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Sample records for bulk viscosity drive

  1. Exploring a matter-dominated model with bulk viscosity to drive the accelerated expansion of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Avelino, Arturo; Nucamendi, Ulises E-mail: ulises@ifm.umich.mx

    2010-08-01

    We explore the viability of a bulk viscous matter-dominated Universe to explain the present accelerated expansion of the Universe. The model is composed by a pressureless fluid with bulk viscosity of the form ζ = ζ{sub 0}+ζ{sub 1}H where ζ{sub 0} and ζ{sub 1} are constants and H is the Hubble parameter. The pressureless fluid characterizes both the baryon and dark matter components. We study the behavior of the Universe according to this model analyzing the scale factor as well as some curvature scalars and the matter density. On the other hand, we compute the best estimated values of ζ{sub 0} and ζ{sub 1} using the type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) probe. We find that from all the possible scenarios for the Universe, the preferred one by the best estimated values of (ζ{sub 0},ζ{sub 1}) is that of an expanding Universe beginning with a Big-Bang, followed by a decelerated expansion at early times, and with a smooth transition in recent times to an accelerated expansion epoch that is going to continue forever. The predicted age of the Universe is a little smaller than the mean value of the observational constraint coming from the oldest globular clusters but it is still inside of the confidence interval of this constraint. A drawback of the model is the violation of the local second law of thermodynamics in redshifts z∼>1. However, when we assume ζ{sub 1} = 0, the simple model ζ = ζ{sub 0} evaluated at the best estimated value for ζ{sub 0} satisfies the local second law of thermodynamics, the age of the Universe is in perfect agreement with the constraint of globular clusters, and it also has a Big-Bang, followed by a decelerated expansion with the smooth transition to an accelerated expansion epoch in late times, that is going to continue forever.

  2. Can a matter-dominated model with constant bulk viscosity drive the accelerated expansion of the universe?

    SciTech Connect

    Avelino, Arturo; Nucamendi, Ulises E-mail: ulises@ifm.umich.mx

    2009-04-15

    We test a cosmological model which the only component is a pressureless fluid with a constant bulk viscosity as an explanation for the present accelerated expansion of the universe. We classify all the possible scenarios for the universe predicted by the model according to their past, present and future evolution and we test its viability performing a Bayesian statistical analysis using the SCP ''Union'' data set (307 SNe Ia), imposing the second law of thermodynamics on the dimensionless constant bulk viscous coefficient {zeta}-tilde and comparing the predicted age of the universe by the model with the constraints coming from the oldest globular clusters. The best estimated values found for {zeta}-tilde and the Hubble constant H{sub 0} are: {zeta}-tilde = 1.922{+-}0.089 and H{sub 0} = 69.62{+-}0.59 (km/s)Mpc{sup -1} with a {chi}{sup 2}{sub min} = 314 ({chi}{sup 2}{sub d.o.f} = 1.031). The age of the universe is found to be 14.95{+-}0.42 Gyr. We see that the estimated value of H{sub 0} as well as of {chi}{sup 2}{sub d.o.f} are very similar to those obtained from {Lambda}CDM model using the same SNe Ia data set. The estimated age of the universe is in agreement with the constraints coming from the oldest globular clusters. Moreover, the estimated value of {zeta}-tilde is positive in agreement with the second law of thermodynamics (SLT). On the other hand, we perform different forms of marginalization over the parameter H{sub 0} in order to study the sensibility of the results to the way how H{sub 0} is marginalized. We found that it is almost negligible the dependence between the best estimated values of the free parameters of this model and the way how H{sub 0} is marginalized in the present work. Therefore, this simple model might be a viable candidate to explain the present acceleration in the expansion of the universe.

  3. Anomalous - viscosity current drive

    DOEpatents

    Stix, Thomas H.; Ono, Masayuki

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus and method for maintaining a steady-state current in a toroidal magnetically confined plasma. An electric current is generated in an edge region at or near the outermost good magnetic surface of the toroidal plasma. The edge current is generated in a direction parallel to the flow of current in the main plasma and such that its current density is greater than the average density of the main plasma current. The current flow in the edge region is maintained in a direction parallel to the main current for a period of one or two of its characteristic decay times. Current from the edge region will penetrate radially into the plasma and augment the main plasma current through the mechanism of anomalous viscosity. In another aspect of the invention, current flow driven between a cathode and an anode is used to establish a start-up plasma current. The plasma-current channel is magnetically detached from the electrodes, leaving a plasma magnetically insulated from contact with any material obstructions including the cathode and anode.

  4. Anomalous-viscosity current drive

    DOEpatents

    Stix, T.H.; Ono, M.

    1986-04-25

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for maintaining a steady-state current for magnetically confining the plasma in a toroidal magnetic confinement device using anomalous viscosity current drive. A second aspect of this invention relates to an apparatus and method for the start-up of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma.

  5. Bulk viscosity of multiparticle collision dynamics fluids.

    PubMed

    Theers, Mario; Winkler, Roland G

    2015-03-01

    We determine the viscosity parameters of the multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC) approach, a particle-based mesoscale hydrodynamic simulation method for fluids. We perform analytical calculations and verify our results by simulations. The stochastic rotation dynamics and the Andersen thermostat variant of MPC are considered, both with and without angular momentum conservation. As an important result, we find a nonzero bulk viscosity for every MPC version. The explicit calculation shows that the bulk viscosity is determined solely by the collisional interactions of MPC.

  6. Bulk viscosity effects on ultrasonic thermoacoustic instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jeffrey; Scalo, Carlo; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2016-11-01

    We have carried out unstructured fully-compressible Navier-Stokes simulations of a minimal-unit traveling-wave ultrasonic thermoacoustic device in looped configuration. The model comprises a thermoacoustic stack with 85% porosity and a tapered area change to suppress the fundamental standing-wave mode. A bulk viscosity model, which accounts for vibrational and rotational molecular relaxation effects, is derived and implemented via direct modification of the viscous stress tensor, τij ≡ 2 μSij +λ/2 μ ∂uk/∂xk δij , where the bulk viscosity is defined by μb ≡ λ +2/3 μ . The effective bulk viscosity coefficient accurately captures acoustic absorption from low to high ultrasonic frequencies and matches experimental wave attenuation rates across five decades. Using pressure-based similitude, the model was downscaled from total length L = 2 . 58 m to 0 . 0258 m, corresponding to the frequency range f = 242 - 24200 Hz, revealing the effects of bulk viscosity and direct modification of the thermodynamic pressure. Simulations are carried out to limit cycle and exhibit growth rates consistent with linear stability analyses, based on Rott's theory.

  7. Numerical estimates for the bulk viscosity of ideal gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, M. S.

    2012-06-01

    We estimate the bulk viscosity of a selection of well known ideal gases. A relatively simple formula is combined with published values of rotational and vibrational relaxation times. It is shown that the bulk viscosity can take on a wide variety of numerical values and variations with temperature. Several fluids, including common diatomic gases, are seen to have bulk viscosities which are hundreds or thousands of times larger than their shear viscosities. We have also provided new estimates for the bulk viscosity of water vapor in the range 380-1000 K. We conjecture that the variation of bulk viscosity with temperature will have a local maximum for most fluids. The Lambert-Salter correlation is used to argue that the vibrational contribution to the bulk viscosities of a sequence of fluids having a similar number of hydrogen atoms at a fixed temperature will increase with the characteristic temperature of the lowest vibrational mode.

  8. Warm-Polytropic Cosmology with and Without Bulk Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Hassan

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we consider warm-polytropic cosmology including bulk viscosity and study cosmological parameters. We can obtain effect of viscosity on the important cosmological parameters such as Hubble expansion, deceleration and scale factor parameters. We compare our results with observational data and fix our solution. We find that the bulk viscosity increases both energy density and Hubble expansion parameter.

  9. Quadratic bulk viscosity and the topology of space time.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, C.

    1997-12-01

    By considering a homogeneous isotropic universe admitting quadratic bulk viscosity the author shows that if the bulk viscosity coefficient is large the effective topology of space time attains an antiintuitive interpretation in the sense that a positive curvature space time is ever-expanding. This is true for all cosmologies studied except in the case of small quadratic bulk viscosity (3γ+1-kβ ≥ 0, 3γ+1 > 0).

  10. Bulk viscosity of anisotropically expanding hot QCD plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Vinod

    2011-11-01

    The bulk viscosity, {zeta} and its ratio with the shear viscosity, {zeta}/{eta} have been studied in an anisotropically expanding pure glue plasma in the presence of turbulent color fields. It has been shown that the anisotropy in the momentum distribution function of gluons, which has been determined from a linearized transport equation eventually leads to the bulk viscosity. For the isotropic (equilibrium) state, a recently proposed quasiparticle model of pure SU(3) lattice QCD equation of state has been employed where the interactions are encoded in the effective fugacity. It has been argued that the interactions present in the equation of state, significantly contribute to the bulk viscosity. Its ratio with the shear viscosity is significant even at 1.5T{sub c}. Thus, one needs to take in account the effects of the bulk viscosity while studying the hydrodynamic expansion of quark-gluon plasma in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the Large Hadron Collider.

  11. Effect of bulk viscosity on a hypersonic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel, George

    1992-03-01

    The bulk viscosity mu(b) is generally set equal to zero (Stokes' hypothesis). For certain gases, such as CO2, mu(b)/mu exceeds 1000, where mu is the shear viscosity. In this circumstance, the bulk viscosity may substantially alter a hypersonic boundary layer. A general, nonsimilar, laminar, boundary-layer formulation is provided in which the bulk viscosity terms are included as a correction. To obtain explicit results, flow over a flat plate is considered. In addition to the heat transfer, the transverse pressure gradient inside the boundary layer is not zero, whereas the skin friction is unaltered by the bulk viscosity. This analysis is relevant to aerogravity-assisted maneuvers in planetary atmospheres that largely consist of CO2.

  12. Effect of bulk viscosity on a hypersonic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel, George

    1992-03-01

    The bulk viscosity μb is generally set equal to zero (Stokes' hypothesis). For certain gases, such as CO2, μb/μ exceeds 103, where μ is the shear viscosity. In this circumstance, the bulk viscosity may substantially alter a hypersonic boundary layer. A general, nonsimilar, laminar, boundary-layer formulation is provided in which the bulk viscosity terms are included as a correction. To obtain explicit results, flow over a flat plate is considered. In addition to the heat transfer, the transverse pressure gradient inside the boundary layer is not zero, whereas the skin friction is unaltered by the bulk viscosity. This analysis is relevant to aerogravity-assisted maneuvers in planetary atmospheres that largely consist of CO2.

  13. Modified Chaplygin gas cosmology with bulk viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaoum, H. B.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the viscous modified Chaplygin gas cosmological model. Solutions for different values of the viscosity parameter are obtained using both analytical and numerical methods. We have calculated the deceleration and defined newly statefinder {r, s} pair in D dimensions. It is shown that when D = 4, the usual statefinder parameters are recovered. Furthermore, we apply the statefinder diagnostic to the MCG model with and without viscosity in D dimensions and explore these parameters graphically.

  14. Bulk viscosity of accretion disks around non rotating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeen Moghaddas, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we study the Keplerian, relativistic accretion disks around the non rotating black holes with the bulk viscosity. Many of authors studied the relativistic accretion disks around the black holes, but they ignored the bulk viscosity. We introduce a simple method to calculate the bulk in these disks. We use the simple form for the radial component of the four velocity in the Schwarzschild metric, then the other components of the four velocity and the components of the shear and the bulk tensor are calculated. Also all components of the bulk viscosity, the shear viscosity and stress tensor are calculated. It is seen that some components of the bulk tensor are comparable with the shear tensor. We calculate some of the thermodynamic quantities of the relativistic disks. Comparison of thermodynamic quantities shows that in some states influences of the bulk viscosity are important, especially in the inner radiuses. All calculations are done analytically and we do not use the boundary conditions. Finally, we find that in the relativistic disks around the black holes, the bulk viscosity is non-negligible in all the states.

  15. Bulk viscosity of strange quark matter: Urca versus nonleptonic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sa'd, Basil A.; Shovkovy, Igor A.; Rischke, Dirk H.

    2007-06-15

    A general formalism for calculating the bulk viscosity of strange quark matter is developed. Contrary to the common belief that the nonleptonic processes alone give the dominant contribution to the bulk viscosity, the inclusion of the Urca processes is shown to play an important role at intermediate densities when the characteristic r-mode oscillation frequencies are not too high. The interplay of nonleptonic and Urca processes is analyzed in detail.

  16. Singularities and Entropy in Bulk Viscosity Dark Energy Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xin-He; Dou, Xu

    2011-11-01

    In this paper bulk viscosity is introduced to describe the effects of cosmic non-perfect fluid on the cosmos evolution and to build the unified dark energy (DE) with (dark) matter models. Also we derive a general relation between the bulk viscosity form and Hubble parameter that can provide a procedure for the viscosity DE model building. Especially, a redshift dependent viscosity parameter ζ ∝ λ0 + λ1(1 + z)n proposed in the previous work [X.H. Meng and X. Dou, Commun. Theor. Phys. 52 (2009) 377] is investigated extensively in this present work. Further more we use the recently released supernova dataset (the Constitution dataset) to constrain the model parameters. In order to differentiate the proposed concrete dark energy models from the well known ΛCDM model, statefinder diagnostic method is applied to this bulk viscosity model, as a complementary to the Om parameter diagnostic and the deceleration parameter analysis performed by us before. The DE model evolution behavior and tendency are shown in the plane of the statefinder diagnostic parameter pair {r, s} as axes where the fixed point represents the ΛCDM model. The possible singularity property in this bulk viscosity cosmology is also discussed to which we can conclude that in the different parameter regions chosen properly, this concrete viscosity DE model can have various late evolution behaviors and the late time singularity could be avoided. We also calculate the cosmic entropy in the bulk viscosity dark energy frame, and find that the total entropy in the viscosity DE model increases monotonously with respect to the scale factor evolution, thus this monotonous increasing property can indicate an arrow of time in the universe evolution, though the quantum version of the arrow of time is still very puzzling.

  17. Metastable Lennard-Jones fluids. III. Bulk viscosity.

    PubMed

    Baidakov, Vladimir G; Protsenko, Sergey P

    2014-09-21

    The method of equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulation in combination with the Green-Kubo formula has been used to calculate the bulk viscosity of a Lennard-Jones fluid. Calculations have been made at temperatures 0.4 ≤ k(B)T/ɛ ≤ 2.0 and densities 0.0075 ≤ ρσ(3) ≤ 1.2 at 116 stable and 106 metastable states of liquid and gas. The depth of penetration into the region of metastable states was limited by spontaneous nucleation. In the region of stable states the data obtained are compared with the results of previous investigations. It has been established that the system transition across the lines of liquid-gas and liquid-crystal phase equilibrium and penetration into the metastable regions of liquid and gas are connected with increasing bulk viscosity. The behavior of bulk viscosity close to the spinodal of a superheated liquid and supersaturated vapor is discussed.

  18. Bulk viscosity in 2SC and CFL quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, Mark G.; Schmitt, Andreas

    2007-11-19

    The bulk viscosities of two color-superconducting phases, the color-flavor locked (CFL) phase and the 2SC phase, are computed and compared to the result for unpaired quark matter. In the case of the CFL phase, processes involving kaons and the superfluid mode give the largest contribution to the bulk viscosity since all fermionic modes are gapped. In the case of the 2SC phase, ungapped fermionic modes are present and the process u+d{r_reversible}u+s provides the dominant contribution. In both cases, the bulk viscosity can become larger than that of the unpaired phase for sufficiently large temperatures (T > or approx. 1 MeV for CFL, T > or approx. 0.1 MeV for 2SC). Bulk viscosity (as well as shear viscosity) is important for the damping of r-modes in compact stars and thus can potentially be used as an indirect signal for the presence or absence of color-superconducting quark matter.

  19. Radiating gravitational collapse with shearing motion and bulk viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, R.

    2001-03-01

    A model is proposed of a collapsing radiating star consisting of a shearing fluid with bulk viscosity undergoing radial heat flow with outgoing radiation. The pressure of the star, at the beginning of the collapse, is isotropic but due to the presence of the bulk viscosity the pressure becomes more and more anisotropic. The behavior of the density, pressure, mass, luminosity, the effective adiabatic index and the Kretschmann scalar is analyzed. Our work is compared to the case of a collapsing shearing fluid of a previous model, for a star with 6 Msun.

  20. Shear and bulk viscosities for pure glue matter

    SciTech Connect

    Khvorostukhin, A. S.; Toneev, V. D.; Voskresensky, D. N.

    2011-03-15

    Shear {eta} and bulk {zeta} viscosities are calculated in a quasiparticle model within a relaxation-time approximation for pure gluon matter. Below T{sub c}, the confined sector is described within a quasiparticle glueball model. The constructed equation of state reproduces the first-order phase transition for the glue matter. It is shown that with this equation of state, it is possible to describe the temperature dependence of the shear viscosity to entropy ratio {eta}/s and the bulk viscosity to entropy ratio {zeta}/s in reasonable agreement with available lattice data, but absolute values of the {zeta}/s ratio underestimate the upper limits of this ratio in the lattice measurements typically by an order of magnitude.

  1. Effect of Varying Bulk Viscosity on Generalized Chaplygin Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, H.; Pourhassan, B.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, viscous generalized Chaplygin gas as a model of dark energy considered. We assume non-constant bulk viscous coefficient and study dark energy density. We consider several cases of density-dependent viscosities. We find that, in the special case, the viscous generalized Chaplygin gas is corresponding to modified Chaplygin gas.

  2. Ferroelectric film bulk acoustic wave resonators for liquid viscosity sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobiev, A.; Gevorgian, S.

    2013-08-01

    A concept of accurate liquid viscosity sensing, using bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonators, is proposed. The proposed BAW resonators use thin ferroelectric films with the dc field induced piezoelectric effect allowing for generation of pure longitudinal acoustic waves in the thickness excitation mode. This makes it possible to utilize exclusively shear liquid particle displacement at the resonator side walls and, therefore, accurate viscosity evaluation. The BAW resonators with the dc field induced piezoelectric effect in 0.67BiFeO3-0.33BaTiO3 ferroelectric films are fabricated and their liquid viscosity sensing properties are characterized. The resonator response is analyzed using simple model of a harmonic oscillator damped by a viscous force. It is shown that the resonator Q-factor is inversely proportional to the square root of the viscosity-density product. The viscosity measurement resolution is estimated to be as high as 0.005 mPa.s, which is 0.5% of the water viscosity.

  3. Accelerating Cosmological Expansion from Shear and Bulk Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floerchinger, Stefan; Tetradis, Nikolaos; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2015-03-01

    The dissipation of energy from local velocity perturbations in the cosmological fluid affects the time evolution of spatially averaged fluid dynamic fields and the cosmological solution of Einstein's field equations. We show how this backreaction effect depends on shear and bulk viscosity and other material properties of the dark sector, as well as the spectrum of perturbations. If sufficiently large, this effect could account for the acceleration of the cosmological expansion.

  4. Bulk viscosity of stirred xenon near the critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, K. A.; Shinder, I. I.; Moldover, M. R.

    2005-11-01

    We deduce the thermophysical properties of near-critical xenon from measurements of the frequencies and half-widths of the acoustic resonances of xenon maintained at its critical density in centimeter-sized cavities. In the reduced temperature range 1×10-3<(T-Tc)/Tc<7×10-6 , we measured the resonance frequency and quality factor (Q) for each of six modes spanning a factor of 27 in frequency. As Tc was approached, the frequencies decreased by a factor of 2.2 and the Q ’s decreased by as much as a factor of 140. Remarkably, these results are predicted (within ±2% of the frequency and within a factor of 1.4 of Q ) by a model for the resonator and a model for the frequency-dependent bulk viscosity ζ(ω) that uses no empirically determined parameters. The resonator model is based on a theory of acoustics in near-critical fluids developed by Gillis, Shinder, and Moldover [Phys. Rev. E 70, 021201 (2004)]. In addition to describing the present low-frequency data (from 120Hzto7.5kHz ), the model for ζ(ω) is consistent with ultrasonic (0.4-7MHz) velocity and attenuation data from the literature. However, the model predicts a peak in the temperature dependence of the dissipation in the boundary layer that we did not detect. This suggests that the model overestimates the effect of the bulk viscosity on the thermal boundary layer. In this work, the acoustic cavities were heated from below to stir the xenon, thereby reducing the density stratification resulting from Earth’s gravity. The stirring reduced the apparent equilibration time from several hours to a few minutes, and it reduced the effective temperature resolution from 60mK to approximately 2mK , which corresponds to (T-Tc)/Tc≈7×10-6 .

  5. The role of bulk viscosity on the decay of compressible, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, Eric; Pan, Shaowu

    2016-11-01

    The practice of neglecting bulk viscosity in studies of compressible turbulence is widespread. While exact for monatomic gases and unlikely to strongly affect the dynamics of fluids whose bulk-to-shear viscosity ratio is small and/or of weakly compressible turbulence, this assumption is not justifiable for compressible, turbulent flows of gases whose bulk viscosity is orders of magnitude larger than their shear viscosities (e.g., CO2). To understand the mechanisms by which bulk viscosity and the associated phenomena affect compressible turbulence, we conduct DNS of freely decaying compressible, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence for ratios of bulk-to-shear viscosity ranging from 0-1000. Our simulations demonstrate that bulk viscosity increases the decay rate of turbulent kinetic energy; while enstrophy exhibits little sensitivity to bulk viscosity, dilatation is reduced by an order of magnitude within the two eddy turnover time. Via a Helmholtz decomposition of the flow, we determined that bulk viscosity damps the dilatational velocity and reduces dilatational-solenoidal exchanges, as well as pressure-dilatation coupling. In short, bulk viscosity renders compressible turbulence incompressible by reducing energy transfer between translational and internal modes.

  6. Bulk viscosity due to kaons in color-flavor-locked quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, Mark G.; Braby, Matt; Reddy, Sanjay; Schaefer, Thomas

    2007-05-15

    We calculate the bulk viscosity of color-superconducting quark matter in the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase. We assume that the lightest bosons are the superfluid mode H and the kaons K{sup 0} and K{sup +}, and that there is no kaon condensate. We calculate the rate of strangeness-equilibrating processes that convert kaons into superfluid modes, and the resultant bulk viscosity. We find that for oscillations with a timescale of milliseconds, at temperatures T<1 MeV, the CFL bulk viscosity is much less than that of unpaired quark matter, but at higher temperatures the bulk viscosity of CFL matter can become larger.

  7. Phenomenological consequences of enhanced bulk viscosity near the QCD critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnai, Akihiko; Mukherjee, Swagato; Yin, Yi

    2017-03-01

    In the proximity of the QCD critical point the bulk viscosity of quark-gluon matter is expected to be proportional to nearly the third power of the critical correlation length, and become significantly enhanced. This work is the first attempt to study the phenomenological consequences of enhanced bulk viscosity near the QCD critical point. For this purpose, we implement the expected critical behavior of the bulk viscosity within a non-boost-invariant, longitudinally expanding 1 +1 dimensional causal relativistic hydrodynamical evolution at nonzero baryon density. We demonstrate that the critically enhanced bulk viscosity induces a substantial nonequilibrium pressure, effectively softening the equation of state, and leads to sizable effects in the flow velocity and single-particle distributions at the freeze-out. The observable effects that may arise due to the enhanced bulk viscosity in the vicinity of the QCD critical point can be used as complementary information to facilitate searches for the QCD critical point.

  8. Acoustic Experiment to Measure the Bulk Viscosity of Near-Critical Xenon in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, K. A.; Shinder, I.; Moldover, M. R.; Zimmerli, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    We plan a rigorous test of the theory of dynamic scaling by accurately measuring the bulk viscosity of xenon in microgravity 50 times closer to the critical temperature T(sub c) than previous experiments. The bulk viscosity zeta (or "second viscosity" or "dilational viscosity") will be determined by measuring the attenuation length of sound alpha lambda and also measuring the frequency-dependence of the speed of sound. For these measurements, we developed a unique Helmholtz resonator and specialized electro-acoustic transducers. We describe the resonator, the transducers, their performance on Earth, and their expected performance in microgravity.

  9. Bulk viscosity for pion and nucleon thermal fluctuation in the hadron resonance gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Chatterjee, Sandeep; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2016-10-01

    We have calculated microscopically bulk viscosity of hadronic matter, where equilibrium thermodynamics for all hadrons in medium are described by the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model. Considering pions and nucleons as abundant medium constituents, we have calculated their thermal widths, which inversely control the strength of bulk viscosities for respective components and represent their in-medium scattering probabilities with other mesonic and baryonic resonances, present in the medium. Our calculations show that bulk viscosity increases with both temperature and baryon chemical potential, whereas viscosity to entropy density ratio decreases with temperature and with baryon chemical potential, the ratio increases first and then decreases. The decreasing nature of the ratio with temperature has been observed in most of the earlier investigations with few exceptions. We find that the temperature dependence of bulk viscosity crucially depends on the structure of the relaxation time. Along the chemical freeze-out line in nucleus-nucleus collisions with increasing collision energy, bulk viscosity as well as the bulk viscosity to entropy density ratio decreases, which also agrees with earlier references. Our results indicate the picture of a strongly coupled hadronic medium.

  10. Bulk viscosity of spin-one color superconductors with two quark flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Sa'd, Basil A.; Shovkovy, Igor A.; Rischke, Dirk H.

    2007-03-15

    We consider the contribution of the Urca-type processes to the bulk viscosity of several spin-one color-superconducting phases of dense two-flavor quark matter. In the so-called transverse phases which are suggested to be energetically favorable at asymptotic densities, the presence of ungapped quasiparticle modes prevents that spin-one color superconductivity has a large effect on the bulk viscosity. When all modes are gapped, as for one particular color-spin-locked phase, the effect on the viscosity can be quite large, which may have important phenomenological implications.

  11. Progress on Acoustic Measurements of the Bulk Viscosity of Near-Critical Xenon (BVX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, Keith A.; Shinder, Iosif I.; Moldover, Michael R.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2004-01-01

    We plan to determine the bulk viscosity of xenon 10 times closer [in reduced temperature tau = (T-Tc)/Tc] to its liquid-vapor critical point than ever before. (Tc is the critical temperature.) To do so, we must measure the dispersion and attenuation of sound at frequencies 1/100 of those used previously. In general, sound attenuation has contributions from the bulk viscosity acting throughout the volume of the xenon as well as contributions from the thermal conductivity and the shear viscosity acting within thin thermoacoustic boundary layers at the interface between the xenon and the solid walls of the resonator. Thus, we can determine the bulk viscosity only when the boundary layer attenuation is small and well understood. We present a comparison of calculations and measurements of sound attenuation in the acoustic boundary layer of xenon near its liquid-vapor critical point.

  12. Effect of Viscosity on the Microformability of Bulk Amorphous Alloy in Supercooled Liquid Region

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Ming; Zhang Shihong; Wang Ruixue

    2010-06-15

    Previously published results have shown that viscosity greatly influences on the deformation behavior of the bulk amorphous alloy in supercooled liquid region during microforming process. And viscosity is proved to be a component of the evaluation index which indicating microformability. Based on the fluid flow theory and assumptions, bulk amorphous alloy can be regarded as the viscous materials with a certain viscosity. It is helpful to understand how the viscosity plays an important role in viscous materials with various viscosities by numerical simulation on the process. Analysis is carried out by linear state equation in FEM with other three materials, water, lubricant oil and polymer melt, whose viscosities are different obviously. The depths of the materials flow into the U-shaped groove during the microimprinting process are compared in this paper. The result shows that the deformation is quite different when surface tension effect is not considered in the case. With the lowest viscosity, water can reach the bottom of micro groove in a very short time. Lubricant oil and polymer melt slower than it. Moreover bulk amorphous alloys in supercooled liquid state just flow into the groove slightly. Among the alloys of different systems including Pd-, Mg- and Zr-based alloy, Pd-based alloy ranks largest in the depth. Mg-based alloy is the second. And Zr-based alloy is the third. Further more the rank order of the viscosities of the alloys is Pd-, Mg- and Zr-based. It agrees well with the results of calculation. Therefore viscosity plays an important role in the microforming of the bulk amorphous alloy in the supercooled liquid state.

  13. Computing bulk and shear viscosities from simulations of fluids with dissipative and stochastic interactions.

    PubMed

    Jung, Gerhard; Schmid, Friederike

    2016-05-28

    Exact values for bulk and shear viscosity are important to characterize a fluid, and they are a necessary input for a continuum description. Here we present two novel methods to compute bulk viscosities by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of steady-state systems with periodic boundary conditions - one based on frequent particle displacements and one based on the application of external bulk forces with an inhomogeneous force profile. In equilibrium simulations, viscosities can be determined from the stress tensor fluctuations via Green-Kubo relations; however, the correct incorporation of random and dissipative forces is not obvious. We discuss different expressions proposed in the literature and test them at the example of a dissipative particle dynamics fluid.

  14. Depth of cure, flexural properties and volumetric shrinkage of low and high viscosity bulk-fill giomers and resin composites.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2017-03-31

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the depth of cure, flexural properties and volumetric shrinkage of low and high viscosity bulk-fill giomers and resin composites. Depth of cure and flexural properties were determined according to ISO 4049, and volumetric shrinkage was measured using a dilatometer. The depths of cure of giomers were significantly lower than those of resin composites, regardless of photo polymerization times. No difference in flexural strength and modulus was found among either high or low viscosity bulk fill materials. Volumetric shrinkage of low and high viscosity bulk-fill resin composites was significantly less than low and high viscosity giomers. Depth of cure of both low and high viscosity bulk-fill materials is time dependent. Flexural strength and modulus of high viscosity or low viscosity bulk-fill giomer or resin composite materials are not different for their respective category. Resin composites exhibited less polymerization shrinkage than giomers.

  15. Importance of the Bulk Viscosity of QCD in Ultrarelativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions.

    PubMed

    Ryu, S; Paquet, J-F; Shen, C; Denicol, G S; Schenke, B; Jeon, S; Gale, C

    2015-09-25

    We investigate the consequences of a nonzero bulk viscosity coefficient on the transverse momentum spectra, azimuthal momentum anisotropy, and multiplicity of charged hadrons produced in heavy ion collisions at LHC energies. The agreement between a realistic 3D hybrid simulation and the experimentally measured data considerably improves with the addition of a bulk viscosity coefficient for strongly interacting matter. This paves the way for an eventual quantitative determination of several QCD transport coefficients from the experimental heavy ion and hadron-nucleus collision programs.

  16. Importance of the Bulk Viscosity of QCD in Ultrarelativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, S.; Paquet, J. -F.; Shen, C.; Denicol, G. S.; Schenke, B.; Jeon, S.; Gale, C.

    2015-09-22

    In this study, we investigate the consequences of a nonzero bulk viscosity coefficient on the transverse momentum spectra, azimuthal momentum anisotropy, and multiplicity of charged hadrons produced in heavy ion collisions at LHC energies. The agreement between a realistic 3D hybrid simulation and the experimentally measured data considerably improves with the addition of a bulk viscosity coefficient for strongly interacting matter. Lastly, this paves the way for an eventual quantitative determination of several QCD transport coefficients from the experimental heavy ion and hadron-nucleus collision programs.

  17. Torque Transient of Magnetically Drive Flow for Viscosity Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ban, Heng; Li, Chao; Su, Ching-Hua; Lin, Bochuan; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2004-01-01

    Viscosity is a good indicator of structural changes for complex liquids, such as semiconductor melts with chain or ring structures. This paper discusses the theoretical and experimental results of the transient torque technique for non-intrusive viscosity measurement. Such a technique is essential for the high temperature viscosity measurement of high pressure and toxic semiconductor melts. In this paper, our previous work on oscillating cup technique was expanded to the transient process of a magnetically driven melt flow in a damped oscillation system. Based on the analytical solution for the fluid flow and cup oscillation, a semi-empirical model was established to extract the fluid viscosity. The analytical and experimental results indicated that such a technique has the advantage of short measurement time and straight forward data analysis procedures

  18. Bulk viscosity of quark-gluon matter in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Agasian, N. O.

    2013-11-15

    On the basis of low-energy QCD theorems, the bulk viscosity {zeta}(T, Micro-Sign , H) is expressed in terms of basic thermodynamic quantities that characterizes quark-gluon matter at finite temperature and a finite baryon density in a magnetic field. Various limiting cases are considered.

  19. Bianchi type-VIh string cloud cosmological models with bulk viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Sunil K.; Behera, Dipanjali

    2010-11-01

    String cloud cosmological models are studied using spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi type VIh metric in the frame work of general relativity. The field equations are solved for massive string cloud in presence of bulk viscosity. A general linear equation of state of the cosmic string tension density with the proper energy density of the universe is considered. The physical and kinematical properties of the models have been discussed in detail and the limits of the anisotropic parameter responsible for different phases of the universe are explored.

  20. Thermodynamics and Bulk Viscosity of Approximate Black Hole Duals to Finite Temperature Quantum Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gubser, Steven S.; Nellore, Abhinav; Pufu, Silviu S.; Rocha, Fabio D.

    2008-09-26

    We consider classes of translationally invariant black hole solutions whose equations of state closely resemble that of QCD at zero chemical potential. We use these backgrounds to compute the ratio {zeta}/s of bulk viscosity to entropy density. For a class of black holes that exhibits a first-order transition, we observe a sharp rise in {zeta}/s near T{sub c}. For constructions that exhibit a smooth crossover, like QCD does, the rise in {zeta}/s is more modest. We conjecture that divergences in {zeta}/s for black hole horizons are related to extrema of the entropy density as a function of temperature.

  1. Neutrino emissivities and bulk viscosity in neutral two-flavor quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdermann, J.; Blaschke, D.; Fischer, T.; Kachanovich, A.

