Science.gov

Sample records for building research establishment

  1. Limiting the Temperatures in Naturally Ventilated Buildings in Warm Climates. Building Research Establishment Current Paper 7/74.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petherbridge, P.

    Formulas used in the calculation of cooling loads and indoor temperatures are employed to demonstrate the influence of various building parameters--such as thermal transmittance (U-value), solar absorptivity, and thermal storage--on the indoor thermal environment. The analysis leads to guidance on ways of limiting temperatures in naturally…

  2. A call for action to establish a research agenda for building a future health workforce in Europe.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Ellen; Batenburg, Ronald; Wismar, Matthias; Dussault, Gilles; Maier, Claudia B; Glinos, Irene A; Azzopardi-Muscat, Natasha; Bond, Christine; Burau, Viola; Correia, Tiago; Groenewegen, Peter P; Hansen, Johan; Hunter, David J; Khan, Usman; Kluge, Hans H; Kroezen, Marieke; Leone, Claudia; Santric-Milicevic, Milena; Sermeus, Walter; Ungureanu, Marius

    2018-06-20

    The importance of a sustainable health workforce is increasingly recognised. However, the building of a future health workforce that is responsive to diverse population needs and demographic and economic change remains insufficiently understood. There is a compelling argument to be made for a comprehensive research agenda to address the questions. With a focus on Europe and taking a health systems approach, we introduce an agenda linked to the 'Health Workforce Research' section of the European Public Health Association. Six major objectives for health workforce policy were identified: (1) to develop frameworks that align health systems/governance and health workforce policy/planning, (2) to explore the effects of changing skill mixes and competencies across sectors and occupational groups, (3) to map how education and health workforce governance can be better integrated, (4) to analyse the impact of health workforce mobility on health systems, (5) to optimise the use of international/EU, national and regional health workforce data and monitoring and (6) to build capacity for policy implementation. This article highlights critical knowledge gaps that currently hamper the opportunities of effectively responding to these challenges and advising policy-makers in different health systems. Closing these knowledge gaps is therefore an important step towards future health workforce governance and policy implementation. There is an urgent need for building health workforce research as an independent, interdisciplinary and multi-professional field. This requires dedicated research funding, new academic education programmes, comparative methodology and knowledge transfer and leadership that can help countries to build a people-centred health workforce.

  3. A New Approach to Predicting the Thermal Environment in Buildings at the Early Design Stage. Building Research Establishment Current Paper 2/74.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milbank, N. O.

    The paper argues that existing computer programs for thermal predictions do not produce suitable information for architects, particularly at the early stages of design. It reviews the important building features that determine the thermal environment and the need for heating and cooling plant. Graphical design aids are proposed, with examples to…

  4. Establishing the boundaries and building bridges: a literature review on ecological theory: implications for research into the refugee parenting experience.

    PubMed

    Williams, Nombasa

    2010-03-01

    Currently an ecological model for conceptualizing and capturing the refugee parenting experience is lacking. After an extensive review of the literature related to the usages of Bronfenbrenner's ecological model of child development, a gap was found in knowledge and research centred on describing the environment of pre-resettlement (i.e. pre-flight, flight, migration, camp) contexts and their impact on refugee parents and carer experiences. The culture of the refugee parenting experience may be characterized by disruptions in and alterations to family structure and organization; values and norms; and gender roles. This paper begins by examining the definition and usages of existing ecological frameworks in the 20th and 21st century. Particular attention is drawn to the gaps in the existing literature and an ecological model is offered. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implications for practice. The outcomes of this paper suggest the need for practitioners, policymakers and researchers to engage and develop culturally competent, relevant and appropriate interventions (i.e. reconciling differing beliefs and behaviours concerning child-rearing practices; affirming positive parenting practices of these families during engagement protocols and processes; adopting a strengths-based orientation) in the area of child protection whilst at the same time safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children within pre- and post-resettlement contexts.

  5. NREL Buildings Research Video

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2017-12-09

    Through research, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed many strategies and design techniques to ensure both commercial and residential buildings use as little energy as possible and also work well with the surroundings. Here you will find a video that introduces the work of NREL Buildings Research, highlights some of the facilities on the NREL campus, and demonstrates these efficient building strategies. Watch this video to see design highlights of the Science and Technology Facility on the NREL campus—the first Federal building to be LEED® Platinum certified. Additionally, the video demonstrates the energy-saving features of NRELs Thermal Test Facility.

  6. Research Staff | Buildings | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    Research Staff Research Staff Photo of Roderick Jackson Roderick Jackson Laboratory Program Manager -related research at NREL. He works closely with senior laboratory management to set the strategic agenda for NREL's buildings portfolio, including all research, development, and market implementation

  7. Building transit oriented development in established communities

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-11-01

    This report provides a synthesis of the steps that established car oriented communities have taken to transform into transit oriented communities. The report identifies several approaches, such as the use of transit oriented design, focusing transit ...

  8. Building breakthrough businesses within established organizations.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Vijay; Trimble, Chris

    2005-05-01

    Many companies assume that once they've launched a major innovation, growth will soon follow. It's not that simple. High-potential new businesses within established companies face stiff headwinds well after their inception. That's why a company's emphasis must shift: from ideas to execution and from leadership excellence to organizational excellence. The authors spent five years chronicling new businesses at the New York Times Company, Analog Devices, Corning, Hasbro, and other organizations. They found that a breakthrough new business (referred to as NewCo) rarely coexists gracefully with the established business in the company (called CoreCo). The unnatural combination creates three specific challenges--forgetting, borrowing, and learning--that NewCo must meet in order to survive and grow. NewCo must first forget some of what made CoreCo successful. NewCo and CoreCo have elemental differences, so NewCo must leave behind CoreCo's notions about what skills and competencies are most valuable. NewCo must also borrow some of CoreCo's assets--usually in one or two key areas that will give NewCo a crucial competitive advantage. Incremental cost reductions, for example, are never a sufficient justification for borrowing. Finally, NewCo must be prepared to learn some things from scratch. Because strategic experiments are highly uncertain endeavors, NewCo will face several critical unknowns. The more rapidly it can resolve those unknowns--that is, the faster it can learn--the sooner it will zero in on a winning business model or exit a hopeless situation. Managers can accelerate this learning by planning more simply and more often and by comparing predicted and actual trends.

  9. Building the Capacity of HBCU's for Establishing Effective Globe Partnerships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagayoko, Diola; Ford, Robert L.

    2002-01-01

    The special GLOBE train-the-trainer (TTT) workshop entitled "Building the Capacity of HBCUs For Establishing Effective GLOBE Partnerships" was help for the purpose of expanding GLOBE training capacity on the campuses of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and community colleges (CCs). The workshop was held March 17-22, 2002 in Washington, D.C. at Howard University. It was designed to establish research and instructional collaboration between and among U.S. universities (HBCUs and CCs) and African countries. Representatives from 13 HBCUs, and two community colleges were represented among trainees, so were representatives from eight African countries who were financially supported by other sources. A total of 38 trainees increased their knowledge of GLOBE protocols through five days of rigorous classroom instruction, field experiences, cultural events, and computer lab sessions.

  10. Establishing a commercial building energy data framework for India

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, Maithili; Kumar, Satish; Mathew, Sangeeta

    Buildings account for over 40% of the world’s energy consumption and are therefore a key contributor to a country’s energy as well as carbon budget. Understanding how buildings use energy is critical to understanding how related policies may impact energy use. Data enables decision making, and good quality data arms consumers with the tools to compare their energy performance to their peers, allowing them to differentiate their buildings in the real estate market on the basis of their energy footprint. Good quality data are also essential for policy makers to prioritize their energy saving strategies and track implementation. The Unitedmore » States’ Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is an example of a successful data framework that is highly useful for governmental and nongovernmental initiatives related to benchmarking energy forecasting, rating systems and metrics, and more. The Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) in India developed the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) and launched the Star Labeling program for a few energy-intensive building segments as a significant first step. However, a data driven policy framework for systematically targeting energy efficiency in both new construction and existing buildings has largely been missing. There is no quantifiable mechanism currently in place to track the impact of code adoption through regular reporting/survey of energy consumption in the commercial building stock. In this paper we present findings from our study that explored use cases and approaches for establishing a commercial buildings data framework for India.« less

  11. Establishing and agreeing on research priorities

    Treesearch

    Ian de Ia Roche

    1999-01-01

    The organizers asked me to share with you my experiences in developing and implementing a process for establishing and agreeing on research priorities in a multi-stakeholder research institute such as Forintek. The mechanism we have in place has been well received by Forintek's membership and certain aspects have been adopted by other research organizations. While...

  12. Establishing a Center to Support Faculty Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Laura; Kozleski, Elizabeth; Muth, Rodney; Rhodes, Lynn K.; White, Kim Kennedy

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the establishment in fall 2002 of a School of Education Research Center designed to support faculty in increasing productivity and quality in research. Details are provided about center goals, services, staffing, space, resources, and logistics during the first year of operation. In addition, data are shared about faculty…

  13. 76 FR 35894 - Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings; Establishment of the Green Building Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    ... Federal High-Performance Green Buildings; Establishment of the Green Building Advisory Committee AGENCY... announces the establishment of the Green Building Advisory Committee (the Committee), pursuant to Section... strategic plans, products and activities of the Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings and...

  14. Establishing a successful clinical research program.

    PubMed

    Scoglio, Daniele; Fichera, Alessandro

    2014-06-01

    Clinical research (CR) is a natural corollary to clinical surgery. It gives an investigator the opportunity to critically review their results and develop new strategies. This article covers the critical factors and the important components of a successful CR program. The first and most important step is to build a dedicated research team to overcome time constraints and enable a surgical practice to make CR a priority. With the research team in place, the next step is to create a program on the basis of an original idea and new clinical hypotheses. This often comes from personal experience supported by a review of the available evidence. Randomized controlled (clinical) trials are the most stringent way of determining whether a cause-effect relationship exists between the intervention and the outcome. In the proper setting, translational research may offer additional avenues allowing clinical application of basic science discoveries.

  15. Partnership to build research capacity.

    PubMed

    Boland, Mary G; Kamikawa, Cindy; Inouye, Jillian; Latimer, Renee W; Marshall, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Today's nursing leaders are setting the stage for the next evolution--bringing together skilled clinicians and administrators with peers in education to create new approaches to leading the profession forward. Partnerships share goals, common purpose, mutual respect, willingness to negotiate and compromise, informed participation, information giving, and shared decision making. The shared practice academia effort between a public university and a private health care system situated in the island state of Hawai'i is described. The medical center and school of nursing pursued individual strategic efforts to build research capacity and used the opportunity to fund academic practice research projects. The mutual need and recognition of the high stakes involved, in concert with stable, committed leaders at all levels, were key to the early success of their efforts. Through the formal research partnership mechanism, a discrete focus was created for efforts and used to move to tactical, operational, and interpersonal integration in this relationship.

  16. Establishing a research and demonstration area initiated by managers: the Sharkey Restoration Research and Demonstration Site

    Treesearch

    E. Gardiner; J. Stanturf; T. Leininger; P. Hamel; L. Jr. Dorris; J. Portwood; J. Shepard

    2008-01-01

    As forest scientists increase their role in the process of science delivery, many research organizations are searching for novel methods to effectively build collaboration with managers to produce valued results. This article documents our experience with establishment of a forest restoration research and demonstration area in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley (...

  17. Building research capital to facilitate research.

    PubMed

    Green, Gill; Rein, Melanie

    2013-04-04

    The National Institute for Health Research, Research Design Service (NIHR RDS) was set up to increase the number and proportion of high quality applications for funding for applied and patient focused health and social care research. Access to specialist expertise and collaboration between researchers and health practitioners at the proposal development stage is crucial for high quality applied health research. In this essay we develop the concept of 'research capital' to describe the wide range of resources and expertise required to develop fundable research projects. It highlights the key role the RDS plays supporting researchers to broker relationships to access the requisite 'research capital'.

  18. Systems Engineering Building Advances Power Grid Research

    ScienceCinema

    Virden, Jud; Huang, Henry; Skare, Paul; Dagle, Jeff; Imhoff, Carl; Stoustrup, Jakob; Melton, Ron; Stiles, Dennis; Pratt, Rob

    2018-01-16

    Researchers and industry are now better equipped to tackle the nation’s most pressing energy challenges through PNNL’s new Systems Engineering Building – including challenges in grid modernization, buildings efficiency and renewable energy integration. This lab links real-time grid data, software platforms, specialized laboratories and advanced computing resources for the design and demonstration of new tools to modernize the grid and increase buildings energy efficiency.

  19. NREL's Buildings Research Honored by Architecture Magazine

    Science.gov Websites

    NREL's Buildings Research Honored by Architecture Magazine For more information contact: Kerry Masson, (303) 275-4083 Golden, Colo., January 15, 1997—Architecture magazine's Progressive Architecture

  20. Essentials of building a career in nursing research.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Sayers, Jan; Watson, Roger

    2016-07-01

    Nursing research is fundamental to driving evidence-based practice and achieving safe outcomes for patients. Underpinning the discussion in this paper are nurse researchers who thought strategically during their undergraduate and postgraduate studies to build a body of credible research influencing patient outcomes and, in so doing, establish their careers. To provide an overview of some of the career essentials that support a transition in role for the beginner or emerging researcher, otherwise known as the early career researcher. Early career researchers need to acquire research competencies, to get involved in research teams, and to understand the research landscape and the various associated subtleties/vagaries and career trajectories. This is fundamental for establishing their credibility as researchers, and enabling them to undertake research that will influence policy and practice. Establishing a research career is challenging, and takes time, effort, patience, perseverance and commitment. For beginner researchers, collegial support and mentoring are essential to support a viable, professional, sustainable, enquiring profession, and a satisfying career. Building individual capabilities and collaborative research teams together is fundamental to research success in adapting to new roles and workplaces.

  1. Building Collective Communication Competence in Interdisciplinary Research Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Jessica Leigh

    2009-01-01

    Using a grounded theory approach, this investigation addresses how an interdisciplinary research (IDR) team negotiates meaning and struggles to establish and sustain a sense of collective communication competence (CCC). Certain communication processes were foundational to building CCC, such as spending time together, practicing trust, discussing…

  2. Establishing space research capability in Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosinger, T.; Damtie, B.; Usoskin, I. G.

    It is often considered by various sources and institutions around the world that promotion of space physics activities in a developing country like Ethiopia is a waste of time and resources. It has, of course, some sense: developing countries should put all their efforts in improving the standard of life, infrastructure and basic education. However, it is straightforward to realize that nowadays improvement in any of the basic needs of developing countries is related to high technology (e.g. mobile phones, GPS, remote sensing). This means that a developing country has to take care of recruiting specialists among their own people who can take part in the decision making processes which are increasingly of global nature. Moreover, many citizens of developing countries are studying and working abroad attaining high expertise. As a matter of fact, there are more Ethiopians with PhD in physics working abroad than in the country. These people are lost for the benefit of their own country if there is no need for their profession in their home country. There is no doubt that the main task of improving the standard of living cannot be achieved without development and social transformation of the society, which can take place efficiently in a self-adopting and dynamic process. In line with the above argument, we have initiated the establishment of the Washera Space Physics Laboratory (WASPL) at Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia. It is a collaboration project between Oulu University and Addis Ababa University. The laboratory is expected to start operation of a pulsation magnetometer and photometer in September 2004. Other types of standard geophysical instruments are to be installed in subsequent missions. The project is of mutual interest of both parties. The equatorial ionosphere is still a poorly investigated region of our near Earth's space. In a first pilot investigation the existence and properties of the ionospheric Alfvén resonator (IAR) in the equatorial ionosphere

  3. Rehabilitation Medicine Summit: Building Research Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Frontera, Walter R; Fuhrer, Marcus J; Jette, Alan M; Chan, Leighton; Cooper, Rory A; Duncan, Pamela W; Kemp, John D; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Peckham, P Hunter; Roth, Elliot J; Tate, Denise G

    2006-01-01

    Summary: The general objective of the “Rehabilitation Medicine Summit: Building Research Capacity” was to advance and promote research in medical rehabilitation by making recommendations to expand research capacity. The five elements of research capacity that guided the discussions were: 1) researchers; 2) research culture, environment, and infrastructure; 3) funding; 4) partnerships; and 5) metrics. The 100 participants included representatives of professional organizations, consumer groups, academic departments, researchers, governmental funding agencies, and the private sector. The small group discussions and plenary sessions generated an array of problems, possible solutions, and recommended actions. A post-Summit, multi-organizational initiative is called to pursue the agendas outlined in this report. PMID:16572568

  4. Building capacity for nurse-led research.

    PubMed

    Edwards, N; Webber, J; Mill, J; Kahwa, E; Roelofs, S

    2009-03-01

    To discuss factors that have influenced the development of research capacity among nurses in lower and middle-income countries (LMICs). Concerned health scientists have addressed the importance of building research capacity among health professionals. Strengthening capacity specifically among LMIC nurses has been infrequently discussed. Without the requisite educational preparation or an enabling environment for research, nurses are unlikely to either demand research capacity-building opportunities or initiate research examining nursing practice and health system challenges. A scan was conducted of nine internationally funded research capacity-building initiatives to identify programme targeting and the proportion of nurse trainees. A literature review examined graduate and post-graduate training opportunities for LMIC nurses, and barriers and enablers to nurses' involvement in research. Informal consultations were held with nurse leaders in 15 LMICs and leaders of eight LMIC nursing organizations. The scan found a generic targeting of health professionals with a very low percentage of nurse trainees. Programmes specifically targeting nurses did attract and prepare a significant number of nurses. Factors limiting nurses' involvement in research include hierarchies of power among disciplines, scarce resources, a lack of graduate and post-graduate education opportunities, few senior mentors, and prolonged underfunding of nursing research. Fully engaging LMIC nurses in health services research may yield pragmatic and evidence-informed service delivery and policy recommendations. Investments in supports for nursing research capacity may enrich global health policy effectiveness and improve quality of care.

  5. Building the Professional Identity of Research Assistants: A Phenomenological Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Büyükgöze, Hilal; Gün, Feyza

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to investigate the determining factors in how research assistants build their professional identity. In the study, which is a qualitative research method patterned on phenomenology, data was collected using a semi-structured interview form. Structured interviews were conducted with seven research assistants selected from a…

  6. Maximize Energy Efficiency in Buildings | Climate Neutral Research Campuses

    Science.gov Websites

    Buildings on a research campus, especially laboratory buildings, often represent the most cost-effective plans, campuses can evaluate the following: Energy Management Building Management New Buildings Design

  7. Supporting Theory Building in Integrated Services Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Mark; Atkinson, Mary; Downing, Dick

    2008-01-01

    This literature review was commissioned by the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) to draw together current and recent studies of integrated working, in order to build an overview of the theories and models of such working. The review is important for current work on evaluating the early impact of integrated children's services and…

  8. Flight Research Building at the Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1942-09-21

    The Flight Research Building at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory is a 272- by 150-foot hangar with an internal height up to 90 feet. The hangar’s massive 37.5-foot-tall and 250-foot-long doors can be opened in sections to suit different size aircraft. The hangar has sheltered a diverse fleet of aircraft over the decades. These have ranged from World War II bombers to Cessna trainers and from supersonic fighter jets to a DC–9 airliner. At the time of this September 1942 photograph, however, the hangar was being used as an office building during the construction of the laboratory. In December of 1941, the Flight Research Building became the lab’s first functional building. Temporary offices were built inside the structure to house the staff while the other buildings were completed. The hangar offices were used for an entire year before being removed in early 1943. It was only then that the laboratory acquired its first aircraft, pilots and flight mechanics. The temporary one-story offices can be seen in this photograph inside the large sliding doors. Also note the vertical lift gate below the NACA logo. The gate was installed so that the tails of larger aircraft could pass into the hangar. The white Farm House that served as the Administration Building during construction can be seen in the distance to the left of the hangar.

  9. LIDAR Point Cloud Data Extraction and Establishment of 3D Modeling of Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yujuan; Li, Xiuhai; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Jiang; Liang, Xin; Li, Dan; Ni, Chundi; Liu, Yan

    2018-01-01

    This paper takes the method of Shepard’s to deal with the original LIDAR point clouds data, and generate regular grid data DSM, filters the ground point cloud and non ground point cloud through double least square method, and obtains the rules of DSM. By using region growing method for the segmentation of DSM rules, the removal of non building point cloud, obtaining the building point cloud information. Uses the Canny operator to extract the image segmentation is needed after the edges of the building, uses Hough transform line detection to extract the edges of buildings rules of operation based on the smooth and uniform. At last, uses E3De3 software to establish the 3D model of buildings.

  10. Helping Research Organizations Build a Clean Energy Future | Working with

    Science.gov Websites

    Us | NREL Helping Research Organizations Build a Clean Energy Future Helping Research Organizations Build a Clean Energy Future Partner with NREL to accelerate the research and development of your

  11. The importance of community building for establishing data management and curation practices for physical samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramdeen, S.; Hangsterfer, A.; Stanley, V. L.

    2017-12-01

    There is growing enthusiasm for curation of physical samples in the Earth Science community (see sessions at AGU, GSA, ESIP). Multiple federally funded efforts aim to develop best practices for curation of physical samples; however, these efforts have not yet been consolidated. Harmonizing these concurrent efforts would enable the community as a whole to build the necessary tools and community standards to move forward together. Preliminary research indicate the various groups focused on this topic are working in isolation, and the development of standards needs to come from the broadest view of `community'. We will investigate the gaps between communities by collecting information about preservation policies and practices from curators, who can provide a diverse cross-section of the grand challenges to the overall community. We will look at existing reports and study results to identify example cases, then develop a survey to gather large scale data to reinforce or clarify the example cases. We will be targeting the various community groups which are working on similar issues, and use the survey to improve the visibility of developed best practices. Given that preservation and digital collection management for physical samples are both important and difficult at present (GMRWG, 2015; NRC, 2002), barriers to both need to be addressed in order to achieve open science goals for the entire community. To address these challenges, EarthCube's iSamples, a research coordination network established to advance discoverability, access, and curation of physical samples using cyberinfrastructure, has formed a working group to collect use cases to examine the breadth of earth scientists' work with physical samples. This research team includes curators of state survey and oceanographic geological collections, and a researcher from information science. In our presentation, we will share our research and the design of the proposed survey. Our goal is to engage the audience in a

  12. Building Teachers' Research Literacy: Integrating Practice and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Carol; Waring, Michael; Christodoulou, Andri

    2017-01-01

    Supporting early career teacher (ECT) research literacy is essential in promoting research-integrated professional practice, however it remains an area in much need of development. This article discusses the importance and process of developing ECTs' research literacy, through establishing strong collaborative links between universities and…

  13. Establishing the credibility of qualitative research findings: the plot thickens.

    PubMed

    Cutcliffe, J R; McKenna, H P

    1999-08-01

    Qualitative research is increasingly recognized and valued and its unique place in nursing research is highlighted by many. Despite this, some nurse researchers continue to raise epistemological issues about the problems of objectivity and the validity of qualitative research findings. This paper explores the issues relating to the representativeness or credibility of qualitative research findings. It therefore critiques the existing distinct philosophical and methodological positions concerning the trustworthiness of qualitative research findings, which are described as follows: quantitative studies should be judged using the same criteria and terminology as quantitative studies; it is impossible, in a meaningful way, for any criteria to be used to judge qualitative studies; qualitative studies should be judged using criteria that are developed for and fit the qualitative paradigm; and the credibility of qualitative research findings could be established by testing out the emerging theory by means of conducting a deductive quantitative study. The authors conclude by providing some guidelines for establishing the credibility of qualitative research findings.

  14. Building a biomedical cyberinfrastructure for collaborative research.

    PubMed

    Schad, Peter A; Mobley, Lee Rivers; Hamilton, Carol M

    2011-05-01

    For the potential power of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and translational medicine to be realized, the biomedical research community must adopt standard measures, vocabularies, and systems to establish an extensible biomedical cyberinfrastructure. Incorporating standard measures will greatly facilitate combining and comparing studies via meta-analysis. Incorporating consensus-based and well-established measures into various studies should reduce the variability across studies due to attributes of measurement, making findings across studies more comparable. This article describes two well-established consensus-based approaches to identifying standard measures and systems: PhenX (consensus measures for phenotypes and eXposures), and the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). NIH support for these efforts has produced the PhenX Toolkit, an assembled catalog of standard measures for use in GWAS and other large-scale genomic research efforts, and the RTI Spatial Impact Factor Database (SIFD), a comprehensive repository of geo-referenced variables and extensive meta-data that conforms to OGC standards. The need for coordinated development of cyberinfrastructure to support measures and systems that enhance collaboration and data interoperability is clear; this paper includes a discussion of standard protocols for ensuring data compatibility and interoperability. Adopting a cyberinfrastructure that includes standard measures and vocabularies, and open-source systems architecture, such as the two well-established systems discussed here, will enhance the potential of future biomedical and translational research. Establishing and maintaining the cyberinfrastructure will require a fundamental change in the way researchers think about study design, collaboration, and data storage and analysis. Copyright © 2011 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Establishing a Common Definition for Zero Energy Buildings: Time to Move the Market

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Kent; Torcellini, Paul; Taylor, Cody

    To change the current paradigm from buildings being consumers of energy to producers of energy requires a common language to facilitate market transformation. Common definitions help create market movement by sharing concepts across market actors. While the term 'zero energy buildings' has been in the marketplace for over 20 years, no common definition had been established. US DOE, last year, embarked on a process to evaluate current definitions and solicit industry input to formulate a common definition and nomenclature for zero energy buildings. This definition uses commonly available site measurements and national conversion factors to define zero energy buildings onmore » a source energy basis for a variety of boundary conditions including building, portfolio, campus, and community. Issues addressed include multiple fuel types, cogeneration, and renewable energy certificates. This paper describes the process used to arrive at the definition, looks at methods of calculating site to source energy conversions, and how boundary decisions affect a robust and stable definition that can be used to direct programs and policies for many years to come. This stability is critical to move building investments towards buildings that produce as much energy as they consume.« less

  16. A framework to evaluate research capacity building in health care

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Jo

    2005-01-01

    Background Building research capacity in health services has been recognised internationally as important in order to produce a sound evidence base for decision-making in policy and practice. Activities to increase research capacity for, within, and by practice include initiatives to support individuals and teams, organisations and networks. Little has been discussed or concluded about how to measure the effectiveness of research capacity building (RCB) Discussion This article attempts to develop the debate on measuring RCB. It highlights that traditional outcomes of publications in peer reviewed journals and successful grant applications may be important outcomes to measure, but they may not address all the relevant issues to highlight progress, especially amongst novice researchers. They do not capture factors that contribute to developing an environment to support capacity development, or on measuring the usefulness or the 'social impact' of research, or on professional outcomes. The paper suggests a framework for planning change and measuring progress, based on six principles of RCB, which have been generated through the analysis of the literature, policy documents, empirical studies, and the experience of one Research and Development Support Unit in the UK. These principles are that RCB should: develop skills and confidence, support linkages and partnerships, ensure the research is 'close to practice', develop appropriate dissemination, invest in infrastructure, and build elements of sustainability and continuity. It is suggested that each principle operates at individual, team, organisation and supra-organisational levels. Some criteria for measuring progress are also given. Summary This paper highlights the need to identify ways of measuring RCB. It points out the limitations of current measurements that exist in the literature, and proposes a framework for measuring progress, which may form the basis of comparison of RCB activities. In this way it could

  17. Research capacity building integrated into PHIT projects: leveraging research and research funding to build national capacity.

    PubMed

    Hedt-Gauthier, Bethany L; Chilengi, Roma; Jackson, Elizabeth; Michel, Cathy; Napua, Manuel; Odhiambo, Jackline; Bawah, Ayaga

    2017-12-21

    Inadequate research capacity impedes the development of evidence-based health programming in sub-Saharan Africa. However, funding for research capacity building (RCB) is often insufficient and restricted, limiting institutions' ability to address current RCB needs. The Doris Duke Charitable Foundation's African Health Initiative (AHI) funded Population Health Implementation and Training (PHIT) partnership projects in five African countries (Ghana, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania and Zambia) to implement health systems strengthening initiatives inclusive of RCB. Using Cooke's framework for RCB, RCB activity leaders from each country reported on RCB priorities, activities, program metrics, ongoing challenges and solutions. These were synthesized by the authorship team, identifying common challenges and lessons learned. For most countries, each of the RCB domains from Cooke's framework was a high priority. In about half of the countries, domain specific activities happened prior to PHIT. During PHIT, specific RCB activities varied across countries. However, all five countries used AHI funding to improve research administrative support and infrastructure, implement research trainings and support mentorship activities and research dissemination. While outcomes data were not systematically collected, countries reported holding 54 research trainings, forming 56 mentor-mentee relationships, training 201 individuals and awarding 22 PhD and Masters-level scholarships. Over the 5 years, 116 manuscripts were developed. Of the 59 manuscripts published in peer-reviewed journals, 29 had national first authors and 18 had national senior authors. Trainees participated in 99 conferences and projects held 37 forums with policy makers to facilitate research translation into policy. All five PHIT projects strongly reported an increase in RCB activities and commended the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation for prioritizing RCB, funding RCB at adequate levels and time frames and for allowing

  18. Building a Biomedical Cyberinfrastructure for Collaborative Research

    PubMed Central

    Schad, Peter A.; Mobley, Lee Rivers; Hamilton, Carol M.

    2018-01-01

    For the potential power of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and translational medicine to be realized, the biomedical research community must adopt standard measures, vocabularies, and systems to establish an extensible biomedical cyberinfrastructure. Incorporating standard measures will greatly facilitate combining and comparing studies via meta-analysis, which is a means for deriving larger populations, needed for increased statistical power to detect less apparent and more complex associations (gene-environment interactions and polygenic gene-gene interactions). Incorporating consensus-based and well-established measures into various studies should reduce the variability across studies due to attributes of measurement, making findings across studies more comparable. This article describes two consensus-based approaches to establishing standard measures and systems: PhenX (consensus measures for Phenotypes and eXposures), and the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). National Institutes of Health support for these efforts has produced the PhenX Toolkit, an assembled catalog of standard measures for use in GWAS and other large-scale genomic research efforts, and the RTI Spatial Impact Factor Database (SIFD), a comprehensive repository of georeferenced variables and extensive metadata that conforms to OGC standards. The need for coordinated development of cyberinfrastructure to support collaboration and data interoperability is clear, and we discuss standard protocols for ensuring data compatibility and interoperability. Adopting a cyberinfrastructure that includes standard measures, vocabularies, and open-source systems architecture will enhance the potential of future biomedical and translational research. Establishing and maintaining the cyberinfrastructure will require a fundamental change in the way researchers think about study design, collaboration, and data storage and analysis. PMID:21521587

  19. Establishing a 'track record': research productivity and nursing academe.

    PubMed

    Emden, C

    1998-01-01

    Many nursing academics in Australia are finding to their dismay that an outstanding teaching career and exemplary professional contribution to their field--and a PhD--are not enough to achieve promotion within their university, or secure a new academic post. One must also possess a proven or established 'track record' in research and publication. The operational funding arrangements for Australian universities rely in part on the research productivity of their academic staff members. This places special expectation upon the way academics conduct their scholarly work. Nursing academics are under particular pressure: as relative newcomers to the university scene, most find themselves considered as early career researchers with weak track records. This paper reviews relevant research and draws upon personal experience in the area of research development, to highlight how nursing academics may most strategically establish a research and publication record with a view to career advancement.

  20. Establishment of Low Energy Building materials and Equipment Database Based on Property Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yumin; Shin, Hyery; eon Lee, Seung

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide reliable service of materials information portal through the establishment of public big data by collecting and integrating scattered low energy building materials and equipment data. There were few cases of low energy building materials database in Korea have provided material properties as factors influencing material pricing. The framework of the database was defined referred with Korea On-line E-procurement system. More than 45,000 data were gathered by the specification of entities and with the gathered data, price prediction models for chillers were suggested. To improve the usability of the prediction model, detailed properties should be analysed for each item.

  1. Integrated Research and Capacity Building in Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willemann, R. J.; Lerner-Lam, A.; Nyblade, A.

    2008-05-01

    There have been special opportunities over the past several years to improve the ways that newly-constructed geophysical observatories in Southeast Asia and the Americas are linked with educational and civil institutions. Because these opportunities have been only partially fulfilled, there remains the possibility that new networks will not fully address desired goals or even lose operational capabilities. In contrast, the AfricaArray project continues to progress towards goals for linkages among education, research, mitigation and observatories. With support from the Office of International Science and Education at the US National Science Foundation, we convened a workshop to explore lessons learned from the AfricaArray experience and their relevance to network development opportunities in other regions. We found closer parallels than we expected between geophysical infrastructure in the predominantly low income countries of Africa with low risk of geophysical disasters and the mostly middle-income countries of Southeast Asia and the Americas with high risk of geophysical disasters. Except in larger countries of South America, workshop participants reported that there are very few geophysicists engaged in research and observatory operations, that geophysical education programs are nearly non-existent even at the undergraduate university level, and that many monitoring agencies continue to focus on limited missions even though closer relationships researchers could facilitate new services that would make important contributions to disaster mitigation and sustainable operations. Workshop participants began discussing plans for international research collaborations that, unlike many projects of even the recent past, would include long-term capacity building and disaster mitigation among their goals. Specific project objectives would include national or regional hazard mapping, development of indigenous education programs, training to address the needs of local

  2. Video: NREL and Buildings Research - Continuum Magazine | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    solutions to improve the energy efficiency of both residential and commercial buildings, and to accelerate the integration of clean energy technologies with buildings. NREL's commercial buildings research focuses on providing large institutional and private sector commercial building owners with tools

  3. Building Space Management | Climate Neutral Research Campuses | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    Building Space Management Building Space Management Building space represents one of the largest recruiting and successful acquisition of research funding. Learn more about how space management is necessary Options Research campuses reduce the need for new space through more effective space management

  4. Research workshop to research work: initial steps in establishing health research systems on Malaita, Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Atoifi Adventist Hospital is a 90 bed general hospital in East Kwaio, Malaita, Solomon Islands providing services to the population of subsistence villagers of the region. Health professionals at the hospital and attached College of Nursing have considerable human capacity and willingness to undertake health research. However they are constrained by limited research experience, training opportunities, research systems, physical infrastructure and access to resources. This brief commentary describes an 'Introduction to Health Research' workshop delivered at Atoifi Adventist Hospital in September 2009 and efforts to move from 'research workshop' to 'research work'. The Approach Using a participatory-action research approach underpinned by decolonising methodologies, staff from Atoifi Adventist Hospital and James Cook University (Queensland, Australia) collaboratively designed, implemented and evaluated a health research workshop. Basic health research principles and methods were presented using active learning methodologies. Following the workshop, Atoifi Adventist Hospital and Atoifi College of Nursing staff, other professionals and community members reported an increased awareness and understanding of health research. The formation of a local Research Committee, improved ethics review procedures and the identification of local research mentors followed the week long workshop. The workshop has acted as a catalyst for research activity, increasing structural and human resource capacity for local health professionals and community leaders to engage in research. Discussion and Conclusions Participants from a variety of educational backgrounds participated in, and received benefit from, a responsive, culturally and linguistically accessible health research workshop. Improving health research systems at a remote hospital and aligning these with local and national research agendas is establishing a base to strengthen public health research and practice on

  5. Research workshop to research work: initial steps in establishing health research systems on Malaita, Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Redman-Maclaren, Michelle L; Maclaren, David J; Solomon, Janella; Muse, Alwin; Asugeni, Rowena; Harrington, Humpress; Kekuabata, Esau; Speare, Richard; Clough, Alan R

    2010-10-31

    Atoifi Adventist Hospital is a 90 bed general hospital in East Kwaio, Malaita, Solomon Islands providing services to the population of subsistence villagers of the region. Health professionals at the hospital and attached College of Nursing have considerable human capacity and willingness to undertake health research. However they are constrained by limited research experience, training opportunities, research systems, physical infrastructure and access to resources. This brief commentary describes an 'Introduction to Health Research' workshop delivered at Atoifi Adventist Hospital in September 2009 and efforts to move from 'research workshop' to 'research work'. Using a participatory-action research approach underpinned by decolonising methodologies, staff from Atoifi Adventist Hospital and James Cook University (Queensland, Australia) collaboratively designed, implemented and evaluated a health research workshop. Basic health research principles and methods were presented using active learning methodologies. Following the workshop, Atoifi Adventist Hospital and Atoifi College of Nursing staff, other professionals and community members reported an increased awareness and understanding of health research. The formation of a local Research Committee, improved ethics review procedures and the identification of local research mentors followed the week long workshop. The workshop has acted as a catalyst for research activity, increasing structural and human resource capacity for local health professionals and community leaders to engage in research. Participants from a variety of educational backgrounds participated in, and received benefit from, a responsive, culturally and linguistically accessible health research workshop. Improving health research systems at a remote hospital and aligning these with local and national research agendas is establishing a base to strengthen public health research and practice on Malaita, Solomon Islands.

  6. 41 CFR 102-79.30 - May Federal agencies allot space in Federal buildings for establishing fitness centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... allot space in Federal buildings for establishing fitness centers? 102-79.30 Section 102-79.30 Public... Space Fitness Centers § 102-79.30 May Federal agencies allot space in Federal buildings for establishing fitness centers? Yes, in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 7901, Federal agencies can allot space in Federal...

  7. 41 CFR 102-79.30 - May Federal agencies allot space in Federal buildings for establishing fitness centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... allot space in Federal buildings for establishing fitness centers? 102-79.30 Section 102-79.30 Public... Space Fitness Centers § 102-79.30 May Federal agencies allot space in Federal buildings for establishing fitness centers? Yes, in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 7901, Federal agencies can allot space in Federal...

  8. 41 CFR 102-79.30 - May Federal agencies allot space in Federal buildings for establishing fitness centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... allot space in Federal buildings for establishing fitness centers? 102-79.30 Section 102-79.30 Public... Space Fitness Centers § 102-79.30 May Federal agencies allot space in Federal buildings for establishing fitness centers? Yes, in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 7901, Federal agencies can allot space in Federal...

  9. 41 CFR 102-79.30 - May Federal agencies allot space in Federal buildings for establishing fitness centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... allot space in Federal buildings for establishing fitness centers? 102-79.30 Section 102-79.30 Public... Space Fitness Centers § 102-79.30 May Federal agencies allot space in Federal buildings for establishing fitness centers? Yes, in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 7901, Federal agencies can allot space in Federal...

  10. 41 CFR 102-79.30 - May Federal agencies allot space in Federal buildings for establishing fitness centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... allot space in Federal buildings for establishing fitness centers? 102-79.30 Section 102-79.30 Public... Space Fitness Centers § 102-79.30 May Federal agencies allot space in Federal buildings for establishing fitness centers? Yes, in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 7901, Federal agencies can allot space in Federal...

  11. The prefabricated building risk decision research of DM technology on the basis of Rough Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Z. L.; Zhang, W. B.; Ma, L. H.

    2017-08-01

    With the resources crises and more serious pollution, the green building has been strongly advocated by most countries and become a new building style in the construction field. Compared with traditional building, the prefabricated building has its own irreplaceable advantages but is influenced by many uncertainties. So far, a majority of scholars have been studying based on qualitative researches from all of the word. This paper profoundly expounds its significance about the prefabricated building. On the premise of the existing research methods, combined with rough set theory, this paper redefines the factors which affect the prefabricated building risk. Moreover, it quantifies risk factors and establish an expert knowledge base through assessing. And then reduced risk factors about the redundant attributes and attribute values, finally form the simplest decision rule. This simplest decision rule, which is based on the DM technology of rough set theory, provides prefabricated building with a controllable new decision-making method.

  12. Building Research Infrastructure in Community Health Centers: A Community Health Applied Research Network (CHARN) Report

    PubMed Central

    Likumahuwa, Sonja; Song, Hui; Singal, Robbie; Weir, Rosy Chang; Crane, Heidi; Muench, John; Sim, Shao-Chee; DeVoe, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces the Community Health Applied Research Network (CHARN), a practice-based research network of community health centers (CHCs). Established by the Health Resources and Services Administration in 2010, CHARN is a network of 4 community research nodes, each with multiple affiliated CHCs and an academic center. The four nodes (18 individual CHCs and 4 academic partners in 9 states) are supported by a data coordinating center. Here we provide case studies detailing how CHARN is building research infrastructure and capacity in CHCs, with a particular focus on how community practice-academic partnerships were facilitated by the CHARN structure. The examples provided by the CHARN nodes include many of the building blocks of research capacity: communication capacity and “matchmaking” between providers and researchers; technology transfer; research methods tailored to community practice settings; and community institutional review board infrastructure to enable community oversight. We draw lessons learned from these case studies that we hope will serve as examples for other networks, with special relevance for community-based networks seeking to build research infrastructure in primary care settings. PMID:24004710

  13. Building research infrastructure in community health centers: a Community Health Applied Research Network (CHARN) report.

    PubMed

    Likumahuwa, Sonja; Song, Hui; Singal, Robbie; Weir, Rosy Chang; Crane, Heidi; Muench, John; Sim, Shao-Chee; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces the Community Health Applied Research Network (CHARN), a practice-based research network of community health centers (CHCs). Established by the Health Resources and Services Administration in 2010, CHARN is a network of 4 community research nodes, each with multiple affiliated CHCs and an academic center. The four nodes (18 individual CHCs and 4 academic partners in 9 states) are supported by a data coordinating center. Here we provide case studies detailing how CHARN is building research infrastructure and capacity in CHCs, with a particular focus on how community practice-academic partnerships were facilitated by the CHARN structure. The examples provided by the CHARN nodes include many of the building blocks of research capacity: communication capacity and "matchmaking" between providers and researchers; technology transfer; research methods tailored to community practice settings; and community institutional review board infrastructure to enable community oversight. We draw lessons learned from these case studies that we hope will serve as examples for other networks, with special relevance for community-based networks seeking to build research infrastructure in primary care settings.

  14. Technical - Economic Research for Passive Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniotaite, Ruta

    2017-10-01

    A newly constructed passive house must save 80 % of heat resources; otherwise it is not a passive house. The heating energy demand of a passive building is less than 15 kWh/m2 per year. However, a passive house is something more than just an energy-saving house. This concept involves sustainable, high-quality, valuable, healthy and durable construction. Features of a passive house: high insulation of envelope components, high-quality windows, good tightness of the building, regenerative ventilation system and elimination of thermal bridges. The Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD) 61 requires all new public buildings to become near-zero energy buildings by 2019 and will be extended to all new buildings by 2021. This concept involves sustainable, high-quality, valuable, healthy and durable construction. Foundation, walls and roofs are the most essential elements of a house. The type of foundation for a private house is selected considering many factors. The article examines technological and structural solutions for passive buildings foundation, walls and roofs. The technical-economic comparison of the main structures of a passive house revealed that it is cheaper to install an adequately designed concrete slab foundation than to build strip or pile foundation and the floor separately. Timber stud walls are the cheapest wall option for a passive house and 45-51% cheaper compared to other options. The comparison of roofs and ceilings showed that insulation of the ceiling is 25% more efficient than insulation of the roof. The comparison of the main envelope elements efficiency by multiple-criteria evaluation methods showed that it is economically feasible to install concrete slab on ground foundation, stud walls with sheet cladding and a pitched roof with insulated ceiling.

  15. Key factors of clinical research network capacity building.

    PubMed

    Li, Guowei; Wu, Qianyu; Jin, Yanling; Vanniyasingam, Thuva; Thabane, Lehana

    2018-01-01

    In general, clinical research network capacity building refers to programs aimed at enhancing networks of researchers to conduct clinical research. Although in the literature there is a large body of research on how to develop and build capacity in clinical research networks, the conceptualizations and implementations remain controversial and challenging. Moreover, the experiences learnt from the past accomplishments and failures can assist in the future capacity building efforts to be more practical, effective and efficient. In this paper, we aim to provide an overview of capacity building in clinical research network by (1) identifying the key barriers to clinical research network capacity building, (2) providing insights into how to overcome those obstacles, and (3) sharing our experiences in collaborating with national and international partners to build capacity in clinical research networks. In conclusion, we have provided some insight into how to address the key factors of clinical research network capacity building and shared some empirical experiences. A successful capacity building practice requires a joint endeavor to procure sufficient resources and support from the relevant stakeholders, to ensure its efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and sustainability.

  16. Singapore Meeting of Education Research Associations Sets the Stage for Establishing a World Education Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses a meeting of education research associations from around the world which achieved a major goal toward establishing a World Education Research Association (WERA) in Singapore on November 24-25, 2008. At the meeting, representatives reaffirmed a commitment to establish WERA and finalized several key documents for its…

  17. Building Identity and Community through Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rude, Carolyn D.

    2015-01-01

    A field's identity and sustainability depend on its research as well as on programs, practice, and infrastructure. Research and practice have a reciprocal relationship, with practice identifying research questions and researchers answering those questions to improve practice. Technical communication research also has an exploratory purpose, using…

  18. Building an Inclusive Research Team: The Importance of Team Building and Skills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strnadová, Iva; Cumming, Therese M.; Knox, Marie; Parmenter, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Background: Inclusive research teams typically describe their experiences and analyse the type of involvement of researchers with disability, but the process of building research teams and the need for research training still remain underexplored in the literature. Materials and Method: Four researchers with intellectual disabilities and four…

  19. External Group Coaching and Mentoring: Building a Research Community of Practice at a University of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maritz, Jeanette; Visagie, Retha; Johnson, Bernadette

    2013-01-01

    Globally, a clarion call has been made for higher education institutions to establish creative and effective research capacity-building systems with the purpose of developing a next generation of scholars. The training and skills development of a researcher entail a process of increasing levels of participation in diverse communities of practice.…

  20. Establishing Base Elements of Perspective in Order to Reconstruct Architectural Buildings from Photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzwierzynska, Jolanta

    2017-12-01

    The use of perspective images, especially historical photographs for retrieving information about presented architectural environment is a fast developing field recently. The photography image is a perspective image with secure geometrical connection with reality, therefore it is possible to reverse this process. The aim of the herby study is establishing requirements which a photographic perspective representation should meet for a reconstruction purpose, as well as determination of base elements of perspective such as a horizon line and a circle of depth, which is a key issue in any reconstruction. The starting point in the reconstruction process is geometrical analysis of the photograph, especially determination of the kind of perspective projection applied, which is defined by the building location towards a projection plane. Next, proper constructions can be used. The paper addresses the problem of establishing base elements of perspective on the basis of the photograph image in the case when camera calibration is impossible to establish. It presents different geometric construction methods selected dependently on the starting assumptions. Therefore, the methods described in the paper seem to be universal. Moreover, they can be used even in the case of poor quality photographs with poor perspective geometry. Such constructions can be realized with computer aid when the photographs are in digital form as it is presented in the paper. The accuracy of the applied methods depends on the photography image accuracy, as well as drawing accuracy, however, it is sufficient for further reconstruction. Establishing base elements of perspective presented in the paper is especially useful in difficult cases of reconstruction, when one lacks information about reconstructed architectural form and it is necessary to lean on solid geometry.

  1. Establishment of a Research Pharmacy to Support Ebola Clinical Research in Liberia

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Jerome F.; Kirchoff, Matthew Carl; Tyee, Rev Tegli; Rhie, Julie K.; Montello, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Objective This paper describes the establishment of a research pharmacy to support the PREVAIL vaccine study for Ebola Virus Disease. Setting This paper describes the establishment of the pharmacy element to support the overall research program during an Ebola outbreak in Monrovia, Liberia in 2014 and 2015. Practice Innovation The need to rapidly establish infrastructure to support the Liberian-US joint clinical research partnership in response to the emerging Ebola Virus Disease provided the opportunity for collaboration among Liberian and US pharmacists. Evaluation and Results Experiences of the Liberian and US pharmacists involved in the program are described. Conclusion The partnership was successful in the conduct of the study, but more importantly, capacity for Liberian pharmacists to support clinical research was established. Additionally, the US team learned several important lessons that will help prepare them for responding to research needs in future infectious disease outbreaks. PMID:28610940

  2. New ways of seeing: Health social work leadership and research capacity building.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Fiona; Bawden, Glenda

    2017-01-01

    Building research capacity amongst social work practitioners is critically important for leaders in the social work profession. To reverse an apparent reluctance to use evidence and engage in research, strong social work leadership in practice organisations is needed. The literature on leadership in health social work is relatively silent regarding research capacity building as a leadership attribute but it is argued in this paper that leadership is crucial. A programme of research capacity building and its outcomes in a health social work department is described, identifying key principles guiding its establishment and tasks undertaken. A transformational leadership style characterised this approach to research capacity building which delivered benefits to the staff and the service.

  3. Research Support Facility (RSF): Leadership in Building Performance (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    This brochure/poster provides information on the features of the Research Support Facility including a detailed illustration of the facility with call outs of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. Imagine an office building so energy efficient that its occupants consume only the amount of energy generated by renewable power on the building site. The building, the Research Support Facility (RSF) occupied by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) employees, uses 50% less energy than if it were built to current commercial code and achieves the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED{reg_sign})more » Platinum rating. With 19% of the primary energy in the U.S. consumed by commercial buildings, the RSF is changing the way commercial office buildings are designed and built.« less

  4. Top 10 research priorities relating to stroke nursing: a rigorous approach to establish a national nurse-led research agenda.

    PubMed

    Rowat, Anne; Pollock, Alex; St George, Bridget; Cowey, Eileen; Booth, Joanne; Lawrence, Maggie

    2016-11-01

    To determine the top 10 research priorities specific to stroke nursing. It is important that stroke nurses build their research capability and capacity. This project built on a previous James Lind Alliance prioritization project, which established the shared stroke research priorities of stroke survivors, carers and health professionals. Research priority setting project using James Lind Alliance methods; a survey for interim prioritization and a consensus meeting for final priority setting. Between September - November 2014, stroke nurses were invited to select their top 10 priorities from a previously established list of 226 unique unanswered questions. These data were used to generate a list of shared research priorities (interim priority setting stage). A purposefully selected group of stroke nurses attended a final consensus meeting (April 2015) to determine the top 10 research priorities. During the interim prioritization stage, 97 stroke nurses identified 28 shared priority treatment uncertainties. At the final consensus meeting, 27 stroke nurses reached agreement on the top 10 stroke nursing research priorities. Five of the top 10 questions relate to stroke-specific impairments and five relate to rehabilitation and long-term consequences of stroke. The research agenda for stroke nursing has now been clearly defined, facilitating nurses to undertake research, which is of importance to stroke survivors and carers and central to supporting optimal recovery and quality of life after stroke. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Building community participatory research coalitions from the ground up: the Philadelphia area research community coalition.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jerry C; Hayden, U Tara; Thomas, Nicole; Groce-Martin, Jennine; Henry, Thomas; Guerra, Terry; Walker, Alia; West, William; Barnett, Marina; Kumanyika, Shiriki

    2009-01-01

    A coalition of formal, large organizations and informal, grassroots organizations, recruited through an open process, contrasts with the usual practice of developing a community-based participatory research (CBPR) coalition with a small number of well-developed organizations. This paper describes the process, developmental challenges, and accomplishments of the Philadelphia Area Research Community Coalition (PARCC). The University of Pennsylvania-Cheyney University of Pennsylvania EXPORT Center established the PARCC, an academic-community research partnership of twenty-two diverse organizations of variable size and with variable experience in health research. The EXPORT Center provided the infrastructure and staff support needed to engage in sustained, face-to-face community outreach and to nurture, coordinate, and facilitate the 2.5-year developmental process. The start-up process, governing principles, activities, challenges, and lessons learned are described. Since its inception, PARCC established core work groups, a governance structure, operating principles, research training activities, community health education projects, and several PARCC-affiliated research projects. Organizations across the spectrum of developmental capacity were major contributors to PARCC. The success of PARCC was based on committed and trusted leadership, preexisting relationships, trust among members from the community and academia, research training, extensive time commitment of members to the coalition's work, and rapid development of work group activities. Building a CBPR coalition from the ground up involving organizations of diverse size and at various stages of development presents unique challenges that can be overcome with committed leadership, clear governance principles, and appropriate infrastructure. Engagement in community-based research during the early stages, while still developing trust, structure, and governance procedures can be accomplished as long as training of

  6. Building a High School Math Research Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerver, Robert; Santucci, Lauren; Leventhal, Hanah

    2017-01-01

    For decades, all honors students at North Shore High School in New York were required to write a mathematics paper. In 1991, these papers were eliminated, and a new elective, "Investigations in Math Research," was added to the course catalog. Research is not an innate skill, and now, students of all ability levels who wanted the research…

  7. Research and Development Needs for Building-Integrated Solar Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-01-01

    The Building Technologies Office (BTO) has identified Building Integrated Solar Technologies (BIST) as a potentially valuable piece of the comprehensive pathway to help achieve its goal of reducing energy consumption in residential and commercial buildings by 50% by the year 2030. This report helps to identify the key research and development (R&D) needs that will be required for BIST to make a substantial contribution toward that goal. BIST include technologies for space heating and cooling, water heating, hybrid photovoltaic-thermal systems (PV/T), active solar lighting, and building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV).

  8. Establishment of a building audit procedure and analysis for the Kansas Department of Transportation phase 2A : buildings.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-11-01

    Over the past few years, state governments and entities have become concerned with the energy : consumption and efficiency of their facilities. An effective manner to identify potential to reduce energy and : water consumption and increase building e...

  9. Establishment of a building audit procedure and analysis for the Kansas Department of Transportation phase 2A : buildings, [technical summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-11-01

    Over the past few years, state governments and entities have become concerned with the energy consumption : and efficiency of their facilities. An effective manner to identify potential to reduce energy and water : consumption and increase building e...

  10. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy: Albern Color Research, Inc. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy: Albern Color Research, Inc. August, 1960 FIRST AND SECOND FLOOR PLANS DATED OCTOBER 28, 1914 - Dartmouth College, Webster Cottage, 27B Main Street, Hanover, Grafton County, NH

  11. Establishment of Kansei Database and Application to Design for Consensus Building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Keiichi; Shiraki, Wataru

    Reflecting the recent social background where the importance of bridge landscape design is recognized and the new business style of citizen-involved infrastructure development has started, there has been a growing need of design where aesthetic feeling of actual users is reflected. In this research, a focus has been placed on the Kansei engineering technique where users' needs are reflected on product development. A questionnaire survey has been conducted for bridge engineers who are most intensively involved in design work and students as actual users. The result was analyzed by factor analysis and the Hayashi's quantification methods (category I). A tool required at consensus-building occasions has been created to change design elements and display accompanying evaluation difference while using the Kansei database.

