Science.gov

Sample records for bulk plasma pressure

  1. Ideal bulk pressure of active Brownian particles.

    PubMed

    Speck, Thomas; Jack, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    The extent to which active matter might be described by effective equilibrium concepts like temperature and pressure is currently being discussed intensely. Here, we study the simplest model, an ideal gas of noninteracting active Brownian particles. While the mechanical pressure exerted onto confining walls has been linked to correlations between particles' positions and their orientations, we show that these correlations are entirely controlled by boundary effects. We also consider a definition of local pressure, which describes interparticle forces in terms of momentum exchange between different regions of the system. We present three pieces of analytical evidence which indicate that such a local pressure exists, and we show that its bulk value differs from the mechanical pressure exerted on the walls of the system. We attribute this difference to the fact that the local pressure in the bulk does not depend on boundary effects, contrary to the mechanical pressure. We carefully examine these boundary effects using a channel geometry, and we show a virial formula for the pressure correctly predicts the mechanical pressure even in finite channels. However, this result no longer holds in more complex geometries, as exemplified for a channel that includes circular obstacles.

  2. Low-pressure plasma-etching of bulk polymer materials using gas mixture of CF{sub 4} and O{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Nabesawa, Hirofumi; Hiruma, Takaharu; Seki, Minoru; Hitobo, Takeshi; Wakabayashi, Suguru; Asaji, Toyohisa; Abe, Takashi

    2013-11-15

    In this study, we have proposed a low-pressure reactive ion etching of bulk polymer materials with a gas mixture of CF{sub 4} and O{sub 2}, and have achieved precise fabrication of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) bulk polymer plates with high-aspect-ratio and narrow gap array structures, such as, pillar, frustum, or cone, on a nano/micro scale. The effects of the etching conditions on the shape and size of each pillar were evaluated by changing etching duration and the size/material of etching mask. The fabricated PMMA array structures indicate possibilities of optical waveguide and nanofiber array. PFA cone array structures showed super-hydrophobicity without any chemical treatments. Also, polystyrene-coated silica spheres were used as an etching mask for the pillar array structure formation to control the gap between pillars.

  3. Bulk properties of plasma ions in the deep Jovian magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaou, Georgios

    The New Horizons spacecraft flew by Jupiter for a gravity assist in 2007. After the closest approach it followed an essentially tailward trajectory and observed the deep Jovian magnetotail (>200 Rj) for the very first time. The Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument is an electrostatic analyzer onboard New Horizons, observing the plasma ions in the energy-per-charge range from ~21 eV to ~7.8 keV. Using the SWAP data-set, previous studies have identified three distinct regions of the Jovian magnetotail:1) the inside magnetosphere 2) the magnetosheath, and 3) the adjacent boundary layer. We have developed several techniques to analyze the observations and derive the plasma bulk properties (density, temperature and velocity) in those three regions. The derived plasma parameters support that the plasma in the magnetosheath is shocked solar wind re-accelerating as it expands down the distant tail. The derived plasma flow implies a movement and/or compression of the magnetotail that eventually results to the observed magnetopause crossings. In addition, we show that the plasma thermal pressure is essentially constant. In order to analyze the boundary layer ions, we introduce some modifications to the previous model in order to account for uncertainties arising from the plasma flow fluctuation. We used the derived parameters to examine the pressure balance condition within the magnetosheath and the boundary layer in order to estimate the magnetic field in that region. The thermal pressure in the boundary layer is essentially constant as it is in the magnetosheath. We also examine several scenarios regarding the structure and movement of the distant magnetotail, comparing them with the observations. Finally, we analyze the data obtained deep inside magnetotail. The methodology we follow for this analysis is rather complicated since the ion flux in this region is very low and extremely variable. The ion bulk properties in this region are extremely diverse and we

  4. Partial pressure analysis of plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.

    1984-11-01

    The application of partial pressure analysis for plasma diagnostic measurements is reviewed. A comparison is made between the techniques of plasma flux analysis and partial pressure analysis for mass spectrometry of plasmas. Emphasis is given to the application of quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMS). The interface problems associated with the coupling of a QMS to a plasma device are discussed including: differential-pumping requirements, electromagnetic interferences from the plasma environment, the detection of surface-active species, ion source interactions, and calibration procedures. Example measurements are presented from process monitoring of glow discharge plasmas which are useful for cleaning and conditioning vacuum vessels.

  5. Ion optical effects in a low pressure rf plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Oechsner, Hans; Paulus, Hubert

    2013-11-15

    Ion optical effects in low pressure gas discharges are introduced as a novel input into low pressure plasma technology. They are based on appropriate geometrical plasma confinements which enable a control of the shape of internal density and potential distributions and, hence, the ion motion in the plasma bulk. Such effects are exemplified for an electron cyclotron wave resonance plasma in Ar at 1–5 × 10{sup −3} millibars. The geometry of the plasma chamber is modified by a conical and a cylindrical insert. Computer simulations display spherical plasma density contours to be formed around the conical confinement. This effects an increase of the ratio of the ion currents into the conical and the cylindrical inserts which depends on the fourth power of the plasma electron temperature. A quantitative understanding of this behavior is presented. As another essential result, the shape of the internal plasma contours is found to be independent of the pressure controlled plasma parameters.

  6. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, Gary S.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A .gamma.-mode, resonant-cavity plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two concentric cylindrical electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the annular region therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly shaping the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, no ions survive for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  7. Bulk viscosity of anisotropically expanding hot QCD plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Vinod

    2011-11-01

    The bulk viscosity, {zeta} and its ratio with the shear viscosity, {zeta}/{eta} have been studied in an anisotropically expanding pure glue plasma in the presence of turbulent color fields. It has been shown that the anisotropy in the momentum distribution function of gluons, which has been determined from a linearized transport equation eventually leads to the bulk viscosity. For the isotropic (equilibrium) state, a recently proposed quasiparticle model of pure SU(3) lattice QCD equation of state has been employed where the interactions are encoded in the effective fugacity. It has been argued that the interactions present in the equation of state, significantly contribute to the bulk viscosity. Its ratio with the shear viscosity is significant even at 1.5T{sub c}. Thus, one needs to take in account the effects of the bulk viscosity while studying the hydrodynamic expansion of quark-gluon plasma in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the Large Hadron Collider.

  8. Multifunctional bulk plasma source based on discharge with electron injection

    SciTech Connect

    Klimov, A. S.; Medovnik, A. V.; Tyunkov, A. V.; Savkin, K. P.; Shandrikov, M. V.; Vizir, A. V.

    2013-01-15

    A bulk plasma source, based on a high-current dc glow discharge with electron injection, is described. Electron injection and some special design features of the plasma arc emitter provide a plasma source with very long periods between maintenance down-times and a long overall lifetime. The source uses a sectioned sputter-electrode array with six individual sputter targets, each of which can be independently biased. This discharge assembly configuration provides multifunctional operation, including plasma generation from different gases (argon, nitrogen, oxygen, acetylene) and deposition of composite metal nitride and oxide coatings.

  9. Magnetospheric control of the bulk ionospheric plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sojka, J.J.; Schunk, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    The temperature, composition, and circulation of the high-latitude, ionosphere display a marked variation with altitude, latitude, longitude, universal time, season, solar cycle, and geomagnetic activity. This variation is largely a consequence of the effect that magnetospheric electric fields, particle precipitation, and heat flows have on the ionosphere. At F-region altitudes, the entire ionosphere drifts in response to magnetospheric electric fields, with the horizontal drift generally displaying a two-cell pattern of antisunward flow over the polar cap and return flow at lower latitudes. This ionospheric motion, in combination with downward magnetospheric heat flows and ion production due to energetic-particle precipitation, act to produce interesting ionospheric features such as ion and electron temperature hot spots, plasma blobs, localized ionization troughs, and extended tongue of ionization, and anomalous F-region peak altitudes and densities. The time delay for the ionosphere to respond to changing magnetospheric conditions is a strong function of altitude and can be as long as 3 to 4 hours in the upper F-region. The ionosphere's response to changing magnetospheric conditions are described using a time-dependent high-latitude ionospheric model.

  10. Bulk molybdenum field emitters by inductively coupled plasma etching.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ningli; Cole, Matthew T; Milne, William I; Chen, Jing

    2016-12-07

    In this work we report on the fabrication of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etched, diode-type, bulk molybdenum field emitter arrays. Emitter etching conditions as a function of etch mask geometry and process conditions were systematically investigated. For optimized uniformity, aspect ratios of >10 were achieved, with 25.5 nm-radius tips realised for masks consisting of aperture arrays some 4.45 μm in diameter and whose field electron emission performance has been herein assessed.

  11. Bulk plasma properties in the pulsed glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Glen P.; King, Fred L.

    2003-08-01

    This work focuses on the spatial and temporal characteristics of a glow discharge plasma operated with power pulses of 5 ms in duration at 25% duty cycle. Interpretation of emission data provides insight into the nature of the plasma at each instant of a typical pulse cycle and at each position in space. Because the bulk plasma properties affect the distribution of excited energy levels of the sputtered atoms, an improved understanding of the plasma affords the ability to select conditions that enhance analytically important emission lines. Optical emission spectroscopy was used to determine the relative populations of excited states for atoms and ions during the initial breakdown, the steady state and the recombining periods of the discharge pulse cycle. The plasma is highly ionizing in nature at the time of breakdown—with lower excited states being overpopulated—before reaching the steady state, or plateau, period, also ionizing in nature. These behaviors arise from a loss of charged particles and photons to the surroundings that shifts the plasma away from Saha and Boltzmann balances during these periods. The post-pulse period typically displays recombining behavior, characterized by population inversion for selected species—except for regions close to the cathode, where electrons and ions are lost by diffusion and are not available for recombination. The sputtered analyte atom emissions closely mimic those of the plasma bath gas, except that their emissions persevere for longer in the recombining after-peak period than do the discharge gas species.

  12. Effects of Bursty Bulk Flows on the Turbulence in the Plasma Sheet.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, M. V.; Antonova, E. E.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have shown the importance of turbulent processes in the dynamics of the magnetosphere of the Earth, including plasma and energy transport and the plasma sheet stability. We studied the properties of the turbulent plasma sheet in the presence and in the absence of the bursty bulk flow events for different phases of geomagnetic substorms and for quiet geomagnetic conditions. The criteria used for the selection of BBFs are similar to ones established by Angelopoulos et al., (JGR, 1994). The classification of time intervals as quiet, expansion phase, and recovery phase was based on the variation of the AL-index (Stepanova et al., 2011). Statistical analysis was performed using the data of THEMIS probes during tail-science seasons. It was found that the plasma pressure is the parameter which experienced major variation if we compare the data for different substrom phases, and also in the presence and absence of BBFs: The radial plasma pressure profiles are steaper during the substorm expansion phase, the presence of BBFs smoothes this effect, especially during the recovery phase and the quiet time. Study of eddy diffusion showed that even in the absence of BBFs the plasma sheet is strongly turbulent. Analysis of bulk velocity data 20 minutes before and after a BBF showed that the BBFs could generate additional vorticity at the leading and trailing edges, but their contribution is not decisive.

  13. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet applications

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.; Herrmann, H.W.; Henins, I.; Selwyn, G.S.

    1998-12-31

    The atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is a non-thermal, high pressure plasma discharge that produces a high velocity effluent stream of highly reactive chemical species. The discharge operates on a feedstock gas (e.g., He/O2/H2O) which flows between two concentric cylindrical electrodes: an outer grounded electrode and an inner electrode powered at 13.56 MHz RF. While passing through the plasma, the feedgas becomes excited, ionized or dissociated by electron impact. The fast-flowing effluent consists of ions and electrons, which are rapidly lost by recombination, highly reactive radicals (e.g., O, OH), and metastable species (e.g., O2). The metastable O2, which is reactive to hydrocarbon and other organic species, has been observed through optical emission spectroscopy to decrease by a factor of 2 from the APPJ nozzle exit to a distance of 10 cm. Unreacted metastable O2, and that which does not impinge on a surface, will then decay back to ordinary ground state O2, resulting in a completely dry, environmentally-benign form of surface cleaning. Applications such as removal of photoresist, oxide films and organic residues from wafers for the electronics industry, decontamination of civilian and military areas and personnel exposed to chemical or biological warfare agents, and paint (e.g., graffiti) removal are being considered.

  14. MEMS pressure sensor fabricated by advanced bulk micromachining techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanko, Gabriel; Hudek, Peter; Zehetner, Johann; Dzuba, Jaroslav; Choleva, Pavlina; Vallo, Martin; Rýger, Ivan; Lalinský, Tibor

    2013-05-01

    We present the design and implementation of a MEMS pressure sensor with an operation potential under harsh conditions at high temperatures (T = 300 - 800°C). The sensor consists of a circular HEMT (C-HEMT) integrated on a circular AlGaN/GaN membrane. In order to realize MEMS for extreme conditions using AlGaN/GaN material system, two key issues should be solved: (a) realization of MEMS structures by etching of the substrate material and (b) formation of metallic contacts (both ohmic and Schottky) to be able to withstand high thermal loads. In this design concept the piezoresistive and piezoelectric effect of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is used to sense the pressure under static and/or dynamic conditions. The backside bulk micromachining of our SiC wafer in the first experiment started with FS-laser ablation down to ~200 -270μm deep holes of 500μm in diameter. Because no additional intermediate layer can stop the ablation process, the number of laser pulses has to be optimized in order to reach the required ablation depth. 2D structural-mechanical and piezoelectric analyses were performed to verify the mechanical and piezoelectric response of the circular membrane pressure sensor to static pressure load (in the range between 20 and 100kPa). We suggested that suppressing the residual stress in the membrane can improve the sensor response. The parameters of the same devices previously fabricated on bulk substrates and/or membranes were compared. The maxima of drain currents of our C-HEMT devices on SiC exhibit more than four times higher values compared to those measured on silicon substrates.

  15. Novel bulk carbon nanotube materials for implant by spark plasma sintering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Omori, Mamoru; Watari, Fumio; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    2005-12-01

    Novel, bulk multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) sintered with polycarbosilane (PCS) as a binder agent were fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS), and their microstructure and properties were investigated. Sintering was done with 20-60 MPa pressure at 1200 degrees C. SEM and TEM observations showed that the nanosized tube microstructure was preserved even after sintering, and tubes adhered to each other with the nanosized nodules of SiC pyrolyzed form PCS as revealed by X-ray diffraction. Bulk density and Vickers hardness were found to increase, whereas the specific surface area decreased, as PCS content and sintering pressure increased. Through animal experiments, the inflammatory reaction of CNTs/PCS material was found to be slightly increased with increasing PCS content. In conclusion, sintered CNTs had physical and mechanical properties close to bone, and their good biocompatibility based on tissue response served to pave their way as a suitable implant material in the future.

  16. Buoyancy and Pressure Effects on Bulk Metal-Oxygen Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbud-Madrid, A.; McKnight, C.; Branch, M. C.; Daily, J. W.; Friedman, R. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The combustion behavior of metal-oxygen reactions if a weakly buoyant environment is studied to understand the rate-controlling mechanisms in the homogeneous and heterogeneous combustion of bulk metals. Cylindrical titanium and magnesium specimens are ignited in pure-oxygen at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 4.0 atm. Reduced gravity is obtained from an aircraft flying parabolic trajectories. A weakly buoyant environment is generated at low pressures under normal gravity and also at 1 atm under reduced gravity (0.01g). The similarity between these two experimental conditions comes from the p(exp 2)g buoyancy scale extracted from the Grashof number. Lower propagation rates of the molten interface on titanium samples are found at progressively lower pressures at 1 g. These rates are compared to theoretical results from heat conduction analyses with a diffusion/convection controlled reaction. The close agreement found between experimental and theoretical values indicate the importance values indicate the importance of natural convection enhanced oxygen transport on combustion rates. For magnesium, progressively longer burning times are experienced at lower pressures and 1 g. Under reduced gravity conditions at 1 atm, a burning time twice as long as in 1 g is exhibited. However, in this case, the validity of the p(exp 2)g buoyancy scale remains untested due to the inability to obtain steady gas-phase burning of the magnesium sample at 0.1 atm. Nevertheless, longer burning times and larger flame standoff distance at low pressures and at low gravity points to a diffusion/convection controlled reaction.

  17. Propagation of an atmospheric pressure plasma plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Xiong, Q.; Xiong, Z.; Hu, J.; Zhou, F.; Gong, W.; Xian, Y.; Zou, C.; Tang, Z.; Jiang, Z.; Pan, Y.

    2009-02-01

    The "plasma bullet" behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma plumes has recently attracted significant interest. In this paper, a specially designed plasma jet device is used to study this phenomenon. It is found that a helium primary plasma can propagate through the wall of a dielectric tube and keep propagating inside the dielectric tube (secondary plasma). High-speed photographs show that the primary plasma disappears before the secondary plasma starts to propagate. Both plumes propagate at a hypersonic speed. Detailed studies on the dynamics of the plasma plumes show that the local electric field induced by the charges on the surface of the dielectric tube plays an important role in the ignition of the secondary plasma. This indicates that the propagation of the plasma plumes may be attributed to the local electric field induced by the charges in the bulletlike plasma volume.

  18. Propagation of an atmospheric pressure plasma plume

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, X.; Xiong, Q.; Xiong, Z.; Hu, J.; Zhou, F.; Gong, W.; Xian, Y.; Zou, C.; Tang, Z.; Jiang, Z.; Pan, Y.

    2009-02-15

    The ''plasma bullet'' behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma plumes has recently attracted significant interest. In this paper, a specially designed plasma jet device is used to study this phenomenon. It is found that a helium primary plasma can propagate through the wall of a dielectric tube and keep propagating inside the dielectric tube (secondary plasma). High-speed photographs show that the primary plasma disappears before the secondary plasma starts to propagate. Both plumes propagate at a hypersonic speed. Detailed studies on the dynamics of the plasma plumes show that the local electric field induced by the charges on the surface of the dielectric tube plays an important role in the ignition of the secondary plasma. This indicates that the propagation of the plasma plumes may be attributed to the local electric field induced by the charges in the bulletlike plasma volume.

  19. Laser plasma at low air pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vas'kovskii, Iu. M.; Moiseev, V. N.; Rovinskii, R. E.; Tsenina, I. S.

    1993-01-01

    The ambient-pressure dependences of the dynamic and optical characteristics of a laser plasma generated by CO2-laser irradiation of an obstacle are investigated experimentally. The change of the sample's surface roughness after irradiation is investigated as a function of air pressure. It is concluded that the transition from the air plasma to the erosion plasma takes place at an air pressure of about 1 mm Hg. The results confirm the existing theory of plasma formation near the surface of an obstacle under the CO2-laser pulse effect in air.

  20. Bursty bulk flows in the inner central plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelopoulos, V.; Baumjohann, W.; Kennel, C. F.; Coronti, F. V.; Kivelson, M. G.; Pellat, R.; Walker, R. J.; Luehr, H.; Paschmann, G.

    1992-01-01

    High-speed flows in the inner central plasma sheet (first reported by Baumjohann et al. (1990) are studied, together with the concurrent behavior of the plasma and magnetic field, by using AMPTE/IRM data from about 9 to 19 R(E) in the earth magnetotail. The conclusions drawn from the detailed analysis of a representative event are reinforced by a superposed epoch analysis applied on two years of data. The high-speed flows organize themselves in 10-min time scale flow enhancements called here bursty-bulk flow (BBF) events. Both temporal and spatial effects are responsible for their bursty nature. The flow velocity exhibits peaks of very large amplitude with a characteristic time scale of the order of a minute, which are usually associated with magnetic field dipolarizations and ion temeperature increases. The BBFs represent intervals of enhanced earthward convection and energy transport per unit area in the y-z GSM direction of the order of 5 x 10 exp 19 ergs/R(E-squared).

  1. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process And Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Peter C. Kong; Myrtle

    2006-09-01

    This paper provides a general discussion of atmospheric-pressure plasma generation, processes, and applications. There are two distinct categories of atmospheric-pressure plasmas: thermal and nonthermal. Thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas include those produced in high intensity arcs, plasma torches, or in high intensity, high frequency discharges. Although nonthermal plasmas are at room temperatures, they are extremely effective in producing activated species, e.g., free radicals and excited state atoms. Thus, both thermal and nonthermal atmosphericpressure plasmas are finding applications in a wide variety of industrial processes, e.g. waste destruction, material recovery, extractive metallurgy, powder synthesis, and energy conversion. A brief discussion of recent plasma technology research and development activities at the Idaho National Laboratory is included.

  2. Dramatic pressure-driven enhancement of bulk skyrmion stability

    PubMed Central

    Levatić, I.; Popčević, P.; Šurija, V.; Kruchkov, A.; Berger, H.; Magrez, A.; White, J. S.; Rønnow, H. M.; Živković, I.

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of magnetic skyrmion lattices initiated a surge of interest in the scientific community. Several novel phenomena have been shown to emerge from the interaction of conducting electrons with the skyrmion lattice, such as a topological Hall-effect and a spin-transfer torque at ultra-low current densities. In the insulating compound Cu2OSeO3, magneto-electric coupling enables control of the skyrmion lattice via electric fields, promising a dissipation-less route towards novel spintronic devices. One of the outstanding fundamental issues is related to the thermodynamic stability of the skyrmion lattice. To date, the skyrmion lattice in bulk materials has been found only in a narrow temperature region just below the order-disorder transition. If this narrow stability is unavoidable, it would severely limit applications. Here we present the discovery that applying just moderate pressure on Cu2OSeO3 substantially increases the absolute size of the skyrmion pocket. This insight demonstrates directly that tuning the electronic structure can lead to a significant enhancement of the skyrmion lattice stability. We interpret the discovery by extending the previously employed Ginzburg-Landau approach and conclude that change in the anisotropy is the main driver for control of the size of the skyrmion pocket. PMID:26892190

  3. Seed disinfection effect of atmospheric pressure plasma and low pressure plasma on Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Terumi; Takai, Yuichiro; Kawaradani, Mitsuo; Okada, Kiyotsugu; Tanimoto, Hideo; Misawa, Tatsuya; Kusakari, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    Gas plasma generated and applied under two different systems, atmospheric pressure plasma and low pressure plasma, was used to investigate the inactivation efficacy on the seedborne pathogenic fungus, Rhizoctonia solani, which had been artificially introduced to brassicaceous seeds. Treatment with atmospheric plasma for 10 min markedly reduced the R. solani survival rate from 100% to 3% but delayed seed germination. The low pressure plasma treatment reduced the fungal survival rate from 83% to 1.7% after 10 min and the inactivation effect was dependent on the treatment time. The seed germination rate after treatment with the low pressure plasma was not significantly different from that of untreated seeds. The air temperature around the seeds in the low pressure system was lower than that of the atmospheric system. These results suggested that gas plasma treatment under low pressure could be effective in disinfecting the seeds without damaging them.

  4. Processing of bulk Al7075 alloy by spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Málek, P.; Molnárová, O.; Cinert, J.; Lukáč, F.; Chráska, T.

    2017-02-01

    The main advantages of powder metallurgy processing route are the possibility to produce near-net-shape compacts and to minimize the finish machining and material loss. The main problem in particle consolidation process is to suppress porosity, to remove oxide layers, and to retain the microstructure of powder materials. Spark plasma sintering (SPS) combines concurrent uniaxial pressure and direct heating by a pulsed DC current. Sintering occurs at relatively low temperatures for a short time and does not influence significantly the microstructure in the interiors of original powder particles. The efficiency of SPS in producing compacts with low porosity might be dependent on the distribution of particle size in original powder material. The gas atomized Al7075 powder was sieved to several charges and then sintered by SPS. Microstructure of sintered compacts was studied by light and scanning electron microscopy. The phase composition was investigated using X-ray diffraction. The mechanical behaviour was tested by bending tests.

  5. Microwave-induced plasma reactor based on a domestic microwave oven for bulk solid state chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, David J.; Douthwaite, Richard E.

    2004-12-01

    A microwave-induced plasma (MIP) reactor has been constructed from a domestic microwave oven (DMO) and applied to the bulk synthesis of solid state compounds. Low pressure MIP can be initiated and maintained using a range of gases including Ar, N{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, O{sub 2}, Cl{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}S. In order to obtain reproducible synthesis conditions the apparatus is designed to allow control of gas flow rate, gas composition, and pressure. The use of the reactor is demonstrated by the synthesis of three binary metal nitrides formed in a NH{sub 3} MIP. The reactions are rapid and the products show good crystallinity and phase purity as judged by powder x-ray diffraction.

  6. Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, Gary S.; Henins, Ivars; Babayan, Steve E.; Hicks, Robert F.

    2001-01-01

    Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two planar, parallel electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the volume therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly spacing the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, there is a negligible density of ions surviving for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike the situation for low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  7. Research on atmospheric pressure plasma processing sewage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gui-cai; Na, Yan-xiang; Dong, Xiao-long; Sun, Xiao-liang

    2013-08-01

    The water pollution has become more and more serious with the industrial progress and social development, so it become a worldwide leading environmental management problem to human survival and personal health, therefore, countries are looking for the best solution. Generally speaking, in this paper the work has the following main achievements and innovation: (1) Developed a new plasma device--Plasma Water Bed. (2) At atmospheric pressure condition, use oxygen, nitrogen, argon and helium as work gas respectively, use fiber spectrometer to atmospheric pressure plasma discharge the emission spectrum of measurement, due to the different work gas producing active particle is different, so can understand discharge, different particle activity, in the treatment of wastewater, has the different degradation effects. (3) Methyl violet solution treatment by plasma water bed. Using plasma drafting make active particles and waste leachate role, observe the decolorization, measurement of ammonia nitrogen removal.

  8. Healing burns using atmospheric pressure plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Takamichi; Kishimoto, Takumi; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Kanai, Takao; Mori, Akira

    2014-01-01

    An experiment testing the effects of plasma irradiation with an atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) reactor on rats given burns showed no evidence of electric shock injuries upon pathology inspection of the irradiated skin surface. In fact, the observed evidence of healing and improvement of the burns suggested healing effects from plasma irradiation. The quantities of neovascular vessels in the living tissues at 7 days were 9.2 ± 0.77 mm-2 without treatment and 18.4 ± 2.9 mm-2 after plasma irradiation.

  9. Remote sensing of a low pressure plasma in the radio near field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Seán; McNally, Patrick J.

    2017-09-01

    A novel approach to remotely monitor low pressure non-equilibrium plasmas is reported. A magnetic field antenna is positioned in the near field of a capacitively coupled plasma. Magnetic flux from plasma currents, present near the viewport, is intercepted by a calibrated loop antenna placed outside the chamber. The induced signal current is correlated to bulk plasma currents. The comparison of relative harmonic amplitudes shows resonance features for lower operating pressures. The geometric resonance and electron-neutral collision frequencies are evaluated from resonant harmonic features. This approach advances remote, noninvasive, and installation-free plasma monitoring, which is of particular interest to industrial scenarios.

  10. Novel applications of atmospheric pressure plasma on textile materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelius, Carrie Elizabeth

    Various applications of atmospheric pressure plasma are investigated in conjunction with polymeric materials including paper, polypropylene non-woven fabric, and cotton. The effect of plasma on bulk and surface properties is examined by treating both cellulosic pulp and prefabricated paper with various plasma-gas compositions. After treatment, pulp is processed into paper and the properties are compared. The method of pulp preparation is found to be more significant than the plasma, but differences in density, strength, and surface roughness are apparent for the pulp vs. paper plasma treatments. The plasma is also used to remove sizes of PVA and starch from poly/cotton and cotton fabric respectively. In both cases plasma successfully removes a significant amount of size, but complete size removal is not achieved. Subsequent washes (PVA) or scouring (cotton) to remove the size are less successful than a control, suggesting the plasma is crosslinking the size that is not etched away. However, at short durations in cold water using an oxygen plasma, slightly more PVA is removed than with a control. For the starch sized samples, plasma and scouring are never as successful at removing starch as a conventional enzyme, but plasma improves dyeability without need for scouring. Plasma is also used to graft chemicals to the surface of polypropylene and cotton fabric. HTCC, an antimicrobial is grafted to polypropylene with successful grafting indicated by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), dye tests, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Antimicrobial activity of the grafted samples is also characterized. 3ATAC, a vinyl monomer is also grafted to polypropylene and to cotton. Additives including Mohr's salt, potassium persulfate, and diacrylate are assessed to increase yield. Successful grafting of 3ATAC is confirmed by XPS and dye testing. A combination of all three additives is identified as optimum for maximizing graft yield.

  11. Cluster view of the plasma sheet boundary layer and bursty bulk flow connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennartsson, O. W.; Kistler, L. M.; Rème, H.

    2009-04-01

    The high-latitude boundaries of the plasma sheet (PSBL) are dynamic latitude zones of recurring and transient (minutes to tens of minutes) earthward and magnetic field-aligned bursts of plasma, each being more or less confined in longitude as well, whose ionic component is dominated by protons with flux, energies and density that are consistent with a central plasma sheet (CPS) source at varying distance (varying rates of energy time dispersion), sometimes as close as the ~19 RE Cluster apogees, or closer still. The arguably most plausible source consists of so called "bursty bulk flows" (BBFs), i.e. proton bulk flow events with large, positive and bursty GSE vx. Known mainly from CPS observations made at GSE x>-30 RE, the BBF type events probably take place much further downtail as well. What makes the BBFs an especially plausible source are (1) their earthward bulk flow, which helps explain the lack of distinctive latitudinal PSBL energy dispersion, and (2) their association with a transient strong increase of the local tail Bz component ("local dipolarization"). The enhanced Bz provides intermittent access to higher latitudes for the CPS plasma, resulting in local density reductions in the tail midplane, as illustrated here by proton data from the Cluster CIS CODIF instruments. Another sign of kinship between the PSBL bursts and the BBFs is their similar spatial fine structure. The PSBL bursts have prominent filaments aligned along the magnetic field with transverse flux gradients that are often characterized by local ~10 keV proton gyroradii scale size (or even smaller), as evidenced by Cluster measurements. The same kind of fine structure is also found during Cluster near-apogee traversals of the tail midplane, as illustrated here and implied by recently published statistics on BBFs obtained with Cluster multipoint observations at varying satellite separations. Altogether, the Cluster observations described here mesh rather well with theories about so called

  12. Comparison of advanced plasma sources for etching applications. V. Polysilicon etching rate, uniformity, profile control, and bulk plasma properties in a helical resonator plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.T.; Layadi, N.; Guinn, K.V.; Maynard, H.L.; Klemens, F.P.; Ibbotson, D.E.; Tepermeister, I.; Egan, P.O.; Richardson, R.A.

    1996-07-01

    Etching of polysilicon features using a helical resonator plasma source is evaluated. Performance metrics consist of etching rate, etching rate uniformity, and profile control using HBr/O{sub 2}{endash}He gas-phase chemistry. The effect of source power, rf-bias power, and reactor pressure on etching rate and uniformity is examined using a response surface experiment. Feature profile control is determined by examining nested and isolated lines and trenches using oxide mask/polysilicon/oxide structures. Good uniformity and vertical profiles are obtained at low reactor pressures, high source power, and rf-bias between 50 and 60 W. The operating point for best uniformity is at 3.5 mTorr, 3000 W source power, and 53 W rf-bias power. At this point, the etching rate is 3700 A/min and the nonuniformity is less than 1.0{percent}, over 125-mm-diam wafers. Radial profiles of electron temperature and ion density near the wafer surface are presented as a function of source power, rf-bias power, and reactor pressure. The ion density was found to be in the mid-10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}3} range and electron temperatures were 5{endash}7 eV. An increase in source power and reactor pressure results in an increase in ion density; however, the electron temperature shows a weaker dependence. Finally, these results are compared to those using helicon and multipole electron cyclotron resonance plasma sources evaluated in previous studies. We found that all three plasma sources provide high ion density at low pressures to meet performance demands for polysilicon etching; however, the helical resonator source offers somewhat higher etching rate and better bulk plasma uniformity. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  13. Basic Studies on High Pressure Air Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-30

    33, 2268 (2000). [3] Non- Equilibrium Air Plasmas at Atmospheric Pressure, K.H. Becker, U. Kogelschatz, K.H. Schoenbach, and R.J. Barker, eds., IOP...10). Note that LIFBASE assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium . 120 100 oExperimentalm Siuation 80 60 20- 0 -J ~ LkXi 3060 3070 3080 3090 3100...Dual laser interferometer for plasma density measurements on large tokamaks >>, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 49 p.919 (1978) [5] C.W. Gowers, C. Lamb, « A

  14. [Spectral investigation of atmospheric pressure plasma column].

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Chen; Chang, Yuan-Yuan; Xu, Long-Fei

    2012-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma column has many important applications in plasma stealth for aircraft. In the present paper, a plasma column with a length of 65 cm was generated in argon at atmospheric pressure by using dielectric barrier discharge device with water electrodes in coaxial configurations. The discharge mechanism of the plasma column was studied by optical method and the result indicates that a moving layer of light emission propagates in the upstream region. The propagation velocity of the plasma bullet is about 0.6 x 10(5) m x s(-1) through optical measurement. Spectral intensity ratios as functions of the applied voltage and driving frequency were also investigated by spectroscopic method. The variation in spectral intensity ratio implies a change in the averaged electron energy. Results show that the averaged electron energy increases with the increase in the applied voltage and the driving frequency. These results have significant values for industrial applications of the atmospheric pressure discharge and have extensive application potentials in stealth for military aircraft.

  15. Cold plasma brush generated at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Duan Yixiang; Huang, C.; Yu, Q. S.

    2007-01-15

    A cold plasma brush is generated at atmospheric pressure with low power consumption in the level of several watts (as low as 4 W) up to tens of watts (up to 45 W). The plasma can be ignited and sustained in both continuous and pulsed modes with different plasma gases such as argon or helium, but argon was selected as a primary gas for use in this work. The brush-shaped plasma is formed and extended outside of the discharge chamber with typical dimension of 10-15 mm in width and less than 1.0 mm in thickness, which are adjustable by changing the discharge chamber design and operating conditions. The brush-shaped plasma provides some unique features and distinct nonequilibrium plasma characteristics. Temperature measurements using a thermocouple thermometer showed that the gas phase temperatures of the plasma brush are close to room temperature (as low as 42 deg. C) when running with a relatively high gas flow rate of about 3500 ml/min. For an argon plasma brush, the operating voltage from less than 500 V to about 2500 V was tested, with an argon gas flow rate varied from less than 1000 to 3500 ml/min. The cold plasma brush can most efficiently use the discharge power as well as the plasma gas for material and surface treatment. The very low power consumption of such an atmospheric argon plasma brush provides many unique advantages in practical applications including battery-powered operation and use in large-scale applications. Several polymer film samples were tested for surface treatment with the newly developed device, and successful changes of the wettability property from hydrophobic to hydrophilic were achieved within a few seconds.

  16. Cold plasma brush generated at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yixiang; Huang, C; Yu, Q S

    2007-01-01

    A cold plasma brush is generated at atmospheric pressure with low power consumption in the level of several watts (as low as 4 W) up to tens of watts (up to 45 W). The plasma can be ignited and sustained in both continuous and pulsed modes with different plasma gases such as argon or helium, but argon was selected as a primary gas for use in this work. The brush-shaped plasma is formed and extended outside of the discharge chamber with typical dimension of 10-15 mm in width and less than 1.0 mm in thickness, which are adjustable by changing the discharge chamber design and operating conditions. The brush-shaped plasma provides some unique features and distinct nonequilibrium plasma characteristics. Temperature measurements using a thermocouple thermometer showed that the gas phase temperatures of the plasma brush are close to room temperature (as low as 42 degrees C) when running with a relatively high gas flow rate of about 3500 ml/min. For an argon plasma brush, the operating voltage from less than 500 V to about 2500 V was tested, with an argon gas flow rate varied from less than 1000 to 3500 ml/min. The cold plasma brush can most efficiently use the discharge power as well as the plasma gas for material and surface treatment. The very low power consumption of such an atmospheric argon plasma brush provides many unique advantages in practical applications including battery-powered operation and use in large-scale applications. Several polymer film samples were tested for surface treatment with the newly developed device, and successful changes of the wettability property from hydrophobic to hydrophilic were achieved within a few seconds.

  17. Plasma Clouds and Snowplows: Bulk Plasma Escape from Mars Observed by MAVEN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halekas, J. S.; Brain, D. A.; Ruhunusiri, S.; McFadden, J. P.; Mitchell, D. L.; Mazelle, C.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Harada, Y.; Hara, T.; Espley, J. R.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2016-01-01

    We present initial Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) observations and preliminary interpretation of bulk plasma loss from Mars. MAVEN particle and field measurements show that planetary heavy ions derived from the Martian atmosphere can escape in the form of discrete coherent structures or "clouds." The ions in these clouds are unmagnetized or weakly magnetized, have velocities well above the escape speed, and lie directly downstream from magnetic field amplifications, suggesting a "snowplow" effect. This postulated escape process, similar to that successfully used to explain the dynamics of active gas releases in the solar wind and terrestrial magnetosheath, relies on momentum transfer from the shocked solar wind protons to the planetary heavy ions, with the electrons and magnetic field acting as intermediaries. Fluxes of planetary ions on the order of 10(exp 7)/sq cm/s can escape by this process, and if it operates regularly, it could contribute 10-20% of the current ion escape from Mars.

  18. Plasma Clouds and Snowplows: Bulk Plasma Escape from Mars Observed by MAVEN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halekas, J. S.; Brain, D. A.; Ruhunusiri, S.; McFadden, J. P.; Mitchell, D. L.; Mazelle, C.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Harada, Y.; Hara, T.; Espley, J. R.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present initial Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) observations and preliminary interpretation of bulk plasma loss from Mars. MAVEN particle and field measurements show that planetary heavy ions derived from the Martian atmosphere can escape in the form of discrete coherent structures or "clouds." The ions in these clouds are unmagnetized or weakly magnetized, have velocities well above the escape speed, and lie directly downstream from magnetic field amplifications, suggesting a "snowplow" effect. This postulated escape process, similar to that successfully used to explain the dynamics of active gas releases in the solar wind and terrestrial magnetosheath, relies on momentum transfer from the shocked solar wind protons to the planetary heavy ions, with the electrons and magnetic field acting as intermediaries. Fluxes of planetary ions on the order of 10(exp 7)/sq cm/s can escape by this process, and if it operates regularly, it could contribute 10-20% of the current ion escape from Mars.

  19. Is the bulk mode conversion important in high density helicon plasma?

    SciTech Connect

    Isayama, Shogo; Hada, Tohru; Shinohara, Shunjiro; Tanikawa, Takao

    2016-06-15

    In a high-density helicon plasma production process, a contribution of Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) wave for surface power deposition is widely accepted. The TG wave can be excited either due to an abrupt density gradient near the plasma edge (surface conversion) or due to linear mode conversion from the helicon wave in a density gradient in the bulk region (bulk mode conversion). By numerically solving the boundary value problem of linear coupling between the helicon and the TG waves in a background with density gradient, we show that the efficiency of the bulk mode conversion strongly depends on the dissipation included in the plasma, and the bulk mode conversion is important when the dissipation is small. Also, by performing FDTD simulation, we show the time evolution of energy flux associated with the helicon and the TG waves.

  20. The solvation of electrons by an atmospheric-pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbach, Paul; Bartels, David M.; Sankaran, R. Mohan; Go, David B.

    2015-06-01

    Solvated electrons are typically generated by radiolysis or photoionization of solutes. While plasmas containing free electrons have been brought into contact with liquids in studies dating back centuries, there has been little evidence that electrons are solvated by this approach. Here we report direct measurements of solvated electrons generated by an atmospheric-pressure plasma in contact with the surface of an aqueous solution. The electrons are measured by their optical absorbance using a total internal reflection geometry. The measured absorption spectrum is unexpectedly blue shifted, which is potentially due to the intense electric field in the interfacial Debye layer. We estimate an average penetration depth of 2.5+/-1.0 nm, indicating that the electrons fully solvate before reacting through second-order recombination. Reactions with various electron scavengers including H+, NO2-, NO3- and H2O2 show that the kinetics are similar, but not identical, to those for solvated electrons formed in bulk water by radiolysis.

  1. Harmonic effects on ion-bulk waves and simulation of stimulated ion-bulk-wave scattering in CH plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Q. S.; Zheng, C. Y.; Liu, Z. J.; Cao, L. H.; Xiao, C. Z.; Wang, Q.; Zhang, H. C.; He, X. T.

    2017-08-01

    Ion-bulk (IBk) wave, a novel branch with a phase velocity close to the ion’s thermal velocity, discovered by Valentini et al (2011 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 53 105017), is recently considered as an important electrostatic activity in solar wind, and thus of great interest to space physics and also inertial confinement fusion. The harmonic effects on IBk waves has been researched by Vlasov simulation for the first time. The condition of excitation of the large-amplitude IBk waves is given. The nature of nonlinear IBk waves in the condition of k< {k}{{lor}}/2 (k lor is the wave number at loss-of-resonance point) is undamped Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal-like waves with harmonic superposition. Only when the wave number k of IBk waves satisfies {k}{{lor}}/2≲ k≤slant {k}{{lor}}, can a large-amplitude and mono-frequency IBk wave be excited. A novel stimulated scattering from IBk modes called stimulated ion-bulk-wave scattering (SIBS) or stimulated Feng scattering (SFS) has been proposed and also verified by Vlasov-Maxwell code. In CH plasmas, in addition to the stimulated Brillouin scattering from multi ion-acoustic waves, there exists SIBS simultaneously. This research gives an insight into the SIBS in the field of laser plasma interaction.

  2. Effects of pressure and temperature on the isothermal bulk modulus of CaO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, T.; Sun, X. W.; Wang, R. F.; Lu, H. W.; Tian, J. H.; Guo, P.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to investigate the effects of pressure and temperature on the isothermal bulk modulus of CaO using pair-wise interactions that include polarization effects through the shell model (SM). The dependence of isothermal bulk modulus BT of CaO on the compression ratio V/ V0 and pressure P have been obtained from MD runs at T=300 K, and compared with the available experimental data and other theoretical results. A good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained. Meanwhile, BT dependence on temperature T at zero pressure is investigated. At extended pressure and temperature ranges, SM-MD method has also been carried out for predicting the P- V- T equation of state and isothermal bulk modulus at different temperatures along the isotherms 0, 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 K, and at different pressures along the isobars 5, 15, 30, 40, and 50 GPa for CaO, respectively.

  3. Bulk-bronzied graphites for plasma-facing components in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.; Doerner, R.; Khandagle, M. . Inst. of Plasma and Fusion Research); Causey, R.; Wilson, K. ); Croessmann, D.; Whitley, J. ); Holland, D.; Smolik, G. ); Matsuda, T.; Sogabe, T. (Toyo Tanso Co. Ltd., O

    1990-06-01

    Newly developed bulk-boronized graphites and boronized C-C composites with a total boron concentration ranging from 1 wt % to 30 wt % have been evaluated as plasma-facing component materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Bulk-boronized graphites have been bombarded with high-flux deuterium plasmas at temperatures between 200 and 1600{degree}C. Plasma interaction induced erosion of bulk-boronized graphites is observed to be a factor of 2--3 smaller than that of pyrolytic graphite, in regimes of physical sputtering, chemical sputtering and radiation enhanced sublimation. Postbombardment thermal desorption spectroscopy indicates that bulk-boronized graphites enhance recombinative desorption of deuterium, which leads to a suppression of the formation of deuterocarbon due to chemical sputtering. The tritium inventory in graphite has been found to decrease by an order of magnitude due to 10 wt % bulk-boronization at temperatures above 1000{degree}C. The critical heat flux to induce cracking for bulk-boronized graphites has been found to be essentially the same as that for non-boronized graphites. Also, 10 wt % bulk-boronization of graphite hinders air oxidation nearly completely at 800{degree}C and reduces the steam oxidation rate by a factor of 2--3 at around 1100 and 1350{degree}C. 38 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Chaos in atmospheric-pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. L.; Iza, F.; Janson, N. B.; Kong, M. G.

    2012-06-01

    We report detailed characterization of a low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma jet that exhibits regimes of periodic, quasi-periodic and chaotic behaviors. Power spectra, phase portraits, stroboscopic section and bifurcation diagram of the discharge current combine to comprehensively demonstrate the existence of chaos, and this evidence is strengthened with a nonlinear dynamics analysis using two control parameters that maps out periodic, period-multiplication, and chaotic regimes over a wide range of the input voltage and gas flow rate. In addition, optical emission signatures of excited plasma species are used as the second and independent observable to demonstrate the presence of chaos and period-doubling in both the concentrations and composition of plasma species, suggesting a similar array of periodic, quasi-periodic and chaotic regimes in plasma chemistry. The presence of quasi-periodic and chaotic regimes in structurally unbounded low-temperature atmospheric plasmas not only is important as a fundamental scientific topic but also has interesting implications for their numerous applications. Chaos may be undesirable for industrial applications where cycle-to-cycle reproducibility is important, yet for treatment of cell-containing materials including living tissues it may offer a novel route to combat some of the major challenges in medicine such as drug resistance. Chaos in low-temperature atmospheric plasmas and its effective control are likely to open up new vistas for medical technologies.

  5. Dynamics of bulk viscous pressure effected inflation in braneworld scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawad, Abdul; Ilyas, Amara; Rani, Shamaila

    2016-08-01

    The main goal of the present work is to examine the possible realization of warm chaotic inflation and logamediate inflation within the framework of a modified Chaplygin gas brane-world model. In this respect, the slow-roll parameters, number of e-folds, scalar-tensor power spectra, spectral indices, tensor-scalar ratio and running of scalar spectral index is being evaluated. These parameters are being analyzed for variable as well as constant dissipation and bulk viscous coefficients. Further, the trajectories among the inflationary parameters such as ns - ϕ , ns - r , αs - ϕ and ns -αs are also developed to examine their behavior as well as physical cosmology. Some of results of inflationary parameters in all cases are: r < 0.11, ns = 0.96 ± 0.025 and αs = - 0.019 ± 0.025 . It is interesting to mention here that the results of inflationary parameters are consistent with BICEP2, WMAP (7 + 9) and Planck data.

  6. Anomalies in bulk supercooled water at negative pressure.

    PubMed

    Pallares, Gaël; El Mekki Azouzi, Mouna; González, Miguel A; Aragones, Juan L; Abascal, José L F; Valeriani, Chantal; Caupin, Frédéric

    2014-06-03

    Water anomalies still defy explanation. In the supercooled liquid, many quantities, for example heat capacity and isothermal compressibility κT, show a large increase. The question arises if these quantities diverge, or if they go through a maximum. The answer is key to our understanding of water anomalies. However, it has remained elusive in experiments because crystallization always occurred before any extremum is reached. Here we report measurements of the sound velocity of water in a scarcely explored region of the phase diagram, where water is both supercooled and at negative pressure. We find several anomalies: maxima in the adiabatic compressibility and nonmonotonic density dependence of the sound velocity, in contrast with a standard extrapolation of the equation of state. This is reminiscent of the behavior of supercritical fluids. To support this interpretation, we have performed simulations with the 2005 revision of the transferable interaction potential with four points. Simulations and experiments are in near-quantitative agreement, suggesting the existence of a line of maxima in κT (LMκT). This LMκT could either be the thermodynamic consequence of the line of density maxima of water [Sastry S, Debenedetti PG, Sciortino F, Stanley HE (1996) Phys Rev E 53:6144-6154], or emanate from a critical point terminating a liquid-liquid transition [Sciortino F, Poole PH, Essmann U, Stanley HE (1997) Phys Rev E 55:727-737]. At positive pressure, the LMκT has escaped observation because it lies in the "no man's land" beyond the homogeneous crystallization line. We propose that the LMκT emerges from the no man's land at negative pressure.

  7. Anomalies in bulk supercooled water at negative pressure

    PubMed Central

    Pallares, Gaël; El Mekki Azouzi, Mouna; González, Miguel A.; Aragones, Juan L.; Abascal, José L. F.; Valeriani, Chantal; Caupin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Water anomalies still defy explanation. In the supercooled liquid, many quantities, for example heat capacity and isothermal compressibility κT, show a large increase. The question arises if these quantities diverge, or if they go through a maximum. The answer is key to our understanding of water anomalies. However, it has remained elusive in experiments because crystallization always occurred before any extremum is reached. Here we report measurements of the sound velocity of water in a scarcely explored region of the phase diagram, where water is both supercooled and at negative pressure. We find several anomalies: maxima in the adiabatic compressibility and nonmonotonic density dependence of the sound velocity, in contrast with a standard extrapolation of the equation of state. This is reminiscent of the behavior of supercritical fluids. To support this interpretation, we have performed simulations with the 2005 revision of the transferable interaction potential with four points. Simulations and experiments are in near-quantitative agreement, suggesting the existence of a line of maxima in κT (LMκT). This LMκT could either be the thermodynamic consequence of the line of density maxima of water [Sastry S, Debenedetti PG, Sciortino F, Stanley HE (1996) Phys Rev E 53:6144–6154], or emanate from a critical point terminating a liquid–liquid transition [Sciortino F, Poole PH, Essmann U, Stanley HE (1997) Phys Rev E 55:727–737]. At positive pressure, the LMκT has escaped observation because it lies in the “no man’s land” beyond the homogeneous crystallization line. We propose that the LMκT emerges from the no man’s land at negative pressure. PMID:24843177

  8. Bulk ZnO as piezotronic pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraki, R.; Novak, N.; Frömling, T.; Granzow, T.; Rödel, J.

    2014-09-01

    The impact of uniaxial compressive mechanical stress on the electrical properties of a ZnO varistor ceramic was studied with respect to a potential use in pressure sensor applications. Current-voltage measurements as a function of temperature are strongly affected by the applied stress. The modulation of charge transport properties with uniaxial stress causes large changes in resistance. Hence, a gauge factor of ˜800 is attained, which significantly exceeds the value of conventional sensors. The effect is attributed to the piezotronic effect, i.e., the altering of the potential barrier at grain boundaries due to the piezoelectricity of ZnO. This change in grain boundary potential barriers via mechanical deformation represents a promising physical concept for the development of better materials for sensor applications.

  9. Densification behavior, nanocrystallization, and mechanical properties of spark plasma sintered Fe-based bulk amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashish Kumar

    Fe-based amorphous alloys are gaining increasing attention due to their exceptional wear and corrosion resistance for potential structural applications. Two major challenges that are hindering the commercialization of these amorphous alloys are difficulty in processing of bulk shapes (diameter > 10 mm) and lack of ductility. Spark plasma sintering (SPS) is evolving as a promising technique for processing bulk shapes of amorphous and nanocrystalline materials. The objective of this work is to investigate densification behavior, nanocrystallization, and mechanical properties of SPS sintered Fe-based amorphous alloys of composition Fe48Cr15Mo14Y2C15B6. SPS processing was performed in three distinct temperature ranges of amorphous alloys: (a) below glass transition temperature (Tg), (b) between Tg and crystallization temperature (Tx), and (c) above Tx. Punch displacement data obtained during SPS sintering was correlated with the SPS processing parameters such as temperature, pressure, and sintering time. Powder rearrangement, plastic deformation below T g, and viscous flow of the material between Tg and Tx were observed as the main densification stages during SPS sintering. Micro-scale temperature distributions at the point of contact and macro-scale temperature distribution throughout the sample during SPS of amorphous alloys were modeled. The bulk amorphous alloys are expected to undergo structural relaxation and nanocrystallization during SPS sintering. X-ray diffraction (XRD), small angle neutron scattering (SANS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed to investigate the evolution of nanocrystallites in SPS sintered Fe-based bulk amorphous alloys. The SANS analysis showed significant scattering for the samples sintered in the supercooled region indicating local structural and compositional changes with the profuse nucleation of nano-clusters (~4 nm). Compression tests and microhardness were performed on the samples sintered at different

  10. Global particle-in-cell simulations of plasma pressure effects on Alfvenic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Mishchenko, Alexey; Koenies, Axel; Hatzky, Roman

    2011-01-15

    Global linear gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations of electromagnetic modes in realistic tokamak geometry are reported. The effect of plasma pressure on Alfvenic modes is studied. It is shown that the fast-particle pressure can considerably affect the shear Alfven wave continuum structure and hence the toroidicity-induced gap in the continuum. It is also found that the energetic ions can substantially reduce the growth rate of the ballooning modes (and perhaps completely stabilize them in a certain parameter range). Ballooning modes are found to be the dominant instabilities if the bulk-plasma pressure gradient is large enough.

  11. Bulk plasma fragmentation in a C4F8 inductively coupled plasma: A hybrid modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shu-Xia; Zhang, Yu-Ru; Gao, Fei; Wang, You-Nian; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2015-06-01

    A hybrid model is used to investigate the fragmentation of C4F8 inductive discharges. Indeed, the resulting reactive species are crucial for the optimization of the Si-based etching process, since they determine the mechanisms of fluorination, polymerization, and sputtering. In this paper, we present the dissociation degree, the density ratio of F vs. CxFy (i.e., fluorocarbon (fc) neutrals), the neutral vs. positive ion density ratio, details on the neutral and ion components, and fractions of various fc neutrals (or ions) in the total fc neutral (or ion) density in a C4F8 inductively coupled plasma source, as well as the effect of pressure and power on these results. To analyze the fragmentation behavior, the electron density and temperature and electron energy probability function (EEPF) are investigated. Moreover, the main electron-impact generation sources for all considered neutrals and ions are determined from the complicated C4F8 reaction set used in the model. The C4F8 plasma fragmentation is explained, taking into account many factors, such as the EEPF characteristics, the dominance of primary and secondary processes, and the thresholds of dissociation and ionization. The simulation results are compared with experiments from literature, and reasonable agreement is obtained. Some discrepancies are observed, which can probably be attributed to the simplified polymer surface kinetics assumed in the model.

  12. MicroScale - Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, Mohan

    2012-01-25

    Low-temperature plasmas play an essential role in the manufacturing of integrated circuits which are ubiquitous in modern society. In recent years, these top-down approaches to materials processing have reached a physical limit. As a result, alternative approaches to materials processing are being developed that will allow the fabrication of nanoscale materials from the bottom up. The aim of our research is to develop a new class of plasmas, termed “microplasmas” for nanomaterials synthesis. Microplasmas are a special class of plasmas formed in geometries where at least one dimension is less than 1 mm. Plasma confinement leads to several unique properties including high-pressure stability and non-equilibrium that make microplasams suitable for nanomaterials synthesis. Vapor-phase precursors can be dissociated to homogeneously nucleate nanometer-sized metal and alloyed nanoparticles. Alternatively, metal salts dispersed in liquids or polymer films can be electrochemically reduced to form metal nanoparticles. In this talk, I will discuss these topics in detail, highlighting the advantages of microplasma-based systems for the synthesis of well-defined nanomaterials.

  13. Spark plasma sintering and thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. L.; Li, J.-F.; Yao, K. F.; Chen, L. D.

    2005-06-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) bulk samples were fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS), which, as a rapid consolidation technique, preserved the phase structure and diameter of cylindrical tubules of the CNTs even at high temperatures of up to 2000°C. The thermal conductivity of the resultant bulk samples was measured by the conventional laser-flash method, and the corresponding thermal conductivity was found to be as low as 4.2W/m/K at room temperature. This low thermal conductivity of the CNT bulk materials was explained on the basis of multiple physical elements including intensive tube-tube interactions. CNT bulk materials may find potential applications as thermoelectric materials that require low thermal conductivity, but high electrical conductivity.

  14. Bulk YBa2Cu3O(x) superconductors through pressurized partial melt growth processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, S.; Hojaji, H.; Barkatt, A.; Boroomand, M.; Hung, M.; Buechele, A. C.; Thorpe, A. N.; Davis, D. D.; Alterescu, S.

    1992-01-01

    A novel pressurized partial melt growth process has been developed for producing large pieces of bulk Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductors. During long-time partial melt growth stage, an additional driving force for solidification is obtained by using pressurized oxygen gas. The microstructure and superconducting properties of the resulting samples were investigated. It was found that this new technique can eliminate porosity and inhomogeneity, promote large-scale grain-texturing, and improve interdomain coupling as well.

  15. Plasma Pressure in the Topside Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, Patrick T.

    1999-01-01

    A previous three year NASA-funded project resulted in the first 2-D maps of magnetotail pressure, density and temperature. A proposal to continue the work was declined, but modest funding was provided for one year to ramp down of the work. During the phase-out year, we used a time when 5 DMSP satellites were simultaneously active to produce the first instantaneous partial image of the magnetotail. The results have been submitted to the proceedings of the 1998 Huntsville Meeting on "The New Millennium Magnetosphere: Integrating Imaging, Discrete Observations and Global Simulations". A method of inferring central plasma sheet (CPS) temperature, density, and pressure from ionospheric observations was developed under a previous 3-year grant. These particles properties are calculated from data taken by particle instruments on DMSP satellites. Ion spectra occurring in conjunction with electron acceleration events are excluded. Because of the variability of magnetotail stretching, mapping to the plasma sheet was done using a modified Tsyganenko 1989 magnetic field model adjusted to agree with the actual magnetotail stretch. On May 25, 1997, five DMSP satellites (F10-F14) passed through the southern hemisphere nightside oval within a 19 minute period. Attached is the first magnetotail image, which results from applying our technique to that data set.

  16. Evidence for bulk superconductivity in pure bismuth single crystals at ambient pressure.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Om; Kumar, Anil; Thamizhavel, A; Ramakrishnan, S

    2017-01-06

    At ambient pressure, bulk rhombohedral bismuth is a semimetal that remains in the normal state down to at least 10 millikelvin. Superconductivity in bulk bismuth is thought to be unlikely because of the extremely low carrier density. We observed bulk superconductivity in pure bismuth single crystals below 0.53 millikelvin at ambient pressure, with an estimated critical magnetic field of 5.2 microteslas at 0 kelvin. Superconductivity in bismuth cannot be explained by the conventional Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory because its adiabatic approximation does not hold true for bismuth. Future theoretical work will be needed to understand superconductivity in the nonadiabatic limit in systems with low carrier densities and unusual band structures, such as bismuth.

  17. Evidence for bulk superconductivity in pure bismuth single crystals at ambient pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Om; Kumar, Anil; Thamizhavel, A.; Ramakrishnan, S.

    2017-01-01

    At ambient pressure, bulk rhombohedral bismuth is a semimetal that remains in the normal state down to at least 10 millikelvin. Superconductivity in bulk bismuth is thought to be unlikely because of the extremely low carrier density. We observed bulk superconductivity in pure bismuth single crystals below 0.53 millikelvin at ambient pressure, with an estimated critical magnetic field of 5.2 microteslas at 0 kelvin. Superconductivity in bismuth cannot be explained by the conventional Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory because its adiabatic approximation does not hold true for bismuth. Future theoretical work will be needed to understand superconductivity in the nonadiabatic limit in systems with low carrier densities and unusual band structures, such as bismuth.

  18. PLASMA TREATMENT OF BULK Nb SURFACE IN THE Ar/Cl2 DISCHARGE

    SciTech Connect

    Marija Raskovic; H. Phillips; Anne-Marie Valente

    2008-02-12

    The preparation of the cavity walls has been one of the major challenges in the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerator technology. Therefore, constant research and development effort is devoted to develop surface preparation processes that will improve roughness and lower the level of impurities, like hydrogen or oxygen, embedded in bulk Nb, having in the same time reasonable etching rates. Plasma based surface modification provides an excellent opportunity to achieve these goals. We present Ar/Cl2 discharge treatment of bulk Nb where we achieved etching rates comparable to the rates obtained with the electropolishing method without introducing impurities in Nb. The current experiments were performed on disk shaped Nb samples, exposed to plasma produced in a microwave discharge system. Surface composition and topology measurements were carried out before and after plasma treatment. Upon determining optimal experimental conditions on disk shaped samples, we will apply the same procedure on the single cell cavities, pursuing improvement of their RF performance.

  19. Elastic Anomaly and Polyamorphic Transition in (La, Ce)-based Bulk Metallic Glass under Pressure.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xintong; Zou, Yongtao; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Welch, David O; Jiang, Jianzhong; Li, Baosheng

    2017-04-07

    Pressure-induced polyamorphism in Ce-based metallic glass has attracted significant interest in condensed matter physics. In this paper, we discover that in association with the polyamorphism of La32Ce32Al16Ni5Cu15 bulk metallic glass, the acoustic velocities, measured up to 12.3 GPa using ultrasonic interferometry, exhibit velocity minima at 1.8 GPa for P wave and 3.2 GPa for S wave. The low and high density amorphous states are distinguished by their distinct pressure derivatives of the bulk and shear moduli. The elasticity, permanent densification, and polyamorphic transition are interpreted by the topological rearrangement of solute-centered clusters in medium-range order (MRO) mediated by the 4f electron delocalization of Ce under pressure. The precisely measured acoustic wave travel times which were used to derive the velocities and densities provided unprecedented data to document the evolution of the bulk and shear elastic moduli associated with a polyamorphic transition in La32Ce32Al16Ni5Cu15 bulk metallic glass and can shed new light on the mechanisms of polyamorphism and structural evolution in metallic glasses under pressure.

  20. Bulk acoustic wave sensor for investigating hemorheological characteristics of plasma and its coagulation.

    PubMed

    Si, S H; Xu, Y J; Nie, L H; Yao, S Z

    1996-02-05

    A method of using a bulk acoustic wave (BAW) device to study the hemorheological phenomena is proposed. By measuring the resonant resistance of a BAW device, the dependence of the plasma viscosity on its composition is investigated. It has been found that during the process of the plasma coagulation, the frequency response of a BAW device is dominated by the change in plasma viscoelasticity, and useful information such as the coagulation time and the viscoelasticity of coagulated plasma can be obtained from the curve of frequency response. Based on the BAW quartz detection system, effects of fibrinogen, thrombin and some drugs on the plasma coagulation are investigated. The results show that the BAW device based on the oscillator method possesses some advantages, such as high sensitivity, simplicity of use, cost effectiveness and small sample volume for clinical hemorheological study.

  1. Thermal and electrical influences from bulk plasma in cathode heating modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tang; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Xiao-Ning; Zhang, Hao; Xia, Wei-Dong

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a numerical calculation is performed for the purpose of estimating the thermal and electrical influences from bulk plasma in cathode heating modeling, in other words researching the necessity of a coupling bulk plasma in near-cathode layer modeling. The proposed model applied in the present work is an improved one from previous work. In this model, the near-cathode region is divided into two parts: the sheath and the ionization layer. The Schottky effect at the cathode surface is considered based on the analytic solution of a 1D sheath model. It is noted that the arc column is calculated simultaneously in the near-cathode region and the cathode bulk. An application is presented for an atmospheric free burning argon arc with arc currents of 50 A-600 A. The modeling results show three interesting points: (1) at the cathode surface, energy transport due to heat conduction of heavy particles and electrons is comparable to total heating flux, no matter whether the arc discharge is performed in a high (400 A) or low current (50 A) situation; (2) the electrical influence from bulk plasma on the cathode heating modeling becomes obvious in a high current situation (>400 A) for the spot mode; (3) the near-cathode layer voltage drop ({{U}\\text{tot}} ) is larger in the diffuse mode than in the spot mode for the same current, which is just the opposite to that for decoupled modeling.

