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Sample records for bulbocavernosus myocutaneous flaps

  1. [Applicability of skin flaps and myocutaneous flaps for esophageal surgery].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruwen; Zhou, Jinghai; Deng, Bo

    2014-09-01

    Stomach and colon are always used to reconstruct esophagus after esophagectomy. However, alternative procedures to reconstruct or repair esophagus are required if the patients suffered from gastric or colonic diseases, underwent gastric colonic operations or had severe local esophageal stricture. More than ten kinds of skin flaps and myocutaneous flaps, which are classified into free or pedicled ones, are used to reconstruct or repair esophagus. Microvascular anastomosis is required while using free flaps. Necrosis of the free flaps is prone to developing once the vascular occlusion occurs. The pectoralis major myocutaneous and latissimus dorsi pedicled flaps have sufficient blood supplies. However, both are bulky and difficult to reconstruct a circumferential esophagus through contouring a tube. Platysma myocutaneous flaps have a large surface area and are supplied from multiple vessels. Single lateral and bilateral platysma myocutaenous flap can be applied to repair the cervical esophageal defect and circumferential cervical esophagus, respectively. The use of platysma myocutaneous to repair and reconstruct cervical esophagus is a procedure easy to perform and confer excellent outcomes. There is no development of ulcer and hair growth after long-term follow-up and resistance to radiotherapy.

  2. Crossed pectoralis major myocutaneous flap for recurrent oral cavity cancers

    PubMed Central

    Pancholi, Mayank; Sharma, Sanjay; Desai, Sanjay M.; Agrawal, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oral cavity cancers are fairly common and have propensity to recur locally. Since Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous (PMMC) flap is the most widely used first flap for reconstruction, it is exhausted at the earliest and recurrence poses a formidable challenge for reconstructive surgeon. Present study evaluated the feasibility of contralateral Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap for reconstruction after resection of recurrent tumour. Methods: This was a study of the patients presenting with recurrent oral cavity cancer after exhausted ipsilateral Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap (PMMC) in whom we used contralateral Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap (Crossed PMMC Flap) for reconstruction between October 2013 to June 2016. Results: Five patients with recurrence underwent reconstruction with contralateral Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap. In all the flap was successfully used to reconstruct defects involving the entire buccal mucosa and in one patient the flap could be used to reconstruct full thickness resection defect(crossed bipedal PMMC Flap) with ease. Conclusion: Crossed Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap can be used safely and reliably for reconstruction of the buccal mucosal defect and in selected patients even for full thickness cheek defect as folded bipaddle Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap.

  3. Latissimus Dorsi Myocutaneous Flap for Breast Reconstruction: Bad Rap or Good Flap?

    PubMed Central

    Perdikis, Galen; Koonce, Stephanie; Collis, George; Eck, Dustin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This article serves to review latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap as an option for breast reconstruction postmastectomy. Since the introduction of the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap in the late 1970s, its use has always been as a secondary technique, particularly after the development of the transverse rectus abdominus myocutaneous flap in the 1980s. Methods: A literature review of the history of latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap utilized for breast reconstruction as well as a review of our institution's experience with latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap and tissue expander placement was performed. Results: There remains a paucity of published studies investigating latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap for breast reconstruction. Most studies have small numbers and do not utilize tissue expanders. More recently several small studies have been published that show acceptably low complication rates with aesthetically pleasing outcomes when latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap is employed with a tissue expander. At our institution, we have employed latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap with tissue expander placement for both delayed and immediate reconstruction with subsequent replacement with a permanent implant with a capsular contraction rate of 10.5%. Our data and others more recently published demonstrate very acceptable capsular contracture rates and aesthetic outcomes, particularly when an expander is utilized. Conclusion: The latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap remains an excellent choice for breast reconstruction with a low risk of complications. PMID:22031843

  4. Delayed platysma myocutaneous turnover flap for repair of pharyngocutaneous fistula.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Paul; Cañadas, Karina; Sasaki, Clarence T

    2015-01-01

    Pharyngocutaneous fistula (PCF) is a common and serious complication after total laryngectomy. Numerous surgical and non-surgical treatment approaches have been described. Here we describe a platysma myocutaneous turnover flap for repair of PCF. Platysma myocutaneous turnover flap is described and two patients are used as examples. Repair was initially successful in both patients; however, one patient had recurrence of fistula after her cancer recurred at the stoma. Numerous surgical techniques have been described for repair of PCF. Here a turnover flap was used, a technique not previously described for this problem. The delay technique enhances the viability of the flap thought to be through numerous mechanisms. The platysma myocutaneous turnover flap is useful for closure of pharyngocutaneous fistula when non-operative measures have failed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Medial thigh myocutaneous flap for covering extended hemipelvectomy.

    PubMed

    Luna-Perez, P; Herrera, L

    1995-12-01

    When a large tumour involves the buttock and anterolateral upper thigh, modifications to the classical hemipelvectomy may be required for its removal. Herein, we report the use of a medial myocutaneous flap for coverage of soft tissue defects produced by such procedures.

  6. Use of Pedicled Trapezius Myocutaneous Flap for Posterior Skull Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mansher; Rios Diaz, Arturo J; Cauley, Ryan; Smith, Timothy R; Caterson, E J

    2015-09-01

    Soft-tissue defects in posterior skull can be challenging for reconstruction. If related to tumor resection, these wound beds are generally irradiated and can be difficult from a recipient-vessel perspective for a free tissue transfer. Locoregional flaps might prove to be important reconstructive option in such patients. There is a very limited data on the usage of pedicled trapezius myocutaneous flaps for such defects. The authors reviewed existing study for usage of trapezius flap for posterior skull repair and used pedicled trapezius myocutaneous flaps based on the descending branch of superficial cervical artery (SCA) for reconstruction of posterior skull soft-tissue defect in an irradiated and infected wound. Two patients were operated for trapezius myocutaneous flap for posterior skull defects complicated by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage and epidural abscess. There was no recipient or donor-site complication at a mean follow-up of 12.5 months. Neither of the 2 patients had any functional deficits for the entire duration of the follow-up. Although this flap was able to help in controlling the CSF leakage in the first patient, it successfully healed the cavity generated from epidural abscess drainage in the second patient. The large angle of rotation coupled with the ability to complete the procedure without repositioning the patients makes trapezius myocutaneous flap an attractive option for posterior skull reconstruction. In our limited experience, the pedicled trapezius flaps are a reliable alternative as they are well vascularized and able to obliterate the soft-tissue defect completely. The recipient site healed completely in infected as well as irradiated wound beds. In addition, the donor site can be primarily closed with minimal donor-associated complication.

  7. Hemipelvectomy for Buttock Tumors Utilizing an Anterior Myocutaneous Flap of Quadriceps Femoris Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sugarbaker, Paul H.; Chretien, Paul A.

    1983-01-01

    Hemipelvectomy utilizing an anterior myocutaneous flap is indicated for aggressive tumors of the buttock and proximal portion of the posterior thigh. A large operative defect created posteriorly by amputation of the lower extremity, hemipelvis, and buttock is covered by a myocutaneous flap of quadriceps femoris muscle and overlying skin and subcutaneous tissue. The superficial femoral artery is preserved to sustain the myocutaneous flap. ImagesFig. 2A,B,C.Fig. 2A,B,C. PMID:6848048

  8. Anterolateral thigh myocutaneous flaps as the preferred flaps for reconstruction of oral and maxillofacial defects.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhen-Hu; Wu, Han-Jiang; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Sheng; Tan, Hong Yu; Gong, Zhao Jian

    2014-12-01

    The anterolateral thigh myocutaneous flap is one of the most commonly used flaps in reconstructive procedures, but its application in oral and maxillofacial defects has not been fully determined. Herein, we summarize the application of 1212 anterolateral thigh myocutaneous flaps in the repair of oral and maxillofacial defects and examine their benefits in maxillofacial reconstruction of these defects. Patients were recruited from February 2002 to June 2013 in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of Central South University. All patients underwent reconstructive surgery employing anterolateral thigh myocutaneous flaps. Patient ages ranged from 6 to 82 years with a mean age of 51.2 years. There are 1015 flaps showing single lobe and 197 flaps showing a multi-island pedicle and one of which carries the iliac bone. The largest area among the single flaps was 28 × 12 cm(2), and the smallest was 3 × 2 cm(2). Among the 1212 transferred flaps, 1176 survived and 36 showed necrosis, a survival rate of about 97.0%. The common complications at flap donor site were poor wound healing (10.1%), localized paraesthesia (50.1%), and altered quadriceps force (11.0%). No cases presented with local serious complications, and 90% of patients achieved good functional recovery and aesthetically acceptable results after reconstruction of oral and maxillofacial defects at various locations using anterolateral thigh myocutaneous flaps. The time (23-121 min; average 51 min) for anastomosis of one vein and one artery was significantly less than that for two veins and one artery (45-153 min, average 83 min; p = 0.0003), which indicates one vein anastomosis can significantly reduce the operating time. The anterolateral thigh myocutaneous flaps can be easily obtained and can provide a good amount of muscle for filling dead space and fascia lata. These flaps can be prepared into a separate fat flap, multi-island fascia with iliac bone, and other composite pedicle flaps to meet the

  9. In situ Transverse Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous Flap: A Rat Model of Myocutaneous Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, Marie-Claire; Wigmore, Stephen; Kluth, David

    2013-01-01

    Free tissue transfer is the gold standard of reconstructive surgery to repair complex defects not amenable to local options or those requiring composite tissue. Ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) is a known cause of partial free flap failure and has no effective treatment. Establishing a laboratory model of this injury can prove costly both financially as larger mammals are conventionally used and in the expertise required by the technical difficulty of these procedures typically requires employing an experienced microsurgeon. This publication and video demonstrate the effective use of a model of IRI in rats which does not require microsurgical expertise. This procedure is an in situ model of a transverse abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap where atraumatic clamps are utilized to reproduce the ischemia-reperfusion injury associated with this surgery. A laser Doppler Imaging (LDI) scanner is employed to assess flap perfusion and the image processing software, Image J to assess percentage area skin survival as a primary outcome measure of injury. PMID:23770929

  10. The Origins of Deltopectoral Flaps and the Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to review the origins and history of deltopectoral flaps and the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap.The first published paper on the deltopectoral flap was written by Aymard in 1917. He described raising a medially based fasciocutaneous flap from the shoulder skin, which was then tubed and used for staged nasal reconstruction. Conley introduced the laterally based deltopectoral flap, which was supplied by the lateral thoracic and thoracocranial branches. Bakamjian used a medially based deltopectoral flap for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction; this was an axial flap based medially on the intercostal perforating vessels of the internal mammary artery. Krizek reviewed the literature and stated that Aymard flap was the keystone to the conception and execution of Bakamjian flap. Hueston was the first to combine a skin flap and pectoralis major muscle for repair of the large defects of the chest wall. The pectoralis major myocutaneous flaps described by Ariyan and Baek are a hybrid of Conley's laterally based deltopectoral flap and Hueston's inclusion of the pectoralis major muscle in the skin flap.When the authors develop what appears to be a new surgical technique, the authors are prone to be excited. However, at such a moment the authors must perform a literature review. In most patients, the authors will realize that the previous authors have already developed a given concept. The authors must not commit plagiarism due to their ignorance or laziness in conducting a literature review.

  11. Paradoxical effects of heme arginate on survival of myocutaneous flaps

    PubMed Central

    Czopek, Alicja; Wigmore, Stephen J.; Kluth, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) contributes to partial flap and solid organ transplant failure. Heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is an inducible, cytoprotective enzyme which protects against IRI in solid organ transplant models. Heme arginate (HA), a HO-1 inducer, is a promising, translatable, preconditioning agent. This study investigated the effects of preconditioning with HA on the clinical outcome of a myocutaneous IRI model. Forty male Lewis rats were randomized to intravenously receive 1) Control-NaCl, 2) HA, 3) HA and tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP), a HO-1 inhibitor; and 4) SnMP alone. Twenty-four hours later, an in situ transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap was performed under isoflurane anesthesia. Viability of flaps was measured clinically and by laser-Doppler perfusion scanning. In vitro work on human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKa) assessed the effects of HA, SnMP, and the iron chelator desferrioxamine on 1) cytotoxicity, 2) intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration, and 3) ROS-mediated DNA damage. In contrast to our hypothesis, HA preconditioning produced over 30% more flap necrosis at 48 h compared with controls (P = 0.02). HA-containing treatments produced significantly worse flap perfusion at all postoperative time points. In vitro work showed that HA is cytotoxic to keratinocytes. This cytotoxicity was independent of HO-1 and was mediated by the generation of ROS by free heme. In contrast to solid organ data, pharmacological preconditioning with HA significantly worsened clinical outcome, thus indicating that this is not a viable approach in free flap research. PMID:24089372

  12. Salvage for pectoralis major myocutaneous flap failure in head and neck reconstruction by microvascular flap.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chen-Ling; Wu, Yi-Chia; Lai, Ching-Hung; Lai, Chung-Sheng; Lin, Chih-Lung; Lin, Sin-Daw; Chang, Kao-Ping

    2012-10-01

    The pectoralis major myocutaneous pedicled flap (PMMPF) - the "workhorse" for head and neck reconstruction - is associated with a high incidence of complications in certain cases. This study presents free tissue transfer as an alternative salvage technique after PMMPF failure in head and neck reconstruction. It includes seven consecutive patients who underwent free tissue salvage after PMMPF failure in head and neck reconstruction from January 2008 to September 2010 at Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Taiwan. Four vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous (VRAM) flaps were applied for tongue and mouth floor defects, while three anterolateral thigh (ALT) flaps were used for mouth floor, buccal, and cheek defects. All flaps survived uneventfully, and normal oral feeding was achieved without major complications. Free tissue transfer has several advantages and can be successfully employed in head and neck reconstruction, and it is also a reliable salvage procedure after PMMPF failure in such cases.

  13. Cornerstones in reconstructive plastic surgery: Argentinian development of muscular, myocutaneous, and fasciocutaneous flaps.

    PubMed

    Kostianovsky, A S; Sostaric, N M

    1992-01-01

    This article pays tribute to two Argentinian surgeons whose work has been published in their local journals but is unknown internationally. Goldtraj's pioneering work on the treatment of vascular ulcers of the leg using a muscular flap, presented in 1954, and Spadafora's work on the treatment of tissue defects with myocutaneous and fasciocutaneous flaps, presented in 1964, are discussed. Both papers deserve a place among the pioneering contributions on the subject of muscular as well as myocutaneous and fasciocutaneous flaps.

  14. Orbicularis oculi myocutaneous advancement flap for upper eyelid reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Demir, Zühtü; Yüce, Serdar; Karamürsel, Sebat; Celebioglu, Selim

    2008-02-01

    Reconstruction of large full-thickness defects of the upper eyelids is challenging because of their complex anatomy and specialized functions. The authors present and discuss a new, simple surgical technique for upper eyelid reconstruction. This is a single-stage procedure and has produced satisfactory to excellent results in the authors' patients. It presents the reconstructive surgeon with several advantages over other techniques. The eyelid tumor is excised surgically until clear margins are obtained. The V-shaped orbicularis oculi myocutaneous advancement flap is marked on the remaining superior eyelid tissue and mobilized, leaving the base of the pedicle intact with submuscular tissue attachment. Posterior lamella reconstruction is performed with mucoperiosteal graft harvested from the hard palate in patients with full-thickness defects. Then, the flap is advanced to the defect and the donor site is closed primarily. Eight patients, aged 17 to 72 years, have been operated on with this technique for upper eyelid reconstruction. Follow-up included assessment of position, closure, length of palpebral rim, eyelid opening, aesthetic balance, presence of corneal erosion, ulcer or entropion, levator function, and donor-site morbidity. The flap was viable in every patient, without total or partial necrosis. No patient required surgical revision. The oncologic result was good, and no recurrence was noted. This method is a simpler, single-stage operation; does not damage the lower lid; provides a thin, mobile eyelid; and, above all, is less invasive than other techniques, and at the same time allows a good functional and aesthetic reconstruction.

  15. The supraclavicular artery island and trapezius myocutaneous flaps in head and neck reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Carlos A; Fernandes, Rui P

    2014-08-01

    The supraclavicular artery island flap can be readily used to reconstruct defects within the neck, parotid, lateral temporal region, and lower third of the face. Benefits of the supraclavicular flap include good color and texture match, an ease of harvest, and minimal donor site morbidity; there is also no significant post-operative monitoring required. The trapezius muscle serves as a source for multiple myocutaneous flaps of which most are considered to be salvage flaps among head and neck reconstructive surgeons.

  16. Recurrent breast carcinoma arising in a transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sun M; Shin, Sandra J; Chen, Xia; Rosen, Paul Peter

    2004-10-01

    Reconstruction after mastectomy for breast carcinoma with implants or myocutaneous flaps is a widely used surgical technique. Recurrence of breast carcinoma after these procedures is uncommon. Most recurrences occur in the skin or scar site of the mastectomy and are readily detectable by physical examination. There are rare reported cases of recurrent carcinoma occurring within the flaps that are usually diagnosed with the aid of imaging and subsequent pathologic examination. In most cases, these recurrences represent invasive or in situ ductal carcinoma. We report an additional 2 cases of breast carcinoma recurring within the myocutaneous flap, both of which exhibited uncommon histologic features not previously reported.

  17. Infrahyoid myocutaneous flap for medium-sized head and neck defects: surgical outcome and technique modification.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hanwei; Wang, Steven J; Yang, Xihong; Guo, Haipeng; Liu, Muyuan

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the surgical outcomes associated with infrahyoid myocutaneous flaps used in the reconstruction of medium-sized defects following head and neck cancer resection, as well as to discuss a novel technique modification. Case series with chart review. University cancer hospital. A total of 20 patients with oral or hypopharyngeal carcinoma who underwent infrahyoid myocutaneous flap reconstruction between June 2005 and December 2011 were retrospectively studied. A novel technical modification of flap harvest, preservation of the cranial portion of the anterior jugular vein, was attempted in 15 flaps and was successful in 13 flaps. Functional evaluation was performed in all patients 3 to 6 months after the operation or postoperative radiation. Total flap necrosis, marginal skin paddle necrosis, and total skin paddle loss were observed in 1, 2, and 1 patient(s), respectively. Pharyngocutaneous fistula without flap problem occurred in 1 patient. No flap complications occurred in 13 cases where the cranial portion of the anterior jugular vein was successfully preserved. Functional results were excellent in 16 patients, good in 3 patients, and fair in 1 patient. The infrahyoid myocutaneous flap is a reliable and convenient technique that can serve as an alternative to free flaps in the reconstruction of medium-sized defects of the oral cavity or hypopharynx. Preservation of the cranial portion of the anterior jugular vein is a novel technical modification of harvesting this flap, which may result in better venous return of the skin paddle and reduce skin paddle necrosis.

  18. Reconstruction of large head and neck deformities: experience with free gracilis muscle and myocutaneous flaps.

    PubMed

    Del Frari, Barbara; Schoeller, Thomas; Wechselberger, Gottfried

    2010-01-01

    Microvascular free flaps continue to revolutionize coverage options in head and neck reconstruction. The authors describe their experience with the gracilis free flap and the myocutaneous gracilis free flap with reconstruction of head and neck defects. Eleven patients underwent 12 free tissue transfer to the head and neck region. The reconstruction was performed with the transverse myocutaneous gracilis (TMG) flap (n = 7) and the gracilis muscle flap with skin graft (n = 5). The average patient age was 63.4 years (range, 17-82 years). The indications for this procedure were tumor and haemangioma resections. The average patient follow-up was 20.7 months (range, 1 month-5.7 years). Total flap survival was 100%. There were no partial flap losses. Primary wound healing occurred in all cases. Recipient site morbidities included one hematoma. In our experience for reconstruction of moderate volume and surface area defects, muscle flaps with skin graft provide a better color match and skin texture relative to myocutaneous or fasciocutaneous flaps. The gracilis muscle free flap is not widely used for head and neck reconstruction but has the potential to give good results. As a filling substance for large cavities, the transverse myocutaneus gracilis flap has many advantages including reliable vascular anatomy, relatively great plasticity and a concealed donor area.

  19. Magnitude of Myocutaneous Flaps and Factors Associated With Loss of Volume in Oral Cancer Reconstructive Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Yuki; Yanamoto, Souichi; Ota, Yoshihide; Furudoi, Shungo; Komori, Takahide; Umeda, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Myocutaneous flaps are often used to repair oral and maxillofacial defects after surgery for oral cancer; however, their volume decreases during the postoperative period. To facilitate treatment planning, the authors measured the extent of such postoperative flap volume loss and identified associated factors in patients who underwent oral reconstruction with myocutaneous flaps. The authors designed and performed a retrospective observational study of patients who underwent reconstructive procedures involving rectus abdominal myocutaneous (RAM) or pectoralis major myocutaneous (PMMC) flaps at Tokai University Hospital, Kobe University Hospital, or Nagasaki University Hospital from April 2009 through March 2013. Flap type and other clinical variables were examined as potential predictors of flap loss. The primary outcome was flap loss at 6 months postoperatively. Correlations between each potential predictor and the primary outcome were examined using multiple regression analysis. The subjects were 75 patients whose oral defects were reconstructed with RAM flaps (n = 57) or PMMC flaps (n = 18). RAM flaps exhibited a mean volume shrinkage of 22% at 6 months postoperatively, which was less than the 27.5% displayed by the PMMC flaps, but the difference was not important. Renal failure, previous surgery of the oral region, postoperative radiotherapy, and postoperative serum albumin level were found to be meaningful risk factors for postoperative flap volume loss. The results of this study suggest that larger flaps should be used in patients who possess these risk factors or are scheduled to undergo postoperative radiotherapy. Future studies should examine the utility of postoperative nutritional management for preventing flap volume loss. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pedicled myocutaneous flap of latissimus dorsi muscle for reconstruction of anterior and middle skull defects: an alternative.

    PubMed

    Seckel, B R; Upton, J; Freidberg, S R; Gilbert, K P; Murray, J E

    1986-01-01

    Three cases are presented demonstrating the use of a pedicled myocutaneous flap of latissimus dorsi muscle to reconstruct large defects of the anterior and middle skull after ablative surgery for carcinoma. This method is proposed as an alternative to reconstruction with a free myocutaneous flap in selected patients.

  1. Pharmacologic manipulation of the microcirculation in cutaneous and myocutaneous flaps in pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, C.Y.; Neligan, P.C.; Nakatsuka, T.; Sasaki, G.H.

    1985-04-01

    The vascular effects of isoxsuprine, diazoxide, and isoproterenol were studied in arterial buttock flaps and latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps in pigs. Capillary blood flow to the skin and muscles of these flaps was measured by the radioactive microsphere (15-mu diameter) technique 6 hours postoperatively under pentobarbital anesthesia. It was observed that isoproterenol, a beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, was not effective in augmentation of skin blood flow in the arterial buttock flaps. However, isoproterenol significantly increased capillary blood flow to the arterialized portion of latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps compared with controls. Isoxsuprine and diazoxide (vascular smooth muscle relaxants) significantly (p less than 0.05) increased total capillary blood flow to the skin of arterial buttock flaps and to the skin and muscles of the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps. However, the increase in capillary blood flow occurred mainly in the arterialized portion of these flaps. The capillary blood flow, which was supplied by the small arteries in the distal portion of the arterial buttock and latissimus dorsi flaps, was not increased by treatment with isoxsuprine or diazoxide. Therefore, there was also no increase in the maximum distance of capillary blood flow from the pedicle to the distal end of the flaps. These observations led the authors to hypothesize that different sizes (diameters) of arteries in the skin and muscle have different reactivity (or sensitivity) to vasodilatory drugs. In the present experiment, the large dominant artery of the arterial buttock and latissimus dorsi flaps responded to isoxsuprine or diazoxide (vascular smooth-muscle relaxants), resulting in an increase in blood supply to the capillaries in the proximal portion of the flaps.

  2. [Free radial forearm flap and myocutaneous flaps in oncological reconstructive surgery of the oral cavity, Comparison of functional results].

    PubMed

    Pompei, S; Caravelli, G; Vigili, M G; Ducci, M; Marzetti, F

    1998-03-01

    In modern multi-disciplinary cancer treatment, rehabilitation and functional results represent utmost intent in reconstructive surgery of the oral cavity. Even in cases where the stage of disease is advanced) and the perspective of survival is limited, it is possible to achieve an acceptable quality of life. The authors report, in this study, the morpho-functional results and the morbidity observed in glossectomies in which the reconstruction was performed using three different methods. In a total of 264 reconstructive flaps of the head and neck regions, the authors considered three groups of 15 patients that had had reconstruction after the demolitive procedure. Respectively these groups were divided by the followed methods: free forearm flap, pectoralis major myocutaneous flap and nasolabial flap. The morbidity showed an extremely low rate of flap loss in all the groups, but "minor" complications, such as fistulas and leakages, were significantly more frequent in the myocutaneous flaps group. Functional evaluation for speech and deglutition showed good results in most patients. Extremely severe postoperative conditions as a permanent NG tube or incomprehensible speech had been observed in less than 15% of the cases. Particularly, the pectoralis major flap, showed its best functional performances in the total or subtotal glossectomies with a sacrifice of the muscles of the oral floor. The free forearm flap is reliable and safe with its low thickness and pliability, especially for partial glossectomies. The nasolabial flap was confirmed to be the first reconstructive choice for selected limited resections of the tongue and of the antero-lateral floor. With this experience it is possible, even in more complex free flaps, to reduce the time consumption and the complication rate. Free flaps do not substitute routinely myocutaneous and conventional flaps, but they represent the "ideal" reconstructive alternatives for specific and selected indications.

  3. Xenogeneic acellular dermal matrix in combination with pectoralis major myocutaneous flap reconstructs hypopharynx and cervical esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Danhui; Tang, Qinglai; Wang, Shuang; Li, Shisheng; He, Xiangbo; Liu, Jiajia; Liu, Bingbing; Yang, Mi; Yang, Xinming

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore xenogeneic acellular dermal matrix (ADM) in combination with pectoralis major myocutaneous flap in hypopharynx and cervical esophagus reconstruction. A total of five patients were treated with this surgical method to reconstruct hypopharynx and cervical esophagus in Second Xiangya Hospital between January 2012 and April 2013. Four of them had hypopharyngeal carcinoma with laryngeal and cervical esophageal invasion, while the fifth patient with hypopharyngeal cancer had developed scars and atresia after postoperative radiotherapy. The defect length after hypopharyngeal and cervical esophageal resection was 6-8 cm, and was repaired by a combination of ADM and pectoralis major myocutaneous flap by our team. Interestingly, the four patients had primary healing and regained their eating function about 2-3 weeks after surgery, the fifth individual suffered from pharyngeal fistula, but recovered after dressing change about 2 months. Postoperative esophageal barium meals revealed that the pharynx and esophagus were unobstructed in all five patients. Xenogeneic ADM in combination with pectoralis major myocutaneous flap for hypopharynx and cervical esophagus reconstruction is a simple, safe and effective method with fewer complications. Nevertheless, according to the defect length of the cervical esophagus, the patients need to strictly follow the medical advice.

  4. Three-dimensional anatomical vascular distribution in the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Rikimaru, Hideaki; Kiyokawa, Kensuke; Inoue, Youjirou; Tai, Yoshiaki

    2005-04-15

    In head and neck reconstruction, the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap, located adjacent to the area of reconstruction, is a very useful and easy-to-prepare flap. However, it is reported to have an unstable blood circulation that could result in partial necrosis of the skin island. The current study investigated the detailed three-dimensional vascular network in the flap to establish a method of preparation with a stable circulation. The pectoralis major muscle and the anterior chest skin on 12 sides of eight fresh cadavers were subjected to angiographic procedures in which contrast medium was injected selectively to the internal thoracic artery and the thoracoacromial artery. On another fresh cadaver, resin was injected in the same manner, and a clear specimen of the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap was prepared. The pectoralis major muscle consists of two anatomical vascular territories that the choke vessels in the muscle at the level of the fourth costal cartilage divide into cranial and caudal sides. The chest skin area on the caudal side where the skin island of the flap is prepared receives its blood supply from a dense anastomotic network formed by the fourth, fifth, and sixth intercostal perforating branches. The blood flow in the pectoral branch of the thoracoacromial artery runs through the choke vessels that dilate at the elevation of the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap, first into the fourth intercostal perforating branches; then to the anastomotic vascular network of the fourth, fifth, and sixth intercostal perforating branches; and finally to reach the periphery of the skin island.

  5. Complications and oncologic outcomes of pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Somintara, Ongart; Lertsithichai, Panuwat; Kongdan, Youwanush; Supsamutchai, Chairat; Sukpanich, Rupporn

    2016-01-01

    Background There are several techniques for harvesting the pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap after mastectomy in breast cancer patients. We examined the whole muscle with partial sheath sparing technique and determined factors associated with its complications and oncological outcomes. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the results of 168 TRAM flaps performed between January 2003 and December 2010, focusing on complications and oncologic outcomes. Results Among the 168 pedicled TRAM flap procedures in 158 patients, flap complications occurred in 34%. Most of the flap complications included some degree of fat necrosis. There was no total flap loss. Flap complications were associated with elderly patients and the presence of major donor site complications. Abdominal bulging and hernia occurred in 12% of patients. The bi-pedicled TRAM flap and higher body mass index (BMI) were significant factors associated with increased donor site complications. Seven patients (4%) developed loco-regional recurrence. Within a median follow-up of 27 months, distant metastasis and death occurred in 6% and 4% of patients, respectively. Conclusions The pedicled TRAM flap using the whole muscle with partial sheath sparing technique in the present study is consistent with the results from previous studies in flap complication rates and oncological outcomes. PMID:27563562

  6. [Repair of occipital and nuchal wounds with inferior trapezius myocutaneous flaps in patients after high voltage electrical burn].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing-min; Hao, Tian-zhi; Sun, Zhi-gang; He, Li-xin; Cao, Yu-jue; Lu, Gang

    2008-06-01

    To explore the methods and effects of repair of occipital and nuchal wounds with inferior trapezius myocutaneous flap after deep electrical bum. Twelve patients with high-voltage electrical burn in occipital and nuchal regions were hospitalized to our ward from March 2003 to September 2007. They were repaired with improved inferior trapezius myocutaneous flaps after debridement. Flaps were of two types: (1) blood supply from cutaneous and perforator branches of the original segment of the superficial descending branch of transverse cervical artery. (2) combined blood supply from both superficial and deep descending branches of transverse cervical artery C, i.e., dorsal scapular artery). All flaps carried segmental and limited trapezius muscle cuff surrounding the vascular pedicle of the flap similar to a perforator flap. Flaps survived completely primarily in eight cases. In two patients, infection developed in flaps adjacent to wounds with lignification; they healed after dress change. Necrosis appeared in distal end of flap (one case), it healed after re-operation. One patient with surviving flaps died of sepsis and multiple organ failure 21 days after operation. The flaps which survived were not swollen ; the donor sites at scapular region looked normal without pterygoid or pendulous scapula deformities. Inferior trapezius myocutaneous flaps can be used to repair occipital and nuchal wounds, with the advantages of constant blood vessels, reliable blood supply, convenience for application.

  7. Myocutaneous flap (V-Y design) from the nasal bridge for medial canthal reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Moretti, E A; Gomez Garcia, F

    1998-07-01

    Repair of soft tissue loss of the medial canthal area is usually accomplished by using skin grafts or frontal flaps based on the glabellar vessels. However, skin grafts can provoke scar tissue contracture, or skin color chromatic changes (hypopigmentation or hyperpigmentation). On the other hand, frontal flaps are sometimes thicker than normal skin and lead to unsatisfactory aesthetic results. To avoid these disadvantages, the authors designed an alternative method for reconstruction of defects of the medical canthal area. The authors suggest using a myocutaneous flap (V-Y design) from the nasal bridge to repair soft tissue defects no larger than 2 cm in diameter (surface < 4 cm2) in the medial canthal area. The pedicle of this flap is based on supratrochlear and dorsal nasal vessels. This technique has proved safe and reliable and has led to good functional and cosmetic results.

  8. [Modified pectoralis major myocutaneous flap in reconstruction of head and neck defects].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Huang, Wenxiao; Li, Zan; Zhou, Xiao; Yu, Jianjun; Bao, Ronghua; Zhang, Hailin; Ling, Hang

    2015-05-01

    To report the experience of use of modified pectoralis major myocutaneous (PMMC) flaps in reconstruction of head and neck postoperative defects. A total of 107 patients who underwent head and neck defect reconstruction using modified PMMC flaps after tumor rescetion between Jan 2008 and Dec 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. The success rate of reconstruction with modified PMMC flaps was 94.4% (101/107). Five patients had partial flap necrosis and their wounds healed with dressing change. One patient (0.9%) had total flap necrosis, followed by the second reconstruction using contralateral PMMC flap. The modified falcate PMMC flap can obtain optimum quantity of the skin in the chest and decreasing the closing tension of the donnor site in favor of wound healing. The pedicle without muscle will not only maintain the partial function of the pectoralis major, but also help to avoid pressing the vascular pedicle within the subclavian tunnel. The muscular element the pedicled muscles of the PMMC flap can increase the ability of the flap to resist infection, which can use for covering an exposed carotid artery and improving the neck fibrosis of irradiated patients.

  9. The rotary door myocutaneous flap. A reliable technique for laryngotracheal reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Eliachar, I; Levine, S C; Sebek, B A; Tucker, H M

    1986-09-01

    We examined the possible uses of the "rotary door" sternohyoid myocutaneous flap (RDF) in laryngotracheal reconstruction. This well-vascularized myocutaneous flap, when rotated axially, can replace or widen the anterolateral walls of the airway. It provides a large epithelial surface, together with bulky structural support. The flap is readily available within the immediate surgical field and can replace large defects in the airway, from the level of the glottis to the cervical trachea. After extensive structural and soft-tissue loss of the larynx and trachea were produced to simulate commonly encountered traumatic and postsurgical stenotic conditions, the RDF was employed in 23 dogs in a single-stage laryngotracheal reconstruction. A stable, widely patent airway was achieved. The dogs were followed up for periods varying from three to six months. No complications or secondary stenoses were encountered. Photographic, radiologic, and endoscopic examinations demonstrated the viability and usefulness of this newly described flap. Long-term tracheostomy was used so that intraluminal stents and cannulas could be avoided. Histopathologic studies confirmed the integration of the RDF into the framework of the larynx and trachea. Application of this technique in cases of tumors, trauma, and stenosis of the airway is suggested.

  10. Does Fibrin Sealant Reduce Seroma after Immediate Breast Reconstruction Utilizing a Latissimus Dorsi Myocutaneous Flap?

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Han Gyu; Shin, Ho Seong; Kang, Moon Seok; Nam, Seung Min

    2012-01-01

    Background The most common complication of latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap in breast reconstruction is seroma formation in the back. Many clinical studies have shown that fibrin sealant reduces seroma formation. We investigated any statistically significant differences in postoperative drainage and seroma formation when utilizing the fibrin sealant on the site of the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap harvested for immediate breast reconstruction after skin-sparing partial mastectomy. Methods A total of 46 patients underwent immediate breast reconstruction utilizing a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous island flap. Of those, 23 patients underwent the procedure without fibrin sealant and the other 23 were administered the fibrin sealant. All flaps were elevated with manual dissection by the same surgeon and were analyzed to evaluate the potential benefits of the fibrin sealant. The correlation analysis and Mann-Whitney U test were used for analyzing the drainage volume according to age, weight of the breast specimen, and body mass index. Results Although not statistically significant, the cumulative drainage fluid volume was higher in the control group until postoperative day 2 (530.1 mL compared to 502.3 mL), but the fibrin sealant group showed more drainage beginning on postoperative day 3. The donor site comparisons showed the fibrin sealant group had more drainage beginning on postoperative day 3 and the drain was removed 1 day earlier in the control group. Conclusions The use of fibrin sealant resulted in no reduction of seroma formation. Because the benefits of the fibrin sealant are not clear, the use of fibrin sealant must be fully discussed with patients before its use as a part of informed consent. PMID:23094246

  11. Pectoralis Major Myofascial Onlay and Myocutaneous Flaps and Pharyngocutaneous Fistula in Salvage Laryngectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Mark R.; Sturm, Joshua J.; Gooding, William E.; Johnson, Jonas T.; Kim, Seungwon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the fistula rate in irradiated patients undergoing salvage laryngectomy, compare the effect of closure type on fistula rate, and examine possible perioperative risk factors that might contribute to an increased fistula rate. Study Design Case series with chart review. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of the University of Pittsburgh head and neck tumor registry and identified 73 patients from 1998 to 2011 who had received prior radiation before total laryngectomy or salvage laryngectomy and who had either primary closure, pectoralis major myofascial flap (PMMF) onlay, or pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMC). Results Fistula was more common in patients who underwent initial primary closure (45%) than in patients who had immediate PMMF onlay (10.5%). The fistula rate for patients who underwent immediate PMMC flap was 28.6%, intermediate to primary closure and PMMF flap. Several factors were evaluated for relationship to fistula, but no significant associations were identified. However, patients with fistula tended to have longer inpatient stays and may have been more likely to have a history of cardiovascular or hypoxic disease. Conclusion Pharyngocutaneous fistula is a well-established complication of total laryngectomy, and it is especially a concern in patients with a previous history of radiation. Our retrospective review demonstrates pectoralis major myofascial onlay flap appears to be more effective in reducing the rate of fistula compared to primary closure in these patients. Myocutaneous augmentation flaps, in contrast, have a fairly high fistula rate and may be better replaced with alternative closures such as free flaps. PMID:25132580

  12. Tug 'O' war: challenges of transverse upper gracilis (TUG) myocutaneous free flap breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Locke, Michelle B; Zhong, Toni; Mureau, Marc A M; Hofer, Stefan O P

    2012-08-01

    Autologous tissue microsurgical breast reconstruction is increasingly requested by women following mastectomy. While the abdomen is the most frequently used donor site, not all women have enough abdominal tissue excess for a unilateral or bilateral breast reconstruction. A secondary choice in such women may be the transverse upper gracilis (TUG) myocutaneous flap. This study reviews our experience with TUG flap breast reconstruction looking specifically at reconstructive success rate and the requirement for secondary surgery. A total of 16 free TUG flaps were performed to reconstruct 15 breasts in eight patients over a period of five years. Data were collected retrospectively by chart review. Follow up ranged from 14 to 41 months. During the follow up period, there was one (6.3%) complete flap loss in an immediate breast reconstruction patient. Four further flaps (25%) failed in their primary aim of breast reconstruction, as they required additional significant reconstruction with either deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps (two flaps (12.5%), one patient) or augmentation with silicone breast implants (two flaps (12.5%), one patient), giving a successful breast reconstruction rate with the TUG flap of only 66.7%. In all of the remaining reconstructed breasts, deficient flap volume or breast contour was seen. Eight flaps were augmented by lipofilling. A total of 62.5% of the donor sites had complications, namely sensory disturbance of the medial thigh (25%) and poor scar (37.5%) requiring revision. This series demonstrates a high rate of reconstructive failure and unsatisfactory outcomes from TUG flap breast reconstruction. We feel this reinforces the necessity of adequate pre-operative patient assessment and counselling, including discussion regarding the likelihood of subsequent revisional surgery, before embarking on this form of autologous breast reconstruction.

  13. Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap for Head and Neck Defects in the Era of Free Flaps: Harvesting Technique and Indications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Muyuan; Liu, Weiwei; Yang, Xihong; Guo, Haipeng; Peng, Hanwei

    2017-04-07

    The role of the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF) in head and neck reconstruction is challenged recently due to its natural drawbacks and the popularity of free flaps. This study was designed to evaluate the indications and reliability of using a PMMF in the current free flap era based on a single center experience. The PMMF was harvested as a pedicle-skeletonized flap, with its skin paddle caudally and medially to the areola, including the third intercostal perforator, preserving the upper one third of the pectoralis major muscle. The harvested flap was passed via a submuscular tunnel over the clavicle. One hundred eighteen PMMFs were used in 114 patients, of which 76 were high-risk candidates for a free flap; 8 patients underwent total glossectomy, and 30 underwent salvage or emergency reconstruction. Major complications occurred in 4 patients and minor complications developed in 10. Tracheal extubation was possible in all cases, while oral intake was possible in all but 1 case. These techniques used in harvesting a PMMF significantly overcome its natural pitfalls. PMMFs can safely be used in head and neck cancer patients who need salvage reconstruction, who are high risk for free flaps, and who need large volume soft-tissue flaps.

  14. Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap for Head and Neck Defects in the Era of Free Flaps: Harvesting Technique and Indications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Muyuan; Liu, Weiwei; Yang, Xihong; Guo, Haipeng; Peng, Hanwei

    2017-01-01

    The role of the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF) in head and neck reconstruction is challenged recently due to its natural drawbacks and the popularity of free flaps. This study was designed to evaluate the indications and reliability of using a PMMF in the current free flap era based on a single center experience. The PMMF was harvested as a pedicle-skeletonized flap, with its skin paddle caudally and medially to the areola, including the third intercostal perforator, preserving the upper one third of the pectoralis major muscle. The harvested flap was passed via a submuscular tunnel over the clavicle. One hundred eighteen PMMFs were used in 114 patients, of which 76 were high-risk candidates for a free flap; 8 patients underwent total glossectomy, and 30 underwent salvage or emergency reconstruction. Major complications occurred in 4 patients and minor complications developed in 10. Tracheal extubation was possible in all cases, while oral intake was possible in all but 1 case. These techniques used in harvesting a PMMF significantly overcome its natural pitfalls. PMMFs can safely be used in head and neck cancer patients who need salvage reconstruction, who are high risk for free flaps, and who need large volume soft-tissue flaps. PMID:28387356

  15. The rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap combined with vascularized costal cartilages in reconstructive craniofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Y; Minakawa, H; Kokubu, I; Kawashima, K; Sugihara, T; Satoh, N; Fukuda, S

    1997-08-01

    The efficacy of osteocutaneous or vascularized bone flaps for reconstruction of massive skeletal and soft-tissue defects has been supported by recent descriptions in the literature. In this article we presented an alternative technique, which is the rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap combined with vascularized eighth and ninth costal cartilages, for reconstruction of midfacial composite defects. The vascular pedicle of the composite flap is the deep inferior epigastric artery and vein. The costal cartilages are supplied by the perichondrial vascular network through the anterior intercostal vessels connecting with the deep epigastric vascular system. Vascularized costal cartilages are considered to reduce the incidence of postoperative complications and resorption of this material. This technique is a useful tool for restoration of craniofacial contour in reconstructive head and neck surgery.

  16. Etanercept protects myocutaneous flaps from ischaemia reperfusion injury: An experimental study in a rat tram flap model.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, Burak; Çevik, Özge; Çilingir, Özlem Tuğçe

    2016-08-01

    Background Being an inevitable component of free tissue transfer, ischemia-reperfusion injury tends to contribute to flap failure. TNF-α is an important proinflammatory cytokine and a prominent mediator of the ischemia-reperfusion injury. Etanercept, a soluble TNF-α binding protein, has shown anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects in animal models of renal and myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. We have designed an experimental study to investigate the effect of etanercept on myocutaneous ischemia-reperfusion injury on transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap model in rats. Methods Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups: In group 1 (sham), the TRAM flap was raised and sutured back without further intervention. In group 2 (control), the flap was raised and the ischemia-reperfusion protocol was followed. In group 3, etanercept (10 mg/kg, i.v.) was administered 10 minutes before reperfusion. At the end of the reperfusion period, biochemical and histolopathological evaluations were performed on serum and tissue samples. Results In the etanercept group the IMA and 8-OHdG levels (p = 0.005 and p = 0.004, respectively) were found significantly lower, and the GSH and SOD levels (p = 0.01 and p < 0.001, respectively) significantly higher in comparison to the control group. The histopathological analysis has revealed a lower degree of hyalinization, degenerated muscle fibers and nuclear change in the etanercept group compared to the control group. Conclusion The results of our experimental study indicate that etanercept offers protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury in skeletal muscle tissue, enhancing the TRAM flap viability. The ability of etanercept to induce ischemic tolerance suggests that it may be applicable in free-flap surgery.

  17. [Radiotherpay and immediate breast reconstruction with myocutaneous flap in breast cancer of reserved prognosis].

    PubMed

    Missana, M C; Levy, C; Barreau-Pouhaer, L; Janin, N

    2000-04-01

    In France, immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) for infiltrating carcinoma remains controversial. Many teams advocate the possible event of a post mastectomy radiotherapy and its negative effect on IBR. In our Institute we do not exclude infiltrating breast cancer patient from IBR. In the poor prognostic patients who wish IBR, we recommend autologous IBR to obtain the best aesthetic result with minimum revision procedures and best tolerance to adjuvant radiotherapy. From January 1993 to December 1997, we performed 687 IBR with myocutaneous flap for infiltrating carcinomas. In this group only 68 patients needed postoperative chest wall radiotherapy (45 Gy): 27 TRAM flap, 41 latissimus flap. Only one of the TRAM but 39 of latissimus flaps were associated with a prosthesis. The mean follow-up was 24 months. Fourteen patients developed metastatic disease, and ten were dead at the time of the chart revue. The autogenous TRAM flap tolerate radiation quite well and remain soft and mobile. The latissimus flap associated with a prosthesis developed capsular contracture (BAKER II or III) in 71% of cases. In all cases the cosmetic impairment was not important and the result after capsulectomy remained soft. We concluded that IBR could be offered to motivated patients in all stages of the disease regardless of the subsequent chest wall radiotherapy, and we recommend its use for possible autologous reconstruction.

  18. Pectoralis major myocutaneous flap for head and neck reconstruction: risk factors for fistula formation.

    PubMed

    Leite, A K N; de Matos, L L; Belli, M; Kulcsar, M A V; Cernea, C R; Garcia Brandão, L; Pinto, F R

    2014-12-01

    The pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF) is a safe and versatile flap used widely for head and neck cancer reconstructions, but one of the major and most feared complications is oro- or pharyngocutaneous fistula. Herein, we attempt to establish risk factors for fistula formation in reconstructions of mucosal defects in the head and neck using PMMF through retrospective analysis of PMMF performed during 3 years at a single institution, with a total of 84 procedures. There were 69 men and 15 women, with a mean age of 59.5 years. There were 15 cases of partial flap loss, two total flap losses and 31 fistulas. The independent risk factors for fistula formation were preoperative serum hemoglobin < 13 g/dl, preoperative serum albumin < 3.4 g/dl and hypopharynx reconstruction. The PMMF is still a very useful flap and this is the first multivariate analysis analysing risk factors for fistula formation. These findings are helpful in selecting patients with elevated risk of fistula formation, and therefore preventive measures can be undertaken to avoid potentially serious complications.

  19. Platysma myocutaneous flap for reconstruction of intraoral defects following excision of oral sub mucous fibrosis: A report of 10 cases

    PubMed Central

    Ramanujam, Sathyanarayanan; Venkatachalam, Suresh; Subramaniyan, Monica; Subramaniyan, Deepika

    2015-01-01

    Various surgical procedures are available for treating oral submucous fibrosis, but all of them have their inherent drawbacks. The superiorly based platysma myocutaneous flap is a common reconstruction option for intraoral defects followed after excision of fibrous bands in oral submucous fibrosis. The superiorly based flap has an excellent blood supply, but less efficient venous drainage when compared with posteriorly based flap. We present our results of using a superiorly based flap in the treatment of oral submucous fibrosis. Of 10 patients eight had no postoperative complications, one patient developed partial skin loss and other developed venous congestion which was managed conservatively. PMID:26538949

  20. Modified pectoralis major myocutaneous flap for the total glossectomy defects: Effect on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Gangiti, Kranthi Kumar; Gondi, Jonathan T; Nemade, Hemantkumar; Sampathirao, L M Chandra Sekhara Rao; Raju, K V V N; Rao, T Subramanyeshwar

    2016-07-01

    There is a general notion that, total glossectomy with laryngeal preservation leads to high dependency of tracheostomy and/or feeding tube. The objective of this study is to analyze the quality of life in terms of tube dependency following total glossectomy with a modified pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMC) reconstruction and laryngeal suspension. The retrospective study included consecutive patients operated from July 2012 to February 2015 proven advanced Carcinoma of tongue. We analyzed the time to wean off tracheostomy and feeding tube in 56 patients who underwent total glossectomy and a modified technique of PMMC reconstruction. The median time for tracheostomy weaning was 10 days and nasogastric tube was 16 days. Modified technique of reconstruction with PMMC in total glossectomy is a viable option with minimal functional morbidity. Quality of life in terms of tracheostomy and feeding tube dependency is minimal. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;114:32-35. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Extensive Chest Wall Tissue Loss and its Management by Vertical Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous Flap

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sandip Kanti; Bain, Jayanta; Chattopadhyay, Debarati; Majumdar, Bijay Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Extensive electric burn around the chest in children is rare and this type of injury always poses a great challenge for its management. A 12-year-old male child with extensive electric burn of the chest wall was admitted to hospital. It was a neglected case of 9 days old burn; the young boy was in critical condition having systemic features of toxemia with widespread necrosis of the skin, subcutaneous tissues, and muscles along with exposed bones (ribs and sternum) with the risk of impending rupture of pleura through the exposed intercostal spaces. After initial resuscitation, a thorough debridement of all necrotic tissues was done. Thereafter, a superiorly based vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap was harvested to cover the exposed bones and intercostal spaces. The remaining raw areas were skin grafted. The child made an excellent recovery with good outcome. PMID:28082777

  2. Reconstruction of complex oro-facial defects using the myocutaneous sub-mental artery flap.

    PubMed

    Saleh, D B; Fourie, L; Mizen, K D

    2014-07-01

    Oro-facial defects require reconstruction that provides suitable colour match and texture. Moreover inner and outer cheek lining and bulk are key considerations. In cases of severe oro-facial infections concomitant mandibular abnormality, for example trismus, can mandate the need for tissue to obturate mandibular defects. We assessed the use of the myocutaneous sub-mental artery flap (MSA) in non-oncological patients with such defects. Twenty two consecutive patients were included in this case series. All patients were survivors of Cancrum Oris (NOMA). Demographic details, nutritional status and co-morbidities were recorded. Defects were classified according to the tissues destroyed; cheek, mandible, oral cavity, lip(s), nose and eye(s). Simultaneous procedures carried out were recorded. The surgical anatomy of the MSA is described. All patients had composite defects of the cheek and oral cavity plus another local anatomical structure. Adjunct procedures such as trismus release were carried out in 18/22 patients. Four patients required a return to theatre. There was no trismus recurrence observed. No flap losses were incurred. The MSA is a robust flap with minimal incidence of major complications. The MSA negates the need for microsurgical tissue transfer. Furthermore the MSA provides adequate bulk to obturate these defects. Future applications of the MSA may include complex oro-facial oncological defects.

  3. Subclavicular Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap for Optimal Reconstruction of Large Orbitozygomatic Defects: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pingarron, Lorena; Ruiz, Julian; Rey, Juan; Maniegas, Lourdes; Roson, Silvia; Martinez, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of microvascular free flaps, the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF) has been relegated to background for most reconstructive surgeons. The objective of this article is to show the advantages of cervicofacial defects reconstruction with PMMF using the subclavicular plane route in a challenging clinical case. An 83-year-old man presented with cutaneous temporomalar lesion with orbital spread. Tumor resection was performed, including 12 × 11 cm skin and subcutaneous tissue, overlying zygomatic and malar bone, and orbital exenteration. Radical parotidectomy and functional neck dissection were performed. PMMF was chosen as reconstructive option routing the pedicle to the subclavicular plane. The length of the pedicle was 31 cm. The subclavicular route for PMMF increases the flap's length and arc of rotation compared with the conventional supraclavicular one. This procedure decreases the bulk of the PMMF pedicle which makes it functionally and cosmetically favorable. By using this modification, we may widen the “safe” reconstructive possibilities. PMID:25136415

  4. Signal averaging and waveform analysis of laser Doppler flowmetry monitoring of porcine myocutaneous flaps: I. Acute assessment of flap viability.

    PubMed

    Stack, B C; Futran, N D; Ridley, M B; Schultz, S; Sillman, J S

    1995-11-01

    Postoperative monitoring of microvascular free-tissue transfer is essential to the early identification and correction of vascular compromise. Laser Doppler flowmetry is a noninvasive monitor of capillary bed perfusion. Its current clinical use requires continuous monitoring and trend analysis to detect changes in capillary perfusion. This study investigated the hypothesis that signal averaging of laser Doppler flowmetry output triggered by a fixed point in the cardiac cycle would provide accurate information about the microvascular flow patterns not dependent on trend analysis. These results indicate that averaged waveform analysis allowed for a rapid, objective, and statistically significant distinction between a viable myocutaneous flap and one with vascular compromise in a porcine model. Moreover, this technique allows for distinction between venous and arterial insufficiency.

  5. Free transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous and deep inferior epigastric perforator flaps for breast reconstruction: a systematic review of flap complication rates and donor-site morbidity.

    PubMed

    Sailon, Alexander M; Schachar, Jeffrey S; Levine, Jamie P

    2009-05-01

    Free transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous and deep inferior epigastric perforator flaps represent increasingly popular options for breast reconstruction. Although several retrospective, small-scale studies comparing these flaps have been published, most have failed to find a significant difference in flap complication rates or donor-site morbidity. We systematically reviewed the current literature, and subsequently pooled and analyzed data from included studies. Included studies reported flap complications and/or donor site morbidities for both flap types. Eight studies met the inclusionary criteria. For flap complications, there was a statistically significant difference between deep inferior epigastric perforator and free transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps in fat necrosis rates (25.5 +/- 0.49 vs. 11.3% +/- 0.41%, P < 0.001) and total necrosis rates (4.15 +/- 0.08 vs. 1.59% +/- 0.08%, P = 0.044). Partial necrosis rates were not statistically significant (3.54 +/- 0.07 vs. 1.60% +/- 0.07%, P = 0.057). For donor-site morbidity, there was no statistically significant difference in abdominal bulge (8.07 +/- 0.23 vs. 11.25% +/- 0.29%, P = 0.28). Multicenter, prospective studies are needed to further investigate differences between these flap options.

  6. Vertical Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous Versus Alternative Flaps for Perineal Repair After Abdominoperineal Excision of the Rectum in the Era of Laparoscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Mark Scott

    2017-07-01

    Plastic surgical reconstruction of the perineum is often required after abdominoperineal excision of the rectum. Options for this reconstruction include a vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous (VRAM) flap, gluteal fasciocutaneous flap, and gracilis myocutaneous flap. Although the VRAM flap is well established at most centers, less experience exists with the gluteal and gracilis flaps. In the era of laparoscopic colorectal resection, plastic surgeons are being forced to use gluteal and gracilis flaps because the VRAM flap must be tunnelled intra-abdominally requiring laparotomy. We therefore aimed to systematically review the evidence comparing VRAM, gluteal, and gracilis flaps. A comprehensive, structured literature search was conducted using Medline, Google Scholar, and Science Direct. Studies included were randomized control trials and observational studies documenting complication rates associated with the VRAM, gluteal, or gracilis flap. Eleven studies meeting all inclusion and exclusion criteria were identified. When meta-analyzed, the overall rate of any perineal wound or flap complication among VRAM patients (35.8%) was significantly lower than gluteal flap (43.7%) and gracilis flap patients (52.9%) (P = 0.041). The VRAM flap is well established for perineal reconstruction, and this study suggests that it may be superior to the gluteal and gracilis flaps in terms perineal wound and flap complication rates. This should be taken into account when weighing up the risks and benefits of a laparoscopic approach to abdominoperineal excision of the rectum. Large studies making direct comparisons between the flap options should be conducted.

  7. Speech articulation after subtotal glossectomy and reconstruction with a myocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Knuuttila, H; Pukander, J; Määttä, T; Pakarinen, L; Vilkman, E

    1999-01-01

    Speech samples of 9 subjects (8 males, 1 female) were recorded before and 0.5-2 years after a partial glossectomy and reconstruction with a pectoralis major myocutaneous flap. A reading sample, a list of meaningful and nonsense words, and a list of sustained vowels were recorded. The speech samples were evaluated by pairs of naive listeners and using acoustic analysis of the vowel production. Each pair listened to the recordings of only one patient. Inter-rater agreement was satisfactory. The general impression of the speech outcome varied from normal to moderately impaired. The perceptually estimated impairments of speech articulation in the after/before comparisons were statistically significant. Only the first formant of the vowel /i/ (rise) and the second formant of the vowel /a/ (drop) changed significantly at the group level. There was a negative correlation (r = -0.79) between the extent of tongue resection and the drop of the second formant of the vowel /a/. The perceptual variables showed a relationship (r = 0.74-0.82) with the changes in the level of the second formant of the vowel /i/. The relationship that emerged between the perceptual estimates and the objective acoustic parameters suggests that it will be possible to develop clinically relevant test batteries for articulatory quality analysis.

  8. [Vascularization of free myocutaneous gracilis flaps in replacement transplantation after preoperative radiotherapy. An experimental study].

    PubMed

    Schultze-Mosgau, S; Rödel, F; Keilholz, L; Grabenbauer, G G; Wiltfang, J; Radespiel-Tröger, M; Sauer, R; Neukam, F W

    2000-11-01

    Following preoperative radiotherapy prior to ablative surgery of squamous epithelial carcinomas of the head and neck region, inflammatory changes to the connective tissue and vascular endothelium are observed. These processes may lead to a delay in healing of free flaps in the irradiated transplant bed. The aim of the study was to investigate qualitative and quantitative changes in vascularization in irradiated and regular transplant beds. In Wistar rats (male, weight 300 to 500 g) undergoing preoperative irradiation of the neck region with 3 times 10 Gy (30 animals) and 5 times 10 Gy (30 animals) and non-irradiated rats (42 animals), a free myocutaneous gracilis flap taken from the groin was transplanted to the irradiated region of the neck. The time interval between irradiation and transplantation was 4 weeks. On day 3, 4, 5, 7, 14 and 28 post operation, the capillary sprouting, structural changes and the distribution patterns were analyzed by H & E and immunohistochemical staining (goat-F[ab]-2-anti-von Willebrand factor antibody). Three histological sections (2 to 4 microns) per sample were investigated histomorphometrically, qualitatively and quantitatively (ratio capillary area/total area, and capillary lumen) by NH-image-digitized measurement. A statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney test. In contrast to non-irradiated rats, irradiated animals showed a qualitatively reduced and a more irregular capillary distribution with more marked pericapillary fibrosis in the irradiated transplant bed. Quantitatively, the ratio capillary area/total area, as a marker of improved capillarization was significantly reduced in the transition area transplant/irradiated transplant bed and in irradiated transplant bed tissues in contrast to the non-irradiated control group (p = 0.004). Also, from day 14 to 28 a significant decrease was found in the transition area between transplanted tissues and irradiated transplant bed tissues in irradiated animals (p = 0

  9. [Articulatory function in patients receiving glossectomy followed by reconstruction with a recto-abdominal myocutaneous free flap].

    PubMed

    Ikema, Y; Tsukuda, M; Mochimatsu, I; Kawai, S; Enomoto, H; Zhou, L X; Yoshida, T; Hirose, H

    1996-06-01

    Postoperative articulatory functions of patients with tongue cancer have been improved by reconstructive surgery with a radial forearm or recto-abdominal myocutaneous free flap. We examined the postoperative articulatory functions of 10 patients who received reconstruction with a recto-abdominal myocutaneous free flap after glossectomy. The functions were investigated by standardized tests, i. e. a quentionnaires, the 100 Japanese monosyllable speech intelligibility test and a single-word intelligibility test. A confusion matrix was obtained from the results of the monosyllable test. On the basis of resection sites, the present cases were divided into two types: an anterior type and a lateral type. The results are summarized as follows. There was no significant difference in the results of the quentionnareis between the two types. The mean score of the 100 Japanese monosyllable speech intelligibility test in cases of the anterior type was 48% and in those of the lateral type it was 62%. The mean score of the single-word intellibibility test in cases of the anterior type was 75% and in those of the lateral type it was 83%. In cases of the anterior type, dental and alveolar sounds were often confused with fricatives, whereas in the lateral type, velars sounds were often confused with affricates or flaps. These results suggest that our classification based on resection site was useful for investigating postoperative articulatory functions after partial glossectomy.

  10. [Genital elephantiasis: reconstructive treatment of penoscrotal lymphoedema with a myocutaneous M. gracilis flap. Experiences from a District Hospital in Ethiopia].

    PubMed

    Prica, S; Donati, O F; Schaefer, D J; Peltzer, J

    2008-08-01

    Genital elephantiasis is an illness leading to serious functional and aesthetic as well as psychosocial impairment. Since the 19th century there have been articles describing methods for surgical ablative treatment of penoscrotal lymphoedema. However, most of these methods ignore the creation a new drainage for the lymph. We now describe a new technique using a myocutaneous M. gracilis muscle flap for the reconstruction of the soft tissue damage resulting from radical excision, thus ensuring drainage of the lymph into the deep muscle compartment of the thigh. In the District Hospital "Mettu-Karl Hospital" in the Ethiopian rain forest region of Illubabor, during a period of 6 months the described surgical procedure was applied to 9 patients suffering from severe forms of this grotesquely disfiguring disease. Two patients presented with combined penoscrotal oedema, while the other 7 patients were suffering from isolated scrotal lymphoedema alone. All patients benefited from reconstruction with a myocutaneous M. gracilis muscle flap after radical excision of the affected tissue. All patients were evaluated after 3 and 12 months postoperatively in the presence of a translator. All nine patients showed a functionally and aesthetically satisfying result after 3 months without postoperative occurrence of infection. The evaluation 12 months postoperatively showed no recurrence of genitoscrotal lymphoedema. All patients reported on having regained normal ability for sexual intercourse and no occurrence of urinary tract infections since the operation. Concerning fertility, no statements could be made. A significant improvement in the quality of life was observed by the regained ability to walk and work and consequently the reintegration of the patients into their socio-economic environment. Radical excision of the affected tissue followed by transferring a functioning lymphatic drainage into the deep muscle compartment of the ipsilateral thigh using a proximally based

  11. Locoregional recurrence after mastectomy with immediate transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Sharla Gayle; Teller, Paige; Iyengar, Radha; Carlson, Grant W; Gabram-Mendola, Sheryl G A; Losken, Albert; Styblo, Toncred; Torres, Mylin; Wood, William C; Perez, Sebastian D; Mosunjac, Marina; Rizzo, Monica

    2012-08-01

    The locoregional recurrence (LRR) rate after mastectomy is reported to be similar with immediate reconstruction. We aimed to identify characteristics of LRR after transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) reconstruction. We retrospectively reviewed patients undergoing immediate TRAM reconstruction for breast cancer who were diagnosed with LRR. We identified 18 LRR (4.6 %) in 18 of 390 patients who underwent immediate TRAM reconstructions for breast cancer from 1998 to 2008. The median follow-up was 69.2 months. The mean age at time of mastectomy was 49.5 years. All LRR were detected by physical examination. The LRR occurred in the TRAM subcutaneous tissue (n = 9), five in the ipsilateral axillary lymph node and four in the supraclavicular lymph node. Of the 18 patients who developed LRR, 14 (77.7 %) presented with stage 0-1-2 and 4 (22.2 %) with stage 3 disease at the time of the original mastectomy. The average time for a LRR to present was 35.8 months after initial mastectomy and reconstruction. For patients who initially presented with stage 3 disease, the average time to LRR was shorter (22.9 months). Nine patients (50.0 %) were found to have metastatic disease at the time of the LRR, and 6 (33.3 %) died of disease. All TRAM LRR were detected by routine physical examination by the patient or the surgeon. Our findings suggest that routine history and clinical breast examination of the breast reconstructed with a TRAM flap along with patient self-awareness are reliable in the diagnosis of LRR.

  12. [Efficacy of the treatment of pharyngeal fistula through pectoralis major myocutaneous flap combined with fistula local skin inversion in 20 cases].

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Liu, Y H; Hu, G Q; Zhao, Y

    2016-08-01

    To sum up the efficacy of treatment of pharyngeal fistula through pectoralis major myocutaneous flap combined with fistula local skin inversion in 20 patients. A retrospective analysis of the therapeutic efficacy in 20 cases of laryngeal and laryngopharyngeal cancer with postoperative pharyngeal fistula, to whom double-deck repairing were operated on through pectoralis major myocutaneous island flap combined with inversion of skin around fistula from January 2010 to December 2013. 20 patients were treated by improved pharyngeal fistula inverting suture of pectoralis major myocutaneous flap combined with the skin around the pharyngeal fistula. Flap around the fistula were sutured without tension formation. The pectoralis major myocutaneous flaps were sutured without tension formation covering the inner flanging flap wound. 20 patients were on a nasogastric liquid diet after operation for one week and received antibiotics to prevent infection. Then they all took liquid diet after one week, and had extubation safely later. Stitches were removed 10 more days later. All the twenty patients were recovered successfully, among them, 16 cases recovered in stage Ⅰ and left the hospital 10 days later, 4 cases recovered in stage Ⅱ and left the hospital 20 days later. All the 4 cases recovered in stage Ⅱ were treated with radiotherapy. Fistulas less than 1 cm occurred near their anastomotic stomas at 7 to 14 days after operation. They were healed well by dressing change and pressure dressing. No recurrence was observed during the six months follow-up. Pectoralis major myocutaneous flap combined with fistula local skin inversion is a good way to repair pharyngeal fistula, and it is suitable for the laryngeal and laryngopharynx cancer patients with postoperative throat fistula in an internal diameter larger than 2 cm.

  13. Chondrosarcoma from the sternum: reconstruction with titanium mesh and a transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap after subtotal sternal excision.

    PubMed

    Koto, Kazutaka; Sakabe, Tomoya; Horie, Naoyuki; Ryu, Kazuteru; Murata, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Ishida, Toshihiro; Konishi, Eiichi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2012-10-01

    Chondrosarcoma arising from the sternum is extremely rare and is often untreatable. Removal of the sternum for malignant tumor results in large defects in bone and soft tissue, causing deformity and paradoxical movement of the chest wall and making subsequent repair of the thorax very important. We report a very rare patient with a chondrosarcoma of the sternum who underwent case chest wall resection, followed by reconstruction using a titanium mesh covered with a transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap. A 63-year-old man was referred to our hospital with progressively enlarged swelling of his anterior chest wall. Physical examination showed a 2.5×2.0 cm mass fixed to the sternum, which was diagnosed as a chondrosarcoma based on clinical findings, imaging characteristics and incision biopsy results. The patient underwent a subtotal sternal and chest wall resection to remove the tumor, followed by reconstruction with a titanium mesh and a TRAM flap. There were no complications associated with surgery. We report an extremely rare case of a patient who underwent subtotal sternal resection, followed by reconstruction, for a large chondrosarcoma. The elasticity and rigidity provided by the titanium mesh and the complete coverage of the surgical wound by a TRAM flap suggest that these procedures may be useful in reconstructing large defects in the chest wall.

