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Sample records for buffaloes naturally infected

  1. Sarcocystis cruzi: comparative studies confirm natural infections of buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zheng; He, Yongshu; Zhao, Hui; Rosenthal, Benjamin M; Dunams, Detiger B; Li, Xiaomei; Zuo, Yangxian; Feng, Guohua; Cui, Liwang; Yang, Zhaoqing

    2011-02-01

    Controversy exists concerning whether cattle and water buffalo sustain infections with cysts of distinct arrays of species in the genus Sarcocystis. In particular, morphologically similar parasites have been alternately ascribed to Sarcocystis cruzi or to Sarcocystis levinei, depending on their occurrence in cattle or water buffalo. We used light and transmission electron microscopy, genetic analysis, and experimental infections of definitive canine hosts to determine whether consistent differences could be identified from parasites derived from several natural infections of each host, examining several tissue types (esophagus, skeletal muscles, and heart). Cysts derived from cattle and water buffalo shared similar structure; variation among 18S rRNA sequences did not segregate consistently according to intermediate host type; parasites derived from cattle and water buffalo induced similar outcomes in the canine definitive host. One cattle specimen harbored unusually large (macroscopic) sarcocysts which nonetheless conformed to previously reported ultrastructural and genetic features of S. cruzi. Finding no consistent basis to differentiate between them, we conclude that the parasites infecting each host and tissue type correspond to S. cruzi. In our sample, no phylogenetically distinct taxon was sampled which might correspond to a distinct taxon previously described as S. levinei. Either that taxon was missed by our sampling effort, or it may represent a junior synonym to S. cruzi, which would then cycle between dogs and a broader range of intermediate bovine hosts than was previously considered.

  2. Glomerulonephritis in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) naturally infected by Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    Marques, Sandra Márcia Tietz; Scroferneker, Maria Lúcia; Edelweiss, Maria Isabel Albano

    2004-08-13

    Glomerulonephritis caused by Fasciola hepatica was observed in buffaloes. Renal biopsies of 20 buffaloes, 11 with F. hepatica and 9 uninfected buffaloes (controls), were examined by light microscopy, direct and indirect immunofluorescence, and immunohistochemical analysis. The biopsies of seven (63.6%) infected buffaloes revealed membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, three biopsies (27.3%) showed mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis, and one kidney presented normal biopsy specimens. In the control group, seven buffaloes (77.8%) presented normal biopsy specimens, while two (22.2%) revealed glomerulonephritis-one with a membranoproliferative pattern, and the other with a mesangioproliferative pattern-with extensive inflammatory cell infiltrate. Our conclusion is that glomerulopathy is associated with fascioliasis and that buffaloes are suitable as a naturally existing experimental model of renal injury by circulating immune complexes.

  3. Natural Babesia bovis Infection in Water Buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) and Crossbred Cattle under Field Conditions in Egypt: a Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Mahmmod, Yasser

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a little or no data available on the natural Babesia bovis (B. bovis) infection in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) comparing to the available one for cattle. This study was conducted to investigate the natural B. bovis infection in water buffaloes in comparison to crossbred cattle under field conditions in Egypt. Methods: A total of 35 buffaloes and cattle were clinically and laboratory investigated from March to June 2008. Twenty-nine buffaloes and cattle out of 35 were naturally infected with B. bovis and showed signs of bovine babesiosis. Three cows and three buffaloes showed no clinical signs and were free from external, internal, and blood parasites served as control group. Results: Babesia bovis-infected cattle showed typical signs of bovine babesiosis while B. bovis-infected buffaloes showed a milder form (less severe) of the clinical signs. Advanced cases of cattle showed dark brown to dark red (coffee-color) urine, hemoglobinuria and nervous manifestations while these manifestations were not detected in the infected buffaloes. Hematological changes in both species however, these changes were less significant in buffaloes than those reported in cattle. Conclusion: This paper documents the first description of natural B. bovis infection in water buffaloes which were found to be more likely to be tolerant than cattle to the natural clinical infection with B. bovis and its subsequent haematological changes. Our finding may lead to a better understanding of the disease pattern of B. bovis infection under field conditions in buffaloes. PMID:25629060

  4. Serological responses to Neospora caninum in experimentally and naturally infected water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A A R; Gennari, S M; Paula, V S O; Aguiar, D M; Fujii, T U; Starke-Buzeti, W; Machado, R Z; Dubey, J P

    2005-04-20

    The water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) is an important natural host for Neospora caninum. Serologic responses to N. caninum were studied in experimentally and naturally infected water buffaloes in Brazil. Antibodies were assayed by the indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) using a cut off value of 1:25. Six buffaloes were each inoculated subcutaneously with 5 x 10(6) live culture-derived tachyzoites of the cattle Illinois strain of N. caninum, and two calves were kept as uninoculated controls. Post-inoculation (p.i.) blood samples were collected weekly for 8 weeks and then monthly until 1 year p.i. All inoculated buffaloes developed IFAT titers of 1:100 or more between 7 and 11 days p.i. and the titers remained elevated until 7 weeks p.i. Antibody titers peaked to 1:1600 in 1, 1:800 in 3 and 1:400 in 2, usually by 3 weeks p.i. Antibody titers declined to 1:25 or 1:50 in all the six buffaloes by 12 months p.i. IFAT titers to N. caninum remained at an undetectable level (< 1:25) in both control uninoculated buffaloes. To follow the dynamics of N. caninum antibodies, sera from 29 buffaloes and their calves were collected for 1 year and assayed for N. caninum antibodies; 23 of 29 calves were seropositive (IFAT of 1:100 or more) at 1-2 day of age. Of these 23 calves, 17 remained seropositive during the study, while six became seronegative at four (two calves), six (one calf) seven (two calves) and eight (one calf) months of age. These findings suggest a high rate of neonatal transmission of N. caninum in buffaloes.

  5. Haemato-biochemical and oxidative status of buffaloes naturally infected with Trypanosoma evansi.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vijay; Nigam, Rajesh; Jaiswal, Amit Kumar; Sudan, Vikrant; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Yadav, Pramod Kumar

    2015-09-15

    Blood samples were collected from 05 clinically healthy and 10 adult female water buffaloes naturally infected with Trypanosoma evansi. Confirmation of disease free and infected status of buffaloes was made on clinical signs, observation of T. evansi parasites in the blood smear and duplex PCR based assay. Blood samples were evaluated for levels of haemoglobin (Hb), packed cell volume (PCV), differential leucocytes count (DLC), lipid peroxidation (LPO), calcium, phosphorous, magnesium sodium and potassium and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), aspartate transaminase (AST), lactate dehydogenase (LDH) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). The results of the study revealed substantial decrease in levels of Hb, PCV and increase in LPO, SOD, CAT and AST in infected animals compared to healthy animals. However other haematological and biochemical indices did not show significant variations in infected and healthy buffaloes. The enhanced erythrocytic oxidation and reduction of hematological indices, suggests that the enhanced oxidation of the erythrocytes may be a contributory factor in erythrocytic destruction and progression of the anaemia in T. evansi infection in water buffaloes. PMID:26242833

  6. Haemato-biochemical and oxidative status of buffaloes naturally infected with Trypanosoma evansi.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vijay; Nigam, Rajesh; Jaiswal, Amit Kumar; Sudan, Vikrant; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Yadav, Pramod Kumar

    2015-09-15

    Blood samples were collected from 05 clinically healthy and 10 adult female water buffaloes naturally infected with Trypanosoma evansi. Confirmation of disease free and infected status of buffaloes was made on clinical signs, observation of T. evansi parasites in the blood smear and duplex PCR based assay. Blood samples were evaluated for levels of haemoglobin (Hb), packed cell volume (PCV), differential leucocytes count (DLC), lipid peroxidation (LPO), calcium, phosphorous, magnesium sodium and potassium and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), aspartate transaminase (AST), lactate dehydogenase (LDH) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). The results of the study revealed substantial decrease in levels of Hb, PCV and increase in LPO, SOD, CAT and AST in infected animals compared to healthy animals. However other haematological and biochemical indices did not show significant variations in infected and healthy buffaloes. The enhanced erythrocytic oxidation and reduction of hematological indices, suggests that the enhanced oxidation of the erythrocytes may be a contributory factor in erythrocytic destruction and progression of the anaemia in T. evansi infection in water buffaloes.

  7. Shedding of Neospora caninum oocysts by dogs fed tissues from naturally infected water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A A R; Gennari, S M; Aguiar, D M; Sreekumar, C; Hill, D E; Miska, K B; Vianna, M C B; Dubey, J P

    2004-10-01

    Attempts were made to isolate Neospora caninum from naturally infected water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) from Brazil. Brains from six buffaloes with indirect fluorescent antibodies (>1:100) to N. caninum were used to isolate the parasite by bioassay in dogs and gerbils followed by in vitro culture. Shedding of Neospora-like oocysts was noticed in dogs fed brains from three buffaloes (isolate designation NcBrBuf-1, 2 and 4). Two more isolates (NcBrBuf-3 and 5) were obtained by in vitro culture of the brains of gerbils previously infected with brains of two other buffaloes. The identity of the isolates was confirmed by biological and molecular methods. The isolates were found to be non-pathogenic to gerbils. All five isolates amplified the gene 5 amplicons using Neospora-specific PCR assay. The sequences of gene 5 fragments and the common toxoplasmatiid ITS-1 fragments were analyzed. The dynamics of oocyst production in the dogs indicate that water buffaloes are natural intermediate hosts for N. caninum. This is the first report of isolation of N. caninum from water buffaloes.

  8. Natural trematode infection in liver of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis): histopathological investigation.

    PubMed

    Haque, Masoodul; Mohan, Chandra; Ahmad, Imtiaz

    2011-06-01

    This study reports the infection of liver and bile ducts, carried out from November 2008 to April 2010, on 730 randomly selected water buffaloes-Bubalusbubalis, infected with the amphistome trematode parasite Explanatum explanatum (Creplin, 1847) Fukui, 1929. Macroscopic examination revealed massive infection of adult fluke in bile ducts and intrahepatic ductules in 131 (18%) cases. The predominant features were multifocal granulomatous nodules throughout the luminal surface of the bile ducts. Histopathological study of 4 μm thick tissue sections cut adjacent to and through the site of attachment of individual worm and stained with hematoxylin and eosin revealed intense infiltration of inflammatory cells such as lymphocytes, macrophages, plasma cells, eosinophils as well as fibrocytes. This was associated with fibrosis and thickening of the bile ducts. Due to high level of prevalence and intensity of natural infection, amphistomiasis appears to be endemic in this geographical region and probably represent one of the most important animal health problems. It is hoped that the study may draw attention to the need for educating farmers, regarding the economic importance of infection of these amphistome parasites and also for the development of control strategies to prevent the spread of infection to ruminants.

  9. Clinical and haematological study on water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) and crossbred cattle naturally infected with Theileria annulata in Sharkia province, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Mahmmod, Yasser S; Elbalkemy, Farouk A; Klaas, Ilka C; Elmekkawy, Mamdouh F; Monazie, Afaf M

    2011-09-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the clinical and haematological findings in water buffaloes and crossbred cattle naturally infected with Theileria annulata with special reference to the clinical picture of tropical theileriosis in Egyptian buffaloes. A total 50 field cases of buffaloes and cattle was clinically and laboratory investigated from March to June 2008. Forty-four buffaloes and cattle out of 50 were naturally infected with T. annulata and showed typical signs of infection. Six animals showed no clinical signs and were free from external, internal, and blood parasites. The clinical findings of examined cattle and buffaloes showed typical signs of tropical theileriosis: fever, enlargement of the superficial lymph nodes, severe lacrimation, bilateral conjunctivitis, photophobia, and corneal opacity. It was clear that the severity of clinical signs in infected buffaloes was more prominent than in infected cattle with persistence of some lesions after recovery as corneal opacity and pulmonary lesions. Haematological analysis revealed a significant decrease in RBCS count, PCV%, haemoglobin amount, and WBCs in the infected animals when compared to the control group. It was concluded from our study that T. annulata infection is associated with impairment and alteration of blood parameters in both cattle and water buffaloes. Theileriosis in water buffaloes might cause irreversible ocular changes that could lead to complete blindness. Data obtained in this study might be the basis for subsequent studies under natural and experimental field conditions.

  10. Evidence of congenital transmission of Neospora caninum in naturally infected water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) fetus from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Chryssafidis, Andreas L; Soares, Rodrigo M; Rodrigues, Aline A R; Carvalho, Nelcio A T; Gennari, Solange Maria

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the congenital infection by Neospora caninum in the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis), a natural intermediate host. Nine pregnant water buffalos, raised under free-grazing condition, were slaughtered, and their fetuses were collected. Samples of brain and thoracic fluid were obtained from those fetuses, with gestational ages ranging from 2 to 5 months. The DNA of N. caninum was detected and identified in the brain of one of those fetuses, using two PCR assays, one directed to the Nc5 gene and the other, to the common toxoplasmatiid ITS1 sequence. The DNA fragments produced on PCR were sequenced, and N. caninum was confirmed in the samples. No antibodies to N. caninum were detected on any sample of thoracic fluid by immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT < 25). This is the first confirmation of congenital transmission of N. caninum in water buffalos.

  11. [First notification of Eimeria bareillyi (Apicomplexa: Eimeridae) in feces of buffalo calves (Bubalus bubalis) naturally infected in Minas Gerais, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Bastianetto, Eduardo; Freitas, Carolina M V; Bello, Ana Cristina P P; Cunha, Arildo P; Dalla Rosa, Ricardo C; Leite, Romário C

    2008-09-01

    In this study the evolution of Eimeriosis in naturally infected calves was analyzed during 23 days starting at birth. The specie E. bareillyi was first identified in feces culture. Later other species of Eimeria already described in water buffalo were identified. The animals which died were submitted to necropsy, revealing macroscopic lesions in the ileum region. Histological analyses of the ileum region showed acute necrotic enteritis and the presence of Eimeria sp. in different developmental stages. Early infection by this parasite could be responsible for a secondary bacterial infection trough the intestinal lesions. The utilization of prophylactic medication and the therapeutic treatment of clinical Coccidiosis in water buffalo calves are necessary to their satisfactory development and surveillance.

  12. Immunodetection of coproantigens for the diagnosis of amphistomosis in naturally infected Indian Water Buffalo, Bubalus bubalis.

    PubMed

    Saifullah, Mohammad K; Ahmad, Gul; Abidi, Syed M A

    2013-01-16

    The infection of gastrointestinal helminths in livestock is routinely diagnosed by microscopical examination of faecal samples for the presence of ova/eggs but this approach becomes ineffective for the seasonally egg producing trematodes. Therefore, an alternative approach to detect the coproantigens of liver and rumen amphistomes, Gigantocotyle explanatum and Gastrothylax crumenifer respectively, infecting Indian water buffalo Bubalus bubalis, was undertaken using ELISA, immunodot and countercurrent immunoelectrophoresis (CCIEP). The hyperimmune polyclonal antisera were separately raised in rabbits against excretory/secretory (ES) antigens of both the flukes under study. An overall 70% buffalo faecal samples were tested positive for G. crumenifer and 75% for G. explanatum in Aligarh region. The ELISA results reflected higher infection intensity among individual buffaloes that was also observed at necropsy. Using the respective homologous hyperimmune antiserum, 55% buffaloes tested positive for G. crumenifer and 65% positive for G. explanatum in immunodot assay. Further, the faecal samples with high absorbance values in ELISA and strong immunodot reaction tested positive in CCIEP. The analysis of CCIEP result revealed two and one precipitin bands in G. crumenifer and G. explanatum respectively, indicating prominent antigenic differences in the coproantigens of these two parasites. Taken together, it is suggested that polyclonal antibodies could be conveniently used for the detection of coproantigens by ELISA and immunodot methods, particularly during the non-egg producing phase of the seasonally regulated reproductive cycle of the rumen amphistome G. crumenifer. It is concluded that the coproantigen detection is a good alternative over conventional method for the diagnosis of amphistomosis in livestock; however, further studies are required on a larger sample size of field buffaloes to augment the reproducibility of the present results.

  13. Metaphylactic treatment strategies with toltrazuril and diclazuril and growth performance of buffalo calves exposed to a natural eimeria infection.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Antonio; Rinaldi, Laura; Cappelli, Giovanna; Saratsis, Anastasios; Nisoli, Lucio; Cringoli, Giuseppe

    2015-09-15

    Five controlled field trials were conducted in southern Italy to evaluate the effect of metaphylactic treatment strategies of toltrazuril and diclazuril for the control of coccidiosis in water buffaloes naturally infected by Eimeria spp. The 5 farms were divided into two types (A and B) according to their management system (individual or collective breeding of buffalo calves). In the farms of type A (no. 3), the buffalo calves were bred in individual boxes from the birth to the 7th/8th week of age and then transferred to concrete based pens; in the farms of type B (no. 2) the calves were bred in groups on concrete based pens from the birth. On each farm, 36 calves aged 5 weeks were divided at random into three similar groups of 12. One group was treated with toltrazuril (TOL), the second group was treated with diclazuril (DIC) and the third group was remained as untreated control group (CONT). On each farm the calves were weighed weekly and clinically examined. In the 5 buffalo farms the average oocyst excretion decreased significantly in both the treated groups (TOL and DIC), however the TOL groups had significantly low counts than the DIC groups. The body-weight gains recorded fortnightly were significantly higher in the TOL groups (range=5.4-8.1 kg) compared to the DIC (range=1.7-3.1 kg).

  14. Metaphylactic treatment strategies with toltrazuril and diclazuril and growth performance of buffalo calves exposed to a natural eimeria infection.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Antonio; Rinaldi, Laura; Cappelli, Giovanna; Saratsis, Anastasios; Nisoli, Lucio; Cringoli, Giuseppe

    2015-09-15

    Five controlled field trials were conducted in southern Italy to evaluate the effect of metaphylactic treatment strategies of toltrazuril and diclazuril for the control of coccidiosis in water buffaloes naturally infected by Eimeria spp. The 5 farms were divided into two types (A and B) according to their management system (individual or collective breeding of buffalo calves). In the farms of type A (no. 3), the buffalo calves were bred in individual boxes from the birth to the 7th/8th week of age and then transferred to concrete based pens; in the farms of type B (no. 2) the calves were bred in groups on concrete based pens from the birth. On each farm, 36 calves aged 5 weeks were divided at random into three similar groups of 12. One group was treated with toltrazuril (TOL), the second group was treated with diclazuril (DIC) and the third group was remained as untreated control group (CONT). On each farm the calves were weighed weekly and clinically examined. In the 5 buffalo farms the average oocyst excretion decreased significantly in both the treated groups (TOL and DIC), however the TOL groups had significantly low counts than the DIC groups. The body-weight gains recorded fortnightly were significantly higher in the TOL groups (range=5.4-8.1 kg) compared to the DIC (range=1.7-3.1 kg). PMID:26215929

  15. Comparison of serological tests for Trypanosoma evansi natural infections in water buffaloes from north Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Verloo, D; Holland, W; My, L N; Thanh, N G; Tam, P T; Goddeeris, B; Vercruysse, J; Büscher, P

    2000-09-20

    In the present study, a collection of 415 water buffalo serum samples originating from the north of Vietnam was used for evaluation of different diagnostic antibody detection methods available to detect infections with Trypanosoma evansi. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of a direct card agglutination test (CATT/T. evansi), an indirect card agglutination test (LATEX/T. evansi) and a newly developed antibody detection ELISA (ELISA/T. evansi) was calculated on the basis of parasitological results, obtained by mouse inoculation, and compared for all assays. The immume trypanolysis assay with the predominant T. evansi RoTat 1.2 variable antigen type was used as reference test for antibody presence. All parasitologically confirmed animals (n=8) were positive in all tests. Diagnostic specificity was highest in CATT/T. evansi (98%) followed by the ELISA/T. evansi (95%) and the LATEX/T. evansi (82%). Concordance of the variant specific immune trypanolysis test with the other tests was calculated and revealed that few (1-8%) false positive results were actually due to a specific reactions, and that LATEX/T. evansi and ELISA/T. evansi detected more immune trypanolysis positives than the CATT/T. evansi. It was concluded that, apart from the immune trypanolysis test, which is not generally applicable, ELISA/T. evansi with a 30% positivity cut-off and LATEX/T. evansi, thanks to their superior capacity of detecting T. evansi specific antibodies, would be suitable as epidemiological tools detecting both active infections and persisting T. evansi specific antibodies. The ELISA/T. evansi with a 50% positivity cut-off and the CATT/T. evansi on the other hand, seem more appropriate to detect true infected water buffaloes.

  16. Biochemical, hematological, and electrocardiographic changes in buffaloes naturally infected with Theileria annulata.

    PubMed

    Hasanpour, A; Moghaddam, G A; Nematollahi, Ahmad

    2008-12-01

    Changes in selected blood and serum components and electrocardiography (ECG) were investigated in 20 adults (13 females and 7 males) of water buffaloes suffering from severe theileriosis. The age of all animals used in this study ranged 1.5-5 yr. Theileriosis was diagnosed by observation of parasites in the peripheral blood and the presence of schizonts in lymphocytes that were provided from swollen lymph nodes. Statistically significant decreases were observed in the means of RBC, WBC, and packed cell volume (PCV) in blood of infected animals. The means levels of sodium, calcium, phosphorus, and potassium of infected animals were lower than healthy animals, but only the decrease of potassium was significant. The mean serum activities of aspartate transferase and alanine aminotransferase were significantly higher than in uninfected animals. Three cases had atrial premature beat, 2 cases had sinus tachycardia, 2 had sinus arrhythmia, and 1 had first degree of atrioventricular block in ECG. The present study showed that T. annulata infection in cattle is associated with hematological and biochemical, and ECG changes.

  17. Immunohistochemical demonstration of Trypanosoma evansi in tissues of experimentally infected rats and a naturally infected water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Sudarto, M W; Tabel, H; Haines, D M

    1990-04-01

    Trypanosoma evansi was demonstrated by an immunohistochemical technique in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues of experimentally infected rats. Trypanosoma evansi was visible readily, nuclei were stained darkly, the cytoplasm was stained moderately, and the cell membranes were delineated clearly. The parasites were present in small- to large-sized blood vessels of all organs, in extravascular spaces of ventricles and neuropil of the brain, and in interstitial tissues of the lung and testes. This method also stained nuclei but not cytoplasm or cell membranes of Trypanosoma congolense, and did not stain Trypanosoma theileri. In a water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) with nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis, the presence of T. evansi could not be demonstrated by conventional histological stains. However, the trypanosomes were recognized readily in the Virchow-Robin spaces and neuropil of the brain by the immunohistochemical method.

  18. Black flies (Diptera: Simuliidae) attracted to humans and water buffalos and natural infections with filarial larvae, probably Onchocerca sp., in northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Takaoka, H; Choochote, W; Aoki, C; Fukuda, M; Bain, O

    2003-03-01

    Several Simulium species were investigated as to their biting habits and natural infections with filarial larvae at Ban Pan Fan, Chiang Mai Province, in northern Thailand. Female adults flies landing on or flighting around a human and a water buffalo were collected during the daytime from 06.00 to 19.00 hours on 22 June 2001. As a result, 217 S. nodosum, 86 S. asakoae and two S. nigrogilvum were obtained from a human attractant, and 416 S. nodosum, 25 S. nakhonense, 16 S. asakoae, four S. fenestratum and two S. nigrogilvum, from a water buffalo. The blood-feeding was confirmed only for S. nodosum and S. nigrogilvum on humans, and for S. nodosum and S. nakhonense on water buffalos. Dissections of these simuliids showed that S. nodosum was naturally infected with developing filarial larvae. Two types of microfilariae were distinguished but only one type of infective larvae. These larvae resembled Onchocerca suzukii, a parasite from a wild Japanese bovid, suggesting that an unknown Onchocerca species from ruminants was transmitted in Thailand. Infection rates with all stages of larvae and third-stage larvae were 2.3% (14/608) and 1.0% (6/608), respectively. This is the first report of natural infections of black flies with Onchocerca larvae in Southeast Asia, and the involved black fly species is shown to be not only anthropophilic but also zoophilic in this region.

  19. Experimental Sarcocystis hominis infection in a water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Chen, X W; Zuo, Y X; Hu, J J

    2003-04-01

    A water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) was fed 5.0 x 10(5) Sarcocystis hominis sporocysts from a human volunteer who had ingested S. hominis cysts from naturally infected cattle. A necropsy was performed on the buffalo 119 days after inoculation, and a large number of microscopic sarcocysts (approximately 5,000/g) were found in skeletal muscles. Ultrastructurally, the sarcocyst wall from buffalo muscles has upright villar protrusions measuring about 5.6 x 0.8 microm with numerous microtubules that run from the base to the apex. Sarcocysts from this buffalo were infective to 2 human volunteers, confirming their identity as S. hominis. Therefore, we believe that buffaloes can act experimentally as the intermediate host for S. hominis.

  20. Productive Infection of Bovine Papillomavirus Type 2 in the Urothelial Cells of Naturally Occurring Urinary Bladder Tumors in Cattle and Water Buffaloes

    PubMed Central

    Roperto, Sante; Russo, Valeria; Ozkul, Ayhan; Corteggio, Annunziata; Sepici-Dincel, Aylin; Catoi, Cornel; Esposito, Iolanda; Riccardi, Marita G.; Urraro, Chiara; Lucà, Roberta; Ceccarelli, Dora M.; Longo, Michele; Roperto, Franco

    2013-01-01

    Background Papillomaviruses (PVs) are highly epitheliotropic as they usually establish productive infections within squamous epithelia of the skin, the anogenital tract and the oral cavity. In this study, early (E) and late (L) protein expression of bovine papillomavirus type 2 (BPV-2) in the urothelium of the urinary bladder is described in cows and water buffaloes suffering from naturally occurring papillomavirus-associated urothelial bladder tumors. Methods and Findings E5 protein, the major oncoprotein of the BPV-2, was detected in all tumors. L1 DNA was amplified by PCR, cloned and sequenced and confirmed to be L1 DNA. The major capsid protein, L1, believed to be only expressed in productive papillomavirus infection was detected by Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical investigations confirmed the presence of L1 protein both in the cytoplasm and nuclei of cells of the neoplastic urothelium. Finally, the early protein E2, required for viral DNA replication and known to be a pivotal factor for both productive and persistent infection, was detected by Western blot and immunohistochemically. Electron microscopic investigations detected electron dense particles, the shape and size of which are consistent with submicroscopic features of viral particles, in nuclei of neoplastic urothelium. Conclusion This study shows that both active and productive infections by BPV-2 in the urothelium of the bovine and bubaline urinary bladder can occur in vivo. PMID:23667460

  1. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for diagnosis of Fasciola gigantica infection in cattle and buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Krishna Murthy, C M; Souza, Placid E D

    2015-12-01

    The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was evaluated for the diagnosis of Fasciola gigantica infection in cattle and buffaloes. The excretory-secretory (E-S Ag) antigen of F. gigantica adult flukes obtained after invitro incubation was used as an antigen. The test was conducted with 276 sera collected from cattle and buffaloes which included 22 sera each from naturally infected cattle and buffaloes (known positive serum) and with similar number of samples with healthy cattle and buffaloes (known negative serum). The positive results were observed in 18 and 19 of the sera from naturally infected cattle and buffaloes with sensitivity of 81.8 and 86.3 % respectively. Out of 188 serum samples which were found negative on faecal examination 32 (34 %) sera of cattle and 40 (42.5 %) sera of buffaloes were found positive by ELISA respectively. The sensitivity of the test was found to be 91.6 and 95.6 % in cattle and buffaloes respectively.

  2. Absence of Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection in buffaloes from Amazon and southeast region in Brazil.

    PubMed

    De Oliveira, Cairo H S; Resende, Cláudia F; Oliveira, Carlos M C; Barbosa, José D; Fonseca, Antônio A; Leite, Rômulo C; Reis, Jenner K P

    2016-07-01

    Enzootic bovine leucosis is an infectious disease caused by Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and is well described in bovines. The majority of infected animals are asymptomatic, one to five percent develop lymphoma and from 30 to 50% present a persistent lymphocytosis. The virus occurs naturally in cattle and experimentally in buffaloes, capybaras and rabbits. The occurrence of lymphoma in buffaloes has been attributed to BLV infection by some authors in India and Venezuela, but not confirmed by other studies and little information on natural BLV infection in buffaloes is available. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of BLV in a sub-sample of buffalo from Amazon and southeast regions in Brazil. Three hundred and fifteen serum samples were negative using commercial AGID and ELISA (ELISA-gp51) which detect anti-BLV glycoprotein gp51 antibodies. The same samples were also evaluated for antibodies to whole virus through a commercial ELISA (ELISA-BLV) in which 77 (24.44%) were found seropositive and two (0.63%) inconclusive. On the other hand, all animals were negative by PCR to BLV targeted to the env and tax genes. These results suggest that ELISA-BLV produces false positive results in buffalo serum (p<0.001). In addition, one buffalo lymphoma sample was negative in both PCR assays used in this study. BLV was not detected in buffaloes from the Amazon basin and the southeast region of Brazil. Serological tests, like ELISA-BLV, usually used for cattle may produce false-positive results for BLV in buffaloes and direct detection tests such as PCR should be chosen in these surveys. The occurrence of lymphoma in buffalo was not associated with BLV infection in the one case analyzed in this work and the etiology and pathogenesis of this disease should be clarified. PMID:27317318

  3. Absence of Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection in buffaloes from Amazon and southeast region in Brazil.

    PubMed

    De Oliveira, Cairo H S; Resende, Cláudia F; Oliveira, Carlos M C; Barbosa, José D; Fonseca, Antônio A; Leite, Rômulo C; Reis, Jenner K P

    2016-07-01

    Enzootic bovine leucosis is an infectious disease caused by Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and is well described in bovines. The majority of infected animals are asymptomatic, one to five percent develop lymphoma and from 30 to 50% present a persistent lymphocytosis. The virus occurs naturally in cattle and experimentally in buffaloes, capybaras and rabbits. The occurrence of lymphoma in buffaloes has been attributed to BLV infection by some authors in India and Venezuela, but not confirmed by other studies and little information on natural BLV infection in buffaloes is available. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of BLV in a sub-sample of buffalo from Amazon and southeast regions in Brazil. Three hundred and fifteen serum samples were negative using commercial AGID and ELISA (ELISA-gp51) which detect anti-BLV glycoprotein gp51 antibodies. The same samples were also evaluated for antibodies to whole virus through a commercial ELISA (ELISA-BLV) in which 77 (24.44%) were found seropositive and two (0.63%) inconclusive. On the other hand, all animals were negative by PCR to BLV targeted to the env and tax genes. These results suggest that ELISA-BLV produces false positive results in buffalo serum (p<0.001). In addition, one buffalo lymphoma sample was negative in both PCR assays used in this study. BLV was not detected in buffaloes from the Amazon basin and the southeast region of Brazil. Serological tests, like ELISA-BLV, usually used for cattle may produce false-positive results for BLV in buffaloes and direct detection tests such as PCR should be chosen in these surveys. The occurrence of lymphoma in buffalo was not associated with BLV infection in the one case analyzed in this work and the etiology and pathogenesis of this disease should be clarified.

  4. Molecular analyses detect natural coinfection of water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) with bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) in serologically negative animals.

    PubMed

    Craig, María I; König, Guido A; Benitez, Daniel F; Draghi, María G

    2015-01-01

    Infection of water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) with bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) has been confirmed in several studies by serological and molecular techniques. In order to determine the presence of persistently infected animals and circulating species and subtypes of BVDV we conducted this study on a buffalo herd, whose habitat was shared with bovine cattle (Bossp.). Our serological results showed a high level of positivity for BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 within the buffalo herd. The molecular analyses of blood samples in serologically negative animals revealed the presence of viral nucleic acid, confirming the existence of persistent infection in the buffaloes. Cloning and sequencing of the 5' UTR of some of these samples revealed the presence of naturally mix-infected buffaloes with at least two different subtypes (1a and 1b), and also with both BVDV species (BVDV-1 and BVDV-2).

  5. Primary experimental infection of riverine buffaloes with Fasciola gigantica.

    PubMed

    Yadav, S C; Sharma, R L; Kalicharan, A; Mehra, U R; Dass, R S; Verma, A K

    1999-05-01

    The clinical course of the primary experimental Fasciola gigantica infection was investigated in riverine buffalo calves of the Murrah breed. Nine male calves aged 12-15 months were randomly assigned to two groups of five (Group I) and four (Group II) animals. Each animal in Group I, was orally infected with 1000 metacercariae (mc) of F. gigantica, whereas Group II animals did not receive any infection dose and served as uninfected controls. No clinical signs of fasciolosis were observed until the sixth week post-infection (PI). Group I animals, however, developed recognised symptoms of acute fasciolosis, comprising apyrexic inappetance, anemia, poor weight gain, diarrhoea and sub-mandibular and facial oedema, respectively, from 5, 6, 8, 16 and 17 weeks PI. The signs were intermittent in nature and of variable duration. The prepatent period was of 92-97 days (mean 95.2 +/- 3.1). One of the five infected animals died on Day 147 PI. At necropsy, 36.8 +/- 11.0% of the infection dose was recovered as adult fluke population. The gross lesions were primarily biliary in nature. Group II, the uninfected controls, throughout the study period of 165 days PI, did not show any symptom and were negative for F. gigantica. The study demonstrated that the onset of adverse effects of F. gigantica on the growth and health of the infected host was mainly noted during late prepatency much before coprological prediction and diagnosis. The significance of preventive therapy against fasciolosis during prepatency has been stressed in endemic areas. PMID:10384904

  6. Improvement in the diagnosis of Brucella abortus infections in naturally infected water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) using an ELISA with a Protein-G-based indicator system.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Chand, Puran

    2011-12-01

    Brucellosis caused by Brucella abortus in domestic water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) raised under the traditional system of husbandry in northern India was diagnosed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) with a Protein-G-based indicator system (Protein-G ELISA). A total of 1,551 animals that are positive (N = 61), negative (N = 243), and suspected (N = 1,247) for brucellosis were examined. Rose bengal test (RBT) was used to predict the disease, and accordingly, animals were dichotomized in positive and negative population for receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis to determine the sensitivity, the specificity, and the performance index of Protein-G ELISA. Taking all animals (N = 1551) into account, the ROC curve analysis revealed cut off value of 29.6% positivity (%P) with 98.40% and 94.94%, sensitivity and specificity, respectively. The results were compared with ELISA in which anti-bovine conjugate was used. The cut off in ELISA was 37.9%P and sensitivity and specificity were 96.26% and 97.07%, respectively. The performance indexes of both the assays were almost equal and were 193.34 for Protein-G ELISA and 193.33 for ELISA. The cut off values of both the tests changed, if only known positive (N = 61) and known negative (N = 243) animals were used for ROC curve analysis, and accordingly, changes in sensitivity and specificity were observed with significant decrease of performance indexes of both the tests. The high optical density (P < 0.0001) background signal with negative serum control and high %P (P < 0.0001) in sera from negative population were noticed in ELISA in comparison to Protein-G ELISA.

  7. Infection of water buffalo in Rio de Janeiro Brazil with Anaplasma marginale strains also reported in cattle.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jenevaldo B; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Fonseca, Adivaldo H; Barbosa, José D; de la Fuente, José

    2014-10-15

    Anaplasma marginale is the most prevalent pathogen of cattle in tropical and subtropical regions of the world and causes the disease bovine anaplasmosis. The importance of water buffalo in the world economy is increasing. In addition, while water buffalo may serve as a reservoir host for A. marginale, the susceptibility of this host for A. marginale cattle strains in Brazil has not been reported. The major surface protein 1 alpha (msp1α) gene has been shown to be a stable genetic marker for identification of A. marginale strains. Herein, we analyzed blood samples from 200 water buffalo and identified the A. marginale strains in an endemic area of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where ticks were present and water buffalo and cattle co-mingled. Ticks that were feeding on the study buffalo were collected and identified. The prevalence of A. marginale in water buffalo in this study was low (10%). Sequence analysis of the msp1α gene demonstrated the presence of 8 different A. marginale strains. Two A. marginale strains in the water buffalo, (α-β-β-β-Γ) and (α-β-β-Γ), were similar to those reported in cattle from nearby regions. The results of this study suggested that water buffalo in this region are naturally infected with the same strains of A. marginale found in cattle.

  8. Development of sarcocysts of Sarcocystis levinei in water buffalo infected with sporocysts from dogs.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, S B; Joshi, S C; Shah, H L

    1987-12-01

    Half a million sporocysts of Sarcocystis levinei obtained from experimentally infected dogs were fed to a buffalo calf, and sarcocysts of this species were recovered from its oesophageal muscles when the animal was killed on the 62nd day of inoculation, thus establishing a buffalo-dog-buffalo cycle.

  9. An experimental intratonsilar infection model for bovine tuberculosis in African buffaloes, Syncerus caffer.

    PubMed

    De Klerk, L; Michel, A L; Grobler, D G; Bengis, R G; Bush, M; Kriek, N P J; Hofmeyr, M S; Griffin, J F T; Mackintosh, C G

    2006-12-01

    An infection model for Mycobacterium bovis in African buffaloes, Syncerus caffer, was developed, using the intratonsilar route of inoculation. Two groups of 11 buffaloes each, aged approximately 18 months, were infected with either 3.2 x 10(2) cfu (low dose) or 3 x 10(4) cfu (high dose) of M. bovis strain isolated from a buffalo. A control group of six buffaloes received saline via the same route. The infection status was monitored in vivo using the comparative intradermal tuberculin test, and in vitro by the modified interferon-gamma assay. All buffaloes were euthanazed 22 weeks post infection and lesion development was assessed by macroscopic examination, culture and histopathology. It was found that the high dose caused macroscopic lesions in nine out of 11 buffaloes. Mycobacterium bovis was isolated from all buffaloes in the high-dose group and from six out of 11 in the low-dose group.

  10. The influence of T. evansi infection on the immuno-responsiveness of experimentally infected water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Holland, W G; My, L N; Dung, T V; Thanh, N G; Tam, P T; Vercruysse, J; Goddeeris, B M

    2001-12-13

    In order to define the immuno-suppressive capacity of Trypanosoma evansi infections in buffaloes on the induction of immune responses against heterologous antigens, infected and non-infected buffaloes were vaccinated against Pasteurella multocida (haemorrhagic septicemia) and were simultaneously immunised with a control antigen, human serum albumin (HSA). Antibody responses against HSA were significantly reduced in T. evansi-infected animals, but no conclusive data were obtained on the antibody responses against P. multocida. Conversely, the local inflammatory response at the site of Pasteurella vaccination, as measured by increase in size, was significantly reduced in T. evansi-infected animals. These results indicate that the inductive capacity to mount humoral and cell-mediated immune responses against heterologous antigens is suppressed in T. evansi-infected animals. Consequently, T. evansi infection might interfere with the development of protective immunity upon heterologous vaccinations and could explain the poor protection of Pasteurella-vaccinated buffaloes in T. evansi-endemic areas of Vietnam.

  11. Exposure of vaccinated and naive cattle to natural challenge from buffalo-derived Theileria parva.

    PubMed

    Sitt, Tatjana; Poole, E Jane; Ndambuki, Gideon; Mwaura, Stephen; Njoroge, Thomas; Omondi, George P; Mutinda, Matthew; Mathenge, Joseph; Prettejohn, Giles; Morrison, W Ivan; Toye, Philip

    2015-08-01

    Integrative management of wildlife and livestock requires a clear understanding of the diseases transmitted between the two populations. The tick-borne protozoan parasite Theileria parva causes two distinct diseases in cattle, East Coast fever and Corridor disease, following infection with parasites derived from cattle or buffalo, respectively. In this study, cattle were immunized with a live sporozoite vaccine containing three T. parva isolates (the Muguga cocktail), which has been used extensively and successfully in the field to protect against cattle-derived T. parva infection. The cattle were exposed in a natural field challenge site containing buffalo but no other cattle. The vaccine had no effect on the survival outcome in vaccinated animals compared to unvaccinated controls: nine out of the 12 cattle in each group succumbed to T. parva infection. The vaccine also had no effect on the clinical course of the disease. A combination of clinical and post mortem observations and laboratory analyses confirmed that the animals died of Corridor disease. The results clearly indicate that the Muguga cocktail vaccine does not provide protection against buffalo-derived T. parva at this site and highlight the need to evaluate the impact of the composition of challenge T. parva populations on vaccine success in areas where buffalo and cattle are present. PMID:26005635

  12. Seasonal dynamics of Schistosoma japonicum infection in buffaloes in the Poyang Lake region and suggestions on local treatment schemes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Ming; Yu, Hua; Shi, Yao-Jun; Li, Hao; He, Liang; Li, Jian-Xi; Dong, Chang-Hua; Xie, Qiao; Jin, Ya-Mei; Lu, Ke; Lin, Jiao-Jiao

    2013-11-15

    Schistosomiasis japonica remains a major public health problem and the Poyang Lake region in Jiangxi province is one of the worst affected endemic areas. Buffaloes play a major role in the transmission of Schistosoma japonicum to humans. The aim of the present study was to increase understanding of the epidemic characteristics of schistosomiasis japonica in water buffaloes in the Poyang Lake region, after achieving the national mid-term goal, and to provide a basis for further interventions. The baseline prevalence in two villages in the Poyang Lake region in May 2010 was compared with respect to usage, sex and age in the total study population. Seasonal dynamics from May 2010 to May 2011 were observed in a natural village in the studied area. The baseline prevalence of infection in both villages (Caohui and Gaozhou) was 4.94% in May 2010. The prevalence in buffalo younger than 12 months was 12.82% in Caohui and 15.11% in Gaozhou, which was significantly higher than that found in those aged 13-24 months and older than 24 months. Of the 28 infected buffaloes, 82.14% (23) were younger than 12 months. The flow of seasonal dynamics showed that S. japonicum infection buffaloes were found from May to July and from November to January of the following year. This survey suggested that it is necessary to conduct two mass treatments (especially for young animals) in late March or early April and November, with an additional treatment of positive animals in July or June.

  13. Abortion and foetal lesions induced by Neospora caninum in experimentally infected water buffalos (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Chryssafidis, Andreas L; Cantón, Germán; Chianini, Francesca; Innes, Elisabeth A; Madureira, Ed H; Soares, Rodrigo M; Gennari, Solange M

    2015-01-01

    The water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) is an important species in several countries for its milk and meat production, as well as for transport and other agricultural activities. It is, in general, considered more resistant than cattle to different parasitic diseases, also less demanding for forage quality. It has been postulated that buffalo may be resistant to abortion caused by neosporosis, because of high serological prevalences found in buffalo herds from different localities, with no description of Neospora caninum-related abortion. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential impact of neosporosis in pregnant water buffalo cows. In this work, three pregnant buffalo cows were experimentally infected with Nc-1 strain of N. caninum, and abortion was detected 35 days post-infection. Molecular and histopathological results found in post-mortem tissues are described and discussed, confirming the susceptibility of water buffalos to abortion caused by N. caninum.

  14. Comparative clinicopathological changes in buffalo and cattle following infection by Pasteurella multocida B:2.

    PubMed

    Annas, S; Zamri-Saad, M; Jesse, F F A; Zunita, Z

    2015-11-01

    Haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) is an acute, septicaemic disease of cattle and buffalo of Asia and Africa caused by Pasteurella multocida B:2 or E:2. Buffaloes are believed to be more susceptible than cattle. In this study, 9 buffaloes of 8 months old were divided equally into 3 groups (Groups 1, 3, 5). Similarly, 9 cattle of 8 months old were equally divided into 3 groups (Groups 2, 4, 6). Animals of Groups 1 and 2 were inoculated with PBS while Groups 3 and 4 were inoculated subcutaneously with 10(5) cfu/ml of P. multocida B:2. Animals of Groups 5 and 6 were inoculated intranasally with the same inoculum. Both buffaloes and cattle that were inoculated subcutaneously succumbed to the infection at 16 h and 18 h, respectively. Two buffaloes that were inoculated intranasally (Group 5) succumbed at 68 h while the remaining cattle and buffaloes survived the 72-h study period. Endotoxin was detected in the blood of infected cattle (Group 4) and buffaloes (Groups 3 and 5) prior to the detection of P. multocida B:2 in the blood. The endotoxin was detected in the blood of buffaloes of Group 3 and cattle of Group 4 at 0.5 h post-inoculation while buffaloes of Group 5 and cattle of Group 6 at 1.5 h. On the other hand, bacteraemia was detected at 2.5 h in buffaloes of Group 3 and cattle of Group 4 and at 12 h in buffaloes of Group 5 and cattle of Group 6. Affected cattle and buffaloes showed lesions typical of haemorrhagic septicaemia. These included congestion and haemorrhages in the organs of respiratory, gastrointestinal and urinary tracts with evidence of acute inflammatory reactions. The severity of gross and histopathology lesions in cattle and buffalo calves that succumbed to the infection showed insignificant (p > 0.05) difference. However, inoculated buffalo and cattle that survived the infection showed significantly (p < 0.05) less severe gross and histopathological changes than those that succumbed. In general, cattle are more resistant to intranasal infection by P

  15. Molecular detection of Cryptosporidium spp. infections in water buffaloes from northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Inpankaew, Tawin; Jiyipong, Tawisa; Wongpanit, Kannika; Pinyopanuwat, Nongnuch; Chimnoi, Wissanuwat; Kengradomkij, Chanya; Xuan, Xuenan; Igarashi, Ikuo; Xiao, Lihua; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn

    2014-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the individual and herd-level prevalence and genotype of Cryptosporidium and to identify putative risk factors associated with Cryptosporidium spp. infections in water buffaloes in northeast Thailand. Fecal samples from 600 water buffaloes of 287 farms in six provinces were collected and tested using DMSO-modified acid-fast staining and polymerase chain reaction. The overall prevalence of Cryptosporidium infections in buffaloes was 5.7 and 8.7% among individual animals and herds, respectively. The provinces with highest infected Cryptosporidium were located in the Sakon Nakhon Basin in the northern part of the region. In addition, higher herd prevalence was observed among farms with more than five buffaloes (30%) than those with five or less animals (16.2%). Thirty (88.2%) of the 34 Cryptosporidium-positive samples were Cryptosporidium parvum and four (11.8%) were Cryptosporidium ryanae.

  16. Gene polymorphisms in African buffalo associated with susceptibility to bovine tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    le Roex, Nikki; Koets, Ad P; van Helden, Paul D; Hoal, Eileen G

    2013-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) is a chronic, highly infectious disease that affects humans, cattle and numerous species of wildlife. In developing countries such as South Africa, the existence of extensive wildlife-human-livestock interfaces poses a significant risk of Mycobacterium bovis transmission between these groups, and has far-reaching ecological, economic and public health impacts. The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer), acts as a maintenance host for Mycobacterium bovis, and maintains and transmits the disease within the buffalo and to other species. In this study we aimed to investigate genetic susceptibility of buffalo for Mycobacterium bovis infection. Samples from 868 African buffalo of the Cape buffalo subspecies were used in this study. SNPs (n = 69), with predicted functional consequences in genes related to the immune system, were genotyped in this buffalo population by competitive allele-specific SNP genotyping. Case-control association testing and statistical analyses identified three SNPs associated with BTB status in buffalo. These SNPs, SNP41, SNP137 and SNP144, are located in the SLC7A13, DMBT1 and IL1α genes, respectively. SNP137 remained significantly associated after permutation testing. The three genetic polymorphisms identified are located in promising candidate genes for further exploration into genetic susceptibility to BTB in buffalo and other bovids, such as the domestic cow. These polymorphisms/genes may also hold potential for marker-assisted breeding programmes, with the aim of breeding more BTB-resistant animals and herds within both the national parks and the private sector.

  17. The Differential Expression of Immune Genes between Water Buffalo and Yellow Cattle Determines Species-Specific Susceptibility to Schistosoma japonicum Infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianmei; Fu, Zhiqiang; Hong, Yang; Wu, Haiwei; Jin, Yamei; Zhu, Chuangang; Li, Hao; Lu, Ke; Shi, Yaojun; Yuan, Chunxiu; Cheng, Guofeng; Feng, Xingang; Liu, Jinming; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2015-01-01

    Water buffalo are less susceptible to Schistosoma japonicum infection than yellow cattle. The factors that affect such differences in susceptibility remain unknown. A Bos taurus genome-wide gene chip was used to analyze gene expression profiles in the peripheral blood of water buffalo and yellow cattle pre- and post-infection with S. japonicum. This study showed that most of the identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between water buffalo and yellow cattle pre- and post-infection were involved in immune-related processes, and the expression level of immune genes was lower in water buffalo. The unique DEGs (390) in yellow cattle were mainly associated with inflammation pathways, while the unique DEGs (2,114) in water buffalo were mainly associated with immune-related factors. The 83 common DEGs may be the essential response genes during S. japonicum infection, the highest two gene ontology (GO) functions were associated with the regulation of fibrinolysis. The pathway enrichment analysis showed that the DEGs constituted similar immune-related pathways pre- and post-infection between the two hosts. This first analysis of the transcriptional profiles of natural hosts has enabled us to gain new insights into the mechanisms that govern their susceptibility or resistance to S. japonicum infections.

  18. Characterization of immune cell infiltration in the placentome of water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) infected with neospora caninum during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cantón, G J; Konrad, J L; Moore, D P; Caspe, S G; Palarea-Albaladejo, J; Campero, C M; Chianini, F

    2014-05-01

    Neospora caninum infection in cattle stimulates host immune responses, which may be responsible for placental damage leading to abortion. Susceptibility of water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) to neosporosis is not well understood, although vertical transmission and fetal death have been documented. The aim of this study was to characterize the immune response in the placentome of water buffalo following experimental infection in early gestation with the Nc-1 strain of N. caninum. Placentomes were examined by immunohistochemistry using antibodies specific for T-cell subsets, natural killer cells and CD79(αcy) cells. Placental inflammation was characterized by the infiltration of CD3(+) and CD4(+) T cells and T cells expressing the γδ T-cell receptor. The distribution of these cellular subsets in buffalo placentomes was similar to that previously described in cattle infected with N. caninum in early gestation, but the lesions were milder, which may explain the lower number of abortions observed in this species after infection.

  19. Host differences in response to trickle infection with Fasciola gigantica in buffalo, Ongole and Bali calves.

    PubMed

    Wiedosari, E; Hayakawa, H; Copeman, B

    2006-01-01

    Progressive weight gain, faecal egg counts, packed cell volume, percent eosinophils in blood, serum antibody and serum levels of glutamate dehydrogenase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase were recorded in seven swamp buffalo (Bubalis bubalis), 7 Ongole (Bos indicus) and four Bali calves (Bos sundiacus) which were infected orally with 15 metacercariae of Fasciola gigantica twice weekly for 32 weeks. Similar observations were made on four buffalo, 4 Ongole calves and 3 Bali calves maintained fluke-free as controls. Flukes were counted at slaughter 36 weeks after initial infection. Mean daily weight gains of infected Bali (228 +/- 100 (SD) g/day) and infected Ongole calves (328 +/- 57 (SD) g/day) were lower (p = 0.026 and 0.067, respectively) than those of control calves (405 +/- 107 (SD) g/day), but infected buffalo calves (379 +/- 78 (SD) g/day) had similar weight gains to those of the controls (p = 0.57). Throughout the trial, faecal Fasciola egg counts in buffaloes were about one-fifth of counts of Ongole calves, and counts in Bali calves were intermediate. Ongole calves had three times the number of flukes at slaughter in their liver compared to buffalo and Bali calves, which had similar numbers. However, there was evidence that Bali calves had acquired a degree of resistance about 24 weeks after infection commenced and may have lost adult flukes as a consequence. PMID:17405628

  20. Treatment and reinfection of water buffaloes and cattle infected with Schistosoma japonicum in Yangtze River Valley, Anhui province, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianping; Zhang, Shiqing; Wu, Weidou; Zhang, Gonghua; Lu, Dabinga; Ornbjerg, Niels; Johansen, Maria V

    2006-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of praziquantel treatment of Schistosoma japonicum infections in cattle and water buffaloes and to assess the natural rate of reinfection after treatment. The studies were conducted on 2 islands in the Yangtze River, Anhui province, China, from March 2003 to January 2004. The efficacy of praziquantel was 97% when applied orally wrapped in tree leaves at the recommended doses. The efficacy was measured using a miracidium hatching technique on fecal samples collected 20 days after treatment. The treatment did not give rise to any major side effects. Reinfection after treatment was high and occurred throughout the year in both cattle and water buffaloes. Age-related resistance was only observed in water buffaloes. It is concluded that although praziquantel is highly effective against S. japonicum in cattle and water buffaloes, a single annual treatment strategy does not effectively control transmission. New strategies for integrated control of animal schistosomiasis are needed to control schistosomiasis transmission more effectively in farm areas of China.

  1. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in Veracruz State, Mexico and its association with climatic factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Infection with Toxoplasma gondii in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) is of epidemiological importance because of the risk for transmission to humans. We sought to determine the seroprevalence of T. gondii infection in 339 water buffaloes in Veracruz State, Mexico using the modified aggl...

  2. Serological investigations on Babesia orientalis infection. Status of water buffaloes in Hubei Province.

    PubMed

    Yao, Baoan; Zhao, Junlong; Liu, Enyong; Ding, Sutian; Shi, Junhua; Liu, Zhongling

    2002-05-01

    A total of 230 water buffaloes were sampled for the determination of the epidemiological situation of Babesia orientalis infection in Hubei Province, using the latex agglutination test. This serological test revealed that 74.7% of the collected sera were positive for antibodies against B. orientalis in endemic areas. In contrast, only 1.79% of water buffaloes were positive in non-epidemic areas. The incidence of the infection was substantially higher in older than in younger animals. The results were analysed using mathematical model and indicated that these areas were in a stable situation.

  3. A complementary diagnosis of naturally occurring tuberculosis in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in Rio de Janeiro using a MPB70-ELISA, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Zarden, Carlos F O; Marassi, Carla D; Oelemann, Walter; Lilienbaum, Walter

    2013-06-01

    As tuberculosis is still a worldwide infection and buffalo breeding represents an important economic activity in various countries, the purpose of this study was to employ an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using MPB70 as a capture antigen for the diagnosis of naturally occurring tuberculosis in water buffaloes in Brazil. After the introduction of newly acquired cattle onto a tuberculosis (TB) free farm, an outbreak of TB was recorded in a mixed herd comprising water buffaloes (21) and cattle (46). The entire herd was tested by intradermal tuberculin injection (ITT) and positive animals were slaughtered and tested by culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and ELISA. From the 21 buffaloes sampled, three were reactive by ITT. All the three had positive culture and ELISA, while PCR was positive in two of them. Besides that, one ITT-negative buffalo was slaughtered and presented positive results by both culture and ELISA, and was considered as anergic. Although there were only few animals, those findings demonstrate the diagnostic usefulness of an MPB70-ELISA to correctly detect Mycobacterium bovis tuberculosis in water buffaloes.

  4. Sarcocystis levinei infection in Philippine water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Claveria, F G; Cruz, M J

    2000-01-01

    Ultrastructural studies of sarcocysts obtained from Philippine water buffaloes revealed the presence of the commonly reported macroscopic species, Sarcocystis fusiformis, and the microscopic species Sarcocystis levinei (Dissanaike A, Kan S. Studies on Sarcocystis in Malaysia. I: Sarcocystis levinei n.sp. from the water buffalo Bubalus bubalis. Z Parasitenkd 1978;55:127-38), (Huong L, Dubey J, Uggla A. Redescription of Sarcocystis levinei Dissanaike and Kan, 1978 (Protozoa: Sarcocystidae) of the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). J Parasitol 1997;83:1148-52). The globular to oval microscopic cysts commonly observed in the muscles of the diaphragm and neck exhibit compartmentalized arrangement of zoites with septal partitions and measure 13-48 microns in diameter. The parasitophorous vacuolar membrane of sarcocyst bears minute and hair-like villar protrusions measuring 2.3-2.75 microns long emanating at certain distances from the primary cyst wall and lack microfilaments. Villar protrusions have expanded to dome-shaped base measuring 0.33-1.6 microns long by 0.22-1.0 micron wide, and intermediate and tapering distal segments bent approximately 90 degrees and run parallel to the cyst surface. The distal segments at some areas join to form conical tufts. The primary cyst wall bears numerous prominent undulations that are arranged in small clusters. The ground substance is 0.42-0.57 micron thick. This paper documents the first report of S. levinei in Philippine water buffaloes possessing the type 7 cyst wall.

  5. Evaluation of the card agglutination test (CATT/T. evansi) for detection of Trypanosoma evansi infection in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Hilali, M; Abdel-Gawad, A; Nassar, A; Abdel-Wahab, A; Magnus, E; Büscher, P

    2004-05-01

    A card agglutination test (CATT/T. evansi) was evaluated for detection of antibodies against Trypanosoma evansi (T. evansi) in experimentally and naturally infected buffaloes. Four calves were inoculated with a strain of T. evansi isolated from a dromedary camel. Parasitological examination of the calves revealed trypanosomes in the blood from days 4 to 9 post-inoculation (PI). General emaciation appeared from day 26 PI and aggravated until the end of the experiment (day 88 PI). Antibodies against T. evansi were detectable from day 8 PI till the end of the experiment. Parasitological examination of 200 water buffalo blood samples obtained from slaughterhouses revealed negative results. Serological examination of these animals showed that 48 (24%) water buffaloes had anti-T. evansi antibodies. PMID:15110402

  6. Evaluation of the card agglutination test (CATT/T. evansi) for detection of Trypanosoma evansi infection in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Hilali, M; Abdel-Gawad, A; Nassar, A; Abdel-Wahab, A; Magnus, E; Büscher, P

    2004-05-01

    A card agglutination test (CATT/T. evansi) was evaluated for detection of antibodies against Trypanosoma evansi (T. evansi) in experimentally and naturally infected buffaloes. Four calves were inoculated with a strain of T. evansi isolated from a dromedary camel. Parasitological examination of the calves revealed trypanosomes in the blood from days 4 to 9 post-inoculation (PI). General emaciation appeared from day 26 PI and aggravated until the end of the experiment (day 88 PI). Antibodies against T. evansi were detectable from day 8 PI till the end of the experiment. Parasitological examination of 200 water buffalo blood samples obtained from slaughterhouses revealed negative results. Serological examination of these animals showed that 48 (24%) water buffaloes had anti-T. evansi antibodies.

  7. Trypanosomiasis in Venezuelan water buffaloes: association of packed-cell volumes with seroprevalence and current trypanosome infection.

    PubMed

    García, H; García, M-E; Pérez, G; Bethencourt, A; Zerpa, E; Pérez, H; Mendoza-León, A

    2006-06-01

    The seroprevalence of trypanosomiasis and the prevalence of current trypanosome infection in water buffaloes from the most important livestock areas of Venezuela were evaluated by IFAT and the microhaematocrit centrifugation technique, respectively. The usefulness of a PCR-based assay for identifying the trypanosome species in the buffaloes was also evaluated. Of the 644 animals investigated, 40 (6.2%) were found infected with trypanosomes by blood centrifugation, and 196 (30.4%) were found positive for anti-trypanosome antibodies, by IFAT. The results of the PCR-based assay indicated that 92.5% of the animals with current infections were infected with Trypanosoma vivax and the rest with T. theileri (the first molecular confirmation of T. theileri in Venezuelan water buffaloes). The national programme to treat and prevent trypanosome infections in the buffaloes does not appear to be meeting with great success, even though it is focused on T. vivax. Although the level of parasitaemia was categorized as low for 28 (70%) of the infections detected (and packed-cell volumes appeared to be unassociated with IFAT result, and uncorrelated, in the infected animals, with level of parasitaemia), the 40 infected buffaloes had a significantly lower mean packed-cell volume than the uninfected animals (P<0.05). Farmers should therefore be made aware of the probability of trypanosome-attributable losses in buffalo productivity.

  8. Within guild co-infections influence parasite community membership: a longitudinal study in African Buffalo.

    PubMed

    Henrichs, Brian; Oosthuizen, Marinda C; Troskie, Milana; Gorsich, Erin; Gondhalekar, Carmen; Beechler, Brianna R; Ezenwa, Vanessa O; Jolles, Anna E

    2016-07-01

    Experimental studies in laboratory settings have demonstrated a critical role of parasite interactions in shaping parasite communities. The sum of these interactions can produce diverse effects on individual hosts as well as influence disease emergence and persistence at the population level. A predictive framework for the effects of parasite interactions in the wild remains elusive, largely because of limited longitudinal or experimental data on parasite communities of free-ranging hosts. This 4-year study followed a community of haemoparasites in free-ranging African buffalo (Syncerus caffer). We detected infection by 11 haemoparasite species using PCR-based diagnostic techniques, and analyzed drivers of infection patterns using generalized linear mixed models to understand the role of host characteristics and season on infection likelihood. We tested for (i) effects of co-infection by other haemoparasites (within guild) and (ii) effects of parasites infecting different tissue types (across guild). We found that within guild co-infections were the strongest predictors of haemoparasite infections in the buffalo; but that seasonal and host characteristics also had important effects. In contrast, the evidence for across-guild effects of parasites utilizing different tissue on haemoparasite infection was weak. These results provide a nuanced view of the role of co-infections in determining haemoparasite infection patterns in free living mammalian hosts. Our findings suggest a role for interactions among parasites infecting a single tissue type in determining infection patterns. PMID:27084785

  9. Within guild co-infections influence parasite community membership: a longitudinal study in African Buffalo.

    PubMed

    Henrichs, Brian; Oosthuizen, Marinda C; Troskie, Milana; Gorsich, Erin; Gondhalekar, Carmen; Beechler, Brianna R; Ezenwa, Vanessa O; Jolles, Anna E

    2016-07-01

    Experimental studies in laboratory settings have demonstrated a critical role of parasite interactions in shaping parasite communities. The sum of these interactions can produce diverse effects on individual hosts as well as influence disease emergence and persistence at the population level. A predictive framework for the effects of parasite interactions in the wild remains elusive, largely because of limited longitudinal or experimental data on parasite communities of free-ranging hosts. This 4-year study followed a community of haemoparasites in free-ranging African buffalo (Syncerus caffer). We detected infection by 11 haemoparasite species using PCR-based diagnostic techniques, and analyzed drivers of infection patterns using generalized linear mixed models to understand the role of host characteristics and season on infection likelihood. We tested for (i) effects of co-infection by other haemoparasites (within guild) and (ii) effects of parasites infecting different tissue types (across guild). We found that within guild co-infections were the strongest predictors of haemoparasite infections in the buffalo; but that seasonal and host characteristics also had important effects. In contrast, the evidence for across-guild effects of parasites utilizing different tissue on haemoparasite infection was weak. These results provide a nuanced view of the role of co-infections in determining haemoparasite infection patterns in free living mammalian hosts. Our findings suggest a role for interactions among parasites infecting a single tissue type in determining infection patterns.

  10. Biochemical and histochemical studies of the sarcocyst of Sarcocystis fusiformis of buffalo Bubalus bubalis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, R K; Kushwah, H S; Shah, H L

    1986-10-01

    The glycogen content and activities of alkaline and acid phosphatases of sarcocysts of Sarcocystis fusiformis from naturally infected Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) were determined biochemically and histochemically.

  11. Pathology of naturally occurring paratuberculosis in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, P; Tripathi, B N; Singh, N; Sharma, A K

    2006-07-01

    Gross and histologic lesions of paratuberculosis were studied in water buffaloes. Small intestines and associated mesenteric lymph nodes of 405 water buffaloes were examined. Of these, 20 animals having visible changes of intestinal thickening, mucosal corrugations, and enlargement of mesenteric lymph nodes exhibited histologic alteration characteristics of mild to moderate granulomatous inflammation. The histologic lesions observed in these animals were classified into 3 grades on the basis of type of cellular infiltration, granuloma formation, and presence of acid-fast bacilli. Grade-1 lesions observed in 8 animals were marked by the presence of scattered epithelioid macrophages amid large number of lymphocytes in the intestinal villi and in the paracortical regions of the associated mesenteric lymph nodes. Another 8 animals classified under grade-2 revealed microgranulomas, infiltration with a larger number of epithelioid macrophages besides lymphocytes in the intestinal villi, and granulomas in the mesenteric lymph nodes. Grade-3 lesions observed in 4 animals were characterized by the presence of epithelioid granulomas and giant cells in the intestines and the mesenteric lymph nodes. The Ziehl-Neelsen's stained tissue sections revealed acid-fast bacilli in grade-3 and -2 animals and acid-fast granular debris in grade-1 animals. Among these 20 buffaloes, 14 (70%) were positive in the IS900 specific polymerase chain reaction and 6 (30%) were positive in the bacterial culture.

  12. Infection of bovine immunodeficiency virus and bovine leukemia virus in water buffalo and cattle populations in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Meas, S; Seto, J; Sugimoto, C; Bakhsh, M; Riaz, M; Sato, T; Naeem, K; Ohashi, K; Onuma, M

    2000-03-01

    A survey of antibodies to bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) known as bovine lentivirus and bovine leukemia virus (BLV) was conducted with samples from water buffalo and cattle populations in Pakistan. A total of 370 water buffaloes and 76 cattle were tested, and 10.3% and 15.8%, respectively, were found positive for anti-BIV p26 antibodies determined by Western blotting, while 0.8% of water buffaloes and no cattle were positive for anti-BLV antibodies determined by immunodiffusion test. BIV-seropositive water buffaloes and cattle were found to have BIV proviral DNA in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells determined by nested polymerase chain reaction. This is the first report of BIV infections in water buffaloes.

  13. A drug-based intervention study on the importance of buffaloes for human Schistosoma japonicum infection around Poyang Lake, People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiagang; Li, Yuesheng; Gray, Darren; Ning, An; Hu, Guanghan; Chen, Honggen; Davis, George M; Sleigh, Adrian C; Feng, Zheng; McManus, Donald P; Williams, Gail M

    2006-02-01

    Schistosomiasis japonica is a zoonosis of major public health importance in southern China. We undertook a drug intervention to test the hypothesis that buffalo are major reservoirs for human infection in the marshlands/lake areas, where one million people are infected. We compared human and buffalo infection rates and intensity in an intervention village (Jishan), where humans and buffalo were treated with praziquantel, and a control village (Hexi), where only humans were treated, in the Poyang Lake region. Over the four-year study, human incidence in Jishan decreased but increased in Hexi. Adjustment of incidence by age, sex, water exposure, year, and village further confirmed the decreased human infection in Jishan. Chemotherapy for buffaloes resulted in a decrease in buffalo infection rates in Jishan, which coincided with the reduction in human infection rates there in the last two years of the study. Mathematical modeling predicted that buffalo are responsible for 75% of human transmission in Jishan.

  14. Prevalence, biology, and distribution pattern of Sarcocystis infection in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in Iran.

    PubMed

    Oryan, Ahmad; Ahmadi, Nasrollah; Mousavi, Seyed Mostafa Modarres

    2010-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine the prevalence, distribution pattern, and the Sarcocystis species involved in slaughtered water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in the Khuzestan, Iran by macroscopic and histological examination. The esophagus, heart, diaphragm, tongue, masseter, and thigh muscles were investigated. Esophagus and thigh muscles of only 3 of the 100 examined water buffaloes (3%) were infected with macroscopic Sarcocystis, whereas at microscopic level Sarcocystis were found in 83 of the 100 examined animals (83%). The highest prevalence rate of microscopic cysts was found in masseter muscle (57.1%) and then followed by tongue, diaphragm, esophagus, heart, and finally, thigh muscles (30.0%). There was no significant difference between males (83.6%) and females (82.0%) or between two investigated age groups (2 years old, 88%). Based on the size of the sarcocysts, thickness of the walls and location of the cysts, Sarcocystis buffalonis as a macroscopic form and Sarcocystis levinei and Sarcocystis dubeyi as the microscopic forms were diagnosed in the examined muscles of the buffaloes of this area. Sarcocystis fusiformis was not seen in the examined organs of these buffaloes. The high prevalence rate of microscopic Sarcocystis in this region indicates that dogs have a more significant role than cats in transmission of these protozoa.

  15. Pig, donkey and buffalo meat as a source of some coccidian parasites infecting dogs.

    PubMed

    Zayed, A A; El-Ghaysh, A

    1998-08-14

    Experimental infection of dogs with meat samples (oesophagus, heart and diaphragm) from each of 105 pigs, 11 donkeys and 17 Egyptian water buffaloes indicated that they contained the infective stages of some coccidian parasites of dogs. The dogs which were fed pig meat shed in their faeces Isospora ohioensis, I. canis oocysts and Sarcocystis miescheriana sporocysts after prepatent periods of 3-5, 4-7 and 9-10 days, respectively. The dogs which were fed donkey meat excreted only I. ohioensis oocysts and Sarcocystis bertrami sporocysts after prepatent periods of 3 and 11 days, respectively. However, the dogs which were fed buffalo meat shed in their faeces I. ohioensis, I. canis and Hammondia heydorni oocysts with prepatent periods of 1, 1 and 7 days, respectively.

  16. Microscopical and serological studies on Sarcocystis infection with first report of S. cruzi in buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in Assiut, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Metwally, Asmaa M; Abd Ellah, Mahmoud R; Al-Hosary, Amira A; Omar, Mosaab A

    2014-12-01

    This study was performed for the purpose of investigating the prevalence and the species composition of Sarcocystis spp. in buffaloes in Assiut province, Egypt. Macroscopically we reported the infection of buffaloes with Sarcocystis fusiformis, while microscopically three Sarcocystis species (Sarcocystis cruzi, Sarcocystis levinei and Sarcocystis hominis) cysts were recognized, and were differentiated by their morphological features using both histopathological sections and electron microscope scanning. Regarding the prevalence of Sarcocystis species among buffaloes in Assiut province, we reported that, using gross examination of 90 buffaloes' esophagus, only 23 samples out of 90 (25.5 %) were found to be infected; on the other hand, by using microscopical examination, the prevalence was 27.7 % (25 samples out of 90 samples were found to be infected). Using ELISA, 85 samples out of 90 (94.4 %) were found positive, an overall prevalence of 94.4 %. In this work we concluded that customary meat inspection methods in abattoirs in Egypt are insufficient for detecting Sarcocystis infection. Due to the presence of hidden or microscopic cysts, we strongly recommend the use of combined microscopical examination and ELISA for Sarcocystis diagnosis, to avoid human infection of such zoonotic parasite and to control the consequent disease. In addition, this study introduced the first report of S. cruzi in buffaloes in Egypt, and proved the hypothesis that S. cruzi is able to use animals such as water buffalo as intermediate hosts.

  17. Epizootic abortion related to infections by Chlamydophila abortus and Chlamydophila pecorum in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Greco, G; Corrente, M; Buonavoglia, D; Campanile, G; Di Palo, R; Martella, V; Bellacicco, A L; D'Abramo, M; Buonavoglia, C

    2008-06-01

    Water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) are affected by high rates of embryonic mortality and abortion related to infectious diseases and non-infectious factors. A number of viral and bacterial infections have been associated with reproductive failure, but there is limited information on the role of chlamydial infections. In order to investigate the presence and the role of Chlamydiaceae in water buffalo a retrospective study was performed in a herd with a history of reproductive failure. During an 11-month period, the pregnant heifers suffered an abortion rate of 36.8% between the 3rd and 7th month of pregnancy. Antibodies to Chlamydiaceae were detected in 57% of the aborted cows, and in 0% of the overtly healthy cows used as control. By a nested-PCR assay, three of 14 vaginal swabs from aborted animals tested positive for Chlamydophila agents and, additionally, three out of seven aborted fetuses tested positive for Chlamydophila spp., with two being co-infections by Cp. abortus and Cp. pecorum and one being characterised as Cp. abortus. Sequence analysis of the amplicons confirmed the results of the nested-PCR. The presence of anti-Chlamydiaceae antibodies in more than half of the aborting animals (P<0.002) and the detection of Chlamydophila agents in several fetal organs and in the vaginal swabs are consistent with the history of abortions observed in the herd and suggest an abortifacient role by Chlamydophila spp. in water buffalo (B. Bubalis) herds.

  18. Serological investigation of Leptospira infection and its circulation in one intensive-type water buffalo farm in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Marvin A; Mingala, Claro N; Gloriani, Nina G; Yanagihara, Yasutake; Isoda, Norikazu; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Koizumi, Nobuo

    2016-02-01

    Water buffalo is an indispensable livestock in the Philippines. Leptospirosis is a serious zoonosis that can be fatal to humans and cause reproductive problems in livestock. Leptospirosis has been reported in some countries where water buffaloes are commercially raised, highlighting the Leptospira prevalence in this farming system, but information on leptospirosis in water buffalo farms in the Philippines is limited. In this study, we collected blood samples from rats (n = 21), and water buffaloes (n = 170) from different groups and locations in one intensive-type buffalo farm in the Philippines. Serum was analyzed by microscopic agglutination test (MAT). Anti-Leptospira antibodies reacting with serogroups Canicola, Icterohaemorrhagiae and Pomona were found in sera of 30% tested rats, and 48% of water buffalo sera tested positive for at least one Leptospira strain, in which serogroups Mini, Hebdomadis, Tarassovi and Pyrogenes were predominantly agglutinated. The number of seropositive young water buffaloes (< 1 year-old) was lower than that of older seropositive ones. Furthermore, sera from younger water buffaloes were reactive with single serotypes with low MAT titers, but older animals were reactive with multiple Leptospira strains with variable MAT titers. In addition, antibodies against serogroups Icterohaemorrhagiae and Pomona were detected in both animals. Finally, Leptospira infection was found associated with age and animal grouping, highlighting the impact of management in the persistence of leptospirosis at intensive-type buffalo farm settings in the Philippines. Further investigation and appropriate control strategies are required to prevent leptospirosis from causing risks to public health and economic losses to the water buffalo farming industry. PMID:27348885

  19. Serological investigation of Leptospira infection and its circulation in one intensive-type water buffalo farm in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Marvin A; Mingala, Claro N; Gloriani, Nina G; Yanagihara, Yasutake; Isoda, Norikazu; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Koizumi, Nobuo

    2016-02-01

    Water buffalo is an indispensable livestock in the Philippines. Leptospirosis is a serious zoonosis that can be fatal to humans and cause reproductive problems in livestock. Leptospirosis has been reported in some countries where water buffaloes are commercially raised, highlighting the Leptospira prevalence in this farming system, but information on leptospirosis in water buffalo farms in the Philippines is limited. In this study, we collected blood samples from rats (n = 21), and water buffaloes (n = 170) from different groups and locations in one intensive-type buffalo farm in the Philippines. Serum was analyzed by microscopic agglutination test (MAT). Anti-Leptospira antibodies reacting with serogroups Canicola, Icterohaemorrhagiae and Pomona were found in sera of 30% tested rats, and 48% of water buffalo sera tested positive for at least one Leptospira strain, in which serogroups Mini, Hebdomadis, Tarassovi and Pyrogenes were predominantly agglutinated. The number of seropositive young water buffaloes (< 1 year-old) was lower than that of older seropositive ones. Furthermore, sera from younger water buffaloes were reactive with single serotypes with low MAT titers, but older animals were reactive with multiple Leptospira strains with variable MAT titers. In addition, antibodies against serogroups Icterohaemorrhagiae and Pomona were detected in both animals. Finally, Leptospira infection was found associated with age and animal grouping, highlighting the impact of management in the persistence of leptospirosis at intensive-type buffalo farm settings in the Philippines. Further investigation and appropriate control strategies are required to prevent leptospirosis from causing risks to public health and economic losses to the water buffalo farming industry.