  2. Analysis of Sterilization Effect of Atmospheric Pressure Pulsed Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ekem, N.; Akan, T.; Pat, S.; Akgun, Y.; Kiremitci, A.; Musa, G.

    2007-04-23

    We have developed a new technology, the High Voltage Atmospheric Pressure Pulsed Plasma (HVAPPP), for bacteria killing. The aim of this paper is to present a simple device to generate plasma able to kill efficiently bacteria.

  3. Optimization of design parameters for bulk micromachined silicon membranes for piezoresistive pressure sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belwanshi, Vinod; Topkar, Anita

    2016-05-01

    Finite element analysis study has been carried out to optimize the design parameters for bulk micro-machined silicon membranes for piezoresistive pressure sensing applications. The design is targeted for measurement of pressure up to 200 bar for nuclear reactor applications. The mechanical behavior of bulk micro-machined silicon membranes in terms of deflection and stress generation has been simulated. Based on the simulation results, optimization of the membrane design parameters in terms of length, width and thickness has been carried out. Subsequent to optimization of membrane geometrical parameters, the dimensions and location of the high stress concentration region for implantation of piezoresistors have been obtained for sensing of pressure using piezoresistive sensing technique.

  4. Optimization of design parameters for bulk micromachined silicon membranes for piezoresistive pressure sensing application

    SciTech Connect

    Belwanshi, Vinod; Topkar, Anita

    2016-05-23

    Finite element analysis study has been carried out to optimize the design parameters for bulk micro-machined silicon membranes for piezoresistive pressure sensing applications. The design is targeted for measurement of pressure up to 200 bar for nuclear reactor applications. The mechanical behavior of bulk micro-machined silicon membranes in terms of deflection and stress generation has been simulated. Based on the simulation results, optimization of the membrane design parameters in terms of length, width and thickness has been carried out. Subsequent to optimization of membrane geometrical parameters, the dimensions and location of the high stress concentration region for implantation of piezoresistors have been obtained for sensing of pressure using piezoresistive sensing technique.

  5. Plasma-induced flow instabilities in atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lietz, Amanda M.; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2017-09-01

    Pulsed plasma excitation of rare gases flowing into air has been shown to impact the stability of the flow in non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs). In this paper, the results from a numerical modeling investigation of the stability of a round He APPJ with a powered electrode exposed to the gas flow are discussed. Localized gas heating at the powered electrode occurs on the time scale of the voltage pulse, tens to 100 ns, which is short compared to the fluid timescales. An acoustic wave propagates from this heated, expanding gas and exits the jet. The wave disturbs the shear layer between the He and surrounding humid air, exciting a shear instability which grows downstream with the flow and increases the mixing of the humid air into the He. The effects of the eddy-dominated flow on ionization wave (IW) propagation in an APPJ were investigated. The IW followed the regions of the highest helium concentration, resulting in an increased production of NO, HO2, and NO2.

  6. Atmospheric-pressure ionization: New approaches and applications for plasmas in contact with liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, D. B.

    2015-10-01

    Historically, gas discharges have been difficult to stabilize at atmospheric pressure, and this has confined them to operation at low pressure under vacuum conditions. However, recent advances in plasma technology have enabled stable high pressure gas discharges up to and even exceeding atmospheric pressure. One significant advantage of operating at atmospheric pressure is that the plasma can be brought into contact with non-conventional substrates, especially soft materials such as plastics, biological tissue, and aqueous solutions. This last example is of prime interest as plasma/liquid interactions have a number of important implications in applications ranging from water purification to plasma medicine. In this paper, recent work studying the impact of electrons in the plasma inducing reactions in aqueous solutions is discussed. These studies include measurements of the bulk solution as the electrons induce long-lived species as well as interfacial measurements directly at the plasma/liquid interface to probe the behaviour of electrons traversing from the plasma into the liquid.

  7. Plasma density perturbation caused by probes at low gas pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, Natalia; Godyak, Valery

    2017-09-01

    An analysis of plasma parameter perturbations caused by a spherical probe immersed into a spherical plasma is presented for arbitrary collisionality and arbitrary ratios of probe to plasma dimensions. The plasma was modeled by the fluid plasma equations with ion inertia and nonlinear ion friction force that dominate plasma transport at low gas pressures. Significant depletion of the plasma density around the probe surface has been found. The area of plasma depletion coincides with the sensing area of different kinds of magnetic and microwave probes and will therefore lead to errors in data inferred from measurements with such probes.

  8. Electrode Configurations in Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lietz, Amanda M.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are being studied for emerging medical applications including cancer treatment and wound healing. APPJs typically consist of a dielectric tube through which a rare gas flows, sometimes with an O2 or H2O impurity. In this paper, we present results from a computational study of APPJs using nonPDPSIM, a 2-D plasma hydrodynamics model, with the goal of providing insights on how the placement of electrodes can influence the production of reactive species. Gas consisting of He/O2 = 99.5/0.5 is flowed through a capillary tube at 2 slpm into humid air, and a pulsed DC voltage is applied. An APPJ with two external ring electrodes will be compared with one having a powered electrode inside and a ground electrode on the outside. The consequences on ionization wave propagation and the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) will be discussed. Changing the electrode configuration can concentrate the power deposition in volumes having different gas composition, resulting in different RONS production. An internal electrode can result in increased production of NOx and HNOx by increasing propagation of the ionization wave through the He dominated plume to outside of the tube where humid air is diffusing into the plume. Work supported by US DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and the National Science Foundation.

  9. RF generated atmospheric pressure plasmas and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeyoung; Herrmann, Hans W.; Henins, Ivars; Gautier, Donald C.

    2001-10-01

    RF generated atmospheric pressure plasma sources have been developed for various materials applications. They operate with rf power and produce a α-mode capacitive discharge that is stable, steady-state, non-thermal, and volumetric. The plasma parameters of this source have been measured: electron densities of 10^11 cm-3 and electron temperatures of 2 eV by using neutral bremsstrahlung emission. Localized electron heating near the sheath boundary has been observed and is related to the discharge stability and α to γ mode (or arcing) transition using 1D fluid model. The discharge stability improves with increase in rf frequency. The electrode surface property such as the secondary electron emission coefficient also plays a significant role in determining α to γ mode transition. For example, a stable α-mode air discharge is produced using 100 MHz rf power with the use of a boron nitride cover on one of the electrodes. In comparison, an air discharge becomes unstable at a lower rf frequency (e.g. 13.56 MHz) or with an alumina cover. Similar results were obtained with various feedgas such as steam, CO_2, and hydrocarbon containing gases. Further characterization of this high frequency source is under progress. For its applications, we have successfully demonstrated the effective neutralization of actual chemical warfare agents such as VX, GD and HD. In addition, significant progresses have been made in the area of etching of organic and metal film etching, and production of novel materials.

  10. Air plasma jet with hollow electrodes at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup

    2007-05-15

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet with air is produced through hollow electrodes and dielectric with a hole of 1 mm diam. The plasma jet device is operated by injecting pressurized air into the electrode hole. The air plasma jet device at average powers less than 5 W exhibits a cold plasma jet of about 2 cm in length and near the room temperature, being low enough to treat thermally sensitive materials. Preliminary studies on the discharge characteristics and application tests are also presented by comparing the air plasma jet with the nitrogen and argon plasma jet.

  11. Kinetic interpretation of resonance phenomena in low pressure capacitively coupled radio frequency plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wilczek, Sebastian; Trieschmann, Jan; Eremin, Denis; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Schulze, Julian; Schuengel, Edmund; Derzsi, Aranka; Korolov, Ihor; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2016-06-15

    Low pressure capacitive radio frequency (RF) plasmas are often described by equivalent circuit models based on fluid approaches that predict the self-excitation of resonances, e.g., high frequency oscillations of the total current in asymmetric discharges, but do not provide a kinetic interpretation of these effects. In fact, they leave important questions open: How is current continuity ensured in the presence of energetic electron beams generated by the expanding sheaths that lead to a local enhancement of the conduction current propagating through the bulk? How do the beam electrons interact with cold bulk electrons? What is the kinetic origin of resonance phenomena? Based on kinetic simulations, we find that the energetic beam electrons interact with cold bulk electrons (modulated on a timescale of the inverse local electron plasma frequency) via a time dependent electric field outside the sheaths. This electric field is caused by the electron beam itself, which leaves behind a positive space charge, that attracts cold bulk electrons towards the expanding sheath. The resulting displacement current ensures current continuity by locally compensating the enhancement of the conduction current. The backflow of cold electrons and their interaction with the nonlinear plasma sheath cause the generation of multiple electron beams during one phase of sheath expansion and contribute to a strongly non-sinusoidal RF current. These kinetic mechanisms are the basis for a fundamental understanding of the electron power absorption dynamics and resonance phenomena in such plasmas, which are found to occur in discharges of different symmetries including perfectly symmetric plasmas.

  12. THE INTRACLUSTER PLASMA: A UNIVERSAL PRESSURE PROFILE?

    SciTech Connect

    Lapi, A.; Cavaliere, A.; Fusco-Femiano, R.

    2012-01-20

    The pressure profiles of the intracluster plasma in galaxy clusters show a wide variance when observed in X-rays at low redshifts, z {approx}< 0.2. We find the profiles to follow two main patterns, featuring either a steep or a shallow shape throughout both core and outskirts. We trace these shapes back to a physical dichotomy of clusters into two classes, marked by either low entropy (LE) or high entropy (HE) throughout. From X-ray observations and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) stacked data at higher redshifts 0.2 {approx}< z {approx}< 0.4, we obtain evidence of an increasing abundance of HEs relative to LEs. We propose this to constitute a systematic trend toward high z; specifically, we predict the pressure profiles to converge into a truly universal HE-like template for z {approx}> 0.5. We submit our physical templates and converging trend for further observational tests, in view of current and upcoming measurements of individual, stacked, and integrated SZ signals.

  13. The solvation of electrons by an atmospheric-pressure plasma

    PubMed Central

    Rumbach, Paul; Bartels, David M.; Sankaran, R. Mohan; Go, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Solvated electrons are typically generated by radiolysis or photoionization of solutes. While plasmas containing free electrons have been brought into contact with liquids in studies dating back centuries, there has been little evidence that electrons are solvated by this approach. Here we report direct measurements of solvated electrons generated by an atmospheric-pressure plasma in contact with the surface of an aqueous solution. The electrons are measured by their optical absorbance using a total internal reflection geometry. The measured absorption spectrum is unexpectedly blue shifted, which is potentially due to the intense electric field in the interfacial Debye layer. We estimate an average penetration depth of 2.5±1.0 nm, indicating that the electrons fully solvate before reacting through second-order recombination. Reactions with various electron scavengers including H+, NO2−, NO3− and H2O2 show that the kinetics are similar, but not identical, to those for solvated electrons formed in bulk water by radiolysis. PMID:26088017

  14. The Effect of Cesium Vapour on the Bulk Conductivity of Plasma - Sprayed Spinel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    1995 P. Agnew TOPAZ International Program 901 University Blvd. Albuquerque, NM 87106 USA. 1999021 9 0 4 7 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for Public...these experiments. References ə> P. Agnew and J.L. Ing, "Surface electrical conductivity of single crystal spinel in cesium vapour", TOPAZ ...International Program report, April 1995. ɚ> P. Agnew and J.L. Ing, "The effect of cesium vapour on the bulk conductivity of plasma- sprayed alumina", TOPAZ

  15. Diagnostics of plasma-biological surface interactions in low pressure and atmospheric pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru

    2014-08-01

    Mechanisms of plasma-surface interaction are required to understand in order to control the reactions precisely. Recent progress in atmospheric pressure plasma provides to apply as a tool of sterilization of contaminated foodstuffs. To use the plasma with safety and optimization, the real time in situ detection of free radicals - in particular dangling bonds by using the electron-spin-resonance (ESR) technique has been developed because the free radical plays important roles for dominantly biological reactions. First, the kinetic analysis of free radicals on biological specimens such as fungal spores of Penicillium digitatum interacted with atomic oxygen generated plasma electric discharge. We have obtained information that the in situ real time ESR signal from the spores was observed and assignable to semiquinone radical with a g-value of around 2.004 and a line width of approximately 5G. The decay of the signal was correlated with a link to the inactivation of the fungal spore. Second, we have studied to detect chemical modification of edible meat after the irradiation. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF-MS) and ESR, signals give qualification results for chemical changes on edible liver meat. The in situ real-time measurements have proven to be a useful method to elucidate plasma-induced surface reactions on biological specimens.

  16. Structure and bulk modulus of Ln-doped UO2 (Ln = La, Nd) at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittman, Dylan R.; Park, Sulgiye; Tracy, Cameron L.; Zhang, Lei; Palomares, Raul I.; Lang, Maik; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Mao, Wendy L.; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2017-07-01

    The structure of lanthanide-doped uranium dioxide, LnxU1-xO2-0.5x+y (Ln = La, Nd), was investigated at pressures up to ∼50-55 GPa. Samples were synthesized with different lanthanides at different concentrations (x ∼ 0.2 and 0.5), and all were slightly hyperstoichiometric (y ∼ 0.25-0.4). In situ high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to investigate their high-pressure phase behavior and determine their bulk moduli. All samples underwent a fluorite-to-cotunnite phase transformation with increasing pressure. The pressure of the phase transformation increased with increasing hyperstoichiometry, which is consistent with results from previous computational simulations. Bulk moduli are inversely proportional to both the ionic radius of the lanthanide and its concentration, as quantified using a weighted cationic radius ratio. This trend was found to be consistent with the behavior of other elastic properties measured for Ln-doped UO2, such as Young's modulus.

  17. Zr-based bulk metallic glass as a cylinder material for high pressure apparatuses

    SciTech Connect

    Komatsu, Kazuki; Munakata, Koji; Matsubayashi, Kazuyuki; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Yokoyama, Yoshihiko; Sugiyama, Kazumasa; Matsuda, Masaaki

    2015-05-12

    Zirconium-based bulk metallic glass (Zr-based BMG) has outstanding properties as a cylinder mate- rial for piston-cylinder high pressure apparatuses and is especially useful for neutron scattering. The piston-cylinder consisting of a Zr-based BMG cylinder with outer/inner diameters of 8.8/2.5 mm sustains pressures up to 1.81 GPa and ruptured at 2.0 GPa, with pressure values determined by the superconduct- ing temperature of lead. The neutron attenuation of Zr-based BMG is similar to that of TiZr null-scattering alloy and more transparent than that of CuBe alloy. No contamination of sharp Bragg reflections is observed in the neutron diffraction pattern for Zr-based BMG. The magnetic susceptibility of Zr-based BMG is similar to that of CuBe alloy; this leads to a potential application for measurements of magnetic properties under pressure.

  18. High-pressure ignition plasma torch for aerospace testing facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusupov, D. I.; Kulikov, Yu M.; Gadzhiev, M. Kh; Tyuftyaev, A. S.; Son, E. E.

    2016-11-01

    The present paper discusses the issues of implementation of high-pressure ignition plasma torch in terms of discharge phenomena in compressed gases, dense nitrogen plasma properties and stable arcing power requirements. Contact ignition has been tested in a pressure range p = 1-25 bar and has proved to be a reliable solution for pilot arc burning.

  19. Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas for Decontamination of Complex Medical Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Winter, Jörn; Polak, Martin; Ehlbeck, Jörg; von Woedtke, Thomas

    Atmospheric pressure plasma sources produce a multiplicity of different antimicrobial agents and are applicable to even complicated geometries as well as to heat sensitive materials. Thus, atmospheric pressure plasmas have a huge potential for the decontamination of even complex medical devices like central venous catheters and endoscopes. In this paper we present practicable realizations of atmospheric pressure plasma sources, namely plasma jet, dielectric barrier discharge and microwave driven discharge that are able to penetrate fine lumen or are adaptable to difficult geometries. Furthermore, the antimicrobial efficacy of these sources is given for one example setup in each case.

  20. Optical Tamm states above the bulk plasma frequency at a Bragg stack/metal interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, S.; Kaliteevski, M. A.; Abram, R. A.

    2009-02-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that surface-plasmon polaritons, a form of optical Tamm state, can occur at the interface between a metal and a Bragg reflector at frequencies above the bulk plasma frequency of the metal. The frequencies of the excitations are within the photonic band gap of the Bragg reflector which provides the required evanescent decay on that side of the interface. At finite in-plane wave vector, the low value of the permittivity of the metal above its plasma frequency can lead to an imaginary normal wave vector component in the metal, which provides the localization on the other side of the interface. It is proposed that the necessary conditions can be realized using a GaAs/AlAs Bragg stack coated with a suitable conducting metal oxide having a bulk plasma frequency of 1 eV, but the concept is valid for other systems given an appropriate plasma frequency and photonic band-gap structure. The dispersion relations of the plasmon polaritons in the structures considered are calculated for both possible polarizations, and it is shown how the excitations result in distinct features in the predicted reflectivity spectra.

  1. Single crystal elasticity of gold up to ˜20 GPa: Bulk modulus anomaly and implication for a primary pressure scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Akira; Fukui, Hiroshi; Gomi, Hitoshi; Kamada, Seiji; Xie, Longjian; Hirao, Naohisa; Uchiyama, Hiroshi; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Baron, Alfred Q. R.

    2017-09-01

    We measured the elasticity of single crystal gold (Au) and its lattice parameters under high pressure using inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS). The elastic moduli were obtained at five pressure points between 0 and 20 GPa. The pressure variation of the bulk modulus displays anomalous behavior, being nearly constant up to ˜5 GPa, and then steeply increasing at higher pressure. A similar anomaly is observed in first-principles calculations. An absolute pressure scale was derived by direct numerical integration of the bulk modulus over volume change. This yields a scale that gives slightly lower pressure values than those of previous work, about 5-10% lower at ˜20 GPa.

  2. Dynamics of bulk electron heating and ionization in solid density plasmas driven by ultra-short relativistic laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L. G. Kluge, T.; Cowan, T. E.

    2016-06-15

    The dynamics of bulk heating and ionization is investigated both in simulations and theory, which determines the crucial plasma parameters such as plasma temperature and density in ultra-short relativistic laser-solid target interactions. During laser-plasma interactions, the solid density plasma absorbs a fraction of laser energy and converts it into kinetic energy of electrons. A portion of the electrons with relativistic kinetic energy goes through the solid density plasma and transfers energy into the bulk electrons, which results in bulk electron heating. The bulk electron heating is finally translated into the processes of bulk collisional ionization inside the solid target. A simple model based on the Ohmic heating mechanism indicates that the local and temporal profile of bulk return current is essential to determine the temporal evolution of bulk electron temperature. A series of particle-in-cell simulations showing the local heating model is robust in the cases of target with a preplasma and without a preplasma. Predicting the bulk electron heating is then benefit for understanding the collisional ionization dynamics inside the solid targets. The connection of the heating and ionization inside the solid target is further studied using Thomas-Fermi model.

  3. “Anomalous” collisionality in low-pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, T.; Chabert, P.; Booth, J. P.; Turner, M. M.

    2013-12-15

    Based on a theoretical argument from fundamental kinetic theory, by way of simple worked examples, and through the use of particle-in-cell simulations of capacitively coupled plasmas, we demonstrate that conventional methods for calculating the momentum transfer collision frequency in low-pressure plasmas can be seriously erroneous. This potentially plays an important and previously unconsidered role in many low-pressure discharges, and at least in part provides a possible explanation for anomalous behaviour often encountered in these plasmas.

  4. Average electric wave spectra across the plasma sheet and their relation to ion bulk speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumjohann, W.; Treumann, R. A.; Labelle, J.; Anderson, R. R.

    1989-01-01

    Using 4 months of tail data obtained by the ELF/MF spectrum analyzer of the wave experiment and the three-dimensional plasma instrument on board the AMPTE/IRM satellite, a statistical survey on the electric wave spectral density in the earth's plasma sheet has been conducted. More than 50,000 10-s-averaged electric wave spectra were analyzed with respect to differences between their values in the inner and outer central plasma sheet and the plasma sheet boundary layer as well as their dependence on radial distance and ion bulk speed. High-speed flows are dominated by broadband electrostatic noise with highest spectral densities in the plasma sheet boundary, where broadband electrostatic noise also exists during periods of low-speed flows. The broadband electrostatic noise has a typical spectral index of about -2. During low-speed flows the spectra in the central plasma sheet show distinct emissions at the electron cyclotron odd half-harmonic and upper hybrid frequency. Wave intensities during episodes of fast perpendicular flows are higher than those associated with fast parallel flows.

  5. Average electric wave spectra across the plasma sheet and their relation to ion bulk speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumjohann, W.; Treumann, R. A.; Labelle, J.; Anderson, R. R.

    1989-01-01

    Using 4 months of tail data obtained by the ELF/MF spectrum analyzer of the wave experiment and the three-dimensional plasma instrument on board the AMPTE/IRM satellite, a statistical survey on the electric wave spectral density in the earth's plasma sheet has been conducted. More than 50,000 10-s-averaged electric wave spectra were analyzed with respect to differences between their values in the inner and outer central plasma sheet and the plasma sheet boundary layer as well as their dependence on radial distance and ion bulk speed. High-speed flows are dominated by broadband electrostatic noise with highest spectral densities in the plasma sheet boundary, where broadband electrostatic noise also exists during periods of low-speed flows. The broadband electrostatic noise has a typical spectral index of about -2. During low-speed flows the spectra in the central plasma sheet show distinct emissions at the electron cyclotron odd half-harmonic and upper hybrid frequency. Wave intensities during episodes of fast perpendicular flows are higher than those associated with fast parallel flows.

  6. Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma: Sources and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napartovich, A. P.

    2008-07-01

    Non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure is an inherently unstable object. Nature of discharge plasma instabilities and conditions for observation of uniform non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure in different environments will be discussed. Various discharge techniques have been developed, which could support uniform non-thermal plasma with parameters varied in a wide range. Time limitation by plasma instabilities can be overcome by shortening pulse length or by restriction of plasma plug residence time with a fast gas flow. Discharge instabilities leading to formation of filaments or sparks are provoked by a positive feedback between the electric field and plasma density, while the counteracting process is plasma and thermal diffusion. With gas pressure growth the size of plasma fluctuation, which could be stabilized by diffusion, diminishes. As a result, to have long lived uniform plasma one should miniaturize discharge. There exist a number of active methods to organize negative feedback between the electric field and plasma density in order to suppress or, at least, delay the instability. Among them are ballast resistors in combination with electrode sectioning, reactive ballast, electronic feedback, and dielectric barrier across the electric current. The last methods are relevant for ac discharges. In the lecture an overview will be given of different discharge techniques scalable in pressure up to one atmosphere. The interest in this topic is dictated by a potential economic benefit from numerous non-thermal plasma technologies. The spectrum of non-thermal plasma applications is continuously broadening. An incomplete list of known applications includes: plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition, etching, polymerization, gas-phase synthesis, protective coating deposition, toxic and harmful gas decomposition, destruction of warfare agents, electromagnetic wave shielding, polymer surface modifications, gas laser excitation, odor control, plasma assisted

  7. Diagnostics of transient non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas have received a renewed interest in last decades for a variety of applications ranging from environmental remediation, material processing and synthesis to envisioned medical applications such as wound healing. While most low pressure plasmas are diffuse, atmospheric pressure plasmas are often filamentary in nature. The existence of these filaments is correlated with strong gradients in plasma properties both in space and time that can significantly affect the plasma chemistry. As these filaments are often randomly appearing in space and time, it poses great challenges for diagnostics often requiring the stabilization of the filament to study the in situ plasma kinetics. In this contribution, diagnostics of a stabilized nanosecond pulsed plasma filament in a pin-pin geometry and a filament in a nanosecond pulsed atmospheric pressure plasma jet will be presented. We will focus on electron kinetics and OH and H radical production in water containing plasmas. The extension of these diagnostics to plasmas in liquids will also be discussed. The author acknowledges support from NSF PHYS1500135, Department of Energy Plasma Science Center through the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (Contract No. DE-SC0001939), University of Minnesota and STW (Netherlands).

  8. Biomedical applications and diagnostics of atmospheric pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Z. Lj; Puač, N.; Lazović, S.; Maletić, D.; Spasić, K.; Malović, G.

    2012-03-01

    Numerous applications of non-equilibrium (cold, low temperature) plasmas require those plasmas to operate at atmospheric pressure. Achieving non-equilibrium at atmospheric pressure is difficult since the ionization growth is very fast at such a high pressure. High degree of ionization on the other hand enables transfer of energy between electrons and ions and further heating of the background neutral gas through collisions between ions and neutrals. Thus, all schemes to produce non-equilibrium plasmas revolve around some form of control of ionization growth. Diagnostics of atmospheric pressure plasmas is difficult and some of the techniques cannot be employed at all. The difficulties stem mostly from the small size. Optical emission spectroscopy and laser absorption spectroscopy require very high resolution in order to resolve the anatomy of the discharges. Mass analysis is not normally applicable for atmospheric pressure plasmas, but recently systems with triple differential pumping have been developed that allow analysis of plasma chemistry at atmospheric pressures which is essential for numerous applications. Application of such systems is, however, not free from problems. Applications in biomedicine require minimum heating of the ambient air. The gas temperature should not exceed 40 °C to avoid thermal damage to the living tissues. Thus, plasmas should operate at very low powers and power control is essential. We developed unique derivative probes that allow control of power well below 1 W and studied four different sources, including dielectric barrier discharges, plasma needle, atmospheric pressure jet and micro atmospheric pressure jet. The jet operates in plasma bullet regime if proper conditions are met. Finally, we cover results on treatment of bacteria and human cells as well as treatment of plants by plasmas. Localized delivery of active species by plasmas may lead to a number of medical procedures that may also involve removal of bacteria, fungi and

  9. Worms under Pressure: Bulk Mechanical Properties of C. elegans Are Independent of the Cuticle

    PubMed Central

    Gilpin, William; Uppaluri, Sravanti; Brangwynne, Clifford P.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of cells and tissues play a well-known role in physiology and disease. The model organism Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits mechanical properties that are still poorly understood, but are thought to be dominated by its collagen-rich outer cuticle. To our knowledge, we use a novel microfluidic technique to reveal that the worm responds linearly to low applied hydrostatic stress, exhibiting a volumetric compression with a bulk modulus, κ = 140 ± 20 kPa; applying negative pressures leads to volumetric expansion of the worm, with a similar bulk modulus. Surprisingly, however, we find that a variety of collagen mutants and pharmacological perturbations targeting the cuticle do not impact the bulk modulus. Moreover, the worm exhibits dramatic stiffening at higher stresses—behavior that is also independent of the cuticle. The stress-strain curves for all conditions can be scaled onto a master equation, suggesting that C. elegans exhibits a universal elastic response dominated by the mechanics of pressurized internal organs. PMID:25902429

  10. Worms under Pressure: Bulk Mechanical Properties of C. elegans Are Independent of the Cuticle.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, William; Uppaluri, Sravanti; Brangwynne, Clifford P

    2015-04-21

    The mechanical properties of cells and tissues play a well-known role in physiology and disease. The model organism Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits mechanical properties that are still poorly understood, but are thought to be dominated by its collagen-rich outer cuticle. To our knowledge, we use a novel microfluidic technique to reveal that the worm responds linearly to low applied hydrostatic stress, exhibiting a volumetric compression with a bulk modulus, κ = 140 ± 20 kPa; applying negative pressures leads to volumetric expansion of the worm, with a similar bulk modulus. Surprisingly, however, we find that a variety of collagen mutants and pharmacological perturbations targeting the cuticle do not impact the bulk modulus. Moreover, the worm exhibits dramatic stiffening at higher stresses-behavior that is also independent of the cuticle. The stress-strain curves for all conditions can be scaled onto a master equation, suggesting that C. elegans exhibits a universal elastic response dominated by the mechanics of pressurized internal organs.

  11. Surface cleaning of metal wire by atmospheric pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Buttapeng, C.; Furuya, S.; Harada, N.

    2009-11-01

    In this study, the possible application of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasma for the annealing of metallic wire is examined and presented. The main purpose of the current study is to examine the surface cleaning effect for a cylindrical object by atmospheric pressure plasma. The experimental setup consists of a gas tank, plasma reactor, and power supply with control panel. The gas assists in the generation of plasma. Copper wire was used as an experimental cylindrical object. This copper wire was irradiated with the plasma, and the cleaning effect was confirmed. The result showed that it is possible to remove the tarnish which exists on the copper wire surface. The experiment reveals that atmospheric pressure plasma is usable for the surface cleaning of metal wire. However, it is necessary to examine the method for preventing oxidization of the copper wire.

  12. Dynamics of modified Chaplygin gas inflation on the Brane with bulk viscous pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawad, Abdul; Ilyas, Amara; Rani, Shamaila

    We investigate the role of bulk viscous pressure on the warm inflationary modified Chaplygin gas (MCG) in braneworld framework in the presence of standard scalar field. We assume the intermediate inflationary scenario in strong dissipative regime and constructed the inflaton, potential, entropy density, slow-roll parameters, scalar and tensor power spectra, scalar spectral index and tensor-to-scalar ratio. We develop various trajectories such as ns-N, ns-r and ns-αs (where ns is the spectral index, αs is the running of spectral index, N is the number of e-folds and r is tensor-to-scalar ratio) for variable as well as constant dissipation and bulk viscous coefficients at high dissipative regime. It is interesting to remark here that our results of these parameters are compatible with recent observational data such as WMAP 7 + 9, BICEP2 and Planck data.

  13. Fast ion generation and bulk plasma heating with three-ion ICRF scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, Ye. O. Van Eester, D.; Ongena, J.; Lerche, E.; Messiaen, A.

    2015-12-10

    Launching electromagnetic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is an efficient method of plasma heating, actively employed in most of fusion machines. ICRF has a number of important supplementary applications, including the generation of high-energy ions. In this paper, we discuss a new set of three-ion ICRF scenarios and the prospect of their use as a dedicated tool for fast ion generation in tokamaks and stellarators. A distinct feature of these scenarios is a strong absorption efficiency possible at very low concentrations of resonant minority ions (∼ 1% or even below). Such concentration levels are typical for impurities contaminating fusion plasmas. An alternative ICRF scenario for maximizing the efficiency of bulk D-T ion heating is suggested for JET and ITER tokamaks, which is based on three-ion ICRF heating of intrinsic Beryllium impurities.

  14. Threefold Increase of the Bulk Electron Temperature of Plasma Discharges in a Magnetic Mirror Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagryansky, P. A.; Shalashov, A. G.; Gospodchikov, E. D.; Lizunov, A. A.; Maximov, V. V.; Prikhodko, V. V.; Soldatkina, E. I.; Solomakhin, A. L.; Yakovlev, D. V.

    2015-05-01

    This Letter describes plasma discharges with a high temperature of bulk electrons in the axially symmetric high-mirror-ratio (R =35 ) open magnetic system gas dynamic trap (GDT) in the Budker Institute (Novosibirsk). According to Thomson scattering measurements, the on-axis electron temperature averaged over a number of sequential shots is 660 ±50 eV with the plasma density being 0.7 ×1 019 m-3 ; in few shots, electron temperature exceeds 900 eV. This corresponds to at least a threefold increase with respect to previous experiments both at GDT and at other comparable machines, thus, demonstrating the highest quasistationary (about 1 ms) electron temperature achieved in open traps. The breakthrough is made possible by application of a new 0.7 MW /54.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance heating system in addition to standard 5 MW heating by neutral beams, and application of a radial electric field to mitigate the flute instability.

  15. Direct depth distribution measurement of deuterium in bulk tungsten exposed to high-flux plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, C. N.; Shimada, M.

    2017-05-01

    Understanding tritium retention and permeation in plasma-facing components is critical for fusion safety and fuel cycle control. Glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GD-OES) is shown to be an effective tool to reveal the depth profile of deuterium in tungsten. Results confirm the detection of deuterium. A ˜46 μm depth profile revealed that the deuterium content decreased precipitously in the first 7 μm, and detectable amounts were observed to depths in excess of 20 μm. The large probing depth of GD-OES (up to 100s of μm) enables studies not previously accessible to the more conventional techniques for investigating deuterium retention. Of particular applicability is the use of GD-OES to measure the depth profile for experiments where high deuterium concentration in the bulk material is expected: deuterium retention in neutron irradiated materials, and ultra-high deuterium fluences in burning plasma environment.

  16. Fast ion generation and bulk plasma heating with three-ion ICRF scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, Ye. O.; Van Eester, D.; Dumont, R.; Ongena, J.; Lerche, E.; Messiaen, A.

    2015-12-01

    Launching electromagnetic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is an efficient method of plasma heating, actively employed in most of fusion machines. ICRF has a number of important supplementary applications, including the generation of high-energy ions. In this paper, we discuss a new set of three-ion ICRF scenarios and the prospect of their use as a dedicated tool for fast ion generation in tokamaks and stellarators. A distinct feature of these scenarios is a strong absorption efficiency possible at very low concentrations of resonant minority ions (˜ 1% or even below). Such concentration levels are typical for impurities contaminating fusion plasmas. An alternative ICRF scenario for maximizing the efficiency of bulk D-T ion heating is suggested for JET and ITER tokamaks, which is based on three-ion ICRF heating of intrinsic Beryllium impurities.

  17. Decomposition of Chemical Chain Molecules with Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tansli, Murat; Tasal, Erol

    2016-10-01

    Chemical chain molecules' decomposition is an interesting subject area for the atmospheric pressure plasma applications. The effects of the atmospheric pressure argon plasma on 4-((2-methoxyphenyl)Diazenyl)Benzene-1,3,-Diol molecule at room temperature are investigated. This molecule is one of the industrial dye molecules used widely. When considering the ecological life, this molecule will be very harmful and danger. We suggest a different, easy and useful decomposing method for such molecules. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet was principally treated for this decomposing of the molecule. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR) was used to characterization of the molecule after the plasma application to molecule in liquid phase with ethanol and methanol solvents. The atmospheric-pressure plasma jet of argon (Ar) as non-equilibrium has been formed by ac-power generator with frequency - 24 kHz and voltage - 12 kV. Characterizations for solutions prepared with ethanol and methanol solvents of molecule have been examined after applying (duration: 3 minutes) the atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The molecule was broken at 6C-7N =8N-9C stretching peak after the plasma treatment. The new plasma photo-products for ethanol and methanol solutions were produced as 6C-7N-8N =9C (strong, varying) and 12C =17O (strong, wide) stretching peaks.

  18. Electrochemical properties of the passive film on bulk Zr-Fe-Cr intermetallic fabricated by spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yakui; Ling, Yunhan; Lai, Wensheng; Xing, Shupei; Ma, Wen

    2016-12-01

    Although Zr-based second phase particles (SPPs) are important factors influencing corrosion resistance of zircaloy cladding materials, the corrosion behavior of SPPs has not been investigated by means of electrochemical method so far. In order to clarify the role of SPPs commonly existed in zircaloy, bulk Zr-based intermetallics were firstly fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) at temperatures 1373 K and an applied pressure of 60 MPa in this work. Both the natural passive film on surface and oxidation behavior of intermetallic has been investigated in this work. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern showed that as-prepared intermetallic of crystal structure belongs to Laves phase with AB2 type. Electrochemical measurement of passive film on surface of bulk Zr-based intermetallic exhibited significant difference with that of zirconium. Potentiodynamic measurements results revealed that intermetallic exhibited higher corrosion potential and lower corrosion current density than that of pure zirconium, implying that Zr-based second phase will act as cathode when they are included in zirconium matrix. Meanwhile, significant improvement of Zr-Fe-Cr intermetallic on the water chemistry corrosion resistance was demonstrated comparing with Zr-Fe and Zr-Cr binary intermetallics.

  19. Modeling of low pressure plasma sources for microelectronics fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ankur; Bera, Kallol; Kenney, Jason; Likhanskii, Alexandre; Rauf, Shahid

    2017-10-01

    Chemically reactive plasmas operating in the 1 mTorr–10 Torr pressure range are widely used for thin film processing in the semiconductor industry. Plasma modeling has come to play an important role in the design of these plasma processing systems. A number of 3-dimensional (3D) fluid and hybrid plasma modeling examples are used to illustrate the role of computational investigations in design of plasma processing hardware for applications such as ion implantation, deposition, and etching. A model for a rectangular inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source is described, which is employed as an ion source for ion implantation. It is shown that gas pressure strongly influences ion flux uniformity, which is determined by the balance between the location of plasma production and diffusion. The effect of chamber dimensions on plasma uniformity in a rectangular capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) is examined using an electromagnetic plasma model. Due to high pressure and small gap in this system, plasma uniformity is found to be primarily determined by the electric field profile in the sheath/pre-sheath region. A 3D model is utilized to investigate the confinement properties of a mesh in a cylindrical CCP. Results highlight the role of hole topology and size on the formation of localized hot-spots. A 3D electromagnetic plasma model for a cylindrical ICP is used to study inductive versus capacitive power coupling and how placement of ground return wires influences it. Finally, a 3D hybrid plasma model for an electron beam generated magnetized plasma is used to understand the role of reactor geometry on plasma uniformity in the presence of E  ×  B drift.

  20. Low-pressure plasma diagnostic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, T.L.

    1989-01-01

    Diagnostic techniques have been recently developed that permit the determination of the deviation from local thermal equilibrium (LTE) in subatmospheric electric arcs and plasma jets. A review is presented of the methods that are applicable to MPD and arcjet thruster plasmas but that have not been used in space propulsion research. Appropriate plasma diagnostics can lead to increased thrust, better nozzle design, and improved modeling capabilities. These methods include nonintrusive techniques, and can determine the electron, gas, and total excitation, temperatures, as well as the electron and atom densities, without using LTE or partial LTE assumptions. General relations for analysis and experimental results for argon constricted arcs, an arc in a rotating magnetic field, and plasma torch jets are presented. The methods discussed can also be applied to plasma mixtures. 23 refs.

  1. Pressure-induced bulk superconductivity in a layered transition-metal dichalcogenide 1 T -tantalum selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bosen; Liu, Yu; Ishigaki, Kento; Matsubayashi, Kazuyuki; Cheng, Jinguang; Lu, Wenjian; Sun, Yuping; Uwatoko, Yoshiya

    2017-06-01

    We report pressure-driven superconductivity (SC) in the vicinity of a commensurate charge-density wave (CCDW) in transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) 1 T -TaS e2 by simultaneous resistivity and ac susceptibility. The superconducting phase enters at 4.5 GPa and bulk SC emerges along with the collapse of the CCDW phase at a critical pressure Pc˜6.5 GPa . Higher than Pc, the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) keeps increasing linearly, without a dome-shaped superconducting diagram in our pressure range. Tc reaches ˜5.3 K at 15 GPa, which is the highest among all 1 T -TMDs. A comprehensive analysis shows that electronic correlations of the CCDW phase open energy gaps, which prohibit Cooper pairing, while the superconducting channels and CCDW domain wall coexist in three dimensions above Pc. The evolutions of the Fermi surface and the softening of phonon modes under pressure are proposed to explain the monotonic increase of Tc. The findings reveal the interplay of CCDW and SC in 1 T -TaS e2 by a clean method, viz., high pressure, and shed light on the underlying superconducting mechanism in the relevant systems.

  2. Measurement of pulse pressure in plasma by crusher gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Kalachnikov, E.V.; Rogovtsev, P.N.

    1988-06-01

    Results are presented of pressure measurements in the plasma of a stabilized pinched discharge with axial blow through of the current channel by plasma using static and dynamic methods for crusher gauge calibration. Accuracies for maximum pressure measurements for both calibration methods are evaluated. The dynamic properties of the crusher gauge are taken into account experimentally in studying pulse forces and pressures in the 1-100 MPa range for times of 10/sup /minus/5/ to 10/sup /minus/3/ seconds. A piezoelectric method and device for dynamic calibration of the pressure gauges is described.

  3. In situ measurements of the plasma bulk velocity near the Io flux tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, A.

    1985-01-01

    The flow around the Io flux tube was studied by analyzing the eleven spectra taken by the Voyager 1 Plasma Science (PLS) experiment in its vicinity. The bulk plasma parameters were determined using a procedure that uses the full response function of the instrument and the data in all four PLS sensors. The mass density of the plasma in the vicinity of Io is found to be 22,500 + or - 2,500 amu/cu cm and its electron density is found to be 1500 + or - 200/cu cm. The Alfven speed was determined using three independent methods; the values obtained are consistent and taken together yield V sub A = 300 + or - 50 km/sec, corresponding to an Alfven Mach number of 0.19 + or - 0.02. For the flow pattern, good agreement was found with the model of Neubauer (1980), and it was concluded that the plasma flows around the flux tube with a pattern similar to the flow of an incompressible fluid around a long cylinder obstacle of radius 1.26 + or - 0.1 R sub Io.

  4. Bacterial Inactivation by Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Sanxi; Cheng, Cheng; Ni, Guohua; Meng, Yuedong; Chen, Hua

    2008-08-01

    Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli seeded in two media (agar and filter papers) were exposed to after-glow plasma emitted from a atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma jet generator in open air with a temperature of about 30-80 °C. In order to estimate the inactivation of microorganism using DBD plasma jet, various plasma conditions (such as treatment time and feed-gas composition of plasma jet) were changed. The results shown that the effective area of inactivation increased with the plasma treatment time as the bacteria seeded in Agar medium. The effective area of inactivation was much bigger than plasma jet treatment area after 5 min treatment. With the use of filter papers as the supporting media, the addition of reactive gases (oxygen, hydrogen peroxide vapor) into the plasma jet system, compared with only pure noble gas, led to a significant improvement in the bacterial Inactivation efficacy.

  5. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON LASER PLASMAS: Laser plasma at low air pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vas'kovskiĭ, Yu M.; Moiseev, V. N.; Rovinskiĭ, R. E.; Tsenina, I. S.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic and optical characteristics of the laser plasma produced during the application of a CO2 laser pulse to a target have been studied as a function of the ambient air pressure. The changes in the surface roughness of the sample after bombardment were studied as a function of the air pressure. It is concluded from the results that a transition from an air plasma to an erosion plasma occurs at a residual air pressure on the order of 1 torr. The experiment data support the existing picture of the process by which a plasma is produced near the surface of a target in air by laser pulses.

  6. Nanodiamonds in dusty low-pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenbulcke, L.; Gries, T.; Rouzaud, J. N.

    2009-01-26

    Dusty plasmas composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen have been evidenced by optical emission spectroscopy and microwave interferometry, due to the increase in electron energy and the decrease in electron density. These plasmas allow homogeneous synthesis of nanodiamond grains composed of either pure diamond nanocrystals only (2-10 nm in size) or of diamond nanocrystals and some sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon entities. The control of their size and their microstructure could open ways for a wide range of fields. Their formation from a plasma-activated gaseous phase is also attractive because the formation of nanodiamonds in the universe is still a matter of controversy.

  7. Low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma sources for plasma medicine.

    PubMed

    Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2016-09-01

    In this review paper, fundamental overviews of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma generation are provided and various sources for plasma medicine are described in terms of operating conditions and plasma properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Medical applications of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Hori, Masaru

    2017-01-01

    An innovative approach for producing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species is the use of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma. The technique has been applied in a wide variety of fields ranging from the micro-fabrication of electric devices to the treatment of disease. Although non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas have been shown to be clinically beneficial for wound healing, blood coagulation, and cancer treatment, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In this review, we describe the current progress in plasma medicine, with a particular emphasis on plasma-activated medium (PAM), which is a solution that is irradiated with a plasma and has broadened the applications of plasmas in medicine. PMID:28163379

  9. Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kangil; Sik Yang, Sang E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr; Jun Ahn, Hak; Lee, Jong-Soo E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2014-01-06

    Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells.

  10. Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kangil; Jun Ahn, Hak; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Ho; Sik Yang, Sang; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells.

  11. Pulse plasma carburizing and high pressure gas quenching -- Industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Preisser, F.; Schnatbaum, F.

    1995-12-31

    Pulse plasma carburizing with high pressure gas quenching up to 20 bar is the newly developed case hardening process now available in production size equipment. The first part of results demonstrates the tremendous potential of high pressure gas quenching for successful hardening of case hardening steels. The second part opens a window to glance at the pulse plasma carburizing of complex shaped parts. Both processes improve economical data and performance of carburizing processes.

  12. High-Pressure Equation of the State of a Zirconium-Based Bulk Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, M.; Sekine, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Kecskes, L.; Thadhani, N. N.

    2007-11-01

    The high stress U s -U p Hugoniot equation of state (EOS) of a zirconium-based bulk metallic glass (BMG, Zr57Nb5Cu15.4Ni12.6Al10) was determined using plate impact experiments on disk-shaped samples of 10-mm diameter and 2-mm thickness. The National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) two-stage light-gas gun was used for the high stress measurements (˜26 to 123 GPa), and the Georgia Institute of Technology (GT) single-stage gas gun was used for the lower stress measurements (˜5 to 26 GPa). The NIMS experiments were instrumented with streak photography and used the inclined mirror (IM) method to simultaneously measure shock velocity and free surface velocity. The GT experiments used polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) stress gages and velocity interferometry (VISAR) to simultaneously measure the shock velocity, free surface velocity, and stress. Results from the streak camera records and PVDF gages + VISAR traces, as well as impedance matching calculations, were used to generate the U s -U p Hugoniot EOS for the BMG over a wide range of stresses. The U s -U p data show evidence of a low pressure phase, a transition to a mixed phase region at ˜26 GPa, followed by transition at ˜67 GPa to a high-pressure phase of bulk modulus of 288 GPa.

  13. Spacecraft Sterilization Using Non-Equilibrium Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Moogega; Vaze, Nachiket; Anderson, Shawn; Fridman, Gregory; Vasilets, Victor N.; Gutsol, Alexander; Tsapin, Alexander; Fridman, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    As a solution to chemically and thermally destructive sterilization methods currently used for spacecraft, non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas are used to treat surfaces inoculated with Bacillus subtilis and Deinococcus radiodurans. Evidence of significant morphological changes and reduction in viability due to plasma exposure will be presented, including a 4-log reduction of B. subtilis after 2 minutes of dielectric barrier discharge treatment.

  14. Spacecraft Sterilization Using Non-Equilibrium Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Moogega; Vaze, Nachiket; Anderson, Shawn; Fridman, Gregory; Vasilets, Victor N.; Gutsol, Alexander; Tsapin, Alexander; Fridman, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    As a solution to chemically and thermally destructive sterilization methods currently used for spacecraft, non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas are used to treat surfaces inoculated with Bacillus subtilis and Deinococcus radiodurans. Evidence of significant morphological changes and reduction in viability due to plasma exposure will be presented, including a 4-log reduction of B. subtilis after 2 minutes of dielectric barrier discharge treatment.

  15. Agyrotropic pressure tensor induced by the plasma velocity shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegoraro, Francesco; Del Sarto, Danele; Califano, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    We show that the spatial inhomogeneity of a shear flow in a fluid plasma is transferred to a pressure anisotropy that has both a gyrotropic and a non gyrotropic component. We investigate this process both analytically and numerically by including the full pressure tensor dynamics. We determine the time evolution of the pressure agyrotropy and in general of the pressure tensor anisotropization which arise from the action of both the magnetic eld and the flow strain tensor. This mechanism can affect the onset and development of shear-induced fluid instabilities in plasmas and is relevant to the understanding of the origin of some of the non-Maxwellian distribution functions evidenced both in Vlasov simulations and in space plasma measurements that exhibit pressure agyrotropy.

  16. PIC-MCC/Fluid Hybrid Model for Low Pressure Capacitively Coupled O{sub 2} Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bera, Kallol; Rauf, Shahid; Collins, Ken

    2011-05-20

    Low pressure capacitively coupled plasmas are extensively used for advanced microelectronic device fabrication. Due to long electron mean free path and large bias voltages in this regime, kinetic effects play an important role in the dynamics of low pressure discharges. To take account of the kinetic effects, a one-dimensional hybrid plasma model has been developed that couples the Particle-In-Cell (PIC) technique for charged species and a fluid method for neutral species. The PIC model uses the Monte Carlo Collision (MCC) method to account for collision processes. The fluid model for neutral species takes into account species transport in the plasma, chemical reactions, and surface processes. An electronegative O{sub 2} plasma is simulated for a range of pressures (10-300 mTorr) and rf voltages (200-600 V) at 60 MHz. Our model for the O{sub 2} plasma considers electrons, O{sub 2}{sup +}, O{sup -}, O, and O*. The reaction mechanism includes electron impact dissociation, ionization, dissociative attachment and ion-ion recombination. Computational results are compared to our previous simulations for an electropositive Ar discharge. The electrons primarily absorb power from the external power supply at the sheath edge during sheath expansion. Energetic beam electrons are generated at the sheath edge during electron heating, which are responsible for plasma production and sustenance through collisions. The negative ions are found to be confined in the bulk plasma due to the potential well. The ratio of negative ions to electrons increases with increase in pressure and decrease in rf voltage. The spatial profiles of charged and neutral species in the plasma are found to primarily depend on species sources due to collisional processes.

  17. High Pressure Equation of State of a Zirconium-Based Bulk Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Morgana; Sekine, Toshimori; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Kecskes, Laszlo; Thadhani, Naresh

    2007-06-01

    The high pressure Us-Up Hugoniot equation of state of (Zr57Nb5Cu15.4Ni12.6Al10 bulk metallic glass (BMG) was determined using plate impact experiments. The National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) two-stage light-gas gun was utilized for the high pressure measurements (˜26-115 GPa) and the Georgia Institute of Technology (GT) single-stage gas gun was utilized for the relatively low pressure measurements (˜5-23 GPa). NIMS experiments were instrumented with streak photography and the inclined mirror method to simultaneously measure shock velocity and free surface velocity. GT experiments utilized polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) stress gauges and velocity interferometry (VISAR) to simultaneously measure the shock velocity, free surface velocity and stress. Results from the streak camera records and PVDF gauges + VISAR traces, as well as impedance matching calculations, were used to generate the Us-Up Hugoniot equation of state data and determine the high pressure stability of the BMG.

  18. Synthesis of Bulk BC8 Silicon Allotrope by Direct Transformation and Reduced-Pressure Chemical Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kurakevych, Oleksandr O; Le Godec, Yann; Crichton, Wilson A; Guignard, Jérémy; Strobel, Timothy A; Zhang, Haidong; Liu, Hanyu; Coelho Diogo, Cristina; Polian, Alain; Menguy, Nicolas; Juhl, Stephen J; Gervais, Christel

    2016-09-06

    Phase-pure samples of a metastable allotrope of silicon, Si-III or BC8, were synthesized by direct elemental transformation at 14 GPa and ∼900 K and also at significantly reduced pressure in the Na-Si system at 9.5 GPa by quenching from high temperatures ∼1000 K. Pure sintered polycrystalline ingots with dimensions ranging from 0.5 to 2 mm can be easily recovered at ambient conditions. The chemical route also allowed us to decrease the synthetic pressures to as low as 7 GPa, while pressures required for direct phase transition in elemental silicon are significantly higher. In situ control of the synthetic protocol, using synchrotron radiation, allowed us to observe the underlying mechanism of chemical interactions and phase transformations in the Na-Si system. Detailed characterization of Si-III using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, (29)Si NMR spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy are discussed. These large-volume syntheses at significantly reduced pressures extend the range of possible future bulk characterization methods and applications.

  19. Pressure induced stiffening, thermal softening of bulk modulus and brittle nature of mercury chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Dinesh; Shriya, Swarna; Sapkale, Raju; Varshney, Meenu; Ameri, M.

    2015-07-01

    The pressure and temperature dependent elastic properties of mercury chalcogenides (HgX; X = S, Se and Te) with pressure induced structural transition from ZnS-type (B3) to NaCl-type (B1) structure have been analyzed within the framework of a model interionic interaction potential with long-range Coulomb and charge transfer interactions, short-range overlap repulsion and van der Waals (vdW) interactions as well as zero point energy effects. Emphasis is on the evaluation of the Bulk modulus with pressure and temperature dependency to yield the Poisson's ratio ν, the Pugh ratio ϕ, anisotropy parameter, Shear and Young's modulus, Lamé's constant, Klein man parameter, elastic wave velocity and Debye temperature. The Poisson's ratio behavior infers that HgX are brittle in nature. To our knowledge this is the first quantitative theoretical prediction of the pressure dependence of elastic and thermodynamical properties explicitly the ductile (brittle) nature of HgX and still awaits experimental confirmations.

  20. Reduction of the bulk modulus at high pressure in CrN.

    PubMed

    Rivadulla, Francisco; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Quintela, Camilo X; Piñeiro, Alberto; Pardo, Victor; Baldomir, Daniel; López-Quintela, Manuel Arturo; Rivas, José; Ramos, Carlos A; Salva, Horacio; Zhou, Jian-Shi; Goodenough, John B

    2009-12-01

    Nitride coatings are increasingly demanded in the cutting- and machining-tool industry owing to their hardness, thermal stability and resistance to corrosion. These properties derive from strongly covalent bonds; understanding the bonding is a requirement for the design of superhard materials with improved capabilities. Here, we report a pressure-induced cubic-to-orthorhombic transition at approximately 1 GPa in CrN. High-pressure X-ray diffraction and ab initio calculations show an unexpected reduction of the bulk modulus, K0, of about 25% in the high-pressure (lower volume) phase. Our combined theoretical and experimental approach shows that this effect is the result of a large exchange striction due to the approach of the localized Cr:t3 electrons to becoming molecular-orbital electrons in Cr-Cr bonds. The softening of CrN under pressure is a manifestation of a strong competition between different types of chemical bond that are found at a crossover from a localized to a molecular-orbital electronic transition.

  1. Zr-based bulk metallic glass as a cylinder material for high pressure apparatuses

    DOE PAGES

    Komatsu, Kazuki; Munakata, Koji; Matsubayashi, Kazuyuki; ...

    2015-05-12

    Zirconium-based bulk metallic glass (Zr-based BMG) has outstanding properties as a cylinder mate- rial for piston-cylinder high pressure apparatuses and is especially useful for neutron scattering. The piston-cylinder consisting of a Zr-based BMG cylinder with outer/inner diameters of 8.8/2.5 mm sustains pressures up to 1.81 GPa and ruptured at 2.0 GPa, with pressure values determined by the superconduct- ing temperature of lead. The neutron attenuation of Zr-based BMG is similar to that of TiZr null-scattering alloy and more transparent than that of CuBe alloy. No contamination of sharp Bragg reflections is observed in the neutron diffraction pattern for Zr-based BMG.more » The magnetic susceptibility of Zr-based BMG is similar to that of CuBe alloy; this leads to a potential application for measurements of magnetic properties under pressure.« less

  2. Characteristics of a Plasma Torch Designed for Very Low Pressure Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Yang, De Ming; Gao, Jianyi

    2012-06-01

    Unlike atmosphere plasma spraying (APS), very low pressure plasma spraying (VLPPS) can only weakly heat the feed materials at the plasma-free region exit of the nozzle. Most current VLPPS methods have adopted a high power plasma gun, which operates at high arc currents up to 2500 A to remedy the lower heating ability, causing a series of problems for both the plasma torch and the associated facility. According to the Kundsen number and pressures distribution inside of the nozzle in a low-pressure environment, a plasma torch was designed with a separated anode and nozzle, and with the powder feed to the plasma jets inside the nozzle intake. In this study, the pressures in the plasma gas intake, in the nozzle intake and outside the plasma torch were measured using an enthalpy probe. For practice, SUS 316 stainless steel coatings were prepared at the plasma currents of 500-600 A, an arc voltage of 50 V and a chamber pressure of 1000 Pa; the results indicated that coatings with an equiaxed microstructure could be deposited in proper conditions.

  3. Charge dependence of the plasma travel length in atmospheric-pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Konda, Kohmei; Masuda, Seiya

    2016-06-15

    Plasma plume is generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and foil electrode by applying AC high voltage under the atmosphere. The plasma plume is released into the atmosphere from inside of the quartz tube and is seen as the continuous movement of the plasma bullet. The travel length of plasma bullet is defined from plasma energy and force due to electric field. The drift velocity of plasma bullet has the upper limit under atmospheric-pressure because the drift velocity is determined from the balance between electric field and resistive force due to collisions between plasma and air. The plasma plume charge depends on the drift velocity. Consequently, in the laminar flow of helium gas flow state, the travel length of the plasma plume logarithmically depends on the plasma plume charge which changes with both the electric field and the resistive force.

  4. Difference in chemical reactions in bulk plasma and sheath regions during surface modification of graphene oxide film using capacitively coupled NH{sub 3} plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung-Youp; Kim, Chan; Kim, Hong Tak

    2015-09-14

    Reduced graphene oxide (r-GO) films were obtained from capacitively coupled NH{sub 3} plasma treatment of spin-coated graphene oxide (GO) films at room temperature. Variations were evaluated according to the two plasma treatment regions: the bulk plasma region (R{sub bulk}) and the sheath region (R{sub sheath}). Reduction and nitridation of the GO films began as soon as the NH{sub 3} plasma was exposed to both regions. However, with the increase in treatment time, the reduction and nitridation reactions differed in each region. In the R{sub bulk}, NH{sub 3} plasma ions reacted chemically with oxygen functional groups on the GO films, which was highly effective for reduction and nitridation. While in the R{sub sheath}, physical reactions by ion bombardment were dominant because plasma ions were accelerated by the strong electrical field. The accelerated plasma ions reacted not only with the oxygen functional groups but also with the broken carbon chains, which caused the removal of the GO films by the formation of hydrocarbon gas species. These results showed that reduction and nitridation in the R{sub bulk} using capacitively coupled NH{sub 3} plasma were very effective for modifying the properties of r-GO films for application as transparent conductive films.

  5. Photoresist Etching by Atmospheric Pressure Uniform-Glow Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shouguo; Xu, Xiangyu; Zhao, Lingli; Ye, Tianchun

    2007-08-01

    An atmospheric pressure uniform-glow plasma (APUGP) operated by radio-frequency (RF) power at 13.56 MHz has been developed for etching, cleaning, surface treatment, and deposition of thin films among others. This plasma employs a capacitive coupling electrode design and produces a stable, volumetric glow discharge in a large disc area of 150 mm diameter using argon and oxygen mixture gas at atmospheric pressure. Its electrical characteristics were obtained by simultaneous measurements of voltage and current. In addition, typical photoresist-AZ9918 films spin-coated on 4-in. silicon wafers have been etched using this plasma source, which shows promise for replacing low-pressure plasma devices for some existing applications.

  6. Atmospheric pressure cold plasma as an antifungal therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Peng; Wu Haiyan; Sun Yi; Liu Wei; Li Ruoyu; Zhu Weidong; Lopez, Jose L.; Zhang Jue; Fang Jing

    2011-01-10

    A microhollow cathode based, direct-current, atmospheric pressure, He/O{sub 2} (2%) cold plasma microjet was used to inactive antifungal resistants Candida albicans, Candida krusei, and Candida glabrata in air and in water. Effective inactivation (>90%) was achieved in 10 min in air and 1 min in water. Antifungal susceptibility tests showed drastic reduction of the minimum inhibitory concentration after plasma treatment. The inactivation was attributed to the reactive oxygen species generated in plasma or in water. Hydroxyl and singlet molecular oxygen radicals were detected in plasma-water system by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. This approach proposed a promising clinical dermatology therapy.

  7. Atmospheric pressure cold plasma as an antifungal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Peng; Sun, Yi; Wu, Haiyan; Zhu, Weidong; Lopez, Jose L.; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Jue; Li, Ruoyu; Fang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    A microhollow cathode based, direct-current, atmospheric pressure, He/O2 (2%) cold plasma microjet was used to inactive antifungal resistants Candida albicans, Candida krusei, and Candida glabrata in air and in water. Effective inactivation (>90%) was achieved in 10 min in air and 1 min in water. Antifungal susceptibility tests showed drastic reduction of the minimum inhibitory concentration after plasma treatment. The inactivation was attributed to the reactive oxygen species generated in plasma or in water. Hydroxyl and singlet molecular oxygen radicals were detected in plasma-water system by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. This approach proposed a promising clinical dermatology therapy.

  8. The mosaic structure of plasma bulk flows in the Earth's magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Richard, R. L.; Zelenyi, L. M.; Peroomian, V.; Bosqued, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Moments of plasma distributions observed in the magnetotail vary with different time scales. In this paper we attempt to explain the observed variability on intermediate timescales of approximately 10-20 min that result from the simultaneous energization and spatial structuring of solar wind plasma in the distant magnetotail. These processes stimulate the formation of a system of spatially disjointed. highly accelerated filaments (beamlets) in the tail. We use the results from large-scale kinetic modeling of magnetotail formation from a plasma mantle source to calculate moments of ion distribution functions throughout the tail. Statistical restrictions related to the limited number of particles in our system naturally reduce the spatial resolution of our results, but we show that our model is valid on intermediate spatial scales Delta(x) x Delta(z) equal to approximately 1 R(sub E) x 1000 km. For these spatial scales the resulting pattern, which resembles a mosaic, appears to be quite variable. The complexity of the pattern is related to the spatial interference between beamlets accelerated at various locations within the distant tail which mirror in the strong near-Earth magnetic field. Global motion of the magnetotail results in the displacement of spacecraft with respect to this mosaic pattern and can produce variations in all of the moments (especially the x-component of the bulk velocity) on intermediate timescales. The results obtained enable us to view the magnetotail plasma as consisting of two different populations: a tailward-Earthward system of highly accelerated beamlets interfering with each other, and an energized quasithermal population which gradually builds as the Earth is approached. In the near-Earth tail, these populations merge into a hot quasi-isotropic ion population typical of the near-Earth plasma sheet. The transformation of plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) beam energy into central plasma sheet (CPS) quasi-thermal energy occurs in the

  9. Physics and chemistry of non-equilibrium, atmospheric pressure plasmas containing fluorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiawan

    The physics and chemistry of low temperature, atmospheric pressure plasmas containing fluorine have been investigated with current, voltage, and power measurements, infrared absorption spectroscopy, and optical emission spectroscopy. The plasma source consisted of two closely spaced metal electrodes, supplied with radio-frequency power at 13.56 MHz. The fluorine atom concentration was measured in the downstream region of a carbon tetrafluoride and helium plasma using infrared spectroscopy. The gas discharge generated 1.2 x 10 15 cm-3 of F atoms, which is ˜100 times higher than that found in low-pressure plasmas. A numerical model of the plasma indicated that most of the F atoms were generated by the reaction of CF4 with metastable helium atoms. It was discovered that the atmospheric pressure, radio-frequency plasma could be made to undergo sheath breakdown with conversion from an alpha- to a gamma-mode discharge. With 0.4 vol% nitrogen in helium, this transition was accompanied by a 40% drop in voltage, a 12% decrease in current, and a surge in power density from 25 to 2083 W/cm3. The shift in intense plasma emission from the bulk gas to the surface of the electrodes was documented by optical techniques. When the plasma was operated in the alpha and gamma modes, 5.2% and 15.2% of the N2 was dissociated into atoms, respectively. In the latter case, the low dissociation efficiency was ascribed to the nonuniform structure of the plasma across the gap. In plasmas containing 1.0 vol% carbon tetrafluoride and sulfur hexafluoride, the alpha to gamma transition occurred smoothly with no discharge contraction. The electron density in these plasmas equaled 6.0 x 1011 cm-3, compared to 1.9 x 1013 cm -3 in pure helium. The drop in plasma density was due to fast electron attachment processes caused by the electronegative molecules, which also resulted in a high density of negative ions, up to 1013 cm-3. In addition, the non-equilibrium, atmospheric pressure plasma was used to

  10. Espisodic detachment of Martian crustal magnetic fields leading to bulk atmospheric plasma escape

    SciTech Connect

    Brain, D A; Baker, A H; Briggs, J; Eastwood, J P; Halekas, J S; Phan, T

    2009-06-02

    We present an analysis of magnetic field and suprathermal electron measurements from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft that reveals isolated magnetic structures filled with Martian atmospheric plasma located downstream from strong crustal magnetic fields with respect to the flowing solar wind. The structures are characterized by magnetic field enhancements and rotations characteristic of magnetic flux ropes, and characteristic ionospheric electron energy distributions with angular distributions distinct from surrounding regions. These observations indicate that significant amounts of atmosphere are intermittently being carried away from Mars by a bulk removal process: the top portions of crustal field loops are stretched through interaction with the solar wind and detach via magnetic reconnection. This process occurs frequently and may account for as much as 10% of the total present-day ion escape from Mars.

