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Sample records for bulimia

  1. Bulimia

    MedlinePlus

    Bulimia nervosa; Binge-purge behavior; Eating disorder - bulimia ... Many more women than men have bulimia. The disorder is most common in teenage girls and young women. The person usually knows that her eating pattern is abnormal. She ...

  2. [Bulimia].

    PubMed

    Ziolko, H U; Schrader, H C

    1985-07-01

    In a literary synopsis we inform about eating addiction or binges already known in antiquity and differentiated as bulimos (fames bovina) respectively as kynorexia (fames canina), partially in a still true description. The syndrome, occurring increasingly since one decade, consists of periodically pathological and excessive devouring of food, mostly consecutive restrictive diet and/or vomiting, use of laxatives, depressivity, experience of shame and guilt s.o. At a prevalency of 5% of the (psychiatric) patients mainly women (95%) are concerned, showing a postpubertary begin of disease. In spite of certain connexions to the anorexia nervosa we have to define the bulimia as its counterpart. The different etiological conceptions suppose an epilepsy-like disorder, an attachment to the (endogenic) depression or the presumption of neuro-endocrine events. Largely it is applied to intra- and interpsychical neurotic conflictuality, though actually behavioristical aspects seem to be preferred. The therapeutic intentions comprise anticonvulsives and antidepressives in view of medicamentous treatment; the psychical treatment comprises psychoanalysis, outpatient and inpatient clinical psychotherapy and all actually usual methods up to self-help groups.

  3. Bulimia Nervosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... 396 KB) Related information Anorexia fact sheet Binge eating disorder fact sheet What is bulimia? Who becomes bulimic? ... suh), often called bulimia, is a type of eating disorder. A person with bulimia eats a lot of ...

  4. Bulimia nerviosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... para orinar con frecuencia. Por lo general, la autoestima de las mujeres con bulimia está muy ligada ... biología de una persona, su imagen corporal y autoestima, sus experiencias sociales, antecedentes de salud familiares y ...

  5. [Bulimia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Zeeck, A; Hartmann, A; Sandholz, A; Joos, A

    2006-08-01

    Bulimia nervosa is characterized by episodes of binge eating and compensatory behaviours (self-induced vomiting, laxative misuse, dietary restriction). It has a complex aetiology and is mostly found in young women. Bulimia leads to substantial physical and psychosocial morbidity. Bulimia nervosa needs specialized psychotherapeutic treatment. In most cases outpatient treatment is sufficient, but comorbidity with other psychiatric disturbances has to be taken into account. Additional psychopharmacological interventions might be helpful. After 5 to 10 years about 50% of the patients show complete remissions, 30% partial remissions and about 20% a chronic course of the illness. General practitioners, dentists and gynaecologists should be informed about typical signs of the disorder that is often hidden by the patients.

  6. Bulimia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Up to 1% of young women may have bulimia nervosa, characterised by an intense preoccupation with body weight, uncontrolled binge-eating episodes, and use of extreme measures to counteract the feared effects of overeating. People with bulimia nervosa may be of normal weight, making it difficult to diagnose. After 10 years, about half of people with bulimia nervosa will have recovered fully, one third will have made a partial recovery, and 10% to 20% will still have symptoms. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for bulimia nervosa in adults? What are the effects of discontinuing treatment in people with bulimia nervosa in remission? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to January 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 27 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT; alone or plus exposure/response prevention enhancement), cognitive orientation therapy, dialectical behavioural therapy, discontinuing fluoxetine in people with remission, guided self-help cognitive behavioural therapy, hypnobehavioural therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, mirtazapine, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), motivational enhancement therapy, pharmacotherapy plus psychotherapy, pure or unguided self-help cognitive behavioural therapy, reboxetine, selective serotonin

  7. Bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Hay, Phillipa J; Claudino, Angélica Medeiros

    2010-07-19

    Up to 1% of young women may have bulimia nervosa, characterised by an intense preoccupation with body weight, uncontrolled binge-eating episodes, and use of extreme measures to counteract the feared effects of overeating. People with bulimia nervosa may be of normal weight, making it difficult to diagnose. After 10 years, about half of people with bulimia nervosa will have recovered fully, one third will have made a partial recovery, and 10% to 20% will still have symptoms. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for bulimia nervosa in adults? What are the effects of discontinuing treatment in people with bulimia nervosa in remission? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to January 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 27 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT; alone or plus exposure/response prevention enhancement), cognitive orientation therapy, dialectical behavioural therapy, discontinuing fluoxetine in people with remission, guided self-help cognitive behavioural therapy, hypnobehavioural therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, mirtazapine, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), motivational enhancement therapy, pharmacotherapy plus psychotherapy, pure or unguided self-help cognitive behavioural therapy, reboxetine, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), topiramate, tricyclic

  8. Bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Hay, Phillipa J; Bacaltchuk, Josue

    2008-06-12

    Up to 1% of young women may have bulimia nervosa, characterised by an intense preoccupation with body weight, uncontrolled binge-eating episodes, and use of extreme measures to counteract the feared effects of overeating. People with bulimia nervosa may be of normal weight, making it difficult to diagnose. After ten years, about half of people with bulimia nervosa will have recovered fully, a third will have made a partial recovery, and 10-20% will still have symptoms. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for bulimia nervosa in adults? What are the effects of discontinuing treatment in people with bulimia nervosa in remission? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to June 2007 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 26 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: cognitive behavioural therapy (alone or plus exposure response prevention enhancement); cognitive orientation therapy; dialectical behavioural therapy; discontinuing fluoxetine in people with remission; guided self-help cognitive behavioural therapy; hypnobehavioural therapy; interpersonal psychotherapy; mirtazapine; monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs); motivational enhancement therapy; pharmacotherapy plus psychotherapy; pure or unguided self-help cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT); reboxetine; selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs); topiramate; tricyclic

  9. Bulimia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Up to 1% of young women may have bulimia nervosa, characterised by an intense preoccupation with body weight, uncontrolled binge-eating episodes, and use of extreme measures to counteract the feared effects of overeating. People with bulimia nervosa may be of normal weight, making it difficult to diagnose. After ten years, about half of people with bulimia nervosa will have recovered fully, a third will have made a partial recovery, and 10-20% will still have symptoms. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for bulimia nervosa in adults? What are the effects of discontinuing treatment in people with bulimia nervosa in remission? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to June 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 26 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: cognitive behavioural therapy (alone or plus exposure response prevention enhancement); cognitive orientation therapy; dialectical behavioural therapy; discontinuing fluoxetine in people with remission; guided self-help cognitive behavioural therapy; hypnobehavioural therapy; interpersonal psychotherapy; mirtazapine; monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs); motivational enhancement therapy; pharmacotherapy plus psychotherapy; pure or unguided self-help cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT); reboxetine; selective serotonin

  10. Understanding bulimia.

    PubMed

    Hay, Phillipa J

    2007-09-01

    Bulimia nervosa (BN) and related eating disorders such as binge eating disorder are common. General practitioners can play a key role in the identification and management of BN and related eating disorders. This article describes the presenting and associated features of BN and overviews evidence based treatment approaches. Key features are recurrent episodes of binge eating, extreme weight control behaviours and over concern about weight and shape issues. By definition people are not underweight. Risk factors include being from a western culture, obesity, exposure to a restrictive dieting environment and low self esteem. People are more likely to present asking for help in weight control or a physical problem secondary to the eating disorder. Evidenced based therapies with good outcomes in current use are cognitive behaviour therapy (in full or guided self help forms), high dose fluoxetine, and interpersonal psychotherapy. It is important to convey optimism about treatment efficacy and outcomes.

  11. [Bulimia during adolescence].

    PubMed

    de Tournemire, R

    2013-11-01

    Binge eating, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, anorexia-bulimia are terms often used without really knowing what precisely one is referring to. Otherwise, there are many articles concerning anorexia nervosa in medical literature, a disease, which can be seen and fascinates. These eating disorders are frequent in today's society; medical, psychological and social consequences are important.

  12. [Bulimia nervosa in adolescence].

    PubMed

    Remschmidt, H; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B

    1988-11-01

    Although eating disorders of the bulimic type have been known for a long time, "bulimia nervosa" as a special and specific type of eating disorder was described only during the last decade. Clinical evidence has shown an increase in bulimic disturbances during the last few years. About 30% of the bulimic disturbances begin between the 14th and 18th year of age. About 50% of patients with bulimia nervosa have been anorexic before. A group of 30 patients with anorexia nervosa and a group of 11 patients with bulimia nervosa were compared by means of the dexamethasone suppression test and two depression scales at the beginning of inpatient treatment, after 8-12 weeks of inpatient treatment and at discharge. Patients with anorexia nervosa revealed significantly higher cortisol levels at the beginning of inpatient treatment as compared with the bulimic group. Cortisol levels were normalized with weight gain. Therapeutic measures in bulimia nervosa comprise medical and psychotherapeutic methods.

  13. The Group Treatment of Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Harvey M.; Richman, Ann

    1984-01-01

    Bulimia has become an increasing problem in the college population. This article describes a group psychotherapeutic treatment approach to the problem. A theoretical formulation of the psychodynamics that may underlie the development of bulimia is offered. (Author/DF)

  14. The Group Treatment of Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Harvey M.; Richman, Ann

    1984-01-01

    Bulimia has become an increasing problem in the college population. This article describes a group psychotherapeutic treatment approach to the problem. A theoretical formulation of the psychodynamics that may underlie the development of bulimia is offered. (Author/DF)

  15. Cognitive hypnotherapy with bulimia.

    PubMed

    Barabasz, Marianne

    2012-04-01

    Research on the efficacy of hypnosis in the treatment of bulimia nervosa has produced mixed findings. This is due in part to the interplay between the characteristics of people with bulimia and the wide variety of hypnosis interventions that have been employed. Several authors have noted that methodological limitations in hypnosis research often make evaluation of treatment efficacy difficult. Many of the studies extant provide insufficient information regarding the specifics of participants' hypnotizability, the hypnotic induction, or the hypnotic suggestion(s) employed. Such limitations preclude replication and clinical implementation. This article reviews the literature with replicable methodologies and discusses the implications for evaluating treatment efficacy.

  16. Bulimia: A Medical Portrait.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santomango, Gloria Jean

    There are three known diseases of eating disorders: compulsive overeating, anorexia nervosa, and bulimia. All three affect various body systems, are pathological in nature, and are addictive behaviors that mainly affect females. All can be fatal if not treated or under-treated. Compulsive overeating is the most known of the three disorders. The…

  17. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csapo, Marg

    1987-01-01

    The article reviews the literature on anorexia nervosa, with or without bulimia, and presents a comprehensive picture of this eating disorder, focusing on terminology, historical references, prevalence, prognosis, classification, diagnostic criteria, physical and psychological characteristics, evolution of the disability, etiology, treatment, and…

  18. Bulimia nervosa: online interventions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Up to 1% of people in the community may have bulimia nervosa, characterised by an intense preoccupation with body weight, binge-eating episodes, and use of extreme measures to counteract the feared effects of overeating. People with bulimia nervosa are of normal weight or are overweight, making the condition distinct from anorexia nervosa. After 10 years, about half of people with bulimia nervosa will have recovered fully, one third will have made a partial recovery, and 10% to 20% will still have symptoms. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of online interventions for people with bulimia nervosa? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2014 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found eight studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: applications (apps) or online programmes used as an adjunct to face-to-face therapy, delivery of self-help online, and delivery of therapy online. PMID:25735611

  19. Bulimia: A Medical Portrait.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santomango, Gloria Jean

    There are three known diseases of eating disorders: compulsive overeating, anorexia nervosa, and bulimia. All three affect various body systems, are pathological in nature, and are addictive behaviors that mainly affect females. All can be fatal if not treated or under-treated. Compulsive overeating is the most known of the three disorders. The…

  20. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csapo, Marg

    1987-01-01

    The article reviews the literature on anorexia nervosa, with or without bulimia, and presents a comprehensive picture of this eating disorder, focusing on terminology, historical references, prevalence, prognosis, classification, diagnostic criteria, physical and psychological characteristics, evolution of the disability, etiology, treatment, and…

  1. Oral manifestations of bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Zachariasen, R D

    1995-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa is a psychological compulsive eating disorder that appears to be affecting a growing number of young women. It is characterized by repeated episodes of binge-eating followed by vomiting or some other purging behavior. Bulimia is accompanied by a number of physiological disturbances, some of which occur in the oral cavity. The present article reviews the major characteristics of bulimia nervosa, and describes the most significant oral manifestations of this disorder along with their reported incidences and etiologies.

  2. Physiological Bases of Bulimia, and Antidepressant Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getzfeld, Andrew R.

    This paper reviews the literature on the physiological causes of bulimia and investigates the rationale behind the usage of antidepressant medication in the treatment of bulimia nervosa. No definite conclusions can be stated regarding the physiology of bulimia, but a number of hypotheses are suggested. It appears that the hypothalamus is involved…

  3. Bulimia and Interpersonal Relationships: A Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelen, Mark H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Assessed changes in bulimia in female college students (N=44) and in relation between bulimia and interpersonal relationships over time. Found (1) stable symptomology for normals and bulimics; (2) strong negative correlations between bulimia measures and interpersonal relationships with men; and (3) improvement in symptomology and relationships…

  4. Bulimia and Interpersonal Relationships: A Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelen, Mark H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Assessed changes in bulimia in female college students (N=44) and in relation between bulimia and interpersonal relationships over time. Found (1) stable symptomology for normals and bulimics; (2) strong negative correlations between bulimia measures and interpersonal relationships with men; and (3) improvement in symptomology and relationships…

  5. [The nosological entity bulimia nerviosa].

    PubMed

    López-Ibor Aliño, J J; Cervera Enguix, S

    1991-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are at the present moment, two well defined clinical entities among the group of the eating disorders. The psychopathological differentiation of both syndromes has a great importance for diagnosis and therapy. The authors make a phenomenological description, based on case histories of patients with diagnostics of anorexia and bulimia nervosa, and try to establish an approach to the essential symptomatology of those disorders. The presence of affective symptomatology--depressive, but not exclusively--in the eating behaviour disorders in general and particularly in bulimia nervosa, is nowadays interpreted as an unspecific emotional lability as a response to stressing situations. That is to say, it is a secondary depressive symptomatology, more than a primary mood disorder preceding or underlying bulimia. There is strong evidence in favour of a dysregulation of serotonin metabolism in patients with bulimia nervosa, in the sense of a reduced activity, which manifest itself clinically by binges with food with a high content in carbohydrates. High levels of 5-HT seem to induce increasing feelings of safety, fullness and lead to an interruption of eating. Fluoxetine and this active metabolite are selective inhibitors of the reuptake of 5-HT and their antibulimic effect could be mediated by this mechanism.

  6. The Bulimia Test--Revised: Validation with "DSM-IV" Criteria for Bulimia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelen, Mark H.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The Bulimia Test--Revised (BULIT-R) was given to 23 female subjects who met the criteria for bulimia in the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (DSM-IV) and 124 female controls. The BULIT-R appears to be a valid instruction for identifying individuals who meet DSM-IV criteria for bulimia. (SLD)

  7. The Bulimia Test--Revised: Validation with "DSM-IV" Criteria for Bulimia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelen, Mark H.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The Bulimia Test--Revised (BULIT-R) was given to 23 female subjects who met the criteria for bulimia in the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (DSM-IV) and 124 female controls. The BULIT-R appears to be a valid instruction for identifying individuals who meet DSM-IV criteria for bulimia. (SLD)

  8. Bulimia: the emergence of a syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huon, G F; Brown, L B

    1984-06-01

    The literature on bulimia, which has regarded it as a psychiatric entity or as a form of disordered eating, suggests that this behaviour is now widespread among the obese, among those with anorexia nervosa and those of normal weight. While physiological, psychological and sociocultural explanations and forms of treatment have been proposed, a holistic perspective on the context in which it occurs can distinguish bulimia nervosa and bulimarexia from 'simple' bulimia.

  9. Bulimia Nervosa: A Primary Care Review

    PubMed Central

    Rushing, Jona M.; Jones, Laura E.; Carney, Caroline P.

    2003-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa is a psychiatric condition that affects many adolescent and young adult women. The disorder is characterized by bingeing and purging behavior and can lead to medical complications. Thus, patients with bulimia nervosa commonly present in the primary care setting. Physical and laboratory examinations reveal markers of bulimia nervosa that are useful in making the diagnosis. Treatment is beneficial, and outcomes of early intervention are good. This article discusses the history, presentation, and tools needed for recognizing and treating bulimia nervosa in primary care. PMID:15213788

  10. Medical Complications of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.

    PubMed

    Westmoreland, Patricia; Krantz, Mori J; Mehler, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are serious psychiatric illnesses related to disordered eating and distorted body images. They both have significant medical complications associated with the weight loss and malnutrition of anorexia nervosa, as well as from the purging behaviors that characterize bulimia nervosa. No body system is spared from the adverse sequelae of these illnesses, especially as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa become more severe and chronic. We review the medical complications that are associated with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, as well as the treatment for the complications. We also discuss the epidemiology and psychiatric comorbidities of these eating disorders.

  11. Anorexia Nervosa/Bulimia: The Teenager's Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, G. Sue

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia are currently being studied with great intensity by the medical profession. Anorexia nervosa was first described in the medical literature in 1868, but was considered a rarity until the late 1930's. Bulimia was not identified in the medical literature until 1979. Recent studies suggest that approximately five percent…

  12. Anorexia Nervosa/Bulimia: The Teenager's Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, G. Sue

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia are currently being studied with great intensity by the medical profession. Anorexia nervosa was first described in the medical literature in 1868, but was considered a rarity until the late 1930's. Bulimia was not identified in the medical literature until 1979. Recent studies suggest that approximately five percent…

  13. Bulimia: disturbed patterns of solitude.

    PubMed

    Larson, R; Johnson, C

    1985-01-01

    This research suggests that daily solitude has a central role in bulimia. A sample of 15 bulimic patients and 24 normal controls carried electronic pagers for one week and filled out self-reports on their experience in response to randomly timed signals. The bulimics reported the lowest mood states when alone at home, the context in which their symptomatic behavior usually takes place. Further, those who reported the worst experiences in this context were the one's showing the most severe behavioral and affective manifestations of the disorder.

  14. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia: A Research Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeten, Mary K.

    1985-01-01

    The eating disorders called anorexia nervosa and bulimia are examined in terms of their symptomatology, etiology, and treatment, and in terms of how the extension home economist or teacher can help. Resources for additional information or help are listed. (CT)

  15. Bulimia: Growing Awareness of an Eating Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yudkovitz, Elaine

    1983-01-01

    Describes bulimia, a disorder involving binge eating and purging increasingly prevalent in young women. Reviews the literature and describes symptoms, etiological factors, and treatment considerations and approaches for the disorder. (Author)

  16. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia: A Research Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeten, Mary K.

    1985-01-01

    The eating disorders called anorexia nervosa and bulimia are examined in terms of their symptomatology, etiology, and treatment, and in terms of how the extension home economist or teacher can help. Resources for additional information or help are listed. (CT)

  17. Bulimia: Growing Awareness of an Eating Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yudkovitz, Elaine

    1983-01-01

    Describes bulimia, a disorder involving binge eating and purging increasingly prevalent in young women. Reviews the literature and describes symptoms, etiological factors, and treatment considerations and approaches for the disorder. (Author)

  18. Treating Women with Bulimia from a Sociocultural Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotelling, Kathy

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a sociocultural perspective of bulimia. Notes that since bulimia occurs in a sociocultural context, which includes a socialized developmental path with concomittant norms and values, effective treatment must address those norms and values. Recommends group therapy. (ABB)

  19. Group Work for Bulimia: A Review of Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimpfer, David G.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews descriptive and experimental research relating to the eating disorder known as bulimia nervosa. Reviews outcome studies of group treatment of bulimia to examine the effectiveness of group intervention. Provides recommendations for practice and future research. (Author/PVV)

  20. Bulimia: Estimate of Incidence and Relationship of Shyness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, Shirley Ann; Figley, Charles R.

    1985-01-01

    Surveyed 160 college women to examine the incidence of bulimia and its relationship to shyness. Results indicated 23 percent of the participants were bulimic. A significant relationship was found between bulimia and fear of rejection (private shyness). (JAC)

  1. Fad Bulimia: A Serious and Separate Counseling Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cesari, Joan P.

    1986-01-01

    Differences between fad bulimia and clinical bulimia are presented using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III) criteria, personality assessment measures, and responses to counseling. (Author)

  2. Group Work for Bulimia: A Review of Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimpfer, David G.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews descriptive and experimental research relating to the eating disorder known as bulimia nervosa. Reviews outcome studies of group treatment of bulimia to examine the effectiveness of group intervention. Provides recommendations for practice and future research. (Author/PVV)

  3. Treating Women with Bulimia from a Sociocultural Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotelling, Kathy

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a sociocultural perspective of bulimia. Notes that since bulimia occurs in a sociocultural context, which includes a socialized developmental path with concomittant norms and values, effective treatment must address those norms and values. Recommends group therapy. (ABB)

  4. Bulimia: Estimate of Incidence and Relationship of Shyness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, Shirley Ann; Figley, Charles R.

    1985-01-01

    Surveyed 160 college women to examine the incidence of bulimia and its relationship to shyness. Results indicated 23 percent of the participants were bulimic. A significant relationship was found between bulimia and fear of rejection (private shyness). (JAC)

  5. Fad Bulimia: A Serious and Separate Counseling Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cesari, Joan P.

    1986-01-01

    Differences between fad bulimia and clinical bulimia are presented using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III) criteria, personality assessment measures, and responses to counseling. (Author)

  6. Study Explores Electrical Brain Stimulation to Treat Bulimia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treat Bulimia Though preliminary, it found symptoms of eating disorder lessened in first 24 hours after treatment To ... brain may temporarily ease the symptoms of the eating disorder bulimia nervosa, a small study suggests. The study ...

  7. Using the Health Belief Model for Bulimia Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grodner, Michele

    1991-01-01

    Discusses application of the Health Belief Model to the prevention of bulimia, describing each model component. The article considers the individual's beliefs about bulimia and bulimic-like behaviors as a means of predicting the likelihood of behavior change to prevent clinically diagnosable bulimia. (SM)

  8. Body and Bulimia Revisited: Reflections on "A Secret Life"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillmann, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    In 1996, the author published "A Secret Life in a Culture of Thinness: Reflections on Body, Food, and Bulimia" (Tillmann-Healy, 1996), an account of her struggle with binging and purging from ages 15 to 25. She came to understand bulimia as a communicative act, expressing fear, anxiety, and grief. From 25 to 35, her recovery from bulimia involved…

  9. Body and Bulimia Revisited: Reflections on "A Secret Life"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillmann, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    In 1996, the author published "A Secret Life in a Culture of Thinness: Reflections on Body, Food, and Bulimia" (Tillmann-Healy, 1996), an account of her struggle with binging and purging from ages 15 to 25. She came to understand bulimia as a communicative act, expressing fear, anxiety, and grief. From 25 to 35, her recovery from bulimia involved…

  10. Using the Health Belief Model for Bulimia Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grodner, Michele

    1991-01-01

    Discusses application of the Health Belief Model to the prevention of bulimia, describing each model component. The article considers the individual's beliefs about bulimia and bulimic-like behaviors as a means of predicting the likelihood of behavior change to prevent clinically diagnosable bulimia. (SM)

  11. Subtyping adolescents with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eunice Y; Le Grange, Daniel

    2007-12-01

    Cluster analyses of eating disorder patients have yielded a "dietary-depressive" subtype, typified by greater negative affect, and a "dietary" subtype, typified by dietary restraint. This study aimed to replicate these findings in an adolescent sample with bulimia nervosa (BN) from a randomized controlled trial and to examine the validity and reliability of this methodology. In the sample of BN adolescents (N=80), cluster analysis revealed a "dietary-depressive" subtype (37.5%) and a "dietary" subtype (62.5%) using the Beck Depression Inventory, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and Eating Disorder Examination Restraint subscale. The "dietary-depressive" subtype compared to the "dietary" subtype was significantly more likely to: (1) report co-occurring disorders, (2) greater eating and weight concerns, and (3) less vomiting abstinence at post-treatment (all p's<.05). The cluster analysis based on "dietary" and "dietary-depressive" subtypes appeared to have concurrent validity, yielding more distinct groups than subtyping by vomiting frequency. In order to assess the reliability of the subtyping scheme, a larger sample of adolescents with mixed eating and weight disorders in an outpatient eating disorder clinic (N=149) was subtyped, yielding similar subtypes. These results support the validity and reliability of the subtyping strategy in two adolescent samples.

  12. Parotid salivary secretory pattern in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Riad, M; Barton, J R; Wilson, J A; Freeman, C P; Maran, A G

    1991-01-01

    Parotid gland enlargement occurs in about 25% of patients with the binge eating syndrome of bulimia nervosa. The parotid salivary secretory patterns in 28 bulimics were determined in order to investigate the functional abnormality in the glands. Bulimia patients had a reduced resting flow rate. Bulimics who developed sialadenosis (4 patients) had reduced resting and stimulated flow rates. The salivary amylase activity was increased in both the resting and stimulated states in bulimics and the sialadenosis group. The resting total protein levels were greater in the bulimics. The electrolyte and immunoglobulin levels were within normal limits. The possibility of protein and enzymatic secretory disturbances due to autonomic nerve disorders as an explanation for the development of sialadenosis in bulimia nervosa is discussed.

  13. [Pharmacotherapy for anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Greetfeld, M; Cuntz, U; Voderholzer, U

    2012-01-01

    Psychotherapy is the treatment of choice for both anorexia nervosa and for bulimia nervosa. However, many patients are also treated by pharmaceutical drugs. For the clinician it is difficult to choose pharmacotherapy, because the drugs may not be licensed, because of pharmacodynamic problems due to underweight or purging behaviour, or because of comorbidity. The present review summarises the current knowledge on pharmacotherapy for anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa considering the available guidelines. In general, the knowledge based on studies is insufficient for anorexia nervosa. Up to now, there is no proof of efficacy for any antidepressant or atypical antipsychotic with respect to weight gain; atypical antipsychotics may be helpful for ruminating or excessive motor hyperactivity. For bulimia nervosa antidepressants are the pharmacotherapy of first choice. Long-term effects, however, are still unknown. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. [Bulimia nervosa (BN)--epidemiology, etiology, clinical features, treatment, prognosis].

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, G; Kuboki, T

    2001-03-01

    Bulimia nervosa is a distinctive disorder that was identified in the late 1970s. At first bulimia nervosa was closely associated with anorexia nervosa, but gradually the two disorders became partly separate. The characteristic of bulimia nervosa is the frequent occurrence of binge-eating episodes and sense of loss of control during eating episodes. Bulimia nervosa is complex disorder that are caused and then maintained by various social, psychological, and biological factors. The result of research over the 20 years have contributed significantly to cognitive-behavioural and pharmacological treatment approach for people with bulimia nervosa.

  15. Bulimia: A Model for Group Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Barbara G.

    Bulimia, an eating disorder characterized by binge eating followed by purging and intense feelings of guilt and failure, is increasing among young women. The eating behavior is only a symptom of more complex underlying problems such as feelings of inadequacy, social isolation, depression, rigid thinking, self-defeating thoughts, and perfectionism.…

  16. [Hypertrophy of the salivary glands in bulimia].

    PubMed

    Herrlinger, P; Gundlach, P

    2001-07-01

    We report a case of bulimia nervosa with bilateral swelling of the parotid and submandibular glands. It was the only symptom of the behavioral disorder. Sjögren's disease was excluded histologically. In our case, the parotomegaly as a symptom of sialadenosis was found at the same time as the eating disorder. MRI or ultrasound are important diagnostic tools to confirm the diagnosis.

  17. Interpersonal Group Therapy for Women Experiencing Bulimia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choate, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Bulimia Nervosa (BN) is a chronic disorder that results in a high degree of psychological impairment for many women. This article presents a description of Interpersonal Therapy for Group (IPT-G), an evidence-based approach for the treatment of BN. The author presents a rationale for the use of IPT-G, an outline of the group model, and provides…

  18. Interpersonal Group Therapy for Women Experiencing Bulimia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choate, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Bulimia Nervosa (BN) is a chronic disorder that results in a high degree of psychological impairment for many women. This article presents a description of Interpersonal Therapy for Group (IPT-G), an evidence-based approach for the treatment of BN. The author presents a rationale for the use of IPT-G, an outline of the group model, and provides…

  19. A Multifaceted Group Treatment of Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzman, Melanie; Weiss, Lillie

    In spite of growing attention to the negative psychological and physiological consequences of bulimia, little has been written on its treatment. A comprehensive group treatment program was developed to increase the bulimic's comfort with herself and her body. Subjects were five single females (four college students and a nurse) who participated in…

  20. Bulimia: A Model for Group Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Barbara G.

    Bulimia, an eating disorder characterized by binge eating followed by purging and intense feelings of guilt and failure, is increasing among young women. The eating behavior is only a symptom of more complex underlying problems such as feelings of inadequacy, social isolation, depression, rigid thinking, self-defeating thoughts, and perfectionism.…

  1. Subclinical bulimia predicts conduct disorder in middle adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Viinamäki, Anni; Marttunen, Mauri; Fröjd, Sari; Ruuska, Jaana; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the comorbidity and longitudinal associations between self-reported conduct disorder and subclinical bulimia in a community-based sample of Finnish adolescents in a 2-year prospective follow-up study. There are 2070 adolescents who participated in the survey as ninth graders (mean age 15.5) and followed-up 2 years later. The Youth Self-Report Externalizing scale was used to measure conduct disorder and DSM-IV-based questionnaire to measure bulimia. Co-occurrence of female conduct disorder and subclinical bulimia was found at ages 15 and 17. Subclinical bulimia among girls at age 15 was a risk factor for conduct disorder at age 17, but conduct disorder at age 15 was not predictive of subclinical bulimia at age 17. The pathway from bulimia to conduct disorder may be suggestive of an association with future borderline personality disorder among girls.

  2. [Neuropsychological performance in anorexia and bulimia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Bühren, Katharina; Holtkamp, Kristian; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Konrad, Kerstin

    2008-11-01

    Anorexia nervosa and Bulimia nervosa are common chronic psychiatric diseases afflicting in particular female adolescents. During the acute phase of starvation a number of hormonal, neuropsychological and cerebral morphological changes occur. Some of these abnormalities are only partly reversible. Psychiatric comorbidities complicate the clinical picture and aggravate appropriate therapeutic interventions. The following review describes in detail the neuropsychological impairments in eating disorders, potential factors influencing cognitive performance, and resulting implications for clinical every day life.

  3. Recurrent acute pancreatitis in anorexia and bulimia.

    PubMed

    Morris, Luc G; Stephenson, Kathryn E; Herring, Sharon; Marti, Jennifer L

    2004-07-01

    Mild pancreatitis has been reported as a consequence of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or what has been termed the "dietary chaos syndrome". Either chronic malnutrition, or refeeding after periods of malnutrition, may precipitate acute pancreatitis through several pathogenetic mechanisms. A 26-year-old woman with a ten-year history of anorexia and bulimia presented with a third episode of acute pancreatitis in three months. The patient had been abstinent from alcohol for many years. Imaging studies during all three admissions failed to identify any biliary disease, including gallstones or biliary sludge. A cholecystectomy was performed, with a normal intraoperative cholangiogram, and no abnormalities on pathologic examination of the gallbladder and bile. The patient was discharged on hospital day 10 with no pain, and she has begun to return to regular eating habits. Pancreatitis has not recurred after 6 months of follow up. We have identified 14 cases in the literature of acute pancreatitis associated with anorexia or bulimia. In the absence of evidence for gallstone, alcohol or metabolic etiologies, eating disorders may contribute to the pathophysiology of some idiopathic cases of pancreatitis.

  4. Characteristics of family background in bulimia.

    PubMed

    Igoin-Apfelbaum, L

    1985-01-01

    21 women consulting for bulimia were followed in individual psychotherapy and assessed for family background characteristics. Two sets of data are reported: objective data concerning the incidence of 'broken homes', i.e., with a history of separation or divorce or death of parents; subjective data concerning the image of the family and the identifications which are worked through in psychotherapy. Among our 25 bulimic patients, 13 patients came from 'broken homes' in which, in 9 cases, separations were so radical that it was impossible to maintain relationships with both parents; 12 patients came from close-knit families which in 6 cases were actually 'closed families' hiding massive internal tensions. The proportion of broken homes is significantly higher than in a population of 25 overweight patients without bulimia also undergoing individual psychotherapy. There exists a sharp discrepancy between the actual family failings and the wish of patients to maintain their 'family unit' fantasy. The hypothesis is made that the occurrence of bulimia may be related to the combination of a history of violent separations (or threats of violent separation) in the family, and the endless denial of these separations.

  5. Choosing Assessment Instruments for Bulimia Practice and Outcome Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Katie; Erford, Bradley T.

    2013-01-01

    Six commonly used instruments for assessment of eating disorders were analyzed. Effect size results from Erford et al.'s (2013) meta-analysis for the treatment of bulimia nervosa were used to compare each scale's ability to measure treatment outcomes for bulimia nervosa. Effect size comparisons indicated higher overall effect sizes using the…

  6. Treatment of Body Image Dissatisfaction among Women with Bulimia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouwers, Mariette

    1990-01-01

    Sees body image dissatisfaction as contributing to development and maintenance of bulimia nervosa and bulimic's desire for thinness breeding low self-esteem, feelings of inadequacy, and resistance to recovery. Offers treatment suggestions for body image dissatisfaction as it relates to bulimia. Advises counselors to be satisfied with their own…

  7. Treatment of Body Image Dissatisfaction among Women with Bulimia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouwers, Mariette

    1990-01-01

    Sees body image dissatisfaction as contributing to development and maintenance of bulimia nervosa and bulimic's desire for thinness breeding low self-esteem, feelings of inadequacy, and resistance to recovery. Offers treatment suggestions for body image dissatisfaction as it relates to bulimia. Advises counselors to be satisfied with their own…

  8. Choosing Assessment Instruments for Bulimia Practice and Outcome Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Katie; Erford, Bradley T.

    2013-01-01

    Six commonly used instruments for assessment of eating disorders were analyzed. Effect size results from Erford et al.'s (2013) meta-analysis for the treatment of bulimia nervosa were used to compare each scale's ability to measure treatment outcomes for bulimia nervosa. Effect size comparisons indicated higher overall effect sizes using the…

  9. Bulimia Nervosa: Changes in Its Prevalence on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Laura

    1989-01-01

    Administered Survey on Eating Habits to 382 male and female university students to elicit information relevant to bulimia nervosa. Prevalence of bulimia nervosa among subjects was 10 percent using old criteria and 1 percent using modified new criteria for the disorder. Whichever criteria were used, typical bulimic student was found to be White…

  10. Adolescent Eating Disorders: Anorexia and Bulimia. Publication 352-004.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Alan E.; Baker, Daniel H.

    This document presents an overview of anorexia nervosa and bulimia in adolescents. A brief review of the historical background of these eating disorders is included. Causes of anorexia and bulimia are discussed and physical, behavioral, emotional, and perceptual characteristics of the disorders are listed in a section on symptoms. The need for a…

  11. Assessing motivation to change in bulimia nervosa: the Bulimia Nervosa Stages of Change Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Esteve; Castro, Josefina; Bigorra, Aitana; Morer, Astrid; Calvo, Rosa; Vila, Montserrat; Toro, Josep; Rieger, Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    To assess motivation to change in adolescent patients with bulimia nervosa through the Bulimia Nervosa Stages of Change Questionnaire (BNSOCQ), an instrument adapted from the Anorexia Nervosa Stages of Change Questionnaire (ANSOCQ) already validated in anorexic patients. Subjects were 30 bulimia nervosa patients (mean age = 16.3 years) who were receiving treatment at an eating disorders unit. The evaluation instruments were: the BNSOCQ, the Eating Disorders Inventory (EDI-2) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The BNSOCQ was re-administered 1 week later to evaluate test-retest reliability. The BNSOCQ demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.94) and one week test-retest reliability (Pearson's r = 0.93). Negative significant correlations were found between the BNSOCQ and several EDI-2 scales (Pearson's r between -0.51 and -0.84) and the BDI (r = -0.74). The study provides initial support for the reliability and validity of the BNSOCQ as a self-report instrument for assessing motivation to change in adolescents with bulimia nervosa. 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association

  12. Defining recovery in adult bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jessica; Agras, W Stewart; Bryson, Susan

    2013-01-01

    To examine how different definitions of recovery lead to varying rates of recovery, maintenance of recovery, and relapse in bulimia nervosa (BN), end-of-treatment (EOT) and follow-up data were obtained from 96 adults with BN. Combining behavioral, physical, and psychological criteria led to recovery rates between 15.5% and 34.4% at EOT, though relapse was approximately 50%. Combining these criteria and requiring abstinence from binge eating and purging when defining recovery may lead to lower recovery rates than those found in previous studies; however, a strength of this definition is that individuals who meet this criteria have no remaining disordered behaviors or symptoms.

  13. A case of hyperemesis in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Pedrolli, Carlo; Sacchi, Manuela C; Togni, Michele; Cereda, Emanuele

    2015-05-01

    Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder defined by recurrent episodes of binge eating followed by compensatory behaviors, primarily self-induced vomiting. Most common complications are due to purge behaviors and are frequently responsible for hospitalization. These include electrolyte disturbances, dehydration, hypovolemia, stomatitis, esophageal diseases, and functional impairment of the colon. However, an obstruction-like syndrome has never been reported. We report the case of a middle-age woman suffering from bulimia nervosa and referring at the emergency department with a 7-day story of hyperemesis responsible for an acute renal failure. During hospitalization, after the most important and common medical causes of hyperemesis were excluded, an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed. The endoscopist reported the presence of an impressive bezoar, which underwent to mechanical fragmentation and biopsy sampling, revealing it was made up exclusively of liquorice wheels. An endoscopy performed few days after showed the complete dissolution of the bezoar, and the patient was discharged without any further gastrointestinal complaint. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. An introduction to anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Beverley; Manning, Yvonne

    2003-12-17

    Nurses may come into contact with patients who have anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. The authors discuss the signs and symptoms of these illnesses and outline treatment options for patients with eating disorders.

  15. Medical complications of bulimia nervosa and their treatments.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Katherine; Mehler, Philip S

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to thoroughly review the medical complications associated with bulimia nervosa and their evidenced-based or typical treatments. A thorough review of medical literature to cull pertinent and best articles which guide the diagnosis and treatment of the medical complications of bulimia nervosa was performed. There are many different medical complications of bulimia nervosa which are caused by the mode and frequency of purging. Some are fluid and electrolyte alterations from the utilized mode of purging and some are due to the local damaging effects of purging behaviors on those body sites. Bulimia nervosa is a serious mental health disorder which has many medical complications associated with it. Most are reversible with treatment.

  16. Understanding Eating Disorders, Anorexia, Bulimia, and Binge-Eating

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Understanding Eating Disorders Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of Contents For ... this page please turn Javascript on. Photo: iStock Eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge ...

  17. Neural signature of behavioural inhibition in women with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Skunde, Mandy; Walther, Stephan; Simon, Joe J; Wu, Mudan; Bendszus, Martin; Herzog, Wolfgang; Friederich, Hans-Christoph

    2016-08-01

    Impaired inhibitory control is considered a behavioural phenotype in patients with bulimia nervosa. However, the underlying neural correlates of impaired general and food-specific behavioural inhibition are largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated brain activation during the performance of behavioural inhibition to general and food-related stimuli in adults with bulimia nervosa. Women with bulimia and healthy control women underwent event-related fMRI while performing a general and a food-specific no-go task. We included 28 women with bulimia nervosa and 29 healthy control women in our study. On a neuronal level, we observed significant group differences in response to general no-go stimuli in women with bulimia nervosa with high symptom severity; compared with healthy controls, the patients showed reduced activation in the right sensorimotor area (postcentral gyrus, precentral gyrus) and right dorsal striatum (caudate nucleus, putamen). The present results are limited to adult women with bulimia nervosa. Furthermore, it remains unclear whether impaired behavioural inhibition in patients with this disorder are a cause or consequence of chronic illness. Our findings suggest that diminished frontostriatal brain activation in patients with bulimia nervosa contribute to the severity of binge eating symptoms. Gaining further insight into the neural mechanisms of behavioural inhibition problems in individuals with this disorder may inform brain-directed treatment approaches and the development of response inhibition training approaches to improve inhibitory control in patients with bulimia nervosa. The present study does not support greater behavioural and neural impairments to food-specific behavioural inhibition in these patients.

  18. Neural signature of behavioural inhibition in women with bulimia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Skunde, Mandy; Walther, Stephan; Simon, Joe J.; Wu, Mudan; Bendszus, Martin; Herzog, Wolfgang; Friederich, Hans-Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Background Impaired inhibitory control is considered a behavioural phenotype in patients with bulimia nervosa. However, the underlying neural correlates of impaired general and food-specific behavioural inhibition are largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated brain activation during the performance of behavioural inhibition to general and food-related stimuli in adults with bulimia nervosa. Methods Women with bulimia and healthy control women underwent event-related fMRI while performing a general and a food-specific no-go task. Results We included 28 women with bulimia nervosa and 29 healthy control women in our study. On a neuronal level, we observed significant group differences in response to general no-go stimuli in women with bulimia nervosa with high symptom severity; compared with healthy controls, the patients showed reduced activation in the right sensorimotor area (postcentral gyrus, precentral gyrus) and right dorsal striatum (caudate nucleus, putamen). Limitations The present results are limited to adult women with bulimia nervosa. Furthermore, it remains unclear whether impaired behavioural inhibition in patients with this disorder are a cause or consequence of chronic illness. Conclusion Our findings suggest that diminished frontostriatal brain activation in patients with bulimia nervosa contribute to the severity of binge eating symptoms. Gaining further insight into the neural mechanisms of behavioural inhibition problems in individuals with this disorder may inform brain-directed treatment approaches and the development of response inhibition training approaches to improve inhibitory control in patients with bulimia nervosa. The present study does not support greater behavioural and neural impairments to food-specific behavioural inhibition in these patients. PMID:27575858

  19. Treatments of medical complications of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Mehler, Philip S; Krantz, Mori J; Sachs, Katherine V

    2015-01-01

    Inherent to anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are a plethora of medical complications which correlate with the severity of weight loss or the frequency and mode of purging. Yet, the encouraging fact is that most of these medical complications are treatable and reversible with definitive care and cessation of the eating-disordered behaviours. Herein, these treatments are described for both the medical complications of anorexia nervosa and those which are a result of bulimia nervosa.

  20. VR cue-exposure treatment for bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Maldonado, José; Ferrer-García, Marta; Riva, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Several approaches to the treatment of bulimia nervosa have proved effective, including cognitive-behavioral therapy; however, not all patients improve. It is therefore necessary to explore the possibilities of increasing the efficacy of such treatments. One way to attempt this is to incorporate new technologies. This review explores the possibility of developing a new, empirically validated procedure for the treatment of bulimia nervosa patients that involves cue exposure via virtual reality.

  1. The Use of Duloxetine in Chronic Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Averbuch, Robert N.

    2009-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are routinely prescribed as off-label treatments for bulimia nervosa. There is, however, a paucity of literature addressing the efficacy of the serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors in the pharmacologic management of this disorder. This article describes a clinical situation in which duloxetine, a serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, effectively treated a patient with long-standing bulimia nervosa, purging type, and comorbid generalized anxiety disorder. PMID:19763204

  2. [ANOREXIA AND BULIMIA: IMPACT ON NETWORK SOCIETY].

    PubMed

    Alex Sánchez, María Dolores

    2015-01-01

    The Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have an increasing influence on the way we relate and in shaping personal identity. The phenomenon of online social networking emerges strongly and contributes to the development of new spaces breaking with the official discourse that marks the scientific evidence on health. This paper analyzes the impact of ICT in relation to the identity of the digital natives and eating disorders (ED). Particular attention to how the network society determines the response of young people in situations of social tension is dedicated. To do this, provides a perspective on the concept of interaction from the analysis of the discourse on anorexia and bulimia in the network, and how to care nurses should consider these factors to improve efficiency and quality in clinical care and patient care.

  3. Dimensions of emotion dysregulation in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Jason M; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Peterson, Carol B; Crosby, Ross D; Engel, Scott G; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott J; Smith, Tracey L; Klein, Marjorie H; Goldschmidt, Andrea B; Berg, Kelly C

    2014-05-01

    The goal of this study was to examine associations between dimensions of emotion dysregulation and eating disorder (ED) symptoms in bulimia nervosa (BN). This investigation used baseline data from a BN treatment study that included 80 adults (90% women) with full or subthreshold BN. Participants completed the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS) and the Eating Disorders Examination interview. The Eating Disorders Examination global score was significantly correlated with the DERS total score, as well as several DERS subscales: nonacceptance, impulse and strategies. Further, the DERS goals subscale was found to be uniquely associated with frequency of purging and driven exercise, although none of the subscales were associated with frequency of objective binge eating. Findings indicate that emotion dysregulation is associated with ED symptoms in BN, suggesting the utility of interventions that address emotion regulation skills deficits in the treatment of the disorder.

  4. [Eating disorders: anorexia nervosa, bulimia, binge eating].

    PubMed

    Langenbach, M; Huber, M

    2003-06-01

    We present an overview of three different eating disorders which seem to have an increasing prevalence, especially among young women between 12 and 20 years of age. Anorexia and bulimia nervosa are "threshold disorders" which usually become manifest for the first time during the transition from childhood to early adult life. Eating disorders are chronic disorders and often take a course of 6 or more years. Remission, improvements and symptom change can be expected even after many years of the disorder. Psychiatric comorbidity which occurs in more than 50% of eating disordered patients is of prime importance for prognosis. Depression, anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorders, and personality disorders are most common. There is a variety of complex in- and outpatient treatments with different components which have to be chosen according to the individual case.

  5. Innovations in the Treatment of Bulimia: Transpersonal Psychology, Relaxation, Imagination, Hypnosis, Myth, and Ritual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Michael H.

    1991-01-01

    Written for counselors who must help clients deal with bulimia, this article reviews bulimia's most obvious physical signs and symptoms, etiology, and behavioral characteristics. Considers innovative counseling approaches including Transpersonal Psychology, relaxation training, imagination, fantasy, hypnosis, myths, and rituals. (Author)

  6. Innovations in the Treatment of Bulimia: Transpersonal Psychology, Relaxation, Imagination, Hypnosis, Myth, and Ritual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Michael H.

    1991-01-01

    Written for counselors who must help clients deal with bulimia, this article reviews bulimia's most obvious physical signs and symptoms, etiology, and behavioral characteristics. Considers innovative counseling approaches including Transpersonal Psychology, relaxation training, imagination, fantasy, hypnosis, myths, and rituals. (Author)

  7. Personality Dimensions in Bulimia Nervosa, Binge Eating Disorder, and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Carol B.; Thuras, Paul; Ackard, Diann M.; Mitchell, James E.; Berg, Kelly; Sandager, Nora; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Pederson, Melissa W.; Crow, Scott J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this investigation was to examine differences in personality dimensions among individuals with bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, non-binge eating obesity and a normal weight comparison group as well as to determine the extent to which these differences were independent of self-reported depressive symptoms. Method Personality dimensions were assessed using the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire in 36 patients with bulimia nervosa, 54 patients with binge eating disorder, 30 obese individuals who did not binge eat, and 77 normal weight comparison participants. Results Participants with bulimia nervosa reported higher scores on measures of stress reaction and negative emotionality compared to the other three groups, and lower well-being scores compared to the normal weight comparison and the obese samples. Patients with binge eating disorder scored lower on well-being and higher on harm avoidance than the normal weight comparison group. In addition, the bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder groups scored lower than the normal weight group on positive emotionality. When personality dimensions were re-analyzed using depression as a covariate, only stress reaction remained higher in the bulimia nervosa group compared to the other three groups and harm avoidance remained higher in the binge eating disorder than the normal weight comparison group. Conclusions The higher levels of stress reaction in the bulimia nervosa sample and harm avoidance in the binge eating disorder sample after controlling for depression indicate that these personality dimensions are potentially important in the etiology, maintenance, and treatment of these eating disorders. Although the extent to which observed group differences in well-being, positive emotionality and negative emotionality reflect personality traits, mood disorders, or both is unclear, these features clearly warrant further examination in understanding and treating bulimia nervosa and

  8. The Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia: A Multidimensional Group Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, P. Scott

    This paper defines the eating disorders of anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and bulimia nervosa, a bulimic subtype of anorexia nervosa. The diagnosis of these disorders is discussed and similarities and differences among the three disorders are reviewed. Etiological factors are considered and current trends in treatment of anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and…

  9. Validity of the Eating Attitudes Test and the Eating Disorders Inventory in Bulimia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Janet; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Assessed criterion and concurrent validity of the Eating Attitudes Test and the Eating Disorder Inventory in 82 women with bulimia nervosa. Both tests demonstrated criterion validity by discriminating bulimia nervosa subjects from normals. Only weak support was found for concurrent validity within bulimia subjects. Recommends combination of…

  10. Validity of the Eating Attitudes Test and the Eating Disorders Inventory in Bulimia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Janet; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Assessed criterion and concurrent validity of the Eating Attitudes Test and the Eating Disorder Inventory in 82 women with bulimia nervosa. Both tests demonstrated criterion validity by discriminating bulimia nervosa subjects from normals. Only weak support was found for concurrent validity within bulimia subjects. Recommends combination of…

  11. Bulimia: A Review of the Literature with an Emphasis on Treatment and the Dynamic Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coull, Charles Edward

    This paper presents a dynamic perspective of some of the major issues surrounding the eating disorder of bulimia. The focus is specifically on the relationship of the bulimia nervosa syndrome to the historical dynamics of the developmental process of the individual. Three major aspects of bulimia are discussed. First, there is a discussion of…

  12. The Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia: A Multidimensional Group Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, P. Scott

    This paper defines the eating disorders of anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and bulimia nervosa, a bulimic subtype of anorexia nervosa. The diagnosis of these disorders is discussed and similarities and differences among the three disorders are reviewed. Etiological factors are considered and current trends in treatment of anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and…

  13. The role of pharmacotherapy in anorexia nervosa and bulimia.

    PubMed

    Tolstoi, L G

    1989-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the basic pharmacology and the role of drugs that are used to treat anorexia nervosa and bulimia. The pharmacological treatment of eating disorders is based upon theoretical principles. The theoretical models include: (a) an illness secondary to other psychiatric disorders, (b) a disorder in the hypothalamic control of food intake, (c) a disorder of hypothalamic endocrine regulation, (d) a syndrome secondary to depressive illness, and (e) a disorder in the hypothalamic regulation of food intake. Theoretical models a, b, and c govern the choice of drug therapy for anorexia nervosa, and models d and e govern the choice of drug therapy for bulimia. Drugs used to treat anorexia nervosa and bulimia include tricyclic antidepressants and lithium carbonate. Chlorpromazine, metoclopramide, cyproheptadine, and clomiphene citrate have also been prescribed for the treatment of anorexia nervosa. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors are commonly prescribed to treat bulimia. Fenfluramine has the potential to be of therapeutic value in patients with bulimia. Although drug therapy plays a limited role in the treatment of eating disorders, drugs are commonly prescribed. Therefore, the nutritionist should be familiar with the basic pharmacology and the side effects related to drug therapy.

  14. [Bulimia and anorexia among the teenagers].

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Hela; Gaigi, Imene; El Fray, Hamouda; Gaigi, Sadok; El Ati, Jalila

    2011-11-01

    The disturbances related to the feeding behavior are increasing in Tunisia. To evaluate the impact of an adapted and personalized therapeutic program, including dietetic advises and practice of yoga in Tunisian teenagers suffering from bulimia or anorexia. Our study was carried out on 31 teenagers, old 16 to 19 years, 10 were anorexics (9 girls and 1 boy) and 21 were bulimics (14 girls and 7 boys). After twelve weeks of program application a clear improvement of the physical and mental state of our subjects was recorded. Indeed, an average fall of 7.3% of the body weight of the compulsive eaters and an increase of 6.6% of that of the anorexics were obtained. On the mental level, the frequency of the subjects which make daily crises passed from 29% to 19%. More half of the subjects (54.8%) paid more not to vomit but occasionally (less than one once out of two crises). These results show that an assumption of responsibility targeted of the teenagers suffering from food behavioral problems can help them to be left there.

  15. Predictors of rapid relapse in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Olmsted, Marion P; MacDonald, Danielle E; McFarlane, Traci; Trottier, Kathryn; Colton, Patricia

    2015-04-01

    Relapse remains a significant concern in bulimia nervosa, with some patients relapsing within months of treatment completion. The purpose of the study was to identify predictors of relapse within the first 6 months following treatment. The 116 participants were bingeing and/or vomiting ≥ 8 times per month before day hospital (DH), and had ≤ 2 episodes per month in the last month of DH and the first month after DH. Rapid relapse was defined as ≥ 8 episodes per month for 3 months starting within 6 months. The rate of rapid relapse was 27.6%. Patients who relapsed soon after DH had higher frequencies of bingeing and vomiting before treatment, engaged in less body avoidance before treatment and were more likely to be slow responders to treatment. Weight and shape concerns and body checking were not significant predictors. More frequent bulimic symptoms accompanied by less body avoidance may indicate an entrenchment in the illness which in turn augurs a labored and transient response to DH treatment that is difficult to sustain after intensive treatment ends. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. [The body and food as objects in anorexia and bulimia].

    PubMed

    Hirsch, M

    1989-03-01

    In this paper the function of food and of the own body in anorexia and bulimia is understood as representations of good and bad mother objects. In anorexia nervosa the body in the state of underweight is the good mother-object ("not-mother"), the too heavy body is the bad mother-object ("like mother"). In bulimia the wish for incorporation of a good object (food before binging) and the following panic of the fusion with a bad object (food after eating) is acted out. Body and food, substituting mother objects, are manageable, the illusion of controlling self-object-boundaries is maintained. Thus anorexia and bulimia are understood as an attempt to cope with fear of fusion as well as of separation, which is revived in adolescence.

  17. Gait analysis in anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Cimolin, Veronica; Galli, Manuela; Vismara, Luca; Vimercati, Sara Laura; Precilios, Helmer; Cattani, Laila; Fabris De Souza, Shirley; Petroni, Maria Letizia; Capodaglio, Paolo

    2013-09-13

    Anorexia (AN) and Bulimia Nervosa (BN) are two common eating disorders, which appear to share some reduced motor capacities, such as a reduced balance. The presence and the extent of other motor disorders have not been investigated in a comprehensive way. The aim of this study was to quantify gait pattern in AN and BN individuals in order to ascertain possible differences from the normality range and provide novel data for developing some evidence-based rehabilitation strategies. Nineteen AN patients (age 30.16+9.73) and 20 BN patients (age 26.8+8.41) were assessed with quantitative 3D computerized Gait Analysis. Results were compared with a group of healthy controls (CG; 30.7+5.6). AN and BN patients were characterized by different gait strategies compared to CG. Spatio-temporal parameters indicated shorter step length, with AN showing the shortest values. AN walked slower than BN and CG. As for kinematics, AN and BN showed a nonphysiologic pattern at pelvis and hip level on the sagittal and frontal plane, with BN yielding the most abnormal values. Both AN and BN patients were characterized by high ankle plantar flexion capacity at toe-off when compared to CG. As for ankle kinetics, both AN and BN showed physiologic patterns. Stiffness at hip level was close to CG in both pathologic groups; at the ankle level, stiffness was significantly decreased in both groups, with AN displaying lower values. Both AN and BN were characterized by an altered gait pattern compared to CG. Biomechanical differences were evident mainly at pelvis and hip level. Loss of lean mass may lead to musculoskeletal adaptation, ultimately causing alterations in the gait pattern.

  18. Biological Aspects of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Allan S.; Woodside, D. Blake

    1987-01-01

    Reviews biological factors relevant to the understanding of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. Considers the physical presentation of these disorders; the medical complications of starvation, binging, and purging; and the cognitive and behavioral effects of starvation. Reviews neurophysiological and neurochemical aspects of these illnesses and…

  19. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia: Questions and Answers for School Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallick, M. Joan

    1984-01-01

    School personnel can have a vital role in the early detection and treatment of anorexia nervosa and bulimia by understanding certain signs and symptoms. This article provides specific information about early detection, approaches to use when confronting the student, and methods to facilitate treatment. (Author/DF)

  20. Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa in Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Karen B. W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Dentists and dental hygienists are in a unique position to identify an eating disorder patient from observed oral manifestations and to refer the patient for psychological therapy. The inclusion of information on general and oral complications of bulimia and anorexia nervosa in dental and dental hygiene curriculum was examined. (MLW)

  1. A Primary Prevention Program to Reduce Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullari, Salvatore; Redmon, William K.

    This paper presents a theoretical model for a primary prevention program for bulimia and anorexia nervosa to be used with adolescents and young women considered most at risk of developing these eating disorders. Characteristics of potential anorexics and bulimics are identified to aid in the selection of target groups for the program. It is…

  2. Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa in Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Karen B. W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Dentists and dental hygienists are in a unique position to identify an eating disorder patient from observed oral manifestations and to refer the patient for psychological therapy. The inclusion of information on general and oral complications of bulimia and anorexia nervosa in dental and dental hygiene curriculum was examined. (MLW)

  3. Biological Aspects of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Allan S.; Woodside, D. Blake

    1987-01-01

    Reviews biological factors relevant to the understanding of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. Considers the physical presentation of these disorders; the medical complications of starvation, binging, and purging; and the cognitive and behavioral effects of starvation. Reviews neurophysiological and neurochemical aspects of these illnesses and…

  4. Depressive Thought Content Among Female College Students With Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouwers, Mariette

    1988-01-01

    Compared overall depression scores on Beck Depression Inventory between women with and without bulimia and examined differences in specific depression items. Results indicated that bulimics were more depressed than controls and had distorted thoughts regarding body image, self-blame, somatic preoccupation, guilt, and suicidal ideation. (Author/NB)

  5. Treatment of Bulimia Nervosa: Psychological and Psychopharmacologic Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Elaine L.; Greydanus, Donald E.; Pratt, Helen D.; Patel, Dilip R.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the current literature on psychological and psychopharmacologic treatments for bulimia nervosa in the adolescent population. Describes the two most researched psychological treatments--cognitive behavior therapy and interpersonal therapy--in terms of treatment protocols and outcome research. Reviews psychopharmacologic treatment, including…

  6. A Naturalistic Investigation of Eating Behavior in Bulimia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Ron; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Investigated parameters of eating behavior in subjects with bulimia nervosa (BN). BN and female comparison (FC) subjects monitored hourly over several days their food intake, mood, hunger, social circumstances, and experiences of unpleasant events. BN subjects reported more positive moods prior to consuming a meal, and more negative moods prior to…

  7. Weight Suppression Predicts Time to Remission from Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Michael R.; Berner, Laura A.; Swanson, Sonja A.; Clark, Vicki L.; Eddy, Kamryn T.; Franko, Debra L.; Shaw, Jena A.; Ross, Stephanie; Herzog, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether, at study entry, (a) weight suppression (WS), the difference between highest past adult weight and current weight, prospectively predicts time to first full remission from bulimia nervosa (BN) over a follow-up period of 8 years, and (b) weight change over time mediates the relationship between WS and time to first…

  8. Treatment of Bulimia Nervosa: Psychological and Psychopharmacologic Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Elaine L.; Greydanus, Donald E.; Pratt, Helen D.; Patel, Dilip R.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the current literature on psychological and psychopharmacologic treatments for bulimia nervosa in the adolescent population. Describes the two most researched psychological treatments--cognitive behavior therapy and interpersonal therapy--in terms of treatment protocols and outcome research. Reviews psychopharmacologic treatment, including…

  9. [Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. Psychological considerations for its treatment].

    PubMed

    Barriguete Meléndez, J Armando; Rojo, Luis; Emmelhainz, Marisa

    2004-11-01

    It is presented the current perspectives in the study and treatment of the eating disorders, in specific: anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, epidemiology, and the interface among the different medical specialties, nutrition and sciences of the behavior, the diagnostic approaches, instruments and current therapeutic models.

  10. Depressive Thought Content Among Female College Students With Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouwers, Mariette

    1988-01-01

    Compared overall depression scores on Beck Depression Inventory between women with and without bulimia and examined differences in specific depression items. Results indicated that bulimics were more depressed than controls and had distorted thoughts regarding body image, self-blame, somatic preoccupation, guilt, and suicidal ideation. (Author/NB)

  11. A Naturalistic Investigation of Eating Behavior in Bulimia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Ron; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Investigated parameters of eating behavior in subjects with bulimia nervosa (BN). BN and female comparison (FC) subjects monitored hourly over several days their food intake, mood, hunger, social circumstances, and experiences of unpleasant events. BN subjects reported more positive moods prior to consuming a meal, and more negative moods prior to…

  12. Weight Suppression Predicts Time to Remission from Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Michael R.; Berner, Laura A.; Swanson, Sonja A.; Clark, Vicki L.; Eddy, Kamryn T.; Franko, Debra L.; Shaw, Jena A.; Ross, Stephanie; Herzog, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether, at study entry, (a) weight suppression (WS), the difference between highest past adult weight and current weight, prospectively predicts time to first full remission from bulimia nervosa (BN) over a follow-up period of 8 years, and (b) weight change over time mediates the relationship between WS and time to first…

  13. Comorbidity of anxiety disorders with anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Walter H; Bulik, Cynthia M; Thornton, Laura; Barbarich, Nicole; Masters, Kim

    2004-12-01

    A large and well-characterized sample of individuals with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa from the Price Foundation collaborative genetics study was used to determine the frequency of anxiety disorders and to understand how anxiety disorders are related to state of eating disorder illness and age at onset. Ninety-seven individuals with anorexia nervosa, 282 with bulimia nervosa, and 293 with anorexia nervosa and bulimia were given the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders and standardized measures of anxiety, perfectionism, and obsessionality. Their ratings on these measures were compared with those of a nonclinical group of women in the community. The rates of most anxiety disorders were similar in all three subtypes of eating disorders. About two-thirds of the individuals with eating disorders had one or more lifetime anxiety disorder; the most common were obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) (N=277 [41%]) and social phobia (N=134 [20%]). A majority of the participants reported the onset of OCD, social phobia, specific phobia, and generalized anxiety disorder in childhood, before they developed an eating disorder. People with a history of an eating disorder who were not currently ill and never had a lifetime anxiety disorder diagnosis still tended to be anxious, perfectionistic, and harm avoidant. The presence of either an anxiety disorder or an eating disorder tended to exacerbate these symptoms. The prevalence of anxiety disorders in general and OCD in particular was much higher in people with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa than in a nonclinical group of women in the community. Anxiety disorders commonly had their onset in childhood before the onset of an eating disorder, supporting the possibility they are a vulnerability factor for developing anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa.

