsson, Maria; Yu, Hao; Gisselsson, Lennart; Chao, Yinxia; Urbano, Alexander; Aits, Sonja; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Svanborg, Catharina

    2011-03-08

    Cell adhesion is tightly regulated by specific molecular interactions and detachment from the extracellular matrix modifies proliferation and survival. HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) is a protein-lipid complex with tumoricidal activity that also triggers tumor cell detachment in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that molecular interactions defining detachment are perturbed in cancer cells. To identify such interactions, cell membrane extracts were used in Far-western blots and HAMLET was shown to bind α-actinins; major F-actin cross-linking proteins and focal adhesion constituents. Synthetic peptide mapping revealed that HAMLET binds to the N-terminal actin-binding domain as well as the integrin-binding domain of α-actinin-4. By co-immunoprecipitation of extracts from HAMLET-treated cancer cells, an interaction with α-actinin-1 and -4 was observed. Inhibition of α-actinin-1 and α-actinin-4 expression by siRNA transfection increased detachment, while α-actinin-4-GFP over-expression significantly delayed rounding up and detachment of tumor cells in response to HAMLET. In response to HAMLET, adherent tumor cells rounded up and detached, suggesting a loss of the actin cytoskeletal organization. These changes were accompanied by a reduction in β1 integrin staining and a decrease in FAK and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, consistent with a disruption of integrin-dependent cell adhesion signaling. Detachment per se did not increase cell death during the 22 hour experimental period, regardless of α-actinin-4 and α-actinin-1 expression levels but adherent cells with low α-actinin levels showed increased death in response to HAMLET. The results suggest that the interaction between HAMLET and α-actinins promotes tumor cell detachment. As α-actinins also associate with signaling molecules, cytoplasmic domains of transmembrane receptors and ion channels, additional α-actinin-dependent mechanisms are discussed.

  11. [Progress of research in retinal image registration].

    PubMed

    Yu, Lun; Wei, Lifang; Pan, Lin

    2011-10-01

    The retinal image registration has important applications in the processes of auxiliary diagnosis and treatment for a variety of diseases. The retinal image registration can be used to measure the disease process and the therapeutic effect. A variety of retinal image registration techniques have been studied extensively in recent years. However, there are still many problems existing and there are numerous research possibilities. Based on extensive investigation of existing literatures, the present paper analyzes the feature of retinal image and current challenges of retinal image registration, and reviews the transformation models of the retinal image registration technology and the main research algorithms in current retinal image registration, and analyzes the advantages and disadvantages of various types of algorithms. Some research challenges and future developing trends are also discussed.

  12. Functional verification of pulse frequency modulation-based image sensor for retinal prosthesis by in vitro electrophysiological experiments using frog retina.

    PubMed

    Furumiya, Tetsuo; Ng, David C; Yasuoka, Koutaro; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Tokuda, Takashi; Nunoshita, Masahiro; Ohta, Jun

    2006-01-15

    The functioning of a 16 x 16 pixel pulse frequency modulation (PFM) image sensor for retinal prosthesis is verified through in vitro electrophysiological experiments using detached frog retinas. This image sensor is a prototype for demonstrating the application to in vitro electrophysiological experiments. Each pixel of the image sensor consists of a pulse generator (PFM photosensor), a stimulus circuit, and a stimulus electrode (Al bonding pad). The image sensor is fabricated using standard 0.6 microm CMOS technology. For in vitro electrophysiological experiments, a Pt/Au stacked electrode is formed on the Al bonding pad of each pixel and the entire sensor is fixed in epoxy resin. The PFM image sensor is confirmed experimentally to provide electrical stimulus to the retinal cells in a detached frog retina.