  20. Sarcocystis spp infection in Philippine water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Claveria, F G; Cruz, M J; Lim, R S

    2000-01-01

    In a survey of sarcocysts in muscle tissues obtained from 142 water buffaloes, 65% of the carcasses had sarcocysts. Macroscopic and two forms of microscopic sarcocysts, the spindle-shaped or fusiform sarcocysts commonly occurring in the muscles of the esophagus, throat and limbs, and the globular to oval-shaped sarcocysts which were the dominant form in the diaphragm and cervical muscle tissues were noted. Ultrastructural analysis of macroscopic and microscopic sarcocysts and their cyst wall revealed two distinct species of Sarcocystis: the macroscopic species, Sarcocystis fusiformis which has been previously reported in Philippine carabaos possessing highly dendritic cauliflower-like projections emanating from the primary cyst wall, with annulated microfilaments and numerous electron dense granules: and the Sarcocystis levinei (Dissanaike and Kan, 1978) Huong, Dubey and Uggla. 1997 exhibiting a cyst wall with undulating and hair-like villar protrusions with expanded or dome-shaped base, intermediate finger-like, and distal tapering segments which at some points join to form conical tufts. Our findings represent the first report of S. levinei in the country supported with ultrastructural analysis of the sarcocysts and cyst wall, and likewise refute earlier published reports that all microscopic sarcocysts in Philippine carabaos are developing forms of the macroscopic species, S. fusiformis. Histopathological changes such as displacement and necrosis of the surrounding host muscle tissue were observed with macroscopic sarcocysts and histologically processed tissue samples containing microscopic fusiform sarcocysts. Necrotic myofibrils and mitochondria were evident in ultrathin sections.

  1. Serum acute phase proteins in control and Theileria annulata infected water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    El-Deeb, Wael M; Iacob, Olimpia C

    2012-11-23

    This study was carried out to ascertain the changes in acute phase proteins (APPs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines in Theileria annulata infected water buffalo. Thirty infected water buffaloes and 20 parasitologically free were used. In the present study there was significant (P ≤ 0.05) increase in haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid A (SAA), ceruloplasmin, α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and fibrinogen levels (2.18 ± 0.29 g/l, 156.58 ± 3.48 mg/l, 31.23 ± 1.25mg/dl, 370.23 ± 33.21 mg/l and 16.17 ± 1.18 g/l, respectively) in T. annulata infected water buffaloes when compared to healthy ones (0.13 ± 0.01 g/l, 23.9 ± 0.56 mg/l, 21.23 ± 1.21 mg/dl, 240.53 ± 22.45 mg/l and 4.2 ± 0.1 6g/l, respectively). Moreover, there was significant (P ≤ 0.05) increase in the levels of TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-6, IL-12, IL-1β and IFN-γ (2.55 ± 0.12 ng/ml, 98.32 ± 4.21 pg/ml, 152.32 ± 5.62 pg/ml, 26.44 ± 1.43 ng/ml, 240.33 ± 20.45 pg/ml and 123.65 ± 5.67 pg/ml, respectively) in T. annulata infected water buffaloes when compared to healthy ones (0.42 ± 0.04 ng/ml, 55.32 ± 3.21 pg/ml, 88.23 ± 3.21 pg/ml, 7.45 ± 0.67 ng/ml, 98.33 ± 3.45 pg/ml and 34.76 ± 1.56 pg/ml, respectively). There was also significant decrease (P ≤ 0.05) in the Hb content, PCV%, RBCs and WBCs counts in the diseased water buffaloes compared to the control ones. Neutropenia, eosinopenia, lymphopenia, monocytopenia and thrombocytopenia were also recorded. The biochemical changes revealed significant (P ≤ 0.05) elevation in the levels of AST, ALT, ALP, LDL-c, VLDL-c, BHBA and NEFA, with significant (P ≤ 0.05) decrease in the levels of total proteins, albumin, globulins, cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, G6PD, calcium and phosphorus in T. annulata infected water buffaloes when compared to healthy ones. It could be concluded that APPs and pro-inflammatory cytokines could be used as a valuable biomarkers in T. annulata infected water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

  2. Helmintic infections in water buffaloes on Italian farms: a spatial analysis.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Laura; Musella, Vincenzo; Veneziano, Vincenzo; Condoleo, Renato U; Cringoli, Giuseppe

    2009-05-01

    The present paper reports the results of a cross-sectional survey aimed at obtaining up-to-date information on the spatial distribution of different groups and/or species of helminths in water buffaloes from central Italy. Geographical information systems (GIS) and spatial analysis were used to plan the sampling procedures, to display the results as maps and to detect spatial clusters of helminths in the study area. The survey was conducted on 127 water buffalo farms, which were selected in the study area using a grid sampling approach, followed by proportional allocation. Faecal samples (n. = 1,883) collected from the 127 farms were examined using the Flotac dual technique. Gastrointestinal strongyles were the most frequent helminths (33.1%) on the tested farms, followed by the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica (7.1%), the rumen fluke Calicophoron daubneyi (7.1%), the nematode Strongyloides spp. (3.1%), the lancet liver fluke Dicrocoelium dendriticum (2.4%) and the tapeworm Moniezia spp. (2.4%). In order to display the spatial distribution of the various helminths detected on the water buffalo farms (used as epidemiological unit in our study), point maps were drawn within the GIS. In addition, for each helminth, clustering of test-positive farms were investigated based on location determined by exact coordinates. Using spatial scan statistic, spatial clusters were found for the flukes F. hepatica and C. daubneyi and the cestode Moniezia spp.; these findings are consistent with the life cycle of these parasites, which have strong environmental determinants. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that, with the appropriate survey-based data at hand, GIS is a useful tool to study epidemiological patterns of infections in veterinary health, in particular in water buffaloes.

  3. A comparative evaluation of parasitological tests and a PCR for Trypanosoma evansi diagnosis in experimentally infected water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Holland, W G; Claes, F; My, L N; Thanh, N G; Tam, P T; Verloo, D; Büscher, P; Goddeeris, B; Vercruysse, J

    2001-05-01

    In this study five parasitological methods and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were compared for the diagnostic sensitivity for Trypanosoma evansi in experimentally infected water buffaloes over a period of 15 weeks. The combined estimates of sensitivity (CE(se)) of the PCR proved to be highest at 78.2%, closely followed by the mouse inoculation (MI), the micro-haematocrite centrifugation technique (MHCT) and the mini-anion-exchange centrifugation technique (MAECT) with CE(se) of, respectively, 74.0, 69.6 and 62.4%. The CE(se) of the buffy-coat technique (BCT) at 38.6% and the sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) clarification technique at 25.1% were considerably lower. PCR detected consistently all buffaloes infected from week 3 post-infection (PI) onwards. For MI this occurred after 5 weeks PI while for MHCT and MAECT these sustainable high levels were reached in the 7th week PI. BCT and SDS never detected all buffaloes infected. The influence of time and temperature on the viability of T. evansi in heparinized blood from water buffalo was also studied. In general we observed that the survival time tends to be longer when blood is kept at 4 degrees C. In samples kept in direct sunlight parasites became undetectable with the MHCT after 30min. After treatment of the water buffaloes with diminazene aceturate, the PCR signal disappeared within 24h.

  4. The oxidant defence system in water-buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) experimentally infected with Anaplasma marginale.

    PubMed

    Reddy, G R; More, T; Sharma, S P; Singh, L N

    1988-03-01

    The glutathione (GSH) -oxidant defence system protects the erythrocytes and leucocytes from oxidative damage. Leucocyte -superoxide dismutase (SOD), GSH-peroxidase (GSH-px), GSH-reductase (GR), GSH-S-transferase (GSH-S-t) and arginase were examined in samples from buffaloes infected with Anaplasma marginale. All the enzymes, except arginase, were also studied in the red cell haemolysates from these animals. GSH-S-t, GSH- and glutathione-reductase (GR) levels in leucocytes decreased in infected animals suggesting a decline in the efficiency of the GSH-oxidant defence system. SOD levels increased but there was no change in leucocyte-arginase activity due to infection. Infection caused no significant changes in red cell SOD, GSH-px, GR and GSH. However, GSH-S-t significantly decreased (P less than 0.05).

  5. Potential association of reduced cholinesterase activity with Trypanosoma evansi pathogenesis in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shanker K; Singh, Vivek K; Yadav, Brajesh K; Nakade, Udayraj P; Kumari, Priyambada; Srivastava, Mukesh K; Sharma, Abhishek; Choudhary, Soumen; Swain, Dilip; Garg, Satish K

    2016-07-30

    The present study aimed to investigate the association of cholinesterase activity with trypanosomosis in buffaloes. Thirty-three clinical cases of trypanosomosis in water buffaloes, found positive for trypomastigotes of T. evansi on blood smear examination, were divided into two groups based on clinical manifestations. Twenty diseased buffaloes revealing only common clinical signs were allocated to Group I, while the remaining 13 buffaloes showing common clinical manifestations along with neurological disturbances were allocated to Group II. Twelve clinically healthy buffaloes, free from any haemoprotozoa infection, were kept as healthy control (Group III). Blood samples were collected from buffaloes of all three groups to determine serum cholinesterase activity. Compared to buffaloes of healthy control group, cholinesterase activity in T. evansi-infected buffaloes of Group I and II was significantly (P<0.001) lower. However, no significant difference was observed in cholinesterase activity between the T. evansi-infected buffaloes exhibiting neurological disorders and no neurological disorders. Summing up, reduced cholinesterase activity seems to be associated with the pathogenesis of natural T. evansi infection and its clinical manifestations in buffaloes possibly by evading immune response. Further studies are warranted on association of cholinesterase activity in T. evansi-infected buffaloes with neurological disorders.

  6. Potential association of reduced cholinesterase activity with Trypanosoma evansi pathogenesis in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shanker K; Singh, Vivek K; Yadav, Brajesh K; Nakade, Udayraj P; Kumari, Priyambada; Srivastava, Mukesh K; Sharma, Abhishek; Choudhary, Soumen; Swain, Dilip; Garg, Satish K

    2016-07-30

    The present study aimed to investigate the association of cholinesterase activity with trypanosomosis in buffaloes. Thirty-three clinical cases of trypanosomosis in water buffaloes, found positive for trypomastigotes of T. evansi on blood smear examination, were divided into two groups based on clinical manifestations. Twenty diseased buffaloes revealing only common clinical signs were allocated to Group I, while the remaining 13 buffaloes showing common clinical manifestations along with neurological disturbances were allocated to Group II. Twelve clinically healthy buffaloes, free from any haemoprotozoa infection, were kept as healthy control (Group III). Blood samples were collected from buffaloes of all three groups to determine serum cholinesterase activity. Compared to buffaloes of healthy control group, cholinesterase activity in T. evansi-infected buffaloes of Group I and II was significantly (P<0.001) lower. However, no significant difference was observed in cholinesterase activity between the T. evansi-infected buffaloes exhibiting neurological disorders and no neurological disorders. Summing up, reduced cholinesterase activity seems to be associated with the pathogenesis of natural T. evansi infection and its clinical manifestations in buffaloes possibly by evading immune response. Further studies are warranted on association of cholinesterase activity in T. evansi-infected buffaloes with neurological disorders. PMID:27369572

  7. Infection rates of Linguatula serrata nymphs in mesenteric lymph nodes from water buffaloes in North India.

    PubMed

    Sudan, Vikrant; Jaiswal, Amit Kumar; Shanker, Daya

    2014-09-15

    The literature pertaining to prevalence of Linguatula serrata in large ruminants is limited. In abattoir survey, the infection rate of L. serrata in 1440 mesenteric lymph nodes collected from 480 buffaloes from North India was investigated. Results revealed 88 (18.3%) buffaloes and 288 (20.0%) mesenteric lymph nodes having parasite's nymphs. Nonsignificant difference (P>0.05), between 1 and 3 years age (51.5%) and above three years of age (48.5%) groups was observed. Nonsignificant difference (P>0.05) between the infection rate of male (51.5%) and female (48.5%) was also observed. Infection in haemorrhagic (57.2%) and black-coloured (67.5%) nymph nodes were significantly (P<0.05) higher than normal-coloured nodes (8.8%). When compared based on consistency, the results showed soft lymph nodes (61.3%) were significantly (P<0.05) more infected than normal (12.8%) and hard (30.0%) lymph nodes. The intensity of infection in normal, haemorrhagic and black lymph nodes were 1.81 ± 0.21, 4.23 ± 0.0.62 and 5.12 ± 0.73, nymphs respectively. The mean numbers of parasites in haemorrhagic and black-coloured lymph nodes were significantly (P<0.0005) more than mean number of parasites in normal-coloured nodes. Again intensity of infection in normal, soft and hard lymph nodes was 2.31 ± 0.18, 5.84 ± 0.74 and 3.21 ± 0.68, respectively. When compared based on lymph nodes consistency, the soft lymph nodes were significantly (P<0.0005) more severely infected than normal and hard ones. The study has generated some vital data about the prevalence of this underreported disease amongst the bubaline intermediate hosts along with important gross changes in the affected lymph nodes.

  8. High prevalence of Schistosoma japonicum infection in water buffaloes in the Philippines assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hai-Wei; Qin, Yuan-Fang; Chu, Kai; Meng, Rui; Liu, Yun; McGarvey, Stephen T; Olveda, Remigio; Acosta, Luz; Ji, Min-Jun; Fernandez, Tomas; Friedman, Jennifer F; Kurtis, Jonathan D

    2010-04-01

    Difficulty in controlling human Schistosoma japonicum infection is partly attributed to the presence of non-human definitive hosts. Water buffaloes are a major reservoir for transmission of S. japonicum to humans in China. However, in the Philippines, reports based on microscopic examination of buffalo stool identified a low prevalence of S. japonicum, and mathematical models using these data concluded that water buffaloes are not a major reservoir for transmission of S. japonicum to humans. We collected stool from 81 buffaloes in Macanip, Leyte, the Philippines, and assayed for S. japonicum infection by the Danish Bilharziasis Laboratory technique, the Kato-Katz technique, miracidia hatching, and a highly validated real-time polymerase chain reaction. The prevalence defined by each assay was 3.7%, 3.7%, 0%, and 51.5% respectively. Our results demonstrate that microscopic-based techniques dramatically underestimate the prevalence of S. japonicum infection in water buffaloes in the Philippines and warrant reexamination of the role of bovines in transmission of S. japonicum to humans in the Philippines.

  9. Molecular characterization of Anaplasma marginale in ticks naturally feeding on buffaloes.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jenevaldo Barbosa; da Fonseca, Adivaldo Henrique; Barbosa, José Diomedes

    2015-10-01

    Anaplasma marginale is the most prevalent pathogen transmitted by ticks in cattle in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. However, the tick species involved in the transmission of A. marginale in buffaloes in Brazil have not been identified. The objective of the present study was to determine the presence of A. marginale in ticks parasitizing water buffaloes. A total of 200 samples of Rhipicephalus microplus, Dermacentor nitens, Amblyomma cajennense, and Amblyomma maculatum were collected and tested by conventional and quantitative PCR for the presence of the msp1a and msp5 genes. In the present study, 35 ticks (17.5%) were positive for A. marginale DNA by qPCR analysis. The positive ticks belonged to four different species: R. microplus (22.2%), A. cajennense (13.8%), A. maculatum (16.0%), and D. nitens (10.0%). Individuals of the three developmental stages (larvae, nymphs, and adults) of R. microplus and A. cajennense were found to be positive for A. marginale, only nymphs and adults of A. maculatum were found to be positive, and finally, only adults of D. nitens were positive for A. marginale. Our results suggest that R. microplus, A. cajennense, A. maculatum, and D. nitens ticks may be involved in the transmission of A. marginale in buffaloes. However, while A. marginale PCR positive ticks were recorded, this does not indicate vector competence; only that the ticks may contain a blood meal from an infected host. Additionally, the results show that the strains of A. marginale from buffaloes and cattle are phylogenetically related. PMID:26209411

  10. Molecular characterization of Anaplasma marginale in ticks naturally feeding on buffaloes.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jenevaldo Barbosa; da Fonseca, Adivaldo Henrique; Barbosa, José Diomedes

    2015-10-01

    Anaplasma marginale is the most prevalent pathogen transmitted by ticks in cattle in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. However, the tick species involved in the transmission of A. marginale in buffaloes in Brazil have not been identified. The objective of the present study was to determine the presence of A. marginale in ticks parasitizing water buffaloes. A total of 200 samples of Rhipicephalus microplus, Dermacentor nitens, Amblyomma cajennense, and Amblyomma maculatum were collected and tested by conventional and quantitative PCR for the presence of the msp1a and msp5 genes. In the present study, 35 ticks (17.5%) were positive for A. marginale DNA by qPCR analysis. The positive ticks belonged to four different species: R. microplus (22.2%), A. cajennense (13.8%), A. maculatum (16.0%), and D. nitens (10.0%). Individuals of the three developmental stages (larvae, nymphs, and adults) of R. microplus and A. cajennense were found to be positive for A. marginale, only nymphs and adults of A. maculatum were found to be positive, and finally, only adults of D. nitens were positive for A. marginale. Our results suggest that R. microplus, A. cajennense, A. maculatum, and D. nitens ticks may be involved in the transmission of A. marginale in buffaloes. However, while A. marginale PCR positive ticks were recorded, this does not indicate vector competence; only that the ticks may contain a blood meal from an infected host. Additionally, the results show that the strains of A. marginale from buffaloes and cattle are phylogenetically related.

  11. Sequential pathological studies in Asian water buffaloes infected intratracheally with Absidia corymbifera.

    PubMed

    Singh, G; Gupta, P P; Sood, N; Banga, H S; Jand, S K

    1998-09-01

    Zygomycosis was produced experimentally in Asian water buffalo calves (Bubalus bubalis) by intratracheal inoculation of sporangiospores of Absidia corymbifera. Infected animals exhibited dullness, depression, partial anorexia, initial pyrexia, mucopurulent nasal and ocular discharge and coughing during the first week. There was no mortality at any stage of the experiment, which continued for 30 days. The gross and microscopic lesions were restricted to the lungs and there was no dissemination of the fungus to other organs. Gross and microscopic changes in the lungs were observed up to the 20th day post-infection. Gross lesions consisted of pneumonic consolidation of the antero-ventral lobes of the lungs. Microscopic changes consisted of granulomatous reactions with well developed pulmonary granulomas. Distorted hyphae of A. corymbifera were demonstrated in tissue sections up to 15 days post inoculation. Re-isolation of the fungus was achieved consistently for up to 15 days. It is concluded that intratracheal inoculation of A. corymbifera in buffalo calves leads to significant pathological changes in the lungs, but the disease appears to be self limiting 20 days following inoculation.

  12. Mast cell and eosinophils in the wall of the gut and eosinophils in the blood stream during Toxocara vitulorum infection of the water buffalo calves (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Neves, Maria F; Starke-Buzetti, Wilma A; Castro, Alessandra M M G

    2003-04-01

    Toxocara vitulorum is a pathogenic nematode from the small intestine of very young buffalo calves. To understand the development of the inflammatory responses in the wall of the gut, samples of tissues were removed from the duodenum, jejunum and ileum of buffalo calves naturally infected with T. vitulorum during the beginning of the infection, at the peak of egg output, as well as during the periods of rejection of the worms and post-rejection. Two additional control groups of uninfected calves (by anti-helminthic therapy of their mothers and after the birth) were also necropsied on days 30 and 50 after birth. Blood samples were fortnightly collected from birth to 174 days post-birth. Blood smears were prepared and stained with Giemsa for eosinophils. The parasitological status of buffalo calves was evaluated through weekly fecal egg counts (EPG) from 1 to 106 days after birth, which revealed that T. vitulorum egg shedding started on day 11, reached the peak of the infection on day 49 and finally expelled the parasites between days 50 and 85 after birth. In the infected buffalo calves, the mast cell population increased significantly, by two-fold in the mucosa (villus-crypt unit (VCU)) of the duodenum and four-fold in the proximal jejunum; but these increases were statistically significant only at the peak of the infection. Although mast cell numbers increased in the mucosa of the ileum as well as in both the submucosal and muscle tissues of the duodenum, proximal jejunum and ileum, the data was not significantly different from the controls. Eosinophil numbers increased in the mucosa of the duodenum (two-five times higher than the control) and proximal jejunum (three-five-fold) during the period of the infection (beginning, peak and rejection). The relative numbers of eosinophils increased in the blood stream from the second to the seventh week. In conclusion, T. vitulorum infection elicited mastocytosis and tissue eosinophilia in the duodenum and proximal jejunum

  13. Hematological and biochemical changes in water buffalo calves (Bubalus bubalis) infected with Trypanosoma evansi.

    PubMed

    Hilali, M; Abdel-Gawad, A; Nassar, A; Abdel-Wahab, A

    2006-06-30

    Four water buffalo calves (Bubalus bubalis) were each inoculated intravenously with 10(6)T. evansi (camel isolate) and the fifth calf kept as non-infected control. The blood and sera of all calves were examined every 4 days during the first month post-inoculation (pi) and then once weekly until the end of the experiment (88 days pi). They were examined for hematological and biochemical changes, liver and kidney function tests. Hemoglobin concentration (Hb%), packed cell volume (PCV) and red blood cell count were significantly decreased. Total leucocytic count, lymphocytes and monocytes showed significant increase. Liver function tests revealed significant elevation in the activity of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme (LDH), globulin, total biliruben and indirect biliruben while alkaline phosphatase enzyme showed significant decrease. Kidney function tests revealed significant decrease of both creatinine and urea.

  14. Infection control in general practices in Buffalo City and OR Tambo District Municipalities, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Good infection control practices are effective in reducing rates of infection in health care settings. Studies in primary care in developed countries indicate that many general practitioners (GPs) do not comply with optimal infection control practices. There are no published studies from developing countries in Southern Africa. Objectives The aim of this study was to describe infection control practices in private GP surgeries in the Buffalo City and OR Tambo District Municipalities in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Method A literature review was conducted to appraise current best practice with respect to Standard Infection Control and Transmission Based Precautions. A questionnaire, inquiring into GPs’ actual practices, was posted to each surgery. Results The valid response rate was 34% (47/140). Methods used to sterilise instruments in 40 practices were: ultraviolet sterilisation (23), chemical disinfection (14), boiling water (7), and steam autoclave (2). Compounds used for chemical disinfection included organotin quaternary, chlorhexidine and benzyl ammonium chloride with a quaternary complex. Twenty-two (47%) used a hand rub. Sixteen (35%) GPs stated that they had a policy to promptly triage patients who are coughing, and 23 (50%) had a policy for airflow movement in the surgery. All practices appropriately disposed of sharps. Thirty-seven (80%) expressed interest in a seminar on infection control. Conclusions Overall, GPs were aware of infection control precautions. Ultraviolet sterilisers and chlorhexidine are not recommended, however, for sterilisation or high level disinfection of medical instruments, and their use should be discontinued. Hand rubs are underutilised. GPs should implement Transmission Based Precautions to prevent airborne and droplet infections.

  15. Genetic variation of foot-and-mouth disease virus isolates recovered from persistently infected water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Barros, José Júnior F; Malirat, Viviana; Rebello, Moacyr A; Costa, Eliane V; Bergmann, Ingrid E

    2007-02-25

    Genetic variation of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) isolates, serotype O, recovered serially over a 1-year period from persistently infected buffalos was assessed. The persistent state was established experimentally with plaque-purified FMDV, strain O(1)Campos, in five buffalos (Bubalus bubalis). Viral isolates collected from esophageal-pharyngeal (EP) fluids for up to 71 weeks after infection were analyzed at different times by nucleotide sequencing and T(1) RNase oligonucleotide fingerprinting to assess variability in the VP1-coding region and in the complete genome, respectively. Genetic variation increased, although irregularly, with time after infection. The highest values observed for the VP1-coding region and for the whole genome were 2.5% and 1.8%, respectively. High rates of fixation of mutations were observed using both methodologies, reaching values of 0.65 substitutions per nucleotide per year (s/nt/y) and 0.44s/nt/y for nucleotide sequencing and oligonucleotide fingerprinting, respectively, when selected samples recovered at close time periods were analyzed. The data herein indicate that complex mixtures of genotypes may arise during FMDV type O persistent infection in water buffalos, which can act as viral reservoirs and also represent a potential source of viral variants. These results fit within the quasi-species dynamics described for FMDV, in which viral populations are constituted by related, non-identical genomes that evolve independently from each other, and may predominate at a given time.

  16. Application of recombinant Sjc26GST for serodiagnosis of Schistosoma japonicum infection in water buffalo (Bos buffelus).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Po-Ching; Tsaihong, John Chin; Lee, Kin-Mu

    2007-12-25

    Schistosomiasis japonica is currently the most serious parasitic disease in mainland China and it is estimated that several million people are infected. Furthermore, it is also responsible for the deaths of many domestic animals. In order to establish an effective diagnostic method, the gene encoding Sjc26GST was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with His-tag. The purified reSjc26GST was used as an antigen for an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and for immunoblotting detection of Schistosoma japonicum antibodies in water buffaloes. Our results showed that mean OD values of specific serum IgG antibodies from egg-positive buffaloes were 3.37-fold higher than what was found in egg-negative buffaloes from non-endemic areas. The data also showed the OD value of the endemic egg-negative group reached as high as 1.69 times as that found in non-endemic areas. The positivity rate of egg-positive buffaloes was 100%, but was 30.3% in the endemic egg-negative group. Infected bovine antisera also recognized reSjc26GST, a 27kDa protein as determined by Western blot. These results suggest that the recombinant GST expressed in E. coli should be an effective diagnostic reagent for detection of antibody against S. japonicum in buffaloes. Due to straightforward production, excellent sensitivity and high specificity, the reSjc26GST described in this study can be considered as a candidate protein for immunological diagnosis of bovine schistosomiasis. Developing reSjc26GST, with its potential diagnostic values, will be useful for diagnosis and surveillance of schistosomiasis in controlling the spread of this parasitic disease in domestic animals.

  17. Utility of a fecal real-time PCR protocol for detection of Mycobacterium bovis infection in African buffalo (Syncerus caffer).

    PubMed

    Roug, Annette; Geoghegan, Claire; Wellington, Elizabeth; Miller, Woutrina A; Travis, Emma; Porter, David; Cooper, David; Clifford, Deana L; Mazet, Jonna A K; Parsons, Sven

    2014-01-01

    A real-time PCR protocol for detecting Mycobacterium bovis in feces was evaluated in bovine tuberculosis-infected African buffalo (Syncerus caffer). Fecal samples spiked with 1.42 × 10(3) cells of M. bovis culture/g and Bacille Calmette-Guérin standards with 1.58 × 10(1) genome copies/well were positive by real-time PCR but all field samples were negative.

  18. Detection of multiple viral infections in cattle and buffalo with suspected vesicular disease in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Laguardia-Nascimento, Mateus; Sales, Érica Bravo; Gasparini, Marcela Ribeiro; de Souza, Natália Mendes; da Silva, Josiane Aparecida Gonçalina; Souza, Giovana Gonçalves; Carani, Fernanda Rezek; Dos Santos, Alyane Figueiredo; Rivetti Júnior, Anselmo Vasconcelos; Camargos, Marcelo Fernandes; Fonseca Júnior, Antônio Augusto

    2016-07-01

    Vesicular diseases are of high importance for livestock, primarily because of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), which is a high-morbidity disease that generates direct losses caused by low milk production, weight loss, and indirect losses because of the need for sanitary barriers. Other vesicular diseases are also of importance for livestock because of direct impacts or because their clinical signs may be confused with those of FMD. We report herein the detection of multiple infections in cattle with suspected vesicular disease in the Brazilian states of Amazonas (AM), Mato Grosso (MT), and Roraima. Thirty-seven epithelial samples from cattle and 1 sample from a buffalo were sent to the laboratory for testing for FMDV and similar disease agents. All samples from MT were positive for parapoxvirus (Pseudocowpox virus and Bovine papular stomatitis virus). In addition, 3 samples were positive for Bluetongue virus, and 5 samples were positive for Bovine herpesvirus 1 Among these samples, 1 was positive for all of these 3 agents. Only 2 samples from AM were negative for parapoxvirus. The molecular tests conducted in this study detected multiple infections, with a high prevalence of parapoxvirus. PMID:27154321

  19. Effect on quarter milk somatic cell count and antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus rostri causing intramammary infection in dairy water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, C; Piepers, S; De Vliegher, S; Barberio, A; Supré, K; Scaccabarozzi, L; Pisoni, G; Bronzo, V; Haesebrouck, F; Moroni, P

    2013-06-01

    In many parts of the world, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are the predominant cause of intramammary infections (IMI) in dairy cows and in water buffaloes, as well. A longitudinal field study was carried out on one well-managed dairy water buffalo herd to determine the prevalence and distribution of CNS and a recently described CNS-species, Staphylococcus rostri, in milk samples to explore its relevance for buffaloes' udder health throughout lactation, and to gain insight into the susceptibility of the latter species toward commonly used antimicrobials. Twice weekly quarter milk samples from a cohort of 11 lactating water buffaloes were collected over an 8-mo period. The CNS (n=109; 76.2% of all culture-positive samples) were the predominant pathogens causing IMI, followed by Corynebacterium bovis (n=11; 7.6%) and Streptococcus spp. (n=9; 6.2%) other than Stretococcus uberis (n=2; 1.4%). Thirty-seven hemolytic staphylococci suspected to be Staphylococcus aureus were further differentiated using transfer DNA-intergenic spacer-PCR and rpoB-gene sequencing because they were coagulase-negative. Thirty-three of those isolates were identified as Staph. rostri, whereas 2 others were identified as Staphylococcus epidermidis. None of the Staph. rostri isolates displayed resistance to the antimicrobial agents tested. Mean quarter milk somatic cell count (qSCC) of all samples collected throughout lactation was 20,970 cells/mL. The qSCC at sampling of quarters infected with Staph. rostri (34,466 cells/mL) and CNS other than Staph. rostri (34,813 cells/mL) were significantly higher than the qSCC of noninfected quarters (20,287 cells/mL), yet not significantly different from each other. These findings provide novel insight into the prevalence and distribution, antimicrobial susceptibility, and relevance of Staph. rostri compared with other CNS species causing IMI in water buffaloes. Further studies are needed to pinpoint the relevance, niches, and transmission routes of

  20. Mannose-binding lectin haplotypes influence Brucella abortus infection in the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Capparelli, R; Parlato, M; Amoroso, M G; Roperto, S; Marabelli, R; Roperto, F; Iannelli, D

    2008-04-01

    A case-control study established that the haplotype pair HYA/HYA at the MBL (mannose binding lectin) locus of water buffalo is associated with resistance to Brucella abortus infection (P < 10(-7)) and the haplotype pairs LYD/LYD with susceptibility to the same pathogen (P < 10(-7)). The subjects included in the present study were tested twice-at a 1-month interval-for the presence of anti-B. abortus antibodies in the serum by agglutination, complement fixation and flow cytometry. Cases (335 subjects) included animals consistently positive to all these tests; controls (335 subjects) comprised animals exposed yet negative by the same tests. The serum from genetically resistant subjects displayed in vitro significantly higher antibacterial activity compared to the serum from genetically susceptible subjects, lending biological significance to the results from the association study. Inhibition of the antibacterial activity following heat treatment of the serum, addition of specific MBL inhibitors (EDTA, mannose, N-acetyl-D: -glucosamine) or anti-human MBL antiserum provide convincing evidence that the antibacterial activity present in the serum results from the interaction between MBL and B. abortus. A replication study (comprising 100 cases and 100 controls) confirmed the results from the original study.

  1. First Molecular Characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. Infecting Buffalo Calves in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Monally C C; Widmer, Giovanni; Zucatto, Anaiza S; Viol, Milena A; Inácio, Sandra V; Nakamura, Alex A; Coelho, Willian M D; Perri, Silvia H V; Meireles, Marcelo V; Bresciani, Katia D S

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of determining the occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp., 222 fecal samples were collected from Murrah buffalo calves aged up to 6 mo. Fecal DNA was genotyped with a nested polymerase chain reaction targeting the 18S rRNA gene and sequencing of the amplified fragment. Nested 18S PCR was positive for 48.2% of the samples. Sequence analysis showed that the most frequent species in these animals was Cryptosporidium ryanae, which was present in buffalo calves as young as 5 d. The zoonotic species Cryptosporidium parvum was detected in one animal. An uncommon Cryptosporidium 18S genotype was found in buffaloes.

  2. First Molecular Characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. Infecting Buffalo Calves in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Monally C C; Widmer, Giovanni; Zucatto, Anaiza S; Viol, Milena A; Inácio, Sandra V; Nakamura, Alex A; Coelho, Willian M D; Perri, Silvia H V; Meireles, Marcelo V; Bresciani, Katia D S

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of determining the occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp., 222 fecal samples were collected from Murrah buffalo calves aged up to 6 mo. Fecal DNA was genotyped with a nested polymerase chain reaction targeting the 18S rRNA gene and sequencing of the amplified fragment. Nested 18S PCR was positive for 48.2% of the samples. Sequence analysis showed that the most frequent species in these animals was Cryptosporidium ryanae, which was present in buffalo calves as young as 5 d. The zoonotic species Cryptosporidium parvum was detected in one animal. An uncommon Cryptosporidium 18S genotype was found in buffaloes. PMID:25941018

  3. Ultrastructural observation and gene expression profiling of Schistosoma japonicum derived from two natural reservoir hosts, water buffalo and yellow cattle.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianmei; Feng, Xingang; Fu, Zhiqiang; Yuan, Chunxiu; Hong, Yang; Shi, Yaojun; Zhang, Min; Liu, Jinming; Li, Hao; Lu, Ke; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2012-01-01

    Water buffalo and yellow cattle are the two of the most important natural reservoir hosts for Schistosoma japonicum in endemic areas of China, although their susceptibility differs, with water buffalo being less conducive to the growth and development of S. japonicum. Results from the current study show that the general morphology and ultrastructure of adult schistosomes derived from the two hosts also differed. Using high-throughput microarray technology, we also compared the gene expression profiles of adult schistosomes derived from the two hosts. We identified genes that were differentially expressed in worms from the two natural hosts. Further analysis revealed that genes associated with protein kinase and phosphatase, the stimulus response, and lipid and nucleotide metabolism were overexpressed, whereas genes associated with reproduction, anatomical structure morphogenesis and multifunctional motif were underexpressed in schistosomes from water buffalo. These differentially expressed genes were mainly involved in nucleotide, energy, lipid metabolism, energy metabolism, transcription, transport and signaling pathway. This suggests that they are key molecules affecting the survival and development of schistosomes in different natural host species. The results of this study add to current understanding of the interplay between parasites and their natural hosts, and provide valuable information for the screening of vaccine candidates or new drug targets against schistosomiasis in the natural reservoir hosts in endemic areas.

  4. The African buffalo parasite Theileria. sp. (buffalo) can infect and immortalize cattle leukocytes and encodes divergent orthologues of Theileria parva antigen genes.

    PubMed

    Bishop, R P; Hemmink, J D; Morrison, W I; Weir, W; Toye, P G; Sitt, T; Spooner, P R; Musoke, A J; Skilton, R A; Odongo, D O

    2015-12-01

    African Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is the wildlife reservoir of multiple species within the apicomplexan protozoan genus Theileria, including Theileria parva which causes East coast fever in cattle. A parasite, which has not yet been formally named, known as Theileria sp. (buffalo) has been recognized as a potentially distinct species based on rDNA sequence, since 1993. We demonstrate using reverse line blot (RLB) and sequencing of 18S rDNA genes, that in an area where buffalo and cattle co-graze and there is a heavy tick challenge, T. sp. (buffalo) can frequently be isolated in culture from cattle leukocytes. We also show that T. sp. (buffalo), which is genetically very closely related to T. parva, according to 18s rDNA sequence, has a conserved orthologue of the polymorphic immunodominant molecule (PIM) that forms the basis of the diagnostic ELISA used for T. parva serological detection. Closely related orthologues of several CD8 T cell target antigen genes are also shared with T. parva. By contrast, orthologues of the T. parva p104 and the p67 sporozoite surface antigens could not be amplified by PCR from T. sp. (buffalo), using conserved primers designed from the corresponding T. parva sequences. Collectively the data re-emphasise doubts regarding the value of rDNA sequence data alone for defining apicomplexan species in the absence of additional data. 'Deep 454 pyrosequencing' of DNA from two Theileria sporozoite stabilates prepared from Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks fed on buffalo failed to detect T. sp. (buffalo). This strongly suggests that R. appendiculatus may not be a vector for T. sp. (buffalo). Collectively, the data provides further evidence that T. sp. (buffalo). is a distinct species from T. parva. PMID:26543804

  5. The African buffalo parasite Theileria. sp. (buffalo) can infect and immortalize cattle leukocytes and encodes divergent orthologues of Theileria parva antigen genes

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, R.P.; Hemmink, J.D.; Morrison, W.I.; Weir, W.; Toye, P.G.; Sitt, T.; Spooner, P.R.; Musoke, A.J.; Skilton, R.A.; Odongo, D.O.

    2015-01-01

    African Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is the wildlife reservoir of multiple species within the apicomplexan protozoan genus Theileria, including Theileria parva which causes East coast fever in cattle. A parasite, which has not yet been formally named, known as Theileria sp. (buffalo) has been recognized as a potentially distinct species based on rDNA sequence, since 1993. We demonstrate using reverse line blot (RLB) and sequencing of 18S rDNA genes, that in an area where buffalo and cattle co-graze and there is a heavy tick challenge, T. sp. (buffalo) can frequently be isolated in culture from cattle leukocytes. We also show that T. sp. (buffalo), which is genetically very closely related to T. parva, according to 18s rDNA sequence, has a conserved orthologue of the polymorphic immunodominant molecule (PIM) that forms the basis of the diagnostic ELISA used for T. parva serological detection. Closely related orthologues of several CD8 T cell target antigen genes are also shared with T. parva. By contrast, orthologues of the T. parva p104 and the p67 sporozoite surface antigens could not be amplified by PCR from T. sp. (buffalo), using conserved primers designed from the corresponding T. parva sequences. Collectively the data re-emphasise doubts regarding the value of rDNA sequence data alone for defining apicomplexan species in the absence of additional data. ‘Deep 454 pyrosequencing’ of DNA from two Theileria sporozoite stabilates prepared from Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks fed on buffalo failed to detect T. sp. (buffalo). This strongly suggests that R. appendiculatus may not be a vector for T. sp. (buffalo). Collectively, the data provides further evidence that T. sp. (buffalo). is a distinct species from T. parva. PMID:26543804

  6. Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors of Toxocara vitulorum Infections in Buffalo and Cattle Calves in Three Provinces of Central Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Dorny, Pierre; Devleesschauwer, Brecht; Stoliaroff, Valérie; Sothy, Meas; Chea, Rortana; Chea, Bunthon; Sourloing, Hor; Samuth, Sum; Kong, Seth; Nguong, Koemseang; Sorn, San; Holl, Davun; Vercruysse, Jozef

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence and associated risk factors of Toxocara vitulorum infection in buffalo and cattle calves was studied in 3 provinces in central Cambodia. Fecal samples were collected from 517 calves between the age of 1-15 weeks and processed for nematode egg counts by a modified McMaster method. A total of 64 calves were found to excrete T. vitulorum eggs in their feces (12.4%; 95% exact CI: 9.7-15.5). The mean fecal egg count was 2,798 EPG (SD=16,351; range=0-224,400). A multivariable generalized linear mixed model showed higher odds of T. vitulorum infection for buffalo versus cattle, for animals aged 4-8 weeks versus younger and older ones, and for animals with strongyle infection. There was no association with fecal consistency. Farmers should be aware of the potential impact of T. vitulorum , and treat their calves at the age of 2-3 weeks with anthelmintics such as benzimidazoles or pyrantel.

  7. Evaluation of an Indirect-ELISA Test for Trypanosoma evansi Infection (Surra) in Buffaloes and Its Application to a Serological Survey in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Kocher, Arthur; Desquesnes, Marc; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Yangtara, Sarawut; Leboucher, Emilye; Rodtian, Pranee; Dargantes, Alan; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn

    2015-01-01

    Surra, caused by Trypanosoma evansi, is a neglected disease due to frequent subclinical evolution, especially in bovines in Asia. However, acute and chronic signs are regularly observed, with significant sanitary and economic impacts. In this study, we evaluated and applied an indirect-ELISA test for the detection of anti-T. evansi immunoglobulin G in buffaloes using antibovine conjugate. Based on buffalo reference sera from the Philippines, a two-graph receiver operating characteristics analysis (TG-ROC) was conducted to define an optimal cut-off value; sensitivity and specificity were estimated at 92.5% and 94.2%, respectively. A cross-sectional serological survey was carried out in the major buffalo breeding areas of Thailand; 892 buffaloes from 8 provinces were sampled in North, Northeastern, and Southern Thailand. Seropositive buffaloes were found in all 8 provinces, on 20.3% of farms for an overall prevalence of 12.2% (95% CI 10.2–14.5%). Nearly one-third of the sampled population was exposed to infection. Broader sampling would be necessary but is not possible in the southern half-wild breeding systems. According to our results, buffaloes may constitute a large and robust reservoir for T. evansi, which is a permanent threat to other livestock such as cattle and horses as well as wild animals such as elephants in Southest Asia. PMID:26101772

  8. Sarcocystis dubeyi (Huong and Uggla, 1999) infection in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) from Egypt.

    PubMed

    Hilali, M; El-Seify, M; Zayed, A; El-Morsey, A; Dubey, J P

    2011-06-01

    Water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) are intermediate hosts for 4 species of Sarcocystis , i.e., Sarcocystis fusiformis and Sarcocystis buffalonis with cats as definitive hosts; Sarcocystis levinei with dogs as definitive hosts; and Sarcocystis dubeyi with an unknown definitive host but thought to be zoonotic. Currently, the latter species has been identified with certainty only from Vietnam. In the present study, sarcocysts of S. dubeyi are reported in 11 (30%) of 35 Egyptian water buffaloes from which the esophageal muscles were examined histologically. Sarcocysts were microscopic, measuring 180-250 × 70-110 µm in size. Ultrastructurally, the sarcocyst wall was 3.5-6.5 µm thick and had palisade-like villar protrusions which give it a striated appearance. The villar protrusions contained microtubules that were distributed along the whole villus. This is the first report of S. dubeyi from water buffaloes in Egypt.

  9. Sarcocystis dubeyi (Huong and Uggla, 1999) infection in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) from Egypt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) are intermediate hosts for 4 species of Sarcocystis, i.e., S. fusiformis and S. buffalonis with cats as definitive hosts, S. levinei with dogs as definitive hosts, and S. dubeyi with an unknown definitive host, but thought to be zoonotic. Currently, the latter speci...

  10. Field application of immunoassays for the detection of Mycobacterium bovis infection in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer).

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, E M D L; Jenkins, A O; Cooper, D V; Rutten, V P M G; Michel, A L

    2016-01-01

    The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is considered the most important maintenance host of bovine tuberculosis (BTB) in wildlife in Southern Africa. The diagnosis of Mycobacterium bovis infection in this species mostly relies on the single intradermal comparative tuberculin test (SICTT). As an alternative, the BOVIGAM® 1G, an interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assay, is frequently used. The test performance of cell-mediated immunity (CMI-) and humoral immunity (HI-) based assays for the detection of M. bovis infections in buffaloes was compared to identify the test or test combination that provided the highest sensitivity in the study. Buffaloes were sampled during the annual BTB SICTT testing in the Hluhluwe-iMfolozi-Park (KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa) during June 2013. A total of 35 animals were subjected to the SICTT, 13 of these tested positive and one showed an inconclusive reaction. CMI-based assays (BOVIGAM® 1G (B1G) and BOVIGAM® 2G (B2G)) as well as a serological assay (IDEXX TB ELISA) were used to further investigate and compare immune responsiveness. Thirteen SICTT positive buffaloes and one inconclusive reactor were slaughtered and a post-mortem (PM) examination was conducted to confirm BTB. Lesions characteristic of BTB were found in 8/14 animals (57.1%). Test results of individual assays were compared with serial and parallel test interpretation and the sensitivity was calculated as a percentage of test positives out of the number of SICTT positive animals with granulomatous lesions (relative sensitivity). The B1G assay showed the highest individual sensitivity (100%; 8/8) followed by the B2G assay (75%; 6/8) and the IDEXX TB ELISA (37.5%; 3/8). Therefore, using in parallel interpretation, any combination with the B1G showed a sensitivity of 100% (8/8), whereas combinations with the B2G showed a 75% sensitivity (6/8). Out of the 21 SICTT negative animals, 7 animals showed responsiveness in the B2G or IDEXX TB ELISA. In conclusion, this study has shown

  11. Field application of immunoassays for the detection of Mycobacterium bovis infection in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer).

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, E M D L; Jenkins, A O; Cooper, D V; Rutten, V P M G; Michel, A L

    2016-01-01

    The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is considered the most important maintenance host of bovine tuberculosis (BTB) in wildlife in Southern Africa. The diagnosis of Mycobacterium bovis infection in this species mostly relies on the single intradermal comparative tuberculin test (SICTT). As an alternative, the BOVIGAM® 1G, an interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assay, is frequently used. The test performance of cell-mediated immunity (CMI-) and humoral immunity (HI-) based assays for the detection of M. bovis infections in buffaloes was compared to identify the test or test combination that provided the highest sensitivity in the study. Buffaloes were sampled during the annual BTB SICTT testing in the Hluhluwe-iMfolozi-Park (KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa) during June 2013. A total of 35 animals were subjected to the SICTT, 13 of these tested positive and one showed an inconclusive reaction. CMI-based assays (BOVIGAM® 1G (B1G) and BOVIGAM® 2G (B2G)) as well as a serological assay (IDEXX TB ELISA) were used to further investigate and compare immune responsiveness. Thirteen SICTT positive buffaloes and one inconclusive reactor were slaughtered and a post-mortem (PM) examination was conducted to confirm BTB. Lesions characteristic of BTB were found in 8/14 animals (57.1%). Test results of individual assays were compared with serial and parallel test interpretation and the sensitivity was calculated as a percentage of test positives out of the number of SICTT positive animals with granulomatous lesions (relative sensitivity). The B1G assay showed the highest individual sensitivity (100%; 8/8) followed by the B2G assay (75%; 6/8) and the IDEXX TB ELISA (37.5%; 3/8). Therefore, using in parallel interpretation, any combination with the B1G showed a sensitivity of 100% (8/8), whereas combinations with the B2G showed a 75% sensitivity (6/8). Out of the 21 SICTT negative animals, 7 animals showed responsiveness in the B2G or IDEXX TB ELISA. In conclusion, this study has shown

  12. Bovine papillomavirus type 2 infection and microscopic patterns of urothelial tumors of the urinary bladder in water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Maiolino, Paola; Ozkul, Ayhan; Sepici-Dincel, Aylin; Roperto, Franco; Yücel, Gözde; Russo, Valeria; Urraro, Chiara; Lucà, Roberta; Riccardi, Marita Georgia; Martano, Manuela; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe; Esposito, Iolanda; Roperto, Sante

    2013-01-01

    Microscopic patterns of thirty-four urothelial tumors of the urinary bladder of water buffaloes from the Marmara and Black Sea Regions of Turkey are here described. All the animals grazed on lands rich in bracken fern. Histological diagnosis was assessed using morphological parameters recently suggested for the urinary bladder tumors of cattle. Papillary carcinoma was the most common neoplastic lesion (22/34) observed in this study, and low-grade carcinoma was more common (seventeen cases) than high-grade carcinoma (five cases). Papilloma, papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP), and invasive carcinomas were less frequently seen. Carcinoma in situ (CIS) was often detected associated with some papillary and invasive carcinomas. De novo (primary) CIS was rare representing 3% of tumors of this series. A peculiar feature of the most urothelial tumors was the presence in the tumor stroma of immune cells anatomically organized in tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs). Bovine papillomavirus type-2 (PV-2) E5 oncoprotein was detected by molecular and immunohistochemistry procedures. Early protein, E2, and late protein, L1, were also detected by immunohistochemical studies. Morphological and molecular findings show that BPV-2 infection contributes to the development of urothelial bladder carcinogenesis also in water buffaloes.

  13. Bovine Papillomavirus Type 2 Infection and Microscopic Patterns of Urothelial Tumors of the Urinary Bladder in Water Buffaloes

    PubMed Central

    Maiolino, Paola; Özkul, Ayhan; Sepici-Dincel, Aylin; Roperto, Franco; Yücel, Gözde; Russo, Valeria; Urraro, Chiara; Lucà, Roberta; Riccardi, Marita Georgia; Martano, Manuela; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe; Esposito, Iolanda; Roperto, Sante

    2013-01-01

    Microscopic patterns of thirty-four urothelial tumors of the urinary bladder of water buffaloes from the Marmara and Black Sea Regions of Turkey are here described. All the animals grazed on lands rich in bracken fern. Histological diagnosis was assessed using morphological parameters recently suggested for the urinary bladder tumors of cattle. Papillary carcinoma was the most common neoplastic lesion (22/34) observed in this study, and low-grade carcinoma was more common (seventeen cases) than high-grade carcinoma (five cases). Papilloma, papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP), and invasive carcinomas were less frequently seen. Carcinoma in situ (CIS) was often detected associated with some papillary and invasive carcinomas. De novo (primary) CIS was rare representing 3% of tumors of this series. A peculiar feature of the most urothelial tumors was the presence in the tumor stroma of immune cells anatomically organized in tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs). Bovine papillomavirus type-2 (PV-2) E5 oncoprotein was detected by molecular and immunohistochemistry procedures. Early protein, E2, and late protein, L1, were also detected by immunohistochemical studies. Morphological and molecular findings show that BPV-2 infection contributes to the development of urothelial bladder carcinogenesis also in water buffaloes. PMID:23762866

  14. Bovine papillomavirus type 2 infects the urinary bladder of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and plays a crucial role in bubaline urothelial carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Roperto, Sante; Russo, Valeria; Ozkul, Ayhan; Sepici-Dincel, Aylin; Maiolino, Paola; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe; Marcus, Ioan; Esposito, Iolanda; Riccardi, Marita Georgia; Roperto, Franco

    2013-02-01

    Bovine papillomavirus type 2 (BPV-2) has been shown to infect and play a role in urinary bladder carcinogenesis of buffaloes grazed on pastures with ferns from the Marmara and Black Sea Regions of Turkey. BPV-2 DNA has been found in both neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions of the urinary bladder. Furthermore, this virus may be a normal inhabitant of the urinary bladder since BPV-2 DNA has also been detected in clinically normal buffaloes. The viral activation by fern immunosuppressant or carcinogen may trigger the urothelial cell transformation. The E5 oncoprotein was solely detected in urothelial tumours and appeared to be co-localized with the overexpressed and phosphorylated platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) β receptor in a double-colour immunofluorescence assay. Our results indicate that the E5-PDGF β receptor interaction also occurs in spontaneous tumours of the bubaline urinary bladder, revealing an additional role of BPV-2 in bladder carcinogenesis of buffaloes.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Transcriptional Profiles of Adult Schistosoma japonicum from Different Laboratory Animals and the Natural Host, Water Buffalo

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chuang; Hou, Nan; Chen, Qijun

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is one of the most widely distributed parasitic diseases in the world. Schistosoma japonicum, a zoonotic parasite with a wide range of mammalian hosts, is one of the major pathogens of this disease. Although numerous studies on schistosomiasis japonica have been performed using laboratory animal models, systematic comparative analysis of whole-genome expression profiles in parasites from different laboratory animals and nature mammalian hosts is lacking to date. Methodology/Principal Findings Adult schistosomes were obtained from laboratory animals BALB/c mice, C57BL/6 mice, New Zealand white rabbits and the natural host, water buffaloes. The gene expression profiles of schistosomes from these animals were obtained and compared by genome-wide oligonucleotide microarray analysis. The results revealed that the gene expression profiles of schistosomes from different laboratory animals and buffaloes were highly consistent (r>0.98) genome-wide. Meanwhile, a total of 450 genes were identified to be differentially expressed in schistosomes which can be clustered into six groups. Pathway analysis revealed that these genes were mainly involved in multiple signal transduction pathways, amino acid, energy, nucleotide and lipid metabolism. We also identified a group of 1,540 abundantly and stably expressed gene products in adult worms, including a panel of 179 Schistosoma- or Platyhelminthes-specific genes that may be essential for parasitism and may be regarded as novel potential anti-parasite intervention targets for future research. Conclusions/Significance This study provides a comprehensive database of gene expression profiles of schistosomes derived from different laboratory animals and water buffaloes. An expanded number of genes potentially affecting the development of schistosomes in different animals were identified. These findings lay the foundation for schistosomiasis research in different laboratory animals and natural hosts at the

  16. Involvement of the nervous system following experimental infection with Pasteurella multocida B:2 in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis): A clinicopathological study.

    PubMed

    Marza, Ali Dhiaa; Jesse, Faez Firdaus Abdullah; Ahmed, Ihsan Muneer; Chung, Eric Lim Teik; Ibrahim, Hayder Hamzah; Zamri-Saad, Mohd; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Abu Bakar, Md Zuki; Saharee, Abdul Aziz; Haron, Abdul Wahid; Alwan, Mohammed Jwaid; Lila, Mohd Azmi Mohd

    2016-04-01

    Haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) is an acute, fatal, septicaemic disease of cattle and buffaloes caused by one of two specific serotypes of Pasteurella multocida B:2 and E:2 in Asian and African, respectively. It is well known that HS affect mainly the respiratory and digestive tracts. However, involvement of the nervous system in pathogenesis of HS has been reported in previous studies without details. In this study, nine buffalo calves of 8 months old were distributed into three groups. Animals of Group 1 and 2 were inoculated orally and subcutaneously with 10 ml of 1 × 10(12) cfu/ml of P. multocida B:2, respectively, while animals of Group 3 were inoculated orally with 10 ml of phosphate buffer saline as a control. All calves in Group 1 and Group 3 were euthanised after 504 h (21 day) post-infection, while calves in Group 2 had to euthanise after 12 h post-infection as they develop sever clinical signs of HS. Significant differences were found in Group 2 in the mean scores of clinical signs, gross and histopathological changes which mainly affect different anatomic regions of the nervous system. In addition, successful bacterial isolation of P. multocida B:2 were obtained from different sites of the nervous system. On the other hand, less sever, clinical, gross and histopathological changes were found in Group 1. These results provide for the first time strong evidence of involving of the nervous system in pathogenesis of HS, especially in the peracute stage of the disease. PMID:26850845

  17. Infection of African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) by oryx bacillus, a rare member of the antelope clade of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C; Perrett, Keith D; Michel, Anita L; Keet, Dewald F; Hlokwe, Tiny; Streicher, Elizabeth M; Warren, Robin M; van Helden, Paul D

    2012-10-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species cause tuberculosis disease in animals and humans. Although they share 99.9% similarity at the nucleotide level, several host-adapted ecotypes of the tubercule bacilli have been identified. In the wildlife setting, probably the most well-known member of this complex is Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis. The recently described oryx bacillus is an extremely rare slow-growing member of the antelope clade of the M. tuberculosis complex and is closely related to the dassie bacillus, Mycobacterium africanum and Mycobacterium microti. The antelope clade is a group of strains apparently host adapted to antelopes, as most described infections were associated with deer and antelope, most specifically the Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx). In this study, oryx bacillus was isolated from a free-ranging adult female African buffalo (Syncerus caffer), in good physical condition, which tested strongly positive on three consecutive comparative intradermal tuberculin tests. Upon necropsy, a single pulmonary granuloma and an active retropharyngeal lymph node was found. Comprehensive molecular genetic assays were performed, which confirmed that the causative microorganism was not M. bovis but oryx bacillus. Oryx bacillus has never been reported in Southern Africa and has never been found to infect African buffalo. The identification of this microorganism in buffalo is an important observation in view of the large and ever-increasing epidemic of the closely related M. tuberculosis complex species M. bovis in some African buffalo populations in South Africa. PMID:23060486

  18. Protective effects of natural rotavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, F Raúl

    2009-03-01

    Rotavirus is a ubiquitous infection that is the leading cause of severe diarrhea worldwide. Severe infections are most commonly observed in the first 2 years of life. Rotavirus-induced diarrhea is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality rates and socioeconomic costs with adverse outcomes particularly prevalent in developing countries. The natural history of rotavirus infection can provide guidance for the development and optimization of an effective vaccine. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that children who acquire natural rotavirus infections develop immunity to subsequent infections, with the protective effect increasing with each natural infection. Natural infections also decrease the severity of any subsequent rotavirus infections. Notably, asymptomatic infections provide protection similar to that induced by symptomatic infections. Data also suggest that the antibody response to natural infection is heterotypic, and therefore may provide protection against multiple serotypes. These data suggest that the development of a vaccine that produces asymptomatic infection at an optimal time point may provide effective immunity. An effective vaccine should mimic protection provided by natural infection and provide protection against the most common rotavirus serotypes (ie, G1, G2, G3, G4, G9) and be able to decrease disease severity, reduce hospitalizations, and decrease disease-related costs.

  19. Molecular and serological detection of Babesia bovis- and Babesia bigemina-infection in bovines and water buffaloes raised jointly in an endemic field.

    PubMed

    Romero-Salas, Dora; Mira, Anabela; Mosqueda, Juan; García-Vázquez, Zeferino; Hidalgo-Ruiz, Mario; Vela, Noot Aditya Ortiz; de León, Adalberto Angel Perez; Florin-Christensen, Monica; Schnittger, Leonhard

    2016-02-15

    Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina are causative agents of bovine babesiosis, a tick-borne disease of cattle in tropical and subtropical regions. Babesia spp. infection adversely affects cattle health and can be fatal resulting in considerable economic loss worldwide. Under endemic stability conditions, herds contain high numbers of chronically infected, asymptomatic carrier animals, in which no parasitemia is detected by microscopic blood smear examination. In addition to bovines, also water buffaloes are infected by both Babesia spp. commonly leading to a subclinical infection. The infection rate (by nPCR) and herd exposure (by IFAT) of bovines and water buffaloes reared under similar field conditions in an area of endemic stability were determined and compared. In order to optimize direct parasite detection, highly sensitive nPCR assays were developed and applied, allowing the detection of as little as 0.1 fg DNA of each Babesia pathogen. Significantly lower percentages (p<0.001) of seropositive water buffaloes compared to bovines were observed for B. bovis (71.4% vs. 98%) and B. bigemina (85% vs. 100%). Interestingly, in comparison, differences noticed between water buffaloes and bovines were considerably larger with direct parasite detection by nPCR (16.2% vs. 82.3% and 24% vs. 94.1% for B. bovis and B. bigemina, respectively). As expected, bovines subjected to monthly acaricide applications exhibited a significant lower infection rate as determined by nPCR than bovines not subjected to these measures (B. bovis 33.3% vs. 90.7%, p<0.001; B. bigemina 80% vs. 96.5%, p<0.001, for treated vs. untreated animals). Interestingly no differences between these groups were observed with respect to seropositivity, suggesting similar rates of parasite exposure (B. bovis 100% vs. 97.7%, p<0.001; B. bigemina 100% vs. 100%, p<0.001). Importantly, a significantly higher number of water buffaloes as determined by nPCR were infected when reared jointly with bovines not subjected

  20. Molecular and serological detection of Babesia bovis- and Babesia bigemina-infection in bovines and water buffaloes raised jointly in an endemic field.

    PubMed

    Romero-Salas, Dora; Mira, Anabela; Mosqueda, Juan; García-Vázquez, Zeferino; Hidalgo-Ruiz, Mario; Vela, Noot Aditya Ortiz; de León, Adalberto Angel Perez; Florin-Christensen, Monica; Schnittger, Leonhard

    2016-02-15

    Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina are causative agents of bovine babesiosis, a tick-borne disease of cattle in tropical and subtropical regions. Babesia spp. infection adversely affects cattle health and can be fatal resulting in considerable economic loss worldwide. Under endemic stability conditions, herds contain high numbers of chronically infected, asymptomatic carrier animals, in which no parasitemia is detected by microscopic blood smear examination. In addition to bovines, also water buffaloes are infected by both Babesia spp. commonly leading to a subclinical infection. The infection rate (by nPCR) and herd exposure (by IFAT) of bovines and water buffaloes reared under similar field conditions in an area of endemic stability were determined and compared. In order to optimize direct parasite detection, highly sensitive nPCR assays were developed and applied, allowing the detection of as little as 0.1 fg DNA of each Babesia pathogen. Significantly lower percentages (p<0.001) of seropositive water buffaloes compared to bovines were observed for B. bovis (71.4% vs. 98%) and B. bigemina (85% vs. 100%). Interestingly, in comparison, differences noticed between water buffaloes and bovines were considerably larger with direct parasite detection by nPCR (16.2% vs. 82.3% and 24% vs. 94.1% for B. bovis and B. bigemina, respectively). As expected, bovines subjected to monthly acaricide applications exhibited a significant lower infection rate as determined by nPCR than bovines not subjected to these measures (B. bovis 33.3% vs. 90.7%, p<0.001; B. bigemina 80% vs. 96.5%, p<0.001, for treated vs. untreated animals). Interestingly no differences between these groups were observed with respect to seropositivity, suggesting similar rates of parasite exposure (B. bovis 100% vs. 97.7%, p<0.001; B. bigemina 100% vs. 100%, p<0.001). Importantly, a significantly higher number of water buffaloes as determined by nPCR were infected when reared jointly with bovines not subjected

  1. A duplex PCR-based assay for simultaneous detection of Trypanosoma evansi and Theileria annulata infections in water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Sudan, Vikrant; Jaiswal, Amit Kumar; Parashar, Rahul; Shanker, Daya

    2015-06-01

    Trypanosomosis and bovine tropical theileriosis are important vector-borne protozoan diseases imposing some of the serious constraints on the health and productivity of domestic cattle in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Following recovery from primary infection of both these conditions, animals become persistent carriers and act as reservoirs of infection thereby playing a critical role in disease epidemiology. The present study describes development and evaluation of duplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for simultaneous detection of Trypanosoma evansi and Theileria annulata in buffaloes. Following in silico screening for candidate target genes representing each of the pathogens, an optimized duplex PCR assay was established using TBR F/R and TAMS F/R as primer sets encoding for products of 164 and 721 bp for T. evansi and T. annulata, respectively. The results were compared and correlated with conventional Giemsa-stained thin blood smear examination and the single PCR assay. The duplex PCR detected each pathogen with the same level of sensitivity, irrespective of whether its DNA was amplified in isolation or together with DNA of another pathogen. Moreover, single and duplex PCRs were able to detect each species with equal sensitivity in serially diluted DNA representing mixtures of T. evansi and T. annulata, and no evidence of nonspecific amplification from nontarget species was observed. The developed assay may be seen as a good tool for epidemiological studies aiming at assessing the burden of dual infections and improving control of the associated diseases in endemic regions.

  2. Diagnosis of Sarcocystis spp. in cattle (Bos taurus) and water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in Northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Jehle, C; Dinkel, A; Sander, A; Morent, M; Romig, T; Luc, P V; De, T V; Thai, V V; Mackenstedt, U

    2009-12-23

    Our aim was to develop a method for species diagnosis and to obtain data on the prevalence of Sarcocystis infections in cattle and water buffalo in the Son La Province of Northern Vietnam. Meat samples of naturally infected animals were examined by light and electron microscopy as well as by molecular methods. A PCR of part of the 18S rDNA gene followed by RFLP analysis was modified to detect infections with different Sarcocystis spp. in cattle and water buffaloes slaughtered in the Son La Province. It showed to be an economical method to detect multiple infections with Sarcocystis spp. Sequence analysis of the PCR amplicons was performed with selected samples and the results were compared with published sequences. With these methods the following Sarcocystis spp. were identified in cattle: Sarcocystis hirsuta, Sarcocystis cruzi and Sarcocystis hominis. Water buffaloes were infected with Sarcocystis fusiformis, S. cruzi, S. hominis and S. hirsuta. The results indicate that Sarcocystis spp. infecting cattle are also able to infect water buffaloes. So the validity of certain Sarcocystis spp. of water buffalo is discussed. Bovine lifestock in Northern Vietnam were commonly infected with Sarcocystis spp.

  3. Molecular and seroepidemiological survey of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina infections in cattle and water buffaloes in the central region of Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Luo, Yuzi; Cao, Shinuo; Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Lan, Dinh Thi Bich; Long, Phung Thang; Yu, Longzheng; Zhou, Mo; Gong, Haiyan; Zhang, Houshuang; Zhou, Jinlin; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Xuan, Xuenan

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, a total of 137 blood samples were collected from cattle and water buffaloes in central region of Vietnam and tested using nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) to determine the molecular and serological prevalence of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina. In cattle, the prevalence of B. bovis and B. bigemina was 21.3% and 16.0% by nPCR, 73.4% and 42.6% by ELISA and 60.6% and 59.6% by IFAT, respectively, whereas those of water buffalos were 23.3% and 0% by nPCR, 37.2% and 9.3% by ELISA and 27.9% and 18.6% by IFAT, respectively. IFAT and ELISA detected a higher number of infected cattle and water buffaloes than nPCR totally. Statistically significant differences in the prevalence of the two infections were observed on the basis of age. Overall, the current data suggest high incidence of B. bovis and B. bigemina infections in the central region of Vietnam, which is needed to develop comprehensive approach to the modern surveillance, diagnosis and control of bovine babesiosis.

  4. Comparative therapeutic effect of toltrazuril, sulphadimidine and amprolium on Eimeria bovis and Eimeria zuernii given at different times following infection in buffalo calves (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Mohamed M; Radwaan, Mervat E; Moustafa, Abdel Moneim M; Ebeid, Mohamed H

    2008-04-17

    We compared the therapeutic effect of three anticoccidial drugs (toltrazuril, sulphadimidine and amprolium) in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) calves experimentally infected with Eimeria bovis (E. bovis) and E. zuernii oocysts (3 x 104oocyst/calf). Buffalo calves (1.5-4 month old, 70-kg body weight) were randomly allocated into 3 groups (9 calves each). Group T was experimentally infected with oocysts and treated with toltrazuril (20 mg/kg BW twice orally at a 1-week interval). Group S was experimentally infected with oocysts and treated with sulphadimidine (125 mg/kg injected IM followed by half dose for 4 successive days). Group A was experimentally infected with oocysts and treated with amprolium (50 mg/kg orally for 7 successive days). Each group had three subgroups (three calves/subgroup) to represent timing of the drug administration: 1st day of coccidia infection (FD), onset of clinical signs of coccidiosis (CC), and onset of oocyst shedding into the faeces (OS). Clinical signs, body-weight gain (BWG) and number of oocysts per gram feces (OPG) were monitored daily for 35 days post-infection (DPI). The OPG were reduced (but the BWG was not different) in the T calves compared to S and A calves. Within the same group, treatment from the 1st day of infection reduced the OPG and increased the BWG compared to the later treatment timings. PMID:18262668

  5. Ultrastructural study of Sarcocystis fusiformis (Railliet, 1897) infecting the Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) of Egypt.

    PubMed

    Ghaffar, F A; Hilali, M; Scholtyseck, E

    1978-09-01

    Sarcocysts from the muscular layer of the oesophagus of 20 Indian water buffaloes (about 7--10 years old) have been collected in Egypt and studied by means of electron microscopy in Bonn (West Germany). Large and small cysts have been observed. The large type ranged from 7--30 X 3--7 mm, and the small cysts measured 1.3--5.1 X 0.7--2.2 mm. The metrocytes of both types of cysts as well as the merozoites were very similar concerning their shape, size and ultrastructural characteristics. The metrocytes of the large and small cysts were mostly located at the peripheral region of the cysts and multiplied by endodyogeny. They were variable in shape and size. They ranged from 7.6 X 4.8 micrometer to 9.2 X 5.4 micrometer. Most of them exhibited deep invaginations of their pellicle. Their cytoplasm was electron pale and often extremely vacuolated. The merozoites of both types of cysts were elongated with a length ranging from 14.6--17.0 micrometer and showed all characteristic organelles of these cells (conoid, rhoptries, micronemes, subpellicular microtubules etc.) The wall of the large and small cysts showed no distinct morphological differences. The great similarities between the walls of the two types of cysts as well as between the micromorphology of the developmental stages (metrocytes and merozoites) lead to the conclusion that the two types of cysts examined may belong to one species of Sarcocystis.

  6. The distribution of Mycobacterium bovis infection in naturally infected badgers.

    PubMed

    Corner, Leigh A L; O'Meara, D; Costello, E; Lesellier, S; Gormley, E

    2012-11-01

    Populations of Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) with tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis infection) are a significant reservoir of infection for cattle in Ireland and the United Kingdom. In this study the distribution of infection, histological lesions and gross lesions was determined in a sample of 132 culled badgers from naturally-infected wild populations. Badgers were culled when an epidemiological investigation following a tuberculosis breakdown in a cattle herd implicated badgers as the probable source of infection. The definition of tuberculosis infection was based on the isolation of M. bovis from tissues or clinical samples. An accurate diagnosis of infection was achieved by culturing a wide range of lymph nodes (LN) and organ tissues (mean 32.1) and clinical samples (faeces and urine) from each badger. Infection was detected in 57/132 badgers (43.2%). Histological lesions consistent with tuberculosis were seen in 39/57 (68.4%) culture-positive and 7/75 (9.3%) culture-negative animals. Gross lesions were seen in only 30/57 (52.6%) infected badgers, leaving a high proportion (47.4%) of infected animals with latent infection (no grossly visible lesions). The most frequently infected tissues were the lungs and axillary LN, followed by the deep cervical LN, parotid LN and tracheobronchial LN. The data support the hypotheses that in badgers there are only two significant routes of infection, namely, the lower respiratory tract and bite wounds, and that badgers are very susceptible to infection but resistant to the development and progression of the disease. At all levels of disease severity, infection was found in widely dispersed anatomical locations suggesting that there is early dissemination of infection in the period preceding the development of active immunity.

  7. Serological & molecular diagnostic surveys combined with examining hematological profiles suggest increased levels of infection & hematological response of cattle to babesiosis infections compared to native buffaloes in Egypt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Babesiosis threatens the development of the cattle and buffaloes industries in Egypt and improved control is needed. The main objectives of this study are surveying the presence of bovine babesiosis in distinct selected bovine and buffalo populations in Egypt using novel molecular and pr...

  8. Immunolocalization of pulmonary intravascular macrophages, TLR4, TLR9 and IL-8 in normal and Pasteurella multocida-infected lungs of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Sethi, R S; Brar, R S; Singh, O; Singh, B

    2011-01-01

    Water buffalo are of considerable economic significance in South East Asia, but these animals suffer from many bacterial respiratory diseases including haemorrhagic septicaemia caused by Pasteurella multocida. Bacterial respiratory diseases of animals cause lung inflammation that is characterized by the activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) expressed on macrophages, expression of chemokines and recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes. Pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs) present in the alveolar septa play a critical role in lung inflammation, but there are no data on the immunolocalization of PIMs or the expression of TLRs and chemokines such as interleukin (IL)-8, in the lungs of water buffalo. The present study compares the occurrence of PIMs, TLR4, TLR9 and IL-8 in the lungs of normal water buffalo and those infected with P. multocida. Labelling of PIMs with the anti-human macrophage antibody (MCA874G) demonstrated an increase in this population in inflamed lungs. TLR4 and IL-8 were detected in the alveolar septa, airway epithelium and endothelium of large blood vessels of normal lungs. TLR9 expression was similar to that of TLR4, but TLR9 was not expressed by the endothelium of arteries and veins. While the expression of TLR9 and IL-8 was increased in the inflamed lungs compared with normal lungs, TLR4 labelling intensity remained unchanged or was reduced. The expression of these molecules potentially plays a role in the regulation of lung inflammation.

  9. Prevalence and distribution patterns of Sarcocystis spp. in buffaloes in Beni-Suef, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Dakhly, Khaled Mohamed; El-Nesr, Khaled A; El-Nahass, El-Shaymaa; Hirata, Akihiro; Sakai, Hiroki; Yanai, Tokuma

    2011-12-01

    This study was performed for the purpose of investigating the prevalence of Sarcocystis spp. in buffaloes in Beni-Suef Governorate, Egypt. Both macroscopic (Sarcocystis fusiformis) and microscopic (Sarcocystis levinei) cysts were recognized, and were differentiated by their morphological features and location in the tissues. Of 379 buffaloes examined in abattoirs in Beni-Suef, 299 were found to be infected, with an overall prevalence of 78.9%. Depending on age, three categorized groups of naturally infected buffaloes were examined: male buffalo calves aged 1.5-2 years, adult females aged 2-5 years, and females older than 5 years. Among these groups, infection rates were 74.5%, 82.3%, and 81.2%, respectively. Organs examined included esophagus, tongue, and heart. Macroscopic cysts were examined by the naked eye through meat inspection in abattoirs, while the pepsin-digestion method and the histological technique were applied to detect microscopic cysts. It has been found that esophagus showed the highest rate of infection among the infected organs, with both macroscopic and microscopic cysts seen in the infected buffaloes. Moreover, results of the pepsin-digestion method proved more accurate than those produced by the histological technique in terms of infection rates for the microscopic cysts. Our findings indicated that infected buffaloes aged 2-5 years showed the highest mixed infection rate (82.3%) for both types of cysts. The high prevalence of microscopic Sarcocystis spp. in Beni-Suef Governorate reflects a significant role played by stray dogs, rather than cats, in the transmission of these parasites.

  10. [Natural remedies for vaginal infections].

    PubMed

    Genet, J

    1995-01-01

    Vaginal infections, affecting half of all women, are more severe in women with AIDS. The infection vulva vaginitis, caused by candida, may require medical attention. The doctor performs a pelvic exam and examines vaginal fluids under a microscope. Antibiotics, diet, or a suppressed immune system can increase candida yeast presence. Sweets should be avoided, as well as foods high in leavening, such as bread, cheese, fruit, or alcoholic beverages. Vegetables, grains, rice and wheat can be added to the diet. Eating a half-cup of yogurt daily will help maintain a proper level of yeast. Acidophilus capsules can be taken two or three times daily to relieve digestive problems. Raw or cooked garlic can be used as a vaginal suppository at night. Pau D'arco, the bark of a South American tree, is also anti-yeast. Boil for ten to twenty minutes, and take a teaspoon two or three times a day. Tea, or vinegar and water, can be used as a douche. Some women get relief by adding a half-cup of white vinegar to their bath. Do not wash genitals with soap and do not use sanitary napkins or tampons. Visit a doctor if the condition persists.

  11. [Natural remedies for vaginal infections].

    PubMed

    Genet, J

    1995-01-01

    Vaginal infections, affecting half of all women, are more severe in women with AIDS. The infection vulva vaginitis, caused by candida, may require medical attention. The doctor performs a pelvic exam and examines vaginal fluids under a microscope. Antibiotics, diet, or a suppressed immune system can increase candida yeast presence. Sweets should be avoided, as well as foods high in leavening, such as bread, cheese, fruit, or alcoholic beverages. Vegetables, grains, rice and wheat can be added to the diet. Eating a half-cup of yogurt daily will help maintain a proper level of yeast. Acidophilus capsules can be taken two or three times daily to relieve digestive problems. Raw or cooked garlic can be used as a vaginal suppository at night. Pau D'arco, the bark of a South American tree, is also anti-yeast. Boil for ten to twenty minutes, and take a teaspoon two or three times a day. Tea, or vinegar and water, can be used as a douche. Some women get relief by adding a half-cup of white vinegar to their bath. Do not wash genitals with soap and do not use sanitary napkins or tampons. Visit a doctor if the condition persists. PMID:11362438

  12. Relationship between system of raising Egyptian buffaloes and the effect of climate conditions on the helminthic infection rate, middle Delta, Egypt.