  14. The efficacy of a brief group CBT program in treating patients diagnosed with bulimia nervosa: a brief report.

    PubMed

    Jones, Allan; Clausen, Loa

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of a brief group cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) program in treating a large cohort of patients diagnosed with bulimia nervosa. Treatment outcome defined as reductions in bulimia related behavioral symptoms and bulimia related distress was examined in 205 consecutive new patients enrolled in an eight-session group CBT program. Significant reductions in eating disorder pathology were found on all measures of bulimia related behavioral symptoms, as well as on all measures of bulimia related distress. There is strong evidence for the efficacy of brief group CBT in treating patients with bulimia nervosa. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Neurobiology of anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Walter

    2008-04-22

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are related disorders of unknown etiology that most commonly begin during adolescence in women. AN and BN have unique and puzzling symptoms, such as restricted eating or binge-purge behaviors, body image distortions, denial of emaciation, and resistance to treatment. These are often chronic and relapsing disorders, and AN has the highest death rate of any psychiatric disorder. The lack of understanding of the pathogenesis of this illness has hindered the development of effective interventions, particularly for AN. Individuals with AN and BN are consistently characterized by perfectionism, obsessive-compulsiveness, and dysphoric mood. Individuals with AN tend to have high constraint, constriction of affect and emotional expressiveness, ahendonia and asceticism, whereas individuals with BN tend to be more impulsive and sensation seeking. Such symptoms often begin in childhood, before the onset of an eating disorder, and persist after recovery, suggesting they are traits that create a vulnerability for developing an ED. There is growing acknowledgement that neurobiological vulnerabilities make a substantial contribution to the pathogenesis of AN and BN. Considerable evidence suggests that altered brain serotonin (5-HT) function contributes to dysregulation of appetite, mood, and impulse control in AN and BN. Brain imaging studies, using 5-HT specific ligands, show that disturbances of 5-HT function occur when people are ill, and persist after recovery from AN and BN. It is possible that a trait-related disturbance of 5-HT neuronal modulation predates the onset of AN and contributes to premorbid symptoms of anxiety, obsessionality, and inhibition. This dysphoric temperament may involve an inherent dysregulation of emotional and reward pathways which also mediate the hedonic aspects of feeding, thus making these individuals vulnerable to disturbed appetitive behaviors. Restricting food intake may become powerfully

  16. Celiac disease diagnosed after uncomplicated pregnancy in a patient with history of bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Milisavljević, Nemanja; Cvetković, Mirjana; Nikolić, Goran; Filipović, Branka; Milinić, Nikola

    2013-01-01

    The association between celiac disease and eating disorders has been very rarely reported. This is the first report on celiac disease associated with bulimia in this part of Europe. An adult female patient with history of bulimia and one uncomplicated pregnancy was admitted to the Gastroenterology Department, due to long lasting dyspeptic symptoms, constipation, major weight loss and fatigue. After positive serological screening, the diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed with histopathology examination of duodenal biopsy specimen. Complicated interactions between celiac disease and bulimia can make them difficult to diagnose and treat. It is important to consider the presence of celiac disease in patients with bulimia and gastrointestinal symptoms.

  17. Multi-Family Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa in Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Catherine; Voulgari, Stamatoula; Eisler, Ivan; Hunt, Katrina; Simic, Mima

    2015-01-01

    Existing randomized controlled trials of family therapy for treatment of bulimia nervosa in adolescence highlight the need for further development of treatments. This article describes the development of multi-family treatment for bulimia nervosa in adolescents aged 13-18. It outlines the theory guiding this development, the areas of need identified by previous studies, and the treatment that has been designed to meet these needs. Particular attention is given to the need to increase communication between family members, strategies to reduce high levels of criticism or hostility, and skills to manage emotion dysregulation and low tolerance for negative emotions. To these ends the program draws on the multi-family treatment for anorexia nervosa, cognitive behavioral therapy techniques, and dialectical behavior therapy.

  18. Treatment manuals: use in the treatment of bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Laurel M; von Ranson, Kristin M

    2011-11-01

    As psychology has moved toward emphasizing evidence-based practice, use of treatment manuals has extended from research trials into clinical practice. Minimal research has directly evaluated use of manuals in clinical practice. This survey of international eating disorder professionals examined use of manuals with 259 clinicians' most recent client with bulimia nervosa. Although evidence-based manuals for bulimia nervosa exist, only 35.9% of clinicians reported using a manual. Clinicians were more likely to use a manual if they were younger; were treating an adult client; were clinical psychologists; were involved in research related to eating disorders; and endorsed a cognitive-behavioral orientation. Clinicians were less likely to use a manual if they provided eclectic psychotherapy that incorporated multiple psychotherapeutic approaches. We conclude that psychotherapy provided in clinical practice often does not align with the specific form validated in research trials, and "eclecticism" is at odds with efforts to disseminate manuals into clinical practice.

  19. Self-forgiveness in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Watson, Michelle J; Lydecker, Janet A; Jobe, Rebecca L; Enright, Robert D; Gartner, Aubrey; Mazzeo, Suzanne E; Worthington, Everett L

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether low levels of self-forgiveness were associated with eating disorder symptomatology. Participating women (N = 51) had diagnoses of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or no eating disorder diagnosis. They completed 3 measures of self-forgiveness. Women with eating disorders had lower levels of self-forgiveness compared with control participants. Results suggest that incorporating self-forgiveness interventions into current eating disorder treatments should be evaluated in future research as they might enhance clinical outcomes.

  20. Plasma homovanillic acid in adolescents with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Deulofeu, Ramón; Martínez-Mallen, Esteve; Baeza, Immaculada; Fernández, Lorena; Lázaro, Luisa; Toro, Josep; Vila, Montserrat; Bernardo, Miquel

    2009-12-30

    Dopaminergic abnormalities in bulimia nervosa have been reported in some studies, but results are not consistent across studies. In the present study, clinical characteristics, plasma level of homovanillic acid (pHVA) and two scales - the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) - were assessed in 36 adolescent bulimia nervosa patients (mean age16.3 years, S.D. 1.1) who were consecutively seen on an Eating Disorder Unit. Levels of pHVA were also measured in 16 healthy control adolescents from the general population. Patients had significantly higher mean pHVA than controls. Eighteen patients (50%) had a pHVA level equal to or higher than the mean of control subjects plus one standard deviation, and this group of patients had significantly higher mean BDI scores and non-significantly higher mean EAT scores, although they did not differ from the other patients in age, time elapsed since the onset of disorder, body mass index and number of binges or vomits. Moreover, in logistic regression analysis the BDI score proved to be an independent predictor of high pHVA. The level of pHVA is increased in bulimia nervosa patients with high scores on measures of depressive and eating symptomatology.

  1. Anorexia Nervosa/Bulimia. LC Science Tracer Bullet, TB 85-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halasz, Hisako, Comp.

    This bibliography is intended to help readers locate material on anorexia nervosa and bulimia in the collections of the Library of Congress. A scope note briefly defines the terms "anorexia nervosa" and "bulimia" and discusses similarities and differences between the two eating disorders. Four references are included as introductions to the topic…

  2. The Prevalence of Frequent Binge Eating and Bulimia in a Non-Clinical College Sample.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzman, Melanie A.; And Others

    Bulimia, an eating disorder characterized by binge eating, may be increasing in frequency. In order to examine and assess: (1) the prevalence of bulimia in a non-clinical sample of college women; (2) the relationship of reports of binge eating to the fulfillment of operationalized Diagnostic and Statistical Manual III (DSM III) criteria for…

  3. Intervention with Adolescents: The Identification of Bulimia Nervosa, and a Possible Treatment Modality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getzfeld, Andrew R.

    Bulimia represents a major health problem in the United States, especially in high schools, colleges, and universities. This paper reviews literature on the definition, etiology, and therapeutic approaches for bulimia. The literature points to potential physiological bases for the disorder since some researchers reported similarities between it…

  4. Fearing Fat: A Literature Review of Family Systems Understandings and Treatments of Anorexia and Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killian, Kyle D.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews literature examining family variables associated with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa and family systems treatments for these eating disorders. Presents definitions of and diagnostic criteria for anorexia and bulimia, and discusses prevalence of these disorders. Reviews role played by psychopathological, sociological, and…

  5. A Pilot Study of a Functional Contextual Treatment for Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Drew A.; Simmons, Angela M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the initial development of a treatment for bulimia nervosa using a functional contextual treatment approach. Seven women (6 with a diagnosis of bulimia nervosa and 1 with a diagnosis of eating disorder not otherwise specified) completed 12 sessions of functional contextual treatment. Participants were assessed with the Eating…

  6. Use of the MMPI and MMPI-2 with Persons with Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geslak, Lisa

    The use of the MMPI and MMPI-2 to assist in the understanding of individuals with bulimia nervosa is examined. DSM-IV criteria for diagnosis of bulimia nervosa are reviewed. It is also important to understand the personality variables or psychological correlates associated with this disorder. The structure and history of the MMPI and MMPI-2 are…

  7. A Pilot Study of a Functional Contextual Treatment for Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Drew A.; Simmons, Angela M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the initial development of a treatment for bulimia nervosa using a functional contextual treatment approach. Seven women (6 with a diagnosis of bulimia nervosa and 1 with a diagnosis of eating disorder not otherwise specified) completed 12 sessions of functional contextual treatment. Participants were assessed with the Eating…

  8. [Anorexia and bulimia--limits and options in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    de Zwaan, M

    1999-01-01

    Even though there is no convincing evidence that eating disorders in general are on the rise, there has been an enormous increase in "treated" cases of patients with eating disorders. General practitioners detect only about 12% of all bulimia nervosa cases, and about 45% of all anorexia nervosa cases. As they often serve as gatekeepers to specialized care, they should receive better training in the recognition of eating disorders. The paper covers important aspects which are essential for the diagnosis and treatment of subjects with eating disorders: early detection, medical examination, motivational interviewing, treatment with self-help manuals, and drug treatment.

  9. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia: an activity-oriented approach.

    PubMed

    Giles, G M

    1985-08-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing trend away from a dogmatic adherence to any one approach in the treatment of eating disorders. This paper adds the new element of practice in relation to cognitive change. The activity-oriented approach outlined here stresses that patients with anorexia nervosa or bulimia must maintain responsibility for their own food intake throughout treatment. The key role of the occupational therapist in the treatment team is outlined, and suggestions for assessment and management of this type of patient are given.

  10. The Changing “Weightscape” of Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Bulik, Cynthia M.; Marcus, Marsha D.; Zerwas, Stephanie; Levine, Michele D.; Via, Maria La

    2014-01-01

    Case Ms. Z, a 35-year-old African-American single woman with a body mass index (BMI) of 37.8 kg/m2 (height 5 feet, 5.5 inches, weight 238 lb.), presents for an evaluation for bulimia nervosa. She was referred to the eating disorders program by her primary care physician who knew about her eating disorder, but was primarily concerned about her weight and blood pressure. Ms. Z has an advanced degree and is employed full time. She has struggled with her eating, weight, and body image since childhood and began binge eating regularly (1–2× week) at age 15. Fasting and self-induced vomiting began in her early twenties, when she achieved her lowest adult BMI of 21.6 kg (weight 130 lb. at age 23). She gained 100 pounds in the past 7 years and currently binges and purges 1–2 times a day. A typical binge consists of a box of cookies, a pint of ice cream, 7 oz. of cheese, two bowls of cereal with 2 cups of milk, and 4 pickles. Ms. Z has seen five therapists to address her eating behaviors and weight concerns and participated in numerous commercial weight loss programs. She states binge eating has always served a self-soothing purpose for her. Ms. Z has a demanding university-related job that absorbs most of her time. She has few friends and has not been in a romantic relationship for the past five years believing that no one would be interested in a woman of her size. She also claimed that food is more reliable than any man because “it’s always there when you need it and you don’t have to take care of it or stoke its ego.” She spends evenings at home working until she is completely exhausted, heads to the kitchen for an all-out binge, vomits everything up, and then cries herself to sleep. She has never smoked and does not drink alcohol. Current medications prescribed by her primary care physician include Fluoxetine (20 mg), Norvasc (5 mg), and Clonazepam (prn). What are Ms. Z’s treatment goals? What are her primary care physician’s? Is her medication for

  11. Psychoanalytic psychotherapy with a client with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lunn, Susanne; Daniel, Sarah I F; Poulsen, Stig

    2016-06-01

    This case study presents the progress of one patient with bulimia nervosa who was originally very compromised in psychological domains that are the focus of analytic treatment, and includes in-session therapeutic process and a range of outcomes, for example, eating disorder symptoms, attachment status, and reflective functioning. Nested in a study showing more rapid behavioral improvement in subjects receiving cognitive behavior therapy than in subjects receiving psychoanalytic psychotherapy, the case highlights the importance of supplementing RCTs with single case studies and the need of adapting the therapeutic approach as well as the current therapeutic dialogue to the individual client. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. Identifying Persuasive Public Health Messages to Change Community Knowledge and Attitudes About Bulimia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    McLean, Siân A; Paxton, Susan J; Massey, Robin; Hay, Phillipa J; Mond, Jonathan M; Rodgers, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Addressing stigma through social marketing campaigns has the potential to enhance currently low rates of treatment seeking and improve the well-being of individuals with the eating disorder bulimia nervosa. This study aimed to evaluate the persuasiveness of health messages designed to reduce stigma and improve mental health literacy about this disorder. A community sample of 1,936 adults (48.2% male, 51.8% female) from Victoria, Australia, provided (a) self-report information on knowledge and stigma about bulimia nervosa and (b) ratings of the persuasiveness of 9 brief health messages on dimensions of convincingness and likelihood of changing attitudes. Messages were rated moderately to very convincing and a little to moderately likely to change attitudes toward bulimia nervosa. The most persuasive messages were those that emphasized that bulimia nervosa is a serious mental illness and is not attributable to personal failings. Higher ratings of convincingness were associated with being female, with having more knowledge about bulimia nervosa, and with lower levels of stigma about bulimia nervosa. Higher ratings for likelihood of changing attitudes were associated with being female and with ratings of the convincingness of the corresponding message. This study provides direction for persuasive content to be included in social marketing campaigns to reduce stigma toward bulimia nervosa.

  13. Altered intrinsic functional brain architecture in female patients with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Kong, Qing-Mei; Li, Ke; Li, Xue-Ni; Zeng, Ya-Wei; Chen, Chao; Qian, Ying; Feng, Shi-Jie; Li, Ji-Tao; Su, Yun'Ai; Correll, Christoph U; Mitchell, Philip B; Yan, Chao-Gan; Zhang, Da-Rong; Si, Tian-Mei

    2017-09-26

    Bulimia nervosa is a severe psychiatric syndrome with uncertain pathogenesis. Neural systems involved in sensorimotor and visual processing, reward and impulsive control may contribute to the binge eating and purging behaviours characterizing bulimia nervosa. However, little is known about the alterations of functional organization of whole brain networks in individuals with this disorder. We used resting-state functional MRI and graph theory to characterize functional brain networks of unmedicated women with bulimia nervosa and healthy women. We included 44 unmedicated women with bulimia nervosa and 44 healthy women in our analyses. Women with bulimia nervosa showed increased clustering coefficient and path length compared with control women. The nodal strength in patients with the disorder was higher in the sensorimotor and visual regions as well as the precuneus, but lower in several subcortical regions, such as the hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed hyperconnectivity primarily involving sensorimotor and unimodal visual association regions, but hypoconnectivity involving subcortical (striatum, thalamus), limbic (amygdala, hippocampus) and paralimbic (orbitofrontal cortex, parahippocampal gyrus) regions. The topological aberrations correlated significantly with scores of bulimia and drive for thinness and with body mass index. We reruited patients with only acute bulimia nervosa, so it is unclear whether the topological abnormalities comprise vulnerability markers for the disorder developing or the changes associated with illness state. Our findings show altered intrinsic functional brain architecture, specifically abnormal global and local efficiency, as well as nodal- and network-level connectivity across sensorimotor, visual, subcortical and limbic systems in women with bulimia nervosa, suggesting that it is a disorder of dysfunctional integration among large-scale distributed brain regions. These abnormalities

  14. Oesophageal and gastric motor activity in patients with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, A; Bergmann, H; Abatzi, T A; Schneider, C; Wiesnagrotzki, S; Höbart, J; Steiner-Mittelbach, G; Gaupmann, G; Kugi, A; Stacher-Janotta, G

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies showed that symptoms of oesophageal motor disorders can be misinterpreted as indicating anorexia nervosa and that in primary anorexia nervosa gastric motility is frequently impaired. We investigated in 32 women with bulimia nervosa whether symptoms of oesophageal motor disorders could be obscured by or be mistaken as forming part of bulimic behaviour, and whether impaired gastric motility was frequent as well. Oesophageal motility was normal in 18 of 26 patients studied, another four had incomplete lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation. Two patients had vigorous achalasia and each one achalasia and diffuse oesophageal spasm, all of whom experienced two types of vomiting: one self-induced and one involuntary, in which the vomit was non-acidic and tasted as the preceding meal. Gastric emptying of a semisolid meal was studied in all patients except of the eight with oesophageal motor abnormalities. Emptying was significantly slower than in healthy controls and grossly delayed in nine of 24 patients. Antral contraction amplitudes were lower and increased less postcibally than in controls. In conclusion (i) bulimic behaviour can obscure symptoms of oesophageal motor disorders and (ii) gastric emptying is frequently delayed in bulimia nervosa. PMID:2323585

  15. Decreased platelet monoamine oxidase activity in female bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, J L; Díaz-Marsá, M; Hollander, E; César, J; Saiz-Ruiz, J

    2000-03-01

    The involvement of brain serotonin systems in the pathophysiology of eating disorders has been repeatedly demonstrated in recent studies. Platelet MAO activity is an index of brain serotonin activity and lowered platelet MAO levels have been found in association with impulsive behaviors. In addition, some preliminary reports indicate that platelet MAO could be lowered in eating disorder patients. 47 patients with DSM-IV eating disorders were studied, including 30 with bulimia nervosa and 17 with anorexia nervosa binge eating-purging type. Platelet MAO activity was measured by isotopic methods using C-14 benzylamine and compared with a control group of 30 healthy subjects. Impulsive personality features were studied with specific rating scales. Platelet MAO activity was significantly lower (4.4+/-2.4 nmol/h/10(8) platelets) in the bulimic patients than in the control group (6.9+/-2.5) (p<0.001). No significant differences were found between pure bulimics and binge eating-purging anorectics. Platelet MAO was inversely and significantly correlated with scores on impulsivity scales and with borderline personality disorder characteristics. Platelet MAO activity is lowered in patients with bulimia, which may reflect dysfunction in impulse control mechanisms. Since platelet MAO has a predominant genetic component, there is need for studies on the association of low platelet MAO and higher risk for developing eating disorders.

  16. Body image, binge eating, and bulimia nervosa in male bodybuilders.

    PubMed

    Goldfield, Gary S; Blouin, Arthur G; Woodside, D Blake

    2006-03-01

    Male bodybuilders (MBB) exhibit more severe body dissatisfaction, bulimic eating behaviour, and negative psychological characteristics, compared with male athletic and nonathletic control subjects, but few studies have directly compared MBB and men with eating disorders. This study compared men with bulimia nervosa (MBN), competitive male bodybuilders (CMBB), and recreational male bodybuilders (RMBB) on a broad range of eating attitudes and behaviours and psychological characteristics to more accurately determine similarities and differences among these groups. Anonymous questionnaires, designed to assess eating attitudes, body image, weight and shape preoccupation, prevalence of binge eating, weight loss practices, lifetime rates of eating disorders, anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) use, and general psychological factors, were completed by 22 MBN, 27 CMBB, and 25 RMBB. High rates of weight and shape preoccupation, extreme body modification practices, binge eating, and bulimia nervosa (BN) were reported among MBB, especially among those who competed. CMBB reported higher rates of binge eating, BN, and AAS use compared with RMBB, but exhibited less eating-related and general psychopathology compared with MBN. Few psychological differences were found between CMBB and RMBB. MBB, especially competitors, and MBN appear to share many eating-related features but few general psychological ones. Longitudinal research is needed to determine whether men with a history of disordered eating or BN disproportionately gravitate to competitive bodybuildin and (or) whether competitive bodybuilding fosters disordered eating, BN, and AAS use.

  17. [Anesthesia in patients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Zenker, J; Hagenah, U; Rossaint, R

    2010-03-01

    Eating disorders are typical diseases of adolescence and early adulthood. About 1-3% of female juveniles suffer from anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN). Today AN is still the psychiatric disease with the highest mortality rate. The peri-operative mortality rate of patients suffering from AN is in the range up to 15%. The beginning of AN is a lingering process and the majority of patients show increasingly restrictive eating habits ending in cachexia. Patients are obsessed by the predominant idea of being obese in spite of having a significant underweight. Patients suffering from bulimia break the strict regimen by eating enormous amounts of high calorie food. Such eating attacks are followed by weight reducing measures, mostly vomiting. Most of the physical changes caused by AN are due to starvation and loss of weight. The most significant medical complications are alterations of the cardiovascular system accompanied by decreasing contractility of the heart, bradycardia, electrocardiographic changes as well as disequilibrium of electrolytic and water balance. Most of these symptoms can be reversed by putting on weight.

  18. Antidepressants versus placebo for people with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Bacaltchuk, J; Hay, P

    2003-01-01

    Bulimia Nervosa (BN) represents an important public health problem and is related to serious morbidity and even mortality. This review attempted to systematically evaluate the use of antidepressant medications compared with placebo for the treatment of bulimia nervosa. The primary objective of this review was to determine whether using antidepressant medications was clinically effective for the treatment of bulimia nervosa. The secondary objectives were:(i) to examine whether there was a differential effect for the various classes/types of antidepressants with regard to effectiveness and tolerability(ii) to test the hypothesis that the effect of antidepressants on bulimic symptoms was independent of its effect on depressive symptoms (1) electronic searches of MEDLINE (1966 to December 2002), EMBASE (1980-December 2002), PsycINFO (to December 2002), LILACS & SCISEARCH (to 2002)(2) the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials and the Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Group Register - ongoing(3) inspection of the references of all identified trials(4) contact with the pharmaceutical companies and the principal investigator of included trials(5) inspection of the International Journal of Eating Disorders - ongoing every randomised, placebo-controlled trial in which antidepressant medications were compared to placebo to reduce the symptoms of bulimia nervosa in patients of any age or gender.Quality criteria: reports were considered adequate if they were classified as A or B according to the Cochrane Manual. The Jadad scale, with a cut off of 2 points, was applied to check the validity of the above referred criterion but was not used as an inclusion criterion. Data were extracted independently by two reviewers for each included trial. Dichotomous data were evaluated by the relative risk with 95% confidence intervals (CI) around this measure, based on the random effects model; continuous data were evaluated by the standardised mean difference with the 95% CI. NNT

  19. Antidepressants versus placebo for people with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Bacaltchuk, J; Hay, P

    2001-01-01

    Bulimia Nervosa (BN) represents an important public health problem and is related to serious morbidity and even mortality. This review attempted to systematically evaluate the use of antidepressant medications compared with placebo for the treatment of bulimia nervosa. The primary objective of this review was to determine whether using antidepressant medications was clinically effective for the treatment of bulimia nervosa. The secondary objectives were: (i) to examine whether there was a differential effect for the various classes/types of antidepressants with regard to effectiveness and tolerability (ii) to test the hypothesis that the effect of antidepressants on bulimic symptoms was independent of its effect on depressive symptoms (1) electronic searches of MEDLINE (1966 to December 2000), EMBASE (1980-December 2000), PsycLIT (to December 2000), LILACS & SCISEARCH (to 1997) (2) the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials and the Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Group Register - ongoing (3) inspection of the references of all identified trials (4) contact with the pharmaceutical companies and the principal investigator of each included trial (5) inspection of the International Journal of Eating Disorders - ongoing every randomized, placebo-controlled trial in which antidepressant medications were compared to placebo to reduce the symptoms of bulimia nervosa in patients of any age or gender. Quality criteria: reports were considered adequate if they were classified as A or B according to the Cochrane Manual. The Jadad scale, with a cut off of 2 points, was applied to check the validity of the above referred criterion but was not used as an inclusion criterion. Data were extracted independently by two reviewers for each included trial. Dichotomous data were evaluated by the relative risk with 95% confidence intervals (CI) around this measure, based on the random effects model; continuous data were evaluated by the standardised mean difference with the 95

  20. Uncontrollable behavior or mental illness? Exploring constructions of bulimia using Q methodology.

    PubMed

    Churruca, Kate; Perz, Janette; Ussher, Jane M

    2014-01-01

    In medical and psychological literature bulimia is commonly described as a mental illness. However, from a social constructionist perspective the meaning of bulimia will always be socially and historically situated and multiple. Thus, there is always the possibility for other understandings or constructions of bulimia to circulate in our culture, with each having distinct real-world implications for those engaging in bulimic behaviors; for instance, they might potentially influence likelihood of help-seeking and the success of treatment. This study used Q methodology to explore culturally-available constructions of bulimia nervosa. Seventy-seven adults with varying experience of eating disorders took part in this Q methodological study. Online, they were asked to rank-order 42 statements about bulimia, and then answer a series of questions about the task and their knowledge of bulimia. A by-person factor analysis was then conducted, with factors extracted using the centroid technique and a varimax rotation. Six factors satisfied selection criteria and were subsequently interpreted. Factor A, "bulimia as uncontrolled behavior", positions bulimia as a behavioral rather than psychological issue. Factor B, entitled "bulimia is a distressing mental illness", reflects an understanding of bulimic behaviors as a dysfunctional coping mechanism, which is often found in psychological literature. Other perspectives position bulimia as about "self-medicating with food" (Factor C), "the pathological pursuit of thinness" (Factor D), "being the best at being thin" (Factor E), or as "extreme behavior vs. mentally ill" (Factor F). These constructions have distinct implications for the subjective experience and behavior of those engaged in bulimic behaviors, with some constructions possibly being more useful in terms of help-seeking (Factor B), while others position these individuals in ways that may be distressing, for instance as shallow (Factor D) or to blame (Factor E). This

  1. Binge eating disorder and bulimia nervosa: differences in the quality and quantity of binge eating episodes.

    PubMed

    Fitzgibbon, M L; Blackman, L R

    2000-03-01

    This study sought to examine the differences in the quantity and quality of binges between binge eating disorder (BED) and bulimia nervosa. Patients (N = 77) seeking treatment for eating disorders were assessed on binge content. Results suggest no differences in binge quantity with BED and bulimia, but there were differences in the binge quality. The binges of bulimics were higher in carbohydrates and sugar than those with BED. The higher levels of obesity of our BED individuals may account for the lack of differences between those with bulimia and BED. The importance of increasing our knowledge of the continuum of weight and binging is discussed. Copyright 2000 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Preliminary Evidence for the Off-Label Treatment of Bulimia Nervosa With Psychostimulants: Six Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Keshen, Aaron; Helson, Thomas

    2017-01-23

    Psychostimulants have been assessed in bulimia nervosa patients with comorbid attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but few studies have examined the impact of psychostimulants on bulimia nervosa patients without comorbid ADHD. The aim of this study was to examine psychostimulants as a potential treatment for bulimia nervosa and to assess the concern of weight loss, given the medication's appetite-suppressing effects. This retrospective study describes 6 case reports of outpatients who were prescribed a psychostimulant specifically for their bulimia nervosa. The number of binge/purge days per months and body mass index were assessed. All patients demonstrated reductions in the number of binge/purge days per month, and 1 patient experienced total remission of bulimic symptoms. Minor fluctuations in weight were observed, but no clinically significant reductions in weight were noted. These findings support the need for clinical trials to examine the efficacy and safety of this potential treatment.

  3. Binge eating as a meaningful experience in bulimia nervosa and anorexia nervosa: a qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Eli, Karin

    2015-12-01

    Clinical studies describe binge eating as a reaction to hunger, negative affect, or the need to dissociate. However, little is known about the meanings that women with bulimia nervosa and anorexia nervosa associate with binge eating. To examine how women with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa interpret their experiences of binge eating. Sixteen women who engaged in binge eating and had been diagnosed with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or their subclinical variants were interviewed about their experiences of eating disorder. Interview data were analyzed using phenomenologically-informed thematic analysis. Participants described binge eating as a practice through which the self experiences a sense of release, and existential emptiness is replaced by overwhelming fullness. Meaningful experiences of release and fullness are central to binge eating in bulimia nervosa and anorexia nervosa, and may contribute to the long-term maintenance of this practice.

  4. Oral health considerations in anorexia and bulimia nervosa. 1. Symptomatology and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Bassiouny, Mohamed A

    2017-01-01

    Eating disorders have captured the attention of medical and dental professionals as well as the public for decades and continue to raise concern today. The literature devoted to anorexia and bulimia highlights myriad psychological, systemic, and dental health complications. Dental practitioners are in a unique position to discover early manifestations of these disorders. The present article reviews anorexia and bulimia, summarizing telltale behavioral traits, systemic manifestations, and dental features to facilitate recognition and enable accurate diagnosis.

  5. Eating pathology and DSM-III-R bulimia nervosa: a continuum of behavior.

    PubMed

    Drewnowski, A; Yee, D K; Kurth, C L; Krahn, D D

    1994-08-01

    This longitudinal survey study of 557 college women used the new Eating Pathology Scale to classify respondents as nondieters, casual dieters, intensive dieters, dieters at risk, and bulimic. Shifts in the severity of dieting behavior over a 6-month period occurred primarily between adjacent scale categories. While new cases of bulimia were drawn from intensive dieters and dieters at risk, those women who no longer met DSM-III-R criteria for bulimia nervosa continued to engage in bulimic behavior.

  6. A Proposal for a Study of Bulimia Among Women in the United States Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    foods, such as breads, sweets, pasta and potatoes (16). DISEASE DEFINITION AND CLASSIFICATION Bulimia is one of the four eating disorders defined in...effect of self-induced vomiting is dental pathology. The repeated acidic vomitus washing over the teeth causes irreversible tooth damage. 45 Normally...dollars over a 3 year period for dental work caused by her bulimia (16,86,87). Although the consequences of vomiting may be more obvious, laxatives can be

  7. Anorexia/bulimia-related sialadenosis of palatal minor salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Mignogna, M D; Fedele, S; Lo Russo, L

    2004-08-01

    In patients affected by alimentary disorders sialadenosis is frequently observed. This non-inflammatory condition is described to affect major salivary glands, leading to the characteristic parotid and/or submandibular swelling. Thus fine-needle aspiration cytology or parotid open biopsy are generally required to diagnose histologically the disorder. We report the case of a 28-year-old patient affected by bulimia/anorexia nervosa who presented, in addition to parotid enlargement, a bilateral symmetric painless soft swelling of the hard palate. The lesion was biopsied and histopathological examination showed the classical features of sialadenosis. To our knowledge, this is the first case of sialadenosis affecting palatal minor salivary glands. It underlines that when sialadenosis is clinically suspected, clinicians could check also patients' oral cavity for minor salivary glands involvement, in order to potentially avoid invasive extra-oral procedures and to easily confirm diagnosis with an intra-oral biopsy.

  8. [Nurses and clientele with anorexia and bulimia: a case study].

    PubMed

    Martins, Claudia Regina Carvalho; Caccavo, Paulo Vaccari

    2012-01-01

    The research aimed to identify the interaction of nurses and clients suffering from bulimia and anorexia. We use the case study as a resource in which we collect clinical data and did interviews with eight of fourteen nurses, who have been our subject-object. According to the nurses, clients are isolated from the world living in a world without hunger and mirrors reflecting a body always above the "ideal weight", they were lonely people, personnel who have lost their shine, sending signals that could extinguish their lives at any time. In the study, was possible to identify the manner in which nurses interacted and perceived customers and, as a result, we elucidate a peculiar practice in nursing.

  9. Meal patterning in the treatment of bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Jo M; Simonich, Heather K; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Crosby, Ross D; Cao, Li; Mitchell, James E; Smith, Tracey L; Klein, Marjorie H; Crow, Scott J; Peterson, Carol B

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between changes in meal and snack consumption and eating disorder behaviors in a treatment sample of bulimic adults. Eighty adults with bulimia nervosa (BN) were randomized to one of two treatments. Meal and snack consumption, binge eating frequency, and purging behavior frequency were assessed at baseline, end-of-treatment, and at four month follow-up using the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE). Generalized linear models indicated that increased consumption of evening meals over the course of treatment was related to a significant decrease in the rate of binge eating and purging at four month follow-up; these results remained significant when controlling for changes in depression over the course of treatment. The findings support the importance of focusing efforts on developing a pattern of regular evening meal consumption among individuals in the treatment of BN. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Anatomical characteristics of the cerebral surface in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Rachel; Stefan, Mihaela; Bansal, Ravi; Hao, Xuejun; Walsh, B Timothy; Peterson, Bradley S

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine morphometric features of the cerebral surface in adolescent and adult female subjects with bulimia nervosa (BN). Anatomical magnetic resonance images were acquired from 34 adolescent and adult female subjects with BN and 34 healthy age-matched control subjects. We compared the groups in the morphological characteristics of their cerebral surfaces while controlling for age and illness duration. Significant reductions of local volumes on the brain surface were detected in frontal and temporoparietal areas in the BN compared with control participants. Reductions in inferior frontal regions correlated inversely with symptom severity, age, and Stroop interference scores in the BN group. These findings suggest that local volumes of inferior frontal regions are smaller in individuals with BN compared with healthy individuals. These reductions along the cerebral surface might contribute to functional deficits in self-regulation and to the persistence of these deficits over development in BN. © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry.

  11. Meal Patterning in the Treatment of Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, Jo M.; Simonich, Heather K.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Crosby, Ross D.; Cao, Li; Mitchell, James E.; Smith, Tracey L.; Professor, Associate; Klein, Marjorie H.; Crow, Scott J.; Peterson, Carol B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study examined the relationship between changes in meal and snack consumption and eating disorder behaviors in a treatment sample of bulimic adults. Method Eighty adults with bulimia nervosa (BN) were randomized to one of two treatments. Meal and snack consumption, binge eating frequency, and purging behavior frequency were assessed at baseline, end-of-treatment, and at four month follow-up using the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE). Results Generalized linear models indicated that increased consumption of evening meals over the course of treatment was related to a significant decrease in the rate of binge eating and purging at four month follow-up; these results remained significant when controlling for changes in depression over the course of treatment. Conclusions The findings support the importance of focusing efforts on developing a pattern of regular evening meal consumption among individuals in the treatment of BN. PMID:26630618

  12. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: brains, bones and breeding.

    PubMed

    Starr, Taylor B; Kreipe, Richard E

    2014-05-01

    Recent research has modified both the conceptualization and treatment of eating disorders. New diagnostic criteria reducing the "not otherwise specified" category should facilitate the early recognition and treatment of anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Technology-based studies identify AN and BN as "brain circuit" disorders; epidemiologic studies reveal that the narrow racial, ethnic and income profile of individuals no longer holds true for AN. The major organs affected long term-the brain and skeletal system-both respond to improved nutrition, with maintenance of body weight the best predictor of recovery. Twin studies have revealed gene x environment interactions, including both the external (social) and internal (pubertal) environments of boys and of girls. Family-based treatment has the best evidence base for effectiveness for younger patients. Medication plays a limited role in AN, but a major role in BN. Across diagnoses, the most important medicine is food.

  13. Family perception of anorexia and bulimia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Espíndola, Cybele Ribeiro; Blay, Sérgio Luís

    2009-08-01

    A systematic literature review published between 1990 and 2006 using a qualitative approach was conducted to explore family members' perception of anorexia and bulimia nervosa patients. Articles were critically reviewed and a meta-synthesis analysis was carried out based on a meta-ethnographic method to analyze and summarize data. Of a total of 3,415 studies, nine met the study inclusion and exclusion criteria. Reciprocal translation was used for data interpretation allowing to identifying two concepts: disease awareness and disease impacts. Feelings of impotence were often described in family reorganization. The study results point to distortions in the concept of disease associated with family involvement, resulting in changes in communication, attitudes, and behaviors in a context of impotence.

  14. Social support in patients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Tiller, J M; Sloane, G; Schmidt, U; Troop, N; Power, M; Treasure, J L

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the social support networks of patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Social support was measured using the Significant Others Scale for 44 patients with AN, 81 patients with BN, and 86 polytechnic students. Eating disorder patients had smaller social networks than the students. AN patients were significantly less likely than BN patients to have a spouse or partner as a support figure. Both AN and BN patients reported less actual emotional and practical support than students. AN patients perceived their social support to be adequate, whereas BN patients were dissatisfied with their support. Patients set lower ideals for support than the students. Social support was not correlated with duration of illness. AN and BN patients have deficient social networks. In BN patients there is disturbance in both the size and perceived adequacy of social relationships.

  15. [On the psychodynamics of an adolescent bulimia patient].

    PubMed

    Wittenberger, Annegret

    2005-04-01

    The aim is to understand the meaning and significance of the symptoms by means of psychoanalytical theoretical models and to give an insight into the functioning of analytical therapy, using the example of an adolescent bulimia patient. In this therapy, the cause of the bulimic illness is seen as being a failure to build an intrapsychic space, and it is shown how triangulation can be achieved via the three-dimensional analytical relationship. Particular attention is given to the theories of M. Klein and W. R. Bion. The theory of S. Freud is based upon the portrayal of bulimic symptoms as the expression of an intrapsychic conflict. The two models complement each other, leading to a more profound understanding of eating disorders.

  16. Cue exposure in the treatment of resistant bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Toro, J; Cervera, M; Feliu, M H; Garriga, N; Jou, M; Martinez, E; Toro, E

    2003-09-01

    It was hypothesized that binge eating (bulimia nervosa [BN]) may be caused by the anticipatory and immediate anxiety associated with certain types of food. Consequently, an extinction schedule should reduce binge eating. Cue exposure was carried out with 6 bulimic women who had responded poorly or not at all to the usual pharmacologic or cognitive-behavioral treatments. Binge eating and vomiting were almost totally suppressed in the 6 patients. Symptom suppression was maintained at two follow-ups, one at 4-20 months and another at 2.5-3 years. Cue exposure may be effective with BN that is resistant to conventional treatments. The anxiety associated with food plays an important role in provoking and/or maintaining binge eating. Motivation to change is likely to be an important mediator. Copyright 2003 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Intellectual function in patients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Weider, Siri; Indredavik, Marit Saebø; Lydersen, Stian; Hestad, Knut

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine cognitive function in individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) on the basis of IQ measures, indexes and subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale – Third Edition (WAIS-III). A total of 41 patients with AN, 40 patients with BN and 40 healthy controls (HC), matched for sex, age and education, were recruited consecutively to complete the WAIS-III. The AN group showed a significantly lower performance than the HC group on most global measures and on eight of the 13 administered subtests. Minor differences in verbal function were detected between the BN group and the HC group. The patients with eating disorders showed normal intellectual functions compared with the normative population. However, the AN group displayed a consistently lower performance than the matched HC group, which performed above normative means. The BN group performed at a level between that of the AN and HC groups.

  18. The psychosexual histories of young women with bulimia.

    PubMed

    Abraham, S F; Bendit, N; Mason, C; Mitchell, H; O'Connor, N; Ward, J; Young, S; Llewellyn-Jones, D

    1985-03-01

    While it is known that anorexia nervosa patients show a wide range of sexual knowledge, attitudes and practices, the psychosexual histories of bulimia patients have not been studied. In this paper the psychosexual histories of 20 bulimic patients and 20 matched control subjects are presented. Bulimic patients were more likely to experience orgasm with masturbation, were more likely to have experimented with anal intercourse, and were more likely to describe their libido as 'above average.' Control subjects were more likely to experience orgasm during sexual intercourse. Bulimic patients associated high body weights with unattractiveness, and tended to withdraw from social and sexual activity at high weights. In other aspects of their sexual behaviour, and in their attitudes to sexual matters, the two groups were similar.

  19. Total energy expenditure as measured by doubly-labeled water in outpatients with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Kotler, L A; Devlin, M J; Matthews, D E; Walsh, B T

    2001-05-01

    This study measured total energy expenditure (TEE) in symptomatic outpatient women with bulimia nervosa and normal controls. The study aimed to test the conceptual model of bulimia nervosa as an illness characterized by a physiological state of starvation, despite normal weight. Total fat and fat-free mass were measured using hydrodensitometry and total energy expenditure was assessed via the doubly-labeled water method, in nine normal weight outpatient females with DSM-III-R bulimia nervosa and ten healthy female controls. Patients and controls were similar in age, body mass index, weight, lean body mass, and levels of exercise and general activity. Patients had an average baseline binge frequency of 14.7 episodes per week and purge frequency of 16.8 times per week, and had been ill for an average of 11.9 years. Group mean TEE did not differ between patients and controls (patients 2380 +/- 482 kcal/day, controls 2368 +/- 515 kcal day). Observed TEE in the bulimic subjects did not differ significantly from TEE predicted on the basis of data from the controls. This finding of normal TEE in symptomatic outpatients with bulimia nervosa is consistent with a previous study that found no difference in TEE in a sample of symptomatic inpatients with bulimia nervosa. These data suggest that the energy conserving metabolic adaptations characteristic of semi-starvation do not occur in patients with bulimia nervosa. Copyright 2001 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Diagnostic Crossover in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa: Implications for DSM-V

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Kamryn T.; Dorer, David J.; Franko, Debra L.; Tahilani, Kavita; Thompson-Brenner, Heather; Herzog, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is designed primarily as a clinical tool. Yet high rates of diagnostic “crossover” among the anorexia nervosa subtypes and bulimia nervosa may reflect problems with the validity of the current diagnostic schema, thereby limiting its clinical utility. This study was designed to examine diagnostic crossover longitudinally in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa to inform the validity of the DSM-IV-TR eating disorders classification system. Method A total of 216 women with a diagnosis of anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa were followed for 7 years; weekly eating disorder symptom data collected using the Eating Disorder Longitudinal Interval Follow-Up Examination allowed for diagnoses to be made throughout the follow-up period. Results Over 7 years, the majority of women with anorexia nervosa experienced diagnostic crossover: more than half crossed between the restricting and binge eating/purging anorexia nervosa subtypes over time; one-third crossed over to bulimia nervosa but were likely to relapse into anorexia nervosa. Women with bulimia nervosa were unlikely to cross over to anorexia nervosa. Conclusions These findings support the longitudinal distinction of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa but do not support the anorexia nervosa subtyping schema. PMID:18198267

  1. The economic effect of Planet Health on preventing bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li Yan; Nichols, Lauren P; Austin, S Bryn

    2011-08-01

    To assess the economic effect of the school-based obesity prevention program Planet Health on preventing disordered weight control behaviors and to determine the cost-effectiveness of the intervention in terms of its combined effect on prevention of obesity and disordered weight control behaviors. On the basis of the intervention's short-term effect on disordered weight control behaviors prevention, we projected the number of girls who were prevented from developing bulimia nervosa by age 17 years. We further estimated medical costs saved and quality-adjusted life years gained by the intervention over 10 years. As a final step, we compared the intervention costs with the combined intervention benefits from both obesity prevention (reported previously) and prevention of disordered weight control behaviors to determine the overall cost-effectiveness of the intervention. Middle schools. A sample of 254 intervention girls aged 10 to 14 years. The Planet Health program was implemented during the school years from 1995 to 1997 and was designed to promote healthful nutrition and physical activity among youth. Intervention costs, medical costs saved, quality-adjusted life years gained, and cost-effectiveness ratio. An estimated 1 case of bulimia nervosa would have been prevented. As a result, an estimated $33 999 in medical costs and 0.7 quality-adjusted life years would be saved. At an intervention cost of $46 803, the combined prevention of obesity and disordered weight control behaviors would yield a net savings of $14 238 and a gain of 4.8 quality-adjusted life years. Primary prevention programs, such as Planet Health, warrant careful consideration by policy makers and program planners. The findings of this study provide additional argument for integrated prevention of obesity and eating disorders.

  2. Effect of eating rate on binge size in Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Kissileff, Harry R; Zimmerli, Ellen J; Torres, Migdalia I; Devlin, Michael J; Walsh, B Timothy

    2008-01-01

    Effect of eating rate on binge size in bulimia nervosa. Bulimia Nervosa (BN) is an eating disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of binge eating. During binge eating episodes, patients often describe the rapid consumption of food, and laboratory studies have shown that during binges patients with BN eat faster than normal controls (NC), but the hypothesis that a rapid rate of eating contributes to the excessive intake of binge meals has not yet been experimentally tested. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of eating rate on binge size in BN, in order to determine whether binge size is mediated, in part, by rate of eating. Thirteen BN and 14 NC subjects were asked to binge eat a yogurt shake that was served at a fast rate (140g/min) on one occasion and at a slow rate (70g/min) on another. NC subjects consumed 169 g more when eating at the fast rate than when eating at the slow rate. In contrast, consumption rates failed to influence binge size in patients with BN (fast: 1205 g; slow: 1195 g). Consequently, there was a significant group by rate interaction. As expected, patients with BN consumed more overall than NC subjects (1200 g vs. 740 g). When instructed to binge in the eating laboratory, patients with BN ate equally large amounts of food at a slow rate as at a fast rate. NC subjects ate less at a slow rate. These findings indicate that in a structured laboratory meal paradigm binge size is not affected by rate of eating. PMID:17996257

  3. The relationship between Internet addiction and bulimia in a sample of Chinese college students: depression as partial mediator between Internet addiction and bulimia.

    PubMed

    Tao, ZhuoLi

    2013-09-01

    It has been reported that Internet addiction is associated with substance dependence. Eating disorders have high rates of co-morbidity with substance use disorders. The relationship between Internet addiction and eating disorders was reported in a previous study. To examine the hypothesis that Internet addiction is closely associated with bulimia. The hypothesis that depression mediates the relationship between Internet addiction and bulimia symptoms was also tested. 2,036 Chinese college students were assessed on Internet addiction, eating behaviors and depression. Binge eating, compensatory behaviors, weight concern, menarche and weight change were also reported. Multiple regression analysis was used to test the mediating effect of depression. Internet addicts showed significantly higher scores on most subscales on EDI-1 than the controls. They reported significantly more binge eating, weight concern and weight change than the controls. Among all of the participants, depression was found to be a partial mediator in the relationship between Internet addiction and bulimia. This survey provides evidence of the co-morbidity of Internet addiction and bulimia.

  4. Childhood Sexual and Physical Abuse as Risk Factors for the Development of Bulimia Nervosa: A Community-Based Case Control Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Sarah L.; Fairburn, Christopher G.

    1996-01-01

    Young women (n=102) with bulimia nervosa were compared with 204 control subjects without an eating disorder and with 102 subjects with other psychiatric disorders. Results suggest that sexual and physical abuse are both risk factors for psychiatric disorders in general, including bulimia nervosa, but are not specific risk factors for bulimia. (DB)

  5. Childhood Sexual and Physical Abuse as Risk Factors for the Development of Bulimia Nervosa: A Community-Based Case Control Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Sarah L.; Fairburn, Christopher G.

    1996-01-01

    Young women (n=102) with bulimia nervosa were compared with 204 control subjects without an eating disorder and with 102 subjects with other psychiatric disorders. Results suggest that sexual and physical abuse are both risk factors for psychiatric disorders in general, including bulimia nervosa, but are not specific risk factors for bulimia. (DB)

  6. De-stabilization of the positive vago-vagal reflex in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Faris, Patricia L; Hofbauer, Randall D; Daughters, Randall; Vandenlangenberg, Erin; Iversen, Laureen; Goodale, Robert L; Maxwell, Robert; Eckert, Elke D; Hartman, Boyd K

    2008-04-22

    Bulimia nervosa is characterized by consuming large amounts of food over a defined period with a loss of control over the eating. This is followed by a compensatory behavior directed at eliminating the consumed calories, usually vomiting. Current treatments include antidepressants and/or behavioral therapies. Consensus exists that these treatments are not very effective and are associated with high relapse rates. We review evidence from literature and present original data to evaluate the hypothesis that bulimia involves alterations in vago-vagal function. Evidence in support of this include (1) laboratory studies consistently illustrate deficits in meal size, meal termination, and satiety in bulimia; (2) basic science studies indicate that meal size and satiation are under vagal influences; (3) anatomical, behavioral and physiological data suggest that achieving satiety and the initiation of emesis involve common neural substrates; (4) abnormal vagal and vago-vagal reflexive functions extend to non-eating activational stimuli; and (5) studies from our laboratory modulating vagal activation have shown significant effects on binge/vomit frequencies and suggest a return of normal satiation. We propose a model for the pathophysiology of bulimia based upon de-stabilization of a bi-stable positive vago-vagal feedback loop. This model is not meant to be complete, but rather to stimulate anatomical, psychobiological, and translational neuroscience experiments aimed at elucidating the pathophysiology of bulimia and developing novel treatment strategies.

  7. Altered insula response to sweet taste processing after recovery from anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Oberndorfer, Tyson A; Frank, Guido K W; Simmons, Alan N; Wagner, Angela; McCurdy, Danyale; Fudge, Julie L; Yang, Tony T; Paulus, Martin P; Kaye, Walter H

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that altered function of higher-order appetitive neural circuitry may contribute to restricted eating in anorexia nervosa and overeating in bulimia nervosa. This study used sweet tastes to interrogate gustatory neurocircuitry involving the anterior insula and related regions that modulate sensory-interoceptive-reward signals in response to palatable foods. Participants who had recovered from anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa were studied to avoid confounding effects of altered nutritional state. Functional MRI measured brain response to repeated tastes of sucrose and sucralose to disentangle neural processing of caloric and noncaloric sweet tastes. Whole-brain functional analysis was constrained to anatomical regions of interest. Relative to matched comparison women (N=14), women recovered from anorexia nervosa (N=14) had significantly diminished and women recovered from bulimia nervosa (N=14) had significantly elevated hemodynamic response to tastes of sucrose in the right anterior insula. Anterior insula response to sucrose compared with sucralose was exaggerated in the recovered group (lower in women recovered from anorexia nervosa and higher in women recovered from bulimia nervosa). The anterior insula integrates sensory reward aspects of taste in the service of nutritional homeostasis. One possibility is that restricted eating and weight loss occur in anorexia nervosa because of a failure to accurately recognize hunger signals, whereas overeating in bulimia nervosa could represent an exaggerated perception of hunger signals. This response may reflect the altered calibration of signals related to sweet taste and the caloric content of food and may offer a pathway to novel and more effective treatments.

  8. De-Stabilization of the Positive Vago-Vagal Reflex in Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Faris, Patricia L.; Hofbauer, Randall D.; Daughters, Randall; VandenLangenberg, Erin; Iversen, Laureen; Goodale, Robert L.; Maxwell, Robert; Eckert, Elke D.; Hartman, Boyd K.

    2008-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa is characterized by consuming large amounts of food over a defined period with a loss of control over the eating. This is followed by a compensatory behavior directed at eliminating the consumed calories, usually vomiting. Current treatments include antidepressants and/or behavioral therapies. Consensus exists that these treatments are not very effective and are associated with high relapse rates. We review evidence from literature and present original data to evaluate the hypothesis that bulimia involves alterations in vago-vagal function. Evidence in support of this include (1) Laboratory studies consistently illustrate deficits in meal size, meal termination, and satiety in bulimia; (2) Basic science studies indicate that meal size and satiation are under vagal influences; (3) Anatomical, behavioral and physiological data suggest that achieving satiety and the initiation of emesis involve common neural substrates; (4) Abnormal vagal and vago-vagal reflexive functions extend to non-eating activational stimuli; and (5) Studies from our laboratory modulating vagal activation have shown significant effects on binge/vomit frequencies and suggest a return of normal satiation. We propose a model for the pathophysiology of bulimia based upon de-stabilization of a bi-stable positive vago-vagal feedback loop. This model is not meant to be complete, but rather to stimulate anatomical, psychobiological, and translational neuroscience experiments aimed at elucidating the pathophysiology of bulimia and developing novel treatment strategies. PMID:18191425

  9. Cigarette Smoking is Associated with Body Shape Concerns and Bulimia Symptoms Among Young Adult Females

    PubMed Central

    Kendzor, Darla E.; Adams, Claire E.; Stewart, Diana W.; Baillie, Lauren E.; Copeland, and Amy L.

    2014-01-01

    Elevated rates of cigarette smoking have been reported among individuals with Bulimia Nervosa. However, little is known about eating disorder symptoms within non-clinical samples of smokers. The purpose of the present study was to compare the eating disorder symptoms of young adult female smokers (n = 184) and non-smokers (n = 56), to determine whether smokers were more likely to endorse bulimic symptoms and report greater body shape concern than non-smokers. Analyses indicated that smokers scored significantly higher than non-smokers on the Body Shape Questionnaire, p = .03, and the Bulimia Test-Revised, p = .006. In addition, a higher proportion of smokers than non-smokers scored ≥ 85 on the Bulimia Test-Revised, p = .05, suggesting the possibility that Bulimia Nervosa diagnoses were more prevalent among smokers. No differences were found between smokers and non-smokers on other measures of eating behavior. Overall, findings suggest that smoking is specifically associated with symptoms of Bulimia Nervosa and body shape concern among young adult females. PMID:19171320

  10. Psychometric characteristics of Spanish adaptation of a Test for Bulimia (BULIT).

    PubMed

    Vázquez Morejón, A J; García-Bóveda, R Jiménez; Vázquez-Morejón Jiménez, R

    2007-01-01

    The high prevalence of bulimia nervosa among eating disorders and limited repertoire of assessment tools available for these disorders in Spanish have resulted in special interest regarding the adaptation of a specific instrument such as the Bulimia Test (BULIT). A total of 119 outpatients, most of them women (97.5%) seen in a community mental health center, were assessed with the Spanish adaptation of the Bulimia Test (BULIT) and by Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-40). Reliability (internal consistency and temporal reliability) and validity (convergent and discriminant) were studied. Cronbach's alpha coefficient (alpha: 0.93) shows high internal consistency while the temporal reliability is supported by the high correlation observed (r=0.83) between applications conducted in an interval of 8-10 weeks. In relationship with convergent validity, moderate correlations were observed with the global score on EAT (r=0.38) and substantial correlation with the EAT Bulimia subscale (r=0.69). By using an 88 cutoff on the BULIT, the test properly classified 90% of the bulimic subjects and 100% of those without eating disorder. The results firmly supported the reliability and validity of this Spanish adaptation, stressing its utility as a screening device to detect current or incipient cases of bulimia and to assess severity of bulimic symptoms.

  11. Cigarette smoking is associated with body shape concerns and bulimia symptoms among young adult females.

    PubMed

    Kendzor, Darla E; Adams, Claire E; Stewart, Diana W; Baillie, Lauren E; Copeland, Amy L

    2009-01-01

    Elevated rates of cigarette smoking have been reported among individuals with Bulimia Nervosa. However, little is known about eating disorder symptoms within non-clinical samples of smokers. The purpose of the present study was to compare the eating disorder symptoms of young adult female smokers (n=184) and non-smokers (n=56), to determine whether smokers were more likely to endorse bulimic symptoms and report greater body shape concern than non-smokers. Analyses indicated that smokers scored significantly higher than non-smokers on the Body Shape Questionnaire, p=.03, and the Bulimia Test-Revised, p=.006. In addition, a higher proportion of smokers than non-smokers scored > or = 85 on the Bulimia Test-Revised, p=.05, suggesting the possibility that Bulimia Nervosa diagnoses were more prevalent among smokers. No differences were found between smokers and non-smokers on other measures of eating behavior. Overall, findings suggest that smoking is specifically associated with symptoms of Bulimia Nervosa and body shape concern among young adult females.

  12. Dying on the Inside: What Every Teacher Needs to Know About Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia, and the Individual Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmer, Marc

    This document provides teachers with information on the identifying features of anorexia nervosa and bulimia and suggests steps which teachers can take to encourage individual children in more positive behavior. The paper makes clear distinctions between anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and bulimarexia, describing the symptoms of each disorder. It is…

  13. Interoceptive sensitivity deficits in women recovered from bulimia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Klabunde, Megan; Acheson, Dean; Boutelle, Kerri; Matthews, Scott; Kaye, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Self-report studies suggest that patients with Bulimia Nervosa (BN) evidence difficulties with interoceptive awareness. Indeed, interoceptive deficits may persist after recovery of BN and may be a biological trait that predisposes symptom development in BN. However, no studies to date have directly assessed interoceptive sensitivity, or accuracy in detecting and perceiving internal body cues, in patients with or recovered from BN. Nine women who had recovered from BN and 10 healthy control women completed the Heart Beat Perception Task (HBPT) in which individuals were required to estimate the number of heartbeats between intervals of time. Accuracy scores were compared between groups. Significant differences were found between the groups on the HBPT ((F 1,19)= 7.78, p=.013, Cohen’s d= 1.16) when controlling for age. These results suggest that deficits in interoceptive sensitivity are present in individuals recovered from BN. Thus interoceptive deficits may be one factor that bridges the gap between brain dysfunction and symptom presentation in BN. PMID:24183142

  14. Frontostriatal circuits and the development of bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Berner, Laura A; Marsh, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa (BN) is characterized by both recurrent episodes of binge eating that are, in part, defined by a sense of loss of control and compensatory behaviors to avoid weight gain. Impulsive behaviors are also common in individuals with BN, indicating more pervasive difficulties in behavioral self-regulation. Findings from functional and anatomical neuroimaging studies of individuals with BN suggest dysfunction in the dorsal frontostriatal circuits that support self-regulatory capacities and habit learning and in overlapping ventral circuits that support reward processing and reward-based learning. In this review, we describe the normal development of frontostriatal circuits and then present behavioral and neuroimaging data from adolescents and adults with BN. These data suggest that the abnormal maturation of frontostriatal circuits may contribute to the habitual binge-eating and purging behaviors of BN. Future longitudinal imaging studies will improve understanding of how these circuits contribute to the developmental trajectory of BN and will inform novel interventions that could target or prevent the impulsive and habit-like features of this disorder.

  15. Frontostriatal Circuits and the Development of Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Berner, Laura A.; Marsh, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa (BN) is characterized by both recurrent episodes of binge eating that are, in part, defined by a sense of loss of control and compensatory behaviors to avoid weight gain. Impulsive behaviors are also common in individuals with BN, indicating more pervasive difficulties in behavioral self-regulation. Findings from functional and anatomical neuroimaging studies of individuals with BN suggest dysfunction in the dorsal frontostriatal circuits that support self-regulatory capacities and habit learning and in overlapping ventral circuits that support reward processing and reward-based learning. In this review, we describe the normal development of frontostriatal circuits and then present behavioral and neuroimaging data from adolescents and adults with BN. These data suggest that the abnormal maturation of frontostriatal circuits may contribute to the habitual binge-eating and purging behaviors of BN. Future longitudinal imaging studies will improve understanding of how these circuits contribute to the developmental trajectory of BN and will inform novel interventions that could target or prevent the impulsive and habit-like features of this disorder. PMID:25452718

  16. Evaluation of the DSM-5 severity indicator for bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Grilo, Carlos M; Ivezaj, Valentina; White, Marney A

    2015-04-01

    This study examined the DSM-5 severity criterion for bulimia nervosa (BN) based on the frequency of inappropriate weight compensatory behaviors. 199 community volunteers classified with BN were categorized using DSM-5 severity levels and compared on demographic and clinical variables. 77 (39%) participants were categorized as mild, 68 (34%) as moderate, 32 (16%) as severe, and 22 (11%) as extreme. The severity groups did not differ significantly in demographic variables or body mass index. Shape and Weight concerns did not differ significantly across severity groups. Binge eating differed with the extreme group having significantly higher frequency than the severe, moderate, and mild groups, which did not differ from each other. Restraint differed with the extreme group having significantly higher levels than the mild group. Eating concerns differed with the extreme group having significantly higher levels than moderate and mild groups. Depression differed with the extreme group having significantly higher levels than severe, moderate, and mild groups, which did not differ from each other. Findings from this non-clinical group provide new, albeit modest, support for DSM-5 severity rating for BN based on frequency of inappropriate weight compensatory behaviors. Statistical findings indicate that differences in collateral clinical variables associated with the DSM-5 severity ratings reflect small effect sizes. Further research is needed with treatment-seeking patient groups with BN to establish the validity of the DSM-5 severity specifier and should include broader clinical and functional validators.

  17. Bulimia nervosa in overweight and normal-weight women.

    PubMed

    Masheb, Robin; White, Marney A

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine overweight bulimia nervosa (BN) in a community sample of women. Volunteers (n = 1964) completed self-report questionnaires of weight, binge eating, purging, and cognitive features. Participants were classified as overweight (body mass index ≥25) or normal weight (body mass index <25). Rates of BN within the overweight and normal-weight classes did not differ (6.4% vs 7.9%). Of the 131 participants identified as BN, 64% (n = 84) were classified as overweight BN and 36% (n = 47) as normal-weight BN. The overweight BN group had a greater proportion of ethnic minorities and reported significantly less restraint than the normal-weight BN group. Otherwise, the 2 groups reported similarly, even in terms of purging and depression. In summary, rates of BN did not differ between overweight and normal-weight women. Among BN participants, the majority (two thirds) were overweight. Differences in ethnicity and restraint, but little else, were found between overweight and normal-weight BN. Findings from the present study should serve to increase awareness of the weight range and ethnic diversity of BN, and highlight the need to address weight and cultural sensitivity in the identification and treatment of eating disorders.