  12. Building Interdisciplinary Research Models Through Interactive Education.

    PubMed

    Hessels, Amanda J; Robinson, Brian; O'Rourke, Michael; Begg, Melissa D; Larson, Elaine L

    2015-12-01

    Critical interdisciplinary research skills include effective communication with diverse disciplines and cultivating collaborative relationships. Acquiring these skills during graduate education may foster future interdisciplinary research quality and productivity. The project aim was to develop and evaluate an interactive Toolbox workshop approach within an interprofessional graduate level course to enhance student learning and skill in interdisciplinary research. We sought to examine the student experience of integrating the Toolbox workshop in modular format over the duration of a 14-week course. The Toolbox Health Sciences Instrument includes six modules that were introduced in a 110-minute dialogue session during the first class and then integrated into the course in a series of six individual workshops in three phases over the course of the semester. Seventeen students participated; the majority were nursing students. Three measures were used to assess project outcomes: pre-post intervention Toolbox survey, competency self-assessment, and a postcourse survey. All measures indicated the objectives were met by a change in survey responses, improved competencies, and favorable experience of the Toolbox modular intervention. Our experience indicates that incorporating this Toolbox modular approach into research curricula can enhance individual level scientific capacity, future interdisciplinary research project success, and ultimately impact on practice and policy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Establishment of a research pharmacy to support Ebola clinical research in Liberia.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Jerome F; Kirchoff, Matthew Carl; Tyee, Rev Tijli; Montello, Michael J; Rhie, Julie K

    This article describes the establishment of a research pharmacy to support the Partnership for Research on Ebola Vaccines in Liberia (PREVAIL) vaccine study for Ebola virus disease. This article describes the establishment of the pharmacy element to support the overall research program during an Ebola outbreak in Monrovia, Liberia, in 2014 and 2015. The need for the rapid establishment of infrastructure to support the Liberia-United States joint clinical research partnership in response to the emerging Ebola virus disease provided the opportunity for collaboration among Liberian and U.S. pharmacists. Resource austere and research naïve. Research pharmacy prepared and randomized 1500 vaccinations in support of PREVAIL. Experiences of the Liberian and U.S. pharmacists involved in the program are described. The partnership was successful in the conduct of the study. More importantly, the capacity for Liberian pharmacists to support clinical research was established. In addition, the U.S. team learned several important lessons that will help prepare them for responding to research needs in future infectious disease outbreaks. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. The Royal Aircraft Establishment - 100 Years of Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-02

    Geoffrey de Havilland joined as Chief Engineer, and Designer and Test Pilot respectively. In 1908-14, the poor quality of aero-engines was a serious...which RAE made major contributiotis. In 1954 the Establishment was responsible for the inquiry into the Comet disasters and established new standards

  15. Building Capacity through Action Research Curricula Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Vanessa; Coombe, Leanne; Robinson, Priscilla

    2015-01-01

    In Australia, graduates of Master of Public Health (MPH) programmes are expected to achieve a set of core competencies, including a subset that is specifically related to Indigenous health. This paper reports on the methods utilised in a project which was designed using action research to strengthen Indigenous public health curricula within MPH…

  16. Building Communities: Teachers Researching Literacy Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cremin, Teresa; Mottram, Marilyn; Collins, Fiona; Powell, Sacha; Drury, Rose

    2012-01-01

    In the light of wide recognition that the traffic between home and school is traditionally one-way, this article reports on a deliberately counter-cultural project that involved teachers in researching children's everyday literacy practices and "funds of knowledge" (Gonzalez, Moll, & Amanti, 2005) over a year. Eighteen primary…

  17. Building Productive Relationships: District Leaders' Advice to Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Christopher; Davidson, Kristen; Farrell, Caitlin

    2017-01-01

    Expectations for the role of research in educational improvement are high. Meeting these expectations requires productive relationships between researchers and practitioners. Few studies, however, have systematically explored the ways researchers can build stronger, more productive relationships with practitioners. This study seeks to identify…

  18. Research capacity building: a US–South African partnership

    PubMed Central

    Airhihenbuwa, Collins O.; Shisana, Olive; Zungu, Nompumelelo; BeLue, Rhonda; Makofani, Daisy M.; Shefer, Tammy; Smith, Edward; Simbayi, Leickness

    2012-01-01

    Research capacity building engenders assets that allow communities (and, in this case, student fellows) to respond adequately to health issues and problems that are contextual, cultural and historical in nature. In this paper, we present a US–South African partnership that led to research training for 30 postgraduate students at two South African universities. We begin by exploring the nature of research capacity building in a partnership research project designed to promote HIV and AIDS-related stigma reduction. We examine methodological issues and their relevance to training of postgraduate students in South Africa. We conclude with recommendations for a successful model of partnership for building capacity of health researchers in Africa with the goal of developing research that informs policies and helps to bridge the health inequity gap globally. PMID:21596937

  19. Framework for Building Collaborative Research Environment

    DOE PAGES

    Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Palanisamy, Giriprakash; San Gil, Inigo

    2014-10-25

    Wide range of expertise and technologies are the key to solving some global problems. Semantic web technology can revolutionize the nature of how scientific knowledge is produced and shared. The semantic web is all about enabling machine-machine readability instead of a routine human-human interaction. Carefully structured data, as in machine readable data is the key to enabling these interactions. Drupal is an example of one such toolset that can render all the functionalities of Semantic Web technology right out of the box. Drupal’s content management system automatically stores the data in a structured format enabling it to be machine. Withinmore » this paper, we will discuss how Drupal promotes collaboration in a research setting such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Long Term Ecological Research Center (LTER) and how it is effectively using the Semantic Web in achieving this.« less

  20. Building capacity in health research in the developing world.

    PubMed Central

    Lansang, Mary Ann; Dennis, Rodolfo

    2004-01-01

    Strong national health research systems are needed to improve health systems and attain better health. For developing countries to indigenize health research systems, it is essential to build research capacity. We review the positive features and weaknesses of various approaches to capacity building, emphasizing that complementary approaches to human resource development work best in the context of a systems and long-term perspective. As a key element of capacity building, countries must also address issues related to the enabling environment, in particular: leadership, career structure, critical mass, infrastructure, information access and interfaces between research producers and users. The success of efforts to build capacity in developing countries will ultimately depend on political will and credibility, adequate financing, and a responsive capacity-building plan that is based on a thorough situational analysis of the resources needed for health research and the inequities and gaps in health care. Greater national and international investment in capacity building in developing countries has the greatest potential for securing dynamic and agile knowledge systems that can deliver better health and equity, now and in the future. PMID:15643798

  1. Building capacity in health research in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Lansang, Mary Ann; Dennis, Rodolfo

    2004-10-01

    Strong national health research systems are needed to improve health systems and attain better health. For developing countries to indigenize health research systems, it is essential to build research capacity. We review the positive features and weaknesses of various approaches to capacity building, emphasizing that complementary approaches to human resource development work best in the context of a systems and long-term perspective. As a key element of capacity building, countries must also address issues related to the enabling environment, in particular: leadership, career structure, critical mass, infrastructure, information access and interfaces between research producers and users. The success of efforts to build capacity in developing countries will ultimately depend on political will and credibility, adequate financing, and a responsive capacity-building plan that is based on a thorough situational analysis of the resources needed for health research and the inequities and gaps in health care. Greater national and international investment in capacity building in developing countries has the greatest potential for securing dynamic and agile knowledge systems that can deliver better health and equity, now and in the future.

  2. Establishing a National Research Agenda for Marketing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Clifton L.

    1992-01-01

    A review of marketing education research 1936-91 illuminated areas of need for a research agenda in marketing education. A framework and proposal for future marketing education research were formulated. (JOW)

  3. Building Sustainable Research Engagements: Lessons Learned from Research with Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vukotich, Charles J., Jr.; Cousins, Jennifer; Stebbins, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Engaged scholarship, translational science, integrated research, and interventionist research, all involve bringing research into a practical context. These usually require working with communities and institutions, and often involve community based participatory research. The article offers practical guidance for engaged research. The authors…

  4. Establishing a National 3d Geo-Data Model for Building Data Compliant to Citygml: Case of Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ates Aydar, S.; Stoter, J.; Ledoux, H.; Demir Ozbek, E.; Yomralioglu, T.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the generation of the 3D national building geo-data model of Turkey, which is compatible with the international OGC CityGML Encoding Standard. We prepare an ADE named CityGML-TRKBIS.BI that is produced by extending existing thematic modules of CityGML according to TRKBIS needs. All thematic data groups in TRKBIS geo-data model have been remodelled in order to generate the national large scale 3D geo-data model for Turkey. Specific attention has been paid to data groups that have different class structure according to related CityGML data themes such as building data model. Current 2D geo-information model for building data theme of Turkey (TRKBIS.BI) was established based on INSPIRE specifications for building (Core 2D and Extended 2D profiles), ISO/TC 211 standards and OGC web services. New version of TRKBIS.BI which is established according to semantic and geometric rules of CityGML will represent 2D-2.5D and 3D objects. After a short overview on generic approach, this paper describes extending CityGML building data theme according to TRKBIS.BI through several steps. First, building models of both standards were compared according to their data structure, classes and attributes. Second, CityGML building model was extended with respect to TRKBIS needs and CityGML-TRKBIS Building ADE was established in UML. This study provides new insights into 3D applications in Turkey. The generated 3D geo-data model for building thematic class will be used as a common exchange format that meets 2D, 2.5D and 3D implementation needs at national level.

  5. Building an inclusive research team: the importance of team building and skills training.

    PubMed

    Strnadová, Iva; Cumming, Therese M; Knox, Marie; Parmenter, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Inclusive research teams typically describe their experiences and analyse the type of involvement of researchers with disability, but the process of building research teams and the need for research training still remain underexplored in the literature. Four researchers with intellectual disabilities and four academic researchers developed an inclusive research team. The team conducted 15 research training sessions, focused on investigating the well-being of older women with intellectual disabilities. They used mobile technology to support research skills acquisition. Findings included the experiences of all team members regarding the team building during training. To become an effective inclusive research team, all team members, regardless of ability, need to bring their own experiences and also learn necessary research skills. This paper highlights the need for team building, joint research training among all members of the research team and strategies supporting the peer-mentoring within the team. We are a team of four researchers with intellectual disabilities and four academic researchers without an intellectual disability. Our aim has been to learn about research together. We want to do this so that we can carry out a research project together about how older women with intellectual disabilities live. We have decided to call our team 'Welcome to our Class'. We have been working together for 9 months. In this time we have had 15 research training meetings. We have learned What research is How to work out a research question, that is what we want to find out about How to get information on what we want to find out. Here we thought of interview questions we could ask older women with intellectual disabilities. We are now meeting once a month, and have just begun our research on finding out how older women with intellectual disabilities live. We are now starting to use what we have learned. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Impacts: NIST Building and Fire Research Laboratory (technical and societal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raufaste, N. J.

    1993-08-01

    The Building and Fire Research Laboratory (BFRL) of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is dedicated to the life cycle quality of constructed facilities. The report describes major effects of BFRL's program on building and fire research. Contents of the document include: structural reliability; nondestructive testing of concrete; structural failure investigations; seismic design and construction standards; rehabilitation codes and standards; alternative refrigerants research; HVAC simulation models; thermal insulation; residential equipment energy efficiency; residential plumbing standards; computer image evaluation of building materials; corrosion-protection for reinforcing steel; prediction of the service lives of building materials; quality of construction materials laboratory testing; roofing standards; simulating fires with computers; fire safety evaluation system; fire investigations; soot formation and evolution; cone calorimeter development; smoke detector standards; standard for the flammability of children's sleepwear; smoldering insulation fires; wood heating safety research; in-place testing of concrete; communication protocols for building automation and control systems; computer simulation of the properties of concrete and other porous materials; cigarette-induced furniture fires; carbon monoxide formation in enclosure fires; halon alternative fire extinguishing agents; turbulent mixing research; materials fire research; furniture flammability testing; standard for the cigarette ignition resistance of mattresses; support of navy firefighter trainer program; and using fire to clean up oil spills.

  7. Building operational research capacity in the Pacific.

    PubMed

    Bissell, K; Viney, K; Brostrom, R; Gounder, S; Khogali, M; Kishore, K; Kool, B; Kumar, A M V; Manzi, M; Marais, B; Marks, G; Linh, N N; Ram, S; Reid, S; Roseveare, C; Tayler-Smith, K; Van den Bergh, R; Harries, A D

    2014-06-21

    Operational research (OR) in public health aims to investigate strategies, interventions, tools or knowledge that can enhance the quality, coverage, effectiveness or performance of health systems. Attention has recently been drawn to the lack of OR capacity in public health programmes throughout the Pacific Islands, despite considerable investment in implementation. This lack of ongoing and critical reflection may prevent health programme staff from understanding why programme objectives are not being fully achieved, and hinder long-term gains in public health. The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union) has been collaborating with Pacific agencies to conduct OR courses based on the training model developed by The Union and Médecins Sans Frontières Brussels-Luxembourg in 2009. The first of these commenced in 2011 in collaboration with the Fiji National University, the Fiji Ministry of Health, the World Health Organization and other partners. The Union and the Secretariat of the Pacific Community organised a second course for participants from other Pacific Island countries and territories in 2012, and an additional course for Fijian participants commenced in 2013. Twelve participants enrolled in each of the three courses. Of the two courses completed by end 2013, 18 of 24 participants completed their OR and submitted papers by the course deadline, and 17 papers have been published to date. This article describes the context, process and outputs of the Pacific courses, as well as innovations, adaptations and challenges.

  8. Building operational research capacity in the Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Viney, K.; Brostrom, R.; Gounder, S.; Khogali, M.; Kishore, K.; Kool, B.; Kumar, A. M. V.; Manzi, M.; Marais, B.; Marks, G.; Linh, N. N.; Ram, S.; Reid, S.; Roseveare, C.; Tayler-Smith, K.; Van den Bergh, R.; Harries, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    Operational research (OR) in public health aims to investigate strategies, interventions, tools or knowledge that can enhance the quality, coverage, effectiveness or performance of health systems. Attention has recently been drawn to the lack of OR capacity in public health programmes throughout the Pacific Islands, despite considerable investment in implementation. This lack of ongoing and critical reflection may prevent health programme staff from understanding why programme objectives are not being fully achieved, and hinder long-term gains in public health. The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union) has been collaborating with Pacific agencies to conduct OR courses based on the training model developed by The Union and Médecins Sans Frontières Brussels-Luxembourg in 2009. The first of these commenced in 2011 in collaboration with the Fiji National University, the Fiji Ministry of Health, the World Health Organization and other partners. The Union and the Secretariat of the Pacific Community organised a second course for participants from other Pacific Island countries and territories in 2012, and an additional course for Fijian participants commenced in 2013. Twelve participants enrolled in each of the three courses. Of the two courses completed by end 2013, 18 of 24 participants completed their OR and submitted papers by the course deadline, and 17 papers have been published to date. This article describes the context, process and outputs of the Pacific courses, as well as innovations, adaptations and challenges. PMID:26477282

  9. Recommendations for Establishing the Texas Roadway Research Implementation Center

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1998-07-01

    The overall objective of the Roadway Research Initiative study was to describe an advanced testing capability, on that would speed implementation of the results from traditional computer and laboratory-based research efforts by providing a reusable t...

  10. Building a Research Community, Developing a Coherent Field of Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Jill Harrison; Carver, Cynthia L.; Mangin, Melinda M.

    2018-01-01

    While many researchers have studied teacher leaders, a corresponding field of research on teacher leadership has been slow to develop. This narrative account charts our strategic efforts to build a community of scholars capable of strengthening teacher leadership as a field of study. It documents the parallel development of two entities, the…

  11. Center for the Built Environment: Research on Building Envelope Systems

    Science.gov Websites

    Studies Facade and Perimeter Zone Field Study Facades and Thermal Comfort Facade Symposium Mixed-Mode Research Adaptive Comfort Model Mixed-Mode Case Studies Operable Windows and Thermal Comfort Occupant thermal preferences in naturally ventilated as sealed buildings? Case Study Research of Mixed-Mode Office

  12. A Tale of Two Cultures: Building Community by Researching Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drane, Jon; Cai, Wenjie; Wechsler, Andrea; Mussi, Eveline; Shi, Ye; Crommelin, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Upon beginning postgraduate research at the Faculty of Built Environment at UNSW, the authors were surprised to find themselves working in a library-like environment, where a culture of silence prevailed. Assuming initially that this was just how postgraduate research was, they soon learned that the building also housed a second postgraduate lab…

  13. Translating Research into Practice: Establishing a Network of Climate Change Practitioners in Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, G. A.

    2017-12-01

    Climate research and information continues to emerge at a rapid pace from the academic and scientific community. Decisions being made today by planners, engineers and staff across the Province of Ontario rely on science and information to plan and build our systems for the long term. Of course, as scientific information evolves continuously to produce lessons learned and new evidence, on the ground decisions often become entrenched in outdated information and need updating. Given this, bridging the gap between research to policy, and research to practice is of critical importance as the Province of Ontario upgrades its infrastructure, plans for long term growth in population within the Great Lakes Basin, and manages its natural systems and resources responsibly. The Ontario Climate Consortium (OCC) is an interdisciplinary network of academics and practitioners established in 2011 in the province that works to mobilize climate research findings towards building capacity, inspiring climate action, and training end-users with the latest science. The OCC has collaborated with more than 39 organizations throughout Ontario and across Canada, including government agencies at all levels (local, provincial and federal), non-profit organizations and private sector companies. This presentation will describe the foundations of climate action in Ontario, Canada including the landscape of climate adaptation practitioners from both public and private organizations. Furthermore, this presentation will feature lessons learned from the OCC network, including: 1) What comprises effective partnerships to undertake climate change adaptation planning for cities; 2) How to build the foundation for capacity at agencies with limited resources or expertise in the climate change field; and 3) How to successfully mobilize complex climate data for end-users to produce usable tools (through a case study research project). The latter will present findings from a two-year research project

  14. Establishing Priorities for Oncology Nursing Research: Nurse and Patient Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Cox, Anna; Arber, Anne; Gallagher, Ann; MacKenzie, Mairead; Ream, Emma

    2017-03-01

    To obtain consensus on priorities for oncology nursing research in the United Kingdom.
. A three-round online Delphi survey.
. Oncology nurses were invited via the United Kingdom Oncology Nursing Society (UKONS) database. Patient participation was invited through patient organizations.
. 50 oncology nurses and 18 patients.
. Eligible and consenting individuals reported five priorities for oncology nursing research (round 1), rated their level of agreement with them (round 2), and restated and revised their responses in light of the group's responses (round 3). Consensus was defined as 80% agreement.
. Research priorities for oncology nursing as reported by oncology nurses and patients. 
. Consensus was reached on 50 of 107 research priorities. These priorities reflected the entire cancer pathway, from diagnosis to palliative care. Highest agreement was reached within and across groups on the need for research relating to prevention, screening, early diagnosis, and psychological care across the cancer trajectory. Little consensus was reached regarding symptoms and side effects. Some evident divergence existed. Oncology nurses and patients do not necessarily prioritize the same research areas. Prevention, screening, and early diagnosis are of the highest priority for future research among oncology nurses and patients. 
. Patients usually play little part in priority setting for research. This study provided the opportunity for meaningful patient and nurse involvement in setting a research agenda for oncology nursing that is relevant and beneficial to oncology nurses and patients.

  15. Establishing a Scale for Assessing the Social Validity of Skill Building Interventions for Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Natalie I.; Manston, Lauren; Ingersoll, Brooke

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the psychometric properties of the Scale of Treatment Perceptions (STP), a measure of treatment acceptability targeting skill-building interventions for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). This scale utilizes a strength-based approach to intervention assessment, and was established by modifying the Behavior Intervention Rating…

  16. Establishing national priorities for Australian occupational health and safety research.

    PubMed

    Smith, Derek R

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to identify current and emerging issues relevant to Occupational Health & Safety (OHS) research in Australia, and to formulate strategic research directions and strategies for the future. A national research forum was held which included leading OHS academics, employer and employee representative groups, as well as executives from state (New South Wales) and national (Safe Work Australia) representative bodies. A modified Delphi technique was used for collecting data in three phases. When ranked according to group consensus, the top three priorities for future OHS research in Australia were identified as being psychosocial and soft tissue injury hazards, work/life issues, and the impact of multiple, long-term exposures. Strategies to enhance collaboration despite limited research funding included the need to focus on complementary skills, to make the best use of Safe Work Australia's role (particularly to link with strategic and operational plans), and to foster closer engagement with research communities. While certain research priorities appear to be similar to those of other countries, the current study did identify some unique characteristics within an Australian context. High quality investigations of these issues should now be considered, in conjunction with greater cooperation between governments, regulators, employers and employee groups for the more effective facilitation of applied OHS research in the coming years.

  17. Application of Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process to Building Research Teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dąbrowski, Karol; Skrzypek, Katarzyna

    2016-03-01

    Building teams has a fundamental impact for execution of research and development projects. The teams appointed for the needs of given projects are based on individuals from both inside and outside of the organization. Knowledge is not only a product available on the market but also an intangible resource affecting their internal and external processes. Thus it is vitally important for businesses and scientific research facilities to effectively manage knowledge within project teams. The article presents a proposal to use Fuzzy AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process) and ANFIS (Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System) methods in working groups building for R&D projects on the basis of employees skills.

  18. Research Progress of Building Materials Used in Construction Land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Yan

    2018-01-01

    Construction land preparation is an important aspect of land remediation project. The research of materials in the process of land improvement is the foundation and the core. Therefore, it is necessary to study the materials that may be involved in the process of building land preparation. In this paper, the research on the construction materials such as recycled concrete, geosynthetics, soil stabilizers, soil improvers, building insulation materials and inorganic fibrous insulation materials, which are commonly used in construction sites, is reviewed and discussed in this paper. Land remediation project involved in the construction of land materials to provide reference.

  19. Building Research Cyberinfrastructure at Small/Medium Research Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agee, Anne; Rowe, Theresa; Woo, Melissa; Woods, David

    2010-01-01

    A 2006 ECAR study defined cyberinfrastructure as the coordinated aggregate of "hardware, software, communications, services, facilities, and personnel that enable researchers to conduct advanced computational, collaborative, and data-intensive research." While cyberinfrastructure was initially seen as support for scientific and…

  20. Sustainable landscaping practices for enhancing vegetation establishment : research summary.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-02-01

    This research supports the integration of new practices and procedures to improve soil : structure that will help turf, meadow, forest and landscape plantings to thrive. It sought : to (1) demonstrate the effectiveness of innovative soil decompaction...

  1. Building Research Collaboration Networks--An Interpersonal Perspective for Research Capacity Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Jun Song

    2014-01-01

    While collaboration is increasingly recognized to be important for research, researchers' collaboration networks are still not adequately recognized as a form of research capacity in the literature. Research is a knowledge creation activity and interpersonal research collaboration networks are important for knowledge cross-fertilization and…

  2. The Theory Question in Research Capacity Building in Education: Towards an Agenda for Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biesta, Gert; Allan, Julie; Edwards, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The question of capacity building in education has predominantly been approached with regard to the methods and methodologies of educational research. Far less attention has been given to capacity building in relation to theory. In many ways the latter is as pressing an issue as the former, given that good research depends on a combination of high…

  3. Planning building energy conservation research in the US

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, F.; LaMontagne, J.

    1988-01-01

    In the US, the federal government plays a key role in the development of energy conserving technologies and practices for buildings. The Office of Buildings and Community Systems (BCS) of the US Department of Energy provides federal leadership for both private and public sector activities in building energy conservation. The federal role in recent years has been largely limited to the development of technical options; behavioral and institutional factors are considered only to the extent necessary to inform the research planning process. Planning in the US requires dealing with uncertainties regarding the federal approach to energy conservation; this can change,more » often dramatically, with changes in administrations or changing economic and energy conditions. Thus federal research plans must be designed to be useful in a wide variety of circumstances. 7 refs.« less

  4. Application of BIM technology in green scientific research office building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Xin; Sun, Jianhua; Wang, Bo

    2017-05-01

    BIM technology as a kind of information technology, has been along with the advancement of building industrialization application in domestic building industry gradually. Based on reasonable construction BIM model, using BIM technology platform, through collaborative design tools can effectively improve the design efficiency and design quality. Vanda northwest engineering design and research institute co., LTD., the scientific research office building project in combination with the practical situation of engineering using BIM technology, formed in the BIM model combined with related information according to the energy energy model (BEM) and the application of BIM technology in construction management stage made exploration, and the direct experience and the achievements gained by the architectural design part made a summary.

  5. A Research-Led Approach to Establishing Foundation Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Claire; Akhtar, Yaseen; Reynolds, Soneeta; Tatton, Allison; Tucker, Stan

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the research approach adopted by one higher education institution in the United Kingdom (UK) to explore employers' and employees' responses to local skills, recruitment and training issues and how these responses were used to develop a curriculum for Foundation degrees. The article discusses skills issues, the varying…

  6. Alignment of Common Wheat and Other Grass Genomes Establishes a Comparative Genomics Research Platform

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Sangrong; Wang, Jinpeng; Yu, Jigao; Meng, Fanbo; Xia, Ruiyan; Wang, Li; Wang, Zhenyi; Ge, Weina; Liu, Xiaojian; Li, Yuxian; Liu, Yinzhe; Yang, Nanshan; Wang, Xiyin

    2017-01-01

    Grass genomes are complicated structures as they share a common tetraploidization, and particular genomes have been further affected by extra polyploidizations. These events and the following genomic re-patternings have resulted in a complex, interweaving gene homology both within a genome, and between genomes. Accurately deciphering the structure of these complicated plant genomes would help us better understand their compositional and functional evolution at multiple scales. Here, we build on our previous research by performing a hierarchical alignment of the common wheat genome vis-à-vis eight other sequenced grass genomes with most up-to-date assemblies, and annotations. With this data, we constructed a list of the homologous genes, and then, in a layer-by-layer process, separated their orthology, and paralogy that were established by speciations and recursive polyploidizations, respectively. Compared with the other grasses, the far fewer collinear outparalogous genes within each of three subgenomes of common wheat suggest that homoeologous recombination, and genomic fractionation should have occurred after its formation. In sum, this work contributes to the establishment of an important and timely comparative genomics platform for researchers in the grass community and possibly beyond. Homologous gene list can be found in Supplemental material. PMID:28912789

  7. Motivators, enablers, and barriers to building allied health research capacity

    PubMed Central

    Pager, Susan; Holden, Libby; Golenko, Xanthe

    2012-01-01

    Purpose A sound, scientific base of high quality research is needed to inform service planning and decision making and enable improved policy and practice. However, some areas of health practice, particularly many of the allied health areas, are generally considered to have a low evidence base. In order to successfully build research capacity in allied health, a clearer understanding is required of what assists and encourages research as well as the barriers and challenges. Participants and methods This study used written surveys to collect data relating to motivators, enablers, and barriers to research capacity building. Respondents were asked to answer questions relating to them as individuals and other questions relating to their team. Allied health professionals were recruited from multidisciplinary primary health care teams in Queensland Health. Eighty-five participants from ten healthcare teams completed a written version of the research capacity and culture survey. Results The results of this study indicate that individual allied health professionals are more likely to report being motivated to do research by intrinsic factors such as a strong interest in research. Barriers they identified to research are more likely to be extrinsic factors such as workload and lack of time. Allied health professionals identified some additional factors that impact on their research capacity than those reported in the literature, such as a desire to keep at the “cutting edge” and a lack of exposure to research. Some of the factors influencing individuals to do research were different to those influencing teams. These results are discussed with reference to organizational behavior and theories of motivation. Conclusion Supporting already motivated allied health professional individuals and teams to conduct research by increased skills training, infrastructure, and quarantined time is likely to produce better outcomes for research capacity building investment. PMID

  8. CASE STUDIES OF RADON REDUCTION RESEARCH IN 13 SCHOOL BUILDINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report details 13 case studies covering radon mitigation research in school buildings from 1990 to 1992. he 13 schools are in Colorado, Maine, Minnesota, Ohio, South Dakota, Tennessee, and the State of Washington. iagnostics were carried out in all of these schools, and sugge...

  9. CASE STUDIES OF RADON REDUCTION RESEARCH IN 13 SCHOOL BUILDINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report details 13 case studies covering radon mitigation research in school buildings from 1990 to 1992. The 13 schools are in Colorado, Maine, Minnesota, Ohio, South Dakota, Tennessee, and the State of Washington. Diagnostics were carried out in all of these schools, and s...

  10. Building capacity for tobacco control research and policy

    PubMed Central

    Stillman, F; Yang, G; Figueiredo, V; Hernandez‐Avila, M; Samet, J

    2006-01-01

    The Fogarty International Center (FIC) initiative, “International Tobacco and Health Research Capacity Building Program” represents an important step in US government funding for global tobacco control. Low‐ and middle‐income countries of the world face a rising threat to public health from the rapidly escalating epidemic of tobacco use. Many are now parties to the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) and capacity development to meet FCTC provisions. One initial grant provided through the FIC was to the Institute for Global Tobacco Control (IGTC) at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHSPH) to support capacity building and research programmes in China, Brazil, and Mexico. The initiative's capacity building effort focused on: (1) building the evidence base for tobacco control, (2) expanding the infrastructure of each country to deliver tobacco control, and (3) developing the next generation of leaders as well as encouraging networking throughout the country and with neighbouring countries. This paper describes the approach taken and the research foci, as well some of the main outcomes and some identified challenges posed by the effort. Individual research papers are in progress to provide more in‐depth reporting of study results. PMID:16723670

  11. A Research Synthesis of the Evaluation Capacity Building Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labin, Susan N.; Duffy, Jennifer L.; Meyers, Duncan C.; Wandersman, Abraham; Lesesne, Catherine A.

    2012-01-01

    The continuously growing demand for program results has produced an increased need for evaluation capacity building (ECB). The "Integrative ECB Model" was developed to integrate concepts from existing ECB theory literature and to structure a synthesis of the empirical ECB literature. The study used a broad-based research synthesis method with…

  12. Commentary: Building Web Research Strategies for Teachers and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloy, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents web research strategies for teachers and students to use in building Dramatic Event, Historical Biography, and Influential Literature wiki pages for history/social studies learning. Dramatic Events refer to milestone or turning point moments in history. Historical Biographies and Influential Literature pages feature…

  13. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Copy photo: Albern Color Research, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Copy photo: Albern Color Research, Inc., Philadelphia, July 1960 COPY OF A PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN ca. 1904 SHOWING PART OF THE ENFIELD, NEW HAMPSHIRE SHAKER COMMUNITY WITH THE GREAT STONE HOUSE IN THE CENTER - Shaker Church Family General Views, State Route 4A, Enfield, Grafton County, NH

  14. Successive Research: A Strategy for Building on Previous Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Mary Anne

    1979-01-01

    Describes an approach to clinical research used by the author in teaching graduate nursing students, involving replication and expansion of a primary study of hospital intensive care units. This approach provided valuable experience as well as validated data about clinical practice. Discusses advantages and disadvantages in the approach. (MF)

  15. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory - An Isolated Nuclear Research Establishment

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, Norris E.; Meade, Roger Allen

    Early in his twenty-five year career as the Director of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Norris Bradbury wrote at length about the atomic bomb and the many implications the bomb might have on the world. His themes were both technical and philosophical. In 1963, after nearly twenty years of leading the nation’s first nuclear weapons laboratory, Bradbury took the opportunity to broaden his writing. In a paper delivered to the International Atomic Energy Agency’s symposium on the “Criteria in the Selection of Sites for the Construction of Reactors and Nuclear Research Centers,” Bradbury took the opportunity to talk about themore » business of nuclear research and the human component of operating a scientific laboratory. This report is the transcript of his talk.« less

  16. Establishing a Corky Ringspot Disease Plot for Research Purposes

    PubMed Central

    Mojtahedi, H.; Boydston, R. A.; Crosslin, J. M.; Brown, C. R.; Riga, E.; Anderson, T. L.; Spellman, D.; Quick, R. A.

    2007-01-01

    A method to establish two experimental corky ringspot disease (CRS) plots that had no prior CRS history is described. CRS is a serious disease of potato in the Pacific Northwest caused by tobacco rattle virus (TRV) and transmitted primarily by Paratrichodorus allius. ‘Samsun NN’ tobacco seedlings were inoculated with viruliferous P. allius in the greenhouse before they were transplanted into the field soil at the rate of 3,000 plus seedlings/ha. Care was taken to keep soil around plants in the greenhouse and transplants in the field moist to avoid vector mortality. The vector population in the soil of one of the fields was monitored by extraction, examination under microscope and bioassay on tobacco seedlings to ascertain that they were virus carriers. Presence of virus in tobacco bioassay plants was determined by visual symptoms on tobacco leaves and by testing leaves and roots using ELISA. Although TRV transmission was rapid, there was loss of infectivity in the first winter which necessitated a re-inoculation. After two years of planting infected tobacco seedlings, 100% of soil samples collected from this field contained viruliferous P. allius. In the second field, all five commercial potato cultivars, known to be susceptible, expressed symptoms of CRS disease indicating that the procedure was successful. PMID:19259504

  17. Lewis Researcher in the Materials and Stresses Building

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1952-12-21

    A materials researcher at the NACA’s Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory examines a surface crack detection apparatus in the Materials and Stresses Building during December 1952. Materials research was an important aspect of propulsion technology. Advanced engine systems relied upon alloys, and later composites, that were strong, lightweight, and impervious to high temperatures. Jet engines which became increasingly popular in the late 1940s, produced much higher temperatures than piston engines. These higher temperatures stressed engine components, particularly turbines. Although Lewis materials research began during World War II, the Materials and Thermodynamics Division was not created until 1949. Its primary laboratories were located in the Materials and Stresses Building. The group sought to create new, improved materials and to improve engine design through increased understanding of materials. The Lewis materials researchers of the 1950s made contributions to nickel-aluminum alloys, cermet blades, metal matrix composites, oxide dispersion strengthened superalloys, and universal slopes.

  18. Coherent Turbulence Rig in the Engine Research Building

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1979-08-21

    An engineer examines the Coherent Turbulence Rig in the Engine Research Building at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center. Coherent turbulence occurs when waves of uniform size and alignment are present in airflow. Researchers at NASA Lewis were interested in determining the relation between the size of the waves and their heat transfer properties. The massive 4.25-acre Engine Research Building contains dozens of test cells, test stands, and altitude chambers. A powerful a collection of compressors and exhausters located in the central portion of the basement provides process air and exhaust for these test areas. This system is connected to similar process air systems in the laboratory’s other large test facilities. The Central Control Room coordinates this activity and communicates with the local utilities.

  19. Establishing Causality: Opportunities of Synthetic Communities for Plant Microbiome Research.

    PubMed

    Vorholt, Julia A; Vogel, Christine; Carlström, Charlotte I; Müller, Daniel B

    2017-08-09

    Plant microbiome research highlights the importance of indigenous microbial communities for host phenotypes such as growth and health. It aims to discover the molecular basis by which host-microbe and microbe-microbe interactions shape and maintain microbial communities and to understand the role of individual microorganisms, as well as their collective ecosystem function. Here, we discuss reductionist approaches to disentangle the inherent complexity of interactions in situ. Experimentally tractable, synthetic communities enable testing of hypotheses by targeted manipulation in gnotobiotic systems. Modifications of microbial, host, and environmental parameters allow for the quantitative assessment of host and microbe characteristics with dynamic and spatial resolution. We summarize first insights from this emerging field and discuss current challenges and limitations. Using multifaceted approaches to detect interactions and functions will provide new insights into the fundamental biology of plant-microbe interactions and help to harness the power of the microbiome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The establishment of research ethics consultation services (RECS): an emerging research resource.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Jennifer B; Sharp, Richard R; Ottenberg, Abigale L; Reider, Carson R; Taylor, Holly A; Wilfond, Benjamin S

    2013-02-01

    Emphasis on translational research to facilitate progression from the laboratory into the community also creates a dynamic in which ethics and social policy questions and solutions are ever pressing. In response, academic institutions are creating Research Ethics Consultation Services (RECS). All Clinical Translational Science Award institutions were surveyed in early 2010 to determine which institutions have a RECS in operation and what is their composition and function. Of the 46 institutions surveyed, 33 (70%) have a RECS. Only 15 RECS have received any consult requests in the last year. Issues that are common among these relatively nascent services include relationships with institutional oversight committees, balancing requestor concerns about confidentiality with research integrity and human subjects protection priorities, tracking consult data and outcomes, and developing systems for internal evaluation. There is variability in how these issues are approached. It will be important to be attentive to the institutional context to develop an appropriate approach. Further data about the issues raised by requestors and the recommendations provided are necessary to build a community of scholars who can navigate and resolve ethical issues encountered along the translational research pathway. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Building the Women's Health Research Workforce: Fostering Interdisciplinary Research Approaches in Women's Health

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Abby; Guimond, Jennifer M.; Glavin, Sarah; Geller, Stacie

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health (BIRCWH) program is a mentored institutional research career development program developed to support and foster the interdisciplinary research careers of men and women junior faculty in women's health and sex/gender factors. The number of scholars who apply for and receive National Institutes of Health (NIH) research or career development grants is one proximate indicator of whether the BIRCWH program is being successful in achieving its goals. Primary Study Objective: To present descriptive data on one metric of scholar performance—NIH grant application and funding rates. Methods/Design: Grant applications were counted if the start date was 12 months or more after the scholar's BIRCWH start date. Two types of measures were used for the outcome of interest—person-based funding rates and application-based success rates. Main Outcome Measures: Grant application, person funding, and application success rates. Results: Four hundred and ninety-three scholars had participated in BIRCWH as of November 1, 2012. Seventy-nine percent of BIRCWH scholars who completed training had applied for at least one competitive NIH grant, and 64% of those who applied had received at least one grant award. Approximately 68% of completed scholars applied for at least one research grant, and about half of those who applied were successful in obtaining at least one research award. Men and women had similar person funding rates, but women had higher application success rates for RoI grants. Limitations: Data were calculated for all scholars across a series of years; many variables can influence person funding and application success rates beyond the BIRCWH program; and lack of an appropriate comparison group is another substantial limitation to this analysis. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the BIRCWH program has been successful in bridging advanced training with establishing independent research careers

  2. The Role of Research Education Coordinators in Building Research Cultures in Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brew, Angela; Boud, David; Malfroy, Janne

    2017-01-01

    The development of cultures of support has become important in programmes for the preparation of research students. The paper draws on in-depth interviews with 21 research education coordinators from Australian and United Kingdom institutions to identify the strategies that they use to build research cultures and integrate research students into…

  3. Establishing and sustaining research partnerships in Africa: a case study of the UK-Africa Academic Partnership on Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the challenges and opportunities in establishing and sustaining north–south research partnerships in Africa through a case study of the UK-Africa Academic Partnership on Chronic Disease. Established in 2006 with seed funding from the British Academy, the partnership aimed to bring together multidisciplinary chronic disease researchers based in the UK and Africa to collaborate on research, inform policymaking, train and support postgraduates and create a platform for research dissemination. We review the partnership’s achievements and challenges, applying established criteria for developing successful partnerships. During the funded period we achieved major success in creating a platform for research dissemination through international meetings and publications. Other goals, such as engaging in collaborative research and training postgraduates, were not as successfully realised. Enabling factors included trust and respect between core working group members, a shared commitment to achieving partnership goals, and the collective ability to develop creative strategies to overcome funding challenges. Barriers included limited funding, administrative support, and framework for monitoring and evaluating some goals. Chronic disease research partnerships in low-income regions operate within health research, practice, funding and policy environments that prioritise infectious diseases and other pressing public health and developmental challenges. Their long-term sustainability will therefore depend on integrated funding systems that provide a crucial capacity building bridge. Beyond the specific challenges of chronic disease research, we identify social capital, measurable goals, administrative support, creativity and innovation and funding as five key ingredients that are essential for sustaining research partnerships. PMID:22897937

  4. Commercial Building Energy Asset Rating Program -- Market Research

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, Molly J.; Wang, Na

    2012-04-19

    Under contract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, HaydenTanner, LLC conducted an in-depth analysis of the potential market value of a commercial building energy asset rating program for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The market research objectives were to: (1) Evaluate market interest and need for a program and tool to offer asset rating and rapidly identify potential energy efficiency measures for the commercial building sector. (2) Identify key input variables and asset rating outputs that would facilitate increased investment in energy efficiency. (3) Assess best practices and lessons learned from existing nationalmore » and international energy rating programs. (4) Identify core messaging to motivate owners, investors, financiers, and others in the real estate sector to adopt a voluntary asset rating program and, as a consequence, deploy high-performance strategies and technologies across new and existing buildings. (5) Identify leverage factors and incentives that facilitate increased investment in these buildings. To meet these objectives, work consisted of a review of the relevant literature, examination of existing and emergent asset and operational rating systems, interviews with industry stakeholders, and an evaluation of the value implication of an asset label on asset valuation. This report documents the analysis methodology and findings, conclusion, and recommendations. Its intent is to support and inform the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy on the market need and potential value impacts of an asset labeling and diagnostic tool to encourage high-performance new buildings and building efficiency retrofit projects.« less

  5. Establishment of the Ivermectin Research for Malaria Elimination Network: updating the research agenda.

    PubMed

    Chaccour, Carlos J; Rabinovich, N Regina; Slater, Hannah; Canavati, Sara E; Bousema, Teun; Lacerda, Marcus; Ter Kuile, Feiko; Drakeley, Chris; Bassat, Quique; Foy, Brian D; Kobylinski, Kevin

    2015-06-11

    The potential use of ivermectin as an additional vector control tool is receiving increased attention from the malaria elimination community, driven by the increased importance of outdoor/residual malaria transmission and the threat of insecticide resistance where vector tools have been scaled-up. This report summarizes the emerging evidence presented at a side meeting on "Ivermectin for malaria elimination: current status and future directions" at the annual meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene in New Orleans on November 4, 2014. One outcome was the creation of the "Ivermectin Research for Malaria Elimination Network" whose main goal is to establish a common research agenda to generate the evidence base on whether ivermectin-based strategies should be added to the emerging arsenal to interrupt malaria transmission.

  6. Building a sustainable complementary and alternative medicine research network in Europe.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Bettina; Baumhöfener, Franziska; Dlaboha, Meike; Odde Madsen, Jesper; Regenfelder, Stephanie; Weidenhammer, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Since CAMbrella is a networking project funded by the European Commission explicitly to build and sustain a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) research network in Europe, communication and dissemination play a large role and form a work package of their own. The present article gives an outline of the communication and dissemination work in the CAMbrella consortium. The intensive building of sound internal communication is an essential part in establishing a functioning structure for collaboration in a diverse group of 16 partner institutions from 12 countries, as exists in the CAMbrella project. The means and tools for dissemination of results to the scientific community and the European public at large, as well as to the European policy makers, are presented. The development of the corporate design and a dissemination strategy are described in detail. In addition, some basic information regarding previous CAM research efforts, which might be interesting for future consortium building in the field of CAM research, is given. Internal communication within a heterogeneous research group, the maintenance of a work-oriented style of communication and a consensus oriented effort in establishing dissemination tools and products will be essential for any future consortium in the CAM field. The outlook shows the necessity for active political encouragement of CAM research and the desideratum of a Pan-European institution analogous to the NIH (National Institutes of Health) in the USA.

  7. Building integrated pathways to independence for diverse biomedical researchers: Project Pathways, the BUILD program at Xavier University of Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Foroozesh, Maryam; Giguette, Marguerite; Morgan, Kathleen; Johanson, Kelly; D'Amour, Gene; Coston, Tiera; Wilkins-Green, Clair

    2017-01-01

    Xavier University of Louisiana is a historically Black and Catholic university that is nationally recognized for its science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) curricula. Approximately 73% of Xavier's students are African American, and about 77% major in the biomedical sciences. Xavier is a national leader in the number of STEM majors who go on to receive M.D. degrees and Ph.D. degrees in science and engineering. Despite Xavier's advances in this area, African Americans still earn about 7.5% of the Bachelor's degrees, less than 8% of the Master's degrees, and less than 5% of the doctoral degrees conferred in STEM disciplines in the United States. Additionally, although many well-prepared, highly-motivated students are attracted by Xavier's reputation in the sciences, many of these students, though bright and capable, come from underperforming public school systems and receive substandard preparation in STEM disciplines. The purpose of this article is to describe how Xavier works to overcome unequal education backgrounds and socioeconomic challenges to develop student talent through expanding biomedical training opportunities and build on an established reputation in science education. The National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)-funded BUILD (Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity) Program at Xavier University of Louisiana, Project Pathways , is a highly-innovative program designed to broaden the career interests of students early on, and to engage them in activities that entice them to continue their education towards biomedical research careers. Project strategies involve a transformation of Xavier's academic and non-academic programs through the redesign, supplementation and integration of academic advising, tutoring, career services, personal counseling, undergraduate research training, faculty research mentoring, and development of new biomedical and research skills courses. The Program also

  8. Leadership, institution building and pay-back of health systems research in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    González-Block, Miguel Angel

    2009-01-01

    Background Health systems research is being increasingly called upon to support scaling up of disease control interventions and to support rapid health sector change. Yet research capacity building and pay-back take years or even decades to be demonstrated, while leadership and institution building are critical for their success. The case of Mexico can be illustrative for middle income countries and emerging economies striving to build health research systems. Methods Historical reflection suggests the relationship between health sector reforms and economic crisis, on the one hand, and research capacity building and payback, on the other. Mexico's post-revolutionary background and its three health sector reforms are analyzed to identify the emphases given to health systems research. Results The first wave of health reform in the 1940s emphasized clinical and epidemiological research. Health systems research was not encouraged in a context of rapid economic development and an authoritarian regime. In contrast, health systems research was given a privileged place with the second wave of health reforms in the 1980s, which addressed health system coordination, decentralization and the universal right to health in a context of a deep economic crisis. The third wave of health reforms between 2003 and 2006 was based on the health system models proposed through research in the 90s. The credibility gained by research institutions was critical to ensure government uptake. Research influence can be traced through the role it played in defining a problem, in designing innovative insurance mechanisms and in establishing evaluation frameworks. It is argued that the Ministry of Health's budget increase of 56% between 2003 and 2006 and the reductions in inequity are pay-back to research investments since the 1980s. PMID:19793399

  9. Renovation and Expansion of the Caspary Research Building. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Grassia, V. L.

    2004-02-07

    Critical to the Hospital's rebuilding efforts have been its public partners at the federal, state, and local government levels who have made a major financial commitment to renovating the Hospital's research infrastructure. To date, the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) has been awarded a total of nearly $8.5 million to create and equip new, state-of-the-art laboratories for scientific investigations. The modernization of the Hospital's research facilities was jump-started in 1998 with a $950,000 seed grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to renovate laboratories for immunology research in the Caspary Research Building. Coupled with a matching $5.5 million commitmentmore » from HSS, this infusion of NIH funding laid the groundwork for an overhaul of all of the Hospital's research space.« less

  10. Designing for health in school buildings: between research and practice.

    PubMed

    Kirkeby, Inge Mette; Jensen, Bjarne Bruun; Larsen, Kristian; Kural, René

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the kinds of knowledge practitioners use when planning and designing for health in school buildings. Twelve semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with architects, teachers and officials to investigate use of knowledge in the making of school buildings. Practitioners drew on many kinds and sources of knowledge, but in particular they made use of concepts, examples or pictures or thought-provoking knowledge. However, the interviews indicate a number of hurdles for efficient knowledge sharing between research and practice: (1) a considerable discrepancy between kinds of knowledge used by practice and knowledge traditionally produced by research; (2) research-knowledge and practice-knowledge form two circuits and the flow from one circuit to the other is weak; (3) practitioners' knowledge was often based on experience and therefore person-dependent. It makes the knowledge vulnerable. Special attention has to be paid by research to concepts and principles to guide the decision-making in practice. Further is recommended to consider new kinds of collaboration between researchers and practitioners. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  11. Mentoring the Next Researcher Generation: Reflections on Three Years of Building VET Research Capacity and Infrastructure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barratt-Pugh, Llandis Gareth

    2012-01-01

    During 2008-2011, the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) funded a programme to build Australian VET research capacity and rejuvenate what has been seen as the existing "greying" researcher pool. This paper is a reflective narrative about experiences of constructing the programme with a specific focus on the…

  12. Establishing a Commercial Buildings Energy Data Framework for India: A Comprehensive Look at Data Collection Approaches, Use Cases and Institutions

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, Maithili; Kumar, Satish; Mathew, Sangeeta

    mechanisms to analyze building energy performance in India and opportunities for standardizing data collection. This report describes the existing capacities and resources for establishing an institutional framework for data collection, the legislation and mandates that support such activity, and identifies roles and responsibilities of the relevant ministries and organizations. Finally, the study presents conclusions and identifies two major data collection strategies within the existing legal framework.« less

  13. "Initiate-build-operate-transfer"--a strategy for establishing sustainable telemedicine programs in developing countries: initial lessons from the balkans.

    PubMed

    Latifi, Rifat; Merrell, Ronald C; Doarn, Charles R; Hadeed, George J; Bekteshi, Flamur; Lecaj, Ismet; Boucha, Kathe; Hajdari, Fatmir; Hoxha, Astrit; Koshi, Dashurije; de Leonni Stanonik, Mateja; Berisha, Blerim; Novoberdaliu, Kadri; Imeri, Arben; Weinstein, Ronald S

    2009-12-01

    Establishing sustainable telemedicine has become a goal of many developing countries around the world. Yet, despite initiatives from a select few individuals and on occasion from various governments, often these initiatives never mature to become sustainable programs. The introduction of telemedicine and e-learning in Kosova has been a pivotal step in advancing the quality and availability of medical services in a region whose infrastructure and resources have been decimated by wars, neglect, lack of funding, and poor management. The concept and establishment of the International Virtual e-Hospital (IVeH) has significantly impacted telemedicine and e-health services in the Balkans. The success of the IVeH in Kosova has led to the development of similar programs in other Balkan countries and other developing countries in the hope of modernizing and improving their healthcare infrastructure. A comprehensive, four-pronged strategy, "Initiate-Build-Operate-Transfer" (IBOT), may be a useful approach in establishing telemedicine and e-health educational services in developing countries. The development strategy, IBOT, used by the IVeH to establish and develop telemedicine programs, was discussed. IBOT includes assessment of healthcare needs of each country, the development of a curriculum and education program, the establishment of a nationwide telemedicine network, and the integration of the telemedicine program into the healthcare infrastructure. The endpoint is the transfer of a sustainable telehealth program to the nation involved. By applying IBOT, a sustainable telemedicine program of Kosova has been established as an effective prototype for telemedicine in the Balkans. Once fully matured, the program will be transitioned to the national Ministry of Health, which ensures the sustainability and ownership of the program. Similar programs are being established in Albania, Macedonia, and other countries around the world. The IBOT model has been effective in creating

  14. UNIVERSITY RESEARCH BUILDINGS FOR SHORT-TERM GRANT PROGRAMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KINNE, W.S., JR.

    GUIDELINES WERE ESTABLISHED TO ASSIST IN THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT OF ADEQUATE FACILITIES FOR SHORT-TERM RESEARCH GRANT PROGRAMS. FUNCTIONAL CRITERIA WERRE DEVELOPED FROM THE ANALYSES OF COST STUDIES AND A SURGE SPACE STUDY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS. ALTERNATIVES WERE SUGGESTED FOR THE PROVISION, PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS, SITE LOCATION,…

  15. Trust Building Recruitment Strategies for Researchers Conducting Studies in African American (AA) Churches: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Gloria; Williams, Sharon; Wilkie, Diana; Hart, Alysha; Burnett, Glenda; Peacock, Geraldine

    2017-12-01

    An initial and vital important step in recruiting participants for church-based hospice and palliative care research is the establishment of trust and credibility within the church community. Mistrust of medical research is an extremely important barrier hindering recruitment in African American (AA) communities. A church-based EOL dementia education project is currently being conducted at four large urban AA churches. Church leaders voiced mistrust concerns of previous researchers who conducted investigations in their faith-based institutions. We explored strategies to ameliorate the mistrust concerns. Specific aim: To identify trust-rebuilding elements for researchers following others who violated trust of AA church leaders. Face-to-face, in-depth interviews were conducted from a convenient sample of four established AA church leaders. Interviews were held in the informants' churches to promote candor and comfort in revealing sensitive information about trust /mistrust. Content analysis framework was used to analyze the data. Elements identified from the analysis were then used to create themes. Multidimensional overarching themes emerged from the analysis included: Experience with researchers (positive and extremely negative), violation of trust and trust building strategies. Findings suggest that researchers who wish to conduct successful studies in the AA religious institutions must implement trust rebuilding strategies that include mutual respect, collaboration and partnership building. If general moral practices continue to be violated, threat to future hospice and palliative care research within the institutions may prevail. Thus, potential benefits are thwarted for the church members, AA community, and advancement of EOL care scholarship.

  16. Building healthy communities: establishing health and wellness metrics for use within the real estate industry.

    PubMed

    Trowbridge, Matthew J; Pickell, Sarah Gauche; Pyke, Christopher R; Jutte, Douglas P

    2014-11-01

    It is increasingly well recognized that the design and operation of the communities in which people live, work, learn, and play significantly influence their health. However, within the real estate industry, the health impacts of transportation, community development, and other construction projects, both positive and negative, continue to operate largely as economic externalities: unmeasured, unregulated, and for the most part unconsidered. This lack of transparency limits communities' ability to efficiently advocate for real estate investment that best promotes their health and well-being. It also limits market incentives for innovation within the real estate industry by making it more difficult for developers that successfully target health behaviors and outcomes in their projects to differentiate themselves competitively. In this article we outline the need for actionable, community-relevant, practical, and valuable metrics jointly developed by the health care and real estate sectors to better evaluate and optimize the "performance" of real estate development projects from a population health perspective. Potential templates for implementation, including the successful introduction of sustainability metrics by the green building movement, and preliminary data from selected case-study projects are also discussed. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  17. Engine Propeller Research Building at the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1955-02-21

    The Engine Propeller Research Building, referred to as the Prop House, emits steam from its acoustic silencers at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory. In 1942 the Prop House became the first completed test facility at the new NACA laboratory in Cleveland, Ohio. It contained four test cells designed to study large reciprocating engines. After World War II, the facility was modified to study turbojet engines. Two of the test cells were divided into smaller test chambers, resulting in a total of six engine stands. During this period the NACA Lewis Materials and Thermodynamics Division used four of the test cells to investigate jet engines constructed with alloys and other high temperature materials. The researchers operated the engines at higher temperatures to study stress, fatigue, rupture, and thermal shock. The Compressor and Turbine Division utilized another test cell to study a NACA-designed compressor installed on a full-scale engine. This design sought to increase engine thrust by increasing its airflow capacity. The higher stage pressure ratio resulted in a reduction of the number of required compressor stages. The last test cell was used at the time by the Engine Research Division to study the effect of high inlet densities on a jet engine. Within a couple years of this photograph the Prop House was significantly altered again. By 1960 the facility was renamed the Electric Propulsion Research Building to better describe its new role in electric propulsion.

  18. Procedures for establishing and maintaining permanent plots for silvicultural and yield research.

    Treesearch

    Robert O. Curtis

    1983-01-01

    This paper reviews procedures for establishing and maintaining permanent plots for silvicultural and yield research; discusses purposes, sampling, and plot design; points out common errors; and makes recommendations for research plot designs and procedures for measuring and recording data.

  19. THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A GROUNDWATER RESEARCH DATA CENTER FOR VALIDATION OF SUBSURFACE FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The International Ground Water Modeling Center has established a Groundwater Research Data Center which provides information on research datasets resulting from publicly funded field experiments regarding soil and groundwater pollution and related laboratory bench studies, and wh...

  20. Intelligent systems installed in building of research centre for research purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusov, Jozef; Mokry, Marian; Kolkova, Zuzana; Sedivy, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The attractiveness of intelligent buildings is nowadays directly connected with higher level of comfort and also the economic mode of consumption energy for heating, cooling and the total consumption of electricity for electric devices. The technologies of intelligent buildings compared with conventional solutions allow dynamic optimization in real time and make it easy for operational message. The basic division of functionality in horizontal direction is possible divide in to two areas such as Economical sophisticated residential care about the comfort of people in the building and Security features. The paper deals with description of intelligent systems which has a building of Research Centre. The building has installed the latest technology for utilization of renewable energy and also latest systems of controlling and driving all devices which contribute for economy operation by achieving the highest thermal comfort and overall safety.

  1. Computer Plotting Data Points in the Engine Research Building

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1956-09-21

    A female computer plotting compressor data in the Engine Research Building at the NACA’s Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory. The Computing Section was introduced during World War II to relieve short-handed research engineers of some of the tedious data-taking work. The computers made the initial computations and plotted the data graphically. The researcher then analyzed the data and either summarized the findings in a report or made modifications or ran the test again. With the introduction of mechanical computer systems in the 1950s the female computers learned how to encode the punch cards. As the data processing capabilities increased, fewer female computers were needed. Many left on their own to start families, while others earned mathematical degrees and moved into advanced positions.