    PubMed

    el-Magdoub, A A; el-Sayed, I A; Mahdy, A E

    1999-08-01

    No doubt climate conditions are of sound influence in both prevalence of helminthic infection and the physiology of the host. Fewer studies have been done on this relationship on farm animals. To complete the view, one thousand, two hundred and seventy eight buffaloes owned by farmers from 160 herds belong to 32 villages in the middle Delta of Egypt were randomly chosen to study factors which influence the infection with gastrointestinal parasites. Relationship between number of parasites, herd size, resources of water and season of the year were investigated. The main results showed that: (1) Fasciola gigantica infection recorded the highest percentage, 48.04% followed by Neoascaris vitulorum and Eimeria spp. (2) Percentage rates of parasitic infection (single, double or triple) in each animal were 62.80%, 29.43% and 7.77%, respectively. (3) Infection rate tended to increase with herd size in most cases. (4) Resource of water had highly significant effect on infection rate. (5) The highest infection was recorded in summer and the lowest in spring or winter. (6) A negative and highly significant correlation between infection and number of parasites (0.99). Herd size did not associate with infection, while temperature and relative humidity correlated significantly with infection rate (0.67 and 0.78) respectively.

  13. Clinical, haematological and therapeutic studies on tropical theileriosis in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Osman, Salama A; Al-Gaabary, Magdy H

    2007-05-31

    Thirty buffaloes naturally infected with Theileria annulata and 10 parasitologically free controls were used to determine the potential clinical, haematological and therapeutic impact of tropical theileriosis in Egypt. The clinical signs in the infected buffaloes were pyrexia (40.5-41.5 degrees C), enlargement of superficial lymph nodes, slight nasal and ocular discharges, salivation, anaemia and respiratory distress. Eye lesions also were recorded. There was a significant decrease in erythrocyte counts and haemoglobin content and a significant decrease in total leucocyte counts in infected buffaloes compared to controls. Early treatment with buparvaquone was 100% effective in eliminating the protozoan parasites from the blood and lymph nodes and led to an improvement in the clinical state whereas treatment in the later stages of the disease whilst eliminating the parasites failed to improve the clinical condition of the animal.

  14. Effect of induced Fasciola gigantica infection during pre-patency on the performance of buffalo calves fed on different percentage of protein.

    PubMed

    Singh, P; Verma, A K; Gupta, S C; Mehra, U R

    2016-09-01

    Thirty growing Murrah buffalo calves (8-12 months of age, 109.85 ± 2.43) were reared in parasite free conditions and randomly divided into three equal groups as per CRD. They were fed on iso-caloric (2.01 ME Mcal/Kg diet) diets containing standard protein (SP) diet at 100 %, 90 % of SP (medium protein, MP) and 80 % of SP (low protein, LP) of the protein requirements (Kearl 1982). After 21 days of feeding, each group was further subdivided into two sub-groups (A & B). Animals in sub-groups 'A' served as non-infected control, while in sub group 'B' were orally infected with Fasciola gigantica metacercarie (mc; 1,000 each). A metabolic trial of 40 days post infection was carried out in control and parasitized animals. Intake of digestible dry matter, organic matter and acid detergent fibre (ADF) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in SP group compared to LP group. The digestibility of crude protein (CP) and ADF was significantly higher in SP group compared to MP and LP groups. The digestible crude protein (DCP) and total digestible nutrients (TDN) intakes (g/kgW(0.75)) were also significantly (P < 0.001) higher in SP than MP and LP groups. However, DCP intake was significantly (P < 0.001) lower in infected subgroups compared to control subgroups. Intake and balance (g/d) of nitrogen, calcium and phosphorus were significantly (P < 0.01) higher in SP than MP and LP groups. The average daily gain of buffalo calves fed on SP Uninfected (SPU), SP Infected (SPI), MPU, MPI and LPU, LPI groups was 333, 178, 356, 144, 222 and 144 g and was significantly (P < 0.01) lower in animals fed LP ration. The feed conversion ratio (FCR) was also significantly (P < 0.01) higher in infected sub-groups as compared to respective control groups. The results showed that a SP diet substantially improved the overall performance of buffalo calves in control and infected groups and reduced adverse effect of F. gigantica infection. PMID:27605773

  15. Enemies and turncoats: bovine tuberculosis exposes pathogenic potential of Rift Valley fever virus in a common host, African buffalo (Syncerus caffer)

    PubMed Central

    Beechler, B. R.; Manore, C. A.; Reininghaus, B.; O'Neal, D.; Gorsich, E. E.; Ezenwa, V. O.; Jolles, A. E.

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquity and importance of parasite co-infections in populations of free-living animals is beginning to be recognized, but few studies have demonstrated differential fitness effects of single infection versus co-infection in free-living populations. We investigated interactions between the emerging bacterial disease bovine tuberculosis (BTB) and the previously existing viral disease Rift Valley fever (RVF) in a competent reservoir host, African buffalo, combining data from a natural outbreak of RVF in captive buffalo at a buffalo breeding facility in 2008 with data collected from a neighbouring free-living herd of African buffalo in Kruger National Park. RVF infection was twice as likely in individual BTB+ buffalo as in BTB− buffalo, which, according to a mathematical model, may increase RVF outbreak size at the population level. In addition, co-infection was associated with a far higher rate of fetal abortion than other infection states. Immune interactions between BTB and RVF may underlie both of these interactions, since animals with BTB had decreased innate immunity and increased pro-inflammatory immune responses. This study is one of the first to demonstrate how the consequences of emerging infections extend beyond direct effects on host health, potentially altering the dynamics and fitness effects of infectious diseases that had previously existed in the ecosystem on free-ranging wildlife populations. PMID:25788592

  16. Invasive fungal infections after natural disasters.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Kaitlin; Park, Benjamin J

    2014-03-01

    The link between natural disasters and subsequent fungal infections in disaster-affected persons has been increasingly recognized. Fungal respiratory conditions associated with disasters include coccidioidomycosis, and fungi are among several organisms that can cause near-drowning pneumonia. Wound contamination with organic matter can lead to post-disaster skin and soft tissue fungal infections, notably mucormycosis. The role of climate change in the environmental growth, distribution, and dispersal mechanisms of pathogenic fungi is not fully understood; however, ongoing climate change could lead to increased disaster-associated fungal infections. Fungal infections are an often-overlooked clinical and public health issue, and increased awareness by health care providers, public health professionals, and community members regarding disaster-associated fungal infections is needed.

  17. Invasive Fungal Infections after Natural Disasters

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Kaitlin

    2014-01-01

    The link between natural disasters and subsequent fungal infections in disaster-affected persons has been increasingly recognized. Fungal respiratory conditions associated with disasters include coccidioidomycosis, and fungi are among several organisms that can cause near-drowning pneumonia. Wound contamination with organic matter can lead to post-disaster skin and soft tissue fungal infections, notably mucormycosis. The role of climate change in the environmental growth, distribution, and dispersal mechanisms of pathogenic fungi is not fully understood; however, ongoing climate change could lead to increased disaster-associated fungal infections. Fungal infections are an often-overlooked clinical and public health issue, and increased awareness by health care providers, public health professionals, and community members regarding disaster-associated fungal infections is needed. PMID:24565446

  18. Invasive fungal infections after natural disasters.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Kaitlin; Park, Benjamin J

    2014-03-01

    The link between natural disasters and subsequent fungal infections in disaster-affected persons has been increasingly recognized. Fungal respiratory conditions associated with disasters include coccidioidomycosis, and fungi are among several organisms that can cause near-drowning pneumonia. Wound contamination with organic matter can lead to post-disaster skin and soft tissue fungal infections, notably mucormycosis. The role of climate change in the environmental growth, distribution, and dispersal mechanisms of pathogenic fungi is not fully understood; however, ongoing climate change could lead to increased disaster-associated fungal infections. Fungal infections are an often-overlooked clinical and public health issue, and increased awareness by health care providers, public health professionals, and community members regarding disaster-associated fungal infections is needed. PMID:24565446

  19. Rift Valley fever virus infection in African Buffalo (Syncerus caffer) herds in rural South Africa: Evidence of interepidemic transmission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaBeaud, A.D.; Cross, P.C.; Getz, W.M.; Glinka, A.; King, C.H.

    2011-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging biodefense pathogen that poses significant threats to human and livestock health. To date, the interepidemic reservoirs of RVFV are not well defined. In a longitudinal survey of infectious diseases among African buffalo during 2000-2006, 550 buffalo were tested for antibodies against RVFV in 820 capture events in 302 georeferenced locations in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Overall, 115 buffalo (21%) were seropositive. Seroprevalence of RVFV was highest (32%) in the first study year, and decreased progressively in subsequent years, but had no detectable impact on survival. Nine (7%) of 126 resampled, initially seronegative animals seroconverted during periods outside any reported regional RVFV outbreaks. Seroconversions for RVFV were detected in significant temporal clusters during 2001-2003 and in 2004. These findings highlight the potential importance of wildlife as reservoirs for RVFV and interepidemic RVFV transmission in perpetuating regional RVFV transmission risk. Copyright ?? 2011 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  20. Anti-infective Natural Products from Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Niedermeyer, Timo Horst Johannes

    2015-10-01

    Cyanobacteria are a promising yet underexplored source for novel natural products with potent biological activities. While predominantly cytotoxic compounds have been isolated from cyanobacteria in the past, there are also a significant number of compounds known that possess anti-infective activities. As the need for novel anti-infective lead compounds is high, this manuscript aims at giving a concise overview on the current knowledge about anti-infective secondary metabolites isolated from cyanobacteria. Antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, antiprotozoal, and molluscicidal activities are discussed. Covering up to February 2015.

  1. Clinico-pathology, hematology and biochemistry responses in buffaloes towards Pasteurella multocida type B: 2 immunogen lypopolysaccharide via oral and intravenous routes of infection.

    PubMed

    Chung, Eric Lim Teik; Abdullah, Faez Firdaus Jesse; Ibrahim, Hayder Hamzah; Marza, Ali Dhiaa; Zamri-Saad, Mohd; Haron, Abdul Wahid; Lila, Mohd Azmi Mohd; Norsidin, Mohd Jefri

    2016-02-01

    Haemorrhagic septicaemia is a disease caused by Pasteurella multocida serotype B: 2 and E: 2. The organism causes acute, highly fatal septicaemic disease with high morbidity and mortality in cattle and more susceptible in buffaloes. Lipopolysaccharide can be found on the outer cell wall of the organism. Lipopolysaccharide is released during multiplication which leads to inflammatory reaction. It represents the endotoxin of P. multocida type B: 2 and responsible for toxicity in haemorrhagic septicaemia which plays an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the clinical signs, blood parameters, gross post mortem lesions and histopathology changes caused by P. multocida type B:2 immunogen lipopolysaccharide infections initiated through intravenous and oral routes of infection. 9 buffalo heifers were divided equally into 3 treatment groups. Group 1 was inoculated orally with 10 ml of phosphate buffer saline (PBS); Group 2 and 3 were inoculated with 10 ml of lipopolysaccharide broth intravenously and orally respectively. For the clinical signs, there were significant differences (p < 0.05) in temperature between the control, intravenous and oral group. In hematology and biochemistry findings, there were significant differences (p < 0.05) in erythrocytes, haemoglobin, PCV, MCV, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, GGT and albumin between the control, intravenous and oral group. However, there were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in the MCHC, leukocytes, band neutrophils, basophils, thrombocytes, plasma protein, icterus index, total protein, globulin and A:G ratio between intravenous and oral group. For Group 2 buffaloes, there were gross lesions in the lung, trachea, heart, liver, spleen, and kidney. In contrast, lesions were only observed in the lung, trachea and liver of Group 3 buffaloes. There were significant differences (p < 0.05) in hemorrhage and congestion; necrosis and degeneration; and

  2. Biochemistry of the sarcocyst of Sarcocystis fusiformis of buffalo Bubalus bubalis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, R K; Kushwah, H S; Shah, H L

    1985-04-01

    Sarcocysts of Sarcocystis fusiformis from oesophageal muscles of naturally-infected Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) were analysed for total lipids, phospholipids, cholesterol, fatty acids and glycerides and total protein. Protein and phospholipids constituted the major portion of the sarcocyst. Acetylcholinesterase and glutamate-oxalo-acetate transaminase activities when assayed were higher than glutamate-pyruvate transaminase in sarcocysts.

  3. The stability of plasma IP-10 enhances its utility for the diagnosis of Mycobacterium bovis infection in African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer).

    PubMed

    Goosen, Wynand J; van Helden, Paul D; Warren, Robin M; Miller, Michele A; Parsons, Sven D C

    2016-05-01

    The measurement of interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10) in antigen-stimulated whole blood is a sensitive biomarker of Mycobacterium bovis infection in African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer). However, this species often occurs in remote locations and diagnostic samples must be transported to centralised laboratories for processing. In humans, plasma IP-10 is highly stable and this feature contributes to its diagnostic utility; for this reason we aimed to characterize the stability of this molecule in buffaloes. Blood from M. bovis-infected and -uninfected animals was incubated with pathogen-specific peptides, saline and phytohaemagglutinin, respectively. Plasma fractions were harvested and aliquots of selected samples were: (i) stored at different temperatures for various times; (ii) heat treated before storage at RT, and (iii) stored on Protein Saver Cards (PSCs) at RT for either 2 or 8 weeks before measurement of IP-10. Incubation of plasma at 65°C for 20 min caused no loss of IP-10 and this protein could be quantified in plasma stored on PSCs for 2 and 8 weeks. Moreover, for all storage conditions, IP-10 retained its excellent diagnostic characteristics. These features of IP-10 might allow for the heat inactivation of potentially infectious plasma which would facilitate the safe and simple transport of samples. PMID:27090621

  4. Relationships between flavoring capabilities, bacterial composition, and geographical origin of natural whey cultures used for traditional water-buffalo mozzarella cheese manufacture.

    PubMed

    Mauriello, G; Moio, L; Genovese, A; Ercolini, D

    2003-02-01

    Natural whey cultures (NWC) (n = 29) used for traditional water-buffalo Mozzarella cheese manufacture and arising from different geographical areas of production were characterized and grouped on the basis of their capability to develop neutral volatile compounds and according to their microbial diversity as revealed by molecular analysis. The flavoring properties of NWC were studied in dairy microcosms resembling the specific technological procedure used in the traditional water-buffalo Mozzarella cheese-making. Neutral volatile compounds were identified by high-resolution gas chromatography (HRGC)-mass spectrometry analysis while information on the microbial diversity occurring in the NWC was retrieved by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of 16S rDNA after direct DNA extraction. Neoformation volatile substances (n = 27) were found; 23 were identified and some of them recognized as odor-conferring molecules. Eight different bands, referable to eight microbial species, were obtained by PCR-DGGE analysis of the NWC. Statistical analyses were applied to PCR-DGGE and HRGC data. Interestingly, the flavoring capabilities and the microbial diversity of the NWC proved to be closely linked and both related to the geographical origin of the NWC. These results suggested a possible use of the molecular characterization of the dairy products to support the traceability criteria of typical dairy products like water-buffalo Mozzarella cheese.

  5. Natural Burkholderia mallei infection in Dromedary, Bahrain.

    PubMed

    Wernery, Ulrich; Wernery, Renate; Joseph, Marina; Al-Salloom, Fajer; Johnson, Bobby; Kinne, Joerg; Jose, Shanti; Jose, Sherry; Tappendorf, Britta; Hornstra, Heidie; Scholz, Holger C

    2011-07-01

    We confirm a natural infection of dromedaries with glanders. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis of a Burkholderia mallei strain isolated from a diseased dromedary in Bahrain revealed close genetic proximity to strain Dubai 7, which caused an outbreak of glanders in horses in the United Arab Emirates in 2004.

  6. Seroprevalence and risk factors associated with exposure of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) to Neospora caninum in northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kengradomkij, Chanya; Inpankaew, Tawin; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Wongpanit, Kannika; Wongnakphet, Sirichai; Mitchell, Thomas J; Xuan, Xuenan; Igarashi, Ikuo; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Stich, Roger W

    2015-01-15

    Water buffalo are important draft animals for agriculture in resource-restricted areas worldwide. Water buffalo were shown to be experimentally susceptible to infection with Neospora caninum, potentially affected by neosporosis, and naturally exposed to the parasite in Asia. Although enzootic to Thailand, the distribution of N. caninum among Thai water buffalo is unclear. The objectives of this study were to determine the seroprevalence of N. caninum among water buffalo of northeast Thailand and to identify risk factors associated with their exposure to N. caninum. Sera from 628 water buffalo from 288 farms were tested with an indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT). A total of 57 samples from 48 herds contained antibodies to N. caninum, indicating overall seroprevalence of 9.1% and 16.7% among individual animals and herds, respectively. The overall seroprevalence was highest in provinces located in the Khorat Basin in the southern part of the region tested. Host age was also associated with seroprevalence, with the greatest seroprevalence (16.1%) among buffalo over 10 years of age, followed by 5-10 years of age (13.4%), 3-5 years (9.2%), and less than 3 years (1.2%). These results collectively suggested that horizontal transmission from canine definitive hosts was an important route of water buffalo exposure to N. caninum. These results also verified the importance of risk factor analysis for effective bovine neosporosis control strategies at the local level.

  7. The Dynamics of Natural Plasmodium falciparum Infections

    PubMed Central

    Felger, Ingrid; Maire, Martin; Bretscher, Michael T.; Falk, Nicole; Tiaden, André; Sama, Wilson; Beck, Hans-Peter; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Smith, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Natural immunity to Plasmodium falciparum has been widely studied, but its effects on parasite dynamics are poorly understood. Acquisition and clearance rates of untreated infections are key elements of the dynamics of malaria, but estimating these parameters is challenging because of frequent super-infection and imperfect detectability of parasites. Consequently, information on effects of host immune status or age on infection dynamics is fragmentary. Methods An age-stratified cohort of 347 individuals from Northern Ghana was sampled six times at 2 month intervals. High-throughput capillary electrophoresis was used to genotype the msp-2 locus of all P. falciparum infections detected by PCR. Force of infection (FOI) and duration were estimated for each age group using an immigration-death model that allows for imperfect detection of circulating parasites. Results Allowing for imperfect detection substantially increased estimates of FOI and duration. Effects of naturally acquired immunity on the FOI and duration would be reflected in age dependence in these indices, but in our cohort data FOI tended to increase with age in children. Persistence of individual parasite clones was characteristic of all age-groups. Duration peaked in 5–9 year old children (average duration 319 days, 95% confidence interval 318;320). Conclusions The main age-dependence is on parasite densities, with only small age-variations in the FOI and persistence of infections. This supports the hypothesis that acquired immunity controls transmission mainly by limiting blood-stage parasite densities rather than changing rates of acquisition or clearance of infections. PMID:23029082

  8. Clinical and pathological insights into Johne's disease in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Dalto, André Cabrera; Bandarra, Paulo Mota; Pavarini, Saulo Petinatti; Boabaid, Fabiana Marques; de Bitencourt, Ana Paula Gobbi; Gomes, Marcos Pereira; Chies, José; Driemeier, David; da Cruz, Cláudio Estêvão Farias

    2012-12-01

    Alternative diagnostic tools and interesting epidemiological assumptions were associated with an outbreak of Johne's disease. In a buffalo herd infected with paratuberculosis, seven clinically affected animals and 21 animals with anti-Mycobacterium avium ELISA reactions were identified. Total herd included 203 buffaloes. Most lesions were comparable to those described in buffaloes and cattle affected by Johne's disease. Water buffalo behaviors such as communal nursing and allosuckling may be additional risk factors for this disease. Detection of positive Ziehl-Neelsen staining and anti-M. avium immunolabeling in rectal biopsies from one buffalo with paratuberculosis are highlighted as auxiliary diagnostic tools for Johne's disease in live animals.

  9. [Immune-humoral response of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) against Anaplasma marginale (Theiler, 1910)].

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ricardo A; Machado, Rosangela Z; Starke-Buzetti, Wilma A; Bonesso, Maria A

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the humoral-immune response of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) naturally infected against Anaplasma marginale. For this work, colostrums/milk and blood samples were sequentially collected from buffalo cows prior and after partum for a period of 335 days and from buffalo calves from birth to 365 days after. The antibodies in the colostrums/milk and serum samples of these animals were determined using an ELISA indirect method and the data were analyzed as a mean of a group of animals with the matched ages during the period of 1999/2000 or individually during the year of 2005. The data from animals analyzed in group showed that the antibodies against A. marginale were in low concentration (below the cut off point: D.O. = 0.265 and ELISA levels, EL < or =3), in the sera of buffalo, during the first 90 and 105 days, respectively for cows and calves. Then, the levels of antibodies in the serum samples of buffalo calves, slightly raised to above the cut-off point and kept in higher levels up to approximately 365 days after birth, indicating active acquired immunity. Furthermore, when the animals were individually examined, the buffalo cows showed high antibody levels in the colostrums, but low levels in the blood stream during the first seven days post-partum, suggesting antibody transference from blood to mammary gland. In addition to that, buffalo calves showed high antibody levels during the first 24 hours after suckling colostrum, indicating a colostral passive immunity. By conclusion, the buffaloes were able to arm a humoral immune response against A. marginale and were considered reservoir of this parasite.

  10. Comparative moleculo-immunological analysis of swamp- and riverine-type water buffaloes responses.

    PubMed

    Mingala, Claro N; Konnai, Satoru; Cruz, Libertado C; Onuma, Misao; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2009-05-01

    This moleculo-epidemiological and immunological study through cytokine response assessment was done to know the dynamics of cytokines in the initiation, persistence and association to physiological changes of a particular pathogen in water buffaloes. This is important to understand the magnitude and behavior of disease progression. Water buffalo blood samples gathered from different places in the Philippines revealed a 9.4%, 27.6%, 10.3% and 4.4% prevalence of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine leukemia virus (BLV), Anaplasma marginale and Babesia bigemina infection, respectively. This was the first surveillance study of BVDV and BLV in the country. Furthermore, cytokine expression of these naturally infected animals was also quantified. BVDV-infected animals had up-regulated expressions of TNFalpha, IL-2 and IL-4; and down-regulated expressions of IFNgamma and IL-12p40 while BLV positive animals had an up-regulated IL-4 and IL-6, and highly expressed IL-10 and IL-12p40 with unchanged IFNgamma expression. Meanwhile, animals infected with A. marginale had all interleukins and IFNgamma up-regulated with significant expression of IL-10 and IL-12p40 similar to the BLV positive animals. Since it was also observed that swamp-type buffaloes were more disease tolerant than riverine-type buffaloes based on the gathered infection rate of each examined pathogen, further assessment was done focusing on the two vital cytokines, IFNgamma and TNFalpha. We quantified IFNgamma and TNFalpha expressions in ConA-stimulated PBMC from both swamp and riverine buffaloes by real-time PCR. Cytokine expression from ConA-stimulated PBMC revealed that both IFNgamma and TNFalpha were more highly expressed in swamp than in riverine buffalo. To further examine the probable cause of expression differences, the proximal promoter region of these two cytokines were sequenced for the presence of nucleotide polymorphism followed by luciferase assay to analyze the effect of these polymorphisms

  11. Genetic analysis of river, swamp and hybrid buffaloes of north-east India throw new light on phylogeography of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Mishra, B P; Dubey, P K; Prakash, B; Kathiravan, P; Goyal, S; Sadana, D K; Das, G C; Goswami, R N; Bhasin, V; Joshi, B K; Kataria, R S

    2015-12-01

    This study analysed buffaloes from north-east India and compared their nuclear and mitochondrial DNA variations with buffaloes of mainland India, China, Mediterranean and South-East Asia. Microsatellite genotypes of 338 buffaloes including 210 from six north-east Indian buffalo populations and three mainland Indian breeds were analysed to evaluate their genetic structure and evolutionary relationships. Phylogenetic analysis and multidimensional scaling plot of pairwise FST revealed the clustering of all swamp-type buffaloes of north-east India with Lower Assamese (significantly hybrid type) buffaloes in one plane and all the mainland river buffaloes in another plane while the upper Assamese buffaloes being distinct from both these clusters. Analysis of mtDNA D-loop region of 530-bp length was performed on 345 sequences belonging to 23 buffalo populations from various geographical regions to establish the phylogeography of Indian water buffalo. The swamp buffaloes of north-east India clustered with both the lineages of Chinese swamp buffalo. Multidimensional scaling display of pairwise FST derived from mitochondrial DNA data showed clustering of upper Assamese, Chilika and Mediterranean buffaloes distinctly from all the other Indian buffalo populations. Median-joining network analysis further confirmed the distinctness and ancestral nature of these buffaloes. The study revealed north-east region of India forming part of the wider hybrid zone of water buffalo that may probably extend from north-east India to South-East Asia.

  12. Genetic analysis of river, swamp and hybrid buffaloes of north-east India throw new light on phylogeography of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Mishra, B P; Dubey, P K; Prakash, B; Kathiravan, P; Goyal, S; Sadana, D K; Das, G C; Goswami, R N; Bhasin, V; Joshi, B K; Kataria, R S

    2015-12-01

    This study analysed buffaloes from north-east India and compared their nuclear and mitochondrial DNA variations with buffaloes of mainland India, China, Mediterranean and South-East Asia. Microsatellite genotypes of 338 buffaloes including 210 from six north-east Indian buffalo populations and three mainland Indian breeds were analysed to evaluate their genetic structure and evolutionary relationships. Phylogenetic analysis and multidimensional scaling plot of pairwise FST revealed the clustering of all swamp-type buffaloes of north-east India with Lower Assamese (significantly hybrid type) buffaloes in one plane and all the mainland river buffaloes in another plane while the upper Assamese buffaloes being distinct from both these clusters. Analysis of mtDNA D-loop region of 530-bp length was performed on 345 sequences belonging to 23 buffalo populations from various geographical regions to establish the phylogeography of Indian water buffalo. The swamp buffaloes of north-east India clustered with both the lineages of Chinese swamp buffalo. Multidimensional scaling display of pairwise FST derived from mitochondrial DNA data showed clustering of upper Assamese, Chilika and Mediterranean buffaloes distinctly from all the other Indian buffalo populations. Median-joining network analysis further confirmed the distinctness and ancestral nature of these buffaloes. The study revealed north-east region of India forming part of the wider hybrid zone of water buffalo that may probably extend from north-east India to South-East Asia. PMID:25780854

  13. Death by attack from a domestic buffalo.

    PubMed

    Bakkannavar, Shankar M; Monteiro, Francis N P; Bhagavath, Prashantha; Pradeep Kumar, G

    2010-02-01

    Attacks on humans by domestic animals causing fatal injuries are not uncommon in rural areas of India. But injuries due to buffalo gore are rarely observed in villages and are different from other casualties like stab injuries, road fatalities, etc. As the victims of buffalo attack are usually recovered from the fields or forest, the investigating officer could be mislead as to the nature of infliction of fatal injuries to a possible homicide. The injuries caused by the horns of buffaloes are of various shapes, sizes and directions. They are violent and goring in nature. The wound sustained may be contusions, lacerations, criss-cross wounds, penetration of body cavities, and sometimes fractures. In the absence of any eye witness, it becomes very difficult to believe the unsuspecting domestic water buffalo as attacker. This case is reported for its rarity, for the awareness of the possible injuries in such unnatural deaths, and factors predisposing to a buffalo attack.

  14. Evaluation of whole fresh blood and dried blood on filter paper discs in serological tests for Trypanosoma evansi in experimentally infected water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Holland, W G; Thanh, N G; My, L N; Magnus, E; Verloo, D; Büscher, P; Goddeeris, B; Vercruysse, J

    2002-02-01

    In this study we investigated if whole blood could substitute for serum in the direct card agglutination test (CATT/Trypansosoma evansi) and the indirect card agglutination test (LATEX/T. evansi) for the sero-diagnosis of T. evansi in buffaloes. Likewise blood spots on filter paper were compared with sera for use in the indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay/T. evansi (ELISA) and immunotrypanolysis test (T.L./T. evansi). Samples were collected weekly from experimentally T. evansi infected- and non-infected water buffaloes. To estimate test agreement between serum and respectively whole fresh blood and dried blood spots on filterpaper of the tests, kappa values with 95% confidence intervals were calculated, 0.75+/-0.11 for the CATT/T. evansi; 0.80+/-0.11 for the ELISA/T. evansi; 0.84+/-0.11 for the LATEX/T. evansi and 0.93+/-0.11 for the T.L./T. evansi. In addition kappa values with 95% confidence intervals were computed to assess agreement between results obtained in the reference T.L./T. evansi test and those obtained in the other assays; 0.70+/-0.10 for the CATT-Serum; 0.75+/-0.11 for the LATEX-Blood; 0.77+/-0.11 for the LATEX-Serum; 0.81+/-0.10 for the CATT-Blood; 0.81+/-0.11 for the ELISA-Serum and 0.84+/-0.11 for the ELISA-Confetti. Based on the high kappa values as calculated, we conclude that serum can be replaced by fresh whole blood for the agglutination assays or blood on filter paper for the ELISA/T. evansi and T.L./T. evansi.

  15. Humoral immune response of water buffalo monitored with three different antigens of Toxocara vitulorum.

    PubMed

    de Souza, E M; Starke-Buzetti, W A; Ferreira, F P; Neves, M F; Machado, R Z

    2004-06-10

    Humoral immune response of water buffalo naturally infected with Toxocara vitulorum was monitored using three different antigens of this parasite in serum and colostrum of buffalo cows and calves. Soluble extract (Ex) and excretory/secretory (ES) larval antigens and perienteric fluid antigen (Pe) of adult T. vitulorum were used to measure the antibody levels by an indirect ELISA. Serum of 7-12 buffalo cows for the first 365 days and colostrum of the same number of buffalo cows for the first 60 days of parturition, and serum of 8-10 buffalo calves for the first 365 days after birth were assayed. The ELISA detected antibodies against all three T. vitulorum antigens in the colostrum and serum of 100% of buffalo cows and calves examined. The highest antibody levels against Ex, ES and Pe antigens were detected in the buffalo cow sera during the perinatal period and were maintained at high levels through 300 days after parturition. On the other hand, colostrum antibody concentrations of all three antigens were highest on the first day post-parturition, but decreased sharply during the first 15 days. Concomitantly to the monitoring of immune response, the parasitic status of the calves was also evaluated. In calves, antibodies passively acquired were at the highest concentrations 24 h after birth and remained at high levels until 45 days coincidentally with the peak of T. vitulorum infection. The rejection of the worms by the calves occurred simultaneously with the decline of antibody levels, which reached their lowest levels between 76 and 150 days. Thereafter, probably because of the presence of adults/larvae stimulation, the calves acquired active immunity and the antibodies started to increase slightly in the serum and plateaued between the days 211 and 365. All three antigens were detected by the serum antibodies of buffalo calves; however, the concentration of anti-Pe antibody was higher than anti-EX and anti-ES, particularly after 90 days of age. By conclusion, the

  16. Detection of antibody to Toxocara vitulorum perieneteric fluid antigens (Pe) in the colostrum and serum of buffalo calves and cows by Western blotting.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Fabiano P; Starke-Buzetti, Wilma A

    2005-04-20

    Toxocara vitulorum, a nematode parasite in the small intestine of cattle and water buffaloes, causes high morbidity and mortality of 1-3 months old buffalo calves. This research evaluated the specific perieneteric antigens (Pe) reactivity of anti-T. vitulorum-Pe antibody (Tv-Pe-Ab) in both immune sera and colostrum from buffalo cows immediately post-partum from buffalo cows. The presence of Tv-Pe-Ab in sera of buffalo newborn calves was also examined at 1 day before and after suckling the colostrum as well as in sera from naturally infected calves at the beginning and peak of the maximum infection and then again during the period of rejection and post-rejection of the parasite. Pe antigens were characterized for Tv-Pe-Ab by SDS-PAGE and Western blot (WB). The SDS-PAGE showed that Pe contained nine protein bands (11, 14, 31, 38, 58, 76, 88, 112 and 165 kDa). All Pe bands were recognized by Tv-Pe-Ab in sera and colostrum of buffalo cows. Only the serum antibodies of buffalo calves at 1 day of age after suckling the colostrum and during the beginning of T. vitulorum infection recognized Pe antigen's nine bands. In contrast, serum antibodies from 1-day-old buffalo calves, taken before suckling colostrum, did not react with any protein band. In suckling calves, which reached peak egg output, rejection and post-rejection stages of the infection, serum Tv-Pe-Ab reactivity with lower molecular weight protein bands (11-76 kDa) was lost and only reactivity with the Pe protein bands of higher molecular weight (88, 112 and 165 kDa) remained.

  17. Immunology of experimental and natural human hookworm infection.

    PubMed

    Gaze, S; Bethony, J M; Periago, M V

    2014-08-01

    Human hookworm infection is one amongst the most prevalent of the neglected tropical diseases. An informative experimental animal model, that is, one that parallels a human infection, is not available for the study of human hookworm infection. Much of our current understanding of the human immune response during hookworm infection relies on the studies from experimental infection of hookworm-naïve individuals or the natural infections from individuals residing in hookworm-endemic areas. The experimental human infections tend to be acute, dose-controlled infections, often with a low larval inoculum so that they are well tolerated by human volunteers. Natural hookworm infections usually occur in areas where hookworm transmission is constant and infection is chronic. In cases where there has been drug administration in an endemic area, re-infection often occurs quickly even amongst those who were treated. Hence, although many of the characteristics of experimental and natural hookworm infection differ, both models have elements in common: mainly an intense Th2 response with the production of total and specific IgE as well as elevated levels of eosinophilia, IL-5, IL-10 and TNF. While hookworm infection affects millions of individuals worldwide, much of the human immunology of this infection still needs to be studied and understood.

  18. Clinical and biochemical studies on Theileria annulata in Egyptian buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) with particular orientation to oxidative stress and ketosis relationship.

    PubMed

    El-Deeb, Wael M; Younis, Emad E

    2009-10-14

    This study was carried out on 68 Theileria annulata naturally infected buffaloes in addition to 25 parasitologically free buffaloes distributed in small herds at Dakahlia and Gharbya governorates, Egypt, to demonstrate the clinical picture associated with theileriosis in this buffaloes with particular emphasis to the oxidative stress and ketosis relationship. Clinical signs recorded in infected buffaloes were in the form of fever, enlargement of one or more lymph node, ocular discharge, corneal opacity, skin lesions, decreased milk yield, pale mucous membrane and anorexia. Blood and serum analysis revealed significant (pinfected animals compared to control ones. Moreover, significant increase (pinfected animals compared to control ones. It can be concluded that T. annulata plays an important role in the occurrence of anemia, oxidative and ketotic stressor in Egyptian water buffaloes.

  19. Natural killer cells in hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shao-fei; Wang, Wen-jing; Gao, Yue-qiu

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells are a unique type of lymphocytes with cytotoxic capacity, and play important roles against tumors and infections. Recently, natural killer cells have been increasingly valued in their effects in hepatitis B virus infection. Since hepatitis B virus is not cytopathic, the subsequent antiviral immune responses of the host are responsible for sustaining the liver injury, which may result in cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Many studies have confirmed that natural killer cells participate in anti-hepatitis B virus responses both in the early phase after infection and in the chronic phase via cytolysis, degranulation, and cytokine secretion. However, natural killer cells play dichotomic roles: they exert antiviral and immunoregulatory functions whilst contribute to the pathogenesis of liver injury. Here, we review the roles of natural killer cells in hepatitis B virus infection, introducing novel therapeutic strategies for controlling hepatitis B virus infection via the modulation of natural killer cells.

  20. Constructing the Average Natural History of HIV-1 Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diambra, L.; Capurro, A.; Malta, C. P.

    2007-05-01

    Many aspects of the natural course of the HIV-1 infection remains unclear, despite important efforts towards understanding its long-term dynamics. Using a scaling approach that places progression markers (viral load, CD4+, CD8+) of many individuals on a single average natural course of disease progression, we introduce the concept of inter-individual scaling and time scaling. Our quantitative assessment of the natural course of HIV-1 infection indicates that the dynamics of the evolution for the individual that developed AIDS (opportunistic infections) is different from that of the individual that did not develop AIDS. This means that the rate of progression is not relevant for the infection evolution.

  1. The polymicrobial nature of biofilm infection.

    PubMed

    Wolcott, R; Costerton, J W; Raoult, D; Cutler, S J

    2013-02-01

    The model of biofilm infection was first proposed over a decade ago. Recent scientific advances have added much to our understanding of biofilms, usually polymicrobial communities, which are commonly associated with chronic infection. Metagenomics has demonstrated that bacteria pursuing a biofilm strategy possess many mechanisms for encouraging diversity. By including multiple bacterial and/or fungal species in a single community, biofilms obtain numerous advantages, such as passive resistance, metabolic cooperation, byproduct influence, quorum sensing systems, an enlarged gene pool with more efficient DNA sharing, and many other synergies, which give them a competitive advantage. Routine clinical cultures are ill-suited for evaluating polymicrobial infections. DNA methods utilizing PCR methods, PCR/mass spectroscopy and sequencing have demonstrated their ability to identify microorganisms and quantitate their contribution to biofilms in clinical infections. A more robust model of biofilm infection along with more accurate diagnosis is rapidly translating into improved clinical outcomes.

  2. Endocrinological evaluation of the induction of superovulation with PMSG in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Schallenberger, E; Wagner, H G; Papa, R; Hartl, P; Tenhumberg, H

    1990-08-01

    Ten nonlactating buffalo were superovulated with 3000 IU PMSG. Luteolysis was induced with 500 microg Cloprostenol (PG) 60 and 72 h after PMSG. Five buffalo were alloted for natural mating and five were bred by artificial insemination 60 and 84 h after the first PG treatment. Since four buffalo developed pyometra, only 6 of 10 underwent embryo collection successfully 180 to 190 h after PG. Three buffalo yielded only one morula each, while the remaining three yielded a total of two, three and four morulae and/or blastocysts as well als zero, one and three unfertilized ova, respectively. Six of the ten buffalo were assigned to an intensive blood collection regimen. Mean concentrations of progesterone (ng/ml) increased from 1.9 at PMSG stimulation to 4.8 at induction of luteolysis and decreased to a nadir of 0.2 about 72 h after PG treatment. The preovulatory surge of LH occurred 36 +/- 9 h after PG and was low in magnitude (7.3 +/- 1.3 ng/ml). Stimulation of 3 to 12 follicles resulted in concentrations of estradiol-17beta exceeding 5 pg/ml within 48 h after PMSG treatment and reaching a maximum of 32 +/- 11 pg/ml about the time of the preovulatory surge. Only in two individuals did concentrations decrease below 5 pg/ml within the following 12 h. In the other four buffalo 3 to 10 unovulated structures remained palpable, secreting estradiol-17beta far exceeding the preovulatory concentrations. The fast appearing, low magnitude LH surges were key problems resulting from PMSG treatment. They caused unovulated endocrinologically active follicles. High estrogen levels during the early luteal period may activate subclinical uterine infections, which in turn may negatively affect embryonic development.

  3. Haemoparasite prevalence and Theileria parva strain diversity in Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Oura, C A L; Tait, A; Asiimwe, B; Lubega, G W; Weir, W

    2011-02-10

    Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer) are considered to be an important reservoir for various tick-borne haemoparasites of veterinary importance. In this study we have compared the haemoparasite carrier prevalence in buffalo from four geographically isolated national parks in Uganda [Lake Mburo National Park (LMNP), Queen Elizabeth National Park (QENP), Murchison Falls National Park (MFNP) and Kidepo Valley National Park (KVNP)]. Differences were seen in haemoparasite prevalence in buffalo from the four national parks. All the buffalo sampled in LMNP were carriers of Theileria parva however, buffalo from MFNP and KVNP, which are both located in the north of Uganda, were negative for T. parva. Interestingly, 95% of buffalo in the northern part of QENP were T. parva positive, however all buffalo sampled in the south of the park were negative. A high multiplicity of infection was recorded in all the buffalo found to be carrying T. parva, with evidence of at least nine parasite genotypes in some animals. Most of the buffalo sampled in all four national parks were carriers of T. mutans and T. velifera, however none were carriers of T. taurotragi, Babesia bovis, Babesia bigemina, Ehrlichia bovis or Ehrlichia ruminantium. All the buffalo sampled from LMNP were positive for T. buffeli and T. sp. (buffalo) however, buffalo from the parks in the north of the country (KVNP and MFNP) were negative for these haemoparasites. Anaplasma centrale and Anaplasma marginale were circulating in buffalo from all four national parks. T. parva gene pools from two geographically separated populations of buffalo in two of the national parks in Uganda (LMNP and QENP) were compared. The T. parva populations in the two national parks were distinct, indicating that there was limited gene flow between the populations. The results presented highlight the complexity of tick-borne pathogen infections in buffalo and the significant role that buffalo may play as reservoir hosts for veterinary haemoparasites

  4. Cystic echinococcosis in water buffaloes: epidemiological survey and molecular evidence of ovine (G1) and buffalo (G3) strains.

    PubMed

    Capuano, F; Rinaldi, L; Maurelli, M P; Perugini, A G; Veneziano, V; Garippa, G; Genchi, C; Musella, V; Cringoli, G

    2006-04-30

    A survey of cystic echinococcosis (CE) in the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) of the Italian Mediterranean breed was carried out in Campania, a region of southern Italy. In addition, a molecular study was performed on 48 hydatid cysts coming from 48 water buffaloes in order to determine the Echinococcus granulosus strain(s) present in this host. Out of a total of 722 water buffaloes examined for CE, 76 (10.5%) were found infected. The average number of cysts per buffalo was 4.3 (minimum 1, maximum 45). Seventeen buffaloes had hydatid cysts only in the liver (with an average of 5 cysts/liver), 34 only in the lungs (with an average of 1.8 cysts/lungs), and 25 buffaloes had cysts both in the liver and in the lungs. Fertile cysts were found in 10 (13.2%) out of the 76 positive buffaloes. The sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) gene of the 48 hydatid cysts produced sequences of 419 bp for each sample analysed. For 33 samples, alignment of the obtained sequences with those present in GenBank showed a total homology with the common domestic sheep strain G1; for 15 samples, sequences obtained showed 100% homology with buffalo strain G3. The findings of the present survey represent the first epidemiological and molecular comprehensive studies on CE in water buffalo from an endemic area for E. granulosus.

  5. Cystic echinococcosis in water buffaloes: epidemiological survey and molecular evidence of ovine (G1) and buffalo (G3) strains.

    PubMed

    Capuano, F; Rinaldi, L; Maurelli, M P; Perugini, A G; Veneziano, V; Garippa, G; Genchi, C; Musella, V; Cringoli, G

    2006-04-30

    A survey of cystic echinococcosis (CE) in the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) of the Italian Mediterranean breed was carried out in Campania, a region of southern Italy. In addition, a molecular study was performed on 48 hydatid cysts coming from 48 water buffaloes in order to determine the Echinococcus granulosus strain(s) present in this host. Out of a total of 722 water buffaloes examined for CE, 76 (10.5%) were found infected. The average number of cysts per buffalo was 4.3 (minimum 1, maximum 45). Seventeen buffaloes had hydatid cysts only in the liver (with an average of 5 cysts/liver), 34 only in the lungs (with an average of 1.8 cysts/lungs), and 25 buffaloes had cysts both in the liver and in the lungs. Fertile cysts were found in 10 (13.2%) out of the 76 positive buffaloes. The sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) gene of the 48 hydatid cysts produced sequences of 419 bp for each sample analysed. For 33 samples, alignment of the obtained sequences with those present in GenBank showed a total homology with the common domestic sheep strain G1; for 15 samples, sequences obtained showed 100% homology with buffalo strain G3. The findings of the present survey represent the first epidemiological and molecular comprehensive studies on CE in water buffalo from an endemic area for E. granulosus. PMID:16480832

  6. Prevalence of helminths in water buffaloes in Hunan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Li, F; Liu, W; Dai, R S; Tan, Y M; He, D S; Lin, R Q; Zhu, X Q

    2009-04-01

    The prevalence of helminths in the Asian water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) was investigated in Hunan Province, People's Republic of China between April 2005 and October 2007. A total of 359 adult buffaloes slaughtered at local abattoirs in 12 representative geographical locations in Hunan Province were examined for the presence of helminths. The worms were examined, counted and identified to species according to existing keys and descriptions. A total of 13 helminth species were found representing one phyla, two classes, eight families and nine genera. All buffaloes were infected by more than one helminth species. 61.8% of the examined buffaloes were infected with Haemonchus contortus, 44.7% with Fasciola hepatica, 24.9% with Fasciola hepatica, 23.5% with Homalogaster paloniae and 23.2% with Setaria labiatopapillosa, whereas the infection of adult buffaloes with cestodes was not detected in the present investigation. The results of the present investigation indicated that the prevalence of nematodes and trematodes in buffaloes is quite severe, some of which pose significant zoonotic public health problems (eg., schistosomiasis). It is imperative that integrated strategies and measures be taken to control helminth infections in buffaloes in Hunan Province and elsewhere.

  7. Heterogeneity in buffalo lutropin.

    PubMed

    Muralidhar, K; Rajendrakumar, T; Sharma, H P

    1992-04-01

    Lutropin (LH-1) from water buffaloes has been shown to exhibit microheterogeneity in the N-terminal amino-acid sequence of its alpha-subunit. The beta-subunit did not exhibit such microheterogeneity. Another protocol of purification yielded a preparation of buffalo LH (bu LH-2) different from the buffalo LH-1 in certain physico-chemical properties like ease of dissociation into subunits, sugar composition, isoelectric point, and elution profile on S-200. Data appear to indicate the presence of more than one form of buffalo lutropin.

  8. Domestic livestock resources of Turkey: water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Orhan; Ertugrul, Mehmet; Wilson, Richard Trevor

    2012-04-01

    Water buffalo are an ancient component of Turkey's domestic livestock resources. Commonly referred to as the Anatolian buffalo the animal is part of the Mediterranean group which includes Syrian, Egyptian and Southeast European animals. Once quite numerous, there have been drastic reductions in their numbers since the 1970s due to intensification of dairy activities, agricultural mechanization and changing consumer preferences. The main areas of distribution are in northwest Turkey in the Marmara and Black Sea Regions. Buffalo are kept in small herds by livestock and mixed crop-livestock farmers. Milk is the main product, meat is largely a by-product of the dairy function and provision of the once-important draught power is now a minor output. Buffalo milk is used to prepare a variety of speciality products but output of both milk and meat is very low in comparison to cattle. Conditions of welfare and health status are not optimal. Internal parasites are a constraint on productivity. Some buffalo are being used for conservation grazing in the Black Sea area to maintain optimal conditions for bird life in a nature reserve. Long neglected by government there are recent activities to establish conservation herds, set up in vitro banks and undertake molecular characterization. More effort is needed by government to promote buffalo production and to engage the general public in conservation of their national heritage.

  9. Domestic livestock resources of Turkey: water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Orhan; Ertugrul, Mehmet; Wilson, Richard Trevor

    2012-04-01

    Water buffalo are an ancient component of Turkey's domestic livestock resources. Commonly referred to as the Anatolian buffalo the animal is part of the Mediterranean group which includes Syrian, Egyptian and Southeast European animals. Once quite numerous, there have been drastic reductions in their numbers since the 1970s due to intensification of dairy activities, agricultural mechanization and changing consumer preferences. The main areas of distribution are in northwest Turkey in the Marmara and Black Sea Regions. Buffalo are kept in small herds by livestock and mixed crop-livestock farmers. Milk is the main product, meat is largely a by-product of the dairy function and provision of the once-important draught power is now a minor output. Buffalo milk is used to prepare a variety of speciality products but output of both milk and meat is very low in comparison to cattle. Conditions of welfare and health status are not optimal. Internal parasites are a constraint on productivity. Some buffalo are being used for conservation grazing in the Black Sea area to maintain optimal conditions for bird life in a nature reserve. Long neglected by government there are recent activities to establish conservation herds, set up in vitro banks and undertake molecular characterization. More effort is needed by government to promote buffalo production and to engage the general public in conservation of their national heritage. PMID:21870064

  10. Generation of a Novel Bacteriophage Library Displaying scFv Antibody Fragments from the Natural Buffalo Host to Identify Antigens from Adult Schistosoma japonicum for Diagnostic Development.

    PubMed

    Hosking, Christopher G; McWilliam, Hamish E G; Driguez, Patrick; Piedrafita, David; Li, Yuesheng; McManus, Donald P; Ilag, Leodevico L; Meeusen, Els N T; Veer, Michael J de

    2015-12-01

    The development of effective diagnostic tools will be essential in the continuing fight to reduce schistosome infection; however, the diagnostic tests available to date are generally laborious and difficult to implement in current parasite control strategies. We generated a series of single-chain antibody Fv domain (scFv) phage display libraries from the portal lymph node of field exposed water buffaloes, Bubalus bubalis, 11-12 days post challenge with Schistosoma japonicum cercariae. The selected scFv-phages showed clear enrichment towards adult schistosomes and excretory-secretory (ES) proteins by immunofluorescence, ELISA and western blot analysis. The enriched libraries were used to probe a schistosome specific protein microarray resulting in the recognition of a number of proteins, five of which were specific to schistosomes, with RNA expression predominantly in the adult life-stage based on interrogation of schistosome expressed sequence tags (EST). As the libraries were enriched by panning against ES products, these antigens may be excreted or secreted into the host vasculature and hence may make good targets for a diagnostic assay. Further selection of the scFv library against infected mouse sera identified five soluble scFv clones that could selectively recognise soluble whole adult preparations (SWAP) relative to an irrelevant protein control (ovalbumin). Furthermore, two of the identified scFv clones also selectively recognised SWAP proteins when spiked into naïve mouse sera. These host B-cell derived scFvs that specifically bind to schistosome protein preparations will be valuable reagents for further development of a cost effective point-of-care diagnostic test. PMID:26684756

  11. Generation of a Novel Bacteriophage Library Displaying scFv Antibody Fragments from the Natural Buffalo Host to Identify Antigens from Adult Schistosoma japonicum for Diagnostic Development

    PubMed Central

    Hosking, Christopher G.; McWilliam, Hamish E. G.; Driguez, Patrick; Piedrafita, David; Li, Yuesheng; McManus, Donald P.; Ilag, Leodevico L.; Meeusen, Els N. T.; de Veer, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of effective diagnostic tools will be essential in the continuing fight to reduce schistosome infection; however, the diagnostic tests available to date are generally laborious and difficult to implement in current parasite control strategies. We generated a series of single-chain antibody Fv domain (scFv) phage display libraries from the portal lymph node of field exposed water buffaloes, Bubalus bubalis, 11–12 days post challenge with Schistosoma japonicum cercariae. The selected scFv-phages showed clear enrichment towards adult schistosomes and excretory-secretory (ES) proteins by immunofluorescence, ELISA and western blot analysis. The enriched libraries were used to probe a schistosome specific protein microarray resulting in the recognition of a number of proteins, five of which were specific to schistosomes, with RNA expression predominantly in the adult life-stage based on interrogation of schistosome expressed sequence tags (EST). As the libraries were enriched by panning against ES products, these antigens may be excreted or secreted into the host vasculature and hence may make good targets for a diagnostic assay. Further selection of the scFv library against infected mouse sera identified five soluble scFv clones that could selectively recognise soluble whole adult preparations (SWAP) relative to an irrelevant protein control (ovalbumin). Furthermore, two of the identified scFv clones also selectively recognised SWAP proteins when spiked into naïve mouse sera. These host B-cell derived scFvs that specifically bind to schistosome protein preparations will be valuable reagents for further development of a cost effective point-of-care diagnostic test. PMID:26684756

  12. Generation of a Novel Bacteriophage Library Displaying scFv Antibody Fragments from the Natural Buffalo Host to Identify Antigens from Adult Schistosoma japonicum for Diagnostic Development.

    PubMed

    Hosking, Christopher G; McWilliam, Hamish E G; Driguez, Patrick; Piedrafita, David; Li, Yuesheng; McManus, Donald P; Ilag, Leodevico L; Meeusen, Els N T; Veer, Michael J de

    2015-12-01

    The development of effective diagnostic tools will be essential in the continuing fight to reduce schistosome infection; however, the diagnostic tests available to date are generally laborious and difficult to implement in current parasite control strategies. We generated a series of single-chain antibody Fv domain (scFv) phage display libraries from the portal lymph node of field exposed water buffaloes, Bubalus bubalis, 11-12 days post challenge with Schistosoma japonicum cercariae. The selected scFv-phages showed clear enrichment towards adult schistosomes and excretory-secretory (ES) proteins by immunofluorescence, ELISA and western blot analysis. The enriched libraries were used to probe a schistosome specific protein microarray resulting in the recognition of a number of proteins, five of which were specific to schistosomes, with RNA expression predominantly in the adult life-stage based on interrogation of schistosome expressed sequence tags (EST). As the libraries were enriched by panning against ES products, these antigens may be excreted or secreted into the host vasculature and hence may make good targets for a diagnostic assay. Further selection of the scFv library against infected mouse sera identified five soluble scFv clones that could selectively recognise soluble whole adult preparations (SWAP) relative to an irrelevant protein control (ovalbumin). Furthermore, two of the identified scFv clones also selectively recognised SWAP proteins when spiked into naïve mouse sera. These host B-cell derived scFvs that specifically bind to schistosome protein preparations will be valuable reagents for further development of a cost effective point-of-care diagnostic test.

  13. The nature and outcome of infection in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Gladman, D D; Hussain, F; Ibañez, D; Urowitz, M B

    2002-01-01

    Infection remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To describe the nature and outcomes of infection and determine their associated risk factors in patients with SLE, we performed a nested case-control study at the University of Toronto Lupus Clinic, with prospective follow-up according to a standard protocol since 1970. Cases were SLE patients seen between January 1987 and January 1992 who had documented infections and controls were patients without infection from the same cohort matched for age, gender and time of visit. The type, site and outcome of infection were recorded for each case. A conditional logistic regression analysis was performed to compare factors associated with infection in cases and their controls. Ninety-three patients had 148 infection episodes; the majority were bacterial, but viral, fungal and protozoan organisms were also identified (multiple organisms in seven). Forty-eight patients required hospital admission and three patients died. Steroids at time of infection, as well as use ever, duration and dose, immunosuppressives at time of infection and use ever, active renal disease, CNS damage, SLEDAI at the time of infection, adjusted mean SLEDAI and variability measure were significantly associated with infection by univariate analysis. By multivariate analysis one factor remained statistically significant: use of steroids ever (P = 0.029). Infection carries a large burden for SLE patients. Until new medications which will control disease activity without predisposing to infection are developed, careful titration of steroids and cytotoxic drugs to control disease activity will remain crucial.

  14. Expression and antigenic characterization of bubaline herpesvirus 1 (BuHV1) glycoprotein E and its potential application in the epidemiology and control of alphaherpesvirus infections in Mediterranean water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Nogarol, C; Bertolotti, L; De Carlo, E; Masoero, L; Caruso, C; Profiti, M; Martucciello, A; Galiero, G; Cordioli, P; Lelli, D; Nardelli, S; Ingravalle, F; Rosati, S

    2014-10-01

    Bubaline herpesvirus 1 (BuHV1) is a member of ruminant alphaherpesviruses antigenically related to bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV1). The impact of BuHV1 infection in infectious bovine rhinotracheitis control program is difficult to establish, due to the lack of specific diagnostic test. The ectodomain of glycoprotein E of BuHV1 was expressed as recombinant secreted protein and used in indirect ELISA as well as in a discriminatory test using the BoHV1 counterpart. A panel of monoclonal antibodies was produced against BuHV1; 6 out of 7 anti-gE monoclonal antibodies specifically recognized the BuHV1 gE. Results indicated BuHV1 gE as a sensitive marker of infection compared to seroneutralization (SN) test or blocking ELISA. When BoHV1 and BuHV1 gEs were immobilized in different wells of the same ELISA microplate, bovine and water buffalo sera were more reactive against the respective infecting virus. About one third of seropositive buffaloes with no history of contact with cattle and having higher SN titres, reacted in BoHV1 gE blocking ELISA, possibly because of steric hindrance. Since in two occasions BuHV1 was also isolated from water buffalo scoring gB+/gE+ BoHV1 blocking ELISA, we conclude that the combination of the two blocking ELISAs is not suitable to differentiate between BoHV1 and BuHV1. PMID:24992670

  15. Expression and antigenic characterization of bubaline herpesvirus 1 (BuHV1) glycoprotein E and its potential application in the epidemiology and control of alphaherpesvirus infections in Mediterranean water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Nogarol, C; Bertolotti, L; De Carlo, E; Masoero, L; Caruso, C; Profiti, M; Martucciello, A; Galiero, G; Cordioli, P; Lelli, D; Nardelli, S; Ingravalle, F; Rosati, S

    2014-10-01

    Bubaline herpesvirus 1 (BuHV1) is a member of ruminant alphaherpesviruses antigenically related to bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV1). The impact of BuHV1 infection in infectious bovine rhinotracheitis control program is difficult to establish, due to the lack of specific diagnostic test. The ectodomain of glycoprotein E of BuHV1 was expressed as recombinant secreted protein and used in indirect ELISA as well as in a discriminatory test using the BoHV1 counterpart. A panel of monoclonal antibodies was produced against BuHV1; 6 out of 7 anti-gE monoclonal antibodies specifically recognized the BuHV1 gE. Results indicated BuHV1 gE as a sensitive marker of infection compared to seroneutralization (SN) test or blocking ELISA. When BoHV1 and BuHV1 gEs were immobilized in different wells of the same ELISA microplate, bovine and water buffalo sera were more reactive against the respective infecting virus. About one third of seropositive buffaloes with no history of contact with cattle and having higher SN titres, reacted in BoHV1 gE blocking ELISA, possibly because of steric hindrance. Since in two occasions BuHV1 was also isolated from water buffalo scoring gB+/gE+ BoHV1 blocking ELISA, we conclude that the combination of the two blocking ELISAs is not suitable to differentiate between BoHV1 and BuHV1.

  16. A review of recent developments in buffalo reproduction - a review.

    PubMed

    Warriach, H M; McGill, D M; Bush, R D; Wynn, P C; Chohan, K R

    2015-03-01

    The buffalo is an important livestock resource in several countries of South Asia and the Mediterranean regions. However, reproductive efficiency is compromised due to known problems of biological and management origins, such as lack of animal selection and poor nutrition. Under optimal conditions puberty is attained at 15 to 18 months in river buffalo, 21 to 24 months in swamp buffalo and is influenced by genotype, nutrition, management and climate. However, under field conditions these values deteriorate up to a significant extant. To improve reproductive efficiency, several protocols of oestrus and ovulation synchronization have been adopted from their use in commercial cattle production. These protocols yield encouraging pregnancy rates of (30% to 50%), which are comparable to those achieved in buffaloes bred at natural oestrus. The use of sexed semen in buffalo heifers also showed promising pregnancy rates (50%) when compared with conventional non-sexed semen. Assisted reproductive technologies have been transferred and adapted to buffalo but the efficiency of these technologies are low. However, these latest technologies offer the opportunity to accelerate the genetic gain in the buffalo industry after improving the technology and reducing its cost. Most buffaloes are kept under the small holder farming system in developing countries. Hence, future research should focus on simple, adoptable and impact- oriented approaches which identify the factors determining low fertility and oestrus behaviour in this species. Furthermore, role of kisspeptin needs to be explored in buffalo. PMID:25656203

  17. Natural Norovirus Infections in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Using a recently developed real-time reverse transcription PCR, I retested 500 fecal samples from rhesus macaques collected in 2008. Previous conventional reverse transcription PCR testing identified 1 isolate of GII norovirus; retesting found GI, GII, and possible GIV noroviruses in the samples, indicating the natural circulation of noroviruses in nonhuman primate colonies. PMID:27314565

  18. The natural history of bacterial biofilm graft infection.

    PubMed

    Bergamini, T M; Corpus, R A; Brittian, K R; Peyton, J C; Cheadle, W G

    1994-05-01

    A mouse model was developed to study the natural history of vascular prosthetic graft infection due to Staphylococcus epidermidis. Graft infections were established in the back subcutaneous tissue of 46 mice by implantation of Dacron prostheses colonized in vitro with slime-producing S. epidermidis to form an adherent bacterial biofilm [1.7 x 10(7) colony forming units (CFU)/cm2 graft]. Control animals (n = 16) had implantation of sterile Dacron prostheses. None of the control animals developed a graft infection or graft-cutaneous sinus tract. All study animals developed a biofilm graft infection with typical anatomic (perigraft abscess), microbiologic (low bacterial concentration in surface biofilm), and immunologic (normal white blood count) characteristics. A graft-cutaneous sinus tract developed in a significantly higher number of mice with infected grafts by 8-10 weeks (9 of 21) compared to infected grafts explanted at 2 and 4-6 weeks (1 of 25, P < 0.01) and controls (0 of 16, P < 0.03). By 8-10 weeks, 2 animals had no signs of graft infection and the S. epidermidis study strain was not recoverable from 7 grafts. The natural history of bacterial biofilm vascular prostheses infection in the mouse model was similar to that in man, provoking a chronic inflammatory process curiously presenting as a perigraft abscess or graft-cutaneous sinus tract.

  19. Colombian Anopheles triannulatus (Diptera: Culicidae) Naturally Infected with Plasmodium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Rosero, Doris A.; Naranjo-Diaz, Nelson; Alvarez, Natalí; Cienfuegos, Astrid V.; Luckhart, Shirley

    2013-01-01

    The role of Anopheles triannulatus as a local vector has not yet been defined for malaria-endemic regions of Colombia. Therefore, the aim of this work was to detect An. triannulatus naturally infected with Plasmodium spp., as an approximation to determining its importance as malaria vector in the country. A total of 510 An. triannulatus were collected in six malaria-endemic localities of NW and SE Colombia from January 2009 to March 2011. In the NW, two specimens were naturally infected; one with Plasmodium vivax VK247, collected biting on humans and the other with Plasmodium falciparum, collected resting on cattle. In the SE, two specimens were positive for P. falciparum. Although these results show An. triannulatus naturally infected with Plasmodium, further studies are recommended to demonstrate the epidemiological importance of this species in malaria-endemic regions of Colombia. PMID:27335865

  20. Wolbachia increases susceptibility to Plasmodium infection in a natural system

    PubMed Central

    Zélé, F.; Nicot, A.; Berthomieu, A.; Weill, M.; Duron, O.; Rivero, A.

    2014-01-01

    Current views about the impact of Wolbachia on Plasmodium infections are almost entirely based on data regarding artificially transfected mosquitoes. This work has shown that Wolbachia reduces the intensity of Plasmodium infections in mosquitoes, raising the exciting possibility of using Wolbachia to control or limit the spread of malaria. Whether natural Wolbachia infections have the same parasite-inhibiting properties is not yet clear. Wolbachia–mosquito combinations with a long evolutionary history are, however, key for understanding what may happen with Wolbachia-transfected mosquitoes after several generations of coevolution. We investigate this issue using an entirely natural mosquito–Wolbachia–Plasmodium combination. In contrast to most previous studies, which have been centred on the quantification of the midgut stages of Plasmodium, we obtain a measurement of parasitaemia that relates directly to transmission by following infections to the salivary gland stages. We show that Wolbachia increases the susceptibility of Culex pipiens mosquitoes to Plasmodium relictum, significantly increasing the prevalence of salivary gland stage infections. This effect is independent of the density of Wolbachia in the mosquito. These results suggest that naturally Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes may, in fact, be better vectors of malaria than Wolbachia-free ones. PMID:24500167

  1. Host cellular components adhering to the tegument of schistosomes from cattle, buffalo, hippopotamus and lechwe.

    PubMed

    Kruger, F J; Wolmarans, C T

    1990-06-01

    The teguments of adult Schistosoma mattheei from cattle and buffalo, S. hippopotami from hippopotamus and S. margrebowiei from lechwe were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy for cells possibly engaged in immunological action. Leukocytes were observed on the teguments of the schistosomes from all 4 host species. Although certain of these cells seemed to be fused to the surface membrane of the worms, they did not display pseudopodia. The tegument of certain schistosomes from buffalo exhibited cells the size of platelets with dendritic structures connected to the tegument of the parasite. The results seem to indicate that, as with laboratory hosts, naturally infected domestic and wild hosts are unable to mount an effective cellular response against the tegument of live adult shistosomes. The possible role of platelets in immunology against schistosomes is mentioned.

  2. Toll-like receptor responses to Peste des petits ruminants virus in goats and water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekaran, Sakthivel; Biswas, Moanaro; Vignesh, Ambothi R; Ramya, R; Raj, Gopal Dhinakar; Tirumurugaan, Krishnaswamy G; Raja, Angamuthu; Kataria, Ranjit S; Parida, Satya; Elankumaran, Subbiah; Subbiah, Elankumaran

    2014-01-01

    Ovine rinderpest or goat plague is an economically important and contagious viral disease of sheep and goats, caused by the Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). Differences in susceptibility to goat plague among different breeds and water buffalo exist. The host innate immune system discriminates between pathogen associated molecular patterns and self antigens through surveillance receptors known as Toll like receptors (TLR). We investigated the role of TLR and cytokines in differential susceptibility of goat breeds and water buffalo to PPRV. We examined the replication of PPRV in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of Indian domestic goats and water buffalo and demonstrated that the levels of TLR3 and TLR7 and downstream signalling molecules correlation with susceptibility vs resistance. Naturally susceptible goat breeds, Barbari and Tellichery, had dampened innate immune responses to PPRV and increased viral loads with lower basal expression levels of TLR 3/7. Upon stimulation of PBMC with synthetic TLR3 and TLR7 agonists or PPRV, the levels of proinflammatory cytokines were found to be significantly higher while immunosuppressive interleukin (IL) 10 levels were lower in PPRV resistant Kanni and Salem Black breeds and water buffalo at transcriptional level, correlating with reduced viralloads in infected PBMC. Water buffalo produced higher levels of interferon (IFN) α in comparison with goats at transcriptional and translational levels. Pre-treatment of Vero cells with human IFNα resulted in reduction of PPRV replication, confirming the role of IFNα in limiting PPRV replication. Treatment with IRS66, a TLR7 antagonist, resulted in the reduction of IFNα levels, with increased PPRV replication confirming the role of TLR7. Single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of TLR7 of these goat breeds did not show any marked nucleotide differences that might account for susceptibility vs resistance to PPRV. Analyzing other host genetic factors might provide

  3. Toll-Like Receptor Responses to Peste des petits ruminants Virus in Goats and Water Buffalo

    PubMed Central

    Dhanasekaran, Sakthivel; Biswas, Moanaro; Vignesh, Ambothi R.; Ramya, R.; Raj, Gopal Dhinakar; Tirumurugaan, Krishnaswamy G.; Raja, Angamuthu; Kataria, Ranjit S.; Parida, Satya; Subbiah, Elankumaran

    2014-01-01

    Ovine rinderpest or goat plague is an economically important and contagious viral disease of sheep and goats, caused by the Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). Differences in susceptibility to goat plague among different breeds and water buffalo exist. The host innate immune system discriminates between pathogen associated molecular patterns and self antigens through surveillance receptors known as Toll like receptors (TLR). We investigated the role of TLR and cytokines in differential susceptibility of goat breeds and water buffalo to PPRV. We examined the replication of PPRV in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of Indian domestic goats and water buffalo and demonstrated that the levels of TLR3 and TLR7 and downstream signalling molecules correlation with susceptibility vs resistance. Naturally susceptible goat breeds, Barbari and Tellichery, had dampened innate immune responses to PPRV and increased viral loads with lower basal expression levels of TLR 3/7. Upon stimulation of PBMC with synthetic TLR3 and TLR7 agonists or PPRV, the levels of proinflammatory cytokines were found to be significantly higher while immunosuppressive interleukin (IL) 10 levels were lower in PPRV resistant Kanni and Salem Black breeds and water buffalo at transcriptional level, correlating with reduced viralloads in infected PBMC. Water buffalo produced higher levels of interferon (IFN) α in comparison with goats at transcriptional and translational levels. Pre-treatment of Vero cells with human IFNα resulted in reduction of PPRV replication, confirming the role of IFNα in limiting PPRV replication. Treatment with IRS66, a TLR7 antagonist, resulted in the reduction of IFNα levels, with increased PPRV replication confirming the role of TLR7. Single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of TLR7 of these goat breeds did not show any marked nucleotide differences that might account for susceptibility vs resistance to PPRV. Analyzing other host genetic factors might provide

  4. Comprehensive Identification of Immunodominant Proteins of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis Using Antibodies in the Sera from Naturally Infected Hosts.

    PubMed

    Wareth, Gamal; Eravci, Murat; Weise, Christoph; Roesler, Uwe; Melzer, Falk; Sprague, Lisa D; Neubauer, Heinrich; Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan

    2016-04-30

    Brucellosis is a debilitating zoonotic disease that affects humans and animals. The diagnosis of brucellosis is challenging, as accurate species level identification is not possible with any of the currently available serology-based diagnostic methods. The present study aimed at identifying Brucella (B.) species-specific proteins from the closely related species B. abortus and B. melitensis using sera collected from naturally infected host species. Unlike earlier reported investigations with either laboratory-grown species or vaccine strains, in the present study, field strains were utilized for analysis. The label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of the naturally isolated strains of these two closely related species revealed 402 differentially expressed proteins, among which 63 and 103 proteins were found exclusively in the whole cell extracts of B. abortus and B. melitensis field strains, respectively. The sera from four different naturally infected host species, i.e., cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goat were applied to identify the immune-binding protein spots present in the whole protein extracts from the isolated B. abortus and B. melitensis field strains and resolved on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Comprehensive analysis revealed that 25 proteins of B. abortus and 20 proteins of B. melitensis were distinctly immunoreactive. Dihydrodipicolinate synthase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate/malate dehydrogenase from B. abortus, amino acid ABC transporter substrate-binding protein from B. melitensis and fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase from both species were reactive with the sera of all the tested naturally infected host species. The identified proteins could be used for the design of serological assays capable of detecting pan-Brucella, B. abortus- and B. melitensis-specific antibodies.

  5. Comprehensive Identification of Immunodominant Proteins of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis Using Antibodies in the Sera from Naturally Infected Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Wareth, Gamal; Eravci, Murat; Weise, Christoph; Roesler, Uwe; Melzer, Falk; Sprague, Lisa D.; Neubauer, Heinrich; Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a debilitating zoonotic disease that affects humans and animals. The diagnosis of brucellosis is challenging, as accurate species level identification is not possible with any of the currently available serology-based diagnostic methods. The present study aimed at identifying Brucella (B.) species-specific proteins from the closely related species B. abortus and B. melitensis using sera collected from naturally infected host species. Unlike earlier reported investigations with either laboratory-grown species or vaccine strains, in the present study, field strains were utilized for analysis. The label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of the naturally isolated strains of these two closely related species revealed 402 differentially expressed proteins, among which 63 and 103 proteins were found exclusively in the whole cell extracts of B. abortus and B. melitensis field strains, respectively. The sera from four different naturally infected host species, i.e., cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goat were applied to identify the immune-binding protein spots present in the whole protein extracts from the isolated B. abortus and B. melitensis field strains and resolved on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Comprehensive analysis revealed that 25 proteins of B. abortus and 20 proteins of B. melitensis were distinctly immunoreactive. Dihydrodipicolinate synthase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate/malate dehydrogenase from B. abortus, amino acid ABC transporter substrate-binding protein from B. melitensis and fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase from both species were reactive with the sera of all the tested naturally infected host species. The identified proteins could be used for the design of serological assays capable of detecting pan-Brucella, B. abortus- and B. melitensis-specific antibodies. PMID:27144565

  6. Local immune responses of the Chinese water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis, against Schistosoma japonicum larvae: crucial insights for vaccine design.

    PubMed

    McWilliam, Hamish E G; Piedrafita, David; Li, Yuesheng; Zheng, Mao; He, Yongkang; Yu, Xinling; McManus, Donald P; Meeusen, Els N T

    2013-01-01

    Asian schistosomiasis is a zoonotic parasitic disease infecting up to a million people and threatening tens of millions more. Control of this disease is hindered by the animal reservoirs of the parasite, in particular the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis), which is responsible for significant levels of human transmission. A transmission-blocking vaccine administered to buffaloes is a realistic option which would aid in the control of schistosomiasis. This will however require a better understanding of the immunobiology of schistosomiasis in naturally exposed buffaloes, particularly the immune response to migrating schistosome larvae, which are the likely targets of an anti-schistosome vaccine. To address this need we investigated the immune response at the major sites of larval migration, the skin and the lungs, in previously exposed and re-challenged water buffaloes. In the skin, a strong allergic-type inflammatory response occurred, characterised by leukocyte and eosinophil infiltration including the formation of granulocytic abscesses. Additionally at the local skin site, interleukin-5 transcript levels were elevated, while interleukin-10 levels decreased. In the skin-draining lymph node (LN) a predominant type-2 profile was seen in stimulated cells, while in contrast a type-1 profile was detected in the lung draining LN, and these responses occurred consecutively, reflecting the timing of parasite migration. The intense type-2 immune response at the site of cercarial penetration is significantly different to that seen in naive and permissive animal models such as mice, and suggests a possible mechanism for immunity. Preliminary data also suggest a reduced and delayed immune response occurred in buffaloes given high cercarial challenge doses compared with moderate infections, particularly in the skin. This study offers a deeper understanding into the immunobiology of schistosomiasis in a natural host, which may aid in the future design of more effective vaccines.

  7. Estimating sensitivity and specificity of a faecal examination method for Schistosoma japonicum infection in cats, dogs, water buffaloes, pigs, and rats in Western Samar and Sorsogon Provinces, The Philippines.