  14. Chondrosarcoma from the sternum: Reconstruction with titanium mesh and a transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap after subtotal sternal excision

    PubMed Central

    Koto, Kazutaka; Sakabe, Tomoya; Horie, Naoyuki; Ryu, Kazuteru; Murata, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Ishida, Toshihiro; Konishi, Eiichi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Chondrosarcoma arising from the sternum is extremely rare and is often untreatable. Removal of the sternum for malignant tumor results in large defects in bone and soft tissue, causing deformity and paradoxical movement of the chest wall and making subsequent repair of the thorax very important. We report a very rare patient with a chondrosarcoma of the sternum who underwent case chest wall resection, followed by reconstruction using a titanium mesh covered with a transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap. Case Report A 63-year-old man was referred to our hospital with progressively enlarged swelling of his anterior chest wall. Physical examination showed a 2.5×2.0 cm mass fixed to the sternum, which was diagnosed as a chondrosarcoma based on clinical findings, imaging characteristics and incision biopsy results. The patient underwent a subtotal sternal and chest wall resection to remove the tumor, followed by reconstruction with a titanium mesh and a TRAM flap. There were no complications associated with surgery. Conclusions We report an extremely rare case of a patient who underwent subtotal sternal resection, followed by reconstruction, for a large chondrosarcoma. The elasticity and rigidity provided by the titanium mesh and the complete coverage of the surgical wound by a TRAM flap suggest that these procedures may be useful in reconstructing large defects in the chest wall. PMID:23018358

  15. Real world dehiscence rates for patients undergoing abdominoperineal resection with or without myocutaneous flap closure in the national surgical quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Curran, Thomas; Poylin, Vitaliy; Nagle, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Perineal wound complications cause significant morbidity following abdominoperineal resection (APR). Myocutaneous flap closure may mitigate perineal wound complications though data is limited outside of specialized oncologic centers. We aim to compare rates of wound dehiscence in patients undergoing APR with and without flap closure. All patients undergoing APR in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program between 2005 and 2013 were included. Thirty-day rate of wound dehiscence and other perioperative outcomes were compared between the flap and non-flap cohorts. Subgroup analysis was performed for propensity score-matched cohorts and those receiving neoadjuvant radiation. Seven thousand two hundred and five patients underwent non-emergent APR [527 (7 %) flap vs. 6678 (93 %) non-flap]. Wound dehiscence occurred in 224 patients [38 (7 %) flap vs. 186 (3 %) non-flap] with 84/224 (38 %) of these reoperated. Reoperation was more common in flap patients [15 vs. 8 %; p = 0.001]. Overall morbidity was higher in flap closure [38 % flap vs. 31 % non-flap; p < 0.001]. Dehiscence was higher for flap closure in the propensity score-matched cohort [7 vs. 3 %; p < 0.001]. Flap closure was an independent predictor of dehiscence for both the overall and propensity score-matched groups. Dehiscence was not increased in patients who had neoadjuvant radiation [5.4 % flap vs. 2.6 % non-flap; p = 0.127]. This represents the largest study of flap vs. non-flap closure following APR and the first such study from a national database. Flap closure was independently associated with increased risk of wound dehiscence in both the overall and matched cohorts. This study highlights the challenge of wound complications following APR and provides real-world generalizable data.

  16. The bipedicled latissimus dorsi myocutaneous free flap: clinical experience with 53 patients.

    PubMed

    Karaaltin, Mehmet Veli; Erdem, Adnan; Canter, Ibrahim; Cavdar, Günay; Baghaki, Semih

    2010-01-01

    The Latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap is a valuable workhorse of the microsurgeon, especially in closing large body defects. One of the pitfalls in harvesting the flap, is particularly in its inferior aspect which may be unreliable. Here we report a series of 53 patients who were undergone bipedicled free latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous free flaps for extensive tissue defects. The age of patients were between 5 and 64 and all of them were males. The wound sizes in these patients ranged between 31-35 x 10-12 cm and flap dimensions were between 38-48 x 6-8 cm. Perforator branches of the 10th intercostal vessels were dissected and supercharged to the flaps to reduce the risk of ischemia of the inferior cutaneous extensions. The secondary pedicles were anastomosed to recipient vessels other than the primary pedicles. Recipient areas were consisted of lower extremities. Four patients suffered of early arterial failure in the major pedicle and all revisions were successfully attempted. Neither sign of venous congestion nor arterial insufficiency were observed at the inferior cutaneous extensions of the flaps, and all defects were reconstructed successfully. All donor sites were primarily closed, only two patients suffered from a minor area of superficial epidermal loss at the donor site, without suffering any adjunct complications. In conclusion coverage of large defects can be safely performed with extending the skin paddle of latissimus dorsi flap as a bipedicled free flap.

  17. [BIPADDLED SPLIT PECTORALIS MAJOR MYOCUTANEOUS FLAPS FOR IMMEDIATE RECONSTRUCTION OF ORAL MUCOSAL DEFECTS AND NECK DEFECTS AFTER RESECTION OF RECURRENT ORAL CANCER].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Jiang, Canhua; Li, Ning; Gao, Zhengyang; Chen, Lichun; Wu, Xiaoshan; Chen, Xinqun; Jian, Xinchun

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the feasibility of the bipaddled split pectoralis major myocutaneous flap for immediate reconstruction of oral mucosal defects and neck defects after resection of recurrent oral cancer. Six patients with oral mucosal defects combined with neck defects after recurrent oral cancer resection were treated with bipaddled split pectoralis major myocutaneous flap between September 2013 and September 2014. There were 5 males and 1 female with an average age of 54.7 years (range, 45-62 years), including 4 cases of recurrent tongue cancer, 1 case of recurrent mandibular gingival cancer, and 1 case of mouth floor carcinoma. All patients underwent local recurrence at 8 to 14 months after first operation, with no distant metastasis. The defects of the intraoral mucosa was 4.0 cm x 2.5 cm to 6.5 cm x 3.5 cm and the defect of the neck skin was 5.5 cm x 3.5 cm to 7.5 cm x 5.0 cm. The pectoralis major myocutaneous flaps (14.0 cm x 3.5 cm to 17.0 cm x 5.5 cm) were incised at the level of the 3rd to the 4th rib, and then split down along the muscle fiber till about 2 cm away from the thoracoacromial vessels, forming 2 independent skin paddles with 1-2 branch vessels to the pedicles of the distal ones. The distal skin paddles were used for oral reconstruction while the proximal paddles for repair of neck defects. The chest donor sites were sutured directly. Cervical haematoma and infection happened in 1 patient respectively after operation, and were cured after symptomatic treatment. All 6 split pectoralis major myocutaneous flaps with 12 skin paddles completely survived. All patients were followed up 6 to 18 months (mean, 11 months). One patient died of pulmonary metastasis at 8 months after operation and the other 5 survived without relapse or metastasis during follow-up. The intraoral paddles showed good shape with satisfactory speech function and swallowing recovery. The paddles also healed perfectly on the neck with flat outlooks, and all patients obtained full

  18. Analyses of speech intelligibility in patients after glossectomy and reconstruction with fasciocutaneous/myocutaneous flaps.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Y; Shirota, T; Yamashita, Y; Ohno, K

    2009-04-01

    This study analyzed the results of speech intelligibility tests in patients with tongue cancer who had undergone resection with the aim of making surgical recommendations for flap design and inset, to improve speech function. A total of 126 patients, enrolled from 13 Japanese institutions, were classified into 3 groups according to the resected site: lateral, anterior, and combined. The lateral group was further divided into 3 subgroups and the anterior group into 2 subgroups according to the size of resection. The speech intelligibility score was analyzed based on articulatory site and mode: 5 articulatory sites (linguodentoalveolar, linguopalatal, linguovelar, and their intermediates); and 7 articulatory modes (plosives, fricatives, affricatives, grids, nasals, vowels and semivowels). Low speech intelligibility scores were recorded at sites where flaps contribute directly to the pronunciation in the lateral and combined groups and at the anterior part of the reconstructed tongue in the anterior group. Plosives and glides displayed low values in general. A radial forearm flap had higher function in the lateral group than other flaps. The type of flap had no effect in the anterior and combined groups. Surgical techniques and flap selection to improve functional status in each type of resection are discussed.

  19. Ultrasound imaging evaluation of abdominal muscles after breast reconstruction with a unilateral pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Lih-Jiun; Lin, Sin-Daw; Guo, Lan-Yuen; Hou, Yi-You; Hou, Ming-Feng; Hsu, Ar-Tyan

    2013-03-01

    A muscle-sparing (MS) procedure using a full-width pedicled transverse rectus abdominis (RA) myocutaneous (TRAM) flap was developed to reduce abdominal morbidities after breast reconstruction. However, the effects of this procedure on the morphology of the remnant RA muscle and other abdominal muscles remain unclear. Ultrasound imaging was used to evaluate the morphology of the remnant RA muscle and other abdominal muscles in women with the MS pedicled TRAM flap procedure. A case-control, cross-sectional design was used. Thirty-four women with an MS unilateral pedicled TRAM flap procedure after mastectomy (TRAM group) and 25 women who were healthy and matched for age (control group) participated. The curl-up test measured trunk flexor muscle strength. Ultrasound imaging measured the thickness of all abdominal muscles in all participants and the cross-sectional area of the RA muscle at rest and in an isometric position with the head raised in women in the TRAM group. Acoustic echogenicity and border visibility assessed the tissue composition of the remnant RA muscle. Trunk flexor muscle strength was weaker in the TRAM group than in the control group. Compared with the remnant RA muscle in the contracted state, the remnant RA muscle in the relaxed state was thinner and had a smaller cross-sectional area. The remnant RA muscle in the relaxed state also was thinner, more echoic, and less visible than its contralateral counterpart. No differences in the thickness of the other abdominal muscles were found between the sides. The abdominal muscles in the TRAM group were smaller than those in the control group. Because a prospective, longitudinal design was not used, a definite cause-effect relationship could not be determined. In women with an MS unilateral pedicled TRAM flap procedure, the remnant RA muscle retains its ability to change in size during contraction, albeit at reduced levels. Muscular atrophy occurs in other ipsilateral and contralateral abdominal muscles as

  20. Complex scalp, skull, and dural defect reconstruction using a turnover "tournedos" myocutaneous free flap.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Lucie; Tahiri, Youssef

    2013-01-01

    The latissimus dorsi flap is one of the most commonly used flaps for calvarial defect reconstruction. In the setting of radiation and/or chronic infection and when skeletal reconstruction of the cranium is not recommended, standard calvarial reconstruction needs to be refined. The standard use of the latissimus dorsi only was associated with potential dead space over the dura, limited skin paddle size, and potential external contour irregularities. In this study, we present our approach to complex calvarial reconstruction with free tissue transfer without bone grafting while avoiding contour deformities in 1 efficient surgical procedure. We propose the "tournedos" turnover de-epithelialized latissimus dorsi flap, which provides stable dermal and subdermal tissue that will not undergo atrophy over time over the dura. To reach an adequate aesthetic result, we used a uniform, unmeshed, thick split-thickness skin graft over the muscular portion of the tournedos flap. Patients who underwent this procedure, from March 1992 to March 2012, at McGill University Health Center and the Montreal Neurological Institute were included. Thirty-three complex microsurgical procedures for oncologic calvarial defect reconstructions were performed from March 1992 to March 2012. Among them, 6 patients benefited from the tournedos procedure. The average age was 74 years. Scalp defects sizes ranged from 4 × 10 to 16 × 18 cm (40-288 cm). All latissimus dorsi flap donor sites were closed primarily. Patients kept their donor-site drains for approximately 18 days (±5 days). One patient developed a seroma at the donor site after drain removal that was treated conservatively. All patients were satisfied with their reconstructions, and no secondary procedures were necessary. We present our most recent case with good photographic documentation. Our approach using the tournedos turnover de-epithelialized free flap provides durable and stable coverage for irradiated and/or previously infected

  1. Quadratus lumborum catheters for breast reconstruction requiring transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps.

    PubMed

    Spence, Nicole Z; Olszynski, Patrycja; Lehan, Anne; Horn, Jean-Lois; Webb, Christopher A J

    2016-06-01

    Patients diagnosed with breast cancer may opt to undergo surgical reconstructive flaps at the time of or after mastectomies. These surgeries leave patients with significant postoperative pain and sometimes involve large surgical beds including graft sites from the abdomen to reconstruct the breast. Consequently, multimodal methods of pain management have become highly favored. Quadratus lumborum catheters offer an opioid-sparing technique that can be performed easily and safely. We present a case of a patient who underwent a breast flap reconstruction and had bilateral quadratus lumborum catheters placed for perioperative pain control.

  2. The platysma myocutaneous flap (PMF) for head and neck reconstruction: a retrospective and multicentric analysis of 91 T1-T2 patients.

    PubMed

    Tosco, Paolo; Garzino-Demo, Paolo; Ramieri, Guglielmo; Tanteri, Giulia; Pecorari, Giancarlo; Caldarelli, Claudio; Garzaro, Massimiliano; Giordano, Carlo; Berrone, Sid

    2012-12-01

    The platysma myocutaneous flap (PMF) was first applied to intraoral reconstructions in 1978. PMF is not only an alternative to microvascular flaps but it also represents an excellent reconstructive choice especially in cases where free tissue transfer cannot be carried out. Failure and complications rate have been described as varying from 18 to 45% and this is why this flap should not be used in specific cases such as in the presence of cervical metastases and in cases of mandibulectomy and simultaneous reconstruction with alloplastic materials. The purpose of this study is to examine the experience and results obtained in three different and independent institutes where PMF has been adopted in 91 patients for head and neck cancer reconstructions. The authors report their departments' separate but simultaneous experiences with PMF for small and middle-size soft tissue defects in a 10-year period.

  3. Anterior rectus fascia back cut: a new modification to relieve the pressure in fascial closure of the superior pedicle of a transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Shalom, Avshalom; Schein, Ophir; Westreich, Melvyn

    2012-04-01

    The maintenance of vascular patency is one of the key points to be considered after a pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap has been raised and when closing the anterior rectus fascia to avoid a hernia. In this study we describe a new approach to closing the most superior part of the fascia to help insure vascular patency. Forty patients who had their breasts reconstructed with TRAM flaps made up the study group. The new back cut technique was used in 25 patients. Of the remaining 15 patients, four required early revision on the day of operation for severe venous congestion or ischaemia. None of the patients who had the back cut technique required early revision. We found the back cut technique to be safe and easy, and we think that it can reduce the incidence of flap ischaemia and still achieve tight fascial closure.

  4. Recurrent cervical esophageal stenosis after colon conduit failure: Use of myocutaneous flap

    PubMed Central

    Sa, Young Jo; Kim, Young Du; Kim, Chi Kyung; Park, Jong Kyung; Moon, Seok Whan

    2013-01-01

    A 53-year-old male developed cervical esophageal stenosis after esophageal bypass surgery using a right colon conduit. The esophageal bypass surgery was performed to treat multiple esophageal strictures resulting from corrosive ingestion three years prior to presentation. Although the patient underwent several endoscopic stricture dilatations after surgery, he continued to suffer from recurrent esophageal stenosis. We planned cervical patch esophagoplasty with a pedicled skin flap of sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle. Postoperative recovery was successful, and the patient could eat a solid meal without difficulty and has been well for 18 mo. SCM flap esophagoplasty is an easier and safer method of managing complicated and recurrent cervical esophageal strictures than other operations. PMID:23345956

  5. Myocutaneous sternocleidomastoid flap for reconstruction after the resection of a parapharyngeal heterotopic glioma in a child with cleft palate, and systematic review of parapharyngeal glial heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Prado-Calleros, Héctor M; Arrieta-Gómez, José R; Castillo-Ventura, Beatriz; Martínez, Sara Parraguirre; Jiménez-Gutiérrez, Carlos; Jiménez-Escobar, Irma

    2016-02-01

    We describe the surgery and reconstruction employed with a sternocleidomastoid myocutaneous flap for the treatment of a heterotopic glioma in a 2-year-old boy with incomplete palatal fissure who presented with dysphagia and snoring, in whom a lateral pharyngeal wall mass obstructing 60% of the airway was noted. Heterotopic gliomas are uncommonly reported in the parapharyngeal space and should be included in the differential diagnosis at this location in children. Parapharyngeal tumors present difficult diagnostic and management challenges; head and neck surgeons must be prepared not only for the resection but also for the reconstruction of these rare lesions.

  6. Oncological safety and quality of life associated with mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction with a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Min, Sun Young; Kim, Hyun Yul; Jung, So-Youn; Kwon, Youngmee; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kang, Han-Sung; Yun, Young Ho; Lee, Eun Sook

    2010-01-01

    To determine the quality of life (QoL) of breast cancer patients who underwent mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction with a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap (LD), and the oncological safety of the procedure. Between May 2001 and March 2007, 2,566 patients had breast cancer surgery at the National Cancer Center, Korea. Of the 2,566 patients, 1,699 had breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and 120 had a mastectomy with an immediate LD. We retrospectively compared the oncologic safety of the two techniques. We also assessed the QoL using the EORTC QLQ BR-23 and Zung's self-rating depression scale in 52 LD patients, 104 age- and stage-matched patients who underwent BCS, and 104 age-matched healthy women. The LD group had earlier stage disease than the BCS group at baseline, but following surgery, the groups did not differ in the rates of local recurrence or systemic metastases. Compared with the healthy group, the patient groups had poorer functioning and more depression (p < 0.001). Among the patient groups, the LD group reported lower scores for body image (p = 0.007) and future perspective (p = 0.023) than the BCS group. In the LD group, patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy reported lower scores for future perspective and higher scores for depression than those who did not receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy (p < 0.001). The BCS and LD groups did not differ in oncological outcome, and the QoL of patients in the LD group was not always good. Mastectomy with immediate reconstruction should be considered carefully and tailored to the patient's needs and characteristics.

  7. Closure of the donor defect for breast reconstruction with rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps.

    PubMed

    Drever, J M; Hodson-Walker, N

    1985-10-01

    The abdominal muscles not only constitute a multidirectional cinch that holds the abdominal contents in place, but they also determine the flexion and rotational movements of the trunk. The rectus is mainly responsible for flexion and the obliques are responsible for rotating the trunk. It is therefore important to maintain the tone and direction of pull of the oblique muscles. The key to closure of the fascial defect is to replace the same area of anterior rectus fascia (tendon of both obliques and transversus muscles) as has been removed with the rectus abdominis flap pedicle. This replacement, done with a double Merselene mesh, should extend up to the costal margin and should be of the same width as the fascia taken with the muscle pedicle. This technique was drawn from experience with 186 patients. Of these, 31 were simply approximated, and 43 percent developed weakness, bulging, or hernias, of which 5 required secondary repair. A total of 155 patients were closed with Merselene mesh, and only 4 percent developed bulging that was later repaired and attributed to technical mistakes. There were two cases of infection and three cases of exposed mesh due to necrosis (mesh did not need removal). Seromas were common (14 percent), but the incidence was reduced to 5 percent after tacking stitches were done from the mesh to the subcutaneous fascia.

  8. Considering the Optimal Timing of Breast Reconstruction With Abdominal Flaps With Adjuvant Irradiation in 370 Consecutive Pedicled Transverse Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous Flap and Free Deep Inferior Epigastric Perforator Flap Performed in a Chinese Oncology Center

    PubMed Central

    He, Shanshan; Yin, Jian; Robb, Geoffrey L.; Sun, Jingyan; Zhang, Xuehui; Li, Haixin; Liu, Jing; Han, Chunyong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose There is an ongoing debate on the optimal sequence of radiation and breast reconstruction. The purpose of this article was to (a) assess the impact of radiation on autologous breast reconstruction and (b) analyze the best timing for autologous breast reconstruction in the setting of radiation in a Chinese population. Methods A retrospective review of patients undergoing breast reconstruction with autologous lower abdominal flaps between 2001 and 2014 in the Tianjin Medical University and Cancer Hospital was performed. Patients were grouped by their irradiation status (irradiated vs nonirradiated). The irradiated group was further stratified into 2 groups by the timing of irradiation (immediate breast reconstruction followed by radiation vs prior radiation and delayed breast reconstruction). The primary outcomes were early and late breast complications, secondary and revision surgeries to the reconstructed breast, whereas the secondary outcomes were aesthetic and psychological evaluations of the patients. Logistic regression was used to assess the potential association between irradiation, patient and treatment variables, and surgical outcomes. Results Three hundred sixty patients with 370 reconstructed breasts were included in the study. Two hundred seventy-eight cases were nonirradiated, of which 158 were immediate and 120 were delayed. Ninety-two cases were irradiated, of which 61 were immediate, and 31 were delayed. Three hundred thirty-two cases underwent pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap, 38 had deep inferior epigastric perforator flap. The irradiated group had a significant increase in secondary surgery due to fat necrosis (P < 0.001) and in late complications (P = 0.011). A significant increase in flap contracture (P = 0.043) and an increasing trend in the severity of fat necrosis were observed when radiation was performed after breast reconstruction. However, radiation and its timing did not have an adverse impact on patients

  9. Single step fibula-pro-tibia transfer and soft tissue coverage with free myocutaneous latissimus dorsi flap after extensive osteomyelitis and soft tissue necrosis--a 3 year follow up.

    PubMed

    Föhn, M; Bannasch, H; Stark, G B

    2009-11-01

    A 10-year-old girl from Ghana, Africa, developed chronic osteomyelitis of her right tibia and a large soft tissue defect on the ventral lower leg after a minor injury. She was treated more than 6 months after trauma without any improvement. We report a follow up of 3 years after reconstruction with a single-step pedicled fibula-pro-tibia transfer and wound coverage with a free myocutaneous latissimus dorsi flap.

  10. A case of central carcinoma of the mandible arising from a recurrent odontogenic keratocyst: delineation of surgical margins and reconstruction with bilateral rectus abdominis myocutaneous free flaps.

    PubMed

    Ota, Y; Karakida, K; Watanabe, D; Miyasaka, M; Tsukinoki, K

    1998-10-01

    A case of central carcinoma of the mandible arising from a recurrent odontogenic keratocyst is reported. A 38-year-old man was admitted to the Tokai University Hospital due to postoperative infection of a recurrent odontogenic keratocyst of the left mandible. He had had a cystectomy for an odontogenic keratocyst 4 years ago. The lesion revealed bony destruction of the mandible with worm-eating shaped margins with extension to the facial skin. A biopsy specimen revealed squamous cell carcinoma. The mandible was resected with facial skin and the sublingual space was dissected to preserve the lingual nerve. The oral and the facial resections were reconstructed with a titanium plate and bilateral rectus abdominis myocutaneous free flaps. The plate was removed due to infection around the margins and readjustment of the flaps was conducted 5 months after the surgery. He has not had a local relapse, metastasis, or incisional hernia for 8 months following surgery. Good occlusion has been attained by the residual mandible, and he is able to eat without any problems.

  11. [Application of anterolateral thigh myocutaneous flap using computed tomography angiography for mouth-floor reconstruction after resection of middle-late stage carcinoma of mouth floor].

    PubMed

    Luo, Shihong; Xiao, Jingang; Sun, Libo; Zhang, Li; Zeng, Liangnan; Xia, Delin; Zhou, Hangyu; Zhang, Lei

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the value of free anterolateral thigh myocutaneous flap (ALTMF) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) for the reconstruction of mouth-floor defects after the resection of middle-late stage carcinoma of the mouth floor. Sixteen cases of middle-late stage carcinomas of the mouth floor underwent radical resection, and mouth-floor and tongue defects were reconstructed with ALTMF. CTA was applied to plan the lateral circumflex femoral artery (LCFA) and its perforating vessel, which was verified during the operation. The position of the perforating vessel in the operation was fully consistent with that designed by the preoperative CTA. All 16 flaps completely survived. The appearance and function of all cases were both satisfactory. All donor sites were primarily closed and healed without functional morbidity. During the follow-up period of 6-36 months, 15 cases survived with acceptable aesthetic and functional results in mouth floor and tongue reconstruction, except for 1 case (T4N2M0) that died of metastasis carcinoma 10 months after operation. CTA can accurately locate the LCFA and artery perforator. Preoperative perforator planning using CTA in ALTMF transplantation is a reliable and useful method thatresults in safe operation with optimal outcome. The ALTMF is an ideal choice for the reconstruction of soft tissue defects after the resection of middle-late staie carcinoma of the mouth floor

  12. Recovery of sensation in immediate breast reconstruction with latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps after breast-conservative surgery and skin-sparing mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Koichi; Yano, Kenji; Hosokawa, Ko

    2011-04-01

    In breast reconstruction, sensation in the reconstructed breasts affects the patients' quality of life along with its aesthetic outcome. Fortunately, less invasive procedures such as breast-conservative surgery (BCS) and skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) have greatly contributed to the improved aesthetic outcome in immediate breast reconstruction. However, there are few reports on the recovery of breast sensation after BCS and SSM. We retrospectively reviewed 104 consecutive patients who underwent immediate breast reconstruction with the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap between 2001 and 2006 at our institution. The sensations of pain, temperature, touch, and vibration were examined at the nipple and skin envelope during the follow-up period (range: 12-61 months, mean: 31 months), and a stratified analysis was performed to determine the critical factors affecting the sensation recovery after BCS and SSM. We found that large breast size significantly impaired the recovery of sensation in the nipple and skin envelope after BCS as well as SSM. Older age and high body mass index value were the factors which negatively affected the sensation in the skin envelope after SSM. While all our BCS patients underwent postoperative radiation therapy, it did not negatively affect the recovery of sensation in SSM patients. On the basis of these findings, we could further improve the sensation of the reconstructed breasts after BCS and SSM. Especially after SSM, the use of innervated flaps is recommended in the patients with large breast, increased age, or obesity when the nipple-areola complex is resected.

  13. A case report on a full-thickness chest wall reconstruction with polypropylene mesh and stainless steel mesh concurrently using a transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Naoyuki; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Akimoto, Masataka; Hisayoshi, Takao; Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Shimizu, Kazuo

    2006-12-01

    A full-thickness chest wall resection requires subsequent chest wall reconstruction. A chest wall resection and reconstruction was performed using a transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap, together with polypropylene mesh (Marlex mesh) and stainless steel mesh (SSM). A 71-year-old man was diagnosed as having recurrent lung cancer in the chest wall, and underwent surgical resection. Marlex mesh was sutured to the posterior wall of the surgical defect. A portion of the SSM was adjusted to the size of the defect and cut out. Its edges were folded to make the portion into a plate. This SSM plate was placed anteriorly to the Marlex mesh and sutured to the ribs. The Marlex mesh was folded back on the SSM plate by 2 cm and fixed. After the above procedures, a left-sided TRAM flap was raised through a subcutaneous tunnel up to the defect and sutured to the region. The patient was discharged from hospital 19 days postoperatively. The wound was fine and he had no flail chest or dyspnea, and carcinomatous pain resolved.

  14. Initial experience with the use of porcine acellular dermal matrix (Strattice) for abdominal wall reinforcement after transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cicilioni, Orlando; Araujo, Gerson; Mimbs, Nancy; Cox, Matthew D

    2012-03-01

    Reestablishing anterior rectus fascial integrity remains a clinical challenge after transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap breast reconstruction. The main concerns include herniation and bulging due to abdominal weakness. Mesh-assisted closure of the fascial defect has improved bulging and herniation rates but infection, extrusion, and encapsulation are serious concerns with mesh use. Biologic tissue matrices may overcome some of these mesh-related complications. The initial experience of using Strattice for fascial closure after TRAM flap procedure is described in this article. Strattice was in-lain and sutured between the anterior and posterior layers of the rectus fascia, at the rectus muscle donor site. The abdominal wall was closed with progressive tension sutures. Postoperative complications at the donor site were assessed. A total of 16 unilateral and 9 bilateral reconstructions were performed in 25 patients. Length of hospital stay was 2 to 3 days which is shorter than with mesh repair (typically 4-5 days). During a mean follow-up period of 14.0 months, complications occurred in 7 patients (28%): seroma formation (2), minor skin separation (2), superficial skin infection (2), and superficial wound dehiscence (1). Complications were not directly related to Strattice and all, except one (superficial skin infection), were resolved without surgical intervention. In all patients, routine abdominal functions were restored 4 months postoperatively. Strattice is a safe, alternative option to synthetic mesh for fascial repair following TRAM flap breast reconstruction. When used in conjunction with progressive tension suture closure of the abdominal wall, dynamic reconstruction of the abdominal wall with resumption of abdominal function is possible with Strattice.

  15. Comparative Perfusion Analysis of Free Muscle-Sparing Versus Pedicle Transverse Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous (TRAM) Flaps in Vivo in the Peri-Operative and Late Post-Operative Periods.

    PubMed

    McNally, Richard; Rimler, Jonathan; Laurence, Vincent; Z Paydar, Keyianoosh; A Wirth, Garrett

    2017-05-01

    Current teaching suggests increased perfusion in free transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flaps over pedicled TRAM flaps, broadening indications for its use in high risk patients. This study compared perfusion analysis of free muscle-sparing versus pedicle TRAM flaps in vivo in the peri-operative and late post-operative periods. The SPY-Elite system using indocyanine green dye was used to analyze flap perfusion intra-operatively and at 1 week and 3 months post-operatively. Image analysis was completed by evaluating the perfusion maps from the SPY- Elite system with Image J software calculate maximum, minimum, and average luminescence over the surface area of the flaps. Student's T-test was used for statistical analysis. Intra-operatively, we found a 73.4% greater perfusion in the free muscle-sparing as compared to the pedicled TRAM. This increase in free muscle-sparing TRAM perfusion was not evident 1 week post-operatively, due to a relative increase in pedicle flap perfusion that coincided with a revision of the pedicled flap due to distal flap necrosis. At 3 months, the free muscle-sparing TRAM flap once again showed superior perfusion with a 15.7% increase over the pedicled flap. We showed superior free muscle-sparing TRAM perfusion in the early peri-operative period which coincided with the time framein which flap loss was most common. Local swelling, pedicle rotation, tunneling, and dominance of the deep inferior epigastric circulation were potential causes of initial decreased pedicled TRAM perfusion. This analysis adds more objective data to the question of indications and relative strengths between free and pedicled TRAM flaps.

  16. Lengthening the pedicle of the rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap for repair of upper chest and neck defects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J M; Liang, W Q; Ji, C Y; Chen, Y H

    2017-07-01

    INTRODUCTION The aim of this study was to investigate whether the pedicle of the rectus abdominis flap can be lengthened by resecting the inferior costal cartilage segments or associated muscle when repairing upper body defects. A formula was generated that calculates the expected increase in pedicle length. METHODS Thirty patients underwent computed tomography. The width and thickness of the third to seventh inferior costal cartilage segments as well as the width of the respective intercostal spaces were recorded. Four patients underwent reconstruction of an upper body defect with the relevant flap. RESULTS The expected mean increases in pedicle length were 4.07cm (standard deviation [SD]: 0.31cm) and 4.63cm (SD: 0.54cm) following resection of the left and right sides respectively of the seventh inferior costal cartilage segment, 7.99cm (SD: 0.49cm) and 10.82cm (SD: 0.23cm) following resection of the left and right sides respectively of the sixth and seventh inferior costal cartilage segments while resection of the fourth to seventh inferior costal cartilage segments would equate to increases of 17.48cm (SD: 0.62cm) and 22.05cm (SD: 0.21cm) for the left and right sides respectively. In four patients who required reconstruction, three flaps survived without problems but one flap developed partial necrosis. CONCLUSIONS Resecting inferior costal cartilage segments or associated muscle can lengthen the pedicle of the rectus abdominis flap for reconstruction of defects on the upper chest and neck.

  17. [Evaluation of patients' satisfaction after breast reconstruction with latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap and immediate permanent breast implant].

    PubMed

    Bognár, Gábor; Gőgh, Bettina; Novák, András; István, Gábor

    2014-04-01

    Current surgical treatment modalities for breast reconstruction include latissimus dorsi mycotaneous flap with immediate permanent breast implant (LDI). The aim of the present study was to analyze reconstruction with LDI in terms of quality of life, cosmesis and patient satisfaction. A chart analysis was carried out with the first ten patients who underwent breast reconstruction with LDI. The patients were interviewed and self-assessment quality of life was administered. They also underwent assessment of satisfaction and cosmesis. The high satisfaction and cosmesis scores in the breast reconstruction group indicate the superior results that can be achieved with breast reconstruction.

  18. Presurgical Botulinum Toxin A Treatment Increases Angiogenesis by Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α/Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Subsequent Superiorly Based Transverse Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous Flap Survival in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae Hwan; Lee, Song Hyun; Park, Yun Joo; Lee, Young Seok; Rah, Dong Kyun; Kim, Sung Young

    2016-06-01

    To date, there have been several experimental studies to assess tissue viability of transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flaps. Botulinum toxin A (BoTA) has gained popularity in many clinical fields, for a variety of therapeutic and aesthetic purposes. In addition, there have been reports regarding the positive effect of BoTA on flap survival by various mechanisms. In this study, we hypothesized that pretreatment with BoTA could augment the survival of TRAM flaps via increased hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1α/vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-dependent angiogenesis.Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: a control group and a BoTA group. Five days before superiorly based TRAM flap elevation, the BoTA group was pretreated with BoTA, whereas the control group was pretreated with normal saline. Gross flap survival rates were assessed, and quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting were performed for the evaluation of angiogenesis-related factors (CD34, HIF-1α, and VEGF).In the BoTA group, the gross flap survival rate was significantly higher than that in the control group on both ipsilateral (92.78.3 ± 5.05% vs 86.8 ± 3.88%, P = 0.009) and contralateral (91.57 ± 5.79% vs 74.28 ± 11.83%, P < 0.001) sides.The relative mRNA expression of CD34 and VEGF was significantly higher in the BoTA group than that in the control group in every zone, whereas the relative mRNA expression of HIF-1α was significantly higher in the BoTA group than that in the control group on contralateral sides. The relative protein expression of CD34, VEGF, and HIF-1α was significantly higher in the BoTA group than that in the control group in every zone.In conclusion, we demonstrate that presurgical BoTA treatment might increase angiogenesis by HIF-1α/VEGF, subsequently increase superiorly based TRAM flap survival in a rat model.

  19. [The use of the myocutaneous flap of m. latissimus dorsi in reconstructive maxillofacial surgery. An analysis and the technical considerations of 42 cases].

    PubMed

    Iriarte Ortabe, J I; Reychler, H

    1992-01-01

    The AA. report their experience about 42 of latissimus dorsi flaps, used in the maxillofacial reconstruction of 40 patients, during the last 4 years. After a brief historic and anatomic descriptions, the operative technique used for them is detailed with the solution for the encountered problems. The discussion of the advantages and drawbacks of this flap which should deserve a preferential place in the reconstructive surgery of large losses of the maxillofacial sphere (besides the microsurgical methods) ends the paper.

  20. Immediate locally advanced breast cancer and chest wall reconstruction: surgical planning and reconstruction strategies with extended V-Y latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Munhoz, Alexandre Mendonça; Montag, Eduardo; Arruda, Eduardo; Okada, Alberto; Brasil, José Augusto; Gemperli, Rolf; Filassi, José Roberto; Ferreira, Marcus Castro

    2011-06-01

    Surgical resection in locally advanced breast cancer produces large defects that may not be suitable for primary closure. Immediate reconstruction is controversial and presents a complicated scenario for breast surgeons and plastic surgeons. In this study, a different design was planned for the latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap with primary closure in V-Y for the correction of major lesions in the anterior chest wall. Twenty-five patients underwent immediate locally advanced breast cancer reconstruction with a V-Y latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap. This flap was raised from adjacent tissue located on the lateral and posterior thoracic region and presented a triangular shape whose base was the lateral aspect of the mastectomy wound. The technique was indicated in patients with large thoracic wounds. Mean follow-up time was 16 months. Closure was obtained in the donor and recipient sites without the use of skin grafts or other more major procedures. Complications occurred in nine patients (36 percent), including dorsal wound dehiscence in five patients and seroma in three. All cases except one were treated by a conservative approach with a good result. No total flap loss was reported. All patients achieved a satisfactory thoracic reconstruction and adequate wound care. The V-Y latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap is a reliable technique for immediate locally advanced breast cancer reconstruction. The technique is advantageous because the V-Y design allows primary closure of the chest wound and donor defect. Success depends on patient selection, coordinated planning with the breast cancer surgeon, and careful intraoperative management.

  1. Use of latissimus dorsi pedicled myocutaneous flap for reconstruction in the chest area of an 8-month-old female infant with ectopia cordis.

    PubMed

    Dastagir, Khaled; Breymann, Thomas; Heckmann, Andreas; Horke, Alexander; Vogt, Peter Maria

    2014-12-01

    Ectopia cordis (EC) is characterized by a complete or partial malposition of the heart outside the thorax. Despite the interdisciplinary treatment, the repair of EC is still very difficult and offers new surgical challenges because of its complexity and various combinations with other anomalies. We report the successful outcome after using a pedicled latissimus dorsi flap in reconstructive surgery in the setting of chronic wound dehiscence in an 8-month-old female infant born with a thoracic EC and omphalocele.

  2. Use of Latissimus Dorsi Pedicled Myocutaneous Flap for Reconstruction in the Chest Area of an 8-Month-Old Female Infant with Ectopia Cordis

    PubMed Central

    Dastagir, Khaled; Breymann, Thomas; Heckmann, Andreas; Horke, Alexander; Vogt, Peter Maria

    2014-01-01

    Ectopia cordis (EC) is characterized by a complete or partial malposition of the heart outside the thorax. Despite the interdisciplinary treatment, the repair of EC is still very difficult and offers new surgical challenges because of its complexity and various combinations with other anomalies. We report the successful outcome after using a pedicled latissimus dorsi flap in reconstructive surgery in the setting of chronic wound dehiscence in an 8-month-old female infant born with a thoracic EC and omphalocele. PMID:25798359

  3. Abdominal wall reconstruction using a combination of free tensor fasciae lata and anterolateral thigh myocutaneous flap: a prospective study in 16 patients.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yang; Cao, Dongsheng; Guo, Fangfang; Qian, Yunliang; Wang, Chen; Wang, Danru

    2015-08-01

    Reconstruction of the abdominal wall continues to be a challenging problem for plastic surgeons. Transposition of well-vascularized flap tissue is the most effective way to repair composite abdominal wall defects. We retrospectively reviewed the treatment of such patients and assessed the reconstructive technique using combination of an inlay of bioprosthetic materials and a united thigh flap. A retrospective review of patients' records in the department was carried out. In total, 16 patients who underwent immediate abdominal wall reconstruction between 2000 and 2013 were identified. Patients' health status, defect sizes, and surgical technique were obtained from medical charts. The immediate reconstruction surgery of the abdominal wall was successful in all patients. One patient with dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans experienced recurrences at the former site. One patient died because of liver metastases at 21 months after surgery. No incisional hernia or infection in this series of patients was observed. Full-thickness, giant defects of the complicated abdominal wall can be repaired successfully with relatively minor complications using this reconstructive technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Solitary metastatic adenocarcinoma of the sternum treated by total sternectomy and chest wall reconstruction using a Gore-Tex patch and myocutaneous flap: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The consequences of bone metastasis are often devastating. Although the exact incidence of bone metastasis is unknown, it is estimated that 350,000 people die of bone metastasis annually in the United States. The incidence of local recurrences after mastectomy and breast-conserving therapy varies between 5% and 40% depending on the risk factors and primary therapy utilized. So far, a standard therapy of local recurrence has not been defined, while indications of resection and reconstruction considerations have been infrequently described. This case report reviews the use of sternectomy for breast cancer recurrence, highlights the need for thorough clinical and radiologic evaluation to ensure the absence of other systemic diseases, and suggests the use of serratus anterior muscle flap as a pedicle graft to cover full-thickness defects of the anterior chest wall. Case presentation We report the case of a 70-year-old Caucasian woman who was referred to our hospital for the management of a retrosternal mediastinal mass. She had undergone radical mastectomy in 1999. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 74.23 × 37.7 × 133.6-mm mass in the anterior mediastinum adjacent to the main pulmonary artery, the right ventricle and the ascending aorta. We performed total sternectomy at all layers encompassing the skin, the subcutaneous tissues, the right pectoralis major muscle, all the costal cartilages, and the anterior part of the pericardium. The defect was immediately closed using a 0.6 mm Gore-Tex cardiovascular patch combined with a serratus anterior muscle flap. Our patient had remained asymptomatic during her follow-up examination after 18 months. Conclusion Chest wall resection has become a critical component of the thoracic surgeon's armamentarium. It may be performed to treat either benign conditions (osteoradionecrosis, osteomyelitis) or malignant diseases. There are, however, very few reports on the results of full

  5. Solitary metastatic adenocarcinoma of the sternum treated by total sternectomy and chest wall reconstruction using a Gore-Tex patch and myocutaneous flap: a case report.

    PubMed

    Daliakopoulos, Stavros I; Klimatsidas, Michael N; Korfer, Reiner

    2010-03-01

    The consequences of bone metastasis are often devastating. Although the exact incidence of bone metastasis is unknown, it is estimated that 350,000 people die of bone metastasis annually in the United States. The incidence of local recurrences after mastectomy and breast-conserving therapy varies between 5% and 40% depending on the risk factors and primary therapy utilized. So far, a standard therapy of local recurrence has not been defined, while indications of resection and reconstruction considerations have been infrequently described. This case report reviews the use of sternectomy for breast cancer recurrence, highlights the need for thorough clinical and radiologic evaluation to ensure the absence of other systemic diseases, and suggests the use of serratus anterior muscle flap as a pedicle graft to cover full-thickness defects of the anterior chest wall. We report the case of a 70-year-old Caucasian woman who was referred to our hospital for the management of a retrosternal mediastinal mass. She had undergone radical mastectomy in 1999. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 74.23 x 37.7 x 133.6-mm mass in the anterior mediastinum adjacent to the main pulmonary artery, the right ventricle and the ascending aorta. We performed total sternectomy at all layers encompassing the skin, the subcutaneous tissues, the right pectoralis major muscle, all the costal cartilages, and the anterior part of the pericardium. The defect was immediately closed using a 0.6 mm Gore-Tex cardiovascular patch combined with a serratus anterior muscle flap. Our patient had remained asymptomatic during her follow-up examination after 18 months. Chest wall resection has become a critical component of the thoracic surgeon's armamentarium. It may be performed to treat either benign conditions (osteoradionecrosis, osteomyelitis) or malignant diseases. There are, however, very few reports on the results of full-thickness complete chest wall resections for locally

  6. The role of monocyte subsets in myocutaneous revascularization.

    PubMed

    Khan, Bilal; Rangasamy, Sampathkumar; McGuire, Paul G; Howdieshell, Thomas R

    2013-08-01

    The controlled recruitment of monocytes from the circulation to the site of injury and their differentiation into tissue macrophages are critical events in the reconstitution of tissue integrity. Subsets of monocytes/macrophages have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and tumor vascularity; however, the significance of monocyte heterogeneity in physiologic neovascularization is just emerging. A cranial-based, peninsular-shaped myocutaneous flap was surgically created on the dorsum of wild-type mice (C57BL6) and populations of mice with genetic deletion of subset-specific chemokine ligand-receptor axes important in monocyte trafficking and function (CCL2(-/-) and CX3CR1(-/-)) (n=36 total; 12 mice per group, nine with flap and three unoperated controls). Planimetric analysis of digital photographic images was utilized to determine flap surface viability in wild-type and knockout mice. Real-time myocutaneous flap perfusion and functional revascularization was determined by laser speckle contrast imaging. Image analysis of CD-31 immunostained sections confirmed flap microvascular density and anatomy. Macrophage quantification and localization in flap tissues was determined by F4/80 gene and protein expression. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed on nonoperative back skin and postoperative flap tissue specimens to determine local gene expression. Myocutaneous flaps created on wild type and CX3CR1(-/-) mice were engrafted to the recipient site, resulting in viability. In contrast, distal full thickness cutaneous necrosis and resultant flap dehiscence was evident by d 10 in CCL2(-/-) mice. Over 10 d, laser speckle contrast imaging documented immediate graded flap ischemia in all three groups of mice, functional flap revascularization in wild type and CX3CR1(-/-) mice, and lack of distal flap reperfusion in CCL2(-/-) mice. Immunostaining of serial histologic specimens confirmed marked increases in microvascular

  7. Myocutaneous revascularization following graded ischemia in lean and obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Ross M; Coffman, Brittany; McGuire, Paul G; Howdieshell, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    Background Murine models of diabetes and obesity have provided insight into the pathogenesis of impaired epithelialization of excisional skin wounds. However, knowledge of postischemic myocutaneous revascularization in these models is limited. Materials and methods A myocutaneous flap was created on the dorsum of wild type (C57BL/6), genetically obese and diabetic (ob/ob, db/db), complementary heterozygous (ob+/ob−, db+/db−), and diet-induced obese (DIO) mice (n=48 total; five operative mice per strain and three unoperated mice per strain as controls). Flap perfusion was documented by laser speckle contrast imaging. Local gene expression in control and postoperative flap tissue specimens was determined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Image analysis of immunochemically stained histologic sections confirmed microvascular density and macrophage presence. Results Day 10 planimetric analysis revealed mean flap surface area necrosis values of 10.8%, 12.9%, 9.9%, 0.4%, 1.4%, and 23.0% for wild type, db+/db−, ob+/ob−, db/db, ob/ob, and DIO flaps, respectively. Over 10 days, laser speckle imaging documented increased perfusion at all time points with revascularization to supranormal perfusion in db/db and ob/ob flaps. In contrast, wild type, heterozygous, and DIO flaps displayed expected graded ischemia with failure of perfusion to return to baseline values. RT-PCR demonstrated statistically significant differences in angiogenic gene expression between lean and obese mice at baseline (unoperated) and at day 10. Conclusion Unexpected increased baseline skin perfusion and augmented myocutaneous revascularization accompanied by a control proangiogenic transcriptional signature in genetically obese mice compared to DIO and lean mice are reported. In future research, laser speckle imaging has been planned to be utilized in order to correlate spatiotemporal wound reperfusion with changes in cell recruitment and gene expression to

  8. Regional flaps in head and neck reconstruction: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Colletti, Giacomo; Tewfik, Karim; Bardazzi, Alessandro; Allevi, Fabiana; Chiapasco, Matteo; Mandalà, Marco; Rabbiosi, Dimitri

    2015-03-01

    Starting from our experience with 45 consecutive cases of regional pedicled flaps, we have underlined the effectiveness and reliability of a variety of flaps. The marketing laws as applied to surgical innovations are reviewed to help in the understanding of why regional flaps are regaining wide popularity in head and neck reconstruction. From January 2009 to January 2014, 45 regional flaps were harvested at San Paolo Hospital to reconstruct head and neck defects. These included 35 pectoralis major muscular and myocutaneous flaps, 4 lower trapezius island or pedicled flaps, 3 supraclavicular flaps, 2 latissimus dorsi pedicled flaps, and 1 fasciocutaneous temporal flap. The basic literature of marketing regarding the diffusion of new products was also reviewed. Two myocutaneous pectoralis major flaps were complicated by necrosis of the cutaneous paddle (one complete and one partial). No complete loss of any of the 45 flaps was observed. At 6 months of follow-up, 2 patients had died of multiple organ failure after prolonged sepsis. The 43 remaining patients had acceptable morphologic and functional results. Regional and free flaps appear to compete in many cases for the same indications. From the results of the present case series, regional flaps can be considered reliable reconstructive choices that are less expensive than their free flap alternatives. The "resurrection" of regional flaps can be partially justified by the changes in the global economy and the required adaptation of developed and developing countries. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. THE SPINAL NUCLEUS OF THE BULBOCAVERNOSUS: FIRSTS IN ANDROGEN-DEPENDENT NEURAL SEX DIFFERENCES

    PubMed Central

    Sengelaub, Dale R.; Forger, Nancy G.

    2008-01-01

    Cell number in the spinal nucleus of the bulbocavernosus (SNB) of rats was the first neural sex difference shown to differentiate under the control of androgens, acting via classical intracellular androgen receptors. SNB motoneurons reside in the lumbar spinal cord and innervate striated muscles involved in copulation, including the bulbocavernosus (BC) and levator ani (LA). SNB cells are much larger and more numerous in males than in females, and the BC/LA target muscles are reduced or absent in females. The relative simplicity of this neuromuscular system has allowed for considerable progress in pinpointing sites of hormone action, and identifying the cellular bases for androgenic effects. It is now clear that androgens act at virtually every level of the SNB system, in development and throughout adult life. In this review we focus on effects of androgens on developmental cell death of SNB motoneurons and BC/LA muscles; the establishment and maintenance of SNB motoneuron soma size and dendritic length; BC/LA muscle morphology and physiology; and behaviors controlled by the SNB system. We also describe new data on neurotherapeutic effects of androgens on SNB motoneurons after injury in adulthood. PMID:18191128

  10. [Thoracodorsal pedicled perforator flap for chest wall and breast reconstruction in children: Illustration with two clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Minetti, C; Colson, T; Gisquet, H; Pujo, J; Brix, M; Simon, E

    2014-02-01

    Perforator flaps represent a new approach in reconstructive surgery including the thoracodorsal perforator flap. It can be used as a free or pedicled tissue transfer. By exposing two clinical cases, we demonstrate that this flap is an interesting option for children and adolescents chest wall skin coverage with less morbidity compared to myocutaneous latissimus dorsi flap. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimizing the pedicled rectus abdominis flap: revised designs and vascular classification for safer procedures.

    PubMed

    Kotti, Bouraoui

    2014-04-01

    The rectus abdominis myocutaneous (RAM) flap is one of the most commonly used flaps in reconstructive surgery, and many designs have been published. The transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM), vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous (VRAM), and oblique designs (ORAM) are the most common. The most frequent complication with these flaps is partial flap necrosis. We describe a new vascular zoning method and a revised classification of abdominal wall perfusion that is applicable when harvesting pedicled TRAM flaps to make them more secure. From February 2009 to February 2013, we performed 70 pedicled RAM flaps in 68 patients for breast reconstruction (79%) as well as pelvic and inguinal reconstruction after bowel and gynecologic tumor resection. Clinical data about cutaneous vascularization of the flaps along with before and after photos were prospectively collected and analyzed, and results were evaluated retrospectively. We collected observations on partial flap necrosis, reviewed the literature, and made design modifications to exclude doubtful vascular territories. Of the total number of flaps, 59 were TRAMs, 7 were VRAMs, and 1 was an ORAM flap. Three combined horizontal and vertical flaps, or what we call TV RAM flaps, were performed. No flap-related complications were observed with VRAM, TV RAM, or ORAM flaps. Three instances of partial necrosis (in the same vascular territory) occurred with TRAM flaps; as a result, we changed our approach to these flaps and examined alternatives to the classical vascular zoning. We discussed abdominal skin perfusion in accordance with the literature and based on our experience with harvesting pedicled RAM flaps. We proposed safer skin paddles made possible by adopting a revised vascular classification. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors

  12. Breast and chest wall reconstruction with the transverse musculocutaneous gracilis flap in Poland syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huemer, George M; Puelzl, Petra; Schoeller, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Poland syndrome is a complex chest wall deformity with unilateral hypoplasia of the breast and pectoralis muscle, with a missing anterior axillary fold in its most common form. The authors report their combined experience and technique with the transverse myocutaneous gracilis flap to reconstruct the chest wall and breast either alone or simultaneously. Between June of 2004 and July of 2010, 11 patients (two male patients) were operated on and 14 flaps were transplanted. The authors found that the transverse myocutaneous gracilis flap proved to be a very valuable microsurgical alternative for reconstructing the chest wall and female breast in Poland syndrome with autologous tissue. The flap provides the surgeon maximal freedom of flap insetting for optimal symmetry together with a very inconspicuous donor site regardless of unilateral or bilateral harvesting.

  13. Reconstruction of the chin using an expanded deltopectoral flap following multiple recurrences of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Chenicheri; Hackenson, David; Balakrishnan, Anila; Elliott, David; Careaga, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    An important alternative to free tissue transfer in patients requiring correction of soft tissue chin defects are local and regional flaps, such as the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap and deltopectoral flap. With predictable vascular supply, potential for large size, and good aesthetic match for facial and cervical skin, the deltopectoral flap can offer the reconstructive surgeon additional options in patients who lack vessels suitable for free tissue transfer. The use of an expanded deltopectoral flap for a staged reconstruction of the chin in a patient with cancer recurrences, concomitant resections, radiation and multiple reconstructions is reported. PMID:23997595

  14. Microsurgical free flaps: Controversies in maxillofacial reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    George, Rinku K.; Krishnamurthy, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    Reconstructive microsurgery for oral and maxillofacial (OMF) defects is considered as a niche specialty and is performed regularly only in a handful of centers. Till recently the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMC) was considered to be the benchmark for OMF reconstruction. This philosophy is changing fast with rapid advancement in reconstructive microsurgery. Due to improvement in instrumentation and the development of finer techniques of flap harvesting we can positively state that microsurgery has come of age. Better techniques, microscopes and micro instruments enable us to do things previously unimaginable. Supramicrosurgery and ultrathin flaps are a testimony to this. Years of innovation in reconstructive microsurgery have given us a reasonably good number of very excellent flaps. Tremendous work has been put into producing some exceptionally brilliant research articles, sometimes contradicting each other. This has led to the need for clarity in some areas in this field. This article will review some controversies in reconstructive microsurgery and analyze some of the most common microvascular free flaps (MFF) used in OMF reconstruction. It aims to buttress the fact that three flaps-the radial forearm free flap (RFFF), anterolateral thigh flap (ALT) and fibula are the ones most expedient in the surgeon's arsenal, since they can cater to almost all sizeable defects we come across after ablative surgery in the OMF region. They can thus aptly be titled as the workhorses of OMF reconstruction with regard to free flaps. PMID:23662264

  15. Neural androgen receptor overexpression affects cell number in the spinal nucleus of the bulbocavernosus.

    PubMed

    Coome, L A; Swift-Gallant, A; Ramzan, F; Melhuish Beaupre, L; Brkic, T; Monks, D A

    2017-09-01

    The spinal nucleus of the bulbocavernosus (SNB) is a sexually dimorphic neuromuscular system in which the masculinisation of cell number is assumed to depend on the action of perinatal androgen in non-neural targets, whereas the masculinisation of cell size is assumed to depend primarily on the action of adult androgen on SNB cells themselves. To test these hypotheses, we characterised the SNB of Cre/loxP transgenic mice that overexpress androgen receptor (AR) throughout the body (CMV-AR) or in neural tissue only (Nestin-AR). Additionally, we examined the effects of androgen manipulation in male mutants and wild-type (WT) controls. We reproduced the expected sex differences in both motoneurone number and size, as well as the expected adult androgen dependence of SNB size. We found effects of genotype such that both Nestin-AR and CMV-AR have more SNB motoneurones than WT littermates and also that CMV-AR females have larger SNB motoneurones than Nes-AR or WT females. These results raise the possibility that AR can act in neurones and/or glia to rescue SNB motoneurones, as well as on non-neural AR to increase SNB cell size. © 2017 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  16. The fleur-de-lis upper gracilis flap for breast reconstruction: flap design and outcome.

    PubMed

    McKane, Brice W; Korn, Peter T

    2012-10-01

    We evaluated a fleur-de-lis design for the gracilis myocutaneous flap to improve flap volume for breast reconstruction. Thirty-one flaps were used in 17 consecutive patients undergoing the procedure for either thin body habitus (23 flaps) or prior abdominal surgery (8 flaps). The flap success rate was 100%. The fleur-de-lis flap provided proportionate breast reconstructions in all patients. Complications included 6 (19.3%) donor-site dehiscence and 4 (12.9%) episodes of cellulitis. Applying a negative pressure dressing to the donor site (n=26) significantly reduced the initially high dehiscence rate to 7.7% (P<0.01). There was no incidence of lower extremity edema or sensory loss. The fleur-de-lis gracilis flap can be performed with a low flap related complication rate and acceptable donor-site morbidity. Because of its standardized flap design, improved volume, and favorable breast shaping, it may allow autologous breast reconstruction to be offered to a greater number of patients.

  17. First case of penile metastasis following abdominoperineal resection with VRAM flap reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kozan, Andrei A.; Smith, Adrian M.; Ilsley, David W.; Rhodes, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Penile metastases are rare in colorectal cancer. We report the first case of such a recurrence in a patient who had undergone an extralevator abdominoperineal resection with vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap perineal reconstruction. The patient was treated with curative intent by total penectomy. PMID:27887019

  18. [Large abdominal wall reconstruction by free flap after recurrence of a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans].

    PubMed

    Le Fourn, B; Lejeune, F; Sartre, J Y; Loirat, Y; Pannier, M

    1996-12-01

    Based on a case of recurrence of a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans of the abdominal wall, the authors discuss the need for initial wide resection of this type of skin tumour and the possibilities of repair of extensive full thickness defects of the abdominal wall by means of a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous free flap.

  19. Bulbocavernosus Reflex Test for Diagnosis of Pudendal Nerve Injury in Female Patients with Diabetic Neurogenic Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xiaoting; Wang, Xun; Huang, Huanjie; Ni, Peiqi; Lin, Yuanshao; Shao, Bei

    2016-01-01

    The study was designed to investigate the clinical application and significance of the bulbocavernosus reflex (BCR) test for diagnosing diabetic neurogenic bladder (DNB) in female subjects. In this study, 68 female patients with DNB and 40 female normal controls were subjected to a nerve conduction study (NCS) of all four limbs and the BCR test. The data were analyzed and compared, and the corresponding diagnostic sensitivities were discussed. Mean BCR latency for female DNB patients was significantly prolonged, compared to that of the control group, suggesting pudendal nerve injuries in female DNB patients. Moreover, DNB patients were categorized according to the diabetes course. Compared to that of Group A (diabetes course < 5 y), the mean BCR latency was significantly prolonged in Group B (diabetes course between 5 and 10 y) and then further prolonged in Group C (diabetes course > 10 y), which were all longer than the control group. Furthermore, compared with that of the controls, the mean BCR latency was prolonged in DNB patients with or without NCS abnormalities in limbs. Nevertheless, no significant difference was observed in BCR latency between DNB patients with and without NCS abnormalities. Significantly increasing trends were also observed in the NCS and BCR abnormality rates along with increased diabetes course. Most importantly, compared with the NCS of limbs, the BCR test was more sensitive in diagnosing DNB in the female subjects. Overall, our findings suggest that the BCR test would help to assess the pudendal nerve injury in female DNB patients, which might be a potential diagnostic tool in the clinic. PMID:28053822

  20. Free anterolateral thigh flap for extremity reconstruction: clinical experience and functional assessment of donor site.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Y R; Jeng, S F; Kuo, M H; Huang, M N; Liu, Y T; Chiang, Y C; Yeh, M C; Wei, F C

    2001-06-01

    From August of 1995 through July of 1998, 38 free anterolateral thigh flaps were transferred to reconstruct soft-tissue defects. The overall success rate was 97 percent. Among 38 anterolateral thigh flaps, four were elevated as cutaneous flaps based on the septocutaneous perforators. The other 34 were harvested as myocutaneous flaps including a cuff of vastus lateralis muscle (15 to 40 cm3), either because of bulk requirements (33 cases) or because of the absence of a septocutaneous perforator (one case). However, vastus lateralis muscle is the largest compartment of the quadriceps, which is the prime extensor of the knee. Losing a portion of the vastus lateralis muscle may affect knee stability. Objective functional assessments of the donor sites were performed at least 6 months postoperatively in 20 patients who had a cuff of vastus lateralis muscle incorporated as part of the myocutaneous flap; assessments were made using a kinetic communicator machine. The isometric power test of the ratios of quadriceps muscle at 30 and 60 degrees of flexion between donor and normal thighs revealed no significant difference (p > 0.05). The isokinetic peak torque ratio of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles, including concentric and eccentric contraction tests, showed no significant difference (p > 0.05), except the concentric contraction test of the quadriceps muscle, which revealed mild weakness of the donor thigh (p < 0.05). In summary, the functional impairment of the donor thighs was minimal after free anterolateral thigh myocutaneous flap transfer.

  1. [Anatomic changes after radical surgery and reconstruction with pedunculated or revascularized flaps in advanced head and neck tumors: computerized tomography and magnetic resonance findings].

    PubMed

    Osti, M F; Scattoni Padovan, F; Ricciardi, D; De Angelis D'Ossat, M; Sbarbati, S; Pirolli, C; Maurizi Enrici, R; Anaveri, G

    1997-04-01

    January, 1992, to October, 1995, sixty-four patients with advanced head and neck cancer underwent head and neck reconstructive surgery using myocutaneous or revascularized flaps; in the same period, all patients were consecutively examined with CT and MRI. Myocutaneous flaps wer used in 26 patients: 12 flaps were tubular and 14 linear. Revascularized flaps were used in 38 patients: to repair a large defect in 26 patients (14 latissimus dorsi flaps and 12 temporal muscle flaps) and to repair an oral damage in 12 patients (5 revascularized radial and 7 jejunal flaps). CT and MR images of myocutaneous flaps showed the flaps as fatty areas, repairing large surgical defects, hypodense at CT and hyperintense at MRI, with no post-contrast enhancement. The postoperative scar around the flap exhibited soft-tissue density with slight post-contrast enhancement at CT and slightly hypodense on T2-weighted MR images. Post-contrast CT and MRI showed slight scar enhancement with no signal changes in the fatty component. The appearance of revascularized flaps at CT and MRI depends on the characteristics of the structure used to repair the surgical defect: jejunal and radial flaps appeared as mostly fatty thickened layers with both imaging methods. Temporal and latissimus dorsi flaps are made basically of muscular tissue, fatty tissue and occasionally skin (used to repair a mucosal defect): consequently, CT showed a structure with mostly parenchymal density in all cases and MRI depicted intermediate signal intensity. MRI was useful to detect 12 revascularized jejunal or radial flaps thanks to its higher contrast resolution and multiplanar capabilities showing even such thin structures as these flaps. Moreover, MRI permitted to study skull base reconstruction with revascularized (latissimus dorsi) flaps in 5 of our patients.

  2. Perforator-based fasciocutaneous flap for pressure sore reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Hsun; Ma, Hsu

    2012-12-01

    Pressure sore reconstruction is always a challenge for plastic surgeons due to its high recurrence rate. In addition to the myocutaneous flap, the perforator-based fasciocutaneous flap has become a new entity used for pressure sore reconstruction. This study presents a series of 26 perforator-based fasciocutaneous flaps for pressure sore reconstruction, with good outcomes in 21 patients from July 2008 to April 2011. The flaps were advanced, transposed, or rotated to obliterate the defects. Twenty of 26 flaps healed uneventfully without complication. One patient had a flap that totally necrosed, one had partial flap necrosis (flap rotated 180° in the above two cases), one had infection and healed by a secondary flap, one had minor wound dehiscence, one died of pneumonia 1 week postoperatively, and recurrence developed in one patient. The perforator-based fasciocutaneous flap is a reliable method and produced good results in this series. These flaps are well vascularised, have enough soft tissue bulk, and have a high degree of mobilisation freedom.

  3. Early postnatal response of the spinal nucleus of the bulbocavernosus and target muscles to testosterone in male gerbils.

    PubMed

    Hadi Mansouri, S; Siegford, Janice M; Ulibarri, Catherine

    2003-05-14

    This study examined the response of the spinal nucleus of the bulbocavernosus (SNB) and the bulbocavernosus (BC) muscle, to testosterone in male Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) during the early postnatal period. Male gerbil pups were given testosterone propionate (TP) or vehicle for 2 days, then perfused on postnatal day (PND) 3, 5, 10 or 15. The BC and levator ani (LA) muscles were removed, weighed, and sectioned. Cross-sections of BC muscle fibers were measured and muscle fiber morphology examined. Spinal cords were removed and coronally sectioned in order to count and measure the SNB motoneurons. Following TP treatment, male pups of all ages had significantly heavier BC-LA muscles and larger fibers in the BC muscle compared to age-matched controls. The increase in muscle weight following TP treatment was greatest at PND10, while fiber size increased to a similar degree at all ages suggesting that hyperplasia as well as hypertrophy was responsible for the increase in muscle mass at this time. SNB motoneurons increased significantly in number and size with age and TP treatment. We hypothesize that the increase in SNB motoneuron number during normal ontogeny that can be augmented by TP treatment and represents an unusual means of establishing sexual dimorphism in the nervous system of a mammal through cell recruitment to the motor pool of a postnatal animal.

  4. Algorithmic approach to lower abdominal, perineal, and groin reconstruction using anterolateral thigh flaps.

    PubMed

    Zelken, Jonathan A; AlDeek, Nidal F; Hsu, Chung-Chen; Chang, Nai-Jen; Lin, Chih-Hung; Lin, Cheng-Hung

    2016-02-01

    Lower abdominal, perineal, and groin (LAPG) reconstruction may be performed in a single stage. Anterolateral thigh (ALT) flaps are preferred here and taken as fasciocutaneous (ALT-FC), myocutaneous (ALT-MC), or vastus lateralis myocutaneous (VL-MC) flaps. We aim to present the results of reconstruction from a series of patients and guide flap selection with an algorithmic approach to LAPG reconstruction that optimizes outcomes and minimizes morbidity. Lower abdomen, groin, perineum, vulva, vagina, scrotum, and bladder wounds reconstructed in 22 patients using ALT flaps between 2000 and 2013 were retrospectively studied. Five ALT-FC, eight ALT-MC, and nine VL-MC flaps were performed. All flaps survived. Venous congestion occurred in three VL-MC flaps from mechanical cause. Wound infection occurred in six cases. Urinary leak occurred in three cases of bladder reconstruction. One patient died from congestive heart failure. The ALT flap is time tested and dependably addresses most LAPG defects; flap variations are suited for niche defects. We propose a novel algorithm to guide reconstructive decision-making. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. [The lower trapezius muscle island flap. Anatomic principles and clinical relevance].