  2. Building an Ontology-driven Database for Clinical Immune Research

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jingming

    2006-01-01

    The clinical researches of immune response usually generate a huge amount of biomedical testing data over a certain period of time. The user-friendly data management systems based on the relational database will help immunologists/clinicians to fully manage the data. On the other hand, the same biological assays such as ELISPOT and flow cytometric assays are involved in immunological experiments no matter of different study purposes. The reuse of biological knowledge is one of driving forces behind this ontology-driven data management. Therefore, an ontology-driven database will help to handle different clinical immune researches and help immunologists/clinicians easily understand the immunological data from each other. We will discuss some outlines for building an ontology-driven data management for clinical immune researches (ODMim). PMID:17238637

  3. Establishing a Practice-Based Research Network: Lessons from the Massachusetts Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulcini, Joyce; Sheetz, Anne; DeSisto, Marie

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the recently established Massachusetts School Nurse Research Network (MASNRN) which has a mission of establishing a practice-based research network (PBRN) comprised of a representative, collaborative group of professional school nurses, nurse academicians, and other interested parties for whom school health is a priority.…

  4. Toward a General Research Process for Using Dubin's Theory Building Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holton, Elwood F.; Lowe, Janis S.

    2007-01-01

    Dubin developed a widely used methodology for theory building, which describes the components of the theory building process. Unfortunately, he does not define a research process for implementing his theory building model. This article proposes a seven-step general research process for implementing Dubin's theory building model. An example of a…

  5. Building capacity for sustainable research programmes for cancer in Africa.

    PubMed

    Adewole, Isaac; Martin, Damali N; Williams, Makeda J; Adebamowo, Clement; Bhatia, Kishor; Berling, Christine; Casper, Corey; Elshamy, Karima; Elzawawy, Ahmed; Lawlor, Rita T; Legood, Rosa; Mbulaiteye, Sam M; Odedina, Folakemi T; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olopade, Christopher O; Parkin, Donald M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Ross, Hana; Santini, Luiz A; Torode, Julie; Trimble, Edward L; Wild, Christopher P; Young, Annie M; Kerr, David J

    2014-05-01

    Cancer research in Africa will have a pivotal role in cancer control planning in this continent. However, environments (such as those in academic or clinical settings) with limited research infrastructure (laboratories, biorespositories, databases) coupled with inadequate funding and other resources have hampered African scientists from carrying out rigorous research. In September 2012, over 100 scientists with expertise in cancer research in Africa met in London to discuss the challenges in performing high-quality research, and to formulate the next steps for building sustainable, comprehensive and multi-disciplinary programmes relevant to Africa. This was the first meeting among five major organizations: the African Organisation for Research and Training in Africa (AORTIC), the Africa Oxford Cancer Foundation (AfrOx), and the National Cancer Institutes (NCI) of Brazil, France and the USA. This article summarizes the discussions and recommendations of this meeting, including the next steps required to create sustainable and impactful research programmes that will enable evidenced-based cancer control approaches and planning at the local, regional and national levels.

  6. Building capacity for sustainable research programmes for cancer in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Adewole, Isaac; Martin, Damali N.; Williams, Makeda J.; Adebamowo, Clement; Bhatia, Kishor; Berling, Christine; Casper, Corey; Elshamy, Karima; Elzawawy, Ahmed; Lawlor, Rita T.; Legood, Rosa; Mbulaiteye, Sam M.; Odedina, Folakemi T.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Olopade, Christopher O.; Parkin, Donald M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Ross, Hana; Santini, Luiz A.; Torode, Julie; Trimble, Edward L.; Wild, Christopher P.; Young, Annie M.; Kerr, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer research in Africa will have a pivotal role in cancer control planning in this continent. However, environments (such as those in academic or clinical settings) with limited research infrastructure (laboratories, biorespositories, databases) coupled with inadequate funding and other resources have hampered African scientists from carrying out rigorous research. In September 2012, over 100 scientists with expertise in cancer research in Africa met in London to discuss the challenges in performing high-quality research, and to formulate the next steps for building sustainable, comprehensive and multi-disciplinary programmes relevant to Africa. This was the first meeting among five major organizations: the African Organisation for Research and Training in Africa (AORTIC), the Africa Oxford Cancer Foundation (AfrOx), and the National Cancer Institutes (NCI) of Brazil, France and the USA. This article summarizes the discussions and recommendations of this meeting, including the next steps required to create sustainable and impactful research programmes that will enable evidenced-based cancer control approaches and planning at the local, regional and national levels. PMID:24614139

  7. Establishing and monitoring an aseptic workspace for building the MOMA mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalime, Erin N.; Berlin, David

    2016-09-01

    Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) is an instrument suite on the European Space Agency (ESA) ExoMars 2020 Rover, and the Mass Spectrometer (MOMA-MS) is being built at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). MOMA-MS is a life-detection instrument and thus falls in the most stringent category of Planetary Protection (PP) biological cleanliness requirements. Less than 0.03 spore/m2 are allowed in the instrument sample path. In order to meet these PP requirements, MOMA-MS must be built and maintained in a low bioburden environment. The MOMA-MS project at GSFC maintains three clean rooms with varying levels of bioburden control. The Aseptic Assembly Clean room has the highest level of control, applying three different bioburden reducing methods: 70% Isopropyl Alcohol (IPA), 7.5% Hydrogen Peroxide, and Ultra-Violet C (UVC) light. The three methods are used in rotation and each kills microorganisms by a different mechanism, reducing the likelihood of microorganisms developing resistance to all three. The Integration and Mars Chamber Clean rooms use less biocidal cleaning, with the option to deploy extra techniques as necessary. To support the monitoring of clean rooms and verification that MOMA-MS hardware meets PP requirements, a new Planetary Protection lab was established that currently has the capabilities of standard growth assays for spore or vegetative bacteria, rapid bioburden analysis that detects Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP), plus autoclave and Dry Heat microbial Reduction (DHMR) verification. The clean rooms are monitored for vegetative microorganisms and by rapid ATP assay, and a clear difference in bioburden is observed between the aseptic and other clean room.

  8. Establishing and Monitoring an Aseptic Workspace for Building the MOMA Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalime, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) is an instrument suite on the ESA ExoMars 2018 Rover, and the Mass Spectrometer (MOMA-MS) is being built at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). As MOMA-MS is a life-detection instrument and it thus falls in the most stringent category of Planetary Protection (PP) biological cleanliness requirements. Less than 0.03 sporem2 is allowed in the instrument sample path. In order to meet these PP requirements, MOMA-MS must be built and maintained in a low bioburden environment. The MOMA-MS project at GSFC maintains three cleanrooms with varying levels of bioburden control. The Aseptic Assembly Cleanroom has the highest level of control, applying three different bioburden reducing methods: 70 IPA, 7.5 Hydrogen Peroxide, and Ultra-Violet C light. The three methods are used in rotation and each kills microbes by a different mechanism, reducing the likelihood of microorganisms developing resistance to all three. The Integration and Mars Chamber Cleanrooms use less biocidal cleaning, with the option to deploy extra techniques as necessary. To support the monitoring of cleanrooms and verification that MOMA-MS hardware meets PP requirements, a new Planetary Protection lab was established that currently has the capabilities of standard growth assays for spore or vegetative bacteria, rapid bioburden analysis that detects Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP), plus autoclave and DHMR verification. The cleanrooms are monitored both for vegetative microorganisms and by rapid ATP assay, and a clear difference in bioburden is observed between the aseptic the other cleanroom.

  9. Establishing and Monitoring an Aseptic Workspace for Building the MOMA Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalime, Erin N.; Berlin, David

    2016-01-01

    Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) is an instrument suite on the European Space Agency (ESA) ExoMars 2020 Rover, and the Mass Spectrometer (MOMA-MS) is being built at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). MOMA-MS is a life-detection instrument and thus falls in the most stringent category of Planetary Protection (PP) biological cleanliness requirements. Less than 0.03 spore/m2 are allowed in the instrument sample path. In order to meet these PP requirements, MOMA-MS must be built and maintained in a low bioburden environment. The MOMA-MS project at GSFC maintains three clean rooms with varying levels of bioburden control. The Aseptic Assembly Clean room has the highest level of control, applying three different bioburden reducing methods: 70% Isopropyl Alcohol (IPA), 7.5% Hydrogen Peroxide, and Ultra-Violet C (UVC) light. The three methods are used in rotation and each kills microorganisms by a different mechanism, reducing the likelihood of microorganisms developing resistance to all three. The Integration and Mars Chamber Clean rooms use less biocidal cleaning, with the option to deploy extra techniques as necessary. To support the monitoring of clean rooms and verification that MOMA-MS hardware meets PP requirements, a new Planetary Protection lab was established that currently has the capabilities of standard growth assays for spore or vegetative bacteria, rapid bioburden analysis that detects Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP), plus autoclave and Dry Heat microbial Reduction (DHMR) verification. The clean rooms are monitored for vegetative microorganisms and by rapid ATP assay, and a clear difference in bioburden is observed between the aseptic and other clean room.

  10. Building a Data Science capability for USGS water research and communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appling, A.; Read, E. K.

    2015-12-01

    Interpreting and communicating water issues in an era of exponentially increasing information requires a blend of domain expertise, computational proficiency, and communication skills. The USGS Office of Water Information has established a Data Science team to meet these needs, providing challenging careers for diverse domain scientists and innovators in the fields of information technology and data visualization. Here, we detail the experience of building a Data Science capability as a bridging element between traditional water resources analyses and modern computing tools and data management techniques. This approach includes four major components: 1) building reusable research tools, 2) documenting data-intensive research approaches in peer reviewed journals, 3) communicating complex water resources issues with interactive web visualizations, and 4) offering training programs for our peers in scientific computing. These components collectively improve the efficiency, transparency, and reproducibility of USGS data analyses and scientific workflows.

  11. Six methodological steps to build medical data warehouses for research.

    PubMed

    Szirbik, N B; Pelletier, C; Chaussalet, T

    2006-09-01

    We propose a simple methodology for heterogeneous data collection and central repository-style database design in healthcare. Our method can be used with or without other software development frameworks, and we argue that its application can save a relevant amount of implementation effort. Also, we believe that the method can be used in other fields of research, especially those that have a strong interdisciplinary nature. The idea emerged during a healthcare research project, which consisted among others in grouping information from heterogeneous and distributed information sources. We developed this methodology by the lessons learned when we had to build a data repository, containing information about elderly patients flows in the UK's long-term care system (LTC). We explain thoroughly those aspects that influenced the methodology building. The methodology is defined by six steps, which can be aligned with various iterative development frameworks. We describe here the alignment of our methodology with the RUP (rational unified process) framework. The methodology emphasizes current trends, as early identification of critical requirements, data modelling, close and timely interaction with users and stakeholders, ontology building, quality management, and exception handling. Of a special interest is the ontological engineering aspect, which had the effects with the highest impact after the project. That is, it helped stakeholders to perform better collaborative negotiations that brought better solutions for the overall system investigated. An insight into the problems faced by others helps to lead the negotiators to win-win situations. We consider that this should be the social result of any project that collects data for better decision making that leads finally to enhanced global outcomes.

  12. The viability of establishing collaborative, reconfigurable research environments for the Human Performance Research Laboratory at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clipson, Colin

    1994-01-01

    This paper will review and summarize research initiatives conducted between 1987 and 1992 at NASA Ames Research Center by a research team from the University of Michigan Architecture Research Laboratory. These research initiatives, funded by a NASA grant NAG2-635, examined the viability of establishing collaborative, reconfigurable research environments for the Human Performance Research Laboratory at NASA Ames in California. Collaborative Research Environments are envisioned as a way of enhancing the work of NASA research teams, optimizing the use of shared resources, and providing superior environments for housing research activities. The Integrated Simulation Project at NASA, Ames Human Performance Research Laboratory is one of the current realizations of this initiative.

  13. Energy Efficient Building Management | Climate Neutral Research Campuses |

    Science.gov Websites

    NREL Efficient Building Management Energy Efficient Building Management As campuses complete generate the greatest climate impact. Energy efficient management in the existing stock of buildings is the following links go to sections that describe how an energy buildings management and maintenance program may

  14. If You Build It, They Will Come: How to Establish an Academic Innovation Enterprise.

    PubMed

    Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Balesh, Elie; Cheng, Christopher P; Chen, David

    2017-06-01

    The rapid growth of minimally invasive, image-guided intervention has redefined the procedural management of multiple disease entities. The process of innovation which has characterized the growth of interventional radiology can be best described as "needs-based," whereby practicing interventionalists identify unmet clinical needs and subsequently invent solutions to achieve desired technical and clinical outcomes. Historically, catheters and other percutaneous devices were developed with rudimentary manufacturing techniques and subsequently translated to patients with relatively little regulatory oversight. Since then, the resources required and financial costs of interventional technology development have grown exponentially. Fortunately, advances in software development, new methods of rapid prototyping, and commoditization of hardware components have made in-house engineering feasible once again. This has created an opportunity for academic medical centers to translate their research into testable prototypes in humans sooner and at reduced costs, and academic interventional radiology divisions are now leveraging these developments to create collaborative centers of innovation. This article describes five such organizational formats for collaboration and innovation in the academic setting, describing the structure, opportunities, requirements, and caveats of each model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Good collaborative practice: reforming capacity building governance of international health research partnerships.

    PubMed

    Ward, Claire Leonie; Shaw, David; Sprumont, Dominique; Sankoh, Osman; Tanner, Marcel; Elger, Bernice

    2018-01-08

    In line with the policy objectives of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, this commentary seeks to examine the extent to which provisions of international health research guidance promote capacity building and equitable partnerships in global health research. Our evaluation finds that governance of collaborative research partnerships, and in particular capacity building, in resource-constrained settings is limited but has improved with the implementation guidance of the International Ethical Guidelines for Health-related Research Involving Humans by The Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS) (2016). However, more clarity is needed in national legislation, industry and ethics guidelines, and regulatory provisions to address the structural inequities and power imbalances inherent in international health research partnerships. Most notably, ethical partnership governance is not supported by the principal industry ethics guidelines - the International Conference on Harmonization Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceutical for Human Use (ICH) Good Clinical Practice (ICH-GCP). Given the strategic value of ICH-GCP guidelines in defining the role and responsibility of global health research partners, we conclude that such governance should stipulate the minimal requirements for creating an equitable environment of inclusion, mutual learning, transparency and accountability. Procedurally, this can be supported by i) shared research agenda setting with local leadership, ii) capacity assessments, and iii) construction of a memorandum of understanding (MoU). Moreover, the requirement of capacity building needs to be coordinated amongst partners to support good collaborative practice and deliver on the public health goals of the research enterprise; improving local conditions of health and reducing global health inequality. In this respect, and in order to develop consistency between sources of research governance, ICH

  16. The Idea and Reality of an Innovative School: From Inventive Design to Established Practice in a New School Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigurðardóttir, Anna Kristín; Hjartarson, Torfi

    2016-01-01

    The physical environment in schools has in the literature of late been gaining recognition as a potential factor supporting educational change. This article draws a single case out of a research sample of 20 schools in Iceland to relate an inventive design process as the school was being developed and study the current state of established school…

  17. Strong One Lasting One: An Elementary School Principal's Ability to Establish a Positive School Culture by Building Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Goldy, III.

    2015-01-01

    Trust is a key element in improving learning and teaching. Reviewing research on the topic of establishing trust by school leaders illuminates actions needed to make a positive difference in the culture of a school. Using the concept of mindfulness, the instructional leader was able to regain the trust of the community, parents, faculty, and…

  18. "Initiate-build-operate-transfer" - a strategy for establishing sustainable telemedicine programs not only in the developing countries.

    PubMed

    Latifi, Rifat

    2011-01-01

    Establishing sustainable telemedicine has become a goal of many developing countries around the world. Yet, despite initiatives from a select few individuals and on occasion from various governments, often these initiatives never mature to become sustainable programs. The introduction of telemedicine and e-learning in the Balkans has been a pivotal step in advancing the quality and availability of medical services in a region whose infrastructure and resources have been decimated by wars, neglect, lack of funding, and poor management. The concept and establishment of the International Virtual e-Hospital (IVeH) has significantly impacted telemedicine and e-health services in Kosova. The success of the IVeH in Kosova has led to the development of similar programs in other Balkan countries and other developing countries in the hope of modernizing and improving their healthcare infrastructure. A comprehensive, four-pronged strategy developed by IVeH "Initiate-Build-Operate-Transfer" (IBOT), may be a useful approach in establishing telemedicine and e-health educational services not only in developing countries, but in developed countries. The development strategy, IBOT, used by the IVeH to establish and develop telemedicine programs is described. IBOT includes assessment of healthcare needs of each country, the development of a curriculum and education program, the establishment of a nationwide telemedicine network, and the integration of the telemedicine program into the very core of healthcare infrastructure. The end point is the transfer of a sustainable telehealth program to the nation involved. By applying IBOT, a sustainable telemedicine program of Kosova and Albania has been established as an effective prototype for telemedicine in the Balkans. Once fully matured, the program is transitioned to the Ministry of Health, which ensures the sustainability and ownership of the program. Similar programs are being established in Macedonia, Montenegro and other countries

  19. Building tobacco control research in Thailand: meeting the need for innovative change in Asia.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Stephen L; Mock, Jeremiah; Hense, Sibasis; Charoenca, Naowarut; Kungskulniti, Nipapun

    2012-01-28

    In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) over the past two decades locally relevant tobacco control research has been scant. Experience shows that tobacco control measures should be based on sound research findings to ensure that measures are appropriate for local conditions and that they are likely to have an impact. Research should also be integrated within tobacco control measures to ensure ongoing learning and the production of knowledge. Thailand, a middle-income country, has a public health community with a record of successful tobacco control and a longstanding commitment to research. Thailand's comprehensive approach includes taxation; bans on tobacco advertising, sponsorship and promotion; smoke-free areas; graphic cigarette pack warnings; social marketing campaigns; cessation counseling; and an established tobacco control research program. The purpose of this study was to document and analyze the development of tobacco control research capacity in Thailand and the impact of research on Thai tobacco control measures. We used mixed methods including review of historical documentation and policy reports, qualitative interviews with key members of Thailand's tobacco control community, and an analysis of research productivity. In Thailand, tobacco control research has evolved through three phases: (1) discovery of the value of research in the policymaking arena, (2) development of a structure to support research capacity building through international collaborations supported by foreign funding agencies, and (3) delivery of locally relevant research made possible largely through substantial stable funding from a domestic health promotion foundation. Over two decades, Thai tobacco control advocates have constructed five steppingstones to success: (1) adapting foreign research to inform policymaking and lobbying for more support for domestic research; (2) attracting foreign funding agencies to support small-scale research and capacity building; (3

  20. Building tobacco control research in Thailand: meeting the need for innovative change in Asia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) over the past two decades locally relevant tobacco control research has been scant. Experience shows that tobacco control measures should be based on sound research findings to ensure that measures are appropriate for local conditions and that they are likely to have an impact. Research should also be integrated within tobacco control measures to ensure ongoing learning and the production of knowledge. Thailand, a middle-income country, has a public health community with a record of successful tobacco control and a longstanding commitment to research. Thailand's comprehensive approach includes taxation; bans on tobacco advertising, sponsorship and promotion; smoke-free areas; graphic cigarette pack warnings; social marketing campaigns; cessation counseling; and an established tobacco control research program. The purpose of this study was to document and analyze the development of tobacco control research capacity in Thailand and the impact of research on Thai tobacco control measures. Method We used mixed methods including review of historical documentation and policy reports, qualitative interviews with key members of Thailand's tobacco control community, and an analysis of research productivity. Findings In Thailand, tobacco control research has evolved through three phases: (1) discovery of the value of research in the policymaking arena, (2) development of a structure to support research capacity building through international collaborations supported by foreign funding agencies, and (3) delivery of locally relevant research made possible largely through substantial stable funding from a domestic health promotion foundation. Over two decades, Thai tobacco control advocates have constructed five steppingstones to success: (1) adapting foreign research to inform policymaking and lobbying for more support for domestic research; (2) attracting foreign funding agencies to support small-scale research and

  1. Nanotechnology on a dime: building affordable research facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiBattista, Jeff; Clare, Donna; Lynch, David

    2005-08-01

    Designing buildings to house nanotechnology research presents a multitude of well-recognized challenges to architectural and engineering design teams, from environmental control to spatial arrangements to operational functionality. These technical challenges can be solved with relative ease on projects with large budgets: designers have the option of selecting leading-edge systems without undue regard for their expense. This is reflected in the construction cost of many nanotechnology research facilities that run well into the hundreds of millions of dollars. Smaller universities and other institutions need not be shut out of the nanotechnology research field simply because their construction budgets are tens of millions of dollars or less. The key to success for these less expensive projects lies with making good strategic decisions: identifying priorities for the facility in terms of what it will is--and will not--provide to the researchers. Making these strategic decisions puts bounds on the tactical, technical problems that the design team at large must address, allowing them to focus their efforts on the key areas for success. The process and challenges of this strategic decision-making process are examined, with emphasis placed on the types of decisions that must be made and the factors that must be considered when making them. Case study examples of projects undertaken at the University of Alberta are used to illustrate how strategic-level decision-making sets the stage for cutting-edge success on a modest budget.

  2. Building organizational supports for research-minded practitioners.

    PubMed

    Austin, Michael J; Dal Santo, Teresa S; Lee, Chris

    2012-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges facing human service organizations is the proliferation of information from inside and outside the agency that needs to be managed if it is to be of use. The concepts of tacit and explicit knowledge can inform an approach to this challenge. Tacit knowledge is stored in the minds of practitioners (often called practice wisdom) and the explicit knowledge is often found in organizational procedure manuals and educational and training materials. Building on this perspective, this analysis provides a preliminary definition of research-minded practitioners by explicating the elements of curiosity, critical reflection, and critical thinking. The organizational implications of developing a cadre of research-minded practitioners include the commitment of top management to support "link officers", evidence request services, research and development units, and service standards. The challenges include the capacity to identify/support research-minded practitioners, promote an organizational culture of evidence-informed practice, redefine staff development and training, redefine job descriptions, and specify the nature of managerial leadership. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  3. Conducting HIV Research in Racial and Ethnic Minority Communities: Building a Successful Interdisciplinary Research Team

    PubMed Central

    Polanco, Frinny R.; Dominguez, Dinora C.; Grady, Christine; Stoll, Pamela; Ramos, Catalina; Mican, JoAnn M.; Miranda-Acevedo, Robert; Morgan, Marcela; Aizvera, Jeasmine; Purdie, Lori; Koziol, Deloris; Rivera-Goba, Migdalia V.

    2011-01-01

    HIV infection occurs in disproportionately high rates among racial and ethnic minorities in the United States, making it imperative that individuals from these groups be included in research studies. Unfortunately, it is often difficult to recruit HIV-infected Hispanics and African Americans into clinical trials, but a skilled interdisciplinary team that includes researchers with racial and ethnic diversity can help. This article describes a successful approach for building an interdisciplinary team that values the participation of racial and ethnic minorities in clinical trials and that has the skills to work with these groups. The success of the Adelante (a Spanish word meaning forward) Team can be attributed to team members who actively participate in decision-making, are empowered, and function in a cohesive manner. Successful research teams build relationships with research participants in order to increase the probability that racial and ethnic minorities will enroll and participate fully in research. PMID:21277228

  4. Conducting HIV research in racial and ethnic minority communities: building a successful interdisciplinary research team.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Frinny R; Dominguez, Dinora C; Grady, Christine; Stoll, Pamela; Ramos, Catalina; Mican, Joann M; Miranda-Acevedo, Robert; Morgan, Marcela; Aizvera, Jeasmine; Purdie, Lori; Koziol, Deloris; Rivera-Goba, Migdalia V

    2011-01-01

    HIV infection occurs in disproportionately high rates among racial and ethnic minorities in the United States, making it imperative that individuals from these groups be included in research studies. However, it is often difficult to recruit HIV-infected Hispanics and African Americans in clinical trials, but a skilled interdisciplinary team that includes researchers with racial and ethnic diversity can help. This article describes a successful approach for building an interdisciplinary team that values the participation of racial and ethnic minorities in clinical trials and has the skills to work with these groups. The success of the Adelante (a Spanish word meaning forward) Team can be attributed to team members who actively participate in decision-making, are empowered, and function in a cohesive manner. Successful research teams build relationships with research participants to increase the probability that racial and ethnic minorities will enroll and participate fully in research. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Consumer-driven health care: building partnerships in research.

    PubMed

    Shea, Beverley; Santesso, Nancy; Qualman, Ann; Heiberg, Turid; Leong, Amye; Judd, Maria; Robinson, Vivian; Wells, George; Tugwell, Peter

    2005-12-01

    Over the past four decades, there has been a widespread movement to increase the involvement of patients and the public in health care. Strategies to effectively foster consumer participation are occurring within all research activities from research priority setting to utilization. One of the ten principles of the Cochrane Collaboration is to 'enable wide participation', and this includes consumers. The Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group (CMSG) is a review group of 50 within the Collaboration that has been working to increase consumer participation since its inception in 1993. Based in Canada, the CMSG has embraced the concept of knowledge translation as advocated by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. The emphasis in knowledge translation is on interactions or partnerships between researchers and users to facilitate the use of relevant research in decision making. While the CMSG recognizes the importance of reaching all users, much of its work has focused on developing relationships with people with musculoskeletal diseases to enhance consumer participation in research. The CMSG has built a network of consumer members who guide research priorities, peer review systematic reviews and also promote and facilitate consumer-appropriate knowledge dissemination. Consumers were recruited through links with other arthritis organizations and the recruitment continues. Specific roles were established for the consumer team and responsibilities of the CMSG staff developed. The continuing development of a diversified team of consumer participants enables the CMSG to produce and promote access to high quality relevant systematic reviews and summaries of those reviews to the consumer.

  6. Consumer‐driven health care: Building partnerships in research

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Beverley; Santesso, Nancy; Qualman, Ann; Heiberg, Turid; Leong, Amye; Judd, Maria; Robinson, Vivian; Wells, George; Tugwell, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Over the past four decades, there has been a widespread movement to increase the involvement of patients and the public in health care. Strategies to effectively foster consumer participation are occurring within all research activities from research priority setting to utilization. One of the ten principles of the Cochrane Collaboration is to ‘enable wide participation’, and this includes consumers. The Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group (CMSG) is a review group of 50 within the Collaboration that has been working to increase consumer participation since its inception in 1993. Based in Canada, the CMSG has embraced the concept of knowledge translation as advocated by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. The emphasis in knowledge translation is on interactions or partnerships between researchers and users to facilitate the use of relevant research in decision making. While the CMSG recognizes the importance of reaching all users, much of its work has focused on developing relationships with people with musculoskeletal diseases to enhance consumer participation in research. The CMSG has built a network of consumer members who guide research priorities, peer review systematic reviews and also promote and facilitate consumer‐appropriate knowledge dissemination. Consumers were recruited through links with other arthritis organizations and the recruitment continues. Specific roles were established for the consumer team and responsibilities of the CMSG staff developed. The continuing development of a diversified team of consumer participants enables the CMSG to produce and promote access to high quality relevant systematic reviews and summaries of those reviews to the consumer. PMID:16266423

  7. Establishing a Student Research and Publishing Program in High School Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eales, Jonathan; Laksana, Sangob

    2016-01-01

    Student learning in science is improved by authentic personal experience of research projects and the publication of findings. Graduate students do this, but it is uncommon to find student research and publishing in high school science programs. We describe here the Student Research and Publishing Program (SRPP) established at International School…

  8. Progress on Establishing a World Education Research Association Continues at Third International Meeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Representatives of 28 education research associations from around the world convened in New York on March 29-30, 2008 at a third meeting to advance the goal of establishing a world education research association (informally called "WERA"). The agenda centered on the nature and form of a world education research association, with discussions…

  9. ESTABLISHMENT OF A GROUNDWATER RESEARCH DATA CENTER FOR VALIDATION OF SUBSURFACE FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The International Ground Water Modeling Center has established a Groundwater Research Data Center that provides information on datasets resulting from publicly funded field experiments and related bench studies in soil and groundwater pollution and distributes datasets for tes...

  10. Whole-Building Retrofits | Climate Neutral Research Campuses | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    Whole-Building Retrofits Whole-Building Retrofits Buildings are the greatest energy consumers on check. As buildings age, O&M costs reach the point where they are best addressed through a top-to wall insulation. Renovations are costly and disruptive, but they are the best way to adapt an aging

  11. How Do Writers Establish Research Niches? A Genre-Based Investigation into Management Researchers' Rhetorical Steps and Linguistic Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Jason Miin-Hwa

    2012-01-01

    "Establishing a niche" often constitutes a crucial rhetorical move in research proposals and journal papers in various academic disciplines. Research proposals and reports submitted by novice writers may at times be rejected on grounds of their inability to demonstrate a need to carry out research in a suggested area. This genre-based…

  12. Central Control Room in the Engine Research Building

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-11-21

    Operators in the Engine Research Building’s Central Control Room at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center. The massive 4.25-acre Engine Research Building contains dozens of test cells, test stands, and altitude chambers. A powerful a collection of compressors and exhausters located in the central portion of the basement provides process air and exhaust for these test areas. This system is connected to similar process air systems in the laboratory’s other large test facilities. The Central Control Room coordinates this activity and communicates with the local utilities. The panels on the wall contain schematics with indicator lights and instrumentation for the atmospheric exhaust, altitude exhaust, refrigerated air, and process air systems. The process air equipment included twelve exhausters, four compressors, refrigeration system, cooling water, and an exhaust system. The operators in the control room kept in contact with engineers running the process air system and those conducting the tests in the test cells. The operators also coordinated with the local power companies to make sure enough electricity was available to operate the powerful compressors and exhausters.

  13. A review on the establishment and research in hydrological experimental areas (catchments) in plain areas in China and abroad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hai; Wang, Chuanhai; Hua, Wenjuan

    2017-04-01

    This paper reviewed some specific conceptions of hydrological experimental areas (catchments) while found that the traditional definition of 'catchment' may be difficult to meet in plain areas. According to the review of development history and current situation of hydrological experimental areas (catchments) in plain areas in China, 4 stages were shown besides the recent 10 years, i.e., 'golden stage(1952-1966)', 'backward stage(1966-1986)', 'short recovery stage(1986-1989)' and 'stagnant stage(1986-2006)'. It gets new impetus since 2006 with some investigation work promoted by the government. Furthermore, some historic problems during establishing experimental areas (catchments) in plain areas were revealed based on the document literature and a few meaningful lessons were drawn from the past. It was also the first time to collect and classify the details of both 11 representative experimental areas in China and abroad, after that a brief comparison about the measurement level and research directions was made between two regions. Additionally, we took the experimental research work in the plain of Taihu Lake Basin as example and introduced the particular research goals and the corresponding establishing process, including how to design the experimental area, eg, size, location, land use type, arranging the measurement instruments et al. We hope such case can provide a reference for newly-building, recovering and extending hydrological experimental areasin plain areas in the future. Finally, this paper prospected the future development in establishment and research in hydrological experimental areas (catchments) in plain areas. It may be more common to see the cooperation between model scientists and field experts. Because of the comprehensive goals in water problems, researchers from various fields would work together in the future experimental research work. Scale study and modelling in plain areas will be a promising branch after some typical experimental areas

  14. Building America Systems Integration Research Annual Report. FY 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Gestwick, Michael

    2013-05-01

    This Building America FY2012 Annual Report includes an overview of the Building America Program activities and the work completed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Building America industry consortia (the Building America teams). The annual report summarizes major technical accomplishments and progress towards U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program's multi-year goal of developing the systems innovations that enable risk-free, cost effective, reliable and durable efficiency solutions that reduce energy use by 30%-50% in both new and existing homes.

  15. Building America Systems Integration Research Annual Report: FY 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Gestwick, M.

    2013-05-01

    This document is the Building America FY2012 Annual Report, which includes an overview of the Building America Program activities and the work completed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Building America industry consortia (the Building America teams). The annual report summarizes major technical accomplishments and progress towards U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program's multi-year goal of developing the systems innovations that enable risk-free, cost effective, reliable and durable efficiency solutions that reduce energy use by 30%-50% in both new and existing homes.

  16. Research on BIM-based building information value chain reengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Zhao; Weishuang, Xie

    2017-04-01

    The achievement of value and value-added factor to the building engineering information is accomplished through a chain-flow, that is, building the information value chain. Based on the deconstruction of the information chain on the construction information in the traditional information mode, this paper clarifies the value characteristics and requirements of each stage of the construction project. In order to achieve building information value-added, the paper deconstructs the traditional building information value chain, reengineer the information value chain model on the basis of the theory and techniques of BIM, to build value-added management model and analyse the value of the model.

  17. Building partnerships for healthy environments: research, leadership and education.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Susan; Kent, Jennifer; Lyons, Claudine

    2014-12-01

    As populations across the globe face an increasing health burden from rising rates of obesity, diabetes and other lifestyle-related diseases, health professionals are collaborating with urban planners to influence city design that supports healthy ways of living. This paper details the establishment and operation of an innovative, interdisciplinary collaboration that brings together urban planning and health. Situated in a built environment faculty at one of Australia's most prestigious universities, the Healthy Built Environments Program (HBEP) partners planning academics, a health non-government organisation, local councils and private planning consultants in a state government health department funded consortium. The HBEP focuses on three strategic areas: research, workforce development and education, and leadership and advocacy. Interdisciplinary research includes a comprehensive literature review that establishes Australian-based evidence to support the development, prioritisation and implementation of healthy built environment policies and practices. Another ongoing study examines the design features, social interventions and locational qualities that positively benefit human health. Formal courses, workshops, public lectures and e-learning develop professional capacity, as well as skills in interdisciplinary practice to support productive collaborations between health professionals and planners. The third area involves working with government and non-government agencies, and the private sector and the community, to advocate closer links between health and the built environment. Our paper presents an overview of the HBEP's major achievements. We conclude with a critical review of the challenges, revealing lessons in bringing health and planning closer together to create health-supportive cities for the 21st century.

  18. Trust Building Recruitment Strategies for Researchers Conducting Studies in African American (AA) Churches: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Gloria; Williams, Sharon; Wilkie, Diana; Hart, Alysha; Burnett, Glenda; Peacock, Geraldine

    2017-01-01

    Background An initial and vital important step in recruiting participants for church-based hospice and palliative care research is the establishment of trust and credibility within the church community. Mistrust of medical research is an extremely important barrier hindering recruitment in African American (AA) communities. A church-based EOL dementia education project is currently being conducted at four large urban AA churches. Church leaders voiced mistrust concerns of previous researchers who conducted investigations in their faith-based institutions. We explored strategies to ameliorate the mistrust concerns. Specific aim To identify trust-rebuilding elements for researchers following others who violated trust of AA church leaders. Methods Face-to-face, in-depth interviews were conducted from a convenient sample of four established AA church leaders. Interviews were held in the informants’ churches to promote candor and comfort in revealing sensitive information about trust/mistrust. Content analysis framework was used to analyze the data. Elements identified from the analysis were then used to create themes. Results Multidimensional overarching themes emerged from the analysis included: Experience with researchers (positive and extremely negative), violation of trust and trust building strategies. Conclusions Findings suggest that researchers who wish to conduct successful studies in the AA religious institutions must implement trust rebuilding strategies that include mutual respect, collaboration and partnership building. If general moral practices continue to be violated, threat to future hospice and palliative care research within the institutions may prevail. Thus, potential benefits are thwarted for the church members, AA community, and advancement of EOL care scholarship. PMID:27577723

  19. The law of incidental findings in human subjects research: establishing researchers' duties.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Susan M; Paradise, Jordan; Caga-anan, Charlisse

    2008-01-01

    Research technologies can now produce so much information that there is significant potential for incidental findings (IFs). These are findings generated in research that are beyond the aims of the study. Current law and federal regulations offer no direct guidance on how to deal with IFs in research, nor is there adequate professional or institutional guidance. We advocate a defined set of researcher duties based on law and ethics and recommend a pathway to be followed in handling IFs in research. This article traces the underlying ethical and legal theories supporting researcher duties to manage IFs, including duties to develop a plan for management in the research protocol, to discuss the possibility of and management plan for IFs in the informed consent process, and to address, evaluate, and ultimately offer to disclose IFs of potential clinical or reproductive significance to research participants when they arise.

  20. Challenges and opportunities in building health research capacity in Tanzania: a case of the National Institute for Medical Research.

    PubMed

    Magesa, Stephen M; Mwape, Bonard; Mboera, Leonard E G

    2011-12-01

    Capacity building is considered a priority for health research institutions in developing countries to achieve the Millennium Development Goals by 2015. However, in many countries including Tanzania, much emphasis has been directed towards human resources for health with the total exclusion of human resources for health research. The objective of this study was to systematically investigate the capacity building process for the Tanzanian National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR) over a 30-year period and identify the challenges and opportunities in creating a critical mass of multi-disciplinary research scientists that is required for achieving the intended health benefits. A desk review of personnel database was conducted for information covering 1980-2009 on academic qualifications, training, research experience and research output. The current staff curriculum vitae (CV) were reviewed to gather information on researchers' employment record, training, training support, area of expertise and scientific output. Interviews were conducted with a cross section of researchers on capacity development aspects using a self-administered questionnaire. In-depth interviews were also conducted with the current and former NIMR Management to seek information on capacity development challenges. A review was also done on staff personal files, annual reports, strategic plans and other occasional documents. A total of 163 CV were assessed; of these, 76.7% (125) were for Research Scientists (RS), 20.9% (34) Laboratory Technologists (LT) and 2.4% (4) for System Analysts. The Institute had 13 research scientists upon its establishment. Since 1980, NIMR has recruited a total of 185 Research Scientists. By 2009, NIMR had a total scientific workforce of 170 staff (RS= 82.4%; LT= 17.6%). Of the 140 RSs, 37 (26.4%), were first degree; 77 (55.5%) second degree while 26 (18.6%) were PhD degree holders. Of the total of 78 researchers interviewed, 55 (70.5%) indicated to have accessed

  1. Establishing Research Universities in Ukrainian Higher Education: The Incomplete Journey of a Structural Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hladchenko, Myroslava; de Boer, Harry F.; Westerheijden, Don F.

    2016-01-01

    The idea of the research university as a key institution for social and economic development in knowledge-intensive societies has been adopted by the Ukrainian government after the fall of the communist regime. Establishing research universities is a long journey during which many things might happen. To understand this journey better in the case…

  2. Established and Evolving Spoken Research Process Genres: Plenary Lecture and Poster Session Discussions at Academic Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shalom, Celia

    1993-01-01

    Two types of main hall discussions at an ecology conference were studied: plenary lecture discussion as an accepted, established spoken research process genre with its own conventions; and poster session discussion as a fragile, embryonic research process genre struggling for definition. (14 references) (Author/LB)

  3. NREL’s Advanced Analytics Research for Energy-Efficient Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Kutscher, Chuck; Livingood, Bill; Wilson, Eric

    At NREL, we believe in building better buildings. More importantly, high-performance buildings that can do more and be smarter than ever before. Forty percent of the total energy consumption in the United States comes from buildings. Working together, we can dramatically shrink that number. But first, it starts with the research: our observations, experiments, modeling, analysis, and more. NREL’s advanced analytics research has already proven to reduce energy use, save money, and stabilize the grid.

  4. Capacity Building in the IAI Collaborative Research Network Program- Experience from CRN03

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckman, B. H.

    2007-05-01

    In addition to their scientific agendas, IAI CRNs have the explicit goal of capacity building in Global Change science. CRN03 examined climate variability in the Americas with particular emphasis on tree-rings, involving collaboration between 3 US, 2 Canadian plus Argentinean and Chilean laboratories. New pioneer laboratories were also established in Mexico, Bolivia and Peru. With limited funding we believed that capacity building is best achieved by involving students and junior researchers in project work directly (about 100 in total) but we also undertook educational activities that augment this role. The most visible was the initiation of dendroecological fieldweeks in Latin America. These brought together 20-30 international students and junior researchers from many disciplines to work in small research teams led by experienced scientists. Over a 7-10 day period projects go from conception via field sampling and measurement to final presentations (and sometimes publication). Major fieldweeks (the first in Latin America) were organized in Argentina (2000), Mexico (2001) Chile (2003) and Brazil (2005) with smaller groups in Chile (2000), Bolivia (2001) and Canada (2002). Over 100 students attended (mainly funded by the CRN) from11 Latin American and Caribbean countries and instructors from 6 countries. These field weeks develop important national and international contacts for participants and also provided promotional material (including a 20 minute bilingual video) for further recruiting. Several students were also supported for travel to short courses in the USA or elsewhere. Given the distances involved, most research collaborations were bilateral between individuals or institutions, the strongest ones generally involving a senior laboratory or scientists with junior partners elsewhere. This has particularly enhanced international collaboration for the established Latin American laboratories by attracting researchers from regions not previously involved in

  5. Promising and Established Investigators' Experiences Participating in the National Athletic Trainers' Association Foundation Research Mentor Programa

    PubMed Central

    Nottingham, Sara L.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Barrett, Jessica L.

    2017-01-01

    Context: Mentorship is a helpful resource for individuals who transition from doctoral student to tenure-track faculty member. The National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) Research & Education Foundation offers a Research Mentor Program to provide mentorship to promising investigators, particularly as they work to establish independent lines of research. Objective: To gain the perspectives of promising and established investigators on their participation in the NATA Foundation Research Mentor Program. Design: Qualitative, phenomenological research. Setting: Higher education institutions. Patients or Other Participants: Seven promising investigators (5 women, 2 men) and 7 established investigators (2 women, 5 men), all of whom had completed the NATA Foundation Research Mentor Program. Data Collection and Analysis: We developed and piloted interview guides designed to gain participants' perspectives on their experiences participating in the NATA Foundation Research Mentor Program. Semistructured telephone interviews were completed with each individual and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using a phenomenological approach, and saturation was obtained. Trustworthiness was established with the use of member checking, multiple-analyst triangulation, and data-source triangulation. Results: Three themes emerged from the interviews: (1) motivation, (2) collaboration, and (3) resources. Participants were motivated to become involved because they saw the value of mentorship, and mentees desired guidance in their research. Participants believed that collaboration on a project contributed to a positive relationship, and they also desired additional program and professional resources to support novice faculty. Conclusions: Promising and established investigators should be encouraged to engage in mentoring relationships to facilitate mentees' research agendas and professional development. The NATA Foundation and athletic training profession may consider providing

  6. Promising and Established Investigators' Experiences Participating in the National Athletic Trainers' Association Foundation Research Mentor Program.

    PubMed

    Nottingham, Sara L; Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Barrett, Jessica L

    2017-04-01

      Mentorship is a helpful resource for individuals who transition from doctoral student to tenure-track faculty member. The National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) Research & Education Foundation offers a Research Mentor Program to provide mentorship to promising investigators, particularly as they work to establish independent lines of research.   To gain the perspectives of promising and established investigators on their participation in the NATA Foundation Research Mentor Program.   Qualitative, phenomenological research.   Higher education institutions.   Seven promising investigators (5 women, 2 men) and 7 established investigators (2 women, 5 men), all of whom had completed the NATA Foundation Research Mentor Program. Data Collection and Analysis We developed and piloted intervi: ew guides designed to gain participants' perspectives on their experiences participating in the NATA Foundation Research Mentor Program. Semistructured telephone interviews were completed with each individual and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using a phenomenological approach, and saturation was obtained. Trustworthiness was established with the use of member checking, multiple-analyst triangulation, and data-source triangulation.   Three themes emerged from the interviews: (1) motivation, (2) collaboration, and (3) resources. Participants were motivated to become involved because they saw the value of mentorship, and mentees desired guidance in their research. Participants believed that collaboration on a project contributed to a positive relationship, and they also desired additional program and professional resources to support novice faculty.   Promising and established investigators should be encouraged to engage in mentoring relationships to facilitate mentees' research agendas and professional development. The NATA Foundation and athletic training profession may consider providing additional resources for novice faculty, such as training on

  7. Fifteen Challenges in Establishing a Multidisciplinary Research Program on eHealth Research in a University Setting: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Birgitta; Held, Claes; Sjöström, Jonas; Lindahl Norberg, Annika; Hovén, Emma; Sanderman, Robbert; van Achterberg, Theo; von Essen, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Background U-CARE is a multidisciplinary eHealth research program that involves the disciplines of caring science, clinical psychology, health economics, information systems, and medical science. It was set up from scratch in a university setting in 2010, funded by a governmental initiative. While establishing the research program, many challenges were faced. Systematic documentation of experiences from establishing new research environments is scarce. Objective The aim of this paper was to describe the challenges of establishing a publicly funded multidisciplinary eHealth research environment. Methods Researchers involved in developing the research program U-CARE identified challenges in the formal documentation and by reflecting on their experience of developing the program. The authors discussed the content and organization of challenges into themes until consensus was reached. Results The authors identified 15 major challenges, some general to establishing a new research environment and some specific for multidisciplinary eHealth programs. The challenges were organized into 6 themes: Organization, Communication, Implementation, Legislation, Software development, and Multidisciplinarity. Conclusions Several challenges were faced during the development of the program and several accomplishments were made. By sharing our experience, we hope to help other research groups embarking on a similar journey to be prepared for some of the challenges they are likely to face on their way. PMID:28536090

  8. An evaluation of the 'Designated Research Team' approach to building research capacity in primary care.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Jo; Nancarrow, Susan; Dyas, Jane; Williams, Martin

    2008-06-27

    This paper describes an evaluation of an initiative to increase the research capability of clinical groups in primary and community care settings in a region of the United Kingdom. The 'designated research team' (DRT) approach was evaluated using indicators derived from a framework of six principles for research capacity building (RCB) which include: building skills and confidence, relevance to practice, dissemination, linkages and collaborations, sustainability and infrastructure development. Information was collated on the context, activities, experiences, outputs and impacts of six clinical research teams supported by Trent Research Development Support Unit (RDSU) as DRTs. Process and outcome data from each of the teams was used to evaluate the extent to which the DRT approach was effective in building research capacity in each of the six principles (as evidenced by twenty possible indicators of research capacity development). The DRT approach was found to be well aligned to the principles of RCB and generally effective in developing research capabilities. It proved particularly effective in developing linkages, collaborations and skills. Where research capacity was slow to develop, this was reflected in poor alignment between the principles of RCB and the characteristics of the team, their activities or environment. One team was unable to develop a research project and the funding was withdrawn at an early stage. For at least one individual in each of the remaining five teams, research activity was sustained beyond the funding period through research partnerships and funding successes. An enabling infrastructure, including being freed from clinical duties to undertake research, and support from senior management were found to be important determinants of successful DRT development. Research questions of DRTs were derived from practice issues and several projects generated outputs with potential to change daily practice, including the use of research evidence in

  9. Harnessing collaboration to build nursing research capacity: a research team journey.

    PubMed

    Priest, Helena; Segrott, Jeremy; Green, Barbara; Rout, Amelia

    2007-08-01

    This paper discusses a qualitative evaluation study, designed to explore nursing lecturers' research capability development through their engagement as co-researchers in a larger case study project (referred to as the 'main project'). It explores the justification for supporting research capacity development using this collaborative approach, the process and experience of undertaking collaborative research, and the effectiveness of this model of collaboration in developing new researchers. The paper also makes connections between the process of undertaking the research (designed to offer opportunities for inexperienced researchers to be involved) and the main project findings (which explored the ways in which academic schools develop research capacity). We first set the main project in its wider context and map key issues relating to research capacity development and collaboration in the literature, before outlining how we involved neophyte and 'midiphyte' researchers. The evaluative study, which is the focus of this paper, discusses the experiences of the neophyte researchers, and explores the synergies between the main project's key findings and the process of undertaking it. We conclude with some principles for using collaboration to build research capacity, visualised through a conceptual model. While this project was located within two universities in the UK, the development of research skills amongst nurses is likely to have broad international relevance. NB1 References to 'nursing', 'nursing research', and 'nursing education' are taken throughout to apply equally to midwifery, midwifery research, and midwifery education. NB2 For the purpose of this project, neophyte researchers are defined as staff needing formal training in research and involvement in others' research, and 'midiphyte' researchers as those with some training but needing support to develop research ideas.

  10. Partnerships for building strong internship and research experiences for undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goehring, L.; Haacker-Santos, R.; Dutilly, E.

    2013-12-01

    REU and internship site directors often operate in geographic and institutional isolation from each other, unable to share best practices or resources. When collaboration is possible, benefits for both the students and leaders of these programs can be achieved. In 2013, the SOARS REU program, hosted at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), supported the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) in creating a new internship program aimed at engaging undergraduate science and engineering students in NEON's work. Both student programs share the objective of reaching underrepresented groups in STEM. The year long collaboration allowed NEON to learn best practices in recruitment and support of students, mentor training, and program development, and to customize its internship according to its organization i.e., a science/engineering observatory under construction. Both programs shared several elements: students were housed together so that interns could tap into a larger cohort of supportive peers; students participated in a joint leadership training to strengthen cross program mentoring; and students met weekly for a scientific communications workshop. Having multiple science disciplines represented enhanced the workshop as students learned about writing styles and cultures of each other's fields, fostering an appreciation of different scientific disciplines and interdisciplinary thinking. Finally, at the end of the summer, students presented their findings in a joint poster session. We found that collaboration between programs led to increased recruitment of students from diverse backgrounds and support of students through stronger cohorts, shared trainings, and enhanced program content. In this presentation we share findings of our programs' evaluations and make recommendations on building collaborative partnerships for internships and research experiences for undergraduates.

  11. Research capacity building in midwifery: Case study of an Australian Graduate Midwifery Research Intern Programme.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Yvonne L; Lewis, Lucy; Bayes, Sara; Keyes, Louise

    2015-09-01

    Having the research capacity to identify problems, create new knowledge and most importantly translate this knowledge into practice is essential within health care. Midwifery, as well as other health professions in Australia, is challenged in building its research capacity to contribute evidence to inform clinical practice. The aim of this project was to evaluate an innovative Graduate Midwifery Research Intern Programme offered at a tertiary obstetric hospital in Western Australia, to determine what was working well and how the programme could be improved. A case study approach was used to gain feedback from graduate midwives within a Graduate Research Intern (GRI) Programme. In addition outcomes were compiled of all projects the GRI midwives contributed to. Six GRI midwives participated in a survey comprising of four open ended questions to provide feedback about the programme. Findings confirm that the GRI programme increased the graduates understanding of how research works, its capacity to define a problem, generate new knowledge and inform clinical practice. The GRI midwives' feedback suggested the programme opened their thinking to future study and gave them enhanced insight into women's experiences around childbirth. To grow our knowledge as a professional group, midwives must develop and promote programmes to build our pool of research capable midwives. By sharing our programme evaluation we hope to entice other clinical settings to consider the value in replicating such a programme within their context. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Building the Science of Research Management: What Can Research Management Learn from Education Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Jun Song; Hung, Wei Loong

    2018-01-01

    Research management is an emerging field of study and its development is significant to the advancement of research enterprise. Developing the science of research management requires investigating social mechanisms involved in research management. Yet, studies on social mechanisms of research management is lacking in the literature. To address…

  13. Building health research systems: WHO is generating global perspectives, and who's celebrating national successes?

    PubMed

    Hanney, Stephen R; González-Block, Miguel A

    2016-12-28

    In 2016, England's National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) celebrated its tenth anniversary as an innovative national health research system with a focus on meeting patients' needs. This provides a good opportunity to reflect on how the creation of the NIHR has greatly enhanced important work, started in 1991, to develop a health research system in England that is embedded in the National Health Service.In 2004, WHO identified a range of functions that a national health research system should undertake to improve the health of populations. Health Research Policy and Systems (HRPS) has taken particular interest in the pioneering developments in the English health research system, where the comprehensive approach has covered most, if not all, of the functions identified by WHO. Furthermore, several significant recent developments in thinking about health research are relevant for the NIHR and have informed accounts of its achievements. These include recognition of the need to combat waste in health research, which had been identified as a global problem in successive papers in the Lancet, and an increasing emphasis on demonstrating impact. Here, pioneering evaluation of United Kingdom research, conducted through the impact case studies of the Research Excellence Framework, is particularly important. Analyses informed by these and other approaches identified many aspects of NIHR's progress in combating waste, building and sustaining research capacity, creating centres of research excellence linked to leading healthcare institutions, developing research networks, involving patients and others in identifying research needs, and producing and adopting research findings that are improving health outcomes.The NIHR's overall success, and an analysis of the remaining problems, might have lessons for other systems, notwithstanding important advances in many countries, as described in papers in HRPS and elsewhere. WHO's recently established Global Observatory for Health

  14. Building Graduate Student Capacity as Future Researchers Through a Research and Training Award Program.

    PubMed

    Cepanec, Diane; Humphries, Amanda; Rieger, Kendra L; Marshall, Shelley; Londono, Yenly; Clarke, Diana

    2016-05-01

    With the global shortage of doctor of philosophy-prepared nursing faculty and an aging nursing professorate, the nursing profession is at risk of having fewer nurses doing research and fewer faculty to supervise the next generation of nurse researchers. A research training award for graduate nursing students was piloted with the intent of providing a research-intensive experiential learning opportunity that would contribute to graduate students' future roles as nurse researchers. This article describes the program design, implementation, and evaluation. The Graduate Student Research Training Awards afforded students an opportunity to develop research and methodologic skills and achieve student-centered outcomes. These awards build their capacity as future researchers by both empowering them and increasing their confidence in research. The input and evaluation from graduate students was integral to the success of the program. Graduate student research training awards can be a valuable experiential learning opportunity in research intensive graduate programs. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(5):284-287.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility (RSF) (Book)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-06-01

    An in-depth look at how the U.S. DOE and NREL used a performance-based design-build contract to build the Research Support Facility (RSF); one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world.

  16. 78 FR 38055 - Building Research Capacity in Global Tobacco Product Regulation Program (U18)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... Monitoring Database. Examples of Global Tobacco Research Reports/White Papers: [cir] WHO report on the global...] Building Research Capacity in Global Tobacco Product Regulation Program (U18) AGENCY: Food and Drug... availability of grant funds for the support of the Center for Tobacco Product's (CTP's) Building Research...

  17. Trauma research in Qatar: a literature review and discussion of progress after establishment of a trauma research centre.

    PubMed

    El-Menyar, A; Asim, M; Zarour, A; Abdelrahman, H; Peralta, R; Parchani, A; Al-Thani, H

    2016-02-01

    A structured research programme is one of the main pillars of a trauma care system. Despite the high rate of injury-related mortalities, especially road traffic accidents, in Qatar, little consideration has been given to research in trauma. This review aimed to analyse research publications on the subject of trauma published from Qatar and to discuss the progress of clinical research in Qatar and the Gulf Cooperation Council countries with special emphasis on trauma research. A literature search using PubMed and Google Scholar search engines located 757 English-language articles within the fields of internal medicine, surgery and trauma originating from Qatar between the years 1993 and 2013. A steep increase in the number of trauma publications since 2010 could be linked to the setting up of a trauma research centre in Qatar in 2011. We believe that establishing a research unit has made a major impact on research productivity, which ultimately benefits health care.