    PubMed

    Carabin, H; Balolong, E; Joseph, L; McGarvey, S T; Johansen, M V; Fernandez, T; Willingham, A L; Olveda, R

    2005-12-01

    Schistosoma japonicum causes a chronic parasitic disease, which persists as a major public health concern in The Philippines, the People's Republic of China and Indonesia. This infection is unique among helminthic zoonoses because it can infect humans and more than 40 other mammals. The objective of this study was to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of the Danish Bilharziasis Laboratory technique in cats, dogs, pigs, water buffaloes and rats in the Philippines. Faecal samples from each animal were collected on up to five occasions on five consecutive days in four villages of Sorsogon and Western Samar Provinces between January and July 2003. The faecal samples were analysed with the filtration and sedimentation Danish Bilharziasis Laboratory technique. Sensitivity and specificity of one, two, three, four, and five faecal samples were estimated using a Bayesian latent class approach. A total of 59, 43, 74, and 80% of the censored cats, dogs, pigs, and water buffaloes in the four villages were sampled, respectively. For all species, the sensitivity estimates when using the results of only 1 day of sampling were less than 80%. However, the sensitivity improved to at least 96% in all species when three or more faecal samples were collected on three separate days. The specificity was estimated to be above 92% across all species, even if just a single sample is used. The prevalences and 95% credible intervals of S. japonicum, adjusted for imperfect sensitivity and specificity, in cats, dogs, pigs, rats, and water buffaloes were 11.9% (6.8-18.3%), 19.9% (15.1-25.2%), 2.9% (1.1-5.2%), 31.3% (18.3-45.6%) and 6.3% (2.1-12.6%), respectively. Our results suggest that the Danish Bilharziasis Laboratory technique is valid for the detection of infection with S. japonicum in animals, and that sensitivity estimates are excellent when faecal samples are collected on at least three different days. Monitoring S. japonicum infection in animal reservoirs with a valid test could

  8. How natural infection by Nosema ceranae causes honeybee colony collapse.

    PubMed

    Higes, Mariano; Martín-Hernández, Raquel; Botías, Cristina; Bailón, Encarna Garrido; González-Porto, Amelia V; Barrios, Laura; Del Nozal, M Jesús; Bernal, José L; Jiménez, Juan J; Palencia, Pilar García; Meana, Aránzazu

    2008-10-01

    In recent years, honeybees (Apis mellifera) have been strangely disappearing from their hives, and strong colonies have suddenly become weak and died. The precise aetiology underlying the disappearance of the bees remains a mystery. However, during the same period, Nosema ceranae, a microsporidium of the Asian bee Apis cerana, seems to have colonized A. mellifera, and it's now frequently detected all over the world in both healthy and weak honeybee colonies. For first time, we show that natural N. ceranae infection can cause the sudden collapse of bee colonies, establishing a direct correlation between N. ceranae infection and the death of honeybee colonies under field conditions. Signs of colony weakness were not evident until the queen could no longer replace the loss of the infected bees. The long asymptomatic incubation period can explain the absence of evident symptoms prior to colony collapse. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that healthy colonies near to an infected one can also become infected, and that N. ceranae infection can be controlled with a specific antibiotic, fumagillin. Moreover, the administration of 120 mg of fumagillin has proven to eliminate the infection, but it cannot avoid reinfection after 6 months. We provide Koch's postulates between N. ceranae infection and a syndrome with a long incubation period involving continuous death of adult bees, non-stop brood rearing by the bees and colony loss in winter or early spring despite the presence of sufficient remaining pollen and honey.

  9. A PCR-based RFLP analysis of Sarcocystis cruzi (Protozoa: Sarcocystidae) in Yunnan Province, PR China, reveals the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) as a natural intermediate host.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing-Qing; Yang, Zha-Qing; Zuo, Yang-Xian; Attwood, S W; Chen, Xin-Wen; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2002-12-01

    A polymerase chain reaction-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) approach is used to examine Sarcocystis cruzi-like taxa from the atypical intermediate host, water buffalo, in Yunnan, People's Republic of China. The loci examined lie within the 18S rRNA gene. A total of 15 water buffalo isolates are compared with those of 10 S. cruzi from cattle. RFLP patterns for the S. cruzi isolates from cattle and the S. cruzi-like taxon from water buffalo are found to be identical with all the 12 restriction enzymes used. Interpopulation variation between samples from Kunming and Gengma (Yunnan) is found to be undetectable at these loci for both S. cruzi and the S. cruzi-like taxon. But RFLPs are found between the S. cruzi taxa and S. suihominis from pigs at the same study sites. These findings support the hypothesis that S. cruzi is able to use the water buffalo as an intermediate host and is not restricted to cattle as was previously supposed.

  10. Reproduction in domestic buffalo.

    PubMed

    Perera, B M A O

    2008-07-01

    The domestic buffalo is an indispensable livestock resource to millions of smallholder farmers in developing countries, particularly in Asia. Although its reproductive biology is basically similar to that of cattle, there are important differences and unique characteristics that need to be considered in order to apply modern reproductive technologies to improve its productivity. Under most smallholder production systems, the reproductive efficiency of buffalo is compromised by factors related to climate, management, nutrition and diseases. However, when managed and fed properly, buffalo can have good fertility and provide milk, calves and draught power over a long productive life. The basic technical problems associated with artificial insemination in buffalo were largely overcome two decades ago, but the technology has not had the expected impact in some developing countries, because largely of infrastructural and logistic problems. Approaches involving the use of hormones for treating anoestrus and for synchronizing oestrus have had varying rates of success, depending on the protocols used and the incidence of underlying problems that cause infertility. Embryo technologies such as multiple ovulation embryo transfer, in vitro embryo production, cryopreservation and cloning are being intensively studied but have had far lower success rates than in cattle. Improving the productivity of buffalo requires an understanding of their potential and limitations under each farming system, development of simple intervention strategies to ameliorate deficiencies in management, nutrition and healthcare, followed by judicious application of reproductive technologies that are sustainable with the resources available to buffalo farmers.

  11. Reproduction in domestic buffalo.

    PubMed

    Perera, B M A O

    2008-07-01

    The domestic buffalo is an indispensable livestock resource to millions of smallholder farmers in developing countries, particularly in Asia. Although its reproductive biology is basically similar to that of cattle, there are important differences and unique characteristics that need to be considered in order to apply modern reproductive technologies to improve its productivity. Under most smallholder production systems, the reproductive efficiency of buffalo is compromised by factors related to climate, management, nutrition and diseases. However, when managed and fed properly, buffalo can have good fertility and provide milk, calves and draught power over a long productive life. The basic technical problems associated with artificial insemination in buffalo were largely overcome two decades ago, but the technology has not had the expected impact in some developing countries, because largely of infrastructural and logistic problems. Approaches involving the use of hormones for treating anoestrus and for synchronizing oestrus have had varying rates of success, depending on the protocols used and the incidence of underlying problems that cause infertility. Embryo technologies such as multiple ovulation embryo transfer, in vitro embryo production, cryopreservation and cloning are being intensively studied but have had far lower success rates than in cattle. Improving the productivity of buffalo requires an understanding of their potential and limitations under each farming system, development of simple intervention strategies to ameliorate deficiencies in management, nutrition and healthcare, followed by judicious application of reproductive technologies that are sustainable with the resources available to buffalo farmers. PMID:18638124

  12. Seroprevalence of Trypanosoma evansi infection in water buffaloes from the mountainous region of North Vietnam and effectiveness of trypanocidal drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quoc Doanh; Nguyen, Thu-Thuy; Pham, Quang Phuc; LE, Ngoc My; Nguyen, Giang Thanh T; Inoue, Noboru

    2013-01-01

    Water buffalo (WB) is an important domestic animal in Vietnam. This study utilized a card agglutination test to investigate seroprevalence of surra in WB population. Sera were collected from 585 WB from 4 different regions in Cao Bang and Thai Nguyen Provinces. Among them, 131 samples (22.4%) were positive for surra. The highest prevalence (24.6%) was found among 3 to 5 years old WB. Buffaloes less than 3 years old had the lowest prevalence (15.6%). Among 27 abortion cases, 9 WB (33.3%) were surra positive. For treatment of surra, Berenil® demonstrated a 100% cure rate, while that of Trypamidium® was only 40%. Our findings suggest that the current control strategy has not succeeded in reducing prevalence of surra in Vietnam.

  13. Natural infection of Cryptosporidium muris (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporiidae) in Siberian chipmunks.

    PubMed

    Hůrková, Lada; Hajdusek, Ondrej; Modrý, David

    2003-04-01

    Coprologic examination of nine Siberian chipmunks (Eutamias sibiricus) imported from Southeast Asia revealed infection with Cryptosporidium sp. Experimental inoculation of BALB/c mice proved their susceptibility to the infection. Infected mice shed oocysts 14-35 days postinfection. Oocyst morphology was similar to that reported for C. muris in previous studies, oocysts were 8.1 (7.0-9.0) x 5.9 (5.0-6.5) microns. Clinical signs were absent in naturally infected chipmunks and experimental mice. Histologic examinations of mice revealed numerous developmental stages of C. muris in the glandular stomach. Analysis of partial small subunit rRNA gene sequences confirmed identity of these isolates as C. muris. Our results represent the first report of C. muris in members of the family Sciuridae.

  14. Naturally occurring animal models of human hepatitis E virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yugo, Danielle M; Cossaboom, Caitlin M; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus in the family Hepeviridae. Hepatitis E caused by HEV is a clinically important global disease. There are currently four well-characterized genotypes of HEV in mammalian species, although numerous novel strains of HEV likely belonging to either new genotypes or species have recently been identified from several other animal species. HEV genotypes 1 and 2 are limited to infection in humans, whereas genotypes 3 and 4 infect an expanding host range of animal species and are zoonotic to humans. Historical animal models include various species of nonhuman primates, which have been indispensable for the discovery of human HEV and for understanding its pathogenesis and course of infection. With the genetic identification and characterization of animal strains of HEV, a number of naturally occurring animal models such as swine, chicken, and rabbit have recently been developed for various aspects of HEV research, including vaccine trials, pathogenicity, cross-species infection, mechanism of virus replication, and molecular biology studies. Unfortunately, the current available animal models for HEV are still inadequate for certain aspects of HEV research. For instance, an animal model is still lacking to study the underlying mechanism of severe and fulminant hepatitis E during pregnancy. Also, an animal model that can mimic chronic HEV infection is critically needed to study the mechanism leading to chronicity in immunocompromised individuals. Genetic identification of additional novel animal strains of HEV may lead to the development of better naturally occurring animal models for HEV. This article reviews the current understanding of animal models of HEV infection in both natural and experimental infection settings and identifies key research needs and limitations.

  15. Eimeria spp. in Brazilian water buffalo.

    PubMed

    de Noronha, Antonio Carlos F; Starke-Buzetti, Wilma A; Duszynski, Donald W

    2009-02-01

    Eimeria species are frequently found in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in Brazil. Here, we report those Eimeria spp. that infect buffalos during their first year of life. Fresh fecal samples were examined from 2 groups (1 group/yr for 2 yr, 2000-2002), each with 18 water buffalo calves (both sexes), from birth through 12 mo of age, in Selvíria, MS, Brazil. Five oocyst morphotypes were observed, i.e., Eimeria ellipsoidalis and Eimeria zuernii, both previously described from water buffalo, and 3 other morphotypes consistent with descriptions of known Eimeria spp. from Artiodactyla hosts, but originally described from other genera than those in which we found them (referred to here as Eimeria species 1-3). Our results showed that buffalo calves started shedding oocysts in their feces between 6-29 days of age, with the highest concentration ranging from 188-292 oocysts/g of feces. The 3 unnamed oocyst morphotypes in the calf feces resembled E. auburnensis (Eimeria sp. 3), E. cylindrica (Eimeria sp. 1), and E. subspherica (Eimeria sp. 2). The most prevalent species were Eimeria sp. 1 and E. ellipsoidalis, which dominated in the youngest animals (6 to 133 days old). Eimeria zuernii oocysts, in contrast, were found only in low numbers in the feces of older calves (208 to 283 days old). Calves were infected more frequently during the rainy season (September to January) in both years, but cows were negative for Eimeria spp., whenever feces were collected (spring, winter, autumn, or summer seasons).

  16. Therapeutic depletion of natural killer cells controls persistent infection.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, Stephen N; Daniels, Keith A; Welsh, Raymond M

    2014-02-01

    Persistent viral infections are associated with host and viral factors that impair effective antiviral immunity. Natural killer (NK) cells contribute to establishment of persistent lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection in mice through suppression of virus-specific T cell responses during the first few days of infection, but NK cell depletion during those early time points can enable severe T cell-mediated immune pathology and death of the host. Here we show that long after their peak in cytolytic activation, NK cells continue to support viral persistence at later times of infection. Delayed depletion of NK cells, 2 to 3 weeks after infection, enhanced virus-specific T cell responses and viral control. This enhancing effect of delayed NK cell depletion on antiviral immunity, in contrast to early NK cell depletion, was not associated with increased morbidity and mortality, and mice quickly regained weight after treatment. The efficacy of the depletion depended in part upon the size of the original virus inoculum, the viral load at the time of depletion, and the presence of CD4 T cells. Each of these factors is an important contributor to the degree of CD8 T cell dysfunction during viral persistence. Thus, NK cells may continuously contribute to exhaustion of virus-specific T cells during chronic infection, possibly by depleting CD4 T cells. Targeting of NK cells could thus be considered in combination with blockade of other immunosuppressive pathways, such as the interleukin-10 (IL-10) and programmed death 1 (PD-1) pathways, as a therapy to cure chronic human infections, including those with HIV or hepatitis C virus. IMPORTANCE Persistent virus infections are a major threat to global human health. The capacity of viruses, including HIV and hepatitis C virus, to overwhelm or subvert host immune responses contributes to a prolonged state of dampened antiviral immune functionality, which in turn facilitates viral persistence. Recent efforts have focused on

  17. Dynamics of Puumala hantavirus infection in naturally infected bank voles (Clethrinomys glareolus).

    PubMed

    Bernshtein, A D; Apekina, N S; Mikhailova, T V; Myasnikov, Y A; Khlyap, L A; Korotkov, Y S; Gavrilovskaya, I N

    1999-01-01

    Specific features of hantavirus infection in bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus) were studied in the endemic area of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in the foothills of the Ural mountains, using long-term observations on living animals by the capture-mark-recapture (CMR) method. The results demonstrated that the infection naturally circulating in the voles is chronic (lasting for up to 15 months) and asymptomatic, with a peak of Puumala virus accumulation and release from the organism during the first month after infection. It was shown that the bank vole population includes young animals with maternal immunity, which remain resistant to the Puumala virus infection for 3-3.5 months. The infection rate in voles depended on the age and sexual maturity of animals. The greatest proportion of seropositive animals was observed among overwintered males. Seroconversion in voles was more frequent during the period of high reproductive activity.

  18. Dynamics of Puumala hantavirus infection in naturally infected bank voles (Clethrinomys glareolus).

    PubMed

    Bernshtein, A D; Apekina, N S; Mikhailova, T V; Myasnikov, Y A; Khlyap, L A; Korotkov, Y S; Gavrilovskaya, I N

    1999-01-01

    Specific features of hantavirus infection in bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus) were studied in the endemic area of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in the foothills of the Ural mountains, using long-term observations on living animals by the capture-mark-recapture (CMR) method. The results demonstrated that the infection naturally circulating in the voles is chronic (lasting for up to 15 months) and asymptomatic, with a peak of Puumala virus accumulation and release from the organism during the first month after infection. It was shown that the bank vole population includes young animals with maternal immunity, which remain resistant to the Puumala virus infection for 3-3.5 months. The infection rate in voles depended on the age and sexual maturity of animals. The greatest proportion of seropositive animals was observed among overwintered males. Seroconversion in voles was more frequent during the period of high reproductive activity. PMID:10664394

  19. Secnidazole for the treatment of giardiasis in naturally infected cats.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Castro, Verônica S P; Tonin, Alexandre A; Brendler, Sabrina; Costa, Marcio M; Jaques, Jeandre A; Bertoletti, Bianca; Zanette, Régis A; Raiser, Alceu G; Mazzanti, Cinthia M; Lopes, Sonia T A; Monteiro, Silvia G

    2011-12-01

    Giardia duodenalis causes enteric infections in humans and animals worldwide. Inefficiency of metronidazole is commonly reported in the veterinary clinic routine in the treatment of giardiasis in dogs and cats. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of secnidazole in the control of infection caused by G. duodenalis in naturally infected cats. For this purpose two experiments were carried out. In the first experiment seven cats were infected with G. duodenalis and treated orally with a single dose of secnidazole (30 mg kg(-1)). In the second experiment a total of 16 cats were used, 11 naturally infected with G. duodenalis and five negative for the parasite. Animals were divided into three groups: group A (n=5) was composed by non-infected animals (negative control), group B (n=5) consisted of infected but untreated animals and group C (n=6) was composed by cats treated orally with a single dose of secnidazole (30 mg kg(-1)). Hematological and biochemical parameters were evaluated before and after treatment. The first experiment reached 100% of efficacy because no cysts were found in the feces after treatment. However, doubts about intoxication and interference with hematological and biochemical parameters came to light. No side effects were observed, and the biochemical and hematological parameters of treated animals remained within physiological range, except for one feline which had elevation of liver enzymes. Based on these results, the utilization of secnidazole could be suggested for the treatment of giardiasis in cats. The main advantage of this treatment is that only a single dose is required, which is interesting in animals hard to handle like cats. PMID:21763779

  20. Ultrastructure of sarcocysts from water buffalo in India.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Speer, C A; Shah, H L

    1989-11-01

    The ultrastructure of sarcocysts of macro- and microscopic species of Sarcocystis was compared from naturally infected water buffalo from India. Grossly visible sarcocysts had walls consisting of cauliflower-like villar protrusions, typical of S. fusiformis. The sarcocyst wall of the microscopic species of Sarcocystis was 6.4 microns thick and consisted of tightly packed conical villar protrusions that were 9.6 microns long and 3.7 microns wide at the base. At approximately 3 microns above the base, the distal two-thirds of the villar protrusion became conical shaped and was bent laterally at an angle of 45 degrees to the sarcocyst surface. The granular layer beneath the villar protrusions was 0.9 microns thick. In S. levinei the granular layer was 1.9 microns thick, the villar protrusions were narrow and it had a highly undulating primary cyst wall. Whether the microscopic S. levinei-like sarcocysts of Indian and Malaysian water buffalo are distinct species of Sarcocystis will require further investigation.

  1. Natural infection of turkeys by infectious laryngotracheitis virus.

    PubMed

    Portz, Cristiana; Beltrão, Nilzane; Furian, Thales Quedi; Júnior, Alfredo Bianco; Macagnan, Marisa; Griebeler, Josiane; Lima Rosa, Carlos André Veiga; Colodel, Edson Moleta; Driemeier, David; Back, Alberto; Barth Schatzmayr, Ortrud Monika; Canal, Cláudio Wageck

    2008-09-18

    The infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) is an important respiratory pathogen of chickens that also infects pheasants and peafowl. Epidemiologically non-related commercial turkey flocks with clinical signs such as tracheitis, swollen sinuses, conjunctivitis and expectoration of bloody mucus were examined for the presence of the virus. Laboratory ILTV detection was performed by virus isolation in embryonated eggs and cell cultures, PCR and sequencing of amplification products, histopathology, indirect immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. One ILTV turkey isolate was also experimentally inoculated into susceptible chickens and turkeys, reproducing a mild respiratory disease. This is the first description of natural infections with ILTV in turkeys.

  2. Natural infection of turkeys by infectious laryngotracheitis virus.

    PubMed

    Portz, Cristiana; Beltrão, Nilzane; Furian, Thales Quedi; Júnior, Alfredo Bianco; Macagnan, Marisa; Griebeler, Josiane; Lima Rosa, Carlos André Veiga; Colodel, Edson Moleta; Driemeier, David; Back, Alberto; Barth Schatzmayr, Ortrud Monika; Canal, Cláudio Wageck

    2008-09-18

    The infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) is an important respiratory pathogen of chickens that also infects pheasants and peafowl. Epidemiologically non-related commercial turkey flocks with clinical signs such as tracheitis, swollen sinuses, conjunctivitis and expectoration of bloody mucus were examined for the presence of the virus. Laboratory ILTV detection was performed by virus isolation in embryonated eggs and cell cultures, PCR and sequencing of amplification products, histopathology, indirect immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. One ILTV turkey isolate was also experimentally inoculated into susceptible chickens and turkeys, reproducing a mild respiratory disease. This is the first description of natural infections with ILTV in turkeys. PMID:18436397

  3. Susceptibility of African buffalo and Boran cattle to intravenous inoculation with Trypanosoma congolense bloodstream forms.

    PubMed

    Olubayo, R O; Grootenhuis, J G; Rurangirwa, F R

    1990-06-01

    This study compares the susceptibility of African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) and Boran cattle (Bos indicus) to intravenous infection with T. congolense blood stream forms. The trypanosomes multiplied in the buffaloes and the Boran and reached levels of detectable parasitaemia 4 days after infection in the Boran and 10 days after infection in the buffalo. The cattle developed severe anaemia and had to be treated 60 days after infection to save them from dying whereas the buffaloes did not develop any signs of anaemia and did not require treatment. The Boran cattle showed high levels of parasitaemia persisting throughout the experimental period with some fluctuations. The parasitaemia in the buffaloes reached a peak of 5 x 10(3)/ml, 100 fold below the maximum level in cattle, it was intermittent and by the end of the experimental period (60 days), 3 out of 4 buffaloes had eliminated the parasites from circulation. Neutralizing antibodies were detected at the time of peak parasitaemia or soon after the 1st peak parasitaemia in buffaloes whereas in the Boran cattle neutralizing antibody could not be detected until after several peaks of parasitaemia. Neutralizing antibody persisted both in the Boran and buffaloes until the end of the experimental period. PMID:2382098

  4. Natural infection of bats with Leishmania in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Kassahun, Aysheshm; Sadlova, Jovana; Benda, Petr; Kostalova, Tatiana; Warburg, Alon; Hailu, Asrat; Baneth, Gad; Volf, Petr; Votypka, Jan

    2015-10-01

    The leishmaniases, a group of diseases with a worldwide-distribution, are caused by different species of Leishmania parasites. Both cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis remain important public health problems in Ethiopia. Epidemiological cycles of these protozoans involve various sand fly (Diptera: Psychodidae) vectors and mammalian hosts, including humans. In recent years, Leishmania infections in bats have been reported in the New World countries endemic to leishmaniasis. The aim of this study was to survey natural Leishmania infection in bats collected from various regions of Ethiopia. Total DNA was isolated from spleens of 163 bats belonging to 23 species and 18 genera. Leishmania infection was detected by real-time (RT) PCR targeting a kinetoplast (k) DNA and internal transcribed spacer one (ITS1) gene of the parasite. Detection was confirmed by sequencing of the PCR products. Leishmania kDNA was detected in eight (4.9%) bats; four of them had been captured in the Aba-Roba and Awash-Methara regions that are endemic for leishmaniasis, while the other four specimens originated from non-endemic localities of Metu, Bedele and Masha. Leishmania isolates from two bats were confirmed by ITS1 PCR to be Leishmania tropica and Leishmania major, isolated from two individual bats, Cardioderma cor and Nycteris hispida, respectively. These results represent the first confirmed observation of natural infection of bats with the Old World Leishmania. Hence, bats should be considered putative hosts of Leishmania spp. affecting humans with a significant role in the transmission.

  5. Mass spectrometry data from proteomics-based screening of immunoreactive proteins of fully virulent Brucella strains using sera from naturally infected animals

    PubMed Central

    Wareth, Gamal; Melzer, Falk; Weise, Christoph; Neubauer, Heinrich; Roesler, Uwe; Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan

    2015-01-01

    Here, we provide the dataset associated with our research article on comprehensive screening of Brucella immunoreactive proteins using sera of naturally infected hosts published in Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications Wareth et al., 2015 [1]. Whole-cell protein extracts were prepared from Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis, separated using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and subsequently western blotting was carried out using sera from bovines (cows and buffaloes) and small ruminants (goats and sheep). The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org) via the PRIDE partner repository [2] with the dataset identifiers PXD001270 and DOI:10.6019/PXD001270. PMID:26322324

  6. Viraemia in patients with naturally acquired dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Gubler, D J; Suharyono, W; Tan, R; Abidin, M; Sie, A

    1981-01-01

    The magnitude and duration of dengue viraemia were studied in 153 patients with naturally acquired dengue infection in Jakarta, Indonesia. The duration of viraemia ranged from 2 to 12 days, but most patients had detectable circulating virus for 4-5 days. Accurate measurement of peak virus titres was not possible for many patients because of late admission to the hospital. Composite pictures of viraemia for each serotype, however, showed that many patients infected with dengue 1, 2, or 3 had circulating virus titres ranging from barely detectable to over 10(8) MID(50) per ml for 3-5 days. Virus titres in patients infected with dengue 4 were about 100-fold lower. Dengue haemagglutination-inhibition antibody titres of 80 or less had little effect on viraemia, but antibody titres of 160 or greater were associated with a decrease in virus isolation rate and in virus titre. The duration and magnitude of viraemia did not vary significantly with the severity of the disease and was only slightly higher in patients classified as primary dengue infections than in those classified as secondary infections. Measurement of viraemia in fatal dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) cases showed that these patients had significant quantities of circulating virus at the time of death.

  7. Biochemistry of the various fractions of sarcocysts of Sarcocystis fusiformis of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Khulbe, D C; Kushwah, A; Kushwah, H S

    1989-04-01

    A comparative biochemical study on the various fractions (cyst wall, cyst fluid and zoites) of the sarcocysts of Sarcocystis fusiformis from oesophageal muscles of naturally infected Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) was carried out. The study included analysis for glycogen, glucose, pyruvic acid, lactic acid, total lipids, phospholipids, cholesterol, triglycerides and fatty acids. The pattern and the distribution of various biochemical constituents varied in the different fractions. The cell wall had the maximum concentration of glucose and phospholipids. Of all the fractions, cell fluid showed the highest contents of pyruvate and lactate, but with a higher level of pyruvate than lactate.

  8. Some enzymes of gluconeogenesis in various fractions of sarcocysts of Sarcocystis fusiformis of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Gupta, R S; Kushwah, H S; Kushwah, A

    1994-03-01

    A biochemical study was conducted to assess the relative presence of some enzymes of gluconeogenesis in various fractions--the cyst wall, cyst fluid and zoites--of sarcocysts of Sarcocystis fusiformis obtained from the oesophageal muscles of naturally infected Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). The activities of fructose 1,6-diphosphatase and malic enzyme were beyond detectable limits. Phosphoenol pyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity was maximally present in the zoites, whereas glucose 6-phosphatase activity was highest in the cyst wall. PEPCK seemed to play a crucial role in carbon dioxide fixation metabolism.

  9. Sarcocystis fusiformis: some Krebs cycle enzymes in various fractions of sarcocysts of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Gupta, R S; Kushwah, H S; Kushwah, A

    1995-01-01

    A biochemical investigation was carried out on the relative presence of some enzymes of the Krebs cycle and of the associated energy metabolism in various fractions (namely, cyst wall, cyst fluid and zoites) of sarcocysts of Sarcocystis fusiformis from the oesophageal muscles of naturally infected Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). Except for malate dehydrogenase, the activities of aconitase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase and fumarase were beyond detectable limits, pointing to a non-functional Krebs cycle in the cysts of this parasite. The activities of adenosine triphosphatase and cytochromes were lowest in cyst fluid and were maximally depicted by cyst wall and zoites.

  10. Naturally occurring, nonregressing canine oral papillomavirus infection: host immunity, virus characterization, and experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, P K; Klaunberg, B A; Moore, R A; Santos, E B; Parry, N R; Gough, G W; Stanley, M A

    1999-12-20

    Papillomaviruses occasionally cause severe, nonregressing or recurrent infections in their human and animal hosts. The mechanisms underlying these atypical infections are not known. Canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) typically regresses spontaneously and is an important model of mucosal human papillomavirus infections. A severe, naturally occurring, nonregressing COPV infection provided an opportunity to investigate some aspects of viral pathogenicity and host immunity. In this case, the papillomas proved refractory to surgical and medical treatments, including autogenous vaccination and vaccination with capsid (L1) virus-like particles. High levels of induced anti-L1 antibodies appeared to have no effect on the infection. The papillomas spread to oesophageal mucosa, perioral haired skin, and remote cutaneous sites. Isolation of COPV from the animal and sequencing of several regions of the viral genome showed no differences to the COPV prototype. Experimental infection of beagle dogs with this viral isolate resulted in the uncomplicated development and regression of oral warts within the usual period, indicating that the virus was not an unusual pathogenic variant. These findings support the hypothesis that the recurrent lesions seen in some human papillomavirus infections, such as recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis, are associated with specific defects in host immunity rather than variations in viral pathogenicity. PMID:10600607

  11. Fatal Theileria orientalis N2 genotype infection among Asian water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in a commercial dairy farm in Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Vinodkumar, Kulangara; Shyma, Varikkottil; Justin, Davis Kollannur; Ashok, Sivasailam; Anu, Joseph Parassery; Mini, Kattilveetil; Muhammedkutty, Varikkottil; Sasidharan, Suchithra; Chullipparambil, Sunanda

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen dairy buffaloes of a farm in the state of Kerala, India developed fatal oriental theileriosis within 2 months of their procurement. Typical piroplasms of Theileria orientalis were observed in the erythrocytes of all affected animals by Giemsa-Leishman staining of blood smears. Case fatality rate was 87·5% (seven out of eight) in the clinically progressed cases. Therapeutic management with anti-theilerial drugs buparvaquone and oxytetracycline led to recovery of seven other animals in less advanced stages of the disease. The aim of this study was to determine the reasons for increased virulence of this pathogen, hitherto considered to be benign. Acute haemolytic anaemia was the predominant haematological finding in the affected animals. Lymphocytic infiltration and degeneration of vital organs leading to functional derangement was the cause of the high mortality. Identification of T. orientalis was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). DNA sequencing of the PCR products revealed close identity with already reported sequences of T. orientalis/buffeli N2 genotype. The sequences were deposited in GenBank with accession number KM609973 and KM043772. Rhipicephalus ticks, previously not reported as vectors for oriental theileriosis, were identified as the potential vectors. This is the first report of fatal oriental theileriosis in Asian water buffaloes. PMID:26522773

  12. Fatal Theileria orientalis N2 genotype infection among Asian water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in a commercial dairy farm in Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Vinodkumar, Kulangara; Shyma, Varikkottil; Justin, Davis Kollannur; Ashok, Sivasailam; Anu, Joseph Parassery; Mini, Kattilveetil; Muhammedkutty, Varikkottil; Sasidharan, Suchithra; Chullipparambil, Sunanda

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen dairy buffaloes of a farm in the state of Kerala, India developed fatal oriental theileriosis within 2 months of their procurement. Typical piroplasms of Theileria orientalis were observed in the erythrocytes of all affected animals by Giemsa-Leishman staining of blood smears. Case fatality rate was 87·5% (seven out of eight) in the clinically progressed cases. Therapeutic management with anti-theilerial drugs buparvaquone and oxytetracycline led to recovery of seven other animals in less advanced stages of the disease. The aim of this study was to determine the reasons for increased virulence of this pathogen, hitherto considered to be benign. Acute haemolytic anaemia was the predominant haematological finding in the affected animals. Lymphocytic infiltration and degeneration of vital organs leading to functional derangement was the cause of the high mortality. Identification of T. orientalis was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). DNA sequencing of the PCR products revealed close identity with already reported sequences of T. orientalis/buffeli N2 genotype. The sequences were deposited in GenBank with accession number KM609973 and KM043772. Rhipicephalus ticks, previously not reported as vectors for oriental theileriosis, were identified as the potential vectors. This is the first report of fatal oriental theileriosis in Asian water buffaloes.

  13. The Schistosoma japonicum self-cure phenomenon in water buffaloes: potential impact on the control and elimination of schistosomiasis in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue-Sheng; McManus, Donald P; Lin, Dan-Dan; Williams, Gail M; Harn, Donald A; Ross, Allen G; Feng, Zheng; Gray, Darren J

    2014-03-01

    Schistosomiasis japonica, caused by Schistosoma japonicum, is an important zoonotic disease in China, the Philippines and small pockets of Indonesia. In addition to infecting people, S. japonicum can infect over 40 species of wild and domestic animals which have varying impacts on human infection. It is now generally accepted that bovines, particularly water buffaloes, are the major reservoir for human infection in China as they are naturally infected with schistosomes and deposit more eggs into the environment than humans or any other animal host. This complicates control efforts and the economic burden associated with schistosomiasis morbidity and mortality has taken its toll on both human and livestock populations. Over the last 50years, the schistosomiasis control program in China has made great strides in reducing prevalence and morbidity, and the Chinese authorities now aim to eliminate the disease nationwide in the next decade. Current Chinese control strategies place particular importance on interventions targeting bovines including: praziquantel treatment, barrier farming to prevent grazing in transmission areas, their replacement with mechanized tractors and possible bovine vaccination. A number of studies have shown that in the period following S. japonicum infection, the worm burden drops sharply in water buffaloes and some other animal hosts such as pigs. This is due to a self-cure phenomenon whereby there is parasite clearance by both immune and non-immune factors. Here we review studies investigating the self-cure effect, paying particular attention to S. japonicum infection in water buffaloes, and discuss its potential impact on the future schistosomiasis control and elimination efforts in China. Further understanding of the mechanism of self-cure in water buffaloes could be important for future schistosome vaccine design and delivery.

  14. NUTRITION OF THE HOST AND NATURAL RESISTANCE TO INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Howard A.; Webster, Leslie T.

    1945-01-01

    1. A diet of whole wheat and whole dried milk has been shown to promote a higher survival rate, among W-Swiss mice subjected to S. enteritidis infection, than that promoted by a "synthetic" diet. 2. The demonstration of this ability of diet to condition natural resistance has been found to depend upon the genetic constitution of the mice employed. The demonstration has been possible in W-Swiss mice, a strain only moderately inbred and retaining a degree of genetic variability. The demonstration has not been possible in three highly inbred strains of mice selected so that they differed predictably from one another in natural resistance. 3. The nutritional factors involved are present in whole wheat and are absent or negligible in dried whole milk. Their nature has not yet been determined. PMID:19871463

  15. Natural infection of wild rodents by Schistosoma mansoni. Parasitological aspects.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues e Silva, R; Machado e Silva, J R; Faerstein, N F; Lenzi, H L; Rey, L

    1992-01-01

    The evaluation of the role of rodents as natural hosts of Schistosoma mansoni was studied at the Pamparrão Valley, Sumidouro, RJ, with monthly captures and examination of the animals. Twenty-three Nectomys squamipes and 9 Akodon arviculoides with a schistosomal infection rate of 56.5% and 22.2% respectively eliminated a great majority of viable eggs. With a strain isolated from one of the naturally infected N. squamipes, we infected 75% of simpatric Biomphalaria glabrata and in 100% of albino Mus musculus mice. The adult worms, isolated from N. squamipes after perfusion were located mainly in the liver (91.5%) and the mesenteric veins (8.5%). The male/female proportion was of 2:1. The eggs were distributed on small intestine segments (proximal, medial and distal portions) and the large intestine without any significant differences in egg concentration of these segments. In A. arviculoides, the few eggs eliminated by the stools were viable and there was little egg retention on intestinal segments. Considering the ease to complete S. mansoni biological cycle in the Nectomys/Biomphalaria/Nectomys system under laboratory conditions, probably the same is likely to occur in natural conditions. In support to this hypothesis there are also the facts that human mansonic schistosomiasis has a very low prevalence in Sumidouro and endemicity among the rodents has not changed even after repeated treatments of the local patients. Based on our experiments, we conclude that N. squamipes has become a natural host of S. mansoni and possibly may participate in keeping the cycle of schistosomiasis transmission at Pamparrão Valley. PMID:1343794

  16. Using the local immune response from the natural buffalo host to generate an antibody fragment library that binds the early larval stages of Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Hosking, Christopher G; Driguez, Patrick; McWilliam, Hamish E G; Ilag, Leodevico L; Gladman, Simon; Li, Yuesheng; Piedrafita, David; McManus, Donald P; Meeusen, Els N T; de Veer, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    Antibodies isolated from the local draining inguinal lymph node of field exposed-water buffaloes following challenge with Schistosoma japonicum cercariae showed high reactivity towards S. japonicum antigen preparations and bound specifically to formaldehyde-fixed S. japonicum schistosomules. Using this specific local immune response we produced a series of single-chain antibody Fv domain libraries from the same lymph nodes. Removal of phage that cross reacted with epitopes on adult parasites yielded a single-chain antibody Fv domain-phage library that specifically bound to whole formaldehyde-fixed and live S. japonicum schistosomules. DNA sequencing indicated clear enrichment of the single-chain antibody Fv domain library for buffalo B-cell complementarity determining regions post-selection for schistosomule binding. This study also revealed that long heavy chain complementarity determining regions appear to be an important factor when selecting for antibody binding fragments against schistosomule proteins. The selected single-chain antibody Fv domain-phage were used to probe a schistosome-specific protein microarray, which resulted in the recognition of many proteins expressed across all schistosome life-cycle stages. Following absorption to adult worms, the single-chain antibody Fv domain-phage library showed significantly reduced binding to most proteins, whilst two proteins (NCBI GenBank accession numbers AY915878 and AY815196) showed increased binding. We have thus developed a unique set of host derived single-chain antibody Fv domains comprising buffalo B-cell variable regions that specifically bind to early S. japonicum life-stages.

  17. First report of Cryptosporidium species in farmed and wild buffalo from the Northern Territory, Australia.

    PubMed

    Zahedi, Alireza; Phasey, Jordan; Boland, Tony; Ryan, Una

    2016-03-01

    A molecular epidemiological survey of Cryptosporidium from water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in the Northern Territory in Australia was conducted. Fecal samples were collected from adult farmed (n = 50) and wild buffalo (n = 50) and screened using an 18S quantitative PCR (qPCR). Positives were typed by sequence analysis of 18S nested PCR products. The qPCR prevalence of Cryptosporidium species in farmed and wild buffalo was 30 and 12 %, respectively. Sequence analysis identified two species: C. parvum and C. bovis, with C. parvum accounting for ~80 % of positives typed from the farmed buffalo fecal samples compared to 50 % for wild buffalo. Subtyping at the 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) locus identified C. parvum subtypes IIdA19G1 (n = 4) and IIdA15G1 (n = 1) in the farmed buffalo and IIaA18G3R1 (n = 2) in the wild buffalo. The presence of C. parvum, which commonly infects humans, suggests that water buffaloes may contribute to contamination of rivers and waterways with human infectious Cryptosporidium oocysts, and further research on the epidemiology of Cryptosporidium in buffalo populations in Australia is required.

  18. First report of Cryptosporidium species in farmed and wild buffalo from the Northern Territory, Australia.

    PubMed

    Zahedi, Alireza; Phasey, Jordan; Boland, Tony; Ryan, Una

    2016-03-01

    A molecular epidemiological survey of Cryptosporidium from water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in the Northern Territory in Australia was conducted. Fecal samples were collected from adult farmed (n = 50) and wild buffalo (n = 50) and screened using an 18S quantitative PCR (qPCR). Positives were typed by sequence analysis of 18S nested PCR products. The qPCR prevalence of Cryptosporidium species in farmed and wild buffalo was 30 and 12 %, respectively. Sequence analysis identified two species: C. parvum and C. bovis, with C. parvum accounting for ~80 % of positives typed from the farmed buffalo fecal samples compared to 50 % for wild buffalo. Subtyping at the 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) locus identified C. parvum subtypes IIdA19G1 (n = 4) and IIdA15G1 (n = 1) in the farmed buffalo and IIaA18G3R1 (n = 2) in the wild buffalo. The presence of C. parvum, which commonly infects humans, suggests that water buffaloes may contribute to contamination of rivers and waterways with human infectious Cryptosporidium oocysts, and further research on the epidemiology of Cryptosporidium in buffalo populations in Australia is required. PMID:26758449

  19. Genetic diversity in Trypanosoma theileri from Sri Lankan cattle and water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Naoaki; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Fukushi, Shintaro; Tattiyapong, Muncharee; Tuvshintulga, Bumduuren; Kothalawala, Hemal; Silva, Seekkuge Susil Priyantha; Igarashi, Ikuo; Inoue, Noboru

    2015-01-30

    Trypanosoma theileri is a hemoprotozoan parasite that infects various ruminant species. We investigated the epidemiology of this parasite among cattle and water buffalo populations bred in Sri Lanka, using a diagnostic PCR assay based on the cathepsin L-like protein (CATL) gene. Blood DNA samples sourced from cattle (n=316) and water buffaloes (n=320) bred in different geographical areas of Sri Lanka were PCR screened for T. theileri. Parasite DNA was detected in cattle and water buffaloes alike in all the sampling locations. The overall T. theileri-positive rate was higher in water buffaloes (15.9%) than in cattle (7.6%). Subsequently, PCR amplicons were sequenced and the partial CATL sequences were phylogenetically analyzed. The identity values for the CATL gene were 89.6-99.7% among the cattle-derived sequences, compared with values of 90.7-100% for the buffalo-derived sequences. However, the cattle-derived sequences shared 88.2-100% identity values with those from buffaloes. In the phylogenetic tree, the Sri Lankan CATL gene sequences fell into two major clades (TthI and TthII), both of which contain CATL sequences from several other countries. Although most of the CATL sequences from Sri Lankan cattle and buffaloes clustered independently, two buffalo-derived sequences were observed to be closely related to those of the Sri Lankan cattle. Furthermore, a Sri Lankan buffalo sequence clustered with CATL gene sequences from Brazilian buffalo and Thai cattle. In addition to reporting the first PCR-based survey of T. theileri among Sri Lankan-bred cattle and water buffaloes, the present study found that some of the CATL gene fragments sourced from water buffaloes shared similarity with those determined from cattle in this country.

  20. Sequence variation identified in the 18S rRNA gene of Theileria mutans and Theileria velifera from the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer).

    PubMed

    Chaisi, Mamohale E; Collins, Nicola E; Potgieter, Fred T; Oosthuizen, Marinda C

    2013-01-16

    The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is a natural reservoir host for both pathogenic and non-pathogenic Theileria species. These often occur naturally as mixed infections in buffalo. Although the benign and mildly pathogenic forms do not have any significant economic importance, their presence could complicate the interpretation of diagnostic test results aimed at the specific diagnosis of the pathogenic Theileria parva in cattle and buffalo in South Africa. The 18S rRNA gene has been used as the target in a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay for the detection of T. parva infections. However, the extent of sequence variation within this gene in the non-pathogenic Theileria spp. of the Africa buffalo is not well known. The aim of this study was, therefore, to characterise the full-length 18S rRNA genes of Theileria mutans, Theileria sp. (strain MSD) and T. velifera and to determine the possible influence of any sequence variation on the specific detection of T. parva using the 18S rRNA qPCR. The reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay was used to select samples which either tested positive for several different Theileria spp., or which hybridised only with the Babesia/Theileria genus-specific probe and not with any of the Babesia or Theileria species-specific probes. The full-length 18S rRNA genes from 14 samples, originating from 13 buffalo and one bovine from different localities in South Africa, were amplified, cloned and the resulting recombinants sequenced. Variations in the 18S rRNA gene sequences were identified in T. mutans, Theileria sp. (strain MSD) and T. velifera, with the greatest diversity observed amongst the T. mutans variants. This variation possibly explained why the RLB hybridization assay failed to detect T. mutans and T. velifera in some of the analysed samples.

  1. Feline leukaemia provirus load during the course of experimental infection and in naturally infected cats.

    PubMed

    Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Huder, J B; Gruber, S; Boretti, F; Sigrist, B; Lutz, H

    2001-07-01

    Feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) infection in domestic cats can vary in its outcome (persistent, transient, no infection) for reasons that are not entirely known. It was hypothesized that the initial virus and provirus load could significantly influence the course of retrovirus infection. To determine the role of provirus loads, two methods of PCR, a nested PCR and a fluorogenic probe-based (TaqMan) real-time quantitative PCR, which were specific to the U3 region of FeLV-A were established. FeLV provirus in naturally and experimentally infected cats was then measured. Only 3 weeks after experimental FeLV-A infection, persistently infected cats demonstrated higher provirus loads and lower humoral immune responses than cats that had overcome antigenaemia. Lower initial provirus loads were associated with successful humoral immune responses. Unexpectedly, provirus in the buffy-coat cells of two cats that tested negative for the p27 antigen (a marker for viraemia) was also detected. In 597 Swiss cats, comparison of p27 antigen levels with PCR results revealed broad agreement. However, similar to the experimental situation, a significant number of animals (10%) was negative for the p27 antigen and FeLV-positive by PCR. These cats had a mean provirus load 300-fold lower than that of animals testing positive for the p27 antigen. In conclusion, an association between the provirus load and the outcome of FeLV infection was found. Detection of provirus carriers should contribute to further the control of FeLV. In addition, quantification of provirus loads will lead to a better understanding of FeLV pathogenesis and anti-retrovirus protective mechanisms.

  2. Reproductive cycles of buffalo.

    PubMed

    Perera, B M A O

    2011-04-01

    The domestic water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) has an important role in the agricultural economy of many developing countries in Asia, providing milk, meat and draught power. It is also used in some Mediterranean and Latin American countries as a source of milk and meat for specialized markets. Although the buffalo can adapt to harsh environments and live on poor quality forage, reproductive efficiency is often compromised by such conditions, resulting in late sexual maturity, long postpartum anoestrus, poor expression of oestrus, poor conception rates and long calving intervals. The age at puberty is influenced by genotype, nutrition, management and climate, and under favourable conditions occurs at 15-18 months in river buffalo and 21-24 months in swamp buffalo. The ovaries are smaller than in cattle and contain fewer primordial follicles. Buffalo are capable of breeding throughout the year, but in many countries a seasonal pattern of ovarian activity occurs. This is attributed in tropical regions to changes in rainfall resulting in feed availability or to temperature stress resulting in elevated prolactin secretion, and in temperate regions to changes in photoperiod and melatonin secretion. The mean length of the oestrous cycle is 21 days, with greater variation than observed in cattle. The signs of oestrus in buffalo are less overt than in cattle and homosexual behaviour between females is rare. The duration of oestrus is 5-27 h, with ovulation occurring 24-48 h (mean 34 h) after the onset of oestrus. The hormonal changes occurring in peripheral circulation are similar to those observed in cattle, but the peak concentrations of progesterone and oestradiol-17β are less. The number of follicular waves during an oestrous cycle varies from one to three and influences the length of the luteal phase as well as the inter-ovulatory interval. Under optimal conditions, dairy types managed with limited or no suckling resume oestrus cyclicity by 30-60 days after calving

  3. Reproductive cycles of buffalo.

    PubMed

    Perera, B M A O

    2011-04-01

    The domestic water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) has an important role in the agricultural economy of many developing countries in Asia, providing milk, meat and draught power. It is also used in some Mediterranean and Latin American countries as a source of milk and meat for specialized markets. Although the buffalo can adapt to harsh environments and live on poor quality forage, reproductive efficiency is often compromised by such conditions, resulting in late sexual maturity, long postpartum anoestrus, poor expression of oestrus, poor conception rates and long calving intervals. The age at puberty is influenced by genotype, nutrition, management and climate, and under favourable conditions occurs at 15-18 months in river buffalo and 21-24 months in swamp buffalo. The ovaries are smaller than in cattle and contain fewer primordial follicles. Buffalo are capable of breeding throughout the year, but in many countries a seasonal pattern of ovarian activity occurs. This is attributed in tropical regions to changes in rainfall resulting in feed availability or to temperature stress resulting in elevated prolactin secretion, and in temperate regions to changes in photoperiod and melatonin secretion. The mean length of the oestrous cycle is 21 days, with greater variation than observed in cattle. The signs of oestrus in buffalo are less overt than in cattle and homosexual behaviour between females is rare. The duration of oestrus is 5-27 h, with ovulation occurring 24-48 h (mean 34 h) after the onset of oestrus. The hormonal changes occurring in peripheral circulation are similar to those observed in cattle, but the peak concentrations of progesterone and oestradiol-17β are less. The number of follicular waves during an oestrous cycle varies from one to three and influences the length of the luteal phase as well as the inter-ovulatory interval. Under optimal conditions, dairy types managed with limited or no suckling resume oestrus cyclicity by 30-60 days after calving

  4. Embryonic mortality in buffaloes synchronized and mated by AI during the seasonal decline in reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Campanile, Giuseppe; Neglia, Gianluca; Gasparrini, Bianca; Galiero, Giorgio; Prandi, Alberto; Di Palo, Rossella; D'Occhio, Michael J; Zicarelli, Luigi

    2005-05-01

    The aim was to determine the factors that contribute to embryonic mortality in buffaloes mated by AI during a period of increasing day length which corresponds to a natural decline in reproductive activity. Italian Mediterranean buffalo cows (n=243) showing regular estrous cycles were synchronized using the Ovsynch-TAI program and mated by AI at 16 and 40 h after the second injection of GnRH. Blood samples were collected on Days 10 and 20 after the first AI and assayed for progesterone (P4). Pregnancy diagnosis was undertaken on Days 26 and 40 after the first AI using rectal ultrasonography. Buffaloes with a conceptus on Day 26 but not on Day 40 were judged to have undergone embryonic mortality and for these animals uterine fluid was recovered by flushing and analysed for common infectious agents. Estrus synchronization was achieved in 86% of buffaloes and the pregnancy rate on Day 40 was 34%. Embryonic mortality between Days 26 and 40 occurred in 45% of buffaloes and was associated with the presence of significant infectious agents in only 10 buffaloes (8%). Concentrations of P4 on Day 10 after AI were higher (P<0.05) in buffaloes that established a pregnancy than in buffaloes that showed embryonic mortality that was not associated with infectious agents. Similarly, on Day 20 after AI P4 concentrations were higher (P<0.01) in pregnant buffaloes compared with non-pregnant buffaloes and buffaloes that had embryonic mortality. It is concluded that a reduced capacity for P4 secretion can explain around 50% of embryonic mortalities in buffaloes synchronised and mated by AI during a period of low reproductive activity and that other as yet unidentified factors also have a significant effect on embryonic survival. PMID:15826694

  5. A field study on artificial insemination of swamp and crossbred buffaloes with sexed semen from river buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yangqing; Liao, Yanqiong; Zhang, Ming; Yang, Bingzhuang; Liang, Xianwei; Yang, Xiaogan; Lu, Shengsheng; Wu, Zhuyue; Xu, Huiyan; Liang, Yunbin; Lu, Kehuan

    2015-10-01

    Sex preselection by flow sorting of X- and Y-sperm has been proven to be an efficient and economically feasible strategy for use in Holstein dairy cow breeding, and previous reports have demonstrated the feasibility of altering the sex ratio in buffalo species by using sexed semen in either artificial insemination or IVF. However, because buffalo reproductive physiology and farm management are different from Holsteins, factors involved in artificial insemination by sexed semen need to be further addressed before being applied in buffalo breeding at village-level husbandry. In this study, a total of 4521 swamp or crossbred (F1 or F2) buffaloes with natural estrus were inseminated with X-sorted sperm from river buffaloes, resulting in a 48.5% (2194 of 4521) pregnancy rate and 87.6% (1895 of 2163) sex accuracy in the derived calves. The pregnancy rate obtained with sexed semen from Murrah bulls was higher than that of Nili-Ravi, 52.5% (895 of 1706) versus 46.1% (1299 of 2815; P < 0.01), respectively. Also, significant variations were seen in pregnancy rates from inseminations performed in different seasons (P < 0.01) and by different technicians (P < 0.01). In contrast to Holsteins, no difference was seen in the pregnancy rate between heifers and parous buffalo cows, and buffalo cows with different genetic backgrounds (swamp type, crossbred F1 and F2) showed similar fertility after insemination with sexed semen. The findings in the present study under field conditions pave the way for application of sexing technology to buffalo breeding under village-level husbandry and diverse genetic backgrounds. PMID:26149075

  6. A review of Neospora caninum in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Reichel, Michael P; McAllister, Milton M; Nasir, Amar; Moore, Dadin P

    2015-09-15

    A number of countries in the world have reported infections with Neospora caninum in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis), from Africa to Asia, Europe and South America and recently Australia. In general, clinical manifestations (such as abortion) seem rare, which has raised the prospect that buffalo may be inherently resistant to clinical effects of N. caninum infection. Worldwide, the seroprevalence of N. caninum infection (as a measure of exposure determined by the detection of antibody) in buffalo is high, at approximately 48%. This reported seroprevalence is three or four times higher than that reported from the world's cattle populations, which have collective seroprevalence rates of 16.1% for dairy cattle and 11.5% for beef cattle. However, there is a lack of standardisation in seroprevalence studies and some studies may well under-estimate the true level of infection. Epidemiologic evidence supports post-natal transmission, and in utero transmission has also been demonstrated. The causes for water buffalo to have markedly higher seroprevalence but apparently lower neosporosis abortion rates than cattle warrant further investigation. PMID:26298507

  7. A review of Neospora caninum in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Reichel, Michael P; McAllister, Milton M; Nasir, Amar; Moore, Dadin P

    2015-09-15

    A number of countries in the world have reported infections with Neospora caninum in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis), from Africa to Asia, Europe and South America and recently Australia. In general, clinical manifestations (such as abortion) seem rare, which has raised the prospect that buffalo may be inherently resistant to clinical effects of N. caninum infection. Worldwide, the seroprevalence of N. caninum infection (as a measure of exposure determined by the detection of antibody) in buffalo is high, at approximately 48%. This reported seroprevalence is three or four times higher than that reported from the world's cattle populations, which have collective seroprevalence rates of 16.1% for dairy cattle and 11.5% for beef cattle. However, there is a lack of standardisation in seroprevalence studies and some studies may well under-estimate the true level of infection. Epidemiologic evidence supports post-natal transmission, and in utero transmission has also been demonstrated. The causes for water buffalo to have markedly higher seroprevalence but apparently lower neosporosis abortion rates than cattle warrant further investigation.

  8. [Mycobacterium avium complex in water buffaloes slaughtered for consumption].

    PubMed

    Freitas, J; Panetta, J C; Curcio, M; Ueki, S Y

    2001-06-01

    Two mycobacterium strains isolated from lung tissue a apical lymph nodes of slaughtered water buffaloes were biochemically analyzed and identified as Mycobacterium avium complex strains. Association between these microorganisms and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and the potential risk posed by eating infected animals and their products, was discussed.

  9. Embryo transfer in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Drost, M; Wright, J M; Cripe, W S; Richter, A R

    1983-11-01

    A normal, live 35-kg water buffalo bull calf was born 300 days after it was nonsurgically collected as a 7-day blastocyst from a water buffalo donor and transferred nonsurgically to an unrelated water buffalo recipient. The development of estrus synchronization, superovulation and estrus detection methods in water buffalo are described.

  10. Natural Bagaza virus infection in game birds in southern Spain.

    PubMed

    Gamino, Virginia; Gutiérrez-Guzmán, Ana-Valeria; Fernández-de-Mera, Isabel G; Ortíz, José-Antonio; Durán-Martín, Mauricio; de la Fuente, José; Gortázar, Christian; Höfle, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    In late summer 2010 a mosquito born flavivirus not previously reported in Europe called Bagaza virus (BAGV) caused high mortality in red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa) and ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus). We studied clinical findings, lesions and viral antigen distribution in naturally BAGV infected game birds in order to understand the apparently higher impact on red-legged partridges. The disease induced neurologic signs in the two galliform species and, to a lesser extent, in common wood pigeons (Columba palumbus). In red-legged partridges infection by BAGV caused severe haemosiderosis in the liver and spleen that was absent in pheasants and less evident in common wood pigeons. Also, BAGV antigen was present in vascular endothelium in multiple organs in red-legged partridges, and in the spleen in common wood pigeons, while in ring-necked pheasants it was only detected in neurons and glial cells in the brain. These findings indicate tropism of BAGV for endothelial cells and a severe haemolytic process in red-legged partridges in addition to the central nervous lesions that were found in all three species.

  11. Natural Bagaza virus infection in game birds in southern Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In late summer 2010 a mosquito born flavivirus not previously reported in Europe called Bagaza virus (BAGV) caused high mortality in red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa) and ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus). We studied clinical findings, lesions and viral antigen distribution in naturally BAGV infected game birds in order to understand the apparently higher impact on red-legged partridges. The disease induced neurologic signs in the two galliform species and, to a lesser extent, in common wood pigeons (Columba palumbus). In red-legged partridges infection by BAGV caused severe haemosiderosis in the liver and spleen that was absent in pheasants and less evident in common wood pigeons. Also, BAGV antigen was present in vascular endothelium in multiple organs in red-legged partridges, and in the spleen in common wood pigeons, while in ring-necked pheasants it was only detected in neurons and glial cells in the brain. These findings indicate tropism of BAGV for endothelial cells and a severe haemolytic process in red-legged partridges in addition to the central nervous lesions that were found in all three species. PMID:22966904

  12. Dynamics of Mycobacterium and bovine tuberculosis in a Human-Buffalo Population

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, A. S.; Garba, S. M.; Gumel, A. B.; Lubuma, J. M.-S.

    2014-01-01

    A new model for the transmission dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and bovine tuberculosis in a community, consisting of humans and African buffalos, is presented. The buffalo-only component of the model exhibits the phenomenon of backward bifurcation, which arises due to the reinfection of exposed and recovered buffalos, when the associated reproduction number is less than unity. This model has a unique endemic equilibrium, which is globally asymptotically stable for a special case, when the reproduction number exceeds unity. Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses, using data relevant to the dynamics of the two diseases in the Kruger National Park, show that the distribution of the associated reproduction number is less than unity (hence, the diseases would not persist in the community). Crucial parameters that influence the dynamics of the two diseases are also identified. Both the buffalo-only and the buffalo-human model exhibit the same qualitative dynamics with respect to the local and global asymptotic stability of their respective disease-free equilibrium, as well as with respect to the backward bifurcation phenomenon. Numerical simulations of the buffalo-human model show that the cumulative number of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cases in humans (buffalos) decreases with increasing number of bovine tuberculosis infections in humans (buffalo). PMID:25254065

  13. Homogeneity of Powassan virus populations in naturally infected Ixodes scapularis

    SciTech Connect

    Brackney, Doug E.; Brown, Ivy K.; Nofchissey, Robert A.; Fitzpatrick, Kelly A.; Ebel, Gregory D.

    2010-07-05

    Powassan virus (POWV, Flaviviridae: Flavivirus) is the sole North American member of the tick-borne encephalitis complex and consists of two distinct lineages that are maintained in ecologically discrete enzootic transmission cycles. The underlying genetic mechanisms that lead to niche partitioning in arboviruses are poorly understood. Therefore, intra- and interhost genetic diversity was analyzed to determine if POWV exists as a quasispecies in nature and quantify selective pressures within and between hosts. In contrast to previous reports for West Nile virus (WNV), significant intrahost genetic diversity was not observed. However, pN (0.238) and d{sub N}/d{sub S} ratios (0.092) for interhost diversity were similar to those of WNV. Combined, these data suggest that purifying selection and/or population bottlenecks constrain quasispecies diversity within ticks. These same selective and stochastic mechanisms appear to drive minor sequence changes between ticks. Moreover, Powassan virus populations seem not to be structured as quasispecies in naturally infected adult deer ticks.

  14. Natural rice rhizospheric microbes suppress rice blast infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The natural interactions between plant roots and their rhizospheric microbiome are vital to plant fitness, modulating both growth promotion and disease suppression. In rice (Oryza sativa), a globally important food crop, as much as 30% of yields are lost due to blast disease caused by fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. Capitalizing on the abilities of naturally occurring rice soil bacteria to reduce M. oryzae infections could provide a sustainable solution to reduce the amount of crops lost to blast disease. Results Naturally occurring root-associated rhizospheric bacteria were isolated from California field grown rice plants (M-104), eleven of which were taxonomically identified by16S rRNA gene sequencing and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis. Bacterial isolates were tested for biocontrol activity against the devastating foliar rice fungal pathogen, M. oryzae pathovar 70–15. In vitro, a Pseudomonas isolate, EA105, displayed antibiosis through reducing appressoria formation by nearly 90% as well as directly inhibiting fungal growth by 76%. Although hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is a volatile commonly produced by biocontrol pseudomonads, the activity of EA105 seems to be independent of its HCN production. During in planta experiments, EA105 reduced the number of blast lesions formed by 33% and Pantoea agglomerans isolate, EA106 by 46%. Our data also show both EA105 and EA106 trigger jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) dependent induced systemic resistance (ISR) response in rice. Conclusions Out of 11 bacteria isolated from rice soil, pseudomonad EA105 most effectively inhibited the growth and appressoria formation of M. oryzae through a mechanism that is independent of cyanide production. In addition to direct antagonism, EA105 also appears to trigger ISR in rice plants through a mechanism that is dependent on JA and ET signaling, ultimately resulting in fewer blast lesions. The application of native bacteria as biocontrol agents in combination with

  15. The behaviour and welfare of buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in modern dairy enterprises.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, F; Pacelli, C; Grasso, F; Braghieri, A; De Rosa, G

    2013-10-01

    This review deals with the behaviour of river buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis), in confinement and in extensive conditions, also focusing on the effects of different housing and rearing conditions on their welfare. The behavioural repertoire expressed by buffaloes in extensive and intensive conditions is similar to those displayed by other domestic ruminants. However, through natural selection, buffaloes have also acquired several morphological, physiological and behavioural (i.e. wallowing) adaptations to hot climatic conditions. Buffaloes kept in intensive conditions and having no access to pasture and water for wallowing extend their periods of idling and are less often involved in investigative activities. Confinement is also associated with a reduction of space; however, no specific studies have been carried out to determine the specific requirements of this species. Space restriction can adversely affect various aspects of buffalo welfare, such as health (increased levels of lesions and injuries), social behaviour (increased number of agonistic interactions) and heat dissipation. The buffaloes, originating from tropical areas, are well adapted to large variations in food availability and quality, and to dietetic unbalances. As to human animal relationship, it has been observed that the incidence of stepping and kicking behaviour of buffaloes in the milking parlour is positively correlated with the frequency of oxytocin injections, whereas the frequency of positive stockperson interactions with the animals such as talking quietly, petting and gentle touching are negatively correlated with the number of kicks during milking. Data from farms where both dairy cattle and buffaloes are present show that avoidance distance measured in the pen is lower in buffaloes than in cattle. This may be attributed to the fact that buffaloes are generally recognised to be curious animals. Finally, the effects of different farming practices on animal-related indicators are described

  16. Underway view from port side in the Buffalo River with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Underway view from port side in the Buffalo River with water cannons spraying. City of Buffalo in background. TC - Fireboat EDWARD M. COTTER, Moored on the Buffalo River at 155 Ohio Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  17. Mekong schistosomiasis. III: a parasitological survey of domestic water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) on Khong Island, Laos.

    PubMed

    Schneider, C R; Kitikoon, V; Sornmani, S; Thirachantra, S

    1975-06-01

    Of 103 water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) examined on Khong Island by means of the M.I.F.C. and hatching techniques, none were passing eggs resimbling those of the Mekong schistosome. One buffalo calf was infected with Orientobilharzia harinasutai and another with Schistosoma spindale; this is the first time these parasites have been reported from Laos. Since the buffalo that were examined had constant and year-round access to a part of the Mekong River that has been shown to be a site of heavy transmission of schistosomiasis to humans and dogs, it was considered that the buffalo would have acquired the infection with the human Mekong schistosome if this were possible. In the absence of buffalo necropsies, and since no eggs of the Mekong schistosome were detected in the stools of these animals, we assumed that they had either not become infected with this parasite or, if they had, that the infections did not produce eggs in the faeces which were detectable by the methods employed. On the basis of our examinations, it would not seem that domestic water buffalo are involved as reservoirs in the epidemiology of human schistosomiasis on Khong Island.

  18. Comparative study of sheep and buffalo isolates of Fasciola gigantica in the intermediate host Lymnaea auricularia.

    PubMed

    al-Kubaisee, R Y; Altaif, K I

    1989-09-01

    A comparison was made of the biological behaviour of two isolates of Fasciola gigantica, obtained from sheep and buffalo, in the aquatic snail Lymnaea auricularia. The sheep isolate exhibited a lower rate of infection, slower larval development and the production of fewer cercariae. Larger eggs, miracidia and metacercariae were obtained from the buffalo isolate while the rediae and cercariae were smaller. Metacercariae of sheep origin were dark brown with a mortality after 80 days of storage at 4 degrees C of 30.6 per cent while those of the buffalo isolate were straw coloured and had a mortality of 10.2 per cent.

  19. A laparoscopic technique for in vivo observation of ovaries in the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Jainudeen, M R; Bongso, T A; Ahmad, F B; Sharifuddin, W

    1982-07-10

    A technique was developed for observing the ovaries of the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) restrained in a standing position using a laparoscope (10 mm diameter, 600 mm length) inserted in the right paralumbar fossa after sedation with xylazine and local infiltration anaesthesia. Insufflation of the abdominal cavity with carbon dioxide was necessary to pass the laparoscope along the body wall to the pelvic inlet where both ovaries could be examined in detail with a manipulating probe inserted ipsilaterally. Twenty-one buffaloes were subjected to 50 laparoscopic examinations without infections or adverse reactions. Laparoscopy was a simple, reliable and rapid technique for repeated observation of the ovaries in the buffalo.

  20. Geographic distribution of Theileria sp. (buffalo) and Theileria sp. (bougasvlei) in Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in southern Africa: implications for speciation.

    PubMed

    Pienaar, Ronel; Latif, Abdalla A; Thekisoe, Oriel M M; Mans, Ben J

    2014-03-01

    Strict control measures apply to movement of buffalo in South Africa including testing for Theileria parva, the causative agent of Corridor disease in cattle. The official test is a real-time hybridization PCR assay that amplifies the 18S rRNA V4 hyper-variable region of T. parva, T. sp. (buffalo) and T. sp. (bougasvlei). Mixed infections with the latter organisms affect diagnostic sensitivity due to PCR suppression. While the incidence of mixed infections in the Corridor disease endemic region of South Africa is significant, little information is available on the specific distribution and prevalence of T. sp. (buffalo) and T. sp. (bougasvlei). Specific real-time PCR assays were developed and a total of 1211 samples known to harbour these parasites were screened. Both parasites are widely distributed in southern Africa and the incidence of mixed infections with T. parva within the endemic region is similar (∼25-50%). However, a significant discrepancy exists in regard to mixed infections of T. sp. (buffalo) and T. sp. (bougasvlei) (∼10%). Evidence for speciation between T. sp. (buffalo) and T. sp. (bougasvlei) is supported by phylogenetic analysis of the COI gene, and their designation as different species. This suggests mutual exclusion of parasites and the possibility of hybrid sterility in cases of mixed infections.

  1. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in South-West of Iran.

    PubMed

    Hamidinejat, Hossein; Ghorbanpour, Masoud; Nabavi, Leily; Haji Hajikolaie, Mohammad Rahim; Razi Jalali, Mohammad Hossein

    2010-08-01

    The prevalence of antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii was conducted in 300 buffaloes from Ahvaz, Kouzestan province, southwest of Iran. Blood sera were screened using a Modified agglutination test (MAT) incorporating 2-mercaptoethanol. Positive reactions in sera dilutions above 1:25 were considered as indicative for the presence of T. gondii antibodies. The overall prevalence of infection in the animals was 14.33% with titers of 1:25 in 21, 1:50 in 12, 1:100 in 6, 1:200 in 2 and 1:400 in 2. The prevalence was different in relation to the sex with buffaloes with 19.7% and 7% in females and males respectively. These results indicate that T. gondii infection in water buffaloes of Khouzestan is relatively high and consumption of buffalo meat may be a risk factor for humans in Ahvaz, southwest of Iran.

  2. Molecular assays reveal the presence of Theileria spp. and Babesia spp. in Asian water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis, Linnaeus, 1758) in the Amazon region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Júlia A G; de Oliveira, Cairo H S; Silvestre, Bruna T; Albernaz, Tatiana T; Leite, Rômulo C; Barbosa, José D; Oliveira, Carlos M C; Ribeiro, Múcio F B

    2016-07-01

    Approximately 50% of buffalo herds in Brazil are located in Pará state in northern Brazil. There are several properties where cattle and buffalo live and graze together, and thus, buffalo pathogens may threaten the health of cattle and vice versa. Therefore, knowledge of infectious agents of buffalo is essential for maintaining healthy livestock. Clinical disease caused by Theileria and Babesia parasites in the Asian water buffalo is not common, although these animals may act as reservoir hosts, and the detection of these hemoparasites in buffaloes is as important as it is in cattle. Studies of the infection of buffaloes by hemoparasites in Brazil are scarce. The objective of the present study was to investigate the occurrence of Piroplasmida parasites in Asian water buffaloes in the state of Pará in the Amazon region of Brazil using nested PCR assays and phylogenetic analysis. The 18S rRNA gene and ITS complete region were amplified from DNA extracted from blood samples collected from 308 apparently healthy buffaloes bred on six properties in the state of Pará, Brazil. The prevalence of positive buffalo samples was 4.2% (13/308) for Theileria spp., 3.6% (11/308) for Babesia bovis and 1% (3/308) for Babesia bigemina. Animals infected with Theileria were detected in 50% (3/6) of the assessed properties. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the Theileria species detected in this study were closely related to Theileria buffeli, Theileria orientalis and Theileria sinensis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Theileria in Asian water buffaloes in the Americas. The majority of Theileria-positive buffaloes (11/13) belong to a property that has a history of animals presenting lymphoproliferative disease of unknown etiology. Therefore, the present research suggests that this disorder can be associated with Theileria infection in this property. Our results provide new insights on the distribution and biological aspects of hemoparasites transmissible from

  3. Molecular assays reveal the presence of Theileria spp. and Babesia spp. in Asian water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis, Linnaeus, 1758) in the Amazon region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Júlia A G; de Oliveira, Cairo H S; Silvestre, Bruna T; Albernaz, Tatiana T; Leite, Rômulo C; Barbosa, José D; Oliveira, Carlos M C; Ribeiro, Múcio F B

    2016-07-01

    Approximately 50% of buffalo herds in Brazil are located in Pará state in northern Brazil. There are several properties where cattle and buffalo live and graze together, and thus, buffalo pathogens may threaten the health of cattle and vice versa. Therefore, knowledge of infectious agents of buffalo is essential for maintaining healthy livestock. Clinical disease caused by Theileria and Babesia parasites in the Asian water buffalo is not common, although these animals may act as reservoir hosts, and the detection of these hemoparasites in buffaloes is as important as it is in cattle. Studies of the infection of buffaloes by hemoparasites in Brazil are scarce. The objective of the present study was to investigate the occurrence of Piroplasmida parasites in Asian water buffaloes in the state of Pará in the Amazon region of Brazil using nested PCR assays and phylogenetic analysis. The 18S rRNA gene and ITS complete region were amplified from DNA extracted from blood samples collected from 308 apparently healthy buffaloes bred on six properties in the state of Pará, Brazil. The prevalence of positive buffalo samples was 4.2% (13/308) for Theileria spp., 3.6% (11/308) for Babesia bovis and 1% (3/308) for Babesia bigemina. Animals infected with Theileria were detected in 50% (3/6) of the assessed properties. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the Theileria species detected in this study were closely related to Theileria buffeli, Theileria orientalis and Theileria sinensis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Theileria in Asian water buffaloes in the Americas. The majority of Theileria-positive buffaloes (11/13) belong to a property that has a history of animals presenting lymphoproliferative disease of unknown etiology. Therefore, the present research suggests that this disorder can be associated with Theileria infection in this property. Our results provide new insights on the distribution and biological aspects of hemoparasites transmissible from

  4. First cloned swamp buffalo produced from adult ear fibroblast cell.

    PubMed

    Tasripoo, K; Suthikrai, W; Sophon, S; Jintana, R; Nualchuen, W; Usawang, S; Bintvihok, A; Techakumphu, M; Srisakwattana, K

    2014-07-01

    The world's first cloned swamp buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) derived from adult ear skin fibroblast has been reported. Donor fibroblast cells were produced from biopsies taken from adult male ear skin and in vitro matured oocytes obtained from a slaughterhouse were used as cytoplasts. A total of 39 blastocysts and 19 morulae fresh embryos were transferred into 12 recipient buffaloes. Progesterone assays indicated establishment of pregnancy in 10 of the 12 buffaloes (83.3%) after 45 days, with six animals still pregnant at 3 months. One recipient maintained pregnancy to term and naturally delivered a 40 kg male calf after 326 days of gestation. DNA analysis showed that the cloned calf was genetically identical to the donor cells. Genotype analyses, using 12 buffalo microsatellite markers, confirmed that the cloned calf was derived from the donor cell lines. In conclusion, the present study reports, for the first time, the establishment of pregnancy and birth of the first cloned Thai swamp buffalo derived from adult ear skin fibroblast cells.

  5. Baccharis megapotamica var. weirii poisoning in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Filho, José C; Carmo, Priscila M S; Lucena, Ricardo B; Pierezan, Felipe; Barros, Claudio S L

    2011-05-01

    An outbreak of an acute disease in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) caused by the ingestion of Baccharis megapotamica var. weirii occurred in the southern region of Brazil. Ten out of 50 buffalo died 24-48 hr after being introduced into a pasture containing abundant amounts of the plant. Factors influencing the ingestion of the plant and consequent toxicosis included hunger, stress caused by shipment, and unfamiliarity with the plant. Clinical signs included serous ocular discharge, incoordination, mild bloat, and muscle trembling. One buffalo was necropsied. Gross findings included dehydration, abundant liquid in the rumen, reddening of the mucosa of forestomachs, abomasum, and intestine, and edema of the wall of the rumen. The main histologic lesions were superficial to full thickness degeneration and necrosis of the stratified epithelium lining the forestomachs, necrosis of the intestinal mucosa, and widespread lymphoid necrosis. A calf (Bos taurus) was fed a single dose of 5 g/kg/body weight of B. megapotamica var. weirii harvested from the same site where the buffalo died. Twenty hours after the administration of the plant this calf died with clinical signs and lesions similar to those observed in the naturally poisoned buffalo.

  6. Efficacy and pharmacokinetics of triclabendazole in buffalo with induced fasciolosis.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, P K; Gupta, S C

    1996-05-01

    A study was conducted to understand pharmacokinetics and flukicidal activity of intraruminal administration of triclabendazole (TCBZ) at 12.0, 24.0 and 36.0 mg kg-1 body weight in experimentally Fasciola gigantica-infected buffaloes on Week 2 and 10 post-infection. No fluke eggs in faeces and no flukes could be recovered from the liver of buffaloes following intraruminal administration of triclabendazole at 24.0 and 36.0 mg kg-1 body weight both on Weeks 2 and 10 post-infection, while the recommended therapeutic dose at 12.0 mg kg-1 body weight was 19-23% effective. Pharmacokinetic analysis of the data revealed a significantly higher (P < 0.05) concentration maximum of both the metabolites and area under concentration-time curve of TCBZ-SO2 in animals treated at 12.0 mg kg-1 body weight on Week 10 post-infection, whereas a significantly higher area under the concentration-curve and elimination half-life of both the metabolites and significantly higher concentration maximum and area under the concentration-time curve of both the metabolites were observed in animals treated on Week 10 post-infection at the dose rates of 24.0 and 36.0 mg kg-1 body weight, respectively. Bioavailability of triclabendazole was more in buffaloes with mature flukes than with immature flukes. PMID:8792582

  7. Natural and induced B-1 cell immunity to infections raises questions of nature versus nurture.

    PubMed

    Baumgarth, Nicole; Waffarn, Elizabeth E; Nguyen, Trang T T

    2015-12-01

    Mouse B-1 cells are not only major producers of steady-state natural antibodies but also rapid responders to infections and inflammation. These discrete functions may be the outcomes of distinct environmental or developmental triggers that drive B-1 cells toward IgM production or an effector cell fate. Alternatively, distinct B-1 cell subsets may exist, which differ in their functional plasticity. In this paper, we summarize existing data suggesting that B-1 cells form a heterogeneous group of cells with distinct developmental requirements and nonoverlapping functions. Most spleen B-1 cells differ in development from that of bone marrow and peritoneal cavity B-1 cells, in that they develop in the absence of natural IgM. Functional heterogeneity is revealed by findings that B-1 cells in the bone marrow and spleen, but not the peritoneal cavity, generate natural serum IgM, while the latter are rapid responders to inflammatory and infectious insults, resulting in their relocation to secondary lymphoid tissues. A clearer understanding of the developmental and functional differences within the B-1 cell pool may reveal how they might be harnessed for prophylaxis or therapy. PMID:26060895

  8. Natural and induced B-1 cell immunity to infections raises questions of nature versus nurture.

    PubMed

    Baumgarth, Nicole; Waffarn, Elizabeth E; Nguyen, Trang T T

    2015-12-01

    Mouse B-1 cells are not only major producers of steady-state natural antibodies but also rapid responders to infections and inflammation. These discrete functions may be the outcomes of distinct environmental or developmental triggers that drive B-1 cells toward IgM production or an effector cell fate. Alternatively, distinct B-1 cell subsets may exist, which differ in their functional plasticity. In this paper, we summarize existing data suggesting that B-1 cells form a heterogeneous group of cells with distinct developmental requirements and nonoverlapping functions. Most spleen B-1 cells differ in development from that of bone marrow and peritoneal cavity B-1 cells, in that they develop in the absence of natural IgM. Functional heterogeneity is revealed by findings that B-1 cells in the bone marrow and spleen, but not the peritoneal cavity, generate natural serum IgM, while the latter are rapid responders to inflammatory and infectious insults, resulting in their relocation to secondary lymphoid tissues. A clearer understanding of the developmental and functional differences within the B-1 cell pool may reveal how they might be harnessed for prophylaxis or therapy.