  18. Central coherence in adolescents with bulimia nervosa spectrum eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Darcy, Alison M; Fitzpatrick, Kathleen Kara; Manasse, Stephanie M; Datta, Nandini; Klabunde, Megan; Colborn, Danielle; Aspen, Vandana; Stiles-Shields, Colleen; Labuschagne, Zandre; Le Grange, Daniel; Lock, James

    2015-07-01

    Weak central coherence-a tendency to process details at the expense of the gestalt-has been observed among adults with bulimia nervosa (BN) and is a potential candidate endophenotype for eating disorders (EDs). However, as BN behaviors typically onset during adolescence it is important to assess central coherence in this younger age group to determine whether the findings in adults are likely a result of BN or present earlier in the evolution of the disorder. This study examines whether the detail-oriented and fragmented cognitive inefficiency observed among adults with BN is observable among adolescents with shorter illness duration, relative to healthy controls. The Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test (RCFT) was administered to a total of 47 adolescents with DSM5 BN, 42 with purging disorder (PD), and 25 healthy controls (HC). Performance on this measure was compared across the three groups. Those with BN and PD demonstrated significantly worse accuracy scores compared to controls in the copy and delayed recall condition with a moderate effect size. These findings were exacerbated when symptoms of BN increased. Poorer accuracy scores reflect a fragmented and piecemeal strategy that interferes with visual-spatial integration in BN spectrum disorders. This cognitive inefficiency likely contributes to broad difficulties in executive functioning in this population especially in the context of worsening bulimic symptoms. The findings of this study support the hypothesis that poor global integration may constitute a cognitive endophenotype for BN. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Experiences of Enhanced Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Onslow, Louise; Woodward, Debbie; Hoefkens, Toni; Waddington, Louise

    2016-03-01

    Recent quantitative studies provide support for an "enhanced" transdiagnostic approach of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT-E) for eating disorders; however it is not yet known how recipients of CBT-E experience therapy. The current study used a qualitative approach to explore service users' experiences of CBT-E. Individuals with a diagnosis of bulimia nervosa and who had completed CBT-E from one service in Wales were invited to participate. Semi-structured interviews were completed with eight individuals and analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Participants valued both specific and non-specific elements of CBT-E. Therapist specialism in eating disorders was considered to enhance therapist empathy. The most helpful aspects specific to CBT-E were gaining insight into maintenance cycles and experiential learning. The most challenging aspects of CBT-E were changing behaviours and cognitions "in the moment" and in the longer-term. The implication of therapist specialism and empathy is further discussed, as well as the difficulty for CBT-E in changing service users' long-standing core beliefs.

  20. Neuropsychological function in patients with anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Weider, Siri; Indredavik, Marit Saebø; Lydersen, Stian; Hestad, Knut

    2015-05-01

    This study explored the neuropsychological performance of patients diagnosed with anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN) compared with healthy controls (HCs). An additional aim was to investigate the effect of several possible mediators on the association between eating disorders (EDs) and cognitive function. Forty patients with AN, 39 patients with BN, and 40 HCs who were comparable in age and education were consecutively recruited to complete a standardized neuropsychological test battery covering the following cognitive domains: verbal learning and memory, visual learning and memory, speed of information processing, visuospatial ability, working memory, executive function, verbal fluency, attention/vigilance, and motor function. The AN group scored significantly below the HCs on eight of the nine measured cognitive domains. The BN group also showed inferior performance on six cognitive domains. After adjusting for possible mediators, the nadir body mass index (lowest lifetime BMI) and depressive symptoms explained all findings in the BN group. Although this adjustment reduced the difference between the AN and HC groups, the AN group still performed worse than the HCs regarding verbal learning and memory, visual learning and memory, visuospatial ability, working memory, and executive functioning. Patients with EDs scored below the HCs on several cognitive function measures, this difference being most pronounced for the AN group. The nadir BMI and depressive symptoms had strong mediating effects. Longitudinal studies are needed to identify the importance of weight restoration and treatment of depressive symptoms in the prevention of a possible cognitive decline. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Bulimia nervosa in overweight and normal weight women

    PubMed Central

    Masheb, R. M.; White, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine overweight bulimia nervosa (BN) in a community sample of women. Volunteers (N=1,964) completed self-report questionnaires of weight, binge eating, purging, and cognitive features. Participants were classified as overweight (BMI>=25) or normal weight (BMI<25). Rates of BN within the overweight and normal weight classes did not differ (6.4% vs.7.9%). Of the 131 participants identified as BN, 64% (n=84) were classified as overweight BN (OBN) and 36% (n=47) as normal weight BN. The OBN group had a greater proportion of ethnic minorities, and reported significantly less restraint than the normal weight BN group. Otherwise, the two groups reported similarly, even in terms of purging and depression. In summary, rates of BN did not differ between overweight and normal weight women. Among BN participants, the majority (two-thirds) were overweight. Differences in ethnicity and restraint, but little else, were found between overweight and normal weight BN. Findings from the present study should serve to increase awareness of the weight range and ethnic diversity of BN, and highlight the need to address weight and cultural sensitivity in the identification and treatment of eating disorders. PMID:21550028

  2. [Assessment of emotional reactivity to food images in bulimia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Gómez Martínez, Ma Angeles; Bernabé, José Ramon Yela; Ruiz, Alfonso Salgado; Rodríguez, María Cortés

    2011-11-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the influence on reactivity to food images of the following variables: craving-trait, positive or negative mood state, and food restriction. Emotional modulation of the defense startle reflex (RMS) was assessed in 26 women at risk of suffering from bulimia nervosa; they were assigned one of to two groups: high craving-trait and low craving-trait. Before the test, positive or negative mood and restriction vs. non-restriction states were induced in each of the groups. Skin conductance response (SCR) and electromyogram activity from the orbiculari oculi region were recorded after the auditory stimuli; questionnaires such as Food Craving Trait Questionnaire (FCQ-T) and the Self-assessment Manikin (SAM) were used. Results showed that negative affect produced a negative valence of food images, more arousal, and more loss of control, as well as higher SCRs. Subjects with low FCQ-T levels reduced their RMS to food images as a consequence of experiencing positive emotions; when emotions were negative, their RMS increased.

  3. Personality Psychopathology Differentiates Risky Behaviors among Women with Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Carolyn M.; Pisetsky, Emily M.; Goldschmidt, Andrea B.; Lavender, Jason M.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Crosby, Ross D.; Engel, Scott G.; Mitchell, James E.; Crow, Scott J.; Peterson, Carol B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Individuals with bulimia nervosa (BN) frequently endorse risky behaviors such as self-harm and substance use. However, no studies of BN to date have examined factors associated with engaging in individual or co-occurring risky behaviors. Given that individuals with BN often have personality psychopathology, which has been linked to symptoms and course of illness, this study sought to examine how personality may differentiate engagement in risky behaviors among BN individuals. Method A sample of 133 women with BN completed self-report measures of personality psychopathology at baseline, and then reported on bulimic and risky behaviors (e.g., substance misuse, self-harm) over 2 weeks using ecological momentary assessment (EMA). A series of hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the unique associations between state-level predictor variables (each risky behavior, e.g., substance misuse, and combination of risky behaviors, e.g., substance misuse plus self-harm) and trait-level personality constructs. Results Substance misuse behavior, above and beyond all other risky behaviors, was significantly associated with higher scores on trait dissocial behavior (p = 0.004). Discussion Substance misuse in BN has a unique association with dissocial behavior, a personality trait characterized by hostility, impulsivity, and entitlement. These results suggest that targeting personality variables may help facilitate more effective treatment of risky behaviors, including substance use in BN. PMID:27301347

  4. White Matter Integrity is Reduced in Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Mettler, Lisa N.; Shott, Megan E.; Pryor, Tamara; Yang, Tony T.; Frank, Guido K.W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate brain white matter (WM) functionality in bulimia nervosa (BN) in relation to anxiety. Method Twenty-one control (CW, mean age 27±7 years) and 20 BN women (mean age 25±5 years) underwent brain diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to measure fractional anisotropy (FA; an indication of WM axon integrity) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC; reflecting WM cell damage). Results FA was decreased in BN in the bilateral corona radiata extending into the posterior limb of the internal capsule, the corpus callosum, the right sub-insular white matter and right fornix. In CW but not BN trait anxiety correlated negatively with fornix, corpus callosum and left corona radiata FA. ADC was increased in BN compared to CW in the bilateral corona radiata, corpus callosum, inferior fronto-occipital and uncinate fasciculus. Alterations in BN WM functionality were not due to structural brain alterations. Discussion WM integrity is disturbed in BN, especially in the corona radiate, which has been associated with taste and brain reward processing. Whether this is a premorbid condition or an effect from the illness is yet uncertain. The relationships between WM FA and trait anxiety in CW but not BN may suggest that altered WM functionality contributes to high anxious traits in BN. PMID:23354827

  5. Serotonin transporter binding after recovery from bulimia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Pichika, Rama; Buchsbaum, Monte S.; Bailer, Ursula; Hoh, Carl; DeCastro, Alex; Buchsbaum, Bradley R.; Kaye, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Objective Physiological and pharmacological studies indicate that altered brain serotonin (5-HT) activity could contribute to a susceptibility to develop appetitive and behavioural alterations that are characteristic of bulimia nervosa (BN). Methods Eight individuals recovered from BN (REC BN) and eight healthy control women were scanned with [11C]DASB and positron emission tomography imaging of the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT). Logan graphical analysis was applied and parametric binding potential (BPnon displaceable (ND)) images were generated. Voxel-by-voxel t-tests and a region of interest (ROI) analysis were conducted. Results REC BN had significantly lower [11C]DASB BPND in midbrain, superior and inferior cingulate and significantly higher [11C]DASB BPND in anterior cingulate and superior temporal gyrus in the voxel based analysis. ROI analysis indicated lower [11C]DASB BPND in midbrain (p=.07), containing the dorsal raphe, in REC BN, consistent with our earlier studies. Discussion These preliminary findings of a small scale study confirm and extend previous data suggesting that ill and recovered BN have altered 5-HTT measures, which potentially contribute to BN symptomology and/or differential responses to medication. PMID:21671458

  6. Imaging techniques in the management of anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Mazzetti di Pietralata, G

    2002-06-01

    This paper discusses the contribution offered by radiological techniques to the diagnosis of the medical and surgical complications of anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia (BN) with the aim of providing general indications as to their use and suggesting the best-suited techniques. In the broad field of the complications of malnourishment, the use of magnetic resonance (MR) instead of computed tomography (CT) in the assessment of brain atrophy provides much more information at a better cost-benefit ratio. Like brain atrophy, other complications may be chance radiographic findings, such as cathartic colon and colon ptosis. Pulmonary tuberculosis and the presence of bronchopneumonia in conditions of malnutrition demand that conventional X-rays be supplemented by high-resolution CT scans, MR and echotomography. When checking for parotidomegaly and polycystic ovary, the best imaging technique is echotomography. Radiologists are also called upon to express their view in the case of emergencies such as the rupture of the esophagus and osteoporosis-induced fractures.

  7. Evaluation of the DSM-5 Severity Indicator for Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Ivezaj, Valentina; White, Marney A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the DSM-5 severity criterion for bulimia nervosa (BN) based on the frequency of inappropriate weight compensatory behaviors. 199 community volunteers classified with BN were categorized using DSM-5 severity levels and compared on demographic and clinical variables. 77 (39%) participants were categorized as mild, 68 (34%) as moderate, 32 (16%) as severe, and 22 (11%) as extreme. The severity groups did not differ significantly in demographic variables or body mass index. Shape and Weight concerns did not differ significantly across severity groups. Binge eating differed with the extreme group having higher frequency than the severe, moderate, and mild groups, which did not differ from each other. Restraint differed with the extreme group having significantly higher levels than the mild group. Eating concerns differed with the extreme group having higher levels than moderate and mild groups. Depression differed with the extreme group having higher levels than severe, moderate, and mild groups, which did not differ from each other. Findings from this non-clinical group provide new, albeit modest, support for DSM-5 severity rating for BN based on frequency of inappropriate weight compensatory behaviors. Statistical findings indicate that differences in collateral clinical variables associated with the DSM-5 severity ratings reflect small effect sizes. Further research is needed with treatment-seeking patient groups with BN to establish the validity of the DSM-5 severity specifier and should include broader clinical and functional validators. PMID:25744910

  8. The validity and utility of subtyping bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    van Hoeken, Daphne; Veling, Wim; Sinke, Sjoukje; Mitchell, James E; Hoek, Hans W

    2009-11-01

    To review the evidence for the validity and utility of subtyping bulimia nervosa (BN) into a purging (BN-P) and a nonpurging subtype (BN-NP), and of distinguishing BN-NP from binge eating disorder (BED), by comparing course, complications, and treatment. A literature search of psychiatry databases for studies published in peer-reviewed journals that used the DSM-definitions of BN and BED, and included both individuals with BN-NP and individuals with BN-P and/or BED. Twenty-three studies compared individuals with BN-NP (N = 671) to individuals with BN-P (N = 1795) and/or individuals with BED (N = 1921), two of which reported on course, 12 on comorbidity and none on treatment response-the indicators for validity and clinical utility. The differences found were mainly quantitative rather than qualitative, suggesting a gradual difference in severity from BN-P (most severe) through BN-NP to BED (least severe). None of the comparisons provided convincing evidence for the validity or utility of the BN-NP diagnosis. Three options for the position of BN-NP in DSM-V were suggested: (1) maintaining the BN-NP subtype, (2) dropping nonpurging compensatory behavior as a criterion for BN, so that individuals currently designated as having BN-NP would be designated as having BED, and (3) including BN-NP in a broad BN category.

  9. Stressful task increases drive for thinness and bulimia: a laboratory study

    PubMed Central

    Sassaroli, Sandra; Fiore, Francesca; Mezzaluna, Clarice; Ruggiero, Giovanni Maria

    2015-01-01

    The scientific literature has suggested that stress undergirds the development of eating disorders (ED). Therefore, this study explored whether laboratory induced stress increases self-reported drive for thinness and bulimic symptoms measured via self-report. The relationship between control, perfectionism, stress, and cognition related to ED was examined using correlational methodology. Eighty-six participants completed an experimental task using a personal computer (PC). All individuals completed a battery of tests before and after the stressful task. Analyses showed a significant statistical increase in average scores on the drive for thinness and bulimia measured before and after a stressful task, and path analysis revealed two different cognitive models for the mechanism leading to drive for thinness and bulimia. These findings suggest that stress is an important factor in the development of the drive for thinness and bulimia. PMID:25999901

  10. Stressful task increases drive for thinness and bulimia: a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Sassaroli, Sandra; Fiore, Francesca; Mezzaluna, Clarice; Ruggiero, Giovanni Maria

    2015-01-01

    The scientific literature has suggested that stress undergirds the development of eating disorders (ED). Therefore, this study explored whether laboratory induced stress increases self-reported drive for thinness and bulimic symptoms measured via self-report. The relationship between control, perfectionism, stress, and cognition related to ED was examined using correlational methodology. Eighty-six participants completed an experimental task using a personal computer (PC). All individuals completed a battery of tests before and after the stressful task. Analyses showed a significant statistical increase in average scores on the drive for thinness and bulimia measured before and after a stressful task, and path analysis revealed two different cognitive models for the mechanism leading to drive for thinness and bulimia. These findings suggest that stress is an important factor in the development of the drive for thinness and bulimia.

  11. Treating bulimia with hypnosis and low-level light therapy: a case report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laser, Eleanor; Sassack, Michael

    2012-03-01

    This case report describes an effort to control bulimia nervosa by combining low-level laser therapy (LLLT)-the application of red and near-infrared light to specific body points-and hypnosis. A 29-year old female with a 14-year history of bulimia received one session of LLLT combined with hypnosis. Two weeks later, following a measurable decrease in bulimic episodes (purging), a session of psychotherapy and hypnosis was administered. Six months post-treatment, the patient has experienced a complete cessation of purging activities without recurrence. LLLT, when used in conjunction with hypnosis and psychotherapy, was effective in managing bulimia and may prove useful in treating other eating disorders.

  12. Sexual function of women suffering from anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Kravvariti, Vasilliki; Varsou, Eleftheria

    2015-01-01

    The cross-sectional study aimed at examining the sexual function of young adult women suffering from eating disorders. The authors interviewed 53 women (26 with anorexia nervosa and 27 with bulimia nervosa) and 58 female students. Each participant was administered the Female Sexual Function Index, the Eating Attitudes Test, the Body Shape Questionnaire, and the Beck Depression Inventory. Comparisons among the 3 groups showed that patients with anorexia nervosa scored lower in each Female Sexual Function Index subscale than did healthy controls. There was no significant difference between bulimia nervosa and healthy controls. Sexual functionality of patients with anorexia nervosa was correlated only with body mass index (r = 0.5, p =.01). Sexual functionality of patients with bulimia nervosa was correlated only with the Beck Depression Inventory (r = -0.4, p =.03) Patients with anorexia nervosa had more disturbed sexual function than did controls. Sexual function can be related to the level of starvation and symptoms of depression.

  13. Possible effects of the popular and medical recognition of bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Habermas, T

    1992-03-01

    Historical changes in psychological symptoms are analysed not only from a social causation approach but also from a labelling perspective. Modern eating disorders lend themselves to such an analysis because of their historical variability. Effects of the introduction and dispersion of the psychiatric concept of 'bulimia nervosa' at normal body weight and its propagation through the mass media are examined (relying on Devereux's model of 'ethnic disorders'). Data of an exploratory interview study with 39 bulimic patients evaluated along these lines (a) indicate that the recognition of bulimia has facilitated seeking of professional and non-professional help, (b) invite categorization of bulimic behaviour implying less self-blame, (c) render imitation of bulimia more probable, and (d) covary with less secretive illness behaviour indicating a broadening of underlying motivations.

  14. [Oral symptoms and signs in patients with bulimia and anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Panico, René L

    2006-01-01

    There are numerous general clinical manifestations in eating disorders, such as anorexia and nervous bulimia, which are fully described in the reading material. The objective of this study is to demonstrate that patients suffering from anorexia and nervous bulimia present manifestations in the oral mucosa and a proper anamnesis can lead to an early disease diagnosis. The clinical cases presented show some of the oral manifestations in patients suffering from these disorders. Abrasion of teeth enamel is a typical sign of this disease, specially in patients with nervous bulimia, caused by self-induced vomit acids. However, this sign does not help to make an early disease diagnosis, since the acid takes a long time to produce demineralization.

  15. Greater left cerebral hemispheric metabolism in bulimia assessed by positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.C.; Hagman, J.; Buchsbaum, M.S.; Blinder, B.; Derrfler, M.; Tai, W.Y.; Hazlett, E.; Sicotte, N. )

    1990-03-01

    Eight women with bulimia and eight age- and sex-matched normal control subjects were studied with positron emission tomography using (18F)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) as a tracer of brain metabolic rate. Subjects performed a visual vigilance task during FDG uptake. In control subjects, the metabolic rate was higher in the right hemisphere than in the left, but patients with bulimia did not have this normal asymmetry. Lower metabolic rates in the basal ganglia, found in studies of depressed subjects, and higher rates in the basal ganglia, reported in a study of anorexia nervosa, were not found. This is consistent with the suggestion that bulimia is a diagnostic grouping distinct from these disorders.

  16. A qualitative study of young women's experiences of recovery from bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Britt-Marie; Enmark, Annika; Bohman, Anna; Lundström, Mats

    2015-04-01

    To describe experiences of recovery from bulimia nervosa among young adult women. Most studies into recovery from eating disorders focus on anorexia nervosa, although some include both anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Recovery has been described as beginning with renewed self-esteem. Qualitative interview study. Fourteen women were invited to participate; five women, between 23-26 years of age, who assessed themselves as healthy for at least 2 years agreed to take part in narrative interviews. Tape-recorded interviews lasting 45-60 minutes (median 49 minutes) were conducted from February-April 2010 and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The interviews revealed four themes in recovery from bulimia nervosa: feeling stuck in bulimia nervosa, getting ready to change, breaking free of bulimia nervosa and grasping a new reality, each comprising two or more subthemes. The process of recovery was not linear, but rather went back and forth between progress and relapse. The women expressed strong ambivalence about leaving the illness behind. An important part of their recovery was their ability to accept themselves. It was essential for their recovery to be supported in developing a unique explanation of the cause of their illness. Women's ability to recover from bulimia nervosa and take control over their lives is based on their self-efficacy. Effective care should therefore strive to strengthen women's beliefs in their own abilities, to instil hope for recovery and thus to bolster their self-efficacy. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Full-mouth rehabilitation of a patient with bulimia nervosa. A case report.

    PubMed

    Kavoura, Virginia; Kourtis, Stefanos G; Zoidis, Panagiotis; Andritsakis, Demetrios P; Doukoudakis, Asterios

    2005-01-01

    Anorexia and bulimia nervosa are eating disorders seen mainly in adolescents or young patients. The dentist should be in the position to recognize early signs of the disorder and alert the patient (and the patient's parents, if necessary) of the possible physical, psychologi cal, and dental consequences. Such dental treatment may help motivate the patient to confront the problem. In this paper the full-mouth rehabilitation, using a combination of galvano- and metal-ceramic restorations, of a young patient suffering from bulimia nervosa is described.

  18. Recovery From Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa at 22-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Kamryn T; Tabri, Nassim; Thomas, Jennifer J; Murray, Helen B; Keshaviah, Aparna; Hastings, Elizabeth; Edkins, Katherine; Krishna, Meera; Herzog, David B; Keel, Pamela K; Franko, Debra L

    2017-02-01

    The course of eating disorders is often protracted, with fewer than half of adults achieving recovery from anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa. Some argue for palliative management when duration exceeds a decade, yet outcomes beyond 20 years are rarely described. This study investigates early and long-term recovery in the Massachusetts General Hospital Longitudinal Study of Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa. Females with DSM-III-R/DSM-IV anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa were assessed at 9 and at 20 to 25 years of follow-up (mean [SD] = 22.10 [1.10] years; study initiated in 1987, last follow-up conducted in 2013) via structured clinical interview (Longitudinal Interval Follow-Up Evaluation of Eating Disorders [LIFE-EAT-II]). Seventy-seven percent of the original cohort was re-interviewed, and multiple imputation was used to include all surviving participants from the original cohort (N = 228). Kaplan-Meier curves estimated recovery by 9-year follow-up, and McNemar test examined concordance between recovery at 9-year and 22-year follow-up. At 22-year follow-up, 62.8% of participants with anorexia nervosa and 68.2% of participants with bulimia nervosa recovered, compared to 31.4% of participants with anorexia nervosa and 68.2% of participants with bulimia nervosa by 9-year follow-up. Approximately half of those with anorexia nervosa who had not recovered by 9 years progressed to recovery at 22 years. Early recovery was associated with increased likelihood of long-term recovery in anorexia nervosa (odds ratio [OR] = 10.5; 95% CI, 3.77-29.28; McNemar χ²₁ = 31.39; P < .01) but not in bulimia nervosa (OR = 1.0; 95% CI, 0.49-2.05; McNemar χ²₁ = 0; P = 1.0). At 22 years, approximately two-thirds of females with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa were recovered. Recovery from bulimia nervosa happened earlier, but recovery from anorexia nervosa continued over the long term, arguing against the implementation of palliative care for most individuals with eating

  19. CCK response in bulimia nervosa and following remission.

    PubMed

    Hannon-Engel, Sandra L; Filin, Evgeniy E; Wolfe, Barbara E

    2013-10-02

    The core defining features of bulimia nervosa (BN) are repeated binge eating episodes and inappropriate compensatory (e.g., purging) behavior. Previous studies suggest an abnormal post-prandial response in the satiety-signaling peptide cholecystokinin (CCK) in persons with BN. It is unknown whether this altered response persists following remission or if it may be a potential target for the development of clinical treatment strategies. To examine the nature of this altered response, this study assessed whether CCK normalizes following remission from BN (RBN). This study prospectively evaluated the plasma CCK response and corresponding eating behavior-related ratings (e.g., satiety, fullness, hunger, urge to binge and vomit) in individuals with BN-purging subtype (n=10), RBN-purging subtype (n=14), and healthy controls (CON, n=13) at baseline, +15, +30, and +60 min following the ingestion of a standardized liquid test meal. Subject groups did not significantly differ in CCK response to the test meal. A significant relationship between CCK response and satiety ratings was observed in the RBN group (r=.59, p<.05 two-tailed). A new and unanticipated finding in the BN group was a significant relationship between CCK response and ratings of "urge to vomit" (r=.86, p<.01, two-tailed). Unlike previous investigations, CCK response did not differ in BN and CON groups. Thus the role of symptom severity remains an area of further investigation. Additionally, findings suggest that in this sample, CCK functioning following remission from BN-purging subtype is not different from controls. It remains unknown whether or not CCK functioning may be a protective or liability factor in the stabilization and recovery process. Replication studies utilizing a larger sample size are needed to further elucidate the role of CCK in recovery from BN and its potential target of related novel treatment strategies.

  20. Therapeutic alliance in a randomized clinical trial for bulimia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Accurso, Erin C.; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E.; Ciao, Anna; Cao, Li; Crosby, Ross D.; Smith, Tracey L.; Klein, Marjorie H.; Mitchell, James E.; Crow, Scott J.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Peterson, Carol B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study examined the temporal relation between therapeutic alliance and outcome in two treatments for bulimia nervosa (BN). Method Eighty adults with BN symptoms were randomized to 21 sessions of integrative cognitive-affective therapy (ICAT) or enhanced cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT-E). Bulimic symptoms (i.e., frequency of binge eating and purging) were assessed at each session and post-treatment. Therapeutic alliance (Working Alliance Inventory) was assessed at sessions 2, 8, 14, and post-treatment. Repeated-measures analyses using linear mixed models with random intercepts were conducted to determine differences in alliance growth by treatment and patient characteristics. Mixed-effects models examined the relation between alliance and symptom improvement. Results Overall, patients in both treatments reported strong therapeutic alliances. Regardless of treatment, greater therapeutic alliance between (but not within) subjects predicted greater reductions in bulimic behavior; reductions in bulimic behavior also predicted improved alliance. Patients with higher depression, anxiety, or emotion dysregulation had a stronger therapeutic alliance in CBT-E than ICAT, while those with more intimacy problems had greater improvement in therapeutic alliance in ICAT compared to CBT-E. Conclusions Therapeutic alliance has a unique impact on outcome, independent of the impact of symptom improvement on alliance. Within- and between-subject effects revealed that changes in alliance over time did not predict symptom improvement, but rather that individuals who had a stronger alliance overall had better bulimic symptom outcomes. These findings indicate that therapeutic alliance is an important predictor of outcome in the treatment of BN. PMID:25894667

  1. Therapeutic alliance in a randomized clinical trial for bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Accurso, Erin C; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E; Ciao, Anna; Cao, Li; Crosby, Ross D; Smith, Tracey L; Klein, Marjorie H; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott J; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Peterson, Carol B

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the temporal relation between therapeutic alliance and outcome in two treatments for bulimia nervosa (BN). Eighty adults with BN symptoms were randomized to 21 sessions of integrative cognitive-affective therapy (ICAT) or enhanced cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT-E). Bulimic symptoms (i.e., frequency of binge eating and purging) were assessed at each session and posttreatment. Therapeutic alliance (Working Alliance Inventory) was assessed at Sessions 2, 8, 14, and posttreatment. Repeated-measures analyses using linear mixed models with random intercepts were conducted to determine differences in alliance growth by treatment and patient characteristics. Mixed-effects models examined the relation between alliance and symptom improvement. Overall, patients in both treatments reported strong therapeutic alliances. Regardless of treatment, greater therapeutic alliance between (but not within) subjects predicted greater reductions in bulimic behavior; reductions in bulimic behavior also predicted improved alliance. Patients with higher depression, anxiety, or emotion dysregulation had a stronger therapeutic alliance in CBT-E than ICAT, while those with more intimacy problems had greater improvement in therapeutic alliance in ICAT compared to CBT-E. Therapeutic alliance has a unique impact on outcome, independent of the impact of symptom improvement on alliance. Within- and between-subjects effects revealed that changes in alliance over time did not predict symptom improvement, but rather that individuals who had a stronger alliance overall had better bulimic symptom outcomes. These findings indicate that therapeutic alliance is an important predictor of outcome in the treatment of BN. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. CCK response in bulimia nervosa and following remission

    PubMed Central

    Hannon-Engel, Sandra L.; Filin, Evgeniy E.; Wolfe, Barbara E.

    2013-01-01

    The core defining features of bulimia nervosa (BN) are repeated binge eating episodes and inappropriate compensatory (e.g. purging) behavior. Previous studies suggest an abnormal postprandial response in the satiety-signaling peptide cholecystokinin (CCK) in persons with BN. It is unknown whether this altered response persists following remission or if it may be a potential target for the development of clinical treatment strategies. To examine the nature of this altered response, this study assessed whether CCK normalizes following remission from BN (RBN). This study prospectively evaluated the plasma CCK response and corresponding eating behavior-related ratings (e.g. satiety, fullness, hunger, urge to binge and vomit) in individuals with BN-purging subtype (n=10), RBN-purging subtype (n =14), and healthy controls (CON, n=13) at baseline, +15, +30, and +60 minutes following the ingestion of a standardized liquid test meal. Subject groups did not significantly differ in CCK response to the test meal. A significant relationship between CCK response and satiety ratings was observed in the RBN group (r=.59, p<.05 two-tailed). A new and unanticipated finding in the BN group was a significant relationship between CCK response and ratings of “urge to vomit” (r=.86, p < .01, two-tailed). Unlike previous investigations CCK response did not differ in BN and CON groups. Thus the role of symptom severity remains an area of further investigation. Additionally, findings suggest that in this sample, CCK functioning following remission from BN-purging subtype is not different from controls. It remains unknown whether or not CCK functioning may be a protective or liability factor in the stabilization and recovery process. Replication studies utilizing a larger sample size are needed to further elucidate the role of CCK in recovery from BN and its potential target of related novel treatment strategies. PMID:23988345

  3. Interhemispheric functional connectivity in anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Canna, Antonietta; Prinster, Anna; Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Cantone, Elena; Monteleone, Palmiero; Volpe, Umberto; Maj, Mario; Di Salle, Francesco; Esposito, Fabrizio

    2017-05-01

    The functional interplay between hemispheres is fundamental for behavioral, cognitive, and emotional control. Anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) have been largely studied with brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in relation to the functional mechanisms of high-level processing, but not in terms of possible inter-hemispheric functional connectivity anomalies. Using resting-state functional MRI (fMRI), voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC) and regional inter-hemispheric spectral coherence (IHSC) were studied in 15 AN and 13 BN patients and 16 healthy controls (HC). Using T1-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging MRI scans, regional VMHC values were correlated with the left-right asymmetry of corresponding homotopic gray matter volumes and with the white matter callosal fractional anisotropy (FA). Compared to HC, AN patients exhibited reduced VMHC in cerebellum, insula, and precuneus, while BN patients showed reduced VMHC in dorso-lateral prefrontal and orbito-frontal cortices. The regional IHSC analysis highlighted that the inter-hemispheric functional connectivity was higher in the 'Slow-5' band in all regions except the insula. No group differences in left-right structural asymmetries and in VMHC vs. callosal FA correlations were significant in the comparisons between cohorts. These anomalies, not explained by structural changes, indicate that AN and BN, at least in their acute phase, are associated with a loss of inter-hemispheric connectivity in regions implicated in self-referential, cognitive control and reward processing. These findings may thus gather novel functional markers to explore aberrant features of these eating disorders. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. A twin study of specific bulimia nervosa symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Mazzeo, S. E.; Mitchell, K. S.; Bulik, C. M.; Aggen, S. H.; Kendler, K. S.; Neale, M. C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Twin studies have suggested that additive genetic factors significantly contribute to liability to bulimia nervosa (BN). However, the diagnostic criteria for BN remain controversial. In this study, an item-factor model was used to examine the BN diagnostic criteria and the genetic and environmental contributions to BN in a population-based twin sample. The validity of the equal environment assumption (EEA) for BN was also tested. Method Participants were 1024 female twins (MZ n=614, DZ n=410) from the population-based Mid-Atlantic Twin Registry. BN was assessed using symptom-level (self-report) items consistent with DSM-IV and ICD-10 diagnostic criteria. Items assessing BN were included in an item-factor model. The EEA was measured by items assessing similarity of childhood and adolescent environment, which have demonstrated construct validity. Scores on the EEA factor were used to specify the degree to which twins shared environmental experiences in this model. Results The EEA was not violated for BN. Modeling results indicated that the majority of the variance in BN was due to additive genetic factors. There was substantial variability in additive genetic and environmental contributions to specific BN symptoms. Most notably, vomiting was very strongly influenced by additive genetic factors, while other symptoms were much less heritable, including the influence of weight on self-evaluation. These results highlight the importance of assessing eating disorders at the symptom level. Conclusions Refinement of eating disorder phenotypes could ultimately lead to improvements in treatment and targeted prevention, by clarifying sources of variation for specific components of symptomatology. PMID:19818201

  5. [Evaluation of temperament and personality in bulimia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Słopień, Agnieszka; Rybakowski, Filip; Rajewski, Andrzej

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies revealed the possibility of abnormal personality development role in the etiology of eating disorders. It was found that a diagnosis of personality disorders, mostly borderline personality and/or histrionic personality can be made in about 44-46% of bulimic patients. The inconsistencies in identifying personality types using categorical assessment approaches have encouraged a conceptualization of the personality from a dimensional perspective. It was revealed that the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire (TPQ) and Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) are useful in studying patients with eating disorders. The aim of the study was personality dimensions and depression symptoms assessment in bulimic patients. We studied 36 women with purging type bulimia according to DSM-IV and ICD 10 criteria. The mean age of the studied women was 19.7 years. The control group were 44 healthy women: university and last year high school students (mean age 20.4). We assessed body height, body mass and Body Mass Index (BMI). Severity of depression symptoms was assessed with the use of Beck Depression Index (BDI), and personality dimensions with the use of (TCI). Women from the study group had higher harm avoidance (HA) scores, which shows that bulimic patients are shy, fearful, doubtful, tend to be inhibited in most social situations. Mood disorders present in the studied women influenced HA scores. The results of the study revealed lower possibilities of self-directness in bulimic patients in comparison with the control group. Negative correlation between BDI and SD scores, shows that a decrease of depression severity may lead to an increase of self-esteem, independence and effectiveness of bulimic patients.

  6. Bulimia nervosa-nonpurging subtype: closer to the bulimia nervosa-purging subtype or to binge eating disorder?

    PubMed

    Jordan, Jennifer; McIntosh, Virginia V W; Carter, Janet D; Rowe, Sarah; Taylor, Kathryn; Frampton, Christopher M A; McKenzie, Janice M; Latner, Janet; Joyce, Peter R

    2014-04-01

    DSM-5 has dropped subtyping of bulimia nervosa (BN), opting to continue inclusion of the somewhat contentious diagnosis of BN-nonpurging subtype (BN-NP) within a broad BN category. Some contend however that BN-NP is more like binge eating disorder (BED) than BN-P. This study examines clinical characteristics, eating disorder symptomatology, and Axis I comorbidity in BN-NP, BN-P, and BED groups to establish whether BN-NP more closely resembles BN-P or BED. Women with BN-P (n = 29), BN-NP (n = 29), and BED (n = 54) were assessed at baseline in an outpatient psychotherapy trial for those with binge eating. Measures included the Structured Clinical Interviews for DSM-IV, Eating Disorder Examination, and Eating Disorder Inventory-2. The BN-NP subtype had BMIs between those with BN-P and BED. Both BN subtypes had higher Restraint and Drive for Thinness scores than BED. Body Dissatisfaction was highest in BN-NP and predicted BN-NP compared to BN-P. Higher Restraint and lower BMI predicted BN-NP relative to BED. BN-NP resembled BED with higher lifetime BMIs; and weight-loss clinic than eating disorder clinic attendances relative to the BN-P subtype. Psychiatric comorbidity was comparable except for higher lifetime cannabis use disorder in the BN-NP than BN-P subtype These results suggest that BN-NP sits between BN-P and BED however the high distress driving inappropriate compensatory behaviors in BN-P requires specialist eating disorder treatment. These results support retaining the BN-NP group within the BN category. Further research is needed to determine whether there are meaningful differences in outcome over follow-up. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Assessment and Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia in School Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Carole; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia are major concerns for high school students, especially females. These syndromes interfere with normal functioning and social development and can be life-threatening. Definitions, characteristics, symptoms, and treatment approaches for these two eating disorders are discussed, and suggestions for involvement of the…

  8. Low Self-Esteem as a Treatment Issue in the Psychotherapy of Anorexia and Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Pryor; Sights, Judith R.

    1986-01-01

    Observation has indicated that low self-esteem is pervasive in clients with anorexia and bulimia. Possible origins of the self-esteem deficit, its relationship to eating problems, and psychotherapeutic strategies to counteract the deficits are explored. (Author/BL)

  9. Anorexia and Bulimia: An Inventory of Public Awareness and Popular Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmer, Marc A.

    Prevention and early intervention in cases of anorexia and bulimia require that both professionals and the general public have knowledge about these eating disorders. A study was conducted to identify the questions about these disorders most often asked by the general public and to develop a guide to answer those questions for individuals of…

  10. Familial Contributions to the Etiology and Course of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strober, Michael; Humphrey, Laura Lynn

    1987-01-01

    Discusses familial influences in anorexia nervosa and bulimia. Reviews descriptions of family interaction, familial correlates of course and phenomenology of symptoms, and studies of familial transmission. Concludes that certain personality factors, possibly genetically determined, predispose the individual to greater sensitivity and vulnerability…

  11. A Short-Term Cognitive-Behavioral Approach to the Treatment of Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakley, Suzanne J.

    Although long-term treatments have successfully reduced or eliminated the binging and purging of bulimia patients, there is a critical need for effective short-term treatments since many bulimics are college students who are not available for lengthy treatment. Seven female university students participated in an eight session individual…

  12. The Relationship between Childhood Sexual Abuse and Subsequent Onset of Bulimia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Debra A. F.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This study compared 72 young adult women identified as suffering from bulimia nervosa with 72 matched controls. Bulimic women reported higher rates of sexual abuse after the age of 12 with an adult relative as the perpetrator, reported dissociative experiences as more common, and reported more negative and unusual mealtime experiences. (Author/JDD)

  13. How Schools Can Help Combat Student Eating Disorders. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Michael P.

    This book presents a comprehensive review of anorexia nervosa and bulimia and the roles that schools can have in preventing, identifying, and treating these disorders. Chapter 1 provides an overview of student eating disorders and presents a case study of a high school student with an eating disorder. Chapter 2 discusses the nature of anorexia…

  14. Dancing on the Sidewalk: Reflections on Working with Women with Weight Preoccupations and Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Heidi

    1997-01-01

    Bulimia and other eating disorders are coping strategies to avoid or mask distressing emotions. Outdoor adventure activities can be intense emotional experiences that help young women find new strategies to deal with their "trigger" emotions in the absence of food. Metaphors are consciously built into adventure activities to facilitate…

  15. Bilateral parotid enlargement as a presenting feature of bulimia nervosa in a post-adolescent male.

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, J. A.; Fortune, F.

    1994-01-01

    An unusual case of bulimia nervosa in a post-adolescent male is reported. The clinical presentation was one of painless parotid swelling of 3 years duration with marked weight loss and underlying metabolic alkalosis. The diagnostic significance of parotid salivary gland swellings is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8140014

  16. An Examination of the Mechanisms of Action in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangler, Diane L.; Baldwin, Scott A.; Agras, W. Stewart

    2004-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for bulimia nervosa (BN) has received considerable empirical support for its efficacy. However, few investigators have examined the mechanisms proposed to account for the reduction of BN symptoms during CBT. The current study examined the associations between therapist interventions, client mechanisms, and…

  17. Comparison of Six- and Eight-Session Cognitive Guided Self-Help for Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furber, Gareth; Steele, Anna; Wade, Tracey D.

    2004-01-01

    A previous case-series evaluation of a six-session guided self-help (GSH) approach with 15 people with bulimia nervosa (BN) showed significant reductions across all measures, including binge eating, self-induced vomiting, weight concern, shape concern and dietary restraint. However, the reduction of binge eating and self-induced vomiting was…

  18. Predictors and Moderators of Outcome in Family-Based Treatment for Adolescent Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grange, Daniel; Crosby, Ross D.; Lock, James

    2008-01-01

    The predictors and moderators of treatment outcome for adolescents with bulimia nervosa (BN) are explored among those who participated in family based treatment or individual supportive psychotherapy. It is concluded that family-based treatment of BN may be most effective in those cases with low levels of eating disorder psychopathology.

  19. The Clinical Features of Binge Eating Disorder and Bulimia Nervosa: What Are the Differences?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Keri A.

    2001-01-01

    Compares the clinical characteristics of binge eating disorder (BED) and the related syndrome bulimia nervosa (BN). Findings suggest individuals with BED are distinguishable from those with BN on a number of traits, including higher rates of obesity and lower levels of eating concern and dietary restraint. (Contains 29 references and 2 tables.)…

  20. Client Pretreatment Characteristics as Predictors of Outcome in Brief Therapy for Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guiffrida, Douglas A.; Barnes, Kristin L.; Hoskins, Christine M.; Roman, Lisa L.

    2001-01-01

    Presents an overview for college counselors of the literature on bulimia treatment outcomes for purposes of screening, treatment, and referral. Outlines pretreatment characteristics that seem amenable to success in brief therapy, as well as those that do not lead to a positive outcome. (Contains 37 references and 2 tables.) (Author/GCP)

  1. Initial evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Brian C; Jimerson, Michelle; Haxton, Christina; Jimerson, David C

    2015-01-01

    Eating disorders are life-threatening conditions that are challenging to address; however, the primary care setting provides an important opportunity for critical medical and psychosocial intervention. The recently published Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th ed., includes updated diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa (e.g., elimination of amenorrhea as a diagnostic criterion) and for bulimia nervosa (e.g., criterion for frequency of binge episodes decreased to an average of once per week). In addition to the role of environmental triggers and societal expectations of body size and shape, research has suggested that genes and discrete biochemical signals contribute to the development of eating disorders. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa occur most often in adolescent females and are often accompanied by depression and other comorbid psychiatric disorders. For low-weight patients with anorexia nervosa, virtually all physiologic systems are affected, ranging from hypotension and osteopenia to life-threatening arrhythmias, often requiring emergent assessment and hospitalization for metabolic stabilization. In patients with frequent purging or laxative abuse, the presence of electrolyte abnormalities requires prompt intervention. Family-based treatment is helpful for adolescents with anorexia nervosa, whereas short-term psychotherapy, such as cognitive behavior therapy, is effective for most patients with bulimia nervosa. The use of psychotropic medications is limited for anorexia nervosa, whereas treatment studies have shown a benefit of antidepressant medications for patients with bulimia nervosa. Treatment is most effective when it includes a multidisciplinary, teambased approach.

  2. Emotion Awareness and Identification Skills in Adolescent Girls with Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sim, Leslie; Zeman, Janice

    2004-01-01

    This study examined emotion-identification skills in 19 adolescent girls (M age = 16 years, 8 months) diagnosed with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed. [DSM-IV], American Psychiatric Association, 1994) diagnosis of bulimia nervosa or eating disorder not otherwise specified in the bulimic spectrum, 19 age-matched girls…

  3. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for subthreshold bulimia nervosa: A case series.

    PubMed

    Peterson, C B; Miller, K B; Willer, M G; Ziesmer, J; Durkin, N; Arikian, A; Crow, S J

    2011-09-01

    The extent to which cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is helpful in treating individuals with bulimic symptoms who do not meet full criteria for bulimia nervosa is unclear. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the potential efficacy of CBT for eating disorder individuals with bulimic symptoms who do not meet full criteria for bulimia nervosa. Twelve participants with subthreshold bulimia nervosa were treated in a case series with 20 sessions of CBT. Ten of the 12 participants (83.3%) completed treatment. Intent-to-treat abstinent percentages were 75.0% for objectively large episodes of binge eating (OBEs), 33.3% for subjectively large episodes of binge eating (SBEs), and 50% for purging at end of treatment. At one year follow-up, 66.7% were abstinent for OBEs, 41.7% for SBEs, and 50.0% for purging. The majority also reported improvements in associated symptoms. This case series provides support for the use of CBT with individuals with subthreshold bulimia nervosa.

  4. An Examination of the Mechanisms of Action in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangler, Diane L.; Baldwin, Scott A.; Agras, W. Stewart

    2004-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for bulimia nervosa (BN) has received considerable empirical support for its efficacy. However, few investigators have examined the mechanisms proposed to account for the reduction of BN symptoms during CBT. The current study examined the associations between therapist interventions, client mechanisms, and…

  5. Predictors and Moderators of Outcome in Family-Based Treatment for Adolescent Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grange, Daniel; Crosby, Ross D.; Lock, James

    2008-01-01

    The predictors and moderators of treatment outcome for adolescents with bulimia nervosa (BN) are explored among those who participated in family based treatment or individual supportive psychotherapy. It is concluded that family-based treatment of BN may be most effective in those cases with low levels of eating disorder psychopathology.

  6. When Dieting Becomes Dangerous: A Guide to Understanding and Treating Anorexia and Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michel, Deborah Marcontell; Willard, Susan G.

    This book about anorexia and bulimia is written for patients and the people who care about them. It describes the symptoms and warning signs of eating disorders, explains their presumed causes and complexities, and suggests effective treatments. The book emphasizes the critical role of psychotherapy and family therapy in recovery, explains how…

  7. Comparison of Six- and Eight-Session Cognitive Guided Self-Help for Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furber, Gareth; Steele, Anna; Wade, Tracey D.

    2004-01-01

    A previous case-series evaluation of a six-session guided self-help (GSH) approach with 15 people with bulimia nervosa (BN) showed significant reductions across all measures, including binge eating, self-induced vomiting, weight concern, shape concern and dietary restraint. However, the reduction of binge eating and self-induced vomiting was…

  8. Emotion Awareness and Identification Skills in Adolescent Girls with Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sim, Leslie; Zeman, Janice

    2004-01-01

    This study examined emotion-identification skills in 19 adolescent girls (M age = 16 years, 8 months) diagnosed with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed. [DSM-IV], American Psychiatric Association, 1994) diagnosis of bulimia nervosa or eating disorder not otherwise specified in the bulimic spectrum, 19 age-matched girls…

  9. Coping Strategies in Bulimia Nervosa Treatment: Impact on Outcome in Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binford, Roslyn B.; Mussell, Melissa Pederson; Crosby, Ross D.; Peterson, Carol B.; Crow, Scott J.; Mitchell, James E.

    2005-01-01

    This study's purpose was to examine the extent to which participants (N = 143) receiving cognitive-behavioral therapy for bulimia nervosa (BN) reported implementing therapeutic strategies to abstain from BN behaviors, and to assess whether use of specific strategies predicts outcome at treatment end and 1-and 6-month follow-up. Frequency of…

  10. Client Pretreatment Characteristics as Predictors of Outcome in Brief Therapy for Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guiffrida, Douglas A.; Barnes, Kristin L.; Hoskins, Christine M.; Roman, Lisa L.

    2001-01-01

    Presents an overview for college counselors of the literature on bulimia treatment outcomes for purposes of screening, treatment, and referral. Outlines pretreatment characteristics that seem amenable to success in brief therapy, as well as those that do not lead to a positive outcome. (Contains 37 references and 2 tables.) (Author/GCP)

  11. Dialectical Behavior Therapy of Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa among Adolescents: A Case Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salbach-Andrae, Harriet; Bohnekamp, Inga; Pfeiffer, Ernst; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Miller, Alec L.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a case series of adolescents (mean age = 16.5 years, SD = 1.0) with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) who received dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). Twelve outpatients with AN and BN took part in 25 weeks of twice weekly therapy consisting of individual therapy and a skills training group.…

  12. Wait Not, Want Not: Factors Contributing to the Development of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Trish

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to examine prevalence and incident rates of both anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. In addition, this article will review the psychological and sociological factors that contribute to the development and maintenance of an eating disorder. Finally, different treatment approaches will be discussed in…

  13. Cognitive Behavior Therapy with Body Image Exposure for Bulimia Nervosa: A Case Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delinsky, Sherrie S.; Wilson, G. Terence

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for bulimia nervosa (BN). However, among patients with BN, symptom improvement is more pronounced for behavioral eating symptoms (i.e., bingeing and purging) than for body image disturbance, and the persistence of body image disturbance is associated with relapse. The need for more…

  14. The Relationship between Childhood Sexual Abuse and Subsequent Onset of Bulimia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Debra A. F.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This study compared 72 young adult women identified as suffering from bulimia nervosa with 72 matched controls. Bulimic women reported higher rates of sexual abuse after the age of 12 with an adult relative as the perpetrator, reported dissociative experiences as more common, and reported more negative and unusual mealtime experiences. (Author/JDD)

  15. Cognitive Behavior Therapy with Body Image Exposure for Bulimia Nervosa: A Case Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delinsky, Sherrie S.; Wilson, G. Terence

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for bulimia nervosa (BN). However, among patients with BN, symptom improvement is more pronounced for behavioral eating symptoms (i.e., bingeing and purging) than for body image disturbance, and the persistence of body image disturbance is associated with relapse. The need for more…

  16. Impact of fasting on food craving, mood and consumption in bulimia nervosa and healthy women participants.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Domínguez, Silvia; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Sonia; Fernández-Santaella, M Carmen; Ortega-Roldán, Blanca; Cepeda-Benito, Antonio

    2012-11-01

    Researchers have found that dietary restraint increases food cravings and may contribute to loss of control over eating. Negative mood states often precede food cravings and binge eating. In the present study, we tested the influence of a prolonged food deprivation period over emotional states and food cravings. Twenty-one bulimia nervosa participants and 20 healthy women participants were asked to refrain from any eating for 20 hours and reported, at baseline, after 6 hours and at the end of the fasting period, their mood and craving states. Food consumption was also measured. Fasting increased food cravings in both groups but increased negative mood in healthy women only. Bulimia nervosa participants reported improved mood following food deprivation. Whereas Bulimia nervosa and healthy women participants ate moderate and similar amounts of food following the 20-hour fasting period, food cravings were significantly associated with the number of calories ingested. These findings are congruent with self-regulation theories that predict that prolonged fasting may reduce negative emotions in women with bulimia nervosa.

  17. Coping Strategies in Bulimia Nervosa Treatment: Impact on Outcome in Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binford, Roslyn B.; Mussell, Melissa Pederson; Crosby, Ross D.; Peterson, Carol B.; Crow, Scott J.; Mitchell, James E.

    2005-01-01

    This study's purpose was to examine the extent to which participants (N = 143) receiving cognitive-behavioral therapy for bulimia nervosa (BN) reported implementing therapeutic strategies to abstain from BN behaviors, and to assess whether use of specific strategies predicts outcome at treatment end and 1-and 6-month follow-up. Frequency of…

  18. Eating Disorders. What Parents Need to Know About Anorexia and Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Our Children, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Examines facts about eating disorders, which typically affect females in their teens, discussing the causes of anorexia and bulimia, describing their effects on the body, and explaining available treatment. Though eating disorders are very serious and potentially fatal, they are treatable. Treatment includes physician evaluation, possible…

  19. Dancing on the Sidewalk: Reflections on Working with Women with Weight Preoccupations and Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Heidi

    1997-01-01

    Bulimia and other eating disorders are coping strategies to avoid or mask distressing emotions. Outdoor adventure activities can be intense emotional experiences that help young women find new strategies to deal with their "trigger" emotions in the absence of food. Metaphors are consciously built into adventure activities to facilitate…

  20. When Dieting Becomes Dangerous: A Guide to Understanding and Treating Anorexia and Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michel, Deborah Marcontell; Willard, Susan G.

    This book about anorexia and bulimia is written for patients and the people who care about them. It describes the symptoms and warning signs of eating disorders, explains their presumed causes and complexities, and suggests effective treatments. The book emphasizes the critical role of psychotherapy and family therapy in recovery, explains how…

  1. Dialectical Behavior Therapy of Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa among Adolescents: A Case Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salbach-Andrae, Harriet; Bohnekamp, Inga; Pfeiffer, Ernst; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Miller, Alec L.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a case series of adolescents (mean age = 16.5 years, SD = 1.0) with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) who received dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). Twelve outpatients with AN and BN took part in 25 weeks of twice weekly therapy consisting of individual therapy and a skills training group.…

  2. Wait Not, Want Not: Factors Contributing to the Development of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Trish

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to examine prevalence and incident rates of both anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. In addition, this article will review the psychological and sociological factors that contribute to the development and maintenance of an eating disorder. Finally, different treatment approaches will be discussed in…

  3. Time trends in age at onset of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Favaro, Angela; Caregaro, Lorenza; Tenconi, Elena; Bosello, Romina; Santonastaso, Paolo

    2009-12-01

    This study aims to explore the time trends in age at onset of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. The sample was composed of 1,666 anorexia nervosa subjects and 793 bulimia nervosa subjects (according to DSM-IV criteria) without previous anorexia nervosa consecutively referred to our outpatient unit in the period between 1985 and 2008. Time trends in illness onset were analyzed according to the year of birth of subjects. In both anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, age at onset showed a significant decrease according to year of birth. A regression model showed a significant independent effect of socioeconomic status, age at menarche, and number of siblings in predicting age at onset lower than 16 years. Age at onset of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa is decreasing in younger generations. The implications of our findings in terms of long-term outcome remain to be understood. Biologic and sociocultural factors explaining this phenomenon need to be explored in future studies. Copyright 2009 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  4. Reward Abnormalities Among Women with Full and Subthreshold Bulimia Nervosa: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Bohon, Cara; Stice, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that women with full and subthreshold bulimia nervosa show abnormal neural activation in response to food intake and anticipated food intake relative to healthy control women. Method Females with and without full/subthreshold bulimia nervosa recruited from the community (N = 26) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during receipt and anticipated receipt of chocolate milkshake and a tasteless control solution. Results Women with bulimia nervosa showed trends for less activation than healthy controls in the right anterior insula in response to anticipated receipt of chocolate milkshake (versus tasteless solution) and in the left middle frontal gyrus, right posterior insula, right precentral gyrus, and right mid dorsal insula in response to consumptions of milkshake (versus tasteless solution). Discussion Bulimia nervosa may be related to potential hypo-functioning of the brain reward system, which may lead these individuals to binge eat to compensate for this reward deficit, though the hypo-responsivity might be a result of a history of binge eating highly palatable foods. PMID:21997421

  5. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: A meta-analysis of executive functioning.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Rayna B; Beard, Charlotte L; Colby, Katrina A; Quittner, Zoe; Mills, Brent; Lavender, Jason M

    2017-08-26

    Research investigating the link between eating disorder (ED) diagnosis and executive dysfunction has had conflicting results, yet no meta-analyses have examined the overall association of ED pathology with executive functioning (EF). Effect sizes were extracted from 32 studies comparing ED groups (27 of anorexia nervosa, 9 of bulimia nervosa) with controls to determine the grand mean effect on EF. Analyses included effects for individual EF measures, as well as an age-based subgroup analysis. There was a medium effect of ED diagnosis on executive functioning, with bulimia nervosa demonstrating a larger effect (Hedges's g=-0.70) than anorexia nervosa (g=-0.41). Within anorexia nervosa studies, subgroup analyses were conducted for age and diagnostic subtype. The effect of anorexia nervosa on EF was largest in adults; however, subgroup differences for age were not significant. Anorexia and bulimia nervosa are associated with EF deficits, which are particularly notable for individuals with bulimia nervosa. The present analysis includes recommendations for future studies regarding study design and EF measurement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Altered insula response to sweet taste processing after recovery from anorexia and bulimia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Oberndorfer, Tyson A.; Frank, Guido K.W.; Simmons, Alan N.; Wagner, Angela; McCurdy, Danyale; Fudge, Julie L.; Yang, Tony T.; Paulus, Martin P.; Kaye, Walter H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Recent studies suggest that altered function of higher-order appetitive neural circuitry may contribute to restricted eating in anorexia nervosa and overeating in bulimia nervosa. This study used sweet tastes to interrogate gustatory neurocircuitry involving the anterior insula and related regions that modulate sensory-interoceptive-reward signals in response to palatable foods. Method Subjects recovered from anorexia and bulimia were studied to avoid confounding effects of altered nutritional state. Functional magnetic resonance imaging measured brain response to repeated tastes of sucrose and sucralose to disentangle neural processing of caloric and non-caloric sweet tastes. Whole-brain functional analysis was constrained to anatomical regions of interest. Results Compared to matched control women (n=14), women recovered from anorexia (n=14) had diminished (F(1,27)=7.79, p=0.01) and women recovered from bulimia (n=14) had exaggerated (F(1,27)=6.12, p=0.02) right anterior insula hemodynamic response to tastes of sucrose. Furthermore, anterior insula responses to sucrose compared to sucralose was exaggerated in recovered subjects (lower in women recovered from anorexia and higher in women recovered from bulimia). Conclusions The anterior insula integrates sensory/reward aspects of taste in the service of nutritional homeostasis. For example, one possibility is that restricted eating and weight loss occur in anorexia nervosa because of a failure to accurately recognize hunger signals, whereas overeating in bulimia nervosa could represent an exaggerated perception of hunger signals. This response may reflect the altered calibration of signals related to sweet taste and the caloric content of food and may offer a pathway to novel and more effective treatments. PMID:23732817

  7. The role of BDNF, leptin, and catecholamines in reward learning in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Homan, Philipp; Grob, Simona; Milos, Gabriella; Schnyder, Ulrich; Eckert, Anne; Lang, Undine; Hasler, Gregor

    2014-12-07

    A relationship between bulimia nervosa and reward-related behavior is supported by several lines of evidence. The dopaminergic dysfunctions in the processing of reward-related stimuli have been shown to be modulated by the neurotrophin brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the hormone leptin. Using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design, a reward learning task was applied to study the behavior of 20 female subjects with remitted bulimia nervosa and 27 female healthy controls under placebo and catecholamine depletion with alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine (AMPT). The plasma levels of BDNF and leptin were measured twice during the placebo and the AMPT condition, immediately before and 1 hour after a standardized breakfast. AMPT-induced differences in plasma BDNF levels were positively correlated with the AMPT-induced differences in reward learning in the whole sample (P=.05). Across conditions, plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor levels were higher in remitted bulimia nervosa subjects compared with controls (diagnosis effect; P=.001). Plasma BDNF and leptin levels were higher in the morning before compared with after a standardized breakfast across groups and conditions (time effect; P<.0001). The plasma leptin levels were higher under catecholamine depletion compared with placebo in the whole sample (treatment effect; P=.0004). This study reports on preliminary findings that suggest a catecholamine-dependent association of plasma BDNF and reward learning in subjects with remitted bulimia nervosa and controls. A role of leptin in reward learning is not supported by this study. However, leptin levels were sensitive to a depletion of catecholamine stores in both remitted bulimia nervosa and controls. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  8. Fluvoxamine in prevention of relapse in bulimia nervosa: effects on eating-specific psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Fichter, M M; Krüger, R; Rief, W; Holland, R; Döhne, J

    1996-02-01

    In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 72 patients with bulimia nervosa treated successfully with inpatient psychotherapy, the efficacy of fluvoxamine in maintaining improvement was tested. Fluvoxamine and placebo, respectively, were given over a period of about 15 weeks (2-3 weeks inpatient titration phase, 12 weeks outpatient relapse-prevention [maintenance] phase). The variables assessed concerned bulimic behavior and other aspects of eating disorders, global status, depression, anxieties, obsessive-compulsive behavior, and other aspects of psychopathology. Because the dropout rate was relatively high (N = 27 [33%]) and because it was considerably higher in the fluvoxamine group (19 out of 37 subjects), analyses were performed on the intent-to-treat sample (ideally including all 72 subjects). Results of the completer sample analyses (including only those subjects who finished the study) are briefly presented for comparison. In both the intent-to-treat and the completer analyses, the following scales showed fluvoxamine to have a significant effect in reducing the return of bulimic behavior: (1) self-ratings: Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI)-bulimia, urges to binge in previous week and the number of actual binges in the previous week; (2) expert ratings: Psychiatric Status Rating Scales for Bulimia nervosa, Structured Interview for Anorexia and Bulimia nervosa (SIAB)-"total score," SIAB-subscale "fasting," and SIAB-subscale "vomiting." Two further variables (EDI-total score and SIAB-subscale "bulimia") showed the superior relapse prevention effects of fluvoxamine compared with placebo for the completer sample, while they did not reach significance for group-by-time interactions in the intent-to-treat sample. During a final, short (4-week) off-medication phase, no effect of the discontinuation of medication was observed.