    PubMed

    Haas, F; Pierer, G; Weiglein, A; Moshammer, H; Schwarzl, F; Scharnagl, E

    1999-01-01

    Up to now, there is no uniform anatomic description neither of the branches of the subclavian artery nor of the pedicle of the lower myocutaneous trapezius flap. A dissection study was carried out on 140 necks in 70 cadavers. Variations of the subclavian artery and its branches, vessel diameter at different levels, the course of the pedicle under the levator scapulae muscle, the arc of rotation of the island flap, and the variations of the segmental intercostal branches to the lower part of the trapezius muscle were examined. Results of this study enable us to suggest a new nomenclature for the branches of the subclavian artery, a proper pedicle definition, and a technique for safe flap elevation. The lower trapezius island flap is a thin and pliable myocutaneous flap with a constant pedicle which ensures safe flap elevation. This flap has the potential for a wider acceptance due to minor donor site morbidity, large arc of rotation, and an ample range of clinical applications in the head and neck area as an island flap as well as a free flap.

  6. Donor-site Morbidity of Medial and Lateral Thigh-based Flaps: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Purnell, Chad A.; Lewis, Kevin C.; Mioton, Lauren M.; Hanwright, Philip J.; Galiano, Robert D.; Dumanian, Gregory A.; Alghoul, Mohammed S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Free and pedicled medial and lateral thigh-based flaps are common reconstructive procedures. However, there have been no comparative studies of morbidity between medial and lateral donor sites. Methods: We conducted an Enterprise Data Warehouse-based review of all the senior authors’ (R.D.G., G.A.D., and M.S.A.) thigh-based free and pedicled flaps. Patient demographic data, donor-site complications, drain duration, and number of postoperative visits were collected and compared. Complications were also compared between fasciocutaneous flaps and muscle or myocutaneous flaps, and skin grafted donor sites. Results: We analyzed 352 flap donor sites, with 155 medial and 197 lateral. Two hundred seventeen (217) flaps were pedicled. Flap types included 127 gracilis, 27 rectus femoris, 134 anterolateral thigh, and 36 vastus lateralis-only flaps. There were no significant differences in complications between medial (17.4%) and lateral thigh (21.3%) donor sites, although lateral thigh flaps had a mean of 1 additional postoperative visit. Rates of wound dehiscence/healing issues were significantly higher in both gracilis myocutaneous flaps (25.9%) and flaps requiring a skin grafted donor site (31.2%). Postoperative therapeutic anticoagulation was the only significant risk factor for a donor-site complication. Flap complications resulted in increased drain duration and postoperative office visits. Conclusions: Donor-site morbidity is similar in both lateral and medial thigh-based flaps. The inclusion of muscle in the flap from either donor site does not seem to increase complications, but the inclusion of a skin paddle with gracilis muscle, or a skin grafted lateral thigh donor site, results in increased wound healing complications. PMID:27975004

  7. Coverage of Amputation Stumps Using a Latissimus Dorsi Flap With a Serratus Anterior Muscle Flap: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Wha; Jeon, Seung Bae; Hwang, Kyu Tae; Kim, Youn Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Amputation of the extremities is a definitive reconstructive option, and surgeons should aim to preserve maximum overall function. If the exposed bone cannot be adequately covered using local tissues, the stump can be reconstructed using a number of well-described free flap transfer techniques. Between January 2002 and December 2011, 31 patients with severe injuries to the lower extremities underwent above-the-knee, below-the-knee, and Chopart and Ray amputations. Bony stumps were covered using latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps alone (group 1), or together with serratus anterior muscle flaps (group 2). The groups were compared with respect to age, flap survival, skin flap size, immediate complications, wound sloughing, deep ulceration, need for bone amputation, limb visual analog scale score, time to prosthesis, and follow-up duration. The mean area of the latissimus dorsi skin flap was 255.9 cm, and immediate complications occurred in 8 (25.8%) patients. In the double-padding group, there were fewer cases of deep ulceration than in the single-flap group, and prostheses could be worn sooner. There were no statistically significant differences in other parameters. Successful reconstruction of amputation stumps requires an adequate, durable, weight-bearing, and well-contoured soft tissue cover. A latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap together with a serratus anterior muscle flap provides well-vascularized muscle tissue and a durable skin paddle, leading to less ulceration than conventional flap techniques.

  8. Vaginal reconstruction with pedicled vertical deep inferior epigastric perforator flap (diep) after pelvic exenteration. A consecutive case series.

    PubMed

    Ferron, Gwénael; Gangloff, Dimitri; Querleu, Denis; Frigenza, Melanie; Torrent, Juan Jose; Picaud, Laetitia; Gladieff, Laurence; Delannes, Martine; Mery, Eliane; Boulet, Berenice; Balague, Gisele; Martinez, Alejandra

    2015-09-01

    Vaginal reconstruction after pelvic exenteration (PE) represents a challenge for the oncologic surgeon. Since the introduction of perforator flaps, using pedicled vertical DIEP (deep inferior epigastric perforator) flap allows to reduce the donor site complication rate. From November 2012 to December 2014, 27 PEs were performed in our institution. 13 patients who underwent PE with vaginal reconstruction and programmed DIEP procedure for gynecologic malignancies were registered. Nine patients underwent PE for recurrent disease and four for primary treatment. Six of the 13 patients have a preoperative fistula. Anterior PE was performed in 10 patients, and total PE in 3 patients. A vertical DIEP flap was performed in 10 patients using one or two medial perforators. The reasons for abortion of vertical DIEP flap procedure were: failure to localizing perforator vessels in two cases, and unavailability of plastic surgeon in one case. A vertical fascia-sparring rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap was then harvested. Median length of surgery was 335min, and 60min for DIEP harvesting and vaginal reconstruction. No flap necrosis occurred. One patient in the VRAM (vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous) group experienced a late incisional hernia and one patient in the DIEP flap group required revision for vaginal stenosis. In our experience, DIEP flap represents our preferred choice of flap for circumferential vaginal reconstruction after PE. To achieve a high reproducibility, the technically demanding pedicled vertical DIEP flap has to be harvested by a trained surgeon, after strict evaluation of the preoperative imaging with identification and localization of perforator vessels.

  9. Complex posterior thoracic wall reconstruction using a crossover combined latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior free flap.

    PubMed

    Bodin, Frédéric; Dissaux, Caroline; Steib, Jean-Paul; Massard, Gilbert

    2016-03-01

    Radical resection of an extended malignant sarcoma of the chest wall requires full-thickness thoracic chest wall reconstruction. Reconstruction is tedious in the case of posteriorly located tumours, because the ipsilateral pedicled myocutaneous latissimus dorsi flap is involved and hence not usable for soft tissue coverage. We report an original case of a left giant dorsal chondrosarcoma originating from the 11th costovertebral joint. After extended resection and skeletal reconstruction, soft tissue coverage was achieved with an original contralateral free flap encompassing both latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior muscles. The flap pedicle was anastomosed to the ipsilateral thoracodorsal vessels.

  10. Reconstruction of through-and-through osteocutaneous defects of the mouth and face with subscapular system flaps.

    PubMed Central

    Kalavrezos, Nicholas; Hardee, Peter S. G. F.; Hutchison, Iain L.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Major ablative surgery in the head and neck region may create composite defects involving the oral mucosa, bone and the overlying facial skin. The large surface area and the three-dimensional nature of these defects pose a difficult reconstructive challenge requiring adequate bone and large, positionally versatile skin flaps. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From September 1993 to May 2000, 19 patients with through-and-through osteocutaneous defects of the mouth and face were reconstructed with composite subscapular artery system flaps. The evaluated parameters included: (i) site and dimensions of the tissue defect; (ii) specific flap properties; and (iii) review of the recipient and donor site morbidity. RESULTS: 10 variants of scapular osteocutaneous flaps, eight latissimus dorsi with serratus anterior and rib osteo-myocutaneous flaps, and one combination of an osteocutaneous scapular and myocutaneous latissimus dorsi flap were used to reconstruct composite facial defects with mean dimensions of: skin 54.4 cm(2), mucosa 56.2 cm(2) and bone of 8.2 cm. Ischaemic complications occurred in three patients including one total flap failure and one failure of the bony component in previously irradiated patients. The third flap was successfully salvaged. No significant long-term donor site morbidity was noted. CONCLUSION: Composite flaps based on the subscapular artery system are a versatile reconstructive modality for large through-and-through defects of the mouth and face. PMID:15720908

  11. Increased Flap Weight and Decreased Perforator Number Predict Fat Necrosis in DIEP Breast Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Mulvey, Carolyn L; Cooney, Carisa M; Daily, Francis F; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Ogbuago, Onyebuchi U; Cooney, Damon S; Rad, Ariel N; Manahan, Michele A; Rosson, Gedge D; Sacks, Justin M

    2013-05-01

    Compromised perfusion in autologous breast reconstruction results in fat necrosis and flap loss. Increased flap weight with fewer perforator vessels may exacerbate imbalances in flap perfusion. We studied deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) and muscle-sparing transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (MS-TRAM) flaps to assess this concept. Data from patients who underwent reconstruction with DIEP and/or MS-TRAM flaps between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2011 (n = 123) were retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographics, comorbidities, intraoperative parameters, and postoperative outcomes were collected, including flap fat necrosis and donor/recipient site complications. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine effects of flap weight and perforator number on breast flap fat necrosis. One hundred twenty-three patients who underwent 179 total flap reconstructions (166 DIEP, 13 MS-TRAM) were included. Mean flap weight was 658 ± 289 g; 132 (73.7%) were single perforator flaps. Thirteen flaps (7.5%) developed fat necrosis. African American patients had increased odds of fat necrosis (odds ratio, 11.58; P < 0.001). Odds of developing fat necrosis significantly increased with flap weight (odds ratio, 1.5 per 100 g increase; P < 0.001). In single perforator flaps weighing more than 1000 g, six (42.9%) developed fat necrosis, compared to 14.3% of large multiple perforator flaps. Flaps with increasing weight have increased risk of fat necrosis. These data suggest that inclusion of more than 1 perforator may decrease odds of fat necrosis in large flaps. Perforator flap breast reconstruction can be performed safely; however, considerations concerning race, body mass index, staging with tissue expanders, perforator number, and flap weight may optimize outcomes.

  12. Increased Flap Weight and Decreased Perforator Number Predict Fat Necrosis in DIEP Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mulvey, Carolyn L.; Cooney, Carisa M.; Daily, Francis F.; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Ogbuago, Onyebuchi U.; Cooney, Damon S.; Rad, Ariel N.; Manahan, Michele A.; Rosson, Gedge D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Compromised perfusion in autologous breast reconstruction results in fat necrosis and flap loss. Increased flap weight with fewer perforator vessels may exacerbate imbalances in flap perfusion. We studied deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) and muscle-sparing transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (MS-TRAM) flaps to assess this concept. Methods: Data from patients who underwent reconstruction with DIEP and/or MS-TRAM flaps between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2011 (n = 123) were retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographics, comorbidities, intraoperative parameters, and postoperative outcomes were collected, including flap fat necrosis and donor/recipient site complications. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine effects of flap weight and perforator number on breast flap fat necrosis. Results: One hundred twenty-three patients who underwent 179 total flap reconstructions (166 DIEP, 13 MS-TRAM) were included. Mean flap weight was 658 ± 289 g; 132 (73.7%) were single perforator flaps. Thirteen flaps (7.5%) developed fat necrosis. African American patients had increased odds of fat necrosis (odds ratio, 11.58; P < 0.001). Odds of developing fat necrosis significantly increased with flap weight (odds ratio, 1.5 per 100 g increase; P < 0.001). In single perforator flaps weighing more than 1000 g, six (42.9%) developed fat necrosis, compared to 14.3% of large multiple perforator flaps. Conclusions: Flaps with increasing weight have increased risk of fat necrosis. These data suggest that inclusion of more than 1 perforator may decrease odds of fat necrosis in large flaps. Perforator flap breast reconstruction can be performed safely; however, considerations concerning race, body mass index, staging with tissue expanders, perforator number, and flap weight may optimize outcomes. PMID:25289212

  13. The versatile application of cervicofacial and cervicothoracic rotation flaps in head and neck surgery

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The large defects resulting from head and neck tumour surgeries present a reconstructive challenge to surgeons. Although numerous methods can be used, they all have their own limitations. In this paper, we present our experience with cervicofacial and cervicothoracic rotation flaps to help expand the awareness and application of this useful system of flaps. Methods Twenty-one consecutive patients who underwent repair of a variety of defects of the head and neck with cervicofacial or cervicothoracic flaps in our hospital from 2006 to 2009 were retrospectively analysed. Statistics pertaining to the patients' clinical factors were gathered. Results Cheek neoplasms are the most common indication for cervicofacial and cervicothoracic rotation flaps, followed by parotid tumours. Among the 12 patients with medical comorbidities, the most common was hypertension. Defects ranging from 1.5 cm × 1.5 cm to 7 cm × 6 cm were reconstructed by cervicofacial flap, and defects from 3 cm × 2 cm to 16 cm × 7 cm were reconstructed by cervicothoracic flap. The two flaps also exhibited versatility in these reconstructions. When combined with the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap, the cervicothoracic flap could repair through-and-through cheek defects, and in combination with a temporalis myofacial flap, the cervicofacial flap was able to cover orbital defects. Additionally, 95% patients were satisfied with their resulting contour results. Conclusions Cervicofacial and cervicothoracic flaps provide a technically simple, reliable, safe, efficient and cosmetic means to reconstruct defects of the head and neck. PMID:22018437

  14. The use of free flaps in skull base reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Macía, G; Picón, M; Nuñez, J; Almeida, F; Alvarez, I; Acero, J

    2016-02-01

    Skull base tumours are rare, comprising less than 1% of all tumours of the head and neck. Surgical treatment of these tumours involves the approach, the resection, and the reconstruction of the defect, which present a challenge due to the technical difficulty and anatomical complexity. A retrospective study of 17 patients with tumours involving the skull base, treated by resection and immediate reconstruction using microsurgical free flaps, is presented; 11 were men and six were women. The following types of flap were used: osteocutaneous fibula flaps, fasciocutaneous anterolateral thigh flaps, and myocutaneous latissimus dorsi flaps. The most common histology of the tumours was squamous cell carcinoma. The most frequent point of origin was the paranasal sinuses (58.8%). All of the free flaps used for reconstruction were viable. A cerebrospinal fluid fistula occurred in two patients, and in one of these cases, meningoencephalitis led to death. In conclusion, the reconstruction of large defects of the skull base after ablation requires a viable tissue that in many cases can be obtained only through the use of microvascular free flaps. The type of flap to be selected depends on the anatomical structures and size of the defect to be restored.

  15. Predictive risk factors of free flap thrombosis in breast reconstruction surgery.

    PubMed

    Masoomi, Hossein; Clark, Emily G; Paydar, Keyianoosh Z; Evans, Gregory R D; Nguyen, Audrey; Kobayashi, Mark R; Wirth, Garrett A

    2014-11-01

    Vascular thrombosis is one of the major postoperative complications of free flap microvascular breast reconstruction operations. It is associated with higher morbidity, higher cost, increased length of hospital stay, and potentially flap loss. Our purpose is to evaluate the rate of this complication and whether patient characteristics play a role. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database, we examined the clinical data of patients who underwent free flap breast reconstruction between 2009 and 2010 in the United States. Multivariate and univariate regression analyses were performed to identify independent risk factors of flap thrombosis. A total of 15,211 patients underwent free flap breast reconstruction surgery (immediate reconstruction: 43%). The most common flap was the free deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap (53.6%), followed by free transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap (43.1%), free superficial inferior epigastric artery (SIEA) flap (2%), and free gluteal artery perforator (GAP) flap (1.3%). The overall rate of flap thrombosis was 2.4 %, with the highest rate seen in the SIEA group (11.4%) and the lowest in the TRAM group (1.7%). Peripheral vascular disease (adjusted odds ration [AOR] 10.61), SIEA flap (AOR, 4.76) and delayed reconstruction (AOR, 1.42) were found to be statistically significant risk factors for flap thrombosis. Other comorbidities were not linked. While the overall rate of flap thrombosis in free flap breast reconstruction was relatively low (2.4%), Plastic Surgeons should be aware that patients with peripheral vascular disease and those undergoing free SIEA flap are at higher risk of flap thrombosis and they should closely monitor flaps to increase the chance for early salvage.

  16. What Is the Ideal Free Flap for Soft Tissue Reconstruction? A Ten-Year Experience of Microsurgical Reconstruction Using 334 Latissimus Dorsi Flaps From a Universal Donor Site.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Tae; Kim, Sang Wha; Youn, Seungki; Kim, Youn Hwan

    2015-07-01

    Microsurgical free tissue transfer is regarded as the best available method of tissue reconstruction for intractable defects. The ideal soft tissue flap is thought to be the anterolateral thigh flap. On the basis of 334 procedures involving the latissimus dorsi (LD) flap, we discuss the advantages of the LD flap over the current universal option, and we aimed to establish whether the LD could also gain universal status in all reconstructive fields.Three hundred thirty-four reconstructive procedures using the LD flap were performed in 322 patients between September 2002 and July 2012. In accordance with defect characteristics, we performed 334 procedures using flaps, which included the LD muscle flap with skin graft, the myocutaneous flap, the muscle-sparing flap, the perforator flap, the chimeric flap, and the 2-flap technique using the serratus anterior branch.Flap-related complications occurred in 21 patients (6.3%), including total and partial flap failure. In 253 cases, the donor site was closed primarily, and in the remaining cases, we used split-thickness skin grafts. Donor-site complications occurred in 20 cases (6%). In 11 of the 182 cases, no suitable perforators were identified during surgery.The advantages of the LD as a donor site include the possibility of various harvesting positions without position change, versatility of components, availability of muscle to fill extensive defects, and presence of thick fascia to enable full abdominal reconstruction. On the basis of our experience, we concluded that this flap has the potential to be used as widely as, or in preference to, the anterolateral thigh flap in most reconstructive areas.

  17. Intercostal artery perforator propeller flap for reconstruction of trunk defects following sarcoma resection.

    PubMed

    Zang, Mengqing; Yu, Shengji; Xu, Libin; Zhao, Zhenguo; Zhu, Shan; Ding, Qiang; Liu, Yuanbo

    2015-06-01

    Trunk defects following soft tissue sarcoma resection are usually managed by myocutaneous flaps or free flaps. However, harvesting muscle will cause functional morbidities and some trunk regions lack reliable recipient vessels. The intercostal arteries give off multiple perforators, which distribute widely over the trunk and can supply various pedicle flaps. Our purpose is to use various intercostal artery perforator propeller flaps for trunk oncologic reconstruction. Between November 2013 and July 2014, nine intercostal artery perforator propeller flaps were performed in seven patients to reconstruct the defects following sarcoma resection in different regions of the trunk, including the back, lumbar, chest, and abdomen. Two perforators from intercostal arteries were identified for each flap using Doppler ultrasound probe adjacent to the defect. The perforator with visible pulsation was chosen as the pedicle vessel. An elliptical flap was raised and rotated in a propeller fashion to repair the defects. There were one dorsal intercostal artery perforator flap, four dorsolateral intercostal artery perforator flaps, three lateral intercostal artery perforator flaps, and one anterior intercostal artery perforator flap. The mean skin paddle dimension was 9.38 cm in width (range 6-14 cm) and 21.22 cm in length (range 13-28 cm). All intercostal artery perforator flaps survived completely, except for marginal necrosis in one flap harvested close to the previous flap donor site. The intercostal artery perforator propeller flap provides various and valuable options in our reconstructive armamentarium for trunk oncologic reconstruction. To our knowledge, this is the first case series of using intercostal artery perforator propeller flaps for trunk oncologic reconstruction and clinical application of dorsolateral intercostal artery perforator flaps. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  18. Trans-vastus Intermedius Transfer of the Pedicled Anterolateral Thigh Flap for Posterior Thigh Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Batdorf, Niles J.; Lettieri, Salvatore C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Proximal, posterior thigh wounds from oncologic or traumatic defects can be difficult wounds to reconstruct if local flap options have been sacrificed during the trauma or oncologic resection. Free flap options to cover these defects are also difficult because of the lack of convenient recipient vessels in the region. The authors present 2 cases (oncologic and traumatic) wherein a myocutaneous anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap was harvested and tunneled from the anterior muscle compartment to the posterior muscle compartment of the thigh through a medially based transmuscular tunnel, decreasing the required pedicle distance to the wound. This technique of transmuscular tunneling of the ALT flap expands the indications and utility of the ALT flap to cover posterior thigh wounds. PMID:25289275

  19. Pelvic reconstruction with pedicled thigh flaps: indications, surgical techniques, and postoperative imaging.

    PubMed

    Sagebiel, Tara L; Faria, Silvana C; Balachandran, Aparna; Butler, Charles E; Garvey, Patrick B; Bhosale, Priya R

    2014-03-01

    This article will describe and illustrate the relevant anatomy and surgical techniques used in pelvic reconstruction using regional pedicled thigh flaps, which is often necessary in oncologic surgeries. Examples of normal postoperative imaging and common complications that can accompany pelvic reconstruction with anterolateral, gracilis myocutaneous, and posterior thigh fasciocutaneous flaps will be provided. Pelvic reconstruction using regional pedicled thigh flaps is often needed with extirpative oncologic surgeries to eliminate dead space, provide pelvic organ support, restore form and function, and introduce vascularized tissue to promote wound healing. Radiologists need to be aware of the normal postoperative appearance of these flaps so that the flaps are not mistaken for residual or recurrent disease and so that residual or recurrent disease can be identified and treated.

  20. Reliable and reproducible murine models for commonly used abdominal plastic surgical flaps.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Jonathan; Pennington, Thomas; Wang, Chuanmin; Allen, Richard; Bishop, Alex; Sharland, Alexandra

    2012-03-01

    Animal models have been used for many years in surgical research to develop different surgical techniques, improve understanding of anatomy and physiology and hone surgical skills. The benefit of such models has been particularly important in developing relatively young specialties like plastic surgery and many plastic surgical techniques are designed and studied in animals long before they are used in humans. We describe techniques for raising several reliable and reproducible abdominal flaps in rodents, including transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps in rats and mice, superficial inferior epigastric artery flaps in rats and perforator flaps in rats. The intention of this paper is to act as a point of reference for any microvascular or plastic surgeon who is planning to perform abdominal plastic surgical flap research or further microvascular skills. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. Effects of Tissue Component Volumes on Vascular Resistance in Free Flaps.

    PubMed

    Ono, Masashi; Takanari, Keisuke; Toriyama, Kazuhiro; Yagi, Shunjiro; Ebisawa, Katsumi; Sawamura, Hisashi; Kambe, Miki; Murotani, Kenta; Kamei, Yuzuru

    2017-01-01

    Background A successful free flap transfer is achieved, in part, by having a thorough understanding of vascular anatomy and blood flow dynamics. We previously reported that vascular resistance differs by type of free flap. To test the hypothesis that the difference reflects the proportion of tissue components within free flaps, we calculated blood flow and vascular resistance for free flaps in which we determined the volume of each tissue component. Methods Measurements and calculations were made for 40 free flap transfers performed at our hospital: 7 radial forearm flaps, 14 anterolateral thigh flaps, and 19 rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps. Results The vascular resistance of free flaps was inversely related to the volume of each tissue component. Univariate regression analysis revealed that muscle volume correlated most closely with resistance (r = 0.881), followed by skin (r = 0.622), and fat (r = 0.577). Multiple regression analysis confirmed the relationship between combined muscle and fat volume and resistance (R(2) = 0.865). Conclusions A strong inverse correlation exists between vascular resistance and combined muscle and fat tissue volume in flaps. It may be helpful to consider these relationships when making decisions regarding choice of free flap and recipient vessels.

  2. The 'reading man flap' for pressure sore reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sapountzis, Stamatis; Park, Hyoung Joon; Kim, Ji Hoon; Chantes, Achilleas; Beak, Rong Min; Heo, Chan Yeong

    2011-09-01

    The treatment of pressure sores represents a significant challenge to health care professionals. Although, pressure wound management demands a multidisciplinary approach, soft tissue defects requiring reconstruction are often considered for surgical management. Myocutaneous and fasciocutaneous flaps can provide stable coverage of pressure sores. Here, we describe our experience using a recent fasciocutaneous flap, which is named 'reading man' flap, in sacral, ischial, and trochanteric pressure sores. During a period of 1 year the authors operated 16 patients, 11 men, and 5 women, using the reading man flap. The ages of the patients ranged from 24 to 78 years. The location of pressure sores was 8 sacral, 5 ischial, and 3 trochanteric pressure sores. The mean size of pressure sores was 8 cm × 9 cm. All pressure sores covered bt the Reading Man flap healed asymptomatically. After follow-up of 2-8 months, no recurrences were encountered and no further surgical intervention was required. The reading man flap was found to be a useful technique for the closure of pressure sore in different anatomic locations. The advantage of tension-free closure and the minimal additional healthy skin excision made this flap a useful tool in pressure sore reconstructions.

  3. Radial free forearm flap versus pectoralis major pedicled flap for reconstruction in patients with tongue cancer: Assessment of quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peipei; Li, Rui; Liu, Yiming; Kan, Quancheng

    2016-01-01

    Background This study investigated the quality of life of Chinese patients with tongue cancer who had undergone immediate flap reconstruction surgery. In addition, we compared 2 groups of patients: those who had received radial forearm free flap (RFFF) surgery and others who had received pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF) surgery. Material and Methods Patients who received RFFF or PMMF reconstruction after primary tongue cancer treated with total and subtotal tongue resection were eligible for the current study. The patients’ demographic data, medical history, and quality of life scores (14-item Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) and the University of Washington Quality of Life (UW-QOL) questionnaires) were collected. Results A total of 41 of 63 questionnaires were returned (65.08%). There were significant differences between the 2 groups in the gender (p< .05). Patients reconstructed with RFFF performed better in the shoulder domains, in addition to worse appearance domains. Conclusions Using either RFFF or PMMF for reconstruction of defects after tongue cancer resection significantly influences a patient’s quality of life. Data from this study provide useful information for physicians and patients during their discussion of reconstruction modalities for tongue cancers. Key words:Quality of life, radial forearm free flaps, pectoralis major myocutaneous flap, tongue cancer, oral function. PMID:27694786

  4. Advancement Flaps.

    PubMed

    Kruter, Laura; Rohrer, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Advancement flaps are random-pattern flaps frequently used in the reconstruction of surgical defects on the face after the removal of skin cancer. Proper design and meticulous execution is crucial in achieving reproducible esthetic results. To review the design and execution of advancement flaps in facial reconstruction. A review of the literature on the use of advancement flaps in facial reconstruction was performed and curated with the authors' experience. Many factors come into play when using local flaps to reconstruct surgical defects on the face. Close attention must be given to the tissue surrounding the surgical defect and any free margin in the area. Designing the flap closure lines along cosmetic unit junctions and or relaxed skin tension lines, preserving both the form and function of the surrounding structures, and using excellent surgical techniques during the closure will all together help in providing reproducibly outstanding results.

  5. Enhancement of the bulbocavernosus reflex during intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring through the use of double train stimulation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Stanley; Chiri, Chala A; Wroblewski, Jill; Transfeldt, Ensor E

    2007-02-01

    Electrophysiological bulbocavernosus reflex (BCR) testing, during surgeries in which the constituent neural components are at risk, might supplement other low sacral (S2-4) stimulation/recording techniques. However, intraoperative BCR is not always reliably implemented. We proposed to analyze BCR signals in five surgical patients monitored with the novel application of double train stimulation (DTS) to determine if the potential could be enhanced. We prospectively planned a regime of DTS BCR with a series of intertrain delays in five monitored patients at risk for low sacral neural injury. Patients were maintained with propofol, opiate infusion, and low inhalant anesthesia without muscle relaxant. Cutaneous sensory nerves of the penis (or clitoris) were stimulated using two consecutive pulse trains (DTS). Intertrain delays were 75, 100, 125, 150, 175, 200, and 250 ms. For BCR recording, uncoated paired wires were inserted into the external anal sphincter (EAS) bilaterally. For each trial, waveform amplitude, duration, and turn count measures for the first (single train) and second (double train) response were recorded. Percent increase/decrease of the second train response compared to the first train response was calculated. There was at least a 30% increase in measures of amplitude, turn count, and duration of the second train response in 22/28, 22/28, and 14/28 of the total trials respectively. There was an insufficient number of independent observations to determine statistical significance. Intraoperative BCR is currently obtained with some difficulty using pulse train stimulation. Our preliminary evidence has identified BCR waveform enhancement using DTS and suggests that the reliability of intraoperative BCR acquisition may be further improved by the addition of this technique. Our data are insufficient to define the best intertrain interval.

  6. The infrahyoid flap: a comprehensive review of an often overlooked reconstructive method.

    PubMed

    Deganello, Alberto; Leemans, C René

    2014-08-01

    The infrahyoid flap is a myocutaneous pedicled flap mainly nourished by the superior thyroid vessels through the perforators of the infrahyoid muscles. This thin and pliable flap provides a skin island of about 7 by 4 cm from the central part of the anterior neck. The flap can be transferred on its pedicle of superior thyroid artery and vein to reconstruct medium sized head and neck defects created after cancer ablation. We have successfully used this flap in a series of 40 cases with no total flap loss and with 1 case of superficial skin necrosis. The aim of this review is to highlight the clinical usefulness of this pedicled flap even in the microvascular free flap era. A comprehensive review of the available literature reporting on the infrahyoid flap has been carried out using a web search. The history of the infrahyoid flap, the surgical technique with technical innovations, the clinical utility and limitations of this flap, are reported and discussed. Among the 7 larger series (cohort larger than 50 cases) a total of 956 flaps were performed, and the global success rate was 91.7%, with failures being mainly related to partial skin necrosis, as the rate of total (skin and muscle) flap necrosis was only 1%. This flap is reliable, easy to harvest during neck dissection, oncologically safe, it does carry a negligible donor site morbidity. This paper highlights how the infrahyoid flap can represent an excellent reconstructive solution in selected patients and head and neck sites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Refinement of Nasal Reconstruction with a V/Y-alar-perforator Flap

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Martin F.; Roldán, J. Camilo

    2017-01-01

    Background: The ala of the nose is vascularized by a dense net of perforators originating from the lateral nasal artery or the angular artery. These vessels reach the ala in a cascade fashion from the alar groove/lateral nasal wall. Based on these vessels, a V/Y flap can be dissected with a wide range of mobility. Materials and Methods: Nineteen patients underwent reconstruction of the nose by means of a V/Y-alar-perforator flap alone or in combination with a myocutaneous rotation flap from the lateral nasal wall and/or from the nasal dorsum for reconstruction of defects at the nasal tip, ala of the nose, and/or lateral nasal wall. All patients were followed up 8 months after surgery in average. Results: There was no prolonged congestion or any tissue loss. All patients presented postoperatively with excellent aesthetic results, and no nasal distortion was observed. Conclusion: The V/Y-alar-perforator flap alone or in combination with a myocutaneous rotation flap proved to be a reliable tool in the armamentarium for reconstruction of nasal tip and alar defects providing good aesthetic results. PMID:28203497

  8. Refinement of Nasal Reconstruction with a V/Y-alar-perforator Flap.

    PubMed

    Feinendegen, Dominik L; Langer, Martin F; Roldán, J Camilo

    2017-01-01

    The ala of the nose is vascularized by a dense net of perforators originating from the lateral nasal artery or the angular artery. These vessels reach the ala in a cascade fashion from the alar groove/lateral nasal wall. Based on these vessels, a V/Y flap can be dissected with a wide range of mobility. Nineteen patients underwent reconstruction of the nose by means of a V/Y-alar-perforator flap alone or in combination with a myocutaneous rotation flap from the lateral nasal wall and/or from the nasal dorsum for reconstruction of defects at the nasal tip, ala of the nose, and/or lateral nasal wall. All patients were followed up 8 months after surgery in average. There was no prolonged congestion or any tissue loss. All patients presented postoperatively with excellent aesthetic results, and no nasal distortion was observed. The V/Y-alar-perforator flap alone or in combination with a myocutaneous rotation flap proved to be a reliable tool in the armamentarium for reconstruction of nasal tip and alar defects providing good aesthetic results.

  9. New options in breast reconstructive surgery: alternatives to the latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Berrino, P; Galli, A; Santi, P L

    1986-01-01

    Transposition of the latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap is still considered by most authors a first-choice technique for breast reconstruction. However, the aesthetic drawbacks of the technique are significant: In our experience the posterior scar and the "patchlike" skin island are of concern to more than 30% of patients. Recent alternatives have sharply reduced the use of the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap as our first-choice technique. The utilization of a latissimus dorsi muscular flap in association with submuscular placement of a tissue expander is now our favorite technique for the majority of patients: Residual scarring is insignificant since the whole muscle can be raised through a 5-7-cm-long, S-shaped incision placed along the anterior border of the latissimus dorsi. The results obtained in a group of 35 patients demonstrate that the final results of the procedure in terms of shape and projection of the reconstructed breasts are absolutely similar to those obtained using the latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap. However, in patients with heavy body structure and large contralateral breast, satisfactory symmetry and a natural-looking reconstructed breast are obtained more effectively by transposition of a rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap. The precautions to be taken in order to make the procedure suitable for over-weight patients are described and the results are discussed.

  10. Autologous breast reconstruction with the extended latissimus dorsi flap.

    PubMed

    Chang, David W; Youssef, Adel; Cha, Sumi; Reece, Gregory P

    2002-09-01

    The extended latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap can provide autogenous tissue replacement of breast volume without an implant. Nevertheless, experience with the extended latissimus dorsi flap for breast reconstruction is relatively limited. In this study, the authors evaluated their experience with the extended latissimus dorsi flap for breast reconstruction to better understand its indications, limitations, complications, and clinical outcomes. All patients who underwent breast reconstruction with extended latissimus dorsi flaps at the authors' institution between January of 1990 and December of 2000 were reviewed. During the study period, 75 extended latissimus dorsi flap breast reconstructions were performed in 67 patients. Bilateral breast reconstructions were performed in eight patients, and 59 patients underwent unilateral breast reconstruction. There were 45 immediate and 30 delayed reconstructions. Mean patient age was 51.5 years. Mean body mass index was 31.8 kg/m2. Flap complications developed in 21 of 75 flaps (28.0 percent), and donor-site complications developed in 29 of 75 donor sites (38.7 percent). Mastectomy skin flap necrosis (17.3 percent) and donor-site seroma (25.3 percent) were found to be the most common complications. There were no flap losses. Patients aged 65 years or older had higher odds of developing flap complications compared with those 45 years or younger (p = 0.03). Patients with size D reconstructed breasts had significantly higher odds of flap complications compared with those with size A or B reconstructed breasts (p = 0.05). Obesity (body mass index greater than or equal to 30 kg/m2) was associated with a 2.15-fold increase in the odds of developing donor-site complications compared with patients with a body mass index less than 30 kg/m2 (p = 0.01). No other studied factors had a significant relationship with flap or donor-site complications. In most patients, the extended latissimus dorsi flap alone, without an implant, can

  11. The free vascularized flap and the flap plate options: comparative results of reconstruction of lateral mandibular defects.

    PubMed

    Shpitzer, T; Gullane, P J; Neligan, P C; Irish, J C; Freeman, J E; Van den Brekel, M; Gur, E

    2000-12-01

    Reconstruction of the mandible and oral cavity after segmental resection is a challenging surgical problem. Although osteocutaneous free flaps are generally accepted to be optimal for reconstruction of anterior defects, the need for bony reconstruction for a pure lateral mandibular defect remains controversial. A retrospective study. A retrospective comparative study of short- and long-term outcomes of three different reconstruction techniques for lateral defects was performed. In total, 57 patients were included, of whom 27 had a plate and pedicled pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF group), 16 had a plate and free radial forearm flap (FRFF group), and 14 had an osteocutaneous free flap. Functionality, flap failure, and complications were scored. Plates had to be removed in 7 of the 27 patients in the PMMF group and 2 of the 16 in the FRFF group; none of the 14 osteocutaneous free flaps failed. The difference was of borderline statistical significance (P = .055). Longterm functional outcome revealed no statistically significant difference in oral deglutition (P = .76) or in facial contour (P = .36). Oral continence was significantly better in patients in the FRFF group (88%) as compared with the PMMF group (52%) or the osteocutaneous free flap group (43%) (P = .02). On the other hand, the results for speech favored the osteocutaneous free flap group; 13 of 14 patients (92.9%) had a normal score compared with 12 of 16 patients (75%) in the FRFF group and 17 of 27 (63%) in the PMMF group. However, this represented a borderline statistically significant result (P = .06). For lateral mandibular defects, the osteocutaneous free flap is reliable and durable in the long term. However, in a selected group of patients either of the two flap-plate options is a viable reconstructive option.

  12. Radial forearm free flap for reconstruction of a large defect after radical ablation of carcinoma of the tongue and floor of the mouth: some new modifications.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiao-Meng; Ye, Jin-Hai; Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Shuang-Yue; Jiang, Hong-Bing; Wu, Yu-Nong

    2010-01-01

    A modified radial forearm free flap was designed to rehabilitate function and to reduce the complications at both donor and recipient sites. Between 2003 and 2007, 15 patients with infiltrating squamous cell carcinoma (T(3)-T(4)) of the tongue and/or floor of the mouth underwent hemiglossectomy and resection of the floor of the mouth with microvascular reconstruction using a modified radial forearm flap. The mean size of the forearm flap was 7.5 x 14 cm, and the de-epithelialized area was 7 x 6 cm, requiring no skin graft from the abdomen. Speech intelligibility tests were administered to test postoperative speech and the functional oral intake scale was applied to assess the postoperative swallowing function, and patients reconstructed with pectoralis major myocutaneous flap were used for comparison. All the flaps were successfully transferred. No obvious complications were found in either the oral-maxillofacial or forearm region. The speech intelligibility was better in the modified flap group (p < 0.01). An acceptable swallowing function was also achieved, although the difference was not significant (p > 0.05). The modified flap used for reconstructing large defects of the tongue and floor of the mouth might be a valid substitute for pectoralis major myocutaneous flap to improve the outcome in individuals with significant oral carcinoma. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Comparison of Clinical and Functional Outcomes Using Pectoralis Major and Cutaneous Free Flaps for Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Taeyul; Chang, Yongjoon; Kim, Jaehyun

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare postoperative morbidities and functional outcomes of pectoralis major myocutaneous (PMMC) flap and cutaneous free flap reconstruction approaches in hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed records from 99 patients who underwent hypopharyngeal reconstruction with a cutaneous free flap (n=85) or PMMC flap (n=14) between 1995 and 2013. Morbidity was classified into hospitalization, medical, or flap-related complications. Functional outcomes were classified into oral re-alimentation and decannulation time. Results The overall flap-related complication rate was higher in the PMMC flap group (n=8, 57.1%; P=0.019), but the medical morbidity rate was higher in the cutaneous free flap group (n=68, 80%; P=0.006). The rate of pneumonia was higher in the cutaneous free flap group (n=48, 56.5%; P=0.020). Pulmonary premorbidity was the variable most significantly associated with pneumonia (odds ratio=3.012, P=0.012). There was no statistically significant difference in oral re-alimentation and decannulation time between the two groups. Conclusions Although the functional superiority of free flaps has been reported in many studies, our results do not support this hypothesis. One limitation of our study is the relatively smaller flap size and fewer PMMC flap cases compared with the cutaneous free flap group. The low postoperative medical morbidity incidence rate in the PMMC flap group was clinically significant; however, the free flap group had more flap-related complications. Thus, PMMC flaps should be considered a viable option, especially for patients with pulmonary premorbidities. PMID:26430633

  14. A new approach to preexisting vertical midline abdominal scars with crossover DIEP flap breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Frank; Somia, Naveen; Lam, Thomas C

    2010-01-01

    Breast reconstruction using a free transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap or a deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap is a challenge in patients with a vertical midline abdominal scar due to the poor perfusion of the lower abdominal skin ellipse across the midline. In such patients, only one half of the abdominal skin ellipse can be used with certainty, and this limits the amount of tissue available for reconstructing the breast. Two cases of breast reconstruction in patients with a lower midline abdominal scar are presented using the DIEP flap, in which the poor perfusion across the midline scar was overcome by a technique of crossover anastomoses between the two deep inferior epigastric pedicles. Reliable perfusion of the entire lower abdominal skin ellipse was achieved. This crossover anastomoses technique overcomes the poor perfusion imposed by the vertical midline abdominal scar and enables DIEP flap breast reconstruction to be offered to women with midline abdominal scars. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Microsurgery, 2010.

  15. [Resurfacing of an ischial and trochanteric recurrent pressure sore by a pedicled fasciocutaneous anterolateral thigh flap].

    PubMed

    Moullot, P; Philandrianos, C; Casanova, D

    2014-10-01

    Ischial pressure sores, common in paraplegic patient, are the most difficult to treat, and poor prognosis associated with a high rate of postoperative recurrence. Many surgical techniques by muscular or myocutaneous flap coverage have been described. We report an original use of a fasciocutaneous pedicled anterolateral thigh (ALTp) flap for coverage of an ischial pressure sore combined with a trochanteric pressure sore, exceeded beyond any conventional therapeutic solution. A 45-year-old paraplegic patient suffered from a trochanteric and ischial pressure sore, which had already received coverage by a muscular flap of biceps femoris and gluteus maximus. At 1 year, the result is satisfactory, with good coverage without recurrence. The fasciocutaneous ALTp flap can be a solution to cover recurrent ischial pressure sores beyond conventional methods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Management of different kinds of head and neck defects with the submental flap for reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wan-Chun; Yang, Jinn-Moon; Liu, Shao-Cheng; Chu, Yueng-Hsiang; Lai, Wen-Sen; Lin, Yaoh-Shiang; Lee, Jih-Chin

    2015-12-01

    Head and neck surgeries often accompany with moderate-sized defects that require time-consuming reconstructions by free flaps. The submental flap is a versatile and time-effective option for reconstruction of orofacial defects providing acceptable cosmetic and functional results without requiring microsurgical techniques. A retrospective case series study of patients who underwent reconstruction with the submental flap between 2009 and 2013 was conducted. There were 36 patients (33 men and 3 women), with a mean age of 56.4 years, enrolled in this study. The primary lesion sites included oral cavity (24 patients), pharynx (8 patients), larynx (2 patients), neck (1 patient) as well as maxillary sinus (1 patient). All flaps were harvested as the myocutaneous flaps. All donor sites were closed primarily without the need of additional surgery. No complete loss of the flap was encountered and two cases developed marginal necrosis of the flap. The submental flap had a reliable pedicle and had minimal donor-site morbidity. It is an excellent flap option for patients with small- to medium-sized defects in head and neck region.

  17. Free myocutaneous flap transfer to treat congenital Volkmann's contracture of the forearm.

    PubMed

    Rubin, G; Palti, R; Gurevitz, S; Yaffe, B

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to report our experience with free functional muscle transfer procedures for the late sequelae of the rare condition of congenital Volkmann's ischaemic contracture of the forearm. Four children, with an average age of 9.5 years (range 1.5-17), were treated and were followed for a mean of 6 years (range 1-14). Two patients had dorsal forearm contractures, and two had both flexor and extensor forearm contractures. We carried out free functional muscle transfers to replace the flexor or extensor muscles. The functional result was assessed according to the classification system of Hovius and Ultee. All patients had wrist contractures and skeletal involvement with limb length discrepancy that influenced the outcome. All five transferred muscles survived and improved the function of the hand in three of the four patients. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 4. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. The value of the bulbocavernosus reflex and pudendal nerve somatosensory evoked potentials in distinguishing between multiple system atrophy and Parkinson's disease at an early stage.

    PubMed

    Cai, Z-Y; Niu, X-T; Pan, J; Ni, P-Q; Wang, X; Shao, B

    2017-09-01

    This study was designed to investigate the clinical value of the bulbocavernosus reflex (BCR) and pudendal nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (PSEPs) in the differential diagnosis between multiple system atrophy (MSA) and Parkinson's disease (PD) in early stage. A total of 31 patients with MSA, 45 patients with PD, and 60 healthy participants were included in this study. A Keypoint EMG/EP system was used for BCR and PSEP measurements. Electrophysiological parameters were collected for statistical analysis. The BCR elicitation rates were significantly lower in the patients with MSA than in the patients with PD (P<.05). Prolonged BCR latencies were found in the MSA group compared to the PD and control groups (P<.05). Bulbocavernosus reflex latencies were significantly prolonged in patients with MSA compared with PD patients showing early urogenital symptoms (P<.05). There was no significant difference in PSEP P41 latencies among the three groups (P=.434 in males, P=.948 in females). Both BCR and PSEP amplitudes were significantly lower in the MSA/PD group than in the control group (P<.001). Pudendal nerve damage is more severe in MSA than in PD. Prolonged BCR latency may be valuable for distinguishing between MSA and PD in the early stages. BCR and PSEP testing may also contribute to localized and qualitative diagnosis of the distribution of neurodegenerative pathologies in these two disorders. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. [Computerized tomography and magnetic resonance in radical and reconstructive surgery using pedunculated and revascularized flaps in advanced-stage tumors of the head and neck. Analysis of recurrences. II].

    PubMed

    Falchetto Osti, M; Scattoni Padovan, F; Sbarbati, S; Ricciardi, D; De Angelis D'Ossat, M; Maurizi Enrici, R

    1998-04-01

    January, 1992, to October, 1995, sixty-four patients with advanced head and neck carcinoma were submitted to reconstructive surgery using pedunculated myocutaneous or revascularized flaps and then to CT and MRI. Myocutaneous flaps were used in 26 cases--12 tubular and 14 linear flaps--and revascularized flaps in 38--14 latissimus dorsi flaps, 12 temporal flaps, 7 jejunal flaps and 5 radial flaps. Twenty-six of 64 cases (41%) relapsed: MRI correctly depicted the recurrence in 24 cases and CT in 19, with 2 false positives and 2 false negatives at MRI and 6 false positives and 7 false negatives at CT. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive value of CT were 84%, 78%, 73%, 76% and 82%, respectively, while the corresponding MR rates were 95%, 94%, 92%, 92% and 95%. MRI was more accurate than CT in demonstrating postoperative and postirradiation changes (92% for MRI versus 73% for CT) thanks to its higher sensitivity in depicting tumor tissue on T2-weighted and post-Gd-DTPA images. CT is very useful in the early postoperative period, to follow-up poorly collaborative patients, because its acquisition time is short; MRI should be performed when CT findings are questionable and the revascularized flap is used to repair a large defect at the skull base.

  20. Reverse sural flap for ankle and heel soft tissues reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ciofu, RN; Zamfirescu, DG; Popescu, SA; Lascar, I

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The potential of the medial calf integument, as donor site for a free flap based on musculocutaneous branches of the medial sural artery, was first identified by Taylor and Daniel, following cadaver investigation. In 1981, Pontén described the fasciocutaneous sural flap as a reconstructive option for soft tissue loss of the lower extremity, particularly around the knee. Two years later, Donski and Fogdestram presented the distally based fasciocutaneous flap from the sural region followed by Montegut and Allen who considered the sural artery perforator flap as a viable alternative for the gastrocnemius myocutaneous flap. The sural flap proved a considerable versatility at the level of the lower leg (from the knee to the ankle and heel) as well as for other anatomical regions. The most common usage of the flap is for the distal-third defects of the leg. Materials and method: A group of 10 patients with soft tissue losses at the ankle or heal due to a various etiopathogeny represented by cancer excision, trauma, unstable scars, chronic osteomyelitis, in which a microsurgical free transfer had no indication or was not wanted, was presented. Our group reported a 30% complication rate in a high-risk patient population, including patients with diabetes mellitus, peripheral vascular disease, and venous insufficiency. Results: All the defects were covered successfully, without major complications. Usually, only a minor margin of the tip of the flap was lost, which was easily solved with a guided secondary healing. Most flaps showed a slight venous congestion, which cleared in a few days. The functional result was very good in all the patients, while the aesthetic appearance was acceptable even in female patients. Discussion: An ideal indication of a reverse sural flap may be a defect over an intact but partially exposed Achilles tendon. Conclusions: The sural reverse flap is useful in the ankle and foot soft tissues reconstruction whenever we have reasons not

  1. Systematic Review and Operative Technique of Recalcitrant Pressure Ulcers Using a Fillet Flap Technique

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Venkat K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this article is to describe the indications, operative technique, outcomes, and systematic review of the literature on the reconstruction of patients with end-stage pressure ulcers using a fillet flap technique. In this technique, the femur, tibia, and fibula are removed from the thigh and leg, and the soft tissue is used as a pedicled, or free, myocutaneous flap for reconstruction. Long-term outcomes, salient surgical technique of flap elevation, and design are detailed for patients who had a fillet of leg flap for reconstruction of extensive pressure ulcers. Methods: The indications, surgical technique, and postoperative outcomes of 5 patients who had pedicled fillet flaps are reviewed including patient age, sex, underlying comorbidities, duration of paraplegia, operative technique, and complications. A systematic review of the literature was performed searching PubMed, Cochrane Database, and Medline with the following MeSH terms: pressure ulcer, pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, fillet flap, and fillet flap. Inclusion criteria were use of a fillet technique, article data on the number of reconstructions before fillet flap, complications, and English language. Results: Most of our patients were male 75% (n = 3) with an average age of 47.5 years, had been paralyzed for an average of 16 years, and had few medical comorbidities. Two patients (3 flaps) required hip disarticulation, 1 patient had a bilateral fillet flaps, and 3 patients had resection of tibia/fibula. After following patients for an average of 1.4 years (4 mo to 2 yr), complications were limited to 1 patient who had partial-thickness flap loss at the distal skin flap that healed by secondary intention and 1 patient who had ulcer recurrence because of noncompliance. Four articles met inclusion criteria for systematic review and 3 were excluded. Conclusions: The fillet of leg flap remains a useful and reliable method of reconstructing end-stage pressure ulcers. PMID:27622082

  2. Rotation flaps for coverage after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Pozzobon, Leonardo Rafael; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Guimarães, Tales Mollica; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results obtained using local myocutaneous rotation flaps in cases of wound dehiscence after total knee arthroplasty. METHODS: Patients undergoing these surgical procedures were selected in the 2000-2012 period. The nine selected cases during this period were subjected to flap coverage due to skin dehiscence associated with infection. In eight cases we used rotation flaps of the medial gastrocnemius, and in one case we used advancing skin. RESULTS: Eighty nine percent of the cases were successful in the coverage of the prosthesis and the viability of the flaps. In four cases it was possible to maintain or review the prosthesis. Four other cases progressed to amputation due to failure on treatment of infections, and one case remained without the prosthesis. The functional evaluation showed an unsatisfactory outcome in 89% of cases. CONCLUSION: Coverage flaps are a good option for the treatment of cases of dehiscence with exposure of the prosthesis and the functional failure was associated with the inability to control the infection and the damage it caused. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453672

  3. Reconstruction of Large Perineal and Pelvic Wounds Using Gracilis Muscle Flaps.

    PubMed

    Chong, Tae W; Balch, Glen C; Kehoe, Siobhan M; Margulis, Vitaly; Saint-Cyr, Michel

    2015-10-01

    The reconstruction of large defects after abdominoperineal resections and pelvic exenterations has traditionally been accomplished with vertical rectus myocutaneous flaps (VRAMs). For patients requiring two ostomies, robot-assisted abdominoperineal resections (APRs), and to avoid the morbidity of a VRAM harvest, the authors have used the gracilis muscle flap to reconstruct the large dead space in these patients. A retrospective analysis of 16 consecutive APRs (10 with concomitant pelvic exenterations) reconstructed with gracilis flaps during a 2-year period was performed. Gracilis muscle flaps were used to obliterate the dead space after primary skin closure was ensured with adduction of the legs. All 16 patients had locally advanced cancers and had received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation. Of these 16 patients, 10 had pelvic exenterations. All the patients had reconstruction with gracilis flaps (6 bilateral flaps). One major wound complication in the perineum occurred as a result of an anastomotic leak in the pelvis, but this was managed with conservative dressing changes. Three patients had skin separation in the perineum greater than 5 mm with intact subcutaneous closure. No patients required operative debridement or revision of their perineal reconstruction. No perineal hernias or gross dehiscence of the skin closure occurred. Large pelvic and perineal reconstructions can be safely accomplished with gracilis muscle flaps and should be considered as an alternative to abdominal-based flaps.

  4. The combined free partial vastus lateralis with anterolateral thigh perforator flap reconstruction of extensive composite defects.

    PubMed

    Posch, N A S; Mureau, M A M; Flood, S J; Hofer, S O P

    2005-12-01

    Myocutaneous (MC) free flaps are useful for many reconstructive indications. Perforator flaps have become standard of care. The anterolateral thigh flap (ALT) donor site is popular. With the ALT flap varying sizes of vastus lateralis (VL) muscle can be harvested as a MC flap. The skin islands of these flaps have a great range of freedom when dissected on their perforator. It was hypothesised that the VL-ALT perforator flap would offer adequate tissue volume combining maximal freedom in planning with minimal donor site morbidity. From November 2001 to February 2003 a free partial VL with ALT perforator flap was used in 11 patients to reconstruct large defects. Indications for adding a muscular component were exposed bone, skull base, (artificial) dura, or osteosynthesis material, open sinuses, and lack of muscular bulk. Flaps were planned as standard ALT flaps, after which three types of dissection were performed: I. true MC flap; II. muscle flap with a skin island on one perforator, which could be rotated up to 180 degrees ; III. chimera skin perforator flap with muscle being harvested on a separate branch from the source vessel or on a side branch of the skin perforator. Mean skin size of the MC-ALT flaps was 131 cm2. Mean muscle part size of the MC-ALT flaps was 268 cm3. Muscular parts were custom designed for all defects. No total or partial flap failures were seen. Colour mismatch was seen in 6 of 8 patients, when skin was used in the facial area in this all white population. Excessive flap bulk was found in 8 of 11 patients at 6 weeks, however, only in 2 of 11 patients after 6 months. Patients were satisfied with the functional result (8 of 11 patients) as well as the cosmetic result of their reconstruction (7 of 11 patients). All less satisfied patients had received their flap for external facial skin reconstruction. Donor site morbidity was minimal. The combined free partial VL with ALT perforator flap proved valuable as a (chimera type) MC flap with maximal

  5. Pedicle perforator flaps for vulvar reconstruction--new generation of less invasive vulvar reconstruction with favorable results.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jung-Ju; Chang, Nai-Jen; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Wu, Chih-Wei; Abdelrahman, Mohamed; Chen, Hsin-Yu; Cheng, Ming-Huei

    2015-04-01

    Vulvar reconstruction after cancer surgery remains challenging. Pedicle perforator flaps are believed to be a less invasive option with better cosmesis. A retrospective review identified 27 flaps in 16 patients who underwent vulvar reconstruction after cancer surgery using island pedicled perforator flaps. Their average age was 55.7±17.8 years (Range: 22-85). The average BMI was 23.5±4.0 (range: 18.8-28.5). Five of the 16 patients underwent unilateral vulvar reconstruction, and 11 of them underwent bilateral vulvar-perineal reconstructions. The perforator flaps included deep femoral (profunda) artery perforator (DFAP or PAP) flaps (n=11), medial circumflex femoral perforator (MCFAP) flaps (n=8), external pudendal artery perforator (EPAP) flaps (n=2), medial thigh free style perforator flaps (n=2), and internal pudendal artery perforator flaps (n=4). All flaps survived with a 100% success rate. Three patients developed small wounds that required debridement and closure after the reconstruction. All donor sites were closed primarily. One patient developed temporary peroneal nerve palsy. During follow-up, none of the patients presented with donor site morbidities. All of the patients were satisfied with the cosmetic and functional results, except that one patient underwent a flap debulking procedure three months after surgery. Compared to traditional myocutaneous flaps, perforator flaps provide thinner fasciocutaneous flaps for vulvar reconstruction with favorable reconstruction results and fewer donor site morbidities. The medial or inner thigh is a region that is rich in perforators, which allow for more versatile flap design according to the defect. Furthermore, most of the donor site can be closed primarily without complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Characteristics and surgical management of flap compromise caused by thrombosis of the internal jugular vein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Qu, Yi; Su, Ming; Li, Jinzhong; Li, Hua; Xing, Rudong; Han, Zhengxue

    2017-02-01

    A principal reason for flap compromise in oral and maxillofacial head and neck surgery, and failure of a free flap transfer, is thrombosis of a drainage vein such as the internal jugular vein. This study characterized flap compromise caused by internal jugular vein thrombosis after a free flap transfer, and its management. A retrospective clinical study was conducted of 306 consecutive microvascular free flaps performed for 305 patients with head and neck cancer from March 2003 to March 2013 at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at Beijing Stomatological Hospital, Capital Medical University. Vascular thrombosis developed postoperatively in 18 of the 306 free flaps (5.9%): 1 arterial and 17 venous. Of the latter, in 10 patients the thrombosis occurred at the anastomosis site; in 7 patients internal jugular vein thrombosis was detected during emergent reexploration (4 radial forearm free flaps, 1 fibular flap, and 2 anterior lateral thigh flaps). The 4 cases involving radial forearm free flaps were salvaged successfully by venous transfer to bridge the reflow vein to the anterior jugular vein, or removal of the thrombosis in the internal jugular vein and re-anastomosis. The remaining 3 cases of internal jugular vein thrombosis were not salvaged: 2 defects were reconstructed with major pectoralis myocutaneous flaps, and the other was closed directly without reconstruction. In oral and maxillofacial head and neck cancer surgery, postoperative thrombosis of the internal jugular vein can result in failure of the free flap transfer. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. ITADE flap after mastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer: A good choice for mid-sized defects of the chest wall, based on a systematic review of thoracoabdominal flaps.

    PubMed

    Vieira, René Aloisio da Costa; da Silva, Katia Mathias Teixeira; de Oliveira-Junior, Idam; de Lima, Marcos Alves

    2017-06-01

    Locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) is still a common problem in developing countries. Extensive resections are aimed at local control and improving quality of life. Dermofat flaps are an option for medium-sized defects. Evaluate the results of a new thoracoabdominal flap (TAF). We describe and evaluate an ipsilateral, thoracoabdominal horizontal, dermofat (ITADE) flap performed in patients submitted to mastectomy and immediate reconstruction. A systematic review of the flaps used in this situation was performed. A total of 23 patients underwent the ITADE flap. The average flap size was 360 cm(2) . One (4.3%) patient presented extensive loss of the flap. In the literature review, we observed 354 patients with 159 TAFs. We added our cases to the evaluation. A significant reduction in the risk of necrosis using myocutaneous flaps versus TAFs was observed (P < 0.001). Comparing other TAFs and ITADE flaps, considering all necrosis, a significant difference was apparent (P = 0.02), which disappeared when evaluating only larger necrosis (P = 0.13). Multivariate analysis showed that the resected area was the best variable related to the presence of necrosis. ITADE allows extensive coverage areas, an early start of adjuvant treatment and it can be performed without requiring a reconstructive team. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Dual-dermal-barrier fashion flaps for the treatment of sacral pressure sores.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yen-Chang; Chuang, Shiow-Shuh

    2015-02-01

    The sacral region is one of the most vulnerable sites for the development of pressure sores. Even when surgical reconstruction is performed, there is a high chance of recurrence. Therefore, the concept of dual-dermal-barrier fashion flaps for sacral pressure sore reconstruction was proposed. From September 2007 to June 2010, nine patients with grade IV sacral pressures were enrolled. Four patients received bilateral myocutaneous V-Y flaps, four patients received bilateral fasciocutaneous V-Y flaps, and one patient received bilateral rotation-advanced flaps for sacral pressure reconstruction. The flaps were designed based on the perforators of the superior gluteal artery in one patient's reconstructive procedure. All flaps' designs were based on dual-dermal-barrier fashion. The mean follow-up time was 16 months (range = 12-25). No recurrence was noted. Only one patient had a complication of mild dehiscence at the middle suture line, occurring 2 weeks after the reconstructive surgery. The dual-dermal fashion flaps are easily duplicated and versatile. The study has shown minimal morbidity and a reasonable outcome.

  9. An Innovative Solution to Complex Inguinal Defect: Deepithelialized SIEA Flap With Mini Abdominoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Daggett, Justin; Harrington, Michael; Dayicioglu, Deniz

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: We describe a novel technique of contralateral pedicled deepithelialized superficial inferior epigastric artery flaps, followed by abdominal advancement coverage, as an alternative treatment of radiated complicated inguinal or lower abdominal defects, avoiding the donor-site defect typically seen with other methods of coverage. Methods: Two male patients with histories of liposarcoma after excision and radiation to one side of lower abdomen/inguinal area presented with complicated wounds that were reconstructed with this technique. Results: Successful obliteration of dead space and wound closure were achieved with the combination of a superficial inferior epigastric artery flap with an abdominal advancement flap. In each case, patients went on to heal uneventfully without need for any secondary procedures. Discussion: The use of a superficial inferior epigastric artery flap for lower abdomen/groin defect closure is an option as an alternative to rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap and anterolateral thigh flaps and should be considered in patients with vascular anatomy conducive for this muscle-sparing procedure. Conclusions: A second layer-overlay coverage with an abdominal advancement flap creates a more durable repair in the complicated radiated wound and a well-concealed abdominoplasty scar. PMID:28197296

  10. Technique for Minimizing Donor-site Morbidity after Pedicled TRAM-Flap Breast Reconstruction: Outcomes by a Single Surgeon's Experience.

    PubMed

    Rietjens, Mario; De Lorenzi, Francesca; Andrea, Manconi; Petit, Jean-Yves; Chirappapha, Prakasit; Hamza, Alaa; Martella, Stefano; Barbieri, Benedetta; Gottardi, Alessandra; Giuseppe, Lomeo

    2015-08-01

    Breast reconstruction with pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap can result in significant abdominal wall donor-site morbidity. We present our technique of transversely dividing the anterior fascia and rectus abdominis combined with reinforcement above the arcuate line for closure of the anterior abdominal wall defect to prevent contour deformities performed by a single senior surgeon and compare these results with those of our prior series. We described our new technique of closure of the abdominal wall defect and retrospectively performed the comparison between the results of pedicled TRAM flaps using the new closure technique and those of 420 pedicled TRAM flaps from our 2003 publication in terms of abdominal bulging and hernia. Sixty-seven pedicled TRAM flaps in 65 patients were compared with 420 pedicled TRAM flaps of the 2003 series. The new technique was associated with 5 partial TRAM flap necroses (8%). There was no total flap loss with the new technique. The median follow-up period was 13 months (range, 4-36 months). There were no instances of abdominal hernia and bulge during follow-up in the new series. Compared with the previous 2003 series, the new technique was superior in terms of occurrence of abdominal wall hernia or bulging. We are still performing pedicled TRAM flap for autologous breast reconstruction. Using the technique of transversely dividing the anterior fascia and rectus abdominis combined with reinforcement above the arcuate line can reduce the occurrence of abdominal bulging and hernia.

  11. Oncological outcome after free jejunal flap reconstruction for carcinoma of the hypopharynx.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jimmy Yu Wai; Chow, Velda Ling Yu; Chan, Richie Chiu Lung; Lau, Gregory Ian Siu Kee

    2012-07-01

    It has been a common practice among the oncologist to reduce the dosage of adjuvant radiotherapy for patients after free jejunal flap reconstruction. The current aims to study potential risk of radiation to the visceral flap and the subsequent oncological outcome. Between 1996 and 2010, consecutive patients with carcinoma of the hypopharynx requiring laryngectomy, circumferential pharyngectomy and post-operative irradiation were recruited. Ninety-six patients were recruited. TNM tumor staging at presentation was: stage II (40.6%), stage III (34.4%) and stage IV (25.0%). Median follow-up period after surgery was 68 months. After tumor ablation, reconstruction was performed using free jejunal flap (60.4%), pectoralis major myocutaneous (PM) flap (31.3%) and free anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap (8.3%). All patients underwent adjuvant radiotherapy within 6.4 weeks after surgery. The mean total dose of radiation given to those receiving cutaneous and jejunal flap reconstruction was 62.2 Gy and 54.8 Gy, respectively. There was no secondary ischaemia or necrosis of the flaps after radiotherapy. The 5-year actuarial loco-regional tumor control for the cutaneous flap and jejunal flap group was: stage II (61 vs. 69%, p = 0.9), stage III (36 vs. 46%, p = 0.2) and stage IV (32 vs. 14%, p = 0.04), respectively. Reduction of radiation dosage in free jejunal group adversely affects the oncological control in stage IV hypopharyngeal carcinoma. In such circumstances, tubed cutaneous flaps are the preferred reconstructive option, so that full-dose radiotherapy can be given.

  12. Impact of Prior Tissue Expander/Implant on Postmastectomy Free Flap Breast Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Roostaeian, Jason; Yoon, Alfred P; Ordon, Shannon; Gold, Chris; Crisera, Christopher; Festekjian, Jaco; Da Lio, Andrew; Lipa, Joan E

    2016-04-01

    Implant-based breast reconstructions can result in unsatisfactory results requiring surgical revision or salvage reconstructive surgery with autologous tissue. This study compares the outcomes and complications of salvage (tertiary) flap reconstruction after failed prosthesis placement to those of primary/secondary flap reconstruction. All patients undergoing free flap breast reconstruction after failed prosthesis between July 1, 2005, and June 30, 2014, were identified. A matched number of patients who underwent a de novo free flap breast reconstruction were selected randomly for review. The indication for prosthesis removal, demographic and operative data, flap type and inset, and complication rates were evaluated. Eighty-nine women with a history of failed implant-based reconstruction required free flap reconstruction for salvage in 121 breasts. Capsular contracture was the most common indication for prosthesis removal (62.0 percent). Recipient vessel scarring was 5.23 times more likely to occur in the prior prosthesis group (p < 0.001). Alternate flap types other than deep inferior epigastric perforator and transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps were more frequently used in this cohort. Major complications requiring operative management were more common in the experimental group (17.4 percent versus 8.1 percent; p = 0.035). No difference was noted in flap loss rates, operative take back, or operative time. Salvage breast reconstruction with autologous tissue after failed prosthesis can be safely performed, with success rates similar to those of primary free flap breast reconstruction. However, these procedures may have increased complexity because of recipient vessel scarring, higher rates of prior radiation therapy, and major complications, which may warrant appropriate preoperative planning and patient counseling. Therapeutic, III.