  11. [Spectral diagnosis of plasma jet at atmospheric pressure].

    PubMed

    Li, Chi; Tang, Xiao-liang; Qiu, Gao

    2008-12-01

    A new approach to surface modification of materials using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma jet at atmospheric pressure is presented in the present paper. The emission spectral lines of argon plasma jet at atmospheric pressure were recorded by the grating spectrograph HR2000 and computer software. The argon plasma emission spectra, ranging from 300nm to 1000 nm, were measured at different applied voltage. Compared to air plasma emission spectra under the same circumstance, it is shown that all of the spectral lines are attributed to neutral argon atoms. The spectral lines 763.51 and 772.42 nm were chosen to estimate the electron excitation temperature. The purpose of the study is to research the relationship between the applied voltage and temperature to control the process of materials' surface modification promptly. The results show that electron excitation temperature is in the range of 0.1-0.5 eV and increases with increasing applied voltage. In the process of surface modification under the plasma jet, the infrared radiation thermometer was used to measure the material surface temperature under the plasma jet. The results show that the material surface temperature is in the range of 50-100 degrees C and it also increases with increasing applied voltage. Because the material surface was under the plasma jet and its temperature was decided by the plasma, and the material surface temperature increased with increasing the macro-temperature of plasma jet, the relationship between the surface temperature and applied voltage indicates the relationship between the macro-temperature of the plasma jet and the applied voltage approximately. The experimental results indicate that DBD plasma jet at atmospheric pressure is a new approach to improving the quality of materials' surface modification, and spectral diagnosis has proved to be a kind of workable method by choosing suitable applied voltage.

  12. Ambient-Pressure Bulk Superconductivity Deep in the Magnetic State of CeRhIn5

    SciTech Connect

    Paglione,J.; Ho, P.; Maple, M.; Tanatar, M.; Taillefer, L.; Lee, Y.; Petrovic, C.

    2008-01-01

    Specific heat, magnetic susceptibility and electrical transport measurements were performed at ambient pressure on high-quality single crystal specimens of CeRhIn5 down to ultra-low temperatures. We report signatures of an anomaly observed in all measured quantities consistent with a bulk phase transition to a superconducting state at T{sub c}=110 mK. Occurring far below the onset of antiferromagnetism at T{sub N}=3.8 K, this transition appears to involve a significant portion of the available low-temperature density of electronic states, exhibiting an entropy change in line with that found in other members of the 115 family of superconductors tuned away from quantum criticality.

  13. Sterilization of Turmeric by Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setareh, Salarieh; Davoud, Dorranian

    2013-11-01

    In this study atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma has been employed for sterilizing dry turmeric powders. A 6 kV, 6 kHz frequency generator was used to generate plasma with Ar, Ar/O2, He, and He/O2 gases between the 5 mm gap of two quartz covered electrodes. The complete sterilization time of samples due to plasma treatment was measured. The most important contaminant of turmeric is bacillus subtilis. The results show that the shortest sterilization time of 15 min is achieved by exposing the samples to Ar/O2 plasma. Survival curves of samples are exponential functions of time and the addition of oxygen to plasma leads to a significant increase of the absolute value of time constant of the curves. Magnitudes of protein and DNA in treated samples were increased to a similar value for all samples. Taste, color, and solubility of samples were not changed after the plasma treatment.

  14. Efficacy of Nonthermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma for Tooth Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seoul Hee; Lee, Hae June; Hong, Jin Woo; Kim, Gyoo Cheon

    2015-01-01

    The conventional light source used for tooth bleaching has the potential to cause thermal damage, and the actual role of the light source is doubtful. In this study, we evaluated bleaching efficacy, temperature, and morphological safety after tooth bleaching with nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma. Tooth bleaching combined with plasma had improved efficacy in providing a higher level of brightness. The temperature of the pulp chamber was maintained around 37°C, indicating that the plasma does not cause any thermal damage. The morphological results of tooth bleaching with plasma did not affect mineral composition under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations. On the basis of these results, the application of plasma and low concentration of 15% carbamide peroxide (CP) has a high capability for effective tooth bleaching. It can be documented that plasma is a safe energe source, which has no deleterious effects on the tooth surface. PMID:25685843

  15. Plasma reactor for deposition of carbon nanowalls at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, Zh; Mitev, D.; Kiss'ovski, Zh

    2016-10-01

    In this study a novel plasma reactor for deposition of carbon nanowalls at atmospheric pressure is constructed and characterized. A low power microwave discharge is used as a plasma source and working gas of Ar/H2/CH4 gas mixture. The substrate is heated by plasma flame and its temperature is in the range 600-700 C. The chemical composition of the plasma and the gas mixture effect on the concentration of the various particles in the plasma is investigated by optical emission spectroscopy. The emission spectrum of the plasma jet in Ar/H2/CH4 mixture shows the presence of carbon (Swan band) and an intensive line of CH (388 nm), which are necessary species for deposition of carbon nanostructures. Additional voltage in the range from -20 V to -100 V is applied in order to ensure the vertical growth of graphene walls. Results of deposited carbon nanostructures on metal substrate are shown.

  16. Determining Electron Density, Pressure, and Temperature in Jupiter's Plasma Sheet Using the Galileo Plasma Wave Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansher, J. A.; Gurnett, D. A.; Khurana, K. K.; Kivelson, M. G.

    2001-05-01

    The plasma wave instrument on board the Galileo spacecraft can be used to determine electron density in Jupiter's magnetosphere. Ordinary mode radio waves are often detected in the form of non-thermal continuum radiation trapped in the magnetosphere at frequencies above the electron plasma frequency. By identifying the low-frequency cutoff of continuum radiation as the plasma frequency, an upper limit to the local electron density can be calculated. This technique has been used with the Galileo plasma wave data to provide an electron density data set with approximately 37-second time resolution. Continuum radiation is detected by the plasma wave instrument in much of Galileo's primary mission and electron density can be calculated at all System-III longitudes and radial distances beyond about 20-25 RJ. The density data set created using this technique is used here in conjunction with data from the Galileo magnetometer instrument and with Khurana's 1998 mathematical model of Jupiter's plasma sheet to study pressure balance in the plasma sheet. As Jupiter rotates, the spacecraft encounters the plasma sheet and crosses the entire sheet from north to south, or south to north, in under five hours. Assuming there are no time dependent variations in the plasma sheet on this time scale, and negligible curvature to the magnetic field lines in this region, the sum of magnetic pressure and particle pressure across the plasma sheet should stay constant. Using electron density and magnetic field data, and varying the temperature parameter, best fits for the total constant pressure and the corresponding temperature can be determined. These values can be determined throughout Jupiter's magnetosphere yielding pressure and temperature profiles of Jupiter's plasma sheet between about 20 and 140 RJ. Typical temperatures determined using this technique are about 108 K, corresponding to energies of about 10 keV. The total pressure decreases with radial distance from Jupiter as a power

  17. The direct injection of liquid droplets into low pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, D.; Saraf, I.; Sra, A.; Timmons, R.; Goeckner, M.; Overzet, L.

    2009-03-15

    A much greater number of useful precursors for plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) can be dispersed in high vapor pressure solvents than can be put into the vapor phase directly. In order to enable the use of such precursors, the authors investigated a method by which one can directly inject these liquids as microdroplets into low pressure PECVD environments. The solvent evaporates first leaving behind the desired precursor in the gas/plasma. The plasma dissociates the vapor and causes the deposition of a composite film (from precursor, solvent, and plasma gas). The authors made preliminary tests using Fe nanoparticles in hexane and were able to incorporate over 4% Fe in the resulting thin films. In addition, the authors simulated the process. The time required for a droplet to fully evaporate is a function of the background pressure, initial liquid temperature, droplet-vapor interactions, and initial droplet size. A typical evaporation time for a 50 {mu}m diameter droplet of hexane is {approx}3 s without plasma at 100 mTorr. The presence of plasma can decrease the evaporation time by more than an order of magnitude. In addition, the model predicts that the temperature of the injected droplet first decreases by evaporative cooling (to {approx}180 K for hexane); however, once the solvent has fully evaporated/sublimated, the plasma heats any remaining solute. As a result the solute temperature can first fall to 180 K, then rise to nearly 750 K in less than 1 s.

  18. Stimulation of wound healing by helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile Nastuta, Andrei; Topala, Ionut; Grigoras, Constantin; Pohoata, Valentin; Popa, Gheorghe

    2011-03-01

    New experiments using atmospheric pressure plasma have found large application in treatment of living cells or tissues, wound healing, cancerous cell apoptosis, blood coagulation on wounds, bone tissue modification, sterilization and decontamination. In this study an atmospheric pressure plasma jet generated using a cylindrical dielectric-barrier discharge was applied for treatment of burned wounds on Wistar rats' skin. The low temperature plasma jet works in helium and is driven by high voltage pulses. Oxygen and nitrogen based impurities are identified in the jet by emission spectroscopy. This paper analyses the natural epithelization of the rats' skin wounds and two methods of assisted epithelization, a classical one using polyurethane wound dressing and a new one using daily atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of wounds. Systemic and local medical data, such as haematological, biochemical and histological parameters, were monitored during entire period of study. Increased oxidative stress was observed for plasma treated wound. This result can be related to the presence in the plasma volume of active species, such as O and OH radicals. Both methods, wound dressing and plasma-assisted epithelization, provided positive medical results related to the recovery process of burned wounds. The dynamics of the skin regeneration process was modified: the epidermis re-epitelization was accelerated, while the recovery of superficial dermis was slowed down.

  19. Unified one-dimensional model of bounded plasma with nonzero ion temperature in a broad pressure range

    SciTech Connect

    Palacio Mizrahi, J. H.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2013-03-15

    A one-dimensional model for steady state plasmas bounded either between large parallel walls, or by a cylinder or a sphere, valid in a wide range of gas pressures, is considered. The model includes nonzero ion temperature, inertial terms in the ion momentum equations, and allows one to calculate the plasma electron temperature and ion current density reaching the wall, as well as the spatial distributions of the ion fluid velocity, plasma density, and plasma potential in the plasma bulk. In addition, the effect of electron inertia is analyzed. The model includes as particular cases several earlier models that were based on a similar set of differential equations, but that are restricted to a specific pressure regime (low, intermediate, or high). Analytical solution is found in planar geometry, and numerical solution is given in cylindrical and spherical geometry. The results obtained are compared with those of earlier models and the differences are analyzed.

  20. Growth of bulk GaN by HVPE on pressure grown seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzegory, I.; Łucznik, B.; Boćkowski, M.; Pastuszka, B.; Kryśko, M.; Kamler, G.; Nowak, G.; Porowski, S.

    2006-02-01

    Growth of GaN under pressure from solution in gallium results in almost dislocation free plate-like crystals but with size limited to app. 1-2 cm (lateral) and 100 μm (thickness) or up to about 1cm long needles. Deposition of GaN by HVPE on the pressure grown seeds allows stable crystallization (in terms of flatness of the crystallization front and uniformity of the new grown material) at a rate of about 100 μm/h on both types of seed crystals. However, in the thick GaN crystals grown on almost dislocation free plate-like substrates quite a high number of dislocations appears if the crystal thickness exceeds certain critical value. Since the critical thickness for defect generation is of the order of 100 μm, almost dislocation free layers (density below 10 4 cm -2) thinner than 100 μm can be grown. The most obvious further step is removing the substrate and continuation of the HVPE deposition on the free standing low dislocation density layer of sub-critical thickness. The pressure grown substrates were removed by mechanical polishing or conductivity sensitive electrochemical etching (for strongly n-type substrates). Then the HVPE low dislocation density GaN 1platelets were used as substrates for the growth of a few mm thick bulk GaN crystals. The crystals were characterized by defect selective etching of both polar (0001) and non-polar (10 -10) surfaces to check presence and distribution of structural defects. The X-ray measurements allowed concluding about character of strain and deformation in high pressure GaN-HVPE GaN system.

  1. Deviation from bulk in the pressure-temperature phase diagram of V2O3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valmianski, I.; Ramirez, Juan Gabriel; Urban, C.; Batlle, X.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2017-04-01

    We found atypical pressure dependence in the transport measurements of the metal to insulator transition (MIT) in epitaxial thin films of vanadium sesquioxide (V2O3 ). Three different crystallographic orientations and four thicknesses, ranging from 40 to 500 nm, were examined under hydrostatic pressures (Ph) of up to 1.5 GPa. All of the films at transition exhibited a four order of magnitude resistance change, with transition temperatures ranging from 140 to 165 K, depending on the orientation. This allowed us to build pressure-temperature phase diagrams of several orientations and film thicknesses. Interestingly, for pressures below 500 MPa, all samples deviate from bulk behavior and show a weak transition temperature (Tc) pressure dependence (d Tc/d Ph=1.2 ×10-2±0.3 ×10-2K /MPa ), which recovers to bulklike behavior (3.9 ×10-2±0.3 ×10-2K /MPa ) at higher pressures. Furthermore, we found that pressurization leads to morphological but not structural changes in the films. This indicates that the difference in the thin film and bulk pressure-temperature phase diagrams is most probably due to pressure-induced grain boundary relaxation, as well as both plastic and elastic deformations in the film microstructure. These results highlight the difference between bulk and thin films behaviors.

  2. Laser-induced microexplosion confined in the bulk of a sapphire crystal: evidence of multimegabar pressures.

    PubMed

    Juodkazis, S; Nishimura, K; Tanaka, S; Misawa, H; Gamaly, E G; Luther-Davies, B; Hallo, L; Nicolai, P; Tikhonchuk, V T

    2006-04-28

    Extremely high pressures (approximately 10 TPa) and temperatures (5 x 10(5) K) have been produced using a single laser pulse (100 nJ, 800 nm, 200 fs) focused inside a sapphire crystal. The laser pulse creates an intensity over 10(14) W/cm2 converting material within the absorbing volume of approximately 0.2 microm3 into plasma in a few fs. A pressure of approximately 10 TPa, far exceeding the strength of any material, is created generating strong shock and rarefaction waves. This results in the formation of a nanovoid surrounded by a shell of shock-affected material inside undamaged crystal. Analysis of the size of the void and the shock-affected zone versus the deposited energy shows that the experimental results can be understood on the basis of conservation laws and be modeled by plasma hydrodynamics. Matter subjected to record heating and cooling rates of 10(18) K/s can, thus, be studied in a well-controlled laboratory environment.

  3. Low-pressure nonequilibrium plasma for a top-down nanoprocess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makabe, Toshiaki; Yagisawa, Takashi

    2011-04-01

    The plasma microprocess has developed in cooperation with the miniaturization and high integration of devices in semiconductor manufacturing into a top-down nanoprocess over the last decade. In this paper we present or partly review our series of investigations on a two-frequency capacitively coupled radio frequency plasma (2f-CCP) for etching, sustained by a very-high-frequency source and biased by a low-frequency source in a collisional region. In particular, the velocity distributions of electrons in a bulk plasma, and ions incident on a structured wafer surface are discussed. The plasma surface process, being competitive with etching, deposition, and sometimes charging, has two critical phenomena in etching: plasma molding at a larger structure and microloading at a smaller size. It will be demonstrated that the modeling will be capable of predicting or designing a low-pressure plasma process for etching, after the modeling of the nonequilibrium plasma structure is smoothly coupled with the modeling of the feature profile evolution. Examples of the feature profile evolution of Si, SiO2 and organic low-k material by using a 2f-CCP in each of the feed gases are shown.

  4. Characteristics of Cylindrical Microwave Plasma Source at Low Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seungil; Youn, S.; Kim, S. B.; Yoo, S. J.

    2016-10-01

    A microwave plasma source with a cylindrical resonance cavity has been proposed to generate the plasma at low pressure. This plasma source consists of magnetron, waveguide, antenna, and cavity. The microwave generating device is a commercial magnetron with 1 kW output power at the frequency of 2.45 GHz. The microwave is transmitted through the rectangular waveguide with the whistle shape, and coupled to the cavity by the slot antenna. The resonant mode of the cylindrical cavity is the TE111 mode. The operating pressure is between 0.1 Torr and 0.3 Torr with the Argon and nitrogen gas. The electron temperature and electron number density of argon plasma were measured with the optical emission spectroscopy measurement. And Ar1s5 metastable density was measured using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). The plasma diagnostic results of a cylindrical microwave plasma source would be described in this study. This work was supported by R&D Program of ``Plasma Advanced Technology for Agriculture and Food (Plasma Farming)'' through the National Fusion Research Institute of Korea (NFRI) funded by the Government funds.

  5. Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Interaction with Soft Materials as Fundamental Processes in Plasma Medicine.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Kosuke; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Uchida, Giichiro; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2015-03-01

    Molecular-structure variation of organic materials irradiated with atmospheric pressure He plasma jet have been investigated. Optical emission spectrum in the atmospheric-pressure He plasma jet has been measured. The spectrum shows considerable emissions of He lines, and the emission of O and N radicals attributed to air. Variation in molecular structure of Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film surface irradiated with the atmospheric-pressure He plasma jet has been observed via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). These results via XPS and FT-IR indicate that the PET surface irradiated with the atmospheric-pressure He plasma jet was oxidized by chemical and/or physical effect due to irradiation of active species.

  6. Low Pressure High Density Plasma Development on a Small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, R. W.; Allen, L. A.; Paolino, R. N.; Thayer, N.; Romano, B.; Stutzman, B. S.; Welicka, C.; Coast Guard Plasma Lab Team

    2011-10-01

    Small helicon plasmas have been employed in various capacities from industry to spacecraft propulsion. At the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), a small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) is being developed to utilize the reputed high densities (1013 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T), in high temperature and density diagnostic development for future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to operate at these high densities and pressure to create repeatedly stable Capacitively Coupled Plasma (CCP) and Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) plasmas induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range. Progress on the development of the RF coupling system, and qualitative observations from the optical and electric diagnostics are to be reported.

  7. Modeling plasma pressure anisotropy's effect on Saturn's global magnetospheric dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilley, M.; Harnett, E. M.; Winglee, R.

    2014-12-01

    A 3D multi-fluid, multi-scale plasma model with a complete treatment of plasma pressure anisotropy is employed to study global magnetospheric dynamics at Saturn. Cassini has observed anisotropies in the Saturnian magnetosphere, and analyses have showed correlations between anisotropy and plasma convection, ring current structure and intensity, confinement of plasma to the equatorial plane, as well as mass transport to the outer magnetosphere. The energization and transport of plasma within Saturn's magnetosphere is impactful upon the induced magnetic environments and atmospheres of potentially habitable satellites such as Enceladus and Titan. Recent efforts to couple pressure anisotropy with 3D multi-fluid plasma modeling have shown a significant move towards matching observations for simulations of Earth's magnetosphere. Our approach is used to study the effects of plasma pressure anisotropy on global processes of the Saturnian magnetosphere such as identifying the effect of pressure anisotropy on the centrifugal interchange instability. Previous simulation results have not completely replicated all aspects of the structure and formation of the interchange 'fingers' measured by Cassini at Saturn. The related effects of anisotropy, in addition to those mentioned above, include contribution to formation of MHD waves (e.g. reduction of Alfvén wave speed) and formation of firehose and mirror instabilities. An accurate understanding of processes such as the interchange instability is required if a complete picture of mass and energy transport at Saturn is to be realized. The results presented here will detail how the inclusion of a full treatment of pressure anisotropy for idealized solar wind conditions modifies the interchange structure and shape of the tail current sheet. Simulation results are compared to observations made by Cassini.

  8. Laser ionization and radiofrequency sustainment of high- pressure seeded plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Kurtis Lester

    2001-10-01

    The feasibility of using a low-ionization potential organic gas to initiate a high-pressure plasma discharge is examined. Laser photoionization of the organic gas creates a high-density initial condition that eliminates the need for capacitive breakdown to form the plasma. The seed gas, tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene, has an ionization potential of 6.1 eV and is ionized by an ultraviolet laser through 6.4 eV photon absorption forming a plasma column inside a vacuum chamber. The plasma absorbs power through collisional damping of the induced 13.56 MHz radiofrequency wave fields. The laser initiation of 2-6 mTorr of the seed gas in 1-150 Torr of argon is accomplished producing steady-state plasma densities of ne >= 1012 cm-3 in a volume of 300-500 cm3 with radiofrequency power densities of 3-10 Watts/cm3. Electron density measurements are taken using a millimeter wave interferometer. The dependence of the antenna radiation resistance and reactance on the plasma density and neutral gas pressure is measured, examined and compared to a transformer coupled equivalent circuit and to a computer model. The coupling can be described by propagation and absorption of the fields into a lossy plasma medium. Antenna design is aided by understanding the radial absorption profile of the inductive radiofrequency fields, and how these fields are excited by various antenna designs. It is found that the azimuthally symmetric helical coil excites the wave fields most conducive to sustaining the plasma at high pressure. The two-body recombination coefficient of the organic seed gas and its optimum partial pressure when mixed with argon at 50-150 Torr are experimentally determined. Particle losses and power requirements for maintaining the discharge are estimated by examining diffusion, two-body and three-body recombination processes. It is found that recombination losses play a dominant role at these high pressures which places an upper bound on the density that is achievable with the 2

  9. Characterization of Dust-Plasma Interactions In Non-Thermal Plasmas Under Low Pressure and the Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilik, Narula

    This dissertation research focuses on the experimental characterization of dust-plasma interactions at both low and atmospheric pressure. Its goal is to fill the knowledge gaps in (1) the fundamental research of low pressure dusty plasma electrons, which mainly relied on models with few experimental results; and (2) the nanoparticle synthesis process in atmospheric pressure uniform glow plasmas (APGDs), which is largely unexplored in spite of the economical advantage of APGDs in nanotechnology. The low pressure part of the dissertation research involves the development of a complete diagnostic process for an argon-siline capacitively-coupled RF plasma. The central part of the diagnostic process is the Langmuir probe measurement of the electron energy probability function (EEPF) in a dusty plasma, which has never been measured before. This is because the dust particles in the plasma cause severe probe surface contamination and consequently distort the measurement. This problem is solved by adding a solenoid-actuated shield structure to the Langmuir probe, which physically protects the Langmuir probe from the dust particle deposition to ensure reliable EEPF measurements. The dusty plasma EEPFs are characterized by lower electron density and higher electron temperature accompanied by a drop in the low energy electron population. The Langmuir probe measurement is complemented with other characterizations including the capacitive probe measurement, power measurement, and dust particle collection. The complete diagnostic process then gives a set of local plasma parameters as well as the details of the dust-electron interactions reflected in the EEPFs. This set of data serves as input for an analytical model of nanoparticle charging to yield the time evolution of nanoparticle size and charge in the dusty plasma. The atmospheric pressure part of the dissertation focuses on the design and development of an APGD for zinc oxide nanocrystal synthesis. One of the main

  10. Electrical characteristics and formation mechanism of atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lijuan; Zhang, Yu; Tian, Weijing; Meng, Ying; Ouyang, Jiting

    2014-06-16

    The behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma jet produced by a coplanar dielectric barrier discharge in helium in external electrostatic and magnetic field is investigated. Net negative charges in the plasma jet outside the tube were detected. The deflection of the plume in the external field was observed. The plasma jet is suggested to be formed by the electron beam from the temporal cathode which is accelerated by a longitudinal field induced by the surface charges on the dielectric tube or interface between the helium and ambient air. The helium flow is necessary for the jet formation in the surrounding air.

  11. Generation of reactive species by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, S.; Turner, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    The role of gas mixing in reactive species delivery to treatment surfaces for an atmospheric pressure capacitively coupled plasma helium jet is investigated by numerical modelling. Atomic oxygen in the jet effluent is shown to quickly convert to ozone for increasing device to surface separation due to the molecular oxygen present in the gas mixture. Surface profiles of reactive oxygen species show narrow peaks for atomic oxygen and broader surface distributions for ozone and metastable species. Production efficiency of atomic oxygen to the helium plasma jet by molecular oxygen admixture is shown to be dependent on electro-negativity. Excessive molecular oxygen admixture results in negative ion dominance over electrons which eventually quenches the plasma. Interaction of the plasma jet with an aqueous surface showed hydrogen peroxide as the dominant species at this interface. Gas heating by the plasma is found to be dominated by elastic electron collisions and positive ion heating. Comparison with experimental measurements for atomic oxygen shows good agreement.

  12. Optical emission spectroscopy of atmospheric pressure microwave plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jia Haijun; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Michio; Kuraseko, Hiroshi

    2008-09-01

    The optical emission behaviors of Ar, He, and Ar+He plasmas generated in air using an atmospheric pressure microwave plasma source have been studied employing optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Emissions from various source gas species and air were observed. The variations in the intensities and intensity ratios of specific emissions as functions of the microwave power and gas flow rate were analyzed to investigate the relationship between the emission behavior and the plasma properties. We find that dependence of the emission behavior on the input microwave power is mainly determined by variations in electron density and electron temperature in the plasmas. On the other hand, under different gas flow rate conditions, changes in the density of the source gas atoms also significantly affect the emissions. Interestingly, when plasma is generated using an Ar+He mixture, emissions from excited He atoms disappear while a strong H{sub {alpha}} signal appears. The physics behind these behaviors is discussed in detail.

  13. Pressure Gradient Effects On Two-Dimensional Plasma Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, S; Smith, R F; Dunn, J; Keenan, R; Nilsen, J; Hunter, J R; Filevich, J; Rocca, J J; Marconi, M C; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2004-10-05

    Recent advances in interferometry has allowed for the characterization of the electron density expansion within a laser produced plasma to within 10 {micro}m of the target surface and over picosecond timescales. This technique employs the high brightness output of the transient gain Ni-like Pd collisional x-ray laser at 14.7 nm to construct an effective moving picture of the two-dimensional (2-D) expansion of the plasma. We present experimentally measured density profiles of an expanding Al plasma generated through laser irradiation in a 14mm line focus geometry. Significant lateral expansion was observed at all times as well as a pronounced on-axis electron density dip. Detailed modeling with a 2-D plasma physics code gives good agreement to experimental observations. Large pressure gradients associated with the tight focal spot conditions are calculated to dominate in shaping the plasma density profile.

  14. Decomposition of Glycerine by Water Plasmas at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayuki, Watanabe; Narengerile

    2013-04-01

    High concentration of aqueous glycerine was decomposed using a direct current (DC) plasma torch at atmospheric pressure. The torch can generate the plasma with water as the plasma-supporting gas in the absence of any additional gas supply system and cooling devices. The results indicated that 5 mol% glycerine was completely decomposed by water plasmas at arc powers of 0.55~1.05 kW. The major products in the effluent gas were H2 (68.9%~71.1%), CO2 (18.9%~23.0%), and CO (0.2%~0.6%). However, trace levels of formic acid (HCOOH) and formaldehyde (HCHO) were observed in the liquid effluent. The results indicated that the water plasma waste treatment process is capable of being an alternative green technology for organic waste decomposition.

  15. Influence of Atmospheric Pressure Torch Plasma Irradiation on Plant Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyoshi, Yusuke; Hayashi, Nobuya; Kitazaki, Satoshi; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2011-10-01

    Growth stimulation characteristics of plants seeds are investigated by an atmospheric discharge irradiation into plasma seeds. Atmospheric pressure plasma torch is consisted of alumina ceramics tube and the steel mesh electrodes wind inside and outside of the tube. When AC high voltage (8 kHz) is applied to the electrode gap, the barrier discharge plasma is produced inside the alumina ceramics tube. The barrier discharge plasma is blown outside with the gas flow in ceramics tube. Radish sprouts seeds locate at 1 cm from the torch edge. The growth stimulation was observed in the length of a stem and a root after the plasma irradiation. The stem length increases approximately 2.8 times at the cultivation time of 24 h. And the growth stimulation effect is found to be maintained for 40 h, after sowing seeds. The mechanism of the growth stimulation would be the redox reaction inside plant cells induced by oxygen radicals.

  16. Inactivation of Escherichia coli using atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahata, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Ohyama, Ryu-ichiro; Ito, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    An atmospheric-pressure argon (Ar) plasma jet was applied to the inactivation of Escherichia coli. The Ar plasma jet was generated at a frequency of 10 kHz, an applied voltage of 10 kV, and an Ar gas flow rate of 10 L/min at atmospheric pressure. E. coli cells seeded on an agar medium in a Petri dish were inactivated by Ar plasma jet irradiation for 1 s. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that E. coli cells were killed because their cell wall and membrane were disrupted. To determine the causes of the disruption of the cell wall and membrane of E. coli, we performed the following experiments: the measurement of the surface temperature of an agar medium using a thermograph, the analysis of an emission spectrum of a plasma jet obtained using a multichannel spectrometer, and the determination of the distribution of the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated on an agar medium by plasma jet irradiation using semiquantitative test strips. Moreover, H2O2 solutions of different concentrations were dropped onto an agar medium seeded with E. coli cells to examine the contribution of H2O2 to the death of E. coli. The results of these experiments showed that the cell wall and membrane of E. coli were disrupted by electrons in the plasma jet, as well as by electroneutral excited nitrogen molecules (N2) and hydroxyl (OH) radicals in the periphery of the plasma jet.

  17. Striations in electronegative capacitively coupled radio-frequency plasmas: Effects of the pressure, voltage, and electrode gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong-Xin; Korolov, Ihor; Schüngel, Edmund; Wang, You-Nian; Donkó, Zoltán; Schulze, Julian

    2017-07-01

    Capacitively coupled radio-frequency (CCRF) CF4 plasmas have been found to exhibit a self-organized striated structure at operating conditions, where the plasma is strongly electronegative and the ion-ion plasma in the bulk region (largely composed of CF3+ and F- ions) resonates with the excitation frequency. In this work, we explore the effects of the gas pressure, the RF voltage, and the electrode gap on this striated structure by phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy and particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collisions simulations. The measured electronic excitation patterns at different external parameters show a good general agreement with the spatio-temporal plots of the ionization rate obtained from the simulations. For a fixed driving frequency, the minima of the CF3+ or F- ion densities (between the density peaks in the bulk) are comparable and independent of other external parameters. However, the ion density maxima generally increase as a function of the pressure or RF voltage, leading to the enhanced spatial modulation of plasma parameters. The striation gap (defined as the distance between two ion density peaks) is approximately inversely proportional to the pressure, while it exhibits a weak dependence on the RF voltage and the electrode gap. A transition between the striated and non-striated modes can be observed by changing either the pressure or the RF voltage; for 13.56 and 18 MHz driving frequencies, we present a phase diagram as a function of the pressure and voltage amplitude parameters.

  18. In-package inhibition of E.coli 0157:H7 on bulk romaine lettuce using cold plasma

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dielectric barrier discharge atmospheric cold plasma (DACP) treatment was evaluated for the inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, surface morphology, color, carbon dioxide generation, and weight loss of bulk Romaine lettuce in a commercial plastic clamshell container. The lettuce samples were pa...

  19. In-package inhibition of E. Coli 0157:H7 on bulk Romaine lettuce using cold plasma

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dielectric barrier discharge atmospheric cold plasma (ACP) has been investigated as an innovative method for in-package decontamination of fresh produce. However, while data is available for treatment of single leaves, data is lacking for the effect of ACP on the microbial decontamination of bulk le...

  20. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment of Salmonella Enteritidis inoculated eggshells.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Maike; Wiacek, Claudia; Koethe, Martin; Braun, Peggy G

    2017-03-20

    Contamination of eggshells with Salmonella Enteritidis remains a food safety concern. In many cases human salmonellosis within the EU can be traced back to raw or undercooked eggs and egg products. Atmospheric pressure plasma is a novel decontamination method that can reduce a wide range of pathogens. The aim of this work was to evaluate the possibility of using an effective short time cold plasma treatment to inactivate Salmonella Enteritidis on the eggshell. Therefore, artificially contaminated eggshells were treated with an atmospheric pressure plasma jet under different experimental settings with various exposure times (15-300s), distances from the plasma jet nozzle to the eggshell surface (5, 8 or 12mm), feed gas compositions (Ar, Ar with 0.2, 0.5 or 1.0% O2), gas flow rates (5 and 7slm) and different inoculations of Salmonella Enteritidis (10(1)-10(6)CFU/cm(2)). Atmospheric pressure plasma could reduce Salmonella Enteritidis on eggshells significantly. Reduction factors ranged between 0.22 and 2.27 log CFU (colony-forming units). Exposure time and, particularly at 10(4)CFU/cm(2) inoculation, feed gas had a major impact on Salmonella reduction. Precisely, longer exposure times led to higher reductions and Ar as feed gas was more effective than ArO2 mixtures.

  1. Influence of flowing helium gas on plasma plume formation in atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Konda, Kohmei; Ogura, Kazuo

    2015-05-15

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and a foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. The helium gas flowing out of quartz tube mixes with air, and the flow channel is composed of the regions of flowing helium gas and air. The plasma plume length is equivalent to the reachable distance of flowing helium gas. Although the amount of helium gas on the flow channel increases by increasing the inner diameter of quartz tube at the same gas flow velocity, the plasma plume length peaks at around 8 m/s of gas flow velocity, which is the result that a flow of helium gas is balanced with the amount of gas. The plasma plume is formed at the boundary region where the flow of helium gas is kept to the wall of the air.

  2. In situ impedance measurement of microwave atmospheric pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. T.; Nam, W. J.; Lee, J. K.; Yun, G. S.

    2017-04-01

    The impedance of atmospheric pressure argon plasma jets driven by microwave frequency is determined in situ by a novel ‘two frequency method’. In the conventional method of reflection coefficient ({{S}}11) measurement, the frequency of the driving microwave power is scanned, which inevitably affects the plasma characters and leads to uncertainty in the estimated plasma impedance. In our proposed method, the frequency-scanning signal additional to the driving power is used to measure {{S}}11 over a wide frequency range, which enables accurate determination of the plasma impedance based on an equivalent circuit model. The measured resistance and reactance of the plasma increase with the driving power in agreement with the transmission line theory. Based on this in situ measurement of the plasma impedance, the net power coupled to the plasma has been determined. The overall power efficiency remains approximately unchanged around 45% for different input power levels owing to the competing effects between the impedance mismatch and the volume change of the plasma.

  3. Using atmospheric pressure plasma treatment for treating grey cotton fabric.

    PubMed

    Kan, Chi-Wai; Lam, Chui-Fung; Chan, Chee-Kooi; Ng, Sun-Pui

    2014-02-15

    Conventional wet treatment, desizing, scouring and bleaching, for grey cotton fabric involves the use of high water, chemical and energy consumption which may not be considered as a clean process. This study aims to investigate the efficiency of the atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) treatment on treating grey cotton fabric when compared with the conventional wet treatment. Grey cotton fabrics were treated with different combinations of plasma parameters with helium and oxygen gases and also through conventional desizing, scouring and bleaching processes in order to obtain comparable results. The results obtained from wicking and water drop tests showed that wettability of grey cotton fabrics was greatly improved after plasma treatment and yielded better results than conventional desizing and scouring. The weight reduction of plasma treated grey cotton fabrics revealed that plasma treatment can help remove sizing materials and impurities. Chemical and morphological changes in plasma treated samples were analysed by FTIR and SEM, respectively. Finally, dyeability of the plasma treated and conventional wet treated grey cotton fabrics was compared and the results showed that similar dyeing results were obtained. This can prove that plasma treatment would be another choice for treating grey cotton fabrics.

  4. Influence of Plasma Pressure Fluctuation on RF Wave Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhiwei; Bao, Weimin; Li, Xiaoping; Liu, Donglin; Zhou, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Pressure fluctuations in the plasma sheath from spacecraft reentry affect radio-frequency (RF) wave propagation. The influence of these fluctuations on wave propagation and wave properties is studied using methods derived by synthesizing the compressible turbulent flow theory, plasma theory, and electromagnetic wave theory. We study these influences on wave propagation at GPS and Ka frequencies during typical reentry by adopting stratified modeling. We analyzed the variations in reflection and transmission properties induced by pressure fluctuations. Our results show that, at the GPS frequency, if the waves are not totally reflected then the pressure fluctuations can remarkably affect reflection, transmission, and absorption properties. In extreme situations, the fluctuations can even cause blackout. At the Ka frequency, the influences are obvious when the waves are not totally transmitted. The influences are more pronounced at the GPS frequency than at the Ka frequency. This suggests that the latter can mitigate blackout by reducing both the reflection and the absorption of waves, as well as the influences of plasma fluctuations on wave propagation. Given that communication links with the reentry vehicles are susceptible to plasma pressure fluctuations, the influences on link budgets should be taken into consideration. supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2014CB340205) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61301173)

  5. Striation and plasma bullet propagation in an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Bae, S. H.

    2010-05-15

    An atmospheric pressure plasma jet source driven by pulsed wave of several tens of kilohertz and by sinusoidal wave was designed and characterized. A newly designed jet consists of a sharpened tungsten pin electrode covered with a cone type Teflon layer confined in a Pyrex tube. This structure provides an efficient ignition since the electric field is concentrated on the end of electrode. Using the electrical and optical characterization, the properties of plasma bullet were explored. For the Ar plasma jet driven by a pulsed wave at low duty cycles, the volume, the speed, and the luminosity of the plasma bullet became larger, and the striation behavior was observed.

  6. Striation and plasma bullet propagation in an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Bae, S. H.

    2010-05-01

    An atmospheric pressure plasma jet source driven by pulsed wave of several tens of kilohertz and by sinusoidal wave was designed and characterized. A newly designed jet consists of a sharpened tungsten pin electrode covered with a cone type Teflon layer confined in a Pyrex tube. This structure provides an efficient ignition since the electric field is concentrated on the end of electrode. Using the electrical and optical characterization, the properties of plasma bullet were explored. For the Ar plasma jet driven by a pulsed wave at low duty cycles, the volume, the speed, and the luminosity of the plasma bullet became larger, and the striation behavior was observed.

  7. Bulk plasma fragmentation in a C{sub 4}F{sub 8} inductively coupled plasma: A hybrid modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Shu-Xia; Zhang, Yu-Ru; Gao, Fei; Wang, You-Nian; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2015-06-28

    A hybrid model is used to investigate the fragmentation of C{sub 4}F{sub 8} inductive discharges. Indeed, the resulting reactive species are crucial for the optimization of the Si-based etching process, since they determine the mechanisms of fluorination, polymerization, and sputtering. In this paper, we present the dissociation degree, the density ratio of F vs. C{sub x}F{sub y} (i.e., fluorocarbon (fc) neutrals), the neutral vs. positive ion density ratio, details on the neutral and ion components, and fractions of various fc neutrals (or ions) in the total fc neutral (or ion) density in a C{sub 4}F{sub 8} inductively coupled plasma source, as well as the effect of pressure and power on these results. To analyze the fragmentation behavior, the electron density and temperature and electron energy probability function (EEPF) are investigated. Moreover, the main electron-impact generation sources for all considered neutrals and ions are determined from the complicated C{sub 4}F{sub 8} reaction set used in the model. The C{sub 4}F{sub 8} plasma fragmentation is explained, taking into account many factors, such as the EEPF characteristics, the dominance of primary and secondary processes, and the thresholds of dissociation and ionization. The simulation results are compared with experiments from literature, and reasonable agreement is obtained. Some discrepancies are observed, which can probably be attributed to the simplified polymer surface kinetics assumed in the model.

  8. Investigation of plasma-sheath resonances in low pressure discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naggary, Schabnam; Kemaneci, Efe; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Megahed, Mustafa

    2016-09-01

    Plasma sheath resonances (PSR) arise from a periodic exchange between the kinetic electron energy in the plasma bulk and the electric field energy in the sheath and can easily be excited by the sheath-generated harmonics of the applied RF. In this contribution, we employ a series of models to obtain a well-defined description of these phenomena. In the first part, we use a global model to study the influence of the nonlinear charge-voltage characteristics on the electron dynamics. However, the global model is restricted to the assumption of spatially constant potential at each driven and grounded electrode and thus delivers only the fundamental mode of the current. In order to remedy the deficiency, we introduce a spatially resolved model for arbitrary reactor geometries with no assumptions on the homogeneity of the plasma. An exact evaluation of the analytical solution is realized on the assumption of a cylinderical plasma reactor geometry with uniform conductance. Furthermore, the spatially resolved model is capable of being utilized for a more realistic CCP reactor geometry and non homogeneous plasma provided the conductance distribution is known. For this purpose, we use the CFD-ACE+ tool. The results show that the proposed multi-mode model provides a significant improvement. The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support by the ESI Group and the SFB- TR 87.

  9. Pressure changes in the plasma sheet during substorm injections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kistler, L. M.; Moebius, E.; Baumjohann, W.; Paschmann, G.; Hamilton, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    Data from the CHEM instrument on AMPTE CCE, data from the 3D plasma instrument and the SULEICA instrument on AMPTE IRM, and magnetometer data from both spacecraft are used to determine the particle pressure and total pressure as a function of radial distance in the plasma sheet for periods before and after the onset of substorm-associated ion enhancements over the range 7-19 RE. Events were chosen that occurred during times of increasing magnetospheric activity, as determined by an increasing AE index, in which a sudden increase, or 'injection', of energetic particle flux is observed. It is shown that the simultaneous appearance of energetic particles and changes in the magnetic field results naturally from pressure balance and does not necessarily indicate that the local changing field is accelerating the particles.

  10. Polymerization of acrylic acid using atmospheric pressure DBD plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, M.; Bashir, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper polymerization of acrylic acid was performed using non thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet technology. The goal of this study is to deposit organic functional coatings for biomedical applications using a low cost and rapid growth rate plasma jet technique. The monomer solution of acrylic acid was vaporized and then fed into the argon plasma for coating. The discharge was powered using a laboratory made power supply operating with sinusoidal voltage signals at a frequency of 10 kHz. The optical emission spectra were collected in order to get insight into the plasma chemistry during deposition process. The coatings were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and growth rates analysis. A high retention of carboxylic functional groups of the monomer was observed at the surface deposited using this low power technique.

  11. An investigation of transient pressures and plasma properties in a pinched plasma column. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stover, E. K.; York, T. M.

    1971-01-01

    The transient pinched plasma column generated in a linear Z-pinch was studied experimentally and analytically. The plasma column was investigated experimentally with several plasma diagnostics; they were: a rapid response pressure transducer, a magnetic field probe, a voltage probe, and discharge luminosity. Axial pressure profiles on the discharge chamber axis were used to identify three characteristic regions of plasma column behavior: (1) strong axial pressure asymmetry noted early in plasma column lifetime, (2) followed by plasma heating in which there is a rapid rise in static pressure, and (3) a slight decrease static pressure before plasma column breakup. Plasma column lifetime was approximately 5 microseconds. The axial pressure asymmetry was attributed to nonsimultaneous pinching of the imploding current sheet along the discharge chamber axis. The rapid heating could be attributed in part to viscous effects introduced by radial gradients in the axial streaming velocity.

  12. Pulsed, atmospheric pressure plasma source for emission spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang; Jin, Zhe; Su, Yongxuan

    2004-05-11

    A low-power, plasma source-based, portable molecular light emission generator/detector employing an atmospheric pressure pulsed-plasma for molecular fragmentation and excitation is described. The average power required for the operation of the plasma is between 0.02 W and 5 W. The features of the optical emission spectra obtained with the pulsed plasma source are significantly different from those obtained with direct current (dc) discharge higher power; for example, strong CH emission at 431.2 nm which is only weakly observed with dc plasma sources was observed, and the intense CN emission observed at 383-388 nm using dc plasma sources was weak in most cases. Strong CN emission was only observed using the present apparatus when compounds containing nitrogen, such as aniline were employed as samples. The present apparatus detects dimethylsulfoxide at 200 ppb using helium as the plasma gas by observing the emission band of the CH radical. When coupled with a gas chromatograph for separating components present in a sample to be analyzed, the present invention provides an apparatus for detecting the arrival of a particular component in the sample at the end of the chromatographic column and the identity thereof.

  13. Characteristics of Atmospheric Pressure Rotating Gliding Arc Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Zhu, Fengsen; Tu, Xin; Bo, Zheng; Cen, Kefa; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a novel direct current (DC) atmospheric pressure rotating gliding arc (RGA) plasma reactor has been developed for plasma-assisted chemical reactions. The influence of the gas composition and the gas flow rate on the arc dynamic behaviour and the formation of reactive species in the N2 and air gliding arc plasmas has been investigated by means of electrical signals, high speed photography, and optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics. Compared to conventional gliding arc reactors with knife-shaped electrodes which generally require a high flow rate (e.g., 10-20 L/min) to maintain a long arc length and reasonable plasma discharge zone, in this RGA system, a lower gas flow rate (e.g., 2 L/min) can also generate a larger effective plasma reaction zone with a longer arc length for chemical reactions. Two different motion patterns can be clearly observed in the N2 and air RGA plasmas. The time-resolved arc voltage signals show that three different arc dynamic modes, the arc restrike mode, takeover mode, and combined modes, can be clearly identified in the RGA plasmas. The occurrence of different motion and arc dynamic modes is strongly dependent on the composition of the working gas and gas flow rate. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51576174), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20120101110099) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. 2015FZA4011)

  14. Diamond film deposition using microwave plasmas under low pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.; Rich, D. H.

    1991-01-01

    Microwave plasma depositions of diamond films have been investigated under low pressures of 10 mTorr to 10 Torr, at low substrate temperatures of 400 to 750 C, using high methane concentrations of 5 to 15 percent and oxygen concentrations of 5 to 10 percent in hydrogen plasmas. The deposition system consists of a microwave plasma chamber, a downstream deposition chamber, and a RF induction-heated sample stage. The deposition system can be operated in either high-pressure microwave or electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) modes by varying the sample stage position. Cathodoluminescence (CL) studies on diamond films deposited at 10 Torr pressure show that CL emissions at 430, 480, 510, 530, 560, 570 and 740 nm can be employed to characterize the quality of diamond films. High-quality, well-faceted diamond films have been deposited at 10 Torr and 600 C using 5 percent CH4 and 5 percent O2 in H2 plasmas; CL measurements on these films show very low N impurities and no detectable Si impurities. Diamond nucleation on SiC has been demonstrated by depositing well-faceted diamond crystallites on SiC-coated Si substrates.

  15. Diamond film deposition using microwave plasmas under low pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.; Rich, D. H.

    1991-01-01

    Microwave plasma depositions of diamond films have been investigated under low pressures of 10 mTorr to 10 Torr, at low substrate temperatures of 400 to 750 C, using high methane concentrations of 5 to 15 percent and oxygen concentrations of 5 to 10 percent in hydrogen plasmas. The deposition system consists of a microwave plasma chamber, a downstream deposition chamber, and a RF induction-heated sample stage. The deposition system can be operated in either high-pressure microwave or electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) modes by varying the sample stage position. Cathodoluminescence (CL) studies on diamond films deposited at 10 Torr pressure show that CL emissions at 430, 480, 510, 530, 560, 570 and 740 nm can be employed to characterize the quality of diamond films. High-quality, well-faceted diamond films have been deposited at 10 Torr and 600 C using 5 percent CH4 and 5 percent O2 in H2 plasmas; CL measurements on these films show very low N impurities and no detectable Si impurities. Diamond nucleation on SiC has been demonstrated by depositing well-faceted diamond crystallites on SiC-coated Si substrates.

  16. Effect of bulk electric field reversal on the bounce resonance heating in dual-frequency capacitively coupled electronegative plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yongxin; Zhang Quanzhi; Liu Jia; Song Yuanhong; Wang Younian; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2012-09-10

    The electron bounce resonance heating (BRH) in dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasmas operated in oxygen and argon has been studied by different experimental methods. In comparison with the electropositive argon discharge, the BRH in an electronegative discharge occurs at larger electrode gaps. Kinetic particle simulations reveal that in the oxygen discharge, the bulk electric field becomes quite strong and is out of phase with the sheath field. Therefore, it retards the resonant electrons when traversing the bulk, resulting in a suppressed BRH. This effect becomes more pronounced at lower high-frequency power, when the discharge mode changes from electropositive to electronegative.

  17. Decolorization of azodyes using the atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazovic, Sasa; Maletic, Dejan; Tomic, Natasa; Malovic, Gordana; Cvelbar, Uros; Dohcevic-Mitrovic, Zorana; Petrovic, Zoran Lj.

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jet operated in air/argon mixture is tested for decolorization of Bezactiv Orange V-3R dye used in the textile industry. The decolorization efficiency is determined by spectrophotometric measurements at 493.7 nm which corresponds to the breaking of dye N =N bond. The initial concentration of 50 mg/L of dye is reduced 50 times after 120 minutes of treatment by plasma. The results are compared to the efficiency of the suspended TiO2 powder and activated by an UV lamp (300 W). The radicals responsible for removal of the dye are OH and super-anion radical. It is found that efficiency of the plasma and TiO2 + UV is quite similar for the treatment times up to 60 min. After that, TiO2 shows higher decolorization rates (100 times reduction after 90 min). However, when plasma and TiO2 (but without the UV lamp) are applied together, it is found that there are synergetic effects and that the efficiency is increased. Plasma (less than 2 W) is not expected to produce high amounts of UV light in the atmospheric pressure. Supported by MESTD, RS, III41011 and ON 171037.

  18. Characterization of high-pressure capacitively coupled hydrogen plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nunomura, S.; Kondo, M.

    2007-11-01

    Capacitively coupled very-high-frequency hydrogen plasmas have been systematically diagnosed in a wide range of a gas pressure from 5 mTorr to 10 Torr. The plasma parameters, ion species, and ion energy distributions (IEDs) are measured using a Langmuir probe, optical emission spectroscopy, and energy filtered mass spectrometer. The measurement results show that the ion species in a hydrogen plasma is determined from ionization channels and subsequent ion-molecule reactions. The ions are dominated by H{sub 2}{sup +} at a less-collisional condition of < or approx. 20 mTorr, whereas those are dominated by H{sub 3}{sup +} at a collisional condition of > or approx. 20 mTorr. The IED is determined by both the sheath potential drop and ion-neutral collisions in the plasma sheath. The IED is broadened for a collisional sheath at > or approx. 0.3 Torr and the ion bombardment energy is lowered. For high-pressure discharge operated at {approx_equal}10 Torr, plasmas are characterized by a low electron temperature of {approx_equal}0.8 eV and a low ion bombardment energy of < or approx. 15 eV.

  19. Collisional and Radiative Processes in High-Pressure Discharge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Kurt

    2001-10-01

    High-pressure discharge plasmas (HPDPs) with operating pressures up to and exceeding atmospheric pressure have gained prominence in many areas of application such as EM absorbers and reflectors, remediation of waste streams, deposition and surface modification, surface cleaning and sterilization, and light source development. In particular, HPDPs are widely used as sources for the generation of non-coherent UV and VUV light such as excimer emissions in the spectral range from 50 nm to 300 nm using rare gases or rare gas admixed with other gases as the operating medium. In this talk we will discuss several common types of HPDPs (e.g. microhollow cathode discharge plasmas, dielectric barrier discharge plasmas, capillary dielectrode discharge plasmas) that are commonly used for the generation of non-coherent excimer emissions. The main focus of this talk will be on the elucidation of the underlying microscopic collisional and radiative processes in these plasmas that lead to the photon emission and that determine the efficiency and spectral characteristics of various sources. Processes of particular interest are the generation of intense, monochromatic atomic line emissions in the 90 - 130 nm range, in particular the H Lyman-alpha emission at 121.6 nm, from HPDPs in gas mixtures containing high-pressure He, Ne, or Ar with trace amounts (1which may have great potential in photolithography and related applications. The mechanism for the emission of these intense atomic VUV lines are near-resonant energy transfer processes from the excimer molecule to the diatomic gas (H2, O2, N2). This work was supported by the NSF and by DARPA/ARO and carried out in collaboration with P. Kurunczi, K.H. Schoenbach, M. Laroussi, M. Gupta, and N. Masoud. Helpful discussions with U. Kogelschatz and E. Kunhardt are gratefully acknowledged.

  20. Application of atmospheric pressure plasma in polymer and composite adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hang

    An atmospheric pressure helium and oxygen plasma was used to investigate surface activation and bonding in polymer composites. This device was operated by passing 1.0-3.0 vol% of oxygen in helium through a pair of parallel plate metal electrodes powered by 13.56 or 27.12 MHz radio frequency power. The gases were partially ionized between the capacitors where plasma was generated. The reactive species in the plasma were carried downstream by the gas flow to treat the substrate surface. The temperature of the plasm gas reaching the surface of the substrate did not exceed 150 °C, which makes it suitable for polymer processing. The reactive species in the plasma downstream includes ~ 1016-1017 cm-3 atomic oxygen, ~ 1015 cm-3 ozone molecule, and ~ 10 16 cm-3 metastable oxygen molecule (O2 1Deltag). The substrates were treated at 2-5 mm distance from the exit of the plasma. Surface properties of the substrates were characterized using water contact angle (WCA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Subsequently, the plasma treated samples were bonded adhesively or fabricated into composites. The increase in mechanical strength was correlated to changes in the material composition and structure after plasma treatment. The work presented hereafter establishes atmospheric pressure plasma as an effective method to activate and to clean the surfaces of polymers and composites for bonding. This application can be further expanded to the activation of carbon fibers for better fiber-resin interactions during the fabrication of composites. Treating electronic grade FR-4 and polyimide with the He/O2 plasma for a few seconds changed the substrate surface from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, which allowed complete wetting of the surface by epoxy in underfill applications. Characterization of the surface by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows formation of oxygenated functional groups, including hydroxyl, carbonyl, and

  1. Cold atmospheric pressure air plasma jet for medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, J. F.; Price, R. O.; Bowman, A.; Chiavarini, R. L.; Stacey, M.; Schoenbach, K. H.; Mohamed, A.-A H.; Swanson, R. J.

    2008-06-16

    By flowing atmospheric pressure air through a direct current powered microhollow cathode discharge, we were able to generate a 2 cm long plasma jet. With increasing flow rate, the flow becomes turbulent and temperatures of the jet are reduced to values close to room temperature. Utilizing the jet, yeast grown on agar can be eradicated with a treatment of only a few seconds. Conversely, animal studies show no skin damage even with exposures ten times longer than needed for pathogen extermination. This cold plasma jet provides an effective mode of treatment for yeast infections of the skin.

  2. Nanocapillary Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet: A Tool for Ultrafine Maskless Surface Modification at Atmospheric Pressure.

    PubMed

    Motrescu, Iuliana; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2016-05-18

    With respect to microsized surface functionalization techniques we proposed the use of a maskless, versatile, simple tool, represented by a nano- or microcapillary atmospheric pressure plasma jet for producing microsized controlled etching, chemical vapor deposition, and chemical modification patterns on polymeric surfaces. In this work we show the possibility of size-controlled surface amination, and we discuss it as a function of different processing parameters. Moreover, we prove the successful connection of labeled sugar chains on the functionalized microscale patterns, indicating the possibility to use ultrafine capillary atmospheric pressure plasma jets as versatile tools for biosensing, tissue engineering, and related biomedical applications.

  3. Sixteen-Day Bedrest Significantly Increases Plasma Colloid Osmotic Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R.; Hsieh, S. T.; Murthy, G.; Ballard, R. E.; Convertino, V. A.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Upon exposure to microgravity, astronauts lose up to 10% of their total plasma volume, which may contribute to orthostatic intolerance after space flight. Because plasma colloid osmotic pressure (COP) is a primary factor maintaining plasma volume, our objective was to measure time course changes in COP during microgravity simulated by 6 deg. head-down tilt (HDT). Seven healthy male subjects (30-55 years of age) were placed in HDT for 16 days. For the purpose of another study, three of the seven subjects were chosen to exercise on a cycle ergometer on day 16. Blood samples were drawn immediately before bedrest on day 14 of bedrest, 18-24 hours following exercise while all subjects were still in HDT and 1 hour following bedrest termination. Plasma COP was measured in all 20 microliter EDTA-treated samples using an osmometer fitted with a PM 30 membrane. Data were analyzed with paired and unpaired t-tests. Plasma COP on day 14 of bedrest (29.9 +/- 0.69 mmHg) was significantly higher (p less than 0.005) than the control, pre-bedrest value (23.1 +/- 0.76 mmHg). At one hour of upright recovery after HDT, plasma COP remained significantly elevated (exercise: 26.9 +/- 0.87 mmHg; no exercise: 26.3 +/- 0.85 mmHg). Additionally, exercise had no significant effect on plasma COP 18-24 hours following exercise (exercise: 27.8 +/- 1.09 mmHg; no exercise: 27.1 +/- 0.78 mmHg). Our results demonstrate that plasma COP increases significantly with microgravity simulated by HDT. However, preliminary results indicate exercise during HDT does not significantly affect plasma COP.

  4. Sixteen-Day Bedrest Significantly Increases Plasma Colloid Osmotic Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R.; Hsieh, S. T.; Murthy, G.; Ballard, R. E.; Convertino, V. A.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Upon exposure to microgravity, astronauts lose up to 10% of their total plasma volume, which may contribute to orthostatic intolerance after space flight. Because plasma colloid osmotic pressure (COP) is a primary factor maintaining plasma volume, our objective was to measure time course changes in COP during microgravity simulated by 6 deg. head-down tilt (HDT). Seven healthy male subjects (30-55 years of age) were placed in HDT for 16 days. For the purpose of another study, three of the seven subjects were chosen to exercise on a cycle ergometer on day 16. Blood samples were drawn immediately before bedrest on day 14 of bedrest, 18-24 hours following exercise while all subjects were still in HDT and 1 hour following bedrest termination. Plasma COP was measured in all 20 microliter EDTA-treated samples using an osmometer fitted with a PM 30 membrane. Data were analyzed with paired and unpaired t-tests. Plasma COP on day 14 of bedrest (29.9 +/- 0.69 mmHg) was significantly higher (p less than 0.005) than the control, pre-bedrest value (23.1 +/- 0.76 mmHg). At one hour of upright recovery after HDT, plasma COP remained significantly elevated (exercise: 26.9 +/- 0.87 mmHg; no exercise: 26.3 +/- 0.85 mmHg). Additionally, exercise had no significant effect on plasma COP 18-24 hours following exercise (exercise: 27.8 +/- 1.09 mmHg; no exercise: 27.1 +/- 0.78 mmHg). Our results demonstrate that plasma COP increases significantly with microgravity simulated by HDT. However, preliminary results indicate exercise during HDT does not significantly affect plasma COP.

  5. High-performance simulations for atmospheric pressure plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugunov, Svyatoslav

    Plasma-assisted processing and deposition of materials is an important component of modern industrial applications, with plasma reactors sharing 30% to 40% of manufacturing steps in microelectronics production. Development of new flexible electronics increases demands for efficient high-throughput deposition methods and roll-to-roll processing of materials. The current work represents an attempt of practical design and numerical modeling of a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. The system utilizes plasma at standard pressure and temperature to activate a chemical precursor for protective coatings. A specially designed linear plasma head, that consists of two parallel plates with electrodes placed in the parallel arrangement, is used to resolve clogging issues of currently available commercial plasma heads, as well as to increase the flow-rate of the processed chemicals and to enhance the uniformity of the deposition. A test system is build and discussed in this work. In order to improve operating conditions of the setup and quality of the deposited material, we perform numerical modeling of the plasma system. The theoretical and numerical models presented in this work comprehensively describe plasma generation, recombination, and advection in a channel of arbitrary geometry. Number density of plasma species, their energy content, electric field, and rate parameters are accurately calculated and analyzed in this work. Some interesting engineering outcomes are discussed with a connection to the proposed setup. The numerical model is implemented with the help of high-performance parallel technique and evaluated at a cluster for parallel calculations. A typical performance increase, calculation speed-up, parallel fraction of the code and overall efficiency of the parallel implementation are discussed in details.

  6. Towards the bulk carbon content of Earth; new metal carbide geobarometer in high pressure diamond.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. P.; Dobson, D.; Milledge, H. J.

    2009-04-01

    Formation of the metallic core in Earth (and other terrestrial planets) is not thought to have completely removed metallic iron from the lower mantle, where metallic iron might therefore be expected to occur as a widespread minor component [1]. We provide a new interpretation of metallic carbide inclusions in some diamond, which support a very high pressure origin from the lower mantle. Unlike rare carbides reported from diamonds previously without silicon [2], some diamonds from Jagersfontein coexist with iron-rich carbides which do contain significant silicon and oxygen, including in some cases their partial exsolution products. Based on an experimental calibration for liquid iron coexisting with lower mantle perovskite [3], we are able to show that some carbides were likely derived from pressures of approximately 45 GPa, or depths of >1100 km. This potential geobarometer has not been corrected for the behaviour of carbon in the liquid iron system, which might be an important experimental goal. The recognition of this independent carbide geobarometer offers an important new tool to confirm the superdeep origin of some diamond. The carbide-bearing diamonds are from a group whose charcteristics have recently been described [5]. Their distinctive light carbon isotopic signature (13^C ~ 17 ) coupled with evidence for very low contents nitrogen which is nonetheless highly aggregated, might be interpreted as indicative of subducted carbon. However, we are also open to the possibility that the bulk carbon isotopic composition of the Earth might also be different from the normal mantle value (13^C ~ 6 ), in which case the potential 0.4 wt% C in the Earth's core could also be isotopically very light, as suggested by Grady et al [6]. References [1] Frost D et al, Nature 428, 409-412 (2004) [2] Jacob D E et al, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol., 146, 566-576 (2004) [3] Lin et al, Science, 295, 313-315 (2002) [4] Dubrovinsky L. et al, Nature 422, 58-61 (2003) [5] Jones A P et al, 9

  7. Solvated electrons at the atmospheric pressure plasma-water anodic interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, R.; Kawamura, E.; Lichtenberg, A. J.; Lieberman, M. A.; Graves, D. B.