    2016-12-01

    We study thermodynamic and transport properties for the isotropic color-spin-locking (iso-CSL) phase of two-flavor superconducting quark matter under compact star constraints within a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type chiral quark model. Chiral symmetry breaking and the phase transition to superconducting quark matter leads to a density dependent change of quark masses, chemical potentials, and diquark gap. A self-consistent treatment of these physical quantities influences the microscopic calculations of transport properties. We present results for the iso-CSL direct URCA emissivities and bulk viscosities, which fulfil the constraints on quark matter derived from cooling and rotational evolution of compact stars. We compare our results with the phenomenologically successful, but yet heuristic 2 SC +X phase. We show that the microscopically founded iso-CSL phase can replace the purely phenomenological 2 SC +X phase in modern simulations of the cooling evolution for compact stars with color-superconducting quark matter interior.

  2. A comparative study on two different approaches of bulk viscosity in the Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Kinkar; Upadhaya, Sudipa; Ghosh, Sabyasachi

    2017-02-01

    We have gone through a comparative study on two different kinds of bulk viscosity expressions by using a common dynamical model. The Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model in the realm of mean-field approximation, including up to eight quark interactions for 2+1 flavor quark matter, is treated for this common dynamics. We have probed the numerical equivalence as well as discrepancy of two different expressions for bulk viscosity at vanishing quark chemical potential. Our estimation of bulk viscosity to entropy density ratio follows a decreasing trend with temperature, which is observed in most of the earlier investigations. We have also extended our estimation for finite values of quark chemical potential.

  3. Thermal conductivity, shear and bulk viscosities for a relativistic binary mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moratto, Valdemar; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, we deal with a binary mixture of diluted relativistic gases within the framework of the kinetic theory. The analysis is made within the framework of the Boltzmann equation. We assume that the gas is under the influence of an isotropic Schwarzschild metric and is composed of particles with speeds comparable with the light speed. Taking into account the constitutive equations for the laws of Fourier and Navier-Stokes, we obtain expressions for the thermal conductivity, the shear, and bulk viscosities. To evaluate the integrals we assume a hard-sphere interaction along with non-disparate masses for the particles of each component. We show the analytical expressions and the behavior of the transport coefficients with respect to a relativistic parameter which gives the ratio of the rest energy of the particles to the thermal energy of the gas. We also determine the dependence of the transport coefficients with respect to the gravitational potential and demonstrate that the corresponding one component limit is recovered by considering particles with equal masses, in accordance with the kinetic theory of a single fluid.

  4. Microstructure and magnetic viscosity of bulk amorphous Nd60Fe20Al5Co10B5 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, X. H.; Xu, H.; Man, H.; Tang, Y. J.; Yang, L. P.; Bai, Q.

    2011-04-01

    The microstructure and magnetic viscosity of bulk amorphous Nd60Fe20Al5Co10B5,prepared by suction casting the molten alloy into a copper mold under an argon atmosphere, have been investigated. The results show that clusters with size 3-5 nm are found to be embedded in the amorphous matrix of as-cast bulk amorphous Nd60Fe20Al5Co10B5 alloy. The Nd60Fe20Al5Co10B5 alloy shows hard magnetic behavior at room temperature, with an intrinsic coercivity of 360 kA/m and a remanence of 69.39 mT. The magnetic viscosity of bulk amorphous Nd60Fe20Al5Co10B5 has been investigated on the major hysteresis loop, and simple logarithmic time dependence is observed. A value for the fluctuation field of 8.24 kA/m is obtained. Analysis based on a Henkel plot is used to confirm the existence of magnetic interaction among clusters. The coercivity mechanism responsible for the hard magnetic behavior of bulk amorphous Nd60Fe20Al5Co10B5 alloy is also discussed.

  5. Shear and bulk viscosities of quark matter from quark-meson fluctuations in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Peixoto, Thiago C.; Roy, Victor; Serna, Fernando E.; Krein, Gastão

    2016-04-01

    We have calculated the temperature dependence of shear η and bulk ζ viscosities of quark matter due to quark-meson fluctuations. The quark thermal width originating from quantum fluctuations of quark-π and quark-σ loops at finite temperature is calculated with the formalism of real-time thermal field theory. Temperature-dependent constituent-quark and meson masses and quark-meson couplings are obtained in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. We found a nontrivial influence of the temperature-dependent masses and couplings on the Landau-cut structure of the quark self-energy. Our results for the ratios η /s and ζ /s , where s is the entropy density (also determined in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in the quasiparticle approximation), are in fair agreement with results of the literature obtained from different models and techniques. In particular, our result for η /s has a minimum very close to the quantum lower bound, η /s =1 /4 π .

  6. ITER ECH launcher options for start-up assist, bulk heating, and EC current drive experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, T.S.

    1994-03-01

    Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) is proposed for providing plasma start-up, bulk heating, current drive, and other applications on the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) project. The requirements for ECH power launching systems for ITER have been investigated, and several possible configurations that have been devised are described in this report. The proposed launcher designs use oversized circular corrugated waveguides that make small penetrations through the blanket modules and radiate into the plasma. The criteria used for the design calls for minimum blanket penetration area, maximum reliability, and optimum launched beam quality. The effects of the harsh plasma edge environment on the launcher are discussed. Power generation systems, windows, and other components of the ECH systems are also investigated. The designs presented are believed to be capable of operating reliably and are relatively easy to maintain remotely.

  7. The disordered P granule protein LAF-1 drives phase separation into droplets with tunable viscosity and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Elbaum-Garfinkle, Shana; Kim, Younghoon; Szczepaniak, Krzysztof; Chen, Carlos Chih-Hsiung; Eckmann, Christian R.; Myong, Sua; Brangwynne, Clifford P.

    2015-01-01

    P granules and other RNA/protein bodies are membrane-less organelles that may assemble by intracellular phase separation, similar to the condensation of water vapor into droplets. However, the molecular driving forces and the nature of the condensed phases remain poorly understood. Here, we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans protein LAF-1, a DDX3 RNA helicase found in P granules, phase separates into P granule-like droplets in vitro. We adapt a microrheology technique to precisely measure the viscoelasticity of micrometer-sized LAF-1 droplets, revealing purely viscous properties highly tunable by salt and RNA concentration. RNA decreases viscosity and increases molecular dynamics within the droplet. Single molecule FRET assays suggest that this RNA fluidization results from highly dynamic RNA–protein interactions that emerge close to the droplet phase boundary. We demonstrate than an N-terminal, arginine/glycine rich, intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) domain of LAF-1 is necessary and sufficient for both phase separation and RNA–protein interactions. In vivo, RNAi knockdown of LAF-1 results in the dissolution of P granules in the early embryo, with an apparent submicromolar phase boundary comparable to that measured in vitro. Together, these findings demonstrate that LAF-1 is important for promoting P granule assembly and provide insight into the mechanism by which IDP-driven molecular interactions give rise to liquid phase organelles with tunable properties. PMID:26015579

  8. Roles of bulk viscosity on Rayleigh-Taylor instability: Non-equilibrium thermodynamics due to spatio-temporal pressure fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Tapan K.; Sengupta, Aditi; Sharma, Nidhi; Sengupta, Soumyo; Bhole, Ashish; Shruti, K. S.

    2016-09-01

    Direct numerical simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) between two air masses with a temperature difference of 70 K is presented using compressible Navier-Stokes formulation in a non-equilibrium thermodynamic framework. The two-dimensional flow is studied in an isolated box with non-periodic walls in both vertical and horizontal directions. The non-conducting interface separating the two air masses is impulsively removed at t = 0 (depicting a heaviside function). No external perturbation has been used at the interface to instigate the instability at the onset. Computations have been carried out for rectangular and square cross sections. The formulation is free of Boussinesq approximation commonly used in many Navier-Stokes formulations for RTI. Effect of Stokes' hypothesis is quantified, by using models from acoustic attenuation measurement for the second coefficient of viscosity from two experiments. Effects of Stokes' hypothesis on growth of mixing layer and evolution of total entropy for the Rayleigh-Taylor system are reported. The initial rate of growth is observed to be independent of Stokes' hypothesis and the geometry of the box. Following this stage, growth rate is dependent on the geometry of the box and is sensitive to the model used. As a consequence of compressible formulation, we capture pressure wave-packets with associated reflection and rarefaction from the non-periodic walls. The pattern and frequency of reflections of pressure waves noted specifically at the initial stages are reflected in entropy variation of the system.

  9. The detection of lubricating oil viscosity changes in gearbox transmission systems driven by sensorless variable speed drives using electrical supply parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abusaad, S.; Brethee, K.; Assaeh, M.; Zhang, R.; Gu, F.; Ball, A. D.

    2015-07-01

    Lubrication oil plays a decisive role to maintain a reliable and efficient operation of gear transmissions. Many offline methods have been developed to monitor the quality of lubricating oils. This work focus on developing a novel online method to diagnose oil degradation based on the measurements from power supply system to the gearbox. Experimental studies based on an 10kW industrial gearbox fed by a sensorless variable speed drive (VSD) shows that measurable changes in both static power and dynamic behaviour are different with lube oils tested. Therefore, it is feasible to use the static power feature to indicate viscosity changes at low and moderate operating speeds. In the meantime, the dynamic feature can separate viscosity changes for all different tested cases.

  10. Surface dilatational viscosity of Langmuir monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Juan; Vogel, Michael; Hirsa, Amir

    2003-11-01

    With increased interest in microfluidic systems, interfacial phenomena is receiving more attention. As the length scales of fluid problems decrease, the surface to volume ratio increases and the coupling between interfacial flow and bulk flow becomes increasingly dominated by effects due to intrinsic surface viscosities (shear and dilatational), in comparison to elastic effects (due to surface tension gradients). The surface shear viscosity is well-characterized, as cm-scale laboratory experiments are able to isolate its effects from other interfacial processes (e.g., in the deep-channel viscometer). The same is not true for the dilatational viscosity, because it acts in the direction of surface tension gradients. Their relative strength scale with the capillary number, and for cm-scale laboratory flows, surface tension effects tend to dominate. In microfluidic scale flows, the scaling favors viscosity. We have devised an experimental apparatus which is capable of isolating and enhancing the effects of dilatational viscosity at the cm scales by driving the interface harmonically in time, while keeping the interface flat. In this talk, we shall present both the theory for how this works as well as experimental measurements of surface velocity from which we deduce the dilatational viscosity of several monolayers on the air-water interface over a substantial range of surface concentrations. Anomalous behavior over some range of concentration, which superficially indicates negative viscosity, maybe explained in terms of compositional effects due to large spatial and temporal variations in concentration and corresponding viscosity.

  11. INEFFICIENT DRIVING OF BULK TURBULENCE BY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN A HYDRODYNAMIC MODEL OF THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Balbus, Steven A.; Schekochihin, Alexander A.

    2015-12-10

    Central jetted active galactic nuclei (AGNs) appear to heat the core regions of the intracluster medium (ICM) in cooling-core galaxy clusters and groups, thereby preventing a cooling catastrophe. However, the physical mechanism(s) by which the directed flow of kinetic energy is thermalized throughout the ICM core remains unclear. We examine one widely discussed mechanism whereby the AGN induces subsonic turbulence in the ambient medium, the dissipation of which provides the ICM heat source. Through controlled inviscid three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we verify that explosive AGN-like events can launch gravity waves (g-modes) into the ambient ICM, which in turn decays to volume-filling turbulence. In our model, however, this process is found to be inefficient, with less than 1% of the energy injected by the AGN activity actually ending up in the turbulence of the ambient ICM. This efficiency is an order of magnitude or more too small to explain the observations of AGN-feedback in galaxy clusters and groups with short central cooling times. Atmospheres in which the g-modes are strongly trapped/confined have an even lower efficiency since, in these models, the excitation of turbulence relies on the g-modes’ ability to escape from the center of the cluster into the bulk ICM. Our results suggest that, if AGN-induced turbulence is indeed the mechanism by which the AGN heats the ICM core, its driving may rely on physics beyond that captured in our ideal hydrodynamic model.

  12. Lagrangian numerical techniques for modelling multicomponent flow in the presence of large viscosity contrasts: Markers-in-bulk versus Markers-in-chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyukova, Elvira; Dabrowski, Marcin; Steinberger, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    Many problems in geodynamic applications may be described as viscous flow of chemically heterogeneous materials. Examples include subduction of compositionally stratified lithospheric plates, folding of rheologically layered rocks, and thermochemical convection of the Earth's mantle. The associated time scales are significantly shorter than that of chemical diffusion, which justifies the commonly featured phenomena in geodynamic flow models termed contact discontinuities. These are spatially sharp interfaces separating regions of different material properties. Numerical modelling of advection of fields with sharp interfaces is challenging. Typical errors include numerical diffusion, which arises due to the repeated action of numerical interpolation. Mathematically, a material field can be represented by discrete indicator functions, whose values are interpreted as logical statements (e.g. whether or not the location is occupied by a given material). Interpolation of a discrete function boils down to determining where in the intermediate node-positions one material ends, and the other begins. The numerical diffusion error thus manifests itself as an erroneous location of the material-interface. Lagrangian advection-schemes are known to be less prone to numerical diffusion errors, compared to their Eulerian counterparts. The tracer-ratio method, where Lagrangian markers are used to discretize the bulk of materials filling the entire domain, is a popular example of such methods. The Stokes equation in this case is solved on a separate, static grid, and in order to do it - material properties must be interpolated from the markers to the grid. This involves the difficulty related to interpolation of discrete fields. The material distribution, and thus material-properties like viscosity and density, seen by the grid is polluted by the interpolation error, which enters the solution of the momentum equation. Errors due to the uncertainty of interface-location can be

  13. Comparing near-infrared conventional diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging for determination of the bulk properties of solid samples by multivariate regression: determination of Mooney viscosity and plasticity indices of natural rubber.

    PubMed

    Juliano da Silva, Carlos; Pasquini, Celio

    2015-01-21

    Conventional reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) and hyperspectral imaging (HI) in the near-infrared region (1000-2500 nm) are evaluated and compared, using, as the case study, the determination of relevant properties related to the quality of natural rubber. Mooney viscosity (MV) and plasticity indices (PI) (PI0 - original plasticity, PI30 - plasticity after accelerated aging, and PRI - the plasticity retention index after accelerated aging) of rubber were determined using multivariate regression models. Two hundred and eighty six samples of rubber were measured using conventional and hyperspectral near-infrared imaging reflectance instruments in the range of 1000-2500 nm. The sample set was split into regression (n = 191) and external validation (n = 95) sub-sets. Three instruments were employed for data acquisition: a line scanning hyperspectral camera and two conventional FT-NIR spectrometers. Sample heterogeneity was evaluated using hyperspectral images obtained with a resolution of 150 × 150 μm and principal component analysis. The probed sample area (5 cm(2); 24,000 pixels) to achieve representativeness was found to be equivalent to the average of 6 spectra for a 1 cm diameter probing circular window of one FT-NIR instrument. The other spectrophotometer can probe the whole sample in only one measurement. The results show that the rubber properties can be determined with very similar accuracy and precision by Partial Least Square (PLS) regression models regardless of whether HI-NIR or conventional FT-NIR produce the spectral datasets. The best Root Mean Square Errors of Prediction (RMSEPs) of external validation for MV, PI0, PI30, and PRI were 4.3, 1.8, 3.4, and 5.3%, respectively. Though the quantitative results provided by the three instruments can be considered equivalent, the hyperspectral imaging instrument presents a number of advantages, being about 6 times faster than conventional bulk spectrometers, producing robust spectral data by ensuring sample

  14. Fluid viscosity under confined conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Belkin, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Closed equations of fluid transfer in confined conditions are constructed in this study using ab initio methods of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. It is shown that the fluid viscosity is not determined by the fluid properties alone, but becomes a property of the "fluid-nanochannel walls" system as a whole. Relations for the tensor of stresses and the interphase force, which specifies the exchange by momentum of fluid molecules with the channel-wall molecules, are derived. It is shown that the coefficient of viscosity is now determined by the sum of three contributions. The first contribution coincides with the expression for the coefficient of the viscosity of fluid in the bulk being specified by the interaction of fluid molecules with each other. The second contribution has the same structure as the first one but is determined by the interaction of fluid molecules with the channel-wall molecules. Finally, the third contribution has no analog in the usual statistical mechanics of transport processes of a simple fluid. It is associated with the correlation of intermolecular forces of the fluid and the channel walls. Thus, it is established that the coefficient of viscosity of fluid in sufficiently small channels will substantially differ from its bulk value.

  15. Non-Newtonian Viscosity of Escherichia coli Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gachelin, Jérémie; Miño, Gastón; Berthet, Hélène; Lindner, Anke; Rousselet, Annie; Clément, Éric

    2013-06-01

    The viscosity of an active suspension of E. coli bacteria is determined experimentally as a function of the shear rate using a Y-shaped microfluidic channel. From the relative suspension viscosity, we identify rheological thickening and thinning regimes as well as situations at low shear rate where the viscosity of the bacteria suspension can be lower than the viscosity of the suspending fluid. In addition, bacteria concentration and velocity profiles in the bulk are directly measured in the microchannel.

  16. Viscosity-dependent protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Ilya J; Massari, Aaron M; Fayer, M D

    2007-05-15

    Spectrally resolved stimulated vibrational echo spectroscopy is used to investigate the dependence of fast protein dynamics on bulk solution viscosity at room temperature in four heme proteins: hemoglobin, myoglobin, a myoglobin mutant with the distal histidine replaced by a valine (H64V), and a cytochrome c552 mutant with the distal methionine replaced by an alanine (M61A). Fructose is added to increase the viscosity of the aqueous protein solutions over many orders of magnitude. The fast dynamics of the four globular proteins were found to be sensitive to solution viscosity and asymptotically approached the dynamical behavior that was previously observed in room temperature sugar glasses. The viscosity-dependent protein dynamics are analyzed in the context of a viscoelastic relaxation model that treats the protein as a deformable breathing sphere. The viscoelastic model is in qualitative agreement with the experimental data but does not capture sufficient system detail to offer a quantitative description of the underlying fluctuation amplitudes and relaxation rates. A calibration method based on the near-infrared spectrum of water overtones was constructed to accurately determine the viscosity of small volumes of protein solutions.

  17. An acoustic transmission sensor for the longitudinal viscosity of fluids.

    PubMed

    Antlinger, Hannes; Clara, Stefan; Beigelbeck, Roman; Cerimovic, Samir; Keplinger, Franz; Jakoby, Bernhard

    2013-11-01

    Physical fluid parameters like viscosity, mass density and sound velocity can be determined utilizing ultrasonic sensors. We introduce the concept of a recently devised transmission based sensor utilizing pressure waves to determine the longitudinal viscosity, bulk viscosity, and second coefficient of viscosity of a sample fluid in a test chamber. A model is presented which allows determining these parameters from measurement values by means of a fit. The setup is particularly suited for liquids featuring higher viscosities for which measurement data are scarcely available to date. The setup can also be used to estimate the sound velocity in a simple manner from the phase of the transfer function.

  18. An acoustic transmission sensor for the longitudinal viscosity of fluids

    PubMed Central

    Antlinger, Hannes; Clara, Stefan; Beigelbeck, Roman; Cerimovic, Samir; Keplinger, Franz; Jakoby, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Physical fluid parameters like viscosity, mass density and sound velocity can be determined utilizing ultrasonic sensors. We introduce the concept of a recently devised transmission based sensor utilizing pressure waves to determine the longitudinal viscosity, bulk viscosity, and second coefficient of viscosity of a sample fluid in a test chamber. A model is presented which allows determining these parameters from measurement values by means of a fit. The setup is particularly suited for liquids featuring higher viscosities for which measurement data are scarcely available to date. The setup can also be used to estimate the sound velocity in a simple manner from the phase of the transfer function. PMID:25844023

  19. Anisotropic eddy viscosity models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carati, D.; Cabot, W.

    1996-01-01

    A general discussion on the structure of the eddy viscosity tensor in anisotropic flows is presented. The systematic use of tensor symmetries and flow symmetries is shown to reduce drastically the number of independent parameters needed to describe the rank 4 eddy viscosity tensor. The possibility of using Onsager symmetries for simplifying further the eddy viscosity is discussed explicitly for the axisymmetric geometry.

  20. Optical viscosity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Cheng-Ling; Peyroux, Juliette; Perez, Alex; Tsui, Chi-Leung; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2009-03-01

    Viscosity measurement by bend loss of fiber is presented. The sensing principle makes use of the damping characteristic of a vibrating optical fiber probe with fix-free end configuration. By measuring the displacement of the fiber probe, the viscosity can be determined by matching the probe's displacement with the displacement built in the database obtained by either experimental method or Finite element calculation. Experimental results are presented by measuring the sucrose and glycerol solutions of different concentrations with a viscosity varying from 1 to 15 cP. Stokes' flow assumption is utilized to attenuate the mass density effect and simplify the viscosity measurement.

  1. Viscosity measuring using microcantilevers

    DOEpatents

    Oden, Patrick Ian

    2001-01-01

    A method for the measurement of the viscosity of a fluid uses a micromachined cantilever mounted on a moveable base. As the base is rastered while in contact with the fluid, the deflection of the cantilever is measured and the viscosity determined by comparison with standards.

  2. Viscosity and Solvation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses theories underlying the phenomena of solution viscosities, involving the Jones and Dole equation, B-coefficient determination, and flickering cluster model. Indicates that viscosity measurements provide a basis for the study of the structural effects of ions in aqueous solutions and are applicable in teaching high school chemistry. (CC)

  3. Viscosity of a nanoconfined liquid during compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shah H.; Kramkowski, Edward L.; Ochs, Peter J.; Wilson, David M.; Hoffmann, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    The viscous behavior of liquids under nanoconfinement is not well understood. Using a small-amplitude atomic force microscope, we found bulk-like viscosity in a nanoconfined, weakly interacting liquid. A further decrease in viscosity was observed at confinement sizes of a just few molecular layers. Overlaid over the continuum viscous behavior, we measured non-continuum stiffness and damping oscillations. The average stiffness of the confined liquid was found to scale linearly with the size of the confining tip, while the damping scales with the radius of curvature of the tip end.

  4. Drop spreading with random viscosity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We examine theoretically the spreading of a viscous liquid drop over a thin film of uniform thickness, assuming the liquid’s viscosity is regulated by the concentration of a solute that is carried passively by the spreading flow. The solute is assumed to be initially heterogeneous, having a spatial distribution with prescribed statistical features. To examine how this variability influences the drop’s motion, we investigate spreading in a planar geometry using lubrication theory, combining numerical simulations with asymptotic analysis. We assume diffusion is sufficient to suppress solute concentration gradients across but not along the film. The solute field beneath the bulk of the drop is stretched by the spreading flow, such that the initial solute concentration immediately behind the drop’s effective contact lines has a long-lived influence on the spreading rate. Over long periods, solute swept up from the precursor film accumulates in a short region behind the contact line, allowing patches of elevated viscosity within the precursor film to hinder spreading. A low-order model provides explicit predictions of the variances in spreading rate and drop location, which are validated against simulations. PMID:27843398

  5. Drop spreading with random viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Jensen, Oliver E.

    2016-10-01

    We examine theoretically the spreading of a viscous liquid drop over a thin film of uniform thickness, assuming the liquid's viscosity is regulated by the concentration of a solute that is carried passively by the spreading flow. The solute is assumed to be initially heterogeneous, having a spatial distribution with prescribed statistical features. To examine how this variability influences the drop's motion, we investigate spreading in a planar geometry using lubrication theory, combining numerical simulations with asymptotic analysis. We assume diffusion is sufficient to suppress solute concentration gradients across but not along the film. The solute field beneath the bulk of the drop is stretched by the spreading flow, such that the initial solute concentration immediately behind the drop's effective contact lines has a long-lived influence on the spreading rate. Over long periods, solute swept up from the precursor film accumulates in a short region behind the contact line, allowing patches of elevated viscosity within the precursor film to hinder spreading. A low-order model provides explicit predictions of the variances in spreading rate and drop location, which are validated against simulations.

  6. Viscosity near Earth's solid inner core

    PubMed

    Smylie

    1999-04-16

    Anomalous splitting of the two equatorial translational modes of oscillation of Earth's solid inner core is used to estimate the effective viscosity just outside its boundary. Superconducting gravimeter observations give periods of 3.5822 +/- 0.0012 (retrograde) and 4.0150 +/- 0.0010 (prograde) hours. With the use of Ekman layer theory to estimate viscous drag forces, an inferred single viscosity of 1.22 x 10(11) Pascal seconds gives calculated periods of 3.5839 and 4.0167 hours for the two modes, close to the observed values. The large effective viscosity is consistent with a fluid, solid-liquid mixture surrounding the inner core associated with the "compositional convection" that drives Earth's geodynamo.

  7. Effective viscosity of dilute bacterial suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Brian M.

    This dissertation explores the bulk (volume averaged) properties of suspensions of microswimmers in a fluid. A microswimmer is a microscopic object that propels itself through a fluid. A common example of a microswimmer is a bacterium, such as Bacillus subtilis. Our particular interest is the bulk rheological properties of suspensions of bacteria -- that is, studying how such a suspension deforms under the application of an external force. In the simplest case, the rheology of a fluid can be described by a scalar effective viscosity. The goal of this dissertation is to find explicit formulae for the effective viscosity in terms of known geometric and physical parameters characterizing bacteria and use them to explain experimental observations. Throughout the dissertation, we consider bacterial suspensions in the dilute limit, where bacteria are assumed to be so far apart that interactions between them are negligible. This simplifies calculations significantly and is the regime in which the most striking experimental results have been observed. We first study suspensions of self-propelled particles using a two-dimensional (2D) Partial Differential Equation (PDE) model. A bacterium is modeled as a disk in 2D with self-propulsion provided by a point force in the fluid. A formula is obtained for the effective viscosity of such suspensions in the dilute limit. This formula includes the two terms that are found in the 2D version of Einstein's classical result for a passive suspension of spheres. To this, our main contribution is added, an additional term due to self-propulsion which depends on the physical and geometric properties of the suspension. This work demonstrates how bacterial self-propulsion can alter the viscosity of a fluid and highlights the importance of bacterial orientation. Next, we present a more realistic PDE model for dilute suspensions of swimming bacteria in a three-dimensional fluid. In this work, a bacterium is modeled as a prolate spheroid with

  8. Viscosity of liquid anorthite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cukierman, M.; Uhlmann, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    The viscosity of liquid anorthite has been determined over the temperature ranges between 1450 to 1620 C and 820 to 950 C. The high-temperature data agree well with previous experimental data and with predictions of the Bottinga and Weill model. The overall log (viscosity) versus 1/T relation exhibits pronounced and rather continuous curvature. The viscosity of anorthite is higher at any given temperature and more strongly temperature-dependent than that of the anorthite-rich lunar compositions 14259, 14310, and 15418. The room-temperature density of glassy anorthite (2.64 gm/cu cm) and the thermal expansion coefficients of glassy and liquid anorthite have also been determined. The volume expansion coefficient for the glass is about 0.000018 per deg C, and that for the liquid is about 0.000048 per deg C. These values are used to relate the high-temperature flow data to the predictions of free-volume theories.

  9. Role of surface in apparent viscosity of glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramov, I.

    2014-03-01

    Two problems have intrigued experts for a long time: The one is within the context of the legend of flowing cathedral glass windows and the second is the inaccuracy appearing in very old thermometers of famous scientists. We relate this with the role of the surface on the apparent viscosity of glasses. The apparent viscosity could deviate from the bulk viscosity if the fraction w of the surface molecules, of small samples, is sufficiently large. The effect is more prominent at low temperatures, correspondingly at high viscosities. The interpretation is within the Avramov and Milchev viscosity model, combined with the predictions of the change of heat capacity for extremely small samples. We find that the apparent glass transition temperature could depend on the sample size, in agreement with experimental observations existing in the literature. In addition to glasses, the present results could be of importance for thin films and foams.

  10. Role of surface in apparent viscosity of glasses.

    PubMed

    Avramov, I

    2014-03-01

    Two problems have intrigued experts for a long time: The one is within the context of the legend of flowing cathedral glass windows and the second is the inaccuracy appearing in very old thermometers of famous scientists. We relate this with the role of the surface on the apparent viscosity of glasses. The apparent viscosity could deviate from the bulk viscosity if the fraction w of the surface molecules, of small samples, is sufficiently large. The effect is more prominent at low temperatures, correspondingly at high viscosities. The interpretation is within the Avramov and Milchev viscosity model, combined with the predictions of the change of heat capacity for extremely small samples. We find that the apparent glass transition temperature could depend on the sample size, in agreement with experimental observations existing in the literature. In addition to glasses, the present results could be of importance for thin films and foams.

  11. Damping of drop oscillations by surfactants and surface viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, Brian M.; Nadim, Ali

    1999-01-01

    An energy equation is derived for the general case of a viscous drop suspended in a viscous medium with surfactants contaminating the interface. It contains terms that clearly identify dissipation contributions from the viscous effects in the bulk fluids, surface shear and dilatational viscosity effects at the interface, and surfactant transport. An efficient boundary integral method is developed which incorporates the effects of a constant surface dilatational viscosity in simulations of an oscillating two-dimensional inviscid drop. Surface dilatational viscosity is shown to have a significant damping effect on the otherwise undamped inviscid oscillations.

  12. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, E.G.D.; Schepper, I.M. de

    1995-12-31

    Simple expressions are given for the effective Newtonian viscosity as a function of concentration as well as for the effective visco-elastic response as a function of concentration and imposed frequency, of monodisperse neutral colloidal suspensions over the entire fluid range. The basic physical mechanisms underlying these formulae are discussed. The agreement with existing experiments is very good.

  13. Viscosity of Campi Flregrei (Italy) magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misiti, Valeria; Vetere, Francesco; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Behrens, Harald; Mangiacapra, Annarita; Freda, Carmela

    2010-05-01

    Viscosity is an important factor governing both intrusive and volcanic processes. The most important parameters governing silicate melts viscosity are bulk composition of melt and temperature. Pressure has only minor effect at crustal depths, whereas crystals and bubbles have significant influence. Among compositional parameters, the water content is critical above all in terms of rheological behaviour of melts and explosive style of an eruption. Consequently, without an appropriate knowledge of magma viscosity depending on the amount of dissolved volatiles, it is not possible to model the processes (i.e., magma ascent, fragmentation, and dispersion) required to predict realistic volcanic scenarios and thus forecast volcanic hazards. The Campi Flegrei are a large volcanic complex (~150 km2) located west of the city of Naples, Italy, that has been the site of volcanic activity for more than 60 ka and represents a potential volcanic hazard owing to the large local population. In the frame of a INGV-DPC (Department of Civil Protection) project devoted to design a multidisciplinary system for short-term volcano hazard evaluation, we performed viscosity measurements, under dry and hydrous conditions, of primitive melt compositions representative of two Campi Flegrei eruptions (Minopoli-shoshonite and Fondo Riccio-latite). Viscosity of the two melts have been investigated in the high temperature/low viscosity range at atmospheric pressure in dry samples and at 0.5 GPa in runs having water content from nominally anhydrous to about 3 wt%. Data in the low temperature/high viscosity range were obtained near the glass transition temperature at atmospheric pressure on samples whose water contents vary from 0.3 up to 2.43 wt%. The combination of high- and low-viscosity data permits a general description of the viscosity as a function of temperature and water content using a modified Tamman-Vogel-Fulcher equation. logν = a+ --b--+ --d--×exp(g × w-) (T - c) (T - e) T (1) where

  14. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Shear thirning will cause a normally viscous fluid -- such as pie filling or whipped cream -- to deform and flow more readily under high shear conditions. In shear thinning, a pocket of fluid will deform and move one edge forward, as depicted here.

  15. Photoacoustic measurement of liquid viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Cunguang; Xing, Da

    2010-05-01

    In this letter, we report on the use of photoacoustic method to measure the viscosity of viscous liquids. The theoretical and experimental study was performed on the influence of viscosity effects on photoacoustic generation. We provide evidence that the frequency spectrum of photoacoustic signal is precisely related to the viscosity. Measurements are validated on different water-glycerol mixtures. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results is obtained. This present method provides an insight into in situ viscosity measurements, which has potential for noninvasive detection of blood viscosity.

  16. Bulk undercooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattamis, T. Z.

    1984-01-01

    Bulk undercooling methods and procedures will first be reviewed. Measurement of various parameters which are necessary to understand the solidification mechanism during and after recalescence will be discussed. During recalescence of levitated, glass-encased large droplets (5 to 8 mm diam) high speed temperature sensing devices coupled with a rapid response oscilloscope are now being used at MIT to measure local thermal behavior in hypoeutectic and eutectic binary Ni-Sn alloys. Dendrite tip velocities were measured by various investigators using thermal sensors or high speed cinematography. The confirmation of the validity of solidification models of bulk-undercooled melts is made difficult by the fineness of the final microstructure, the ultra-rapid evolution of the solidifying system which makes measurements very awkward, and the continuous modification of the microstructure which formed during recalescence because of precipitation, remelting and rapid coarsening.

  17. Viscosity Destabilizes Sonoluminescing Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toegel, Ruediger; Luther, Stefan; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-03-01

    In single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) microbubbles are trapped in a standing sound wave, typically in water or water-glycerol mixtures. However, in viscous liquids such as glycol, methylformamide, or sulphuric acid it is not possible to trap the bubble in a stable position. This is very peculiar as larger viscosity normally stabilizes the dynamics. Suslick and co-workers call this new mysterious state of SBSL “moving-SBSL.” We identify the history force (a force nonlocal in time) as the origin of this destabilization and show that the instability is parametric. A force balance model quantitatively accounts for the observed quasiperiodic bubble trajectories.

  18. Viscosity destabilizes sonoluminescing bubbles.

    PubMed

    Toegel, Ruediger; Luther, Stefan; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-03-24

    In single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) microbubbles are trapped in a standing sound wave, typically in water or water-glycerol mixtures. However, in viscous liquids such as glycol, methylformamide, or sulphuric acid it is not possible to trap the bubble in a stable position. This is very peculiar as larger viscosity normally stabilizes the dynamics. Suslick and co-workers call this new mysterious state of SBSL "moving-SBSL." We identify the history force (a force nonlocal in time) as the origin of this destabilization and show that the instability is parametric. A force balance model quantitatively accounts for the observed quasiperiodic bubble trajectories.

