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Sample records for building stakeholder partnerships

  1. Building partnerships: a pilot study of stakeholders' attitudes on technology disruption in behavioral health delivery and research.

    PubMed

    Sucala, Madalina; Nilsen, Wendy; Muench, Frederick

    2017-06-13

    Collaborations between scientists, care providers, and technology industry professionals are becoming more relevant for developing, testing, and implementing behavioral health technologies. As the need for such partnerships increases, it is important to understand stakeholders' attitudes about their role in partnering for developing such technologies and how much do they expect technology to impact behavioral research and care. The aim of this study was to investigate how much technology disruption do stakeholders expect in healthcare, as well as their perceived contribution in partnering for developing behavioral health technologies. Stakeholders (N = 74) responded to an online convenience sampling survey. Over 89% of participants reported expecting that technology will bring at least a moderate amount of disruption in the current models of behavioral healthcare, with respondents with the most experience in digital health expecting the most disruption. As for their perception of each other's role in partnering for developing behavioral health technologies, one group's weakness was considered to be complemented by another group's strength. Academics were perceived as having more theoretical and research expertise but being less technology-savvy, while industry professionals were considered to excel at technological and marketing activities. Providers were considered to have the most clinical and real-world healthcare industry expertise. Our results indicate that technology is expected to disrupt current healthcare models, while also highlighting the need for collaboration, as no single group was considered to have sufficient expertise and resources to develop successful, effective behavioral health technologies on its own. These results may contribute to a better understanding of how technology disruption is affecting behavioral healthcare from the standpoint of its key players, which may lead to better collaborative models of research and care delivery.

  2. Stakeholder Perspectives on Creating and Maintaining Trust in Community--Academic Research Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frerichs, Leah; Kim, Mimi; Dave, Gaurav; Cheney, Ann; Hassmiller Lich, Kristen; Jones, Jennifer; Young, Tiffany L.; Cene, Crystal W.; Varma, Deepthi S.; Schaal, Jennifer; Black, Adina; Striley, Catherine W.; Vassar, Stefanie; Sullivan, Greer; Cottler, Linda B.; Brown, Arleen; Burke, Jessica G.; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2017-01-01

    Community-academic research partnerships aim to build stakeholder trust in order to improve the reach and translation of health research, but there is limited empirical research regarding effective ways to build trust. This multisite study was launched to identify similarities and differences among stakeholders' perspectives of antecedents to…

  3. Stakeholder Perspectives on Creating and Maintaining Trust in Community--Academic Research Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frerichs, Leah; Kim, Mimi; Dave, Gaurav; Cheney, Ann; Hassmiller Lich, Kristen; Jones, Jennifer; Young, Tiffany L.; Cene, Crystal W.; Varma, Deepthi S.; Schaal, Jennifer; Black, Adina; Striley, Catherine W.; Vassar, Stefanie; Sullivan, Greer; Cottler, Linda B.; Brown, Arleen; Burke, Jessica G.; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2017-01-01

    Community-academic research partnerships aim to build stakeholder trust in order to improve the reach and translation of health research, but there is limited empirical research regarding effective ways to build trust. This multisite study was launched to identify similarities and differences among stakeholders' perspectives of antecedents to…

  4. Creating partnership synergy: the critical role of community stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Lasker, Roz D; Weiss, Elisa S

    2003-01-01

    While there are compelling reasons for professionals in health and human services administration to collaborate with other stakeholders in the community, the experience with such partnerships thus far has generated more frustration than results. Recent research on partnership synergy--a key indicator of a successful collaboration process--suggests that many of these partnerships are inadvertently compromising their own success by the way they involve community stakeholders. Applying research findings to current practice, this article shows how the ability of a partnership to understand and address complex problems--and sustain interventions over time--is related to who is involved in the partnership, how community stakeholders are involved, and the leadership and management of the partnership. The article addresses key challenges that health and human services administrators face when they seek to optimize the role of community stakeholders in partnership.

  5. Stakeholder Perspectives on Creating and Maintaining Trust in Community-Academic Research Partnerships.

    PubMed

    Frerichs, Leah; Kim, Mimi; Dave, Gaurav; Cheney, Ann; Hassmiller Lich, Kristen; Jones, Jennifer; Young, Tiffany L; Cene, Crystal W; Varma, Deepthi S; Schaal, Jennifer; Black, Adina; Striley, Catherine W; Vassar, Stefanie; Sullivan, Greer; Cottler, Linda B; Brown, Arleen; Burke, Jessica G; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2017-02-01

    Community-academic research partnerships aim to build stakeholder trust in order to improve the reach and translation of health research, but there is limited empirical research regarding effective ways to build trust. This multisite study was launched to identify similarities and differences among stakeholders' perspectives of antecedents to trust in research partnerships. In 2013-2014, we conducted a mixed-methods concept mapping study with participants from three major stakeholder groups who identified and rated the importance of different antecedents of trust on a 5-point Likert-type scale. Study participants were community members ( n = 66), health care providers ( n = 38), and academic researchers ( n = 44). All stakeholder groups rated "authentic communication" and "reciprocal relationships" the highest in importance. Community members rated "communication/methodology to resolve problems" ( M = 4.23, SD = 0.58) significantly higher than academic researchers ( M = 3.87, SD = 0.67) and health care providers ( M = 3.89, SD = 0.62; p < .01) and had different perspectives regarding the importance of issues related to "sustainability." The importance of communication and relationships across stakeholders indicates the importance of colearning processes that involve the exchange of knowledge and skills. The differences uncovered suggest specific areas where attention and skill building may be needed to improve trust within partnerships. More research on how partnerships can improve communication specific to problem solving and sustainability is merited.

  6. Building Arts Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soper, Stephanie

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the activities of the Education Department at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, including the local education outreach program and the Partners in Education program promoting school-community partnerships. (SR)

  7. Stakeholder Experiences in District-University Administrator Preparation Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanzo, Karen L.; Wilson, Jacob McKinley, III

    2016-01-01

    Our qualitative study explores the lived experiences of district stakeholders in university-district leadership preparation programs. Collaborative partnerships between school districts and universities focused on developing quality school leader are a part of recent efforts to provide the field of public education with exemplary leadership. The…

  8. Building research capacity: the role of partnerships.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Wayne A; Brown, Margaret

    2005-12-01

    What "connections"--a broader term than "partnerships"--need to be made to build research capacity? Connections build capacity to the degree that they augment the skills, knowledge and resources of the focal investigator or investigating entity. We suggest that the goal of capacity building through partnerships/connections is to maximize research utility, i.e., its potential to effect desired changes in targeted systems. Specifically, an investigator or research organization must create connections that will enable: the selection and framing of research questions to address matters of importance to relevant stakeholders, especially and necessarily responding to the needs of people with disabilities; the development of a research design adhering to the highest standards of science; and the translation of new knowledge into messages about the results useful to those who are potential beneficiaries, tailoring the message so that it will be clearly "heard" by each respective target audience (including clinicians, other researchers, administrators and/or people with disabilities and their family members). Utility of research traditionally has not comprised the standard for judging research. However, the current focus in Federal funding appears to be shifting, with a demand to assess outcomes (i.e., utility) of research, thus, bolstering the argument to strengthen research utility through creating appropriate partnerships.

  9. Stakeholder Engagement/Capacity Building Pilot Opportunity FAQ

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about the pilot opportunity for stakeholder engagement/capacity building. EPA is offering an opportunity for community stakeholders and ports to participate in a pilot project to test and refine capacity building tools.

  10. New Partnerships for EFA: Building on Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draxler, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization-International Institute for Educational Planning (UNESCO-IIEP) and the World Economic Forum's Global Education Initiative launched a new program, "Partnerships for Education" (PfE), to create a global coalition for multi-stakeholder partnerships for education, including…

  11. Partnership to build research capacity.

    PubMed

    Boland, Mary G; Kamikawa, Cindy; Inouye, Jillian; Latimer, Renee W; Marshall, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Today's nursing leaders are setting the stage for the next evolution--bringing together skilled clinicians and administrators with peers in education to create new approaches to leading the profession forward. Partnerships share goals, common purpose, mutual respect, willingness to negotiate and compromise, informed participation, information giving, and shared decision making. The shared practice academia effort between a public university and a private health care system situated in the island state of Hawai'i is described. The medical center and school of nursing pursued individual strategic efforts to build research capacity and used the opportunity to fund academic practice research projects. The mutual need and recognition of the high stakes involved, in concert with stable, committed leaders at all levels, were key to the early success of their efforts. Through the formal research partnership mechanism, a discrete focus was created for efforts and used to move to tactical, operational, and interpersonal integration in this relationship.

  12. Building strong partnerships with CMOs.

    PubMed

    Dye, Carson F

    2014-07-01

    CFOs and chief medical officers (CMOs) can build on common traits to form productive partnerships in guiding healthcare organizations through the changes affecting the industry. CFOs can strengthen bonds with CMOs by taking steps to engage physicians on their own turf--by visiting clinical locations and attending medical-executive committee meetings, for example. Steps CFOs can take to help CMOs become more acquainted with the financial operations of health systems include demonstrating the impact of clinical decisions on costs and inviting CMOs to attend finance-related meetings.

  13. BUILDING STRONGER STATE ENERGY PARTNERSHIPS

    SciTech Connect

    David Terry

    2002-04-22

    When initiated by the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Rebuild America Program (RBA), this project--Strengthening the Partnerships Between the State and Territory Energy Offices and the U.S. Department of Energy--was geared toward addressing some project development and communications barriers between the State Energy Offices and the RBA program. While successful in some states, RBA officials were having difficulty assisting states in forming partnerships with communities and taking advantage of the programs technical assistance and other resources. NASEO's efforts under the project were, in large part, aimed at educating state energy offices about RBA's resources and delivering timely information to help move the program forward by emphasizing the successes of key states and identifying concerns and problems in states beginning to implement RBA activities. This report defines these outreach needs and challenges, the tasks designed to address these issues, and results during the first year of the project. As contemplated in NASEO's workplan, the approach during the first year of the agreement focuses on working through NASEO's State Energy Committee structure. Support provided under the agreement for tasks one and two during year one was intended to address partnerships in the buildings area. Specifically, NASEO was to work with its buildings committee, various state energy office members, and the Rebuild America program to improve partnership efforts, communications, and effectiveness of these combined efforts. The approach of to the project included three elements during year one. First, NASEO and its Buildings Committee were to focus on raising awareness and coordination of Rebuild activities. Through education, one-on-one communications, and presentations at NASEO meetings and other events, staff and the committee will assist Rebuild officials in stimulating interest in the program and building

  14. Appreciative leadership: building customer-driven partnerships.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Gwen

    2006-12-01

    Partnerships are relationships and are only as effective as the communication between participants. Partnerships imply building something new by bringing together varying elements to achieve mutual goals. Appreciative inquiry initiates change through questions derived from valuing. Leaders who use inquiry to initiate business planning to create academic and practice partnerships move away from traditional industrial models in healthcare to focus on the symbiotic, interdependent, and complex need for partnerships between education and practice as evidenced in exemplars.

  15. Building Business & Community Partnerships for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partnership for Family Involvement in Education (ED), Washington, DC.

    This brochure is directed at individuals interested in building business and community partnerships with education. It details how and why to establish partnerships in classrooms, school districts, communities, and the policy arena. It begins with brief discussions of the following: reasons for encouraging higher standards in education; the need…

  16. Partnerships for Knowledge Building: An Emerging Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laferriere, Therese; Montane, Mireia; Gros, Begona; Alvarez, Isabel; Bernaus, Merce; Breuleux, Alain; Allaire, Stephane; Hamel, Christine; Lamon, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge Building is approached in this study from an organizational perspective, with a focus on the nature of school-university-government partnerships to support research-based educational innovation. The paper starts with an overview of what is known about effective partnerships and elaborates a conceptual framework for Knowledge Building…

  17. Building Stakeholder Trust: Defensible Government Decisions - 13110

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, Victor A.

    2013-07-01

    Administrative decisions must be grounded in reasonable expectations, founded on sound principles, and bounded by societal norms. Without these first principles, attaining and retaining public trust is a Herculean task. Decisions made by governmental administrators must be both transparent and defensible: without the former the agency will lose the public's trust and support (possibly prompting a legal challenge to the decision) and without the latter the decision may fail to withstand judicial scrutiny. This presentation and accompanying paper delves into the process by which governmental decisions can achieve both defensibility and openness through building stakeholder trust with transparency. Achieving and maintaining stakeholder trust is crucial, especially in the environs of nuclear waste management. Proving confidence, stability, and security to the surrounding citizenry as well as those throughout the country is the goal of governmental nuclear waste remediation. Guiding administrative decision-making processes and maintaining a broad bandwidth of communication are of incalculable importance to all those charged with serving the public, but are especially essential to those whose decisional impacts will be felt for millennia. A strong, clear, and concise administrative record documenting discrete decisions and overarching policy choices is the strongest defense to a decisional challenge. However, this can be accomplished using transparency as the fundamental building block. This documentation allows the decision-makers to demonstrate the synthesis of legal and technical challenges and fortifies the ground from which challenges will be defended when necessary. Further, administrative actions which capture the public's interest and captivate that interest throughout the process will result in a better-informed, more deeply-involved, and more heavily-invested group of interested parties. Management of information, involvement, and investment on the front-end of

  18. Collaborating for Change: Building Partnerships among Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs-Richardson, Rita; Rivers, Eileen S.

    Building partnerships among teachers is essential to enhance student learning. The Richardson-Rivers Collaboration Model emphasizes the importance of relationship building and describes procedures for successful classroom collaboration among teachers. The model combines theoretical constructs based on the Johari window and Jung's personality…

  19. How Do Stakeholders Engaged in School-University Partnerships Create Value for Their Own Organizations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuppett, Kevin S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how stakeholders engaged in school-university partnerships, specifically in the work preparing future school administrators, created and captured value for their own organizations. These case studies examined three partnerships that involved three school systems who all partnered with the same college,…

  20. Innovative Public Engagement Practices and Partnerships: Lifting Stakeholder Voices in Education Accountability Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wills, Monica; Brewer, Curtis; Knoeppel, Robert; Witte, James; Pargas, Roy; Lindle, Jane Clark

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, due to increasing stakeholder dissatisfaction with assessment results and school report cards, South Carolina revised its 1998 Educational Accountability Act and required public engagement with stakeholders including parents/guardians, educators, business and community leaders, and taxpayers. The legislation created partnerships between…

  1. Building Sustainable Capacity with University Partnerships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    Universities can play an important role in building scientific and technical capacity by providing educational opportunities for local and regional populations in developing countries. These opportunities may be short term or long term through for example faculty exchanges, student exchanges, and collaborative teaching and research activities. As the demand for talented graduates expands in developing countries, local universities face competition for students, lecturers, and professors from the same industries and communities they serve. This competition is in many ways counterproductive to building the sustainable human resource that is needed to support local development, management, and governance. Such competition is particularly evident for top science and engineering students in energy rich countries. University partnerships, e.g., in particular those between universities in OECD countries and universities in developing countries, have an important role to play in bridging the gap between today's lack of capacity and a sustainable human resource for the future. Such university partnerships, however, face many challenges, some of which can be traced to organizational and cultural differences In this presentation, I will discuss how university partnerships are formed, some of the benefits to partners, and some pitfalls to avoid during implementation of university partnerships. The examples are taken from Stanford partnerships that involve geoscience and engineering, and will include representative goals and content of the example partnerships. These partnerships I'll describe are actually trilateral, with partners from two or more universities and a private company or government agency. I conclude the presentation with a brief discussion on multiculturalism, perhaps the most important consideration when planning a partnership between diverse organizations. Organizers of partnerships must recognize the fact that multiculturalism and diversity are assets that

  2. Building Academic Partnerships in Psychology: The Psychology Partnerships Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathie, Virginia Andreoli

    2002-01-01

    Outlines how academic partnerships across educational levels can help psychology teachers address educational challenges, examining factors that facilitate the formation and maintenance of these partnerships and presenting the American Psychological Association's successful Psychology Partnerships Project: Academic Partnerships to Meet the…

  3. Stakeholders' Partnership Synergy and its Impact on Commercialization of New Technologies: Renewable Energy Industry Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoukian, Agassy

    This study examines the impact of the partnership synergy and inter-organizational cooperation between government (federal, state, local), public agencies, private companies and local on successful communities commercialization of renewable energy (RE) technologies. The study produced several interesting results: (i) a model was developed that analyzes the role of partnership synergy on technology commercialization, conceptualizing the relationships among partnership drivers, partnership synergy, resources, and commercialization performance; (ii) the major drivers motivating stakeholders of RE projects have been identified and differences between those were recognized; (iii) a novel theoretical and analytical basis of commercialization through partnership and synergy has been established; (iv) interrelated effects of partnership synergy, dynamic capabilities and technology implementation mechanisms on various performance measures of project success have also been identified. Overall, this study and its conceptual model provide a richer understanding of the factors that lead to successful commercialization of RE technologies, possibly applicable to other infrastructural projects, as well.

  4. Global health public-private partnerships: IAVI, partnerships and capacity building.

    PubMed

    Hanlin, R; Chataway, J; Smith, J

    2007-01-01

    New developments in biotechnology and the need to overcome the lack of incentive for investment in vaccines for diseases affecting Africa have led to the promotion of product development public-private partnerships (PPP). Our work at the ESRC INNOGEN Research Centre assesses the way in which these collaborative mechanisms approach their mission of getting science to work for the poor and what they contribute to broader development objectives, particularly in relation to capacity building. Case study research of the International AIDS Vaccine initiative (IAVI) and their work on the ground in Africa and India has highlighted two legal related issues. First, by working as a PPP the organisation has changed the 'ownership' of science, making the process more flexible and emphasising a bottom-up dialogue process while advocating a private sector ethos. Second--whether intentionally or not--the partnership's emphasis on advocacy and communications has increased the importance of knowledge generation and management activities within the partnership and its availability to stakeholders. This paper attempts to ascertain the impact of these issues for the building of health research capacity.

  5. Building Partnerships by Design or by Default?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-24

    defines building partnership capacity as, “targeted efforts to improve the collective capabilities and performance of the Department of Defense and...flexibility and adaptability to transition between peace and war may not be valid. The missions are entirely different and the forces required to perform ...objectives of the NMS includes: counter violent extremism , deter and defeat aggression, strengthen international and regional security, and shape the

  6. Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP II)

    SciTech Connect

    Abernethy, Bob; Chandra, Subrato; Baden, Steven; Cummings, Jim; Cummings, Jamie; Beal, David; Chasar, David; Colon, Carlos; Dutton, Wanda; Fairey, Philip; Fonorow, Ken; Gil, Camilo; Gordon, Andrew; Hoak, David; Kerr, Ryan; Peeks, Brady; Kosar, Douglas; Hewes, Tom; Kalaghchy, Safvat; Lubliner, Mike; Martin, Eric; McIlvaine, Janet; Moyer, Neil; Liguori, Sabrina; Parker, Danny; Sherwin, John; Stroer, Dennis; Thomas-Rees, Stephanie; Daniel, Danielle; McIlvaine, Janet

    2010-11-30

    This report summarizes the work conducted by the Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP - www.baihp.org) during the final budget period (BP5) of our contract, January 1, 2010 to November 30, 2010. Highlights from the four previous budget periods are included for context. BAIHP is led by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) of the University of Central Florida. With over 50 Industry Partners including factory and site builders, work in BP5 was performed in six tasks areas: Building America System Research Management, Documentation and Technical Support; System Performance Evaluations; Prototype House Evaluations; Initial Community Scale Evaluations; Project Closeout, Final Review of BA Communities; and Other Research Activities.

  7. Stakeholder Perceptions of the Need for Research on Elements of Service Dog Partnerships in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Margaret K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the perceived need for research on elements of successful service dog partnerships in the workplace outlined by stakeholders in an exploratory study. Method: A structured mixed methods approach was used to gather ideas from people with service dogs, trainers, vocational rehabilitation counselors, and other health care…

  8. Stakeholder Perceptions of the Need for Research on Elements of Service Dog Partnerships in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Margaret K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the perceived need for research on elements of successful service dog partnerships in the workplace outlined by stakeholders in an exploratory study. Method: A structured mixed methods approach was used to gather ideas from people with service dogs, trainers, vocational rehabilitation counselors, and other health care…

  9. Building of multilevel stakeholder consensus in radioactive waste repository siting

    SciTech Connect

    Dreimanis, A.

    2007-07-01

    This report considers the problem of multilevel consensus building for siting and construction of shared multinational/regional repositories for radioactive waste (RW) deep disposal. In the siting of a multinational repository there appears an essential innovative component of stakeholder consensus building, namely: to reach consent - political, social, economic, ecological - among international partners, in addition to solving the whole set of intra-national consensus building items. An entire partnering country is considered as a higher-level stakeholder - the national stakeholder, represented by the national government, being faced to simultaneous seeking an upward (international) and a downward (intra-national) consensus in a psychologically stressed environment, possibly being characterized by diverse political, economic and social interests. The following theses as a possible interdisciplinary approach towards building of shared understanding and stakeholder consensus on the international scale of RW disposal are forwarded and developed: a) building of international stakeholder consensus would be promoted by activating and diversifying on the international scale multilateral interactions between intra- and international stakeholders, including web-based networks of the RW disposal site investigations and decision-making, as well as networks for international cooperation among government authorities in nuclear safety, b) gradual progress in intergovernmental consensus and reaching multilateral agreements on shared deep repositories will be the result of democratic dialogue, via observing the whole set of various interests and common resolving of emerged controversies by using advanced synergetic approaches of conflict resolution, c) cross-cultural thinking and world perception, mental flexibility, creativity and knowledge are considered as basic prerogatives for gaining a higher level of mutual understanding and consensus for seeking further consensus, for

  10. Commercial Building Partnership General Merchandise Energy Savings Overview

    SciTech Connect

    2013-03-01

    The Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) paired selected commercial building owners and operators with representatives of DOE, national laboratories and private sector exports to explore energy efficiency measures across general merchandise commercial buildings.

  11. Commercial Building Partnership Retail Food Sales Energy Savings Overview

    SciTech Connect

    2013-03-01

    The Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) paired selected commercial building owners and operators with representatives of DOE, national laboratories and private sector exports to explore energy efficiency measures across general merchandise commercial buildings.

  12. Commercial Building Partnerships Replication and Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Dillon, Heather E.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2013-09-16

    This study presents findings from survey and interview data investigating replication efforts of Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) partners that worked directly with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL partnered directly with 12 organizations on new and retrofit construction projects, which represented approximately 28 percent of the entire U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CBP program. Through a feedback survey mechanism, along with personal interviews, PNNL gathered quantitative and qualitative data relating to replication efforts by each organization. These data were analyzed to provide insight into two primary research areas: 1) CBP partners’ replication efforts of technologies and approaches used in the CBP project to the rest of the organization’s building portfolio (including replication verification), and, 2) the market potential for technology diffusion into the total U.S. commercial building stock, as a direct result of the CBP program. The first area of this research focused specifically on replication efforts underway or planned by each CBP program participant. Factors that impact replication include motivation, organizational structure and objectives firms have for implementation of energy efficient technologies. Comparing these factors between different CBP partners revealed patterns in motivation for constructing energy efficient buildings, along with better insight into market trends for green building practices. The second area of this research develops a diffusion of innovations model to analyze potential broad market impacts of the CBP program on the commercial building industry in the United States.

  13. A watershed-based adaptive knowledge system for developing ecosystem stakeholder partnerships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hebin; Thornton, Jeffrey A.; Shadrin, Nickolai

    2015-11-01

    This study proposes a Watershed-based Adaptive Knowledge System (WAKES) to consistently coordinate multiple stakeholders in developing sustainable partnerships for ecosystem management. WAKES is extended from the institutional mechanism of Payments for Improving Ecosystem Services at the Watershed-scale (PIES-W). PIES-W is designed relating to the governance of ecosystem services fl ows focused on a lake as a resource stock connecting its infl owing and outfl owing rivers within its watershed. It explicitly realizes the values of conservation services provided by private land managers and incorporates their activities into the public organizing framework for ecosystem management. It implicitly extends the "upstream-to-downstream" organizing perspective to a broader vision of viewing the ecosystems as comprised of both "watershed landscapes" and "marine landscapes". Extended from PIES-W, WAKES specifies two corresponding feedback: Framework I and II. Framework I is a relationship matrix comprised of three input-output structures of primary governance factors intersecting three subsystems of a watershed with regard to ecosystem services and human stakeholders. Framework II is the Stakeholder-and-Information structure channeling five types of information among four stakeholder groups in order to enable the feedbacks mechanism of Framework I. WAKES identifies the rationales behind three fundamental information transformations, illustrated with the Transboundary Diagnostic Analysis and the Strategic Action Program of the Bermejo River Binational Basin. These include (1) translating scientific knowledge into public information within the Function-and-Service structure corresponding to the ecological subsystem, (2) incorporating public perceptions into political will within the Service- and- Value structure corresponding to the economic subsystem, and (3) integrating scientific knowledge, public perceptions and political will into management options within the Value-and-Stakeholder

  14. Building Interagency Partnerships Curriculum: Instructor’s Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    This is an instructor’s guide outlining how to conduct the Building Interagency partnerships curriculum . The Building Interagency Partnerships... curriculum is a video- and discussion- based curriculum and includes instructor-led components, documentary-style footage of subject matter experts, and

  15. Building academic capacity through statewide partnerships.

    PubMed

    Green, Alexia; Mancini, Mary E; Flemming, Sondra; Bingle, Catherine; Jordan, Clair; Kishi, Aileen; Fowler, Chris; Thomas, Kathy; Sjoberg, Elizabeth; Walker, Scheleen

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, Texas was challenged by the Center to Champion Nursing in America, an initiative of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and AARP, to join a nationwide campaign for action to increase nursing education capacity. This article describes how one state created academic partnerships to achieve capacity building and strengthened relationships and commitments to invest in nursing education. Three year outcomes include a) the creation of a statewide team to address nursing education capacity, b) progress toward doubling the number of nursing graduates from the state's schools of nursing, c) strengthening and emphasizing retention efforts across the state, d) regionalization, including implementation of a $1 million grant and e) transitioning the statewide team to a broader focus and commitment to the Initiative on the Future of Nursing via the formation of a Regional Action Coalition.

  16. Keys to building effective community partnerships.

    PubMed

    Zukoski, A P; Shortell, S M

    2001-01-01

    A four-year study of 25 community health partnerships reveals the six characteristics that help partnerships succeed. Managing size and diversity, addressing coalition conflict, and recognizing life cycles are among the primary behaviors differentiating the strong from the weak.

  17. Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP)

    SciTech Connect

    McIlvaine, Janet; Chandra, Subrato; Barkaszi, Stephen; Beal, David; Chasar, David; Colon, Carlos; Fonorow, Ken; Gordon, Andrew; Hoak, David; Hutchinson, Stephanie; Lubliner, Mike; Martin, Eric; McCluney, Ross; McGinley, Mark; McSorley, Mike; Moyer, Neil; Mullens, Mike; Parker, Danny; Sherwin, John; Vieira, Rob; Wichers, Susan

    2006-06-30

    This final report summarizes the work conducted by the Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (www.baihp.org) for the period 9/1/99-6/30/06. BAIHP is led by the Florida Solar Energy Center of the University of Central Florida and focuses on factory built housing. In partnership with over 50 factory and site builders, work was performed in two main areas--research and technical assistance. In the research area--through site visits in over 75 problem homes, we discovered the prime causes of moisture problems in some manufactured homes and our industry partners adopted our solutions to nearly eliminate this vexing problem. Through testing conducted in over two dozen housing factories of six factory builders we documented the value of leak free duct design and construction which was embraced by our industry partners and implemented in all the thousands of homes they built. Through laboratory test facilities and measurements in real homes we documented the merits of 'cool roof' technologies and developed an innovative night sky radiative cooling concept currently being tested. We patented an energy efficient condenser fan design, documented energy efficient home retrofit strategies after hurricane damage, developed improved specifications for federal procurement for future temporary housing, compared the Building America benchmark to HERS Index and IECC 2006, developed a toolkit for improving the accuracy and speed of benchmark calculations, monitored the field performance of over a dozen prototype homes and initiated research on the effectiveness of occupancy feedback in reducing household energy use. In the technical assistance area we provided systems engineering analysis, conducted training, testing and commissioning that have resulted in over 128,000 factory built and over 5,000 site built homes which are saving their owners over $17,000,000 annually in energy bills. These include homes built by Palm Harbor Homes, Fleetwood, Southern Energy Homes

  18. Building Climate Literacy Through Strategic Partnerships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrin, M.; Creyts, T. T.; Bell, R. E.; Meadows, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    One of the challenges of developing climate science literacy is establishing the relevance of both climate science and climate change at a local community level. By developing partnerships with community-based informal science education providers, we are able to build our climate science and climate change content into existing programs. Employing a systems science approach facilitates these partnerships as our systems science program links with a range of topics, demonstrating the multiple connections between climate, our communities and our daily lives. Merging hands on activities, collaborative projects, and new technology, we encourage learning through doing by engaging participants in active exploration of climate science concepts. Many informal education venues operating locally, from large science museums to small grass-roots community groups, provide ongoing opportunities to connect with students. Through our collaborations we have worked with various types and sizes of non-classroom science providers including: the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum "Greater Opportunities Advancing Leadership and Science" camps for high school girls, Hudson River Park Trust 'Science on the River' events, the annual New York City World Science Festival, and the AAUW's annual STEM Super Scholars Workshops among others. This range of venues has enabled us to reach various ages, backgrounds and interests advancing climate literacy in a number of forums. Major outcomes of these efforts are: (1) Building capacity with community groups: Many local organizations running community programs do not have in-house science expertise. Both science educators and local organization benefit from these collaborations. Science educators and scientists provide up to date climate science information to the community groups while these programs establish strong working relationships between our research and the local community. (2) Developing climate science literacy and lifelong learning: We

  19. Building Customized University-to-Business (U2B) Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvine, George; Verma, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Continuing education (CE) units throughout the United States have successfully built University-to-Business (U2B) partnerships to provide greater value to their community partners and to increase revenue for the university. Our experience in building U2B partnerships and feedback from our partners--businesses, corporations, state agencies, and…

  20. Boundary Dynamics: Implications for Building Parent-School Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price-Mitchell, Marilyn

    2009-01-01

    This article draws on systems theory, complexity theory, and the organizational sciences to engage boundary dynamics in the creation of parent-school partnerships. These partnerships help children succeed through an emergent process of dialogue and relationship building in the peripheral spaces where parents and schools interact on behalf of…

  1. Estuary 2100 Project, Phase 2: Building Partnerships for Resilient Watersheds

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the SFBWQP Estuary 2100 Project, Phase 2: Building Partnerships for Resilient Watersheds, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquat

  2. Building Partnerships with College Campuses: Community Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leiderman, Sally; Furco, Andrew; Zapf, Jennifer; Goss, Megan

    The information that forms the basis of this brochure was drawn from a summit of community organization representatives who have worked in partnerships with institutions of higher education. The brochure highlights three issues community partners believe must be fully addressed if community/campus partnerships are to be successful and mutually…

  3. Building Community-University Partnerships by Listening, Learning, and Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martenson, Diana M.; Newman, Dawn A.; Zak, Deborah M.

    2011-01-01

    University of Minnesota Extension is expanding work in Indian country by building community-university partnerships through a methodology of listening by gathering data in Indian country; learning by creating opportunities for professional development; and responding by building trusting relationships, resulting in more educators working in…

  4. Partnership Building: The Beat Goes On.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choulochas, John; McKenney, Jim

    1986-01-01

    Describes the Keeping America Working Project's Partnership Development Fund, which is used to award minigrants to colleges for the purpose of developing cooperative arrangements with local businesses and industry. Uses the Automotive Service Educational Program sponsored by General Motors Corporation as an example of collaborative programs. (DMM)

  5. Building a School-Industrial Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunting, Carolyn

    1994-01-01

    Describes a partnership involving North Carolina middle school and Weck Industry, a surgical instrument manufacturing company. Steering committee generated ideas to improve curriculum, student services, and teacher services. Several curriculum-related recommendations have been carried out the first year, including a speakers' bureau, facility…

  6. Partnerships in the Arts: Building Creative Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulder, Anne

    1989-01-01

    Cites examples of partnerships between two-year colleges and community groups to promote the arts through the sponsorship of musical and theatrical events. Discusses benefits to the college and community. Stresses the role of art in furthering cultural pluralism and social responsiveness. (DMM)

  7. Building a School-Industrial Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunting, Carolyn

    1994-01-01

    Describes a partnership involving North Carolina middle school and Weck Industry, a surgical instrument manufacturing company. Steering committee generated ideas to improve curriculum, student services, and teacher services. Several curriculum-related recommendations have been carried out the first year, including a speakers' bureau, facility…

  8. Research capacity building: a US–South African partnership

    PubMed Central

    Airhihenbuwa, Collins O.; Shisana, Olive; Zungu, Nompumelelo; BeLue, Rhonda; Makofani, Daisy M.; Shefer, Tammy; Smith, Edward; Simbayi, Leickness

    2012-01-01

    Research capacity building engenders assets that allow communities (and, in this case, student fellows) to respond adequately to health issues and problems that are contextual, cultural and historical in nature. In this paper, we present a US–South African partnership that led to research training for 30 postgraduate students at two South African universities. We begin by exploring the nature of research capacity building in a partnership research project designed to promote HIV and AIDS-related stigma reduction. We examine methodological issues and their relevance to training of postgraduate students in South Africa. We conclude with recommendations for a successful model of partnership for building capacity of health researchers in Africa with the goal of developing research that informs policies and helps to bridge the health inequity gap globally. PMID:21596937

  9. Building "Our School": Parental Perspectives for Building Trusting Family-Professional Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Grace L.; Blue-Banning, Martha; Haines, Shana J.; Turnbull, Ann P.; Gross, Judith M. S.

    2016-01-01

    All educational stakeholders benefit when families and school staff have trusting partnerships as they work together to achieve mutual goals. Eleven focus groups were conducted with parents of children with and without disabilities in six schools, which had been selected as knowledge development sites by the Schoolwide Integrated Framework for…

  10. Building "Our School": Parental Perspectives for Building Trusting Family-Professional Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Grace L.; Blue-Banning, Martha; Haines, Shana J.; Turnbull, Ann P.; Gross, Judith M. S.

    2016-01-01

    All educational stakeholders benefit when families and school staff have trusting partnerships as they work together to achieve mutual goals. Eleven focus groups were conducted with parents of children with and without disabilities in six schools, which had been selected as knowledge development sites by the Schoolwide Integrated Framework for…

  11. Building Trust and Commitment in Scientist-Teacher Partnerships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, B. A.; Hall-Wallace, M. K.

    2003-12-01

    Scientific partnerships bring individuals from different cultures together to achieve mutual goals, make decisions, exchange ideas, and contribute resources (Gomez et al., 1990.) These collaborations have the potential to benefit both parties, but forming functional partnerships between two different work-environment cultures is difficult. We were interested in determining what governs their success. CATTS (Collaboration to Advance Teaching Technology and Science) is an NSF GK-12 fellowship program that fosters relationships between graduate and undergraduate CATTS scientists and K-12 teachers. A case-study approach was used to examine the dynamics of partnership development. Specifically, we looked for patterns in the behavior and attitudes of partners to understand why some partnerships are successful and others fail. We used classroom observations, journals, surveys, and interviews with scientists and teachers to establish these patterns. By their nature, the evolution of every scientific partnership is unique, and the outcome is unpredictable. However, the case-study approach allowed us to understand some of the attributes of successful and unsuccessful partnerships. Frequent communication was essential, especially in defining the roles and responsibilities of the teacher and scientist. Setting mutual goals and expectations was necessary, but the flexibility of both partners was also crucial as goals and expectations typically evolved as the partnership progressed. The most successful partners shared classroom and planning responsibilities in ways that utilized the strengths of each partner. This promoted greater exchange of scientific and pedagogical knowledge and experience between the partners and made the scientist and teacher feel as though their respective contributions were important. When both partners felt welcomed, invited, and appreciated, investment in the partnership remained high. Because it takes time and negotiation to build trust and commitment

  12. Community Building of (Student) Teachers and a Teacher Educator in a School-University Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandyck, Inne; de Graaff, Rick; Pilot, Albert; Beishuizen, Jos

    2012-01-01

    School-university partnerships (SUPs) are considered a way of improving teacher education. For the successful implementation of such partnerships, cooperation between the different stakeholders is of crucial importance. Therefore, most partnerships are organised in short- and long-term teams, which are usually composed of teachers, student…

  13. Community Building of (Student) Teachers and a Teacher Educator in a School-University Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandyck, Inne; de Graaff, Rick; Pilot, Albert; Beishuizen, Jos

    2012-01-01

    School-university partnerships (SUPs) are considered a way of improving teacher education. For the successful implementation of such partnerships, cooperation between the different stakeholders is of crucial importance. Therefore, most partnerships are organised in short- and long-term teams, which are usually composed of teachers, student…

  14. A realist evaluation of community-based participatory research: partnership synergy, trust building and related ripple effects.

    PubMed

    Jagosh, Justin; Bush, Paula L; Salsberg, Jon; Macaulay, Ann C; Greenhalgh, Trish; Wong, Geoff; Cargo, Margaret; Green, Lawrence W; Herbert, Carol P; Pluye, Pierre

    2015-07-30

    Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) is an approach in which researchers and community stakeholders form equitable partnerships to tackle issues related to community health improvement and knowledge production. Our 2012 realist review of CBPR outcomes reported long-term effects that were touched upon but not fully explained in the retained literature. To further explore such effects, interviews were conducted with academic and community partners of partnerships retained in the review. Realist methodology was used to increase the understanding of what supports partnership synergy in successful long-term CBPR partnerships, and to further document how equitable partnerships can result in numerous benefits including the sustainability of relationships, research and solutions. Building on our previous realist review of CBPR, we contacted the authors of longitudinal studies of academic-community partnerships retained in the review. Twenty-four participants (community members and researchers) from 11 partnerships were interviewed. Realist logic of analysis was used, involving middle-range theory, context-mechanism-outcome configuration (CMOcs) and the concept of the 'ripple effect'. The analysis supports the central importance of developing and strengthening partnership synergy through trust. The ripple effect concept in conjunction with CMOcs showed that a sense of trust amongst CBPR members was a prominent mechanism leading to partnership sustainability. This in turn resulted in population-level outcomes including: (a) sustaining collaborative efforts toward health improvement; (b) generating spin-off projects; and (c) achieving systemic transformations. These results add to other studies on improving the science of CBPR in partnerships with a high level of power-sharing and co-governance. Our results suggest sustaining CBPR and achieving unanticipated benefits likely depend on trust-related mechanisms and a continuing commitment to power-sharing. These

  15. Patterns for Success: Team Building (P4). Workforce 2000 Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enterprise State Junior Coll., AL.

    This curriculum package on team building is a product of the Workforce 2000 Partnership, which combined the resources of four educational partners and four industrial partners in Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina to provide education and training in communication, computation, and critical thinking to employees in the apparel, carpet, and…

  16. Building Collaborative Health Promotion Partnerships: The Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Addison, Clifton C.; Campbell Jenkins, Brenda W.; Odom, Darcel; Fortenberry, Marty; Wilson, Gregory; Young, Lavon; Antoine-LaVigne, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Building Collaborative Health Promotion Partnerships: The Jackson Heart Study. Background: Building a collaborative health promotion partnership that effectively employs principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR) involves many dimensions. To ensure that changes would be long-lasting, it is imperative that partnerships be configured to include groups of diverse community representatives who can develop a vision for long-term change. This project sought to enumerate processes used by the Jackson Heart Study (JHS) Community Outreach Center (CORC) to create strong, viable partnerships that produce lasting change. Methods: JHS CORC joined with community representatives to initiate programs that evolved into comprehensive strategies for addressing health disparities and the high prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This collaboration was made possible by first promoting an understanding of the need for combined effort, the desire to interact with other community partners, and the vision to establish an effective governance structure. Results: The partnership between JHS CORC and the community has empowered and inspired community members to provide leadership to other health promotion projects. Conclusion: Academic institutions must reach out to local community groups and together address local health issues that affect the community. When a community understands the need for change to respond to negative health conditions, formalizing this type of collaboration is a step in the right direction. PMID:26703681

  17. Building Collaborative Health Promotion Partnerships: The Jackson Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Addison, Clifton C; Campbell Jenkins, Brenda W; Odom, Darcel; Fortenberry, Marty; Wilson, Gregory; Young, Lavon; Antoine-LaVigne, Donna

    2015-12-22

    Building Collaborative Health Promotion Partnerships: The Jackson Heart Study. Building a collaborative health promotion partnership that effectively employs principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR) involves many dimensions. To ensure that changes would be long-lasting, it is imperative that partnerships be configured to include groups of diverse community representatives who can develop a vision for long-term change. This project sought to enumerate processes used by the Jackson Heart Study (JHS) Community Outreach Center (CORC) to create strong, viable partnerships that produce lasting change. JHS CORC joined with community representatives to initiate programs that evolved into comprehensive strategies for addressing health disparities and the high prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This collaboration was made possible by first promoting an understanding of the need for combined effort, the desire to interact with other community partners, and the vision to establish an effective governance structure. The partnership between JHS CORC and the community has empowered and inspired community members to provide leadership to other health promotion projects. Academic institutions must reach out to local community groups and together address local health issues that affect the community. When a community understands the need for change to respond to negative health conditions, formalizing this type of collaboration is a step in the right direction.

  18. Building opportunities and partnerships in Zambia, Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Decot, M.E.

    1998-07-01

    This paper explores opportunities in Zambia, Africa for the US and other developed nations to extend building technologies that can potentially reduce global greenhouse gas emissions and also support mutual economic development and environmental quality benefits. About ninety percent of the agrarian population in Zambia live in buildings constructed of wooden sticks and native grasses. Energy for these homes is primarily limited to wood and charcoal for heating and cooking. The countryside and ambient air are tainted by smoke from smoldering wood from production of charcoal for local and export markets. Cooking and heating appliances are extremely primitive, inefficient, and unhealthy. Opportunities exist to develop building technologies that use cleaner burning coal briquettes for fuel, improve efficiency of cooking stoves, improve conditions for human health, construct more energy-efficient buildings, and stimulate economic development. External financial and technical support for such development would yield investor benefits including market entry or expansion in a resource rich developing county, low capital investment costs, low labor costs, and greenhouse gas mitigation and offset opportunities. Zambia is too rich in natural and human resources to be so poor. Building infrastructure and community development can establish a foundation for sustainable economic development and environmental quality for the whole world to enjoy.

  19. An empirical study of early childhood support through partnership building.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianjun; Ortiz, Theresa; Navarro, Diana; Maier, Roland; Wang, Summer; Wang, Lisa; Wang, Libing

    2016-12-01

    The first five years were recognized as a critical period of child growth. Accordingly, California voters approved tobacco tax through Proposition 10 to fund early childhood services since 1998. Due to the state revenue decline, Service Integration has been advocated to enhance program supports in Child Health, Family Functioning, and Child Development. In this study, interview data are analyzed to examine the partnership building among 40 programs. The results indicate a significant impact of the service outreach across remote communities in Kern County, California. In addition, contextual information is provided to facilitate interpretation of the partnership strength from a social network analysis. Enhancement of this investigation is discussed in light of future development.

  20. “We Make the Path by Walking It”: Building an Academic Community Partnership With Boston Chinatown

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Carolyn Leung; Allukian, Nathan; Wang, Xingyue; Ghosh, Sujata; Huang, Chien-Chi; Wang, Jacy; Brugge, Doug; Wong, John B.; Mark, Shirley; Dong, Sherry; Koch-Weser, Susan; Parsons, Susan K.; Leslie, Laurel K.; Freund, Karen M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The potential for academic community partnerships are challenged in places where there is a history of conflict and mistrust. Addressing Disparities in Asian Populations through Translational Research (ADAPT) represents an academic community partnership between researchers and clinicians from Tufts Medical Center and Tufts University and community partners from Boston Chinatown. Based in principles of community-based participatory research and partnership research, this partnership is seeking to build a trusting relationship between Tufts and Boston Chinatown. Objectives This case study aims to provides a narrative story of the development and formation of ADAPT as well as discuss challenges to its future viability. Methods Using case study research tools, this study draws upon a variety of data sources including interviews, program evaluation data and documents. Results Several contextual factors laid the foundation for ADAPT. Weaving these factors together helped to create synergy and led to ADAPT’s formation. In its first year, ADAPT has conducted formative research, piloted an educational program for community partners and held stakeholder forums to build a broad base of support. Conclusions ADAPT recognizes that long term sustainability requires bringing multiple stakeholders to the table even before a funding opportunity is released and attempting to build a diversified funding base. PMID:25435562

  1. Chapter 8: Using GTR 220 to build stakeholder collaboration

    Treesearch

    C. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Since 2008, Sierra Forest Legacy, a nonprofit conservation organization, has increased its participation in the design of projects on national forest lands in the Sierra Nevada. Our interest has been to engage scientists, managers, and other stakeholders in the design of projects that integrate the best available scientific information. Our second interest has been to...

  2. Involving Stakeholders in Building Integrated Fisheries Models Using Bayesian Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haapasaari, Päivi; Mäntyniemi, Samu; Kuikka, Sakari

    2013-06-01

    A participatory Bayesian approach was used to investigate how the views of stakeholders could be utilized to develop models to help understand the Central Baltic herring fishery. In task one, we applied the Bayesian belief network methodology to elicit the causal assumptions of six stakeholders on factors that influence natural mortality, growth, and egg survival of the herring stock in probabilistic terms. We also integrated the expressed views into a meta-model using the Bayesian model averaging (BMA) method. In task two, we used influence diagrams to study qualitatively how the stakeholders frame the management problem of the herring fishery and elucidate what kind of causalities the different views involve. The paper combines these two tasks to assess the suitability of the methodological choices to participatory modeling in terms of both a modeling tool and participation mode. The paper also assesses the potential of the study to contribute to the development of participatory modeling practices. It is concluded that the subjective perspective to knowledge, that is fundamental in Bayesian theory, suits participatory modeling better than a positivist paradigm that seeks the objective truth. The methodology provides a flexible tool that can be adapted to different kinds of needs and challenges of participatory modeling. The ability of the approach to deal with small data sets makes it cost-effective in participatory contexts. However, the BMA methodology used in modeling the biological uncertainties is so complex that it needs further development before it can be introduced to wider use in participatory contexts.

  3. Involving stakeholders in building integrated fisheries models using Bayesian methods.

    PubMed

    Haapasaari, Päivi; Mäntyniemi, Samu; Kuikka, Sakari

    2013-06-01

    A participatory Bayesian approach was used to investigate how the views of stakeholders could be utilized to develop models to help understand the Central Baltic herring fishery. In task one, we applied the Bayesian belief network methodology to elicit the causal assumptions of six stakeholders on factors that influence natural mortality, growth, and egg survival of the herring stock in probabilistic terms. We also integrated the expressed views into a meta-model using the Bayesian model averaging (BMA) method. In task two, we used influence diagrams to study qualitatively how the stakeholders frame the management problem of the herring fishery and elucidate what kind of causalities the different views involve. The paper combines these two tasks to assess the suitability of the methodological choices to participatory modeling in terms of both a modeling tool and participation mode. The paper also assesses the potential of the study to contribute to the development of participatory modeling practices. It is concluded that the subjective perspective to knowledge, that is fundamental in Bayesian theory, suits participatory modeling better than a positivist paradigm that seeks the objective truth. The methodology provides a flexible tool that can be adapted to different kinds of needs and challenges of participatory modeling. The ability of the approach to deal with small data sets makes it cost-effective in participatory contexts. However, the BMA methodology used in modeling the biological uncertainties is so complex that it needs further development before it can be introduced to wider use in participatory contexts.

  4. Overview of Commercial Building Partnerships in Higher Education

    SciTech Connect

    Schatz, Glenn

    2013-03-01

    Higher education uses less energy per square foot than most commercial building sectors. However, higher education campuses house energy-intensive laboratories and data centers that may spend more than this average; laboratories, in particular, are disproportionately represented in the higher education sector. The Commercial Building Partnership (CBP), a public/private, cost-shared program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), paired selected commercial building owners and operators with representatives of DOE, its national laboratories, and private-sector technical experts. These teams explored energy-saving measures across building systems–including some considered too costly or technologically challenging–and used advanced energy modeling to achieve peak whole-building performance. Modeling results were then included in new construction or retrofit designs to achieve significant energy reductions.

  5. HUD's Livable Communities Conference: building capacity for change through evidence dissemination and partnership-based training.

    PubMed

    Confair, Amy R; Wilson, Deanda; Schildhorn, Lisa; Keppen, Stacey J; Hart, Bianca; Klassen, Ann C

    2013-01-01

    A growing prioritization for addressing the health needs of low-resource individuals in public housing has resulted from increased recognition of disparities and the effects of housing and the built environment on residents' health. With scarce financial resources, creating capacity for local partnerships to plan and implement small-scale, evidence-based improvements may be more sustainable. The "Livable Communities Conference" held in Philadelphia in 2011 is one example of a capacity-building event. The goals of the event were to engage local housing authority staff, residents, and service providers in education and planning around health disparities issues in public housing by presenting evidence of effective practices, creating networking opportunities for developing strategic partnerships, and training to foster action planning for strategic local initiatives. The 2-day conference included one day of scientific and practice-based presentations and one day of professionally facilitated workshop activities including small and larger group discussions. The event successfully convened wide-ranging stakeholders and exposed participants to "bigger picture" views, and was successful in disseminating best practices information from research and practice perspectives. Wider recruiting for participation and improved integration of Day 1 and Day 2 activities and participants could have yielded even further impact. Based on the success and the perceived potential impact of this event, facilitating similar community capacity-building events that convene a wide range of stakeholders to discuss health in public housing and low-resource communities is recommended. Discussions around the personal dynamics of partnerships and resistance to change also proved useful.

  6. A Model for Building School-Family-Community Partnerships: Principles and Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Julia; Henry, Lynette

    2012-01-01

    The extant literature documents the importance of school counselors' roles in school-family-community partnerships, yet no model exists to guide school counselors through the process of building partnerships. The authors propose a model to help school counselors navigate the process and principles of partnerships. They define partnerships; discuss…

  7. A Model for Building School-Family-Community Partnerships: Principles and Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Julia; Henry, Lynette

    2012-01-01

    The extant literature documents the importance of school counselors' roles in school-family-community partnerships, yet no model exists to guide school counselors through the process of building partnerships. The authors propose a model to help school counselors navigate the process and principles of partnerships. They define partnerships; discuss…

  8. STAYING AT THE TABLE: BUILDING SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY-RESEARCH PARTNERSHIPS

    PubMed Central

    Rappaport, Nancy; Alegria, Margarita; Mulvaney-Day, Norah; Boyle, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the authors identify three guiding principles or relational strategies for developing successful community partnerships and building an alliance for systemic change. These principles were derived from their work over 4 years with an urban public school system, which was focused on generating a series of interventions for improving the behavioral and academic functioning of immigrant students. In their process, they developed an analysis and monitoring system of students’ progress, which allowed for earlier targeted effective support. PMID:23667274

  9. STAYING AT THE TABLE: BUILDING SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY-RESEARCH PARTNERSHIPS.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, Nancy; Alegria, Margarita; Mulvaney-Day, Norah; Boyle, Barbara

    2008-08-01

    In this study, the authors identify three guiding principles or relational strategies for developing successful community partnerships and building an alliance for systemic change. These principles were derived from their work over 4 years with an urban public school system, which was focused on generating a series of interventions for improving the behavioral and academic functioning of immigrant students. In their process, they developed an analysis and monitoring system of students' progress, which allowed for earlier targeted effective support.