    2016-07-01

    We present results from a particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo model of a dc discharge in argon at atmospheric pressure coupled with a fluid model of an aqueous electrolyte acting as anode to the plasma. The coupled models reveal the structure of the plasma-electrolyte interface and near-surface region, with a special emphasis on solvated or hydrated electrons. Results from the coupled models are in generally good agreement with the experimental results of Rumbach et al (2016 Nat. Commun. 6 7248). Electrons injected from the plasma into the water are solvated, then lost by reaction with water within about 10-20 nm from the surface. The major reaction products are OH- and H2. The solvated electron density profile is controlled by the injected electron current density and subsequent reactions with water, and is relatively independent of the external plasma electric field and the salt concentration in the aqueous electrolyte. Simulations of the effects of added scavenger compounds (H2O2, \\text{NO}2- , \\text{NO}2- and H+) on near-surface solvated electron density generally match the experimental results. The generation of near-surface OH- following electron-water decomposition in the presence of bulk acid creates a highly basic region (pH ~ 11) very near the surface. In the presence of bulk solution acidity, pH can vary from a very acidic pH 2 away from the surface to a very basic pH 11 over a distance of ~200 nm. High near-surface gradients in aqueous solution properties could strongly affect plasma-liquid applications and challenge theoretical understanding of this complex region.

  8. Atmospheric Pressure Low Temperature Plasma System for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnette, Matthew; Staack, David

    2016-09-01

    There is growing interest in using plasmas for additive manufacturing, however these methods use high temperature plasmas to melt the material. We have developed a novel technique of additive manufacturing using a low temperature dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet. The jet is attached to the head of a 3D printer to allow for precise control of the plasma's location. Various methods are employed to deposit the material, including using a vaporized precursor or depositing a liquid precursor directly onto the substrate or into the plasma via a nebulizer. Various materials can be deposited including metals (copper using copper (II) acetylacetonate), polymers (PMMA using the liquid monomer), and various hydrocarbon compounds (using alcohols or a 100% methane DBD jet). The rastering pattern for the 3D printer was modified for plasma deposition, since it was originally designed for thermoplastic extrusion. The design constraints for fill pattern selection for the plasma printer are influenced by substrate heating, deposition area, and precursor consumption. Depositions onto pressure and/or temperature sensitive substrates can be easily achieved. Deposition rates range up to 0.08 cm3/hr using tris(2-methoxyethoxy)(vinyl)silane, however optimization can still be done on the system to improve the deposition rate. For example higher concentration of precursor can be combined with faster motion and higher discharge powers to increase the deposition rate without overheating the substrate.

  9. Atmospheric pressure plasma assisted calcination of composite submicron fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvecká, Veronika; Kováčik, Dušan; Tučeková, Zlata; Zahoranová, Anna; Černák, Mirko

    2016-08-01

    The plasma assisted calcination of composite organic/inorganic submicron fibers for the preparation of inorganic fibers in submicron scale was studied. Aluminium butoxide/polyvinylpyrrolidone fibers prepared by electrospinning were treated using low-temperature plasma generated by special type of dielectric barrier discharge, so called diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge (DCSBD) at atmospheric pressure in ambient air, synthetic air, oxygen and nitrogen. Effect of plasma treatment on base polymer removal was investigated by using Attenuated total reflectance - Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Influence of working gas on the base polymer reduction was studied by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and CHNS elemental analysis. Changes in fibers morphology were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). High efficiency of organic template removal without any degradation of fibers was observed after plasma treatment in ambient air. Due to the low-temperature approach and short exposure time, the plasma assisted calcination is a promising alternative to the conventional thermal calcination. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  10. Bursty bulk flows in the inner central plasma sheet: An effective means of earthward transport in the magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Kennel, Charles F.; Coroniti, F. V.; Pellat, R.; Kivelson, M. G.; Walker, R. J.; Baumjohann, W.; Paschmann, G.; Luhr, H.

    1992-01-01

    High speed flows in the Earth's Inner Central Plasma Sheet (ICPS) occur during enhanced flow intervals that have been termed Bursty Bulk Flow (BBF) events. The importance of different flow magnitude samples for Earthward transport in the ICPS are statistically evaluated and several representative BBF's and their relevance to Earthward transport are discussed. The selection of BBF's is automated in a database and they are shown to be responsible for most of the Earthward transport that occurs within the ICPS. The BBF related transport is compared to the transport measured within the entire plasma sheet during the 1985 AMPTE/IRM crossings of the magnetotail. The results show that BBF's last only a small fraction of the time in the plasma sheet but can account for several tens of percent of the Earthward particle and energy transfer and possibly all of the Earthward magnetic flux transfer in the plasma sheet.

  11. Dynamic pressure transducer system for pulsed plasma flow diagnosis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, T. M.; Mckenna, K. F.; Michels, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The response characteristics of high sensitivity piezoelectric pressure transducers suitable for use in the plasma flow induced by megawatt-level electric discharges in low density (less than 1 Torr) gases are described. The uniquely designed probe records the initial impingement of a large magnitude total pressure pulse, followed by the flow of primary interest with order-of-magnitude smaller signals. Effects relating to probe and support accelerations, blast shielding and probe heating are evaluated and accounted for in a probe system with a sensitivity of 40 V/atm.

  12. Study of atmospheric pressure plasma jet parameters generated by DC voltage driven cold plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingxing; Shashurin, Alexey

    2017-08-01

    In this work, plasma and discharge parameters of a DC voltage driven cold plasma source were measured. The device exhibits a plasma jet with a length of 3 cm and a pulsation frequency of about 2.75 kHz. The peak current of each pulse was about 1.1 mA, and the duration was about 5 μs. The repetition rate could be increased by raising the DC voltage level. By utilizing the microwave scattering system, electron density in the plasma was measured to be about ˜1011 cm-3. Vibrational and rotational temperatures of atmospheric pressure plasma jets were also measured by optical emission spectroscopy. The vibrational temperature was measured to be 2850 K and rotational temperature to be 300 K at the applied voltage of 5 kV. No strong dependence of the temperatures was found with the DC voltage level.

  13. Near-surface modification of optical properties of fused silica by low-temperature hydrogenous atmospheric pressure plasma.

    PubMed

    Gerhard, Christoph; Tasche, Daniel; Brückner, Stephan; Wieneke, Stephan; Viöl, Wolfgang

    2012-02-15

    In this Letter, we report on the near-surface modification of fused silica by applying a hydrogenous atmospheric pressure plasma jet at ambient temperature. A significant decrease in UV-transmission due to this plasma treatment was observed. By the use of secondary ion mass spectroscopy, the composition of the plasma-modified glass surface was investigated. It was found that the plasma treatment led to a reduction of a 100 nm thick SiO2 layer to SiOx of gradual depth-dependent composition. For this plasma-induced layer, depth-resolved characteristic optical parameters, such as index of refraction and dispersion, were determined. Further, a significant plasma-induced increase of the concentration of hydrogen in the bulk material was measured. The decrease in transmission is explained by the plasma-induced near-surface formation of SiOx on the one hand and the diffusion of hydrogen into the bulk material on the other hand.

  14. Plasma Ion Sources for Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jian-Guo

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure ionization (API) sources using direct-current (DC) and radio-frequency (RF) plasma have been developed in this thesis work. These ion sources can provide stable discharge currents of ~ 1 mA, 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than that of the corona discharge, a widely used API source. The plasmas can be generated and maintained in 1 atm of various buffer gases by applying -500 to -1000 V (DC plasma) or 1-15 W with a frequency of 165 kHz (RF plasma) on the needle electrode. These ion sources have been used with liquid injection to detect various organic compounds of pharmaceutical, biotechnological and environmental interest. Key features of these ion sources include soft ionization with the protonated molecule as the largest peak, and superb sensitivity with detection limits in the low picogram or femtomole range and a linear dynamic range over ~4 orders of magnitude. The RF plasma has advantages over the DC plasma in its ability to operate in various buffer gases and to produce a more stable plasma. Factors influencing the performance of the ion sources have been studied, including RF power level, liquid flow rate, chamber temperature, solvent composition, and voltage affecting the collision induced dissociation (CID). Ionization of hydrocarbons by the RF plasma API source was also studied. Soft ionization is generally produced. To obtain high sensitivity, the ion source must be very dry and the needle-to-orifice distance must be small. Nitric oxide was used to enhance the sensitivity. The RF plasma source was then used for the analysis of hydrocarbons in auto emissions. Comparisons between the corona discharge and the RF plasma have been made in terms of discharge current, ion residence time, and the ion source model. The RF plasma source provides larger linear dynamic range and higher sensitivity than the corona discharge, due to its much larger discharge current. The RF plasma was also observed to provide longer ion residence times and was not

  15. Electric probe investigations of microwave generated, atmospheric pressure, plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Porteanu, H. E.; Kuehn, S.; Gesche, R.

    2010-07-15

    We examine the applicability of the Langmuir-type of characterization for atmospheric pressure plasma jets generated in a millimeter-size cavity microwave resonator at 2.45 GHz. Wide range I-V characteristics of helium, argon, nitrogen, air and oxygen are presented for different gas fluxes, distances probe-resonator, and microwave powers. A detailed analysis is performed for the fine variation in the current around the floating potential. A simplified theory specially developed for this case is presented, considering the ionic and electronic saturation currents and the floating potential. Based on this theory, we conclude that, while the charge carrier density depends on gas flow, distance to plasma source, and microwave absorbed power, the electron temperature is quite independent of these parameters. The resulting plasma parameters for helium, argon, and nitrogen are presented.

  16. Plasmid DNA damage induced by helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Cantrell, William A.; Escobar, Erika E.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-03-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is applied to induce damage to aqueous plasmid DNA. The resulting fractions of the DNA conformers, which indicate intact molecules or DNA with single- or double-strand breaks, are determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. The DNA strand breaks increase with a decrease in the distance between the APPJ and DNA samples under two working conditions of the plasma source with different parameters of applied electric pulses. The damage level induced in the plasmid DNA is also enhanced with increased plasma irradiation time. The reactive species generated in the APPJ are characterized by optical emission spectra, and their roles in possible DNA damage processes occurring in an aqueous environment are also discussed.

  17. On non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jets and plasma bullet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xinpei

    2012-10-01

    Because of the enhanced plasma chemistry, atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasmas (APNPs) have been widely studied for several emerging applications such as biomedical applications. For the biomedical applications, plasma jet devices, which generate plasma in open space (surrounding air) rather than in confined discharge gaps only, have lots of advantages over the traditional dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) devices. For example, it can be used for root canal disinfection, which can't be realized by the traditional plasma device. On the other hand, currently, the working gases of most of the plasma jet devices are noble gases or the mixtures of the noble gases with small amount of O2, or air. If ambient air is used as the working gas, several serious difficulties are encountered in the plasma generation process. Amongst these are high gas temperatures and disrupting instabilities. In this presentation, firstly, a brief review of the different cold plasma jets developed to date is presented. Secondly, several different plasma jet devices developed in our lab are reported. The effects of various parameters on the plasma jets are discussed. Finally, one of the most interesting phenomena of APNP-Js, the plasma bullet is discussed and its behavior is described. References: [1] X. Lu, M. Laroussi, V. Puech, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 21, 034005 (2012); [2] Y. Xian, X. Lu, S. Wu, P. Chu, and Y. Pan, Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 123702 (2012); [3] X. Pei, X. Lu, J. Liu, D. Liu, Y. Yang, K. Ostrikov, P. Chu, and Y. Pan, J. Phys. D 45, 165205 (2012).

  18. Collisional and radiative processes in high-pressure discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Kurt H.; Kurunczi, Peter F.; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2002-05-01

    Discharge plasmas at high pressures (up to and exceeding atmospheric pressure), where single collision conditions no longer prevail, provide a fertile environment for the experimental study of collisions and radiative processes dominated by (i) step-wise processes, i.e., the excitation of an already excited atomic/molecular state and by (ii) three-body collisions leading, for instance, to the formation of excimers. The dominance of collisional and radiative processes beyond binary collisions involving ground-state atoms and molecules in such environments allows for many interesting applications of high-pressure plasmas such as high power lasers, opening switches, novel plasma processing applications and sputtering, absorbers and reflectors for electromagnetic waves, remediation of pollutants and waste streams, and excimer lamps and other noncoherent vacuum-ultraviolet light sources. Here recent progress is summarized in the use of hollow cathode discharge devices with hole dimensions in the range 0.1-0.5 mm for the generation of vacuum-ultraviolet light.

  19. Axisymmetric equilibria with pressure anisotropy and plasma flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Throumoulopoulos, George; Evangelias, Achilleas

    2015-11-01

    A generalised Grad-Shafranov equation that governs the equilibrium of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma with anisotropic pressure and incompressible flow of arbitrary direction is derived. This equation includes six free surface functions and recovers known Grad-Shafranov-like equations in the literature as well as the usual static, isotropic one. The form of the generalised equation indicates that pressure anisotropy and flow act additively on equilibrium. In addition, two sets of analytical solutions, an extended Solovev one with a free boundary and an extended Hernegger-Maschke one for a plasma surrounded by a fixed boundary possessing an X-point, are constructed, particularly in relevance to the ITER and NSTX tokamaks. Furthermore, the impacts both of pressure anisotropy and plasma flow on these equilibria are examined. It turns out that depending on the maximum value and the shape of an anisotropy function, the anisotropy can act either paramagnetically or diamagnetically. Also, in most of the cases considered both the anisotropy and the flow have stronger effects on NSTX equilibria than on ITER ones. This work has been carried out within the framework of the EUROfusion Consortium and has received funding from (a) the National Programme for the Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion, Hellenic Republic, (b) Euratom research and training programme 2014-2018.

  20. Electric and plasma characteristics of RF discharge plasma actuation under varying pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huimin, Song; Min, Jia; Di, Jin; Wei, Cui; Yun, Wu

    2016-03-01

    The electric and plasma characteristics of RF discharge plasma actuation under varying pressure have been investigated experimentally. As the pressure increases, the shapes of charge-voltage Lissajous curves vary, and the discharge energy increases. The emission spectra show significant difference as the pressure varies. When the pressure is 1000 Pa, the electron temperature is estimated to be 4.139 eV, the electron density and the vibrational temperature of plasma are 4.71×1011 cm-3 and 1.27 eV, respectively. The ratio of spectral lines which describes the electron temperature hardly changes when the pressure varies between 5000-30000 Pa, while it increases remarkably with the pressure below 5000 Pa, indicating a transition from filamentary discharge to glow discharge. The characteristics of emission spectrum are obviously influenced by the loading power. With more loading power, both of the illumination and emission spectrum intensity increase at 10000 Pa. The pin-pin electrode RF discharge is arc-like at power higher than 33 W, which results in a macroscopic air temperature increase. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11472306, 51336011, and 51407197).

  1. Preparation of Bulk Graphene Nanoplatelets by Spark Plasma Sintering — Electrical and Thermal Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Mattipally; Rao, Tata N.; Prasad, P. S. R.; Babu, D. Suresh

    2016-10-01

    Consolidation of graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) by spark plasma sintering (SPS) to study the feasibility of its structure retention at extreme temperature and pressure conditions. Structural characterization of the GNP powder and pellet were carried out by Micro-Raman, SEM, and TEM. HT-XRD. A.C. and D.C. conductivity of GNP pellet is carried out at room temperature. GNPs survived its structure in the SPS processing at an extreme temperature of 1850∘C and uni-axial pressure 60MPa, vacuum at 2.5-3.2 × 10-3 Torr. Our study shows the potential for GNPs to be successfully used as a reinforcing in ceramic matrix composites using SPS. The diffraction has been accurately calibrated to waterfall the shift in 2θ values at elevated temperatures. The corrected lattice parameter data have been used to estimate the instantaneous and mean thermal expansion coefficients as a function of temperature. The lattice parameters “a” and “c” for powder and pellet GNP is found to be 0.2456(1)nm and 0.6700(2)nm, respectively. The thermal expansivity of GNP powder and pellet along “a”- and “c”-axis are found to be 22.6×10-6K-1, 13.01×10-6K-1 and 15.11×10-6K-1, 10.44×10-6K-1, respectively. Electrical conductivity of GNP pellet is found to be 5700S/m.

  2. Trends in surface engineering of biomaterials: atmospheric pressure plasma deposition of coatings for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Ponte, G.; Sardella, E.; Fanelli, F.; D'Agostino, R.; Favia, P.

    2011-11-01

    Cold plasma processes for surface engineering of biomaterials and biomedical devices are traditionally performed at low pressure; more and more, though, surface modification plasma processes at atmospheric pressure are also gaining popularity. This short review is aimed to list briefly atmospheric pressure plasma processes reported, in the last decade, for adapting the surface of materials to the best interactions with cells, bacteria and biomolecules.

  3. In-package inhibition of E. coli O157:H7 on bulk Romaine lettuce using cold plasma.

    PubMed

    Min, Sea C; Roh, Si Hyeon; Niemira, Brendan A; Boyd, Glenn; Sites, Joseph E; Uknalis, Joseph; Fan, Xuetong

    2017-08-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge atmospheric cold plasma (DACP) treatment was evaluated for the inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, surface morphology, color, carbon dioxide generation, and weight loss of bulk Romaine lettuce in a commercial plastic clamshell container. The lettuce samples were packed in a model bulk packaging configuration (three rows with either 1, 3, 5, or 7 layers) in the container and treated by DACP (42.6 kV, 10 min). DACP treatment reduced the number of E. coli O157:H7 in the leaf samples in the 1-, 3-, and 5-layer configurations by 0.4-0.8 log CFU/g lettuce, with no significant correlation to the sample location (P > 0.05). In the largest bulk stacking with 7 layers, a greater degree of reduction (1.1 log CFU/g lettuce) was observed at the top layer, but shaking the container increased the uniformity of the inhibition. DACP did not significantly change the surface morphology, color, respiration rate, or weight loss of the samples, nor did these properties differ significantly according to their location in the bulk stack. DACP treatment inhibited E. coli O157:H7 on bulk lettuce in clamshell containers in a uniform manner, without affecting the physical and biological properties and thus holds promise as a post-packaging process for fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. On uniform plasma generation for the large area plasma processing in intermediate pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun Jun; Hwang, Hye-Ju; Cho, Jeong Hee; Chae, Hee Sun; Kim, Dong Hwan; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-04-21

    Radial plasma discharge characteristics in the range of 450 mm were studied in a dual inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source, which consisted of a helical ICP and the side type ferrite ICPs. Since the energy relaxation length is shorter than the distance between each of the ferrite ICPs in an intermediate pressure (600 mTorr), local difference in the plasma ignition along the antenna position were observed. In addition, large voltage drop in the discharge of the ferrite ICPs causes an increase in the displacement current to the plasma, and separate discharge mode (E and H mode) according to the antenna position was observed. This results in non-uniform plasma distribution. For the improvement in the discharge of the ferrite ICPs, a capacitor which is placed between the ends of antenna and the ground is adjusted to minimize the displacement current to the plasma. As a result, coincident transitions from E to H mode were observed along the antenna position, and radially concave density profile (edge focused) was measured. For the uniform density distribution, a helical ICP, which located at the center of the discharge chamber, was simultaneously discharged with the ferrite ICPs. Due to the plasma potential variation through the simultaneous discharge of helical ICP and ferrite ICPs, uniform radial distribution in both plasma density and electron temperature are achieved.

  5. Voltage distribution over capacitively coupled plasma electrode for atmospheric-pressure plasma generation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    When capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) is used to generate large-area plasma, the standing wave effect becomes significant, which results in the hindering of the uniform plasma process such as in a plasma etcher or plasma chemical vapor deposition. In this study, the transmission line modeling method is applied to calculate the voltage distribution over atmospheric-pressure CCP electrodes with the size of 1 m × 0.2 m. The measured plasma impedance in our previous study was used in the present calculation. The results of the calculations clearly showed the effects of excitation frequency and the impedance of the plasma on the form of the voltage distribution caused by the standing wave effect. In the case of 150 MHz frequency, the standing wave effect causes a drastic change in the voltage distribution via plasma ignition; however, the change is small for 13.56 MHz. It was also clarified that the power application position is important for obtaining a uniform voltage distribution. PMID:23634893

  6. Voltage distribution over capacitively coupled plasma electrode for atmospheric-pressure plasma generation.

    PubMed

    Shuto, Mitsutoshi; Tomino, Fukumi; Ohmi, Hiromasa; Kakiuchi, Hiroaki; Yasutake, Kiyoshi

    2013-05-01

    When capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) is used to generate large-area plasma, the standing wave effect becomes significant, which results in the hindering of the uniform plasma process such as in a plasma etcher or plasma chemical vapor deposition. In this study, the transmission line modeling method is applied to calculate the voltage distribution over atmospheric-pressure CCP electrodes with the size of 1 m × 0.2 m. The measured plasma impedance in our previous study was used in the present calculation. The results of the calculations clearly showed the effects of excitation frequency and the impedance of the plasma on the form of the voltage distribution caused by the standing wave effect. In the case of 150 MHz frequency, the standing wave effect causes a drastic change in the voltage distribution via plasma ignition; however, the change is small for 13.56 MHz. It was also clarified that the power application position is important for obtaining a uniform voltage distribution.

  7. Investigation of plasma-organic materials interaction in aqueous solution with atmospheric pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, K.; Miyazaki, A.; Setsuhara, Y.

    2014-06-01

    An investigation was carried out into the interaction of an atmospheric pressure plasma with an organic material in an aqueous solution. The degradation of methylene blue (MB) by plasma exposure through the gas/liquid interface was studied. In the optical emission spectrum of the plasma, in addition to strong He emission lines, emissions due to O and OH radicals formed by dissociation of water were present. The change in the absorbance of a MB aqueous solution during plasma exposure was measured using UV-Vis spectroscopy. The absorption peak intensity decreased with plasma exposure time and complete decolorization occurred after 10 min. Since plasma exposure was found to decrease the pH of water, the effect of changes in pH on MB degradation in the absence of a plasma was investigated using solutions with different pH values. However, varying the pH was found to have no influence on MB degradation. The results indicated that MB degradation occurred due to interactions between MB and radicals across the plasma/liquid interface.

  8. Atmospheric pressure plasma accelerates tail regeneration in tadpoles Xenopus laevis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivie, A.; Martus, K.; Menon, J.

    2017-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma is a partially ionized gas composed of neutral and charged particles, including electrons and ions, as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, it is utilized as possible therapy in oncology, sterilization, skin diseases, wound healing and tissue regeneration. In this study we focused on effect of plasma exposure on tail regeneration of tadpoles, Xenopus leavis with special emphasis on role of ROS, antioxidant defenses and morphological features of the regenerate. When amputated region of the tail was exposed to the helium plasma it resulted in a faster rate of growth, elevated ROS and increase in antioxidant enzymes in the regenerate compared to that of untreated control. An increase in nitric oxide (free radical) as well as activity of nitric oxide synthase(s) were observed once the cells of the regeneration blastema - a mass of proliferating cells are ready for differentiation. Microscopically the cells of the regenerate of plasma treated tadpoles show altered morphology and characteristics of cellular hypoxia and oxidative stress. We summarize that plasma exposure accelerates the dynamics of wound healing and tail regeneration through its effects on cell proliferation and differentiation as well as angiogenesis mediated through ROS signaling.

  9. Dynamics of apokamp-type atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnin, Eduard A.; Panarin, Victor A.; Skakun, Victor S.; Baksht, Evgeny Kh.; Tarasenko, Victor F.

    2017-02-01

    The paper describes a new discharge source of atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) in air with no gas supply through the discharge region. In this discharge mode, plasma jets develop from the bending point of a bright current channel between two electrodes and are therefore termed an apokamp (from Greek `off' and `bend'). The apokamp can represent single plasma jets of length up 6 cm or several jets, and the temperature of such jets can range from more than 1000 °C at their base to 100-250 °C at their tip. Apokamps are formed at maximum applied voltage of positive polarity, provided that the second electrode is capacitively decoupled with ground. According to high-speed photography with time resolution from several nanoseconds to several tens of nanoseconds, the apokamp consists of a set of plasma bullets moving with a velocity of 100-220 km/s, which excludes the convective mechanism of plasma decay. Estimates on a 100-ns scale show that the near-electrode zones and the zones from which apokamps develop are close in temperature.

  10. The effects of plasma inhomogeneity on the nanoparticle coating in a low pressure plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pourali, N.; Foroutan, G.

    2015-10-15

    A self-consistent model is used to study the surface coating of a collection of charged nanoparticles trapped in the sheath region of a low pressure plasma reactor. The model consists of multi-fluid plasma sheath module, including nanoparticle dynamics, as well as the surface deposition and particle heating modules. The simulation results show that the mean particle radius increases with time and the nanoparticle size distribution is broadened. The mean radius is a linear function of time, while the variance exhibits a quadratic dependence. The broadening in size distribution is attributed to the spatial inhomogeneity of the deposition rate which in turn depends on the plasma inhomogeneity. The spatial inhomogeneity of the ions has strong impact on the broadening of the size distribution, as the ions contribute both in the nanoparticle charging and in direct film deposition. The distribution width also increases with increasing of the pressure, gas temperature, and the ambient temperature gradient.

  11. The effects of plasma inhomogeneity on the nanoparticle coating in a low pressure plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourali, N.; Foroutan, G.

    2015-10-01

    A self-consistent model is used to study the surface coating of a collection of charged nanoparticles trapped in the sheath region of a low pressure plasma reactor. The model consists of multi-fluid plasma sheath module, including nanoparticle dynamics, as well as the surface deposition and particle heating modules. The simulation results show that the mean particle radius increases with time and the nanoparticle size distribution is broadened. The mean radius is a linear function of time, while the variance exhibits a quadratic dependence. The broadening in size distribution is attributed to the spatial inhomogeneity of the deposition rate which in turn depends on the plasma inhomogeneity. The spatial inhomogeneity of the ions has strong impact on the broadening of the size distribution, as the ions contribute both in the nanoparticle charging and in direct film deposition. The distribution width also increases with increasing of the pressure, gas temperature, and the ambient temperature gradient.

  12. Low Temperature Plasma Surface Interactions: Atomic Layer Etching And Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet Modification Of Biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehrlein, Gottlieb

    2013-09-01

    Control of plasma-surface interactions is essential for successful application of low temperature plasma to materials processing. We review work performed in our laboratory in two areas: First, low pressure plasma surface interaction mechanisms aimed at achieving atomic precision in etching materials in the semiconductor industry. We discuss sequential reactions of surface passivation followed by directional low energy ion attack for ``volatile product'' removal to establish for what conditions self-limiting behavior required for Atomic Layer Etching (ALE) can be established using prototypical SiO2 -Si/fluorocarbon-Ar materials/etching systems. Second, studies of plasma-surface interactions related to application of a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) for modification of biomaterials are discussed. Changes in surface chemistry/biological activity of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposed to the APPJ plume/effluent in a controlled environment are reviewed. The results clarify how jet chemistry and interactions of plasma with the environment impact the consequences of APPJ-biomaterial-surface interactions. Based on collaborations with D. Metzler, S. Engelmann, R. Bruce, E. Joseph, E. Bartis, C. Hart, Q.-Y. Yang, J. Seog, T.-Y. Chung, H.-W. Chang, and D.B. Graves. We gratefully acknowledge funding from US Department of Energy (DE-SC0005105; DE-SC0001939) and National Science Foundation (CBET-1134273; PHY-1004256).

  13. Sterilization of Surfaces with a Handheld Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Robert; Habib, Sara; Chan, Wai; Gonzalez, Eleazar; Tijerina, A.; Sloan, Mark

    2009-10-01

    Low temperature, atmospheric pressure plasmas have shown great promise for decontaminating the surfaces of materials and equipment. In this study, an atmospheric pressure, oxygen and argon plasma was investigated for the destruction of viruses, bacteria, and spores. The plasma was operated at an argon flow rate of 30 L/min, an oxygen flow rate of 20 mL/min, a power density of 101.0 W/cm^3 (beam area = 5.1 cm^2), and at a distance from the surface of 7.1 mm. An average 6log10 reduction of viable spores was obtained after only 45 seconds of exposure to the reactive gas. By contrast, it takes more than 35 minutes at 121^oC to sterilize anthrax in an autoclave. The plasma properties were investigated by numerical modeling and chemical titration with nitric oxide. The numerical model included a detailed reaction mechanism for the discharge as well as for the afterglow. It was predicted that at a delivered power density of 29.3 W/cm^3, 30 L/min argon, and 0.01 volume% O2, the plasma generated 1.9 x 10^14 cm-3 O atoms, 1.6 x 10^12 cm-3 ozone, 9.3 x 10^13 cm-3 O2(^1δg), and 2.9 x 10^12 cm-3 O2(^1σ^+g) at 1 cm downstream of the source. The O atom density measured by chemical titration with NO was 6.0 x 10^14 cm-3 at the same conditions. It is believe that the oxygen atoms and the O2(^1δg) metastables were responsible for killing the anthrax and other microorganisms.

  14. Structure and bulk modulus of Ln-doped UO2 (Ln = La, Nd) at high pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Rittman, Dylan R.; Park, Sulgiye; Tracy, Cameron L.; ...

    2017-04-10

    The structure of lanthanide-doped uranium dioxide, LnxU1-xO2-0.5x+y (Ln = La, Nd), was investigated at pressures up to ~50–55 GPa. Samples were synthesized with different lanthanides at different concentrations (x ~ 0.2 and 0.5), and all were slightly hyperstoichiometric (y ~ 0.25–0.4). In situ high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to investigate their high-pressure phase behavior and determine their bulk moduli. All samples underwent a fluorite-to-cotunnite phase transformation with increasing pressure. The pressure of the phase transformation increased with increasing hyperstoichiometry, which is consistent with results from previous computational simulations. Bulk moduli are inversely proportional to both the ionic radius ofmore » the lanthanide and its concentration, as quantified using a weighted cationic radius ratio. As a result, this trend was found to be consistent with the behavior of other elastic properties measured for Ln-doped UO2, such as Young's modulus.« less

  15. Correlation between helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) variables and plasma induced DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Ek R.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2016-09-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) source with a dielectric capillary and two tubular electrodes was used to induce damage in aqueous plasmid DNA. The fraction of different types of DNA damage (i.e., intact or undamaged, double strand breaks (DSBs), and single strand breaks (SSBs)) that occurred as the result of plasma irradiation was quantified through analysis of agarose gel electrophoresis images. The total DNA damage increased with an increase in both flow rate and duration of irradiation, but decreased with an increase in distance between the APPJ and sample. The average power of the plasma was calculated and the length of APPJ was measured for various flow rates and voltages applied. The possible effects of plasma power and reactive species on DNA damage are discussed.

  16. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of bulk aqueous solutions at oceanic pressures: evaluation of key measurement parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, Anna P. M.; Lawrence-Snyder, Marion; Angel, S. Michael; Chave, Alan D

    2007-05-01

    The development of in situ chemical sensors is critical for present-day expeditionary oceanography and the new mode of ocean observing systems that we are entering. New sensors take a significant amount of time to develop; therefore, validation of techniques in the laboratory for use in the ocean environment is necessary. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a promising in situ technique for oceanography. Laboratory investigations on the feasibility of using LIBS to detect analytes in bulk liquids at oceanic pressures were carried out. LIBS was successfully used to detect dissolved Na, Mn, Ca, K, and Li at pressures up to 2.76x107 Pa. The effects of pressure, laser-pulse energy, interpulse delay, gate delay, temperature, and NaCl concentration on the LIBS signal were examined. An optimal range of laser-pulse energies was found to exist for analyte detection in bulk aqueous solutions at both low and high pressures. No pressure effect was seen on the emission intensity for Ca and Na, and an increase in emission intensity with increased pressure was seen for Mn. Using the dual-pulse technique for several analytes, a very short interpulse delay resulted in the greatest emission intensity. The presence of NaCl enhanced the emission intensity for Ca, but had no effect on peak intensity of Mn or K. Overall, increased pressure, the addition of NaCl to a solution, and temperature did not inhibit detection of analytes in solution and sometimes even enhanced the ability to detect the analytes. The results suggest that LIBS is a viable chemical sensing method for in situ analyte detection in high-pressure environments such as the deep ocean.

  17. Atmospheric-pressure plasma decontamination/sterilization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Herrmann, Hans W.; Selwyn, Gary S.

    2001-01-01

    An atmospheric-pressure plasma decontamination/sterilization chamber is described. The apparatus is useful for decontaminating sensitive equipment and materials, such as electronics, optics and national treasures, which have been contaminated with chemical and/or biological warfare agents, such as anthrax, mustard blistering agent, VX nerve gas, and the like. There is currently no acceptable procedure for decontaminating such equipment. The apparatus may also be used for sterilization in the medical and food industries. Items to be decontaminated or sterilized are supported inside the chamber. Reactive gases containing atomic and metastable oxygen species are generated by an atmospheric-pressure plasma discharge in a He/O.sub.2 mixture and directed into the region of these items resulting in chemical reaction between the reactive species and organic substances. This reaction typically kills and/or neutralizes the contamination without damaging most equipment and materials. The plasma gases are recirculated through a closed-loop system to minimize the loss of helium and the possibility of escape of aerosolized harmful substances.

  18. Development of atmospheric pressure plasma needle jet for sterilization applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfa, Rizan Rizon; Ahmad, Mohd Khairul; Soon, Chin Fhong; Sahdan, Mohd Zainizan; Lias, Jais; Wibowo, Kusnanto Mukti; Bakar, Ahmad Shuhaimi Abu; Arshad, Mohd Khairuddin Md; Hashim, Uda; Nayan, Nafarizal

    2017-09-01

    Inactivation of bacteria or sterilization has been a major issue in the medical field, especially regarding of human safety, whereby, in a huge scenario fatality can be caused by hazardous bacteria. Often, E-coli as gram-negative bacteria are selected as a key indicator of proper sterilization process as E-coli is tough and dormant bacteria. The technology in sterilization has moved on from chemical, wet and irradiation sterilization to a high promising device such as atmospheric pressure plasma needle jet (APPNJ). It has been reported that atmospheric pressure plasma has provided bundle of advantages over earlier sterilization process. The APPNJ is developed in our lab using high frequency and high voltage neon transformer power supply connected to copper needle and copper sheet electrodes. The gas discharge is Ar gas flowing at 40 L/min through a quartz glass tube. The E-coli bacteria are self-cultured from waste water and then treated with APPNJ. The treatment processes are run into two difference gaps between the plasma orifice and sample with various treatment times. Only 40s is required by direct treatment to achieve 100% killing of E-coli. On the other hand, indirect treatment has inactivated 50% of the E-coli in 40s. In this study, direct and indirect effect of APPNJ to the E-coli can be observed which can be utilized into sterilization of bio-compatible material applications.

  19. Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Cleaning of Contaminated Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Robert F. Hicks; Hans W. Herrmann

    2003-12-15

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate a practical, environmentally benigh technology for the surface decontamination and decommissioning of radioactive waste. A low temperature, atmospheric pressure plasma has been developed with initial support from the DOE, Environmental Management Sciences Program. This devise selectively etches radioactive metals from surfaces, rendering objects radiation free and suitable for decommissioning. The volatile reaction products are captured on filters, which yields a tremendous reduction in the volume of the waste. The technology shows a great potential for accelerating the clean-up effort for the equipment and structures contaminated with radioactive materials within the DOE complex. The viability of this technology has been demonstrated by selectively and rapidly stripping uranium from stainless steel surfaces at low temperature. Studies on uranium oxide have shown that etch rates of 4.0 microns per minute can be achieved at temperature below 473 K. Over the past three years, we have made numerous improvements in the design of the atmospheric pressure plasma source. We are now able to scale up the plasma source to treat large surface areas.

  20. Progress in Development of Low Pressure High Density Plasmas on a Small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Royce; Lopez, M.; Nolan, S.; Page, E. L.; Schlank, C.; Sherman, J.; Stutzman, B. S.; Zuniga, J.

    2012-10-01

    At the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), a small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) is being developed to utilize the reputed high densities (10^13 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T) [1], for eventual high temperature and density diagnostic development in future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to create repeatedly stable plasmas induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range and employs an electromagnet to provide the external energy in the plasma's magnetic field to transition from the H-Mode to the Helicon Mode. An acceleration coil, currently under construction, will place the plasma in the vacuum chamber for optical and particle probing. With the initial construction phase complete and first plasmas attained, HPX is constructing triple and mach particle probes, magnetic probes, and a single point 300 W Thompson Scattering system backed by a 32-channel DAQ system capable 12 bits of sampling precision at 2 MS/s for plasma property investigations. Progress on the development of the RF coupling system, magnetic coils, and qualitative observations from the optical and electric diagnostics are to be reported. [4pt] [1] K. Toki, et al., Thin Solid Films 506-507 (2005).

  1. Tailoring non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas for healthcare technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gans, Timo

    2012-10-01

    Non-equilibrium plasmas operated at ambient atmospheric pressure are very efficient sources for energy transport through reactive neutral particles (radicals and metastables), charged particles (ions and electrons), UV radiation, and electro-magnetic fields. This includes the unique opportunity to deliver short-lived highly reactive species such as atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can initiate a wide range of reactions in biochemical systems, both therapeutic and toxic. The toxicological implications are not clear, e.g. potential risks through DNA damage. It is anticipated that interactions with biological systems will be governed through synergies between two or more species. Suitable optimized plasma sources are improbable through empirical investigations. Quantifying the power dissipation and energy transport mechanisms through the different interfaces from the plasma regime to ambient air, towards the liquid interface and associated impact on the biological system through a new regime of liquid chemistry initiated by the synergy of delivering multiple energy carrying species, is crucial. The major challenge to overcome the obstacles of quantifying energy transport and controlling power dissipation has been the severe lack of suitable plasma sources and diagnostic techniques. Diagnostics and simulations of this plasma regime are very challenging; the highly pronounced collision dominated plasma dynamics at very small dimensions requires extraordinary high resolution - simultaneously in space (microns) and time (picoseconds). Numerical simulations are equally challenging due to the inherent multi-scale character with very rapid electron collisions on the one extreme and the transport of chemically stable species characterizing completely different domains. This presentation will discuss our recent progress actively combining both advance optical diagnostics and multi-scale computer simulations.

  2. Microwave capillary plasmas in helium at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, M.; Noël, C.; Belmonte, T.; Alves, L. L.

    2014-07-01

    This work uses both simulations and experiments to study helium plasmas (99.999% purity), sustained by surface-wave discharges (2.45 GHz frequency) in capillary tubes (3 mm in-radius) at atmospheric pressure. The simulations use a self-consistent homogeneous and stationary collisional-radiative model (CRM) that solves the rate balance equations for the different species present in the plasma (electrons, He+ and He_2^+ ions, He(n ⩽ 6) excited states and He_2^* excimers) and the gas thermal balance equation, coupled with the two-term electron Boltzmann equation (including direct and stepwise inelastic and superelastic collisions as well as electron-electron collisions). The experiments use optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics to measure the electron density ne (from the Hβ Stark broadening), the gas temperature Tg (from the ro-vibrational transitions of OH, present at trace concentrations) and the populations of excited states in the energy region 22.7-24.2 eV, whose spectrum allows determining the excitation temperature Texc. Measurements yield ne ≃ (2.45 ± 1.4) × 1013 cm-3, Tg ≃ 1700 ± 100 K and Texc ≃ 2793 ± 116 K, for a ˜180 ± 10 W power coupled and ˜1 cm length plasma column. The model predictions at ne = 1.7 × 1013 cm-3 are in very good agreement with measurements yielding Tg = 1800 K, Texc = 2792 K (for ˜30% average relative error between calculated and measured excited-state densities), and a power absorbed by the plasma per unit length of 165 W cm-1. The model results depend strongly on ne, and hence on the plasma conductivity and on the power coupled to the plasma. The coupling of a thermal module to the CRM has been shown to be crucial. Increasing the electron density leads to very high gas temperature values, which limits the variation range of (ne, Tg) as input parameters to the model.

  3. Generation of Gigabar Pressures for High-Energy-Density Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theobald, W.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Seka, W.; Stoeckl, C.; Mangino, D.; Casner, A.; Beg, F. N.; Llor Aisa, E.; Ribeyre, X.; Wei, M. S.; Schoff, M. E.; Florido, R.; Mancini, R. C.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments on the OMEGA laser were performed to study gigabar pressures in small (50- μm-diam) Ti and Cu target samples for high-energy-density plasma applications. The samples were precisely placed (better than 10 μm) at the center of a spherical plastic matrix that is irradiated at incident laser intensities of 5 ×1015 W /cm2 . The laser launches a spherical shock wave that converges in the center in order to reach Gbar pressures in the sample. The shock convergence produces a short burst ( 30ps) of x-ray emission. Time-resolved and time-integrated x-ray spectroscopy provides the means to diagnose the plasma conditions in the sample. The time-resolved spectra are compared to predictions from radiation-hydrodynamic simulations to infer the material conditions at Gbar pressures. A second x-ray flash delayed by 600ps caused by the breakout of the rebounded shock through the outer surface of the compressed plastic was observed. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and by the Fusion Science Center under Grant No. DE-FC02-04ER54789.

  4. Thermoelectric properties of a plasma at megabar pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starostin, A. N.; Gryaznov, V. K.; Filippov, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    A nonideal hydrogen plasma is theoretically studied for the first time as the working medium of a thermoelectric generator. A method is proposed for the calculation of the electrical conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, and thermal conductivity of the nonideal plasma in a wide range of densities and temperatures, including the region of strong degeneracy of electrons, which is achieved in experiments on the quasi-isentropic compression of deuterium and where a "plasma phase transition" (transition with a sharp change in the component composition) is possibly implemented. In this method, the kinetic coefficients are calculated together with the equation of states of the nonideal plasma. It is shown for the first time that the Seebeck coefficient in such a medium reaches 5500 μV/(K cm), which is an order of magnitude larger than that in currently available semiconductor materials used in thermoelectric generators. It is found that the figure of merit in hydrogen, which has a high thermal conductivity, at megabar pressures reaches 0.4, which is only slightly below that in currently available semiconductor materials.

  5. Low-pressure microwave plasma sterilization of polyethylene terephthalate bottles.

    PubMed

    Deilmann, Michael; Halfmann, Helmut; Bibinov, Nikita; Wunderlich, Joachim; Awakowicz, Peter

    2008-10-01

    A low-pressure microwave plasma reactor was developed for sterilization of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles. In contrast to the established method using aseptic filling machines based on toxic sterilants, here a microwave plasma is ignited inside a bottle by using a gas mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrogen. To that effect, a reactor setup was developed based on a Plasmaline antenna allowing for plasma ignition inside three-dimensional packages. A treatment time below 5 s is provided for a reduction of 10(5) and 10(4) CFU of Bacillus atrophaeus and Aspergillus niger, respectively, verified by means of a count reduction test. The sterilization results obtained by means of this challenge test are in accordance with requirements for aseptic packaging machines as defined by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the German Engineering Federation. The plasma sterilization process developed here for aseptic filling of beverages is a dry process that avoids residues and the use of maximum allowable concentrations of established sterilants, e.g., hydrogen peroxide.

  6. Helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets touching dielectric and metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Seth A.; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are being investigated in the context plasma medicine and biotechnology applications, and surface functionalization. The composition of the surface being treated ranges from plastics, liquids, and biological tissue, to metals. The dielectric constant of these materials ranges from as low as 1.5 for plastics to near 80 for liquids, and essentially infinite for metals. The electrical properties of the surface are not independent variables as the permittivity of the material being treated has an effect on the dynamics of the incident APPJ. In this paper, results are discussed from a computational investigation of the interaction of an APPJ incident onto materials of varying permittivity, and their impact on the discharge dynamics of the plasma jet. The computer model used in this investigation solves Poisson's equation, transport equations for charged and neutral species, the electron energy equation, and the Navier-Stokes equations for the neutral gas flow. The APPJ is sustained in He/O2 = 99.8/0.2 flowing into humid air, and is directed onto dielectric surfaces in contact with ground with dielectric constants ranging from 2 to 80, and a grounded metal surface. Low values of relative permittivity encourage propagation of the electric field into the treated material and formation and propagation of a surface ionization wave. High values of relative permittivity promote the restrike of the ionization wave and the formation of a conduction channel between the plasma discharge and the treated surface. The distribution of space charge surrounding the APPJ is discussed.

  7. Relatively high plasma density in low pressure inductive discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-09-15

    Electron energy probability functions (EEPFs) were measured in a low pressure argon inductive discharge. As radio frequency (RF) power increases, discharge mode is changed from E-mode (capacitively coupled) to H-mode (inductively coupled) and the EEPFs evolve from a bi-Maxwellian distribution to a Maxwellian distribution. It is found that the plasma densities at low RF powers (<30 W) are much higher than the density predicted from the slope of the densities at high powers. Because high portion of high energy electrons of the bi-Maxwellian distribution lowers the collisional energy loss and low electron temperature of low energy electrons reduces particle loss rate at low powers. Therefore, the energy loss of plasma decreases and electron densities become higher at low powers.

  8. Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Cleaning of Contaminated Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Robert F. Hicks; Gary S. Selwyn

    2001-01-09

    Project was to develop a low-cost, environmentally benign technology for the decontamination and decommissioning of transuranic waste. With the invention of the atmospheric-pressure plasma jet the goal was achieved. This device selectively etches heavy metals from surfaces, rendering objects radiation free and suitable for decommissioning. The volatile reaction products are captured on filters, which yields a tremendous reduction in the volume of the waste. Studies on tantalum, a surrogate material for plutonium, have shown that etch rate of 6.0 microns per minute can be achieved under mild conditions. Over the past three years, we have made numerous improvements in the design of the plasma jet. It may now be operated for hundreds of hours and not undergo any degradation in performance. Furthermore, small compact units have been developed, which are easily deployed in the field.

  9. Sudden pressure enhancement and tailward retreat in the near-Earth plasma sheet: THEMIS observation and MHD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.

    2015-01-01

    enhancement of the plasma pressure in the near-Earth plasma sheet is one of the common manifestations of substorms and is thought to play an important role in relevant disturbances in the magnetosphere and ionosphere. On 1 March 2008, four of the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms probes observed the sudden enhancement of the plasma pressure around 15:40 UT. The four probes were almost aligned along the Sun-Earth line, which was suitable for investigating spatial-temporal evolution of the near-Earth plasma sheet around the substorm onset. The four probes were located off the equatorial plane, according to a magnetic field model. The plasma pressure suddenly increased at the innermost probe first (at ~7.2 Re), followed by the outer probes (at ~7.5, ~8.3, and ~10.4 Re), that could be seen as a tailward propagation (or retreat) of high-pressure region (HPR). After comparing with results of a global magnetohydrodynamic simulation, we found that only the tailward propagation of the HPR could be seen at off equator. Near the equatorial plane, the HPR propagates earthward from the magnetotail region, then it retreats tailward. In the course of the tailward retreat, the HPR also propagates away from the equatorial plane. As a consequence, the innermost probe observed the pressure enhancement first, followed by the outer probes. The propagation of the HPR in the ZGSM direction is understood to be a combination of the convergence of the plasma flow (the divergence of bulk velocity along the ZGSM axis) and the pressure gradient force.

  10. Sudden Pressure Enhancement and Tailward Retreat in the Near-Earth Plasma Sheet: THEMIS Observation and MHD Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.

    2014-12-01

    Sudden enhancement of the plasma pressure in the near-Earth plasma sheet is one of the common manifestations of the substorms, and is thought to play an important role in relevant disturbances in the magnetosphere and ionosphere. On 1 March 2008 four of the THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) probes observed the sudden enhancement of the plasma pressure around 15:40 UT. The four probes were almost aligned along the Sun-Earth line, which was suitable for investigating spatial-temporal evolution of the near-Earth plasma sheet around the substorm onset. The four probes were located off the equatorial plane, according to a magnetic field model. The plasma pressure suddenly increased at the inner most probe first (at ~7.2 Re), followed by the outer probes (at ~7.5, ~8.3, and ~10.4 Re), that could be seen as a tailward propagation (or retreat) of high-pressure region (HPR). After comparing with results of a global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation, we found that only the tailward propagation of the HPR could be seen at off-equator. Near the equatorial plane, the HPR propagates earthward from the magnetotail region, then it retreats tailward. In the course of the tailward propagation, the HPR also propagates away from the equatorial plane. As a consequence, the inner most probe observed the pressure enhancement first, followed by the outer probes. The propagation of the HPR in the ZGSM direction is understood to be a combination of the convergence of the plasma flow (the divergence of bulk velocity along the ZGSM axis), and the pressure gradient force.

  11. Surface Modification by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma for Improved Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Thomas Scott

    An atmospheric pressure plasma source operating at temperatures below 150?C and fed with 1.0-3.0 volume% oxygen in helium was used to activate the surfaces of the native oxide on silicon, carbon-fiber reinforced epoxy composite, stainless steel type 410, and aluminum alloy 2024. Helium and oxygen were passed through the plasma source, whereby ionization occurred and ˜10 16 cm-3 oxygen atoms, ˜1015 cm -3 ozone molecules and ˜1016 cm-3 metastable oxygen molecules (O21Deltag) were generated. The plasma afterglow was directed onto the substrate material located 4 mm downstream. Surface properties of the plasma treated materials have been investigated using water contact angle (WCA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The work presented herein establishes atmospheric-pressure plasma as a surface preparation technique that is well suited for surface activation and enhanced adhesive bond strength in a variety of materials. Atmospheric plasma activation presents an environmentally friendly alternative to wet chemical and abrasive methods of surface preparation. Attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy was used to study the aging mechanism of the native oxide on silicon. During storage at ambient conditions, the water contact angle of a clean surface increased from <5° to 40° over a period of 12 hours. When stored under a nitrogen purge, the water contact angle of a clean surface increased from <5° to 30° over a period of 40-60 hours. The change in contact angle resulted from the adsorption of nonanal onto the exposed surface hydroxyl groups. The rate of adsorption of nonanal under a nitrogen purged atmosphere ranged from 0.378+/-0.011 hr-1 to 0.182+/-0.008 hr -1 molecules/(cm2•s), decreasing as the fraction of hydrogen-bonded hydroxyl groups increased from 49% to 96% on the SiO 2 surface. The adsorption of the organic contaminant could be suppressed indefinitely by storing the

  12. Exploring the Utilization of Low-Pressure, Piston-Cylinder Experiments to Determine the Bulk Compositions of Finite, Precious Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vander Kaaden, K. E.; McCubbin, F. M.; Harrington, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    Determining the bulk composition of precious materials with a finite mass (e.g., meteorite samples) is extremely important in the fields of Earth and Planetary Science. From meteorite studies we are able to place constraints on large scale planetary processes like global differentiation and subsequent volcanism, as well as smaller scale processes like crystallization in a magma chamber or sedimentary compaction at the surface. However, with meteorite samples in particular, far too often we are limited by how precious the sample is as well as its limited mass. In this study, we have utilized aliquots of samples previously studied for toxicological hazards, including both the fresh samples (lunar mare basalt NWA 4734, lunar regolith breccia NWA 7611, martian basalt Tissint, martian regolith breccia NWA 7034, a vestian basalt Berthoud, a vestian regolith breccia NWA 2060, and a terrestrial mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB)), and those that underwent iron leaching (Tissint, NWA 7034, NWA 4734, MORB). With these small masses of material, we performed low pressure (approx. 0.75 GPa), high temperature (greater than 1600 degrees Celsius) melting experiments. Each sample was analyzed using a JEOL 8530F electron microprobe to determine the bulk composition of the materials that were previously examined. When available, the results of our microprobe data were compared with bulk rock compositions in the literature. The results of this study show that with this technique, only approx. 50 mg of sample is required to accurately determine the bulk composition of the materials of interest.

  13. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet interactions with plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, D.; Cox, L. J.; Hyland, W. B.; McMahon, S. J.; Reuter, S.; Graham, W. G.; Gans, T.; Currell, F. J.

    2011-01-24

    The effect of a cold (<40 deg. C) radio frequency-driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet on plasmid DNA has been investigated. Gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the DNA forms post-treatment. The experimental data are fitted to a rate equation model that allows for quantitative determination of the rates of single and double strand break formation. The formation of double strand breaks correlates well with the atomic oxygen density. Taken with other measurements, this indicates that neutral components in the jet are effective in inducing double strand breaks.

  14. Fundamental Studies of Transient, Atmospheric-Pressure, Small-Scale Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-23

    e.g. plasma brush) were explored for surface decontamination against pathogenic bacteria and biofilms, as well as for treatment of cervical cancer, in...pressure plasma jets and jet arrays (e.g. plasma brush) were explored for surface decontamination against pathogenic bacteria and biofilms, as well as...atmospheric pressure plasma jets and jet arrays (e.g. plasma brush) were explored for surface decontamination against pathogenic bacteria and biofilms, as

  15. AC losses in high pressure synthesized MgB2 bulk rings measured by a transformer method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerovich, V.; Sokolovsky, V.; Prikhna, T.; Gawalek, W.; Habisreuther, T.

    2013-03-01

    Recently developed manufacturing technologies use high pressure and various doping additions to prepare bulk MgB2-based materials with a high critical current density measured by the magnetization method. We use a contactless transformer method, which is based on studying the superconductor response to an induced transport current, to measure AC losses in bulk MgB2 rings synthesized under high pressure. The obtained dependence of the losses on the primary current (applied magnetic field) is fitted by a power law with an exponent of ˜2.1 instead of the cubic dependence predicted by Bean’s model and power law electric field-current density (E-J) characteristics with a large exponent. An unusually strong dependence of the AC losses on the frequency is also observed. It is shown that the E-J characteristic of bulk MgB2 is well fitted by the dependence used in the extended critical state model based on account of the viscous vortex motion in the flux flow regime. Numerical simulation using this E-J characteristic gives current and frequency AC loss dependences that agree well with the experimental results.

  16. Energy transfer, pressure tensor, and heating of kinetic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yan; Matthaeus, William H.; Parashar, Tulasi N.; Haggerty, Colby C.; Roytershteyn, Vadim; Daughton, William; Wan, Minping; Shi, Yipeng; Chen, Shiyi

    2017-07-01

    Kinetic plasma turbulence cascade spans multiple scales ranging from macroscopic fluid flow to sub-electron scales. Mechanisms that dissipate large scale energy, terminate the inertial range cascade, and convert kinetic energy into heat are hotly debated. Here, we revisit these puzzles using fully kinetic simulation. By performing scale-dependent spatial filtering on the Vlasov equation, we extract information at prescribed scales and introduce several energy transfer functions. This approach allows highly inhomogeneous energy cascade to be quantified as it proceeds down to kinetic scales. The pressure work, - ( P . ∇ ) . u , can trigger a channel of the energy conversion between fluid flow and random motions, which contains a collision-free generalization of the viscous dissipation in collisional fluid. Both the energy transfer and the pressure work are strongly correlated with velocity gradients.

  17. Plasma Streamwise Vortex Generators in an Adverse Pressure Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Christopher; Corke, Thomas; Thomas, Flint

    2013-11-01

    A wind tunnel experiment was conducted to compare plasma streamwise vortex generators (PSVGs) and passive vortex generators (VGs). These devices were installed on a wing section by which the angle of attack could be used to vary the streamwise pressure gradient. The experiment was performed for freestream Mach numbers 0.1-0.2. Three-dimensional velocity components were measured using a 5-hole Pitot probe in the boundary layer. These measurements were used to quantify the production of streamwise vorticity and the magnitude of the reorientation term from the vorticity transport equation. The effect of Mach number, pressure gradient, operating voltage, and electrode length was then investigated for the PSVGs. The results indicate that the PSVGs could easily outperform the passive VGs and provide a suitable alternative for flow control.

  18. Response of acoustic and elastic properties to pressure and crystallization of Ce-based bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Wang, R. J.; Wang, W. H.

    2005-09-01

    The density and acoustic velocities of a Ce70Al10Ni10Cu10 bulk metallic glass (BMG) under hydrostatic-pressure (up to 0.5GPa ) and in crystallized state in ambient conditions were measured in situ by a pulse echo overlap method. The pressure derivatives of velocities and Grüneisen parameters as well as the equation of state (EOS) of the BMG were determined and compared to those of various other BMGs and nonmetallic glasses. Surprisingly, the BMG, unlike other BMGs with normal mode stiffness, exhibits an anomalous soft longitudinal acoustic mode under pressure similar to that of typical oxide glasses. An unusually large softening of longitudinal acoustic phonons in the BMG, relative to its crystalline state, is also observed, analogous with that in oxide glasses. The possible origin for the anomaly is the intrinsic glassy structure containing short-range covalent bonds.

  19. Progress on Development of Low Pressure High Density Plasmas on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, R. W.; Duke-Tinson, O.; Nolan, S.; Page, E. J.; Lopez, M.; Karama, J.; Paolino, R. N.; Schlank, C.; Sherman, J.; Stutzman, B. S.; Crilly, P. B.

    2013-10-01

    At the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), a small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) is being developed to utilize the reputed high densities (1013 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T), for eventual high temperature and density diagnostic development in future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to create repeatedly stable plasmas induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range. We employ a 400 to 1000 Gauss electromagnet that promotes energy conservation in the plasma via external energy production in the magnetic field facilitated by decreased inertial effects, in order to reach the Helicon Mode. With the initial construction phase complete and repeatable plasmas attained, HPX is constructing triple and mach particle probes, magnetic probes, and a single point 300 W Thompson Scattering system backed by a 32-channel Data Acquisition (DAQ) system capable 12 bits of sampling precision at 2 MS/s for HPX plasma property investigations. Progress on the development of the RF coupling system, Helicon Mode development, magnetic coils, and observations from the optical, particle, and electromagnetic scattering diagnostics will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY12.

  20. Ionospheric Plasma Outflow Under High Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malingre, M.; Bouhram, M.; Dubouloz, N.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Berthomier, M.; Carlson, C. W.

    The polar cusp is well-known to be one of the most intense source regions of iono- spheric outflow. Since this region is of direct access for solar wind plasma, changes in the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind dynamic pressure are expected to influence the ion outflow. We report combined observations from the Interball- Auroral in the high-altitude range (10,000-20,000km) and the FAST satellite in the mid-altitude range (4000 km) revealing enhanced ion outflows in association with the passage of an interplanetary shock and CME. Several case studies based on the anal- ysis of ion data recorded from several orbits before and after the pressure impulse are made to investigate how the dynamic pressure affects the amount of outflowing ions. We found a clear relationship between the ion outflow variations and the dy- namic pressure changes when choosing average ion flux and average ion energy flux, inferred from global conservation laws, as parameters to characterize the ion outflow.

  1. VOC removal by plasma-photocatalyst combination : comparison between a low and an atmospheric pressure plasma.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Antoine; Guaitella, Olivier; Gatilova, Lina; Thevenet, Frederic; Guillard, Chantal; Hannemann, Mario; Roepcke, Jurgen

    2004-09-01

    The combination of a non thermal plasma with a photo-catalyst is promising for VOC and odour abatement at room temperature and at a very low energy cost. In classical photocatalysis, UV photons generate an electron hole pair on the surface of the photo-catalyst (TiO2), which generates primary radicals responsible of VOC oxidation. In plasma-photocatalysis combination, activation mechanisms of the photocatalytic surface are not clearly identified to the day. Our strategy is to compare a pulsed DBD at atmospheric pressure containing TiO2 pellets, with a pulsed low pressure DC discharge in contact with a porous TiO2 surface. These two discharge are characterized electrically and the efficiency of VOC removal is performed using infrared laser absorption spectroscopy and gas chromatography.

  2. Evaluation of Low-Pressure Cold Plasma for Disinfection of ISS Grown Produce and Metal Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummerick, Mary E.; Hintze, Paul E.; Maloney, Philip R.; Spencer, Lashelle E.; Coutts, Janelle L.; Franco, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Low pressure cold plasma, using breathing air as the plasma gas, has been shown to be effective at precision cleaning aerospace hardware at Kennedy Space Center.Both atmospheric and low pressure plasmas are relatively new technologies being investigated for disinfecting agricultural commodities and medical instruments.

  3. One-dimensional electromagnetic band gap plasma structure formed by atmospheric pressure plasma inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babitski, V. S.; Callegari, Th.; Simonchik, L. V.; Sokoloff, J.; Usachonak, M. S.

    2017-08-01

    The ability to use plasma columns of pulse discharges in argon at atmospheric pressure to form a one-dimensional electromagnetic band gap structure (or electromagnetic crystal) in the X-band waveguide is demonstrated. We show that a plasma electromagnetic crystal attenuates a microwave propagation in the stopband more than by 4 orders of magnitude. In order to obtain an effective control of the transmission spectrum comparable with a metallic regular structure, the electron concentration in plasma inhomogeneities should vary within the range from 1014 cm-3 to 1016 cm-3, while gas temperature and mean electron energy must be in the range of 2000 K and 0.5 eV, respectively, to lower electron collision frequency around 1010 s-1. We analyze in detail the time evolution response of the electromagnetic crystal according to the plasma parameters for the duration of the discharge. The interest of using atmospheric pressure discharges is to increase the microwave breakdown threshold in discharge volumes, whereby it becomes possible to perform dynamic control of high power microwaves.

  4. Low pressure plasma diagnostics by cars and other techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, N. )

    1989-01-01

    Within the past several years, intensive research activities relating amorphous-silicon technology have stimulated plasma-chemical-vapor-deposition (plasma-CVD) diagnostics by laser-spectroscopic techniques. Among them, coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) has attracted much attention because of its great success in combustion diagnostics, and has been employed for low-pressure-plasma studies. Gas-phase species such as SiH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, Si{sub 2}H{sub 6}, SiH{sub 2}, and GeH{sub 4} have been detected, time dependences of their concentration and spatial profiles of their concentration and rotational temperature have been determined, and the gas-phase mechanisms have been discussed. This talk will employ those results as examples, and discuss (1) the potential of CARS for gas-phase analysis in CVD (including (i) what species are monitored, (ii) what information is obtained, and (iii) what are the advantages and limitations), and (2) some other diagnostic techniques that provide additional information for better understandings of CVD mechanisms.

  5. Flow control in low pressure turbine blades using plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakumar, Karthik

    2005-11-01

    An experimental study of plasma flow control actuators for flow separation control in low pressure turbine (LPT) blades is presented. The actuator arrangement consists of two copper strips separated by a dielectric medium with an input voltage of approximately 5kV and a frequency input varying from 3-5 kHz, creating a region of plasma used for boundary layer flow control. The effect of varying waveform on control efficacy is investigated using sine, square and saw tooth waveforms. The impact of duty cycle and forcing frequency on both displacement and momentum thickness are also examined. Boundary layer measurements are carried out using PIV while measurements of the wake downstream are performed using a 7-hole probe for Reynolds number ranging from 30,000 to 50,000. Separation is fully controlled in most configurations and boundary layer parameters reveal that the actuator entrains the free-stream flow at the actuator location and creates a region of high turbulence, essentially behaving similar to an active boundary layer trip. A small region of reversed flow near the surface indicates the presence of cross-stream vortical structures. The use of plasma synthetic jet actuators flow LPT flow control is also discussed.