  19. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The sample cell at the heart of CVX-2 will sit inside a thermostat providing three layers of insulation. The cell itself comprises a copper body that conducts heat efficiently and smoothes out thermal variations that that would destroy the xenon's uniformity. Inside the cell, the oscillating screen viscometer element is supported between two pairs of electrodes that deflect the screen and then measure screen motion.

  20. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2001 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (not shown) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. This is a detail view of MSFC 0100143.

  1. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Because xenon near the critical point will collapse under its own weight, experiments on Earth (green line) are limited as they get closer (toward the left) to the critical point. CVX in the microgravity of space (red line) moved into unmeasured territory that scientists had not been able to reach.

  2. Constraints on Crustal Viscosity from Geodetic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houseman, Gregory

    2015-04-01

    Laboratory measurements of the ductile deformation of crustal rocks demonstrate a range of crystal deformation mechanisms that may be represented by a viscous deformation law, albeit one in which the effective viscosity may vary by orders of magnitude, depending on temperature, stress, grain size, water content and other factors. In such measurements these factors can be separately controlled and effective viscosities can be estimated more or less accurately, though the measured deformation occurs on much shorter time scales and length scales than are typical of geological deformation. To obtain bulk measures of the in situ crustal viscosity law for actual geological processes, estimated stress differences are balanced against measured surface displacement or strain rates: at the continental scale, surface displacement and strain rates can be effectively measured using GPS, and stress differences can be estimated from the distribution of gravitational potential energy; this method has provided constraints on a depth-averaged effective viscosity for the lithosphere as a whole in regions that are actively deforming. Another technique measures the post-seismic displacements that are interpreted to occur in the aftermath of a large crustal earthquake. Stress-differences here are basically constrained by the co-seismic deformation and the elastic rigidity (obtained from seismic velocity) and the strain rates are again provided by GPS. In this technique the strain is a strong function of position relative to the fault, so in general the interpretation of this type of data depends on a complex calculation in which various simplifying assumptions must be made. The spatial variation of displacement history on the surface in this case contains information about the spatial variation of viscosity within the crust. Recent post-seismic studies have shown the potential for obtaining measurements of both depth variation and lateral variation of viscosity in the crust beneath

  3. Crustal Viscosity Structure Estimated from Multi-Phase Mixing Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinevar, W. J.; Behn, M. D.; Hirth, G.

    2014-12-01

    Estimates of lower crustal viscosity are typically constrained by analyses of isostatic rebound, post seismic creep, and laboratory-derived flow laws for crustal rocks and minerals. Here we follow a new approach for calculating the viscosity structure of the lower continental crust. We use Perple_X to calculate mineral assemblages for different crustal compositions. Effective viscosity is then calculated using the rheologic mixing model of Huet et al. (2014) incorporating flow laws for each mineral phase. Calculations are performed along geotherms appropriate for the Basin and Range, Tibetan Plateau, Colorado Plateau, and the San Andreas Fault. To assess the role of crustal composition on viscosity, we examined two compositional gradients extending from an upper crust with ~67 wt% SiO2 to a lower crust that is either: (i) basaltic with ~53 wt% SiO2 (Rudnick and Gao, 2003), or (ii) andesitic with ~64% SiO2 (Hacker et al., 2011). In all cases, the middle continental crust has a viscosity that is 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than that inferred for wet quartz, a common proxy for mid-crustal viscosities. An andesitic lower crust results in viscosities of 1020-1021 Pa-s and 1021-1022 Pa-s for hotter and colder crustal geotherms, respectively. A mafic lower crust predicts viscosities that are an order of magnitude higher for the same geotherm. In all cases, the viscosity calculated from the mixing model decreases less with depth compared to single-phase estimates. Lastly, for anhydrous conditions in which alpha quartz is stable, we find that there is a strong correlation between Vp/Vs and bulk viscosity; in contrast, little to no correlation exists for hydrous conditions.

  4. Experimental understanding of the viscosity reduction ability of TLCPs with different PEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Youhong; Zuo, Min; Gao, Ping

    2014-08-01

    In this study, two thermotropic liquid crystalline polyesters (TLCPs) synthesized by polycondensation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid /hydroquinone/ poly dicarboxylic acid were used as viscosity reduction agents for polyethylene (PE). The TLCPs had different thermal, rheological and other physical properties that were quantitatively characterized. The two TLCPs were blended with high density PE (HDPE) and high molecular mass PE (HMMPE) by simple twin screw extrusion under the same weight ratio of 1.0 wt% and were each rheologically characterized at 190°C. The TLCPs acted as processing modifiers for the PEs and the bulk viscosity of the blends decreased dramatically. However, the viscosity reduction ability was not identical: one TLCP had obviously higher viscosity reduction ability on the HDPE, with a maximum viscosity reduction ratio of 68.1%, whereas the other TLCP had higher viscosity reduction ability on the HMMPE, with a maximum viscosity reduction ratio of 98.7%. Proposed explanations for these differences are evaluated.

  5. Viscosity of the earth's core.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gans, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the viscosity of the core at the boundary of the inner and outer core. It is assumed that this boundary is a melting transition and the viscosity limits of the Andrade (1934,1952) hypothesis (3.7 to 18.5 cp) are adopted. The corresponding kinematic viscosities are such that the precessional system explored by Malkus (1968) would be unstable. Whether it would be sufficiently unstable to overcome a severely subadiabatic temperature gradient cannot be determined.

  6. Viscosity measuring instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinstein, S. P. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for enabling the measurement of the viscosity of substances, especially those containing volatiles at elevated temperatures, with greater accuracy and at less cost than before. The apparatus includes a cylinder with a narrow exit opening at one end and a piston which closely slides within the cylinder to apply force against a sample in the cylinder to force the sample through the exit opening. In order to more rapidly heat a sample the ends of the cylinder and piston are tapered and the sample is correspondingly tapered, to provide a large surface to volume ratio. A corresponding coal sample is formed by compressing particles of coal under high pressure in a mold of appropriate shape.

  7. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of liquid xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Resembling a tiny bit of window screen, the oscillator at the heart of CVX-2 will vibrate between two pairs of paddle-like electrodes. The slight bend in the shape of the mesh has no effect on the data. What counts are the mesh's displacement in the xenon fluid and the rate at which the displacement dampens. The unit shown here is encased in a small test cell and capped with a sapphire windown to contain the xenon at high pressure.

  8. Negative-viscosity lattice gases

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, D.H. )

    1989-08-01

    A new irreversible collision rule is introduced for lattice-gas automata. The rule maximizes the flux of momentum in the direction of the local momentum gradient, yielding a negative shear viscosity. Numerically results in 2D show that the negative viscosity leads to the spontaneous ordering of the velocity field, with vorticity resolvable down to one lattice-link length. The new rule may be used in conjunction with previously proposed collision rules to yield a positive shear viscosity lower than the previous rules provide. In particular, Poiseuille flow tests demonstrate a decrease in viscosity by more than a factor of 2.

  9. FRW bulk viscous cosmology with modified cosmic Chaplygin gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, H.; Pourhassan, B.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we study FRW bulk viscous cosmology in presence of modified cosmic Chaplygin gas. We obtain generalized Friedmann equations due to bulk viscosity and modified cosmic Chaplygin gas. Then, we calculate time-dependent energy density and discuss Hubble expansion parameter.

  10. Effective Viscosity Coefficient of Nanosuspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Belkin, A. A.; Egorov, V. V.

    2008-12-01

    Systematic calculations of the effective viscosity coefficient of nanosuspensions have been performed using the molecular dynamics method. It is established that the viscosity of a nanosuspension depends not only on the volume concentration of the nanoparticles but also on their mass and diameter. Differences from Einstein's relation are found even for nanosuspensions with a low particle concentration.

  11. Low viscosity oils. [oxidation resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.W.; Schaap, L.A.; Udelhofen, J.H.

    1981-08-04

    An improved low viscosity (I.E.) 5 W to 7 1/2 W engine oil resistant to oxidation and consumption comprising a major portion of a lubricating oil stock, a sulfurized oil, a dispersant, an anti-corrosion agent, an anti-rust agent, a detergent, an antioxidant, and a viscosity index improver.

  12. Volatiles Which Increase Magma Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S.

    2015-12-01

    The standard model of an erupting volcano is one in which the viscosity of a decompressing magma increases as the volatiles leave the melt structure to form bubbles. It has now been observed that the addition of the "volatiles" P, Cl and F result in an increase in silicate melt viscosity. This observation would mean that the viscosity of selected degassing magmas would decrease rather than increase. Here we look at P, Cl and F as three volatiles which increase viscosity through different structural mechanisms. In all three cases the volatiles increase the viscosity of peralkaline composition melts, but appear to always decrease the viscosity of peraluminous melts. Phosphorus causes the melt to unmix into a Na-P rich phase and a Na-poor silicate phase. Thus as the network modifying Na (or Ca) are removed to the phosphorus-rich melt, the matrix melt viscosity increases. With increasing amounts of added phosphorus (at network modifying Na ~ P) the addition of further phosphorus causes a decrease in viscosity. The addition of chlorine to Fe-free aluminosilicate melts results in an increase in viscosity. NMR data on these glass indicates that the chlorine sits in salt-like structures surrounded by Na and/or Ca. Such structures would remove network-modifying atoms from the melt structure and thus result in an increase in viscosity. The NMR spectra of fluorine-bearing glasses shows that F takes up at least 5 different structural positions in peralkaline composition melts. Three of these positions should result in a decrease in viscosity due to the removal of bridging oxygens. Two of the structural positons of F, however, should result in an increase in viscosity as they require the removal of network-modifying atoms from the melt structure (with one of the structures being that observed for Cl). This would imply that increasing amounts of F might result in an increase in viscosity. This proposed increase in viscosity with increasing F has now been experimentally confirmed.

  13. Detection of liposome membrane viscosity perturbations with ratiometric molecular rotors.

    PubMed

    Nipper, Matthew E; Dakanali, Marianna; Theodorakis, Emmanuel; Haidekker, Mark A

    2011-06-01

    Molecular rotors are a form of fluorescent intramolecular charge-transfer complexes that can undergo intramolecular twisting motion upon photoexcitation. Twisted-state formation leads to non-radiative relaxation that competes with fluorescence emission. In bulk solutions, these molecules exhibit a viscosity-dependent quantum yield. On the molecular scale, the fluorescence emission is a function of the local free volume, which in turn is related to the local micro-viscosity. Membrane viscosity, and the inverse; fluidity, are characteristic terms used to describe the ease of movement withing the membrane. Often, changes in membrane viscosity govern intracellular processes and are indicative of a disease state. Molecular rotors have been used to investigate viscosity changes in liposomes and cells, but accuracy is affected by local concentration gradients and sample optical properties. We have developed self-calibrating ratiometric molecular rotors to overcome this challenge and integrated the new molecules into a DLPC liposome model exposed to the membrane-fluidizing agent propanol. We show that the ratiometric emission intensity linearly decreases with the propanol exposure and that the ratiometric intensity is widely independent of the total liposome concentration. Conversely, dye concentration inside liposomes influences the sensitivity of the system. We suggest that the new self-calibrating dyes can be used for real-time viscosity sensing in liposome systems with the advantages of lifetime measurements, but with low-cost steady-state instrumentation.

  14. Plasma viscosity: a forgotten variable.

    PubMed

    Késmárky, Gábor; Kenyeres, Péter; Rábai, Miklós; Tóth, Kálmán

    2008-01-01

    Evaluation of plasma viscosity has been underutilized in the clinical practice. Plasma viscosity is determined by water-content and macromolecular components. Plasma is a highly concentrated protein solution, therefore weak protein-protein interactions can play a role that is not characterized by electrophoresis. The effect of a protein on plasma viscosity depends on its molecular weight and structure. The less spheroid shape, the higher molecular weight, the higher aggregating capacity, and the higher temperature or pH sensitivity a protein has, the higher plasma viscosity results. Plasma is a Newtonian fluid, its viscosity does not depend on flow characteristics, therefore it is simple to measure, especially in capillary viscosimeters. Its normal value is 1.10-1.30 mPa s at 37 degrees C and independent of age and gender. The measurement has high stability and accuracy, thus little alterations may be pathologically important. Inflammations, tissue injuries resulting in plasma protein changes can increase its value with high sensitivity, though low specificity. It can increase in parallel with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), but it is not influenced by hematocrit (anemia, polycytemia), or time to analysis. Based on these favorable features, in 1942 plasma viscosity was recommended to substitute ESR. In hyperviscosity syndromes plasma viscosity is better in follow-up than ESR. In rheumatoid arthritis, its sensitivity and specificity are better than that of ESR or C-reactive protein. Plasma fibrinogen concentration and plasma viscosity are elevated in unstable angina pectoris and stroke and their higher values are associated with higher rate of major adverse clinical events. Elevation of plasma viscosity correlates to the progression of coronary and peripheral artery diseases. In conclusion, plasma viscosity should be measured routinely in medical practice.

  15. Viscosity behavior of carbon dioxide treated Cut Bank crude oil

    SciTech Connect

    Cady, G.V.; Mosawi, H.

    1995-12-31

    Carbon dioxide injection, either by huff and puff or displacement operations, results in a crude oil viscosity reduction at pressures below the miscibility conditions. Carbon dioxide miscibility occurs in reservoirs at miscible temperature and pressure, but these conditions are not possible in shallow reservoirs. Improved oil recovery in a shallow reservoir depends on the degree of viscosity reduction at the reservoir temperature and pressure. A recovery project`s success depends on the interaction between the carbon dioxide and the reservoir system. A research project carried out at Montana Tech to study the viscosity reduction and carbon dioxide solubility in Cut Bank crude oil at the reservoir`s prevailing temperature and near fracture pressure shows a viscosity reduction ratio (crude-carbon dioxide mixture to original dead oil viscosity) of 0.22 at a pressure of 1,000 psig and 90 F. An original mobility of 20 Md/cp improves to 91 Md/cp under a carbon dioxide recovery process at or near the reservoir`s fracture pressure. Based on the authors` research, improved oil recovery operations in the Cut Bank Field, Montana, is viable when using a commercial on site carbon dioxide recovery or generating system to minimize the cost of CO{sub 2} transportation. The major benefits are oil viscosity reduction, mobility ratio improvement, gas drive, and crude oil swelling.

  16. ZBLAN Viscosity Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William

    2001-01-01

    The past year's contribution from Dr. Kaukler's experimental effort consists of these 5 parts: a) Construction and proof-of-concept testing of a novel shearing plate viscometer designed to produce small shear rates and operate at elevated temperatures; b) Preparing nonlinear polymeric materials to serve as standards of nonlinear Theological behavior; c) Measurements and evaluation of above materials for nonlinear rheometric behavior at room temperature using commercial spinning cone and plate viscometers available in the lab; d) Preparing specimens from various forms of pitch for quantitative comparative testing in a Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer, Thermal Mechanical Analyzer; and Archeological Analyzer; e) Arranging to have sets of pitch specimens tested using the various instruments listed above, from different manufacturers, to form a baseline of the viscosity variation with temperature using the different test modes offered by these instruments by compiling the data collected from the various test results. Our focus in this project is the shear thinning behavior of ZBLAN glass over a wide range of temperature. Experimentally, there are no standard techniques to perform such measurements on glasses, particularly at elevated temperatures. Literature reviews to date have shown that shear thinning in certain glasses appears to occur, but no data is available for ZBLAN glass. The best techniques to find shear thinning behavior require the application of very low rates of shear. In addition, because the onset of the thinning behavior occurs at an unknown elevated temperature, the instruments used in this study must provide controlled low rates of shear and do so for temperatures approaching 600 C. In this regard, a novel shearing parallel plate viscometer was designed and a prototype built and tested.

  17. Critical Viscosity of Xenon investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Dr. Robert F. Berg (right), principal investigator and Dr. Micheal R. Moldover (left), co-investigator, for the Critical Viscosity of Xenon (CVX/CVX-2) experiment. They are with the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Although it does not easily combine with other chemicals, its viscosity at the critical point can be used as a model for a range of chemicals.

  18. Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement (FMVM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Astronaut Mike Fincke places droplets of honey onto the strings for the Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement (FMVM) investigation onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The FMVM experiment measures the time it takes for two individual highly viscous fluid droplets to coalesce or merge into one droplet. Different fluids and droplet size combinations were tested in the series of experiments. By using the microgravity environment, researchers can measure the viscosity or 'thickness' of fluids without the influence of containers and gravity using this new technique. Understanding viscosity could help scientists understand industrially important materials such as paints, emulsions, polymer melts and even foams used to produce pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic products.

  19. Viscosity Measurement for Tellurium Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bochuan; Li, Chao; Ban, Heng; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2006-01-01

    The viscosity of high temperature Te melt was measured using a new technique in which a rotating magnetic field was applied to the melt sealed in a suspended ampoule, and the torque exerted by rotating melt flow on the ampoule wall was measured. Governing equations for the coupled melt flow and ampoule torsional oscillation were solved, and the viscosity was extracted from the experimental data by numerical fitting. The computational result showed good agreement with experimental data. The melt velocity transient initiated by the rotating magnetic field reached a stable condition quickly, allowing the viscosity and electrical conductivity of the melt to be determined in a short period.

  20. Local viscosity and environment on the nanometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Sangmin

    2002-01-01

    fluorescence measurements, it was shown that the motions of DNA and polystyrene at the surface were more retarded than those in bulk. Also, local viscosity of the pluronic polymer which shows sol to gel phase transition was compared to the bulk viscosity near the transition temperature and the local viscosity change is much smaller than bulk viscosity. With the combination of dielectric measurement, the motion of polymer chains and local viscosity were separately measured for the ion conductive polypropylene oxide.

  1. iDriving (Intelligent Driving)

    SciTech Connect

    Malikopoulos, Andreas

    2012-09-17

    iDriving identifies the driving style factors that have a major impact on fuel economy. An optimization framework is used with the aim of optimizing a driving style with respect to these driving factors. A set of polynomial metamodels is constructed to reflect the responses produced in fuel economy by changing the driving factors. The optimization framework is used to develop a real-time feedback system, including visual instructions, to enable drivers to alter their driving styles in responses to actual driving conditions to improve fuel efficiency.

  2. Molecular rotors--fluorescent biosensors for viscosity and flow.

    PubMed

    Haidekker, Mark A; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A

    2007-06-07

    Viscosity is a measure of the resistance of a fluid against gradients in flow (shear rate). Both flow and viscosity play an important role in all biological systems from the microscopic (e.g., cellular) to the systemic level. Many methods to measure viscosity and flow have drawbacks, such as the tedious and time-consuming measurement process, expensive instrumentation, or the restriction to bulk sample sizes. Fluorescent environment-sensitive dyes are known to show high sensitivity and high spatial and temporal resolution. Molecular rotors are a group of fluorescent molecules that form twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) states upon photoexcitation and therefore exhibit two competing deexcitation pathways: fluorescence emission and non-radiative deexcitation from the TICT state. Since TICT formation is viscosity-dependent, the emission intensity of molecular rotors depends on the solvent's viscosity. Furthermore, shear-stress dependency of the emission intensity was recently described. Although the photophysical processes are widely explored, the practical application of molecular rotors as sensors for viscosity and the fluid flow introduce additional challenges. Intensity-based measurements are influenced by fluid optical properties and dye concentration, and solvent-dye interaction requires calibration of the measurement system to a specific solvent. Ratiometric dyes and measurement systems help solve these challenges. In addition, the combination of molecular rotors with specific recognition groups allows them to target specific sites, for example the cell membrane or cytoplasm. Molecular rotors are therefore emerging as new biosensors for both bulk and local microviscosity, and for flow and fluid shear stress on a microscopic scale and with real-time response.

  3. Viscosity Depressants for Coal Liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalfayan, S. H.

    1983-01-01

    Proposed process modification incorporates viscosity depressants to prevent coal from solidifying during liquefaction. Depressants reduce amount of heat needed to liquefy coal. Possible depressants are metallic soaps, such as stearate, and amides, such as stearamide and dimer acid amides.

  4. Dark matter perturbations and viscosity: A causal approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, Giovanni; John, Anslyn; Pénin, Aurélie

    2016-08-01

    The inclusion of dissipative effects in cosmic fluids modifies their clustering properties and could have observable effects on the formation of large-scale structures. We analyze the evolution of density perturbations of cold dark matter endowed with causal bulk viscosity. The perturbative analysis is carried out in the Newtonian approximation and the bulk viscosity is described by the causal Israel-Stewart (IS) theory. In contrast to the noncausal Eckart theory, we obtain a third-order evolution equation for the density contrast that depends on three free parameters. For certain parameter values, the density contrast and growth factor in IS mimic their behavior in Λ CDM when z ≥1 . Interestingly, and contrary to intuition, certain sets of parameters lead to an increase of the clustering.

  5. Hydrodynamic Viscosity in Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duschl, Wolfgang J.; Strittmatter, Peter A.; Biermann, Peter L.

    We propose a generalized accretion disk viscosity prescription based on hydrodynamically driven turbulence at the critical effective Reynolds number. This approach is consistent with recent re-analysis by Richard & Zahn (1999) of experimental results on turbulent Couette-Taylor flows. This new β-viscosity formulation applies to both selfgravitating and non-selfgravitating disks and is shown to yield the standard α-disk prescription in the case of shock dissipation limited, non-selfgravitating disks.

  6. Evaluation of Viscosity Characteristics of Spin-Coated UV Nanoimprint Resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atobe, Hidemasa; Hiroshima, Hiroshi; Wang, Qing

    2010-06-01

    The viscosity of a UV-curable resin used in UV nanoimprint is one of the key parameters to determine the process speed of resin filling in the recesses of a mold. We have developed an apparatus to measure the viscosity of a spin-coated thin liquid film on a wafer. With this viscosity measuring apparatus we examined the effect of the film thickness, exposure of resin to atmosphere, and temperature of resin on the viscosity of PAK-01, which is a UV-curable resin commonly employed in UV nanoimprint. The viscosity of this resin with its film thickness larger than 2.3 µm showed a constant value of 83 mPa·s, which is almost the same as that of the bulk PAK-01. At below 2.3 µm, the viscosity seemed to increase with decreasing film thickness. The viscosity of the spin-coated resin was also found to increase with the duration of its exposure to atmosphere; for a 30 min exposure to atmosphere, the viscosity reached up to 461 mPa·s. It is considered that during the prolonged exposure, the volatile component of the resin evaporated. When subjected to heat treatment, the viscosity of the UV-curable resin did not seem to depend on film thickness and maintained a steady value of 385 mPa·s. It was found that as the film thickness decreased the viscosity approached the value obtained by heat treatment.

  7. Evaluation of Viscosity Characteristics of Spin-Coated UV Nanoimprint Resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidemasa Atobe,; Hiroshi Hiroshima,; Qing Wang,

    2010-06-01

    The viscosity of a UV-curable resin used in UV nanoimprint is one of the key parameters to determine the process speed of resin filling in the recesses of a mold. We have developed an apparatus to measure the viscosity of a spin-coated thin liquid film on a wafer. With this viscosity measuring apparatus we examined the effect of the film thickness, exposure of resin to atmosphere, and temperature of resin on the viscosity of PAK-01, which is a UV-curable resin commonly employed in UV nanoimprint. The viscosity of this resin with its film thickness larger than 2.3 μm showed a constant value of 83 mPa\\cdots, which is almost the same as that of the bulk PAK-01. At below 2.3 μm, the viscosity seemed to increase with decreasing film thickness. The viscosity of the spin-coated resin was also found to increase with the duration of its exposure to atmosphere; for a 30 min exposure to atmosphere, the viscosity reached up to 461 mPa\\cdots. It is considered that during the prolonged exposure, the volatile component of the resin evaporated. When subjected to heat treatment, the viscosity of the UV-curable resin did not seem to depend on film thickness and maintained a steady value of 385 mPa\\cdots. It was found that as the film thickness decreased the viscosity approached the value obtained by heat treatment.

  8. Global scaling symmetry, Noether charge, and universality of shear viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai-Shan

    2016-05-01

    Recently, it was established in Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton gravity that the Kovtun-Son-Starinets viscosity/entropy ratio associated with anti-de Sitter planar black holes can be viewed as the boundary dual to the generalized Smarr relation of the black holes in the bulk. In this paper, we establish this relation in Einstein gravity with general minimally coupled matter and also in theories with an additional nonminimally coupled scalar field. We consider two examples for explicit demonstrations.

  9. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription Drugs & Cold ... in the past year. Middle Figure: Driving after marijuana use is more common than driving after alcohol ...

  10. Impaired Driving

    MedlinePlus

    Impaired driving is dangerous. It's the cause of more than half of all car crashes. It means operating a ... texting Having a medical condition which affects your driving For your safety and the safety of others, ...

  11. Viscosity and scale invariance in the unitary Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Enss, Tilman; Haussmann, Rudolf; Zwerger, Wilhelm

    2011-03-15

    We compute the shear viscosity of the unitary Fermi gas above the superfluid transition temperature, using a diagrammatic technique that starts from the exact Kubo formula. The formalism obeys a Ward identity associated with scale invariance which guarantees that the bulk viscosity vanishes identically. For the shear viscosity, vertex corrections and the associated Aslamazov-Larkin contributions are shown to be crucial to reproduce the full Boltzmann equation result in the high-temperature, low fugacity limit. The frequency dependent shear viscosity {eta}({omega}) exhibits a Drude-like transport peak and a power-law tail at large frequencies which is proportional to the Tan contact. The weight in the transport peak is given by the equilibrium pressure, in agreement with a sum rule due to Taylor and Randeria. Near the superfluid transition the peak width is of the order of 0.5T{sub F}, thus invalidating a quasiparticle description. The ratio {eta}/s between the static shear viscosity and the entropy density exhibits a minimum near the superfluid transition temperature whose value is larger than the string theory bound h/(4{pi}k{sub B}) by a factor of about seven.

  12. Demonstrating the Importance of Bubbles and Viscosity on Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namiki, A.

    2005-12-01

    The behavior of bubbles (exsolved volatile from magma) and viscosity of magma are important parameters that influence volcanic eruptions. Exsolved volatiles increase the volume of magma and reduce its density so that magma has sufficient volume and buoyancy force to erupt. Volatiles exsolve through nucleation and growth by diffusion and bubbles can expand as pressure is reduced. The time scale of diffusion depends on the viscosity of surrounding magma, and the expansion time scale of a bubble is also depends on the viscosity of magma. These control the time scale for volume change. If bubbles segregate from magma and collapse, the magma might not able to expand sufficiently to erupt violently. Whether a bubble can segregate from the liquid part of magma is also depends on viscosity of magma. In this poster, I introduce a straightforward demonstration to show the importance of bubbles and viscosity of magma on volcanic eruptions. To make bubbles, I use baking soda (NaHCO3) and citric acid. Reaction between them generates carbon dioxide (CO2) to make bubbles. I make citric acid solution gel by using agar at the bottom of a transparent glass and pour baking soda disolved corn syrup on top of the agar. This situation is a model of basally heated magma chamber. When water disolved magma (baking soda disolved corn syrup) receives sufficient heat (citric acid) bubbles are generated. I can change viscosity of corn syrup by varying the concentration of water. This demonstration shows how viscosity controls the time scale of volume change of bubbly magma and the distribution of bubbles in the fluid. In addition it helps to understand the important physical processes in volcanic eruption: bubble nucleation, diffusion grows, expansion, and bubble driving convection. I will perform a live demonstration at the site of the poster.

  13. Viscosities of aqueous blended amines

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.H.; Li, M.H.

    1997-07-01

    Solutions of alkanolamines are an industrially important class of compounds used in the natural gas, oil refineries, petroleum chemical plants, and synthetic ammonia industries for the removal of acidic components like CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S from gas streams. The viscosities of aqueous mixtures of diethanolamine (DEA) + N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), DEA + 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP), and monoethanolamine (MEA) + 2-piperidineethanol (2-PE) were measured from 30 C to 80 C. A Redlich-Kister equation for the viscosity deviation was applied to represent the viscosity. On the basis of the available viscosity data for five ternary systems, MEA + MDEA + H{sub 2}O, MEA + AMP + H{sub 2}O, DEA + MDEA + H{sub 2}O, DEA + AMP + H{sub 2}O, and MEA + 2-PE + H{sub 2}O, a generalized set of binary parameters were determined. For the viscosity calculation of the systems tested, the overall average absolute percent deviation is about 1.0% for a total of 499 data points.

  14. The Viscosity-Temperature-Dependence of Liquids,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The viscosity-temperature- dependence of liquids of different types can be represented by the formula lg kinematic viscosity = A/T to the x power + B...if A has a constant value, only one viscosity measurement at one temperature is necessary for the characterization of the viscosity-temperature- dependence . Examples for each different case are given. (Author)

  15. Hypoxic viscosity and diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Rimmer, T; Fleming, J; Kohner, E M

    1990-01-01

    Diabetic and sickle retinopathy have features in common--for example, venous dilatation, microaneurysms, and capillary closure preceding neovascularisation. Bearing in mind that haemoglobin in poorly controlled diabetes is abnormal and that extremely low oxygen tensions (known to cause sickling) exist in the healthy cat retina, we wished to explore the possibility that diabetic blood, like that of sickle cell disease, may become more viscous when deoxygenated. To do this we measured whole blood viscosity, under oxygenated and deoxygenated conditions, of 23 normal persons, 23 diabetic patients without retinopathy, and 34 diabetic patients with retinopathy. The shear rate used was 230 s-1, which is similar to that thought to prevail in the major retinal veins. The viscosity of blood from normal persons, corrected for packed cell volume, did not change significantly on deoxygenation: mean 4.54 (SD 0.38) cps, versus, 4.57 (0.39) paired t test, p = 0.66. Similarly the blood from diabetics without retinopathy showed no change: 4.42 (0.45) versus 4.42 (0.30), p = 0.98; whereas the blood from patients with retinopathy changed from 4.82 (0.48) to 4.95 (0.63), p = 0.027. The hypoxic viscosity ratio (deoxygenated divided by oxygenated viscosity) correlated with total serum cholesterol (r = 0.44, p = 0.018) but not with HbA1, serum glucose, triglycerides, or age. A disproportionate increase in venous viscosity relative to arterial viscosity would lead to increased intraluminal and transmural pressure and therefore exacerbate leakage across capillary walls. PMID:2378855

  16. Pile Driving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Machine-oriented structural engineering firm TERA, Inc. is engaged in a project to evaluate the reliability of offshore pile driving prediction methods to eventually predict the best pile driving technique for each new offshore oil platform. Phase I Pile driving records of 48 offshore platforms including such information as blow counts, soil composition and pertinent construction details were digitized. In Phase II, pile driving records were statistically compared with current methods of prediction. Result was development of modular software, the CRIPS80 Software Design Analyzer System, that companies can use to evaluate other prediction procedures or other data bases.

  17. Viscosity Formulations and the Effect of Uncertain Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasiliev, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The development of detailed models of the interior of the Earth and other terrestrial planets is frequently hampered by poorly constrained compositional parameters, namely Activation Energy and Volume, which are necessary to define Arrhenius viscosity. This results in the values of said parameters varying considerably to suit the needs of individual investigations. A computational exploration of the effects of Activation Energy and Volume on the Earth's mantle was thus conducted, with a view to developing a robust and versatile method for obtaining a first-degree approximation for the parameter values, and providing some context for future studies. A wide range of plausible mantle configurations was examined in both one and two dimensions, with the latter case utilising the modelling program ASPECT to generate a series of simple Earth-like planets which were allowed to evolve until a steady state was achieved. A comprehensive statistical analysis was then performed, allowing for suitable parameter values to be more effectively constrained for numerous given viscosity formulations. Activation Energy was seen to exhibit considerable influence over the bulk magnitude of viscosity values, while Activation Volume heavily impacted the viscosity contrast between the upper and lower mantle. This behaviour stems from the parameters controlling the temperature and pressure dependency of viscosity within the calculation. Results were found to be highly dependent on the minimum and maximum values imposed on the viscosity, reinforcing the need for a fuller understanding of the formulation. A notable impact on stress profiles, and hence tectonic regime, was also observed. As such similar calculations were performed on directly scaled Super-Earths, with the intention of providing some insight into scenarios conducive to particular tectonic regimes in planets outside our solar system.

  18. Light Effect on Water Viscosity: Implication for ATP Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Andrei P.; Haddad, Mike Kh.; Fecht, Hans-Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Previous work assumed that ATP synthase, the smallest known rotary motor in nature, operates at 100% efficiency. Calculations which arrive to this result assume that the water viscosity inside mitochondria is constant and corresponds to that of bulk water. In our opinion this assumption is not satisfactory for two reasons: (1) There is evidence that the water in mitochondria prevails to 100% as interfacial water. (2) Laboratory experiments which explore the properties of interfacial water suggest viscosities which exceed those of bulk water, specifically at hydrophilic interfaces. Here, we wish to suggest a physicochemical mechanism which assumes intramitochondrial water viscosity gradients and consistently explains two cellular responses: The decrease and increase in ATP synthesis in response to reactive oxygen species and non-destructive levels of near-infrared (NIR) laser light, respectively. The mechanism is derived from the results of a new experimental method, which combines the technique of nanoindentation with the modulation of interfacial water layers by laser irradiation. Results, including the elucidation of the principle of light-induced ATP production, are expected to have broad implications in all fields of medicine. PMID:26154113

  19. Distracted driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... the road Your hands on the wheel Your mind on driving Distracted driving occurs when something gets in the way of you doing all 3 things. Examples include: Talking on a cell phone Reading or sending text messages Eating and drinking Grooming ( ...