  9. Duration of maternally derived antibodies in Toxoplasma gondii naturally infected piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A longitudinal study was performed to analyze the dynamics of T. gondii antibodies in naturally infected piglets from 1 to 25 weeks of age. Seventy three piglets from 20 seronegative sows (modified agglutination test, MAT <1:25) and 20 naturally infected T. gondii seropositive sows (MAT>/=1:25) were...

  10. Brucellosis in domestic water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) of Trinidad and Tobago with comparative epidemiology to cattle.

    PubMed

    Fosgate, Geoffrey T; Diptee, Michael D; Ramnanan, Anil; Adesiyun, Abiodun Adewale

    2011-12-01

    The water buffalo is an important domestic animal worldwide, and the local Buffalypso variety was developed in Trinidad to have improved beef qualities. Brucellosis was diagnosed in Trinidad and Tobago during 1998 in both cattle and domestic water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) populations. Brucellosis in the latter species is caused by infection with Brucella abortus, similar to bovine brucellosis. Control of brucellosis is of paramount importance to preservation of the genetic diversity of these animals in Trinidad, and this has been complicated by differences in the epidemiology of water buffalo and bovine brucellosis. Some diagnostic tests do not have comparable accuracy between the two species, and the RB51 vaccine does not adequately protect against infection in water buffalo. The water buffalo in Trinidad may also be more resistant to infection than cattle. Development of effective vaccination protocols is key to brucellosis control in Buffalypso in Trinidad, and prohibitions on import of virulent B. abortus strains for vaccine efficacy studies has impeded progress in this area. These Trinidadian strains are of variable virulence; some might be effective for challenge in vaccine efficacy studies, while other, of lower virulence, may be vaccine candidates for use in water buffalo.

  11. Molecular and serological detection of Babesia bovis- and Babesiabigemina-infection in bovines and water buffaloes raised jointly in anendemic field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    tBabesia bovis and Babesia bigemina are causative agents of bovine babesiosis, a tick-borne disease of cattlein tropical and subtropical regions. Babesia spp. infection adversely affects cattle health and can be fatalresulting in considerable economic loss worldwide. Under endemic stability conditio...

  12. Epidemiological studies on Japanese encephalitis in Kyoto City area, Japan. IV. Natural infection in sentinel pigs.

    PubMed

    Maeda, O; Takenokuma, K; Karoji, Y; Kuroda, A; Sasaki, O; Karaki, T; Ishii, T

    1978-08-01

    Natural infection with Japanese encephalitis virus in three sentinel pigs held in separate experimental huts was examined daily by virus recovery from blood samples of the pigs and from mosquitoes after incubation for about 7 days from their blood feeding and by HI antibody titration of the blood samples. After a period of low infection rates, below 6%, for about two weeks in engorged Culex tritaeniorhynchus summorosus, high mosquito infections of over 30% from each viremic pig occurred for two to three days. The pigs may be probably have been bitten by many infected but not infective mosquitoes in a period of about 10 days before infection.

  13. Molecular and serological prevalence of Anaplasma marginale in water buffaloes in northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barbosa da Silva, Jenevaldo; Vinhote, Wagner Marcelo Sousa; Oliveira, Carlos Magno Chaves; André, Marcos Rogério; Machado, Rosangela Zacarias; da Fonseca, Adivaldo Henrique; Barbosa, José Diomedes

    2014-03-01

    Bovine anaplasmosis, caused by Anaplasma marginale, occurs in tropical and subtropical regions throughout the world and is a major constraint on cattle production in many countries. Approximately 60% of the buffalo herds in South America are located in northern Brazil. However, compared with the research on cattle, research on buffaloes has been neglected. Therefore, the present study was conducted to investigate the distribution of A. marginale in water buffaloes in northern Brazil. A total of 500 buffalo blood samples was randomly collected from 16 provinces and was analyzed using both nPCR assay and ELISA techniques. The percentage of animals that were seropositive for A. marginale according to ELISA was 49% (245/500). The main risk factors associated with seroprevalence were the region (p=0.021; OR=1.2) and the reproductive status (p=0.0001; OR=1.6). Anaplasma marginale DNA was detected in 5.4% (27/500) of the sampled buffaloes. Our data provide information about the incidence of A. marginale infection in water buffaloes and may guide future programs aimed at controlling the disease in the northern region of Brazil. Although these water buffaloes are exposed to A. marginale, a low rate of A. marginale PCR-positive animals was found, which could be explained by the habitat in which the sampled animals live because they exhibited a low rate of attached ticks on their skin.

  14. Molecular cloning and characterization of Th1 and Th2 cytokines of African buffalo (Syncerus caffer).

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Konnai, S; Okagawa, T; Githaka, N W; Kariuki, E; Gakuya, F; Kanduma, E; Shirai, T; Ikebuchi, R; Ikenaka, Y; Ishizuka, M; Murata, S; Ohashi, K

    2012-04-01

    The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) has been implicated as the reservoir of several bovine infectious agents. However, there is insufficient information on the protective immune responses in the African buffalo, particularly in infected animals. In this study, we analysed Th1 cytokines IL-2 and IFN-γ, and Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-10. The cloned cDNA of IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ contained an open reading frame of 468, 501, 408 and 540 nucleotides, encoding polypeptides of 155, 166, 135 and 179 amino acids, respectively. Nucleotide sequence homology of IL-2, IFN-γ and IL-4 was more than 98% between the African buffalo and cattle, which resulted in identical polypeptides. Meanwhile, IL-10 gene of African buffalo and cattle had 95% homology in nucleotide sequence, corresponding to thirteen amino acid residues substitution. Cysteine residues and potential glycosylation sites were conserved within the family Bovinae. Phylogenetic analyses including cytokines of the African buffalo placed them within a cluster comprised mainly of species belonging to the order Artiodactyla, including cattle, water buffalo, sheep, goat, pig and artiodactyl wildlife. A deeper understanding of the structure of these cytokines will shed light on their protective role in the disease-resistant African buffalo in comparison with other closely related species.

  15. Infections do not predict shedding in co-infections with two helminths from a natural system.

    PubMed

    Cattadori, Isabella M; Wagner, Benjamin R; Wodzinski, Laura A; Pathak, Ashutosh K; Poole, Adam

    2014-06-01

    Given the health and economic burden associated with the widespread occurrence of co-infections in humans and agricultural animals, understanding how coinfections contribute to host heterogeneity to infection and transmission is critical if we are to assess risk of infection based on host characteristics. Here, we examine whether host heterogeneity to infection leads to similar heterogeneity in transmission in a population of rabbits single and co-infected with two helminths and monitored monthly for eight years. Compared to single infections, co-infected rabbits carried higher Trichostrongylus retortaeformis intensities, shorter worms with fewer eggs in utero, and shed similar numbers of parasite eggs. In contrast, the same co-infected rabbits harbored fewer Graphidium strigosum with longer bodies and more eggs in utero, and shed more eggs of this helminth. A positive density-dependent relationship between fecundity and intensity was found for T. retortaeformis but not G. strigosum in co-infected rabbits. Juvenile rabbits contributed to most of the infection and shedding of T. retortaeformis, while adult hosts were more important for G. strigosum dynamics of infection and transmission, and this pattern was consistent in single and co-infected individuals. This host-parasite system suggests that we cannot predict the pattern of parasite shedding during co-infections based on intensity of infection alone. We suggest that a mismatching between susceptibility and infectiousness should be expected in helminth coinfections and should not be overlooked.

  16. Giardia and Cryptosporidium in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, L; Musella, V; Condoleo, R; Saralli, G; Veneziano, V; Bruni, G; Condoleo, R U; Cringoli, G

    2007-04-01

    A cross-sectional survey of Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium parvum infection in the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) was carried out in central Italy. A geographical information system (GIS) was constructed utilizing as data-layers the topographic base map and the digital aerial photographs of the study area, as well as the geo-referenced points of all the buffalo farms. The survey was conducted on a sample of 90 farms, selected using a grid approach followed by proportional allocation. For this purpose, a grid representing quadrants of 5 x 5 km was overlaid on the study area within the GIS. As a result, the study area was divided in equal quadrants, and the number of farms sampled in each quadrant was proportional to the total number of study population in that quadrant. On each farm, faecal samples were collected per rectum from three to five asymptomatic buffalo calves, aged from 1 to 9 weeks. The total number of faecal samples collected was 347. Each faecal sample was tested for the presence of copro-antigens of G. duodenalis and of C. parvum using two commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Out of the 90 farms, 27 (30.0%) resulted positive for G. duodenalis and 22 (24.4%) for C. parvum. Co-infection was found in ten (11.1%) farms. With respect to animals, out of the 347 faecal samples, 63 (18.1%) were found to have antigens of G. duodenalis and 51 (14.7%) of C. parvum. Co-infection was found in ten buffalo calves (2.9%). The results of the logistic regression models showed a positive association between the positivity to G. duodenalis and the presence of sheep on farm and between the positivity to C. parvum and the high number of buffaloes on farms. No significant co-infection between the two protozoa was found. In conclusion, the findings of the present study, derived from a systematic territorial survey planned with GIS, are noteworthy because they provided additional data on C. parvum and the first evidence of G. duodenalis

  17. Wolbachia Infection in a Natural Parasitoid Wasp Population

    PubMed Central

    Duplouy, Anne; Couchoux, Christelle; Hanski, Ilkka; van Nouhuys, Saskya

    2015-01-01

    The maternally transmitted bacterium Wolbachia pipientis is well known for spreading and persisting in insect populations through manipulation of the fitness of its host. Here, we identify three new Wolbachia pipientis strains, wHho, wHho2 and wHho3, infecting Hyposoter horticola, a specialist wasp parasitoid of the Glanville fritillary butterfly. The wHho strain (ST435) infects about 50% of the individuals in the Åland islands in Finland, with a different infection rate in the two mitochondrial (COI) haplotypes of the wasp. The vertical transmission rate of Wolbachia is imperfect, and lower in the haplotype with lower infection rate, suggesting a fitness trade-off. We found no association of the wHho infection with fecundity, longevity or dispersal ability of the parasitoid host. However, preliminary results convey spatial associations between Wolbachia infection, host mitochondrial haplotype and parasitism of H. horticola by its hyperparasitoid, Mesochorus cf. stigmaticus. We discuss the possibility that Wolbachia infection protects H. horticola against hyperparasitism. PMID:26244782

  18. Vitrification of buffalo oocytes and embryos.

    PubMed

    Parnpai, Rangsun; Liang, Yuanyuan; Ketudat-Cairns, Mariena; Somfai, Tamas; Nagai, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    During the past decade, vitrification has been acknowledged as an efficient alternative to traditional slow-rate freezing in both human and animal embryology. The buffalo is the major milk and meat producing farm animal in many developing countries. Cryopreservation of buffalo oocytes and embryos is very important in preserving this species for future use. This review discusses the recent buffalo oocytes and embryos vitrification procedures, different types of cryoinjuries, and other factors affecting the vitrification of buffalo oocytes and embryos.

  19. [Natural and experimental infections of lambs with Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae].

    PubMed

    Bocklisch, H; Pfützner, H; Zepezauer, V

    1989-01-01

    Mycoplasma (M.) ovipneumoniae was isolated pure or mixed with bacteria from 47 lungs of lambs of 14 in 22 tested flocks. M. ovipneumoniae was obtained as pure culture in cases of mild bronchopneumonia. Experimental intratracheal or intranasal infection caused several days of rising body temperature above 39.7 degrees C. Nasal discharge, coughing, and dyspnea did not occur. M. ovipneumoniae was successfully re-isolated from nasal swabs, beginning 2 d from infection. Lobular catarrhal bronchopneumonia was established by postmortem examinations, 10-14 d from infection, and M. ovipneumoniae was re-isolated from the lungs. Histological patterns of lungs were characterised by interstitial cell reactions.

  20. Natural and Experimental Infection of Caenorhabditis Nematodes by Novel Viruses Related to Nodaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guang; Nuez, Isabelle; Bélicard, Tony; Jiang, Yanfang; Zhao, Guoyan; Franz, Carl J.; Goldstein, Leonard D.; Sanroman, Mabel; Miska, Eric A.; Wang, David

    2011-01-01

    An ideal model system to study antiviral immunity and host-pathogen co-evolution would combine a genetically tractable small animal with a virus capable of naturally infecting the host organism. The use of C. elegans as a model to define host-viral interactions has been limited by the lack of viruses known to infect nematodes. From wild isolates of C. elegans and C. briggsae with unusual morphological phenotypes in intestinal cells, we identified two novel RNA viruses distantly related to known nodaviruses, one infecting specifically C. elegans (Orsay virus), the other C. briggsae (Santeuil virus). Bleaching of embryos cured infected cultures demonstrating that the viruses are neither stably integrated in the host genome nor transmitted vertically. 0.2 µm filtrates of the infected cultures could infect cured animals. Infected animals continuously maintained viral infection for 6 mo (∼50 generations), demonstrating that natural cycles of horizontal virus transmission were faithfully recapitulated in laboratory culture. In addition to infecting the natural C. elegans isolate, Orsay virus readily infected laboratory C. elegans mutants defective in RNAi and yielded higher levels of viral RNA and infection symptoms as compared to infection of the corresponding wild-type N2 strain. These results demonstrated a clear role for RNAi in the defense against this virus. Furthermore, different wild C. elegans isolates displayed differential susceptibility to infection by Orsay virus, thereby affording genetic approaches to defining antiviral loci. This discovery establishes a bona fide viral infection system to explore the natural ecology of nematodes, host-pathogen co-evolution, the evolution of small RNA responses, and innate antiviral mechanisms. PMID:21283608

  1. Natural and experimental infection of Caenorhabditis nematodes by novel viruses related to nodaviruses.

    PubMed

    Félix, Marie-Anne; Ashe, Alyson; Piffaretti, Joséphine; Wu, Guang; Nuez, Isabelle; Bélicard, Tony; Jiang, Yanfang; Zhao, Guoyan; Franz, Carl J; Goldstein, Leonard D; Sanroman, Mabel; Miska, Eric A; Wang, David

    2011-01-25

    An ideal model system to study antiviral immunity and host-pathogen co-evolution would combine a genetically tractable small animal with a virus capable of naturally infecting the host organism. The use of C. elegans as a model to define host-viral interactions has been limited by the lack of viruses known to infect nematodes. From wild isolates of C. elegans and C. briggsae with unusual morphological phenotypes in intestinal cells, we identified two novel RNA viruses distantly related to known nodaviruses, one infecting specifically C. elegans (Orsay virus), the other C. briggsae (Santeuil virus). Bleaching of embryos cured infected cultures demonstrating that the viruses are neither stably integrated in the host genome nor transmitted vertically. 0.2 µm filtrates of the infected cultures could infect cured animals. Infected animals continuously maintained viral infection for 6 mo (∼50 generations), demonstrating that natural cycles of horizontal virus transmission were faithfully recapitulated in laboratory culture. In addition to infecting the natural C. elegans isolate, Orsay virus readily infected laboratory C. elegans mutants defective in RNAi and yielded higher levels of viral RNA and infection symptoms as compared to infection of the corresponding wild-type N2 strain. These results demonstrated a clear role for RNAi in the defense against this virus. Furthermore, different wild C. elegans isolates displayed differential susceptibility to infection by Orsay virus, thereby affording genetic approaches to defining antiviral loci. This discovery establishes a bona fide viral infection system to explore the natural ecology of nematodes, host-pathogen co-evolution, the evolution of small RNA responses, and innate antiviral mechanisms.

  2. Morphological evidence for natural poxvirus infection in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, L. M.; Dantoni Damelio, E.; Damelio, F. E.

    1982-01-01

    Focal inflammatory and desquamating lesions were seen in the nasal mucosa of rats that were flown aboard the Soviet satellite, Cosmos 1129, in 1979 and in the ground based controls. The infection was clinically inapparent. Electron microscopic examination revealed the presence of poxvirus virions in desquamating cells. The specific poxvirus involved could not be identified. The lesions appeared to be similar to those described by others in rats experimentally infected with mousepox (infectious ectromelia) virus by the intranasal route.

  3. Neosporosis in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in Southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Guarino, A; Fusco, G; Savini, G; Di Francesco, G; Cringoli, G

    2000-07-24

    A study was carried on 1377 water buffalo serum samples from 50 farms in southern Italy to test the presence of Neospora caninum antibodies by indirect fluorescence antibody test (IFAT). Rabbit anti-buffalo immunoglobulins conjugated to fluorescein were used in the test. Fluorescence in sera dilutions above 1:200 was considered as indicative of the presence of N. caninum antibodies. The overall prevalence of infection in the animals was 34.6%. The prevalence increased in relation to the age of subjects and most of the herds examined (82%) were found infected. In two farms abortions and neurological signs were reported. No suppurative inflammatory lesions were seen, but few protozoan-like cysts were observed on foetal tissues by histology.

  4. Survival of Arcobacter butzleri during production and storage of artisan water buffalo mozzarella cheese.

    PubMed

    Serraino, Andrea; Giacometti, Federica; Daminelli, Paolo; Losio, Marina N; Finazzi, Guido; Marchetti, Giacomo; Zambrini, Angelo V; Rosmini, Roberto

    2013-09-01

    Water buffalo mozzarella cheese (WBMC) is a fresh stretched cheese produced from whole chilled buffalo milk. Although pasteurization of milk and the use of defined starter cultures are recommended, traditional technology involving unpasteurized milk and natural whey cultures is still employed for WBMC production in Italy. The purpose of this study was to assess the behavior of Arcobacter butzleri during WBMC production and storage under different temperature conditions (5, 10, and 20 °C). Raw milk was experimentally inoculated with one reference strain and two isolates of A. butzleri, and the count was monitored during WBMC production and storage. The bacterial count of A. butzleri decreased during curd ripening (from 7.83 log colony-forming units (CFU)/g to 4.14 log CFU/g in about 4 h) and a further decrease (>4 log CFU/g) was observed at the end of curd stretching. During storage testing, A. butzleri was never detected by direct plating, whereas it was recovered from 12 of the total 162 WBMC until the end of storage testing by enrichment. The results revealed that A. butzleri is able to survive during WBMC production and storage at different temperature conditions. Consequently, traditional WBMC produced from raw milk could represent a potential source of Arcobacter infection for humans.

  5. Renal effects of Dirofilaria immitis in experimentally and naturally infected cats.

    PubMed

    Atkins, C E; Vaden, S L; Arther, R G; Ciszewski, D K; Davis, W L; Ensley, S M; Chopade, N H

    2011-03-22

    Canine heartworm infection has been associated with glomerular disease and proteinuria. We hypothesized that proteinuria, likely due to glomerular damage, would also be found in cats experimentally and naturally infected with Dirofilaria immitis. Two populations of cats were evaluated, including 80 that were each experimentally infected with 60 infective heartworm larvae as part of a drug safety study, and 31 that were naturally infected with D. immitis. Each had a control population with which to be compared. In the experimentally infected group, we evaluated urine from 64 cats. Ten of these cats were shown to have microalbuminuria 8 months post infection. No cat refractory to infection with larvae and no cats from the control group demonstrated microalbuminuria. All 10 microalbuminuric cats were shown to have significant proteinuria, as measured by the urine protein:creatinine ratio. There was a subtle, but significant, association between worm burden and proteinuria, and although the presence of adult heartworms was required for the development of proteinuria, both microfilaremic and amicrofilaremic cats were affected. Neither the presence of circulating heartworm antibodies and antigen nor the presence of antigenuria predicted the development of proteinuria. Both heavily infected cats (5-25 adult heartworms) and cats with worm burdens compatible with natural infections (1-4 adult heartworms) developed proteinuria, and the relative numbers of cats so affected were similar between heavily and more lightly infected cats. Naturally infected cats, for which only dipstick protein determinations were available, were shown to have a significantly greater incidence of proteinuria (90% vs 35%) than did those in an age- and gender-matched control population. Additionally, the proteinuria in heartworm-infected cats was 3- to 5-fold greater in severity. We conclude that cats infected with mature adult heartworms are at risk for developing proteinuria and that this is

  6. Renal effects of Dirofilaria immitis in experimentally and naturally infected cats.

    PubMed

    Atkins, C E; Vaden, S L; Arther, R G; Ciszewski, D K; Davis, W L; Ensley, S M; Chopade, N H

    2011-03-22

    Canine heartworm infection has been associated with glomerular disease and proteinuria. We hypothesized that proteinuria, likely due to glomerular damage, would also be found in cats experimentally and naturally infected with Dirofilaria immitis. Two populations of cats were evaluated, including 80 that were each experimentally infected with 60 infective heartworm larvae as part of a drug safety study, and 31 that were naturally infected with D. immitis. Each had a control population with which to be compared. In the experimentally infected group, we evaluated urine from 64 cats. Ten of these cats were shown to have microalbuminuria 8 months post infection. No cat refractory to infection with larvae and no cats from the control group demonstrated microalbuminuria. All 10 microalbuminuric cats were shown to have significant proteinuria, as measured by the urine protein:creatinine ratio. There was a subtle, but significant, association between worm burden and proteinuria, and although the presence of adult heartworms was required for the development of proteinuria, both microfilaremic and amicrofilaremic cats were affected. Neither the presence of circulating heartworm antibodies and antigen nor the presence of antigenuria predicted the development of proteinuria. Both heavily infected cats (5-25 adult heartworms) and cats with worm burdens compatible with natural infections (1-4 adult heartworms) developed proteinuria, and the relative numbers of cats so affected were similar between heavily and more lightly infected cats. Naturally infected cats, for which only dipstick protein determinations were available, were shown to have a significantly greater incidence of proteinuria (90% vs 35%) than did those in an age- and gender-matched control population. Additionally, the proteinuria in heartworm-infected cats was 3- to 5-fold greater in severity. We conclude that cats infected with mature adult heartworms are at risk for developing proteinuria and that this is

  7. Paratuberculosis in buffaloes in Northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Farias Brito, Marilene; Dos Santos Belo-Reis, Alessandra; Barbosa, José Diomedes; Ubiali, Daniel Guimarães; de Castro Pires, Ana Paula; de Medeiros, Elizabeth Sampaio; de Melo, Renata Pimentel Bandeira; de Albuquerque, Pedro Paulo Feitosa; Yamasaki, Elise; Mota, Rinaldo Aparecido

    2016-10-01

    Several farms in the Northeast of Brazil were investigated for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in order to identify the occurrence of paratuberculosis in buffaloes. Samples were obtained from 17 farms, two slaughter houses, and a quarantine area in the Northeast. About 15,000 buffaloes of the Murrah, Mediterranean, and Jafarabadi breed as well as their crossbreeds were evaluated for meat, dairy, and mixed farms with semi-intensive or extensive breeding practices. For diagnostic purposes, postmortem and histopathological examination, including Ziehl-Neelsen test of fecal smears and scraped intestinal mucosa were performed. PCR was applied for fecal samples, mesenteric lymph nodes, and intestines. Six Johne's disease-positive farms, which together with those previously identified, indicate that the disease is spread through the Brazilian Northeast, similar to what occurs in cattle herds in other regions of the country. The increase in prevalence of paratuberculosis is a consequence of introduction of animals from other regions without adequate veterinary assistance and due to the little official attention paid to this initially silent and chronic disease.

  8. Paratuberculosis in buffaloes in Northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Farias Brito, Marilene; Dos Santos Belo-Reis, Alessandra; Barbosa, José Diomedes; Ubiali, Daniel Guimarães; de Castro Pires, Ana Paula; de Medeiros, Elizabeth Sampaio; de Melo, Renata Pimentel Bandeira; de Albuquerque, Pedro Paulo Feitosa; Yamasaki, Elise; Mota, Rinaldo Aparecido

    2016-10-01

    Several farms in the Northeast of Brazil were investigated for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in order to identify the occurrence of paratuberculosis in buffaloes. Samples were obtained from 17 farms, two slaughter houses, and a quarantine area in the Northeast. About 15,000 buffaloes of the Murrah, Mediterranean, and Jafarabadi breed as well as their crossbreeds were evaluated for meat, dairy, and mixed farms with semi-intensive or extensive breeding practices. For diagnostic purposes, postmortem and histopathological examination, including Ziehl-Neelsen test of fecal smears and scraped intestinal mucosa were performed. PCR was applied for fecal samples, mesenteric lymph nodes, and intestines. Six Johne's disease-positive farms, which together with those previously identified, indicate that the disease is spread through the Brazilian Northeast, similar to what occurs in cattle herds in other regions of the country. The increase in prevalence of paratuberculosis is a consequence of introduction of animals from other regions without adequate veterinary assistance and due to the little official attention paid to this initially silent and chronic disease. PMID:27334632

  9. Genetic parameters for stayability in Murrah buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Galeazzi, Priscilla M; Mercadante, Maria E Z; Silva, Josineudson Aiiv; Aspilcueta-Borquis, Rúsbel R; de Camargo, Gregório M F; Tonhati, Humberto

    2010-05-01

    In order to contribute to the breeding programmes of Asian water buffalo, the aim of this study was to analyse the influence of genetic effects in the stayability of Murrah dairy buffaloes. The stayability trait (ST) was defined as the female's ability to stay in the herd for one (ST1), two (ST2), three (ST3), four (ST4), five (ST5) or six years (ST6) after the first calving. The same trait was also considered as continuous and was designated stayability in days up to one (STD1), two (STD2), three (STD3), four (STD4), five (STD5) or six years (STD6) after the first calving. Data from 1016 females reared in nine herds located in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, were analysed. Statistical models included the additive genetic effect of the animal and the fixed effects of the buffalo breeding herd, birth year and birth season. Additive effects for ST were estimated by approximate restricted maximum likelihood using a threshold model, while for STD, the additive effects were estimated by restricted maximum likelihood. Heritability estimates were lower for ST, except for ST1, (0.11+/-0.07, 0.17+/-0.06, 0.23+/-0.06, 0.16+/-0.08, 0.14+/-0.09 and 0.16+/-0.10 for ST1, ST2, ST3, ST4, ST5 and ST6, respectively) when compared with STD (0.05+/-0.06, 0.18+/-0.08, 0.40+/-0.10, 0.49+/-0.11, 0.41+/-0.11 and 0.30+/-0.13, for STD1, STD2, STD3, STD4, STD5 and STD6, respectively). Considering the values of heritability and owing to the serial nature of STD to a specific age, selection for STD3 should have a favourable influence on STD to other ages.

  10. Genetic characterization of Babesia and Theileria parasites in water buffaloes in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Tattiyapong, Muncharee; Fukushi, Shintaro; Hayashida, Kyoko; Kothalawala, Hemal; Silva, Seekkuge Susil Priyantha; Vimalakumar, Singarayar Caniciyas; Kanagaratnam, Ratnam; Meewewa, Asela Sanjeewa; Suthaharan, Kalpana; Puvirajan, Thamotharampillai; de Silva, Weligodage Kumarawansa; Igarashi, Ikuo; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2014-02-24

    Water buffaloes are thought to be the reservoir hosts for several hemoprotozoan parasites that infect cattle. In the present study, we surveyed Sri Lankan bred water buffaloes for infections with Babesia bovis, Babesia bigemina, Theileria annulata, and Theileria orientalis using parasite-specific PCR assays. When 320 blood-derived DNA samples from water buffaloes reared in three different districts (Polonnaruwa, Mannar, and Mullaitivu) of Sri Lanka were PCR screened, B. bovis, B. bigemina, and T. orientalis were detected. While T. orientalis was the predominant parasite (82.5%), low PCR-positive rates were observed for B. bovis (1.9%) and B. bigemina (1.6%). Amplicons of the gene sequences of the Rhoptry Associated Protein-1 (RAP-1) of B. bovis, the Apical Membrane Antigen-1 (AMA-1) of B. bigemina, and the Major Piroplasm Surface Protein (MPSP) of T. orientalis were compared with those characterized previously in Sri Lankan cattle. While the B. bigemina AMA-1 sequences from water buffaloes shared high identity values with those from cattle, B. bovis RAP-1 sequences from water buffaloes diverged genetically from those of cattle. For T. orientalis, none of the MPSP sequence types reported previously in Sri Lankan cattle (types 1, 3, 5, and 7) were detected in the water buffaloes, and the MPSP sequences analyzed in the present study belonged to types N1 or N2. In summary, in addition to reporting the first PCR-based survey of Babesia and Theileria parasites in water buffaloes in Sri Lanka, the present study found that the predominant variants of water buffalo-derived B. bovis RAP-1 and T. orientalis MPSP sequences were different from those previously described from cattle in this country.

  11. Evidence of natural Wolbachia infections in field populations of Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Baldini, Francesco; Segata, Nicola; Pompon, Julien; Marcenac, Perrine; Robert Shaw, W.; Dabiré, Roch K.; Diabaté, Abdoulaye; Levashina, Elena A.; Catteruccia, Flaminia

    2014-01-01

    Wolbachia are maternally transmitted intracellular bacteria that invade insect populations by manipulating their reproduction and immunity and thus limiting the spread of numerous human pathogens. Experimental Wolbachia infections can reduce Plasmodium numbers in Anopheles mosquitoes in the laboratory, however, natural Wolbachia infections in field anophelines have never been reported. Here we show evidence of Wolbachia infections in Anopheles gambiae in Burkina Faso, West Africa. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene identified Wolbachia sequences in both female and male germlines across two seasons, and determined that these sequences are vertically transmitted from mother to offspring. Whole-genome sequencing of positive samples suggests that the genetic material identified in An. gambiae belongs to a novel Wolbachia strain, related to but distinct from strains infecting other arthropods. The evidence of Wolbachia infections in natural Anopheles populations promotes further investigations on the possible use of natural Wolbachia–Anopheles associations to limit malaria transmission. PMID:24905191

  12. Meiotic peculiarities in hybrid buffalo.

    PubMed

    Guiraaraes, S E; Pinheiro, L E; Guimaraes, J D

    1995-02-01

    The two varieties of the Water buffalo (Bubalis bubalis var. bubalis and Bubalis bubalis var. carabao) have 2n = 50 and 2n = 48 karyotypes, respectively. The F1 hybrids are thought to exhibit a karyotype of 2n = 49 and are known to be fertile. Meiosis was studied in 10 hybrid water buffalo bulls. Karyotypes of the bulls were prepared from leukocyte cultures and testicular biopsy samples in a routine manner and examined. Phenotypically the bulls showed characteristics of the hybrid buffalo. Five of the bulls carried 2n = 50 and 5 had 2n = 49. Multivalent chromosomes were found in diakinesis (metaphase I) cells of bulls with 2n = 49 karyotypes. Synapses were found in bulls of both karyotypes.

  13. Some glucose metabolic enzymes in various fractions of sarcocysts of Sarcocystis fusiformis of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Gupta, R S; Kushwah, H S; Kushwah, A

    1992-09-01

    A comparative biochemical study on some enzymes of glycogenolysis, glycolysis and the hexose monophosphate shunt pathway in various fractions (cyst wall, cyst fluid and zoites) of the sarcocysts of Sarcocystis fusiformis from the oesophageal muscles of naturally infected Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) was carried out. The pattern and the magnitude of enzymic activity differed markedly in these fractions. Phosphorylase, hexokinase, aldolase and pyruvate kinase showed their highest levels of activity in the zoites fractions, whereas lactate dehydrogenase was the highest in cyst fluid. Alcohol dehydrogenases were non-detectable. Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase were localized in the cyst wall only. Zoites were considered to be the most active metabolic sites for glucose breakdown.

  14. The natural alternative: protozoa as cellular models for Legionella infection.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Christine; Harrison, Christopher F; Hilbi, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease occurs following infection by the Gram-negative bacterium Legionella pneumophila. Normally resident in fresh-water sources, Legionella are subject to predation by eukaryotic phagocytes such as amoeba and ciliates. To counter this, L. pneumophila has evolved a complex system of effector proteins which allow the bacteria to hijack the phagocytic vacuole, hiding and replicating within their erstwhile killers. These same mechanisms allow L. pneumophila to hijack another phagocyte, lung-based macrophages, which thus avoids a vital part of the immune system and leads to infection. The course of infection can be divided into five main categories: pathogen uptake, formation of the replication-permissive vacuole, intracellular replication, host cell response, and bacterial exit. L. pneumophila effector proteins target every stage of this process, interacting with secretory, endosomal, lysosomal, retrograde and autophagy pathways, as well as with mitochondria. Each of these steps can be studied in protozoa or mammalian cells, and the knowledge gained can be readily applied to human pathogenicity. Here we describe the manner whereby L. pneumophila infects host protozoa, the various techniques which are available to analyse these processes and the implications of this model for Legionella virulence and the pathogenesis of Legionnaires' disease.

  15. Transplacental transmission of rabies virus from a naturally infected skunk.

    PubMed

    Howard, D R

    1981-04-01

    A female skunk (Mephitis mephitis) was submitted to the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory for routine rabies diagnosis. Rabies infection was confirmed by fluorescent rabies antibody examination on brain tissue. Additional tissues, including uterus, ovaries, and 6 embryos, were collected to study rabies pathogenesis. The fluorescent rabies antibody examination showed rabies virus antigen in 1 embryo, the uterus, and ovaries.

  16. Natural killer T cell strategies to combat Epstein–Barr virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Priatel, John J; Chung, Brian K; Tsai, Kevin; Tan, Rusung

    2014-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection results in rapid loss of CD1d expression from the surface of infected B cells, thus enabling the virus to evade immune recognition by natural killer T (NKT) cells. Using pharmacologic means to boost CD1d expression, potent NKT cell effector functions can be elicited toward EBV-infected B cells, suggesting the promise of novel strategies to target EBV-associated diseases such as some B-cell malignancies. PMID:25050206

  17. Wolbachia, Sodalis and trypanosome co-infections in natural populations of Glossina austeni and Glossina pallidipes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tsetse flies harbor at least three bacterial symbionts: Wigglesworthia glossinidia, Wolbachia pipientis and Sodalis glossinidius. Wigglesworthia and Sodalis reside in the gut in close association with trypanosomes and may influence establishment and development of midgut parasite infections. Wolbachia has been shown to induce reproductive effects in infected tsetse. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of these endosymbionts in natural populations of G. austeni and G. pallidipes and to assess the degree of concurrent infections with trypanosomes. Methods Fly samples analyzed originated from Kenyan coastal forests (trapped in 2009–2011) and South African G. austeni collected in 2008. The age structure was estimated by standard methods. G. austeni (n=298) and G. pallidipes (n= 302) were analyzed for infection with Wolbachia and Sodalis using PCR. Trypanosome infection was determined either by microscopic examination of dissected organs or by PCR amplification. Results Overall we observed that G. pallidipes females had a longer lifespan (70 d) than G. austeni (54 d) in natural populations. Wolbachia infections were present in all G. austeni flies analysed, while in contrast, this symbiont was absent from G. pallidipes. The density of Wolbachia infections in the Kenyan G. austeni population was higher than that observed in South African flies. The infection prevalence of Sodalis ranged from 3.7% in G. austeni to about 16% in G. pallidipes. Microscopic examination of midguts revealed an overall trypanosome infection prevalence of 6% (n = 235) and 5% (n = 552), while evaluation with ITS1 primers indicated a prevalence of about 13% (n = 296) and 10% (n = 302) in G. austeni and G. pallidipes, respectively. The majority of infections (46%) were with T. congolense. Co-infection with all three organisms was observed at 1% and 3.3% in G. austeni and G. pallidipes, respectively. Eleven out of the thirteen (85%) co-infected flies

  18. Genetic diversity analysis of buffalo fatty acid synthase (FASN) gene and its differential expression among bovines.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, S K; Goyal, S; Dubey, P K; Kumari, N; Mishra, S K; Mukesh, M; Kataria, R S

    2016-01-10

    Fatty Acid Synthase (FASN) gene seems to be structurally and functionally different in bovines in view of their distinctive fatty acid synthesis process. Structural variation and differential expression of FASN gene is reported in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis), a bovine species close to cattle, in this study. Amino acid sequence and phylogenetic analysis of functionally important thioesterase (TE) domain of FASN revealed its conserved nature across mammals. Amino acid residues at TE domain, responsible for substrate binding and processing, were found to be invariant in all the mammalian species. A total of seven polymorphic nucleotide sites, including two in coding region of TE domain were identified across the 10 buffalo populations of riverine and swamp types. G and C alleles were found almost fixed at g18996 and g19056 loci, respectively in riverine buffaloes. Principal component analysis of three SNPs (g18433, g18996 and g19056) revealed distinct classification of riverine and swamp buffalo populations. Reverse Transcription-PCR amplification of mRNA corresponding to exon 8-10 region of buffalo FASN helped in identification of two transcript variants; one transcript of 565 nucleotides and another alternate transcript of 207 nucleotides, seems to have arisen through alternative splicing. Both the transcripts were found to be expressed in most of the vital tissues of buffalo with the highest expression in mammary gland. Semi-quantitative and real-time expression analysis across 13 different buffalo tissues revealed its highest expression in lactating mammary gland. When compared, expression of FASN was also found to be higher in liver, adipose and skeletal muscle of buffalo tissues, than cattle. However, the FASN expression was highest in adipose among the three tissues in both the species. Results indicate structural and functional distinctiveness of bovine FASN. Presence of alternate splicing in buffalo FASN also seems to be a unique phenomenon to the bovines

  19. The potential of a polyphasic PCR-dGGE approach in evaluating microbial diversity of natural whey cultures for water-buffalo Mozzarella cheese production: bias of culture-dependent and culture-independent analyses.

    PubMed

    Ercolini, D; Moschetti, G; Blaiotta, G; Coppola, S

    2001-12-01

    A polyphasic PCR-DGGE approach was used to describe the microbial population occurring in natural whey cultures (NWCs) for water-buffalo Mozzarella cheese production. Total microbial community was assessed without cultivation by analyzing DNA directly extracted from the original samples of NWC. In addition, DNA extracted from bulks of cells formed by harvesting colonies from the serial dilution agar plates of a variety of culture media was used to profile the "cultivable" community. The 16S rDNA V3 region was amplified using DNA from NWC as well as DNA from bulks as templates and the amplicons were separated by DGGE. The microbial entities occurring in NWCs were identified by partial 16S rDNA sequencing of DGGE bands: four lactic acid bacteria (LAB) closest relative of Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Lactobacillus crispatus were revealed by the analysis of DNA directly extracted from NWC while two other LAB, Lactobacillus fermentum and Enterococcus faecalis, were identified by analyzing DNA from the cultivable community. The developed PCR-DGGE analysis of the "cultivable" community showed good potential in evaluating microbial diversity of a dairy environment: it usefully highlighted the bias introduced by selective amplification when compared to the analysis of the total community from NWC and allowed suitability of media and growth conditions to be evaluated. Moreover, it could be used to complete the culture independent study of microbial diversity to give information on concentration ratios among species occurring in a particular environment and can be proposed for rapid identification of dominant microorganisms in alternative to traditional tools.

  20. Detection of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) nucleic acid and antigen in different organs of water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Craig, M I; Venzano, A; König, G; Morris, W E; Jiménez, L; Juliá, S; Capellino, F; Blanco Viera, J; Weber, E L

    2008-08-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is a pestivirus that infects mainly bovine cattle. Nevertheless, there are several reports about infections in other members of the Artiodactyla order including serological studies, that indicate infection of BVDV in buffaloes. The aim of this article is to study the presence of BVDV in three young water buffaloes, displaying nonspecific clinical signs, compatible with the BVDV infection. Both immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR confirmed the presence of BVDV in the animals. The sequence analysis on RT-PCR amplicons revealed high identity with reference strains of genotypes 1a and 1b. Although BVDV was unequivocally identified in the sick animals, it has not been proved it is responsible for the clinical signs. Further studies are needed to clarify the pathogenic role of BVDV infection in this animal species, and the role of buffaloes in the epidemiology of BVDV infection.

  1. Description of Events Where African Buffaloes (Syncerus caffer) Strayed from the Endemic Foot-and-Mouth Disease Zone in South Africa, 1998-2008.

    PubMed

    van Schalkwyk, O L; Knobel, D L; De Clercq, E M; De Pus, C; Hendrickx, G; Van den Bossche, P

    2016-06-01

    African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer) are reservoir hosts of Southern African Territories (SAT) foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus strains. In South Africa, infected buffaloes are found in the FMD-infected zone comprising the Kruger National Park (KNP) and its adjoining reserves. When these buffaloes stray into livestock areas, they pose a risk of FMD transmission to livestock. We assessed 645 records of stray buffalo events (3124 animals) from the FMD infected zone during 1998-2008 for (i) their temporal distribution, (ii) group size, (iii) age and gender composition, (iv) distance from the infected zone fence and (v) outcome reported for each event. A maximum entropy model was developed to evaluate spatial predictors of stray buffalo events and assess current disease control zones. Out of all buffaloes recorded straying, 38.5% escaped from the FMD infected zone during 2000/2001, following floods that caused extensive damage to wildlife fences. Escape patterns were not apparently influenced by season. The median size of stray groups was a single animal (IQR [1-2]). Adult animals predominated, comprising 90.4% (620/686) of the animals for which age was recorded. Of the 315 events with accurate spatial information, 204 (64.8%) were recorded within 1 km from the FMD infected zone. During late winter/spring (June-October), stray buffaloes were found significantly closer to the FMD infected zone (median = 0.3 km, IQR [0.1-0.6]). Less than 13% (40/315) of stray groups reached the FMD protection zone without vaccination, posing a higher risk of spreading FMD to these more susceptible livestock. Model outputs suggest that distance from the FMD infected zone, urban areas and permanent water sources contributed almost 85% to the spatial probability of stray buffalo events. Areas with a high probability for stray buffalo events were well covered by current disease control zones, although FMD risk mitigation could be improved by expanding the vaccination zone in certain areas.

  2. Evidence of co-infection with Mycobacterium bovis and tick-borne pathogens in a naturally infected sheep flock.

    PubMed

    López, Vladimir; Alberdi, Pilar; Fernández de Mera, Isabel G; Barasona, José Angel; Vicente, Joaquín; Garrido, Joseba M; Torina, Alessandra; Caracappa, Santo; Lelli, Rossella Colomba; Gortázar, Christian; de la Fuente, José

    2016-03-01

    Ticks are responsible for the transmission of pathogens of veterinary importance, including those affecting sheep. The current study was designed to investigate co-infections with tick-borne and other pathogens in a naturally infected sheep flock with poor health condition using serology and PCR. Infection with Anaplasma ovis was detected by serology and PCR in 56% of the animals. The presence of Rickettsia spp. of the Spotted Fever Group (SFG) was detected by PCR and sequence analysis in 31% of the animals. All the animals were negative for Anaplasma phagocytophilum either by serology or PCR. Twelve sheep were randomly selected for anatomopathological studies. Five of these animals presented lesions consistent with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) infection and spoligotyping confirmed infection with Mycobacterium bovis spoligotype SB0339. Co-infection with tick-borne pathogens and MTBC could contribute to the poor health condition observed in these animals but other uncontrolled factors may also be responsible. The differential expression of immune response genes supported previous findings in ruminants and suggested that infection with tick-borne pathogens and M. bovis may results in unique gene expression patterns in sheep. The results underline the need for further research into the possible role of sheep in the epidemiology of animal tuberculosis.

  3. Density dynamics of diverse Spiroplasma strains naturally infecting different species of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Haselkorn, Tamara S; Watts, Thomas D; Markow, Therese A

    2013-01-01

    Facultative heritable bacterial endosymbionts can have dramatic effects on their hosts, ranging from mutualistic to parasitic. Within-host bacterial endosymbiont density plays a critical role in maintenance of a symbiotic relationship, as it can affect levels of vertical transmission and expression of phenotypic effects, both of which influence the infection prevalence in host populations. Species of genus Drosophila are infected with Spiroplasma, whose characterized phenotypic effects range from that of a male-killing reproductive parasite to beneficial defensive endosymbiont. For many strains of Spiroplasma infecting at least 17 species of Drosophila, however, the phenotypic effects are obscure. The infection prevalence of these Spiroplasma vary within and among Drosophila species, and little is known about the within-host density dynamics of these diverse strains. To characterize the patterns of Spiroplasma density variation among Drosophila we used quantitative PCR to assess bacterial titer at various life stages of three species of Drosophila naturally-infected with two different types of Spiroplasma. For naturally infected Drosophila species we found that non-male-killing infections had consistently lower densities than the male-killing infection. The patterns of Spiroplasma titer change during aging varied among Drosophila species infected with different Spiroplasma strains. Bacterial density varied within and among populations of Drosophila, with individuals from the population with the highest prevalence of infection having the highest density. This density variation underscores the complex interaction of Spiroplasma strain and host genetic background in determining endosymbiont density. PMID:23846301

  4. African horse sickness in naturally infected, immunised horses.

    PubMed

    Weyer, C T; Quan, M; Joone, C; Lourens, C W; MacLachlan, N J; Guthrie, A J

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether subclinical cases, together with clinical cases, of African horse sickness (AHS) occur in immunised horses in field conditions, whole blood samples were collected and rectal temperatures recorded weekly from 50 Nooitgedacht ponies resident in open camps at the Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Onderstepoort, during 2008-2010. The samples were tested for the presence of African horse sickness virus (AHSV) RNA by a recently developed real-time RT-PCR. It was shown that 16% of immunised horses in an AHS endemic area were infected with AHSV over a 2 year period, with half of these (8%) being subclinically infected. The potential impact of such cases on the epidemiology of AHS warrants further investigation.

  5. Two Different Macaviruses, ovine herpesvirus-2 and caprine herpesvirus-2, behave differently in water buffaloes than in cattle or in their respective reservoir species.

    PubMed

    Stahel, Anina B J; Baggenstos, Rhea; Engels, Monika; Friess, Martina; Ackermann, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    The ongoing global spread of "exotic" farm animals, such as water buffaloes, which carry their native sets of viruses, may bear unknown risks for the animals, into whose ecological niches the former are introduced and vice versa. Here, we report on the occurrence of malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) on Swiss farms, where "exotic" water buffaloes were kept together with "native" animals, i.e. cattle, sheep, and goats. In the first farm with 56 water buffaloes, eight cases of MCF due to ovine herpesvirus-2 (OvHV-2) were noted, whereas additional ten water buffaloes were subclinically infected with either OvHV-2 or caprine herpesvirus-2 (CpHV-2). On the second farm, 13 water buffaloes were infected with CpHV-2 and two of those succumbed to MCF. In neither farm, any of the two viruses were detected in cattle, but the Macaviruses were present at high prevalence among their original host species, sheep and goats, respectively. On the third farm, sheep were kept well separated from water buffaloes and OvHV-2 was not transmitted to the buffaloes, despite of high prevalence of the virus among the sheep. Macavirus DNA was frequently detected in the nasal secretions of virus-positive animals and in one instance OvHV-2 was transmitted vertically to an unborn water buffalo calf. Thus, water buffaloes seem to be more susceptible than cattle to infection with either Macavirus; however, MCF did not develop as frequently. Therefore, water buffaloes seem to represent an interesting intermediate-type host for Macaviruses. Consequently, water buffaloes in their native, tropic environments may be vulnerable and endangered to viruses that originate from seemingly healthy, imported sheep and goats.

  6. Disease, predation and demography: Assessing the impacts of bovine tuberculosis on African buffalo by monitoring at individual and population levels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, P.C.; Heisey, D.M.; Bowers, J.A.; Hay, C.T.; Wolhuter, J.; Buss, P.; Hofmeyr, M.; Michel, A.L.; Bengis, Roy G.; Bird, T.L.F.; Du Toit, J.T.; Getz, W.M.

    2009-01-01

    1. Understanding the effects of disease is critical to determining appropriate management responses, but estimating those effects in wildlife species is challenging. We used bovine tuberculosis (BTB) in the African buffalo Syncerus caffer population of Kruger National Park, South Africa, as a case study to highlight the issues associated with estimating chronic disease effects in a long-lived host. 2. We used known and radiocollared buffalo, aerial census data, and a natural gradient in pathogen prevalence to investigate if: (i) at the individual level, BTB infection reduces reproduction; (ii) BTB infection increases vulnerability to predation; and (iii) at the population level, increased BTB prevalence causes reduced population growth. 3. There was only a marginal reduction in calving success associated with BTB infection, as indexed by the probability of sighting a known adult female with or without a calf (P = 0??065). 4. Since 1991, BTB prevalence increased from 27 to 45% in the southern region and from 4 to 28% in the central region of Kruger National Park. The prevalence in the northern regions was only 1??5% in 1998. Buffalo population growth rates, however, were neither statistically different among regions nor declining over time. 5. Lions Panthera leo did not appear to preferentially kill test-positive buffalo. The best (Akaike's Information Criterion corrected for small sample size) AICc model with BTB as a covariate [exp(??) = 0??49; 95% CI = (0??24-1??02)] suggested that the mortality hazard for positive individuals was no greater than for test-negative individuals. 6. Synthesis and applications. Test accuracy, time-varying disease status, and movement among populations are some of the issues that make the detection of chronic disease impacts challenging. For these reasons, the demographic impacts of bovine tuberculosis in the Kruger National Park remain undetectable despite 6 years of study on known individuals and 40 years of population counts

  7. The pulmonary involvement in Theileria lestoquardi naturally infected sheep.

    PubMed

    El Imam, Ahmed H; Hassan, Shawgi M; Gameel, Ahmed A; El Hussein, Abdelrahim M; Taha, Khalid M

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Ovine Theileriosis (MOT) caused by Theileria lestoquardi is considered a major constraint for sheep production in many areas of the world including Sudan. Pulmonary oedema is thought to be the main cause of animal death, but the mechanism, the cell types involved and/or the probable cause of this pneumonia has yet to be defined. The present study was carried out to investigate the pulmonary involvement post T. lestoquardi infection and to identify the cell types involved in pneumonia. Apparently healthy sheep were exposed to ticks challenge in T. lestoquardi endemic area. Lungs impression smears and tissue sections for histopathology were processed. At necropsy, fifteen infected sheep revealed severe pneumonia associated with oedema and accumulation of creamy-grayish frothy exudates. The microscopic findings of examined lungs showed emphysema, congestion, collapse and proliferation of immense amount of different kinds of cells. The current study indicates that T. lestoquardi infections are accompanied with remarkable pulmonary involvements and may lead to respiratory failure and death. PMID:27262956

  8. Natural infection of Cryptosporidium muris in ostriches (Struthio camelus).

    PubMed

    Qi, Meng; Huang, Lei; Wang, Rongjun; Xiao, Lihua; Xu, Lina; Li, Junqiang; Zhang, Longxian

    2014-10-15

    A total of 303 fecal samples were collected from ostriches (Struthio camelus) and 31 samples (10.2%) were Cryptosporidium-positive upon microscopic analysis. The infection rate was 27.6% in ostriches aged 16-60 days, 1.2% in those aged 61-180 days, and 20.4% in those aged >10 years. The Cryptosporidium-positive isolates were genotyped with a restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and DNA sequence analysis of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene. The 22 isolates from ostriches aged >10 years were identified as Cryptosporidium muris, whereas the nine isolates from ostriches <180 days were Cryptosporidium baileyi. Ten of the 22 C. muris isolates were analyzed based on the actin and HSP70 genes, and the results were identical to those observed for the SSU rRNA gene. Cross-transmission studies demonstrated that the C. muris isolate infected BALB/c mice and Mongolian gerbils, but did not infect chickens. C. muris isolated in this study appears to be host-adapted, consistent with a previous multilocus sequence typing analysis. Further studies are required to understand the prevalence and transmission of Cryptosporidium spp. in ostriches in different geographic areas. PMID:25178556

  9. Prevalence and distribution of Neospora caninum in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and cattle in the Northern Territory of Australia.

    PubMed

    Neverauskas, Claudia E; Nasir, Amar; Reichel, Michael P

    2015-10-01

    The seroprevalence of Neospora caninum infection in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and domestic cattle in the Northern Territory (NT) of Australia has never been determined. A total of 480 serum samples from water buffalo and 192 serum samples from cattle, collected by the NT Government from 1993 through to 2001, at 18 different survey sites throughout the Northern Territory were tested by commercial ELISA for anti-N. caninum antibodies. The water buffalo samples demonstrated a seroprevalence of 88.3% (95% CI ± 2.9%), while 31.8% (±6.1%) of the cattle sera tested positive for N. caninum antibodies. Individual buffalo from the same herd, sampled over years, showed considerable fluctuations in S/P ratios. Overall, seropositivity was consistent across buffalo herds, and showed a slight decline over the years. The study presents evidence for the first time that N. caninum infection in water buffalo in the Northern Territory is a highly endemic and that infection rates are higher than those for cattle. This is important for an understanding of any potential sylvatic life cycle of N. caninum in Northern Australia. This survey also tests cattle from that territory for the first time for evidence of N. caninum infection and makes an important contribution to the understanding of disease management issues for the beef industry in the region.

  10. The African buffalo: a villain for inter-species spread of infectious diseases in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Michel, Anita L; Bengis, Roy G

    2012-06-20

    The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is a large wild bovid which until recently ranged across all but the driest parts of sub-Saharan Africa, and their local range being limited to about 20 km from surface water. They are of high ecological value due to their important role as bulk feeders in the grazing hierarchy. They also have high economic value, because they are one of the sought after 'Big Five' in the eco-tourism industry. In Africa, buffaloes have been recognised for some time as an important role player in the maintenance and transmission of a variety of economically important livestock diseases at the wildlife and/or livestock interface. These include African strains of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), Corridor disease (theileriosis), bovine tuberculosis and bovine brucellosis. For a number of other diseases of veterinary importance, African buffaloes may also serve as amplifier or incidental host, whereby infection with the causative pathogens may cause severe clinical signs such as death or abortion as in the case of anthrax and Rift Valley fever, or remain mild or subclinical for example heartwater. The long term health implications of most of those infections on the buffalo at a population level is usually limited, and they do not pose a threat on the population's survival. Because of their ability to harbour and transmit important diseases to livestock, their sustainable future in ecotourism, trade and transfrontier conservation projects become complex and costly and reliable diagnostic tools are required to monitor these infections in buffalo populations.

  11. Malignant Catarrhal Fever: An Emerging Disease in the African Buffalo (Syncerus caffer).

    PubMed

    Pfitzer, S; Last, R; Espie, I; van Vuuren, M

    2015-06-01

    Within the tribe Bovini in the subfamily Bovinae, the water buffalo (Bubalus Bubalis), American bison (Bison bison), European bison (Bubalus bonasus) and yak (Bos grunniens) are recognized as species highly susceptible to malignant catarrhal fever (MCF). In contrast, the lack of reports describing clinical MCF in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) whether free ranging or captive has led to a perception that African buffaloes are resistant to MCF. During the last decade, several cases of MCF in African buffaloes were confirmed in South Africa and experience with seven of these cases is described in this report. Detection of viral nucleic acid in blood or tissues was successful in six African buffaloes that suffered from clinical signs compatible with MCF. Four were positive for infection with ovine herpesvirus type 2 (the causative virus of sheep-associated MCF), and two were positive for alcelaphine herpesvirus type 1 (causative virus of wildebeest-associated MCF). Histopathological examination of tissue samples from all the animals yielded typical lesions that were consistent with those described for MCF in domestic cattle. Developments in the management of African buffaloes translocated from their traditional habitats have likely contributed to the identification of another susceptible host in the subfamily Bovinae.

  12. Detection of Persistent West Nile Virus RNA in Experimentally and Naturally Infected Avian Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Sarah S.; Langevin, Stanley A.; Brault, Aaron C.; Woods, Leslie; Carroll, Brian D.; Reisen, William K.

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether West Nile virus (WNV) persistent infection in avian hosts may potentially serve as an overwintering mechanism, House Sparrows and House Finches, experimentally and naturally infected with several strains of WNV, and two naturally infected Western Scrub-Jays were held in mosquito-proof outdoor aviaries from 2007–March 2008. Overall, 94% (n = 36) of House Sparrows, 100% (n = 14) of House Finches and 2 Western Scrub-Jays remained WNV antibody positive. When combined by species, 37% of the House Sparrows, 50% of the House Finches, and 2 Western Scrub-Jays were WNV RNA positive at necropsy, up to 36 weeks post-infection. Infectious WNV was not detected. Our study supports the hypothesis that some avian hosts support the long-term persistence of WNV RNA, but it remains unresolved whether these infections relapse to restart an avian-arthropod transmission cycle and thereby serve as an overwintering mechanism for WNV. PMID:22826479

  13. Decreased Flight Activity in Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) Naturally Infected With Culex flavivirus.

    PubMed

    Newman, Christina M; Anderson, Tavis K; Goldberg, Tony L

    2016-01-01

    Insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFVs) commonly infect vectors of mosquito-borne arboviruses. To investigate whether infection with an ISFV might affect mosquito flight behavior, we quantified flight behavior in Culex pipiens L. naturally infected with Culex flavivirus (CxFV). We observed a significant reduction in the scotophase (dark hours) flight activity of CxFV-positive mosquitoes relative to CxFV-negative mosquitoes, but only a marginal reduction in photophase (light hours) flight activity, and no change in the circadian pattern of flight activity. These results suggest that CxFV infection alters the flight activity of naturally infected Cx. pipiens most dramatically when these vectors are likely to be host seeking and may therefore affect the transmission of medically important arboviruses.

  14. Naturally acquired picornavirus infections in primates at the Dhaka zoo.

    PubMed

    Oberste, M Steven; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Maher, Kaija; Nix, W Allan; Engel, Gregory A; Begum, Sajeda; Hasan, Kamrul M; Oh, Gunwha; Pallansch, Mark A; Jones-Engel, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    The conditions in densely populated Bangladesh favor picornavirus transmission, resulting in a high rate of infection in the human population. Data suggest that nonhuman primates (NHP) may play a role in the maintenance and transmission of diverse picornaviruses in Bangladesh. At the Dhaka Zoo, multiple NHP species are caged in close proximity. Their proximity to other species and to humans, both zoo workers and visitors, provides the potential for cross-species transmission. To investigate possible interspecies and intraspecies transmission of picornaviruses among NHP, we collected fecal specimens from nine NHP taxa at the Dhaka Zoo at three time points, August 2007, January 2008, and June 2008. Specimens were screened using real-time PCR for the genera Enterovirus, Parechovirus, and Sapelovirus, and positive samples were typed by VP1 sequencing. Fifty-two picornaviruses comprising 10 distinct serotypes were detected in 83 fecal samples. Four of these serotypes, simian virus 19 (SV19), baboon enterovirus (BaEV), enterovirus 112 (EV112), and EV115, have been solely associated with infection in NHP. EV112, EV115, and SV19 accounted for 88% of all picornaviruses detected. Over 80% of samples from cages housing rhesus macaques, olive baboons, or hamadryas baboons were positive for a picornavirus, while no picornaviruses were detected in samples from capped langurs or vervet monkeys. In contrast to our findings among synanthropic NHP in Bangladesh where 100% of the picornaviruses detected were of human serotypes, in the zoo population, only 15% of picornaviruses detected in NHP were of human origin. Specific serotypes tended to persist over time, suggesting either persistent infection of individuals or cycles of reinfection.

  15. Microvasculature of the buffalo epididymis.

    PubMed

    Scala, Gaetano; De Girolamo, Paolo; Corona, Mario; Pelagalli, Gaetano Vincenzo

    2002-01-01

    The microvasculature of the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) epididymis was investigated using light (LM), scanning electron (SEM), and transmission electron (TEM) microscopy techniques. SEM analysis of the buffalo epididymis showed fenestrations that occupied ovoid inside the endothelium of the postcapillary venules located in the caput, corpus, and cauda. They varied in shape and dimension, but more importantly, they connected the venules of the blood vascular system to the capillaries of the peripheral lymphatic vascular system. Morphofunctional analysis of these connections suggests that the microvasculature of the buffalo epididymis plays a role in facilitating the circulation of biologically active substances, and the absorption and secretion processes necessary for the survival and maturation of spermatozoa. The lymphatic capillaries at the connection points formed a network of variously sized polygonal links. These capillaries then converged to form the precollector lymphatic vessels, which in turn converged with the larger vessels originating from the testis. It was further noted that in the capillary endothelium there were no fenestrations, and in the large veins there were many diverticula. These diverticula appear to play a role in the regulation of the seasonal variations of the blood reflux. In general, the microvascular architecture of the buffalo epididymis, particularly its connection to the lymphatic vascular system, appears to play an important role in the absorption and secretion processes of the epididymal epithelium.

  16. Blood eicosanoids and immune indices during fasciolosis in water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Daugschies, A; Wang, B; Mao, X

    2000-12-01

    The effects of trickle infections of water buffaloes with Fasciola hepatica (60 metacercariae daily during a period of 20 days) on the blood plasma levels of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE2), 6-keto-prostaglandin F(1alpha) (6-keto-PG F(1alpha)) and thromboxane B(2) (TXB2) were assessed. F. hepatica specific IgG and T- and B-lymphocyte ratios were evaluated as indicators of the immune response. Although the applied mode of infection did not result in clinical disease, changes in the plasma eicosanoid pattern were observed. Plasma PGE2 values were significantly elevated in the infected water buffaloes 11 weeks post-infection (w.p.i.). In contrast, transiently but significantly lower TXB2 values than in the uninfected controls were recorded in the phase of chronic fasciolosis. Plasma 6-keto-PGF(1alpha) values were not considerably altered by the infection throughout the study period. F. hepatica-specific IgG were detected from 4 to 21 w.p.i. The proportion of peripheral T- and B-lymphocytes shifted towards B-cells from 2 to 12 w.p.i., gradually returning to control values afterwards. Although the water buffaloes appeared to be rather resistant to trickle infection with F. hepatica, moderate changes in plasma eicosanoid patterns were observed, indicating tissue damage and/or inflammation. Induction of the immune response could be monitored by an increase of F. hepatica-specific IgG, which was paralleled by a relative increase of the B-lymphocyte population.

  17. Detection of Echinococcus granulosus coproantigens in Australian canids with natural or experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, D J; Fraser, A; Bradshaw, H; Craig, P S

    2000-02-01

    Coproparasitological and purging methods for diagnosing canids infected with the intestinal helminth Echinococcus granulosus, an important zoonotic parasite, are unreliable. Detection of coproantigens in feces of infected dogs by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is suitable for detecting patent and prepatent infections with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. In the present study, natural and experimental infections in domestic and wild Australian canids were investigated using a coproantigen capture ELISA. Experimental infection of dogs with E. granulosus was detected at between 14 and 22 days postinfection (PI), and optical density (OD) values remained high until termination of experiments 35 days PI. After chemotherapy, coproantigen levels in infected dogs dropped rapidly, becoming negative 2-4 days after treatment. In experimentally infected red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), the coproantigen excretion profile was different, with ELISA OD levels peaking 15-17 days PI, then falling to low or undetectable levels by 30 days PI. Coproantigens were detected in the feces of naturally infected Australian wild dogs (dingoes, dingo/domestic dog hybrids) with infection levels ranging between 2 worms and 42,600. Preliminary data on the stability of coproantigen in dog feces exposed to environmental conditions indicated that there was no change in antigenicity over 6 days. The results suggest the coproantigen ELISA could be successfully used to monitor E. granulosus prevalence rates in Australian domestic dogs, foxes, and wild dogs. PMID:10701577

  18. Buffalo, Bush Meat, and the Zoonotic Threat of Brucellosis in Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Kathleen Anne; Blackburn, Jason Kenna; Vandewalle, Mark Eric; Pesapane, Risa; Baipoledi, Eddie Kekgonne; Elzer, Phil H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease of global importance infecting humans, domestic animals, and wildlife. Little is known about the epidemiology and persistence of brucellosis in wildlife in Southern Africa, particularly in Botswana. Methods Archived wildlife samples from Botswana (1995–2000) were screened with the Rose Bengal Test (RBT) and fluorescence polarization assay (FPA) and included the African buffalo (247), bushbuck (1), eland (5), elephant (25), gemsbok (1), giraffe (9), hartebeest (12), impala (171), kudu (27), red lechwe (10), reedbuck (1), rhino (2), springbok (5), steenbok (2), warthog (24), waterbuck (1), wildebeest (33), honey badger (1), lion (43), and zebra (21). Human case data were extracted from government annual health reports (1974–2006). Findings Only buffalo (6%, 95% CI 3.04%–8.96%) and giraffe (11%, 95% CI 0–38.43%) were confirmed seropositive on both tests. Seropositive buffalo were widely distributed across the buffalo range where cattle density was low. Human infections were reported in low numbers with most infections (46%) occurring in children (<14 years old) and no cases were reported among people working in the agricultural sector. Conclusions Low seroprevalence of brucellosis in Botswana buffalo in a previous study in 1974 and again in this survey suggests an endemic status of the disease in this species. Buffalo, a preferred source of bush meat, is utilized both legally and illegally in Botswana. Household meat processing practices can provide widespread pathogen exposure risk to family members and the community, identifying an important source of zoonotic pathogen transmission potential. Although brucellosis may be controlled in livestock populations, public health officials need to be alert to the possibility of human infections arising from the use of bush meat. This study illustrates the need for a unified approach in infectious disease research that includes consideration of both domestic and wildlife

  19. Oxfendazole treatment for cystic hydatid disease in naturally infected animals.

    PubMed

    Blanton, R E; Wachira, T M; Zeyhle, E E; Njoroge, E M; Magambo, J K; Schantz, P M

    1998-03-01

    Few chemotherapeutic agents are available for the medical management of hydatid disease caused by the parasite Echinococcus granulosus. In order to test the potential of oxfendazole for the treatment of infection with this parasite, nine infected goats and four sheep were given oxfendazole twice weekly at a dose of 30 mg/kg of body weight for 4 weeks and monitored by ultrasound for an additional 4 weeks. Efficacy was finally evaluated by postmortem examination, including determination of protoscolex viability and cyst wall histology. In treated animals, protoscolices were dead or absent in 97% of cysts from oxfendazole-treated animals compared to 28% of cysts from untreated control animals. On postmortem examination, 53% of cysts from treated animals were found to be grossly degenerate. A sample of those cysts that appeared potentially viable all demonstrated evidence of severe damage to the cyst wall. By light microscopy, cysts showed severe disorganization of the adventitial layer with invasion of inflammatory cells and in some cases frank necrosis with no apparent adventitial layer. The follow-up period for assessment of the drug's ability to cause complete degeneration and resorption of cysts was relatively short. This study, however, indicates that oxfendazole is at least as effective as and is easier to administer than albendazole for the treatment of hydatid disease.

  20. Molecular characterization of T-cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-3 and Galectin-9 genes of swamp- and riverine-type water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Duran, P L H; Padiernos, R B C; Abella, E A; Konnai, S; Mingala, C N

    2015-12-01

    Molecular characterization of T-cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-3 (TIM-3) and Galectin-9 (GAL-9) genes of swamp- and riverine-type water buffaloes was conducted to compare these genes with other species; determine the unique characteristic specific in water buffalo; and provide baseline information for the assessment of disease progression in buffalo species. TIM-3 and GAL-9 genes were amplified, purified, sequenced and characterized. The sequence result of TIM-3 in both types of water buffaloes contained 843 nucleotides encoding to 280 amino acids while GAL-9 of swamp-type and riverine-type water buffaloes contained 1023 and 972 nucleotides encoding to 340 and 323 amino acids, respectively. Meanwhile, the nucleotide and amino sequence of TIM-3 in water buffalo were 83-98% and 94-97% identical with other artiodactyl species, respectively. On the other hand, GAL-9 nucleotide and amino acid sequence in water buffalo were 85-98% and 76-96% identical with other artiodactyl species. The tyrosine-kinase phosphorylation motif and potential glycosylation sites were conserved within the tribe Bovinae. It is imperative to have further studies in the assessment of the role of these genes in disease progression in water buffalo during chronic infection. The study is the first report that describes the genetic characteristic of TIM-3 and GAL-9 genes in water buffalo. PMID:26441033

  1. Molecular characterization of T-cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-3 and Galectin-9 genes of swamp- and riverine-type water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Duran, P L H; Padiernos, R B C; Abella, E A; Konnai, S; Mingala, C N

    2015-12-01

    Molecular characterization of T-cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-3 (TIM-3) and Galectin-9 (GAL-9) genes of swamp- and riverine-type water buffaloes was conducted to compare these genes with other species; determine the unique characteristic specific in water buffalo; and provide baseline information for the assessment of disease progression in buffalo species. TIM-3 and GAL-9 genes were amplified, purified, sequenced and characterized. The sequence result of TIM-3 in both types of water buffaloes contained 843 nucleotides encoding to 280 amino acids while GAL-9 of swamp-type and riverine-type water buffaloes contained 1023 and 972 nucleotides encoding to 340 and 323 amino acids, respectively. Meanwhile, the nucleotide and amino sequence of TIM-3 in water buffalo were 83-98% and 94-97% identical with other artiodactyl species, respectively. On the other hand, GAL-9 nucleotide and amino acid sequence in water buffalo were 85-98% and 76-96% identical with other artiodactyl species. The tyrosine-kinase phosphorylation motif and potential glycosylation sites were conserved within the tribe Bovinae. It is imperative to have further studies in the assessment of the role of these genes in disease progression in water buffalo during chronic infection. The study is the first report that describes the genetic characteristic of TIM-3 and GAL-9 genes in water buffalo.

  2. The occurrence of nymphal stage of Linguatula serrata in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis): nymphal morphometry and lymph node pathology.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, P; Sankar, M; Nambi, P A; Praveena, P E; Singh, N

    2005-12-01

    The mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) of buffaloes (n = 100) were examined for the presence of parasitic infection. The nymphal stage of Linguatula serrata was observed in two buffaloes. A single white-coloured nymph with transversely striated spines on a segmented body, two pairs of oral suckers and hooks was observed in the MLN. The morphometrics of the nymphs were studied. The affected lymph nodes were grossly enlarged with cyst and showed pathological lesions of fibroblastic reaction with a mild underlying inflammatory zone.

  3. Geo-referencing livestock farms as tool for studying cystic echinococcosis epidemiology in cattle and water buffaloes from southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Cringoli, Giuseppe; Rinaldi, Laura; Musella, Vincenzo; Veneziano, Vincenzo; Maurelli, Maria Paola; Di Pietro, Francesco; Frisiello, Michele; Di Pietro, Salvatore

    2007-11-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE), caused by the larval stages of the tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus, is known to be one of the most important parasitic infection in livestock worldwide and one of the most widespread zoonoses known. In the present study, we used a geographical information system (GIS) to study the spatial structure of livestock (cattle, water buffaloes and sheep) populations to gain a better understanding of the role of sheep as reservoir for the transmission of CE to cattle and water buffaloes. To this end, a survey on CE in cattle and water buffaloes from the Campania region of southern Italy was conducted and the geo-referenced results linked to the regional farm geo-referenced data within a GIS. The results showed a noteworthy prevalence of CE in cattle and water buffalo farms (overall prevalence = 18.6%). The elaboration of the data with a GIS approach showed a close proximity of the bovine and/or water buffalo CE positive farms with the ovine farms present in the study area, thus giving important information on the significance of sheep and free-ranging canids in the transmission cycles of CE in relation to cattle and water buffaloes. The significantly higher prevalence found in cattle as compared to water buffalo farms (20.0% versus 12.4%) supports the key role of sheep in the CE transmission; indeed, within the 5 km radius buffer zones constructed around the cattle farms positive for CE, a higher number of (potentially infected) sheep farms were found compared to those found within the buffer zones around the water buffalo farms. Furthermore, the average distances between the sheep and cattle farms falling in the same buffer zones were significantly lower than those between the sheep and water buffalo farms. We emphasize that the use of GIS is a novel approach to further our understanding of the epidemiology and control of CE and we encourage other groups to make use of it.

  4. Recombination in feline immunodeficiency virus genomes from naturally infected cougars.

    PubMed

    Bruen, Trevor C; Poss, Mary

    2007-08-01

    Recombination contributes significantly to diversity within virus populations and ultimately to viral evolution. Here we use a recently developed statistical test to perform exploratory analysis of recombination in fourteen feline immunodeficiency virus (FIVpco) genomes derived from a wild population of cougars. We use both the global and local Phi statistical test as an overall guide to predict where recombination may have occurred. Further analyses, including similarity plots and phylogenetic incongruence tests, confirmed that three FIVpco lineages were derived from recombinant events. Interestingly, the regions of mosaic origin were clustered in the area encoding lentiviral accessory genes and largely spared the viral structural genes. Because some of the mosaic strains are currently geographically disparate, our data indicate that the dispersal of cougars infected with these strains was preceded by recombination events. These results suggest that recombination has played an important role in the evolution of FIVpco for this wild population of cougars.

  5. In vitro infection of natural killer cells with different human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Chehimi, J; Bandyopadhyay, S; Prakash, K; Perussia, B; Hassan, N F; Kawashima, H; Campbell, D; Kornbluth, J; Starr, S E

    1991-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a discrete subset of leukocytes, distinct from T and B lymphocytes. NK cells mediate spontaneous non-MHC-restricted killing of a wide variety of target cells without prior sensitization and appear to be involved in initial protection against certain viral infections. Depressed NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity, one of the many immunological defects observed in AIDS patients, may contribute to secondary virus infections. Here we report that clonal and purified polyclonal populations of NK cells, which expressed neither surface CD4 nor CD4 mRNA, were susceptible to infection with various isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Viral replication was demonstrated by detection of p24 antigen intracellularly and in culture supernatants, by the presence of HIV DNA within infected cells, and by the ability of supernatants derived from HIV-infected NK cells to infect peripheral blood mononuclear cells or CD4+ cell lines. Infection of NK cells was not blocked by anti-CD4 or anti-Fc gamma RIII monoclonal antibodies. NK cells from HIV-infected and uninfected cultures were similar in their ability to lyse three different target cells. Considerable numbers of cells died in HIV-infected NK cell cultures. These results suggest that loss of NK cells in AIDS patients is a direct effect of HIV infection but that reduced NK cell function involves another mechanism. The possibility that NK cells serve as a potential reservoir for HIV-1 must be considered. Images PMID:1672164

  6. Leukocyte profiles for western fence lizards, Sceloporus occidentalis, naturally infected by the malaria parasite Plasmodium mexicanum.