  13. Reconstruction of maxillary defect with musculo-adipose rectus free flap.

    PubMed

    Low, Tsu-Hui Hubert; Lindsay, Andrew; Clark, Jonathan; Chai, Francis; Lewis, Richard

    2017-02-01

    The rectus myocutaneous free flap (RMFF) is used for medium to large maxillectomy defects. However, in patients with central obesity the inset could be difficult due to the bulk from excessive layer of adipose tissue. We describe a modification of the RMFF for patients with excessive central obesity with a flap consisting of adipose tissue with minimal rectus muscle; the musculo-adipose rectus free flap (MARF). Five cases of MARF reconstruction were performed between 2003 and 2013, with patients' body mass indexes ranging from 29.0 to 41.2 kg/m(2) . All patients had sinonasal tumor, of which three were adenoid cystic carcinoma, one squamous cell carcinoma, and one melanoma. Four patients had Codeiro IIIb defects and one had Codeiro II defect. Using the MARF technique, the maxillectomy defect was obliterated with vascularized adipose tissue overlying the rectus muscle and was trimmed to fit the maxillectomy defect. The adipose tissue was allowed to granulate and mucosalize. The volume of adipose tissue harvested was between 120 and 160 mL. All flaps survived with no requirement for re-exploration. Complete oro-nasal separation was achieved in all patients. The time to commencement of oral intake ranges from 5 to 15 days. One patient developed seroma and one developed wound breakdown on the donor site. The length of stay at the hospital ranges from 9 to 22 days. On follow-up ranging 7.5-32.8 months, two patients died from their malignancies. The other three patients were able to tolerate oral soft diet. The MARF may be considered as an alternative to myocutaneous rectus free flap particularly for the reconstruction of maxillary defects in patients with central obesity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microsurgery 37:137-141, 2017. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Flap Failure and Wound Complications in Autologous Breast Reconstruction: A National Perspective.

    PubMed

    Massenburg, Benjamin B; Sanati-Mehrizy, Paymon; Ingargiola, Michael J; Rosa, Jonatan Hernandez; Taub, Peter J

    2015-12-01

    There are many options for breast reconstruction following a mastectomy, and data on outcomes are greatly needed for both the patient and the care provider. This study aims to identify the prevalence and predictors of adverse outcomes in autologous breast reconstruction in order to better inform patients and surgeons when choosing a surgical technique. This study retrospectively reviewed the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) and identified each autologous breast reconstruction performed between 2005 and 2012. Of the 6855 autologous breast reconstructions, there were 2085 latissimus dorsi (LD) flap procedures, 2464 pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap procedures, and 2306 free flap procedures that met the inclusion criteria. The prevalence of complications in each of the three procedures was calculated and compared using χ(2) analysis for binomial categorical variables. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses identified independent risk factors for adverse outcomes in autologous reconstruction as a whole. The prevalence of general complications was 10.8% in LD flaps, 20.6% in TRAM flaps, and 26.1% in free flaps for autologous breast reconstruction (p < 0.001). The prevalence of wound complications was 4.3% in LD flaps, 8.1% in TRAM flaps, and 6.2% in free flaps for autologous breast reconstruction (p < 0.001). The prevalence of flap failure was 1.1 % in LD flaps, 2.7% in TRAM flaps, and 2.4% in free flaps for autologous breast reconstruction (p < 0.001). Multivariate regression analysis showed that obesity [odds ratio (OR) 1.495, p = 0.024], hypertension (OR 1.633, p = 0.008), recent surgery (OR 3.431, p < 0.001), and prolonged operative times (OR 1.944, p < 0.001) were independently associated with flap failure in autologous breast reconstruction procedures. When controlling for confounding variables, TRAM flaps were twice as likely (OR 2.279, p = 0.001) and free flaps

  15. Preoperative TRAM free flap volume estimation for breast reconstruction in lean patients.

    PubMed

    Minn, Kyung Won; Hong, Ki Yong; Lee, Sang Woo

    2010-04-01

    To obtain pleasing symmetry in breast reconstruction with transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) free flap, a large amount of abdominal flap is elevated and remnant tissue is trimmed in most cases. However, elevation of abundant abdominal flap can cause excessive tension in donor site closure and increase the possibility of hypertrophic scarring especially in lean patients. The TRAM flap was divided into 4 zones in routine manner; the depth and dimension of the 4 zones were obtained using ultrasound and AutoCAD (Autodesk Inc., San Rafael, CA), respectively. The acquired numbers were then multiplied to obtain an estimate of volume of each zone and the each zone volume was added. To confirm the relation between the estimated volume and the actual volume, authors compared intraoperative actual TRAM flap volumes with preoperative estimated volumes in 30 consecutive TRAM free flap breast reconstructions. The estimated volumes and the actual elevated volumes of flap were found to be correlated by regression analysis (r = 0.9258, P < 0.01). According to this result, we could confirm the reliability of the preoperative volume estimation using our method. Afterward, the authors applied this method to 7 lean patients by estimation and revision of the design and obtained symmetric results with minimal donor site morbidity. Preoperative estimation of TRAM flap volume with ultrasound and AutoCAD (Autodesk Inc.) allow the authors to attain the precise volume desired for elevation. This method provides advantages in terms of minimal flap trimming, easier closure of donor sites, reduced scar widening and symmetry, especially in lean patients.

  16. Breast reconstruction with single-pedicle TRAM flap in breast cancer patients with low midline abdominal scar

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun-Dong; Huang, Wen-He; Qiu, Si-Qi; He, Li-Fang; Guo, Cui-Ping; Zhang, Yong-Qu; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Breast reconstruction with transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap is challenging in patients with low midline abdominal scar. In this study, we aimed to investigate the clinical feasibility of immediate breast reconstruction using single-pedicle TRAM (SP-TRAM) flaps in patients with low midline abdominal scar. There were 4 strict selection criteria: 1) presence at least 3 perforators on the pedicle side; 2) perforators with regional average flow velocity of >20 cm/s; 3) upper edge of the abdominal scar at least 4 cm from the umbilicus; and 4) scar age >1 year. Eight breast cancer patients with low midline abdominal scar (scar group) and 20 without (control group) underwent immediate breast reconstruction with SP-TRAM flaps consisting of zone I and III and zone II tissues. Flap complications, donor-site complications, and cosmetic results were compared between the two groups. All flaps survived and both groups presented similar flap and donor site complications, including fat necrosis, seroma, hematoma, infection, delayed wound healing, and abdominal hernia, and patients in both groups had similar aesthetic results (p > 0.05). Thus, the study demonstrated that breast reconstruction using SP-TRAM flap was a safe approach in carefully selected patients with low midline abdominal scar. PMID:27406872

  17. Breast reconstruction with single-pedicle TRAM flap in breast cancer patients with low midline abdominal scar.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun-Dong; Huang, Wen-He; Qiu, Si-Qi; He, Li-Fang; Guo, Cui-Ping; Zhang, Yong-Qu; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-07-13

    Breast reconstruction with transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap is challenging in patients with low midline abdominal scar. In this study, we aimed to investigate the clinical feasibility of immediate breast reconstruction using single-pedicle TRAM (SP-TRAM) flaps in patients with low midline abdominal scar. There were 4 strict selection criteria: 1) presence at least 3 perforators on the pedicle side; 2) perforators with regional average flow velocity of >20 cm/s; 3) upper edge of the abdominal scar at least 4 cm from the umbilicus; and 4) scar age >1 year. Eight breast cancer patients with low midline abdominal scar (scar group) and 20 without (control group) underwent immediate breast reconstruction with SP-TRAM flaps consisting of zone I and III and zone II tissues. Flap complications, donor-site complications, and cosmetic results were compared between the two groups. All flaps survived and both groups presented similar flap and donor site complications, including fat necrosis, seroma, hematoma, infection, delayed wound healing, and abdominal hernia, and patients in both groups had similar aesthetic results (p > 0.05). Thus, the study demonstrated that breast reconstruction using SP-TRAM flap was a safe approach in carefully selected patients with low midline abdominal scar.

  18. Superior epigastric artery perforator (SEAP) flap: a novel approach to autologous breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Neilendu; Chopra, Karan; Morales, Robert; Djohan, Risal; Chung, Thomas; Gastman, Brian R

    2015-04-01

    Although free tissue breast reconstruction has been increasingly used, it remains challenging to perform outside of specialized centers due to facility and personnel limitations. We describe a preclinical study highlighting the feasibility of a pedicled, superior epigastric artery perforator (SEAP) flap utilizing lower abdominal tissues similar to a transverse rectus abdominus myocutaneous (TRAM) reconstruction, but with decreased donor-site morbidity. Fresh cadavers were dissected generating a total of 32 SEAP flaps. These flaps were subsequently studied for transposition potential and vascularity utilizing computed tomographic (CT) imaging. An obvious, single, dominant SEAP was appreciated, and a developed flap was routinely capable of reaching either nipple-areola complex with simple interposition. Cadaveric CT imaging revealed global contrast filling in each dissected hemi-abdomen tested. We describe a preclinical study utilizing a novel pedicled, SEAP flap for aesthetic breast reconstruction. While this will not obviate the use of free tissue transfer, it may add to the surgical armamentarium for aesthetic restoration in the breast cancer patient. Copyright © 2014 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Use of Composite Flaps in the Management of Large Full-Thickness Defects of the Lower Eyelid

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Shuo; Yang, Chao; Zhang, Yuntong; Xue, Chunyu; Bi, Hongda; Dai, Haiying; Xing, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To describe a modified surgical procedure that uses a combination of the tarsoconjunctival flap, orbicularis myocutaneous advancement flap, and paranasal-island flap to correct extensive full-thickness lower eyelid defects in functioning eyes. From May 2010 to December 2013, a total of 15 patients had reconstructive surgeries of large to giant lower eyelid defect, with an average 19-month follow-up. The musculocutaneous flaps were harvested from both orbicularis and paranasal regions and clinical outcomes were recorded and analyzed. No major complications were observed in any of the patients. All the patients showed aesthetic eyelid contour, good color, and texture match as well as no obvious scar formation. The mean Marginal Reflex Distance-2 measured 4 months after surgery was 4.9 ± 0.4 mm. Reconstruction of a large defect in the lower eyelid with a tarsoconjunctival flap and the composite neighboring musculocutaneous flaps is a reliable and reproducible method. With proper design and well-executed precision, excellent functional and aesthetic results can be achieved by this elegant procedure without any major complications. PMID:26765467

  20. Are there risk factors for complications of perforator-based propeller flaps for lower-extremity reconstruction?

    PubMed

    Innocenti, Marco; Menichini, Giulio; Baldrighi, Carla; Delcroix, Luca; Vignini, Livia; Tos, Pierluigi

    2014-07-01

    Conventional pedicled flaps for soft tissue reconstruction of lower extremities have shortcomings, including donor-site morbidity, restricted arc of rotation, and poor cosmetic results. Propeller flaps offer several potential advantages, including no need for microvascular anastomosis and low impact on donor sites, but their drawbacks have not been fully characterized. We assessed (1) frequency and types of complications after perforator-based propeller flap reconstruction in the lower extremity and (2) association of complications with arc of rotation, flap dimensions, and other potential risk factors. From 2007 to 2012, 74 patients (44 males, 30 females), 14 to 87 years old, underwent soft tissue reconstruction of the lower extremities with propeller flaps. General indications for this flap were wounds and small- and medium-sized defects located in distal areas of the lower extremity, not suitable for coverage with myocutaneous or muscle pedicled flaps. This group represented 26% (74 of 283) of patients treated with vascularized coverage procedures for soft tissue defects in the lower limb during the study period. Minimum followup was 1 year (mean, 3 years; range, 1-7 years); eight patients (11%) were lost to followup before 1 year. Complications and potential risk factors, including arc of rotation, flap dimensions, age, sex, defect etiology, smoking, diabetes, and peripheral vascular disease, were recorded based on chart review. Twenty-eight of 66 flaps (42%) had complications. Venous congestion (11 of 66, 17%) and superficial necrosis (seven of 66, 11%) occurred most frequently. Eighteen of the 28 complications (64%) healed with no further treatment; eight patients (29%) underwent skin grafting, and one patient each experienced total flap failure (2%) and partial flap failure (2%). In those patients, a free anterolateral thigh flap was used as the salvage procedure. No correlations were found between complications and any potential risk factor. We were

  1. Esthetic result of rhomboid flap repair after breast-conserving surgery for lower quadrant breast cancer lesion with skin invasion: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Satoru; Nohara, Takehiro; Nakatani, Shuichi; Iwamoto, Mitsuhiko; Sumiyoshi, Kazuhiro; Kimura, Kosei; Takahashi, Yuko; Sato, Nayuko; Tanigawa, Nobuhiko

    2011-06-01

    Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) has been increasingly performed as a standard operative strategy for patients with breast cancer. The primary purpose of BCS is to acquire both local control and good cosmetic results. An insignificant difference in cancer treatment results has been shown between BCS and total mastectomy. However, achieving sufficiently cosmetic results can be difficult, particularly in patients with tumors that are large or localized to the lower quadrant. To avoid breast deformities and asymmetries after BCS, immediate reconstruction using autologous tissue has been accepted as the standard option. Rhomboid skin and adipose flap repair is a simple, less invasive procedure than the myocutaneous flap, which has primarily been performed in patients with upper quadrant lesions. We herein report the cases of two patients with lower quadrant breast cancer with skin invasion, who underwent BCS with immediate breast repair using a rhomboid flap. This procedure is therefore worth considering as one of the first options for immediate repair after BCS.

  2. Funding analysis of bilateral autologous free-flap breast reconstructions in Australia.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Shiba; Ruskin, Olivia; McCombe, David; Morrison, Wayne; Webb, Angela

    2015-08-01

    Bilateral breast reconstructions are being increasingly performed. Autologous free-flap reconstructions represent the gold standard for post-mastectomy breast reconstruction but are resource intensive. This study aims to investigate the difference between hospital reimbursement and true cost of bilateral autologous free-flap reconstructions. Retrospective analysis of patients who underwent bilateral autologous free-flap reconstructions at a single Australian tertiary referral centre was performed. Hospital reimbursement was determined from coding analysis. A true cost analysis was also performed. Comparisons were made considering the effect of timing, indication and complications of the procedure. Forty-six bilateral autologous free-flap procedures were performed (87 deep inferior epigastric perforators (DIEPs), four superficial inferior epigastric artery perforator flaps (SIEAs) and one muscle-sparing free transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap (MS-TRAM)). The mean funding discrepancy between hospital reimbursement and actual cost was $12,137 ± $8539 (mean ± standard deviation (SD)) (n = 46). Twenty-four per cent (n = 11) of the cases had been coded inaccurately. If these cases were excluded from analysis, the mean funding discrepancy per case was $9168 ± $7453 (n = 35). Minor and major complications significantly increased the true cost and funding discrepancy (p = 0.02). Bilateral free-flap breast reconstructions performed in Australian public hospitals result in a funding discrepancy. Failure to be economically viable threatens the provision of this procedure in the public system. Plastic surgeons and hospital managers need to adopt measures in order to make these gold-standard procedures cost neutral. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Angular vessels as a new vascular pedicle of an island nasal chondromucosal flap: Anatomical study and clinical application

    PubMed Central

    HOU, DIANJU; FANG, LIN; ZHAO, ZHENMIN; ZHOU, CHUANDE; YANG, MINGYONG

    2013-01-01

    Successful eyelid reconstructions have been reported when using an axial nasal chondromucosal flap based on the dorsal nasal artery. The present study aimed to present a detailed anatomical description of the blood supply of the lateral nasal region and the angular artery, in order to propose the angular vessels as a new vascular pedicle for the island nasal chondromucosal flap. A total of 11 cadavers (22 hemi-faces) were examined. Observations with regard to the origin, course and distribution patterns of the angular artery were recorded. Based on the anatomical study findings, the angular vessels were proposed as a vascular source for the island nasal chondromucosal flap. Observations with regard to the varying origins of the angular artery were categorized into four types. The course of the angular artery along the nasojugal fold was constant. The angular artery branched off into the upper two-thirds of the lateral nasal region and anastomosed with the other vascular branches on the nasal dorsum. Clinically, reconstruction of a full-thickness defect of the lower eyelid was successfully performed by using this composite flap based on the angular vessels and an adjacent orbicularis oculi myocutaneous flap. Satisfactory esthetic outcomes were obtained for the donor and recipient sites. The angular artery is a good vascular source for an island nasal chondromucosal flap. The flap may be created safely and successfully in clinic. Island nasal chondromucosal flaps and nasolabial groove skin flaps based on the angular vessels may be designed simultaneously for use on full-thickness defects of the eyelid. PMID:23408230

  4. Perforator flaps in late-stage pressure sore treatment: outcome analysis of 11-year-long experience with 143 patients.

    PubMed

    Grassetti, Luca; Scalise, Alessandro; Lazzeri, Davide; Carle, Flavia; Agostini, Tommaso; Gesuita, Rosaria; Di Benedetto, Giovanni

    2014-12-01

    In the last decade, perforator flaps have been introduced for the treatment of pressure ulcers as alternative to the more popular myocutaneous local flaps. We reviewed our single-team 11-year experience in order to define whether real advantages could be achieved. We analyzed 143 patients undergoing perforator flap surgery for a single late-stage pressure sore. All patients underwent the same protocol treatment. Data regarding associated pathologies, demographics, complications, healing, and hospitalization times were collected. Ninety-three percent of 143 patients were white Caucasian, and 61% were men, with median age of 51 years. Of 143 stage 4 ulcers, 46.2% were ischial, 42.7% sacral, and 11.2% trochanteric. The most common diagnosis was traumatic paraplegia/tetraplegia (74.9%); no significant difference was found in diagnosis distribution and in ulcer location between recurrent and nonrecurrent patients. We performed 44 S-GAP, 78 I-GAP, 3 PFAP-am, and 18 PFAP-1 flaps. At 2 years' follow-up, the overall recurrence was 22.4% and new ulcer occurrence was 4.2%. Mean hospital stay was 16 days. The overall complication percentage was 22.4%, mostly due to suture-line dehiscence (14%) and distal flap necrosis (6.3%). PFAP flaps had a significant higher risk of developing recurrence than I-GAP flaps. The recurrence risk was significantly higher for subjects suffering from coronary artery disease. Late-stage pressure sore treatment with local perforator flaps can achieve reliable long-term outcomes in terms of recurrences and complications. When compared to previously published data, perforator flaps surgery decreased postoperative hospital stay (by an average of nearly 1 week), reoperations (5.6%), and occurrences.

  5. Free fibula flap in the reconstruction of mandible: a report of six cases.

    PubMed

    Girish Rao, S; Aditya, T N; Gopinath, K S; Anand, Krishna

    2009-09-01

    The defects secondary to surgical ablation of the mandible have far reaching consequences. Speech, respiration, mastication, deglutition and cosmesis are severely affected. Restoring these functions is a challenging task. Till the late eighties, myocutaneous flaps were the rule for mandibular reconstruction and free bone was used to restore bony continuity.In spite of the result being predictable the outcome left much to be desired. There was also a fairly regular crop of complications. Acceptable dental rehabilitation was almost non-existent. With the introduction of free flaps as a consequence of the development of the operating microscope, the field of reconstruction was revolutionized.The fibular free flap is especially suited for mandibular reconstruction. It provides adequate bone to re-establish bony continuity and also allows for the placement of osseointegrated implants.Here we present six of our cases, which underwent mandibular reconstruction with free fibula flaps and the current thoughts in literature on the reconstruction of the mandible with this technique.

  6. Serratus anterior venous tributary as a second outflow vein in latissimus dorsi free flaps.

    PubMed

    Goh, Terence; Tan, Bien-Keem; Ong, Yee-Siang; Chew, Winston

    2011-10-01

    The latissimus dorsi (LD) flap is a large and reliable myocutaneous flap with a consistently long vascular pedicle. However, the limitation of the thoracodorsal pedicle is that it has only one draining vein for anastomosis. We describe a simple technique of recruiting the tributary vein to the serratus anterior and using it as a second draining vein to alleviate congestion in lower limb reconstruction. The serratus anterior venous tributary segment is cut back to an avalvular segment which averages 5 mm in length. Provision of an additional venous outflow to the flap enabled a second venous anastomosis to the short saphenous vein (N = 1), the long saphenous vein (N = 2), a deep vein (N= 1), and to a deep vein via a vein graft (N = 1), respectively. Five patients with degloving injury of the lower extremity of sizes 150 cm(2) (10 × 15 cm) to 260 cm(2) (10 × 26 cm) underwent successful reconstruction using the LD muscle flap with the serratus anterior tributary vein as a second outflow vein. This serratus anterior venous tributary serves as a useful second outflow channel for alleviating venous congestion during lower limb reconstructive surgery and should be routinely preserved as a lifeboat.

  7. Sensitive areolar reconstruction in using a neurocutaneous island flap based on the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, J A; Pereira Filho, O J; Ely, J B

    1999-11-01

    Sensory reconstruction has recently been stressed in breast reconstruction. However, there are no reports concerning the reconstruction of a sensitive areola. The bilateral reconstruction of a sensitive areola using a neurocutaneous flap based on the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve is reported. The flap was harvested from the distal third of the forearm as an island flap and tunneled to reach the apex of the new breast, which was previously reconstructed using a 135-cc, gel-filled, silicone prosthesis covered by a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap. Six months later, fine sensibility in the reconstructed areola was demonstrated. The patient could perceive light touch, pain, and 14 mm two-point discrimination. At 2 months after surgery, 50 percent of cutaneous faulty stimulus location was observed. However, at 4 and 6 months after surgery, faulty location disappeared. Six months after harvesting the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve, the sensory deficit was minimal; it included a hypoesthesic zone of 4 to 7 cm and an anesthesic zone of 2.5 to 5 cm on the middle third of the forearm. Fifteen months after the procedure, no hypoesthesic zone was observed; only a 2 to 3 cm anesthesic zone on the proximal medial side of the forearm existed. This sensory deficit passed unnoticed by the patient. The technique developed here is a refinement in breast reconstruction, and we think it should be used in selected patients.

  8. Palaeontology: in a flap about flaps.

    PubMed

    Edgecombe, Gregory D

    2015-06-15

    An anomalocaridid from the Ordovician exposes a second set of body flaps and reopens the question of how the two branches of arthropod legs evolved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Reconstruction of severely infected gluteal osteoradionecrosis using negative-pressure wound therapy and latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flaps.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Wha; Youn, Dong Geun; Hwang, Kyu Tae; Kim, Jeong Tae; Kim, Youn Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is mandatory for aggressive cancer treatment. Unfortunately, the high-energy radiation used can lead to severe osteoradionecrosis. Radical debridement of devitalized bone and soft tissue coupled with reconstruction using well-vascularized tissues is the accepted treatment for this condition. However, osteoradionecrosis cannot be controlled easily or rapidly. The aim of this study was to present the results of the use of serial negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in combination with a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap for treatment of gluteal osteoradionecrosis in a consecutive series of patients. Between January 2003 and December 2012, nine patients underwent reconstruction using serial NPWT and latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps. We applied negative-pressure dressings for at least 8 weeks. Final reconstruction was performed after the infection was controlled. The superior gluteal artery and vein were used as recipient vessels in all the cases. The mean interval between operation and radiation therapy was 28.3 ± 8.3 years, and the mean number of debridement performed was 6.3 ± 1. NPWT dressings were applied for 8-12 weeks (mean, 9.3 ± 2 weeks). The defects ranged in size from 14 × 8 cm to 18 × 15 cm. The flap size ranged from 15 × 10 cm to 18 × 15 cm. All flaps survived uneventfully except in one patient who experienced chronic seroma and wound dehiscence. There were no recurrences of osteomyelitis during the follow-up periods (mean, 14 ± 6.1 months). Based on the results obtained from this consecutive series of patients, we suggest that this methodology may provide an alternative approach for the treatment of severe osteoradionecrosis of the gluteal region. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Lessons in the management of post-operative tension pneumocephalus complicating transcranial resection of advanced cutaneous tumours with free flap reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Swan, Marc C; Scholz, Anna F M; Pretorius, Pieter M; Johnson, David; Martinez-Devesa, Pablo; Wall, Steven A

    2013-12-01

    Tension pneumocephalus is a rare, but potentially life-threatening complication of transcranial surgery. Whilst commonly described in the field of neurosurgery, little has been published in the context of craniofacial surgery. We describe two cases of post-operative extradural tension pneumocephalus occurring following free myocutaneous latissimus dorsi flap reconstruction of anterior cranial defects following extirpation of advanced recurrent skin carcinomas. These cases illustrate the variation in clinical presentation of this condition, the importance of prompt recognition, urgent radiological investigation and timely decompression, and potential management strategies for minimising the risk of recurrent symptoms. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. “Emergency” definitive reconstruction of a necrotising fasciitis thigh debridement defect with a pedicled TRAM flap

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Tom; Yu, Jonathan T.S.; Wong, Kai Yuen; Malata, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Necrotising fasciitis (NF) is a rare, severe, rapidly progressing and life-threatening synergistic infection primarily affecting the superficial fascia. A novel method of definitive and aesthetic reconstruction of NF thigh defects by using a pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap without recourse to temporising skin grafts is presented. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 30-year-old parous woman presented in extremis with fulminant NF of her left anteromedial thigh. Following emergency radical debridement and intensive care stabilisation she was reconstructed 48 h later in a single stage with a pedicled TRAM flap islanded on the ipsilateral deep inferior epigastric vessels. There was excellent contour restoration of her thigh and coverage of the exposed femoral vessels. DISCUSSION Pedicled flaps based on the rectus abdominis muscle provide a large, readily available reconstructive option for correction of substantial regional defects as herein illustrated. They are robust when based on dominant inferior vascular pedicle with a long reach and wide arc of rotation when designed transversely (as a TRAM flap). CONCLUSION This case also illustrates that definitive flap reconstruction of NF can be successfully undertaken in the emergent setting, thereby negating the need for large areas of skin grafting which can lead to contractures with consequent functional impairment and suboptimal aesthetic results. PMID:23548707

  12. The submental island flap.

    PubMed

    Sterne, G D; Januszkiewicz, J S; Hall, P N; Bardsley, A F

    1996-03-01

    The submental island flap is a reliable source of skin of excellent colour, contour and texture match for facial resurfacing and leaves a well hidden donor site. The flap is safe, rapid and simple to raise. We report on its use in 12 cases of facial or intraoral reconstruction. Complications were few. However, there was one case of complete flap loss following its use in a reverse flow manner, due to the presence of an unreported, but constant, valve in the venous system of the face. We believe this flap to be a worthwhile addition to the existing surgical armamentarium.

  13. The sternocleidomastoid perforator flap.

    PubMed

    Avery, C M E

    2011-10-01

    The conventional pedicled sternocleidomastoid (SCM) flap has a poor arc of rotation, limited volume and precarious vascularity. This report describes a new technique for raising a SCM flap based on the perforating vessels of the superior thyroid vascular pedicle. The upper and lower attachments of the sternocleidomastoid muscle are divided. Four medically and/or surgically compromised patients have successfully undergone reconstruction of hemiglossectomy (1), partial glossectomy (1) and rim of mandible (2) defects for malignancy. The arc of rotation of the SCM flap is greatly increased and the potential applications for the flap expanded.

  14. Donor-Site Hernia Repair in Abdominal Flap Breast Reconstruction: A Population-Based Cohort Study of 7929 Patients.

    PubMed

    Mennie, Joanna C; Mohanna, Pari-Naz; O'Donoghue, Joe M; Rainsbury, Richard; Cromwell, David A

    2015-07-01

    The authors investigated hernia repair rates following pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM), free TRAM, and deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap breast reconstruction in English National Health Service hospitals. Women diagnosed with breast cancer who underwent pedicled TRAM, free TRAM, or DIEP flap breast reconstruction procedures in English National Health Service hospitals between April of 2006 and March of 2012 were identified using the Hospital Episode Statistics database. Women who underwent mastectomy without reconstruction acted as controls, and hernia repair rates were calculated for all four groups. Multiple Cox regression was performed to estimate the relative risk of hernia repair among the reconstruction groups, adjusted for age, obesity, previous abdominal surgery, reconstruction year, and bilateral flap harvest. Between 2006 and 2012, 7929 women had a DIEP or TRAM flap breast reconstruction. The overall hernia repair rate within 3 years was 2.45 percent after abdominal flap breast reconstruction, and 0.28 percent among the 15,679 women who had mastectomy only. Mean time to hernia repair following an abdominal flap harvest was 17.7 months. Compared with DIEP flaps, free and pedicled TRAM flap procedures were associated with adjusted hazard ratios of 1.81 (95 percent CI, 1.24 to 2.64) and 2.89 (95 percent CI, 1.91 to 4.37), respectively. The only independent risk factor for hernia repair was age older than 60 years (p = 0.039). Abdominally based autologous breast reconstruction carries a small risk of subsequent donor-site hernia repair. The rates herein can be used to inform patients and to assess quality of care across service providers. Therapeutic, III.

  15. Radial free forearm flap versus pectoralis major pedicled flap for reconstruction in patients with tongue cancer: Assessment of quality of life.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Zhang, P; Li, R; Liu, Y; Kan, Q

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the quality of life of Chinese patients with tongue cancer who had undergone immediate flap reconstruction surgery. In addition, we compared 2 groups of patients: those who had received radial forearm free flap (RFFF) surgery and others who had received pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF) surgery. Patients who received RFFF or PMMF reconstruction after primary tongue cancer treated with total and subtotal tongue resection were eligible for the current study. The patients' demographic data, medical history, and quality of life scores (14-item Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) and the University of Washington Quality of Life (UW-QOL) questionnaires) were collected. A total of 41 of 63 questionnaires were returned (65.08%). There were significant differences between the 2 groups in the gender (p< .05). Patients reconstructed with RFFF performed better in the shoulder domains, in addition to worse appearance domains. Using either RFFF or PMMF for reconstruction of defects after tongue cancer resection significantly influences a patient's quality of life. Data from this study provide useful information for physicians and patients during their discussion of reconstruction modalities for tongue cancers.

  16. Comparison between anterolateral thigh perforator free flaps and pectoralis major pedicled flap for reconstruction in oral cancer patients--a quality of life analysis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan; Zhu, Juanfang; Cai, Xiangping; Wang, Jing; Liu, Fei; Wang, Haibin

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the differences between anterolateral thigh perforator free flaps (ALTFF) and pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF) for reconstruction in oral cancer patients. Method Patients: who received free flap or PMMF reconstruction after ablation surgeries were eligible for the current study. The patients' demographic data, medical history, and quality of life scores(Medical Outcomes Study-Short Form-36 (MOS SF-36) and the University of Washington Quality of Life (UW-QOL) questionnaires were collected. 81 of 118 questionnaires were returned (68.64%). There was significant differences between two groups in the gender (P<0.005). Patients reconstructed with ALTFF had better appearance domains and better shoulders domains, in addition to better role emotion domains. Using either PMMF or ALTFF for reconstruction of oral defects after cancer resection significantly influences a patient's quality of life. Data from this study provide useful information for physicians and patients during their discussion of reconstruction modalities for oral cancers.

  17. Comparison between anterolateral thigh perforator free flaps and pectoralis major pedicled flap for reconstruction in oral cancer patients-A quality of life analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yan; Cai, Xiangping; Wang, Jing; Liu, Fei; Wang, Haibin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the differences between anterolateral thigh perforator free flaps (ALTFF) and pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF) for reconstruction in oral cancer patients. Method and Patients: who received free flap or PMMF reconstruction after ablation surgeries were eligible for the current study. The patients’ demographic data, medical history, and quality of life scores(Medical Outcomes Study-Short Form-36 (MOS SF-36) and the University of Washington Quality of Life (UW-QOL) questionnaires were collected. Results: 81 of 118 questionnaires were returned (68.64%). There was significant differences between two groups in the gender (P<0.005). Patients reconstructed with ALTFF had better appearance domains and better shoulders domains, in addition to better role emotion domains. Conclusions: Using either PMMF or ALTFF for reconstruction of oral defects after cancer resection significantly influences a patient’s quality of life. Data from this study provide useful information for physicians and patients during their discussion of reconstruction modalities for oral cancers. Key words:Quality of life, ALTFF,PMMF, oral cancer. PMID:24121914

  18. Ex-vivo oxygenated perfusion of free flaps during ischemia time: a feasibility study in a porcine model and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Slater, Nicholas J; Zegers, Her J H; Küsters, Benno; Beune, Thimpe; van Swieten, Henri A; Ulrich, Dietmar J O

    2016-10-01

    Under ideal circumstances, creation of the anastomosis during free flap transfer is a routine task and can be performed under short ischemia time. However, vessels may be in suboptimal state due to atherosclerosis, radiotherapy or trauma, increasing difficulties regarding receptor vessel identification, and anastomosis which in turn may lead to lengthening of ischemia time resulting in postoperative wound problems or even flap loss. In the current pilot study, a modified heart-lung machine was assembled to achieve continuous oxygenated extracoporeal perfusion using porcine myocutaneous rectus abdominis flaps, aimed at minimizing tissue damage occurring during ischemia time. Different pilot test groups with n = 2 were created, including oxygenated perfusion with heparinized autologous blood or organ preservation solutions. Control groups included short flush with preservation solution followed by cold storage. Flaps were successfully attached to the modified heart-lung machine while maintaining stable flow throughout the 24-h experiments. Flaps undergoing continuous oxygenated perfusion with preservation solutions showed minimal or no signs of cell necrosis during the 24-h experiment, in contrast to using heparinized autologous blood or flushing and cold storage. The use of a modified heart-lung machine for oxygenated perfusion of free flaps provides new possibilities to minimize tissue damage during ischemia time, and further study of its use is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A study of the blown flap/jet flap analogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hough, G. R.

    1979-01-01

    A study of the blown flap/jet flap analogy has been undertaken. Analytical predictions were made using both improved lifting line and optimized vortex lattice models for the jet flap. Results were compared with experimental data for three propulsive lift systems; the jet augmented flap, the externally blown flap, and the upper surface blown flap. Force increments due to changes in geometry and jet parameters were well approximated in most cases, although the absolute values of the aerodynamic forces were usually underestimated. The relatively simple jet-flap models gave performance predictions of accuracy comparable to more complex analyses.

  20. Local flaps, including pedicled perforator flaps: anatomy, technique, and applications.

    PubMed

    Maciel-Miranda, Alejandro; Morris, Steven F; Hallock, Geoffrey G

    2013-06-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Discuss the types of local flaps. 2. Analyze the advantages, disadvantages, and applications for each kind of flap. 3. Perform appropriate design and dissection techniques of local flaps. 4. Describe appropriate design and dissection techniques of local perforator and propeller flaps. The purpose of this article is to comprehensively review the topic of local flaps. Local flaps are those that are elevated nearby and then transferred to an adjacent wound. Options include geometric local flaps, axial pattern local flaps and a new exciting group of flaps, local perforator flaps. The principles, advantages, disadvantages, and applications for each are carefully analyzed. Local perforator flaps can be harvested virtually anywhere in the body and represent a significant clinical advance, as these can solve a wide variety of clinical challenges. These flaps do require gentle microsurgical dissection technique with careful handling for inset of the flap and simultaneously provide the same advantages of other types of local flaps because they also use nearby tissues with a similar color match, thickness, and texture, with primary donor-site closure possible. Local perforator flaps are another very useful option that undoubtedly will become more popular as more surgeons become more familiar with their use and advantages.

  1. The ability of intra-operative perfusion mapping with laser-assisted indocyanine green angiography to predict mastectomy flap necrosis in breast reconstruction: a prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Munabi, Naikhoba C O; Olorunnipa, Olushola B; Goltsman, David; Rohde, Christine H; Ascherman, Jeffrey A

    2014-04-01

    Mastectomy skin flap ischaemia leading to necrosis is a common occurrence. Laser-assisted indocyanine green (ICG) angiography can assist to locate these poorly perfused areas intra-operatively. Our study aims to identify specific perfusion values produced by ICG angiography that accurately predict mastectomy flap necrosis. A total of 42 patients undergoing autologous or implant-based breast reconstruction had mastectomy flaps imaged using laser-assisted ICG angiography at the completion of reconstruction. Intra-operative perfusion values were correlated with postoperative skin flap outcomes. Risk factors for abnormal perfusion were recorded and analysed. A total of 62 breast reconstructions were imaged, including 48 tissue expander reconstructions, six transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flaps, six deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps and two direct-to-implant reconstructions. Eight cases (13%) of full-thickness skin necrosis were identified postoperatively. A SPY Elite(®) value of ≤ 7 accurately predicted the development of flap necrosis at 88% sensitivity and 83% specificity. False-positive cases (those with perfusion values ≤ 7 which did not develop necrosis) were more likely to have a smoking history and/or to have had an epinephrine-containing tumescent solution used during mastectomy. Excluding patients with smoking or epinephrine use, a SPY value of ≤ 7 predicted flap necrosis with a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 97%. Thus, these data suggest that laser-assisted ICG angiography predicts postoperative outcomes with high accuracy. In our series, a SPY value of ≤ 7 correlated well with mastectomy flap necrosis. Furthermore, smoking and intra-operative injections containing epinephrine should be considered when evaluating low perfusion values as they can lead to false-positive test results.

  2. Novel technique for laparoscopic harvesting of latissimus dorsi flap with prosthesis implantation for breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuman; Tang, Peng; Chen, Xianchun; Yang, Xi; Pan, Qinwen; Gui, Yu; Chen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Backgroud: An important drawback of the traditional technique for harvesting latissimus dorsi (LD) myocutaneous flap is a long, posterior donor-site incision. Current techniques involve endoscopic or robotic harvesting via a combined approach of open and closed surgery, which necessitates an open axillary incision and the use of special retractors. In this paper, we introduce a fully enclosed laparoscopic technique for harvesting LD flap (LDF) using only 3 small trocar ports. This technique eliminates the need for axillary and donor-site incisions and specialized retractors and considerably reduces the incision size. Methods: We performed laparoscopic harvesting of LDF with prosthesis implantation for immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) after nipple-sparing mastectomy in 2 patients with malignant breast neoplasm who wished to avoid a long scar on the back. Results: IBR using this technique was uneventful in both cases, without any donor-site complications or flap failure. Both patients were satisfied with the esthetic results of the procedure, especially the absence of a visible scar on the back. Conclusion: Enclosed laparoscopic harvesting of LDF is simpler and less invasive than the traditional methods. These preliminary results warrant further evaluation in a larger population to validate the benefits of this technique. PMID:27861385

  3. A New Pedicled Internal Mammary Osteomyocutaneous Chimeric Flap (PIMOC) for Salvage Head and Neck Reconstruction: Anatomic Study and Clinical Application.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Guilherme C; Snider, Chelsea C; Galvão, Flavio H F; Baptista, Rachel R; Kasai, Kiril E; Dos Anjos, Daniel M; Ferreira, Marcus C

    2017-10-11

    Well-vascularized composite tissue offers improved outcomes for complex head and neck reconstruction. Patients with vessel-depleted necks and failed reconstructions require alternative reconstructive options. We describe a pedicled internal mammary artery osteomyocutaneous chimeric flap (PIMOC) for salvage head and neck reconstruction. Bilateral dissections of 35 fresh cadavers were performed to study individual tissue components and vascular pedicles to develop the PIMOC technique. The flap was then utilized in a series of patients with vessel-depleted neck anatomy. The PIMOC was dissected bilaterally in all cadavers and there were no statistical differences in vascular pedicle caliber or length with regards to laterality or gender. Five patients subsequently underwent this procedure. The flaps included a vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous component and a 6(th) or 7(th) rib with adjacent muscle and skin to restore bone defects, internal lining, and external coverage. All donor sites were closed primarily. There were no flap losses and all patients gained improvements in facial contour, speech and swallow. Although technically complex, the PIMOC is reproducible and provides a safe and reliable option for salvage head and neck reconstruction. The harvest of the 6(th) or 7(th) rib and rectus abdominis muscle renders an acceptable donor site.

  4. Long-term results of through-knee amputation with dorsal musculocutaneous flap in patients with end-stage arterial occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Kock, Hans-Juergen; Friederichs, Jan; Ouchmaev, Alexander; Hillmeier, Joachim; Von Gumppenberg, Stephan

    2004-08-01

    A modified technique of knee joint disarticulation using a dorsal musculocutaneous flap of the gastrocnemius muscle was first described in 1985. The operative results in 66 patients (33 women, 33 men; mean age 66.7 +/- 11.3 years, range 42-93 years) with gangrene due to peripheral vascular disease with 69 knee disarticulations are reported. After a mean survival period of 35.2 months (0-116 months), 88% ( n = 58) of the patients had died owing to cardiopulmonary reasons. The in-hospital 48-day mortality was 9%. Nine patients (14%) underwent reamputation at the above-knee level, and five patients underwent operative revision of the soft tissue. After discharge from the hospital, 35 of 60 patients (58%) were able to walk with the aid of a prosthesis. We conclude that knee disarticulation with the use of a myocutaneous gastrocnemius flap is a safe, functionally acceptable operative method in high risk vascular patients.

  5. Flapping of Insectile Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yangyang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Insects use flight muscles attached at the base of the wings to produce impressive wing flapping frequencies. Yet the effects of muscle stiffness on the performance of insect wings remain unclear. Here, we construct an insectile wing model, consisting of two rigid wings connected at their base by an elastic torsional spring and submerged in an oscillatory flow. The wing system is free to rotate and flap. We first explore the extent to which the flyer can withstand roll perturbations, then study its flapping behavior and performance as a function of spring stiffness. We find an optimal range of spring stiffness that results in large flapping amplitudes, high force generation and good storage of elastic energy. We conclude by conjecturing that insects may select and adjust the muscle spring stiffness to achieve desired movement. These findings may have significant implications on the design principles of wings in micro air-vehicles.

  6. Oral reconstruction with submental flap

    PubMed Central

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Submental flap is a useful technique for reconstruction of medium to large oral cavity defects. Hair bearing nature of this flap in men makes it less appropriate. Therefore, deepithelialized variant is introduced to overcome the problem of hair with this flap. Recently, application of this flap has been introduced in maxillofacial trauma patients. Materials and Methods: Deepithelialized orthograde submental flap is used for the reconstruction of oral cavity mucosal defects. Results: Four cases including two trauma patients and two squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of oral cavity were treated using deepithelialized orthograde submental flap. There were no complications in all four patients and secondary epithelialization occurred in raw surface of the flap which was exposed to oral cavity. Conclusion: Deepithelialized orthograde submental flap is very effective in reconstruction of oral cavity in men. The problem of hair is readily solved using this technique without jeopardizing flap blood supply. PMID:24205473

  7. Control of Flap Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David

    2005-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was carried out on a semi-span wing model to assess the feasibility of controlling vortices emanating from outboard flaps and tip-flaps by actively varying the degree of boundary layer separation. Separation was varied by means of perturbations produced from segmented zero-efflux oscillatory blowing slots, while estimates of span loadings and vortex sheet strengths were obtained by integrating wing surface pressures. These estimates were used as input to inviscid rollup relations as a means of predicting changes to the vortex characteristics resulting from the perturbations. Surveys of flow in the wake of the outboard and tip-flaps were made using a seven-hole probe, from which the vortex characteristics were directly deduced. Varying the degree of separation had a marked effect on vortex location, strength, tangential velocity, axial velocity and size for both outboard and tip-flaps. Qualitative changes in vortex characteristics were well predicted by the inviscid rollup relations, while the failure to account for viscosity was presumed to be the main reason for observed discrepancies. Introducing perturbations near the outboard flap-edges or on the tip-flap exerted significant control over vortices while producing negligible lift excursions.

  8. Local flap therapy for the treatment of pressure sore wounds.

    PubMed

    Wettstein, Reto; Tremp, Mathias; Baumberger, Michael; Schaefer, Dirk J; Kalbermatten, Daniel F

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effectiveness of an interdisciplinary cooperation between conservative and surgical disciplines for the treatment of pressure sores (PS). From January 2004 to December 2005, a single-centre study was performed with paraplegic and tetraplegic patients presenting with PS grades III-V. Outcome measures were defect size, grade, method of reconstruction, complication and recurrence rate as well as average length of hospitalisation. A total of 119 patients aged 22-84 years with totally 170 PS were included. The most common PS were located in the ischial region (47%), followed by the sacral (18%), trochanteric (11%), foot (9%) and the malleolar (8%) regions. Defect sizes ranged between 4 and 255 cm(2) . Grade IV was the most common PS (68%), followed by grade III (30%) and grade V (2%) PS. For wound closure, fasciocutaneous flaps were used most frequently (71%), followed by skin grafts (10%) and myocutaneous flaps (7%). Postoperative follow-up ranged between 6 and 38 months. The overall complication and recurrence rate was 26% and 11%, respectively. If no complication occurred, the average duration of hospitalisation stay after the first debridement was 98 ± 62 days. In conclusion, our treatment concept is reliable, effective and results in a low recurrence rate. The complication rate, even though favourable when compared with the literature, still needs to be improved. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Blowing Flap Experiment: PIV Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Stead, Daniel J.; Bremmer, David M.

    2004-01-01

    PIV measurements of the flow in the region of a flap side edge are presented for several flap configurations. The test model is a NACA 63(sub 2)-215 Hicks Mod-B main element airfoil with a half-span Fowler flap. Air is blown from small slots located along the flap side edge on either the top, bottom or side surfaces. The test set up is described and flow measurements for a baseline and three blowing flap configurations are presented. The effects that the flap tip jets have on the structure of the flap side edge flow are discussed for each of the flap configurations tested. The results indicate that blowing air from a slot located along the top surface of the flap greatly weakened the top vortex system and pushed it further off the top surface. Blowing from the bottom flap surface kept the strong side vortex further outboard while blowing from the side surface only strengthened the flap vortex system. It is concluded that blowing from the top or bottom surfaces of the flap may lead to a reduction of flap side edge noise.

  10. Transposition Flaps: Principles and Locations.

    PubMed

    Blake, Brett P; Simonetta, Cassandra J; Maher, Ian A

    2015-10-01

    Transposition flaps are frequently used to repair defects of the head and neck after tumor extirpation with Mohs micrographic surgery. To review the basic principles underlying single-stage transposition flaps and also their utility relative to location on the head and neck. A review of the literature on transposition flaps was performed with specific reference to the principles of single-stage transposition flaps, including rhomboid flaps and their variations, multilobed flaps, and the locations where transposition flaps are frequently executed on the head and neck. Numerous articles have been written with regard to the techniques for designing and executing transposition flaps. The primary advantages of transposition flaps include less undermining as compared to large sliding flaps and the superior ability to displace tension away from the defect and from free margins. Optimal cosmesis with these flaps can be achieved with appropriate sizing of flaps (or lobes), appropriate undermining, and meticulous suturing. The versatility of transposition flaps makes them optimal for repair of defects on the head and neck and utilization of the outlined key principles and techniques aid in achieving an aesthetic result.

  11. The saphenous neurovascular free flap.

    PubMed

    Acland, R D; Schusterman, M; Godina, M; Eder, E; Taylor, G I; Carlisle, I

    1981-06-01

    A new neurovascular free-flap donor area on the medial side of the knee is described. The flap is supplied by the saphenous artery, a branch of the descending genicular artery. It is drained both by the long saphenous vein and by the saphenous venae comitantes. Its nerve supply is from the medial femoral cutaneous nerve above the knee and the saphenous nerve below the knee. The flap is thin, has a long vascular pedicle (up to 15 cm) and a dependable nerve supply, and can be made quite large. The principal disadvantage is the donor wound, which requires grafting in most cases. We describe the anatomy of the saphenous flap, the method of raising it, and our early clinical experience with it both as a free flap and as a pedicled flap. Potential uses of the saphenous flap and its broader significance in relation to flaps on the lower extremity are briefly discussed.

  12. Breast Reconstruction with Flap Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Breast reconstruction with flap surgery Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Breast reconstruction is a surgical procedure that restores shape to ... breast tissue to treat or prevent breast cancer. Breast reconstruction with flap surgery is a type of breast ...

  13. Externally blown flap impingement noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasagna, P. L.; Putnam, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    Tests of the noise produced by the impingement of the jet exhaust on the wing and flap for an externally blown flap system were conducted with a CF700 turbofan engine and an F-111B wing panel. The noise produced with a daisy nozzle installed on the engine was greater than that produced by a conical nozzle at the same thrust. The presence of the wing next to the test nozzles increased the noise, as did increasing the flap deflection angle. Compared with the conical nozzle, the daisy nozzle produced slightly less noise at a flap deflection of 60 deg but produced more noise at the lower flap deflections tested. Tests showed that the single-slotted flap deflected 60 deg, produced less noise than the double-slotted flaps. Also, maintaining the maximum distance between the exit nozzle and flap system resulted in a minor reduction in noise.

  14. Bilobed flap in sole surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Conejo-Mir, J.; Bueno Montes, J.; Moreno Gimenez, J.C.; Camacho-Martinez, F.

    1985-09-01

    The bilobed flap is a simple reconstructive technique principally used to correct substantial defects in the facial region. The authors present their experience with this local flap in the difficult plantar area, with excellent short-term functional results. They describe the special characteristics of the bilobed flap in this zone, and comment on its indications and possible complications.

  15. Blown flap noise prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, N. N.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental developments of flow-surface interaction noise with a particular emphasis on blown-flap noise were reviewed. Several blown-flap noise prediction methods were evaluated by comparing predicted acoustic levels, directivity, and spectra with a recently obtained data base. A prediction method was selected and a detailed step-by-step description of this method was provided to develop a computer module to calculate one-third octave band frequency spectra at any given location in the far-field for under-the-wing and upper surface blown configurations as a function of geometric and operational parameters.

  16. Retroauricular cutaneous advancement flap.

    PubMed

    Kim, Peter; Lee, Kwan Stephen

    2012-08-01

    Excisional surgery of the ear, such as that following a skin cancer excision, often produces a smaller ear postoperatively. This article describes the various uses of a retroauricular cutaneous advancement flap to repair surgical defects of the ear following a skin cancer excision, without miniaturising the ear. A retroauricular cutaneous advancement flap is an option for patients who require cosmetically satisfying reconstruction of the ear post skin cancer excision. The technique can avoid the miniaturisation of the ear that may occur with other techniques.

  17. Intraoral Reconstruction Using Local and Regional Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Squaquara, Roberto; Kim Evans, Karen F.; Spanio di Spilimbergo, Stefano; Mardini, Samir

    2010-01-01

    Choosing a pedicled flap to reconstruct an intraoral defect depends on the size and the anatomic position of the tissue defect. The goals are to restore form and function and minimize donor site morbidity. Regional pedicled flaps available for intraoral reconstruction are the buccal fat pad flap, facial artery musculomucosal flap, platysma, pectoralis major, temporalis muscle flap, and trapezius flaps. We give a concise illustration of anatomy, our harvesting technique, indications, and eventual pitfalls for each of the six flaps. PMID:22550440

  18. An analysis of free flap failure using the ACS NSQIP database. Does flap site and flap type matter?

    PubMed

    Kwok, Alvin C; Agarwal, Jayant P

    2017-09-01

    We sought to use the NSQIP database to determine the national rate and predictors of free flap failure based upon flap sites and flap types. Free flaps were identified using the 2005-2010 NSQIP database. We examined overall flap failure rates as well as failure rates based upon flap sites (head and neck, extremities, trunk, and breast) and flap types (muscle, fascial, skin, bone, and bowel flaps). Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to determine predictors of flap failure. There were 1,187 microvascular free tissue transfers identified. The overall flap failure rate was 5.1%. Head and neck flaps had the highest rate of free flap failure at 7.7%. Prolonged operative time is an independent predictor of flap failure for all free flaps (OR: 2.383, P = 0.0013). When examining predictors of failure by flap site, free flaps to the breast with prolonged operative time are independently associated with flap failure (OR: 2.288, P = 0.0152). When examining predictors of flap failure by flap type, muscle based free flaps with an ASA classification ≥3 are associated with flap failure (P = 0.0441). Risk factors for free flap failure differ based upon flap site and flap type. Prolonged operative time is an independent risk factor for the failure of free flaps used for breast reconstruction. An ASA classification ≥3 is associated with the failure of free muscle based flaps. Our findings identify actionable areas that may help to improve free flap success. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Externally blown flap impingement noise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, T. W.; Lasagna, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of externally blown flap impingement noise was conducted using a full-scale turbofan engine and aircraft wing. The noise produced with a daisy nozzle installed on the engine exhaust system was greater than that produced by a conical nozzle at the same thrust. The daisy nozzle caused the jet velocity to decay about 35 percent at the flap. The presence of the wing next to the conical nozzle increased the noise, as did increasing the flap deflection. Compared with the conical nozzle, the daisy nozzle produced slightly less noise at a flap deflection of 60 deg but produced more noise at the lower flap deflections tested.

  20. Local Flaps of The Hand

    PubMed Central

    Rehim, Shady A.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis A local flap consists of skin and subcutaneous tissue that is harvested from a site nearby a given defect while maintaining its intrinsic blood supply. When a soft tissue defect of the hand is not amenable to primary closure or skin grafting, local skin flaps can be a used as a reliable source of soft tissue replacement that replaces like with like. Flaps are categorized based on their composition, method of transfer, flap design and blood supply, yet flap circulation is considered the most critical factor for the flap survival. This article reviews the classification of local skin flaps of the hand and offers a practical reconstructive approach for several soft tissue defects of the hand and digits. PMID:24731606

  1. Noise Reduction of Aircraft Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V. (Inventor); Brooks, Thomas F. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A reduction in noise radiating from a side of a deployed aircraft flap is achieved by locating a slot adjacent the side of the flap, and then forcing air out through the slot with a suitable mechanism. One, two or even three or more slots are possible, where the slot is located at one;or more locations selected from a group of locations comprising a top surface of the flap, a bottom surface of the flap, an intersection of the top and side surface of the flap, an intersection of the bottom and side surfaces of the flap, and a side surface of the flap. In at least one embodiment the slot is substantially rectangular. A device for adjusting a rate of the air forced out through the slot can also be provided.

  2. The abdominal fascial closure in a double-breasted jacket pattern following a TRAM free flap breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Seok; Yoo, Han-Su; Hong, Jong Won; Lew, Dae hyun; Roh, Tai Suk

    2014-02-01

    The primary closure of abdominal fascia after breast reconstruction with transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap has been reported to be the most effective way to reduce these complications. A total of 108 patients who underwent immediate unilateral breast reconstruction with muscle-sparing TRAM flap were included in the study. We compared complications between 56 patients who underwent conventional primary fascial closure (group 1) and 52 who underwent fascial closure in a new double-breasted jacket pattern (group 2), retrospectively. Abdominal bulging occurred in four patients (7.1%) in group 1 and one patient (1.9%) in group 2 (p = 0.01). An abdominal wound dehiscence occurred in three (5.4%) patient in group 1 and two (3.8%) patient in group 2 (p = 0.12). After conventional or muscle-sparing TRAM free flap reconstruction, closing the abdominal fascia in a double-breasted jacket pattern can help reinforce the lower abdominal fascia and prevent abdominal bulging caused by abdominal fascia tensional imbalance. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  3. Pectoralis major myofascial interposition flap prevents postoperative pharyngocutaneous fistula in salvage total laryngectomy.

    PubMed

    Anschütz, Lukas; Nisa, Lluís; Elicin, Olgun; Bojaxhiu, Beat; Caversaccio, Marco; Giger, Roland

    2016-11-01

    Pharyngocutaneous fistula (PCF) is the most cumbersome complication after salvage total laryngectomy (STL) in patients who have been previously irradiated for laryngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer. To assess the fistula rate, risk factors and effects of primary closure with and without pectoralis major myofascial interposition flap (PMMIF) on fistula formation, we conducted a retrospective review. We identified 48 patients from 2004 to 2013 who underwent STL after failure of primary curative (chemo)radiotherapy in laryngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer. Details of risk factors for PCF formation, other postoperative complications and general outcome data were analyzed. Ten (20.8 %) out of 48 patients underwent STL with PMMIF closure. Patient and tumor features were not different between the groups with or without PMMIF closure. PCF rates were 0 and 42.1 % in patients with and without PMMIF, respectively (p = 0.002). Other operative complications were similar. We identified prior neck irradiation to be a risk factor for fistula formation (p = 0.04). Patients without PCF had a statistically significant reduction of average hospital stay (20 vs. 56 days; p = 0.001). Analysis of fistula management revealed 50 % of PCF to be closed secondarily by a pectoralis major myocutaneous flap. Over one-third of fistulae persisted despite attempted surgical closure in some cases. PMMIF is useful to prevent PCF in STL following (chemo)radiotherapy. Neck irradiation during primary treatment is a risk factor for PCF formation.

  4. The Deltopectoral Flap Revisited: The Internal Mammary Artery Perforator Flap.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Amir; Atiyeh, Bishara; Karami, Reem; Adelman, David M; Papazian, Nazareth J

    2016-03-01

    Pharyngo-esophageal and tracheostomal defects pose a challenge in head and neck reconstruction whenever microanastomosis is extremely difficult in hostile neck that is previously dissected and irradiated. The deltopectoral (DP) flap was initially described as a pedicled flap for such reconstruction with acceptable postoperative results. A major drawback is still that the DP flap is based on 3 perforator vessels leading to a decreased arc of rotation. The DP flap also left contour deformities in the donor site. The internal mammary artery perforator flap was described as a refinement of the deltopectoral flap. It is a pedicled fasciocutaneous flap based on a single perforator, with comparable and reliable blood supply compared with the DP flap, giving it the benefit of having a wide arc of rotation. It is both thin and pliable, with good skin color match and texture. The donor site can be closed primarily with no esthetic deformity and minimal morbidity. The procedure is relatively simple and does not require microvascular expertise. In this report, the authors describe a patient in whom bilateral internal mammary artery perforator flaps were used for subtotal pharyngo-esophageal reconstruction and neck resurfacing. The flaps healed uneventfully bilaterally with no postoperative complications.

  5. Myocutaneous Mucormycosis in a Diabetic Burnt Patient Led to Upper Extremity Amputation; A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ayaz, Mehdi; Moein, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare opportunistic fungal infection that can implicate cranial sinuses, brain, lungs, gastrointestinal tract and skin. Although it can occur in patients with competent and incompetent immunity such as patients with diabetes mellitus, lymphoma, leukemia and burns, but it has an aggressive, malignant and lethal course in patients with incompetent immunity. To enforce the importance of burn in patients with underlaying diseases such as diabetes, we are going to report a rare case of diabetic burnt patient complicated by right upper extremity myocutaneous mucormycosis. We selected this case to emphasis the importance of underlying disease (diabetes mellitus) with cutaneous burn, aggressive treatment of fungal infection in these patients and referring such case to burn center to prevent catastrophic results. A 50-year-old woman was introduced to us after several days of medical and surgical care of right upper extremity and trunk split-thickness burn. Due to gross muscle necrosis of right upper extremity and poor general condition of the patient, she was taken to the operating room that led to right upper extremity amputation and several times of aggressive debridement to save her life. Pathologic report was indicative of mucormycosis. We can conclude from this case that: 1) Burn, even partially thickness and with little body surface area, should be referred to burn center for better care 2) No response to usual medical treatment should make us more sensitive to consider the unusual causes of infection such as fungi 3) Suspected dead tissues should be excised aggressively especially if suspiciousness to wound sepsis and fungal infection is present especially in an immunocompromised patient. PMID:28246626

  6. Myocutaneous Mucormycosis in a Diabetic Burnt Patient Led to Upper Extremity Amputation; A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ayaz, Mehdi; Moein, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare opportunistic fungal infection that can implicate cranial sinuses, brain, lungs, gastrointestinal tract and skin. Although it can occur in patients with competent and incompetent immunity such as patients with diabetes mellitus, lymphoma, leukemia and burns, but it has an aggressive, malignant and lethal course in patients with incompetent immunity. To enforce the importance of burn in patients with underlaying diseases such as diabetes, we are going to report a rare case of diabetic burnt patient complicated by right upper extremity myocutaneous mucormycosis. We selected this case to emphasis the importance of underlying disease (diabetes mellitus) with cutaneous burn, aggressive treatment of fungal infection in these patients and referring such case to burn center to prevent catastrophic results. A 50-year-old woman was introduced to us after several days of medical and surgical care of right upper extremity and trunk split-thickness burn. Due to gross muscle necrosis of right upper extremity and poor general condition of the patient, she was taken to the operating room that led to right upper extremity amputation and several times of aggressive debridement to save her life. Pathologic report was indicative of mucormycosis. We can conclude from this case that: 1) Burn, even partially thickness and with little body surface area, should be referred to burn center for better care 2) No response to usual medical treatment should make us more sensitive to consider the unusual causes of infection such as fungi 3) Suspected dead tissues should be excised aggressively especially if suspiciousness to wound sepsis and fungal infection is present especially in an immunocompromised patient.

  7. Microdissected Prefabricated Flap: An Evolution in Flap Prefabrication

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    When traditional flap techniques are not feasible, we apply flap prefabrication, which is more complicated and sophisticated but supplies large and thin flaps. There are some disadvantages to the technique that require improvement, such as venous congestion after flap transfer, which requires months for neoangiogenesis and necessitates a vascular carrier. Here, the author presents a new technique, called as ‘microdissected prefabricated flap,’ to successfully produce a safe, large, and thin flap. This technique is based on the microdissection of the perforators to the greatest extent possible, spreading them out into the subdermal level and using them as a carrier. The details and the application of this technique are presented and reported. PMID:27896196

  8. The temporalis muscle flap and temporoparietal fascial flap.

    PubMed

    Lam, Din; Carlson, Eric R

    2014-08-01

    The temporal arterial system provides reliable vascular anatomy for the temporalis muscle flap and temporoparietal fascial flap that can support multiple reconstructive needs of the oral and maxillofacial region. The minimal donor site morbidity and ease of development of these flaps result in their predictable and successful transfer for reconstructive surgery of the oral and maxillofacial region. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Novel flaps for head and neck reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Quazi Ghazwan; Shankhdhar, Vinay Kant

    2010-04-01

    The head and neck region is important both functionally and aesthetically and its reconstruction poses a formidable challenge for plastic surgeons. A perforator flap is a flap of skin or subcutaneous tissue supplied by a vessel that perforates the deep fascia to gain access to flap. With improvement in our knowledge of the anatomy of blood supply to the skin, the perforator flaps have opened a whole new horizon for the plastic surgeon to choose flaps with better function and cosmesis. The locally available perforators enable flaps to be designed with excellent match in tissue characteristics. Perforator flaps limit donor site morbidity and as they are islanded complete insetting is possible in a single stage. The principal perforator flaps such as facial artery perforator flap, platysma flap and its variant the submental flap and supra-clavicular artery flap used in the head and neck reconstruction are discussed. The more commonly used flaps are the free radial artery forearm flap and the anterolateral thigh flap while the novel ones are the thoracodorsal artery perforator flap, medial sural artery perforator flap and the toe-web flap for commissure reconstruction. The indications, reach and drawbacks of these flaps have been discussed in this review.

  10. Skin flaps and grafts - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Free flap - self-care; Skin autografting - self-care; Pressure ulcer skin flap self-care; Burns skin flap self- ... skin infection Surgery for skin cancer Venous ulcers , pressure ulcers , or diabetic ulcers that DO NOT heal After ...

  11. Superficial ulnar artery perforator flap.

    PubMed

    Schonauer, Fabrizio; Marlino, Sergio; Turrà, Francesco; Graziano, Pasquale; Dell'Aversana Orabona, Giovanni

    2014-09-01

    Superficial ulnar artery is a rare finding but shows significant surgical implications. Its thinness and pliability make this flap an excellent solution for soft tissue reconstruction, especially in the head and neck region. We hereby report a successful free superficial ulnar artery perforator forearm flap transfer for tongue reconstruction. A 64-year-old man presenting with a squamous cell carcinoma of the left tongue underwent a wide resection of the tumor, left radical neck dissection, and reconstruction of the tongue and the left tonsillar pillar with the mentioned flap. No complications were observed postoperatively. The flap survived completely; no recurrence at 6 months of follow-up was detected. Superficial ulnar artery perforator flap has shown to be a safe alternative to other free tissue flaps in specific forearm anatomic conditions.

  12. Skin flaps in reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Pavletic, M M

    1990-01-01

    A skin flap (pedicle graft) is a partially detached segment of skin and subcutaneous tissue that includes a blood supply essential to its survival. As a result, skin flaps are capable of closing a variety of defects, including poorly vascularized wound beds that are incapable of maintaining free grafts. In many cases, skin flaps can bypass economically many of the potential problems associated with healing by second intention. This article presents an overview of pedicle grafts, with emphasis on the clinical use of local flap techniques.

  13. The Versatile Modiolus Perforator Flap

    PubMed Central

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon Leifur; Thomsen, Jorn Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Perforator flaps are well established, and their usefulness as freestyle island flaps is recognized. The whereabouts of vascular perforators and classification of perforator flaps in the face are a debated subject, despite several anatomical studies showing similar consistency. In our experience using freestyle facial perforator flaps, we have located areas where perforators are consistently found. This study is focused on a particular perforator lateral to the angle of the mouth; the modiolus and the versatile modiolus perforator flap. Methods: A cohort case series of 14 modiolus perforator flap reconstructions in 14 patients and a color Doppler ultrasonography localization of the modiolus perforator in 10 volunteers. Results: All 14 flaps were successfully used to reconstruct the defects involved, and the location of the perforator was at the level of the modiolus as predicted. The color Doppler ultrasonography study detected a sizeable perforator at the level of the modiolus lateral to the angle of the mouth within a radius of 1 cm. This confirms the anatomical findings of previous authors and indicates that the modiolus perforator is a consistent anatomical finding, and flaps based on it can be recommended for several indications from the reconstruction of defects in the perioral area, cheek and nose. Conclusions: The modiolus is a well-described anatomical area containing a sizeable perforator that is consistently present and readily visualized using color Doppler ultrasonography. We have used the modiolus perforator flap successfully for several indications, and it is our first choice for perioral reconstruction. PMID:27257591

  14. Intracranial microvascular free flaps.

    PubMed

    Levine, Steven; Garfein, Evan S; Weiner, Howard; Yaremchuk, Michael J; Saadeh, Pierre B; Gurtner, Geoffrey; Levine, Jamie P; Warren, Stephen M

    2009-02-01

    Large acquired intracranial defects can result from trauma or surgery. When reoperation is required because of infection or tumor recurrence, management of the intracranial dead space can be challenging. By providing well-vascularized bulky tissue, intracranial microvascular free flaps offer potential solutions to these life-threatening complications. A multi-institutional retrospective chart and radiographic review was performed of all patients who underwent microvascular free-flap surgery for salvage treatment of postoperative intracranial infections between 1998 and 2006. A total of six patients were identified with large intracranial defects and postoperative intracranial infections. Four patients had parenchymal resections for tumor or seizure and two patients had posttraumatic encephalomalacia. All patients underwent operative debridement and intracranial free-flap reconstruction using the latissimus dorsi muscle (N=2), rectus abdominis muscle (N=2), or omentum (N=2). All patients had titanium (N=4) or Medpor (N=2) cranioplasties. We concluded that surgery or trauma can result in significant intracranial dead space. Treatment of postoperative intracranial infection can be challenging. Vascularized free tissue transfer not only fills the void, but also provides a delivery system for immune cells, antibodies, and systemically administered antibiotics. The early use of this technique when intracranial dead space and infection coexist is beneficial.