  10. A Framework to Assess Programs for Building Partnerships

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    U.S. foreign policy and national secu- rity goals of regional stability, promotion of democracy, and economic development. Organization of the...erning and economic capacity. Also, since most programs support multiple end-states and there- fore multiple stakeholders, it is necessary to identify...with other U.S. government efforts in economic and social development. Key Themes of the Assessment Workshop 29 Build a transparent assessment

  11. Building Better Volcanic Hazard Maps Through Scientific and Stakeholder Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M. A.; Lindsay, J. M.; Calder, E.

    2015-12-01

    All across the world information about natural hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and tsunami is shared and communicated using maps that show which locations are potentially exposed to hazards of varying intensities. Unlike earthquakes and tsunami, which typically produce one dominant hazardous phenomenon (ground shaking and inundation, respectively) volcanic eruptions can produce a wide variety of phenomena that range from near-vent (e.g. pyroclastic flows, ground shaking) to distal (e.g. volcanic ash, inundation via tsunami), and that vary in intensity depending on the type and location of the volcano. This complexity poses challenges in depicting volcanic hazard on a map, and to date there has been no consistent approach, with a wide range of hazard maps produced and little evaluation of their relative efficacy. Moreover, in traditional hazard mapping practice, scientists analyse data about a hazard, and then display the results on a map that is then presented to stakeholders. This one-way, top-down approach to hazard communication does not necessarily translate into effective hazard education, or, as tragically demonstrated by Nevado del Ruiz, Columbia in 1985, its use in risk mitigation by civil authorities. Furthermore, messages taken away from a hazard map can be strongly influenced by its visual design. Thus, hazard maps are more likely to be useful, usable and used if relevant stakeholders are engaged during the hazard map process to ensure a) the map is designed in a relevant way and b) the map takes into account how users interpret and read different map features and designs. The IAVCEI Commission on Volcanic Hazards and Risk has recently launched a Hazard Mapping Working Group to collate some of these experiences in graphically depicting volcanic hazard from around the world, including Latin America and the Caribbean, with the aim of preparing some Considerations for Producing Volcanic Hazard Maps that may help map makers in the future.

  12. Investing in Partnerships for Student Success: A Basic Tool for Community Stakeholders To Guide Educational Partnership Development and Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otterbourg, Susan D.

    This guide, intended to be used collaboratively, was designed for a broad-range of community groups. It is meant to encourage education leaders to use its material as a guide and as support throughout the continuous-improvement process for partnership planning, development, implementation, management, monitoring/evaluation, and long-term…

  13. Building Sustainable Health and Education Partnerships: Stories From Local Communities

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Growing health disparities have a negative impact on young people's educational achievement. Community schools that involve deep relationships with partners across multiple domains address these disparities by providing opportunities and services that promote healthy development of young people, and enable them to graduate from high school ready for college, technical school, on-the-job training, career, and citizenship. METHODS Results from Milwaukie High School, North Clackamas, OR; Oakland Unified School District, Oakland, CA; and Cincinnati Community Learning Centers, Cincinnati, OH were based on a review of local site documents, web-based information, interviews, and e-mail communication with key local actors. RESULTS The schools and districts with strong health partnerships reflecting community schools strategy have shown improvements in attendance, academic performance, and increased access to mental, dental, vision, and health supports for their students. CONCLUSIONS To build deep health-education partnerships and grow community schools, a working leadership and management infrastructure must be in place that uses quality data, focuses on results, and facilitates professional development across sectors. The leadership infrastructure of community school initiatives offers a prototype on which others can build. Moreover, as leaders build cross-sector relationships, a clear definition of what scaling up means is essential for subsequent long-term systemic change. PMID:26440823

  14. Building community resilience to violent extremism through genuine partnerships.

    PubMed

    Ellis, B Heidi; Abdi, Saida

    2017-04-01

    What is community resilience in relation to violent extremism, and how can we build it? This article explores strategies to harness community assets that may contribute to preventing youth from embracing violent extremism, drawing from models of community resilience as defined in relation to disaster preparedness. Research suggests that social connection is at the heart of resilient communities and any strategy to increase community resilience must both harness and enhance existing social connections, and endeavor to not damage or diminish them. First, the role of social connection within and between communities is explored. Specifically, the ways in which social bonding and social bridging can diminish risk for violence, including violent extremism, is examined. Second, research on the role of social connection between communities and institutions or governing bodies (termed social linking) is described. This research is discussed in terms of how the process of government partnering with community members can both provide systems for early intervention for violent extremism, as well as strengthen bonding and bridging social networks and in this way contribute broadly to building community resilience. Finally, community-based participatory research, a model of community engagement and partnership in research, is presented as a road map for building true partnerships and community engagement. (PsycINFO Database Record

  15. Building sustainable health and education partnerships: stories from local communities.

    PubMed

    Blank, Martin J

    2015-11-01

    Growing health disparities have a negative impact on young people's educational achievement. Community schools that involve deep relationships with partners across multiple domains address these disparities by providing opportunities and services that promote healthy development of young people, and enable them to graduate from high school ready for college, technical school, on-the-job training, career, and citizenship. Results from Milwaukie High School, North Clackamas, OR; Oakland Unified School District, Oakland, CA; and Cincinnati Community Learning Centers, Cincinnati, OH were based on a review of local site documents, web-based information, interviews, and e-mail communication with key local actors. The schools and districts with strong health partnerships reflecting community schools strategy have shown improvements in attendance, academic performance, and increased access to mental, dental, vision, and health supports for their students. To build deep health-education partnerships and grow community schools, a working leadership and management infrastructure must be in place that uses quality data, focuses on results, and facilitates professional development across sectors. The leadership infrastructure of community school initiatives offers a prototype on which others can build. Moreover, as leaders build cross-sector relationships, a clear definition of what scaling up means is essential for subsequent long-term systemic change. © 2015 Institute for Educational Leadership. Journal of School Health published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American School Health Association.

  16. A Framework for Building Research Partnerships with First Nations Communities

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Lalita

    2014-01-01

    Solutions to complex health and environmental issues experienced by First Nations communities in Canada require the adoption of collaborative modes of research. The traditional “helicopter” approach to research applied in communities has led to disenchantment on the part of First Nations people and has impeded their willingness to participate in research. University researchers have tended to develop projects without community input and to adopt short term approaches to the entire process, perhaps a reflection of granting and publication cycles and other realities of academia. Researchers often enter communities, collect data without respect for local culture, and then exit, having had little or no community interaction or consideration of how results generated could benefit communities or lead to sustainable solutions. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) has emerged as an alternative to the helicopter approach and is promoted here as a method to research that will meet the objectives of both First Nations and research communities. CBPR is a collaborative approach that equitably involves all partners in the research process. Although the benefits of CBPR have been recognized by segments of the University research community, there exists a need for comprehensive changes in approaches to First Nations centered research, and additional guidance to researchers on how to establish respectful and productive partnerships with First Nations communities beyond a single funded research project. This article provides a brief overview of ethical guidelines developed for researchers planning studies involving Aboriginal people as well as the historical context and principles of CBPR. A framework for building research partnerships with First Nations communities that incorporates and builds upon the guidelines and principles of CBPR is then presented. The framework was based on 10 years’ experience working with First Nations communities in Saskatchewan. The

  17. Commercial Buildings Partnership Projects - Metered Data Format and Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Katipamula, Srinivas

    2010-11-16

    A number of the Commercial Building Partnership Projects (CBPs) will require metering, monitoring, data analysis and verification of savings after the retrofits are complete. Although monitoring and verification (M&V) agents are free to use any metering and monitoring devices that they chose, the data they collect should be reported to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in a standard format. PNNL will store the data collected in its CBP database for further use by PNNL and U.S. Department of Energy. This document describes the data storage process and the deliver format of the data from the M&V agents.

  18. Building public health capacity in Madhya Pradesh through academic partnership

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Ritika; Sharma, Anjali; Negandhi, Himanshu; Zodpey, Sanjay; Vyas, Nidhi; Agnani, Manohar

    2014-01-01

    Engaging in partnerships is a strategic means of achieving objectives common to each partner. The Post Graduate Diploma in Public Health Management (PGDPHM) partners in consultation with the government and aims to strengthen the public health managerial capacity. This case study examines the PGDPHM program conducted jointly by the Public Health Foundation of India and the Government of Madhya Pradesh (GoMP) at the State Institute of Health Management and Communication, Gwalior, which is the apex training and research institute of the state government for health professionals. This is an example of collaborative partnership between an academic institution and the Department of Public Health and Family Welfare, GoMP. PGDPHM is a 1-year, fully residential course with a strong component of field-based project work, and aims to bridge the gap in public health managerial capacity of the health system through training of health professionals. The program is uniquely designed in the context of the National Rural Health Mission and uses a multidisciplinary approach with a focus on inter-professional education. The curriculum is competency driven and health systems connected and the pedagogy uses a problem-solving approach with multidisciplinary faculty from different programs and practice backgrounds that bring rich field experience to the classroom. This case study presents the successful example of the interface between academia and the health system and of common goals achieved through this partnership for building capacity of health professionals in the state of Madhya Pradesh over the past 3 years. PMID:25128807

  19. Hospital ships adrift? Part 2: the role of US Navy hospital ship humanitarian assistance missions in building partnerships.

    PubMed

    Licina, Derek; Mookherji, Sangeeta; Migliaccio, Gene; Ringer, Cheryl

    2013-12-01

    US Navy hospital ships are used as a foreign policy instrument to achieve various objectives that include building partnerships. Despite substantial resource investment by the Department of Defense (DoD) in these missions, their impact is unclear. The purpose of this study was to understand how and why hospital ship missions influence partnerships among the different participants. An embedded case study was used and included the hospital ship Mercy's mission to Timor-Leste in 2008 and 2010 with four units of analysis: the US government, partner nation, host nation, and nongovernmental organizations. Key stakeholders representing each unit were interviewed using open-ended questions that explored the experiences of each participant and their organization. Findings were analyzed using a priori domains from a proposed partnership theoretical framework. A documentary review of key policy, guidance, and planning documents was also conducted. Fifteen themes related to how and why hospital ship missions influence partnerships emerged from the 37 interviews and documentary review. The five most prominent included: developing relationships, developing new perspectives, sharing resources, understanding partner constraints, and developing credibility. Facilitators to joining the mission included partner nations seeking a regional presence and senior executive relationships. Enablers included historical relationships and host nation receptivity. The primary barrier to joining was the military leading the mission. Internal constraints included the short mission duration, participant resentment, and lack of personnel continuity. External constraints included low host nation and United States Agency for International Development (USAID) capacity. The research finds the idea of building partnerships exists among most units of analysis. However, the results show a delay in downstream effects of generating action and impact among the participants. Without a common partnership

  20. Commercial Buildings Partnerships - Overview of Higher education projects

    SciTech Connect

    Parrish, Kristen; Robinson, Alastair; Regnier, Cindy

    2013-02-01

    The Commercial Building Partnership (CBP), a public/private, cost-shared program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), paired selected commercial building owners and operators with representatives of DOE, its national laboratories, and private-sector technical experts. These teams explored energy-saving measures across building systems – including some considered too costly or technologically challenging – and used advanced energy modeling to achieve peak whole-building performance. Modeling results were then included in new construction or retrofit designs to achieve significant energy reductions. CBP design goals aimed to achieve 50 percent energy savings compared to ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2004 for new construction, while retrofits are designed to consume at least 30 percent less energy than either Standard 90.1-2004 or current consumption. After construction and commissioning of the project, laboratory staff continued to work with partners to collect and analyze data for verification of the actual energy reduction. CBP projects represent diverse building types in commercial real estate, including lodging, grocery, retail, higher education, office, and warehouse/storage facilities. Partners also commit to replicating low-energy technologies and strategies from their CBP projects throughout their building portfolios. As a result of CBP projects, five sector overviews (Lodging, Food Sales, General Merchandise, Higher Education, Offices) were created to capture successful strategies and recommended energy efficiency measures that could broadly be applied across these sectors. These overviews are supplemented with individual case studies providing specific details on the decision criteria, modeling results, and lessons learned on specific projects. Sector overviews and CBP case studies will also be updated to reflect verified data and replication strategies as they become available.

  1. Family Gatherings: An Innovative Way to Build Meaningful Partnerships with Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seitz, Hilary

    2007-01-01

    Family gatherings are an effective way to build meaningful partnerships between classrooms and families. Children learn best when they are in a supportive environment, one that meets the needs of the children, the needs of the families, and the needs of the staff of the child care center or school. The partnership-building process can be assisted…

  2. Building community capacity to prevent violence through coalitions and partnerships.

    PubMed

    Chavis, D M

    1995-01-01

    This paper will explore the most effective strategic roles that coalitions can play in the prevention of complex, entrenched social and health problems such as violence, alcoholism, and other substance abuse problems. There is a growing body of "wisdom" and research literature that suggests that the most effective role for community coalitions and partnerships in terms of prevention is to build the capacity of community leaders and their institutions to better serve their constituencies. This can be accomplished through the use of the coalition to strengthen the enabling or support system for community initiatives. An enabling system provides a variety of services, including training and consultation, information and referral, networking and local coalition development, communication, incentive grants and recognition, information and social marketing, resource development, and research and evaluation services. This paper also outlines the key internal capacities a coalition will need in order to establish this system.

  3. Building the Capacity of HBCU's for Establishing Effective Globe Partnerships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagayoko, Diola; Ford, Robert L.

    2002-01-01

    The special GLOBE train-the-trainer (TTT) workshop entitled "Building the Capacity of HBCUs For Establishing Effective GLOBE Partnerships" was help for the purpose of expanding GLOBE training capacity on the campuses of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and community colleges (CCs). The workshop was held March 17-22, 2002 in Washington, D.C. at Howard University. It was designed to establish research and instructional collaboration between and among U.S. universities (HBCUs and CCs) and African countries. Representatives from 13 HBCUs, and two community colleges were represented among trainees, so were representatives from eight African countries who were financially supported by other sources. A total of 38 trainees increased their knowledge of GLOBE protocols through five days of rigorous classroom instruction, field experiences, cultural events, and computer lab sessions.

  4. Building the Capacity of HBCU's for Establishing Effective Globe Partnerships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagayoko, Diola; Ford, Robert L.

    2002-01-01

    The special GLOBE train-the-trainer (TTT) workshop entitled "Building the Capacity of HBCUs For Establishing Effective GLOBE Partnerships" was help for the purpose of expanding GLOBE training capacity on the campuses of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and community colleges (CCs). The workshop was held March 17-22, 2002 in Washington, D.C. at Howard University. It was designed to establish research and instructional collaboration between and among U.S. universities (HBCUs and CCs) and African countries. Representatives from 13 HBCUs, and two community colleges were represented among trainees, so were representatives from eight African countries who were financially supported by other sources. A total of 38 trainees increased their knowledge of GLOBE protocols through five days of rigorous classroom instruction, field experiences, cultural events, and computer lab sessions.

  5. Building Higher Education-Community Development Corporation Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nye, Nancy; Schramm, Richard

    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's Office of University Partnerships helps support the process of forming higher education-community development partnerships through its Community Outreach Partnership Centers (COPC) and Joint Community Development (JCD) initiatives. This handbook describes COPC and JCD initiatives for building…

  6. Diffusion of Energy Efficient Technology in Commercial Buildings: An Analysis of the Commercial Building Partnerships Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonopoulos, Chrissi Argyro

    This study presents findings from survey and interview data investigating replication of green building measures by Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) partners that worked directly with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL partnered directly with 12 organizations on new and retrofit construction projects, which represented approximately 28 percent of the entire U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CBP program. Through a feedback survey mechanism, along with personal interviews, quantitative and qualitative data were gathered relating to replication efforts by each organization. These data were analyzed to provide insight into two primary research areas: 1) CBP partners' replication efforts of green building approaches used in the CBP project to the rest of the organization's building portfolio, and, 2) the market potential for technology diffusion into the total U.S. commercial building stock, as a direct result of the CBP program. The first area of this research focused specifically on replication efforts underway or planned by each CBP program participant. The second area of this research develops a diffusion of innovations model to analyze potential broad market impacts of the CBP program on the commercial building industry in the United States. Findings from this study provided insight into motivations and objectives CBP partners had for program participation. Factors that impact replication include motivation, organizational structure and objectives firms have for implementation of energy efficient technologies. Comparing these factors between different CBP partners revealed patterns in motivation for constructing energy efficient buildings, along with better insight into market trends for green building practices. The optimized approach to the CBP program allows partners to develop green building parameters that fit the specific uses of their building, resulting in greater motivation for replication. In addition, the diffusion model developed

  7. Building International Sustainable Partnerships in Occupational Therapy: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Tupe, Debra Ann; Kern, Stephen B; Salvant, Sabrina; Talero, Pamela

    2015-09-01

    Occupational therapy practitioners frequently identify opportunities for international practice. The World Health Organization and the World Federation of Occupational Therapists have encouraged occupational therapists to address transnational issues, social inclusion, and equal access to opportunities grounded in meaningful occupation (WFOT, 2012). This case study describes a partnership between two U.S. schools of occupational therapy and a Cuban community based pediatric clinic. It examines the dynamics that have sustained the partnership despite political, economic, and logistical barriers. The literature is scrutinized to show how this case study fits into other accounts of collaborative international partnerships. Particularly, it investigates structural and institutional conditions that shape international sustainable partnerships. In doing so, we answer the following questions: (1) Under which circumstances do international partnerships emerge and flourish? (2) What structural and institutional conditions shape international sustainable partnerships? And (3) How do partners perceive and experience the bilateral international partnership? It also discusses and illustrates the foundations and development of international partnerships that succeed. Through the use of a case study we illustrate the development of this partnership. Finally, we consider the next steps of this particular sustainable and collaborative international partnership.

  8. Public-Private Partnerships for Maritime Security Capacity-Building in the Gulf of Guinea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    SUBTITLE Public - Private Partnerships for Maritime Security Capacity- 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER N00014-11-D-0323 Building in the Gulf of Guinea 5b...www.bizresearchpapers.com/12.%20Nilufa.pdf (ac- cessed 13 August 2012). 12 Canadian Council for Public - Private Partnerships , “Definition: Public-Private...the contract stage. 14 Peter Farlam, Working Together: Assessing Public – Private Partnerships in

  9. Building and Sustaining International Scientific Partnerships Through Data Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurthy, M. K.; Yoksas, T.; Miller, L.

    2007-05-01

    Understanding global environmental processes and their regional linkages has heightened the importance of full, open, and timely access to earth system science data and strong international scientific partnerships. To that end, the Unidata Program at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research has developed a growing portfolio of international outreach activities, conducted in close collaboration with academic, research and operational institutions on several continents. The overarching goals of Unidata's international activities include: - democratization of access-to and use-of data that describe the dynamic earth system - building capacity and empowering geoscientists and educators worldwide - strengthening international science partnerships for exchanging knowledge and expertise - effectuating sustainable cultural changes that recognize the benefits of data sharing, and - helping to build regional and global communities around specific geoscientific themes Using an Internet-based data sharing network, Unidata has made great strides in establishing the underpinnings of a worldwide data sharing network. To date, over 160 institutions of higher education worldwide are participating in this data sharing effort. The Internet Data Distribution (IDD) system, as it is known, was originally developed for sharing mostly atmospheric science data among U.S. institutions. It has now been extended beyond North America into a system of interconnected regional data networks encompassing Latin America, the Caribbean, Antarctica, Asia, Europe, and most recently Africa. The adoption of the IDD concept in Brazil has been so successful that Brazil now ranks second behind the U. S. in the number of institutions participating in their own regionally customized and managed data sharing network, which is dubbed the IDD-Brazil. Another noteworthy data distribution network, Antarctic IDD, is leveraging the IDD system for the benefit of the Antarctic meteorological research

  10. The Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) - A Building America Energy Efficient Housing Partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Robb Aldrich; Lois Arena; Dianne Griffiths; Srikanth Puttagunta; David Springer

    2010-12-31

    This final report summarizes the work conducted by the Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) (http://www.carb-swa.com/), one of the 'Building America Energy Efficient Housing Partnership' Industry Teams, for the period January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2010. The Building America Program (BAP) is part of the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program (BTP). The long term goal of the BAP is to develop cost effective, production ready systems in five major climate zones that will result in zero energy homes (ZEH) that produce as much energy as they use on an annual basis by 2020. CARB is led by Steven Winter Associates, Inc. with Davis Energy Group, Inc. (DEG), MaGrann Associates, and Johnson Research, LLC as team members. In partnership with our numerous builders and industry partners, work was performed in three primary areas - advanced systems research, prototype home development, and technical support for communities of high performance homes. Our advanced systems research work focuses on developing a better understanding of the installed performance of advanced technology systems when integrated in a whole-house scenario. Technology systems researched included: - High-R Wall Assemblies - Non-Ducted Air-Source Heat Pumps - Low-Load HVAC Systems - Solar Thermal Water Heating - Ventilation Systems - Cold-Climate Ground and Air Source Heat Pumps - Hot/Dry Climate Air-to-Water Heat Pump - Condensing Boilers - Evaporative condensers - Water Heating CARB continued to support several prototype home projects in the design and specification phase. These projects are located in all five program climate regions and most are targeting greater than 50% source energy savings over the Building America Benchmark home. CARB provided technical support and developed builder project case studies to be included in near-term Joule Milestone reports for the following community scale projects: - SBER Overlook at Clipper

  11. Building sustained partnerships in Greenland through shared science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culler, L. E.; Albert, M. R.; Ayres, M. P.; Grenoble, L. A.; Virginia, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    (cultural center in Nuuk) and being interviewed for a program that was broadcasted on Kalaallit Nunaat Radio. Third, students in the IGERT program have participated in Arctic science and educational initiatives by the Joint Committee, an international high-level government forum that promotes interactions between government, academic, and private institutions in Greenland, Denmark, and the U.S. Graduate students worked with high-school students and teachers from Greenland, Denmark, and the U.S. during the Joint Committee's scientific field school based in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland. We attribute our success in building sustained partnerships to allocating resources for cultural and social connections, working with the Joint Committee, maintaining connections with Greenlandic students, creative and collaborative approaches to communication, and connecting young researchers with high school students. Furthermore, our approach has been to participate in a conversation with Greenlanders rather than simply sharing our science and ideas. This has improved our communication skills and is helping our science become more accessible and relevant to the needs and interests of Greenland.

  12. Local Partnerships: Achieving Stakeholder Consensus on Low-Level Waste Disposal?

    SciTech Connect

    Hooft, E.; Bergmans, A.; Derveaux, K.; Vanhoof, L.

    2002-02-28

    Nuclear waste management is more then finding a technical answer to a technical problem. Dealing with nuclear, or any other form of hazardous waste, for that matter, not only implies solving a technical problem, it also means solving a societal problem. And societal questions cannot be resolved in a technical laboratory. Of course, the technical aspect of nuclear waste management and disposal is a very important one, but the societal aspect is of equal importance. In order to find an implementable solution to deal with nuclear waste, attention should be paid to what kind of solution the society wants and under what conditions a proposed solution might be acceptable. This, however, cannot be achieved by simply adding a number of ''societal parameters'' to a technical concept modeling. It is something that can only be established through interaction with the public concerned. And that, in addition, is not something that can be preformed as an accidental spin off of a vastly elaborated technical program. Communicating or interacting with the public does not mean sweeping them off their feet with smoothly edited leaflets explaining how technically sound the proposed solution is and how wonderful it would fit in their back yard. Adding, just to proof how brilliantly this all has been thought through, numerous safety measures, so people would feel reassured. This kind of communication, will only activate people's suspicion and drive them straight into a ''NIMBY''-reaction. The public (and by this we mean the stakeholders or the people actually concerned) should be involved in the decision making on nuclear waste from the very start of the program. This means that they must be aware of the fact that tests are taken place, that they can participate in the follow up of these technical analysis, and, that they have a say in whether further steps will eventually be taken.

  13. Supervising an International Teaching Practicum: Building Partnerships in Postcolonial Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Major, Jae; Santoro, Ninetta

    2016-01-01

    Teaching practicum experiences, including those in international contexts, are based on partnerships between institutions and host schools, and the partnership between the pre-service teacher, the cooperating teacher and the university supervisor. This article explores the relationship between pre-service teachers and cooperating teachers in an…

  14. Building Effective Community-University Partnerships: Are Universities Truly Ready?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curwood, Susan Eckerle; Munger, Felix; Mitchell, Terry; Mackeigan, Mary; Farrar, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    Community service learning and community-based research necessitate the development of strong community-university partnerships. In this paper, students, faculty, and a community partner critically reflect upon the process of establishing a long-term community-university partnership through the integration of a community service learning component…

  15. Building Rural Health Partnerships in the South. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Rural Development Center, Mississippi State, MS.

    The Southern Rural Development Center (SRDC) at Mississippi State University aims to stimulate the creation of new partnerships to enhance rural communities' capacity to address key health issues. In 1997, SRDC hosted a conference to develop the following: partnerships among land-grant universities, the health sector, and local citizens and…

  16. Building Partnership Capacity by Leveraging the Air National Guard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    State Partnership Program,” 12 6 Pappalardo , “Guard Rediscovers Diplomatic Role,” 30 7 US Air Force, Air Force Global Partnership Strategy, 2 8...Program: Vision to Reality.” Joint Forces Quarterly 42 (2006): 22-25. Pappalardo , Joe. “Guard Rediscovers Diplomatic Role.” National Defense 89

  17. Building on mental health training for law enforcement: strengthening community partnerships.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jorien; Ahalt, Cyrus; Hagar, Randall; Arroyo, William

    2017-09-11

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe the current state of law enforcement training related to the high number of interactions with persons with mental illness, and to recommend next steps in preparing law enforcement to effectively meet this challenge. Design/methodology/approach The authors reviewed the current literature on relevant law enforcement training programs, focusing primarily on crisis intervention team (CIT) training, and used the case example of California to identify opportunities to improve and enhance law enforcement preparedness for the challenge of responding to persons with mental illness. Findings Broad-based community partnerships working together to develop programs that meet the local needs of both those with mental illness and law enforcement, the availability of mental health treatment centers with no-refusal policies, and a coordinating person or agency to effectively liaise among stakeholders are critical enhancements to CIT training. Originality/value As increasing attention is paid to adverse interactions between police and vulnerable populations, this paper identifies policies that would build on existing training programs to improve police responses to persons with mental illness.

  18. Capacity building efforts and perceptions for wildlife surveillance to detect zoonotic pathogens: comparing stakeholder perspectives.

    PubMed

    Schwind, Jessica S; Goldstein, Tracey; Thomas, Kate; Mazet, Jonna A K; Smith, Woutrina A

    2014-07-04

    The capacity to conduct zoonotic pathogen surveillance in wildlife is critical for the recognition and identification of emerging health threats. The PREDICT project, a component of United States Agency for International Development's Emerging Pandemic Threats program, has introduced capacity building efforts to increase zoonotic pathogen surveillance in wildlife in global 'hot spot' regions where zoonotic disease emergence is likely to occur. Understanding priorities, challenges, and opportunities from the perspectives of the stakeholders is a key component of any successful capacity building program. A survey was administered to wildlife officials and to PREDICT-implementing in-country project scientists in 16 participating countries in order to identify similarities and differences in perspectives between the groups regarding capacity needs for zoonotic pathogen surveillance in wildlife. Both stakeholder groups identified some human-animal interfaces (i.e. areas of high contact between wildlife and humans with the potential risk for disease transmission), such as hunting and markets, as important for ongoing targeting of wildlife surveillance. Similarly, findings regarding challenges across stakeholder groups showed some agreement in that a lack of sustainable funding across regions was the greatest challenge for conducting wildlife surveillance for zoonotic pathogens (wildlife officials: 96% and project scientists: 81%). However, the opportunity for improving zoonotic pathogen surveillance capacity identified most frequently by wildlife officials as important was increasing communication or coordination among agencies, sectors, or regions (100% of wildlife officials), whereas the most frequent opportunities identified as important by project scientists were increasing human capacity, increasing laboratory capacity, and the growing interest or awareness regarding wildlife disease or surveillance programs (all identified by 69% of project scientists). A One

  19. Capacity building efforts and perceptions for wildlife surveillance to detect zoonotic pathogens: comparing stakeholder perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The capacity to conduct zoonotic pathogen surveillance in wildlife is critical for the recognition and identification of emerging health threats. The PREDICT project, a component of United States Agency for International Development’s Emerging Pandemic Threats program, has introduced capacity building efforts to increase zoonotic pathogen surveillance in wildlife in global ‘hot spot’ regions where zoonotic disease emergence is likely to occur. Understanding priorities, challenges, and opportunities from the perspectives of the stakeholders is a key component of any successful capacity building program. Methods A survey was administered to wildlife officials and to PREDICT-implementing in-country project scientists in 16 participating countries in order to identify similarities and differences in perspectives between the groups regarding capacity needs for zoonotic pathogen surveillance in wildlife. Results Both stakeholder groups identified some human-animal interfaces (i.e. areas of high contact between wildlife and humans with the potential risk for disease transmission), such as hunting and markets, as important for ongoing targeting of wildlife surveillance. Similarly, findings regarding challenges across stakeholder groups showed some agreement in that a lack of sustainable funding across regions was the greatest challenge for conducting wildlife surveillance for zoonotic pathogens (wildlife officials: 96% and project scientists: 81%). However, the opportunity for improving zoonotic pathogen surveillance capacity identified most frequently by wildlife officials as important was increasing communication or coordination among agencies, sectors, or regions (100% of wildlife officials), whereas the most frequent opportunities identified as important by project scientists were increasing human capacity, increasing laboratory capacity, and the growing interest or awareness regarding wildlife disease or surveillance programs (all identified by 69% of

  20. Involving stakeholders in the commissioning and implementation of fishery science projects: experiences from the U.K. Fisheries Science Partnership.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, M J; Payne, A I L; Deas, B; Catchpole, T L

    2013-10-01

    Following from similar initiatives worldwide, the U.K.'s Fisheries Science Partnership (FSP) was established in 2003 to provide the fishing industry with opportunities to propose and participate in scientific studies in collaboration with fishery scientists. Key concepts were that most of the available funding would support industry participation, that industry, not scientists, would come up with the ideas for projects, and that commercial fishing vessels and fishing methods would be used to address specific concerns of the fishing industry in a scientifically controlled manner. Nearly 100 projects had been commissioned by March 2012, covering annual time-series surveys of stocks subject to traditional assessment, and ad hoc projects on, e.g. gear selectivity, discard survival, tagging and migration and fishery development. The extent to which the results of the projects have been used by stakeholders, fishery scientists and fishery managers at a national and E.U. level is evaluated, along with the degree of industry interest and involvement, and reasons are identified for successes or failures in the uptake of the results into management and policy. Finally, the question is posed whether the programme has been successful in improving the engagement of the fishing community in the science-management process and in fostering communication and greater trust between fishers, scientists and managers. © 2013 Crown Copyright. © 2013 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  1. Partnerships for building strong internship and research experiences for undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goehring, L.; Haacker-Santos, R.; Dutilly, E.

    2013-12-01

    REU and internship site directors often operate in geographic and institutional isolation from each other, unable to share best practices or resources. When collaboration is possible, benefits for both the students and leaders of these programs can be achieved. In 2013, the SOARS REU program, hosted at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), supported the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) in creating a new internship program aimed at engaging undergraduate science and engineering students in NEON's work. Both student programs share the objective of reaching underrepresented groups in STEM. The year long collaboration allowed NEON to learn best practices in recruitment and support of students, mentor training, and program development, and to customize its internship according to its organization i.e., a science/engineering observatory under construction. Both programs shared several elements: students were housed together so that interns could tap into a larger cohort of supportive peers; students participated in a joint leadership training to strengthen cross program mentoring; and students met weekly for a scientific communications workshop. Having multiple science disciplines represented enhanced the workshop as students learned about writing styles and cultures of each other's fields, fostering an appreciation of different scientific disciplines and interdisciplinary thinking. Finally, at the end of the summer, students presented their findings in a joint poster session. We found that collaboration between programs led to increased recruitment of students from diverse backgrounds and support of students through stronger cohorts, shared trainings, and enhanced program content. In this presentation we share findings of our programs' evaluations and make recommendations on building collaborative partnerships for internships and research experiences for undergraduates.

  2. Building sustainable organizational capacity to deliver HIV programs in resource-constrained settings: stakeholder perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anjali; Chiliade, Philippe; Michael Reyes, E; Thomas, Kate K; Collens, Stephen R; Rafael Morales, José

    2013-12-13

    In 2008, the US government mandated that HIV/AIDS care and treatment programs funded by the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) should shift from US-based international partners (IPs) to registered locally owned organizations (local partners, or LPs). The US Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) developed the Clinical Assessment for Systems Strengthening (ClASS) framework for technical assistance in resource-constrained settings. The ClASS framework involves all stakeholders in the identification of LPs' strengths and needs for technical assistance. This article examines the role of ClASS in building capacity of LPs that can endure and adapt to changing financial and policy environments. All stakeholders (n=68) in Kenya, Zambia, and Nigeria who had participated in the ClASS from LPs and IPs, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and, in Nigeria, HIV/AIDS treatment facilities (TFs) were interviewed individually or in groups (n=42) using an open-ended interview guide. Thematic analysis revealed stakeholder perspectives on ClASS-initiated changes and their sustainability. Local organizations were motivated to make changes in internal operations with the ClASS approach, PEPFAR's competitive funding climate, organizational goals, and desired patient health outcomes. Local organizations drew on internal resources and, if needed, technical assistance from IPs. Reportedly, ClASS-initiated changes and remedial action plans made LPs more competitive for PEPFAR funding. LPs also attributed their successful funding applications to their preexisting systems and reputation. Bureaucracy, complex and competing tasks, and staff attrition impeded progress toward the desired changes. Although CDC continues to provide technical assistance through IPs, declining PEPFAR funds threaten the consolidation of gains, smooth program transition, and continuity of treatment services. The well-timed adaptation and implementation of Cl

  3. Building Effective Scientist-Teacher Partnerships: A Case Study Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, B. A.; Hall, M. K.; Regens, N. L.

    2005-12-01

    Scientist-teacher partnerships provide opportunities for scientists to become better educators and teachers to increase their science content knowledge, but few accounts exist about how partnerships evolve and why some succeed and others fail. We investigated these questions in the context of an NSF GK-12 program that pairs graduate and undergraduate science and math students (fellows) with K-12 teachers. Using a variety of data sources, we found several patterns that were influential across the majority of partnerships. Aligned, partnership-centered goals and expectations were most conducive to productive relationships. A desire and commitment to collaborate and a willingness to communicate openly were also essential. Differences in the rigidity and intensity of the K-12 and university schedules and working with multiple teachers made collaboration difficult due to lack of planning time. Mutual investment manifested itself in several ways among partnerships including collaboration on teaching, planning, and other classroom activities, exchange of resources, and exchange of constructive feedback. Fellows and teachers were most likely to invest themselves when they perceived that their contributions were invited and appreciated in and out of the classroom. In all cases, role ambiguity was a major barrier to partnership formation. Fellows employed numerous strategies to define their roles, but working collaboratively was possible only when roles were discussed and allowed to evolve. Fellows and teachers found it difficult to communicate directly about dissatisfaction. While each partnership was unique, these major patterns influencing the success of a partnership occur in many situations and thus appear transferable. Regardless of outcome, partners felt as though they benefited significantly from this experience. Our results may be applied to similar partnership programs to improve project design and enhance the sustainability of relationships between scientists and

  4. Building effective public-private partnerships: experiences and lessons from the African Comprehensive HIV/AIDS Partnerships (ACHAP).

    PubMed

    Ramiah, Ilavenil; Reich, Michael R

    2006-07-01

    This paper examines the processes for building highly collaborative public-private partnerships for public health, with a focus on the efforts to manage the complex relationships that underlie these partnerships. These processes are analyzed for the African Comprehensive HIV/AIDS Partnerships (ACHAP), a 5-year partnership (2001-2005) between the government of Botswana, Merck & Co., Inc. (and its company foundation), and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. ACHAP is a highly collaborative initiative. The ACHAP office in Botswana engages intensively (on a daily basis) with the government of Botswana (an ACHAP partner and ACHAP's main grantee) to support HIV/AIDS control in that country, which had an adult prevalence of 38.5% HIV infection in 2000 when ACHAP was being established. The paper discusses the development of ACHAP in four stages: the creation of ACHAP, the first year, the second and third years, and the fourth year. Based on ACHAP's experiences over these four years, the paper identifies five lessons for managing relationships in highly collaborative public-private partnerships for public health.

  5. Growing partners: building a community-academic partnership to address health disparities in rural North Carolina.

    PubMed

    De Marco, Molly; Kearney, William; Smith, Tosha; Jones, Carson; Kearney-Powell, Arconstar; Ammerman, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) holds tremendous promise for addressing public health disparities. As such, there is a need for academic institutions to build lasting partnerships with community organizations. Herein we have described the process of establishing a relationship between a research university and a Black church in rural North Carolina. We then discuss Harvest of Hope, the church-based pilot garden project that emerged from that partnership. The partnership began with a third-party effort to connect research universities with Black churches to address health disparities. Building this academic-community partnership included collaborating to determine research questions and programming priorities. Other aspects of the partnership included applying for funding together and building consensus on study budget and aims. The academic partners were responsible for administrative details and the community partners led programming and were largely responsible for participant recruitment. The community and academic partners collaborated to design and implement Harvest of Hope, a church-based pilot garden project involving 44 youth and adults. Community and academic partners shared responsibility for study design, recruitment, programming, and reporting of results. The successful operation of the Harvest of Hope project gave rise to a larger National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded study, Faith, Farming and the Future (F3) involving 4 churches and 60 youth. Both projects were CBPR efforts to improve healthy food access and reducing chronic disease. This partnership continues to expand as we develop additional CBPR projects targeting physical activity, healthy eating, and environmental justice, among others. Benefits of the partnership include increased community ownership and cultural appropriateness of interventions. Challenges include managing expectations of diverse parties and adequate communication. Lessons learned and strategies for building

  6. Building and Sustaining Community-University Partnerships in Marginalized Urban Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allahwala, Ahmed; Bunce, Susannah; Beagrie, Lesley; Brail, Shauna; Hawthorne, Timothy; Levesque, Sue; von Mahs, Jurgen; Spotton Visano, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    This symposium explores and examines the challenges and opportunities of building community-university collaborations in marginalized urban areas. The selection of short essays highlights different experiences of building and sustaining community-university partnerships in a variety of cities as vehicles for enhancing experiential learning in…

  7. Build Your Own Particle Smasher: The Royal Society Partnership Grants Scheme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article features the project, "Build Your Own Particle Smasher" and shares how to build a particle smasher project. A-level and AS-level students from Trinity Catholic School have built their own particle smashers, in collaboration with Nottingham Trent University, as part of The Royal Society's Partnership Grants Scheme. The…

  8. Build Your Own Particle Smasher: The Royal Society Partnership Grants Scheme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article features the project, "Build Your Own Particle Smasher" and shares how to build a particle smasher project. A-level and AS-level students from Trinity Catholic School have built their own particle smashers, in collaboration with Nottingham Trent University, as part of The Royal Society's Partnership Grants Scheme. The…

  9. Building and Sustaining Community-University Partnerships in Marginalized Urban Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allahwala, Ahmed; Bunce, Susannah; Beagrie, Lesley; Brail, Shauna; Hawthorne, Timothy; Levesque, Sue; von Mahs, Jurgen; Spotton Visano, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    This symposium explores and examines the challenges and opportunities of building community-university collaborations in marginalized urban areas. The selection of short essays highlights different experiences of building and sustaining community-university partnerships in a variety of cities as vehicles for enhancing experiential learning in…

  10. Expediting the transfer of evidence into practice: building clinical partnerships*

    PubMed Central

    Rader, Tamara; Gagnon, Anita J.

    2000-01-01

    A librarian/clinician partnership was fostered in one hospital through the formation of the Evidence-based Practice Committee, with an ulterior goal of facilitating the transfer of evidence into practice. The paper will describe barriers to evidence-based practice and outline the committee's strategies for overcoming these barriers, including the development and promotion of a Web-based guide to evidence-based practice specifically designed for clinicians (health professionals). Educational strategies for use of the Web-based guide will also be addressed. Advantages of this partnership are that the skills of librarians in meeting the needs of clinicians are maximized. The evidence-based practice skills of clinicians are honed and librarians make a valuable contribution to the knowledgebase of the clinical staff. The knowledge acquired through the partnership by both clinicians and librarians will increase the sophistication of the dialogue between the two groups and in turn will expedite the transfer of evidence into practice. PMID:10928710

  11. Participatory evaluation of a community-academic partnership to inform capacity-building and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Vani Nath; Klasko, Lynne B; Fleming, Khaliah; Koskan, Alexis M; Jackson, Nia T; Noel-Thomas, Shalewa; Luque, John S; Vadaparampil, Susan T; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Britt, Lounell; Waddell, Rhondda; Meade, Cathy D; Gwede, Clement K

    2015-10-01

    The Tampa Bay Community Cancer Network (TBCCN) was formed as a partnership comprised of committed community based organizations (grassroots, service, health care organizations) and a National Cancer Institute designated cancer center working together to reduce cancer health disparities. Adhering to principles of community-based participatory research, TBCCN's primary aims are to develop and sustain outreach, training, and research programs that aim to reach medically underserved, multicultural and multilingual populations within the Tampa Bay tri-county area. Using a participatory evaluation approach, we recently evaluated the partnerships' priorities for cancer education and outreach; perspectives on the partnerships' adherence to CBPR principles; and suggestions for sustaining TBCCN and its efforts. The purpose of this paper is to describe implementation and outcomes of this participatory evaluation of a community/academic partnership, and to illustrate the application of evaluation findings for partnership capacity-building and sustainability. Our evaluation provides evidence for partners' perceived benefits and realized expectations of the partnership and illustrates the value of ongoing and continued partnership assessment to directly inform program activities and build community capacity and sustainability.

  12. Building sustainable organizational capacity to deliver HIV programs in resource-constrained settings: stakeholder perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anjali; Chiliade, Philippe; Reyes, E Michael; Thomas, Kate K; Collens, Stephen R; Morales, José Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2008, the US government mandated that HIV/AIDS care and treatment programs funded by the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) should shift from US-based international partners (IPs) to registered locally owned organizations (local partners, or LPs). The US Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) developed the Clinical Assessment for Systems Strengthening (ClASS) framework for technical assistance in resource-constrained settings. The ClASS framework involves all stakeholders in the identification of LPs' strengths and needs for technical assistance. Objective This article examines the role of ClASS in building capacity of LPs that can endure and adapt to changing financial and policy environments. Design All stakeholders (n=68) in Kenya, Zambia, and Nigeria who had participated in the ClASS from LPs and IPs, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and, in Nigeria, HIV/AIDS treatment facilities (TFs) were interviewed individually or in groups (n=42) using an open-ended interview guide. Thematic analysis revealed stakeholder perspectives on ClASS-initiated changes and their sustainability. Results Local organizations were motivated to make changes in internal operations with the ClASS approach, PEPFAR's competitive funding climate, organizational goals, and desired patient health outcomes. Local organizations drew on internal resources and, if needed, technical assistance from IPs. Reportedly, ClASS-initiated changes and remedial action plans made LPs more competitive for PEPFAR funding. LPs also attributed their successful funding applications to their preexisting systems and reputation. Bureaucracy, complex and competing tasks, and staff attrition impeded progress toward the desired changes. Although CDC continues to provide technical assistance through IPs, declining PEPFAR funds threaten the consolidation of gains, smooth program transition, and continuity of treatment services. Conclusions The well

  13. Building Bridges in Social Studies Education: Professional Development School Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vontz, Thomas S.; Franke, Jim; Burenheide, Brad; Bietau, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    The authors explore the extent to which a mature professional development school (PDS) partnership at Kansas State University (KSU) helps link the disparate parts of the social studies education community. The authors initially identify and describe the divisions or "gulfs" that commonly plague social studies education, such as the gulfs…

  14. Metropolitan College: Building Community Value through Education-Business Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggert, Steven C.; Ash, Daniel; Boyle, Mike A.; Kinney, John; Howarth, David A.; Rudy-Parkins, Carolyn

    2004-01-01

    Metropolitan College is a distinctive and innovative business-education partnership that provides educational opportunities to many Kentucky residents who would otherwise be unable to attend college. The program also provides significant, tangible benefits to the business and education partners, as well as to the local and statewide community.…

  15. Building Tomorrow's Higher Education: Leadership, Partnerships, and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Sandra; Krebs, Paula M.; Buehler, Julie; Phillips, Clarenda M.

    2012-01-01

    Four members of the ACE Fellows Program class of 2010-2011 share the results of their fellowship projects, all of which were based at urban universities. The projects addressed partnerships between the universities and their urban communities in different contexts, including the creation of college-town developments, establishing a center for…

  16. Building Tomorrow's Higher Education: Leadership, Partnerships, and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Sandra; Krebs, Paula M.; Buehler, Julie; Phillips, Clarenda M.

    2012-01-01

    Four members of the ACE Fellows Program class of 2010-2011 share the results of their fellowship projects, all of which were based at urban universities. The projects addressed partnerships between the universities and their urban communities in different contexts, including the creation of college-town developments, establishing a center for…

  17. Building Leadership Capacity via School Partnerships and Teacher Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon-Dotson, Lisa J.; Floyd, Loury O.

    2012-01-01

    Universities and schools are struggling with the critical issues surrounding teacher quality, student learning, and the gap between research and practice. This study employed a collective case-study design to explore the impact of leadership teams and school-university partnerships on teacher leadership, professional development, and overall…

  18. Building Strong Community Partnerships: Equal Voice and Mutual Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberg De La Garza, Tammy; Moreno Kuri, Lissette

    2014-01-01

    This article explores an urban partnership and service-learning project deliberately created to improve literacy and strengthen learning communities in an urban, Latino neighborhood of Chicago. The project aligns activities and objectives with resources and needs of university participants, a Latino community organization, and local public…

  19. Building Strong Community Partnerships: Equal Voice and Mutual Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberg De La Garza, Tammy; Moreno Kuri, Lissette

    2014-01-01

    This article explores an urban partnership and service-learning project deliberately created to improve literacy and strengthen learning communities in an urban, Latino neighborhood of Chicago. The project aligns activities and objectives with resources and needs of university participants, a Latino community organization, and local public…

  20. Building joint commission continuous readiness in partnership with nursing students.

    PubMed

    Baas, Donna; Bryant, Keneshia; Sadaka, Heba; Henderson, Tamisha

    2014-01-01

    A partnership between an academic medical center and a college of nursing has proven to be an equally beneficial opportunity for continuous readiness for The Joint Commission. Nursing students learn the principles of regulatory compliance and accreditation through simulated surveys in their leadership and management course. The medical center receives continuous feedback and achieves survey readiness and fluency with better-prepared new graduates.

  1. Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Anne

    The strength of partnerships within and without the educational enterprise provides the ability to alter or modify existing practices as social and economic realities emerge. A number of interdependent factors raise questions related to partnerships. Demography is a major factor; while a substantial portion of the aging population will have less…

  2. The process, outcomes, and challenges of feasibility studies conducted in partnership with stakeholders: a health intervention for women survivors of intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Wuest, Judith; Merritt-Gray, Marilyn; Dubé, Norma; Hodgins, Marilyn J; Malcolm, Jeannie; Majerovich, Jo Ann; Scott-Storey, Kelly; Ford-Gilboe, Marilyn; Varcoe, Colleen

    2015-02-01

    Feasibility studies play a crucial role in determining whether complex, community-based interventions should be subject to efficacy testing. Reports of such studies often focus on efficacy potential but less often examine other elements of feasibility, such as acceptance by clients and professionals, practicality, and system integration, which are critical to decisions for proceeding with controlled efficacy testing. Although stakeholder partnership in feasibility studies is widely suggested to facilitate the research process, strengthen relevance, and increase knowledge transfer, little is written about how this occurs or its consequences and outcomes. We began to address these gaps in knowledge in a feasibility study of a health intervention for women survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV) conducted in partnership with policy, community and practitioner stakeholders. We employed a mixed-method design, combining a single-group, pre-post intervention study with 52 survivors of IPV, of whom 42 completed data collection, with chart review data and interviews of 18 purposefully sampled participants and all 9 interventionists. We assessed intervention feasibility in terms of acceptability, demand, practicality, implementation, adaptation, integration, and efficacy potential. Our findings demonstrate the scope of knowledge attainable when diverse elements of feasibility are considered, as well as the benefits and challenges of partnership. The implications of diverse perspectives on knowledge transfer are discussed. Our findings show the importance of examining elements of feasibility for complex community-based health interventions as a basis for determining whether controlled intervention efficacy testing is justified and for refining both the intervention and the research design.

  3. Oceanography in the next decade: Building new partnerships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The field of oceanography has existed as a major scientific discipline in the United States since World War 2, largely funded by the federal government. In this report, the Ocean Studies Board documents the state of the field of oceanography and assesses the health of the partnership between the federal government and the academic oceanography community. The objectives are to document and discuss important trends in the human, physical, and fiscal resources available to oceanographers, especially academic oceanographers, over the last decade; to present the Ocean Studies Board's best assessment of scientific opportunities in physical oceanography, marine geochemistry, marine geology and geophysics, biological oceanography, and coastal oceanography during the upcoming decade; and to provide a blueprint for more productive partnerships between academic oceanographers and federal agencies.

  4. Clean Cities: Building Partnerships to Cut Petroleum Use in Transportation

    SciTech Connect

    2016-01-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Cities program, which advances the nation's economic, environmental, and energy security by supporting local actions to cut petroleum use in transportation. At the national level, the program develops and promotes publications, tools, and other unique resources. At the local level, nearly 100 coalitions leverage these resources to create networks of stakeholders.

  5. Clean Cities: Building Partnerships to Cut Petroleum Use in Transportation

    SciTech Connect

    2016-01-07

    This brochure provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Cities program, which advances the nation's economic, environmental, and energy security by supporting local actions to cut petroleum use in transportation. At the national level, the program develops and promotes publications, tools, and other unique resources. At the local level, nearly 100 coalitions leverage these resources to create networks of stakeholders.

  6. Collaborative capacity building in complex community-based health partnerships: a model for translating knowledge into action.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Elizabeth; Muenchberger, Heidi; Sunderland, Naomi; Harris, Michelle; Cowan, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Partnerships among multiple organizations across a range of sectors that bring together multiple perspectives are a common way of addressing community health and building capacity. To function successfully, partnerships depend on the careful orchestration of a collaborative culture and the facilitation of collective action. Using a systematic method, we developed a synthesis of evidence about collaborative capacity building, integrating this diverse knowledge base into a usable framework. Seventeen published models of collaborative capacity building met the inclusion criteria and were combined to derive a matrix that could guide the actions of those responsible for partnership management. This matrix may make the process of developing partnerships less complicated in future.

  7. Stakeholder Participation in International Higher Education Partnerships: Results of a Survey of Two Sub-Saharan African Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiteng Kot, Felly

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years, foreign institutions have increasingly sought to establish partnerships with African universities. Likewise, African universities have increasingly sought to establish linkages with foreign institutions. Different factors suggest that these partnerships will continue to be a major focus in the future. This study draws from a…

  8. Building Our Own Classroom: A Process of Creativity and Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacPhail, Wendy R.

    2001-01-01

    Documents the process of building a classroom for environmental education studies. Describes an experiential program that the classroom supports. Provides insight into the integration of subject areas. (DDR)

  9. Building Ocean Learning Communities: A COSEE Science and Education Partnership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robigou, V.; Bullerdick, S.; Anderson, A.