    PubMed

    Motz, Victoria L; Lewis, William D; Vardo-Zalik, Anne M

    2014-10-01

    Plasmodium mexicanum is a malaria parasite that naturally infects the western fence lizard, Sceloporus occidentalis , in northern California. We set out to determine whether lizards naturally infected with this malaria parasite have different leukocyte profiles, indicating an immune response to infection. We used 29 naturally infected western fence lizards paired with uninfected lizards based on sex, snout-to-vent length, tail status, and the presence-absence of ectoparasites such as ticks and mites, as well as the presence-absence of another hemoparasite, Schellackia occidentalis. Complete white blood cell (WBC) counts were conducted on blood smears stained with Giemsa, and the proportion of granulocytes per microliter of blood was estimated using the Avian Leukopet method. The abundance of each WBC class (lymphocytes, monocytes, heterophils, eosinophils, and basophils) in infected and uninfected lizards was compared to determine whether leukocyte densities varied with infection status. We found that the numbers of WBCs and lymphocytes per microliter of blood significantly differed (P < 0.05) between the 2 groups for females but not for males, whereas parasitemia was significantly correlated with lymphocyte counts for males, but not for females. This study supports the theory that infection with P. mexicanum stimulates the lizard's immune response to increase the levels of circulating WBCs, but what effect this has on the biology of the parasite remains unclear. PMID:24945903

  7. Leukocyte profiles for western fence lizards, Sceloporus occidentalis, naturally infected by the malaria parasite Plasmodium mexicanum.

    PubMed

    Motz, Victoria L; Lewis, William D; Vardo-Zalik, Anne M

    2014-10-01

    Plasmodium mexicanum is a malaria parasite that naturally infects the western fence lizard, Sceloporus occidentalis , in northern California. We set out to determine whether lizards naturally infected with this malaria parasite have different leukocyte profiles, indicating an immune response to infection. We used 29 naturally infected western fence lizards paired with uninfected lizards based on sex, snout-to-vent length, tail status, and the presence-absence of ectoparasites such as ticks and mites, as well as the presence-absence of another hemoparasite, Schellackia occidentalis. Complete white blood cell (WBC) counts were conducted on blood smears stained with Giemsa, and the proportion of granulocytes per microliter of blood was estimated using the Avian Leukopet method. The abundance of each WBC class (lymphocytes, monocytes, heterophils, eosinophils, and basophils) in infected and uninfected lizards was compared to determine whether leukocyte densities varied with infection status. We found that the numbers of WBCs and lymphocytes per microliter of blood significantly differed (P < 0.05) between the 2 groups for females but not for males, whereas parasitemia was significantly correlated with lymphocyte counts for males, but not for females. This study supports the theory that infection with P. mexicanum stimulates the lizard's immune response to increase the levels of circulating WBCs, but what effect this has on the biology of the parasite remains unclear.

  8. 77 FR 39408 - Safety Zone; Buffalo July 4th Fireworks, Lake Erie, Buffalo, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Buffalo July 4th Fireworks, Lake Erie, Buffalo, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on Lake Erie, Buffalo, NY. This safety zone is intended to...

  9. Piroplasmosis in buffaloes and its serological diagnosis based on a homology between buffalo and bovine immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Callow, L L; Parker, R J; Rodwell, B J; Ottley, M L

    1976-01-01

    Babesia argentina, Babesia bigemina and Theileria mutans were transmitted experimentally from water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) to splenectomised Bos taurus calves. Buffaloes were positive to an indirect fluorescent antibody test for B. argentina when reagents of bovine origin were used. The formation of similar patterns during immunoelectrophoresis suggested a homology of buffalo and bovine serum proteins, particularly IgG.

  10. Observations on mass production of Calicophoron microbothrium metacercariae from experimentally and naturally infected Bulinus tropicus.

    PubMed

    Mavenyengwa, M; Mukaratirwa, S; Obwolo, M; Monrad, J

    2006-06-01

    In an attempt to establish an ideal method for mass production of Calicophoron microbothrium metacercariae, a study was carried out to compare the shedding capacities of Bulinus tropicus naturally and experimentally infected with C. microbothrium. A total of 906 F1 B. tropicus between 4 and 5 weeks old were each experimentally infected with two C. microbothrium miracidia and monitored for 12 weeks. The infected snails were fed on dried lettuce and fish flakes and were kept in 1 l plastic aquaria housed in a snail room where temperature, light and humidity were controlled. Seventy-four percent of the experimentally infected snails died during the prepatent period and of the remaining, only 13.2% developed patent infection, while 12.5% were refractory. Snail growth rate was poor and the average shedding rate was 20 cercariae per snail per day. Compared to the experimentally infected snails, 2200 adult B. tropicus, collected from the field and naturally infected with C. microbothrium, yielded high numbers of metacercariae. Eighty-four percent of the snails died within 7 weeks of the study with peak mortality occurring from the 2nd to the 4th week of infection and coinciding with an overall decrease in the number of cercariae shed. PMID:16958259

  11. Epidemiology and natural history of urinary tract infections in children.

    PubMed

    Stull, T L; LiPuma, J J

    1991-03-01

    Recent retrospective surveys have supported previous investigations in demonstrating the incidence of UTI during infancy; 0.3% to 1.2% of infants develop symptomatic UTI during the first year of life. Boys are more commonly infected during the first 3 months of life. After the first year, symptomatic UTI is much more frequent among girls. Similarly, asymptomatic bacteriuria is more frequently detected in boys than in girls during the first 12 months of life. Thereafter, the incidence decreases markedly in boys but increases in girls. Recent investigations indicate that lack of circumcision is a risk factor for UTI among male infants. Recurrent UTI is common and frequently asymptomatic. The most important microbiologic factor that is associated with E. coli causing acute pyelonephritis is adherence mediated by P fimbriae. Other factors, such as capsule, lipopolysaccharide, aerobactin production, and serum resistance, also determine the invasiveness of E. coli. Vesicoureteral reflux appears to be an important host factor predisposing to UTI. Microbiologic and host factors that are determinants of renal scarring are under investigation.

  12. Molecular detection of bovine immunodeficiency virus in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) from the Amazon region, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Albernaz, Tatiane Teles; Leite, Rômulo Cerqueira; Reis, Jenner Karlison Pimenta; de Sousa Rodrigues, Ana Paula; da Cunha Kassar, Telissa; Resende, Claudia Fideles; de Oliveira, Cairo Henrique Sousa; Silva, Rafaela das Mercês; Salvarani, Felipe Masiero; Barbosa, José Diomedes

    2015-12-01

    Bovine immunodeficiency is a chronic progressive disease caused by a lentivirus that affects cattle and buffaloes. Although the infection has been described in cattle in some countries, including in Brazil, there are only two reports of infection in buffaloes: one in Pakistan and one in Cambodia. The aim of the present study was to survey the occurrence of bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) in water buffaloes from the Amazon region, Pará state, Brazil. BIV proviral DNA was surveyed in 607 whole blood samples of water buffaloes from 10 farms located in the state of Pará using semi-nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (PCR-SN) to amplify the pol region of the viral genome. Of the 607 samples tested, 27 (4.4 %) were positive for BIV proviral DNA. The amplified fragments were confirmed by sequence analysis after cloning and nucleotide sequencing. The sequence obtained had 99 % similarity to the reference strain (R-29). The present study provides important epidemiological data because BIV was detected for the first time in water buffaloes in Brazil. Further, the results suggest the possibility of the virus being a risk factor for herd health because it may be a potential causal agent of chronic disease and, also may be associated to other infectious diseases.

  13. Seroprevalence of Neospora caninum antibodies in cattle and water buffaloes in India.

    PubMed

    Meenakshi; Sandhu, K S; Ball, M S; Kumar, H; Sharma, S; Sidhu, P K; Sreekumar, C; Dubey, J P

    2007-12-01

    Neospora caninum is now recognized as a major cause of abortion in cattle worldwide, but there is no report of N. caninum infection in cattle in India. Serum samples from 427 dairy cattle and 32 dairy water buffaloes from 7 organized dairy farms located in Punjab, India, were tested for N. caninum antibodies using a commercial monoclonal antibody-based competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Antibodies to N. caninum were found in 35 of 427 cattle from 6 of the 7 farms; 9.6% of cows, 5.1% of heifers, and 5.0% of calves were seropositive, suggesting postnatal transmission of N. caninum on the farm. Antibodies to N. caninum were found in 16 of 32 buffaloes tested from 2 dairy farms. In total, 64 cattle and 16 buffalo sera already tested by ELISA were also evaluated by an indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) to verify ELISA results. Of the 64 cattle samples, 29 sera were negative by both tests and of the 35 ELISA-positive sera, 12 had IFAT titers of 1:100 or higher (1 had IFAT titer of 100, 2 had IFAT titer of 200, and 9 had IFAT titers of 400 or higher). Of the 16 buffalo sera positive by ELISA, 1 had an IFAT titer of 1:400. Thus, antibodies to N. caninum were demonstrated in cattle sera by 2 serologic methods. To our knowledge this is the first report of N. caninum infection in cattle and buffaloes in India.

  14. Screening of Natural Waters for Viruses Which Infect Chlorella Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Takashi; Higashiyama, Takanobu; Fukuda, Takao

    1991-01-01

    By using a plaque assay with the unicellular green alga Chlorella sp. strain NC64A as a host, viruses were screened from natural pond waters collected in Kyoto and Higashi-Hiroshima, Japan. From some samples tested, two kinds of plaques, large (φ = 6 to 10 mm) and small (φ = 2 to 3 mm), were detected with various frequencies. The frequency of plaques in each of the water sources was seasonal; generally, it reached a peak value (8,000 PFU/ml) in May and gradually decreased to the limit of detection (<1) in November before increasing again in early spring. Electron microscopy revealed that the purified and negatively stained viruses were very large (125 to 200 nm) icosahedral particles. The genome isolated from these particles was always a linear double-stranded DNA of 340 to 370 kbp. Electrophoresis patterns of the DNA fragments produced by digestion with restriction enzymes differed considerably from plaque to plaque, even for plaques from the same water source. However, Southern hybridization showed strong homology among all of the virus DNAs tested, indicating relatedness of those viruses. A possible use of the Chlorella virus assay system to monitor the natural population of algal cells and water quality is discussed. Images PMID:16348596

  15. Sex ratios of Dirofilaria immitis in naturally infected dogs show female bias at low worm intensities.

    PubMed

    Rishniw, Mark; Schukken, Ynte; Greiner, Ellis

    2012-12-01

    Sex ratios in invertebrates commonly deviate from parity (1:1). Various genetic and epigenetic factors distort sex ratios to favor males or females. We examined sex ratios in Dirofilaria immitis (heartworms) obtained from naturally-infected dogs. Dirofilaria from 84 naturally-infected pound-source dogs were extracted at necropsy, counted and sexed. Dogs had a median worm intensity of 15 filariae. Overall, sex ratios equaled 1. However, at low worm intensities, dogs were more likely to have female than male worms. Of eight unisex infections, seven were all-female (range 1-11 worms), while only one dog had a single male worm. Similarly, in mixed-sex infection at worm intensities<20 worms, dogs were more likely to have more female worms than male worms. Our results suggest that sex disequilibrium exists in D. immitis at lower worm intensities, but disappears with higher worm intensities. Reasons for this disequilibrium are unknown, but presumably confer a species survival advantage.

  16. Isolation and characterization of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 from water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) was isolated from dairy buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) naturally affected with respiratory and reproductive clinical conditions. Results Examination of nasal and vaginal swabs collected from 12 diseased buffaloes led to the isolation of three paramyxovirus isolates from two animals. Antigenic, morphological and biological characteristics of these three isolates were essentially similar to those of members of the Paramyxoviridae family. Antigenic analysis by direct immunofluorescence and cross neutralization test placed these isolates together with bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3). Nucleotide and amino acid phylogenetic analysis of partial matrix gene sequences of the buffalo isolates and six field BPIV3 isolates from bovines in Argentina were studied. Buffalo isolates were similar to genotype B (BPIV3b) while the six BPIV3 isolates were similar to genotypes A (BPIV3a) and C (BPIV3c). Conclusions This is the first characterization of BPIV3 in water buffalo. According to the samples analyzed, in Argentina, the genotype B was found in buffalo and the genotypes A and C were found in cattle. PMID:22716217

  17. Marine natural product drug discovery: Leads for treatment of inflammation, cancer, infections, and neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Villa, Francisco A; Gerwick, Lena

    2010-06-01

    Natural products, secondary metabolites, isolated from plants, animals and microbes are important sources for bioactive molecules that in many cases have been developed into treatments for diseases. This review will focus on describing the potential for finding new treatments from marine natural products for inflammation, cancer, infections, and neurological disorders. Historically terrestrial natural products have been studied to a greater extent and such classic drugs as aspirin, vincristine and many of the antibiotics are derived from terrestrial natural products. The need for new therapeutics in the four areas mentioned is dire. Within the last 30 years marine natural products, with their unique structures and high level of halogenation, have shown many promising activities against the inflammatory response, cancer, infections and neurological disorders. The review will outline examples of such compounds and activities.

  18. Marine natural product drug discovery: Leads for treatment of inflammation, cancer, infections, and neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Villa, Francisco A; Gerwick, Lena

    2010-06-01

    Natural products, secondary metabolites, isolated from plants, animals and microbes are important sources for bioactive molecules that in many cases have been developed into treatments for diseases. This review will focus on describing the potential for finding new treatments from marine natural products for inflammation, cancer, infections, and neurological disorders. Historically terrestrial natural products have been studied to a greater extent and such classic drugs as aspirin, vincristine and many of the antibiotics are derived from terrestrial natural products. The need for new therapeutics in the four areas mentioned is dire. Within the last 30 years marine natural products, with their unique structures and high level of halogenation, have shown many promising activities against the inflammatory response, cancer, infections and neurological disorders. The review will outline examples of such compounds and activities. PMID:20441539

  19. Likelihood ratio estimation without a gold standard: a case study evaluating a brucellosis c-ELISA in cattle and water buffalo of Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Fosgate, G T; Adesiyun, A A; Hird, D W; Hietala, S K

    2006-08-17

    The likelihood ratio (LR) is a measure of association that quantifies how many more times likely a particular test result is from an infected animal compared to one that is uninfected. They are ratios of conditional probabilities and cannot be interpreted at the individual animal level without information concerning pretest probabilities. Their usefulness is that they can be used to update the prior belief that the individual has the outcome of interest through a modification of Bayes' theorem. Bayesian analytic techniques can be used for the evaluation of diagnostic tests and estimation of LRs when information concerning a gold standard is not available. As an example, these techniques were applied to the estimation of LRs for a competitive ELISA (c-ELISA) for diagnosis of Brucella abortus infection in cattle and water buffalo in Trinidad. Sera from four herds of cattle (n=391) and four herds of water buffalo (n=381) in Trinidad were evaluated for Brucella-specific antibodies using a c-ELISA. On the basis of previous serologic (agglutination) test results in the same animals, iterative simulation modeling was used to classify animals as positive or negative for Brucella infection. LRs were calculated for six categories of the c-ELISA proportion inhibition (PI) results pooled for cattle and water buffalo and yielded the following estimations (95% probability intervals): <0.10 PI, 0.05 (0-0.13); 0.10-0.249 PI, 0.11 (0.04-0.20); 0.25-0.349 PI, 0.77 (0.23-1.63); 0.35-0.499 PI, 3.22 (1.39-6.84); 0.50-0.749 PI, 17.9 (6.39-77.4); > or =0.75 PI, 423 (129-infinity). LRs are important for calculation of post-test probabilities and maintaining the quantitative nature of diagnostic test results.

  20. Protection against hepatitis E virus infection by naturally acquired and vaccine-induced immunity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Zhang, X-F; Zhou, C; Wang, Z-Z; Huang, S-J; Yao, X; Liang, Z-L; Wu, T; Li, J-X; Yan, Q; Yang, C-L; Jiang, H-M; Huang, H-J; Xian, Y-L; Shih, J W-K; Ng, M-H; Li, Y-M; Wang, J-Z; Zhu, F-C; Xia, N-S

    2014-06-01

    Immunity acquired from infection or vaccination protects humans from symptomatic hepatitis E. However, whether the risk of hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is reduced by the immunity remains unknown. To understand this issue, a cohort with 12 409 participants randomized to receive the hepatitis E vaccine Hecolin(®) or placebo were serologically followed up for 2 years after vaccination. About half (47%) of participants were initially seropositive. A total of 139 infection episodes, evidenced by four-fold or greater rise of anti-HEV level or positive seroconversion, occurred in participants who received three doses of treatment. Risk of infection was highest among the baseline seronegative placebo group participants (2.04%). Pre-existing immunity and vaccine-induced immunity lower the risk significantly, to 0.52% and 0.30%, respectively. In conclusion, both vaccine-induced and naturally acquired immunity can effectively protect against HEV infection. PMID:24118636

  1. Natural and nosocomial infection in a patient with West Nile encephalitis and extrapyramidal movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Tom; Fisher, Ann F; Beasley, David W C; Mandava, Pitchaiah; Granwehr, Bruno P; Langsjoen, Hans; Travassos Da Rosa, Amelia P; Barrett, Alan D T; Tesh, Robert B

    2003-06-01

    Since its first recognition in North America in 1999, West Nile virus (WNV) has spread rapidly across the continent, but in many communities, rapid diagnostic tests for detection of WNV infection are not fully available. We describe a patient with extrapyramidal movement disorders and changes in the basal ganglia noted on magnetic resonance images that are characteristic of other flavivirus encephalitides and may help in the recognition of patients with West Nile encephalitis. Detailed molecular analysis suggested that, although our patient received a blood transfusion infected with WNV, the virus that caused his initial infection and encephalitis was probably acquired naturally from a mosquito.

  2. Multi-Infections of Feminizing Wolbachia Strains in Natural Populations of the Terrestrial Isopod Armadillidium Vulgare

    PubMed Central

    Valette, Victorien; Bitome Essono, Paul-Yannick; Le Clec’h, Winka; Johnson, Monique; Bech, Nicolas; Grandjean, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Maternally inherited Wolbachia (α-Proteobacteria) are widespread parasitic reproductive manipulators. A growing number of studies have described the presence of different Wolbachia strains within a same host. To date, no naturally occurring multiple infections have been recorded in terrestrial isopods. This is true for Armadillidium vulgare which is known to harbor non simultaneously three Wolbachia strains. Traditionally, such Wolbachia are detected by PCR amplification of the wsp gene and strains are characterized by sequencing. The presence of nucleotide deletions or insertions within the wsp gene, among these three different strains, provides the opportunity to test a novel genotyping method. Herein, we designed a new primer pair able to amplify products whose lengths are specific to each Wolbachia strain so as to detect the presence of multi-infections in A. vulgare. Experimental injections of Wolbachia strains in Wolbachia-free females were used to validate the methodology. We re-investigated, using this novel method, the infection status of 40 females sampled in 2003 and previously described as mono-infected based on the classical sequencing method. Among these females, 29 were identified as bi-infected. It is the first time that naturally occuring multiple infections of Wolbachia are detected within an individual A. vulgare host. Additionally, we resampled 6 of these populations in 2010 to check the infection status of females. PMID:24324814

  3. Experimental evolution can unravel the complex causes of natural selection in clinical infections.

    PubMed

    Brockhurst, Michael A

    2015-06-01

    It is increasingly clear that rapid evolutionary dynamics are an important process in microbial ecology. Experimental evolution, wherein microbial evolution is observed in real-time, has revealed many instances of appreciable evolutionary change occurring on very short timescales of a few days or weeks in response to a variety of biotic and abiotic selection pressures. From clinical infections, including the chronic bacterial lung infections associated with cystic fibrosis that form a focus of my research, there is now abundant evidence suggesting that rapid evolution by infecting microbes contributes to host adaptation, treatment failure and worsening patient prognosis. However, disentangling the drivers of natural selection in complex infection environments is extremely challenging and limits our understanding of the selective pressures acting upon microbes in infections. Controlled evolution experiments can make a vital contribution to this by determining the causal links between predicted drivers of natural selection and the evolutionary responses of microbes. Integration of experimental evolution into studies of clinical infections is a key next step towards a better understanding of the causes and consequences of rapid microbial evolution in infections, and discovering how these evolutionary processes might be influenced to improve patient health.A video of this Prize Lecture, presented at the Society for General Microbiology Annual Conference 2015, can be viewed via this link: Michael A. Brockhurst https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N1bodVSl27E.

  4. Multi-infections of feminizing Wolbachia strains in natural populations of the terrestrial isopod Armadillidium vulgare.

    PubMed

    Valette, Victorien; Bitome Essono, Paul-Yannick; Le Clec'h, Winka; Johnson, Monique; Bech, Nicolas; Grandjean, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Maternally inherited Wolbachia (α-Proteobacteria) are widespread parasitic reproductive manipulators. A growing number of studies have described the presence of different Wolbachia strains within a same host. To date, no naturally occurring multiple infections have been recorded in terrestrial isopods. This is true for Armadillidium vulgare which is known to harbor non simultaneously three Wolbachia strains. Traditionally, such Wolbachia are detected by PCR amplification of the wsp gene and strains are characterized by sequencing. The presence of nucleotide deletions or insertions within the wsp gene, among these three different strains, provides the opportunity to test a novel genotyping method. Herein, we designed a new primer pair able to amplify products whose lengths are specific to each Wolbachia strain so as to detect the presence of multi-infections in A. vulgare. Experimental injections of Wolbachia strains in Wolbachia-free females were used to validate the methodology. We re-investigated, using this novel method, the infection status of 40 females sampled in 2003 and previously described as mono-infected based on the classical sequencing method. Among these females, 29 were identified as bi-infected. It is the first time that naturally occurring multiple infections of Wolbachia are detected within an individual A. vulgare host. Additionally, we resampled 6 of these populations in 2010 to check the infection status of females. PMID:24324814

  5. Experimental evolution can unravel the complex causes of natural selection in clinical infections.

    PubMed

    Brockhurst, Michael A

    2015-06-01

    It is increasingly clear that rapid evolutionary dynamics are an important process in microbial ecology. Experimental evolution, wherein microbial evolution is observed in real-time, has revealed many instances of appreciable evolutionary change occurring on very short timescales of a few days or weeks in response to a variety of biotic and abiotic selection pressures. From clinical infections, including the chronic bacterial lung infections associated with cystic fibrosis that form a focus of my research, there is now abundant evidence suggesting that rapid evolution by infecting microbes contributes to host adaptation, treatment failure and worsening patient prognosis. However, disentangling the drivers of natural selection in complex infection environments is extremely challenging and limits our understanding of the selective pressures acting upon microbes in infections. Controlled evolution experiments can make a vital contribution to this by determining the causal links between predicted drivers of natural selection and the evolutionary responses of microbes. Integration of experimental evolution into studies of clinical infections is a key next step towards a better understanding of the causes and consequences of rapid microbial evolution in infections, and discovering how these evolutionary processes might be influenced to improve patient health.A video of this Prize Lecture, presented at the Society for General Microbiology Annual Conference 2015, can be viewed via this link: Michael A. Brockhurst https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N1bodVSl27E. PMID:25957311

  6. Multi-infections of feminizing Wolbachia strains in natural populations of the terrestrial isopod Armadillidium vulgare.

    PubMed

    Valette, Victorien; Bitome Essono, Paul-Yannick; Le Clec'h, Winka; Johnson, Monique; Bech, Nicolas; Grandjean, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Maternally inherited Wolbachia (α-Proteobacteria) are widespread parasitic reproductive manipulators. A growing number of studies have described the presence of different Wolbachia strains within a same host. To date, no naturally occurring multiple infections have been recorded in terrestrial isopods. This is true for Armadillidium vulgare which is known to harbor non simultaneously three Wolbachia strains. Traditionally, such Wolbachia are detected by PCR amplification of the wsp gene and strains are characterized by sequencing. The presence of nucleotide deletions or insertions within the wsp gene, among these three different strains, provides the opportunity to test a novel genotyping method. Herein, we designed a new primer pair able to amplify products whose lengths are specific to each Wolbachia strain so as to detect the presence of multi-infections in A. vulgare. Experimental injections of Wolbachia strains in Wolbachia-free females were used to validate the methodology. We re-investigated, using this novel method, the infection status of 40 females sampled in 2003 and previously described as mono-infected based on the classical sequencing method. Among these females, 29 were identified as bi-infected. It is the first time that naturally occurring multiple infections of Wolbachia are detected within an individual A. vulgare host. Additionally, we resampled 6 of these populations in 2010 to check the infection status of females.

  7. Lake Effect Snow Covers Buffalo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    An average of one foot of snow per day has fallen on Buffalo, New York, since Christmas Eve, resulting in a total of up to 5 feet from December 24-28. The snow fell very heavily, with accumulations of up to 3 inches per hour. Cold winds blowing along the surface of Lake Erie pick up warmth and moisture, which falls as snow as the warm air rises. This image was acquired by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), operated by NOAA, on December 27, 2001, at 12:32 p.m. EST. The scene shows thick bands of clouds extending from the eastern tip of Lake Erie and over Buffalo. The arrows show the wind direction, which is blowing down the length of the lake. Image and animation by Robert Simmon, based on data from the NASA GOES Project Science Office.

  8. Reproduction in the water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Presicce, G A

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, an account of various aspects related to buffalo reproduction are given. Fundamental concepts of the reproductive physiology as well as manipulation of the reproductive function will be presented. This will include an overview of the most recent developments of the oestrous cycle and the ovulation control, new strategies of reproductive management for the improvement of genetic gain and the application of newly developed reproductive technologies, such as in vitro embryo production, embryo and sperm sexing and cloning.

  9. Histology of hemal nodes of the water buffalo (Bos bubalus).

    PubMed

    Zidan, Mohamed; Pabst, Reinhard

    2010-06-01

    Hemal nodes are independent lymphoid organs found in various mammals but are ignored by most immunologists. They seem to play a role in defense against blood-borne infections in some species. The structure of the hemal node has been described in various species but, so far, not in the water buffalo. Specimens were obtained from ten clinically healthy male animals (five calves: 2-3 months old; five bulls: 2-8 years old). Six hemal nodes were obtained from each animal from the mesenteric and perirectal region. The samples were studied by light and transmission electron microscopy. The hemal nodes are bean-shaped or spherical, with one hilus through which the hilus arteries and nerves enter the node and from which veins and lymphatics leave it. The buffalo hemal node has a thin capsule of connective tissue and a few smooth muscle cells. Trabeculae extend from the capsule partially dividing the parenchyma. Subcapsular and trabecular blood sinuses are present. The parenchyma is composed of irregular lymphoid cords rich in erythrocytes, macrophages, and plasma cells and is separated by blood sinuses of variable size engorged with blood. These blood sinuses drain into the trabecular sinuses and then into the subcapsular sinus. In calves, the size of the lymphoid cords is larger than that in adult bulls. Buffalo hemal nodes can be classified as typical hemal nodes, because they are definitely different from hemolymph nodes in other species. They may play a role in filtering the blood.

  10. Morphological characteristics of Echinococcus granulosus derived from buffalo in Iran.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Seyed Hossein; Pour, Arash Amin; Shayan, Parviz

    2012-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is a significant parasitic disease in Iran, where a variety of animals act as intermediate hosts. In this study, 25 isolates of Echinococcus granulosus obtained from water buffalo from various parts of Iran were characterized on the basis of the morphology of the metacestode and the adult worm. The characteristics of protoscoleces from the different studied areas were nearly similar. They showed 2 rows of alternating large and small hooks and their shapes were smooth in outline. In contrast to the protoscoleces, the adult rostellar hooks showed a rough outline. The results showed that the total length, the blade lengths of the large and small hooks and the number of hooks are almost similar to those isolated from sheep but significantly different from those isolated from camels. The growth rates of adult E. granulosus (total worm length, segmentation and maturation) of buffalo origin, at 35 and 41 days post-infection of dogs, were nearly comparable to the common sheep strain. The form of the strobila and the morphology of the reproductive system were also similar to those of sheep origin. This suggests that the common sheep strain (G1) of E. granulosus may also use buffaloes as its intermediate host.

  11. Evaluation of leptin receptor expression on buffalo leukocytes.

    PubMed

    De Matteis, Giovanna; Grandoni, Francesco; Scatà, Maria Carmela; Catizone, Angela; Reale, Anna; Crisà, Alessandra; Moioli, Bianca

    2016-09-01

    Experimental evidences support a direct role for leptin in immunity. Besides controlling food intake and energy expenditure, leptin was reported to be involved in the regulation of the immune system in ruminants. The aim of this work was to highlight the expression of leptin receptor (LEPR) on Bubalus bubalis immune cells using a multi-approach assessment: flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and gene expression analysis. Flow cytometric analysis of LEPR expression showed that peripheral blood monocytes were the predominant cells expressing LEPR. This result was corroborated by confocal microscopy and RT-PCR analysis. Moreover, among lymphocytes, LEPR was mainly expressed by B lymphocytes and Natural Killer cells. Evidence of LEPR expression on buffalo blood leukocytes showed to be a good indicator of the responsivity of these cells to leptin, so confirming the involvement of leptin in buffalo immune response. PMID:27436440

  12. Natural and experimental West Nile virus infection in five raptor species.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Nicole; Gould, Daniel; Bowen, Richard; Komar, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    We studied the effects of natural and/or experimental infections of West Nile virus (WNV) in five raptor species from July 2002 to March 2004, including American kestrels (Falco sparverius), golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), barn owls (Tyto alba), and great horned owls (Bubo virginianus). Birds were infected per mosquito bite, per os, or percutaneously by needle. Many experimentally infected birds developed mosquito-infectious levels of viremia (>10(5) WNV plaque forming units per ml serum) within 5 days postinoculation (DPI), and/ or shed virus per os or per cloaca. Infection of organs 15-27 days postinoculation was infrequently detected by virus isolation from spleen, kidney, skin, heart, brain, and eye in convalescent birds. Histopathologic findings varied among species and by method of infection. The most common histopathologic lesions were subacute myocarditis and encephalitis. Several birds had a more acute, severe disease condition represented by arteritis and associated with tissue degeneration and necrosis. This study demonstrates that raptor species vary in their response to WNV infection and that several modes of exposure (e.g., oral) may result in infection. Wildlife managers should recognize that, although many WNV infections are sublethal to raptors, subacute lesions could potentially reduce viability of populations. We recommend that raptor handlers consider raptors as a potential source of WNV contamination due to oral and cloacal shedding. PMID:16699143

  13. Natural infection of free-range chickens with the ascarid nematode Toxocara sp.

    PubMed

    Campos-da-Silva, Danielle R; da Paz, Jeanne S; Fortunato, Viviane R; Beltrame, Marcus A V; Valli, Luis C P; Pereira, Fausto E L

    2015-11-01

    Human toxocariasis may be acquired by eating raw chicken liver. However, there are no reports on the prevalence of natural infection of chickens with Toxocara. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of anti-Toxocara antibodies as indicators of natural infection with Toxocara, in free-range chickens from Espírito Santo State, Brazil. An ELISA test with secretory and excretory Toxocara canis antigens was used. Negative controls were 20 industrial chickens reared in a high hygiene standard environment. Positive control serum was from a chicken infected with embryonated eggs of T. canis. Sera were adsorbed with Ascaridia galli extract to reduce cross-reactivity. Cut-off was the mean plus four times the standard deviation of optical density (OD) in negative group. One hundred and fifty-seven sera from free-range chicken were investigated. Results showed 58.5% of the chickens were positive with ELISA test; 12.7% had OD over the positive control and may be considered as true infected chickens. The results between the cut-off and the positive control may include infections with low titers of antibodies or may represent serum scar of past infection or may be the result of cross-reaction with other nematodes rather than A. galli which is used for the adsorption of sera. In conclusion, high prevalence of Toxocara sp. antibodies demonstrates natural infection of free-range chickens from Espírito Santo State which may represent a risk of infection with this nematode in people who have the habit of eating raw or undercooked chicken meat or viscera. The results also suggest that chickens may be useful as sentinels to detect soil contaminated with Toxocara eggs.

  14. Natural infection of free-range chickens with the ascarid nematode Toxocara sp.

    PubMed

    Campos-da-Silva, Danielle R; da Paz, Jeanne S; Fortunato, Viviane R; Beltrame, Marcus A V; Valli, Luis C P; Pereira, Fausto E L

    2015-11-01

    Human toxocariasis may be acquired by eating raw chicken liver. However, there are no reports on the prevalence of natural infection of chickens with Toxocara. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of anti-Toxocara antibodies as indicators of natural infection with Toxocara, in free-range chickens from Espírito Santo State, Brazil. An ELISA test with secretory and excretory Toxocara canis antigens was used. Negative controls were 20 industrial chickens reared in a high hygiene standard environment. Positive control serum was from a chicken infected with embryonated eggs of T. canis. Sera were adsorbed with Ascaridia galli extract to reduce cross-reactivity. Cut-off was the mean plus four times the standard deviation of optical density (OD) in negative group. One hundred and fifty-seven sera from free-range chicken were investigated. Results showed 58.5% of the chickens were positive with ELISA test; 12.7% had OD over the positive control and may be considered as true infected chickens. The results between the cut-off and the positive control may include infections with low titers of antibodies or may represent serum scar of past infection or may be the result of cross-reaction with other nematodes rather than A. galli which is used for the adsorption of sera. In conclusion, high prevalence of Toxocara sp. antibodies demonstrates natural infection of free-range chickens from Espírito Santo State which may represent a risk of infection with this nematode in people who have the habit of eating raw or undercooked chicken meat or viscera. The results also suggest that chickens may be useful as sentinels to detect soil contaminated with Toxocara eggs. PMID:26319520

  15. Differential Specificity and Immunogenicity of Adenovirus Type 5 Neutralizing Antibodies Elicited by Natural Infection or Immunization▿

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Cheng; Gall, Jason G. D.; Nason, Martha; King, C. Richter; Koup, Richard A.; Roederer, Mario; McElrath, M. Juliana; Morgan, Cecilia A.; Churchyard, Gavin; Baden, Lindsey R.; Duerr, Ann C.; Keefer, Michael C.; Graham, Barney S.; Nabel, Gary J.

    2010-01-01

    A recent clinical trial of a T-cell-based AIDS vaccine delivered with recombinant adenovirus type 5 (rAd5) vectors showed no efficacy in lowering viral load and was associated with increased risk of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Preexisting immunity to Ad5 in humans could therefore affect both immunogenicity and vaccine efficacy. We hypothesized that vaccine-induced immunity is differentially affected, depending on whether subjects were exposed to Ad5 by natural infection or by vaccination. Serum samples from vaccine trial subjects receiving a DNA/rAd5 AIDS vaccine with or without prior immunity to Ad5 were examined for the specificity of their Ad5 neutralizing antibodies and their effect on HIV-1 immune responses. Here, we report that rAd5 neutralizing antibodies were directed to different components of the virion, depending on whether they were elicited by natural infection or vaccination in HIV vaccine trial subjects. Neutralizing antibodies elicited by natural infection were directed largely to the Ad5 fiber, while exposure to rAd5 through vaccination elicited antibodies primarily to capsid proteins other than fiber. Notably, preexisting immunity to Ad5 fiber from natural infection significantly reduced the CD4 and CD8 cell responses to HIV Gag after DNA/rAd5 vaccination. The specificity of Ad5 neutralizing antibodies therefore differs depending on the route of exposure, and natural Ad5 infection compromises Ad5 vaccine-induced immunity to weak immunogens, such as HIV-1 Gag. These results have implications for future AIDS vaccine trials and the design of next-generation gene-based vaccine vectors. PMID:19846512

  16. [THE PRESENT STATE OF EPIZOOTOLOGICAL MONITORING OF THE NATURAL FOCI OF INFECTIONS IN THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION].

    PubMed

    Trankvilevsky, D V; Tsarenko, V A; Zhukov, V I

    2016-01-01

    The facilities of the Russian Federal Service for Supervision of Consumer Rights Protection and Human Welfare play a leading role in epizootological monitoring. The specialists (zoologists and entomologists) of Hygiene and Epidemiology Centers do basic work in the subjects of the Russian Federation. The data obtained in the participation of different ministries and departments are used to analyze the results of monitoring. The latter is one of the important steps in the management of the epidemic, process in natural focal infections. In recent years, there has been an unjustified reduction in the volume of studies in the natural foci. This negatively affects the reliability of estimates and predictions of the epidemic activity of the natural foci of infections. Ensuring the national, security of the Russian Federation, epidemiological surveillance, and control of its natural foci requires staffing and appropriate professional training in the zoological and entomological subdivisions of the Russian Federal Service for Supervision of Consumer Rights Protection and Human Welfare. PMID:27405210

  17. [THE PRESENT STATE OF EPIZOOTOLOGICAL MONITORING OF THE NATURAL FOCI OF INFECTIONS IN THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION].

    PubMed

    Trankvilevsky, D V; Tsarenko, V A; Zhukov, V I

    2016-01-01

    The facilities of the Russian Federal Service for Supervision of Consumer Rights Protection and Human Welfare play a leading role in epizootological monitoring. The specialists (zoologists and entomologists) of Hygiene and Epidemiology Centers do basic work in the subjects of the Russian Federation. The data obtained in the participation of different ministries and departments are used to analyze the results of monitoring. The latter is one of the important steps in the management of the epidemic, process in natural focal infections. In recent years, there has been an unjustified reduction in the volume of studies in the natural foci. This negatively affects the reliability of estimates and predictions of the epidemic activity of the natural foci of infections. Ensuring the national, security of the Russian Federation, epidemiological surveillance, and control of its natural foci requires staffing and appropriate professional training in the zoological and entomological subdivisions of the Russian Federal Service for Supervision of Consumer Rights Protection and Human Welfare.

  18. The pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis disturbs the frog skin microbiome during a natural epidemic and experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Jani, Andrea J; Briggs, Cheryl J

    2014-11-25

    Symbiotic microbial communities may interact with infectious pathogens sharing a common host. The microbiome may limit pathogen infection or, conversely, an invading pathogen can disturb the microbiome. Documentation of such relationships during naturally occurring disease outbreaks is rare, and identifying causal links from field observations is difficult. This study documented the effects of an amphibian skin pathogen of global conservation concern [the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd)] on the skin-associated bacterial microbiome of the endangered frog, Rana sierrae, using a combination of population surveys and laboratory experiments. We examined covariation of pathogen infection and bacterial microbiome composition in wild frogs, demonstrating a strong and consistent correlation between Bd infection load and bacterial community composition in multiple R. sierrae populations. Despite the correlation between Bd infection load and bacterial community composition, we observed 100% mortality of postmetamorphic frogs during a Bd epizootic, suggesting that the relationship between Bd and bacterial communities was not linked to variation in resistance to mortal disease and that Bd infection altered bacterial communities. In a controlled experiment, Bd infection significantly altered the R. sierrae microbiome, demonstrating a causal relationship. The response of microbial communities to Bd infection was remarkably consistent: Several bacterial taxa showed the same response to Bd infection across multiple field populations and the laboratory experiment, indicating a somewhat predictable interaction between Bd and the microbiome. The laboratory experiment demonstrates that Bd infection causes changes to amphibian skin bacterial communities, whereas the laboratory and field results together strongly support Bd disturbance as a driver of bacterial community change during natural disease dynamics. PMID:25385615

  19. The pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis disturbs the frog skin microbiome during a natural epidemic and experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Jani, Andrea J; Briggs, Cheryl J

    2014-11-25

    Symbiotic microbial communities may interact with infectious pathogens sharing a common host. The microbiome may limit pathogen infection or, conversely, an invading pathogen can disturb the microbiome. Documentation of such relationships during naturally occurring disease outbreaks is rare, and identifying causal links from field observations is difficult. This study documented the effects of an amphibian skin pathogen of global conservation concern [the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd)] on the skin-associated bacterial microbiome of the endangered frog, Rana sierrae, using a combination of population surveys and laboratory experiments. We examined covariation of pathogen infection and bacterial microbiome composition in wild frogs, demonstrating a strong and consistent correlation between Bd infection load and bacterial community composition in multiple R. sierrae populations. Despite the correlation between Bd infection load and bacterial community composition, we observed 100% mortality of postmetamorphic frogs during a Bd epizootic, suggesting that the relationship between Bd and bacterial communities was not linked to variation in resistance to mortal disease and that Bd infection altered bacterial communities. In a controlled experiment, Bd infection significantly altered the R. sierrae microbiome, demonstrating a causal relationship. The response of microbial communities to Bd infection was remarkably consistent: Several bacterial taxa showed the same response to Bd infection across multiple field populations and the laboratory experiment, indicating a somewhat predictable interaction between Bd and the microbiome. The laboratory experiment demonstrates that Bd infection causes changes to amphibian skin bacterial communities, whereas the laboratory and field results together strongly support Bd disturbance as a driver of bacterial community change during natural disease dynamics.

  20. The pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis disturbs the frog skin microbiome during a natural epidemic and experimental infection

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Andrea J.; Briggs, Cheryl J.

    2014-01-01

    Symbiotic microbial communities may interact with infectious pathogens sharing a common host. The microbiome may limit pathogen infection or, conversely, an invading pathogen can disturb the microbiome. Documentation of such relationships during naturally occurring disease outbreaks is rare, and identifying causal links from field observations is difficult. This study documented the effects of an amphibian skin pathogen of global conservation concern [the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd)] on the skin-associated bacterial microbiome of the endangered frog, Rana sierrae, using a combination of population surveys and laboratory experiments. We examined covariation of pathogen infection and bacterial microbiome composition in wild frogs, demonstrating a strong and consistent correlation between Bd infection load and bacterial community composition in multiple R. sierrae populations. Despite the correlation between Bd infection load and bacterial community composition, we observed 100% mortality of postmetamorphic frogs during a Bd epizootic, suggesting that the relationship between Bd and bacterial communities was not linked to variation in resistance to mortal disease and that Bd infection altered bacterial communities. In a controlled experiment, Bd infection significantly altered the R. sierrae microbiome, demonstrating a causal relationship. The response of microbial communities to Bd infection was remarkably consistent: Several bacterial taxa showed the same response to Bd infection across multiple field populations and the laboratory experiment, indicating a somewhat predictable interaction between Bd and the microbiome. The laboratory experiment demonstrates that Bd infection causes changes to amphibian skin bacterial communities, whereas the laboratory and field results together strongly support Bd disturbance as a driver of bacterial community change during natural disease dynamics. PMID:25385615

  1. Prevalence of antibodies to Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii in cattle and water buffaloes in southern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Huong, L T; Ljungström, B L; Uggla, A; Björkman, C

    1998-02-15

    Serum samples from 200 dairy cattle and 200 beef water buffaloes were collected in southern Vietnam during May to September 1995. The sera were analysed for antibodies to Neospora caninum by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the indirect fluorescent antibody test, and for antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii by the direct agglutination test. Significant levels of N. caninum antibodies were detected in 5.5% of the cattle sera and in 1.5% of the water buffalo sera. 10.5% of the cattle sera and 3% of the water buffalo sera were found to contain T. gondii antibodies. Two of the cattle sera had both T. gondii and N. caninum antibodies. The present communication is the first to report serological evidence of N. caninum infection in the water buffalo.

  2. Identification of Theileria parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo) 18S rRNA gene sequence variants in the African Buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Chaisi, Mamohale E; Sibeko, Kgomotso P; Collins, Nicola E; Potgieter, Fred T; Oosthuizen, Marinda C

    2011-12-15

    Theileria parva is the causative agent of Corridor disease in cattle in South Africa. The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is the reservoir host, and, as these animals are important for eco-tourism in South Africa, it is compulsory to test and certify them disease free prior to translocation. A T. parva-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test based on the small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene is one of the tests used for the diagnosis of the parasite in buffalo and cattle in South Africa. However, because of the high similarity between the 18S rRNA gene sequences of T. parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo), the latter is also amplified by the real-time PCR primers, although it is not detected by the T. parva-specific hybridization probes. Preliminary sequencing studies have revealed a small number of sequence differences within the 18S rRNA gene in both species but the extent of this sequence variation is unknown. The aim of the current study was to sequence the 18S rRNA genes of T. parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo), and to determine whether all identified genotypes can be correctly detected by the real-time PCR assay. The reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay was used to identify T. parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo) positive samples from buffalo blood samples originating from the Kruger National Park, Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, the Greater Limpopo Transfrontier Park, and a private game ranch in the Hoedspruit area. T. parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo) were identified in 42% and 28%, respectively, of 252 samples, mainly as mixed infections. The full-length 18S rRNA gene of selected samples was amplified, cloned and sequenced. From a total of 20 sequences obtained, 10 grouped with previously published T. parva sequences from GenBank while 10 sequences grouped with a previously published Theileria sp. (buffalo) sequence. All these formed a monophyletic group with known pathogenic Theileria species. Our phylogenetic analyses confirm the

  3. Phylogeography and domestication of Chinese swamp buffalo.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiang-Peng; Li, Ran; Xie, Wen-Mei; Xu, Ping; Chang, Ti-Cheng; Liu, Li; Cheng, Feng; Zhang, Run-Feng; Lan, Xian-Yong; Chen, Hong; Lei, Chu-Zhao

    2013-01-01

    To further probe into whether swamp buffaloes were domesticated once or multiple times in China, this survey examined the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) Control Region (D-loop) diversity of 471 individuals representing 22 populations of 455 Chinese swamp buffaloes and 16 river buffaloes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Chinese swamp buffaloes could be divided into two distinct lineages, A and B, which were defined previously. Of the two lineages, lineage A was predominant across all populations. For predominant lineage A, Southwestern buffalo populations possess the highest genetic diversity among the three hypothesized domestication centers (Southeastern, Central, and Southwestern China), suggesting Southwestern China as the most likely location for the domestication of lineage A. However, a complex pattern of diversity is detected for the lineage B, preventing the unambiguous pinpointing of the exact place of domestication center and suggesting the presence of a long-term, strong gene flow among swamp buffalo populations caused by extensive migrations of buffaloes and frequent human movements along the Yangtze River throughout history. Our current study suggests that Southwestern China is the most likely domestication center for lineage A, and may have been a primary center of swamp buffalo domestication. More archaeological and genetic evidence is needed to show the process of domestication.

  4. In Buffalo, Opening Doors for the Overlooked

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honawar, Vaishali

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the Buffalo Prep program. Housed at University of Buffalo, the program identifies disadvantaged but talented minority children, places them in academic-enrichment classes, and then finds them spots at private schools and a more selective public high school in the area to complete their precollegiate careers. In addition to…

  5. Reproductive endocrinology and biotechnology applications among buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Madan, M L; Prakash, B S

    2007-01-01

    Buffalo, as the major livestock species for milk and meat production, contribute significantly to the economy of many countries in south & south-east Asia, South America, Africa and the Mediterranean. Improved buffalo production could significantly enhance the economy and the living standards of farmers in countries where buffaloes predominate; particularly, in countries with a tropical climate. The major factors limiting the efficient utilization of buffaloes in countries with a tropical climate are: late maturity; poor estrus expressivities, particularly in summer months; long postpartum calving intervals; low reproductive efficiencies and fertility rates which are closely linked with environmental stress; as well as managerial problems. As good reproductive performance is essential for efficient livestock production, the female buffalo calves must grow rapidly to attain sexual maturity, initiate estrous cycles, ovulate and be mated by fertile males or inseminated with quality semen to optimize conception and production. In the last two decades, considerable attention has been focused on understanding some of the causes for the inherent limitations in reproduction among buffaloes by studying their reproductive endocrinology as well as developing biotechniques for augmenting their reproductive efficiency. This review provides an overview of buffalo reproductive endocrinology and also of the research done to date towards the enhancement of buffalo reproductive efficiency through endocrine and embryo biotechniques.

  6. 33 CFR 117.955 - Buffalo Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Buffalo Bayou. 117.955 Section 117.955 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.955 Buffalo Bayou. (a) The draw of...

  7. 33 CFR 117.955 - Buffalo Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Buffalo Bayou. 117.955 Section 117.955 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.955 Buffalo Bayou. (a) The draw of...

  8. 33 CFR 117.955 - Buffalo Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Buffalo Bayou. 117.955 Section 117.955 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.955 Buffalo Bayou. (a) The draw of...

  9. 33 CFR 117.955 - Buffalo Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Buffalo Bayou. 117.955 Section 117.955 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.955 Buffalo Bayou. (a) The draw of...

  10. Reproductive endocrinology and biotechnology applications among buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Madan, M L; Prakash, B S

    2007-01-01

    Buffalo, as the major livestock species for milk and meat production, contribute significantly to the economy of many countries in south & south-east Asia, South America, Africa and the Mediterranean. Improved buffalo production could significantly enhance the economy and the living standards of farmers in countries where buffaloes predominate; particularly, in countries with a tropical climate. The major factors limiting the efficient utilization of buffaloes in countries with a tropical climate are: late maturity; poor estrus expressivities, particularly in summer months; long postpartum calving intervals; low reproductive efficiencies and fertility rates which are closely linked with environmental stress; as well as managerial problems. As good reproductive performance is essential for efficient livestock production, the female buffalo calves must grow rapidly to attain sexual maturity, initiate estrous cycles, ovulate and be mated by fertile males or inseminated with quality semen to optimize conception and production. In the last two decades, considerable attention has been focused on understanding some of the causes for the inherent limitations in reproduction among buffaloes by studying their reproductive endocrinology as well as developing biotechniques for augmenting their reproductive efficiency. This review provides an overview of buffalo reproductive endocrinology and also of the research done to date towards the enhancement of buffalo reproductive efficiency through endocrine and embryo biotechniques. PMID:17491153

  11. 33 CFR 117.955 - Buffalo Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buffalo Bayou. 117.955 Section 117.955 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.955 Buffalo Bayou. (a) The draw of...

  12. Phylogeography and Domestication of Chinese Swamp Buffalo

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wen-Mei; Xu, Ping; Chang, Ti-Cheng; Liu, Li; Cheng, Feng; Zhang, Run-Feng; Lan, Xian-Yong; Chen, Hong; Lei, Chu-Zhao

    2013-01-01

    To further probe into whether swamp buffaloes were domesticated once or multiple times in China, this survey examined the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) Control Region (D-loop) diversity of 471 individuals representing 22 populations of 455 Chinese swamp buffaloes and 16 river buffaloes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Chinese swamp buffaloes could be divided into two distinct lineages, A and B, which were defined previously. Of the two lineages, lineage A was predominant across all populations. For predominant lineage A, Southwestern buffalo populations possess the highest genetic diversity among the three hypothesized domestication centers (Southeastern, Central, and Southwestern China), suggesting Southwestern China as the most likely location for the domestication of lineage A. However, a complex pattern of diversity is detected for the lineage B, preventing the unambiguous pinpointing of the exact place of domestication center and suggesting the presence of a long-term, strong gene flow among swamp buffalo populations caused by extensive migrations of buffaloes and frequent human movements along the Yangtze River throughout history. Our current study suggests that Southwestern China is the most likely domestication center for lineage A, and may have been a primary center of swamp buffalo domestication. More archaeological and genetic evidence is needed to show the process of domestication. PMID:23437167

  13. Factors influencing Nosema bombi infections in natural populations of Bombus terrestris (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    PubMed

    Huth-Schwarz, Anett; Settele, Josef; Moritz, Robin F A; Kraus, F Bernhard

    2012-05-01

    Bumblebees are of profound ecological importance because of the pollination services they provide in natural and agricultural ecosystems. Any decline of these pollinators is therefore of great concern for ecosystem functioning. Increased parasite pressures have been discussed as a major factor for the loss of pollinators. One of the main parasites of bumblebees is Nosema bombi, an intracellular microsporidian parasite with considerable impact on the vitality of the host. Here we study the effect of host colony density and host genetic variability on N. bombi infections in natural populations of the bumblebee Bombus terrestris. We sampled males and workers from six B. terrestris populations located in an agricultural landscape in Middle Sweden to determine the prevalence and degree of N. bombi infections. All individuals were genotyped with five microsatellite markers to infer the colony densities in the sampled populations and the genetic variability of the host population. We confirmed that genetic variability and sex significantly correlate with the degree of infection with N. bombi. Males and workers with lower genetic variability had significantly higher infection levels than average. Also colony density had a significant impact on the degree of infection, with high density populations having higher infected individuals.

  14. Review of the Occurrence of Anti-infectives in Contaminated Wastewaters and Natural and Drinking Waters

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Pedro A.; François, Matthieu; Gagnon, Christian; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2009-01-01

    Objective Anti-infectives are constantly discharged at trace levels in natural waters near urban centers and agricultural areas. They represent a cause for concern because of their potential contribution to the spread of anti-infective resistance in bacteria and other effects on aquatic biota. We compiled data on the occurrence of anti-infectives published in the last 24 years in environmental water matrices. The collected information was then compared with the available ecotoxicologic values to evaluate potential environmental concerns. Data sources We used Web of Science and Google Scholar to search for articles published in peer-reviewed journals written in the English language since 1984. Data extraction Information on compound concentrations in wastewaters and natural and drinking waters, the source of contamination, country of provenance of the samples, year of publication, limits of quantification, and method of analysis was extracted. Data synthesis From the 126 different substances analyzed in environmental waters, 68 different parent compounds and 10 degradation products or metabolites have been quantified to date. Environmental concentrations vary from about 10−1 to 109 ng/L, depending on the compound, the matrix, and the source of contamination. Conclusions Detrimental effects of anti-infectives on aquatic microbiota are possible with the constant exposure of sensitive species. Indirect impact on human health cannot be ruled out when considering the potential contribution of high anti-infective concentrations to the spreading of anti-infective resistance in bacteria. PMID:19479007

  15. Paramphistomum daubneyi: the number of sporocysts developing in experimentally and naturally infected Galba truncatula.

    PubMed

    Dreyfuss, G; Vignoles, P; Rondelaud, D

    2008-07-01

    Experimental infections of Galba truncatula with Paramphistomum daubneyi were carried out to determine at day 50 (at 24 degrees C) the numbers of sporocysts, which grew in infected snails via the count of first- and second-generation rediae. In snails individually exposed to one, two, three, four, or five miracidia, the numbers of first-generation rediae increased from the one-miracidium group to the five-miracidium snails (from a mean of 6.7 to 26.1), while second-generation rediae decreased in number (from 6.2 to 0.9, respectively). This scale of redial numbers was used to determine the number of sporocysts, which grew in naturally infected snails collected from sedimentary or acid soils between 1993 and 2006. In cercariae-containing snails, natural infections resulting from the development of one to five sporocysts were found in both samples of G. truncatula examined. The numbers of 3-, 4-, and 5-sporocyst infections were increasing over time since 1997, 2000, and 2003, respectively. The utility of such multiple-sporocyst infections is open to question, as the differentiation of second-generation rediae and that of procercariae were delayed and always limited. They might be interpreted as a consequence of a zoonosis, which has been spreading since 1990 in ruminants of central France. PMID:18470698

  16. A Bovine Cell Line That Can Be Infected by Natural Sheep Scrapie Prions

    PubMed Central

    Oelschlegel, Anja M.; Geissen, Markus; Lenk, Matthias; Riebe, Roland; Angermann, Marlies; Schaetzl, Hermann; Groschup, Martin H.

    2015-01-01

    Cell culture systems represent a crucial part in basic prion research; yet, cell lines that are susceptible to prions, especially to field isolated prions that were not adapted to rodents, are very rare. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize a cell line that was susceptible to ruminant-derived prions and to establish a stable prion infection within it. Based on species and tissue of origin as well as PrP expression rate, we pre-selected a total of 33 cell lines that were then challenged with natural and with mouse propagated BSE or scrapie inocula. Here, we report the successful infection of a non-transgenic bovine cell line, a sub-line of the bovine kidney cell line MDBK, with natural sheep scrapie prions. This cell line retained the scrapie infection for more than 200 passages. Selective cloning resulted in cell populations with increased accumulation of PrPres, although this treatment was not mandatory for retaining the infection. The infection remained stable, even under suboptimal culture conditions. The resulting infectivity of the cells was confirmed by mouse bioassay (Tgbov mice, Tgshp mice). We believe that PES cells used together with other prion permissive cell lines will prove a valuable tool for ongoing efforts to understand and defeat prions and prion diseases. PMID:25565633

  17. Parasites pitched against nature: Pitch Lake water protects guppies (Poecilia reticulata) from microbial and gyrodactylid infections.

    PubMed

    Schelkle, Bettina; Mohammed, Ryan S; Coogan, Michael P; McMullan, Mark; Gillingham, Emma L; VAN Oosterhout, Cock; Cable, Joanne

    2012-11-01

    SUMMARY The enemy release hypothesis proposes that in parasite depleted habitats, populations will experience relaxed selection and become more susceptible (or less tolerant) to pathogenic infections. Here, we focus on a population of guppies (Poecilia reticulata) that are found in an extreme environment (the Pitch Lake, Trinidad) and examine whether this habitat represents a refuge from parasites. We investigated the efficacy of pitch in preventing microbial infections in Pitch Lake guppies, by exposing them to dechlorinated water, and reducing gyrodactylid infections on non-Pitch Lake guppies by transferring them to Pitch Lake water. We show that (i) natural prevalence of ectoparasites in the Pitch Lake is low compared to reference populations, (ii) Pitch Lake guppies transferred into aquarium water develop microbial infections, and (iii) experimentally infected guppies are cured of their gyrodactylid infections both by natural Pitch Lake water and by dechlorinated water containing solid pitch. These results indicate a role for Pitch Lake water in the defence of guppies from their parasites and suggest that Pitch Lake guppies might have undergone enemy release in this extreme environment. The Pitch Lake provides an ideal ecosystem for studies on immune gene evolution in the absence of parasites and long-term evolutionary implications of hydrocarbon pollution for vertebrates.

  18. A bovine cell line that can be infected by natural sheep scrapie prions.

    PubMed

    Oelschlegel, Anja M; Geissen, Markus; Lenk, Matthias; Riebe, Roland; Angermann, Marlies; Schatzl, Herman; Schaetzl, Hermann; Groschup, Martin H

    2015-01-01

    Cell culture systems represent a crucial part in basic prion research; yet, cell lines that are susceptible to prions, especially to field isolated prions that were not adapted to rodents, are very rare. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize a cell line that was susceptible to ruminant-derived prions and to establish a stable prion infection within it. Based on species and tissue of origin as well as PrP expression rate, we pre-selected a total of 33 cell lines that were then challenged with natural and with mouse propagated BSE or scrapie inocula. Here, we report the successful infection of a non-transgenic bovine cell line, a sub-line of the bovine kidney cell line MDBK, with natural sheep scrapie prions. This cell line retained the scrapie infection for more than 200 passages. Selective cloning resulted in cell populations with increased accumulation of PrPres, although this treatment was not mandatory for retaining the infection. The infection remained stable, even under suboptimal culture conditions. The resulting infectivity of the cells was confirmed by mouse bioassay (Tgbov mice, Tgshp mice). We believe that PES cells used together with other prion permissive cell lines will prove a valuable tool for ongoing efforts to understand and defeat prions and prion diseases.

  19. Transmission and virological studies of a malignant catarrhal fever syndrome in the Indonesian swamp buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, D; Sobironingsih, S; Clarke, B C; Young, P J; Sendow, I

    1984-04-01

    A malignant catarrhal fever-like syndrome in indonesian swamp buffalo was experimentally transmitted to one of 2 Bos indicus and 3 of 3 Bos javanicus cattle by intravenous inoculation of 250 ml of citrated, whole blood from affected buffaloes. The 4 cattle developed clinical signs of disease on average 32.5 days after receiving the inoculation of blood. The 4 cattle died after a variable period of illness. None of a further 3 B. javanicus cattle inoculated intravenously with a spleen homogenate prepared from another affected buffalo developed the disease. The experimental disease was clinically and pathologically similar to the natural disease in buffaloes although differences were noted. Attempts to adapt the agent to mice, guinea pigs and rabbits failed. A cytopathic agent (Japanese encephalitis virus) was isolated from the spleen of one buffalo with clinical signs but was not considered significant. Sixty-three B. indicus, 7 B. javanicus (and 6 of their crosses), 3 B. taurus and 4 Bubalus bubalis (Murrah buffalo) were kept in the same quarters where 50 of 177 swamp buffaloes died between September 1979 and May 1982. Four of the 7 B. javanicus cattle developed the clinical signs of disease and died. All the other cattle in contact remained healthy. PMID:6743150

  20. Tifft Farm Nature Preserve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Thomas B.; Gannon, David J.

    1980-01-01

    Described are the creation, development, activities, and programs of Tifft Farm, a 264-acre nature preserve and environmental education center in Buffalo, New York, constructed on a sanitary landfill. (BT)

  1. Bay laurel (Laurus nobilis) as potential antiviral treatment in naturally BQCV infected honeybees.

    PubMed

    Aurori, Adriana C; Bobiş, Otilia; Dezmirean, Daniel S; Mărghitaş, Liviu A; Erler, Silvio

    2016-08-15

    Viral diseases are one of the multiple factors associated with honeybee colony losses. Apart from their innate immune system, including the RNAi machinery, honeybees can use secondary plant metabolites to reduce or fully cure pathogen infections. Here, we tested the antiviral potential of Laurus nobilis leaf ethanolic extracts on forager honeybees naturally infected with BQCV (Black queen cell virus). Total viral loads were reduced even at the lowest concentration tested (1mg/ml). Higher extract concentrations (≥5mg/ml) significantly reduced virus replication. Measuring vitellogenin gene expression as an indicator for transcript homeostasis revealed constant RNA levels before and after treatment, suggesting that its expression was not impacted by the L. nobilis treatment. In conclusion, plant secondary metabolites can reduce virus loads and virus replication in naturally infected honeybees. PMID:27235809

  2. Bay laurel (Laurus nobilis) as potential antiviral treatment in naturally BQCV infected honeybees.

    PubMed

    Aurori, Adriana C; Bobiş, Otilia; Dezmirean, Daniel S; Mărghitaş, Liviu A; Erler, Silvio

    2016-08-15

    Viral diseases are one of the multiple factors associated with honeybee colony losses. Apart from their innate immune system, including the RNAi machinery, honeybees can use secondary plant metabolites to reduce or fully cure pathogen infections. Here, we tested the antiviral potential of Laurus nobilis leaf ethanolic extracts on forager honeybees naturally infected with BQCV (Black queen cell virus). Total viral loads were reduced even at the lowest concentration tested (1mg/ml). Higher extract concentrations (≥5mg/ml) significantly reduced virus replication. Measuring vitellogenin gene expression as an indicator for transcript homeostasis revealed constant RNA levels before and after treatment, suggesting that its expression was not impacted by the L. nobilis treatment. In conclusion, plant secondary metabolites can reduce virus loads and virus replication in naturally infected honeybees.

  3. Monitoring the Freezing Point of Buffalo Milk

    PubMed Central

    Salzano, Caterina; De Felice, Anna; Garofalo, Francesca; Liguori, Salvatore; De Santo, Annunziata; Palermo, Pierpaolo; Guarino, Achille

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the basic freezing point of buffalo milk. Bulk milk samples were collected from buffalo and cattle farms in Caserta area from 2008 to 2014. The analysis involved a total of 1886 buffalo milk samples and 1711 bovine milk samples. These were also tested for fat, protein and lactose contents by means of infrared spectrometry. The freezing point was determined by means of a thermistor cryoscope. Data underwent statistical analysis. Our research showed an average freezing point of -0.528°C for buffalo milk and -0.522°C for bovine milk. Given the lack of data on the freezing point of buffalo milk, our study provides the first indication of a basic freezing point of the milk of this species in Italy. PMID:27800448

  4. [Experimental and natural infection with the enzootic leukosis virus of cattle].

    PubMed

    Hofírek, B; Horín, P; Granátová, M; Machatková, M; Franz, J; Svoboda, I; Blecha, J

    1986-03-01

    A trial was performed with heifers at the age of six to seven months. The animals were experimentally infected with the lymphocytes of a virus-productive donor. Infection was produced in all the nine cases, as demonstrated by means of the positive syncytial test. As indicated by the results of the trial, the antibodies to the enzootic bovine leucosis virus (BLV) were produced soon after experimental infection. A high sensitivity of the serum-neutralization test and the ELISA method was demonstrated in this connection: by these methods, the antibodies were identified already two to three weeks after experimental infection whereas by the immunodiffusion test they could be detected only after five weeks. Twenty-four animals were exposed to natural contact infection. Within 270 days of the trial, the disease after contact was recorded only in one heifer out of the four that were in close contact with the experimentally infected animals. In this case, as compared with experimental infection, the antibodies were produced much later--after 85 to 93 days. Leucosis was recorded in none of the remaining animals. The reasons why such a favourable result was obtained were the thorough disinfection of the stables after blood collections and the strict observance of the aseptic conditions. The results of experimental infection in three cows were identical with those obtained in young cattle. In the experimentally infected dairy cows, antibodies in milk were determined by the ELISA method. As found, in milk the antibodies to BLV appear two to three weeks later than they do in serum. The ELISA method of BLV antibody detection can be used for the identification of infected animals in herds where enzootic bovine leucosis occurs. PMID:3010532

  5. Complex Links between Natural Tuberculosis and Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Infection in Wild Boar

    PubMed Central

    Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Martín-Hernando, MariPaz; Barasona, José Angel; Beltrán-Beck, Beatriz; González-Barrio, David; Vicente, Joaquín; Garrido, Joseba M.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals in natural populations are exposed to a diversity of pathogens which results in coinfections. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between natural infection with tuberculosis (TB) due to infection by bacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in free-ranging Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa). Apparent prevalence for TB lesions and PCV2 infection was extremely high in all age classes, including piglets (51% for TB; 85.7% for PCV2). Modeling results revealed that the relative risk of young (less than 2 years old) wild boar to test positive to PCV2 PCR was negatively associated with TB lesion presence. Also, an interaction between TB, PCV2, and body condition was evidenced: in wild boar with TB lesions probability of being PCV2 PCR positive increased with body condition, whereas this relation was negative for wild boar without TB lesions. This study provides insight into the coinfections occurring in free-ranging host populations that are naturally exposed to several pathogens at an early age. Using TB and PCV2 as a case study, we showed that coinfection is a frequent event among natural populations that takes place early in life with complex effects on the infections and the hosts. PMID:24991567

  6. Natural infections of Clinostomum complanatum (Trematoda: Clinostomatidae) in wild herons and egrets, Tottori Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Aohagi, Y; Shibahara, T; Machida, N; Yamaga, Y; Kagota, K; Hayashi, T

    1992-07-01

    Nycticorax nycticorax, Ardea cinerea, Egretta garzetta, and Egretta intermedia were naturally infected with Clinostomum complanatum (Trematoda: Clinostomatidae) among fourteen wild herons, seven wild egrets and one wild bittern evaluated at the Veterinary Hospital of Tottori University, Tottori, Japan. The latter three species of heron and egrets are reported for the first time as definitive hosts of this parasite in Japan.

  7. Complex links between natural tuberculosis and porcine circovirus type 2 infection in wild boar.

    PubMed

    Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Boadella, Mariana; Martín-Hernando, MariPaz; Barasona, José Angel; Beltrán-Beck, Beatriz; González-Barrio, David; Sibila, Marina; Vicente, Joaquín; Garrido, Joseba M; Segalés, Joaquim; Gortazar, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Individuals in natural populations are exposed to a diversity of pathogens which results in coinfections. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between natural infection with tuberculosis (TB) due to infection by bacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in free-ranging Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa). Apparent prevalence for TB lesions and PCV2 infection was extremely high in all age classes, including piglets (51% for TB; 85.7% for PCV2). Modeling results revealed that the relative risk of young (less than 2 years old) wild boar to test positive to PCV2 PCR was negatively associated with TB lesion presence. Also, an interaction between TB, PCV2, and body condition was evidenced: in wild boar with TB lesions probability of being PCV2 PCR positive increased with body condition, whereas this relation was negative for wild boar without TB lesions. This study provides insight into the coinfections occurring in free-ranging host populations that are naturally exposed to several pathogens at an early age. Using TB and PCV2 as a case study, we showed that coinfection is a frequent event among natural populations that takes place early in life with complex effects on the infections and the hosts.

  8. Rhinitis and disseminated disease in a ferret (Mustela putorius futo) naturally infected with Sarcocystis neurona

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Naturally occurring Sarcocystis neurona infection in a ferret (Mustela putorius futo) with rhinitis and disseminated disease are described for the first time. The ferret exhibited severe rhinitis with intra-lesional S. neurona merozoites and schizonts. Diagnosis was confirmed immunohistochemically b...

  9. Mouse Adenovirus Type 1 Infection of Natural Killer Cell-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Amanda R.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Spindler, Katherine R.

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the initial nonspecific response to viral infection, and viruses exhibit a range of sensitivities to NK cells in vivo. We investigated the role of NK cells in infection of mice by mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) using antibody-mediated depletion and knockout mice. MAV-1 causes encephalomyelitis and replicates to highest levels in brains. NK cell-depleted mice infected with MAV-1 showed brain viral loads 8-20 days p.i. that were similar to wild-type control non-depleted mice. Mice genetically deficient for NK cells behaved similarly to wild-type control mice with respect to brain viral loads and survival. We conclude that NK cells are not required to control virus replication in the brains of MAV-1-infected mice. PMID:18155121

  10. Wolbachia infections in natural Anopheles populations affect egg laying and negatively correlate with Plasmodium development

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, W. Robert; Marcenac, Perrine; Childs, Lauren M.; Buckee, Caroline O.; Baldini, Francesco; Sawadogo, Simon P.; Dabiré, Roch K.; Diabaté, Abdoulaye; Catteruccia, Flaminia

    2016-01-01

    The maternally inherited alpha-proteobacterium Wolbachia has been proposed as a tool to block transmission of devastating mosquito-borne infectious diseases like dengue and malaria. Here we study the reproductive manipulations induced by a recently identified Wolbachia strain that stably infects natural mosquito populations of a major malaria vector, Anopheles coluzzii, in Burkina Faso. We determine that these infections significantly accelerate egg laying but do not induce cytoplasmic incompatibility or sex-ratio distortion, two parasitic reproductive phenotypes that facilitate the spread of other Wolbachia strains within insect hosts. Analysis of 221 blood-fed A. coluzzii females collected from houses shows a negative correlation between the presence of Plasmodium parasites and Wolbachia infection. A mathematical model incorporating these results predicts that infection with these endosymbionts may reduce malaria prevalence in human populations. These data suggest that Wolbachia may be an important player in malaria transmission dynamics in Sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:27243367

  11. Natural breeding with bulls experimentally infected with Neospora caninum failed to induce seroconversion in dams.

    PubMed

    Osoro, K; Ortega-Mora, L M; Martínez, A; Serrano-Martínez, E; Ferre, I

    2009-03-01

    Four bulls and 56 heifers seronegative to Neospora caninum were used to determine the feasibility of venereal transmission in bovine neosporosis under natural conditions. Bulls were experimentally infected with 10(8) live N. caninum tachyzoites. Two of them with the Nc-1 isolate and the other two with the Nc-Spain-7 isolate. After 13 months of initial infection, each bull was re-infected with the same isolate and dose. The experiments were carried out from March to September during 2006 and 2007 where groups of cyclic heifers were naturally mated by the experimentally infected bulls. In year 2006, two bulls infected with different N. caninum isolate serviced 12 heifers each. In year 2007, the same bulls serviced the same heifers a second time (now primiparous) and six new heifers were also added to each group. In addition, the other two bulls serviced 10 additional heifers each. Experimental animals were monitored for 30 weeks and serum samples were collected weekly and fortnightly in years 2006 and 2007, respectively to evaluate the presence of specific antibodies to N. caninum. Experimentally infected bulls showed a significant increase of specific IgG antibodies from 13 (Nc-SP-7) and 21 (Nc-1) days post-infection. Serum IgG antibody responses of individual animals were similar in kinetics but slightly different in magnitude. Serum samples from heifers were all negative. Pregnant rates were 100% in heifers and 91% in primiparous animals. Calves did not show precolostral specific antibodies to N. caninum. Venereal transmission of bovine neosporosis under natural grazing conditions is unlikely to occur.

  12. Experimental infection of rabbits with bovine viral diarrhoea virus by a natural route of exposure.

    PubMed

    Bachofen, Claudia; Grant, Dawn M; Willoughby, Kim; Zadoks, Ruth N; Dagleish, Mark P; Russell, George C

    2014-04-02

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is an important pathogen of cattle that can naturally infect a wide range of even-toed ungulates. Non-bovine hosts may represent reservoirs for the virus that have the potential to hamper BVDV eradication programs usually focused on cattle. Rabbits are very abundant in countries such as the United Kingdom or Australia and are often living on or near livestock pastures. Earlier reports indicated that rabbits can propagate BVDV upon intravenous exposure and that natural infection of rabbits with BVDV may occur but experimental proof of infection of rabbits by a natural route is lacking. Therefore, New Zealand White rabbits were exposed to a Scottish BVDV field strain intravenously, oro-nasally and by contaminating their hay with virus. None of the animals showed any clinical signs. However, the lymphoid organs from animals sacrificed at day five after exposure showed histological changes typical of transient infection with pestivirus. Most organ samples and some buffy coat samples were virus positive at day five but saliva samples remained negative. Development of antibodies was observed in all intravenously challenged animals, in all of the nebulised group and in four of six animals exposed to contaminated hay. To our knowledge this is the first report of BVDV propagation in a species other than ruminants or pigs after exposure to the virus by a natural route. However, to assess the role of rabbits as a potential reservoir for BVDV it remains to be determined whether persistent infection caused by intra-uterine infection is possible and whether BVDV is circulating in wild rabbit populations.

  13. Deformed wing virus can be transmitted during natural mating in honey bees and infect the queens

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Esmaeil; Meixner, Marina D.; Kryger, Per

    2016-01-01

    Deformed wing virus is an important contributor to honey bee colony losses. Frequently queen failure is reported as a cause for colony loss. Here we examine whether sexual transmission during multiple matings of queens is a possible way of virus infection in queens. In an environment with high prevalence of deformed wing virus, queens (n = 30) were trapped upon their return from natural mating flights. The last drone’s endophallus (n = 29), if present, was removed from the mated queens for deformed wing virus quantification, leading to the detection of high-level infection in 3 endophalli. After oviposition, viral quantification revealed that seven of the 30 queens had high-level deformed wing virus infections, in all tissues, including the semen stored in the spermathecae. Two groups of either unmated queens (n = 8) with induced egg laying, or queens (n = 12) mated in isolation with drones showing comparatively low deformed wing virus infections served as control. None of the control queens exhibited high-level viral infections. Our results demonstrate that deformed wing virus infected drones are competitive to mate and able to transmit the virus along with semen, which occasionally leads to queen infections. Virus transmission to queens during mating may be common and can contribute noticeably to queen failure. PMID:27608961

  14. Role of natural killer cells in innate protection against lethal ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Warfield, Kelly L; Perkins, Jeremy G; Swenson, Dana L; Deal, Emily M; Bosio, Catharine M; Aman, M Javad; Yokoyama, Wayne M; Young, Howard A; Bavari, Sina

    2004-07-19

    Ebola virus is a highly lethal human pathogen and is rapidly driving many wild primate populations toward extinction. Several lines of evidence suggest that innate, nonspecific host factors are potentially critical for survival after Ebola virus infection. Here, we show that nonreplicating Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs), containing the glycoprotein (GP) and matrix protein virus protein (VP)40, administered 1-3 d before Ebola virus infection rapidly induced protective immunity. VLP injection enhanced the numbers of natural killer (NK) cells in lymphoid tissues. In contrast to live Ebola virus, VLP treatment of NK cells enhanced cytokine secretion and cytolytic activity against NK-sensitive targets. Unlike wild-type mice, treatment of NK-deficient or -depleted mice with VLPs had no protective effect against Ebola virus infection and NK cells treated with VLPs protected against Ebola virus infection when adoptively transferred to naive mice. The mechanism of NK cell-mediated protection clearly depended on perforin, but not interferon-gamma secretion. Particles containing only VP40 were sufficient to induce NK cell responses and provide protection from infection in the absence of the viral GP. These findings revealed a decisive role for NK cells during lethal Ebola virus infection. This work should open new doors for better understanding of Ebola virus pathogenesis and direct the development of immunotherapeutics, which target the innate immune system, for treatment of Ebola virus infection.