  15. New aspects in free flap surgery: Mini-perforator flaps and extracorporeal flap perfusion.

    PubMed

    Wolff, K-D

    2017-09-01

    The scope of microvascular tissue transfer in the Head and Neck reaches from coverage of simple soft tissue defects to complex 3-D reconstructions using multiple or chimeric flaps. This paper summarises the presentation given at the Congress of the French Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Marseille 2017. It was the aim of our work to add further elements to this wide spectrum of reconstructive possibilities. For patients with small intraoral soft tissue defects in whom the use of a radial forearm flap would not be justified because of its donor site morbidity, but who nevertheless would take a benefit from a small free flap, we used mini-perforator flaps from the lower leg. These flaps were raised with negligible morbidity. Moreover, for patients necessarily needing a free flap, but having vessel depleted, irradiated necks, we have developed a first idea of extracorporeal flap perfusion to make microvascular anastomoses unnecessary. Using donor sites from the lower leg, mini-soleus and medial sural perforator flaps were raised to cover defects of 2×3 to 2×4cm at the anterior floor of the mouth or lateral tongue. The success rate was 91%, and despite their small size, the flaps helped to maintain the mobility of the tongue. The donor site morbidity was minimal. After extensive experimental work on small animals and human tissue, four flaps could successfully be transferred so far by means of extracorporeal perfusion. In these patients, autonomisation took place between 5 and 12 days. Although microvascular tissue transfer already allows for reconstruction in almost any possible defect constellation, mini-perforator flaps and machine-perfused transplants seem to represent new aspects of free flap surgery, being useful extensions of the reconstructive surgeon's armament. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Peroneal Flap for Tongue Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Sheng; Liu, Wen-Chung; Lin, Yaoh-Shiang; Chen, Lee-Wei; Yang, Kuo-Chung

    2017-07-01

    Background For large tongue defects, reconstructive surgeons have devised a variety of feasible options, such as radial forearm free flap and anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap. In our institution, peroneal flap has been the workhorse flap for the soft tissue defect in head and neck reconstruction. We present our experience using peroneal flap in tongue reconstruction. Patients and Methods The study included 47 patients who had undergone tongue reconstructions with peroneal flaps after tumor resection. The size and location of the defect after tumor resection determined whether the peroneal flaps could be harvested as pure septocutaneous flaps to solely reconstruct the neotongue or to carry an additional muscle bulk to fill the adjacent defect. Retrospective chart review was used to look for postoperative complications and to perform functional assessments (which were also performed through telephone inquiry). Results Of the 47 patients, 3 (6%) had flap failure and 1 (2.1%) had partial flap necrosis. The hemiglossectomy group had better results than the total glossectomy group with respect to speech and diet, but neither of these results reached statistical significance (p = 1.0 for speech and p = 0.06 for diet). The results of the subtotal glossectomy group were better than those of the total glossectomy group with respect to diet (p = 0.03). No statistically significant differences were noted among the three groups with respect to cosmetic aspect (p = 0.64). Conclusions Considering its reasonable postoperative complication rates and functional results, peroneal flap can be considered a feasible option for tongue reconstruction. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Reduction of Flap Side Edge Noise - the Blowing Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, THomas F.

    2005-01-01

    A technique to reduce the noise radiating from a wing-flap side edge is being developed. As an airplane wing with an extended flap is exposed to a subsonic airflow, air is blown outward through thin rectangular chord-wise slots at various locations along the side edges and side surface of the flap to weaken and push away the vortices that originate in that region of the flap and are responsible for important noise emissions. Air is blown through the slots at up to twice the local flow velocity. The blowing is done using one or multiple slots, where a slot is located along the top, bottom or side surface of the flap along the side edge, or also along the intersection of the bottom (or top) and side surfaces.

  18. Flap-Edge Blowing Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaeta, R. J.; Englar, R. J.; Ahuja, K. K.

    2003-01-01

    This Appendix documents the salient results from an effort to mitigate the so-called flap-edge noise generated at the split between a flap edge that is deployed and the undeployed flap. Utilizing a Coanda surface installed at the flap edge, steady blowing was used in an attempt to diminish the vortex strength resulting from the uneven lift distribution. The strength of this lifting vortex was augmented by steady blowing over the deployed flap. The test article for this study was the same 2D airfoil used in the steady blowing program reported earlier (also used in pulsed blowing tests, see Appendix G), however its trailing edge geometry was modified. An exact duplicate of the airfoil shape was made out of fiberglass with no flap, and in the clean configuration. It was attached to the existing airfoil to make an airfoil that has half of its flap deployed and half un-deployed. Figure 1 shows a schematic of the planform showing the two areas where steady blowing was introduced. The flap-edge blowing or the auxiliary blowing was in the direction normal to the freestream velocity vector. Slot heights for the blowing chambers were on the order of 0.0 14 inches.

  19. Propeller Flaps: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Sisti, Andrea; D'Aniello, Carlo; Fortezza, Leonardo; Tassinari, Juri; Cuomo, Roberto; Grimaldi, Luca; Nisi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Since their introduction in 1991, propeller flaps are increasingly used as a surgical approach to loss of substance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the indications and to verify the outcomes and the complication rates using this reconstructing technique through a literature review. A search on PubMed was performed using "propeller flap", "fasciocutaneous flap", "local flap" or "pedicled flap" as key words. We selected clinical studies using propeller flaps as a reconstructing technique. We found 119 studies from 1991 to 2015. Overall, 1,315 propeller flaps were reported in 1,242 patients. Most frequent indications included loss of substance following tumor excision, repair of trauma-induced injuries, burn scar contractures, pressure sores and chronic infections. Complications were observed in 281/1242 patients (22.6%) occurring more frequently in the lower limbs (31.8%). Partial flap necrosis and venous congestion were the most frequent complications. The complications' rate was significantly higher in infants (<10 years old) and in the older population (>70 years old) but there was not a significant difference between the sexes. Trend of complication rate has not improved during the last years. Propeller flaps showed a great success rate with low morbidity, quick recovery, good aesthetic outcomes and reduced cost. The quality and volume of the transferred soft tissue, the scar orientation and the possibility of direct donor site closure should be considered in order to avoid complications. Indications for propeller flaps are small- or medium-sized defects located in a well-vascularized area with healthy surrounding tissues. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  20. Novel technique for laparoscopic harvesting of latissimus dorsi flap with prosthesis implantation for breast reconstruction: A preliminary study with 2 case reports.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuman; Tang, Peng; Chen, Xianchun; Yang, Xi; Pan, Qinwen; Gui, Yu; Chen, Li

    2016-11-01

    An important drawback of the traditional technique for harvesting latissimus dorsi (LD) myocutaneous flap is a long, posterior donor-site incision. Current techniques involve endoscopic or robotic harvesting via a combined approach of open and closed surgery, which necessitates an open axillary incision and the use of special retractors. In this paper, we introduce a fully enclosed laparoscopic technique for harvesting LD flap (LDF) using only 3 small trocar ports. This technique eliminates the need for axillary and donor-site incisions and specialized retractors and considerably reduces the incision size. We performed laparoscopic harvesting of LDF with prosthesis implantation for immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) after nipple-sparing mastectomy in 2 patients with malignant breast neoplasm who wished to avoid a long scar on the back. IBR using this technique was uneventful in both cases, without any donor-site complications or flap failure. Both patients were satisfied with the esthetic results of the procedure, especially the absence of a visible scar on the back. Enclosed laparoscopic harvesting of LDF is simpler and less invasive than the traditional methods. These preliminary results warrant further evaluation in a larger population to validate the benefits of this technique.

  1. Does the use of an acellular dermal graft in abdominal closure after rectus flap harvest impact the occurrence of post-operative hernia?

    PubMed

    Saman, Masoud; Kadakia, Sameep; Ducic, Yadranko

    2015-12-01

    Patients with rectus free flap harvest extending below the arcuate line are predisposed to postoperative hernia formation. As such, many authors have advocated the use of closure adjuncts to increase the integrity of the closure and prevent hernia or abdominal wall bulging. Busy level 1 public trauma center in metropolitan Fort Worth, Texas Following harvest of the rectus free flap, 48 patients underwent primary closure; 24 of these patients had defects extending below the arcuate line. Forty patients were closed with an acellular dermal graft; 22 of these patients had defects extending below the arcuate line. Postoperative hernia formation and local infection rate were examined in a minimum follow-up period of 1 year. Regardless of closure method, no hernias were observed in the postoperative period. Using an unpaired t test and an alpha value of 0.05, there was no statistically significant difference in the infection rate between the two groups. Following rectus abdominis myocutaneous free flap harvest, the use of an acellular dermal graft in abdominal wall closure may not be of any further advantage in the prevention of hernia. Retrospective (Level III).

  2. Flap Edge Noise Reduction Fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor); Choudhan, Meelan M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A flap of the type that is movably connected to an aircraft wing to provide control of an aircraft in flight includes opposite ends, wherein at least a first opposite end includes a plurality of substantially rigid, laterally extending protrusions that are spaced apart to form a plurality of fluidly interconnected passageways. The passageways have openings adjacent to upper and lower sides of the flap, and the passageways include a plurality of bends such that high pressure fluid flows from a high pressure region to a low pressure region to provide a boundary condition that inhibits noise resulting from airflow around the end of the flap.

  3. Dancing girl flap: a new flap suitable for web release.

    PubMed

    Shinya, K

    1999-12-01

    To create a deep web, a flap must be designed to have a high elongation effect in one direction along the mid-lateral line of the finger and also to have a shortening effect in the other direction, crossing at a right angle to the mid-lateral line. The dancing girl flap is a modification of a four-flap Z-plasty with two additional Z-plasties. It has a high elongation effect in one direction (>550%) and a shortening effect in the other direction at a right angle (<33%), creating a deep, U-shaped surface. This new flap can be used to release severe scar contracture with a web, and is most suitable for incomplete syndactyly with webs as high as the proximal interphalangeal joint.

  4. Expanding the scope of the turnover flap.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Avir; Spears, Julie; Newsome, Edward; McCampbell, Beth; Kiran, Ravi; Mitra, Amit

    2006-07-01

    Turnover flaps are often utilized as alternatives to more traditional flaps, especially in situations where traditional flap viability is limited. Most turnover flaps are currently used in the lower extremities. This study examined the senior author's use of the turnover flap in 103 cases between 1987 and 2004. Postoperative follow-up ranged from 3 months to 10 years, with an average follow-up of 9 months. The majority (n = 90) of the cases involved the lower extremities and carried high success rates; there were 72 successful operations (complete graft take), 10 partial flap losses (partial graft take that could be treated postoperatively without surgery), and eight complete flap losses (no graft take and the necessity of additional surgery). Three of the partial flap losses and two of the complete flap losses involved patients with end-stage vascular disease. End-stage vascular disease cases represented 20.0 percent of the lower extremity cases and carried a significantly higher percentage of partial or complete flap loss (27.8 percent). These circumstances were examined in detail; the authors found that the turnover flap provided improved outcome to such end-stage patients who otherwise would have undergone amputation. In 13 cases, turnover flaps were utilized in nontraditional regions, such as the chest wall, abdominal wall, head and neck region, and upper extremities, with a high degree of success (zero partial or complete flap losses). These approaches are discussed in detail. The surgical approach is examined with recommendations regarding preferred wound size and type and overall flap design. This study indicates that turnover flaps are effective and useful as an alternative and, in some cases, primary procedure. In addition, the results serve to expand the present scope of the turnover flap by examining nontraditional regions in which the flap was highly successful. The authors believe the turnover flap should be given higher priority as a reconstructive

  5. Flap monitoring using infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Alex; Wright, Leigh P.; Elmandjra, Mohamed; Mao, Jian-min

    2006-02-01

    We report results of clinical trials on flap monitoring in 65 plastic surgeries. Hemoglobin oxygen saturation of flap tissue (StO II) was monitored non-invasively by using ODISsey TM tissue oximeter, an infrared spectroscopic device. StO II measurements were conducted both intra-operatively and post-operatively. From the intra-operative measurements, we observed that StO II values dropped when the main blood vessels supplying the flap were clamped in surgery, and that StO II jumped after anastomosis to a value close to its pre-operative value. From post-operative monitoring measurements for the 65 flap cases, each lasted two days or so, we found that the StO II values approach to a level close to the baseline if the surgery was successful, and that the StO II value dropped to a value below 30% if there is a perfusion compromise, such as vascular thrombosis.

  6. Full scale upper surface blown flap noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, L. J.; Homyak, L.; Jones, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    A highly noise suppressed TF 34 engine was used to investigate the noise of several powered lift configurations involving upper surface blown (USB) flaps. The configuration variables were nozzle type (i.e. slot and circular with deflector), flap chord length, and flap angle. The results of velocity surveys at both the nozzle exit and the flap trailing edge are also presented and used for correlation of the noise data. Configurations using a long flap design were 4 db quieter than a short flap typical of current trends in USB flap design. The lower noise for the long flap is attributed primarily to the greater velocity decay of the jet at the flap trailing edge. The full-scale data revealed substantially more quadrupole noise in the region near the deflected jet than observed in previous sub-scale tests.

  7. Perforator Flaps in Head and Neck Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chana, Jagdeep S.; Odili, Joy

    2010-01-01

    Free tissue transfer has revolutionized the management of complex head and neck defects. Perforator flaps represent the most recent advance in the development of free flap surgery. These flaps are based on perforating vessels and can be harvested without significant damage to associated muscles, thereby reducing the postoperative morbidity associated with muscle-based flaps. Elevation of perforator flaps requires meticulous technique and can be more challenging than raising muscle-based flaps. Use of a Doppler device enables reliable identification of the perforating vessels and aids in the design of free-style free flaps, where the flaps are designed purely according to the perforator located. The major advantage of free-style free flaps is that an unlimited number of flaps can potentially be designed on much shorter pedicles. The anterolateral thigh flap is the most commonly used perforator flap in head and neck reconstruction. Its use is described in detail, as is use of other less common perforator flaps. This article also describes head and neck reconstruction in a region-specific manner and gives a short-list of suitable flaps based on the location of the defect. PMID:22550446

  8. The Gradual Expansion Muscle Flap

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Biochem Cytol. 1961;9:493 495. 42. Sola OM, Christensen DL, Martin AW. Hypertrophy and hyperplasia of adult chicken anterior latissimus dorsi muscles ...TECHNICAL TRICK The Gradual Expansion Muscle Flap Michael J. Beltran, MD,* James A. Blair, MD,* Christopher R. Rathbone, PhD,† and Joseph R. Hsu, MD...acute shortening and angulation of the tibia and rotational muscle flap coverage and split thickness skin grafting of the soft tissue defect

  9. Buried free flaps in head and neck reconstruction: higher risk of free flap failure?

    PubMed

    Reiter, M; Harréus, U; Kisser, U; Betz, C S; Baumeister, Ph

    2017-01-01

    Thrombosis of the pedicle is central to free flap failure, and early revision of a compromised flap is the key to successfully salvage a flap. Therefore, the majority of free flaps in reconstructive head and neck surgery are used with the ability to visually examine the flap. Sometimes, due to intra-operative circumstances, it is necessary to use a flap that cannot be monitored externally. These flaps are called buried flaps and have the reputation of being put at risk. The current literature provides only limited data to support or disprove this position. A single institution retrospective review of patient charts between 2007 and 2015 was performed. Flap monitoring was carried out with hand-held Doppler of the pedicle hourly for the first 72 h in all cases. Additional duplex ultrasound was performed in the majority of buried flaps. A total of 437 flaps were included into the study. 37 flaps (7.8 %) were identified to fulfill the criteria of a buried free flap. In total, four patients had complications, three of which required operative reexploration. All interventions were successful, resulting in no flap loss in our series. An accurate operation technique combined with meticulous monitoring protocols supported by duplex ultrasound can result in satisfactory outcome of buried flaps. No enhanced risk of flap loss of buried flaps was found in our cohort.

  10. The evolution of perforator flap breast reconstruction: twenty years after the first DIEP flap.

    PubMed

    Healy, Claragh; Allen, Robert J

    2014-02-01

    It is over 20 years since the inaugural deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap breast reconstruction. We review the type of flap utilized and indications in 2,850 microvascular breast reconstruction over the subsequent 20 years in the senior author's practice (Robert J. Allen). Data were extracted from a personal logbook of all microsurgical free flap breast reconstructions performed between August 1992 and August 2012. Indication for surgery; mastectomy pattern in primary reconstruction; flap type, whether unilateral or bilateral; recipient vessels; and adjunctive procedures were recorded. The DIEP was the most commonly performed flap (66%), followed by the superior gluteal artery perforator flap (12%), superficial inferior epigastric artery perforator flap (9%), inferior gluteal artery perforator flap (6%), profunda artery perforator flap (3%), and transverse upper gracilis flap (3%). Primary reconstruction accounted for 1,430 flaps (50%), secondary 992 (35%), and tertiary 425 (15%). As simultaneous bilateral reconstructions, 59% flaps were performed. With each flap, there typically ensues a period of enthusiasm which translated into surge in flap numbers. However, each flap has its own nuances and characteristics that influence patient and physician choice. Of note, each newly introduced flap, either buttock or thigh, results in a sharp decline in its predecessor. In this practice, the DIEP flap has remained the first choice in autologous breast reconstruction. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. The rat saphenous flap: a fasciocutaneous free flap model without panniculus carnosus.

    PubMed

    Mutaf, M; Tasaki, Y; Tanaka, K; Fujii, T

    1995-10-01

    The rat saphenous flap is described as a new experimental model for free flap studies. This is a fasciocutaneous free flap based on the saphenofemoral vascular pedicle. The flap may include the entire medial aspect of the lower leg between the knee and ankle. Thirty flaps were harvested from 15 inbred rats. Each flap was transferred to the anterior neck of a recipient rat of the same inbred strain so that 15 flaps were vascularized free flaps using the standard end-to-end microvascular technique and the other 15 flaps were nonvascularized free grafts. All but two (technical failure) of the vascularized flaps showed complete survival, whereas all nonvascularized flaps completely necrosed 2 weeks after transfer. It was concluded that the rat saphenous flap has several advantages such as a long and consistent vascular pedicle, ease of harvest, and an all-or-none survival pattern. Furthermore, as a unique feature of this flap, histological analysis revealed that the rat saphenous flap is composed of the skin and underlying fascia without panniculus carnosus. We therefore suggest that the rat saphenous flap is the first true fasciocutaneous free flap model in the rat. In this paper, in addition to illustrating the anatomy of the saphenous vessels and describing a new fasciocutaneous free flap model based on these vessels, we have documented some anatomical details of the rat leg that have never been described in the literature related to the rat anatomy.

  12. The Role of Muscle Flaps for Salvage of Failed Perforator Free Flaps

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the most heroic efforts, sometimes free flaps fail. Perforator free flaps are not invincible and can suffer the same fate. The real challenge is how to decide what is the next best choice for achieving the desired outcome. Methods: Over the past decade, 298 free perforator flaps were used in our institution. Total failure occurred in 16 patients, and partial failure requiring a second free flap occurred in an additional 6 patients for a true success rate of 93%. All failures had some form of secondary vascularized tissue transfer, which included the use of muscle flaps in 9 (41%) different patients. Results: Initial flap salvage after a failed perforator free flap was attempted with 12 perforator and 5 muscle free flaps as well as 1 perforator and 2 muscle local flaps. These were not all successful, with loss of 3 muscle free flaps and 3 perforator flaps. Tertiary free flap coverage was successful in 3 cases using 2 muscle flaps and 1 perforator free flap. Local fasciocutaneous flaps or primary wound closure was used in the remaining individuals. Conclusions: Microsurgical tissue transfers can be the most rewarding and at the same time the most challenging reconstructive endeavor. Persistence in achieving the desired outcome can require multiple steps. Perforator flaps are an important asset to obtain this goal. However, muscle flaps can still be a useful alternative, and the message is that they should not be overlooked as sometimes a viable option. PMID:26893989

  13. Outcomes and Cost Analysis in High-Risk Patients Undergoing Simultaneous Free Flap Breast Reconstruction and Gynecologic Procedures.

    PubMed

    Del Corral, Gabriel A; Wes, Ari M; Fischer, John P; Serletti, Joseph M; Wu, Liza C

    2015-11-01

    For patients with BRCA mutations, a simultaneous procedure that combines risk-reducing operation of the ovaries with mastectomy and breast reconstruction is an attractive option. The purpose of this study was to assess the outcomes and associated cost of performing simultaneous mastectomy, free flap breast reconstruction (FFR), and gynecologic procedure. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients who underwent bilateral FFR from 2005 to 2012. Four hundred twenty-two patients were identified who underwent bilateral breast reconstruction without a simultaneous gynecologic procedure. Forty-two patients were identified who underwent simultaneous FFR and gynecologic procedure. Clinical outcomes, medical and surgical complications, and hospital costs were analyzed and compared between the 2 groups. A total of 928 free flaps were performed on 464 patients. Forty-two patients had a simultaneous gynecologic procedure at the time of breast reconstruction. Twenty-three (54.8%) patients within the study group underwent simultaneous bilateral salpingo oophorectomy (BSO), whereas the other 19 (45.2%) underwent both total abdominal hysterectomy and BSO. Eighty-four free flaps were performed in this cohort (n = 48 muscle-sparing transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous, n = 28 deep inferior epigastric perforator, n = 4 superficial inferior epigastric perforator, n = 4 transverse upper gracilis). Mean operative time was 573 minutes. Mean hospitalization was 5.3 days. Postoperatively, 4 patients experienced an anastomotic thrombosis; 2 patients had an arterial thrombosis and 2 patients had a venous thrombosis. There were 2 flap failures, 2 patients with mastectomy skin flap necrosis, 11 patients who developed breast wound healing complications, and 6 patients who developed abdominal wound healing complications. Surgical and medical complication rates did not differ significantly between those who had simultaneous procedures, and those who did not. There was a

  14. [Significance of abdominal wall CT-angiography in planning DIEA perforator flaps, TRAM flaps and SIEA flaps].

    PubMed

    Fansa, H; Schirmer, S; Frerichs, O; Gehl, H B

    2011-04-01

    Muscle sparing TRAM flaps and DIEA perforator flaps are standard procedures for breast reconstruction. Recently CT-angiography has been established to evaluate perforator vessels pre-operatively. CT-angiography was introduced to our department in July 2009. In a retrospective analysis data of the last 20 patients (altogether 22 flaps) before CT-angiography introduction and the following 20 (also 22 flaps) patients after introduction of CT-angiography were analysed with regard to the ratio of TRAM to DIEP flaps, and the time required to raise the flaps. The same surgeon raised all flaps. As different surgeons performed dissection of the recipient site, anastomoses, and insertion of flaps, and patients received primary (with sentinel or complete lymphadenctomy) or secondary reconstructions, only the time required harvesting the flap was compared. Thus other influences on raising the flap were eliminated. DIEP flaps were harvested with one single perforator. If perfusion or was considered not to be safe via one single perforator a muscle sparing TRAM flap (ms2) was raised. Angiography was performed using a 64-slice multi-detector CT scanner. CT-angiography did not lead to an increased rate of DIEP flaps in relation to ms2-TRAM flaps. Harvesting time of all flap types with CT-angiography on average was 121 min, without CT-angiography 135 min. This was not significantly different. However, separate analysis of DIEP flaps and ms2-TRAM flaps revealed a significant advantage of CT-angiography based harvesting of DIEP flaps of 26 min: with CT-angiography 101 min vs. 127 min without CT-angiography (p<0.028). There were no significant differences for ms2-TRAM flaps. All scans showed course and branching, diameter and size of the inferior epigastric artery. If evident the superficial inferior epigastric artery (SIEA) was marked. Dosage was 292 mGy-606 mGy×cm dependent on body weight. CTDI was 6.8-14.7 mGy. CT-angiography is a reproducible and observer independent procedure

  15. Experience in Reconstruction for Small Digital Defects With Free Flaps.

    PubMed

    Hung, Min-Hsiang; Huang, Kuo-Feng; Chiu, Haw-Yen; Chao, Wai-Nang

    2016-03-01

    Traumatic injuries to the digits resulting in soft tissue or bone loss require reconstruction. Traditionally, local flaps, such as homodigital flaps, heterodigital flaps, pedicled flaps, or distant flaps, are used for digital resurfacing. However, free tissue transfers can be used in selected patients. In this study, we present the use of different free flaps including groin skin flaps, groin osteocutaneous flaps, groin chimeric flaps, second dorsal metacarpal artery flaps, and partial toe flaps for digital reconstruction. A total of 19 digits were treated with 16 free flaps in our hospital. Of the flaps used, 5 were free groin skin flaps, 4 were free partial toe flaps, 3 were free groin chimeric flaps, 2 were free groin osteocutaneous flaps, and 2 were free second dorsal metacarpal artery flaps. The average flap size was 4.7 × 2.0 cm (range, 1.5 × 1 to 5 × 4 cm), and the average operative time was 6.0 hours (range, 4-9 hours). All flaps survived without partial or total necrosis. In conclusion, the free flap is a reliable and safe alternative for digital reconstruction. Moreover, the free groin flap provides not only a chimeric pattern for multiple fingers coverage but also an osteocutaneous pattern for thumb lengthening. The free second dorsal metacarpal artery flap provides a tenocutaneous pattern for tendon reconstruction and soft tissue coverage simultaneously, and the free partial toe flap is an excellent alternative for pulp reconstruction in terms of aesthetic appearance and functional outcome.

  16. Treatment of degloving injury involving multiple fingers with combined abdominal superficial fascial flap, dorsalis pedis flap, dorsal toe flap, and toe-web flap.

    PubMed

    Han, Fengshan; Wang, Guangnan; Li, Gaoshan; Ping, Juan; Mao, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to summarize the treatment of degloving injury involving multiple fingers using combined abdominal superficial fascial flap, dorsalis pedis flap, dorsal toe flap, and toe-web flap. Each degloved finger was debrided under microscopic guidance and embedded in the superficial layer of the abdominal fascia. The abdominal skin was sutured to the skin on the back and side of the hand to promote circumferential healing. After removal, the only remaining injured region was on the flexor surface, and this was repaired by multiple dorsal toe flaps, toe-web flaps, and dorsalis pedis flaps to provide blood vessels and sensory nerves. All fingers had proper flap thickness 3-6 months after surgery, and required only lateral Z-plasty modification with web deepening and widening to narrow the fingers and extend their relative length. We completed flap-graft and finger narrowing for 25 fingers in eight patients. Abdominal skin flaps and dorsal toe flaps were grafted, and resulted in both firmness and softness, providing finger flexibility. The dorsal toe flap provided good blood circulation and sensory nerves, and was used to cover the finger-flexor surface to regain sensation and stability when holding objects. During the 1-8 years of follow-up, sensation on the finger-flexor side recovered to the S3-4 level, and patient satisfaction based on the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire was 4-5. Flap ulcers or bone/tendon necrosis were not observed. Treatment of degloving injury involving multiple fingers with combined abdominal superficial fascial flap, dorsalis pedis flap, dorsal toe flap, and toe-web flap was effective and reliable.

  17. PIV Measurements on a Blowing Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    PIV measurements of the flow in the region of a flap side edge are presented for several blowing flap configurations. The test model is a NACA 63(sub 2)-215 Hicks Mod-B main-element airfoil with a half-span Fowler flap. Air is blown from small slots located along the flap side edge on either the top, bottom or side surfaces. The test set up is described and flow measurements for a baseline and three blowing flap configurations are presented. The effects that the flap tip jets have on the structure of the flap side edge flow are discussed for each of the flap configurations tested. The results indicate that blowing air from a slot located along the top surface of the flap greatly weakened the top vortex system and pushed it further off the top surface. Blowing from the bottom flap surface kept the strong side vortex further outboard while blowing from the side surface only strengthened the vortex system or accelerated the merging of the side vortex to the flap top surface. It is concluded that blowing from the top or bottom surfaces of the flap may lead to a reduction of flap side edge noise.

  18. Free digital artery flap: an ideal flap for large finger defects in situations where local flaps are precluded.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chin-Ho; Teoh, Lam-Chuan; Lee, Jonathan Y-L; Yam, Andrew K-T; Khoo, David B-A; Yong, Fok-Chuan

    2008-03-01

    The heterodigital arterialized flap is increasingly accepted as a flap of choice for reconstruction of large finger wounds. However, in situations where the adjacent fingers sustained concomitant injuries, the use of this flap as a local flap is precluded. This paper describes our experience with the free digital artery flap as an evolution of the heterodigital arterialized flap. Four patients with large finger wounds were reconstructed with free digital artery flap. Our indications for digital artery free flap were concomitant injuries to adjacent fingers that precluded their use as donor sites. The arterial supply of the flap was from the digital artery and the venous drainage was from the dominant dorsal vein of the finger. The flap was harvested from the ulnar side of the finger. The digital nerve was left in situ to minimize donor morbidity. The donor site was covered with a full-thickness skin graft and secured with bolster dressings. Early intensive mobilization was implemented for all patients. All flaps survived. No venous congestion was noted and primary healing was achieved in all flaps. In addition to providing well-vascularized tissue for coverage of vital structures, the digital artery was also used as a flow-through flap for finger revascularization in one patient. Donor-site morbidity was minimal, with all fingers retaining protective pulp sensation and the distal and proximal interphalangeal joints retaining full ranges of motion. In conclusion, the free digital artery flap is a versatile flap that is ideal for coverage of large-sized finger defects in situations where local flaps are unavailable. Donor-site morbidity can be minimized by preservation of the digital nerve, firmly securing the skin graft with bolster dressings, and early mobilization of the donor finger.

  19. Experimental Study of Wake / Flap Interaction Noise and the Reduction of Flap Side Edge Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Stead, Daniel J.; Plassman, Gerald E.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the interaction of a wake with a half-span flap on radiated noise are examined. The incident wake is generated by bars of various widths and lengths or by a simplified landing gear model. Single microphone and phased array measurements are used to isolate the effects of the wake interaction on the noise radiating from the flap side edge and flap cove regions. The effects on noise of the wake generator's geometry and relative placement with respect to the flap are assessed. Placement of the wake generators upstream of the flap side edge is shown to lead to the reduction of flap side edge noise by introducing a velocity deficit and likely altering the instabilities in the flap side edge vortex system. Significant reduction in flap side edge noise is achieved with a bar positioned directly upstream of the flap side edge. The noise reduction benefit is seen to improve with increased bar width, length and proximity to the flap edge. Positioning of the landing gear model upstream of the flap side edge also leads to decreased flap side edge noise. In addition, flap cove noise levels are significantly lower than when the landing gear is positioned upstream of the flap mid-span. The impact of the local flow velocity on the noise radiating directly from the landing gear is discussed. The effects of the landing gear side-braces on flap side edge, flap cove and landing gear noise are shown.

  20. Comparison of outcomes of pressure sore reconstructions among perforator flaps, perforator-based rotation fasciocutaneous flaps, and musculocutaneous flaps.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Pao-Jen; Chew, Khong-Yik; Kuo, Yur-Ren; Lin, Pao-Yuan

    2014-10-01

    Pressure sore reconstruction remains a significant challenge for plastic surgeons due to its high postoperative complication and recurrence rates. Free-style perforator flap, fasciocutaeous flap, and musculocutaneous flap are the most common options in pressure sore reconstructions. Our study compared the postoperative complications among these three flaps at Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. From 2003 to 2012, 99 patients (54 men and 45 women) with grade III or IV pressure sores received regional flap reconstruction, consisting of three cohorts: group A, 35 free-style perforator-based flaps; group B, 37 gluteal rotation fasciocutaneous flaps; and group C, 27 musculocutaneous or muscle combined with fasciocutaneous flap. Wound complications such as wound infection, dehiscence, seroma formation of the donor site, partial or complete flap loss, and recurrence were reviewed. The mean follow-up period for group A was 24.2 months, 20.8 months in group B, and 19.0 months for group C. The overall complication rate was 22.9%, 32.4%, and 22.2% in groups A, B, and C, respectively. The flap necrosis rate was 11.4%, 13.5%, and 0% in groups A, B, and C, respectively. There was no statistical significance regarding complication rate and flap necrosis rate among different groups. In our study, the differences of complication rates and flap necrosis rate between these groups were not statistically significant. Further investigations should be conducted. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps. Wing flaps, their operating mechanisms, and their supporting structures must be designed for critical...

  2. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps. Wing flaps, their operating mechanisms, and their supporting structures must be designed for critical...

  3. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps. Wing flaps, their operating mechanisms, and their supporting structures must be designed for critical...

  4. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps. Wing flaps, their operating mechanisms, and their supporting structures must be designed for critical...

  5. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps. Wing flaps, their operating mechanisms, and their supporting structures must be designed for critical...

  6. Traumatic Forefoot Reconstructions With Free Perforator Flaps.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yue-Liang; He, Xiao-Qing; Wang, Yi; Lv, Qian; Fan, Xin-Yv; Xu, Yong-Qing

    2015-01-01

    The forefoot is critical to normal walking; thus, any reconstruction of forefoot defects, including the soft tissues, must be carefully done. The free perforator flap, with its physiologic circulation, lower donor site morbidity, and minimal thickness is the most popular technique in plastic and microsurgery, and is theoretically the most suitable for such forefoot reconstruction. However, these flaps are generally recognized as more difficult and time-consuming to create than other flaps. In 41 patients with traumatic forefoot defects, we reconstructed the forefoot integument using 5 types of free perforator flaps. The overall functional and cosmetic outcomes were excellent. Three flaps required repeat exploration; one survived. The most common complications were insufficient perfusion and the need for second debulking. The key to our success was thoroughly debriding devitalized bone and soft tissue before attaching the flap. Forefoot reconstruction with a free perforator flap provides better function, better cosmesis, better weightbearing, and better gait than the other flaps we have used.

  7. [Development and current status of perforator flaps].

    PubMed

    Xu, Dachuan; Zhang, Shimin; Tang, Maolin; Ouyang, Jun

    2011-09-01

    To provide a comprehensive review for development and existing problems of the perforator flaps. The related home and abroad literature concerning perforator flaps was extensively reviewed. The perforator flaps are defined as the axial flaps nourished solely by small cutaneous perforating vessels (perforating arteries and veins), which are exclusively composed of skin and subcutaneous fat. The perforator flaps have the advantages as follows: less injury at donor site, less damage to the contour of the donor site, good reconstruction and appearance of the recipient site flexible design, and short time of postoperative recovery, which have been widely used in reconstructive surgery. The perforator flaps are the new development of the microsurgery, which usher an era of small axial flaps; However, the controversies of the definition, vascular classification, the nomenclature, and the clinical application of the perforator flaps still exist, which are therefore the hot spot for future study.

  8. Effects of irradiation of skin flaps

    SciTech Connect

    Sumi, Y.; Ueda, M.; Oka, T.; Torii, S.

    1984-07-01

    The reaction of skin flaps to irradiation and the optimum postoperative time for irradiation was studied in the rat. Flaps showed different reactions depending on the time of irradiation. There was a correlation between the radiosensitivity and the vascularity of the flap. Those flaps in the marginal hypovascular stage of revascularization showed reactions similar to normal skin. However, severe adverse reactions were observed in the marginal hypervascular stage.

  9. Septic necrosis of the midline wound in postoperative peritonitis. Successful management by debridement, myocutaneous advancement, and primary skin closure.

    PubMed Central

    Lévy, E; Palmer, D L; Frileux, P; Hannoun, L; Nordlinger, B; Tiret, E; Honiger, J; Parc, R

    1988-01-01

    Wound management following laparotomy for postoperative peritonitis and varying degrees of parietal necrosis remains a challenging and controversial problem. Because maintained peritoneal integrity and primary wound closure offer the best opportunity for survival, an original technique involving bilateral incisions to relax skin and rectus fascia is proposed. This technique permits medial myocutaneous advancement and primary tension-free skin closure of midline laparotomy incisions. Sixty-nine patients with severe postoperative peritonitis were treated according from 1980 through 1985. Nine of these patients died of advanced multiple organ failure soon after referral, and eight more died after prolonged treatment. Fourteen patients had one or more reoperations for complications. Only nine wound failures resulted, including five eviscerations and four wound infections followed by progressive dehiscence. The bilateral relaxing incisions healed secondarily without complication. Survivors developed midline wound hernia; ten of the 52 surviving patients have had these repaired. This method of primary closure is safe when performed in conjunction with rigorous surgical care of intraperitoneal infection and may enhance survival. We recommend the technique to surgeons who treat severe postoperative peritonitis and septic necrosis of midline laparotomy wounds. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. Fig. 7. Figs. 8A and B. Fig. 9. PMID:3281613

  10. Sartorius muscle "twist" rotation flap: an answer to flap necrosis.

    PubMed

    Khalil, I M; Sudarsky, L

    1987-07-01

    Coverage of the femoral vessels with viable muscle flap after vascular reconstruction in the presence of infection is essential to prevent serious complications. Necrosis of the muscle flap as a result of interruption of its vascular pedicle can lead to complications that jeopardize the patient's life and limb. Our simple technique prevents such complications by preserving the muscle blood supply. We have used this method routinely during the past 6 years in patients with groin sepsis and did not encounter any case of muscle necrosis.

  11. New model of flap-gliding flight.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Gottfried

    2015-07-21

    A new modelling approach is presented for describing flap-gliding flight in birds and the associated mechanical energy cost of travelling. The new approach is based on the difference in the drag characteristics between flapping and non-flapping due to the drag increase caused by flapping. Thus, the possibility of a gliding flight phase, as it exists in flap-gliding flight, yields a performance advantage resulting from the decrease in the drag when compared with continuous flapping flight. Introducing an appropriate non-dimensionalization for the mathematical relations describing flap-gliding flight, results and findings of generally valid nature are derived. It is shown that there is an energy saving of flap-gliding flight in the entire speed range compared to continuous flapping flight. The energy saving reaches the highest level in the lower speed region. The travelling speed of flap-gliding flight is composed of the weighted average of the differing speeds in the flapping and gliding phases. Furthermore, the maximum range performance achievable with flap-gliding flight and the associated optimal travelling speed are determined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flap interconnection. 23.701 Section 23.701 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... Systems § 23.701 Flap interconnection. (a) The main wing flaps and related movable surfaces as a...

  13. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.701 Flap interconnection. (a) The main wing flaps and related movable surfaces as a system... independent of the flap drive system; or by an approved equivalent means; or (2) Be designed so that...

  14. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.701 Flap interconnection. (a) The main wing flaps and related movable surfaces as a system... independent of the flap drive system; or by an approved equivalent means; or (2) Be designed so that...

  15. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.701 Flap interconnection. (a) The main wing flaps and related movable surfaces as a system... independent of the flap drive system; or by an approved equivalent means; or (2) Be designed so that...

  16. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.701 Flap interconnection. (a) The main wing flaps and related movable surfaces as a system... independent of the flap drive system; or by an approved equivalent means; or (2) Be designed so that...

  17. O to Z flaps in facial reconstructions*

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Sara Alcántara; Cejudo, Manuel Perea; Mendonça, Francisco Manuel Ildefonso; Martínez, Francisco M. Camacho

    2015-01-01

    Local flaps are the standard procedure to reconstruct facial defects. As it occurs in any surgical procedure, the incision should be planned so that scars are located in the minimum skin tension lines. We report two cases of O to Z flaps in the supra and infraciliary regions. One of them is a hatchet flap. PMID:25831001

  18. The Sternohyoid Flap for Facial Reanimation.

    PubMed

    Alam, Daniel S

    2016-02-01

    This article discusses the use of the sternohyoid muscle for facial reanimation. The report outlines the rationale for use, the technical aspects of flap harvest, and early clinical outcomes. The utility of the flap and its comparative attributes relative to the gracilis flap are discussed.

  19. Freestyle groin flaps: the real axial flap design and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Chao, Wai-Nang; Tsai, Chin-Feng; Wang, Po-Hui; Chan, Khee-Siang; Lee, Yuan-Ti; Lin, Ding-Bang; Chen, Chun-Chieh; Chen, Shiuan-Chih

    2015-05-01

    The groin flap represents a milestone in the history of flap development, since it was the first successful free cutaneous flap. Once widely used, it is currently less popular owing to the variations in vascular anatomy and the small, short pedicle. To enhance the clinical applications of the groin flap, its merits need to be promoted and its faults improved, including making some useful innovations. From February 2010 to February 2014, we successfully treated 35 patients with soft tissue defects in the extremities (28 patients), buttock (1 patient), and head (6 patients) using new designs in groin flaps: axial free (34 patients) or pedicle (1 patient) groin flaps. All types of axial groin flaps survived successfully in the 2 to 38 months' (mean, 15.6 months) follow-up. The branches of the superficial circumflex iliac artery used for the axial flap design were 2 to 4 (mean, 3.09). The flap size ranged from 1×1.5 cm to 11×30 cm. No significant complications developed in any of the patients, with the exception of 2 mildly bulky flaps. This axial design of freestyle groin flaps not only preserves the earlier merits of the groin flap but also creates many new advantages: (1) reliability is greater, (2) ability to tailor the dimensions and flap paddles to the lesions, (3) options available to "lengthen" flap pedicles, and (4) local anesthesia usable with free flaps for reconstruction.

  20. Microvascular free flaps in head and neck surgery: complications and outcome of 1000 flaps.

    PubMed

    Pohlenz, P; Klatt, J; Schön, G; Blessmann, M; Li, L; Schmelzle, R

    2012-06-01

    This study analyzed the surgical outcome and complications of 1000 microvascular free flaps performed at the authors' institution in Germany, between 1987 and 2010. 972 patients underwent reconstruction with 1000 flaps: 28% latissimus dorsi flaps, 27% radial forearm flaps, 20% iliac crest flaps, 12% fibula flaps, 6% jejunal flaps, 2% anterolateral thigh flaps, and 5% other flaps. 130 failures (7.6%) were encountered, including 58 complete flap failures (44.6%) and 72 partial free-flap failures (55.4%). This study confirms that free flaps are extremely reliable in achieving successful reconstruction of the head and neck, but it is essential that complications be recognized and addressed early in their course to prevent or minimize devastating consequences. Owing to the large number of possible errors in flap transplantation, microsurgeons should always check everything for themselves. The on-duty doctors and nursing staff should not be trusted blindly. Venous thrombosis and cervical haematoma are the most common complications at the recipient site and are mainly responsible for flap failure, while complications occurring at the donor site may result from dehiscence and graft necrosis. When a compromised flap is identified, surgical re-exploration should not be deferred.

  1. Efficient flapping flight of pterosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strang, Karl Axel

    In the late eighteenth century, humans discovered the first pterosaur fossil remains and have been fascinated by their existence ever since. Pterosaurs exploited their membrane wings in a sophisticated manner for flight control and propulsion, and were likely the most efficient and effective flyers ever to inhabit our planet. The flapping gait is a complex combination of motions that sustains and propels an animal in the air. Because pterosaurs were so large with wingspans up to eleven meters, if they could have sustained flapping flight, they would have had to achieve high propulsive efficiencies. Identifying the wing motions that contribute the most to propulsive efficiency is key to understanding pterosaur flight, and therefore to shedding light on flapping flight in general and the design of efficient ornithopters. This study is based on published results for a very well-preserved specimen of Coloborhynchus robustus, for which the joints are well-known and thoroughly described in the literature. Simplifying assumptions are made to estimate the characteristics that can not be inferred directly from the fossil remains. For a given animal, maximizing efficiency is equivalent to minimizing power at a given thrust and speed. We therefore aim at finding the flapping gait, that is the joint motions, that minimize the required flapping power. The power is computed from the aerodynamic forces created during a given wing motion. We develop an unsteady three-dimensional code based on the vortex-lattice method, which correlates well with published results for unsteady motions of rectangular wings. In the aerodynamic model, the rigid pterosaur wing is defined by the position of the bones. In the aeroelastic model, we add the flexibility of the bones and of the wing membrane. The nonlinear structural behavior of the membrane is reduced to a linear modal decomposition, assuming small deflections about the reference wing geometry. The reference wing geometry is computed for

  2. Schooling of flapping wings: Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoud, Hassan; Becker, Alexander; Ristroph, Leif; Shelley, Michael

    2014-11-01

    We examine the locomotion of an infinite array of wings that heave vertically with a prescribed sinusoidal motion and are free to translate in the horizontal direction. To do this, we simulate the motion of a freely translating flapping airfoil in a domain with periodic horizontal boundary conditions. These simulations indicate that the wings can ``take advantage'' of their collectively generated wake flows. In agreement with our experiments in a rotational geometry, we find ranges of flapping frequency over which there are multiple stable states of locomotion, with one of these swimming states having both higher speeds and efficiencies than an isolated flapping and locomoting wing. A simple mathematical model, which emphasizes the importance of history dependence in vortical flows, explains this multi-stability. These results may be important to understanding the role of hydrodynamic interactions in fish schooling and bird flocking.

  3. USE of arterialized saphenous vein venous flow-through flaps as a temporizing measure for hand salvage in contaminated wounds presenting with limb ischemia: A case series.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Abele, Julian; Safa, Bauback; Buntic, Rudolf F; Islur, Avinash

    2017-07-28

    Vascular injuries resulting in limb ischemia are traditionally treated acutely with autologous or prosthetic bypass grafts. Traumatic contaminated injuries with soft tissue and vascular segmental loss are challenging as prosthetic bypasses are at risk of erosion, infection, and occlusion; and autologous bypasses are at risk of desiccation, blow-out, infection, and clotting. We propose a novel approach to these injuries by using arterialized saphenous vein venous flow-through free flaps (S-VFTF) as an autologous bypass, and present the results of its application in a series of cases. Spanning 2008 to 2015, four patients presenting with large contaminated crush/avulsion wounds with vascular injury underwent hand revascularization with S-VFTF, allowing the contaminated wounds to be serially debrided. Definitive soft tissue reconstruction was performed once the wound was considered clean. The S-VFTF skin paddle was de-epithelialized and the soft tissue defect covered with a free latissimus dorsi flap or a rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap. All ischemic limbs were successfully reperfused and there were no take backs for perfusion issues. All S-VFTF remained patent at discharge and final follow-up. No partial or complete finger/hand amputations were required. All definitive coverage free flap survived with no complications. The two-stage reconstruction presented may help reconstructive and vascular surgeons consider alternatives to traditional vascular reconstruction methods. This technique avoids an exposed vascular graft in an extensively contaminated open wound. It allows the surgeon to perform thorough and sufficient debridement of the wound, preventing definitive reconstruction in a not yet declared zone of injury. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Experience with 100 muscle flaps.

    PubMed

    Irons, G B; Arnold, P G; Masson, J K; Woods, J E

    1980-01-01

    One hundred muscule flap transfers performed at the Mayo Clinic from 1975 to 1978 are reviewed and assessed as to the cause and location of the defects, muscles used, complications, and results. We found the muscle flaps very versatile for covering for a wide variety of difficult soft tissue and bony defects. The complication rate was very low, considering the severity and chronic nature of the problem. Ninety-two percent of patients showed healing after surgery, and 82% remained healed at the time of this follow-up survey.

  5. Scrotal reconstruction with modified pudendal thigh flaps.

    PubMed

    Mopuri, Nabil; O'Connor, Edmund Fitzgerald; Iwuagwu, Fortune C

    2016-02-01

    Scrotal skin loss can occur following trauma, Fournier's gangrene, post tumour excision, burns, etc. There are many techniques described in the literature including residual scrotal skin mobilization, skin grafts, pedicled and free flaps. The management is complex and challenging shown by the multiplicity of flaps and techniques described in the literature. We used a modified pudendal thigh flap to reconstruct scrotal defects in five patients. This study describes the vascularity of the flap, technique of elevation and the inset of the flap. The elevation and particularly the insetting make it different from other flaps raised on this vascular network for scrotal reconstruction. This pedicled flap is robust, reliable, resilient and produces a neo-scrotum that looks natural in appearance, offers good-quality skin cover and cushion to the testes as well as protective sensation.

  6. The island thoracoacromial artery muscle perforator flap.

    PubMed

    Hallock, Geoffrey G

    2011-02-01

    Descriptions of muscle perforator flaps incorporating the same skin territory of almost all known musculocutaneous flaps reflect their versatility. The pectoralis major musculocutaneous flap is a proven "workhorse" flap, especially for head and neck reconstruction. Yet, the corresponding thoracoacromial artery muscle perforator flap has been relatively overlooked, with few clinical experiences reported, presumably because of the highly variable and diminutive perforators emanating from this source vessel. However, in certain circumstances, this can be another alternative as a local muscle perforator flap for the transfer of chest skin to adjacent defects. Two clinical examples using the island thoracoacromial artery perforator flap prove that this can sometimes be a viable option also for head and neck reconstruction.

  7. Vertical trapezius musculocutaneous flap: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Othon N; Chrisostomidis, Chrisostomos I; Georgiou, Panagis N; Frangoulis, Marios B; Zapantis-Fragos, Menelaos K; Champsas, Grigorios G

    2005-01-01

    From 1986 to 2001, 17 patients (aged 26-77 years) were treated using the vertical trapezius musculocutaneous flap. A two-stage procedure was used in 7 and a single-stage island flap in 10. The donor site was closed directly in all patients. Mean length of hospital stay was 16 days (range 12-25). There was no operative mortality. Complications were one partial flap necrosis and two seromas of the donor site, complicated by infection. With a minimum follow-up of more than two years, our study confirms the usefulness of the vertical trapezius musculocutaneous flap in head and neck reconstructive surgery. It is a reliable, thin flap of uniform thickness, which carries hairless skin. The length and thickness of its pedicle allows excellent mobility. The main disadvantage of the flap is the complete sacrifice of the muscle necessary for total mobilisation of the flap, and the intraoperative repositioning of the patient.

  8. [Functional hemitongue reconstruction with free forearm flap].

    PubMed

    Liao, Gui-Qing; Su, Yu-Xiong; Liu, Hai-Chao; Li, Jin; Fahmha, Numan; Ou, De-Ming; Wang, Qin

    2008-07-01

    To investigate the clinical application of free forearm flap in the functional hemitongue reconstruction. From July 2002 to November 2006, 40 patients with tongue cancer underwent hemiglossectomy and primary hemitongue reconstruction with free forearm flaps. In some cases, the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerves of the flaps were anastomosed with the lingual nerve to restore the flap sensation. All patients recovered uneventfully after surgery with no morbidity in the donor site. All free flaps survived. The average follow-up period was 2 years and 6 months. The aesthetic and functional results were both satisfactory. The swallowing and speech function were almost normal. The flap sensation was partially restored. Good functional hemitongue reconstruction can be achieved with free forearm flaps.

  9. The Simplified Posterior Interosseous Flap.

    PubMed

    Cavadas, Pedro C; Thione, Alessandro; Rubí, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    Several technical modifications have been described to avoid complications and simplify dissection. The authors describe some technical tips that make posterior interosseous flap dissection safer and more straightforward. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Force Generation by Flapping Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, P. R.; Donnelly, M.

    1996-11-01

    Aquatic animals like fish use flapping caudal fins to produce axial and cross-stream forces. During WW2, German scientists had built and tested an underwater vehicle powered by similar flapping foils. We have examined the forces produced by a pair of flapping foils. We have examined the forced produced by a pair of flapping foils attached to the tail end of a small axisymmetric cylinder. The foils operate in-phase (called waving), or in anti-phase (called clapping). In a low-speed water tunnel, we have undertaken time-dependent measurements of axial and cross-stream forces and moments that are exerted by the vortex shedding process over the entire body. Phase-matched LDV measurements of vorticity-velocity vectors, as well as limited flow visualization of the periodic vortex shedding process have also been carried out. The direction of the induced velocity within a pair of shed vortices determines the nature of the forces produced, viz., thrust or drag or cross-stream forces. The clapping mode produces a widely dispersed symmetric array of vortices which results in axial forces only (thrust and rag). On the other hand, the vortex array is staggered in the waving mode and cross-stream (maneuvering) forces are then generated.

  11. The "seagull" flap for syndactyly.

    PubMed

    Smith, P J; Harrison, S H

    1982-07-01

    A technique is described for the treatment of post-burn syndactyly using a seagull shaped flap to produce a realistic commissure that does not subsequently advance distally. It can release volar digital contractures at the metacarpo-phalangeal level and import skin with tactile "adherence" into the distal palmar area.

  12. Sternocleidomastoid Muscle Flap after Parotidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Nofal, Ahmad Abdel-Fattah; Mohamed, Morsi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Most patients after either superficial or total parotidectomy develop facial deformity and Frey syndrome, which leads to a significant degree of patient dissatisfaction. Objective Assess the functional outcome and esthetic results of the superiorly based sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) flap after superficial or total parotidectomy. Methods A prospective cohort study for 11 patients subjected to parotidectomy using a partial-thickness superiorly based SCM flap. The functional outcome (Frey syndrome, facial nerve involvement, and ear lobule sensation) and the esthetic results were evaluated subjectively and objectively. Results Facial nerve palsy occurred in 5 cases (45%), and all of them recovered completely within 6 months. The Minor starch iodine test was positive in 3 patients (27%), although only 1 (9%) subjectively complained of gustatory sweating. The designed visual analog score completed by the patients themselves ranged from 0 to 3 with a mean of 1.55 ± 0.93; the scores from the blinded evaluators ranged from 1 to 3 with a mean 1.64 ± 0.67. Conclusion The partial-thickness superiorly based SCM flap offers a reasonable cosmetic option for reconstruction following either superficial or total parotidectomy by improving the facial deformity. The flap also lowers the incidence of Frey syndrome objectively and subjectively with no reported hazard of the spinal accessory nerve. PMID:26491478

  13. Sternocleidomastoid Muscle Flap after Parotidectomy.

    PubMed

    Nofal, Ahmad Abdel-Fattah; Mohamed, Morsi

    2015-10-01

    Introduction Most patients after either superficial or total parotidectomy develop facial deformity and Frey syndrome, which leads to a significant degree of patient dissatisfaction. Objective Assess the functional outcome and esthetic results of the superiorly based sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) flap after superficial or total parotidectomy. Methods A prospective cohort study for 11 patients subjected to parotidectomy using a partial-thickness superiorly based SCM flap. The functional outcome (Frey syndrome, facial nerve involvement, and ear lobule sensation) and the esthetic results were evaluated subjectively and objectively. Results Facial nerve palsy occurred in 5 cases (45%), and all of them recovered completely within 6 months. The Minor starch iodine test was positive in 3 patients (27%), although only 1 (9%) subjectively complained of gustatory sweating. The designed visual analog score completed by the patients themselves ranged from 0 to 3 with a mean of 1.55 ± 0.93; the scores from the blinded evaluators ranged from 1 to 3 with a mean 1.64 ± 0.67. Conclusion The partial-thickness superiorly based SCM flap offers a reasonable cosmetic option for reconstruction following either superficial or total parotidectomy by improving the facial deformity. The flap also lowers the incidence of Frey syndrome objectively and subjectively with no reported hazard of the spinal accessory nerve.

  14. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Baytinger, V. F. Kurochkina, O. S. Selianinov, K. V.; Baytinger, A. V.; Dzyuman, A. N.

    2015-11-17

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.

  15. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baytinger, V. F.; Kurochkina, O. S.; Selianinov, K. V.; Baytinger, A. V.; Dzyuman, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.

  16. Beyond the nasoseptal flap: outcomes and pearls with secondary flaps in endoscopic endonasal skull base reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mihir R; Taylor, Robert J; Hackman, Trevor G; Germanwala, Anand V; Sasaki-Adams, Deanna; Ewend, Matthew G; Zanation, Adam M

    2014-04-01

    Endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery defects require effective reconstruction. Although the nasoseptal flap (NSF) has become our institution's workhorse for large skull base defects with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks, situations where it is unavailable require secondary flaps. Clinical outcomes, pearls and pitfalls, and an algorithm will be presented for these secondary flaps. Clinical case series. Medical records of all endoscopic endonasal skull base surgeries at a tertiary care academic medical center were reviewed for skull base defect type, reconstruction method, CSF leak rate, and flap necrosis rate. Of 330 flaps for reconstructing endoscopic endonasal skull base defects, secondary flaps were used in 34 cases (10%). These included 16 endoscopic-assisted pericranial flaps, seven tunneled temporoparietal fascia flaps, three inferior turbinate flaps, two middle turbinate flaps, two anterior lateral nasal wall flaps, two palatal flaps, one occipital flap, and one facial artery buccinator flap. There were 19 anterior cranial fossa defects, 10 clival defects, three sellar defects, and one frontal and one lateral orbit/middle fossa defect. Twenty-five of the 34 cases (73.5%) had either prior or postoperative radiation therapy. The most common pathology was sinonasal cancer, with 16 cases (47.1%). The postoperative CSF leak rate was 3.6% due to one middle turbinate flap necrosis. Secondary flaps for skull base reconstruction can be harvested with minimally invasive techniques and demonstrate excellent success rates (97%) that are comparable to that of the NSF (>95%). Multiple flaps for complex skull base defects should be in the armamentarium of comprehensive skull base surgery centers. 4. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. Do rhomboid flaps provide more elongation than Z-plasty flaps? An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Altun, Serdar; Çakır, Fatih; Öztan, Mehmet; Okur, Mehmet İhsan; Bal, Ali

    2017-09-04

    A Z-plasty flap is one of the most widely used geometric relaxation methods to release contracture bands. A rhomboid flap is a lesser used geometric relaxation method than a Z-plasty flap. This study aimed to determine the length and rate of elongation provided by rhomboid and Z-plasty flaps. Bilateral contracture bands were created in the inguinal skins of rats. A rhomboid flap was planned for the right side of the inguinal region, and a single Z-plasty flap was planned for the left side. The length and rate of elongation provided by the two flaps were calculated after completing the procedures and were compared using Student's t-test. Experimental contracture bands disappeared in both the inguinal regions after creating rhomboid and Z-plasty flaps. The mean postoperative elongation of the contracture band was 1.4 ± 0.119 and 2.47 ± 0.281 cm using the rhomboid and Z-plasty flaps, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (p < .001). Z-plasty flaps provide more elongation than rhomboid flaps and also appear to be better options for releasing linear contracture bands. However, rhomboid flaps may be used as alternatives when Z-plasty flaps cannot be used and in regions such as the axilla, genital region, nipple-areola, where their distortion effects should be avoided.

  18. Vasculature of a Medial Femoral Condyle Free Flap in Intact and Osteotomized Flaps.

    PubMed

    Rysz, Maciej; Grabczan, Wojciech; Mazurek, Maciej Jan; Krajewski, Romuald; Grzelecki, Dariusz; Ciszek, Bogdan

    2017-04-01

    A small size and difficulties with shaping a medial femoral condyle corticocancellous bone flap are factors limiting its use. The goal of this study was to evaluate range of vascular supply to a medial femoral condyle corticocancellous bone flap to determine whether harvesting of larger flaps and performing a flap osteotomy would compromise the vasculature of a flap's bone. Twenty-four limbs were dissected and medial femoral condyle corticocancellous bone flaps were harvested with skin paddles. Thirteen of 24 flaps had subperiosteal osteotomies simulating shaping a bone for reconstruction. A pedicle artery was perfused with red latex. Medial femoral condyle corticocancellous bone flap vascularization was evaluated by cutting the bone into 1-cm blocks and assessing the number of Haversian canals filled with red latex. Length of harvested flaps was 7 to 13 cm, thickness was 0.5 to 3 cm, and width was 1 to 3 cm. Pedicle length was between 3.5 and 9 cm (mean ± SD, 6.6 ± 1.6 cm). Red latex filled bone vessels at a distance of 6 to 11.5 cm from the distal end of a flap (8.2 ± 1.4 cm). Skin paddles were filled with latex in all cases. A medial femoral condyle corticocancellous bone flap had sufficient blood supply, allowing for harvesting flaps up to 11 cm long, and subperiosteal osteotomy did not compromise the vasculature of the flap's bone.

  19. Monitoring of intraoral free flaps with microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Henrik Toft; Gutberg, Nils; Birke-Sorensen, Hanne

    2011-10-01

    Because of the confined nature of their position, monitoring intraoral free flaps is a challenge, but it is essential to detect vascular complications in time to ensure the possibility of salvaging the flap. Microdialysis has been the standard technique of choice at the Department of Plastic Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, since September 1998. In this study we present our experience of monitoring 78 intraoral free flaps. It is a retrospective evaluation of patients' casenotes from November 1998 to March 2008. Sixty-five of the 78 flaps healed without complications. Sixty-one of these showed no sign of ischaemia in the microdialysis values; in 4 cases the microdialysis system caused technical problems. Thirteen patients were reoperated on based on the results of microdialysis analysis, and in all but 2 cases critical ischaemia was found. Ten of the 11 critically ischaemic flaps were saved. The overall loss rate of flaps was 1.3%. The 2 flaps that were reoperated on but no critical ischaemia found were 2 fibular flaps during the time that we were learning how to monitor with microdialysis (1999 and 2000). Since then we have developed a decision algorithm for standard monitoring, and since 2000 we have had no false positive results. We have never lost a flap from neglected ischaemia. Our results show that microdialysis is a safe and reliable technique for postoperative monitoring of intraoral free flaps.

  20. Pedicle Temporalis Fascial Flap with Axial Scalp Flap Obviates Need of Free Flap in Extensive Scalp Wound

    PubMed Central

    Khainga, S. O.

    2017-01-01

    Extensive scalp defect with exposed bone is best reconstructed with flaps. Majority of these wounds are now routinely reconstructed with free flaps in many centers. Free flaps however require lengthy operative time and may not be available to all patients, where possible less extensive options should thus be encouraged. A sixty-eight-year-old patient presented to us with a Marjolin's ulcer on the vertex of the scalp. After wide local excision a defect of about 17 cm and 12 cm was left. The defect was successfully covered with a combination of an ipsilateral pedicle temporalis fascial flap and an axial supraorbital scalp flap with good outcome. In conclusion wide defects of the scalp can be fully covered with a combination of local flaps. The axial scalp flap and the pedicle temporalis fascial flap where applicable provide an easy and less demanding option in covering such wounds. These flaps are reliable with good blood supply and have got less donor side morbidity. PMID:28194294

  1. The free iliac flap: a lateral modification of the free groin flap.

    PubMed

    Acland, R D

    1979-07-01

    A lateral modification of the free groin flap, called the free iliac flap, is presented. By moving the outline of the free groin flap laterally, so that the medial margin lies lateral to the underlying femoral triangle, a flap is obtained which is uniformly slender and which has a long vascular pedicle. The anatomical findings, a method for safe dissection of the superficial circumflex iliac vessels, and the results of 18 clinical cases are presented.

  2. Versatility and "flap efficiency" of pedicled perforator flaps in lower extremity reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jason K F; Deek, Nidal; Hsu, Chung-Chen; Chen, Hsin-Yu; Lin, Chih-Hung; Lin, Cheng-Hung

    2017-01-01

    The use of pedicled perforator flaps provides an alternative to free tissue transfer for lower limb reconstruction. We use computer-aided image analysis to investigate the versatility of pedicled perforator flaps for the reconstruction of lower limb defects. Between April 2007 and April 2011, a case series of 61 patients with wounds of the lower extremity from knee to ankle were reconstructed with pedicled perforator flaps. We performed 16 pedicled reverse-flow anterolateral thigh (RF-ALT) flaps, 8 pedicled medial sural artery perforator (MSAP) flaps, 26 pedicled peroneal artery perforator (PAP) flaps, and 11 pedicled posterior tibial artery perforator (PTAP) flaps. Digital planimetry of defects covered was analyzed and the "efficiency" of each flap was calculated, which allowed the assessment of the merits of each flap in the management of lower limb defects. Flaps healed primarily in 82% of cases (50/61). Approximately 50% of the secondary donor sites required skin grafting. Complications requiring secondary surgery occurred in 18% (11/61) of the cases. Six required secondary skin grafting (10%). One RF-ALT flap was converted into a free flap, one PAP required arterial supercharging, and three pedicled RF-ALT flaps required venous supercharging. Image analysis showed that these pedicled perforator flaps could cover 75% of the surface area of the lower leg. The higher length of perforator allowed for greater "flap efficiency" and better versatility of tissue cover. Image analysis can be used as a modality to assess the versatility of individual flaps in the reconstruction of lower limb defects. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Freestyle Local Perforator Flaps for Facial Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Yong; Kim, Ji Min; Kwon, Ho; Jung, Sung-No; Shim, Hyung Sup; Kim, Sang Wha

    2015-01-01

    For the successful reconstruction of facial defects, various perforator flaps have been used in single-stage surgery, where tissues are moved to adjacent defect sites. Our group successfully performed perforator flap surgery on 17 patients with small to moderate facial defects that affected the functional and aesthetic features of their faces. Of four complicated cases, three developed venous congestion, which resolved in the subacute postoperative period, and one patient with partial necrosis underwent minor revision. We reviewed the literature on freestyle perforator flaps for facial defect reconstruction and focused on English articles published in the last five years. With the advance of knowledge regarding the vascular anatomy of pedicled perforator flaps in the face, we found that some perforator flaps can improve functional and aesthetic reconstruction for the facial defects. We suggest that freestyle facial perforator flaps can serve as alternative, safe, and versatile treatment modalities for covering small to moderate facial defects.

  4. Freestyle Local Perforator Flaps for Facial Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Min; Kwon, Ho; Jung, Sung-No; Shim, Hyung Sup; Kim, Sang Wha

    2015-01-01

    For the successful reconstruction of facial defects, various perforator flaps have been used in single-stage surgery, where tissues are moved to adjacent defect sites. Our group successfully performed perforator flap surgery on 17 patients with small to moderate facial defects that affected the functional and aesthetic features of their faces. Of four complicated cases, three developed venous congestion, which resolved in the subacute postoperative period, and one patient with partial necrosis underwent minor revision. We reviewed the literature on freestyle perforator flaps for facial defect reconstruction and focused on English articles published in the last five years. With the advance of knowledge regarding the vascular anatomy of pedicled perforator flaps in the face, we found that some perforator flaps can improve functional and aesthetic reconstruction for the facial defects. We suggest that freestyle facial perforator flaps can serve as alternative, safe, and versatile treatment modalities for covering small to moderate facial defects. PMID:26236734

  5. Dermatosurgery Rounds - The Island SKIN Infraorbital Flap

    PubMed Central

    Tchernev, Georgi; Gianfaldoni, Serena; Wollina, Uwe; Lotti, Torello; Lotti, Jacopo; França, Katlein; Batashki, Atanas; Maximov, Georgi Konstantinov

    2017-01-01

    The main objective in dermatologic surgery is complete excision of the tumour while achieving the best possible functional and cosmetic outcome. Also we must take into account age, sex, and tumour size and site. We should also consider the patient’s expectations, the preservation of the different cosmetic units, and the final cosmetic outcome. Various reconstructive methods ranging from secondary healing to free flap applications are usedfor the reconstruction of perinasal or facial defects caused by trauma or tumour surgery. Herein, we describe the nasal infraorbital island skin flap for the reconstruction in a patient with basal cell carcinoma. No complications were observed in operation field. The infraorbital island skin flap which we describe for the perinasal area reconstruction is a safe, easily performed and versatile flap. The multidimensional use of this flap together with a relatively easy reconstruction plan and surgical procedure would be effective in flap choice. PMID:28785362

  6. Free flaps for pressure sore coverage.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Vincent; Boulanger, Kevin; Heymans, Oliver

    2008-06-01

    Management of pressure sores still represents a major challenge in plastic surgery practice due to recurrence. The surgeon may have to face multiple or recurrent pressure ulcerations without any local flap left. In this very limited indication, free flap surgery appears to be a useful adjunct in the surgical treatment. We reviewed our charts looking for patients operated for a pressure sore of the sacral, ischial, or trochanteric region. We found 88 consecutive patients representing 108 different pressure sores and 141 flap procedures. Among these patients, 6 presented large sores that could not be covered with a pedicled flap and benefited from free flap surgery (4.2% of all procedures). Stable coverage was achieved in 80% of these patients after a mean follow-up of 32 months. Comparison between pedicled and free flaps groups showed a trend in the latest concerning the presence of diabetes, incontinence, paraplegia, and male sex.