    2007-12-01

    The core mission of the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE) is to promote partnerships between research scientists and educators through a national network of regional and thematic centers. In addition, the COSEEs also disseminate best practices in ocean sciences education, and promote ocean sciences as a charismatic interdisciplinary vehicle for creating a more scientifically literate workforce and citizenry. Although each center is mainly funded through a peer-reviewed grant process by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the centers form a national network that fosters collaborative efforts among the centers to design and implement initiatives for the benefit of the entire network and beyond. Among these initiatives the COSEE network has contributed to the definition, promotion, and dissemination of Ocean Literacy in formal and informal learning settings. Relevant to all research scientists, an Education and Public Outreach guide for scientists is now available at www.tos.org. This guide highlights strategies for engaging scientists in Ocean Sciences Education that are often applicable in other sciences. To address the challenging issue of ocean sciences education informed by scientific research, the COSEE approach supports centers that are partnerships between research institutions, formal and informal education venues, advocacy groups, industry, and others. The COSEE Ocean Learning Communities, is a partnership between the University of Washington College of Ocean and Fishery Sciences and College of Education, the Seattle Aquarium, and a not-for-profit educational organization. The main focus of the center is to foster and create Learning Communities that cultivate contributing, and ocean sciences-literate citizens aware of the ocean's impact on daily life. The center is currently working with volunteer groups around the Northwest region that are actively involved in projects in the marine environment and to empower these diverse groups

  10. Building on partnerships: reconnecting kids with nature for health benefits.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Judy; Nelson, Kristen; Klein, Patti; McCurdy, Leyla Erk; Pride, Patti; Carrier Ady, Janet

    2010-05-01

    In April 2008, several federal and nonprofit agencies organized an informational Web-based meeting titled "Reconnecting Kids With Nature for Health Benefits." This online meeting was convened by the Society for Public Health Education and delivered to public health educators, health professionals, environmental educators, and land conservationists to raise awareness of national efforts to promote children's involvement in outdoor recreation. This article describes eight programs discussed at this meeting. For public health professionals, partnership with land-management agencies conducting such programs may be an effective way to increase physical activity levels among children.

  11. The Role of Partnerships in Academic Capacity Building in Open and Online Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Berg, Geesje; Joffe, Muriel; Porto, Stella C. S.

    2016-01-01

    In many parts of the world online education is still taking shape and faces many obstacles, including insufficient numbers of professionals prepared to teach using new technologies. This paper is a case study of academic capacity building to determine how a partnership between the University of South Africa (Unisa) and the University of Maryland…

  12. Building Public-Private Partnerships To Improve Vocational Education in Illinois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheets, Robert G.; And Others

    The Illinois Council on Vocational Education (ICoVE) launched a statewide study in 1990 to understand the perspectives of business and labor on what vocational education can do to prepare the work force with the skills necessary for the future. The study was designed to build new public-private partnerships. It included a survey of businesses and…

  13. Building Learning Communities: Partnerships, Social Capital and VET Performance. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Janelle; Gorringe, Scott; Lacey, Justine

    2006-01-01

    This document was produced by the authors based on their research for the report "Building Learning Communities: Partnerships, Social Capital and VET Performance." It provides regional summaries and the "facts and flavour" for each of the following areas: (1) Restructuring Rural Landscape (Wide Bay Burnett, Queensland); (2)…

  14. Success Skills for the Textile Industry: Team Building (SS2). Workforce 2000 Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enterprise State Junior Coll., AL.

    This curriculum package on team building is a product of the Workforce 2000 Partnership, which combined the resources of four educational partners and four industrial partners in Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina to provide education and training in communication, computation, and critical thinking to employees in the apparel, carpet, and…

  15. Mutual Concerns of Farmers and Farmworkers: An Agenda for Building Partnerships in Michigan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siles, Marcelo E.; Elicerio, Monica B.; Gonzalez, Manuel

    This document reports on a survey regarding the needs and concerns of 51 members of grower associations, 35 seasonal farmworkers, and 74 migrant farmworkers in Michigan. The survey was conducted during the conference "Building Partnerships: Growers, Farmworkers, and Agencies United," held on December 10, 1994, in Lansing, Michigan. The…

  16. Sustainability and productivity of southern pine ecosystems: A thematic framework for integrating research and building partnerships

    Treesearch

    Charles K. McMahon; James P. Barnett

    2000-01-01

    In 1997, the USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) published a Strategic Plan that formed a framework for addressing the Sustainability of Southern Forest Ecosystems. Six crosscutting themes were identified to facilitate research integration and partnership building among the widely dispersed SRS research work units. The Sustainability and Productivity of...

  17. Building an Academe and Government Partnership in Workforce Education: Challenges and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Kerri S.; Self, Mary Jo; Bailey, Lucy; Harris, Ed; Halcomb, Starla; Hill, Brent; Shimp, Upton

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, the College of Education at Oklahoma State University began the task of building a partnership with the Defense Ammunition Center (DAC) in McAlester, Oklahoma, and implementing research-driven, experience-based workforce education. In this article, the authors describe unique features and challenges of this multi-year…

  18. A Proposal to Build Evaluation Capacity at the Bunche-Da Vinci Learning Partnership Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Jean A.

    2005-01-01

    The author describes potential evaluation capacity-building activities in contrast to the specifics of an evaluation design. Her response to the case of the Bunche-Da Vinci Learning Partnership Academy is developed in three parts: (1) an initial framing of the Bunche-Da Vinci situation; (2) what should be done before signing a contract; and (3)…

  19. The Machinery of Management: Team Building (MM4). Workforce 2000 Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enterprise State Junior Coll., AL.

    This curriculum package on team building--the machinery of management for supervisors, auditors, and training instructors has been developed by the Workforce 2000 Partnership, a network of industries and educational institutions that provides training in communication, computation, and creative thinking to employees and supervisors in textile,…

  20. BUILDING STRONGER STATE ENERGY PARTNERSHIPS WITH THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Kate Burke

    2002-11-01

    This technical progress report includes an update of the progress during the second year of cooperative agreement DE-FC26-00NT40802, Building Stronger State Energy Partnerships with the U.S. Department of Energy. The report also describes the barriers in conduct of the effort, and our assessment of future progress and activities.

  1. Building capacity in the rural physiotherapy workforce: a paediatric training partnership.

    PubMed

    Williams, E N; McMeeken, J M

    2014-01-01

    Building capacity in the rural physiotherapy workforce: a paediatric training partnership' provided 6 months postgraduate paediatric clinical and academic training for two physiotherapists in rural Australia. It is described as a model for improving services and workforce retention. The need for 'an appropriate, skilled and well-supported health workforce' is the third goal in Australia's National Strategic Framework for Rural and Remote Health 2011. The World Health Organization recently published its first global policy for improving the retention of rural and remote health workers. Education is its first recommendation and aims to 'design continuing education and professional development programmes that meet the needs of rural health workers and that are accessible from where they live and work, so as to support their retention …'. Additionally, '… to be successful, continuing education needs to be linked to career paths, as well as with other education interventions'. The problem is a lack of paediatric physiotherapy expertise in rural areas due to an absence of postgraduate clinical training opportunities in the rural workforce. The result is fragmented local services for families who are forced to travel to metropolitan services, costly in terms of both time and money. The aims were to improve local paediatric physiotherapy clinical services, provide physiotherapists additional access to professional development and subsequently provide a career path to retain these health professionals. Evaluation of the project used purpose-built questionnaires as there are no specific indicators to monitor the performance of systems and services that are available to children and families in Australia. The paediatric physiotherapy training program was enabled through initial funding for a 12-month pilot project. Further government funding built on that success for this reported 6-month project. Funding to employ the postgraduate physiotherapists was essential to the

  2. Building a stakeholder's vision of an offshore wind-farm project: A group modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Château, Pierre-Alexandre; Chang, Yang-Chi; Chen, Hsin; Ko, Tsung-Ting

    2012-03-15

    This paper describes a Group Model Building (GMB) initiative that was designed to discuss the various potential effects that an offshore wind-farm may have on its local ecology and socioeconomic development. The representatives of various organizations in the study area, Lu-Kang, Taiwan, have held several meetings, and structured debates have been organized to promote the emergence of a consensual view on the main issues and their implications. A System Dynamics (SD) model has been built and corrected iteratively with the participants through the GMB process. The diverse interests within the group led the process toward the design of multifunctional wind-farms with different modalities. The scenario analyses, using the SD model under various policies, including no wind-farm policy, objectively articulates the vision of the local stakeholders. The results of the SD simulations show that the multifunctional wind-farms may have superior economic effects and the larger wind-farms with bird corridors could reduce ecological impact. However, the participants of the modeling process did not appreciate any type of offshore wind-farm development when considering all of the identified key factors of social acceptance. The insight gained from the study can provide valuable information to actualize feasible strategies for the green energy technique to meet local expectations.

  3. Participatory Evaluation of a Community-Academic Partnership to Inform Capacity-building and Sustainability

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Vani Nath; Klasko, Lynne B.; Fleming, Khaliah; Koskan, Alexis M.; Jackson, Nia T.; Noel-Thomas, Shalewa; Luque, John S.; Vadaparampil, Susan T.; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Britt, Lounell; Waddell, Rhondda; Meade, Cathy D.; Gwede, Clement K.

    2015-01-01

    The Tampa Bay Community Cancer Network (TBCCN) was formed as a partnership comprised of committed community based organizations (grassroots, service, health care organizations) and a National Cancer Institute designated cancer center working together to reduce cancer health disparities. Adhering to principles of community-based participatory research, TBCCN’s primary aims are to develop and sustain outreach, training, and research programs that aim to reach medically underserved, multicultural and multilingual populations within the Tampa Bay tri-county area. Using a participatory evaluation approach, we recently evaluated the partnerships’ priorities for cancer education and outreach; perspectives on the partnerships’ adherence to CBPR principles; and suggestions for sustaining TBCCN and its efforts. The purpose of this paper is to describe implementation and outcomes of this participatory evaluation of a community/academic partnership, and to illustrate the application of evaluation findings for partnership capacity-building and sustainability. Our evaluation provides evidence for partners’ perceived benefits and realized expectations of the partnership and illustrates the value of ongoing and continued partnership assessment to directly inform program activities and build community capacity and sustainability. PMID:25863014

  4. Trust build up and break down between stakeholders in water resource management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Gemma

    2015-04-01

    Trust is a word that is often heard in discussions about stakeholder participation in water management programmes and projects. A break down in trust between participants is often attributed to the failure of a project reaching its objectives. In contrast, the development of trust is often described as a success in itself, and is thought to lead to positive water management outcomes. To explore how trust impacts water management, this research explores the factors that led to trust development and break-down, and the implications of this, in a major stakeholder engagement project in water management in North America. A major review of the Lake Ontario and St Lawrence River water level operating system (the LOSL Study) was commissioned in 1999 by the International Joint Commission (IJC). The goal of the five-year LOSL Study was to produce an operating policy for the system that was acceptable to everyone impacted by the water levels and flows in the basin. Through public meetings and consultations, the Study aimed to bring together and combine public and scientist input to co-produce an operating policy that met the needs of all interest groups. Freely accessible documentation of the public involvement activities that took place is available, which is used to explore trust and mistrust development. Provisional findings show that some public/interest group representatives mistrusted the Study. This was related to concerns over data quality, whether appropriate indicators were selected by the researchers and whether the models used were producing accurate outputs. Scientist responses to questions at public meetings were able to address some of these concerns and therefore build trust in the methods, but could also lead to further mistrust if public concerns and questions were not addressed adequately (for example, simply dismissed as irrelevant by scientists without due explanation). The impacts of distrust between participants and scientists included apathy and low

  5. Coaching Leadership: Building Educational Leadership Capacity through Partnership. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Jan

    2016-01-01

    "Coaching Leadership" is about building leadership capacity in individuals, and in institutions, through enhancing professional relationships. It is based on the importance of maximising potential, and harnessing the ongoing commitment and energy needed to meet personal and professional goals. This book is for anyone interested in…

  6. Ethical considerations related to participation and partnership: an investigation of stakeholders' perceptions of an action-research project on user fee removal for the poorest in Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Matthew R; Gogognon, Patrick; Ridde, Valéry

    2014-02-20

    Healthcare user fees present an important barrier for accessing services for the poorest (indigents) in Burkina Faso and selective removal of fees has been incorporated in national healthcare planning. However, establishing fair, effective and sustainable mechanisms for the removal of user fees presents important challenges. A participatory action-research project was conducted in Ouargaye, Burkina Faso, to test mechanisms for identifying those who are indigents, and funding and implementing user fee removal. In this paper, we explore stakeholder perceptions of ethical considerations relating to participation and partnership arising in the action-research. We conducted 39 in-depth interviews to examine ethical issues associated with the action-research. Respondents included 14 individuals identified as indigent through the community selection process, seven members of village selection committees, six local healthcare professionals, five members of the management committees of local health clinics, five members of the research team, and four regional or national policy-makers. Using constant comparative techniques, we carried out an inductive thematic analysis of the collected data. The Ouargaye project involved a participatory model, included both implementation and research components, and focused on a vulnerable group within small, rural communities. Stakeholder perceptions and experiences relating to the participatory approach and reliance on multiple partnerships in the project were associated with a range of ethical considerations related to 1) seeking common ground through communication and collaboration, 2) community participation and risk of stigmatization, 3) impacts of local funding of the user fee removal, 4) efforts to promote fairness in the selection of the indigents, and 5) power relations and the development of partnerships. This investigation of the Ouargaye project serves to illuminate the distinctive ethical terrain of a participatory public

  7. The Process, Outcomes, and Challenges of Feasibility Studies Conducted in Partnership With Stakeholders: A Health Intervention for Women Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence

    PubMed Central

    Wuest, Judith; Merritt-Gray, Marilyn; Dubé, Norma; Hodgins, Marilyn J; Malcolm, Jeannie; Majerovich, Jo Ann; Scott-Storey, Kelly; Ford-Gilboe, Marilyn; Varcoe, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Feasibility studies play a crucial role in determining whether complex, community-based interventions should be subject to efficacy testing. Reports of such studies often focus on efficacy potential but less often examine other elements of feasibility, such as acceptance by clients and professionals, practicality, and system integration, which are critical to decisions for proceeding with controlled efficacy testing. Although stakeholder partnership in feasibility studies is widely suggested to facilitate the research process, strengthen relevance, and increase knowledge transfer, little is written about how this occurs or its consequences and outcomes. We began to address these gaps in knowledge in a feasibility study of a health intervention for women survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV) conducted in partnership with policy, community and practitioner stakeholders. We employed a mixed-method design, combining a single-group, pre-post intervention study with 52 survivors of IPV, of whom 42 completed data collection, with chart review data and interviews of 18 purposefully sampled participants and all 9 interventionists. We assessed intervention feasibility in terms of acceptability, demand, practicality, implementation, adaptation, integration, and efficacy potential. Our findings demonstrate the scope of knowledge attainable when diverse elements of feasibility are considered, as well as the benefits and challenges of partnership. The implications of diverse perspectives on knowledge transfer are discussed. Our findings show the importance of examining elements of feasibility for complex community-based health interventions as a basis for determining whether controlled intervention efficacy testing is justified and for refining both the intervention and the research design. © 2015 The Authors. Research in Nursing & Health published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25594917

  8. Consumer-driven health care: building partnerships in research.

    PubMed

    Shea, Beverley; Santesso, Nancy; Qualman, Ann; Heiberg, Turid; Leong, Amye; Judd, Maria; Robinson, Vivian; Wells, George; Tugwell, Peter

    2005-12-01

    Over the past four decades, there has been a widespread movement to increase the involvement of patients and the public in health care. Strategies to effectively foster consumer participation are occurring within all research activities from research priority setting to utilization. One of the ten principles of the Cochrane Collaboration is to 'enable wide participation', and this includes consumers. The Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group (CMSG) is a review group of 50 within the Collaboration that has been working to increase consumer participation since its inception in 1993. Based in Canada, the CMSG has embraced the concept of knowledge translation as advocated by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. The emphasis in knowledge translation is on interactions or partnerships between researchers and users to facilitate the use of relevant research in decision making. While the CMSG recognizes the importance of reaching all users, much of its work has focused on developing relationships with people with musculoskeletal diseases to enhance consumer participation in research. The CMSG has built a network of consumer members who guide research priorities, peer review systematic reviews and also promote and facilitate consumer-appropriate knowledge dissemination. Consumers were recruited through links with other arthritis organizations and the recruitment continues. Specific roles were established for the consumer team and responsibilities of the CMSG staff developed. The continuing development of a diversified team of consumer participants enables the CMSG to produce and promote access to high quality relevant systematic reviews and summaries of those reviews to the consumer.

  9. Consumer‐driven health care: Building partnerships in research

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Beverley; Santesso, Nancy; Qualman, Ann; Heiberg, Turid; Leong, Amye; Judd, Maria; Robinson, Vivian; Wells, George; Tugwell, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Over the past four decades, there has been a widespread movement to increase the involvement of patients and the public in health care. Strategies to effectively foster consumer participation are occurring within all research activities from research priority setting to utilization. One of the ten principles of the Cochrane Collaboration is to ‘enable wide participation’, and this includes consumers. The Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group (CMSG) is a review group of 50 within the Collaboration that has been working to increase consumer participation since its inception in 1993. Based in Canada, the CMSG has embraced the concept of knowledge translation as advocated by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. The emphasis in knowledge translation is on interactions or partnerships between researchers and users to facilitate the use of relevant research in decision making. While the CMSG recognizes the importance of reaching all users, much of its work has focused on developing relationships with people with musculoskeletal diseases to enhance consumer participation in research. The CMSG has built a network of consumer members who guide research priorities, peer review systematic reviews and also promote and facilitate consumer‐appropriate knowledge dissemination. Consumers were recruited through links with other arthritis organizations and the recruitment continues. Specific roles were established for the consumer team and responsibilities of the CMSG staff developed. The continuing development of a diversified team of consumer participants enables the CMSG to produce and promote access to high quality relevant systematic reviews and summaries of those reviews to the consumer. PMID:16266423

  10. Using the Delphi and snow card techniques to build consensus among diverse community and academic stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Rideout, Catlin; Gil, Rosa; Browne, Ruth; Calhoon, Claudia; Rey, Mariano; Gourevitch, Marc; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2013-01-01

    The New York University- New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (NYU-HHC) Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) used a community-based participatory research (CBPR) and consensus-building approach among its community advisory board (CAB) and steering committee (SC) members to formulate research priorities to foster shared research collaborations. The Delphi technique is a methodology used to generate consensus from diverse perspectives and organizational agendas through a multi-method, iterative approach to collecting data. A series of on-line surveys was conducted with CAB members to identify health and research priorities from the community perspective. Subsequently, CAB and SC members were brought together and the snow card approach was utilized to narrow to two priority areas for shared research collaborations. Cardiovascular disease (CVD)/obesity and mental health were identified as health disparity areas for shared research collaborations within a social determinants framework. In response, two workgroups were formed with leadership provided by three co-chairs representing the three constituents of the NYU-HHC CTSI: NYU faculty, HHC providers, and community leaders The Delphi approach fostered ownership and engagement with community partners because it was an iterative process that required stakeholders' input into decision making. The snow card technique allowed for organizing of a large number of discrete ideas. Results have helped to inform the overall CTSI research agenda by defining action steps, and setting an organizing framework to tackle two health disparity areas. The process helped ensure that NYUHHC CTSI research and community engagement strategies are congruent with community priorities.

  11. Building Lasting Impact: Ten Years of the Earth to Sky Interagency Partnership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A.; Lacome, B.; Merrick, B.; Morris, J.; Paglierani, R.; Spakoff, S.

    2014-12-01

    Beginning in Fall of 2004, NASA and the National Park Service (NPS) embarked on collaborative work aimed at bringing the wonders of NASA science and education content into the hands of outstanding and highly regarded science "communicators" - interpreters in NPS. What began as a showcase of NASA content delivered in an interpretive workshop has evolved and matured into a long-standing, and growing partnership focused on climate change communication. The partnership has been fruitful and successful, producing a variety of professional development events that have resulted in participants reaching millions of Park and Refuge visitors and thousands of interpreters and educators, with content derived from our courses. Earth to Sky (ETS) now includes the US Fish and Wildlife Service and NOAA, and is working towards establishment of a network of regional networks made up of alumni and their communities. The key to our success has been the careful building and nurturing of the partnership, and its resulting community of practice, beginning with excellent facilitated meetings of the parties involved, and continuing through implementation of best practices in partnership and collaborative work. Project design, development, and execution were accomplished in true partnership with leaders from our intended audience, NPS interpreters, and later USFWS environmental educators. Our partners were fully involved, from the inception of the first workshop design, through its implementation and assessment, to strategic planning for sustainability and all subsequent efforts. ETS can serve as a model of an effective partnership in climate communication efforts, drawing upon the strengths of partners with widely different areas of expertise to produce cohesive work with high impact. We will share the ETS model of partnership, and discuss how this model might be useful as the climate communication community moves towards a more coherent approach to improve climate literacy.

  12. The California Central Coast Research Partnership: Building Relationships, Partnerships and Paradigms for University-Industry Collaboration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-25

    142 Use of Unstiffened Steel Plates to Prevent Progressive Collapse of Existing Steel Building Frames with Simple Beam-to-Column Connections. Bing...configurations are Page 46 of 471 N00014-11-1-0359 P.I. Susan C. Opava, Ph.D. glass and steel , which contributes $2/Watt ofthat cost.x" Our project reduces...using a Xerox 8570 Color Cube printer, which uses wax ink, see Figure 3 below. Figure 3. The left panel: Xerox 8570 Color Cube printer. Right panel

  13. DOE's Minority Serving Institutions Partnership Program: Building a Sustainable Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusnezov, Dimitri

    2013-04-01

    We set out to build a sustainable pipeline between the Department of Energy sites and Minority Serving Institutions in areas of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM), starting this year with Historically Black Colleges and Universities. The program is built around the concept of sustainability. This program is targeted at the intersection of DOE site interests and MSI goals. It will be sufficiently flexible in its organization to reflect the unique regional priorities that Universities have in faculty research and developing STEM disciplines and skills, and DOE site targets for research and critical skill development. The main elements of the consortium approach will be outlined, from K-12, MSIs, DOE sites and Industrial partners, together with the potential metrics for measuring progress.

  14. GeosciNET: Building a Global Geoinformatics Partnership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, W. S.; Lehnert, K. A.; Ito, E.; Harms, U.; Klump, J.

    2008-12-01

    GeosciNET is a collaboration of several existing geoinformatics efforts organized to provide a more effective data system for geoscience projects. Current members are: CoreWall (www.corewall.org), Geoinformatics for Geochemistry (GfG; www.geoinfogeochem.org), System for Earth Sample Registration (SESAR; www.geosamples.org ), GeoStrat SYS (www.geostratsys.org (formerly: PaleoStrat, www.paleostrat.org)), and the International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP; www.icdp-online.org). GeosciNET's basic goal is to advance coordination, complementarity, and interoperability, and minimize duplication of efforts among the involved partner systems in order to streamline the development and operation of geoinformatics efforts. We believe that by advancing the development and data holdings of its member groups, the overall value of each site will be significantly enhanced and better meet the needs of the users. With the existing membership, GeosciNET can offer a comprehensive, integrated system for data acquisition, dissemination, archiving, visualization, integration, and analysis. The system will enable a single researcher or a group of collaborators to keep track of, visualize, and digitally archive any type of sample- or stratigraphic-based data produced from drill holes, dredges, measured stratigraphic sections, the field, or the laboratory. The challenge is to build a linked system that provides users a library of research data as well as tools to input, discover, access, integrate, manipulate, analyze, and model interdisciplinary data - all without corrupting the original data and insuring that the data are attributed to the originator at all times. Science runs on data, but despite the importance of data (legacy or otherwise), there are currently few convenient mechanisms that enable users to easily input their data into databases. While some efforts such as GfG databases, PetDB and SedDB have worked hard to compile such data, only users' active participation can

  15. Using Community Advisory Boards to Build Partnerships and Develop Peer-Led Services for Rural Student Veterans.

    PubMed

    Cheney, Ann M; Abraham, Traci H; Sullivan, Steve; Russell, Shane; Swaim, Dianne; Waliski, Angie; Lewis, Caleb; Hudson, Cliff; Candler, Brian; Hall, Sonya; Hunt, Justin

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Veterans' Affairs (VA)/Student Partnership for Rural Veterans (VSP) built partnerships between institutional (health services researchers, VA chaplains) and community groups to develop veteran-to-veteran services on college campuses. Describe challenges and lessons learned in year 1 of the VSP project at six campuses in rural Arkansas. Researchers leveraged established community advisory boards (CABs) to develop veteran-to-veteran services. Ethnographic and qualitative methods were used to assess partnership building and evaluate peer-led services. Local established CABs and buy-in from student services and veteran organizations was instrumental to building partnerships and developing services. Challenges included developing rapport with campus leaders and creating sustainable role/expectations for student veteran leaders. Peer-led services are an ideal way to connect student veterans and link them to resources and health care services. Partnerships can facilitate grassroots efforts to develop local services that meet the needs of diverse student veteran populations.

  16. Interactive Learning Program (ILP)- a concept for life long learning and Capacity Building of Stakeholders in Integrated Flood Management (IFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasche, E.; Manojlovic, N.; Basener, S.; Behzadnia, N.

    2009-04-01

    In the paradigm shift in flood management from traditional to more integrated approach the key to initialising this transition stage is capacity building of stakeholders. It supports the effective participation of stakeholders within their role by giving the individuals/professionals and institutions required knowledge and skills. Such a process of empowering targeted stakeholder groups should be based on the interactive learning rather than mere delivering of flood related information. It can be achieved by initiating the learning process and developing life-long learning programs in form of blended learning that combines both, supervised online and face-to-face approaches. The learning concept based on the didactic principle of Kolb/Fry, has been used as a basis for development of the Interactive Learning Program (ILP) presented in this paper. Kolb/Fry define learning as a cyclic process dividing it into four steps: concrete experience, reflection & observation, forming abstract concepts, testing of acquainted knowledge in new situations. As the knowledge to understand the complexity of IFM is extensive and required level usually cannot be achieved within the face-to-face phase, additional autodidactic learning module tailored to the individual skills should be included in the learning program. ILP combines both, the face-to-face sessions following the Kolb?s learning cycle including theoretical and practical aspects and autodidactic phase by means of the e-learning platform based on the web dissemination strategy for IFM- Kalypso Inform (Pasche/Kraus/Manojlovic). According to this strategy, the access to the flood related information is enabled through three different modules Tutorial, Knowledge Base and Virtual Trainer enabling interaction with the system. This ILP is generic and can be tailored to requirements of different stakeholder groups depending on their role and level of integration in IFM. The first results, obtained for both public and private

  17. Elements of a strong and healthy interagency partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, Laurel

    2013-07-01

    In an era of budget cuts and declining resources, an increased need exists for government agencies to develop formal and informal partnerships. Such partnerships are a means through which government agencies can use their resources to accomplish together what they cannot accomplish on their own. Interagency partnerships may involve multiple government agencies, private contractors, national laboratories, technology developers, public representatives, and other stakeholders. Four elements of strong and healthy interagency partnerships are presented as well as three needs that must be satisfied for the partnership to last. A diagnostic tool to measure the strength of these building blocks within an existing partnership is provided. Tools, techniques, and templates to develop these fundamental elements within a new partnership or to strengthen those within an already existing partnership are presented. This includes a comprehensive template for a partnership agreement along with practical suggestions as membership, operations, and decisions-making. (authors)

  18. Building Trust among Educational Stakeholders through Participatory School Administration, Leadership and Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Antonio, Diosdado M.; Gamage, David T.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of implementing Participatory School Administration, Leadership and Management (PSALM) on the levels of trust among the educational stakeholders in Philippine public secondary schools. After an introductory section, the research context is provided by briefly reviewing relevant literature on PSALM and on trust and by…

  19. Building Trust among Educational Stakeholders through Participatory School Administration, Leadership and Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Antonio, Diosdado M.; Gamage, David T.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of implementing Participatory School Administration, Leadership and Management (PSALM) on the levels of trust among the educational stakeholders in Philippine public secondary schools. After an introductory section, the research context is provided by briefly reviewing relevant literature on PSALM and on trust and by…

  20. A model for upscaling global partnerships and building nurse and midwifery capacity.

    PubMed

    Spies, L A; Garner, S L; Faucher, M A; Hastings-Tolsma, M; Riley, C; Millenbruch, J; Prater, L; Conroy, S F

    2017-09-01

    To provide a unique model for use in guiding global collaboration and policy to upscale nursing and midwifery partnerships. Nurses and midwives across nations need skills reaching beyond the bedside and unit level in today's complex, global, multifaceted healthcare milieu. Thoughtful consideration, research and concomitant development of models to guide appropriate upscaling of nurse and midwifery capacity within and between nations are needed. This article explores an integrated global approach to upscaling nurse and midwifery capacity using examples of partnerships between nursing and midwifery programmes across multiple continents. Global nurse and midwifery capacity is effectively being developed using a myriad of approaches. A new model is presented to illustrate supports, strategies and activities to achieve intermediate and long-term goals for capacity building through strong and sustainable global partnerships. Development of global skills can focus the nurse and midwife to influence policy-level decisions. Human resource planning that can impact countrywide provision of health care begins in the preservice setting for both nurses and midwives. A global experience can be a value-added component to the well-rounded education of future nurses. Education during preparation for entry into practice is a strategic way to develop a worldview. Incorporating reflective practice can build skills and shape attitudes to prepare the new nurse to be comfortable as a global healthcare provider. An expanded world view is the springboard to more robust and informed involvement and inclusion in policy-level discussions. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  1. A Novel Program Trains Community‐Academic Teams to Build Research and Partnership Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jen; LeBailly, Susan; McGee, Richard; Bayldon, Barbara; Huber, Gail; Kaleba, Erin; Lowry, Kelly Walker; Martens, Joseph; Mason, Maryann; Nuñez, Abel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Community‐Engaged Research Team Support (CERTS) program was developed and tested to build research and partnership capacity for community‐engaged research (CEnR) teams. Led by the Northwestern University Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (NUCATS), the goals of CERTS were: (1) to help community‐academic teams build capacity for conducting rigorous CEnR and (2) to support teams as they prepare federal grant proposal drafts. The program was guided by an advisory committee of community and clinical partners, and representatives from Chicago's Clinical and Translational Science Institutes. Monthly workshops guided teams to write elements of NIH‐style research proposals. Draft reviewing fostered a collaborative learning environment and helped teams develop equal partnerships. The program culminated in a mock‐proposal review. All teams clarified their research and acquired new knowledge about the preparation of NIH‐style proposals. Trust, partnership collaboration, and a structured writing strategy were assets of the CERTS approach. CERTS also uncovered gaps in resources and preparedness for teams to be competitive for federally funded grants. Areas of need include experience as principal investigators, publications on study results, mentoring, institutional infrastructure, and dedicated time for research. PMID:23751028

  2. Building Service Delivery Networks: Partnership Evolution Among Children's Behavioral Health Agencies in Response to New Funding.

    PubMed

    Bunger, Alicia C; Doogan, Nathan J; Cao, Yiwen

    2014-12-01

    Meeting the complex needs of youth with behavioral health problems requires a coordinated network of community-based agencies. Although fiscal scarcity or retrenchment can limit coordinated services, munificence can stimulate service delivery partnerships as agencies expand programs, hire staff, and spend more time coordinating services. This study examines the 2-year evolution of referral and staff expertise sharing networks in response to substantial new funding for services within a regional network of children's mental health organizations. Quantitative network survey data were collected from directors of 22 nonprofit organizations that receive funding from a county government-based behavioral health service fund. Both referral and staff expertise sharing networks changed over time, but results of a stochastic actor-oriented model of network dynamics suggest the nature of this change varies for these networks. Agencies with higher numbers of referral and staff expertise sharing partners tend to maintain these ties and/or develop new relationships over the 2 years. Agencies tend to refer to agencies they trust, but trust was not associated with staff expertise sharing ties. However, agencies maintain or form staff expertise sharing ties with referral partners, or with organizations that provide similar services. In addition, agencies tend to reciprocate staff expertise sharing, but not referrals. Findings suggest that during periods of resource munificence and service expansion, behavioral health organizations build service delivery partnerships in complex ways that build upon prior collaborative history and coordinate services among similar types of providers. Referral partnerships can pave the way for future information sharing relationships.

  3. Building outside the Box. Public-Private Partnership: A Strategy for Improved Public School Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twenty-First Century School Fund, Washington, DC.

    This publication describes the creation of a new school building for James F. Oyster Bilingual Elementary School in Washington, DC. Despite the success of its academic program, the school's 70-year-old building had become unsafe and unsuitable for teaching and learning and was threatened with closure in 1993 because of the district's fiscal…

  4. The Anthropology of Science Education Reform: An Alabama Model for Building an Integrated Stakeholder Systems Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denson, R. L.; Cox, G. N.

    2004-12-01

    Anthropologists are concerned with every aspect of the culture they are investigating. One of the five main branches of anthropology, socio-cultural anthropology, concerns itself with studying the relationship between behavior and culture. This paper explores the concept that changing the behavior of our culture - its beliefs and values - towards science is at the heart of science education reform. There are five institutions that socio-cultural anthropologists use to study the social organization of cultures: the educational system is only one of them. Its function - across all cultures - is to serve as a mechanism for implementing change in cultural beliefs and values. As leaders of science education reform, the Alabama model contends that we must stop the struggle with our purpose and get on with the business of leading culture change through an integrated stakeholder systems approach. This model stresses the need for the interaction of agencies other than education - including government, industry, the media and our health communities to operate in an integrated and systemic fashion to address the issues of living among a technically literate society. Twenty-five years of science education reform needs being voiced and programs being developed has not produced the desired results from within the educational system. This is too limited a focus to affect any real cultural change. It is when we acknowledge that students spend only an average of 12 percent of their life time in schools, that we can begin to ask ourselves what are our students learning the other 88 percent of their time - from their peers, their parents and the media - and what should we be doing to address this cultural crisis in these other arenas in addition to the educational system? The Alabama Math, Science and Technology Education Coalition (AMSTEC) is a non-profit 501c(3) organization operating in the state of Alabama to provide leadership in improving mathematics, science, and technology

  5. Results and Lessons Learned From the DOE Commercial Building Partnerships: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, A.; Deru, M.; Langner, R.; Stark, G.; Doebber, I.; Scheib, J.; Sheppy, M.; Bonnema, E.; Pless, S.; Livingood, B.; Torcellini, P.

    2014-09-01

    Over the course of 5 years, NREL worked with commercial building owners and their design teams in the DOE Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) to cut energy consumption by 50% in new construction (versus code) and by 30% in existing building pilot projects (versus code or pre-retrofit operational energy use depending on the preference of the Partner) using strategies that could be replicated across their building portfolios. A number of different building types were addressed, including supermarket, retail merchandise, combination big box (general merchandise and food sales), high rise office space, and warehouse. The projects began in pre-design and included a year of measurement data to evaluate performance against design expectations. Focused attention was required throughout the entire process to achieve a design with the potential to hit the energy performance target and to operate the resulting building to reach this potential. This paper will report quantitative results and cover both the technical and the human sides of CBP, including the elements that were required to succeed and where stumbling blocks were encountered. It will also address the impact of energy performance goals and intensive energy modeling on the design process innovations and best practices.

  6. Building Stronger State Energy Partnerships with the U.S. Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, Kate

    2011-09-30

    This final technical report details the results of total work efforts and progress made from October 2007 – September 2011 under the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) cooperative agreement DE-FC26-07NT43264, Building Stronger State Energy Partnerships with the U.S. Department of Energy. Major topical project areas in this final report include work efforts in the following areas: Energy Assurance and Critical Infrastructure, State and Regional Technical Assistance, Regional Initiative, Regional Coordination and Technical Assistance, and International Activities in China. All required deliverables have been provided to the National Energy Technology Laboratory and DOE program officials.

  7. The rural pipeline: building a strong nursing workforce through academic and service partnerships.

    PubMed

    Murray, Maureen Fitzgerald; Havener, Jeanne-Marie; Davis, Patricia S; Jastremski, Connie; Twichell, Martha L

    2011-03-01

    Nurse recruitment and the retention of a high-quality workforce are challenging issues facing rural hospitals and health centers. The Bassett Healthcare Network has met these challenges by building a supportive framework to develop and support nurses at every level of their professional careers. The organization has partnered with local colleges to help staff nurses further their education. These and other partnership endeavors, such as the organization's clinical ladder and collaborative continuing nursing education opportunities, are helping Bassett sustain and grow the nursing workforce across 8 counties in rural upstate New York and develop stronger ties with academic partners.

  8. Building an Evidence-Driven Child Welfare Workforce: A University–Agency Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Lery, Bridgette; Wiegmann, Wendy; Berrick, Jill Duerr

    2016-01-01

    The federal government increasingly expects child welfare systems to be more responsive to the needs of their local populations, connect strategies to results, and use continuous quality improvement (CQI) to accomplish these goals. A method for improving decision making, CQI relies on an inflow of high-quality data, up-to-date research evidence, and a robust organizational structure and climate that supports the deliberate use of evidence for decision making. This article describes an effort to build and support these essential system components through one public-private child welfare agency–university partnership. PMID:27429534

  9. Understanding collaboration in a multi-national research capacity-building partnership: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Dinansha; Atkins, Salla; Das, Arindam; Diwan, Vishal

    2016-08-18

    Research capacity building and its impact on policy and international research partnership is increasingly seen as important. High income and low- and middle-income countries frequently engage in research collaborations. These can have a positive impact on research capacity building, provided such partnerships are long-term collaborations with a unified aim, but they can also have challenges. What are these challenges, which often result in a short term/ non viable collaboration? Does such collaboration results in capacity building? What are the requirements to make any collaboration sustainable? This study aimed to answer these and other research questions through examining an international collaboration in one multi-country research capacity building project ARCADE RSDH (Asian Regional Capacity Development for Research on Social Determinants of Health). A qualitative study was conducted that focused on the reasons for the collaboration, collaboration patterns involved, processes of exchanging information, barriers faced and perceived growth in research capacity. In-depth interviews were conducted with the principal investigators (n = 12), research assistants (n = 2) and a scientific coordinator (n = 1) of the collaborating institutes. Data were analysed using thematic framework analysis. The initial contact between institutes was through previous collaborations. The collaboration was affected by the organisational structure of the partner institutes, political influences and the collaboration design. Communication was usually conducted online, which was affected by differences in time and language and inefficient infrastructure. Limited funding resulted in restricted engagement by some partners. This study explored work in a large, North-South collaboration project focusing on building research capacity in partner institutes. The project helped strengthen research capacity, though differences in organization types, existing research capacity, culture, time, and

  10. Development of a multi stakeholder partnership to improve access to and delivery of neurosurgical services in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sunjay; Bohn, Des; Mikroyiannakis, Iphigenia; Trowbridge, Joslyn; Thompson, Donna; Bell, Robert; Rutka, James

    2017-02-01

    Neurosurgical emergencies require expedient access to definitive care at neurosurgical centers. Neurosurgical resources in province of Ontario are highly centralized, and subsequently, most patients with neurosurgical emergencies will present to non-neurosurgical centers. From 2000-2010, metrics demonstrated the organization of neurosurgical resources might not be optimal. In response to this a program entitled Provincial Neurosurgery Ontario (PNO)- was formed to address these issues in cooperation with neurosurgeons, hospitals and the provincial government. PNO worked with multiple stakeholders to implement interventions to not only prevent out of country transfer, but to also improve the flow of neurosurgical patients in the province and potentially improve outcome. The main interventions undertaken by PNO were: 1) implementation and development of a province-wide tele-radiology system; 2) development of neurosurgery as a provincially-funded program; 3) significant outreach to non-neurosurgical centers; and 4) specialized funding packages for highly specialized level care. This report provides background on the challenges faced by neurosurgery in the province of Ontario and the process developed to address these challenges. Finally, we describe the impact provincial strategies have had on improving access to emergency neurosurgical care in the Ontario.

  11. Stakeholder Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Jessica W.; Petherick, J.T.; Basara, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Background Oklahoma law pre-empts local governments from enacting smoking restrictions inside public places that are stricter than state law, but the sovereign status of Oklahoma’s 38 Tribal nations means they are uniquely positioned to stand apart as leaders in the area of tobacco policy. Purpose To provide recommendations for employing university–Tribal partnerships as an effective strategy for tobacco policy planning in tribal communities. Methods Using a community-based participatory research approach, researchers facilitated a series of meetings with key Tribal stakeholders in order to develop a comprehensive tobacco policy plan. Ongoing engagement activities held between January 2011 and May 2012, including interdepartmental visits, facility site tours, interviews, and attendance at tribal activities, were critical for fostering constructive and trusting relationships between all partners involved in the policy planning process. Results The 17-month collaborative engagement produced a plan designed to regulate the use of commercial tobacco in all Tribally owned properties. The extended period of collaboration between the researchers and Tribal stakeholders facilitated: (1) levels of trust between partners; and (2) a steadfast commitment to the planning process, ensuring completion of the plan amid uncertain political climates and economic concerns about tobacco bans. Conclusions Extended engagement produced an effective foundation for policy planning that promoted collaboration between otherwise dispersed Tribal departments, and facilitated communication of diverse stakeholder interests related to the goal of tobacco policies. The findings of this study provide useful strategies and best practices for those looking to employ Tribal–university partnerships as strategies for tobacco control planning and policy-based research. PMID:25528706

  12. Building a science of partnership-focused research: forging and sustaining partnerships to support child mental health prevention and services research.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Catherine P; Haynes, Katherine Taylor

    2012-07-01

    Building on growing interest in translational research, this paper provides an overview of a special issue of Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Service Research, which is focused on the process of forging and sustaining partnerships to support child mental health prevention and services research. We propose that partnership-focused research is a subdiscipline of translational research which requires additional research to better refine the theoretical framework and the core principles that will guide future research and training efforts. We summarize some of the major themes across the eight original articles and three commentaries included in the special issue. By advancing the science of partnership-focused research we will be able to bridge the gap between child mental health prevention and services research and practice.

  13. Building partnerships with Indigenous communities around climate change: A new UCAR initiative.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, R. E.

    2008-12-01

    The atmospheric and related sciences have one of the lowest rates of participation by American Indians of any physical science. This not only disadvantages the atmospheric sciences by isolating them from a rich and relevant intellectual heritage, it disadvantages tribal communities who seek to apply the insights from atmospheric sciences to planning their own future. In a time of rapid environmental change and its impact on tribal lands and all lands, the need for connection between these two communities is especially urgent. In 2007, the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research launched a new Community Building Program, in order to catalyze and coordinate activities that contribute to UCAR's strategic goal of developing a diverse atmospheric science workforce. A key goal of this program has been to look for partnerships with the American Indian community around climate change issues. The goal of these partnerships is to support North American tribal efforts to enhance their own scientific and adaptive capacity around climate change. In the early stages of this partnership, we have listened to some important messages from Indigenous communities: •Climate change, like all things related to the landscape, is intimately connected to identity and sovereignty • Scientific expertise is one among many skills indigenous people employ in their relation with their homelands • Climate change research and education are embedded in decision-making about economic development, energy, public health as well as cultural preservation, language, and tribal sovereignty This presentation will be an opportunity to check and extend these insights discuss and use them as a basis for a long-term partnership between UCAR and tribal communities.

  14. DataStreme Earth's Climate System: Building a Climate Literate Society through Effective Partnerships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brey, J. A.; Geer, I. W.; Weinbeck, R. S.; Mills, E. W.; Nugnes, K. A.; Stimach, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    Effective partnerships are key to increasing climate and overall environmental literacy. Financial support from NSF, NASA, and NOAA has allowed the American Meteorological Society (AMS) to offer DataStreme courses for almost 20 years. DataStreme Atmosphere, Ocean, and Earth's Climate System (ECS) are offered each fall and spring semester by Local Implementation Teams (LITs) across the country in coordination with AMS Education Program scientists and educators who develop instructional materials, provide logistical support to the LITs, and administer the project. A long-standing partnership with State University of New York's The College at Brockport gives teachers the opportunity to receive 3 tuition-free graduate credits upon successful completion of each DataStreme course and construction of a Plan of Action for educational peer-training. DataStreme ECS investigates the fundamental science of Earth's climate system, explores humans' impact on it, and identifies actions needed in response to climate change. The course provides participants with the knowledge to make informed climate decisions. In fact, according to a recent three-year study conducted by AMS, 98% of DataStreme ECS participants reported an increase in environmental literacy as a result of the course. DataStreme Atmosphere, Ocean, and ECS content has been improved because of AMS partnerships with NOAA and NASA. Specifically, hundreds of NASA and NOAA scientists and faculty from numerous institutions both domestic and abroad have contributed and reviewed DataStreme ECS content. Additional collaborations with Consortium for Ocean Leadership and the U.S. Ice Drilling Program greatly improved the course's paleoclimate content. Looking ahead, the Climate Resilience Toolkit from NOAA's Climate Program Office will further bolster the course this fall. These partnerships have resulted in a powerful, content-rich climate science course for K-12 teachers, building the foundation to a climate literate society.

  15. Safe Shores and Resilient Transit Corridors: Using Science, Design, and Stakeholder Partnerships to Address Connecticut's Coastal Vulnerabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, R. A.; Felson, A. J.; Kirmmse, E.; Hagemann, K.

    2015-12-01

    Connecticut's densely developed coastline is highly vulnerable to sea level rise and coastal storms. 95% of the state's entire population lives within 50 miles of the shore. Connecticut has more than $542 billion in insured assets in harms way, only Florida has a greater exposure. As part of the state of Connecticut Phase 1 application for the HUD National Disaster Resilience Competition, the Connecticut Institute for Resilience and Climate Adaptation (CIRCA) at the University of Connecticut undertook an assessment of coastal vulnerabilities, including the impacts of sea level rise on the frequency of flooding, socioeconomic factors, critical infrastructure, and housing using data collected from federal, state, and municipal sources. Connecticut's unique geology, characterized by a glaciated coastline with highly erodible former deltas and elevated ridgelines extending out to rocky headlands, became the basis of the climate adaptation approach. Together with a nine state agency workgroup, municipal and regional government, and non-profit and industry representatives, CIRCA and the Yale UED lab developed a long-term urban redevelopment solution of resilient access and egress corridors layered over ridgelines and resilient zones of transit oriented economic development linked to shoreline communities. This concept can be applied in both Connecticut's coastal cities like New Haven and its smaller towns. The process demonstrated the effective partnership between the universities and state agencies in bringing the science of flood modeling and mapping together with innovative design to create solutions for climate adaptation. However, it also revealed significant gaps in data availability to analyze the economic and social drivers for adopting different adaptation strategies. Furthermore, the accuracy of current flood mapping tools needs to be improved to predict future flooding at the municipal project scale. As Connecticut and other states move forward with resilience

  16. Federal climate change programs in the water-limited Southwest: intersection of mission, stakeholders and geography to build successful collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, E.; Steele, C. M.; Rango, A.; Reyes, J. J.; Langston, M. A.; Johnson, K.

    2016-12-01

    As one of the newest federal programs to emerge in response to climate change, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Climate Hubs were established to assist farmers, ranchers and forest landowners in their adaptation and mitigation efforts under a changing climate. The Hubs' mission is to deliver science-based information and tools to agricultural and natural resource land managers, to enable climate-informed decision-making. By facilitating and transferring tools and knowledge, the Hubs also provide value to cooperative extension, land grant institutions, and USDA itself, especially in leveraging existing resource capacity. Various federal agencies (NOAA, USGS, USFWS) have also developed climate change coordination networks: RISAs, CSCs, and LCCs. These regionally-based federal networks can best operate in collaboration with one another. At their programmatic level, however, there are fundamental discrepancies in mission, stakeholder definition and geographic region. In this presentation, we seek to compare and contrast these divergent characteristics by identifying `hot spots' and `hot moments' where definitions, programs, or priorities may intersect due to place-based or event-based issues. The Southwest (SW) region of the United States, which presently operates under warm and dry conditions, is projected to become warmer and drier in the future. On-going drought conditions have presented an opportunity to maintain and build professional networks among these federal climate change coordination networks, as well as within USDA, to better understand impacts and respond to stakeholder needs. Projects in the Rio Grande River Valley and with Tribal nations highlight successful collaboration based on geography and common stakeholders, respectively. Aridity and water scarcity characterize the SW region and provide an overarching theme to better support adaptation and mitigation, as well as create opportunities for collaborative success.

  17. How much does participatory flood management contribute to stakeholders' social capacity building? Empirical findings based on a triangulation of three evaluation approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchecker, M.; Menzel, S.; Home, R.

    2013-06-01

    Recent literature suggests that dialogic forms of risk communication are more effective to build stakeholders' hazard-related social capacities. In spite of the high theoretical expectations, there is a lack of univocal empirical evidence on the relevance of these effects. This is mainly due to the methodological limitations of the existing evaluation approaches. In our paper we aim at eliciting the contribution of participatory river revitalisation projects on stakeholders' social capacity building by triangulating the findings of three evaluation studies that were based on different approaches: a field-experimental, a qualitative long-term ex-post and a cross-sectional household survey approach. The results revealed that social learning and avoiding the loss of trust were more relevant benefits of participatory flood management than acceptance building. The results suggest that stakeholder involvements should be more explicitly designed as tools for long-term social learning.

  18. The Mumbai experience in building field level partnerships for DOTS implementation.

    PubMed

    Rangan, S; Ambe, G; Borremans, N; Zallocco, D; Porter, J

    2003-01-01

    In February 1999, the Revised National Tuberculosis (TB) Control Programme (RNTCP) was implemented in the city of Mumbai after a pilot phase of 5 years. The city has a population of more than 12 million people and an estimated annual TB incidence of 21,000 cases, 8000 of these being infectious. This paper describes a partnership between the TB programme and a Non Governmental Organization (NGO), which began with a methodological analysis of the problems faced by the programme to help identify other key organizations, who might usefully be involved. The work focussed on "networking" to ensure the optimum use of existing resources. The problems encountered affected all levels of TB control from access to drug supply and treatment. The major issues related to an inadequate public health infrastructure resulting in poor technical and administrative support to field staff. There was confusion over roles of the health personnel in the TB programme and the public health facility, as well as poor technical performance. Partnerships were found to be useful in addressing the following areas: (1) the implementation of an external quality assurance scheme for sputum microscopy through involvement of microbiologists from large hospitals and research organizations; (2) training and capacity strengthening of programme and public health facility staff through innovative training and team building exercises organized by the programme, NGOs and the private sector; (3) development of Information, Education and Communication (IEC) material through partnerships with NGOs, and (4) the involvement of local NGOs and private doctors to increase case finding and to improve access to direct observation of treatment (DOT). The paper discusses the lessons learnt in this process and identifies some of the key issues in urban TB control, for consideration by policy makers.

  19. Building community partnerships to implement the new Science and Engineering component of the NGSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, M. P.; Linn, F.