  18. New Buildings Design | Climate Neutral Research Campuses | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    over a building's lifetime, energy efficiency represents the lowest cost strategy for reducing energy (ft2*yr) to $16/ft2*yr. This means that if you are designing a new 100,000-ft2 building, it could cost as much as $1.6 million per year to operate. Given this baseline, life cycle cost calculations are

  19. Establishing a distributed national research infrastructure providing bioinformatics support to life science researchers in Australia.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Maria Victoria; Griffin, Philippa C; Tyagi, Sonika; Flannery, Madison; Dayalan, Saravanan; Gladman, Simon; Watson-Haigh, Nathan; Bayer, Philipp E; Charleston, Michael; Cooke, Ira; Cook, Rob; Edwards, Richard J; Edwards, David; Gorse, Dominique; McConville, Malcolm; Powell, David; Wilkins, Marc R; Lonie, Andrew

    2017-06-30

    EMBL Australia Bioinformatics Resource (EMBL-ABR) is a developing national research infrastructure, providing bioinformatics resources and support to life science and biomedical researchers in Australia. EMBL-ABR comprises 10 geographically distributed national nodes with one coordinating hub, with current funding provided through Bioplatforms Australia and the University of Melbourne for its initial 2-year development phase. The EMBL-ABR mission is to: (1) increase Australia's capacity in bioinformatics and data sciences; (2) contribute to the development of training in bioinformatics skills; (3) showcase Australian data sets at an international level and (4) enable engagement in international programs. The activities of EMBL-ABR are focussed in six key areas, aligning with comparable international initiatives such as ELIXIR, CyVerse and NIH Commons. These key areas-Tools, Data, Standards, Platforms, Compute and Training-are described in this article. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Establishing good collaborative research practices in the responsible conduct of research in nursing science.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Connie M; Wallen, Gwenyth R; Cui, Naixue; Chittams, Jesse; Sweet, Monica; Plemmons, Dena

    2015-01-01

    Team science is advocated to speed the pace of scientific discovery, yet the goals of collaborative practice in nursing science and the responsibilities of nurse stakeholders are sparse and inconclusive. The purpose of this study was to examine nurse scientists' views on collaborative research as part of a larger study on standards of scientific conduct. Web-based descriptive survey of nurse scientists randomly selected from 50 doctoral graduate programs in the United States. Nearly forty percent of nurse respondents were not able to identify good collaborative practices for the discipline; more than three quarters did not know of any published guidelines available to them. Successful research collaborations were challenged by different expectations of authorship and data ownership, lack of timeliness and communication, poorly defined roles and responsibilities, language barriers, and when they involve junior and senior faculty working together on a project. Individual and organizational standards, practices, and policies for collaborative research needs clarification within the discipline. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Fifteen Challenges in Establishing a Multidisciplinary Research Program on eHealth Research in a University Setting: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Grönqvist, Helena; Olsson, Erik Martin Gustaf; Johansson, Birgitta; Held, Claes; Sjöström, Jonas; Lindahl Norberg, Annika; Hovén, Emma; Sanderman, Robbert; van Achterberg, Theo; von Essen, Louise

    2017-05-23

    U-CARE is a multidisciplinary eHealth research program that involves the disciplines of caring science, clinical psychology, health economics, information systems, and medical science. It was set up from scratch in a university setting in 2010, funded by a governmental initiative. While establishing the research program, many challenges were faced. Systematic documentation of experiences from establishing new research environments is scarce. The aim of this paper was to describe the challenges of establishing a publicly funded multidisciplinary eHealth research environment. Researchers involved in developing the research program U-CARE identified challenges in the formal documentation and by reflecting on their experience of developing the program. The authors discussed the content and organization of challenges into themes until consensus was reached. The authors identified 15 major challenges, some general to establishing a new research environment and some specific for multidisciplinary eHealth programs. The challenges were organized into 6 themes: Organization, Communication, Implementation, Legislation, Software development, and Multidisciplinarity. Several challenges were faced during the development of the program and several accomplishments were made. By sharing our experience, we hope to help other research groups embarking on a similar journey to be prepared for some of the challenges they are likely to face on their way. ©Helena Grönqvist, Erik Martin Gustaf Olsson, Birgitta Johansson, Claes Held, Jonas Sjöström, Annika Lindahl Norberg, Emma Hovén, Robbert Sanderman, Theo van Achterberg, Louise von Essen. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 23.05.2017.

  2. Establishment of research-oriented hospital: an important way for translational medicine development in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Meina; Zhang, Lulu

    2015-01-01

    Globally, one of the major trends is the development of translational medicine. The traditional hospital structure could not meet the demands of translational medicine development any longer and to explore a novel hospital structure is imperative. Following the times, China proposed and implemented a development strategy for a first-class modern research-oriented hospital. To establish a research-oriented hospital has become an important strategy to guide the scientific development of high-quality medical institutions and to advance translational medicine development. To facilitate translational medicine by developing research-oriented hospital, the Chinese Research Hospital Association (CRHA) has been established, which provides service of medicine, talents cultivation, scientific research and clinical teaching and covers areas of theoretical research, academic exchange, translational medicine, talents training and practice guiding. On the whole, research-oriented hospital facilitated translational medicine by developing interdisciplinary platform, training core competencies in clinical and translational research, providing financial support of translational research, and hosting journals on translational medicine, etc.

  3. Establishing a Research Center: The Minority Male Community College Collaborative (M2C3)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, J. Luke; Urias, Marissa Vasquez; Harris, Frank, III

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the establishment of the Minority Male Community College Collaborative (M2C3), a research and practice center at San Diego State University. M2C3 partners with community colleges across the United States to enhance access, achievement, and success among men of color. This chapter begins with a description of the national…

  4. Gerontology Education and Research in Kenya: Establishing a U.S.-African Partnership in Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Sharon V.; Gachuhi, Mugo; Ice, Gillian; Cattell, Maria; Whittington, Frank

    2005-01-01

    This article reprises four presentations on "Gerontology Education in Kenya," a seminar at the 2004 Annual Meeting of the Association of Gerontology in Higher Education. It describes the process by which the Gerontology Institute of Georgia State University established a 3-year gerontology education and research partnership with Kenyatta…

  5. RESEARCH TO ESTABLISH A COLLEGE-LEVEL CURRICULUM IN GLASS. TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT, NUMBER 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WILLSON, RICHARD

    THE PURPOSE OF THE RESEARCH IS TO CORRELATE A COLLECTED MASS OF INFORMATION RELATED TO THE ACCEPTED NEED TO ESTABLISH A CURRICULUM FOR TEACHING GLASS AS A FINE ART MATERIAL IN THE UNITED STATES. AN ARTIST OR AN ARCHITECT WHO WISHES TO LEARN THE POTENTIAL USE OF GLASS MUST GO TO EUROPE, AS NO COMPREHENSIVE TEACHING OF GLASS AS A FINE ART EXISTS ON…

  6. The Role of Philanthropic Funding in Building Research Evidence to Support an Aging Population: A Case Study from Ireland.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Andy; McGilloway, Sinéad

    2017-01-01

    This case study examines the role of philanthropic funding in building capacity for aging research in Ireland, and how this investment has addressed the lack of evidence to support planning for an aging population. The funding has supported a range of initiatives including the national longitudinal study on aging (TILDA), the creation of three professorships/chairs, and the establishment of four new research centers. Important potential outcomes are emerging across other domains including research-informed policy development and the generation of health benefits. The efforts of academic researchers to ensure that their findings are readily accessible to end users and to forge robust working relationships with all stakeholders have helped to enhance the use of research findings. Overall, philanthropy has played a pivotal role in building capacity, infrastructure, and expertise in academic settings in Ireland. Moreover, this work provides an excellent example of how such efforts can begin to inform effective planning and service provision.

  7. Partnership with the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes: Establishing an Advisory Committee for Pharmacogenetic Research

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Chelsea T.; Muzquiz, LeeAnna I.; Howlett, Kevin; Azure, Bernie; Bodnar, Brenda; Finley, Vernon; Incashola, Tony; Mathias, Cheryl; Laukes, Cindi; Beatty, Patrick; Burke, Wylie; Pershouse, Mark A.; Putnam, Elizabeth A.; Trinidad, Susan Brown; James, Rosalina; Woodahl, Erica L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Inclusion of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations in pharmacogenetic research is key if the benefits of pharmacogenetic testing are to reach these communities. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) offers a model to engage these communities in pharmacogenetics. Objectives An academic-community partnership between the University of Montana and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) was established to engage the community as partners and advisors in pharmacogenetic research. Methods A community advisory committee, the Community Pharmacogenetics Advisory Council (CPAC), was established to ensure community involvement in the research process. To promote bidirectional learning, researchers gave workshops and presentations about pharmacogenetic research to increase research capacity and CPAC members trained researchers in cultural competencies. As part of our commitment to a sustainable relationship, we conducted a self-assessment of the partnership, which included surveys and interviews with CPAC members and researchers. Results Academic and community participants agree that the partnership has promoted a bidirectional exchange of knowledge. Interviews showed positive feedback from the perspectives of both the CPAC and researchers. CPAC members discussed their trust in and support of the partnership as well as having learned more about research processes and pharmacogenetics. Researchers discussed their appreciation of CPAC involvement in the project and guidance the group provided in understanding the CSKT community and culture. Discussion We have created an academic-community partnership to ensure CSKT community input and to share decision-making about pharmacogenetic research. Our CBPR approach may be a model for engaging AI/AN people, and other underserved populations, in genetic research. PMID:27346763

  8. Partnership with the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes: Establishing an Advisory Committee for Pharmacogenetic Research.

    PubMed

    Morales, Chelsea T; Muzquiz, LeeAnna I; Howlett, Kevin; Azure, Bernie; Bodnar, Brenda; Finley, Vernon; Incashola, Tony; Mathias, Cheryl; Laukes, Cindi; Beatty, Patrick; Burke, Wylie; Pershouse, Mark A; Putnam, Elizabeth A; Trinidad, Susan Brown; James, Rosalina; Woodahl, Erica L

    2016-01-01

    Inclusion of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations in pharmacogenetic research is key if the benefits of pharmacogenetic testing are to reach these communities. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) offers a model to engage these communities in pharmacogenetics. An academic-community partnership between the University of Montana (UM) and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) was established to engage the community as partners and advisors in pharmacogenetic research. A community advisory committee, the Community Pharmacogenetics Advisory Council (CPAC), was established to ensure community involvement in the research process. To promote bidirectional learning, researchers gave workshops and presentations about pharmacogenetic research to increase research capacity and CPAC members trained researchers in cultural competencies. As part of our commitment to a sustainable relationship, we conducted a self-assessment of the partnership, which included surveys and interviews with CPAC members and researchers. Academic and community participants agree that the partnership has promoted a bidirectional exchange of knowledge. Interviews showed positive feedback from the perspectives of both the CPAC and researchers. CPAC members discussed their trust in and support of the partnership, as well as having learned more about research processes and pharmacogenetics. Researchers discussed their appreciation of CPAC involvement in the project and guidance the group provided in understanding the CSKT community and culture. We have created an academic-community partnership to ensure CSKT community input and to share decision making about pharmacogenetic research. Our CBPR approach may be a model for engaging AI/AN people, and other underserved populations, in genetic research.

  9. Research on Energy-saving Shape Design of High School Library Building in Cold Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Zhao; Weishuang, Xie; Zirui, Tong

    2017-11-01

    Considering climatic characteristics in cold region, existing high school libraries in Changchun are researched according to investigation of real conditions of these library buildings. Mathematical analysis and CAD methods are used to summarize the relation between building shape and building energy saving of high school library. Strategies are put forward for sustainable development of high school library building in cold region, providing reliable design basis for construction of high school libraries in Changchun.

  10. Interdisciplinary Research Career Development: Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health Program Best Practices

    PubMed Central

    Bodurtha, Joann; Nagel, Joan D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Institutes and Centers and the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality (AHRQ) have sponsored an interdisciplinary research career development program in five funding cycles since 2000 through a K12 mechanism titled “Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health (BIRCWH).” As of 2010, 407 scholars have been supported in interdisciplinary women's health research and a total of 63 BIRCWH program awards have been made to 41 institutions across the U.S. Methods In an effort to share practical approaches to interdisciplinary research training, currently funded BIRCWH sites were invited to submit 300-word bullet-point style summaries describing their best practices in interdisciplinary research training following a common format with an emphasis on practices that are innovative, can be reproduced in other places, and advance women's health research. Results and Conclusions Twenty-six program narratives provide unique perspectives along with common elements and themes in interdisciplinary research training best practices. PMID:21923414

  11. Interdisciplinary research career development: building interdisciplinary research careers in women's health program best practices.

    PubMed

    Domino, Steven E; Bodurtha, Joann; Nagel, Joan D

    2011-11-01

    The Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Institutes and Centers and the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality (AHRQ) have sponsored an interdisciplinary research career development program in five funding cycles since 2000 through a K12 mechanism titled "Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health (BIRCWH)." As of 2010, 407 scholars have been supported in interdisciplinary women's health research and a total of 63 BIRCWH program awards have been made to 41 institutions across the U.S. In an effort to share practical approaches to interdisciplinary research training, currently funded BIRCWH sites were invited to submit 300-word bullet-point style summaries describing their best practices in interdisciplinary research training following a common format with an emphasis on practices that are innovative, can be reproduced in other places, and advance women's health research. Twenty-six program narratives provide unique perspectives along with common elements and themes in interdisciplinary research training best practices.

  12. Beyond "Two Cultures": Guidance for Establishing Effective Researcher/Health System Partnerships

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Sarah; Botting, Ingrid; Graham, Ian D.; Huebner, Lori-Anne

    2017-01-01

    research activities, factors related to the established collaboration, and interpersonal, intra- and inter-organizational dynamics may present additional challenges to research partnerships built on existing collaboration. Differences between researchers and KUs may pose no greater challenges than differences among KUs (at various levels, and representing diverse perspectives and organizations) themselves. Effective "relationship brokering" is essential for meaningful collaboration. PMID:28005540

  13. The establishment of an attachment research network in Latin America: goals, accomplishments, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Causadias, José M; Sroufe, L Alan; Herreros, Francisca

    2011-03-01

    In the face of a pressing need for expanded attachment research programs and attachment informed interventions in Latin America, a research network was established: Red Iberoamericana de Apego: RIA (Iberian-American Attachment Network). The purpose of RIA is to promote human development and well being, informed by attachment theory, centering on research, and with implications for public policies, education, and intervention. We report the proceedings of the second meeting of RIA held in Panama City, Panama, in February 2010. As part of this meeting, RIA sponsored the first Latin-American attachment conference. Proceedings of the conference are described, as are future goals of this new organization.

  14. Dissemination as Dialogue: Building Trust and Sharing Research Findings Through Community Engagement.

    PubMed

    McDavitt, Bryce; Bogart, Laura M; Mutchler, Matt G; Wagner, Glenn J; Green, Harold D; Lawrence, Sean Jamar; Mutepfa, Kieta D; Nogg, Kelsey A

    2016-03-17

    A fundamental feature of community-based participatory research (CBPR) is sharing findings with community members and engaging community partners in the dissemination process. To be truly collaborative, dissemination should involve community members in a two-way dialogue about new research findings. Yet little literature describes how to engage communities in dialogue about research findings, especially with historically marginalized communities where mistrust of researchers may exist because of past or present social injustices. Through a series of interactive community presentations on findings from a longitudinal study, we developed a process for community dissemination that involved several overlapping phases: planning, outreach, content development, interactive presentations, and follow-up. Through this process, we built on existing and new community relationships. Following each interactive presentation, the research team debriefed and reviewed notes to identify lessons learned from the process. Key themes included the importance of creating a flexible dissemination plan, tailoring presentations to each community group, establishing a point person to serve as a community liaison, and continuing dialogue with community members after the presentations. Core strategies for developing trust during dissemination included engaging community members at every step, reserving ample time for discussion during presentations, building rapport by sharing personal experiences, being receptive to and learning from criticism, and implementing input from community members. This process led to a deeper understanding of research findings and ensured that results reached community members who were invested in them.

  15. Dissemination as Dialogue: Building Trust and Sharing Research Findings Through Community Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Bogart, Laura M.; Mutchler, Matt G.; Wagner, Glenn J.; Green, Harold D.; Lawrence, Sean Jamar; Mutepfa, Kieta D.; Nogg, Kelsey A.

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental feature of community-based participatory research (CBPR) is sharing findings with community members and engaging community partners in the dissemination process. To be truly collaborative, dissemination should involve community members in a two-way dialogue about new research findings. Yet little literature describes how to engage communities in dialogue about research findings, especially with historically marginalized communities where mistrust of researchers may exist because of past or present social injustices. Through a series of interactive community presentations on findings from a longitudinal study, we developed a process for community dissemination that involved several overlapping phases: planning, outreach, content development, interactive presentations, and follow-up. Through this process, we built on existing and new community relationships. Following each interactive presentation, the research team debriefed and reviewed notes to identify lessons learned from the process. Key themes included the importance of creating a flexible dissemination plan, tailoring presentations to each community group, establishing a point person to serve as a community liaison, and continuing dialogue with community members after the presentations. Core strategies for developing trust during dissemination included engaging community members at every step, reserving ample time for discussion during presentations, building rapport by sharing personal experiences, being receptive to and learning from criticism, and implementing input from community members. This process led to a deeper understanding of research findings and ensured that results reached community members who were invested in them. PMID:26986541

  16. Building Climate Resilience at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iraci, L. T.; Mueller, C.; Podolske, J. R.; Milesi, C.

    2016-12-01

    NASA Ames Research Center, located at the southern end of the San Francisco Bay (SFB) estuary, has identified three primary vulnerabilities to changes in climate. The Ames Climate Adaptation Science Investigator (CASI) workgroup has studied each of these challenges to operations and the potential exposure of infrastructure and employees to an increased frequency of hazards. Sea level rise inundation scenarios for the SFB Area generally refer to projected scenarios in mean sea level rather than changes in extreme tides that could occur during future storm conditions. In the summer of 2014, high resolution 3-D mapping of the low-lying portion of Ames was performed. Those data are integrated with improved sea level inundation scenarios to identify the buildings, basements and drainage systems potentially affected. We will also identify the impacts of sea level and storm surge effects on transportation to and from the Center. This information will help Center management develop future master plans. Climate change will also lead to changes in temperature, storm frequency and intensity. These changes have potential impacts on localized floods and ecosystems, as well as on electricity and water availability. Over the coming decades, these changes will be imposed on top of ongoing land use and land cover changes, especially those deriving from continued urbanization and increase in impervious surface areas. These coupled changes have the potential to create a series of cascading impacts on ecosystems, including changes in primary productivity and disturbance of hydrological properties and increased flood risk. The majority of the electricity used at Ames is supplied by hydroelectric dams, which will be influenced by reductions in precipitation or changes in the timing or phase of precipitation which reduces snow pack. Coupled with increased demand for summertime air conditioning and other cooling needs, NASA Ames is at risk for electricity shortfalls. To assess the

  17. Building intelligent systems: Artificial intelligence research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedland, P.; Lum, H.

    1987-01-01

    The basic components that make up the goal of building autonomous intelligent systems are discussed, and ongoing work at the NASA Ames Research Center is described. It is noted that a clear progression of systems can be seen through research settings (both within and external to NASA) to Space Station testbeds to systems which actually fly on the Space Station. The starting point for the discussion is a truly autonomous Space Station intelligent system, responsible for a major portion of Space Station control. Attention is given to research in fiscal 1987, including reasoning under uncertainty, machine learning, causal modeling and simulation, knowledge from design through operations, advanced planning work, validation methodologies, and hierarchical control of and distributed cooperation among multiple knowledge-based systems.

  18. Building intelligent systems - Artificial intelligence research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedland, Peter; Lum, Henry

    1987-01-01

    The basic components that make up the goal of building autonomous intelligent systems are discussed, and ongoing work at the NASA Ames Research Center is described. It is noted that a clear progression of systems can be seen through research settings (both within and external to NASA) to Space Station testbeds to systems which actually fly on the Space Station. The starting point for the discussion is a 'truly' autonomous Space Station intelligent system, responsible for a major portion of Space Station control. Attention is given to research in fiscal 1987, including reasoning under uncertainty, machine learning, causal modeling and simulation, knowledge from design through operations, advanced planning work, validation methodologies, and hierarchical control of and distributed cooperation among multiple knowledge-based systems.

  19. Connecting Hydrologic Research and Management in American Samoa through Collaboration and Capacity Building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuler, C. K.; El-Kadi, A. I.; Dulai, H.; Glenn, C. R.; Mariner, M. K. E.; DeWees, R.; Schmaedick, M.; Gurr, I.; Comeros, M.; Bodell, T.

    2017-12-01

    In small-island developing communities, effective communication and collaboration with local stakeholders is imperative for successful implementation of hydrologic or other socially pertinent research. American Samoa's isolated location highlights the need for water resource sustainability, and effective scientific research is a key component to addressing critical challenges in water storage and management. Currently, aquifer degradation from salt-water-intrusion or surface-water contaminated groundwater adversely affects much of the islands' municipal water supply, necessitating an almost decade long Boil-Water-Advisory. This presentation will share the approach our research group, based at the University of Hawaii Water Resources Research Center, has taken for successfully implementing a collaboration-focused water research program in American Samoa. Instead of viewing research as a one-sided activity, our program seeks opportunities to build local capacity, develop relationships with key on-island stakeholders, and involve local community through forward-looking projects. This presentation will highlight three applications of collaborative research with water policy and management, water supply and sustainability, and science education stakeholders. Projects include: 1) working with the island's water utility to establish a long-term hydrological monitoring network, motivated by a need for data to parameterize numerical groundwater models, 2) collaboration with the American Samoa Environmental Protection Agency to better understand groundwater discharge and watershed scale land-use impacts for management of nearshore coral reef ecosystems, and 3) participation of local community college and high school students as research interns to increase involvement in, and exposure to socially pertinent water focused research. Through these innovative collaborative approaches we have utilized resources more effectively, and focused research efforts on more pertinent

  20. Establishing research priorities for patient safety in emergency medicine: a multidisciplinary consensus panel.

    PubMed

    Plint, Amy C; Stang, Antonia S; Calder, Lisa A

    2015-01-01

    Patient safety in the context of emergency medicine is a relatively new field of study. To date, no broad research agenda for patient safety in emergency medicine has been established. The objective of this study was to establish patient safety-related research priorities for emergency medicine. These priorities would provide a foundation for high-quality research, important direction to both researchers and health-care funders, and an essential step in improving health-care safety and patient outcomes in the high-risk emergency department (ED) setting. A four-phase consensus procedure with a multidisciplinary expert panel was organized to identify, assess, and agree on research priorities for patient safety in emergency medicine. The 19-member panel consisted of clinicians, administrators, and researchers from adult and pediatric emergency medicine, patient safety, pharmacy, and mental health; as well as representatives from patient safety organizations. In phase 1, we developed an initial list of potential research priorities by electronically surveying a purposeful and convenience sample of patient safety experts, ED clinicians, administrators, and researchers from across North America using contact lists from multiple organizations. We used simple content analysis to remove duplication and categorize the research priorities identified by survey respondents. Our expert panel reached consensus on a final list of research priorities through an in-person meeting (phase 3) and two rounds of a modified Delphi process (phases 2 and 4). After phases 1 and 2, 66 unique research priorities were identified for expert panel review. At the end of phase 4, consensus was reached for 15 research priorities. These priorities represent four themes: (1) methods to identify patient safety issues (five priorities), (2) understanding human and environmental factors related to patient safety (four priorities), (3) the patient perspective (one priority), and (4) interventions for

  1. Aircraft in the Flight Research Building at the Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1944-06-21

    A Consolidated B–24D Liberator (left), Boeing B–29 Superfortress (background), and Lockheed RA–29 Hudson (foreground) parked inside the Flight Research Building at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory in Cleveland, Ohio. A P–47G Thunderbolt and P–63A King Cobra are visible in the background. The laboratory utilized 15 different aircraft during the final 2.5 years of World War II. This starkly contrasts with the limited-quantity, but long-duration aircraft of the NASA’s modern fleet. The Flight Research Building is a 272- by 150-foot hangar with an internal height ranging from 40 feet at the sides to 90 feet at its apex. The steel support trusses were pin-connected at the top with tension members extending along the corrugated transite walls down to the floor. The 37.5-foot-tall and 250-foot-long doors on either side can be opened in sections. The hangar included a shop area and stock room along the far wall, and a single-story office wing with nine offices, behind the camera. The offices were later expanded. The hangar has been in continual use since its completion in December 1942. Nearly 70 different aircraft have been sheltered here over the years. Temporary offices were twice constructed over half of the floor area when office space was at a premium.

  2. Space Planning for Laboratory Buildings | Climate Neutral Research Campuses

    Science.gov Websites

    facilities such as warehouses, offices, and high-tech laboratories have very different energy requirements , and a successful climate action plan will set aside adequate space for different activities. The Facility offices are housed in a different portion of the building than labs, resulting in lower cost

  3. Center for the Built Environment: Research on Building HVAC Systems

    Science.gov Websites

    , and lessons learned. Underfloor Air Distribution (UFAD) Cooling Airflow Design Tool Developing simplified design tools for optimization of underfloor systems. Underfloor Air Distribution (UFAD) Cost Near-ZNE Buildings Setpoint Energy Savings Calculator UFAD Case Studies UFAD Cooling Design Tool UFAD

  4. Building an International Geosciences Network (i-GEON) for cyberinfrastructure-based Research and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seber, D.; Baru, C.

    2007-05-01

    The Geosciences Network (GEON) project is a collaboration among multiple institutions to develop a cyberinfrastructure (CI) platform in support of integrative geoscience research activities. Taking advantage of the state-of-the-art information technology resources GEON researchers are building a cyberinfrastructure designed to enable data sharing, resource discovery, semantic data integration, high-end computations and 4D visualization in an easy-to-use web-based environment. The cyberinfrastructure in GEON is required to support an inherently distributed system, since the scientists, who are users as well as providers of resources, are themselves distributed. International collaborations are a natural extension of GEON; the geoscience research requires strong international collaborations. The goals of the i-GEON activities are to collaborate with international partners and jointly build a cyberinfrastructure for the geosciences to enable collaborative work environments. International partners can participate in GEON efforts, establish GEON nodes at their universities, institutes, or agencies and also contribute data and tools to the network. Via jointly run cyberinfrastructure workshops, the GEON team also introduces students, scientists, and research professionals to the concepts of IT-based geoscience research and education. Currently, joint activities are underway with the Chinese Academy of Sciences in China, the GEO Grid project at AIST in Japan, and the University of Hyderabad in India (where the activity is funded by the Indo-US Science and Technology Forum). Several other potential international partnerships are under consideration. iGEON is open to all international partners who are interested in working towards the goal of data sharing, managing and integration via IT-based platforms. Information about GEON and its international activities can be found at http:www.geongrid.org/

  5. Understanding the Conceptual Development Phase of Applied Theory-Building Research: A Grounded Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storberg-Walker, Julia

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a provisional grounded theory of conceptual development for applied theory-building research. The theory described here extends the understanding of the components of conceptual development and provides generalized relations among the components. The conceptual development phase of theory-building research has been widely…

  6. Capacity building for health through community-based participatory nutrition intervention Research in rural communities

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Building community capacity for health promotion in small rural communities is essential if health promotion research is to yield sustainable outcomes. Since its inception, capacity-building has been a stated goal of the Delta Nutrition Intervention Research Initiative, a tri-state collaboration in ...

  7. Building the Synergy between Public Sector and Research Data Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craglia, Massimo; Friis-Christensen, Anders; Ostländer, Nicole; Perego, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    INSPIRE is a European Directive aiming to establish a EU-wide spatial data infrastructure to give cross-border access to information that can be used to support EU environmental policies, as well as other policies and activities having an impact on the environment. In order to ensure cross-border interoperability of data infrastructures operated by EU Member States, INSPIRE sets out a framework based on common specifications for metadata, data, network services, data and service sharing, monitoring and reporting. The implementation of INSPIRE has reached important milestones: the INSPIRE Geoportal was launched in 2011 providing a single access point for the discovery of INSPIRE data and services across EU Member States (currently, about 300K), while all the technical specifications for the interoperability of data across the 34 INSPIRE themes were adopted at the end of 2013. During this period a number of EU and international initiatives has been launched, concerning cross-domain interoperability and (Linked) Open Data. In particular, the EU Open Data Portal, launched in December 2012, made provisions to access government and scientific data from EU institutions and bodies, and the EU ISA Programme (Interoperability Solutions for European Public Administrations) promotes cross-sector interoperability by sharing and re-using EU-wide and national standards and components. Moreover, the Research Data Alliance (RDA), an initiative jointly funded by the European Commission, the US National Science Foundation and the Australian Research Council, was launched in March 2013 to promote scientific data sharing and interoperability. The Joint Research Centre of the European Commission (JRC), besides being the technical coordinator of the implementation of INSPIRE, is also actively involved in the initiatives promoting cross-sector re-use in INSPIRE, and sustainable approaches to address the evolution of technologies - in particular, how to support Linked Data in INSPIRE and

  8. Clinical research in the United States at a crossroads: proposal for a novel public-private partnership to establish a national clinical research enterprise.

    PubMed

    Crowley, William F; Sherwood, Louis; Salber, Patricia; Scheinberg, David; Slavkin, Hal; Tilson, Hugh; Reece, E Albert; Catanese, Veronica; Johnson, Stephen B; Dobs, Adrian; Genel, Myron; Korn, Allan; Reame, Nancy; Bonow, Robert; Grebb, Jack; Rimoin, David

    2004-03-03

    The clinical research infrastructure of the United States is currently at a critical crossroads. To leverage the enormous biomedical research gains made in the past century efficiently, a drastic need exists to reengineer this system into a coordinated, safe, and more efficient and effective enterprise. To accomplish this task, clinical research must be transformed from its current state as a cottage industry to an enterprise-wide health care pipeline whose function is to bring the novel research from both government and private entities to the US public. We propose the establishment of a unique public-private partnership termed the National Clinical Research Enterprise (NCRE). Its agenda should consist of informed public participation, supportive information technologies, a skilled workforce, and adequate funding in clinical research. Devoting only 0.25% of the budgets from all health care stakeholders to support the NCRE would permit adequate funding to build the infrastructure required to address these problems in an enterprise fashion. All participants in the US health care delivery system must come together to focus on system-wide improvements that will benefit the public.

  9. Disaster Research Team Building: A Case Study of a Web-based Disaster Research Training Program.

    PubMed

    Beaton, Randal D; Johnson, L Clark; Maida, Carl A; Houston, J Brian; Pfefferbaum, Betty

    2012-11-19

    This case study describes the process and outcomes of the Northwest Center for Public Health Practice Child and Family Disaster Research Training (UWDRT) Program housed at the University of Washington, which used web-based distance learning technology. The purposes of this program were to provide training and to establish a regional cadre of researchers and clinicians; to increase disaster mental health research capacity and collaboration; and to improve the scientific rigor of research investigations of disaster mental health in children and families. Despite a number of obstacles encountered in development and implementation, outcomes of this program included increased team member awareness and knowledge of child and family disaster mental health issues; improved disaster and public health instruction and training independent of the UWDRT program; informed local and state disaster response preparedness and response; and contributions to the child and family disaster mental health research literature.

  10. Faculty in New Jobs: A Guide to Settling In, Becoming Established, and Building Institutional Support. Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menges, Robert, Ed.

    This book is comprised of 14 papers developed for the New Faculty Project, a career development project for college faculty. Papers are grouped into sections which address orientation and settling in of new faculty; how faculty members get established within the institution; and how faculty build institutional supports. The papers are: (1) "Being…

  11. Developing the community empowered research training program: building research capacity for community-initiated and community-driven research.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Simona; Rideout, Catlin; Tseng, Winston; Islam, Nadia; Cook, Won Kim; Ro, Marguerite; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2012-01-01

    Health promotion practice research conducted by or in partnership with community-based organizations (CBOs) serving Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders (AA and NHPI) can address health disparities. Few CBOs have the tools to integrate or initiate research into their programmatic agenda. The New York University (NYU) Center for the Study of Asian American Health (CSAAH) and the Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum (APIAHF) created a partnership with the goal to support CBO research infrastructure development by creating the Community Empowered Research Training (CERT) program. A survey was conducted and discussions held with CBO leaders representing AA and NHPI communities to inform the development of the CERT program. The majority of participants are engaged in service-related research and reported interest in building their research capacity. CBOs may require help reframing how data can be collected and used to better inform programmatic activities and to address health disparities facing AA and NHPI communities. CBOs possess both an interest in and access to local knowledge that can inform health priorities. Findings have been applied to the CERT program to build capacity to support community-initiated/driven research to address health disparities affecting AAs and NHPIs.

  12. Research to policy and practice change: is capacity building in operational research delivering the goods?

    PubMed

    Zachariah, Rony; Guillerm, Nathalie; Berger, Selma; Kumar, Ajay M V; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Bissell, Karen; Edginton, Mary; Hinderaker, Sven Gudmund; Tayler-Smith, Katie; Van den Bergh, Rafael; Khogali, Mohammed; Manzi, Marcel; Reid, Anthony J; Ramsay, Andrew; Reeder, John C; Harries, Anthony D

    2014-09-01

    Between 2009 and 2012, eight operational research capacity building courses were completed in Paris (3), Luxembourg (1), India (1), Nepal (1), Kenya (1) and Fiji (1). Courses had strict milestones that were subsequently adopted by the Structured Operational Research and Training InitiaTive (SORT IT) of the World Health Organization. We report on the numbers of enrolled participants who successfully completed courses, the number of papers published and their reported effect on policy and/or practice. Retrospective cohort study including a survey. Participant selection criteria ensured that only those proposing specific programme-related and relevant operational research questions were selected. Effects on policy and/or practice were assessed in a standardised manner by two independent reviewers. Of 93 enrolled participants from 31 countries (14 in Africa, 13 in Asia, two in Latin America and two in South Pacific), 83 (89%) completed their courses. A total of 96 papers were submitted to scientific journals of which 89 (93%) were published and 88 assessed for effect on policy and practice. There was a reported effect in 65 (74%) studies including changes to programme implementation (27), adaptation of monitoring tools (24) and changes to existing guidelines (20). Three quarters of published operational research studies from these structured courses had reported effects on policy and/or practice. It is important that this type of tracking becomes a standard component of operational research and research in general. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Building research capacity and productivity among advanced practice nurses: an evaluation of the Community of Practice model.

    PubMed

    Gullick, Janice G; West, Sandra H

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate Wenger's Community of Practice as a framework for building research capacity and productivity. While research productivity is an expected domain in influential models of advanced nursing practice, internationally it remains largely unmet. Establishment of nursing research capacity precedes productivity and consequently, there is a strong imperative to identify successful capacity-building models for nursing-focussed research in busy clinical environments. Prospective, longitudinal, qualitative descriptive design was used in this study. Bruyn's participant observation framed evaluation of a Community of Practice comprising 25 advanced practice nurses. Data from focus groups, education evaluations, blog/email transcripts and field observations, collected between 2007 and 2014, were analysed using a qualitative descriptive method. The Community of Practice model invited differing levels of participation, allowed for evolution of the research community and created a rhythm of research-related interactions and enduring research relationships. Participants described the value of research for their patients and families and the significance of the developing research culture in providing richness to their practice and visibility of their work to multidisciplinary colleagues. Extensive examples of research dissemination and enrolment in doctoral programmes further confirmed this value. A Community of Practice framework is a powerful model enabling research capacity and productivity evidenced by publication. In developing a solid foundation for a nursing research culture, it should be recognized that research skills, confidence and growth develop over an extended period of time and success depends on skilled coordination and leadership. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Establishing confidence in the output of qualitative research synthesis: the ConQual approach.

    PubMed

    Munn, Zachary; Porritt, Kylie; Lockwood, Craig; Aromataris, Edoardo; Pearson, Alan

    2014-09-20

    The importance of findings derived from syntheses of qualitative research has been increasingly acknowledged. Findings that arise from qualitative syntheses inform questions of practice and policy in their own right and are commonly used to complement findings from quantitative research syntheses. The GRADE approach has been widely adopted by international organisations to rate the quality and confidence of the findings of quantitative systematic reviews. To date, there has been no widely accepted corresponding approach to assist health care professionals and policy makers in establishing confidence in the synthesised findings of qualitative systematic reviews. A methodological group was formed develop a process to assess the confidence in synthesised qualitative research findings and develop a Summary of Findings tables for meta-aggregative qualitative systematic reviews. Dependability and credibility are two elements considered by the methodological group to influence the confidence of qualitative synthesised findings. A set of critical appraisal questions are proposed to establish dependability, whilst credibility can be ranked according to the goodness of fit between the author's interpretation and the original data. By following the processes outlined in this article, an overall ranking can be assigned to rate the confidence of synthesised qualitative findings, a system we have labelled ConQual. The development and use of the ConQual approach will assist users of qualitative systematic reviews to establish confidence in the evidence produced in these types of reviews and can serve as a practical tool to assist in decision making.

  15. [Establishment of prescription research technology system in Chinese medicine secondary exploitation based on "component structure" theory].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xu-Dong; Feng, Liang; Gu, Jun-Fei; Zhang, Ming-Hua; Jia, Xiao-Bin

    2014-11-01

    Chinese medicine prescriptions are the wisdom outcomes of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) clinical treatment determinations which based on differentiation of symptoms and signs. Chinese medicine prescriptions are also the basis of secondary exploitation of TCM. The study on prescription helps to understand the material basis of its efficacy, pharmacological mechanism, which is an important guarantee for the modernization of traditional Chinese medicine. Currently, there is not yet dissertation n the method and technology system of basic research on the prescription of Chinese medicine. This paper focuses on how to build an effective system of prescription research technology. Based on "component structure" theory, a technology system contained four-step method that "prescription analysis, the material basis screening, the material basis of analysis and optimization and verify" was proposed. The technology system analyzes the material basis of the three levels such as Chinese medicine pieces, constituents and the compounds which could respect the overall efficacy of Chinese medicine. Ideas of prescription optimization, remodeling are introduced into the system. The technology system is the combination of the existing research and associates with new techniques and methods, which used for explore the research thought suitable for material basis research and prescription remodeling. The system provides a reference for the secondary development of traditional Chinese medicine, and industrial upgrading.

  16. Opportunities and challenges of current electrophysiology research: a plea to establish 'translational electrophysiology' curricula.

    PubMed

    Lau, Dennis H; Volders, Paul G A; Kohl, Peter; Prinzen, Frits W; Zaza, Antonio; Kääb, Stefan; Oto, Ali; Schotten, Ulrich

    2015-05-01

    Cardiac electrophysiology has evolved into an important subspecialty in cardiovascular medicine. This is in part due to the significant advances made in our understanding and treatment of heart rhythm disorders following more than a century of scientific discoveries and research. More recently, the rapid development of technology in cellular electrophysiology, molecular biology, genetics, computer modelling, and imaging have led to the exponential growth of knowledge in basic cardiac electrophysiology. The paradigm of evidence-based medicine has led to a more comprehensive decision-making process and most likely to improved outcomes in many patients. However, implementing relevant basic research knowledge in a system of evidence-based medicine appears to be challenging. Furthermore, the current economic climate and the restricted nature of research funding call for improved efficiency of translation from basic discoveries to healthcare delivery. Here, we aim to (i) appraise the broad challenges of translational research in cardiac electrophysiology, (ii) highlight the need for improved strategies in the training of translational electrophysiologists, and (iii) discuss steps towards building a favourable translational research environment and culture. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative: Building a Big Data System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, M. K.; Gayanilo, F. C.; Gibeaut, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    On April 20, 2010 the Deepwater Horizon drilling unit located in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico experienced a catastrophic wellhead blowout. Billions of barrels of oil and roughly 1 million U.S. gallons of dispersant were released near the wellhead over the subsequent three months. On May 24, 2010 BP announced the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI) and pledged 500M over 10 years toward independent scientific research on the spill's impact on the ecosystem. Data collection began immediately. By summer 2012 nearly 200M will have been committed to this research. Five hundred and seventy researchers from 114 institutions in 30 states and 4 countries are involved. Research activities include substantial numerical modeling, field and laboratory investigations of the environment and biota, and chemical studies of oil and dispersants. An additional $300M will be competed in subsequent years. The administrative and data management elements of the enterprise began to build in earnest in mid 2011. The last position in the GoMRI Information and Data Cooperative (GRIIDC) team was filled in July 2012. Due to the rapid evolution of the program in the first year, few data management requirements were imposed on the Year-One researchers. Proposal guidance for the Year 2-4 Research Consortia (RC) programs asked proposers to address data management questions but expressed few mandates. GRIIDC is charged with providing a portal to GoMRI data and metadata. Researchers are required to provide their data to GRIIDC and to national digital repositories with a minimum delay. Almost everything else was left to evolve through human networks. The GRIIDC team is composed of a System Architect, a Database Administrator, Software Engineers, a GIS specialist, a Technical Coordinator and several subject matter experts. The team faces the usual choices related to building a new cyberinfrastructure (e.g., metadata, ontologies, file formats, web services, etc.). However, the human element is

  18. Intention, Principle, Outputs and Aims of the Experimental Pavilion Research of Building Envelopes Including Windows for Wooden Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štaffenová, Daniela; Rybárik, Ján; Jakubčík, Miroslav

    2017-06-01

    The aim of experimental research in the area of exterior walls and windows suitable for wooden buildings was to build special pavilion laboratories. These laboratories are ideally isolated from the surrounding environment, airtight and controlled by the constant internal climate. The principle of experimental research is measuring and recording of required physical parameters (e.g. temperature or relative humidity). This is done in layers of experimental fragment sections in the direction from exterior to interior, as well as in critical places by stable interior and real exterior climatic conditions. The outputs are evaluations of experimental structures behaviour during the specified time period, possibly during the whole year by stable interior and real exterior boundary conditions. The main aim of this experimental research is processing of long-term measurements of experimental structures and the subsequent analysis. The next part of the research consists of collecting measurements obtained with assistance of the experimental detached weather station, analysis, evaluation for later setting up of reference data set for the research locality, from the point of view of its comparison to the data sets from Slovak Hydrometeorological Institute (SHMU) and to localities with similar climate conditions. Later on, the data sets could lead to recommendations for design of wooden buildings.

  19. An Emergency Medicine Research Priority Setting Partnership to establish the top 10 research priorities in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jason; Keating, Liza; Flowerdew, Lynsey; O'Brien, Rachel; McIntyre, Sam; Morley, Richard; Carley, Simon

    2017-07-01

    Defining research priorities in a specialty as broad as emergency medicine is a significant challenge. In order to fund and complete the most important research projects, it is imperative that we identify topics that are important to all clinicians, society and to our patients. We have undertaken a priority setting partnership to establish the most important questions facing emergency medicine. The top 10 questions reached through a consensus process are discussed. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Data on the interaction between thermal comfort and building control research.

    PubMed

    Park, June Young; Nagy, Zoltan

    2018-04-01

    This dataset contains bibliography information regarding thermal comfort and building control research. In addition, the instruction of a data-driven literature survey method guides readers to reproduce their own literature survey on related bibliography datasets. Based on specific search terms, all relevant bibliographic datasets are downloaded. We explain the keyword co-occurrences of historical developments and recent trends, and the citation network which represents the interaction between thermal comfort and building control research. Results and discussions are described in the research article entitled "Comprehensive analysis of the relationship between thermal comfort and building control research - A data-driven literature review" (Park and Nagy, 2018).

  1. New Knowledge about Research Capacity Building: An Autoethnographic Approach to Understanding Skill Enhancement Strategies for Minority Researchers with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Perry; Davis, Dytisha; Moore, Corey L.; Manyibe, Edward O.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this inquiry was to examine the research skill building and career development lived experiences of a Native American who is blind serving as a disability and rehabilitation researcher at a National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR)-sponsored Rehabilitation Research and…

  2. [Establishment and Management of Multiple Myeloma Specimen Bank Applied for Molecular Biological Researches].

    PubMed

    Li, Han-Qing; Mei, Jian-Gang; Cao, Hong-Qin; Shao, Liang-Jing; Zhai, Yong-Ping

    2017-12-01

    To establish a multiple myeloma specimen bank applied for molecular biological researches and to explore the methods of specimen collection, transportation, storage, quality control and the management of specimen bank. Bone marrow and blood samples were collected from multiple myeloma patients, plasma cell sorting were operated after the separation of mononuclear cells from bone marrow specimens. The plasma cells were divided into 2 parts, one was added with proper amount of TRIzol and then kept in -80 °C refrigerator for subsequent RNA extraction, the other was added with proper amount of calf serum cell frozen liquid and then kept in -80 °C refrigerator for subsequent cryopreservation of DNA extraction after numbered respectively. Serum and plasma were separated from peripheral blood, specimens of serum and plasma were then stored at -80 °C refrigerator after registration. Meantime, the myeloma specimen information management system was established, managed and maintained by specially-assigned persons and continuous modification and improvement in the process of use as to facilitate the rapid collection, management, query of the effective samples and clinical data. A total of 244 portions plasma cells, 564 portions of serum, and 1005 portions of plasma were collected, clinical characters were documented. A multiple myeloma specimen bank have been established initially, which can provide quality samples and related clinical information for molecular biological research on multiple myeloma.

  3. An electronic delphi study to establish pediatric intensive care nursing research priorities in twenty European countries*.

    PubMed

    Tume, Lyvonne N; van den Hoogen, Agnes; Wielenga, Joke M; Latour, Jos M

    2014-06-01

    To identify and to establish research priorities for pediatric intensive care nursing science across Europe. A modified three-round electronic Delphi technique was applied. Questionnaires were translated into seven different languages. European PICUs. The participants included pediatric intensive care clinical nurses, managers, educators, and researchers. In round 1, the qualitative responses were analyzed by content analysis and a list of research statements and domains was generated. In rounds 2 and 3, the statements were ranked on a scale of one to six (not important to most important). Mean scores and SDs were calculated for rounds 2 and 3. None. Round 1 started with 90 participants, with round 3 completed by 64 (71%). The seven highest ranking statements (≥ 5.0 mean score) were related to end-of-life care, decision making around forgoing and sustaining treatment, prevention of pain, education and competencies for pediatric intensive care nurses, reducing healthcare-associated infections, identifying appropriate nurse staffing levels, and implementing evidence into nursing practice. Nine research domains were prioritized, and these were as follows: 1) clinical nursing care practices, 2) pain and sedation, 3) quality and safety, 4) respiratory and mechanical ventilation, 5) child- and family-centered care, 6) ethics, 7) professional issues in nursing, 8) hemodynamcis and resuscitation, and 9) trauma and neurocritical care. The results of this study inform the European Society of Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care's nursing research agenda in the future. The results allow nurse researchers within Europe to encourage collaborative initiatives for nursing research.

  4. Addressing NCDs through research and capacity building in LMICs: lessons learned from tobacco control.

    PubMed

    Sturke, Rachel; Vorkoper, Susan; Duncan, Kalina; Levintova, Marya; Parascondola, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Confronting the global non-communicable diseases (NCDs) crisis requires a critical mass of scientists who are well versed in regional health problems and understand the cultural, social, economic, and political contexts that influence the effectiveness of interventions. Investments in global NCD research must be accompanied by contributions to local research capacity. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Fogarty International Center have a long-standing commitment to supporting research capacity building and addressing the growing burden of NCDs in low- and middle-income countries. One program in particular, the NIH International Tobacco and Health Research and Capacity Building Program (TOBAC program), offers an important model for conducting research and building research capacity simultaneously. This article describes the lessons learned from this unique funding model and demonstrates how a relatively modest investment can make important contributions to scientific evidence and capacity building that could inform ongoing and future efforts to tackle the global burden of NCDs.

  5. Addressing NCDs through research and capacity building in LMICs: lessons learned from tobacco control

    PubMed Central

    Sturke, Rachel; Vorkoper, Susan; Duncan, Kalina; Levintova, Marya; Parascondola, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Confronting the global non-communicable diseases (NCDs) crisis requires a critical mass of scientists who are well versed in regional health problems and understand the cultural, social, economic, and political contexts that influence the effectiveness of interventions. Investments in global NCD research must be accompanied by contributions to local research capacity. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Fogarty International Center have a long-standing commitment to supporting research capacity building and addressing the growing burden of NCDs in low- and middle-income countries. One program in particular, the NIH International Tobacco and Health Research and Capacity Building Program (TOBAC program), offers an important model for conducting research and building research capacity simultaneously. This article describes the lessons learned from this unique funding model and demonstrates how a relatively modest investment can make important contributions to scientific evidence and capacity building that could inform ongoing and future efforts to tackle the global burden of NCDs. PMID:27545455

  6. Building a Common Pediatric Research Terminology for Accelerating Child Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, L. Charles; Forrest, Christopher B.; Padula, Michael A.; Hirschfeld, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal observational clinical data on pediatric patients in electronic format is becoming widely available. A new era of multi-institutional data networks that study pediatric diseases and outcomes across disparate health delivery models and care settings are also enabling an innovative collaborative rapid improvement paradigm called the Learning Health System. However, the potential alignment of routine clinical care, observational clinical research, pragmatic clinical trials, and health systems improvement requires a data infrastructure capable of combining information from systems and workflows that historically have been isolated from each other. Removing barriers to integrating and reusing data collected in different settings will permit new opportunities to develop a more complete picture of a patient’s care and to leverage data from related research studies. One key barrier is the lack of a common terminology that provides uniform definitions and descriptions of clinical observations and data. A well-characterized terminology ensures a common meaning and supports data reuse and integration. A common terminology allows studies to build upon previous findings and to reuse data collection tools and data management processes. We present the current state of terminology harmonization and describe a governance structure and mechanism for coordinating the development of a common pediatric research terminology that links to clinical terminologies and can be used to align existing terminologies. By reducing the barriers between clinical care and clinical research, a Learning Health System can leverage and reuse not only its own data resources but also broader extant data resources. PMID:24534404

  7. The Golden Gate: Building Bridges Between Research and Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Lacey L.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has discussed the ongoing dilemma of implementing research-based findings in an applied setting. This panel will discuss lessons learned from various examples where bridges have been forged between research and operations, and examine ways to promote and achieve similar collaborations in other areas in the future.

  8. Building Education Research Capacity in Developing Countries: Some Fundamental Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puryear, Jeffrey M.

    2005-01-01

    This article addresses how to develop education research capacity in developing countries, using Chile's experience as a case study. Education research capacity is defined as a productive, modern, diverse, and self-reproducing professional community conducting research at internationally acceptable levels of quality. I argue that 3 general…

  9. Key Strategies for Building Research Capacity of University Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huenneke, Laura F.; Stearns, Diane M.; Martinez, Jesse D.; Laurila, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    Universities are under pressure to increase external research funding, and some federal agencies offer programs to expand research capacity in certain kinds of institutions. However, conflicts within faculty roles and other aspects of university operations influence the effectiveness of particular strategies for increasing research activity. We…

  10. Building a Research Administration Infrastructure at the Department Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chun, Maria B. J.

    2010-01-01

    Due to the current economic crisis, research administrators at public universities are grappling with declining state funding and are faced with identifying other potential sources of revenue to support operations. Research administrators at all levels are forced to do more with less. Department level research administrators must be innovative…

  11. Apparel Honors Program Builds Research Skills in Undergrads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Catherine; Grise, Kay; Barker, Jessica; Thomas, Brandi; Bollinger, Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    Institutions of higher education are being challenged to strengthen undergraduate education. One strategy for meeting students' needs is to incorporate research activities into the undergraduate experience. Each project can be tailored to fit the student's research interest and contribute to a faculty member's research productivity. An honors…

  12. Long-term agroecosystem research in the central Mississippi river basin: introduction, establishment, and overview.

    PubMed

    Sadler, E John; Lerch, Robert N; Kitchen, Newell R; Anderson, Stephen H; Baffaut, Claire; Sudduth, Kenneth A; Prato, Anthony A; Kremer, Robert J; Vories, Earl D; Myers, D Brent; Broz, Robert; Miles, Randall J; Young, Fred J

    2015-01-01

    Many challenges currently facing agriculture require long-term data on landscape-scale hydrologic responses to weather, such as from the Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed (GCEW), located in northeastern Missouri, USA. This watershed is prone to surface runoff despite shallow slopes, as a result of a significant smectitic clay layer 30 to 50 cm deep that restricts downward flow of water and gives rise to a periodic perched water table. This paper is the first in a series that documents the database developed from GCEW. The objectives of this paper are to (i) establish the context of long-term data and the federal infrastructure that provides it, (ii) describe the GCEW/ Central Mississippi River Basin (CMRB) establishment and the geophysical and anthropogenic context, (iii) summarize in brief the collected research results published using data from within GCEW, (iv) describe the series of papers this work introduces, and (v) identify knowledge gaps and research needs. The rationale for the collection derives from converging trends in data from long-term research, integration of multiple disciplines, and increasing public awareness of increasingly larger problems. The outcome of those trends includes being selected as the CMRB site in the USDA-ARS Long-Term Agro-Ecosystem Research (LTAR) network. Research needs include quantifying watershed scale fluxes of N, P, K, sediment, and energy, accounting for fluxes involving forest, livestock, and anthropogenic sources, scaling from near-term point-scale results to increasingly long and broad scales, and considering whole-system interactions. This special section informs the scientific community about this database and provides support for its future use in research to solve natural resource problems important to US agricultural, environmental, and science policy. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  13. Use of consensus development to establish national research priorities in critical care

    PubMed Central

    Vella, Keryn; Goldfrad, Caroline; Rowan, Kathy; Bion, Julian; Black, Nick

    2000-01-01

    Objectives To test the feasibility of using a nominal group technique to establish clinical and health services research priorities in critical care and to test the representativeness of the group's views. Design Generation of topics by means of a national survey; a nominal group technique to establish the level of consensus; a survey to test the representativeness of the results. Setting United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland. Subjects Nominal group composed of 10 doctors (8 consultants, 2 trainees) and 2 nurses. Main outcome measure Level of support (median) and level of agreement (mean absolute deviation from the median) derived from a 9 point Likert scale. Results Of the 325 intensive care units approached, 187 (58%) responded, providing about 1000 suggestions for research. Of the 106 most frequently suggested topics considered by the nominal group, 37 attracted strong support, 48 moderate support and 21 weak support. There was more agreement after the group had met—overall mean of the mean absolute deviations from the median fell from 1.41 to 1.26. The group's views represented the views of the wider community of critical care staff (r=0.73, P<0.01). There was no significant difference in the views of staff from teaching or from non-teaching hospitals. Of the 37 topics that attracted the strongest support, 24 were concerned with organisational aspects of critical care and only 13 with technology assessment or clinical research. Conclusions A nominal group technique is feasible and reliable for determining research priorities among clinicians. This approach is more democratic and transparent than the traditional methods used by research funding bodies. The results suggest that clinicians perceive research into the best ways of delivering and organising services as a high priority. PMID:10753149

  14. Using a Systematic Approach in the Analysis of the Factors That Influence On a Form Formation of Buildings of Higher Educational Establishments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyniv, Oleksandra; Kinasz, Roman

    2017-10-01

    This material covers the row of basic factors that influence on architectonically-spatial solution formation of building of Higher educational establishments (hereinafter universities). For this purpose, the systematization process of factors that influence on the university architecture was conducted and presented. The conclusion of this article was the proposed concept of considering universities as a hierarchical system, elements of which act as factors of influence, which in the process of alternating influence lead to the main goal, namely the formation of a new university building.

  15. Research ethics on the agenda - the debates preceding the establishment of the ethics committees.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Nadia Shad; Lie, Anne Kveim

    2016-11-01

    BACKGROUND This article examines two factors that helped to trigger and drive forward the debate about research ethics committees (now the Regional Committees for Medical and Health Research Ethics) in Norway in the 1970s: the revision of the Declaration of Helsinki by a Scandinavian working group, and the unfolding of the so-called Gro case in the Norwegian national media.METHOD We have used existing literature in the form of books and articles on the history of research ethics from the University Library of the University of Oslo, the National Library of Norway, the History of Science, Technology and Medicine database, and Retriever. We have manually reviewed issues of the Dagbladet daily newspaper from 1974, and relevant volumes of the Journal of the Norwegian Medical Association from the 1960s and 1970s. Finally, we have used the archives of the Norwegian Association of Higher Education Institutions, and the Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Oslo.RESULTS The World Medical Association's revision of the Declaration of Helsinki in 1975 stipulated the use of independent ethics committees for the assessment and supervision of research projects. The Gro case, which concerned the testing of behavioural therapeutic treatment on a young girl resident in an institution and the ensuing public debate, led to a demand from the public for closer monitoring and ethical regulation of research activity.INTERPRETATION Both of the events mentioned were used actively in the argumentation and preparatory work for the establishment of research ethics committees.

  16. Novel bibliometric scores for evaluating research quality and output: a correlation study with established indexes.

    PubMed

    Scotti, Valeria; De Silvestri, Annalisa; Scudeller, Luigia; Abele, Paola; Topuz, Funda; Curti, Moreno

    2016-12-23

    Novel bibliometric indexes (commonly known as altmetrics) are gaining interest within the scientific community and might represent an important alternative measure of research quality and output. We evaluate how these new metrics correlate with established bibliometric indexes such as the impact factor (IF), currently used as a measure of scientific production as well as a criterion for scientific research funding, and how they might be helpful in assessing the impact of research. We calculated altmetrics scores for all the articles published at our institution during a single year and examined the correlation between altmetrics scores and IFs as a measure of research quality and impact in all departments. For all articles from the various departments published in a single year, the altmetrics score and the sum of all IFs showed a strong and significant correlation (Spearman's rho 0.88). The correlation was significant also when the major components of altmetrics, including Facebook, Twitter and Mendeley, were analyzed. The implementation of altmetrics has been found to be easy and effective at both the researcher and librarian levels. The novel bibliographic index altmetrics is consistent and reliable and can complement or be considered a valid alternative to standard bibliometric indexes to benchmark output and quality of research for academic and funding purposes.