  15. Deformed wing virus can be transmitted during natural mating in honey bees and infect the queens.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Esmaeil; Meixner, Marina D; Kryger, Per

    2016-01-01

    Deformed wing virus is an important contributor to honey bee colony losses. Frequently queen failure is reported as a cause for colony loss. Here we examine whether sexual transmission during multiple matings of queens is a possible way of virus infection in queens. In an environment with high prevalence of deformed wing virus, queens (n = 30) were trapped upon their return from natural mating flights. The last drone's endophallus (n = 29), if present, was removed from the mated queens for deformed wing virus quantification, leading to the detection of high-level infection in 3 endophalli. After oviposition, viral quantification revealed that seven of the 30 queens had high-level deformed wing virus infections, in all tissues, including the semen stored in the spermathecae. Two groups of either unmated queens (n = 8) with induced egg laying, or queens (n = 12) mated in isolation with drones showing comparatively low deformed wing virus infections served as control. None of the control queens exhibited high-level viral infections. Our results demonstrate that deformed wing virus infected drones are competitive to mate and able to transmit the virus along with semen, which occasionally leads to queen infections. Virus transmission to queens during mating may be common and can contribute noticeably to queen failure. PMID:27608961

  16. Deformed wing virus can be transmitted during natural mating in honey bees and infect the queens.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Esmaeil; Meixner, Marina D; Kryger, Per

    2016-09-09

    Deformed wing virus is an important contributor to honey bee colony losses. Frequently queen failure is reported as a cause for colony loss. Here we examine whether sexual transmission during multiple matings of queens is a possible way of virus infection in queens. In an environment with high prevalence of deformed wing virus, queens (n = 30) were trapped upon their return from natural mating flights. The last drone's endophallus (n = 29), if present, was removed from the mated queens for deformed wing virus quantification, leading to the detection of high-level infection in 3 endophalli. After oviposition, viral quantification revealed that seven of the 30 queens had high-level deformed wing virus infections, in all tissues, including the semen stored in the spermathecae. Two groups of either unmated queens (n = 8) with induced egg laying, or queens (n = 12) mated in isolation with drones showing comparatively low deformed wing virus infections served as control. None of the control queens exhibited high-level viral infections. Our results demonstrate that deformed wing virus infected drones are competitive to mate and able to transmit the virus along with semen, which occasionally leads to queen infections. Virus transmission to queens during mating may be common and can contribute noticeably to queen failure.

  17. Pathology and tissue tropism of natural West Nile virus infection in birds: a review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a globally distributed arthropod-borne flavivirus capable of infecting a wide variety of vertebrates, with birds as its natural reservoir. Although it had been considered a pathogen of little importance for birds, from the 1990’s, and especially after its introduction in the North American continent in 1999, thousands of birds have succumbed to West Nile infection. This review summarizes the pathogenesis and pathology of WNV infection in birds highlighting differences in lesion and antigen distribution and severity among bird orders and families. Despite significant species differences in susceptibility to infection, WNV associated lesions and viral antigen are present in the majority of organs of infected birds. The non-progressive, acute or more prolonged course of the disease accounts for part of the differences in lesion and viral antigen distribution and lesion severity. Most likely a combination of host variables and environmental factors in addition to the intrinsic virulence and pathogenicity of the infecting WNV strain influence the pathogenesis of the infection. PMID:23731695

  18. Bovine herpesvirus 6 in buffaloes (Bubalus bulalis) from the Amazon region, Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Cairo Henrique Sousa; de Oliveira, Fernanda Gonçalves; Gasparini, Marcela Ribeiro; Galinari, Grazielle Cossenzo Florentino; Lima, Graciela Kunrath; Fonseca, Antônio Augusto; Barbosa, José Diomedes; Barbosa-Stancioli, Edel Figueiredo; Leite, Rômulo Cerqueira; Dos Reis, Jenner Karlisson Pimenta

    2015-02-01

    This study presents the first description of Bovine herpesvirus 6 (BoHV-6) that was isolated from buffaloes of Amazon region in Brazil. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the BoHV-6 Brazilian strains clustered with the sequence of BoHV-6 from elsewhere available at the GenBank. It was observed in some buffaloes with lymphoproliferative disease in one herd, thus the animals were also tested for Bovine leukemia virus (BLV), which has been associated to lymphoma in bovines. All animals were negative to BLV. These results indicate that BoHV-6 is present in buffaloes in Brazil, but the importance and impact of this infection and its association with any illness is still undefined.

  19. Molecular identification of Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia duodenalis in the Italian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Cacciò, Simone M; Rinaldi, Laura; Cringoli, Giuseppe; Condoleo, Renato; Pozio, Edoardo

    2007-11-30

    Livestock are commonly infected with protozoan parasites of the genera Cryptosporidium and Giardia, and some of the species and genotypes found in these animals have zoonotic significance. We characterized isolates of both parasites recovered from the Italian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis), an economically important species whose milk is used for the production of "buffalo mozzarella" fresh cheese. Molecular analysis of the Cryptosporidium small subunit ribosomal DNA gene and of the Giardia beta-giardin gene shows the presence of both zoonotic parasites (Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia duodenalis assemblage A) and host-specific parasites (G. duodenalis assemblage E), suggesting that water buffaloes can contribute to environmental contamination with oocysts and cysts potentially infectious to humans if their faeces are improperly disposed of. On the other hand, mozzarella cheese is probably a safe product, given that its production involves the treatment of cheese curd at 85-95 degrees C, which is likely to kill or inactivate the parasites.

  20. Detection of Coxiella burnetii in buffaloes aborted fetuses by IS111 DNA amplification: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Perugini, A G; Capuano, F; Esposito, A; Marianelli, C; Martucciello, A; Iovane, G; Galiero, G

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate by PCR analyses the presence of Coxiella burnetii infection in fetuses of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in the Campania region (Southern Italy). Samples were collected only from aborted fetuses and C. burnetii presence was evaluated by one-tube nested PCR amplification of the IS111 repetitive element. Of the 164 fetuses examined 14 (17.5%) were positive after DNA amplification, showing that C. burnetii occurs in this population of water buffaloes. However, more extensive prevalence studies need to be carried out to define the role of buffaloes as reservoirs for this pathogen and also the role of C. burnetii as an abortive agent in this animal.

  1. The efficacy and safety of alphacypermethrin as a pour-on treatment for water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) infested with Haematopinus tuberculatus (Phthiraptera: Haematopinidae).

    PubMed

    Veneziano, Vincenzo; Neglia, Gianluca; Cimmino, Roberta; Balestrieri, Anna; Rufrano, Domenico; Bastianetto, Eduardo; Santoro, Mario; Gokbulut, Cengiz

    2013-08-01

    The sucking louse Haematopinus tuberculatus (Burmeister 1839) is an ectoparasite of buffaloes, cattle, camels, and American bison. Alphacypermethrin (ACYP) is a pyrethroid insecticide commonly used to control arthropods of veterinary and public health interest. Therapeutics, such as antiparasitic compounds, is often administered to buffaloes based on dosage and intervals recommended for cattle because very few drugs have buffalo-specific label indications. A trial was conducted on 20 louse-infested buffaloes at a farm to assess the efficacy and safety of ACYP pour-on, at the manufacturer's recommended dose for cattle, on buffaloes naturally infested by H. tuberculatus. Ten animals were assigned to ACYP-treated group (ACYP-group) and ten to untreated control group (C-group). On day 0, all ACYP-group buffaloes received alphacypermethrin pour-on. Louse counts were performed on days -1, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, and 56 at eight predilection sites on the skin of each buffalo. ACYP was completely effective (100%) at day 7, highly effective (99.8%) at day 14, and completely effective (100%) from day 21 until the end of the study (day 56 post-treatment). During the trial, ACYP was well tolerated by all animals as there were no observed clinically adverse reactions. The results of this trial suggest that ACYP is an effective, safe, and user-friendly compound suitable for treatment of buffaloes with natural louse infestations.

  2. Asymptomatic Cattle Naturally Infected with Mycobacterium bovis Present Exacerbated Tissue Pathology and Bacterial Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Menin, Álvaro; Fleith, Renata; Reck, Carolina; Marlow, Mariel; Fernandes, Paula; Pilati, Célso; Báfica, André

    2013-01-01

    Rational discovery of novel immunodiagnostic and vaccine candidate antigens to control bovine tuberculosis (bTB) requires knowledge of disease immunopathogenesis. However, there remains a paucity of information on the Mycobacterium bovis-host immune interactions during the natural infection. Analysis of 247 naturally PPD+ M. bovis-infected cattle revealed that 92% (n = 228) of these animals were found to display no clinical signs, but presented severe as well as disseminated bTB-lesions at post-mortem examination. Moreover, dissemination of bTB-lesions positively correlated with both pathology severity score (Spearman r = 0.48; p<0.0001) and viable tissue bacterial loads (Spearman r = 0.58; p = 0.0001). Additionally, granuloma encapsulation negatively correlated with M. bovis growth as well as pathology severity, suggesting that encapsulation is an effective mechanism to control bacterial proliferation during natural infection. Moreover, multinucleated giant cell numbers were found to negatively correlate with bacterial counts (Spearman r = 0.25; p = 0.03) in lung granulomas. In contrast, neutrophil numbers in the granuloma were associated with increased M. bovis proliferation (Spearman r = 0.27; p = 0.021). Together, our findings suggest that encapsulation and multinucleated giant cells control M. bovis viability, whereas neutrophils may serve as a cellular biomarker of bacterial proliferation during natural infection. These data integrate host granuloma responses with mycobacterial dissemination and could provide useful immunopathological-based biomarkers of disease severity in natural infection with M. bovis, an important cattle pathogen. PMID:23326525

  3. Molecular characterization of oxytocin receptor gene in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Arunmozhi, N; Singh, S K; Sarath, T; Agarwal, S K; Doiphode, A; Shankar, U

    2014-10-01

    Buffaloes are known for their productivity as compared to average yielding cows due to higher fat percentage, better feed conversion ability and disease resistance. On the other hand, the reproductive performances of buffaloes are often considered as poor owing to late sexual maturity, weak/silent oestrus, repeat breeder and prolonged intercalving interval. The study of cascade of events during oestrus and oestrous cycle can be useful for the improvement of reproductive efficiency of buffaloes. More precisely, the hormonal changes initiated at the molecular level within the animal determine the reproductive nature of the species. Nucleotide/protein sequence analysis serves as a vital tool in analysing the binding of the hormones for their effect or functions. In this study, we have reported cloning and characterization of the complete coding (cDNA) sequence of oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) in buffaloes. Buffalo OXTR gene contains an uninterrupted ORF of 1176 nucleotides corresponding to an inferred polypeptide length of 391 amino acids (aa). The molecular weight of the deduced aa sequence was found to be 43 kDa with an isoelectric point of 9.253 and 16.328 charge at pH 7.0. The deduced protein sequence consists of 38 strongly basic (+) (K,R), 22 strongly acidic (-) (D,E), 186 hydrophobic (A, I, L, F, W, V) and 95 Polar (N, C, Q, S, T, Y) aa. Results indicated that aspartate (D) at aa position 85 and D, R and C at aa positions 136, 137 and 138, respectively, are conserved in buffaloes. The buffalo OXTR gene shared a per cent similarity ranging from 84.7 to 98.1 and 88.5 to 97.7 at nucleotide and deduced aa sequence levels, respectively, with that of other species. Phylogram constructed on the basis of either nucleotide or deduced aa sequences of buffalo OXTR gene showed that buffalo, cattle and sheep have diverged from human and swine and formed a separate clad. The buffalo sequence has shown maximum similarity and closeness with cattle followed by sheep both at

  4. Natural Plasmodium infection in monkeys in the state of Rondônia (Brazilian Western Amazon)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Simian malaria is still an open question concerning the species of Plasmodium parasites and species of New World monkeys susceptible to the parasites. In addition, the lingering question as to whether these animals are reservoirs for human malaria might become important especially in a scenario of eradication of the disease. To aid in the answers to these questions, monkeys were surveyed for malaria parasite natural infection in the Amazonian state of Rondônia, Brazil, a state with intense environmental alterations due to human activities, which facilitated sampling of the animals. Methods Parasites were detected and identified in DNA from blood of monkeys, by PCR with primers for the 18S rRNA, CSP and MSP1 genes and sequencing of the amplified fragments. Multiplex PCR primers for the 18S rRNA genes were designed for the parasite species Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax, Plasmodium malariae/Plasmodium brasilianum and Plasmodium simium. Results An overall infection rate of 10.9% was observed or 20 out 184 monkey specimens surveyed, mostly by P. brasilianum. However, four specimens of monkeys were found infected with P. falciparum, two of them doubly infected with P. brasilianum and P. falciparum. In addition, a species of monkey of the family Aotidae, Aotus nigriceps, is firstly reported here naturally infected with P. brasilianum. None of the monkeys surveyed was found infected with P. simium/P. vivax. Conclusion The rate of natural Plasmodium infection in monkeys in the Brazilian state of Rondônia is in line with previous surveys of simian malaria in the Amazon region. The fact that a monkey species was found that had not previously been described to harbour malaria parasites indicates that the list of monkey species susceptible to Plasmodium infection is yet to be completed. Furthermore, finding monkeys in the region infected with P. falciparum clearly indicates parasite transfer from humans to the animals. Whether this parasite can be

  5. Detection of Bovine viral diarrhea virus from three water buffalo fetuses (Bubalus bubalis) in southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Martucciello, Alessandra; De Mia, Gian Mario; Giammarioli, Monica; De Donato, Immacolata; Iovane, Giuseppe; Galiero, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an important pathogen that primarily infects ruminants, leading to several clinical problems including abortion. BVDV-specific antibodies were reported in a wide range of hosts within domestic and wildlife animal populations, and serological studies also indicated BVDV infection in buffaloes. The purpose of this study was to analyze the presence of BVDV in 2 water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) herds with a history of abortion. Virus isolation from aborted fetuses and from maternal buffy coat and the molecular characterization of the isolates confirmed the presence of BVDV in these animals. The sequence analysis based on the 5' UTR and N(pro) coding regions of the Pestivirus genome revealed that the isolates belong to subgenotype 1b of BVDV. The findings of this study also suggest a possible role of BVDV in causing congenital infection in water buffalo. Its presence in fetal tissues as well as in maternal blood raises questions about the possible development of clinical disease or its influence in abortions in water buffalo.

  6. Genetic resistance to Brucella abortus in the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Borriello, Giorgia; Capparelli, Rosanna; Bianco, Michele; Fenizia, Domenico; Alfano, Flora; Capuano, Federico; Ercolini, Danilo; Parisi, Antonio; Roperto, Sante; Iannelli, Domenico

    2006-04-01

    Brucellosis is a costly disease of water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis). Latent infections and prolonged incubation of the pathogen limit the efficacy of programs based on the eradication of infected animals. We exploited genetic selection for disease resistance as an approach to the control of water buffalo brucellosis. We tested 231 water buffalo cows for the presence of anti-Brucella abortus antibodies (by the agglutination and complement fixation tests) and the Nramp1 genotype (by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis). When the 231 animals (58 cases and 173 controls) were divided into infected (seropositive) and noninfected (seronegative) groups and the Nramp1 genotypes were compared, the seropositive subjects were 52 out of 167 (31%) in the Nramp1A+ (Nramp1AA or Nramp1AB) group and 6 out of 64 (9.4%) in the Nramp1A- (Nramp1BB) group (odds ratio, 4.37; 95% confidence limits, 1.87 to 10.19; chi2, 11.65 for 1 degree of freedom). Monocytes from Nramp1BB subjects displayed significantly (P < 0.01) higher levels of Nramp1 mRNA than Nramp1AA subjects and also a significantly (P < 0.01) higher ability in controlling the intracellular replication of several Brucella species in vitro. Thus, selection for the Nramp1BB genotype can become a valuable tool for the control of water buffalo brucellosis in the areas where the disease is endemic.

  7. Natural anti-CCR5 antibodies in HIV-infection and -exposure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Natural antibodies constitute a first-line of defence against pathogens; they may also play other roles in immune regulation and homeostasis, through their ability to bind host antigens, surface molecules and receptors. Natural anti-CCR5 antibodies can be decisive in preventing HIV infection in mucosal tissues and offer prompt and effective protection just at major sites of virus entry. Among natural anti-CCR5 antibodies, IgG and IgA to the ECL1 domain have been shown to block HIV effectively and durably without causing harm to the host. Their biological properties and their uncommon generation in subsets of HIV-infected and HIV-exposed individuals (so called ESN) will be introduced and discussed, with the aim at exploiting their potential in therapy and prevention. PMID:21284903

  8. Clinical demodicosis in African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in the Kruger National Park.

    PubMed

    Wolhuter, Julie; Bengis, Roy G; Reilly, Brian K; Cross, Paul C

    2009-04-01

    We investigated the relationship between prevalence and severity of clinical signs of Demodex cafferi infection in free-ranging African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) and other factors such as age, sex, pregnancy status, and concomitant infections with bovine tuberculosis (BTB), Rift Valley fever (RVF), and brucellosis (BA). Approximately half of 203 buffalo examined in this study had clinical signs of demodicosis (cutaneous nodules); younger age classes had the highest prevalence and severity of lesions (chi(2)=21.4, df=6, P=0.0015). Nodules were generally limited to the head and neck region, but in severe cases were present over the entire animal. We found no significant association between clinical severity of the Demodex infection and gender, pregnancy status, or infection with BTB, RVF, or BA.

  9. Nuclear Industry Support Services by the Buffalo Materials Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, L.G. )

    1993-01-01

    The Buffalo Materials Research Center (BMRC) is located on the campus of the State University of New York at Buffalo, Principal facilities within BMRC include a 2-MW PULSTAR, low-enrichment reactor, an electron accelerator, and irradiated materials remote testing facilities. The reactor and the materials testing facilities have been utilized extensively in support of the power reactor community since 1961. This paper briefly highlights the nature and scope of this service. The BMRC is operated for the university by Buffalo Materials Research, Inc., a private for-profit company, which is a subsidiary of Materials Engineering Associates, Inc. (MEA), a Maryland-based materials testing company. A primary mission of MEA has been research on the effects of neutron irradiation on reactor structural materials, including those used for pressure vessel and piping systems. The combined resources of MEA and BMRC have played a pivotal role in the assessment of reactor pressure vessel safety both in the United States and abroad and in the development of new radiation-resistant steels.

  10. [The fertility of the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalus)].

    PubMed

    TerMeulen, U; Bode, E; Nothelle, G

    1995-12-01

    In the present study the conception- and calving-frequencies of Nili-Ravi milk buffaloes were calculated over a year's period in the Punjab region of Pakistan. The results show prominent fluctuations throughout the year with a minimum calving-frequency of 1.6% in March and a minimum conception-frequency of 1.8% in May and maximum calving frequencies of 15.2% in November. This distribution occurs in association with unsuitable and suitable climatic conditions respectively, and also in association with the feeding situation which is better in autumn than in spring (Nothelle, 1992). Thibault and Levasseur (1974) believe that there is an inborn seasonal nature of sexual activity for nearly all mammals. This principle surely applies to the milk buffaloes, although it is confirmed that the buffalo cow is a poly-oestrous animal with a regular sexual cycle all over the year. Through breeding-, feeding-, animal husbandry- and management practice it is possible to compensate the fluctuations of conception- and calving frequencies over the whole year.

  11. High prevalence of muscular sarcocystosis in cattle and water buffaloes from Selangor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Latif, B; Vellayan, S; Heo, C C; Kannan Kutty, M; Omar, E; Abdullah, S; Tappe, D

    2013-12-01

    The prevalence of sarcocystosis in cattle and water buffaloes from peninsular Malaysia was investigated in abattoirs in Selangor state, February, 2011, to March, 2012. Fresh muscle samples were collected from the tongue, heart, oesophagus, diaphragm and skeletal muscles of 102 cattle and 18 water buffaloes. Each sample was initially screened by light microscopy and then fixed for further histopathological analysis. Out of 120 animals examined, 49 (40.8%) harboured the microscopic type of Sarcocystis spp. The positivity rate for cattle was 36.2% and for water buffaloes 66.7%. In cattle, the organs highly infected were the skeletal muscles and diaphragm (27% each), followed by tongue and esophagus (24.3% each), and the heart (8%). In water buffaloes, the heart was most often infected (66.7%), followed by the oesophagus (50%) and skeletal muscle (33.3%); no sarcocysts were detected in the tongue and diaphragm. The shape of the sarcocyst was fusiform to oval with a mean cyst size of 151.66 x 75.83 μm and wall thickness of 2.47 μm in cattle, and 114 x 50.81 μm cyst size and the wall thickness of 1.11 μm in water buffaloes, consistent with Sarcocystis cruzi and Sarcocystis levinei, respectively. Remaining tissue from cattle was subjected to parasite specific 18S rRNA gene PCR and Sarcocystis cruzi was confirmed, at least exemplarily. The peripheral metrocytes and the banana-shaped bradyzoites (15.23 x 2.2 μm in cattle and 11.49 x 2.45 μm in water buffalo hosts) were easily recognized. In conclusion, a high positivity rate was found in Malaysian meat-producing animals with possible implications for meat consumption and human health. PMID:24522140

  12. High prevalence of muscular sarcocystosis in cattle and water buffaloes from Selangor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Latif, B; Vellayan, S; Heo, C C; Kannan Kutty, M; Omar, E; Abdullah, S; Tappe, D

    2013-12-01

    The prevalence of sarcocystosis in cattle and water buffaloes from peninsular Malaysia was investigated in abattoirs in Selangor state, February, 2011, to March, 2012. Fresh muscle samples were collected from the tongue, heart, oesophagus, diaphragm and skeletal muscles of 102 cattle and 18 water buffaloes. Each sample was initially screened by light microscopy and then fixed for further histopathological analysis. Out of 120 animals examined, 49 (40.8%) harboured the microscopic type of Sarcocystis spp. The positivity rate for cattle was 36.2% and for water buffaloes 66.7%. In cattle, the organs highly infected were the skeletal muscles and diaphragm (27% each), followed by tongue and esophagus (24.3% each), and the heart (8%). In water buffaloes, the heart was most often infected (66.7%), followed by the oesophagus (50%) and skeletal muscle (33.3%); no sarcocysts were detected in the tongue and diaphragm. The shape of the sarcocyst was fusiform to oval with a mean cyst size of 151.66 x 75.83 μm and wall thickness of 2.47 μm in cattle, and 114 x 50.81 μm cyst size and the wall thickness of 1.11 μm in water buffaloes, consistent with Sarcocystis cruzi and Sarcocystis levinei, respectively. Remaining tissue from cattle was subjected to parasite specific 18S rRNA gene PCR and Sarcocystis cruzi was confirmed, at least exemplarily. The peripheral metrocytes and the banana-shaped bradyzoites (15.23 x 2.2 μm in cattle and 11.49 x 2.45 μm in water buffalo hosts) were easily recognized. In conclusion, a high positivity rate was found in Malaysian meat-producing animals with possible implications for meat consumption and human health.

  13. Is the infectiousness of dogs naturally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi associated with poly-parasitism?

    PubMed

    Enriquez, G F; Garbossa, G; Macchiaverna, N P; Argibay, H D; Bua, J; Gürtler, R E; Cardinal, M V

    2016-06-15

    Interactions among different species of parasites co-infecting the same host could be synergistic or antagonistic. These interactions may modify both the frequency of infected hosts and their infectiousness, and therefore impact on transmission dynamics. This study determined the infectiousness of Trypanosoma cruzi-seropositive dogs (using xenodiagnosis) and their parasite load (quantified by qPCR), and tested the association between both variables and the presence of concomitant endoparasites. A cross-sectional serosurvey conducted in eight rural villages from Pampa del Indio and neighboring municipalities (northeastern Argentina) detected 32 T. cruzi-seropositive dogs out of 217 individuals examined for infection. Both the infectiousness to the vector Triatoma infestans and parasite load of T. cruzi-seropositive dogs examined were heterogeneous. A statistically significant, nine-fold higher mean infectiousness was registered in T. cruzi-seropositive dogs co-infected with Ancylostoma caninum and a trematode than in T. cruzi-seropositive dogs without these infections. The median parasite load of T. cruzi was also significantly higher in dogs co-infected with these helminths. An opposite trend was observed in T. cruzi-seropositive dogs that were serologically positive to Toxoplasma gondii or Neospora caninum relative to dogs seronegative for these parasites. Using multiple logistic regression analysis with random effects, we found a positive and significant association between the infectiousness of T. cruzi-seropositive dogs and co-infections with A. caninum and a trematode. Our results suggest that co-infections may be a modifier of host infectiousness in dogs naturally infected with T. cruzi. PMID:27198799

  14. Interactions Between Trypanosoma cruzi the Chagas Disease Parasite and Naturally Infected Wild Mepraia Vectors of Chile.

    PubMed

    Campos-Soto, Ricardo; Ortiz, Sylvia; Cordova, Ivan; Bruneau, Nicole; Botto-Mahan, Carezza; Solari, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    Chagas disease, which ranks among the world's most neglected diseases, is a chronic, systemic, parasitic infection caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Mepraia species are the wild vectors of this parasite in Chile. Host-parasite interactions can occur at several levels, such as co-speciation and ecological host fitting, among others. Thus, we are exploring the interactions between T. cruzi circulating in naturally infected Mepraia species in all areas endemic of Chile. We evaluated T. cruzi infection rates of 27 different haplotypes of the wild Mepraia species and identified their parasite genotypes using minicircle PCR amplification and hybridization tests with genotype-specific DNA probes. Infection rates were lower in northern Chile where Mepraia gajardoi circulates (10-35%); in central Chile, Mepraia spinolai is most abundant, and infection rates varied in space and time (0-55%). T. cruzi discrete typing units (DTUs) TcI, TcII, TcV, and Tc VI were detected. Mixed infections with two or more DTUs are frequently found in highly infected insects. T. cruzi DTUs have distinct, but not exclusive, ecological and epidemiological associations with their hosts. T. cruzi infection rates of M. spinolai were higher than in M. gajardoi, but the presence of mixed infection with more than one T. cruzi DTU was the same. The same T. cruzi DTUs (TcI, TcII, TcV, and TcVI) were found circulating in both vector species, even though TcI was not equally distributed. These results suggest that T. cruzi DTUs are not associated with any of the two genetically related vector species nor with the geographic area. The T. cruzi vectors interactions are discussed in terms of old and recent events. By exploring T. cruzi DTUs present in Mepraia haplotypes and species from northern to central Chile, we open the analysis on these invertebrate host-parasite interactions.

  15. Enhancing reproductive performance in domestic dairy water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Zicarelli, L

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the review is to describe the factors that affect fertility in domestic water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and the techniques that enable an improvement in reproductive performance. On Italian and Latin American farms where natural mating is practiced and bulls are always present in the herd, the inter-calving interval is approximately 400 days and the culling rate is lower than 15%. The buffalo has a tendency for seasonal reproductive activity. Reproduction is favoured when there is a decrease in day length. Ovarian activity stops if conception does not occur within 3 to 5 ovarian cycles. It is important, therefore, that appropriate management of the transition period is practiced, particularly with respect to the hygienic conditions of the uterus. In tropical countries located north of the equator, feed deficiencies and heat stress are considered the main factors that lead to poor fertility in the summer. In Pakistan, for example, the increase in body condition score during the autumn was associated with the commencement of the breeding season in buffaloes. Anoestrus is observed also in Italy, however, where the average daily temperature during the same period is 13.5 to 23.5 degrees C and feeding is constant throughout the year. The only common element between the two areas is the progressive increase in daylight hours between April and June and the day length greater than 12 hours up to September. In Italian herds that apply an out-of-season breeding strategy, an improvement in fertility (measured as the percentage of corpora lutea corresponding to subsequent pregnancy) is observed when water pools are present on the farm. This demonstrates that an improvement in environmental conditions reduces the incidence of embryonic mortality and/or abnormal cycles. To summarize, in the absence of serious nutritional problems, an improvement in environmental conditions increases fertility in buffalo.

  16. Identification of a site for a cohort study on natural history of HIV infection in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Sahlu, T; Fontanet, A; Rinke de Wit, T; Messele, T; Doorly, R; Yeneneh, H; Bindels, P; Coutinho, R

    1998-02-01

    A cross-sectional survey was carried out in a sugar estate in central Ethiopia to identify a subgroup for a cohort study on the natural history of HIV infection. HIV prevalence was 2.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7%-3.9%) in 957 adults aged 15 to 54 years randomly selected for the initial survey. A follow-up survey including only factory workers of the estate aged 18 to 45 years (n = 280) showed a higher HIV prevalence in male factory workers (n = 262) compared with the male estate workers of the same age of the initial survey (n = 484; 8.8% versus 3.1 %; p < .05). Factors independently associated with HIV infection in male factory workers were number of lifetime sexual partners, positive syphilis serology, higher income, and absence of travel outside the residential area. Among male estate workers, only older age was associated with HIV infection. Both factory workers and male estate workers were stable residents and were willing to participate in a long-term study on HIV/ AIDS. However, because of the higher HIV prevalence in factory workers and the higher prevalence of behaviors associated with an increased risk for HIV infection, factory workers were selected for the long-term cohort study on the natural history of HIV infection.

  17. Natural Hendra Virus Infection in Flying-Foxes - Tissue Tropism and Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Goldspink, Lauren K; Edson, Daniel W; Vidgen, Miranda E; Bingham, John; Field, Hume E; Smith, Craig S

    2015-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is a lethal zoonotic agent that emerged in 1994 in Australia. Pteropid bats (flying-foxes) are the natural reservoir. To date, HeV has spilled over from flying-foxes to horses on 51 known occasions, and from infected horses to close-contact humans on seven occasions. We undertook screening of archived bat tissues for HeV by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Tissues were tested from 310 bats including 295 Pteropodiformes and 15 Vespertilioniformes. HeV was detected in 20 individual flying-foxes (6.4%) from various tissues including spleen, kidney, liver, lung, placenta and blood components. Detection was significantly higher in Pteropus Alecto and P. conspicillatus, identifying species as a risk factor for infection. Further, our findings indicate that HeV has a predilection for the spleen, suggesting this organ plays an important role in HeV infection. The lack of detections in the foetal tissues of HeV-positive females suggests that vertical transmission is not a regular mode of transmission in naturally infected flying-foxes, and that placental and foetal tissues are not a major source of infection for horses. A better understanding of HeV tissue tropism will strengthen management of the risk of spillover from flying-foxes to horses and ultimately humans.

  18. Clinical, serological, and parasitological analysis of snakes naturally infected with Cryptosporidium serpentis.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Philipp Ricardo S O; Grego, Kathleen F; Lima, Valéria M F; Nakamura, Alex A; da Silva, Deuvânia C; Meireles, Marcelo V

    2013-11-15

    Infection by Cryptosporidium serpentis is one of the most important diseases in reptiles and is characterized by chronic clinical or subclinical infection and the presence of hypertrophic gastritis, food regurgitation, progressive weight loss, mortality, and intermittent or continuous shedding of oocysts in the feces. The objectives of this study were to standardize an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect antibodies against C. serpentis and to evaluate the clinical, parasitological, and humoral immune response in snakes naturally infected with C. serpentis. Twenty-one snakes naturally infected with C. serpentis and housed at the Butantan Institute, São Paulo, Brazil, underwent clinical and parasitological analyses for C. serpentis infection through daily records of clinical signs and a monthly survey of fecal shedding of oocysts using the Kinyoun's acid-fast staining. The serological evaluation was performed monthly by indirect ELISA using crude total antigen from oocysts of C. serpentis to detect anti-C. serpentis antibodies. Clinical symptoms consisted of food regurgitation, inappetence, and progressive weight loss. The parasitological analysis revealed intermittent fecal shedding of a variable number of oocysts in all snakes, with positivity in 85.32% (157/184) of the samples. The indirect ELISA was positive in 68.25% (86/126) of the samples. A humoral immune response was observed in most animals; however, fluctuating antibodies levels, leading to alternating positive and negative results, were observed in most snakes.

  19. Natural Hendra Virus Infection in Flying-Foxes - Tissue Tropism and Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Goldspink, Lauren K; Edson, Daniel W; Vidgen, Miranda E; Bingham, John; Field, Hume E; Smith, Craig S

    2015-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is a lethal zoonotic agent that emerged in 1994 in Australia. Pteropid bats (flying-foxes) are the natural reservoir. To date, HeV has spilled over from flying-foxes to horses on 51 known occasions, and from infected horses to close-contact humans on seven occasions. We undertook screening of archived bat tissues for HeV by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Tissues were tested from 310 bats including 295 Pteropodiformes and 15 Vespertilioniformes. HeV was detected in 20 individual flying-foxes (6.4%) from various tissues including spleen, kidney, liver, lung, placenta and blood components. Detection was significantly higher in Pteropus Alecto and P. conspicillatus, identifying species as a risk factor for infection. Further, our findings indicate that HeV has a predilection for the spleen, suggesting this organ plays an important role in HeV infection. The lack of detections in the foetal tissues of HeV-positive females suggests that vertical transmission is not a regular mode of transmission in naturally infected flying-foxes, and that placental and foetal tissues are not a major source of infection for horses. A better understanding of HeV tissue tropism will strengthen management of the risk of spillover from flying-foxes to horses and ultimately humans. PMID:26060997

  20. Natural infection of small mammal species in Minnesota with the agent of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis.

    PubMed

    Walls, J J; Greig, B; Neitzel, D F; Dumler, J S

    1997-04-01

    The natural reservoirs for the agent of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE) are suspected to be the small mammals that host immature stages of Ixodes scapularis ticks. To determine if such small mammals are naturally infected, we collected blood and serum samples from small mammal species in rural and suburban areas of Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minn. Samples were collected from white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus), eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus), southern red-backed voles (Clethrionomys gapperi), and insectivorous shrews (Blarina brevicauda and Sorex cinereus). Blood samples were tested by PCR for active infection with the HGE agent, and sera from P. leucopus mice were tested for serologic evidence of infection by indirect immunofluorescence. PCR analyses revealed the presence of HGE agent DNA in 20 of the 190 samples (10.5%) tested. Of the 119 P. leucopus mouse serum samples that were analyzed, 12 (10.1%) contained Ehrlichia equi antibodies. In 3 of 119 (2.5%) P. leucopus mice from which both blood and serum were collected. HGE agent DNA and antibodies against E. equi were present. Animals with evidence of infection with the HGE agent are widely distributed around the Minneapolis-St. Paul area in regions with known I. scapularis tick activity. Small mammals that are frequent hosts for larval I. scapularis ticks and that are found in areas where HGE occurs are likely to be a major reservoir from which infected ticks that bite humans are derived. PMID:9157141

  1. Natural Rabies Infection in a Domestic Fowl (Gallus domesticus): A Report from India

    PubMed Central

    Baby, Julie; Mani, Reeta Subramaniam; Abraham, Swapna Susan; Thankappan, Asha T.; Pillai, Prasad Madhavan; Anand, Ashwini Manoor; Madhusudana, Shampur Narayan; Ramachandran, Jayachandran; Sreekumar, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    Background Rabies is a fatal encephalitis caused by viruses belonging to the genus Lyssavirus of the family Rhabdoviridae. It is a viral disease primarily affecting mammals, though all warm blooded animals are susceptible. Experimental rabies virus infection in birds has been reported, but naturally occurring infection of birds has been documented very rarely. Principal Findings The carcass of a domestic fowl (Gallus domesticus), which had been bitten by a stray dog one month back, was brought to the rabies diagnostic laboratory. A necropsy was performed and the brain tissue obtained was subjected to laboratory tests for rabies. The brain tissue was positive for rabies viral antigens by fluorescent antibody test (FAT) confirming a diagnosis of rabies. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleoprotein gene sequencing revealed that the rabies virus strain from the domestic fowl belonged to a distinct and relatively rare Indian subcontinent lineage. Significance This case of naturally acquired rabies infection in a bird species, Gallus domesticus, being reported for the first time in India, was identified from an area which has a significant stray dog population and is highly endemic for canine rabies. It indicates that spill over of infection even to an unusual host is possible in highly endemic areas. Lack of any clinical signs, and fewer opportunities for diagnostic laboratory testing of suspected rabies in birds, may be the reason for disease in these species being undiagnosed and probably under-reported. Butchering and handling of rabies virus- infected poultry may pose a potential exposure risk. PMID:26201090

  2. Natural infection of guinea pigs exposed to patients with highly drug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Dharmadhikari, Ashwin S.; Basaraba, Randall J.; Van Der Walt, Martie L.; Weyer, Karin; Mphahlele, Matsie; Venter, Kobus; Jensen, Paul A.; First, Melvin W.; Parsons, Sydney; McMurray, David N.; Orme, Ian M.; Nardell, Edward A.

    2012-01-01

    A natural TB infection model using guinea pigs may provide useful information for investigating differences in transmission efficiency and establishment of active disease by clinical TB strains in a highly susceptible host under controlled environmental conditions. We sought to examine the capacity of naturally transmitted multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis to establish infection and produce active disease in guinea pigs. Guinea pigs were continuously exposed for 4 months to the exhaust air of a 6-bed multidrug-resistant tuberculosis inpatient hospital ward in South Africa. Serial tuberculin skin test reactions were measured to determine infection. All animals were subsequently evaluated for histologic disease progression at necropsy. Although 75% of the 362 exposed guinea pigs had positive skin test reactions [≥6mm], only 12% had histopathologic evidence of active disease. Reversions (≥ 6 mm change) in skin test reactivity were seen in 22% of animals, exclusively among those with reactions of 6 to 13 mm. Only two of 86 guinea pigs with reversion had histological evidence of disease compared to 47% (31/66) of guinea pigs with large, non-reverting reactions. Immunosuppression of half the guinea pigs across all skin test categories did not significantly accelerate disease progression. In guinea pigs that reverted a skin test, a second positive reaction in 27 (33%) of them strongly suggested re-infection due to ongoing exposure. These results show that a large majority of guinea pigs naturally exposed to human-source strains of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis became infected, but that many resolved their infection and a large majority failed to progress to detectable disease. PMID:21478054

  3. Experimental Transmission of Ehrlichia equi to Horses through Naturally Infected Ticks (Ixodes pacificus) from Northern California

    PubMed Central

    Reubel, Gerhard H.; Kimsey, Robert B.; Barlough, Jeffrey E.; Madigan, John E.

    1998-01-01

    We report the experimental transmission of Ehrlichia equi from naturally infected Ixodes pacificus ticks to horses. Three weeks after exposure to ticks, two of three horses developed clinical signs compatible with E. equi infection, while one horse remained asymptomatic. 16S rRNA gene PCR of blood leukocyte lysates was positive for all horses at various time points; two horses seroconverted. The 16S rRNA gene sequences amplified from tick-exposed horses showed more than 99% homology to corresponding fragments of the 16S rRNA genes of E. equi, Ehrlichia phagocytophila, and the human granulocytic ehrlichiosis agent. PMID:9650983

  4. Circulating concentrations of soluble granzyme A and B increase during natural and experimental Plasmodium falciparum infections.

    PubMed

    Hermsen, C C; Konijnenberg, Y; Mulder, L; Loé, C; van Deuren, M; van der Meer, J W M; van Mierlo, G J; Eling, W M C; Hack, C E; Sauerwein, R W

    2003-06-01

    Release of soluble Granzymes (sGranzymes) is considered to reflect activation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes and NK cells. sGranzymes and a number of pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured in plasma of malaria patients with natural or experimentally induced Plasmodium falciparum infections. Concentrations of sGranzyme A and B, IL-10, IL-12p70 and CRP were significantly increased in African children presenting with clinical malaria; IL-10 and CRP concentrations were significantly correlated with disease severity. In nonimmune Dutch volunteers which were experimentally infected by P. falciparum-infected mosquitoes, sGranzyme A increment started 1-2 days prior to clinical symptoms and microscopically detectable parasitaemia. This coincided with increases in IFNgamma, IL-12p40 and IL-8, while sGranzyme B and IL-10 levels increased 24-48 h later. The elevation of sGranzyme A and IFNgamma in nonimmune volunteers suggests that NK cells are activated upon release of parasites by infected liver cells and subsequently during blood stage infection; thus, NK cells are likely involved innate immune human host resistance in the early phase of a malaria infection.

  5. Natural Killer Cell Evasion Is Essential for Infection by Rhesus Cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Sturgill, Elizabeth R; Malouli, Daniel; Hansen, Scott G; Burwitz, Benjamin J; Seo, Seongkyung; Schneider, Christine L; Womack, Jennie L; Verweij, Marieke C; Ventura, Abigail B; Bhusari, Amruta; Jeffries, Krystal M; Legasse, Alfred W; Axthelm, Michael K; Hudson, Amy W; Sacha, Jonah B; Picker, Louis J; Früh, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    The natural killer cell receptor NKG2D activates NK cells by engaging one of several ligands (NKG2DLs) belonging to either the MIC or ULBP families. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL16 and UL142 counteract this activation by retaining NKG2DLs and US18 and US20 act via lysomal degradation but the importance of NK cell evasion for infection is unknown. Since NKG2DLs are highly conserved in rhesus macaques, we characterized how NKG2DL interception by rhesus cytomegalovirus (RhCMV) impacts infection in vivo. Interestingly, RhCMV lacks homologs of UL16 and UL142 but instead employs Rh159, the homolog of UL148, to prevent NKG2DL surface expression. Rh159 resides in the endoplasmic reticulum and retains several NKG2DLs whereas UL148 does not interfere with NKG2DL expression. Deletion of Rh159 releases human and rhesus MIC proteins, but not ULBPs, from retention while increasing NK cell stimulation by infected cells. Importantly, RhCMV lacking Rh159 cannot infect CMV-naïve animals unless CD8+ cells, including NK cells, are depleted. However, infection can be rescued by replacing Rh159 with HCMV UL16 suggesting that Rh159 and UL16 perform similar functions in vivo. We therefore conclude that cytomegaloviral interference with NK cell activation is essential to establish but not to maintain chronic infection. PMID:27580123

  6. Natural Killer Cell Evasion Is Essential for Infection by Rhesus Cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Sturgill, Elizabeth R; Malouli, Daniel; Hansen, Scott G; Burwitz, Benjamin J; Seo, Seongkyung; Schneider, Christine L; Womack, Jennie L; Verweij, Marieke C; Ventura, Abigail B; Bhusari, Amruta; Jeffries, Krystal M; Legasse, Alfred W; Axthelm, Michael K; Hudson, Amy W; Sacha, Jonah B; Picker, Louis J; Früh, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    The natural killer cell receptor NKG2D activates NK cells by engaging one of several ligands (NKG2DLs) belonging to either the MIC or ULBP families. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL16 and UL142 counteract this activation by retaining NKG2DLs and US18 and US20 act via lysomal degradation but the importance of NK cell evasion for infection is unknown. Since NKG2DLs are highly conserved in rhesus macaques, we characterized how NKG2DL interception by rhesus cytomegalovirus (RhCMV) impacts infection in vivo. Interestingly, RhCMV lacks homologs of UL16 and UL142 but instead employs Rh159, the homolog of UL148, to prevent NKG2DL surface expression. Rh159 resides in the endoplasmic reticulum and retains several NKG2DLs whereas UL148 does not interfere with NKG2DL expression. Deletion of Rh159 releases human and rhesus MIC proteins, but not ULBPs, from retention while increasing NK cell stimulation by infected cells. Importantly, RhCMV lacking Rh159 cannot infect CMV-naïve animals unless CD8+ cells, including NK cells, are depleted. However, infection can be rescued by replacing Rh159 with HCMV UL16 suggesting that Rh159 and UL16 perform similar functions in vivo. We therefore conclude that cytomegaloviral interference with NK cell activation is essential to establish but not to maintain chronic infection.

  7. Natural Killer Cell Evasion Is Essential for Infection by Rhesus Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Sturgill, Elizabeth R.; Malouli, Daniel; Hansen, Scott G.; Burwitz, Benjamin J.; Schneider, Christine L.; Womack, Jennie L.; Verweij, Marieke C.; Ventura, Abigail B.; Bhusari, Amruta; Jeffries, Krystal M.; Legasse, Alfred W.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Hudson, Amy W.; Sacha, Jonah B.; Picker, Louis J.; Früh, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The natural killer cell receptor NKG2D activates NK cells by engaging one of several ligands (NKG2DLs) belonging to either the MIC or ULBP families. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL16 and UL142 counteract this activation by retaining NKG2DLs and US18 and US20 act via lysomal degradation but the importance of NK cell evasion for infection is unknown. Since NKG2DLs are highly conserved in rhesus macaques, we characterized how NKG2DL interception by rhesus cytomegalovirus (RhCMV) impacts infection in vivo. Interestingly, RhCMV lacks homologs of UL16 and UL142 but instead employs Rh159, the homolog of UL148, to prevent NKG2DL surface expression. Rh159 resides in the endoplasmic reticulum and retains several NKG2DLs whereas UL148 does not interfere with NKG2DL expression. Deletion of Rh159 releases human and rhesus MIC proteins, but not ULBPs, from retention while increasing NK cell stimulation by infected cells. Importantly, RhCMV lacking Rh159 cannot infect CMV-naïve animals unless CD8+ cells, including NK cells, are depleted. However, infection can be rescued by replacing Rh159 with HCMV UL16 suggesting that Rh159 and UL16 perform similar functions in vivo. We therefore conclude that cytomegaloviral interference with NK cell activation is essential to establish but not to maintain chronic infection. PMID:27580123

  8. Hepatitis E in blood donors: investigation of the natural course of asymptomatic infection, Germany, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Vollmer, Tanja; Diekmann, Juergen; Eberhardt, Matthias; Knabbe, Cornelius; Dreier, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Asymptomatic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections have been found in blood donors from various European countries, but the natural course is rarely specified. Here, we compared the progression of HEV viraemia, serostatus and liver-specific enzymes in 10 blood donors with clinically asymptomatic genotype 3 HEV infection, measuring HEV RNA concentrations, plasma concentrations of alanine/aspartate aminotransferase, glutamate dehydrogenase and bilirubin and anti-HEV IgA, IgM and IgG antibodies. RNA concentrations ranged from 77.2 to 2.19×105 IU/mL, with viraemia lasting from less than 10 to 52 days. Donors showed a typical progression of a recent HEV infection but differed in the first detection of anti-HEV IgA, IgM and IgG and seropositivity of the antibody classes. The diagnostic window between HEV RNA detection and first occurrence of anti-HEV antibodies ranged from eight to 48 days, depending on the serological assay used. The progression of laboratory parameters of asymptomatic HEV infection was largely comparable to the progression of symptomatic HEV infection, but only four of 10 donors showed elevated liver-specific parameters. Our results help elucidate the risk of transfusion-associated HEV infection and provide a basis for development of screening strategies. The diagnostic window illustrates that infectious blood donors can be efficiently identified only by RNA screening. PMID:27608433

  9. Hepatitis E in blood donors: investigation of the natural course of asymptomatic infection, Germany, 2011.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Tanja; Diekmann, Juergen; Eberhardt, Matthias; Knabbe, Cornelius; Dreier, Jens

    2016-09-01

    Asymptomatic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections have been found in blood donors from various European countries, but the natural course is rarely specified. Here, we compared the progression of HEV viraemia, serostatus and liver-specific enzymes in 10 blood donors with clinically asymptomatic genotype 3 HEV infection, measuring HEV RNA concentrations, plasma concentrations of alanine/aspartate aminotransferase, glutamate dehydrogenase and bilirubin and anti-HEV IgA, IgM and IgG antibodies. RNA concentrations ranged from 77.2 to 2.19×10(5) IU/mL, with viraemia lasting from less than 10 to 52 days. Donors showed a typical progression of a recent HEV infection but differed in the first detection of anti-HEV IgA, IgM and IgG and seropositivity of the antibody classes. The diagnostic window between HEV RNA detection and first occurrence of anti-HEV antibodies ranged from eight to 48 days, depending on the serological assay used. The progression of laboratory parameters of asymptomatic HEV infection was largely comparable to the progression of symptomatic HEV infection, but only four of 10 donors showed elevated liver-specific parameters. Our results help elucidate the risk of transfusion-associated HEV infection and provide a basis for development of screening strategies. The diagnostic window illustrates that infectious blood donors can be efficiently identified only by RNA screening. PMID:27608433

  10. Tandem repeat protein as potential diagnostic antigen for Trypanosoma evansi infection.

    PubMed

    Thuy, Nguyen Thu; Goto, Yasuyuki; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Kawazu, Shin-Ichiro; Inoue, Noboru

    2012-02-01

    Trypanosoma evansi infection (surra) causes significant losses in livestock production in tropical and sub-tropical areas. The current ELISA recommended by OIE for diagnosis of the disease is based on trypanosome lysate antigen. However, antigenic variation and unstable nature of cell lysate antigen make it difficult to standardize the assay. Thus, there are needs to develop recombinant antigen-based ELISA that improve stability, sensitivity, and specificity of the test. Since tandem repeat (TR) proteins of trypanosomatid parasites generally possess high antigenicity, they have been considered to be the promising antigens for trypanosomosis and leishmaniosis. In this study, IgG responses against 14 recombinant TR proteins of trypanosomes were examined by ELISA. Serum samples were obtained from three water buffaloes experimentally infected with T. evansi. Since Trypanosoma congolense GM6 (TcoGM6) elicited highest IgG responses to all water buffaloes, we further bioinformatically and molecular biologically identified Trypanosoma brucei brucei GM6 (TbbGM6) and T. evansi GM6 (TeGM6) TR genes, respectively. As expected, predicted amino acid sequences of TbbGM6 and TeGM6 were identical while the nucleic acid sequence homology between TbbGM6 and TcoGM6 was 63.8%. All buffaloes became clearly positive in recombinant TbbGM6 (rTbbGM6)-based ELISA at 48 days post-infection, suggesting that rTbbGM6 is usable as a serodiagnostic antigen for chronic T. evansi infection.

  11. Sarcocystis neurona infections in sea otter (Enhydra lutris): evidence for natural infections with sarcocysts and transmission of infection to opossums (Didelphis virginiana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dubey, J.P.; Rosypal, A.C.; Rosenthal, B.M.; Thomas, N.J.; Lindsay, D.S.; Stanek, J.F.; Reed, S.M.; Saville, W.J.A.

    2001-01-01

    Although Sarcocystis neurona has been identified in an array of terrestrial vertebrates, recent recognition of its capacity to infect marine mammals was unexpected. Here, sarcocysts from 2 naturally infected sea otters (Enhydra lutris) were characterized biologically, ultrastructurally, and genetically. DNA was extracted from frozen muscle of the first of these sea otters and was characterized as S. neurona by polymerase chain reation (PCR) amplification followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and sequencing. Sarcocysts from sea otter no. 1 were up to 350 I?m long, and the villar protrusions on the sarcocyst wall were up to 1.3 I?m long and up to 0.25 I?m wide. The villar protrusions were tapered towards the villar tip. Ultrastructurally, sarcocysts were similar to S. neurona sarcocysts from the muscles of cats experimentally infected with S. neurona sporocysts. Skeletal muscles from a second sea otter failed to support PCR amplification of markers considered diagnostic for S. neurona but did induce the shedding of sporocysts when fed to a laboratory-raised opossum (Didelphis virginiana). Such sporocysts were subsequently fed to knockout mice for the interferon-gamma gene, resulting in infections with an agent identified as S. neurona on the basis of immunohistochemistry, serum antibodies, and diagnostic sequence detection. Thus, sea otters exposed to S. neurona may support the development of mature sarcocysts that are infectious to competent definitive hosts.

  12. Effectiveness of Natural Antifungal Compounds in Controlling Infection by Grapevine Trunk Disease Pathogens through Pruning Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Cobos, Rebeca; Mateos, Rosa María; Álvarez-Pérez, José Manuel; Olego, Miguel Angel; Sevillano, Silvia; González-García, Sandra; Garzón-Jimeno, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Grapevine trunk fungal pathogens, such as Diplodia seriata and Phaeomoniella chlamydospora, can infect plants through pruning wounds. They cause grapevine trunk diseases and are involved in grapevine decline. Accordingly, the protection of pruning wounds is crucial for the management of grapevine trunk diseases. The efficacy of different natural antifungals in inhibiting the growth of several fungi causing grapevine trunk diseases was evaluated in vitro. The fungi showing greater in vitro efficacy were tested on autoclaved grape wood assays against D. seriata and P. chlamydospora. Based on results from these assays, chitosan oligosaccharide, vanillin, and garlic extract were selected for further evaluation on pruning wounds inoculated with D. seriata and P. chlamydospora in field trials. A significant decrease in plant mortality was observed after 2 years of growth in the plants treated with the different natural antifungals compared to the mortality rate observed in infected plants that were not treated with antifungals. Also, the infection rate for the inoculated pathogens was significantly reduced in plants treated with the selected natural antifungals. Therefore, natural antifungals represent a promising alternative for disease control and could provide significant economic benefits for the grape-growing industry. PMID:26162882

  13. Rickettsiaceae and Anaplasmataceae infections in Ixodes ricinus ticks from urban and natural forested areas of Poland

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ixodes ricinus is a major vector for a range of microbial pathogens and the most prevalent and widely distributed tick species on the European continent, occurring in both natural and urban habitats. Nevertheless, little is known about the relative density of ticks in these two ecologically distinct habitats and the diversity of tick-borne pathogens that they carry. Methods We compared densities of questing I. ricinus nymphs and adults in urban and natural habitats in Central and Northeastern Poland, assessed the prevalence and rate of co-infection with A. phagocytophilum, Rickettsia, Ehrlichia and ‘Ca. Neoehrlichia spp.’ in ticks, and compared the diversity of tick-borne pathogens using molecular assays (PCR). Results Of the 1325 adults and nymphs, 6.2% were infected with at least one pathogen, with 4.4%, 1.7% and less than 0.5% being positive for the DNA of Rickettsia spp., A. phagocytophilum, Ehrlichia spp. and Ca. N. mikurensis, respectively. Although tick abundance was higher in natural habitats, the prevalence of the majority of pathogens was higher in urban forested areas. Conclusion We conclude that: (i) zoonotic genetic variants of A. phagocytophilum are widely distributed in the Polish tick population, (ii) although the diversity of tick borne pathogens was higher in natural habitats, zoonotic species/strains were detected only in urban forests, (iii) and we provide the first description of Ca. N. mikurensis infections in ticks in Poland. PMID:24661311

  14. The chicken as a natural model for extraintestinal infections caused by avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC).

    PubMed

    Antão, Esther-Maria; Glodde, Susanne; Li, Ganwu; Sharifi, Reza; Homeier, Timo; Laturnus, Claudia; Diehl, Ines; Bethe, Astrid; Philipp, Hans-C; Preisinger, Rudolf; Wieler, Lothar H; Ewers, Christa

    2008-01-01

    E. coli infections in avian species have become an economic threat to the poultry industry worldwide. Several factors have been associated with the virulence of E. coli in avian hosts, but no specific virulence gene has been identified as being entirely responsible for the pathogenicity of avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC). Needless to say, the chicken would serve as the best model organism for unravelling the pathogenic mechanisms of APEC, an extraintestinal pathogen. Five-week-old white leghorn SPF chickens were infected intra-tracheally with a well characterized APEC field strain IMT5155 (O2:K1:H5) using different doses corresponding to the respective models of infection established, that is, the lung colonization model allowing re-isolation of bacteria only from the lung but not from other internal organs, and the systemic infection model. These two models represent the crucial steps in the pathogenesis of APEC infections, including the colonization of the lung epithelium and the spread of bacteria throughout the bloodstream. The read-out system includes a clinical score, pathomorphological changes and bacterial load determination. The lung colonization model has been established and described for the first time in this study, in addition to a comprehensive account of a systemic infection model which enables the study of severe extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) infections. These in vivo models enable the application of various molecular approaches to study host-pathogen interactions more closely. The most important application of such genetic manipulation techniques is the identification of genes required for extraintestinal virulence, as well as host genes involved in immunity in vivo. The knowledge obtained from these studies serves the dual purpose of shedding light on the nature of virulence itself, as well as providing a route for rational attenuation of the pathogen for vaccine construction, a measure by which extraintestinal infections, including

  15. The utility of polymerase chain reaction for diagnosis of lumpy skin disease in cattle and water buffaloes in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Sharawi, S S A; Abd El-Rahim, I H A

    2011-12-01

    An outbreak of lumpy skin disease (LSD) occurred among cattle and water buffaloes in Egypt in 2006. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the agar gel precipitation test (AGPT) were compared. Eight of ten (80%) tissue specimens from diseased cattle were positive with AGPT while 100% were positive with PCR. Of ten tissue specimens from diseased water buffaloes, 70% were positive with AGPT while 100% were positive with PCR. Ten milk samples were obtained from diseased water buffaloes; PCR detected nucleic acid of LSD virus (LSDV) in 50% while AGPT failed to detect LSDV antigen. Water buffaloes are susceptible to LSDV infection. The clinical signs of LSD were less severe in water buffaloes, but the virus was excreted in their milk. Diagnosis of LSD outbreaks by PCR will facilitate rapid application of control measures. Mass vaccination should be applied in both cattle and water buffaloes in Egypt using an effective specific vaccine against LSD, such as the attenuated Neethling strain vaccine or a recombinant vaccine.

  16. Decline in CD4+ cell numbers in cats with naturally acquired feline immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann-Fezer, G; Thum, J; Ackley, C; Herbold, M; Mysliwietz, J; Thefeld, S; Hartmann, K; Kraft, W

    1992-03-01

    T-cell subsets were studied by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis in 57 feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-seropositive cats with naturally acquired FIV infection to see whether CD4(+)-CD8+ alterations were comparable to those observed in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. CD4+ values were decreased and CD8+ values were increased. The CD4+/CD8+ ratio was reduced to 1.6, compared with 3.3 in 33 FIV-seronegative control cats. Variance analysis of data showed a significant influence of FIV seropositivity, sex, and spaying of female cats on CD4+ values. CD8+ values were significantly influenced by FIV seropositivity, age, and breed. These findings indicate a similarity between FIV and human immunodeficiency virus infections, as far as alterations of T-cell subsets are concerned. PMID:1310760

  17. First report of a naturally patent infection of Angiostrongylus costaricensis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Alfaro-Alarcón, Alejandro; Veneziano, Vincenzo; Galiero, Giorgio; Cerrone, Anna; Gutierrez, Natalia; Chinchilla, Adriana; Annoscia, Giada; Colella, Vito; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Otranto, Domenico; Santoro, Mario

    2015-09-15

    Angiostrongylus costaricensis is the zoonotic agent of abdominal angiostrongyliasis in several countries in North and South America. Rodents are recognized as the main definitive hosts of A. costaricensis, but other wildlife species can develop patent infections. Although, several human cases have been described in the literature, the role of domestic animals in the epidemiology of the infection is not clear. Here we review the literature available on A. costaricensis in mammals and describe the first confirmed fatal case of abdominal angiostrongyliasis in a 4-month-old dog, presented with intestinal perforation, peritonitis and faecal shedding of first-stage larvae. Parasite identity was confirmed by morphology, histology and molecular characterization of target genes. This is the first record of a naturally infected dog acting as a definitive host for A. costaricensis. These data suggest that dogs may potentially spread this parasite in urbanized areas.

  18. Multiple Origins of Virus Persistence during Natural Control of HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Boritz, Eli A; Darko, Samuel; Swaszek, Luke; Wolf, Gideon; Wells, David; Wu, Xiaolin; Henry, Amy R; Laboune, Farida; Hu, Jianfei; Ambrozak, David; Hughes, Marybeth S; Hoh, Rebecca; Casazza, Joseph P; Vostal, Alexander; Bunis, Daniel; Nganou-Makamdop, Krystelle; Lee, James S; Migueles, Stephen A; Koup, Richard A; Connors, Mark; Moir, Susan; Schacker, Timothy; Maldarelli, Frank; Hughes, Stephen H; Deeks, Steven G; Douek, Daniel C

    2016-08-11

    Targeted HIV cure strategies require definition of the mechanisms that maintain the virus. Here, we tracked HIV replication and the persistence of infected CD4 T cells in individuals with natural virologic control by sequencing viruses, T cell receptor genes, HIV integration sites, and cellular transcriptomes. Our results revealed three mechanisms of HIV persistence operating within distinct anatomic and functional compartments. In lymph node, we detected viruses with genetic and transcriptional attributes of active replication in both T follicular helper (TFH) cells and non-TFH memory cells. In blood, we detected inducible proviruses of archival origin among highly differentiated, clonally expanded cells. Linking the lymph node and blood was a small population of circulating cells harboring inducible proviruses of recent origin. Thus, HIV replication in lymphoid tissue, clonal expansion of infected cells, and recirculation of recently infected cells act together to maintain the virus in HIV controllers despite effective antiviral immunity. PMID:27453467

  19. Natural occurrence of gliotoxin in turkeys infected with Aspergillus fumigatus, Fresenius.

    PubMed

    Richard, J L; Dvorak, T J; Ross, P F

    1996-01-01

    Thirteen samples of infected turkey lung tissue from cases of 'airsacculitis' were collected either at the processing plant or from a local turkey farm and subjected to cultural and gliotoxin analysis. Aspergillus fumigatus was isolated from 6 of the 13 samples; all isolates were determined to be gliotoxin producers when grown in laboratory culture and assayed by HPLC procedures. Gliotoxin was isolated from 5 of the 13 tissue but was not isolated from all tissues that were infected with A. fumigatus. Gliotoxin was isolated from which no A. fumigatus was isolated and it was not detected in three tissues from which gliotoxin-producing isolates of A. fumigatus were obtained. The ability of this pathogenic fungs to produce this immunomodulating compound in naturally infected turkeys provides further evidence that gliotoxin may be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease, aspergillosis of turkeys. PMID:8981782

  20. Type I interferon regulation of natural killer cell function in primary and secondary infections.

    PubMed

    Stackaruk, Michele L; Lee, Amanda J; Ashkar, Ali A

    2013-08-01

    The priming of natural killer (NK) cells by type I interferon (IFN) is necessary for protection against primary and secondary viral infections. However, the pathway by which type I IFN activates NK cells to elicit antiviral responses is controversial. There is evidence to suggest that type I IFN priming of NK cells occurs through both direct and indirect pathways. As with many innate mechanisms, type I IFN and NK cells also orchestrate the adaptive immune response and thus aid in protection against secondary infections. Type I IFN can shape CD4(+) T cell, B cell and humoral memory formation. In addition, long-lived NK cells can perform specific and enhanced memory-like protection in secondary infections. This review outlines the different mechanisms underlying type I IFN regulation of NK cells and how type I IFN and NK cells can be used as a therapeutic target in vaccinations.

  1. First report of a naturally patent infection of Angiostrongylus costaricensis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Alfaro-Alarcón, Alejandro; Veneziano, Vincenzo; Galiero, Giorgio; Cerrone, Anna; Gutierrez, Natalia; Chinchilla, Adriana; Annoscia, Giada; Colella, Vito; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Otranto, Domenico; Santoro, Mario

    2015-09-15

    Angiostrongylus costaricensis is the zoonotic agent of abdominal angiostrongyliasis in several countries in North and South America. Rodents are recognized as the main definitive hosts of A. costaricensis, but other wildlife species can develop patent infections. Although, several human cases have been described in the literature, the role of domestic animals in the epidemiology of the infection is not clear. Here we review the literature available on A. costaricensis in mammals and describe the first confirmed fatal case of abdominal angiostrongyliasis in a 4-month-old dog, presented with intestinal perforation, peritonitis and faecal shedding of first-stage larvae. Parasite identity was confirmed by morphology, histology and molecular characterization of target genes. This is the first record of a naturally infected dog acting as a definitive host for A. costaricensis. These data suggest that dogs may potentially spread this parasite in urbanized areas. PMID:26321134

  2. How does the humoral response to HIV-2 infection differ from HIV-1 and can this explain the distinct natural history of infection with these two human retroviruses?

    PubMed

    Makvandi-Nejad, Shokouh; Rowland-Jones, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    A substantial proportion of people infected with HIV-2, the second causative agent of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), behave as long-term non-progressors (LTNP) and are able to control the infection more effectively than most HIV-1-infected patients. A better understanding of the differences in the natural history of HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection, and how these relate to the relative immunogenicity and evolution of the two virus strains, could provide important insights into the mechanisms of protective immunity in HIV infection. One of the most striking differences is that most people infected with HIV-2 generate high titers of broadly neutralizing antibodies, whereas this is relatively uncommon in HIV-1 infection. In this review we compare the underlying structural differences of the envelope (Env) between HIV-1 and HIV-2, and examine how these might affect the antibody responses as well as their impact on Env evolution and control of viral replication.

  3. Serum concentrations of eicosanoids and lipids in dogs naturally infected with Babesia canis.

    PubMed

    Mrljak, Vladimir; Kučer, Nada; Kuleš, Josipa; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Brkljačić, Mirna; Crnogaj, Martina; Zivičnjak, Tatjana; Smit, Iva; Ceron, Jose Joaquin; Rafaj, Renata Barić

    2014-03-17

    Canine babesiosis is a tick-borne disease with world-wide significance caused by intraerythrocytic protozoa of the genus Babesia. The eicosanoids, as inflammatory mediators, are involved in the regulation of the immune response and inflammatory reaction. Metabolism of lipids is of great importance in babesiosis. In this study it was aimed to investigate the dynamics of serum concentration of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), thromboxane B2 (TxB2), leukotriene B4 (LTB4), triglycerides, total cholesterol (Chol), HDL- and LDL-cholesterol in dogs naturally infected with Babesia canis and healthy dogs. Both groups were measured for all parameters on the admission day and on the first, second and seventh day of the disease. Dogs that were included in this study had systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). It was demonstrated that the level of LTB4, PGE2, TxB2 in dogs naturally infected with B. canis significantly changed during the disease. The level of LTB4 was significantly higher during the study, while the concentration of PGE2 was significantly higher second, third and seventh day of disease in relation with healthy dogs. The level of TxB2 was significantly lower at the beginning of the disease, but after seven days concentration was significantly higher. Both group of patients with SIRS and MODS had significantly higher level of LTB4. Substained high concentrations of PGE2 were observed in dogs with MODS after therapy but not in dogs with SIRS, and LTB4 followed a similar tendency. On the other hand, increases in TxB2 were only significant in dogs with SIRS. The lipid profile in naturally infected dogs with B. canis infection was significantly changed. Further studies are needed to assess the prognostic values of lipid mediators in dogs with B. canis infection, and the ability of these markers to predict the progress of SIRS and MODS.

  4. NTPDase and 5'-nucleotidase as inflammatory markers in cattle naturally infected by Eurytrema coelomaticum.

    PubMed

    Fávero, Juscivete F; Schwertz, Claiton I; Doleski, Pedro H; Leal, Daniela B R; Machado, Gustavo; Manzoni, Alessandra G; da Silva, Ester S; Gabriel, Mateus E; Stedille, Fernanda A; Christ, Ricardo; Stefani, Lenita M; Mendes, Ricardo E; da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate seric NTPDase and 5'nucleotidase activities of cattle naturally infected by Eurytrema coelomanticum, as well as to correlate them to histopathological lesions in the pancreas and the degree of parasitism. Blood samples and pancreas of 51 bovines were collected on a slaughterhouse in Southern Brazil: 33 from cattle naturally infected by E. coelomanticum (the Group A), and 18 from uninfected animals (the Group B). Infected animals showed an average of 532 parasites per pancreas. In the pancreatic histology, ducts displayed hyperplasia, stenosis, proliferation of fibrous tissue, and interstitial inflammatory infiltration of lymphocytes. The serum from infected animals showed an increase in NTPDase activity when ATP was used as substrate (P<0.001). For the ADP substrate, there was no difference between groups regarding NTPDase activity (P=0.37), as well as 5'-nucleotidase activity (P=0.27). Correlating NTPDase activity (ATP substrate) with the degree of histopathological lesions (rho=0.66, P<0.001) and the parasitic load on the pancreas (rho=0.65, P<0.001), a positive correlation was observed. Similar results were found between the degree of histopathological lesions and NTPDase activity (ADP substrate; rho=0.29, P=0.03), and 5'nucleotidase activity (rho=0.35, P=0.01). Based on the results of NTPDase and 5'nucleotidase enzymes in cattle naturally infected by E. coleomanticum, it is possible to suggest that these enzymes are involved in the modulation of inflammation, and they can act as markers of inflammatory response. PMID:27638119

  5. Evidence of Fasciola spp. resistance to albendazole, triclabendazole and bromofenofos in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Venturina, Virginia M; Alejandro, Ma Antonette F; Baltazar, Cyril P; Abes, Nancy S; Mingala, Claro N

    2015-01-01

    Fasciolosis caused by Fasciola spp. is considered the most important helminth infection of ruminants in tropical countries. Anthelmintic resistance has become a global concern. This study compared the efficacy of the commonly used anthelmintics, determined the toxicity level and any indication of resistance. Thirty two water buffaloes naturally-infected with Fasciola spp. were used to determine the efficacy of triclabendazole (TBZ), albendazole (ABZ), and bromofenofos (BRO) using Fecal Egg Count Reduction Test (FECRT). To test the toxicity of the drugs given, serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (SGPT) was evaluated before and within one week after treatment. One dose administration of ABZ registered an efficacy of 79.17%, 73.33% for TBZ and 70.83% for BRO. Efficacy in two dose- treatment group was 83.33% for both BRO and ABZ, and 90.00% for TBZ. Two dose-treatment was effective for TBZ (90%), ineffective for BRO and ABZ. SGPT levels were not significantly different between pre-treatment and post- treatment across all treatments. Giving one or two doses of anthelmintics, at one month interval, does not increase the efficacy of the three drugs tested. The study also implies that anthelmintic resistance may have developed in the animals.

  6. Evidence of Fasciola spp. resistance to albendazole, triclabendazole and bromofenofos in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Venturina, Virginia M; Alejandro, Ma Antonette F; Baltazar, Cyril P; Abes, Nancy S; Mingala, Claro N

    2015-01-01

    Fasciolosis caused by Fasciola spp. is considered the most important helminth infection of ruminants in tropical countries. Anthelmintic resistance has become a global concern. This study compared the efficacy of the commonly used anthelmintics, determined the toxicity level and any indication of resistance. Thirty two water buffaloes naturally-infected with Fasciola spp. were used to determine the efficacy of triclabendazole (TBZ), albendazole (ABZ), and bromofenofos (BRO) using Fecal Egg Count Reduction Test (FECRT). To test the toxicity of the drugs given, serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (SGPT) was evaluated before and within one week after treatment. One dose administration of ABZ registered an efficacy of 79.17%, 73.33% for TBZ and 70.83% for BRO. Efficacy in two dose- treatment group was 83.33% for both BRO and ABZ, and 90.00% for TBZ. Two dose-treatment was effective for TBZ (90%), ineffective for BRO and ABZ. SGPT levels were not significantly different between pre-treatment and post- treatment across all treatments. Giving one or two doses of anthelmintics, at one month interval, does not increase the efficacy of the three drugs tested. The study also implies that anthelmintic resistance may have developed in the animals. PMID:26878627

  7. Serum DHEA-S increases in dogs naturally infected with Ehrlichia canis.

    PubMed

    Rondelli, M C H; Munhoz, T D; Catandi, P B; Freschi, C R; Palacios Junior, R J G; Machado, R Z; Tinucci-Costa, M

    2015-06-01

    Adrenocortical disturbances are expected in canine ehrlichiosis due to the immunological challenges caused by infection and consequent inflammation. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the occurrence of adrenocortical hormonal alterations in dogs naturally infected with Ehrlichia canis (n = 21) as positively confirmed by the presence of anti-E. canis antibodies (Dot-ELISA) and nested PCR (nPCR). Serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) concentrations were assessed via ELISA before and one hour after ACTH stimulation. Another 10 healthy dogs were subjected to the same stimulation protocol and used as controls. The results revealed that baseline and post-ACTH DHEA-S concentrations were significantly greater in sick dogs, regardless of gender, and this finding illustrates the stress induced by naturally acquired ehrlichiosis in dogs. PMID:25956636

  8. Curcumin and its analogues: a potential natural compound against HIV infection and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Tyagi, Amit K

    2015-11-01

    No safe and effective cure currently exists for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, antiretroviral therapy can prolong the lives of HIV patients and lowers the secondary infections. Natural compounds, which are considered to be pleiotropic molecules, could be useful against HIV. Curcumin, a yellow pigment present in the spice turmeric (Curcuma longa), can be used for the treatment of several diseases including HIV-AIDS because of its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antiviral, and antibacterial nature. In this review we have summarized that how curcumin and its analogues inhibit the infection and replication of viral genes and prevent multiplicity of HIV. They are inhibitors of HIV protease and integrase. Curcumin also inhibits Tat transactivation of the HIV1-LTR genome, inflammatory molecules (interleukins, TNF-α, NF-κB, COX-2) and HIV associated various kinases including tyrosine kinase, PAK1, MAPK, PKC, cdk and others. In addition, curcumin enhances the effect of conventional therapeutic drugs and minimizes their side effects.

  9. Field assessment of recombinant Schistosoma japonicum 26 kDa glutathione S-transferase in Chinese water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    He, Y K; Liu, S X; Zhang, X Y; Song, G C; Luo, X S; Li, Y S; Xu, Y X; Yu, X L; Li, Y; Hou, X Y; McManus, D P

    2003-09-01

    We have shown previously that anti-fecundity immunity can be induced experimentally against recombinant 26 kDa glutathione S-transferase (reSjc26GST) in Chinese water buffaloes (Bos buffelus), important reservoir hosts for Schistosoma japonicum in China. In the field study described here, we immunized buffaloes with reSjc26GST to induce protective immunity against S. japonicum and to evaluate its effectiveness in controlling schistosomiasis japonica. We selected two villages as test and control groups in inside-embankment areas endemic for schistosomiasis japonica. The buffaloes in the test village were vaccinated with reSjc26GST, whereas those in the control village were not. The indicators of the effect of the vaccine included the generation of specific IgG antibodies in the vaccinated buffaloes, changes in the prevalence and infection intensity in buffaloes and village children, changes in the density of infected snails, and changes in the infectivity of water bodies (assessed by sentinel mice) in transmission areas adjacent to both villages. Twenty months after vaccination, the infection rate of buffaloes in the test village was decreased by 60.4% (from an initial prevalence of 13.5% to 5.4%), and 67.9% when compared with that in the control village (initial prevalence of 16.7%). However, the infection rate in village children remained unchanged. The density of infected snails decreased by 71.4%, from 0.0049/0.11 m2 to 0.0014/0.11m2 in the high transmission area outside the embankment in the test village. There was no change in the infectivity of the water body transmission areas between the test and control villages. The levels of specific antibodies to reSjc26GST showed a continuous increase after vaccination. These results indicate that protective immunity was induced and maintained in buffaloes after vaccination with reSjc26GST. The vaccine could thus play a significant role in reducing S. japonicum transmission caused by water buffaloes in the Lake region

  10. Molecular update on cystic echinococcosis in cattle and water buffaloes of southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, L; Maurelli, M P; Capuano, F; Perugini, A G; Veneziano, V; Cringoli, S

    2008-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE)--caused by the larval stage (hydatid cyst) of the cestode Echinococcus granulosus--is one of the most widespread zoonoses of veterinary and medical importance. Molecular techniques have allowed the identification of 10 different genotypes (G1-G10) of the parasite. The present paper is an update regarding the E. granulosus genotypes infecting water buffaloes and cattle bred in the Campania region of southern Italy. The molecular study was performed on 30 hydatid cysts (11 from water buffaloes and 19 from cattle). Two different mitochondrial DNA genes, namely the cytochrome c oxidase subunits 1 and the 12S ribosomal DNA (12S rDNA) were used as genetic markers. Three different genotypes of E. granulosus were unequivocally identified, i.e. the G1 (common sheep), G2 (Tasmanian sheep) and G3 (buffalo) genotypes, as well as some G1 and G2 variants. It should be noted that the present study demonstrated for the first time: (i) the presence of the G2 genotype in water buffaloes from a Mediterranean area; and (ii) the fact that the analysed portion of the 12S rDNA gene can not discriminate between the G2 and G3 genotypes of E. granulosus. The finding of the G1, G2 and G3 genotypes in large ruminants from southern Italy is of epidemiological relevance and immediate public health importance because of their recognized infectivity in humans. PMID:18234031

  11. Molecular update on cystic echinococcosis in cattle and water buffaloes of southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, L; Maurelli, M P; Capuano, F; Perugini, A G; Veneziano, V; Cringoli, S

    2008-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE)--caused by the larval stage (hydatid cyst) of the cestode Echinococcus granulosus--is one of the most widespread zoonoses of veterinary and medical importance. Molecular techniques have allowed the identification of 10 different genotypes (G1-G10) of the parasite. The present paper is an update regarding the E. granulosus genotypes infecting water buffaloes and cattle bred in the Campania region of southern Italy. The molecular study was performed on 30 hydatid cysts (11 from water buffaloes and 19 from cattle). Two different mitochondrial DNA genes, namely the cytochrome c oxidase subunits 1 and the 12S ribosomal DNA (12S rDNA) were used as genetic markers. Three different genotypes of E. granulosus were unequivocally identified, i.e. the G1 (common sheep), G2 (Tasmanian sheep) and G3 (buffalo) genotypes, as well as some G1 and G2 variants. It should be noted that the present study demonstrated for the first time: (i) the presence of the G2 genotype in water buffaloes from a Mediterranean area; and (ii) the fact that the analysed portion of the 12S rDNA gene can not discriminate between the G2 and G3 genotypes of E. granulosus. The finding of the G1, G2 and G3 genotypes in large ruminants from southern Italy is of epidemiological relevance and immediate public health importance because of their recognized infectivity in humans.