    2013-12-01

    Partnerships between science professionals in the community and professional educators can help facilitate the adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Classroom teachers have been trained in content areas but may be less familiar with the new required Science and Engineering component of the NGSS. This presentation will offer a successful model for building classroom and community partnerships and highlight the particulars of a collaborative lesson taught to Rapid City High School students. Local environmental issues provided a framework for learning activities that encompassed several Crosscutting Concepts and Science and Engineering Practices for a lesson focused on Life Science Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics. Specifically, students studied local water quality impairments, collected and measured stream samples, and analyzed their data. A visiting hydrologist supplied additional water quality data from ongoing studies to extend the students' datasets both temporally and spatially, helping students to identify patterns and draw conclusions based on their findings. Context was provided through discussions of how science professionals collect and analyze data and communicate results to the public, using an example of a recent bacterial contamination of a local stream. Working with Rapid City High School students added additional challenges due to their high truancy and poverty rates. Creating a relevant classroom experience was especially critical for engaging these at-risk youth and demonstrating that science is a viable career path for them. Connecting science in the community with the problem-solving nature of engineering is a critical component of NGSS, and this presentation will elucidate strategies to help prospective partners maneuver through the challenges that we've encountered. We recognize that the successful implementation of the NGSS is a challenge that requires the support of the scientific community. This partnership

  20. Building strong research partnerships between public health and researchers: a VA case study.

    PubMed

    Midboe, Amanda M; Elwy, A Rani; Durfee, Janet M; Gifford, Allen L; Yakovchenko, Vera; Martinello, Richard A; Ross, David; Czarnogorski, Maggie; Goetz, Matthew B; Asch, Steven M

    2014-12-01

    We are in a new era of partner-based implementation research, and we need clear strategies for how to navigate this new era. Drawing on principles from community-based participatory research, the Clinical Public Health group of the Department of Veterans Affairs and the HIV/Hepatitis Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (HHQUERI) forged a longstanding partnership that has improved the care of Veterans with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C Virus. An exemplar HIV testing project epitomizes this partnership and is discussed in terms of the lessons learned as a result of our high level of collaboration around design, analysis, implementation, and dissemination across projects over the past several years. Lessons learned through this partnered testing program involve respecting different time horizons among the partners, identifying relevant research questions for both parties, designing flexible studies, engaging all partners throughout the research, and placing an emphasis on relationship building at all times. These lessons and strategies can benefit others conducting partner-based research both within the Veterans Health Administration (VA) and in other integrated healthcare systems.

  1. [From health promoting school perspectives to discuss the building of school-community partnership].

    PubMed

    Chang, Li-Chun; Huang, Song-Yuan; Wu, Fei-Lin

    2005-06-01

    In the wake of the WHO's health promotion campaign health promotion schools have gained currency in Europe and the United States. The Department of Education in Taiwan has proposed a "school health promotion program" and the Department of Health a "program to build healthy schools" The goal of these programs was to create a holistic environment for school health and put the concepts of "school-family-community partnership" into practice. Although difficulties, such as school-centered perspectives, ambiguous definitions of "community" and shortage of funding, human resources and long-term planning impeded the program, this article, based on literature and practical experience, presents the "school-community model" and the strategies that it applied to organize the school-community health promotion committee to plan long-term programs and to assess the needs and resources of schools and communities on a collaborative basis. It contends, furthermore, that integrating community services into curriculums in order to enable students to appreciate the meaning of partnership, and involving the community in the planning process, can achieve the goal of effectively promoting the health of both the school and the community.

  2. Building National Capacity for Climate Change Interpretation: The Role of Leaders, Partnerships, and Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitzer, W.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2007, the New England Aquarium has led a national effort to increase the capacity of informal science venues to effectively communicate about climate change. We are now leading the NSF-funded National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (NNOCCI), partnering with the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, FrameWorks Institute, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Monterey Bay Aquarium, and National Aquarium, with evaluation conducted by the New Knowledge Organization, Pennsylvania State University, and Ohio State University. NNOCCI enables teams of informal science interpreters across the country to serve as "communication strategists" - beyond merely conveying information they can influence public perceptions, given their high level of commitment, knowledge, public trust, social networks, and visitor contact. We provide in-depth training as well as an alumni network for ongoing learning, implementation support, leadership development, and coalition building. Our goals are to achieve a systemic national impact, embed our work within multiple ongoing regional and national climate change education networks, and leave an enduring legacy. Our project represents a cross-disciplinary partnership among climate scientists, social and cognitive scientists, and informal education practitioners. We have built a growing national network of more than 250 alumni, including approximately 15-20 peer leaders who co-lead both in-depth training programs and introductory workshops. We have found that this alumni network has been assuming increasing importance in providing for ongoing learning, support for implementation, leadership development, and coalition building. As we look toward the future, we are exploring potential partnerships with other existing networks, both to sustain our impact and to expand our reach. This presentation will address what we have learned in terms of network impacts, best practices, factors for success, and future directions.

  3. The Wilson Bay Initiative, Riverworks, and the Sturgeon City Partnership: A Case Study for Building Effective Academic-Community Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Jay F.; Hargett, Glenn; McCann, J. P.; Potts, Pat Donovan; Pierce, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    This article describes North Carolina State University's Sturgeon City partnership, which has transformed an urban brownfield site into a community civic, recreational, and learning resource. The project was recognized in 2010 with the C. Peter Magrath Community Engagement Award and the Outreach Scholarship W. K. Kellogg Foundation Engagement…

  4. Points of View: Effective Partnerships Between K-12 and Higher Education--Building Successful Partnerships Between K-12 and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomanek, Debra

    2005-01-01

    This article directs attention to partnership models, such as the North Dakota State University Graduate Student-University-School Collaborative (NDSU GrSUS) project, that are replacing one-time summer courses and workshops as vehicles for improving science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education in the United States. This project…

  5. Engaging a University in Self-Assessment and Strategic Planning to Build Partnership Capacity: The UCSF Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wortis, Naomi; Goldstein, Ellen; Vargas, Roberto Ariel; Grumbach, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to better fulfill its public service mission, the University of California, San Francisco, has undertaken an intensive assessment and strategic planning process to build institutional capacity for civic engagement and community partnership. The first stage was a qualitative assessment focused primarily on three local communities,…

  6. A Social Partnership Model to Promote Educators' Development in Mauritius through Formal and Informal Capacity-Building Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santally, Mohammad Issack; Cooshna-Naik, Dorothy; Conruyt, Noel; Wing, Caroline Koa

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a social partnership model based on the living lab concept to promote the professional development of educators through formal and informal capacity-building initiatives. The aim is to have a broader impact on society through community outreach educational initiatives. A Living Lab is an environment for user-centered…

  7. Building Learning Communities: Partnerships, Social Capital and VET Performance. A National Vocational Education and Training Research and Evaluation Program Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Janelle; Gorringe, Scott; Lacey, Justine

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the nature of the impact of vocational education and training (VET), and its project-based activities and partnerships, on the development of sustainable communities in regional Australia. It finds that VET plays a critical role as the entry point to learning and builds considerable social and other forms of capital in regional…

  8. Always Feed the Clowns and Other Tips for Building Better Partnerships between School Librarians and Providers of Educational Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Jason Edwards travels to schools and libraries across the nation performing educational enrichment programs, such as his Monster Hunt Library Skills-Building Adventure Program, for librarians and students. In this article, he shares tips that he has gleaned that may help librarian/programmer partnerships function more smoothly. Three of the…

  9. Always Feed the Clowns and Other Tips for Building Better Partnerships between School Librarians and Providers of Educational Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Jason Edwards travels to schools and libraries across the nation performing educational enrichment programs, such as his Monster Hunt Library Skills-Building Adventure Program, for librarians and students. In this article, he shares tips that he has gleaned that may help librarian/programmer partnerships function more smoothly. Three of the…

  10. The Climate Change Education Partnership Alliance: Building a Network for Effective Collaboration and Impact (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scowcroft, G.

    2013-12-01

    The mission of the Climate Change Education Partnership Alliance (The Alliance), funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), is to advance exemplary climate change education through research and innovative partnerships. Through six unique regional projects, The Alliance is reaching wide and diverse audiences across the U.S., while linking groups and institutions that might not otherwise be connected by a common focus on climate change education. The goals for The Alliance include building collaborations between projects and institutions, sharing effective practices, and leveraging resources to create a community in which the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. To foster these goals, NSF has funded a central hub, the Alliance Office. Currently, the Alliance Office is building the infrastructure necessary to support activities and communication between the projects. Successful networks need objectives for their interactions and a common vision held by the partners. In the first national meeting of The Alliance members, held in June 2013, the foundation was laid to begin this work. The Alliance now has a common mission and vision to guide the next four years of activities. An initial 'mapping' of the network has identified the scope and diversity of the network, how members are connected, current boundaries of the network, network strengths and weaknesses, and network needs. This information will serve as a baseline as the network develops. The Alliance has also identified the need for key 'working groups' which provide an opportunity for members to work across the projects on common goals. As The Alliance evolves, building blocks identified by the field of network science will be used to forge a strong and successful collaborative enterprise. Infrastructure is being established to support widespread engagement; social ties are being fostered through face-to-face meetings and monthly teleconferences; time is provided to build and share knowledge; the

  11. Residential building stakeholders' attitudes and beliefs regarding nail gun injury risks and prevention.

    PubMed

    Albers, James T; Hudock, Stephen D; Lowe, Brian D

    2013-01-01

    Pneumatic nail guns are ubiquitous at residential construction sites across the United States. These tools are noted for the traumatic injuries that can occur from their operation. Different trigger mechanisms on these tools are associated with different levels of risk. Residential building subcontractors and workers, both native-born and immigrant, were brought together in focus groups to discuss their attitudes and beliefs regarding risk factors for nail gun injury as well as barriers to the adoption of safer technology. Participants' comments are organized first by influences on traumatic injury occurrence or prevention and later by sociotechnical system category. Participants attributed influences on injury risk to personal and external causation factors in all sociotechnical system categories; however, participants more frequently described influences on injury prevention as related to workers' behaviors, rather than to external factors. A discussion of these influences with respect to attribution theory and sociotechnical models of injury causation is presented.

  12. Cooperative partnerships between the petroleum industry and environmental, educational and community groups

    SciTech Connect

    Retzsch, W.C.

    1997-06-01

    The petroleum industry has a long history of public-private partnerships aimed at seeking cooperative solutions to environmental, educational and community problems. Although some partnerships are over 65 years old, this paper focuses on more recent, ongoing partnerships. Public-private partnerships provide a first-hand means for the public to participate with individual companies and the industry on programs that result in direct improvements within the communities in which the industry operates. These partnerships demonstrate the commitment by American Petroleum Institute member companies to build sustained understanding and credibility with a broad range of industry stakeholders.

  13. How blind dates, internet dating, and facebook can inform the building of effective organizational partnerships.

    PubMed

    Lever, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    To have a significant impact on public health, partnerships are essential - especially among researchers and organizations that can translate such research into action. Based on the experience of YMCA of the USA, this commentary describes how to develop a partnership strategy. It also highlights the opportunities and challenges associated with developing partnerships and translating theory into action. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Using the Delphi and Snow Card Techniques to Build Consensus Among Diverse Community and Academic Stakeholders

    PubMed Central

    Rideout, Catlin; Gil, Rosa; Browne, Ruth; Calhoon, Claudia; Rey, Mariano; Gourevitch, Marc; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2013-01-01

    Background: The New York University– New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (NYU-HHC) Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) used a community-based participatory research (CBPR) and consensus-building approach among its community advisory board (CAB) and steering committee (SC) members to formulate research priorities to foster shared research collaborations. Methods: The Delphi technique is a methodology used to generate consensus from diverse perspectives and organizational agendas through a multi-method, iterative approach to collecting data. A series of on-line surveys was conducted with CAB members to identify health and research priorities from the community perspective. Subsequently, CAB and SC members were brought together and the snow card approach was utilized to narrow to two priority areas for shared research collaborations. Results: Cardiovascular disease (CVD)/obesity and mental health were identified as health disparity areas for shared research collaborations within a social determinants framework. In response, two workgroups were formed with leadership provided by three co-chairs representing the three constituents of the NYU-HHC CTSI: NYU faculty, HHC providers, and community leaders Conclusions: The Delphi approach fostered ownership and engagement with community partners because it was an iterative process that required stakeholders’ input into decision making. The snow card technique allowed for organizing of a large number of discrete ideas. Results have helped to inform the overall CTSI research agenda by defining action steps, and setting an organizing framework to tackle two health disparity areas. The process helped ensure that NYUHHC CTSI research and community engagement strategies are congruent with community priorities. PMID:24056515

  15. The development and achievement of a healthy cities network in Taiwan: sharing leadership and partnership building.

    PubMed

    Hu, Susan C; Kuo, Hsien-Wen

    2016-03-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Healthy Cities (HC) projects are the best known of the settings-based approaches to health promotion. They engage local governments in health development through a process of political commitment, institutional change, capacity-building, partnership-based planning and innovative projects. Many cities have promoted HC projects in Taiwan since 2002. In 2008, the Taiwan Alliance for Healthy Cities (TAHC) was launched to assist local governments in effectively establishing, operating and promoting HC projects. In this article, we share our experiences of establishing a platform and network to promote the HC program in Taiwan. Based on individual city profiles and governance in Taiwan, the TAHC developed a well-organized framework and model to encourage strong leadership in local governments and to promote participation and engagement in their communities. In the last 6 years, leaders from Taiwan's local governments in HC networks have integrated the HC concepts into their governance models, actively engaging and combining various resources with practical expertise and private sectors. The network of health in Taiwan allows each city to develop its unique perspective on the HC projects. Using this method, not only local government meets its needs, but also increases governance efficiency and effectiveness, resulting in the promotion of its citizens' overall sustainable urban health development. This HC network in Taiwan has partnerships with government and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), with academic support and citizen involvement, a dynamic data collection system and demonstrated leadership in the sharing of information in the Asian region. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Geothermal Program Review XVII: proceedings. Building on 25 years of Geothermal Partnership with Industry

    SciTech Connect

    1999-10-01

    The US Department of Energy's Office (DOE) of Geothermal Technologies conducted its annual Program Review XVII in Berkeley, California, on May 18--20, 1999. The theme this year was "Building on 25 Years of Geothermal Partnership with Industry". In 1974, Congress enacted Public Law 93-410 which sanctioned the Geothermal Energy Coordination and Management Project, the Federal Government's initial partnering with the US geothermal industry. The annual program review provides a forum to foster this federal partnership with the US geothermal industry through the presentation of DOE-funded research papers from leaders in the field, speakers who are prominent in the industry, topical panel discussions and workshops, planning sessions, and the opportunity to exchange ideas. Speakers and researchers from both industry and DOE presented an annual update on research in progress, discussed changes in the environment and deregulated energy market, and exchanged ideas to refine the DOE Strategic Plan for research and development of geothermal resources in the new century. A panel discussion on Climate Change and environmental issues and regulations provided insight into the opportunities and challenges that geothermal project developers encounter. This year, a pilot peer review process was integrated with the program review. A team of geothermal industry experts were asked to evaluate the research in progress that was presented. The evaluation was based on the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) criteria and the goals and objectives of the Geothermal Program as set forth in the Strategic Plan. Despite the short timeframe and cursory guidance provided to both the principle investigators and the peer reviewers, the pilot process was successful. Based on post review comments by both presenters and reviewers, the process will be refined for next year's program review.

  17. An Innovative Approach to Addressing Childhood Obesity: A Knowledge-Based Infrastructure for Supporting Multi-Stakeholder Partnership Decision-Making in Quebec, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Addy, Nii Antiaye; Shaban-Nejad, Arash; Buckeridge, David L.; Dubé, Laurette

    2015-01-01

    Multi-stakeholder partnerships (MSPs) have become a widespread means for deploying policies in a whole of society strategy to address the complex problem of childhood obesity. However, decision-making in MSPs is fraught with challenges, as decision-makers are faced with complexity, and have to reconcile disparate conceptualizations of knowledge across multiple sectors with diverse sets of indicators and data. These challenges can be addressed by supporting MSPs with innovative tools for obtaining, organizing and using data to inform decision-making. The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze the development of a knowledge-based infrastructure to support MSP decision-making processes. The paper emerged from a study to define specifications for a knowledge-based infrastructure to provide decision support for community-level MSPs in the Canadian province of Quebec. As part of the study, a process assessment was conducted to understand the needs of communities as they collect, organize, and analyze data to make decisions about their priorities. The result of this process is a “portrait”, which is an epidemiological profile of health and nutrition in their community. Portraits inform strategic planning and development of interventions, and are used to assess the impact of interventions. Our key findings indicate ambiguities and disagreement among MSP decision-makers regarding causal relationships between actions and outcomes, and the relevant data needed for making decisions. MSP decision-makers expressed a desire for easy-to-use tools that facilitate the collection, organization, synthesis, and analysis of data, to enable decision-making in a timely manner. Findings inform conceptual modeling and ontological analysis to capture the domain knowledge and specify relationships between actions and outcomes. This modeling and analysis provide the foundation for an ontology, encoded using OWL 2 Web Ontology Language. The ontology is developed to provide

  18. An innovative approach to addressing childhood obesity: a knowledge-based infrastructure for supporting multi-stakeholder partnership decision-making in Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Addy, Nii Antiaye; Shaban-Nejad, Arash; Buckeridge, David L; Dubé, Laurette

    2015-01-23

    Multi-stakeholder partnerships (MSPs) have become a widespread means for deploying policies in a whole of society strategy to address the complex problem of childhood obesity. However, decision-making in MSPs is fraught with challenges, as decision-makers are faced with complexity, and have to reconcile disparate conceptualizations of knowledge across multiple sectors with diverse sets of indicators and data. These challenges can be addressed by supporting MSPs with innovative tools for obtaining, organizing and using data to inform decision-making. The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze the development of a knowledge-based infrastructure to support MSP decision-making processes. The paper emerged from a study to define specifications for a knowledge-based infrastructure to provide decision support for community-level MSPs in the Canadian province of Quebec. As part of the study, a process assessment was conducted to understand the needs of communities as they collect, organize, and analyze data to make decisions about their priorities. The result of this process is a "portrait", which is an epidemiological profile of health and nutrition in their community. Portraits inform strategic planning and development of interventions, and are used to assess the impact of interventions. Our key findings indicate ambiguities and disagreement among MSP decision-makers regarding causal relationships between actions and outcomes, and the relevant data needed for making decisions. MSP decision-makers expressed a desire for easy-to-use tools that facilitate the collection, organization, synthesis, and analysis of data, to enable decision-making in a timely manner. Findings inform conceptual modeling and ontological analysis to capture the domain knowledge and specify relationships between actions and outcomes. This modeling and analysis provide the foundation for an ontology, encoded using OWL 2 Web Ontology Language. The ontology is developed to provide semantic

  19. Lessons Learned from Three Models that Use Small Grants for Building Academic-Community Partnerships for Research

    PubMed Central

    Kegler, Michelle C.; Blumenthal, Daniel S.; Akintobi, Tabia Henry; Rodgers, Kirsten; Erwin, Katherine; Thompson, Winifred; Hopkins, Ernest

    2017-01-01

    Despite the direct contribution of community-engaged research towards effective translation, establishing strong and sustained community academic research partnerships remains a challenge. The Atlanta Clinical and Translational Science Institute's Community Engagement Research Program (CERP) has developed and implemented three models for using small grants to seed new community academic partnerships for research: 1) community-initiated health projects with faculty partners, 2) dissemination of discoveries to community partners, and 3) building collaborative research capacity. In this paper, we describe each model in terms of its purpose, funding level, funding period, proposal requirements, selection criteria and faculty involvement. Resulting partnerships are described, along with benefits and challenges from faculty and community perspectives, and lessons learned in using these mechanisms to promote community-engaged research. These models may aid others attempting to promote community-engaged research for the purpose of narrowing the gap between research, practice and ultimately, impact on community health. PMID:27180693

  20. Indicators of Partnership Success among MICHIANA Coordinated School Health Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Priscilla A.; Lohrmann, David; Shipley, Meagan; O'Neill, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Coordinated school health (CSH) is an increasingly popular approach used by school and community stakeholders for implementing policy and programmatic changes. Because funding is limited, examination of factors that maximize the potential for schools to build sustainable partnerships is crucially important. This study assessed the extent to which…

  1. A Capacity Building Program to Promote CBPR Partnerships Between Academic Researchers and Community Members

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Michele L.; Culhane-Pera, Kathleen A.; Pergament, Shannon; Call, Kathleen Thiede

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Community-based participatory research (CBPR) adds community perspectives to research and aids translational research aims. There is a need for increased capacity in CBPR but few models exist for how to support the development of community/university partnerships Objective Evaluate an approach to promote nascent CBPR partnerships. Methods Design was a mixed-methods evaluation utilizing interviews, process notes, and open and closed ended survey questions. We trained ten community scholars, matched them with prepared researchers to form seven partnerships, and supported their developing partnerships. Sequential mixed-methods analysis assessed research and partnership processes and identified integrated themes. Results Four of seven partnerships were funded within 15 months; all self-reported their partnerships as successful. Themes were: 1) Motivators contributed to partnership development and resiliency; 2) Partners took on responsibilities that utilized individuals' strengths; 3) Partners grappled with communication, decision-making, and power-dynamics; and 4) Community-university infrastructure was essential to partnership development. Conclusions This program for developing nascent partnerships between academicians and community members may guide others in increasing capacity for CBPR. PMID:22212224

  2. A capacity building program to promote CBPR partnerships between academic researchers and community members.

    PubMed

    Allen, Michele L; Culhane-Pera, Kathleen A; Pergament, Shannon; Call, Kathleen Thiede

    2011-12-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) adds community perspectives to research and aids translational research aims. There is a need for increased capacity in CBPR but few models exist for how to support the development of community/university partnerships. Evaluate an approach to promote nascent CBPR partnerships. Design was a mixed-methods evaluation using interviews, process notes, and open- and close-ended survey questions. We trained 10 community scholars, matched them with prepared researchers to form seven partnerships, and supported their developing partnerships. Sequential mixed-methods analysis assessed research and partnership processes and identified integrated themes. Four of seven partnerships were funded within 15 months; all self-reported their partnerships as successful. Themes were: (1) motivators contributed to partnership development and resiliency; (2) partners took on responsibilities that used individuals' strengths; (3) partners grappled with communication, decision making, and power dynamics; and (4) community-university infrastructure was essential to partnership development. This program for developing nascent partnerships between academicians and community members may guide others in increasing capacity for CBPR. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Europe sees mixed results from public-private partnerships for building and managing health care facilities and services.

    PubMed

    Barlow, James; Roehrich, Jens; Wright, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Prompted in part by constrained national budgets, European governments are increasingly partnering with the private sector to underwrite the costs of constructing and operating public hospitals and other health care facilities and delivering services. Through such public-private partnerships, governments hope to avoid up-front capital expenditure and to harness private-sector efficiencies, while private-sector partners aim for a return on investment. Our research indicates that to date, experience with these partnerships has been mixed. Early models of these partnerships-for example, in which a private firm builds a hospital and carries out building maintenance, which we term an "accommodation-only" model-arguably have not met expectations for achieving greater efficiencies at lower costs. Newer models described in this article offer greater opportunities for efficiency gains but are administratively harder to set up and manage. Given the shortages in public capital for new infrastructure, it seems likely that the attractiveness of these partnerships to European governments will grow.

  4. Moving research to practice through partnership: a case study in Asphalt Paving.

    PubMed

    Chang, Charlotte; Nixon, Laura; Baker, Robin

    2015-08-01

    Multi-stakeholder partnerships play a critical role in dissemination and implementation in health and safety. To better document and understand construction partnerships that have successfully scaled up effective interventions to protect workers, this case study focused on the collaborative processes of the Asphalt Paving Partnership. In the 1990s, this partnership developed, evaluated, disseminated, and achieved near universal, voluntary adoption of paver engineering controls to reduce exposure to asphalt fumes. We used in-depth interviews (n = 15) and document review in the case study. We describe contextual factors that both facilitated and challenged the formation of the collaboration, central themes and group processes, and research to practice (r2p) outcomes. The Asphalt Paving Partnership offers insight into how multi-stakeholder partnerships in construction can draw upon the strengths of diverse members to improve the dissemination and adoption of health and safety innovations and build a collaborative infrastructure to sustain momentum over time. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Clean Cities: Building Partnerships to Reduce Petroleum Use in Transportation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program, which builds partnerships to reduce petroleum use in transportation in communities across the country. The U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities initiative advances the nation's economic, environmental, and energy security by supporting local actions to reduce petroleum consumption in transportation. Clean Cities accomplishes this work through the activities of nearly 100 local coalitions. These coalitions provide resources and technical assistance in the deployment of alternative and renewable fuels, idle-reduction measures, fuel economy improvements, and new transportation technologies, as they emerge. Clean Cities overarching goal is to reduce U.S. petroleum use by 2.5 billion gallons per year by 2020. To achieve this goal, Clean Cities employs three strategies: (1) Replace petroleum with alternative and renewable fuels, including natural gas, propane, electricity, ethanol, biodiesel, and hydrogen; (2) Reduce petroleum consumption through smarter driving practices and fuel economy improvements; and (3) Eliminate petroleum use through idle reduction and other fuel-saving technologies and practices.

  6. Embracing external scrutiny to build bridges and genuine partnerships between education and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    McSherry, Rob; Cottis, Kathryn; Rapson, Terri; Stringer, Mary

    2015-05-01

    Despite having made significant changes and improvements since 2007, publication of The Mid-Staffordshire National Health Service Foundation Trust Public Inquiry (2013) refocused attention on the poor care standards that had taken place. Recommendations include far reaching national transformational changes not only for the National Health Service but also for professional regulatory bodies and other agencies linked to health and social care. This paper describes how external scrutiny was embraced to move staff from initial loss of confidence, feelings of anger and defensiveness to embracing opportunities to increase transparency, build bridges and genuine partnerships between universities and healthcare providers. Following an Extraordinary Review by the Nursing and Midwifery Council an action plan was collaboratively formulated between Staffordshire University and Mid-Staffordshire National Health Service Foundation Trust. This resulted in the implementation of a Practice Learning Improvement Project which monitored the action plan, ensured sharing of all learning and production of evidence for external scrutiny. Key lessons learnt included the need to: move beyond mere compliance with regulatory performance indicators; engage senior staff in all aspects of student learning; develop candid sharing of soft and hard intelligence, clearly delineate placement support roles and ensure engagement of academics in practice has transparent outcomes for the student, practice and education. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Assessing diabetes practices in clinical settings: precursor to building community partnerships around disease management.

    PubMed

    Prochaska, John D; Mier, Nelda; Bolin, Jane N; Hora, Kerrie L; Clark, Heather R; Ory, Marcia G

    2009-12-01

    Many recommended best practices exist for clinical and community diabetes management and prevention. However, in many cases, these recommendations are not being fully utilized. It is useful to gain a sense of currently utilized and needed practices when beginning a partnership building effort to ameliorate such practice problems. The purpose of this study was to assess current practices in clinical settings within the Brazos Valley in preparation for beginning a community-based participatory research project on improving diabetes prevention and management in this region. Fifty-seven physicians with admission privileges to a regional health system were faxed a survey related to current diabetes patient loads, knowledge and implementation of diabetes-related best practices, and related topics. Both qualitative and quantitative examination of the data was conducted. Fifteen percent of responding providers indicated they implemented diabetes prevention best practices, with significant differences between primary-care physicians and specialists. Respondents indicated a need for educational and counseling resources, as well as an increased health-care workforce in the region. The utilization of a faxed-based survey proved an effective means for assessing baseline data as well as serving as a catalyst for further discussion around coalition development. Results indicated a strong need for both clinical and community-based services regarding diabetes prevention and management, and provided information and insight to begin focused community dialogue around diabetes prevention and management needs across the region. Other sites seeking to begin similar projects may benefit from a similar process.

  8. Research to reality (R2R) mentorship program: building partnership, capacity, and evidence.

    PubMed

    Purcell, E Peyton; Mitchell, Charlene; Celestin, Michael D; Evans, Kiameesha R; Haynes, Venice; McFall, Angela; Troyer, Lisa; Sanchez, Michael A

    2013-05-01

    Despite a wealth of intervention research in cancer control, full integration of evidence-based interventions into practice often fails, at least in part because of inadequate collaboration between practitioners and researchers. The National Cancer Institute piloted a mentorship program designed for practitioners to improve their ability to navigate evidence-based decision making within a context of inadequate resources, political barriers, and organizational constraints. The National Cancer Institute simultaneously sought to provide opportunities for practitioners and researchers to share and learn from each other. We identified four key successes and challenges related to translation as experienced by mentees: (a) establishing and maintaining partnerships, (b) data collection and analysis, (c) navigating context, and (d) program adaptation and evaluation. Mentorship programs have the potential to facilitate increased and more successful integration of evidence-based interventions into practice by promoting and building the capacity for collaborative decision making and generating in-depth understanding of the translation barriers and successes as well as strategies to address the complex contextual issues relative to implementation.

  9. Stakeholder Understandings of Wildfire Mitigation: A Case of Shared and Contested Meanings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champ, Joseph G.; Brooks, Jeffrey J.; Williams, Daniel R.

    2012-10-01

    This article identifies and compares meanings of wildfire risk mitigation for stakeholders in the Front Range of Colorado, USA. We examine the case of a collaborative partnership sponsored by government agencies and directed to decrease hazardous fuels in interface areas. Data were collected by way of key informant interviews and focus groups. The analysis is guided by the Circuit of Culture model in communication research. We found both shared and differing meanings between members of this partnership (the "producers") and other stakeholders not formally in the partnership (the "consumers"). We conclude that those promoting the partnership's project to mitigate risk are primarily aligned with a discourse of scientific management. Stakeholders outside the partnership follow a discourse of community. We argue that failure to recognize and account for differences in the way risk mitigation is framed and related power dynamics could hamper the communicational efforts of the collaborative partnership and impact goals for fuels reduction. We recommend ways that both groups can capitalize on shared meanings and how agency managers and decision makers can build better working relationships with interface communities and other external stakeholders.

  10. Building a partnership to evaluate school-linked health services: the Cincinnati School Health Demonstration Project.

    PubMed

    Rose, Barbara L; Mansour, Mona; Kohake, Kelli

    2005-12-01

    The Cincinnati School Health Demonstration Project was a 3-year collaboration that evaluated school-linked health services in 6 urban elementary (kindergarten to eighth grade) schools. Partners from the Cincinnati Health Department, Cincinnati Public Schools, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, and The Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati wanted to determine if levels of school-linked care made a difference in student quality of life, school connectedness, attendance, emergency department use, and volume of referrals to health care specialists. School nurses, principals and school staff, parents and students, upper-level managers, and health service researchers worked together over a 2.5-year period to learn about and use new technology to collect information on student health, well-being, and outcome measures. Varying levels of school health care intervention models were instituted and evaluated. A standard model of care was compared with 2 models of enhanced care and service. The information collected from students, parents, nurses, and the school system provided a rich database on the health of urban children. School facilities, staffing, and computer technology, relationship building among stakeholders, extensive communication, and high student mobility were factors that influenced success and findings of the project. Funding for district-wide computerization and addition of school health staff was not secured by the end of the demonstration project; however, relationships among the partners endured and paved the way for future collaborations designed to better serve urban school children in Cincinnati.

  11. Building Stronger State Partnerships with the US Department of Energy (Energy Assurance)

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Keogh

    2011-09-30

    From 2007 until 2011, the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) engaged in a partnership with the National Energy Technology Lab (NETL) to improve State-Federal coordination on electricity policy and energy assurance issues. This project allowed State Public Utility Commissioners and their staffs to engage on the most cutting-edge level in the arenas of energy assurance and electricity policy. Four tasks were outlined in the Statement of Performance Objectives: Task 1 - Training for Commissions on Critical Infrastructure Topics; Task 2 - Analyze and Implement Recommendations on Energy Assurance Issues; Task 3 - Ongoing liaison activities & outreach to build stronger networks between federal agencies and state regulators; and Task 4 - Additional Activities. Although four tasks were prescribed, in practice these tasks were carried out under two major activity areas: the critical infrastructure and energy assurance partnership with the US Department of Energy's Infrastructure Security and Emergency Response office, and the National Council on Electricity Policy, a collaborative which since 1994 has brought together State and Federal policymakers to address the most pressing issues facing the grid from restructuring to smart grid implementation. On Critical Infrastructure protection, this cooperative agreement helped State officials yield several important advances. The lead role on NARUC's side was played by our Committee on Critical Infrastructure Protection. Key lessons learned in this arena include the following: (1) Tabletops and exercises work - They improve the capacity of policymakers and their industry counterparts to face the most challenging energy emergencies, and thereby equip these actors with the capacity to face everything up to that point as well. (2) Information sharing is critical - Connecting people who need information with people who have information is a key success factor. However, exposure of critical infrastructure

  12. Uncertainty Analysis of Coupled Socioeconomic-Cropping Models: Building Confidence in Climate Change Decision-Support Tools for Local Stakeholders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malard, J. J.; Rojas, M.; Adamowski, J. F.; Gálvez, J.; Tuy, H. A.; Melgar-Quiñonez, H.

    2015-12-01

    While cropping models represent the biophysical aspects of agricultural systems, system dynamics modelling offers the possibility of representing the socioeconomic (including social and cultural) aspects of these systems. The two types of models can then be coupled in order to include the socioeconomic dimensions of climate change adaptation in the predictions of cropping models.We develop a dynamically coupled socioeconomic-biophysical model of agricultural production and its repercussions on food security in two case studies from Guatemala (a market-based, intensive agricultural system and a low-input, subsistence crop-based system). Through the specification of the climate inputs to the cropping model, the impacts of climate change on the entire system can be analysed, and the participatory nature of the system dynamics model-building process, in which stakeholders from NGOs to local governmental extension workers were included, helps ensure local trust in and use of the model.However, the analysis of climate variability's impacts on agroecosystems includes uncertainty, especially in the case of joint physical-socioeconomic modelling, and the explicit representation of this uncertainty in the participatory development of the models is important to ensure appropriate use of the models by the end users. In addition, standard model calibration, validation, and uncertainty interval estimation techniques used for physically-based models are impractical in the case of socioeconomic modelling. We present a methodology for the calibration and uncertainty analysis of coupled biophysical (cropping) and system dynamics (socioeconomic) agricultural models, using survey data and expert input to calibrate and evaluate the uncertainty of the system dynamics as well as of the overall coupled model. This approach offers an important tool for local decision makers to evaluate the potential impacts of climate change and their feedbacks through the associated socioeconomic system.

  13. Building Partnerships for Service-Learning. The Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacoby, Barbara

    The chapters in this collection contain information, exemplary models, and practical tools to make service-learning succeed. The chapters are: (1) "Fundamentals of Service-Learning Partnerships" (Barbara Jacoby); (2) "Developing a Theory and Practice of Campus-Community Partnerships" (Sandra Enos and Keith Morton); (3) "Assessment as a Means of…

  14. NOAA & Academia Partnership Building Conference. Highlights (3rd, Washington, DC, November 14-15, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Silver Spring, MD.

    In November 2001 the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) hosted the third NOAA and Academia Partnership to evaluate, maintain, and expand on efforts to optimize NOAA-university cooperation. Close partnership between the NOAA and U.S. universities has produced many benefits for the U.S. economy and the environment. Based on the…

  15. Building Reciprocal Partnerships for Service-Learning: The Experiences of Hong Kong Secondary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngai, Steven Sek-Yum; Cheung, Chau-Kiu; Ngai, Ngan-Pun; Chan, Kwok-Bong

    2009-01-01

    With the maturation of the service-learning field in recent years, school-community partnerships have emerged as an important area for studying the effectiveness of this type of experiential education. However, the paucity of studies of school-community partnerships indicates that they are only beginning to be understood and thus require further…

  16. Building Partnerships for Service-Learning. The Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacoby, Barbara

    The chapters in this collection contain information, exemplary models, and practical tools to make service-learning succeed. The chapters are: (1) "Fundamentals of Service-Learning Partnerships" (Barbara Jacoby); (2) "Developing a Theory and Practice of Campus-Community Partnerships" (Sandra Enos and Keith Morton); (3) "Assessment as a Means of…

  17. Building Successful Partnerships: Lessons from the Specialist Schools Achievement Programme (SSAP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Tracey

    2007-01-01

    Current UK education policy favours collaborative models of school improvement. This article explores the potential for school improvement through a specific partnership initiative involving specialist secondary schools in England. Findings are based on interview data collected from nine partnerships involving 20 schools from the Specialist…

  18. Strength in Partnership: Building a New Approach to Workforce Development in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workforce Strategy Center, 2006

    2006-01-01

    If one mantra dominates the field of workforce development, it is partnership and collaboration: the need to link disparate training providers and colleges, to better connect employers with training courses and to unite public and private sector funding. The need for partnership is clear, but all the rhetoric and legislative mandates supporting…

  19. National Clean Fleets Partnership (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-01-01

    Provides an overview of Clean Cities National Clean Fleets Partnership (NCFP). The NCFP is open to large private-sector companies that have fleet operations in multiple states. Companies that join the partnership receive customized assistance to reduce petroleum use through increased efficiency and use of alternative fuels. This initiative provides fleets with specialized resources, expertise, and support to successfully incorporate alternative fuels and fuel-saving measures into their operations. The National Clean Fleets Partnership builds on the established success of DOE's Clean Cities program, which reduces petroleum consumption at the community level through a nationwide network of coalitions that work with local stakeholders. Developed with input from fleet managers, industry representatives, and Clean Cities coordinators, the National Clean Fleets Partnership goes one step further by working with large private-sector fleets.

  20. The Practical Integration of Action Research into Building Climate Literacy and Partnership with Key Influentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, M.

    2015-12-01

    Climate Education Partners (CEP) has been using an action research approach to build climate literacy and partnership with key influential (KI) leaders in the San Diego community. After identifying 6 key sectors that either (a) could reduce green house gas emissions and adapt to impacts, or (b) would be highly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, we conducted 89 interviews with KIs from the San Diego region -- including elected officials, academics, laborers, and representatives from local businesses, non-profits, ethnic and cultural communities, faith-based groups, and special interest groups -- to assess their science knowledge and opinions about climate change and the impacts of climate change. Other questions asked were about KIs' personal efficacy, identity, values and engagement in pro-environmental behaviors related to climate change. The results of the interviews contributed to CEP's action research approach in two ways: 1) it provided critical data regarding which leaders wanted further engagement with CEP and what that engagement should entail (e.g., being a connector to other leaders, a spokesperson, or a participant in future educational activities), and 2) it provided key information about the extent to which "knowledge deficit" is related to use of climate change knowledge to inform engagement in mitigation and adaptive behaviors. Practically, the results were used to create a database that is being used to inform the contact and education of KIs. We were able to show, consistent with previous research and identity theory, that liberal leaders were more likely than conservatives to believe in, feel concern for, and be knowledgeable about climate change. However, engagement in mitigation behaviors- specifically making decisions that would reduce electricity, gas, or water use- were similar for both groups. These results are being used to create resources and direct climate education activities going forward.

  1. An academic-community outreach partnership: building relationships and capacity to address childhood lead poisoning.

    PubMed

    Serrell, Nancy; Caron, Rosemary M; Fleishman, Bethany; Robbins, Emily D

    2009-01-01

    Although academic institutions are rich resources for improving public health, academic partnerships with community organizations can be challenging. We describe a successful academic-community partnership composed of the Dartmouth Toxic Metals Research Program, the Manchester (New Hampshire) Health Department, and the Greater Manchester Partners Against Lead Poisoning (GMPALP). Partners collaborated to translate science and best practices into social action and policy change to address childhood lead poisoning. Using the evolution of a childhood lead poisoning prevention initiative, we discuss how an academic-community relationship can be created and sustained. Our experience demonstrates that broad-based partnerships are enhanced by the attributes of community-based participatory research (CBPR). We observe that engaging in community collaborations that are not driven by research eliminates potential conflicts for academic and community partners. We identify four core values, namely, (1) adaptability, (2) consistency, (3) shared authority, and (4) trust, as being constructive when working in such partnerships.

  2. Building a Culture of Authentic Partnership: One Academic Health Center Model for Nursing Leadership.

    PubMed

    Heath, Janie; Swartz, Colleen

    2017-09-01

    Senior nursing leaders from the University of Kentucky (UK) College of Nursing and UK HealthCare have explored the meaning of an authentic partnership. This article quantifies the tangible benefits and outcomes from this maturing academic nursing and clinical practice partnership. Benefits include inaugural academic nursing participation in health system governance, expanded integration of nursing research programs both in the college and in the health science center, and the development of collaborative strategies to address nursing workforce needs.

  3. The Gulf of Maine Ocean Data Partnership: Building a Region-wide Information System from the Bottom Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schloss, A. L.; Mountain, D.; Shyka, T.; Most, S.; Richert, E.

    2005-12-01

    The Gulf of Maine Ocean Data Partnership promotes and coordinates the sharing, linking, electronic dissemination, and use of data on the Gulf of Maine. The Partnership was formed through a Memorandum of Agreement in 2004 as a region-wide effort to assist individual institutions in publishing valuable data and information on the physical, biological, chemical and geologic conditions in the Gulf of Maine. The Partnership has grown to include twenty-one member organizations from government agencies, intergovernmental organizations, academic, research, and other nongovernmental and nonprofit entities. The Partnership provides guidance and technical assistance to members, a forum for exchanging ideas and experiences, and in the future, a web-based data portal to be hosted by the Gulf of Maine Ocean Observing System (GoMOOS). Four project areas have been designated as priorities: Data Assurance, Data Discovery, Data Accessibility, and Data Interoperability. Recommendations and protocols are in development for each project area. These are based on either accepted protocols, or best practices if no protocols exist. Accomplishments to date include a comprehensive inventory of the data management and technology capabilities of participants and a completion of a pilot project on metadata issues. A hands-on Metadata Training Workshop was held in the fall to familiarize participants with preparing compatible metadata for publishing their data collections on the web. The Partnership seeks to advance a truly integrated ocean observing system in the Gulf of Maine Designed and implemented as a grass-roots organization, it will be an important building block of the nascent Northeast Regional Association that will become a component of the US Coastal Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) and a member of the National Federation of Regional Associations.

  4. Building partnerships to support community-led HIV/AIDS management: a case study from rural South Africa.

    PubMed

    Nair, Yugi; Campbell, Catherine

    2008-05-01

    The importance of partnerships between marginalised communities and support agencies (from the public sector, private sector and civil society) is a pillar of HIV/AIDS management policy. Such alliances are notoriously difficult to promote and sustain. We present a case study focusing on the first stage of a project seeking to build partnerships to facilitate local responses to HIV/AIDS in a remote rural community in South Africa. To date the Entabeni project has been successful in its goal of training volunteer health workers in home-based care, peer education, project management and procedures for accessing grants and services. The paper focuses on the project's other goal - to create external support structures for these volunteers (drawing on government departments, local NGOs and private-sector philanthropists). The partnership aims to empower volunteers to lead HIV-prevention and AIDS-care efforts, and to make public services more responsive to local needs. We illustrate how features of the local public-sector environment have actively worked against effective community empowerment. These include a rigid hierarchy, poor communication between senior and junior health professionals, lack of social development skills and the demoralisation and/or exhaustion of public servants dealing with multiple social problems in under-resourced settings. We outline the obstacles that have prevented private-sector involvement, suggesting a degree of scepticism about the potential for private-sector contributions to development in remote areas. We discuss how the project's most effective partners have been two small under-funded NGOs - run by highly committed individuals with a keen understanding of social-development principles, flexible working styles and a willingness to work hard for small gains. Despite many challenges, the partnership formation process has seen some positive achievements; we outline these and discuss the essential role played by an external change agent

  5. Eight years of building community partnerships and trust: the UCLA family medicine community-based participatory research experience.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Gerardo; Rodríguez, Michael A; Lopez, Glenn A; Bholat, Michelle A; Dowling, Patrick T

    2009-10-01

    Acknowledging the growing disparities in health and health care that exist among immigrant families and minority populations in large urban communities, the UCLA Department of Family Medicine (DFM) sought a leadership role in the development of family medicine training and community-based participatory research (CBPR). Performing CBPR requires that academic medicine departments build sustainable and long-term community partnerships. The authors describe the eight-year (2000-2008) process of building sustainable community partnerships and trust between the UCLA DFM and the Sun Valley community, located in Los Angeles County.The authors used case studies of three research areas of concentration (asthma, diabetes prevention, and establishing access to primary care) to describe how they established community trust and sustained long-term community research partnerships. In preparing each case study, they used an iterative process to review qualitative data.Many lessons were common across their research concentration areas. They included the importance of (1) having clear and concrete community benefits, (2) supporting an academic-community champion, (3) political advocacy, (4) partnering with diverse organizations, (5) long-term academic commitment, and (6) medical student involvement. The authors found that establishing a long-term relationship and trust was a prerequisite to successfully initiate CBPR activities that included an asthma school-based screening program, community walking groups, and one of the largest school-based primary care clinics in the United States.Their eight-year experience in the Sun Valley community underscores how academic-community research partnerships can result in benefits of high value to communities and academic departments.

  6. Stakeholders Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delrio, Claudio; Ami, Zvi Ben; de Groot, Reuma; Drachmann, Raul; Ilomaki, Liisa

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this report is, first of all, to present the KP-Lab approach toward stakeholders in the wider framework of European policies. Secondly, the KP-Lab definition of stakeholders and the strategy to address different stakeholders needs, concerns and expectations is presented in the following paragraphs. The second chapter presents concrete…

  7. Helix Nebula - the Science Cloud: a public-private partnership to build a multidisciplinary cloud platform for data intensive science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Bob; Casu, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    The feasibility of using commercial cloud services for scientific research is of great interest to research organisations such as CERN, ESA and EMBL, to the suppliers of cloud-based services and to the national and European funding agencies. Through the Helix Nebula - the Science Cloud [1] initiative and with the support of the European Commission, these stakeholders are driving a two year pilot-phase during which procurement processes and governance issues for a framework of public/private partnership will be appraised. Three initial flagship use cases from high energy physics, molecular biology and earth-observation are being used to validate the approach, enable a cost-benefit analysis to be undertaken and prepare the next stage of the Science Cloud Strategic Plan [2] to be developed and approved. The power of Helix Nebula lies in a shared set of services for initially 3 very different sciences each supporting a global community and thus building a common e-Science platform. Of particular relevance is the ESA sponsored flagship application SuperSites Exploitation Platform (SSEP [3]) that offers the global geo-hazard community a common platform for the correlation and processing of observation data for supersites monitoring. The US-NSF Earth Cube [4] and Ocean Observatory Initiative [5] (OOI) are taking a similar approach for data intensive science. The work of Helix Nebula and its recent architecture model [6] has shown that is it technically feasible to allow publicly funded infrastructures, such as EGI [7] and GEANT [8], to interoperate with commercial cloud services. Such hybrid systems are in the interest of the existing users of publicly funded infrastructures and funding agencies because they will provide "freedom of choice" over the type of computing resources to be consumed and the manner in which they can be obtained. But to offer such freedom-of choice across a spectrum of suppliers, various issues such as intellectual property, legal responsibility

  8. Addressing unresolved tensions to build effective partnerships: lessons from an Aboriginal cancer support network.

    PubMed

    Cuesta-Briand, Beatriz; Bessarab, Dawn; Shahid, Shaouli; Thompson, Sandra C

    2015-11-04

    'flexibility' between Indigenous and non-Indigenous participants. Despite the group's achievements, unresolved tensions between opposing perspectives on how a support group should operate negatively impacted on the working relationship between the group and mainstream service providers, and posed a threat to the Network's sustainability. Our results support the need to acknowledge and address different perspectives and world views in order to build strong, effective partnerships between service providers and Indigenous communities.

  9. Irish-African Partnership and Research Capacity Building for Development: Potential to Learn from Research for the Education and Lifelong Learning Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mark, Rob; Nakabugo, Mary Goretti

    2011-01-01

    The Irish-African Partnership for Research Capacity Building (IAP) is a research consortium involving all of the nine universities on the island of Ireland together with four African universities, with the overall aim of building research capacity for poverty reduction. The project was supported by a three-year grant from Irish Aid. This article…

  10. Building sustainable community partnerships into the structure of new academic public health schools and programs.

    PubMed

    Gaughan, Monica; Gillman, Laura B; Boumbulian, Paul; Davis, Marsha; Galen, Robert S

    2011-01-01

    We describe and assess how the College of Public Health at the University of Georgia, established in 2005, has developed formal institutional mechanisms to facilitate community-university partnerships that serve the needs of communities and the university. The College developed these partnerships as part of its founding; therefore, the University of Georgia model may serve as an important model for other new public health programs. One important lesson is the need to develop financial and organizational mechanisms that ensure stability over time. Equally important is attention to how community needs can be addressed by faculty and students in academically appropriate ways. The integration of these 2 lessons ensures that the academic mission is fulfilled at the same time that community needs are addressed. Together, these lessons suggest that multiple formal strategies are warranted in the development of academically appropriate and sustainable university-community partnerships.

  11. Building Pipelines for Information: Developing Partnerships Between Scientists, Educators, and Community Groups to Learn More About Hydraulic Fracturing in Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafich, K. A.; Hannigan, M.; Martens, W.; McDonald, J. E.; Knight, D.; Gardiner, L. S.; Collier, A. M.; Fletcher, H.; Polmear, M.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a highly contentious issue, and trusted sources of information about the impacts and benefits are difficult to find. Scientific research is making strides to catch up with rapidly expanding unconventional oil and gas development, in part, to meet the need for information for policy, regulation, and public interest. A leader in hydraulic fracturing research, the AirWaterGas Sustainability Research Network is a multi-institution, multi-disciplinary team of researchers working to understand the environmental, economic, and social tradeoffs of oil and gas development. AirWaterGas recently restructured and implemented our education and outreach program around a partnership with the CU-Boulder Office for Outreach and Engagement that leverages existing campus infrastructure, networks, and expertise to disseminate research results and engage the public. The education and outreach team is working with formal and informal K-12 educators through several programs: a yearlong teacher professional development program, a rural classroom air quality monitoring program, and a community partnership grant program. Each program brings together scientists and educators in different environments such as the classroom, online learning, in-person workshops, and community lectures. We will present best practices for developing and implementing a viable outreach and education program through building and fostering mutually beneficial partnerships that bridge the gap between scientists and the public.

  12. Municipalities Collaborating in Public Health: The Danish Smoking Prevention and Cessation Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Pernille Tanggaard; El Ansari, Walid; Rasmussen, Hanna Barbara; Stock, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the Smoking Prevention and Cessation Partnership (SPCP) which builds upon a collaboration between two Danish municipalities targeted at the prevention of tobacco smoking. The aim of the study was to describe the processes of SPCP, to examine the difficulties this collaboration faced, and to assess how these experiences could be used to improve future partnership collaboration. We employed qualitative methodology comprising 12 semi-structured one-to-one interviews with SPCP’s stakeholders and an analysis of the partnership documents and reports. The findings suggested that the main potentials of the partnership were the personal relations between the members and stakeholders with the possibilities of the creation of new connections with other actors. Barriers to successful partnership building were the implementation of the new Local Government Reform as a competing task, and that the two municipalities were heterogenic in respect to organizational issues and working methods. Other impediments included the lack of continuity in leadership, the lack of clarity regarding the form of collaboration and roles, as well as different expectations of the stakeholders. We conclude that four factors remain critical for partnerships. The first is the clarity of the collaborative effort. Second, partnerships need to take into account the structural circumstances and culture/value systems of all stakeholders. Third is the impact of contextual factors on the development of the partnership; and the fourth factor is the bearing of personal/individual factors on the partnership e.g., personal engagement in the project. Early attention to these four factors could contribute to more effective partnership working. PMID:21139870

  13. Municipalities collaborating in public health: the Danish Smoking Prevention and Cessation Partnership.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Pernille Tanggaard; El Ansari, Walid; Rasmussen, Hanna Barbara; Stock, Christiane

    2010-11-01

    This study explored the Smoking Prevention and Cessation Partnership (SPCP) which builds upon a collaboration between two Danish municipalities targeted at the prevention of tobacco smoking. The aim of the study was to describe the processes of SPCP, to examine the difficulties this collaboration faced, and to assess how these experiences could be used to improve future partnership collaboration. We employed qualitative methodology comprising 12 semi-structured one-to-one interviews with SPCP's stakeholders and an analysis of the partnership documents and reports. The findings suggested that the main potentials of the partnership were the personal relations between the members and stakeholders with the possibilities of the creation of new connections with other actors. Barriers to successful partnership building were the implementation of the new Local Government Reform as a competing task, and that the two municipalities were heterogenic in respect to organizational issues and working methods. Other impediments included the lack of continuity in leadership, the lack of clarity regarding the form of collaboration and roles, as well as different expectations of the stakeholders. We conclude that four factors remain critical for partnerships. The first is the clarity of the collaborative effort. Second, partnerships need to take into account the structural circumstances and culture/value systems of all stakeholders. Third is the impact of contextual factors on the development of the partnership; and the fourth factor is the bearing of personal/individual factors on the partnership e.g., personal engagement in the project. Early attention to these four factors could contribute to more effective partnership working.