  13. Improved Crystal Quality By Detached Solidification in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.; Wang, Yaz-Hen; Wang, Jian-Bin

    2003-01-01

    Many microgravity directional solidification experiments yielded ingots with portions that grew without contacting the ampoule wall, leading to greatly improved crystallographic perfection. Our long term goals have been: (1) To develop a complete understanding of all of the phenomena of detached solidification.; (2) To make it possible to achieve detached solidification reproducibly; (3) To increase crystallographic perfection through detached solidification. We have three major achievements to report here: (1) We obtained a new material balance solution for the Moving Meniscus Model of detached solidification. This solution greatly clarifies the physics as well as the roles of the parameters in the system; (2) We achieved detached solidification of InSb growing on earth in BN-coated ampoules; (3) We performed an extensive series of experiments on freezing water that showed how to form multiple gas bubbles or tubes on the ampoule wall. However, these did not propagate around the wall and lead to fully detached solidification unless the ampoule wall was extremely rough and non-wetted.

  14. Growth and Detachment of 5 Helix DNA Ribbons.

    PubMed

    Bashar, Saima; Hwang, Si Un; Lee, Junwye; Amin, Rashid; Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Ha, Tai Hwan; Park, Sung Ha

    2016-04-01

    We report on the concentration-dependent surface-assisted growth and time-temperature-dependent detachment of one-dimensional 5 helix DNA ribbons (5HR) on a mica substrate. The growth coverage ratio was determined by varying the concentration of the 5HR strands in a test tube, and the detachment rate of 5HR on mica was determined by varying the incubation time at a fixed temperature on a heat block. The topological changes in the concentration-dependent attachment and the time-temperature-dependent detachment for 5HR on mica were observed via atomic force microscopy. The observations indicate that 5HR started to grow on mica at ~10 nM and provided full coverage at ~50 nM. In contrast, 5HR at 65 °C started to detach from mica after 5 min and was completely removed after 10 min. The growth and detachment coverage show a sinusoidal variation in the growth ratio and a linear variation with a rate of detachment of 20%/min, respectively. The physical parameters that control the stability of the DNA structures on a given substrate should be studied to successfully integrate DNA structures for physical and chemical applications. PMID:27451775

  15. Defect Density Characterization of Detached-Grown Germanium Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweizer, M.; Cobb, S. D.; Volz, M. P.; Szoke, J.; Szofran, F. R.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several (111)-oriented, Ga-doped germanium crystals were grown in pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN) containers by the Bridgman and the detached Bridgman growth techniques. Growth experiments in closed-bottom pBN containers resulted in nearly completely detached-grown crystals, because the gas pressure below the melt can build up to a higher pressure than above the melt. With open-bottom tubes the gas pressure above and below the melt is balanced during the experiment, and thus no additional force supports the detachment. In this case the crystals grew attached to the wall. Etch pit density (EPD) measurements along the axial growth direction indicated a strong improvement of the crystal quality of the detached-grown samples compared to the attached samples. Starting in the seed with an EPD of 6-8 x 10(exp 3)/square cm it decreased in the detached-grown crystals continuously to about 200-500/square cm . No significant radial difference between the EPD on the edge and the middle of the crystal exists. In the attached grown samples the EPD increases up to a value of about 2-4 x 10(exp 4)/square cm (near the edge) and up to 1 x 10(exp 4)/square cm in the middle of the sample. Thus the difference between the detached- and the attached-grown crystals with respect to the EPD is approximately two orders of magnitude.

  16. Effects of Nanoscale Surface Roughness on Colloid Detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmuson, J. A.; Johnson, W. P.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances in colloid transport science have demonstrated the importance of surface roughness on colloid attachment; however, few studies have investigated the influence of nano-scale roughness on colloid detachment. This study explores the effects of flow perturbations on a variety of mineral surfaces, as well as NaOH treated (i.e. rough, Figure 1a) and untreated (i.e. smooth, Figure 1b) surfaces for colloids of various sizes attached in an impinging jet system under flowing and stagnant conditions. These experiments showed minimal detachment from the roughened surfaces (treated glass) and significant detachment from the smooth surfaces (untreated glass and mica). A correlation between residence time and attachment irreversibility was also revealed, indicating that the particles that spent the longest time attached to the surface developed the strongest adhesion. The representative surface-heterogeneity model developed by Pazmino et al. (2014) was used to conduct detachment simulations under similar geochemical and flow conditions. While simulated results show qualitative agreement with experimental results, they tend to over-predict detachment, highlighting differences among simulated versus real surfaces, which may be related to surface roughness. These results suggest that more sophisticated models that incorporate surface roughness and time-based adhesion are needed to accurately predict colloid detachment in environmental systems.