  17. Establishment of a Laboratory for Biofuels Research at the University of Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Crocker, Mark; Crofcheck, Czarena; Andrews, Rodney

    2013-03-29

    This project was aimed at the development of the biofuels industry in Kentucky by establishing a laboratory to develop improved processes for biomass utilization. The facility is based at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and the Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, and constitutes an “open” laboratory, i.e., its equipment is available to other Kentucky researchers working in the area. The development of this biofuels facility represents a significant expansion of research infrastructure, and will provide a lasting resource for biobased research endeavors at the University of Kentucky. In order to enhance the laboratory's capabilities andmore » contribute to on-going biofuels research at the University of Kentucky, initial research at the laboratory has focused on the following technical areas: (i) the identification of algae strains suitable for oil production, utilizing flue gas from coal-fired power plants as a source of CO 2; (ii) the conversion of algae to biofuels; and (iii) the development of methods for the analysis of lignin and its deconstruction products. Highlights from these activities include the development of catalysts for the upgrading of lipids to hydrocarbons by means of decarboxylation/decarbonylation (deCOx), a study of bio-oil production from the fast pyrolysis of algae (Scenedesmus), and the application of pyrolytic gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) to the characterization of high lignin biomass feedstocks.« less

  18. Research career development: the importance of establishing a solid track record in nursing academia.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda; Cleary, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Academic status and achievement is increasingly influenced by research income and outputs with nursing academics experiencing considerable pressure to perform in these areas. As a result funding and career opportunities are becoming more competitive. Establishing expertise and a sound track record is crucial for success at both the individual and organisational level. However, despite their importance, methods to effectively establish a track record have received limited attention in the literature. The aim of this paper is to articulate the need for and provide advice for achieving a strategic approach to develop a solid and competitive track record. Practical tips are provided to facilitate the development of productive research teams with clear and logical contributions from each member, having a dissemination plan to maximise research outputs, and remaining focused on specific areas of content expertise. It is intended that these tips will assist individuals and academic units with to develop a stronger track record that may increase the likelihood of success in obtaining competitive funding.

  19. 75 FR 18430 - Establishment of a U.S. Honey Producer Research, Promotion, and Consumer Information Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ... research and promotion programs issued under other laws. For example, in proposing the Packers and...; FV-07-706-PR-2A] RIN 0581-AC78 Establishment of a U.S. Honey Producer Research, Promotion, and... Referendum Order. SUMMARY: This proposed rule would establish a new U.S. honey producer funded research and...

  20. Building Innovation and Sustainability in Programs of Research.

    PubMed

    Villarruel, Antonia M

    2018-01-01

    Innovation and sustainability are two important concepts of impactful programs of research. While at first glance these concepts and approaches may seem at odds, they are synergistic. We examine the social, political, and policy context as it relates to innovation and sustainability. We present an exemplar of a program of research and discuss factors to consider in developing innovative and sustainable programs of research. Innovation is an important component of sustainable programs of research. Understanding the social and political context and addressing relevant policy issues are factors to be considered in both innovation and sustainability. Innovation and sustainability, important components of research, are also central to clinical practice. Open communication between researchers and clinicians can support the acceleration of innovations and the integration of evidence-based findings in practice. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  1. Building Human Resources Management Capacity for University Research: The Case at Four Leading Vietnamese Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, T. L.

    2016-01-01

    At research-intensive universities, building human resources management (HRM) capacity has become a key approach to enhancing a university's research performance. However, despite aspiring to become a research-intensive university, many teaching-intensive universities in developing countries may not have created effective research-promoted HRM…

  2. Building capacity for the conduct of nursing research at a Veterans Administration hospital.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Cynthia H; Schumacher, Sandra; Roiland, Rachel; Royer, Heather; Roberts, Tonya

    2015-05-01

    Evidence is the bedrock of nursing practice, and nursing research is the key source for this evidence. In this article, we draw distinctions between the use and the conduct of nursing research and provide a perspective for how the conduct of nursing research in a Veterans Administration hospital can build an organization's capacity for nursing research.

  3. Building Capacity for Research and Audit: Outcomes of a Training Workshop for Pacific Physicians and Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekeroma, Alec J.; Kenealy, Tim; Shulruf, Boaz; Nosa, Vili; Hill, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Building the research capacity of clinicians in the Pacific Island countries is important in addressing evidence gaps relevant to local policy and clinical practice. This paper aimed to assess the effectiveness of a reproductive health research workshop in increasing research knowledge and intention to perform research amongst a diverse group of…

  4. Building an Australasian paramedicine research agenda: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, Peter; Maguire, Brian; Jennings, Paul; Simpson, Paul

    2015-12-15

    The need for paramedicine research has been recognised internationally through efforts to develop out-of-hospital research agendas in several developed countries. Australasia has a substantial paramedicine research capacity compared to the discipline internationally and is well positioned as a potential leader in the drive towards evidence-based policy and practice in paramedicine. Our objective was to draw on international experiences to identify and recommend the best methodological approach that should be employed to develop an Australasian paramedicine research agenda. A search and critical appraisal process was employed to produce an overview of the literature related to the development of paramedicine research agendas throughout the world. Based on these international experiences, and our own analysis of the Australasian context, we recommend that a mixed methods approach be used to develop an inclusive Australasian Paramedicine Research Agenda. This approach will capture the views and interests of a wide range of expert stakeholders through multiple data collection strategies, including interviews, roundtable discussions and an online Delphi consensus survey. Paramedic researchers and industry leaders have the opportunity to use this multidisciplinary process of inquiry to develop a paramedicine research agenda that will provide a framework for the development of a culture of open evaluation, innovation and improvement. This research agenda would assess the progress of paramedicine research in Australia and New Zealand, map the research capacity of the paramedicine discipline, paramedic services, universities and professional organisations, identify current strengths and opportunities, make recommendations to capitalize on opportunities, and identify research priorities. Success will depend on ensuring the participation of a representative sample of expert stakeholders, fostering an open and collaborative roundtable discussion, and adhering to a predefined

  5. Building Professional Learning Communities in Special Education through Social Networking: Directions for Future Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardman, Elizabeth L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the challenges inherent in building professional learning communities (PLCs) in special education and describes how two Web 2.0 tools were used to build a community that engages general and special education teachers, school administrators, and teacher educators in implementing research based inclusive practices that are known…

  6. Interpretive Research Aiming at Theory Building: Adopting and Adapting the Case Study Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz Andrade, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Although the advantages of case study design are widely recognised, its original positivist underlying assumptions may mislead interpretive researchers aiming at theory building. The paper discusses the limitations of the case study design for theory building and explains how grounded theory systemic process adds to the case study design. The…

  7. Research to reality (R2R) mentorship program: building partnership, capacity, and evidence.

    PubMed

    Purcell, E Peyton; Mitchell, Charlene; Celestin, Michael D; Evans, Kiameesha R; Haynes, Venice; McFall, Angela; Troyer, Lisa; Sanchez, Michael A

    2013-05-01

    Despite a wealth of intervention research in cancer control, full integration of evidence-based interventions into practice often fails, at least in part because of inadequate collaboration between practitioners and researchers. The National Cancer Institute piloted a mentorship program designed for practitioners to improve their ability to navigate evidence-based decision making within a context of inadequate resources, political barriers, and organizational constraints. The National Cancer Institute simultaneously sought to provide opportunities for practitioners and researchers to share and learn from each other. We identified four key successes and challenges related to translation as experienced by mentees: (a) establishing and maintaining partnerships, (b) data collection and analysis, (c) navigating context, and (d) program adaptation and evaluation. Mentorship programs have the potential to facilitate increased and more successful integration of evidence-based interventions into practice by promoting and building the capacity for collaborative decision making and generating in-depth understanding of the translation barriers and successes as well as strategies to address the complex contextual issues relative to implementation.

  8. Building health research systems to achieve better health

    PubMed Central

    Hanney, Stephen R; González Block, Miguel A

    2006-01-01

    Health research systems can link knowledge generation with practical concerns to improve health and health equity. Interest in health research, and in how health research systems should best be organised, is moving up the agenda of bodies such as the World Health Organisation. Pioneering health research systems, for example those in Canada and the UK, show that progress is possible. However, radical steps are required to achieve this. Such steps should be based on evidence not anecdotes. Health Research Policy and Systems (HARPS) provides a vehicle for the publication of research, and informed opinion, on a range of topics related to the organisation of health research systems and the enormous benefits that can be achieved. Following the Mexico ministerial summit on health research, WHO has been identifying ways in which it could itself improve the use of research evidence. The results from this activity are soon to be published as a series of articles in HARPS. This editorial provides an account of some of these recent key developments in health research systems but places them in the context of a distinguished tradition of debate about the role of science in society. It also identifies some of the main issues on which 'research on health research' has already been conducted and published, in some cases in HARPS. Finding and retaining adequate financial and human resources to conduct health research is a major problem, especially in low and middle income countries where the need is often greatest. Research ethics and agenda-setting that responds to the demands of the public are issues of growing concern. Innovative and collaborative ways are being found to organise the conduct and utilisation of research so as to inform policy, and improve health and health equity. This is crucial, not least to achieve the health-related Millennium Development Goals. But much more progress is needed. The editorial ends by listing a wide range of topics related to the above

  9. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Establishing the key unanswered research questions within gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Rees, Colin J; Ngu, Wee Sing; Regula, Jaroslaw; Bisschops, Raf; Saftoiu, Adrian; Dekker, Evelien; Gralnek, Ian; Ciocirlan, Mihai; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mario; Jover, Rodrigo; Meisner, Søren; Spada, Cristiano; Hassan, Cesare; Valori, Roland; Hucl, Tomas; Le Moine, Olivier; Domagk, Dirk; Kaminski, Michal F; Bretthauer, Michael; Rutter, Matthew D; Aabakken, Lars; Ponchon, Thierry; Fockens, Paul; Siersema, Peter D

    2016-10-01

    Background and study aim: Gastrointestinal endoscopy is a rapidly evolving research field. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) plays a key role in shaping opinion and endoscopy activity throughout Europe and further afield. Establishing key unanswered questions within the field of endoscopy and prioritizing those that are important enables researchers and funders to appropriately allocate resources. Methods: Over 2 years, the ESGE Research Committee gathered information on research priorities and refined them through a modified Delphi approach. Consultations were held with the ESGE Governing Board and Quality Improvement Committee to identify important unanswered questions. Research workshops were held at the 21st United European Gastroenterology Week. Research questions were refined by the ESGE Research Committee and Governing Board, compiled into an online survey, and distributed to all ESGE members, who were invited to rank each question by priority. Results: The final questionnaire yielded 291 responses from over 60 countries. The three countries with the highest response rates were Spain, Italy, and United Kingdom. Most responders were from teaching hospitals (62 %) and were specialist endoscopists (51 %). Responses were analyzed with weighted rankings, resulting in prioritization of 26 key unanswered questions. The top ranked generic questions were: 1) How do we define the correct surveillance interval following endoscopic diagnosis? 2) How do we correctly utilize advanced endoscopic imaging? 3) What are the best markers of endoscopy quality? Conclusion: Following this comprehensive process, the ESGE has identified and ranked the key unanswered questions within the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy. Researchers, funders, and journals should prioritize studies that seek to answer these important questions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Using concept building in optics to improve student research skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Mark F.; Grove, Timothy T.

    2014-07-01

    Optics is a core component of an undergraduate physics degree. Not only is optics a fascinating topic on its own, but a good understanding of optics helps students gain valuable insight into more complex topics. A working knowledge of optics is vital for the experimental investigation of astronomy, quantum mechanics, and a host of other research endeavors involving optical measurements. Research is also a critical part of a student's education. Participation in research brings tremendous benefits to a student. So what do the students gain by participation in research? They learn independence. They learn how to plan a project. They learn the process of discovery. They learn that all answers are not always found on the internet, from professors, in books and publications (in that order). Research makes the "book" learning real. But what skills do the students need to be able to do research? Most of our experimental research opportunities involve optics. We have students working on investigations that range from atomic spectroscopy of rubidium to Rayleigh scattering to optical tweezers to quantum optics. When a student starts research, we want them to be ready to go. We don't want them to have to relearn material (or for us to reteach material) that they should already have mastered in earlier classes.

  11. External Research in AISD: Knowledge for Building, 1982-83.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin Independent School District, TX. Office of Research and Evaluation.

    The Austin Independent School District (AISD) Office of Research and Development, presents abstracts of research projects conducted by external agencies or individuals within AISD. For 33 projects, this report contains the AISD project number, project title, project director, project sponsor, schools where conducted, and whether or not a full…

  12. Building Bridges for Dance through Arts-Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Lisa; Moffett, Ann-Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This paper considers arts-based research (ABR) as a useful resource for creating fluid and dialogic spaces between multiple domains of dance knowledge and practices. Through the lens of a multi-disciplinary, arts-based research project "Same Story, Different Countries" explored the socio-political phenomena of racism in the United States…

  13. Building Research Skills in the Macalester Economics Major

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferderer, J. Peter; Krueger, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Economics majors at Macalester College have won numerous awards for their research papers, and this success has helped them land jobs in finance, consulting, and the nonprofit sector, as well as gain admission to top graduate programs. This article describes how the Economics Department at Macalester promotes economic research among its students.

  14. NCVER Building Researcher Capacity Scholarship: A Rural Participant's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, Anne

    2015-01-01

    This article uses an autoethnographic methodology to describe the experience of a novice practitioner-researcher engaging in the NCVER community of practice (CoP). The author's experience of the journey from vocational education and training (VET) practitioner to practitioner-researcher is recorded. The findings show that the numerous aspirations…

  15. Research on Building Education & Workforce Capacity in Systems Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    Science Coast Guard Academy Chris Lund, Research Engineer USCG R&D center Civil Engineering Coast Guard Academy Scot T. Tripp, Program Manager USCG...74 researchers Coast Guard Academy Scot T. Tripp, Program Manager Internal institutional USCG R&D center... Woods Industry Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Defense contracted system development and analysis Stevens Tom Newby Industry Buro

  16. Building Action Research Teams: A Case of Struggles and Successes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du, Fengning

    2009-01-01

    Teaching teams can hold the promise of being an ideal vehicle in which collaborative action research is conducted. This case documents the mixed results of a team leader's efforts to improve teaching and introduce inquiry-based professional development through action research in a community college. This case paints a realistic and…

  17. Research and Practice in Education: Building Alliances, Bridging the Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coburn, Cynthia E., Ed.; Stein, Mary Kay, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    That there is a divide between research and practice is a common lament across policy-oriented disciplines, and education is no exception. Rhetoric abounds about the role research plays (or does not play) in the improvement of schools and classrooms, and policy makers push solutions that are rooted in assumptions about the way that research…

  18. Research Capacity Building in Education: The Role of Digital Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmichael, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Accounts of how research capacity in education can be developed often make reference to electronic networks and online resources. This paper presents a theoretically driven analysis of the role of one such resource, an online archive of educational research studies that includes not only digitised collections of original documents but also videos…

  19. Teen dating violence: building a research program through collaborative insights.

    PubMed

    Mulford, Carrie F; Blachman-Demner, Dara R

    2013-06-01

    The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) has an emerging portfolio of research in the area of teen dating violence (also known as adolescent relationship abuse). This article begins with a discussion of the developments that prompted NIJ to focus on teen dating violence. Next, the article highlights specific accomplishments and contributions that NIJ has made to helping develop knowledge and scientific understanding of adolescent relationship abuse, particularly around the prevention of teen dating violence perpetration and victimization. This is followed by a presentation of some of the key findings from NIJ-funded research. We then move to a discussion of some of the complex issues around definition, measurement and research methods and how NIJ has been involved in addressing those issues. The article concludes with some thoughts about the intersection of teen dating violence research, policy, and practice and highlights several research gaps that are in need of additional attention.

  20. The establishment of a national tissue bank for inflammatory bowel disease research in Canada.

    PubMed

    Collins, Stephen M; McHugh, Kevin; Croitoru, Ken; Howorth, Michael

    2003-02-01

    The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of Canada (CCFC) has established a national bank for tissue, serum and blood from patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Investigators from across the country submit material to the bank together with clinical data. Investigators may access their own patient information from the bank for their own study purposes, but the distribution of tissue is restricted to specific CCFC-funded projects. Currently, tissues are being collected from newly diagnosed, untreated IBD patients to support a recent initiative aimed at characterizing microbes in colonic and ileal biopsies from such patients. In the future, criteria for the submission of tissue will be tailored to specific research questions. This bank is believed to be the first national bank of its kind dedicated to research in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis

  1. Neuroimaging in aphasia treatment research: Standards for establishing the effects of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kiran, Swathi; Ansaldo, Ana; Bastiaanse, Roelien; Cherney, Leora R.; Howard, David; Faroqi-Shah, Yasmeen; Meinzer, Marcus; Thompson, Cynthia K

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to discuss experimental design options available for establishing the effects of treatment in studies that aim to examine the neural mechanisms associated with treatment-induced language recovery in aphasia, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We present both group and single-subject experimental or case-series design options for doing this and address advantages and disadvantages of each. We also discuss general components of and requirements for treatment research studies, including operational definitions of variables, criteria for defining behavioral change and treatment efficacy, and reliability of measurement. Important considerations that are unique to neuroimaging-based treatment research are addressed, pertaining to the relation between the selected treatment approach and anticipated changes in language processes/functions and how such changes are hypothesized to map onto the brain. PMID:23063559

  2. Bioimaging of Transgenic Rats Established at Jichi Medical University: Applications in Transplantation Research

    PubMed Central

    Teratani, Takumi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    Research in the life sciences has been greatly advanced by the ability to directly visualize cells, tissues, and organs. Preclinical studies often involve many small and large animal experiments and, frequently, cell and organ transplantations. The rat is an excellent animal model for the development of transplantation and surgical techniques because of its small size and ability to breed in small spaces. Ten years ago, we established color-imaging transgenic rats and methods for the direct visualization of their tissues. Since then, our transgenic rats have been used throughout the various fields that are concerned with cell transplantation therapy. In this minireview, we summarize results from some of the groups that have used our transgenic rats at the bench level and in cell transplantation research. PMID:26858864

  3. Australia's TERN: Building, Sustaining and Advancing Collaborative Long Term Ecosystem Research Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HEld, A. A.; Phinn, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    TERN is Australia's Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (www.tern.org.au) is one of several environmental data collection, storage and sharing projects developed through the government's research infrastructure programs 2008-2014. This includes terrestrial and coastal ecosystem data collection infrastructure across multiple disciplines, hardware, software and processes used to store, analyse and integrate data sets. TERN's overall objective is to build the collaborations, infrastructure and programs to meet the needs of ecosystem science communities in Australia in the long term, through institutional frameworks necessary to establish a national terrestrial ecosystem site and observational network, coordinated networks enabling cooperation and operational experience; public access to quality assured and appropriately licensed data; and allowing the terrestrial ecosystem research community to define and sustain the terrestrial observing paradigm into the longer term. This paper explains how TERN was originally established, and now operates, along with plans to sustain itself in the future. TERN is implemented through discipline/technical groups referred to as "TERN Facilities". Combined, the facilities provide observations of surface mass and energy fluxes over key ecosystems, biophysical remote sensing data, ecological survey plots, soils information, and coastal ecosystems and associated water quality variables across Australia. Additional integrative facilities cover elements of ecoinformatics, data-scaling and modelling, and linking science to management. A central coordination and portal facility provides meta-data storage, data identification, legal and licensing support. Data access, uploading, meta-data generation, DOI attachment and licensing is completed at each facility's own portal level. TERN also acts as the open-data repository of choice for Australian scientists required to publish their data. Several key lessons we have learnt, will be presented

  4. Growing our own: building a native research team.

    PubMed

    Gray, Jacqueline S; Carter, Paula M

    2012-01-01

    In 2006, American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) made up less than 1% of the science, engineering and health doctorates in the U.S. Early introduction of AI/AN students to research and continued opportunities are necessary to develop successful AI/AN researchers who can better serve their communities. This team was developed to form a cohort of American Indian students, staff and faculty interested in research and becoming researchers. Since implementation, the program grew from one student to over 20 AI students ranging from freshmen just entering college to doctoral students working to complete their dissertations. This article highlights the team growth, increasing structure, student needs and the faculty and staff involved. It further addresses the support and educational aspects of growing an ongoing, multidisciplinary research team committed to ethical research in Native communities. The team addresses substance use prevalence, the relationship of substance abuse to other mental health diagnoses, and treatment issues. The team includes weekly team meetings, a Blackboard site on the Internet that is populated with resources and focused on sharing materials and information, a weekly journal club discussion of research articles, and collaborative discussions on each project and the barriers and challenges that need to be addressed to move forward.

  5. Building Research Relationships With Managed Care Organizations: Issues and Strategies.

    PubMed

    Lein, Catherine; Collins, Clare; Lyles, Judith S; Hillman, Donald; Smith, Robert C

    2003-06-01

    Managed care is now the dominant form of healthcare in the United States. The need for clinical research about the organization, delivery, and outcomes of primary care services in managed care models is high, yet access to managed care organizations as sites for clinical research may be problematic. The purpose of this article is to describe issues involved in obtaining access to managed care settings for clinical research and practical strategies for successful collaboration using literature review and case description. Three steps for developing collaborative relationships with managed care organizations (MCOs) are presented: 1) assessment of organizational structure, history, and culture; 2) finding common ground; and 3) project implementation. These steps are discussed within the context of MCO systems issues and a relationship-centered approach to communication between researchers and individuals from the MCO. Successful relationships with MCOs for clinical research are possible when careful attention is paid to inclusion of MCOs as collaborators in the development of the research questions and design, and as partners in the research implementation process.

  6. Global Disease Detection-Achievements in Applied Public Health Research, Capacity Building, and Public Health Diplomacy, 2001-2016.

    PubMed

    Rao, Carol Y; Goryoka, Grace W; Henao, Olga L; Clarke, Kevin R; Salyer, Stephanie J; Montgomery, Joel M

    2017-11-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has established 10 Global Disease Detection (GDD) Program regional centers around the world that serve as centers of excellence for public health research on emerging and reemerging infectious diseases. The core activities of the GDD Program focus on applied public health research, surveillance, laboratory, public health informatics, and technical capacity building. During 2015-2016, program staff conducted 205 discrete projects on a range of topics, including acute respiratory illnesses, health systems strengthening, infectious diseases at the human-animal interface, and emerging infectious diseases. Projects incorporated multiple core activities, with technical capacity building being most prevalent. Collaborating with host countries to implement such projects promotes public health diplomacy. The GDD Program continues to work with countries to strengthen core capacities so that emerging diseases can be detected and stopped faster and closer to the source, thereby enhancing global health security.

  7. Joint China-United States Report for Year 1 Insulation Materials and Systems Project Area Clean Energy Research Center Building Energy Efficiency (CERC-BEE)

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, Therese K; Biswas, Kaushik; Song, Bo

    In November of 2009, the presidents of China and the U.S. announced the establishment of the Clean Energy Research Center (CERC). This broad research effort is co-funded by both countries and involves a large number of research centers and universities in both countries. One part of this program is focused on improving the energy efficiency of buildings. One portion of the CERC-BEE was focused on building insulation systems. The research objective of this effort was to Identify and investigate candidate high performance fire resistant building insulation technologies that meet the goal of building code compliance for exterior wall applications inmore » green buildings in multiple climate zones. A Joint Work Plan was established between researchers at the China Academy of Building Research and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Efforts in the first year under this plan focused on information gathering. The objective of this research program is to reduce building energy use in China via improved building insulation technology. In cold regions in China, residents often use inefficient heating systems to provide a minimal comfort level within inefficient buildings. In warmer regions, air conditioning has not been commonly used. As living standards rise, energy consumption in these regions will increase dramatically unless significant improvements are made in building energy performance. Previous efforts that defined the current state of the built environment in China and in the U.S. will be used in this research. In countries around the world, building improvements have typically followed the implementation of more stringent building codes. There have been several changes in building codes in both the U.S. and China within the last few years. New U.S. building codes have increased the amount of wall insulation required in new buildings. New government statements from multiple agencies in China have recently changed the requirements for buildings in terms of energy

  8. Establishing a Research and Evaluation Capability for the Joint Medical Education and Training Campus.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Sheila Nataraj; Marsh, Julie A; Thie, Harry J

    2011-01-01

    In calling for the transformation of military medical education and training, the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure Commission recommended relocating basic and specialty enlisted medical training to a single site to take advantage of economies of scale and the opportunity for joint training. As a result, a joint medical education and training campus (METC) has been established at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Two of METC's primary long-term goals are to become a high-performing learning organization and to seek accreditation as a community college. Such goals require a clear model of organizational improvement with well-defined metrics for measuring its performance and using research and evaluation to assess and improve that performance. Lessons learned from a review of practices at institutions with similar missions-such as community colleges, corporate universities, the UK's Defence Medical Education and Training Agency, and other federal agencies, such as the Veterans Health Administration-establish a clear need for an office of institutional research to help METC attain its organizational goals. They also provide useful recommendations regarding the METC office's structure, scope, and governance.

  9. Establishing a Research and Evaluation Capability for the Joint Medical Education and Training Campus

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Sheila Nataraj; Marsh, Julie A.; Thie, Harry J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In calling for the transformation of military medical education and training, the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure Commission recommended relocating basic and specialty enlisted medical training to a single site to take advantage of economies of scale and the opportunity for joint training. As a result, a joint medical education and training campus (METC) has been established at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Two of METC's primary long-term goals are to become a high-performing learning organization and to seek accreditation as a community college. Such goals require a clear model of organizational improvement with well-defined metrics for measuring its performance and using research and evaluation to assess and improve that performance. Lessons learned from a review of practices at institutions with similar missions—such as community colleges, corporate universities, the UK's Defence Medical Education and Training Agency, and other federal agencies, such as the Veterans Health Administration—establish a clear need for an office of institutional research to help METC attain its organizational goals. They also provide useful recommendations regarding the METC office's structure, scope, and governance. PMID:28083182

  10. Research notes : if we build it, will they come?

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-05-01

    These are some of the questions being evaluated by the Oregon Department of Transportations research on Indirect Land Use and Growth Impacts of Highway Improvements. The findings are intended to help in completing environmental analysis for ...

  11. Building Capacity in Community-Based Participatory Research Partnerships Through a Focus on Process and Multiculturalism.

    PubMed

    Corbie-Smith, Giselle; Bryant, Angela R; Walker, Deborah J; Blumenthal, Connie; Council, Barbara; Courtney, Dana; Adimora, Ada

    2015-01-01

    In health research, investigators and funders are emphasizing the importance of collaboration between communities and academic institutions to achieve health equity. Although the principles underlying community-academic partnered research have been well-articulated, the processes by which partnerships integrate these principles when working across cultural differences are not as well described. We present how Project GRACE (Growing, Reaching, Advocating for Change and Empowerment) integrated participatory research principles with the process of building individual and partnership capacity. We worked with Vigorous Interventions In Ongoing Natural Settings (VISIONS) Inc., a process consultant and training organization, to develop a capacity building model. We present the conceptual framework and multicultural process of change (MPOC) that was used to build individual and partnership capacity to address health disparities. The process and capacity building model provides a common language, approach, and toolset to understand differences and the dynamics of inequity. These tools can be used by other partnerships in the conduct of research to achieve health equity.

  12. Building a Bright Future. The Hydro Research Foundation's Fellowship Program

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, Brenna; Linke, Deborah M.

    The Hydro Fellowship Program (program) began as an experiment to discover whether the hydropower industry could find mechanisms to attract new entrants through conducting relevant research to benefit the industry. This nationwide, new-to-the-world program was started through funding from the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Office of the Department of Energy (DOE). Between 2010-2015, the Hydro Research Foundation (HRF) designed and implemented a program to conduct valuable research and attract new entrants to the hydro workforce. This historic grant has empowered and engaged industry members from 25 organizations by working withmore » 91 students and advisors at 24 universities in 19 states. The work funded answered pressing research needs in the fields of civil, mechanical, environmental, and electrical engineering, as well as law, energy engineering and materials innovation. In terms of number of individuals touched through funding, 148 individuals were supported by this work through direct research, mentorship, oversight of the work, partnerships and the day-to-day program administration. Based on the program results, it is clear that the funding achieved the hoped-for outcomes and has the capacity to draw universities into the orbit of hydropower and continue the conversation about industry research and development needs. The Foundation has fostered unique partnerships at the host universities and has continued to thrive with the support of the universities, advisors, industry and the DOE. The Foundation has demonstrated industry support through mentorships, partnerships, underwriting the costs and articulating the universities’ support through in-kind cost sharing. The Foundation recommends that future work be continued to nurture these graduate level programs using the initial work and improvements in the successor program, the Research Awards Program, while stimulating engagement of academia at

  13. Astrobiology and society: building an interdisciplinary research community.

    PubMed

    Race, Margaret; Denning, Kathryn; Bertka, Constance M; Dick, Steven J; Harrison, Albert A; Impey, Christopher; Mancinelli, Rocco

    2012-10-01

    This paper reports recent efforts to gather experts from the humanities and social sciences along with astrobiologists to consider the cultural, societal, and psychological implications of astrobiology research and exploration. We began by convening a workshop to draft a research roadmap on astrobiology's societal implications and later formed a Focus Group on Astrobiology and Society under the auspices of the NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI). Just as the Astrobiology Science Roadmap and various astrobiology science focus groups have helped researchers orient and understand their work across disciplinary contexts, our intent was to apply the same approach to examine areas beyond the physical and life sciences and expand interdisciplinary interaction and scholarly understanding. These efforts continue as an experiment in progress, with an open invitation to interested researchers-astrobiologists as well as scholars in the humanities and social sciences-to become involved in research, analysis, and proactive discussions concerning the potential impacts of astrobiology on society as well as the possible impacts of society on progress in astrobiology.

  14. Building a teaching-research nexus in a research intensive university: rejuvenating the recruitment and training of the clinician scientist.

    PubMed

    Eley, Diann S; Wilkinson, David

    2015-02-01

    The continuing decline in clinician scientists is a global concern. This paper reports on a two-fold rationale to address this decline by increasing the number of students on a formal pathway to an academic research career, and building a 'teaching-research nexus' using the research intensive environment at our University. The University of Queensland has implemented a research intensive program, the Clinician Scientist Track (CST), for a select cohort of students to pursue a part time research Masters degree alongside their full time medical degree. To this end, the support of clinical academics and the research community was vital to achieve a 'teaching-research-clinical nexus' - most appropriate for nurturing future Clinician Scientists. In three years, the CST has 42 enrolled research Masters' students with the majority (90%) upgrading to a PhD. Research represents 33 different areas and over 25 research groups/centres across this University and internationally. Other research intensive institutions may similarly build their 'teaching-research nexus' by purposeful engagement between their medical school and research community. The CST offers a feasible opportunity for outstanding students to build their own 'field of dreams' through an early start to their research career while achieving a common goal of rejuvenating the ethos of the clinician scientist.

  15. Better Thinking and Learning: Building Effective Teaching through Educational Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore. Div. of Instruction.

    Presenting syntheses of research on effective instruction in 30 program areas, this paper is designed as a resource to assist teachers in expanding and refining their repertoire of teaching strategies and to guide instructional planning and decision making. For each program area, the paper presents a "finding" (a one-sentence statement…

  16. Astrobiology and Society: Building an Interdisciplinary Research Community

    PubMed Central

    Denning, Kathryn; Bertka, Constance M.; Dick, Steven J.; Harrison, Albert A.; Impey, Christopher; Mancinelli, Rocco

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This paper reports recent efforts to gather experts from the humanities and social sciences along with astrobiologists to consider the cultural, societal, and psychological implications of astrobiology research and exploration. We began by convening a workshop to draft a research roadmap on astrobiology's societal implications and later formed a Focus Group on Astrobiology and Society under the auspices of the NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI). Just as the Astrobiology Science Roadmap and various astrobiology science focus groups have helped researchers orient and understand their work across disciplinary contexts, our intent was to apply the same approach to examine areas beyond the physical and life sciences and expand interdisciplinary interaction and scholarly understanding. These efforts continue as an experiment in progress, with an open invitation to interested researchers—astrobiologists as well as scholars in the humanities and social sciences—to become involved in research, analysis, and proactive discussions concerning the potential impacts of astrobiology on society as well as the possible impacts of society on progress in astrobiology. Key Words: Astrobiology—Extraterrestrial life—Life detection. Astrobiology 12, 958–965. PMID:23046203

  17. Schools and Neighborhoods Research Study: School Building Use Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eismann, Donald; And Others

    This report documents the findings related to Objective 2 of the Schools and Neighborhoods Research Study. The task was to identify community services provided by the neighborhood school. The study staff reviewed the existing facilities use information from the Seattle Public Schools. Results from the Facilities Utilization Study Survey and the…

  18. Building a research legacy -- The Intermountain Station 1911-1997

    Treesearch

    Richard J. Klade

    2006-01-01

    Includes highlights of the history of organizations that preceded formation of the Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station in 1954. Provides detailed accounts of Intermountain Station research and administrative accomplishments, some of the people who led activities, and changes in the organization from 1954 through 1997 when the Intermountain and Rocky...

  19. Building Global Health Research Competencies at the Undergraduate Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatfield, Jennifer M.; Hecker, Kent G.; Jensen, Ashley E.

    2009-01-01

    Faculty from the University of Calgary's bachelor of health sciences (BHSc) Global Health Program argue for the development of "global health research competencies" to prepare students for international placements in low- and middle-income countries. These competencies include the ability to define and describe (a) how to use the concept…

  20. Child Language Research: Building on the Past, Looking to the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perera, Katharine

    1994-01-01

    Outlines descriptive, theoretical, and methodological advances in child language research since the first volume of the "Journal of Child Language" was published. Papers in this volume build on earlier research, point the way to new research avenues, and open new lines of inquiry. (Contains 36 references.) (JP)

  1. Sustainability and productivity of southern pine ecosystems: A thematic framework for integrating research and building partnerships

    Treesearch

    Charles K. McMahon; James P. Barnett

    2000-01-01

    In 1997, the USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) published a Strategic Plan that formed a framework for addressing the Sustainability of Southern Forest Ecosystems. Six crosscutting themes were identified to facilitate research integration and partnership building among the widely dispersed SRS research work units. The Sustainability and Productivity of...

  2. Developing mental health research in sub-Saharan Africa: capacity building in the AFFIRM project.

    PubMed

    Schneider, M; Sorsdahl, K; Mayston, R; Ahrens, J; Chibanda, D; Fekadu, A; Hanlon, C; Holzer, S; Musisi, S; Ofori-Atta, A; Thornicroft, G; Prince, M; Alem, A; Susser, E; Lund, C

    2016-01-01

    There remains a large disparity in the quantity, quality and impact of mental health research carried out in sub-Saharan Africa, relative to both the burden and the amount of research carried out in other regions. We lack evidence on the capacity-building activities that are effective in achieving desired aims and appropriate methodologies for evaluating success. AFFIRM was an NIMH-funded hub project including a capacity-building program with three components open to participants across six countries: (a) fellowships for an M.Phil. program; (b) funding for Ph.D. students conducting research nested within AFFIRM trials; (c) short courses in specialist research skills. We present findings on progression and outputs from the M.Phil. and Ph.D. programs, self-perceived impact of short courses, qualitative data on student experience, and reflections on experiences and lessons learnt from AFFIRM consortium members. AFFIRM delivered funded research training opportunities to 25 mental health professionals, 90 researchers and five Ph.D. students across 6 countries over a period of 5 years. A number of challenges were identified and suggestions for improving the capacity-building activities explored. Having protected time for research is a barrier to carrying out research activities for busy clinicians. Funders could support sustainability of capacity-building initiatives through funds for travel and study leave. Adoption of a train-the-trainers model for specialist skills training and strategies for improving the rigor of evaluation of capacity-building activities should be considered.

  3. The Use of Invariance and Bootstrap Procedures as a Method to Establish the Reliability of Research Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandler, Andrew B.

    Statistical significance is misused in educational and psychological research when it is applied as a method to establish the reliability of research results. Other techniques have been developed which can be correctly utilized to establish the generalizability of findings. Methods that do provide such estimates are known as invariance or…

  4. Scientific production and bibliometric impact of a representative group of Spanish internists with established research careers.

    PubMed

    Burbano Santos, P; Miró, Ò; Martín-Sánchez, F J; Fernández Pérez, C; Casademont, J

    2015-10-01

    To study the temporal evolution of the bibliometric indices of internists with established research experience in order to predict the future behavior of researchers and to assess whether output focused on a specific area of internal medicine helps obtain greater visibility than in general internal medicine. We analyzed a representative group of members of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) based on data obtained from the Web of Science. As an indicator of productivity, we analyzed the number of articles published. As impact indicators, we studied the impact factor (IF), the number of citations and the h-index. We analyzed 42 internists, with a mean experience of 30 years and a total of 6655 publications. The mean (SD) number of studies was 158 (96), the number of citations was 2,850 (2,865), the IF was 711 (549) and the h-index was 25 (11). These figures were higher for the specialist internists than for the general internists. There was a good relationship between the impact and productivity indicators (R(2)=.61-.89) and a poor relationship between these indicators and the years of experience (R(2)=.13-.19). The temporal evolution of these indicators for each individual researcher and for all researchers as a whole was adjusted to a second-degree polynomial model, with the h-index having the highest R(2) values. The h-index is the factor that had the best adjustment and least variability and could therefore help predict the future scientific output and impact of internists. The specialist researchers achieved greater visibility than the general internists. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  5. Engaging Patients and Clinicians in Establishing Research Priorities for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rees, Sandra E; Chadha, Rati; Donovan, Lois E; Guitard, Adrienne L T; Koppula, Sudha; Laupacis, Andreas; Simpson, Sara; Johnson, Jeffrey A

    2017-04-01

    We involved patients and clinicians in Alberta, Canada, to establish research priorities in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), using an approach based on a model proposed by the James Lind Alliance (JLA). We adapted the 4-step JLA process to engage women with GDM and clinicians to identify uncertainties about the management of GDM. Uncertainties were identified through a survey and a review of the clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Uncertainties were short-listed by a steering committee, followed by a 1-day facilitated workshop using a nominal group format and involving a similar number of patients and clinicians, who identified the top 10 research priorities. Across the various survey formats, 75 individuals submitted 389 uncertainties, the majority (44; 59%) coming from patients. We removed 9 questions as being out of scope or unclear, and 41 were identified on a review of CPG, resulting in a total of 421 uncertainties. After the priority setting process, the final top 10 research priorities included questions about a simpler, more accurate and convenient screening test; risk factors for GDM; improving postpartum diabetes screening; the impact of GDM on the future health of the children; lifestyle challenges and mental health issues; safety, effectiveness and/or impact of diet and/or medication treatments; appropriate timing for delivery; and how care is provided, organized or communicated. These top 10 research priorities were informed through a comprehensive and transparent process involving women who have experienced GDM as well as clinicians, and they may be regarded as research priorities for GDM. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Willingness to Donate Human Samples for Establishing a Dermatology Research Biobank: Results of a Survey.

    PubMed

    Gross, Durdana; Schmitz, Arndt A; Vonk, Richardus; Igney, Frederik H; Döcke, Wolf-Dietrich; Schoepe, Stefanie; Sterry, Wolfram; Asadullah, Khusru

    2011-09-01

    There is a rising need for biomaterial in dermatological research with regard to both quality and quantity. Research biobanks as organized collections of biological material with associated personal and clinical data are of increasing importance. Besides technological/methodological and legal aspects, the willingness to donate samples by patients and healthy volunteers is a key success factor. To analyze the theoretical willingness to donate blood and skin samples, we developed and distributed a questionnaire. Six hundred nineteen questionnaires were returned and analyzed. The willingness to donate samples of blood (82.5%) and skin (58.7%) is high among the population analyzed and seems to be largely independent of any expense allowance. People working in the healthcare system, dermatological patients, and higher qualified individuals seem to be in particular willing to donate material. An adequate patient insurance as well as an extensive education about risks and benefits is requested. In summary, there is a high willingness to donate biological samples for dermatological research. This theoretical awareness fits well with our own experiences in establishing such a biobank.

  7. NSF's Perspective on Space Weather Research for Building Forecasting Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, M. M.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Bisi, M. M.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Webb, D. F.; Oughton, E. J.; Azeem, S. I.

    2017-12-01

    Space weather research at the National Science Foundation (NSF) is focused on scientific discovery and on deepening knowledge of the Sun-Geospace system. The process of maturation of knowledge base is a requirement for the development of improved space weather forecast models and for the accurate assessment of potential mitigation strategies. Progress in space weather forecasting requires advancing in-depth understanding of the underlying physical processes, developing better instrumentation and measurement techniques, and capturing the advancements in understanding in large-scale physics based models that span the entire chain of events from the Sun to the Earth. This presentation will provide an overview of current and planned programs pertaining to space weather research at NSF and discuss the recommendations of the Geospace Section portfolio review panel within the context of space weather forecasting capabilities.

  8. Building Networks for Global Clinical Research: The Basics.

    PubMed

    Shearer, David W; Volberding, Paul A; Schemitsch, Emil H; Cook, Gillian E; Slobogean, Gerard P; Morshed, Saam

    2015-12-01

    Over the last several decades, interest in global health across all fields of medicine, including orthopaedic surgery, has grown markedly. Cross-national collaborations are an effective means of conducting high-quality clinical research and offer many advantages over single-center investigations. Successful collaboration requires a well-designed research protocol, development of an effective team structure, and the funding to ensure the project is sustained to completion. Equally important, investigators must consider the social, linguistic, and cultural context in which the study is being undertaken. Although randomized clinical trials are the highest level of evidence, study designs may have to be adapted to accommodate available resources, expertise, and local contextual factors. With appropriate planning, these collaborative endeavors can generate changes in clinical practice and positively impact health policy.

  9. Seismic performance of non-structural components and contents in buildings: an overview of NZ research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Rajesh P.; Pourali, Atefeh; Tasligedik, Ali Sahin; Yeow, Trevor; Baird, Andrew; MacRae, Gregory; Pampanin, Stefano; Palermo, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    This paper summarizes the research on non-structural elements and building contents being conducted at University of Canterbury in New Zealand. Since the 2010-2011 series of Canterbury earthquakes, in which damage to non-structural components and contents contributed heavily to downtime and overall financial loss, attention to seismic performance and design of non-structural components and contents in buildings has increased exponentially in NZ. This has resulted in an increased allocation of resources to research leading to development of more resilient non-structural systems in buildings that would incur substantially less damage and cause little downtime during earthquakes. In the last few years, NZ researchers have made important developments in understanding and improving the seismic performance of secondary building elements such as partitions, facades, ceilings and contents.

  10. The National Shipbuilding Research Program. Build Strategy Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    technologies to the product mix and marketing strategies. In a general sense, the most productive yards have identified market niches, developed suitable...CAPABILITIES AND LIMITATIONS QUESTIONNAIRE U.S. SHIPYARD RESPONSE YES NO Does your Company have a Marketing /Sales Department? 2 1 Does your Company...engage in Market Research? 2 1 Domestic Foreign What is your current primary market ? Military 2 1 Commercial Ocean Going 1 Commercial Off shore Commercial

  11. Research on Building Education & Workforce Capacity in Systems Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-31

    product or prototype that addresses a real DoD need. Implemented as pilot courses in eight civilian and six military universities affiliated with...Engineering 1 1.1 Computer Engineering 1 1.1 Operations Research 1 1.1 Product Architecture 1 1.1 Total 93 100.0 Table 7: Breakdown of Student... product specifications, inattention to budget limits and safety issues, inattention to product life cycle, poor implementation of risk management plans

  12. Using Consensus Building Procedures with Expert Raters to Establish Comparison Scores of Behavior for Direct Behavior Rating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffery, Rose; Johnson, Austin H.; Bowler, Mark C.; Riley-Tillman, T. Chris; Chafouleas, Sandra M.; Harrison, Sayward E.

    2015-01-01

    To date, rater accuracy when using Direct Behavior Rating (DBR) has been evaluated by comparing DBR-derived data to scores yielded through systematic direct observation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate an alternative method for establishing comparison scores using expert-completed DBR alongside best practices in consensus building…

  13. Establishing effective working relations with a potential user community - NASA Lewis Research Center experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, P.

    1977-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has held a series of six major and unique technology utilization conferences which were major milestones in planned structured efforts to establish effective working relationships with specific technology user communities. These efforts were unique in that the activities undertaken prior to the conference were extensive, and effectively laid the groundwork for productive technology transfer following, and as a direct result of, the conferences. The effort leading to the conference was in each case tailored to the characteristics of the potential user community, however, the common factors comprise a basic framework applicable to similar endeavors. The process is essentially a planned sequence of steps that constitute a technical market survey and a marketing program for the development of beneficial applications of aerospace technology beyond the aerospace field.

  14. A Research Agenda for Helminth Diseases of Humans: Health Research and Capacity Building in Disease-Endemic Countries for Helminthiases Control

    PubMed Central

    Osei-Atweneboana, Mike Y.; Lustigman, Sara; Prichard, Roger K.; Boatin, Boakye A.; Basáñez, María-Gloria

    2012-01-01

    Capacity building in health research generally, and helminthiasis research particularly, is pivotal to the implementation of the research and development agenda for the control and elimination of human helminthiases that has been proposed thematically in the preceding reviews of this collection. Since helminth infections affect human populations particularly in marginalised and low-income regions of the world, they belong to the group of poverty-related infectious diseases, and their alleviation through research, policy, and practice is a sine qua non condition for the achievement of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. Current efforts supporting research capacity building specifically for the control of helminthiases have been devised and funded, almost in their entirety, by international donor agencies, major funding bodies, and academic institutions from the developed world, contributing to the creation of (not always equitable) North–South “partnerships”. There is an urgent need to shift this paradigm in disease-endemic countries (DECs) by refocusing political will, and harnessing unshakeable commitment by the countries' governments, towards health research and capacity building policies to ensure long-term investment in combating and sustaining the control and eventual elimination of infectious diseases of poverty. The Disease Reference Group on Helminth Infections (DRG4), established in 2009 by the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR), was given the mandate to review helminthiases research and identify research priorities and gaps. This paper discusses the challenges confronting capacity building for parasitic disease research in DECs, describes current capacity building strategies with particular reference to neglected tropical diseases and human helminthiases, and outlines recommendations to redress the balance of alliances and partnerships for health research between the developed countries of the

  15. School food research: building the evidence base for policy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michael; Breda, João

    2013-06-01

    Following an international workshop on developing the evidence base for policy relating to school food held in London, UK, in January 2012, the objectives of the present paper were (i) to outline a rationale for school food research, monitoring and evaluation in relation to policy and (ii) to identify ways forward for future working. The authors analysed presentations, summaries of evidence, and notes from discussions held at the international workshop in London in 2012 to distil common themes and make recommendations for the development of coherent research programmes relating to food and nutrition in schools. International, with an emphasis on middle- and high-income countries. Overviews of existing school food and nutrition programmes from the UK, Hungary, Sweden, the USA, Australia, Brazil, China, Mexico and other countries were presented, along with information on monitoring, evaluation and other research to demonstrate the impact of school feeding on health, attainment, food sourcing, procurement and finances, in the context of interactions between the evidence base and policy decisions. This provided the material which, together with summaries and notes of discussions, was used to develop recommendations for the development and dissemination of robust approaches to sustainable and effective school food and nutrition programmes in middle- and high-income countries, including policy guidelines, standards, cost-effectiveness measures and the terms of political engagement. School food and nutrition can provide a cohesive core for health, education and agricultural improvement provided: (i) policy is appropriately framed and includes robust monitoring and evaluation; and (ii) all stakeholders are adequately engaged in the process. International exchange of information will be used to develop a comprehensive guide to the assessment of the impact of school food and nutrition policy and supporting infrastructure.

  16. Building a framework for ergonomic research on laparoscopic instrument handles.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Guohui; Tan, Juan; Sun, Xulong; Lin, Hao; Zhu, Shaihong

    2016-06-01

    Laparoscopic surgery carries the advantage of minimal invasiveness, but ergonomic design of the instruments used has progressed slowly. Previous studies have demonstrated that the handle of laparoscopic instruments is vital for both surgical performance and surgeon's health. This review provides an overview of the sub-discipline of handle ergonomics, including an evaluation framework, objective and subjective assessment systems, data collection and statistical analyses. Furthermore, a framework for ergonomic research on laparoscopic instrument handles is proposed to standardize work on instrument design. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Community-Building Framework for Collaborative Research Coordination across the Education and Biology Research Disciplines.

    PubMed

    Pelaez, Nancy; Anderson, Trevor R; Gardner, Stephanie M; Yin, Yue; Abraham, Joel K; Bartlett, Edward L; Gormally, Cara; Hurney, Carol A; Long, Tammy M; Newman, Dina L; Sirum, Karen; Stevens, Michael T

    2018-06-01

    Since 2009, the U.S. National Science Foundation Directorate for Biological Sciences has funded Research Coordination Networks (RCN) aimed at collaborative efforts to improve participation, learning, and assessment in undergraduate biology education (UBE). RCN-UBE projects focus on coordination and communication among scientists and educators who are fostering improved and innovative approaches to biology education. When faculty members collaborate with the overarching goal of advancing undergraduate biology education, there is a need to optimize collaboration between participants in order to deeply integrate the knowledge across disciplinary boundaries. In this essay we propose a novel guiding framework for bringing colleagues together to advance knowledge and its integration across disciplines, the "Five 'C's' of Collaboration: Commitment, Collegiality, Communication, Consensus, and Continuity." This guiding framework for professional network practice is informed by both relevant literature and empirical evidence from community-building experience within the RCN-UBE Advancing Competencies in Experimentation-Biology (ACE-Bio) Network. The framework is presented with practical examples to illustrate how it might be used to enhance collaboration between new and existing participants in the ACE-Bio Network as well as within other interdisciplinary networks.

  18. A training programme to build cancer research capacity in low- and middle-income countries: findings from Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lauren D; Barnoya, Joaquin; Gharzouzi, Eduardo N; Benson, Peter; Colditz, Graham A

    2014-04-01

    Guatemala is experiencing an increasing burden of cancer but lacks capacity for cancer prevention, control and research. In partnership with a medical school in the United States of America, a multidisciplinary Cancer Control Research Training Institute was developed at the Instituto de Cancerología (INCAN) in Guatemala City. This institute provided a year-long training programme for clinicians that focused on research methods in population health and sociocultural anthropology. The programme included didactic experiences in Guatemala and the United States as well as applied training in which participants developed research protocols responsive to Guatemala's cancer needs. Although INCAN is the point of referral and service for Guatemala's cancer patients, the institute's administration is also interested in increasing cancer research - with a focus on population health. INCAN is thus a resource for capacity building within the context of cancer prevention and control. Trainees increased their self-efficacy for the design and conduct of research. Value-added benefits included establishment of an annual cancer seminar and workshops in cancer pathology and qualitative analysis. INCAN has recently incorporated some of the programme's components into its residency training and established a research department. A training programme for clinicians can build cancer research capacity in low- and middle-income countries. Training in population-based research methods will enable countries such as Guatemala to gather country-specific data. Once collected, such data can be used to assess the burden of cancer-related disease, guide policy for reducing it and identify priority areas for cancer prevention and treatment.

  19. Current Lewis Turbomachinery Research: Building on our Legacy of Excellence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    1997-01-01

    This Wu Chang-Hua lecture is concerned with the development of analysis and computational capability for turbomachinery flows which is based on detailed flow field physics. A brief review of the work of Professor Wu is presented as well as a summary of the current NASA aeropropulsion programs. Two major areas of research are described in order to determine our predictive capabilities using modern day computational tools evolved from the work of Professor Wu. In one of these areas, namely transonic rotor flow, it is demonstrated that a high level of accuracy is obtainable provided sufficient geometric detail is simulated. In the second case, namely turbine heat transfer, our capability is lacking for rotating blade rows and experimental correlations will provide needed information in the near term. It is believed that continuing progress will allow us to realize the full computational potential and its impact on design time and cost.

  20. National Library of Medicine Disaster Information Management Research Center: Establishment and growth, 2008–2010 1

    PubMed Central

    Love, Cynthia B.; Arnesen, Stacey J.; Phillips, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) established the Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC). Prior to 2008, NLM had a long history of involvement in providing health information for disaster management. Aware of this legacy and moved by the catastrophic aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the NLM long range plan (Charting a Course for the 21st Century: NLM’s Long Range Plan 2006–2016) called for creation of a center to show “a strong commitment to disaster remediation and to provide a platform for demonstrating how libraries and librarians can be part of the solution to this national problem”. NLM was urged to “ensure continuous access to health information and effective use of libraries and librarians when disasters occur”. In response to this charge, NLM has undertaken substantial efforts to ensure that medical libraries have plans for the continuity of their operations, librarians are trained to understand their roles in preparedness and response, online disaster health information resources are available for many audiences and in multiple formats, and research is conducted on tools to enhance the exchange of critical information during and following disasters. This paper documents the history, goals, initiatives, accomplishments and future plans of the Center. PMID:25324584

  1. Understanding collaboration in a multi-national research capacity-building partnership: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Dinansha; Atkins, Salla; Das, Arindam; Diwan, Vishal

    2016-08-18

    Research capacity building and its impact on policy and international research partnership is increasingly seen as important. High income and low- and middle-income countries frequently engage in research collaborations. These can have a positive impact on research capacity building, provided such partnerships are long-term collaborations with a unified aim, but they can also have challenges. What are these challenges, which often result in a short term/ non viable collaboration? Does such collaboration results in capacity building? What are the requirements to make any collaboration sustainable? This study aimed to answer these and other research questions through examining an international collaboration in one multi-country research capacity building project ARCADE RSDH (Asian Regional Capacity Development for Research on Social Determinants of Health). A qualitative study was conducted that focused on the reasons for the collaboration, collaboration patterns involved, processes of exchanging information, barriers faced and perceived growth in research capacity. In-depth interviews were conducted with the principal investigators (n = 12), research assistants (n = 2) and a scientific coordinator (n = 1) of the collaborating institutes. Data were analysed using thematic framework analysis. The initial contact between institutes was through previous collaborations. The collaboration was affected by the organisational structure of the partner institutes, political influences and the collaboration design. Communication was usually conducted online, which was affected by differences in time and language and inefficient infrastructure. Limited funding resulted in restricted engagement by some partners. This study explored work in a large, North-South collaboration project focusing on building research capacity in partner institutes. The project helped strengthen research capacity, though differences in organization types, existing research capacity, culture, time, and

  2. MillionTreesNYC, Green infrastructure, and urban ecology: building a research agenda

    Treesearch

    Jacqueline W.T. Lu; Megan Shane; Erika Svendsen; Lindsay Campbell; Cristiana Fragola; Marianne Krasny; Gina Lovasl; David Maddox; Simon McDonnell; P. Timon McPhearson; Franco Montalto; Andrew Newman; Ellen Pehek; Ruth A. Rae; Richard Stedman; Keith G. Tidball; Lynne Westphal; Tom Whitlow

    2009-01-01

    MillionTreesNYC is a citywide, public-private initiative with an ambitious goal: to plant and care for one million new trees across New York City's five boroughs by 2017. The Spring 2009 workshop MillionTreesNYC, Green Infrastructure, and Urban Ecology: Building a Research Agenda brought together more than 100 researchers, practitioners and New York City...

  3. Training for Innovation: Capacity-Building in Agricultural Research in Post-War Sierra Leone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gboku, Matthew L. S.; Bebeley, Jenneh F.