  20. Both protein adsorption and aggregation contribute to shear yielding and viscosity increase in protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Maria Monica; Pathak, Jai A; Colby, Ralph H

    2014-01-07

    A combination of sensitive rotational rheometry and surface rheometry with a double-wall ring were used to identify the origins of the viscosity increase at low shear rates in protein solutions. The rheology of two high molecular weight proteins is discussed: Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) in a Phosphate Buffered Saline solution and an IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) in a formulation buffer containing small quantities of a non-ionic surfactant. For surfactant-free BSA solutions, the interfacial viscosity dominates the low shear viscosity measured in rotational rheometers, while the surfactant-laden mAb solution has an interfacial viscosity that is small compared to that from aggregation in the bulk. A viscoelastic film forms at the air/water interface in the absence of surfactant, contributing to an apparent yield stress (thus a low shear viscosity increase) in conventional bulk rheology measurements. Addition of surfactant eliminates the interfacial yield stress. Evidence of a bulk yield stress arising from protein aggregation is presented, and correlated with results from standard characterization techniques used in the bio-pharmaceutical industry. The protein film at the air/water interface and bulk aggregates both lead to an apparent viscosity increase and their contributions are quantified using a dimensionless ratio of the interfacial and total yield stress. While steady shear viscosities at shear rates below ∼1 s(-1) contain rich information about the stability of protein solutions, embodied in the measured yield stress, such low shear rate data are regrettably often not measured and reported in the literature.

  1. Surface tensions, viscosities, and diffusion constants in mixed component single aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzdek, Bryan; Marshall, Frances; Song, Young-Chul; Haddrell, Allen; Reid, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Surface tension and viscosity are important aerosol properties but are challenging to measure on individual particles owing to their small size and mass. Aerosol viscosity impacts semivolatile partitioning from the aerosol phase, molecular diffusion in the bulk of the particle, and reaction kinetics. Aerosol surface tension impacts how particles activate to serve as cloud condensation nuclei. Knowledge of these properties and how they change under different conditions hinders accurate modelling of aerosol physical state and atmospheric impacts. We present measurements made using holographic optical tweezers to directly determine the viscosity and surface tension of optically trapped droplets containing ~1-4 picolitres of material (corresponding to radii of ~5-10 micrometres). Two droplets are captured in the experimental setup, equilibrated to a relative humidity, and coalesced through manipulation of the relative trap positions. The moment of coalescence is captured using camera imaging as well as from elastically backscattered light connected to an oscilloscope. For lower viscosity droplets, the relaxation in droplet shape to a sphere follows the form of a damped oscillator and gives the surface tension and viscosity. For high viscosity droplets, the relaxation results in a slow merging of the two droplets to form a sphere and the timescale of that process permits determination of viscosity. We show that droplet viscosity and surface tension can be quantitatively determined to within <10% of the expected value for low viscosity droplets and to better than 1 order of magnitude for high viscosity droplets. Examples illustrating how properties such as surface tension can change in response to environmental conditions will be discussed. Finally, a study of the relationship between viscosity, diffusion constants, vapour pressures, and reactive uptake coefficients for a mixed component aerosol undergoing oxidation and volatilisation will be discussed.

  2. Density and viscosity of lipids under pressure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a lack of data for the viscosity of lipids under pressure. The current report is a part of the effort to fill this gap. The viscosity, density, and elastohydrodynamic film thicknesses of vegetable oil (HOSuO) were investigated. Pressure–viscosity coefficients (PVC) of HOSuO at different tem...

  3. Dementia & Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caregiver Resource Center Family Care Navigator Research Registry Support Groups Caregiver Stories Connections e-Newsletter FCA+(plus) Services ... be like if you could no longer drive. Support groups provide a good venue for both the caregivers ...

  4. Rotary bulk solids divider

    DOEpatents

    Maronde, Carl P.; Killmeyer, Jr., Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for the disbursement of a bulk solid sample comprising, a gravity hopper having a top open end and a bottom discharge end, a feeder positioned beneath the gravity hopper so as to receive a bulk solid sample flowing from the bottom discharge end, and a conveyor receiving the bulk solid sample from the feeder and rotating on an axis that allows the bulk solid sample to disperse the sample to a collection station.

  5. ROTARY BULK SOLIDS DIVIDER

    DOEpatents

    Maronde, Carl P.; Killmeyer JR., Richard P.

    1992-03-03

    An apparatus for the disbursement of a bulk solid sample comprising, a gravity hopper having a top open end and a bottom discharge end, a feeder positioned beneath the gravity hopper so as to receive a bulk solid sample flowing from the bottom discharge end, and a conveyor receiving the bulk solid sample from the feeder and rotating on an axis that allows the bulk solid sample to disperse the sample to a collection station.

  6. Electron viscosity, current vortices and negative nonlocal resistance in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitov, Leonid; Falkovich, Gregory

    2016-07-01

    Quantum-critical strongly correlated electron systems are predicted to feature universal collision-dominated transport resembling that of viscous fluids. However, investigation of these phenomena has been hampered by the lack of known macroscopic signatures of electron viscosity. Here we identify vorticity as such a signature and link it with a readily verifiable striking macroscopic d.c. transport behaviour. Produced by the viscous flow, vorticity can drive electric current against an applied field, resulting in a negative nonlocal voltage. We argue that the latter may play the same role for the viscous regime as zero electrical resistance does for superconductivity. Besides offering a diagnostic that distinguishes viscous transport from ohmic currents, the sign-changing electrical response affords a robust tool for directly measuring the viscosity-to-resistivity ratio. A strongly interacting electron-hole plasma in high-mobility graphene affords a unique link between quantum-critical electron transport and the wealth of fluid mechanics phenomena.

  7. Superparamagnetic nanoparticle-based viscosity test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kai; Liu, Jinming; Wang, Yi; Ye, Clark; Feng, Yinglong; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2015-08-01

    Hyperviscosity syndrome is triggered by high blood viscosity in the human body. This syndrome can result in retinopathy, vertigo, coma, and other unanticipated complications. Serum viscosity is one of the important factors affecting whole blood viscosity, which is regarded as an indicator of general health. In this letter, we propose and demonstrate a Brownian relaxation-based mixing frequency method to test human serum viscosity. This method uses excitatory and detection coils and Brownian relaxation-dominated superparamagnetic nanoparticles, which are sensitive to variables of the liquid environment such as viscosity and temperature. We collect the harmonic signals produced by magnetic nanoparticles and estimate the viscosity of unknown solutions by comparison to the calibration curves. An in vitro human serum viscosity test is performed in less than 1.5 min.

  8. Simultaneous liquid viscosity and density determination with piezoelectric unimorph cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Wan Y.; Li, Xiaoping; Gu, Huiming; Shih, Wei-Heng; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2001-01-01

    We have examined both experimentally and theoretically a piezoelectric unimorph cantilever as a liquid viscosity-and-density sensor. The fabricated piezoelectric unimorph consisted of a PbOṡZrO2ṡTiO2 (PZT) layer on a thin stainless-steel plate. In addition to a driving electrode, a sensing electrode was placed on top of the PZT layer, permitting the direct measurement of the resonance frequency. The cantilever was tested using water-glycerol solutions of different compositions. In all three of the tested modes, the resonance frequency decreased while the width of the resonance peak increased with increasing glycerol content. To account for the liquid effect, we consider the cantilever as a sphere of radius R oscillating in a liquid. By including the high and low frequency terms in the induced mass and the damping coefficient of the liquid, we show that for a given liquid density and viscosity the oscillating-sphere model predicts a resonance frequency and peak width that closely agree with experiment. Furthermore, the viscosity and the density of a liquid have been determined simultaneously using the experimentally measured resonance frequency and peak width as inputs to the oscillating-sphere model. The calculated liquid viscosity and density closely agreed with the known values, indicating that our cantilever-based sensor is effective in determining viscosity and density, simultaneously. We also show that scaling analysis predicts an increase in the width of the resonance peak with decreasing cantilever size, an observation in agreement with the large peak widths observed for microcantilevers.

  9. Interacting Modified Cosmic Chaplygin Gas with Variable Cosmological Constant and Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Hassan

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we study interaction between modified cosmic Chaplygin gas and pressureless matter in presence of both bulk and shear viscosities as a model of our Universe. Also we consider variable cosmological constant and investigate some cosmological parameters such as sound speed and time-dependent density. We investigate stability of model by using first order linear perturbation.

  10. Bulk Superconductors in Mobile Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werfel, F. N.; Delor, U. Floegel-; Rothfeld, R.; Riedel, T.; Wippich, D.; Goebel, B.; Schirrmeister, P.

    We investigate and review concepts of multi - seeded REBCO bulk superconductors in mobile application. ATZ's compact HTS bulk magnets can trap routinely 1 T@77 K. Except of magnetization, flux creep and hysteresis, industrial - like properties as compactness, power density, and robustness are of major device interest if mobility and light-weight construction is in focus. For mobile application in levitated trains or demonstrator magnets we examine the performance of on-board cryogenics either by LN2 or cryo-cooler application. The mechanical, electric and thermodynamical requirements of compact vacuum cryostats for Maglev train operation were studied systematically. More than 30 units are manufactured and tested. The attractive load to weight ratio is more than 10 and favours group module device constructions up to 5 t load on permanent magnet (PM) track. A transportable and compact YBCO bulk magnet cooled with in-situ 4 Watt Stirling cryo-cooler for 50 - 80 K operation is investigated. Low cooling power and effective HTS cold mass drives the system construction to a minimum - thermal loss and light-weight design.

  11. Method of adaptive artificial viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, I. V.; Fryazinov, I. V.

    2011-09-01

    A new finite-difference method for the numerical solution of gas dynamics equations is proposed. This method is a uniform monotonous finite-difference scheme of second-order approximation on time and space outside of domains of shock and compression waves. This method is based on inputting adaptive artificial viscosity (AAV) into gas dynamics equations. In this paper, this method is analyzed for 2D geometry. The testing computations of the movement of contact discontinuities and shock waves and the breakup of discontinuities are demonstrated.

  12. Effective Viscosity of Microswimmer Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafaï, Salima; Jibuti, Levan; Peyla, Philippe

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of a quantitative and macroscopic parameter to estimate the global motility of a large population of swimming biological cells is a challenge. Experiments on the rheology of active suspensions have been performed. Effective viscosity of sheared suspensions of live unicellular motile microalgae (Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii) is far greater than for suspensions containing the same volume fraction of dead cells. In addition, suspensions show shear thinning behavior. We relate these macroscopic measurements to the orientation of individual swimming cells under flow and discuss our results in the light of several existing models.

  13. Effective viscosity of microswimmer suspensions.

    PubMed

    Rafaï, Salima; Jibuti, Levan; Peyla, Philippe

    2010-03-05

    The measurement of a quantitative and macroscopic parameter to estimate the global motility of a large population of swimming biological cells is a challenge. Experiments on the rheology of active suspensions have been performed. Effective viscosity of sheared suspensions of live unicellular motile microalgae (Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii) is far greater than for suspensions containing the same volume fraction of dead cells. In addition, suspensions show shear thinning behavior. We relate these macroscopic measurements to the orientation of individual swimming cells under flow and discuss our results in the light of several existing models.

  14. Critical Viscosity of Xenon team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure (at left) that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister (right) holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (left) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD.

  15. Critical Viscosity of Xenon team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure (at left) that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister (right) holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (not shown) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD.

  16. Disk Drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A new material known as AlBeMet, developed by Brush Wellman for research applications in the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) program, is now used for high performance disk drives. AlBeMet is a compression of aluminum, beryllium metal matrix composite. It reduces system weight and its high thermal conductivity can effectively remove heat and increase an electrical system's lifetime. The lighter, stiffer AlBeMet (AlBeMet 160) used in the disk drive means heads can be moved faster, improving disk performance.

  17. FRW bulk viscous cosmology with modified Chaplygin gas in flat space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, H.; Pourhassan, B.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we study FRW bulk viscous cosmology in presence of modified Chaplygin gas. We write modified Friedmann equations due to bulk viscosity and Chaplygin gas and obtain time-dependent energy density for the special case of flat space.

  18. Drop Spreading with Random Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Jensen, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    Airway mucus acts as a barrier to protect the lung. However as a biological material, its physical properties are known imperfectly and can be spatially heterogeneous. In this study we assess the impact of these uncertainties on the rate of spreading of a drop (representing an inhaled aerosol) over a mucus film. We model the film as Newtonian, having a viscosity that depends linearly on the concentration of a passive solute (a crude proxy for mucin proteins). Given an initial random solute (and hence viscosity) distribution, described as a Gaussian random field with a given correlation structure, we seek to quantify the uncertainties in outcomes as the drop spreads. Using lubrication theory, we describe the spreading of the drop in terms of a system of coupled nonlinear PDEs governing the evolution of film height and the vertically-averaged solute concentration. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to predict the variability in the drop centre location and width (1D) or area (2D). We show how simulation results are well described (at much lower computational cost) by a low-order model using a weak disorder expansion. Our results show for example how variability in the drop location is a non-monotonic function of the solute correlation length increases. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

  19. Viscosity Dependence of Some Protein and Enzyme Reaction Rates: Seventy-Five Years after Kramers.

    PubMed

    Sashi, Pulikallu; Bhuyan, Abani K

    2015-07-28

    Kramers rate theory is a milestone in chemical reaction research, but concerns regarding the basic understanding of condensed phase reaction rates of large molecules in viscous milieu persist. Experimental studies of Kramers theory rely on scaling reaction rates with inverse solvent viscosity, which is often equated with the bulk friction coefficient based on simple hydrodynamic relations. Apart from the difficulty of abstraction of the prefactor details from experimental data, it is not clear why the linearity of rate versus inverse viscosity, k ∝ η(-1), deviates widely for many reactions studied. In most cases, the deviation simulates a power law k ∝ η(-n), where the exponent n assumes fractional values. In rate-viscosity studies presented here, results for two reactions, unfolding of cytochrome c and cysteine protease activity of human ribosomal protein S4, show an exceedingly overdamped rate over a wide viscosity range, registering n values up to 2.4. Although the origin of this extraordinary reaction friction is not known at present, the results indicate that the viscosity exponent need not be bound by the 0-1 limit as generally suggested. For the third reaction studied here, thermal dissociation of CO from nativelike cytochrome c, the rate-viscosity behavior can be explained using Grote-Hynes theory of time-dependent friction in conjunction with correlated motions intrinsic to the protein. Analysis of the glycerol viscosity-dependent rate for the CO dissociation reaction in the presence of urea as the second variable shows that the protein stabilizing effect of subdenaturing amounts of urea is not affected by the bulk viscosity. It appears that a myriad of factors as diverse as parameter uncertainty due to the difficulty of knowing the exact reaction friction and both mode and consequences of protein-solvent interaction work in a complex manner to convey as though Kramers rate equation is not absolute.

  20. Linear Back-Drive Differentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waydo, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Linear back-drive differentials have been proposed as alternatives to conventional gear differentials for applications in which there is only limited rotational motion (e.g., oscillation). The finite nature of the rotation makes it possible to optimize a linear back-drive differential in ways that would not be possible for gear differentials or other differentials that are required to be capable of unlimited rotation. As a result, relative to gear differentials, linear back-drive differentials could be more compact and less massive, could contain fewer complex parts, and could be less sensitive to variations in the viscosities of lubricants. Linear back-drive differentials would operate according to established principles of power ball screws and linear-motion drives, but would utilize these principles in an innovative way. One major characteristic of such mechanisms that would be exploited in linear back-drive differentials is the possibility of designing them to drive or back-drive with similar efficiency and energy input: in other words, such a mechanism can be designed so that a rotating screw can drive a nut linearly or the linear motion of the nut can cause the screw to rotate. A linear back-drive differential (see figure) would include two collinear shafts connected to two parts that are intended to engage in limited opposing rotations. The linear back-drive differential would also include a nut that would be free to translate along its axis but not to rotate. The inner surface of the nut would be right-hand threaded at one end and left-hand threaded at the opposite end to engage corresponding right- and left-handed threads on the shafts. A rotation and torque introduced into the system via one shaft would drive the nut in linear motion. The nut, in turn, would back-drive the other shaft, creating a reaction torque. Balls would reduce friction, making it possible for the shaft/nut coupling on each side to operate with 90 percent efficiency.

  1. Negative viscosity from negative compressibility and axial flow shear stiffness in a straight magnetic field

    DOE PAGES

    Li, J. C.; Diamond, P. H.

    2017-03-23

    Here, negative compressibility ITG turbulence in a linear plasma device (CSDX) can induce a negative viscosity increment. However, even with this negative increment, we show that the total axial viscosity remains positive definite, i.e. no intrinsic axial flow can be generated by pure ITG turbulence in a straight magnetic field. This differs from the case of electron drift wave (EDW) turbulence, where the total viscosity can turn negative, at least transiently. When the flow gradient is steepened by any drive mechanism, so that the parallel shear flow instability (PSFI) exceeds the ITG drive, the flow profile saturates at a level close to the value above which PSFI becomes dominant. This saturated flow gradient exceeds the PSFI linear threshold, and grows withmore » $$\

  2. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL DETERMINATION OF HEAVY OIL VISCOSITY UNDER RESERVOIR CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2003-05-01

    The USA deposits of heavy oils and tar sands contain significant energy reserves. Thermal methods, particularly steam drive and steam soak, are used to recover heavy oils and bitumen. Thermal methods rely on several displacement mechanisms to recover oil, but the most important is the reduction of crude viscosity with increasing temperature. The main objective of this research is to propose a simple procedure to predict heavy oil viscosity at reservoir conditions as a function of easily determined physical properties. This procedure will avoid costly experimental testing and reduce uncertainty in designing thermal recovery processes. First, we reviewed critically the existing literature choosing the most promising models for viscosity determination. Then, we modified an existing viscosity correlation, based on the corresponding states principle in order to fit more than two thousand commercial viscosity data. We collected data for compositional and black oil samples (absence of compositional data). The data were screened for inconsistencies resulting from experimental error. A procedure based on the monotonic increase or decrease of key variables was implemented to carry out the screening process. The modified equation was used to calculate the viscosity of several oil samples where compositional data were available. Finally, a simple procedure was proposed to calculate black oil viscosity from common experimental information such as, boiling point, API gravity and molecular weight.

  3. Viscosity dictates metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber

    PubMed Central

    Borić, Maja; Danevčič, Tjaša; Stopar, David

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about metabolic activity of bacteria, when viscosity of their environment changes. In this work, bacterial metabolic activity in media with viscosity ranging from 0.8 to 29.4 mPas was studied. Viscosities up to 2.4 mPas did not affect metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber. On the other hand, at 29.4 mPas respiration rate and total dehydrogenase activity increased 8 and 4-fold, respectively. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) increased up to 13-fold at higher viscosities. However, intensified metabolic activity did not result in faster growth rate. Increased viscosity delayed the onset as well as the duration of biosynthesis of prodigiosin. As an adaptation to viscous environment V. ruber increased metabolic flux through the pentose phosphate pathway and reduced synthesis of a secondary metabolite. In addition, V. ruber was able to modify the viscosity of its environment. PMID:22826705

  4. Bacterial accumulation in viscosity gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waisbord, Nicolas; Guasto, Jeffrey

    2016-11-01

    Cell motility is greatly modified by fluid rheology. In particular, the physical environments in which cells function, are often characterized by gradients of viscous biopolymers, such as mucus and extracellular matrix, which impact processes ranging from reproduction to digestion to biofilm formation. To understand how spatial heterogeneity of fluid rheology affects the motility and transport of swimming cells, we use hydrogel microfluidic devices to generate viscosity gradients in a simple, polymeric, Newtonian fluid. Using video microscopy, we characterize the random walk motility patterns of model bacteria (Bacillus subtilis), showing that both wild-type ('run-and-tumble') cells and smooth-swimming mutants accumulate in the viscous region of the fluid. Through statistical analysis of individual cell trajectories and body kinematics in both homogeneous and heterogeneous viscous environments, we discriminate passive, physical effects from active sensing processes to explain the observed cell accumulation at the ensemble level.

  5. Viscosity undulations in the lower mantle: The dynamical role of iron spin transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justo, J. F.; Morra, G.; Yuen, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    A proper determination of the lower-mantle viscosity profile is fundamental to understanding Earth geodynamics. Based on results coming from different sources, several models have been proposed to constrain the variations of viscosity as a function of pressure, stress and temperature. While some models have proposed a relatively modest viscosity variation across the lower mantle, others have proposed variations of several orders of magnitude. Here, we have determined the viscosity of ferropericlase, a major mantle mineral, and explored the role of the iron high-to-low spin transition. Viscosity was described within the elastic strain energy model, in which the activation parameters are obtained from the bulk and shear wave velocities. Those velocities were computed combining first principles total energy calculations and the quasi-harmonic approximation. As a result of a strong elasticity softening across the spin transition, there is a large reduction in the activation free energies of the materials creep properties, leading to viscosity undulations. These results suggest that the variations of the viscosity across the lower mantle, resulting from geoid inversion and postglacial rebound studies, may be caused by the iron spin transition in mantle minerals. Implications of the undulated lower mantle viscosity profile exist for both, down- and up-wellings in the mantle. We find that a viscosity profile characterized by an activation free energy of G* (z0) ˜ 300- 400 kJ /mol based on diffusion creep and dilation factor δ = 0.5 better fits the observed high velocity layer at mid mantle depths, which can be explained by the stagnation and mixing of mantle material. Our model also accounts for the growth of mantle plume heads up to the size necessary to explain the Large Igneous Provinces that characterize the start of most plume tracks.

  6. Viscosity of strongly interacting quantum fluids: Spectral functions and sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Edward; Randeria, Mohit

    2010-05-15

    The viscosity of strongly interacting systems is a topic of great interest in diverse fields. We focus here on the bulk and shear viscosities of nonrelativistic quantum fluids, with particular emphasis on strongly interacting ultracold Fermi gases. We use Kubo formulas for the bulk and shear viscosity spectral functions, {zeta}({omega}) and {eta}({omega}), respectively, to derive exact, nonperturbative results. Our results include a microscopic connection between the shear viscosity {eta} and the normal-fluid density {rho}{sub n}; sum rules for {zeta}({omega}) and {eta}({omega}) and their evolution through the BCS-BEC crossover (where BEC denotes Bose-Einstein condensate); and universal high-frequency tails for {eta}({omega}) and the dynamic structure factor S(q,{omega}). We use our sum rules to show that, at unitarity, {zeta}({omega}) is identically zero and thus relate {eta}({omega}) to density-density correlations. We predict that frequency-dependent shear viscosity {eta}({omega}) of the unitary Fermi gas can be experimentally measured using Bragg spectroscopy.

  7. The experimental viscosity and calculated relative viscosity of liquid In Sn allcoys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, A. Q.; Guo, L. J.; Liu, C. S.; Jia, E. G.; Zhu, Z. G.

    2007-04-01

    The experimental measured viscosity of liquid pure Sn, In 20Sn 80 and In 80Sn 20 alloys was studied, and to make a comparison, the calculated relative viscosity based on the pair distribution functions, g( r), has also been studied. There is one peak in each experimental viscosity and calculated relative-viscosity curve of liquid pure Sn about 1000 °C. One valley appears in each experimental viscosity and calculated viscosity curve of liquid In 20Sn 80 alloy about 700 °C. There is no abnormal behavior on In 80Sn 20 alloy. The behavior of experimental viscosity and calculated relative viscosity is coincident with each other. Those results conformed that the temperature-induced structure anomalies reported before did take place.

  8. Structural rejuvenation in bulk metallic glasses

    DOE PAGES

    Tong, Yang; Iwashita, T.; Dmowski, Wojciech; ...

    2015-01-05

    Using high-energy X-ray diffraction we study structural changes in bulk metallic glasses after uniaxial compressive homogeneous deformation at temperatures slightly below the glass transition. We observe that deformation results in structural disordering corresponding to an increase in the fictive, or effective, temperature. However, the structural disordering saturates after yielding. Lastly, examination of the experimental structure and molecular dynamics simulation suggests that local changes in the atomic connectivity network are the main driving force of the structural rejuvenation.

  9. THE VISCOSITY OF HELIUM-CESIUM MIXTURES,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The viscosities of helium-cesium mixtures having mole fractions of cesium from zero to unity were evaluated using a Lennard - Jones 6-12 interaction potential for all encounters in the Enskog Chapman expressions for the viscosity of a binary mixture. (Author)

  10. Reducing blood viscosity with magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, R.; Huang, K.

    2011-07-01

    Blood viscosity is a major factor in heart disease. When blood viscosity increases, it damages blood vessels and increases the risk of heart attacks. Currently, the only method of treatment is to take drugs such as aspirin, which has, however, several unwanted side effects. Here we report our finding that blood viscosity can be reduced with magnetic fields of 1 T or above in the blood flow direction. One magnetic field pulse of 1.3 T lasting ˜1 min can reduce the blood viscosity by 20%-30%. After the exposure, in the absence of magnetic field, the blood viscosity slowly moves up, but takes a couple of hours to return to the original value. The process is repeatable. Reapplying the magnetic field reduces the blood viscosity again. By selecting the magnetic field strength and duration, we can keep the blood viscosity within the normal range. In addition, such viscosity reduction does not affect the red blood cells’ normal function. This technology has much potential for physical therapy.

  11. Viscosity test standards for engine oils

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This report presents a compilation of 10 ASTM standards that cover both low and high temperature viscosity tests for automotive engine oils, with respect to low temperature flow properties and performance requirements under high temperature, high shear rate conditions. Society of Automotive Engineer's Engine Oil Viscosity Classification SAE J300 is included to provide low temperature high shear rate method.

  12. STUDIES ON THE ANOMALOUS VISCOSITY AND FLOW-BIREFRINGENCE OF PROTEIN SOLUTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, A. S. C.; Needham, Joseph; Shen, Shih-Chang

    1944-01-01

    1. A coaxial viscosimeter which permits the simultaneous determination of relative and anomalous viscosity and of flow-birefringence is described. Flow-anomaly and flow-birefringence are regarded as characteristic of elongated micelles and molecules. 2. Such methods have been applied to dilute solutions of proteins. The conditions under which the coaxial (Couette) viscosimeter measures the viscosity of the bulk phase and the surface film phase respectively have been investigated and are described. 3. The general behaviour of protein solutions subjected to shear is summarised. PMID:19873384

  13. Large area bulk superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Dean J.; Field, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

  14. Plasma viscosity elevations with simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, D. G.; Convertino, V. A.; Goldwater, D.; Ferguson, E. W.; Schoomaker, E. B.

    1986-01-01

    A hypothesis correlating an increase in blood viscosity during bed rest to a decrease in aerobic capacity during simulated weightlessness is tested. Eight human subjects were studied on the sixth day of bed rest during two consecutive 10-d bed rest periods separated by a 14-d recovery interval designed to simulate the flight-layover schedule of Shuttle astronauts. Plasma viscosity and volume were measured, together with maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max). An increase in hematocrit, plasma protein, and fibrinogen concentrations was found, contributing to an elevation in plasma viscosity. VO2max decreased significantly in the first, but not the second bed rest cycle, and though many individuals exhibited a decrease in plasma volume and aerobic capacity coupled with elevated plasma viscosity, correlations between these variables were lacking. It is concluded that the decrease in VO2max observed following simulated weightlessness cannot be attributed to alterations in muscle blood flow resulting from increased blood viscosity.

  15. Anomalous magnetic viscosity in relativistic accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Fujun; Liu, Sanqiu; Li, Xiaoqing

    2013-07-01

    It has been proved that the self-generated magnetic fields by transverse plasmons in the relativistic regime are modulationally unstable, leading to a self-similar collapse of the magnetic flux tubes and resulting in local magnetic structures; highly spatially intermittent flux is responsible for generating the anomalous viscosity. We derive the anomalous magnetic viscosity coefficient, in accretion disks around compact objects, such as black holes, pulsars and quasars, where the plasmas are relativistic, in order to help clarify the nature of viscosity in the theory of accretion disks. The results indicate that, the magnetic viscosity is modified by the relativistic effects of plasmas, and its' strength would be 1015 stronger than the molecular viscosity, which may be helpful in explaining the observations.

  16. Eruptive viscosity and volcano morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posin, Seth B.; Greeley, Ronald

    1988-01-01

    Terrestrial central volcanoes formed predominantly from lava flows were classified as shields, stratovolcanoes, and domes. Shield volcanoes tend to be large in areal extent, have convex slopes, and are characterized by their resemblance to inverted hellenic war shields. Stratovolcanoes have concave slopes, whereas domes are smaller and have gentle convex slopes near the vent that increase near the perimeter. In addition to these differences in morphology, several other variations were observed. The most important is composition: shield volcanoes tend to be basaltic, stratovolcanoes tend to be andesitic, and domes tend to be dacitic. However, important exceptions include Fuji, Pico, Mayon, Izalco, and Fuego which have stratovolcano morphologies but are composed of basaltic lavas. Similarly, Ribkwo is a Kenyan shield volcano composed of trachyte and Suswa and Kilombe are shields composed of phonolite. These exceptions indicate that eruptive conditions, rather than composition, may be the primary factors that determine volcano morphology. The objective of this study is to determine the relationships, if any, between eruptive conditions (viscosity, erupted volume, and effusion rate) and effusive volcano morphology. Moreover, it is the goal of this study to incorporate these relationships into a model to predict the eruptive conditions of extraterrestrial (Martian) volcanoes based on their morphology.

  17. Viscosity measurement techniques in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boromand, Arman; Jamali, Safa; Maia, Joao M.

    2015-11-01

    In this study two main groups of viscosity measurement techniques are used to measure the viscosity of a simple fluid using Dissipative Particle Dynamics, DPD. In the first method, a microscopic definition of the pressure tensor is used in equilibrium and out of equilibrium to measure the zero-shear viscosity and shear viscosity, respectively. In the second method, a periodic Poiseuille flow and start-up transient shear flow is used and the shear viscosity is obtained from the velocity profiles by a numerical fitting procedure. Using the standard Lees-Edward boundary condition for DPD will result in incorrect velocity profiles at high values of the dissipative parameter. Although this issue was partially addressed in Chatterjee (2007), in this work we present further modifications (Lagrangian approach) to the original LE boundary condition (Eulerian approach) that will fix the deviation from the desired shear rate at high values of the dissipative parameter and decrease the noise to signal ratios in stress measurement while increases the accessible low shear rate window. Also, the thermostat effect of the dissipative and random forces is coupled to the dynamic response of the system and affects the transport properties like the viscosity and diffusion coefficient. We investigated thoroughly the dependency of viscosity measured by both Eulerian and Lagrangian methodologies, as well as numerical fitting procedures and found that all the methods are in quantitative agreement.

  18. Relaxation Behavior of Ca-Based Bulk Metallic Glasses (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-03

    DD-MM-YY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) April 2014 Interim 19 March 2014 – 31 March 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE RELAXATION...liquids.[2 4] Almost all bulk metallic glasses show intermediate fragile behavior.[ 5 ] Slow kinet- ics of crystallization due to high viscosity/high...on u is used to calculate the activation enthalpy of structural relax- ation, DHg, at the glass transition: [17] DHg ¼ R d lnu d 1 . Tcalg ½ 5

  19. Viscoseal performance with rarefied-gas sealant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, M. W.

    1973-01-01

    A fundamental study of viscoseals having a rarefied gas as the sealant was conducted. Both experimental and analytical investigations are reported. Three different analytical models were formulated and are described in detail. An experimental investigation was conducted on multiple grooved two-inch diameter viscoseals over a wide range of gas densities and shaft speeds up to 30,000 rpm. Comparisons are presented between actual viscoseal performance and the theoretical predictions for both sealing coefficient and net leakage parameters as functions of the degree of gas rarefication. Recommendations are presented for the use of the analytical models.

  20. Shear viscosity in the postquasistatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Peralta, C.; Rosales, L.; Rodriguez-Mueller, B.; Barreto, W.

    2010-05-15

    We apply the postquasistatic approximation, an iterative method for the evolution of self-gravitating spheres of matter, to study the evolution of anisotropic nonadiabatic radiating and dissipative distributions in general relativity. Dissipation is described by viscosity and free-streaming radiation, assuming an equation of state to model anisotropy induced by the shear viscosity. We match the interior solution, in noncomoving coordinates, with the Vaidya exterior solution. Two simple models are presented, based on the Schwarzschild and Tolman VI solutions, in the nonadiabatic and adiabatic limit. In both cases, the eventual collapse or expansion of the distribution is mainly controlled by the anisotropy induced by the viscosity.

  1. Viscosity of high-temperature iodine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Steve H.; Kunc, Joseph A.

    1991-01-01

    The viscosity coefficient of iodine in the temperature range 500 - 3000 K is calculated. Because of the low dissociation energy of the I2 molecules, the dissociation degree of the gas increases quickly with temperature, and I + I2 and I + I collisions must be taken into account in calculation of viscosity at temperatures greater than 1000 deg. Several possible channels for atom-atom interaction are considered, and the resulting collision integrals are averaged over all the important channels. It is also shown that the rigid-sphere model is inaccurate in predictions of the viscosity.

  2. Viscosity studies of water based magnetite nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anu, K.; Hemalatha, J.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetite nanofluids of various concentrations have been synthesized through co-precipitation method. The structural and topographical studies made with the X-Ray Diffractometer and Atomic Force Microscope are presented in this paper. The density and viscosity studies for the ferrofluids of various concentrations have been made at room temperature. The experimental viscosities are compared with theoretical values obtained from Einstein, Batchelor and Wang models. An attempt to modify the Rosensweig model is made and the modified Rosensweig equation is reported. In addition, new empirical correlation is also proposed for predicting viscosity of ferrofluid at various concentrations.

  3. Macroscopic and direct light propulsion of bulk graphene material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tengfei; Chang, Huicong; Wu, Yingpeng; Xiao, Peishuang; Yi, Ningbo; Lu, Yanhong; Ma, Yanfeng; Huang, Yi; Zhao, Kai; Yan, Xiao-Qing; Liu, Zhi-Bo; Tian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Yongsheng

    2015-07-01

    It has been a great challenge to achieve the direct light manipulation of matter on a bulk scale. In this work the direct light propulsion of matter is observed on a macroscopic scale using a bulk graphene-based material. The unique structure and properties of graphene, and the novel morphology of the bulk three-dimensional linked graphene material make it capable not only of absorbing light at various wavelengths but also of emitting energetic electrons efficiently enough to drive the bulk material, following Newtonian mechanics. Thus, the unique photonic and electronic properties of individual graphene sheets are manifested in the response of the bulk state. These results offer an exciting opportunity to bring about bulk-scale light manipulation with the potential to realize long-sought applications in areas such as the solar sail and space transportation driven directly by sunlight.