  7. Pressure Distribution Over Airfoils with Fowler Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzinger, Carl J; Anderson, Walter B

    1938-01-01

    Report presents the results of tests made of a Clark y airfoil with a Clark y Fowler flap and of an NACA 23012 airfoil with NACA Fowler flaps. Some of the tests were made in the 7 by 10-foot wind tunnel and others in the 5-foot vertical wind tunnel. The pressures were measured on the upper and lower surfaces at one chord section both on the main airfoils and on the flaps for several angles of attack with the flaps located at the maximum-lift settings. A test installation was used in which the model was mounted in the wind tunnel between large end planes so that two-dimensional flow was approximated. The data are given in the form of pressure-distribution diagrams and as plots of calculated coefficients for the airfoil-and-flap combinations and for the flaps alone.

  8. Retrograde arterialized venous flap: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Moshammer, Harald E T; Schwarzl, Franz X; Haas, Franz M; Maechler, Heinrich; Pierer, Gerhard; Wiltgen, Marco; Koch, Horst

    2003-01-01

    An experimental model was established to study circulation in retrograde arterialized venous flaps (RAVF). Venous flaps measuring 7 x 4 cm with a matching venous system were harvested from both forearms of 10 fresh human cadavers. In each trial, both flaps were simultaneously perfused with heparinized human blood driven by a pulsatile circulation model. In each trial there was one flap with retrograde perfusion, and one flap with antegrade perfusion. Clinical assessment, measurement of outflow, and angiographic examination with digitally assisted assessment after 3 h of perfusion showed better results for retrograde perfusion in 8 of the 10 trials. This study indicates that blood circulation in the periphery of arterialized venous flaps can be enhanced by retrograde arterialization. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Pectoralis major flap for head and neck reconstruction in era of free flaps.

    PubMed

    Kekatpure, V D; Trivedi, N P; Manjula, B V; Mathan Mohan, A; Shetkar, G; Kuriakose, M A

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate factors affecting the selection of pectoralis major flap in the era of free tissue reconstruction for post ablative head and neck defects and flap associated complications. The records of patients who underwent various reconstructive procedures between July 2009 and December 2010 were retrospectively analysed. 147 reconstructive procedures including 79 free flaps and 58 pectoralis major flaps were performed. Pectoralis major flap was selected for reconstruction in 21 patients (36%) due to resource constrains, in 12 (20%) patients for associated medical comorbidities, in 11 (19%) undergoing extended/salvage neck dissections, and in 5 patients with vessel depleted neck and free flap failure salvage surgery. None of the flaps was lost, 41% of patients had flap related complications. Most complications were self-limiting and were managed conservatively. Data from this study suggest that pectoralis major flap is a reliable option for head and neck reconstruction and has a major role even in this era of free flaps. The selection of pectoralis major flap over free flap was influenced by patient factors in most cases. Resource constraints remain a major deciding factor in a developing country setting.

  10. Craniotomy flap osteomyelitis: a diagnostic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenkopf, B.; Hartshorne, M.F.; Bauman, J.M.; Cawthon, M.A.; Patton, J.A.; Friedman, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    Nine cases of suspected craniotomy flap osteomyelitis evaluated by combined bone and gallium scanning are presented. In six cases, the clinical data were inconclusive and evaluation by radionuclide imaging provided an accurate negative diagnosis. The other three cases considered positive by this technique were proven infected at subsequent exploration and flap removal. The use of radionuclide bone and gallium imaging should be considered in cases of possible craniotomy flap osteomyelitis.

  11. Scaling Effects on Stern Flap Performance. Progress Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    prototype stern flap on the USS RAMAGE ( DDG 61), the 11th destroyer of the DDG 51 Class, with associated stern flap evaluation trials, has provided...TERMS Stern flap scaling effects; DDG 61 stern flap performance trials; geosim model experiments 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT...GUIDANCE FOR PROJECTING FULL-SCALE STERN FLAP PERFORMANCE 12 CONTINUED RESEARCH 17 DDG 51 Stern Flap Scaling Effects Study 17 Application to Other

  12. Pedicled Latissimus Dorsi Muscle Flap

    PubMed Central

    Abolhoda, Amir; Bui, Trung D.; Milliken, Jeffrey C.; Wirth, Garrett A.

    2009-01-01

    Bronchopleural fistula and empyema are serious complications after thoracic surgical procedures, and their prevention is paramount. Herein, we review our experience with routine prophylactic use of the pedicled ipsilateral latissimus dorsi muscle flap. From January 2004 through February 2006, 10 surgically high-risk patients underwent intrathoracic transposition of this muscle flap for reinforcement of bronchial-stump closure or obliteration of empyema cavities. Seven of the patients were chronically immunosuppressed, 5 were severely malnourished (median preoperative serum albumin level, 2.4 g/dL), and 5 had severe underlying obstructive pulmonary disease (median forced expiratory volume in 1 second, 44% of predicted level). Three upper lobectomies and 1 completion pneumonectomy were performed in order to treat massive hemoptysis that was secondary to complex aspergilloma. One patient underwent left pneumonectomy due to ruptured-cavitary primary lung lymphoma. One upper lobectomy was performed because of necrotizing, localized Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection. One patient underwent right upper lobectomy and main-stem bronchoplasty for carcinoma after chemoradiation therapy. In 3 patients, the pedicled latissimus dorsi muscle was used to obliterate chronic empyema cavities and to buttress the closure of underlying bronchopleural fistulas. No operative deaths or recurrent empyemas resulted. Two patients retained peri-flap air that required no surgical intervention. We conclude that the use of transposed pedicled latissimus dorsi muscle flap effectively and reliably prevents clinically overt bronchopleural fistula and recurrent empyema. We advocate its routine use in first-time and selected reoperative thoracotomies in patients who are undergoing high-risk lung resection or reparative procedures. PMID:19693302

  13. Refining the intrinsic chimera flap: a review.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Jayant P; Agarwal, Shailesh; Adler, Neta; Gottlieb, Lawrence J

    2009-10-01

    Reconstruction of complex tissue deficiencies in which each missing component is in a different spatial relationship to each other can be particularly challenging, especially in patients with limited recipient vessels. The chimera flap design is uniquely suited to reconstruct these deformities. Chimera flaps have been previously defined in many ways with 2 main categories: prefabricated or intrinsic. Herein we attempt to clarify the definition of a true intrinsic chimeric flap and provide examples of how these constructs provide a method for reconstruction of complex defects. The versatility of the intrinsic chimera flap and its procurement from 7 different vascular systems is described. A clarification of the definition of a true intrinsic chimera flap is described. In addition, construction of flaps from the lateral femoral circumflex, deep circumflex iliac, inferior gluteal, peroneal, subscapular, thoracodorsal, and radial arterial systems is described to showcase the versatility of these chimera flaps. A true intrinsic chimera flap must consist of more than a single tissue type. Each of the tissue components receives its blood flow from separate vascular branches or perforators that are connected to a single vascular source. These vascular branches must be of appropriate length to allow for insetting with 3-dimensional spatial freedom. There are a multitude of sites from which true intrinsic chimera flaps may be harvested.

  14. A water tunnel study of Gurney flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhart, Dan H.; Pendergraft, Odis C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Several Gurney flap configurations were tested in the NASA Langley 16 x 24 inch Water Tunnel. These devices provided an increased region of attached flow on a wing upper surface relative to the wing without the flaps. The recirculation region behind the flap was visualized and shown to be consistent with hypotheses stated in previous research. Although the test Reynolds number for this study was several orders of magnitude below those in previous investigations, the effect of the Gurney flaps is in qualitative agreement with them. This is as would be expected from first order effects for high lift devices.

  15. Arterialized Venous Bone Flaps: An Experimental Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Borumandi, Farzad; Higgins, James P.; Buerger, Heinz; Vasilyeva, Anna; Benlidayi, Memmet Emre; Sencar, Leman; Gaggl, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In arterialized venous flaps (AVFs) the venous network is used to revascularize the flap. While the feasibility of AVFs in soft tissues has been reported there is no study on osseous AVFs. In this study we aim to assess the flap survival of osseous AVFs in a pig model. Medial femoral condyle flaps were elevated in 18 pigs. Three groups were created: AVF (n = 6), conventional arterial flap (cAF, n = 6) and bone graft (BG, n = 6). The AVFs were created by anastomosis of genicular artery with one vena comitans while leaving one efferent vein for drainage. After 6 months the specimens were harvested. The histology and histomorphometry of of the bone in cAF and AVF was significantly superior to bone grafts with a higher bone volume in AVFs (p = 0.01). This study demonstrates that osseous free flaps may be supported and survive using the technique of arterialization of the venous network. The concept of AVFs in osseous flaps may be feasible for revascularization of free flaps with an inadequate artery but well developed veins. Further experimental and clinical studies are needed to assess the feasibility of clinical use of arterialized venous bone flaps. PMID:27558705

  16. Temporoparietal-occipital flap for facial reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Moretti, E; Garcia, F G

    2001-04-01

    Eight patients with an extensive facial defect of the masseter region were reconstructed with a temporoparietal- occipital rotation flap. This flap is vascularized by both the arteria auricularis posterior and the arteria occipitalis lateralis. These vessels have been sufficient to ensure viability of the entire flap. It is elevated and easily transposed to the masseter region because of the distensibility obtained from the posterior neck. This approach avoided the need for an unsightly skin graft at the site while providing tissue with hair follicles that blend well with the surrounding hair. This large flap offers cosmetic advantages over other techniques for coverage of facial defects in men.

  17. Optimal propulsive flapping in Stokes flows.

    PubMed

    Was, Loïc; Lauga, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Swimming fish and flying insects use the flapping of fins and wings to generate thrust. In contrast, microscopic organisms typically deform their appendages in a wavelike fashion. Since a flapping motion with two degrees of freedom is able, in theory, to produce net forces from a time-periodic actuation at all Reynolds numbers, we compute in this paper the optimal flapping kinematics of a rigid spheroid in a Stokes flow. The hydrodynamics for the force generation and energetics of the flapping motion is solved exactly. We then compute analytically the gradient of a flapping efficiency in the space of all flapping gaits and employ it to derive numerically the optimal flapping kinematics as a function of the shape of the flapper and the amplitude of the motion. The kinematics of optimal flapping are observed to depend weakly on the flapper shape and are very similar to the figure-eight motion observed in the motion of insect wings. Our results suggest that flapping could be a exploited experimentally as a propulsion mechanism valid across the whole range of Reynolds numbers.

  18. Basic Perforator Flap Hemodynamic Mathematical Model.

    PubMed

    Tao, Youlun; Ding, Maochao; Wang, Aiguo; Zhuang, Yuehong; Chang, Shi-Min; Mei, Jin; Tang, Maolin; Hallock, Geoffrey G

    2016-05-01

    A mathematical model to help explain the hemodynamic characteristics of perforator flaps based on blood flow resistance systems within the flap will serve as a theoretical guide for the future study and clinical applications of these flaps. There are 3 major blood flow resistance network systems of a perforator flap. These were defined as the blood flow resistance of an anastomosis between artery and artery of adjacent perforasomes, between artery and vein within a perforasome, and then between vein and vein corresponding to the outflow of that perforasome. From this, a calculation could be made of the number of such blood flow resistance network systems that must be crossed for all perforasomes within a perforator flap to predict whether that arrangement would be viable. The summation of blood flow resistance networks from each perforasome in a given perforator flap could predict which portions would likely survive. This mathematical model shows how this is directly dependent on the location of the vascular pedicle to the flap and whether supercharging or superdrainage maneuvers have been added. These configurations will give an estimate of the hemodynamic characteristics for the given flap design. This basic mathematical model can (1) conveniently determine the degree of difficulty for each perforasome within a perforator flap to survive; (2) semiquantitatively allow the calculation of basic hemodynamic parameters; and (3) allow the assessment of the pros and cons expected for each pattern of perforasomes encountered clinically based on predictable hemodynamic observations.

  19. Microsurgical free flaps at Kathmandu Model Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rai, S M; Grinsell, D; Hunter-Smith, D; Corlett, R; Nakarmi, K; Basnet, S J; Shakya, P; Nagarkoti, K; Ghartimagar, M; Karki, B

    2014-01-01

    Microsurgery is an emerging subspecialty in Nepal. Microsurgery was started at Kathmandu Model Hospital in 2007 with the support from Interplast Australia and New Zealand. This study will be useful for establishing a baseline for future comparisons of outcome variables and for defining the challenges of performing microsurgical free flaps in Nepal. A retrospective cross sectional study was conducted using the clinical records of all the microsurgical free flaps performed at Kathmandu Model Hospital from April 2007 to April 2014. Fifty-six free flaps were performed. The commonest indication was neoplasm followed by post-burn contracture, infection and trauma. Radial artery forearm flap was the commonest flap followed by fibula, antero-lateral thigh, rectus, tensor facia lata, lattisimus dorsi, deep inferior epigastric artery perforator, and deep circumflex iliac artery flap. Radial artery forearm flaps and anterolateral thigh flaps were mostly used for burn contracture reconstructions. Twelve of the 13 (92%) fibulae were used for mandibular reconstruction for oral cancer and ameloblastoma. Rectus flaps were used mainly for covering defects over tibia. Hospital stay ranged from six to 67 days with an average of fourteen. Fifteen patients (26%) developed complications. The duration of operation ranged from six hours to 10.5 hours with an average of nine hours. The longest follow up was for four years. Microsurgery can be started even in very resource-poor center if there is support from advanced centers and if there is commitment of the institution and surgical team.

  20. Pressure Available for Cooling with Cowling Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stickle, George W; Naiman, Irven; Crigler, John L

    1941-01-01

    Report presents the results of a full-scale investigation conducted in the NACA 20-foot tunnel to determine the pressure difference available for cooling with cowling flaps. The flaps were applied to an exit slot of smooth contour at 0 degree flap angle. Flap angles of 0 degree, 15 degrees, and 30 degrees were tested. Two propellers were used; propeller c which has conventional round blade shanks and propeller f which has airfoil sections extending closer to the hub. The pressure available for cooling is shown to be a direct function of the thrust disk-loading coefficient of the propeller.

  1. Extended locoregional use of intercostal artery perforator propeller flaps.

    PubMed

    Baghaki, Semih; Diyarbakirlioglu, Murat; Sahin, Ugur; Kucuksucu, Muge Anil; Turna, Akif; Baca, Bilgi; Aydın, Yağmur

    2017-05-01

    Besides conventional flaps, intercostal artery perforator flaps have been reported to cover trunk defects. In this report the use of anterior intercostal artery perforator (AICAP) flap, lateral intercostal artery perforator (LICAP) flap and dorsal intercostal artery perforator (DICAP) flap for thoracic, abdominal, cervical, lumbar and sacral defects with larger dimensions and extended indications beyond the reported literature were reevaluated. Thirty-nine patients underwent surgery between August 2012 and August 2014. The age of the patients ranged between 16 and 79 with a mean of 49 years. The distribution of defects were as follows; 12 thoracic, 8 parascapular, 3 cervical, 8 abdominal, 4 sacral and 4 lumbar. AICAP, LICAP and DICAP flaps were used for reconstruction. Fifty-two ICAP flaps were performed on 39 patients. Flap dimensions ranged between 6 × 9 cm and 14 × 35 cm. Twenty-six patients had single flap coverage and 13 patients had double flap coverage. Forty-six flaps have been transferred as propeller flaps and 6 flaps have been transferred as perforator plus flap. Forty flaps (75%) went through transient venous congestion. In one DICAP flap, 30% of flap was lost. No infection, hematoma or seroma were observed in any patient. Follow-up period ranged between 3 and 32 months with a mean of 9 months. The ICAP flaps provide reliable and versatile options in reconstructive surgery and can be used for challenging defects in trunk. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Reconstruction of the Foot and Ankle Using Pedicled or Free Flaps: Perioperative Flap Survival Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiucun; Cui, Jianli; Maharjan, Suraj; Lu, Laijin; Gong, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to determine the correlation between non-technical risk factors and the perioperative flap survival rate and to evaluate the choice of skin flap for the reconstruction of foot and ankle. Methods This was a clinical retrospective study. Nine variables were identified. The Kaplan-Meier method coupled with a log-rank test and a Cox regression model was used to predict the risk factors that influence the perioperative flap survival rate. The relationship between postoperative wound infection and risk factors was also analyzed using a logistic regression model. Results The overall flap survival rate was 85.42%. The necrosis rates of free flaps and pedicled flaps were 5.26% and 20.69%, respectively. According to the Cox regression model, flap type (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.592; 95% confidence interval [CI] (1.606, 4.184); P < 0.001) and postoperative wound infection (HR = 0.266; 95% CI (0.134, 0.529); P < 0.001) were found to be statistically significant risk factors associated with flap necrosis. Based on the logistic regression model, preoperative wound bed inflammation (odds ratio [OR] = 11.371,95% CI (3.117, 41.478), P < 0.001) was a statistically significant risk factor for postoperative wound infection. Conclusion Flap type and postoperative wound infection were both independent risk factors influencing the flap survival rate in the foot and ankle. However, postoperative wound infection was a risk factor for the pedicled flap but not for the free flap. Microvascular anastomosis is a major cause of free flap necrosis. To reconstruct complex or wide soft tissue defects of the foot or ankle, free flaps are safer and more reliable than pedicled flaps and should thus be the primary choice. PMID:27930679

  3. Effects of perforated flap surfaces and screens on acoustics of a large externally blown flap model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. J.; Mckinzie, D. J., Jr.; Wagner, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Various model geometries and combinations of perforated flap surfaces and screens mounted close to the flap surfaces were studied for application to jet-flap noise attenuation for externally blown flap, under-the-wing aircraft. The efforts to reduce jet-flap interaction noise were marginally successful. Maximum attenuations of less than 4 db in overall sound pressure level were obtained in the flyover plane. Noise reductions obtained in the low-to-middle-frequency ranges (up to 7 db) were generally offset by large increases in high-frequency noise (up to 20 db).

  4. Prevention of necrosis of adjacent expanded flaps by surgical delay.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hainan; Xie, Yun; Xie, Feng; Gu, Bin; Liu, Kai; Zan, Tao; Li, QingFeng

    2014-11-01

    Although expanded flaps have been shown to survive longer than unexpanded flaps, flap necrosis still occurs, particularly when a deep back cut has been made. Overcautious design can avoid necrosis but leads to inefficient usage of the expanded flap. In this study, we tested a surgical delay method to prevent partial necrosis and maximize the use of the expanded flap. Ten patients with 13 expanders were included in this series. The surgical delay was performed 2 weeks before the final flap transfer. The survival of the delayed flaps was compared with that in previous cases without surgical delay. All 13 expanded flaps exhibited complete survival, which was significantly better than the 27.5% partial flap necrosis observed in nondelayed cases. Surgical delay can decrease the risk of necrosis in an expanded flap caused by a back cut and can thus maximize flap use.

  5. Secondary onlay free flap reconstruction of glossectomy defects following initial successful flap restoration.

    PubMed

    Rihani, Jordan; Lee, Thomas; Ducic, Yadranko

    2013-08-01

    Patients who undergo tongue reconstruction over time may develop gradual worsening of dysarthria and dysphagia secondary to flap atrophy. At our institution, these patients undergo a secondary flap onlay procedure for augmentation of the neotongue. We review a total of 11 patients with total glossectomy defect who underwent secondary tongue augmentation with secondary onlay free flap consisting of radial forearm free flap (n = 6) and rectus free flap (n = 5). There was improvement in swallowing in 7 of 11 patients. Five (45.4%) patients achieved gastric tube independence. Seven (63.6%) patients achieved a varying degree of oral intake. All patients achieved tracheostomy independence. Dysarthria was improved in all patients. There were no flap failures. Therefore, a secondary onlay flap technique is feasible and may improve dysphagia and dysarthria to achieve gastric tube and tracheostomy independence in total glossectomy patients with delayed tongue atrophy.

  6. Two Cases of Annular Skin Defects Repaired with Quadruple Fan Flaps (O-X Flap)

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ji-Eun; Lee, Sang-Min

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, patients have high expectations when it comes to minimization of postoperative scarring after dermatologic surgical procedures. When an annular lesion is being excised, normal skin should be excised, as well, to prevent a dog ears resulting in a long scar. We introduce a new flap reducing the scar length in annular defects. In order to avoid a long scar, we designed a quadruple fan flap (O-X flap) that is a variation of the rotation flap. It consists of four rotation flaps arranged like fans, with open and closed configuration. We suggest that the quadruple fan flap (O-X flap) is a viable option for treating annular skin defects, because it shortens the scar line, preserves normal tissue, and provides a cosmetically favorable outcome. PMID:20548871

  7. Reconstruction of Complex Facial Defects Using Cervical Expanded Flap Prefabricated by Temporoparietal Fascia Flap.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Yang, Qinghua; Jiang, Haiyue; Liu, Ge; Huang, Wanlu; Dong, Weiwei

    2015-09-01

    Reconstruction of complex facial defects using cervical expanded flap prefabricated by temporoparietal fascia flap. Complex facial defects are required to restore not only function but also aesthetic appearance, so it is vital challenge for plastic surgeons. Skin grafts and traditional flap transfer cannot meet the reconstructive requirements of color and texture with recipient. The purpose of this sturdy is to create an expanded prefabricated temporoparietal fascia flap to repair complex facial defects. Two patients suffered severe burns on the face underwent complex facial resurfacing with prefabricated cervical flap. The vasculature of prefabricated flap, including the superficial temporal vessel and surrounding fascia, was used as the vascular carrier. The temporoparietal fascia flap was sutured underneath the cervical subcutaneous tissue, and expansion was begun in postoperative 1 week. After 4 to 6 months of expansion, the expander was removed, facial scars were excised, and cervical prefabricated flap was elevated and transferred to repair the complex facial defects. Two complex facial defects were repaired successfully by prefabricated temporoparietal fascia flap, and prefabricated flaps survived completely. On account of donor site's skin was thinner and expanded too fast, 1 expanded skin flap was rupture during expansion, but necrosis was not occurred after the 2nd operation. Venous congestion was observed in 1 patient, but after dressing, flap necrosis was not happened. Donor site was closed primarily. Postoperative follow-up 6 months, the color, texture of prefabricated flap was well-matched with facial skin. This method of expanded prefabricated flap may provide a reliable solution to the complex facial resurfacing.

  8. The Foreign Language Assistance Program (FLAP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richey, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    This article features the Foreign Language Assistance Program, also known as FLAP, which holds the distinction as the only federally funded program that exclusively targets foreign language instruction in elementary and secondary schools. Funded under Title V of No Child Left Behind, FLAP provides 3-year grants to states and local school districts…

  9. White light spectroscopy for free flap monitoring.

    PubMed

    Fox, Paige M; Zeidler, Kamakshi; Carey, Joseph; Lee, Gordon K

    2013-03-01

    White light spectroscopy non-invasively measures hemoglobin saturation at the capillary level rendering an end-organ measurement of perfusion. We hypothesized this technology could be used after microvascular surgery to allow for early detection of ischemia and thrombosis. The Spectros T-Stat monitoring device, which utilizes white light spectroscopy, was compared with traditional flap monitoring techniques including pencil Doppler and clinical exam. Data were prospectively collected and analyzed. Results from 31 flaps revealed a normal capillary hemoglobin saturation of 40-75% with increase in saturation during the early postoperative period. One flap required return to the operating room 12 hours after microvascular anastomosis. The T-stat system recorded an acute decrease in saturation from ~50% to less than 30% 50 min prior to identification by clinical exam. Prompt treatment resulted in flap salvage. The Spectros T-Stat monitor may be a useful adjunct for free flap monitoring providing continuous, accurate perfusion assessment postoperatively.

  10. Scrubbing noise of externally blown flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to examine the aeroacoustic mechanism that produces externally blown flap (EBF) scrubbing noise, i.e. a surface-radiated noise which is generally strongest normal to UTW deflected flaps. Scrubbing noise was not radiated from portions of the surface adjacent to strong, locally coherent turbulent eddies. Instead, scrubbing noise seemed to come from weak loading fluctuations that were coherent along the scrubbed span. These loading fluctuations probably were induced by the convected large-scale vortex structure of the attached exhaust jet. Deflecting a UTW flap would reduce the distance between the vortex trajectory and the flap surface, increasing the resulting dipole noise and rotating its directivity. In contrast, deflecting a USB flap would increase this distance, so that observable scrubbing noise would be radiated only from the undeflected forward portion of the wing.

  11. Energy management - The delayed flap approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    Flight test evaluation of a Delayed Flap approach procedure intended to provide reductions in noise and fuel consumption is underway using the NASA CV-990 test aircraft. Approach is initiated at a high airspeed (240 kt) and in a drag configuration that allows for low thrust. The aircraft is flown along the conventional ILS glide slope. A Fast/Slow message display signals the pilot when to extend approach flaps, landing gear, and land flaps. Implementation of the procedure in commercial service may require the addition of a DME navigation aid co-located with the ILS glide slope transmitter. The Delayed Flap approach saves 250 lb of fuel over the Reduced Flap approach, with a 95 EPNdB noise contour only 43% as large.

  12. Fasciocutaneous flap for vaginal and perineal reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.N.; Whetzel, T.; Mathes, S.J.; Vasconez, L.O.

    1987-07-01

    A skin and fascia flap from the medial thigh is proposed for vaginal and perineal reconstruction. Dissection, vascular injection, and radiographs of 20 fresh cadaver limbs uniformly demonstrated the presence of a communicating suprafascial vascular plexus in the medial thigh. Three to four nonaxial vessels were consistently found to enter the proximal plexus from within 5 cm of the perineum. Preservation of these vessels permitted reliable elevation of a 9 X 20 cm fasciocutaneous flap without using the gracilis muscle as a vascular carrier. Fifteen flaps in 13 patients were used for vaginal replacement and coverage of vulvectomy, groin, and ischial defects. Depending on the magnitude of the defect, simultaneous and independent elevation of the gracilis muscle provided additional vascularized coverage as needed. Our experience indicates that the medial thigh fasciocutaneous flap is a durable, less bulky, and potentially sensate alternative to the gracilis musculocutaneous flap for vaginal and perineal reconstruction.

  13. Energy management - The delayed flap approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    Flight test evaluation of a Delayed Flap approach procedure intended to provide reductions in noise and fuel consumption is underway using the NASA CV-990 test aircraft. Approach is initiated at a high airspeed (240 kt) and in a drag configuration that allows for low thrust. The aircraft is flown along the conventional ILS glide slope. A Fast/Slow message display signals the pilot when to extend approach flaps, landing gear, and land flaps. Implementation of the procedure in commercial service may require the addition of a DME navigation aid co-located with the ILS glide slope transmitter. The Delayed Flap approach saves 250 lb of fuel over the Reduced Flap approach, with a 95 EPNdB noise contour only 43% as large.

  14. Refinements in lower extremity free flap surgery.

    PubMed

    Acland, R D

    1990-10-01

    This chapter recommends numerous factors that are significant refinements in approach and execution of lower extremity free flaps. I encourage a clear conceptual separation between the two essential phases of successful reconstruction of problem wounds: wound preparation and flap transfer. I have found that antibiotic beads maintain the sterility of temporary bony dead space. Due emphasis should be given to preparation of the surgeon, patient, and wound, allowing a nonemergency approach to lower extremity free flap coverage. The surgeon needs to be familiar with a variety of flaps beyond the usual workhorse group. Also, attention should be paid to perioperative warmth and hydration, and vessels affected by posttraumatic vessel disease must be avoided. A positive attitude toward the use of vein grafts whenever necessary is important. I also favor careful planning of the exact size and shape of the flap and length of the vessels along with use of a widely spatulated technique of end-to-side anastomoses.

  15. Microvascular free flaps in skull base reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Herr, Marc W; Lin, Derrick T

    2013-01-01

    The anatomical challenges of skull base surgery are well known. Furthermore, ablative and traumatic defects in this region produce complex reconstructive problems with a high risk of significant postoperative morbidity and mortality. Over the past two decades, microvascular free tissue reconstruction following open resection has been shown to improve outcomes and reduce complication rates when compared to the traditional use of pedicled flaps. The increasing use of free tissue transfer has been further strengthened by improved technical expertise and high flap success rates. Since the size and type of free tissue to be utilized must be individualized to each defect, the accomplished reconstructive surgeon should be extremely versatile and, by extension, facile with a several types of free flaps. Thus, four of the most commonly used flaps--the rectus abdominis, radial forearm, latissimus dorsi and anterolateral thigh flaps--are discussed.

  16. Rotation Flaps-Principles and Locations.

    PubMed

    LoPiccolo, Matteo C

    2015-10-01

    The rotation flap is a classic method of tissue rearrangement. It is a simple yet effective tool for recruiting tissue from areas of laxity and redirecting vectors of tension to reconstruct wounds not amenable to primary closure. This article presents the basic design principles and specific applications of the rotation flap in dermatologic surgery. A Medline search of articles describing rotation flaps published prior to April 1, 2015 was performed, and several prominent texts in dermatologic surgery were reviewed. Information gathered from the above sources is combined with the clinical experience of the author and editors to present surgeons with a guide for planning and executing various rotation flaps. Mastering the technique of the rotation flap will allow a surgeon to repair a wide variety of cutaneous defects.

  17. DIEP flap sentinel skin paddle positioning algorithm.

    PubMed

    Laporta, Rosaria; Longo, Benedetto; Sorotos, Michail; Pagnoni, Marco; Santanelli Di Pompeo, Fabio

    2015-02-01

    Although clinical examination alone or in combination with other techniques is the only ubiquitous method for flap monitoring, it becomes problematic with buried free-tissue transfer. We present a DIEP flap sentinel skin paddle (SSP) positioning algorithm and its reliability is also investigated using a standardized monitoring protocol. All DIEP flaps were monitored with hand-held Doppler examination and clinical observation beginning immediately after surgery in recovery room and continued postoperatively at the ward. Skin paddle (SP) position was preoperatively drawn following mastectomy type incisions; in skin-sparing mastectomies types I-III a small SP (sSP) replaces nipple-areola complex; in skin-sparing mastectomy type IV, SSP is positioned between wise-pattern branches while in type V between medial/lateral branches. In case of nipple-sparing mastectomy SSP is positioned at inframammary fold or in lateral/medial branches of omega/inverted omega incision if used. Three hundred forty-seven DIEP flap breast reconstructions were reviewed and stratified according to SP type into group A including 216 flaps with large SP and group B including 131 flaps with SSP and sSP. Sixteen flaps (4.6%) were taken back for pedicle compromise, 13 of which were salvaged (81.25%), 11 among 13 from group A and 2 among 3 from group B. There was no statistical difference between the groups concerning microvascular complication rate (P = 0.108), and time until take-back (P = 0.521) and flap salvage rate (P = 0.473) resulted independent of SP type. Our results suggest that early detection of perfusion impairment and successful flaps salvage could be achieved using SSP for buried DIEP flap monitoring, without adjunctive expensive monitoring tests.

  18. Peroneal Flap: Clinical Application and Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Yooseok; Yeo, Kwan Koo; Piao, Yibo

    2017-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to investigate the anatomy of the peroneal artery and its perforators, and to report the clinical results of reconstruction with peroneal artery perforator flaps. Methods The authors dissected 4 cadaver legs and investigated the distribution, course, origin, number, type, and length of the perforators. Peroneal artery perforator flap surgery was performed on 29 patients. Results We identified 19 perforators in 4 legs. The mean number of perforators was 4.8 per leg, and the mean length was 4.8 cm. Five perforators were found proximally, 9 medially, and 5 distally. We found 12 true septocutaneous perforators and 7 musculocutaneous perforators. Four emerged from the posterior tibia artery, and 15 were from the peroneal artery. The peroneal artery perforator flap was used in 29 patients. Retrograde island peroneal flaps were used in 8 cases, anterograde island peroneal flaps in 5 cases, and free peroneal flaps in 16 cases. The mean age was 59.9 years, and the defect size ranged from 2.0 cm×4.5 cm to 8.0 cm×8.0 cm. All the flaps survived. Five flaps developed partial skin necrosis. In 2 cases, a split-thickness skin graft was performed, and the other 3 cases were treated without any additional procedures. Conclusions The peroneal artery perforator flap is a good alternative for the reconstruction of soft tissue defects, with a constant and reliable vascular pedicle, thin and pliable skin, and the possibility of creating a composite tissue flap. PMID:28352602

  19. Coverage of exposed hardware after lower leg fractures with free flaps or pedicled flaps.

    PubMed

    Fallico, N; Somma, F; Cigna, E; Dessy, L A; Tarallo, M; Ribuffo, D

    2015-12-01

    The placement of osteosynthetic materials in the leg may be complicated by hardware exposure. Successful soft tissue reconstruction often provides a critical means for limb salvage in patients with hardware exposure in the leg. Free flaps are currently considered the standard surgical procedure for soft tissue coverage of the wounds with internal hardware exposure. However, to date, no conclusive literature shows the superiority of a specific type of flap. The current review compares data from the literature concerning outcomes and complications of free and pedicled flaps for exposed osteosynthetic material preservation in the leg. A total of 81 cases from twelve different articles presenting internal hardware exposure of the leg were analyzed in our study. Thirty-two patients underwent immediate reconstructive surgery with pedicled flaps, while forty-nine patients underwent free flap reconstruction. The overall survival rate for pedicled flaps was 96.77%, while for free flaps it was 97.77%. The overall implant preservation rate was 78.12% for pedicled flaps and 53.33% for free flaps. With reference to postoperative complications, the overall complication rate was 46.87% for pedicled flaps and 10.20% for free flaps. No significant difference was found in terms of overall flap survival. However, a significant difference was found regarding successful implant preservation (78.12% in the pedicled flap group vs. 53.33% in the free flap group). In particular, the first observation appears to be in contrast with the current trend of considering the free flaps the first choice procedure for soft tissue coverage of the wounds with internal hardware exposure. Nevertheless, a higher occurrence of postoperative complications was observed in the pedicled flap group (46.87% vs. 10.20%). The choice of the most appropriate reconstructive procedure should take into account several issues including the size of the wounds with internal hardware exposure, the possibility of soft

  20. Use of rotation scalp flaps for treatment of occipital baldness.

    PubMed

    Juri, J; Juri, C; Arufe, H N

    1978-01-01

    We have used 25 rotation scalp flaps to treat occipital baldness associated with fronto-parietal baldness (the third flap), and 35 such flaps for the correction of isolated occipital baldness. We have not had any flap necrosis, and our patients have been well satisfied with the results of this surgery.

  1. 14 CFR 23.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 23.1511 Section 23... Information § 23.1511 Flap extended speed. (a) The flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it is... established under § 23.345(a), (c), and (d). (b) Additional combinations of flap setting, airspeed, and engine...

  2. 14 CFR 23.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 23.1511 Section 23... Information § 23.1511 Flap extended speed. (a) The flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it is... established under § 23.345(a), (c), and (d). (b) Additional combinations of flap setting, airspeed, and engine...

  3. 14 CFR 23.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 23.1511 Section 23... Information § 23.1511 Flap extended speed. (a) The flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it is... established under § 23.345(a), (c), and (d). (b) Additional combinations of flap setting, airspeed, and engine...

  4. 14 CFR 23.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 23.1511 Section 23... Information § 23.1511 Flap extended speed. (a) The flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it is... established under § 23.345(a), (c), and (d). (b) Additional combinations of flap setting, airspeed, and engine...

  5. 14 CFR 23.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 23.1511 Section 23... Information § 23.1511 Flap extended speed. (a) The flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it is... established under § 23.345(a), (c), and (d). (b) Additional combinations of flap setting, airspeed, and engine...

  6. Aerodynamic characteristics of a wing with Fowler flaps including flap loads, downwash, and calculated effect on take-off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Robert C

    1936-01-01

    This report presents the results of wind tunnel tests of a wing in combination with each of three sizes of Fowler flap. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the aerodynamic characteristics as affected by flap chord and position, the air loads on the flaps, and the effect of flaps on the downwash.

  7. Hydrodynamic schooling of flapping swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Alexander D.; Masoud, Hassan; Newbolt, Joel W.; Shelley, Michael; Ristroph, Leif

    2015-01-01

    Fish schools and bird flocks are fascinating examples of collective behaviours in which many individuals generate and interact with complex flows. Motivated by animal groups on the move, here we explore how the locomotion of many bodies emerges from their flow-mediated interactions. Through experiments and simulations of arrays of flapping wings that propel within a collective wake, we discover distinct modes characterized by the group swimming speed and the spatial phase shift between trajectories of neighbouring wings. For identical flapping motions, slow and fast modes coexist and correspond to constructive and destructive wing–wake interactions. Simulations show that swimming in a group can enhance speed and save power, and we capture the key phenomena in a mathematical model based on memory or the storage and recollection of information in the flow field. These results also show that fluid dynamic interactions alone are sufficient to generate coherent collective locomotion, and thus might suggest new ways to characterize the role of flows in animal groups. PMID:26439509

  8. Hydrodynamic schooling of flapping swimmers

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Alexander D.; Masoud, Hassan; Newbolt, Joel W.; Shelley, Michael; Ristroph, Leif

    2015-10-06

    Fish schools and bird flocks are fascinating examples of collective behaviours in which many individuals generate and interact with complex flows. Motivated by animal groups on the move, here we explore how the locomotion of many bodies emerges from their flow-mediated interactions. Through experiments and simulations of arrays of flapping wings that propel within a collective wake, we discover distinct modes characterized by the group swimming speed and the spatial phase shift between trajectories of neighbouring wings. For identical flapping motions, slow and fast modes coexist and correspond to constructive and destructive wing–wake interactions. Simulations show that swimming in a group can enhance speed and save power, and we capture the key phenomena in a mathematical model based on memory or the storage and recollection of information in the flow field. Lastly, these results also show that fluid dynamic interactions alone are sufficient to generate coherent collective locomotion, and thus might suggest new ways to characterize the role of flows in animal groups.

  9. Hydrodynamic schooling of flapping swimmers

    DOE PAGES

    Becker, Alexander D.; Masoud, Hassan; Newbolt, Joel W.; ...

    2015-10-06

    Fish schools and bird flocks are fascinating examples of collective behaviours in which many individuals generate and interact with complex flows. Motivated by animal groups on the move, here we explore how the locomotion of many bodies emerges from their flow-mediated interactions. Through experiments and simulations of arrays of flapping wings that propel within a collective wake, we discover distinct modes characterized by the group swimming speed and the spatial phase shift between trajectories of neighbouring wings. For identical flapping motions, slow and fast modes coexist and correspond to constructive and destructive wing–wake interactions. Simulations show that swimming in amore » group can enhance speed and save power, and we capture the key phenomena in a mathematical model based on memory or the storage and recollection of information in the flow field. Lastly, these results also show that fluid dynamic interactions alone are sufficient to generate coherent collective locomotion, and thus might suggest new ways to characterize the role of flows in animal groups.« less

  10. Hydrodynamic schooling of flapping swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Alexander D.; Masoud, Hassan; Newbolt, Joel W.; Shelley, Michael; Ristroph, Leif

    2015-10-01

    Fish schools and bird flocks are fascinating examples of collective behaviours in which many individuals generate and interact with complex flows. Motivated by animal groups on the move, here we explore how the locomotion of many bodies emerges from their flow-mediated interactions. Through experiments and simulations of arrays of flapping wings that propel within a collective wake, we discover distinct modes characterized by the group swimming speed and the spatial phase shift between trajectories of neighbouring wings. For identical flapping motions, slow and fast modes coexist and correspond to constructive and destructive wing-wake interactions. Simulations show that swimming in a group can enhance speed and save power, and we capture the key phenomena in a mathematical model based on memory or the storage and recollection of information in the flow field. These results also show that fluid dynamic interactions alone are sufficient to generate coherent collective locomotion, and thus might suggest new ways to characterize the role of flows in animal groups.

  11. Anatomy of gracilis muscle flap.

    PubMed

    Magden, Orhan; Tayfur, Volkan; Edizer, Mete; Atabey, Atay

    2010-11-01

    Gracilis muscle flap is commonly used in reconstructive surgery. The gracilis muscles of 15 formalin-fixed adult cadavers (30 cases) were dissected with 4× loupe magnification. The most proximal pedicle of gracilis muscle was the deep branch of the medial circumflex femoral artery. It was located 60 mm from the pubic tubercle and had a diameter of 0.9 m on the average. The second pedicle was the medial circumflex femoral artery. It was the dominant pedicle in 13% of the cases. The mean diameter of the artery was 1.2 mm, and it entered the muscle 98 mm from the pubic tubercle. The third artery that nourished the muscle was deep femoral artery. It was the dominant pedicle in 87% of the cases. It had a mean diameter of 1.6 mm with a length of 54 mm. The most distant pedicles originated from the superficial femoral artery. They were present in all cases and were double in 77% of the cases. Mean diameter and length of the artery were 1.4 and 52 mm, respectively. They entered the muscle 266 mm from the pubic tubercle. These distal pedicles seem to be large enough to elevate the middle part of the muscle as a free flap.

  12. Critical Mach Numbers of Thin Airfoil Sections with Plain Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pardee, Otway O'm.; Heaslet, Max A.

    1946-01-01

    Critical Mach number as function of lift coefficient is determined for certain moderately thick NACA low-drag airfoils. Results, given graphically, included calculations on same airfoil sections with plain flaps for small flap deflections. Curves indicate optimum critical conditions for airfoils with flaps in such form that they can be compared with corresponding results for zero flap deflections. Plain flaps increase life-coefficient range for which critical Mach number is in region of high values characteristic of low-drag airfoils.

  13. Preputial flaps to correct buried penis.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chih-Chun; Chen, Yi-Hsin; Diau, Guan-Yeu; Loh, Ih-Wei; Chen, Ke-Chi

    2007-11-01

    The authors developed a preputial skin flap technique to correct the buried penis which was simple and practical. This simple procedure can be applied to most boys with buried penis. In the last 3 years, we have seen 12 boys with buried penis and have been treated by using preputial flaps. The mean age is about 5.1 (from 3 to 12). By making a longitudinal incision on the ventral side of penis, the tightness of the foreskin is released and leave a diamond-shaped skin defect. It allows the penile shaft to extend out. A circumferential incision is made about 5 mm proximal to the coronal sulcus. Pedicled preputial flaps are obtained leaving optimal penile skin on the dorsal side. The preputial skin flaps are rotated onto the ventral side and tailored to cover the defect. All patients are followed for at least 3 months. Edema and swelling on the flaps are common, but improves with time. None of our patients need a second operation. The preputial flaps technique is a simple technique which allows surgeons to deal with most cases of buried penis by tailoring the flaps providing good cosmetic and functional results.

  14. A review of propeller flaps for distal lower extremity soft tissue reconstruction: Is flap loss too high?

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jonas A; Fischer, John P; Brazio, Philip S; Kovach, Stephen J; Rosson, Gedge D; Rad, Ariel N

    2013-10-01

    Soft tissue coverage in the distal lower extremity remains a significant challenge. While free flaps are often utilized for larger defects, local perforator-based propeller flaps may be ideal for smaller wounds requiring coverage. Propeller flaps can provide excellent form and function for both traumatic and atraumatic defects with minimal donor site morbidity but can have concerning rates of flap loss. We reviewed the literature, identifying 21 studies presenting 310 propeller flaps for distal lower extremity reconstruction. Total flap necrosis was noted in 5.5% of flaps, with partial necrosis in 11.6%. While these flaps do enable transfer of local, healthy tissue to the defect site without the need for a microsurgical anastomosis, this rate of flap loss is concerning and appropriate patient selection is crucial. This review provides a brief history and overview of the clinical application and research into distal lower extremity perforator propeller flaps to place this technique into a clinical context.

  15. Pedicled Supraclavicular Artery Island Flap Versus Free Radial Forearm Flap for Tongue Reconstruction Following Hemiglossectomy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Senlin; Chen, Wei; Cao, Gang; Dong, Zhen

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the tongue function and donor-site morbidity of patients with malignant tumors who had undergone immediate flap reconstruction surgery. Twenty-seven patients who had undergone immediate reconstruction after hemiglossectomy were observed. Twelve patients were reconstructed using the pedicled supraclavicular artery island flap (PSAIF) and 15 patients using the free radial forearm flap (FRFF). Flap survival, speech and swallowing function, and donor-site morbidity at the 6-month follow-up were evaluated. All the flaps were successfully transferred. No obvious complications were found in either the transferred flaps or donor regions. Age, sex, defect extent, speech and swallowing function were comparable between the 2 groups. Donor-site complications were less frequent with PSAIF reconstruction than FRFF reconstruction. The PSAIF is reliable and well suited for hemiglossectomy defect. It has few significant complications, and allows preservation of oral function.

  16. The ulnar digital artery perforator flap: A new flap for little finger reconstruction - A preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Panse, Nikhil; Sahasrabudhe, Parag

    2010-01-01

    An ulnar digital artery perforator flap was used for little finger reconstruction. The flap has a reliable blood supply, being perfused by a constant sizeable perforator. This paper describes a study of a cadaveric dissection with methylene blue dye that was conducted to prove the rationality and reliability of the blood supply. The position of the perforator is confirmed intraoperatively by an exploratory incision before committing to the distal incision. The flap used to cover the flexor aspect of the little finger in three cases yielded positive results. To our knowledge, a digital artery perforator flap of this nature is unprecedented. We propose to call this flap the B.J. Flap after our institute. PMID:21217979

  17. Reconstruction of lateral forefoot using reversed medial plantar flap with free anterolateral thigh flap.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Masaki; Hayashida, Kenji; Senju, Chikako

    2014-01-01

    Skin defects of the heel have frequently been reconstructed using the medial plantar flap; however, forefoot coverage has remained a challenge, because the alternatives for flap coverage have been very limited. We describe a case of malignant melanoma on the lateral forefoot that was radically removed and reconstructed successfully with a distally based medial plantar flap, together with a free anterolateral thigh flap. The advantages of this flap include that it does not reduce the vascular supply to the foot owing to reconstruction of the medial plantar vascular systems, reduces the risk of flap congestion, minimizes donor site morbidity, and enables the transport of structurally similar tissues to the plantar forefoot. We believe this technique is a reasonable reconstructive option for large lateral plantar forefoot defects.

  18. Monitoring of free TRAM flaps with microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Udesen, A; Løntoft, E; Kristensen, S R

    2000-02-01

    The aim of this investigation was to follow the metabolism of free TRAM flaps using microdialysis. Microdialysis is a new sampling technique that provide opportunities to follow the biochemistry in specific organs or tissues. A double-lumen microdialysis catheter or probe, with a dialysis membrane at the end, is introduced into the specific tissue. Perfusion fluid is slowly pumped through the catheter and equilibrates across the membrane with surrounding extracellular concentrations of low molecular weight substances. The dialysate is collected in microvials and analyzed by an instrument using very small volumes. Glucose, glycerol, and lactate concentrations were measured in the flaps and compared with those in a reference catheter that was placed subcutaneously in the femur. The investigation continued 72 hr postoperatively. The study group consisted of 14 women who underwent reconstruction with a free TRAM flap, and one woman with a double TRAM flap. During flap ischemia, the concentration of glucose was reduced, while the lactate and glycerol levels increased. The differences between the flaps and controls were statistically highly significant. After reperfusion of the flaps, the concentrations of glucose, lactate, and glycerol approached normal. One flap failed because of an arterial anastomosis thrombosis. This was clearly demonstrated by the samples from the microdialysis: the concentration of glucose fell to an unmeasurable level; the concentration of lactate increased for a period before it stopped due to lack of glucose; and the concentration of glycerol increased to a very high level, probably because ischemia caused damage to the cell membranes of which glycerol is an important part. The authors concluded that microdialysis can detect ischemia in free flaps at an early stage, making early surgical intervention possible.

  19. Blended Cutout Flap for Reduction of Jet-Flap Interaction Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czech, Michael J (Inventor); Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An aircraft system includes a wing and a trailing edge device coupled to the wing. The trailing edge device is movable relative to the wing, and includes a leading edge and a trailing edge having a center flap portion and a plurality of outer edge portions integrally combined with the center flap portion such that the center flap portion is shorter in width than that of outer edge portions.

  20. New drag laws for flapping flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agre, Natalie; Zhang, Jun; Ristroph, Leif

    2014-11-01

    Classical aerodynamic theory predicts that a steadily-moving wing experiences fluid forces proportional to the square of its speed. For bird and insect flight, however, there is currently no model for how drag is affected by flapping motions of the wings. By considering simple wings driven to oscillate while progressing through the air, we discover that flapping significantly changes the magnitude of drag and fundamentally alters its scaling with speed. These measurements motivate a new aerodynamic force law that could help to understand the free-flight dynamics, control, and stability of insects and flapping-wing robots.

  1. The plane problem of the flapping wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birnbaum, Walter

    1954-01-01

    In connection with an earlier report on the lifting vortex sheet which forms the basis of the following investigations this will show how the methods developed there are also suitable for dealing with the air forces for a wing with a circulation variable with time. The theory of a propulsive wing flapping up and down periodically in the manner of a bird's wing is developed. This study shows how the lift and its moment result as a function of the flapping motion, what thrust is attainable, and how high is the degree of efficiency of this flapping propulsion unit if the air friction is disregarded.

  2. Dynamic response of a piezoelectric flapping wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Alok; Khandwekar, Gaurang; Venkatesh, S.; Mahapatra, D. R.; Dutta, S.

    2015-03-01

    Piezo-composite membranes have advantages over motorized flapping where frequencies are high and certain coupling between bending and twisting is useful to generate lift and forward flight. We draw examples of fruit fly and bumble bee. Wings with Piezo ceramic PZT coating are realized. The passive mechanical response of the wing is characterized experimentally and validated using finite element simulation. Piezoelectric actuation with uniform electrode coating is characterized and optimal frequencies for flapping are identified. The experimental data are used in an empirical model and advanced ratio for a flapping insect like condition for various angular orientations is estimated.

  3. Flap-augmented shrouds for aerogenerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seginer, A.

    1976-01-01

    Axisymmetrical shrouds for windmills are augmented by ring-shaped 'flaps' and their performance is studied experimentally. The concept of the shroud as an annular 'wing' is justified, leading to the conclusion that high-lift techniques should be used in shroud design, and that high-lift devices, such as flaps, would increase the power output of the windmill. It is shown experimentally that the ideal power output of a flap-augmented shrouded turbine can be more than 4 times the power of unshrouded turbines of the same diameter.

  4. Foot and ankle reconstruction: an experience on the use of 14 different flaps in 226 cases.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yue-Liang; Wang, Yi; He, Xiao-Qing; Zhu, Min; Li, Fu-Bin; Xu, Yong-Qing

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this report was to present our experience on the use of different flaps for soft tissue reconstruction of the foot and ankle. From 2007 to 2012, the soft tissue defects of traumatic injuries of the foot and ankle were reconstructed using 14 different flaps in 226 cases (162 male and 64 female). There were 62 pedicled flaps and 164 free flaps used in reconstruction. The pedicled flaps included sural flap, saphenous flap, dorsal pedal neurocutaneous flap, pedicled peroneal artery perforator flap, pedicled tibial artery perforator flap, and medial plantar flap. The free flaps were latissimus musculocutaneous flap, anterolateral thigh musculocutaneous flap, groin flap, lateral arm flap, anterolateral thigh perforator flap, peroneal artery perforator flap, thoracdorsal artery perforator flap, medial arm perforator flap. The sensory nerve coaptation was not performed for all of flaps. One hundred and ninety-four cases were combined with open fractures. One hundred and sixty-two cases had tendon. Among 164 free flaps, 8 flaps were completely lost, in which the defects were managed by the secondary procedures. Among the 57 flaps for plantar foot coverage (25 pedicled flaps and 32 free flaps), ulcers were developed in 5 pedicled flaps and 6 free flaps after weight bearing, and infection was found in 14 flaps. The donor site complications were seen in 3 cases with the free anterolateral thigh perforator flap transfer. All of limbs were preserved and the patients regained walking and daily activities. All of patients except for one regained protective sensation from 3 to 12 months postoperatively. Our experience showed that the sural flap and saphenous flap could be good options for the coverage of the defects at malleolus, dorsal hindfoot and midfoot. Plantar foot, forefoot and large size defects could be reconstructed with free anterolateral thigh perforator flap. For the infected wounds with dead spce, the free latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap remained to

  5. The prepuce free flap in 10 patients: modifications in flap design and surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Werker, Paul M N

    2002-06-01

    The prepuce free flap was used in 10 oral and oropharyngeal reconstructions. During the course of this study, various modifications took place. Residual penile skin necrosis and skin island necrosis early in the series led to modification of flap design. This solved the donor-site problem by placing the skin island more proximally, to consist of the outer layer of the prepuce and an equidimensional area of penile skin proximal to the prepuce. Identification of the vascular pedicle was greatly facilitated by changing to retrograde dissection, making skin incision in the mons veneris superfluous. Incongruence between donor and recipient artery, together with microsurgical arrogance, resulted in (resolvable) inflow problems in four patients. One flap was lost. After modification, marginal necrosis still occurred in one flap, most likely because of an episode of venous congestion. Although much care was taken to not harvest more skin than in a regular circumcision, penile skin shortage, especially during erection, appeared to be the major long-term shortcoming of this flap. Flap thinness and pliability, both expected strongholds of the flap, were evident during flap inset, but less apparent during follow-up because of postoperative radiotherapy in the majority of the cases. The best indications for this flap include defects in the tonsillar area extending into the soft palate, tongue, lateral oropharynx, retromolar trigonum, gums, and vallecula.

  6. Paramedian forehead flap combined with hinge flap for nasal tip reconstruction*

    PubMed Central

    Cerci, Felipe Bochnia; Dellatorre, Gerson

    2016-01-01

    The paramedian forehead flap is a great option for restoration of complex nasal defects. For full-thickness defects, it may be used alone or in combination with other methods. We present a patient with a basal cell carcinoma on the distal nose treated by Mohs micrographic surgery, and a resulting full-thickness defect repaired with paramedian forehead flap combined with a hinge flap. For optimal results with the paramedian forehead flap, adequate surgical planning, patient orientation and meticulous surgical technique are imperative.

  7. Route Flap Damping Made Usable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelsser, Cristel; Maennel, Olaf; Mohapatra, Pradosh; Bush, Randy; Patel, Keyur

    The Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), the de facto inter-domain routing protocol of the Internet, is known to be noisy. The protocol has two main mechanisms to ameliorate this, MinRouteAdvertisementInterval (MRAI), and Route Flap Damping (RFD). MRAI deals with very short bursts on the order of a few to 30 seconds. RFD deals with longer bursts, minutes to hours. Unfortunately, RFD was found to severely penalize sites for being well-connected because topological richness amplifies the number of update messages exchanged. So most operators have disabled it. Through measurement, this paper explores the avenue of absolutely minimal change to code, and shows that a few RFD algorithmic constants and limits can be trivially modified, with the result being damping a non-trivial amount of long term churn without penalizing well-behaved prefixes' normal convergence process.

  8. A dynamical system for interacting flapping swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oza, Anand; Ramananarivo, Sophie; Ristroph, Leif; Shelley, Michael

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of a theoretical investigation into the dynamics of interacting flapping swimmers. Our study is motivated by the recent experiments of Becker et al., who studied a one-dimensional array of self-propelled flapping wings that swim within each other's wakes in a water tank. They discovered that the system adopts certain ``schooling modes'' characterized by specific spatial phase relationships between swimmers. To rationalize these phenomena, we develop a discrete dynamical system in which the swimmers are modeled as heaving airfoils that shed point vortices during each flapping cycle. We then apply our model to recent experiments in the Applied Math Lab, in which two tandem flapping airfoils are free to choose both their speed and relative positions. We expect that our model may be used to understand how schooling behavior is influenced by hydrodynamics in more general contexts. Thanks to the NSF for its support.

  9. The flow around a flapping foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandujano, Francisco; Malaga, Carlos

    2016-11-01

    The flow around a two-dimensional flapping foil immersed in a uniform stream is studied numerically using a Lattice-Boltzmann model, for Reynolds numbers between 100 and 250, and flapping Strouhal numbers between 0 . 01 and 0 . 6 . The computation of the hydrodynamic force on the foil is related to the wake structure. When the foil's is fixed in space, numerical results suggest a relation between drag coefficient behaviour and the flapping frequency which determines the transition from the von Kármán to the inverted von Kármán wake. When the foil is free of translational motion up-stream swimming at constant speed is observed at certain values of the flapping Strouhal. This work was partially supported by UNAM-DGAPA-PAPIIT Grant Number IN115316.

  10. The Chimera Flap: A Quarter Century Odyssey.

    PubMed

    Hallock, Geoffrey G

    2017-02-01

    Incredibly complicated multidimensional defects have always strained the ingenuity of the reconstructive surgeon. Secondary perhaps to vascularized composite allotransplantation as a solution to this dilemma, the compound flap has been developed to be a more useful and available alternative. Their greatest versatility has been proven by its subtype, the chimera flap. The chimera flap itself consists of multiple flaps, the latter possibly composed of bone, skin, muscle, and so on, where each part has an independent vascular supply, and each part is independent of any physical interconnection whatsoever with the other components, except where joined ultimately only to a common vascular pedicle. An appellation for this concept was first introduced a quarter century ago in this very journal, a time frame now the impetus for a recapitulation of its origin and subsequent history that proves that it has eventually withstood the test of time and has been successfully assimilated into the reconstructive repertoire.

  11. Postirradiation flap infection about the oral cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Cabbabe, E.B.; Herbold, D.R.; Sunwoo, Y.C.; Baroudi, I.F.

    1983-06-01

    Postirradiation alteration of oral flora is well documented in the literature. Infection as a complication leading to partial or complete loss of a flap used to reconstruct a defect in the oral cavity is a worrisome outcome. We describe how a flap that was judged clinically to be viable became overwhelmingly infected with the Klebsiella oxytoca, an oral cavity pathogen encountered in this patient following irradiation. Local and systemic changes led to detachment of the flap. This complication may be explained, in view of the absence of venous congestion or arterial ischemia both clinically and pathologically, by the proven contamination of the flap by the Klebsiella pathogen. Local factors resulted in lower resistance and subsequent overwhelming infection. Discussion of the case, review of pertinent literature, and proposed solutions are presented.

  12. Mandibular reconstruction in irradiated patients utilizing myosseous-cutaneous flaps

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlman, N.W.; Albin, R.E.; O'Donnell, R.S.

    1983-10-01

    Myosseous-cutaneous flaps were used for mandibular reconstruction in 16 irradiated patients. Three of six sternomastoid-clavicle flaps failed (all in conjunction with a neck dissection), as did one of 10 pectoralis major-anterior-fifth rib flaps. One trapezius-scapular flap was used and it succeeded. We found the blood supply of the sternomastoid-clavicle flap too tenuous for use in conjunction with a neck dissection. The trapezius-scapular flap had too short an arc of rotation to be used for defects other than those in the horizontal ramus. In addition, this flap required a change of position and created an undesirable functional deformity. The pectoralis major-fifth rib flap, in contrast, could be used for a variety of defects, in conjunction with a neck dissection, and did not require a change of position during operation. We found it to be the most versatile and dependable of the flaps employed in this series.

  13. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P.

    2010-01-01

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re ≈ 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small robotic

  14. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P

    2010-03-06

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re approximately 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small

  15. Lower extremity free flaps: a review

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Mark D.; Bowen, C. Vaughan; Manktelow, Ralph T.; Graham, John; Boyd, J. Brian

    1996-01-01

    Objective To identify factors related to free-flap coverage of lower extremity fractures that are linked to a negative outcome. Design A chart review. Setting A large microsurgical referral centre. Patients From 1981 to 1989, the records of all patients who underwent free-tissue transfer to the lower extremity with more than 1 year of follow-up were selected. From this was drawn a subgroup of 49 patients (mean age, 36 years) who had tibial fractures (55% were motor vehicle injuries) and in almost all cases established soft-tissue or bony defects. They formed the study group. Intervention Free-flap transfer. Outcome Measures Factors that might be associated with free-flap failure: mechanism of injury, grade of tibial fracture, history of smoking, diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, ischemic heart disease, vascular compromise in the leg preoperatively, recipient artery used, type of anastomosis, and hypertension or hypotension intraoperatively. Results Type IIIB tibial fractures were the most frequent (67%) and carried a significantly (p = 0.02) higher risk of free-flap failure than other types of fracture. Patients underwent a mean of four procedures before referral for free-tissue transfer. The mean time from injury to flap coverage was 1006 days. Stable, long-term coverage of the free flaps was achieved in 78% of patients. Wound breakdown was most often caused by recurrent osteomyelitis (65%). Seventy-four percent of the fractures healed. The amputation rate was 10%. Four patients required repeat free-flap transfer for limb salvage. Conclusion Only the grade of tibial fracture could be significantly related to postoperative free-flap failure. PMID:8640624

  16. Predictable Pattern Digital Artery Perforator Flap

    PubMed Central

    Epameinondas, Kostopoulos; Christos, Agiannidis; Petros, Konofaos; Avraam, Dounavis; Othon, Papadopoulos; Vincent, Casoli

    2016-01-01

    Background: The proper digital arteries as any other axial vessel give rise to multiple cutaneous perforators either volar or dorsal along their course. Their identification is performed with Doppler flowmetry. The vasculo-cutano-tendino-osseous complex (VCTOC), which was described by the senior authors, was responsible for the vascularization of all digital anatomic structures (extensor apparatus, skin, periosteum). Their consistent appearance to well measured distances from the digital joints led the way to the present clinical study for highlighting this described anatomy in-vivo and demonstrating the predictability in digital artery perforator (DAP) flap harvest. Methods: From November 2012 to March 2014, fifteen patients underwent reconstruction with a predictable pattern digital artery perforator flap (PPDAP), based on the previously described VCTOC mapping, for digital lesions secondary to tumor extirpation. Flaps were designed as V-Y advancement or propeller type. Postoperative control concerned flap viability and digital function. Results: Seven males and 8 females underwent elective surgery using PPDAP flaps for digital defects following tumor extirpation. The diameter of the defect ranged from 0.5 to 1.5 cm. The vast majority of the lesions were identified on the right hand, the index, the ring finger and the distal phalanx. All flaps survived without signs of venous congestion. No functional digital problems were observed during follow up (mean of 77 months). A minor wound dehiscence presented in one patient. Conclusions: Authors introduced the concept of a “predictable pattern” in the surgery of perforator flaps in the digits. These flaps are reliable and could be a valuable reconstructive option. PMID:27418896

  17. Free flaps in head and neck surgery.

    PubMed

    Boeckx, W; Fossion, E; Guelinckx, P; Demey, R; Dewilde, R

    1982-01-01

    Free flaps in head and neck reconstruction offer a one step reconstructive procedure with a decreased patient morbidity and an 85% successrate in 60 free flaps, including twenty-eight intra-oral free flaps. Groinflaps were used in twenty-five patients and latissimus dorsi flaps in 34 patients. The indications included benign conditions in 10 patients, from which six has an atrofia of subcutaneous fattissue in the face. Carcinomas were treated in 50 patients. Forty squamous cell carcinomas involved 11 tumors of the floor of the mouth and 11 tongue carcinomas, five orbita and four nose reconstructions. The facial artery was the recipient vessel in 70% of the extra-oral and 68% of the intra-oral free flaps. The lingual artery was used in 12% of the cases, and the superior thyroid artery in 10% of the cases. Free flap procedures, do not increase the operation time substantially. The wound healing is excellent and the hospital stay shortened to 10 days. This quick recovery improves the quality of life for patients with often extensive cancer. Also major salvage procedure can be carried out after conventional methods have failed.

  18. A method for constructing vascularized muscle flap.

    PubMed

    Shandalov, Yulia; Egozi, Dana; Freiman, Alina; Rosenfeld, Dekel; Levenberg, Shulamit

    2015-08-01

    Abdominal wall reconstruction following extensive tissue loss is essential and can be achieved using autologous flaps. However, their use is limited due to their inadequate availability and due to post-operative donor site scarification. This work presents a step-by-step technique for fabrication of a vascularized muscle flap, to be applied in full-thickness abdominal wall defect reconstruction. Poly L-lactic acid/poly lactic-co-glycolic acid scaffolds, prepared using a salt leaching technique, were used as the supporting matrix in vitro for simultaneously seeded endothelial cells, fibroblasts and myoblasts. The cell-embedded graft was then implanted around femoral artery and vein vessels, which provided a central blood supply. Vascularization and perfusion were achieved by capillary sprouting from the main host vessel into the graft. A thick and vascularized tissue was formed within one week, and was then transferred as an autologous flap together with its main vessels, to a full-thickness abdominal wall defect. The flap remained viable after transfer and featured sufficient mechanical strength to support the abdominal viscera. Thus, this engineered muscle flap can be used as an alternative source for autologous flaps to reconstruct full-thickness abdominal wall defects.