  6. Stability of the n{=}1 Internal Kink Mode in Plasmas with Centrally Peaked Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozeki, Takahisa; Azumi, Masafumi

    1990-12-01

    The stability of the n{=}1 internal kink mode in a tokamak is numerically analyzed for plasmas with a centrally peaked pressure profile. The effect of pressure profile is studied by the comparison of a strongly peaked pressure inside the q{=}1 surface with a parabolic pressure profile. The effects of shaping, i.e., elongation and triangularity, are also studied for the both pressure profiles. The plasma with the strongly peaked pressure profile has higher limiting value of poloidal beta defined within the q{=}1 surface than that of the parabolic pressure profile. Though the beta limit reduces with the increase of the elongation, the plasma with the peaked pressure profile has larger improvement due to the triangularity than that with the parabolic pressure profile. However, to enter the second stability region of the n{=}1 internal kink mode, the plasma with a flat pressure profile and the large minor radius of the q{=}1 surface is effective.

  7. Gas convection caused by electron pressure drop in the afterglow of a pulsed inductively coupled plasma discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Cunge, G.; Vempaire, D.; Sadeghi, N.

    2010-03-29

    Neutral depletion is an important phenomenon in high-density plasmas. We show that in pulsed discharges, the neutral depletion caused by the electron pressure P{sub e} plays an important role on radical transport. In the afterglow, P{sub e} drops rapidly by electron cooling. So, a neutral pressure gradient built up between the plasma bulk and the reactor walls, which forces the cold surrounding gas to move rapidly toward the reactor center. Measured drift velocity of Al atoms in the early afterglow of Cl{sub 2}/Ar discharge by time-resolved laser induced fluorescence is as high as 250 ms{sup -1}. This is accompanied by a rapid gas cooling.

  8. Gd Ba Cu O bulk superconductors fabricated by a seeded infiltration growth technique under reduced oxygen partial pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, K.; Babu, N. H.; Shi, Y. H.; Cardwell, D. A.; Murakami, M.

    2006-06-01

    Single-grain Gd-Ba-Cu-O (GdBCO) bulk superconductors have been grown by a seeded infiltration and growth (SIG) technique under a 1% O2+N2 atmosphere using a generic MgO-doped Nd-Ba-Cu-O (MgO-NdBCO) seed placed on the sample surface at room temperature (the so-called the cold-seeding method). Partial melting of the MgO-NdBCO seeds fabricated in air under notionally identical thermal processing conditions, however, limited the reliability of this bulk GdBCO single-grain process. The observed seed decomposition is attributed to the dependence of the peritectic temperature Tp of MgO-doped Nd1+xBa2-xCu3Oy solid solution (MgO-doped Nd-123ss, where ss indicates solid solution) compounds on both oxygen partial pressure during the melt process and the level of solid solution (x). The peritectic decomposition temperature of MgO-doped Nd-123ss, with x ranging from 0 to 0.5 under p(O2) = 1.00 atm, was observed to remain constant at 1120 °C. Tp was observed to decrease linearly as a function of solid solution level, on the other hand, under oxygen partial pressures of both p(O2) = 0.21 and 0.01 atm. Based on these results, MgO-doped NdBCO seed crystals should be grown under reduced oxygen partial pressure in order to obtain a stable MgO-doped NdBCO seed crystal suitable for cold-seeding processes of large-grain (RE)BCO bulk superconductors (where RE is a rare earth element).

  9. Sensitivity analysis of effective fluid and rock bulk modulus due to changes in pore pressure, temperature and saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhakta, Tuhin; Avseth, Per; Landrø, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Fluid substitution plays a vital role in time-lapse seismic modeling and interpretation. It is, therefore, very important to quantify as exactly as possible the changes in fluid bulk modulus due to changes in reservoir parameters. In this paper, we analyze the sensitivities in effective fluid bulk modulus due to changes in reservoir parameters like saturation, pore-pressure and temperature. The sensitivities are analyzed for two extreme bounds, i.e. the Voigt average and the Reuss average, for various fluid combinations (i.e. oil-water, gas-water and gas-oil). We quantify that the effects of pore-pressure and saturation changes are highest in the case of gas-water combination, while the effect of temperature is highest for oil-gas combination. Our results show that sensitivities vary with the bounds, even for same amount of changes in any reservoir parameter. In 4D rock physics studies, we often neglect the effects of pore-pressure or temperature changes assuming that those effects are negligible compare to the effect due to saturation change. Our analysis shows that pore-pressure and temperature changes can be vital and sometimes higher than the effect of saturation change. We investigate these effects on saturated rock bulk modulus. We first compute frame bulk modulus using the Modified Hashin Shtrikman (MHS) model for carbonate rocks and then perform fluid substitution using the Gassmann equation. We consider upper bound of the MHS as elastic behavior for stiffer rocks and lower bound of the MHS as elastic behavior for softer rocks. We then investigate four various combinations: stiff rock with upper bound (the Voigt bound) as effective fluid modulus, stiff rock with lower bound (Reuss bound) as effective fluid modulus, soft rock with upper bound as effective fluid modulus and soft rock with lower bound as effective fluid modulus. Our results show that the effect of any reservoir parameter change is highest for soft rock and lower bound combination and lowest

  10. The structural properties of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses subjected to high pressure torsion at different temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Boltynjuk, E. V. Ubyivovk, E. V.; Kshumanev, A. M.; Gunderov, D. V.; Lukianov, A. V.; Bednarz, A.; Valiev, R. Z.

    2016-06-17

    The structural properties of a Zr{sub 62}Cu{sub 22}Al{sub 10}Fe{sub 5}Dy{sub 1} bulk metallic glasses were investigated. Cylindrical rods of the Zr{sub 62}Cu{sub 22}Al{sub 10}Fe{sub 5}Dy{sub 1} BMG were subjected to high pressure torsion at temperatures of 20°C and 150°C. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy were used to determine peculiarities of the modified structure. Analysis of fracture surfaces, nanohardness measurements were conducted to investigate the influence of structural changes on mechanical behavior of processed samples.

  11. Helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets touching dielectric and metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Norberg, Seth A. Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-07-07

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are being investigated in the context plasma medicine and biotechnology applications, and surface functionalization. The composition of the surface being treated ranges from plastics, liquids, and biological tissue, to metals. The dielectric constant of these materials ranges from as low as 1.5 for plastics to near 80 for liquids, and essentially infinite for metals. The electrical properties of the surface are not independent variables as the permittivity of the material being treated has an effect on the dynamics of the incident APPJ. In this paper, results are discussed from a computational investigation of the interaction of an APPJ incident onto materials of varying permittivity, and their impact on the discharge dynamics of the plasma jet. The computer model used in this investigation solves Poisson's equation, transport equations for charged and neutral species, the electron energy equation, and the Navier-Stokes equations for the neutral gas flow. The APPJ is sustained in He/O{sub 2} = 99.8/0.2 flowing into humid air, and is directed onto dielectric surfaces in contact with ground with dielectric constants ranging from 2 to 80, and a grounded metal surface. Low values of relative permittivity encourage propagation of the electric field into the treated material and formation and propagation of a surface ionization wave. High values of relative permittivity promote the restrike of the ionization wave and the formation of a conduction channel between the plasma discharge and the treated surface. The distribution of space charge surrounding the APPJ is discussed.

  12. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet as an Accelerator of Tooth Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Santak, Vedran; Zaplotnik, Rok; Milosevic, Slobodan; Klaric, Eva; Tarle, Zrinka

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) jet as a potential accelerator of the degradation of hydrogen peroxide in bleaching gels which could lead to better and faster bleaching. Material and Methods 25 pastilles of hydroxylapatite were colored in green tea for 8 hours and were randomly divided into five groups (n = 5). The bleaching process was performed with 30% and 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) gel alone and in conjunction with helium APP jet. During the bleaching treatment, optical emission spectroscopy and non-contact surface temperature measurement using pyrometer were performed. Color of the pastilles was determined by a red–green–blue (RGB) colorimeter. PH values of bleaching gels were measured before and after the plasma treatment on additional 10 pastilles using a pH meter with contact pH electrode. Results The color measurements of pastilles before and after the treatment showed that treatment with APP jet improved the bleaching effect by 32% and 15% in the case of 30% and 40% HP gel. Better results were obtained approximately six times faster than with a procedure suggested by the bleaching gel manufacturer. Optical emission spectroscopy proved that plasma has a chemically active role on the gel. After the APP treatment, pH values of bleaching gels dropped to about 50–75% of their initial value while the surface temperature increased by 8–10˚C above baseline. Conclusion The use of plasma jet provides more effective bleaching results in a shorter period of time without a significant temperature increase which may cause damage of the surrounding tissue. PMID:27688375

  13. Updates to the Development of Low Pressure High Density Plasmas on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Royce; Azzari, Phil; Crilly, Paul; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Karama, Jackson; Paolino, Richard; Schlank, Carter; Sherman, Justin; Emami, Tooran; Turk, Jeremy

    2016-10-01

    The small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), continues to progress toward utilizing the reputed high densities (1013 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T) [1] of helicons, for eventual high temperature and density diagnostic development in future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to create repeatedly stable plasmas ( 20 - 30 ns) induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range. HPX is constructing RF field corrected Langmuir probe raw data will be collected and used to measure the plasma's density, temperature, and potentially the structure and behavior during experiments. Our 2.5 J YAG laser Thomson Scattering system backed by a 32-channel Data Acquisition (DAQ) system is capable 12 bits of sampling precision at 2 MS/s for HPX plasma property investigations are being developed and tested. Progress on the construction of the RF coupling system, Helicon Mode development, and magnetic coils, along with observations from the Thomson Scattering, particle, and electromagnetic scattering diagnostics will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY15-16.

  14. Development of Low Pressure High Density Plasmas on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Royce; Azzari, Phillip; Crilly, Paul; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Karama, Jackson; Paolino, Richard; Schlank, Carter; Sherman, Justin

    2014-10-01

    The small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), continues to progress toward utilizing the reputed high densities (10 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T) of helicons, for eventual high temperature and density diagnostic development in future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to create repeatedly stable plasmas induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range. We employ a 400 to 1000 Gauss electromagnet that promotes energy conservation in the plasma via external energy production in the magnetic field facilitated by decreased inertial effects, in order to reach the Helicon Mode. HPX is completing construction of triple and mach particle probes, magnetic probes, and is designing a single point 300 W Thompson Scattering system backed by a 32-channel Data Acquisition (DAQ) system capable 12 bits of sampling precision at 2 MS/s for HPX plasma property investigations. Progress on the development of the RF coupling system, Helicon Mode development, magnetic coils, and observations from the optical, particle, and electromagnetic scattering diagnostics will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY13.

  15. Progress on Development of Low Pressure High Density Plasmas on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Royce; Azzari, Phillip; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Frank, John; Karama, Jackson; Hopson, Jordan; Paolino, Richard; Sandri, Eva; Sherman, Justin; Wright, Erin; Turk, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    The small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), continues to progress toward utilizing the reputed high densities (1013 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T) [1] of helicons, for eventual high temperature and density diagnostic development in future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to create repeatedly stable plasmas (~ 20 - 30 ns) induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range. HPX is constructing RF field corrected Langmuir probe raw data will be collected and used to measure the plasma's density, temperature, and potentially the structure and behavior during experiments. Our 2.5 J YAG laser Thomson Scattering system backed by a 32-channel Data Acquisition (DAQ) system is capable 12 bits of sampling precision at 2 MS/s for HPX plasma property investigations. Progress on the development of the RF coupling system, Helicon Mode development, magnetic coils, and observations from the Thomson Scattering, particle, and electromagnetic scattering diagnostics will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY15.

  16. Effective dose delivery in atmospheric pressure plasma jets for plasma medicine: a model predictive control approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidon, Dogan; Graves, David B.; Mesbah, Ali

    2017-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) have been identified as a promising tool for plasma medicine. This paper aims to demonstrate the importance of using model-based feedback control strategies for safe, reproducible, and therapeutically effective application of APPJs for dose delivery to a target substrate. Key challenges in model-based control of APPJs arise from: (i) the multivariable, nonlinear nature of system dynamics, (ii) the need for constraining the system operation within an operating region that ensures safe plasma treatment, and (iii) the cumulative, nondecreasing nature of dose metrics. To systematically address these challenges, we propose a model predictive control (MPC) strategy for real-time feedback control of a radio-frequency APPJ in argon. To this end, a lumped-parameter, physics-based model is developed for describing the jet dynamics. Cumulative dose metrics are defined for quantifying the thermal and nonthermal energy effects of the plasma on substrate. The closed-loop performance of the MPC strategy is compared to that of a basic proportional-integral control system. Simulation results indicate that the MPC stategy provides a versatile framework for dose delivery in the presence of disturbances, while the safety and practical constraints of the APPJ operation can be systematically handled. Model-based feedback control strategies can lead to unprecedented opportunities for effective dose delivery in plasma medicine.

  17. STS-3/OSS-1 Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) measurements of the temperature pressure and plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shawhan, S. D.; Murphy, G.

    1983-01-01

    Designed to withstand the thermal extremes of the STS-3 mission through the use of heaters and thermal blankets, the plasma diagnostics package sat on the release/engagement mechanism on the OSS-1 payload pallet without a coldplate and was attached to the RMS for two extended periods. Plots show temperature versus mission elapsed time for two temperature sensors. Pressure in the range of 10 to the -3 power torr and 10 to the -7 power torr, measured 3 inches from the skin of the package is plotted against GMT during the mission. The most distinctive feature of the pressure profile is the modulation at the obit period. It was found that pressure peaks when the atmospheric gas is rammed into the cargo bay. Electric and magnetic noise spectra and time variability due to orbiter systems, UHF and S-band transmitter field strengths, and measurements of the ion spectra obtained both in the cargo bay and during experiments are plotted.

  18. Polymerization of cyanoacetylene under pressure: Formation of carbon nitride polymers and bulk structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaei, Mohammad; Liang, Yunye; Venkataramanan, Natarajan S.; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    High-pressure phase transitions of polar and nonpolar molecular structures of cyanoacetylene (HC3N) are studied by using first-principles simulations at constant pressure. In both polar and nonpolar crystals, at pressure ˜20 GPa, the cyanoacetylene molecules are interconnected together and form polyacrylonitrile (PA) polymers. At pressure ˜30 GPa, PA polymers are transformed to polymers with fused pyridine rings (FPR's). The individual geometrical structures of PA and FPR polymers obtained from polar and nonpolar molecular crystals of cyanoacetylene are identical, but their stacking is different. At pressures above 40 GPa, the FPR polymers are interconnected together and new three-dimensional (3D) carbon nitride systems are formed. At ambient pressure, the long-length PA and FPR polymers are metallic, and the created 3D structures are an insulator with energy band gaps around 2.85 eV. The electron transport characteristics of FPR polymers with different lengths are investigated at finite biases by using the nonequilibrium Green's function technique combined with density functional theory (DFT) by connecting the polymers to gold electrodes. The results show that FPR polymers have negative differential resistance behavior. Our time-dependent DFT calculations reveal that FPR polymers can absorb light in the visible region. From our results, it is expected that the FPR polymers will be a good material for optoelectronic applications.

  19. High-intensity xenon plasma discharge lamp for bulk-sensitive high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Souma, S.; Sato, T.; Takahashi, T.; Baltzer, P.

    2007-12-15

    We have developed a highly brilliant xenon (Xe) discharge lamp operated by microwave-induced electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) for ultrahigh-resolution bulk-sensitive photoemission spectroscopy (PES). We observed at least eight strong radiation lines from neutral or singly ionized Xe atoms in the energy region of 8.4-10.7 eV. The photon flux of the strongest Xe I resonance line at 8.437 eV is comparable to that of the He I{alpha} line (21.218 eV) from the He-ECR discharge lamp. Stable operation for more than 300 h is achieved by efficient air-cooling of a ceramic tube in the resonance cavity. The high bulk sensitivity and high-energy resolution of PES using the Xe lines are demonstrated for some typical materials.

  20. A film bulk acoustic resonator-based high-performance pressure sensor integrated with temperature control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mengying; Zhao, Zhan; Du, Lidong; Fang, Zhen

    2017-04-01

    This paper presented a high-performance pressure sensor based on a film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR). The support film of the FBAR chip was made of silicon nitride and the part under the resonator area was etched to enhance the sensitivity and improve the linearity of the pressure sensor. A micro resistor temperature sensor and a micro resistor heater were integrated in the chip to monitor and control the operating temperature. The sensor chip was fabricated, and packaged in an oscillator circuit for differential pressure detection. When the detected pressure ranged from  ‑100 hPa to 600 hPa, the sensitivity of the improved FBAR pressure sensor was  ‑0.967 kHz hPa‑1, namely  ‑0.69 ppm hPa‑1, which was 19% higher than that of existing sensors with a complete support film. The nonlinearity of the improved sensor was less than  ±0.35%, while that of the existing sensor was  ±5%. To eliminate measurement errors from humidity, the temperature control system integrated in the sensor chip controlled the temperature of the resonator up to 75 °C, with accuracy of  ±0.015 °C and power of 20 mW.

  1. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Electrospin Hybrid Process for Protective Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitchuli Gangadharan, Narendiran

    2011-12-01

    -level aerosol chemical and biological threats. Polymer solution concentration, electrospinning voltage, and deposition areal density were varied to establish the relationship of processing-structure-filtration efficiency for electrospun fiber mats. A high barrier efficiency of greater than 99.5% was achieved on electrospun fiber mats without sacrificing air permeability and pressure drop. ii) Fabrication and Characterization of Multifunctional ZnO/Nylon 6 nanofibers ZnO/Nylon 6 nanofiber mats were prepared by an electrospinning-electrospraying hybrid process, The electrospinning of polymer solution and electrospraying of ZnO particles were carried out simultaneously such that the ZnO nanoparticles were dispersed on the surface of Nylon 6 nanofibers. The prepared ZnO/Nylon 6 nanofiber mats were tested for detoxifying characteristics against simulants of C-B agents. The results showed that ZnO/Nylon 6 functional nanofiber mats exhibited good detoxification action against paraoxon and have antibacterial efficiency over 99.99% against both the gram-negative E. coli and gram positive B. cereus bacteria. iii) Improving adhesion of electrospun nanofiber mat onto woven fabric by plasma pretreatment of substrate fabric and plasma-electrospinning hybrid process Electrospun nanofibers were deposited onto plasma-pretreated woven fabric to improve the adhesion. In addition, the plasma-electrospinning hybrid process was developed and used in which the nanofibers were subjected to in-situ plasma treatment during electrospinning. The effects of plasma treatement on substrate fabric and electrospun fibers were characterized by water contact angle test, XPS analyses. The improvement of nanofiber adhesive properties on fabric substrate was evaluated by peel test, flex resistance test and abrasion resistance test. The test results showed that the plasma treatment caused introduction of active chemical groups on substrate fabric and electrospun nanofibers. These active chemical assisted in possible

  2. Tokamak plasma equilibrium problems with anisotropic pressure and rotation and their numerical solution

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A. A. Martynov, A. A. Medvedev, S. Yu. Poshekhonov, Yu. Yu.

    2015-03-15

    In the MHD tokamak plasma theory, the plasma pressure is usually assumed to be isotropic. However, plasma heating by neutral beam injection and RF heating can lead to a strong anisotropy of plasma parameters and rotation of the plasma. The development of MHD equilibrium theory taking into account the plasma inertia and anisotropic pressure began a long time ago, but until now it has not been consistently applied in computational codes for engineering calculations of the plasma equilibrium and evolution in tokamak. This paper contains a detailed derivation of the axisymmetric plasma equilibrium equation in the most general form (with arbitrary rotation and anisotropic pressure) and description of the specialized version of the SPIDER code. The original method of calculation of the equilibrium with an anisotropic pressure and a prescribed rotational transform profile is proposed. Examples of calculations and discussion of the results are also presented.

  3. Fluid modeling of plasma dynamics in pulsed RF capacitive glow discharges in low pressure argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruiqiang; Liu, Yue; Jia, Wenzhu; Zhou, Yanwen

    2017-08-01

    Based on the drift-diffusive approximation, one-dimensional fluid modeling is carried out for the pulsed RF capacitive glow discharges in low pressure argon. Investigated are the effects of various discharge parameters, such as the duty cycle ratio and frequency of the pulsed modulation, and the material properties of the electrode, on the plasma characteristics such as the electron recombination rate, during both the initial and the steady state phases of the discharge. The modeling results show that, after switching off the applied voltage during the pulsed modulation of the RF discharge, the electron density increases first and then decreases. This phenomenon is particularly pronounced before the discharge reaches steady state. Meanwhile, independent of whether the discharge has reached steady state or not, right after the applied voltage is switched on during each modulation period, the electron and ion densities and the metastable argon atom density, as well as their generation rate, experience a time delay (phase lag) with respect to the applied voltage. The results also show that, at the initial phase of the pulsed modulation, during the steady state discharge, the electron temperature in the center of the bulk plasma is almost not affected by the applied voltage, or by the material properties of the electrode such as the secondary electron emission rate. The electron density, however, does increase with these parameters, resulting in increased power density dissipation of the plasma. On the other hand, at fixed applied voltage, the central electron temperature of the bulk plasma is reduced by increasing several parameters, including the modulation duty ratio, the distance between two electrodes, and the modulation frequency, as well as the electron recombination rate due to different choices of the electrode material. This eventually leads to a reduction of the dissipated power density in the plasma. In particular, with the increase of the modulation duty

  4. Pressure dependence of critical temperature of bulk FeSe from spin fluctuation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschfeld, Peter; Kreisel, Andreas; Wang, Yan; Tomic, Milan; Jeschke, Harald; Jacko, Anthony; Valenti, Roser; Maier, Thomas; Scalapino, Douglas

    2013-03-01

    The critical temperature of the 8K superconductor FeSe is extremely sensitive to pressure, rising to a maximum of 40K at about 10GPa. We test the ability of the current generation of fluctuation exchange pairing theories to account for this effect, by downfolding the density functional theory electronic structure for each pressure to a tight binding model. The Fermi surface found in such a procedure is then used with fixed Hubbard parameters to determine the pairing strength using the random phase approximation for the spin singlet pairing vertex. We find that the evolution of the Fermi surface captured by such an approach is alone not sufficient to explain the observed pressure dependence, and discuss alternative approaches. PJH, YW, AK were supported by DOE DE-FG02-05ER46236, the financial support of MT, HJ, and RV from the DFG Schwerpunktprogramm 1458 is kindly acknowledged.

  5. A simple grand canonical approach to compute the vapor pressure of bulk and finite size systems

    SciTech Connect

    Factorovich, Matías H.; Scherlis, Damián A.

    2014-02-14

    In this article we introduce a simple grand canonical screening (GCS) approach to accurately compute vapor pressures from molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations. This procedure entails a screening of chemical potentials using a conventional grand canonical scheme, and therefore it is straightforward to implement for any kind of interface. The scheme is validated against data obtained from Gibbs ensemble simulations for water and argon. Then, it is applied to obtain the vapor pressure of the coarse-grained mW water model, and it is shown that the computed value is in excellent accord with the one formally deduced using statistical thermodynamics arguments. Finally, this methodology is used to calculate the vapor pressure of a water nanodroplet of 94 molecules. Interestingly, the result is in perfect agreement with the one predicted by the Kelvin equation for a homogeneous droplet of that size.

  6. Pressure-induced topological phase transitions and strongly anisotropic magnetoresistance in bulk black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Hong; Long, Yu-Jia; Zhao, Ling-Xiao; Shan, Lei; Ren, Zhi-An; Zhao, Jian-Zhou; Weng, Hong-Ming; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Ren, Cong; Chen, Gen-Fu

    2017-03-01

    We report the anisotropic magnetotransport measurement on a noncompound band semiconductor black phosphorus (BP) with magnetic field B up to 16 Tesla applied in both perpendicular and parallel to electric current I under hydrostatic pressures. The BP undergoes a topological Lifshitz transition from band semiconductor to a zero-gap Dirac semimetal state at a critical pressure Pc, characterized by a weak localization-weak antilocalization transition at low magnetic fields and the emergence of a nontrivial Berry phase of π detected by SdH magneto-oscillations in magnetoresistance curves. In the transition region, we observe a pressure-dependent negative MR only in the B ∥I configuration. This negative longitudinal MR is attributed to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly (topological E .B term) in the presence of weak antilocalization corrections.

  7. A simple grand canonical approach to compute the vapor pressure of bulk and finite size systems.

    PubMed

    Factorovich, Matías H; Molinero, Valeria; Scherlis, Damián A

    2014-02-14

    In this article we introduce a simple grand canonical screening (GCS) approach to accurately compute vapor pressures from molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations. This procedure entails a screening of chemical potentials using a conventional grand canonical scheme, and therefore it is straightforward to implement for any kind of interface. The scheme is validated against data obtained from Gibbs ensemble simulations for water and argon. Then, it is applied to obtain the vapor pressure of the coarse-grained mW water model, and it is shown that the computed value is in excellent accord with the one formally deduced using statistical thermodynamics arguments. Finally, this methodology is used to calculate the vapor pressure of a water nanodroplet of 94 molecules. Interestingly, the result is in perfect agreement with the one predicted by the Kelvin equation for a homogeneous droplet of that size.

  8. An investigation of transient pressure and plasma properties in a pinched plasma column. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stover, E. K.; York, T. M.

    1971-01-01

    The transient pinched plasma column generated in a linear Z-pinch was studied experimentally and analytically. The plasma column was investigated experimentally with the following plasma diagnostics: a special rapid response pressure transducer, a magnetic field probe, a voltage probe and discharge luminosity. Axial pressure profiles on the discharge chamber axis were used to identify three characteristic regions of plasma column behavior; they were in temporal sequence: strong axial pressure asymmetry noted early in plasma column lifetime followed by plasma heating in which there is a rapid rise in static pressure and a slight decrease static pressure before plasma column breakup. Plasma column lifetime was approximately 5 microseconds. The axial pressure asymmetry was attributed to nonsimultaneous pinching of the imploding current sheet along the discharge chamber axis. The rapid heating is attributed in part to viscous effects introduced by radial gradients in the axial streaming velocity. Turbulent heating arising from discharge current excitation of the ion acoustic wave instability is also considered a possible heating mechanism.

  9. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-12-01

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  10. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-12-15

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  11. Reconnection AND Bursty Bulk Flow Associated Turbulence IN THE Earth'S Plasma Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voros, Z.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Runov, A.; Volwerk, M.; Jankovicova, D.; Balogh, A.; Klecker, B.

    2006-12-01

    Reconnection related fast flows in the Earth's plasma sheet can be associated with several accompanying phenomena, such as magnetic field dipolarization, current sheet thinning and turbulence. Statistical analysis of multi-scale properties of turbulence facilitates to understand the interaction of the plasma flow with the dipolar magnetic field and to recognize the remote or nearby temporal and spatial characteristics of reconnection. The main emphasis of this presentation is on differentiating between the specific statistical features of flow associated fluctuations at different distances from the reconnection site.

  12. Revealing an intermediate region between the collisional radiofrequency plasma bulk and its sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, J.; Trienekens, D. J. M.; Kroesen, G. M. W.

    2015-03-01

    Experimental evidence of the existence of an intermediate region between a capacitively coupled plasma and the collisional space-charge region at its borders is presented. This proof is generated by monitoring—in an airplane carrying out parabolic flights—the trajectory of plasma-confined microparticles. Based on only primary data and without the need for a sophisticated model, our analysis concludes a sharply marked transition from the sheath region into another region with a significantly lower—yet nonzero—space-charge density, i.e., a region which is often called the presheath.

  13. Revealing an intermediate region between the collisional radiofrequency plasma bulk and its sheath.

    PubMed

    Beckers, J; Trienekens, D J M; Kroesen, G M W

    2015-03-01

    Experimental evidence of the existence of an intermediate region between a capacitively coupled plasma and the collisional space-charge region at its borders is presented. This proof is generated by monitoring-in an airplane carrying out parabolic flights-the trajectory of plasma-confined microparticles. Based on only primary data and without the need for a sophisticated model, our analysis concludes a sharply marked transition from the sheath region into another region with a significantly lower-yet nonzero-space-charge density, i.e., a region which is often called the presheath.

  14. Experimental determination of bulk modulus of 14 A tobermorite using high pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jae Eun; Clark, Simon M.; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2012-02-15

    Using a diamond anvil cell, 14 A tobermorite, a structural analogue of calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), was examined by high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction up to 4.8 GPa under hydrostatic conditions. The bulk modulus of 14 A tobermorite was calculated, K{sub o} = 47 GPa. Comparison of the current results with previous high pressure studies on C-S-H(I) indicates that: (1) the compression behavior of the lattice parameters a and b of 14 A tobermorite and C-S-H(I) are very similar, implying that both materials may have very similar Ca-O layers, and also implying that an introduction of structural defects into the Ca-O layers may not substantially change in-plane incompressibility of the ab plane of 14 A tobermorite; and (2) the bulk modulus values of 14 A tobermorite and C-S-H(I) are dominated by the incompressibility of the lattice parameter c, which is directly related to the interlayer spacing composed of dreierketten silicate chains, interlayer Ca, and water molecules.

  15. Atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced spatial ALD of silver

    SciTech Connect

    Bruele, Fieke J. van den Smets, Mireille; Illiberi, Andrea; Poodt, Paul; Buskens, Pascal; Roozeboom, Fred

    2015-01-15

    The authors have investigated the growth of thin silver films using a unique combination of atmospheric process elements: spatial atomic layer deposition and an atmospheric pressure surface dielectric barrier discharge plasma source. Silver films were grown on top of Si substrates with good purity as revealed by resistivity values as low as 18 μΩ cm and C- and F-levels below detection limits of energy dispersive x-ray analysis. The growth of the silver films starts through the nucleation of islands that subsequently coalesce. The authors show that the surface island morphology is dependent on surface diffusion, which can be controlled by temperature within the deposition temperature range of 100–120 °C.

  16. Ultrafast laser-collision-induced fluorescence in atmospheric pressure plasma

    DOE PAGES

    Barnat, E. V.; Fierro, A.

    2017-03-07

    The implementation and demonstration of laser-collision-induced fluorescence (LCIF) generated in atmospheric pressure helium environments is presented in this communication. As collision times are observed to be fast (~10 ns), ultrashort pulse laser excitation (<100 fs) of the 23S to 33P (388.9 nm) is utilized to initiate the LCIF process. Both neutral-induced and electron-induced components of the LCIF are observed in the helium afterglow plasma as the reduced electric field (E/N) is tuned from <0.1 Td to over 5 Td. Under the discharge conditions presented in this study (640 Torr He), the lower limit of electron density detection is ~1012 emore » cm-3. Lastly, the spatial profiles of the 23S helium metastable and electrons are presented as functions of E/N to demonstrate the spatial resolving capabilities of the LCIF method.« less

  17. Use of Atmospheric Pressure Cold Plasma for Meat Industry

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juri; Lee, Cheol Woo; Yong, Hae In; Lee, Hyun Jung; Jo, Cheorun; Jung, Samooel

    2017-01-01

    Novel, effective methods to control and prevent spoilage and contamination by pathogenic microorganisms in meat and meat products are in constant demand. Non-thermal pasteurization is an ideal method for the preservation of meat and meat products because it does not use heat during the pasteurization process. Atmospheric pressure cold plasma (APCP) is a new technology for the non-thermal pasteurization of meat and meat products. Several recent studies have shown that APCP treatment reduces the number of pathogenic microorganisms in meat and meat products. Furthermore, APCP treatment can be used to generate nitrite, which is an essential component of the curing process. Here, we introduce the effectiveness of APCP treatment as a pasteurization method and/or curing process for use in the meat and meat product processing industry. PMID:28943759

  18. Destruction mechanisms for formaldehyde in atmospheric pressure low temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storch, Daniel G.; Kushner, Mark J.

    1993-01-01

    Formaldehyde (CH2O) is a common pollutant of indoor air in residences and commercial buildings. The removal of CH2O from atmospheric pressure gas streams (N2/O2/H2O/CH2O) using plasmas generated by a dielectric barrier discharge has been theoretically investigated with the goal of cleansing indoor air. The model consists of a full accounting of the electron, ion, and neutral chemical kinetics in contaminated humid air. We find that the destruction of CH2O results dominantly from chemical attack by OH and O radicals, with the primary end products being CO and H2O. The predicted destruction rates for CH2O are typically 2-8 ppm/(mJ cm-3) (parts per million of CH2O in air/energy deposition). The elimination of the unwanted byproducts, CO and NO, using a platinum catalyst is discussed.

  19. Ultrafast laser-collision-induced fluorescence in atmospheric pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnat, E. V.; Fierro, A.

    2017-04-01

    The implementation and demonstration of laser-collision-induced fluorescence (LCIF) generated in atmospheric pressure helium environments is presented in this communication. As collision times are observed to be fast (~10 ns), ultrashort pulse laser excitation (<100 fs) of the 23S to 33P (388.9 nm) is utilized to initiate the LCIF process. Both neutral-induced and electron-induced components of the LCIF are observed in the helium afterglow plasma as the reduced electric field (E/N) is tuned from  <0.1 Td to over 5 Td. Under the discharge conditions presented in this study (640 Torr He), the lower limit of electron density detection is ~1012 e cm-3. The spatial profiles of the 23S helium metastable and electrons are presented as functions of E/N to demonstrate the spatial resolving capabilities of the LCIF method.

  20. On the atomic line profiles in high pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, J. F. J.; Gnybida, M.; Rijke, A. J.; Dijk, J. van; Suijker, J. L. G.

    2013-11-14

    In a previous contribution to this journal [H. P. Stormberg, J. Appl. Phys. 51(4), 1963 (1980)], Stormberg presented an analytical expression for the convolution of Lorentz and Levy line profiles, which models atomic radiative transitions in high pressure plasmas. Unfortunately, the derivations are flawed with errors and the final expression, while correct, is accompanied by misguiding comments about the meaning of the symbols used therein, in particular the “complex error function.” In this paper, we discuss the broadening mechanisms that give rise to Stormberg's model and present a correct derivation of his final result. We will also provide an alternative expression, based on the Faddeeva function, which has decisive computational advantages and emphasizes the real-valuedness of the result. The MATLAB/Octave scripts of our implementation have been made available on the publisher's website for future reference.

  1. Modular Hybrid Plasma Reactor for Low Cost Bulk Production of Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Peter C. Kong

    2011-12-01

    INL developed a bench scale modular hybrid plasma system for gas phase nanomaterials synthesis. The system was being optimized for WO3 nanoparticles production and scale model projection to a 300 kW pilot system. During the course of technology development many modifications had been done to the system to resolve technical issues that had surfaced and also to improve the performance. All project tasks had been completed except 2 optimization subtasks. These 2 subtasks, a 4-hour and an 8-hour continuous powder production runs at 1 lb/hr powder feeding rate, were unable to complete due to technical issues developed with the reactor system. The 4-hour run had been attempted twice and both times the run was terminated prematurely. The modular electrode for the plasma system was significantly redesigned to address the technical issues. Fabrication of the redesigned modular electrodes and additional components had been completed at the end of the project life. However, not enough resource was available to perform tests to evaluate the performance of the new modifications. More development work would be needed to resolve these problems prior to scaling. The technology demonstrated a surprising capability of synthesizing a single phase of meta-stable delta-Al2O3 from pure alpha-phase large Al2O3 powder. The formation of delta-Al2O3 was surprising because this phase is meta-stable and only formed between 973-1073 K, and delta-Al2O3 is very difficult to synthesize as a single phase. Besides the specific temperature window to form this phase, this meta-stable phase may have been stabilized by nanoparticle size formed in a high temperature plasma process. This technology may possess the capability to produce unusual meta-stable nanophase materials that would be otherwise difficult to produce by conventional methods. A 300 kW INL modular hybrid plasma pilot scale model reactor had been projected using the experimental data from PPG Industries 300 kW hot wall plasma reactor. The

  2. Effect of extravascular plasma protein on pressure-flow relations across synovium in anaesthetized rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, J N; Levick, J R

    1993-01-01

    1. The effect of extravascular plasma protein on fluid flux through interstitial matrix was investigated in vivo by studying the pressure-flow relation across synovium during intra-articular infusions of protein solutions (usually bovine serum albumin). Synovium is a sheet of non-epithelial cells separated by interstitium-filled gaps, beneath which are fenestrated capillaries: synovium regulates synovial fluid volume and composition. 2. Albumin solutions (10-150 g l-1) of measured oncotic pressure and viscosity were infused at known pressure into the synovial cavity of knees of anaesthetized rabbits. Flow across the synovial lining in the steady state (absorption rate Qs) was recorded at a series of joint pressures (Pj) to define the pressure-flow relation. Krebs solution was infused into the opposite knee as a control (26 animals). 3. Infusion of a low albumin concentration (10 g l-1, bovine or rabbit) or diluted rabbit serum revealed no specific effect of plasma protein on interstitial matrix permeability (cf. specific protein effect on capillary glycocalyx permeability). Physiological (22.5 g l-1) and higher concentrations reduced trans-synovial absorption rate. The slope of the pressure-flow relation was reduced and the pressure intercept displaced to the right (i.e. Pj at zero flow was raised). 4. Slope dQs/dPj correlated negatively with intra-articular viscosity (P = 0.001-0.04), in keeping with viscous interstitial flow. The reduction in normalized slope, however, did not equal the reduction in fluidity (1/viscosity) quantitatively. It is proposed that apparent fluidity within the interstitial matrix is higher than in the bulk phase due to steric exclusion of albumin (radius 3.55 nm) by the interstitial glycosaminoglycans. The latter form spaces of estimated mean hydraulic radius 14-18 nm in synovium. 5. The joint-pressure intercept at zero net trans-synovial flow was displaced 0.015 cmH2O per cmH2O intra-articular oncotic pressure (pi j; S.E.M. +/- 0

  3. Analysis of nitrogen plasma generated by a pulsed plasma system near atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, R.; Yoshimura, T.; Ashida, A.; Fujimura, N.; Kitahata, H.; Yuasa, M.

    2004-12-01

    Stable discharging of pure nitrogen can be maintained even at atmospheric pressure when alternative pulsed voltage is applied between two parallel plate electrodes. We evaluated the nitrogen plasma generated by an alternative pulsed voltage system. The excited nitrogen species in a pure nitrogen plasma was evaluated using optical emission spectroscopy. In the discharging space, the largest peak detected corresponded to the N2 second positive system. Additionally, the emission peaks from the excited nitrogen atom were detected at a pressure of as high as 45Torr. In the downstream space, we detected emission peaks from the N2 Herman's infrared system as well as the N2 second positive system. The N2 (AΣu+3) state is considered to be the origin of the N2 Herman's infrared system. The emission intensities from the N2 second positive system and the N2 Herman's infrared system increase with increasing nitrogen gas pressure, whereas the emission intensity from the N2+ first negative system decreases.

  4. Thermal expansivity and bulk modulus of ZnO with NaCl-type cubic structure at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaowei; Liu, Zijiang; Chen, Qifeng; Chu, Yandong; Wang, Chengwei

    2006-12-01

    The thermal expansivity and bulk modulus of ZnO with NaCl-type cubic structure were estimated by using the constant temperature and pressure molecular dynamics technique with effective pair potentials which consist of the Coulomb, dispersion, and repulsion interaction at high pressures and temperatures. It is shown that the calculated thermodynamic parameters including linear thermal expansion coefficient, isothermal bulk modulus and its pressure derivative are in good agreement with the available experimental data and the latest theoretical results. At an extended pressure and temperature ranges, linear thermal expansion coefficient and isothermal bulk modus have also been predicted. The thermodynamic properties of ZnO with NaCl-type cubic structure are summarized in the pressure 0 150 GPa ranges and the temperature up to 3000 K.

  5. Pressure Induced Phase Transition of Nanocrystalline and Bulk Maghemite (g-Fe2O3) to Hematite (a-Fe2O3)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H.; Ma, Y; Yang, H; Ji, C; Hou, D; Guo, L

    2010-01-01

    Phase transition and bulk moduli of bulk and nanocrystalline {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were studied using synchrotron X-ray diffraction under high pressure. Contrary to most other nanomaterials, nanocrystalline {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} begins to transform into {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the same pressure as bulk {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which is caused by a special structure of {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, in which there exist vacancies of crystal. It is believed that phase transition starts from a certain site of vacancy because of the stress concentration at vacancy sites. Compared to bulk material, nanocrystalline {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} has a larger bulk modulus, which is ascribed to the large ratio of surface to volume.

  6. Mercury's Plasma Mantle during Solar Wind Dynamical Pressure Enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcourt, D.; Seki, K.; Terada, N.; Moore, T. E.

    2014-12-01

    Because of the weak planetary magnetic field as well as proximity to the Sun, the magnetosphere of Mercury is very dynamical and at times subjected to prominent compression. Recent observations from MESSENGER reveal that during events of enhanced solar wind dynamical pressure, the subsolar magnetopause may actually be pushed until the immediate vicinity of the planet surface. Using three-dimensional single-particle simulations, we examine the dynamics of solar wind originating protons during such events. We show that these impulsive events can lead to substantial (several hundreds of eVs or a few keVs) H+ energization in the plasma mantle. Unlike ions with large mass-to-charge ratios (e.g., Na+ of planetary origin), H+ are transported adiabatically during these events, their energization being due to the ExB convection surge. MESSENGER observations of the plasma mantle show repeated evidences of such a transient H+ energization which may follow from the variable character of Mercury's magnetosphere.

  7. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet for Chem/Bio Warfare Decontamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Hans W.; Henins, Ivars; Park, Jaeyoung; Selwyn, Gary S.

    1999-11-01

    Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet (APPJ) technology may provide a much needed method of CBW decontamination which, unlike traditional decon methods, is dry and nondestructive to sensitive equipment and materials. The APPJ discharge uses a high-flow feedgas consisting primarily of an inert carrier gas, such as He, and a small amount of a reactive additive, such as O2, which flows between capacitively-coupled electrodes powered at 13.56 MHz. The plasma generates highly reactive metastable and atomic species of oxygen which are then directed onto a contaminated surface. The reactive effluent of the APPJ has been shown to effectively neutralize VX nerve agent as well as simulants for anthrax and mustard blister agent. Research efforts are now being directed towards reducing He consumption and increasing the allowable stand-off distance. Recent results demonstrate that by replacing the O2 reactive additive with CO2, ozone formation is greatly reduced. This has the result of extending the lifetime of atomic oxygen by an order of magnitude or more. A recirculating APP Decon Chamber which combines heat, vacuum, forced convection and reactivity is currently being developed for enhanced decontamination of sensitive equipment. Several techniques are also being evaluated for use in an APP Decon Jet for decontamination of items which cannot be placed inside a chamber.

  8. Abatement of perfluorinated compounds using microwave plasmas at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabouzi, Y.; Moisan, M.; Rostaing, J. C.; Trassy, C.; Guérin, D.; Kéroack, D.; Zakrzewski, Z.

    2003-06-01

    Microwave plasmas sustained at atmospheric pressure, for instance by electromagnetic surface waves, can be efficiently used to abate greenhouse-effect gases such as perfluorinated compounds. As a working example, we study the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) of SF6 at concentrations ranging from 0.1% to 2.4% of the total gas flow where N2, utilized as a purge gas, is the carrier gas. O2 is added to the mixture at a fixed ratio of 1.2-1.5 times the concentration of SF6 to ensure full oxidation of the SF6 fragments, providing thereby scrubbable by-products. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy has been utilized for identification of the by-products and quantification of the residual concentration of SF6. Optical emission spectroscopy was employed to determine the gas temperature of the nitrogen plasma. In terms of operating parameters, the DRE is found to increase with increasing microwave power and decrease with increasing gas flow rate and discharge tube radius. Increasing the microwave power, in the case of a surface-wave discharge, or decreasing the gas flow rate increases the residence time of the molecules to be processed, hence, the observed DRE increase. In contrast, increasing the tube radius or the gas-flow rate increases the degree of radial contraction of the discharge and, therefore, the plasma-free space close to the tube wall: this comparatively colder region favors the reformation of the fragmented SF6 molecules, and enlarging it lowers the destruction rate. DRE values higher than 95% have been achieved at a microwave power of 6 kW with 2.4% SF6 in N2 flow rates up to 30 standard l/min.

  9. Wide-pressure-range coplanar dielectric barrier discharge: Operational characterisation of a versatile plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čech, J.; Bonaventura, Z.; SÅ¥ahel, P.; Zemánek, M.; Dvořáková, H.; Černák, M.

    2017-01-01

    Many plasma applications could benefit from the versatile plasma source operable at a wide-pressure-range, e.g., from the fraction of Pa to the super-atmospheric conditions. In this paper, the basic characteristics of wide-pressure-range plasma source based on the coplanar dielectric barrier discharge is given. The operational characteristics of this plasma source were measured in nitrogen at pressures ranging from 101 Pa (resp. 10-4 Pa) to 105 Pa. Measurements of the plasma geometry, breakdown voltage, and micro-discharges' behaviour revealed three operational regimes of this plasma source: "high pressure," "transitional" and "low-pressure" with vague boundaries at the pressures of approx. 10 kPa and 1 kPa. It was found that the plasma layer of coplanar dielectric barrier discharge could be expanded up to several centimetres to the half-space above the planar dielectric barrier when the gas pressure is reduced below 1 kPa, which provides an outstanding space to tailor the source for the specific applications. The proposed model of an effective gap distance in the Paschen breakdown criterion enabled us to explain the discharge behaviour fitting the experimental breakdown voltage data in the whole studied pressure range. Under the filament-forming conditions, i.e., at the pressure range from approx. 1-100 kPa, the active plasma volume could be varied through the micro-discharges' lateral thickness scaling with the inverse of the square-root of the gas pressure.

  10. Generation and diagnostics of atmospheric pressure CO{sub 2} plasma by laser driven plasma wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Makoto; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki; Tanaka, Kensaku; Arakawa, Yoshihiro; Nomura, Satoshi; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2012-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure CO{sub 2} plasma was generated by a laser driven plasma wind tunnel. At an ambient pressure of 0.38 MPa, a stable plasma was maintained by a laser power of 1000 W for more than 20 min. The translational temperature was measured using laser absorption spectroscopy with the atomic oxygen line at 777.19 nm. The measured absorption profiles were analyzed by a Voigt function considering Doppler, Stark, and pressure-broadening effects. Under the assumption of thermochemical equilibrium, all broadening effects were consistent with each other. The measured temperature ranged from 8500 K to 8900 K.

  11. High pressure laser plasma studies. [energy pathways in He-Ar gas mixtures at low pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    The operation of a nuclear pumped laser, operating at a wavelength of 1.79 micron m on the 3d(1/2-4p(3/2) transition in argon with helium-3 as the majority gas is discussed. The energy pathways in He-Ar gas were investigated by observing the effects of varying partial pressures on the emissions of levels lying above the 4p level in argon during a pulsed afterglow. An attempt is made to determine the population mechanisms of the 3d level in pure argon by observing emission from the same transition in a high pressure plasma excited by a high energy electron beam. Both collisional radiative and dissociative recombination are discussed.

  12. Micro-electromechanical film bulk acoustic sensor for plasma and whole blood coagulation monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chen, Da; Song, Shuren; Ma, Jilong; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Peng; Liu, Weihui; Guo, Qiuquan

    2017-05-15

    Monitoring blood coagulation is an important issue in the surgeries and the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In this work, we reported a novel strategy for the blood coagulation monitoring based on a micro-electromechanical film bulk acoustic resonator. The resonator was excited by a lateral electric field and operated under the shear mode with a frequency of 1.9GHz. According to the apparent step-ladder curves of the frequency response to the change of blood viscoelasticity, the coagulation time (prothrombin time) and the coagulation kinetics were measured with the sample consumption of only 1μl. The procoagulant activity of thromboplastin and the anticoagulant effect of heparin on the blood coagulation process were illustrated exemplarily. The measured prothrombin times showed a good linear correlation with R(2)=0.99969 and a consistency with the coefficient of variation less than 5% compared with the commercial coagulometer. The proposed film bulk acoustic sensor, which has the advantages of small size, light weight, low cost, simple operation and little sample consumption, is a promising device for miniaturized, online and automated analytical system for routine diagnostics of hemostatic status and personal health monitoring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Work-Hardening Induced Tensile Ductility of Bulk Metallic Glasses via High-Pressure Torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Soo-Hyun; Pi, Dong-Hai; Setyawan, Albertus Deny Heri; Kato, Hidemi; Janecek, Milos; Kim, Yong Chan; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2015-04-01

    The mechanical properties of engineering materials are key for ensuring safety and reliability. However, the plastic deformation of BMGs is confined to narrow regions in shear bands, which usually result in limited ductilities and catastrophic failures at low homologous temperatures. The quasi-brittle failure and lack of tensile ductility undercut the potential applications of BMGs. In this report, we present clear tensile ductility in a Zr-based BMG via a high-pressure torsion (HPT) process. Enhanced tensile ductility and work-hardening behavior after the HPT process were investigated, focusing on the microstructure, particularly the changed free volume, which affects deformation mechanisms (i.e., initiation, propagation, and obstruction of shear bands). Our results provide insights into the basic functions of hydrostatic pressure and shear strain in the microstructure and mechanical properties of HPT-processed BMGs.

  14. Formation and characteristics of patterns in atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lizhen; Liu, Zhongwei; Mao, Zhiguo; Li, Sen; Chen, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    The patterns in radio-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (RF DBD) are studied at atmospheric pressure of argon (Ar) or helium (He) mixed with nitrogen (N2) gas. When a small amount of N2 is mixed with He or Ar gas, discharge patterns are formed. In a N2/He gas mixture, besides the filament discharge that forms patterns, a glow background discharge is also observed, whereas only the filament discharge forms patterns in a N2/Ar gas mixture. The resolution of the hexagonal pattern as a function of applied power and gas flow rate is then explored. On the basis of spatial-temporal images taken using an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD), we find that there is no interleaving of two transient hexagon sublattices in N2/Ar or N2/He plasma in RF DBD patterns, which are totally different from those in which surface charges dominated in the mid-frequency DBD plasma. This supports our hypothesis that the bulk charges dominate the pattern formation in RF DBD.

  15. Competition between pressure effects and airflow influence for the performance of plasma actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Kriegseis, J.; Barckmann, K.; Grundmann, S.; Frey, J.; Tropea, C.

    2014-05-15

    The present work addresses the combined influence of pressure variations and different airflow velocities on the discharge intensity of plasma actuators. Power consumption, plasma length, and discharge capacitance were investigated systematically for varying pressure levels (p = 0.1–1 bar) and airflow velocities (U{sub ∞}=0−100 m/s) to characterize and quantify the favorable and adverse effects on the discharge intensity. In accordance with previous reports, an increasing plasma actuator discharge intensity is observed for decreasing pressure levels. At constant pressure levels, an adverse airflow influence on the electric actuator performance is demonstrated. Despite the improved discharge intensity at lower pressure levels, the seemingly improved performance of the plasma actuators is accompanied with a more pronounced drop of the relative performance. These findings demonstrate the dependency of the (kinematic and thermodynamic) environmental conditions on the electric performance of plasma actuators, which in turn affects the control authority of plasma actuators for flow control applications.

  16. Direct depth distribution measurement of deuterium in bulk tungsten exposed to high-flux plasma

    DOE PAGES

    Taylor, Chase N.; Shimada, M.

    2017-05-08

    Understanding tritium retention and permeation in plasma-facing components is critical for fusion safety and fuel cycle control. Glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GD-OES) is shown to be an effective tool to reveal the depth profile of deuterium in tungsten. Results confirm the detection of deuterium. Furthermore, a ~46 µm depth profile revealed that the deuterium content decreased precipitously in the first 7 µm, and detectable amounts were observed to depths in excess of 20 µm. The large probing depth of GD-OES (up to 100s of µm) enables studies not previously accessible to the more conventional techniques for investigating deuterium retention.more » Of particular applicability is the use of GD-OES to measure the depth profile for experiments where high diffusion is expected: deuterium retention in neutron irradiated materials, and ultra-high deuterium fluences in burning plasma environment.« less

  17. Plasma-polymerized methyl methacrylate via intense and highly energetic atmospheric pressure micro-plasma for bio-medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Choon-Sang; Ballato, John; Kim, Sung-O.; Clemson University Team

    2013-09-01

    Poly (methyl methacrylate), PMMA, has been widely used as a biocompatible material in bone cement, dental fillings, and many other bio-related applications. Vacuum plasmas and radio frequency (RF) atmospheric plasmas are the most common methods for depositing plasma-derived thin films and nanoparticles. However, the necessary equipment is difficult to operate and maintain as well as being large and expensive. Here, we report the use of a novel intense and highly energetic atmospheric pressure plasma jet array using direct plasma jet-to-jet coupling effects to deposit high quality plasma-polymerized MMA (PPMMA) for bio-medical applications. The newly proposed atmospheric pressure micro-plasma jet array device can generate the intense plasma mode with a strong plasma emission and high plasma particle energy. PPMMA was successfully deposited on a variety of substrates and characterized by SEM, AFM, and FT-IR. The micro-plasma jet is obtained at a sinusoidal voltage with a peak value of 30 kV and frequency of 35 kHz. Argon gas was employed as the discharge gas for plasma generation and its flow rate was in the range of 2230 sccm, Methyl methacrylate (MMA) monomer was vaporized by means of a glass bubbler which was supplied by argon gas with flow rates in the range of 268 sccm from room temperature to 400°C. The deposited PPMMA thin films were flexible, transparent, thin, and strong on metal substrates.

  18. Selective cytotoxicity of indirect nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma against ovarian clear-cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Fumi; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Kae; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Hori, Masaru; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (CCC) is a histological type of epithelial ovarian cancer that is less responsive to chemotherapy and associated with a poorer prognosis than serous and endometrioid carcinoma. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma which produces reactive species has recently led to an explosion of research in plasma medicine. Plasma treatment can be applied to cancer treatment to induce apoptosis and tumor growth arrest. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that a medium exposed to plasma also has an anti-proliferative effect against cancer in the absence of direct exposure to plasma. In this study, we confirmed whether this indirect plasma has an anti-tumor effect against CCC, and investigated whether this efficacy is selective for cancer cells. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma induced apoptosis in CCC cells, while human peritoneal mesothelial cells remained viable. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma exhibits selective cytotoxicity against CCC cells which are resistant to chemotherapy.

  19. Theoretical study of turbulent channel flow - Bulk properties, pressure fluctuations, and propagation of electromagnetic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Hartke, G. J.; Battaglia, A.; Chasnov, J.; Albrecht, G. F.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, we apply two theoretical turbulence models, DIA and the recent GISS model, to study properties of a turbulent channel flow. Both models provide a turbulent kinetic energy spectral function E(k) as the solution of a non-linear equation; the two models employ the same source function but different closures. The source function is characterized by a rate n sub s (k) which is derived from the complex eigenvalues of the Orr-Sommerfeld (OS) equation in which the basic flow is taken to be of a Poiseuille type. The O-S equation is solved for a variety of Reynolds numbers corresponding to available experimental data. A physical argument is presented whereby the central line velocity characterizing the basic flow, U0 sup L, is not to be identified with the U0 appearing in the experimental Reynolds number. The theoretical results are compared with two types of experimental data: (1) turbulence bulk properties, and (2) properties that depend strongly on the structure of the turbulence spectrum at low wave numbers. The only existing analytical expression for Pi (k) cannot be used in the present case because it applies to the case of a flat plate, not a finite channel.

  20. Theoretical study of turbulent channel flow - Bulk properties, pressure fluctuations, and propagation of electromagnetic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Hartke, G. J.; Battaglia, A.; Chasnov, J.; Albrecht, G. F.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, we apply two theoretical turbulence models, DIA and the recent GISS model, to study properties of a turbulent channel flow. Both models provide a turbulent kinetic energy spectral function E(k) as the solution of a non-linear equation; the two models employ the same source function but different closures. The source function is characterized by a rate n sub s (k) which is derived from the complex eigenvalues of the Orr-Sommerfeld (OS) equation in which the basic flow is taken to be of a Poiseuille type. The O-S equation is solved for a variety of Reynolds numbers corresponding to available experimental data. A physical argument is presented whereby the central line velocity characterizing the basic flow, U0 sup L, is not to be identified with the U0 appearing in the experimental Reynolds number. The theoretical results are compared with two types of experimental data: (1) turbulence bulk properties, and (2) properties that depend strongly on the structure of the turbulence spectrum at low wave numbers. The only existing analytical expression for Pi (k) cannot be used in the present case because it applies to the case of a flat plate, not a finite channel.

  1. Theoretical study of turbulent channel flow: Bulk properties, pressure fluctuations, and propagation of electromagnetic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Hartke, G. J.; Battaglia, A.; Chasnov, J.; Albrecht, G. F.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, we apply two theoretical turbulence models, DIA and the recent GISS model, to study properties of a turbulent channel flow. Both models provide a turbulent kinetic energy spectral function E(k) as the solution of a non-linear equation; the two models employ the same source function but different closures. The source function is characterized by a rate n sub s (k) which is derived from the complex eigenvalues of the Orr--Sommerfeld (OS) equation in which the basic flow is taken to be of a Poiseuille type. The O--S equation is solved for a variety of Reynolds numbers corresponding to available experimental data. A physical argument is presented whereby the central line velocity characterizing the basic flow, U0 sup L, is not to be identified with the U0 appearing in the experimental Reynolds number. The theoretical results are compared with two types of experimental data: (1) turbulence bulk properties, and (2) properties that depend stongly on the structure of the turbulence spectrun at low wave numbers. The only existing analytical expression for Pi (k) cannot be used in the present case because it applies to the case of a flat plate, not a finite channel.

  2. Time-resolved dynamics of plasma self-channeling and bulk modification in silica glasses induced by a high-intensity femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Kumagai, Hiroshi; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Obara, Minoru

    2000-11-01

    The time-resolved dynamics of plasma self-channeling and refractive index bulk modification in the silica glasses are first observed using a high-intensity femtosecond (110 fs) Ti: sapphire laser ((Lambda) pequals790 nm) We propose the new pump-probe measurement to observe the lifetime of both plasma self-channeling and induced refractive index bulk modification. The energy variation of transmitted probe beam, which propagates transversely through the plasma self- channeling is measured. At the pre-breakdown domain, the lifetime of induced plasma self-channeling is 20 ps and structural transition time for reforming the refractive index change is 10 ps. At the breakdown domain, however, the lifetime of induced plasma formation is 30 ps and structural transition time for forming the optical damage is 40 ps. We find that the process of refractive index bulk modification is significantly different from those of optical damage. We also measure a wavelength shift (blueshift) of reflected probe beam from the surface of the plasma self-channeling induced by the pump beam. A maximum value of blue wavelength shift is 3 nm when the time delay of probe beam is 2 ps. The expanding velocity of the plasma ionization is calculated from the wavelength shirt (blueshift) using the Doppler formula. A maximum velocity of the plasma ionization is calculated to be approximately 6x105 m/s at the delay time of 2 ps.

  3. Effects of plasma conditions on the shapes of features etched in Cl{sub 2} and HBr plasmas. I. Bulk crystalline silicon etching

    SciTech Connect

    Vyvoda, M.A.; Lee, H.; Malyshev, M.V.; Klemens, F.P.; Cerullo, M.; Donnelly, V.M.; Graves, D.B.; Kornblit, A.; Lee, J.T.

    1998-11-01

    We have studied the effects of source and bias powers, pressure, and feed gas composition on the shapes of SiO{sub 2}-masked crystalline silicon features etched in a transformer-coupled high density plasma system. Higher etching rates were obtained at higher source and bias powers, and higher pressure. The etching rates of isolated and nested trenches, isolated lines, and holes were nearly the same, indicating a negligible pattern density dependence. We did, however, observe a very weak decrease in etch rates with increasing aspect ratio at 2 mTorr in a pure Cl{sub 2} plasma. At 10 mTorr, no aspect ratio dependence was observed, except at the highest source and bias powers. Microtrenching was observed under certain plasma conditions and could be reduced by using higher bias powers. At 10 mTorr in a pure chlorine plasma, we observed a slight taper at the bottoms of the etched features and the formation of narrow microtrenches near feature corners. At 2 mTorr, the microtrenches were broader and overlapped near the center of narrow trenches to form pyramid-shaped trench bottoms. When a HBr plasma was used instead of Cl{sub 2}, the etching rate decreased by 50{percent} but the etching profiles were more vertical and the trench bottoms were flat. Isolated lines etched in the HBr plasma, however, revealed broad but shallow microtrenches near the edges of the line, suggesting that the flat trench bottoms were a result of broad microtrenches that overlapped. Trenches of 3 {mu}m depth and aspect ratios of 7 have been obtained using either HBr or Cl{sub 2}, exhibiting similar microfeatures as observed when etching shallower trenches. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Vacuum Society.}

  4. Chemical pressure effect on optical properties in multiferroic bulk BiFeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, B.; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.

    2012-10-01

    We have investigated diffuse reflectance spectra of the polycrystalline BiFeO3, Bi0.9Ba0.05Ca0.05FeO2.95, and Bi0.9Ca0.1FeO2.95 samples to demonstrate crystal-field spectroscopy, which enabled us to explore local distortion in the non-centrosymmetric FeO6 octahedron, and also to study chemical pressure effect on the band gap and d-d transition band energies. The energy values of band gap and d-d transition bands of the doped BiFeO3 samples were found to red-shift with the reduced unit cell volume. Absorption spectroscopic studies of the BiFeO3 samples reveal that nature of the band gap is a direct. Raman spectroscopy study also reveals that the softening/hardening of the certain Raman modes in BiFeO3 upon substitution of Ca. The chemical pressure induced changes in the band gap and d-d band energies, and the Raman modes of the Ca doped BiFeO3, which also found to enhance its magnetic and magnetoelectric properties.

  5. Structure and dynamics of bulk liquid iron at pressures up to 58 GPa. A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, David; Marques, Miriam; Gonzalez, Luis Enrique

    The static and dynamic properties of bulk liquid Fe at a several high pressure states, have been studied by using first-principles molecular dynamics simulations based on the density functional theory and the projector augmented wave technique. Results are reported for four thermodynamic states at pressures of 27, 42, 50 and 58 GPa for which x-ray scattering data are available. The calculated static structure shows very good agreement with the available experimental data, including an asymmetric second peak which becomes more marked with increasing pressure. The dynamical structure reveals the existence of propagating density fluctuations and the associated dispersion relation has also been determined. The relaxation mechanisms for the density fluctuations have been analyzed in terms of a model with two decay channels (fast and slow, respectively). We found that the thermal relaxation proceeds along the slow decaying channel whereas the fast one is that of the viscoelastic relaxation. Finally, results are also reported for some transport coefficients. We acknowledge financial support from Spanish MCI (FIS2014-59279-P) and JCyL (CIP13/03 and VA104A11-2).