  14. Partnerships in Pharma--An Economist Intelligence Unit Seminar--Building Innovation into Alliances and Business Models. 1 October 2010, London, UK.

    PubMed

    Kibble, Alexandra

    2010-12-01

    The Partnerships in Pharma seminar, held in London, included topics related to building innovation into alliances and business models within the pharmaceutical industry. This conference report highlights selected presentations on strategies for successful partnering, partnering alongside an evolving CRO industry, considering the pharma value chain, and partnerships between industry and academia. Approaches used by Ipsen, Merck Serono, Pfizer and ViiV Healthcare are also described.

  15. Building a Foundation for Collaboration: K-20 Partnerships in Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Janet W.; Spang, Lothar; Padron, Kristy

    2005-01-01

    The authors have developed collaborative partnerships with K-12 educators and school library/media specialist students to promote information literacy. This article traces the history beginning with on-site workshops collaboratively developed by K-12 and university library staff; a continuing education course in information literacy for teachers…

  16. High Road Partnerships Report: Innovations in Building Good Jobs and Strong Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations, Washington, DC. Working for America Inst.

    When deciding how to compete in the new global economy, employers can opt for "low-road" strategies such as low wages and no job security. Alternatively, they can choose the "high road" and compete by offering quality goods and services, innovation, and value. Fourteen successful "high-road" partnerships were examined…

  17. The Perfect Partnership: What It Takes to Build and Sustain Relationships that Benefit Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killion, Joellen

    2011-01-01

    Schools and districts are beneficiaries of multiple opportunities to extend and enhance their core work of educating students through partnerships in two ways. These opportunities emerge either from invitations that come from outside the school and district, such as those from corporations, universities, or regional education agencies, or they are…

  18. Achieving Results through Community School Partnerships: How District and Community Leaders Are Building Effective, Sustainable Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Martin J.; Jacobson, Reuben; Melaville, Atelia

    2012-01-01

    A community school is a place and a set of partnerships connecting a school, the families of students, and the surrounding community. A community school is distinguished by an integrated focus on academics, youth development, family support, health and social services, and community development. The community school strategy is central to efforts…

  19. Parents as Collaborators: Building Partnerships with School- and Community-Based Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deFur, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Parental involvement and parent-school-community partnerships receive wide acclaim for making a positive difference in the educational and transition outcomes for youth with and without disabilities. Although the impact of parental involvement in education remains undisputed, secondary education traditionally emphasizes the emerging adult…

  20. Building Partnerships. Inter-American Foundation: 1997 in Review, October 1, 1996 to September 30, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inter-American Foundation, Arlington, VA.

    This report summarizes 1997 activities of the Inter-American Foundation (IAF), an independent agency of the U.S. government. The IAF promotes equitable, participatory, and sustainable self-help development in Latin America and the Caribbean by awarding grants directly to local organizations, as well as by entering into partnerships with public-…

  1. Making Their Voices Heard: A Partnership to Build Writing Skills through Empowerment, Imagination, and Scaffolded Supports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varady, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    In San Francisco, a partnership between a K-8 school and a non-profit writing program helps students who are achieving below grade level find their voices and blossom into confident thinkers and writers. 826 Valencia is a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting under-resourced students ages six to eighteen with their creative and…

  2. Professionalization, Partnership, and Power: Building Professional Development Schools. SUNY Series, Frontiers in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrie, Hugh G., Ed.

    This volume presents a variety of different implementations of the professional development school concept of teacher education in the following 17 author-contributed chapters: "School-University Partnerships and Partner Schools" (John Goodlad); "Design Principles and Criteria for Professional Development Schools" (Frank…

  3. Integrated School-Family Partnerships in Preschool: Building Quality Involvement through Multidimensional Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nitecki, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine a preschool program with a high level of quality family involvement. Since family involvement during the early years has been linked to achievement and success in school, it is important to examine how such partnerships can be fostered in a meaningful way. The study employs an inductive qualitative approach,…

  4. An Academic-Community Outreach Partnership: Building Relationships and Capacity to Address Childhood Lead Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Serrell, Nancy; Caron, Rosemary M.; Fleishman, Bethany; Robbins, Emily D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Although academic institutions are rich resources for improving public health, academic partnerships with community organizations can be challenging. We describe a successful academic-community partnership composed of the Dartmouth Toxic Metals Research Program, the Manchester (New Hampshire) Health Department, and the Greater Manchester Partners Against Lead Poisoning (GMPALP). Objective Partners collaborated to translate science and best practices into social action and policy change to address childhood lead poisoning. Methods Using the evolution of a childhood lead poisoning prevention initiative, we discuss how an academic-community relationship can be created and sustained. Lessons Learned Our experience demonstrates that broad-based partnerships are enhanced by the attributes of community-based participatory research (CBPR). We observe that engaging in community collaborations that are not driven by research eliminates potential conflicts for academic and community partners. Conclusion We identify four core values, namely, (1) adaptability, (2) consistency, (3) shared authority, and (4) trust, as being constructive when working in such partnerships. PMID:19779580

  5. The Continuity Framework: A Tool for Building Home, School, and Community Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, E. Glyn; Amwake, Carolynn; Speth, Tim; Scott-Little, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    In the face of today's challenging social and family issues, many new efforts are underway to help children and families. One solution that many communities have adopted is the establishment of a collaborative partnership that involves all the relevant partners--home, school, and community--in the planning and monitoring of services for children.…

  6. Aspiring to Quality Teacher-Parent Partnerships in Vietnam: Building Localised Funds of Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Helen; Fleer, Marilyn; Fleer-Stout, Freya; Hanh, Le Thi Bich

    2016-01-01

    Collaborative and reciprocal teacher-parent partnerships have been established in prior research as vital in empowering ethnic-minority children to be competent learners who value their home background, culture, and language and also learn the language used by teachers as the medium of education. Such collaborative relationships may be challenging…

  7. A Guide to Building Education Partnerships: Navigating Diverse Cultural Contexts to Turn Challenge into Promise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hora, Matthew T.; Millar, Susan B.

    2011-01-01

    Education partnerships are central to--and often a requirement of--most education reform initiatives promoted by state and local governments, by foundations, and by business funders. Many fail for failure to understand the dynamics of their complex relationships. This book provides insights and guidance to enable prospective and existing education…

  8. Parents as Collaborators: Building Partnerships with School- and Community-Based Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deFur, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Parental involvement and parent-school-community partnerships receive wide acclaim for making a positive difference in the educational and transition outcomes for youth with and without disabilities. Although the impact of parental involvement in education remains undisputed, secondary education traditionally emphasizes the emerging adult…

  9. The Perfect Partnership: What It Takes to Build and Sustain Relationships that Benefit Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killion, Joellen

    2011-01-01

    Schools and districts are beneficiaries of multiple opportunities to extend and enhance their core work of educating students through partnerships in two ways. These opportunities emerge either from invitations that come from outside the school and district, such as those from corporations, universities, or regional education agencies, or they are…

  10. Building Bridges: A Research Library Model for Technology-Based Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Carolyn A.; Carter, Howard; Soltys, Mickey

    2005-01-01

    The nature of technology-based collaboration is affected by the changing goals and priorities, budgetary considerations, staff expertise, and leadership of each of the organizations involved in the partnership. In the context of a national research library, this article will describe Southern Illinois University Carbondale Library Affairs'…

  11. The union, the mining company, and the environment: steelworkers build a multi-stakeholder model for corporate accountability at Phelps Dodge.

    PubMed

    Lewis, S

    1999-01-01

    This is a case study of ongoing relations between the Phelps Dodge mining company, a United Steelworkers local representing 560 employees at the company's Chino Mines in New Mexico, and an array of other concerned stakeholders. This case study shows that labor can be a full partner in environmental advocacy, and even take a leadership role in building a strong multi-stakeholder alliance for corporate accountability. While the case also shows that corporate jobs blackmail is alive and well in the global economy, the labor community-coalition that has emerged at the mining complex has broken some new ground. The approach taken attends to diverse stakeholder interests--cultural protection issues of Native-American and Mexican-American ethnic groups; conservation, groundwater and Right-to-Know issues of traditional environmental constituencies; and environmental liability and disclosure concerns of corporate shareholders. Among the key developments are: A new approach to corporate reporting to shareholders as an enforcement and right-to-know tool; The use of the internet as an information dissemination and action tool; The potential for environmentally needed improvements to serve as a receptor for employment of workers at a mine during periods of reduced production.

  12. Building Service Delivery Networks: Partnership Evolution Among Children’s Behavioral Health Agencies in Response to New Funding

    PubMed Central

    Bunger, Alicia C.; Doogan, Nathan J.; Cao, Yiwen

    2014-01-01

    Meeting the complex needs of youth with behavioral health problems requires a coordinated network of community-based agencies. Although fiscal scarcity or retrenchment can limit coordinated services, munificence can stimulate service delivery partnerships as agencies expand programs, hire staff, and spend more time coordinating services. This study examines the 2-year evolution of referral and staff expertise sharing networks in response to substantial new funding for services within a regional network of children’s mental health organizations. Quantitative network survey data were collected from directors of 22 nonprofit organizations that receive funding from a county government-based behavioral health service fund. Both referral and staff expertise sharing networks changed over time, but results of a stochastic actor-oriented model of network dynamics suggest the nature of this change varies for these networks. Agencies with higher numbers of referral and staff expertise sharing partners tend to maintain these ties and/or develop new relationships over the 2 years. Agencies tend to refer to agencies they trust, but trust was not associated with staff expertise sharing ties. However, agencies maintain or form staff expertise sharing ties with referral partners, or with organizations that provide similar services. In addition, agencies tend to reciprocate staff expertise sharing, but not referrals. Findings suggest that during periods of resource munificence and service expansion, behavioral health organizations build service delivery partnerships in complex ways that build upon prior collaborative history and coordinate services among similar types of providers. Referral partnerships can pave the way for future information sharing relationships. PMID:25574359

  13. Strategic Partnerships in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortega, Janet L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impacts of strategic partnerships between community colleges and key stakeholders; to specifically examine strategic partnerships; leadership decision-making; criteria to evaluate strategic partnerships that added value to the institution, value to the students, faculty, staff, and the local…

  14. Medical Education Capacity-Building Partnerships for Health Care Systems Development.

    PubMed

    Rabin, Tracy L; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Rastegar, Asghar

    2016-07-01

    Health care workforce development is a key pillar of global health systems strengthening that requires investment in health care worker training institutions. This can be achieved by developing partnerships between training institutions in resource-limited and resource-rich areas and leveraging the unique expertise and opportunities both have to offer. To realize their full potential, however, these relationships must be equitable. In this article, we use a previously described global health ethics framework and our ten-year experience with the Makerere University-Yale University (MUYU) Collaboration to provide an example of an equity-focused global health education partnership. © 2016 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. ISSN 2376-6980.

  15. Building partnerships in community-based participatory research: budgetary and other cost considerations.

    PubMed

    Hoeft, Theresa J; Burke, Wylie; Hopkins, Scarlett E; Charles, Walkie; Trinidad, Susan B; James, Rosalina D; Boyer, Bert B

    2014-03-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is an important framework for partnering with communities to reduce health disparities. Working in partnership with community incurs additional costs, some that can be represented in a budget summary page and others that are tied to the competing demands placed on community and academic partners. These cost considerations can inform development of community-academic partnerships. We calculated costs from a case study based on an ongoing CBPR project involving a Community Planning Group (CPG) of community co-researchers in rural Alaska and a bicultural liaison group who help bridge communication between CPG and academic co-researchers. Budget considerations specific to CBPR include travel and other communication-related costs, compensation for community partners, and food served at meetings. We also identified sources of competing demands for community and academic partners. Our findings can inform budget discussions in community-academic partnerships. Discussions of competing demands on community partners' time can help plan timelines for CBPR projects. Our findings may also inform discussions about tenure and promotion policies that may represent barriers to participation in CBPR for academic researchers.

  16. Overcoming Constraints of Building Successful Partnerships Incorporating STEM Research Into K-12 Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radencic, S.; McNeal, K. S.; Pierce, D.; Hare, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Initiating New Science Partnerships in Rural Education (INSPIRE) program at Mississippi State University (MSU), funded by the NSF Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education (GK12) program, focuses on the advancement of Earth and Space science education in K-12 classrooms. INSPIRE is currently in its second year of partnering ten graduate students from the STEM fields of Geosciences, Engineering and Chemistry at MSU with five teachers from local, rural school districts. The five year project serves to increase inquiry and technology experiences in science and math while enhancing graduate student's communication skills as they create interactive lessons linking their STEM research focus to the state and national standards covered in the classrooms. Each graduate student is responsible for the development of two lessons each month of the school year that are then published on the INSPIRE project webpage, www.gk12.msstate.edu, where they are a free resource for any K-12 classroom teacher seeking innovative activities for their classrooms. Many of the participating teachers and graduate students share activities developed with non-participating teachers, expanding INSPIRE's outreach throughout the local community. Numerous challenges were met during the formation of the program as well as throughout the first year in which the project management team worked together to find solutions ensuring that INSPIRE maintained successful partnerships for all involved. Proposed solutions of the following key components were identified by INSPIRE through the development, implementation, and continuous evaluation (internal and external) of the first year of the program as areas that can pose challenges to the construction of strong relationships between STEM research and K-12 classrooms: initializing the partnerships with the K-12 classrooms and STEM graduate fields at the university; maintaining strong partnerships; providing appropriate training and support; developing sound

  17. Building a community of practice for sustainability: strengthening learning and collective action of Canadian biosphere reserves through a national partnership.

    PubMed

    Reed, Maureen G; Godmaire, Hélène; Abernethy, Paivi; Guertin, Marc-André

    2014-12-01

    Deliberation, dialogue and systematic learning are now considered attributes of good practice for organizations seeking to advance sustainability. Yet we do not know whether organizations that span spatial scales and governance responsibilities can establish effective communities of practice to facilitate learning and action. The purpose of this paper is to generate a framework that specifies actions and processes of a community of practice designed to instill collective learning and action strategies across a multi-level, multi-partner network. The framework is then used to describe and analyze a partnership among practitioners of Canada's 16 UNESCO biosphere reserves, and additional researchers and government representatives from across Canada. The framework is a cycle of seven action steps, beginning and ending with reflecting on and evaluating present practice. It is supported by seven characteristics of collaborative environmental management that are used to gauge the success of the partnership. Our results show that the partnership successfully built trust, established shared norms and common interest, created incentives to participate, generated value in information sharing and willingness to engage, demonstrated effective flow of information, and provided leadership and facilitation. Key to success was the presence of a multi-lingual facilitator who could bridge cultural differences across regions and academia-practitioner expectations. The project succeeded in establishing common goals, setting mutual expectations and building relations of trust and respect, and co-creating knowledge. It is too soon to determine whether changes in practices that support sustainability will be maintained over the long term and without the help of an outside facilitator. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. EPA Leadership in the Global Mercury Partnership

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Global Mercury Partnership is a voluntary multi-stakeholder partnership initiated in 2005 to take immediate actions to protect human health and the environment from the releases of mercury and its compounds to the environment.

  19. Relationship Building One Step at a Time: Case Studies of Successful Faculty-Librarian Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Díaz, José O.; Mandernach, Meris A.

    2017-01-01

    Building strong relationships between academic librarians and teaching faculty is paramount for promoting services and resources. While librarians face challenges ranging from new technologies to heightened expectations and fiscal difficulties, the key work remains in solid relationship building. Drawing on the experience of a group of subject…

  20. Building Better Drought Resilience Through Improved Monitoring and Early Warning: Learning From Stakeholders in Europe, the USA, and Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, K.; Hannaford, J.; Bachmair, S.; Tijdeman, E.; Collins, K.; Svoboda, M.; Knutson, C. L.; Wall, N.; Smith, K. H.; Bernadt, T.; Crossman, N. D.; Overton, I. C.; Barker, L. J.; Acreman, M. C.

    2016-12-01

    With climate projections suggesting that droughts will intensify in many regions in future, improved drought risk management may reduce potential threats to freshwater security across the globe. One aspect that has been called for in this respect is an improvement of the linkage of drought monitoring and early warning, which currently focuses largely on indicators from meteorology and hydrology, to drought impacts on environment and society. However, a survey of existing monitoring and early warning systems globally, that we report on in this contribution, demonstrates that although impacts are being monitored, there is limited work, and certainly little consensus, on how to best achieve this linkage. The Belmont Forum project DrIVER (Drought impacts: Vulnerability thresholds in monitoring and early-warning research) carried out a number of stakeholder workshops in North America, Europe and Australia to elaborate on options for such improvements. A first round of workshops explored current drought management practices among a very diverse range of stakeholders, and their expectations from monitoring and early warning systems (particularly regarding impact characterization). The workshops revealed some disconnects between the indices used in the public early warning systems and those used by local decision-makers, e.g. to trigger drought measures. Follow-up workshops then explored how the links between information at these different scales can be bridged and applied. Impact information plays a key role in this task. This contribution draws on the lessons learned from the transdisciplinary interactions in DrIVER, to enhance the usability of drought monitoring and early-warning systems and other risk management strategies.

  1. Linking research to global health equity: the contribution of product development partnerships to access to medicines and research capacity building.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Bridget; Loff, Bebe

    2013-11-01

    Certain product development partnerships (PDPs) recognize that to promote the reduction of global health disparities they must create access to their products and strengthen research capacity in developing countries. We evaluated the contribution of 3 PDPs--Medicines for Malaria Venture, Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative, and Institute for One World Health--according to Frost and Reich's access framework. We also evaluated PDPs' capacity building in low- and middle-income countries at the individual, institutional, and system levels. We found that these PDPs advance public health by ensuring their products' registration, distribution, and adoption into national treatment policies in disease-endemic countries. Nonetheless, ensuring broad, equitable access for these populations--high distribution coverage; affordability, particularly for the poor; and adoption at provider and end-user levels--remains a challenge.

  2. Linking Research to Global Health Equity: The Contribution of Product Development Partnerships to Access to Medicines and Research Capacity Building

    PubMed Central

    Loff, Bebe

    2013-01-01

    Certain product development partnerships (PDPs) recognize that to promote the reduction of global health disparities they must create access to their products and strengthen research capacity in developing countries. We evaluated the contribution of 3 PDPs—Medicines for Malaria Venture, Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative, and Institute for One World Health—according to Frost and Reich’s access framework. We also evaluated PDPs’ capacity building in low- and middle-income countries at the individual, institutional, and system levels. We found that these PDPs advance public health by ensuring their products’ registration, distribution, and adoption into national treatment policies in disease-endemic countries. Nonetheless, ensuring broad, equitable access for these populations—high distribution coverage; affordability, particularly for the poor; and adoption at provider and end-user levels—remains a challenge. PMID:24028246

  3. Principles for building public-private partnerships to benefit food safety, nutrition, and health research

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Sylvia; Alexander, Nick; Kretser, Alison; Steele, Robert; Kretsch, Molly; Applebaum, Rhona; Clydesdale, Fergus; Cummins, Deborah; Hentges, Eric; Navia, Juan; Jarvis, Ashley; Falci, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The present article articulates principles for effective public-private partnerships (PPPs) in scientific research. Recognizing that PPPs represent one approach for creating research collaborations and that there are other methods outside the scope of this article, PPPs can be useful in leveraging diverse expertise among government, academic, and industry researchers to address public health needs and questions concerned with nutrition, health, food science, and food and ingredient safety. A three-step process was used to identify the principles proposed herein: step 1) review of existing PPP guidelines, both in the peer-reviewed literature and at 16 disparate non-industry organizations; step 2) analysis of relevant successful or promising PPPs; and step 3) formal background interviews of 27 experienced, senior-level individuals from academia, government, industry, foundations, and non-governmental organizations. This process resulted in the articulation of 12 potential principles for establishing and managing successful research PPPs. The review of existing guidelines showed that guidelines for research partnerships currently reside largely within institutions rather than in the peer-reviewed literature. This article aims to introduce these principles into the literature to serve as a framework for dialogue and for future PPPs. PMID:24117791

  4. Principles for building public-private partnerships to benefit food safety, nutrition, and health research.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Sylvia; Alexander, Nick; Kretser, Alison; Steele, Robert; Kretsch, Molly; Applebaum, Rhona; Clydesdale, Fergus; Cummins, Deborah; Hentges, Eric; Navia, Juan; Jarvis, Ashley; Falci, Ken

    2013-10-01

    The present article articulates principles for effective public-private partnerships (PPPs) in scientific research. Recognizing that PPPs represent one approach for creating research collaborations and that there are other methods outside the scope of this article, PPPs can be useful in leveraging diverse expertise among government, academic, and industry researchers to address public health needs and questions concerned with nutrition, health, food science, and food and ingredient safety. A three-step process was used to identify the principles proposed herein: step 1) review of existing PPP guidelines, both in the peer-reviewed literature and at 16 disparate non-industry organizations; step 2) analysis of relevant successful or promising PPPs; and step 3) formal background interviews of 27 experienced, senior-level individuals from academia, government, industry, foundations, and non-governmental organizations. This process resulted in the articulation of 12 potential principles for establishing and managing successful research PPPs. The review of existing guidelines showed that guidelines for research partnerships currently reside largely within institutions rather than in the peer-reviewed literature. This article aims to introduce these principles into the literature to serve as a framework for dialogue and for future PPPs.

  5. Building a community-academic partnership to improve health outcomes in an underserved community.

    PubMed

    McCann, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    East Garfield Park, IL, is an impoverished community with 59.7% of residents falling below twice the poverty level and 42.6% of its children in poverty. In 2001, the leading causes of hospitalizations were heart disease (10.3%), diabetes (2%), and asthma (3.9%), all of which occur at frequencies 33% greater than the Chicago average. Finally, a review of the health care facilities in the community suggests that there is a need for accessible primary health care services in the area. The purpose of this project was to improve health outcomes in an impoverished, underserved community with documented health care needs and lack of adequate health care services by creating a community-academic partnership to provide on-site, interdisciplinary, health care services within an established and trusted community-based social service agency, Marillac House. The short-term objectives for this project included creating a community-academic partnership between Marillac House and Colleges of Nursing, Medicine, and Health Sciences; providing comprehensive health care services; and developing an innovative clinical education model for interdisciplinary care across specialties. Long-term objectives included providing preventative services; evidenced-based management of acute and chronic illness; evaluating client's health outcomes; and creating a sustainability plan for the long-term success of the health center.

  6. Building community for health: lessons from a seven-year-old neighborhood/university partnership.

    PubMed

    Flick, L H; Reese, C G; Rogers, G; Fletcher, P; Sonn, J

    1994-01-01

    This article presents two case studies highlighting the role of community conflict in the process of community empowerment. A graduate program for community health nurses (CHNs) in a large Midwestern city formed a partnership with a diverse, integrated neighborhood for the dual purposes of enhancing the community's capacity to improve its own health and teaching CHNs community organizing as a means to improve health. Central to the partnership are a broad definition of health, trust developed through long-term involvement, a commitment to reciprocity, social justice, and Freire's model of adult learning. Two initiatives that gave rise to major conflicts between community groups are analyzed. Conflicts, external and internal to the community, proved to be both powerful catalysts and potential barriers to the use of Freirian themes in community organization. Both university and community participants report needing better skills in the early recognition and management of conflict. We conclude that conflict management theory must be integrated with empowerment education theory, particularly when empowerment education is applied in a diverse community.

  7. Building effective partnerships: a national evaluation of the Cancer Information Service outreach program. Part 2.

    PubMed

    Fleisher, L; Kornfeld, J; Ter Maat, J; Davis, S W; Laepke, K; Bradley, A

    1998-01-01

    The Cancer Information Service's (CIS) nationally coordinated, regionally focused outreach program establishes partnerships with government, nonprofit, and private organizations to reach underserved and minority populations. A national random sample telephone survey, conducted with 867 partner organizations who had contact with the CIS in early 1996, assessed the types of CIS assistance used, satisfaction with and usefulness of these services, organizational characteristics, and the overall impact on partners' cancer-related programs. CIS partners provide programs for the medically underserved (79%) and specific racial and ethnic groups (72%) and address a range of cancer control issues. Partners use and highly value an array of CIS assistance. Over 90% are satisfied with the CIS services. Diffusion of accurate and science-based information, materials and resources is a key element of the outreach assistance. Two out of three partners are receiving late-breaking news and scientific information from the CIS and 86% are disseminating it to their constituents. The majority of those partners surveyed reported that they rely on the CIS to assist with their most important cancer programs. Sixty-eight percent of the partners rated the CIS assistance as important or very important to their cancer-related programs. These survey results indicate that the CIS outreach program provides key support to partners' cancer programs and has an impact on their efforts. The results support the effectiveness of a regionally based outreach program working in partnership with existing organizations at the state, county, and local level who are addressing the needs of underserved populations.

  8. The nursing quality partnership: building a health system approach to improving care in community hospitals using principles of the magnet program of excellence.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Nancy M; Murphy, Denise; DeRoberts, Annamarie; Lyman, Martha B

    2012-01-01

    Review of the Magnet Recognition Program journey related to the partnership between nursing and quality in building a comprehensive, results-driven quality and safety program in a 5 hospital community system in suburban Philadelphia over a 5-year period (2006-2011).

  9. Partners in research: building academic-practice partnerships to educate and mentor advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Harbman, Patricia; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Carter, Nancy; Covell, Christine L; Donald, Faith; Gibbins, Sharyn; Kilpatrick, Kelley; McKinlay, James; Rawson, Krista; Sherifali, Diana; Tranmer, Joan; Valaitis, Ruta

    2017-04-01

    Clinical practice is the primary focus of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles. However, with unprecedented needs for health care reform and quality improvement (QI), health care administrators are seeking new ways to utilize all dimensions of APN expertise, especially related to research and evidence-based practice. International studies reveal research as the most underdeveloped and underutilized aspect of these roles. To improve patient care by strengthening the capacity of advanced practice nurses to integrate research and evidence-based practice activities into their day-to-day practice. An academic-practice partnership was created among hospital-based advanced practice nurses, nurse administrators, and APN researchers to create an innovative approach to educate and mentor advanced practice nurses in conducting point-of-care research, QI, or evidence-based practice projects to improve patient, provider, and/or system outcomes. A practice-based research course was delivered to 2 cohorts of advanced practice nurses using a range of teaching strategies including 1-to-1 academic mentorship. All participants completed self-report surveys before and after course delivery. Through participation in this initiative, advanced practice nurses enhanced their knowledge, skills, and confidence in the design, implementation, and/or evaluation of research, QI, and evidence-based practice activities. Evaluation of this initiative provides evidence of the acceptability and feasibility of academic-practice partnerships to educate and mentor point-of-care providers on how to lead, implement, and integrate research, QI and evidence-based activities into their practices. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. The Sombrero Marsh Education Program: Diverse partnerships building strong Earth System science programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. K.; Bierbaum, V.

    2003-12-01

    Broad-based science education partnerships can create exemplary education programs because each partner brings their particular expertise to the table. The Sombrero Marsh Education Program provides an example of such a program where a school district, a local government agency, a non-profit organization, and an institute of higher learning developed a field-based watershed curriculum for upper elementary students at Sombrero Marsh, a recently restored rare saline marsh located in Boulder Valley. The partners' expertise, ranging from wetland ecology and restoration to pedagogy, yielded a curriculum that includes many of the characteristics that are highlighted within the National Science Education Standards, such as inquiry-based, hands-on activities where students serve as scientists and collect real data that will be used to monitor the progress of marsh restoration. Once established, these diverse partnerships can attract further funding and expand their programs from the local to the national level, thus providing a successful model with a widespread impact. The Sombrero Marsh Program will soon be making this transition because the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), along with 4 other departments of the University of Colorado, was awarded a NSF GK-12 Grant to expand the marsh program to the secondary science level. Using the initial Sombrero Marsh Program as a guide, eight GK-12 Fellows from the departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Geological Sciences, Environmental and Evolutionary Biology, and Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences will develop a secondary science level program at Sombrero Marsh, which initially will be delivered to schools with a significant population of students from under-represented groups. Several dimensions of the marsh program, such as community-based research and ecological sterwardship, can serve as a national model for similar science education programs that aim to promote Earth System science.

  11. How the Pacific Islands Climate Education Partnership (PCEP) Has Collaboratively Increased Regional Collective Impacts on Climate Literacy Via Networks of Diverse Stakeholders Engaging in Multiple Reinforcing Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussman, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Pacific Islands Climate Education Partnership (PCEP) serves the U.S. Affiliated Pacific Island (USAPI) Region. The international entities served by PCEP are the state of Hawai`i (USA); three Freely Associated States (the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau), and three Territories (Guam, Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands, and American Samoa). Funded by NSF, the PCEP aims to educate the region's students and citizens in ways that exemplify modern science and indigenous environmental knowledge, address the urgency of climate change impacts, and focus on adaptation strategies that can increase resiliency with respect to climate change impacts. PCEP partners include universities, education nonprofits, state or country offices/ministries of education, local ecological nonprofits, and a variety of community organizations. Partners contribute and share expertise in climate science, local ecological knowledge, K-12 education in the Pacific island region, science and environmental education, community college education, learning science, indigenous navigation, and oceanography. Over the past six years, PCEP has engaged with regional school systems and communities in a wide variety of ways that complement and reinforce each other. Highlighted activities include improving country and state climate science education standards; focusing on place-based local ecological knowledge and skills in working with schools and communities; developing and disseminating formal education resources such as books and web resources that focus on local contexts and skills rather than contextually inappropriate mainland the textbooks; developing and implementing professional development for teachers; and supporting local ways of knowing by gathering and sharing local stories of climate change; and promoting an emphasis on climate adaptation strategies that increase resilience of natural environments and community systems.

  12. Thinking Like a Whole Building: Whole Foods Market New Construction Summary, U.S. Department of Energy's Commercial Building Partnerships (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-04-01

    Whole Foods Market participates in the U.S. Department of Energy's Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) to identify and develop cost-effective, readily deployed, replicable energy efficiency measures (EEMs) for commercial buildings. Whole Foods Market is working with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) on a retrofit and a new construction CBP project. Whole Foods Market's CBP new construction project is a standalone store in Raleigh, North Carolina. Whole Foods Market examined the energy systems and the interactions between those systems in the design for the new Raleigh store. Based on this collaboration and preliminary energy modeling, Whole Foods Market and NREL identified a number of cost-effective EEMs that can be readily deployed in other Whole Foods Market stores and in other U.S. supermarkets. If the actual savings in the Raleigh store - which NREL will monitor and verify - match the modeling results, each year this store will save nearly $100,000 in operating costs (Raleigh's rates are about $0.06/kWh for electricity and $0.83/therm for natural gas). The store will also use 41% less energy than a Standard 90.1-compliant store and avoid about 3.7 million pounds of carbon dioxide emissions.

  13. Giving Life to Data: University-Community Partnerships in Addressing HIV and AIDS through Building Digital Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Lange, Naydene; Mnisi, Thoko; Mitchell, Claudia; Park, Eun G.

    2010-01-01

    The partnerships, especially university-community partnerships, that sustain globally networked learning environments often face challenges in mobilizing research to empower local communities to effect change. This article examines these challenges by describing a university-community partnership involving researchers and graduate students in…

  14. Giving Life to Data: University-Community Partnerships in Addressing HIV and AIDS through Building Digital Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Lange, Naydene; Mnisi, Thoko; Mitchell, Claudia; Park, Eun G.

    2010-01-01

    The partnerships, especially university-community partnerships, that sustain globally networked learning environments often face challenges in mobilizing research to empower local communities to effect change. This article examines these challenges by describing a university-community partnership involving researchers and graduate students in…

  15. Setting the Direction. Partnerships in Action: First Nations, Metis and Inuit Learning Access and Success. A Learning Alberta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Advanced Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The Aboriginal Learning Subcommittee looked specifically at developing recommendations that address First Nations, Metis and Inuit learning needs and supports. The Subcommittee proposes policy actions and recommends that all stakeholders work together to implement these actions. The first recommendation for action is to build on partnerships to…

  16. Building Co-Management as a Process: Problem Solving Through Partnerships in Aboriginal Country, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurba, Melanie; Ross, Helen; Izurieta, Arturo; Rist, Philip; Bock, Ellie; Berkes, Fikret

    2012-06-01

    Collaborative problem solving has increasingly become important in the face of the complexities in the management of resources, including protected areas. The strategy undertaken by Girringun Aboriginal Corporation in north tropical Queensland, Australia, for developing co-management demonstrates the potential for a problem solving approach involving sequential initiatives, as an alternative to the more familiar negotiated agreements for co-management. Our longitudinal case study focuses on the development of indigenous ranger units as a strategic mechanism for the involvement of traditional owners in managing their country in collaboration with government and other interested parties. This was followed by Australia's first traditional use of marine resources agreement, and development of a multi-jurisdictional, land to sea, indigenous protected area. In using a relationship building approach to develop regional scale co-management, Girringun has been strengthening its capabilities as collaborator and regional service provider, thus, bringing customary decision-making structures into play to `care for country'. From this evolving process we have identified the key components of a relationship building strategy, `the pillars of co-management'. This approach includes learning-by-doing, the building of respect and rapport, sorting out responsibilities, practical engagement, and capacity-building.

  17. Motivational interviewing competencies among UK family nurse partnership nurses: a process evaluation component of the building blocks trial.

    PubMed

    Channon, Sue; Bekkers, Marie-Jet; Sanders, Julia; Cannings-John, Rebecca; Robertson, Laura; Bennert, Kristina; Butler, Christopher; Hood, Kerenza; Robling, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a person-centred counselling approach to behaviour change which is increasingly being used in public health settings, either as a stand-alone approach or in combination with other structured programmes of health promotion. One example of this is the Family Nurse Partnership (FNP) a licensed, preventative programme for first time mothers under the age of 20, delivered by specialist family nurses who are additionally trained in MI. The Building Blocks trial was an individually randomised controlled trial comparing effectiveness of Family Nurse Partnership when added to usual care compared to usual care alone within 18 sites in England. The aim of this process evaluation component of the trial is to determine the extent to which Motivational Interviewing skills taught to Family Nurse Partnership nurses were used in their home visits with clients. Between July 2010 and November 2011, 92 audio-recordings of nurse-client consultations were collected during the 'pregnancy' and 'infancy' phases of the FNP programme. They were analysed using The Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity (MITI) coding system. A competent level of overall MI adherent practice according to the MITI criteria for 'global clinician ratings' was apparent in over 70 % of the consultations. However, on specific behaviours and the MITI-derived practitioner competency variables, there was a large variation in the percentage of recordings in which "beginner proficiency" levels in MI (as defined by the MITI criteria) was achieved, ranging from 73.9 % for the 'MI adherent behaviour' variable in the pregnancy phase to 6.7 % for 'percentage of questions coded as open' in the infancy phase. The results suggest that it is possible to deliver a structured programme in an MI-consistent way. However, some of the behaviours regarded as key to MI practice such as the percentage of questions coded as open can be more difficult to achieve in such a context. This is an

  18. Meeting in the MIDDLE:BUILDING off Regional Policies to Promote Climate Education Partnerships on and off Campus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griswold, M.; Stylinski, C.; Shea, N.; Veron, D. E.; Merrill, J.

    2013-12-01

    Both the impacts of climate change and the choices available to adapt and mitigate climate change largely function at the regional scale. Understanding and addressing climate change will require a concerted campaign involving a diverse array of educations from small to large organizations. By focusing on a specific region's climate impacts, adaptation and mitigation options, and existing policies, climate education networks will likely have a higher likelihood of sustainability. Building on this concept, we have developed a climate education partnership, Maryland Delaware Climate Change Education, Assessment and Research (MADE CLEAR), to better understand effective ways to support formal-, informal- and higher-education practitioners in climate change education in this Mid-Atlantic region. We do so largely through face-to-face and web based professional development for each education practitioner group to improve their capacity to incorporate rigorous regionally-based climate science and solutions into their education strategies. We are promoting communities-of-practice within and across these groups as they share their successes and challenges and consider common messages and approaches. Our training and resources focus on impacts and solutions most relevant to our region including sea level rise, extreme events, and urban heat impacts. Our professional development approach aligns directly with existing education and natural resource, including the region's environmental literacy initiatives, the Next Generation Science Standards, and state climate adaptation and mitigation plans. We anticipate that by building off of existing policy, we will build the success of the network into the future. Our project includes design-based research of all three education groups, and thus we will identify effective climate change education strategies, in and out of schools, that are applicable in other regions.

  19. Public-private partnerships to build human capacity in low income countries: findings from the Pfizer program

    PubMed Central

    Vian, Taryn; Richards, Sarah C; McCoy, Kelly; Connelly, Patrick; Feeley, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Background The ability of health organizations in developing countries to expand access to quality services depends in large part on organizational and human capacity. Capacity building includes professional development of staff, as well as efforts to create working environments conducive to high levels of performance. The current study evaluated an approach to public-private partnership where corporate volunteers give technical assistance to improve organizational and staff performance. From 2003 to 2005, the Pfizer Global Health Fellows program sent 72 employees to work with organizations in 19 countries. This evaluation was designed to assess program impact. Methods The researchers administered a survey to 60 Fellows and 48 Pfizer Supervisors. In addition, the team conducted over 100 interviews with partner organization staff and other key informants during site visits in Uganda, Kenya, Ghana, South Africa and India, the five countries where 60% of Fellows were placed. Results Over three-quarters of Fellowships appear to have imparted skills or enhanced operations of NGOs in HIV/AIDS and other health programs. Overall, 79% of Fellows reported meeting all or most technical assistance goals. Partner organization staff reported that the Fellows provided training to clinical and research personnel; strengthened laboratory, pharmacy, financial control, and human resource management systems; and helped expand Partner organization networks. Local staff also reported the Program changed their work habits and attitudes. The evaluation identified problems in defining goals of Fellowships and matching Organizations with Fellows. Capacity building success also appears related to size and sophistication of partner organization. Conclusion Public expectations have grown regarding the role corporations should play in improving health systems in developing countries. Corporate philanthropy programs based on "donations" of personnel can help build the organizational and human

  20. Building Bridges Between EPO Professionals Across Scientific Disciplines: Partnerships with NSF Centers (First Steps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, D.; Black, K.; Schultz, S.

    2010-08-01

    NASA, NSF and other funding organizations support science education and outreach to achieve their broader impact goals. Organizations like ASP and the NSF Research Centers Educators Network (NRCEN) are building networks of education and public outreach (EPO) professionals to enhance programmatic success in reaching these goals. As the professionals who provide these programs to the various scientific communities, we are often the key connectors between investigators at cutting-edge research centers, the education world and the public. However, our profession does not have strong ties for sharing best practices across the different scientific disciplines. To develop those ties, we need to identify our common interests and build on them by sharing lessons learned and best practices. We will use the technique of concept mapping to develop a schematic of how each of us addresses our broader impact goals and discuss the common and divergent features. We will also present the education and outreach logic model that was recently developed by the 27 Education Directors of NSF-funded Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers (MRSEC). Building on this information, we will collaboratively develop a list of key areas of similar interest between ASP and NRCEN EPO professionals.

  1. Guiding Principles And A Decision-Making Framework For Stakeholders Pursuing Healthy Food Environments.

    PubMed

    Kraak, Vivica I; Story, Mary

    2015-11-01

    To address obesity and diet-related chronic diseases in the United States, organizations such as the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Institute of Medicine have encouraged the use of voluntary engagement strategies among stakeholders. By using public-private partnerships as well as networks, alliances, and coalitions, voluntary engagement can translate evidence-informed dietary recommendations into effective policies and actions and into innovative products and services. We offer six guiding principles and a decision-making framework that stakeholders can use to ensure that partnerships are accountable and effective in their pursuit of health-related goals. We apply the principles and framework to four national partnerships of US food, beverage, and food retail industry stakeholders working to prevent child obesity and to promote healthy food environments through product reformulation and healthy food retail incentives. We conclude that partnerships should be evaluated for their synergy, accountability, and effectiveness at achieving the partners' objectives. Independent evaluations will help build credibility and public trust in the capacity of voluntary engagement strategies to promote healthy food environments and positively influence public health.

  2. 77 FR 7124 - Information Sharing With Agency Stakeholders; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Information Sharing With Agency Stakeholders; Public Meeting... (APHIS) is soliciting feedback from our stakeholders in several areas having to do with our partnerships... modernization initiatives and to provide an opportunity for stakeholders to share their thoughts on...

  3. Patient and Stakeholder Engagement in the PCORI Pilot Projects: Description and Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, Laura P; Ellis, Lauren E; Edmundson, Lauren; Sabharwal, Raj; Rein, Alison; Konopka, Kristen; Frank, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Patients and healthcare stakeholders are increasingly becoming engaged in the planning and conduct of biomedical research. However, limited research characterizes this process or its impact. We aimed to characterize patient and stakeholder engagement in the 50 Pilot Projects funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), and identify early contributions and lessons learned. A self-report instrument was completed by researchers between 6 and 12 months following project initiation. Forty-seven principal investigators or their designees (94 % response rate) participated in the study. MAIN MEASURES Self-report of types of stakeholders engaged, stages and levels of engagement, facilitators and barriers to engagement, lessons learned, and contributions from engagement were measured. Most (83 %) reported engaging more than one stakeholder in their project. Among those, the most commonly reported groups were patients (90 %), clinicians (87 %), health system representatives (44 %), caregivers (41 %), and advocacy organizations (41 %). Stakeholders were commonly involved in topic solicitation, question development, study design, and data collection. Many projects engaged stakeholders in data analysis, results interpretation, and dissemination. Commonly reported contributions included changes to project methods, outcomes or goals; improvement of measurement tools; and interpretation of qualitative data. Investigators often identified communication and shared leadership strategies as "critically important" facilitators (53 and 44 % respectively); lack of stakeholder time was the most commonly reported challenge (46 %). Most challenges were only partially resolved. Early lessons learned included the importance of continuous and genuine partnerships, strategic selection of stakeholders, and accommodation of stakeholders' practical needs. PCORI Pilot Projects investigators report engaging a variety of stakeholders across many stages of research, with specific

  4. Building better research partnerships by understanding how Aboriginal health communities perceive and use data: a semistructured interview study

    PubMed Central

    Young, Christian; Tong, Allison; Sherriff, Simone; Kalucy, Deanna; Fernando, Peter; Muthayya, Sumithra; Craig, Jonathan C

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the attitudes and beliefs of health professionals working in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) towards the access, usage and potential value of routinely obtained clinical and research data. Design, setting and participants Face-to-face, semistructured interviews were conducted with 35 health professionals from 2 urban and 1 regional ACCHS in New South Wales. The interviews were transcribed and themes were identified using an adapted grounded theory approach. Results Six major themes were identified: occupational engagement (day-to-day relevance, contingent on professional capacity, emphasising clinical relevance), trust and assurance (protecting ownership, confidence in narratives, valuing local sources), motivation and empowerment (engaging the community, influencing morale, reassuring and encouraging clients), building research capacity (using cultural knowledge, promoting research aptitude, prioritising specific data), optimising service provision (necessity for sustainable services, guiding and improving services, supporting best practice), and enhancing usability (ensuring ease of comprehension, improving efficiency of data management, valuing accuracy and accessibility). Conclusions Participants were willing to learn data handling procedures that could further enhance health service delivery and enable more ACCHS-led research, but busy workloads restrict these opportunities. Staff held concerns regarding the translation of research data into beneficial services, and believed that the outcome and purpose of data collection could be communicated more clearly. Promoting research partnerships, ensuring greater awareness of positive health data and the purposes of data collection, and communicating data in a user-friendly format are likely to encourage greater data use, build research capacity and improve health services within the Aboriginal community. PMID:27113239

  5. Building better research partnerships by understanding how Aboriginal health communities perceive and use data: a semistructured interview study.

    PubMed

    Young, Christian; Tong, Allison; Sherriff, Simone; Kalucy, Deanna; Fernando, Peter; Muthayya, Sumithra; Craig, Jonathan C

    2016-04-25

    To describe the attitudes and beliefs of health professionals working in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) towards the access, usage and potential value of routinely obtained clinical and research data. Face-to-face, semistructured interviews were conducted with 35 health professionals from 2 urban and 1 regional ACCHS in New South Wales. The interviews were transcribed and themes were identified using an adapted grounded theory approach. Six major themes were identified: occupational engagement (day-to-day relevance, contingent on professional capacity, emphasising clinical relevance), trust and assurance (protecting ownership, confidence in narratives, valuing local sources), motivation and empowerment (engaging the community, influencing morale, reassuring and encouraging clients), building research capacity (using cultural knowledge, promoting research aptitude, prioritising specific data), optimising service provision (necessity for sustainable services, guiding and improving services, supporting best practice), and enhancing usability (ensuring ease of comprehension, improving efficiency of data management, valuing accuracy and accessibility). Participants were willing to learn data handling procedures that could further enhance health service delivery and enable more ACCHS-led research, but busy workloads restrict these opportunities. Staff held concerns regarding the translation of research data into beneficial services, and believed that the outcome and purpose of data collection could be communicated more clearly. Promoting research partnerships, ensuring greater awareness of positive health data and the purposes of data collection, and communicating data in a user-friendly format are likely to encourage greater data use, build research capacity and improve health services within the Aboriginal community. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Biodiversity prospecting in Nigeria: seeking equity and reciprocity in intellectual property rights through partnership arrangements and capacity building.

    PubMed

    Iwu, M M

    1996-04-01

    The regulation of genetic materials in Nigeria for the isolation of biologically active compounds and/or their exportation from the country fall under the purview of several government departments and parastatals. In principle, biological resources are considered similar to any other natural resource with different levels of stake holders. Specific restrictions, however, apply to the export of food crops. Nigeria is a traditional society where most of biodiversity belongs to what could be appropriately classified as public domain. It has therefore not been easy to carve out property rights from what is generally regarded as communal resources. Private access and occupancy of land and tenure are derived mainly from rights of membership of kindred groups or as custodian of "family' inheritance. The multi-state federal structure allows for negotiations to be conducted mainly at the level of the various State Government Departments responsible for forest resources, and the Federal Government providing the necessary policy guidelines and regulations. The Bioresources Development and Conservation Programme (BDCP), an international NGO based in Nigeria, has adopted an innovative model for biological prospecting based on establishing strategic partnerships and capacity building.

  7. Climate Literacy Partnership in the Southeast (CLiPSE): A Focus on Climate Change-related Dialogs with Faith-Based Groups as a form of Network Building in the Southeast United States - Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, F. J.; McNeal, K. S.; Hammerman, J.; Christiansen, J.

    2013-05-01

    The Climate Literacy Partnership in the Southeast (CLiPSE, http://CLiPSE-project.org), funded through the National Science Foundation Climate Change Education Partnership program, is dedicated to improving climate literacy in the Southeastern United States (SE US). By promoting science-based formal and informal educational resources, CLiPSE works through a diverse network of key partner organizations in the SE US to conduct effective public dialogues that address diverse audiences and support learning about climate, climate change, and its impact on human and environmental systems. The CLiPSE project successfully created partnerships with more than fifty key stakeholders, including agriculture, education, leisure, and religious organizations, along with culturally diverse communities. This presentation will explain the CLiPSE model for reaching key publics who hold traditional ideologies typically perceived as incompatible with climate change science. We will discuss the results of our interactions with the leaders of our partnering organizations, their knowledge, perceptions, needs, and input in crafting effective messages for their audiences, through addressing both learners' affective and cognitive domains. For the informal education sector, CLiPSE utilized several open discussion and learning forums aimed to promote critical thinking and civil conversation about climate change. Focusing on Faith-based audiences, a key demographic, in the Southeast US, CLiPSE also conducted an online, moderated, author-attended book study, discussing the thoughts and ideas contained in the work, "Green Like God," by Jonathan Merritt. We will share the questions we faced as we focused on and learned about faith-based audiences, such as: What are the barriers and opportunities?; How do we break out of the assumptions that we have to find the common ground?; How do the audiences understand the issues?; How do we understand the issues?; What common language can we find?; What

  8. Successful VET Partnerships in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guenther, John; Kilpatrick, Sue

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports findings of the first phase of a study conducted to investigate the factors that contribute to the success of partnerships between vocational education and training (VET) providers and community/industry, and the processes partnerships employ to produce quality learning outcomes for individuals and other stakeholders, including…

  9. Partnerships for development: municipal solid waste management in Kasese, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Christensen, David; Drysdale, David; Hansen, Kenneth; Vanhille, Josefine; Wolf, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Municipal solid waste management systems of many developing countries are commonly constrained by factors such as limited financial resources and poor governance, making it a difficult proposition to break with complex, entrenched and unsustainable technologies and systems. This article highlights strategic partnerships as a way to affect a distributed agency among several sets of stakeholders to break so-called path dependencies, which occur when such unsustainable pathways arise, stabilize and become self-reinforcing over time. Experiences from a North-South collaborative effort provide some lessons in such partnership building: In Uganda and Denmark, respectively, the World Wildlife Fund and the network organization access2innovation have mobilized stakeholders around improving the municipal solid waste management system in Kasese District. Through a municipal solid waste management system characterization and mapping exercise, some emergent lessons and guiding principles in partnership building point to both pitfalls and opportunities for designing sustainable pathways. First, socio-technical lock-in effects in the municipal solid waste management system can stand in the way of partnerships based on introducing biogas or incineration technologies. However, opportunities in the municipal solid waste management system can exist within other areas, and synergies can be sought with interlinking systems, such as those represented with sanitation.

  10. An Academic-Government-Faith Partnership to Build Disaster Mental Health Preparedness and Community Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Semon, Natalie L.; Lating, Jeffrey M.; Everly, George S.; Perry, Charlene J.; Moore, Suzanne Straub; Mosley, Adrian M.; Thompson, Carol B.; Links, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Faculty and affiliates of the Johns Hopkins Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Center partnered with local health departments and faith-based organizations to develop a dual-intervention model of capacity-building for public mental health preparedness and community resilience. Project objectives included (1) determining the feasibility of the tri-partite collaborative concept; (2) designing, delivering, and evaluating psychological first aid (PFA) training and guided preparedness planning (GPP); and (3) documenting preliminary evidence of the sustainability and impact of the model. Methods We evaluated intervention effectiveness by analyzing pre- and post-training changes in participant responses on knowledge-acquisition tests administered to three urban and four rural community cohorts. Changes in percent of correct items and mean total correct items were evaluated. Criteria for model sustainability and impact were, respectively, observations of nonacademic partners engaging in efforts to advance post-project preparedness alliances, and project-attributable changes in preparedness-related practices of local or state governments. Results The majority (11 of 14) test items addressing technical or practical PFA content showed significant improvement; we observed comparable testing results for GPP training. Government and faith partners developed ideas and tools for sustaining preparedness activities, and numerous project-driven changes in local and state government policies were documented. Conclusions Results suggest that the model could be an effective approach to promoting public health preparedness and community resilience. PMID:25355980

  11. Building an academic-community partnership for increasing representation of minorities in the health professions.

    PubMed

    Erwin, Katherine; Blumenthal, Daniel S; Chapel, Thomas; Allwood, L Vernon

    2004-11-01

    We evaluated collaboration among academic and community partners in a program to recruit African American youth into the health professions. Six institutions of higher education, an urban school system, two community organizations, and two private enterprises became partners to create a health career pipeline for this population. The pipeline consisted of 14 subprograms designed to enrich academic science curricula, stimulate the interest of students in health careers, and facilitate entry into professional schools and other graduate-level educational programs. Subprogram directors completed questionnaires regarding a sense of common mission/vision and coordination/collaboration three times during the 3-year project. The partners strongly shared a common mission and vision throughout the duration of the program, although there was some weakening in the last phase. Subprogram directors initially viewed coordination/collaboration as weak, but by midway through the project period viewed it as stronger. Feared loss of autonomy was foremost among several factors that threatened collaboration among the partners. Collaboration was improved largely through a process of building trust among the partners.