  19. Mastoid fascia kite flap for cryptotia correction.

    PubMed

    Simon, François; Celerier, Charlotte; Garabedian, Erea-Noël; Denoyelle, Françoise

    2016-11-01

    Cryptotia is one of the most common malformations of the upper auricle with aesthetic and functional consequences, however there is no standard treatment. We present the surgical technique and results of a kite flap procedure which can be used in the different cryptotia subtypes. We reviewed all patients treated in our department from 2010 to 2015, using a mastoid fascia kite flap technique. The incision of this local flap follows the retro-auricular sulcus along the rim of the helix superiorly and drawing a skin paddle inferiorly. The mastoid fascia is exposed and a superiorly and posteriorly based flap is drawn and detached from the skull. Finally, the skin paddle is rotated and sutured between the superior helix and temporal skin creating the superior sulcus. The retro-auricular incision is closed directly inferiorly. Six patients (mean age 12) and seven ears were studied. One patient had bilateral cryptotia and only two had a normal contralateral ear. Mean follow-up was of 45 months. There was no skin necrosis, no complications reported and no revision surgery. We describe a reliable flap with a simple design and improved aesthetic result, as the thickness of the flap projects the helix well, the scar is entirely hidden in the retro-auricular sulcus and the direct suture induces a harmonious medialization of the inferior part of the ear and earlobe. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The medial sural artery perforator free flap.

    PubMed

    Cavadas, P C; Sanz-Giménez-Rico, J R; Gutierrez-de la Cámara, A; Navarro-Monzonís, A; Soler-Nomdedeu, S; Martínez-Soriano, F

    2001-11-01

    The medial sural artery supplies the medial gastrocnemius muscle and sends perforating branches to the skin. The possible use of these musculocutaneous perforators as the source of a perforator-based free flap was investigated in cadavers. Ten legs were dissected, and the topography of significant perforating musculocutaneous vessels on both the medial and the lateral gastrocnemius muscles was recorded. A mean of 2.2 perforators (range, 1 to 4) was noted over the medial gastrocnemius muscle, whereas in only 20 percent of the specimens was a perforator of moderate size noted over the lateral gastrocnemius muscle. The perforating vessels from the medial sural artery clustered about 9 to 18 cm from the popliteal crease. When two perforators were present (the most frequent case), the perforators were located at a mean of 11.8 cm (range, 8.5 to 15 cm) and 17 cm (range, 15 to 19 cm) from the popliteal crease. A series of six successful clinical cases is reported, including five free flaps and one pedicled flap for ipsilateral lower-leg and foot reconstruction. The dissection is somewhat tedious, but the vascular pedicle can be considerably long and of suitable caliber. Donor-site morbidity was minimal because the muscle was not included in the flap. Although the present series is short, it seems that the medial sural artery perforator flap can be a useful flap for free and pedicled transfer in lower-limb reconstruction.

  1. Radial forearm free flap pharyngoesophageal reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Azizzadeh, B; Yafai, S; Rawnsley, J D; Abemayor, E; Sercarz, J A; Calcaterra, T C; Berke, G S; Blackwell, K E

    2001-05-01

    This study evaluates the outcome of pharyngoesophageal reconstruction using radial forearm free flaps with regard to primary wound healing, speech, and swallowing in patients requiring laryngopharyngectomy. Retrospective review in the setting of a tertiary, referral, and academic center. Twenty patients underwent reconstruction of the pharyngoesophageal segment using fasciocutaneous radial forearm free flaps. All free flap transfers were successful. An oral diet was resumed in 85% of the patients after surgery. Postoperative pharyngocutaneous fistulas occurred in 4 patients (20%) with 3 resolving spontaneously. Distal strictures also occurred in 20% of the patients. Five patients who underwent tracheoesophageal puncture achieved useful speech. Advantages of radial forearm free flaps for microvascular pharyngoesophageal function include high flap reliability, limited donor site morbidity, larger vascular pedicle caliber, and the ability to achieve good quality tracheoesophageal speech. The swallowing outcome is similar to that achieved after jejunal flap pharyngoesophageal reconstruction. The main disadvantage of this technique relates to a moderately high incidence of pharyngocutaneous fistulas, which contributes to delayed oral intake in affected patients.

  2. Bilobed flaps for nonhealing ulcer treatment.

    PubMed

    Yetkin, Haluk; Kanatli, Ulunay; Oztürk, Akif Muhtar; Ozalay, Metin

    2003-09-01

    Healing of round ulcers may be difficult particularly in the plantar area. Rigidity and thickness of the plantar skin do not allow fusiform excision and primary suturing. The bilobed flap is a simple reconstructive technique principally used to repair substantial defects in the facial region. The authors' experience with this local flap in the foot is presented with good short-term results. Between 1995 and 1998, five female and seven male neuropathic foot patients with round plantar ulcers were treated with bilobed flaps. The average age of the patients was 50 (range, 15-76). The average size of the ulcers was 1.6 cm (1-3.2 cm). Debridement and orthotic insoles were used at least for 3 months before considering bilobed flaps. Seven patients were diagnosed as type II diabetes mellitus, four patients had cerebral palsy, and another patient had meningomyelocele. The minimal follow-up period was 1 year (average, 19.5 months). The only complication was wound dehiscence at the lateral side of the heel in a type II diabetic. Subsequently, this complicated ulcer was managed with a sliding flap and skin graft without further problem. The study concluded that nonhealing foot ulcers can be effectively treated with a bilobed skin flap of healthy tissues rotated from nonweightbearing parts of the sole.

  3. Partial flap during laser in situ keratomileusis: role of smaller diameter corneal flap of original thickness.

    PubMed

    Fogla, Rajesh; Sitalakshmi, Guruswamy

    2003-01-01

    To report results of smaller diameter corneal flap of original thickness in the management of partial flap during laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Retrospective review of the case records of three patients (3 eyes) who had a partial corneal flap during LASIK. Retreatment was performed using an 8.5-mm-diameter corneal flap, which was smaller than the original partial flap of 9.5-mm diameter. The recut depth was maintained as the original cut depth of 160 microm. No intraoperative or postoperative complications were noted. At follow-up 4 weeks later, two patients had an uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20. One patient had uncorrected visual acuity of 20/40 that improved to preoperative best spectacle-corrected visual acuity of 20/30 with a correction of +0.50 -1.25 x 170 degrees. A smaller diameter corneal flap of original thickness can be used for retreatment of partial flap during LASIK. A thicker posterior stromal bed after laser ablation may be retained with this technique, compared to retreatment using a corneal flap of greater thickness.

  4. Aerodynamics power consumption for mechanical flapping wings undergoing flapping and pitching motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razak, N. A.; Dimitriadis, G.; Razaami, A. F.

    2017-07-01

    Lately, due to the growing interest in Micro Aerial Vehicles (MAV), interest in flapping flight has been rekindled. The reason lies in the improved performance of flapping wing flight at low Reynolds number regime. Many studies involving flapping wing flight focused on the generation of unsteady aerodynamic forces such as lift and thrust. There is one aspect of flapping wing flight that received less attention. The aspect is aerodynamic power consumption. Since most mechanical flapping wing aircraft ever designed are battery powered, power consumption is fundamental in improving flight endurance. This paper reports the results of experiments carried out on mechanical wings under going active root flapping and pitching in the wind tunnel. The objective of the work is to investigate the effect of the pitch angle oscillations and wing profile on the power consumption of flapping wings via generation of unsteady aerodynamic forces. The experiments were repeated for different airspeeds, flapping and pitching kinematics, geometric angle of attack and wing sections with symmetric and cambered airfoils. A specially designed mechanical flapper modelled on large migrating birds was used. It will be shown that, under pitch leading conditions, less power is required to overcome the unsteady aerodnamics forces. The study finds less power requirement for downstroke compared to upstroke motion. Overall results demonstrate power consumption depends directly on the unsteady lift force.

  5. [Application of both expanded cutaneous flap and temporoparietal fascia flap in ear reconstruction with Medpor framework].

    PubMed

    Yang, Song-Lin; Liu, Qing-Yang; Chen, Rui-Hong; Jin, Yi-Ping; Ding, Zhi; Gao, Yun; Zheng, Jiang-Hong

    2007-03-01

    To investigate the feasibility and results of application of both expanded cutaneous flap and temporoparietal fascia flap in total ear reconstruction with Medpor framework. The main procedure consists of two stages: Stage I-skin expansion; Stage II -auricle formation consists of orientation of Medpor implant and creation of coverage for the implant by both expanded skin flap and temporoparietal fascia flap. Twenty-two ears in 22 unilateral microtia patients were constructed using Medpor implants covered with both expanded cutaneous flap and temporoparietal fascia flap over the last three years, they were accepted as pleasing by the patients. Application of both expanded cutaneous flap and temporoparietal fascia flap can assure no extrusion of Medpor implant in ear reconstruction. Either more, the two layers of transferred tissues will not affect the profile details of the reconstructed ear. And because the skin covering the framework and fascia is derived from mastoid region, the appearance and profile of the reconstructed auricle is true to nature and close to that of the opposite one.

  6. Combined fascial flap and expanded skin flap for enveloping Medpor framework in microtia reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Song-Lin; Zheng, Jiang-Hong; Ding, Zhi; Liu, Qing-Yang; Mao, Guang-Yu; Jin, Yi-Ping

    2009-07-01

    The Medpor implant is another choice for a new auricular framework besides autogenous costal cartilage. However, its relatively frequent exposure and less-matching skin coverage discourage surgeons from using it. In this article, we present a new two-flap method, a combination of the temporoparietal fascial flap and the expanded skin flap, for wrapping the Medpor implant in microtia reconstruction. A staged surgical procedure was performed, including soft tissue expansion in the mastoid region, soft tissue expander removal, expanded skin flap and temporoparietal fascial flap formation, Medpor framework implantation, and the combined two-flap envelopment. Conventional lobule transposition and tragus reconstruction were accomplished for selected patients. In this study, a total of 22 microtias were reconstructed consecutively using this method. Eighteen patients were followed since the first surgery. The postoperative follow-up time ranged from 3 to 12 months. The draped soft tissue covering was thin enough to show the reconstructed ear with excellent, subtle contour when edema gradually vanished 3-6 months postoperatively. The new ear had a stable shape, and its skin color and texture matched the normal surrounding skin very well. No exposure or extrusion of the framework was observed in the series. The Medpor implant enveloped by both a temporoparietal fascial flap and an expanded cutaneous flap appears to be a promising alternative for the auricular framework in microtia reconstruction. Because of the wrapping tissues, auricular construction using a Medpor implant can be a safe, steady, and easily acceptable choice for both microtia patients and their physicians.

  7. [Flap techniques in secondary alveoloplasty: a comparison between two types of flap].

    PubMed

    Hugentobler, M; Dojcinovic, I; Richter, M

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare two surgical soft tissue coverage techniques of secondary alveolar grafts in cleft lip and palate patients: the gingival mucoperiostal slidind flap and the mucosal rotation flap. Fifty-two secondary alveolar bone grafts were retrospectively included in the study. Four clinical parameters were evaluated: post-operative dehiscence, oro-nasal fistula relapse, canine eruption through the graft and postoperative secondary periodontal procedures. Gingival mucoperiostal flaps had less postoperative dehiscence, more fistula relapse and needed less secondary periodontal procedures. Based on this study and on literature data, gingival mucoperiostal flap provides better quality of soft tissue coverage. Flap design doesn't influence canine eruption. Bone graft complications are increased with poor oral hygiene, if canine eruption occurred before surgery and in older patients.

  8. Functional results of microvascular reconstruction after hemiglossectomy: free anterolateral thigh flap versus free forearm flap.

    PubMed

    Tarsitano, A; Vietti, M V; Cipriani, R; Marchetti, C

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to assess functional outcomes after hemiglossectomy and microvascular reconstruction. Twenty-six patients underwent primary tongue microvascular reconstruction after hemiglossectomy. Twelve patients were reconstructed using a free radial forearm flap and 14 with an anterolateral thigh flap. Speech intelligibility, swallowing capacity and quality of life scores were assessed. Factors such as tumour extension, surgical resection and adjuvant radiotherapy appeared to be fundamental to predict post-treatment functional outcomes. The data obtained in the present study indicate that swallowing capacity after hemiglossectomy is better when an anterolateral thigh flap is used. No significant differences were seen for speech intelligibility or quality of life between free radial forearm flap and anterolateral thigh flap.

  9. Free flap reconstruction for diabetic foot limb salvage.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomoya; Yana, Yuichiro; Ichioka, Shigeru

    2017-02-13

    Although free flap is gaining popularity for the reconstruction of diabetic foot ulcers, it is unclear whether free flap reconstruction increases the chances of postoperative independent ambulation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between free flap success and postoperative ambulation. This study reviewed 23 cases of free flap reconstruction for diabetic foot ulcers between January 2007 and March 2014. Free rectus abdominis, latissimus dorsi, and anterolateral thigh flaps were used in ten, eight, and five patients, respectively. A comparison was made between free flap success and postoperative independent ambulation using Fisher's exact test. Two patients developed congestive heart failure with fatal consequences within 14 days postoperatively, resulting in an in-hospital mortality rate of 8.7%. Five patients lost their flaps (21.7%). Of the 16 patients who had flap success, 12 achieved independent ambulation. Five patients with flap loss did not achieve independent ambulation, except one patient who underwent secondary flap reconstruction using a distally based sural flap. Fisher's exact test revealed that independent ambulation was associated with free flap success (p = 0.047). The present study indicates that free flap reconstruction may increase the possibility of independent ambulation for patients with extensive tissue defects due to diabetic ulcers. Intermediate limb salvage rates and independent ambulation rates were favourable in patients with successful reconstruction. The use of foot orthoses and a team approach with pedorthists were effective to prevent recurrence.

  10. Lateral thoracic artery perforator (LTAP) flap in partial breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    McCulley, Stephen J; Schaverien, Mark V; Tan, Veronique K M; Macmillan, R Douglas

    2015-05-01

    Partial breast reconstruction using pedicled perforator flaps from the thoracodorsal (TDAP) and lateral intercostal arteries (LICAP) is well described. The article introduces the lateral thoracic artery perforator (LTAP) flap as an additional valuable option from the lateral chest wall and reports clinical experience and outcomes. The anatomy of the LTAP flap is reviewed and the results of a consecutive series are reported. In a series of 75 consecutive cases of lateral chest wall perforator flaps used for reconstruction of partial breast defects, 12 (17%) were raised as pure LTAP flaps, and a further 19 (27%) as combined LTAP/LICAP flaps. The LTAP was therefore used in 44% of flaps overall. One LTAP flap (delayed case) had early venous compromise that settled spontaneously. The LTAP flap is a reliable option for partial breast reconstruction from the lateral chest wall, particularly in the immediate setting. It allows comparable flap size to be harvested compared to LICAP flaps. The LTAP flap can be raised on its own pedicle allowing greater mobilization or it can be incorporated into the more commonly used LICAP flap to augment perfusion. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Experimental comparison of bone revascularization by musculocutaneous and cutaneous flaps

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J.; Wood, M.B.

    1987-01-01

    Revascularization, one of the major components of bone healing, was examined in an experimental model. The radioactive microsphere technique demonstrated that after 4 weeks beneath a musculocutaneous flap, isolated bone segments had significant blood flow, whereas bone beneath a cutaneous flap did not. The muscle flap bone had a blood flow approximately half that of normal control bone. The muscle of the musculocutaneous flap had a blood flow three times that of the skin of the cutaneous flap. The bipedicle cutaneous flap used was designed to have a healthy blood supply, and at 4 weeks it had a blood flow twice that of control skin. Despite this, there was essentially no demonstrable blood flow in the cutaneous flap bone segments at 4 weeks. Only 3 of 17 bone segments underneath cutaneous flaps showed medullary vascularization, whereas 10 of 11 muscle flap bones did. All bone segments underneath muscle flaps showed osteoblasts and osteoclasts at 4 weeks; neither were seen in the cutaneous bone segments. The process of revascularization occurred through an intact cortex and penetrated into the cancellous bone. Because the bone segments were surrounded by an impervious barrier except for one cortical surface, the cellular activity seen is attributed to revascularization by the overlying flap. In this model, a muscle flap was superior to a cutaneous flap in revascularizing isolated bone segments at 4 weeks. This was documented by blood flow measured by the radioactive microsphere technique and by bone histology.

  12. The Internal Pudendal Artery Perforator Thigh Flap: A New Freestyle Pedicle Flap for the Ischial Region

    PubMed Central

    Goishi, Keiichi; Abe, Yoshiro; Takaku, Mitsuru; Seike, Takuya; Harada, Hiroshi; Nakanishi, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recurrence and complication rates of pressure sores are highest in the ischial region, and other donor sites are needed for recurrent pressure sores. The potential of a new freestyle pedicle flap for ischial lesions, an internal pudendal artery perforator (iPap) thigh flap, was examined through anatomical and theoretical analyses and a case series using computed tomography angiography. Methods: The skin flap was designed in the thigh region based on an iPap. The skin perforators were marked with a Doppler probe. One patient underwent computed tomography angiography with fistulography to identify the damage to or effects on the pedicle vessels of the flap. Debridement of ischial lesions and flap elevation were performed in the jackknife position. Results: The iPap thigh flaps were performed in 5 patients, 4 with ischial pressure sores and 1 with calcinosis cutis of the ischial region. The width and length of the flaps ranged from 5 to 8 cm (mean, 6.6 cm) and 10 to 17 cm (mean, 12.6 cm), respectively. Three patients underwent partial osteotomy of the ischial bone. No complications, including flap necrosis or wound dehiscence of the donor and reconstructed sites, were observed. Conclusions: The perforator vessels of the internal pudendal artery are very close to the ischial tuberosity. Blood flow to the flap is reliable when careful debridement of the pressure sore is performed. The iPap thigh flap is a new option for soft-tissue defects in the ischial region, including ischial pressure sores. PMID:25289335

  13. Preliminary Exploration: When Angiosome Meets Prefabricated Flaps.

    PubMed

    Xu, Heng; Zhang, Zheng; Xia, Yimeng; Steinberger, Zvi; Min, Peiru; Li, Hua; Dai, Yahui; Zhang, Yixin

    2016-11-01

    Background The best known limitation to the use of prefabricated flaps is their limited survival area. One explanation for this is insufficient neovascularization. However, blood flow of prefabricated flaps is through their innate vascular network. This could lead one to conclude that angiosomes may impede blood perfusion. This study aims to settle this contradiction between theory and clinical practice. Methods We performed a two-stage operation of a prefabricated abdominal flap in a rat model. The rats were divided into five groups (n = 6/group). Group A: fixed pedicle at a horizontal angle; Group B: fixed pedicle at an oblique angle; Group C: fixed pedicle at a vertical angle; Group D: fixed pedicle in the same position as Group A; and Group E: axial flap. Groups A and B were prefabricated for 2 weeks and Groups C and D were prefabricated for 3 weeks. Macroscopic appearance was noted, and analysis of near-infrared fluorescence imaging and capillary density was performed. Results There was no significant difference in the flaps' survival area between Groups A and B. Group D had a significantly larger survival area when compared with Group C. The boundary between two angiosomes (medioventral line) seemed to limit the indocyanine green perfusion in Groups B, C, and E, while in Groups A and D, no such limitation was seen. Capillary density was positively correlated with neovascularization time. Conclusions Angiosomes impede blood perfusion in prefabricated flaps. Cross-bound neovascular vessels nourish the flap, thus overcoming the limitation of choke vessels. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  14. Analysis of Flap Weight and Postoperative Complications Based on Flap Weight in Patients Undergoing Microsurgical Breast Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lam, Gretl; Weichman, Katie E; Reavey, Patrick L; Wilson, Stelios C; Levine, Jamie P; Saadeh, Pierre B; Allen, Robert J; Choi, Mihye; Karp, Nolan S; Thanik, Vishal D

    2017-03-01

    Background Higher body mass index (BMI) has been shown to increase postoperative complications in autologous breast reconstruction. However, the correlation with flap weight is unknown. Here, we explore the relationship of flap weights and complication rates in patients undergoing microvascular breast reconstruction. Methods Retrospective chart review identified all patients undergoing microvascular breast reconstruction with abdominally based flaps at a single institution between November 2007 and April 2013. Breasts with documented flap weight and 1-year follow-up were included. Patients undergoing stacked deep inferior epigastric perforator flaps were excluded. Breasts were divided into quartiles based on flap weight and examined by demographics, surgical characteristics, complications, and revisions. Results A total of 130 patients undergoing 225 flaps were identified. Patients had a mean age of 50.4 years, mean BMI of 27.1 kg/m(2), and mean flap weight of 638.4 g (range: 70-1640 g). Flap weight and BMI were directly correlated. Flaps were divided into weight-based quartiles: first (70-396 g), second (397-615 g), third (616-870 g), and fourth (871-1640 g). There were no associations between flap weight and incidences of venous thrombosis, arterial thrombosis, hematoma, flap loss, fat necrosis, or donor site hernia. However, increased flap weight was associated with increased rate of donor site wound healing problems in both univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusions Increased flap weight is not associated with added flap complications among patients undergoing microvascular breast reconstruction, however, patients with flaps of 667.5 g or more are more likely to have donor site healing problems. The success and evidence contrary to previous studies may be attributed to surgeon intraoperative flap choice.

  15. Muscle-Sparing TRAM Flap Does Not Protect Breast Reconstruction from Post-Mastectomy Radiation Damage Compared to DIEP Flap

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Patrick B.; Clemens, Mark W.; Hoy, Austin E.; Smith, Benjamin; Zhang, Hong; Kronowitz, Steven J.; Butler, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Radiation to free flaps following immediate breast reconstruction has been shown to compromise outcomes. We hypothesized that irradiated muscle-sparing free transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (MS FTRAM) flaps experience less fat necrosis than irradiated deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps. METHODS We performed a retrospective study of all consecutive patients undergoing immediate, autologous, abdominal-based free flap breast reconstruction with MS FTRAM or DIEP flaps over a 10-year period at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Irradiated flaps (external-beam radiation therapy) after immediate breast reconstruction were compared to non-irradiated flaps. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify potential associations between patient, tumor, and reconstructive characteristics and surgical outcomes. RESULTS A total of 625 flaps were included in the analysis: 40 (6.4%) irradiated vs. 585 (93.6%) non-irradiated. Mean follow-up for the irradiated vs. non-irradiated flaps was 60.0 months and 48.5 months, respectively (p=0.02). Overall complication rates were similar for both the irradiated and non-irradiated flaps. Irradiated flaps (i.e., both DIEP and MS FTRAM flaps) developed fat necrosis at a significantly higher rate (22.5%) than the non-irradiated flaps (9.2%; p=0.009). There were no differences in fat necrosis rates between the DIEP and MS FTRAM flaps in both the irradiated and non-irradiated groups. CONCLUSIONS Both DIEP and MS FTRAM flap reconstructions had much higher rates of fat necrosis when irradiated. Contrary to our hypothesis, we found that immediate breast reconstruction with an MS FTRAM flap does not result in a lower rate of fat necrosis than reconstruction with a DIEP flap. PMID:24469158

  16. Microsurgical free flap reconstructions of the head and neck region: Shanghai experience of 34 years and 4640 flaps.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Sun, J; Zhu, H; Xu, L; Ji, T; He, Y; Yang, W; Hu, Y; Yang, X; Zhang, Z

    2015-06-01

    This study represents the surgical experience of 4481 microvascular free flap cases performed at the authors' institution in China, between 1979 and 2013. Four thousand four hundred and eighty-one patients underwent reconstruction with 4640 flaps: 56% radial forearm flaps, 8% iliac crest flaps, 13% fibula flaps, 10% anterolateral thigh flaps, and other flaps. In the overwhelming majority of cases, the flap transfer was required following tumour resection (97.5%). Three hundred and twenty minor complications (6.9%) occurred. One hundred and eighteen major complications (2.5%) were encountered: 114 cases of failure (2.4%) and four deaths. Among the 118 cases with major complications, 26 - 22.0% - had received radiotherapy; this proportion was higher than the 6.9% in the minor complications group and 8.1% in the non-intervention group. Venous thrombosis was the most common complication at the recipient site and was the main cause of flap failure. When a compromised flap is identified, surgical re-exploration should not be delayed. This study confirms that free flaps are reliable in achieving successful reconstruction in the head and neck region; however this technique requires extensive clinical experience. Owing to the large number of flap options, microsurgeons should always pay attention to the details of the different surgical defects and choose the most appropriate flap.

  17. Analytical study of vortex flaps on highly swept delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, N. T.

    1982-01-01

    This paper highlights some current results from ongoing analytical studies of vortex flaps on highly swept delta wings. A brief discussion of the vortex flow analysis tools is given along with comparisons of the theories to vortex flap force and pressure data. Theoretical trends in surface pressure distribution for both angle-of-attack variation and flap deflection are correctly predicted by Free Vortex Sheet theory. Also shown are some interesting calculations for attached-flow and vortex-flow flap hinge moments that indicate flaps utilizing vortex flow may generate less hinge moment than attached flow flaps. Finally, trailing-edge flap effects on leading-edge flap thrust potential are investigated and theory-experiment comparisons made.

  18. Free flap monitoring in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Pickett, John A; Thorniley, Maureen S; Carver, Nigel; Jones, Deric P

    2003-01-01

    Free flaps are regularly used in plastic and reconstructive surgery but have a significant failure rate due to vessel thrombosis in the re-established arterial or venous circulation. A monitor of flap perfusion and oxygenation would allow the early detection of progressing flap ischaemia, hastening the required intervention and maximising the chances of salvaging the flap. A dual wavelength spectrophotometer has been designed and constructed which can monitor haemodynamic events in flaps during surgery and postoperatively. Eleven patients undergoing free flap surgery were studied. Measurements were made during surgery before division of the vessels and during and after microvascular anastomosis. Significant changes in all parameters were observed on reperfusion of the flaps after anastomosis or tourniquet ischaemia. Abnormal reperfusion in one flap and subsequent ischaemic events in two others were identified.

  19. Flapping wing PIV and force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Benjamin H.

    Flapping wing aerodynamics has been of interest to engineers recently due in part to the DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) MAV (Micro-Aerial Vehicle) initiative. MAVs are small unmanned aerial vehicles with length scales similar to birds and insects. Flapping wing MAVs would serve as mobile and stealthy sensing platforms capable of gathering intelligence in hazardous and physically inaccessible locations. Traditional means of lift and thrust generation become inefficient when scaled to these sizes, therefore a flapping wing propulsion system will be necessary. The design of a flapping wing MAV requires the ability to measure forces and velocities around the wing. Three components of velocity were measured in the wake of a two dimensional (2D) flapping airfoil model using a novel application of stereoscopic DPIV (Digital Particle Image Velocimetry). One component of force was measured using a newly proposed method outlined in the dissertation. The force measurement technique relies on a specific sequence of data acquisition, which has the benefit of reducing measurement uncertainty and noise. No experiments of this type have been conducted, and no direct aerodynamic force data exists for the low Reynolds numbers applicable to flapping wing MAVs. The well-established stereoscopic DPIV technique produces relatively low uncertainties while the new force measurement technique has not been previously tested. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that aerodynamic forces are attainable for chord Reynolds numbers as low as 1,000, which is significantly lower than previous studies. PIV measurements reveal symmetric and asymmetric wake topologies for a NACA 0012 and flat plate airfoil. A sinusoidally heaving flat plate airfoil produces highly deflected wakes for a wider range of flapping conditions than a NACA 0012 airfoil. Deflected wakes are of potentially interest since both lift and thrust components of force are developed. The flat plate also

  20. Flow field of flexible flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallstrom, Erik

    The agility and maneuverability of natural fliers would be desirable to incorporate into engineered micro air vehicles (MAVs). However, there is still much for engineers to learn about flapping flight in order to understand how such vehicles can be built for efficient flying. The goal of this study is to develop a methodology for capturing high quality flow field data around flexible flapping wings in a hover environment and to interpret it to gain a better understanding of how aerodynamic forces are generated. The flow field data was captured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and required that measurements be taken around a repeatable flapping motion to obtain phase-averaged data that could be studied throughout the flapping cycle. Therefore, the study includes the development of flapping devices with a simple repeatable single degree of freedom flapping motion. The acquired flow field data has been examined qualitatively and quantitatively to investigate the mechanisms behind force production in hovering flight and to relate it to observations in previous research. Specifically, the flow fields have been investigated around a rigid wing and several carbon fiber reinforced flexible membrane wings. Throughout the whole study the wings were actuated with either a sinusoidal or a semi-linear flapping motion. The semi-linear flapping motion holds the commanded angular velocity nearly constant through half of each half-stroke while the sinusoidal motion is always either accelerating or decelerating. The flow fields were investigated by examining vorticity and vortex structures, using the Q criterion as the definition for the latter, in two and three dimensions. The measurements were combined with wing deflection measurements to demonstrate some of the key links in how the fluid-structure interactions generated aerodynamic forces. The flow fields were also used to calculate the forces generated by the flapping wings using momentum balance methods which yielded

  1. Morbidity after flap reconstruction of hypopharyngeal defects.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jonathan R; Gilbert, Ralph; Irish, Jonathan; Brown, Dale; Neligan, Peter; Gullane, Patrick J

    2006-02-01

    Laryngopharyngeal reconstruction continues to challenge in terms of operative morbidity and optimal functional results. The primary aim of this study is to determine whether complications can be predicted on the basis of reconstruction in patients undergoing pharyngectomy for tumors involving the hypopharynx. In addition, we detail a reconstructive algorithm for management of partial and total laryngopharyngectomy defects. A retrospective review was performed of 153 patients undergoing flap reconstruction for 85 partial and 68 circumferential pharyngectomies at a single institution over a 10-year period. There were 118 males and 35 females, the median age was 62 years, and mean follow up was 3.1 years. Pharyngectomy was performed for recurrence after radiotherapy in 80 patients and as primary surgery in 73. Free flap reconstruction was used in 42%, with 30 jejunal, 15 radial forearm, 11 anterolateral thigh, five rectus abdominis, and three gastro-omental flaps. Gastric transposition and pectoralis major pedicle flap was used in 14% and 44% of patients, respectively. Morbidity was analyzed according to extent of defect, regional versus free flap, enteric versus fasciocutaneous free flap reconstruction, and the effect of laparotomy. The total operative morbidity and mortality rate was 71% and 3%, respectively. The most common complications were hypocalcemia in 45%, pharyngocutaneous fistula in 33%, and wound complications in 25%. The late complication and stricture rate was 26% and 15%, respectively. On univariate analysis, circumferential defects were associated with increased total (P=.046) and flap-related morbidity (P=.037), hypocalcemia (P<.001), late complications (P=.003), and stricture (P=.009). Gastric transposition had increased total (P=.007), flap-related (P=.035), late complications (P=.034), and hypocalcemia (P=.001). Pharyngocutaneous fistula was increased in patients undergoing salvage pharyngectomy for radiation failure (P=.048) compared with primary

  2. 14 CFR 25.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 25.1511 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1511 Flap extended speed. The established flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it does not exceed the design flap speed V F chosen under §§ 25.335(e) and 25.345, for the...

  3. 14 CFR 25.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 25.1511 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1511 Flap extended speed. The established flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it does not exceed the design flap speed V F chosen under §§ 25.335(e) and 25.345, for the...

  4. 14 CFR 25.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 25.1511 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1511 Flap extended speed. The established flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it does not exceed the design flap speed V F chosen under §§ 25.335(e) and 25.345, for the...

  5. 14 CFR 25.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 25.1511 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1511 Flap extended speed. The established flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it does not exceed the design flap speed V F chosen under §§ 25.335(e) and 25.345, for the...

  6. 14 CFR 25.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 25.1511 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1511 Flap extended speed. The established flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it does not exceed the design flap speed V F chosen under §§ 25.335(e) and 25.345, for the...

  7. Hardware Removal after Osseous Free Flap Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Day, Kristine E.; Desmond, Renee; Magnuson, J. Scott; Carroll, William R.; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Identifying risk factors for hardware removal in patients undergoing mandibular reconstruction with vascularized osseous free flaps remains a challenge. The purpose of this study is to identify potential risk factors, including osteocutaneous radial forearm versus fibular flap, for need for removal and to describe the fate of implanted hardware. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting Academic tertiary care medical center. Subjects and Methods Two hundred thirteen patients undergoing 227 vascularized osseous mandibular reconstructions between the years 2004 and 2012. Data were compiled through a manual chart review, and patients incurring hardware removals were identified. Results Thirty-four of 213 evaluable vascularized osseous free flaps (16%) underwent surgical removal of hardware. The average length of time to removal was 16.2 months (median 10 months), with the majority of removals occurring within the first year. Osteocutaneous radial forearm free flaps (OCRFFF) incurred a slightly higher percentage of hardware removals (9.9%) compared to fibula flaps (6.1%). Partial removal was performed in 8 of 34 cases, and approximately 38% of these required additional surgery for removal. Conclusion Hardware removal was associated with continued tobacco use after mandibular reconstruction (P = .03). Removal of the supporting hardware most commonly occurs from infection or exposure in the first year. In the majority of cases the bone is well healed and the problem resolves with removal. PMID:24201061

  8. Hardware removal after osseous free flap reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Day, Kristine E; Desmond, Renee; Magnuson, J Scott; Carroll, William R; Rosenthal, Eben L

    2014-01-01

    Identifying risk factors for hardware removal in patients undergoing mandibular reconstruction with vascularized osseous free flaps remains a challenge. The purpose of this study is to identify potential risk factors, including osteocutaneous radial forearm versus fibular flap, for need for removal and to describe the fate of implanted hardware. Case series with chart review Setting Academic tertiary care medical center. Two hundred thirteen patients undergoing 227 vascularized osseous mandibular reconstructions between the years 2004 and 2012. Data were compiled through a manual chart review, and patients incurring hardware removals were identified. Thirty-four of 213 evaluable vascularized osseous free flaps (16%) underwent surgical removal of hardware. The average length of time to removal was 16.2 months (median 10 months), with the majority of removals occurring within the first year. Osteocutaneous radial forearm free flaps (OCRFFF) incurred a slightly higher percentage of hardware removals (9.9%) compared to fibula flaps (6.1%). Partial removal was performed in 8 of 34 cases, and approximately 38% of these required additional surgery for removal. Hardware removal was associated with continued tobacco use after mandibular reconstruction (P = .03). Removal of the supporting hardware most commonly occurs from infection or exposure in the first year. In the majority of cases the bone is well healed and the problem resolves with removal.

  9. Experimental and Numerical investigations of flapping flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krithivasan, Siddharth; Ansumali, Santosh; Kr, Sreenivas; Emu, Jncasr Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    Insects have been observed to produce higher lift than predicted by conventional steady-aerodynamics using a combination of unsteady aerodynamic mechanisms. The wing kinematics and the flow fields produced during flapping flight is essentially 3D. Recently, in our group it has been shown, using flow visualization and 2D simulations, that the asymmetric flapping where, down-stroke is faster than the upstroke, can produce sustained lift. Also by introducing controlled wing flexibility, one can increase the magnitude of the lift. In order to verify these predictions quantitatively we are measuring forces produced by a mechanical flapper using a force-balance. Results of this study will be presented that includes the forces measured in symmetric and asymmetric flapping at different flapping frequencies. Similar understanding of various wing-kinematics during a forward flight can be achieved by doing transient, 3D simulations. A fast, accurate and simple 3D scheme which is capable of dealing with moving boundaries using Lattice Boltzmann has been developed for this purpose. Benchmarking of this scheme has been done for a forward flapping of the wing with elliptical cross-section. The results on the benchmarking and other preliminary results will be presented in the conference.

  10. [Boomerang flap. A true single-stage pedicled cross finger flap].

    PubMed

    Legaillard, P; Grangier, Y; Casoli, V; Martin, D; Baudet, J

    1996-06-01

    The indications for cover of long fingers have been considerably modified over recent years as a result of the concept of retrograde flow flaps. However, in some cases in which the dorsal digital networks cannot be used, cross-finger flaps are still indicated for cover of long fingers beyond the PIP joint. The authors present a new flap eliminating the need for this rather complicated procedure. The donor site takes advantage of the rich dorsal collateral arterial network of P1 of an adjacent healthy finger. The flap can be raised due to the constant existence of a bifurcation between the collateral dorsal digital arterial networks and the anastomoses situated at various levels between the dorsal and palmar collateral networks of the long fingers, which are constant as far as the PIP joint. A dorsolateral flap can therefore be raised from a healthy finger and transferred to the injured finger by raising the fatty connective tissue, including the dorsal collateral pedicles, in the shape of a boomerang. This flap covers distal defects from the PIP joint to the fingertip. The authors describe the anatomical basis for raising of the flap, the operative technique and report six clinical cases with a mean follow-up of 11 months.

  11. Calculation of the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of wing-flap configurations with externally blown flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, M. R.; Spangler, S. B.; Nielsen, J. N.; Goodwin, F. K.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was carried out to extend and improve an existing method for predicting the longitudinal characteristics of wing flap configurations with externally blown flaps (EBF). Two potential flow models were incorporated into the prediction method: a wing and flap lifting-surface model and a turbofan engine wake model. The wing-flap model uses a vortex-lattice approach to represent the wing and flaps. The jet wake model consists of a series of closely spaced vortex rings normal to a centerline which may have vertical and lateral curvature to conform to the local flow field beneath the wing and flaps. Comparisons of measured and predicted pressure distributions, span load distributions on each lifting surface, and total lift and pitching moment coefficients on swept and unswept EBF configurations are included. A wide range of thrust coefficients and flap deflection angles is considered at angles of attack up to the onset of stall. Results indicate that overall lift and pitching-moment coefficients are predicted reasonably well over the entire range. The predicted detailed load distributions are qualitatively correct and show the peaked loads at the jet impingement points, but the widths and heights of the load peaks are not consistently predicted.

  12. [Reconstruction of the oral cavity: the free radial forearm flap versus the free jejunal flap].

    PubMed

    Belli, E; Cicconetti, A; Matteini, C

    1995-05-01

    The concentration in a restricted area such as the oral cavity of the essential anatomic structures for mastication, deglutition, speech, salivary drainage and respiration makes it indispensable to ensure not only the structural reconstruction of the region but also, and above all, a functional reconstruction of the anatomic unit affected by resection. The use of revascularised flaps has extended both the quantity and quality of reconstructive methods available. In the context of the oral cavity the most widely used flaps are the radial forearm free flap and jejunum free flap. In this paper the authors report their personal experience in a group of 13 patients (6 radial forearm and 7 jejunum) undergoing oral cavity reconstruction using free flap. For each flap the authors describe the microsurgical procedure, the clinical characteristics of the post-operative period, the locoregional complications, the donor site and lastly the long-term clinical, anatomopathological and functional modifications 6-12 months after primary treatment. Moreover, they highlight the varying characteristics of the two flaps and make a critical assessment of the advantages and disadvantages of using one or other method. Lastly, in the light of their experience and a review of international literature, the authors underline the importance of making a careful choice and personalized reconstruction, and finally outline their own criteria of choice.

  13. Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicle Wing Manufacture and Force Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-03

    FLAPPING WING MICRO AIR VEHICLE WING MANUFACTURE AND FORCE TESTING THESIS Nathanael J...FLAPPING WING MICRO AIR VEHICLE WING MANUFACTURE AND FORCE TESTING THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics...March 2011 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED AFIT/GA/ENY/11-M14 FLAPPING WING MICRO AIR VEHICLE WING MANUFACTURE AND FORCE

  14. Free flap rescue using an extracorporeal perfusion device.

    PubMed

    Fichter, Andreas M; Ritschl, Lucas M; Rau, Andrea; Schwarzer, Claudia; von Bomhard, Achim; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Mücke, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    The warm ischaemia time of microvascular free flaps is limited. Incalculable events, such as lack of adequate recipient vessels or intraoperative medical emergencies, can lead to prolonged ischaemia and potentially to flap loss. In this study, critically perfused ischaemic or congested flaps were temporarily perfused with an extracorporeal perfusion system until anastomosis could be commenced. Temporary extracorporeal perfusion was performed in 8 radial forearm flaps for 147 ± 52 (range 77-237) minutes. Flap perfusion was assessed using Indocyanine Green fluorescence angiography and combined laser Doppler flowmetry and remission spectroscopy. Results were compared with those of 30 patients who underwent conventional reconstruction with radial forearm flaps. Flap survival, flap microcirculation, postoperative complications, and hospital stay did not differ between groups. We report successful free flap transfer after short-term extracorporeal perfusion for up to 4 h in 8 patient cases. Temporary extracorporeal free flap perfusion reduces the warm ischaemia time in emergency situations and can help to prevent flap failure in critically perfused or congested flaps. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02449525.

  15. 14 CFR 23.699 - Wing flap position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wing flap position indicator. 23.699 Section 23.699 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Construction Control Systems § 23.699 Wing flap position indicator. There must be a wing flap...

  16. 14 CFR 23.699 - Wing flap position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Wing flap position indicator. 23.699 Section 23.699 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Construction Control Systems § 23.699 Wing flap position indicator. There must be a wing flap...

  17. 14 CFR 23.699 - Wing flap position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Wing flap position indicator. 23.699 Section 23.699 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Construction Control Systems § 23.699 Wing flap position indicator. There must be a wing flap...

  18. 14 CFR 23.699 - Wing flap position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Wing flap position indicator. 23.699 Section 23.699 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Construction Control Systems § 23.699 Wing flap position indicator. There must be a wing flap...

  19. 14 CFR 23.699 - Wing flap position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Wing flap position indicator. 23.699 Section 23.699 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Construction Control Systems § 23.699 Wing flap position indicator. There must be a wing flap...

  20. Posttraumatic eyebrow reconstruction with hair-bearing temporoparietal fascia flap

    PubMed Central

    Denadai, Rafael; Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo; Marques, Frederico Figueiredo; Raposo-Amaral, Cesar Augusto

    2015-01-01

    The temporoparietal fascia flap has been extensively used in craniofacial reconstructions. However, its use for eyebrow reconstruction has been sporadically reported. We describe a successfully repaired hair-bearing temporoparietal fascia flap after traumatic avulsion of eyebrow. Temporoparietal fascia flap is a versatile tool and should be considered as a therapeutic option by all plastic surgeons. PMID:25993077

  1. Sural Versus Perforator Flaps for Distal Medial Leg Wounds.

    PubMed

    Schannen, Andrew P; Truchan, Lisa; Goshima, Kaoru; Bentley, Roger; DeSilva, Gregory L

    2015-12-01

    Soft tissue coverage of distal medial ankle wounds is a challenging problem in orthopedic surgery because of the limited local tissues and prominent instrumentation. Traditionally, these wounds required free tissue transfer to achieve suitable coverage and subsequent bony union. To better respect the reconstructive ladder and to avoid the inherent difficulty of free flap coverage, rotational flaps have been used to cover these wounds. Both sural fasciocutaneous flaps and rotational fasciocutaneous perforator (propeller) flaps have been described for distal medial soft tissue coverage. The authors performed a retrospective chart review of patients who underwent distal medial leg coverage with the use of either sural flaps or rotational fasciocutaneous perforator flaps. The authors identified 14 patients by Current Procedural Terminology code who met the study criteria. The average age and degree of medical comorbidities were comparable in the 2 groups. The authors reviewed their medical records to evaluate fracture healing, flap size, complications, and return to normal shoe wear. All 7 sural flaps healed without incident, with underlying fracture healing. Of the 7 perforator flaps, 6 healed without incident, with underlying fracture healing. One perforator-based flap was complicated by superficial tip necrosis and went on to heal with local wound care. All patients returned to normal shoe wear. Both sural artery rotational flaps and posterior tibial artery-based rotational flaps are viable options for coverage of the distal medial leg. Coverage can be achieved reliably without microsurgery, anticoagulation, or monitoring in the intensive care unit. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Treatment of Ischial Pressure Sores with Both Profunda Femoris Artery Perforator Flaps and Muscle Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chae Min; Yun, In Sik; Lee, Dong Won; Lew, Dae Hyun; Rah, Dong Kyun

    2014-01-01

    Background Reconstruction of ischial pressure sore defects is challenging due to extensive bursas and high recurrence rates. In this study, we simultaneously applied a muscle flap that covered the exposed ischium and large bursa with sufficient muscular volume and a profunda femoris artery perforator fasciocutaneous flap for the management of ischial pressure sores. Methods We retrospectively analyzed data from 14 patients (16 ischial sores) whose ischial defects had been reconstructed using both a profunda femoris artery perforator flap and a muscle flap between January 2006 and February 2014. We compared patient characteristics, operative procedure, and clinical course. Results All flaps survived the entire follow-up period. Seven patients (50%) had a history of surgery at the site of the ischial pressure sore. The mean age of the patients included was 52.8 years (range, 18-85 years). The mean follow-up period was 27.9 months (range, 3-57 months). In two patients, a biceps femoris muscle flap was used, while a gracilis muscle flap was used in the remaining patients. In four cases (25%), wound dehiscence occurred, but healed without further complication after resuturing. Additionally, congestion occurred in one case (6%), but resolved with conservative treatment. Among 16 cases, there was only one (6%) recurrence at 34 months. Conclusions The combination of a profunda femoris artery perforator fasciocutaneous flap and muscle flap for the treatment of ischial pressure sores provided pliability, adequate bulkiness and few long-term complications. Therefore, this may be used as an alternative treatment method for ischial pressure sores. PMID:25075362

  3. Girth augmentation of the penis using flaps "Shaeer's augmentation phalloplasty": the superficial circumflex iliac flap.

    PubMed

    Shaeer, Osama

    2014-07-01

    Penile girth augmentation can be achieved by various techniques, among which are liposuction injection, synthetic grafts, and autologous grafts, with variable outcome, mostly related to viability and receptivity of the tissue used for augmentation. Flaps are considered superior to grafts considering their uninterrupted blood supply. The current work describes long-term experience with penile girth augmentation using the superficial circumflex iliac artery and vein (SCIAV) flap. SCIAV flap was used for penile girth augmentation in 40 candidates who followed up for a minimum of 18 months. The flap was mobilized from the groin region. The penis was pulled out of a peno-pubic incision. The flap was tunneled under the pubic region to emerge at the base of the penis and was sutured to the subcoronal area and on either sides of the spongiosum. Another session was required for either de-bulking of the oversized flap (four overweight candidates), flap pedicle (n = 6), or for donor site scar revision (n = 11). Gain in girth in centimeters was evaluated. Excluding dropouts (n = 8) and participants who had encountered de-bulking of the flap body (n = 4), 40 participants had a preoperative average flaccid girth (AFG) of 9.3 ± 1.1 cm. Immediately postoperative AFG was 14.9 ± 1.1 cm (P < 0.001). Postoperative AFG at the final follow-up visit (a minimum of 18 months) was 14.5 ± 1.1 cm (55.6% gain compared with baseline, P < 0.001). SCIAV flap is a reliable option for long-lasting and sizable penile girth augmentation. One-stage augmentation is more suited for non-obese candidates. A second session may be indicated in overweight candidates or for scar revision. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  4. Numerical linearized MHD model of flapping oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovinskiy, D. B.; Ivanov, I. B.; Semenov, V. S.; Erkaev, N. V.; Kiehas, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Kink-like magnetotail flapping oscillations in a Harris-like current sheet with earthward growing normal magnetic field component Bz are studied by means of time-dependent 2D linearized MHD numerical simulations. The dispersion relation and two-dimensional eigenfunctions are obtained. The results are compared with analytical estimates of the double-gradient model, which are found to be reliable for configurations with small Bz up to values ˜ 0.05 of the lobe magnetic field. Coupled with previous results, present simulations confirm that the earthward/tailward growth direction of the Bz component acts as a switch between stable/unstable regimes of the flapping mode, while the mode dispersion curve is the same in both cases. It is confirmed that flapping oscillations may be triggered by a simple Gaussian initial perturbation of the Vz velocity.

  5. Collective Flow Enhancement by Tandem Flapping Wings.

    PubMed

    Gravish, Nick; Peters, Jacob M; Combes, Stacey A; Wood, Robert J

    2015-10-30

    We examine the fluid-mechanical interactions that occur between arrays of flapping wings when operating in close proximity at a moderate Reynolds number (Re≈100-1000). Pairs of flapping wings are oscillated sinusoidally at frequency f, amplitude θ_{M}, phase offset ϕ, and wing separation distance D^{*}, and outflow speed v^{*} is measured. At a fixed separation distance, v^{*} is sensitive to both f and ϕ, and we observe both constructive and destructive interference in airspeed. v^{*} is maximized at an optimum phase offset, ϕ_{max}, which varies with wing separation distance, D^{*}. We propose a model of collective flow interactions between flapping wings based on vortex advection, which reproduces our experimental data.

  6. The angel flap for nipple reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wendy W; Hiersche, Matthew A; Martin, Mark C

    2013-01-01

    Creation of an aesthetically pleasing nipple plays a significant role in breast reconstruction as a determining factor in patient satisfaction. The goals for nipple reconstruction include minimal donor site morbidity and appropriate, long-lasting projection. Currently, the most popular techniques used are associated with a significant loss of projection postoperatively. Accordingly, the authors introduce the angel flap, which is designed to achieve nipple projection with lasting results. The lateral edges of the flap and the area surrounding the top of the nipple are de-epithelialized and the flaps are wrapped to create a nipple mound composed primarily of dermis. Decreasing the amount of fat within core of the nipple and enhancing dermal content promotes long-lasting projection. Furthermore, the incision pattern fits within a desired areolar size, preventing unnecessary superfluous extension of the incisions. Thus, the technique described herein achieves the goals of nipple reconstruction, including adequate and long-lasting projection, without extension of the lateral limb scars.

  7. New developments in blown flap noise technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    The noise technology relating to blown-flap systems is reviewed. There are three general sources of noise: turbomachinery, airframe, and the interaction noise of the jet blowing on the flaps. The latter noise-source area is the most critical and the main subject dicussed. Characteristics of lower surface blown and upper surface blown systems are described, including noise spectra, directivity, jet velocity characteristics, aircraft geometric variation effects, and aircraft forward speed effects. Noise reduction concepts are described, including slowing down the jet flow field by devices and engine cycle modifications, structural geometry and shielding modifications, local flow field modifications of the passive and active type, and the absorption of noise. It is concluded that, while there has been considerable progress in the past several years, low noise characteristics in blown flap aircraft must be largely built in by better application of low noise principles during the design.

  8. [Soft tissue defects treated with perforator flaps].

    PubMed

    Weum, Sven; de Weerd, Louis; Klein, Steven; Hage, J Joris

    2008-01-31

    Treatment of soft tissue defects caused by trauma, tumour surgery or pressure sores is a challenge to the reconstructive surgeon. Although contour and function may be restored by tissue transposition, traditional methods often cause significant donor site morbidity. This article describes how increased understanding of vascular anatomy has led to the development of new techniques. The article is based on textbooks of plastic surgery, selected articles and own clinical experience. Pedicled and free perforator flaps represent the latest development in surgical treatment of soft tissue defects. The use of perforator flaps can considerably reduce the disadvantages that are associated with other surgical methods. The use of perforator flaps demands microsurgical skills, but has many advantages. Reliable vascular supply and a good aesthetical result can be combined with minimal donor site morbidity. In many cases this technique may even give sensibility to the reconstructed area.

  9. Exceedingly expanded retroauricular flaps for microtia reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenyu; Zhang, Weina; Huang, Jinjun; Ren, Jizhen; Zhu, Yuehua

    2011-11-01

    The authors propose here a new strategy to obtain exceedingly expanded retroauricular mastoid skin for sufficient coverage of the three-dimensional autogenous costal cartilage framework generally used in auricular reconstruction surgery. From February 2000 to September 2009, 42 microtia reconstructions were performed using this new strategy. Auricular reconstruction was performed in three surgical stages. In the first stage, a 50-ml kidney-shaped expander was inserted subcutaneously in the retroauricular mastoid region. From 5 to 8 ml saline was then injected into the expander every 4 days until the final volume of the expander reached 100-120 ml. In the second stage, we divided the expanded mastoid skin into a superior two-third region (flap A) and an inferior one-third region (flap B, rotation flap). Autogenous costal cartilage framework was then enveloped by these expanded flaps. Tragus construction and conchal excavation was performed in the third stage. All patients were followed up from 6 months to 4 years after reconstruction. A total of 36 cases reported to be satisfied with the appearance of good shape, accurate size, right orientation, and duplication of well-detailed structures. Further revision was requested by six of the total. Complications in this series includes one case of haematoma, two cases of partial evection of the expanded skin and two cases of partial skin necrosis of the helix. All the complications were treated appropriately. Exceeding expansion can provide sufficient retroauricular non-hair-bearing skin tissues for draping the auricular cartilage framework. Skin grafts and retroauricular fascial flap are not needed any more. Patients are usually satisfied with their reconstructive auricles as regards the size, location, projection, convolution, skin-colour matching, etc. Exceedingly expanded retroauricular flaps are the appropriate envelope for the auricular cartilage framework. Copyright © 2011 British Association of Plastic

  10. [Reconstruction of full-thickness nasal alar defect with combined nasolabial flap and free auricular composite flap].

    PubMed

    Peng, Weihai; Rong, Li; Wang, Wangshu; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Duo

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the technique and its effect of combined nasolabial flap and free auricular composite flap for full-thickness nasal alar defect. From March 2010 to March 2013, 9 patients with full-thickness nasal alar defects were treated with combined nasolabial flaps and free auricular composite flaps. Composite auricular flap was used as inner lining and cartilage framework. The nasolabial flap at the same side was used as outer lining. All the patients were followed up for 6-18 months (average, 12 months). All the 9 composite auricular flaps survived completely. Epidermal necrosis happened at the distal end of 1 nasolabial flap. Alar rim was almost normal and symmetric nose was achieved in 6 cases. The arc and the thickness of the alar rim was not enough in 3 cases, resulting in asymmetric appearance. The survival area of auricular composite flap can be enlarged with nasolabial flap. The auricular helix edge can be reserved to reconstruct nasal alar rim with smooth and natural arc. Large full-thickness nasal alar defedts can be reconstructed with combined nasolabial flaps and free auricular composite flaps.

  11. 50 CFR Figure 16 to Part 223 - Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED 16 Figure 16 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES... MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 16 Figure 16 to Part 223—Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions...

  12. 50 CFR Figure 16 to Part 223 - Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED 16 Figure 16 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE... AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 16 Figure 16 to Part 223—Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for...

  13. 50 CFR Figure 16 to Part 223 - Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED 16 Figure 16 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE... AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 16 Figure 16 to Part 223—Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for...

  14. 50 CFR Figure 16 to Part 223 - Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED 16 Figure 16 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES... MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 16 Figure 16 to Part 223—Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions...

  15. 50 CFR Figure 16 to Part 223 - Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED 16 Figure 16 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES... MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 16 Figure 16 to Part 223—Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions...

  16. Comparison of a new flap design with the routinely used triangular flap design in third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Yolcu, Ü; Acar, A H

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to introduce a new flap design in the surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars - a lingually based triangular flap - and to compare this flap design with the routinely used triangular flap. This randomized, prospective, split-mouth study involved 22 patients with impacted bilateral mandibular third molars that were symmetrically positioned, mesially angulated, and retained in bone. The impacted teeth were removed in two sessions, using two different flap designs: the new alternative flap and the traditional triangular flap. Postoperative complications (pain, swelling, trismus, alveolar osteitis, and wound dehiscence) were recorded on days 2, 7, 14, and 21. The data obtained were analysed using the χ(2) test, the Mann-Whitney U-test, and Pearson's correlation. In terms of the severity of postoperative facial swelling and trismus, there were no statistically significant differences between the flap designs (P>0.05). The alternative flap exhibited higher pain scores at 12h post-surgery (P<0.05). In addition, the alternative flap group exhibited less wound dehiscence, although this was not statistically significant. Moreover, all wound dehiscence in this group occurred on sound bone. In conclusion, these results show that this new flap design is preferable to the routinely used flap for impacted third molar surgery.

  17. Porcine model for free-flap breast reconstruction training.

    PubMed

    Bodin, Frédéric; Diana, Michele; Koutsomanis, Alexandre; Robert, Emeric; Marescaux, Jacques; Bruant-Rodier, Catherine

    2015-10-01

    Free-flap breast reconstruction is a challenging surgical procedure with a steep learning curve. A reproducible large animal model could be relevant for free-flap harvesting and microsurgical anastomosis training. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a porcine model for free-flap breast reconstruction. Three female pigs were placed under general anesthesia in order to study feasibility and estimate relevance for training. The deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap, the transverse musculocutaneous gracilis (TMG) flap, and the superior gluteal artery perforator (SGAP) flap were harvested and anastomosed to the internal thoracic vessels. Differences were noted between pig and human anatomy, and the surgical procedure was adapted to build training models. Under a more prominent anterior thoracic wall, the internal thoracic vessels were slightly deeper and larger than in human anatomy. The DIEP flap was never feasible in the porcine model. However, the superior epigastric artery perforator (SEAP) flap showed anatomical similarity with the human DIEP flap, and it proved to be suitable for an inverted training model. The porcine TMG flap harvesting was close to the human one, reproducing specific dissection and anastomotic difficulties. The SGAP flap was not a muscular perforator flap in pigs but a septocutaneous flap. Because of the thinness of the hypodermal fat, porcine flaps were not considered adequate training models for breast-mound shaping. Despite any anatomical variations, the pig has proven to be a suitable training model for free-flap harvesting and transfer in the field of breast reconstruction. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Proposed pathway and mechanism of vascularized lymph node flaps.

    PubMed

    Ito, Ran; Zelken, Jonathan; Yang, Chin-Yu; Lin, Chia-Yu; Cheng, Ming-Huei

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the pump mechanism and pathway of lymph transit in vascularized lymph node flaps. Microsurgical treatment of lymphedema with vascularized lymph node transfer can improve signs and symptoms of disease, but the pathways and mechanisms of these flaps warrant further exploration. (Animal model) 72 flaps were raised in 18 rats: 36 groin flaps contained lymph nodes (LN), 36 deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flaps did not (non-LN). Indocyanine green (ICG) was added into normal saline (NS), 1%, 3%, 5%, 7% and 10% albumin. Three rats were assigned to each group. LN and non-LN flaps were submerged in solution and surveyed for venous fluorescence. In the 7% albumin and NS groups, volumetric change of solution was measured. (Human model) A similar experiment was performed in humans using five submental LN flaps. (Animal model) Fluorescence was detected in the venous pedicle of LN flaps submerged in 5%, 7% and 10% albumin, and half of flaps submerged in 3% albumin. Fluorescence was not detected in LN node flaps submerged in ICG-containing NS or 1% albumin solution. Fluorescence was not detected in non-LN flaps. There was greater volume reduction with LN flaps than non-LN flaps (p<0.001). (Human model) Fluorescence was detected in the venous pedicle of all flaps immersed in lymph. ICG fluorescence was detected in the venous pedicle of rat and human LN flaps submerged in lymph or albumin when the concentration was greater than 3%. Based on these results, a pathway for lymphatic uptake is presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Airplane wing leading edge variable camber flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    The invention and design of an aerodynamic high lift device which provided a solution to an aircraft performance problem are described. The performance problem of converting a high speed cruise airfoil into a low speed aerodynamic shape that would provide landing and take-off characteristics superior to those available with contemporary high lift devices are addressed. The need for an improved wing leading edge device that would complement the high lift performance of a triple slotted trailing edge flap is examined. The mechanical and structural aspects of the variable camber flap are discussed and the aerodynamic performance aspects only as they relate to the invention and design of the device are presented.

  20. Flap Edge Aeroacoustic Measurements and Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An aeroacoustic model test has been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation on high-lift wing configurations. This paper presents an analysis of flap side-edge noise, which is often the most dominant source. A model of a main element wing section with a half-span flap was tested at low speeds of up to a Mach number of 0.17, corresponding to a wing chord Reynolds number of approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for flat (or blunt), flanged, and round flap-edge geometries, with and without boundary-layer tripping, deployed at both moderate and high flap angles. The acoustic database is obtained from a Small Aperture Directional Array (SADA) of microphones, which was constructed to electronically steer to different regions of the model and to obtain farfield noise spectra and directivity from these regions. The basic flap-edge aerodynamics is established by static surface pressure data, as well as by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations and simplified edge flow analyses. Distributions of unsteady pressure sensors over the flap allow the noise source regions to be defined and quantified via cross-spectral diagnostics using the SADA output. It is found that shear layer instability and related pressure scatter is the primary noise mechanism. For the flat edge flap, two noise prediction methods based on unsteady surface pressure measurements are evaluated and compared to measured noise. One is a new causality spectral approach developed here. The other is a new application of an edge-noise scatter prediction method. The good comparisons for both approaches suggest that much of the physics is captured by the prediction models. Areas of disagreement appear to reveal when the assumed edge noise mechanism does not fully define the noise production. For the different edge conditions, extensive spectra and directivity are presented. Significantly, for each edge configuration, the spectra for different flow speeds, flap angles, and

  1. Flap Edge Aeroacoustic Measurements and Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An aeroacoustic model test has been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation on high-lift wing configurations. This paper presents an analysis of flap side-edge noise, which is often the most dominant source. A model of a main element wing section with a half-span flap was tested at low speeds of up to a Mach number of 0.17, corresponding to a wing chord Reynolds number of approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for flat (or blunt), flanged, and round flap-edge geometries, with and without boundary-layer tripping, deployed at both moderate and high flap angles. The acoustic database is obtained from a Small Aperture Directional Array (SADA) of microphones, which was constructed to electronically steer to different regions of the model and to obtain farfield noise spectra and directivity from these regions. The basic flap-edge aerodynamics is established by static surface pressure data, as well as by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations and simplified edge flow analyses. Distributions of unsteady pressure sensors over the flap allow the noise source regions to be defined and quantified via cross-spectral diagnostics using the SADA output. It is found that shear layer instability and related pressure scatter is the primary noise mechanism. For the flat edge flap, two noise prediction methods based on unsteady-surface-pressure measurements are evaluated and compared to measured noise. One is a new causality spectral approach developed here. The other is a new application of an edge-noise scatter prediction method. The good comparisons for both approaches suggest that much of the physics is captured by the prediction models. Areas of disagreement appear to reveal when the assumed edge noise mechanism does not fully define, the noise production. For the different edge conditions, extensive spectra and directivity are presented. Significantly, for each edge configuration, the spectra for different flow speeds, flap angles, and

  2. Fascia-only anterolateral thigh flap for extremity reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fox, Paige; Endress, Ryan; Sen, Subhro; Chang, James

    2014-05-01

    The ability to use the anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap as a vascularized fascial flap, without skin or muscle, was first documented by Koshima et al in 1989. The authors mention the possibility of using the fascia alone for dural reconstruction. Despite its description more than 20 years ago, little literature exists on the application of the ALT flap as a vascularized fascial flap. In our experience, the ALT flap can be used as a fascia-only flap for thin, pliable coverage in extremity reconstruction. After approval from the institutional review board, the medical records and photographs of patients who had undergone fascia-only ALT free flaps for extremity reconstruction were reviewed. Photographic images of patients were then matched to patients who had undergone either a muscle-only or a fasciocutaneous free flap reconstruction of an extremity. Photographs of the final reconstruction were then given to medical and nonmedical personnel for analysis, focusing on aesthetics including color and contour. Review of cases performed over a 2-year period demonstrated similar ease of harvest for fascia-only ALT flaps compared to standard fasciocutaneous ALT flaps. Fascia-only flaps were used for thin, pliable coverage in the upper and lower extremities. There was no need for secondary procedures for debulking or aesthetic flap revision. In contrast to muscle flaps, which require muscle atrophy over time to achieve their final appearance, there was a similar flap contour from approximately 1 month postoperatively throughout the duration of follow-up. When a large flap is required, the fascia-only ALT has the advantage of a single-line donor-site scar. Photograph comparison to muscle flaps with skin grafts and fasciocutaneous flaps demonstrated improved color, contour, and overall aesthetic appearance of the fascia-only ALT over muscle and fasciocutaneous flaps. The fascia-only ALT flap provides reliable, thin, and pliable coverage with improved contour and color over

  3. Pre-expanded Intercostal Perforator Super-Thin Skin Flap.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yunjun; Luo, Yong; Lu, Feng; Hyakusoku, Hiko; Gao, Jianhua; Jiang, Ping

    2017-01-01

    This article introduces pre-expanded super-thin intercostal perforator flaps, particularly the flap that has a perforator from the first to second intercostal spaces. The key techniques, advantages and disadvantages, and complications and management of this flap are described. At present, the thinnest possible flap is achieved by thinning the pre-expanded flap that has a perforator from the first to second intercostal spaces. It is used to reconstruct large defects on the face and neck, thus restoring function and cosmetic appearance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of Clinical Outcome of Facial Artery Myomucosal Flap and Tongue Flap for Closure of Large Anterior Palatal Fistulas.

    PubMed

    Sohail, Muhammad; Bashir, Muhammad Mustehsan; Khan, Farid Ahmad; Ashraf, Noreen

    2016-09-01

    Closure of large anterior palatal fistula has high recurrence rate. The objective of this study was to compare the clinical outcome of facial artery myomucosal flap (FAMM flap) and tongue flap used for closure of large anterior palatal fistula. This study was conducted from March 2008 to March 2014. Thirty-nine patients, aged 2 to 40 years, who had anterior palatal fistula 5 to 20 mm in width with associated alveolar cleft and repaired with either a tongue flap or FAMM flap were included. Patients were excluded if they had adequate local palatal tissue for closure, mid, posterior or multiple fistulae, fistula width >20 mm. Closure was performed in 2 layers. Turndown flap of oral mucoperiosteum was used to reconstruct nasal layer and oral layer was reconstructed with FAMM flap in 16 and tongue flap in 23 patients. Mean(SD) pain score was 3(1) and 7(1) in FAMM flap and tongue flap groups respectively with a P value <0.096. All patients in tongue flap group experienced difficulty in speaking and eating whereas in FAMM flap group 2 had eating problem and 2 experienced speech difficulty. Mean(SD) total operative times for FAMM flap and tongue flap were 155(38) and 242(10) minutes, respectively, P value <0.002. There was no difference for other complications and no recurrence at 1 year follow-up in both groups. The authors concluded that FAMM flap should be considered first choice for closure of large anterior palatal fistulas associated with alveolar cleft as it requires less total operative time and has less early postoperative complications.

  5. Utility of sentinel flaps in assessing facial allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Kueckelhaus, Maximilian; Fischer, Sebastian; Lian, Christine G; Bueno, Ericka M; Marty, Francisco M; Tullius, Stefan G; Pribaz, Julian J; Murphy, George J; Pomahac, Bohdan

    2015-01-01

    Skin biopsies are critical for histologic evaluation of rejection and proper treatment after facial allotransplantation. Many facial allografts provide only limited skin area, and frequent biopsies may also compromise aesthetic outcome. Sentinel flaps, recovered as free fasciocutaneous radial forearm flaps, have been used for remote-site rejection monitoring. They maintain their axial blood supply, similar to facial allografts. The correlation between facial allografts and sentinel flaps in cases of rejection is presented. The authors analyzed the experience of the Boston team's use of four sentinel flaps. Rejection was evaluated and results were compared for each time point. Sentinel flaps were used as functional flaps whenever possible. Results showed a reliable correlation between biopsy specimens taken from the facial allograft and sentinel flaps. During severe rejection episodes in 100 percent of biopsy pairs, both sites displayed a similar grade of rejection. In one case, clinical findings suggested rejection in the facial allograft but were unraveled as rosacea, because clinically there was no rejection displayed in the sentinel flap. The sentinel flap shows a reliable correlation to the facial allograft in cases of severe rejection, therefore providing a valuable tool for rejection monitoring in facial allotransplantation. Advantages of using these flaps include the avoidance of further surgical procedures to the primary vascularized composite allotransplant, additional use of the sentinel flap to repair damaged nonfacial sites, and its utility as both a clinical and histopathologic barometer of rejection and predictor of the potential existence of facial dermatitis unrelated to rejection. Therapeutic, IV.