  9. Neural response to catecholamine depletion in remitted bulimia nervosa: Relation to depression and relapse.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Stefanie Verena; Mihov, Yoan; Federspiel, Andrea; Wiest, Roland; Hasler, Gregor

    2017-07-01

    Bulimia nervosa has been associated with a dysregulated catecholamine system. Nevertheless, the influence of this dysregulation on bulimic symptoms, on neural activity, and on the course of the illness is not clear yet. An instructive paradigm for directly investigating the relationship between catecholaminergic functioning and bulimia nervosa has involved the behavioral and neural responses to experimental catecholamine depletion. The purpose of this study was to examine the neural substrate of catecholaminergic dysfunction in bulimia nervosa and its relationship to relapse. In a randomized, double-blind and crossover study design, catecholamine depletion was achieved by using the oral administration of alpha-methyl-paratyrosine (AMPT) over 24 h in 18 remitted bulimic (rBN) and 22 healthy (HC) female participants. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured using a pseudo continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) sequence. In a follow-up telephone interview, bulimic relapse was assessed. Following AMPT, rBN participants revealed an increased vigor reduction and CBF decreases in the pallidum and posterior midcingulate cortex (pMCC) relative to HC participants showing no CBF changes in these regions. These results indicated that the pallidum and the pMCC are the functional neural correlates of the dysregulated catecholamine system in bulimia nervosa. Bulimic relapse was associated with increased depressive symptoms and CBF reduction in the hippocampus/parahippocampal gyrus following catecholamine depletion. AMPT-induced increased CBF in this region predicted staying in remission. These findings demonstrated the importance of depressive symptoms and the stress system in the course of bulimia nervosa. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Bulimia nervosa patient diagnosed with previously unsuspected ADHD in adulthood: clinical case report, literature review, and diagnostic challenges.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Konstantinos; Serfontein, Jaco; Müller, Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    There is increasing literature suggesting a link between attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and eating disorders (EDs), especially bulimia nervosa. ADHD is under-diagnosed in girls and children of high intelligence are typically missed. We identified a case of a 23-year-old woman suffering from severe bulimia nervosa and previously unsuspected ADHD in adulthood; we diagnosed and treated her with extended-release methylphenidate. We performed a literature review on the ADHD and bulimia nervosa comorbidity. We discuss the reasons why her ADHD remained undiagnosed and the difficulties in diagnosing ADHD in patients with EDs. We suggest that identifying comorbid ADHD is crucial for these patients and argue for the use of a structured interview, collateral history and investigation of onset of symptoms to establish a diagnosis of ADHD in adults with bulimia nervosa. Comorbidities and overlap of symptomatology need to be taken into account.

  11. Adjunctive Methylphenidate in the Treatment of Bulimia Nervosa Co-occurring with Bipolar Disorder and Substance Dependence

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa is associated with bipolar disorder, substance dependence, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and anxiety disorders. Few reports, however, have addressed the treatment of patients with all of these conditions. We describe a young woman with bulimia nervosa, bipolar I disorder, cocaine and alcohol dependence, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and panic disorder who achieved a sustained (>1 year) remission of her bulimia nervosa symptoms and significant improvement of her attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms with adjunctive methylphenidate after her bipolar, substance use, and panic disorders were successfully treated with hospitalization, intensive psychotherapy, quetiapine, and lamotrigine. Further research into the use of stimulants in bulimia nervosa, including in patients with complex comorbidity, is required. PMID:23556140

  12. Psychosocial factors associated with broadly defined bulimia nervosa during early pregnancy: findings from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Knoph Berg, Cecilie; Bulik, Cynthia M; Von Holle, Ann; Torgersen, Leila; Hamer, Robert; Sullivan, Patrick; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between psychosocial characteristics and broadly defined bulimia nervosa during early pregnancy, including factors associated with continuation, incidence and remission. A total of 41 157 women completed questionnaires at approximately gestation week 18, including items on eating disorders and psychosocial characteristics as a part of Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Incident bulimia nervosa during the first trimester was significantly associated with symptoms of anxiety and depression and low self-esteem and life satisfaction, whereas remission was significantly associated with higher self-esteem and life satisfaction. Continuation was not significantly related to any of the psychosocial variables tested. Onset of bulimia nervosa during pregnancy is associated with mood and anxiety symptoms. Remission of bulimic symptoms and new onset of bulimia nervosa are associated with opposite profiles of self-esteem, and life satisfaction measures.

  13. Low density and high affinity of platelet [3H]paroxetine binding in women with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Agneta; Sundblad-Elverfors, Charlotta; Landén, Mikael; Eriksson, Tomas; Eriksson, Elias

    2006-06-15

    Impaired serotonin transmission has been suggested to be implicated in the pathophysiology of bulimia nervosa. As an indirect measure of brain serotonergic activity, the binding of tritiated ligands to platelet serotonin transporters has been studied in bulimia nervosa as well as in other putatively serotonin-related psychiatric disorders. In this study, the density and affinity of platelet serotonin transporters were assessed in 20 women meeting the DSM-IV criteria for bulimia nervosa and in 14 controls without previous or ongoing eating disorder using [(3)H]paroxetine as a ligand. In comparison to controls, women with bulimia nervosa had a significantly reduced number of platelet binding sites (B(max) = 721 +/- 313 vs. 1145 +/- 293 fmol/mg protein) and an increase in the affinity for the ligand demonstrated by a lower dissociaton constant (K(d) = 33 +/- 10 vs. 44 +/- 10 pM). A significant correlation between B(max) and K(d) values was found in patients but not in controls. Our results support the notion that bulimia nervosa is associated with a reduction in platelet serotonin transporter density. In addition, our study is the first to report that this reduced transporter density in women with bulimia nervosa is accompanied by an increase in the affinity of the transporter for the ligand.

  14. Mood spectrum comorbidity in patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Miniati, Mario; Benvenuti, Antonella; Bologna, Elena; Maglio, Alessandra; Cotugno, Biagio; Massimetti, Gabriele; Calugi, Simona; Mauri, Mauro; Dell'Osso, Liliana

    2016-10-20

    To investigate the presence of mood spectrum signs and symptoms in patients with anorexia nervosa, restricting subtype (AN-R) or bulimia nervosa (BN). 55 consecutive female patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for eating disorders (EDs) not satisfying DSM-IV criteria for Axis I mood disorders were evaluated with the Lifetime Mood Spectrum Self-Report (MOODS-SR) and the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). The MOODS-SR explored the subthreshold comorbidity for mood spectrum symptoms in patients not reaching the threshold for a mood disorder Axis I diagnosis. MOODS-SR included 161 items. Separate factor analyses of MOODS-SR identified 6 'depressive factors' and 9 'manic-hypomanic factors'. The mean total score of MOODS-SR was significantly higher in BN than in AN-R patients (97.5 ± 25.4 vs 61.1 ± 38.5, respectively; p = 0.0001). 63.6 % of the sample (n = 35) endorsed the threshold of ≥61 items, with a statistically significant difference between AN-R and BN (39.3 % vs 88.9 %; χ (2) = 14.6; df = 1; p = 0.0001). Patients with BN scored significantly higher than AN-R patients on several MOODS-SR factors: (a) MOODS-SR depressive component: 'depressive mood' (11.2 ± 7.4 vs 16.0 ± 5.8; p < 0.05), 'psychomotor retardation' (5.4 ± 5.6 vs 8.9 ± 3.8; p = 0.003), 'psychotic features' (2.0 ± 1.8 vs 4.1 ± 1.6; p = 0.001), 'neurovegetative symptoms' (5.0 ± 2.6 vs 7.7 ± 1.7; p = 0.001); (b) MOODS-SR manic/hypomanic component: 'psychomotor activation' (4.3 ± 3.6 vs 7.4 ± 3.1; p = 0.002), 'mixed instability' (1.0 ± 1.5 vs 2.0 ± 1.6; p < 0.05), 'mixed irritability' (2.5 ± 1.8 vs 3.7 ± 1.6; p < 0.05), 'inflated self-esteem' (1.1 ± 1.4 vs 2.1 ± 1.6; p < 0.05), and 'wastefulness/recklessness' (1.0 ± 1.4 vs 2.0 ± 1.2; p = 0.009). MOODS-SR identifies subthreshold mood signs/symptoms among patients with AN-R, and BN and with no Axis I comorbidity for mood disorders, and provides a

  15. Psychopharmacotherapy of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, S; Kennedy, SH

    2000-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy for anorexia nervosa is considered to be of limited efficacy. However, many studies suffer methodological limitations, and the utility of newer drugs in the treatment of anorexia has not been examined yet. Although there have been more fruitful investigations on the efficacy of medication in the management of bulimia nervosa, there are still many unresolved issues regarding the optimal management of partial remission during the acute treatment phase and the intensity and duration of pharmacotherapy to achieve optimal prophylaxis. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) control the binge urges in binge-eating disorder, but more trials are required to investigate the utility of SSRIs and other agents in maintenance treatment. We review the current status of psychopharmacotherapy for anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder and evaluate the merits of newer agents in the treatment of these disorders. PMID:11109300

  16. Abdominal aortic occlusion and vascular compromise secondary to acute gastric dilatation in a patient with bulimia.

    PubMed

    Elsharif, M; Doulias, T; Aljundi, W; Balchandra, S

    2014-11-01

    Acute gastric dilation is a rare but recognised complication in patients with bulimia and anorexia following binge episodes owing to decreased bowel motility. We present a rare case of acute gastric dilation secondary to bulimia in an otherwise healthy 18-year-old female patient that resulted in compression and complete occlusion of the abdominal aorta, leading to acute mesenteric and bilateral lower limb ischaemia. This resolved immediately following a laparotomy and gastric decompression. Management of these patients is very challenging owing to the lack of a successful precedent. To our knowledge, such a catastrophic complication has only ever been reported once in the literature and the outcome was fatal. Our case is of additional importance as it offers a successful management strategy for these patients.

  17. Just Desserts? Exploring Constructions of Food in Women's Experiences of Bulimia.

    PubMed

    Churruca, Kate; Ussher, Jane M; Perz, Janette

    2017-08-01

    Bulimia, an eating disorder that affects more women than men, involves binging and compensatory behaviors. Given the importance of food in experiences of these behaviors, in this article, we examine constructions of food in accounts of bulimic behavior: how these constructions relate to cultural discourses, and their implications for subjectivity. Fifteen women who engaged in bulimic behaviors were interviewed. Through a thematic decomposition of their accounts, we identified six discursive constructions of food: "good/healthy" or "bad/unhealthy," "contaminating body and soul," "collapsed into fat," "pleasurable reward," "comfort," and "fuel for the body." Many constructions were consolidated through participants' embodied experiences, but made available through discourses in public health, biomedicine, and femininity, and had implications for subjectivity in terms of morality, spirituality, and self-worth. Thus, despite women deploying these constructions to make sense of their bulimic behaviors, they are culturally normative; this point has implications for therapeutic and preventive strategies for bulimia.

  18. Management of anorexia and bulimia nervosa: An evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Kaustav; Basu, Debasish

    2010-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are primarily psychiatric disorders characterized by severe disturbances of eating behavior. Eating disorders are most prevalent in the Western culture where food is in abundance and female attractiveness is equated with thinness. Eating disorders are rare in countries like India. Despite a plethora of management options available to the mental health professionals, no major breakthrough has been achieved in recent years. Nutritional rehabilitation along with some form of re educative psychotherapy remains the mainstay of management of anorexia nervosa. In bulimia nervosa, both fluoxetine and cognitive behavior therapy have been found to be effective. Although the above-mentioned management options have been in use for decades, the active ingredient is still to be ascertained. PMID:20838508

  19. Abdominal aortic occlusion and vascular compromise secondary to acute gastric dilatation in a patient with bulimia

    PubMed Central

    Doulias, T; Aljundi, W; Balchandra, S

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastric dilation is a rare but recognised complication in patients with bulimia and anorexia following binge episodes owing to decreased bowel motility. We present a rare case of acute gastric dilation secondary to bulimia in an otherwise healthy 18-year-old female patient that resulted in compression and complete occlusion of the abdominal aorta, leading to acute mesenteric and bilateral lower limb ischaemia. This resolved immediately following a laparotomy and gastric decompression. Management of these patients is very challenging owing to the lack of a successful precedent. To our knowledge, such a catastrophic complication has only ever been reported once in the literature and the outcome was fatal. Our case is of additional importance as it offers a successful management strategy for these patients. PMID:25350169

  20. Bulimia as a disturbance of narcissism: self-esteem and the capacity to self-soothe.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, B E; Shaw, R J

    1997-01-01

    A review of the literature on eating disorders reveals that, although psychodynamic formulations linking narcissistic dynamics--particularly difficulties with self-soothing--and eating disorders are common in the theoretical and clinical literature, little empirical work has attempted to substantiate this claim. In this study, 117 women completed the Eating Disorder Inventory and the Bulimia Test Revised and four scales that measure different components of narcissism (the Multidimensional Self-Esteem Inventory, measuring self-esteem, the Self-Care Questionnaire, and two subscales of the Ego Functioning Assessment Questionnaire, measuring self-soothing). The four scales used to assess narcissism were all highly correlated with each other, indicating that they measure a similar construct. In addition, the eating-disorder measures were correlated with the measures of narcissism, suggesting that a relationship exists between bulimia and narcissism, as assessed using self-report instruments.

  1. Effectiveness of individualized, integrative outpatient treatment for females with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Freudenberg, Cara; Jones, Rebecca A; Livingston, Genvieve; Goetsch, Virginia; Schaffner, Angela; Buchanan, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of an individualized outpatient program was investigated in the treatment of bulimia nervosa (BN) and anorexia nervosa (AN). Participants included 151 females who received outpatient eating disorder treatment in the partial hospitalization program, the intensive outpatient program, or a combination of the two programs. Outcome measures included the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), frequency of binge eating and purging, and mean body weight. Findings included significant increases in weight for the AN group, reductions in binge eating frequency for the BN group, and reductions in EDI-2 and BDI-II scores and purging frequency for both groups. This study provides preliminary support for the efficacy of a multimodal program for the treatment of both anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

  2. Thoughts about eating, weight and shape in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Cooper, M J; Fairburn, C G

    1992-09-01

    Concurrent verbalisation and a self-report questionnaire were used to investigate self-statements in patients with anorexia nervosa, patients with bulimia nervosa, two groups of dieters and non-dieting controls. Thoughts were collected while subjects performed three behavioural tasks, looking at themselves in a full-length mirror, weighing themselves and eating a chocolate covered mint. Both groups of patients had more negative thoughts related to eating, weight and shape than those in the three control groups. In addition, patients with anorexia nervosa showed a greater concern with eating while patients with bulimia nervosa showed a greater concern with weight and appearance. Differences were found between the patients and non-dieting controls using both methods but the self-report questionnaire was less sensitive than concurrent verbalisation to differences between the patients and dieters. Implications of the findings for cognitive-behavioural treatments of the two disorders are discussed.

  3. [Self-treament for bulimia on the Internet: first results in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Rouget, P; Carrard, I; Archinard, M

    2005-02-02

    Adolescents with bulimia have become a major clinical problem with increasing health concern. A self-help guide, inspired by the cognitive and behavioral therapy, was developed in response to the growing demand for treatment. On the behalf European research fund "SALUT", the guide was implemented on the Internet. The first swiss results are very encouraging; particularly concerning symptoms and the questionnaires (SCL-90 and EDI-2).

  4. Initial assessment and early treatment options for anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Powers, P S

    1996-12-01

    This article presents the essential aspects of assessment of patients with anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa. The evaluation of the athlete with a suspected eating disorder is described. The choice of appropriate type and site of treatment is discussed. Throughout the article there is an emphasis on methods that can be useful in assisting the patient to acknowledge his or her illness and participate in treatment. The need to focus simultaneously on psychological and relationship issues and nutritional status is stressed.

  5. Negative affect and neural response to palatable food intake in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Bohon, Cara; Stice, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Binge eating is often preceded by reports of negative affect, but the mechanism by which affect may lead to binge eating is unclear. This study evaluated the effect of negative affect on neural response to anticipation and receipt of palatable food in women with bulimia nervosa (BN) versus healthy controls. We also evaluated connectivity between the amygdala and reward-related brain regions. Females with and without BN (n=26) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during receipt and anticipated receipt of chocolate milkshake and a tasteless solution. We measured negative affect just prior to the scan. Women with BN showed a positive correlation between negative affect and activity in the putamen, caudate, and pallidum during anticipated receipt of milkshake (versus tasteless solution). There were no significant relations between negative affect and receipt of milkshake. Connectivity analyses revealed a greater relation of amygdala activity to activation in the left putamen and insula during anticipated receipt of milkshake in the bulimia group relative to the control group. The opposite pattern was found for the taste of milkshake; the control group showed a greater relation of amygdala activity to activation in the left putamen and insula in response to milkshake receipt than the bulimia group. Results show that as negative affect increases, so does responsivity of reward regions to anticipated intake of palatable food, implying that negative affect may increase the reward value of food for individuals with bulimia nervosa or that negative affect has become a conditioned cue due to a history of binge eating in a negative mood.

  6. Negative Affect and Neural Response to Palatable Food Intake in Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Bohon, Cara; Stice, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Binge eating is often preceded by reports of negative affect, but the mechanism by which affect may lead to binge eating is unclear. This study evaluated the effect of negative affect on neural response to anticipation and receipt of palatable food in women with bulimia nervosa (BN) versus healthy controls. We also evaluated connectivity between the amygdala and reward-related brain regions. Females with and without BN (N = 26) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during receipt and anticipated receipt of chocolate milkshake and a tasteless solution. We measured negative affect just prior to the scan. Women with BN showed a positive correlation between negative affect and activity in the putamen, caudate, and pallidum during anticipated receipt of milkshake (versus tasteless solution). There were no significant relations between negative affect and receipt of milkshake. Connectivity analyses revealed a greater relation of amygdala activity to activation in the left putamen and insula during anticipated receipt of milkshake in the bulimia group relative to the control group. The opposite pattern was found for the taste of milkshake; the control group showed a greater relation of amygdala activity to activation in the left putamen and insula in response to milkshake receipt than the bulimia group. Results show that as negative affect increases, so does responsivity of reward regions to anticipated intake of palatable food, implying that negative affect may increase the reward value of food for individuals with bulimia nervosa or that negative affect has become a conditioned cue due to a history of binge eating in a negative mood. PMID:22387716

  7. Oral health considerations in anorexia and bulimia nervosa. 2. Multidisciplinary management and personalized dental care.

    PubMed

    Bassiouny, Mohamed A; Tweddale, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    This article outlines a comprehensive, multidisciplinary strategy for treatment of patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa. In this approach, primary medical intervention and emergency dental care are followed by the staging of treatment phases that integrate medical care, psychotherapy, nutritional counseling, and dental management, which may encompass various treatment options for repair of damaged dentition. Emphasis is placed on prevention of further tissue damage during all phases of management and following completion of the treatment course.

  8. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa - a psychotherapeutic cognitive-constructivist approach.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Cristiano Nabuco de; Cangelli Filho, Raphael

    2017-06-01

    Of the eating disorders, anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are the ones that have made adolescent patients-often females and aged younger and younger-seek for help. This help is provided through a multidisciplinary treatment involving psychiatrists, psychologists and dietists. Psychotherapy has shown to be an efficient component for these patients' improvement. The present article aims at presenting a proposal of psychotherapeutic treatment based on a cognitive-constructivist approach.

  9. [Some critical considerations on the status of the psychoanalytic discussion of bulimia].

    PubMed

    Diebel-Braune, E

    1991-01-01

    The most discussed psychoanalytic publications about bulimia and their central thesis are critically reported. Apparent is the accent of the very early childhood development, especially the earliest stages of mother-child-symbiosis in their pathogenic influence. Only some authors oppose with regard to conflicts of later stages of development in bulimic women. Personal clinical experiences and research data support the critique of the exclusive accent of early development. Rather adolescent developmental problems and particularities of female adolescence are stressed by the author.

  10. Content Analysis of the Construction of Self and Others in Women with Bulimia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Dada, Gloria; Izu, Sheila; Montebruno, Claudia; Grau, Antoni; Feixas, Guillem

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the content of personal constructs in people diagnosed with bulimia nervosa (BN). We expected to find differences in the predominant content of the construct systems between women with and without BN. We analyzed the constructs elicited using the repertory grid technique from 120 women aged between 18 to 45 years, divided into two groups: a clinical group of women diagnosed with bulimia (n = 62) and a control group of university students (n = 58). The constructs were categorized using the Classification System for Personal Constructs (CSPC), composed of six themes which are broken down into 45 categories. For this study, a new area called "Physical" was included, and it consists of three categories. The results indicated that women diagnosed with bulimia used significantly more constructs related to the body, while the control group used more constructs from the personal area. In addition, the congruent constructs from the clinical sample were predominantly moral, or related to values and interests, while discrepant constructs were personal and physical. The findings provide evidence for the clinical use of the CSPC as an instrument for exploring the content of personal meaning systems. Understanding the patient's personal constructions about herself and others is useful for treatment. Moreover, it is important for clinicians to explore the content of constructs related to symptomatic areas, which could be hindering change, and focus on them to facilitate improvement.

  11. Relationship-focused therapy for bulimia and binge eating: Introduction to the special section.

    PubMed

    Thompson-Brenner, Heather

    2016-06-01

    Individuals with bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder commonly report co-occurring interpersonal problems, and treatment that focuses on relationships and relational functioning has shown benefit relative to other forms of treatment. Relational psychotherapy for eating disorders can vary on several important dimensions, such as how structured and symptom-focused versus exploratory and patient-directed it is, whether it focuses on past relationships and patterns in relationships over time versus focusing on current relationships, and whether it includes the relationship with the therapist as an explicit topic of conversation and mechanism for relational change. The cases in this special section provide the opportunity to closely compare 3 therapeutic approaches on each of these dimensions. Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy for Bulimia Nervosa, Integrative Dynamic Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa, and Interpersonal Psychotherapy for the Prevention of Weight Gain and Eating Disorders are each highly distinct approaches. The authors of each case explain the intended mechanisms of treatment response, the measures that assess changes in eating disorder symptoms as well as the mechanisms of change, and provide extensive excerpts from case material to demonstrate and illustrate the particular evidence-based treatment. Therapists and researchers may usefully consider the process and outcome variables described in these interpersonal approaches. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Taste Reward Circuitry Related Brain Structures Characterize Ill and Recovered Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Guido K.; Shott, Megan E.; Hagman, Jennifer O.; Mittal, Vijay A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The pathophysiology of the eating disorder anorexia nervosa remains obscure, but structural brain alterations could be functionally important biomarkers. Here we assessed taste pleasantness and reward sensitivity in relation to brain structure, which might be related to food avoidance commonly seen in eating disorders. Method We used structural magnetic resonance brain imaging to study gray and white matter volumes in individuals with restricting type currently ill (n = 19) or recovered-anorexia nervosa (n = 24), bulimia nervosa (n= 19) and healthy control women (n=24). Results All eating disorder groups showed increased gray matter volume of the medial orbitofrontal cortex (gyrus rectus). Manually tracing confirmed larger gyrus rectus volume, and predicted taste pleasantness across all groups. The analyses also indicated other morphological differences between diagnostic categories: Ill and recovered-anorexia nervosa had increased right, while bulimia nervosa had increased left antero-ventral insula gray matter volumes compared to controls. Furthermore, dorsal striatum volumes were reduced in recovered-anorexia and bulimia nervosa, and predicted sensitivity to reward in the eating disorder groups. The eating disorder groups also showed reduced white matter in right temporal and parietal areas when compared to healthy controls. Notably, the results held when controlling for a range of covariates (e.g., age, depression, anxiety, medications). Conclusion Brain structure in medial orbitofrontal cortex, insula and striatum is altered in eating disorders and suggests altered brain circuitry that has been associated with taste pleasantness and reward value. PMID:23680873

  13. Empirically-supported and non-empirically supported therapies for bulimia nervosa: retrospective patient ratings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Empirically supported therapies for bulimia nervosa include cognitive behaviour therapy and interpersonal therapy. Whilst these treatments have been shown to be effective in multiple randomised controlled trials, little research has investigated how they are perceived by patients who receive them. This study investigated whether empirically-supported psychological therapies (ESTs) are associated with superior self-rated treatment outcomes in clients with Bulimia Nervosa (BN). Results 98 adults who had received psychological therapy for BN in the United Kingdom completed a questionnaire which retrospectively assessed the specific contents of their psychological therapy and self-rated treatment outcomes. Around half the sample, fifty three participants reported receiving an EST. Fifty of these received Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) and three Interpersonal Therapy (IPT). Where therapy met expert criteria for Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa (CBT-BN, an EST) participants reported superior treatment outcomes than those who appeared to receive non-specialist cognitive-behavioural therapy. However, self-rated treatment outcomes were similar overall between those whose therapy met criteria for ESTs and those whose therapy did not. Conclusions The findings offer tentative support for the perceived helpfulness of CBT-BN as evaluated in controlled research trials. Cognitive-behavioural therapies for BN, as they are delivered in the UK, may not necessarily be perceived as more beneficial by clients with BN than psychological therapies which currently have less empirical support. PMID:24999419

  14. Perception of autonomy and connectedness prior to the onset of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Huemer, Julia; Haidvogl, Maria; Mattejat, Fritz; Wagner, Gudrun; Nobis, Gerald; Fernandez-Aranda, Fernando; Collier, David A; Treasure, Janet L; Karwautz, Andreas F K

    2012-01-01

    This study examines retrospective correlates of nonshared family environment prior to onset of disease, by means of multiple familial informants, among anorexia and bulimia nervosa patients. A total of 332 participants was included (anorexia nervosa, restrictive type (AN-R): n = 41 plus families); bulimic patients (anorexia nervosa, binge-purging type; bulimia nervosa: n = 59 plus families). The EATAET Lifetime Diagnostic Interview was used to establish the diagnosis; the Subjective Family Image Test was used to derive emotional connectedness (EC) and individual autonomy (IA). Bulimic and AN-R patients perceived significantly lower EC prior to onset of disease compared to their healthy sisters. Bulimic patients perceived significantly lower EC prior to onset of disease compared to AN-R patients and compared to their mothers and fathers. A low family sum - sister pairs sum comparison - of EC had a significant influence on the risk of developing bulimia nervosa. Contrary to expectations, AN-R patients did not perceive significantly lower levels of IA compared to their sisters, prior to onset of disease. Findings of low IA in currently ill AN-R patients may represent a disease consequence, not a risk factor. Developmental child psychiatrists should direct their attention to disturbances of EC, which may be present prior to the onset of the disease.

  15. [Nasogastric tube feeding in bulimia. Controlled study with follow-up at 3 months].

    PubMed

    Rigaud, Daniel; Brayer, Véronique; Biton-Jélic, Violaine; Païs, Vanessa; Pennacchio, Hélène; Brun, Jean-Marcel

    2007-10-01

    Few effective treatments are available for severe forms of bulimia nervosa, which are accompanied by malnutrition, anxiety, and depressive mood. We previously showed in an open study that nasogastric tube feeding (TF) reduced binges and purging in patients with anorexia nervosa. This prospective randomized trial compared bulimia patients in two treatment groups: one group received TF at home, together with psychotherapy, nutritional counseling and a support group while the control group received only psychotherapy, nutritional counseling, and a support group. Patients in the first group underwent TF for 8 weeks (exclusively for 10 days and associated with meals thereafter). Assessment was based on clinical examination, laboratory results, and a variety of questionnaires (our in-house instrument for measuring binge and vomiting episodes, eating disorder inventory, Beck's depression inventory and the Hamilton rating scale for anxiety), all performed at the onset of treatment and at 8 days, 8 weeks (i.e., the end of TF), and 3 months after treatment began. Binges and vomiting disappeared faster and more frequently in TF patients than in the control group: 65% versus 29% (p<0.01). Three months later, these remained less frequent in the TF group than among controls (52% versus 33%, p=0.064). Nutritional status, depression, and anxiety improved more among the TF than control subjects (p<0.05). Tube feeding was effective in these patients with bulimia nervosa, reducing the number of binge and vomiting episodes and improving nutritional status and mood.

  16. Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire as a measure of change in patients with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Sysko, Robyn; Walsh, B Timothy; Fairburn, Christopher G

    2005-03-01

    The current study evaluated the agreement between the Eating Disorder Examination and the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire in assessing eating disorder pathology in a sample of women with bulimia nervosa. Patients with broadly defined bulimia nervosa were enrolled in a double-blind, placebo-controlled treatment study of fluoxetine, with and without guided self-help. The current study presents information from 50 patients with data from both the EDE and EDE-Q at study entry and treatment termination. The EDE and EDE-Q produced more similar scores for compensatory behaviors (vomiting/laxative use) than complex eating-disordered features (binge eating/importance of shape and weight) at the pretreatment and posttreatment assessments, and for change during the study. The EDE and EDE-Q are highly correlated for many of the behavioral and attitudinal features of bulimia nervosa. There is substantial variability in agreement for individual patients, but on average, the EDE and EDE-Q will yield similar assessments of eating disorder symptoms and change in symptoms over time. (c) 2005 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Food Addiction and Bulimia Nervosa: New Data Based on the Yale Food Addiction Scale 2.0.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Sarah-Kristin; Meule, Adrian

    2016-11-01

    Previous research on 'food addiction' as measured with the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) showed a large overlap between addiction-like eating and bulimia nervosa. Most recently, a revised version of the YFAS has been developed according to the changes made in the diagnostic criteria for substance use disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fifth edition. The current study examined prevalence and correlates of the YFAS2.0 in individuals with bulimia (n = 115) and controls (n = 341). Ninety-six per cent of participants with bulimia and 14% of controls received a YFAS2.0 diagnosis. A higher number of YFAS2.0 symptoms was associated with lower interoceptive awareness, higher depressiveness, and higher impulsivity in both groups. However, a higher number of YFAS2.0 symptoms was associated with higher body mass and weight suppression in controls only and not in participants with bulimia. The current study is the first to show a large overlap between bulimia and 'food addiction' as measured with the YFAS2.0, replicating and extending findings from studies, which used the previous version of the YFAS. Compensatory weight control behaviours in individuals with bulimia likely alleviate the association between addiction-like eating and higher body mass. Thus, the large overlap between bulimia and 'food addiction' should be taken into consideration when examining the role of addiction-like eating in weight gain and obesity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  18. "Diagnostic shift" from eating disorder not otherwise specified to bulimia nervosa using DSM-5 criteria: a clinical comparison with DSM-IV bulimia.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Danielle E; McFarlane, Traci L; Olmsted, Marion P

    2014-01-01

    In the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), the diagnostic threshold for binging and compensation in bulimia nervosa (BN) decreased from twice to once weekly for 3 months. This study investigates the validity of this change by examining whether BN patients and those whose diagnoses "shift" to BN with DSM-5 are similar in their psychological functioning. EDNOS patients whose symptoms met DSM-5 BN criteria (n=25) were compared to DSM-IV BN patients (n=146) on clinically relevant variables. No differences were found on: BMI; weight-based self-evaluation; perfectionism; depression and anxiety symptoms; or readiness for change. Differences were found on one Eating Disorder Inventory subscale (i.e., bulimia), with the BN group reporting higher scores, consistent with group definitions. These findings support the modified criteria, suggesting that psychopathology both directly and indirectly related to eating disorders is comparable between those with once weekly versus more frequent bulimic episodes.

  19. Altered structural and effective connectivity in anorexia and bulimia nervosa in circuits that regulate energy and reward homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Frank, G K W; Shott, M E; Riederer, J; Pryor, T L

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia and bulimia nervosa are severe eating disorders that share many behaviors. Structural and functional brain circuits could provide biological links that those disorders have in common. We recruited 77 young adult women, 26 healthy controls, 26 women with anorexia and 25 women with bulimia nervosa. Probabilistic tractography was used to map white matter connectivity strength across taste and food intake regulating brain circuits. An independent multisample greedy equivalence search algorithm tested effective connectivity between those regions during sucrose tasting. Anorexia and bulimia nervosa had greater structural connectivity in pathways between insula, orbitofrontal cortex and ventral striatum, but lower connectivity from orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala to the hypothalamus (P<0.05, corrected for comorbidity, medication and multiple comparisons). Functionally, in controls the hypothalamus drove ventral striatal activity, but in anorexia and bulimia nervosa effective connectivity was directed from anterior cingulate via ventral striatum to the hypothalamus. Across all groups, sweetness perception was predicted by connectivity strength in pathways connecting to the middle orbitofrontal cortex. This study provides evidence that white matter structural as well as effective connectivity within the energy-homeostasis and food reward-regulating circuitry is fundamentally different in anorexia and bulimia nervosa compared with that in controls. In eating disorders, anterior cingulate cognitive–emotional top down control could affect food reward and eating drive, override hypothalamic inputs to the ventral striatum and enable prolonged food restriction. PMID:27801897

  20. Altered structural and effective connectivity in anorexia and bulimia nervosa in circuits that regulate energy and reward homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Frank, G K W; Shott, M E; Riederer, J; Pryor, T L

    2016-11-01

    Anorexia and bulimia nervosa are severe eating disorders that share many behaviors. Structural and functional brain circuits could provide biological links that those disorders have in common. We recruited 77 young adult women, 26 healthy controls, 26 women with anorexia and 25 women with bulimia nervosa. Probabilistic tractography was used to map white matter connectivity strength across taste and food intake regulating brain circuits. An independent multisample greedy equivalence search algorithm tested effective connectivity between those regions during sucrose tasting. Anorexia and bulimia nervosa had greater structural connectivity in pathways between insula, orbitofrontal cortex and ventral striatum, but lower connectivity from orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala to the hypothalamus (P<0.05, corrected for comorbidity, medication and multiple comparisons). Functionally, in controls the hypothalamus drove ventral striatal activity, but in anorexia and bulimia nervosa effective connectivity was directed from anterior cingulate via ventral striatum to the hypothalamus. Across all groups, sweetness perception was predicted by connectivity strength in pathways connecting to the middle orbitofrontal cortex. This study provides evidence that white matter structural as well as effective connectivity within the energy-homeostasis and food reward-regulating circuitry is fundamentally different in anorexia and bulimia nervosa compared with that in controls. In eating disorders, anterior cingulate cognitive-emotional top down control could affect food reward and eating drive, override hypothalamic inputs to the ventral striatum and enable prolonged food restriction.

  1. Recurrent aborted sudden cardiac death with seizures and rhabdomyolysis due to bulimia-induced hypokalemia: report of one case.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia

    2014-06-01

    Recurrent vomiting due to bulimia associated with abuse of furosemide and laxatives causing severe hypokalemia may result in recurrent aborted sudden cardiac death (SCD) and seizures. We report a 25-year-old female with a history of bulimia associated with abuse of furosemide and laxatives since the age of 15 years, migraine since puberty, renal abscesses at age 20 y, and rhabdomyolysis of unknown cause at age 24 y. She experienced aborted SCD due to severe hypokalemia with symptomatic seizures at 21 and 25 years of age. Bulimia patients additionally taking laxatives or furosemide are at particular risk of SCD and rhabdomyolysis and require periodic determination of electrolytes, potassium substitution, and adequate psychiatric therapy and surveillance.

  2. Affect regulation and food intake in bulimia nervosa: emotional responding to food cues after deprivation and subsequent eating.

    PubMed

    Mauler, Birgit I; Hamm, Alfons O; Weike, Almut I; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna

    2006-08-01

    Emotional responding to salient food cues and effects of food deprivation and consumption were investigated in 32 women with bulimia and 32 control women. One half of each group was food deprived before viewing unpleasant, neutral, pleasant, and food-related pictures. Then participants could eat from a buffet before viewing a parallel picture set. Women with bulimia showed a substantial potentiation of startle responses during viewing of food cues relative to control women. This startle potentiation was attenuated by food deprivation and augmented by increased food consumption. These data support the affective regulation model suggesting that food cues prompt negative affective states in women with bulimia, who are overwhelmed by fasting. The resulting deprivation increases the incentive value of food cues and may thus trigger binge eating.

  3. Temperamental dimensions of the TEMPS-A in females with co-morbid bipolar disorder and bulimia.

    PubMed

    Rybakowski, Janusz K; Kaminska, Katarzyna; Charytonik, Jolanta; Akiskal, Kareen K; Akiskal, Hagop S

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the effect of co-morbid bipolar disorder and bulimia on temperamental dimensions measured by TEMPS-A, relative to "pure" bulimia and "pure" bipolar disorder, in female patients. The study was performed on 47 patients with bipolar disorder (BD) with a mean age of 36±10 years, 96 patients with bulimia or bulimic type of anorexia, mean age 26±9 years and 50 control healthy females (HC), mean age 29±6 years. Among bulimic patients, a group of 68 subjects with co-morbid bulimia with bipolarity (BD+B) was identified, based on positive score of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ). The TEMPS-A questionnaire, 110 questions version, has been used, evaluating five temperament domains: depressive, cyclothymic, hyperthymic, irritable and anxious. Parametric analysis was performed for 4 groups (BD, "pure" bulimia (PB), BD+B and HC), with 28 subjects randomly chosen from each group, using analysis of variance and cluster analysis. All clinical groups significantly differed from control group by having higher scores of depressive, cyclothymic, irritable and anxious temperaments and lower of hyperthymic one. Among patients, significantly higher scores of cyclothymic and irritable temperaments were found in BD+B compared to both PB and BD. These differences were also reflected in cluster analysis, where two clusters were identified. Bipolarity in bulimic patients assessed only by the MDQ. These results show that co-morbid bulimia and bipolar disorder is characterized by extreme dimensions of both cyclothymic and irritable temperaments, significantly higher than each single diagnosis. Possible clinical implications of such fact are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. An fMRI Study of Self-Regulatory Control and Conflict Resolution in Adolescents With Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Rachel; Horga, Guillermo; Wang, Zhishun; Wang, Pengwei; Klahr, Kristin W.; Berner, Laura A.; Walsh, B. Timothy; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The authors examined functional activity in the frontostriatal systems that mediate self-regulatory capacities and conflict resolution in adolescents with bulimia nervosa. Method Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to compare blood-oxygen-level-dependent response in 18 female adolescents with bulimia nervosa and 18 healthy female age-matched subjects during performance on a Simon spatial incompatibility task. Bayesian analyses were used to compare the two groups on patterns of brain activation during correct responses to conflict stimuli and to explore the effects of antecedent stimulus context on group differences in self-regulation and conflict resolution. Results Adolescents with and without bulimia nervosa performed similarly on the task. During correct responses in conflict trials, frontostriatal circuits—including the right inferolateral and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices and putamen—failed to activate to the same degree in adolescents with bulimia nervosa as in healthy comparison subjects. Instead, deactivation was seen in the left inferior frontal gyrus as well as a neural system encompassing the posterior cingulate cortex and superior frontal gyrus. Group differences in cortical and striatal regions were driven by the differential responses to stimuli preceded by conflict and nonconflict stimuli, respectively. Conclusions When engaging the self-regulatory control processes necessary to resolve conflict, adolescents with bulimia nervosa displayed abnormal patterns of activation in frontostriatal and default-mode systems. Their abnormal processing of the antecedent stimulus context conditioned their brain response to conflict differently from that of healthy comparison subjects, specifically in frontal regions. It is suspected that functional disturbances in frontal portions of frontostriatal systems may release feeding behaviors from regulatory control, thereby perpetuating the conflicting desires to consume fattening foods and

  5. Neural Responses during Social and Self-Knowledge Tasks in Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    McAdams, Carrie J.; Krawczyk, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    Self-evaluation closely dependent upon body shape and weight is one of the defining criteria for bulimia nervosa (BN). We studied 53 adult women, 17 with BN, 18 with a recent history of anorexia nervosa (AN), and 18 healthy comparison women, using three different fMRI tasks that required thinking about self-knowledge and social interactions: the Social Identity task, the Physical Identity task, and the Social Attribution task. Previously, we identified regions of interest (ROI) in the same tasks using whole-brain voxel-wise comparisons of the healthy comparison women and women with a recent history of AN. Here, we report on the neural activations in those ROIs in subjects with BN. In the Social Attribution task, we examined activity in the right temporoparietal junction (RTPJ), an area frequently associated with mentalization. In the Social Identity task, we examined activity in the precuneus (PreC) and dorsal anterior cingulate (dACC). In the Physical Identity task, we examined activity in a ventral region of the dACC. Interestingly, in all tested regions, the average activation in subjects with bulimia was more than the average activation levels seen in the subjects with a history of anorexia but less than that seen in healthy subjects. In three regions, the RTPJ, the PreC, and the dACC, group responses in the subjects with bulimia were significantly different from healthy subjects but not subjects with anorexia. The neural activations of people with BN performing fMRI tasks engaging social processing are more similar to people with AN than healthy people. This suggests biological measures of social processes may be helpful in characterizing individuals with eating disorders. PMID:24065928

  6. Effect of management of patients with Anorexia and Bulimia nervosa on symptoms and impulsive behavior.

    PubMed

    Sernec, Karin; Tomori, Martina; Zalar, Bojan

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the study was to provide further and up to date information on the evaluation of the management of Anorexia and Bulimia nervosa at the Eating Disorders Unit (EDU) of the Ljubljana Psychiatric Clinic, based upon detailed assessment of the eating disorders specific and non specific symptoms of impulsive behaviors, highly correlated with these entities. 34 female patients with anorexia (restrictive or purgative type) and 38 female patients with Bulimia nervosa (purgative or non-purgative type) undergoing hospital treatment at the EDU were evaluated upon admission, as well as upon discharge and three and six months after discharge, using the Eating Disorder Questionnaire. Upon discharge a marked decrease in the overall symptoms was noted. The differences in symptoms incidences between the two groups were significantly specific for the individual form of eating disorder, especially upon admission, and were more pronounced in anorexia group. In later measurements, performed during the period of three and six months after discharge, a mild trend of increase in the disorder specific symptoms was detected in both groups, but was not statistically significant. In addition to binging on food, striking, quarreling and spending sprees are characteristics of patients with eating disorders, which in particular apply to the Bulimia nervosa group. Apart from the disorder specific symptoms, impulsive behavior was also reduced during study period, while the difference in its occurrence between the two groups gradually became non-significant. The management of patients with eating disorders at the EDU was successful in both groups, confirmed by an intense reduction of the disorder specific symptoms, impulsive behavior and increased stability recorded three and six months after discharge. The study strongly suggests that the effect of treatment regime for eating disorders can be predicted by careful assessment of the relevant symptoms and impulsive behavioral patterns.

  7. A longitudinal investigation of mortality in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Franko, Debra L; Keshaviah, Aparna; Eddy, Kamryn T; Krishna, Meera; Davis, Martha C; Keel, Pamela K; Herzog, David B

    2013-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Although anorexia nervosa has a high mortality rate, our understanding of the timing and predictors of mortality in eating disorders is limited. The authors investigated mortality in a long-term study of patients with eating disorders. METHOD Beginning in 1987, 246 treatment-seeking female patients with anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa were interviewed every 6 months for a median of 9.5 years to obtain weekly ratings of eating disorder symptoms, comorbidity, treatment participation, and psychosocial functioning. From January 2007 to December 2010 (median follow-up of 20 years), vital status was ascertained with a National Death Index search. RESULTS Sixteen deaths (6.5%) were recorded (lifetime anorexia nervosa, N=14; bulimia nervosa with no history of anorexia nervosa, N=2). The standardized mortality ratio was 4.37 (95% CI=2.4-7.3) for lifetime anorexia nervosa and 2.33 (95% CI=0.3-8.4) for bulimia nervosa with no history of anorexia nervosa. Risk of premature death among patients with lifetime anorexia nervosa peaked within the first 10 years of follow-up, resulting in a standardized mortality ratio of 7.7 (95% CI=3.7-14.2). The standardized mortality ratio varied by duration of illness and was 3.2 (95% CI=0.9-8.3) for patients with lifetime anorexia nervosa for 0 to 15 years (4/119 died), and 6.6 (95% CI=3.2-12.1) for those with lifetime anorexia nervosa for >15 to 30 years (10/67 died). Multivariate predictors of mortality included alcohol abuse, low body mass index, and poor social adjustment. CONCLUSIONS These findings highlight the need for early identification and intervention and suggest that a long duration of illness, substance abuse, low weight, and poor psychosocial functioning raise the risk for mortality in anorexia nervosa.

  8. Efficacy of High-Dose Baclofen for Alcohol Use Disorder and Comorbid Bulimia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Weibel, Sébastien; Lalanne, Laurence; Riegert, Myriam; Bertschy, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    High-dose baclofen is a promising treatment for alcohol use disorder, with a specific action on craving. A more general action on craving in other addictive disorders has been suggested based on the hypothesis of a common neurobiological pathway in addictions. We report the case of a woman with both alcohol use disorder and bulimia nervosa. There was a positive response to high-dose baclofen on alcohol craving, but no response on food craving. The case illustrates that craving could be differentially responsive to anti-craving drugs.

  9. Distinguishing Between Risk Factors for Bulimia Nervosa, Binge Eating Disorder, and Purging Disorder.

    PubMed

    Allen, Karina L; Byrne, Susan M; Crosby, Ross D

    2015-08-01

    Binge eating disorder and purging disorder have gained recognition as distinct eating disorder diagnoses, but risk factors for these conditions have not yet been established. This study aimed to evaluate a prospective, mediational model of risk for the full range of binge eating and purging eating disorders, with attention to possible diagnostic differences. Specific aims were to determine, first, whether eating, weight and shape concerns at age 14 would mediate the relationship between parent-perceived childhood overweight at age 10 and a binge eating or purging eating disorder between age 15 and 20, and, second, whether this mediational model would differ across bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, and purging disorder. Participants (N = 1,160; 51 % female) were drawn from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study, which has followed children from pre-birth to age 20. Eating disorders were assessed via self-report questionnaires when participants were aged 14, 17 and 20. There were 146 participants (82 % female) with a binge eating or purging eating disorder with onset between age 15 and 20 [bulimia nervosa = 81 (86 % female), binge eating disorder = 43 (74 % female), purging disorder = 22 (77 % female)]. Simple mediation analysis with bootstrapping was used to test the hypothesized model of risk, with early adolescent eating, weight and shape concerns positioned as a mediator between parent-perceived childhood overweight and later onset of a binge eating or purging eating disorder. Subsequently, a conditional process model (a moderated mediation model) was specified to determine if model pathways differed significantly by eating disorder diagnosis. In the simple mediation model, there was a significant indirect effect of parent-perceived childhood overweight on risk for a binge eating or purging eating disorder in late adolescence, mediated by eating, weight and shape concerns in early adolescence. In the conditional process model

  10. [Prevention and Treatment of Eating Disorders: The Health Care Network Anorexia and Bulimia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Weigel, Angelika; Gumz, Antje; Kästner, Denise; Romer, Georg; Wegscheider, Karl; Löwe, Bernd

    2015-07-01

    The "Health care network anorexia and bulimia nervosa", a subproject of psychenet - the Hamburg network for mental health - aims to decrease the incidence of eating disorders as well as the risk for chronic illness courses. One focal project, therefore, evaluates a school-based prevention manual in a randomized controlled trial. The other one examines the impact of a systemic public health intervention on early treatment initiation in anorexia nervosa. The present article provides an overview about study design and interventions in both focal projects as well as preliminary results.

  11. Guided Imagery Treatment to Promote Self-Soothing in Bulimia Nervosa: A Theoretical Rationale

    PubMed Central

    Esplen, Mary Jane; Garfinkel, Paul E.

    1998-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa (BN) has been described as involving impairment in affect regulation and in self-soothing. Such a conceptualization suggests the need to design treatments that specifically target these problems in order to assist individuals with BN in comforting themselves. A model of guided imagery therapy suggests that imagery therapy has multiple levels of action and can assist these individuals in the regulation of affect by providing an external source of soothing and also by enhancing self-soothing. The authors illustrate the model with a case example and report the results of a study in a clinical sample of BN. PMID:9527955

  12. Predictors of early change in bulimia nervosa after a brief psychoeducational therapy.

    PubMed

    Fernàndez-Aranda, Fernando; Alvarez-Moya, Eva M; Martínez-Viana, Cristina; Sànchez, Isabel; Granero, Roser; Penelo, Eva; Forcano, Laura; Peñas-Lledó, Eva

    2009-06-01

    We aimed to examine baseline predictors of treatment response in bulimic patients. 241 seeking-treatment females with bulimia nervosa completed an exhaustive assessment and were referred to a six-session psychoeducational group. Regression analyses of treatment response were performed. Childhood obesity, lower frequency of eating symptomatology, lower body mass index, older age, and lower family's and patient's concern about the disorder were predictors of poor abstinence. Suicidal ideation, alcohol abuse, higher maximum BMI, higher novelty seeking and lower baseline purging frequency predicted dropouts. Predictors of early symptom changes and dropouts were similar to those identified in longer CBT interventions.

  13. Aftercare intervention through text messaging in the treatment of bulimia nervosa--feasibility pilot.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sarah; Perkins, Sarah; Bauer, Stephanie; Hammond, Neil; Treasure, Janet; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2006-12-01

    Even with the best available treatment, most bulimia nervosa (BN) sufferers are not symptom free at the end of therapy and, for those who have achieved remission, risk of relapse is high. Thus, there is a need for aftercare or relapse prevention interventions after therapy. It is not yet known what type of intervention should be delivered, and how to suit patient needs while being mindful of cost and time constraints of service providers. This pilot study was conducted to explore the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of a text messaging (short messaging service [SMS])-based intervention in the aftercare of BN patients who had received outpatient psychotherapy. A total of 21 patients with BN participated in the 6-month SMS-based intervention as a step-down treatment after outpatient therapy. Levels of use of the program were relatively low and attrition high, indicating limited acceptance of the intervention. This study suggests that the SMS-based intervention would benefit from further adaptation to make it a more useful tool for the aftercare of patients after outpatient treatment for bulimia nervosa. Copyright 2006 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Subjective binge eating with compensatory behaviors: a variant presentation of bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Watson, Hunna J; Fursland, Anthea; Bulik, Cynthia M; Nathan, Paula

    2013-03-01

    To determine whether a variant bulimic-type presentation, whereby one meets criteria for bulimia nervosa (BN) except that binge eating episodes are not objectively large (i.e., "subjective bulimia nervosa," SBN), has comparable clinical severity to established eating disorders, particularly BN. Treatment-seeking adults with BN (N = 112), SBN (N = 28), anorexia nervosa restricting type (AN-R) (N = 45), and AN-binge/purge type (AN-B/P) (N = 24) were compared. Overall, SBN could not be meaningfully distinguished from BN. SBN and BN had equivalent eating pathology, depression and anxiety symptoms, low quality of life, impulsivity, Axis I comorbidity, and lifetime psychiatric history, and comparable clinical severity to AN-R and AN-B/P. Individuals with SBN, differing from BN only by the smaller size of their binge eating episodes, had a form of eating disorder comparable in clinical severity to threshold AN and BN and warranting clinical attention. Health professionals and the community require greater awareness of this variant to optimize detection, treatment-seeking, and outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for bulimia nervosa and atypical bulimic nervosa: effectiveness in clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Waller, Glenn; Gray, Emma; Hinrichsen, Hendrik; Mountford, Victoria; Lawson, Rachel; Patient, Eloise

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for bulimic disorders has been established in research trials. This study examined whether that efficacy can be translated into effectiveness in routine clinical practice. Seventy-eight adult women with bulimic disorders (bulimia nervosa and atypical bulimia nervosa) undertook individual CBT, with few exclusion criteria and a treatment protocol based on evidence-based approaches, utilizing individualized formulations. Patients completed measures of eating behaviors, eating attitudes, and depression pre- and post-treatment. Eight patients dropped out. The mean number of sessions attended was 19.2. No pretreatment features predicted drop-out. Treatment outcome was similar whether using treatment completer or intent to treat analyses. Approximately 50% of patients were in remission by the end of treatment. There were significant improvements in mood, eating attitudes, and eating behaviors. Reductions in bingeing and vomiting were comparable to efficacy trials. The improvements in this "real-world" trial of CBT for adults with bulimic disorders mirrored those from large, funded research trials, though the conclusions that can be reached are inevitably limited by the nature of the trial (e.g., lack of control group and therapy validation). Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Hypovitaminosis D3, Leukopenia, and Human Serotonin Transporter Polymorphism in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Tasegian, Anna; Curcio, Francesco; Dalla Ragione, Laura; Rossetti, Francesca; Cataldi, Samuela; Codini, Michela; Ambesi-Impiombato, Francesco Saverio; Beccari, Tommaso; Albi, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D3 has been described to have different extraskeletal roles by acting as parahormone in obesity, diabetes, cancer, cognitive impairment, and dementia and to have important regulatory functions in innate immunity. There are no studies showing extraskeletal changes associated with hypovitaminosis D3 in eating disorders. Methods. We have analyzed the blood of 18 patients affected by anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa collected over a 15-month period. We performed a panel of chemical and clinical analyses: the assay of vitamin D3, the immunoblotting of vitamin D receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, and the genotyping of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region. Results. We choose 18 patients with a normal blood test profile such as thyroid hormones, hepatic and renal parameters, triglycerides, proteins, vitamin B12, and folic acid. Among these emerged the case of a woman with long-term anorexia nervosa and the case of a woman with long-term bulimia nervosa both complicated by anxiety and depression, severe hypovitaminosis D3, decrease of vitamin D receptor, leukopenia, and 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region short allele. Conclusion. The results induce hypothesising that the severe hypovitaminosis D3 might be responsible for the lack of the inflammatory response and the depressive symptoms in patients with long-term eating disorders.

  17. Electrocortical processing of food and emotional pictures in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Blechert, Jens; Feige, Bernd; Joos, Andreas; Zeeck, Almut; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna

    2011-06-01

    Objective To compare the electrocortical processing of food pictures in participants with anorexia nervosa (n = 21), bulimia nervosa (n = 22), and healthy controls (HCs) (n = 32) by measuring the early posterior negativity, an event-related potential that reflects stimulus salience and selective attention. Methods We exposed these three groups to a rapid stream of high- and low-calorie food pictures, as well as standard emotional and neutral pictures. Results Event-related potentials in the time range of 220 milliseconds to 310 milliseconds on posterior electrodes differed between groups: patients with eating disorders showed facilitated processing of both high- and low-calorie food pictures relative to neutral pictures, whereas HC participants did so only for the high-calorie pictures. Subjective palatability of the pictures was rated highest by patients with anorexia nervosa, followed by the HC and bulimia nervosa groups. Conclusions Patients with eating disorders show a generalized attentional bias for food images, regardless of caloric value. This might explain the persistent preoccupation with food in these individuals.

  18. [Attachment patterns, self-esteem, gender schema in anorexia and bulimia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Józefik, Barbara; Iniewicz, Grzegorz; Ulasińska, Romualda

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was comparison of perception of attachment patterns between adolescent girls suffering from anorexia nervosa (restrictive type), bulimia nervosa and healthy peers. Moreover, we tried to find the differences between the groups in self-esteem and identification with the culture-defined sex role. We examined 40 patients with anorexia, 32 with bulimia and 63 girls from the comparison group. Three questionnaires were used: Parental Bonding Instrument, The Culture-Free Self-Esteem Inventory and Psychological Sex Inventory. Results indicate that the parents' emotional commitment in relations with daughters from the clinical sample is weaker, and they are controlled by parents more then those from the control group. In all groups, the mothers' emotional commitment correlates positively with daughters' social self-esteem. In the anorectic group, fathers' control correlates negatively with daughters' identification with the culture-defined feminine role. In the bulimic group, fathers' emotional commitment correlates positively with self-esteem as well as daughters' identification with the culture-defined masculine role. The results concerning the bonds between the ED patients and their parents indicating dysfunctions of the bonds are generally consistent with the data from literature. Additionally they show the relationship between quality of the bonds between the patients and parents and its influence on development of self-evaluation and a sense of feminity/masculinity in anorectic and bulimic girls.

  19. Regional grey matter volume abnormalities in bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Axel; Vaitl, Dieter; Schienle, Anne

    2010-04-01

    This study investigated whether bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge-eating disorder (BED) are associated with structural brain abnormalities. Both disorders share the main symptom binge-eating, but are considered differential diagnoses. We attempted to identify alterations in grey matter volume (GMV) that are present in both psychopathologies as well as disorder-specific GMV characteristics. Such information can help to improve neurobiological models of eating disorders and their classification. A total of 50 participants (patients suffering from BN (purge type), BED, and normal-weight controls) underwent structural MRI scanning. GMV for specific brain regions involved in food/reinforcement processing was analyzed by means of voxel-based morphometry. Both patient groups were characterized by greater volumes of the medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) compared to healthy controls. In BN patients, who had increased ventral striatum volumes, body mass index and purging severity were correlated with striatal grey matter volume. Altogether, our data implicate a crucial role of the medial OFC in the studied eating disorders. The structural abnormality might be associated with dysfunctions in food reward processing and/or self-regulation. The bulimia-specific volume enlargement of the ventral striatum is discussed in the framework of negative reinforcement through purging and associated weight regulation. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Production of "Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Anorexia and Bulimia, but Were Afraid to Ask".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmer, Marc A.

    This report describes the research study involved in developing a document on anorexia and bulimia for the lay population. Chapter I focuses on the basic areas that provided the foundation for the study: (1) the definitions of specific eating disorders; (2) the role of the mass media in affecting anorexics and bulimics, and in educating the public…

  1. Subtyping Women with Bulimia Nervosa along Dietary and Negative Affect Dimensions: Further Evidence of Reliability and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stice, Eric; Bohon, Cara; Marti, C. Nathan; Fischer, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    Studies have found that individuals with bulimia nervosa can be classified into dietary and dietary-negative affect subtypes and that the latter exhibit greater eating pathology, psychiatric comorbidity, and functional impairment; a more protracted clinical course; and a worse treatment response. In this report, the authors describe 2 prospective…

  2. Therapeutic Alliance and Treatment Adherence in Two Interventions for Bulimia Nervosa: A Study of Process and Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loeb, Katharine L.; Wilson, G. Terence; Labouvie, Erich; Pratt, Elizabeth M.; Hayaki, Jumi; Walsh, B. Timothy; Agras, W. Stewart; Fairburn, Christopher G.

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between therapeutic alliance, therapist adherence to treatment protocol, and outcome was analyzed in a randomized trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal psychotherapy for bulimia nervosa. Independent observers rated audiotapes of full-length therapy sessions. Purging frequency was the primary outcome…

  3. Psychiatric Disorders Associated with the Onset and Persistence of Bulimia Nervosa and Binge Eating Disorder during Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaider, Talia I.; Johnson, Jeffrey G.; Cockell, Sarah J.

    2002-01-01

    Conducted a prospective longitudinal study to investigate whether anxiety, depressive, personality, or substance abuse disorders increase risk for onset of bulimia nervosa (BN) or binge eating disorder (BED) during adolescence. Findings for 201 adolescents suggest that adolescents with chronic depressive symptoms may be at elevated risk for the…

  4. Psychiatric Disorders Associated with the Onset and Persistence of Bulimia Nervosa and Binge Eating Disorder during Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaider, Talia I.; Johnson, Jeffrey G.; Cockell, Sarah J.

    2002-01-01

    Conducted a prospective longitudinal study to investigate whether anxiety, depressive, personality, or substance abuse disorders increase risk for onset of bulimia nervosa (BN) or binge eating disorder (BED) during adolescence. Findings for 201 adolescents suggest that adolescents with chronic depressive symptoms may be at elevated risk for the…

  5. Subtyping Women with Bulimia Nervosa along Dietary and Negative Affect Dimensions: Further Evidence of Reliability and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stice, Eric; Bohon, Cara; Marti, C. Nathan; Fischer, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    Studies have found that individuals with bulimia nervosa can be classified into dietary and dietary-negative affect subtypes and that the latter exhibit greater eating pathology, psychiatric comorbidity, and functional impairment; a more protracted clinical course; and a worse treatment response. In this report, the authors describe 2 prospective…

  6. Therapeutic Alliance and Treatment Adherence in Two Interventions for Bulimia Nervosa: A Study of Process and Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loeb, Katharine L.; Wilson, G. Terence; Labouvie, Erich; Pratt, Elizabeth M.; Hayaki, Jumi; Walsh, B. Timothy; Agras, W. Stewart; Fairburn, Christopher G.

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between therapeutic alliance, therapist adherence to treatment protocol, and outcome was analyzed in a randomized trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal psychotherapy for bulimia nervosa. Independent observers rated audiotapes of full-length therapy sessions. Purging frequency was the primary outcome…

  7. The Production of "Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Anorexia and Bulimia, but Were Afraid to Ask".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmer, Marc A.

    This report describes the research study involved in developing a document on anorexia and bulimia for the lay population. Chapter I focuses on the basic areas that provided the foundation for the study: (1) the definitions of specific eating disorders; (2) the role of the mass media in affecting anorexics and bulimics, and in educating the public…

  8. Emotion Dysregulation and Affective Intensity Mediate the Relationship Between Childhood Abuse and Suicide-Related Behaviors Among Women with Bulimia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Kathryn H; Simonich, Heather; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Dhankikar, Swati; Crosby, Ross D; Cao, Li; Kwan, Mun Yee; Mitchell, James E; Engel, Scott G

    2016-02-01

    Self-harm and suicide attempts occur at elevated rates among individuals with bulimia nervosa, particularly among those who have experienced childhood abuse. This study investigated the potential mediating roles of emotion dysregulation and affective intensity in the relationship between these variables in 125 women with bulimia nervosa. Analyses revealed that emotion dysregulation mediated the relationship between sexual and emotional abuse with both self-harm and suicide attempts. Negative affective intensity mediated the relationship between abuse and suicide attempts. The findings may advance the understanding of mechanisms underlying suicide-related behaviors in women with bulimia nervosa who experienced abuse and suggest potential clinical targets. © 2015 The American Association of Suicidology.