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines how the Sierra Leone Agricultural Research Institute (SLARI) used training and development to build capacity for innovation in agricultural research following the country's civil war which ended in 2002. The Institute's training for innovation addressed different agricultural product value chains (APVCs) within the framework of…

  4. Building Bridges Rather than Walls: Research into an Experiential Model of Interfaith Education in Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCowan, Tim

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines research findings from an experiential model of interfaith education called the Building Bridges through Interfaith Dialogue in Schools Programme (BBP). The BBP has been operating continuously in Melbourne, Australia since 2004. In the research, participating students were interviewed and surveyed to assess the effect of this…

  5. Equipped for the Future Research Report: Building the Framework, 1993-1997. EFF Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrifield, Juliet

    This report focuses on the research aspects of the Equipped for the Future (EFF) project that works toward system reform for adult literacy and lifelong learning. Section 1 describes the EFF process 1993-97, the impetus for EFF, and approaches to system reform. Section 2 explores the research processes EFF uses to build a framework that could…

  6. Building Research Infrastructure in Schools of Social Work: A University Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Videka, Lynn; Blackburn, James A.; Moran, James R.

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses strategies for research infrastructure development in social work by building on the profession's work of the past two decades and by drawing on the experiences of the larger university environment. The article provides a set of recommendations for the next generation of social work research, which is likely to be highly…

  7. Strategic Capacity Building for Australian Educational Research: Creating Spaces for Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodyear, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides some background information about the Strategic Capacity Building for Australian Educational Research initiative: a joint program of work sponsored by the Australian Association for Research in Education and the Australian Council of Deans of Education. In addition, it offers some broader analysis of the contexts within which…

  8. Four Methods for Completing the Conceptual Development Phase of Applied Theory Building Research in HRD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storberg-Walker, Julia; Chermack, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe four methods for completing the conceptual development phase of theory building research for single or multiparadigm research. The four methods selected for this review are (1) Weick's method of "theorizing as disciplined imagination" (1989); (2) Whetten's method of "modeling as theorizing" (2002); (3)…

  9. THE SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE NEW RESEARCH AND TEACHING BUILDING FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia.

    IN PLANNING A NEW RESEARCH AND TEACHING BUILDING FOR THE SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE, A PROGRAM WAS DEVELOPED OUTLINING THE DESIGN NEEDS AND THE SPACE AND FACILITY REQUIREMENTS. MAJOR AREAS OF THE PROGRAM WERE--(1) GENERAL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION COMPONENTS, (2) THE RESEARCH COMPONENT, AND (3) THE BASIC SCIENCE TEACHING COMPONENTS. SPACE…

  10. Effects of a Preschool Mathematics Curriculum: Summative Research on the "Building Blocks" Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Douglas H.; Sarama, Julie

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a preschool mathematics program based on a comprehensive model of developing research-based software and print curricula. Building Blocks, funded by the National Science Foundation, is a curriculum development project focused on creating research-based, technology-enhanced mathematics materials for pre-K…

  11. Building Student Ownership and Responsibility: Examining Student Outcomes from a Research-Practice Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannata, Marisa; Redding, Christopher; Nguyen, Tuan D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper is situated at the intersection of two trends in education research: a growing emphasis on the importance of co-cognitive traits and emergence of research-practice partnerships to more effectively scale effective practices. Our partnership focused on building student ownership and responsibility for their learning, which means creating…

  12. Using an integrated knowledge translation approach to build a public health research agenda.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Anita; Regan, Sandra; Gore, Dana; Valaitis, Ruta; Garcia, John; Manson, Heather; O'Mara, Linda

    2014-01-29

    Public Health Systems Research is an emerging field of research that is gaining importance in Canada. On October 22 and 23, 2012, public health researchers, practitioners, and policy-makers came together at the Accelerating Public Health Systems Research in Ontario: Building an Agenda think tank to develop a research agenda for the province. This agenda included the identification of the six top priorities for research in Ontario: public health performance, evidence-based practice, public health organization and structure, public health human resources, public health infrastructure, and partnerships/linkages. This paper explores the priorities in detail and hopes to bring more attention to this area of research.

  13. Investing in nursing research in practice settings: a blueprint for building capacity.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Lianne; Smith, Orla; Beswick, Susan; Maoine, Maria; Ferris, Ella

    2013-12-01

    Engaging clinical nurses in practice-based research is a cornerstone of professional nursing practice and a critical element in the delivery of high-quality patient care. Practising staff nurses are well suited to identify the phenomena and issues that are clinically relevant and appropriate for research. In response to the need to invest in and build capacity in nursing research, hospitals have developed creative approaches to spark interest in nursing research and to equip clinical nurses with research competencies. This paper outlines a Canadian hospital's efforts to build research capacity as a key strategy to foster efficacious, safe and cost-effective patient care practices. Within a multi-pronged framework, several strategies are described that collectively resulted in enhanced research and knowledge translation productivity aimed at improving the delivery of safe and high-quality patient care.

  14. Autism BrainNet: A network of postmortem brain banks established to facilitate autism research.

    PubMed

    Amaral, David G; Anderson, Matthew P; Ansorge, Olaf; Chance, Steven; Hare, Carolyn; Hof, Patrick R; Miller, Melissa; Nagakura, Ikue; Pickett, Jane; Schumann, Cynthia; Tamminga, Carol

    2018-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD or autism) is a neurodevelopmental condition that affects over 1% of the population worldwide. Developing effective preventions and treatments for autism will depend on understanding the genetic perturbations and underlying neuropathology of the disorder. While evidence from magnetic resonance imaging and other noninvasive techniques points to altered development and organization of the autistic brain, these tools lack the resolution for identifying the cellular and molecular underpinnings of the disorder. Postmortem studies of high-quality human brain tissue currently represent the only viable option to pursuing these types of studies. However, the availability of high-quality ASD brain tissue has been extremely limited. Here we describe the establishment of a privately funded tissue bank, Autism BrainNet, a network of brain collection sites that work in a coordinated fashion to develop an adequate library of human postmortem brain tissues. Autism BrainNet was initiated as a collaboration between the Simons Foundation and Autism Speaks, and is currently funded by the Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative. Autism BrainNet has collection sites (nodes) in California, Texas, New York, and Massachusetts; an affiliated, international node is located in Oxford, England. All donations to this network become part of a consolidated pool of tissue that is distributed to qualified investigators worldwide to carry out autism research. An essential component of this program is a widespread outreach program that highlights the need for postmortem brain donations to families affected by autism, led by the Autism Science Foundation. Challenges include an outreach campaign that deals with a disorder beginning in early childhood, collecting an adequate number of donations to deal with the high level of biologic heterogeneity of autism, and preparing this limited resource for optimal distribution to the greatest number of investigators. Copyright

  15. Clinicians' and researchers' perspectives on establishing and implementing core outcomes in haemodialysis: semistructured interview study.

    PubMed

    Tong, Allison; Crowe, Sally; Gill, John S; Harris, Tess; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Manns, Braden; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto; Tugwell, Peter; van Biesen, Wim; Wang, Angela Yee Moon; Wheeler, David C; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; Gutman, Talia; Ju, Angela; O'Lone, Emma; Sautenet, Benedicte; Viecelli, Andrea; Craig, Jonathan C

    2018-04-20

    To describe the perspectives of clinicians and researchers on identifying, establishing and implementing core outcomes in haemodialysis and their expected impact. Face-to-face, semistructured interviews; thematic analysis. Twenty-seven centres across nine countries. Fifty-eight nephrologists (42 (72%) who were also triallists). We identified six themes: reflecting direct patient relevance and impact (survival as the primary goal of dialysis, enabling well-being and functioning, severe consequences of comorbidities and complications, indicators of treatment success, universal relevance, stakeholder consensus); amenable and responsive to interventions (realistic and possible to intervene on, differentiating between treatments); reflective of economic burden on healthcare; feasibility of implementation (clarity and consistency in definition, easily measurable, requiring minimal resources, creating a cultural shift, aversion to intensifying bureaucracy, allowing justifiable exceptions); authoritative inducement and directive (endorsement for legitimacy, necessity of buy-in from dialysis providers, incentivising uptake); instituting patient-centredness (explicitly addressing patient-important outcomes, reciprocating trial participation, improving comparability of interventions for decision-making, driving quality improvement and compelling a focus on quality of life). Nephrologists emphasised that core outcomes should be relevant to patients, amenable to change, feasible to implement and supported by stakeholder organisations. They expected core outcomes would improve patient-centred care and outcomes. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Establishing a definition of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) health: a guide to research and management activities.

    PubMed

    Patyk, Kelly A; Duncan, Colleen; Nol, Pauline; Sonne, Christian; Laidre, Kristin; Obbard, Martyn; Wiig, Øystein; Aars, Jon; Regehr, Eric; Gustafson, Lori L; Atwood, Todd

    2015-05-01

    The meaning of health for wildlife and perspectives on how to assess and measure health, are not well characterized. For wildlife at risk, such as some polar bear (Ursus maritimus) subpopulations, establishing comprehensive monitoring programs that include health status is an emerging need. Environmental changes, especially loss of sea ice habitat, have raised concern about polar bear health. Effective and consistent monitoring of polar bear health requires an unambiguous definition of health. We used the Delphi method of soliciting and interpreting expert knowledge to propose a working definition of polar bear health and to identify current concerns regarding health, challenges in measuring health, and important metrics for monitoring health. The expert opinion elicited through the exercise agreed that polar bear health is defined by characteristics and knowledge at the individual, population, and ecosystem level. The most important threats identified were in decreasing order: climate change, increased nutritional stress, chronic physiological stress, harvest management, increased exposure to contaminants, increased frequency of human interaction, diseases and parasites, and increased exposure to competitors. Fifteen metrics were identified to monitor polar bear health. Of these, indicators of body condition, disease and parasite exposure, contaminant exposure, and reproductive success were ranked as most important. We suggest that a cumulative effects approach to research and monitoring will improve the ability to assess the biological, ecological, and social determinants of polar bear health and provide measurable objectives for conservation goals and priorities and to evaluate progress. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Establishing a definition of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) health: A guide to research and management activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patyk, Kelly A.; Duncan, Colleen G.; Nol, Pauline; Sonne, C.; Laidre, Kristin L.; Obbard, Martyn E.; Wiig, Øystein; Aars, Jon; Regehr, Eric V.; Gustafson, L.; Atwood, Todd C.

    2015-01-01

    The meaning of health for wildlife and perspectives on how to assess and measure health, are not well characterized. For wildlife at risk, such as some polar bear (Ursus maritimus) subpopulations, establishing comprehensive monitoring programs that include health status is an emerging need. Environmental changes, especially loss of sea ice habitat, have raised concern about polar bear health. Effective and consistent monitoring of polar bear health requires an unambiguous definition of health. We used the Delphi method of soliciting and interpreting expert knowledge to propose a working definition of polar bear health and to identify current concerns regarding health, challenges in measuring health, and important metrics for monitoring health. The expert opinion elicited through the exercise agreed that polar bear health is defined by characteristics and knowledge at the individual, population, and ecosystem level. The most important threats identified were in decreasing order: climate change, increased nutritional stress, chronic physiological stress, harvest management, increased exposure to contaminants, increased frequency of human interaction, diseases and parasites, and increased exposure to competitors. Fifteen metrics were identified to monitor polar bear health. Of these, indicators of body condition, disease and parasite exposure, contaminant exposure, and reproductive success were ranked as most important. We suggest that a cumulative effects approach to research and monitoring will improve the ability to assess the biological, ecological, and social determinants of polar bear health and provide measurable objectives for conservation goals and priorities and to evaluate progress.

  18. Experiments in evaluation capacity building: Enhancing brain disorders research impact in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Nylen, Kirk; Sridharan, Sanjeev

    2017-05-08

    This paper is the introductory paper on a forum on evaluation capacity building for enhancing impacts of research on brain disorders. It describes challenges and opportunities of building evaluation capacity among community-based organizations in Ontario involved in enhancing brain health and supporting people living with a brain disorder. Using an example of a capacity building program called the "Evaluation Support Program", which is run by the Ontario Brain Institute, this forum discusses multiple themes including evaluation capacity building, evaluation culture and evaluation methodologies appropriate for evaluating complex community interventions. The goal of the Evaluation Support Program is to help community-based organizations build the capacity to demonstrate the value that they offer in order to improve, sustain, and spread their programs and activities. One of the features of this forum is that perspectives on the Evaluation Support Program are provided by multiple stakeholders, including the community-based organizations, evaluation team members involved in capacity building, thought leaders in the fields of evaluation capacity building and evaluation culture, and the funders. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Building research capacity for evidence-informed tobacco control in Canada: a case description

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Paul W; Viehbeck, Sarah; Robinson, Sarah J; Leatherdale, Scott T; Nykiforuk, Candace IJ; Jolin, Mari Alice

    2009-01-01

    Tobacco use remains the leading cause of death and disability in Canada. Insufficient research capacity can inhibit evidence-informed decision making for tobacco control. This paper outlines a Canadian project to build research capacity, defined as a community's ability to produce research that adequately informs practice, policy, and future research in a timely, practical manner. A key component is that individuals and teams within the community must mutually engage around common, collectively negotiated goals to address specific practices, policies or programs of research. An organizing framework, a set of activities to build strategic recruitment, productivity tools, and procedures for enhancing social capital are described. Actions are intended to facilitate better alignment between research and the priorities of policy developers and service providers, enhance the external validity of the work performed, and reduce the time required to inform policy and practice. PMID:19664224

  20. Researching for sustained translation from site cluster permeability into building courtyard and interior atrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teddy Badai Samodra, FX; Defiana, Ima; Setyawan, Wahyu

    2018-03-01

    Many previous types of research have discussed the permeability of site cluster. Because of interaction and interconnected attribute, it will be better that there is its translation into lower context such as building and interior scale. In this paper, the sustainability design performance of both similar designs of courtyard and atrium are investigated continuing the recommendation of site space permeability. By researching related literature review and study through Ecotect Analysis and Ansys Fluent simulations, the pattern transformation and optimum courtyard and atrium design could comply the requirement. The results highlighted that the air movement from the site could be translated at the minimum of 50% higher to the building and indoor environment. Thus, it has potency for energy efficiency when grid, loop, and cul-de-sac site clusters, with 25% of ground coverage, have connectivity with building courtyard compared to the atrium. Energy saving is higher when using low thermal transmittance of transparent material and its lower area percentages for the courtyard walls. In general, it was more energy efficient option as part of a low rise building, while the courtyard building performed better with increasing irregular building height more than 90% of the difference.

  1. Supporting Latino communities' natural helpers: a case study of promotoras in a research capacity building course.

    PubMed

    Otiniano, Angie Denisse; Carroll-Scott, Amy; Toy, Peggy; Wallace, Steven P

    2012-08-01

    Promotores have unique access to underserved and hard-to-reach Latino communities facing health disparities. Although promotores are involved in community change, they rarely receive training that gives them the skills to be partners in research. We present a case study of promotoras who participated in a research capacity building course focused on assessing community health needs. Data comes from course application surveys, follow-up notes, and narratives from qualitative phone interviews of eight promotoras. Content analysis drawing from grounded theory was conducted to identify and describe emerging themes. Four themes emerged as promotoras discussed their experience learning basic research skills and teaching others: (1) challenges, (2) support, (3) building capacity, and (4) using research. Promotores play an important role in the health of Latino communities and are increasingly asked to participate in research processes; however they have few opportunities for training and professional development in this area. Capacity building opportunities for promotores need to be tailored to their needs and provide them with support. Fostering collaboration between promotores and partnering with local community-based organizations can help facilitate needed research skill-building among promotores.

  2. Research utilization in the building industry: decision model and preliminary assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, R.L.; Johnson, D.R.; Smith, S.A.

    1985-10-01

    The Research Utilization Program was conceived as a far-reaching means for managing the interactions of the private sector and the federal research sector as they deal with energy conservation in buildings. The program emphasizes a private-public partnership in planning a research agenda and in applying the results of ongoing and completed research. The results of this task support the hypothesis that the transfer of R and D results to the buildings industry can be accomplished more efficiently and quickly by a systematic approach to technology transfer. This systematic approach involves targeting decision makers, assessing research and information needs, properly formatingmore » information, and then transmitting the information through trusted channels. The purpose of this report is to introduce elements of a market-oriented knowledge base, which would be useful to the Building Systems Division, the Office of Buildings and Community Systems and their associated laboratories in managing a private-public research partnership on a rational systematic basis. This report presents conceptual models and data bases that can be used in formulating a technology transfer strategy and in planning technology transfer programs.« less

  3. Capacity Building for Sustainable Marine Research in the Asia-Pacific Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Liuming; Avril, Bernard; Zhang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    An international workshop on capacity building (CB) for marine research in the Asia-Pacific region (http://www.imber.info/index.php/Science/Working-Groups/Capacity-Building/2012-CB-Workshop) was held at the East China Normal University (ECNU), in Shanghai, China. The workshop brought together about 20 marine researchers and CB experts from 14 countries to discuss CB experiences, assess regional CB needs, and consider recommendations to improve regional CB, which would be of interest to other groups and other geographical regions.

  4. Improvements in the use of aquatic herbicides and establishment of future research directions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Getsinger, K.D.; Netherland, M.D.; Grue, C.E.; Koschnick, T.J.

    2008-01-01

    Peer-reviewed literature over the past 20 years identifies significant changes and improvements in chemical control strategies used to manage nuisance submersed vegetation. The invasive exotic plants hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata L.f. Royle) and Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum L.) continue to spread and remain the plant species of greatest concern for aquatic resource managers at the national scale. Emerging exotic weeds of regional concern such as egeria (Egeria densa Planch.), curlyleaf pondweed (Potamogeton crispus L.), and hygrophila (Hygrophila polysperma (Roxb.) T. Anders), as well as native plants such as variable watermilfoil (Myriophyllum heterophyllum Michx), and cabomba (Cabomba caroliniana Gray) are invasive outside their home ranges. In addition, there is always the threat of new plant introductions such as African elodea (Lagarosiphon major (Ridley) Moss) or narrow-leaf anacharis (Egeria najas Planchon). The registration of the bleaching herbicide fluridone in the mid 1980s for whole-lake and large-scale management stimulated numerous lines of research involving reduction of use rates, plant selectivity, residue monitoring, and impacts on fisheries. In addition to numerous advances, the specificity of fluridone for a single plant enzyme led to the first documented case of herbicide resistance in aquatic plant management. The resistance of hydrilla to fluridone has stimulated a renewed interest by industry and others in the registration of alternative modes of action for aquatic use. These newer chemistries tend to be enzyme-specific compounds with favorable non-target toxicity profiles. Registration efforts have been facilitated by increased cooperation between key federal government agencies that have aquatic weed control and research responsibilities, and regulators within the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). We reviewed past and current research efforts to identify areas in need of further investigation and to establish

  5. The Conundrum of Training and Capacity Building for People with Learning Disabilities Doing Research.

    PubMed

    Nind, Melanie; Chapman, Rohhss; Seale, Jane; Tilley, Liz

    2016-11-01

    This study explores the training involved when people with learning disabilities take their place in the community as researchers. This was a theme in a recent UK seminar series where a network of researchers explored pushing the boundaries of participatory research. Academics, researchers with learning disabilities, supporters and other inclusive researchers considered important themes arising from presentations about developments in participatory research. The paper emerges from critical reflection on these rich discussions. A seminar series is a form of research training and capacity building, albeit a dynamic, interactive and collegial one. More formal training in research skills for people with learning disabilities is being developed but raises questions regarding the best contribution people with learning disabilities can make to the research process. There are various models of training for inclusive research, but these need to be reciprocal if they are not to undermine the inclusive goal. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Four centuries on from Bacon: progress in building health research systems to improve health systems?

    PubMed

    Hanney, Stephen R; González-Block, Miguel A

    2014-09-23

    In 1627, Francis Bacon's New Atlantis described a utopian society in which an embryonic research system contributed to meeting the needs of the society. In this editorial, we use some of the aspirations described in New Atlantis to provide a context within which to consider recent progress in building health research systems to improve health systems and population health. In particular, we reflect on efforts to build research capacity, link research to policy, identify the wider impacts made by the science, and generally build fully functioning research systems to address the needs identified. In 2014, Health Research Policy and Systems has continued to publish one-off papers and article collections covering a range of these issues in both high income countries and low- and middle-income countries. Analysis of these contributions, in the context of some earlier ones, is brought together to identify achievements, challenges and possible ways forward. We show how 2014 is likely to be a pivotal year in the development of ways to assess the impact of health research on policies, practice, health systems, population health, and economic benefits.We demonstrate how the increasing focus on health research systems will contribute to realising the hopes expressed in the World Health Report, 2013, namely that all nations would take a systematic approach to evaluating the outputs and applications resulting from their research investment.

  7. A Disability and Health Institutional Research Capacity Building and Infrastructure Model Evaluation: A Tribal College-Based Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Corey L.; Manyibe, Edward O.; Sanders, Perry; Aref, Fariborz; Washington, Andre L.; Robertson, Cherjuan Y.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this multimethod study was to evaluate the institutional research capacity building and infrastructure model (IRCBIM), an emerging innovative and integrated approach designed to build, strengthen, and sustain adequate disability and health research capacity (i.e., research infrastructure and investigators' research skills)…

  8. The current situation regarding the establishment of national ethical guidelines for biomedical research in Thailand and its neighboring countries.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Somei; Waikagul, Jitra; Rojekittikhun, Wichit; Keicho, Naoto

    2005-05-01

    This study discusses the establishment of ethical guidelines for ethical review for biomedical research performed in Thailand, and to some extent, in neighboring countries. There are differences, from country to country, at national and institutional levels regarding guidelines for ethical review committees. Only a handbook issued by Mahidol University describes guidelines for human genetic research and on research dealing with reproductive technology. Both these areas require special consideration to avoid violating human dignity, rights, and confidentiality. This indicates that further efforts should be made to establish research guidelines and/or principles dealing with the human genome.

  9. Building electronic data infrastructure for comparative effectiveness research: accomplishments, lessons learned and future steps.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Gurvaneet S

    2014-11-01

    There are large gaps in our knowledge on the potential impact of diagnostics and therapeutics on outcomes of patients treated in the real world. Comparative effectiveness research aims to fill these gaps to maximize effectiveness of these interventions. Health information technology has the potential to dramatically improve the practice of medicine and of research. This is an overview of about US$100 million of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act investment in 12 projects managed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to build an electronic clinical data infrastructure that connects research with healthcare delivery. The achievements and lessons learned from these projects provided a foundation for the National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network (PCORnet)and will help to guide future infrastructure development needed to build an efficient, scalable and sustainable learning health system.

  10. Research of building information extraction and evaluation based on high-resolution remote-sensing imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qiong; Gu, Lingjia; Ren, Ruizhi; Wang, Lang

    2016-09-01

    Building extraction currently is important in the application of high-resolution remote sensing imagery. At present, quite a few algorithms are available for detecting building information, however, most of them still have some obvious disadvantages, such as the ignorance of spectral information, the contradiction between extraction rate and extraction accuracy. The purpose of this research is to develop an effective method to detect building information for Chinese GF-1 data. Firstly, the image preprocessing technique is used to normalize the image and image enhancement is used to highlight the useful information in the image. Secondly, multi-spectral information is analyzed. Subsequently, an improved morphological building index (IMBI) based on remote sensing imagery is proposed to get the candidate building objects. Furthermore, in order to refine building objects and further remove false objects, the post-processing (e.g., the shape features, the vegetation index and the water index) is employed. To validate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm, the omission errors (OE), commission errors (CE), the overall accuracy (OA) and Kappa are used at final. The proposed method can not only effectively use spectral information and other basic features, but also avoid extracting excessive interference details from high-resolution remote sensing images. Compared to the original MBI algorithm, the proposed method reduces the OE by 33.14% .At the same time, the Kappa increase by 16.09%. In experiments, IMBI achieved satisfactory results and outperformed other algorithms in terms of both accuracies and visual inspection

  11. Creating a Culture of Empowerment in Research: Findings from a Capacity-Building Training Program.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Carolyn Leung; Martinez, Linda Sprague; Tse, Lisa; Brugge, Doug; Hacker, Karen; Pirie, Alex; Leslie, Laurel K

    2016-01-01

    This paper uses a theory from educational research - "the culture of power" - to explore power differentials between academic researchers and community partners in community engaged research partnership programs. This paper describes how a capacity-building program illuminated the tensions between academics and community partners related to power differentials and offers strategies for how to balance the power dynamic. This paper relies on semi-structured interviews from 30 community partners who participated in the "Building your capacity" program. The framework of "culture of power" applied to research relationships helps us understand the following: (1) The power differentials between academic institutions and community agencies are deeply entrenched. That is there is a "culture of power." (2) This culture of power is often reinforced through the cultural rules and dominant language of the academy. (3) Academic institutions, by and large, have created and perpetuated the rules that have led to these uneven power relationships. (4) Being told explicitly about the rules of academic culture make acquiring power easier for community partners. (5) Community partners are often more aware of the culture of power in research and more willing to acknowledge these differentials than academic researchers. Academic partners who want to work with community partners need to acknowledge these power imbalances and be intentional about shifting these power dynamics. Capacity-building programs can help to shift these power imbalances because they help community partners acquire the confidence, knowledge and skills to advocate for more equitable research relationships.

  12. Trading Zones: Building Connections to Past Research in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Faculty face significant challenges when moving into scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) for the first time. Perhaps the greatest of these challenges is the act of building connections to past research, both within the individual scholar's field, and more broadly across the disciplines. This article examines the nature of this challenge,…

  13. Claim Your Space: Leadership Development as a Research Capacity Building Goal in Global Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Airhihenbuwa, Collins O.; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Iwelunmor, Juliet; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Williams, Natasha; Zizi, Freddy; Okuyemi, Kolawole

    2016-01-01

    As the burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) rises in settings with an equally high burden of infectious diseases in the Global South, a new sense of urgency has developed around research capacity building to promote more effective and sustainable public health and health care systems. In 2010, NCDs accounted for more than 2.06 million deaths…

  14. Building a Community among Teachers, Researchers and University Students. A Blended Approach to Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cesareni, Donatella; Martini, Francesca; Mancini, Ilaria

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a case study about a community of practice's foundation and development among Italian teachers, researchers and university students who participated in a European project aimed at developing and testing innovative pedagogical models and technologies for collaborative knowledge building. Forty-five people (34 teachers, five…

  15. NREL’s Advanced Analytics Research for Buildings – Social Media Version

    SciTech Connect

    None

    Forty percent of the total energy consumption in the United States comes from buildings. Working together, we can dramatically shrink that number. NREL’s advanced analytics research has already proven to reduce energy use, save money, and stabilize the grid.

  16. EDUsummIT: A Global Knowledge Building Community for Educational Researchers, Practitioners, and Policy Makers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Kwok-Wing; Voogt, Joke; Knezek, Gerald; Gibson, David

    2016-01-01

    The International Summit on Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in Education (EDUsummIT) is a global knowledge building community of researchers, educational practitioners, and policy makers aiming to create and disseminate ideas and knowledge to promote the integration of ICT in education. Four EDUsummITs have been convened in The…

  17. A laboratory facility for research on wind-driven rain intrusion in building envelope assemblies

    Treesearch

    Samuel V. Glass

    2010-01-01

    Moisture management is critical for durable, energy-efficient buildings. To address the need for research on wind-driven rain intrusion in wall assemblies, the U.S. Forest Products Laboratory is developing a new facility. This paper describes the underlying principle of this facility and its capabilities.

  18. The returning tide: how China, the world's most populous country, is building a competitive research base.

    PubMed

    Wells, William A

    2007-02-19

    When China turned its back on the Cultural Revolution, it aimed to build a thriving capitalist sector. It got one. Now, it wants a world-class research enterprise. How far has it progressed in the biosciences, how did it get there, and how far does it have to go?

  19. Tour Brookhaven Lab's Future Hub for Energy Research: The Interdisciplinary Science Building

    ScienceCinema

    Gerry Stokes; Jim Misewich; Caradonna, Peggy; Sullivan, John; Olsen, Jim

    2018-04-16

    Construction is under way for the Interdisciplinary Science Building (ISB), a future world-class facility for energy research at Brookhaven Lab. Meet two scientists who will develop solutions at the ISB to tackle some of the nation's energy challenges, and tour the construction site.

  20. Education and Capacity Building with Research: A Possible Case for Future Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukushima, Yasuhiro; Ishimura, Gakushi; Komasinski, Andrew James; Omoto, Reiko; Managi, Shunsuke

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to suggest the structure of a platform for education and capacity building for Future Earth, which is an intensive program open to the eight stakeholders and which utilizes existing research programs/facilities associated with Future Earth. An intention of this paper is to facilitate a policy brief for projects associated…

  1. Smart Homes and Buildings Research at the Energy Systems Integration Facility

    ScienceCinema

    Christensen, Dane; Sparn, Bethany; Hannegan, Bryan

    2018-01-16

    Watch how NREL researchers are using the unique capabilities of the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) to develop technologies that will help the “smart” homes and buildings of the future perform efficiently and communicate effectively with the electricity grid while enhancing occupants' comfort and convenience.

  2. Building and Strengthening Policy Research Capacity: Key Issues in Canadian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Glen A.

    2014-01-01

    Given the importance of higher education in social and economic development, governments need to build a strong higher education data and policy research infrastructure to support informed decision-making, provide policy advice, and offer a critical assessment of key trends and issues. The author discusses the decline of higher education policy…

  3. Smart Homes and Buildings Research at the Energy Systems Integration Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Dane; Sparn, Bethany; Hannegan, Bryan

    Watch how NREL researchers are using the unique capabilities of the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) to develop technologies that will help the “smart” homes and buildings of the future perform efficiently and communicate effectively with the electricity grid while enhancing occupants' comfort and convenience.

  4. Indicators of sustainable capacity building for health research: analysis of four African case studies.

    PubMed

    Bates, Imelda; Taegtmeyer, Miriam; Squire, S Bertel; Ansong, Daniel; Nhlema-Simwaka, Bertha; Baba, Amuda; Theobald, Sally

    2011-03-28

    Despite substantial investment in health capacity building in developing countries, evaluations of capacity building effectiveness are scarce. By analysing projects in Africa that had successfully built sustainable capacity, we aimed to identify evidence that could indicate that capacity building was likely to be sustainable. Four projects were selected as case studies using pre-determined criteria, including the achievement of sustainable capacity. By mapping the capacity building activities in each case study onto a framework previously used for evaluating health research capacity in Ghana, we were able to identify activities that were common to all projects. We used these activities to derive indicators which could be used in other projects to monitor progress towards building sustainable research capacity. Indicators of sustainable capacity building increased in complexity as projects matured and included- early engagement of stakeholders; explicit plans for scale up; strategies for influencing policies; quality assessments (awareness and experiential stages)- improved resources; institutionalisation of activities; innovation (expansion stage)- funding for core activities secured; management and decision-making led by southern partners (consolidation stage).Projects became sustainable after a median of 66 months. The main challenges to achieving sustainability were high turnover of staff and stakeholders, and difficulties in embedding new activities into existing systems, securing funding and influencing policy development. Our indicators of sustainable capacity building need to be tested prospectively in a variety of projects to assess their usefulness. For each project the evidence required to show that indicators have been achieved should evolve with the project and they should be determined prospectively in collaboration with stakeholders.

  5. Semantic Differential as One of the Research Tools Suitable for Establishing the Attitudes of Pupils to Old Age and Seniors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Divilová, Sona

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the pre-research conducted under the project entitled "Seniors in the Eyes of Children". The main objective of the project was to create and test a research tool in order to establish what the attitudes of pupils to old age and seniors were. Semantic differential was chosen for these purposes. Semantic…

  6. Academic librarians at play in the field of cheminformatics: building the case for chemistry research data management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Leah; Li, Ye

    2014-10-01

    There are compelling needs from a variety of camps for more chemistry data to be available. While there are funder and government mandates for depositing research data in the United States and Europe, this does not mean it will be done well or expediently. Chemists themselves do not appear overly engaged at this stage and chemistry librarians who work directly with chemists and their local information environments are interested in helping with this challenge. Our unique understanding of organizing data and information enables us to contribute to building necessary infrastructure and establishing standards and best practices across the full research data cycle. As not many support structures focused on chemistry currently exist, we are initiating explorations through a few case studies and focused pilot projects presented here, with an aim of identifying opportunities for increased collaboration among chemists, chemistry librarians, cheminformaticians and other chemistry professionals.

  7. Academic librarians at play in the field of cheminformatics: building the case for chemistry research data management.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Leah; Li, Ye

    2014-10-01

    There are compelling needs from a variety of camps for more chemistry data to be available. While there are funder and government mandates for depositing research data in the United States and Europe, this does not mean it will be done well or expediently. Chemists themselves do not appear overly engaged at this stage and chemistry librarians who work directly with chemists and their local information environments are interested in helping with this challenge. Our unique understanding of organizing data and information enables us to contribute to building necessary infrastructure and establishing standards and best practices across the full research data cycle. As not many support structures focused on chemistry currently exist, we are initiating explorations through a few case studies and focused pilot projects presented here, with an aim of identifying opportunities for increased collaboration among chemists, chemistry librarians, cheminformaticians and other chemistry professionals.

  8. Ethical Issues in Online Educational Research: Protecting Privacy, Establishing Authenticity in Email Interviewing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Nalita; Busher, Hugh

    2007-01-01

    Educational researchers have a responsibility to ensure that in whatever research paradigm they work, the research that is conducted is done so within an "ethic of respect" to those who participate. This implies a number of responsibilities on the part of the researcher that include ensuring trust, dignity, privacy, confidentiality and anonymity.…

  9. Feathers in the Nest: Establishing a Supportive Environment for Women Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Nicole; Dobele, Angela

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses research examining the attitudes and behaviours of researching women in academia and considers the effect of these factors on successful researching outcomes. The results of this exploratory research highlight in particular, a number of interesting environmental influencers which contribute to enhancing successful work…

  10. A thematic analysis of the role of the organisation in building allied health research capacity: a senior managers' perspective.

    PubMed

    Golenko, Xanthe; Pager, Susan; Holden, Libby

    2012-08-27

    Evidence-based practice aims to achieve better health outcomes in the community. It relies on high quality research to inform policy and practice; however research in primary health care continues to lag behind that of other medical professions. The literature suggests that research capacity building (RCB) functions across four levels; individual, team, organisation and external environment. Many RCB interventions are aimed at an individual or team level, yet evidence indicates that many barriers to RCB occur at an organisational or external environment level. This study asks senior managers from a large healthcare organisation to identify the barriers and enablers to RCB. The paper then describes strategies for building allied health (AH) research capacity at an organisational level from a senior managers' perspective. This qualitative study is part of a larger collaborative RCB project. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with nine allied health senior managers. Recorded interviews were transcribed and NVivo was used to analyse findings and emergent themes were defined. The dominant themes indicate that the organisation plays an integral role in building AH research capacity and is the critical link in creating synergy across the four levels of RCB. The organisation can achieve this by incorporating research into its core business with a whole of organisation approach including its mission, vision and strategic planning. Critical success factors include: developing a co-ordinated and multidisciplinary approach to attain critical mass of research-active AH and enhance learning and development; support from senior managers demonstrated through structures, processes and systems designed to facilitate research; forming partnerships to increase collaboration and sharing of resources and knowledge; and establishing in internal framework to promote recognition for research and career path opportunities. This study identifies four key themes: whole of

  11. Corrosion of Embedded Metals in Wood: An Overview of Recent Research with Implications for building moisture design

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka

    2013-01-01

    ASHRAE Standard 160, Criteria for Moisture-Control Design Analysis in Buildings, specifies moisture design criteria in buildings to prevent moisture damage such as fungal activity and corrosion. While there has been much research on mold and decay fungi in wood buildings, it is often overlooked that wet wood is corrosive to the metal screws...

  12. Establishing health systems financing research priorities in developing countries using a participatory methodology.

    PubMed

    Ranson, Kent; Law, Tyler J; Bennett, Sara

    2010-06-01

    Donor funding for health systems financing (HSF) research is inadequate and often poorly aligned with national priorities. This study aimed to generate consensus about a core set of research issues that urgently require attention in order to facilitate policy development. There were three key inputs into the priority setting process: key-informant interviews with health policy makers, researchers, community and civil society representatives across twenty-four low- and middle-income countries in four regions; an overview of relevant reviews to identify research completed to date; and inputs from 12 key informants (largely researchers) at a consultative workshop. Nineteen priority research questions emerged from key-informant interviews. The overview of reviews was instructive in showing which health financing topics have had comparatively little written about them, despite being identified as important by key informants. The questions ranked as most important at the consultative workshop were: It is hoped that this work on HSF research priorities will complement calls for increased health systems research and evaluation by providing specific suggestions as to where new and existing research resources can best be invested. The list of high priority HSF research questions is being communicated to research funders and researchers in order to seek to influence global patterns of HSF research funding and activity. A "bottom up" approach to setting global research priorities such as that employed here should ensure that priorities are more sensitive to user needs. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Optics and materials research for controlled radiant energy transfer in buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldner, R. B.

    1983-11-01

    The overall objective of the Tufts research program was to identify and attempt to solve some of the key materials problems associated with practical approaches for achieving controlled radiant energy transfer (CRET) through building windows and envelopes, so as to decrease heating and cooling loads in buildings. Major accomplishments included: the identification of electrochromic (EC)-based structures as the preferred structures for achieving CRET; the identification of modulated reflectivity as the preferred mode of operation for EC-based structures; demonstration of the feasibility of operating EC-materials in a modulated R(lambda) mode; and demonstration of the applicability of free electron model to colored polycrystalline WO3 films.

  14. An action research approach for developing research and innovation in nursing and midwifery practice: building research capacity in one NHS foundation trust.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jenny; Crozier, Kenda; Kite, Katharine

    2012-01-01

    The National Health Service in the United Kingdom is committed to a process of reform centred on quality care and innovative practice. Central to this process is the need for research capacity building within the workforce. The aim of this study was to develop an infrastructure for research capacity building within one National Health Service Foundation Trust. Using an Action Research methodology, sixteen individuals were purposefully selected from a population of nurses and midwives to participate in the study. This nonprobability sampling method enabled the researchers to select participants on the basis of who would be most informative about existing research capacity building structures and processes within the Trust. Data were collected in the form of semi-structured individual interviews with each participant. The main findings were that research activity was not embedded in the culture of the organisation, and initiating and undertaking change was a complex process. As a result, a range of structures and processes which were considered necessary to enable the Trust move forward in developing capacity and capability for research were developed and implemented. This paper reports the first two stages of this process, namely: the findings from the pre-step and an outline of how these findings were used to create an infrastructure to support research capacity building within one NHS Foundation Trust Hospital in the United Kingdom. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Establishing a research agenda for scientific and technical information (STI) - Focus on the user

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    This report addresses the relationship between library science and information science theory and practice, between the development of conceptual understanding, and the practical competence of information professionals. Consideration is given to the concept of research, linking theory with practice, and the reality of theory based practice. Attention is given to the need for research and research priorities, focus on the user and information-seeking behavior, and a user-oriented research agenda for STI.

  16. Establishing a research agenda for Scientific and Technical Information (STI): Focus on the user

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    This report addresses the relationship between library science and information science theory and practice, between the development of conceptual understanding, and the practical competence of information professionals. Consideration is given to the concept of research, linking theory with practice, and the reality of theory based practice. Attention is given to the need for research and research priorities, focus on the user and information-seeking behavior, and a user-oriented research agenda for STI.

  17. The Process of Establishing a New Master of Research Administration Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jo Ann; Torres, Laurianne

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, the second largest university in the nation was awarded a grant from NCURA to initiate a new fully-online graduate program in research administration. The Master of Research Administration (MRA) was approved by the institution's Board of Trustees in March 2011 and the first classes will begin August 2011. Currently the research literature…

  18. Department of Defense Plan to Establish Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    journal articles , data management plans, and will track metrics on compliance and public usage. The current DTIC infrastructure will be modified to...tokens to authors who submit digitally formatted scientific data and articles . DTIC will establish compliance metrics in FY15. DoD will explore...15 10. METRICS , COMPLIANCE and EVALUATION

  19. Research on the Establishment and Evaluation of End - to - End Service Quality Index System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chen; Jing, Tao; Ji, Yutong

    2018-01-01

    From the perspective of power data networks, put forward the index system model to measure the quality of service, covering user experience, business performance, network capacity support, etc., and gives the establishment and use of each layer index in the model.

  20. Research to Establish the Validity, Reliability, and Clinical Utility of a Comprehensive Language Assessment of Mandarin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xueman Lucy; de Villiers, Jill; Ning, Chunyan; Rolfhus, Eric; Hutchings, Teresa; Lee, Wendy; Jiang, Fan; Zhang, Yi Wen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: With no existing gold standard for comparison, challenges arise for establishing the validity of a new standardized Mandarin language assessment normed in mainland China. Method: A new assessment, Diagnostic Receptive and Expressive Assessment of Mandarin (DREAM), was normed with a stratified sample of 969 children ages 2;6 (years;months)…

  1. Definition and constituents of maltreatment in sport: establishing a conceptual framework for research practitioners.

    PubMed

    Stirling, A E

    2009-12-01

    There has recently been an increased emergence of research on the maltreatment of athletes in sport. It is suggested that research may play a particularly salient role with respect to athlete protection initiatives. However, as it stands, current research in this area is limited by a lack of consistency in definitions. The purpose of the paper, therefore, is to propose a conceptual framework of maltreatment in sport to be used among research practitioners. More specifically, a conceptual model of the different categories, constructs and constituents of maltreatment in sport is proposed. Sport-specific examples of the various maltreatments are outlined. Current literature is reviewed, and recommendations are made for future research.

  2. How Well Establishment of Research Plans Can Improve Scientific Ranking of Medical Universities

    PubMed Central

    Saadat, Seyed Hassan; Izadi, Morteza; Aslani, Jafar; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: As a developing country, Iran has not had a substantial share in global science production activities; however, this country has recently been the forth country in the world regarding research output publications, and biomedical research has played a crucial role in achieving this honorable position. Objectives: In this paper, we aimed to introduce the strategies employed at Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences of Iran, to enhance scientific research output of this university. Patients and Methods: The present study used the qualitative content analysis technique. The Research deputies and the head of research centers of Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences were the research subjects. The main researcher conducted all the interviews. The participants were all authorities of the university. Sampling continued until data saturation. After speaking with 16 participants, the interviews yielded no new information, and no new categories or subcategories were added to the previous ones. Deep and semi-structured interviews with open-ended questions were used to collect data. Results: Diplomacies employed to promote research, organizing educational classes, and foundation of infrastructural organizations for research and true surveillance of research programs were the main characteristics of Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences research strategies. Conclusions: Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences is a military university of limited resources that has won several awards in the recent years, and has been categorized as one of the leading first ranked medical universities in Iran; a position quite higher than several other larger universities of the country. We recommend more enhanced strategies for other universities. PMID:25793114

  3. How well establishment of research plans can improve scientific ranking of medical universities.

    PubMed

    Saadat, Seyed Hassan; Izadi, Morteza; Aslani, Jafar; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2015-02-01

    As a developing country, Iran has not had a substantial share in global science production activities; however, this country has recently been the forth country in the world regarding research output publications, and biomedical research has played a crucial role in achieving this honorable position. In this paper, we aimed to introduce the strategies employed at Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences of Iran, to enhance scientific research output of this university. The present study used the qualitative content analysis technique. The Research deputies and the head of research centers of Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences were the research subjects. The main researcher conducted all the interviews. The participants were all authorities of the university. Sampling continued until data saturation. After speaking with 16 participants, the interviews yielded no new information, and no new categories or subcategories were added to the previous ones. Deep and semi-structured interviews with open-ended questions were used to collect data. Diplomacies employed to promote research, organizing educational classes, and foundation of infrastructural organizations for research and true surveillance of research programs were the main characteristics of Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences research strategies. Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences is a military university of limited resources that has won several awards in the recent years, and has been categorized as one of the leading first ranked medical universities in Iran; a position quite higher than several other larger universities of the country. We recommend more enhanced strategies for other universities.

  4. Building Interdisciplinary Qualitative Research Networks: Reflections on Qualitative Research Group (QRG) at the University of Manitoba

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roger, Kerstin Stieber; Halas, Gayle

    2012-01-01

    As qualitative research methodologies continue to evolve and develop, both students and experienced researchers are showing greater interest in learning about and developing new approaches. To meet this need, faculty at the University of Manitoba created the Qualitative Research Group (QRG), a community of practice that utilizes experiential…

  5. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman

    2005-08-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis overmore » an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. A year into the life of this cooperative agreement, we note the following achievements: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (A) Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, (B) Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, (C) Adaptation of SDI's Angulate program to use acoustic slant ranges and DGPS data to compute and map the bottom location of the vertical array, (D) Progress in T''0'' delay and timing issues for improved control in data recording, (E) Successful deployment and recovery of the VLA twice during an October, 2003 cruise, once in 830m water, once in 1305m water, (F) Data collection and recovery from the DATS data logger, (G

  6. Building Efficiency Technologies by Tomorrow’s Engineers and Researchers (BETTER) Capstone. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Shannon

    BETTER Capstone supported 29 student project teams consisting of 155 students over two years in developing transformative building energy efficiency technologies through a capstone design experience. Capstone is the culmination of an undergraduate student’s engineering education. Interdisciplinary teams of students spent a semester designing and prototyping a technological solution for a variety building energy efficiency problems. During this experience students utilized the full design process, including the manufacturing and testing of a prototype solution, as well as publically demonstrating the solution at the Capstone Design Expo. As part of this project, students explored modern manufacturing techniques and gained hands-on experiencemore » with these techniques to produce their prototype technologies. This research added to the understanding of the challenges within building technology education and engagement with industry. One goal of the project was to help break the chicken-and-egg problem with getting students to engage more deeply with the building technology industry. It was learned however that this industry is less interested in trying innovative new concept but rather interested in hiring graduates for existing conventional building efforts. While none of the projects yielded commercial success, much individual student growth and learning was accomplished, which is a long-term benefit to the public at large.« less

  7. Using an integrated knowledge translation approach to build a public health research agenda

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Public Health Systems Research is an emerging field of research that is gaining importance in Canada. Methods On October 22 and 23, 2012, public health researchers, practitioners, and policy-makers came together at the Accelerating Public Health Systems Research in Ontario: Building an Agenda think tank to develop a research agenda for the province. Results This agenda included the identification of the six top priorities for research in Ontario: public health performance, evidence-based practice, public health organization and structure, public health human resources, public health infrastructure, and partnerships/linkages. Conclusions This paper explores the priorities in detail and hopes to bring more attention to this area of research. PMID:24475759

  8. How to create innovation by building the translation bridge from basic research into medicinal drugs: an industrial perspective.

    PubMed

    Germann, Paul G; Schuhmacher, Alexander; Harrison, Juan; Law, Ronald; Haug, Kevin; Wong, Gordon

    2013-03-05

    The global healthcare industry is undergoing substantial changes and adaptations to the constant decline of approved new medical entities. This decrease in internal research productivity is resulting in a major decline of patent-protected sales (patent cliff) of most of the pharmaceutical companies. Three major global adaptive trends as driving forces to cope with these challenges are evident: cut backs of internal research and development jobs in the western hemisphere (Europe and USA), following the market growth potential of Asia by building up internal or external research and development capabilities there and finally, 'early innovation hunting' with an increased focus on identifying and investing in very early innovation sources within academia and small start-up companies. Early innovation hunting can be done by different approaches: increased corporate funding, establishment of translational institutions to bridge innovation, increasing sponsored collaborations and formation of technology hunting groups for capturing very early scientific ideas and concepts. This emerging trend towards early innovation hunting demands special adaptations from both the pharmaceutical industry and basic researchers in academia to bridge the translation into new medicines which deliver innovative medicines that matters to the patient. This opinion article describes the different modalities of cross-fertilisation between basic university or publicly funded institutional research and the applied research and development activities within the pharmaceutical industry. Two key factors in this important translational bridge can be identified: preparation of both partnering organisations to open up for new and sometime disruptive ideas and creation of truly trust-based relationships between the different groups allowing long-term scientific collaborations while acknowledging that value-creating differences are an essential factor for successful collaboration building.

  9. How to create innovation by building the translation bridge from basic research into medicinal drugs: an industrial perspective

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The global healthcare industry is undergoing substantial changes and adaptations to the constant decline of approved new medical entities. This decrease in internal research productivity is resulting in a major decline of patent-protected sales (patent cliff) of most of the pharmaceutical companies. Three major global adaptive trends as driving forces to cope with these challenges are evident: cut backs of internal research and development jobs in the western hemisphere (Europe and USA), following the market growth potential of Asia by building up internal or external research and development capabilities there and finally, ‘early innovation hunting’ with an increased focus on identifying and investing in very early innovation sources within academia and small start-up companies. Early innovation hunting can be done by different approaches: increased corporate funding, establishment of translational institutions to bridge innovation, increasing sponsored collaborations and formation of technology hunting groups for capturing very early scientific ideas and concepts. This emerging trend towards early innovation hunting demands special adaptations from both the pharmaceutical industry and basic researchers in academia to bridge the translation into new medicines which deliver innovative medicines that matters to the patient. This opinion article describes the different modalities of cross-fertilisation between basic university or publicly funded institutional research and the applied research and development activities within the pharmaceutical industry. Two key factors in this important translational bridge can be identified: preparation of both partnering organisations to open up for new and sometime disruptive ideas and creation of truly trust-based relationships between the different groups allowing long-term scientific collaborations while acknowledging that value-creating differences are an essential factor for successful collaboration building. PMID

  10. Building Interdisciplinary Research Capacity: a Key Challenge for Ecological Approaches in Public Health.

    PubMed

    Galway, Lindsay P; Parkes, Margot W; Allen, Diana; Takaro, Tim K

    2016-01-01

    The shortcomings of public health research informed by reductionist and fragmented biomedical approaches and the emergence of wicked problems are fueling a renewed interest in ecological approaches in public health. Despite the central role of interdisciplinarity in the context of ecological approaches in public health research, inadequate attention has been given to the specific challenge of doing interdisciplinary research in practice. As a result, important knowledge gaps exist with regards to the practice of interdisciplinary research. We argue that explicit attention towards the challenge of doing interdisciplinary research is critical in order to effectively apply ecological approaches to public health issues. This paper draws on our experiences developing and conducting an interdisciplinary research project exploring the links among climate change, water, and health to highlight five specific insights which we see as relevant to building capacity for interdisciplinary research specifically, and which have particular relevance to addressing the integrative challenges demanded by ecological approaches to address public health issues. These lessons include: (i) the need for frameworks that facilitate integration; (ii) emphasize learning-by-doing; (iii) the benefits of examining issues at multiple scales; (iv) make the implicit, explicit; and (v) the need for reflective practice. By synthesizing and sharing experiences gained by engaging in interdisciplinary inquiries using an ecological approach, this paper responds to a growing need to build interdisciplinary research capacity as a means for advancing the ecological public health agenda more broadly.

  11. Building Interdisciplinary Research Capacity: a Key Challenge for Ecological Approaches in Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Galway, Lindsay P.; Parkes, Margot W.; Allen, Diana; Takaro, Tim K.

    2016-01-01

    The shortcomings of public health research informed by reductionist and fragmented biomedical approaches and the emergence of wicked problems are fueling a renewed interest in ecological approaches in public health. Despite the central role of interdisciplinarity in the context of ecological approaches in public health research, inadequate attention has been given to the specific challenge of doing interdisciplinary research in practice. As a result, important knowledge gaps exist with regards to the practice of interdisciplinary research. We argue that explicit attention towards the challenge of doing interdisciplinary research is critical in order to effectively apply ecological approaches to public health issues. This paper draws on our experiences developing and conducting an interdisciplinary research project exploring the links among climate change, water, and health to highlight five specific insights which we see as relevant to building capacity for interdisciplinary research specifically, and which have particular relevance to addressing the integrative challenges demanded by ecological approaches to address public health issues. These lessons include: (i) the need for frameworks that facilitate integration; (ii) emphasize learning-by-doing; (iii) the benefits of examining issues at multiple scales; (iv) make the implicit, explicit; and (v) the need for reflective practice. By synthesizing and sharing experiences gained by engaging in interdisciplinary inquiries using an ecological approach, this paper responds to a growing need to build interdisciplinary research capacity as a means for advancing the ecological public health agenda more broadly. PMID:29546171

  12. Establishing the Research Agenda for Increasing the Representation of Women in Engineering and Computing

    PubMed Central

    Buse, Kathleen; Hill, Catherine; Benson, Kathleen

    2017-01-01

    While there is an extensive body of research on gender equity in engineering and computing, there have been few efforts to glean insight from a dialog among experts. To encourage collaboration and to develop a shared vision of the future research agenda, a 2 day workshop of 50 scholars who work on the topic of gender in engineering and computing was held at a rural conference center. The structure of the conference and the location allowed for time to reflect, dialog, and to craft an innovative research agenda aimed at increasing the representation of women in engineering and computing. This paper has been written by the conference organizers and details the ideas and recommendations from the scholars. The result is an innovative, collaborative approach to future research that focuses on identifying effective interventions. The new approach includes the creation of partnerships with stakeholders including businesses, government agencies, non-profits and academic institutions to allow a broader voice in setting research priorities. Researchers recommend incorporating multiple disciplines and methodologies, while expanding the use of data analytics, merging and mining existing databases and creating new datasets. The future research agenda is detailed and includes studies focused on socio-cultural interventions particularly on career choice, within undergraduate and graduate programs, and for women in professional careers. The outcome is a vision for future research that can be shared with researchers, practitioners and other stakeholders that will lead to gender equity in the engineering and computing professions. PMID:28469591

  13. Establishing the Research Agenda for Increasing the Representation of Women in Engineering and Computing.

    PubMed

    Buse, Kathleen; Hill, Catherine; Benson, Kathleen

    2017-01-01

    While there is an extensive body of research on gender equity in engineering and computing, there have been few efforts to glean insight from a dialog among experts. To encourage collaboration and to develop a shared vision of the future research agenda, a 2 day workshop of 50 scholars who work on the topic of gender in engineering and computing was held at a rural conference center. The structure of the conference and the location allowed for time to reflect, dialog, and to craft an innovative research agenda aimed at increasing the representation of women in engineering and computing. This paper has been written by the conference organizers and details the ideas and recommendations from the scholars. The result is an innovative, collaborative approach to future research that focuses on identifying effective interventions. The new approach includes the creation of partnerships with stakeholders including businesses, government agencies, non-profits and academic institutions to allow a broader voice in setting research priorities. Researchers recommend incorporating multiple disciplines and methodologies, while expanding the use of data analytics, merging and mining existing databases and creating new datasets. The future research agenda is detailed and includes studies focused on socio-cultural interventions particularly on career choice, within undergraduate and graduate programs, and for women in professional careers. The outcome is a vision for future research that can be shared with researchers, practitioners and other stakeholders that will lead to gender equity in the engineering and computing professions.

  14. Presence Personalization and Persistence: A New Approach to Building Archives to Support Collaborative Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGlynn, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    We discuss approaches to building archives that support the way most science is done. Today research is done in formal teams and informal groups. However our on-line services are designed to work with a single user. We have begun prototyping a new approach to building archives in which support for collaborative research is built in from the start. We organize the discussion along three elements that we believe to be necessary for effective support: We must enable user presence in the archive environment; users must be able to interact. Users must be able to personalize the environment, adding data and capabilities useful to themselves and their team. These changes must be persistent: subsequent sessions must be able to build upon previous sessions. In building the archive we see the large multi-player interactive games as a paradigm of how this approach can work. These three 'P's are essential in gaming as well and we shall use insights from the gaming world and virtual reality systems like Second Life in our prototype.

  15. The Healthy Aging Research Network: Resources for Building Capacity for Public Health and Aging Practice

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Sara; Altpeter, Mary; Anderson, Lynda A.; Belza, Basia; Bryant, Lucinda; Jones, Dina L.; Leith, Katherine H.; Phelan, Elizabeth A.; Satariano, William A.