  17. Retinitis Pigmentosa and Education Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa includes a number of inherited diseases which usually result in blindness. The disease is progressive in nature and begins with the deterioration of cells in the eye responsible for peripheral vision. As the condition worsens there is a gradual loss of peripheral vision and night blindness. Proper educational planning requires…

  18. Automatic temperature controlled retinal photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlott, Kerstin; Koinzer, Stefan; Ptaszynski, Lars; Bever, Marco; Baade, Alex; Roider, Johann; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2012-06-01

    Laser coagulation is a treatment method for many retinal diseases. Due to variations in fundus pigmentation and light scattering inside the eye globe, different lesion strengths are often achieved. The aim of this work is to realize an automatic feedback algorithm to generate desired lesion strengths by controlling the retinal temperature increase with the irradiation time. Optoacoustics afford non-invasive retinal temperature monitoring during laser treatment. A 75 ns/523 nm Q-switched Nd:YLF laser was used to excite the temperature-dependent pressure amplitudes, which were detected at the cornea by an ultrasonic transducer embedded in a contact lens. A 532 nm continuous wave Nd:YAG laser served for photocoagulation. The ED50 temperatures, for which the probability of ophthalmoscopically visible lesions after one hour in vivo in rabbits was 50%, varied from 63°C for 20 ms to 49°C for 400 ms. Arrhenius parameters were extracted as ΔE=273 J mol-1 and A=3.1044 s-1. Control algorithms for mild and strong lesions were developed, which led to average lesion diameters of 162+/-34 μm and 189+/-34 μm, respectively. It could be demonstrated that the sizes of the automatically controlled lesions were widely independent of the treatment laser power and the retinal pigmentation.

  19. Nondimensional parameters and equations for buckling of symmetrically laminated thin elastic shallow shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    1991-01-01

    A method of deriving nondimensional equations and identifying the fundamental parameters associated with bifurcation buckling of anisotropic shells subjected to combined loads is presented. The procedure and rationale used to obtain useful nondimensional forms of the transverse equilibrium and compatibility equations for buckling are presented. Fundamental parameters are identified that represent the importance of both membrane and bending orthotropy and anisotropy on the results.

  20. Anomalous Buckling Characteristics of Laminated Metal-Matrix Composite Plates with Central Square Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1998-01-01

    Compressive buckling analysis was performed on metal-matrix composite (MMC) plates with central square holes. The MMC plates have varying aspect ratios and hole sizes and are supported under different boundary conditions. The finite-element structural analysis method was used to study the effects of plate boundary conditions, plate aspect ratio, hole size, and the composite stacking sequence on the compressive buckling strengths of the perforated MMC plates. Studies show that by increasing the hole sizes, compressive buckling strengths of the perforated MMC plates could be considerably increased under certain boundary conditions and aspect ratios ("anomalous" buckling behavior); and that the plate buckling mode could be symmetrical or antisymmetrical, depending on the plate boundary conditions, aspect ratio, and the hole size. For same-sized plates with same-sized holes, the compressive buckling strengths of the perforated MMC plates with [90/0/0/90]2 lamination could be as much as 10 percent higher or lower than those of the [45/- 45/- 45/45]2 laminations, depending on the plate boundary conditions, plate aspect ratios, and the hole size. Clamping the plate edges induces far stronger "anomalous" buckling behavior (enhancing compressive buckling strengths at increasing hole sizes) of the perforated MMC plates than simply supporting the plate edges.