  9. Association of CNR1 and FAAH endocannabinoid gene polymorphisms with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: evidence for synergistic effects.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, P; Bifulco, M; Di Filippo, C; Gazzerro, P; Canestrelli, B; Monteleone, F; Proto, M C; Di Genio, M; Grimaldi, C; Maj, M

    2009-10-01

    Endocannabinoids modulate eating behavior; hence, endocannabinoid genes may contribute to the biological vulnerability to eating disorders. The rs1049353 (1359 G/A) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the gene coding the endocannabinoid CB1 receptor (CNR1) and the rs324420 (cDNA 385C to A) SNP of the gene coding fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the major degrading enzyme of endocannabinoids, have been suggested to have functional effects on mature proteins. Therefore, we explored the possibility that those SNPs were associated to anorexia nervosa and/or bulimia nervosa. The distributions of the CNR1 1359 G/A SNP and of the FAAH cDNA 385C to A SNP were investigated in 134 patients with anorexia nervosa, 180 patients with bulimia nervosa and 148 normal weight healthy controls. Additive effects of the two SNPs in the genetic susceptibility to anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa were also tested. As compared to healthy controls, anorexic and bulimic patients showed significantly higher frequencies of the AG genotype and the A allele of the CNR1 1359 G/A SNP. Similarly, the AC genotype and the A allele of the FAAH cDNA 385C to A SNP were significantly more frequent in anorexic and bulimic individuals. A synergistic effect of the two SNPs was evident in anorexia nervosa but not in bulimia nervosa. Present findings show for the first time that the CNR1 1359 G/A SNP and the FAAH cDNA 385C to A SNP are significantly associated to anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, and demonstrate a synergistic effect of the two SNPs in anorexia nervosa.

  10. Analysis of multi-instrumental assessment of eating disorders: comparison between Anorexia and Bulimia.

    PubMed

    Juli, Maria-Rosaria

    2012-09-01

    The origin and course of eating disorders constitute a multifactorial etiopathology. This is why it is important to consider the psychological, developmental, biological and socio - cultural evaluation of each patient. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual DSM IV - TR (APA, 1994) distinguishes two main eating disorders: Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa. Together with them are described a broad and heterogeneous category (EDNOS) of "atypical eating disorders," that is a clinically significant eating disorder, but that does not meet all the diagnostic criteria for Anorexia Nervosa or Bulimia Nervosa. The aim of this pilot study was to analyze the differences detectable in anorexic and bulimic patients in relation to several factors of mental functioning, particularly with respect to the presence of distinctive characteristics and symptoms and the associated substrate personality. 20 patients with eating disorders who have a residential rehabilitation program, all women, 10 diagnosed with AN aged between 18 years and 31 years, including (5 Restrictive and 5 with Purging) and 10 diagnosed with BN aged between 19 years and 31 years (including 5 with Purging). The pictures of AN and BN can be placed within a continuum of symptoms that distinguishes them exclusively for the presence or absence of bulimic episodes; also the symptom of bulaemia can be considered a most important aspect in the distinction between anorexia and bulimia as all other aspects of mental functioning appear to be similar in almost direct measurement, and finally some food pathological events are associated with personality characteristics, Axis I symptoms and quality of life, linked to specific types of global functioning. Some symptoms may have different functions depending on the patient's personality style: a patient may develop a symptom of anorexia because it is competitive and a perfectionist, another as a form of self-punishment or as a strategy to regulate the feeling of being out of

  11. [EDNOS is an eating disorder of clinical relevance, on a par with anorexia and bulimia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Dingemans, A E; van Furth, E F

    2015-01-01

    The category 'eating disorder 'not otherwise specified'' (EDNOS) in DSM-IV is restricted to eating disorders of clinical severity that do not completely fulfil the criteria for anorexia and bulimia nervosa. The EDNOS category is, by definition, often regarded as a a residual category and in principle designed to incorporate a small group of patients with atypical characteristics. Health insurance companies argue that the treatment of patients diagnosed with EDNOS should not be treated in mental health institutions and therefore should not get their treatment costs reimbursed by the insurance companies. The most important argument of the insurance companies is that patients in the EDNOS category do not display serious psychiatric symptoms. The aim of this paper is to show that EDNOS is an eating disorder category of clinical relevance. The article provides a critical overview of literature on EDNOS which studies the prevalence, severity and course of the disorder. We also discuss to what extent the fifth version of dsm solves the problems relating to this residual category. We reviewed the literature. The classification given in DSM-IV is not an accurate reflection of clinical reality. Half of the patients presenting with an eating disorder and seeking treatment do meet the criteria for EDNOS. The duration and the severity of eating disorder psychopathology, the presence of comorbidity, the mortality, and the use of the mental health care services by individuals with an eating disorder appear to be very similar in EDNOS patients and in patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Eating disorder classifications can be regarded as snapshots taken throughout the course of an illness. Over of the years patients can be afflicted with various subtypes of an eating disorder. DSM-5 places fewer patients in the EDNOS category that did DSM-IV. In the latest version of dsm, namely DSM-5, the number of patients with an eating disorder classified as EDNOS has declined. There

  12. Predictors for good therapeutic outcome and drop-out in technology assisted guided self-help in the treatment of bulimia nervosa and bulimia like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Gudrun; Penelo, Eva; Nobis, Gerald; Mayrhofer, Anna; Wanner, Christian; Schau, Johanna; Spitzer, Marion; Gwinner, Paulina; Trofaier, Marie-Louise; Imgart, Hartmut; Fernandez-Aranda, Fernando; Karwautz, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    Technology assisted guided self-help has been proven to be effective in the treatment of bulimia nervosa (BN). The aim of this study was to determine predictors of good long-term outcome as well as drop-out, in order to identify patients for whom these interventions are most suitable. One hundred and fifty six patients with BN were assigned to either 7 months internet-based guided self-help (INT-GSH) or to conventional guided bibliotherapy (BIB-GSH), both guided by e-mail support. Evaluations were taken at baseline, after 4, 7, and 18 months. As potential predictors, psychiatric comorbidity, personality features, and eating disorder psychopathology were considered. Higher motivation, lower frequency of binge eating, and lower body dissatisfaction at baseline predicted good outcome after the end of treatment. Lower frequency of binge eating predicted good outcome at long-term follow-up. Factors prediciting drop-out were higher depression and lower self-directedness at baseline. Technology assisted self-help can be recommended for patients with a high motivation to change, lower binge-eating frequency and lower depression scores. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  13. Observed Connection and Individuation: Relation to Symptoms in Families of Adolescents with Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sarah A.; Hoste, Renee Rienecke; Le Grange, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the relation between observed familial connection and individuation and adolescent bulimia nervosa (BN) symptoms. Method As part of a treatment study for adolescent BN, adolescents (n = 54) and their parents participated in a videotaped semi-structured interview. Participants were rated on observed connection and individuation from these interviews using the Scale of Intergenerational Relationship Quality and two measures of connection. Results There was a significant negative relation between individuation from parents and adolescent BN symptoms. Connection both to and from mothers and adolescents was negatively associated with BN symptoms. Increased eating concern was significantly associated with a greater likelihood of expressing a desire for more connection with the family. Discussion Investigating and understanding family factors present at the time of adolescent BN may assist in providing treatment specific to the needs of the family to best aid the adolescent’s recovery process. PMID:22593023

  14. Electrophysiological evidence for an attentional bias in processing body stimuli in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Mai, Sandra; Gramann, Klaus; Herbert, Beate M; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Warschburger, Petra; Pollatos, Olga

    2015-05-01

    Empirical evidence suggests abnormalities in the processing of body stimuli in bulimia nervosa (BN). This study investigated central markers of processing body stimuli by means of event-related potentials in BN. EEG was recorded from 20 women with BN and 20 matched healthy controls while watching and evaluating underweight, normal and overweight female body pictures. Bulimics evaluated underweight bodies as less unpleasant and overweight bodies as bigger and more arousing. A higher P2 to overweight stimuli occurred in BN only. In contrast to controls, no N2 increase to underweight bodies was observed in BN. P3 was modulated by stimulus category only in healthy controls; late slow waves to underweight bodies were more pronounced in both groups. P2 amplitudes to overweight stimuli were correlated with drive for thinness and body dissatisfaction. We present novel support for altered perceptual and cognitive-affective processing of body images in BN on the subjective and electrophysiological level.

  15. Predictors of mental health problems and negative caregiving experiences in carers of adolescents with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Winn, Suzanne; Perkins, Sarah; Walwyn, Rebecca; Schmidt, Ulrike; Eisler, Ivan; Treasure, Janet; Berelowitz, Mark; Dodge, Liz; Frost, Susie; Jenkins, Mari; Johnson-Sabine, Eric; Keville, Saskia; Murphy, Rebecca; Robinson, Paul; Yi, Irene

    2007-03-01

    This exploratory study focuses on the mental health (MH) and caregiving experience of carers of adolescents with Bulimia Nervosa (BN)/Eating Disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS), aiming to determine: levels of MH problems in carers and if a negative experience of caregiving predicts carer MH status and which factors predict a negative experience of caregiving. Hundred and twelve carers and 68 adolescents with BN/EDNOS completed self-report measures (General Health Questionnaire, Experience of Caregiving Inventory, Level of Expressed Emotion, Self-report Family Inventory, Inventory of Interpersonal Problems). Over half of the carers reported some MH problems and a minority (5.4%) were experiencing considerable difficulties. A negative experience of caregiving predicted carer MH status. Higher weekly contact hours and patient ratings of expressed emotion (EE) predicted a negative experience of caregiving. Interventions focusing on reducing EE and contact hours could prove beneficial for both patient and caregiver outcomes. 2006 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Dieting in bulimia nervosa is associated with increased food restriction and psychopathology but decreased binge eating.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Michael R; Witt, Ashley A; Grossman, Stephanie L

    2013-08-01

    The cognitive behavioral model of bulimia nervosa (BN) suggests that dieting is central to the maintenance of binge eating. However, correlational and experimental studies suggest that additional clarification is needed about the nature of this relationship. Dieting, weight, eating disorder psychopathology, and depression were assessed at admission among 166 patients with BN presenting for residential treatment. As in past research, a significant fraction (43%) of patients with BN reported not currently dieting. A comparison of weight loss dieters and non-dieters found greater food restriction and eating disorder psychopathology among weight loss dieters. However, dieters reported less frequent binge eating. There were no significant group differences in depression. Results suggest that 1) while many individuals with BN are attempting to restrict their food intake, the goal of losing weight fundamentally alters the effect of such restriction on binge eating, and 2) treatment may benefit from helping patients to establish a healthier approach to achieving long-term weight stability.

  17. Evaluation of a functional treatment for binge eating associated with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Giddings, T D; Miltenberger, R G

    2010-01-01

    Binge-eating disorders (BED) are a common problem affecting up to 5 percent of the American population in any given 6-month period. Currently, the most widely accepted treatment is some variation of Cognitive Behavior Therapy, although the abstinence rates following this type of treatment are only around 50%. A recent study by Bosch et al. explored the effects of extinction with four women who engaged in binge-eating behavior associated with BED and bulimia nervosa (BN). The treatment was successful, with three of the four participants obtaining abstinence. To date, this has been the only study examining this procedure. The purpose of the current study was to further evaluate extinction of binge eating with four young women who met diagnostic criteria for BN. The results showed that the treatment decreased binge eating to zero for all four women, although one dropped out of the study shortly after beginning the intervention.

  18. A Risk and Maintenance Model for Bulimia Nervosa: From Impulsive Action to Compulsive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Carolyn M.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Smith, Gregory T.

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers a new model for bulimia nervosa (BN) that explains both the initial impulsive nature of binge eating and purging as well as the compulsive quality of the fully developed disorder. The model is based on a review of advances in research on BN and advances in relevant basic psychological science. It integrates transdiagnostic personality risk, eating disorder specific risk, reinforcement theory, cognitive neuroscience, and theory drawn from the drug addiction literature. We identify both a state-based and a trait-based risk pathway, and we then propose possible state-by-trait interaction risk processes. The state-based pathway emphasizes depletion of self-control. The trait-based pathway emphasizes transactions between the trait of negative urgency (the tendency to act rashly when distressed) and high-risk psychosocial learning. We then describe a process by which initially impulsive BN behaviors become compulsive over time, and we consider the clinical implications of our model. PMID:25961467

  19. Investigation of Oxytocin Secretion in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa: Relationships to Temperament Personality Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Scognamiglio, Pasquale; Volpe, Umberto; Di Maso, Virginia; Monteleone, Palmiero

    2016-01-01

    Published studies suggested an implication of oxytocin in some temperament characteristics of personality. Therefore, we measured oxytocin secretion in 23 women with anorexia nervosa (AN), 27 with bulimia nervosa (BN) and 19 healthy controls and explored the relationships between circulating oxytocin and patients' personality traits. Plasma oxytocin levels were significantly reduced in AN women but not in BN ones. In healthy women, the attachment subscale scores of the reward dependence temperament and the harm avoidance (HA) scores explained 82% of the variability in circulating oxytocin. In BN patients, plasma oxytocin resulted to be negatively correlated with HA, whereas no significant correlations emerged in AN patients. These findings confirm a dysregulation of oxytocin production in AN but not in BN and show, for the first time, a disruption of the associations between hormone levels and patients' temperament traits, which may have a role in certain deranged behaviours of eating disorder patients. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  20. Emotion recognition, emotional awareness and cognitive bias in individuals with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Legenbauer, Tanja; Vocks, Silja; Rüddel, Heinz

    2008-06-01

    Difficulties recognizing emotion have been reported for eating disordered individuals in relation to perception of emotions in others and emotional self-awareness. It remains unclear whether this is a perceptual or cognitive-affective problem. Clarification is sought and the question of a cognitive bias is addressed when interpreting facially expressed emotions. Twenty participants with bulimia nervosa (BN) and 20 normal controls (NC) were assessed for ability to recognize emotional and neutral expressions. Emotional self-awareness was also assessed. Significant differences were found for emotional self-awareness. For emotional faces, only a poorer recognition of the emotion, surprise, for BN was found. Problems with emotional self-awareness suggest a cognitive-affective disturbance in emotion recognition. Implications for therapy are discussed. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Anorexia, bulimia, and obesity: shared decision making deficits on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT).

    PubMed

    Brogan, Amy; Hevey, David; Pignatti, Riccardo

    2010-07-01

    The pathological eating behaviors in Anorexia Nervosa (AN), Bulimia Nervosa (BN), and obesity are characterized by a preference for high immediate reward, despite higher future losses in terms of both physical and psychological outcomes. The present study compared the decision making profile of females with a diagnosis of AN (n = 22), BN (n = 17), obesity (n = 18), and a healthy weight comparison group (n = 20) using a standardized neuropsychological test, the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). The three clinical groups (AN, BN, obesity) were significantly impaired on the IGT compared with the comparison group on both overall task performance and task learning; however, the three clinical groups were not significantly different from each other. Sixty-one percent to 77% of the clinical groups reached the threshold for impairment on the IGT, compared with 15% of the comparison group. The potential basis for this shared decision making profile is discussed.

  2. Stigmatizing Attitudes and Beliefs About Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa Among Italian Undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Caslini, Manuela; Crocamo, Cristina; Dakanalis, Antonios; Tremolada, Martina; Clerici, Massimo; Carrà, Giuseppe

    2016-12-01

    Stigmatizing attitudes toward eating disorders (EDs) may lead to reduced treatment seeking. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of stigmatizing trends and beliefs related to anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN), and the associations with the experiential knowledge of the problem, in a large sample of Italian undergraduates. A total of 2109 participants completed an online survey including questionnaires related to stigmatizing beliefs toward AN and BN, and personal contacts with people with EDs. Undergraduates reported almost overlapping low levels of stigmatizing trends for AN and BN, apart from personal responsibility and social distance. Those aged 18 to 25 and living with family held higher stigmatizing attitudes. Stigma was lower in underweight participants and in those (12%) reporting a previous ED diagnosis. Although not improving stigmatizing attitudes, 83% of the sample was familiar with people with an ED. Antistigma actions to increase awareness on EDs and to improve treatment-seeking behaviors are needed.

  3. Sampling of empirically supported psychological treatments from health psychology: smoking, chronic pain, cancer, and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Compas, B E; Haaga, D A; Keefe, F J; Leitenberg, H; Williams, D A

    1998-02-01

    Interventions in health psychology and behavioral medicine represent an integral area of research for the development of psychological therapies to enhance health behaviors, manage symptoms and sequelae of disease, treat psychological symptoms and disorders, prolong survival in the face of a life-threatening illness, and improve quality of life. A sampling of interventions in health psychology and behavioral medicine is offered that meet the criteria for empirically supported treatments for smoking cessation, chronic pain, cancer, and bulimia nervosa. Evidence for empirically supported treatments is identified, along with promising interventions that do not yet meet the criteria as outlined by D. L. Chambless and S. D. Hollon (1998). Evidence for the effectiveness and clinical significance of these interventions is reviewed, and issues in this area of research are outlined.

  4. Intentional hypoglycemia to control bingeing in a patient with type 1 diabetes and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Mandana; Kreisman, Stuart; Hall, Lacresha

    2015-02-01

    Most cases of eating disorders associated with type 1 diabetes mellitus are categorized as diabulimia, a disorder of withholding insulin treatment to lose weight through sustained hyperglycemia. In this paper, we report a unique case of a patient with both type 1 diabetes and bulimia nervosa who has an atypical way of controlling her bingeing by keeping her blood sugars low. This pattern of intentionally sustained hypoglycemia has not been previously described in the literature to the best of our knowledge. Knowing various presentations of eating disorders in patients with type 1 diabetes can provide healthcare workers with enhanced ability in recognizing and educating at-risk patients, in the hope of preventing serious hypoglycemia or complications. Furthermore, a patient's awareness of complications associated with suboptimal control of diabetes, whether by overdosing or underdosing their insulin regimen, might lead to avoidance of disordered eating behaviours.

  5. The contributions of self psychology to the treatment of anorexia and bulimia.

    PubMed

    Bachar, E

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews the contribution of self psychology to the treatment and understanding of anorexia and bulimia. It tries to show that the unique conceptualization of self, selfobject relations, and this theory's conceptualization of resistance and defenses constitutes a therapeutic stance which especially fits the therapeutic needs of eating-disordered patients. Clinical vignettes illuminate three main issues exemplifying the opportunities and dilemmas that this new development in psychoanalytic theory brings to the fore in the treatment of eating disorders: (1) empathy with deeds and attitudes of the patient that the therapist finds difficult to empathize with; (2) empathic understanding "from within" from an experience-near stance vs. experience-distant interpretation "from without"; (3) self, selfobject relations with food and as a result of progress in therapy, with human beings.

  6. Client attachment and therapist feelings in the treatment of bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Sarah Ingrid Franksdatter; Lunn, Susanne; Poulsen, Stig

    2015-06-01

    The relationship between client attachment and therapist postsession feelings was investigated in a randomized clinical trial of psychoanalytic psychotherapy (PPT) and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for bulimia nervosa. Therapists completed feeling word checklists after each session, and client attachment was assessed with the Adult Attachment Interview. A factor analysis identified 3 feeling factors, Happy/Enthusiastic, Overwhelmed/Moved, and Indifferent/Bored. Positive feelings were predominant, but PPT therapists reported more negative and fewer positive feelings than CBT therapists did. Client improvement in terms of frequency of bulimic episodes and general psychiatric distress was related to an increase in Happy/Enthusiastic feelings. Multilevel analyses indicated significant interactions between therapy type and client dismissing versus preoccupied attachment in predicting therapist negative emotional reactions. PPT therapist felt more Indifferent/Bored the more dismissing clients were, whereas CBT therapists felt more Overwhelmed/Moved the more preoccupied clients were.

  7. [Childhood masturbation--a genetic viewpoint, especially in anorexia and bulimia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Binswanger, R

    1996-07-01

    The author examines the functions of child masturbation in the development of narcissim and distinguishes a demarcation function, a compensation function and a function serving to establish autonomy. In Binswanger's view, certain reactions to child masturbation on the part of parents may affect the interactive relationship between the child and the parent representing the primary object in such a way as to thwart or undermine these functions. The result is the appearance of masturbation substitutes in the form of certain symptoms. Binswanger distinguishes "horrified", "liberal", and "eroticized" reactions by parents, relating the first to compulsion neurosis, the second to obesity, and the third to anorexia/bulimia. The author illustrates his hypotheses with copious references to cases from his own practice.

  8. The role of the central nervous system in the psychoneuroendocrine disturbances of anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Kaye, W H; Gendall, K; Kye, C

    1998-06-01

    It has been well-recognized that starvation in anorexia and bulimia nervosa causes endocrine disturbances. Such disturbances may help understand why many people with eating disorders cannot easily reverse their illness since people with eating disorders often enter a downward spiraling circle with malnutrition sustaining and perpetuating the desire for more weight loss and dieting. Symptoms, such as obsessions and dysphoric mood, and altered appetitive behavior, may be exaggerated by neuropeptide alterations and thus contribute to this downward spiral. While neuropeptide disturbances do not appear to be a permanent feature or cause or anorexia nervosa, these disturbances are strongly entrenched, and are not easily corrected by improved nutrition or short-term weight normalization. This suggests that therapy should be sustained for months after nutritional normalization.

  9. Preliminary evidence for a role for impulsivity in cognitive disinhibition in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Kemps, Eva; Wilsdon, Alexandra

    2010-06-01

    The present study investigated cognitive disinhibition in bulimia nervosa (BN) and examined whether impulsivity could account for this neuropsychological deficiency. Inhibitory processing of 13 women with BN (16-29 years) was compared against that of 13 healthy control participants matched for age, education, and socioeconomic status on a battery of widely used tasks: Stroop task, Haylings sentence completion test, excluded letter fluency, and Matching Familiar Figures Test. The women were also administered the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11). The BN patients displayed significant impairments on all inhibition measures and posited significantly higher impulsivity scores than the controls. Moreover, controlling for impulsivity reduced the group differences in Stroop color naming and excluded letter fluency to nonsignificance, indicating that poor inhibitory control in BN is at least partly attributable to an impulsive disposition.

  10. Memory bias for schema-related stimuli in individuals with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Legenbauer, Tanja; Maul, Bärbel; Rühl, Ilka; Kleinstäuber, Maria; Hiller, Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    This study investigates whether individuals with bulimia nervosa (BN) have a memory bias in relation to explicit memory (cued and free recall vs. verbal and pictorial recognition tasks). Twenty-five participants diagnosed with BN and 27 normal controls (NC) were exposed to body-related, food-related, and neutral TV commercials, and then recall and recognition rates were assessed. Poorer recognition and recall of body-related stimuli was found for BN in comparison to NC, suggesting a memory bias. Results are discussed in relation to previous studies, along with suggestions as to how future studies can gain more insight into dysfunctions in information processing that can lead to the maintenance of eating disorders.

  11. Food cravings discriminate between anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Implications for "success" versus "failure" in dietary restriction.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Silvia; Warren, Cortney S; Rodríguez, Sonia; Fernández, M Carmen; Cepeda-Benito, Antonio

    2009-06-01

    Food cravings are subjective, motivational states thought to induce binge eating among eating disorder patients. This study compared food cravings across eating disorders. Women (N=135) diagnosed with anorexia nervosa, restrictive (ANR) or binge-purging (ANBP) types, or bulimia nervosa, non-purging (BNNP) or purging (BNP) types completed measures of food cravings. Discriminant analysis yielded two statistically significant functions. The first function differentiated between all the four group pairs except ANBP and BNNP, with levels of various food-craving dimensions successively increasing for ANR, ANBP, BNNP, and BNP participants. The second function differentiated between ANBP and BNNP participants. Overall, the functions improved classification accuracy above chance level (44% fewer errors). The findings suggest that cravings are more strongly associated with loss of control over eating than with dietary restraint tendencies.

  12. Bulimia and anorexia nervosa in winter depression: lifetime rates in a clinical sample.

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, N P; Dilsaver, S C

    1996-01-01

    Symptoms of an eating disorder (hyperphagia, carbohydrate craving, and weight gain) are characteristic of wintertime depression. Recent findings suggest that the severity of bulimia nervosa peaks during fall and winter months, and that persons with this disorder respond to treatment with bright artificial light. However, the rates of eating disorders among patients presenting for the treatment of winter depression are unknown. This study was undertaken to determine these rates among 47 patients meeting the DSM-III-R criteria for major depression with a seasonal pattern. All were evaluated using standard clinical interviews and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R. Twelve (25.5%) patients met the DSM-III-R criteria for an eating disorder. Eleven patients had onset of mood disorder during childhood or adolescence. The eating disorder followed the onset of the mood disorder. Clinicians should inquire about current and past symptoms of eating disorders when evaluating patients with winter depression. PMID:8580121

  13. Prevalence and correlates of bulimia nervosa and bulimic behaviors in a racially diverse sample of undergraduate students in two universities in southeast Texas.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, A R; Vernon, S W; Lee, E S

    1996-09-01

    This cross-sectional survey used a self-report questionnaire to measure the prevalence and correlates of bulimia nervosa and bulimic behaviors in a sample of undergraduate students enrolled in two state-supported universities in Texas in 1990. In one university, the student population was predominantly white; in the other, it was predominantly nonwhite. Bulimia status was assessed using criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition, Revised (DSM-III-R), of the American Psychiatric Association and was operationalized using the Revised Bulimia Test. Overall, 0.9% of the sample, 1.3% of the females, and 0.2% of the males were classified as having bulimia nervosa. The prevalence of bulimic behaviors was 5.4% overall, 6.6% for females, and 3.6% for males. There was no racial/ethnic difference in the prevalence of bulimia nervosa or bulimic behaviors; 1.5% of the whites (n = 459) and 0.4% of the nonwhites (n = 693) were classified as having bulimia nervosa, while 5.5% of the whites and 5.3% of the nonwhites reported bulimic behaviors. In univariate analysis, female sex, obesity, dieting behavior, and a family history of alcoholism, drug abuse, and depression were statistically associated with bulimic behaviors. After adjustment for covariates, only obesity and dieting behavior were statistically significant. We concluded that the sex difference in bulimic behaviors reported in other studies may be due to the failure to control for confounding factors.

  14. Behavioral responses to catecholamine depletion in unmedicated, remitted subjects with bulimia nervosa and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Grob, Simona; Stern, Jair; Gamper, Lara; Moergeli, Hanspeter; Milos, Gabriella; Schnyder, Ulrich; Hasler, Gregor

    2015-04-01

    Bulimia nervosa (BN) has been associated with dysregulation of the central catecholaminergic system. An instructive way to investigate the relationship between catecholaminergic function and psychiatric disorder has involved behavioral responses to experimental catecholamine depletion (CD). The purpose of this study was to examine a possible catecholaminergic dysfunction in the pathogenesis of bulimia nervosa. CD was achieved by oral administration of alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine (AMPT) in 18 remitted female subjects with BN (rBN) and 31 healthy female control subjects. The study design consisted of a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled crossover, single-site experimental trial. The main outcome measures were bulimic symptoms assessed by the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire. Measures were assessed before and 26, 30, 54, 78, 102 hours after the first AMPT or placebo administration. In the experimental environment (controlled environment with a low level of food cues) rBN subjects had a greater increase in eating disorder symptoms during CD compared with healthy control subjects (condition × diagnosis interaction, p < .05). In the experimental environment, rBN subjects experienced fewer bulimic symptoms than in the natural environment (uncontrolled environment concerning food cues) 36 hours after the first AMPT intake (environment × diagnosis interaction, p < .05). Serum prolactin levels increased significantly, and to a comparable degree across groups, after AMPT administration. This study suggests that rBN is associated with vulnerability for developing eating disorder symptoms in response to reduced catecholamine neurotransmission after CD. The findings support the notion of catecholaminergic dysfunction as a possible trait abnormality in BN. © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry Published by Society of Biological Psychiatry All rights reserved.

  15. Latent class analysis of eating and impulsive behavioral symptoms in Taiwanese women with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Mei-Chih Meg; Hu, Fu-Chang

    2012-01-01

    The implications of impulsivity in its relationship with binge-eating or purging behaviors remain unclear. This study examined the patterns of eating behaviors and co-morbid impulsive behaviors in individuals with bulimia nervosa n optimally homogeneous classes using latent class analysis (LCA). All participants (n=180) were asked to complete a series of self-reported inventories of impulsive behaviors and other psychological measures. Information regarding the lifetime presence of symptoms of eating disorder was assessed by clinical interviews. LCA was conducted using eating disorder symptoms, impulsive behaviors, and the number of purging methods. Three latent classes of bulimic women were identified. These were women who exhibited relatively higher rates of purging, symptoms of impulsive behavior, and multiple purging methods (17.8%), women who used no more than one purging method with a low occurrence of impulsive behavior (41.7%), and women who showed higher rates of purging behaviors and the use of multiple purging methods with a low rate of impulsive behavior (41.7%). The impulsive sub-group had comparable severity of eating-related measures, frequency of binge-eating, and higher levels of general psychopathology than that of the other two sub-groups. This study provides empirical support for the existence of an impulsive subgroup with distinctive features among a non-Western group of BN patients. This study also suggests that mechanisms other than impulse dysregulation may exist for the development of binge-eating and purging behaviors in bulimia nervosa patients, or the mechanisms contributing to binge-eating and impulsive behaviors may be different. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. An exploratory assessment of theory of mind and psychological impairment in patients with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Laghi, Fiorenzo; Cotugno, Armando; Cecere, Francesco; Sirolli, Arianna; Palazzoni, David; Bosco, Francesca M

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate psychosocial functioning and different dimensions of theory of mind (ToM) in people with bulimia nervosa (BN) and Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified-BN type (EDNOS-BN). Psychosocial functioning and ToM were assessed in a sample of young adult females, 16 BN and 16 EDNOS-BN outpatients and 16 healthy controls (HCs). They were assessed using the Eating Disorder Inventory-Symptom Checklist-2 (EDI-2 SC) for evaluating psychological traits associated with eating disorders; the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) for evaluating psychopathological status; and the Theory of Mind Assessment Scale (Th.o.m.a.s.), a semi-structured interview aimed at assessing a person's different dimensions of ToM. The BN and EDNOS-BN groups exhibited worse performance than the control group on all dimensions of the SCL-90-R, and on all dimensions of the EDI-2 SC. The only difference for perfectionism was that BN obtained higher scores than EDNOS-BN group. Our results also revealed an impairment of third-person and second-order ToM in patients with bulimia (BN and EDNOS-BN) with respect to control subjects. These preliminary data have important implications for future empirical work, in that they provide valuable information regarding the importance of investigating the various facets of ToM ability separately, in order to provide a more detailed profile of ToM functioning in the clinical samples. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  17. Randomized controlled trial of a treatment for anorexia and bulimia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Bergh, Cecilia; Brodin, Ulf; Lindberg, Greger; Södersten, Per

    2002-01-01

    Evidence for the effectiveness of existing treatments of patients with eating disorders is weak. Here we describe and evaluate a method of treatment in a randomized controlled trial. Sixteen patients, randomly selected out of a group composed of 19 patients with anorexia nervosa and 13 with bulimia nervosa, were trained to eat and recognize satiety by using computer support. They rested in a warm room after eating, and their physical activity was restricted. The patients in the control group (n = 16) received no treatment. Remission was defined by normal body weight (anorexia), cessation of binge eating and purging (bulimia), a normal psychiatric profile, normal laboratory test values, normal eating behavior, and resumption of social activities. Fourteen patients went into remission after a median of 14.4 months (range 4.9–26.5) of treatment, but only one patient went into remission while waiting for treatment (P = 0.0057). Relapse is considered a major problem in patients who have been treated to remission. We therefore report results on a total of 168 patients who have entered our treatment program. The estimated rate of remission was 75%, and estimated time to remission was 14.7 months (quartile range 9.6 ≥ 32). Six patients (7%) of 83 who were treated to remission relapsed, but the others (93%) have remained in remission for 12 months (quartile range 6–36). Because the risk of relapse is maximal in the first year after remission, we suggest that most patients treated with this method recover. PMID:12082182

  18. Gustatory and olfactory sensitivity in patients with anorexia and bulimia in the course of treatment.

    PubMed

    Aschenbrenner, Katja; Scholze, Ninette; Joraschky, Peter; Hummel, Thomas

    2008-12-01

    The majority of studies on taste and smell in eating disorders have revealed several alterations of olfactory or gustatory functions. Aim of this prospective study was to employ detailed olfactory and gustatory testing in female subjects of three homogenous groups - anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and healthy controls - and to look at the effects of treatment on these measures. Sixteen hospitalized female patients with anorexia (restricting type, mean age [M]=24.5 years), 24 female patients with bulimia (purging type, M=24.3 years) as well as 23 healthy controls (M=24.5 years) received olfactory ("Sniffin' Sticks") and gustatory testing ("Taste Strips"). Group differences in olfactory and gustatory sensitivity, body mass index (BMI), the Beck depression inventory, the eating attitudes test (EAT), and the influence of therapy on gustatory and olfactory function were investigated. (1) Group differences were present for odor discrimination and overall olfactory function with anorexic patients having the lowest scores. (2) Regarding taste function, controls scored higher than patients with anorexia. (3) At admission small but significant correlations were found between overall olfactory function and body weight (r(63)=0.35), BMI (r(63) = 0.37), and EAT score (r(63) = -0.27). Similarly, (4) the taste test score correlated significantly with body weight (r(63)= 0.48), and BMI (r(63) = 0.45). Finally, (5) at discharge overall olfactory and gustatory function were significantly higher compared to admission in anorexic patients. As compared to healthy controls and bulimic patients our results show lowered olfactory and gustatory sensitivities in anorexic patients that improved with increasing BMI and decreasing eating pathology in the course of treatment.

  19. Treating Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Lisa P.; DeBlassie, Richard R.

    1989-01-01

    Identifies and discusses treatment of some irrational cognitions of bulimics concerning food, weight loss, eating, and dieting. Describes use of cognitive, behavioral, and emotional interventions. Notes importance of providing nutrition information and realistic diet practices. Group treatment approach is briefly addressed in dealing with…

  20. Treating Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Lisa P.; DeBlassie, Richard R.

    1989-01-01

    Identifies and discusses treatment of some irrational cognitions of bulimics concerning food, weight loss, eating, and dieting. Describes use of cognitive, behavioral, and emotional interventions. Notes importance of providing nutrition information and realistic diet practices. Group treatment approach is briefly addressed in dealing with…

  1. Citalopram versus fluoxetine for the treatment of patients with bulimia nervosa: a single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Leombruni, Paolo; Amianto, Federico; Delsedime, Nadia; Gramaglia, Carla; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Fassino, Secondo

    2006-01-01

    The most studied and most frequently used pharmacologic treatments in bulimia nervosa are the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), in particular, fluoxetine. Less is known about the efficacy of the other SSRIs. To compare fluoxetine with citalopram in the treatment of bulimic patients, 37 bulimic patients were randomized to receive fluoxetine (n=18) or citalopram (n=19); these patients were assessed with regard to clinical (ie, body mass index, pathologic behaviors), psychopathologic (Eating Disorder Inventory-2, Body Shape Questionnaire, Binge-Eating Scale, Beck Depression Inventory), personality (Temperament and Character Inventory), and clinical global impression measures. These measures were compared between the 2 treatment groups at baseline and at the end of treatment. Dropout rates were similar in the 2 groups. Both groups showed significant improvement in eating psychopathology, angry feelings, and clinical global impression. Patients in the fluoxetine group displayed a greater reduction in introjected anger, whereas those in the citalopram group displayed a greater reduction in depressive feelings. Both treatments showed some effect on outcome measures, but efficacy profiles did not overlap. Citalopram may be useful in depressed patients with bulimia, whereas fluoxetine is more specific for those with introjected anger and bulimia.

  2. Getting better byte by byte: a pilot randomised controlled trial of email therapy for bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Paul; Serfaty, Marc

    2008-03-01

    One hundred and ten people in an university population responded to emailed eating disorder questionnaires. Ninty-seven fulfilling criteria for eating disorders (bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder (BED), EDNOS) were randomised to therapist administered email bulimia therapy (eBT), unsupported Self directed writing (SDW) or Waiting list control (WLC). Measures were repeated at 3 months. Diagnosis, Beck depression inventory (BDI) and Bulimia investigatory test (BITE) scores were recorded. Follow-up rate was 63% and results must be interpreted cautiously. However significantly fewer participants who had received eBT or SDW fulfilled criteria for eating disorders at follow up compared to WLC. There was no significant difference between eBT and SDW in the analysis of variance (ANOVA), although in separate analyses, eBT was significantly superior to WLC (p < 0.02) and the difference for SDW approached significance (p = 0.06). BDI and BITE scores showed no significant change. For eBT participants there was a significant positive correlation between words written and improvement in BITE severity score. BN, BED and EDNOS can be treated via email. (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association

  3. Self-harm and suicidal behavior in borderline personality disorder with and without bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Reas, Deborah L; Pedersen, Geir; Karterud, Sigmund; Rø, Øyvind

    2015-06-01

    Few studies have investigated whether a diagnosis of Bulimia nervosa (BN) confers additional risk of life-threatening behaviors such as self-harm and suicidal behavior in borderline personality disorder (BPD). Participants were 483 treatment-seeking women diagnosed with BPD according to the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Personality Disorders (SCID-II; First, Gibbon, Spitzer, Williams, & Benjamin, 1997; Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed.; APA, 1994) and admitted to the Norwegian Network of Psychotherapeutic Day Hospitals between 1996 and 2009. Of these, 57 (11.8%) women met DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for BN according to the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.; Sheehan et al., 1998) and they were compared with women with BPD and other Axis I disorders. We found that comorbid BN is uniquely and significantly associated with increased risk of suicidal behavior among women being treated for BPD. Findings underscore the importance of routinely screening for BN among women seeking treatment for BPD, as co-occurring bulimia appears to be a significant marker for immediate life-threatening behaviors in this already high-risk population, which is a significant public health issue. A significantly greater proportion of women with BPD-BN reported suicidal ideation at intake (past 7 days), engaged in self-harm behavior during treatment, and attempted suicide during treatment. All bivariate associations remained significant in the logistic regression models after controlling for mood, anxiety, and substance-related disorders. The presence of a concurrent diagnosis of BN among women with BPD is significantly and uniquely associated with recent suicidal ideation, and self-harm behavior and suicide attempts during treatment after controlling for major classes of mental disorders. Co-occurring BN appears to represent a significant marker for immediate life-threatening behaviors in women seeking treatment for BPD

  4. A comprehensive investigation of putative correlates of bulimia among college-age women: object relations, dependency, ego defenses, trait anxiety, and depression.

    PubMed

    Zborowski, M J

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated putative correlates of bulimia, which included measures of object relations impairment, dependency, ego defenses, trait anxiety and depression. Subjects were college-age women drawn from a larger sample (n = 417) and selected on the basis of their scores on the revised version of the Bulimia Test. The bulimia group was composed of those scoring in the top 5% (n = 23), concordant with the base rate of bulimia in this population, whereas controls (n = 23) were conservatively selected from those scoring around the mean (56th-61st percentile). A multivariate analysis of variance revealed a significant group difference across dependent variables (p < .05), and univariate Fs uniformly demonstrate predicted group differences. A stepwise discriminant analysis was performed to assess the relative contribution of these variables toward the differentiation between psychometrically defined, bulimic and nonbulimic women, revealing that trait anxiety, dependency, and depression reliably differentiated these groups, accounting for 37% of between-groups variance. In replicating and extending prior research, the results have implications for elucidating the phenomenology and potential etiologic factors associated with bulimia and for informing treatment and future research.

  5. The efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy on the core symptoms of bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D A; Maloney, K C

    2001-10-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is widely regarded as the treatment of choice for bulimia nervosa (BN), with previous reviews of the CBT outcome literature claiming an approximate 40%-50% recovery rate. Most of these reviews have focused on reductions of binge eating and purging; however, the cognitive model of BN that underlies the CBT approach identifies three additional symptoms as central to the disorder: restrictive eating, concerns with shape and weight, and self-esteem. The purpose of this review was to determine the effect of CBT on the five core symptoms of BN, particularly those neglected in previous reviews. This review found that while most studies provided outcome data on binge eating, purgative behavior, and concern with shape and weight, fewer studies provided data on restraint and self-esteem. While generally favorable, evidence for the efficacy of CBT on the core symptoms of BN was mixed, depending on the outcome measures used. Shortcomings in the literature are identified and suggestions to correct these shortcomings are provided.

  6. Comparison of group and individual cognitive-behavioral therapy for patients with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eunice; Touyz, Stephen W; Beumont, Pierre J V; Fairburn, Christopher G; Griffiths, Rosalyn; Butow, Phyllis; Russell, Janice; Schotte, David E; Gertler, Robert; Basten, Christopher

    2003-04-01

    The clinical effectiveness of group and individual cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for bulimia nervosa (BN) was compared. Sixty BN patients from hospitals and general practitioners in Sydney, Australia, were allocated randomly to group or individual CBT. Forty-four completed treatment (n = 22 in group CBT and n = 22 in individual CBT). Patients were assessed at pretreatment, posttreatment, and at 3 and 6 months follow-up with the Eating Disorder Examination-12 and self-report questionnaires examining weight and shape attitudes (Eating Disorder Inventory-2), social adjustment (Social Adjustment Scale-Modified), self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale), and general psychopathology (Symptom Checklist 90R). The effects of group and individual CBT were equivalent on most measures. However, a significantly greater proportion of individual CBT patients than group CBT patients were abstinent from bulimic behaviors at posttreatment, but not at follow-up. This has implications for the delivery of cost-effective and clinically effective treatment for BN. Copyright 2003 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Social comparison and its relation to body dissatisfaction in bulimia nervosa: evidence from eye movements.

    PubMed

    Blechert, Jens; Nickert, Till; Caffier, Detlef; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna

    2009-10-01

    To determine the role of social comparison for body dissatisfaction in bulimia nervosa (BN). Previous research suggested that exposure to media content idealizing thin body shape decreases body satisfaction, particularly in women with eating disorder symptoms. This might be due to the negative outcome of social comparisons with media models, and women with eating disorders might be particularly susceptible because they engage in upward social comparison more frequently than women without these symptoms. However, no study has yet explored both upward (i.e., toward more attractive others) and downward (i.e., toward less attractive others) social comparisons and their impact on body dissatisfaction in a clinical eating disorder and healthy controls. We presented patients with BN (n = 20) and healthy controls (HC) (n = 22) with slides comprising a digitized image of their own body alongside comparison bodies with higher and lower body mass indices (BMIs) while measuring their eye movements. As hypothesized, patients with BN fixated longer on comparison bodies with lower BMIs than controls, with the reverse pattern for high BMI bodies. This gaze pattern suggests that upward comparisons were more prevalent in the BN group. Furthermore, upward comparisons were related to a drop in body satisfaction in the BN group. Disadvantageous social comparison strategies might be related to body dissatisfaction and therefore to the maintenance of BN.

  8. Differences and similarities between bulimia nervosa, compulsive buying and gambling disorder.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Granero, Roser; Moragas, Laura; Steiger, Howard; Israel, Mimi; Aymamí, Neus; Gómez-Peña, Mónica; Sauchelli, Sarah; Agüera, Zaida; Sánchez, Isabel; Riesco, Nadine; Penelo, Eva; Menchón, José M; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the study was to analyse shared commonalities and differences between bulimia nervosa (BN) and certain impulse-related disorders, namely compulsive buying (CB) and gambling disorder (GD), with respect to general psychopathology and personality traits. A total of 188 female patients [50 BN without comorbid CB (BN-CB), 49 BN with comorbid CB (BN+CB), 53 GD and 36 CB] and 50 comparison non-psychiatric women participated in the current study. All patients were diagnosed using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth revised edition, the Temperament and Character Inventory-Revised, and other clinical indices. A positive-growing trend was observed in psychopathology and personality traits across the four clinical groups. Comorbid BN with CB was associated with highest eating psychopathology and social anxiety. On Novelty Seeking, the CB, GD and BN+CB were similar to each other, whereas BN-CB presented a distinct profile. Moreover, the BN+CB group displayed more dysfunctional personality traits and higher general psychopathology. The clinical groups demonstrated overall higher levels of psychopathology compared with the control group. The results of this study demonstrate that disorders with impulsive traits (CB, GD, BN+CB and BN-CB) follow a linear trend in general psychopathology and specific personality traits, but differ along specific personality and psychopathological dimensions. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  9. Food Addiction in Bulimia Nervosa: Clinical Correlates and Association with Response to a Brief Psychoeducational Intervention.

    PubMed

    Hilker, Ines; Sánchez, Isabel; Steward, Trevor; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Granero, Roser; Gearhardt, Ashley N; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rita Cristina; Dieguez, Carlos; Crujeiras, Ana B; Tolosa-Sola, Iris; Casanueva, Felipe F; Menchón, José M; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    Food addiction (FA) has been examined in different populations. Although high FA levels are associated with greater eating disorder severity, few studies have addressed how FA relates to treatment outcome. The study aims (1) to determine whether a brief intervention for bulimia nervosa (BN) reduces FA diagnosis or severity compared with baseline and (2) to determine if FA is predictive of treatment outcome. Sixty-six female BN patients participated in the study. The Yale Food Addiction Scale was administered at two time points: prior to and following a 6-week intervention. The number of weekly binging/purging episodes, dropout and abstinence from bulimic behaviour were used as primary outcome measures. This brief intervention reduced FA severity and FA diagnosis in the 55 patients who completed treatment. FA severity was a short-term predictor of abstinence from binging/purging episodes after treatment (p = .018). Food addiction appears to be prevalent in BN although FA severity can improve following a short-term intervention. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  10. Altered White Matter Microstructure in Adolescents and Adults with Bulimia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaofu; Stefan, Mihaela; Terranova, Kate; Steinglass, Joanna; Marsh, Rachel

    2016-06-01

    Previous data suggest structural and functional deficits in frontal control circuits in adolescents and adults with bulimia nervosa (BN), but less is known about the microstructure of white matter in these circuits early in the course of the disorder. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data were acquired from 28 female adolescents and adults with BN and 28 age- and BMI-matched healthy female participants. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) was used to detect group differences in white matter microstructure and explore the differential effects of age on white matter microstructure across groups. Significant reductions in fractional anisotropy (FA) were detected in the BN compared with healthy control group in multiple tracts including forceps minor and major, superior longitudinal, inferior fronto-occipital, and uncinate fasciculi, anterior thalamic radiation, cingulum, and corticospinal tract. FA reductions in forceps and frontotemporal tracts correlated inversely with symptom severity and Stroop interference in the BN group. These findings suggest that white matter microstructure is abnormal in BN in tracts extending through frontal and temporoparietal cortices, especially in those with the most severe symptoms. Age-related differences in both FA and RD in these tracts in BN compared with healthy individuals may represent an abnormal trajectory of white matter development that contributes to the persistence of functional impairments in self-regulation in BN.

  11. Implicit learning on a probabilistic classification task in adults and adolescents with Bulimia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Labouliere, Christa D; Terranova, Kate; Steinglass, Joanna; Marsh, Rachel

    2016-06-01

    Dysfunction in frontostriatal circuits likely contributes to impaired regulatory control in Bulimia Nervosa (BN), resulting in binge-eating and purging behaviors that resemble maladaptive habits. Less is known about the implicit learning processes of these circuits, which may contribute to habit formation. We compared 52 adolescent and adult females with BN to 55 healthy matched-controls during performance of a probabilistic classification learning task, one form of implicit learning. Groups were compared in accuracy and response times, using mixed-models with block, age, and diagnosis as predictors, corrected for multiple comparisons with confounds covaried. BN participants showed differences in performance on a probabilistic classification learning task that varied by age. Adolescents with BN initially performed as accurately as healthy adolescents, but showed poorer perseverance over time. Adults with BN initially performed less accurately than healthy adults, but improved to perform equivalently. Symptom severity was associated with poorer accuracy in both adults and adolescents with BN. Frontostriatal dysfunction may underlie abnormalities in regulatory control and probabilistic classification learning in BN, likely contributing to the dysregulation of implicitly learned, maladaptive binge-eating and purging behaviors. Such dysfunction in BN may progress with increasing age, first manifesting in poor regulatory control over behaviors and then expanding to implicit learning processes that may underlie habitual behaviors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Altered White Matter Microstructure in Adolescents and Adults with Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaofu; Stefan, Mihaela; Terranova, Kate; Steinglass, Joanna; Marsh, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Previous data suggest structural and functional deficits in frontal control circuits in adolescents and adults with bulimia nervosa (BN), but less is known about the microstructure of white matter in these circuits early in the course of the disorder. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data were acquired from 28 female adolescents and adults with BN and 28 age- and BMI-matched healthy female participants. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) was used to detect group differences in white matter microstructure and explore the differential effects of age on white matter microstructure across groups. Significant reductions in fractional anisotropy (FA) were detected in the BN compared with healthy control group in multiple tracts including forceps minor and major, superior longitudinal, inferior fronto-occipital, and uncinate fasciculi, anterior thalamic radiation, cingulum, and corticospinal tract. FA reductions in forceps and frontotemporal tracts correlated inversely with symptom severity and Stroop interference in the BN group. These findings suggest that white matter microstructure is abnormal in BN in tracts extending through frontal and temporoparietal cortices, especially in those with the most severe symptoms. Age-related differences in both FA and RD in these tracts in BN compared with healthy individuals may represent an abnormal trajectory of white matter development that contributes to the persistence of functional impairments in self-regulation in BN. PMID:26647975

  13. Psychosocial Factors Associated with Bulimia Nervosa during Pregnancy: An Internal Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Hunna J.; Von Holle, Ann; Knoph, Cecilie; Hamer, Robert M.; Torgersen, Leila; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Stoltenberg, Camilla; Magnus, Per; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this paper was to internally validate previously reported relations (1) between psychosocial factors and bulimia nervosa (BN) outcomes during pregnancy. Method This study is based on the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Participants were women enrolled during pregnancy (N = 69,030). Internal validity was evaluated by way of bootstrapped parameter estimates using the overall sample and a split sample calibration approach. Results Bootstrap bias estimates were below the problematic threshold, and extend earlier findings(1) by providing support for the validity of the models at the population level of all pregnant women in Norway. Bootstrap risk ratios indicated that prevalence, incidence, and remission of BN during pregnancy were significantly associated with psychosocial factors. The split sample procedure showed that the models developed on the training sample did not predict risks in the validation sample. Discussion This study characterizes associations between psychosocial exposures and BN outcomes among pregnant women in Norway. Women with lifetime and current self-reported psychosocial adversities were at a much higher risk for BN during pregnancy. Psychosocial factors were associated with BN remission during pregnancy, inviting the prospect of enhancing therapeutic interventions. We consider the findings in the context of reproducibility in science. PMID:25346291

  14. A Bidirectional Examination of Expressed Emotion among Families of Adolescents with Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Hoste, Renee Rienecke; Lebow, Jocelyn; Le Grange, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this paper was to examine expressed emotion (EE) measured from adolescents with bulimia nervosa (BN) toward their parents, in addition to measuring EE from parents toward patients. Method Fifty-four adolescents and their parents who were receiving treatment for BN participated in a videotaped family interview, from which ratings of EE were made. Results Parent and patient scores were highly correlated. Four family profiles were created (Low Patient EE/Low Parent EE; High Patient EE/High Parent EE; Low Patient EE/High Parent EE; High Patient EE/Low Parent EE) to determine whether the match between parent and patient EE was related to treatment outcome. The Low Patient EE/Low Parent EE group demonstrated the greatest reduction in purging from baseline to end-of-treatment; the High Patient EE/Low Parent EE group showed the smallest reduction in purging. Discussion Expressed emotion has historically been rated from relatives toward patients, but patients’ own EE may also be related to treatment outcome. PMID:24888496

  15. The role of depression and impulsivity in the psychopathology of bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Vaz-Leal, Francisco J; Rodríguez-Santos, Laura; García-Herráiz, M Angustias; Chimpén-López, Carlos A; Rojo-Moreno, Luís; Beato-Fernández, Luís; Ramos-Fuentes, María Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to analyze the role of depression and impulsivity in the psychopathology of bulimia nervosa (BN). Seventy female patients with DSM-IV BN, purging subtype, were assessed for eating-related symptoms, body dissatisfaction, affective symptoms, impulsivity, and personality traits. Factor analysis and structural equation modeling methods were used for statistical analysis. BN appeared as a condition which incorporated 5 general dimensions: a) binge eating and compensatory behaviours; b) restrictive eating; c) body dissatisfaction; d) dissocial personality traits; and e) a cluster of features which was called «emotional instability» The 5 obtained dimensions can be grouped into 2 basic factors: body dissatisfaction/eating behaviour and personality traits/psychopathology. The first one contains the clinical items used for the definition of BN as a clinical condition in the DSM-V and the International Classification of Diseases 10, and reflects the morphology and the severity of the eating-related symptoms. The second dimension includes a cluster of symptoms (depressive symptoms, impulsivity, and borderline, self-defeating and dissocial personality traits) which could be regarded as the «psychopathological core» of BN and may be able to condition the course and the prognosis of BN. Copyright © 2013 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Reactivity to 35% carbon dioxide in bulimia nervosa and panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Woznica, Andrea; Vickers, Kristin; Koerner, Naomi; Fracalanza, Katie

    2015-08-30

    The inhalation of 35% carbon dioxide (CO₂) induces panic and anxiety in people with panic disorder (PD) and in people with various other psychiatric disorders. The anxiogenic effect of CO₂ in people with eating disorders has received sparse attention despite the fact that PD and bulimia nervosa (BN) have several common psychological and neurobiological features. This study compared CO₂-reactivity across three groups of participants: females with BN, females with PD, and female controls without known risk factors for enhanced CO₂-reactivity (e.g., social anxiety disorder, first degree relatives with PD). Reactivity was measured by self-reported ratings of panic symptomatology and subjective anxiety, analyzed as both continuous variables (change from room-air to CO₂) and dichotomous variables (positive versus negative responses to CO₂). Analyses of each outcome measure demonstrated that CO₂-reactivity was similar across the BN and PD groups, and reactivity within each of these two groups was significantly stronger than that in the control group. This is the first study to demonstrate CO₂-hyperreactivity in individuals with BN, supporting the hypothesis that reactivity to this biological paradigm is not specific to PD. Further research would benefit from examining transdiagnostic mechanisms in CO₂-hyperreactivity, such as anxiety sensitivity, which may account for this study's results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Can the reinforcing value of food be measured in bulimia nervosa?

    PubMed

    Schebendach, Janet; Broft, Allegra; Foltin, Richard W; Walsh, B Timothy

    2013-03-01

    Binge eating is a core clinical feature of bulimia nervosa (BN). Enhanced reinforcing value of food may play a role in this behavioral disturbance, but a systematic behavioral assessment of objective measures of the rewarding value of binge eating is lacking. The purpose of this study was to quantify the reinforcing value of food in BN patients as compared with normal controls. A progressive ratio (PR) computerized work task was completed under binge and non-binge instruction. The task consisted of 12 trials. The first trial required 50 keyboard taps to earn one portion of yogurt shake, and subsequent trials required progressive work increments of 200 taps for each additional portion. Completion of all 12 trials required 13,800 taps to earn 2100ml of shake. The breakpoint, defined as the largest ratio completed before a participant stopped working, was the measure of reinforcing efficacy. Ten patients and 10 controls completed the experiment. Under binge instruction, patients completed more trials and taps, and had a higher breakpoint than controls. The non-binge instruction yielded opposite findings; compared to controls, patients completed fewer trials and taps, and had a lower breakpoint. These results support the feasibility and potential utility of a PR task to quantify the reinforcing value of food in patients with BN.

  18. Selective Visual Attention during Mirror Exposure in Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Bender, Caroline; Caffier, Detlef; Klenner, Katharina; Braks, Karsten; Svaldi, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cognitive theories suggest that body dissatisfaction results from the activation of maladaptive appearance schemata, which guide mental processes such as selective attention to shape and weight-related information. In line with this, the present study hypothesized that patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are characterized by increased visual attention for the most dissatisfying/ugly body part compared to their most satisfying/beautiful body part, while a more balanced viewing pattern was expected for controls without eating disorders (CG). Method Eye movements were recorded in a group of patients with AN (n = 16), BN (n = 16) and a CG (n = 16) in an ecologically valid setting, i.e., during a 3-min mirror exposure. Results Evidence was found that patients with AN and BN display longer and more frequent gazes towards the most dissatisfying relative to the most satisfying and towards their most ugly compared to their most beautiful body parts, whereas the CG showed a more balanced gaze pattern. Discussion The results converge with theoretical models that emphasize the role of information processing in the maintenance of body dissatisfaction. Given the etiological importance of body dissatisfaction in the development of eating disorders, future studies should focus on the modification of the reported patterns. PMID:26714279

  19. Mobile therapy: Use of text-messaging in the treatment of bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Jennifer R; Bauer, Stephanie; Andrews, Ellen; Pisetsky, Emily; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Hamer, Robert M; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2010-09-01

    To examine a text-messaging program for self-monitoring symptoms of bulimia nervosa (BN) within the context of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Thirty-one women participated in 12 weekly group CBT sessions and a 12 week follow-up. Participants submitted a text message nightly indicating the number of binge eating and purging episodes and rating their urges to binge and purge. Automatic feedback messages were tailored to their self-reported symptoms. Fully 87% of participants adhered to self-monitoring and reported good acceptability. The number of binge eating and purging episodes as well as symptoms of depression (BDI), eating disorder (EDI), and night eating (NES) decreased significantly from baseline to both post-treatment and follow-up. Given the frequent use of mobile phones and text-messaging globally, this proof-of-principle study suggests their use may enhance self-monitoring and treatment for BN leading to improved attendance, adherence, engagement in treatment, and remission from the disorder. © 2009 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Smoking Status and Psychosocial Factors in Binge Eating Disorder and Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Ariana; White, Marney A.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine eating disorder psychopathology and depressive symptoms by smoking status (never, former, or current smoker) in persons with binge eating disorder (BED) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Methods Participants were 575 adult volunteers from the community (mean age=36.0±12 years and BMI=32.9±9.5 kg/m2; 80% white; 88% female) who were classified with BED (n=410) or BN (n=165). Participants completed a battery of questionnaires, including items about current and historical cigarette smoking, the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire, and the Beck Depression Inventory. Results Among those with BED, depressive symptoms were significantly higher in current smokers than former or never smokers (p=.001). There were no significant differences in depressive symptoms by smoking status in participants with BN and no differences in eating disorder psychopathology by smoking status in either the BED or BN groups. Discussion In this non-clinical group of community volunteers, we found that smoking history or status was not associated with eating disorder psychopathology in participants classified with BED and BN but was significantly associated with depressive symptoms in participants with BED. PMID:26741260

  1. Hard exercise, affect lability, and personality among individuals with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Brownstone, Lisa M; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Joiner, Thomas E; Le Grange, Daniel; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott J; Peterson, Carol B; Crosby, Ross D; Klein, Marjorie H; Bardone-Cone, Anna M

    2013-12-01

    The current study explores the personality traits of compulsivity (e.g., sense of orderliness and duty to perform tasks completely) and restricted expression (e.g., emotion expression difficulties) as potential moderators of the relation between affect lability and frequency of hard exercise episodes in a sample of individuals with bulimic pathology. Participants were 204 adult females recruited in five Midwestern cities who met criteria for threshold or subthreshold bulimia nervosa (BN). Compulsivity was found to significantly moderate the relation between affect lability and number of hard exercise episodes over the past 28 days, such that among those with high compulsivity, level of affect lability was associated with the number of hard exercise episodes; whereas, among those with low compulsivity, affect lability was not associated with the number of hard exercise episodes. The same pattern of findings emerged for restricted expression; however, this finding approached, but did not reach statistical significance. As such, it appears that affect lability is differentially related to hard exercise among individuals with BN depending upon the level of compulsivity and, to a more limited extent, restricted expression. These results suggest that, for individuals with BN with either compulsivity or restricted expression, focusing treatment on increasing flexibility and/or verbal expression of emotions may help in the context of intense, fluctuating affect.

  2. Visual selective attention in body dysmorphic disorder, bulimia nervosa and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Kollei, Ines; Horndasch, Stefanie; Erim, Yesim; Martin, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral models postulate that selective attention plays an important role in the maintenance of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). It is suggested that individuals with BDD overfocus on perceived defects in their appearance, which may contribute to the excessive preoccupation with their appearance. The present study used eye tracking to examine visual selective attention in individuals with BDD (n=19), as compared to individuals with bulimia nervosa (BN) (n=21) and healthy controls (HCs) (n=21). Participants completed interviews, questionnaires, rating scales and an eye tracking task: Eye movements were recorded while participants viewed photographs of their own face and attractive as well as unattractive other faces. Eye tracking data showed that BDD and BN participants focused less on their self-rated most attractive facial part than HCs. Scanning patterns in own and other faces showed that BDD and BN participants paid as much attention to attractive as to unattractive features in their own face, whereas they focused more on attractive features in attractive other faces. HCs paid more attention to attractive features in their own face and did the same in attractive other faces. Results indicate an attentional bias in BDD and BN participants manifesting itself in a neglect of positive features compared to HCs. Perceptual retraining may be an important aspect to focus on in therapy in order to overcome the neglect of positive facial aspects. Future research should aim to disentangle attentional processes in BDD by examining the time course of attentional processing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Does anger mediate between personality and eating symptoms in bulimia nervosa?

    PubMed

    Amianto, Federico; Siccardi, Sara; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Marech, Lucrezia; Barosio, Marta; Fassino, Secondo

    2012-12-30

    The goals of the study were to explore anger correlation with bulimic symptoms and to test the mediation power of anger between personality and eating psychopathology. A total of 242 bulimia nervosa (BN) outpatients and 121 healthy controls were recruited. Assessment was performed using Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI); State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory 2 (STAXI-2); Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2); Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ); Binge Eating Scale (BES); and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Mediation was tested on the whole BN group, on controls and on two BN subgroups based on a previous history of anorexia nervosa. Self-Directedness and Cooperativeness extensively relate to anger and psychopathology in bulimic group. Bulimic symptoms are related to Trait Reactive Anger. Trait Anger and Anger Expression fully mediate Cooperativeness effects on binge eating and Impulsiveness in the BN subjects. Anger Expression-In partially mediates between Harm Avoidance and Social Insecurity/Interpersonal Distrust in BN subjects. The comparison with controls and the analysis of subgroups underlines that these patterns are specific for BN. Anger mediation between Cooperativeness, and binge eating and impulsive behaviours confirm the relevance of relational dynamics in the expression of these core eating symptoms. Relational skills may represent a relevant target for the treatment of BN.