  4. Vortex lattices and defect-mediated viscosity reduction in active liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slomka, Jonasz; Dunkel, Jorn

    2016-11-01

    Generic pattern-formation and viscosity-reduction mechanisms in active fluids are investigated using a generalized Navier-Stokes model that captures the experimentally observed bulk vortex dynamics in microbial suspensions. We present exact analytical solutions including stress-free vortex lattices and introduce a computational framework that allows the efficient treatment of previously intractable higher-order shear boundary conditions. Large-scale parameter scans identify the conditions for spontaneous flow symmetry breaking, defect-mediated low-viscosity phases and negative-viscosity states amenable to energy harvesting in confined suspensions. The theory uses only generic assumptions about the symmetries and long-wavelength structure of active stress tensors, suggesting that inviscid phases may be achievable in a broad class of non-equilibrium fluids by tuning confinement geometry and pattern scale selection.

  5. Quartz resonator fluid density and viscosity monitor

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Stephen J.; Wiczer, James J.; Cernosek, Richard W.; Frye, Gregory C.; Gebert, Charles T.; Casaus, Leonard; Mitchell, Mary A.

    1998-01-01

    A pair of thickness-shear mode resonators, one smooth and one with a textured surface, allows fluid density and viscosity to be independently resolved. A textured surface, either randomly rough or regularly patterned, leads to trapping of liquid at the device surface. The synchronous motion of this trapped liquid with the oscillating device surface allows the device to weigh the liquid; this leads to an additional response that depends on liquid density. This additional response enables a pair of devices, one smooth and one textured, to independently resolve liquid density and viscosity; the difference in responses determines the density while the smooth device determines the density-viscosity product, and thus, the pair determines both density and viscosity.

  6. Neoclassical Viscosities and Anomalous Flows in Stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, A. S.; Spong, D. A.; Breyfogle, M.; Marine, T.

    2009-05-01

    We present initial work to use neoclassical viscosities calculated with the PENTA code [1] in a transport model that includes Reynolds stress generation of flows [2]. The PENTA code uses a drift kinetic equation solver to calculate neoclassical viscosities and flows in general three-dimensional geometries over a range of collisionalities. The predicted neoclassical viscosities predicted by PENTA can be flux-surfaced average and applied in a 1-D transport model that includes anomalous flow generation. This combination of codes can be used to test the impact of stellarator geometry on anomalous flow generation. As a test case, we apply the code to modeling flows in the HSX stellarator. Due to variations in the neoclassical viscosities, HSX can have strong neoclassical flows in the core region. In turn, these neoclassical flows can provide a seed for anomalous flow generation. [1] D. A. Spong, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056114 (2005). [2] D. E. Newman, et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 938 (1998).

  7. Sludge based Bacillus thuringiensis biopesticides: viscosity impacts.

    PubMed

    Brar, S K; Verma, M; Tyagi, R D; Valéro, J R; Surampalli, R Y

    2005-08-01

    Viscosity studies were performed on raw, pre-treated (sterilised and thermal alkaline hydrolysed or both types of treatment) and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) fermented sludges at different solids concentration (10-40 g/L) for production of biopesticides. Correlations were established among rheological parameter (viscosity), solids (total and dissolved) concentration and entomotoxicity (Tx) of Bt fermented sludges. Exponential and power laws were preferentially followed by hydrolysed fermented compared to raw fermented sludge. Soluble chemical oxygen demand variation corroborated with increase in dissolved solids concentration on pre-treatments, contributing to changes in viscosity. Moreover, Tx was higher for hydrolysed fermented sludge in comparison to raw fermented sludge owing to increased availability of nutrients and lower viscosity that improved oxygen transfer. The shake flask results were reproducible in fermenter. This study will have major impact on selecting fermentation, harvesting and formulation techniques of Bt fermented sludges for biopesticide production.

  8. Viscosity of Sheared Helical filament Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartucci, Matthew; Urbach, Jeff; Blair, Dan; Schwenger, Walter

    The viscosity of suspensions can be dramatically affected by high aspect ratio particles. Understanding these systems provides insight into key biological functions and can be manipulated for many technological applications. In this talk, the viscosity as a function of shear rate of suspensions of helical filaments is compared to that of suspensions of straight rod-like filaments. Our goal is to determine the impact of filament geometry on low volume fraction colloidal suspensions in order to identify strategies for altering viscosity with minimal volume fraction. In this research, the detached flagella of the bacteria Salmonella Typhimurium are used as a model system of helical filaments and compared to mutated straight flagella of the Salmonella. We compare rheological measurements of the suspension viscosity in response to shear flow and use a combination of the rheology and fluorescence microscopy to identify the microstructural changes responsible for the observed rheological response.

  9. The direct viscosity enhancement of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Iezzi, A.; Enick, R.; Brady, J. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1988-01-01

    A high pressure viscometer has been constructed for use over a wide range of temperatures and pressures, including near-critical and supercritical conditions. An aluminum cylinder falls through a tube containing a stationary column of fluid, enabling viscosities to be determined from terminal velocity measurements. Preliminary results are presented on the search for an additive which can enhance the viscosity of carbon dioxide when present in low (less than 1%) concentrations.

  10. Viscosity and dissipative hydrodynamics from effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grozdanov, Sašo; Polonyi, Janos

    2015-05-01

    With the goal of deriving dissipative hydrodynamics from an action, we study classical actions for open systems, which follow from the generic structure of effective actions in the Schwinger-Keldysh closed-time-path (CTP) formalism with two time axes and a doubling of degrees of freedom. The central structural feature of such effective actions is the coupling between degrees of freedom on the two time axes. This reflects the fact that from an effective field theory point of view, dissipation is the loss of energy of the low-energy hydrodynamical degrees of freedom to the integrated-out, UV degrees of freedom of the environment. The dynamics of only the hydrodynamical modes may therefore not possess a conserved stress-energy tensor. After a general discussion of the CTP effective actions, we use the variational principle to derive the energy-momentum balance equation for a dissipative fluid from an effective Goldstone action of the long-range hydrodynamical modes. Despite the absence of conserved energy and momentum, we show that we can construct the first-order dissipative stress-energy tensor and derive the Navier-Stokes equations near hydrodynamical equilibrium. The shear viscosity is shown to vanish in the classical theory under consideration, while the bulk viscosity is determined by the form of the effective action. We also discuss the thermodynamics of the system and analyze the entropy production.

  11. Validity of Taylor's Dissipation-Viscosity Independence Postulate in Variable-Viscosity Turbulent Fluid Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kurnchul; Girimaji, Sharath S.; Kerimo, Johannes

    2008-08-01

    G. I. Taylor’s postulate [Proc. R. Soc. APRLAAZ0080-4630 151, 421 (1935)10.1098/rspa.1935.0158] that dissipation is independent of viscosity at high Reynolds numbers is the foundation of many single-fluid turbulence theories and closure models. The validity of this key postulate in an important class of flows, turbulent mixtures, is not yet clearly established. We devise a simple numerical experiment of decaying turbulence in a mixture of two fluids of vastly different viscosities to examine dissipation scaling. Initially, the two fluids are segregated, and dissipation is directly proportional to viscosity. As turbulence evolves and fluids mix, the velocity gradients rapidly adapt to the viscosity field, and within one-half eddy turnover time, dissipation-viscosity independence is established. Viscosity-weighted velocity-gradient skewness is shown to be constant, leading to the validity of Taylor’s postulate in turbulent mixtures.

  12. Effects of surface roughness on shear viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanikolaou, Michail; Frank, Michael; Drikakis, Dimitris

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigates the effect of surface roughness on fluid viscosity using molecular dynamics simulations. The three-dimensional model consists of liquid argon flowing between two solid walls whose surface roughness was modeled using fractal theory. In tandem with previously published experimental work, our results show that, while the viscosity in smooth channels remains constant across the channel width, in the presence of surface roughness it increases close to the walls. The increase of the boundary viscosity is further accentuated by an increase in the depth of surface roughness. We attribute this behavior to the increased momentum transfer at the boundary, a result of the irregular distribution of fluid particles near rough surfaces. Furthermore, although the viscosity in smooth channels has previously been shown to be independent of the strength of the solid-liquid interaction, here we show that in the presence of surface roughness, the boundary viscosity increases with the solid's wettability. The paper concludes with an analytical description of the viscosity as a function of the distance from the channel walls, the walls' surface roughness, and the solid's wetting properties. The relation can potentially be used to adjust the fluid dynamics equations for a more accurate description of microfluidic systems.

  13. Viscosity effects in wind wave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquier, A.; Moisy, F.; Rabaud, M.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate experimentally the influence of the liquid viscosity on the problem of the generation of waves by a turbulent wind at the surface of a liquid, extending the results of Paquier et al. [A. Paquier et al., Phys. Fluids 27, 122103 (2015), 10.1063/1.4936395] over nearly three decades of viscosity. The surface deformations are measured with micrometer accuracy using the free-surface synthetic schlieren method. We recover the two regimes of surface deformations previously identified: the wrinkle regime at small wind velocity, resulting from the viscous imprint on the liquid surface of the turbulent fluctuations in the boundary layer, and the regular wave regime at large wind velocity. Below the wave threshold, we find that the characteristic amplitude of the wrinkles scales as ν-1 /2u*3 /2 over nearly the whole range of viscosities, whereas their size is essentially unchanged. We propose a simple model for this scaling, which compares well with the data. We show that the critical friction velocity u* for the onset of regular waves slowly increases with viscosity as ν0.2. Whereas the transition between wrinkles and waves is smooth at low viscosity, including for water, it becomes rather abrupt at high viscosity. A third wave regime is found at ν >(100 -200 ) ×10-6m2s-1 , characterized by a slow, nearly periodic emission of large-amplitude isolated fluid bumps.

  14. Viscosity of mafic magmas at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochain, B.; Sanloup, C.; Leroy, C.; Kono, Y.

    2017-01-01

    While it is accepted that silica-rich melts behave anomalously with a decrease of their viscosity at increased pressures (P), the viscosity of silica-poor melts is much less constrained. However, modeling of mantle melts dynamics throughout Earth's history, including the magma ocean era, requires precise knowledge of the viscous properties of silica-poor magmas. We extend here our previous measurements on fayalite melt to natural end-members pyroxenite melts (MgSiO3 and CaSiO3) using in situ X-ray radiography up to 8 GPa. For all compositions, viscosity decreases with P, rapidly below 5 GPa and slowly above. The magnitude of the viscosity decrease is larger for pyroxene melts than for fayalite melt and larger for the Ca end-member within pyroxene melts. The anomalous viscosity decrease appears to be a universal behavior for magmas up to 13 GPa, while the P dependence of viscosity beyond this remains to be measured. These results imply that mantle melts are very pervasive at depth.

  15. Improving transaxle performance at low temperature with reduced-viscosity automatic transmission fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, J.L.; Kemp, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of automatic transmission fluid viscosity on the low-temperature performance of a front-wheel-drive transaxle were determined in a cold room maintained at a temperature of -20/sup 0/F (-28.9/sup 0/C), using both a cranking apparatus and a vehicle. Cranking and vehicle tests were conducted to determine the effects of fluid viscosity on the power required to crack a transaxle and on transaxle performance under low-temperature transient operation, respectively. Four automatic transmission fluids were tested, ranging in viscosity from 2 600 to 16 000 cP at - 20/sup 0/F. All test fluids contained the same additive package and were blended using the same types of base oils.

  16. Batch uptake of lysozyme: effect of solution viscosity and mass transfer on adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wright, P R; Muzzio, F J; Glasser, B J

    1998-01-01

    In this study, solid-phase adsorption by macroporous and hyper-diffusive resins was investigated in a batch uptake adsorption system to quantify solid-phase diffusion rates as a function of bulk phase viscosity. The performance of chromatographic resins used for adsorption of proteins is dependent on several factors including solid and liquid-phase diffusivity, boundary layer mass transfer, and intraparticle mass transfer effects. Understanding these effects is critical to process development and optimization of both packed and fluidized bed adsorption systems. The macroporous resin used here was Streamline SP, and the hyper-diffusive resin was S-HyperD LS. Both have been frequently used in fluidized bed adsorption of proteins; however, factors that affect uptake rates of these media are not well quantified. Adsorption isotherms were well represented by an empirical fit of a Langmuir isotherm. Solid-phase diffusion coefficients obtained from simulations were in agreement with other models for macroporous and hyper-diffusive particles. S-HyperD LS in the buffer system had the highest uptake rate, but increased bulk phase viscosity decreased the rate by approximately 50%. Increases in bulk phase viscosity increased film mass transfer effects, and uptake was observed to be a strong function of the film mass transfer coefficient. Uptake by Streamline SP particles was slower than S-HyperD in buffer, due to a greater degree of intraparticle mass transfer resistance. The effect of increased film mass transfer resistance coupled with intraparticle mass transfer resistances at an increased bulk phase viscosity resulted in a decrease of 80% in the uptake rate by Streamline SP relative to S-HyperD.

  17. Effects of heat conduction on artificial viscosity methods for shock capturing

    DOE PAGES

    Cook, Andrew W.

    2013-12-01

    Here we investigate the efficacy of artificial thermal conductivity for shock capturing. The conductivity model is derived from artificial bulk and shear viscosities, such that stagnation enthalpy remains constant across shocks. By thus fixing the Prandtl number, more physical shock profiles are obtained, only on a larger scale. The conductivity model does not contain any empirical constants. It increases the net dissipation of a computational algorithm but is found to better preserve symmetry and produce more robust solutions for strong-shock problems.

  18. Viscosity of Anhydrous and Hydrous Basalt Melts at High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinker, D.; Lesher, C. E.; Baxter, G. M.; Uchida, T.; Wang, Y.; Zhao, Y.

    2004-12-01

    We performed in situ falling-sphere experiments to determine the viscosity of anhydrous and hydrous basaltic (48 wt% SiO2) melts from 1.5 to 5.3 GPa between 1600 and 1840 K, using the T-25 MA8 multianvil apparatus at the GSECARS 13-ID-D beamline at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Lab. These falling-sphere experiments included monitoring the simultaneous settling of Pt and Mo spheres, an approach that provides redundant viscosity measurements for individual experiments and offers the opportunity to recover simultaneously melt density. Our results show that the viscosity of anhydrous basalt melt decreases with pressure up to 5.3 GPa, with an activation volume for viscous flow of -8.1 to -9.5 cm3/mol between 2 and 5.3 GPa. The addition of a few wt. % water reduces melt viscosity by roughly 0.5 log units; however, there is no resolvable influence on activation volume. This negative pressure dependence is consistent with previous results for basaltic melts up to 3 GPa [1, 2], while the activation volume at low pressure is indistinguishable from the activation volume for O self-diffusion in the same bulk composition [3]. Application of the Eyring equation using O self-diffusion data for basaltic melt [3] predicts anhydrous melt viscosities that are 30-90% of the values determined in this study. This result is in stark contrast with our recent results for dacitic melt (68 wt% SiO2) melt [4], in which the Eyring equation overestimates viscosity by as much as 40% at pressures < 5 GPa. The limited utility of the Eyring equation for naturally-occurring silicate melts illustrates the difficulties in relating O self-diffusion to viscous flow in polymerized liquids. Adam-Gibbs theory [5] provides a means for addressing structural controls on these transport properties. The negative pressure dependence for anhydrous and hydrous basalt viscosity suggests that the extraction of partial melts from mantle source regions will be enhanced with pressure to 5.3 GPa. Future

  19. Magnetostrictive Roller-Drive Stepping Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed motor based on magnetostrictive effect provides stepped angular motion with angular increments of order of 100 microradians. Driven to repeat stepping cycle rapidly enough to achieve maximum speed of about 20 rpm, provides torque an order of magnitude greater than electric motors, and brakes itself when power turned off. Magnetostrictive rods in electromagnet coils push against drive plate, causing it to rotate slightly. This slight rotation jams conical rollers between cam surfaces on outer drive ring and split drum, so rollers transmit rotation to drum. Suitable for precise, high-torque, fail-safe-braking, direct drive of robot joint, without bulk and weight of additional brake mechanism and gear train.

  20. Magnetic viscosity: outbursts and outflows in accretion driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meintjes, P. J.; Breedt, E.

    In this paper magnetic viscosity is investigated in magnetized accretion discs. It will be shown that the effective coupling between the magnetic field of a slow-rotator and an accretion disc, can be a very effective mechanism to drive episodes of high mass accretion onto the surface of a compact object. Outside the corotation radius, angular momentum is effectively transferred outwards through a propeller-type process from the magnetospheric field and magnetic bubbles that are formed as a result of a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, which can result in a centrifugal barrier and accumulation of disc matter outside the corotation radius which will become unstable at some point, triggering enhanced inward mass advection as a result of a magneto-gravitational instability. This may lead to periods of enhanced mass accretion and associated disc brightening, which may explain the dwarf novae phenomenon in certain disc accreting cataclysmic variables. This may be accompanied by mass outflows from the disc and possible non-thermal emission. The description of magnetic viscosity presented in this paper will rely on the values of two constants, i.e. the Hartmann and Reynolds numbers of the magnetized disc plasma. For both these numbers above unity, magnetic stresses in the disc can play a very important role in the kinematics of the plasma in disc accreting systems.

  1. Effective viscosity of bacterial suspensions: a three-dimensional PDE model with stochastic torque.

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, B. M.; Aranson, I. S.; Berlyand, L.; Karpeev, D. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a PDE model for dilute suspensions of swimming bacteria in a three-dimensional Stokesian fluid. This model is used to calculate the statistically-stationary bulk deviatoric stress and effective viscosity of the suspension from the microscopic details of the interaction of an elongated body with the background flow. A bacterium is modeled as an impenetrable prolate spheroid with self-propulsion provided by a point force, which appears in the model as an inhomogeneous delta function in the PDE. The bacterium is also subject to a stochastic torque in order to model tumbling (random reorientation). Due to a bacterium's asymmetric shape, interactions with prescribed generic planar background flows, such as a pure straining or planar shear flow, cause the bacterium to preferentially align in certain directions. Due to the stochastic torque, the steady-state distribution of orientations is unique for a given background flow. Under this distribution of orientations, self-propulsion produces a reduction in the effective viscosity. For sufficiently weak background flows, the effect of self-propulsion on the effective viscosity dominates all other contributions, leading to an effective viscosity of the suspension that is lower than the viscosity of the ambient fluid. This is in qualitative agreement with recent experiments on suspensions of Bacillus subtilis.

  2. Viscosity of Xenon Examined in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1999-01-01

    Why does water flow faster than honey? The short answer, that honey has a greater viscosity, merely rephrases the question. The fundamental answer is that viscosity originates in the interactions between a fluid s molecules. These interactions are so complicated that, except for low-density gases, the viscosity of a fluid cannot be accurately predicted. Progress in understanding viscosity has been made by studying moderately dense gases and, more recently, fluids near the critical point. Modern theories predict a universal behavior for all pure fluids near the liquid-vapor critical point, and they relate the increase in viscosity to spontaneous fluctuations in density near this point. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon (CVX) experiment tested these theories with unprecedented precision when it flew aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-85) in August 1997. Near the critical point, xenon is a billion times more compressible than water, yet it has about the same density. Because the fluid is so "soft," it collapses under its own weight when exposed to the force of Earth s gravity - much like a very soft spring. Because the CVX experiment is conducted in microgravity, it achieves a very uniform fluid density even very close to the critical point. At the heart of the CVX experiment is a novel viscometer built around a small nickel screen. An oscillating electric field forces the screen to oscillate between pairs of electrodes. Viscosity, which dampens the oscillations, can be calculated by measuring the screen motion and the force applied to the screen. So that the fluid s delicate state near the critical point will not be disrupted, the screen oscillations are set to be both slow and small.

  3. Estimating the Kinematic Viscosity of Petroleum Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlMulla, Hessa A.; Albahri, Tareq A.

    2017-04-01

    Kinematic viscosity correlation has been developed for liquid petroleum fractions at 37.78°C and 98.89°C (100 and 210°F) standard temperatures using a large variety of experimental data. The only required inputs are the specific gravity and the average boiling point temperature. The accuracy of the correlation was compared with several other correlations available in the literature. The proposed correlations proved to be more accurate in predicting the viscosity at 37.78°C and 98.89°C with average absolute deviations of 0.39 and 0.72 mm2/s, respectively. Another objective was to develop a relation for the variation of viscosity with temperature to predict the viscosity of petroleum fraction at a certain temperature from the knowledge of the viscosity for the same liquid at two other temperatures. The newly developed correlation represents a wide array of temperatures from 20°C to 150°C and viscosities from 0.14 mm2/s to 343.64 mm2/s. The results have been validated with experimental data consisting of 9558 data points, yielding an overall deviation of 0.248 mm2/s and R2 of 0.998. In addition, new formulas were developed to interconvert the viscosity of petroleum fractions from one unit of measure to another based on finding the best fit for a set of experimental data from the literature with R2 as high as 1.0 for many cases. Detailed analysis showed good agreement between the predicted values and the experimental data.

  4. The viscosity of hydrous dacitic liquids: implications for the rheology of evolving silicic magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittington, Alan G.; Hellwig, Bridget M.; Behrens, Harald; Joachim, Bastian; Stechern, André; Vetere, Francesco

    2009-03-01

    The viscosity of a series of six synthetic dacitic liquids, containing up to 5.04 wt% dissolved water, was measured above the glass transition range by parallel-plate viscometry. The temperature of the 1011 Pa s isokom decreases from 1065 K for the anhydrous liquid, to 864 K and 680 K for water contents of 0.97 and 5.04 wt% H2O. Including additional measurements at high temperatures by concentric-cylinder and falling-sphere viscometry, the viscosity ( η) can be expressed as a function of temperature and water content w according to: log _{10} {text{ }}η = - 4.43 + ( {7618.3 - 17.25{log _{10} [ {w + 0.26} ]} )} ({7618.3 - 17.25{log _{10} [ {w + 0.26} ] )} ( {T - {406.1 - 292.6{log_{10} {[ {w + 0.26} ]} }} } ( {T - {406.1 - 292.6{log _{10} {[ w + 0.26} ]} } )} where η is in Pa s, T is temperature in K, and w is in weight percent. Within the conditions of measurement, this parameterization reproduces the 76 viscosity data with a root-mean square deviation (RMSD) of 0.16 log units in viscosity, or 7.8 K in temperature. The measurements show that water decreases the viscosity of the dacitic liquids more than for andesitic liquids, but less than for rhyolites. At low temperatures and high water contents, andesitic liquids are more viscous than the dacitic liquids, which are in turn more viscous than rhyolitic liquids, reversing the trend seen for high temperatures and low water contents. This suggests that the relative viscosity of different melts depends on temperature and water content as much as on bulk melt composition and structure. At magmatic temperatures, rhyolites are orders of magnitude more viscous than dacites, which are slightly more viscous than andesites. During degassing, all three liquids undergo a rapid viscosity increase at low water contents, and both dacitic and andesitic liquids will degas more efficiently than rhyolitic liquids. During cooling and differentiation, changing melt chemistry, decreasing temperature and increasing crystal content all

  5. Models for viscosity and shear localization in bubble-rich magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vona, Alessandro; Ryan, Amy G.; Russell, James K.; Romano, Claudia

    2016-09-01

    Bubble content influences magma rheology and, thus, styles of volcanic eruption. Increasing magma vesicularity affects the bulk viscosity of the bubble-melt suspension and has the potential to promote non-Newtonian behavior in the form of shear localization or brittle failure. Here, we present a series of high temperature uniaxial deformation experiments designed to investigate the effect of bubbles on the magma bulk viscosity. The starting materials are cores of natural rhyolitic obsidian synthesized to have variable vesicularity (ϕ = 0- 66%). The foamed cores were deformed isothermally (T = 750 °C) at atmospheric conditions using a high-temperature uniaxial press under constant displacement rates (strain rates between 0.5- 1 ×10-4 s-1) and to total strains of 10-40%. The viscosity of the bubble-free melt (η0) was measured by micropenetration and parallel plate methods to establish a baseline for experiments on the vesicle rich cores. At the experimental conditions, rising vesicle content produces a marked decrease in bulk viscosity that is best described by a two-parameter empirical equation: log10 ⁡ηBulk =log10 ⁡η0 - 1.47[ ϕ / (1 - ϕ) ] 0.48. Our parameterization of the bubble-melt rheology is combined with Maxwell relaxation theory to map the potential onset of non-Newtonian behavior (shear localization) in magmas as a function of melt viscosity, vesicularity, and strain rate. For low degrees of strain (i.e. as in our study), the rheological properties of vesicular magmas under different flow types (pure vs. simple shear) are indistinguishable. For high strain or strain rates where simple and pure shear viscosity values may diverge, our model represents a maximum boundary condition. Vesicular magmas can behave as non-Newtonian fluids at lower strain rates than unvesiculated melts, thereby, promoting shear localization and (explosive or non-explosive) magma fragmentation. The extent of shear localization in magma influences outgassing efficiency

  6. High Pressure and Temperature Effects on the Viscosity, Density, and Bulk Modulus of Four Liquid Lubricants.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-01

    stainless—steel sheath which is silver— brazed to an air-quenched tool- steel plug. Six conductors, four iron and two constantan, are containec in the 0.63...intermittent short circuit between coils and had tr ~e rep laced . The new coil was heat treated and then pressure aged to minimize drift during...N cm cm —St —St C-~ C- ’ . SN C” ‘ -tO C —1 C..) —I N. -.1- cm r i U’ 0 ‘0 C ft (N cm U) N. N. cm. -ft -C U’ N. ‘0 N. — i f’ U’ Cl) El — U) —St U

  7. Shear-free spherically symmetric inhomogeneous cosmological model with heat flow and bulk viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Y.; Mannheim, P.D. )

    1990-07-15

    An exact solution to the Einstein equations with a shear-free imperfect-fluid source is obtained. The solution approaches a locally flat Robertson-Walker one in the large-{ital t} limit and thus serves as a viable candidate for a realistic cosmological model. The model built out of this solution is found to be free of horizon, entropy, and flatness problems.

  8. Flow-induced agitations create a granular fluid: effective viscosity and fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Nichol, Kiri; van Hecke, Martin

    2012-06-01

    We fluidize a granular medium with localized stirring in a split-bottom shear cell. We probe the mechanical response of quiescent regions far from the main flow by observing the vertical motion of cylindrical probes rising, sinking, and floating in the grains. First, we find that the probe motion suggests that the granular material behaves in a liquid-like manner: high-density probes sink and low-density probes float at the depth given by Archimedes' law. Second, we observe that the drag force on moving probes scales linearly with their velocity, which allows us to define an effective viscosity for the system. This effective viscosity is inversely proportional to the rotation rate of the disk which drives the split bottom flow. Moreover, the apparent viscosity depends on radius and mass of the probe: despite the linear dependence of the drag forces on sinking speed of the probe, the granular medium is not simply Newtonian, but exhibits a more complex rheology. The decrease of viscosity with filling height of the cell, combined with the poor correlation between local strain rate and viscosity, suggests that the fluid-like character of the material is set by agitations generated in the stirred region: the relation between applied stress and observed strain rate in one location depends on the strain rate in another location. We probe the nature of the granular fluctuations that we believe mediates these nonlocal interactions by characterizing the small and random up and down motion that the probe experiences. These Gaussian fluctuations exhibit a mix of diffusive and subdiffusive behavior at short times and saturate at a value of roughly 1/10th of a grain diameter longer times, consistent with the picture of a random walker in a potential well. The product of crossover time and effective viscosity is constant, evidencing a direct link between fluctuations and viscosity.

  9. Mechanism and nature of the different viscosity sensitivities of hemicyanine dyes with various heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jianfang; Hu, Chong; Liu, Fei; Sun, Wen; Fan, Jiangli; Song, Fengling; Sun, Shiguo; Peng, Xiaojun

    2013-06-03

    A series of hemicyanine derivatives are excellent fluorescent viscosity sensors in live cells and in imaging of living tissues due to their low quantum yields in solution but large fluorescence enhancements in viscous environments. Herein, three carbazole-based hemicyanine dyes with different heterocycles are studied. They have different background quantum yields, and hence different sensitivities to viscosity detection, large Stokes shifts, and high sensitivity. Better understanding of the structure-property relationships for viscosity sensitivity could benefit the design of improved dyes. Computational studies on these dyes reveal the mechanism of viscosity sensitivity of fluorescent molecular rotors and the nature of the difference in viscosity sensitivity of the three dyes. The results show that the greatly raised HOMO and greatly lowered LUMO in the S1 state compared with the S0 state are responsible for the large Stokes shift of the three dyes. The heterocyclic moieties have the primary influence on the LUMO levels of the three hemicyanine dyes. Rotation about the C-C bond adjacent to the carbazole moiety of the three dyes drives the molecule toward a small energy gap between the ground state and the first excited state, which causes mainly nonradiative deactivation. The oscillator strengths in the lowest singlet excited state drop rapidly with increasing rotation between 0 and 95°, which leads to a dark state for these dyes when fully twisted at 95°. We draw a mechanistic picture at the molecular level to illustrate how these dyes work as viscosity-sensitive fluorescent probes. The activation barriers and energy gaps of C-C bond rotation strongly depend on the choice of heterocycle, which plays a major role in reducing fluorescence quantum yield in the free state and provides high sensitivity to viscosity detection in viscous environments for the carbazole-based hemicyanine dyes.

  10. Viscosity and electric properties of water aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavlov, A. V.; Sokolov, I. V.; Dzhumandzhi, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    The flow of water mist in a narrow duct has been studied experimentally. The profile of the velocity of drops has been measured, and the viscosity of the mist has been calculated using the Navier-Stokes equation. It has been found that at low gradients of the rate of shear the viscosity of the mist can exceed that of clean air by tens and even hundreds of times. The electric charge of the drops has been measured. It has been found that the viscosity of the mist differs from that of clean air at gradients of the rate of shear that are less than the frequency of the establishment of electric equilibrium between the drops. A comparative analysis of the viscosities of the mist and a drop cluster has been carried out, and the dependence of the viscosity of the water aerosol on the radius and the charge of the drops has been predicted. The possible role of aerosols that contain submicron drops in the known "clear air turbulence" problem has been shown.

  11. Predicting slag viscosity from coal ash composition

    SciTech Connect

    Laumb, J.; Benson, S.A.; Katrinak, K.A.; Schwalbe, R.; McCollor, D.P.

    1999-07-01

    Management of slag flow from cyclone-fired utility boilers requires accurate prediction of viscosity. Cyclones tend to build up slag when the cyclone combustion temperature is less than the temperature required to melt and tap the ash from the coal being fired. Cyclone-fired boilers designed for lignite are equipped with predry systems, which remove 6-9% of the moisture from the coal. Cyclones tend to slag when the as-received heating value of the fuel is less than 6350 Btu/lb and T250 (temperature where viscosity equals 250 poise) is greater than 2350 F. The T250 value, as well as the rest of the viscosity-temperature relationship, can be predicted using models based on coal ash composition. The focus of this work is to evaluate several models in terms of their agreement with measured viscosities. Viscosity measurements were made for ten samples, including nine lignite coals and one lignite-derived slag. Model performance is related to the SiO{sub 2}, CaO, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} contents of the slag. The Sage and McIlroy and Kalmanovitch models worked best for high SiO{sub 2} and low Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} fuels. The Senior model worked best when Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} content was moderate to high.

  12. Viscosity Measurement Using Drop Coalescence in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.; Ethridge, Edwin C.; Maxwell, Daniel; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present in here validation studies of a new method for application in microgravity environment which measures the viscosity of highly viscous undercooled liquids using drop coalescence. The method has the advantage of avoiding heterogeneous nucleation at container walls caused by crystallization of undercooled liquids during processing. Homogeneous nucleation can also be avoided due to the rapidity of the measurement using this method. The technique relies on measurements from experiments conducted in near zero gravity environment as well as highly accurate analytical formulation for the coalescence process. The viscosity of the liquid is determined by allowing the computed free surface shape relaxation time to be adjusted in response to the measured free surface velocity for two coalescing drops. Results are presented from two sets of validation experiments for the method which were conducted on board aircraft flying parabolic trajectories. In these tests the viscosity of a highly viscous liquid, namely glycerin, was determined at different temperatures using the drop coalescence method described in here. The experiments measured the free surface velocity of two glycerin drops coalescing under the action of surface tension alone in low gravity environment using high speed photography. The liquid viscosity was determined by adjusting the computed free surface velocity values to the measured experimental data. The results of these experiments were found to agree reasonably well with the known viscosity for the test liquid used.

  13. Entropy viscosity method applied to Euler equations

    SciTech Connect

    Delchini, M. O.; Ragusa, J. C.; Berry, R. A.