  12. An academic-government-faith partnership to build disaster mental health preparedness and community resilience.

    PubMed

    McCabe, O Lee; Semon, Natalie L; Lating, Jeffrey M; Everly, George S; Perry, Charlene J; Moore, Suzanne Straub; Mosley, Adrian M; Thompson, Carol B; Links, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    Faculty and affiliates of the Johns Hopkins Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Center partnered with local health departments and faith-based organizations to develop a dual-intervention model of capacity-building for public mental health preparedness and community resilience. Project objectives included (1) determining the feasibility of the tri-partite collaborative concept; (2) designing, delivering, and evaluating psychological first aid (PFA) training and guided preparedness planning (GPP); and (3) documenting preliminary evidence of the sustainability and impact of the model. We evaluated intervention effectiveness by analyzing pre- and post-training changes in participant responses on knowledge-acquisition tests administered to three urban and four rural community cohorts. Changes in percent of correct items and mean total correct items were evaluated. Criteria for model sustainability and impact were, respectively, observations of nonacademic partners engaging in efforts to advance post-project preparedness alliances, and project-attributable changes in preparedness-related practices of local or state governments. The majority (11 of 14) test items addressing technical or practical PFA content showed significant improvement; we observed comparable testing results for GPP training. Government and faith partners developed ideas and tools for sustaining preparedness activities, and numerous project-driven changes in local and state government policies were documented. Results suggest that the model could be an effective approach to promoting public health preparedness and community resilience.

  13. If We Build It, Will They Come? A Qualitative Study of Key Stakeholder Opinions on the Implementation of a Videogame Intervention for Risk Reduction in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Hieftje, Kimberly; Crusto, Cindy A.; Montanaro, Erika; Fiellin, Lynn E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Serious games are emerging as important tools that offer an innovative approach to teach adolescents behavioral skills to avoid risky situations. PlayForward: Elm City Stories, an interactive videogame targeting risk reduction, is currently undergoing evaluation. Collecting stakeholder data on its acceptability and real-life implementation strategies is critical for successful dissemination. Materials and Methods: We collected interview data from four stakeholder groups regarding incorporating PlayForward into settings with adolescents. Transcripts were coded, creating a comprehensive code structure for each stakeholder group. Results: We conducted 40 semi-structured interviews that included 14 adolescents (aged 12–15 years; 10 boys), eight parents/guardians (all women), 12 after-school/school coordinators (nine women), and 14 community partners (13 women). We identified four themes that reflected stakeholders' perceptions about how the videogame might be implemented in real-world settings. (1) Stakeholder groups expressed that the topics of sex, alcohol, and drugs were not being taught in an educational setting. (2) Stakeholder groups saw a videogame as a viable option to teach about sex, alcohol, and drugs. (3) Stakeholder groups thought that the videogame would fit well into other settings, such as after-school programs or community organizations. (4) Some stakeholder groups highlighted additional tools that could help with implementation, such as manuals, homework assignments, and group discussion questions. Conclusion: Stakeholder groups supported the game as a delivery vehicle for targeted content, indicating high acceptability but highlighting additional tools that would aid in implementation. PMID:27336205

  14. If We Build It, Will They Come? A Qualitative Study of Key Stakeholder Opinions on the Implementation of a Videogame Intervention for Risk Reduction in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pendergrass, Tyra M; Hieftje, Kimberly; Crusto, Cindy A; Montanaro, Erika; Fiellin, Lynn E

    2016-08-01

    Serious games are emerging as important tools that offer an innovative approach to teach adolescents behavioral skills to avoid risky situations. PlayForward: Elm City Stories, an interactive videogame targeting risk reduction, is currently undergoing evaluation. Collecting stakeholder data on its acceptability and real-life implementation strategies is critical for successful dissemination. We collected interview data from four stakeholder groups regarding incorporating PlayForward into settings with adolescents. Transcripts were coded, creating a comprehensive code structure for each stakeholder group. We conducted 40 semi-structured interviews that included 14 adolescents (aged 12-15 years; 10 boys), eight parents/guardians (all women), 12 after-school/school coordinators (nine women), and 14 community partners (13 women). We identified four themes that reflected stakeholders' perceptions about how the videogame might be implemented in real-world settings. (1) Stakeholder groups expressed that the topics of sex, alcohol, and drugs were not being taught in an educational setting. (2) Stakeholder groups saw a videogame as a viable option to teach about sex, alcohol, and drugs. (3) Stakeholder groups thought that the videogame would fit well into other settings, such as after-school programs or community organizations. (4) Some stakeholder groups highlighted additional tools that could help with implementation, such as manuals, homework assignments, and group discussion questions. Stakeholder groups supported the game as a delivery vehicle for targeted content, indicating high acceptability but highlighting additional tools that would aid in implementation.

  15. Building Social Capital through the Use of an Appreciative Inquiry Theoretical Perspective in a School and University Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabrese, Raymond L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the ecology of collaboration between school and university partners using an appreciative inquiry theoretical perspective and to demonstrate how it enhances the social capital in school and university partnerships. Design/methodology/approach: A case study of a partnership of an inner-city high…

  16. Whole-School Success and Inclusive Education: Building Partnerships for Learning, Achievement, and Accountability. Special Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sailor, Wayne, Ed.

    This collection of papers examines inclusive education practices in public schools. There are 14 papers in 4 parts. Part 1, "Inclusive Education in a Context of Emerging Partnerships," includes: (1) "Devolution, School/Community/Family Partnerships, and Inclusive Education" (Wayne Sailor); (2) "The Implications of Goals 2000 for Inclusive…

  17. Whole-School Success and Inclusive Education: Building Partnerships for Learning, Achievement, and Accountability. Special Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sailor, Wayne, Ed.

    This collection of papers examines inclusive education practices in public schools. There are 14 papers in 4 parts. Part 1, "Inclusive Education in a Context of Emerging Partnerships," includes: (1) "Devolution, School/Community/Family Partnerships, and Inclusive Education" (Wayne Sailor); (2) "The Implications of Goals 2000 for Inclusive…

  18. Community ACTION Boards: An Innovative Model for Effective Community–Academic Research Partnerships

    PubMed Central

    James, Sherline; Arniella, Guedy; Bickell, Nina A.; Walker, Willie; Robinson, Virginia; Taylor, Barbara; Horowitz, Carol R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Community-based participatory research (CBPR) requires equitable partnerships between community stakeholders and academics. Traditionally, researchers relied on community advisory boards, but these boards often play a reactive role on a project-by-project basis. The East and Central Harlem Health Outcomes (ECHHO) Community Action Board (CAB), however, is an effective, proactive group. Objectives The ECHHO board sought to identify key strategies and tools to build and employ a partnership model, and to disseminate lessons learned to other community–academic partnerships. Methods Current and former board members were interviewed and a wide range of related documents was reviewed. Lessons Learned The board became effective when it prioritized action and relationship-building, across seven key domains: Shared priorities, diversity, participation, transparency, mutual respect and recognition, and personal connections. The model is depicted graphically. Conclusion Community advisory boards may benefit from attention to taking action, and to building relationships between academics and community members. PMID:22616207

  19. NASA and Public-Private Partnerships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews ways to build public-private partnerships with NASA, and the many efforts that Ames Research Center is engaged in in building partnerships with private businesses, not profit organizations and universities.

  20. Surgery and anesthesia capacity-building in resource-poor settings: description of an ongoing academic partnership in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Lipnick, Michael; Mijumbi, Cephas; Dubowitz, Gerald; Kaggwa, Samuel; Goetz, Laura; Mabweijano, Jacqueline; Jayaraman, Sudha; Kwizera, Arthur; Tindimwebwa, Joseph; Ozgediz, Doruk

    2013-03-01

    Surgery and perioperative care have been neglected in the arena of global health despite evidence of cost-effectiveness and the growing, substantial burden of surgical conditions. Various approaches to address the surgical disease crisis have been reported. This article describes the strategy of Global Partners in Anesthesia and Surgery (GPAS), an academically based, capacity-building collaboration between North American and Ugandan teaching institutions. The collaboration's projects shift away from the trainee exchange, equipment donation, and clinical service delivery models. Instead, it focuses on three locally identified objectives to improve surgical and perioperative care capacity in Uganda: workforce expansion, research, collaboration. Recruitment programs from 2007 to 2011 helped increase the number of surgery and anesthesia trainees at Mulago Hospital (Kampala, Uganda) from 20 to 40 and 2 to 19, respectively. All sponsored trainees successfully graduated and remained in the region. Postgraduate academic positions were created and filled to promote workforce retention. A local research agenda was developed, more than 15 collaborative, peer-reviewed papers have been published, and the first competitive research grant for a principal investigator in the Department of Surgery at Mulago was obtained. A local projects coordinator position and an annual conference were created and jointly funded by partnering international efforts to promote collaboration. Sub-Saharan Africa has profound unmet needs in surgery and perioperative care. This academically based model helped increase recruitment of trainees, expanded local research, and strengthened stakeholder collaboration in Uganda. Further analysis is underway to determine the impact on surgical disease burden and other important outcome measures.

  1. Value-Added Clinical Systems Learning Roles for Medical Students That Transform Education and Health: A Guide for Building Partnerships Between Medical Schools and Health Systems.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, Jed D; Lucey, Catherine; Wolpaw, Terry; Chang, Anna

    2017-05-01

    To ensure physician readiness for practice and leadership in changing health systems, an emerging three-pillar framework for undergraduate medical education integrates the biomedical and clinical sciences with health systems science, which includes population health, health care policy, and interprofessional teamwork. However, the partnerships between medical schools and health systems that are commonplace today use health systems as a substrate for learning. Educators need to transform the relationship between medical schools and health systems. One opportunity is the design of authentic workplace roles for medical students to add relevance to medical education and patient care. Based on the experiences at two U.S. medical schools, the authors describe principles and strategies for meaningful medical school-health system partnerships to engage students in value-added clinical systems learning roles. In 2013, the schools began large-scale efforts to develop novel required longitudinal, authentic health systems science curricula in classrooms and workplaces for all first-year students. In designing the new medical school-health system partnerships, the authors combined two models in an intersecting manner-Kotter's change management and Kern's curriculum development steps. Mapped to this framework, they recommend strategies for building mutually beneficial medical school-health system partnerships, including developing a shared vision and strategy and identifying learning goals and objectives; empowering broad-based action and overcoming barriers in implementation; and generating short-term wins in implementation. Applying this framework can lead to value-added clinical systems learning roles for students, meaningful medical school-health system partnerships, and a generation of future physicians prepared to lead health systems change.

  2. Partnerships for community mental health in the Asia-Pacific: principles and best-practice models across different sectors.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chee; Fraser, Julia; Goding, Margaret; Paroissien, David; Ryan, Brigid

    2013-02-01

    Stage Two of the Asia-Pacific Community Mental Health Development Project was established to document successful partnership models in community mental health care in the region. This paper summarizes the best-practice examples and principles of partnerships in community mental health across 17 Asia-Pacific countries. A series of consensus workshops between countries identified best-practice exemplars that promote or advance community mental health care in collaboration with a range of community stakeholders. These prototypes highlighted a broad range of partnerships across government, non-government and community agencies, as well as service users and family carers. From practice-based evidence, a set of 10 key principles was developed that can be applied in building partnerships for community mental health care consistent with the local cultures, communities and systems in the region. Such practical guidance can be useful to minimize fragmentation of community resources and promote effective partnerships to extend community mental health services in the region.

  3. Building Robust Community Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Diane L.

    2012-01-01

    The Antelope Valley Union High School District (AVUHSD), located in the Los Angeles, Bakersfield, and San Bernardino metro areas, receives students from eight area K-8 districts. AVUHSD is home to seven career academies with themes ranging from digital design and engineering to law and government, each of which integrates core content with…

  4. Building Robust Community Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Diane L.

    2012-01-01

    The Antelope Valley Union High School District (AVUHSD), located in the Los Angeles, Bakersfield, and San Bernardino metro areas, receives students from eight area K-8 districts. AVUHSD is home to seven career academies with themes ranging from digital design and engineering to law and government, each of which integrates core content with…

  5. Building Effective Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulder, Anne E.; Wismer, Jack N.

    In an era with corporate layoffs, budget freezes, and plant closings, Lake Michigan College (LMC) is providing job training services in the economic revitalization of Southwest Michigan. The college's Corporate and Community Development Division, in cooperation with the Berrien County Economic Development Commission and the Cornerstone Alliance,…

  6. Building Collaborative Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madigan, Jennifer C.; Schroth-Cavataio, Georganne

    2011-01-01

    Communication and professional dialogue are essential elements of a high-quality education environment in which all students can succeed. Such an environment is especially important for the success of students with special needs. Unfortunately, collaboration between special educators, general educators, and other professionals is often hindered by…

  7. Building Collaborative Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madigan, Jennifer C.; Schroth-Cavataio, Georganne

    2011-01-01

    Communication and professional dialogue are essential elements of a high-quality education environment in which all students can succeed. Such an environment is especially important for the success of students with special needs. Unfortunately, collaboration between special educators, general educators, and other professionals is often hindered by…

  8. Building Effective Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulder, Anne E.; Wismer, Jack N.

    In an era with corporate layoffs, budget freezes, and plant closings, Lake Michigan College (LMC) is providing job training services in the economic revitalization of Southwest Michigan. The college's Corporate and Community Development Division, in cooperation with the Berrien County Economic Development Commission and the Cornerstone Alliance,…

  9. Building school health programs through public health initiatives: the first three years of the Healthy Hawaii Initiative partnership for school health.

    PubMed

    Pateman, Beth; Irvin, Lola H; Shoji, Lynn; Serna, Kuulei

    2004-01-01

    The Healthy Hawaii Initiative, funded through the Hawaii tobacco settlement, allocates funds from the Hawaii Department of Health to the Hawaii Department of Education for school programs that promote health and reduce the burden of chronic disease. This article outlines progress, challenges, and insights from the first 3 years of the Hawaii Partnership for Standards-based School Health Education (the Partnership). The Hawaii Department of Education added health education as a content area to the Hawaii Content and Performance Standards in 1999. The American Cancer Society, Hawaii Pacific, Inc., convened a Comprehensive School Health Education Committee that initiated a school health professional development program for teachers. During the 2000-2001 academic year, new Healthy Hawaii Initiative funding began for school health programs. Healthy Hawaii Initiative (HHI) funding has been used to provide new state and district resource teacher positions, professional development workshops for educators, tuition waivers and materials for graduate-level summer institutes for educators, annual statewide school health conferences, and pilot school implementation of coordinated school health programs. Schools across Hawaii demonstrate clear progress in implementing standards-based school health education and coordinated school health programs. The funding has led to increased support from other sources to build school health programs. The ultimate beneficiaries of school health programs are the children and families of Hawaii. This health and education partnership continues to work toward improved health outcomes for young people as the future leaders and citizens of Hawaii.

  10. Building analytic capacity, facilitating partnerships, and promoting data use in state health agencies: a distance-based workforce development initiative applied to maternal and child health epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Kristin M; Kroelinger, Charlan D; Rosenberg, Deborah; Barfield, Wanda D

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to summarize the methodology, partnerships, and products developed as a result of a distance-based workforce development initiative to improve analytic capacity among maternal and child health (MCH) epidemiologists in state health agencies. This effort was initiated by the Centers for Disease Control's MCH Epidemiology Program and faculty at the University of Illinois at Chicago to encourage and support the use of surveillance data by MCH epidemiologists and program staff in state agencies. Beginning in 2005, distance-based training in advanced analytic skills was provided to MCH epidemiologists. To support participants, this model of workforce development included: lectures about the practical application of innovative epidemiologic methods, development of multidisciplinary teams within and across agencies, and systematic, tailored technical assistance The goal of this initiative evolved to emphasize the direct application of advanced methods to the development of state data products using complex sample surveys, resulting in the articles published in this supplement to MCHJ. Innovative methods were applied by participating MCH epidemiologists, including regional analyses across geographies and datasets, multilevel analyses of state policies, and new indicator development. Support was provided for developing cross-state and regional partnerships and for developing and publishing the results of analytic projects. This collaboration was successful in building analytic capacity, facilitating partnerships and promoting surveillance data use to address state MCH priorities, and may have broader application beyond MCH epidemiology. In an era of decreasing resources, such partnership efforts between state and federal agencies and academia are essential for promoting effective data use.

  11. Building Social Infrastructure through Public-Private Partnerships: The Case of Student Housing in Public Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Bruce Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Evaluations of Public-Private Partnership arrangements as alternatives to traditional government procurement methods for the delivery of public infrastructure projects have been anecdotal at best. This paper proposes a framework to evaluate a public university's infrastructure asset management performance and a specific measure based on a new…

  12. Building a citizen-agency partnership among diverse interests: the Colville National Forest and Northeast Washington Forestry Coalition Experience

    Treesearch

    Ryan Gordon; Angela Mallon; Carolin Maier; Linda Kruger; Bruce Shindler

    2012-01-01

    Concerns about forest health and the threat of wildfire across the Western United States increasingly provide the impetus for communities to find land management solutions that serve multiple interests. Funding and procedural changes over the past decade have positioned federal agencies to put greater emphasis on multistakeholder partnerships and public outreach...

  13. Building Social Infrastructure through Public-Private Partnerships: The Case of Student Housing in Public Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Bruce Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Evaluations of Public-Private Partnership arrangements as alternatives to traditional government procurement methods for the delivery of public infrastructure projects have been anecdotal at best. This paper proposes a framework to evaluate a public university's infrastructure asset management performance and a specific measure based on a new…

  14. Building a community-academic partnership: implementing a community-based trial of telephone cognitive behavioral therapy for rural latinos.

    PubMed

    Aisenberg, Eugene; Dwight-Johnson, Meagan; O'Brien, Mary; Ludman, Evette J; Golinelli, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Concerns about the appropriate use of EBP with ethnic minority clients and the ability of community agencies to implement and sustain EBP persist and emphasize the need for community-academic research partnerships that can be used to develop, adapt, and test culturally responsive EBP in community settings. In this paper, we describe the processes of developing a community-academic partnership that implemented and pilot tested an evidence-based telephone cognitive behavioral therapy program. Originally demonstrated to be effective for urban, middle-income, English-speaking primary care patients with major depression, the program was adapted and pilot tested for use with rural, uninsured, low-income, Latino (primarily Spanish-speaking) primary care patients with major depressive disorder in a primary care site in a community health center in rural Eastern Washington. The values of community-based participatory research and community-partnered participatory research informed each phase of this randomized clinical trial and the development of a community-academic partnership. Information regarding this partnership may guide future community practice, research, implementation, and workforce development efforts to address mental health disparities by implementing culturally tailored EBP in underserved communities.

  15. Building a Community-Academic Partnership: Implementing a Community-Based Trial of Telephone Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Rural Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Aisenberg, Eugene; Dwight-Johnson, Meagan; O'Brien, Mary; Ludman, Evette J.; Golinelli, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Concerns about the appropriate use of EBP with ethnic minority clients and the ability of community agencies to implement and sustain EBP persist and emphasize the need for community-academic research partnerships that can be used to develop, adapt, and test culturally responsive EBP in community settings. In this paper, we describe the processes of developing a community-academic partnership that implemented and pilot tested an evidence-based telephone cognitive behavioral therapy program. Originally demonstrated to be effective for urban, middle-income, English-speaking primary care patients with major depression, the program was adapted and pilot tested for use with rural, uninsured, low-income, Latino (primarily Spanish-speaking) primary care patients with major depressive disorder in a primary care site in a community health center in rural Eastern Washington. The values of community-based participatory research and community-partnered participatory research informed each phase of this randomized clinical trial and the development of a community-academic partnership. Information regarding this partnership may guide future community practice, research, implementation, and workforce development efforts to address mental health disparities by implementing culturally tailored EBP in underserved communities. PMID:23050133

  16. Building District Capacity for Data-Informed Leadership. Special Series on the Fresno-Long Beach Learning Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Helen; Hannan, Stephanie; O'Day, Jennifer; Brown, Jim

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, Fresno Unified and Long Beach Unified School Districts entered into a formal learning partnership, with the goal of preparing all students for success in higher education or for a career with significant growth potential. Though they were perhaps at different points on their growth trajectories, both districts were on similar paths, and…

  17. Academic practice-policy partnerships for health promotion research: experiences from three research programs.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Charli C-G; Fredriksson, Ingela; Fröding, Karin; Geidne, Susanna; Pettersson, Camilla

    2014-11-01

    The development of knowledge for health promotion requires an effective mechanism for collaboration between academics, practitioners, and policymakers. The challenge is better to understand the dynamic and ever-changing context of the researcher-practitioner-policymaker-community relationship. The aims were to explore the factors that foster Academic Practice Policy (APP) partnerships, and to systematically and transparently to review three cases. Three partnerships were included: Power and Commitment-Alcohol and Drug Prevention by Non-Governmental Organizations in Sweden; Healthy City-Social Inclusion, Urban Governance, and Sustainable Welfare Development; and Empowering Families with Teenagers-Ideals and Reality in Karlskoga and Degerfors. The analysis includes searching for evidence for three hypotheses concerning contextual factors in multi-stakeholder collaboration, and the cumulative effects of partnership synergy. APP partnerships emerge during different phases of research and development. Contextual factors are important; researchers need to be trusted by practitioners and politicians. During planning, it is important to involve the relevant partners. During the implementation phase, time is important. During data collection and capacity building, it is important to have shared objectives for and dialogues about research. Finally, dissemination needs to be integrated into any partnership. The links between process and outcomes in participatory research (PR) can be described by the theory of partnership synergy, which includes consideration of how PR can ensure culturally and logistically appropriate research, enhance recruitment capacity, and generate professional capacity and competence in stakeholder groups. Moreover, there are PR synergies over time. The fundamentals of a genuine partnership are communication, collaboration, shared visions, and willingness of all stakeholders to learn from one another. © 2014 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  18. State Action 5: Role-Based, Timely Access to Information for Authorized Stakeholders. State Actions to Change the Culture around Data--from Building to Using Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Quality Campaign, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Data are only useful if people are able to access, understand and use them. Without access to the right information, stakeholders are forced to make decisions based on anecdote, experience or instinct. For information to be useful, it must be timely, readily available, and easy to understand. This brief highlights the importance of implementing…

  19. Stakeholder engagement in dredged material management decisions.

    PubMed

    Collier, Zachary A; Bates, Matthew E; Wood, Matthew D; Linkov, Igor

    2014-10-15

    Dredging and disposal issues often become controversial with local stakeholders because of their competing interests. These interests tend to manifest themselves in stakeholders holding onto entrenched positions, and deadlock can result without a methodology to move the stakeholder group past the status quo. However, these situations can be represented as multi-stakeholder, multi-criteria decision problems. In this paper, we describe a case study in which multi-criteria decision analysis was implemented in a multi-stakeholder setting in order to generate recommendations on dredged material placement for Long Island Sound's Dredged Material Management Plan. A working-group of representatives from various stakeholder organizations was formed and consulted to help prioritize sediment placement sites for each dredging center in the region by collaboratively building a multi-criteria decision model. The resulting model framed the problem as several alternatives, criteria, sub-criteria, and metrics relevant to stakeholder interests in the Long Island Sound region. An elicitation of values, represented as criteria weights, was then conducted. Results show that in general, stakeholders tended to agree that all criteria were at least somewhat important, and on average there was strong agreement on the order of preferences among the diverse groups of stakeholders. By developing the decision model iteratively with stakeholders as a group and soliciting their preferences, the process sought to increase stakeholder involvement at the front-end of the prioritization process and lead to increased knowledge and consensus regarding the importance of site-specific criteria.

  20. Building Global Partnerships: Cooperative Maritime Security Operations as the Most Effective Fire of 21st Century Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-31

    participation based on the two benefits previously listed. The nature of the partnership must now be determined. Will it be a coalition of equals or...the fundamental bases of international cooperation. That equality is in its turn founded upon a mutual respect, no matter how the military force or...cooperative will vary based on its means and force structure. What is most important for the ultimate success of this cooperative effort is that each nation

  1. Public-academic partnerships: improving care for older persons with schizophrenia through an academic-community partnership.

    PubMed

    Lindamer, Laurie A; Lebowitz, Barry D; Hough, Richard L; Garcia, Piedad; Aquirre, Alfredo; Halpain, Maureen C; Depp, Colin; Jeste, Dilip V

    2008-03-01

    Translating evidence-based mental health interventions designed in research settings into community practice is a priority for multiple stakeholders. Partnerships between academic and public institutions can facilitate this translation. To improve care for middle-aged and older adults with schizophrenia, the authors developed a collaboration between a university research center and a public mental health service system using principles from community-based participatory research and cultural exchange theory. They describe the process that has led to a number of mutually beneficial products. Despite the challenges involved, building and maintaining academic-public collaborations will be essential for improving mental health care for persons with schizophrenia.

  2. Funding renal replacement therapy in southeast Asia: building public-private partnerships in Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, and Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Morad, Zaki; Choong, Hui Lin; Tungsanga, Kriang; Suhardjono

    2015-05-01

    The provision of renal replacement therapy (RRT) in developing economies is limited by lack of financial and other resources. There are no national reimbursement policies for RRT in many countries in Asia. The Southeast Asia countries of Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, and Indonesia have adopted a strategy of encouraging public-private partnerships to increase the RRT rates in their respective countries. The private organizations include both for-profit and philanthropic bodies. The latter raise funds from ordinary citizens, corporations, and faith-based groups, as well as receive subsidies from the government to support RRT for patients in need. The kidney foundations of these countries play a leadership role in this public-private partnership. Many of the private organizations that support RRT are providers of treatment in addition to offering financial assistance to patients, with hemodialysis being the most frequently supported modality. Public-private partnership in funding RRT is sustainable over the long term with proper organization and facilitated by support from the government.

  3. Social firms: building cross-sectoral partnerships to create employment opportunity and supportive workplaces for people with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Paluch, Tamar; Fossey, Ellie; Harvey, Carol

    2012-01-01

    A major barrier to employment for people with mental illness is limited access to supportive and non-discriminatory workplaces. Social firms are businesses committed to employing up to 50% of people with a disability or other disadvantage and to providing supportive work environments that benefit workers. Little research has been conducted to understand the features and social processes that support the vocational experiences of employees with mental health issues in social firms. This ethnographic study sought to explore the experiences of nine employees at one Australian social firm. Nine employees of a social firm, with and without mental illness. Study methods used included participant observation, interviewing and document analysis. The study highlights the complexity of running a socially-invested business, and the importance of cross-sectoral partnerships to support their operational success. Natural workplace supports, adequate training and support infrastructure and enabling participation in the business, were identified as important to creating a supportive workplace. Partnerships within the workplace and in support of the workplace are discussed. Future growth and development of partnerships are recommended to support the establishment of social firms.

  4. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-11-01

    Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Deliverables for the 7th Quarter reporting period include (1) for the geological efforts: Reports on Technology Needs and Action Plan on the Evaluation of Geological Sinks and Pilot Project Deployment (Deliverables 2 and 3), and Report on the Feasibility of Mineralization Trapping in the Snake River Plain Basin (Deliverable 14); (2) for the terrestrial efforts: Report on the Evaluation of Terrestrial Sinks and a Report of the Best Production Practices for Soil C Sequestration (Deliverables 8 and 15). In addition, the 7th Quarter activities for the Partnership included further development of the proposed activities for the deployment and demonstration phase of the carbon sequestration pilots including geological and terrestrial pilots, expansion of the Partnership to encompass regions and institutions that are complimentary to the steps we have identified, building greater collaborations with industry and stakeholders in the region, contributed to outreach efforts that spanned all partnerships, co-authorship on the Carbon Capture and Separation report, and developed a regional basis to address future energy opportunities in the region. The deliverables and activities are discussed in the following sections and appended to this report. The education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The public website has been expanded and integrated with the GIS carbon atlas. We have made presentations to stakeholders and policy makers including two tribal sequestration workshops, and made connections to other federal and

  5. Collaborative partnership in age-friendly cities: two case studies from Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Garon, Suzanne; Paris, Mario; Beaulieu, Marie; Veil, Anne; Laliberté, Andréanne

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to explain the collaborative partnership conditions and factors that foster implementation effectiveness within the age-friendly cities (AFC) in Quebec (AFC-QC), Canada. Based on a community-building approach that emphasizes collaborative partnership, the AFC-QC implementation process is divided into three steps: (1) social diagnostic of older adults' needs; (2) an action plan based on a logic model; and (3) implementation through collaborations. AFC-QC promotes direct involvement of older adults and seniors' associations at each of the three steps of the implementation process, as well as other stakeholders in the community. Based on two contrasting case studies, this article illustrates the importance of collaborative partnership for the success of AFC implementation. Results show that stakeholders, agencies, and organizations are exposed to a new form of governance where coordination and collaborative partnership among members of the steering committee are essential. Furthermore, despite the importance of the senior associations' participation in the process, they encountered significant limits in the capacity of implementing age-friendly environments solely by themselves. In conclusion, we identify the main collaborative partnership conditions and factors in AFC-QC.

  6. Global medical education partnerships to expand specialty expertise: a case report on building neurology clinical and research capacity.

    PubMed

    Kaddumukasa, Mark; Katabira, Elly; Salata, Robert A; Costa, Marco A; Ddumba, Edward; Furlan, Anthony; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Kamya, Moses R; Kayima, James; Longenecker, Chris T; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Mondo, Charles; Moore, Shirley; Pundik, Svetlana; Sewankambo, Nelson; Simon, Daniel I; Smyth, Kathleen A; Sajatovic, Martha

    2014-12-30

    Neurological disorders are a common cause of morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan African, but resources for their management are scarce. Collaborations between training institutions in developed and resource-limited countries can be a successful model for supporting specialty medical education and increasing clinical and research capacity. This report describes a US National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) to enhance expertise in neurology, developed between Makerere University College of Health Sciences in Kampala, Uganda, and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, OH, USA. This collaborative model is based on a successful medical education and research model that has been developed over the past two decades. The Ugandan and US teams have accumulated knowledge and 'lessons learned' that facilitate specialty expertise in neurological conditions, which are widespread and associated with substantial disability in resource-limited countries. Strengths of the model include a focus on community health care settings and a strong research component. Key elements include strong local leadership; use of remote technology, templates to standardize performance; shared exchanges; mechanisms to optimize sustainability and of dissemination activities that expand impact of the original initiative. Efficient collaborations are further enhanced by external and institutional support, and can be sequentially refined. Models such as the Makerere University College of Health Sciences - Case Western Reserve University partnership may help other groups initiate collaborative education programmes and establish successful partnerships that may provide the opportunity to expand to other chronic diseases. A benefit of collaboration is that learning is two-directional, and interaction with other international medical education collaborators is likely to be of benefit to the larger global health community.

  7. The Tribal Lands Collaboratory: Building partnerships and developing tools to support local Tribal community response to climate change.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. D.; Wee, B.; Kuslikis, A.

    2015-12-01

    Response of Tribal nations and Tribal communities to current and emerging climate change challenges requires active participation of stakeholders who have effective access to relevant data, information and analytical tools. The Tribal Lands Collaboratory (TLC), currently under development, is a joint effort between the American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC), the Environmental Systems Research Institute (Esri), and the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON). The vision of the TLC is to create an integrative platform that enables coordination between multiple stakeholders (e.g. Tribal resource managers, Tribal College faculty and students, farmers, ranchers, and other local community members) to collaborate on locally relevant climate change issues. The TLC is intended to facilitate the transformation of data into actionable information that can inform local climate response planning. The TLC will provide the technical mechanisms to access, collect and analyze data from both internal and external sources (e.g. NASA's Giovanni climate data portal, Ameriflux or USA National Phenology Network) while also providing the social scaffolds to enable collaboration across Tribal communities and with members of the national climate change research community. The prototype project focuses on phenology, a branch of science focused on relationships between climate and the seasonal timing of biological phenomena. Monitoring changes in the timing and duration of phenological stages in plant and animal co­­­­mmunities on Tribal lands can provide insight to the direct impacts of climate change on culturally and economically significant Tribal resources . The project will leverage existing phenological observation protocols created by the USA-National Phenology Network and NEON to direct data collection efforts and will be tailored to the specific needs and concerns of the community. Phenology observations will be captured and managed within the Collaboratory

  8. Implementation of an innovative grant programme to build partnerships between researchers, decision-makers and practitioners: the experience of the Quebec Social Research Council.

    PubMed

    Antil, Thomas; Desrochers, Mireille; Joubert, Pierre; Bouchard, Camil

    2003-10-01

    This paper examines a grant programme developed by the Quebec Social Research Council in the 1990s to encourage the building of research partnerships between researchers, decision-makers and practitioners. In particular, it studies the perceptions of key participants concerning the reasons behind the programme's successful implementation and growth. In addition to secondary data about institutional involvement in the programme, 10 researchers and administrators were consulted as key informants. The method of concept mapping was used in order to draw out a consensus on the different factors associated with the successful implementation of the programme. The participants identified 10 main factors that help explain the programme's successful implementation. These factors were then grouped into a model containing four dimensions: the leadership and coherence shown in the programme's implementation; the presence of a favourable political and social conjuncture; the programme's responsiveness to the needs of health and social services institutions; and the programme's responsiveness to the needs of the university milieu. Although this model remains specific to the prevailing situation in Quebec at the time of its application, it may help stimulate reflection and contribute to an understanding of how research policies can encourage partnerships between researchers, practitioners and decision-makers.

  9. The Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI), a collaborative paradigm for institutional and human resources capacity building between high- and low- and middle-income countries: the Mozambique experience.

    PubMed

    Virgínia Noormahomed, Emília; Carrilho, Carla; Ismail, Mamudo; Noormahomed, Sérgio; Nguenha, Alcido; Benson, Constance A; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Schooley, Robert T

    2017-01-01

    Collaborations among researchers based in lower and middle income countries (LMICs) and high income countries (HICs) have made major discoveries related to diseases disproportionately affecting LMICs and have been vital to the development of research communities in LMICs. Such collaborations have generally been scientifically and structurally driven by HICs. In this report we outline a paradigm shift in collaboration, exemplified by the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI), in which the formulation of priorities and administrative infrastructure reside in the LMIC. This descriptive report outlines the critical features of the MEPI partnership. In the MEPI, LMIC program partners translate broad program goals and define metrics into priorities that are tailored to local conditions. Program funds flow to a LMIC-based leadership group that contracts with peers from HICs to provide technical and scientific advice and consultation in a 'reverse funds flow' model. Emphasis is also placed on strengthening administrative capacity within LMIC institutions. A rigorous monitoring and evaluation process modifies program priorities on the basis of evolving opportunities to maximize program impact. Vesting LMIC partners with the responsibility for program leadership, and building administrative and fiscal capacity in LMIC institutions substantially enhances program relevance, impact and sustainability.

  10. The Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI), a collaborative paradigm for institutional and human resources capacity building between high- and low- and middle-income countries: the Mozambique experience

    PubMed Central

    Virgínia Noormahomed, Emília; Carrilho, Carla; Ismail, Mamudo; Noormahomed, Sérgio; Nguenha, Alcido; Benson, Constance A.; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Schooley, Robert T.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Collaborations among researchers based in lower and middle income countries (LMICs) and high income countries (HICs) have made major discoveries related to diseases disproportionately affecting LMICs and have been vital to the development of research communities in LMICs. Such collaborations have generally been scientifically and structurally driven by HICs. Objectives: In this report we outline a paradigm shift in collaboration, exemplified by the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI), in which the formulation of priorities and administrative infrastructure reside in the LMIC. Methods: This descriptive report outlines the critical features of the MEPI partnership. Results: In the MEPI, LMIC program partners translate broad program goals and define metrics into priorities that are tailored to local conditions. Program funds flow to a LMIC-based leadership group that contracts with peers from HICs to provide technical and scientific advice and consultation in a 'reverse funds flow' model. Emphasis is also placed on strengthening administrative capacity within LMIC institutions. A rigorous monitoring and evaluation process modifies program priorities on the basis of evolving opportunities to maximize program impact. Conclusions: Vesting LMIC partners with the responsibility for program leadership, and building administrative and fiscal capacity in LMIC institutions substantially enhances program relevance, impact and sustainability. PMID:28452653

  11. Building a discovery partnership with Sarawak Biodiversity Centre: a gateway to access natural products from the rainforests.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Tiong Chia; Naming, Margarita; Manurung, Rita

    2014-03-01

    The Sarawak Biodiversity Centre (SBC) is a state government agency which regulates research and promotes the sustainable use of biodiversity. It has a program on documentation of traditional knowledge (TK) and is well-equipped with facilities for natural product research. SBC maintains a Natural Product Library (NPL) consisting of local plant and microbial extracts for bioprospecting. The NPL is a core discovery platform for screening of bioactive compounds by researchers through a formal agreement with clear benefit sharing obligations. SBC aims to develop partnerships with leading institutions and the industries to explore the benefits of biodiversity.

  12. A Canadian model for building university and community partnerships: centre for research & education on violence against women and children.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Peter G; Berman, Helene; MacQuarrie, Barb

    2011-09-01

    The importance of Canadian research on violence against women became a national focus after the 1989 murder of 14 women at École Polytechnique in Montreal. This tragedy led to several federal government studies that identified a need to develop centers for applied research and community-university alliances on violence against women. One such center is the Centre for Research & Education on Violence against Women and Children. The Centre was founded in London, Canada in 1992 out of a partnership of a university, a community college, and community services. The centre's history and current activities are summarized as a model for the development and sustainability of similar centers.

  13. Community ACTION boards: an innovative model for effective community-academic research partnerships.

    PubMed

    James, Sherline; Arniella, Guedy; Bickell, Nina A; Walker, Willie; Robinson, Virginia; Taylor, Barbara; Horowitz, Carol R

    2011-01-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) requires equitable partnerships between community stakeholders and academics. Traditionally, researchers relied on community advisory boards, but these boards often play a reactive role limited to a project-by-project basis. The East and Central Harlem Health Outcomes (ECHHO) Community Action Board (CAB), however, is an effective, proactive group. The ECHHO board sought to identify key strategies and tools used to build and sustain the model, and to disseminate lessons learned to other community-academic partnerships. Current and former board members were interviewed and a wide range of related documents was reviewed. The board became effective when it prioritized action and relationship-building, across seven key domains: Shared priorities, diversity, participation, transparency, mutual respect and recognition, and personal connections. The model is depicted graphically. Community advisory boards may benefit from reduced emphasis on protocols and procedures, and increased attention to building relationships between academics and community members.

  14. Dual-track CCS stakeholder engagement: Lessons learned from FutureGen in Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hund, G.; Greenberg, S.E.

    2011-01-01

    FutureGen, as originally planned, was to be the world's first coal-fueled, near-zero emissions power plant with fully integrated, 90% carbon capture and storage (CCS). From conception through siting and design, it enjoyed strong support from multiple stakeholder groups, which benefited the overall project. Understanding the stakeholder engagement process for this project provides valuable insights into the design of stakeholder programs for future CCS projects. FutureGen is one of few projects worldwide that used open competition for siting both the power plant and storage reservoir. Most site proposals were coordinated by State governments. It was unique in this and other respects relative to the site selection method used on other DOE-supported projects. At the time of site selection, FutureGen was the largest proposed facility designed to combine an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) coal-fueled power plant with a CCS system. Stakeholder engagement by states and the industry consortium responsible for siting, designing, building, and operating the facility took place simultaneously and on parallel tracks. On one track were states spearheading state-wide site assessments to identify candidate sites that they wanted to propose for consideration. On the other track was a public-private partnership between an industry consortium of thirteen coal companies and electric utilities that comprised the FutureGen Alliance (Alliance) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The partnership was based on a cooperative agreement signed by both parties, which assigned the lead for siting to the Alliance. This paper describes the stakeholder engagement strategies used on both of these tracks and provides examples from the engagement process using the Illinois semi-finalist sites. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. The Partnership for Integration of Computation into Undergraduate Physics (PICUP): A Community-Building Prototype for Positively Affecting the Undergraduate Physics Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    Computation in the undergraduate curriculum is gaining significant traction in physics departments across the country, including a burgeoning effort to integrate computation into individual physics courses, both introductory and advanced, in such a way that it plays a role that is as important as non-computational mathematics in two important educational areas: (i) providing a deeper conceptual understanding of physical principles, and (ii) problem-solving. The Partnership for Integration of Computation into Undergraduate Physics (PICUP), an informal group of physics faculty from around the country, is committed to building a community of STEM educators dedicated to integrating computation into the undergraduate curriculum. One of the cornerstones of the PICUP community-building efforts is a significant online component. In this presentation, I shall describe the PICUP community-building framework, and the unique educational materials development effort that has already attracted much interest amongst physics faculty at all levels of computational physics education experience. Support for the PICUP project in the form of a grant from the National Science Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  16. The Los Angeles Healthy Community Neighborhood Initiative: A Ten Year Experience in Building and Sustaining a Successful Community-Academic Partnership

    PubMed Central

    King, Keyonna M; Morris, D’Ann; Jones, Loretta; Lucas-Wright, Aziza; Jones, Felica; del Pino, Homero E; Porter, Courtney; Vargas, Roberto; Kahn, Katherine; Brown, Arleen F; Norris, Keith C

    2016-01-01

    Background Developing effective Community-Academic Partnerships (CAPs) is challenging, and the steps to build and sustain them have not been well documented. This paper describes efforts to form and sustain the Healthy Community Neighborhood Initiative (HCNI), a CAP to improve health in a low-income community in South Los Angeles. Methods Moderated, semi-structured discussions with HCNI community and academic partners were used to develop a framework for CAP formation. Results We identified two key features, shared values and respect, as critical to the decision to form the HCNI. Five elements were identified as necessary for building and sustaining the HCNI: trust, transparency, equity and fairness, adequate resources and developing protocols to provide structure. We also identified several challenges and barriers and the strategies used in the HCNI to mitigate these challenges. Conclusion We developed a framework to incorporate and reinforce the key elements identified as crucial in building and sustaining a CAP in a low-income community. PMID:27747314

  17. Building Relationships: It's Not Always Easy, but Juggling Relationships with Board Members and Community Stakeholders Is Essential to Making Needed Campus Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collett, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    Building relationships is the essence of the community college. Higher education administrators learned long ago that building rapport with businesses, state and local government, and constituents is the best way to represent the interests of the community. But that does not make it easy. Board members come and go and the shifting dynamics of…

  18. Building Relationships: It's Not Always Easy, but Juggling Relationships with Board Members and Community Stakeholders Is Essential to Making Needed Campus Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collett, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    Building relationships is the essence of the community college. Higher education administrators learned long ago that building rapport with businesses, state and local government, and constituents is the best way to represent the interests of the community. But that does not make it easy. Board members come and go and the shifting dynamics of…

  19. Promoting a Sustainable Academic–Correctional Health Partnership: Lessons for Systemic Action Research

    PubMed Central

    Barta, William D.; Shelton, Deborah; Cepelak, Cheryl; Gallagher, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, the phenomenon of mass incarceration has created a public health crisis. One strategy for addressing this crisis involves developing a correctional agency – academic institution partnership tasked with augmenting the quality and quantity of evidence-based healthcare delivered in state prisons and attracting a greater number of health professionals to the field of correctional health research. Using a Connecticut correctional agency – academic institution partnership as a case example, the present paper examines some of the key challenges encountered over the course of a 3-year capacity-building initiative. Particular attention is given to agency and institution characteristics both at the structural level and in terms of divergent stakeholder perspectives. The authors find that future partnership development work in this area will likely benefit from close attention to predictable sources of temporal variation in agency capability to advance project-related aims. PMID:26997863

  20. GLOBE Observer and the Association of Science & Technology Centers: Leveraging Citizen Science and Partnerships for an International Science Experiment to Build Climate Literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riebeek Kohl, H.; Chambers, L. H.; Murphy, T.

    2016-12-01

    For more that 20 years, the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Program has sought to increase environment literacy in students by involving them in the process of data collection and scientific research. In 2016, the program expanded to accept observations from citizen scientists of all ages through a relatively simple app. Called GLOBE Observer, the new program aims to help participants feel connected to a global community focused on advancing the scientific understanding of Earth system science while building climate literacy among participants and increasing valuable environmental data points to expand both student and scientific research. In October 2016, GLOBE Observer partnered with the Association of Science & Technology Centers (ASTC) in an international science experiment in which museums and patrons around the world collected cloud observations through GLOBE Observer to create a global cloud map in support of NASA satellite science. The experiment was an element of the International Science Center and Science Museum Day, an event planned in partnership with UNESCO and ASTC. Museums and science centers provided the climate context for the observations, while GLOBE Observer offered a uniform experience and a digital platform to build a connected global community. This talk will introduce GLOBE Observer and will present the results of the experiment, including evaluation feedback on gains in climate literacy through the event.

  1. Building Partnerships to Address Community Geoscience Priorities: A Brief History of the Thriving Earth Exchange (TEX) Model and its Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, C.; Udu-gama, N.; Pandya, R.; Leshin, L. A.; McEntee, C.; Williams, B. M.; Goodwin, M.

    2016-12-01

    Increasingly, communities around the world are being challenged by extremes in climatic change and natural hazards and a lack of key natural resources. In many cases, such communities do not have access to the experts and resources they need to address these changes. While partnerships are being developed to address these challenges, there is a need to bring communities and scientists together equitably. Thriving Earth Exchange (TEX), a program powered by the American Geophysical Union (AGU), seeks to connect communities by offering them scientists that can work with them on developing effective solutions for their real-life climate change, natural hazards and/or natural resources challenges. TEX advocates community science - the notion that scientists and communities equitably work together to identify how science can advance local priorities such that it produces local impact, guides future research and generates solutions that can be shared. The concept for TEX evolved from 2011 AGU Council discussions on potential options for impacting AGU's upcoming Centennial. The concept started as a single "Grand Challenge" concept, but evolved through several trails and iterations to today's vibrant TEX program and model. The TEX process is not for every community or scientist. In order to ensure that a community can proceed through a project with a scientist, TEX has found that they often must have a mandate to work on the issue at hand. For instance, if a planning department is tasked with doing a climate vulnerability assessment, a project looking at how heat extremes affect the elderly could probably proceed without interruption from other internal community processes. In some cases, available funds acts as an impetus for a community to seek action. Yet at other times, an individual's passion to address a community challenge may be the spark required to turn ideas into action. This presentation will provide an overview of the TEX genesis within AGU, and its growth and

  2. Building Community Partnerships with Adults with Disabilities: A Case Study Using Narrative Literacy as a Conduit for Shared Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, David S.; Ghosh, Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Building relationships between traditional college students and adults with disabilities is an important yet little understood aspect of civic engagement. The case study presented in this paper built one such relationship by utilizing a shared narrative project to construct an equitable collaborative experience between a set of students from…

  3. Family Support: Fostering Leadership and Partnership to Improve Access and Quality. Building State Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Series, Number 14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Lisa; Uyeda, Kimberly

    2004-01-01

    The federal Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) has launched a five-year initiative that will support state efforts to build comprehensive early childhood service systems. This initiative--the State Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (SECCS) Initiative--provides planning and implementation grants to the state and territory Maternal and…

  4. Building community partnerships to end interpersonal violence: a collaboration of the schools of social work, law, and nursing.

    PubMed

    Busch-Armendariz, Noël Bridget; Johnson, Regina Jones; Buel, Sarah; Lungwitz, Jeana

    2011-09-01

    The article discusses the University of Texas at Austin's (UT Austin) Institute on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (IDVSA), an institution that was established in 2001. IDVSA is a collaboration of the Schools of Social Work, Law, and Nursing, and 150 community affiliates. Recognizing that interpersonal violence does not occur in a vacuum, the IDVSA operates within an ecological framework in which explanations for interpersonal violence acknowledge that individuals and families are nested in larger mezzo and macro systems, and factors such as gender, poverty, ethnicity, religion, disability, sexual orientation, and immigration status play influential roles in our understanding of these issues. The overarching goal is to advance knowledge and meaningful practice in the field through partnerships with survivors and community practitioners. Specifically, the mission is to advance the knowledge related to domestic violence and sexual assault in order to end interpersonal violence. IDVSA seeks to achieve its mission by focusing on three key areas: (1) rigorous research and scholarship on domestic violence and sexual assault; (2) comprehensive training, technical assistance, and information dissemination to the practitioner community and the community at large; and (3) substantial collaboration with our community partners. This article summarizes the authors' pursuit.

  5. Geology at Our Doorstep: Building a Partnership for Standards-Based Curriculum and Professional Development in Middle School Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laursen, S.; Lester, A.; Cannon, E.; Forrest, A.; Bencivengo, B.; Hunter, K.

    2003-12-01

    Geology at Our Doorstep is a collaboration between a science outreach program (CIRES Outreach), students and faculty in a university geology department (U. Colorado at Boulder), and a local school district (St. Vrain Valley) to develop locally relevant geology classroom resources for use by the district's middle-school teachers. The project grew out of direct conversations with teachers about their ideas and needs and was explicitly based on district and state standards in Earth science and scientific thinking, drawing on close work with the district on standards implementation and assessment over the past two years. We intended to draw on existing curriculum resources and substitute local geologic examples to construct a "place-based" teaching resource. However, we found that generic, national-level curricula did not effectively match the rich geologic resources of our area, and instead developed a rather more substantial set of original materials, including classroom collections of regional rocks, reference materials on local geology, classroom activities, and media resources, all shared with teachers at a series of professional development workshops. While the original project was small in scale, a number of spin-off projects have evolved. This project models several important features in the development of university-K12 partnerships: consultation with districts, piloting of small projects, and the role of outreach programs in facilitating participation of university faculty and students.

  6. Modelling with stakeholders - Next generation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voinov, Alexey; Kolagani, Nagesh; McCall, Michael K; Glynn, Pierre D.; Kragt, Marit E; Ostermann, Frank O; Pierce, Suzanne A; Ramu, Palaniappan

    2016-01-01

    This paper updates and builds on ‘Modelling with Stakeholders’ Voinov and Bousquet, 2010 which demonstrated the importance of, and demand for, stakeholder participation in resource and environmental modelling. This position paper returns to the concepts of that publication and reviews the progress made since 2010. A new development is the wide introduction and acceptance of social media and web applications, which dramatically changes the context and scale of stakeholder interactions and participation. Technology advances make it easier to incorporate information in interactive formats via visualization and games to augment participatory experiences. Citizens as stakeholders are increasingly demanding to be engaged in planning decisions that affect them and their communities, at scales from local to global. How people interact with and access models and data is rapidly evolving. In turn, this requires changes in how models are built, packaged, and disseminated: citizens are less in awe of experts and external authorities, and they are increasingly aware of their own capabilities to provide inputs to planning processes, including models. The continued acceleration of environmental degradation and natural resource depletion accompanies these societal changes, even as there is a growing acceptance of the need to transition to alternative, possibly very different, life styles. Substantive transitions cannot occur without significant changes in human behaviour and perceptions. The important and diverse roles that models can play in guiding human behaviour, and in disseminating and increasing societal knowledge, are a feature of stakeholder processes today.

  7. Lessons learned about coordinating academic partnerships from an international network for health education.

    PubMed

    Luo, Airong; Omollo, Kathleen Ludewig

    2013-11-01

    There is a growing trend of academic partnerships between U.S., Canadian, and European health science institutions and academic health centers in low- and middle-income countries. These partnerships often encounter challenges such as resource disparities and power differentials, which affect the motivations, expectations, balance of benefits, and results of the joint projects. Little has been discussed in previous literature regarding the communication and project management processes that affect the success of such partnerships. To fill the gap in the literature, the authors present lessons learned from the African Health Open Educational Resources Network, a multicountry, multiorganizational partnership established in May 2008. The authors introduce the history of the network, then discuss actively engaging stakeholders throughout the project's life cycle (design, planning, execution, and closure) through professional development, relationship building, and assessment activities. They focus on communication and management practices used to identify mutually beneficial project goals, ensure timely completion of deliverables, and develop sustainable sociotechnical infrastructure for future collaborative projects. These activities yielded an interactive process of action, assessment, and reflection to ensure that project goals and values were aligned with implementation. The authors conclude with a discussion of lessons learned and how the partnership project may serve as a model for other universities and academic health centers in high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries that are interested in or currently pursuing international academic partnerships.