  4. Smoking status and psychosocial factors in binge eating disorder and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ariana M; White, Marney A; Grilo, Carlos M

    2016-04-01

    To examine eating-disorder psychopathology and depressive symptoms by smoking status (never, former, or current smoker) in persons with binge eating disorder (BED) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Participants were 575 adult volunteers from the community (mean age=36.0±12years and BMI=32.9±9.5kg/m(2); 80% white; 88% female) who were classified with BED (n=410) or BN (n=165). Participants completed a battery of questionnaires, including items about current and historical cigarette smoking, the Eating Disorder Examination -Questionnaire, and the Beck Depression Inventory. Among those with BED, depressive symptoms were significantly higher in current smokers than former or never smokers (p=.001). There were no significant differences in depressive symptoms by smoking status in participants with BN and no differences in eating-disorder psychopathology by smoking status in either the BED or BN groups. In this non-clinical group of community volunteers, we found that smoking history or status was not associated with eating disorder psychopathology in participants classified with BED and BN but was significantly associated with depressive symptoms in participants with BED. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. A bidirectional examination of expressed emotion among families of adolescents with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Hoste, Renee Rienecke; Lebow, Jocelyn; Le Grange, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this paper was to examine expressed emotion (EE) measured from adolescents with bulimia nervosa (BN) toward their parents, in addition to measuring EE from parents toward patients. Fifty-four adolescents and their parents who were receiving treatment for BN participated in a videotaped family interview, from which ratings of EE were made. Parent and patient scores were highly correlated. Four family profiles were created (Low Patient EE/Low Parent EE; High Patient EE/High Parent EE; Low Patient EE/High Parent EE; High Patient EE/Low Parent EE) to determine whether the match between parent and patient EE was related to treatment outcome. The Low Patient EE/Low Parent EE group demonstrated the greatest reduction in purging from baseline to end-of-treatment; the High Patient EE/Low Parent EE group showed the smallest reduction in purging. EE has historically been rated from relatives toward patients, but patients' own EE may also be related to treatment outcome. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Is technology assisted guided self-help successful in treating female adolescents with bulimia nervosa?

    PubMed

    Wagner, Gudrun; Wagner, Gudrun; Penelo, Eva; Nobis, Gerald; Mayerhofer, Anna; Schau, Johanna; Spitzer, Marion; Imgart, Hartmut; Karwautz, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the long-term outcome of new technology assisted guided self-help in adolescents with bulimia nervosa (BN). One hundred and twenty-six patients with BN (29 adolescents and 97 adults) were randomly allocated to a cognitive behavioural therapy-based self-help program delivered by the Internet or bibliotherapy, both accompanied by e-mail guidance. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, month 4, 7 and 18 including remission rates and eating disorder associated psychopathology. In all, 44% of adolescents vs. 38.7% of adults were in remission at month 7, and 55% of adolescents vs. 62.5% of adults were in remission at follow-up. Objective binge eating and compensatory behaviour improved significantly over time in both groups, with the highest decrease during the first 4 months. A significant decrease over time and no group differences have been found in almost all EDI-2 subscales. E-mail guided self-help (delivered via the Internet or bibliotherapy) is equally effective for adolescents as for adults with BN, and can be recommended as an initial step of treatment for this younger age group.

  7. Anorexia nervosa versus bulimia nervosa: differences based on retrospective correlates in a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Machado, Bárbara C; Gonçalves, Sónia F; Martins, Carla; Brandão, Isabel; Roma-Torres, António; Hoek, Hans W; Machado, Paulo P

    2016-06-01

    This study is the result of two Portuguese case-control studies that examined the replication of retrospective correlates and preceding life events in anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) development. This study aims to identify retrospective correlates that distinguish AN and BN METHOD: A case-control design was used to compare a group of women who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for AN (N = 98) and BN (N = 79) with healthy controls (N = 86) and with other psychiatric disorders (N = 68). Each control group was matched with AN patients regarding age and parental social categories. Risk factors were assessed by interviewing each person with the Oxford Risk Factor Interview. Compared to AN, women with BN reported significantly higher rates of paternal high expectations, excessive family importance placed on fitness/keeping in shape, and negative consequences due to adolescent overweight and adolescent objective overweight. Overweight during adolescence emerged as the most relevant retrospective correlate in the distinction between BN and AN participants. Family expectations and the importance placed on keeping in shape were also significant retrospective correlates in the BN group.

  8. Differential Neural Responses to Food Images in Women with Bulimia versus Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Samantha J.; O′Daly, Owen G.; Uher, Rudolf; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Michael; Williams, Steven C. R.; Schiöth, Helgi B.; Treasure, Janet; Campbell, Iain C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous fMRI studies show that women with eating disorders (ED) have differential neural activation to viewing food images. However, despite clinical differences in their responses to food, differential neural activation to thinking about eating food, between women with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) is not known. Methods We compare 50 women (8 with BN, 18 with AN and 24 age-matched healthy controls [HC]) while they view food images during functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Results In response to food (vs non-food) images, women with BN showed greater neural activation in the visual cortex, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, right insular cortex and precentral gyrus, women with AN showed greater activation in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, cerebellum and right precuneus. HC women activated the cerebellum, right insular cortex, right medial temporal lobe and left caudate. Direct comparisons revealed that compared to HC, the BN group showed relative deactivation in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus/insula, and visual cortex, and compared to AN had relative deactivation in the parietal lobe and dorsal posterior cingulate cortex, but greater activation in the caudate, superior temporal gyrus, right insula and supplementary motor area. Conclusions Women with AN and BN activate top-down cognitive control in response to food images, yet women with BN have increased activation in reward and somatosensory regions, which might impinge on cognitive control over food consumption and binge eating. PMID:21799807

  9. Can the reinforcing value of food be measured in bulimia nervosa?

    PubMed Central

    Schebendach, Janet; Broft, Allegra; Foltin, Richard W.; Walsh, B. Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Binge eating is a core clinical feature of bulimia nervosa (BN). Enhanced reinforcing value of food may play a role in this behavioral disturbance, but a systematic behavioral assessment of objective measures of the rewarding value of binge eating is lacking. The purpose of this study was to quantify the reinforcing value of food in BN patients as compared with normal controls. A progressive ratio (PR) computerized work task was completed under binge and non-binge instruction. The task consisted of 12 trials. The first trial required 50 keyboard taps to earn one portion of yogurt shake, and subsequent trials required progressive work increments of 200 taps for each additional portion. Completion of all 12 trials required 13,800 taps to earn 2,100 ml of shake. The breakpoint, defined as the largest ratio completed before a participant stopped working, was the measure of reinforcing efficacy. Ten patients and 10 controls completed the experiment. Under binge instruction, patients completed more trials and taps, and had a higher breakpoint than controls. The non-binge instruction yielded opposite findings; compared to controls, patients completed fewer trials and taps, and had a lower breakpoint. These results support the feasibility and potential utility of a PR task to quantify the reinforcing value of food in patients with BN. PMID:23178173

  10. A behavioral-genetic investigation of bulimia nervosa and its relationship with alcohol use disorder

    PubMed Central

    Trace, Sara Elizabeth; Thornton, Laura Marie; Baker, Jessica Helen; Root, Tammy Lynn; Janson, Lauren Elizabeth; Lichtenstein, Paul; Pedersen, Nancy Lee; Bulik, Cynthia Marie

    2013-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa (BN) and alcohol use disorder (AUD) frequently co-occur and may share genetic factors; however, the nature of their association is not fully understood. We assessed the extent to which the same genetic and environmental factors contribute to liability to BN and AUD. A bivariate structural equation model using a Cholesky decomposition was fit to data from 7,241 women who participated in the Swedish Twin study of Adults: Genes and Environment. The proportion of variance accounted for by genetic and environmental factors for BN and AUD and the genetic and environmental correlations between these disorders were estimated. In the best-fitting model, the heritability estimates were 0.55 (95% CI: 0.37; 0.70) for BN and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.54; 0.70) for AUD. Unique environmental factors accounted for the remainder of variance for BN. The genetic correlation between BN and AUD was 0.23 (95% CI: 0.01; 0.44), and the correlation between the unique environmental factors for the two disorders was 0.35 (95% CI: 0.08; 0.61), suggesting moderate overlap in these factors. Findings from this investigation provide additional support that some of the same genetic factors may influence liability to both BN and AUD. PMID:23790978

  11. Ecological momentary assessment of stressful events and negative affect in bulimia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Andrea B.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Crosby, Ross D.; Engel, Scott G.; Lavender, Jason M.; Peterson, Carol B.; Crow, Scott J.; Cao, Li; Mitchell, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Negative affect precedes binge eating and purging in bulimia nervosa (BN), but little is known about factors that precipitate negative affect in relation to these behaviors. We aimed to assess the temporal relation among stressful events, negative affect, and bulimic events in the natural environment using ecological momentary assessment. Method A total of 133 women with current BN recorded their mood, eating behavior, and the occurrence of stressful events every day for two weeks. Multi-level structural equation mediation models evaluated the relations among Time 1 stress measures (i.e., interpersonal stressors, work/environment stressors, general daily hassles, and stress appraisal), Time 2 negative affect, and Time 2 binge eating and purging, controlling for Time 1 negative affect. Results Increases in negative affect from Time 1 to Time 2 significantly mediated the relations between Time 1 interpersonal stressors, work/environment stressors, general daily hassles, and stress appraisal, and Time 2 binge eating and purging. When modeled simultaneously, confidence intervals for interpersonal stressors, general daily hassles, and stress appraisal did not overlap, suggesting that each had a distinct impact on negative affect in relation to binge eating or purging. Conclusions Our findings indicate that stress precedes the occurrence of bulimic behaviors and that increases in negative affect following stressful events mediate this relation. Results suggest that stress and subsequent negative affect may function as maintenance factors for bulimic behaviors and should be targeted in treatment. PMID:24219182

  12. Ecological momentary assessment of stressful events and negative affect in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Andrea B; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Crosby, Ross D; Engel, Scott G; Lavender, Jason M; Peterson, Carol B; Crow, Scott J; Cao, Li; Mitchell, James E

    2014-02-01

    Negative affect precedes binge eating and purging in bulimia nervosa (BN), but little is known about factors that precipitate negative affect in relation to these behaviors. We aimed to assess the temporal relation among stressful events, negative affect, and bulimic events in the natural environment using ecological momentary assessment. A total of 133 women with current BN recorded their mood, eating behavior, and the occurrence of stressful events every day for 2 weeks. Multilevel structural equation mediation models evaluated the relations among Time 1 stress measures (i.e., interpersonal stressors, work/environment stressors, general daily hassles, and stress appraisal), Time 2 negative affect, and Time 2 binge eating and purging, controlling for Time 1 negative affect. Increases in negative affect from Time 1 to Time 2 significantly mediated the relations between Time 1 interpersonal stressors, work/environment stressors, general daily hassles, and stress appraisal and Time 2 binge eating and purging. When modeled simultaneously, confidence intervals for interpersonal stressors, general daily hassles, and stress appraisal did not overlap, suggesting that each had a distinct impact on negative affect in relation to binge eating and purging. Our findings indicate that stress precedes the occurrence of bulimic behaviors and that increases in negative affect following stressful events mediate this relation. Results suggest that stress and subsequent negative affect may function as maintenance factors for bulimic behaviors and should be targeted in treatment. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. Autonomous motivation: a predictor of treatment outcome in bulimia-spectrum eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Sandra; Bruce, Kenneth R; Steiger, Howard; Zuroff, David C; Horowitz, Sarah; Anestin, Annelie S; Sycz, Lindsay

    2012-05-01

    Individuals with eating disorders are said to be highly ambivalent towards change and thus have difficulty maintaining a commitment to, and motivation for, treatment. Self-Determination Theory postulates that autonomous motivation for therapy exists when individuals view their participation as freely chosen. The present study was designed to ascertain whether or not autonomous motivation was associated with treatment response in individuals with bulimia-spectrum eating disorders (BSED). One hundred and fifty-five women with DSM-IV-TR BSED participated in multimodal group therapy and completed measures to assess motivation, eating and comorbid symptoms. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses demonstrated that higher levels of autonomous motivation at pretreatment predicted lower post-treatment scores on measures of eating preoccupations (shape, weight and eating concerns), binge eating, anxiety/depression, relationship to self and others and impulsivity. These results indicate that autonomous motivation may be an important predictor of outcome following treatment for BSED. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  14. A Meta-analysis on Resting State High-frequency Heart Rate Variability in Bulimia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Peschel, Stephanie K V; Feeling, Nicole R; Vögele, Claus; Kaess, Michael; Thayer, Julian F; Koenig, Julian

    2016-09-01

    Autonomic nervous system function is altered in eating disorders. We aimed to quantify differences in resting state vagal activity, indexed by high-frequency heart rate variability comparing patients with bulimia nervosa (BN) and healthy controls. A systematic search of the literature to identify studies eligible for inclusion and meta-analytical methods were applied. Meta-regression was used to identify potential covariates. Eight studies reporting measures of resting high-frequency heart rate variability in individuals with BN (n = 137) and controls (n = 190) were included. Random-effects meta-analysis revealed a sizeable main effect (Z = 2.22, p = .03; Hedge's g = 0.52, 95% CI [0.06;0.98]) indicating higher resting state vagal activity in individuals with BN. Meta-regression showed that body mass index and medication intake are significant covariates. Findings suggest higher vagal activity in BN at rest, particularly in unmedicated samples with lower body mass index. Potential mechanisms underlying these findings and implications for routine clinical care are discussed. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  15. A Prospective Test of the Relation between Weight Change and Risk for Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, J. Graham; Butryn, Meghan L.; Stice, Eric; Lowe, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Prospectively investigate whether weight gain or weight loss increases risk for onset of binge eating and purging in adolescent women. Method Diagnostic interviews and direct measures of body mass were completed by 496 adolescent women annually for eight years. Results Substantial weight gain or weight loss during the study produced a 7-fold increase in risk for future onset of threshold or subthreshold bulimia nervosa (BN) relative to weight-stable participants, though the low incidence rate limited statistical power. Those who showed onset of threshold/subthreshold BN experienced greater increases in weight in the two years before onset of their eating disorder relative to healthy comparison participants. Discussion This is the first prospective study to demonstrate that weight gain and weight loss may both increase risk for future onset of bulimic pathology. Results suggest that young women who have difficulty limiting their dietary intake are at increased risk for BN, an eating disorder characterized by loss of control over eating. PMID:21472748

  16. Hard Exercise, Affect Lability, and Personality Among Individuals with Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Brownstone, Lisa M.; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Joiner, Thomas E.; Le Grange, Daniel; Mitchell, James E.; Crow, Scott J.; Peterson, Carol B.; Crosby, Ross D.; Klein, Marjorie H.; Bardone-Cone, Anna M.

    2013-01-01

    The current study explores the personality traits of compulsivity (e.g., sense of orderliness and duty to perform tasks completely) and restricted expression (e.g., emotion expression difficulties) as potential moderators of the relation between affect lability and frequency of hard exercise episodes in a sample of individuals with bulimic pathology. Participants were 204 adult females recruited in five Midwestern cities who met criteria for threshold or subthreshold bulimia nervosa (BN). Compulsivity was found to significantly moderate the relation between affect lability and number of hard exercise episodes over the past 28 days, such that among those with high compulsivity, level of affect lability was associated with the number of hard exercise episodes; whereas, among those with low compulsivity, affect lability was not associated with the number of hard exercise episodes. The same pattern of findings emerged for restricted expression; however, this finding approached, but did not reach statistical significance. As such, it appears that affect lability is differentially related to hard exercise among individuals with BN depending upon the level of compulsivity and, to a more limited extent, restricted expression. These results suggest that, for individuals with BN with either compulsivity or restricted expression, focusing treatment on increasing flexibility and/or verbal expression of emotions may help them in the context of intense, fluctuating affect. PMID:24183126

  17. Serotonin alterations in anorexia and bulimia nervosa: new insights from imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Walter H; Frank, Guido K; Bailer, Ursula F; Henry, Shannan E; Meltzer, Carolyn C; Price, Julie C; Mathis, Chester A; Wagner, Angela

    2005-05-19

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are related disorders with relatively homogenous presentations such as age of onset and gender distribution. In addition, they share symptoms, such as extremes of food consumption, body image distortion, anxiety and obsessions, and ego-syntonic neglect, raises the possibility that these symptoms reflect disturbed brain function that contributes to the pathophysiology of this illness. Recent brain imaging studies have identified altered activity in frontal, cingulate, temporal, and parietal cortical regions in AN and BN. Importantly, such disturbances are present when subjects are ill and persist after recovery, suggesting that these may be traits that are independent of the state of the illness. Emerging data point to a dysregulation of serotonin pathways in cortical and limbic structures that may be related to anxiety, behavioral inhibition, and body image distortions. In specific, recent studies using PET with serotonin specific radioligands implicate alterations of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors and the 5-HT transporter. Alterations of these circuits may affect mood and impulse control as well as the motivating and hedonic aspects of feeding behavior. Such imaging studies may offer insights into new pharmacology and psychotherapy approaches.

  18. Differential neural responses to food images in women with bulimia versus anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Samantha J; O'Daly, Owen G; Uher, Rudolf; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Michael; Williams, Steven C R; Schiöth, Helgi B; Treasure, Janet; Campbell, Iain C

    2011-01-01

    Previous fMRI studies show that women with eating disorders (ED) have differential neural activation to viewing food images. However, despite clinical differences in their responses to food, differential neural activation to thinking about eating food, between women with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) is not known. We compare 50 women (8 with BN, 18 with AN and 24 age-matched healthy controls [HC]) while they view food images during functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). In response to food (vs non-food) images, women with BN showed greater neural activation in the visual cortex, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, right insular cortex and precentral gyrus, women with AN showed greater activation in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, cerebellum and right precuneus. HC women activated the cerebellum, right insular cortex, right medial temporal lobe and left caudate. Direct comparisons revealed that compared to HC, the BN group showed relative deactivation in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus/insula, and visual cortex, and compared to AN had relative deactivation in the parietal lobe and dorsal posterior cingulate cortex, but greater activation in the caudate, superior temporal gyrus, right insula and supplementary motor area. Women with AN and BN activate top-down cognitive control in response to food images, yet women with BN have increased activation in reward and somatosensory regions, which might impinge on cognitive control over food consumption and binge eating.

  19. Trail making task performance in inpatients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Vall, Eva; Wade, Tracey D

    2015-07-01

    Set-shifting inefficiencies have been consistently identified in adults with anorexia nervosa (AN). It is less clear to what degree similar inefficiencies are present in those with bulimia nervosa (BN). It is also unknown whether perfectionism is related to set-shifting performance. We employed a commonly used set-shifting measure, the Trail Making Test (TMT), to compare the performance of inpatients with AN and BN with a healthy control sample. We also investigated whether perfectionism predicted TMT scores. Only the BN sample showed significantly suboptimal performance, while the AN sample was indistinguishable from controls on all measures. There were no differences between the AN subtypes (restrictive or binge/purge), but group sizes were small. Higher personal standards perfectionism was associated with better TMT scores across groups. Higher concern over mistakes perfectionism predicted better accuracy in the BN sample. Further research into the set-shifting profile of individuals with BN or binge/purge behaviours is needed. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  20. Selective Visual Attention during Mirror Exposure in Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Bender, Caroline; Caffier, Detlef; Klenner, Katharina; Braks, Karsten; Svaldi, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive theories suggest that body dissatisfaction results from the activation of maladaptive appearance schemata, which guide mental processes such as selective attention to shape and weight-related information. In line with this, the present study hypothesized that patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are characterized by increased visual attention for the most dissatisfying/ugly body part compared to their most satisfying/beautiful body part, while a more balanced viewing pattern was expected for controls without eating disorders (CG). Eye movements were recorded in a group of patients with AN (n = 16), BN (n = 16) and a CG (n = 16) in an ecologically valid setting, i.e., during a 3-min mirror exposure. Evidence was found that patients with AN and BN display longer and more frequent gazes towards the most dissatisfying relative to the most satisfying and towards their most ugly compared to their most beautiful body parts, whereas the CG showed a more balanced gaze pattern. The results converge with theoretical models that emphasize the role of information processing in the maintenance of body dissatisfaction. Given the etiological importance of body dissatisfaction in the development of eating disorders, future studies should focus on the modification of the reported patterns.

  1. Childhood trauma and cortisol awakening response in symptomatic patients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Monteleone, Palmiero; Serino, Ismene; Scognamiglio, Pasquale; Di Genio, Monica; Maj, Mario

    2015-09-01

    Exposure to trauma during childhood is a risk factor for eating disorders (EDs) in adulthood. The biological mechanisms underlying such increased risk seem to involve the endogenous stress response system (i.e., the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal [HPA] axis), which undergoes trauma-induced functional changes that may persist later in life. In the present study, we examined the effects of childhood trauma experiences on HPA-axis activity, comparing saliva cortisol awakening response (CAR) in adult patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN) with CAR in adult healthy controls. Twenty-three patients with symptomatic AN, 21 patients with symptomatic BN, and 29 healthy women collected saliva samples at awakening and again after 15, 30, and 60 min. Participants also completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and eating-related psychopathological rating scales. According to the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, 13 individuals with AN and 12 individuals with BN, but none of the healthy women, reported childhood maltreatment. Compared with the control group, the non-maltreated AN patient group exhibited an enhanced CAR, whereas the group of non-maltreated BN patients showed a normal CAR. Moreover, both AN and BN patient groups with childhood maltreatment exhibited statistically significant blunting of CAR compared with non-maltreated groups. The present findings add to the evidence supporting the concept that there is a dysregulation of HPA-axis activity in symptomatic patients with EDs and suggest that childhood trauma exposure may contribute to such dysregulation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Altered sensitization patterns to sweet food stimuli in patients recovered from anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Angela; Simmons, Alan N; Oberndorfer, Tyson A; Frank, Guido K W; McCurdy-McKinnon, Danyale; Fudge, Julie L; Yang, Tony T; Paulus, Martin P; Kaye, Walter H

    2015-12-30

    Recent studies show that higher-order appetitive neural circuitry may contribute to restricted eating in anorexia nervosa (AN) and overeating in bulimia nervosa (BN). The purpose of this study was to determine whether sensitization effects might underlie pathologic eating behavior when a taste stimulus is administered repeatedly. Recovered AN (RAN, n=14) and BN (RBN, n=15) subjects were studied in order to avoid the confounding effects of altered nutritional state. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measured higher-order brain response to repeated tastes of sucrose (caloric) and sucralose (non-caloric). To test sensitization, the neuronal response to the first and second administration was compared. RAN patients demonstrated a decreased sensitization to sucrose in contrast to RBN patients who displayed the opposite pattern, increased sensitization to sucrose. However, the latter was not as pronounced as in healthy control women (n=13). While both eating disorder subgroups showed increased sensitization to sucralose, the healthy controls revealed decreased sensitization. These findings could reflect on a neuronal level the high caloric intake of RBN during binges and the low energy intake for RAN. RAN seem to distinguish between high energy and low energy sweet stimuli while RBN do not. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of driven exercise on treatment outcomes for adolescents with anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Stiles-Shields, Colleen; DclinPsy, Bryony Bamford; Lock, James; Le Grange, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of driven exercise (DE) and its role in treatment outcome for adolescents with bulimia nervosa (BN) and anorexia nervosa (AN). Participants were 201 adolescents with an eating disorder (ED) (80 with BN and 121 with AN) presenting for outpatient treatment at two specialist clinics. All adolescents participated in one of two randomized controlled trials. Descriptive statistics were conducted to evaluate the presence and frequency of baseline DE. Exploratory hierarchical regressions were used to evaluate the effect of baseline DE on treatment outcomes. About 66.3% of adolescents with BN and 23.1% of adolescents with AN presented with baseline DE. The presence of baseline DE predicted significantly worse outcomes for adolescents with AN in terms of ED symptom severity (ps < .004); however, baseline DE did not significantly predict any of the evaluated outcomes for adolescents with BN (ps < .05). The results of this secondary exploratory data suggest that DE is prevalent for adolescents with BN and AN. However, DE may be related to different constructs for adolescents with AN than those with BN, suggesting differences in treatment needs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Understanding the Relation between Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa in a Swedish National Twin Sample

    PubMed Central

    Bulik, Cynthia M; Thornton, Laura; Root, Tammy L.; Pisetsky, Emily M.; Lichtenstein, Paul; Pedersen, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    Background We present a bivariate twin analysis of anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) to determine the extent to which shared genetic and environmental factors contribute to liability to these disorders. Method Focusing on females from the Swedish Twin study of Adults: Genes and Environment (STAGE) (N=7000), we calculated heritability estimates for narrow and broad AN and BN and estimated their genetic correlation. Results In the full model, the heritability estimate for narrow AN was (a2 = .57; 95% CI: .00, .81) and for narrow BN (a2 = .62; 95% CI: .08, .70) with the remaining variance accounted for by unique environmental factors. Shared environmental factors estimates were (c2 = .00; 95% CI: .00, .67) for AN and (c2 = .00; 95% CI: .00, .40) for BN. Moderate additive genetic (.46) and unique environmental (.42) correlations between AN and BN were observed. Heritability estimates for broad AN were lower (a2 = .29; 95% CI: .04, .43) than for narrow AN, but estimates for broad BN were similar to narrow BN. The genetic correlation for broad AN and BN was .79 and the unique environmental correlation was .44. Conclusions We highlight the contribution of additive genetic factors to both narrow and broad AN and BN and demonstrate a moderate overlap of both genetic and unique environmental factors that influence the two conditions. Common concurrent and sequential comorbidity of AN and BN can in part be accounted for by shared genetic and environmental influences on liability although independent factors also operative. PMID:19828139

  5. Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, and Binge Eating Disorder in Midlife and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Elran-Barak, Roni; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E; Benyamini, Yael; Crow, Scott J; Peterson, Carol B; Hill, Laura L; Crosby, Ross D; Mitchell, James E; Le Grange, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    We examined eating disorders in midlife and beyond by comparing frequency of anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder (BED), and other specified feeding or eating disorder (OSFED) among midlife eating disorder treatment-seeking individuals and younger controls. We also compared demographic and eating disorder-related characteristics across diagnoses and age groups. Participants included 2,118 treatment-seeking adults who self-reported their eating-related symptoms on the Eating Disorder Questionnaire. Results showed that percent of patients with BN was significantly lower whereas percent of patients with BED and OSFED was significantly higher among midlife relative to younger patients. Percent of patients with AN did not differ between midlife and younger patients. Additionally, midlife and younger patients with BED and OSFED differed on several demographic (e.g., marital status) and eating disorder-related characteristics (e.g., BMI, compulsive exercising). This study suggests that BN is less common whereas BED and OSFED are more common among midlife eating disorder treatment-seeking individuals relative to younger controls. In addition, AN and BN present fairly similarly whereas BED and OSFED present fairly differently among midlife patients relative to younger controls. Attention to these differences and similarities is necessary to understand eating disorders in midlife.

  6. Therapeutic alliance in Enhanced Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for bulimia nervosa: probably necessary but definitely insufficient.

    PubMed

    Raykos, Bronwyn C; McEvoy, Peter M; Erceg-Hurn, David; Byrne, Susan M; Fursland, Anthea; Nathan, Paula

    2014-06-01

    The present paper assessed therapeutic alliance over the course of Enhanced Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT-E) in a community-based sample of 112 patients with a diagnosis of bulimia nervosa (BN) or atypical BN. Temporal assessment of alliance was conducted at three time points (the start, middle and end of treatment) and the relationship between alliance and treatment retention and outcome was explored. Results indicated that the alliance between patient and therapist was strong at all stages of CBT-E, and even improved in the early stages of treatment when behaviour change was initiated (weekly in-session weighing, establishing regular eating, and ceasing binge-eating and compensatory behaviours). The present study found no evidence that alliance was related to treatment retention or outcomes, or that symptom severity or problematic interpersonal styles interacted with alliance to influence outcomes. Alliance was also unrelated to baseline emotional or interpersonal difficulties. The study provides no evidence that alliance has clinical utility for the prediction of treatment retention or outcome in CBT-E for BN, even for individuals with severe symptoms or problematic interpersonal styles. Early symptom change was the best predictor of outcome in CBT-E. Further research is needed to determine whether these results are generalizable to patients with anorexia nervosa.

  7. Characteristics of suicide attempts in anorexia and bulimia nervosa: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, Sébastien; Jaussent, Isabelle; Olié, Emilie; Genty, Catherine; Bringer, Jacques; Courtet, Philippe; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2011-01-01

    Compared to other eating disorders, anorexia nervosa (AN) has the highest rates of completed suicide whereas suicide attempt rates are similar or lower than in bulimia nervosa (BN). Attempted suicide is a key predictor of suicide, thus this mismatch is intriguing. We sought to explore whether the clinical characteristics of suicidal acts differ between suicide attempters with AN, BN or without an eating disorders (ED). Case-control study in a cohort of suicide attempters (n = 1563). Forty-four patients with AN and 71 with BN were compared with 235 non-ED attempters matched for sex, age and education, using interview measures of suicidal intent and severity. AN patients were more likely to have made a serious attempt (OR = 3.4, 95% CI 1.4-7.9), with a higher expectation of dying (OR = 3.7,95% CI 1.1-13.5), and an increased risk of severity (OR = 3.4,95% CI 1.2-9.6). BN patients did not differ from the control group. Clinical markers of the severity of ED were associated with the seriousness of the attempt. There are distinct features of suicide attempts in AN. This may explain the higher suicide rates in AN. Higher completed suicide rates in AN may be partially explained by AN patients' higher desire to die and their more severe and lethal attempts.

  8. A risk and maintenance model for bulimia nervosa: From impulsive action to compulsive behavior.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Carolyn M; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Smith, Gregory T

    2015-07-01

    This article offers a new model for bulimia nervosa (BN) that explains both the initial impulsive nature of binge eating and purging, as well as the compulsive quality of the fully developed disorder. The model is based on a review of advances in research on BN and advances in relevant basic psychological science. It integrates transdiagnostic personality risk, eating-disorder-specific risk, reinforcement theory, cognitive neuroscience, and theory drawn from the drug addiction literature. We identify both a state-based and a trait-based risk pathway, and we then propose possible state-by-trait interaction risk processes. The state-based pathway emphasizes depletion of self-control. The trait-based pathway emphasizes transactions between the trait of negative urgency (the tendency to act rashly when distressed) and high-risk psychosocial learning. We then describe a process by which initially impulsive BN behaviors become compulsive over time, and we consider the clinical implications of our model. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Expressed emotion, family environment, and parental bonding in bulimia nervosa: a 6-year investigation.

    PubMed

    Hedlund, S; Fichter, M M; Quadflieg, N; Brandl, C

    2003-03-01

    As part of a prospective, long-term treatment study, 30 in-patients with bulimia nervosa (BN) were divided into groups with high and low expressed emotion (EE) family backgrounds according to the Camberwell Family Interview, and followed for a period of six years. The high EE group initially showed significantly more psychopathology than the low EE group. No group x time interactions were found, but the high EE group showed a worse outcome on the "conflict" and "organisation" subscales of the Family Environment Scale. They also showed significantly more eating disorder pathology according to the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI) and the Structured Interview for anorexia nervosa (AN) and BN before treatment at discharge, after two years and, to some degree, even after six years. Depth of depression (Beck Depression Inventory) was significantly higher in the high EE group at admission (moderate depression), discharge and after the 6-year follow-up (still slight depression). The Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) showed no differences between the high EE and low EE groups, but the individuals with "affectionless control" according to the PBI had more negative scores on three of the subscales of the Family Environment Scale (FES). In brief, the high EE individuals with BN were initially sicker and did not fully catch up over time in comparison with the symptomatic recovery of the low EE individuals. These data suggest that EE status upon admission to in-patient treatment is a relevant predictor of the severity and course of BN and depressive symptoms.

  10. Differential impairments underlying decision making in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: a cognitive modeling analysis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Trista Wai Sze; Ahn, Woo-Young; Bates, John E; Busemeyer, Jerome R; Guillaume, Sebastien; Redgrave, Graham W; Danner, Unna N; Courtet, Philippe

    2014-03-01

    This study examined the underlying processes of decision-making impairments in individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). We deconstructed their performance on the widely used decision task, the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) into cognitive, motivational, and response processes using cognitive modeling analysis. We hypothesized that IGT performance would be characterized by impaired memory functions and heightened punishment sensitivity in AN, and by elevated sensitivity to reward as opposed to punishment in BN. We analyzed trial-by-trial data of IGT obtained from 224 individuals: 94 individuals with AN, 63 with BN, and 67 healthy comparison individuals (HC). The prospect valence learning model was used to assess cognitive, motivational, and response processes underlying IGT performance. Individuals with AN showed marginally impaired IGT performance compared to HC. Their performance was characterized by impairments in memory functions. Individuals with BN showed significantly impaired IGT performance compared to HC. They showed greater relative sensitivity to gains as opposed to losses than HC. Memory functions in AN were positively correlated with body mass index. This study identified differential impairments underlying IGT performance in AN and BN. Findings suggest that impaired decision making in AN might involve impaired memory functions. Impaired decision making in BN might involve altered reward and punishment sensitivity. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Testing the DSM-5 severity indicator for bulimia nervosa in a treatment-seeking sample.

    PubMed

    Dakanalis, Antonios; Clerici, Massimo; Riva, Giuseppe; Carrà, Giuseppe

    2017-03-01

    This study tested the new DSM-5 severity criterion for bulimia nervosa (BN) based on the frequency of inappropriate weight compensatory behaviors in a treatment-seeking sample. Participants were 345 adults with DSM-5 BN presenting for treatment. They were sub-grouped based on DSM-5 severity levels and compared on a range of variables of clinical interest and demographics. Based on DSM-5 severity definitions, 27.2 % of the sample was categorized with mild, 26.1 % with moderate, 24.9 % with severe, and 21.8 % with extreme severity of BN. Analyses revealed that the four (mild, moderate, severe, and extreme) severity groups of BN significantly differed from each other in eating disordered and body-related attitudes and behaviors, factors involved in the maintenance process of the disorder, comorbid psychiatric disorders, psychological distress, and psychosocial impairment (medium-to-large effect sizes). No significant between-group differences were observed in demographics, body mass index, or at the age when BN first occurred, lending some credence to recent suggestions that age-at-onset of BN may be more a disorder- than a severity-dependent variable. Collectively, our findings provide support for the severity indicator for BN introduced in the DSM-5 as a means of addressing heterogeneity and variability in the severity of the disorder.

  12. An evaluation of the enhanced cognitive-behavioural model of bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lampard, Amy M; Byrne, Susan M; McLean, Neil; Fursland, Anthea

    2011-09-01

    The original cognitive-behavioural model of bulimia nervosa (BN) has been enhanced to include four additional maintaining mechanisms: low self esteem, clinical perfectionism, interpersonal problems, and mood intolerance. These models have been used to guide cognitive-behavioural treatment for BN, but the enhanced model has yet to be directly evaluated as a whole in a clinical sample. This study aimed to compare and evaluate the original and the enhanced cognitive-behavioural models of BN using structural equation modelling. The Eating Disorder Examination and self-report questionnaires were completed by 162 patients seeking treatment for BN (N = 129) or atypical BN (N = 33). Fit indices suggested that both the original and enhanced models provided a good fit to the data, but the enhanced model accounted for more variance in dietary restraint and binge eating. In the enhanced model, low self esteem was associated with greater overevaluation of weight and shape, which, in turn, was associated with increased dietary restraint. Interpersonal problems were also directly associated with dietary restraint, and binge eating was associated with increased purging. While the current study provides support for some aspects of the enhanced cognitive-behavioural model of BN, some key relationships in the model were not supported, including the important conceptual relationship between dietary restraint and binge eating.

  13. Does habituation really happen? Investigation of psycho-biological responses to body exposure in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Trentowska, Monika; Svaldi, Jennifer; Blechert, Jens; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna

    2017-03-01

    Body exposure is a common and effective treatment for body image disturbance in bulimia nervosa (BN). However, little is known about treatment mechanisms. Based on models of emotional processing and neurovisceral integration, we expected to observe a) initial activation and b) habituation of cognitive-affective and autonomic responding within one and between two standardized body exposure sessions. A group of 13 women with BN and 13 healthy controls (HC) were repeatedly exposed to their bodies. Prior to and after treatment with three individualized mirror exposure sessions participants received a session of standardized exposure to videographic recordings of their body. Subjective ratings of body-related emotions and thoughts were assessed repeatedly throughout the standardized exposure sessions and autonomic responses were recorded continuously. Subjective and sympathetic responses were activated initially in both groups. Cognitive-affective responses habituated within the standardized sessions in both groups, whereas between the standardized sessions habituation was only found in women with BN. Increasing sympathetic responses were found within the sessions in both groups. The results support cognitive-affective habituation during body exposure in BN and to a lesser extent in HC. Autonomic responses however did not show a corresponding pattern and did not distinguish between groups. Implications for body exposure research and practice are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Conceptualizing the Role of Estrogens and Serotonin in the Development and Maintenance of Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Alfano, Lauren; Tricamo, Michelle; Pfaff, Donald W.

    2010-01-01

    Serotonergic dysregulation is thought to underlie much of the pathology in bulimia nervosa (BN). The purpose of this review is to expand the serotonergic model by incorporating specific and nonspecific contributions of estrogens to the development and maintenance of bulimic pathology in order to guide research from molecular genetics to novel therapeutics for BN. Special emphasis is given to the organizing theory of general brain arousal which allows for integration of specific and nonspecific effects of these systems on behavioral endpoints such as binge eating or purging as well as arousal states such as fear, novelty seeking, or sex. Regulation of the serotonergic system by estrogens is explored, and genetic, epigenetic, and environmental estrogen effects on bulimic pathology and risk factors are discussed. Genetic and neuroscientific research support this two-system conceptualization of BN with both contributions to the developmental and maintenance of the disorder. Implications of an estrogenic-serotonergic model of BN are discussed as well as guidelines and suggestions for future research and novel therapeutic targets. PMID:20554102

  15. Quantitative evidence for distinct cognitive impairment in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Zakzanis, Konstantine K; Campbell, Zachariah; Polsinelli, Angelina

    2010-03-01

    It is generally agreed that at least some aspects of abnormal eating behaviour is indeed due in part to disordered cognition. The accumulated literature illustrates cognitive impairment in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Yet beyond being inconsistent, these independent studies also do not reveal the magnitude of impairment within and across studies and fail to give due consideration to the magnitude of impairment so as to understand the severity and breadth of impairment and/or differences in cognitive profiles between patients with AN and BN. Hence, the present review on the subject sought to articulate the magnitude of cognitive impairment in patients with AN and BN by quantitatively synthesizing the existing literature using meta-analytic methodology. The results demonstrate modest evidence of cognitive impairment specific to AN and BN that is related to body mass index in AN in terms of its severity, and is differentially impaired between disorders. Together, these results suggest that disturbed cognition is figural in the presentation of eating disorders and may serve to play an integral role in its cause and maintenance. Implications of these findings with respects to future research are discussed.

  16. Weight suppression in bulimia nervosa: relationship with cognitive behavioral therapy outcome.

    PubMed

    Dawkins, Hayley; Watson, Hunna J; Egan, Sarah J; Kane, Robert T

    2013-09-01

    In light of prior inconsistent findings, this study revisits the relationship between weight suppression and treatment outcome in bulimia nervosa. Aside from differences in methodology, we propose that moderator effects may assist the field in interpreting previous inconsistency. In this study, we considered moderators that might place individuals at risk of broad cognitive and biobehavioral mechanisms implicated in weight (dys)regulation and binge eating, and that within the context of a history of weight suppression, might be associated with especially poor outcomes. Participants were 117 female outpatients aged 16-54 years (M = 25.5) with bulimic disorders treated with enhanced cognitive behavioral therapy. Logistic regression indicated that higher pretreatment weight suppression did not predict drop-out or poor treatment outcome (nonabstinence from binging and purging). Moderators of parental history of overweight, childhood body shape, pretreatment body mass index, and the difference between highest and lowest ever adult body weight were analyzed, but no moderator effects were apparent. This study, along with other negative studies, calls into question the association between weight suppression and treatment outcome. We maintain that moderators may account for inconsistencies, but no candidates were identified in this study. Moderator models could assist us to refine conceptualizations of why some patients high in weight suppression may be vulnerable to poor treatment adherence and outcome and to establish clinical interventions that enhance prognosis. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Brain responses to body image stimuli but not food are altered in women with bulimia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Research into the neural correlates of bulimia nervosa (BN) psychopathology remains limited. Methods In this functional magnetic resonance imaging study, 21 BN patients and 23 healthy controls (HCs) completed two paradigms: 1) processing of visual food stimuli and 2) comparing their own appearance with that of slim women. Participants also rated food craving and anxiety levels. Results Brain activation patterns in response to food cues did not differ between women with and without BN. However, when evaluating themselves against images of slim women, BN patients engaged the insula more and the fusiform gyrus less, compared to HCs, suggesting increased self-focus among women with BN whilst comparing themselves to a ‘slim ideal’. In these BN patients, exposure to food and body image stimuli increased self-reported levels of anxiety, but not craving. Conclusions Our findings suggest that women with BN differ from HCs in the way they process body image, but not in the way they process food stimuli. PMID:24238299

  18. Enhanced ghrelin secretion in the cephalic phase of food ingestion in women with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, Palmiero; Serritella, Cristina; Scognamiglio, Pasquale; Maj, Mario

    2010-02-01

    In humans, the cephalic phase response to food ingestion consists mostly of vagal efferent activation, which promotes the secretion of entero-pancreatic hormones, including ghrelin. Since symptomatic patients with bulimia nervosa (BN) are characterized by increased vagal tone, we hypothesized an enhanced ghrelin secretion in the cephalic phase of vagal stimulation. Therefore, we investigated ghrelin response to modified sham feeding (MSF) in both BN and healthy women. Six drug-free BN women and 7 age-matched healthy females underwent MSF with initially seeing and smelling a meal, and then chewing the food without swallowing it. Blood samples were drawn immediately before and after MSF for hormone assay. Circulating ghrelin increased after MSF in both groups with BN individuals exhibiting a greater ghrelin increase, which positively correlated with the patients' weekly frequency of binge-purging. These results show for the first time an increased ghrelin secretion in the cephalic phase of vagal stimulation in symptomatic BN patients, likely resulting in a potentiation of the peripheral hunger signal, which might contribute to their aberrant binge-purging behavior. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The impact of exposure to images of ideally thin models in TV commercials on eating behavior: an experimental study with women diagnosed with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Rühl, Ilka; Legenbauer, Tanja; Hiller, Wolfgang

    2011-09-01

    This study investigates whether eating behavior in women with diagnosed bulimia nervosa is influenced by prior exposure to images of ideally thin models. Twenty-six participants diagnosed with bulimia nervosa (BN) and 30 normal controls (NC) were exposed to body-related and neutral TV commercials; then food that typically triggers binge eating was provided, and the amount of food eaten was measured. No significant difference for food intake between NC and BN could be found, but food intake for BN was predicted by the degree of thoughts related to eating behaviors during exposure to the thin ideal. No impact of general body image or eating pathology on food intake could be found. The results emphasize the importance of action-relevance of dysfunctional cognitions for the maintenance of eating-disordered behaviors in women with bulimia nervosa, when exposed to eating-disorder-specific triggers.

  20. Body images of patients with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and female control subjects: a comparison with male ideals of female attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Benninghoven, Dieter; Raykowski, Lena; Solzbacher, Svenja; Kunzendorf, Sebastian; Jantschek, Günter

    2007-03-01

    Body images of female patients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa were assessed against females without eating disorders and compared with male ideals of female attractiveness. A computer program was applied to examine body images of 62 patients with anorexia nervosa, 45 patients with bulimia nervosa, and 40 female and 39 male control subjects. Body size overestimation was most distinct in the two patient groups. Self-ideal discrepancy was highest in bulimia nervosa. Estimation of the society's ideal female body in all three female groups did not differ from men's perception of the most attractive female body. Congruence of ideals of female attractiveness in patients, female, and male control subjects and described differences between patients and female controls support the theory that body image disturbance is a problem of processing self-referential information regarding body image rather than a problem of processing body image related information per se.

  1. A Randomized Controlled Comparison of Integrative Cognitive-Affective Therapy and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy-Enhanced for Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Peterson, Carol B.; Crosby, Ross D.; Smith, Tracey L.; Klein, Marjorie H.; Mitchell, James E.; Crow, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this investigation was to compare a new psychotherapy for bulimia nervosa, Integrative Cognitive-Affective Therapy (ICAT), with an established treatment, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy-Enhanced (CBT-E). Method Eighty adults with symptoms of bulimia nervosa were randomized to ICAT or CBT-E for 21 sessions over 19 weeks. Bulimic symptoms, measured by the Eating Disorder Examination, were assessed at baseline, end of treatment, and 4-month follow-up. Treatment outcome, as measured by binge eating frequency, purging frequency, global eating disorder severity, emotion regulation, self-oriented cognition, depression, anxiety, and self-esteem, was determined using generalized estimating equations, logistic regression, and a general linear model (intent-to-treat). Results Both treatments were associated with significant improvement in bulimic symptoms as well as all measures of outcome, and no statistically significant differences were observed between the two conditions at end of treatment or follow-up. Intent-to-treat abstinence rates for ICAT (37.5% at end of treatment, 32.5% at follow-up) and CBT-E (22.5% at both end of treatment and follow-up) were not significantly different. Conclusions ICAT was associated with significant improvements in bulimic and associated symptoms that did not differ from those obtained with CBT-E. This initial randomized controlled trial of a new individual psychotherapy for bulimia nervosa suggests that targeting emotion and self-oriented cognition in the context of nutritional rehabilitation may be efficacious and worthy of further study. PMID:23701891

  2. Alterations in brain structures related to taste reward circuitry in ill and recovered anorexia nervosa and in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Frank, Guido K; Shott, Megan E; Hagman, Jennifer O; Mittal, Vijay A

    2013-10-01

    The pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa remains obscure, but structural brain alterations could be functionally important biomarkers. The authors assessed taste pleasantness and reward sensitivity in relation to brain structure, which may be related to food avoidance commonly seen in eating disorders. The authors used structural MR imaging to study gray and white matter volumes in women with current restricting-type anorexia nervosa (N=19), women recovered from restricting-type anorexia nervosa (N=24), women with bulimia nervosa (N=19), and healthy comparison women (N=24). All eating disorder groups exhibited increased gray matter volume of the medial orbitofrontal cortex (gyrus rectus). Manual tracing confirmed larger gyrus rectus volume, and volume predicted taste pleasantness ratings across all groups. Analyses also indicated other morphological differences between diagnostic categories. Antero-ventral insula gray matter volumes were increased on the right side in the anorexia nervosa and recovered anorexia nervosa groups and on the left side in the bulimia nervosa group relative to the healthy comparison group. Dorsal striatum volumes were reduced in the recovered anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa groups and predicted sensitivity to reward in all three eating disorder groups. The eating disorder groups also showed reduced white matter in right temporal and parietal areas relative to the healthy comparison group. The results held when a range of covariates, such as age, depression, anxiety, and medications, were controlled for. Brain structure in the medial orbitofrontal cortex, insula, and striatum is altered in eating disorders and suggests altered brain circuitry that has been associated with taste pleasantness and reward value.

  3. Do Mortality Rates in Eating Disorders Change over Time? A Longitudinal Look at Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Franko, Debra L.; Keshaviah, Aparna; Eddy, Kamryn T.; Krishna, Meera; Davis, Martha C.; Keel, Pamela K.; Herzog, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although anorexia nervosa has a high mortality rate, our understanding of the timing and predictors of mortality in eating disorders is limited. The authors investigated mortality in a long-term study of patients with eating disorders. Method Beginning in 1987, 246 treatment-seeking women with anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa were interviewed every 6 months for a median of 9.5 years to obtain weekly ratings of eating disorder symptoms, comorbidity, treatment participation, and psychosocial functioning. From January 2007 to December 2010 (median follow-up of 20 years), vital status was ascertained with a National Death Index search. Results Sixteen deaths (6.5%) were recorded (lifetime anorexia nervosa, N=14; bulimia nervosa with no history of anorexia nervosa, N=2). The standardized mortality ratio was 4.37 [95% CI=2.4-7.3] for lifetime anorexia nervosa and 2.33 [95% CI=0.3-8.4] for bulimia nervosa with no history of anorexia nervosa. Risk of premature death among women with lifetime anorexia nervosa peaked within the first 10 years of follow-up resulting in a standardized mortality ratio of 7.7 [95% CI=3.7-14.2]. The standardized mortality ratio varied by duration of illness and was 3.2 [95% CI=0.9-8.3] for women with lifetime anorexia nervosa for 0-15 years (4/119 died), and 6.6 [95% CI=3.2-12.1] for women with lifetime anorexia nervosa for >15-30 years (10/67 died). Multivariate predictors of mortality included alcohol abuse (p<0.0001), low body mass index (p=0.0005), and poor social adjustment (p=0.0090). Conclusions These findings highlight the need for early identification and intervention and suggest that a long duration of illness, substance abuse, low weight, and/or poor psychosocial functioning raise the risk for mortality in anorexia nervosa. PMID:23771148

  4. Body image distortions in bulimia nervosa: investigating body size overestimation and body size satisfaction by fMRI.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Harald Matthias; Röder, Christian; Zimmermann, Jan; Hummel, Dennis; Negele, Alexa; Grabhorn, Ralph

    2011-06-01

    Body image distortion is a key symptom of eating disorders. In behavioral research two components of body image have been defined: attitudes towards the body and body size estimation. Only few fMRI-studies investigated the neural correlates of body image in bulimia; those are constrained by the lack of a direct distinction between these different body image components. The present study investigates the neural correlates of two aspects of the body image using fMRI: satisfaction rating and size estimation of distorted own body photographs in bulimia nervosa patients (15) and controls (16). Patients were less satisfied with their current body shape than controls and preferred to be thinner. The amount of insula activity reflects the pattern of the satisfaction rating for patients and controls. Patients also overestimated their own body size. For control subjects, an activated cluster in lateral occipital cortex was sensitive for body size distortions, whereas bulimic patients did not demonstrate such a modulation. Furthermore, bulimic subjects did not recruit the middle frontal gyrus (MFG) in contrast to controls during the body size estimation task, maybe indicating a reduced spatial manipulation capacity. Therefore, this activation pattern of lateral occipital cortex and MFG might be responsible for body size overestimation in bulimia. The present results show that bulimic patients exhibit two distinct deficits in body image representations similar to anorectic patients and that specifically associated neuronal correlates can be identified. Concludingly, our study support psychotherapeutic strategies specifically targeting these two aspects of body image distortions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Deficient Activity in the Neural Systems That Mediate Self-regulatory Control in Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Rachel; Steinglass, Joanna E.; Gerber, Andrew J.; O’Leary, Kara Graziano; Wang, Zhishun; Murphy, David; Walsh, B. Timothy; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2009-01-01

    Context Disturbances in neural systems that mediate voluntary self-regulatory processes may contribute to bulimia nervosa (BN) by releasing feeding behaviors from regulatory control. Objective To study the functional activity in neural circuits that subserve self-regulatory control in women with BN. Design We compared functional magnetic resonance imaging blood oxygenation level–dependent responses in patients with BN with healthy controls during performance of the Simon Spatial Incompatibility task. Setting University research institute. Participants Forty women: 20 patients with BN and 20 healthy control participants. Main Outcome Measure We used general linear modeling of Simon Spatial Incompatibility task–related activations to compare groups on their patterns of brain activation associated with the successful or unsuccessful engagement of self-regulatory control. Results Patients with BN responded more impulsively and made more errors on the task than did healthy controls; patients with the most severe symptoms made the most errors. During correct responding on incongruent trials, patients failed to activate frontostriatal circuits to the same degree as healthy controls in the left inferolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area [BA] 45), bilateral inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44), lenticular and caudate nuclei, and anterior cingulate cortex (BA 24/32). Patients activated the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (BA 32) more when making errors than when responding correctly. In contrast, healthy participants activated the anterior cingulate cortex more during correct than incorrect responses, and they activated the striatum more when responding incorrectly, likely reflecting an automatic response tendency that, in the absence of concomitant anterior cingulate cortex activity, produced incorrect responses. Conclusions Self-regulatory processes are impaired in women with BN, likely because of their failure to engage frontostriatal circuits appropriately. These

  6. Prevalence, incidence, and natural course of anorexia and bulimia nervosa among adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Nagl, Michaela; Jacobi, Corinna; Paul, Martin; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Höfler, Michael; Lieb, Roselind; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to assess the prevalence, incidence, age-of-onset and diagnostic stability of threshold and subthreshold anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) in the community. Data come from a prospective-longitudinal community study of 3021 subjects aged 14-24 at baseline, who were followed up at three assessment waves over 10 years. Eating disorder (ED) symptomatology was assessed with the DSM-IV/M-CIDI at each wave. Diagnostic stability was defined as the proportion of individuals still affected with at least symptomatic eating disorders (EDs) at follow-ups. Baseline lifetime prevalence for any threshold ED were 2.9 % among females and 0.1 % among males. For any subthreshold ED lifetime prevalence were 2.2 % for females and 0.7 % for males. Symptomatic expressions of EDs (including core symptoms of the respective disorder) were most common with a lifetime prevalence of 11.5 % among females and 1.8 % among males. Symptomatic AN showed the earliest onset with a considerable proportion of cases emerging in childhood. 47 % of initial threshold AN cases and 42 % of initial threshold BN cases showed at least symptomatic expressions of any ED at any follow-up assessment. Stability for subthreshold EDs and symptomatic expressions was 14-36 %. While threshold EDs are rare, ED symptomatology is common particularly in female adolescents and young women. Especially threshold EDs are associated with a substantial risk for stability. A considerable degree of symptom fluctuation is characteristic especially for subthreshold EDs.

  7. Neurobiological and psychopharmacological basis in the therapy of bulimia and anorexia.

    PubMed

    Mauri, M C; Rudelli, R; Somaschini, E; Roncoroni, L; Papa, R; Mantero, M; Longhini, M; Penati, G

    1996-02-01

    1. Eating disorders can be found in several psychiatric pathologies: schizophrenia, delusional disorder (somatic type), bipolar disorders, major depressive disorder, borderline personality disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, body dysmorphic disorder, somatization disorder and conversion disorder. 2. Although their clinical features have been defined, relatively little is known about the role of neurobiological patterns in the pathogenesis of these disorders. Several CNS neurotransmitters and neuromodulators are involved in the regulation of eating behavior in animals and have been implicated in symptoms such as depression and anxiety often observed in patients with eating disorders. The authors will review some studies on NA, DA, 5-HT, beta-endorphins, CRH, VP, OT, CCK, NPY and PYY involved in eating disorders. Furthermore, we will highlight some of the studies on drug therapy of eating disorders taking into account the effects of these agents on neurotransmitters and neuromodulators. 3. Antidepressant drugs have long been used for anorexia nervosa and bulimia, these disorders been claimed to be affective equivalent. Antidepressant agents seem to be effective in reducing the frequency of binge-eating episodes, purging behavior and depressive symptomatology. It is notable that antidepressant agents have been proved to be effective in patients with chronic bulimic symptoms, even in cases persisting for many years and in patients who had repeatedly failed courses of alternative therapeutic approaches. In all of the positive studies, antidepressant agents appeared effective even in bulimic subjects who did not display concomitant depression. 4. Few controlled studies on use of medications for anorexia nervosa have been published. Central serotonergic receptor-blocking compounds such as cyproheptadine cause marked increase in appetite and body weight. Zinc supplementation or cisapride could be a therapeutic option in addition to psychological and other approaches in

  8. Brain volumetric abnormalities in patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Amianto, Federico; Caroppo, Paola; D'Agata, Federico; Spalatro, Angela; Lavagnino, Luca; Caglio, Marcella; Righi, Dorico; Bergui, Mauro; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Rigardetto, Roberto; Mortara, Paolo; Fassino, Secondo

    2013-09-30

    Recent studies focussing on neuroimaging features of eating disorders have observed that anorexia nervosa (AN) is characterized by significant grey matter (GM) atrophy in many brain regions, especially in the cerebellum and anterior cingulate cortex. To date, no studies have found GM atrophy in bulimia nervosa (BN) or have directly compared patients with AN and BN. We used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to characterize brain abnormalities in AN and BN patients, comparing them with each other and with a control group, and correlating brain volume with clinical features. We recruited 17 AN, 13 BN and 14 healthy controls. All subjects underwent high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a T1-weighted 3D image. VBM analysis was carried out with the FSL-VBM 4.1 tool. We found no global atrophy, but regional GM reduction in AN with respect to controls and BN in the cerebellum, fusiform area, supplementary motor area, and occipital cortex, and in the caudate in BN compared to AN and controls. Both groups of patients had a volumetric increase bilaterally in somatosensory regions with respect to controls, in areas that are typically involved in the sensory-motor integration of body stimuli and in mental representation of the body image. Our VBM study documented, for the first time in BN patients, the presence of volumetric alterations and replicated previous findings in AN patients. We evidenced morphological differences between AN and BN, demonstrating in the latter atrophy of the caudate nucleus, a region involved in reward mechanisms and processes of self-regulation, perhaps involved in the genesis of the binge-eating behaviors of this disorder. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Micronuclei and nuclear abnormalities in buccal mucosa cells in patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Torres-Bugarín, Olivia; Pacheco-Gutiérrez, Angélica Guadalupe; Vázquez-Valls, Eduardo; Ramos-Ibarra, María Luisa; Torres-Mendoza, Blanca Miriam

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the frequency of micronucleated cell (MNC) and nuclear abnormalities (NA) in the buccal mucosa cells of females with anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN), compared with healthy women. Individuals with AN and BN have inadequate feeding and compensatory behaviour to avoid weight gain. These behaviours can cause extreme body stress, thereby inducing DNA damage. In a cross-sectional study, we assessed the frequency of MNC and NA in the buccal mucosa cells of female participants with AN or BN. All of these patients had been admitted to a private clinic for the treatment of eating disorders after diagnosis with AN (n = 10) or BN (n = 7) according to the DSM-IV. Age-matched healthy female participants (n = 17) composed the control group. Oral mucosa samples were collected, fixed, stained by aceto-orcein/fast green and microscopically examined. Normal cells, MNC and NAs were counted within a 2000 cell sample. The results were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Differences were observed in the frequency of MNC in healthy females (1.2±0.9) versus that of patients with AN (3.4±1.5) (P < 0.0001) and BN (4.1±2.2) (P < 0.001). No differences were found among these groups in terms of NA. AN and BN are related to the loss of genetic material through chromosomal fractures and/or damage to the mitotic spindle (i.e. possibly a result of a deficiency in DNA precursors). Self-imposed compensatory behaviours in AN and BN, such as severe food restriction, potential malnutrition, vomiting, use of diuretics and laxatives and acute exhaustive exercise, are possible inducers of MNC and genotoxic damage. Of these compensatory behaviours, only vomiting has not been linked to genotoxic damage. This is the first report in women with BN, which should be studied in the future.

  10. An empirical comparison of atypical bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder.

    PubMed

    Fontenelle, L F; Mendlowicz, M V; Moreira, R O; Appolinario, J C

    2005-11-01

    The International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition (ICD-10) defines atypical bulimia nervosa (ABN) as an eating disorder that encompasses several different syndromes, including the DSM-IV binge eating disorder (BED). We investigated whether patients with BED can be differentiated clinically from patients with ABN who do not meet criteria for BED. Fifty-three obese patients were examined using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and the ICD-10 criteria for eating disorders. All volunteers completed the Binge Eating Scale (BES), the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90). Individuals fulfilling criteria for both ABN and BED (N = 18), ABN without BED (N = 16), and obese controls (N = 19) were compared and contrasted. Patients with ABN and BED and patients with ABN without BED displayed similar levels of binge eating severity according to the BES (31.05 +/- 7.7 and 30.05 +/- 5.5, respectively), which were significantly higher than those found in the obese controls (18.32 +/- 8.7; P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). When compared to patients with ABN and BED, patients with ABN without BED showed increased lifetime rates of agoraphobia (P = 0.02) and increased scores in the somatization (1.97 +/- 0.85 vs 1.02 +/- 0.68; P = 0.001), obsessive-compulsive (2.10 +/- 1.03 vs 1.22 +/- 0.88; P = 0.01), anxiety (1.70 +/- 0.82 vs 1.02 +/- 0.72; P = 0.02), anger (1.41 +/- 1.03 vs 0.59 +/- 0.54; P = 0.005) and psychoticism (1.49 +/- 0.93 vs 0.75 +/- 0.55; P = 0.01) dimensions of the SCL-90. The BED construct may represent a subgroup of ABN with less comorbities and associated symptoms.