    2013-07-01

    The entropy viscosity method [4] has been successfully applied to hyperbolic systems of equations such as Burgers equation and Euler equations. The method consists in adding dissipative terms to the governing equations, where a viscosity coefficient modulates the amount of dissipation. The entropy viscosity method has been applied to the 1-D Euler equations with variable area using a continuous finite element discretization in the MOOSE framework and our results show that it has the ability to efficiently smooth out oscillations and accurately resolve shocks. Two equations of state are considered: Ideal Gas and Stiffened Gas Equations Of State. Results are provided for a second-order time implicit schemes (BDF2). Some typical Riemann problems are run with the entropy viscosity method to demonstrate some of its features. Then, a 1-D convergent-divergent nozzle is considered with open boundary conditions. The correct steady-state is reached for the liquid and gas phases with a time implicit scheme. The entropy viscosity method correctly behaves in every problem run. For each test problem, results are shown for both equations of state considered here. (authors)

  14. Ekman Spiral in Horizontally Inhomogeneous Ocean with Varying Eddy Viscosity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    1 Ekman Spiral in Horizontally Inhomogeneous Ocean with Varying Eddy Viscosity ...in Horizontally Inhomogeneous Ocean with Varying Eddy Viscosity 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...generated by surface wind stress with constant eddy viscosity in homogeneous ocean. In real oceans, the eddy viscosity varies due to turbulent mixing

  15. A Quantitative Study of Bulk Stresses in Nonlinear Microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depuit, Ryan; Squires, Todd

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the nonlinear microrheology of a simple model system - a spherical probe translating through a dilute suspension of rigid rods - to elucidate a variety of issues inherent in the interpretation of nonlinear microrheology. We have developed a computational system to quantitatively examine the issues present in interpretation of nonlinear microrheology, as originally discussed by Squires (Langmuir, 2008). Following recent work emphasizing the importance of the microstructural behavior in the bulk (Sriram et. al, 2009), we focus our attention on the bulk microstructural deformation, and examine the significance of its (Lagrangian) transient nature, as well as the consequences of the mixed and inhomogeneous flows inherent to nonlinear microrheology. From this quantitative study, we pose solutions for the current theoretical issues facing nonlinear microrheology in interpretation and comparison of the microviscosity with the shear viscosity from traditional bulk rheometry.

  16. Polyfunctional dispersants for controlling viscosity of phyllosilicates

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2006-07-25

    This invention provides phyllosilicates and polyfunctional dispersants which can be manipulated to selectively control the viscosity of phyllosilicate slurries. The polyfunctional dispersants used in the present invention, which include at least three functional groups, increase the dispersion and exfoliation of phyllosilicates in polymers and, when used in conjunction with phyllosilicate slurries, significantly reduce the viscosity of slurries having high concentrations of phyllosilicates. The functional groups of the polyfunctional dispersants are capable of associating with multivalent metal cations and low molecular weight organic polymers, which can be manipulated to substantially increase or decrease the viscosity of the slurry in a concentration dependent manner. The polyfunctional dispersants of the present invention can also impart desirable properties on the phyllosilicate dispersions including corrosion inhibition and enhanced exfoliation of the phyllosilicate platelets.

  17. Neoclassical Viscosities and Anomalous Flows in Stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, A. S.; Spong, D. A.

    2008-11-01

    We discuss initial work to use neoclassical viscosities calculated with the PENTA code [1,2] in a transport model that includes Reynolds stress generation of flows [3]. The PENTA code uses a drift kinetic equation solver to calculate neoclassical viscosities and flows in general three-dimensional geometries over a range of collisionalities. The predicted neoclassical viscosities predicted by PENTA can be flux-surfaced average and applied in a 1-D transport model that includes anomalous flow generation. This combination of codes can be used to test the impact of stellarator geometry on anomalous flow generation. [1] D. A. Spong, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056114 (2005). [2] D. A. Spong, Fusion Sci. Technology 50, 343 (2006). [3] D. E. Newman, et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 938 (1998).

  18. Viscosity of fluids in subduction zones.

    PubMed

    Audétat, Andreas; Keppler, Hans

    2004-01-23

    The viscosities of aqueous fluids with 10 to 80 weight percent dissolved silicates have been measured at 600 degrees to 950 degrees C and 1.0 to 2.0 gigapascals by in situ observation of falling spheres in the diamond anvil cell. The viscosities at 800 degrees C range from 10(-4) to 10(0.5) pascal seconds. The combination of low viscosities with a favorable wetting angle makes silicate-rich fluid an efficient agent for material transport at low-volume fractions. Our results therefore suggest that there may be a direct relationship between the position of the volcanic front and the onset of complete miscibility between water and silicate melt in the subducting slab.

  19. Diffusion, Viscosity and Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myerson, Allan S.

    1996-01-01

    The diffusivity of TriGlycine Sulfate (TGS), Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate (KDP), Ammonium Dihydrogen Phosphate (ADF) and other compounds of interest to microgravity crystal growth, in supersaturated solutions as a function of solution concentration, 'age' and 'history was studied experimentally. The factors that affect the growth of crystals from water solutions in microgravity have been examined. Three non-linear optical materials have been studied, potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) and triglycine sulfate (TGC). The diffusion coefficient and viscosity of supersaturated water solutions were measured. Also theoretical model of diffusivity and viscosity in a metastable state, model of crystal growth from solution including non-linear time dependent diffusivity and viscosity effect and computer simulation of the crystal growth process which allows simulation of the microgravity crystal growth were developed.

  20. Evaluation of SpectroVisc Q3000 for Viscosity Determination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-14

    The Navy routinely measures the viscosity of lubricating oils and hydraulic fluids. Viscosity measurements typically are conducted in a land based...BACKGROUND The Navy routinely measures the viscosity of lubricating oils and hydraulic fluids. Viscosity measurements that are lower than expected... viscosity at 40°C in lubricating oils and hydraulic fluids. 3.0 APPROACH The accuracy and repeatability of the SpectroVisc Q3000 was evaluated using

  1. Viscosity properties of sodium borophosphate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Gaylord, S.; Tincher, B.; Petit, L. Richardson, K.

    2009-05-06

    The viscosity behavior of (1 - x)NaPO{sub 3}-xNa{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} glasses (x = 0.05-0.20) have been measured as a function of temperature using beam-bending and parallel-plate viscometry. The viscosity was found to shift to higher temperatures with increasing sodium borate content. The kinetic fragility parameter, m, estimated from the viscosity curve, decreases from 52 to 33 when x increases from 0.05 to 0.20 indicating that the glass network transforms from fragile to strong with the addition of Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}. The decrease in fragility with increasing x is due to the progressive depolymerization of the phosphate network by the preferred four-coordinated boron atoms present in the low alkali borate glasses. As confirmed by Raman spectroscopy increasing alkali borate leads to enhanced B-O-P linkages realized with the accompanying transition from solely four-coordinated boron (in BO{sub 4} units) to mixed BO{sub 4}/BO{sub 3} structures. The glass viscosity characteristics of the investigated glasses were compared to those of P-SF67 and N-FK5 commercial glasses from SCHOTT. We showed that the dependence of the viscosity of P-SF67 was similar to the investigated glasses due to similar phosphate network organization confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, whereas N-FK5 exhibited a very different viscosity curve and fragility parameter due to its highly coordinated silicate network.

  2. Viscosity Meaurement Technique for Metal Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ban, Heng; Kennedy, Rory

    2015-02-09

    Metallic fuels have exceptional transient behavior, excellent thermal conductivity, and a more straightforward reprocessing path, which does not separate out pure plutonium from the process stream. Fabrication of fuel containing minor actinides and rare earth (RE) elements for irradiation tests, for instance, U-20Pu-3Am-2Np-1.0RE-15Zr samples at the Idaho National Laboratory, is generally done by melt casting in an inert atmosphere. For the design of a casting system and further scale up development, computational modeling of the casting process is needed to provide information on melt flow and solidification for process optimization. Therefore, there is a need for melt viscosity data, the most important melt property that controls the melt flow. The goal of the project was to develop a measurement technique that uses fully sealed melt sample with no Americium vapor loss to determine the viscosity of metallic melts and at temperatures relevant to the casting process. The specific objectives of the project were to: develop mathematical models to establish the principle of the measurement method, design and build a viscosity measurement prototype system based on the established principle, and calibrate the system and quantify the uncertainty range. The result of the project indicates that the oscillation cup technique is applicable for melt viscosity measurement. Detailed mathematical models of innovative sample ampoule designs were developed to not only determine melt viscosity, but also melt density under certain designs. Measurement uncertainties were analyzed and quantified. The result of this project can be used as the initial step toward the eventual goal of establishing a viscosity measurement system for radioactive melts.

  3. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF DODONAEA VISCOSE

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, N.; Venkatesh, Sama; Suresh, B.

    1998-01-01

    Dodonaea viscose, Linn is a widely grown plant of Nilgiris district of Tamil and is commonly used by the tribals of Nilgiris as a traditional medicine for done fracture and joint sprains. Since it is generally believed tat fractures are accompanied by either some degree of injury or inflammations, it was felt desirable to carry our anti inflammatory activity of Dodonaea viscose. Anti-inflammatory activity of the plant was carried out by carrageenin induced paw edema method in Wister albino rats. PMID:22556883

  4. Shear Viscosity in a Gluon Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Zhe; Greiner, Carsten

    2008-05-02

    The relation of the shear viscosity coefficient to the recently introduced transport rate is derived within relativistic kinetic theory. We calculate the shear viscosity over entropy ratio {eta}/s for a gluon gas, which involves elastic gg{yields}gg perturbative QCD (PQCD) scatterings as well as inelastic gg{r_reversible}ggg PQCD bremsstrahlung. For {alpha}{sub s}=0.3 we find {eta}/s=0.13 and for {alpha}{sub s}=0.6, {eta}/s=0.076. The small {eta}/s values, which suggest strongly coupled systems, are due to the gluon bremsstrahlung incorporated.

  5. Measuring Viscosities of Gases at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Mall, Gerald H.; Hoshang, Chegini

    1987-01-01

    Variant of general capillary method for measuring viscosities of unknown gases based on use of thermal mass-flowmeter section for direct measurement of pressure drops. In technique, flowmeter serves dual role, providing data for determining volume flow rates and serving as well-characterized capillary-tube section for measurement of differential pressures across it. New method simple, sensitive, and adaptable for absolute or relative viscosity measurements of low-pressure gases. Suited for very complex hydrocarbon mixtures where limitations of classical theory and compositional errors make theoretical calculations less reliable.

  6. Shock capturing by the spectral viscosity method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadmor, Eitan

    1989-01-01

    A main disadvantage of using spectral methods for nonlinear conservation laws lies in the formation of Gibbs phenomenon, once spontaneous shock discontinuities appear in the solution. The global nature of spectral methods than pollutes the unstable Gibbs oscillations overall the computational domain, and the lack of entropy dissipation prevents convergences in these cases. The Spectral Viscosity method, which is based on high frequency dependent vanishing viscosity regularization of the classical spectral methods is discussed. It is shown that this method enforces the convergence of nonlinear spectral approximations without sacrificing their overall spectral accuracy.

  7. Gravimetric capillary method for kinematic viscosity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Iwan, J.; Alexander, D.; Jin, Wei-Qing

    1992-01-01

    A novel version of the capillary method for viscosity measurements of liquids is presented. Viscosity data can be deduced in a straightforward way from mass transfer data obtained by differential weighing during the gravity-induced flow of the liquid between two cylindrical chambers. Tests of this technique with water, carbon tetrachloride, and ethanol suggest that this arrangement provides an accuracy of about +/- 1 percent. The technique facilitates operation under sealed, isothermal conditions and, thus can readily be applied to reactive and/or high vapor pressure liquids.

  8. Low shear viscosity of dilute polymer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, C.S.; Gordon, R.J.

    1980-09-01

    A modification of a viscometer originally proposed by Zimm and Crothers is studied, which may be used to measure ultra low shear viscosity for highly dilute polymer solutions. This may provide useful information on polymer coil dimensions and relaxation time. Use of the low shear viscosity data leads to large value of relaxation time induced by polymer addition to a concentration of only 2 to 3 ppM by wt. This finding is consistent with the marked viscoelastic effects exhibited by these solutions.

  9. Apparatus and method for measuring viscosity

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Jr., Robert J.

    1986-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for measuring the viscosity of a fluid. This apparatus and method is particularly useful for the measurement of the viscosity of a liquid in a harsh environment characterized by high temperature and the presence of corrosive or deleterious gases and vapors which adversely affect conventional ball or roller bearings. The apparatus and method of the present invention employ one or more flexural or torsional bearings to suspend a bob capable of limited angular motion within a rotatable sleeve suspended from a stationary frame.

  10. Apparatus and method for measuring viscosity

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, R.J. Jr.

    1986-02-25

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for measuring the viscosity of a fluid. This apparatus and method is particularly useful for the measurement of the viscosity of a liquid in a harsh environment characterized by high temperature and the presence of corrosive or deleterious gases and vapors which adversely affect conventional ball or roller bearings. The apparatus and method of the present invention employ one or more flexural or torsional bearings to suspend a bob capable of limited angular motion within a rotatable sleeve suspended from a stationary frame. 7 figs.

  11. Shear viscosity coefficient of liquid lanthanides

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, H. P. Thakor, P. B. Prajapati, A. V.; Sonvane, Y. A.

    2015-05-15

    Present paper deals with the computation of shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides. The effective pair potential v(r) is calculated through our newly constructed model potential. The Pair distribution function g(r) is calculated from PYHS reference system. To see the influence of local field correction function, Hartree (H), Tailor (T) and Sarkar et al (S) local field correction function are used. Present results are compared with available experimental as well as theoretical data. Lastly, we found that our newly constructed model potential successfully explains the shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides.

  12. Belt conveyors for bulk materials. 6th ed.

    SciTech Connect

    2007-07-01

    The 16 chapters are entitled: Belt conveyor general applications economics; Design considerations; Characteristics and conveyability of bulk materials; Capacities, belt widths and speeds; Belt conveyor idlers; Belt tension and power engineering; Belt selection; Pulleys and shafts; Curves; Steep angle conveying; Belt cleaners and accessories; Transfer points; Conveyor motor drives and controls; Operation, maintenance and safety; Belt takeups; and Emerging technologies. 6 apps.

  13. Effect of Viscosity on Liquid Curtain Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad Karim, Alireza; Suszynski, Wieslaw; Francis, Lorraine; Carvalho, Marcio; Dow Chemical Company Collaboration; PUC Rio Collaboration; University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    The effect of viscosity on the stability of Newtonian liquid curtains was explored by high-speed visualization. Glycerol/water solutions with viscosity ranging from 19.1 to 210 mPa.s were used as coating liquids. The experimental set-up used a slide die delivery and steel tube edge guides. The velocity along curtain at different positions was measured by tracking small particles at different flow conditions. The measurements revealed that away from edge guides, velocity is well described by free fall effect. However, close to edge guides, liquid moves slower, revealing formation of a viscous boundary layer. The size of boundary layer and velocity near edge guides are strong function of viscosity. The critical condition was determined by examining flow rate below which curtain broke. Curtain failure was initiated by growth of a hole within liquid curtain, close to edge guides. Visualization results showed that the hole forms in a circular shape then becomes elliptical as it grows faster in vertical direction compared to horizontal direction. As viscosity rises, minimum flow rate for destabilization of curtain increased, indicating connection between interaction with edge guides and curtain stability. We would like to acknowledge the financial support from the Dow Chemical Company.

  14. Viscosity Measurement using Drop Coalescence in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.; Ethridge, Edwin; Maxwell, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    We present in here details of a new method, using drop coalescence, for application in microgravity environment for determining the viscosity of highly viscous undercooled liquids. The method has the advantage of eliminating heterogeneous nucleation at container walls caused by crystallization of undercooled liquids during processing. Also, due to the rapidity of the measurement, homogeneous nucleation would be avoided. The technique relies on both a highly accurate solution to the Navier-Stokes equations as well as on data gathered from experiments conducted in near zero gravity environment. The liquid viscosity is determined by allowing the computed free surface shape relaxation time to be adjusted in response to the measured free surface velocity of two coalescing drops. Results are presented from two validation experiments of the method which were conducted recently on board the NASA KC-135 aircraft. In these tests the viscosity of a highly viscous liquid, such as glycerine at different temperatures, was determined to reasonable accuracy using the liquid coalescence method. The experiments measured the free surface velocity of two glycerine drops coalescing under the action of surface tension alone in low gravity environment using high speed photography. The free surface velocity was then compared with the computed values obtained from different viscosity values. The results of these experiments were found to agree reasonably well with the calculated values.

  15. Viscosity in accretion discs. [for binary stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. I.

    1980-01-01

    Both HerX-1 and SS433 may contain accretion disks slaved to a precessing companion star. If so, it is possible to bound the effective viscosity in these disks. The results, in terms of the disk parameter alpha, are lower bounds of 0.01 for HerX-1 and of 0.1 for SS433.

  16. Modeling the Viscosity of Aluminosilicate Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decterov, Sergei A.; Grundy, A. Nicholas; Jung, In-Ho; Pelton, Arthur D.

    2007-12-01

    Silicate systems are of fundamental importance for many metallurgical processes, for the glass industry and also for many aspects of geology. In addition to the phase relations, there are many properties of the liquid phase such as molar volume, surface tension, absorption coefficient, thermal conductivity and viscosity that are important for understanding, simulating and modeling processes involving silicate liquids. Over the past several years, through critical evaluation of all available thermodynamic and phase equilibrium data, we have developed a quantitative thermodynamic description of multicomponent silicate melts using the Modified Quasichemical Model for short-range ordering. We find that the local structure of the liquid, in terms of the bridging behavior of oxygen, calculated using our thermodynamic description allows us to link the viscosity and the thermodynamics of the silicate liquid. We can thus simultaneously calculate phase relations, thermodynamics and viscosity of the liquid over a wide composition and temperature range. In the present work we outline the viscosity model using selected binary and ternary systems as examples. The model has successfully been applied to melts in the multicomponent Na2O-K2O-MgO-CaO-MnO-FeO-ZnO-PbO-Al2O3-SiO2 system and more elements are currently being added to the database.

  17. Sensor for Viscosity and Shear Strength Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, J.; Moore, J.E. Jr.; Ebadian, M.A.; Jones, W.K.

    1998-10-20

    Measurement of the physical properties (viscosity and density) of waste slurries is critical in evaluating transport parameters to ensure turbulent flow through transport pipes. The environment for measurement and sensor exposure is extremely harsh; therefore, reliability and ruggedness are critical in the sensor design. The work for this project will be performed in three phases. The first phase, carried out in FY96, involved (1) an evaluation of acoustic and other methods for viscosity measurement; (2) measurement of the parameters of slurries over the range of percent solids found in tanks and transport systems; (3) a comparison of physical properties (e.g., viscosity and density) to percent solids found composition; and (4) the design of a prototype sensor. The second phase (FY97) will involve the fabrication of a prototype hybrid sensor to measure the viscosity and mechanical properties of slurries in remote, high-radiation environments. Two different viscometer designs are being investigated in this study: a magnetostrictive pulse wave guide viscometer; an oscillating cylinder viscometer. In FY97, the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU), which has printed circuit, thick film, thin film, and co-fired ceramic fabrication capability, will fabricate five probes for demonstration after technology selection and evaluation.

  18. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-05-15

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a “heat flux viscosity,” is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  19. Spiders Tune Glue Viscosity to Maximize Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Zhang, Ci; Diaz, Candido; Opell, Brent D; Blackledge, Todd A; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-11-24

    Adhesion in humid conditions is a fundamental challenge to both natural and synthetic adhesives. Yet, glue from most spider species becomes stickier as humidity increases. We find the adhesion of spider glue, from five diverse spider species, maximizes at very different humidities that matches their foraging habitats. By using high-speed imaging and spreading power law, we find that the glue viscosity varies over 5 orders of magnitude with humidity for each species, yet the viscosity at maximal adhesion for each species is nearly identical, 10(5)-10(6) cP. Many natural systems take advantage of viscosity to improve functional response, but spider glue's humidity responsiveness is a novel adaptation that makes the glue stickiest in each species' preferred habitat. This tuning is achieved by a combination of proteins and hygroscopic organic salts that determines water uptake in the glue. We therefore anticipate that manipulation of polymer-salts interaction to control viscosity can provide a simple mechanism to design humidity responsive smart adhesives.

  20. Pressure-viscosity coefficient of biobased lubricants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Film thickness is an important tribological property that is dependent on the combined effect of lubricant properties, material property of friction surfaces, and the operating conditions of the tribological process. Pressure-viscosity coefficient (PVC) is one of the lubricant properties that influe...

  1. Coaxial Redundant Drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brissette, R.

    1983-01-01

    Harmonic drives allow redundancy and high out put torque in small package. If main drive fails, standby drive takes over and produces torque along same axis as main drive. Uses include power units in robot for internal pipeline inspection, manipulators in deep submersible probes or other applications in which redundancy protects against costly failures.

  2. Reference Correlation for the Viscosity of Ethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eckhard; Span, Roland; Herrmann, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    A new representation of the viscosity for the fluid phase of ethane includes a zero-density correlation and a contribution for the critical enhancement, initially both developed separately, but based on experimental data. The higher-density contributions are correlated as a function of the reduced density δ = ρ/ρc and of the reciprocal reduced temperature τ = Tc/T (ρc—critical density and Tc—critical temperature). The final formulation contains 14 coefficients obtained using a state-of-the-art linear optimization algorithm. The evaluation and choice of the selected primary data sets is reviewed, in particular with respect to the assessment used in earlier viscosity correlations. The new viscosity surface correlation makes use of the reference equation of state for the thermodynamic properties of ethane by Bücker and Wagner [J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 35, 205 (2006)] and is valid in the fluid region from the melting line to temperatures of 675 K and pressures of 100 MPa. The viscosity in the limit of zero density is described with an expanded uncertainty of 0.5% (coverage factor k = 2) for temperatures 290 < T/K < 625, increasing to 1.0% at temperatures down to 212 K. The uncertainty of the correlated values is 1.5% in the range 290 < T/K < 430 at pressures up to 30 MPa on the basis of recent measurements judged to be very reliable as well as 4.0% and 6.0% in further regions. The uncertainty in the near-critical region (1.001 < 1/τ < 1.010 and 0.8 < δ < 1.2) increases with decreasing temperature up to 3.0% considering the available reliable data. Tables of the viscosity calculated from the correlation are listed in an appendix for the single-phase region, for the vapor-liquid phase boundary, and for the near-critical region.

  3. Conditions of viscosity measurement for detecting irradiated peppers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Toru; Todoriki, Setsuko; Okadome, Hiroshi; Kohyama, Kaoru

    1995-04-01

    Viscosity of gelatinized suspensions of black and white peppers decreased depending upon dose. The viscosity was influenced by gelatinization and viscosity measurement conditions. The difference between unirradiated pepper and an irradiated one was larger at a higher pH and temperature for gelatinization. A viscosity parameter normalized with the starch content of pepper sample and the viscosity of a 5% suspension of corn starch could get rid of the influence of the conditions for viscosity measurement such as a type of viscometer, shear rate and temperature.

  4. Bulk viscous matter-dominated Universes: asymptotic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Avelino, Arturo; García-Salcedo, Ricardo; Gonzalez, Tame; Nucamendi, Ulises; Quiros, Israel E-mail: rigarcias@ipn.mx E-mail: ulises@ifm.umich.mx

    2013-08-01

    By means of a combined use of the type Ia supernovae and H(z) data tests, together with the study of the asymptotic properties in the equivalent phase space — through the use of the dynamical systems tools — we demonstrate that the bulk viscous matter-dominated scenario is not a good model to explain the accepted cosmological paradigm, at least, under the parametrization of bulk viscosity considered in this paper. The main objection against such scenarios is the absence of conventional radiation and matter-dominated critical points in the phase space of the model. This entails that radiation and matter dominance are not generic solutions of the cosmological equations, so that these stages can be implemented only by means of unique and very specific initial conditions, i. e., of very unstable particular solutions. Such a behavior is in marked contradiction with the accepted cosmological paradigm which requires of an earlier stage dominated by relativistic species, followed by a period of conventional non-relativistic matter domination, during which the cosmic structure we see was formed. Also, we found that the bulk viscosity is positive just until very late times in the cosmic evolution, around z < 1. For earlier epochs it is negative, been in tension with the local second law of thermodynamics.

  5. Evaluation of the synergistic effects of milk proteins in a rapid viscosity analyzer.

    PubMed

    Stephani, Rodrigo; Borges de Souza, Alisson; Leal de Oliveira, Marcone Augusto; Perrone, Ítalo Tuler; Fernandes de Carvalho, Antônio; Cappa de Oliveira, Luiz Fernando

    2015-12-01

    Protein systems (PS) are routinely used by companies from Brazil and around the globe to improve the texture, yield, and palatability of processed foods. Understanding the synergistic behavior among the different protein structures of these systems during thermal treatment under the influence of pH can help to better define optimum conditions for products and processes. The interpretation of the reactions and interactions that occur simultaneously among the protein constituents of these systems as dispersions during thermal processing is still a major challenge. Here, using a rapid viscosity analyzer, we observed the rheological changes in the startup viscosities of 5 PS obtained by combining varying proportions of milk protein concentrate and whey protein concentrate under different conditions of pH (5.0, 6.5, and 7.0) and heat processing (85°C/15min and 95°C/5min). The solutions were standardized to 25% of total solids and 17% of protein. Ten analytical parameters were used to characterize each of the startup-viscosity ramps for 35 experiments conducted in a 2×3 × 5 mixed planning matrix, using principal component analysis to interpret behavioral similarities. The study showed the clear influence of pH 5.5 in the elevation of the initial temperature of the PS startup viscosity by at least 5°C, as well as the effect of different milk protein concentrate:whey protein concentrate ratios above 15:85 at pH 7.0 on the viscographic profile curves. These results suggested that the primary agent driving the changes was the synergism among the reactions and interactions of casein with whey proteins during processing. This study reinforces the importance of the rapid viscosity analyzer as an analytical tool for the simulation of industrial processes involving PS, and the use of the startup viscosity ramp as a means of interpreting the interactions of system components with respect to changes related to the treatment temperature.

  6. Structure–property reduced order model for viscosity prediction in single-component CO 2 -binding organic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Cantu, David C.; Malhotra, Deepika; Koech, Phillip K.; Heldebrant, David J.; Zheng, Feng; Freeman, Charles J.; Rousseau, Roger; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    CO2 capture from power generation with aqueous solvents remains energy intensive due to the high water content of the current technology, or the high viscosity of non-aqueous alternatives. Quantitative reduced models, connecting molecular structure to bulk properties, are key for developing structure-property relationships that enable molecular design. In this work, we describe such a model that quantitatively predicts viscosities of CO2 binding organic liquids (CO2BOLs) based solely on molecular structure and the amount of bound CO2. The functional form of the model correlates the viscosity with the CO2 loading and an electrostatic term describing the charge distribution between the CO2-bearing functional group and the proton-receiving amine. Molecular simulations identify the proton shuttle between these groups within the same molecule to be the critical indicator of low viscosity. The model, developed to allow for quick screening of solvent libraries, paves the way towards the rational design of low viscosity non-aqueous solvent systems for post-combustion CO2 capture. Following these theoretical recommendations, synthetic efforts of promising candidates and viscosity measurement provide experimental validation and verification.

  7. Viscosity controls humidity dependence of N2O5 uptake to citric acid aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gržinić, G.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Berkemeier, T.; Türler, A.; Ammann, M.

    2015-08-01

    The heterogeneous loss of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) to aerosol particles has a significant impact on the night time nitrogen oxide cycle and therefore the oxidative capacity in the troposphere. Using a 13N short lived radioactive tracer method we studied the uptake kinetics of N2O5 on citric acid aerosol particles as a function of relative humidity (RH). The results show that citric acid exhibits lower reactivity than similar di- and polycarboxylic acids, with uptake coefficients between ~ 3 × 10-4-~ 3 × 10-3 depending on humidity (17-70 % RH). This humidity dependence can be explained by a changing viscosity and, hence, diffusivity in the organic matrix. Since the viscosity of highly concentrated citric acid solutions is not well established, we present four different parameterizations of N2O5 diffusivity based on the available literature data or estimates for viscosity and diffusivity. Above 50 % RH, uptake is consistent with the reacto-diffusive kinetic regime whereas below 50 % RH, the uptake coefficient is higher than expected from hydrolysis of N2O5 within the bulk of the particles, and the uptake kinetics may be limited by loss on the surface only. This study demonstrates the impact of viscosity in highly oxidized and highly functionalized secondary organic aerosol material on the heterogeneous chemistry of N2O5 and may explain some of the unexpectedly low loss rates to aerosol derived from field studies.

  8. Dynamic acid/base equilibrium in single component switchable ionic liquids and consequences on viscosity

    DOE PAGES

    Cantu, David C.; Lee, Juntaek; Lee, Mal -Soon; ...

    2016-03-28

    The deployment of transformational non-aqueous CO2-capture solvent systems is encumbered by high viscosity even at intermediate uptakes. Using single-molecule CO2 binding organic liquids as a prototypical example, we identify the key molecular features controlling bulk liquid viscosity and CO2 uptake kinetics. Fast uptake kinetics arise from close proximity of the alcohol and amine sites that are involved in CO2 binding. This process results in the concerted formation of a Zwitterion containing both an alkylcarbonate and a protonated amine. The hydrogen bonding between the two functional groups ultimately determines the solution viscosity. Based on molecular simulation, this work reveals options tomore » significantly reduce viscosity with molecular modifications that shift the proton transfer equilibrium towards a neutral acid/amine species as opposed to the ubiquitously accepted Zwitterionic state. Lastly, the molecular design concepts proposed here, for the alkyl-carbonate systems, are readily extensible to other CO2 capture technologies, such as the carbamate- or imidazole-based solvent chemistries.« less

  9. Dynamic acid/base equilibrium in single component switchable ionic liquids and consequences on viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Cantu, David C.; Lee, Juntaek; Lee, Mal -Soon; Heldebrant, David J.; Koech, Phillip K.; Freeman, Charles J.; Rousseau, Roger; Glezakou, Vassiliki -Alexandra

    2016-03-28

    The deployment of transformational non-aqueous CO2-capture solvent systems is encumbered by high viscosity even at intermediate uptakes. Using single-molecule CO2 binding organic liquids as a prototypical example, we identify the key molecular features controlling bulk liquid viscosity and CO2 uptake kinetics. Fast uptake kinetics arise from close proximity of the alcohol and amine sites that are involved in CO2 binding. This process results in the concerted formation of a Zwitterion containing both an alkylcarbonate and a protonated amine. The hydrogen bonding between the two functional groups ultimately determines the solution viscosity. Based on molecular simulation, this work reveals options to significantly reduce viscosity with molecular modifications that shift the proton transfer equilibrium towards a neutral acid/amine species as opposed to the ubiquitously accepted Zwitterionic state. Lastly, the molecular design concepts proposed here, for the alkyl-carbonate systems, are readily extensible to other CO2 capture technologies, such as the carbamate- or imidazole-based solvent chemistries.

  10. Dynamic Acid/Base Equilibrium in Single Component Switchable Ionic Liquids and Consequences on Viscosity.

    PubMed

    Cantu, David C; Lee, Juntaek; Lee, Mal-Soon; Heldebrant, David J; Koech, Phillip K; Freeman, Charles J; Rousseau, Roger; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra

    2016-05-05

    The deployment of transformational nonaqueous CO2-capture solvent systems is encumbered by high viscosities even at intermediate uptakes. Using single-molecule CO2 binding organic liquids as a prototypical example, we present key molecular features that control bulk viscosity. Fast CO2-uptake kinetics arise from close proximity of the alcohol and amine sites involved in CO2 binding in a concerted fashion, resulting in a Zwitterion containing both an alkyl-carbonate and a protonated amine. The population of internal hydrogen bonds between the two functional groups determines the solution viscosity. Unlike the ion pair interactions in ionic liquids, these observations are novel and specific to a hydrogen-bonding network that can be controlled by chemically tuning single molecule CO2 capture solvents. We present a molecular design strategy to reduce viscosity by shifting the proton transfer equilibrium toward a neutral acid/amine species, as opposed to the ubiquitously accepted zwitterionic state. The molecular design concepts proposed here are readily extensible to other CO2 capture technologies.

  11. Online measurement of viscosity for biological systems in stirred tank bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Schelden, Maximilian; Lima, William; Doerr, Eric Will; Wunderlich, Martin; Rehmann, Lars; Büchs, Jochen; Regestein, Lars

    2016-11-14

    One of the most critical parameters in chemical and biochemical processes is the viscosity of the medium. Its impact on mixing, as well as on mass and energy transfer is substantial. An increase of viscosity with reaction time can be caused by the formation of biopolymers like xanthan or by filamentous growth of microorganisms. In either case the properties of fermentation broth are changing and frequently non-Newtonian behavior are observed, resulting in major challenges for the measurement and control of mixing and mass transfer. This study demonstrates a method for the online determination of the viscosity inside a stirred tank reactor. The presented method is based on online measurement of heat transfer capacity from the bulk medium to the jacket of the reactor. To prove the feasibility of the method, fermentations with the xanthan producing bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris B100 as model system were performed. Excellent correlation between offline measured apparent viscosity and online determined heat transfer capacity were found. The developed tool should be applicable to any other process with formation of biopolymers and filamentous growth. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;9999: 1-8. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Bulk Site Reference Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Barich, J.J. III; Jones, R.R. Sr.

    1996-12-31

    The selection, manufacture and use of Bulk Site Reference Materials (BSRMs) at hazardous waste sites is discussed. BSRMs are useful in preparing stabilization/solidification (S/S) formulations for soils, ranking competing S/S processes, comparing S/S alternatives to other technologies, and in interpreting data from different test types. BSRMs are large volume samples that are representative of the physical and chemical characteristics of a site soil, and that contain contaminants at reasonably high levels. A successful BSRM is extremely homogeneous and well-characterized. While not representative of any point on the site, they contain the contaminants of the site in the matrices of the site. Design objectives for a BSRM are to produce a material that (1) maintains good fidelity to site matrices and contaminants, and (2) exhibits the lowest possible relative standard deviation.

  13. Bulk material handling system

    DOEpatents

    Kleysteuber, William K.; Mayercheck, William D.

    1979-01-01

    This disclosure relates to a bulk material handling system particularly adapted for underground mining and includes a monorail supported overhead and carrying a plurality of conveyors each having input and output end portions with the output end portion of a first of the conveyors positioned above an input end portion of a second of the conveyors, a device for imparting motion to the conveyors to move the material from the input end portions toward the output end portions thereof, a device for supporting at least one of the input and output end portions of the first and second conveyors from the monorail, and the supporting device including a plurality of trolleys rollingly supported by the monorail whereby the conveyors can be readily moved therealong.