  6. State-of-Art Empirical Modeling of Ring Current Plasma Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, C.; Ma, Q.; Wang, C. P.; Bortnik, J.; Thorne, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    The plasma pressure in the inner magnetosphere plays a key role in plasma dynamics by changing magnetic field configurations and generating the ring current. In this study, we present our preliminary results of empirically constructing 2D equatorial ring current pressure and pressure anisotropy spatial distributions controlled by Dst based on measurements from two particle instruments (HOPE and RBSPICE) onboard Van Allen Probes. We first obtain the equatorial plasma perpendicular and parallel pressures for different species including H+, He+, O+ and e- from 20 eV to ~1 MeV, and investigate their relative contributions to the total plasma pressure and pressure anisotropy. We then establish empirical equatorial pressure models within ~ 6 RE using a state-of-art machine learning technique, Support Vector Regression Machine (SVRM). The pressure models predict equatorial perpendicular and parallel plasma thermal pressures (for each species and for total pressures) and pressure anisotropy at any given r, MLT, Bz/Br (equivalent Z distance), and Dst within applicable ranges. We are currently validating our model predictions and investigating how the ring current pressure distributions and the associated pressure gradients vary with Dst index.

  7. End-boundary sheath potential, electron and ion energy distribution in the low-pressure non-ambipolar electron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lee; Chen, Zhiying; Funk, Merritt

    2013-12-01

    The end-boundary floating-surface sheath potential, electron and ion energy distribution functions (EEDf, IEDf) in the low-pressure non-ambipolar electron plasma (NEP) are investigated. The NEP is heated by an electron beam extracted from an inductively coupled electron-source plasma (ICP) through a dielectric injector by an accelerator located inside the NEP. This plasma's EEDf has a Maxwellian bulk followed by a broad energy continuum connecting to the most energetic group with energies around the beam energy. The NEP pressure is 1-3 mTorr of N2 and the ICP pressure is 5-15 mTorr of Ar. The accelerator is biased positively from 80 to 600 V and the ICP power range is 200-300 W. The NEP EEDf and IEDf are determined using a retarding field energy analyser. The EEDf and IEDf are measured at various NEP pressures, ICP pressures and powers as a function of accelerator voltage. The accelerator current and sheath potential are also measured. The IEDf reveals mono-energetic ions with adjustable energy and it is proportionally controlled by the sheath potential. The NEP end-boundary floating surface is bombarded by a mono-energetic, space-charge-neutral plasma beam. When the injected energetic electron beam is adequately damped by the NEP, the sheath potential is linearly controlled at almost a 1 : 1 ratio by the accelerator voltage. If the NEP parameters cannot damp the electron beam sufficiently, leaving an excess amount of electron-beam power deposited on the floating surface, the sheath potential will collapse and become unresponsive to the accelerator voltage.

  8. Low-pressure and atmospheric pressure plasma polymerized silica-like films as primers for adhesive bonding of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Munish

    2007-12-01

    Plasma processes, including plasma etching and plasma polymerization, were investigated for the pretreatment of aluminum prior to structural adhesive bonding. Since native oxides of aluminum are unstable in the presence of moisture at elevated temperature, surface engineering processes must usually be applied to aluminum prior to adhesive bonding to produce oxides that are stable. Plasma processes are attractive for surface engineering since they take place in the gas phase and do not produce effluents that are difficult to dispose off. Reactive species that are generated in plasmas have relatively short lifetimes and form inert products. The objective of this work was to develop plasma etching and plasma polymerization as environmentally compatible processes for surface engineering of aluminum. Plasma polymerized silica-like films of thickness less than 200 nm were deposited on pretreated aluminum substrates using hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) as the "monomer" and oxygen as a "co-reactant" in low-pressure RF-powered (13.6 MHz) reactor. Recently, plasma deposition at atmospheric pressure has become a promising technology because they do not require vacuum systems, can be applied to large objects with complex shapes, and adapted easily for continuous processing. Therefore, atmospheric pressure plasma processes were investigated and compared with their more traditional counterparts, low-pressure plasmas. Molecular structure and morphology of the plasma polymerized films were determined using surface analysis techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The effectiveness of plasma etching and plasma polymerization as surface engineering processes for aluminum were probed by determining the initial strength and durability of aluminum/epoxy lap joints prepared from substrates that were plasma pretreated, coated with silica-like film, and

  9. High Pressure and Temperature Effects on the Viscosity, Density, and Bulk Modulus of Four Liquid Lubricants.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-01

    stainless—steel sheath which is silver— brazed to an air-quenched tool- steel plug. Six conductors, four iron and two constantan, are containec in the 0.63...intermittent short circuit between coils and had tr ~e rep laced . The new coil was heat treated and then pressure aged to minimize drift during...N cm cm —St —St C-~ C- ’ . SN C” ‘ -tO C —1 C..) —I N. -.1- cm r i U’ 0 ‘0 C ft (N cm U) N. N. cm. -ft -C U’ N. ‘0 N. — i f’ U’ Cl) El — U) —St U

  10. Modeling high-pressure and high-temperature phase changes in bulk carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Glosi, J N; Ree, F H

    1999-07-01

    The phase diagram of carbon is not experimentally well known at high pressure and/or high temperature. We have determined the phase diagram of carbon by means of Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations methods using the Brenner bond order potential. The melting line of diamond was found to have a positive slope with the graphite-diamond-liquid triple point in agreement with an estimated value based on experiment. The present calculation predicts a first-order phase transition in liquid carbon terminated by a critical point and by a triple point on the graphite melting line. The low-density liquid is predominantly sp bonded with little sp{sup 3} character. The high-density liquid is mostly sp{sup 3} bonded with little sp character.

  11. Bulk properties of crystalline single wall carbon nanotubes: Purification, pressure effects and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, J. E.; Lee, R. S.; Kim, H. J.; Rinzler, A. G.; Smalley, R. E.; Yaguzhinski, S. L.; Bozhko, A. D.; Sklovsky, D. E.; Nalimova, V. A.

    1998-08-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) has been scaled up to yield several grams/day of single-walled nanotubes. Annealed, purified material is highly crystalline, essentially free of amorphous carbon, fullerenes and catalyst residues, and about 3 times denser than the highly porous, as-grown product. In principle the interactions between tubes in a rope, and/or between rope crystallites, may be "tuned" by 3 different approaches—chemical doping, hydrostatic pressure, or purification/annealing, all of which have a dramatic effect on the temperature dependence of resistivity. In particular, we suggest that the crossover from positive to negative dR/dT at low temperature is a 3D effect and not an intrinsic property of isolated neutral SWNT.

  12. Dietary salt influences postprandial plasma sodium concentration and systolic blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Suckling, Rebecca J; He, Feng J; Markandu, Nirmala D; MacGregor, Graham A

    2012-02-01

    The plasma sodium concentration has a direct effect on blood pressure in addition to its effects on extracellular volume regulated through changes in the endothelium. The mechanism for elevated blood pressure seen with habitually increased salt intake is unclear, especially the effect of salt in a single meal on plasma sodium concentration and blood pressure. To resolve this we compared the effect of soup with or without 6 g of salt (an amount similar to that in a single meal) on the plasma sodium concentration and blood pressure in 10 normotensive volunteers using a randomized, crossover design. The plasma sodium concentration was significantly increased by 3.13±0.75 mmol/l with salted compared with unsalted soup. Blood pressure increased in volunteers ingesting soup with added salt, and there was a significant positive correlation between plasma sodium concentration and systolic blood pressure. A 1-mmol/l increase in plasma sodium was associated with a 1.91-mm Hg increase in systolic blood pressure by linear regression. Thus, changes in plasma sodium concentration occur each time a meal containing salt is consumed. A potential mechanism for the changes in blood pressure seen with salt intake may be through its effects on plasma sodium concentration.

  13. Plasma noradrenaline concentration and blood pressure in essential hypertension, phaeochromocytoma and depression.

    PubMed

    Louis, W J; Doyle, A E; Anavekar, S N

    1975-06-01

    1. Mean plasma noradrenaline concentration was elevated in forty-four patients with established essential hypertension. Eighteen of the hypertensive patients had resting plasma noradrenaline concentrations in the normal range. 2. Patients with endogenous depression had higher mean plasma noradrenaline concentrations but significantly lower blood pressure than patients with essential hypertension. 3. Patients with phaeochromocytoma had plasma noradrenaline concentrations twenty-eight times greater than those found in essential hypertension, but blood pressures were less than 20% higher. 4. It is concluded that excess of sympathetic drive only partly explains the level of the blood pressure in essential hypertension.

  14. Analysis of Physics Processes in the AC Plasma Torch Discharge under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronov, A. A.; Vasilieva, O. B.; Dudnik, J. D.; E Kuznetsov, V.; Kuchina, J. A.; Shiryaev, V. N.; Pavlov, A. V.

    2017-04-01

    The paper is devoted to investigation of electrophysical processes in the electric discharge generated by a three-phase AC plasma torch when using a high pressure inert working gas. AC plasma torch design with end electrodes intended for work on inert gases at pressures up to 81 bar is studied. Current-voltage characteristics for different gas flow rates and pressures are presented. Physical processes characteristics of the arising voltage ripples which depend on various working parameters of the plasma torch have been investigated. Arc burning processes in the electric discharge chamber of the three-phase AC plasma torch at various working parameters were photographed.

  15. Chemical detoxification of trichloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethane in a microwave discharge plasma reactor at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, T.R.; Helt, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    This report focuses on the application of plasma technology to hazardous waste treatment. Microwave sustained plasmas are used to thermal degrade trichloroethylene and trichloroethane at atmospheric pressure. (JL)

  16. Chemical detoxification of trichloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethane in a microwave discharge plasma reactor at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, T.R.; Helt, J.E.

    1991-12-31

    This report focuses on the application of plasma technology to hazardous waste treatment. Microwave sustained plasmas are used to thermal degrade trichloroethylene and trichloroethane at atmospheric pressure. (JL)

  17. Low-pressure RF plasma and corona decolourisation of indigo dyed denim fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radetic, M.; Puac, N.; Jovancic, P.; Saponjic, Z.; Petrovic, Z. Lj.

    2008-07-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the influence of low-pressure RF plasma (gas, treatment time and power) and atmospheric pressure corona (number of passages and power) parameters on decolourisation of indigo dyed denim fabrics. CIEL*a*b* colourimetric system was used for determination of colour difference between untreated and differently plasma treated denim fabrics. The morphology of plasma treated fibres was assessed by SEM analysis. The results showed that decolourisation was highly affected by plasma parameters and desired "worn look" effects could be designed by adequate control of plasma processing.

  18. Biomedical Applications of Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas to Cancerous Cell Treatment and Tooth Bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Koo; Kim, Myoung Soo; Byun, June Ho; Kim, Kyong Tai; Kim, Gyoo Cheon; Park, Gan Young

    2011-08-01

    Low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas have attracted great interests and they have been widely applied to biomedical applications to interact with living tissues, cells, and bacteria due to their non-thermal property. This paper reviews the biomedical applications of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas to cancerous cell treatment and tooth bleaching. Gold nanoparticles conjugated with cancer-specific antibodies have been introduced to cancerous cells to enhance selective killing of cells, and the mechanism of cell apoptosis induced by plasma has been investigated. Tooth exposed to helium plasma jet with hydrogen peroxide has become brighter and the productions of hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide have been enhanced by plasma exposure.

  19. Dynamic high pressure generation through plasma implosion driven by an intense laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Wang, J. X.; Yuan, T.; Xu, Y. X.; Zhu, W. J.

    2017-03-01

    When an intense laser pulse is loaded upon solids, very high impact pressure can be generated on the surface. In this letter, we simulate this process through one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation and find that the pressure as high as 0.13 TPa can be generated after the laser pulse with intensity 1015 W/cm2 and 5 picosecond duration is injected upon a nanometer solid-density plasma. The peak pressure is shown to be resulted from an energetic high-density plasma bunch, produced through plasma implosion under extremely high light pressure.

  20. Suppression of diamagnetism by neutrals pressure in partially ionized, high-beta plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Shunjiro; Kuwahara, Daisuke; Yano, Kazuki; Fruchtman, Amnon

    2016-12-01

    Suppression of diamagnetism in a partially ionized plasma with high beta was experimentally investigated by the use of Langmuir and Hall sensor probes, focusing on a neutrals pressure effect. The plasma beta, which is the ratio of plasma to vacuum magnetic pressures, varied from ˜1% to >100% while the magnetic field varied from ˜120 G to ˜1 G. Here, a uniform magnetized argon plasma was operated mostly in an inductive mode, using a helicon plasma source of the Large Helicon Plasma Device [S. Shinohara et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 057104 (2009)] with a diameter of 738 mm and an axial length of 4860 mm. Electron density varied from 5 × 1015 m-3 to <3 × 1018 m-3, while an argon fill pressure was varied from ˜0.02 Pa to 0.75 Pa as well as the magnetic field mentioned above, with the fixed radio frequency (rf) and power of 7 MHz and ˜3.5 kW, respectively. The observed magnetic field reduction rate, a decrease of the magnetic field divided by the vacuum one, was up to 18%. However, in a certain parameter regime, where the product of ion and electron Hall terms is a key parameter, the measured diamagnetic effect was smaller than that expected by the plasma beta. This suppressed diamagnetism is explained by the neutrals pressure replacing magnetic pressure in balancing plasma pressure. Diamagnetism is weakened if neutrals pressure is comparable to the plasma pressure and if the coupling of plasma and neutrals pressures by ion-neutral collisions is strong enough.

  1. Combined effects of gas pressure and exciting frequency on electron energy distribution functions in hydrogen capacitively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Fattah, E.; Sugai, H.

    2013-02-15

    The combined effects of the variation of hydrogen pressure (40-400 mTorr) and exciting frequency (13.56-50 MHz) on the electron energy probability function (EEPF) and other plasma parameters in capacitively coupled hydrogen H{sub 2} discharge at fixed discharge voltage were investigated using rf-compensated Langmuir probe. At a fixed exciting frequency of 13.56 MHz, the EEPF evolved from Maxwellian-like distribution to a bi-Maxwellian distribution when the H{sub 2} pressure increased, possibly due to efficient vibrational excitation. The electron density largely increased to a peak value and then decreased with the increase of H{sub 2} pressure. Meanwhile, the electron temperature and plasma potential significantly decrease and reaching a minimum at 120 mTorr beyond, which saturated or slightly increases. On the other hand, the dissipated power and electron density markedly increased with increasing the exciting frequency at fixed H{sub 2} pressure and voltage. The electron temperatures negligibly dependent on the driving frequency. The EEPFs at low pressure 60 mTorr resemble Maxwellian-like distribution and evolve into a bi-Maxwellian type as frequency increased, due to a collisonless (stochastic) sheath-heating in the very high frequency regime, while the EEPF at hydrogen pressure {>=}120 mTorr retained a bi-Maxwellian-type distribution irrespective of the driving frequency. Such evolution of the EEPFs shape with the driving frequency and hydrogen pressure has been discussed on the basis of electron diffusion processes and low threshold-energy inelastic collision processes taking place in the discharge. The ratio of stochastic power to bulk power heating ratio is dependent on the hydrogen pressure while it is independent on the driving frequency.

  2. Microstructure and Thermoelectric Properties of Bulk Cobalt Antimonide (CoSb3) Skutterudites Obtained by Pulse Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruszewski, M. J.; Zybała, R.; Ciupiński, Ł.; Chmielewski, M.; Adamczyk-Cieślak, B.; Michalski, A.; Rajska, M.; Kurzydłowski, K. J.

    2016-03-01

    The use of the pulse plasma sintering technique for CoSb3 thermoelectric material consolidation is reported in this work. The influence of sintering temperature on the microstructure and material properties such as the Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, and thermal conductivity has been investigated. It is shown that, for samples fabricated at 923 K and 973 K, there were no significant differences in the average grain size or final phase composition. In both cases, a fine-grained polycrystalline structure of the compacts with density nearly equal to the theoretical value was achieved. Both samples were composed almost uniquely of CoSb3 phase. The measured thermoelectric parameters such as the Seebeck coefficient, electrical, and thermal conductivity showed similar dependence on temperature. For both samples, the Seebeck coefficient was negative at room temperature and showed a transition from n- to p-type conduction over the temperature range of 400 K to 460 K. The measured minimum thermal conductivity values, 4 W m-1 K-1 to 5 W m-1 K-1 at 723 K, are typical for undoped bulk CoSb3. A maximum ZT value of 0.08 at 623 K was obtained for the sample consolidated at 923 K for 5 min. The results of this work are very promising from the point of view of use of pulse plasma sintering as an alternative method for fabrication of a broad range of thermoelectric materials in the future.

  3. Assessment of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Treatment for Implant Osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Danna, Natalie R.; Beutel, Bryan G.; Tovar, Nick; Witek, Lukasz; Marin, Charles; Granato, Rodrigo; Suzuki, Marcelo; Coelho, Paulo G.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the osseointegrative effects of atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) surface treatment for implants in a canine model. Control surfaces were untreated textured titanium (Ti) and calcium phosphate (CaP). Experimental surfaces were their 80-second air-based APP-treated counterparts. Physicochemical characterization was performed to assess topography, surface energy, and chemical composition. One implant from each control and experimental group (four in total) was placed in one radius of each of the seven male beagles for three weeks, and one implant from each group was placed in the contralateral radius for six weeks. After sacrifice, bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupancy (BAFO) were assessed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed decreased surface levels of carbon and increased Ti and oxygen, and calcium and oxygen, posttreatment for Ti and CaP surfaces, respectively. There was a significant (P < 0.001) increase in BIC for APP-treated textured Ti surfaces at six weeks but not at three weeks or for CaP surfaces. There were no significant (P = 0.57) differences for BAFO between treated and untreated surfaces for either material at either time point. This suggests that air-based APP surface treatment may improve osseointegration of textured Ti surfaces but not CaP surfaces. Studies optimizing APP parameters and applications are warranted. PMID:26090443

  4. Introduction of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma to Aqueous Detergent Processes.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Keiko; Kanasaki, Yu; Uchinomaru, Haruka

    2015-01-01

    The effects of exposure of polymer surfaces to atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) on detergency were investigated from the viewpoint of pretreatment to cleaning in aqueous systems using three PET substrates: film, mesh, and fabric. The PET substrates were soiled with stearic acid as a model oily contaminant, and were treated with the APP jet immediately before cleaning. Stir washing in aqueous solutions with and without alkali or anionic surfactant was performed, and then the detergency was evaluated from the microscopic image analysis or surface reflectance measurement. For all PET samples and detergent solutions, APP exposure was found to promote the removal of stearic acid. Contact angle measurements showed that APP exposure enhanced the hydrophilicity of PET and stearic acid. The increase in the surface oxygen concentration on PET and stearic acid due to the APP exposure was also observed by XPS analysis. The simultaneous oxidation of the PET substrate and stearic acid soil by the APP pretreatment resulted in detergency improvement via surface hydrophilization. Furthermore, microscopic observations suggested that the collapse of crystallized stearic acid deposited on the PET substrate by APP heating facilitated its removal. In situ detergency evaluation by a quartz crystal microbalance technique confirmed that the removal of stearic acid from the PET substrate was promoted by the APP exposure. The experimental findings of this study demonstrate the effectiveness of the APP exposure before cleaning in aqueous solutions.

  5. Three electrode atmospheric pressure plasma jet in helium flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maletic, Dejan; Puac, Nevena; Malovic, Gordana; Petrovic, Zoran Lj.

    2015-09-01

    Plasma jets are widely used in various types of applications and lately more and more in the field of plasma medicine. However, it is not only their applicability that distinguishes them from other atmospheric plasma sources, but also the behavior of the plasma. It was shown that plasma plume is not continuous, but discrete set of plasma packages. Here we present iCCD images and current voltage characteristics of a three electrode plasma jet. Our plasma jet has a simple design with body made of glass tube and two transparent electrodes wrapped around it. The additional third metal tip electrode was positioned at 10 and 25 mm in front of the jet nozzle and connected to the same potential as the powered electrode. Power transmitted to the plasma was from 0.5 W to 4.0 W and the helium flow rate was kept constant at 4 slm. For the 10 mm configuration plasma is ignited on the metal tip in the whole period of the excitation signal and in the positive half cycle plasma ``bullet'' is propagating beyond the metal tip. In contrast to that, for the 25 mm configuration at the tip electrode plasma can be seen only in the minimum and maximum of the excitation signal, and there is no plasma ``bullet'' formation. This research has been supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Republic of Serbia, under projects ON171037 and III41011.

  6. Atmospheric-pressure plasma activation and surface characterization on polyethylene membrane separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Yu-Chien; Li, Hsiao-Ling; Huang, Chun

    2017-01-01

    The surface hydrophilic activation of a polyethylene membrane separator was achieved using an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. The surface of the atmospheric-pressure-plasma-treated membrane separator was found to be highly hydrophilic realized by adjusting the plasma power input. The variations in membrane separator chemical structure were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Chemical analysis showed newly formed carbonyl-containing groups and high surface concentrations of oxygen-containing species on the atmospheric-pressure-plasma-treated polymeric separator surface. It also showed that surface hydrophilicity primarily increased from the polar component after atmospheric-pressure plasma treatment. The surface and pore structures of the polyethylene membrane separator were examined by scanning electron microscopy, revealing a slight alteration in the pore structure. As a result of the incorporation of polar functionalities by atmospheric-pressure plasma activation, the electrolyte uptake and electrochemical impedance of the atmospheric-pressure-plasma-treated membrane separator improved. The investigational results show that the separator surface can be controlled by atmospheric-pressure plasma surface treatment to tailor the hydrophilicity and enhance the electrochemical performance of lithium ion batteries.

  7. A new ion cyclotron range of frequency scenario for bulk ion heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas: How to utilize intrinsic impurities in our favour

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, Ye. O.; Ongena, J.; Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Messiaen, A.; Dumont, R.; Mantsinen, M.

    2015-08-15

    A fusion reactor requires plasma pre-heating before the rate of deuterium-tritium fusion reactions becomes significant. In ITER, radio frequency (RF) heating of {sup 3}He ions, additionally puffed into the plasma, is one of the main options considered for increasing bulk ion temperature during the ramp-up phase of the pulse. In this paper, we propose an alternative scenario for bulk ion heating with RF waves, which requires no extra {sup 3}He puff and profits from the presence of intrinsic Beryllium impurities in the plasma. The discussed method to heat Be impurities in D-T plasmas is shown to provide an even larger fraction of fuel ion heating.

  8. Density functional investigation of the thermodynamic stability of lithium oxide bulk crystalline structures as a function of oxygen pressure.

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, K. C.; Curtiss, L. A.; Greeley, J.

    2011-01-01

    Density functional theory is used together with classical statistical mechanical analyses to investigate the thermodynamic stability of bulk crystalline LiO{sub 2}, Li{sub 2}O, and Li{sub 2}O{sub 2} as a function of the oxygen environment. The results indicate that lithium peroxide (Li{sub 2}O{sub 2(s)}) and superoxide (LiO{sub 2(s)}) are likely to be stable only under O{sub 2}-rich conditions with high oxygen partial pressures (P?{sub 2}), whereas Li{sub 2}O is the most stable at ambient conditions. Additionally, the trends in the density functional calculated equilibrium potential for an ideal reversible Li-O{sub 2} couple can be described by an analytical equation as a function of pressure and temperature. As part of this work, we have also calculated the structure and thermodynamics for lithium superoxide. It is found to be stable with respect to lattice vibrations, with an O-O stretching vibration mode very similar to that of the isolated LiO{sub 2} molecule and to the O{sub 2}{sup -} ion radical.

  9. APPLICATIONS OF LASERS AND OTHER TOPICS IN LASER PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY: Switching of a pulsed ionic diode through the bulk of an ion source with laser plasma initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleshakova, R. P.; Shikanov, A. E.

    1987-10-01

    An analysis was made of the results of an investigation of switching of a pulsed ionic diode through the bulk of an ion source with a laser plasma and a vacuum arc. The dependences of the neutron yield on the electrical energy of the diode were recorded and analyzed. The results indicated a possible way of simple construction of an acceleration tube with switching via a laser-plasma source.

  10. Properties of Atmospheric Pressure Ar Plasma Jet Depending on Treated Dielectric Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prysiazhnyi, Vadym; Ricci Castro, Alonso H.; Kostov, Konstantin G.

    2017-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jet operated in argon was utilized to modify surfaces of glass, acrylic, and PTFE dielectrics. This paper describes the influence of the dielectric substrate on operation and properties of plasma. Two modes of operation (each of those have two patterns) were described. The transition from one mode to another, values of the dissipated power, and spreading of plasma over the dielectric surfaces strongly depended on the substrate material. Additionally, three methods of plasma spreading estimation were presented and discussed.

  11. Very low pressure plasma sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coating using a low-energy plasma gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; Zhang, Nannan; Bolot, Rodolphe; Planche, Marie-Pierre; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, a more economical low-energy plasma source was used to perform a very low pressure plasma-spray (VLPPS) process. The plasma-jet properties were analyzed by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Moreover, yttria-stabilized zirconia coating (YSZ) was elaborated by a F100 low-power plasma gun under working pressure of 1 mbar, and the substrate specimens were partially shadowed by a baffle-plate during plasma spraying for obtaining different coating microstructures. Based on the SEM observation, a column-like grain coating was deposited by pure vapor deposition at the shadowed region, whereas, in the unshadowed region, the coating exhibited a binary microstructure which was formed by a mixed deposition of melted particles and evaporated particles. The mechanical properties of the coating were also well under investigation.

  12. A pulse-modulated nonequilibrium atmospheric-pressure microwave argon plasma discharge preionized by a kilohertz excited plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shouzhe; Xu Maochun; Zhang Xin; Zhang Jialiang

    2012-04-23

    A pulse-modulated nonequilibrium atmospheric-pressure microwave argon surface wave plasma is generated by means of a preionization discharge with a single-electrode plasma jet driven by a power supply of 50 kHz. It is found that the electron induced Saha-like balance dominates excitation process in the plasma discharge through the electron temperature varying with the microwave input power and the applied voltage of kilohertz power supply. The microwave pulse-modulating effect on nonequilibrium characteristics of dual-frequency exciting argon surface wave plasma is studied by spectroscopic measurement of the excitation temperature and gas temperature.

  13. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma activates lactate in Ringer's solution for anti-tumor effects.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Nakamura, Kae; Mizuno, Masaaki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Utsumi, Fumi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2016-11-08

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a novel approach for wound healing, blood coagulation, and cancer therapy. A recent discovery in the field of plasma medicine is that non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma not only directly but also indirectly affects cells via plasma-treated liquids. This discovery has led to the use of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma as a novel chemotherapy. We refer to these plasma-treated liquids as plasma-activated liquids. We chose Ringer's solutions to produce plasma-activated liquids for clinical applications. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that plasma-activated Ringer's lactate solution has anti-tumor effects, but of the four components in Ringer's lactate solution, only lactate exhibited anti-tumor effects through activation by non-thermal plasma. Nuclear magnetic resonance analyses indicate that plasma irradiation generates acetyl and pyruvic acid-like groups in Ringer's lactate solution. Overall, these results suggest that plasma-activated Ringer's lactate solution is promising for chemotherapy.

  14. Blue-violet InGaN laser diodes grown on bulk GaN substrates by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Skierbiszewski, C.; Wasilewski, Z.R.; Siekacz, M.; Feduniewicz, A.; Perlin, P.; Wisniewski, P.; Borysiuk, J.; Grzegory, I.; Leszczynski, M.; Suski, T.; Porowski, S.

    2005-01-03

    We report on the InGaN multiquantum laser diodes (LDs) made by rf plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE). The laser operation at 408 nm is demonstrated at room temperature with pulsed current injections using 50 ns pulses at 0.25% duty cycle. The threshold current density and voltage for the LDs with cleaved uncoated mirrors are 12 kA/cm{sup 2} (900 mA) and 9 V, respectively. High output power of 0.83 W is obtained during pulse operation at 3.6 A and 9.6 V bias with the slope efficiency of 0.35 W/A. The laser structures are deposited on the high-pressure-grown low dislocation bulk GaN substrates taking full advantage of the adlayer enhanced lateral diffusion channel for adatoms below the dynamic metallic cover. Our devices compare very favorably to the early laser diodes fabricated using the metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy technique, providing evidence that the relatively low growth temperatures used in this process pose no intrinsic limitations on the quality of the blue optoelectronic components that can be fabricated using PAMBE.

  15. Application of Langmuir Probe Method to the Atmospheric Pressure Discharge Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, Hiroto; Matsumura, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Ken

    2008-12-31

    The heat balance model in the probe tip applied to atmospheric pressure plasma is constructed. Considering the natural convective heat loss, the limitation of plasma density for probe application to such a plasma is estimated. The rough limit is about n{sub e} = 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}. Four kind of materials (Cu, SUS, W, Al) are used for probe tips, and are tested in DC atmospheric pressure discharge. Heat conductivity is found to be a more important property than melting point in design of probes in high pressure discharge. DC atmospheric pressure discharge plasma parameters are obtained with our test probes. Obtained density is the order of 10{sup 17} m{sup -3} and does not contradict with the above density limitation. Change of space potential in air/Ar plasma is also confirmed.

  16. Influence of low and high pressure baroreceptors on plasma renin activity in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, A. L.; Abboud, F. M.; Fitz, A. E.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of low and high pressure baroreceptors on plasma renin activity (immunoassay) were evaluated using graded lower body suction (LBS) in six healthy men. LBS at -10 and -20 mmHg for 10 min decreased central venous pressure without changing arterial pressure and thereby presumably reduced low but not high pressure baroreceptor inhibition of renin release. LBS at these levels produced forearm vasoconstriction, but did not increase renin. LBS at -40 mmHG decreased central venous and arterial pulse pressure and thus reduced both low and high pressure baroreceptor inhibition. LBS at this level produced forearm vasoconstriction and tachycardia and increased renin. In summary, reduction in low pressure baroreceptor inhibition in humans did not increase renin in the presence of physiological tonic inhibition from high pressure baroreceptors. Increases in renin did not occur until there was combined reduction of high and low pressure baroreceptor inhibition on plasma renin activity.

  17. Review on VUV to MIR absorption spectroscopy of atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Stephan; Santos Sousa, Joao; Stancu, Gabi Daniel; Hubertus van Helden, Jean-Pierre

    2015-10-01

    Absorption spectroscopy (AS) represents a reliable method for the characterization of cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets. The method’s simplicity stands out in comparison to competing diagnostic techniques. AS is an in situ, non-invasive technique giving absolute densities, free of calibration procedures, which other diagnostics, such as laser-induced fluorescence or optical emission spectroscopy, have to rely on. Ground state densities can be determined without the knowledge of the influence of collisional quenching. Therefore, absolute densities determined by absorption spectroscopy can be taken as calibration for other methods. In this paper, fundamentals of absorption spectroscopy are presented as an entrance to the topic. In the second part of the manuscript, a review of AS performed on cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets, as they are used e.g. in the field of plasma medicine, is presented. The focus is set on special techniques overcoming not only the drawback of spectrally overlapping absorbing species, but also the line-of-sight densities that AS usually provides or the necessity of sufficiently long absorption lengths. Where references are not available for measurements on cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets, other plasma sources including low-pressure plasmas are taken as an example to give suggestions for possible approaches. The final part is a table summarizing examples of absorption spectroscopic measurements on cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets. With this, the paper provides a ‘best practice’ guideline and gives a compendium of works by groups performing absorption spectroscopy on cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets.

  18. The plasma footprint of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet on a flat polymer substrate and its relation to surface treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onyshchenko, Iuliia; Nikiforov, Anton Yu.; De Geyter, Nathalie; Morent, Rino

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work is to show the correlation between the plasma propagation in the footprint of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet on a flat polymer surface and the plasma treatment impact on the polymer properties. An argon plasma jet working in open air is used as plasma source, while PET thin films are used a substrates for plasma treatment. Light emission photographs are taken with an ICCD camera to have a close look at the generated structures in the plasma jet footprint on the surface. Water contact angle (WCA) measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis are also performed to obtain information about the impact of the plasma treatment on the PET surface characteristics. A variation in ICCD camera gate duration (1 µs, 100 µs, 50 ms) results in the photographs of the different plasma structures occurring during the plasma propagation on the flat PET surface. Contact angle measurements provide results on improvement of the PET hydrophilic character, while XPS analysis shows the distribution of atomic elements on the treated substrate surface. Light emission images help explaining the obtained WCA and XPS results. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  19. Erratum to: An approach to the research on ion and water properties in the interphase between the plasma membrane and bulk extracellular solution.

    PubMed

    Hibino, Hiroshi; Takai, Madoka; Noguchi, Hidenori; Sawamura, Seishiro; Takahashi, Yasufumi; Sakai, Hideki; Shiku, Hitoshi

    2017-10-04

    The article An approach to the research on ion and water properties in the interphase between the plasma membrane and bulk extracellular solution, written by Hiroshi Hibino, Madoka Takai, Hidenori Noguchi, Seishiro Sawamura, Yasufumi Takahashi, Hideki Sakai and Hitoshi Shiku, was originally published Online First without open access.

  20. Effect of Background Pressure on the Plasma Oscillation Characteristics of the HiVHAc Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani; Lobbia, Robert B.; Brown, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    During a component compatibility test of the NASA HiVHAc Hall thruster, a number of plasma diagnostics were implemented to study the effect of varying facility background pressure on thruster operation. These diagnostics characterized the thruster performance, the plume, and the plasma oscillations in the thruster. Thruster performance and plume characteristics as functions of background pressure were previously published. This paper focuses on changes in the plasma oscillation characteristics with changing background pressure. The diagnostics used to study plasma oscillations include a high-speed camera and a set of high-speed Langmuir probes. The results show a rise in the oscillation frequency of the "breathing" mode with rising background pressure, which is hypothesized to be due to a shortening acceleration/ionization zone. An attempt is made to apply a simplified ingestion model to the data. The combined results are used to estimate the maximum acceptable background pressure for performance and wear testing.

  1. Comparison of pressure dependence of electron energy distributions in oxygen capacitively and inductively coupled plasmas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Hyong; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-04-01

    Electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) were measured with increasing gas pressure in oxygen capacitively and inductively coupled plasmas. It was found that, in the capacitive discharge, abnormally low-energy electrons became highly populated and the EEDF evolved to a more distinct bi-Maxwellian distribution as the gas pressure was increased. This pressure dependence of the EEDF in the oxygen capacitive discharge is contrary to argon capacitively coupled plasma, where--at high gas pressure--low-energy electrons are significantly reduced due to collisional heating and the EEDF evolves to the Maxwellian. The highly populated low-energy electrons at high gas pressure, which was not observed in inductively coupled oxygen plasma, show that collisional heating is very inefficient in terms of the oxygen capacitive discharge. It appears that this inefficient collisional heating seems to be attributed to a low electric field strength at the center of the oxygen capacitive plasma.

  2. Combined effects of ambient gas pressures and magnetic field on laser plasma expansion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atif, Hussain; Xun, Gao; Qi, Li; Zuoqiang, Hao; Jingquan, Lin

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the influence of air gas pressures on the expansion features of nanosecond laser ablated aluminum plasma in the absence and presence of a nonuniform magnetic field using fast photography. A particular emphasis was given to the plume dynamics (shape, size) with the combined effects of ambient gas pressures and an external magnetic field. Free expansion, sharpening effect, and hemi-spherical structures of the aluminum plasma were observed without a magnetic field under different gas pressures. Analysis of the resulting plume images with the combined effects of air gas pressures and a magnetic field show significant changes, such as plume splitting, elliptical geometry changes, radial expansion, and plume confinement. Furthermore, the total size of the plasma plume with a magnetic field was measured to be smaller than the plasma plume without a magnetic field at several background pressures.

  3. Characterization of Low Pressure Cold Plasma in the Cleaning of Contaminated Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanz, Devin Garrett; Hintze, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    The characterization of low pressure cold plasma is a broad topic which would benefit many different applications involving such plasma. The characterization described in this paper focuses on cold plasma used as a medium in cleaning and disinfection applications. Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) and Mass Spectrometry (MS) are the two analytical methods used in this paper to characterize the plasma. OES analyzes molecules in the plasma phase by displaying the light emitted by the plasma molecules on a graph of wavelength vs. intensity. OES was most useful in identifying species which may interact with other molecules in the plasma, such as atomic oxygen or hydroxide radicals. Extracting useful data from the MS is done by filtering out the peaks generated by expected molecules and looking for peaks caused by foreign ones leaving the plasma chamber. This paper describes the efforts at setting up and testing these methods in order to accurately and effectively characterize the plasma.

  4. Improvement of Plasma Spray Torch Stability by Controlling Pressure and Voltage Dynamic Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rat, V.; Coudert, J. F.

    2011-01-01

    The development of coating formation processes involving electric arcs depends on process stability and the capacity to ensure a constant reproducibility of coating properties. This is particularly important when considering suspension plasma spraying or solution precursor plasma spraying. Submicron particles closely follow plasma instabilities and have nonhomogeneous plasma treatment. Recently, it has been shown that arc voltage fluctuations in direct-current (dc) plasma torches, showing dominant fluctuation frequencies between 4 and 6 kHz, are linked to pressure oscillations in the cathode cavity of the plasma torch. In this study, first, a method to isolate the different oscillation modes in arc voltage and pressure signals using signal processing methods is presented. Second, correlations between the different modes of oscillations are analyzed following the plasma torch operating parameters. Lastly, it is shown that the use of an acoustic stub, mounted on the torch body, decreases the amplitude of arc voltage fluctuations and slightly increases the mean voltage.

  5. Properties of the acrylic acid polymers obtained by atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topala, Ionut; Dumitrascu, Nicoleta; Popa, Gheorghe

    2009-01-01

    Plasma polymers of acrylic acid were obtained using an atmospheric pressure discharge system. The plasma polymerization reactor uses a dielectric barrier discharge, with the polyethylene terephthalate dielectric acting as substrate for deposition. The plasma was characterized by specific electrical measurements, monitoring the applied voltage and the discharge current. Based on the spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy, we analyzed the distribution of the excited species in the discharge gap, specific plasma temperatures (vibrational and gas temperatures) being calculated with the Boltzmann plot method. The properties of the plasma polymer films were investigated by contact angle measurements, infrared and UV-Vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy. The films produced by plasma polymerization at atmospheric pressure showed a hydrophilic character, in correlation with the strong absorbance of OH groups in the FTIR spectrum. Moreover, the surface of the plasma polymers at micrometric scale is smooth and free of defects without particular features.

  6. Role of Pressure Gradient on Intrinsic Toroidal Rotation in Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, M.; Kamada, Y.; Takenaga, H.; Sakamoto, Y.; Urano, H.; Oyama, N.; Matsunaga, G.

    2008-03-14

    The toroidal plasma rotation generated by the external momentum input and by the plasma itself (intrinsic rotation) has been separated through a novel momentum transport analysis in the JT-60U tokamak device. The toroidal rotation, which is not determined by the momentum transport coefficients and the external momentum input, has been observed. It is found that this intrinsic rotation is locally determined by the local pressure gradient and increases with increasing pressure gradient. This trend is almost the same for various plasmas: low and high confinement mode, co and counterrotating plasmas.

  7. Spectroscopic diagnosis of an atmospheric-pressure waveguide-based microwave N2-Ar plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shou-Zhe; Chen, Chuan-Jie; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Jialiang; Wang, Yong-Xing

    2015-04-01

    An atmospheric-pressure N2-Ar plasma is investigated by means of optical emission spectroscopic diagnosis concerning the variation of its fundamental parameters, electron density and plasma temperature, and concentrations of ionized molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and excited argon with the tuning variables, such as the input power and the ratio of N2 in N2-Ar mixture gas, in the discharge region of the plasma torch. Moreover, qualitative discussions are delivered with respect to the mechanisms for nitrogen dissociation and influence of the Ar component on the N2 plasma discharge at atmospheric pressure.

  8. Theoretical Study of Plasma Parameters Dependence on Gas Temperature in an Atmospheric Pressure Argon Microwave Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    2008-03-19

    The gas temperature is an important parameter in many applications of atmospheric pressure microwave discharges (MW). That is why it is necessary to study the influence of that temperature on the plasma characteristics. Our investigation is based on a self-consistent model including the wave electrodynamics and gas-discharge kinetics. We adopt a blocks' energy structure of the argon excited atom. More specifically, we consider 7 different blocks of states, namely 4s, 4p, 3d, 5s, 5p, 4d, and 6s. Each block k is characterized by its effective energy uk (derived as an average energy of all levels in the block), as well as its effective g-factor and population. The argon dimmer, atomic and molecular ions are also taken into account in the model. We solve the Boltzmann equation in order to get the electron energy distribution function and the necessary rate constants of the elementary processes. The collisional-radiative part of the model is based on 87 processes. As a result we obtain the electron and ions' number densities, mean electron energy, mean power for sustaining an electron--ion pair in the discharge bulk, as well as the population of the excited blocks of states of the argon atom as functions of the gas temperature.

  9. Intracellular effects of atmospheric-pressure plasmas on melanoma cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ishaq, M.; Bazaka, K.; Ostrikov, K.

    2015-12-15

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown as a promising tool for cancer treatment. The mechanism of the plasma action is attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, electric fields, charges, and photons. The relative importance of different modes of action of atmospheric-pressure plasmas depends on the process parameters and specific treatment objects. Hence, an in-depth understanding of biological mechanisms that underpin plasma-induced death in cancer cells is required to optimise plasma processing conditions. Here, the intracellular factors involved in the observed anti-cancer activity in melanoma Mel007 cells are studied, focusing on the effect of the plasma treatment dose on the expression of tumour suppressor protein TP73. Over-expression of TP73 causes cell growth arrest and/or apoptosis, and hence can potentially be targeted to enhance killing efficacy and selectivity of the plasma treatment. It is shown that the plasma treatment induces dose-dependent up-regulation of TP73 gene expression, resulting in significantly elevated levels of TP73 RNA and protein in plasma-treated melanoma cells. Silencing of TP73 expression by means of RNA interference inhibited the anticancer effects of the plasma, similar to the effect of caspase inhibitor z-VAD or ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine. These results confirm the role of TP73 protein in dose-dependent regulation of anticancer activity of atmospheric-pressure plasmas.

  10. Intracellular effects of atmospheric-pressure plasmas on melanoma cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishaq, M.; Bazaka, K.; Ostrikov, K.

    2015-12-01

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown as a promising tool for cancer treatment. The mechanism of the plasma action is attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, electric fields, charges, and photons. The relative importance of different modes of action of atmospheric-pressure plasmas depends on the process parameters and specific treatment objects. Hence, an in-depth understanding of biological mechanisms that underpin plasma-induced death in cancer cells is required to optimise plasma processing conditions. Here, the intracellular factors involved in the observed anti-cancer activity in melanoma Mel007 cells are studied, focusing on the effect of the plasma treatment dose on the expression of tumour suppressor protein TP73. Over-expression of TP73 causes cell growth arrest and/or apoptosis, and hence can potentially be targeted to enhance killing efficacy and selectivity of the plasma treatment. It is shown that the plasma treatment induces dose-dependent up-regulation of TP73 gene expression, resulting in significantly elevated levels of TP73 RNA and protein in plasma-treated melanoma cells. Silencing of TP73 expression by means of RNA interference inhibited the anticancer effects of the plasma, similar to the effect of caspase inhibitor z-VAD or ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine. These results confirm the role of TP73 protein in dose-dependent regulation of anticancer activity of atmospheric-pressure plasmas.

  11. Perspective: The physics, diagnostics, and applications of atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma sources used in plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroussi, M.; Lu, X.; Keidar, M.

    2017-07-01

    Low temperature plasmas have been used in various plasma processing applications for several decades. But it is only in the last thirty years or so that sources generating such plasmas at atmospheric pressure in reliable and stable ways have become more prevalent. First, in the late 1980s, the dielectric barrier discharge was used to generate relatively large volume diffuse plasmas at atmospheric pressure. Then, in the early 2000s, plasma jets that can launch cold plasma plumes in ambient air were developed. Extensive experimental and modeling work was carried out on both methods and much of the physics governing such sources was elucidated. Starting in the mid-1990s, low temperature plasma discharges have been used as sources of chemically reactive species that can be transported to interact with biological media, cells, and tissues and induce impactful biological effects. However, many of the biochemical pathways whereby plasma affects cells remain not well understood. This situation is changing rather quickly because the field, known today as "plasma medicine," has experienced exponential growth in the last few years thanks to a global research community that engaged in fundamental and applied research involving the use of cold plasma for the inactivation of bacteria, dental applications, wound healing, and the destruction of cancer cells/tumors. In this perspective, the authors first review the physics as well as the diagnostics of the principal plasma sources used in plasma medicine. Then, brief descriptions of their biomedical applications are presented. To conclude, the authors' personal assessment of the present status and future outlook of the field is given.

  12. The study of bulk plasma motions and associated electric fields in the plasmasphere by means of whistler-mode signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, D. L.; Smith, A. J.

    2001-07-01

    Whistler-mode waves propagating to ground stations along geomagnetic-field-aligned paths provide powerful tools for investigating bulk motions of the magnetospheric plasma and thus the corresponding convection electric fields. Natural whistlers from lightning as well as signals from very low frequency (VLF) transmitters have been employed. The whistler method emphasizes measurement of temporal variations in the frequency versus time, or dispersion, properties of whistlers, while the transmitter method focuses upon measurement of the phase and group paths of fixed-frequency signal propagation. The methods depend upon wave properties that are sensitive to inhomogeneities in the geomagnetic field, and thus provide information on what are essentially cross-/L plasma motions in a frame of reference rotating with the Earth. In addition, whistler data on the duskside plasmasphere bulge have been used to estimate values of the radial convection electric field (GSE /Y direction) near dusk. In this topical review we discuss the development, beginning in the 1960s, of the whistler and transmitter methods, as well as a few of their geophysical applications. Whistlers have provided substantial new information on the spatially and temporally structured manner in which convection electric fields penetrate the plasmasphere, one example being the still unexplained reversal from inward to outward of the post-midnight radial flow direction following temporally isolated substorms. Whistlers have also been useful in identifying the plasmaspheric drifts associated with quiet-day electric fields of ionospheric dynamo origin and in showing that the Ey (duskward), component of the convection electric field in the outer plasmasphere is substantially larger near dusk than it is near mid-night. Whistler-mode signals from transmitters have been found to be a powerful means of tracking cross-/L motions in the plasmasphere near /L=2.5 while separately identifying the effects of interchange

  13. Optimization of vortex pinning at grain boundaries on ex-situ MgB2 bulks synthesized by spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Tomoyuki; Endo, Yuri; Fujishiro, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-01

    Grain boundaries are well known to be the predominant pinning centers in MgB2 superconductors. To study the effects of grain boundaries on the trapped field properties of MgB2 bulk, we prepared MgB2 bulks by a spark plasma sintering method using a ball-milled starting powder. The trapped field was maximized for the bulk made from the ball-milled powder with crystallite size, τ, of 27 nm; the highest trapped field, {B}{{T}}, of 2.3 T achieved at 19.3 K was 1.2 times larger than that of the bulk made from the non ball-milled powder (τ = 50 nm). The degradation of the trapped field for the bulk from finer powder (τ = 6 nm) originated mainly from the lowered {T}{{c}}. The critical current density, {J}{{c}}, and the pinning force density, {F}{{p}}, were also maximized for the bulk from τ = 27 nm. The competition between the increase of the numerical density of grain boundaries and the degradation of superconductivity determined the vortex pinning properties for the MgB2 bulks with mechanically refined grains. The scaling analysis for the pinning force density suggested that the change in the dimension of the dominant pinning source from 2D (surface) to 0D (point) was induced by grain refining. Although the nanometric impurity particles such as MgB4, MgO and Mg-B-O were created in the bulk during both ball-milling and spark plasma sintering processes, we considered the point-contact between the refined grains was the predominant point pinning source.

  14. 3D Mapping of plasma effective areas via detection of cancer cell damage induced by atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Liu, Yueing; Stack, M. Sharon; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, a nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used for irradiation of oral cancer cells. Since cancer cells are very susceptible to plasma treatment, they can be used as a tool for detection of APPJ-effective areas, which extended much further than the visible part of the APPJ. An immunofluorescence assay was used for DNA damage identification, visualization and quantification. Thus, the effective damage area and damage level were determined and plotted as 3D images.

  15. Cellular and molecular responses of Neurospora crassa to non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gyungsoon; Ryu, Young H.; Hong, Young J.; Choi, Eun H.; Uhm, Han S.

    2012-02-01

    Filamentous fungi have been rarely explored in terms of plasma treatments. This letter presents the cellular and molecular responses of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa to an argon plasma jet at atmospheric pressure. The viability and cell morphology of N. crassa spores exposed to plasma were both significantly reduced depending on the exposure time when treated in water. The intracellular genomic DNA content was dramatically reduced in fungal tissues after a plasma treatment and the transcription factor tah-3 was found to be required for fungal tolerance to a harsh plasma environment.

  16. A long plasma column in a flexible tube at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Cho, Soon Cheon; Kim, Jong Hun; Uhm, Han Sup

    2007-07-15

    Atmospheric-pressure nonthermal plasma produced at a low frequency in a flexible dielectric tube in an argon gas flow is presented. The plasma system consists of a typical injection needle as a hot electrode, a Teflon registered tube as a dielectric, and a high voltage power supply. The plasma column is stabilized in the Teflon registered tube by flowing channels of argon gas through an injection needle. The column has a length of approximately 60 cm with 3 lpm of argon, and plasma exists throughout the Teflon registered tube with an inner diameter of 1.6 mm. The characteristics of the long plasma column are studied by preliminary observations.

  17. Selective killing of ovarian cancer cells through induction of apoptosis by nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Iseki, Sachiko; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Kondo, Hiroki; Hori, Masaru; Nakamura, Kae; Hayashi, Moemi; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Kano, Hiroyuki

    2012-03-12

    Two independent ovarian cancer cell lines and fibroblast controls were treated with nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP). Most ovarian cancer cells were detached from the culture dish by continuous plasma treatment to a single spot on the dish. Next, the plasma source was applied over the whole dish using a robot arm. In vitro cell proliferation assays showed that plasma treatments significantly decreased proliferation rates of ovarian cancer cells compared to fibroblast cells. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis showed that plasma treatment of ovarian cancer cells induced apoptosis. NEAPP could be a promising tool for therapy for ovarian cancers.

  18. Selective killing of ovarian cancer cells through induction of apoptosis by nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iseki, Sachiko; Nakamura, Kae; Hayashi, Moemi; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Kondo, Hiroki; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kano, Hiroyuki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2012-03-01

    Two independent ovarian cancer cell lines and fibroblast controls were treated with nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP). Most ovarian cancer cells were detached from the culture dish by continuous plasma treatment to a single spot on the dish. Next, the plasma source was applied over the whole dish using a robot arm. In vitro cell proliferation assays showed that plasma treatments significantly decreased proliferation rates of ovarian cancer cells compared to fibroblast cells. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis showed that plasma treatment of ovarian cancer cells induced apoptosis. NEAPP could be a promising tool for therapy for ovarian cancers.

  19. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet During Tooth Bleaching Gel Treatment.

    PubMed

    Šantak, Vedran; Zaplotnik, Rok; Tarle, Zrinka; Milošević, Slobodan

    2015-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was performed during atmospheric pressure plasma needle helium jet treatment of various tooth-bleaching gels. When the gel sample was inserted under the plasma plume, the intensity of all the spectral features increased approximately two times near the plasma needle tip and up to two orders of magnitude near the sample surface. The color change of the hydroxylapatite pastille treated with bleaching gels in conjunction with the atmospheric pressure plasma jet was found to be in correlation with the intensity of OH emission band (309 nm). Using argon as an additive to helium flow (2 L/min), a linear increase (up to four times) of OH intensity and, consequently, whitening (up to 10%) of the pastilles was achieved. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet activates bleaching gel, accelerates OH production, and accelerates tooth bleaching (up to six times faster).

  20. A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun for nanomaterial synthesis in liquid phase

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Shuang; Wang, Kaile; Zuo, Shasha; Liu, Jiahui; Zhang, Jue Fang, Jing

    2015-10-15

    A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun based on a dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes was proposed. The portable plasma gun with an embedded mini air pump was driven by a 12 V direct voltage battery. The air plasma jet generated from the gun could be touched without a common shock hazard. Besides working in air, the plasma gun can also work in water. The diagnostic result of optical emission spectroscopy showed the difference in reactive species of air plasma jet between in air and in water. The plasma gun was excited in 20 ml chloroauric acid aqueous solution with a concentration of 1.214 mM. A significant amount of gold nanoparticles were synthesized after 2 min continuous discharge. The plasma gun with these unique features is applicable in plasma medicine, etching, and s-nthesis of nanomaterials.

  1. A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun for nanomaterial synthesis in liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shuang; Wang, Kaile; Zuo, Shasha; Liu, Jiahui; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2015-10-01

    A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun based on a dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes was proposed. The portable plasma gun with an embedded mini air pump was driven by a 12 V direct voltage battery. The air plasma jet generated from the gun could be touched without a common shock hazard. Besides working in air, the plasma gun can also work in water. The diagnostic result of optical emission spectroscopy showed the difference in reactive species of air plasma jet between in air and in water. The plasma gun was excited in 20 ml chloroauric acid aqueous solution with a concentration of 1.214 mM. A significant amount of gold nanoparticles were synthesized after 2 min continuous discharge. The plasma gun with these unique features is applicable in plasma medicine, etching, and s-nthesis of nanomaterials.

  2. Diagnostics and active species formation in an atmospheric pressure helium sterilization plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A.; Anghel, S. D.; Papiu, M.; Dinu, O.

    2009-01-01

    Systematic spectroscopic studies and diagnostics of an atmospheric pressure radiofrequency (13.56 MHz) He plasma is presented. The discharge is an intrinsic part of the resonant circuit of the radiofrequency oscillator and was obtained using a monoelectrode type torch, at various gas flow-rates (0.1-6.0 l/min) and power levels (0-2 W). As function of He flow-rate and power the discharge has three developing stages: point-like plasma, spherical plasma and ellipsoidal plasma. The emission spectra of the plasma were recorded and investigated as function of developing stages, flow-rates and plasma power. The most important atomic and molecular components were identified and their evolution was studied as function of He flow-rate and plasma power towards understanding basic mechanisms occurring in this type of plasma. The characteristic temperatures (vibrational Tvibr, rotational Trot and excitation Texc) and the electron number density (ne) were determined.

  3. Effect of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet on human breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirpour, Shahriar; Nikkhah, Maryam; Pirouzmand, Somaye; Ghomi, Hamid Reza

    2012-10-01

    Nowadays, Non-thermal plasma enjoy a wide range of applications in biomedical fields such as Sterilization, Wound healing, Cancer treatment and etc. The aim of this paper is to study the effect of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet on breast cancer (MCF-7) cells. In this regard the effect of plasma on death of the cancer cells are explored experimentally. The plasma in this discharge is created by pulsed dc high voltage power supply with repetition rate of several tens of kilohertz which led to the inductively coupled plasma. The pure helium gas were used for formation of the plasma jet. MTT assay were used for quantification of death cells. The results showed that the cells death rate increase with plasma exposure time. This study confirm that plasma jet have significant effect on treatment of human breast cancer cells.

  4. Experimental evidence of bulk chemistry constraint on SiO2 solubility in clinopyroxene at high-pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Toshisuke; Osanai, Yasuhito

    2015-06-01

    We have experimentally confirmed that the solubility of SiO2 in clinopyroxene at ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic conditions is buffered by coesite and kyanite. The present findings were derived from high-pressure experiments on metapelite glass, powdered andesite and eclogite glass under anhydrous conditions. The metapelite glass and powdered andesite were recrystallised in boron nitride capsules at 8 GPa and 1100-1500 °C. The eclogite glass was heated in an AuPd capsule, both ends of which were welded, at 3 GPa and 1000 °C. Clinopyroxene nucleated from metapelite glass, the bulk composition of which is saturated in both SiO2 and Al2SiO5 components plotting within the Jd (Na,K)(Al,Cr)(Si,Ti)2O6-Qtz (Si,Ti)O2-Grt M3(Al,Cr)2(Si,Ti)3O12-Als (Al,Cr)2(Si,Ti)O5 tetrahedron (M = Fe, Mn, Mg, Ni, Zn, Ca), coexists with garnet, coesite and kyanite. The average excess silica content of the clinopyroxene ranges from 23.4 to 35.4 mol%. In contrast, an andesite experiment saturated in SiO2 but undersaturated in Al2SiO5 within the Jd-Qtz-Aug M(Si,Ti)O3-Grt tetrahedron produced clinopyroxene, garnet and coesite but no kyanite. The average excess silica in the clinopyroxene was 9.7-15.5 mol%, which is comparable to previous experimental data. Experiment on the eclogite glass with similar composition to andesite yielded clinopyroxene, garnet and coesite. An average excess silica content in clinopyroxene counts 6.4 mol%, which is much lower than that obtained from the andesite. The SiO2 content of clinopyroxene coexisting with garnet, coesite and kyanite is much higher than that of clinopyroxene coexisting with garnet and coesite without kyanite. Although the temperature dependence is unclear, the SiO2 solubility increases with pressure and Fe/(Fe+Mg). Clinopyroxene forms the solid solution series Jd-Es □0.5M0.5Al(Si,Ti)2O6 and Aug-Es, rather than Jd-Ts MAl2(Si,Ti)O6 and Es-Ts joins. Our experimental data suggest the probable existence of octahedral Si which may accompany the M2

  5. Reactive species in non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas: Generation, transport, and biological effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Naidis, G. V.; Laroussi, M.; Reuter, S.; Graves, D. B.; Ostrikov, K.

    2016-05-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas have recently become a topical area of research owing to their diverse applications in health care and medicine, environmental remediation and pollution control, materials processing, electrochemistry, nanotechnology and other fields. This review focuses on the reactive electrons and ionic, atomic, molecular, and radical species that are produced in these plasmas and then transported from the point of generation to the point of interaction with the material, medium, living cells or tissues being processed. The most important mechanisms of generation and transport of the key species in the plasmas of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets and other non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas are introduced and examined from the viewpoint of their applications in plasma hygiene and medicine and other relevant fields. Sophisticated high-precision, time-resolved plasma diagnostics approaches and techniques are presented and their applications to monitor the reactive species and plasma dynamics in the plasma jets and other discharges, both in the gas phase and during the plasma interaction with liquid media, are critically reviewed. The large amount of experimental data is supported by the theoretical models of reactive species generation and transport in the plasmas, surrounding gaseous environments, and plasma interaction with liquid media. These models are presented and their limitations are discussed. Special attention is paid to biological effects of the plasma-generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen (and some other) species in basic biological processes such as cell metabolism, proliferation, survival, etc. as well as plasma applications in bacterial inactivation, wound healing, cancer treatment and some others. Challenges and opportunities for theoretical and experimental research are discussed and the authors' vision for the emerging convergence trends across several disciplines and application domains is presented to

  6. Energy density dependence of hydrogen combustion efficiency in atmospheric pressure microwave plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, T.; Ezumi, N.; Sawada, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K.

    2015-03-15

    The recovery of tritium in nuclear fusion plants is a key issue for safety. So far, the oxidation procedure using an atmospheric pressure plasma is expected to be part of the recovery method. In this study, in order to clarify the mechanism of hydrogen oxidation by plasma chemistry, we have investigated the dependence of hydrogen combustion efficiency on gas flow rate and input power in the atmospheric pressure microwave plasma. It has been found that the combustion efficiency depends on energy density of absorbed microwave power. Hence, the energy density is considered as a key parameter for combustion processes. Also neutral gas temperatures inside and outside the plasma were measured by an optical emission spectroscopy method and thermocouple. The result shows that the neutral gas temperature in the plasma is much higher than the outside temperature of plasma. The high neutral gas temperature may affect the combustion reaction. (authors)

  7. Free radicals induced in aqueous solution by non-contact atmospheric-pressure cold plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tani, Atsushi; Fukui, Satoshi; Ono, Yusuke; Kitano, Katsuhisa; Ikawa, Satoshi

    2012-06-18

    To understand plasma-induced chemical processing in liquids, we investigated the formation of free radicals in aqueous solution exposed to different types of non-contact atmospheric-pressure helium plasma using the spin-trapping technique. Both hydroxyl radical (OH{center_dot}) and superoxide anion radical (O{sub 2}{sup -}{center_dot}) adducts were observed when neutral oxygen gas was additionally supplied to the plasma. In particular, O{sub 2}{sup -}{center_dot} can be dominantly induced in the solution via oxygen flow into the afterglow gas of helium plasma. This type of plasma treatment can potentially be used in medical applications to control infectious diseases, because the O{sub 2}{sup -}{center_dot} is crucial for sterilization of liquids via atmospheric-pressure plasma.

  8. Electron ranaway and ion-ion plasma formation in afterglow low-pressure plasma of oxygen-containing gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Bogdanov, Eugene; Kosykh, Nikolay; Gutsev, Sergey

    2012-10-01

    Experimental investigation of temporal evolution of charged plasma species in afterglow plasma of oxygen-containing mixtures have been investigated. The probe VAC and the time dependence of the saturation positive and negative particles currents to a probe in a fixed bias voltage were performed. The decay of afterglow low-pressure electronegative gas plasmas take place in two distinct stages (the electron-ion stage, and the ion-ion stage) as it was shown in [1] for pure oxygen. In the first stage, the negative ions are locked within a discharge volume and plasma is depleted of electrons and positive ions. The electron density decay is faster, than exponential, and practically all electrons leave plasma volume during finite time followed by the ion--ion (electron-free) plasma formation. The decay of the ion-ion plasma depends on the presence of detachment. With a large content of electronegative gas (oxygen) in a mixture, when there is a ``detachment particles,'' a small fraction of the electrons appearing as a result of the detachment continue to hold all negative ions in the discharge volume. In this case, the densities of all charged plasma components decay according to the same exponential law with a characteristic detachment time. At a low oxygen content in the gas mixture there is no detachment and plasma decays by an ion--ion ambipolar diffusion mechanism.[4pt][1]. S.A.Gutsev, A.A.Kudryavtsev, V.A.Romanenko. Tech.Phys. 40, 1131, (1995).

  9. Measurement of plasma-generated RONS in the cancer cells exposed by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joh, Hea Min; Baek, Eun Jeong; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, Tae Hun

    2015-09-01

    The plasma-induced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) could result in cellular responses including DNA damages and apoptotic cell death. These chemical species, O, O2-,OH, NO, and NO2-,exhibit strong oxidative stress and/or trigger signaling pathways in biological cells. Each plasma-generated chemical species having biological implication should be identified and quantitatively measured. For quantitative measurement of RONS, this study is divided into three stages; plasma diagnostics, plasma-liquid interactions, plasma-liquid-cell interactions. First, the optical characteristics of the discharges were obtained by optical emission spectroscopy to identify various excited plasma species. And the characteristics of voltage-current waveforms, gas temperature, and plume length with varying control parameters were measured. Next, atmospheric pressure plasma jet was applied on the liquid. The estimated OH radical densities were obtained by ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy at the liquid surface. And NO2-is detected by Griess test and compared between the pure liquid and the cell-containing liquid. Finally, bio-assays were performed on plasma treated human lung cancer cells (A549). Intracellular ROS production was measured using DCF-DA. Among these RONS, productions of NO and OH within cells were measured by DAF-2DA and APF, respectively. The data are very suggestive that there is a strong correlation among the production of RONS in the plasmas, liquids, and cells.