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to translate science into practice and help enhance the capacity of professionals to deliver evidence-based programming. We describe contributions of the Healthy Aging Research Network in building professional capacity through online modules, issue briefs, monographs, and tools focused on health promotion practice, physical activity, mental health, and environment and policy. We also describe practice partnerships and research activities that helped inform product development and ways these products have been incorporated into real-world practice to illustrate possibilities for future applications. Our work aims to bridge the research-to-practice gap to meet the demands of an aging population. PMID:24000962

  16. Claim Your Space: Leadership Development as a Research Capacity Building Goal in Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Airhihenbuwa, Collins O.; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Iwelunmor, Juliet; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Williams, Natasha; Zizi, Freddy; Okuyemi, Kolawole

    2017-01-01

    As the burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) rises in settings with an equally high burden of infectious diseases in the Global South, a new sense of urgency has developed around research capacity building to promote more effective and sustainable public health and health care systems. In 2010, NCDs accounted for more than 2.06 million deaths in sub-Saharan Africa. Available evidence suggests that the number of people in sub-Saharan Africa with hypertension, a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, will increase by 68% from 75 million in 2008 to 126 million in 2025. Furthermore, about 27.5 million people currently live with diabetes in Africa, and it is estimated that 49.7 million people living with diabetes will reside in Africa by 2030. It is therefore necessary to centralize leadership as a key aspect of research capacity building and strengthening in the Global South in ways that enables researchers to claim their spaces in their own locations. We believe that building capacity for transformative leadership in research will lead to the development of effective and appropriate responses to the multiple burdens of NCDs that coexist with infectious diseases in Africa and the rest of the Global South. PMID:27037144

  17. Claim Your Space: Leadership Development as a Research Capacity Building Goal in Global Health.

    PubMed

    Airhihenbuwa, Collins O; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Iwelunmor, Juliet; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Williams, Natasha; Zizi, Freddy; Okuyemi, Kolawole

    2016-04-01

    As the burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) rises in settings with an equally high burden of infectious diseases in the Global South, a new sense of urgency has developed around research capacity building to promote more effective and sustainable public health and health care systems. In 2010, NCDs accounted for more than 2.06 million deaths in sub-Saharan Africa. Available evidence suggests that the number of people in sub-Saharan Africa with hypertension, a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, will increase by 68% from 75 million in 2008 to 126 million in 2025. Furthermore, about 27.5 million people currently live with diabetes in Africa, and it is estimated that 49.7 million people living with diabetes will reside in Africa by 2030. It is therefore necessary to centralize leadership as a key aspect of research capacity building and strengthening in the Global South in ways that enables researchers to claim their spaces in their own locations. We believe that building capacity for transformative leadership in research will lead to the development of effective and appropriate responses to the multiple burdens of NCDs that coexist with infectious diseases in Africa and the rest of the Global South. © 2016 Society for Public Health Education.

  18. Integrating formative assessment and participatory research: Building healthier communities in the CHILE Project

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Andrew L.; Davis, Sally

    2013-01-01

    Background The need to conduct formative assessment to inform the development of interventional studies has been increasingly recognized in community-based health research. While this purpose alone may provide sufficient justification to conduct formative assessment, researchers are also recognizing the importance of such efforts with regard to partnership building. Purpose This article reports a formative assessment process in a large scale randomized controlled trial in New Mexico aimed at preventing obesity in rural American Indian and Hispanic children in Head Start programs. Methods We interviewed Head Start staff and conducted observations to understand the context of food service and physical activity in these sites. We also collected data from other community partners, including grocery store managers and primary care providers, to assess appropriate strategies regarding their engagement in the study. Results Formative assessment findings helped modify the planned intervention while allowing for variation relevant to cultural and Head Start organizational conditions in each community. Rather than view formative assessment only as a planning phase of the research, our experience illustrates the need to conceptualize these activities more broadly. Discussion Integrating formative assessment and participatory research raises the need to address the challenge of ensuring standardization and consistency across varied community settings, the evolving nature of initial formative relationships and the need to build trust in academic/community partnerships. Translation to Health Education Practice In our work with American Indian and Hispanic communities in New Mexico, formative assessment represents a partnership building opportunity. PMID:23745177

  19. 'Pre-Run, Re-Run': An innovative research capacity building exercise.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Margaret; Brien, Donna Lee

    2017-11-01

    Within higher education it is ironic that experienced and novice researchers rarely take the opportunity to come together to share their research - whether these be to discuss findings, puzzles or developing projects. Within this paper, an innovative strategy building on these assumptions is described. It is entitled: 'Pre-run, Re-run' and is a learning community where specific processes are modelled by all to help build professional communication, collegial respect, and scholarship. Our evaluation showed that there is value in bringing together researchers especially when they have diverse profiles. Also, mixing experience with naivety, by inviting professors and junior staff to fraternize equally, offers the possibility for wide ranging discussion, as well as sharing a range of successful techniques, knowledge of the big picture and ways around obstacles that would otherwise be off-putting for novices. The less experienced perspective can equally be revitalizing because newcomers to scholarship often bring a fresh focus and enthusiasm and energy for practice. While this was a local innovation, which may not be generalizable to all settings, others hoping to bring together disciplines may benefit from utilizing the successful methods to build a productive, mixed research culture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Construction of a Solid State Research Facility, Building 3150. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct a new facility to house the Materials Synthesis Group (MSG) and the Semiconductor Physics Group (SPG) of the Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The location of the proposed action is Roane County, Tennessee. MSG is involved in the study of crystal growth and the preparation and characterization of advanced materials, such as high-temperature superconductors, while SPG is involved in semiconductor physics research. All MSG and a major pardon of SPG research activities are now conducted in Building 2000, a deteriorating structure constructed in the 1940. The physical deterioration ofmore » the roof; the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system; and the plumbing make this building inadequate for supporting research activities. The proposed project is needed to provide laboratory and office space for MSG and SPG and to ensure that research activities can continue without interruption due to deficiencies in the building and its associated utility systems.« less

  1. 76 FR 45585 - Establishment of the Advisory Committee to the Deputy Director for Intramural Research

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... Research and include (1) the Office of Intramural Training and Education; (2) the Office of Animal Care and... Technology Transfer; and (6) any other program located in the Office of Intramural Research. Advice provided... well as recommendations for future directions, the overall design, content, development and/or delivery...

  2. THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE STATE RESEARCH COORDINATING UNIT FOR THE STATE OF NEW MEXICO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BARNES, BILL; SCHRADER, EUGENE

    THE FINAL REPORT OF THE FIRST FUNDING PERIOD, JULY 1, 1965 TO FEBRUARY 28, 1967, IS PRESENTED. THE PURPOSES OF THE UNIT WERE (1) WORK WITH THE STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION RESEARCH DIVISION AND LOCAL EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS IN PROMOTING AND ASSISTING RESEARCH STUDIES AND PROGRAMS CONCERNED WITH OCCUPATIONAL STUDIES, AND (2) WORK WITH THE STATE…

  3. 76 FR 20673 - Announcement of Notice; Proposed Establishment of a Federally Funded Research and Development...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... Research and Development Center (FFRDC) to facilitate the modernization of business processes and..., Simulations, and Cost Modeling Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC) to facilitate the modernization of business processes and supporting systems and their operations. Some of the broad task areas...

  4. Building capacity for knowledge translation in occupational therapy: learning through participatory action research.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Sally; Whitehead, Mary; Eames, Sally; Fleming, Jennifer; Low, Shanling; Caldwell, Elizabeth

    2016-10-01

    There has been widespread acknowledgement of the need to build capacity in knowledge translation however much of the existing work focuses on building capacity amongst researchers rather than with clinicians directly. This paper's aim is to describe a research project for developing a knowledge translation capacity building program for occupational therapy clinicians. Participatory action research methods were used to both develop and evaluate the knowledge translation capacity-building program. Participants were occupational therapists from a large metropolitan hospital in Australia. Researchers and clinicians worked together to use the action cycle of the Knowledge to Action Framework to increase use of knowledge translation itself within the department in general, within their clinical teams, and to facilitate knowledge translation becoming part of the department's culture. Barriers and enablers to using knowledge translation were identified through a survey based on the Theoretical Domains Framework and through focus groups. Multiple interventions were used to develop a knowledge translation capacity-building program. Fifty-two occupational therapists participated initially, but only 20 across the first 18 months of the project. Barriers and enablers were identified across all domains of the Theoretical Domains Framework. Interventions selected to address these barriers or facilitate enablers were categorised into ten different categories: educational outreach; teams working on clinical knowledge translation case studies; identifying time blocks for knowledge translation; mentoring; leadership strategies; communication strategies; documentation and resources to support knowledge translation; funding a knowledge translation champion one day per week; setting goals for knowledge translation; and knowledge translation reporting strategies. Use of these strategies was, and continues to be monitored. Participants continue to be actively involved in learning and

  5. Basic science research and education: a priority for training and capacity building in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Deckelbaum, Richard J; Ntambi, James M; Wolgemuth, Debra J

    2011-09-01

    This article provides evidence that basic science research and education should be key priorities for global health training, capacity building, and practice. Currently, there are tremendous gaps between strong science education and research in developed countries (the North) as compared to developing countries (the South). In addition, science research and education appear as low priorities in many developing countries. The need to stress basic science research beyond the typical investment of infectious disease basic service and research laboratories in developing areas is significant in terms of the benefits, not only to education, but also for economic strengthening and development of human resources. There are some indications that appreciation of basic science research education and training is increasing, but this still needs to be applied more rigorously and strengthened systematically in developing countries. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Building from In Vivo Research to the Future of Research on Relational Thinking and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schunn, Christian D.

    2017-01-01

    This concluding commentary takes the perspective of research on practicing scientists and engineers to consider what open areas and future directions on relational thinking and learning should be considered beyond the impressive research presented in the special issue. Areas for more work include (a) a need to examine educational applications of…

  7. Health research capacity building in Georgia: a case-based needs assessment.

    PubMed

    Squires, A; Chitashvili, T; Djibuti, M; Ridge, L; Chyun, D

    2017-06-01

    Research capacity building in the health sciences in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) has typically focused on bench-science capacity, but research examining health service delivery and health workforce is equally necessary to determine the best ways to deliver care. The Republic of Georgia, formerly a part of the Soviet Union, has multiple issues within its healthcare system that would benefit from expended research capacity, but the current research environment needs to be explored prior to examining research-focused activities. The purpose of this project was to conduct a needs assessment focused on developing research capacity in the Republic of Georgia with an emphasis on workforce and network development. A case study approach guided by a needs assessment format. We conducted in-country, informal, semi-structured interviews in English with key informants and focus groups with faculty, students, and representatives of local non-governmental organizations. Purposive and snowball sampling approaches were used to recruit participants, with key informant interviews scheduled prior to arrival in country. Documents relevant to research capacity building were also included. Interview results were coded via content analysis. Final results were organized into a SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threat) analysis format, with the report shared with participants. There is widespread interest among students and faculty in Georgia around building research capacity. Lack of funding was identified by many informants as a barrier to research. Many critical research skills, such as proposal development, qualitative research skills, and statistical analysis, were reported as very limited. Participants expressed concerns about the ethics of research, with some suggesting that research is undertaken to punish or 'expose' subjects. However, students and faculty are highly motivated to improve their skills, are open to a variety of learning modalities, and have

  8. Practical Tips for Establishing Partnerships With Academic Researchers: A Resource Guide for Community-Based Organizations.

    PubMed

    Darling, Margaret; Gonzalez, Florencia; Graves, Kristi; Sheppard, Vanessa B; Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Leventhal, Kara-Grace; Caicedo, Larisa

    2015-01-01

    Research exists on strategies for successful conduct of community-based participatory research (CBPR). Unfortunately, few published resources are available to advise community-based organizations (CBOs) on preparation for and engagement in CBPR. We aimed to create a resource for CBOs that describes how an organization can prepare for and participate in CBPR. We used a case study approach of one CBO with a decade-long history of collaboration with academic researchers. We identified lessons learned through a retrospective review of organizational records and the documentation of experiences by CBO leadership and research partners. The findings were then labeled according to CBPR Partnership Readiness Model dimensions. The review of CBO documents and key informant interviews yielded ten practical tips to increase organizational readiness for and engagement in CBPR. By understanding the best practices for organizational readiness for and participation in CPBR, CBOs will be better equipped to actively participate in community-academic partnerships.

  9. Establishing a Research Agenda for Understanding the Role and Impact of Mental Health Peer Specialists.

    PubMed

    Chinman, Matthew; McInnes, D Keith; Eisen, Susan; Ellison, Marsha; Farkas, Marianne; Armstrong, Moe; Resnick, Sandra G

    2017-09-01

    Mental health peer specialists are individuals with serious mental illnesses who receive training to use their lived experiences to help others with serious mental illnesses in clinical settings. This Open Forum discusses the state of the research for mental health peer specialists and suggests a research agenda to advance the field. Studies have suggested that peer specialists vary widely in their roles, settings, and theoretical orientations. Theories of action have been proposed, but none have been tested. Outcome studies have shown benefits of peer specialists; however, many studies have methodological shortcomings. Qualitative descriptions of peer specialists are plentiful but lack grounding in implementation science frameworks. A research agenda advancing the field could include empirically testing theoretical mechanisms of peer specialists, developing a measure of peer specialist fidelity, conducting more rigorous outcomes studies, involving peer specialists in executing the research, and assessing various factors that influence implementing peer specialist services and testing strategies that could address those factors.

  10. The Establishment of a Management Information Systems Research Center at the Naval Postgraduate School

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    Project WP 88-03 GDSS Technology in Practice: A Study D. Straub R. Beauclair WP 88-04 Interaction Analysis in GDSS Research: I. Zigurs Description of an...03 GDSS Technology in Practice: A Study (D. Straub and R. Beauclair ) 4. WP 88-04 Interaction Analysis in GDSS Research: Description of an Experience...Implementing an Information Architecture," Data Base, forthcoming. 25 Straub, D. W. and R. A. Beauclair . "A New Dimension to Decision Support

  11. Creating a Culture of Empowerment in Research: Findings from a Capacity-Building Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Carolyn Leung; Martinez, Linda Sprague; Tse, Lisa; Brugge, Doug; Hacker, Karen; Pirie, Alex; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2017-01-01

    Background This paper uses a theory from educational research – “the culture of power” – to explore power differentials between academic researchers and community partners in community engaged research partnership programs. Objectives This paper describes how a capacity-building program illuminated the tensions between academics and community partners related to power differentials and offers strategies for how to balance the power dynamic. Methods This paper relies on semi-structured interviews from 30 community partners who participated in the “Building your capacity” program. Results The framework of “culture of power” applied to research relationships helps us understand the following: (1) The power differentials between academic institutions and community agencies are deeply entrenched. That is there is a “culture of power.” (2) This culture of power is often reinforced through the cultural rules and dominant language of the academy. (3) Academic institutions, by and large, have created and perpetuated the rules that have led to these uneven power relationships. (4) Being told explicitly about the rules of academic culture make acquiring power easier for community partners. (5) Community partners are often more aware of the culture of power in research and more willing to acknowledge these differentials than academic researchers. Conclusions Academic partners who want to work with community partners need to acknowledge these power imbalances and be intentional about shifting these power dynamics. Capacity-building programs can help to shift these power imbalances because they help community partners acquire the confidence, knowledge and skills to advocate for more equitable research relationships PMID:28230555

  12. Leadership and capacity building in international chiropractic research: introducing the chiropractic academy for research leadership (CARL).

    PubMed

    Adams, Jon; Kawchuk, Greg; Breen, Alexander; De Carvalho, Diana; Eklund, Andreas; Fernandez, Matthew; Funabashi, Martha; Holmes, Michelle M; Johansson, Melker S; de Luca, Katie; Moore, Craig; Pagé, Isabelle; Pohlman, Katherine A; Swain, Michael S; Wong, Arnold Y L; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2018-01-01

    In an evidence-based health care environment, healthcare professions require a sustainable research culture to remain relevant. At present however, there is not a mature research culture across the chiropractic profession largely due to deficiencies in research capacity and leadership, which may be caused by a lack of chiropractic teaching programs in major universities. As a response to this challenge the Chiropractic Academy for Research Leadership, CARL, was created with the aim of develop a global network of successful early-career chiropractic researchers under the mentorship of three successful senior academics from Australia, Canada, and Denmark. The program centres upon an annual week-long program residential that rotates continental locations over the first three-year cycle and between residentials the CARL fellows work on self-initiated research and leadership initiatives. Through a competivite application process, the first cohort was selected and consists of 13 early career researchers from five professions in seven countries who represent diverse areas of interests of high relevance for chiropractic. The first residential was held in Odense, Denmark, with the second being planned in April 2018 in Edmonton, Canada, and the final residential to be held in Sydney, Australia in 2019.

  13. A Testbed Environment for Buildings-to-Grid Cyber Resilience Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Sridhar, Siddharth; Ashok, Aditya; Mylrea, Michael E.

    The Smart Grid is characterized by the proliferation of advanced digital controllers at all levels of its operational hierarchy from generation to end consumption. Such controllers within modern residential and commercial buildings enable grid operators to exercise fine-grained control over energy consumption through several emerging Buildings-to-Grid (B2G) applications. Though this capability promises significant benefits in terms of operational economics and improved reliability, cybersecurity weaknesses in the supporting infrastructure could be exploited to cause a detrimental effect and this necessitates focused research efforts on two fronts. First, the understanding of how cyber attacks in the B2G space could impact grid reliabilitymore » and to what extent. Second, the development and validation of cyber-physical application-specific countermeasures that are complementary to traditional infrastructure cybersecurity mechanisms for enhanced cyber attack detection and mitigation. The PNNL B2G testbed is currently being developed to address these core research needs. Specifically, the B2G testbed combines high-fidelity buildings+grid simulators, industry-grade building automation and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems in an integrated, realistic, and reconfigurable environment capable of supporting attack-impact-detection-mitigation experimentation. In this paper, we articulate the need for research testbeds to model various B2G applications broadly by looking at the end-to-end operational hierarchy of the Smart Grid. Finally, the paper not only describes the architecture of the B2G testbed in detail, but also addresses the broad spectrum of B2G resilience research it is capable of supporting based on the smart grid operational hierarchy identified earlier.« less

  14. Toward Establishing a Realistic Benchmark for Airframe Noise Research: Issues and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2010-01-01

    The availability of realistic benchmark configurations is essential to enable the validation of current Computational Aeroacoustic (CAA) methodologies and to further the development of new ideas and concepts that will foster the technologies of the next generation of CAA tools. The selection of a real-world configuration, the subsequent design and fabrication of an appropriate model for testing, and the acquisition of the necessarily comprehensive aeroacoustic data base are critical steps that demand great care and attention. In this paper, a brief account of the nose landing-gear configuration, being proposed jointly by NASA and the Gulfstream Aerospace Company as an airframe noise benchmark, is provided. The underlying thought processes and the resulting building block steps that were taken during the development of this benchmark case are given. Resolution of critical, yet conflicting issues is discussed - the desire to maintain geometric fidelity versus model modifications required to accommodate instrumentation; balancing model scale size versus Reynolds number effects; and time, cost, and facility availability versus important parameters like surface finish and installation effects. The decisions taken during the experimental phase of a study can significantly affect the ability of a CAA calculation to reproduce the prevalent flow conditions and associated measurements. For the nose landing gear, the most critical of such issues are highlighted and the compromises made to resolve them are discussed. The results of these compromises will be summarized by examining the positive attributes and shortcomings of this particular benchmark case.

  15. To Crowdfund Research, Scientists Must Build an Audience for Their Work.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, Jarrett E K; Ranganathan, Jai; Walker, Barbara L E; Faulkes, Zen

    2014-01-01

    As rates of traditional sources of scientific funding decline, scientists have become increasingly interested in crowdfunding as a means of bringing in new money for research. In fields where crowdfunding has become a major venue for fundraising such as the arts and technology, building an audience for one's work is key for successful crowdfunding. For science, to what extent does audience building, via engagement and outreach, increase a scientist's abilities to bring in money via crowdfunding? Here we report on an analysis of the #SciFund Challenge, a crowdfunding experiment in which 159 scientists attempted to crowdfund their research. Using data gathered from a survey of participants, internet metrics, and logs of project donations, we find that public engagement is the key to crowdfunding success. Building an audience or "fanbase" and actively engaging with that audience as well as seeking to broaden the reach of one's audience indirectly increases levels of funding. Audience size and effort interact to bring in more people to view a scientist's project proposal, leading to funding. We discuss how projects capable of raising levels of funds commensurate with traditional funding agencies will need to incorporate direct involvement of the public with science. We suggest that if scientists and research institutions wish to tap this new source of funds, they will need to encourage and reward activities that allow scientists to engage with the public.

  16. To Crowdfund Research, Scientists Must Build an Audience for Their Work

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, Jarrett E. K.; Ranganathan, Jai; Walker, Barbara L. E.; Faulkes, Zen

    2014-01-01

    As rates of traditional sources of scientific funding decline, scientists have become increasingly interested in crowdfunding as a means of bringing in new money for research. In fields where crowdfunding has become a major venue for fundraising such as the arts and technology, building an audience for one's work is key for successful crowdfunding. For science, to what extent does audience building, via engagement and outreach, increase a scientist's abilities to bring in money via crowdfunding? Here we report on an analysis of the #SciFund Challenge, a crowdfunding experiment in which 159 scientists attempted to crowdfund their research. Using data gathered from a survey of participants, internet metrics, and logs of project donations, we find that public engagement is the key to crowdfunding success. Building an audience or “fanbase” and actively engaging with that audience as well as seeking to broaden the reach of one's audience indirectly increases levels of funding. Audience size and effort interact to bring in more people to view a scientist's project proposal, leading to funding. We discuss how projects capable of raising levels of funds commensurate with traditional funding agencies will need to incorporate direct involvement of the public with science. We suggest that if scientists and research institutions wish to tap this new source of funds, they will need to encourage and reward activities that allow scientists to engage with the public. PMID:25494306

  17. The role of consent in medical research: breaking or building walls? A call for legislative reform.

    PubMed

    Dangata, Yohanna Yanshiyi

    2011-12-01

    Research has been integral to the practice of medicine for almost as long as the discipline has existed. Until fairly recently research used to be conducted on human subjects without mandatory requirement for their consent. However, over time medical research became associated with significant cruelty resulting in an outcry for regulation of research actives. This resulted in significant legislation in place for monitoring. Today it is mandatory to obtain consent from subjects before embarking on medical research, and indeed treatment. Its significant regulatory role notwithstanding, the issue of consent at times becomes a hindrance to research. This paper examines the issue of consent in relation to medical research in the context of present legislation. It lays out the background to medical research with respect to purpose, scope, standard protocol and related issues; it then addresses the issue of consent in various scenarios, highlighting problems and the need for legislative reform. It is maintained that while regulatory measures have brought a lot of sanity to medical research and the medical profession, some measures are building walls inhibitory to research activities. Research being integral to the development and growth of healthcare delivery, there is need for reformation of current medical law for balance between patient protectionism and progress in medical research for effective patient care.

  18. What Goes Around: the process of building a community-based harm reduction research project.

    PubMed

    Jalloh, Chelsea; Illsley, Shohan; Wylie, John; Migliardi, Paula; West, Ethan; Stewart, Debbie; Mignone, Javier

    2017-11-16

    Often, research takes place on underserved populations rather than with underserved populations. This approach can further isolate and stigmatize groups that are already made marginalized. What Goes Around is a community-based research project that was led by community members themselves (Peers). This research aimed to implement a community-based research methodology grounded in the leadership and growing research capacity of community researchers and to investigate a topic which community members identified as important and meaningful. Chosen by community members, this project explored how safer sex and safer drug use information is shared informally among Peers. Seventeen community members actively engaged as both community researchers and research participants throughout all facets of the project: inception, implementation, analysis, and dissemination of results. Effective collaboration between community researchers, a community organization, and academics facilitated a research process in which community members actively guided the project from beginning to end. The methods used in What Goes Around demonstrated that it is not only possible, but advantageous, to draw from community members' involvement and direction in all stages of a community-based research project. This is particularly important when working with a historically underserved population. Purposeful and regular communication among collaborators, ongoing capacity building, and a commitment to respect the experience and expertise of community members were essential to the project's success. This project demonstrated that community members are highly invested in both informally sharing information about safer sex and safer drug use and taking leadership roles in directing research that prioritizes harm reduction in their communities.

  19. Peer exchange, "strategic goals to manage research programs : building a premier research program".

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-06-10

    The objectives of the District Department of Transportation (DDOT) Research, Development, & Technology Transfer (RDT) Branch Peer Exchange were: : 1. Receive peer input and perspective on RDT Strategic Plan. : 2. Obtain assistance in assessing validi...

  20. Faculty Development Workshops to Support Establishing and Sustaining Undergraduate Research Programs in the Earth Sciences (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, L. K.; Guertin, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Geosciences Division of the Council of Undergraduate Research (GeoCUR, http://curgeoscience.wordpress.com/) has a long history of supporting faculty who engage in undergraduate research. The division has held faculty development workshops at national meetings of the GSA and AGU for over 15 years. These workshops serve faculty at all career stages and cover multiple aspects of the enterprise of engaging students in undergraduate research. Topics covered include: getting a job (particularly at a primarily undergraduate institution), incorporating research into classes, mentoring independent research projects and identifying sources of internal and external funding. Originally, these workshops were funded through CUR and registration income. When the administrative costs to run the workshops increased, we successfully sought funding from the NSF Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) program. This CCLI Type 1 special project allowed the expansion of the GSA workshops from half-day to full-day and the offering of workshops to other venues, including the annual meeting of the Association of American Geographers and sectional GSA meetings. The workshops are organized and led by GeoCUR councilors, some of whom attended workshops as graduate students or new faculty. Current and past Geoscience program officers in the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) have presented on NSF funding opportunities. Based on participant surveys, the content of the workshops has evolved over time. Workshop content is also tailored to the particular audience; for example, AGU workshops enroll more graduate students and post-docs and thus the focus is on the job ';search' and getting started in undergraduate research. To date, this CCLI Type 1 project has supported 15 workshops and a variety of print and digital resources shared with workshop participants. This presentation will highlight the goals of this workshop proposal and also provide insights about strategies

  1. Exploring mentorship as a strategy to build capacity for knowledge translation research and practice: protocol for a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Gagliardi, Anna R; Perrier, Laure; Webster, Fiona; Leslie, Karen; Bell, Mary; Levinson, Wendy; Rotstein, Ori; Tourangeau, Ann; Morrison, Laurie; Silver, Ivan L; Straus, Sharon E

    2009-01-01

    Background Research funders, educators, investigators and decision makers worldwide have identified the need to improve the quality of health care by building capacity for knowledge translation (KT) research and practice. Peer-based mentorship represents a vehicle to foster KT capacity. The purpose of this exploratory study is to identify mentoring models that could be used to build KT capacity, consult with putative mentee stakeholders to understand their KT mentorship needs and preferences, and generate recommendations for the content and format of KT mentorship strategies or programs, and how they could be tested through future research. Methods A conceptual framework was derived based on mentoring goals, processes and outcomes identified in the management and social sciences literature, and our research on barriers and facilitators of academic mentorship. These concepts will inform data collection and analysis. To identify useful models by which to design, implement and evaluate KT mentorship, we will review the social sciences, management, and nursing literature from 1990 to current, browse tables of contents of relevant journals, and scan the references of all eligible studies. Eligibility screening and data extraction will be performed independently by two investigators. Semi-structured interviews will be used to collect information about KT needs, views on mentorship as a knowledge sharing strategy, preferred KT mentoring program elements, and perceived barriers from clinician health services researchers representing different disciplines. Qualitative analysis of transcripts will be performed independently by two investigators, who will meet to compare findings and resolve differences through discussion. Data will be shared and discussed with the research team, and their feedback incorporated into final reports. Discussion These findings could be used by universities, research institutes, funding agencies, and professional organizations in Canada and

  2. Towards Building a Bridge between Community Engagement in Research (CEnR) and Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER).

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Syed M; Nelson, David; Kissack, Anne; Franco, Zeno; Whittle, Jeff; Kotchen, Theodore; Meurer, John R; Morzinski, Jeffrey; Brandenburg, Terry

    2015-04-01

    A major national priority is establishing an effective infrastructure for translation of scientific discoveries into the community. Knowledge and practice continue to accelerate in health research yet healthcare recommendation adoption remains slow for practitioners, patients, and communities. Two areas of research placed in the later stages of the translational research spectrum, Community Engagement in Research and Comparative Effectiveness Research, are ideal for approaching this challenge collaboratively. The Clinical and Translational Science Institute of Southeastern Wisconsin convened academics and community-based organizations familiar with these fields of research in a 1-day workshop to establish an initial dialogue on similarities and differences with a goal of exploring ways to operationalize a collective effort. Participants represented four academic institutions and twelve other healthcare and community-based service organizations. Primary fields of study included community engaged research, comparative effectiveness research, psychology, clinical research, administration, nursing, public health, education, and other professionals. This initial report outlines the results of this diverse discussion and provides insights into the priorities, diverging issues, and areas for future examination and practice. Key discoveries reveal clear crosscutting issues, value in philosophical and provocative discussions among investigators, a need for practice and lessons learned, and bidirectional exchange with community representation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A Novel Program Trains Community‐Academic Teams to Build Research and Partnership Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jen; LeBailly, Susan; McGee, Richard; Bayldon, Barbara; Huber, Gail; Kaleba, Erin; Lowry, Kelly Walker; Martens, Joseph; Mason, Maryann; Nuñez, Abel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Community‐Engaged Research Team Support (CERTS) program was developed and tested to build research and partnership capacity for community‐engaged research (CEnR) teams. Led by the Northwestern University Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (NUCATS), the goals of CERTS were: (1) to help community‐academic teams build capacity for conducting rigorous CEnR and (2) to support teams as they prepare federal grant proposal drafts. The program was guided by an advisory committee of community and clinical partners, and representatives from Chicago's Clinical and Translational Science Institutes. Monthly workshops guided teams to write elements of NIH‐style research proposals. Draft reviewing fostered a collaborative learning environment and helped teams develop equal partnerships. The program culminated in a mock‐proposal review. All teams clarified their research and acquired new knowledge about the preparation of NIH‐style proposals. Trust, partnership collaboration, and a structured writing strategy were assets of the CERTS approach. CERTS also uncovered gaps in resources and preparedness for teams to be competitive for federally funded grants. Areas of need include experience as principal investigators, publications on study results, mentoring, institutional infrastructure, and dedicated time for research. PMID:23751028

  4. Establishing an Appropriate Level of Detail (LoD) for a Building Information Model (BIM) - West Block, Parliament Hill, Ottawa, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fai, S.; Rafeiro, J.

    2014-05-01

    In 2011, Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) embarked on a comprehensive rehabilitation of the historically significant West Block of Canada's Parliament Hill. With over 17 thousand square meters of floor space, the West Block is one of the largest projects of its kind in the world. As part of the rehabilitation, PWGSC is working with the Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS) to develop a building information model (BIM) that can serve as maintenance and life-cycle management tool once construction is completed. The scale and complexity of the model have presented many challenges. One of these challenges is determining appropriate levels of detail (LoD). While still a matter of debate in the development of international BIM standards, LoD is further complicated in the context of heritage buildings because we must reconcile the LoD of the BIM with that used in the documentation process (terrestrial laser scan and photogrammetric survey data). In this paper, we will discuss our work to date on establishing appropriate LoD within the West Block BIM that will best serve the end use. To facilitate this, we have developed a single parametric model for gothic pointed arches that can be used for over seventy-five unique window types present in the West Block. Using the AEC (CAN) BIM as a reference, we have developed a workflow to test each of these window types at three distinct levels of detail. We have found that the parametric Gothic arch significantly reduces the amount of time necessary to develop scenarios to test appropriate LoD.

  5. Research on MRV system of iron and steel industry and verification mechanism establishment in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Huiting; Chen, Liang; Chen, Jianhua

    2017-12-01

    The national carbon emissions trading market will be launched in 2017 in China. The iron and steel industry will be covered as one of the first industries. Establishing its MRV system is critical to promote the development of the iron and steel industry in the carbon trading market. This paper studies the requirements and procedures of the accounting, monitoring, reporting and verification of the seven iron and steel industry carbon trading pilots. The construction and operating mechanism of the MRV systems are also analyzed. Combining with the emission feature of the iron and steel industry, we study the suitable national MRV system for the whole iron and steel industry to consummate the future national carbon trading framework of iron and steel industry.

  6. Utilization of the Building-Block Approach in Structural Mechanics Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, Marshall; Jegley, Dawn C.; McGowan, David M.; Bush, Harold G.; Waters, W. Allen

    2005-01-01

    In the last 20 years NASA has worked in collaboration with industry to develop enabling technologies needed to make aircraft safer and more affordable, extend their lifetime, improve their reliability, better understand their behavior, and reduce their weight. To support these efforts, research programs starting with ideas and culminating in full-scale structural testing were conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center. Each program contained development efforts that (a) started with selecting the material system and manufacturing approach; (b) moved on to experimentation and analysis of small samples to characterize the system and quantify behavior in the presence of defects like damage and imperfections; (c) progressed on to examining larger structures to examine buckling behavior, combined loadings, and built-up structures; and (d) finally moved to complicated subcomponents and full-scale components. Each step along the way was supported by detailed analysis, including tool development, to prove that the behavior of these structures was well-understood and predictable. This approach for developing technology became known as the "building-block" approach. In the Advanced Composites Technology Program and the High Speed Research Program the building-block approach was used to develop a true understanding of the response of the structures involved through experimentation and analysis. The philosophy that if the structural response couldn't be accurately predicted, it wasn't really understood, was critical to the progression of these programs. To this end, analytical techniques including closed-form and finite elements were employed and experimentation used to verify assumptions at each step along the way. This paper presents a discussion of the utilization of the building-block approach described previously in structural mechanics research and development programs at NASA Langley Research Center. Specific examples that illustrate the use of this approach are

  7. Establishing a community-wide DNA barcode library as a new tool for arctic research.

    PubMed

    Wirta, H; Várkonyi, G; Rasmussen, C; Kaartinen, R; Schmidt, N M; Hebert, P D N; Barták, M; Blagoev, G; Disney, H; Ertl, S; Gjelstrup, P; Gwiazdowicz, D J; Huldén, L; Ilmonen, J; Jakovlev, J; Jaschhof, M; Kahanpää, J; Kankaanpää, T; Krogh, P H; Labbee, R; Lettner, C; Michelsen, V; Nielsen, S A; Nielsen, T R; Paasivirta, L; Pedersen, S; Pohjoismäki, J; Salmela, J; Vilkamaa, P; Väre, H; von Tschirnhaus, M; Roslin, T

    2016-05-01

    DNA sequences offer powerful tools for describing the members and interactions of natural communities. In this study, we establish the to-date most comprehensive library of DNA barcodes for a terrestrial site, including all known macroscopic animals and vascular plants of an intensively studied area of the High Arctic, the Zackenberg Valley in Northeast Greenland. To demonstrate its utility, we apply the library to identify nearly 20 000 arthropod individuals from two Malaise traps, each operated for two summers. Drawing on this material, we estimate the coverage of previous morphology-based species inventories, derive a snapshot of faunal turnover in space and time and describe the abundance and phenology of species in the rapidly changing arctic environment. Overall, 403 terrestrial animal and 160 vascular plant species were recorded by morphology-based techniques. DNA barcodes (CO1) offered high resolution in discriminating among the local animal taxa, with 92% of morphologically distinguishable taxa assigned to unique Barcode Index Numbers (BINs) and 93% to monophyletic clusters. For vascular plants, resolution was lower, with 54% of species forming monophyletic clusters based on barcode regions rbcLa and ITS2. Malaise catches revealed 122 BINs not detected by previous sampling and DNA barcoding. The insect community was dominated by a few highly abundant taxa. Even closely related taxa differed in phenology, emphasizing the need for species-level resolution when describing ongoing shifts in arctic communities and ecosystems. The DNA barcode library now established for Zackenberg offers new scope for such explorations, and for the detailed dissection of interspecific interactions throughout the community. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Wellness and multiple sclerosis: The National MS Society establishes a Wellness Research Working Group and research priorities

    PubMed Central

    Motl, Robert W; Mowry, Ellen M; Ehde, Dawn M; LaRocca, Nicholas G; Smith, Kathy E; Costello, Kathleen; Shinto, Lynne; Ng, Alexander V; Sullivan, Amy B; Giesser, Barbara; McCully, Kevin K; Fernhall, Bo; Bishop, Malachy; Plow, Matthew; Casaccia, Patrizia; Chiaravalloti, Nancy D

    2017-01-01

    Background: People with multiple sclerosis (MS) have identified “wellness” and associated behaviors as a high priority based on “social media listening” undertaken by the National MS Society (i.e. the Society). Objective: The Society recently convened a group that consisted of researchers with experience in MS and wellness-related research, Society staff members, and an individual with MS for developing recommendations regarding a wellness research agenda. Method: The members of the group engaged in focal reviews and discussions involving the state of science within three approaches for promoting wellness in MS, namely diet, exercise, and emotional wellness. Results: That process informed a group-mediated activity for developing and prioritizing research goals for wellness in MS. This served as a background for articulating the mission and objectives of the Society’s Wellness Research Working Group. Conclusion: The primary mission of the Wellness Research Working Group is the provision of scientific evidence supporting the application of lifestyle, behavioral, and psychosocial approaches for promoting optimal health of mind, body, and spirit (i.e. wellness) in people with MS as well as managing the disease and its consequences. PMID:28080254

  9. Establishing the Infrastructure to Conduct Comparative Effectiveness Research Toward the Elimination of Disparities: A Community-Based Participatory Research Framework

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Danyell S.; Dapic, Virna; Sultan, Dawood H.; August, Euna M.; Green, B. Lee; Roetzheim, Richard; Rivers, Brian

    2014-01-01

    In Tampa, Florida, researchers have partnered with community- and faith-based organizations to create the Comparative Effectiveness Research for Eliminating Disparities (CERED) infrastructure. Grounded in community-based participatory research, CERED acts on multiple levels of society to enhance informed decision making (IDM) of prostate cancer screening among Black men. CERED investigators combined both comparative effectiveness research and community-based participatory research to design a trial examining the effectiveness of community health workers and a digitally enhanced patient decision aid to support IDM in community settings as compared with “usual care” for prostate cancer screening. In addition, CERED researchers synthesized evidence through the development of systematic literature reviews analyzing the effectiveness of community health workers in changing knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of African American adults toward cancer prevention and education. An additional systematic review analyzed chemoprevention agents for prostate cancer as an emerging technique. Both of these reviews, and the comparative effectiveness trial supporting the IDM process, add to CERED’s goal of providing evidence to eliminate cancer health disparities. PMID:23431128

  10. Establishing the infrastructure to conduct comparative effectiveness research toward the elimination of disparities: a community-based participatory research framework.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Danyell S; Dapic, Virna; Sultan, Dawood H; August, Euna M; Green, B Lee; Roetzheim, Richard; Rivers, Brian

    2013-11-01

    In Tampa, Florida, researchers have partnered with community- and faith-based organizations to create the Comparative Effectiveness Research for Eliminating Disparities (CERED) infrastructure. Grounded in community-based participatory research, CERED acts on multiple levels of society to enhance informed decision making (IDM) of prostate cancer screening among Black men. CERED investigators combined both comparative effectiveness research and community-based participatory research to design a trial examining the effectiveness of community health workers and a digitally enhanced patient decision aid to support IDM in community settings as compared with "usual care" for prostate cancer screening. In addition, CERED researchers synthesized evidence through the development of systematic literature reviews analyzing the effectiveness of community health workers in changing knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of African American adults toward cancer prevention and education. An additional systematic review analyzed chemoprevention agents for prostate cancer as an emerging technique. Both of these reviews, and the comparative effectiveness trial supporting the IDM process, add to CERED's goal of providing evidence to eliminate cancer health disparities.

  11. Wellness and multiple sclerosis: The National MS Society establishes a Wellness Research Working Group and research priorities.

    PubMed

    Motl, Robert W; Mowry, Ellen M; Ehde, Dawn M; LaRocca, Nicholas G; Smith, Kathy E; Costello, Kathleen; Shinto, Lynne; Ng, Alexander V; Sullivan, Amy B; Giesser, Barbara; McCully, Kevin K; Fernhall, Bo; Bishop, Malachy; Plow, Matthew; Casaccia, Patrizia; Chiaravalloti, Nancy D

    2018-03-01

    People with multiple sclerosis (MS) have identified "wellness" and associated behaviors as a high priority based on "social media listening" undertaken by the National MS Society (i.e. the Society). The Society recently convened a group that consisted of researchers with experience in MS and wellness-related research, Society staff members, and an individual with MS for developing recommendations regarding a wellness research agenda. The members of the group engaged in focal reviews and discussions involving the state of science within three approaches for promoting wellness in MS, namely diet, exercise, and emotional wellness. That process informed a group-mediated activity for developing and prioritizing research goals for wellness in MS. This served as a background for articulating the mission and objectives of the Society's Wellness Research Working Group. The primary mission of the Wellness Research Working Group is the provision of scientific evidence supporting the application of lifestyle, behavioral, and psychosocial approaches for promoting optimal health of mind, body, and spirit (i.e. wellness) in people with MS as well as managing the disease and its consequences.

  12. Building clinicians-researchers partnerships: lessons from diverse natural settings and practice-oriented initiatives.

    PubMed

    Castonguay, Louis G; Youn, Soo Jeong; Xiao, Henry; Muran, J Christopher; Barber, Jacques P

    2015-01-01

    In this concluding paper, we identify the type of studies conducted by 11 teams of contributors to a special issue on building clinicians-researchers partnerships. Those studies were conducted across a variety of clinical settings. We also integrate the lessons that have emerged from their collaborative initiatives in terms of obstacles faced, strategies adopted to address these challenges, benefits gained, and general recommendations offered to facilitate studies conducted with or by clinicians. The paper ends with the authors' thoughts about the future success of practice-oriented research in general.

  13. Building research and evaluation capacity in population health: the NSW Health approach.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Barry; Stickney, Beth; Milat, Andrew; Campbell, Danielle; Thackway, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    Issue addressed An organisational culture that values and uses research and evaluation (R&E) evidence to inform policy and practice is fundamental to improving health outcomes. The 2016 NSW Government Program Evaluation Guidelines recommend investment in training and development to improve evaluation capacity. The purpose of this paper is to outline the approaches taken by the NSW Ministry of Health to develop R&E capacity and assess these against existing models of practice. Method The Ministry of Health's Centre for Epidemiology and Evidence (CEE) takes an evidence-based approach to building R&E capacity in population health. Strategies are informed by: the NSW Population Health Research Strategy, R&E communities of practice across the Ministry and health Pillar agencies and a review of the published evidence on evaluation capacity building (ECB). An internal survey is conducted biennially to monitor research activity within the Ministry's Population and Public Health Division. One representative from each of the six centres that make up the Division coordinates completion of the survey by relevant staff members for their centre. Results The review identified several ECB success factors including: implementing a tailored multifaceted approach; an organisational commitment to R&E; and offering experiential training and ongoing technical support to the workforce. The survey of research activity found that the Division funded a mix of research assets, research funding schemes, research centres and commissioned R&E projects. CEE provides technical advice and support services for staff involved in R&E and in 2015, 22 program evaluations were supported. R&E capacity building also includes a series of guides to assist policy makers, practitioners and researchers to commission, undertake and use policy-relevant R&E. Staff training includes workshops on critical appraisal, program logic and evaluation methods. From January 2013 to June 2014 divisional staff published 84

  14. Establishing Interventions via a Theory-Driven Single Case Design Research Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgus, Stephen P.; Riley-Tillman, T. Chris; Kratochwill, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested single case design (SCD) intervention research is subject to publication bias, wherein studies are more likely to be published if they possess large or statistically significant effects and use rigorous experimental methods. The nature of SCD and the purposes for which it might be used could suggest that large effects…

  15. Examining the Role of Group Experimental Research in Establishing Evidenced-Based Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Lysandra; Cook, Bryan G.; Landrum, Timothy J.; Tankersley, Melody

    2008-01-01

    Using evidence-based practices, or those instructional techniques shown by research to improve student outcomes meaningfully, increases the performance of students with disabilities and should therefore be a priority for special educators. But how does a practice come to be considered evidence based? The unique characteristics of group…

  16. Establishing Criteria for Effective Professional Development and Use in Evaluating an Action Research Based Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piggot-Irvine, Eileen

    2006-01-01

    A dialectical, or mutually informing and influencing, relationship exists between research, programmes for development and improved teaching and learning. Among a raft of other attributes, current perceptions of effective professional development (summarised in the paper) point to deep, collaborative, active and ongoing features as important. Such…

  17. 76 FR 34713 - Proposed Establishment of a Federally Funded Research and Development Center-Third Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... (FFRDC) to facilitate the modernization of business processes and supporting systems and their operations... processes and supporting systems and their operations. Some of the broad task areas that will be utilized..., organizational planning, research and development, continuous process improvement, Independent Verification and...

  18. 76 FR 28042 - Announcement of Notice; Proposed Establishment of a Federally Funded Research and Development...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... Research and Development Center (FFRDC) to facilitate the modernization of business processes and... Health and Human Services (DHHS), intends to sponsor a study and analysis, delivery system, simulations... modernization of business processes and supporting systems and their operations. Some of the broad task areas...

  19. DOE to establish two Energy Frontier Research Centers at Argonne | Argonne

    Science.gov Websites

    . Catalysis in chemistry is the acceleration of a chemical reaction caused by the introduction of a substance or material that remains unchanged by the reaction. "Catalysts found in nature demonstrate how Electrochemical Energy Science CTRCenter for Transportation Research CRIChain Reaction Innovations CIComputation

  20. Establishing a Research Agenda for American Indian and Alaska Native Head Start Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Ellen L.; Graham, Elliott T.

    2004-01-01

    Since it began in 1965, Head Start has been the cornerstone of the nation's services for low-income children and their families. A substantial research base has been attached to Head Start, providing information about the program's overall accomplishments and directions about ways to improve services for young children. American Indian and Alaska…

  1. Establishing the Goals of a Science Fair Based on Sound Research Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slisz, Jill

    Science fairs are held in many elementary, junior high, and high schools. Typically they are thought of as a competitive event where students display science projects. Publications occasionally print accounts of successful science fairs, but these articles are usually based on opinions rather than on research. The purpose of this study is to…

  2. [Establish research model of post-marketing clinical safety evaluation for Chinese patent medicine].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wen-ke; Liu, Zhi; Lei, Xiang; Tian, Ran; Zheng, Rui; Li, Nan; Ren, Jing-tian; Du, Xiao-xi; Shang, Hong-cai

    2015-09-01

    The safety of Chinese patent medicine has become a focus of social. It is necessary to carry out work on post-marketing clinical safety evaluation for Chinese patent medicine. However, there have no criterions to guide the related research, it is urgent to set up a model and method to guide the practice for related research. According to a series of clinical research, we put forward some views, which contained clear and definite the objective and content of clinical safety evaluation, the work flow should be determined, make a list of items for safety evaluation project, and put forward the three level classification of risk control. We set up a model of post-marketing clinical safety evaluation for Chinese patent medicine. Based this model, the list of items can be used for ranking medicine risks, and then take steps for different risks, aims to lower the app:ds:risksrisk level. At last, the medicine can be managed by five steps in sequence. The five steps are, collect risk signal, risk recognition, risk assessment, risk management, and aftereffect assessment. We hope to provide new ideas for the future research.

  3. Research on precise modeling of buildings based on multi-source data fusion of air to ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongqiang; Niu, Lubiao; Yang, Shasha; Li, Lixue; Zhang, Xitong

    2016-03-01

    Aims at the accuracy problem of precise modeling of buildings, a test research was conducted based on multi-source data for buildings of the same test area , including top data of air-borne LiDAR, aerial orthophotos, and façade data of vehicle-borne LiDAR. After accurately extracted the top and bottom outlines of building clusters, a series of qualitative and quantitative analysis was carried out for the 2D interval between outlines. Research results provide a reliable accuracy support for precise modeling of buildings of air ground multi-source data fusion, on the same time, discussed some solution for key technical problems.

  4. Insulated Masonry Cavity Walls. Proceedings of the Research Correlation Conference by the Building Research Institute, Division of Engineering and Industrial Research. (April 1960).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    Publication of conference paper texts include --(1) history and development of masonry cavity walls, (2) recent research related to determination of thermal and moisture resistance, (3) wall design and detailing, (4) design for crack prevention, (5) mortar specification characteristics, (6) performance experience with low-rise buildings, (7)…

  5. Building and executing a research agenda toward conducting implementation science in medical education.

    PubMed

    Carney, Patricia A; Crites, Gerald E; Miller, Karen H; Haight, Michelle; Stefanidis, Dimitrios; Cichoskikelly, Eileen; Price, David W; Akinola, Modupeola O; Scott, Victoria C; Kalishman, Summers

    2016-01-01

    Implementation science (IS) is the study of methods that successfully integrate best evidence into practice. Although typically applied in healthcare settings to improve patient care and subsequent outcomes, IS also has immediate and practical applications to medical education toward improving physician training and educational outcomes. The objective of this article is to illustrate how to build a research agenda that focuses on applying IS principles in medical education. We examined the literature to construct a rationale for using IS to improve medical education. We then used a generalizable scenario to step through a process for applying IS to improve team-based care. IS provides a valuable approach to medical educators and researchers for making improvements in medical education and overcoming institution-based challenges. It encourages medical educators to systematically build upon the research outcomes of others to guide decision-making while evaluating the successes of best practices in individual environments and generate additional research questions and findings. IS can act as both a driver and a model for educational research to ensure that best educational practices are easier and faster to implement widely.

  6. Building and executing a research agenda toward conducting implementation science in medical education

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Patricia A.; Crites, Gerald E.; Miller, Karen H.; Haight, Michelle; Stefanidis, Dimitrios; Cichoskikelly, Eileen; Price, David W.; Akinola, Modupeola O.; Scott, Victoria C.; Kalishman, Summers

    2016-01-01

    Background Implementation science (IS) is the study of methods that successfully integrate best evidence into practice. Although typically applied in healthcare settings to improve patient care and subsequent outcomes, IS also has immediate and practical applications to medical education toward improving physician training and educational outcomes. The objective of this article is to illustrate how to build a research agenda that focuses on applying IS principles in medical education. Approach We examined the literature to construct a rationale for using IS to improve medical education. We then used a generalizable scenario to step through a process for applying IS to improve team-based care. Perspectives IS provides a valuable approach to medical educators and researchers for making improvements in medical education and overcoming institution-based challenges. It encourages medical educators to systematically build upon the research outcomes of others to guide decision-making while evaluating the successes of best practices in individual environments and generate additional research questions and findings. Conclusions IS can act as both a driver and a model for educational research to ensure that best educational practices are easier and faster to implement widely. PMID:27565131

  7. Training and technical assistance to enhance capacity building between prevention research centers and their partners.

    PubMed

    Spadaro, Antonia J; Grunbaum, Jo Anne; Dawkins, Nicola U; Wright, Demia S; Rubel, Stephanie K; Green, Diane C; Simoes, Eduardo J

    2011-05-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has administered the Prevention Research Centers Program since 1986. We quantified the number and reach of training programs across all centers, determined whether the centers' outcomes varied by characteristics of the academic institution, and explored potential benefits of training and technical assistance for academic researchers and community partners. We characterized how these activities enhanced capacity building within Prevention Research Centers and the community. The program office collected quantitative information on training across all 33 centers via its Internet-based system from April through December 2007. Qualitative data were collected from April through May 2007. We selected 9 centers each for 2 separate, semistructured, telephone interviews, 1 on training and 1 on technical assistance. Across 24 centers, 4,777 people were trained in 99 training programs in fiscal year 2007 (October 1, 2006-September 30, 2007). Nearly 30% of people trained were community members or agency representatives. Training and technical assistance activities provided opportunities to enhance community partners' capacity in areas such as conducting needs assessments and writing grants and to improve the centers' capacity for cultural competency. Both qualitative and quantitative data demonstrated that training and technical assistance activities can foster capacity building and provide a reciprocal venue to support researchers' and the community's research interests. Future evaluation could assess community and public health partners' perception of centers' training programs and technical assistance.

  8. A Community-Building Framework for Collaborative Research Coordination across the Education and Biology Research Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelaez, Nancy; Anderson, Trevor R.; Gardner, Stephanie M.; Yin, Yue; Abraham, Joel K.; Barlett, Edward L.; Gormally, Cara; Hurney, Carol A.; Long, Tammy M.; Newman, Dina L.; Sirum, Karen; Stevens, Michael T.

    2018-01-01

    Since 2009, the U.S. National Science Foundation Directorate for Biological Sciences has funded Research Coordination Networks (RCN) aimed at collaborative efforts to improve participation, learning, and assessment in undergraduate biology education (UBE). RCN-UBE projects focus on coordination and communication among scientists and educators who…

  9. [How are the hypothesis and the objectives established in a Radiology research project?].

    PubMed

    Alústiza Echeverría, J M; Salvador Pardo, E; Castiella Eguzkiza, A

    2012-01-01

    Research is a systematic process designed to answer a question. This is the starting point of the whole project and specifically formulates a problem observed in the analysis of the reality. The answer to this attempts to clarify an uncertainty in our knowledge. The conceptual hypothesis is the theoretical answer to the question set out. The operational hypothesis is the particular form that which sets out to demonstrate the conceptual hypothesis. The objectives are the justification for conducting the research. They help to define what it attempts to obtain, and what answers it will give to the formulated questions. It must show a clear and consistent relationship with the description of the problem and, specifically, with the questions and/or hypothesis that are to be resolved. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Establishing the Biodynamics Data Resource (BDR): Human Volunteer Impact Acceleration Research Data in the BDR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    accelerations (+Z) were applied to HRVs in the supine position to mimic the acceleration of an ejection seat , while runs simulating aircraft crashes were...Naval Biodynamics Laboratory, 1985). The vertical testing provided a more authentic ejection seat simulation than was achievable using axial...impact acceleration exposures with hundreds of human research volunteers. The resulting volumes of kinematic and physiological data serve as a

  11. Establishing repeatable operation of a centrifugal compressor research facility for aerodynamic investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, Matthew Philip

    The objective of this research has been to analyze the steady state performance of a new centrifugal compressor research facility. The CSTAR (Centrifugal STage for Aerodynamic Research) compressor has been designed to be placed as the last stage in an axial compressor and its performance in this flow regime was measured. Because the compressor was designed as a research vehicle, unique instrumentation throughout the flow path provides a detailed look at its steady state performance. Rakes at the inlet and deswirl section quantify the overall performance but other instrumentation is used to understand the component performance. Static pressure taps along the shroud, within the diffuser, and through the turn-to-axial show the static pressure rise. Additionally, rakes at the inlet and exit of diffuser also characterize the performance of the wedge diffuser and the impeller. Additionally, capacitance probes located at the knee and exducer of the impeller non-intrusively measure the size of the tip clearance during facility operation. An investigation into these measurements resulted in a standard procedure for in-situ calibration and installation to produce repeatable and accurate clearance measurements. Finally, the feasibility of future Laser Doppler Velocimetry measurements acquired through the shroud window was tested and was found to be achievable with the use of beam translators to ensure that measurement volumes are created after beam refraction through the windows. Inlet conditions of the facility have been investigated and fluctuations of the ambient conditions have been mitigated with a large settling chamber to ensure repeatable and stable operation. The current instrumentation was utilized to determine the compressor performance. Measurements of the steady performance parameters along with those of the internal flowfield are documented.