  14. Explosive bulk charge

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jacob Lee

    2015-04-21

    An explosive bulk charge, including: a first contact surface configured to be selectively disposed substantially adjacent to a structure or material; a second end surface configured to selectively receive a detonator; and a curvilinear side surface joining the first contact surface and the second end surface. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface form a bi-truncated hemispherical structure. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface are formed from an explosive material. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface each have a substantially circular shape. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface consist of planar structures that are aligned substantially parallel or slightly tilted with respect to one another. The curvilinear side surface has one of a smooth curved geometry, an elliptical geometry, and a parabolic geometry.

  15. Bulk muscles, loose cables

    PubMed Central

    Liyanage, Chamari R D G; Kodali, Venkata

    2014-01-01

    The accessibility and usage of body building supplements is on the rise with stronger internet marketing strategies by the industry. The dangers posed by the ingredients in them are underestimated. A healthy young man came to the emergency room with palpitations and feeling unwell. Initial history and clinical examination were non-contributory to find the cause. ECG showed atrial fibrillation. A detailed history for any over the counter or herbal medicine use confirmed that he was taking supplements to bulk muscle. One of the components in these supplements is yohimbine; the onset of symptoms coincided with the ingestion of this product and the patient is symptom free after stopping it. This report highlights the dangers to the public of consuming over the counter products with unknown ingredients and the consequential detrimental impact on health. PMID:25326558

  16. Creating bulk nanocrystalline metal.

    SciTech Connect

    Fredenburg, D. Anthony; Saldana, Christopher J.; Gill, David D.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Roemer, Timothy John; Vogler, Tracy John; Yang, Pin

    2008-10-01

    Nanocrystalline and nanostructured materials offer unique microstructure-dependent properties that are superior to coarse-grained materials. These materials have been shown to have very high hardness, strength, and wear resistance. However, most current methods of producing nanostructured materials in weapons-relevant materials create powdered metal that must be consolidated into bulk form to be useful. Conventional consolidation methods are not appropriate due to the need to maintain the nanocrystalline structure. This research investigated new ways of creating nanocrystalline material, new methods of consolidating nanocrystalline material, and an analysis of these different methods of creation and consolidation to evaluate their applicability to mesoscale weapons applications where part features are often under 100 {micro}m wide and the material's microstructure must be very small to give homogeneous properties across the feature.

  17. Bulk amorphous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.B.; Archuleta, J.I.; Sickafus, K.E.

    1998-12-01

    This is the final report for a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this work was to develop the competency for the synthesis of novel bulk amorphous alloys. The authors researched their synthesis methods and alloy properties, including thermal stability, mechanical, and transport properties. The project also addressed the development of vanadium-spinel alloys for structural applications in hostile environments, the measurement of elastic constants and thermal expansion in single-crystal TiAl from 300 to 750 K, the measurement of elastic constants in gallium nitride, and a study of the shock-induced martensitic transformations in NiTi alloys.

  18. Nonuniform viscosity in the solar nebula and large masses of Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.

    2004-08-01

    I report a novel theory that nonuniform viscous frictional force in the solar nebula accounts for the largest mass of Jupiter and Saturn and their largest amount of H and He among the planets, two outstanding facts that are unsolved puzzles in our understanding of origin of the Solar System. It is shown that the nebula model of uniform viscosity does not match the present planet masses. By studying current known viscosity mechanisms, I show that viscosity is more efficient in the inner region inside Mercury and the outer region outside Jupiter-Saturn than the intermediate region. The more efficient viscosity drives faster radial inflow of material during the nebula evolution. Because the inflow in the outer region is faster than the intermediate region, the material tends to accumulate in Jupiter-Saturn region which is between the outer and intermediate region. It is demonstrated that the gas trapping time of Jovian planets is longer than the inflow time in the outer region. Therefore the gas already flows to Jupiter-Saturn region before Uranus and Neptune can capture significant gas. But the inflow in the Jupiter-Saturn region is so slow that they can capture large amount of gas before the gas can flow further inward. Hence they have larger masses with larger H and He content than Uranus and Neptune. I also extend the discussion to the masses of the terrestrial planets, especially low mass of Mercury. The advantages of this theory are discussed.

  19. Single wall carbon nanotubes as viscosity modifiers in polypropylene matrix nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simien, Daneesh Olivia

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were studied as low shear rate viscosity modifiers in the polypropylene matrix of nanocomposites. To create nanocomposites which did not demonstrate increased low shear rate viscosity when nanotubes were added into the polymer melt, this work focused on modifying the sidewall profile of the SWNTs and manipulating their configuration in the polymer matrix before subjecting them to rheological testing. Fluorinated single-walled nanotubes (F-SWNTs) played a critical part in evaluating how functionalizations could affect the viscosity of the polymer melt. Fibers made from weight percents ranging from 2.5wt% to 10wt% of F-SWNTs in isotactic polypropylene, with Mw = 250,000 g/mol (iPP250,000), were shown to have lower complex viscosity profiles than the neat iPP250,000 sample at low shear rates. These fibers demonstrated decreases in the complex viscosities, in the low frequency range, of 36.5%, 27.8% and 37.5%, for the 2.5wt.%, 5wt.% and 10wt.% fiber samples respectively. F-SWNTs were shown to stimulate in situ initiated reactions in the polymer melt where free radials generated, as a result of spontaneously dissociated fluorine atoms which scavenge hydrogen from the surrounding polymer chains, facilitate the covalent bonding of nanotubes directly to the polypropylene chains. These covalently bonded nanotubes were then forced to align themselves, along with the polymer chains when the bulk composite is spun into a small diameter fiber (dia.130mum). Another method used to create low shear rate viscosity nanocomposites was to capitalize on the low viscosity properties of low molecular weight isotactic polypropylene (Mw = 12,000g/mol) by creating a hybrid nanocomposite system in the iPP250,000 matrix. In these systems, benzoyl peroxide was used as the free radical initiator which could facilitate the covalent bonding of single walled nanotubes to the polymer chains in the melt. Both non-functionalized and functionalized hybrid

  20. Molten Composition B Viscosity at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerkle, David K.; Núñez, Marcel P.; Zucker, Jonathan M.

    2016-10-01

    A shear-thinning viscosity model is developed for molten Composition B at elevated temperature from analysis of falling ball viscometer data. Results are reported with the system held at 85, 110, and 135°C. Balls of densities of 2.7, 8.0, and 15.6 g/cm3 are dropped to generate a range of strain rates in the material. Analysis of video recordings gives the speed at which the balls fall. Computer simulation of the viscometer is used to determine parameters for a non-Newtonian model calibrated to measured speeds. For the first time, viscosity is shown to be a function of temperature and strain rate-dependent maximum RDX (cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine) particle volume fraction.

  1. Viscosity function in polymer-modified asphalts.

    PubMed

    Stastna, J; Zanzotto, L; Vacin, O J

    2003-03-01

    Asphalt is a multidisperse micellar system with rheological behavior resembling that of a low-molecular-weight polymer. Nowadays, asphalt is frequently modified by blending it with various polymers. Such modified asphalt has rheological properties that differ from the properties of the base asphalt. It is quite common to study asphalt in dynamic experiments. Such studies, however useful, cannot reveal all characteristic features of polymer-modified asphalts. Asphalt modification by polymers is strongly manifested in the region of transitions from a viscoelastic fluid to the Newtonian fluid. The viscosity study in this region can reveal behavior characteristic of the used polymer modifier, thus complementing the dynamic studies of these materials. The viscosity of base asphalt modified by styrene-butadiene-styrene and by ethylene-vinyl acetate polymers (in several concentrations) is studied and discussed in this note.

  2. Prediction of viscosity of dense fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royal, Damian D.; Vesovic, Velisa; Trusler, J. P. Martin; Wakeham, William. A.

    The Vesovic-Wakeham (VW) method of predicting the viscosity of dense fluid mixtures has been improved by implementing new mixing rules based on the rigid sphere formalism. The proposed mixing rules are based on both Lebowitz's solution of the Percus-Yevick equation and on the Carnahan-Starling equation. The predictions of the modified VW method have been compared with experimental viscosity data for a number of diverse fluid mixtures: natural gas, hexane + hheptane, hexane + octane, cyclopentane + toluene, and a ternary mixture of hydrofluorocarbons (R32 + R125 + R134a). The results indicate that the proposed improvements make possible the extension of the original VW method to liquid mixtures and to mixtures containing polar species, while retaining its original accuracy.

  3. A brief review on viscosity of nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Purna Chandra; Mukherjee, Sayantan; Nayak, Santosh Kumar; Panda, Arabind

    2014-10-01

    Since the past decade, rapid development in nanotechnology has produced several aspects for the scientists and technologists to look into. Nanofluid is one of the incredible outcomes of such advancement. Nanofluids (colloidal suspensions of metallic and nonmetallic nanoparticles in conventional base fluids) are best known for their remarkable change to enhanced heat transfer abilities. Earlier research work has already acutely focused on thermal conductivity of nanofluids. However, viscosity is another important property that needs the same attention due to its very crucial impact on heat transfer. Therefore, viscosity of nanofluids should be thoroughly investigated before use for practical heat transfer applications. In this contribution, a brief review on theoretical models is presented precisely. Furthermore, the effects of nanoparticles' shape and size, temperature, volume concentration, pH, etc. are organized together and reviewed.

  4. Effective viscosity of magnetic nanofluids through capillaries.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rajesh

    2012-02-01

    The simultaneous effect of magnetic field and temperature on the capillary viscosity of magnetic nanofluid is an important parameter for a new class of applications such as nanoduct flow, nanomotors, micro- and nanofluidic devices, for transformer cooling, magnetic targeted drug delivery, etc. The effective viscosity of a nanofluid is explained based on the rotation of the particles and the effect of torque on it due to an externally applied magnetic field. Two types of fluids are used here, temperature-sensitive and non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluids. In both types of fluids, decrease in effective viscosity with temperature is observed, but in both cases the mechanism for the decrement is quite different. One is due to temperature dependence of the magnetic moment and the other is due to removal of the secondary surfactant. For temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluids, a Curie temperature of ~80 °C is extracted from this study. For non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluids ~65% of the secondary surfactant is removed for a change in temperature, ΔT = 40 °C. This is analogous with removal of a drug from magnetic particles for targeted drug delivery. Further, a linear dependence of effective viscosity with different capillary size and ξ (angle between magnetic field and flow direction, ξε[0,π/2]) is also observed. This linear dependence can also be a good approximation for the study of magnetic drug targeting, as in the human body the capillaries are of different sizes, and the externally applied magnetic field is not always parallel or perpendicular to the drug flow direction.

  5. Effective viscosity of magnetic nanofluids through capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Rajesh

    2012-02-01

    The simultaneous effect of magnetic field and temperature on the capillary viscosity of magnetic nanofluid is an important parameter for a new class of applications such as nanoduct flow, nanomotors, micro- and nanofluidic devices, for transformer cooling, magnetic targeted drug delivery, etc. The effective viscosity of a nanofluid is explained based on the rotation of the particles and the effect of torque on it due to an externally applied magnetic field. Two types of fluids are used here, temperature-sensitive and non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluids. In both types of fluids, decrease in effective viscosity with temperature is observed, but in both cases the mechanism for the decrement is quite different. One is due to temperature dependence of the magnetic moment and the other is due to removal of the secondary surfactant. For temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluids, a Curie temperature of ˜80 ∘C is extracted from this study. For non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluids ˜65% of the secondary surfactant is removed for a change in temperature, ΔT = 40 ∘C. This is analogous with removal of a drug from magnetic particles for targeted drug delivery. Further, a linear dependence of effective viscosity with different capillary size and ξ (angle between magnetic field and flow direction, ξ∈[0,π/2]) is also observed. This linear dependence can also be a good approximation for the study of magnetic drug targeting, as in the human body the capillaries are of different sizes, and the externally applied magnetic field is not always parallel or perpendicular to the drug flow direction.

  6. Power semiconductor controlled drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Gopal K.

    This book presents power semiconductor controlled drives employing dc motors, induction motors, and synchronous motors. The dynamics of motor and load systems are covered. Open-loop and closed-loop drives are considered, and thyristor, power transistor, and GTO converters are discussed. In-depth coverage is given to ac drives, particularly those fed by voltage and current source inverters and cycloconverters. Full coverage is given to brushless and commutatorless dc drives, including load-commuted synchronous motor drives. Rectifier-controlled dc drives are presented in detail.

  7. Vapor-phase viscosity of phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, E.; Neumann, A.-K.

    1993-07-01

    New measurements of the vapor-phase viscosity of phenol were performed from 437 up to 624 K and for densities between 0.006 and 0.023 mol · L-1 in an all-quartz oscillating-disk viscometer with small gaps. Thus, including our own measurements reported earlier, experimental data are available in the temperature range between 376 and 639 K and in the density range from 0.001 up to 0.023 mol · L-1. The data were evaluated with a density series for the viscosity in which only a linear density contribution is included. The values of the second viscosity virial coefficient obtained for phenol as well as for benzene, toluene, and p-xylene were compared with results of the Rainwater-Friend theory and of the modified Enskog theory on the basis of the Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential. The agreement is reasonable, when the potential parameter ratios determined by Bich and Vogel are used. The influence of bound dimers seems to be already taken into account in the three-monomer contribution according to Hoffman and Curtiss.

  8. Shear & Compression Plasma Viscosity In Spherical ICF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Richard

    2003-10-01

    In (1) the exceptional viscosity of DT plasmas (Braginskii) was estimated to reduce by orders of magnitude growth rates of the most threatening m=0 modes in liner implosions of cylindrical Z-pinch plasmas that reach a thermonuclear T=10keV. Here in spherical B=0 implosions shear viscosity is estimated, by numerical(2)(implicit in t) & analytic(Chandrasekhar) methods, to reduce similarly the growth of R-T modes in DT plasmas reaching 10keV, where μ ˜5.E4 poise, or higher T. Surface plasma interactions with the confining pusher shell(3) & Knudsen(large mfp) limitation of the viscous effects are discussed. Compression viscosity(Zel'dovich) adds noticeably to irreversible heating(reduced to quadratures) in such systems, esp. with final T>10keV &/or implosion velocities >10E7cm/s. Here double implosions, as suggested in (4), can increase significantly entropy production prior to final implosion &, consequently, heating efficiency. (1)Bull. APS 44-7 Nov99 BP189 (2)McCrory et. al. Nuc.Sci.. 64,163(77) & references (3)Montierth et al., PFB 4(4) Ap92 & references (4)Two Stage Heating Of Theta Pinches, Freidberg & Morse, Proc. '71 Garching Conf. On High β Plasmas

  9. Magnetic viscosity studies in hard magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, E.W.; Hadjipanayis, G.C. )

    1990-05-01

    The magnetic viscosity behavior has been studied in several hard magnets with different magnetization reversal mechanisms including barium ferrite powders, Cu-Mn-Al, ferrite magnets, Nd-Fe-B, and SmCo{sub 5}, Sm{sub 2}(Co,Fe,Cu,Zr){sub 17}. The measurements were made with a vibrating sample magnetometer for times up to 60 s and a SQUID magnetometer for longer times in the range of 60--2300 s. For most of the samples the magnetization was found to vary logarithmically with time. The field and temperature dependence of the magnetic viscosity coefficient {ital S} was studied. Here, {ital S} was found to vary with the applied field and it usually peaked around the coercive field {ital H}{sub {ital c}}. The measured values of {ital S}{sub max} at 10 K range from 0.004 to 1.853 emu/g for Cu-Mn-Al and Sm{sub 2}(Co,Fe,Cu,Zr){sub 17}, respectively. The magnetic viscosity coefficient was used together with the magnetic susceptibility to determine the activation volume.

  10. RELAP-7 Numerical Stabilization: Entropy Viscosity Method

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Berry; M. O. Delchini; J. Ragusa

    2014-06-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on the INL's modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical integration methods, and physical models. The end result will be a reactor systems analysis capability that retains and improves upon RELAP5's capability and extends the analysis capability for all reactor system simulation scenarios. RELAP-7 utilizes a single phase and a novel seven-equation two-phase flow models as described in the RELAP-7 Theory Manual (INL/EXT-14-31366). The basic equation systems are hyperbolic, which generally require some type of stabilization (or artificial viscosity) to capture nonlinear discontinuities and to suppress advection-caused oscillations. This report documents one of the available options for this stabilization in RELAP-7 -- a new and novel approach known as the entropy viscosity method. Because the code is an ongoing development effort in which the physical sub models, numerics, and coding are evolving, so too must the specific details of the entropy viscosity stabilization method. Here the fundamentals of the method in their current state are presented.

  11. The Effect of Exercise on Salivary Viscosity

    PubMed Central

    Ligtenberg, Antoon J. M.; Liem, Erwin H. S.; Brand, Henk S.; Veerman, Enno C. I.

    2016-01-01

    A common experience after exercise is the presence of a thick and sticky saliva layer on the oral surfaces, which causes a feeling of a dry mouth. Since the salivary mucin MUC5B is responsible for the visco-elastic behavior of saliva, in the present study we explored the effect of exercise on both the salivary viscosity and the secretion of MUC5B in saliva. Twenty healthy dental students performed an aerobic exercise by cycling for 15 min on cycle-ergometers at a heart rate of 130–140 beats per minute. Saliva was collected at three time points: before exercise, immediately after exercise and after 30 min recovery. Salivary flow rate, viscosity, amylase activity, total protein, carbohydrate and MUC5B concentration were determined. Salivary flow rate, protein and amylase did not change significantly. Immediately after exercise, the salivary viscosity and carbohydrate concentration were significantly higher than at baseline and after 30 min recovery. Immediately after exercise, the MUC5B concentration was significantly higher than after 30 min recovery. It is concluded that the presence of thick saliva after exercise is at least partially due to an increased secretion of MUC5B. PMID:27854320

  12. Viscosity stratified fluids in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldati, Alfredo; Ahmadi, Somayeh; Roccon, Alessio; Zonta, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) is used to study the turbulent Poiseuille flow of two immiscible liquid layers inside a rectangular channel. A thin liquid layer (fluid 1) flows on top of a thick liquid layer (fluid 2), such that their thickness ratio is h1 /h2 = 1 / 9 . The two liquid layers have the same density but different viscosities (viscosity-stratified fluids). In particular, we consider three different values of the viscosity ratio λ =ν1 /ν2 : λ = 1 , λ = 0 . 875 and λ = 0 . 75 . Numerical Simulations are based on a Phase Field method to describe the interaction between the two liquid layers. Compared with the case of a single phase flow, the presence of a liquid-liquid interface produces a remarkable turbulence modulation inside the channel, since a significant proportion of the kinetic energy is subtracted from the mean flow and converted into work to deform the interface. This induces a strong turbulence reduction in the proximity of the interface and causes a substantial increase of the volume-flowrate. These effects become more pronounced with decreasing λ.

  13. Nonadiabatic bulk-surface oscillations in driven topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodrubetz, Michael; Fregoso, Benjamin M.; Moore, Joel E.

    2016-11-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work has suggested the tantalizing possibility of opening a topological gap upon driving the surface states of a three-dimensional strong topological insulator (TI) with circularly polarized light. With this motivation, we study the response of TIs to a driving field that couples to states near the surface. We unexpectedly find coherent oscillations between the surface and the bulk and trace their appearance to unavoidable resonances caused by photon absorption from the drive. We show how these resonant oscillations may be captured by the Demkov-Osherov model of multilevel Landau-Zener physics, leading to nontrivial consequences such as the loss of adiabaticity upon slow ramping of the amplitude. We numerically demonstrate that these oscillations are observable in the time-dependent Wigner distribution, which is directly measurable in time-resolved angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments. Our results apply to any system with surface states in the presence of a gapped bulk, and thus suggest experimental signatures of a generic surface-bulk coupling mechanism that is fundamental for proposals to engineer nontrivial states by periodic driving.

  14. Anisotropic Shear Viscosity of Photoaligned Liquid Crystal Confined in Submicrometer-to-Nanometer-Scale Gap Widths Revealed with Simultaneously Measured Molecular Orientation.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Shintaro; Imura, Yuuichi; Fukuzawa, Kenji; Zhang, Hedong

    2015-10-20

    In the context of the use of liquid crystals (LCs) as lubricants and lubricant additives, this study investigates the anisotropic shear viscosity of LCs confined in nanometer-sized gap widths subject to both shearing and photoalignment. The photoalignment is achieved using anisotropically dimerized polyvinyl cinnamate (PVCi) films coated on substrates. We simultaneously measure the viscosity and order parameter of a liquid crystal (4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl) confined and sheared in the gap range of 500 nm down to a few nm. We achieve this simultaneous measurement using an original method that combines a highly sensitive viscosity measurement and a sensitive birefringence measurement. When the LC is sheared in the same direction as the photoalignment (parallel shearing), the order parameter, which is around 0.3 in the bulk state, increases up to around 0.4 at a gap width of less than 50 nm and the viscosity is smaller than half the bulk viscosity. We consider that this increase in the order parameter is due to the highly ordered photoaligned LC layer near the PVCi film, and the viscosity decrease is due to shear thinning of this layer enhanced by both confinement and molecular ordering. In addition, we observe a gradual decrease in viscosity starting at a gap of less than around 300 nm in the parallel shearing. Based on the apparent slip model, we show that the LC layer near the PVCi film can also cause this gradual viscosity decrease. In contrast, when the LC is sheared in the direction perpendicular to the photoalignment direction (perpendicular shearing), the viscosity increases as the gap decreases. We speculate that this is due to the rotational motion of the LC molecules caused by the competing effect of shear alignment and photoalignment. We believe our findings can significantly contribute to a better understanding of the confined LCs utilized for lubrication.

  15. Composition and Temperature Dependence of Shear Viscosity of Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    model for viscosity of liquids , we feel that this is a very good correlation between molecular structure and viscosity, and it appears then that the...B. Thole, "The Viscosity of Liquids ," Longmans, Green and Co., London (1914). 15. W. R. Gambill, Chem. Eng, 66, 151 (1959) 16. P. K. Katti and M. M

  16. Reference Correlation for the Viscosity of Ethane

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Eckhard; Span, Roland; Herrmann, Sebastian

    2015-12-15

    A new representation of the viscosity for the fluid phase of ethane includes a zero-density correlation and a contribution for the critical enhancement, initially both developed separately, but based on experimental data. The higher-density contributions are correlated as a function of the reduced density δ = ρ/ρ{sub c} and of the reciprocal reduced temperature τ = T{sub c}/T (ρ{sub c}—critical density and T{sub c}—critical temperature). The final formulation contains 14 coefficients obtained using a state-of-the-art linear optimization algorithm. The evaluation and choice of the selected primary data sets is reviewed, in particular with respect to the assessment used in earlier viscosity correlations. The new viscosity surface correlation makes use of the reference equation of state for the thermodynamic properties of ethane by Bücker and Wagner [J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 35, 205 (2006)] and is valid in the fluid region from the melting line to temperatures of 675 K and pressures of 100 MPa. The viscosity in the limit of zero density is described with an expanded uncertainty of 0.5% (coverage factor k = 2) for temperatures 290 < T/K < 625, increasing to 1.0% at temperatures down to 212 K. The uncertainty of the correlated values is 1.5% in the range 290 < T/K < 430 at pressures up to 30 MPa on the basis of recent measurements judged to be very reliable as well as 4.0% and 6.0% in further regions. The uncertainty in the near-critical region (1.001 < 1/τ < 1.010 and 0.8 < δ < 1.2) increases with decreasing temperature up to 3.0% considering the available reliable data. Tables of the viscosity calculated from the correlation are listed in an appendix for the single-phase region, for the vapor–liquid phase boundary, and for the near-critical region.

  17. Ocular disease and driving.

    PubMed

    Wood, Joanne M; Black, Alex A

    2016-09-01

    As the driving population ages, the number of drivers with visual impairment resulting from ocular disease will increase given the age-related prevalence of ocular disease. The increase in visual impairment in the driving population has a number of implications for driving outcomes. This review summarises current research regarding the impact of common ocular diseases on driving ability and safety, with particular focus on cataract, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, hemianopia and diabetic retinopathy. The evidence considered includes self-reported driving outcomes, driving performance (on-road and simulator-based) and various motor vehicle crash indices. Collectively, this review demonstrates that driving ability and safety are negatively affected by ocular disease; however, further research is needed in this area. Older drivers with ocular disease need to be aware of the negative consequences of their ocular condition and in the case where treatment options are available, encouraged to seek these earlier for optimum driving safety and quality of life benefits.

  18. Dementia and driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000028.htm Dementia and driving To use the sharing features on this page, ... their independence is being taken away. Signs That Driving May No Longer be Safe People with signs ...

  19. Safe driving for teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/pubmed/25837240 . Simons-Morton B, Ouimet MC. Parent involvement in novice teen driving: a review of the ... nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16788109 . Simons-Morton B. Parent involvement in novice teen driving: rationale, evidence of effects, ...

  20. Probing bulk viscous matter-dominated models with gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Montiel, A.; Bretón, N. E-mail: nora@fis.cinvestav.mx

    2011-08-01

    In this paper we extend the range of consistency of a constant bulk viscosity model to redshifts up to z ∼ 8.1. In this model the dark sector of the cosmic substratum is a viscous fluid with pressure p = −ζθ, where θ is the fluid-expansion scalar and ζ is the coefficient of bulk viscosity. Using the sample of 59 high-redshift GRBs reported by Wei (2010), we calibrate GRBs at low redshifts with the Union 2 sample of SNe Ia, thus avoiding the circularity problem. Testing the constant bulk viscosity model with GRBs we found the best fit for the viscosity parameter ζ-tilde in the range 0 < ζ-tilde < 3, so that it be consistent with previous probes; we also determined the deceleration parameter q{sub 0} and the redshift of transition to accelerated expansion. Besides, we present an updated analysis of the model with CMB5-year data and CMB7-year data, as well as with the baryon acoustic peak BAO. From the statistics with CMB it turns out that the model does not describe in a feasible way to such a far epoch of recombination of the universe, but is in very good concordance for epochs as far as z ∼ 8.1 till present.

  1. Gear bearing drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Brian (Inventor); Mavroidis, Constantinos (Inventor); Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gear bearing drive provides a compact mechanism that operates as an actuator providing torque and as a joint providing support. The drive includes a gear arrangement integrating an external rotor DC motor within a sun gear. Locking surfaces maintain the components of the drive in alignment and provide support for axial loads and moments. The gear bearing drive has a variety of applications, including as a joint in robotic arms and prosthetic limbs.

  2. Sequential Dependencies in Driving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doshi, Anup; Tran, Cuong; Wilder, Matthew H.; Mozer, Michael C.; Trivedi, Mohan M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of recent experience on current behavior has been studied extensively in simple laboratory tasks. We explore the nature of sequential effects in the more naturalistic setting of automobile driving. Driving is a safety-critical task in which delayed response times may have severe consequences. Using a realistic driving simulator, we find…

  3. Magnetic drive coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Edward L. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The driving and driven members of a magnetic drive are separated by en enlarged gap to provide clearance for a conduit or other member. Flux pins in the gap maintain the torque transmitting capability of the drive. The spacing between two of the flux pins is increased to provide space for the conduit.

  4. Grieving while Driving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblatt, Paul C.

    2004-01-01

    Secondary analysis of data from 84 people in 2 interview studies shows that some bereaved people grieve actively while driving. The grief can be intense, even years after a death. Grief while driving may erupt spontaneously or be set off by a wide range of reminders. Some bereaved people seem to save their grieving for times when they drive,…

  5. Viscosity and stability of ultra-high internal phase CO2-in-water foams stabilized with surfactants and nanoparticles with or without polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zheng; Worthen, Andrew; Qajar, Ali; Robert, Isaiah; Bryant, Steven L; Huh, Chun; Prodanović, Maša; Johnston, Keith P

    2016-01-01

    To date, relatively few examples of ultra-high internal phase supercritical CO2-in-water foams (also referred to as macroemulsions) have been observed, despite interest in applications including "waterless" hydraulic fracturing in energy production. The viscosities and stabilities of foams up to 0.98 CO2 volume fraction were investigated in terms of foam bubble size, interfacial tension, and bulk and surface viscosity. The foams were stabilized with laurylamidopropyl betaine (LAPB) surfactant and silica nanoparticles (NPs), with and without partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM). For foams stabilized with mixture of LAPB and NPs, fine ∼70 μm bubbles and high viscosities on the order of 100 cP at>0.90 internal phase fraction were stabilized for hours to days. The surfactant reduces interfacial tension, and thus facilitates bubble generation and decreases the capillary pressure to reduce the drainage rate of the lamella. The LAPB, which is in the cationic protonated form, also attracts anionic NPs (and anionic HPAM in systems containing polymer) to the interface. The adsorbed NPs at the interface are shown to slow down Ostwald ripening (with or without polymer added) and increase foam stability. In systems with added HPAM, the increase in the bulk and surface viscosity of the aqueous phase further decreases the lamella drainage rate and inhibits coalescence of foams. Thus, the added polymer increases the foam viscosity by threefold. Scaling law analysis shows the viscosity of 0.90 volume fraction foams is inversely proportional to the bubble size.

  6. The role of viscosity in TATB hot spot ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Laurence E.; Zepeda-Ruis, Luis; Howard, W. Michael; Najjar, Fady; Reaugh, John E.

    2012-03-01

    The role of dissipative effects, such as viscosity, in the ignition of high explosive pores is investigated using a coupled chemical, thermal, and hydrodynamic model. Chemical reactions are tracked with the Cheetah thermochemical code coupled to the ALE3D hydrodynamic code. We perform molecular dynamics simulations to determine the viscosity of liquid TATB. We also analyze shock wave experiments to obtain an estimate for the shock viscosity of TATB. Using the lower bound liquid-like viscosities, we find that the pore collapse is hydrodynamic in nature. Using the upper bound viscosity from shock wave experiments, we find that the pore collapse is closest to the viscous limit.

  7. Reduction of viscosity in suspension of swimming bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Aranson, I. S.; Sokolov, A.; Chen, L.; Jin, Q.; Materials Science Division

    2009-09-29

    Measurements of the shear viscosity in suspensions of swimming Bacillus subtilis in free-standing liquid films have revealed that the viscosity can decrease by up to a factor of 7 compared to the viscosity of the same liquid without bacteria or with nonmotile bacteria. The reduction in viscosity is observed in two complementary experiments: one studying the decay of a large vortex induced by a moving probe and another measuring the viscous torque on a rotating magnetic particle immersed in the film. The viscosity depends on the concentration and swimming speed of the bacteria.

  8. Reduction of viscosity in suspension of swimming bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, A.; Aranson, I. S.; Materials Science Division; Illinois Inst. of Tech.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of the shear viscosity in suspensions of swimming Bacillus subtilis in free-standing liquid films have revealed that the viscosity can decrease by up to a factor of 7 compared to the viscosity of the same liquid without bacteria or with nonmotile bacteria. The reduction in viscosity is observed in two complementary experiments: one studying the decay of a large vortex induced by a moving probe and another measuring the viscous torque on a rotating magnetic particle immersed in the film. The viscosity depends on the concentration and swimming speed of the bacteria.

  9. The Role of Viscosity in TATB Hot Spot Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L E; Zepeda-Ruis, L; Howard, W M; Najjar, F; Reaugh, J E

    2011-08-02

    The role of dissipative effects, such as viscosity, in the ignition of high explosive pores is investigated using a coupled chemical, thermal, and hydrodynamic model. Chemical reactions are tracked with the Cheetah thermochemical code coupled to the ALE3D hydrodynamic code. We perform molecular dynamics simulations to determine the viscosity of liquid TATB. We also analyze shock wave experiments to obtain an estimate for the shock viscosity of TATB. Using the lower bound liquid-like viscosities, we find that the pore collapse is hydrodynamic in nature. Using the upper bound viscosity from shock wave experiments, we find that the pore collapse is closest to the viscous limit.

  10. Microrheology with Optical Tweezers: Measuring the relative viscosity of solutions ‘at a glance'

    PubMed Central

    Tassieri, Manlio; Giudice, Francesco Del; Robertson, Emma J.; Jain, Neena; Fries, Bettina; Wilson, Rab; Glidle, Andrew; Greco, Francesco; Netti, Paolo Antonio; Maffettone, Pier Luca; Bicanic, Tihana; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    We present a straightforward method for measuring the relative viscosity of fluids via a simple graphical analysis of the normalised position autocorrelation function of an optically trapped bead, without the need of embarking on laborious calculations. The advantages of the proposed microrheology method are evident when it is adopted for measurements of materials whose availability is limited, such as those involved in biological studies. The method has been validated by direct comparison with conventional bulk rheology methods, and has been applied both to characterise synthetic linear polyelectrolytes solutions and to study biomedical samples. PMID:25743468

  11. "Coulombic Viscosity" In Granular Materials: Planetary and Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    very brief (30-60 sec) damping period, motion of the grains was observed to be retarded by the electrostatic interactions. The fact that the grains almost instantly formed aggregates was evidence that their ballistic motions had been constrained and redirected by the dipole-dipole interactions that led to filamentary aggregate development. Undoubtedly, the "Coulombic viscosity" of the cloud assisted in damping grain motion so rapidly. The electrostatically-induced grain-cloud viscosity or drag exerted on grain motion, is a complex function of three major parameters: charge magnitude, charge sign, and mean intergranular distance. The above experiments illustrate one particular type of granular behavior. The discussion here will therefore be restricted to drag relationships: (a) between grains that are naturally charged triboelectrically and thus exhibit dipole-dipole attractions between one another even if there are slight net charges present (which can be overwhelmed by dipole coupling at short distances), and (b) between grains that are densely spaced where the intergranular distance varies between zero and some value (usually tens or hundreds of grain diameters) that permits each grain to detect the dipole moment of another grain -- the distance is not so great that other grains appears as neutral electrical "singularities. I. Aeolian transport: During motion of grains in a saltation cloud (on Earth, Mars, or Venus), triboelectric charging must occur as a result of multiple grain contacts, and by friction with the entraining air. A situation might develop that is similar to the one described above in the attrition device: grain motion becoming significantly retarded (reduced flux) as grains find it increasingly difficult to either separate from the surface, or to pass one another without Coulombic retarding forces. A "Coulombic drag" will exist at flux initiation and increase with time to work in direct opposition to the aerodynamic drag that drives the grain motion

  12. Predicted Optimum Composition for the Glass-Forming Ability of Bulk Amorphous Alloys: Application to Cu-Zr-Al.

    PubMed

    An, Qi; Samwer, Konrad; Goddard, William A; Johnson, William L; Jaramillo-Botero, Andres; Garret, Glenn; Demetriou, Marios D

    2012-11-01

    Metallic glasses have been established to have unique properties such as ductility, toughness, and soft magnetism with promising engineering applications. However, the glass-forming ability (GFA) has not been sufficient to synthesize the bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) required for many engineering applications. Attempts to develop the understanding of the GFA required to predict the optimum alloys have not yet been proven successful. We develop here a computational model based on molecular dynamics simulations that explains the dramatic change of GFA with alloying small amounts of Al into Cu-Zr. We find that the high GFA to form BMGs depends on a combination of three factors, (a) a low thermodynamic driving force for crystallization, (b) a high melt viscosity, and (c) large ratios of icosahedral structures in the liquid phase. These computational methods to predict these factors that suppress formation of crystal nuclei and slow the dynamic motions in the liquids are practical for in silico prediction of new alloys with optimal GFA.