  10. Single channel atmospheric pressure transporting plasma and plasma stream demultiplexing: physical characterization and application to E. coli bacteria inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valinataj Omran, A.; Sohbatzadeh, F.; Siadati, S. N.; Hosseinzadeh Colagar, A.; Akishev, Y.; Arefi-Khonsari, F.

    2017-08-01

    In this article, we developed transporting plasma sources that operate at atmospheric pressure. The effect of electrode configuration on plasma transporting was investigated. In order to increase the transporting plasma cross-section, we converted a plasma stream into four plasma channels by a cylindrical housing. Electron excitation and rotational temperatures were estimated using optical emission spectroscopy. Furthermore, the electrical and temporal characteristics of the plasma, discharge power and charge deposition on the target were investigated. The propagation characteristics of single and multi-channel transporting plasma were compared with the same cross-sectional area. Two configurations for multi-channels were designed for this purpose. Escherichia coli bacteria were exposed to the single and multi-channel transporting discharge for different time durations. After exposure, the results indicated that the inactivation zones were significantly increased by a multi-channel transporting plasma. Finally, E. coli inactivation by those plasma apparatuses was compared with that of several standard antimicrobial test discs such as Gentamicin, Tetracycline, Amoxicillin and Cefixime.

  11. Life modeling of atmospheric and low pressure plasma-sprayed thermal-barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Argarwal, P.; Duderstadt, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    The cycles-to-failure vs cycle duration data for three different thermal barrier coating systems, which consist of atmospheric pressure plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8 percent Y2O3 over similarly deposited or low pressure plasma sprayed Ni-base alloys, are presently analyzed by means of the Miller (1980) oxidation-based life model. Specimens were tested at 1100 C for heating cycle lengths of 1, 6, and 20 h, yielding results supporting the model's value.

  12. DNA strand scission induced by a non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Ptasińska, Sylwia; Bahnev, Blagovest; Stypczyńska, Agnieszka; Bowden, Mark; Mason, Nigel J; Braithwaite, Nicholas St J

    2010-07-28

    The DNA molecule is observed to be very susceptible to short-term exposures to an atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The DNA damage induced by plasma-generated species, i.e. excited atoms, charged particles, electrons and UV light is determined.

  13. Characterization of an atmospheric pressure air plasma source for polymer surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shujun; Tang, Jiansheng

    2013-10-01

    An atmospheric pressure air plasma source was generated through dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). It was used to modify polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) surfaces with very high throughput. An equivalent circuit model was used to calculate the peak average electron density. The emission spectrum from the plasma was taken and the main peaks in the spectrum were identified. The ozone density in the down plasma region was estimated by Absorption Spectroscopy. NSF and ARC-ODU

  14. Study on the Striation of an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Flare Using a High Speed Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Yutaka; Sakakita, Hajime; Yamada, Hiromasa; Itagaki, Hirotomo; Kiyama, Satoru; Fujiwara, Masanori; Ikehara, Yuzuru; Kim, Jaeho

    2015-09-01

    Characteristics of a low energy atmospheric pressure plasma (LEAPP) specially designed for a medical application has been studied by the visualization of plasma emissions using a high speed camera. The formation of striations in the LEAPP was observed between a nozzle exit and a target material. This result indicates that the plasma propagation is not a bullet type. Detail structure of the striation phenomena will be presented in the conference.

  15. Study of the low-pressure plasma effect on polypropylene nonwovens

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, R.; Pascual, M.; Calvo, O.

    2010-06-02

    In this work we have used low-pressure plasma with a gas based on methane and oxygen mixture to improve wettability and durability of a PP nonwoven fabrics. The obtained results show good durability with the use of methane-oxygen plasma mixture gas. The effects of the plasma are similar to a plasmapolymerization process but in this case we obtain hydrophilic properties with high durability. The surface does not suffer important changes and the roughness of the material remains constant.

  16. Isentropic expansion of copper plasma in Mbar pressure range at "Luch" laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel'kov, S. A.; Derkach, V. N.; Garanin, S. G.; Mitrofanov, E. I.; Voronich, I. N.; Fortov, V. E.; Levashov, P. R.; Minakov, D. V.

    2014-01-01

    We present experimental results on thermodynamic properties of dense copper plasma in Mbar pressure range. The laser facility "Luch" with laser intensity 1014 W/cm2 is used to compress copper up to ˜8 Mbar by a strong shock wave; subsequent expansion of copper plasma into Al, Ti, Sn allows us to obtain release isentropes of copper by the impedance-matching method. A theoretical analysis and quantum simulations show that in our experiments strongly coupled quantum plasma is generated.

  17. Sterilization mechanism for Escherichia coli by plasma flow at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Takehiko; Miyahara, Takashi; Doi, Akiko; Ochiai, Shiroh; Urayama, Takuya; Nakatani, Tatsuyuki

    2006-08-01

    A mechanism for sterilizing Escherichia coli by a flowing postdischarge and UV radiation of argon plasma at atmospheric pressure was investigated by analyzing the surviving cells and the potassium leakage of cytoplasmic material and by morphological observation. Inactivation of E. coli results from the destruction of the cytoplasmic membrane and the outer membrane under plasma exposure and the destruction of nucleic acids by exposure to ultraviolet radiation from the plasma source.

  18. Sterilization mechanism for Escherichia coli by plasma flow at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Takehiko; Miyahara, Takashi; Doi, Akiko; Ochiai, Shiroh; Urayama, Takuya; Nakatani, Tatsuyuki

    2006-08-14

    A mechanism for sterilizing Escherichia coli by a flowing postdischarge and UV radiation of argon plasma at atmospheric pressure was investigated by analyzing the surviving cells and the potassium leakage of cytoplasmic material and by morphological observation. Inactivation of E. coli results from the destruction of the cytoplasmic membrane and the outer membrane under plasma exposure and the destruction of nucleic acids by exposure to ultraviolet radiation from the plasma source.

  19. Growth Enhancement of Radish Sprouts Induced by Low Pressure O2 Radio Frequency Discharge Plasma Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazaki, Satoshi; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu; Hayashi, Nobuya

    2012-01-01

    We studied growth enhancement of radish sprouts (Raphanus sativus L.) induced by low pressure O2 radio frequency (RF) discharge plasma irradiation. The average length of radish sprouts cultivated for 7 days after O2 plasma irradiation is 30-60% greater than that without irradiation. O2 plasma irradiation does not affect seed germination. The experimental results reveal that oxygen related radicals strongly enhance growth, whereas ions and photons do not.

  20. Modified drug release using atmospheric pressure plasma deposited siloxane coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, D. P.; Maher, S.; Law, V. J.; Ardhaoui, M.; Stallard, C.; Keenan, A.

    2016-09-01

    This pilot study evaluates the potential of atmospheric plasma polymerised coatings to modify the rate of drug release from polymeric substrates. The antibiotic rifampicin was deposited in a prototype multi-layer drug delivery system, consisting of a nebulized layer of active drug between a base layer of TEOS deposited on a plastic substrate (polystyrene) and an overlying layer of plasma polymerised PDMS. The polymerised TEOS and PDMS layers were deposited using a helium atmospheric plasma jet system. Elution of rifampicin was measured using UV-VIS spectroscopy, in addition to a antimicrobial well diffusion assay with an established indicator organism. The multi-layered plasma deposited coatings significantly extended the duration of release of the rifampicin from 24 h for the uncoated polymer to 144 h for the coated polymer.

  1. Effects of gas pressure on 60/13.56 MHz dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Q. H.; Yin, G. Q.; Xin, Y.; Ning, Z. Y.

    2011-05-15

    The electron energy probability functions (EEPFs) were measured with increasing gas pressure in 60/13.56 MHz dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasma (DF-CCP) using compensated Langmiur electrostatic probe. The transition pressure of heating mode from collisionless to collisional heating in 60/13.56 MHz DF-CCP is found to be significantly lower than that in 13.56 MHz single-frequency CCP. As the pressure increases, the EEPFs change from bi-Maxwellian to Druyvesteyn type which is similar with that in 60 MHz single-frequency CCP. The pressure dependence of electron densities, effective electron temperatures, floating potentials, and plasma potentials in 60/13.56 MHz DF-CCP were measured and were compared with that in 60 MHz single-frequency CCP. The pressure dependence of these plasma parameters in 60/13.56 MHz DF-CCP is similar with that in 60 MHz single-frequency CCP.

  2. Influence of emitter temperature on the energy deposition in a low-pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-03-15

    The influence of emitter temperature on the energy deposition into low-pressure plasma is studied by the self-consistent one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions model. Depending on the emitter temperature, different modes of discharge operation are obtained. The mode type depends on the plasma frequency and does not depend on the ratio between the densities of beam and plasma electrons. Namely, plasma is stable when the plasma frequency is small. For this plasma, the energy transfer from emitted electrons to plasma electrons is inefficient. The increase in the plasma frequency results first in the excitation of two-stream electron instability. However, since the thermal velocity of plasma electrons is smaller than the electrostatic wave velocity, the resonant wave-particle interaction is inefficient for the energy deposition into the plasma. Further increase in the plasma frequency leads to the distortion of beam of emitted electrons. Then, the electrostatic wave generated due to two-stream instability decays into multiple slower waves. Phase velocities of these waves are comparable with the thermal velocity of plasma electrons which makes possible the resonant wave-particle interaction. This results in the efficient energy deposition from emitted electrons into the plasma.

  3. Rare-gas liquids - Equation of state and reduced-pressure, reduced-bulk-modulus, and reduced-sound-velocity functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert

    1990-01-01

    This paper is concerned with verification of the applicability of the Vinet et al. (1987) universal equation of state to the liquid phase of the rare-gas elements under pressure. As previously observed in solids and liquids metals, to a good approximation, in the absence of phase transitions, plots of the logarithms of the reduced pressure function, of the reduced sound velocity, and of the reduced bulk modulus, are all linear functions of 1 - X over the entire experimental pressure range. The results obtained on the rare-gas liquids are comparable in accuracy to those obtained in previous work on solids and liquid metals.

  4. Rare-gas liquids - Equation of state and reduced-pressure, reduced-bulk-modulus, and reduced-sound-velocity functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert

    1990-01-01

    This paper is concerned with verification of the applicability of the Vinet et al. (1987) universal equation of state to the liquid phase of the rare-gas elements under pressure. As previously observed in solids and liquids metals, to a good approximation, in the absence of phase transitions, plots of the logarithms of the reduced pressure function, of the reduced sound velocity, and of the reduced bulk modulus, are all linear functions of 1 - X over the entire experimental pressure range. The results obtained on the rare-gas liquids are comparable in accuracy to those obtained in previous work on solids and liquid metals.

  5. Application of nonlinear dynamic techniques to high pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorui, S.; Das, A. K.

    2010-02-01

    Arcs and arc plasmas have been known and used for welding, cutting, chemical synthesis and multitude of other industrial applications for more than hundred years. Though a copious source of heat, light and active species, plasma arc is inherently unstable, turbulent and difficult to control. During recent years, primarily driven by the need of new and energy efficient materials processing, various research groups around the world have been studying new and innovative ways of looking at the issues related to arc dynamics, arc stabilization, species non equilibrium, flow and heat transfer in a stabilized arc plasma device. In this context, experimental determination of nature of arc instabilities using tools of non-linear dynamics, theoretical model formulation, prediction of instability behavior under given operating conditions and possible control methods for the observed instabilities in arcs are reviewed. Space selective probing of the zones inside arc plasma devices without disturbing the system is probably the best way to identify the originating zone of instabilities inside such devices. Existence of extremely high temperature and inaccessibility to direct experimentations due to mechanical obstructions make this task extremely difficult. Probing instabilities in otherwise inaccessible inner regions of the torches, using binary gas mixture as plasma gas is a novel technique that primarily rests on a process known as demixing in arcs. Once a binary gas mixture enters the constricted plasma column, the demixing process sets in causing spatial variations for each of the constituent gases depending on the diffusion coefficients and the gradient of the existing temperature field. By varying concentrations of the constituent gases in the feeding line, it is possible to obtain spatial variations of the plasma composition in a desired manner, enabling spatial probing of the associated zones. Detailed compositional description of different zones inside the torch may be

  6. An atmospheric-pressure, high-aspect-ratio, cold micro-plasma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, X.; Wu, S.; Gou, J.; Pan, Y.

    2014-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium Ar micro-plasma generated inside a micro-tube with plasma radius of 3 μm and length of 2.7 cm is reported. The electron density of the plasma plume estimated from the broadening of the Ar emission line reaches as high as 3 × 1016 cm−3. The electron temperature obtained from CR model is 1.5 ev while the gas temperature of the plasma estimated from the N2 rotational spectrum is close to room temperature. The sheath thickness of the plasma could be close to the radius of the plasma. The ignition voltages of the plasma increase one order when the radius of the dielectric tube is decreased from 1 mm to 3 μm. PMID:25502006

  7. An atmospheric-pressure, high-aspect-ratio, cold micro-plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Wu, S.; Gou, J.; Pan, Y.

    2014-12-01

    An atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium Ar micro-plasma generated inside a micro-tube with plasma radius of 3 μm and length of 2.7 cm is reported. The electron density of the plasma plume estimated from the broadening of the Ar emission line reaches as high as 3 × 1016 cm-3. The electron temperature obtained from CR model is 1.5 ev while the gas temperature of the plasma estimated from the N2 rotational spectrum is close to room temperature. The sheath thickness of the plasma could be close to the radius of the plasma. The ignition voltages of the plasma increase one order when the radius of the dielectric tube is decreased from 1 mm to 3 μm.

  8. Modeling and Data Needs of Atmospheric Pressure Gas Plasma and Biomaterial Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sakiyama, Yukinori; Graves, David B.

    2009-05-02

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas have received considerable attention recently. One promising application of non-thermal plasma devices appears to be biomaterial and biomedical treatment. Various biological and medical effects of non-thermal plasmas have been observed by a variety of investigators, including bacteria sterilization, cell apoptosis, and blood coagulation, among others. The mechanisms of the plasma-biomaterial interaction are however only poorly understood. A central scientific challenge is therefore how to answer the question: 'What plasma-generated agents are responsible for the observed biological effects?' Our modeling efforts are motivated by this question. In this paper, we review our modeling results of the plasma needle discharge. Then, we address data needs for further modeling and understanding of plasma-biomaterial interaction.

  9. Helium Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet: Diagnostics and Application for Burned Wounds Healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topala, Ionut; Nastuta, Andrei

    A new field of plasma applications developed in the last years, entitled plasma medicine, has focused the attention of many peoples from plasma ­community on biology and medicine. Subjects that involve plasma physics and technology (e.g. living tissue treatment or wound healing, cancer cell apoptosis, blood coagulation, sterilization and decontamination) are nowadays in study in many laboratories. In this paper we present results on optical and electrical diagnosis of a helium ­atmospheric pressure plasma jet designed for medical use. This type of plasma jet was used for improvement of the wound healing process. We observed a more rapid macroscopic healing of the plasma treated wounds in comparison with the control group.

  10. Modeling and Data Needs of Atmospheric Pressure Gas Plasma and Biomaterial Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakiyama, Yukinori; Graves, David B.

    2009-05-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas have received considerable attention recently. One promising application of non-thermal plasma devices appears to be biomaterial and biomedical treatment. Various biological and medical effects of non-thermal plasmas have been observed by a variety of investigators, including bacteria sterilization, cell apoptosis, and blood coagulation, among others. The mechanisms of the plasma-biomaterial interaction are however only poorly understood. A central scientific challenge is therefore how to answer the question: "What plasma-generated agents are responsible for the observed biological effects?" Our modeling efforts are motivated by this question. In this paper, we review our modeling results of the plasma needle discharge. Then, we address data needs for further modeling and understanding of plasma-biomaterial interaction

  11. The evolution of atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma jets: jet current measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakas, Erdinc; Arda Akman, Mehmet; Laroussi, Mounir

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we report insights into the dynamics of atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma jets (APLTPJs). The plasma jet current was measured by a Pearson current monitor for different operating conditions. These jet current measurements confirmed a proposed photo-ionization model based on streamer theory. Our results are supported by intensified charged-couple device camera observations. It was found that a secondary discharge ignition, arising from the positive high-voltage electrode, causes the inhibition of plasma bullet propagation. Our observations also showed the existence of an ionization channel between the APLTPJ reactor and the plasma bullet. In addition, the maximum electron density along the plasma jet was estimated using Ohm's law, and an empirical relationship was derived between the plasma bullet velocity and the plasma bullet area.

  12. Design and characterization of an RF excited micro atmospheric pressure plasma jet for reference in plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker

    2015-09-01

    Over the last decade a huge variety of atmospheric pressure plasma jets has been developed and applied for plasma medicine. The efficiency of these non-equilibrium plasmas for biological application is based on the generated amounts of reactive species and radiation. The gas temperatures stay within a range tolerable for temperature-sensitive tissues. The variety of different discharge geometries complicates a direct comparison. In addition, in plasma-medicine the combination of plasma with reactive components, ambient air, as well as biologic tissue - typically also incorporating fluids - results in a complex system. Thus, real progress in plasma-medicine requires a profound knowledge of species, their fluxes and processes hitting biological tissues. That will allow in particular the necessary tailoring of the discharge to fit the conditions. The complexity of the problem can only be overcome by a common effort of many groups and requires a comparison of their results. A reference device based on the already well-investigated micro-scaled atmospheric pressure plasma jet is presented. It is developed in the frame of the European COST initiative MP1101 to establish a publicly available, stable and reproducible source, where required plasma conditions can be investigated. Here we present the design and the ideas behind. The presentation discusses the requirements for the reference source and operation conditions. Biological references are also defined by the initiative. A specific part of the talk will be attributed to the reproducibility of results from various samples of the device. Funding by the DFG within the Package Project PAK816 ``Plasma Cell Interaction in Dermatology'' and the Research Unit FOR 1123 ``Physics of microplasmas'' is gratefully acknowledged.

  13. Development of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma system for surface modification of polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasih, T. P.

    2017-04-01

    Non-thermal plasma has become one of the new technologies which are highly developed now days. This happens because the cold plasma using the principle of generated reactive gases that have the ability to modify the surface properties of a material or product without changing the original characteristics of the material. The purpose of this study is to develop a cold plasma system that operates at atmospheric pressure and investigates the effect of cold plasma treatment to change the surface characteristics of the polymer material polyethylene (PE) at various time conditions. We are successfully developing a non-thermal plasma system that can operate at atmospheric pressure and can be run with Helium or Argon gas. The characteristics of plasma will be discussed from the view of its electrical property, plasma discharge regime andoperation temperature. Experiment results on plasma treatment on PE material shows the changes of surface properties of originally hydrophobic material PE becomes hydrophilic by only few seconds of plasma treatment and level of hydrophilicity become greater with increasing duration of plasma treatment. Confirmation of this is shown by the measurement of contact angle of droplets of water on the surface of PE are getting smaller.

  14. The effect of plasmapheresis on blood pressure in voluntary plasma donors

    PubMed Central

    Rosa-Bray, M; Wisdom, C; Marier, J F; Mouksassi, M-S; Wada, S

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Donor plasmapheresis involves the removal of a weight-adjusted volume of plasma and the return of cellular components to the donor. Although plasma volume generally returns to normal, some residual effect on vital signs may be possible. This analysis was performed to determine the possible effects of plasmapheresis on blood pressure. Materials and Methods A 16-week study was conducted to evaluate the effects of plasma donations on cholesterol levels in healthy donors. From this study, the vital signs obtained prior to donation were analysed using statistical and dynamic analytical predictive models. Results Preliminary analyses revealed a change in systolic and diastolic blood pressure from the corresponding baseline values (Pearson Coefficient −0·44 and −0·47, respectively). Statistical models predicted a marked decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure following multiple donations in donors with baseline pressure in the Stage 2 hypertension range with less pronounced decreases predicted in Stage 1 donors. Little or no change in blood pressure was predicted in donors with baseline normal blood pressure or prehypertension. Dynamic models including time between donations supported these results and predicted a recovery period of about 14 days without donation in donors with Stage 2 baseline levels. Conclusions Results suggest that systolic and diastolic blood pressure may be decreased following plasmapheresis used for plasma donations at intervals of <14 days in donors with high baseline blood pressure levels. PMID:25169580

  15. Generation of Free Radicals in Liquid by Atmospheric-Pressure Plasmas and its Application to Biology and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Satoshi; Ikuse, Kazumasa; Kanazawa, Tatsuya

    Numerical simulations have been performed to determine the concentration distributions of reactive species in pure water exposed to atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APPs). The model equations for simulations are the reaction-diffusion equations for 37 species and 111 chemical reactions. From global-model simulations, where the liquid is assumed to be well stirred and the concentration of each species is assumed to be uniform in the entire liquid volume, it has been found that hydrogen peroxide H2O2 is one of the most dominant species in water that is in contact with an APP. One-dimensional simulations, where reactive species diffuse into water at given diffusion speeds, show that, in the liquid phase, only highly stable species such as H2O2 are found in the bulk and highly reactive species such as OH radicals are concentrated only in a very thin layer near the gas-liquid boundary.

  16. The Healing Effect of Low-Temperature Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma in Pressure Ulcer: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Chuangsuwanich, Apirag; Assadamongkol, Tananchai; Boonyawan, Dheerawan

    2016-08-31

    Pressure ulcers are difficult to treat. Recent reports of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma (LTAPP) indicated its safe and effectiveness in chronic wound care management. It has been shown both in vitro and vivo studies that LTAPP not only helps facilitate wound healing but also has antimicrobial efficacy due to its composition of ion and electron, free radicals, and ultraviolet ray. We studied the beneficial effect of LTAPP specifically on pressure ulcers. In a prospective randomized study, 50 patients with pressure ulcers were divided into 2 groups: Control group received standard wound care and the study group was treated with LTAPP once every week for 8 consecutive weeks in addition to standard wound care. We found that the group treated with LTAPP had significantly better PUSH (Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing) scores and exudate amount after 1 week of treatment. There was also a reduction in bacterial load after 1 treatment regardless of the species of bacteria identified.

  17. The acute cerebral effects of changes in plasma osmolality and oncotic pressure.

    PubMed

    Zornow, M H; Todd, M M; Moore, S S

    1987-12-01

    Although it is generally accepted that a decrease in plasma oncotic pressure may result in the formation of peripheral edema, the effect of a hypo-oncotic state on brain water content is less well known. Therefore, utilizing the technique of hollow-fiber plasma-pheresis to manipulate plasma composition, the authors examined the effects of acute changes in either plasma osmolality or colloid oncotic pressure on the EEG, regional cerebral blood flow, intracranial pressure, and brain tissue specific gravity (as a measure of cerebral water content) in anesthetized, neurologically normal New Zealand white rabbits. Animals in which either osmolality or oncotic pressure was decreased by plasma replacement with an appropriate solution were compared with a group of control animals in which both of these variables were maintained constant. Animals in which plasma osmolality was decreased by 13 +/- 6 mOsm/kg (from a baseline value of 295 +/- 5 mOsm/kg) showed evidence of a significant increase in cortical water content (approximately 0.5%), whereas a 65% reduction in oncotic pressure (from 20 +/- 2 mmHg to 7 +/- 1 mmHg) failed to produce any change. There were no significant differences in mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure, regional cerebral blood flow, or the EEG between any of the groups. Although intracranial pressure increased in all groups, the largest increase (8.1 +/- 4.4 mmHg) occurred in those animals whose osmolality was reduced. The increase in intracranial pressure in animals rendered hypo-oncotic was no different from the "control" group (2.4 +/- 0.9 mmHg vs. 3.0 +/- 1.5 mmHg).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Radical electronic transformation of strongly coupled plasma at megabar pressure ionization, dielectrization and phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortov, Vladimir

    2007-06-01

    The work presents new results of investigation of pressure and temperature ionization of coupled nonideal plasmas generated as a result of multiple shock compression of metals, H2, He, noble gases, S, I, fullerene C60, H2O in the megabar pressure range. The highly time-resolved diagnostics permit us to measure thermodynamical, radiative and mechanical properties of high pressure condensed matter in a broad region of the phase diagram. This data in combination with exploding wire conductivity measurements demonstrate an ionization rate increase up to ten orders of magnitude as a result of compression of degenerate plasmas at p 104-107 bars. Shock compression of H2, Ar, He, Kr, Ne, Xe in initially gaseous and cryogenic liquid state allows measuring the electrical conductivity, Hall effect parameters, equation of state, and emission spectra of strongly nonideal plasma. Thermal and pressure ionization of strongly coupled states of matter is the most prominent effects under the experimental conditions. It was shown that plasma compression strongly deforms the ionization potentials, emission spectra and scattering cross-sections of the neutrals and ions in the strongly coupled plasmas. In contrast to the plasma compression the multiple shock compression of solid Li, Na, Ca shows ``dielectrization'' of the elements. Phase transitions in strongly nonideal plasmas are discussed.

  19. An improved process for high nutrition of germinated brown rice production: Low-pressure plasma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua Han; Chang, Hung Chia; Chen, Yu Kuo; Hung, Chien Lun; Lin, Su Yi; Chen, Yi Sheng

    2016-01-15

    Brown rice was exposed to low-pressure plasma ranging from 1 to 3kV for 10min. Treatment of brown rice in low-pressure plasma increases the germination percentage, seedling length, and water uptake in laboratory germination tests. Of the various treatments, 3-kV plasma exposure for 10min yielded the best results. In germinating brown rice, α-amylase activity was significantly higher in treated groups than in controls. The higher enzyme activity in plasma-treated brown rice likely triggers the rapid germination and earlier vigor of the seedlings. Low-pressure plasma also increased gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels from ∼19 to ∼28mg/100g. In addition, a marked increase in the antioxidant activity of brown rice was observed with plasma treatments compared to controls. The main finding of this study indicates that low-pressure plasma is effective at enhancing the growth and GABA accumulation of germinated brown rice, which can supply high nutrition to consumer.

  20. Low-Pressure Plasma Application for the Inactivation of the Seed-borne Pathogen Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Terumi; Takai, Yuichiro; Mishima, Tomoko; Kawaradani, Mitsuo; Tanimoto, Hideo; Okada, Kiyotsugu; Misawa, Tatsuya; Kusakari, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of low-pressure plasma treatment on seed disinfection and the possible mechanisms underlying this effect. Seed-borne disease refers to plant diseases that are transmitted by seeds; seed disinfection is an important technique for prevention of such diseases. In this study, the effectiveness of low-pressure plasma treatment in the inactivation of the seed-borne plant pathogenic bacterium, Xanthomonas campestris, inoculated on cruciferous seeds, was evaluated. The highest inactivation effect was observed when the treatment voltage and argon gas flow rate were 5.5 kV and 0.5 L/min, respectively. The viable cell number of X. campestris was 6.6 log cfu/seed before plasma treatment, and decreased by 3.9 log after 5 min of treatment and by 6.6 log after 40 min. Ethidium monoazide treatment and quantitative real-time PCR results indicated that both the cell membrane and target DNA region were damaged following 5 min of plasma treatment. Although both heat and ozone were generated during the plasma treatment, the contribution of both factors to the inactivation of X. campestris was small by itself in our low-pressure plasma system. Overall, we have shown that our low-pressure plasma system has great applicability to controlling plant pathogenic bacterium contamination of seeds.

  1. Influence of pressure on ion energy distribution functions in EUV-induced hydrogen plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Ven, T. H. M.; Reefman, P.; de Meijere, C. A.; Banine, V. Y.; Beckers, J.

    2016-09-01

    Next-generation lithography tools currently use Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) radiation to create even smaller features on computer chips. The high energy photons (92 eV) induce a plasma in the low pressure background gas by photoionization. Industries have realized that these plasmas are of significant importance with respect to machine lifetime because impacting ions affect exposed surfaces. The mass resolved ion energy distribution function (IEDF) is therefore one of the main plasma parameters of interest. In this research an ion mass spectrometer is used to investigate IEDFs of ions impacting on surfaces in EUV-induced plasmas. EUV radiation is focused into a vessel with a low pressure hydrogen environment. Here, photoionization creates free electrons with energies up to 76 eV, which further ionize the background gas. The influence of the pressure on plasma composition and IEDFs has been investigated in the range 0.1-10 Pa. In general the ion fluxes towards the surface increase with pressure. However, above 5 Pa the flux of H2+ is not affected by the increase in pressure due to the balance between the creation of H2+ and the conversion of H2+ to H3+. These results will be used to benchmark plasma scaling models and verify numerical simulations.

  2. On anomalous temporal evolution of gas pressure in inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, B. H.; Chang, H. Y.; You, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Seong, D. J.

    2013-04-01

    The temporal measurement of gas pressure in inductive coupled plasma revealed that there is an interesting anomalous evolution of gas pressure in the early stage of plasma ignition and extinction: a sudden gas pressure change and its relaxation of which time scales are about a few seconds and a few tens of second, respectively, were observed after plasma ignition and extinction. This phenomenon can be understood as a combined result between the neutral heating effect induced by plasma and the pressure relaxation effect for new gas temperature. The temporal measurement of gas temperature by laser Rayleigh scattering and the time dependant calculations for the neutral heating and pressure relaxation are in good agreement with our experimental results. This result and physics behind are expected to provide a new operational perspective of the recent plasma processes of which time is very short, such as a plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition/etching, a soft etch for disposal of residual by-products on wafer, and light oxidation process in semiconductor manufacturing.

  3. Characterization of Inductively Coupled Plasmas in High Power, High Pressure Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Chieh; Kenney, Jason; Agarwal, Ankur; Nichols, Michael; Rogers, James; Rauf, Shahid

    2015-09-01

    Inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) are widely used in the microelectronic industry for thin film etching. ICPs have typically been operated at low gas pressures (<50 mTorr) and they have been well-characterized in this regime. Several applications requiring high etch rates (e.g., vertical NAND etch) have recently extended the use of ICPs to the high power (>4000 W) and high pressure (>100 mTorr) regime. ICP operation in this high-power, high-pressure regime imposes a tremendous challenge of achieving good plasma uniformity over large substrates. This necessitates a good theoretical understanding of the underlying physics, thorough experimental characterization, and more accurate numerical models for hardware design guidance. In this study, we will focus on the characterization of ICP in the high-power, high-pressure regime. Computational modeling is done using CRTRS, our in-house 2D/3D plasma model. The fluid plasma model is coupled to a circuit model to self-consistently account for the capacitive coupling from the coils that is expected to dominate in this operating regime. Properties of Ar plasma will be discussed and compared with experiments. The impact of critical operating parameters such as ICP power, pressure, flow rate, and current ratio (in multi-coil antenna structures) on plasma characteristics will be examined. Results in relevant processing gases will also be discussed.

  4. plasmatis Center for Innovation Competence: Controlling reactive component output of atmospheric pressure plasmas in plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Stephan

    2012-10-01

    The novel approach of using plasmas in order to alter the local chemistry of cells and cell environment presents a significant development in biomedical applications. The plasmatis center for innovation competence at the INP Greifswald e.V. performs fundamental research in plasma medicine in two interdisciplinary research groups. The aim of our plasma physics research group ``Extracellular Effects'' is (a) quantitative space and time resolved diagnostics and modelling of plasmas and liquids to determine distribution and composition of reactive species (b) to control the plasma and apply differing plasma source concepts in order to produce a tailored output of reactive components and design the chemical composition of the liquids/cellular environment and (c) to identify and understand the interaction mechanisms of plasmas with liquids and biological systems. Methods to characterize the plasma generated reactive species from plasma-, gas- and liquid phase and their biological effects will be presented. The diagnostic spectrum ranges from absorption/emission/laser spectroscopy and molecular beam mass spectrometry to electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and cell biological diagnostic techniques. Concluding, a presentation will be given of the comprehensive approach to plasma medicine in Greifswald where the applied and clinical research of the Campus PlasmaMed association is combined with the fundamental research at plasmatis center.

  5. Particle-In-Cell simulations of high pressure plasmas using graphics processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, Markus; Atteln, Frank; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Mertmann, Philipp; Awakowicz, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations are widely used to understand the fundamental phenomena in low-temperature plasmas. Particularly plasmas at very low gas pressures are studied using PIC methods. The inherent drawback of these methods is that they are very time consuming -- certain stability conditions has to be satisfied. This holds even more for the PIC simulation of high pressure plasmas due to the very high collision rates. The simulations take up to very much time to run on standard computers and require the help of computer clusters or super computers. Recent advances in the field of graphics processing units (GPUs) provides every personal computer with a highly parallel multi processor architecture for very little money. This architecture is freely programmable and can be used to implement a wide class of problems. In this paper we present the concepts of a fully parallel PIC simulation of high pressure plasmas using the benefits of GPU programming.

  6. Effect of the atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasmas on the conformational changes of plasmid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xu; Zou, Fei; Lu, Xin Pei; He, Guangyuan; Shi, Meng Jun; Xiong, Qing; Gao, Xuan; Xiong, Zilan; Li, Yin; Ma, Feng Yun; Yu, Men; Wang, Chang Dong; Wang, Yuesheng; Yang, Guangxiao

    2009-08-01

    The cold atmospheric pressure plasma, which has been widely used for biomedical applications, may potentially affect the conformation of DNA. In this letter, an atmospheric pressure plasma plume is used to investigate its effects on the conformational changes of DNA of plasmid pAHC25. It is found that the plasma plume could cause plasmid DNA topology alteration, resulting in the percentage of the supercoiled plasmid DNA form decreased while that of the open circular and linearized form of plasmid DNA increased as detected by agrose gel electrophoresis. On the other hand, further investigation by using polymerase chain reaction method shows that the atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatments under proper conditions does not affect the genes of the plasmid DNA, which may have potential application in increasing the transformation frequency by genetic engineering.

  7. Effect of the atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasmas on the conformational changes of plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Xu; He Guangyuan; Shi Mengjun; Gao Xuan; Li Yin; Ma Fengyun; Yu Men; Wang Changdong; Wang Yuesheng; Yang Guangxiao; Zou Fei; Lu Xinpei; Xiong Qing; Xiong Zilan

    2009-08-24

    The cold atmospheric pressure plasma, which has been widely used for biomedical applications, may potentially affect the conformation of DNA. In this letter, an atmospheric pressure plasma plume is used to investigate its effects on the conformational changes of DNA of plasmid pAHC25. It is found that the plasma plume could cause plasmid DNA topology alteration, resulting in the percentage of the supercoiled plasmid DNA form decreased while that of the open circular and linearized form of plasmid DNA increased as detected by agrose gel electrophoresis. On the other hand, further investigation by using polymerase chain reaction method shows that the atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatments under proper conditions does not affect the genes of the plasmid DNA, which may have potential application in increasing the transformation frequency by genetic engineering.

  8. Impact of Xe partial pressure on the production of excimer vacuum ultraviolet emission for plasma display panels

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Di; Zhang Xiong; Kajiyama, Hiroshi

    2012-08-01

    In this work, the effect of the Xe partial pressure on the excimer vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission intensity of the plasma display panels is investigated, both by measuring the spectral emission directly and by two-dimensional simulations. Experimentally, we find that at the high Xe partial pressure levels, there is an supra-linear increase of excimer VUV radiation and that determines the strong increase of luminance at the high pressures and high voltage. Due to the increase of the luminance and the almost unchanged discharge current, the luminous efficacy strongly increases with the Xe partial pressure. In addition, we also investigated the dynamics of the VUV generation, by measuring the decay time of the excimer VUV light as a function of the gas pressure. It is found that the decay time decreases with the increase of gas pressure. The spatial characteristics of the excimer VUV emission are also discussed. Different from the Ne and near-infrared emission, the excimer VUV emission is generated near the surface of the electrodes and increases uniformly on both sides of the anode and cathode (i.e., the bulk plasma region). Most importantly, it is found that the VUV production occurs during the afterglow period, while it is almost zero at the moment of the discharge itself. From the simulations, it can be seen that the Xe{sub 2}*({sup 3}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +}) excimer species, which are generated from Xe*(1s{sub 5}), play a dominant role in the excimer VUV emission output at the high Xe partial pressure. The two-dimensional simulations also show that the strong increase of Xe excimer excitation states in the case of high pressure is mainly the result of the high conversion efficiency of the Xe excimer states, especially in the afterglow period. Due to the high conversion efficiency of Xe excitation species to Xe excimer species by the high collision rate in the case of high pressure, there is a strong increase of excimer VUV production, especially from the cathode.

  9. Electron heating in radio-frequency capacitively coupled atmospheric-pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D. W.; Iza, F.; Kong, M. G.

    2008-12-29

    In atmospheric-pressure plasmas the main electron heating mechanism is Ohmic heating, which has distinct spatial and temporal evolutions in the {alpha} and {gamma} modes. In {gamma} discharges, ionizing avalanches in the sheaths are initiated not only by secondary electrons but also by metastable pooling reactions. In {alpha} discharges, heating takes place at the sheath edges and in contrast with low-pressure plasmas, close to 50% of the power absorbed by the electrons is absorbed at the edge of the retreating sheaths. This heating is due to a field enhancement caused by the large collisionality in atmospheric-pressure discharges.

  10. Influence of hot plasma pressure on the global structure of Saturn’s magnetodisk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achilleos, N.; Guio, P.; Arridge, C. S.; Sergis, N.; Wilson, R. J.; Thomsen, M. F.; Coates, A. J.

    2010-10-01

    Using a model of force balance in Saturn's disk-like magnetosphere, we show that variations in hot plasma pressure can change the magnetic field configuration. This effect changes (i) the location of the magnetopause, even at fixed solar wind dynamic pressure, and (ii) the magnetic mapping between ionosphere and disk. The model uses equatorial observations as a boundary condition—we test its predictions over a wide latitude range by comparison with a Cassini high-inclination orbit of magnetic field and hot plasma pressure data. We find reasonable agreement over time scales larger than the period of Saturn kilometric radiation (also known as the camshaft period).

  11. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma possible application in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Haertel, Beate; von Woedtke, Thomas; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2014-11-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma, also named cold plasma, is defined as a partly ionized gas. Therefore, it cannot be equated with plasma from blood; it is not biological in nature. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma is a new innovative approach in medicine not only for the treatment of wounds, but with a wide-range of other applications, as e.g. topical treatment of other skin diseases with microbial involvement or treatment of cancer diseases. This review emphasizes plasma effects on wound healing. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma can support wound healing by its antiseptic effects, by stimulation of proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells, by activation or inhibition of integrin receptors on the cell surface or by its pro-angiogenic effect. We summarize the effects of plasma on eukaryotic cells, especially on keratinocytes in terms of viability, proliferation, DNA, adhesion molecules and angiogenesis together with the role of reactive oxygen species and other components of plasma. The outcome of first clinical trials regarding wound healing is pointed out.

  12. Non-Thermal Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Possible Application in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Haertel, Beate; von Woedtke, Thomas; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma, also named cold plasma, is defined as a partly ionized gas. Therefore, it cannot be equated with plasma from blood; it is not biological in nature. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma is a new innovative approach in medicine not only for the treatment of wounds, but with a wide-range of other applications, as e.g. topical treatment of other skin diseases with microbial involvement or treatment of cancer diseases. This review emphasizes plasma effects on wound healing. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma can support wound healing by its antiseptic effects, by stimulation of proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells, by activation or inhibition of integrin receptors on the cell surface or by its pro-angiogenic effect. We summarize the effects of plasma on eukaryotic cells, especially on keratinocytes in terms of viability, proliferation, DNA, adhesion molecules and angiogenesis together with the role of reactive oxygen species and other components of plasma. The outcome of first clinical trials regarding wound healing is pointed out. PMID:25489414

  13. Pulmonary and heart diseases with inhalation of atmospheric pressure plasma flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Takamichi; Murata, Shigeru; Kishimoto, Takumi; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Kondo, Akane; Mori, Akira

    2012-10-01

    We examined blood pressure in the abdominal aorta of mini pig under plasma inhalation of atmospheric pressure plasma flow. The coaxial atmospheric pressure plasma source has a tungsten wire inside a glass capillary, that is surrounded by a grounded tubular electrode. Plasma was generated under the following conditions; applied voltage: 8 kVpp, frequency: 3 kHz, and helium (He) gas flow rate: 1 L/min. On the other hand, sphygmomanometry of a blood vessel proceeded using a device comprising a disposable force transducer, and a bedside monitor for simultaneous electrocardiography and signal pressure measurements. We directly measured Nitric oxide (NO) using a catheter-type NO sensor placed in the coronary sinus through an angiography catheter from the abdomen. Blood pressure decreased from 110/65 to 90/40 mm Hg in the animals in vivo under plasma inhalation. The NO concentration in the abdominal aorta like the blood pressure, reached a maximum value at about 40 s and then gradually decreased.

  14. Effect of ambient pressure on a femtosecond laser induced titanium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Chen, Chuansong; Gao, Xun; Lin, Jingquan; Man, Baoyuan; Sun, Yanna; Li, Feifei

    2016-11-01

    Femtosecond laser induced Ti plasma has been characterized as a function of pressure by means of femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (fs-LIBS). Experiments were performed with a Ti: sapphire laser system (100 fs, 800 nm), in an air pressure from 10 Pa to 104 Pa. The time-resolved spectrum has been acquired and the spectral intensities of different plasma species have been investigated with a changing ambient pressure. The Ti atomic lines decay while the ionic ones grow with an increasing pressure. The enhancement of nitrogen ionic line has also been observed. The time of flight spectroscopy is adopted to measure the expanding velocity of the plasma plume. The increasing pressure slows the plasma expansion along both axial and radial directions. The electron density and temperature are measured by means of Boltzmann plot method and Stark width method, respectively. It is concluded that higher pressure will increase the energy absorption and retard the plasma expansion, leading to larger electron density and temperature.

  15. Low-pressure microwave plasma nucleation and deposition of diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.; Rich, D. H.

    1992-01-01

    Low-pressure microwave plasma nucleation and deposition of diamond films were investigated in the pressure range 10-mtorr to 10 torr, at substrate temperatures 400-750 C and with CH4 and O2 concentrations in H2 plasma of 2-15 percent and 2-10 percent, respectively. The experiments were performed in a microwave plasma system consisting of a microwave plasma chamber, a downstream deposition chamber, and an RF induction heated sample stage. Scanning electron microscopy of diamond films deposited at 600 C with 5 percent CH4 and 5 percent O2 in H2 plasmas showed high-quality well faceted crystallites of 1/2 micron size. Cathodoluminescence measurements of these films showed very few nitrogen impurities and no detectable silicon impurities.

  16. Low-pressure microwave plasma nucleation and deposition of diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.; Rich, D. H.

    1992-01-01

    Low-pressure microwave plasma nucleation and deposition of diamond films were investigated in the pressure range 10-mtorr to 10 torr, at substrate temperatures 400-750 C and with CH4 and O2 concentrations in H2 plasma of 2-15 percent and 2-10 percent, respectively. The experiments were performed in a microwave plasma system consisting of a microwave plasma chamber, a downstream deposition chamber, and an RF induction heated sample stage. Scanning electron microscopy of diamond films deposited at 600 C with 5 percent CH4 and 5 percent O2 in H2 plasmas showed high-quality well faceted crystallites of 1/2 micron size. Cathodoluminescence measurements of these films showed very few nitrogen impurities and no detectable silicon impurities.

  17. A model of force balance in Jupiter's magnetodisc including hot plasma pressure anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, J. D.; Achilleos, N.; Cowley, S. W. H.

    2015-12-01

    We present an iterative vector potential model of force balance in Jupiter's magnetodisc that includes the effects of hot plasma pressure anisotropy. The fiducial model produces results that are consistent with Galileo magnetic field and plasma data over the whole radial range of the model. The hot plasma pressure gradient and centrifugal forces dominate in the regions inward of ˜20 RJ and outward of ˜50 RJ, respectively, while for realistic values of the pressure anisotropy, the anisotropy current is either the dominant component or at least comparable with the hot plasma pressure gradient current in the region in between. With the inclusion of hot plasma pressure anisotropy, the ˜1.2 and ˜2.7° shifts in the latitudes of the main oval and Ganymede footprint, respectively, associated with variations over the observed range of the hot plasma parameter Kh, which is the product of hot pressure and unit flux tube volume, are comparable to the shifts observed in auroral images. However, the middle magnetosphere is susceptible to the firehose instability, with peak equatorial values of βh∥e-βh⊥e≃1 - 2, for Kh=2.0 - 2.5 × 107 Pa m T-1. For larger values of Kh,βh∥e-βh⊥e exceeds 2 near ˜25 RJ and the model does not converge. This suggests that small-scale plasmoid release or "drizzle" of iogenic plasma may often occur in the middle magnetosphere, thus forming a significant mode of plasma mass loss, alongside plasmoids, at Jupiter.

  18. Induction of apoptosis in human breast cancer cells by a pulsed atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Bae, S. H.; Leem, S. H.

    2010-07-01

    By using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage with repetition rate of several tens of kilohertz, we were able to induce apoptosis in cultured human breast cancer cells (MCF-7). The apoptotic changes in cells with plasma treatment were detected by flow cytometry and fluorescence staining assay. A significant portion of these cells was observed to exhibit the apoptotic fragmentation. Helium plasma with additive O2 gas was found to be effective in the induction of apoptosis. This plasma jet provides an effective mode of human breast cancer cell therapy.

  19. Bullet-to-streamer transition on the liquid surface of a plasma jet in atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, S.-Y.; Kim, G.-H.; Kim, S.-J.; Bae, B.; Kim, N.-K.; Lee, H.; Bae, N.; Ryu, S.; Yoo, S. J.; Kim, S. B.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the transition of the plasma shape from a ring-shaped bullet to a pin-like streamer adjacent to the electrolyte surface in a kHz-driven helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The transition was observed by synchronized fast images, plasma propagation speed, time-resolved emission profile of Hβ, and spatially and temporally resolved helium metastable density. The transition height increased when electrolyte evaporation was enhanced. The plasma continued to discharge on the electrolyte surface even in the absence of metastable species, i.e., the discharge mechanism changed from Penning ionization between helium metastable and ambient nitrogen to electron collision on evaporated water.

  20. Nonlinear frequency coupling in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Waskoenig, J.; Gans, T.

    2010-05-03

    Plasma ionization, and associated mode transitions, in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas are governed through nonlinear frequency coupling in the dynamics of the plasma boundary sheath. Ionization in low-power mode is determined by the nonlinear coupling of electron heating and the momentary local plasma density. Ionization in high-power mode is driven by electron avalanches during phases of transient high electric fields within the boundary sheath. The transition between these distinctly different modes is controlled by the total voltage of both frequency components.

  1. Polishing of Optical Media by Dielectric Barrier Discharge Inert Gas Plasma at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, C.; Weihs, T.; Luca, A.; Wieneke, S.; Viöl, W.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, surface smoothing of optical glasses, glass ceramic and sapphire using a low-power dielectric barrier discharge inert gas plasma at atmospheric pressure is presented. For this low temperature treatment method, no vacuum devices or chemicals are required. It is shown that by such plasma treatment the micro roughness and waviness of the investigated polished surfaces were significantly decreased, resulting in a decrease in surface scattering. Further, plasma polishing of lapped fused silica is introduced. Based on simulation results, a plasma physical process is suggested to be the underlying mechanism for initialising the observed smoothing effect.

  2. Modeling a Langmuir probe in atmospheric pressure plasma at different EEDFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenchev, G.; Kolev, St.; Kiss'ovski, Zh

    2017-05-01

    In this study, we present a computational model of a cylindrical electric probe in atmospheric pressure argon plasma. The plasma properties are varied in terms of density and electron temperature. Furthermore, results for plasmas with Maxwellian and non-Maxwellian electron energy distribution functions are also obtained and compared. The model is based on the fluid description of plasma within the COMSOL software package. The results for the ion saturation current are compared and show good agreement with existing analytical Langmuir probe theories. A strong dependence between the ion saturation current and electron transport properties was observed, and attributed to the effects of ambipolar diffusion.

  3. Complete elastic characterization of viscoelastic materials by dynamic measurements of the complex bulk and Young's moduli as a function of temperature and hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, François M.; Trivett, D. H.

    2011-07-01

    Two independent systems to measure the dynamic complex Young's and bulk moduli of viscoelastic materials as a function of temperature and hydrostatic pressure are described. In the Young's modulus system, a bar-shaped sample is adhered to a piezoelectric shaker and mounted vertically inside an air-filled pressure vessel. Data are obtained using both the traditional resonant approach and a wave-speed technique. In the bulk modulus system, the compressibility of a sample of arbitrary shape immersed in Castor oil and placed inside a pressure chamber is measured. Data can be obtained at frequencies typically ranging from 50 Hz to 5 kHz, at temperatures comprised between -2 and 50 °C and under hydrostatic pressures ranging from 0 to 2 MPa (Young's), or 6.5 MPa (bulk). Typical data obtained with both systems are presented, and it is shown how these data can be combined to completely characterize the elasticity of the material under investigation. In particular, they can be used to obtain experimental values of the complex Poisson's ratio, whose accurate measurement is otherwise quite challenging to perform directly. As an example, the magnitude and loss tangent of Poisson's ratio are presented for a nearly incompressible rubber.

  4. Plasma diagnostics and modeling of direct current microplasma discharges at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang

    High pressure (100s of torr) microplasma (length scale 100s of micrometer) non-equilibrium discharges have potential applications as chemical microreactors, sensors, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and excimer radiation sources. Experimental and theoretical studies of these microplasmas can provide critical information on fundamental discharge characteristics, and help extend the window of stable discharge operation. Spatially resolved measurements (resolution ˜ 6 mum) were taken across a 200 mum slot-type microdischarge in atmospheric pressure helium or argon. Small amounts of actinometer gases were added to the flow for optical emission spectroscopy measurements. Gas temperature profiles were determined from N2 emission rotational spectroscopy. Stark splitting of the hydrogen Balmer-beta (Hbeta ) line was used to investigate the electric field distribution in the cathode sheath region. Electron densities were evaluated from the analysis of the spectral line broadenings of Hbeta emission. The measured gas temperature was in the range of 350--650 K in He, and 600--1200 K in Ar, both peaking near the cathode and increasing with power. The electron density in the bulk plasma was in the range (3-7)x1013 cm -3 in He, and (1-4)x1014 cm-3 in Ar. The measured electric field in He peaked at the cathode and decayed to small values over a distance of ˜50 mum (sheath edge) from the cathode. The experimental data were also used to validate a self-consistent one-dimensional plasma model. By a combination of measurements and simulation it was found that the dominant gas heating mechanism in DC microplasmas was ion Joule heating. Simulation results also predicted the existence of electric field reversals in the negative glow under operating conditions that favor a high electron diffusion flux emanating from the cathode sheath. The electric field adjusted to satisfy continuity of the total current. Also, the electric field in the anode layer was self adjusted to be

  5. Study of plasma pressure evolution driven by strong picosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Wang, J. X.; Xu, Y. X.; Zhu, W. J.

    2017-01-01

    Through one dimensional relativistic particle-in-cell simulation of strong laser interaction with the solid-density plasma, the evolution of the plasma impact pressure behind a thin foil has been investigated in details. An energy-compression mechanism has been proposed to help optimizing the laser and plasma parameters. It has been found that by using a picosecond laser with intensity 1015 W cm-2, an impact pressure as high as several hundreds of GPa order of magnitude can be obtained. The numerical analysis demonstrates that the peak pressure is mainly resulted from the ion contribution. These results are of potential application to the laser loading upon solids in order to study the material properties under extra-high dynamic pressure.

  6. Variation of antioxidative activity and growth enhancement of Brassicaceae induced by low-pressure oxygen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya

    2015-06-01

    The mechanism of growth enhancement induced by active oxygen species generated in an oxygen plasma is investigated. The plant growth enhancement induced by the active oxygen species would relate to an antioxidative activity, which is one of the biological responses. The amount of generated active oxygen species is varied by the oxygen gas pressure in a low-pressure RF glow discharge plasma. The antioxidative activity of sprouts of Brassicaceae induced by the oxygen plasma is maximized at pressures between 30 and 40 Pa, whereas the antioxidative activity becomes small at around 60 and 80 Pa. The pressure dependence of the antioxidative activity of sprout stems is opposite to that of the stem length of the sprouts. The growth enhancement would be induced by the increase in the concentration of active oxygen species in plants owing to the decrease in the amount of antioxidative substances.

  7. Decay of femtosecond laser-induced plasma filaments in air, nitrogen, and argon for atmospheric and subatmospheric pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, N. L.; Bodrov, S. B.; Tsarev, M. V.; Murzanev, A. A.; Sergeev, Yu. A.; Malkov, Yu. A.; Stepanov, A. N.

    2016-07-01

    The temporal evolution of a plasma channel at the trail of a self-guided femtosecond laser pulse was studied experimentally and theoretically in air, nitrogen (with an admixture of ˜3% O2), and argon in a wide range of gas pressures (from 2 to 760 Torr). Measurements by means of transverse optical interferometry and pulsed terahertz scattering techniques showed that plasma density in air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure reduces by an order of magnitude within 3-4 ns and that the decay rate decreases with decreasing pressure. The argon plasma did not decay within several nanoseconds for pressures of 50-760 Torr. We extended our theoretical model previously applied for atmospheric pressure air plasma to explain the plasma decay in the gases under study and to show that allowance for plasma channel expansion affects plasma decay at low pressures.

  8. Investigations on the time evolution of the plasma density in argon electron-beam plasma at intermediate pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoyan, BAI; Chen, CHEN; Hong, LI; Wandong, LIU

    2017-03-01

    The time evolution of the argon electron-beam plasma at intermediate pressure and low electron beam intensity was presented. By applying the amplitude modulation with the frequency of 20 Hz on the stable beam current, the plasma evolution was studied. A Faraday cup was used for the measurement of the electron beam current and a single electrostatic probe was used for the measurement of the ion current. Experimental results indicated that the ion current was in phase with the electron beam current in the pressure range from 200 Pa to 3000 Pa and in the beam current range lower than 20 mA, the residual density increased approximately linearly with the maximum density in the log-log plot and the fitting coefficient was irrelative to the pressure. And then three kinds of kinetic models were developed and the simulated results given by the kinetic model, without the consideration of the excited atoms, mostly approached to the experimental results. This indicated that the effect of the excited atoms on the plasma density can be ignored at intermediate pressure and low electron beam current intensity, which can greatly simplify the kinetic model. In the end, the decrease of the plasma density when the beam current was suddenly off was studied based on the simplified model and it was found that the decease characteristic at intermediate pressure was approximate to the one at high pressure at low electron beam intensity, which was in good accordance with the experimental results. Supported by National Natural Science Foundations of China (No. 11375187) and the Foundation of State key Laboratory of China (No. SKLIPR1510).

  9. Computational study of sheath structure in oxygen containing plasmas at medium pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrach, Rudolf; Novak, Stanislav; Ibehej, Tomas; Hrachova, Vera

    2016-09-01

    Plasma mixtures containing active species are used in many plasma-assisted material treatment technologies. The analysis of such systems is rather difficult, as both physical and chemical processes affect plasma properties. A combination of experimental and computational approaches is the best suited, especially at higher pressures and/or in chemically active plasmas. The first part of our study of argon-oxygen mixtures was based on experimental results obtained in the positive column of DC glow discharge. The plasma was analysed by the macroscopic kinetic approach which is based on the set of chemical reactions in the discharge. The result of this model is a time evolution of the number densities of each species. In the second part of contribution the detailed analysis of processes taking place during the interaction of oxygen containing plasma with immersed substrates was performed, the results of the first model being the input parameters. The used method was the particle simulation technique applied to multicomponent plasma. The sheath structure and fluxes of charged particles to substrates were analysed in the dependence on plasma pressure, plasma composition and surface geometry.

  10. Treatment of Candida albicans biofilms with low-temperature plasma induced by dielectric barrier discharge and atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koban, Ina; Matthes, Rutger; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Welk, Alexander; Meisel, Peter; Holtfreter, Birte; Sietmann, Rabea; Kindel, Eckhard; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Kramer, Axel; Kocher, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Because of some disadvantages of chemical disinfection in dental practice (especially denture cleaning), we investigated the effects of physical methods on Candida albicans biofilms. For this purpose, the antifungal efficacy of three different low-temperature plasma devices (an atmospheric pressure plasma jet and two different dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs)) on Candida albicans biofilms grown on titanium discs in vitro was investigated. As positive treatment controls, we used 0.1% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) and 0.6% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The corresponding gas streams without plasma ignition served as negative treatment controls. The efficacy of the plasma treatment was determined evaluating the number of colony-forming units (CFU) recovered from titanium discs. The plasma treatment reduced the CFU significantly compared to chemical disinfectants. While 10 min CHX or NaOCl exposure led to a CFU log10 reduction factor of 1.5, the log10 reduction factor of DBD plasma was up to 5. In conclusion, the use of low-temperature plasma is a promising physical alternative to chemical antiseptics for dental practice.

  11. Influence of Penning effect on the plasma features in a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Zhengshi; Zhang, Guanjun; Jiang, Nan; Cao, Zexian

    2014-03-14

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is a cold plasma source that promises various innovative applications. The influence of Penning effect on the formation, propagation, and other physical properties of the plasma bullets in APPJ remains a debatable topic. By using a 10 cm wide active electrode and a frequency of applied voltage down to 0.5 Hz, the Penning effect caused by preceding discharges can be excluded. It was found that the Penning effect originating in a preceding discharge helps build a conductive channel in the gas flow and provide seed electrons, thus the discharge can be maintained at a low voltage which in turn leads to a smaller propagation speed for the plasma bullet. Photographs from an intensified charge coupled device reveal that the annular structure of the plasma plume for He is irrelevant to the Penning ionization process arising from preceding discharges. By adding NH{sub 3} into Ar to introduce Penning effect, the originally filamentous discharge of Ar can display a rather extensive plasma plume in ambient as He. These results are helpful for the understanding of the behaviors of non-equilibrium APPJs generated under distinct conditions and for the design of plasma jet features, especially the spatial distribution and propagation speed, which are essential for application.

  12. Influence of Penning effect on the plasma features in a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhengshi; Jiang, Nan; Zhang, Guanjun; Cao, Zexian

    2014-03-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is a cold plasma source that promises various innovative applications. The influence of Penning effect on the formation, propagation, and other physical properties of the plasma bullets in APPJ remains a debatable topic. By using a 10 cm wide active electrode and a frequency of applied voltage down to 0.5 Hz, the Penning effect caused by preceding discharges can be excluded. It was found that the Penning effect originating in a preceding discharge helps build a conductive channel in the gas flow and provide seed electrons, thus the discharge can be maintained at a low voltage which in turn leads to a smaller propagation speed for the plasma bullet. Photographs from an intensified charge coupled device reveal that the annular structure of the plasma plume for He is irrelevant to the Penning ionization process arising from preceding discharges. By adding NH3 into Ar to introduce Penning effect, the originally filamentous discharge of Ar can display a rather extensive plasma plume in ambient as He. These results are helpful for the understanding of the behaviors of non-equilibrium APPJs generated under distinct conditions and for the design of plasma jet features, especially the spatial distribution and propagation speed, which are essential for application.

  13. Development of a laser-induced plasma probe to measure gas phase plasma signals at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gounder, J. D.; Kutne, P.; Meier, W.

    2012-08-01

    The ability of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique for on line simultaneous measurement of elemental concentrations has led to its application in a wide number of processes. The simplicity of the technique allows its application to harsh environments such as present in boilers, furnaces and gasifiers. This paper presents the design of a probe using a custom optic which transforms a round beam into a ring (Donut) beam, which is used for forming a plasma in an atmosphere of nitrogen at high pressure (20 bar) and temperature (200 °C). The LIBS experiments were performed using a high pressure cell to characterize and test the effectiveness of the donut beam transmitted through the LIBS probe and collect plasma signal in back scatter mode. The first tests used the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser, pulse width 7 ns, to form a plasma in nitrogen gas at five different pressures (1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 bar) and three different gas temperatures (25, 100 and 200 °C). The uniqueness of this probe is the custom made optic used for reshaping the round laser beam into a ring (Donut) shaped laser beam, which is fed into the probe and focused to form a plasma at the measurement point. The plasma signal is collected and collimated using the laser focusing lens and is reflected from the laser beam axis onto an achromatic lens by a high reflection mirror mounted in the center section of the donut laser beam. The effect of gas pressure and temperature on N(I) lines in the high pressure cell experiment shows that the line intensity decreases with pressure and increases with temperature. Mean plasma temperature was calculated using the ratios of N(I) line intensities ranging from 7400 K to 8900 K at 1 bar and 2400 K to 3200 K at 20 bar for the three different gas temperatures. The results show that as a proof of principle the donut beam optics in combination with the LIBS probe can be used for performing extensive LIBS measurements in well controlled laboratory

  14. Infrared spectroscopic and modeling studies of H2/CH4 microwave plasma gas phase from low to high pressure and power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rond, C.; Hamann, S.; Wartel, M.; Lombardi, G.; Gicquel, A.; Röpcke, J.

    2014-09-01

    InfraRed Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy technique has been implemented in a H2/CH4 Micro-Wave (MW frequency f = 2.45 GHz) plasma reactor dedicated to diamond deposition under high pressure and high power conditions. Parametric studies such as a function of MW power, pressure, and admixtures of methane have been carried out on a wide range of experimental conditions: the pressure up to 270 mbar and the MW power up to 4 kW. These conditions allow high purity Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond deposition at high growth rates. Line integrated absorption measurements have been performed in order to monitor hydrocarbon species, i.e., CH3, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6. The densities of the stable detected species were found to vary in the range of 1012-1017 molecules cm-3, while the methyl radical CH3 (precursor of diamond growth under these conditions) measured into the plasma bulk was found up to 1014 molecules cm-3. The experimental densities have been compared to those provided by 1D-radial thermochemical model for low power and low pressure conditions (up to 100 mbar/2 kW). These densities have been axially integrated. Experimental measurements under high pressure and power conditions confirm a strong increase of the degree of dissociation of the precursor, CH4, associated to an increase of the C2H2 density, the most abundant reaction product in the plasma.

  15. [Sterilizing effect of atmospheric pressure plasma jet on microbes].