  11. Autoantibodies against α-MSH, ACTH, and LHRH in anorexia and bulimia nervosa patients

    PubMed Central

    Fetissov, Sergueï O.; Hallman, Jarmila; Oreland, Lars; af Klinteberg, Britt; Grenbäck, Eva; Hulting, Anna-Lena; Hökfelt, Tomas

    2002-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus is involved in the control of energy intake and expenditure and may participate in the pathogenesis of eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Two systems are of particular interest in this respect, synthesizing α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) and synthesizing neuropeptide Y, respectively. We report here that 42 of 57 (74%) AN and/or BN patients studied had in their plasma Abs that bind to melanotropes and/or corticotropes in the rat pituitary. Among these sera, 8 were found to bind selectively to α-MSH-positive neurons and their hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic projections as revealed with immunostaining on rat brain sections. Adsorption of these sera with α-MSH peptide abolished this immunostaining. In the pituitary, the immunostaining was blocked by adsorption with α-MSH or adrenocorticotropic hormone. Additionally, 3 AN/BN sera bound to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH)-positive terminals in the rat median eminence, but only 2 of them were adsorbed with LHRH. In the control subjects, 2 of 13 sera (16%) displayed similar to AN/BN staining. These data provide evidence that a significant subpopulation of AN/BN patients have autoantibodies that bind to α-MSH or adrenocorticotropic hormone, a finding pointing also to involvement of the stress axis. It remains to be established whether these Abs interfere with normal signal transduction in the brain melanocortin circuitry/LHRH system and/or in other central and peripheral sites relevant to food intake regulation, to what extent such effects are related to and/or could be involved in the pathophysiology or clinical presentation of AN/BN, and to what extent increased stress is an important factor for production of these autoantibodies. PMID:12486250

  12. Sensory modulation disorder symptoms in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Brand-Gothelf, Ayelet; Parush, Shula; Eitan, Yehudith; Admoni, Shai; Gur, Eitan; Stein, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) may exhibit reduced ability to modulate sensory, physiological, and affective responses. The aim of the present study is to assess sensory modulation disorder (SMD) symptoms in patients with AN and BN. We assessed female adolescent and young adult inpatients with restrictive type anorexia nervosa (AN-R; n = 20) and BN (n = 20) evaluated in the acute stage of their illness, and 27 female controls. Another group of 20 inpatients with AN-R was assessed on admission and discharge, upon achieving their required weight. Participants completed standardized questionnaires assessing the severity of their eating disorder (ED) and the sensory responsiveness questionnaire (SRQ). Inpatients with AN-R demonstrated elevated overall sensory over-responsiveness as well as elevated scores on the taste/gustatory, vestibular/kinesthetic and somatosensory/tactile SRQ modalities compared with patients with BN and controls. Significant correlations between the severity of sensory over-responsiveness and ED-related symptomatology were found in acutely-ill patients with AN-R and to a lesser extent, following weight restoration. Elevated sensory over-responsiveness was retained in weight-restored inpatients with AN-R. Inpatients with BN demonstrated greater sensory under-responsiveness in the intensity subscale of the SRQ, but not in the frequency and combined SRQ dimensions. Female inpatients with AN-R exhibited sensory over-responsiveness both in the acute stage of their illness and following weight restoration, suggesting that sensory over-responsiveness may represent a trait related to the illness itself above and beyond the influence of malnutrition. The finding for sensory under-responsiveness in BN is less consistent. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Deficient activity in the neural systems that mediate self-regulatory control in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Rachel; Steinglass, Joanna E; Gerber, Andrew J; Graziano O'Leary, Kara; Wang, Zhishun; Murphy, David; Walsh, B Timothy; Peterson, Bradley S

    2009-01-01

    Disturbances in neural systems that mediate voluntary self-regulatory processes may contribute to bulimia nervosa (BN) by releasing feeding behaviors from regulatory control. To study the functional activity in neural circuits that subserve self-regulatory control in women with BN. We compared functional magnetic resonance imaging blood oxygenation level-dependent responses in patients with BN with healthy controls during performance of the Simon Spatial Incompatibility task. University research institute. Forty women: 20 patients with BN and 20 healthy control participants. Main Outcome Measure We used general linear modeling of Simon Spatial Incompatibility task-related activations to compare groups on their patterns of brain activation associated with the successful or unsuccessful engagement of self-regulatory control. Patients with BN responded more impulsively and made more errors on the task than did healthy controls; patients with the most severe symptoms made the most errors. During correct responding on incongruent trials, patients failed to activate frontostriatal circuits to the same degree as healthy controls in the left inferolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area [BA] 45), bilateral inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44), lenticular and caudate nuclei, and anterior cingulate cortex (BA 24/32). Patients activated the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (BA 32) more when making errors than when responding correctly. In contrast, healthy participants activated the anterior cingulate cortex more during correct than incorrect responses, and they activated the striatum more when responding incorrectly, likely reflecting an automatic response tendency that, in the absence of concomitant anterior cingulate cortex activity, produced incorrect responses. Self-regulatory processes are impaired in women with BN, likely because of their failure to engage frontostriatal circuits appropriately. These findings enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of BN by pointing

  14. Highly increased risk of type 2 diabetes in patients with binge eating disorder and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Raevuori, Anu; Suokas, Jaana; Haukka, Jari; Gissler, Mika; Linna, Milla; Grainger, Marjut; Suvisaari, Jaana

    2015-09-01

    We aimed to examine the prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in a large patient cohort treated for binge eating disorder (BED), bulimia nervosa (BN), and anorexia nervosa. Patients (N = 2,342) treated at the Eating Disorder Unit of Helsinki University Central Hospital over the period up to 16 years were compared with matched general population controls (N = 9,368) in three stages: before entering to the treatment for an eating disorder, after the entrance until the end of the study period, and combined any time before, during, and after the treatment. The study population was linked with the oral TSD medication data of 17 years from The Medical Reimbursement Register. Data were analyzed using conditional and Poisson regression models. Before entering to the treatment for eating disorders, the risk of T2D was substantially increased in patients compared with controls (OR 6.6, 95% CI 4.0-10.7). At the end of the study period, the lifetime prevalence of T2D was 5.2% among patients, 1.7% among controls (OR 3.4, 95% CI 2.6-4.4), and in male patients, it was significantly higher compared with females. Of those treated for BED, every third had T2D by the end of the study period (OR 12.9, 95% CI 7.4-22.5), whereas the same was true for 4.4% of those with BN (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.7-3.5). Our findings provide strong support for the association between T2D and clinically significant binge eating. Disturbed glucose metabolism may contribute to the onset and maintenance of BED and BN. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Leptin in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: importance of assay technique and method of interpretation.

    PubMed

    Frederich, Robert; Hu, Shousheng; Raymond, Nancy; Pomeroy, Claire

    2002-02-01

    Studies of the role of leptin in patients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa have conflicted in their data and interpretation. Such differences may be a result of the assay methods used or the way results are compared with those from normal controls. To investigate these possibilities, we analyzed serum leptin levels in anorexic, bulimic, obese, and control individuals, thereby spanning the full range of human body weights, using three frequently employed commercial kits. Kits from Linco (St Louis, MO) and DSL (Webster, TX) employ a radioimmunoassay method, and the R&D Systems kit (Minneapolis, MN) uses an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We found that the three kits provide results that are highly linearly correlated with each other and remarkably linearly related to percent ideal body weight (%IBW) over more than three orders of magnitude (Linco, r = 0.90; R&D, r = 0.87; DSL, r = 0.86). For very low leptin levels, the more sensitive kits from R&D and Linco appeared to give more reliable results. Measurement method does not appear to explain the literature conflicts. We found that patients with anorexia nervosa have serum leptin values that lie above the line extrapolated from the %IBW/leptin curve generated from analysis of all non-anorexic patients. Therefore, in anorexia nervosa, inappropriately high leptin levels for %IBW may contribute to a blunted physiologic response to underweight and consequent resistance to dietary treatment. By contrast, most bulimic patients have leptin levels significantly below those predicted from the same %IBW/leptin curve. The relative leptin deficiency in bulimic subjects may contribute to food-craving behavior. We propose that using the %IBW/ leptin curve can facilitate identification of true pathophysiologic abnormalities in eating-disordered individuals and provide a basis for the design of therapeutic interventions or monitoring of response to treatment.

  16. Addicted to palatable foods: comparing the neurobiology of Bulimia Nervosa to that of drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Hadad, Natalie A; Knackstedt, Lori A

    2014-05-01

    Bulimia nervosa (BN) is highly comorbid with substance abuse and shares common phenotypic and genetic predispositions with drug addiction. Although treatments for the two disorders are similar, controversy remains about whether BN should be classified as addiction. Here, we review the animal and human literature with the goal of assessing whether BN and drug addiction share a common neurobiology. Similar neurobiological features are present following administration of drugs and bingeing on palatable food, especially sugar. Specifically, both disorders involve increases in extracellular dopamine (DA), D1 binding, D3 messenger RNA (mRNA), and ΔFosB in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Animal models of BN reveal increases in ventral tegmental area (VTA) DA and enzymes involved in DA synthesis that resemble changes observed after exposure to addictive drugs. Additionally, alterations in the expression of glutamate receptors and prefrontal cortex activity present in human BN or following sugar bingeing in animals are comparable to the effects of addictive drugs. The two disorders differ in regards to alterations in NAc D2 binding, VTA DAT mRNA expression, and the efficacy of drugs targeting glutamate to treat these disorders. Although additional empirical studies are necessary, the synthesis of the two bodies of research presented here suggests that BN shares many neurobiological features with drug addiction. While few Food and Drug Administration-approved options currently exist for the treatment of drug addiction, pharmacotherapies developed in the future, which target the glutamate, DA, and opioid systems, may be beneficial for the treatment of both BN and drug addiction.

  17. Addicted to Palatable Foods: Comparing the Neurobiology of Bulimia Nervosa to that of Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Hadad, Natalie A.; Knackstedt, Lori A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Bulimia Nervosa (BN) is highly comorbid with substance abuse and shares common phenotypic and genetic predispositions with drug addiction. Although treatments for the two disorders are similar, controversy remains about whether BN should be classified as addiction. Objectives: Here we review the animal and human literature with the goal of assessing whether BN and drug addiction share a common neurobiology. Results: Similar neurobiological features are present following administration of drugs and bingeing on palatable food, especially sugar. Specifically, both disorders involve increases in extracellular dopamine (DA), D1 binding, D3 mRNA, and ΔFosB in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Animal models of BN reveal increases in ventral tegmental area (VTA) DA and enzymes involved in DA synthesis that resemble changes observed after exposure to addictive drugs. Additionally, alterations in the expression of glutamate receptors and prefrontal cortex activity present in human BN or following sugar bingeing in animals are comparable to the effects of addictive drugs. The two disorders differ in regards to alterations in NAc D2 binding, VTA DAT mRNA expression, and the efficacy of drugs targeting glutamate to treat these disorders. Conclusions: Although additional empirical studies are necessary, the synthesis of the two bodies of research presented here suggests that BN shares many neurobiological features with drug addiction. While few FDA-approved options currently exist for the treatment of drug addiction, pharmacotherapies developed in the future which target the glutamate, DA, and opioid systems may be beneficial for the treatment of both BN and drug addiction. PMID:24500676

  18. Evaluation of the DSM-5 Severity Specifier for Bulimia Nervosa in Treatment-Seeking Youth.

    PubMed

    Dakanalis, Antonios; Colmegna, Fabrizia; Zanetti, Maria Assunta; Di Giacomo, Ester; Riva, Giuseppe; Clerici, Massimo

    2017-05-16

    A new severity specifier for bulimia nervosa (BN), based on the frequency of inappropriate weight compensatory behaviours (e.g., laxative misuse, self-induced vomiting, fasting, diuretic misuse, and excessive exercise), has been added to the most recent (fifth) edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) as a means of addressing variability and heterogeneity in the severity of the disorder. While existing research provides support for the DSM-5 severity specifier for BN in adult patients, evidence for its validity and clinical utility in youth is currently lacking. To address this gap, data from 272 treatment-seeking adolescents with DSM-5 BN (94.2% female, M age = 15.3 years, SD 1.7) were analysed to examine whether these patients, sub-grouped based on the DSM-5 severity definitions, would show meaningful differences in a broad range of clinical variables and demographic and physical characteristics. Analyses revealed that participants categorized with mild, moderate, severe, and extreme severity of BN significantly differed from each other in 15 variables regarding eating disorder pathological features and putative maintenance factors (i.e., core low self-esteem, perfectionism, social appearance anxiety, body surveillance, and mood intolerance), health-related quality of life and comorbid psychiatric (i.e., affective and anxiety) disorders (large effect sizes). Between-group differences in demographics, body mass index, or age-of-BN onset were not observed. Collectively, our findings provide support for the utility of the frequency of inappropriate weight compensatory behaviours as a severity indicator for BN and suggest that age-at-onset of BN is probably more disorder- than severity-dependent. Implications for future research are outlined.

  19. Attention Network Dysfunction in Bulimia Nervosa - An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Dahmen, Brigitte; Schulte-Rüther, Martin; Legenbauer, Tanja; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Konrad, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recent evidence has suggested an increased rate of comorbid ADHD and subclinical attentional impairments in bulimia nervosa (BN) patients. However, little is known regarding the underlying neural mechanisms of attentional functions in BN. Method Twenty BN patients and twenty age- and weight-matched healthy controls (HC) were investigated using a modified version of the Attention Network Task (ANT) in an fMRI study. This design enabled an investigation of the neural mechanisms associated with the three attention networks involved in alerting, reorienting and executive attention. Results The BN patients showed hyperactivation in parieto-occipital regions and reduced deactivation of default-mode-network (DMN) areas during alerting compared with HCs. Posterior cingulate activation during alerting correlated with the severity of eating-disorder symptoms within the patient group. Conversely, BN patients showed hypoactivation during reorienting and executive attention in anterior cingulate regions, the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) and parahippocampus compared with HCs, which was negatively associated with global ADHD symptoms and impulsivity, respectively. Discussion Our findings demonstrate altered brain mechanisms in BN associated with all three attentional networks. Failure to deactivate the DMN and increased parieto-occipital activation required for alerting might be associated with a constant preoccupation with food or body image-related thoughts. Hypoactivation of executive control networks and TPJ might increase the likelihood of inattentive and impulsive behaviors and poor emotion regulation. Thus, dysfunction in the attentional network in BN goes beyond an altered executive attentional domain and needs to be considered in the diagnosis and treatment of BN. PMID:27607439

  20. Modified Sham Feeding of Sweet Solutions in Women with and without Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Klein, DA; Schebendach, JE; Brown, AJ; Smith, GP; Walsh, BT

    2009-01-01

    Although it is possible that binge eating in humans is due to increased responsiveness of orosensory excitatory controls of eating, there is no direct evidence for this because food ingested during a test meal stimulates both orosensory excitatory and postingestive inhibitory controls. To overcome this problem, we adapted the modified sham feeding technique (MSF) to measure the orosensory excitatory control of intake of a series of sweetened solutions. Previously published data showed the feasibility of a “sip-and-spit” procedure in nine healthy control women using solutions flavored with cherry Kool Aid® and sweetened with sucrose (0-20%)1. The current study extended this technique to measure the intake of artificially sweetened solutions in women with bulimia nervosa (BN) and in women with no history of eating disorders. Ten healthy women and 11 women with BN were randomly presented with cherry Kool Aid® solutions sweetened with five concentrations of aspartame (0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.08 and 0.28%) in a closed opaque container fitted with a straw. They were instructed to sip as much as they wanted of the solution during 1-minute trials and to spit the fluid out into another opaque container. Across all subjects, presence of sweetener increased intake (p<0.001). Women with BN sipped 40.5-53.1% more of all solutions than controls (p=0.03 for total intake across all solutions). Self-report ratings of liking, wanting and sweetness of solutions did not differ between groups. These results support the feasibility of a MSF procedure using artificially sweetened solutions, and the hypothesis that the orosensory stimulation of MSF provokes larger intake in women with BN than controls. PMID:18773914

  1. Seasonal patterns of birth for subjects with bulimia nervosa, binge eating, and purging: results from the National Women's Study.

    PubMed

    Brewerton, Timothy D; Dansky, Bonnie S; O'Neil, Patrick M; Kilpatrick, Dean G

    2012-01-01

    Studies of birth patterns in anorexia nervosa have shown relative increases between March and August, while studies in Bulimia Nervosa (BN) have been negative. Since there are no studies using representative, nonclinical samples, we looked for seasonal birth patterns in women with BN and in those who ever endorsed bingeing or purging. A national, representative sample of 3,006 adult women completed structured telephone interviews including screenings for bulimia nervosa (BN) and questions about month, date, and year of birth. Season of birth was calculated using traditional definitions. Differences across season of birth between subjects with (n = 85) and without BN (n = 2,898), those with (n = 749) and without bingeing (n = 2,229), and those with (n = 267) and without any purging (n = 2,715) were compared using chi-square analyses. There were significant differences across season of birth between subjects: (1) with and without BN (p = 0.033); (2) with and without bingeing (p = 0.034), and; (3) with and without purging (p = 0.001). Fall had the highest relative number of births for all categories, while spring had the lowest. In a national representative study of nontreatment seeking subjects significant differences in season of birth were found for subjects with lifetime histories of BN, binge eating and purging. © 2011 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2012). Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Cortisol responses on the dexamethasone suppression test among women with Bulimia-spectrum eating disorders: associations with clinical symptoms.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Kenneth R; Steiger, Howard; Israël, Mimi; Groleau, Patricia; Ng Ying Kin, N M K; Ouellette, Anne-Sophie; Sycz, Lindsay; Badawi, Ghislaine

    2012-08-07

    Evidence associates Bulimia Nervosa (BN) with altered functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, but the clinical implications of such alterations need to be better understood. We contrasted cortisol responses to the dexamethasone suppression test (DST) in bulimic and non-eating disordered women and examined relationships among DST cortisol responses, eating symptoms and co-morbid disturbances. Sixty women with Bulimia Spectrum (BS) Disorders (either BN or normal weight Eating Disorder NOS with regular binge eating or purging) and 54 non-eating disordered women of similar age and body mass index participated in a 0.5 mg DST, and completed interviews and questionnaires assessing eating symptoms and co-morbid psychopathology. Compared with the normal-eater group, the BS women demonstrated significantly less DST suppression. Among BS women, DST non-suppression was associated with more severe depression, anxiety and eating preoccupations. Our findings show BS women to show less DST suppression compared to normal eater women, and results link extent of non-suppression, in BS individuals, to severity of depression, anxiety and eating preoccupations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dimensional measures of personality as a predictor of outcome at 5-year follow-up in women with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Sarah; Jordan, Jennifer; McIntosh, Virginia; Carter, Frances; Frampton, Chris; Bulik, Cynthia; Joyce, Peter

    2011-02-28

    Dimensional models are commonly used as a supplement to the categorical model within the field of personality disorders. The purpose of this study was to examine personality dimensions as predictors of 5-year outcomes among women with bulimia nervosa. One hundred and thirty-four women with bulimia nervosa participated in a randomised psychotherapy treatment trial. Data was available for 109 out of the 134 participants at follow-up. Outcomes were the presence of any eating disorder (past year), the presence of a mood disorder episode (past year), and the global assessment of functioning at 5-year follow-up. Self-directedness was the only predictor of any eating disorder diagnosis (past year) at 5-year follow-up. Asceticism significantly predicted the presence of a mood disorder episode (past year) at 5 years. Borderline personality disorder symptoms predicted global functioning at 5 years. These results suggest that high self-directedness at pre-treatment may offer potential prognostic information regarding eating disorder status 5 years post-treatment. Furthermore, no single measure predicted outcome for all variables (any eating disorder diagnosis, a mood disorder episode (past year), or global functioning) at 5-year follow-up. This suggests that a comprehensive personality assessment using multiple measures is desirable for predicting outcomes.

  4. Daily and Momentary Mood and Stress Are Associated with Binge Eating and Vomiting in Bulimia Nervosa Patients in the Natural Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smyth, Joshua M.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Heron, Kristin E.; Sliwinski, Martin J.; Crosby, Ross D.; Mitchell, James E.; Engel, Scott G.

    2007-01-01

    The relation of mood and stress to binge eating and vomiting in the natural environments of patients with bulimia nervosa (BN) was examined using real-time data collection. Women (n = 131; mean age = 25.3 years) with BN carried a palmtop computer for 2 weeks and completed ratings of positive affect (PA), negative affect (NA), anger/hostility (AH),…

  5. A Needs Assessment for Health Care Professionals in the Detection, Intervention and Interdisciplinary Treatment of Bulimia Nervosa Using Focus Group Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hague, Anne; Kovacich, Joann

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of bulimia nervosa has increased significantly in the second half of the twentieth century and its occurrence is more than twice that of anorexia nervosa. Due to its complex nature, successful treatment requires an interdisciplinary approach with nutritional, psychological, medical, pharmacological and dental therapies. Despite…

  6. Mental Health Literacy and Eating-Disordered Behavior: Beliefs of Adolescent Girls Concerning the Treatment of and Treatment-Seeking for Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mond, J. M.; Marks, P.; Hay, P. J.; Rodgers, B.; Kelly, C.; Owen, C.; Paxton, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    This research examined the "mental health literacy" of adolescents concerning eating-disordered behavior. A vignette describing a fictional 16-year old female meeting diagnostic criteria for bulimia nervosa was presented to 522 female high school students, followed by a series of questions concerning treatment of and treatment-seeking…

  7. Daily and Momentary Mood and Stress Are Associated with Binge Eating and Vomiting in Bulimia Nervosa Patients in the Natural Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smyth, Joshua M.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Heron, Kristin E.; Sliwinski, Martin J.; Crosby, Ross D.; Mitchell, James E.; Engel, Scott G.

    2007-01-01

    The relation of mood and stress to binge eating and vomiting in the natural environments of patients with bulimia nervosa (BN) was examined using real-time data collection. Women (n = 131; mean age = 25.3 years) with BN carried a palmtop computer for 2 weeks and completed ratings of positive affect (PA), negative affect (NA), anger/hostility (AH),…

  8. Mental Health Literacy and Eating-Disordered Behavior: Beliefs of Adolescent Girls Concerning the Treatment of and Treatment-Seeking for Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mond, J. M.; Marks, P.; Hay, P. J.; Rodgers, B.; Kelly, C.; Owen, C.; Paxton, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    This research examined the "mental health literacy" of adolescents concerning eating-disordered behavior. A vignette describing a fictional 16-year old female meeting diagnostic criteria for bulimia nervosa was presented to 522 female high school students, followed by a series of questions concerning treatment of and treatment-seeking…

  9. Association between A218C polymorphism of the tryptophan-hydroxylase-1 gene, harm avoidance and binge eating behavior in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, Palmiero; Tortorella, Alfonso; Martiadis, Vassilis; Serino, Ismene; Di Filippo, Carmela; Maj, Mario

    2007-06-21

    Genes involved in serotonin transmission are likely involved in the biological predisposition to bulimia nervosa. We investigated whether the A218C polymorphism of the tryptophan-hydroxylase-1 gene was associated to bulimia nervosa and/or to some phenotypic aspects of the disorder. One hundred eighty Caucasian women (91 patients with bulimia nervosa and 89 healthy controls) were enrolled into the study. They underwent a blood sample collection for A218C polymorphism of the tryptophan-hydroxylase-1 genotyping and a clinical evaluation assessing comorbidity for Axis I and II psychiatric disorders, harm avoidance personality dimension and bulimic symptoms. The distribution of both tryptophan-hydroxylase-1 A218C genotypes and alleles did not significantly differ between patients and controls. Bulimic women with the AA genotype exhibited a more severe binge eating behavior and higher harm avoidance scores than those with CC genotype. These findings support the idea that tryptophan-hydroxylase-1 A218C polymorphism does not play a part in the genetic susceptibility to bulimia nervosa, but it seems to be involved in predisposing bulimic patients to a more disturbed eating behavior and higher harm avoidance.

  10. Web-Based Aftercare for Women With Bulimia Nervosa Following Inpatient Treatment: Randomized Controlled Efficacy Trial.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Corinna; Beintner, Ina; Fittig, Eike; Trockel, Mickey; Braks, Karsten; Schade-Brittinger, Carmen; Dempfle, Astrid

    2017-09-22

    Relapse rates in bulimia nervosa (BN) are high even after successful treatment, but patients often hesitate to take up further treatment. An easily accessible program might help maintain treatment gains. Encouraged by the effects of Web-based eating disorder prevention programs, we developed a manualized, Web-based aftercare program (IN@) for women with BN following inpatient treatment. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of the web-based guided, 9-month, cognitive-behavioral aftercare program IN@ for women with BN following inpatient treatment. We conducted a randomized controlled efficacy trial in 253 women with DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition) BN and compared the results of IN@ with treatment as usual (TAU). Assessments were carried out at hospital admission (T0), hospital discharge/baseline (T1), postintervention (T2; 9 months after baseline), 9-month follow-up (T3; 18 months after baseline). The primary outcome, abstinence from binge eating and compensatory behaviors during the 2 months preceding T2, was analyzed by intention to treat, using logistic regression analyses. Frequencies of binge eating and vomiting episodes, and episodes of all compensatory behaviors were analyzed using mixed effects models. At T2, data from 167 women were available. There were no significant differences in abstinence rates between the TAU group (n=24, 18.9%) and the IN@ group (n=27, 21.4%; odds ratio, OR=1.29; P=.44). The frequency of vomiting episodes in the IN@ group was significantly (46%) lower than in the TAU group (P=.003). Moderator analyses revealed that both at T2 and T3, women of the intervention group who still reported binge eating and compensatory behaviors after inpatient treatment benefited from IN@, whereas women who were already abstinent after the inpatient treatment did not (P=.004; P=.002). Additional treatment utilization was high in both groups between baseline and follow-up. Overall, data

  11. The Use of Videogames as Complementary Therapeutic Tool for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Bulimia Nervosa Patients.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Aranda, Fernando; Jimenez-Murcia, Susana; Santamaría, Juan J; Giner-Bartolomé, Cristina; Mestre-Bach, Gemma; Granero, Roser; Sánchez, Isabel; Agüera, Zaida; Moussa, Maher H; Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia; Konstantas, Dimitri; Lam, Tony; Lucas, Mikkel; Nielsen, Jeppe; Lems, Peter; Tarrega, Salomé; Menchón, José Manuel

    2015-12-01

    Although cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been demonstrated to be the most effective approach for the treatment of bulimia nervosa (BN), there is lack of studies showing whether a combination with a serious video game (SVG) might be useful to enhance patients' emotional regulation capacities and general outcome. The aims of this study were (a) to analyze whether outpatient CBT + SVG, when compared with outpatient CBT - SVG, shows better short-term outcome; (b) to examine whether the CBT + SVG group is more effective in reducing emotional expression and levels of anxiety than CBT - SVG. Thirty-eight patients diagnosed as having BN according to DSM-5 criteria were consecutively assigned to two outpatient group therapy conditions (that lasted for 16 weekly sessions): 20 CBT + SVG versus 18 CBT - SVG. Patients were assessed before and after treatment using not only a food and binging/purging diary and clinical questionnaires in the field of eating disorders but also additional indexes for measuring anger expression and anxiety. Regarding the post-treatment psychometric measures, most of the mean differences (Eating Disorder Inventory-2, Symptom Checklist-Revised, State-Trait Anxiety Index, and partially State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory) achieved moderate to high effect size (d > 0.5), in the sense that CBT + SVG obtained the best results compared with the CBT - SVG group. Regarding therapy outcome (dropout, partial remission, and total remission), CBT + SVG showed better results and a moderate effect size emerged for the comparison of the risk of dropout during the treatment, being higher for CBT - SVG compared with CBT + SVG (44.1 percent versus 20.0 percent, d = 0.54). Although the sample size in our study was low, and consequently results should be considered with caution, we have obtained promising findings suggesting that in the short-term CBT + SVG might be a good option not only for improving

  12. Anorexia and bulimia nervosa in same-sex and opposite-sex twins: lack of association with twin type in a nationwide study of Finnish twins.

    PubMed

    Raevuori, Anu; Kaprio, Jaakko; Hoek, Hans W; Sihvola, Elina; Rissanen, Aila; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna

    2008-12-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that either prenatal feminization or masculinization hormone influences in utero or later socialization affects the risk for anorexia and bulimia nervosa and disordered eating in members of opposite-sex twin pairs. Finnish twins (N=2,426 women, N=1,962 men with known zygosity) from birth cohorts born 1974-1979 were assessed at age 22 to 28 years with a questionnaire for eating disorder symptoms. Based on the questionnaire screen, women (N=292), men (N=53), and their cotwins were interviewed to assess diagnoses of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa (per DSM-IV and broad criteria). In women from opposite-sex twin pairs, the prevalence of DSM-IV or broad anorexia nervosa was not significantly different than that of women from monozygotic pairs or same-sex dizygotic pairs. Of the five male anorexia nervosa probands, only one was from an opposite-sex twin pair. Bulimia nervosa in men was too rare to be assessed by zygosity; the prevalence of DSM-IV or broad bulimia nervosa did not differ in women from opposite- versus same-sex twin pairs. In both sexes, the overall profile of indicators on eating disorders was rather similar between individuals from opposite- and same-sex pairs. The authors found little evidence that the risk for anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or disordered eating was associated with zygosity or sex composition of twin pairs, thus making it unlikely that in utero femininization or masculinization or socialization effects of growing up with an opposite-sex twin have a major influence on the later development of eating disorders.

  13. A randomized controlled trial of family therapy and cognitive behavior therapy guided self-care for adolescents with bulimia nervosa and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ulrike; Lee, Sally; Beecham, Jennifer; Perkins, Sarah; Treasure, Janet; Yi, Irene; Winn, Suzanne; Robinson, Paul; Murphy, Rebecca; Keville, Saskia; Johnson-Sabine, Eric; Jenkins, Mari; Frost, Susie; Dodge, Liz; Berelowitz, Mark; Eisler, Ivan

    2007-04-01

    To date no trial has focused on the treatment of adolescents with bulimia nervosa. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of family therapy and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) guided self-care in adolescents with bulimia nervosa or eating disorder not otherwise specified. Eighty-five adolescents with bulimia nervosa or eating disorder not otherwise specified were recruited from eating disorder services in the United Kingdom. Participants were randomly assigned to family therapy for bulimia nervosa or individual CBT guided self-care supported by a health professional. The primary outcome measures were abstinence from binge-eating and vomiting, as assessed by interview at end of treatment (6 months) and again at 12 months. Secondary outcome measures included other bulimic symptoms and cost of care. Of the 85 study participants, 41 were assigned to family therapy and 44 to CBT guided self-care. At 6 months, bingeing had undergone a significantly greater reduction in the guided self-care group than in the family therapy group; however, this difference disappeared at 12 months. There were no other differences between groups in behavioral or attitudinal eating disorder symptoms. The direct cost of treatment was lower for guided self-care than for family therapy. The two treatments did not differ in other cost categories. Compared with family therapy, CBT guided self-care has the slight advantage of offering a more rapid reduction of bingeing, lower cost, and greater acceptability for adolescents with bulimia or eating disorder not otherwise specified.

  14. Randomized Clinical Trial of Family-Based Treatment and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Bulimia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Le Grange, Daniel; Lock, James; Agras, W Stewart; Bryson, Susan W; Jo, Booil

    2015-11-01

    There is a paucity of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) for adolescents with bulimia nervosa (BN). Prior studies suggest cognitive-behavioral therapy adapted for adolescents (CBT-A) and family-based treatment for adolescent bulimia nervosa (FBT-BN) could be effective for this patient population. The objective of this study was to compare the relative efficacy of these 2 specific therapies, FBT-BN and CBT-A. In addition, a smaller participant group was randomized to a nonspecific treatment (supportive psychotherapy [SPT]), whose data were to be used if there were no differences between FBT-BN and CBT-A at end of treatment. This 2-site (Chicago and Stanford) randomized controlled trial included 130 participants (aged 12-18 years) meeting DSM-IV criteria for BN or partial BN (binge eating and purging once or more per week for 6 months). Outcomes were assessed at baseline, end of treatment, and 6 and 12 months posttreatment. Treatments involved 18 outpatient sessions over 6 months. The primary outcome was defined as abstinence from binge eating and purging for 4 weeks before assessment, using the Eating Disorder Examination. Participants in FBT-BN achieved higher abstinence rates than in CBT-A at end of treatment (39% versus 20%; p = .040, number needed to treat [NNT] = 5) and at 6-month follow-up (44% versus 25%; p = .030, NNT = 5). Abstinence rates between these 2 groups did not differ statistically at 12-month follow-up (49% versus 32%; p = .130, NNT = 6). In this study, FBT-BN was more effective in promoting abstinence from binge eating and purging than CBT-A in adolescent BN at end of treatment and 6-month follow-up. By 12-month follow-up, there were no statistically significant differences between the 2 treatments. Study of Treatment for Adolescents With Bulimia Nervosa; http://clinicaltrials.gov/; NCT00879151. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Reduced resting-state functional connectivity of the somatosensory cortex predicts psychopathological symptoms in women with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lavagnino, Luca; Amianto, Federico; D'Agata, Federico; Huang, Zirui; Mortara, Paolo; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Marzola, Enrica; Spalatro, Angela; Fassino, Secondo; Northoff, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in the resting-state functional connectivity (rs-FC) of several brain networks have been demonstrated in eating disorders. However, very few studies are currently available on brain network dysfunctions in bulimia nervosa (BN). The somatosensory network is central in processing body-related stimuli and it may be altered in BN. The present study therefore aimed to investigate rs-FC in the somatosensory network in bulimic women. Sixteen medication-free women with BN (age = 23 ± 5 years) and 18 matched controls (age = 23 ± 3 years) underwent a functional magnetic resonance resting-state scan and assessment of eating disorder symptoms. Within-network and seed-based functional connectivity analyses were conducted to assess rs-FC within the somatosensory network and to other areas of the brain. Bulimia nervosa patients showed a decreased rs-FC both within the somatosensory network (t = 9.0, df = 1, P = 0.005) and with posterior cingulate cortex and two visual areas (the right middle occipital gyrus and the right cuneus) (P = 0.05 corrected for multiple comparison). The rs-FC of the left paracentral lobule with the right middle occipital gyrus correlated with psychopathology measures like bulimia (r = -0.4; P = 0.02) and interoceptive awareness (r = -0.4; P = 0.01). Analyses were conducted using age, BMI (body mass index), and depressive symptoms as covariates. Our findings show a specific alteration of the rs-FC of the somatosensory cortex in BN patients, which correlates with eating disorder symptoms. The region in the right middle occipital gyrus is implicated in body processing and is known as extrastriate body area (EBA). The connectivity between the somatosensory cortex and the EBA might be related to dysfunctions in body image processing. The results should be considered preliminary due to the small sample size.

  16. Reduced Resting-State Functional Connectivity of the Somatosensory Cortex Predicts Psychopathological Symptoms in Women with Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Lavagnino, Luca; Amianto, Federico; D’Agata, Federico; Huang, Zirui; Mortara, Paolo; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Marzola, Enrica; Spalatro, Angela; Fassino, Secondo; Northoff, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Background: Alterations in the resting-state functional connectivity (rs-FC) of several brain networks have been demonstrated in eating disorders. However, very few studies are currently available on brain network dysfunctions in bulimia nervosa (BN). The somatosensory network is central in processing body-related stimuli and it may be altered in BN. The present study therefore aimed to investigate rs-FC in the somatosensory network in bulimic women. Methods: Sixteen medication-free women with BN (age = 23 ± 5 years) and 18 matched controls (age = 23 ± 3 years) underwent a functional magnetic resonance resting-state scan and assessment of eating disorder symptoms. Within-network and seed-based functional connectivity analyses were conducted to assess rs-FC within the somatosensory network and to other areas of the brain. Results: Bulimia nervosa patients showed a decreased rs-FC both within the somatosensory network (t = 9.0, df = 1, P = 0.005) and with posterior cingulate cortex and two visual areas (the right middle occipital gyrus and the right cuneus) (P = 0.05 corrected for multiple comparison). The rs-FC of the left paracentral lobule with the right middle occipital gyrus correlated with psychopathology measures like bulimia (r = −0.4; P = 0.02) and interoceptive awareness (r = −0.4; P = 0.01). Analyses were conducted using age, BMI (body mass index), and depressive symptoms as covariates. Conclusion: Our findings show a specific alteration of the rs-FC of the somatosensory cortex in BN patients, which correlates with eating disorder symptoms. The region in the right middle occipital gyrus is implicated in body processing and is known as extrastriate body area (EBA). The connectivity between the somatosensory cortex and the EBA might be related to dysfunctions in body image processing. The results should be considered preliminary due to the small sample size. PMID:25136302

  17. Video game therapy for emotional regulation and impulsivity control in a series of treated cases with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Fagundo, Ana B; Santamaría, Juan J; Forcano, Laura; Giner-Bartolomé, Cristina; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Sánchez, Isabel; Granero, Roser; Ben-Moussa, Maher; Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia; Konstantas, Dimitri; Lam, Tony; Lucas, Mikkel; Nielsen, Jeppe; Bults, Richard G A; Tarrega, Salomé; Menchón, José M; de la Torre, Rafael; Cardi, Valentina; Treasure, Janet; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando

    2013-11-01

    Although standard psychological treatments have been successful in treating several core features in eating disorders (ED), other characteristics such as emotional regulation or impulsivity appear to be more resistant to change. There is a growing body of evidence to support the efficacy of cognitive remediation for cognitive and emotional difficulties in ED. Playmancer/ Islands is a video game (VG) designed to specifically treat mental disorders, characterized by problems in impulse control. The objective of the game is to increase self-control over emotions, decision making and behaviours. The aim of this study is to describe the results from a consecutive series of nine bulimia nervosa patients who were treated with the VG in addition to cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT). The outcomes included clinical and psychopathological questionnaires, and physiological measures were obtained during the VG. Emotional regulation improved, heart rate variability increased, and respiratory rate and impulsivity measures reduced after the treatment. These findings suggest that VG training may enhance treatment for ED.

  18. Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for Individuals with Bulimia Nervosa and a Co-Occurring Substance Use Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sysko, Robyn; Hildebrandt, Tom

    2010-01-01

    A significant percentage of individuals with bulimia nervosa (BN) also can be diagnosed with a co-occurring substance use disorder (SUD). Although studies have addressed the frequency of overlap between the disorders, etiology and shared personality traits, limited research is available about the treatment of these comorbid patients. Adapting cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) to serve as an integrated treatment for patients with both BN and a SUD is a viable option, as studies of CBT suggest that this form of treatment is efficacious for both disorders independently. The shared strategies in CBT for BN and SUDs facilitate the development of a combined treatment for individuals with both disorders with the addition of modules designed to address some common features of these disorders, such as motivation, difficulty with interpersonal relationships, reward sensitivity and impulsivity. Future research should begin to evaluate the efficacy of an integrated CBT in treating individuals with BN and a SUD. PMID:19130465

  19. Bilateral necrotizing sialometaplasia of the hard palate in a patient with bulimia: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Janner, Simone F M; Suter, Valerie G A; Altermatt, Hans Jörg; Reichart, Peter A; Bornstein, Michael M

    2014-05-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS) is a rare and benign lesion that mostly affects the posterior hard palate. Its importance resides in its clinical and microscopic characteristics, which can closely mimic malignant neoplasias, in particular oral squamous cell carcinoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Accurate histopathologic evaluation of an incisional biopsy is considered as the diagnostic gold standard. NS lesions heal spontaneously within weeks, and no further treatment is necessary. We report a case of a bilateral palatal NS in a 22-yearold woman with bulimia, where an incisional biopsy confirmed the clinical diagnosis. The different clinical stages of the lesions from onset to resolution and the possible etiologic factors are described in detail, as well as a discussion of the differential diagnoses of palatal ulcers. When taking a biopsy from suspicious oral lesions, care has to be taken that an appropriate tissue sample is harvested, and the histopathologic analysis is performed by an experienced pathologist to establish a correct diagnosis.

  20. Loneliness mediates the relationship between emotion dysregulation and bulimia nervosa/binge eating disorder psychopathology in a clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Southward, Matthew W; Christensen, Kara A; Fettich, Karla C; Weissman, Jessica; Berona, Johnny; Chen, Eunice Y

    2014-12-01

    Emotion dysregulation has been linked to binge eating disorder (BED) and bulimia nervosa (BN) although the mechanisms by which it affects BN/BED psychopathology are unclear. This study tested loneliness as a mediator between emotion dysregulation and BN/BED psychopathology. A treatment-seeking sample of 107 women with BN or BED was assessed for loneliness (UCLA Loneliness Scale), emotion dysregulation (Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale), and BN/BED psychopathology (Eating Disorder Examination) before treatment. Hierarchical linear regressions and bootstrapping mediation models were run. Greater overall emotion dysregulation was associated with greater BN/BED psychopathology, mediated by loneliness (95 % CI 0.03, 0.09). Emotion dysregulation, however, did not mediate between loneliness and BN/BED psychopathology (95 % CI −0.01, 0.01). Targeting loneliness may effectively treat emotional aspects of BN/BED in women.

  1. Central and peripheral peptides regulating eating behaviour and energy homeostasis in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Tortorella, Alfonso; Brambilla, Francesca; Fabrazzo, Michele; Volpe, Umberto; Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Mastromo, Daniele; Monteleone, Palmiero

    2014-09-01

    A large body of literature suggests the occurrence of a dysregulation in both central and peripheral modulators of appetite in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN), but at the moment, the state or trait-dependent nature of those changes is far from being clear. It has been proposed, although not definitively proved, that peptide alterations, even when secondary to malnutrition and/or to aberrant eating behaviours, might contribute to the genesis and the maintenance of some symptomatic aspects of AN and BN, thus affecting the course and the prognosis of these disorders. This review focuses on the most significant literature studies that explored the physiology of those central and peripheral peptides, which have prominent effects on eating behaviour, body weight and energy homeostasis in patients with AN and BN. The relevance of peptide dysfunctions for the pathophysiology of eating disorders is critically discussed. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  2. Empirical Comparison of Two Psychological Therapies: Self Psychology and Cognitive Orientation in the Treatment of Anorexia and Bulimia

    PubMed Central

    Bachar, Eytan; Latzer, Yael; Kreitler, Shulamit; Berry, Elliot M.

    1999-01-01

    The authors investigated the applicability of self psychological treatment (SPT) and cognitive orientation treatment (COT) to the treatment of anorexia and bulimia. Thirty-three patients participated in this study. The bulimic patients (n = 25) were randomly assigned either to SPT, COT, or control/nutritional counseling only (C/NC). The anorexic patients (n = 8) were randomly assigned to either SPT or COT. Patients were administered a battery of outcome measures assessing eating disorders symptomatology, attitudes toward food, self structure, and general psychiatric symptoms. After SPT, significant improvement was observed. After COT, slight but nonsignificant improvement was observed. After C/NC, almost no changes could be detected.(The Journal of Psychotherapy Practice and Research 1999; 8:115–128) PMID:10079459

  3. Anxiety and compulsion patterns in the maintenance of bingeing/purging behaviours by individuals with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M; Lovell, A

    2015-02-01

    Bulimia nervosa, if not treated or if treated unsuccessfully, can develop into a severe and enduring eating disorder. Analysis of self-management of Seed-BN indicates that individuals frequently experience significant negative mental health issues and a complex relationship with medication management. Two discrete patterns of coping strategies to prevent deterioration in distressing symptoms were in evidence, controlled vomiting, which was related to the management of anxiety, and uncontrolled vomiting due to more dominant self-management of compulsive acts. The implications for nursing revolve around accurate assessment of vomiting and subsequent engagement by the individual with their coping strategies in relation to perceived deterioration in distressing symptoms. This paper reports on the results of a study into the self-reported coping strategies employed by a small sample (n = 12) of individuals diagnosed with bulimia nervosa purging sub-type, severe and enduring eating disorder (Seed-BN), referred to an outpatient clinic for psychotherapy. Data collection focused on the vomiting activities of participants through analysis of their self-management from diary extracts, which recorded vomiting patterns. Participants all experienced significant mental health issues, had complex histories of BN over a prolonged period, difficulties maintaining relationships, and many had an additional history of substance misuse including dependence on prescription drugs. The study findings indicated two different self-management strategies, anxiety containment and compulsion maintenance. There was a clear association between anxiety and controlled weekly vomiting patterns compared with compulsion and daily vomiting patterns. The implications for nursing practice relate to the potential for assessment of differences in vomiting patterns to indicate self-management status and subsequent interventions focusing on either anxiety or compulsive patterns. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Cognitive behaviour therapy response and dropout rate across purging and nonpurging bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder: DSM-5 implications.

    PubMed

    Agüera, Zaida; Riesco, Nadine; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Islam, Mohammed Anisul; Granero, Roser; Vicente, Enrique; Peñas-Lledó, Eva; Arcelus, Jon; Sánchez, Isabel; Menchon, Jose Manuel; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando

    2013-11-07

    With the imminent publication of the new edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), there has been a growing interest in the study of the boundaries across the three bulimic spectrum syndromes [bulimia nervosa-purging type (BN-P), bulimia nervosa-non purging type (BN-NP) and binge eating disorder (BED)]. Therefore, the aims of this study were to determine differences in treatment response and dropout rates following Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) across the three bulimic-spectrum syndromes. The sample comprised of 454 females (87 BED, 327 BN-P and 40 BN-NP) diagnosed according to DSM-IV-TR criteria who were treated with 22 weekly outpatient sessions of group CBT therapy. Patients were assessed before and after treatment using a food and binging/purging diary and some clinical questionnaires in the field of ED. "Full remission" was defined as total absence of binging and purging (laxatives and/or vomiting) behaviors and psychological improvement for at least 4 (consecutive). Full remission rate was found to be significantly higher in BED (69.5%) than in both BN-P (p < 0.005) and BN-NP (p < 0.001), which presented no significant differences between them (30.9% and 35.5%). The rate of dropout from group CBT was also higher in BED (33.7%) than in BN-P (p < 0.001) and BN-NP (p < 0.05), which were similar (15.4% and 12.8%, respectively). Results suggest that purging and non-purging BN have similar treatment response and dropping out rates, whereas BED appears as a separate diagnosis with better outcome for those who complete treatment. The results support the proposed new DSM-5 classification.

  5. Cognitive behaviour therapy response and dropout rate across purging and nonpurging bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder: DSM-5 implications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the imminent publication of the new edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), there has been a growing interest in the study of the boundaries across the three bulimic spectrum syndromes [bulimia nervosa-purging type (BN-P), bulimia nervosa-non purging type (BN-NP) and binge eating disorder (BED)]. Therefore, the aims of this study were to determine differences in treatment response and dropout rates following Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) across the three bulimic-spectrum syndromes. Method The sample comprised of 454 females (87 BED, 327 BN-P and 40 BN-NP) diagnosed according to DSM-IV-TR criteria who were treated with 22 weekly outpatient sessions of group CBT therapy. Patients were assessed before and after treatment using a food and binging/purging diary and some clinical questionnaires in the field of ED. “Full remission” was defined as total absence of binging and purging (laxatives and/or vomiting) behaviors and psychological improvement for at least 4 (consecutive). Results Full remission rate was found to be significantly higher in BED (69.5%) than in both BN-P (p < 0.005) and BN-NP (p < 0.001), which presented no significant differences between them (30.9% and 35.5%). The rate of dropout from group CBT was also higher in BED (33.7%) than in BN-P (p < 0.001) and BN-NP (p < 0.05), which were similar (15.4% and 12.8%, respectively). Conclusions Results suggest that purging and non-purging BN have similar treatment response and dropping out rates, whereas BED appears as a separate diagnosis with better outcome for those who complete treatment. The results support the proposed new DSM-5 classification PMID:24200085

  6. Treatment of bulimia nervosa with topiramate in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, part 2: improvement in psychiatric measures.

    PubMed

    Hedges, Dawson W; Reimherr, Frederick W; Hoopes, Scott P; Rosenthal, Norman R; Kamin, Marc; Karim, Rezaul; Capece, Julie A

    2003-12-01

    We conducted a 10-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to examine the efficacy of topiramate in the treatment of bulimia nervosa. Primary efficacy analyses showed that topiramate treatment significantly reduced days on which patients binged and/or purged. This article describes further analyses investigating topiramate's effect on psychological symptoms associated with disordered eating. Patients with DSM-IV bulimia nervosa were randomly assigned to receive topiramate (N = 35) or placebo (N = 34) for 10 weeks. Topiramate treatment was started at 25 mg/day and titrated by 25 to 50 mg/week to a maximum of 400 mg/day. Secondary psychiatric endpoints, including the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI), Eating Attitudes Test (EAT), Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAM-A), Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D), and Patient Global Improvement (PGI) were assessed for change from baseline in the topiramate versus placebo group. Thirty-one patients receiving topiramate and 33 receiving placebo were included in the intent-to-treat analysis. Percent change from baseline on the EDI indicated significantly greater improvement in the topiramate group compared with the placebo group for subscales measuring bulimia/uncontrollable overeating (p =.005), body dissatisfaction (p =.007), and drive for thinness (p =.002). The EAT showed significant improvement in the topiramate group compared with the placebo group for the bulimia/food preoccupation (p =.019) and dieting (p =.031) subscales and the total score (p =.022). For the topiramate group, the reduction in mean HAM-A score was significantly greater (p =.046) than that in the placebo group, while reduction in HAM-D scores was greater in the topiramate group compared with the placebo group but did not reach statistical significance (p =.069). Significantly more patients treated with topiramate compared with placebo reported improvement on the PGI (p =.004). Topiramate treatment improves multiple behavioral

  7. Neuroendocrinology and brain imaging of reward in eating disorders: A possible key to the treatment of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Castellini, Giovanni; Volpe, Umberto; Ricca, Valdo; Lelli, Lorenzo; Monteleone, Palmiero; Maj, Mario

    2018-01-03

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are severe eating disorders whose etiopathogenesis is still unknown. Clinical features suggest that eating disorders may develop as reward-dependent syndromes, since eating less food is perceived as rewarding in anorexia nervosa while consumption of large amounts of food during binge episodes in bulimia nervosa aims at reducing the patient's negative emotional states. Therefore, brain reward mechanisms have been a major focus of research in the attempt to contribute to the comprehension of the pathophysiology of these disorders. Structural brain imaging data provided the evidence that brain reward circuits may be altered in patients with anorexia or bulimia nervosa. Similarly, functional brain imaging studies exploring the activation of brain reward circuits by food stimuli as well as by stimuli recognized to be potentially rewarding for eating disordered patients, such as body image cues or stimuli related to food deprivation and physical hyperactivity, showed several dysfunctions in ED patients. Moreover, very recently, it has been demonstrated that some of the biochemical homeostatic modulators of eating behavior are also implicated in the regulation of food-related and non-food-related reward, representing a possible link between the aberrant behaviors of ED subjects and their hypothesized deranged reward processes. In particular, changes in leptin and ghrelin occur in patients with anorexia or bulimia nervosa and have been suggested to represent not only homeostatic adaptations to an altered energy balance but to contribute also to the acquisition and/or maintenance of persistent starvation, binge eating and physical hyperactivity, which are potentially rewarding for ED patients. On the basis of such findings new pathogenetic models of EDs have been proposed, and these models may provide new theoretical basis for the development of innovative treatment strategies, either psychological and pharmacological, with the aim to

  8. Age at menarche and digit ratio (2D:4D): relationships with body dissatisfaction, drive for thinness, and bulimia symptoms in women.

    PubMed

    Oinonen, Kirsten A; Bird, Jessica L

    2012-03-01

    This study examined the hypothesis that lower prenatal androgen exposure and earlier puberty are associated with more dysfunctional eating attitudes and behaviors. Relationships between both age at menarche (AAM) and 2D:4D (a marker of prenatal androgen exposure), and EDI-2-Body Dissatisfaction, EDI-2-Drive for Thinness, and EDI-2-Bulimia scores, were examined in women using correlations and regressions. Earlier menarche was associated with higher drive for thinness after controlling for BMI and negative affect, but only in women who were not exclusively heterosexual. Higher 2D:4D was associated with higher Bulimia and Body Dissatisfaction scores, but only in exclusively heterosexual women, and relationships disappeared when covariates were controlled. Later AAM and higher 2D:4D were unique predictors of higher Bulimia scores for exclusive heterosexuals when BMI was controlled. These findings suggest future research should examine sexual orientation as a mediator or moderator of prenatal and postnatal organizational hormonal effects on women's disordered eating attitudes and behaviors.

  9. Internet-delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy v. conventional guided self-help for bulimia nervosa: long-term evaluation of a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Gudrun; Penelo, Eva; Wanner, Christian; Gwinner, Paulina; Trofaier, Marie-Louise; Imgart, Hartmut; Waldherr, Karin; Wöber-Bingöl, Ciçek; Karwautz, Andreas F K

    2013-02-01

    Cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT)-based guided self-help is recommended as a first step in the treatment of bulimia nervosa. To evaluate in a randomised controlled trial (Clinicaltrials.gov registration number: NCT00461071) the long-term effectiveness of internet-based guided self-help (INT-GSH) compared with conventional guided bibliotherapy (BIB-GSH) in females with bulimia nervosa. A total of 155 participants were randomly assigned to INT-GSH or BIB-GSH for 7 months. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, month 4, month 7 and month 18. The greatest improvement was reported after 4 months with a continued reduction in eating disorder symptomatology reported at month 7 and 18. After 18 months, 14.6% (n = 7/48) of the participants in the INT-GSH group and 25% (n = 7/28) in the BIB-GSH group were abstinent from binge eating and compensatory measures, 43.8% (n = 21/48) and 39.2% (n = 11/28) respectively were in remission. No differences regarding outcome between the two groups were found. Internet-based guided self-help for bulimia nervosa was not superior compared with bibliotherapy, the gold standard of self-help. Improvements remain stable in the long term.

  10. [Triggers of bulimia and compulsion attacks: validation of the "Start" questionnaire].

    PubMed

    Rigaud, D; Jiang, T; Pennacchio, H; Brémont, M; Perrin, D

    2014-09-01

    There are few published studies on the triggers of binge eating in anorexia nervosa of binge/purging subtype (BPAN), bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED). We validated in 29 patients (10 BPAN, 10 BN and 9 BED) the perspicuity, the clarity and the intra- (doubles) and inter- (test-retest) reproducibility of a 24-item Start questionnaire on the triggers of binge eating. Then the Start questionnaire was administered to 176 patients (65 BPAN, 62 BN and 59 BED patients) being 27.5+9.1 yr old, having 15+9 binge eating (BE) episodes/week, with a mean binge duration of 1 hr 36min (+ 38min)/day. BE episodes occurred mainly during the second part of the day: afternoon after work (67% of the patients), "tea" time (55%), evening after dinner (42%) and at night (22%). The principal place for BE episodes was at home (96%). The BED patients avoided binges at the parents' home (89%) more often than the BPAN (62%, P<0.02). The binges occurred mainly in the living room (44%), in the kitchen (43%), and less in the bedroom (31%). Hunger pangs seemed to be a trigger of binges in 31% of the patients, and a stronger trigger in BED (42%) than in the BPAN and BN patients (24%; P=0.04). Binge eating episodes could occur despite a high satiety level (just after lunch or dinner) in 29% of the BN and in 16% of the BED patients (P<0.02). Concerning food, the major triggers were high energy-density food (77%) and comfort food (60%), such as chocolate, cakes, bread and pasta. The food consumed for binge episodes (in-binge food) was more often a strong trigger than the other food (not used for binges): olfaction (19% versus 10%), sight (52% versus 25%) and placing in the mouth (71% versus 26%; P<0.02 for all, in the 3 groups). Being tired could be a strong trigger in 37% of the patients, but "being aroused" in the other 38 % of the patients. Stressful events (65%), anxiety (74%), "being under pressure" or irritated (51% and 55%) were of course major triggers in a majority of the

  11. Effect of decreasing afferent vagal activity with ondansetron on symptoms of bulimia nervosa: a randomised, double-blind trial.

    PubMed

    Faris, P L; Kim, S W; Meller, W H; Goodale, R L; Oakman, S A; Hofbauer, R D; Marshall, A M; Daughters, R S; Banerjee-Stevens, D; Eckert, E D; Hartman, B K

    2000-03-04

    Several lines of evidence have led us to postulate that afferent vagal hyperactivity could be an important factor in the pathophysiology of the eating disorder bulimia nervosa. Ondansetron is a peripherally active antagonist of the serotonin receptor 5-HT3, and is marketed for prevention of vagally-mediated emesis caused by cancer chemotherapeutic agents. We investigated the effects of ondansetron on bulimic behaviours in patients with severe and chronic bulimia nervosa in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. We enrolled patients with severe bulimia nervosa (at least seven coupled binge/vomit episodes per week). The patients were otherwise healthy, their weight was normal, and they were not receiving medical or psychiatric treatment. During the first week of the study, patients recorded all eating-behaviour events to establish a baseline. In the second week, all patients received placebo, but were told that they were receiving either placebo or active drug. At the end of this single-blind phase, patients were randomly assigned placebo or ondansetron (24 mg daily) for a further 4 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the number of binge/vomit episodes per week. Data were analysed by intention to treat. 29 patients met the inclusion criteria, of whom 28 completed the baseline study, and 26 completed the single-blind placebo week. 12 patients were assigned placebo, and 14 ondansetron; one patient in the ondansetron group dropped out owing to accidental injury. During the 4th week of double-blind treatment, mean binge/vomit frequencies were 13.2 per week (SD 11.6) in the placebo group, versus 6.5 per week (3.9) in the ondansetron group (estimated difference 6.8 [95% CI 4.0-9.5]; p<0.0001). The ondansetron group also showed significant improvement, compared with the placebo group, in two secondary indicators of disease severity. The amount of time spent engaging in bulimic behaviours was decreased on average by 7.6 h per week in the ondansetron group

  12. Associations of borderline personality disorder traits with stressful events and emotional reactivity in women with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Carolyn M; Lavender, Jason M; Cao, Li; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Crosby, Ross D; Engel, Scott G; Mitchell, James E; Peterson, Carol B; Crow, Scott J

    2017-07-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) traits are common among those with bulimia nervosa (BN). However, how these traits impact the state experience of precipitants of BN behavior, such as stressful events and emotional reactivity, has not been determined. Thus, the purpose of this naturalistic study was to examine this trait-state association in BN. Women with DSM-IV BN (N = 133) completed a baseline measure of personality pathology traits, and subsequently recorded their affective state and the frequency and perception of 3 types of stressful events (interpersonal, work/environment, and daily hassles) several times per day for 2 weeks using ecological momentary assessment (EMA). Pearson correlations assessed the associations between BPD traits (affective lability, identity problems, insecure attachment, and cognitive dysregulation) and (a) frequency of stressful events and (b) perception of stressful events. Generalized linear models (GLM) were used to evaluate the relationship between BPD traits and changes in negative affect following stressful events. Results revealed that while all traits were significantly associated with perceived stressfulness, certain BPD traits were significantly associated with the frequency of stressful events. Individuals with higher trait insecure attachment experienced larger increases in negative affect following interpersonal stressful events. These findings suggest that interventions focused on addressing stressful events and enhancing adaptive emotional responses to interpersonal events may be particularly useful for a subset of individuals with BN with BPD-related personality characteristics, including insecure attachment, affective lability, and identity problems. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Does individualization matter? A randomized trial of standardized (focused) versus individualized (broad) cognitive behavior therapy for bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Ata

    2006-02-01

    Does higher level of individualization increase treatment efficacy? Fifty patients with bulimia nervosa were randomized into either manual-based (focused) or more individualized (broader) cognitive behavioral therapy guided by logical functional analysis. Eating disorders Examination and a series of self-report questionnaires were used for assessment at pre-, and post-treatment as well as at follow-up. Both conditions improved significantly at post-treatment, and the results were maintained at the 6 months follow-up. There were no statistically and clinically significant differences between the two conditions at post-treatment with the exception of abstinence from objective bulimic episodes, eating concerns, and body shape dissatisfaction, all favoring the individualized, broader condition. Both groups improved concerning self-esteem, perceived social support from friends, and depression. The improvements were maintained at follow-up. Ten patients (20%) did not respond to the treatment. Notably, a majority of non-responders (80%) were in the manual-based condition. Non-responders showed extreme dominance of rule-governed behavior, and lack of contact with actual contingencies compared to responders. The study provided preliminary support for the superiority of higher level of individualization (i.e. broader CBT) in terms of the response to treatment, and relapses. However, the magnitude of effects was moderate, and independent replications, with blind assessment procedures, and a larger sample sized are needed before more clear cut conclusions can be drawn.

  14. The Emotional and Attentional Impact of Exposure to One's Own Body in Bulimia Nervosa: A Physiological View

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Roldán, Blanca; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Sonia; Perakakis, Pandelis; Fernández-Santaella, M. Carmen; Vila, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Background Body dissatisfaction is the most relevant body image disturbance in bulimia nervosa (BN). Research has shown that viewing one's own body evokes negative thoughts and emotions in individuals with BN. However, the psychophysiological mechanisms involved in this negative reaction have not yet been clearly established. Our aim was to examine the emotional and attentional processes that are activated when patients with BN view their own bodies. Method We examined the effects of viewing a video of one's own body on the physiological (eye-blink startle, cardiac defense, and skin conductance) and subjective (pleasure, arousal, and control ratings) responses elicited by a burst of 110 dB white noise of 500 ms duration. The participants were 30 women with BN and 30 healthy control women. The experimental task consisted of two consecutive and counterbalanced presentations of the auditory stimulus preceded, alternatively, by a video of the participant's own body versus no such video. Results The results showed that, when viewing their own bodies, women with BN experienced (a) greater inhibition of the startle reflex, (b) greater cardiac acceleration in the first component of the defense reaction, (c) greater skin conductance response, and (d) less subjective pleasure and control combined with greater arousal, compared with the control participants. Conclusion Our findings suggest that, for women with BN, peripheral-physiological responses to self-images are dominated by attentional processes, which provoke an immobility reaction caused by a dysfunctional negative response to their own body. PMID:25036222

  15. Preliminary Examination of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Levels in Women with Purging Disorder and Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Dossat, Amanda M.; Bodell, Lindsay P.; Williams, Diana L.; Eckel, Lisa A.; Keel, Pamela K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study examined pre- and post-prandial glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) levels in women with bulimia nervosa (BN), purging disorder (PD), and non-eating disorder control women to better understand whether alterations in satiation-related hormones in BN may be linked to binge-eating episodes or other altered ingestive behaviors. Method Participants included women with BN (n = 19), PD (n = 14), or controls (n = 14). Participants provided subjective ratings for hunger and fullness and plasma samples before and after consumption of a standardized test meal. Results As expected, GLP-1 levels increased significantly following test meal consumption; however, participants with BN displayed significantly lower GLP-1 levels compared to PD and control participants both before and after consumption of the test meal. There were no significant differences between PD and control participants in GLP-1 levels, but individuals with PD displayed significantly higher levels of fullness throughout the test meal as compared to both control and BN participants. Discussion Our findings provide preliminary evidence that reduced GLP-1 levels in individuals with BN may be associated with binge-eating episodes. Additionally, increased fullness in individuals with PD does not appear to be accounted for by exaggerated post-prandial GLP-1 release. PMID:24590464

  16. Clinical Utility of Subtyping Binge Eating Disorder by History of Anorexia or Bulimia Nervosa in a Treatment Sample

    PubMed Central

    Utzinger, Linsey M.; Mitchell, James E.; Cao, Li; Crosby, Ross D.; Crow, Scott J.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Peterson, Carol B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study examined whether having a history of anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN) is associated with response to treatment in adults with binge eating disorder (BED). Method Data from 189 adults diagnosed with BED who were randomly assigned to one of three group cognitive-behavioral (CBT) treatments were analyzed to compare those with and without a history of AN/BN. Results A total of 16% of the sample had a history of AN/BN. The BED subgroup with a history of AN/BN presented with higher rates of mood disorders and greater eating-related symptom severity at baseline. Participants with a history of AN/BN also had higher global eating disorder (ED) symptoms at end of treatment (EOT), and more frequent objective binge-eating episodes at EOT and 12-month follow-up. Discussion These findings suggest that in adults with BED, a history of AN/BN is predictive of greater eating-related symptom severity following group-based CBT and poorer short- and long-term binge-eating outcomes. These findings suggest that considering ED history in the treatment of adults with BED may be clinically useful. PMID:25959549

  17. Specificity of psychological treatments for bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder? A meta-analysis of direct comparisons.