  8. Partnerships for Minority Student Achievement Program (PMSA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Directorate for Education and Human Resources.

    This packet of materials describes the Partnerships for Minority Achievement (PMSA) Project of the National Science Foundation (NSF). PMSA is a comprehensive precollege program that builds on the NSF strategy of forging alliances and partnerships for systemic reform. The partnerships identify successful models in the public and private sectors to…

  9. Building Partnerships and Research Collaborations to Address the Impacts of Arctic Change: The North Atlantic Climate Change Collaboration (NAC3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, J.; North, L. A.; Strenecky, B.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in Arctic warming influence the various atmospheric and oceanic patterns that drive Caribbean and mid-latitude climate events, including extreme events like drought, tornadoes, and flooding in Kentucky and the surrounding region. Recently, the establishment of the North Atlantic Climate Change Collaboration (NAC3) project at Western Kentucky University (WKU) in partnership with the University of Akureyri (UNAK), Iceland Arctic Cooperation Network (IACN), and Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) provides a foundation from which to engage students in applied research from the local to global levels and more clearly understand the many tenets of climate change impacts in the Arctic within both a global and local community context. The NAC3 project encompasses many facets, including joint international courses, student internships, economic development, service learning, and applied research. In its first phase, the project has generated myriad outcomes and opportunities for bridging STEM disciplines with other fields to holistically and collaboratively address specific human-environmental issues falling under the broad umbrella of climate change. WKU and UNAK students desire interaction and exposure to other cultures and regions that are threatened by climate change and Iceland presents a unique opportunity to study influences such as oceanic processes, island economies, sustainable harvest of fisheries, and Arctic influences on climate change. The project aims to develop a model to bring partners together to conduct applied research on the complex subject of global environmental change, particularly in the Arctic, while simultaneously focusing on changing how we learn, develop community, and engage internationally to understand the impacts and find solutions.

  10. Using the give-get grid to understand potential expectations of engagement in a community-academic partnership.

    PubMed

    Southerland, Jodi; Behringer, Bruce; Slawson, Deborah L

    2013-11-01

    Research suggests that stakeholder investment is maximized when partnerships understand the assumptions held by partners of the benefits to be derived and contributions to be made to the partnership. In 2011, representatives from seven rural county high schools and five university departments participated in a planning workshop designed to identify elements of an effective community-academic partnership to address adolescent obesity disparity in Southern Appalachia. The purpose of this investigation was to examine key elements of partnership building by way of the Give-Get Grid partnership tool. Content analysis was conducted to identify emerging themes. University representatives consistently identified more proposed program contributions as well as benefits than their high school partners. University personnel responses generally pertained to their level of participation and investment in the partnership, whereas high school personnel tended to identify contributions fundamental to both partnership and program success. Additionally, content analysis uncovered programmatic facilitators and potential barriers that can be instrumental in program planning and forming program messages. Findings suggest that although partners often share common goals, perceptions of the value of investment and benefits may vary. The Give-Get Grid can be used during the program-planning phase to help identify these differences. Implications for practice are discussed.

  11. Stakeholder Relationships in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kettunen, Juha

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a stakeholder map to describe the most important stakeholders and the process of stakeholder relationships in higher education. According to the perspective of the balanced scorecard, the classification of stakeholders integrates stakeholders into strategic management. Stakeholder maps are essential in…

  12. Stakeholder Relationships in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kettunen, Juha

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a stakeholder map to describe the most important stakeholders and the process of stakeholder relationships in higher education. According to the perspective of the balanced scorecard, the classification of stakeholders integrates stakeholders into strategic management. Stakeholder maps are essential in…

  13. The Latino Migrant Worker HIV Prevention Program: building a community partnership through a community health worker training program.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Jesús; Silva-Suarez, Georgina; Serna, Claudia A; De La Rosa, Mario

    2012-01-01

    There is limited information on the impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on Latino migrant workers (LMWs), although available data indicate that this community is being disproportionally affected. The need for prevention programs that address the specific needs of LMWs is becoming well recognized. HIV prevention interventions that train and employ community health workers are a culturally appropriate way to address the issues of community trust and capacity building in this community. This article describes the Latino Migrant Worker HIV Prevention Program and its efforts to train and engage community health workers in the prevention of HIV among LMWs in South Florida.

  14. Twenty-first century vaccinomics innovation systems: capacity building in the global South and the role of Product Development Partnerships (PDPs).

    PubMed

    Huzair, Farah; Borda-Rodriguez, Alexander; Upton, Mary

    2011-09-01

    The availability of sequence information from publicly available complete genomes and data intensive sciences, together with next-generation sequencing technologies offer substantial promise for innovation in vaccinology and global public health in the beginning of the 21st century. This article presents an innovation analysis for the nascent field of vaccinomics by describing one of the major challenges in this endeavor: the need for capacities in "vaccinomics innovation systems" to support the developing countries involved in the creation and testing of new vaccines. In particular, we discuss the need for understanding how institutional frameworks can enhance capacities as intrinsic to a systems approach to health technology development. We focus our attention on the global South, meaning the technically less advanced and developing nations in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. This focus is timely and appropriate because the challenge for innovation in postgenomics medicine is markedly much greater in these regions where basic infrastructures are often underresourced and new or the anticipated institutional relationships can be fragile. Importantly, we examine the role of Product Development Partnerships (PDPs) as a 21st century organizational innovation that contributes to strengthening fragile institutions and capacity building. For vaccinomics innovation systems to stand the test of time in a context of global public health, local communities, knowledge, and cultures need to be collectively taken into account at all stages in programs for vaccinomics-guided vaccine development and delivery in the global South where the public health needs for rational vaccine development are urgent.

  15. Building an Outpatient Kidney Palliative Care Clinical Program.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Jennifer S; Wright, Rebecca; Blaum, Caroline S; Wall, Stephen P

    2017-08-09

    A diagnosis of advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD), or end stage renal disease (ESRD) represents a significant life change for patients and families. Individuals often experience high symptom burden, decreased quality of life, increased health care utilization, and end-of-life care discordant with their preferences. Early integration of palliative care with standard nephrology practice in the outpatient setting has the potential to improve quality of life through provision of expert symptom management, emotional support, and facilitation of advance care planning that honors the individual's values and goals. This special report describes application of participatory action research (PAR) methods to develop an outpatient integrated nephrology and palliative care program. Stakeholder concerns were thematically analyzed to inform translation of a known successful model of outpatient kidney palliative care to a practice in a large, urban medical center in the United States. Stakeholder needs and challenges to meeting these needs were identified. We uncovered a shared understanding of the clinical need for palliative care services in nephrology practice, but apprehension towards practice change. Action steps to modify the base model were created in response to stakeholder feedback. The development of a model of care that provides a new approach to clinical practice requires attention to relevant stakeholder concerns. PAR is a useful methodological approach that engages stakeholders and builds partnerships. This creation of shared ownership can facilitate innovation and practice change. We synthesized stakeholder concerns to build a conceptual model for an integrated nephrology and palliative care clinical program. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Framing K-12 partnerships in order to make a difference.

    PubMed

    Hamos, James E

    2006-06-01

    The Health Professions Partnership Initiative (HPPI) furthered the establishment of partnerships between academic health centers and K-12 school systems. The present article contends that partnerships in efforts such as the HPPI exist in varying degrees of depth with deeper partnerships being those based in a concept of mutuality even as partners continue to maintain institutional identity. In the context of K-12 schools, the article reinforces the view that K-12 students, teachers, and administrators can benefit through partnership contexts, but also suggests that institutions of higher education-including academic health centers-should enter into partnerships because they benefit when they commit as stakeholders in the outcomes, not principally as altruistic good neighbors to the schools. Partnerships can continue to grow when multiple stakeholders accept mutual dependence as a norm, with goals, processes, and outcomes impacting each partner.

  17. Stakeholder analysis of Florida farmworker housing.

    PubMed

    Flocks, Joan D; Burns, Allan F

    2006-01-01

    Farmworkers, farmworker advocates, state and federal policy-makers, and researchers all consider adequate housing as central to successful migration, community building, and quality of life, including good health, among farmworkers. This study analyzes results from interviews and focus groups with stakeholders involved in Florida farmworker housing conducted with the goal of providing recommendations for future farmworker housing policy. These recommendations include considering housing needs within a life continuum and understanding how wages and housing are interconnected. The concurring perspectives of stakeholders can be considered as building blocks in developing more effective state and local housing policy.

  18. 24 CFR 964.14 - HUD policy on partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false HUD policy on partnerships. 964.14... policy on partnerships. HUD promotes partnerships between residents and HAs which are an essential component to building, strengthening and improving public housing. Strong partnerships are critical...

  19. 24 CFR 964.14 - HUD policy on partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false HUD policy on partnerships. 964.14... policy on partnerships. HUD promotes partnerships between residents and HAs which are an essential component to building, strengthening and improving public housing. Strong partnerships are critical...

  20. 24 CFR 964.14 - HUD policy on partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false HUD policy on partnerships. 964.14... policy on partnerships. HUD promotes partnerships between residents and HAs which are an essential component to building, strengthening and improving public housing. Strong partnerships are critical...

  1. 24 CFR 964.14 - HUD policy on partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false HUD policy on partnerships. 964.14... policy on partnerships. HUD promotes partnerships between residents and HAs which are an essential component to building, strengthening and improving public housing. Strong partnerships are critical...

  2. Training for Trade: A Partnership Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wismer, Jack N.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the role of community colleges in providing international trade education and training, highlighting the importance of building partnerships. Describes methods for building partnerships, eight current community college training-for-trade (TFT) programs, and training services and resources. Suggests that TFT programs must become a…

  3. All Together Now: Building Strong Communities through Arts and Education Partnerships (New Orleans, Louisiana, February 12-13, 2009). Reflections on the Forum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arts Education Partnership (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    When the members of Arts Education Partnership (AEP) first started thinking of how they might disseminate information about the AEP Winter Forum in New Orleans, they knew they wanted to shake up the format of a traditional Forum report. At this stage in the evolution of the Partnership, and of the arts education field as a whole, they felt they…

  4. Partnership Successes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Through partnerships with industry and academia, NASA s space-age technology improves all aspects of society. While not every technology transfer activity results in commercialization, these partnerships offer far-reaching benefits to U.S. citizens. The following examples are just a few of the ways NASA is applying its technology and resources to improve the quality of life on Earth.

  5. Partnership Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matlin, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Portrays partnerships as strategic alliances and temporary relationships characterized by self-interest. References a series of national and organizational case studies throughout the world. Compares the organizational and sectoral domains of partnerships. Examines the asymmetries of power and their implications for educational policy and…

  6. ScienceToGo.org: Using 'Ozzie the Ostrich' to Build Local Partnerships around Climate Change Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustick, D. S.; Lohmeier, J.; Chen, R. F.; Wilson, R.; Rabkin, D.; Thompson, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    , we will describe ScienceToGo.org and explore the various theories that help explain why Phase III was successful at building alliances among more than three dozen diverse urban partners. Finally, we will conclude with some recommendations for how this work could improve and inform other urban informal science learning initiatives.

  7. Stakeholder perceptions of a total market approach to family planning in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Drake, Jennifer Kidwell; Espinoza, Henry; Suraratdecha, Chutima; Lacayo, Yann; Keith, Bonnie M; Vail, Janet G

    2011-05-01

    To assess private-sector stakeholders' and donors' perceptions of a total market approach (TMA) to family planning in Nicaragua in the context of decreased funding; to build evidence for potential strategies and mechanisms for TMA implementation (including public-private partnerships (PPPs)); and to identify information gaps and future priorities for related research and advocacy. A descriptive exploratory study was conducted in various locations in Nicaragua from March to April 2010. A total of 24 key private-sector stakeholders and donors were interviewed and their responses analyzed using two questionnaires and a stakeholder analysis tool (PolicyMakerTM software). All survey participants supported a TMA, and public-private collaboration, in family planning in Nicaragua. Based on the survey responses, opportunities for further developing PPPs for family planning include building on and expanding existing governmental frameworks, such as Nicaragua's current coordination mechanism for contraceptive security. Obstacles include the lack of ongoing government engagement with the commercial (for-profit) sector and confusion about regulations for its involvement in family planning. Strategies for strengthening existing PPPs include establishing a coordination mechanism specifically for the commercial sector and collecting and disseminating evidence supporting public-private collaboration in family planning. There was no formal or absolute opposition to a TMA or PPPs in family planning in Nicaragua among a group of diverse nongovernmental stakeholders and donors. This type of study can help identify strategies to mobilize existing and potential advocates in achieving articulated policy goals, including diversification of funding sources for family planning to achieve contraceptive security.

  8. Project STONE: A Partnership Between Academia, Business and Government to Build a Pathway to STEM Careers for K-12 Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slattery, W.; Jacomet, P.; Lunsford, S.; Suttle, C.; Grove, R. L.; Teed, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    In the US, more than 1,500 informal science venues (science centers, museums, aquariums, zoos, nature centers, national parks) are visited annually by 61% of the population. Research shows that these visitors are receptive to learning about climate change, and expect these institutions to provide reliable information about environmental issues and solutions. Given that we spend less than 5% of our lifetime in a classroom, informal science venues play a critical role in shaping public understanding. Since 2007, the New England Aquarium (NEAq) has led a national effort to increase the capacity of informal science education institutions (ISEIs) to effectively communicate about the impacts of climate change on the oceans. NEAq is now leading the NSF-funded National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (NNOCCI), partnering with the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, FrameWorks Institute, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Monterey Bay Aquarium, and National Aquarium, with evaluation conducted by the New Knowledge Organization, Pennsylvania State University, and Ohio State University. NNOCCI's design is based on best practices in informal science learning, cognitive/social psychology, community and network building: Interpreters as Communication Strategists - Interpreters can serve not merely as educators disseminating information, but can also be leaders in influencing public perceptions, given their high level of commitment, knowledge, public trust, social networks, and visitor contact. Communities of Practice - Learning is a social activity that is created through engagement in a supportive community context. Social support is particularly important in addressing a complex, contentious and distressing subject. Diffusion of Innovation - Peer networks are of primary importance in spreading innovations. Leaders serve as 'early adopters' and influence others to achieve a critical mass of implementation. Over the next five years, NNOCCI will achieve a

  9. Exploring Cooperative Education Partnerships: A Case Study in Sport Tertiary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jenny; Hickey, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Cooperative education can be expressed in terms of a partnership between students, university and industry. A stakeholder-integrated approach to cooperative education involves formalized sustainable relationships between stakeholders. This study investigated the motives and determinants for the formation of cooperative education partnerships.…

  10. Partnership-based practice with young people: relational dimensions of partnership in a therapeutic setting.

    PubMed

    Timor-Shlevin, Shachar; Krumer-Nevo, Michal

    2016-09-01

    The recent literature concerning partnership between professionals and young people reveals important developments regarding the nature of partnership: from short-term partnerships with young people's parents intended to improve decision-making in the context of critical life decisions, to a growing interest in direct partnership between professionals and young people as a core principle of long-term relationships. Although it is widely acknowledged among health and social service professionals that partnerships can have positive outcomes for young people, the concept and implementation of partnership remain vague. This article examines the meanings of partnership for people involved in a community youth centre for marginalised youth. Data were collected during the year 2011 using multiple-methods including focus groups (with eight youth workers), participant observations (in assembly meetings and 'partnership meetings') and semi-structured interviews (with 10 principal stakeholders, including youth, youth workers and the Center's founders). Data were analysed using principles of grounded theory to articulate partnership as an ongoing experience, combining both structural-technical and content-experiential components. Our findings present partnership as existing simultaneously in the practice of decision-making and in the realm of self-experience and interpersonal relationships, and explore the relationship between both spheres. The findings also shed light on the importance of the specific characteristics of shared decision-making (atmosphere, content and duration) in the creation of partnership. We discuss our findings in the light of possibilities for partnership-based practice with marginalised youth.

  11. Towards Typology of Stakeholders: A Case of Lithuanian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Švaikauskiene, Simona; Mikulskiene, Birute

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore internal management, advocacy and partnerships of interest groups with the aim of representing their interests in public policy formation with a view to developing a stakeholder typology. This qualitative study involves eight in-depth, semi-structured interviews with representatives from stakeholder…

  12. Towards Typology of Stakeholders: A Case of Lithuanian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Švaikauskiene, Simona; Mikulskiene, Birute

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore internal management, advocacy and partnerships of interest groups with the aim of representing their interests in public policy formation with a view to developing a stakeholder typology. This qualitative study involves eight in-depth, semi-structured interviews with representatives from stakeholder…

  13. Principles of successful partnerships.

    PubMed

    Mangold, Kara; Denke, Nancy J; Gorombei, Deb; Ostroski, Tammy L; Root, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Health care providers must understand and value the unique contributions of all interdisciplinary professionals, with the goal of optimizing the wellness or illness needs of each patient. Work cannot be done in silos, and the ability to develop and sustain effective professional partnerships is essential. Health care teams must work within a complex environment that depends on the shared efforts of multiple professionals to successfully provide care in a fragmented, highly stressed system. Implementing partnerships that foster relationships through shared interests, vision, and values can aid in the coordination of resources to provide a more positive patient experience and outcome. The development of partnerships requires time and acceptance of shared risks and responsibilities. In return, involved parties will be able to build trust, share rewards, and expand the possibilities of what can be accomplished. The purpose of this review is to describe results-oriented partnerships, which include the attributes of collaboration, coordination, and communication. Essential concepts and practical tools for success are reviewed to offer new and existing partnerships a lens through which to view interdisciplinary interactions that can contribute to organizational success and longevity. Potential pitfalls that may impact patient services and organizational health are also discussed.

  14. Partnership implementation research

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, Leif I.; Glasgow, Russell E.; Unützer, Jürgen; Jaeckels, Nancy; Oftedahl, Gary; Beck, Arne; Maciosek, Michael V.; Crain, A. Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Background Translational research is increasingly important as academic health centers transform themselves to meet new requirements of NIH funding. Most attention has focused on T1 translation studies (bench to bedside) with considerable uncertainty about how to enhance T2 (effectiveness trials) and especially T3 (implementation studies). Objective To describe an innovative example of a T3 study, conducted as partnership research with the leaders of a major natural experiment in Minnesota to improve the primary care of depression. Methods All health plans in the state have agreed on a new payment model to support clinics that implement the well-evidenced collaborative care model for depression in the DIAMOND Initiative (Depression Improvement Across Minnesota: Offering a New Direction). The DIAMOND Study was developed in an ongoing partnership with Initiative leaders from seven health plans, 85 clinics, and a regional quality improvement collaborative to evaluate the implementation and its impacts on patients and other stakeholders. We agreed upon a staggered implementation, multiple baseline research design, utilizing the concepts of practical clinical trials and engaged scholarship and have collaborated on all aspects of conducting the study, including joint identification of patient and clinic survey recipients. Results Complex study methods have worked well through 20 months because of the commitment of all stakeholders to both the Initiative and study. Over 1,500 patient subjects have been recruited from health plan information delivered weekly and 99.7% of 316 physicians and administrators from all participating clinical organizations have completed Study surveys. Conclusions Partnership research can greatly facilitate translational research studies. PMID:20508531

  15. The Global Soil Partnership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanarella, Luca

    2015-07-01

    The Global Soil Partnership (GSP) has been established, following an intensive preparatory work of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in collaboration with the European Commission (EC), as a voluntary partnership coordinated by the FAO in September 2011 [1]. The GSP is open to all interested stakeholders: Governments (FAO Member States), Universities, Research Organizations, Civil Society Organizations, Industry and private companies. It is a voluntary partnership aiming towards providing a platform for active engagement in sustainable soil management and soil protection at all scales: local, national, regional and global. As a “coalition of the willing” towards soil protection, it attempts to make progress in reversing soil degradation with those partners that have a genuine will of protecting soils for our future generations. It openly aims towards creating an enabling environment, despite the resistance of a minority of national governments, for effective soil protection in the large majority of the countries that are genuinely concerned about the rapid depletion of their limited soil resources.

  16. Engaging Educational Stakeholders in the Challenge of Shared Accountability: The Texas Prospectus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, William H.

    This paper discusses how to engage educational stakeholders for productive partnerships in accountability, examining accountability in the world of demands and describing the Texas Prospectus for Shared Accountability, which provides 3 components: (1) the Partnership for Texas Public Schools (consisting of the Chancellor of the Texas A&M…

  17. Stakeholder analysis: a review.

    PubMed

    Brugha, R; Varvasovszky, Z

    2000-09-01

    The growing popularity of stakeholder analysis reflects an increasing recognition of how the characteristics of stakeholders--individuals, groups and organizations--influence decision-making processes. This paper reviews the origins and uses of stakeholder analysis, as described in the policy, health care management and development literature. Its roots are in the political and policy sciences, and in management theory where it has evolved into a systematic tool with clearly defined steps and applications for scanning the current and future organizational environment. Stakeholder analysis can be used to generate knowledge about the relevant actors so as to understand their behaviour, intentions, interrelations, agendas, interests, and the influence or resources they have brought--or could bring--to bear on decision-making processes. This information can then be used to develop strategies for managing these stakeholders, to facilitate the implementation of specific decisions or organizational objectives, or to understand the policy context and assess the feasibility of future policy directions. Policy development is a complex process which frequently takes place in an unstable and rapidly changing context, subject to unpredictable internal and external factors. As a cross-sectional view of an evolving picture, the utility of stakeholder analysis for predicting and managing the future is time-limited and it should be complemented by other policy analysis approaches.

  18. Community-Academic Partnership Participation.

    PubMed

    Meza, Rosemary; Drahota, Amy; Spurgeon, Emily

    2016-10-01

    Community-academic partnerships (CAPs) improve the research process, outcomes, and yield benefits for the community and researchers. This exploratory study examined factors important in community stakeholders' decision to participate in CAPs. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) community stakeholders, previously contacted to participate in a CAP (n = 18), completed the 15-item Decision to Participate Questionnaire (DPQ). The DPQ assessed reasons for participating or declining participation in the ASD CAP. CAP participants rated networking with other providers, fit of collaboration with agency philosophy, and opportunity for future training/consultations as factors more important in their decision to participate in the ASD CAP than nonparticipants. Nonparticipants reported the number of requests to participate in research as more important in their decision to decline participation than participants. Findings reveal important factors in community stakeholders' decision to participate in CAPs that may provide guidance on increasing community engagement in CAPs and help close the science-to-service gap.

  19. Facilitating Preservice Teacher Induction through Learning in Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Briony

    2012-01-01

    Partnership in teacher education is usually seen as needing to occur between the university and a school. This teacher education program, however, considers partnership across many stakeholders, in addition: employer authorities, community agencies and pre-service teachers themselves as active partners. Using Wenger's (1998) concept of communities…

  20. Partnership in Computational Science

    SciTech Connect

    Huray, Paul G.

    1999-02-24

    This is the final report for the "Partnership in Computational Science" (PICS) award in an amount of $500,000 for the period January 1, 1993 through December 31, 1993. A copy of the proposal with its budget is attached as Appendix A. This report first describes the consequent significance of the DOE award in building infrastructure of high performance computing in the Southeast and then describes the work accomplished under this grant and a list of publications resulting from it.

  1. Stakeholder Perceptions of Risk in Construction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dong; McCoy, Andrew P; Kleiner, Brian M; Mills, Thomas H; Lingard, Helen

    2016-02-01

    Safety management in construction is an integral effort and its success requires inputs from all stakeholders across design and construction phases. Effective risk mitigation relies on the concordance of all stakeholders' risk perceptions. Many researchers have noticed the discordance of risk perceptions among critical stakeholders in safe construction work, however few have provided quantifiable evidence describing them. In an effort to fill this perception gap, this research performs an experiment that investigates stakeholder perceptions of risk in construction. Data analysis confirms the existence of such discordance, and indicates a trend in risk likelihood estimation. With risk perceptions from low to high, the stakeholders are architects, contractors/safety professionals, and engineers. Including prior studies, results also suggest that designers have improved their knowledge in building construction safety, but compared to builders they present more difficultly in reaching a consensus of perception. Findings of this research are intended to be used by risk management and decision makers to reassess stakeholders' varying judgments when considering injury prevention and hazard assessment.

  2. Building Design Fosters Partnerships | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The physical space of the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF) is designed to encourage collaborations, both internal and external. Of the 330,000 square feet of space at the new facility, nearly 40,000 have been set aside for collaborations between the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNL) and outside partners in an arrangement that brings together scientists and specialists from government, industry, academia, and the nonprofit sectors in support of the research of NCI.

  3. Building Design Fosters Partnerships | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The physical space of the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF) is designed to encourage collaborations, both internal and external. Of the 330,000 square feet of space at the new facility, nearly 40,000 have been set aside for collaborations between the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNL) and outside partners in an arrangement that brings together scientists and specialists from government, industry, academia, and the nonprofit sectors in support of the research of NCI.

  4. Principles of Building Partnership Capacity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-11

    Historical Analysis Ian Nish provides a detailed description of the Japanese foreign policy objectives during the time of the Meiji Restoration in...illgotten? The role of Meiji militarism in Japan’s technological progress. The Journal of Economic History 37, no. 1, The Tasks of Economic History

  5. Building Partnerships with Immigrant Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobel, Andrea; Kugler, Eileen Gale

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, immigrant-rich Annandale High School in the Virginia suburbs of Washington, D.C., launched a focused effort to bring more parents of students from immigrant families into school leadership. Nearly half of the parents of Annandale High students are immigrants to the United States--and they come from more than 80 different countries.…

  6. Effects of stakeholder involvement in river management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchecker, M.; Menzel, S.

    2012-04-01

    In the last decades, in many parts of Europe involving local stakeholders or the local public in river management has become a standard procedure. For many decision makers, the purpose of involving other interest groups is limited to achieving a sufficient local acceptance of the project, and accordingly they adopt minimal forms of involvement. Theoretical literature and first empirical studies, however, suggest that stakeholder involvement can have, if done in appropriate quality, have much more far-reaching benefits for a sustainable river management such as a better consensus, social learning and social capital building. But there is so far only little reliable evidence that and under which conditions such benefits or effects in fact result from stakeholder involvement processes. The reason for this is that such involvement processes represent very complex social interventions, and all"affordable"effect measurement methods have their weaknesses. In our project we wanted to find out which were the really robust social effects of stakeholder involvement in river management. We therefore evaluated a number of real Swiss case studies of participatory river management using three different approaches of effect measurements: a quasi-experimental approach using repeated standardized measurement of stakeholders' attitudes, a qualitative long-term ex-post measurement approach based on interviews with stakeholders of five participatory river projects, and a comparative analysis approach based on data of residents effect assessments of participatory river planning gathered in a Swiss national survey. The analysis of all three evaluation studies confirmed that stakeholder involvement in river management projects have substantive social effects. The comparison of the results of the three measurement approaches revealed that social learning and acceptance building were the most robust effects of stakeholder involvement, as they were confirmed by all the three measurement

  7. Universities, Partnership and the Promotion of Social Inclusion: Some Issues and Developments in Ireland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O Fathaigh, Mairtin

    University College Cork (UCC) and excluded/disadvantaged communities on Cork's Northside undertook a partnership project. The partnership process exposed real divisions and differences among the partners and stakeholders on the link between participation and partnership and on the continuum of issues ranging from the more traditionalist model of…

  8. Developing Skills through Partnerships: Symposium Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colleges Ontario, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In November 2005, the province of Ontario and the federal government signed two historic agreements--the Canada-Ontario Labour Market Development Agreement and the Canada-Ontario Labour Market Partnership Agreement. One year later, on Nov. 24, 2006, key labour market stakeholders, including users, delivery agents and government came together to…

  9. Forging Collaborative Partnerships: The Waterloo Neighborhood Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruenewald, Anne

    The Forging Collaborative Partnerships Project in Waterloo, Iowa is a collaborative venture to assist voluntary agencies in developing tools and strategies to strengthen collaborative relationships among public and nonprofit child welfare agencies and other key stakeholders as they adopt a family-focused philosophy. This monograph details how the…

  10. Evaluator Responsiveness to Stakeholders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azzam, Tarek

    2010-01-01

    A simulation study was conducted in an attempt to examine how evaluators modify their evaluation design in response to differing stakeholder groups. In this study, evaluators were provided with a fictitious description of a school-based program. They were then asked to design an evaluation of the program. After the evaluation design decisions were…

  11. Multiple Stakeholders and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichelberger, R. Tony

    Evaluations occur within a political decision-making mileau, where multiple stakeholders are contending for limited funds. Given the subjective basis of empirical information, different conclusions or recommendations about a program may result from different ideological, theoretical, and disciplinary perspectives. The logic behind the…

  12. Public-Private Partnerships in Flanders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leemans, Geert

    2006-01-01

    Belgium's Flemish government recently approved a EUR 1 billion investment in school infrastructure through public-private partnerships, its first major initiative of this kind. The Flemish Community's variant of public-private partnerships in school building allows the government to meet urgent needs in the short run, but also to spread the costs…

  13. Public-Private Partnerships in Flanders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leemans, Geert

    2006-01-01

    Belgium's Flemish government recently approved a EUR 1 billion investment in school infrastructure through public-private partnerships, its first major initiative of this kind. The Flemish Community's variant of public-private partnerships in school building allows the government to meet urgent needs in the short run, but also to spread the costs…

  14. Maryland Child Care Business Partnership Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Human Resources, Baltimore. Child Care Administration.

    Building on a pledge to support the state's job growth and successful transitions from welfare to work, the governor of Maryland issued an executive order in 1998 to establish the Maryland Child Care Business Partnership (MCCBP). This partnership, comprised of 23 members representing business, labor, state and local government, and the child care…

  15. Creating Partnerships. A Handbook for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Council on Vocational Education, Des Moines.

    This handbook details a step-by-step process to establishing educational relationships or partnerships with business, labor, government, and community organizations. Worksheets are provided to help with this relationship-building process. Chapter 1 focuses on these areas: the why of a partnership, resources to support the effort, benefits for each…

  16. Building Community Partnerships: Tips for Out-of-School Time Programs. Research-to-Results Practitioner Insights. Publication #2008-13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhauser, Mary; Bronte-Tinkew, Jacinta; Kennedy, Elena

    2008-01-01

    Increasing community involvement in out-of-school time programs can yield significant benefits to programs and the students that they serve. Community partnerships have the potential to meet a wide variety of needs, from improving participant recruitment and attendance to contributing volunteers or other resources to programs. This research brief…

  17. Building a Drug-Free County: A Partnership of Community, Business, Schools, and Government. An Interim Report to the County Executive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Dept. of Family Resources, Rockville, MD. Div. on Children and Youth.

    This document is the interim report of a task force on drug and alcohol abuse prevention for Montgomery County, Maryland. The report emphasizes that in order to effect prevention, a partnership between business, schools, and communities is needed. These four tasks of the task force are listed: (1) to determine the extent of the problem; (2) to…

  18. Building Partnerships for Excellence in Correctional Education. A National Conference on Correctional Education. Proceedings (Arlington, Virginia, October 21-23, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Corrections (Dept. of Justice/LEAA), Washington, DC.

    These proceedings represent major addresses, panel presentations, and abstracts of workshops from a conference to develop partnerships, coordination, and cooperation among the correctional education field. Federal agencies, professional organizations, and the private sector in addressing juvenile and adult offender education needs. The two major…

  19. Taking the "guest" work out of school-health interagency partnerships.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Leslie A

    2008-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) have proliferated rapidly, demonstrated success in health outcomes and access, and gained national recognition. Despite these accomplishments, organizational dissimilarities exist among health and school systems that are potentially leading to SBHC partnership barriers. This study sought to determine how partnering agencies promote cooperation and manage conflict across institutional boundaries. Utilizing case study methods, we conducted semistructured interviews of 55 stakeholders involved in program operations from four Massachusetts SBHCs. All had similar characteristics, yet based on a state-level rating system, two had successful interagency partnerships and two were experiencing difficulties. Success designation played a role in how sites managed conflict and promoted understanding and cooperation. Data also revealed similarities such as frequent use of the term "guest" by all study subjects when describing SBHCs. School representatives stated that as guests, SBHCs should adhere to school rules. Health representatives assumed that as guests, they were not full partners and could be asked to leave. Successful sites were less likely to perceive themselves as guests. At successful sites, guest terminology also dissipated over time and evolved into interdependence and cooperation among school-health interagency partners. Viewing SBHCs as guests creates a tenuous partnership that may be counterproductive to SBHC growth and sustainability. Given current levels of public interest in education, SBHCs may afford enhanced attention to youth health. Additional financial and training resources are needed to build the common purpose that will encourage the formation and sustainability of strong, interdependent school-health partnerships.

  20. Writing Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Cathy

    2009-01-01

    In the writer's workshop, teachers are highly challenged after the minilesson during the independent writing time. In that segment, teachers are confronted by the demands of conferencing with numerous students and responding to writing in a limited amount of time. Writing partnerships link students in long-term pairs, resulting in two valuable…

  1. The ESTHER hospital partnership initiative: a powerful levy for building capacities to combat the HIV pandemic in low-resource countries.

    PubMed

    Raguin, Gilles

    2016-04-01

    Partnerships between hospitals in high income countries and low resource countries are uniquely capable of fulfilling the tripartite needs of care, training, and research required to address health care crises in low resource countries. Of particular interest, at a time when the EBOLA crisis highlights the weaknesses of health systems in resource-poor settings, the institutional resources and expertise of hospitals can also contribute to strengthening health systems with long-term sustainability.We describe a partnership network between French Hospitals and hospitals/health structures in 19 countries that demonstrates the power and efficacy of health partnership in the response to the HIV/AIDS pandemic in sub-Saharan Africa and south East Asia. Through the ESTHER initiative, the partnership network currently provides capacity development, care and treatment to over 165,000 HIV-positive patients at 87 urban and 92 peripheral sites in 17 countries and enrolls 19,000 new HIV positive patients, delivers psychosocial services to 120 000 people and tests more than 35,000 pregnant women for HIV annually. It also, engages communities and assists with the development of a robust electronic information system.Launched in 2002, the ESTHER (Ensemble pour une Solidarite Thérapeutique Hospitalière En Reseau) initiative has grown from small projects with a focus on access to antiretroviral treatment in a limited number of West African countries at its outset into a large and comprehensive HIV/AIDS-control system in Western and Central Africa. The partnership's rapid achievements in the fight against HIV/AIDS, combined with the comprehensive and long-term approach to countries' health care needs, suggest that this "twinning" and medical mentoring model can and should be duplicated and developed to address the ever more pressing demand for response to global health needs in low resource countries.

  2. Partnerships as knowledge encounters: a psychosocial theory of partnerships for health and community development.

    PubMed

    Aveling, Emma-Louise; Jovchelovitch, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we present a psychosocial theory of partnership, illustrated with case studies from Cambodia and Brazil. Partnerships are conceptualised as encounters with the knowledge of self and others, entailing processes of representation and communication between all stakeholders involved, and shaped by institutional and sociocultural contexts. We argue that partnership is an evolving practice that requires critical reflection and the creation of enabling institutional contexts. As such, it must be understood not as a tool for intervention, but as part of the intervention and definition of success.

  3. Defense Partnerships: Documenting Trends and Emerging Topics for Action

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    Public - public and public - private and partnerships (P4s) are time-proven effective solutions for delivering public ...14. ABSTRACT Public - public and public - private and partnerships (P4s) are time-proven effective solutions for delivering public services at reasonable...facing DOD partnerships , building off a paper titled Public - Private Cooperation in the Department of Defense: A Framework for Analysis

  4. Public Participation Guide: Stakeholder Interviews

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Interviews with stakeholders are one-to-one conversations about a specific topic or issue. The primary purpose of these interviews is to obtain project-relevant information and elicit stakeholder reactions and suggestions.

  5. Theory-Based Stakeholder Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Morten Balle; Vedung, Evert

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a new approach to program theory evaluation called theory-based stakeholder evaluation or the TSE model for short. Most theory-based approaches are program theory driven and some are stakeholder oriented as well. Practically, all of the latter fuse the program perceptions of the various stakeholder groups into one unitary…

  6. Organizational Culture and Partnership Process: A Grounded Theory Study of Community-Campus Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman Kready, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Community engagement initiatives have experienced an increase in attention, appreciation, and participation among those in academic, nonprofit, and other community-based organizations over the past two decades. The purpose of this study is to explore the meanings of community-campus partnerships among stakeholders in the community and in academia…

  7. Developing partnership promotes peace: group psychotherapy experiences.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Robi

    2002-04-01

    Partnerships are often optimal processes for interpersonal growth. The ability to have and keep a partner in mind should, therefore, be thought about and learnt. Although reciprocity, some symmetry, and mutual give and take are important aspects of partnerships, this article emphasizes a partners ability to process difficulties for the other as an aid to growth. The containment and elaboration of distress in partnerships is discussed using three examples of such potential relationships. The emotional beginning of a partnership, whether starting from love, working relationship or from hate, is the focus of the article. Individual, dyadic, and group aspects as separation-individuation and containment processes are described as contributing to partnership-building. The ability of a therapy group to process splitting and projecting phenomena are discussed. Co-therapists seem to have to work through painful conflicts between themselves to develop the therapists' containment abilities inside a functional partnership. Supervision may help process these emotional hardships. Within families, mothers could contribute to a better processing of their sons violence shared through infant dreams, which represent an effort to cope with inner and outer aggression. Growth-promoting aspects of dream telling as potential partnerships in families and groups are discussed. Finally, partnership building between hating foes is exemplified by the efforts made by participants in Israeli and Palestinian peace dialogues. In groups, interpersonal development may be furthered by helping participants mutually contain and be contained, enabling partnership opportunities to grow after love and sympathy are over.

  8. Building bridges: a partnership between professional nursing and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to reduce the burden of heart disease and stroke.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Sandra B; Mensah, George A; Labarthe, Darwin R

    2005-12-01

    The escalating burden of heart disease and stroke in the United States, coupled with the complexity of public health goals to prevent and control chronic diseases, warrant new strategies and partners. The 2.7 million nurses in the United States represent the nation's largest healthcare profession and, through their professional organizations, constitute a strategic partner for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Heart Disease and Stroke Programs. In addition, because heart disease and stroke rank first and third among leading causes of death in women in the United States, and 95% of nurses are women, nurses represent an important population to target with preventive cardiovascular health approaches. The authors describe a proposed CDC strategic partnership with professional nursing organizations, including goals aimed at improving the capacity of nurses as change agents in the area of heart disease and stroke, as well as promoting change among the change agents to reduce nurses' risk for cardiovascular disease. The primary goals of the partnership between key professional nursing organizations and the CDC Cardiovascular Health (CVH) Programs follow: (1) share information and develop effective communication; (2) link with key professional and community organizations; (3) assess capabilities and expertise that nursing organizations can add to CDC's internal and external partnerships, including the Public Health Action Plan; (4) explore possible linkages with the CDC-funded state-level heart disease and stroke prevention programs and emerging CDC stroke networks; (5) develop, disseminate, and apply evidence-based guidelines to improve outcomes of care; and (6) develop policy and environment strategies in work-site settings to prevent heart disease and stroke in women and among the membership of professional nursing organizations. The development and implementation of a CDC CVH Program Professional Nurse Partnership have strong potential for enhancing

  9. Stakeholders in nursing education: their role and involvement.

    PubMed

    Virgolesi, M; Marchetti, A; Piredda, M; Pulimeno, A M L; Rocco, G; Stievano, A; De Marinis, M G

    2014-01-01

    In literature, there is evidence that all stakeholders need to be involved in the curricula building process to make sure that health professionals are "educated" to meet the stakeholders' "demands". In Italy, the involvement of stakeholders in the definition of university curricula is ratified by various regulations. To describe the major experiences of stakeholder involvement in nursing education, identify the main stakeholders for nursing education, and the processes in which they are involved. The search strategy included an electronic exploration of the relevant databases. The search terms were: Stakeholders, Curriculum, Nursing Education combined with Boolean operators. The references of the retrieved articles were hand searched for additional related studies. Most of the studies identified were from the United Kingdom, Australia, and the USA. In Italy, no relevant studies were found. The most frequently identified stakeholders were: students, clinicians, educators, nurse managers. They were mainly involved during profound changes in the curricula and the implementation of new educational approaches. Stakeholders are mostly involved in countries with a private funding system for universities. Such funding systems have probably developed in the academia a greater propensity to involve stakeholders, to provide recognition of success when starting new programs, and are perceived more as marketing research. This seems contrary to the spirit of the Italian and European regulatory interventions, which instead, provide a structured commitment to consolidating and expanding the collaboration among universities, users, and the world of labor. This latter collaboration should facilitate internship activities, lifelong learning, and employability of the newly-graduated professionals.

  10. Partnership with Mexico

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    NORAD and USNORTHCOM THEATER SECURITY COOPERATION (TSC) “PARTNERSHIP WITH  MEXICO ” This briefing is UNCLASSIFIED Report Documentation Page Form...COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Partnership with Mexico 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Mission: As directed by the Secretary of Defense,  USNORTHCOM conducts security cooperation  activities with The Bahamas, Canada, and  Mexico   to build

  11. Understanding the economic and social effects of academic clinical partnerships.

    PubMed

    Davies, Stephen M; Bennett, Anita

    2008-06-01

    Partnerships between medical schools and their clinical associates, which we describe in this article as academic clinical partnerships (ACPs), are powerful economic and social actors through their roles as major employers and procurers of goods and services. A broad spectrum of effects extending beyond the tripartite mission shapes the social contract between ACPs and the communities they serve. The authors present a model for identifying and measuring effects across this spectrum and illustrate the model's application with reference to specific case studies set in the United Kingdom. This model categorizes effects into five different domains: economic, human capital, social capital, knowledge, and place. These different effects express themselves along a spatial scale that varies from the very local to the global. The authors describe the theoretical background for each domain, as well as the methods required to identify and measure effects. These methods range from a quantitative economic impact analysis using extended input-output models to qualitative methods to capture social capital and place effects. The authors demonstrate how leaders in academic medicine can use the model to build a holistic picture of the societal effects of ACPs. Evidence of impact is of value to ACP leaders in engaging with both national and local stakeholders, and the approach is likely transferable to different countries.

  12. Sixth national stakeholder workshop summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    On June 17--18, 1998, the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Worker and Community Transition convened its sixth National Stakeholder Workshop at the Ramada Plaza Hotel Old Town in Alexandria, Virginia. Approximately 325 stakeholders attended representing DOE headquarters and field offices, contractors, labor organizations, state and local government, education and community interest groups. The meeting addressed the progress made on the issues and challenges identified at the last stakeholder`s meeting in Oakland, California on April 9--11, 1997. Also discussed were the full range of the Department`s work force issues and creative solutions to the inherent challenges of simultaneously implementing the Department`s post Cold-War mission, work force restructuring guidance, contract reform objectives, asset disposition, performance-based management requirements, and business process improvement policies. The format of the Workshop included several plenary sessions and a number of small group discussion sessions. The small group sessions focused on topics related to labor issues, work force restructuring, work force planning, community transition, and employee concerns. The sessions provided a wide range of views on worker and community transition issues. The plenary sessions of the Workshop included presentations on the following topics: welcome and introductions; opening remarks; building a better labor-management relationship; keynote speech from Secretary of Energy Federico Pena; meeting tomorrow`s challenges (early site closures); harnessing the contracting process to encourage local growth; and, the British experience in economic conversion.

  13. Stakeholder Perceptions of Risk in Construction

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dong; McCoy, Andrew P.; Kleiner, Brian M.; Mills, Thomas H.; Lingard, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Safety management in construction is an integral effort and its success requires inputs from all stakeholders across design and construction phases. Effective risk mitigation relies on the concordance of all stakeholders’ risk perceptions. Many researchers have noticed the discordance of risk perceptions among critical stakeholders in safe construction work, however few have provided quantifiable evidence describing them. In an effort to fill this perception gap, this research performs an experiment that investigates stakeholder perceptions of risk in construction. Data analysis confirms the existence of such discordance, and indicates a trend in risk likelihood estimation. With risk perceptions from low to high, the stakeholders are architects, contractors/safety professionals, and engineers. Including prior studies, results also suggest that designers have improved their knowledge in building construction safety, but compared to builders they present more difficultly in reaching a consensus of perception. Findings of this research are intended to be used by risk management and decision makers to reassess stakeholders’ varying judgments when considering injury prevention and hazard assessment. PMID:26441481

  14. Triple-Loop Learning in a Cross-Sector Partnership: The DC Central Kitchen Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ameli, Patrizia; Kayes, D. Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to build on notions of a higher level of organizational learning to suggest another dimension: interorganizational learning that emerges in a cross-sector partnership. Design/methodology/approach: A case study was conducted with the DC Central Kitchen (DCCK) partnership with for-profit and governmental entities. Research…

  15. Partnership in Action: Examples of Employer/Faith-Based and Community Organization Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Labor, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This publication builds on the "Making a Difference Through Strategic Business Partnerships: A Guide for Faith-Based and Community Organizations" guidebook by providing a series of snapshots of partnerships between employers and faith-based and community organizations (FBCOs). FBCOs bring unique assets to the task of assisting…

  16. Building Partnerships Between Research Institutions, University Academic Departments, Local School Districts, and Private Enterprise to Advance K-12 Science Education in Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellins, K. K.; Ganey-Curry, P.; Fennell, T.

    2003-12-01

    The University of Texas at Austin Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) is engaged in six K-12 education and outreach programs, including two NSF-sponsored projects--GK-12: Linking Graduate Fellows with K-12 Students and Teachers and Cataclysms and Catastrophes--Texas Teachers in the Field, Adopt-a-School, Geoscience in the Classroom, and UT's Science and Engineering Apprenticeship Program. The GK-12 Program is central to UTIG's effort and links the six education projects together. While the specific objectives of each project differ, the broad goals of UTIG's education and outreach are to provide high-quality professional development for teachers, develop curriculum resources aligned with state and national education standards, and promote interaction between teachers, scientists, graduate students, and science educators. To achieve these goals, UTIG has forged funded partnerships with scientific colleagues at UT's Bureau of Economic Geology, Marine Science Institute and Department of Geological Sciences; science educators at UT's Charles A. Dana Center and in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction in the College of Education; teachers in six Texas independent school districts; and 4empowerment.com, a private education company that established the "Cyberways and Waterways" Web site to integrate technology and education through an environmentally-based curriculum. These partnerships have allowed UTIG to achieve far more than would have been possible through individual projects alone. Examples include the development of more than 30 inquiry-based activities, hosting workshops and a summer institute, and participation in local science fairs. UTIG has expanded the impact of its education and outreach and achieved broader dissemination of learning activities through 4empowerment's web-based programs, which reach ethnically diverse students in schools across Texas. These partnerships have also helped UTIG and 4empowerment to secure additional funding for other education

  17. Assessing global partnerships in graduate nursing.

    PubMed

    Birch, Amelia P; Tuck, Jodi; Malata, Address; Gagnon, Anita J

    2013-11-01

    North-South partnerships in graduate nursing education can prepare students to address global healthcare issues, increase cultural competence, and build research capacity. However, the current literature does not include a critical and systematic assessment of partnerships using established guidelines. This paper has two objectives: 1) Find and refine a suitable measure to assess a North-South inter-institutional research and clinical partnership in nursing; 2) Pilot test an assessment measure and describe the results of a systematic institutional self-evaluation of a developing North-South research and clinical partnership within a graduate nursing program. The first objective was addressed by searching for, examining and selecting an assessment measure. The second objective was obtained by applying the assessment measure to a developing graduate-level research and clinical partnership between a Canadian School of Nursing and a Malawian College of Nursing; qualitative data collected included information from a document review and subjective experiences of partners. Results showed that when appropriate revisions are made to an existing guideline, it is applicable to use as an assessment measure for North-South inter-institutional research and clinical partnerships. Recommendations for improvement were made, allowing the guideline to be more specific for research and clinical partnerships. Results demonstrated that the existing Canadian-Malawian partnership was strongest in the guideline category of "shaping the purpose and scope of the partnership," and weakest in "partnership implementation and context." This paper implies that: 1) evaluation can strengthen partnerships and enhance educational experience for nursing students; 2) research comparing and contrasting different genres of partnerships could help determine which type is the most appropriate for an institutions' particular outcome goals; and 3) effective establishment and maintenance of North

  18. Building effective partnerships to improve birth outcomes by reducing obesity: The B'more Fit for healthy babies coalition of Baltimore.

    PubMed

    Truiett-Theodorson, Robin; Tuck, Stacey; Bowie, Janice V; Summers, Amber C; Kelber-Kaye, Jodi

    2015-08-01

    Obesity affects a large percentage of Baltimore City's population with repercussions on maternal health and birth outcomes. Approaches to ameliorate its impact must be comprehensive and include stakeholder involvement at all levels of influence including policy makers, service providers, and community residents. In this article, we examine the evolution of the B'more Fit for Healthy Babies Coalition in Baltimore, Maryland, with a specific focus on how the public health alliance was formed, the strategies employed, and how partners continually evaluated themselves. This study offers the opportunity to understand the extent and complexity undergirding the collaborative processes of community coalitions as they strive to find innovative solutions to major public health concerns.

  19. Barriers and strategies to align stakeholders in healthcare alliances.

    PubMed

    Herald, Larry R; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Beich, Jeff; Mittler, Jessica N; O'Hora, Jennifer L

    2012-09-01

    To identify barriers to stakeholder alignment and strategies used by 14 multi-stakeholder alliances participating in the Aligning Forces for Quality initiative to overcome these barriers. The study used a mixed method, comparative case study design. Alliances were categorized as more or less highly aligned based on an alignment index constructed from survey responses. Six alliances (top and bottom quartile) were selected for more in-depth qualitative analysis. Semi-structured interviews of key informants were used to identify factors that distinguished more highly aligned alliances from less highly aligned alliances. Market context was one of the most important factors differentiating alliances. More highly aligned alliances had more extensive histories of collaboration, established more credibility in the local community, and were more effective at balancing collaborative initiatives against competitive interests. More highly aligned alliances also took more active approaches to build consensus among stakeholders regarding alliance initiatives, and were able to successfully utilize small decision-making bodies to foster this consensus. In contrast, leadership credibility, leadership stability, and trust were important facilitators of alignment for all alliances, regardless of the level of alignment. These factors intersect and overlap in a multitude of ways to influence stakeholder alignment. Alignment in an alliance context is critical for leveraging the unique knowledge, skills, and abilities of stakeholders in ways that can build capacity to improve the health of the community in ways that cannot be achieved independently by stakeholders. The findings highlight the need for multifaceted approaches to promote stakeholder alignment.