    PubMed

    Wu, Xu-Qin; Wang, Shou-guo; Han, Li; Zhao, Ling-li; Chang, Xiao; Chen, Geng; Suo, Ji-jiang; Xing, Yu-bin; Chen, Shi-ping

    2005-04-01

    To study the sterilizing effect and mechanism of APPJ on microbes preliminarily, three representative bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis var. niger were treated by two kinds of plasma, DBD (dielectric barrier discharge) and APPJ. The survival curves of different microbes were compared and analyzed; Furthermore, the morphological change to cell walls and cell membranes were studied by scanning electric microscope. These results demonstrated that in the beginning phase the sterilizing effect of two kinds of plasmas on three microorganisms was stronger than in the later phase, and APPJ was more effective than DBD (D value of DBD on Bacillus subtilis var. niger was 70 s, whereas APPJ's was 4 s, much more efficient). Meanwhile, the gross morphological damage of E. coli cells under SEM after APPJ treatment was observed. These gave the obvious evidence that APPJ can destroy the microbes very efficiently, and more likely through the damage of cell walls and membranes of microbes treated by APPJ.

  16. A simple atmospheric pressure room-temperature air plasma needle device for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Xiong, Z.; Zhao, F.; Xian, Y.; Xiong, Q.; Gong, W.; Zou, C.; Jiang, Z.; Pan, Y.

    2009-11-01

    Rather than using noble gas, room air is used as the working gas for an atmospheric pressure room-temperature plasma. The plasma is driven by submicrosecond pulsed directed current voltages. Several current spikes appear periodically for each voltage pulse. The first current spike has a peak value of more than 1.5 A with a pulse width of about 10 ns. Emission spectra show that besides excited OH, O, N2(C-B), and N2+(B-X) emission, excited NO, N2(B-A), H, and even N emission are also observed in the plasma, which indicates that the plasma may be more reactive than that generated by other plasma jet devices. Utilizing the room-temperature plasma, preliminary inactivation experiments show that Enterococcus faecalis can be killed with a treatment time of only several seconds.

  17. Inactivation of Microorganisms in Model Biofilms by an Atmospheric Pressure Pulsed Non-thermal Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishev, Yuri; Trushkin, N.; Grushin, M.; Petryakov, A.; Karal'nik, V.; Kobzev, E.; Kholodenko, V.; Chugunov, V.; Kireev, G.; Rakitsky, Yu.; Irkhina, I.

    Non-thermal plasma jet formed by self-running pulsed-periodical high-current spark generator (PPSG) was used for atmospheric pressure inactivation of microorganisms including biofilms. A distinctive feature of the PPSG is a formation of transient hot plasma clouds (plasma bullets) periodically flying out to the target. We experimented with model biofilms of E. coli and Bacillus subtilis monocultures which were grown on agar and surfaces of steel and polypropylene coupons. High efficiency of plasma inactivation was demonstrated. This effect is associated primarily with an interaction of transient hot plasma clouds with biofilms. Besides complete or partial degradation of the cell membrane, weakening of the cell wall of E.coli culture by active plasma was found.

  18. Spectroscopic study of plasma evolution in runaway nanosecond atmospheric-pressure He discharges.

    PubMed

    Yatom, S; Stambulchik, E; Vekselman, V; Krasik, Ya E

    2013-07-01

    Time- and space-resolved visible-emission spectroscopy measurements are applied to study plasma parameters in nanosecond electrical discharges in He gas at pressure of 10(5) Pa, using a 150 kV, 5 ns duration high-voltage pulse. The plasma evolution during the discharge is investigated by applying line-shape analysis of several He I spectral transitions, with the Stark and opacity effects accounted for. The analysis shows that the discharge plasma is not in equilibrium and that significant electric fields of several kV/cm are present in the plasma during the discharge. Regions of plasma with significantly different electron densities are identified and a qualitative model of the plasma formation and evolution is proposed.

  19. Body tissue activation using micro-spot atmospheric pressure plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Takumi; Hirata, Takamichi; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Akiya, Masahiro; Mori, Akira

    2012-10-01

    Experiments have been performed involving directly irradiating body tissues with atmospheric pressure plasma for various medical engineering applications of plasmas. Plasma irradiation was used to burn back dermis of rats. Then, healing and improvement of the scald areas were observed. Additionally, we devoted attention to the angiogenesis, which is a key component of the healing mechanism. Plasma irradiated rats and non treatment were performed an intravenous injection of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labelled tomato-lectin. The neo-vascular vessels were observed by a confocal laser scanning microscopy, and the quantities were calculated. Each quantity was the non treatment: 9.2 +/-- 0.77 and plasma irradiation: 18.4 +/-- 2.9. These data indicates that direct plasma irradiation involving ion/radical may promote angiogenesis, and it promotes living-body activation.

  20. A battery-operated atmospheric-pressure plasma wand for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, X.; Liu, J.; Xian, Y.; Lu, X.

    2014-04-01

    A handheld, battery-operated atmospheric-pressure plasma rod (named the plasma wand) which does not rely on an external power source (e.g. mains power or a power generator) or gas supply is reported. The plasma wand can be used for killing bacteria, fungi or viruses that are hidden in narrow channels such as the nasal cavity and ear canal, which are difficult to access using most currently available devices. Besides, the electrical characterization, plasma wand temperature, emission spectra of the plasma, ozone and OH radical concentration generated by the device, are investigated by different diagnostic methods. The ozone concentration reaches 120 ppm 1 mm away from the device and the OH concentration reaches 3.5 × 1014 cm-3 in the plasma. The preliminary bacteria inactivation experiment results show that all the bacteria samples on the microfiltration membrane are killed by this device within 30 s.

  1. Surface Modification of Material by Irradiation of Low Power Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akamatsu, Hiroshi; Ichikawa, Kazunori; Azuma, Kingo; Onoi, Masahiro

    2010-10-01

    Application of a low power atmospheric pressure plasma jet for surface modifications of acrylic, aluminum, and highly crystalline graphite has been carried out experimentally. The plasma jet was generated with batteries-driven high voltage modulator. The power consumed for the plasma generation was estimated to be 0.12 W. The plasma had hydroxyl radicals, which is known as a strong oxider from an observation of optical emission spectrum. After the irradiation of the plasma, the surfaces of acrylic and aluminum became to be hydrophilic from the compartment of contact angle of water on these surfaces. The surface of highly crystalline graphite irradiated by the plasma jet had oxygen-rich functional groups such as C-O, C = O, and O = C-O.

  2. Chemically reactive species in liquids generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas and their roles in plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2013-07-01

    Plasmas whose gas temperatures are close to room temperature may be generated in ambient air or a gas at atmospheric pressure with the use of low-frequency high voltage or low-power radio-frequency (RF) or microwave power applied to electrodes. Such plasmas can serve as a powerful source of free radicals and/or chemically reactive species that arise from atoms and molecules of the ambient gas. Recently use of such plasmas for medical purposes has attracted much attention as they can be implemented in possible medical devices that can cause blood coagulation, heal wounds, facilitate angiogenesis, sterilize surgical devices as well as living tissues without harming healthy cells, and selectively inactivate cancer cells. Especially of interest among reactive species generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APP) are reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that are generated in liquid phase. Since most living tissues and cells are immersed in liquids (such as blood or culture media), reactive species generated by APPs in the gas phase are transported to the liquid phase and possibly converted to different types of reactive species therein before causing some influence on the tissues or cells. In this study, the rate equations are solved to evaluate concentrations of various reactive species in pure water that are originated by plasma reactions in atmosphere and possible effects of such species (including ROS/RNS) on living tissues and cells are discussed.

  3. Chemically reactive species in liquids generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas and their roles in plasma medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2013-07-11

    Plasmas whose gas temperatures are close to room temperature may be generated in ambient air or a gas at atmospheric pressure with the use of low-frequency high voltage or low-power radio-frequency (RF) or microwave power applied to electrodes. Such plasmas can serve as a powerful source of free radicals and/or chemically reactive species that arise from atoms and molecules of the ambient gas. Recently use of such plasmas for medical purposes has attracted much attention as they can be implemented in possible medical devices that can cause blood coagulation, heal wounds, facilitate angiogenesis, sterilize surgical devices as well as living tissues without harming healthy cells, and selectively inactivate cancer cells. Especially of interest among reactive species generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APP) are reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that are generated in liquid phase. Since most living tissues and cells are immersed in liquids (such as blood or culture media), reactive species generated by APPs in the gas phase are transported to the liquid phase and possibly converted to different types of reactive species therein before causing some influence on the tissues or cells. In this study, the rate equations are solved to evaluate concentrations of various reactive species in pure water that are originated by plasma reactions in atmosphere and possible effects of such species (including ROS/RNS) on living tissues and cells are discussed.

  4. Liquid fuel reforming using microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miotk, Robert; Hrycak, Bartosz; Czylkowski, Dariusz; Dors, Miroslaw; Jasinski, Mariusz; Mizeraczyk, Jerzy

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen is expected to be one of the most promising energy carriers. Due to the growing interest in hydrogen production technologies, in this paper we present the results of experimental investigations of thermal decomposition and dry reforming of two alcohols (ethanol and isopropanol) in the waveguide-supplied metal-cylinder-based nozzleless microwave (915 MHz) plasma source (MPS). The hydrogen production experiments were preceded by electrodynamics properties investigations of the used MPS and plasma spectroscopic diagnostics. All experimental tests were performed with the working gas (nitrogen or carbon dioxide) flow rate ranging from 1200 to 3900 normal litres per hour and an absorbed microwave power up to 5 kW. The alcohols were introduced into the plasma using an induction heating vaporizer. The ethanol thermal decomposition resulted in hydrogen selectivity up to 100%. The hydrogen production rate was up to 1150 NL(H2) h-1 and the energy yield was 267 NL(H2) kWh-1 of absorbed microwave energy. Due to intense soot production, the thermal decomposition process was not appropriate for isopropanol conversion. Considering the dry reforming process, using isopropanol was more efficient in hydrogen production than ethanol. The rate and energy yield of hydrogen production were up to 1116 NL(H2) h-1 and 223 NL(H2) kWh-1 of microwave energy used, respectively. However, the hydrogen selectivity was no greater than 37%. Selected results given by the experiment were compared with the results of numerical modeling.

  5. Low-pressure water-cooled inductively coupled plasma torch

    DOEpatents

    Seliskar, C.J.; Warner, D.K.

    1984-02-16

    An inductively coupled plasma torch is provided which comprises an inner tube, including a sample injection port to which the sample to be tested is supplied and comprising an enlarged central portion in which the plasma flame is confined; an outer tube surrounding the inner tube and containing water therein for cooling the inner tube, the outer tube including a water inlet port to which water is supplied and a water outlet port spaced from the water inlet port and from which water is removed after flowing through the outer tube; and an rf induction coil for inducing the plasma in the gas passing into the tube through the sample injection port. The sample injection port comprises a capillary tube including a reduced diameter orifice, projecting into the lower end of the inner tube. The water inlet is located at the lower end of the outer tube and the rf heating coil is disposed around the outer tube above and adjacent to the water inlet.

  6. Low-pressure water-cooled inductively coupled plasma torch

    DOEpatents

    Seliskar, Carl J.; Warner, David K.

    1988-12-27

    An inductively coupled plasma torch is provided which comprises an inner tube, including a sample injection port to which the sample to be tested is supplied and comprising an enlarged central portion in which the plasma flame is confined; an outer tube surrounding the inner tube and containing water therein for cooling the inner tube, the outer tube including a water inlet port to which water is supplied and a water outlet port spaced from the water inlet port and from which water is removed after flowing through the outer tube; and an r.f. induction coil for inducing the plasma in the gas passing into the tube through the sample injection port. The sample injection port comprises a capillary tube including a reduced diameter orifice, projecting into the lower end of the inner tube. The water inlet is located at the lower end of the outer tube and the r.f. heating coil is disposed around the outer tube above and adjacent to the water inlet.

  7. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet with high-voltage power supply based on piezoelectric transformer

    SciTech Connect

    Babij, Michał; Kowalski, Zbigniew W. Nitsch, Karol; Gotszalk, Teodor; Silberring, Jerzy

    2014-05-15

    The dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet, an example of the nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ), generates low-temperature plasmas that are suitable for the atomization of volatile species and can also be served as an ionization source for ambient mass and ion mobility spectrometry. A new design of APPJ for mass spectrometry has been built in our group. In these plasma sources magnetic transformers (MTs) and inductors are typically used in power supplies but they present several drawbacks that are even more evident when dealing with high-voltage normally used in APPJs. To overcome these disadvantages, high frequency generators with the absence of MT are proposed in the literature. However, in the case of miniaturized APPJs these conventional power converters, built of ferromagnetic cores and inductors or by means of LC resonant tank circuits, are not so useful as piezoelectric transformer (PT) based power converters due to bulky components and small efficiency. We made and examined a novel atmospheric pressure plasma jet with PT supplier served as ionization source for ambient mass spectrometry, and especially mobile spectrometry where miniaturization, integration of components, and clean plasma are required. The objective of this paper is to describe the concept, design, and implementation of this miniaturized piezoelectric transformer-based atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

  8. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet with high-voltage power supply based on piezoelectric transformer.

    PubMed

    Babij, Michał; Kowalski, Zbigniew W; Nitsch, Karol; Silberring, Jerzy; Gotszalk, Teodor

    2014-05-01

    The dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet, an example of the nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ), generates low-temperature plasmas that are suitable for the atomization of volatile species and can also be served as an ionization source for ambient mass and ion mobility spectrometry. A new design of APPJ for mass spectrometry has been built in our group. In these plasma sources magnetic transformers (MTs) and inductors are typically used in power supplies but they present several drawbacks that are even more evident when dealing with high-voltage normally used in APPJs. To overcome these disadvantages, high frequency generators with the absence of MT are proposed in the literature. However, in the case of miniaturized APPJs these conventional power converters, built of ferromagnetic cores and inductors or by means of LC resonant tank circuits, are not so useful as piezoelectric transformer (PT) based power converters due to bulky components and small efficiency. We made and examined a novel atmospheric pressure plasma jet with PT supplier served as ionization source for ambient mass spectrometry, and especially mobile spectrometry where miniaturization, integration of components, and clean plasma are required. The objective of this paper is to describe the concept, design, and implementation of this miniaturized piezoelectric transformer-based atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

  9. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet with high-voltage power supply based on piezoelectric transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babij, Michał; Kowalski, Zbigniew W.; Nitsch, Karol; Silberring, Jerzy; Gotszalk, Teodor

    2014-05-01

    The dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet, an example of the nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ), generates low-temperature plasmas that are suitable for the atomization of volatile species and can also be served as an ionization source for ambient mass and ion mobility spectrometry. A new design of APPJ for mass spectrometry has been built in our group. In these plasma sources magnetic transformers (MTs) and inductors are typically used in power supplies but they present several drawbacks that are even more evident when dealing with high-voltage normally used in APPJs. To overcome these disadvantages, high frequency generators with the absence of MT are proposed in the literature. However, in the case of miniaturized APPJs these conventional power converters, built of ferromagnetic cores and inductors or by means of LC resonant tank circuits, are not so useful as piezoelectric transformer (PT) based power converters due to bulky components and small efficiency. We made and examined a novel atmospheric pressure plasma jet with PT supplier served as ionization source for ambient mass spectrometry, and especially mobile spectrometry where miniaturization, integration of components, and clean plasma are required. The objective of this paper is to describe the concept, design, and implementation of this miniaturized piezoelectric transformer-based atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

  10. Ion temperature and gas pressure effects on the magnetized sheath dynamics during plasma immersion ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Khoram, M.; Ghomi, H. Navab Safa, N.

    2016-03-15

    Here, a collisional magnetized plasma with finite ion temperature is considered to examine the effects of the ion temperature and gas pressure on the plasma-sheath dynamics. We use the two-fluid model of plasma-sheath where the nonlinear equations of a dynamic sheath are solved using a full implicit scheme of finite difference method along with some convenient initial and boundary conditions at the plasma center and target. It is found that the ion temperature only has a significant effect on the characteristics of low voltage sheath, while the gas pressure (collision rate) seriously affects the dynamic characteristics of the low and high voltage plasma-sheath. One can see, increasing the ion temperature in low voltage plasma-sheath causes to increase the temporal curve of the ion dose and the ion impact energy on the target, reduces the temporal curve of the sheath width, and has no any effect on the temporal curve of the ion incident angle on the target. However, rising the gas pressure in low and high voltage plasma-sheath reduces all of these temporal curves.

  11. Thermodynamic and Transport Properties of Real Air Plasma in Wide Range of Temperature and Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunlin; Wu, Yi; Chen, Zhexin; Yang, Fei; Feng, Ying; Rong, Mingzhe; Zhang, Hantian

    2016-07-01

    Air plasma has been widely applied in industrial manufacture. In this paper, both dry and humid air plasmas' thermodynamic and transport properties are calculated in temperature 300-100000 K and pressure 0.1-100 atm. To build a more precise model of real air plasma, over 70 species are considered for composition. Two different methods, the Gibbs free energy minimization method and the mass action law method, are used to determinate the composition of the air plasma in a different temperature range. For the transport coefficients, the simplified Chapman-Enskog method developed by Devoto has been applied using the most recent collision integrals. It is found that the presence of CO2 has almost no effect on the properties of air plasma. The influence of H2O can be ignored except in low pressure air plasma, in which the saturated vapor pressure is relatively high. The results will serve as credible inputs for computational simulation of air plasma. supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (973 Program)(No. 2015CB251002), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51521065, 51577145), the Science and Technology Project Funds of the Grid State Corporation (SGTYHT/13-JS-177), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, and State Grid Corporation Project (GY71-14-004)

  12. Efficacy of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma as an Antibacterial Agent Against Enterococcus Faecalis in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yingguang; Yang, Ping; Lu, Xinpei; Xiong, Zilan; Ye, Tao; Xiong, Qing; Sun, Ziyong

    2011-02-01

    Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) is a microorganism that can survive extreme challenges in obturated root canals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma plume against E. faecalis in vitro. A non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet device which could generate a cold plasma plume carrying a peak current of 300 mA was used. The antibacterial efficacy of this device against E. faecalis and its biofilm under different conditions was detected. The antibacterial efficacy of the plasma against E. faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) was also evaluated. After plasma treatment, the average diameter of inhibition zone on S. aureus and E. faecalis was 2.62±0.26 cm and 1.06±0.30 cm, respectively (P < 0.05). The diameter was increased with prolongation of the treatment duration. The diameters of inhibition zone of the sealed Petri dishes were larger than those of the uncovered Petri dishes. There was significant difference in colony-forming units between plasma group and control group on E. faecalis biofilm (P < 0.01). The transmission electron microscopy revealed that the ultrastructural changes cytoderm of E. faecalis were observed after treatment for 2 min. It is concluded that the non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma could serve as an effective adjunct to standard endodontic microbial treatment.

  13. Underwater plasma-MIG arc welding: Shielding technique and pressure reduction by a centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.; Mewes, D.; Bartzsch, J.; Draugelates, U.

    1995-12-31

    In comparison to hyperbaric underwater welding in diving chambers, wet welding techniques promise higher flexibility and lower costs. One technique for creating a local dry and pressure reduced welding zone is the use of a centrifugal pump. Results of experimental investigations in combination with a plasma-MIG arc welding system are presented in this paper. Special importance is attached to the local pressure reduction in view of the fact that low pressure, i.e. a high pressure difference between surrounding water and dry welding area, is a good condition for welding but is difficult to be obtained with other shielding systems than pressure chambers. Plasma-MIG welding has been done under water with a good result on the weld quality. Values of the hardness of the joint and the appearance of the weld structure are nearly comparable to atmospheric welds.

  14. [Influence of the albumin fraction in the plasma oncotic pressure (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Portillo, M; Trujillo Rodríguez, F; Aznar Reig, A

    1979-12-15

    This work analyzes the influence which albumin fraction exerts upon plasma oncotic pressure. With this objective three different groups were studied, each one of which was composed of subjects with identical total proteinemia and variable albuminemia. The first group: nine subjects with 6.2 g/100 ml proteinemia and albumin values between 3.2 and 3.8 g/100 ml; the second group: seven healthy subjects with 6.4 g/100 ml proteinemia and the level of albumina between 3 and 4 g/100 ml; the third group: subjects with proteinemia at 6.6 g/100 ml and extreme values of albumin between 3.1 and 4.3 g/100 ml. Plasma oncotic pressure was determined by means of an electronic osmometer, according to the described technique. With a proteinemia constant at 6.2 g/100 ml, a 0.6 percent fluctuation of the albumin concentration induced a variation in the plasma oncotic pressure of up to 20.4 per cent. In cases of proteinemia remaining constant at 6.4 g/100 ml, the oscillation of albumin levels between 3 and 4 g/100 ml represented a change in the plasmatic oncotic pressure of 32.58 per cent. In the third group, the influence of the albuminemia was lesser (23.1 per cent variability in the plasma oncotic pressure, with an oscillation of 1.2 g/100 ml in albuminemia). The existence of variable values of plasma oncotic pressure corresponding to cases with identical proteinemia and albuminemia, lead us to consider the powerful influence exerted upon the plasma oncotic pressure by other factors which affect the mass-structure and the electrical charges of proteins.

  15. Liquid alkali metals - Equation of state and reduced-pressure, bulk-modulus, sound-velocity, and specific-heat functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Ferrante, John

    1989-01-01

    The previous work of Schlosser and Ferrante (1988) on universality in solids is extended to the study of liquid metals. As in the case of solids, to a good approximation, in the absence of phase transitions, plots of the logarithm of the reduced-pressure function H, of the reduced-isothermal-bulk-modulus function b, and of the reduced-sound-velocity function v are all linear in 1-X. Finally, it is demonstrated that ln(Cp/C/v) is also linear in 1-X, where X = (V/V/0/)exp 1/3), and V(0) is the volume at zero pressure.

  16. Liquid alkali metals - Equation of state and reduced-pressure, bulk-modulus, sound-velocity, and specific-heat functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Ferrante, John

    1989-01-01

    The previous work of Schlosser and Ferrante (1988) on universality in solids is extended to the study of liquid metals. As in the case of solids, to a good approximation, in the absence of phase transitions, plots of the logarithm of the reduced-pressure function H, of the reduced-isothermal-bulk-modulus function b, and of the reduced-sound-velocity function v are all linear in 1-X. Finally, it is demonstrated that ln(Cp/C/v) is also linear in 1-X, where X = (V/V/0/)exp 1/3), and V(0) is the volume at zero pressure.

  17. Storm-time plasma pressure distribution: First results from an advanced empirical geomagnetic field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, G. K.; Sitnov, M. I.; Merkin, V. G.; Ukhorskiy, S.; Brandt, P. C.; Gkioulidou, M.; Korth, H.; Redmon, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    Plasma pressure is a key parameter of the magnetosphere whose distribution is particularly important during storm times. At the same time, its first-principles description is still missing in the global MHD modeling. Here we present an alternative - empirical reconstruction of the plasma pressure, given the upstream solar wind and IMF parameters, from historical records of spaceborne magnetometers, assuming steady-state force balance between the magnetic field and the isotropic plasma pressure. The reconstruction is based on an advanced version of the TS07D geomagnetic field model, which has been improved by increasing the resolution of the equatorial current systems and the field aligned current systems and by incorporating new magnetometer datasets from the Van Allen Probes and THEMIS missions. These improvements allow the model, in particular, to resolve for the first time the structure of the innermost magnetosphere, including its eastward current region, which is critical for capturing the peak of the pressure distribution. We present the reconstructed plasma pressure from the upgraded TS07D model and compare its distribution with direct particle measurements including the energy spectra obtained from RBSPICE and HOPE instruments on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft, energetic neutral atom inversions from IMAGE/HENA observations, as well as the output of a coupled MHD and kinetic ring current model LFM-RCM. The obtained comprehensive pressure distribution are then considered as an input for assimilative models of the equation of state in global MHD codes.

  18. Improved thermoelectric performance of Bi2Te3-xSex bulk materials produced by the preparation of high-pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xin; Jia, Xiaopeng; Jiang, Yiping; Sun, Hairui; Zhang, Yuewen; Sun, Bing; Liu, Binwu; Ma, Hongan

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the effect of Se doping content on the improvement in thermoelectric properties of Bi2Te3-xSex bulk materials produced by high-pressure role. The Bi2Te3-xSex bulk materials can be successfully synthesized within 30 min due to high-pressure role, which significantly shortened the synthesis time. The typical textures of the reaction products exhibit abundant cracked crystal planes and special layer structures with increasing Se content, which can coordinate electrical and thermal transport in the Bi2Te3-xSex samples to achieve an optimal thermoelectric performance. As a result, a Bi2Te2.73Se0.27 bulk material obtained a maximum ZT value of 1.03 at 344 K. These results suggest that the low Se doping content with high-pressure can improve the figure of merit of Bi2Te3-xSex materials.

  19. The role of thermal energy accommodation and atomic recombination probabilities in low pressure oxygen plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Andrew Robert; Foucher, Mickaël; Marinov, Daniil; Chabert, Pascal; Gans, Timo; Kushner, Mark J.; Booth, Jean-Paul

    2017-02-01

    Surface interaction probabilities are critical parameters that determine the behaviour of low pressure plasmas and so are crucial input parameters for plasma simulations that play a key role in determining their accuracy. However, these parameters are difficult to estimate without in situ measurements. In this work, the role of two prominent surface interaction probabilities, the atomic oxygen recombination coefficient γ O and the thermal energy accommodation coefficient α E in determining the plasma properties of low pressure inductively coupled oxygen plasmas are investigated using two-dimensional fluid-kinetic simulations. These plasmas are the type used for semiconductor processing. It was found that α E plays a crucial role in determining the neutral gas temperature and neutral gas density. Through this dependency, the value of α E also determines a range of other plasma properties such as the atomic oxygen density, the plasma potential, the electron temperature, and ion bombardment energy and neutral-to-ion flux ratio at the wafer holder. The main role of γ O is in determining the atomic oxygen density and flux to the wafer holder along with the neutral-to-ion flux ratio. It was found that the plasma properties are most sensitive to each coefficient when the value of the coefficient is small causing the losses of atomic oxygen and thermal energy to be surface interaction limited rather than transport limited.

  20. Application of Atmospheric-Pressure Microwave Line Plasma for Low Temperature Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Haruka; Nakano, Suguru; Itoh, Hitoshi; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure (AP) plasmas have been given much attention because of its high cost benefit and a variety of possibilities for industrial applications. In various kinds of plasma production technique, pulsed-microwave discharge plasma using slot antenna is attractive due to its ability of high-density and stable plasma production. In this plasma source, however, size of the plasma has been limited up to a few cm in length due to standing wave inside a waveguide. To solve this, we have proposed a newly-developed AP microwave plasma source that utilizes not standing wave but travelling wave. By using this plasma source, spatially-uniform AP line plasma with 40 cm in length was realized by pure helium discharge in 60 cm slot and with nitrogen gas additive of 1%. Furthermore, gas temperature as low as 400 K was realized in this device. In this study, as an example of low temperature processes, hydrophilic treatment of PET films was performed. Processing speed increased with pulse frequency and a water contact angle of ~20° was easily obtained within 5 s with no thermal damage to the substrate. To evaluate treatment-uniformity of long line length, PET films were treated by 90 cm slot-antenna plasma and uniform treatment performance was confirmed.

  1. Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma and bacteria: understanding the mode of action using vibrational microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartaschew, Konstantin; Baldus, Sabrina; Mischo, Meike; Bründermann, Erik; Awakowicz, Peter; Havenith, Martina

    2016-09-01

    Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma show promising antimicrobial effects, however the detailed biochemical mechanism of the bacterial inactivation is still unknown. We investigated, for the first time, plasma-treated Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli bacteria with Raman and infrared microspectroscopy. A dielectric barrier discharge was used as a plasma source. We were able to detect several plasma-induced chemical modifications, which suggest a pronounced oxidative effect on the cell envelope, cellular proteins and nucleotides as well as a generation of organic nitrates in the treated bacteria. Vibrational microspectroscopy is used as a comprehensive and a powerful tool for the analysis of plasma interactions with whole organisms such as bacteria. Analysis of reaction kinetics of chemical modifications allow a time-dependent insight into the plasma-mediated impact. Investigating possible synergistic effects between the plasma-produced components, our observations strongly indicate that the detected plasma-mediated chemical alterations can be mainly explained by the particle effect of the generated reactive species. By changing the polarity of the applied voltage pulse, and hence the propagation mechanisms of streamers, no significant effect on the spectral results could be detected. This method allows the analysis of the individual impact of each plasma constituent for particular chemical modifications. Our approach shows great potential to contribute to a better understanding of plasma-cell interactions.

  2. Pressure-driven reconnection and quasi periodical oscillations in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Paccagnella, R.

    2014-03-15

    This paper presents a model for an ohmically heated plasma in which a feedback exists between thermal conduction and transport, on one side, and the magneto-hydro-dynamical stability of the system, on the other side. In presence of a reconnection threshold for the magnetic field, a variety of periodical or quasi periodical oscillations for the physical quantities describing the system are evidenced. The model is employed to interpret the observed quasi periodical oscillations of electron temperature and perturbed magnetic field around the so called “Single Helical” state in the reversed field pinch, but its relevance for other periodical phenomena observed in magnetic confinement systems, especially in tokamaks, is suggested.

  3. Quantitation of Physostigmine in Plasma by High Pressure Liquid Chromatography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    temperature (ca. 220 c) in the absence of stabilizing agents such as acetylsalicylic acid , dilute ammonia, pyridostigmine, or neostigmine. However...purchased from Aldrich Chemical Co. (Milwaukee, WI). Sodium dihydrogen phosphate and picric acid were purchased from Baker Chemical Co. (Phillipsburg, NJ...enzymes of the plasma, 20 jtl of dimethylphysostigmine (1 jig/ml) as an internal standard, 0.5 ml of 0.1 M picric acid (pH 7), and 0.5 ml of 0.1 M sodium

  4. Implementation Of External Magnetic Fields To Create Pressure High Density Plasmas On The Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzari, Phil; Hopson, Jordan; Frank, Jordan; Crilly, Paul; James, Royce; Karama, Jackson; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Paolino, Richard; Sandri, Eva; Sherman, Justin; Wright, Erin; Turk, Jeremy

    2016-10-01

    HPX Plasmas are created by imparting directed energy into a Pyrex tube preloaded with Ar gas at fill pressures on the order of 10-4 mTorr utilizing an RF power supply and matching box that can deliver about 250 W of power in the 20 MHz to 100 MHz frequency range. It has been demonstrated [1] that a uniform magnetic field in lower energy level plasmas can facilitate a decrease in inertial effects, which promotes energy conservation within the plasma to provide the necessary external energy in the plasma's magnetic field required to reach the Helicon Mode. This uniform magnetic field will be created by a set of electromagnets capable of producing 1000 gauss. These electromagnets, provided by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory will facilitate W-mode production. After reaching the Helicon Mode, the plasma must be forced along the Pyrex tube by an acceleration coil in order to come in contact with several diagnostic probes and to be propelled into a viewing port so Thompson Scattering can be conducted. The progress on the development of the acceleration coil and electromagnets will be presented. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY15-16.

  5. Two-dimensional profile measurement of plasma parameters in radio frequency-driven argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, D. W.; You, S. J.

    2015-09-15

    The two-dimensional profiles of the electron density, electron temperature, neutral translational temperature, and molecular rotational temperature are investigated in an argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet, which is driven by the radio frequency of 13.56 MHz by means of the laser scattering methods of Thomson, Rayleigh, and Raman. All measured parameters have maximum values at the center of the discharge and decrease toward the plasma edge. The results for the electron temperature profile are contrary to the results for the microwave-driven plasma. From our experimental results, the profiles of the plasma parameters arise from the radial contraction of plasmas and the time averaged profile of the electric field, which is obtained by a microwave simulation performed under identical conditions to the plasma jet. In the case of the neutral temperature, a higher translational temperature than the rotational temperature is measured, and its discrepancy is tentatively explained in terms of the low ion-neutral charge exchange rate and the additional degrees of freedom of the molecules. The description of our experimental results and the underlying physics are addressed in detail.

  6. Eradication of Bacterial Biofilms Using Atmospheric Pressure Non-Thermal Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkawareek, Mahmoud; Gilmore, Brendan; Gorman, Sean; Algwari, Qais; Graham, William; O'Connell, Deborah

    2011-10-01

    Bacterial biofilms are ubiquitous in natural and clinical settings and form a major health risk. Biofilms are recognised to be the predominant mode of bacterial growth, and are an immunological challenge compared to planktonic bacteria of the same species. Eradication of biofilms with atmospheric pressure plasma jets is investigated. Cold non-equilibrium plasmas, operated at ambient atmospheric pressure and temperature, are efficient sources for controlled energy transport through highly reactive neutrals (e.g. ROS, RNS), charged particles (ions and electrons), UV radiation, and electro-magnetic fields. A focused panel of clinically significant biofilms, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus cereus, are exposed to various plasma jet configurations operated in helium and oxygen mixtures. Viability of surviving cells was determined using both standard plate counting method and XTT viability assay. These are correlated with measurements and simulations of relevant reactive plasma species.

  7. Apoptotic effects on cultured cells of atmospheric-pressure plasma produced using various gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominami, Kanako; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Kudo, Tada-aki; Sasaki, Shota; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma on various cells such as rat fibroblastic Rat-1 cell line, rat neuroblastoma-like PC12 cell line, and rat macrophage-like NR8383 cell line. The plasma was irradiated directly to a culture medium containing plated cells for 0-20 s. The applied voltage, excitation frequency, and argon or helium gas flow were, respectively, 3-6 kV, 10 kHz, and 3 L/min. Cell viability and apoptotic activity were evaluated using annexin-V/propidium iodide staining. Results showed that the low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma irradiation promoted cell death in a discharge-voltage-dependent and irradiation-time-dependent manner. Furthermore, different effects are produced depending on the cell type. Moreover, entirely different mechanisms might be responsible for the induction of apoptosis in cells by helium and argon plasma.

  8. Comparative study between chemical and atmospheric pressure plasma jet cleaning on glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfa, Rizan Rizon; Ahmad, Mohd Khairul; Fhong, Soon Chin; Sahdan, Mohd Zainizan; Nayan, Nafarizal

    2017-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure plasma jet with low frequency and argon as working gas is presented in this paper to demonstrate its application for glass substrate clean and modification. The glass substrate clean by atmospheric pressure plasma jet is an efficient method to replace other substrate clean method. A comparative analysis is done in this paper between substrate cleaned by chemical and plasma treatment methods. Water contact angle reading is taken for a different method of substrate clean and period of treatment. Under the plasma treatment, the sample shows low surface adhesion due to having the surface property of super hydrophilic surface 7.26°. This comparative analysis is necessary in the industrial application for cost production due to sufficient time and method of substrate clean.

  9. Plasma action on helium flow in cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darny, T.; Pouvesle, J.-M.; Fontane, J.; Joly, L.; Dozias, S.; Robert, E.

    2017-10-01

    In this work, helium flow modifications, visualized by schlieren imaging, induced by the plasma generated in a plasma jet have been studied in conditions used for biomedical treatments (jet being directed downwards with a low helium flow rate). It has been shown that the plasma action can shift up to few centimeters downstream the effects of buoyancy, which allows to the helium flow to reach a target below in conditions for which it is not the case when the plasma is off. This study reveals the critical role of large and long lifetime negative ions during repetitive operations in the kHz regime, inducing strong modifications in the gas propagation. The cumulative added streamwise momentum transferred to ambient air surrounding molecules resulting from a series of applied voltage pulses induces a gradual built up of a helium channel on tens of millisecond timescale. In some conditions, a remarkable stable cylindrical helium channel can be generated to the target with plasma supplied by negative polarity voltage pulses whereas a disturbed flow results from positive polarity operation. This has a direct effect on air penetration in the helium channel and then on the reactive species production over the target which is of great importance for biomedical applications. It has also been shown that with an appropriate combination of negative and positive polarity pulses, it is possible to benefit from both polarity features in order to optimize the plasma plume propagation and plasma delivery to a target.

  10. Cold atmospheric pressure gas plasma enhances the wear performance of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Perni, Stefano; Kong, Michael G; Prokopovich, Polina

    2012-03-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is frequently employed in joint replacements because of its high biocompatibility; however, this material does not exhibit particularly strong wear performance, thus potentially reducing the longevity of such devices. Numerous techniques have been investigated to increase the resistance to wear of UHMWPE, but they are all based on expensive machinery and require a high level of safety precautions. Cold atmospheric pressure gas plasma treatment is an inexpensive process that has been used as a surface modification method and as a sterilization technique. We demonstrate for the first time that a helium/oxygen cold atmospheric pressure gas plasma can be used to enhance the wear performance of UHMWPE without affecting the cytocompatibility of the material. The exposure to a cold atmospheric pressure gas plasma results in a greater level of crosslinking of the polyethylene chains. As a consequence of the higher crosslinking, the material stiffness of the treated surface is increased.

  11. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet's characterization and surface wettability driven by neon transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfa, R. R.; Nafarizal, N.; Ahmad, M. K.; Sahdan, M. Z.; Soon, C. F.

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma driven by Neon transformer power supply argon is presented in this paper. Atmospheric pressure plasma system has attracted researcher interest over low pressure plasma as it provides a flexibility process, cost-efficient, portable device and vacuum-free device. Besides, another golden key of this system is the wide promising application in the field of work cover from industrial and engineering to medical. However, there are still numbers of fundamental investigation that are necessary such as device configuration, gas configuration and its effect. Dielectric barrier discharge which is also known as atmospheric pressure plasma discharge is created when there is gas ionization process occur which enhance the movement of atom and electron and provide energetic particles. These energetic particles can provide modification and cleaning property to the sample surface due to the bombardment of the high reactive ion and radicals to the sample surface. In order to develop atmospheric pressure plasma discharge, a high voltage and high frequency power supply is needed. In this work, we used a neon transformer power supply as the power supply. The flow of the Ar is feed into 10 mm cylinder quartz tube with different treatment time in order to investigate the effect of the plasma discharge. The analysis of each treatment time is presented by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and water contact angle (WCA) measurement. The increase of gas treatment time shows increases intensity of reactive Ar and reduces the angle of water droplets in water contact angle. Treatment time of 20 s microslide glass surface shows that the plasma needle discharges have modified the sample surface from hydrophilic surface to superhydrophilic surface. Thus, this leads to another interesting application in reducing sample surface adhesion to optimize productivity in the industry of paintings, semiconductor and more.

  12. Freezing and Melting of 3D Complex Plasma Structures under Microgravity Conditions Driven by Neutral Gas Pressure Manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Khrapak, S. A.; Klumov, B. A.; Huber, P.; Thomas, H. M.; Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.; Molotkov, V. I.; Lipaev, A. M.; Naumkin, V. N.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.; Malentschenko, Yu.; Volkov, S.

    2011-05-20

    Freezing and melting of large three-dimensional complex plasmas under microgravity conditions is investigated. The neutral gas pressure is used as a control parameter to trigger the phase changes: Complex plasma freezes (melts) by decreasing (increasing) the pressure. The evolution of complex plasma structural properties upon pressure variation is studied. Theoretical estimates allow us to identify the main factors responsible for the observed behavior.

  13. Scattering of Microwaves by Steady-State Plasma Slabs, Columns, and Layers at Atmospheric Pressure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    submitted by Mounir Laroussi, Gary S. Sayler , and Battle B. Glascock, and approved by the Research Office of The University of Tennessee. Plasma-Aided...Laboratory University of Tennessee Knoxville, TN 37996, U.S.A. K. Gillispie & Gary S. Sayler Center for Environmental Biotechnology University of...Discharge at Atmospheric Pressure". Under review by the IEEE Trans. Plasma Sei. 6. M. Laroussi, G. S. Sayler , B. B. Glascock, B. McCurdy, M. E

  14. Modified quadrupole mass analyzer RGA-100 for beam plasma research in forevacuum pressure range

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotukhin, D. B.; Tyunkov, A. V.; Yushkov, Yu. G.; Oks, E. M.

    2015-12-15

    The industrial quadrupole RGA-100 residual gas analyzer was modified for the research of electron beam-generated plasma at forevacuum pressure range. The standard ionizer of the RGA-100 was replaced by three electrode extracting unit. We made the optimization of operation parameters in order to provide the maximum values of measured currents of any ion species. The modified analyzer was successfully tested with beam plasma of argon, nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrocarbons.

  15. Modelling Of Generation And Growth Of Nanoparticles In Low-Pressure Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gordiets, B. F.

    2008-09-07

    Theoretical kinetic models of generation and growth of clusters and nanoparticles in low-pressure plasma are briefly rewired. The relatively simple kinetic model is discussed more detail. Simple formulas and equations are given for monomer density; cluster dimension distribution; critical cluster dimension; rate of particle production; particle density and average dimension as well as plasma characteristics. The analytical formula is also obtained for the time delay of the measured LIPEE signal in the 'Laser Induced Particle Explosive Evaporation' experimental method.

  16. Observation of Quartz Cathode-Luminescence in a Low Pressure Plasma Discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2004-01-01

    Intense, steady-state cathode-luminescence has been observed from exposure of quartz powder to a low pressure rf-excited argon plasma discharge. The emission spectra (400 to 850 nm) associated with the powder luminescence were documented as a function of bias voltage using a spectrometer. The emission was broad-band, essentially washing out the line spectra features of the argon plasma discharge.

  17. Modelling of an inductively coupled plasma torch with argon at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahouh, Hanene; Rebiai, Saida; Rochette, David; Vacher, Damien; Dudeck, Michel

    2014-05-01

    A fluid dynamic model is used to simulate the electromagnetic field, fluid flow and heat transfer in an inductively coupled plasma torch working at atmospheric pressure for argon plasma. The numerical simulation is carried out by using the finite element method based on COMSOL software. The two-dimensional profiles of the electric field, temperature, velocity and charged particle densities are demonstrated inside the discharge region. These numerical results are obtained for a fixed flow rate, frequency and electric power.

  18. Cleaning of niobium surface by plasma of diffuse discharge at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Erofeev, M. V.; Shulepov, M. A.; Ripenko, V. S.

    2017-07-01

    Elements composition of niobium surface before and after plasma treatment by runaway electron preionized diffuse discharge was investigated in atmospheric pressure nitrogen flow by means of an Auger electron spectroscopy. Surface characterizations obtained from Auger spectra show that plasma treatment by diffuse discharge after exposure of 120000 pulses provides ultrafine surface cleaning from carbon contamination. Moreover, the surface free energy of the treated specimens increased up to 3 times, that improve its adhesion property.

  19. Changes in renal hemodynamics and renin release caused by increased plasma oncotic pressure.

    PubMed

    Hall, J E; Guyton, A C

    1976-11-01

    The effect of increased plasma oncotic pressure on renal blood flow (RBF), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), electrolyte excretion, and renin secretion rate (RSR) was studied in dogs anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital. Renal artery infusions of hyperoncotic dextran or human serum albumin raised renal venous colloid osmotic pressure an average of 7.3 and 10.1 mmHg, respectively, and caused small but consistent increases in RBF, large increases in RSR, marked decreases in urine flow rate and electrolyte excretion, with either no change or small decreases in GFR, and no change in renal artery pressure. Renal vasodilation was confined primarily to afferent arterioles and was not measureable until approximately 45 s after the start of infusions. The renal responses to increased plasma oncotic pressure appeared to be an autoregulatory phenomenon, consistent with a tubular mechanism dependent on an altered distal tubular fluid flow and/or composition. The increased renin release during increased plasma oncotic pressure is not compatible with a renal baroreceptor mechanism that responds to decreases in afferent arteriolar pressure because calculated glomerular pressure increased during albumin and dextran infusions.

  20. Plasma pressure in Mercury's equatorial magnetosphere derived from MESSENGER Magnetometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korth, Haje; Anderson, Brian J.; Raines, Jim M.; Slavin, James A.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Purucker, Michael E.; Winslow, Reka M.; Solomon, Sean C.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.

    2011-11-01

    Since insertion of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft into orbit around Mercury on 18 March 2011, the probe's Magnetometer has routinely observed localized reductions of the magnetic field magnitude below the level predicted by a planetary dipole model corrected for magnetospheric magnetic fields. These magnetic depressions are observed on almost every orbit, and the latitude at which they are observed is local-time dependent. The depression signatures are indicators of the presence of enhanced plasma pressures, which inflate the magnetic field locally to maintain pressure balance, thus lowering the magnetic flux density. Mapping the magnetic depressions in local time and latitude provides insight into the plasma distribution near the planet, which complements that provided by MESSENGER's Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer. The spatial distribution shows that magnetic depressions are concentrated in two distinct regions, one near the equator on the nightside and another at high latitudes principally on the dayside. Here we focus on the nightside, equatorial pressure signatures, which we attribute to the magnetotail plasma sheet. The plasma-sheet pressures extend from dusk to dawn and are offset northward from the planetary geographic equator by about 10° in latitude, commensurate with the offset of the planetary dipole. The pressures associated with the plasma-sheet depressions range from 0.1 to 3 nPa and are systematically higher at dawn than at dusk. Proton gradient-curvature and convection drift in Mercury's dipole magnetic field with a dawn-to-dusk electric field result in low drift velocities near dawn, leading to systematically higher densities and pressures at dawn than at dusk, consistent with the observations.

  1. Plasma diagnostics of low pressure high power impulse magnetron sputtering assisted by electron cyclotron wave resonance plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Stranak, Vitezslav; Herrendorf, Ann-Pierra; Drache, Steffen; Bogdanowicz, Robert; Hippler, Rainer; Cada, Martin; Hubicka, Zdenek; Tichy, Milan

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of the hybrid pulsed sputtering source based on the combination of electron cyclotron wave resonance (ECWR) inductively coupled plasma and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) of a Ti target. The plasma source, operated in an Ar atmosphere at a very low pressure of 0.03 Pa, provides plasma where the major fraction of sputtered particles is ionized. It was found that ECWR assistance increases the electron temperature during the HiPIMS pulse. The discharge current and electron density can achieve their stable maximum 10 {mu}s after the onset of the HiPIMS pulse. Further, a high concentration of double charged Ti{sup ++} with energies of up to 160 eV was detected. All of these facts were verified experimentally by time-resolved emission spectroscopy, retarding field analyzer measurement, Langmuir probe, and energy-resolved mass spectrometry.

  2. Investigations of the surface activation of thermoplastic polymers by atmospheric pressure plasma treatment with a stationary plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritzer, Elmar; Nordmeyer, Timo; Leister, Christian; Schmidt, Martin Andreas; Grishin, Artur; Knospe, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    The production of high-quality thermoplastic parts often requires an additional process step after the injection molding stage. This may be a coating, bonding process or a 2K-injection moulding process. A commonly used process to improve the bond strength is atmospheric pressure plasma treatment. A variety of applications are realized with the aid of CNC systems. Although they ensure excellent reproducibility, they make it difficult to implement inline applications. This paper therefore examines the possibility of surface treatment using a stationary plasma jet. However, before it is possible to integrate this technology into a production process, preliminary trials need to be carried out to establish which factors influence the process. Experimental tests were performed using a special test set-up, enabling geometric, plasma-specific parameters to be identified. These results can help with the practical integration of this technology into existing production processes.

  3. Formation of self-consistent pressure profiles in simulation of turbulent convection in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pastukhov, V. P. Smirnov, D. V.

    2016-04-15

    The formation of pressure profiles in turbulent tokamak plasmas in ohmic heating regimes and transient regimes induced by turning-on of electron-cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating is investigated. The study is based on self-consistent modeling of low-frequency turbulent plasma convection described by an adiabatically reduced set of hydrodynamic-type equations. The simulations show that, in the ohmic heating stage, turbulence forms and maintains profiles of the total plasma pressure corresponding to turbulent relaxed states. These profiles are close to self-consistent profiles of the total plasma pressure experimentally observed on the T-10 tokamak in ohmic regimes with different values of the safety factor q{sub L} at the limiter. Simulations of nonstationary regimes induced by turning-on of on- and off-axis ECR heating show that the total plasma pressure profiles in the transient regimes remain close to those in the turbulent-relaxed state, as well as to the profiles experimentally observed on T-10.

  4. [Spectroscopic investigation of the argon plasma discharge in quartz capillary at atmospheric pressure].

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Tong; Li, Shou-Zhe; Guo, Qing-Chao; Zhang, Jia-Liang; Wang, De-Zhen; Ma, Teng-Cai

    2010-05-01

    An arc plasma discharge with a long length of 20 cm was generated in a quartz capillary between two hollow needle electrodes in argon at atmospheric pressure with use of the sinusoidal power supply operating at 45 kHz, which was characterized by a very high electron density. The spectroscopic method of optical emission was employed to diagnose the characteristic parameters of the arc plasma discharge in the quartz capillary. The gas temperature was determined by simulating the OH A-X(0, 0) vibrational band around 300 nm and comparison with measured spectrum by means of optical emission spectroscopy. Furthermore, the electron density was measured by means of Stark broadening of the profile of Hbeta at 486.1 nm. The electron temperature was determined using a Boltzmann plot method. The experiment results show that in the argon arc plasma discharge generated in the quartz capillary at atmospheric pressure, the gas temperature of plasma is about (1 100 +/- 50)K, the electron density at the gas temperature of 1 100 K is approximately 10(14) cm(-3), and the corresponding electron temperature is (14 515 +/- 500)K. This work has accumulated some significant experimental parameters for the treatment of inner surface of large length-to-radius-ratio insulated dielectric tube using plasma, and the results are of great importance to the applications of this type of atmospheric-pressure plasma discharge.

  5. Effect of feed-gas humidity on nitrogen atmospheric-pressure plasma jet for biological applications.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Karl D; McLean, Robert J C; DeLeon, Gian; Melnikov, Vadim

    2016-11-14

    We investigate the effect of feed-gas humidity on the oxidative properties of an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet using nitrogen gas. Plasma jets operating at atmospheric pressure are finding uses in medical and biological settings for sterilization and other applications involving oxidative stress applied to organisms. Most jets use noble gases, but some researchers use less expensive nitrogen gas. The feed-gas water content (humidity) has been found to influence the performance of noble-gas plasma jets, but has not yet been systematically investigated for jets using nitrogen gas. Low-humidity and high-humidity feed gases were used in a nitrogen plasma jet, and the oxidation effect of the jet was measured quantitatively using a chemical dosimeter known as FBX (ferrous sulfate-benzoic acid-xylenol orange). The plasma jet using high humidity was found to have about ten times the oxidation effect of the low-humidity jet, as measured by comparison with the addition of measured amounts of hydrogen peroxide to the FBX dosimeter. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using nitrogen as a feed gas have a greater oxidizing effect with a high level of humidity added to the feed gas.

  6. [Investigation on the gas temperature of a plasma jet at atmospheric pressure by emission spectrum].

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-chen; Yuan, Ning; Jia, Peng-ying; Niu, Dong-ying

    2010-11-01

    A plasma jet of a dielectric barrier discharge in coaxial electrode was used to produce plasma plume in atmospheric pressure argon. Spatially and temporally resolved measurement was carried out by photomultiplier tubes. The light emission signals both from the dielectric barrier discharge and from the plasma plume were analyzed. Furthermore, emission spectrum from the plasma plume was collected by high-resolution optical spectrometer. The emission spectra of OH (A 2sigma + --> X2 II, 307.7-308.9 nm) and the first negative band of N2+ (B2 sigma u+ --> X2 IIg+, 390-391.6 nm) were used to estimate the rotational temperature of the plasma plume by fitting the experimental spectra to the simulated spectra. The rotational temperature obtained is about 443 K by fitting the emission spectrum from the OH, and that from the first negative band of N2+ is about 450 K. The rotational temperatures obtained by the two method are consistent within 5% error band. The gas temperature of the plasma plume at atmospheric pressure was obtained because rotational temperature equals to gas temperature approximately in gas discharge at atmospheric pressure. Results show that gas temperature increases with increasing the applied voltage.

  7. Thermalization of electrons in decaying extreme ultraviolet photons induced low pressure argon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, J.; van der Horst, R. M.; Osorio, E. A.; Kroesen, G. M. W.; Banine, V. Y.

    2016-06-01

    We monitored—in the pressure range: 0.5-15 Pa—the electron temperature in decaying plasmas induced in argon gas by pulsed irradiation with extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons with wavelengths closely around 13.5 nm. For this purpose, temporal measurements of the space-averaged and electric field weighted electron density after pulsed EUV irradiation are combined with an ambipolar diffusion model of the plasma. Results demonstrate that electrons are thermalized to room temperature before the plasma has fully expanded to the chamber walls for pressures of 3 Pa and higher. At pressures below 3 Pa, the electron temperature was found to be up to 0.1 eV above room temperature which is explained by the fact that plasma expansion is too quick for the electrons to fully thermalize. The comparison between plasma expansion duration towards a surface, plasma decay at a surface and time needed for thermalization and cooling of electrons is essential for designers of EUV lithography tools and EUV sources since the temperature of electrons dictates many fundamental physical processes.

  8. Deposition of silicon dioxide films with a non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayan, S. E.; Jeong, J. Y.; Schütze, A.; Tu, V. J.; Moravej, Maryam; Selwyn, G. S.; Hicks, R. F.

    2001-11-01

    Silicon dioxide films were grown using an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet that was produced by flowing oxygen and helium between two coaxial metal electrodes that were driven by 13.56 MHz radio frequency power. The plasma exiting from between the electrodes was mixed with tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), and directed onto a silicon substrate held at 115-350 °C. Silicon dioxide films were deposited at rates ranging from 20±2 to 300±25 nm min-1. The deposition rate increased with decreasing temperature and increasing TEOS pressure, oxygen pressure and RF power. For the latter two variables, the rate increased as follows: Rd∝P0.3O2(RF)1.4. Films grown at 115 °C were porous and contained adsorbed hydroxyl groups, whereas films grown at 350 °C were smooth, dense and free of impurities. These results suggest that the mechanism in the atmospheric pressure plasma is the same as that in low-pressure plasmas.

  9. DNA damage in oral cancer cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Xu; Ptasinska, Sylwia; Klas, Matej; Liu, Yueying; Sharon Stack, M.

    2013-06-10

    The nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was applied to induce DNA damage of SCC-25 oral cancer cells. Optical emission spectra were taken to characterize the reactive species produced in APPJ. In order to explore the spatial distribution of plasma effects, cells were placed onto photo-etched grid slides and the antibody H2A.X was used to locate double strand breaks of DNA inside nuclei using an immunofluorescence assay. The number of cells with double strand breaks in DNA was observed to be varied due to the distance from the irradiation center and duration of plasma treatment.

  10. Enhancement of liquid treatment efficiency by microwave plasma under flow-induced reduced pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Michiko; Takahashi, Tomohiro; Takitou, Sho; Takashima, Seigo; Nomura, Norio; Kitagawa, Tominori; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2017-02-01

    A new microwave plasma device system for in-line solution treatment is developed. In this system, the Venturi effect for pressure reduction is utilized for stable and effective plasma production. The decomposition of phenol solution is tested to verify the efficiency of an in-line plasma treatment system, and such a treatment system is confirmed to have a higher decomposition efficiency than our previously developed batch-type treatment system. Increases in phenol decomposition speed and decomposition energy efficiency with increasing solution flow rate are observed, which suggests the suppression of OH radical recombination and the utilization of OH radicals under flowing solution conditions.

  11. Isentropic expansion of copper plasma in Mbar pressure range at “Luch” laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bel'kov, S. A.; Derkach, V. N.; Garanin, S. G.; Mitrofanov, E. I.; Voronich, I. N.; Fortov, V. E.; Levashov, P. R.; Minakov, D. V.

    2014-01-21

    We present experimental results on thermodynamic properties of dense copper plasma in Mbar pressure range. The laser facility “Luch” with laser intensity 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} is used to compress copper up to ∼8 Mbar by a strong shock wave; subsequent expansion of copper plasma into Al, Ti, Sn allows us to obtain release isentropes of copper by the impedance–matching method. A theoretical analysis and quantum simulations show that in our experiments strongly coupled quantum plasma is generated.

  12. Energy enhancement of proton acceleration in combinational radiation pressure and bubble by optimizing plasma density

    SciTech Connect

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie Baisong; Shan Zhang; Hong Xueren; Wang Hongyu

    2012-08-15

    The combinational laser radiation pressure and plasma bubble fields to accelerate protons are researched through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. The dephasing length of the accelerated protons bunch in the front of the bubble and the density gradient effect of background plasma on the accelerating phase are analyzed in detail theoretically. The radiation damping effect on the accelerated protons energy is also considered. And it is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that the protons bunch energy can be increased by using the background plasma with negative density gradient. However, radiation damping makes the maximal energy of the accelerated protons a little reduction.

  13. DNA damage in oral cancer cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Klas, Matej; Liu, Yueying; Sharon Stack, M.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2013-06-01

    The nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was applied to induce DNA damage of SCC-25 oral cancer cells. Optical emission spectra were taken to characterize the reactive species produced in APPJ. In order to explore the spatial distribution of plasma effects, cells were placed onto photo-etched grid slides and the antibody H2A.X was used to locate double strand breaks of DNA inside nuclei using an immunofluorescence assay. The number of cells with double strand breaks in DNA was observed to be varied due to the distance from the irradiation center and duration of plasma treatment.

  14. Determination of the Electron Temperature in a Low Pressure Dusty Radiofrequency Methane Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Massereau-Guilbaud, Veronique; Geraud-Grenier, Isabelle; Plain, Andre

    2011-11-29

    The particles are obtained by PECVD in radiofrequency (13.56 MHz) low pressure plasmas (90%CH4-10%Ar). During the particle growth, the particles trap electrons and modify the EEDF, and the electrical and optical characteristics of the plasma. The plasma is analyzed by Optical Emission Spectroscopy. The excitation temperature and the electron temperature are calculated from the H{sub {alpha}}, H{sub {beta}}, H{sub {gamma}} Balmer hydrogen line intensities and from Ar ones. The temporal evolutions of the temperatures during the particle formation are compared and discussed.

  15. Turbulent jet flow generated downstream of a low temperature dielectric barrier atmospheric pressure plasma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, Richard D.; Walsh, James L.

    2016-08-01

    Flowing low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma devices have been used in many technological applications ranging from energy efficient combustion through to wound healing and cancer therapy. The generation of the plasma causes a sudden onset of turbulence in the inhomogeneous axisymmetric jet flow downstream of the plasma plume. The mean turbulent velocity fields are shown to be self-similar and independent of the applied voltage used to generate the plasma. It is proposed that the production of turbulence is related to a combination of the small-amplitude plasma induced body forces and gas heating causing perturbations in the unstable shear layers at the jet exit which grow as they move downstream, creating turbulence.

  16. Atmospheric Pressure Non-Equilibrium Plasma as a Green Tool to Crosslink Gelatin Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Anna; Bigi, Adriana; Colombo, Vittorio; Focarete, Maria Letizia; Gherardi, Matteo; Gualandi, Chiara; Oleari, Maria Chiara; Panzavolta, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Electrospun gelatin nanofibers attract great interest as a natural biomaterial for cartilage and tendon repair despite their high solubility in aqueous solution, which makes them also difficult to crosslink by means of chemical agents. In this work, we explore the efficiency of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma in stabilizing gelatin nanofibers. We demonstrate that plasma represents an innovative, easy and environmentally friendly approach to successfully crosslink gelatin electrospun mats directly in the solid state. Plasma treated gelatin mats display increased structural stability and excellent retention of fibrous morphology after immersion in aqueous solution. This method can be successfully applied to induce crosslinking both in pure gelatin and genipin-containing gelatin electrospun nanofibers, the latter requiring an even shorter plasma exposure time. A complete characterization of the crosslinked nanofibres, including mechanical properties, morphological observations, stability in physiological solution and structural modifications, has been carried out in order to get insights on the occurring reactions triggered by plasma. PMID:27924840

  17. Fast low-temperature plasma reduction of monolayer graphene oxide at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodik, Michal; Zahoranova, Anna; Micusik, Matej; Bugarova, Nikola; Spitalsky, Zdenko; Omastova, Maria; Majkova, Eva; Jergel, Matej; Siffalovic, Peter

    2017-04-01

    We report on an ultrafast plasma-based graphene oxide reduction method superior to conventional vacuum thermal annealing and/or chemical reduction. The method is based on the effect of non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma generated by the diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge in proximity of the graphene oxide layer. As the reduction time is in the order of seconds, the presented method is applicable to the large-scale production of reduced graphene oxide layers. The short reduction times are achieved by the high-volume power density of plasma, which is of the order of 100 W cm-3. Monolayers of graphene oxide on silicon substrate were prepared by a modified Langmuir-Schaefer method and the efficient and rapid reduction by methane and/or hydrogen plasma was demonstrated. The best results were obtained for the graphene oxide reduction in hydrogen plasma, as verified by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

  18. Turbulent jet flow generated downstream of a low temperature dielectric barrier atmospheric pressure plasma device.

    PubMed

    Whalley, Richard D; Walsh, James L

    2016-08-26

    Flowing low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma devices have been used in many technological applications ranging from energy efficient combustion through to wound healing and cancer therapy. The generation of the plasma causes a sudden onset of turbulence in the inhomogeneous axisymmetric jet flow downstream of the plasma plume. The mean turbulent velocity fields are shown to be self-similar and independent of the applied voltage used to generate the plasma. It is proposed that the production of turbulence is related to a combination of the small-amplitude plasma induced body forces and gas heating causing perturbations in the unstable shear layers at the jet exit which grow as they move downstream, creating turbulence.

  19. Direct current-self-sustained non-ambipolar plasma at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhiying; Chen, Lee; Funk, Merritt

    2013-12-16

    For decades, non-ambipolar diffusion has been observed and studied in laboratory plasmas that contain a double layer. However, self-sustained non-ambipolar plasma has yet to be demonstrated. This article reports the method and results for achieving such a condition at low pressure, with a wide power range (as low as 6 W). The findings reveal that to achieve self-sustained non-ambipolar plasma, both the balance between electron and ion heating and the space-potential gradient are critical. The plasma reactor developed in this work has potential applications that include microelectronic surface processing and space propulsion, via space-charge-neutral plasma-beam thruster, when operated in the high power regime.

  20. Atmospheric Pressure Non-Equilibrium Plasma as a Green Tool to Crosslink Gelatin Nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liguori, Anna; Bigi, Adriana; Colombo, Vittorio; Focarete, Maria Letizia; Gherardi, Matteo; Gualandi, Chiara; Oleari, Maria Chiara; Panzavolta, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    Electrospun gelatin nanofibers attract great interest as a natural biomaterial for cartilage and tendon repair despite their high solubility in aqueous solution, which makes them also difficult to crosslink by means of chemical agents. In this work, we explore the efficiency of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma in stabilizing gelatin nanofibers. We demonstrate that plasma represents an innovative, easy and environmentally friendly approach to successfully crosslink gelatin electrospun mats directly in the solid state. Plasma treated gelatin mats display increased structural stability and excellent retention of fibrous morphology after immersion in aqueous solution. This method can be successfully applied to induce crosslinking both in pure gelatin and genipin-containing gelatin electrospun nanofibers, the latter requiring an even shorter plasma exposure time. A complete characterization of the crosslinked nanofibres, including mechanical properties, morphological observations, stability in physiological solution and structural modifications, has been carried out in order to get insights on the occurring reactions triggered by plasma.