  12. Building a virtual network in a community health research training program.

    PubMed

    Lau, F; Hayward, R

    2000-01-01

    To describe the experiences, lessons, and implications of building a virtual network as part of a two-year community health research training program in a Canadian province. An action research field study in which 25 health professionals from 17 health regions participated in a seven-week training course on health policy, management, economics, research methods, data analysis, and computer technology. The participants then returned to their regions to apply the knowledge in different community health research projects. Ongoing faculty consultations and support were provided as needed. Each participant was given a notebook computer with the necessary software, Internet access, and technical support for two years, to access information resources, engage in group problem solving, share ideas and knowledge, and collaborate on projects. Data collected over two years consisted of program documents, records of interviews with participants and staff, meeting notes, computer usage statistics, automated online surveys, computer conference postings, program Web site, and course feedback. The analysis consisted of detailed review and comparison of the data from different sources. NUD*IST was then used to validate earlier study findings. The ten key lessons are that role clarity, technology vision, implementation staging, protected time, just-in-time training, ongoing facilitation, work integration, participatory design, relationship building, and the demonstration of results are essential ingredients for building a successful network. This study provides a descriptive model of the processes involved in developing, in the community health setting, virtual networks that can be used as the basis for future research and as a practical guide for managers.

  13. Lessons learned from community-based participatory research: establishing a partnership to support lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender ageing in place.

    PubMed

    Wright, Leslie A; King, Diane K; Retrum, Jessica H; Helander, Kenneth; Wilkins, Shari; Boggs, Jennifer M; Portz, Jennifer Dickman; Nearing, Kathryn; Gozansky, Wendolyn S

    2017-06-01

    Due to a history of oppression and lack of culturally competent services, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) seniors experience barriers to accessing social services. Tailoring an evidence-based ageing in place intervention to address the unique needs of LGBT seniors may decrease the isolation often faced by this population. To describe practices used in the formation of a community-based participatory research (CBPR), partnership involving social workers, health services providers, researchers and community members who engaged to establish a LGBT ageing in place model called Seniors Using Supports To Age In Neighborhoods (SUSTAIN). A case study approach was employed to describe the partnership development process by reflecting on past meeting minutes, progress reports and interviews with SUSTAIN's partners. Key partnering practices utilized by SUSTAIN included (i) development of a shared commitment and vision; (ii) identifying partners with intersecting spheres of influence in multiple communities of identity (ageing services, LGBT, health research); (iii) attending to power dynamics (e.g. equitable sharing of funds); and (iv) building community capacity through reciprocal learning. Although the partnership dissolved after 4 years, it served as a successful catalyst to establish community programming to support ageing in place for LGBT seniors. Multi-sector stakeholder involvement with capacity to connect communities and use frameworks that formalize equity was key to establishing a high-trust CBPR partnership. However, lack of focus on external forces impacting each partner (e.g. individual organizational strategic planning, community funding agency perspectives) ultimately led to dissolution of the SUSTAIN partnership even though implementation of community programming was realized. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. [Research report of experimental database establishment of digitized virtual Chinese No.1 female].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shi-zhen; Yuan, Lin; Tang, Lei; Huang, Wen-hua; Dai, Jing-xing; Li, Jian-yi; Liu, Chang; Wang, Xing-hai; Li, Hua; Luo, Shu-qian; Qin, Dulie; Zeng, Shao-qun; Wu, Tao; Zhang, Mei-chao; Wu, Kun-cheng; Jiao, Pei-feng; Lu, Yun-tao; Chen, Hao; Li, Pei-liang; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Tong; Fan, Ji-hong

    2003-03-01

    To establish digitized virtual Chinese No.1 female (VCH-F1) image database. A 19 years old female cadaver was scanned by CT, MRI, and perfused with red filling material through formal artery before freezing and em- bedding. The whole body was cut by JZ1500A vertical milling machine with a 0.2 mm inter-spacing. All the images was produced by Fuji FinePix S2 Pro camera. The body index of VCH-F1 was 94%. We cut 8 556 sections of the whole body, and each image was 17.5 MB in size and the whole database reached 149.7 GB. We have totally 6 versions of the database for different applications. Compared with other databases, VCH-F1 has good representation of the Chinese body shape, colorful filling material in blood vessels providing enough information for future registration and segmentation. Vertical embedding and cutting helped to retain normal human physiological posture, and the image quality and operation efficiency were improved by using various techniques such as one-time freezing and fixation, double-temperature icehouse, large-diameter milling disc and whole body cutting.

  15. Encouraging Teachers to Build Collaborations with Researchers; Examples From the Classroom (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, M.

    2013-12-01

    Bringing experts into our schools allows for highly engaging lessons, encourages career thinking, adds authenticity to the topic, and allows student's questions to be answered by experts. Researchers can physically visit classrooms or appear through presentation technologies, such as Skype, or Google Hangouts. Virtual visits allow students to see laboratories and field sites. Collaborating with scientists builds the connective tissue that helps all educators and our students learn more deeply. When K-12 teachers collaborate with scientists and graduate students, teachers learn more science, and scientists learn more teaching. This growth of background knowledge is a win-win situation and helps us meet the expectations of the Common Core State Standards. Teachers need to feel encouraged to contact their local or regional scientists for support. Reaching out into the universities to make contact with polar scientists or graduate students is a good place to start. Building professional networks allows PI's to address the 'broader impact' requirement on many grant applications, and helps spread the university's work in the polar regions out to the general public. These collaborations also give teachers expert insights and current data to build authentic lessons, and excite their students to seek careers in the sciences. This presentation will focus on three completed interactive opportunities I have built with researchers in my classroom. Students adding daily sediment to their sediment core, after communications from the field with scientist Heidi Roop in Alaska.

  16. SIOS: A regional cooperation of international research infrastructures as a building block for an Arctic observing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmen, K. J.; Lønne, O. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Svalbard Integrated Earth Observing System (SIOS) is a regional response to the Earth System Science (ESS) challenges posed by the Amsterdam Declaration on Global Change. SIOS is intended to develop and implement methods for how observational networks in the Arctic are to be designed in order to address such issues in a regional scale. SIOS builds on the extensive observation capacity and research installations already in place by many international institutions and will provide upgraded and relevant Observing Systems and Research Facilities of world class in and around Svalbard. It is a distributed research infrastructure set up to provide a regional observational system for long term measurements under a joint framework. As one of the large scale research infrastructure initiatives on the ESFRI roadmap (European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures), SIOS is now being implemented. The new research infrastructure organization, the SIOS Knowledge Center (SIOS-KC), is instrumental in developing methods and solutions for setting up its regional contribution to a systematically constructed Arctic observational network useful for global change studies. We will discuss cross-disciplinary research experiences some case studies and lessons learned so far. SIOS aims to provide an effective, easily accessible data management system which makes use of existing data handling systems in the thematic fields covered by SIOS. SIOS will, implement a data policy which matches the ambitions that are set for the new European research infrastructures, but at the same time be flexible enough to consider `historical' legacies. Given the substantial international presence in the Svalbard archipelago and the pan-Arctic nature of the issue, there is an opportunity to build SIOS further into a wider regional network and pan-Arctic context, ideally under the umbrella of the Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks (SAON) initiative. It is necessary to anchor SIOS strongly in a European

  17. Building hospital pharmacy practice research capacity in Qatar: a cross-sectional survey of hospital pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Derek; Al Hail, Moza; Abdul Rouf, P V; El Kassem, Wessam; Diack, Lesley; Thomas, Binny; Awaisu, Ahmed

    2015-06-01

    research compared to experience and confidence. While general attitudes towards research were positive, there were some barriers relating to support (e.g. administration) and research culture. Positive attitudes towards research and possessing postgraduate qualifications were significant in relation to readiness to participate in research and research training. Findings are of key relevance when considering the aims of research capacity building of encouraging research, improving skills and identifying skills gaps.

  18. Optics and materials research for controlled radiant energy transfer in buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Goldner, R.B.

    1983-11-01

    The overall objective of the Tufts research program was to identify and attempt to solve some of the key materials problems associated with practical approaches for achieving controlled radiant energy transfer (CRET) through building windows and envelopes, so as to decrease heating and cooling loads in buildings. Major accomplishments included: the identification of electrochromic (EC)-based structures as the preferred structures for achieving CRET the identification of modulated reflectivity as the preferred mode of operation for EC-based structures demonstration of the feasibility of operating EC-materials in a modulated R(lambda) mode and demonstration of the applicability of free electron model to coloredmore » polycrystalline WO3 films.« less

  19. Establishing Long Term Data Management Research Priorities via a Data Decadal Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A.; Uhlir, P.; Meyer, C. B.; Robinson, E.

    2013-12-01

    We live in a time of unprecedented collection of and access to scientific data. Improvements in sensor technologies and modeling capabilities are constantly producing new data sources. Data sets are being used for unexpected purposes far from their point of origin, as research spans projects, discipline domains, and temporal and geographic boundaries. The nature of science is evolving, with more open science, open publications, and changes to the nature of peer review and data "publication". Data-intensive, or computational science, has been identified as a new research paradigm. There is recognition that the creation of a data set can be a contribution to science deserving of recognition comparable to other scientific publications. Federally funded projects are generally expected to make their data open and accessible to everyone. In this dynamic environment, scientific progress is ever more dependent on good data management practices and policies. Yet current data management and stewardship practices are insufficient. Data sets created at great, and often public, expense are at risk of being lost for technological or organizational reasons. Insufficient documentation and understanding of data can mean that the data are used incorrectly or not at all. Scientific results are being scrutinized and questioned, and occasionally retracted due to problems in data management. The volume of data is greatly increasing while funding for data management is meager and generally must be found within existing budgets. Many federal government agencies, including NASA, USGS, NOAA and NSF are already making efforts to address data management issues. Executive memos and directives give substantial impetus to those efforts, such as the May 9 Executive Order directing agencies to implement Open Data Policy requirements and regularly report their progress. However, these distributed efforts risk duplicating effort, lack a unifying, long-term strategic vision, and too often work in

  20. Prince Edward Island Heart Health Dissemination Research Project: establishing a sustainable community mobilization initiative.

    PubMed

    White, R; Mitchell, T; Gyorfi-Dyke, E; Sweet, L; Hebert, R; Moase, O; MacPhee, R; MacDonald, B

    2001-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Prince Edward Island Heart Health Program (PEIHHP) Dissemination Research Project. Prince Edward Island (PEI) is a small province in the Atlantic region of Canada with a population of 137,980. The Island's economy is dependent on the fishery, agriculture, and tourism industries. Although unemployment rates are high (14.4%), Prince Edward Island has the lowest poverty rate in the country at 15.2%, high levels of social support (86%), and the second lowest rate of high chronic stress (Report on the Health of Canadians, 1996, 1999).

  1. Privacy protection and public goods: building a genetic database for health research in Newfoundland and Labrador

    PubMed Central

    Pullman, Daryl; Perrot-Daley, Astrid; Hodgkinson, Kathy; Street, Catherine; Rahman, Proton

    2013-01-01

    Objective To provide a legal and ethical analysis of some of the implementation challenges faced by the Population Therapeutics Research Group (PTRG) at Memorial University (Canada), in using genealogical information offered by individuals for its genetics research database. Materials and methods This paper describes the unique historical and genetic characteristics of the Newfoundland and Labrador founder population, which gave rise to the opportunity for PTRG to build the Newfoundland Genealogy Database containing digitized records of all pre-confederation (1949) census records of the Newfoundland founder population. In addition to building the database, PTRG has developed the Heritability Analytics Infrastructure, a data management structure that stores genotype, phenotype, and pedigree information in a single database, and custom linkage software (KINNECT) to perform pedigree linkages on the genealogy database. Discussion A newly adopted legal regimen in Newfoundland and Labrador is discussed. It incorporates health privacy legislation with a unique research ethics statute governing the composition and activities of research ethics boards and, for the first time in Canada, elevating the status of national research ethics guidelines into law. The discussion looks at this integration of legal and ethical principles which provides a flexible and seamless framework for balancing the privacy rights and welfare interests of individuals, families, and larger societies in the creation and use of research data infrastructures as public goods. Conclusion The complementary legal and ethical frameworks that now coexist in Newfoundland and Labrador provide the legislative authority, ethical legitimacy, and practical flexibility needed to find a workable balance between privacy interests and public goods. Such an approach may also be instructive for other jurisdictions as they seek to construct and use biobanks and related research platforms for genetic research. PMID

  2. Privacy protection and public goods: building a genetic database for health research in Newfoundland and Labrador.

    PubMed

    Kosseim, Patricia; Pullman, Daryl; Perrot-Daley, Astrid; Hodgkinson, Kathy; Street, Catherine; Rahman, Proton

    2013-01-01

    To provide a legal and ethical analysis of some of the implementation challenges faced by the Population Therapeutics Research Group (PTRG) at Memorial University (Canada), in using genealogical information offered by individuals for its genetics research database. This paper describes the unique historical and genetic characteristics of the Newfoundland and Labrador founder population, which gave rise to the opportunity for PTRG to build the Newfoundland Genealogy Database containing digitized records of all pre-confederation (1949) census records of the Newfoundland founder population. In addition to building the database, PTRG has developed the Heritability Analytics Infrastructure, a data management structure that stores genotype, phenotype, and pedigree information in a single database, and custom linkage software (KINNECT) to perform pedigree linkages on the genealogy database. A newly adopted legal regimen in Newfoundland and Labrador is discussed. It incorporates health privacy legislation with a unique research ethics statute governing the composition and activities of research ethics boards and, for the first time in Canada, elevating the status of national research ethics guidelines into law. The discussion looks at this integration of legal and ethical principles which provides a flexible and seamless framework for balancing the privacy rights and welfare interests of individuals, families, and larger societies in the creation and use of research data infrastructures as public goods. The complementary legal and ethical frameworks that now coexist in Newfoundland and Labrador provide the legislative authority, ethical legitimacy, and practical flexibility needed to find a workable balance between privacy interests and public goods. Such an approach may also be instructive for other jurisdictions as they seek to construct and use biobanks and related research platforms for genetic research.

  3. Increasing Participation in Genomic Research and Biobanking Through Community-Based Capacity Building

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Elizabeth Gross; Husamudeen, Maryam; Larson, Elaine L.; Williams, Janet K.

    2016-01-01

    Achieving equitable minority representation in genomic biobanking is one of the most difficult challenges faced by researchers today. Capacity building—a framework for research that includes collaborations and on-going engagement—can be used to help researchers, clinicians and communities better understand the process, utility, and clinical application of genomic science. The purpose of this exploratory descriptive study was to examine factors that influence the decision to participate in genomic research, and identify essential components of capacity building with a community at risk of being under-represented in biobanks. Results of focus groups conducted in Central Harlem with 46 participants were analyzed by a collaborative team of community and academic investigators using content analysis and AtlisTi. Key themes identified were: (1) the potential contribution of biobanking to individual and community health, for example the effect of the environment on health, (2) the societal context of the science, such as DNA criminal databases and paternity testing, that may affect the decision to participate, and (3) the researchers’ commitment to community health as an outcome of capacity building. These key factors can contribute to achieving equity in biobank participation, and guide genetic specialists in biobank planning and implementation. PMID:25228357

  4. How the research-based industry approaches vaccine development and establishes priorities.

    PubMed

    André, F E

    2002-01-01

    Over the past two decades, progress in immunology, molecular biology and genomics as well as some technological breakthroughs in computer science has opened the way to the development of prophylactic vaccines against most acute infectious diseases. Therapeutic vaccines against chronic infections, allergic conditions, auto-immune diseases and cancer have also come into the realm of possibility. It is estimated that wordwide there are about 400 vaccine projects in R&D laboratories of academic institutions, research institutes and vaccine manufacturers. Most of these projects will not yield a licensed vaccine for routine or even targeted immunisation. This is mostly not because of scientific barriers but due to financial and politicoeconomic obstades that make their development feasible only by the handful of major research-based vaccine manufacturers that nowadays all form part of large global pharmaceutical corporations. Such enterprises have to be profitable to survive and priority setting, when it comes to R&D projects, has to take into account potential return on all investments, particularly as it currently costs between 200 and 500 million US dollars to bring a new vaccine from the concept stage to market. Factors that influence the decision to embark upon an R&D project on a new vaccine include the medical need for the vaccine, gauged by the global burden of the targeted disease, potential and probable market size - judged on volume (number of doses required) and value (total sales) -, probability of success and expertise of the company in the field (both R&D and marketing) as well as the likelihood of competitors taking a large part of the market. Moral imperatives such as the urgent need for vaccines against HIV/AIDS, malaria and an improved vaccine against tuberculosis to save the several millions of lives claimed each year by these diseases also play a role. However, for such investments to be sustainable other sources of financing than the commercial

  5. Building Research Capacity for African Institutions: Confronting the Research Leadership Gap and Lessons from African Research Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owusu, Francis; Kalipeni, Ezekiel; Awortwi, Nicholas; Kiiru, Joy Mueni Maina

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the meaning and competencies of "research leadership" in the African context and investigates strategies for developing it. Data for the study were gathered through an online survey that targeted recipients of research grants/support from key research funders to selected African institutions. The recipients of these…

  6. Connectivity research in Iceland - using scientific tools to establish sustainable water management strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finger, David

    2015-04-01

    Since the ninth century when the first settlers arrived in Iceland the island has undergone deforestation and subsequent vegetation degradation and soil erosion. Almost the entire birch forest and woodland, which originally covered ~ 25% of the nation, have been deforested through wood cutting and overgrazing. Consequently, soil erosion seriously affects over 40% of the country. During the last 50 years extensive drainage of wetlands has taken place. Furthermore, about 75% of Iceland electricity production comes from hydropower plants, constructed along the main rivers. Along with seismic and volcanic activities the above mentioned anthropogenic impacts continuously altered the hydro-geomorphic connectivity in many parts of the island. In the framework of ongoing efforts to restore ecosystems and their services in Iceland a thorough understanding of the hydro-geomorphic processes is essential. Field observations and numerical models are crucial tools to adopt appropriate management strategies and help decision makers establish sustainable governance strategies. Sediment transport models have been used in the past to investigate the impacts of hydropower dams on sediment transport in downstream rivers (Finger et al., 2006). Hydropower operations alter the turbidity dynamics in downstream freshwater systems, affecting visibility and light penetration into the water, leading to significant changes in primary production (Finger et al., 2007a). Overall, the interruption of connectivity by physical obstructions can affect the entire food chain, hampering the fishing yields in downstream waters (Finger et al., 2007b). In other locations hydraulic connectivity through retreating glaciers assures water transfer from upstream to downstream areas. The drastically retreat of glaciers can raise concerns of future water availability in remote mountain areas (Finger et al., 2013). Furthermore, the drastic reduction of glacier mass also jeopardizes the water availability for

  7. Establishment of Next-Generation Neurosurgery Research and Training Laboratory with Integrated Human Performance Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    Quality of neurosurgical care and patient outcomes are inextricably linked to surgical and technical proficiency and a thorough working knowledge of microsurgical anatomy. Neurosurgical laboratory-based cadaveric training is essential for the development and refinement of technical skills before their use on a living patient. Recent biotechnological advances including 3-dimensional (3D) microscopy and endoscopy, 3D printing, virtual reality, surgical simulation, surgical robotics, and advanced neuroimaging have proved to reduce the learning curve, improve conceptual understanding of complex anatomy, and enhance visuospatial skills in neurosurgical training. Until recently, few means have allowed surgeons to obtain integrated surgical and technological training in an operating room setting. We report on a new model, currently in use at our institution, for technologically integrated surgical training and innovation using a next-generation microneurosurgery skull base laboratory designed to recreate the setting of a working operating room. Each workstation is equipped with a 3D surgical microscope, 3D endoscope, surgical drills, operating table with a Mayfield head holder, and a complete set of microsurgical tools. The laboratory also houses a neuronavigation system, a surgical robotic, a surgical planning system, 3D visualization, virtual reality, and computerized simulation for training of surgical procedures and visuospatial skills. In addition, the laboratory is equipped with neurophysiological monitoring equipment in order to conduct research into human factors in surgery and the respective roles of workload and fatigue on surgeons' performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A method for establishing a long duration, stratospheric platform for astronomical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesen, Robert; Brown, Yorke

    2015-10-01

    During certain times of the year at middle and low latitudes, winds in the upper stratosphere move in nearly the opposite direction than the wind in the lower stratosphere. Here we present a method for maintaining a high-altitude balloon platform in near station-keeping mode that utilizes this stratospheric wind shear. The proposed method places a balloon-borne science platform high in the stratosphere connected by a lightweight, high-strength tether to a tug vehicle located in the lower or middle stratosphere. Using aerodynamic control surfaces, wind-induced aerodynamic forces on the tug can be manipulated to counter the wind drag acting on the higher altitude science vehicle, thus controlling the upper vehicle's geographic location. We describe the general framework of this station-keeping method, some important properties required for the upper stratospheric science payload and lower tug platforms, and compare this station-keeping approach with the capabilities of a high altitude airship and conventional tethered aerostat approaches. We conclude by discussing the advantages of such a platform for a variety of missions with emphasis on astrophysical research.

  9. Consumer attitudes towards the establishment of a national Australian familial cancer research database by the Inherited Cancer Connect (ICCon) Partnership.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Laura; Mitchell, Gillian; Thrupp, Letitia; Petelin, Lara; Richardson, Kate; Mascarenhas, Lyon; Young, Mary-Anne

    2018-01-01

    Clinical genetics units hold large amounts of information which could be utilised to benefit patients and their families. In Australia, a national research database, the Inherited Cancer Connect (ICCon) database, is being established that comprises clinical genetic data held for all carriers of mutations in cancer predisposition genes. Consumer input was sought to establish the acceptability of the inclusion of clinical genetic data into a research database. A qualitative approach using a modified nominal group technique was used to collect data through consumer forums conducted in three Australian states. Individuals who had previously received care from Familial Cancer Centres were invited to participate. Twenty-four consumers participated in three forums. Participants expressed positive attitudes about the establishment of the ICCon database, which were informed by the perceived benefits of the database including improved health outcomes for individuals with inherited cancer syndromes. Most participants were comfortable to waive consent for their clinical information to be included in the research database in a de-identified format. As major stakeholders, consumers have an integral role in contributing to the development and conduct of the ICCon database. As an initial step in the development of the ICCon database, the forums demonstrated consumers' acceptance of important aspects of the database including waiver of consent.

  10. Establishing causality in the decline and deformity of amphibians: The amphibian research and monitoring initiative model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Little, E.E.; Bridges, C.M.; Linder, G.; Boone, M.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Research to date has indicated that a range of environmental variables such as disease, parasitism, predation, competition, environmental contamination, solar ultraviolet radiation, climate change, or habitat alteration may be responsible for declining amphibian populations and the appearance of deformed organisms, yet in many cases no definitive environmental variable stands out as a causal factor. Multiple Stressors are often present in the habitat, and interactions among these can magnify injury to biota. This raises the possibility that the additive or synergistic impact of these Stressors may be the underlying cause of amphibian declines. Effective management for the restoration of amphibian populations requires the identification of causal factors contributing to their declines. A systematic approach to determine causality is especially important because initial impressions may be misleading or ambiguous. In addition, the evaluation of amphibian populations requires consideration of a broader spatial scale than commonly used in regulatory monitoring. We describe a systematic three-tiered approach to determine causality in amphibian declines and deformities. Tier 1 includes an evaluation of historic databases and extant data and would involve a desktop synopsis of the status of various stressors as well as site visits. Tier 2 studies are iterative, hypothesis driven studies beginning with general tests and continuing with analyses of increasing complexity as certain stressors are identified for further investigation. Tier 3 applies information developed in Tier 2 as predictive indicators of habitats and species at risk over broad landscape scales and provides decision support for the adaptive management of amphibian recovery. This comprehensive, tiered program could provide a mechanistic approach to identifying and addressing specific stressors responsible for amphibian declines across various landscapes.

  11. Information Requirements for Selection of Plastics for Use in Building. Proceedings of Conference of the Building Research Institute, Division of Engineering and Industrial Research (Spring 1960).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    Several aspects of plastics used in the building industry are discussed, and a general information format for specifying plastics in building construction is given. This format includes--(1) description of product, (2) physical properties, (3) design criteria, (4) installation, (5) maintenance, (6) economics, and (7) case histories. Several uses…

  12. A National Collaborative for Building the Field of Childhood Obesity Research.

    PubMed

    2018-03-01

    Rising rates of childhood obesity over the past 2 decades have spurred a number of public- and private-sector initiatives aimed at halting or even reversing this trend. Recognizing common interests in this issue, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, NIH, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation began conversations about creating a formal collaboration aimed at accelerating efforts to address childhood obesity by coordinating research agendas and providing support for evidence-building activities. The National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR) was launched in February 2009, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture joined in 2010. Using the model provided by other previously successful collaborations, such as the Youth Tobacco Cessation Collaborative, NCCOR has emphasized several principles suggested by Petrovich as key elements for successful partnerships: (1) delineate a common purpose by identifying key knowledge gaps in the field; (2) create a shared identity around that common purpose; (3) develop structures for democratic and respectful collaboration so as to strategically coordinate efforts for maximum national impact; (4) identify effective leaders capable of articulating challenges in the field and inspiring a commitment of minds and the resolve to address identified needs; (5) facilitate continuous knowledge exchange and synthesis to keep the field informed; and (6) support assessment of progress and feedback loops for ensuring continual progress. This paper examines how NCCOR has used these principles to help build the field of research, evaluation, and surveillance for childhood obesity prevention and management. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Social cognition in children with Down's syndrome: challenges to research and theory building.

    PubMed

    Cebula, K R; Moore, D G; Wishart, J G

    2010-02-01

    Characterising how socio-cognitive abilities develop has been crucial to understanding the wider development of typically developing children. It is equally central to understanding developmental pathways in children with intellectual disabilities such as Down's syndrome. While the process of acquisition of socio-cognitive abilities in typical development and in autism has received considerable attention, socio-cognitive development in Down's syndrome has received far less scrutiny. Initial work in the 1970s and 1980s provided important insights into the emergence of socio-cognitive abilities in the children's early years, and recently there has been a marked revival of interest in this area, with research focusing both on a broader range of abilities and on a wider age range. This annotation reviews some of these more recent findings, identifies outstanding gaps in current understanding, and stresses the importance of the development of theory in advancing research and knowledge in this field. Barriers to theory building are discussed and the potential utility of adopting a transactional approach to theory building illustrated with reference to a model of early socio-cognitive development in Down's syndrome. The need for a more extensive model of social cognition is emphasised, as is the need for larger-scale, finer-grained, longitudinal work which recognises the within-individual and within-group variability which characterises this population. The value of drawing on new technologies and of adapting innovative research paradigms from other areas of typical and atypical child psychology is also highlighted.

  14. Community-Engaged Strategies to Promote Relevance of Research Capacity-Building Efforts Targeting Community Organizations.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Jennifer; Miller, Stephania T; Joosten, Yvonne; Elzey, Jared D; Israel, Tiffany; King, Christine; Luther, Patrick; Vaughn, Yolanda; Wilkins, Consuelo H

    2015-10-01

    The study goal is to highlight strategies for promoting relevance of research capacity-building efforts targeting community organizations (CO)s. Two community partners, representing two COs, were invited to participate in CO research development trainings, Community Research Forums (Forum)s. Their contributions were documented via Forum document review. Forum participants, representatives from other COs, completed post-Forum surveys to identify additional training needs and rate Forum impact relative to their training expectations. A content-based analysis and descriptive statistics were used to summarize needs assessment- and impact-related survey responses, respectively. Community partners were involved in eight Forum-related activities including marketing (planning), facilitation (implementation), and manuscript coauthorship (dissemination). Eighty-one individuals, representing 55 COs, attended the Forums. Needs assessment responses revealed a desire for additional assistance with existing Forum topics (e.g., defining research priorities) and a need for new ones (e.g., promoting organizational buy in for research). Ninety-one percent of participants agreed that the Forum demonstrated the value of research to COs and how to create a research agenda. Including community partners in all Forum phases ensured that CO perspectives were integrated throughout. Post-Forum needs and impact assessment results will help in tailoring, where needed, future training topics and strategies, respectively. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Best practices and pearls in interdisciplinary mentoring from Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health Directors.

    PubMed

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Nagel, Joan D; Regensteiner, Judith G

    2012-11-01

    Increasingly, national programs and leaders are looking at interdisciplinary collaborations as essential to future research. Twelve years ago, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) developed and implemented the Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health (BIRCWH) K12 program to focus on interdisciplinary mentored career development for junior faculty in women's health research. We applied a mixed-methods approach using an electronic survey and in-person presentations and discussions to understand best practices and lessons learned for interdisciplinary mentoring across BIRCWH K12 program leaders. We received responses from all 29 active BIRCWH programs. Factors associated with success included ensuring sufficient protected time for regular (weekly or biweekly) mentoring; mentors promoting the research independence of the Scholar; a team mentoring approach, including career as well as content mentors; and explicit and clear expectations outlined between the Scholar and mentor. The majority of programs conduct formal evaluations of mentorship, and 79% of programs offer training in mentorship for either Scholars, mentors, or both. This article presents program leaders' best practices, challenges, and lessons learned from mentoring junior faculty who are conducting women's health research, whether basic, clinical, behavioral, translational, or health services research, using an interdisciplinary mentoring approach.

  16. Best Practices and Pearls in Interdisciplinary Mentoring from Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health Directors

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Joan D.; Regensteiner, Judith G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Increasingly, national programs and leaders are looking at interdisciplinary collaborations as essential to future research. Twelve years ago, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) developed and implemented the Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health (BIRCWH) K12 program to focus on interdisciplinary mentored career development for junior faculty in women's health research. Methods We applied a mixed-methods approach using an electronic survey and in-person presentations and discussions to understand best practices and lessons learned for interdisciplinary mentoring across BIRCWH K12 program leaders. Results and Conclusions We received responses from all 29 active BIRCWH programs. Factors associated with success included ensuring sufficient protected time for regular (weekly or biweekly) mentoring; mentors promoting the research independence of the Scholar; a team mentoring approach, including career as well as content mentors; and explicit and clear expectations outlined between the Scholar and mentor. The majority of programs conduct formal evaluations of mentorship, and 79% of programs offer training in mentorship for either Scholars, mentors, or both. This article presents program leaders' best practices, challenges, and lessons learned from mentoring junior faculty who are conducting women's health research, whether basic, clinical, behavioral, translational, or health services research, using an interdisciplinary mentoring approach. PMID:22994986

  17. Building capacity for service user and carer involvement in research: the implications and impact of best research for best health.

    PubMed

    Minogue, Virginia; Girdlestone, John

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of service user and carer involvement in NHS research and describe the nature of this involvement in three specialist mental health Trusts. It also aims to discuss the value of service user and carer involvement and present the perspective of the service user and research manager. The paper reviews patient and public involvement policy and practice in the NHS and NHS research. It examines the effectiveness of involvement activity and utilises a case example to demonstrate the impact of patient/service user involvement on the NHS and the individuals who take part. The paper concludes that service user involvement is essential if research is to support the development of health services that clearly reflect the needs of the service user and impact positively on service quality. Service user involvement is an established element of NHS research and development at both national and local level. The Department of Health strategy for research, Best Research for Best Health, reiterates both the importance of research that benefits the patient and the involvement of the service user in the research process. Despite this, the changes in Department of Health support funding for research, introduced by the strategy, may inadvertently lead to some NHS Trusts experiencing difficulty in resourcing this important activity. The paper illustrates the effectiveness of successful patient and public involvement in research. It also identifies how involvement has developed in a fragmented and uncoordinated way and how it is threatened by a failure to embed it more consistently in research infrastructure.

  18. Establishing community partnerships to support late-life anxiety research: lessons learned from the Calmer Life project.

    PubMed

    Jameson, John Paul; Shrestha, Srijana; Escamilla, Monica; Clark, Sharonda; Wilson, Nancy; Kunik, Mark; Zeno, Darrell; Harris, Toi B; Peters, Alice; Varner, Ivory L; Scantlebury, Carolyn; Scott-Gurnell, Kathy; Stanley, Melinda

    2012-01-01

    This article outlines the development of the Calmer Life project, a partnership established between researchers and faith-based and social service organizations to examine the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) incorporating religious/spiritual components for older African Americans in low-income communities. The program was designed to bypass several barriers to delivery of CBT within the specified community; it allows multimodal delivery (in person or by telephone) that occurs outside traditional mental health settings through faith-based organizations and neighborhood community centers. It includes religion/spirituality as an element, dependent upon the preference of the participant, and is modular, so that people can select the skills they wish to learn. Established relationships within the community were built upon, and initial meetings were held in community settings, allowing feedback from community organizations. This ongoing program is functioning successfully and has strengthened relationships with community partners and facilitated increased availability of education and services in the community. The lessons learned in establishing these partnerships are outlined. The growth of effectiveness research for late-life anxiety treatments in underserved minority populations requires development of functional partnerships between academic institutions and community stakeholders, along with treatment modifications to effectively address barriers faced by these consumers. The Calmer Life project may serve as a model.

  19. Establishing a European research agenda on 'gut feelings' in general practice. A qualitative study using the nominal group technique.

    PubMed

    Stolper, Erik; van Leeuwen, Yvonne; van Royen, Paul; van de Wiel, Margaretha; van Bokhoven, Marloes; Houben, Paul; Hobma, Sjoerd; van der Weijden, Trudy; Dinant, Geert Jan

    2010-06-01

    Although 'gut feelings' are perceived as playing a substantial role in the diagnostic reasoning of the general practitioner (GP), there is little evidence about their diagnostic and prognostic value. Consensus on both types of 'gut feelings' (a 'sense of alarm', a 'sense of reassurance') has enabled us to operationalize the concept. As a next step we wanted to identify research questions that are considered relevant to validate the concept of 'gut feelings' and to estimate its usefulness for daily practice and medical education. Moreover, we were interested in the study designs considered appropriate to study these research questions. The nominal group technique (NGT) is a qualitative research method of judgmental decision-making involving four phases: generating ideas, recording them, evaluation and prioritization. Dutch and Belgian academics whose subject is general practice (n = 18), attended one of three meetings during which NGT was used to produce a 'research agenda' on 'gut feelings'. NGT yielded ten research questions and nine corresponding appropriate designs on four topics, i.e. the diagnostic value of 'gut feelings', the validation of its determinants, the opportunities for integrating 'gut feelings' in medical education and a rest group. The study designs respectively included recording and follow-up of 'gut feelings', video recording of consultations with stimulated recall using simulated and real patients respectively, analysing trainees' consultation stories and videos, linguistic analyses, and vignette studies. Furthermore, two experimental designs were proposed. A European research agenda on 'gut feelings' in general practice has been established and could be used in collaborative research.

  20. Allison V–1710 Engine on a Dynamotor Stand in the Engine Research Building

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1943-03-21

    The first research assignment specifically created for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics’ (NACA) new Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory was the integration of a supercharger into the Allison V–1710 engine. The military was relying on the liquid-cooled V–1710 to power several types of World War II fighter aircraft and wanted to improve the engine's speed and altitude performance. Superchargers forced additional airflow into the combustion chamber, which increased the engine’s performance resulting in greater altitudes and speeds. They also generated excess heat that affected the engine cylinders, oil, and fuel. In 1943 the military tasked the new Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory to integrate the supercharger, improve the cooling system, and remedy associated engine knock. Three Allison engines were provided to the laboratory’s research divisions. One group was tasked with improving the supercharger performance, another analyzed the effect of the increased heat on knock in the fuel, one was responsible for improving the cooling system, and another would install the new components on the engine with minimal drag penalties. The modified engines were installed on this 2000-horsepower dynamotor stand in a test cell within the Engine Research Building. The researchers could run the engine at different temperatures, fuel-air ratios, and speeds. When the modifications were complete, the improved V–1710 was flight tested on a P–63A Kingcobra loaned to the NACA for this project.

  1. Proceedings of the 25th Seismic Research Review -- Nuclear Explosion Monitoring: Building the Knowledge Base

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Francesca C.; Mendius, E. Louise

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 25th Seismic Research Review -- Nuclear Explosion Monitoring: Building the Knowledge Base, held 23-25 September, 2003 in Tucson, Arizona. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as wellmore » as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.« less

  2. Social Work Intervention Research With Adult Cancer Patients: A Literature Review and Reflection on Knowledge-Building for Practice.

    PubMed

    Pockett, Rosalie; Dzidowska, Monika; Hobbs, Kim

    2015-01-01

    The results of a literature review of social work intervention research with adult cancer patients found only a small number of studies conducted by social work researchers. The findings of the review are presented followed by a reflective discussion on the nature of knowledge-building and research knowledge for practice. Knowledge building is considered as a continuous, negotiated process within communities of practice focused on psychosocial perspectives that draw on a range of knowledge sources. Epistemology, worldviews and research orientations are considered along with the values and stance of social work, all of which create the domain of the practice-researcher.

  3. Building an International Initiative to Infuse Novel Cancer Models into the Research Community | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    My name is Caitlyn Barrett and I am the Scientific Program Manager for the Human Cancer Model Initiative (HCMI) in the Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG). In my role within the HCMI, I am helping to establish communication pathways and build the foundation for collaboration that will enable the completion of the Initiative’s aim to develop as many as 1000 next-generation cancer models, established from patient tumors and accompanied by clinical and molecular data.

  4. Research on the Technology of Producing Building Stone by Using Blast Furnace Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bingji; Zhang, Jianliang; Guo, Hongwei; Shi, Zhiwen; Liu, Feng

    During production of a large quantity of steel, slag is produced at the same time. This paper chooses blast furnace slag (BFS) as the main material for the research. The purpose of the research is to explore its optimal physicochemical properties and the use of BFS in building stone field. The paper elaborates the experimentation process of producing glass-ceramics and presents the results. The results show that SiO2 content in BFS and amount of Cr2O3 and Fe2O3 added as nucleating agents have certain effect on the properties of glass-ceramics. The results also show that the exothermic peak temperature of base glass is the lowest when adding 20% SiO2 to the BFS, and 2% Cr2O3 and 3% Fe2O3 as nucleating agents, which makes easy crystallization and optimal properties of the glass-ceramics.

  5. Analysis on the hot spot and trend of the foreign assembly building research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Xiaoqing; Luo, Yanbing

    2017-03-01

    First of all, the paper analyzes the research on the front of the assembly building in the past 15 years. This article mainly adopts the method of CO word analysis, construct the co word matrix, correlation matrix, and then into a dissimilarity matrix, and on this basis, using factor analysis, cluster analysis and multi scale analysis method to study the structure of prefabricated construction field display. Finally, the results of the analysis are discussed, and summarized the current research focus of foreign prefabricated construction mainly concentrated in 7 aspects: embankment construction, wood construction, bridge construction, crane layout, PCM wall and glass system, based on neural network test, energy saving and recycling, and forecast the future trend of development study.

  6. Building connected data standards to promote interdisciplinary research in the paleogeosciences- PalEON, Neotoma, THROUGHPUT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goring, S. J.; Richard, S. M.; Williams, J. W.; Dawson, A.

    2017-12-01

    A broad array of data resources, across disciplines, are needed to study Earth system processes operating at multiple spatial or temporal scales. Data friction frequently delays this integrative and interdisciplinary research, while sustainable solutions may be hampered as a result of academic incentives that penalize technical "tool building" at the expense of research publication. The paleogeosciences, in particular, often integrate data drawn from multiple sub-disciplines and from a range of long-tail and big data sources. Data friction can be lowered and the pace of scientific discovery accelerated through the development and adoption of data standards, both within the paleogeosciences and with allied disciplines. Using the PalEON Project (https://sites.nd.edu/paleonproject/) and the Neotoma Paleoecological Database (https://neotomadb.org) as focal case studies, we first illustrate the advances possible through data standardization. We then focus on new efforts in data standardization and building linkages among paleodata resources underway through the EarthCube-funded Throughput project. A first step underway is to analyze existing standards across paleo-data repositories and identify ways in which the adoption of common standards can promote connectivity, reducing barriers to interdisciplinary research, especially for early career researchers. Experience indicates that standards tend to emerge by necessity and from a mixture of bottom-up and top-down processes. A common pathway is when conventions developed to solve specific problems within a community are extended to address challenges that are more general. The Throughput project will identify, document, and promote such solutions to foster wider adoption of standards for data interchange and reduce data friction in the paleogeosciences.

  7. Capacity building among african american faith leaders to promote HIV prevention and vaccine research.

    PubMed

    Alio, Amina P; Lewis, Cindi A; Bunce, Catherine A; Wakefield, Steven; Thomas, Weldon G; Sanders, Edwin; Keefer, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    In light of the increasing rates of HIV infection in African Americans, it is essential that black faith leaders become more proactive in the fight against the epidemic. The study aim was to engage faith leaders in a sustainable partnership to increase community participation in preventive HIV vaccine clinical research while improving their access to and utilization of HIV/AIDS prevention services. Leadership Development Seminars were adapted for faith leaders in Rochester, NY, with topics ranging from the importance of preventive HIV vaccine research to social issues surrounding HIV/AIDs within a theological framework. Seminars were taught by field-specific experts from the black community and included the development of action plans to institute HIV preventive ministries. To assess the outcome of the Seminars, baseline and post-training surveys were administered and analyzed through paired sample t Tests and informal interviews. 19 faith leaders completed the intervention. In general, the majority of clergy felt that their understanding of HIV vaccine research and its goals had increased postintervention. A critical outcome was the subsequent formation of the Rochester Faith Collaborative by participating clergy seeking to sustain the collaborative and address the implementation of community action plans. Providing scientific HIV/AIDS knowledge within the context of clergy members' belief structure was an effective method for engaging black Church leaders in Rochester, NY. Collaborative efforts with various local institutions and community-based organizations were essential in building trust with the faith leaders, thereby building bridges for better understanding of HIV/AIDS prevention efforts, including HIV vaccine research.

  8. Annual Research Review: Building a science of personalized intervention for youth mental health.

    PubMed

    Ng, Mei Yi; Weisz, John R

    2016-03-01

    Within the past decade, health care service and research priorities have shifted from evidence-based medicine to personalized medicine. In mental health care, a similar shift to personalized intervention may boost the effectiveness and clinical utility of empirically supported therapies (ESTs). The emerging science of personalized intervention will need to encompass evidence-based methods for determining which problems to target and in which order, selecting treatments and deciding whether and how to combine them, and informing ongoing clinical decision-making through monitoring of treatment response throughout episodes of care. We review efforts to develop these methods, drawing primarily from psychotherapy research with youths. Then we propose strategies for building a science of personalized intervention in youth mental health. The growing evidence base for personalizing interventions includes research on therapies adapted for specific subgroups; treatments targeting youths' environments; modular therapies; sequential, multiple assignment, randomized trials; measurement feedback systems; meta-analyses comparing treatments for specific patient characteristics; data-mining decision trees; and individualized metrics. The science of personalized intervention presents questions that can be addressed in several ways. First, to evaluate and organize personalized interventions, we propose modifying the system used to evaluate and organize ESTs. Second, to help personalizing research keep pace with practice needs, we propose exploiting existing randomized trial data to inform personalizing approaches, prioritizing the personalizing approaches likely to have the greatest impact, conducting more idiographic research, and studying tailoring strategies in usual care. Third, to encourage clinicians' use of personalized intervention research to inform their practice, we propose expanding outlets for research summaries and case studies, developing heuristic frameworks that

  9. A participatory evaluation framework in the establishment and implementation of transdisciplinary collaborative centers for health disparities research.

    PubMed

    Scarinci, Isabel C; Moore, Artisha; Benjamin, Regina; Vickers, Selwyn; Shikany, James; Fouad, Mona

    2017-02-01

    We describe the formulation and implementation of a participatory evaluation plan for three Transdisciplinary Collaborative Centers for Health Disparities Research funded by the National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities. Although different in scope of work, all three centers share a common goal of establishing sustainable centers in health disparities science in three priority areas - social determinants of health, men's health research, and health policy research. The logic model guides the process, impact, and outcome evaluation. Emphasis is placed on process evaluation in order to establish a "blue print" that can guide other efforts as well as assure that activities are being implemented as planned. We have learned three major lessons in this process: (1) Significant engagement, participation, and commitment of all involved is critical for the evaluation process; (2) Having a "roadmap" (logic model) and "directions" (evaluation worksheets) are instrumental in getting members from different backgrounds to follow the same path; and (3) Participation of the evaluator in the leadership and core meetings facilitates continuous feedback. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Establishing the ACORN National Practitioner Database: Strategies to Recruit Practitioners to a National Practice-Based Research Network.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jon; Steel, Amie; Moore, Craig; Amorin-Woods, Lyndon; Sibbritt, David

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the recruitment and promotion strategies employed by the Australian Chiropractic Research Network (ACORN) project aimed at helping recruit a substantial national sample of participants and to describe the features of our practice-based research network (PBRN) design that may provide key insights to others looking to establish a similar network or draw on the ACORN project to conduct sub-studies. The ACORN project followed a multifaceted recruitment and promotion strategy drawing on distinct branding, a practitioner-focused promotion campaign, and a strategically designed questionnaire and distribution/recruitment approach to attract sufficient participation from the ranks of registered chiropractors across Australia. From the 4684 chiropractors registered at the time of recruitment, the project achieved a database response rate of 36% (n = 1680), resulting in a large, nationally representative sample across age, gender, and location. This sample constitutes the largest proportional coverage of participants from any voluntary national PBRN across any single health care profession. It does appear that a number of key promotional and recruitment features of the ACORN project may have helped establish the high response rate for the PBRN, which constitutes an important sustainable resource for future national and international efforts to grow the chiropractic evidence base and research capacity. Further rigorous enquiry is needed to help evaluate the direct contribution of specific promotional and recruitment strategies in attaining high response rates from practitioner populations who may be invited to participate in future PBRNs. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Opportunities and Challenges in Establishing a Cohort Study: An Example From Cleft Lip/Palate Research in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Stock, Nicola Marie; Humphries, Kerry; Pourcain, Beate St; Bailey, Maggie; Persson, Martin; Ho, Karen M; Ring, Susan; Marsh, Cathy; Albery, Liz; Rumsey, Nichola; Sandy, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) is one of the most common birth conditions in the world, but little is known about its causes. Professional opinion remains divided as to which treatments may be the most beneficial for patients with CL/P, and the factors that contribute to psychological adjustment are poorly understood. The use of different methodological approaches and tools plays a key role in hampering efforts to address discrepancies within the evidence base. A new UK-wide program of research, The Cleft Collective, was established to combat many of these methodological challenges and to address some of the key research questions important to all CL/P stakeholders. To describe the establishment of CL/P cohort studies in the United Kingdom and to consider the many opportunities this resource will generate. To date, protocols have been developed and implemented within most UK cleft teams. Biological samples, environmental information, and data pertaining to parental psychological well-being and child development are being collected successfully. Recruitment is currently on track to meet the ambitious target of approximately 9800 individuals from just more than 3000 families. The Cleft Collective cohort studies represent a significant step forward for research in the field of CL/P. The data collected will form a comprehensive resource of information about individuals with CL/P and their families. This resource will provide the basis for many future projects and collaborations, both in the United Kingdom and around the world.

  12. Linking research to global health equity: the contribution of product development partnerships to access to medicines and research capacity building.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Bridget; Loff, Bebe

    2013-11-01

    Certain product development partnerships (PDPs) recognize that to promote the reduction of global health disparities they must create access to their products and strengthen research capacity in developing countries. We evaluated the contribution of 3 PDPs--Medicines for Malaria Venture, Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative, and Institute for One World Health--according to Frost and Reich's access framework. We also evaluated PDPs' capacity building in low- and middle-income countries at the individual, institutional, and system levels. We found that these PDPs advance public health by ensuring their products' registration, distribution, and adoption into national treatment policies in disease-endemic countries. Nonetheless, ensuring broad, equitable access for these populations--high distribution coverage; affordability, particularly for the poor; and adoption at provider and end-user levels--remains a challenge.

  13. Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Mixed-Humid Climates; January 2006 - December 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership; Building Industry Research Alliance; Building Science Consortium

    2006-12-01

    The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studiesmore » in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Mixed-Humid Climate Region on a cost-neutral basis.« less

  14. Building partnership in oral cancer research in a developing country: processes and barriers.

    PubMed

    Zain, Rosnah Binti; Ghani, Wan Maria Nabillah; Razak, Ishak Abdul; Latifah, Raja Jallaludin Raja; Samsuddin, Abdul Rani; Cheong, Sok Ching; Abdullah, Norlida; Ismail, Abdul Rashid; Hussaini, Haizal Bin; Talib, Norain Abu; Jallaludin, Amin

    2009-01-01

    The rising burden of cancer in the developing world calls for a re-evaluation of the treatment strategies employed to improve patient management, early detection and understanding of the disease. There is thus an increasing demand for interdisciplinary research that integrates two or more disciplines of what may seemed to be highly unrelated and yet very much needed as strategies for success in research. This paper presents the processes and barriers faced in building partnerships in oral cancer research in a developing country. A case study was undertaken in a developing country (Malaysia) to assess the strengths and weaknesses of the situation leading to the formation of a multidisciplinary research partnership in oral cancer. Following the formalization of the partnership, further evaluation was undertaken to identify measures that can assist in sustaining the partnership. The group identifies its strength as the existence of academia, research-intensive NGOs and good networking of clinicians via the existence of the government's network of healthcare provider system who are the policy makers. The major weaknesses identified are the competing interest between academia and NGOs to justify their existence due to the lack of funding sources and well trained human resources. With the growing partnership, the collaborative group recognizes the need to develop standard operating procedures (SOPs) and guidelines for the sharing and usage of resources in order to safeguard the interest of the original partners while also attending to the needs of the new partners.

  15. Wright R–2600–8 Engine in the Engine Propeller Research Building

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1943-03-21

    A Wright Aeronautical R–2600 Cyclone piston engine installed in the Engine Propeller Research Building, or Prop House, at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory. The R–2600 was among the most powerful engines that emerged during World War II. The engine, which was developed for commercial applications in 1939, was used to power the North American B–25 bomber and several other midsize military aircraft. The higher altitudes required by the military caused problems with the engine's cooling and fuel systems. The military requested that the Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory analyze the performance of the R–2600, improve its cooling system, and reduce engine knock. The NACA researchers subjected the engine to numerous tests in its Prop House. The R–2600 was the subject of the laboratory's first technical report, which was written by members of the Fuels and Lubricants Division. The Prop House contained soundproof test cells in which piston engines and propellers were mounted and operated at high powers. Electrically driven fans drew air through ducts to create a stream of cooling air over the engines. Researchers tested the performance of fuels, turbochargers, water-injection and cooling systems here during World War II. The facility was also investigated a captured German V–I buzz bomb during the war.

  16. NASA's Contribution to Water Research, Applications and Capacity Building in the America's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toll, D. L.; Searby, N. D.; Doorn, B.; Lawford, R. G.; Entin, J. K.; Mohr, K. I.; Lee, C.; NASA International Water Team

    2013-05-01

    NASA's water research, applications and capacity building activities use satellites and models to contribute to regional water information and solutions for the Americas. Free and open exchange of Earth data observations and products helps engage and improve integrated observation networks and enables national and multi-national regional water cycle research and applications. NASA satellite and modeling products provide a huge volume of valuable data extending back over 50 years across a broad range of spatial (local to global) and temporal (hourly to decadal) scales and include many products that are available in near real time (see earthdata.nasa.gov). In addition, NASA's work in hydrologic predictions are valuable for: 1) short-term and hourly data that is critical for flood and landslide warnings; 2) mid-term predictions of days to weeks useful for reservoir planning and water allocation, and 3) long term seasonal to decadal forecasts helpful for agricultural and irrigation planning, land use planning, and water infrastructure development and planning. To further accomplish these objectives NASA works to actively partner with public and private groups (e.g. federal agencies, universities, NGO's, and industry) in the U.S. and internationally to ensure the broadest use of its satellites and related information and products and to collaborate with regional end users who know the regions and their needs best. Through these data, policy and partnering activities, NASA addresses numerous water issues including water scarcity, the extreme events of drought and floods, and water quality so critical to the Americas. This presentation will outline and describe NASA's water related research, applications and capacity building programs' efforts to address the Americas' critical water challenges. This will specifically include water activities in NASA's programs in Terrestrial Hydrology (e.g., land-atmosphere feedbacks and improved stream flow estimation), Water Resources

  17. Community Capacity Building and Sustainability: Outcomes of Community-Based Participatory Research

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Karen; Tendulkar, Shalini A.; Rideout, Catlin; Bhuiya, Nazmim; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau; Savage, Clara P.; Grullon, Milagro; Strelnick, Hal; Leung, Carolyn; DiGirolamo, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Background For communities, the value of community-based participatory research (CBPR) is often manifested in the outcomes of increased capacity and sustainable adoption of evidence-based practices for social change. Educational opportunities that promote discourse between community and academic partners can help to advance CBPR and better define these outcomes. Objectives This paper describes a community–academic conference to develop shared definitions of community capacity building and sustainability related to CBPR and to identify obstacles and facilitators to both. Methods “Taking It to the Curbside: Engaging Communities to Create Sustainable Change for Health” was planned by five Clinical Translational Science Institutes and four community organizations. After a keynote presentation, breakout groups of community and academic members met to define community capacity building and sustainability, and to identify facilitators and barriers to achieving both. Groups were facilitated by researcher–community partner teams and conversations were recorded and transcribed. Qualitative analysis for thematic content was conducted by a subset of the planning committee. Results Important findings included learning that (1) the concepts of capacity and sustainability were considered interconnected; (2) partnership was perceived as both a facilitator and an outcome of CBPR; (3) sustainability was linked to “transfer of knowledge” from one generation to another within a community; and (4) capacity and sustainability were enhanced when goals were shared and health outcomes were achieved. Conclusions Community capacity building and sustainability are key outcomes of CBPR for communities. Co-learning opportunities that engage and mutually educate both community members and academics can be useful strategies for identifying meaningful strategies to achieve these outcomes. PMID:22982848

  18. Research Capacity-Building with New Technologies within New Communities of Practice: Reflections on the First Year of the Teacher Education Research Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Zoe; Stanley, Grant; Murray, Jean; Jones, Marion; McNamara, Olwen

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on a virtual research environment (VRE) and how it facilitated the networking of teacher educators participating in an Economic and Social Research Council-funded research capacity-building project. Using the theoretical lenses of situated learning and socio-cultural approaches to literacy, participants' ways of engaging with…

  19. Research Capacity Building: A Historically Black College/University-Based Case Study of a Peer-to-Peer Mentor Research Team Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Corey L.; Manyibe, Edward O.; Aref, Fariborz; Washington, Andre L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a peer-to-peer mentor research team model (PPMRTM) in building investigators' research skills (i.e., research methods and grant writing) at a historically Black college/university (HBCU) in the United States. Method: Three different theories (i.e., planned change, critical mass, and self-efficacy), contemporary study findings,…

  20. Establishing research priorities relating to the long-term impact of TIA and minor stroke through stakeholder-centred consensus.

    PubMed

    Turner, Grace M; Backman, Ruth; McMullan, Christel; Mathers, Jonathan; Marshall, Tom; Calvert, Melanie

    2018-01-01

    that care should be delivered (clinical setting and follow-up pathway); impact on family members; and education/training for health care professionals. Background Clinical management after transient ischaemic attack (TIA) and minor stroke focuses on stroke prevention. However, evidence demonstrates that many patients experience ongoing residual impairments. Residual impairments post-TIA and minor stroke may affect patients' quality of life and return to work or social activities. Research priorities of patients, health care professionals and key stakeholders relating to the long-term impact of TIA and minor stroke are unknown. Methods Our objective was to establish the top shared research priorities relating to the long-term impact of TIA and minor stroke through stakeholder-centred consensus. A one-day priority setting consensus meeting took place with representatives from different stakeholder groups in October 2016 (Birmingham, UK). Nominal group technique was used to establish research priorities. This involved three stages: (i) gathering research priorities from individual stakeholders; (ii) interim prioritisation in three subgroups; and (iii) final priority setting. Results The priority setting consensus meeting was attended by 11 stakeholders. The individual stakeholders identified 34 different research priorities. During the interim prioritisation exercise, the three subgroups generated 24 unique research priorities which were discussed as a whole group. Following the final consensus discussion, 11 shared research priorities were unanimously agreed.The 11 research questions encompass a range of categories, including: understanding the existing care patients receive (according to diagnosis and geographical location); exploring what optimal care post-TIA/minor stroke should comprise (identifying and treating impairments, information giving and support groups) and how that care should be delivered (clinical setting and follow-up pathway); impact on family members