    PubMed

    Spielmans, Glen I; Benish, Steven G; Marin, Catherine; Bowman, Wesley M; Menster, Maria; Wheeler, Anthony J

    2013-04-01

    Treatment guidelines state that cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal therapy are the best-supported psychotherapies for bulimia nervosa (BN) and that CBT is the preferred psychological treatment for binge eating disorder (BED). However, no meta-analysis which both examined direct comparisons between psychological treatments for BN and BED and considered the role of moderating variables, such as the degree to which psychotherapy was bona fide, has previously been conducted Thus, such an analysis was undertaken. We included 77 comparisons reported in 53 studies. The results indicated that: (a) bona fide therapies outperformed non-bona fide treatments, (b) bona fide CBT outperformed bona fide non-CBT interventions by a statistically significant margin (only approaching statistical significance for BN and BED when examined individually), but many of these trials had confounds which limited their internal validity, (c) full CBT treatments offered no benefit over their components, and (d) the distribution of effect size differences between bona fide CBT treatments was homogeneously distributed around zero. These findings provide little support for treatment specificity in psychotherapy for BN and BED.

  18. Serum Amylase in Bulimia Nervosa and Purging Disorder: Differentiating the Association with Binge Eating versus Purging Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Barbara E.; Jimerson, David C.; Smith, Adrian; Keel, Pamela K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Elevated serum amylase levels in bulimia nervosa (BN), associated with increased salivary gland size and self-induced vomiting in some patients, provide a possible marker of symptom severity. The goal of this study was to assess whether serum hyperamylasemia in BN is more closely associated with binge eating episodes involving consumption of large amounts of food or with purging behavior. Method Participants included women with BN (n=26); women with “purging disorder” (PD), a subtype of EDNOS characterized by recurrent purging in the absence of objectively large binge eating episodes (n=14); and healthy non-eating disorder female controls (n=32). There were no significant differences in age or body mass index (BMI) across groups. The clinical groups reported similar frequency of self-induced vomiting behavior and were free of psychotropic medications. Serum samples were obtained after overnight fast and were assayed for alpha-amylase by enzymatic method. Results Serum amylase levels were significantly elevated in BN (60.7 ± 25.4 international units [IU]/liter, mean ± sd) in comparison to PD (44.7 ± 17.1 IU/L, p < 02) and to Controls (49.3 ± 15.8, p < .05). Conclusion These findings provide evidence to suggest that it is recurrent binge eating involving large amounts of food, rather than self-induced vomiting, which contributes to elevated serum amylase values in BN. PMID:21781981

  19. Reciprocal associations between negative affect, binge eating, and purging in the natural environment in women with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Jason M; Utzinger, Linsey M; Cao, Li; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Engel, Scott G; Mitchell, James E; Crosby, Ross D

    2016-04-01

    Although negative affect (NA) has been identified as a common trigger for bulimic behaviors, findings regarding NA following such behaviors have been mixed. This study examined reciprocal associations between NA and bulimic behaviors using real-time, naturalistic data. Participants were 133 women with bulimia nervosa (BN) according to the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders who completed a 2-week ecological momentary assessment protocol in which they recorded bulimic behaviors and provided multiple daily ratings of NA. A multilevel autoregressive cross-lagged analysis was conducted to examine concurrent, first-order autoregressive, and prospective associations between NA, binge eating, and purging across the day. Results revealed positive concurrent associations between all variables across all time points, as well as numerous autoregressive associations. For prospective associations, higher NA predicted subsequent bulimic symptoms at multiple time points; conversely, binge eating predicted lower NA at multiple time points, and purging predicted higher NA at 1 time point. Several autoregressive and prospective associations were also found between binge eating and purging. This study used a novel approach to examine NA in relation to bulimic symptoms, contributing to the existing literature by directly examining the magnitude of the associations, examining differences in the associations across the day, and controlling for other associations in testing each effect in the model. These findings may have relevance for understanding the etiology and/or maintenance of bulimic symptoms, as well as potentially informing psychological interventions for BN.

  20. Empirically defining rapid response to intensive treatment to maximize prognostic utility for bulimia nervosa and purging disorder.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Danielle E; Trottier, Kathryn; McFarlane, Traci; Olmsted, Marion P

    2015-05-01

    Rapid response (RR) to eating disorder treatment has been reliably identified as a predictor of post-treatment and sustained remission, but its definition has varied widely. Although signal detection methods have been used to empirically define RR thresholds in outpatient settings, RR to intensive treatment has not been investigated. This study investigated the optimal definition of RR to day hospital treatment for bulimia nervosa and purging disorder. Participants were 158 patients who completed ≥6 weeks of day hospital treatment. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to create four definitions of RR that could differentiate between remission and nonremission at the end of treatment. Definitions were based on binge/vomit episode frequency or percent reduction from pre-treatment, during either the first four or first two weeks of treatment. All definitions were associated with higher remission rates in rapid compared to nonrapid responders. Only one definition (i.e., ≤3 episodes in the first four weeks of treatment) predicted sustained remission (versus relapse) at 6- and 12-month follow-up. These findings provide an empirically derived definition of RR to intensive eating disorder treatment, and provide further evidence that early change is an important prognostic indicator.

  1. A history of the identification of the characteristic eating disturbances of Bulimia Nervosa, Binge Eating Disorder and Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Heaner, Martica K; Walsh, B Timothy

    2013-06-01

    During the last 25 years, the careful examination of the eating behavior of individuals with eating disorders has provided critical insights into the nature of these disorders. Crucially, studies investigating components of different eating behaviors have documented that Anorexia Nervosa (AN), Bulimia Nervosa (BN), and Binge Eating Disorder (BED) are characterized by objective disturbances in eating patterns that are significantly different than behaviors exhibited by individuals who do not have these eating disorders. The detailed description of the disturbances in eating behavior has helped to identify diagnostic criteria associated with each disorder, and has led to important hypotheses about the underlying pathophysiology. These advances in understanding have provided, and continue to provide, a foundation for translational research and for the development of novel treatment interventions. This review is based on a presentation given by B. Timothy Walsh, M.D. at the 40th anniversary symposium of the Columbia University Appetite talks outlining the evolution of the discovery of the characteristic eating disturbances seen with each disorder.

  2. Enhanced serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels in bulimia nervosa: relationships to psychiatric comorbidity, psychopathology and hormonal variables.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, Palmiero; Santonastaso, Paolo; Pannuto, Marilena; Favaro, Angela; Caregaro, Lorenza; Castaldo, Eloisa; Zanetti, Tatiana; Maj, Mario

    2005-04-30

    Increased levels of cholesterol have been reported in patients with bulimia nervosa (BN), but all but one of the published studies were performed on non-fasting subjects, which limits the interpretation of this finding. Moreover, the relationships between serum lipids and comorbid psychiatric disorders or bulimic psychopathology have scarcely been investigated. We measured serum levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, 17beta-estradiol and thyroid hormones in 75 bulimic women and 64 age-matched healthy females after an overnight fast. Compared with healthy women, bulimic patients exhibited significantly enhanced serum levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, but similar values of glucose, 17beta-estradiol, FT3 and FT4. No significant differences emerged in these variables between patients with or without comorbid depression, borderline personality disorder or lifetime anorexia nervosa. Circulating cholesterol was positively correlated to the patients' drive for thinness, ineffectiveness, enteroceptive awareness and impulse regulation sub-item scores of the Eating Disorder Inventory-2. These findings confirm that BN is associated with increased levels of serum lipids. This alteration may be involved in the pathophysiology of certain psychopathological characteristics of BN and cannot be explained by the co-occurrence of other psychiatric disorders.

  3. Volumetric alterations in the nucleus accumbens and caudate nucleus in bulimia nervosa: a structural magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Joana; Ramos, Ana Filipa; Maia, Liliana; Castro, Liliana; Conceição, Eva; Geliebter, Allan; Machado, Paulo P P; Gonçalves, Óscar; Sampaio, Adriana

    2015-03-01

    Bulimia nervosa (BN) is an eating disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of binge eating and inappropriate compensatory behaviors (such as purging, fasting, or excessive exercise) to prevent weight gain. BN has been associated with deficits in inhibitory control processes. The basal ganglia specifically, the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the caudate nucleus (CN) are part of the frontostriatal circuits involved in inhibitory control. The main goal of this study was to investigate the presence of morphological alterations in the NAc and the CN in a sample of patients diagnosed with BN. Forty-one female participants, 21 diagnosed with BN and 20 healthy matched controls (HC), underwent a structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition and clinical assessment. The NAc and the CN were manually segmented using the software Slicer 3D. The results reveal a significant volumetric decrease in the CN and a preserved NAc volume in BN compared to the control group. These findings suggest a contributory role of the caudate nucleus part of the dorsal striatum in the psychopathology of BN. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A pilot study examining diagnostic differences among exercise and weight suppression in bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder.

    PubMed

    Cook, Brian J; Steffen, Kristine J; Mitchell, James E; Otto, Maxwell; Crosby, Ross D; Cao, Li; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Crow, Scott; Hill, Laura; Le Grange, Daniel; Powers, Pauline

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate diagnostic differences in weight suppression (e.g., the difference between one's current body weight and highest non-pregnancy adult body weight) and exercise among Bulimia Nervosa (BN) and Binge Eating Disorder (BED). Because exercise may be a key contributor to weight suppression in BN, we were interested in examining the potential moderating effect of exercise on weight suppression in BN or BED. Participants with BN (n = 774) and BED (n = 285) completed self-report surveys of weight history, exercise and eating disorder symptoms. Generalised linear model analyses were used to examine the associations among diagnosis, exercise frequency and their interaction on weight suppression. Exercise frequency and BN/BED diagnosis were both associated with weight suppression. Additionally, exercise frequency moderated the relationship between diagnosis and weight suppression. Specifically, weight suppression was higher in BN than in BED among those with low exercise frequency but comparable in BN and BED among those with high exercise frequency. Our results suggest that exercise frequency may contribute to different weight suppression outcomes among BN and BED. This may inform clinical implications of exercise in these disorders. Specifically, much understanding of the differences among exercise frequency and the compensatory use of exercise in BN and BED is needed. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  5. CBT4BN versus CBTF2F: Comparison of Online versus Face-To-FaceTreatment for Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Bulik, Cynthia M.; Marcus, Marsha D.; Zerwas, Stephanie; Levine, Michele D.; Hofmeier, Sara; Trace, Sara E.; Hamer, Robert M.; Zimmer, Benjamin; Moessner, Markus; Kordy, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is currently the “gold standard” for treatment of bulimia nervosa (BN), and is effective for approximately 40–60% of individuals receiving treatment; however, the majority of individuals in need of care do not have access to CBT. New strategies for service delivery of CBT and for maximizing maintenance of treatment benefits are critical for improving our ability to treat BN. This clinical trial is comparing an Internet-based version of CBT (CBT4BN) in which group intervention is conducted via therapeutic chat group with traditional group CBT (CBTF2F) for BN conducted via face-to-face therapy group. The purpose of the trial is to determine whether manualized CBT delivered via the Internet is not inferior to the gold standard of manualized group CBT. In this two-site randomized controlled trial, powered for non-inferiority analyses, 180 individuals with BN are being randomized to either CBT4BN or CBTF2F. We hypothesize that CBT4BN will not be inferior to CBTF2F and that participants will value the convenience of an online intervention. If not inferior, CBT4BN may be a cost-effective approach to service delivery for individuals requiring treatment for BN. PMID:22659072

  6. Reciprocal Associations between Negative Affect, Binge Eating, and Purging in the Natural Environment in Women with Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, Jason M.; Utzinger, Linsey M.; Cao, Li; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Engel, Scott G.; Mitchell, James E.; Crosby, Ross D.

    2016-01-01

    Although negative affect (NA) has been identified as a common trigger for bulimic behaviors, findings regarding NA following such behaviors have been mixed. This study examined reciprocal associations between NA and bulimic behaviors using real-time, naturalistic data. Participants were 133 women with DSM-IV bulimia nervosa (BN) who completed a two-week ecological momentary assessment (EMA) protocol in which they recorded bulimic behaviors and provided multiple daily ratings of NA. A multilevel autoregressive cross-lagged analysis was conducted to examine concurrent, first-order autoregressive, and prospective associations between NA, binge eating, and purging across the day. Results revealed positive concurrent associations between all variables across all time points, as well as numerous autoregressive associations. For prospective associations, higher NA predicted subsequent bulimic symptoms at multiple time points; conversely, binge eating predicted lower NA at multiple time points, and purging predicted higher NA at one time point. Several autoregressive and prospective associations were also found between binge eating and purging. This study used a novel approach to examine NA in relation to bulimic symptoms, contributing to the existing literature by directly examining the magnitude of the associations, examining differences in the associations across the day, and controlling for other associations in testing each effect in the model. These findings may have relevance for understanding the etiology and/or maintenance of bulimic symptoms, as well as potentially informing psychological interventions for BN. PMID:26692122

  7. Dimensions of Emotion Dysregulation in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa: A Conceptual Review of the Empirical Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, Jason M.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Engel, Scott G.; Gordon, Kathryn H.; Kaye, Walter H.; Mitchell, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Several existing conceptual models and psychological interventions address or emphasize the role of emotion dysregulation in eating disorders. The current article uses Gratz and Roemer’s (2004) multidimensional model of emotion regulation and dysregulation as a clinically relevant framework to review the extant literature on emotion dysregulation in anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Specifically, the dimensions reviewed include: (1) the flexible use of adaptive and situationally appropriate strategies to modulate the duration and/or intensity of emotional responses, (2) the ability to successfully inhibit impulsive behavior and maintain goal-directed behavior in the context of emotional distress, (3) awareness, clarity, and acceptance of emotional states, and (4) the willingness to experience emotional distress in the pursuit of meaningful activities. The current review suggests that both AN and BN are characterized by broad emotion regulation deficits, with difficulties in emotion regulation across the four dimensions found to characterize both AN and BN, although a small number of more specific difficulties may distinguish the two disorders. The review concludes with a discussion of the clinical implications of the findings, as well as a summary of limitations of the existing empirical literature and suggestions for future research. PMID:26112760

  8. The acute salivary ghrelin response to a psychosocial stress is enhanced in symptomatic patients with bulimia nervosa: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, Palmiero; Tortorella, Alfonso; Scognamiglio, Pasquale; Serino, Ismene; Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Maj, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Stress is a precipitating factor for both binge eating and bulimia nervosa (BN); however, the biological mechanisms through which it may trigger binge eating are poorly understood. There is evidence that the adrenal hormone cortisol and the gastric peptide ghrelin might be involved in stress-induced food ingestion. We hypothesized that symptomatic patients with BN might disclose deranged responses of ghrelin and/or cortisol to stressors and that this could be related to their binge-eating behaviour. Here we investigated salivary cortisol and ghrelin responses to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) in 10 women with acute BN and 10 age-matched healthy females. Eating-related psychopathology and behaviours were assessed by self-report measures. No significant differences emerged between bulimic patients and healthy controls in the pre-stress salivary levels of both cortisol and ghrelin. The BN patients displayed normal cortisol but enhanced ghrelin responses to TSST. No significant correlations emerged between stress-induced salivary hormone changes and self-report measures of binge eating. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing deranged salivary ghrelin reactivity to a psychosocial stressor in symptomatic patients with BN. The extent to which this could contribute to the binge-eating behaviour of BN subjects awaits clarification. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. The relevance of personality traits in impulsivity-related disorders: From substance use disorders and gambling disorder to bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Del Pino-Gutiérrez, Amparo; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Agüera, Zaida; Granero, Roser; Hakansson, Anders; Fagundo, Ana B; Bolao, Ferran; Valdepérez, Ana; Mestre-Bach, Gemma; Steward, Trevor; Penelo, Eva; Moragas, Laura; Aymamí, Neus; Gómez-Peña, Mónica; Rigol-Cuadras, Assumpta; Martín-Romera, Virginia; Menchón, José M

    2017-09-01

    Background and aims The main aim of this study was to analyze and describe the clinical characteristics and shared personality traits in different impulsivity-compulsivity spectrum disorders: substance use disorders (SUD), gambling disorder (GD), and bulimia nervosa (BN). The specific aims were to compare personality differences among individuals with pure SUD, BN with and without SUD, and GD with and without SUD. In addition, we assessed the differential predictive capacity of clinical and personality variables in relation to diagnostic subtype. Methods The sample comprised 998 subjects diagnosed according to DSM-IV-TR criteria: 101 patients were diagnosed with SUD, 482 with GD, 359 with BN, 11 with GD + SUD, and 45 patients with BN + SUD. Various assessment instruments were administered, as well as other clinical measures, to evaluate their predictive capacity. Results Marked differences in personality traits were observed between groups. Novelty seeking, harm avoidance, self-directedness, cooperation, and self-transcendence best differentiated the groups. Notably, novelty seeking was significantly higher in the two dual pathology subgroups. Patients with dual pathology showed the most dysfunctional personality profiles. Discussion and conclusion Our results indicate the existence of shared dysfunctional personality traits among the groups studied, especially in novelty seeking and self-directedness.

  10. Computerized assessment of body image in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: comparison with standardized body image assessment tool.

    PubMed

    Caspi, Asaf; Amiaz, Revital; Davidson, Noa; Czerniak, Efrat; Gur, Eitan; Kiryati, Nahum; Harari, Daniel; Furst, Miriam; Stein, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Body image disturbances are a prominent feature of eating disorders (EDs). Our aim was to test and evaluate a computerized assessment of body image (CABI), to compare the body image disturbances in different ED types, and to assess the factors affecting body image. The body image of 22 individuals undergoing inpatient treatment with restricting anorexia nervosa (AN-R), 22 with binge/purge AN (AN-B/P), 20 with bulimia nervosa (BN), and 41 healthy controls was assessed using the Contour Drawing Rating Scale (CDRS), the CABI, which simulated the participants' self-image in different levels of weight changes, and the Eating Disorder Inventory-2-Body Dissatisfaction (EDI-2-BD) scale. Severity of depression and anxiety was also assessed. Significant differences were found among the three scales assessing body image, although most of their dimensions differentiated between patients with EDs and controls. Our findings support the use of the CABI in the comparison of body image disturbances in patients with EDs vs.

  11. Effects of emotional acceptance and rumination on media-induced body dissatisfaction in anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Eva; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Voderholzer, Ulrich; Schäfer, Johanna; Svaldi, Jennifer

    2016-11-01

    Body dissatisfaction is an important risk and maintaining factor for eating disorders. The aim of the present study was to experimentally test the effects of two emotion regulation strategies - acceptance and rumination - on media-induced body dissatisfaction in eating disorders. After watching pictures of thin models, women with anorexia nervosa (AN; n = 39) and bulimia nervosa (BN; n = 39) were encouraged to either use emotional acceptance or rumination to cope with their feelings. Body dissatisfaction and mood were repeatedly assessed. Acceptance significantly improved body dissatisfaction in women with BN. Rumination led to a significant increase of body dissatisfaction in both eating disorder groups. Results were independent from mood changes. Findings highlight the importance ruminative thinking may have in the aggravation of dissatisfaction with the own body in AN and BN. Results suggest that emotional acceptance is a useful strategy to regulate body dissatisfaction after exposure to thin-ideal media in BN. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Depictive and metric body size estimation in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mölbert, Simone Claire; Klein, Lukas; Thaler, Anne; Mohler, Betty J; Brozzo, Chiara; Martus, Peter; Karnath, Hans-Otto; Zipfel, Stephan; Giel, Katrin Elisabeth

    2017-11-01

    A distorted representation of one's own body is a diagnostic criterion and core psychopathology of both anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Despite recent technical advances in research, it is still unknown whether this body image disturbance is characterized by body dissatisfaction and a low ideal weight and/or includes a distorted perception or processing of body size. In this article, we provide an update and meta-analysis of 42 articles summarizing measures and results for body size estimation (BSE) from 926 individuals with AN, 536 individuals with BN and 1920 controls. We replicate findings that individuals with AN and BN overestimate their body size as compared to controls (ES=0.63). Our meta-regression shows that metric methods (BSE by direct or indirect spatial measures) yield larger effect sizes than depictive methods (BSE by evaluating distorted pictures), and that effect sizes are larger for patients with BN than for patients with AN. To interpret these results, we suggest a revised theoretical framework for BSE that accounts for differences between depictive and metric BSE methods regarding the underlying body representations (conceptual vs. perceptual, implicit vs. explicit). We also discuss clinical implications and argue for the importance of multimethod approaches to investigate body image disturbance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Drop-out and treatment outcome of outpatient cognitive-behavioral therapy for anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Schnicker, Katja; Hiller, Wolfgang; Legenbauer, Tanja

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, drop-out-analyses were carried out for a manual-based cognitive-behavioral therapy for 104 females with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN), in the service setting of a university outpatient clinic (naturalistic setting). A total of 22.9% of patients with AN terminated therapy prematurely (drop-outs), compared to 40.6% of patients with BN. Group differences between drop-outs and completers show that the group of drop-outs with BN had higher values in the depression score at the start of therapy and was almost two times more likely to have a comorbid disorder (odds ratio 1.69), whereas drop-outs with AN had higher values in the outcome-scale drive for thinness and the odds ratio for being employed or living in a partnership was slightly lower. Completers and drop-outs did not differ significantly within groups in regard to age, body mass index at the start and end of therapy, or the number of comorbid disorders. On the whole, the therapy effect in the group of drop-outs was relatively moderate. For patients with AN, even higher therapy effects were observed among the drop-outs than among the completers. These data suggest that moderate therapy effects and responses can be achieved even among the drop-outs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A review of the father-child relationship in the development and maintenance of adolescent anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Gale, Christopher J; Cluett, Elizabeth R; Laver-Bradbury, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    There are disproportionately fewer studies examining the role of the father in the development of child and adolescent psychopathology. This is pertinent in the field of eating disorders, where there is a wealth of research related to family influences and the value of family-based interventions. This article reviews the key themes within the literature around the potential impact of the father-child relationship on the development and maintenance of Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa in young people. The critical review searched relevant health and social care databases, as well as manually searching key journals in the eating disorder field. In these results, 13 studies met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were critiqued, with 8 being taken forward for discussion. The 8 studies identified key themes within the relationship of the father and child (particularly daughters) around conflict and communication, parental protection and psychological control, emotional regulation and self-esteem, and self-perfectionism. All of these factors appear to influence the child's level of self-determining autonomy, which in turn can impact maladaptive eating attitudes and psychopathology. Tentative recommendations are made around working with fathers to encourage free expression of ideas and foster a sense of autonomy through compromise and collaboration with their adolescent child. Further research around these themes in relation to other family members is also suggested.

  15. Executive Functioning and Visuospatial Abilities in Bulimia Nervosa with or without a Previous History of Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Degortes, Daniela; Tenconi, Elena; Santonastaso, Paolo; Favaro, Angela

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate executive functioning and visuospatial abilities in patients with bulimia nervosa (BN), with a particular interest in exploring the impact of a previous diagnosis of anorexia nervosa (AN). Several neuropsychological tasks were administered to 89 BN patients (52 with a previous history of AN and 37 without previous AN) and 160 healthy women. A poorer performance on set-shifting measures (Wisconsin Card Sorting Test) was found only in BN patients with a previous history of AN. Decision-making abilities (Iowa Gambling Task) were significantly impaired in the whole sample of BN patients, but difficulties were more pronounced in the subgroup with previous AN. Finally, we did not find any differences in response inhibition and visuospatial abilities between the two samples of BN patients and healthy women. Our findings support the idea that cognitive abilities in patients with BN are more impaired in the presence of a prior history of AN. The clinical and treatment implications of our findings should be explored in future studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  16. Clinical utility of subtyping binge eating disorder by history of anorexia or bulimia nervosa in a treatment sample.

    PubMed

    Utzinger, Linsey M; Mitchell, James E; Cao, Li; Crosby, Ross D; Crow, Scott J; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Peterson, Carol B

    2015-09-01

    This study examined whether having a history of anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN) is associated with response to treatment in adults with binge eating disorder (BED). Data from 189 adults diagnosed with BED who were randomly assigned to one of three group cognitive-behavioral (CBT) treatments were analyzed to compare those with and without a history of AN/BN. A total of 16% of the sample had a history of AN/BN. The BED subgroup with a history of AN/BN presented with higher rates of mood disorders and greater eating-related symptom severity at baseline. Participants with a history of AN/BN also had higher global eating disorder (ED) symptoms at end of treatment (EOT), and more frequent objective binge-eating episodes at EOT and 12-month follow-up. These findings suggest that in adults with BED, a history of AN/BN is predictive of greater eating-related symptom severity following group-based CBT and poorer short- and long-term binge-eating outcomes. These findings suggest that considering ED history in the treatment of adults with BED may be clinically useful. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. [Validation of a German-language Version of the Body Checking Questionnaire (BCQ) in Adolescents with Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa].

    PubMed

    Steinfeld, Beate; Bauer, Anika; Waldorf, Manuel; Engel, Nicole; Braks, Karsten; Huber, Thomas J; Vocks, Silja

    2017-01-01

    Body-related checking behavior, as a behavioral manifestation of a disturbed body image, fosters the development and maintenance of eating disorders. The Body Checking Questionnaire (BCQ) is the most commonly used questionnaire for measuring body-related checking behavior internationally. To date, validation studies are only available for adult populations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to statistically test the German-language version of the BCQ in adolescents. A total of N=129 female adolescents were examined, comprising n=57 with Anorexia Nervosa, n=24 with Bulimia Nervosa, and n=48 healthy female adolescents. A confirmatory factor analysis supports the subdivision of the BCQ into a general factor and the subfactors "overall appearance", "specific body parts" and "idiosyncratic checking", which was also found in the original version. The internal consistencies are good (α≥0.81), and the BCQ is able to differentiate well between adolescents with and without eating disorders. Significant correlations between the BCQ and other body image questionnaires point to a good convergent validity. The German-language BCQ thus constitutes a valid and reliable instrument for measuring body-related checking behavior among adolescents in clinical research and practice. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Impaired prefrontal cognitive control over interference by food images in binge-eating disorder and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Eun; Namkoong, Kee; Jung, Young-Chul

    2017-06-09

    Binge-eating disorder (BED)characterized by recurrent episodes of binge-eating without inappropriate compensatory behaviors is classified as an official diagnosis in DSM-5. However, the neural bases that differentiate BED from other eating disorders such as bulimia nervosa (BN), are still under debate. Thirty-nine participants (HC, n=14; BN, n=13; BED, n=12) underwent functional MRI while performing a Stroop-Match-to-Sample task. This pilot study investigated how food images interfered with the behavioral performances and blood-oxygenation-level-dependent neuronal activity. Compared to healthy controls, participants with BN showed lower accuracy indicating impaired cognitive control over interference. Compared to healthy controls, participants with BED demonstrated stronger activations in the ventral striatum in response to food images. By contrast, participants with BN exhibited stronger activations in the premotor cortex and dorsal striatum. These aberrant ventral and dorsal frontostriatal activations in response to food images are associated with increased reward sensitivity and habitual binge-eating/purging behaviors in BED and BN. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. An examination of affect prior to and following episodes of getting drunk in women with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Pisetsky, Emily M; Crosby, Ross D; Cao, Li; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E; Mitchell, James E; Engel, Scott G; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Peterson, Carol B

    2016-06-30

    The current study examined the association between affect and self-reported alcohol intoxication in women with bulimia nervosa (BN; N=133). Participants completed a two-week ecological momentary assessment protocol. Momentary global positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA), as well as the facets of NA (fear, guilt, hostility and sadness), were measured. Forty-five participants endorsed that they "got drunk" during the study period. Daily mean and variability of global PA and NA were compared between days with self-reported alcohol intoxication and days without self-reported alcohol intoxication. Trajectories of affect were modeled prior to and following episodes of self-reported alcohol intoxication. There were no differences in the mean or variability of PA or NA on days characterized by self-reported alcohol intoxication compared to days with no self-reported alcohol intoxication (ps>0.05). PA decreased significantly prior to self-reported alcohol intoxication and remained stable afterwards. There were no changes in global NA before or after self-reported alcohol intoxication, but an examination of the facets of NA showed that sadness increased following episodes of self-reported alcohol intoxication. These findings showed only partial support for a negative reinforcement model of alcohol use in women with BN.

  20. Depression and personality traits associated with emotion dysregulation: correlates of suicide attempts in women with bulimia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Pisetsky, Emily M.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Crosby, Ross D.; Peterson, Carol B.; Mitchell, James E.; Engel, Scott G.; Joiner, Thomas E.; Bardone-Cone, Anna; Le Grange, Daniel; Klein, Marjorie H.; Crow, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to identify personality traits and psychiatric comorbidities associated with a lifetime history of a suicide attempt in women with bulimia nervosa (BN). Method Data from two samples of women with BN (n = 204 and n = 133) were examined. Participants in both samples completed the Dimensional Assessment of Personality Pathology – Basic Questionnaire (DAPP-BQ) and reported whether they had ever had a lifetime suicide attempt. Comorbid psychopathology was based on self-reported questionnaire and interview data. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were run predicting a lifetime suicide attempt. Results Based on the DAPP-BQ, identity problems were associated with lifetime suicide attempt in both samples; cognitive dysregulation, anxiousness and insecure attachment were associated with lifetime suicide attempt in one but not both samples. Lifetime anxiety disorder was associated with lifetime suicide attempt in one sample and depression was associated with a lifetime suicide attempt in both samples. Multivariate analyses revealed that only depression was uniquely associated with a lifetime suicide attempt in both samples. Discussion Although personality traits associated with aspects of emotion dysregulation were associated with a lifetime suicide attempt, depression was found to have the strongest association with a lifetime suicide attempt in two samples of women with BN. These findings suggest that depression severity may be the most important target of treatment and suicide prevention efforts in women with BN. PMID:26315489

  1. Early psychopathological signs in bulimia nervosa. A retrospective comparison of the period of puberty in bulimic and control girls.

    PubMed

    Corcos, M; Flament, M F; Giraud, M J; Paterniti, S; Ledoux, S; Atger, F; Jeammet, P

    2000-06-01

    While bulimia nervosa (BN) typically begins in girls during late adolescence, puberty and associated developmental changes have been linked to negative body image and onset of a variety of psychological problems. This study aimed to identify early psychopathological signs, which could have marked the period of puberty in subjects whom later developed BN. In a case control study, we compared 49 girls with BN according to DSM-IV, aged between 18 and 20 years, to 49 girls of the same age, who were free of any past or current psychiatric diagnosis. Psychiatrists or clinical psychologists, using a semi-structured clinical interview including retrospective assessment of the emotional and behavioural changes that had occurred in puberty evaluated both groups. Before the onset of a clinical eating disorder, the subjects with BN presented significantly more often than controls weight related concerns, attitudes of withdrawal and social isolation, and negative changes in their body image and self-image, as well as in their relationships with siblings and peers. The results suggest that early psychological distress precedes the onset of an eating disorder in many cases, and that prevention efforts should be directed towards peripubertal psychopathology.

  2. The validity of DSM-5 severity specifiers for anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kathryn E; Ellison, Jo M; Crosby, Ross D; Engel, Scott G; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott J; Peterson, Carol B; Le Grange, Daniel; Wonderlich, Stephen A

    2017-09-01

    The DSM-5 includes severity specifiers (i.e., mild, moderate, severe, extreme) for anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge-eating disorder (BED), which are determined by weight status (AN) and frequencies of binge-eating episodes (BED) or inappropriate compensatory behaviors (BN). Given limited data regarding the validity of eating disorder (ED) severity specifiers, this study examined the concurrent and predictive validity of severity specifiers in AN, BN, and BED. Adults with AN (n = 109), BN (n = 76), and BED (n = 216) were identified from previous datasets. Concurrent validity was assessed by measures of ED psychopathology, depression, anxiety, quality of life, and physical health. Predictive validity was assessed by ED symptoms at the end of the treatment in BN and BED. Severity categories did not differ in baseline validators, though the mild AN group evidenced greater ED symptoms compared to the severe group. In BN, greater severity was related to greater end of treatment binge-eating and compensatory behaviors, and lower likelihood of abstinence; however, in BED, greater severity was related to lower ED symptoms at the end of the treatment. Results demonstrated limited support for the validity of DSM-5 severity specifiers. Future research is warranted to explore additional validators and possible alternative indicators of severity in EDs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. How useful is the DSM-5 severity indicator in bulimia nervosa? A clinical study including a measure of impairment.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Paul E; Luck, Amy; Cardy, Jessica; Staniford, Jessica

    2016-12-30

    The severity criterion used in DSM-5 for bulimia nervosa (BN) was investigated in 214 individuals referred for treatment at a regional eating disorders service in the UK. In addition to comparing eating disorder symptoms, impairment secondary to these symptoms was also assessed. According to guidance in DSM-5, 94 individuals were classified as mild (43.9%), 70 as moderate (32.7%), 32 as severe (15.0%), and 8 as extreme (3.7%) levels of BN severity. Due to small numbers in the latter two groups, it was necessary to combine these to form one 'severe/extreme' group. Analyses on these three groups suggested no group effect on demographic variables but differences were seen on measures of eating pathology, psychological distress, and psychosocial impairment between the mild group and other groups. Individuals in the moderate and severe/extreme groups scored comparably on most measures of pathology and impairment. The results are broadly consistent with past studies on community samples although together question the demarcation between moderate and more severe groups of individuals with BN.

  4. High-fat taste challenge reveals altered striatal response in women recovered from bulimia nervosa: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    RADELOFF, DANIEL; WILLMANN, KATHRIN; OTTO, LISA; LINDNER, MICHAEL; PUTNAM, KAREN; VAN LEEUWEN, SARA; KAYE, WALTER H; POUSTKA, FRITZ; WAGNER, ANGELA

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) tend to have disordered thinking and eating behaviours in regards to fat containing foods. This is the first study to investigate neuronal pathways that may contribute to altered fat consumption in eating disordered patients. Methods We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare responses to a high-fat cream stimulus, water, and a non-caloric viscous stimulus (CMC) to control for response to viscosity in individuals recovered from AN (N = 15), BN (N = 14) and a healthy control sample (CW, N = 18). Results An interaction analysis (ANOVAR) comparing the three groups (AN, BN, CW) and the three conditions (cream, CMC, water) revealed significant differences in the left anterior ventral striatum (AVS). A post hoc analysis displayed a higher magnitude of response for the contrast cream/water in BN compared to AN or CW and for the contrast CMC/water in BN compared to AN. Conclusions BN showed an exaggerated AVS response for the cream/water contrast in comparison to AN or CW. Moreover, BN showed an exaggerated AVS response for the CMC/water contrast in comparison to AN. These findings support the possibility that BN have an altered hedonic and/or motivational drive to consume fats. PMID:22540408

  5. Bulimia nervosa and its relation to voice changes in young adults: A simple review of epidemiology, complications, diagnostic criteria and management

    PubMed Central

    Rajiah, Kingston; Mathew, Elizabeth M; Veettil, Sajesh K; Kumar, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Bulimia nervosa (BN) is a type of feeding disorder that starts in adolescence and presents a variety of symptoms, recurrent vomiting in the oral cavity that may reach down to the larynx – similarly to gastro-esophageal reflux, causing laryngeal and voice disorder alterations. Objective: These studies aimed at surveying the literature and investigate the studies that considered BN a risk factor for voice disorders and its epidemiology, complications, diagnostic criteria, and management. Materials and Methods: A review of the literature was done based on a survey of BIOMED CENTRAL and COCHRANE @ OVID databases, which are linked to the IMU ezproxy virtual library (http://ezp.imu.edu.my/menu). The keywords “bulimia nervosa”, “teenage complications” and “voice changes” were used. Citations with summaries were chosen to limit the topic, for the period between 2000 and 2010, in English. Results: Of the ninety three papers we found, twenty three were used as a basis for this review. Among them, only three discuss BN as an etiology factor associated with voice changes in adult women, and we did not find any paper associating this with bulimic teenagers. Conclusion: It is necessary to observe laryngeal and vocal signs and symptoms associated with BN, especially in teenagers whose voices are going through a period of change. The contribution of this type of investigation, which should begin with a clinical history, is essential for minimizing the complications of bulimia nervosa. Thus, adolescents and adults with voice disorders should be investigated in greater detail. PMID:23798933

  6. Altered 5-HT2A Receptor Binding after Recovery from Bulimia-Type Anorexia Nervosa: Relationships to Harm Avoidance and Drive for Thinness

    PubMed Central

    Bailer, Ursula F; Price, Julie C; Meltzer, Carolyn C; Mathis, Chester A; Frank, Guido K; Weissfeld, Lisa; McConaha, Claire W; Henry, Shannan E; Brooks-Achenbach, Sarah; Barbarich, Nicole C; Kaye, Walter H

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that a disturbance of serotonin neuronal pathways may contribute to the pathogenesis of anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). This study applied positron emission tomography (PET) to investigate the brain serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor, which could contribute to disturbances of appetite and behavior in AN and BN. To avoid the confounding effects of malnutrition, we studied 10 women recovered from bulimia-type AN (REC AN–BN, >1 year normal weight, regular menstrual cycles, no binging, or purging) compared with 16 healthy control women (CW) using PET imaging and a specific 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, [18F]altanserin. REC AN–BN women had significantly reduced [18F]altanserin binding potential relative to CW in the left subgenual cingulate, the left parietal cortex, and the right occipital cortex. [18F]altanserin binding potential was positively related to harm avoidance and negatively related to novelty seeking in cingulate and temporal regions only in REC AN–BN subjects. In addition, REC AN–BN had negative relationships between [18F]altanserin binding potential and drive for thinness in several cortical regions. In conclusion, this study extends research suggesting that altered 5-HT neuronal system activity persists after recovery from bulimia-type AN, particularly in subgenual cingulate regions. Altered 5-HT neurotransmission after recovery also supports the possibility that this may be a trait-related disturbance that contributes to the pathophysiology of eating disorders. It is possible that subgenual cingulate findings are not specific for AN–BN, but may be related to the high incidence of lifetime major depressive disorder diagnosis in these subjects. PMID:15054474

  7. Altered 5-HT(2A) receptor binding after recovery from bulimia-type anorexia nervosa: relationships to harm avoidance and drive for thinness.

    PubMed

    Bailer, Ursula F; Price, Julie C; Meltzer, Carolyn C; Mathis, Chester A; Frank, Guido K; Weissfeld, Lisa; McConaha, Claire W; Henry, Shannan E; Brooks-Achenbach, Sarah; Barbarich, Nicole C; Kaye, Walter H

    2004-06-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that a disturbance of serotonin neuronal pathways may contribute to the pathogenesis of anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). This study applied positron emission tomography (PET) to investigate the brain serotonin 2A (5-HT(2A)) receptor, which could contribute to disturbances of appetite and behavior in AN and BN. To avoid the confounding effects of malnutrition, we studied 10 women recovered from bulimia-type AN (REC AN-BN, > 1 year normal weight, regular menstrual cycles, no binging, or purging) compared with 16 healthy control women (CW) using PET imaging and a specific 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist, [18F]altanserin. REC AN-BN women had significantly reduced [18F]altanserin binding potential relative to CW in the left subgenual cingulate, the left parietal cortex, and the right occipital cortex. [18F]altanserin binding potential was positively related to harm avoidance and negatively related to novelty seeking in cingulate and temporal regions only in REC AN-BN subjects. In addition, REC AN-BN had negative relationships between [18F]altanserin binding potential and drive for thinness in several cortical regions. In conclusion, this study extends research suggesting that altered 5-HT neuronal system activity persists after recovery from bulimia-type AN, particularly in subgenual cingulate regions. Altered 5-HT neurotransmission after recovery also supports the possibility that this may be a trait-related disturbance that contributes to the pathophysiology of eating disorders. It is possible that subgenual cingulate findings are not specific for AN-BN, but may be related to the high incidence of lifetime major depressive disorder diagnosis in these subjects. Copyright 2004 Nature Publishing Group

  8. Do coping strategies discriminate eating disordered individuals better than eating disorder features? An explorative study on female inpatients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Villa, Valentina; Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Pagnini, Francesco; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Cesa, Gian Luca; Molinari, Enrico

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this explorative research was to examine how the COPE (Coping Orientation to Problem Experienced Inventory), an established instrument for measuring coping styles, and EDI-2 (Eating Disorder Inventory-2), a widely used questionnaire for assessing psychological and behavioural features of eating disorders (ED), discriminate among healthy individuals, inpatients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and inpatients with bulimia nervosa (BN). A discriminant analysis approach was used. Results showed that coping styles such as positive attitude, planning and social support are even more discriminative variables than eating disorder features. Implications for further studies are discussed.

  9. Randomized Clinical Trial of Family-Based Treatment and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Le Grange, Daniel; Lock, James; Agras, W. Stewart; Bryson, Susan W.; Jo, Booil

    2015-01-01

    Objective There is a paucity of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) for adolescents with bulimia nervosa (BN). Prior studies suggest cognitive-behavioral therapy adapted for adolescents (CBT-A) and family-based treatment (FBT-BN) could be effective for this patient population. The objective of this study was to compare the relative efficacy of these two specific therapies, FBT-BN and CBT-A. In addition, a smaller group was randomized to a non-specific treatment (supportive psychotherapy [SPT]), whose data were to be used if there were no differences between FBT-BN and CBT-A at end of treatment (EOT). Method This two-site RCT (Chicago and Stanford) randomized 130 participants (aged 12–18 years) meeting DSM, 4th Edition criteria for BN or partial BN (binge eating and purging ≥once per week for six months). Outcomes were assessed at baseline, EOT, 6 and 12 months post treatment. Treatments involved 18 outpatient sessions over 6 months. Primary outcome was defined as abstinence from binge eating and purging for 4 weeks prior to assessment, using the Eating Disorder Examination. Results Participants in FBT-BN achieved higher abstinence rates than in CBT-A at EOT (39% vs. 20%; p=.040, number needed to treat [NNT]=5) and at 6-month follow-up (44% vs. 25%; p=.030, NNT=5). Abstinence rates between these two groups did not differ statistically at 12- month follow-up (49% vs. 32%; p=.130, NNT=6). Conclusion FBT-BN is more effective in promoting abstinence from binge eating and purging than CBT-A in adolescent BN at EOT and 6-month follow-up. By 12-month follow-up there were no statistically significant differences between the two treatments. PMID:26506579

  10. Increased use of antimicrobial medication in bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder prior to the eating disorder treatment.

    PubMed

    Raevuori, Anu; Lukkariniemi, Laura; Suokas, Jaana T; Gissler, Mika; Suvisaari, Jaana M; Haukka, Jari

    2016-06-01

    We examined the use of antimicrobial medication as a proxy for infections in large patient cohort treated for binge-eating disorder (BED), bulimia nervosa (BN), and anorexia nervosa (AN) over the five-year period preceding eating disorder treatment. Patients (N = 1592) at the Eating Disorder Unit of Helsinki University Central Hospital between 2000 and 2010 were compared with matched general population controls (N = 6368). The study population was linked to the prescription data of antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral medication from the Register on Reimbursed Prescription Medicine. Data were analyzed using regression models. Individuals with BN and BED had received more often antimicrobial medication prescriptions compared to their controls (OR: 1.7, 95% CI: 1.3-2.1; OR: 2.6, 95% CI: 1.4-4.6, respectively), while no significant difference emerged in AN (OR: 0.9, 95% CI: 0.7-1.0, p = 0.10). Of the main drug categories, the respective pattern was seen in antibacterial and antifungal medication, while increased use for antivirals appeared only in BN (OR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.1-2.3). Measured with the mean number of prescriptions or mean Defined Daily Doses per individual, patients with BN, BED and males with AN had also higher total antimicrobial medication use. Indicating increased infections, we found elevated use of antimicrobial medication in BN, BED and in males with AN. Infections may be consequence of hyperglycemia, weight gain, or dysregulation of intestinal microbiota associated with core eating disorder behaviors. Or the other way round; changes in intestinal microbiota due to infections, inflammation, or antibacterial medications might contribute to eating disorders in multiple ways. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:542-552). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The Role of Leptin, Melanocortin, and Neurotrophin System Genes on Body Weight in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Zeynep; Kaplan, Allan S.; Tiwari, Arun K.; Levitan, Robert D.; Piran, Sara; Bergen, Andrew W.; Kaye, Walter H.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Wang, Kai; Berrettini, Wade H.; Brandt, Harry A.; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Crawford, Steve; Crow, Scott; Fichter, Manfred M.; Halmi, Katherine A.; Johnson, Craig L.; Keel, Pamela K.; Klump, Kelly L.; Magistretti, Pierre; Mitchell, James E.; Strober, Michael; Thornton, Laura M.; Treasure, Janet; Woodside, D. Blake; Knight, Joanne; Kennedy, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although low weight is a key factor contributing to the high mortality in anorexia nervosa (AN), it is unclear how AN patients sustain low weight compared with bulimia nervosa (BN) patients with similar psychopathology. Studies of genes involved in appetite and weight regulation in eating disorders have yielded variable findings in part due to small sample size and clinical heterogeneity. This study: (1) assessed the role of leptin, melanocortin, and neurotrophin genetic variants in conferring risk for AN and BN and (2) explored the involvement of these genes in body mass index (BMI) variations within AN and BN. Method Our sample consisted of 745 individuals with AN without a history of BN, 245 with BN without a history of AN, and 321 controls. We genotyped 20 markers with known or putative function among genes selected from leptin, melanocortin, and neurotrophin systems. Results There were no significant differences in allele frequencies among individuals with AN, BN, and controls. AGRP rs13338499 polymorphism was associated with lowest illness-related BMI in those with AN (p=0.0013), and NTRK2 rs1042571 was associated with highest BMI in those with BN (p=0.0018). Discussion To our knowledge, this is the first study to address the issue of clinical heterogeneity in eating disorder genetics and to explore the role of known or putatively functional markers in genes regulating appetite and weight in individuals with AN and BN. If replicated, our results may serve as an important first step toward gaining a better understanding of weight regulation in eating disorders. PMID:24831852

  12. The role of leptin, melanocortin, and neurotrophin system genes on body weight in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Zeynep; Kaplan, Allan S; Tiwari, Arun K; Levitan, Robert D; Piran, Sara; Bergen, Andrew W; Kaye, Walter H; Hakonarson, Hakon; Wang, Kai; Berrettini, Wade H; Brandt, Harry A; Bulik, Cynthia M; Crawford, Steven; Crow, Scott; Fichter, Manfred M; Halmi, Katherine A; Johnson, Craig L; Keel, Pamela K; Klump, Kelly L; Magistretti, Pierre; Mitchell, James E; Strober, Michael; Thornton, Laura M; Treasure, Janet; Woodside, D Blake; Knight, Joanne; Kennedy, James L

    2014-08-01

    Although low weight is a key factor contributing to the high mortality in anorexia nervosa (AN), it is unclear how AN patients sustain low weight compared with bulimia nervosa (BN) patients with similar psychopathology. Studies of genes involved in appetite and weight regulation in eating disorders have yielded variable findings, in part due to small sample size and clinical heterogeneity. This study: (1) assessed the role of leptin, melanocortin, and neurotrophin genetic variants in conferring risk for AN and BN; and (2) explored the involvement of these genes in body mass index (BMI) variations within AN and BN. Our sample consisted of 745 individuals with AN without a history of BN, 245 individuals with BN without a history of AN, and 321 controls. We genotyped 20 markers with known or putative function among genes selected from leptin, melanocortin, and neurotrophin systems. There were no significant differences in allele frequencies among individuals with AN, BN, and controls. AGRP rs13338499 polymorphism was associated with lowest illness-related BMI in those with AN (p = 0.0013), and NTRK2 rs1042571 was associated with highest BMI in those with BN (p = 0.0018). To our knowledge, this is the first study to address the issue of clinical heterogeneity in eating disorder genetic research and to explore the role of known or putatively functional markers in genes regulating appetite and weight in individuals with AN and BN. If replicated, our results may serve as an important first step toward gaining a better understanding of weight regulation in eating disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Eating attitudes of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder and obesity without eating disorder female patients: differences and similarities.

    PubMed

    Alvarenga, M S; Koritar, P; Pisciolaro, F; Mancini, M; Cordás, T A; Scagliusi, F B

    2014-05-28

    The objective was to compare eating attitudes, conceptualized as beliefs, thoughts, feelings, behaviors and relationship with food, of anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED) patients and a group of obese (OBS) without eating disorders (ED). Female patients from an Eating Disorder (ED) Unit with AN (n=42), BN (n=52) and BED (n=53) and from an obesity service (n=37) in Brazil answered the Disordered Eating Attitude Scale (DEAS) which evaluate eating attitudes with 5 subscales: relationship with food, concerns about food and weight gain, restrictive and compensatory practices, feelings toward eating, and idea of normal eating. OBS patients were recruited among those without ED symptoms according to the Binge Eating Scale and the Questionnaire on Eating and Weight Patterns. ANOVA was used to compare body mass index and age between groups. Bonferroni test was used to analyze multiple comparisons among groups. AN and BN patients presented more dysfunctional eating attitudes and OBS patients less dysfunctional (p<0.001). For DEAS total score, AN and BN patients were similar and all other were different (p<0.001). Similarities suggested between BN and BED were true just for the "Relationship with food" and "Idea of normal eating." BED patients were worst than OBS for "Relationship with food" and as dysfunctional as AN patients - besides their behavior could be considered the opposite. Differences and similarities support a therapeutic individualized approach for ED and obese patients, call attention for the theoretical differences between obesity and ED, and suggest more research focused on eating attitudes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Attitudes toward health and taste of food among women with bulimia nervosa and women of a non-clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Koritar, Priscila; Philippi, Sonia Tucunduva; Alvarenga, Marle Dos Santos

    2017-06-01

    Taste preferences and health concerns play important roles in determining eating attitudes, thus influencing food choices. Disordered eating attitudes are common among women, and can lead to the development and maintenance of eating disorders (ED). Attitudes toward health and taste of food among ED patients and its comparison with non-clinical women are not well known, and this knowledge could improve eating interventions. In this study, we compared taste preferences and health concerns in 27 women with diagnosis of bulimia nervosa (BN) and 216 women of a non-clinical sample. All participants completed the Health and Taste Attitude Scale (HTAS). Using analysis of covariance we compared the HTAS scores of the BN patients with those of the college students. Risk behaviors for ED (assessed by the Eating Attitudes Test) were identified in 54 (25%) of the non-clinical sample, all of whom were therefore excluded in comparison of BN patients. Non-clinical sample, compared to patients, scored higher on the HTAS Taste domain (p < 0.001) and its pleasure subscale (p < 0.001), whereas patients scored higher on the HTAS Health domain (p < 0.05) and its light product interest subscale (p < 0.05). Based on our data, eating attitudes of women of non-clinical sample are related to taste and pleasure, whereas women with BN are concerned with adopting a diet regarded as healthy, thus increasing their interest in "light" products. Therefore, the taste and health concerns must be considered in nutrition interventions for women in general, and prevention and treatment of ED as determinants of food choice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Focused vs. Broad enhanced cognitive behavioral therapy for bulimia nervosa with comorbid borderline personality: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Thompson-Brenner, Heather; Shingleton, Rebecca M; Thompson, Douglas R; Satir, Dana A; Richards, Lauren K; Pratt, Elizabeth M; Barlow, David H

    2016-01-01

    A subset of individuals with bulimia nervosa (BN) have borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms, including chronic negative affect and interpersonal problems. These symptoms predict poor BN treatment outcome in some studies. The broad version of Enhanced Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT-E) was developed to address co-occurring problems that interfere with treatment response. The current study investigated the relative effects, predictors, and moderators of CBT-E for BN with BPD and co-occurring mood/anxiety disorders. Fifty patients with BN and threshold or sub-threshold BPD and current or recent Axis I mood or anxiety disorders were randomly assigned to receive focused CBT-E (CBT-Ef) or broad CBT-E (CBT-Eb) specifically including an interpersonal module and additional attention to mood intolerance. Forty-two percent of the sample reported remission from binge eating and purging at termination. Significant changes across symptom domains were observed at termination and at 6-month follow-up. Though CBT-Ef predicted good outcomes in multivariate models, the severity of affective/interpersonal problems moderated treatment effects: participants with higher severity showed better ED outcomes in CBT-Eb, whereas those with lower severity showed better outcomes in CBT-Ef. Severity of affective/interpersonal BPD symptoms at baseline predicted negative outcomes overall. Follow-up BPD affective/interpersonal problems were predicted by baseline affective/interpersonal problems and by termination EDE score. This study supports the utility of CBT-E for patients with BN and complex comorbidity. CBT-Ef appears to be more efficacious for patients with relatively less severe BPD symptoms, whereas CBT-Eb appears to be more efficacious for patients with more severe BPD symptoms. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Population-based cost-offset analyses for disorder-specific treatment of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa in Germany.

    PubMed

    Bode, Katharina; Götz von Olenhusen, Nina Maria; Wunsch, Eva-Maria; Kliem, Sören; Kröger, Christoph

    2017-03-01

    Previous research has shown that anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are expensive illnesses to treat. To reduce their economic burden, adequate interventions need to be established. Our objective was to conduct cost-offset analyses for evidence-based treatment of eating disorders using outcome data from a psychotherapy trial involving cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and focal psychodynamic therapy (FPT) for AN and a trial involving CBT for BN. Assuming a currently running, ideal healthcare system using a 12-month, prevalence-based approach and varying the willingness to participate in treatment, we investigated whether the potential financial benefits of AN- and BN-related treatment outweigh the therapy costs at the population level. We elaborated on a formula that allows calculating cost-benefit relationships whereby the calculation of the parameters is based on estimates from data of health institutions within the German healthcare system. Additional intangible benefits were calculated with the aid of Quality-Adjusted Life Years. The annual costs of an untreated eating disorder were 2.38 billion EUR for AN and 617.69 million EUR for BN. Independent of the willingness to participate in treatment, the cost-benefit relationships for the treatment remained constant at 2.51 (CBT) and 2.33 (FPT) for AN and 4.05 (CBT) for BN. This consistency implies that for each EUR invested in the treatment, between 2.33 and 4.05 EUR could be saved each year. Our findings suggest that the implementation of evidence-based psychotherapy treatments for AN and BN may achieve substantial cost savings at the population level. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Three decades of eating disorders in Dutch primary care: decreasing incidence of bulimia nervosa but not of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Smink, F R E; van Hoeken, D; Donker, G A; Susser, E S; Oldehinkel, A J; Hoek, H W

    2016-04-01

    Whether the incidence of eating disorders in Western, industrialized countries has changed over time has been the subject of much debate. The purpose of this primary-care study was to examine changes in the incidence of eating disorders in The Netherlands during the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s. A nationwide network of general practitioners (GPs), serving a representative sample (~1%) of the total Dutch population, recorded newly diagnosed patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) in their practice during 1985-1989, 1995-1999, and 2005-2009. GPs are key players in the Dutch healthcare system, as their written referral is mandatory in order to get access to specialized (mental) healthcare, covered by health insurance. Health insurance is virtually universal in The Netherlands (99% of the population). A substantial number of GPs participated in all three study periods, during which the same case identification criteria were used and the same psychiatrist was responsible for making the final diagnoses. Incidence rates were calculated and for comparison between periods, incidence rate ratios. The overall incidence rate of BN decreased significantly in the past three decades (from 8.6 per 100,000 person-years in 1985-1989 to 6.1 in 1995-1999, and 3.2 in 2005-2009). The overall incidence of AN remained fairly stable during three decades, i.e. 7.4 per 100,000 person-years in 1985-1989, 7.8 in 1995-1999, and 6.0 in 2005-2009. The incidence rate of BN decreased significantly over the past three decades, while the overall incidence rate of AN remained stable.

  18. The Natural Course of Bulimia Nervosa and Eating Disorder not Otherwise Specified is not Influenced by Personality Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Sanislow, Charles A.; Shea, M. Tracie; Skodol, Andrew E.; Stout, Robert L.; Pagano, Maria E.; Yen, Shirley; McGlashan, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine prospectively the natural course of bulimia nervosa (BN) and eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) and to test the effects of personality disorder (PD) comorbidity on the outcomes. Method Ninety-two female patients with current BN (N = 23) or EDNOS (N = 69) were evaluated at baseline enrollment in the Collaborative Longitudinal Personality Disorders Study (CLPS). Eating disorders (EDs) were assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders. Personality disorders (PDs) were assessed with the Diagnostic Interview for DSM-IV PD (DIPD-IV). The course of BN and EDNOS was assessed with the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation and the course of PDs was evaluated with the Follow-Along version of the DIPD-IV at 6, 12, and 24 months. Results Probability of remission at 24 months was 40% for BN and 59% for EDNOS. To test the effects of PD comorbidity on course, ED patients were divided into groups with no, one, and two or more PDs. Cox proportional regression analyses revealed that BN had a longer time to remission than EDNOS (p < .05). The number of PDs was not a significant predictor of time to remission, nor was the presence of Axis I psychiatric comorbidity or Global Assessment of Functioning scores. Analyses using proportional hazards regression with time-varying covariates revealed that PD instability was unrelated to changes in ED. Conclusions BN has a worse 24-month course (longer time to remission) than EDNOS. The natural course of BN and EDNOS is not influenced significantly by the presence, severity, or time-varying changes of co-occurring PDs, co-occurring Axis I disorders, or by global functioning. PMID:12949923

  19. Nutrient and food group intakes of women with and without Bulimia Nervosa and Binge Eating Disorder during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Haugen, Margaretha; Meltzer, Helle M; Von Holle, Ann; Hamer, Robert; Torgersen, Leila; Knopf-Berg, Cecilie; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2009-01-01

    Background Little is known concerning the dietary habits of eating disordered women during pregnancy that may lie in the causal pathway of adverse birth outcomes. Objective To examine the nutrient and food group intake of women with bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED) during pregnancy and compare their intake to women with no eating disorders. Design Data on 30,040 mother-child pairs are from the prospective Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study was used in cross-sectional analyses. Dietary information was collected using a food frequency questionnaire during the first half of pregnancy. Statistical testing by eating disorder categories with the non-eating disorder category as the referent group were conducted using log (means) adjusted for confounding and multiple comparisons. Food group differences were conducted using a Wilcoxon two-sided normal approximation test also adjusting for multiple comparisons. Results Women with BED before and during pregnancy had higher intakes of total energy, total mono-saturated and saturated fat, and lower intakes of folate, potassium, and vitamin C compared to the referent (p<.02). Women with incident BED during pregnancy had higher total energy and saturated fat intake compared to the referent (p=.01). Several differences emerged in food group consumption between women with and without eating disorders including intakes of artificial sweeteners, sweets, juice, fruits and fats. Conclusions Women with BN before and during pregnancy and those with BED before pregnancy exhibit dietary patterns different from women without eating disorders, that are reflective of their symptomatology, and may influence pregnancy outcomes. PMID:18469258

  20. Cardiac Risk and Disordered Eating: Decreased R Wave Amplitude in Women with Bulimia Nervosa and Women with Subclinical Binge/Purge Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Green, Melinda; Rogers, Jennifer; Nguyen, Christine; Blasko, Katherine; Martin, Amanda; Hudson, Dominique; Fernandez-Kong, Kristen; Kaza-Amlak, Zauditu; Thimmesch, Brandon; Thorne, Tyler

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was threefold. First, we examined whether women with bulimia nervosa (n = 12) and women with subthreshold binge/purge symptoms (n = 20) showed decreased mean R wave amplitude, an indicator of cardiac risk, on electrocardiograph compared to asymptomatic women (n = 20). Second, we examined whether this marker was pervasive across experimental paradigms, including before and after sympathetic challenge tasks. Third, we investigated behavioural predictors of this marker, including binge frequency and purge frequency assessed by subtype (dietary restriction, excessive exercise, self-induced vomiting, and laxative abuse). Results of a 3 (ED symptom status) × 5 (experimental condition) mixed factorial ANCOVA (covariates: body mass index, age) indicated women with bulimia nervosa and women with subclinical binge/purge symptoms demonstrated significantly reduced mean R wave amplitude compared to asymptomatic women; this effect was pervasive across experimental conditions. Multiple regression analyses showed binge and purge behaviours, most notably laxative abuse as a purge method, predicted decreased R wave amplitude across all experimental conditions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.