  6. Choice of Flap Affects Fistula Rate after Salvage Laryngopharyngectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Huang-Kai; Abdelrahman, Mohamed; Chang, Kai-Ping; Wu, Chao-Min; Hung, Shao-Yu; Shyu, Victor Bong-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Due to the significant morbidity and mortality associated with pharyngocutaneous fistula in pharyngoesophageal reconstruction following cancer resection, the purpose of this retrospective study is to examine the selection of tubed skin flaps that impact anastomotic integrity. The flaps evaluated included radial forearm flap versus anterolateral thigh flap, and fasciocutaneous anterolateral thigh flap versus chimeric anterolateral thigh flap. The outcome of interest is the incidence of pharyngocutaneous fistula. The radial forearm group had a significantly higher rate of fistula than the anterolateral thigh group (56.6% vs. 30.2%, p = 0.03). No significant difference in the incidence of fistula was demonstrated between fasciocutaneous and chimeric anterolateral thigh flap (36.8% vs. 25%, p = 0.51). The anastomotic integrity in pharyngoesopharyngeal reconstruction is affected by choice of skin flaps. Anterolateral thigh flap appears to be a viable option for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction. The more technical demand of the anterolateral thigh flap must be weighed against an easily harvested radial forearm flap. PMID:25776941

  7. Decellularized skin/adipose tissue flap matrix for engineering vascularized composite soft tissue flaps.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qixu; Johnson, Joshua A; Dunne, Lina W; Chen, Youbai; Iyyanki, Tejaswi; Wu, Yewen; Chang, Edward I; Branch-Brooks, Cynthia D; Robb, Geoffrey L; Butler, Charles E

    2016-04-15

    Using a perfusion decellularization protocol, we developed a decellularized skin/adipose tissue flap (DSAF) comprising extracellular matrix (ECM) and intact vasculature. Our DSAF had a dominant vascular pedicle, microcirculatory vascularity, and a sensory nerve network and retained three-dimensional (3D) nanofibrous structures well. DSAF, which was composed of collagen and laminin with well-preserved growth factors (e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor), was successfully repopulated with human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), which integrated with DSAF and formed 3D aggregates and vessel-like structures in vitro. We used microsurgery techniques to re-anastomose the recellularized DSAF into nude rats. In vivo, the engineered flap construct underwent neovascularization and constructive remodeling, which was characterized by the predominant infiltration of M2 macrophages and significant adipose tissue formation at 3months postoperatively. Our results indicate that DSAF co-cultured with hASCs and HUVECs is a promising platform for vascularized soft tissue flap engineering. This platform is not limited by the flap size, as the entire construct can be immediately perfused by the recellularized vascular network following simple re-integration into the host using conventional microsurgical techniques. Significant soft tissue loss resulting from traumatic injury or tumor resection often requires surgical reconstruction using autologous soft tissue flaps. However, the limited availability of qualitative autologous flaps as well as the donor site morbidity significantly limits this approach. Engineered soft tissue flap grafts may offer a clinically relevant alternative to the autologous flap tissue. In this study, we engineered vascularized soft tissue free flap by using skin/adipose flap extracellular matrix scaffold (DSAF) in combination with multiple types of human cells. Following

  8. Aerodynamic characteristics of NACA 4412 airfoil sction with flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ockfen, Alex E.; Matveev, Konstantin I.

    2009-09-01

    Wing-in-Ground vehicles and aerodynamically assisted boats take advantage of increased lift and reduced drag of wing sections in the ground proximity. At relatively low speeds or heavy payloads of these craft, a flap at the wing trailing-ground-effect flow id numerically investigated in this study. The computational method consists of a steady-state, incompressible, finite volume method utilizing the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Grid generation and solution of the Navier-Stokes equations are completed flow with a flap, as well as ground-effect motion without a flap. Aerodynamic forces are plain flap. Changes in the flow introduced with the flap addition are also discussed. Overall, the use of a flap on wings with small attack angles is found to be beneficial for small flap deflections up to 5% of the chord, where the contribution of lift augmentation exceeds the drag increase, yielding an augmented lift-to-drag ratio

  9. Effect of Systemic Antioxidant Allopurinol Therapy on Skin Flap Survival

    PubMed Central

    Rasti Ardakani, Mehdi; Al-Dam, Ahmed; Rashad, Ashkan; Shayesteh Moghadam, Ali

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND It has been reported that systemic administration of allopurinol improves cell survival. This study was aimed to evaluate effects of allopurinol on skin flaps in dogs. METHODS Twenty dogs underwent one skin flap surgery with a 2-week interval. The first procedure was performed according to the standard protocols. The second phase was started by a 1-week pretreatment with allopurinol. Length of the necrotic zone was measured and recorded daily. At each phase, flaps were removed and sent for histopathological study after 1 week observation. RESULTS Mean length of the necrotic zone in allopurinol treated skin flaps has been significantly less than normal flaps over all 7 days of observation (p<0.0001). Histopathology study showed less inflammation and more normal tissue structure in the allopurinol treated skin flaps. CONCLUSION It was demonstrated that systemic administration of allopurinol significantly improved skin flap survival. PMID:28289614

  10. Tunnelled tensor fascia lata flap for complex abdominal wall reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Frederick; Buonocore, Samuel; Narayan, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the treatment of two patients with recurrent, infected abdominal wall defects using bilateral delayed and tunnelled pedicled tensor fascia lata (TFL) myofascial flaps. TFL flaps were elevated and delayed for 4 weeks in both cases. In the second case, Parietex Composite mesh was positioned underneath the TFL flap and allowed to incorporate. After a delay of 4 weeks, the flaps were harvested and tunnelled subcutaneously to repair the abdominal wall defect. Both patients have stable repairs but had donor site seromas requiring drainage. Cadaver dissection was also performed to identify structures related to TFL flap harvest. We identified a variant of lateral femoral cutaneous nerve that traversed the TFL flap, necessitating meticulous dissection during surgery. In summary, we describe a new technique of incorporating mesh into the TFL prior to flap harvest for reconstruction of complex abdominal wall. PMID:22707661

  11. The value of postoperative anticoagulants to improve flap survival in the free radial forearm flap

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Justin E.; Aarts, Mark C.J.; Swart, Karin M.A.; Disa, Joseph J.; Gerressen, Marcus; Kuo, Yur-Ren; Wax, Mark K.; Grolman, Wilko; Braunius, Weibel W

    2016-01-01

    Background Free radial forearm flap (FRFF) reconstruction is a valuable technique in head and neck surgery, that allows closure of large defects while striving to maintain functionality. Anticoagulative drugs are often administered to improve flap survival, although evidence regarding effectiveness is lacking. Objective of review To investigate the effectiveness of postoperative anticoagulants to improve survival of the FRFF in head and neck reconstruction. Type of review Systematic review and multicenter, individual patient data meta-analysis. Search strategy MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and CINAHL were searched for synonyms of ‘anticoagulants’ and ‘free flap reconstruction’. Evaluation method Studies were critically appraised for directness of evidence and risk of bias. Authors of the highest quality publications were invited to submit their original data for meta-analysis. Results Five studies were of adequate quality and data from four studies (80%) were available for meta-analysis, describing 759 FRFF procedures. Anticoagulants used were: aspirin (12%), low-molecular weight dextran (18.3%), unfractioned heparin (28.1%), low-molecular weight heparin (49%) and prostaglandin-E1 (2.1%). Thirty-one percent did not receive anticoagulants. Flap failure occurred in 40 of 759 patients (5.3%) On univariate analysis, use of unfractioned heparin was associated with a higher rate of flap failure. However, these regimens were often administered to patients who had revision surgery of the anastomosis. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, anticoagulant use was not associated with improved flap survival or flap-related complications. Conclusions The studied anticoagulative drugs did not improve FRFF survival or lower the rate of flap-related complications. In addition some anticoagulants may cause systemic complications. PMID:25823832

  12. Dorsalis Pedis Free Flap: The Salvage Option following Failure of the Radial Forearm Flap in Total Lower Lip Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Stathas, Theodoros; Tsiliboti, Dimitra; Tsiros, Aris; Mastronikolis, Nicholas; Goumas, Panos

    2014-01-01

    Reconstruction after resection of large tumors of the lower lip requires the use of free flaps in order to restore the shape and the function of the lip, with the free radial forearm flap being the most popular. In this study we describe our experience in using the dorsalis pedis free flap as a salvage option in reconstruction of total lower lip defect in a patient with an extended lower lip carcinoma after failure of the radial forearm free flap, that was initially used. The flap was integrated excellently and on the followup the patient was free of disease and fully satisfied with the aesthetic and functional result. PMID:24803937

  13. To flap or not to flap: a discussion between a fish and a jellyfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nathan; Roh, Chris; Idrees, Suhail; Gharib, Morteza

    2016-11-01

    Fish and jellyfish are known to swim by flapping and by periodically contracting respectively, but which is the more effective propulsion mechanism? In an attempt to answer this question, an experimental comparison is made between simplified versions of these motions to determine which generates the greatest thrust for the least power. The flapping motion is approximated by pitching plates while periodic contractions are approximated by clapping plates. A machine is constructed to operate in either a flapping or a clapping mode between Reynolds numbers 1,880 and 11,260 based on the average plate tip velocity and span. The effect of the total sweep angle, total sweep time, plate flexibility, and duty cycle are investigated. The average thrust generated and power required per cycle are compared between the two modes when their total sweep angle and total sweep time are identical. In general, operating in the clapping mode required significantly more power to generate a similar thrust compared to the flapping mode. However, modifying the duty cycle for clapping caused the effectiveness to approach that of flapping with an unmodified duty cycle. These results suggest that flapping is the more effective propulsion mechanism within the range of Reynolds numbers tested. This work was supported by the Charyk Bio-inspired Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology, the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1144469, and the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships program.

  14. Innervated reverse dorsal digital island flap for fingertip reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Meisei; Shinoda, Akihiko; Sugiyama, Atsuki; Ui, Keito

    2006-09-01

    Various methods of fingertip reconstruction with a sensory flap have been reported. Digital island flaps or cross-finger flaps have to be used for large defects; however, the digital artery is sacrificed when creating conventional homodigital island flaps and 2 surgeries are required for the cross-finger flap. We describe our experience with an innervated reverse dorsal digital island flap that does not require sacrifice of the digital artery. We used innervated reverse dorsal digital flaps for fingertip reconstruction in 8 patients. The flap was supplied by the vascular network between the dorsal digital artery (the terminal branch of the dorsal metacarpal artery) and the dorsal branch of the digital artery. Venous drainage was through the cutaneous veins and the venous network associated with the dorsal arterial network. The flap was designed on either the dorsal proximal or the dorsal middle phalangeal region. The flap was harvested with the dorsal branch of the digital nerve (for the dorsal middle phalanx), the dorsal digital nerve (for the dorsal proximal phalanx), or the superficial branch of the radial nerve (for the thumb), which was anastomosed to the distal end of the digital nerve. After flap transfer the donor site was covered with a full-thickness skin graft. Of the 8 flaps, 6 survived completely, 1 had partial epithelial skin necrosis, and 1 showed central compression skin necrosis. Three flaps showed congestive changes from the first to the fifth day after surgery, which resolved by massage. All patients achieved satisfactory recovery of sensation; the static 2-point discrimination ranged from 3 mm to 5 mm and the Semmes-Weinstein test results ranged from 0.036 g to 0.745 g. The innervated reverse dorsal digital island flap provides another option for homodigital tip coverage. The advantages are that the digital artery is not sacrificed and only 1 surgery is needed. A disadvantage is the potential for venous congestion for the first 4 or 5 days after

  15. Unilateral Breast Reconstruction Using Bilateral Inferior Gluteal Artery Perforator Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Muto, Mayu; Ogawa, Marina; Shibuya, Mai; Yasumura, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Shinji; Ishikawa, Takashi; Maegawa, Jiro

    2015-01-01

    Background: For reconstructing moderate-to-high projection breasts in nulliparous patients with insufficient abdominal tissue or prior abdominal surgeries, a unilateral inferior gluteal artery perforator (IGAP) flap is an alternative procedure. In patients with slim hips, however, unilateral gluteal tissue is insufficient and inferior gluteal crease displacement may develop postoperatively. Donor-site asymmetry is also a major disadvantage. In these circumstances, bilateral IGAP flaps provide sufficient tissue without significant gluteal deformity. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 20 patients who underwent unilateral breast reconstruction using bilateral IGAP flaps by a single surgeon between November 2007 and December 2012. A quantitative outcome assessment was performed and compared with that of 22 unilateral IGAP flap patients operated on by the same surgeon. Results: Twenty patients underwent reconstruction with 40 IGAP flaps. Of the 40 flaps, 39 survived and 1 developed total necrosis due to repeated venous thrombosis. In 15 of 20 patients, the size of reconstructed breast was comparable to that of the contralateral breast. Final inset flap weight was 462.3 g for bilateral flaps and 244.3 g for unilateral flaps. Total operating time was 671.1 minutes (bilateral flaps) and 486.8 minutes (unilateral flaps). Conclusions: Use of bilateral IGAP flaps for breast reconstruction helps to avoid asymmetry of the inferior buttock volume and shape. Bilateral flaps provide sufficient tissue volume and allow for reconstruction of a breast comparable to the unaffected side. In patients with moderate-to-high projection breast whose abdominal tissue cannot be used for reconstruction, IGAP flaps may be a suitable alternative. PMID:25878925

  16. Enhanced Correlation of SMART Active Flap Rotor Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, Sesi

    2011-01-01

    This is a follow-on study to a 2010 correlation effort. Measured data from the SMART rotor test in the NASA Ames 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel are compared with CAMRAD II calculations. As background, during the wind tunnel test, unexpectedly high inboard loads were encountered, and it was hypothesized at that time that due to changes in the flexbeams over the years, the flexbeam properties used in the analysis needed updating. Boeing Mesa, recently updated these properties. This correlation study uses the updated flexbeam properties. Compared to earlier studies, the following two enhancements are implemented: i) the inboard loads (pitchcase and flexbeam loads) correlation is included for the first time (reliable prediction of the inboard loads is a prerequisite for any future anticipated flight-testing); ii) the number of blade modes is increased to better capture the flap dynamics and the pitchcase-flexbeam dynamics. Also, aerodynamically, both the rolled-up wake model and the more complex, multiple trailer wake model are used, with the latter slightly improving the blade chordwise moment correlation. This sensitivity to the wake model indicates that CFD is needed. Three high-speed experimental cases, one uncontrolled free flap case and two commanded flap cases, are considered. The two commanded flap cases include a 2o flap deflection at 5P case and a 0o flap deflection case. For the free flap case, selected modifications to the HH-06 section flap airfoil pitching moment table are implemented. For the commanded 2o flap case, the experimental flap variation is approximately matched by increasing the analytical flap hinge stiffness. This increased flap hinge stiffness is retained for the commanded 0o flap case also, which is treated as a free flap case, but with larger flap hinge stiffness. The change in the mid-span and outboard loads correlation due to the updating of the flexbeam properties is not significant. Increasing the number of blade modes results in an

  17. [Double vascular pedicle iliac crest flap].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Fernández, Javier; Mateos Micas, Mario; Galán, Ramón; Cobos, Pedro; Jové, Montserrat; Jové, Margarita; Aguilera, Laura; Vázquez, Olga; Mommsen, Jens; Forteza, Gabriel; Piera, Verónica

    2009-01-01

    The iliac crest flap is commonly used in reconstructions of the head and neck. The vascularisation of this region depends on the deep circumflex iliac artery and vein (ACIP/VCIP). The present study describes for the first time, the simultaneous use of the deep and superficial circumflex iliac systems to obtain an iliac crest flap for head and neck reconstructions. Ten inguinal regions were dissected in five cadavers in the Human Anatomy and Embryology Unit of the Faculty of Medicine of the Rovira i Virgili University. In the period 2005-2007, three patients required mandibular reconstruction with a microvascularised iliac crest osteocutaneous flap at the Maxillofacial Surgery Unit of the Joan XXIII University Hospital. The 3 cases showed a favourable outcome. This "supercharging" variation guarantees the perfusion to the skin flap, provides a better three-dimensional arrangement of the soft tissue and lowers the morbidity at the donor site, as much less internal oblique muscle cuff is harvested. This technique may be of great interest in the reconstruction of complex maxillofacial defects instead of having to carry out a vascular dissection and its extra anastomosis.

  18. Free Surface and Flapping Foil Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthakrishnan, Palaniswamy

    2014-11-01

    Flapping foils for station-keeping of a near-surface body in a current is analyzed using a finite-difference method based on boundary-fitted coordinates. The foils are hinge-connected to the aft of the body and subject to pitch oscillation. Results are obtained for a range of Strouhal number, Froude number, unsteady frequency parameter τ, Reynolds number and the depth of foil submergence. Results show that at low Strouhal number (St < 0 . 1) and sub-critical unsteady parameter τ < 0 . 25 , the flapping generates drag instead of thrust. At high Strouhal number and super-critical value of the unsteady parameter (τ > 0 . 25) flapping generates high thrust with low efficiency. Thrust and efficiency are found to decrease with decreasing submergence depth of the foil. At the critical τ = 0 . 25 and shallow submergence of the foil, the standing wave generated above the foil continues to grow until breaking; both the thrust and efficiency of the foil are reduced at the critical τ. The necessary conditions for optimal thrust generation by a flapping foil underneath the free surface are found to be (i) Strouhal number in the range from 0.25 to 0.35, (ii) unsteady parameter τ > 0 . 25 and (iii) the maximum angle of attack less than 15° for the flat-plate foil. Supported by the US Office of Naval Research through the Naval Engineering Education Center (NEEC) Consortium of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

  19. Computational Aerodynamics of Insects' Flapping Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kyung Dong; Kyung, Richard

    2011-11-01

    The kinematics of the Insects' flapping flight is modeled through mathematical and computational observations with commercial software. Recently, study on the insects' flapping flight became one of the challenging research subjects in the field of aeronautics because of its potential applicability to intelligent micro-robots capable of autonomous flight and the next generation aerial-vehicles. In order to uncover its curious unsteady characteristics, many researchers have conducted experimental and computational studies on the unsteady aerodynamics of insects' flapping flight. In the present paper, the unsteady flow physics around insect wings is carried out by utilizing computer software e-AIRS. The e-AIRS (e-Science Aerospace Integrated Research System) analyzes and models the results of computational and experimental aerodynamics, along with integrated research process of these two research activities. Stroke angles and phase angles, the important two factors in producing lift of the airfoils are set as main parameters to determine aerodynamic characteristics of the insects' flapping flight. As a result, the optimal phase angle to minimize the drag and to maximize the lift are found. Various simulations indicate that using proper value of variables produce greater thrust due to an optimal angle of attack at the initial position during down stroke motion.

  20. Computation of Lifting Wing-Flap Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, Brian; Kwak, Dochan

    1996-01-01

    Research has been carried out on the computation of lifting wing-flap configurations. The long term goal of the research is to develop improved computational tools for the analysis and design of high lift systems. Results show that state-of-the-art computational methods are sufficient to predict time-averaged lift and overall flow field characteristics on simple high-lift configurations. Recently there has been an increased interest in the problem of airframe generated noise and experiments carried out in the 7 x 10 wind tunnel at NASA Ames have identified the flap edge as an important source of noise. A follow-on set of experiments will be conducted toward the end of 1995. The computations being carried out under this project are coordinated with these experiments. In particular, the model geometry being used in the computations is the same as that in the experiments. The geometry consists of a NACA 63-215 Mod B airfoil section which spans the 7 x lO tunnel. The wing is unswept and has an aspect ratio of two. A 30% chord Fowler flap is deployed modifications of the flap edge geometry have been shown to be effective in reducing noise and the existing code is currently being used to compute the effect of a modified geometry on the edge flow.

  1. Flapping wing aerodynamics: from insects to vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Chin, Diana D; Lentink, David

    2016-04-01

    More than a million insects and approximately 11,000 vertebrates utilize flapping wings to fly. However, flapping flight has only been studied in a few of these species, so many challenges remain in understanding this form of locomotion. Five key aerodynamic mechanisms have been identified for insect flight. Among these is the leading edge vortex, which is a convergent solution to avoid stall for insects, bats and birds. The roles of the other mechanisms - added mass, clap and fling, rotational circulation and wing-wake interactions - have not yet been thoroughly studied in the context of vertebrate flight. Further challenges to understanding bat and bird flight are posed by the complex, dynamic wing morphologies of these species and the more turbulent airflow generated by their wings compared with that observed during insect flight. Nevertheless, three dimensionless numbers that combine key flow, morphological and kinematic parameters - the Reynolds number, Rossby number and advance ratio - govern flapping wing aerodynamics for both insects and vertebrates. These numbers can thus be used to organize an integrative framework for studying and comparing animal flapping flight. Here, we provide a roadmap for developing such a framework, highlighting the aerodynamic mechanisms that remain to be quantified and compared across species. Ultimately, incorporating complex flight maneuvers, environmental effects and developmental stages into this framework will also be essential to advancing our understanding of the biomechanics, movement ecology and evolution of animal flight.

  2. Undulatory Flap Propulsion - Reduction to Practice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-05-10

    We use computational and reduced-order modeling for predictive studies of undulatory propulsion systems. Through the understanding of the factors...that affect the performance of undulatory swimmers, we optimize man-made devices that employ novel methods for propulsion such as undulatory flap propulsion.

  3. Correlation of Smart Active Flap Rotor Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, Sesi; Straub, Friedrich

    2009-01-01

    The ability to predict SMART active trailing edge flap rotor loads is explored in this study. Full-scale wind tunnel data recently acquired in the NASA Ames 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel are compared with analytical results from CAMRAD II. For the 5-bladed rotor, two high-speed forward flight cases are considered, namely, a 0 deg flap deflection case and a 5P, 2 deg flap deflection case. Overall, the correlation is reasonable, with the following exceptions: the torsion moment frequency and the chordwise bending moment are under predicted. In general, the effect of the 5P, 2 deg flap motion is captured by the analysis, though there is over prediction in the neighborhood of the 105 deg and 120 deg azimuthal locations. Changes to the flexbeam torsion stiffness are also briefly considered in this study, as this stiffness will be updated in the future. Finally, the indication is that compressibility effects are important, and this suggests that computational fluid dynamics might improve the current correlation.

  4. Propulsion of a flapping and oscillating airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrick, I E

    1937-01-01

    Formulas are given for the propelling or drag force experience in a uniform air stream by an airfoil or an airfoil-aileron combination, oscillating in any of three degrees of freedom; vertical flapping, torsional oscillations about a fixed axis parallel to the span, and angular oscillations of the aileron about a hinge.

  5. Microsurgery flap in endodontic surgery: case report

    PubMed Central

    CECCHETTI, F.; RICCI, S.; DI GIORGIO, G.; PISACANE, C.; OTTRIA, L.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY In periodontal plastic surgery it is increasingly more evident the relavance of the protection of the gingival marginal anatomy through the realization of a conservative flap. Minimizing the recession of the treated tissue. A correct healing always needs to take into account the diameter and type of the suture and the time of removal from the wound. PMID:23285354

  6. Microsurgery flap in endodontic surgery: case report.

    PubMed

    Cecchetti, F; Ricci, S; DI Giorgio, G; Pisacane, C; Ottria, L

    2009-01-01

    In periodontal plastic surgery it is increasingly more evident the relavance of the protection of the gingival marginal anatomy through the realization of a conservative flap. Minimizing the recession of the treated tissue. A correct healing always needs to take into account the diameter and type of the suture and the time of removal from the wound.

  7. Periodic and chaotic flapping of insectile wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Kanso, E.

    2015-11-01

    Insects use flight muscles attached at the base of the wings to produce impressive wing flapping frequencies. The maximum power output of these flight muscles is insufficient to maintain such wing oscillations unless there is good elastic storage of energy in the insect flight system. Here, we explore the intrinsic self-oscillatory behavior of an insectile wing model, consisting of two rigid wings connected at their base by an elastic torsional spring. We study the wings behavior as a function of the total energy and spring stiffness. Three types of behavior are identified: end-over-end rotation, chaotic motion, and periodic flapping. Interestingly, the region of periodic flapping decreases as energy increases but is favored as stiffness increases. These findings are consistent with the fact that insect wings and flight muscles are stiff. They further imply that, by adjusting their muscle stiffness to the energy level at which they are operating, insects can maintain periodic flapping mechanically for a range of operating conditions.

  8. Calcaneal reconstruction with free fibular osteocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Barbour, John; Saunders, Stuart; Hartsock, Langdon; Schimpf, Dennis; O'Neill, Patrick

    2011-07-01

    Due to the role of the calcaneus in weight bearing, soft tissue coverage along with proper reduction of the fracture is the treatment following open calcaneal injury. Intra-articular calcaneal fractures present a very difficult management problem, as the lack of soft tissue and the intricate vascularity in this area pose a risk of complications. Coverage with local and free muscle flaps following excision of infected structures is a common approach for the treatment of chronic osteomyelitis. However, it is unknown which type of flap is optimal for the treatment of lateral foot wounds, especially when complicated by calcaneal osteomyelitis. A patient presented with an open wound over the lateral aspect of the heel with exposed hardware and chronic osteomyelitis of the calcaneus. Following multiple debridements, an ipsilateral osteocutaneous free fibular flap was transferred to the bony defect. Weight bearing was initiated at 2 months postoperatively, and he now ambulates with a normal gait, has normal plantar sensation, and has no difficulty maneuvering stairs. The patient has done well postoperatively and has recovered full range of motion and complete mobility. In this case report, an osteocutaneous free flap provided an excellent outcome for an active patient with a very complex and complicated condition. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  9. Aerohydrodynamics of flapping-wing propulsors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhdestvensky, Kirill V.; Ryzhov, Vladimir A.

    2003-11-01

    It is the objective of this survey to review research and development results of flapping-wing propulsors and of vehicles equipped with them. Given the complex and multi-disciplinary character of the problem, a wide range of questions is considered in order to provide a general idea of the state-of-the-art. The main attention is directed at the aerohydrodynamics of flapping-wing propulsors. The major relevant mathematical models and the corresponding numerical results are presented together with the experimental data obtained up to the present time. Also, the physical and the design factors are discussed, which affect the aerohydrodynamic characteristics of flapping wings and that therefore have to be accounted for in the modern mathematical models. Experimental data and numerical modeling results are compared to determine domains of validity of the latter for the aerohydrodynamic design of full-scale air and marine vehicles. Also, existing engineering solutions for vehicles with flapping-wing propulsors are presented and prospective directions for future investigations are outlined.

  10. The Retrograde Ulnar Dorsal Flap: Surgical Technique and Experience as Island Flap in Coverage of Hand Defects.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Amador, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    Flaps from the forearm are often used to reconstruct soft-tissue defects in the hand. The retrograde ulnar dorsal flap has the advantage that it does not sacrifice a major vascular axis. The anatomic bases of this flap are the proximal and distal branch of the ulnar dorsal artery. The distal branch is partially accompanied with the dorsal branch of the ulnar nerve, and arrives under the abductor digiti quinti muscle making anastomoses with the deep branch of the ulnar artery. The proximal branch reaching the proximal third of the forearm, and anastomose with perforating branches of the ulnar artery. I used this island flap in 12 patients with coverage defects on the hand. The biggest flap was 13×6 cm. Only 1 flap had partial necrosis which did not lead to problems. The retrograde ulnar dorsal flap is a flap designed with reverse flow from the distal branch of the ulnar dorsal artery, and which does not sacrifice the ulnar artery. The donor defect on the forearm ulnar side had a greater esthetic acceptance. Knowing other distal anastomoses, described by other authors later, dorsal at the base of the fourth interdigital space grant greater security to the retrograde ulnar dorsal flap. It is worth highlighting the importance of preserving the adipofascial tissue around the pedicle. Experience with this flap permits us to state that it is a safe and reproducible flap to cover any defect on the dorsal of the hand as well as the first web space.

  11. Comparison of the Results of Early Flap Coverage with Late Flap Coverage in High-Voltage Electrical Injury.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Hamid; Akhoondinasab, Mohammad-Reza; Kazem-Zadeh, Jafar; Dayani, Ahmad-Reza

    Patients with high-voltage electrical injuries had very high rates of infection, morbidity, and limb amputation. The results of early and late flap coverage in these patients were prospectively compared. The patients were divided into two groups, early flap group (≤3 weeks) and late flap group (>3 weeks), according to the length of time from injury to wound coverage with flap. Age, sex, demographic data, time taken for flap coverage, time taken for pedicle division, time taken to discharge, wound infection, range of motion in joints, amputation, mortality, and outcome were gathered in a special questionnaire. This study included 55 patients, 31 within the early flap group and 24 within the late flap group. Of the 55 patients, 94.6% were male; mean (SD) of age was 29.04 (10.11) and of TBSA was 13.8 (10.07). Length of stay was significantly longer in the late flap group. The rates of infection and amputation were lower in the early flap group. There was no correlation between the type and the number of flaps and amputations. Early flap repair reduces the length of stay by 56%, rate of amputation by 54%, and also 86.1% in the rate of infection in the burn site.

  12. Outcome and complications of 540 microvascular free flaps: the Hamburg experience.

    PubMed

    Pohlenz, Philipp; Blessmann, Marco; Blake, Felix; Li, Lei; Schmelzle, Rainer; Heiland, Max

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze surgical outcome and complications of 540 free flap procedures performed at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf during 1987-2005. A total of 532 patients were reconstructed with 540 flaps: 32% were latissimus dorsi flaps, 23% were radial forearm flaps, 21% were iliac crest flaps, 10% were fibula flaps, 6% were jejunal flaps, and 8% were other flaps. Thrombosis of one of the vessels and hematoma were the most frequent causes of failure in microvascular free tissue transfer. A total free flap failure occurred in 34 (6.2%) and a partial flap failure in 42 (7.7%) patients. The most reliable flap in regard to survival was the radial forearm flap. The present study confirms that free flaps are extremely reliable in achieving successful reconstruction of the head and neck.

  13. The Split Pectoralis Flap: Combining the Benefits of Pectoralis Major Advancement and Turnover Techniques in One Flap.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rodger H; Sharabi, Safa E; Kania, Katarzyna E; Hollier, Larry H; Izaddoost, Shayan A

    2017-06-01

    The pectoralis major is a versatile flap used as an advancement or turnover flap for sternal wound treatment. The advancement flap provides suboptimal inferior sternal coverage and poorly fills mediastinal dead space. The turnover flap covers the inferior sternum and fills dead space but requires disinsertion of the muscle from the humerus, resulting in functional loss and cosmetic deformity. The authors describe a new technique of splitting the pectoralis muscle along its fibers, using the superior portion as an advancement flap and the inferior portion as a turnover flap. Eleven patients underwent the described technique. Nine patients healed without complications or repeated operations. One patient had a recurrent aortic graft infection requiring reoperation. One patient had a postoperative seroma requiring incision and drainage. Using the pectoralis as an advancement and turnover flap allows inferior sternum and mediastinum coverage using one donor site and maintaining the function of the muscle and preventing cosmetic deformity.

  14. A Miniature Controllable Flapping Wing Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabagi, Veaceslav Gheorghe

    The agility and miniature size of nature's flapping wing fliers has long baffled researchers, inspiring biological studies, aerodynamic simulations, and attempts to engineer their robotic replicas. Flapping wing flight is characterized by complex reciprocating wing kinematics, transient aerodynamic effects, and very small body lengths. These characteristics render robotic flapping wing aerial vehicles ideal for surveillance and defense applications, search and rescue missions, and environment monitoring, where their ability to hover and high maneuverability is immensely beneficial. One of the many difficulties in creating flapping wing based miniature robotic aerial vehicles lies in generating a proper wing trajectory that would result in sufficient lift forces for hovering and maneuvering. Since design of a flapping wing system is a balance between overall weight and the number of actuated inputs, we take the approach of having minimal controlled inputs, allowing passive behavior wherever possible. Hence, we propose a completely passive wing pitch reversal design that relies on wing inertial dynamics, an elastic energy storage mechanism, and low Reynolds number aerodynamic effects. Theoretical models, compiling previous research on piezoelectric actuators, four-bar transmissions, and aerodynamics effects, are developed and used as basis for a complete numerical simulation. Limitations of the model are discussed in comparison to experimental results obtained from a working prototype of the proposed passive pitch reversal flapping wing mechanism. Given that the mechanism is under-actuated, methods to control lift force generation by actively varying system parameters are proposed, discussed, and tested experimentally. A dual wing aerial platform is developed based on the passive pitch reversal wing concept. Design considerations are presented, favoring controllability and structural rigidity of the final platform. Finite element analysis and experimental

  15. The epithelial flap for photorefractive keratectomy

    PubMed Central

    Shah, S; Sarhan, A; Doyle, S; Pillai, C; Dua, H

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Epithelial debridement for photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) is associated with pain, slower visual recovery, and may be aetiological in haze production. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical results of a new technique involving raising and replacing of an epithelial flap in photorefractive keratectomy.
METHODS—A prospective, non-randomised, comparative, paired eye trial was performed in 72 eyes of 36 patients who underwent PRK with a Nidek EC-5000 excimer laser. For epithelial debridement before PRK, the eyes were divided into two groups. The first eye of each patient was treated with 20% ethanol debridement and the second eye with an epithelial flap which was replaced after treatment. PRK was carried out with the same laser and nomogram in both groups by the same surgeon. Visual and refractive outcome of PRK treatment was compared in both groups.
RESULTS—The mean (SD) preoperative mean spherical equivalent (MSE) was -3.61 (1.38) dioptres (D) (range -1.00 D to -7.88 D) with no significant difference between the two groups. After a mean follow up period of 62.6 weeks (range 52-70) the final MSE was +0.07 (0.61) D (range -5.50 D to +4.50 D) in the debridement group and -0.24 (0.43) D in the epithelial flap group. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in postoperative MSE. The best corrected visual acuity was better in the epithelial flap group at all visits; this difference was statistically significant (p<0.05). The corneal haze was less in the epithelial flap group and this difference was also statistically significant (p<0.05).
CONCLUSIONS—Managing the corneal epithelium as a hinged flap with 20% ethanol is a safe technique with faster visual rehabilitation and reduced haze compared with debridement of the epithelium with alcohol. Further studies need to be performed to compare pain levels postoperatively with the epithelial flap and epithelial debridement. 

 PMID:11264125

  16. Wind-tunnel Investigation of Two Airfoils with 25-percent-chord Gwinn and Plain Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Milton B , Jr

    1940-01-01

    Aerodynamic force tests of an NACA 23018 airfoil with a Gwinn flap having a chord 25 percent of the overall chord and of an NACA 23015 airfoil with a plain flap having a 25-percent chord were conducted to determine the relative merits of the Gwinn and the plain flaps. The tests indicated that, based on speed-range ratios, the plain flap was more effective than the Gwinn flap. At small flap deflections, the plain flap had lower drag coefficients at lift-coefficient values less than 0.70. For lift coefficients greater than 0.70, however, the Gwinn flap at all downward flap deflections had the lower drag coefficients.

  17. [Vestibularly displaced flap with bone augmentation].

    PubMed

    Bakalian, V L

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to achieve esthetic gingival contours with the help of less traumatic mucogingival surgeries. 9 Patients were operated with horizontal deficiencies in 9 edentulous sites, planned to be restored with fixed partial dentures. In all cases there was lack of keratinized tissues. Temporary bridges were fabricated to all patients. Before surgery the bridges were removed and the abutment teeth were additionally cleaned with ultrasonic device. A horizontal incision was made from lingual (palatal) side between the abutment teeth, which was connected with two vertical releasing incisions to the mucogingival junction from the vestibular side. The horizontal incision was made on a distance 6-10 mm from the crest of the alveolar ridge. A partial thickness flap in the beginning 3-5 mm, then a full thickness flap up to the mucogingival junction, then a partial thickness flap was made. The flap was mobilized and displaced vestibularly. In the apical part the cortical bone was perforated, graft material was put and the flap was sutured. In all 9 cases the horizontal defect was partially or fully eliminated. The width of the keratinized tissues was also augmented in all cases. The postoperative healing was without complications, discomfort and painless. The donor sites also healed without complications. The application of Solcoseryl Dental Adhesive Paste 3 times a day for 7-10 days helped for painless healing of the donor site. The offered method of soft tissue and bone augmentation is effective in the treatment of horizontal defects of edentulous alveolar ridges of not big sizes. It makes possible to achieve esthetic results without traumatizing an additional donor-site.

  18. [Effects of perforator flaps combined with muscle flaps for repairing grade Ⅳ pressure ulcers in ischial tuberosity of elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Su, W G; Li, D P; Xing, P P; Xu, L G; Shi, F C; Wen, B; Niu, X H

    2017-09-20

    Objective: To explore effects of perforator flaps combined with muscle flaps for repairing grade Ⅳ pressure ulcers in ischial tuberosity of elderly patients. Methods: Nine elderly patients with grade Ⅳ pressure ulcers in ischial tuberosity were hospitalized in our burn ward from April 2014 to April 2017. Size of wounds ranged from 5 cm×3 cm to 12 cm×7 cm, and depth of sinus ranged from 6 to 22 cm. After admission, emergency debridement or debridement in selective time was performed. After debridement, the wounds were treated with continuous vacuum assisted closure therapy. After the treatment for 1 to 2 weeks, tissue flaps repair operations were performed. Four patients were repaired with inferior gluteal artery perforator flaps combined with long head of biceps femoris muscle flaps. Three patients were repaired with inferior gluteal artery perforator flaps combined with semimembranous muscle flaps. One patient was repaired with inferior gluteal artery perforator flap combined with gracilis muscle flap. One patient was repaired with femoral profound artery perforator flap combined with gluteus maximus muscle flap, and the distal area of femoral profound artery perforator flap of the patient which showed intraoperative cyanosis of 6 cm×4 cm was thinned to medium thickness skin to cover the muscle flap. The other eight patients showed no abnormality during operation. Size of perforator flaps ranged from 7 cm×5 cm to 14 cm×12 cm, and size of muscle flaps ranged from 11 cm×4 cm to 24 cm×6 cm. The donor sites of flaps were all sutured directly. Results: The tissue flaps and skin graft of all patients survived well after operation. During follow-up of 8 to 35 weeks, operative area of all patients showed good shape and texture, with no local diabrosis or recurrence of pressure ulcers. Conclusions: The combination of perforator flaps and muscle flaps is effective in repairing and reducing recurrence of grade Ⅳ pressure ulcers in ischial tuberosity of elderly

  19. [The clinical application of superficial circumflex iliac artery flaps].

    PubMed

    Bao, Guo-Hong; Huang, Chao-Shuai; Zhu, Xiao-Ping

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the clinical application of pedicled superficial circumflex iliac artery (SCIA) flaps in Burns and Plastic Surgery. 19 cases with skin and soft tissue defects were repaired with the Superficial circumflex iliac artery flaps. The defects located in the hand and forearm, the lower abdomen and perineal area, the radicle area of thigh, etc. Before the SCIA flaps were transfered to the recipient areas, 15 cases with different kinds of wounds were debrided thoroughly, 3 cases with scar were removed directly. The size of the flaps ranged from 3.0 cm x 4.5 cm to 26.0 cm x 22.0 cm, and the pedical was 5 cm to 7 cm in length. The flaps in the 18 cases survived completely. Skin necrosis in the distal end of the flap appeared in 1 case, and the wound healed after the second repair. The follow-up period rang from 3 to 18 months. The apperance and function of the hand or foot was satisfactory. Because the pedicled SCIA flaps can be obtain conveniently and contain sufficient blood-supply, so the flap is easy to survive and the flap can be designed in a large size. We believe it is an ideal method to use this flap to repair skin and soft tissue defects located in hands, forearms, the lower abdomen and perineal areas, the radicle area of thigh and so on.

  20. Extensor digitorum brevis muscle flap: modified approach preserving extensor retinaculum.

    PubMed

    Koul, Ashok Raj; Patil, Rahul Krishnarao; Philip, Vinoth

    2009-03-01

    Although numerous reconstructive options for covering defects over distal third of leg and dorsum of foot have been suggested, obtaining satisfactory cover remains difficult problem. Extensor digitorum brevis muscle flap as proximally or distally based island flap has been well described to be a promising alternative. Between 2004 and 2005, 10 defects over dorsum of foot and around malleoli were reconstructed with extensor digitorum brevis muscle flap. Six were proximally based and four were distally based flaps. Retrospectively, data were collected from these patients records like age, gender, type of injury, flap used, flap survival, complications, hospital stay, return to work. Mean follow-up period was 17.5 months (26-12 months). Of 10 flaps, one flap had failed (approximately 10%). Minor donor site problem presented in one case (10%). All patients returned to work after variable periods of rest (average 1(1/2) month). First web hypoesthesia was present only in two patients. This flap provides an excellent local option for small defects around ankle and over dorsum of foot. The advantages of this flap are its easy dissection, reliable blood supply. Disadvantages related to donor site can be minimized with careful technique.

  1. An ameliorated skin flap model in rats for experimental research.

    PubMed

    Hosnuter, Mübin; Kargi, Eksal; Peksoy, Irfan; Babucçu, Orhan; Payasli, Cem

    2006-01-01

    There is a disagreement in the experimental design of random skin flaps owing to their vascular inconsistency. The definition of a reliable axial-pattern skin flap model is needed. The purpose of this study was to describe a new skin flap model to deal with entire drawbacks of existing random and axial pattern skin flap designs. This was accomplished by creating paired skin flaps including both skin and vascular pedicle on the dorsum of the same rat. This design was suitably termed as rando-axial flap. The present study offers a simple and reliable skin flap model with following advantages: (1) it has a predictable necrosis area, (2) it reveals a larger survival area (75 +/- 5%) when compared to other flaps in this study (Mann-Whitney U-test, p<0.001), (3) the vascular pedicle is consistent, (4) control and study flaps are placed on the same animal (5) it can be converted to a random, an axial or a free flap.

  2. A new flap alternative for trochanteric pressure sore coverage: distal gluteus maximus musculocutaneous advancement flap.

    PubMed

    Nisanci, Mustafa; Sahin, Ismail; Eski, Muhitdin; Alhan, Dogan

    2015-02-01

    Management of long-term bedridden patients experiencing pressure sores still represents a surgical challenge due to limited flap alternatives and high recurrence rates after the treatment. Fasciocutaneous, musculocutaneous, local perforator-based flaps, and free flaps have all been used for treatment of trochanteric pressure sores. This study presents a new use of distal gluteus maximus (GM) muscle as an advancement musculocutaneous flap for coverage of trochanteric pressure sores in 7 patients. The technique involves design of a long V-shaped skin island over the distal fibers of the GM muscle, beginning from the inferoposterior wound edge and extending inferomedially, almost parallel to the gluteal crease. After its harvest as an island flap on the distal fibers of the GM muscle, the skin paddle can be advanced onto the trochanteric defect, whereas the muscle itself is rotated after severing its insertion to femur. If a second triangular skin island is designed on the proximal fibers of GM muscle to cover an associated sacral defect, 2 coexisting pressure sores can be reconstructed concomitantly with 2 skin paddles on a single muscle belly at 1 surgical setting. Of the 7 patients, 3 had 3 (bilateral trochanteric and sacral), 2 had 2 (sacral and trochanteric), and 2 had 1 (only trochanteric) pressure sores. All ulcers were closed successfully and all of the flaps survived totally without any complication except the one in which we experienced minimal wound dehiscence in the early postoperative period. Conclusively, our current surgical method provided a reliable coverage for trochanteric pressure sores although it was technically straightforward and fast. Additionally, it offers simultaneous closure of 2 pressure ulcers with 2 skin islands on a single muscle flap.

  3. Superficial femoral artery perforator flap: anatomical study of a new flap and clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Mojallal, Ali; Boucher, Fabien; Shipkov, Hristo; Saint-Cyr, Michel; Braye, Fabienne

    2014-04-01

    The medial thigh has been infrequently studied as a donor site for pedicled or free flaps. In their previous studies, the authors observed a direct cutaneous branch from the superficial femoral artery. This study aimed to investigate the anatomy and potential possibility for flap elevation (the midmedial thigh flap) on this direct branch of the superficial femoral vessels. Circumferential adipocutaneous thigh flaps were harvested from 14 fresh adult cadaver legs. The direct cutaneous branch from the superficial femoral vessels was located between the sartorius and gracilis muscles. Pedicle location, diameter, and length and position of the great saphenous vein and saphenous nerve were recorded. A flap based on this vessel was designed. Height, width, and surface of the skin paddle were recorded. Three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography was used to analyze the area of cutaneous territory supplied by the studied perforator. The pedicle was located at an average distance of 22.79 ± 1.55 cm below the pubic tubercle on the medial axis of the thigh, and it was found in 100 percent of dissections. It was always located between the sartorius and gracilis muscles, with a mean diameter of 2.82 ± 0.69 mm and mean length of 4.79 ± 0.52 cm. The average area of skin perfused was 182.24 cm, located preferentially distal and posterior to the perforator pedicle. Two clinical cases illustrate the feasibility of the midmedial thigh perforator flap. The superficial femoral artery perforator flap appears to be reliable and has a constant vascular anatomy. Donor-site morbidity is low, resulting in only a vertical scar on the medial thigh. Therapeutic, V.

  4. Comparison of outcome of microvascular bony head and neck reconstructions using the fibular free flap and the iliac crest flap.

    PubMed

    Mücke, Thomas; Loeffelbein, Denys J; Kolk, Andreas; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Kanatas, Anastasios; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Mitchell, David A; Kesting, Marco R

    2013-09-01

    Several microvascular free flaps are available for reconstruction of the osseous components after resections for head and neck cancer. We have prospectively evaluated patients treated by bony microsurgical reconstruction to identify predictors of adverse outcomes for delayed wound healing and failure of free flaps. All patients from July 2007 to June 2011 who had reconstructions with microvascular fibular or iliac crest flaps immediately after resection of the tumour were evaluated. There were a total of 156 bony free flaps: 120 (77%) fibular and 36 (23%) iliac crest flaps. A total of 133 (85%) were successful. Delayed wound healing was more common with the iliac crest flap (p=0.01) at the intraoral site (p=0.04). Significantly more iliac crest free flaps failed (p=0.02). Anastomosis to the facial artery (p=0.05) and facial vein (p=0.04), and duration of overall operating time were associated with a significantly higher risk of failure of the flap. Patients with cancer of the head and neck who require microsurgical bony reconstruction are at increased risk of postoperative complications. Significantly more complications were found with the iliac crest flap, whereas the fibular flap was associated with a significantly longer operating time.

  5. Aerodynamic flight performance in flap-gliding birds and bats.

    PubMed

    Muijres, Florian T; Henningsson, Per; Stuiver, Melanie; Hedenström, Anders

    2012-08-07

    Many birds use a flight mode called undulating or flap-gliding flight, where they alternate between flapping and gliding phases, while only a few bats make use of such a flight mode. Among birds, flap-gliding is commonly used by medium to large species, where it is regarded to have a lower energetic cost than continuously flapping flight. Here, we introduce a novel model for estimating the energetic flight economy of flap-gliding animals, by determining the lift-to-drag ratio for flap-gliding based on empirical lift-to-drag ratio estimates for continuous flapping flight and for continuous gliding flight, respectively. We apply the model to flight performance data of the common swift (Apus apus) and of the lesser long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris yerbabuenae). The common swift is a typical flap-glider while-to the best of our knowledge-the lesser long-nosed bat does not use flap-gliding. The results show that, according to the model, the flap-gliding common swift saves up to 15% energy compared to a continuous flapping swift, and that this is primarily due to the exceptionally high lift-to-drag ratio in gliding flight relative to that in flapping flight for common swifts. The lesser long-nosed bat, on the other hand, seems not to be able to reduce energetic costs by flap-gliding. The difference in relative costs of flap-gliding flight between the common swift and the lesser long-nosed bat can be explained by differences in morphology, flight style and wake dynamics. The model presented here proves to be a valuable tool for estimating energetic flight economy in flap-gliding animals. The results show that flap-gliding flight that is naturally used by common swifts is indeed the most economic one of the two flight modes, while this is not the case for the non-flap-gliding lesser long-nosed bat. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Reconstruction of Lateral Skull Base Defects: A Comparison of the Submental Flap to Free and Regional Flaps.

    PubMed

    Howard, Brittany E; Nagel, Thomas H; Barrs, David M; Donald, Carrlene B; Hayden, Richard E

    2016-06-01

    To compare reconstructive techniques, operative times, duration of hospitalization, and need for subsequent flap revisions between reconstructive approaches to lateral skull base defects. Case series with chart review. Tertiary academic referral center. Patients (n = 31) undergoing reconstruction of composite lateral skull base defects from 2002 to 2014. Data were analyzed for demographics, tumor characteristics, reconstructive technique, operative time, duration of hospitalization, complications, and outcomes. Thirty-one patients were identified for inclusion. Lateral temporal bone defects resulted from resection of malignant lesions, including squamous cell carcinoma (n = 25), basal cell carcinoma (n = 2), and other carcinoma (n = 4). Defects were reconstructed with submental flaps (n = 16), pedicled latissimus dorsi flaps (n = 6), and free anterolateral thigh flaps (n = 9). All cases involved neurosurgery, neurotology, and head and neck surgery services. Although time of surgical resection was similar, time saving was noticed with submental reconstruction. Compared with free flaps, submental flap reconstruction was associated with significantly reduced total operative time (mean, 544 vs 683 min; P = .00817) and duration of hospitalization (4.9 vs 9.8 days; P = .02067). Submental flaps were significantly less likely to require revision debulking procedures (mean = 0.6) compared with latissimus dorsi flaps (mean, 1.3; P < .00001) and free flaps (mean, 1.6; P < .00001). There was 100% flap survival. The musculocutaneous submental flap provides an excellent option for reconstruction of lateral skull base defects given its proximity, reliability, ease of harvest, and exceptional color match. Submental flap reconstruction was associated with reduced operative time, hospitalization duration, and flap revisions. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  7. Acute ischemic preconditioning of skeletal muscle prior to flap elevation augments muscle-flap survival.

    PubMed

    Carroll, C M; Carroll, S M; Overgoor, M L; Tobin, G; Barker, J H

    1997-07-01

    Ischemic preconditioning of the myocardium with repeated brief periods of ischemia and reperfusion prior to prolonged ischemia significantly reduces subsequent myocardial infarction. Following ischemic preconditioning, two "windows of opportunity" (early and late) exist, during which time prolonged ischemia can occur with reduced infarction size. The early window occurs at approximately 4 hours and the late window at 24 hours following ischemic preconditioning of the myocardium. We investigated if ischemic preconditioning of skeletal muscle prior to flap creation improved subsequent flap survival and perfusion immediately or 24 hours following ischemic preconditioning. Currently, no data exist on the utilization of ischemic preconditioning in this fashion. The animal model used was the latissimus dorsi muscle of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were assigned to three groups, and the right or left latissimus dorsi muscle was chosen randomly in each animal. Group 1 (n = 12) was the control group, in which the entire latissimus dorsi muscle was elevated acutely without ischemic preconditioning. Group 2 (n = 8) investigated the effects of ischemic preconditioning in the early window. In this group, the latissimus dorsi muscle was elevated immediately following preconditioning. Group 3 (n = 8) investigated the effects of ischemic preconditioning in the late window, with elevation of the latissimus dorsi muscle 24 hours following ischemic preconditioning. The preconditioning regimen used in groups 2 and 3 was two 30-minute episodes of normothermic global ischemia with intervening 10-minute episodes of reperfusion. Latissimus dorsi muscle ischemia was created by occlusion of the thoracodorsal artery and vein and the intercostal perforators, after isolation of the muscle on these vessels. Muscle perfusion was assessed by a laser-Doppler perfusion imager. One week after flap elevation, muscle necrosis was quantified in all groups by means of computer-assisted digital

  8. Power performance optimization and loads alleviation with active flaps using individual flap control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettas, Vasilis; Barlas, Thanasis; Gertz, Drew; Madsen, Helge A.

    2016-09-01

    The present article investigates the potential of Active Trailing Edge Flaps (ATEF) in terms of increase in annual energy production (AEP) as well as reduction of fatigue loads. The basis for this study is the DTU 10 MW Reference Wind Turbine (RWT) simulated using the aeroelastic code HAWC2. In an industrial-oriented manner the baseline rotor is upscaled by 5% and the ATEFs are implemented in the outer 30% of the blades. The flap system is kept simple and robust with a single flap section and control with wind speed, rotor azimuth, root bending moments and angle of attack in flap's mid-section being the sensor inputs. The AEP is increased due to the upscaling but also further due to the flap system while the fatigue loads in components of interest (blade, tower, nacelle and main bearing) are reduced close to the level of the original turbine. The aim of this study is to demonstrate a simple and applicable method that can be a technology enabler for rotor upscaling and lowering cost of energy.

  9. Vertical electrostatically 90° turning flaps for reflective MEMS display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutzi, Fabio; Noell, Wilfried; de Rooij, Nico F.

    2011-03-01

    A new kind of MEMS reflective display is being developed having high contrast and reflectivity, better than on printed paper. The system is based on novel vertical flaps, which can be electrostatically turned by 90° to horizontal position. After fabrication, the poly-silicon flaps are vertical to the wafer surface and on the top suspended by torsion beams. In this state the pixel is black, incoming ambient light passes by the flaps and is absorbed by an underlying absorptive layer. When the flaps are turned to horizontal position light is reflected back and the pixel gets white. A self-aligning four masks bulk microfabrication process is employed, which uses poly-silicon filling of high aspect-ratio cavities. Parylene was also employed as flap material. Thanks to auto stress-compensation the flaps are not deformed due to intrinsic stresses. Low actuation voltages down to 20V can be achieved.

  10. Blood flow and tissue survival in the rabbit venous flap.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, K; Firrell, J C; Ogden, L; Tsai, T M

    1993-01-01

    The extent of venous flow, revascularization, local fluid imbibition, and metabolic status was evaluated in an experimental venous flap model. Thirty-six rabbits divided into six groups of six rabbits each had a 3.5 x 2.5 cm venous flap elevated along the thoracoepigastric vein, connected only by its proximal and distal vein, and sutured back. A composite graft of the same size was created on the contralateral side. Venous flaps survived 14 days, while composite grafts consistently did not. The vascular network was partially filled with fluorescein tracer within an hour after flap creation, even with an underlying Silastic sheet. Filling improved over several days, consistent with rapid revascularization. Composite grafts showed no immediate filling and delayed revascularization. Venous flow was apparently insufficient to enhance metabolism, since both glucose and lactate levels were equivalent between venous flaps and composite grafts. This supports the concept that an enhanced revascularization may be the primary mechanism of survival for venous flaps.

  11. Pedicled perforator flaps in the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Stefan O P; Mureau, Marc A M

    2010-10-01

    Perforator flaps, since their first description in 1989, have in many ways revolutionized reconstructive surgery. Whereas little more than a decade ago many surgeons were still hesitant to fully trust perforator flaps to be a reliable option, nowadays these flaps are often first choice. Investigators have to remain critical, however, of their advances and realize that not every reconstruction will require or benefit from a perforator flap, as previously well-established, nonperforator flaps still have their indication and can give excellent results. The most important skill in reconstructive surgery of the head and neck is not cutting the flap but assessing the defect, planning the reconstruction, and choosing wisely from the ever-increasing options available.

  12. Flap Necrosis after Palatoplasty in Patients with Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Rossell-Perry, Percy

    2015-01-01

    Palatal necrosis after palatoplasty in patients with cleft palate is a rare but significant problem encountered by any cleft surgeon. Few studies have addressed this disastrous complication and the prevalence of this problem remains unknown. Failure of a palatal flap may be attributed to different factors like kinking or section of the pedicle, anatomical variations, tension, vascular thrombosis, type of cleft, used surgical technique, surgeon's experience, infection, and malnutrition. Palatal flap necrosis can be prevented through identification of the risk factors and a careful surgical planning should be done before any palatoplasty. Management of severe fistulas observed as a consequence of palatal flap necrosis is a big challenge for any cleft surgeon. Different techniques as facial artery flaps, tongue flaps, and microvascular flaps have been described with this purpose. This review article discusses the current status of this serious complication in patients with cleft palate. PMID:26273624

  13. [Mandibular reconstruction with osseous free flaps: functional results].

    PubMed

    Bozec, A; Poissonnet, G; Converset, S; Lattes, L; Chamorey, E; Vallicioni, J; Demard, F; Dassonville, O

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate functional results of oromandibular reconstruction with osseous free flaps. A total of 67 patients who underwent oromandibular reconstruction with fibula (n=60) or scapular (n=7) free flap between 2000 and 2004 were included in this study. We analysed functional results (alimentation, elocution, mouth opening and cosmetic appearance) and researched the potentially predictive factors of these results (age, comorbidity, preoperative irradiation, type of defect...; Chi(2) test). The rate of free flap success was 89.6%. A functional result considered as normal or subnormal was obtained by more than 50% of patients. Oral alimentation (without tube feeding) and intelligible speech were recovered by 92.5% of patients. Through and through defects and free flap failures were determinant predictive factors of worse functional outcomes. Fibula free flap is considered as the flap of choice for oromandibular reconstruction and allows excellent functional results.

  14. Clinical application of the retrograde arterialized venous flap.

    PubMed

    Koch, Horst; Scharnagl, Erwin; Schwarzl, Franz X; Haas, Franz M; Hubmer, Martin; Moshammer, Harald E T

    2004-01-01

    Retrograde arterialized venous flaps were applied to skin and soft-tissue defects in 13 patients with an average age of 34.4 years. Ten defects were located on the hand, and three on the lower leg. All flaps were harvested from the flexor aspect of the forearm; they ranged in size from 2 x 1 to 11 x 7 cm. There was venous congestion with superficial epidermolysis in six flaps, but not in the other seven. Partial skin necrosis in two of the lower-extremity flaps necessitated secondary skin grafts. Our results suggest that retrograde perfusion enhances blood flow in the periphery of arterialized venous flaps and gives good results in terms of flap survival, especially on the upper extremity. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Reconstructive potential of the lateral arm flap after tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Haas, Franz; Ensat, Florian; Windhager, Reinhard; Stammberger, Heinz; Koch, Horst; Scharnagl, Erwin

    2007-01-01

    The reconstruction of extended tumor-related defects in different anatomic regions requires a versatile and reliable flap. For many surgeons, the lateral arm flap has become the technique of choice in the reconstruction of small- to medium-sized defects. The aim of this study was to analyze the reconstructive potential of the lateral arm flap after cancer ablation in various indications. Between 1998 and 2006, 14 patients underwent reconstruction with differently composed and designed lateral arm flaps at our institution. Complete coverage of all defects was achieved with a single surgical procedure. With a flap survival rate of 100% in our series, excellent long term results and high patient satisfaction combined with low donor site morbidity, we can recommend the use of the lateral arm flap in tumor patients. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Management of complications with flap procedures and replantation.

    PubMed

    Sammer, Douglas M

    2015-05-01

    Replantation and flap procedures employ microvascular techniques to salvage or reconstruct a severely damaged limb or digit. The most devastating complications include complete or partial flap loss, or replantation failure due to vascular complications. Often, these complications can be prevented by appropriate patient selection, careful surgical planning, meticulous technique, and proper postoperative management. This article discusses complications related to replantation and flap procedures in the upper limb, focusing on preventing and managing these complications.

  17. Flight test pilot evaluation of a delayed flap approach procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, J. S.; Edwards, F. G.; Foster, J. D.; Hegarty, D. M.; Drinkwater, F. J., III

    1977-01-01

    Using NASA's CV-990 aircraft, a delayed flap approach procedure was demonstrated to nine guest pilots from the air transport industry. Four demonstration flights and 37 approaches were conducted under VFR weather conditions. A limited pilot evaluation of the delayed flap procedure was obtained from pilot comments and from questionaires they completed. Pilot acceptability, pilot workload, and ATC compatibility were quantitatively rated. The delayed flap procedure was shown to be feasible, and suggestions for further development work were obtained.

  18. Changes in the blood biochemistry following experimental flap ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Knight, K R; Gumley, G J; Rogers, I W; O'Brien, B M

    1988-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate tissue changes occurring within an ischaemic flap by monitoring the blood biochemistry, and to evaluate these changes in relation to ultimate flap viability. A rabbit epigastric free flap was made ischaemic for 4 days at 6 degrees C, then revascularized by anastomosis of its femoral artery and vein. An identical free flap immediately revascularized in another group of rabbits served as a control. The viability of the free flap, as well as various biochemical parameters studied by drawing blood from a catheter in the ear vein, were observed daily. Immediately after the revascularization of ischaemic flaps, there was a 16-fold increase in the plasma levels of creatine kinase (CK) and a smaller but significant 1.5-fold to 2.0-fold increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). In flaps which ultimately failed by 7 days post-ischaemia, the plasma levels of CK, LDH and AST peaked at day 2 post-ischaemia at 68, 13 and 8 times normal respectively, whereas in flaps which survived, the levels of these enzymes recovered to normal by day 3 post-ischaemia. These enzymic changes are probably due to a combination of ischaemic changes in the flap vasculature, ischaemic changes in the flap muscle, and inflammatory changes in the surrounding abdominal tissue. The plasma levels of CK at any time post-ischaemia, and particularly in the first 24 h, were significantly higher in ischaemic flaps which failed compared with those which survived. This parameter is therefore proposed as a possible means of predicting potential flap failure after ischaemic insult, in time to make appropriate surgical intervention.

  19. Microdialysis in clinical practice: monitoring intraoral free flaps.

    PubMed

    Jyränki, Janne; Suominen, Sinikka; Vuola, Jyrki; Bäck, Leif

    2006-04-01

    Clinical examination is still the gold standard of postoperative free flap monitoring, but with intraorally situated and/or buried flaps, it can be difficult or impossible. Microdialysis is a sampling technique which offers the possibility to monitor the metabolism of a flap continuously. Ischemia can be detected by monitoring the changes in glucose, lactate, and pyruvate levels in interstitial fluid of the specific tissue. Our aim was to use microdialysis to monitor the metabolism of free flaps used for reconstructions inside the oral cavity/oropharynx and to evaluate the reliability and usefulness of this new monitoring method.Twenty-five consecutive patients who underwent oral cavity/oropharynx cancer resection and immediate reconstruction with free flap were included in the study. A microdialysis catheter was placed into the subcutaneous adipose tissue of the flap in the end of the surgical procedure. Dialysate samples were taken on an hourly basis for 72 hours postoperatively. Routine clinical monitoring was carried out by experienced nursing staff. Clinical findings were recorded and later compared with microdialysis values. Two flaps out of 25 failed in spite of reoperations. In both problem cases, microdialysis indicated ischemia 1 to 2 hours before it became clinically evident. During flap ischemia, the lactate/pyruvate ratio increased, glucose concentrations reduced, whereas lactate level increased when compared with normal values. Our results indicate that microdialysis is safe for the patient and the flap. It can reliably detect flap ischemia at an early stage. This is especially useful in buried flaps when clinical monitoring is difficult. Microdialysis may also reduce the patient discomfort caused by repeated clinical examination of the flap.

  20. Design and Control of Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    preferred solution for MAVs as the scale is reduced. 2.1 Flapping Wing Aerodynamics A hypothetical flapping wing can have up to four substantial DOF if...unsteady mechanisms depends on the forward velocity of the FWF. As the FWF speeds up , the flow over the Figure 2.1. Flapping wing kinematics...reversal and wing rotation [35, 58, 71, 72]. Therefore, similar to rapid pitch - up , wake capture is a mechanism through which the precise control of the

  1. USB noise reduction by nozzle and flap modifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    The development of concepts for reducing upper surface blown flap noise at the source through flap modifications and special nozzles is reviewed. In particular, recent results obtained on the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of flaps with porous surfaces near the trailing edge and multi-slotted nozzles are reviewed. Considerable reduction (6-10 db) of the characteristic low frequency peak is shown. The aerodynamic performance is compared with conventional systems, and prospects for future improvements are discussed.

  2. Dealing with the venous congestion of free flaps: venous catheterization.

    PubMed

    Gürsoy, Koray; Kankaya, Yüksel; Uysal, Afşin; Koçer, Uğur

    2008-11-01

    For head and neck reconstruction after tumor ablation surgery, free flaps are mostly the chosen treatment modality for most of the centers. Coping with venous insufficiency and increasing venous outflow of the flap during this process increases the success rate. To increase venous outflow, triple-lumen central venous catheter is inserted to one of the donor veins of the flap that has venous insufficiency and one intact vein anastomosis.

  3. Robot-Assisted Free Flap in Head and Neck Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Song, Han Gyeol; Yun, In Sik; Lee, Won Jai; Rah, Dong Kyun

    2013-01-01

    Background Robots have allowed head and neck surgeons to extirpate oropharyngeal tumors safely without the need for lip-split incision or mandibulotomy. Using robots in oropharyngeal reconstruction is new but essential for oropharyngeal defects that result from robotic tumor excision. We report our experience with robotic free-flap reconstruction of head and neck defects to exemplify the necessity for robotic reconstruction. Methods We investigated head and neck cancer patients who underwent ablation surgery and free-flap reconstruction by robot. Between July 1, 2011 and March 31, 2012, 5 cases were performed and patient demographics, location of tumor, pathologic stage, reconstruction methods, flap size, recipient vessel, necessary pedicle length, and operation time were investigated. Results Among five free-flap reconstructions, four were radial forearm free flaps and one was an anterolateral thigh free-flap. Four flaps used the superior thyroid artery and one flap used a facial artery as the recipient vessel. The average pedicle length was 8.8 cm. Flap insetting and microanastomosis were achieved using a specially manufactured robotic instrument. The total operation time was 1,041.0 minutes (range, 814 to 1,132 minutes), and complications including flap necrosis, hematoma, and wound dehiscence did not occur. Conclusions This study demonstrates the clinically applicable use of robots in oropharyngeal reconstruction, especially using a free flap. A robot can assist the operator in insetting the flap at a deep portion of the oropharynx without the need to perform a traditional mandibulotomy. Robot-assisted reconstruction may substitute for existing surgical methods and is accepted as the most up-to-date method. PMID:23898431