  20. Collaboration in natural resource governance: reconciling stakeholder expectations in deer management in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Davies, Althea L; White, Rehema M

    2012-12-15

    The challenges of integrated, adaptive and ecosystem management are leading government agencies to adopt participatory modes of engagement. Collaborative governance is a form of participation in which stakeholders co-produce goals and strategies and share responsibilities and resources. We assess the potential and challenges of collaborative governance as a mechanism to provide an integrated, ecosystem approach to natural resource management, using red deer in Scotland as a case study. Collaborative Deer Management Groups offer a well-established example of a 'bridging organisation', intended to reduce costs and facilitate decision making and learning across institutions and scales. We examine who initiates collaborative processes and why, what roles different actors adopt and how these factors influence the outcomes, particularly at a time of changing values, management and legislative priorities. Our findings demonstrate the need for careful consideration of where and how shared responsibility might be best implemented and sustained as state agencies often remain key to the process, despite the partnership intention. Differing interpretations between agencies and landowners of the degree of autonomy and division of responsibilities involved in 'collaboration' can create tension, while the diversity of landowner priorities brings additional challenges for defining shared goals in red deer management and in other cases. Effective maintenance depends on appropriate role allocation and adoption of responsibilities, definition of convergent values and goals, and establishing communication and trust in institutional networks. Options that may help private stakeholders offset the costs of accepting responsibility for delivering public benefits need to be explicitly addressed to build capacity and support adaptation. This study indicates that collaborative governance has the potential to help reconcile statutory obligations with stakeholder empowerment. The potential of

  1. Building Successful Partnerships Between Scientists and Educators to Bridge Scientific Research to Education and Outreach Audiences at a National Research Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Henderson, S.; Carbone, L.; Eastburn, T.; Russell, R.; Gardiner, L.; Ammann, C.; Carlson, D.; Deluca, C.; Fried, A.; Killeen, T.; Laursen, K.; Lopez, R.; Lu, G.; Marsh, D.; Mearns, L.; Otto-Bleisner, B.; Richmond, A.; Richter, D.; Hughes, J.; Alexander, C.; Gombosi, T.; Haines-Stiles, G.

    2003-12-01

    The scientific missions of National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) community offer numerous opportunities to integrate content on atmospheric, climate, and related sciences into formal and informal public education and outreach programs. The UCAR Office of Education and Outreach currently coordinates a variety of partnerships with science PI's catalyzing activities that include work-study experiences for teachers and students in the laboratory; creation of EO resources for scientists to utilize when visiting K-12 classrooms; extension of exhibit content in K-12 teacher guides; topic-specific web site content for the public, K-12, and undergraduates; professional development for K-12 educators; and public broadcast quality documentation of emerging technology. This presentation will review how these partnerships are developed, what works best, and plans for the future drawing from examples of collaborations with scientists. The scientists represent the NSF-funded Analytical Photonics and Optoelectronics Laboratory (APOL), the Boston University Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling, and the High Altitude Instrumented Platform for Environmental Research Program (HIAPER); the NASA-funded Earth System Modeling Framework; collaborations with the Windows to the Universe project sponsored by multiple agencies; the NCAR Climate Assessment Initiative; and several NASA-funded Sun-Earth Connection Research Programs.

  2. 15 CFR 1160.22 - Goal of the Strategic Partnership initiative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... benefits of forming Strategic Partnerships among firms representing the entire food chain of specific... private sector in key technologies at which the stakeholder industries in the food chain for each...

  3. 15 CFR 1160.22 - Goal of the Strategic Partnership initiative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... benefits of forming Strategic Partnerships among firms representing the entire food chain of specific... private sector in key technologies at which the stakeholder industries in the food chain for each...

  4. 15 CFR 1160.22 - Goal of the Strategic Partnership initiative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... benefits of forming Strategic Partnerships among firms representing the entire food chain of specific... private sector in key technologies at which the stakeholder industries in the food chain for each...

  5. 15 CFR 1160.22 - Goal of the Strategic Partnership initiative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... benefits of forming Strategic Partnerships among firms representing the entire food chain of specific... private sector in key technologies at which the stakeholder industries in the food chain for each...

  6. Green Power Partnership Videos

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Green Power Partnership develops videos on a regular basis that explore a variety of topics including, Green Power partnership, green power purchasing, Renewable energy certificates, among others.

  7. Stakeholders in One Health.

    PubMed

    Mazet, J A K; Uhart, M M; Keyyu, J D

    2014-08-01

    The stakeholders in One Health include the ultimate beneficiaries (i.e. animals, people and the environment) and the organisations that work to protect them (i.e. research institutes, government ministries, international organisations and professional bodies). However, identifying these stakeholders who will contribute to One Health activities and develop solutions to complex health problems can be difficult, as these problems often affect all sectors of society. In addition, evolving concepts about health and its dependence on environmental resilience necessitate the inclusion of ministries, organisations and disciplines that may not have been traditionally considered to be related to health. The multilateral organisations with greatest responsibilities in the global health arena have recognised that the best way to protect health security and promote overall global well-being is to work together across disciplinary and jurisdictional boundaries. Permanent regional networks and ad hoc networks created to tackle specific issues (both of which require donor investment) are also facilitating improved disease surveillance and collaborative approaches to synchronised interventions across country borders. These networks necessarily involve the key ministries for One Health, those of health, agriculture/livestock, and natural resources/environment. Ministries play a critical role in the formulation and implementation of policies for the promotion of health and disease control. They contribute to all stages of the One Heath process, as do universities, which engage by generating knowledge and capacity through teaching, research and extension services. Similarly, non-governmental organisations have a key role in stewardship; resource mobilisation; generation of knowledge; capacity development; intervention design; and implementation. Finally, communities, including rural and indigenous peoples, particularly those that are in close proximity to natural areas, are at the

  8. Partnerships for better oral health.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, E

    2003-05-01

    Improving oral health in populations who do not easily access the private dental office or the available community care site is a challenge to dental hygienists and others concerned with the health and well-being of all. Partnerships for improved oral health have been part of the community health efforts for many years and in many countries. With the knowledge, skills, and resources that are held by specific groups and organisations combined into a larger entity of a partnership or coalition, greater impact on oral health issue may be possible. Agencies and individuals interested in making improvements in oral health status in any particular target group may begin a process of working with others who have an interest in improving the health and well being of that target group. In a world that is increasingly synergistic and mutually dependent, improvements in oral health can be advanced by considering the elements of successful coalition building and forming partnerships with multiple organisations and individuals.

  9. Public-Private Leadership Forum; 21st Century Power Partnership

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-14

    The PPLF convenes stakeholders from across the power sector, spanning electricity supply, delivery, and end-use, and plays a key role in guiding the strategic direction of the Power Partnership. In addition, PPLF members support the implementation of activities set out in the Power Partnership Program of Work. Taken together, the activities of the PPLF span the dynamic landscape of power challenges and opportunities, with a focus on business models, ?nancial tools, and regulatory frameworks.

  10. Progress in public-private partnerships to fight neglected diseases.

    PubMed

    Gustavsen, Kenneth; Hanson, Christy

    2009-01-01

    In the global fight against neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), public health partnerships involving donations of medicines by pharmaceutical companies are enabling access to treatment for millions of people worldwide. These partnerships collaborate with other disease programs and a range of key stakeholders to develop and improve programs to control and eliminate NTDs. Although progress is being made against NTDs, continued success depends on a policy environment that supports appropriate levels of engagement and collaboration from all participants.

  11. Building international research partnerships to develop HIV programs for women of color in the context of social inequalities and human rights.

    PubMed

    Sanders-Phillips, Kathy; Pretorius, Liezille; Reddy, Priscilla

    2009-01-01

    This article examines relationships among social inequality, drug use, and HIV risk for women of color in the United States and South Africa. In the first section, social and cultural factors that may place women of color at risk for drug use and exposure to HIV are identified. In the second section, lessons learned while developing HIV prevention research protocols for women of color in South Africa are presented and discussed. Experience suggests that to effectively address women's risks of drug use and AIDS requires specific theoretical models and methodological approaches that acknowledge the critical interface that may exist among social inequality, drug use, and AIDS risk for women worldwide. Successful HIV prevention and intervention programs for women of color worldwide also require international research partnerships that are based on mutual respect between partners and attention to the needs and priorities of the target populations.

  12. National Clean Fleets Partnership (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2014-01-01

    Clean Cities' National Clean Fleets Partnership establishes strategic alliances with large fleets to help them explore and adopt alternative fuels and fuel economy measures to cut petroleum use. The initiative leverages the strength of nearly 100 Clean Cities coalitions, nearly 18,000 stakeholders, and more than 20 years of experience. It provides fleets with top-level support, technical assistance, robust tools and resources, and public acknowledgement to help meet and celebrate fleets' petroleum-use reductions.

  13. Final Report. An Integrated Partnership to Create and Lead the Solar Codes and Standards Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, Andrew

    2013-12-30

    The DOE grant, “An Integrated Partnership to Create and Lead the Solar Codes and Standards Working Group,” to New Mexico State University created the Solar America Board for Codes and Standards (Solar ABCs). From 2007 – 2013 with funding from this grant, Solar ABCs identified current issues, established a dialogue among key stakeholders, and catalyzed appropriate activities to support the development of codes and standards that facilitated the installation of high quality, safe photovoltaic systems. Solar ABCs brought the following resources to the PV stakeholder community; Formal coordination in the planning or revision of interrelated codes and standards removing “stove pipes” that have only roofing experts working on roofing codes, PV experts on PV codes, fire enforcement experts working on fire codes, etc.; A conduit through which all interested stakeholders were able to see the steps being taken in the development or modification of codes and standards and participate directly in the processes; A central clearing house for new documents, standards, proposed standards, analytical studies, and recommendations of best practices available to the PV community; A forum of experts that invites and welcomes all interested parties into the process of performing studies, evaluating results, and building consensus on standards and code-related topics that affect all aspects of the market; and A biennial gap analysis to formally survey the PV community to identify needs that are unmet and inhibiting the market and necessary technical developments.

  14. Building Alliances Series: Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    Public-private partnerships done right are a powerful tool for development, providing enduring solutions to some of the greatest challenges. To help familiarize readers with the art of alliance building, the Global Development Alliance (GDA) office has created a series of practical guides that highlight proven practices in partnerships,…

  15. Collaborative Stakeholder Engagement. Special Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Matt; Chrislip, David; Workman, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Stakeholder engagement and collaboration are essential to the development of an effective state plan. Engaging a diverse group of stakeholders tasked with working together to create education policies that will have a positive, lasting impact on students is not as easy as it sounds. Experts in the field argue that the traditional stakeholder…

  16. Educational Partnerships. Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodinger-deUriarte, Christine; And Others

    The United States Congress enacted the Educational Partnerships Act in 1988. The Educational Partnerships Program (EPP) stimulated the creation of educational partnerships to demonstrate their contribution to educational reform. The Office of Educational Research (OERI) provided funds to 30 educational partnerships. This document contains five…

  17. Annual Partnership Report, 2016

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. This partnership report fulfills statutory reporting requirement W.S. 21-18-202(e)(iv) which mandates the development of annual reports to the legislature on the outcomes of partnerships between colleges…

  18. Building a Registry of Research Volunteers among Older Urban African Americans: Recruitment Processes and Outcomes from a Community-Based Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadiha, Letha A.; Washington, Olivia G. M.; Lichtenberg, Peter A.; Green, Carmen R.; Daniels, Karen L.; Jackson, James S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the study: An emerging strategy for increasing public participation in health research is volunteer registries. Using a community-based participatory research framework, we describe recruitment processes and outcomes in building a research volunteer registry of older urban African Americans. The specific research question examined…

  19. Partners or Managers? A Case Study of Public-Private Partnerships in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiMartino, Catherine; Thompson, Eustace

    2016-01-01

    This case tells the story of a failed public-private partnership. It illustrates how stakeholders, encouraged by the current political context, rushed into a partnership without establishing a basis for mutual understanding and expectations. As a result of this hasty arrangement, questions emerged over who ultimately controlled decisions related…

  20. Partners or Managers? A Case Study of Public-Private Partnerships in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiMartino, Catherine; Thompson, Eustace

    2016-01-01

    This case tells the story of a failed public-private partnership. It illustrates how stakeholders, encouraged by the current political context, rushed into a partnership without establishing a basis for mutual understanding and expectations. As a result of this hasty arrangement, questions emerged over who ultimately controlled decisions related…

  1. Networking for the Turnaround of a School District: The Boston University--Chelsea Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paletta, Angelo; Candal, Cara Stillings; Vidoni, Daniele

    2009-01-01

    The 20-year partnership between Boston University and the school district of Chelsea, Massachusetts, came to an official end in June 2008. Although the partnership is by many measures successful, the continued success of the district will depend on how well Boston University is able to share with stakeholders management techniques and the…

  2. Modeling Creative and Courageous School Leadership Through District-Community-University Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldring, Ellen; Sims, Pearl

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the Principals Leadership Academy of Nashville (PLAN) to explore the question "How do university-community-district partnerships develop as successful cooperative endeavors?" Interviews conducted with key stakeholders are analyzed to study critical aspects of the partnership's governance structure, guiding principles, and…

  3. Achieving success in trail related partnerships: the Michigan State Forest Experience

    Treesearch

    Joel A. Lynch; Charles M. Nelson

    1998-01-01

    Management of trails has become challenging as funding for their operation and administration has decreased. To contend with shortfalls, resources managers are forming partnerships with stakeholders to meet these challenges. An investigation of two trail programs in Michigan is used to illustrate the benefits of partnerships, key elements related to success, and...

  4. Making Smart Building Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coburn, Janet

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how a positive partnership with the architect can help one who is inexperienced in building design and construction make smart building decisions. Tips address how to prevent change orders, what red flags to look for in a building project, what the administrator should expect from the architect to make the project run smoothly, and what…

  5. Building capacity for community-based participatory research for health disparities in Canada: the case of "Partnerships in Community Health Research".

    PubMed

    Masuda, Jeffrey R; Creighton, Genevieve; Nixon, Sean; Frankish, James

    2011-03-01

    Enthusiasm for community-based participatory research (CBPR) is increasing among health researchers and practitioners in addressing health disparities. Although there are many benefits of CBPR, such as its ability to democratize knowledge and link research to community action and social change, there are also perils that researchers can encounter that can threaten the integrity of the research and undermine relationships. Despite the increasing demand for CBPR-qualified individuals, few programs exist that are capable of facilitating in-depth and experiential training for both students and those working in communities. This article reviews the Partnerships in Community Health Research (PCHR), a training program at the University of British Columbia that between 2001 and 2009 has equipped graduate student and community-based learners with knowledge, skills, and experience to engage together more effectively using CBPR. With case studies of PCHR learner projects, this article illustrates some of the important successes and lessons learned in preparing CBPR-qualified researchers and community-based professionals in Canada.

  6. Building academic-practice partnerships: the Center for Public Health Preparedness at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, before and after 9/11.

    PubMed

    Morse, Stephen S

    2003-01-01

    The Center for Public Health Preparedness at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health is part of a national network of academic centers established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to strengthen links between public health practice and academe, especially for public health workforce development. Since its inception in Fall 2000, the Center has been working in partnership with the New York City Department of Health & Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) on planning and competency-based training in emergency preparedness (including bioterrorism and infectious diseases) and evaluation. Initial programs with DOHMH included development of a 3-hour orientation to basic emergency preparedness for their workforce. In the wake of 9/11 and the anthrax events, Center members gave over two dozen presentations at community forums, seminars, and clinical rounds, and over 100 press interviews, provided lay language information through community forum presentations and the School's Web site, and developed a database of volunteers for surge capacity. Subsequent programs include bioterrorism response training for clinicians and emergency medical services personnel, incident command for public health, and a study of evacuation from the World Trade Center on 9/11.

  7. Capacity Building Resource Management Of Coastal Areas To Improve The Local Economic Based By Cross-Cutting Partnerships: Case Study on Panjang Beach Bengkulu City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darmi, Titi

    2017-02-01

    The western part of Bengkulu city is a coastal region approximately 525 km, along the coast lies the tourism object which become the flagship of Bengkulu province. Coastal tourism is made as the pre-eminent is Panjang beach. Management of two beaches has not been managed optimally, so that is not yet on the economy have implications for communities, the people majority are fishermen, the highest poverty levels of Bengkulu city. The purpose of this research is to examine the development capacity of resource management and coastal areas of Panjang beach should be able to increase income community along the coast. Research method is using qualitative research types with approach case studies, which can investigate and phenomena identify that occur, and explain how and why about the income community arround the beaches, using the instrumental case study. Determination of samples is done based on the purposes and research problems, primary data sources are collected by in-depth interviews, FGD, and secondary data source are collected by observation and documentation. Data relating to be interpreted set forth in proposition because the result of the organized with matching pattern competition. The study results indicate there has been no integrated and suitability management between province and the city; stakeholders participation in community empowerment on the coast has been optimal; leadership commitment related to enhance institutional capacity is too weak, and there has not been a policy of managing the Panjang beach Bengkulu based on information technology.

  8. Green Buildings in Use: Post Occupancy Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Chris

    2007-01-01

    This article briefly describes users' experiences of two "green" education buildings. It goes on to conclude that stakeholders' negotiation of building performance is necessary to minimise environmental impact, just as it is necessary to achieve other aspects of building performance.

  9. Green Buildings in Use: Post Occupancy Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Chris

    2007-01-01

    This article briefly describes users' experiences of two "green" education buildings. It goes on to conclude that stakeholders' negotiation of building performance is necessary to minimise environmental impact, just as it is necessary to achieve other aspects of building performance.

  10. Principles and processes behind promoting awareness of rights for quality maternal care services: a synthesis of stakeholder experiences and implementation factors.

    PubMed

    George, Asha S; Branchini, Casey

    2017-08-31

    Promoting awareness of rights is a value-based process that entails a different way of thinking and acting, which is at times misunderstood or deemed as aspirational. Guided by the SURE framework, we undertook a secondary analysis of 26 documents identified by an earlier systematic review on promoting awareness of rights to increase use of maternity care services. We thematically analysed stakeholder experiences and implementation factors across the diverse initiatives to derive common elements to guide future efforts. Interventions that promote awareness of rights for maternal health varied in nature, methodological orientation, depth and quality. Materials included booklets, posters, pamphlets/ briefs and service standards/charters. Target populations included women, family members, communities, community structures, community-based and non governmental organizations, health providers and administrators, as well as elected representatives. While one initiative only focused on raising awareness, most were embedded within larger efforts to improve the accountability and responsiveness of service delivery through community monitoring and advocacy, with a few aiming to change policies and contest elections. Underlying these action oriented forms of promoting awareness of rights, was a critical consciousness and attitudinal change gained through iterative capacity-building for all stakeholders; materials and processes that supported group discussion and interaction; the formation or strengthening of community groups; situational analysis to ensure adaptation to local context; facilitation to ensure common ground and language across stakeholders; and strategic networking and alliance building across health system levels. While many positive experiences are discussed, few challenges or barriers to implementation are documented. The limited documentation and poor quality of information found indicate that while various examples of promoting awareness of rights for

  11. Stakeholder understandings of wildfire mitigation: A case of shared and contested meanings

    Treesearch

    Joseph G. Champ; Jeffrey J. Brooks; Daniel R. Williams

    2012-01-01

    This article identifies and compares meanings of wildfire risk mitigation for stakeholders in the Front Range of Colorado, USA. We examine the case of a collaborative partnership sponsored by government agencies and directed to decrease hazardous fuels in interface areas. Data were collected by way of key informant interviews and focus groups. The analysis is guided by...

  12. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-30

    , monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed in the second quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO2 concentrations. While no key deliverables were due during the third quarter, progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations and in this report. A series of meetings held during the second and third quarters have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding carbon sequestration in this region, the need for a holistic approach to meeting energy demands and economic development potential, and the implementation of government programs or a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. A third Partnership meeting has been planned for August 04 in Idaho Falls; a preliminary agenda is attached.

  13. The Nursing Education Partnership Initiative (NEPI): innovations in nursing and midwifery education.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Lyn; Howard, Andrea A; Dohrn, Jennifer; Von Zinkernagel, Deborah; Parham Hopson, Deborah; Aranda-Naranjo, Barbara; Hall, Carolyn; Malata, Address; Bvumbwe, Thokozani; Chabela, Adeline; Molise, Nthabiseng; El-Sadr, Wafaa M

    2014-08-01

    The nursing and midwifery workforce is key to improving the performance of the health system overall. Health workforce shortages are significantly influenced by the productive capacity of health professions education institutions. Long-standing underinvestment in preservice nursing and midwifery education severely limits the capacity of institutions to educate nurses and midwives in sufficient numbers, and with the necessary clinical skills, for current and anticipated population health needs. The Nursing Education Partnership Initiative (NEPI) was established in 2011 by the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief in response to key capacity-building challenges facing preservice nursing and midwifery education in Sub-Saharan Africa. NEPI has formed partnerships with governments and key stakeholders in Ethiopia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Lesotho, Malawi, and Zambia and supports 19 nursing and midwifery education institutions and 1 nursing council. NEPI has been informed by activities that strengthen education systems, institutions, and organizations as well as faculty capacity building. Ministry of health-led advisory groups were established to provide strategic direction and oversight for the work, fostering intersectoral dialogue and ensuring country ownership and sustainability. Three illustrative examples of innovations at the system, institution, and workforce levels describe approaches for country ownership, for addressing the shortage of highly qualified faculty, and for remedying the inadequate teaching and learning infrastructure.

  14. Veterinarians and public practice at the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine: building on a tradition of expertise and partnership.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Katherine A; Walters, Bettye K

    2008-01-01

    The Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine (VMRCVM), a regional veterinary college for Maryland and Virginia, has a long and unique tradition of encouraging careers in public and corporate veterinary medicine. The VMRCVM is home to the Center for Public and Corporate Veterinary Medicine (CPCVM), and each year approximately 10% of the veterinary students choose the public/corporate veterinary medicine track. The faculty of the CPCVM, and their many partners from the veterinary public practice community, teach in the veterinary curriculum and provide opportunities for students locally, nationally, and internationally during summers and the final clinical year. Graduates of the program work for government organizations, including the US Department of Agriculture, the Food and Drug Administration, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as well as in research, in industry, and for non-governmental organizations. Recent activities include securing opportunities for students, providing career counseling for graduate veterinarians interested in making a career transition, delivering continuing education, and offering a preparatory course for veterinarians sitting the board examination for the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine. As the VMRCVM moves forward in recognition of the changing needs of the veterinary profession, it draws on its tradition of partnership and capitalizes on the excellence of its existing program. Future plans for the CPCVM include possible expansion in the fields of public health, public policy, international veterinary medicine, organizational leadership, and the One Health initiative. Quality assurance and evaluation of the program is ongoing, with recognition that novel evaluation approaches will be useful and informative.

  15. Policy content and stakeholder network analysis for infant and young child feeding in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Karn, Sumit; Devkota, Madhu Dixit; Uddin, Shahadat; Thow, Anne Marie

    2017-06-13

    Despite concerted effort from government and partners, Nepal continues to have a high burden of under nutrition among children. Identifying opportunities to strengthen policy support for infant and young child feeding (IYCF) is a key component to improve child survival, growth and development. This study aims to explore policy support for IYCF and to identify the influential stakeholders for IYCF for effective future policy development and programmatic action. Policies relevant to IYCF were identified through web searches and direct approaches to relevant government ministries. Policy content was analysed based on four key domains focussed on mothers, using a qualitative synthesis approach. Three group interviews were conducted using the participatory tool "Net-Map", to identify the influential stakeholders in IYCF policy and programming processes. Twenty-six relevant policy documents were analysed for content relating to IYCF. General support for IYCF was found in most of the development plans and high-level health sector policies. Most implementation level documents included support for provision of correct information to mothers. Capacity building of frontline workers for IYCN and system strengthening were well supported through sectoral plans and policies. However, gaps were identified regarding maternity protection, support for monitoring and evaluation, and translation of high-level policy directives into implementation level guidelines, resulting in a lack of clarity over roles and responsibilities. Both government and non-governmental stakeholders, particularly donors, emerged as influential drivers of IYCF policy decisions in Nepal, through technical assistance and funding. The Nutrition Technical Committee under the Ministry of Health, UNICEF, Suaahara, USAID and WHO were identified as key actors providing technical assistance. Key funding agencies were identified as UNICEF and USAID. This study reveals strong policy support for key dimensions of IYCF

  16. Factors influencing trust and mistrust in health promotion partnerships.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jacky; Barry, Margaret M

    2016-07-27

    Partnerships between sectors can achieve better outcomes than can be achieved by individual partners working alone. Trust is necessary for partnerships to function effectively. Mistrust makes partnership working difficult, if not impossible. There has been little research into partnership functioning factors that influence trust and mistrust. This study aimed to identify these factors in health promotion partnerships. Data were collected from 337 partners in 40 health promotion partnerships using a postal survey. The questionnaire incorporated multi-dimensional scales designed to assess the contribution of factors that influence partnership trust and mistrust. Newly validated scales were developed for trust, mistrust and power. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify the significance of each factor to partnership trust and mistrust. Power was found to be the only predictor of partnership trust. Power, leadership, and efficiency were the most important factors influencing partnership mistrust. Power in partnerships must be shared or partners will not trust each other. Power-sharing and trust-building mechanisms need to be built into partnerships from the beginning and sustained throughout the collaborative process.

  17. 77 FR 42801 - Public Private Partnerships Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Public Private Partnerships Public Meeting AGENCY: Department of... public meeting on August 7 regarding program design and implementation of an equipage incentives program... beneficial to the various stakeholders, if such a program were to be created. Meeting Information...

  18. Examining the Complexities of School-Museum Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Preeti; Adams, Jennifer; Kisiel, James; Dewitt, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    We examine the research conducted by Kang, Anderson and Wu by discussing it in a larger context of science museum-school partnerships. We review how the disconnect that exists between stakeholders, the historical and cultural contexts in which formal and informal institutions are situated, and ideas of globalization, mediate the success for…

  19. Port Stakeholder Summit - April 2014

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's National Port Stakeholders Summit, Advancing More Sustainable Ports, focused on actions to protect air quality while reducing climate risk and supporting economic growth, making ports more environmentally sustainable.

  20. State and Local Government Partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Alexander; Rinebold, Joel; Aresta, Paul

    2012-03-30

    The State and Local Government Partnership project has built relationships between the Department of Energy (DOE), regional states, and municipalities. CCAT implemented this project using a structure that included leadership by the DOE. Outreach was undertaken through collaborative meetings, workshops, and briefings; the development of technical models and local energy plans; support for state stakeholder groups; and implementation of strategies to facilitate the deployment of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. The final guidance documents provided to stakeholders consisted of individual strategic state “Roadmaps” to serve as development plans. These “Roadmaps” confirm economic impacts, identify deployment targets, and compare policies and incentives for facility development in each of the regional states. The partnerships developed through this project have improved the exchange of knowledge between state and local government stakeholders and is expected to increase the deployment of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in early market applications, consistent with the DOE’s market transformation efforts. Technically accurate and objective information was, and continues to be, provided to improve public and stakeholder perceptions regarding the use of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. Based on the “Roadmaps” and studies conducted for this project, there is the potential to generate approximately 10.75 million megawatt hours (MWh) of electricity annually from hydrogen and fuel cell technologies at potential host sites in the Northeast regional states, through the development of 1,364 to 1,818 megawatts (MW) of fuel cell electric generation capacity. Currently, the region has approximately 1,180 companies that are part of the growing hydrogen and fuel cell industry supply chain in the region. These companies are estimated to have over $1 billion in annual revenue and investment, contribute more than $51 million in annual state and local tax revenue

  1. Applying Critical Race Theory to Group Model Building Methods to Address Community Violence.

    PubMed

    Frerichs, Leah; Lich, Kristen Hassmiller; Funchess, Melanie; Burrell, Marcus; Cerulli, Catherine; Bedell, Precious; White, Ann Marie

    2016-01-01

    Group model building (GMB) is an approach to building qualitative and quantitative models with stakeholders to learn about the interrelationships among multilevel factors causing complex public health problems over time. Scant literature exists on adapting this method to address public health issues that involve racial dynamics. This study's objectives are to (1) introduce GMB methods, (2) present a framework for adapting GMB to enhance cultural responsiveness, and (3) describe outcomes of adapting GMB to incorporate differences in racial socialization during a community project seeking to understand key determinants of community violence transmission. An academic-community partnership planned a 1-day session with diverse stakeholders to explore the issue of violence using GMB. We documented key questions inspired by critical race theory (CRT) and adaptations to established GMB "scripts" (i.e., published facilitation instructions). The theory's emphasis on experiential knowledge led to a narrative-based facilitation guide from which participants created causal loop diagrams. These early diagrams depict how violence is transmitted and how communities respond, based on participants' lived experiences and mental models of causation that grew to include factors associated with race. Participants found these methods useful for advancing difficult discussion. The resulting diagrams can be tested and expanded in future research, and will form the foundation for collaborative identification of solutions to build community resilience. GMB is a promising strategy that community partnerships should consider when addressing complex health issues; our experience adapting methods based on CRT is promising in its acceptability and early system insights.

  2. Partnerships panel: natural, resource partnerships: literature synthesis and research agenda

    Treesearch

    Steve Selin; Nancy Myers

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of an annotated bibliography on natural resource partnerships. Resource areas and management functions addressed in the partnership literature are examined. Partnership research is summarized and broken into categories including: Partnership outcomes, assessing the potential for partnerships, characteristics of successful partnerships,...

  3. Solicitation and Selection of Partner Projects, Technical Team Leads, and Measurement and Validation Contractors for the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Funded Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP-2)

    SciTech Connect

    Nesse, Ronald J.; Baechler, Michael C.; Iverson, Megan M.

    2010-09-30

    In March 2010, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) joined two other labs receiving ARRA funding, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the National Renewable National Laboratory (NREL), to began weekly conference calls with the goal of coordinating a joint lab solicitation to support the ARRA-funded CBP project. Two solicitations were identified for: 1) new CBP Partners; 2) technical contractors to provide technical assistance and measurement and verification (M&V) contractors. The M&V contractors support the work by providing model reviews and conducting monitoring studies to verify building performance. This report documents the process used by the labs for the solicitations, and describes the process and outcomes for PNNL, selection of candidate Partners, technical teams, and M&V contractors.

  4. A Methodological Framework to Analyze Stakeholder Preferences and Propose Strategic Pathways for a Sustainable University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turan, Fikret Korhan; Cetinkaya, Saadet; Ustun, Ceyda

    2016-01-01

    Building sustainable universities calls for participative management and collaboration among stakeholders. Combining analytic hierarchy and network processes (AHP/ANP) with statistical analysis, this research proposes a framework that can be used in higher education institutions for integrating stakeholder preferences into strategic decisions. The…

  5. A Methodological Framework to Analyze Stakeholder Preferences and Propose Strategic Pathways for a Sustainable University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turan, Fikret Korhan; Cetinkaya, Saadet; Ustun, Ceyda

    2016-01-01

    Building sustainable universities calls for participative management and collaboration among stakeholders. Combining analytic hierarchy and network processes (AHP/ANP) with statistical analysis, this research proposes a framework that can be used in higher education institutions for integrating stakeholder preferences into strategic decisions. The…

  6. Green Power Partnership Requirements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary partnership program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. To join, organizations must meet EPA's program requirements.

  7. Macular Degeneration Partnership

    MedlinePlus

    ... Age Related Macular Degeneration) Partnership Listen AMD Month Public Service Announcement To raise awareness of AMD, the Macular Degeneration Partnership (MDP) is distributing a public service announcement (PSA) nationwide. Seen through the eyes of a ...

  8. Green Power Partnership Scope

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary partnership program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. Organizations can elect to join organization-wide or at the facility level.

  9. Water System Partnerships Meeting

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Flyer, agenda and background document for January 31, 2017 meeting focused on incentives and drivers to support water system partnership development, funding and finance options for partnerships, and outreach and education.

  10. Special Issue: Partnerships and Collaborations in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddy, Pamela L.

    2010-01-01

    This volume comprises three chapters. The first chapter reviews organizational partnerships. The rationale for organizations and individuals to participate in institutional collaborations sets the foundation for the development of the partnership, builds on preconceived ideas regarding roles in the group and the level of resources each contributes…

  11. Understanding International Partnerships: A Theoretical and Practical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, John

    2016-01-01

    Internationalisation is now a key strategic priority for many universities. As part of this process, universities are increasingly looking to build a number of key strategic partnerships with a small number of like-minded institutions. This paper, based on a detailed study of three such partnerships, seeks to understand and theorise the process by…

  12. Understanding International Partnerships: A Theoretical and Practical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, John

    2016-01-01

    Internationalisation is now a key strategic priority for many universities. As part of this process, universities are increasingly looking to build a number of key strategic partnerships with a small number of like-minded institutions. This paper, based on a detailed study of three such partnerships, seeks to understand and theorise the process by…

  13. Special Issue: Partnerships and Collaborations in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddy, Pamela L.

    2010-01-01

    This volume comprises three chapters. The first chapter reviews organizational partnerships. The rationale for organizations and individuals to participate in institutional collaborations sets the foundation for the development of the partnership, builds on preconceived ideas regarding roles in the group and the level of resources each contributes…

  14. One size fits all partnerships? What explains community partnership leadership skills?

    PubMed

    El Ansari, Walid; Oskrochi, Reza; Phillips, Ceri J

    2010-07-01

    The authors evaluated W. K. Kellogg-funded Community Partnerships (CPs) between academic, health service, and community partners in South Africa. Stakeholders (N = 668 respondents) completed questionnaires to explore the operational, functional and organisational factors that contribute to members' perceptions of the skills of their CPs' leadership. Ten factors accounted for 53% of leadership skills across five participating CPs and six stakeholder groups. Each CP displayed its unique footprint of factors that accounted for its leadership levels. Similarly, each stakeholder group had its unique signature of factors that were associated with its leadership. Two factors (communication mechanisms and operational understanding) accounted for more than 25% of leadership skills; management capabilities and participation benefits accounted for 4% and 3%; and effectiveness, benefits to difficulties ratio of being a member, engagement in education, flow of information and sense of ownership accounted for 2% to 3% each. Attention to these and other factors is warranted.

  15. Partnerships in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Perspectives, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This theme issue includes eight articles that discuss partnerships between schools, colleges, and businesses. The partnerships are members of the National Network for Educational Renewal (NNER). "School-University Partnerships: Fundamental Concepts" (J. I. Goodlad) outlines the concepts, agenda, and structure essential to…

  16. Using the Partnership Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilks, Bob

    This paper provides a case study of the use of the Partnership Model in the development of a film about female menopause. Not only are the film maker and the client involved in the trust based partnership relationship, but the film subjects and audience are also included in the information sharing process. Advantages of the Partnership Model…

  17. Using the Partnership Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilks, Bob

    This paper provides a case study of the use of the Partnership Model in the development of a film about female menopause. Not only are the film maker and the client involved in the trust based partnership relationship, but the film subjects and audience are also included in the information sharing process. Advantages of the Partnership Model…

  18. Partnerships That Work!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Don, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This theme issue of the monthly Partnerships in Education (PIE) journal focuses on new collaborations, new educational challenges, and some examples of exemplary partnership programs at work in school districts across the country. Each of the 22 chapters was written by those who either direct or coordinate a partnership program. Partnership…

  19. Pathways to Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeman, Cheryl

    1994-01-01

    Calls for new approaches to meeting the needs of children and families, specifically through partnerships among Head Start, education, business, and other social service agencies. Discusses steps for establishing such partnerships as well as partnership objectives. Describes some existing collaborative programs around the country. (HTH)

  20. Partnerships in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Perspectives, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This theme issue includes eight articles that discuss partnerships between schools, colleges, and businesses. The partnerships are members of the National Network for Educational Renewal (NNER). "School-University Partnerships: Fundamental Concepts" (J. I. Goodlad) outlines the concepts, agenda, and structure essential to…

  1. National Guard State Partnership Program: Building Partnership Capacity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Kareem Fahim, “Slap to a Man’s Pride Set Off Tumult in Tunisia,” New York Times, January 22, 2011. 33 John Arquilla, “The Big Kill: Sorry, Steven ... Pinker , the world isn’t getting less violent.” Foreign Policy, December 3, 2012, http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2012/12/03/the_big_kill?page

  2. One Health stakeholder and institutional analysis in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Kimani, Tabitha; Ngigi, Margaret; Schelling, Esther; Randolph, Tom

    2016-01-01

    extending the OH network to include the other 50% stakeholders and fostering of the process at subnational-level building on available cross-sectoral platforms. PMID:27330042

  3. Industry Stakeholder Recommendations for DOE's RD&D for Increasing Energy Efficiency in Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Plympton, P.; Dagher, L.; Zwack, B.

    2007-06-01

    This technical report documents feedback for Industry Stakeholders on the direction of future U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research and development in the area of improving energy efficiency in existing residential buildings.

  4. An approach to building research capacity for health practitioners in a public health environment: an organisational perspective.

    PubMed

    Hulcombe, Julie; Sturgess, Jennifer; Souvlis, Tina; Fitzgerald, Cate

    2014-06-01

    A unique opportunity to engage in research capacity-building strategies for health practitioners arose within public sector health services during the negotiations for an industrial agreement. A research capacity-building initiative for health practitioners that is allied health, oral health and scientist practitioners was funded and the components of this initiative are described. The initiative was implemented using a research capacity-building framework developed from a review of the literature and stakeholder consultations. The framework included leadership and governance, support to researchers and translation of evidence into practice and was contextualised to public health environments. There were several phases of implementation. An evaluation of the preliminary phase of establishing research positions and research activity was conducted and several successes of the capacity-building strategies were identified. These successes (e.g. solid partnerships with universities) are discussed, as are future concerns, such as sustainability of the initiative in a tighter fiscal context.

  5. Research Stakeholders' Views on Benefits and Challenges for Public Health Research Data Sharing in Kenya: The Importance of Trust and Social Relations.

    PubMed

    Jao, Irene; Kombe, Francis; Mwalukore, Salim; Bull, Susan; Parker, Michael; Kamuya, Dorcas; Molyneux, Sassy; Marsh, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the importance of sharing research data within the international scientific community, but also of the ethical and social challenges this presents, particularly in the context of structural inequities and varied capacity in international research. Public involvement is essential to building locally responsive research policies, including on data sharing, but little research has involved stakeholders from low-to-middle income countries. Between January and June 2014, a qualitative study was conducted in Kenya involving sixty stakeholders with varying experiences of research in a deliberative process to explore views on benefits and challenges in research data sharing. In-depth interviews and extended small group discussions based on information sharing and facilitated debate were used to collect data. Data were analysed using Framework Analysis, and charting flow and dynamics in debates. The findings highlight both the opportunities and challenges of communicating about this complex and relatively novel topic for many stakeholders. For more and less research-experienced stakeholders, ethical research data sharing is likely to rest on the development and implementation of appropriate trust-building processes, linked to local perceptions of benefits and challenges. The central nature of trust is underpinned by uncertainties around who might request what data, for what purpose and when. Key benefits perceived in this consultation were concerned with the promotion of public health through science, with legitimate beneficiaries defined differently by different groups. Important challenges were risks to the interests of study participants, communities and originating researchers through stigmatisation, loss of privacy, impacting autonomy and unfair competition, including through forms of intentional and unintentional 'misuse' of data. Risks were also seen for science. Given background structural inequities in much international research

  6. 76 FR 34087 - Broad Stakeholder Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... SECURITY Broad Stakeholder Survey AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS. ACTION: 60-day... comments concerning the Broad Stakeholder Survey. DATES: Comments are encouraged and will be accepted until.... The Broad Stakeholder Survey is designed to gather stakeholder feedback on the effectiveness of...

  7. Data2Paper: A stakeholder-driven solution to data publication and citation challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Fiona; Jefferies, Neil; Ingraham, Thomas; Murray, Hollydawn; Ranganathan, Anusha

    2017-04-01

    Data, and especially open data, are valuable to the community but can also be valuable to the researcher. Data papers are a clear and open way to publicize and contextualize your data in a way that is citable and aids both reproducibility and efficiency in scholarly endeavour. However, this is not yet a format that is well understood or proliferating amongst the mainstream research community. Part of the Jisc Data Spring Initiative, a team of stakeholders (publishers, data repository managers, coders) have been developing a simple 'one-click' process where data, metadata and methods detail are transferred from a data repository (via a SWORD-based API and a cloud-based helper app based on the Fedora/Hydra platform) to a relevant publisher platform for publication as a data paper. Relying on automated processes: using ORCIDs to authenticate and pre-populate article templates and building on the DOI infrastructure to encourage provenance and citation, the app seeks to drive the deposit of data in repositories and encourage the growth of data papers by simplifying the process through the removal of redundant metadata entry and streamlining publisher submissions into a single consistent workflow. This poster will explain the underlying rationale and evidence gathering, development, partnerships, governance and other progress that this project has so far achieved. It will outline some key learning opportunities, challenges and drivers and explore the next steps.

  8. Developing Effective P-20 Partnerships to Benefit Chicano/Latino Students and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Carrol; Cooper, Catherine R.; Lopez, Angelica; Goza, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    To consider how interdisciplinary P-20 partnerships increase college going among Chicano/Latino youth, the authors highlight evidence from the Educational Partnership Center (EPC), University of California, Santa Cruz, a P-20 partnership building academic achievement and college and career pathways. Three elements advance EPC effectiveness:…

  9. Developing Effective P-20 Partnerships to Benefit Chicano/Latino Students and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Carrol; Cooper, Catherine R.; Lopez, Angelica; Goza, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    To consider how interdisciplinary P-20 partnerships increase college going among Chicano/Latino youth, the authors highlight evidence from the Educational Partnership Center (EPC), University of California, Santa Cruz, a P-20 partnership building academic achievement and college and career pathways. Three elements advance EPC effectiveness:…

  10. Creating a Seamless Web of Services for Youth: The DC Children and Youth Investment Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keegan, Sinead; Chaplin, Duncan

    This report describes the DC Children and Youth Investment Partnership, which helps improve outcomes for DC youth by building a sustainable partnership to increase the quality and quantity of youth services. Data from interviews with key actors, attendance at Partnership meetings, and site visits with affiliated initiatives show progress in…

  11. One perspective on stakeholder involvement at Hanford.

    PubMed

    Martin, Todd

    2011-11-01

    The Hanford nuclear site in Washington State had a major role in the production of nuclear weapons materials during the Manhattan Project in World War II and during the Cold War that followed. The production of weapons-grade radionuclides produced a large amount of radioactive byproducts that have been stored since the mid-1900s at the Hanford Site. These by-product radionuclides have leaked from containment facilities into the groundwater, contaminated buildings used for radionuclide processing, and also contaminated the nuclear reactors used to produce weapons-grade uranium and plutonium. This issue has been a major concern to Hanford stakeholders for several decades, and the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology established a Tri-Party Agreement in 1989, at which time Hanford ceased production of nuclear weapons materials and began a major effort to clean up and remediate the Hanford Site's contaminated groundwater, soil, and facilities. This paper describes the concerns of stakeholders in the production of nuclear weapons, the secrecy of Hanford operations, and the potential impacts to public health and the environment from the unintended releases of weapons-grade materials and by-products associated with their production at the Hanford Site. It also describes the involvement of public stakeholders in the development and oversight by the Hanford Advisory Board of the steps that have been taken in cleanup activities at the Hanford Site that began as a major effort about two decades ago. The importance of involvement of the general public and public interest organizations in developing and implementing the Hanford cleanup strategy are described in detail.

  12. Business resiliency and stakeholder management.

    PubMed

    Carey, Noel; Perry, Tony

    2014-01-01

    The authors facilitated separate round table discussions at the City and Financial Conference in London on 29th January, 2014. The theme of these discussions was business resiliency and stakeholder management. This topic attracted the largest group of all the breakout sessions, as the issue continues to generate much interest across the business resilience community. In this paper, the authors summarise the discussions held at the event and add their own insights into the subject of who are stakeholders, and the different means and messages to communicate to them.

  13. Public-private partnerships to revitalize psychiatric drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Brady, Linda S; Potter, William Z

    2014-01-01

    Precompetitive public-private partnerships (PPPs) have the potential to improve psychiatric drug discovery by addressing gaps in the research and development pipeline such as the identification and validation of new targets, models, biomarkers and disease phenotyping. PPPs are a model to strategically bring together expertise, in-kind support and funding from multiple public and private sector partners. This editorial describes selected case examples of established and emerging public-private consortia in the United States and Europe that provide tools, methods or resources to accelerate central nervous system (CNS) drug discovery. The authors provides a listing of public-private consortia projects that focus on the CNS, the stage of the drug discovery pipeline that they address, diseases, deliverables provided and current consortia partners. Some of the projects undertaken by PPPs in the area of CNS drug discovery and development are beginning to make tools, resources and data publicly available. Only a few PPPs have delivered enough to extract lessons learned. These include building alignment across a wide group of stakeholders, engaging advocacy groups and funding commitments for a minimum of 5 years.

  14. Exploring Stakeholder Definitions within the Aerospace Industry: A Qualitative Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebert, Jonathan R.

    A best practice in the discipline of project management is to identify all key project stakeholders prior to the execution of a project. When stakeholders are properly identified, they can be consulted to provide expert advice on project activities so that the project manager can ensure the project stays within the budget and schedule constraints. The problem addressed by this study is that managers fail to properly identify key project stakeholders when using stakeholder theory because there are multiple conflicting definitions for the term stakeholder. Poor stakeholder identification has been linked to multiple negative project outcomes such as budget and schedules overruns, and this problem is heightened in certain industries such as aerospace. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore project managers' and project stakeholders' perceptions of how they define and use the term stakeholder within the aerospace industry. This qualitative exploratory single-case study had two embedded units of analysis: project managers and project stakeholders. Six aerospace project managers and five aerospace project stakeholders were purposively selected for this study. Data were collected through individual semi-structured interviews with both project managers and project stakeholders. All data were analyzed using Yin's (2011) five-phased cycle approach for qualitative research. The results indicated that the aerospace project managers and project stakeholder define the term stakeholder as "those who do the work of a company." The participants build upon this well-known concept by adding that, "a company should list specific job titles" that correspond to their company specific-stakeholder definition. Results also indicated that the definition of the term stakeholder is used when management is assigning human resources to a project to mitigate or control project risk. Results showed that project managers tended to include the customer in their stakeholder definitions

  15. School-Community Partnerships in Rural Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipka, Jerry

    1986-01-01

    Illustrates complexities involved in establishing school-community partnership in a cross-cultural setting--an Alaskan village of 500 inhabitants. Analyzes outcomes of a three-week multidisciplinary program developed jointly by high school students and teachers which utilized Native community members and resources to study kayak and boat building,…

  16. Developing Partnerships to Promote Local Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters-Bayer, Ann; van Veldhuizen, Laurens; Wettasinha, Chesha; Wongtschowski, Mariana

    2004-01-01

    Local innovation in agriculture and natural resource management is the process through which individuals or groups discover or develop new and better ways of managing resources, building on and expanding the boundaries of their existing knowledge. Prolinnova (Promoting Local Innovation) is a NGO-led global partnership programme that is being built…

  17. Developing Partnerships to Promote Local Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters-Bayer, Ann; van Veldhuizen, Laurens; Wettasinha, Chesha; Wongtschowski, Mariana

    2004-01-01

    Local innovation in agriculture and natural resource management is the process through which individuals or groups discover or develop new and better ways of managing resources, building on and expanding the boundaries of their existing knowledge. Prolinnova (Promoting Local Innovation) is a NGO-led global partnership programme that is being built…

  18. A research and evaluation capacity building model in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Roanna; Crawford, Gemma; Hallett, Jonathan; Laing, Sue; Mak, Donna B; Jancey, Jonine; Rowell, Sally; McCausland, Kahlia; Bastian, Lisa; Sorenson, Anne; Tilley, P J Matt; Yam, Simon; Comfort, Jude; Brennan, Sean; Doherty, Maryanne

    2016-12-27

    Evaluation of public health programs, services and policies is increasingly required to demonstrate effectiveness. Funding constraints necessitate that existing programs, services and policies be evaluated and their findings disseminated. Evidence-informed practice and policy is also desirable to maximise investments in public health. Partnerships between public health researchers, service providers and policymakers can help address evaluation knowledge and skills gaps. The Western Australian Sexual Health and Blood-borne Virus Applied Research and Evaluation Network (SiREN) aims to build research and evaluation capacity in the sexual health and blood-borne virus sector in Western Australia (WA). Partners' perspectives of the SiREN model after 2 years were explored. Qualitative written responses from service providers, policymakers and researchers about the SiREN model were analysed thematically. Service providers reported that participation in SiREN prompted them to consider evaluation earlier in the planning process and increased their appreciation of the value of evaluation. Policymakers noted benefits of the model in generating local evidence and highlighting local issues of importance for consideration at a national level. Researchers identified challenges communicating the services available through SiREN and the time investment needed to develop effective collaborative partnerships. Stronger engagement between public health researchers, service providers and policymakers through collaborative partnerships has the potential to improve evidence generation and evidence translation. These outcomes require long-term funding and commitment from all partners to develop and maintain partnerships. Ongoing monitoring and evaluation can ensure the partnership remains responsive to the needs of key stakeholders. The findings are applicable to many sectors.

  19. Ethical challenges for international collaborative research partnerships in the context of the Zika outbreak in the Dominican Republic: a qualitative case study.

    PubMed

    Canario Guzmán, Julio Arturo; Espinal, Roberto; Báez, Jeannette; Melgen, Ricardo Elias; Rosario, Patricia Antonia Pérez; Mendoza, Eddys Rafael

    2017-09-25

    The establishment of international collaborative research partnerships in times of infectious disease outbreaks of international importance has been considered an ethical imperative. Frail health research systems in low- and middle-income countries can be an obstacle to achieve the goal of knowledge generation and the search for health equity before, during and after infectious disease outbreaks. A qualitative case study was conducted to identify the challenges and opportunities facing the Dominican Republic with regards to developing international collaborative research partnerships in the context of the Zika outbreak and its ethical implications. Researchers conducted 34 interviews (n = 30 individual; n = 4 group) with 39 participants (n = 23 males; n = 16 females) representing the government, universities, international donor agencies, non-governmental organisations, community-based organisations and medical societies, in two metropolitan cities. Five international collaborative research projects related to the Zika virus were identified. Major ethical challenges were linked to the governance of health research, training of human resources, the institutionalisation of scientific activity, access to research funds and cultural aspects. Capacity-building was not necessarily a component of some partnership agreements. With few exceptions, local researchers were merely participating in data collection and less on defining the problem. Opportunities for collaborative work included the possibility of participation in international research consortiums through calls for proposals. The Dominican government and research stakeholders can contribute to the international response to the Zika virus through active participation in international collaborative research partnerships; however, public recognition of the need to embrace health research as part of public policy efforts is warranted. A working group led by the government and formed by national and

  20. How to Achieve Transparency in Public-Private Partnerships Engaged in Hunger and Malnutrition Reduction.

    PubMed

    Eggersdorfer, Manfred; Bird, Julia K

    2016-01-01

    Multi-stakeholder partnerships are important facilitators of improving nutrition in developing countries to achieve the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals. Often, the role of industry is challenged and questions are raised as to the ethics of involving for-profit companies in humanitarian projects. The Second International Conference on Nutrition placed great emphasis on the role of the private sector, including industry, in multi-stakeholder partnerships to reduce hunger and malnutrition. Governments have to establish regulatory frameworks and institutions to guarantee fair competition and invest in infrastructure that makes investments for private companies attractive, eventually leading to economic growth. Civil society organizations can contribute by delivering nutrition interventions and behavioral change-related communication to consumers, providing capacity, and holding governments and private sector organizations accountable. Industry provides technical support, innovation, and access to markets and the supply chain. The greatest progress and impact can be achieved if all stakeholders cooperate in multi-stakeholder partnerships aimed at improving nutrition, thereby strengthening local economies and reducing poverty and inequality. Successful examples of public-private partnerships exist, as well as examples in which these partnerships did not achieve mutually agreed objectives. The key requirements for productive alliances between industry and civil society organizations are the establishment of rules of engagement, transparency and mutual accountability. The Global Social Observatory performed a consultation on conflicts of interest related to the Scaling Up Nutrition movement and provided recommendations to prevent, identify, manage and monitor potential conflicts of interest. Multi-stakeholder partnerships can be successful models in improving nutrition if they meet societal demand with transparent decision-making and execution. Solutions to