  12. Streptococcal infection of endocardial and other intravascular vegetations in rabbits: natural history and effect of dexamethasone.

    PubMed Central

    Francioli, P B; Freedman, L R

    1979-01-01

    Experiments were designed to study the natural history of infection in different parts of the vascular system. Sterile vegetations were produced in rabbits by placing catheters in the inferior vena cava, tricuspid or aortic valves, and thoracic or abdominal aorta and then were infected by the intravenous inoculation of Streptococcus sanguis. At 1 day after bacterial challenge, all VEGS were infected, mean bacterial densities being highest in the VEGS of the aortic and tricuspid valves. By 14 days, there was a significant decrease in the mean bacterial density in all VEGS except for the aortic valve: the VEGS of the inferior vena cava and abdominal aorta were sterile, as were half of those of the thoracic aorta. There were no deaths except for animals with aortic valve infection. Dexamethasone inhibited the sterilization of the thoracic aorta VEGS, but was without effect on aortic valve VEGS, 5 mm distant. Sterilization of tricuspid valve VEGS after catheter removal was also inhibited by dexamethasone. Thus, there are host defense mechanisms which lead to the sterilization of infections everywhere in the vascular system except in the left side of the heart, and these mechanisms, as yet undefined, are inhibited by dexamethasone. Images PMID:457283

  13. Iron metabolism and oxidative profile of dogs naturally infected by Ehrlichia canis: Acute and subclinical disease.

    PubMed

    Bottari, Nathieli B; Crivellenti, Leandro Z; Borin-Crivellenti, Sofia; Oliveira, Jéssica R; Coelho, Stefanie B; Contin, Catarina M; Tatsch, Etiane; Moresco, Rafael N; Santana, Aureo E; Tonin, Alexandre A; Tinucci-Costa, Mirela; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the oxidant profile and iron metabolism in serum of dogs infected by Ehrlichia canis. Banked sera samples of dogs were divided into two groups: negative control (n = 17) and infected by E. canis on acute (n = 24), and subclinical (n = 18) phases of the disease. The eritrogram, leucogram, and platelet counts were evaluate as well as iron, ferritin, and transferrin levels, latent iron binding capacity (LIBC), and transferrin saturation index (TSI) concentration. In addition, the advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) in sera were also analyzed. Blood samples were examined for the presence of E. canis by PCR techniques. History and clinical signals were recorded for each dog. During the acute phase of the disease, infected animals showed thrombocytopenia and anemia when compared to healthy animals (P < 0.05) as a consequence of lower iron levels. Ferritin and transferrin levels were higher in both phases (acute and subclinical) of the disease. The AOPP and FRAP levels increased in infected animals on the acute phase; however, the opposite occurred in the subclinical phase. We concluded that dogs naturally infected by E. canis showed changes in the iron metabolism and developed an oxidant status in consequence of disease pathophysiology. PMID:26724737

  14. Serum antibody as a marker of protection against natural rotavirus infection and disease.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, F R; Matson, D O; Guerrero, M L; Shults, J; Calva, J J; Morrow, A L; Glass, R I; Pickering, L K; Ruiz-Palacios, G M

    2000-12-01

    To determine whether naturally acquired serum IgA and IgG antibodies were associated with protection against rotavirus infection and illness, a cohort of 200 Mexican infants was monitored weekly for rotavirus excretion and diarrhea from birth to age 2 years. Serum samples collected during the first week after birth and every 4 months were tested for anti-rotavirus IgA and IgG. Children with an IgA titer >1:800 had a lower risk of rotavirus infection (adjusted relative risk [aRR], 0.21; P<.001) and diarrhea (aRR, 0. 16; P=.01) and were protected completely against moderate-to-severe diarrhea. However, children with an IgG titer >1:6400 were protected against rotavirus infection (aRR, 0.51; P<.001) but not against rotavirus diarrhea. Protective antibody titers were achieved after 2 consecutive symptomatic or asymptomatic rotavirus infections. These findings indicate that serum anti-rotavirus antibody, especially IgA, was a marker of protection against rotavirus infection and moderate-to-severe diarrhea.

  15. Hepatic extracellular matrix alterations in dogs naturally infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Ferdinan Almeida; Moura, Eliane Perlatto; Ribeiro, Raul Rio; Alves, Cíntia Fontes; Caliari, Marcelo Vidigal; Tafuri, Washington Luiz; da Silva Calabrese, Kátia; Tafuri, Wagner Luiz

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study alterations in the extracellular matrix of liver in dogs naturally infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi that are correlated with clinical aspects and with histological, parasitological and immunological findings. The study was carried out on 30 dogs, 10 uninfected (control group) and 20 infected. The infected animals were further divided into two groups: an asymptomatic group of 10 dogs without clinical signs of the disease; and a symptomatic group of 10 dogs with classical clinical signs. All thirty animals were mongrel dogs of undefined age, obtained from the municipality of Belo Horizonte, MG, metropolitan area. During necropsy, liver fragments were collected and fixed in 10% buffered formaldehyde for histological examination. Paraffined sections of the tissues were stained with haematoxylin–eosin, Gomori’s ammoniacal silver stain for reticular fibres and strepto-avidin peroxidase for immunohistochemical detection of Leishmania amastigotes. Frozen tissue sections were stained by immunofluorescence for fibronectin (FN) and laminin (LN). Liver collagen deposition was significantly greater in the infected than the control animals and differed significantly between the symptomatic and asymptomatic dogs. There was a positive correlation between the parasite load and liver collagen deposition. The increased collagen deposition in infected animal livers may be associated with the parasite burden. Adhesive FN and LN fibres were significantly more highly expressed in the livers of symptomatic than of asymptomatic dogs. Our results demonstrate that canine visceral leishmaniasis causes fibrogenesis in liver, associated with the parasite load and degenerative processes. PMID:19765108

  16. Activated natural killer cells accelerate liver damage in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Q; Zhu, Y Y; Chen, J; Ye, Y B; Li, J Y; Liu, Y R; Hu, M L; Zheng, Y C; Jiang, J J

    2015-06-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that natural killer (NK) cells may contribute to liver injury in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Because HBV infection progresses through various disease phases, the cytolytic profiles of peripheral and intrahepatic NK cells in HBV-infected patients remain to be defined. In this study, we comprehensively characterized intrahepatic and peripheral NK cells in a cohort of HBV-infected individuals, and investigated their impact on liver pathogenesis during chronic HBV infection. The study population included 34 immune-clearance (IC) patients, 36 immune-tolerant (IT) carriers and 10 healthy subjects. We found that the activity of peripheral NK cells from IC patients was functionally elevated compared to IT carriers and controls, and NK cell activation was indicated by an increased expression of CD69, CD107a, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Further analysis showed that the increased activity of both peripheral and hepatic NK cells was correlated positively with liver injury, which was assessed by serum alanine aminotransferase levels (ALT) and the liver histological activity index (HAI). Interestingly, the frequency of peripheral NK cells was reduced in IC patients (especially those with higher HAI scores of 3-4), but there was a concomitant increase in hepatic NK cells. The functionally activated NK cells are enriched preferentially in the livers of IC patients and skew towards cytolytic activity that accelerates liver injury in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients.

  17. Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in naturally-infected dogs and cats using serological, parasitological and molecular methods

    PubMed Central

    Enriquez, G.F.; Cardinal, M.V.; Orozco, M.M.; Schijman, A.G.; Gürtler, R.E.

    2013-01-01

    Domestic dogs and cats are major domestic reservoir hosts of Trypanosoma cruzi and a risk factor for parasite transmission. In this study we assessed the relative performance of a polymerase chain reaction assay targeted to minicircle DNA (kDNA-PCR) in reference to conventional serological tests, a rapid dipstick test and xenodiagnosis to detect T. cruzi infection in dogs and cats from an endemic rural area in northeastern Argentina. A total of 43 dogs and 13 cats seropositive for T. cruzi by an immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and an indirect hemagglutination assay (IHA), which had been examined by xenodiagnosis, were also tested by kDNA-PCR. kDNA-PCR was nearly as sensitive as xenodiagnosis for detecting T. cruzi- infectious dogs and cats. kDNA-PCR was slightly more sensitive than xenodiagnosis in seropositive dogs (91% versus 86%, respectively) and cats (77% against 54%, respectively), but failed to detect all of the seropositive individuals. ELISA and IHA detected all xenodiagnosis-positive dogs and both outcomes largely agreed (kappa coefficient, κ = 0.92), whereas both assays failed to detect all of the xenodiagnosis-positive cats and their agreement was moderate (κ = 0.68). In dogs, the sensitivity of the dipstick test was 95% and agreed closely with the outcome of conventional serological tests (κ = 0.82). The high sensitivity of kDNA-PCR to detect T. cruzi infections in naturally-infected dogs and cats supports its application as a diagnostic tool complementary to serology and may replace the use of xenodiagnosis or hemoculture. PMID:23499860

  18. Innate immune control of EBV-infected B cells by invariant natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Brian K; Tsai, Kevin; Allan, Lenka L; Zheng, Dong Jun; Nie, Johnny C; Biggs, Catherine M; Hasan, Mohammad R; Kozak, Frederick K; van den Elzen, Peter; Priatel, John J; Tan, Rusung

    2013-10-10

    Individuals with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease lack invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and are exquisitely susceptible to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. To determine whether iNKT cells recognize or regulate EBV, resting B cells were infected with EBV in the presence or absence of iNKT cells. The depletion of iNKT cells increased both viral titers and the frequency of EBV-infected B cells. However, EBV-infected B cells rapidly lost expression of the iNKT cell receptor ligand CD1d, abrogating iNKT cell recognition. To determine whether induced CD1d expression could restore iNKT recognition in EBV-infected cells, lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) were treated with AM580, a synthetic retinoic acid receptor-α agonist that upregulates CD1d expression via the nuclear protein, lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF-1). AM580 significantly reduced LEF-1 association at the CD1d promoter region, induced CD1d expression on LCL, and restored iNKT recognition of LCL. CD1d-expressing LCL elicited interferon γ secretion and cytotoxicity by iNKT cells even in the absence of exogenous antigen, suggesting an endogenous iNKT antigen is expressed during EBV infection. These data indicate that iNKT cells may be important for early, innate control of B cell infection by EBV and that downregulation of CD1d may allow EBV to circumvent iNKT cell-mediated immune recognition.

  19. Seroprevalence of Neospora caninum in female water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) from the southeastern region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fujii, T U; Kasai, N; Nishi, S M; Dubey, J P; Gennari, S M

    2001-08-31

    Antibodies to Neospora caninum were assayed in sera of 222 female water buffaloes from Ribeira Valley of São Paulo State, Brazil, using an indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) and Neospora agglutination test (NAT). IFAT antibodies were found in 64% of buffaloes with titers of 1:25 (42 buffaloes), 1:50 (53 buffaloes), 1:100 (31 buffaloes), 1:200 (10 buffaloes), 1:400 (3 buffaloes), or > or =1:800 (3 buffaloes). NAT antibodies were found in 53% of buffaloes; in titers of 1:40 in 52 buffaloes, 1:80 in 27 buffaloes, 1:160 in 21 buffaloes, and > or =1:320 in 17 buffaloes. Results indicate a high prevalence of N. caninum exposure in water buffaloes in Brazil and warrant an investigation of the role of N. caninum as an abortifacient in water buffaloes.

  20. Fasciola hepatica from naturally infected sheep and cattle in Great Britain are diploid.

    PubMed

    Beesley, N J; Cwiklinski, K; Williams, D J L; Hodgkinson, J

    2015-08-01

    Diploid (2n = 2x = 20) and triploid (2n = 3x = 30) Fasciola hepatica have been reported in the UK, and in Asia diploid, triploid and mixoploid (2x/3x) Fasciola spp. exist but there is little information to indicate how common triploidy is, particularly in UK fluke. Here the ploidy of 565 adult F. hepatica from 66 naturally infected British sheep and 150 adult F. hepatica from 35 naturally infected British cattle was determined. All 715 of these parasites were diploid, based on observation of 10 bivalent chromosomes and sperm (n = 335) or, since triploids are aspermic, sperm alone (n = 380). This constitutes the first extensive analysis of the ploidy of F. hepatica field isolates from Great Britain and shows that most F. hepatica isolated from cattle and sheep are diploid and have the capacity to sexually reproduce. These data suggest that triploidy, and by extension parthenogenesis, is rare or non-existent in wild British F. hepatica populations. Given that F. hepatica is the only species of Fasciola present in Britain our results indicate that the parasite is predominantly diploid in areas where F. hepatica exists in isolation and suggests that triploidy may only originate in natural populations where co-infection of F. hepatica and its sister species Fasciola gigantica commonly occurs.

  1. Recent advances in natural product-based anti-biofilm approaches to control infections.

    PubMed

    Buommino, Elisabetta; Scognamiglio, Monica; Donnarumma, Giovanna; Fiorentino, Antonio; D'Abrosca, Brigida

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are highly organized surface-associated communities of bacteria encased within an extracellular matrix produced by themselves, capable of growing in connection with different biological or inert surfaces such as artificial joints or catheters. Biofilms are commonly associated with many health problems, such as endocarditis, otitis media, periodontitis, prostatitis, and urinary tract infections. Several bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or fungal pathogen as Candida albicans, can form biofilms in the body tissues, leading to different infections. The inherently defensive character of the biofilm is demonstrated by enhanced persistence of bacteria grown in the sessile mode respect to bacteria grown planktonically. This makes most biofilm- associated infections difficult to eradicate, thus contributing to disease chronicity. Since natural products provide a diverse array of chemical structures and possess a wide variety of biological properties, natural resources are worldwide exploited in the search of new pharmaceuticals. In this context bioactive secondary metabolites from natural sources, useful for the new antimicrobial and anti-biofilm drugs, are of interest. In this review, the role of small molecules from plants and marine organisms in inhibiting and/or dispersing bacterial biofilms is discussed, as well as the approaches that have been applied to the discovery of lead small molecules that mediate biofilm development. Molecules inhibiting the formation of biofilm may have therapeutic potential. Several candidates, as halogenated furanones, 2-amminoimidazole alkaloids and flavonoids have been already isolated and characterized from many plants and from marine organisms. PMID:25553429

  2. Leishmania infection and neuroinflammation: Specific chemokine profile and absence of parasites in the brain of naturally-infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Melo, Guilherme D; Silva, José Eduardo S; Grano, Fernanda G; Souza, Milena S; Machado, Gisele F

    2015-12-15

    Visceral leishmaniasis is a chronic disease caused by Leishmania infantum. We aimed to detect the parasite in the brain of fifteen naturally-infected dogs using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, and the gene expression of selected chemokines by RT-qPCR. We detected no parasite in the brain, but perivascular deposition of parasite DNA and IgG in the choroid plexus. We noticed up-regulation of CCL-3, CCL-4 and CCL-5, coherent with T lymphocyte accumulation, stating the brain as a pro-inflammatory environment. Indeed, not necessarily the parasite itself, but rather its DNA seems to act as a trigger to promote brain inflammation during visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:26616868

  3. The African buffalo: a villain for inter-species spread of infectious diseases in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Michel, Anita L; Bengis, Roy G

    2012-01-01

    The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is a large wild bovid which until recently ranged across all but the driest parts of sub-Saharan Africa, and their local range being limited to about 20 km from surface water. They are of high ecological value due to their important role as bulk feeders in the grazing hierarchy. They also have high economic value, because they are one of the sought after 'Big Five' in the eco-tourism industry. In Africa, buffaloes have been recognised for some time as an important role player in the maintenance and transmission of a variety of economically important livestock diseases at the wildlife and/or livestock interface. These include African strains of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), Corridor disease (theileriosis), bovine tuberculosis and bovine brucellosis. For a number of other diseases of veterinary importance, African buffaloes may also serve as amplifier or incidental host, whereby infection with the causative pathogens may cause severe clinical signs such as death or abortion as in the case of anthrax and Rift Valley fever, or remain mild or subclinical for example heartwater. The long term health implications of most of those infections on the buffalo at a population level is usually limited, and they do not pose a threat on the population's survival. Because of their ability to harbour and transmit important diseases to livestock, their sustainable future in ecotourism, trade and transfrontier conservation projects become complex and costly and reliable diagnostic tools are required to monitor these infections in buffalo populations. PMID:23327373

  4. 33 CFR 117.773 - Buffalo River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Sundays, and on New Year's Day, Memorial Day, Fourth of July, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York § 117.773 Buffalo River. (a) The draw of...

  5. 33 CFR 117.773 - Buffalo River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Sundays, and on New Year's Day, Memorial Day, Fourth of July, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York § 117.773 Buffalo River. (a) The draw of...

  6. Prevalence and first molecular identification of Sarcocystis species in cattle and water buffaloes in India.

    PubMed

    Daptardar, Monal; Singh, Balbir Bagicha; Aulakh, Rabinder Singh; Gill, Jatinder Paul Singh

    2016-09-01

    The importance of Sarcocystis hominis in causing zoonotic infections is well known. Recently, S. hominis like cysts have been reported from water buffalo in China. Previous studies indicate prevalence of Sarcocystis species in bovine populations in India but molecular evidence is required for proper species differentiation. We examined two hundred and ninety six cardiac tissue samples of Indian water buffaloes and cattle from northern and western parts of the country. Tissues were examined for Sarcocystis using intact cyst isolation method, pepsin acid digestion method and Sarcocystis 18S rRNA PCR. The combination of primers was used for 18S rRNA PCR amplification followed by sequencing. Twenty five representative samples were sent for sequencing and 19 readable sequences were obtained for phylogenetic analysis. Overall, the Sarcocystis cysts/zoites were recorded in 44% (95% CI 38-49%), 58% (95% CI 53-64%) and 68% (95% CI 63-73%) from both cattle and buffalo samples using intact cyst isolation, pepsin-HCl digestion method and conventional PCR, respectively. The results indicate that pepsin-HCl digestion method and conventional PCR are more sensitive than intact cyst isolation for detection of Sarcocystis species in tissue samples. The prevalence of Sarcocystis species was high in buffalo as compared to cattle intermediate hosts. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that more than one Sarcocystis species are circulating in cattle and water buffaloes in India. The results further indicate that experimental transmission studies are required to re-confirm the identities and host ranges of the Sarcocystis species in cattle and water buffaloes in India.

  7. Prevalence and first molecular identification of Sarcocystis species in cattle and water buffaloes in India.

    PubMed

    Daptardar, Monal; Singh, Balbir Bagicha; Aulakh, Rabinder Singh; Gill, Jatinder Paul Singh

    2016-09-01

    The importance of Sarcocystis hominis in causing zoonotic infections is well known. Recently, S. hominis like cysts have been reported from water buffalo in China. Previous studies indicate prevalence of Sarcocystis species in bovine populations in India but molecular evidence is required for proper species differentiation. We examined two hundred and ninety six cardiac tissue samples of Indian water buffaloes and cattle from northern and western parts of the country. Tissues were examined for Sarcocystis using intact cyst isolation method, pepsin acid digestion method and Sarcocystis 18S rRNA PCR. The combination of primers was used for 18S rRNA PCR amplification followed by sequencing. Twenty five representative samples were sent for sequencing and 19 readable sequences were obtained for phylogenetic analysis. Overall, the Sarcocystis cysts/zoites were recorded in 44% (95% CI 38-49%), 58% (95% CI 53-64%) and 68% (95% CI 63-73%) from both cattle and buffalo samples using intact cyst isolation, pepsin-HCl digestion method and conventional PCR, respectively. The results indicate that pepsin-HCl digestion method and conventional PCR are more sensitive than intact cyst isolation for detection of Sarcocystis species in tissue samples. The prevalence of Sarcocystis species was high in buffalo as compared to cattle intermediate hosts. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that more than one Sarcocystis species are circulating in cattle and water buffaloes in India. The results further indicate that experimental transmission studies are required to re-confirm the identities and host ranges of the Sarcocystis species in cattle and water buffaloes in India. PMID:27447215

  8. Aeromonas sobria in bubaline (water buffalo) abortion: growth requirement, biochemical characters, antibiotic susceptibility, experimental pathogenicity and serology.

    PubMed

    Das, A M; Paranjape, V L

    1990-04-01

    A. sobria was isolated unexpectedly on Campylobacter selective medium from abortion specimens of 16 buffaloes. All strains (AS1-AS16) required Campylobacter growth supplement (sodium pyruvate, sodium metabisulphate and ferrous sulphate) and 10% C02 atmosphere on primary isolation. They were unusually sensitive to bile salt and failed to grow on MacConkey's agar. Biochemically, these strains were homogeneous but antibiogram profile and physiological/other characters revealed a moderate heterogeneity. In vitro antibiotic sensitivity pattern showed a number of antibiotics effective whereas only a few (penicillin and co-trimoxazole) ineffective against these strains. It took 9 days for 3 x 10(8) A. sobria organisms/ml in 5 ml quantity to terminate the pregnancy in an experimentally infected buffalo via iv route. Foetal and placental lesions were classical as that of field cases. The infection evoked serum antibody response. Apparently disease-free buffalo sera were devoid of such antibodies.

  9. Infections of neonatal and adult mice with murine CMV HaNa1 strain upon oronasal inoculation: New insights in the pathogenesis of natural primary CMV infections.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jun; Zhang, Shunchuan; Nauwynck, Hans

    2016-01-01

    In healthy individuals, naturally acquired infections of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) are generally asymptomatic. Animal models mimicking the natural primary HCMV infections in infants and adults are scarce. Here, neonatal and adult BALB/c mice were inoculated oronasally with a Belgian isolate HaNa1 of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). None of the mice showed clinical symptoms. In neonatal mice, a typical systemic infection occurred. In adult mice, viral replication was restricted to the nasal mucosa and submandibular glands. Infectious virus was not detected in trachea, oral mucosa, pharynx, esophagus, small intestines of both neonatal and adult mice at all time points. Nose was demonstrated to be the entry site. Double immunofluorescence staining showed that in nose infected cells were olfactory neurons and sustentacular cells in olfactory epithelium and were macrophages and dendritic cells in nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissues (NALT). Neonatal and adult mice developed similar antibody response pattern, though former magnitude was lower. In summary, we have established intranasal (without anesthesia) infections of neonatal and adult mice with murine CMV HaNa1 strain, which mimic the range and extent of virus replication during natural primary HCMV infections in healthy infants and adults. These findings might bring new insights in the pathogenesis of natural primary CMV infections. PMID:26474525

  10. Advanced reproductive technology in the water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Drost, M

    2007-08-01

    Embryo transfer techniques in water buffalo were derived from those in cattle. However, the success rate is much lower in buffaloes, due to their inherent lower fertility and poor superovulatory response. The buffalo ovary has a smaller population of recruitable follicles at any given time than the ovary of the cow (89% fewer at birth). In addition, estrus detection is problematic. Progress in the field of embryo transfer in water buffalo has been slow, and is primarily due to a poor response to superovulation. The average yield of transferable embryos is less than one per superovulated donor. In vitro embryo production could considerably improve the efficacy and logistics of embryo production. The technique of Ovum Pick Up is superior to superovulation; it can yield more transferable embryos per donor on a monthly basis (2.0 versus 0.6). The feasibility of intergeneric embryo transfer between buffalo and cattle has been investigated. No pregnancy resulted after transfer of 13 buffalo embryos to synchronized Holstein heifers. Preliminary successes with nucleus transfer of Bubalus bubalis fetal and adult somatic nuclei into enucleated bovine oocytes and subsequent development to the blastocyst stage have been reported.

  11. Capacity of a natural strain of woodchuck hepatitis virus, WHVNY, to induce acute infection in naive adult woodchucks.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Natalia; Lukash, Tetyana; Dudek, Megan; Litwin, Sam; Menne, Stephan; Gudima, Severin O

    2015-07-01

    Woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) is often used as surrogate to study mechanism of HBV infection. Currently, most infections are conducted using strains WHV7 or WHV8 that have very high sequence identity. This study focused on natural strain WHVNY that is more genetically distant from WHV7. Three naive adult woodchucks inoculated with WHVNY developed productive acute infection with long lasting viremia. However, only one of two woodchucks infected with WHV7 at the same multiplicity demonstrated productive liver infection. Quantification of intracellular WHV RNA and DNA replication intermediates; percentages of core antigen-positive hepatocytes; and serum relaxed circular DNA showed that strains WHVNY and WHV7 displayed comparable replication levels and capacities to induce acute infection in naive adult woodchucks. Strain WHVNY was therefore validated as valuable reagent to analyze the mechanism of hepadnavirus infection, especially in co- and super-infection settings, which required discrimination between two related virus genomes replicating in the same liver. PMID:25979221

  12. Detection of Sarcocystis spp. in cattle (Bos taurus) and water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in Iran by PCR-RFLP.

    PubMed

    Hamidinejat, Hossein; Razi Jalali, Mohammad Hossein; Gharibi, Darioush; Molayan, Pedram Haddad

    2015-12-01

    Sarcocystis species are cyst-forming intracellular protozoan parasites. Cattle are mainly infected with Sarcocystis cruzi, Sarcocystis hominis and Sarcocystis hirsuta. Water buffaloes are intermediate hosts for Sarcocystis fusiformis, Sarcocystis levinei (S. cruzi-like species), Sarcocystis dubeyi, Sarcocystis sinensis (S. hominis-like species) and Sarcocystis buffalonis (S. hirsuta- like species). The aim of this study was Identification of Sarcocystis spp. in slaughtered cattle and water buffaloes in Ahvaz, Khuzestan province by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Meat inspection was done on 124 cattle and 147 water buffaloes. From each animal tissue samples (each 50 g) from heart, esophagus, diaphragm and intercostal muscle were collected during meat inspection. Samples examined with digestion method. Genomic DNA of 80 positive samples was extracted and their 18S rRNA gene was amplified. PCR products were digested by restricted enzymes (FokI, SspI and DraI). S. cruzi in cattle and S. fusiformis in water buffaloes were identified. Our study clarified that sarcocystosis in cattle in Ahvaz district may be results acute infection according to determined species, but in buffaloes as S. fusiformis was detected we may expect only economic loss follow up slaughterhouse inspection. PMID:26688630

  13. Detection of Sarcocystis spp. in cattle (Bos taurus) and water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in Iran by PCR-RFLP.

    PubMed

    Hamidinejat, Hossein; Razi Jalali, Mohammad Hossein; Gharibi, Darioush; Molayan, Pedram Haddad

    2015-12-01

    Sarcocystis species are cyst-forming intracellular protozoan parasites. Cattle are mainly infected with Sarcocystis cruzi, Sarcocystis hominis and Sarcocystis hirsuta. Water buffaloes are intermediate hosts for Sarcocystis fusiformis, Sarcocystis levinei (S. cruzi-like species), Sarcocystis dubeyi, Sarcocystis sinensis (S. hominis-like species) and Sarcocystis buffalonis (S. hirsuta- like species). The aim of this study was Identification of Sarcocystis spp. in slaughtered cattle and water buffaloes in Ahvaz, Khuzestan province by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Meat inspection was done on 124 cattle and 147 water buffaloes. From each animal tissue samples (each 50 g) from heart, esophagus, diaphragm and intercostal muscle were collected during meat inspection. Samples examined with digestion method. Genomic DNA of 80 positive samples was extracted and their 18S rRNA gene was amplified. PCR products were digested by restricted enzymes (FokI, SspI and DraI). S. cruzi in cattle and S. fusiformis in water buffaloes were identified. Our study clarified that sarcocystosis in cattle in Ahvaz district may be results acute infection according to determined species, but in buffaloes as S. fusiformis was detected we may expect only economic loss follow up slaughterhouse inspection.

  14. Haematological response of snow barbell, Schizothorax plagiostomus Heckel, naturally infected with a new Trypanosoma species.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, Aamir; Ahmed, Imtiaz

    2016-09-01

    The present study deals with the description of a new piscine trypanosome species found infecting the fresh water fish Schizothorax plagiostomus Heckel from river Jhelum, Srinagar, J&K, India and evaluating the haematological parameters of the infected fish. Haematological examination of S. plagiostomus revealed 61.1 % infection with an intensity of 1-9 trypanosomes/100 RBC's. Small (26.9 ± 1.39 µm) and large (47.17 ± 3.50 µm) forms of the trypanosome were observed in light microscopy investigations, revealing the dimorphic nature of the species. The trypanosome species was found to be distinct from the other related dimorphic species in morphometric dimensions including cell length, cell breadth, kinetoplast index, flagellar index, and cytological peculiarities, respectively. The detailed descriptions of the two morphological forms found in the blood of S. plagiostomus are provided. Based on the geographical location, morphometrics, cytological peculiarities, host status and comparative study, the new species is named Trypanosoma kashmirensis n. sp. The parasitic infestation caused a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in red blood cell counts, haematocrit and haemoglobin concentrations while, the leucocyte (WBC) count, mean cellular volume and mean cellular haemoglobin showed a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the infected fish as compared to the non-infected. The above alterations of the haematological parameters could be used as an important tool for the indication of Trypanosoma infection in the fish. PMID:27605786

  15. Widespread Recombination, Reassortment, and Transmission of Unbalanced Compound Viral Genotypes in Natural Arenavirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Stenglein, Mark D.; Jacobson, Elliott R.; Chang, Li-Wen; Sanders, Chris; Hawkins, Michelle G.; Guzman, David S-M.; Drazenovich, Tracy; Dunker, Freeland; Kamaka, Elizabeth K.; Fisher, Debbie; Reavill, Drury R.; Meola, Linda F.; Levens, Gregory; DeRisi, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    Arenaviruses are one of the largest families of human hemorrhagic fever viruses and are known to infect both mammals and snakes. Arenaviruses package a large (L) and small (S) genome segment in their virions. For segmented RNA viruses like these, novel genotypes can be generated through mutation, recombination, and reassortment. Although it is believed that an ancient recombination event led to the emergence of a new lineage of mammalian arenaviruses, neither recombination nor reassortment has been definitively documented in natural arenavirus infections. Here, we used metagenomic sequencing to survey the viral diversity present in captive arenavirus-infected snakes. From 48 infected animals, we determined the complete or near complete sequence of 210 genome segments that grouped into 23 L and 11 S genotypes. The majority of snakes were multiply infected, with up to 4 distinct S and 11 distinct L segment genotypes in individual animals. This S/L imbalance was typical: in all cases intrahost L segment genotypes outnumbered S genotypes, and a particular S segment genotype dominated in individual animals and at a population level. We corroborated sequencing results by qRT-PCR and virus isolation, and isolates replicated as ensembles in culture. Numerous instances of recombination and reassortment were detected, including recombinant segments with unusual organizations featuring 2 intergenic regions and superfluous content, which were capable of stable replication and transmission despite their atypical structures. Overall, this represents intrahost diversity of an extent and form that goes well beyond what has been observed for arenaviruses or for viruses in general. This diversity can be plausibly attributed to the captive intermingling of sub-clinically infected wild-caught snakes. Thus, beyond providing a unique opportunity to study arenavirus evolution and adaptation, these findings allow the investigation of unintended anthropogenic impacts on viral ecology

  16. Natural History of Polyomaviruses in Men: The HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study

    PubMed Central

    Hampras, Shalaka S.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fisher, Kate J.; Abrahamsen, Martha E.; McKay-Chopin, Sandrine; Gheit, Tarik; Tommasino, Massimo; Rollison, Dana E.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Several new polyomaviruses have been discovered in the last decade, including Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV). Little is known about the natural history of the more recently discovered polyomaviruses. We estimated the incidence, prevalence, and persistence of 9 polyomaviruses (MCPyV, BK polyomavirus, KI polyomavirus, JC polyomavirus, WU polyomavirus, Human polyomavirus 6 [HPyV6], HPyV7, HPyV9, and Trichodysplasia spinulosa–associated polyomavirus) and examined factors associated with MCPyV infection in a prospective cohort of 209 men initially enrolled in the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) study. Methods. Participants enrolled at the US site of the HIM study were recruited into a substudy of cutaneous viral infections and followed for a median of 12.6 months. Eyebrow hair and normal skin swab specimens were obtained at each study visit, and the viral DNA load was measured using multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Results. MCPyV infection showed the highest prevalence (65.1% of normal skin swab specimens and 30.6% of eyebrow hair specimens), incidence (81.7 cases per 1000 person-months among normal skin swab specimens, and 24.1 cases per 1000 person-months among eyebrow hair specimens), and persistence (85.8% of normal skin swab specimens and 58.9% of eyebrow hair specimens) among all polyomaviruses examined. Age of >44 years (odds ratio [OR], 2.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03–4.33) and Hispanic race (OR, 2.64; 95% CI, 1.01–6.88) were associated with an increased prevalence of MCPyV infection in eyebrow hair and normal skin swab specimens, respectively. Conclusion. MCPyV infection is highly prevalent in adults, with age and race being predisposing factors. PMID:25387582

  17. Larval trematode infections in Galba truncatula (Gastropoda, Lymnaeidae) from the Brenne Regional Natural Park, central France.

    PubMed

    Rondelaud, D; Vignoles, P; Dreyfuss, G

    2016-05-01

    Adult Galba truncatula ( ≥ 4 mm in shell height) were collected from 135 habitats for 3 years (2012-2014) to identify parasite species via the study of cercariae, and to determine the prevalence of each digenean infection in relation to the type of snail habitat (six types). A total of 323 infected snails and ten digenean species were noted in the bodies of 11,025 G. truncatula after their dissection. Snails with Calicophoron daubneyi and/or Fasciola hepatica were found in 20.7% and 12.5% of the habitats, respectively, and most of these infected snails were collected from rainwater-draining furrows and pools in meadows. The percentages were lower for snails with Echinostoma revolutum (9.6% of habitats) and Haplometra cylindracea (7.4%), and were less than 5% for those parasitized by any of the other five species of digenean. The highest prevalence of all digenean infections was noted in pools (9.4%), followed by furrows located in meadows (8.3%) and ponds (5.1%). The prevalence noted for each digenean infection varied with the type of habitat. In furrows located in meadows, the infection rate of C. daubneyi in snails (3.5%) was significantly higher than that of F. hepatica (2.2%). In pools, values greater than 1.5% were noted for C. daubneyi, H. cylindracea and Opistoglyphe ranae. In ponds, E. revolutum was the dominant species (prevalence, 2.5%). Parasite species richness in G. truncatula was greater in the Brenne Natural Regional Park than in the nearby region of Limousin (ten instead of eight). The distribution and prevalence of each parasite species were dependent on the type and location of each snail habitat.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of sulfamethazine in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Khan, F H; Nawaz, M; Anwar-Ul-Hassan, S

    1980-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters which describe distribution and elimination of sulfamethazine were determined in buffaloes. Following intravenous administration of a single dose (100 mg/kg), disposition of the drug was described in terms of biexponential expression: Cp = Ae alpha t + Be-beta t. Based on total (free and bound) sulfonamide levels in the plasma, pseudo-distribution equilibrium was rapidly attained and the half-life value of 5.54 +/- 0.41 h (mean +/- S.D., n = 8) was recorded. Body clearance was 56 +/- 7 ml x kg-1 x h-1. Based on this study we suggest an intravenous dosage regimen consisting of 38.4 mg sulfamethazine/kg body-weight repeated at 12 h inrervals. With this dosage level the predicted plasma concentrations will oscillate between 125 and 25 micrograms/ml during the steady-state. The influence of febrile states and bacterial diseases on predicted levels remains to be verified experimentally. PMID:7436332

  19. Prevalence of Sarcocystis spp. in water buffaloes in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Huong, L T

    1999-09-15

    Muscles from heart, tongue, oesophagus, neck and abdomen from 502 adult water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) slaughtered in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, between 1996 and 1997 were examined for Sarcocystis cysts by a combination of ocular and histological examination. Sarcocysts were present in 396 (79%) of the animals and the prevalence increased with age from a 57% infection rate among 2-3 year old animals to 93% among 6-7 year olds. The prevalence was higher in animals originating from the northern part (89%) than in those from the southern part (69%) of the country. Four species of Sarcocystis were identified. S. levinei (74%) was the most common species found, followed by S. fusiformis (41%), S. buffalonis (33%) and S. dubeyi (12%). All four species were present in 8% of the infected animals. The most common site for sarcocyst location was oesophagus, followed by cervical muscles, tongue and heart.

  20. Oxidative stress associated with pathological changes in the pancreas of cattle naturally infected by Eurytrema coelomaticum.

    PubMed

    Schwertz, Claiton I; Gabriel, Mateus E; Henker, Luan C; Bottari, Nathieli B; Carmo, Guilherme do; Guarda, Naiara Dos S; Moresco, Rafael N; Machado, Gustavo; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Stedille, Fernanda A; Baska, Piotr; Mattei, Vanessa; da Silva, Aleksandro S; Mendes, Ricardo E

    2016-06-15

    Although Eurytrema coelomaticum is considered a parasite with low pathogenicity, it may be associated with mortality and loss of productive performance in animals due to chronic pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of oxidative stress caused by E. coelomaticum in naturally infected cattle, correlating the biochemical findings with the parasite load and histopathological changes. For this study, blood and pancreas samples from 51 cattle were collected, and levels of the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) were measured in the serum and pancreas, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was measured in total blood. Parasite burden was determined opening the pancreatic ducts, and then fragments of pancreas were collected and fixed in 10% buffered formalin and routinely processed for histopathology. From the 51 collected pancreas, 33 (63.5%) were parasitized. The average parasite burden per pancreas was 532 (12-2,578). TBARS and FRAP showed higher levels in serum and pancreas of infected animals (p<0.05), with a positive correlation between the histopathological changes and the number of parasites. SOD level in blood was 42% higher in parasitized group compared with control group (p<0.05), as well as AOPP in serum. Based on these results, we concluded that in natural infection by E. coelomaticum in cattle, oxidative stress occurs, characterized by the occurrence of protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation and activation of antioxidant system.

  1. Infection with Wolbachia protects mosquitoes against Plasmodium-induced mortality in a natural system.

    PubMed

    Zélé, F; Nicot, A; Duron, O; Rivero, A

    2012-07-01

    In recent years, there has been a shift in the one host-one parasite paradigm with the realization that, in the field, most hosts are coinfected with multiple parasites. Coinfections are particularly relevant when the host is a vector of diseases, because multiple infections can have drastic consequences for parasite transmission at both the ecological and evolutionary timescales. Wolbachia pipientis is the most common parasitic microorganism in insects, and as such, it is of special interest for understanding the role of coinfections in the outcome of parasite infections. Here, we investigate whether Wolbachia can modulate the effect of Plasmodium on what is, arguably, the most important component of the vectorial capacity of mosquitoes: their longevity. For this purpose, and in contrast to recent studies that have focused on mosquito-Plasmodium and/or mosquito-Wolbachia combinations not found in nature, we work on a Wolbachia-mosquito-Plasmodium triad with a common evolutionary history. Our results show that Wolbachia protects mosquitoes from Plasmodium-induced mortality. The results are consistent across two different strains of Wolbachia and repeatable across two different experimental blocks. To our knowledge, this is the first time that such an effect has been shown for Plasmodium-infected mosquitoes and, in particular, in a natural Wolbachia-host combination. We discuss different mechanistic and evolutionary explanations for these results as well as their consequences for Plasmodium transmission. PMID:22533729

  2. Oxidative stress associated with pathological changes in the pancreas of cattle naturally infected by Eurytrema coelomaticum.

    PubMed

    Schwertz, Claiton I; Gabriel, Mateus E; Henker, Luan C; Bottari, Nathieli B; Carmo, Guilherme do; Guarda, Naiara Dos S; Moresco, Rafael N; Machado, Gustavo; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Stedille, Fernanda A; Baska, Piotr; Mattei, Vanessa; da Silva, Aleksandro S; Mendes, Ricardo E

    2016-06-15

    Although Eurytrema coelomaticum is considered a parasite with low pathogenicity, it may be associated with mortality and loss of productive performance in animals due to chronic pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of oxidative stress caused by E. coelomaticum in naturally infected cattle, correlating the biochemical findings with the parasite load and histopathological changes. For this study, blood and pancreas samples from 51 cattle were collected, and levels of the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) were measured in the serum and pancreas, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was measured in total blood. Parasite burden was determined opening the pancreatic ducts, and then fragments of pancreas were collected and fixed in 10% buffered formalin and routinely processed for histopathology. From the 51 collected pancreas, 33 (63.5%) were parasitized. The average parasite burden per pancreas was 532 (12-2,578). TBARS and FRAP showed higher levels in serum and pancreas of infected animals (p<0.05), with a positive correlation between the histopathological changes and the number of parasites. SOD level in blood was 42% higher in parasitized group compared with control group (p<0.05), as well as AOPP in serum. Based on these results, we concluded that in natural infection by E. coelomaticum in cattle, oxidative stress occurs, characterized by the occurrence of protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation and activation of antioxidant system. PMID:27198785

  3. Natural history of woodchuck hepatitis virus infections during the course of experimental viral infection: molecular virologic features of the liver and lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Korba, B E; Cote, P J; Wells, F V; Baldwin, B; Popper, H; Purcell, R H; Tennant, B C; Gerin, J L

    1989-01-01

    In this study, the kinetic patterns of woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) infection were monitored in the liver and the five primary components of the lymphoid system (peripheral blood lymphocytes, lymph nodes, bone marrow, spleen, and thymus). Groups of woodchucks experimentally infected with a standardized inoculum of WHV were sacrificed at different times over a 65-week period beginning in the preacute phase of viral infection and continuing to the period of serologic recovery or the establishment of chronic infections and subsequent hepatocellular carcinoma. Infection by WHV was not limited to the liver but involved the major components of the lymphoid system during all stages of virus infection. A complex series of kinetic patterns was observed for the appearance of WHV DNA in the different lymphoid compartments and the liver during the entire course of viral infection. A progressive evolution of different WHV genomic forms related to the replicative state of WHV was also observed. Lymphoid cells of the bone marrow were the first cells in which WHV DNA was detected, followed in order by the liver, the spleen, peripheral blood lymphocytes, lymph nodes, and finally the thymus. Several differences were observed in the cellular WHV DNA patterns between woodchucks that developed chronic WHV infections and those that serologically recovered from acute WHV infections. The observations compiled in this study indicate that the host lymphoid system is intimately involved in the natural history of hepadnavirus infections from the earliest stages of virus entry. Images PMID:2915383

  4. Comparative Burkholderia pseudomallei natural history virulence studies using an aerosol murine model of infection

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Shane; Yeager, Linsey A.; Blumentritt, Carla A.; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Sbrana, Elena; Peterson, Johnny W.; Brasel, Trevor; LeDuc, James W.; Endsley, Janice J.; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2014-01-01

    Melioidosis is an endemic disease caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. Concerns exist regarding B. pseudomallei use as a potential bio-threat agent causing persistent infections and typically manifesting as severe pneumonia capable of causing fatal bacteremia. Development of suitable therapeutics against melioidosis is complicated due to high degree of genetic and phenotypic variability among B. pseudomallei isolates and lack of data establishing commonly accepted strains for comparative studies. Further, the impact of strain variation on virulence, disease presentation, and mortality is not well understood. Therefore, this study evaluate and compare the virulence and disease progression of B. pseudomallei strains K96243 and HBPUB10303a, following aerosol challenge in a standardized BALB/c mouse model of infection. The natural history analysis of disease progression monitored conditions such as weight, body temperature, appearance, activity, bacteremia, organ and tissue colonization (pathological and histological analysis) and immunological responses. This study provides a detailed, direct comparison of infection with different B. pseudomallei strains and set up the basis for a standardized model useful to test different medical countermeasures against Burkholderia species. Further, this protocol serves as a guideline to standardize other bacterial aerosol models of infection or to define biomarkers of infectious processes caused by other intracellular pathogens. PMID:24603493

  5. Populations, not clones, are the unit of vibrio pathogenesis in naturally infected oysters.

    PubMed

    Lemire, Astrid; Goudenège, David; Versigny, Typhaine; Petton, Bruno; Calteau, Alexandra; Labreuche, Yannick; Le Roux, Frédérique

    2015-07-01

    Disease in oysters has been steadily rising over the past decade, threatening the long-term survival of commercial and natural stocks. Our understanding and management of such diseases are of critical importance as aquaculture is an important aspect of dealing with the approaching worldwide food shortage. Although some bacteria of the Vibrio genus isolated from diseased oysters have been demonstrated to be pathogenic by experimental infection, direct causality has not been established. Little is known about the dynamics of how the bacterial population hosted by oysters changes during disease progression. Combining experimental ecology, a high-throughput infection assay and genome sequencing, we show that the onset of disease in oysters is associated with progressive replacement of diverse benign colonizers by members of a phylogenetically coherent virulent population. Although the virulent population is genetically diverse, all members of that population can cause disease. Comparative genomics across virulent and nonvirulent populations identified candidate virulence factors that were clustered in population-specific genomic regions. Genetic analyses revealed that one gene for a candidate virulent factor, a putative outer membrane protein, is necessary for infection of oysters. Finally, analyses of oyster mortality following experimental infection suggest that disease onset can be facilitated by the presence of nonvirulent strains. This is a new form of polymicrobial disease, in which nonpathogenic strains contribute to increase mortality.

  6. Populations, not clones, are the unit of vibrio pathogenesis in naturally infected oysters

    PubMed Central

    Lemire, Astrid; Goudenège, David; Versigny, Typhaine; Petton, Bruno; Calteau, Alexandra; Labreuche, Yannick; Le Roux, Frédérique

    2015-01-01

    Disease in oysters has been steadily rising over the past decade, threatening the long-term survival of commercial and natural stocks. Our understanding and management of such diseases are of critical importance as aquaculture is an important aspect of dealing with the approaching worldwide food shortage. Although some bacteria of the Vibrio genus isolated from diseased oysters have been demonstrated to be pathogenic by experimental infection, direct causality has not been established. Little is known about the dynamics of how the bacterial population hosted by oysters changes during disease progression. Combining experimental ecology, a high-throughput infection assay and genome sequencing, we show that the onset of disease in oysters is associated with progressive replacement of diverse benign colonizers by members of a phylogenetically coherent virulent population. Although the virulent population is genetically diverse, all members of that population can cause disease. Comparative genomics across virulent and nonvirulent populations identified candidate virulence factors that were clustered in population-specific genomic regions. Genetic analyses revealed that one gene for a candidate virulent factor, a putative outer membrane protein, is necessary for infection of oysters. Finally, analyses of oyster mortality following experimental infection suggest that disease onset can be facilitated by the presence of nonvirulent strains. This is a new form of polymicrobial disease, in which nonpathogenic strains contribute to increase mortality. PMID:25489729

  7. Natural Infection of Pregnant Cows with Schmallenberg Virus – A Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Schirrmeier, Horst; Hoffmann, Bernd; Beer, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV), an orthobunyavirus discovered in European livestock in late 2011 for the first time, causes premature or stillbirth and severe fetal malformation when cows and ewes are infected during pregnancy. Therefore, cattle of two holdings in the initially most affected area in Germany were closely monitored to describe the consequence for fetuses and newborn calves. Seventy-one calves whose mothers were naturally infected during the first five months of pregnancy were clinically, virologically, and serologically examined. One calve showed typical malformation, another one, born without visible abnormalities, was dead. Two cows aborted during the studied period; spleen and brain samples or meconium swabs were tested by real-time PCR, in none of the fetuses SBV-specific RNA was detectable and the tested fetal sera were negative in a commercially available antibody ELISA. In contrast, in nine clinically healthy calves high SBV-antibody titers were measurable before colostrum intake, and in meconium swabs of six of these animals viral RNA was present as well. The mothers of all nine seropositive calves were presumably infected between days 47 and 162 of gestation, which is within the critical timeframe for fetal infection suggested for SBV and related viruses. PMID:24853555

  8. Generation of a persistently infected MDBK cell line with natural bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE).

    PubMed

    Tark, Dongseob; Kim, Hyojin; Neale, Michael H; Kim, Minjeong; Sohn, Hyunjoo; Lee, Yoonhee; Cho, Insoo; Joo, Yiseok; Windl, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a zoonotic transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) thought to be caused by the same prion strain as variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). Unlike scrapie and chronic wasting disease there is no cell culture model allowing the replication of proteinase K resistant BSE (PrPBSE) and the further in vitro study of this disease. We have generated a cell line based on the Madin-Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK) cell line over-expressing the bovine prion protein. After exposure to naturally BSE-infected bovine brain homogenate this cell line has shown to replicate and accumulate PrPBSE and maintain infection up to passage 83 after initial challenge. Collectively, we demonstrate, for the first time, that the BSE agent can infect cell lines over-expressing the bovine prion protein similar to other prion diseases. These BSE infected cells will provide a useful tool to facilitate the study of potential therapeutic agents and the diagnosis of BSE.

  9. Populations, not clones, are the unit of vibrio pathogenesis in naturally infected oysters.

    PubMed

    Lemire, Astrid; Goudenège, David; Versigny, Typhaine; Petton, Bruno; Calteau, Alexandra; Labreuche, Yannick; Le Roux, Frédérique

    2015-07-01

    Disease in oysters has been steadily rising over the past decade, threatening the long-term survival of commercial and natural stocks. Our understanding and management of such diseases are of critical importance as aquaculture is an important aspect of dealing with the approaching worldwide food shortage. Although some bacteria of the Vibrio genus isolated from diseased oysters have been demonstrated to be pathogenic by experimental infection, direct causality has not been established. Little is known about the dynamics of how the bacterial population hosted by oysters changes during disease progression. Combining experimental ecology, a high-throughput infection assay and genome sequencing, we show that the onset of disease in oysters is associated with progressive replacement of diverse benign colonizers by members of a phylogenetically coherent virulent population. Although the virulent population is genetically diverse, all members of that population can cause disease. Comparative genomics across virulent and nonvirulent populations identified candidate virulence factors that were clustered in population-specific genomic regions. Genetic analyses revealed that one gene for a candidate virulent factor, a putative outer membrane protein, is necessary for infection of oysters. Finally, analyses of oyster mortality following experimental infection suggest that disease onset can be facilitated by the presence of nonvirulent strains. This is a new form of polymicrobial disease, in which nonpathogenic strains contribute to increase mortality. PMID:25489729

  10. Virus-specific T lymphocytes home to the skin during natural dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Rivino, Laura; Kumaran, Emmanuelle A; Thein, Tun-Linn; Too, Chien Tei; Gan, Victor Chih Hao; Hanson, Brendon J; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Bertoletti, Antonio; Gascoigne, Nicholas R J; Lye, David Chien; Leo, Yee Sin; Akbar, Arne N; Kemeny, David M; MacAry, Paul A

    2015-03-11

    Dengue, which is the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral disease afflicting human populations, causes a spectrum of clinical symptoms that include fever, muscle and joint pain, maculopapular skin rash, and hemorrhagic manifestations. Patients infected with dengue develop a broad antigen-specific T lymphocyte response, but the phenotype and functional properties of these cells are only partially understood. We show that natural infection induces dengue-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes that are highly activated and proliferating, exhibit antiviral effector functions, and express CXCR3, CCR5, and the skin-homing marker cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA). In the same patients, bystander human cytomegalovirus -specific CD8(+) T cells are also activated during acute dengue infection but do not express the same tissue-homing phenotype. We show that CLA expression by circulating dengue-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells correlates with their in vivo ability to traffic to the skin during dengue infection. The juxtaposition of dengue-specific T cells with virus-permissive cell types at sites of possible dengue exposure represents a previously uncharacterized form of immune surveillance for this virus. These findings suggest that vaccination strategies may need to induce dengue-specific T cells with similar homing properties to provide durable protection against dengue viruses. PMID:25761891

  11. Virus-specific T lymphocytes home to the skin during natural dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Rivino, Laura; Kumaran, Emmanuelle A; Thein, Tun-Linn; Too, Chien Tei; Gan, Victor Chih Hao; Hanson, Brendon J; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Bertoletti, Antonio; Gascoigne, Nicholas R J; Lye, David Chien; Leo, Yee Sin; Akbar, Arne N; Kemeny, David M; MacAry, Paul A

    2015-03-11

    Dengue, which is the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral disease afflicting human populations, causes a spectrum of clinical symptoms that include fever, muscle and joint pain, maculopapular skin rash, and hemorrhagic manifestations. Patients infected with dengue develop a broad antigen-specific T lymphocyte response, but the phenotype and functional properties of these cells are only partially understood. We show that natural infection induces dengue-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes that are highly activated and proliferating, exhibit antiviral effector functions, and express CXCR3, CCR5, and the skin-homing marker cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA). In the same patients, bystander human cytomegalovirus -specific CD8(+) T cells are also activated during acute dengue infection but do not express the same tissue-homing phenotype. We show that CLA expression by circulating dengue-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells correlates with their in vivo ability to traffic to the skin during dengue infection. The juxtaposition of dengue-specific T cells with virus-permissive cell types at sites of possible dengue exposure represents a previously uncharacterized form of immune surveillance for this virus. These findings suggest that vaccination strategies may need to induce dengue-specific T cells with similar homing properties to provide durable protection against dengue viruses.

  12. Generation of a Persistently Infected MDBK Cell Line with Natural Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE)

    PubMed Central

    Tark, Dongseob; Kim, Hyojin; Neale, Michael H.; Kim, Minjeong; Sohn, Hyunjoo; Lee, Yoonhee; Cho, Insoo; Joo, Yiseok; Windl, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a zoonotic transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) thought to be caused by the same prion strain as variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). Unlike scrapie and chronic wasting disease there is no cell culture model allowing the replication of proteinase K resistant BSE (PrPBSE) and the further in vitro study of this disease. We have generated a cell line based on the Madin-Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK) cell line over-expressing the bovine prion protein. After exposure to naturally BSE-infected bovine brain homogenate this cell line has shown to replicate and accumulate PrPBSE and maintain infection up to passage 83 after initial challenge. Collectively, we demonstrate, for the first time, that the BSE agent can infect cell lines over-expressing the bovine prion protein similar to other prion diseases. These BSE infected cells will provide a useful tool to facilitate the study of potential therapeutic agents and the diagnosis of BSE. PMID:25647616

  13. OVERVIEW OF AMERICAN BRASS BUFFALO PLANT FROM ROOF OF STRAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF AMERICAN BRASS BUFFALO PLANT FROM ROOF OF STRAND ANNEALING TOWER, INCLUDING ORIGINAL BRASS MILL (1906-7,1911) TUBE MILL (1915), COPPER MILL (1921). - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  14. OVERVIEW OF AMERICAN BRASS BUFFALO PLANT FROM ROOF OF STRAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF AMERICAN BRASS BUFFALO PLANT FROM ROOF OF STRAND ANNEALING TOWER, INCLUDING CASTING SHOP AND BAG HOUSE (CENTER-LEFT) AND PORTION OF REROLL BAY (R). VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  15. DNA-based vaccines protect against zoonotic schistosomiasis in water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Da'dara, Akram A; Li, Yuesheng S; Xiong, Tie; Zhou, Jie; Williams, Gail M; McManus, Donald P; Feng, Zheng; Yu, Xin L; Gray, Darren J; Harn, Donald A

    2008-07-01

    Schistosomiasis japonica is an endemic, zoonotic disease of major public health importance in China where water buffaloes account for approximately 75% of disease transmission. Interventions that reduce schistosome infection in water buffaloes will enhance their health simultaneously reducing disease transmission to humans. While chemotherapy has proved successful, it requires continued time consuming and expensive mass treatments. A more sustainable option would be development of vaccines that reduce transmission of S. japonicum from bovines to replace bovine chemotherapy. We performed two randomized double blind trials in water buffaloes to determine if DNA vaccines encoding triose-phosphate isomerase (SjCTPI), or the tetraspanin 23 kDa integral membrane protein (SjC23), alone or fused to bovine heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) could induce a level of immunity conducive to long-term sustainable control. Groups of water buffaloes (15/group) received three intramuscular injections, 4 weeks apart. Booster immunizations were co-administered with a plasmid DNA encoding IL-12. Four weeks after the last injection, water buffaloes were challenged with 1000 cercariae, and vaccine efficacy analyzed 8 weeks later. Water buffaloes vaccinated with SjCTPI-Hsp70 or SjCTPI plasmids had worm burdens reduced by 51.2% and 41.5%, respectively. Importantly, fecal miracidial hatching was reduced by 52.1% and 33.2% respectively compared to control vaccinated water buffaloes. Vaccination with SjC23-Hsp70 and SjC23 plasmids reduced worm burdens by 50.9% and 45.5%, respectively, and fecal miracidial hatching by 52.0% and 47.4%. A mathematical model of schistosome transmission predicts that schistosome vaccines capable of reducing water buffaloes' fecal egg output by 45%, alone or in conjunction with praziquantel treatment, will lead to a significant reduction in transmission of schistosomiasis. Both DNA vaccines tested here exceed this hypothetical level. Indeed, mathematical modeling of Sj

  16. Renal alterations in feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cats: a natural model of lentivirus-induced renal disease changes.

    PubMed

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy. PMID:23170163

  17. Renal Alterations in Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)-Infected Cats: A Natural Model of Lentivirus-Induced Renal Disease Changes

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy. PMID:23170163

  18. Efficacy of a single oral dose of oxfendazole against Fasciola hepatica in naturally infected sheep.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Puerta, Luis A; Gavidia, Cesar; Lopez-Urbina, Maria T; Garcia, Hector H; Gonzalez, Armando E

    2012-03-01

    The efficacy of a single oral dose of 30 mg/kg of oxfendazole against Fasciola hepatica was evaluated in a controlled study in naturally infected sheep. Sheep were diagnosed by stool microscopy after sedimentation, and positive animals were randomized to oxfendazole (N = 20) or no treatment (N = 20). A new stool exam was performed 10 days after treatment. All stool microscopies were performed masked to the treatment group. No side effects were noticed. All sheep in the control group remained infected with similar counts of eggs per gram of stools. None of the animals in the treatment group showed Fasciola eggs in stools after 10 days of treatment. A single dose of oxfendazole is highly effective against F. hepatica, providing a new drug alternative for the control of fascioliasis or integrated zoonosis control.

  19. Efficacy of a Single Oral Dose of Oxfendazole against Fasciola hepatica in Naturally Infected Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Puerta, Luis A.; Gavidia, Cesar; Lopez-Urbina, Maria T.; Garcia, Hector H.; Gonzalez, Armando E.

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of a single oral dose of 30 mg/kg of oxfendazole against Fasciola hepatica was evaluated in a controlled study in naturally infected sheep. Sheep were diagnosed by stool microscopy after sedimentation, and positive animals were randomized to oxfendazole (N = 20) or no treatment (N = 20). A new stool exam was performed 10 days after treatment. All stool microscopies were performed masked to the treatment group. No side effects were noticed. All sheep in the control group remained infected with similar counts of eggs per gram of stools. None of the animals in the treatment group showed Fasciola eggs in stools after 10 days of treatment. A single dose of oxfendazole is highly effective against F. hepatica, providing a new drug alternative for the control of fascioliasis or integrated zoonosis control. PMID:22403323

  20. A Nature-Inspired Betalainic Probe for Live-Cell Imaging of Plasmodium-Infected Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Letícia Christina Pires; Tonelli, Renata Rosito; Bagnaresi, Piero; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Ferreira, Antonio Gilberto; Bastos, Erick Leite

    2013-01-01

    A model betalainic dye was semisynthesized from betanin, the magenta pigment of the red beet, and was effective for live-cell imaging of Plasmodium-infected red blood cells. This water-soluble fluorescent probe is photostable, excitable in the visible region and cell membrane-permeable, and its photophysical properties are not notably pH-sensitive. Fluorescence imaging microscopy of erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum, a causative agent of malaria in humans, showed that only the parasite was stained. Z-stacking analysis suggested that the probe accumulates proximal to the nucleus of the parasite. Indicaxanthin, one of the natural fluorescent betalains found in the petals of certain flowers, did not stain the parasite or the red blood cell. PMID:23342028

  1. A nature-inspired betalainic probe for live-cell imaging of Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Letícia Christina Pires; Tonelli, Renata Rosito; Bagnaresi, Piero; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Ferreira, Antonio Gilberto; Bastos, Erick Leite

    2013-01-01

    A model betalainic dye was semisynthesized from betanin, the magenta pigment of the red beet, and was effective for live-cell imaging of Plasmodium-infected red blood cells. This water-soluble fluorescent probe is photostable, excitable in the visible region and cell membrane-permeable, and its photophysical properties are not notably pH-sensitive. Fluorescence imaging microscopy of erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum, a causative agent of malaria in humans, showed that only the parasite was stained. Z-stacking analysis suggested that the probe accumulates proximal to the nucleus of the parasite. Indicaxanthin, one of the natural fluorescent betalains found in the petals of certain flowers, did not stain the parasite or the red blood cell. PMID:23342028

  2. Cryptosporidiosis in buffalo calves (Bubalus bubalis): prevalence and potential risk factors.

    PubMed

    El-Khodery, Sabry A; Osman, Salama A

    2008-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to describe the prevalence and risk factors associated with cryptosporidiosis in buffalo calves in Middle Egypt. During one year, 458 fecal samples were collected from buffalo calves less than 3 month age in 55 small scale herds and examined for the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts. Data describing age, gender, season, and herd management practices were gathered to assess potential risk factors. Fecal examination showed that 14.19% of the examined calves were positive for Cryptosporidium spp. Calves at 1-15 days were at the highest risk (P < 0.001), and a significant relationship between season and infection (P < 0.05) was recorded. A significant association between infection and hygiene (P < 0.001), type of floor (P < 0.01) and source of water (P < 0.01) was also recorded. Statistical analysis concerning the clinical signs and fecal characteristics revealed a significant association with fecal consistency (P < 0.001), presence of blood (P < 0.01) and mucous (P < 0.01). Moreover, a significant association was found between infection and the desire for suckling (P < 0.05) and tenesmus (P < 0.05). The results of the present study demonstrated the strong relation between infections by Cryptosporidium spp. and diarrhea in buffalo calves.

  3. 33 CFR 110.84b - Buffalo, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Buffalo, N.Y. 110.84b Section 110... REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.84b Buffalo, N.Y. The area within the Port of Buffalo known as Port of Buffalo Small Boat Harbor commencing at a point on shore at latitude 42°51′05″ N., longitude...

  4. Immune responses to viable and degenerative metacestodes of Taenia solium in naturally infected swine.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aloukick K; Prasad, Kashi N; Prasad, Amit; Tripathi, Mukesh; Gupta, Rakesh K; Husain, Nuzhat

    2013-12-01

    Neurocysticercosis, caused by the larvae of the pork tapeworm Taenia solium, is the most common helminth infection of the CNS in humans worldwide. There is no existing animal model of neurocysticercosis that resembles human infection. To overcome this limitation, swine (the natural intermediate host of the parasite) may be a suitable model. The immune response associated with different stages of the parasite larva (metacestode) has not yet been explored. Therefore, we investigated the immune response to various stages of the metacestode (cyst) in the brain and muscles of naturally infected swine. Swine with neurocysticercosis (n = 10) and healthy controls (n = 10), as confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging, were included in this study. The animals were sacrificed, and the tissues containing viable or degenerative metacestods in the brain and infected muscles were collected and subjected to reverse transcriptase-PCR and ELISA to determine the expression of different cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4 IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10). Higher expression of IL-10 was found to be associated with viable cysts. Degenerating cysts displayed significantly increased levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-8, whereas calcified cysts had elevated levels of IL-4, IL-10, TNF-α and IL-6. The present study indicated a strong regulatory (IL-10) and Th1 cytokine response in viable and degenerating cysts, respectively, whereas calcified cysts had a mixed anti-inflammatory (IL-4), regulatory (IL-10) and pro-inflammatory (TNF-α and IL-6) response. Thus, Th1 and Th2 immune response operate in the vicinity of metacestodes and the type of immune response may be responsible for disease severity.

  5. Differences in intermittent and continuous fecal shedding patterns between natural and experimental Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infections in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this paper is to study shedding patterns of cows infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). While multiple single farm studies of MAP dynamics were reported, there is not large-scale meta-analysis of both natural and experimental infections. Large difference...

  6. Severe seizures in pigs naturally infected with Taenia solium in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Chiara; Mkupasi, Ernatus M; Ngowi, Helena A; Forkman, Björn; Johansen, Maria V

    2016-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) caused by Taenia solium is a serious neurological disease. In humans neurological symptoms have been thoroughly studied and documented, however, there is limited information on clinical signs in pigs infected with T. solium cysticerci. Among the scientific community, it is in fact believed that pigs with NCC rarely show neurological signs. The aim of this study was to describe clinical manifestations associated with NCC in pigs and correlate the manifestations to the number and distribution of cysticerci in brains of naturally infected pigs in Tanzania. Sixteen infected and 15 non-infected control pigs were observed for 14 days during daylight hours, and subsequently videotaped for another 14 consecutive days using close circuit television cameras. All occurrences of abnormal behaviour (trembling, twitching, mouth and ear paralysis, ataxia, dribbling, salivating, eye blinking, walking in circles) were recorded. At the end of the recording period, pigs were slaughtered and their brains dissected, cysticerci counted and locations noted. During the recording period, two infected pigs were observed having seizures. Some of the observed autonomic signs during a seizure were chewing motions with foamy salivation and ear stiffening. Motor signs included tonic muscle contractions followed by a sudden diminution in all muscle function leading to collapse of the animal. Stereotypic walking in circles was observed on several occasions. At dissection, both pigs had a high number of brain cysticerci (241 and 247 cysticerci). The two pigs with seizures were also older (36 months) compared to the others (18.3 months, ± 8.2 standard deviation). Results of this study have shown that pigs with NCC can develop clinical signs and suffer from seizures like humans with symptomatic NCC. Results of this study could potentially open up a new experimental pathway to explore the aetiology of neurological symptoms in humans with NCC associated epilepsy. PMID:26995723

  7. Characterization of mesenchymal stem cells in sheep naturally infected with scrapie.

    PubMed

    Mediano, Diego R; Sanz-Rubio, David; Bolea, Rosa; Belén, Marín; Vázquez, Francisco J; Remacha, Ana R; López-Pérez, Oscar; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Castilla, Joaquin; Zaragoza, Pilar

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be infected with prions and have been proposed as in vitro cell-based models for prion replication. In addition, autologous MSCs are of interest for cell therapy in neurodegenerative diseases. To the best of our knowledge, the effect of prion diseases on the characteristics of these cells has never been investigated. Here, we analysed the properties of MSCs obtained from bone marrow (BM-MSCs) and peripheral blood (PB-MSCs) of sheep naturally infected with scrapie — a large mammal model for the study of prion diseases. After three passages of expansion, MSCs derived from scrapie animals displayed similar adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation ability as cells from healthy controls, although a subtle decrease in the proliferation potential was observed. Exceptionally, mesenchymal markers such as CD29 were significantly upregulated at the transcript level compared with controls. Scrapie MSCs were able to transdifferentiate into neuron-like cells, but displayed lower levels of neurogenic markers at basal conditions, which could limit this potential .The expression levels of cellular prion protein (PrPC) were highly variable between cultures, and no significant differences were observed between control and scrapie-derived MSCs. However, during neurogenic differentiation the expression of PrPC was upregulated in MSCs. This characteristic could be useful for developing in vitro models for prion replication. Despite the infectivity reported for MSCs obtained from scrapie-infected mice and Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease patients, protein misfolding cyclic amplification did not detect PrPSc in BM- or PB-MSCs from scrapie-infected sheep, which limits their use for in vivo diagnosis for scrapie. PMID:26431976

  8. Severe seizures in pigs naturally infected with Taenia solium in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Chiara; Mkupasi, Ernatus M; Ngowi, Helena A; Forkman, Björn; Johansen, Maria V

    2016-04-15

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) caused by Taenia solium is a serious neurological disease. In humans neurological symptoms have been thoroughly studied and documented, however, there is limited information on clinical signs in pigs infected with T. solium cysticerci. Among the scientific community, it is in fact believed that pigs with NCC rarely show neurological signs. The aim of this study was to describe clinical manifestations associated with NCC in pigs and correlate the manifestations to the number and distribution of cysticerci in brains of naturally infected pigs in Tanzania. Sixteen infected and 15 non-infected control pigs were observed for 14 days during daylight hours, and subsequently videotaped for another 14 consecutive days using close circuit television cameras. All occurrences of abnormal behaviour (trembling, twitching, mouth and ear paralysis, ataxia, dribbling, salivating, eye blinking, walking in circles) were recorded. At the end of the recording period, pigs were slaughtered and their brains dissected, cysticerci counted and locations noted. During the recording period, two infected pigs were observed having seizures. Some of the observed autonomic signs during a seizure were chewing motions with foamy salivation and ear stiffening. Motor signs included tonic muscle contractions followed by a sudden diminution in all muscle function leading to collapse of the animal. Stereotypic walking in circles was observed on several occasions. At dissection, both pigs had a high number of brain cysticerci (241 and 247 cysticerci). The two pigs with seizures were also older (36 months) compared to the others (18.3 months, ± 8.2 standard deviation). Results of this study have shown that pigs with NCC can develop clinical signs and suffer from seizures like humans with symptomatic NCC. Results of this study could potentially open up a new experimental pathway to explore the aetiology of neurological symptoms in humans with NCC associated epilepsy.

  9. Vaccination of pigs reduces Torque teno sus virus viremia during natural infection.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Melsió, Alexandra; Rodriguez, Fernando; Darji, Ayub; Segalés, Joaquim; Cornelissen-Keijsers, Vivian; van den Born, Erwin; Kekarainen, Tuija

    2015-07-01

    Anelloviruses are a group of single-stranded circular DNA viruses infecting several vertebrate species. Four species have been found to infect swine, namely Torque teno sus virus (TTSuV) 1a and 1b (TTSuV1a, TTSuV1b; genus Iotatorquevirus), TTSuVk2a and TTSuVk2b (genus Kappatorquevirus). TTSuV infection in pigs is distributed worldwide, and is characterized by a persistent viremia. However, the real impact, if any, on the pig health is still under debate. In the present study, the impact of pig immunization on TTSuVk2a loads was evaluated. For this, three-week old conventional pigs were primed with DNA vaccines encoding the ORF2 gene and the ORF1-A, ORF1-B, and ORF1-C splicing variants and boosted with purified ORF1-A and ORF2 Escherichia coli proteins, while another group served as unvaccinated control animals, and the viral load dynamics during natural infection was observed. Immunization led to delayed onset of TTSuVk2a infection and at the end of the study when the animals were 15 weeks of age, a number of animals in the immunized group had cleared the TTSuVk2a viremia, which was not the case in the control group. This study demonstrated for the first time that TTSuV viremia can be controlled by a combined DNA and protein immunization, especially apparent two weeks after the first DNA immunization before seroconversion was observed. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms behind this and its impact for pig producers.

  10. Conserved Immune Recognition Hierarchy of Mycobacterial PE/PPE Proteins during Infection in Natural Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Vordermeier, H. Martin; Hewinson, R. Glyn; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Wilkinson, Katalin A.; Gideon, Hannah P.; Young, Douglas B.; Sampson, Samantha L.

    2012-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome contains two large gene families encoding proteins of unknown function, characterized by conserved N-terminal proline and glutamate (PE and PPE) motifs. The presence of a large number of PE/PPE proteins with repetitive domains and evidence of strain variation has given rise to the suggestion that these proteins may play a role in immune evasion via antigenic variation, while emerging data suggests that some family members may play important roles in mycobacterial pathogenesis. In this study, we examined cellular immune responses to a panel of 36 PE/PPE proteins during human and bovine infection. We observed a distinct hierarchy of immune recognition, reflected both in the repertoire of PE/PPE peptide recognition in individual cows and humans and in the magnitude of IFN-γ responses elicited by stimulation of sensitized host cells. The pattern of immunodominance was strikingly similar between cattle that had been experimentally infected with Mycobacterium bovis and humans naturally infected with clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis. The same pattern was maintained as disease progressed throughout a four-month course of infection in cattle, and between humans with latent as well as active tuberculosis. Detailed analysis of PE/PPE responses at the peptide level suggests that antigenic cross-reactivity amongst related family members is a major determinant in the observed differences in immune hierarchy. Taken together, these results demonstrate that a subset of PE/PPE proteins are major targets of the cellular immune response to tuberculosis, and are recognized at multiple stages of infection and in different disease states. Thus this work identifies a number of novel antigens that could find application in vaccine development, and provides new insights into PE/PPE biology. PMID:22870206

  11. Hepatic cholinesterase of laying hens naturally infected by Salmonella Gallinarum (fowl typhoid).

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Boiago, Marcel M; Bottari, Nathieli B; do Carmo, Guilherme M; Alves, Mariana Sauzen; Boscato, Carla; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Casagrande, Renata A; Stefani, Lenita M

    2016-09-01

    Salmonella is a facultative intracellular pathogen that may cause foodborne gastroenteritis in humans and animals consisting of over 2000 serovars. The serovar Salmonella Gallinarum is an important worldwide pathogen of poultry. However, little is known on the mechanisms of pathogenesis of Salmonella in chickens. The aim of this study was to evaluate cholinesterase and myeloperoxidase activities in hepatic tissue of laying hens naturally infected by S. Gallinarum. Twenty positive liver samples for S. Gallinarum were collected, in addition to seven liver samples from healthy uninfected laying hens (control group). The right liver lobe was homogenized for analysis of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and myeloperoxidase (MPO), and the left lobe was divided into two fragments, one f