  13. Substrate viscosity enhances correlation in epithelial sheet movement.

    PubMed

    Murrell, Michael; Kamm, Roger; Matsudaira, Paul

    2011-07-20

    The movement of the epithelium plays vital roles in the development and renewal of complex tissues, from the separation of tissues in the early embryo, to turnover in the homeostasis of the gastrointestinal mucosa. Yet, despite its importance, a clear interpretation of the mechanism for collective motion in epithelial sheets remains elusive. This interpretation is prohibited by the lack of understanding of the relationship between motion and cell-cell contact, and their mediation by the mechanical properties of the underlying substrate. To better mimic physiological substrates that have inherent viscosity, we probe this relationship using polydimethylsiloxane, a substrate whose mechanical properties can be tuned from predominantly elastic to viscous by altering its cross-linking content. We therefore characterize the comparative spatiotemporal correlations in cell velocity during the movement of an epithelial monolayer as a function of the viscoelasticity of the substrate. Our results show that high correlation in cell velocity is achieved when the substrate G''(ω) is ~0.4 × G'(ω). This correlation is driven by a balance between cell-cell contact and the adhesion and contraction of the extracellular matrix. For G'(ω) > G'(ω), this balance shifts, and contraction of the tissue drives the substrate to flow, further elevating the correlation in movement.

  14. Imaging tumor microscopic viscosity in vivo using molecular rotors

    PubMed Central

    Shimolina, Lyubov’ E.; Izquierdo, Maria Angeles; López-Duarte, Ismael; Bull, James A.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Klapshina, Larisa G.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Kuimova, Marina K.

    2017-01-01

    The microscopic viscosity plays an essential role in cellular biophysics by controlling the rates of diffusion and bimolecular reactions within the cell interior. While several approaches have emerged that have allowed the measurement of viscosity and diffusion on a single cell level in vitro, the in vivo viscosity monitoring has not yet been realized. Here we report the use of fluorescent molecular rotors in combination with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) to image microscopic viscosity in vivo, both on a single cell level and in connecting tissues of subcutaneous tumors in mice. We find that viscosities recorded from single tumor cells in vivo correlate well with the in vitro values from the same cancer cell line. Importantly, our new method allows both imaging and dynamic monitoring of viscosity changes in real time in live animals and thus it is particularly suitable for diagnostics and monitoring of the progress of treatments that might be accompanied by changes in microscopic viscosity. PMID:28134273

  15. Electron treatment of wood pulp for the viscose process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanik, T. M.; Ewing, D. E.; Whitehouse, R.

    2000-03-01

    Electron processing is currently being evaluated by several viscose producers for integration into their process. The viscose industry converts dissolving wood pulp into products such as staple fibre, filament, cord, film, packaging, and non-edible sausage casings. These materials are used in the clothing, drapery, hygiene, automobile, food, and packaging industries. Viscose producers are facing increasingly high production costs and stringent environmental regulations that have forced some plants to close. Electron treatment of wood pulp can significantly reduce the amounts of chemicals used for producing viscose and the production of hazardous pollutants. Acsion Industries has worked with companies worldwide to demonstrate the benefits of using electron treated pulp for producing viscose (rayon). This paper describes the viscose process, the benefits of using electron treatment in the viscose process, and Acsion's efforts in developing this technology.

  16. "Coulombic Viscosity" In Granular Materials: Planetary and Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    very brief (30-60 sec) damping period, motion of the grains was observed to be retarded by the electrostatic interactions. The fact that the grains almost instantly formed aggregates was evidence that their ballistic motions had been constrained and redirected by the dipole-dipole interactions that led to filamentary aggregate development. Undoubtedly, the "Coulombic viscosity" of the cloud assisted in damping grain motion so rapidly. The electrostatically-induced grain-cloud viscosity or drag exerted on grain motion, is a complex function of three major parameters: charge magnitude, charge sign, and mean intergranular distance. The above experiments illustrate one particular type of granular behavior. The discussion here will therefore be restricted to drag relationships: (a) between grains that are naturally charged triboelectrically and thus exhibit dipole-dipole attractions between one another even if there are slight net charges present (which can be overwhelmed by dipole coupling at short distances), and (b) between grains that are densely spaced where the intergranular distance varies between zero and some value (usually tens or hundreds of grain diameters) that permits each grain to detect the dipole moment of another grain -- the distance is not so great that other grains appears as neutral electrical "singularities. I. Aeolian transport: During motion of grains in a saltation cloud (on Earth, Mars, or Venus), triboelectric charging must occur as a result of multiple grain contacts, and by friction with the entraining air. A situation might develop that is similar to the one described above in the attrition device: grain motion becoming significantly retarded (reduced flux) as grains find it increasingly difficult to either separate from the surface, or to pass one another without Coulombic retarding forces. A "Coulombic drag" will exist at flux initiation and increase with time to work in direct opposition to the aerodynamic drag that drives the grain motion

  17. Syncope and Driving.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Juan C; Morillo, Carlos A

    2015-08-01

    The occurrence of syncope while driving has obvious implications for personal and public safety. Neurally mediated syncope is the most common type of syncope in general and, thereby, also while driving. The presence of structural heart disease (reduced ejection fraction, previous myocardial infarction, significant congenital heart disease) potentially leads to high risk and should determine driving restrictions pending clarification of underlying heart disease and etiology of syncope. The clinical approach to syncope evaluation and recommendations for driving should not differ, whether or not the syncopal spell occurred while driving.

  18. New Formulation for the Viscosity of Propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eckhard; Herrmann, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    A new viscosity formulation for propane, using the reference equation of state for its thermodynamic properties by Lemmon et al. [J. Chem. Eng. Data 54, 3141 (2009)] and valid in the fluid region from the triple-point temperature to 650 K and pressures up to 100 MPa, is presented. At the beginning, a zero-density contribution and one for the critical enhancement, each based on the experimental data, were independently generated in parts. The higher-density contributions are correlated as a function of the reciprocal reduced temperature τ = Tc/T and of the reduced density δ = ρ/ρc (Tc—critical temperature, ρc—critical density). The final formulation includes 17 coefficients inferred by applying a state-of-the-art linear optimization algorithm. The evaluation and choice of the primary data sets are detailed due to its importance. The viscosity at low pressures p ≤ 0.2 MPa is represented with an expanded uncertainty of 0.5% (coverage factor k = 2) for temperatures 273 ≤ T/K ≤ 625. The expanded uncertainty in the vapor phase at subcritical temperatures T ≥ 273 K as well as in the supercritical thermodynamic region T ≤ 423 K at pressures p ≤ 30 MPa is assumed to be 1.5%. In the near-critical region (1.001 < 1/τ < 1.010 and 0.8 < δ < 1.2), the expanded uncertainty increases with decreasing temperature up to 3.0%. It is further increased to 4.0% in regions of less reliable primary data sets and to 6.0% in ranges in which no primary data are available but the equation of state is valid. Tables of viscosity computed for the new formulation are given in an Appendix for the single-phase region, for the vapor-liquid phase boundary, and for the near-critical region.

  19. Viscosity in the edge of tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacey, W. M.

    1993-05-01

    A fluid representation of viscosity has been incorporated into a set of fluid equations that are maximally ordered in the 'short radial gradient scale length' (srgsl) ordering that is appropriate for the edge of tokamak plasmas. The srgsl ordering raises viscous drifts and other viscous terms to leading order and fundamentally alters the character of the fluid equations. A leasing order viscous drift is identified. Viscous-driven radial particle and energy fluxes in the scrape-off layer and divertor channel are estimated to have an order unity effect in reducing radial peaking of energy fluxes transported along the field lines to divertor collector plates.

  20. Viscosity in the edge of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, W.M.

    1993-05-01

    A fluid representation of viscosity has been incorporated into a set of fluid equations that are maximally ordered in the ``short-radial-gradient-scale-length`` (srgsl) ordering that is appropriate for the edge of tokamak plasmas. The srgsl ordering raises viscous drifts and other viscous terms to leading order and fundamentally alters the character of the fluid equations. A leasing order viscous drift is identified. Viscous-driven radial particle and energy fluxes in the scrape-off layer and divertor channel are estimated to have an order unity effect in reducing radial peaking of energy fluxes transported along the field lines to divertor collector plates.

  1. Collective excitations and viscosity in liquid Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ropo, Matti; Akola, Jaakko; Jones, R. O.

    2016-11-01

    The analysis of extensive density functional/molecular dynamics simulations (over 500 atoms, up to 100 ps) of liquid bismuth at four temperatures between 573 K and 1023 K has provided details of the dynamical structure factors, the dispersion of longitudinal and transverse collective modes, and related properties (power spectrum, viscosity, and sound velocity). Agreement with available inelastic x-ray and neutron scattering data and with previous simulations is generally very good. The results show that density functional/molecular dynamics simulations can give dynamical information of good quality without the use of fitting functions, even at long wavelengths.

  2. Viscosity of many-component glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Arrigoni, Benjamin M.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2009-06-01

    The effect of composition on the viscosity of multicomponent glasses was expressed as a function of temperature and composition for three composition regions containing various subsets of Al2O3, B2O3, Bi2O3, CaO, Cr2O3, F, Fe2O3, K2O, Li2O, MgO, MnO, Na2O, NiO, P2O5, SiO2, UO2, and ZrO2. Limits of applicability of the composition models are discussed.

  3. A transport equation for eddy viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.; Yang, Z.

    1992-01-01

    A transport equation for eddy viscosity is proposed for wall bounded turbulent flows. The proposed model reduces to a quasi-homogeneous form far from surfaces. Near to a surface, the nonhomogeneous effect of the wall is modeled by an elliptic relaxation model. All the model terms are expressed in local variables and are coordinate independent; the model is intended to be used in complex flows. Turbulent channel flow and turbulent boundary layer flows with/without pressure gradient are calculated using the present model. Comparisons between model calculations and direct numerical simulation or experimental data show good agreement.

  4. Combustion of bulk titanium in oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, A. F.; Moulder, J. C.; Runyan, C. C.

    1975-01-01

    The combustion of bulk titanium in one atmosphere oxygen is studied using laser ignition and several analytical techniques. These were high-speed color cinematography, time and space resolved spectra in the visible region, metallography (including SEM) of specimens quenched in argon gas, X-ray and chemical product analyses, and a new optical technique, the Hilbert transform method. The cinematographic application of this technique for visualizing phase objects in the combustion zone is described. The results indicate an initial vapor phase reaction immediately adjacent to the molten surface but as the oxygen uptake progresses the evaporation approaches the point of congruency and a much reduced evaporation rate. This and the accumulation of the various soluble oxides soon drive the reaction zone below the surface where gas formation causes boiling and ejection of particles. The buildup of rutile cuts off the oxygen supply and the reaction ceases.

  5. Drill drive mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Dressel, Michael O.

    1979-01-01

    A drill drive mechanism is especially adapted to provide both rotational drive and axial feed for a drill of substantial diameter such as may be used for drilling holes for roof bolts in mine shafts. The drill shaft is made with a helical pattern of scroll-like projections on its surface for removal of cuttings. The drill drive mechanism includes a plurality of sprockets carrying two chains of drive links which are arranged to interlock around the drill shaft with each drive link having depressions which mate with the scroll-like projections. As the chain links move upwardly or downwardly the surfaces of the depressions in the links mate with the scroll projections to move the shaft axially. Tangs on the drive links mate with notch surfaces between scroll projections to provide a means for rotating the shaft. Projections on the drive links mate together at the center to hold the drive links tightly around the drill shaft. The entire chain drive mechanism is rotated around the drill shaft axis by means of a hydraulic motor and gear drive to cause rotation of the drill shaft. This gear drive also connects with a differential gearset which is interconnected with a second gear. A second motor is connected to the spider shaft of the differential gearset to produce differential movement (speeds) at the output gears of the differential gearset. This differential in speed is utilized to drive said second gear at a speed different from the speed of said gear drive, this speed differential being utilized to drive said sprockets for axial movement of said drill shaft.

  6. Evaluation of cervical marginal and internal adaptation using newer bulk fill composites: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Rolly Shrivastav; Hiremath, Hemlatha; Agarwal, Jatin; Garg, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the cervical marginal and internal adaptation of posterior bulk fill resin composites of different viscosities, before and after thermo-cycling (TMC). Materials and Methods: Eighty box-only class II cavities were prepared in 40 extracted human premolars with the distal proximal box beneath the enamel-cementum junction (CEJ). The teeth in the experimental groups were restored with bulk fill resin composite restorations (Gr. I- Sonic Fill, Gr. II- SDR, Gr. III- Tetric N Ceram Bulk Fill or a conventional composite designed for 2-mm increments (Gr. IV- Tetric N Flow along with Tetric N Ceram). Before and after thermal cycling, the gap-free marginal length was analyzed using SEM of epoxy resin replicas. After thermal cycling, specimens were cut longitudinally in order to investigate internal dentine adaptation by epoxy replicas under SEM (500 × magnification). Results: Statistical analysis was performed using the ANOVA and Tukey Post Hoc tests (P < 0.05). In enamel, high percentages of gap-free margins were initially identified for all the groups, which declined after thermal cycling. However, no significant differences were identified among any of the groups (P > 0.05). In dentine, bulk fill groups performed at par with the incremental placement; for both marginal and internal adaptation (P < 0.05), for all materials except Tetric N Ceram Bulk Fill. Conclusions: Viscosity of the bulk fill restorative material influenced the proportion of gap-free marginal interface and the internal adaptation in dentin. PMID:25657529

  7. Glymphatic solute transport does not require bulk flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari, Mahdi; de Zélicourt, Diane; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2016-12-01

    Observations of fast transport of fluorescent tracers in mouse brains have led to the hypothesis of bulk water flow directed from arterial to venous paravascular spaces (PVS) through the cortical interstitium. At the same time, there is evidence for interstitial solute transport by diffusion rather than by directed bulk fluid motion. It has been shown that the two views may be consolidated by intracellular water flow through astrocyte networks combined with mainly diffusive extracellular transport of solutes. This requires the presence of a driving force that has not been determined to date, but for which arterial pulsation has been suggested as the origin. Here we show that arterial pulsation caused by pulse wave propagation is an unlikely origin of this hypothetical driving force. However, we further show that such pulsation may still lead to fast para-arterial solute transport through dispersion, that is, through the combined effect of local mixing and diffusion in the para-arterial space.

  8. Glymphatic solute transport does not require bulk flow

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Mahdi; de Zélicourt, Diane; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2016-01-01

    Observations of fast transport of fluorescent tracers in mouse brains have led to the hypothesis of bulk water flow directed from arterial to venous paravascular spaces (PVS) through the cortical interstitium. At the same time, there is evidence for interstitial solute transport by diffusion rather than by directed bulk fluid motion. It has been shown that the two views may be consolidated by intracellular water flow through astrocyte networks combined with mainly diffusive extracellular transport of solutes. This requires the presence of a driving force that has not been determined to date, but for which arterial pulsation has been suggested as the origin. Here we show that arterial pulsation caused by pulse wave propagation is an unlikely origin of this hypothetical driving force. However, we further show that such pulsation may still lead to fast para-arterial solute transport through dispersion, that is, through the combined effect of local mixing and diffusion in the para-arterial space. PMID:27929105

  9. Predicting human blood viscosity in silico

    SciTech Connect

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Pan, Wenxiao; Caswell, Bruce; Gompper, Gerhard; Karniadakis, George E.

    2011-07-05

    Cellular suspensions such as blood are a part of living organisms and their rheological and flow characteristics determine and affect majority of vital functions. The rheological and flow properties of cell suspensions are determined by collective dynamics of cells, their structure or arrangement, cell properties and interactions. We study these relations for blood in silico using a mesoscopic particle-based method and two different models (multi-scale/low-dimensional) of red blood cells. The models yield accurate quantitative predictions of the dependence of blood viscosity on shear rate and hematocrit. We explicitly model cell aggregation interactions and demonstrate the formation of reversible rouleaux structures resulting in a tremendous increase of blood viscosity at low shear rates and yield stress, in agreement with experiments. The non-Newtonian behavior of such cell suspensions (e.g., shear thinning, yield stress) is analyzed and related to the suspension’s microstructure, deformation and dynamics of single cells. We provide the flrst quantitative estimates of normal stress differences and magnitude of aggregation forces in blood. Finally, the flexibility of the cell models allows them to be employed for quantitative analysis of a much wider class of complex fluids including cell, capsule, and vesicle suspensions.

  10. Methods of Viscosity Measurements in Sealed Ampoules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    1999-01-01

    Viscosity of semiconductor and metallic melts is usually measured by oscillating cup method. This method utilizes the melts contained in vacuum sealed silica ampoules, thus the problems related to volatility, contamination, and high temperature and pressure can be alleviated. In a typical design, the time required for a single measurement is of the order of one hour. In order to reduce this time to a minute range, a high resolution (0.05 arc.sec) angular detection system is implemented in our design of the viscometer. Furthermore, an electromagnet generating a rotational magnetic field (RMF) is incorporated into the apparatus. This magnetic field can be used to remotely and non intrusively measure the electrical conductivity of the melt. It can also be used to induce a well controlled rotational flow in the system. The transient behavior of this flow can potentially yield the viscosity of the fluid. Based on RMF implementation, two novel viscometry methods are proposed in this work: a) the transient torque method, b) the resonance method. A unified theoretical approach to the three methods (oscillating cup, transient torque, and resonance) is presented along with the initial test results of the constructed apparatus. Advantages of each of the method are discussed.

  11. Soy protein isolate molecular level contributions to bulk adhesive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Jeanne Norton

    Increasing environmental awareness and the recognized health hazards of formaldehyde-based resins has prompted a strong demand for environmentally-responsible adhesives for wood composites. Soy protein-based adhesives have been shown to be commercially viable with 90-day shelf stability and composite physical properties comparable to those of commercial formaldehyde-based particleboards. The main research focus is to isolate and characterize the molecular level features in soy protein isolate responsible for providing mechanical properties, storage stability, and water resistance during adhesive formulation, processing, and wood composite fabrication. Commercial composite board will be reviewed to enhance our understanding of the individual components and processes required for particleboard production. The levels of protein structure will be defined and an overview of current bio-based technology will be presented. In the process, the logic for utilizing soy protein as a sole binder in the adhesive will be reinforced. Variables such as adhesive components, pH, divalent ions, blend aging, protein molecular weight, formulation solids content, and soy protein functionalization will relate the bulk properties of soy protein adhesives to the molecular configuration of the soybean protein. This work has demonstrated that when intermolecular beta-sheet interactions and protein long-range order is disrupted, viscosity and mechanical properties decrease. Storage stability can be maintained through the stabilization of intermolecular beta-sheet interactions. When molecular weight is reduced through enzymatic digestion, long-range order is disrupted and viscosity and mechanical properties decrease accordingly. Processibility and physical properties must be balanced to increase solids while maintaining low viscosity, desirable mechanical properties, and adequate storage stability. The structure of the soybean protein must be related to the particleboard bulk mechanical

  12. VISCOSITY IN PLANETARY RINGS WITH SPINNING SELF-GRAVITATING PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, Yuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji; Daisaka, Hiroshi

    2012-05-15

    Using local N-body simulation, we examine viscosity in self-gravitating planetary rings. We investigate the dependence of viscosity on various parameters in detail, including the effects of particle surface friction. In the case of self-gravitating rings with low optical depth, viscosity is determined by particle random velocity. Inclusion of surface friction slightly reduces both random velocity and viscosity when particle random velocity is determined by inelastic collisions, while surface friction slightly increases viscosity when gravitational encounters play a major role in particle velocity evolution, so that viscous heating balances with increased energy dissipation at collisions due to surface friction. We find that including surface friction changes viscosity in dilute rings up to a factor of about two. In the case of self-gravitating dense rings, viscosity is significantly increased due to the effects of gravitational wakes, and we find that varying restitution coefficients also change viscosity in such dense rings by a factor of about two. We confirm that our numerical results for viscosity in dense rings with gravitational wakes can be well approximated by a semianalytic expression that is consistent with a previously obtained formula. However, we find that this formula seems to overestimate viscosity in dense rings far from the central planet, where temporary gravitational aggregates form. We derive semianalytic expressions that reproduce our numerical results well for the entire range of examined parameters.

  13. Importance of Mantle Viscosity in Interseismic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; He, J.; Hu, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The role of mantle viscosity in subduction earthquake cycles was postulated when the plate tectonics theory had just gained wide acceptance. The process was described using Elsasser's 1-D model for diffusion of stress from the subduction boundary to the plate interior. Main features of interseismic surface deformation predicted by this elegantly simple model were later verified by GPS observations following giant subduction earthquakes. However, and intriguingly, the vast majority of interseismic deformation models developed in the era of space geodesy assume an elastic Earth, incorrectly regarding interseismic deformation as a subdued mirror image of coseismic deformation. The reason is four-fold. (1) The 1-D model and subsequent 2-D viscoelastic models failed to recognize the role of rupture length in the strike direction and could not self-consistently explain deformation following medium and small earthquakes. (2) Based on global mantle viscosity models derived from glacial isostatic adjustment studies, the viscoelastic mantle should indeed behave elastically in earthquake cycles of a few hundred years. (3) The effect of viscous mantle deformation can often be equivalently described by deep fault creep in a purely elastic Earth. (4) The use of an elastic model provides convenience in inverting geodetic data to determine fault locking and creep. Here we use 3D finite element models to show that the main characteristics of surface deformation following subduction earthquakes of all sizes can be explained with a viscoelastic Earth in which the mantle wedge is less viscous than global upper-mantle average of 1020 - 1021 Pa s by one to two orders of magnitude. Following giant earthquakes, such as 1700 Cascadia, 1960 Chile, 1964 Alaska, 2004 Sumatra, and 2011 Japan, upper-plate land deformation undergoes phases of wholesale seaward motion, opposing motion of coastal and inland areas, and wholesale landward motion. The "speed" of the evolution scales inversely with

  14. Enhancing bulk superconductivity by engineering granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayoh, James; García García, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    The quest for higher critical temperatures is one of the main driving forces in the field of superconductivity. Recent theoretical and experimental results indicate that quantum size effects in isolated nano-grains can boost superconductivity with respect to the bulk limit. Here we explore the optimal range of parameters that lead to an enhancement of the critical temperature in a large three dimensional array of these superconducting nano-grains by combining mean-field, semiclassical and percolation techniques. We identify a broad range of parameters for which the array critical temperature, TcArray, can be up to a few times greater than the non-granular bulk limit, Tc 0. This prediction, valid only for conventional superconductors, takes into account an experimentally realistic distribution of grain sizes in the array, charging effects, dissipation by quasiparticles and limitations related to the proliferation of thermal fluctuations for sufficiently small grains. For small resistances we find the transition is percolation driven. Whereas at larger resistances the transition occurs above the percolation threshold due to phase fluctuations. JM acknowledes support from an EPSRC Ph.D studentship, AMG acknowledges support from EPSRC, grant No. EP/I004637/1, FCT, grant PTDC/FIS/111348/2009 and a Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant PIRG07-GA-2010-268172.

  15. Analytical Sensor Response Function of Viscosity Sensors Based on Layered Piezoelectric Thickness Shear Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benes, Ewald; Nowotny, Helmut; Braun, Stefan; Radel, Stefan; Gröschl, Martin

    Resonant piezoelectric sensors based on bulk acoustic wave (BAW) thickness shear resonators are promising for the inline measurement of fluid viscosity, e.g., in industrial processes. The sensor response function can be derived from the general rigorous transfer matrix description of one-dimensional layered structures consisting of piezoelectric and non-piezoelectric layers of arbitrary number. This model according to Nowotny et al. provides a complete analytical description of the electrical and mechanical behaviour of such structures with two electrodes and arbitrary acoustic termination impedances (Rig-1d-Model). We apply this model to derive the sensor response functions and the mechanical displacement curves of the following configurations appropriate for viscosity sensors: An AT cut quartz crystal plate in contact with vacuum at the backside plane and with the liquid under investigation at the front side plane (QL). An AT cut quartz crystal in contact with the liquid under investigation at both sides (LQL). It is shown that in the QL case the originally only heuristically introduced and well established sensor response function according to Kanasawa can be derived from the Rig-1d-Model by introducing minor approximations. Experimental results are presented for the LQL configuration using an N1000 viscosity reference oil as test fluid.

  16. Cylindrical Micro Ultrasonic Motor Utilizing Bulk Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Takeshi; Kurosawa, Minoru; Higuchi, Toshiro

    1999-05-01

    Ultrasonic motors are expected to be used as microactuatorsbecause of their high torque, low speed and simple construction. Wehave already reported cylindrical-shaped micro ultrasonic motors whichutilized a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin film. In this paper, wediscuss a micro ultrasonic motor composed of bulk PZT. The statortransducer had dimensions of 2.4 mm in diameter and 10 mmlength. The maximum revolution speed was 650 rpm and the maximumoutput torque was 0.22 mNm with the condition of 100 Vp-pinput voltage. The driving frequency was 85 kHz. The comparisonbetween the bulk PZT stator transducer and the previous PZT thin filmtransducer was considered. From this consideration, the e31piezoelectric factor was determined to be the main factor fordifferent output torques. The bulk PZT motor wasapplied to robot hands which was a simple procedure. A two axes hands application was successfully operated with a step motion and carried up to a 10 g load.

  17. Marihuana and driving.

    PubMed

    Moskowitz, H

    1985-08-01

    A review was performed of the marihuana and driving literature, both epidemiological and experimental. It was noted that epidemiological studies face considerable difficulties in obtaining estimates of risks involved for drivers utilizing marihuana due to the rapid decline in blood levels of tetrahydrocannabinol. On the other hand, experimental studies examining the relationship between administered marihuana dose and performance have identified many driving-related areas as exhibiting impairment. Areas impaired include coordination, tracking, perception, vigilance and performance in both driving simulators and on the road. Other behavioral areas of lesser importance for driving also exhibited evidence of impairment by marihuana. Areas for further research are suggested.

  18. New constitutive equation for the volume viscosity in fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Ash, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    The traditional volume viscosity, Stokes' hypothesis, and acoustical relaxation are reviewed. The lossy Navier-Stokes Equation is applied to periodic (acoustic) flow, and it is shown that the traditional volume viscosity leads to a result which contradicts that describing acoustical relaxation. It is demonstrated that the addition of a second volume viscosity term to the constitutive equation, to account for pressure relaxation, resolves the conflict, and leads to a direct correspondence between the volume viscosity parameters and the acoustical relaxation parameters. The representation of volume viscosity is formulated for the case of multiple relaxations, as occur in air. Finally, an application of the new constitutive equation to a simple convective compressible flow, namely a linearly accelerating flow, demonstrates the impact of volume viscosity upon the flow and the physical conditions for which it is important.

  19. Isomorphic Viscosity Equation of State for Binary Fluid Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Behnejad, Hassan; Cheshmpak, Hashem; Jamali, Asma

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of the simple binary mixtures in the vicinity of critical line has a universal character and can be mapped from pure components using the isomorphism hypothesis. Consequently, based upon the principle of isomorphism, critical phenomena and similarity between P-ρ-T and T-η-(viscosity)-P relationships, the viscosity model has been developed adopting two cubic, Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK) and Peng-Robinson (PR), equations of state (EsoS) for predicting the viscosity of the binary mixtures. This procedure has been applied to the methane-butane mixture and predicted its viscosity data. Reasonable agreement with the experimental data has been observed. In conclusion, we have shown that the isomorphism principle in conjunction with the mapped viscosity EoS suggests a reliable model for calculating the viscosity of mixture of hydrocarbons over a wide pressure range up to 35 MPa within the stated experimental errors.

  20. Dependence of neoclassical toroidal viscosity on the poloidal spectrum of applied nonaxisymmetric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, Nikolas C.; Park, Jong -Kyu; Paz-Soldan, Carloa; Lanctot, Matthew J.; Smith, Sterling P.; Burrell, K. H.

    2016-02-05

    This paper presents a single mode model that accurately predicts the coupling of applied nonaxisymmetric fields to the plasma response that induces neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) torque in DIII-D H-mode plasmas. The torque is measured and modeled to have a sinusoidal dependence on the relative phase of multiple nonaxisymmetric field sources, including a minimum in which large amounts of nonaxisymmetric drive is decoupled from the NTV torque. This corresponds to the coupling and decoupling of the applied field to a NTV-driving mode spectrum. Modeling using the perturbed equilibrium nonambipolar transport (PENT) code confirms an effective single mode coupling between the applied field and the resultant torque, despite its inherent nonlinearity. Lastly, the coupling to the NTV mode is shown to have a similar dependence on the relative phasing as that of the IPEC dominant mode, providing a physical basis for the efficacy of this linear metric in predicting error field correction optima in NTV dominated regimes.

  1. Non-invasive fluid density and viscosity measurement

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-05-01

    The noninvasively measurement of the density and viscosity of static or flowing fluids in a section of pipe such that the pipe performs as the sensing apparatus, is described. Measurement of a suitable structural vibration resonance frequency of the pipe and the width of this resonance permits the density and viscosity to be determined, respectively. The viscosity may also be measured by monitoring the decay in time of a vibration resonance in the pipe.

  2. Viscosity Difference Measurements for Normal and Para Liquid Hydrogen Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webeler, R.; Bedard, F.

    1961-01-01

    The absence of experimental data in the literature concerning a viscosity difference for normal and equilibrium liquid hydrogen may be attributed to the limited reproducibility of "oscillating disk" measurements in a liquid-hydrogen environment. Indeed, there is disagreement over the viscosity values for equilibrium liquid hydrogen even without proton spin considerations. Measurements presented here represent the first application of the piezoelectric alpha quartz torsional oscillator technique to liquid-hydrogen viscosity measurements.

  3. Effective Viscosity of a Periodic Suspension,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    6D-fl148 483 EFFECTIVE VISCOSITY OF A PERIODIC SUSPENSION(U) / STANFORD UNIV CA KC C NUNAN ET AL. 1984 UNCLASSIFIED F/G 28/4 ML lii1.5 i&121111=Ś...sin(2wSa’x)ykJ~kx)dAx = - A~x)(62) *~ .fsin2wSay),Vj~ky) dA (y) and we can show that ( Nunan , 1983) f sint.x)xPx2x3’ dA(x) = (-1)8- 1 4wb 2P+1 (63) bh...WeL 5, 168 Nunan , K. C., 1983 Effective Properties of Composite Media Containing Periodic Arrays of Spheres, Ph.D. thesis, Stanford University Zick, A

  4. Viscosity of glass-forming liquids

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, John C.; Yue, Yuanzheng; Ellison, Adam J.; Gupta, Prabhat K.; Allan, Douglas C.

    2009-01-01

    The low-temperature dynamics of ultraviscous liquids hold the key to understanding the nature of glass transition and relaxation phenomena, including the potential existence of an ideal thermodynamic glass transition. Unfortunately, existing viscosity models, such as the Vogel–Fulcher–Tammann (VFT) and Avramov–Milchev (AM) equations, exhibit systematic error when extrapolating to low temperatures. We present a model offering an improved description of the viscosity–temperature relationship for both inorganic and organic liquids using the same number of parameters as VFT and AM. The model has a clear physical foundation based on the temperature dependence of configurational entropy, and it offers an accurate prediction of low-temperature isokoms without any singularity at finite temperature. Our results cast doubt on the existence of a Kauzmann entropy catastrophe and associated ideal glass transition. PMID:19903878

  5. Critical dynamic viscosities in a binary mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Y.; Sawano, H.; Sato, H.; Miyake, Y.; Kono, R.; Yoshizaki, H.

    1989-03-01

    Ultrasonic shear measurements were conducted on polystyrene-cyclohexane solutions at 3, 51, and 252 kHz using the crystal fork and torsion methods. The real and imaginary parts of the complex shear modulus above the critical point are compared with modified theoretical expressions derived within the framework of the decoupled-mode theory. For this comparison, a background part was assumed to be described by a scaling form proposed by de Gennes. Numerical analysis of the data shows a satisfactory agreement between the theory and the experiments for ultrasonic shear data over a wide range of reduced frequency ω ... In addition, it is shown that the description of the simple viscosity dynamical scaling function is broken at a high-frequency limit.

  6. Role of liquid compressional viscosity in the dynamics of a sonoluminescing bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshaii, A.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.

    2004-07-01

    The well-known Rayleigh-Plesset (RP) equation is the basis of almost all hydrodynamical descriptions of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) . A major deficiency of the RP equation is that it accounts for viscosity of an incompressible liquid and compressibility, separately. By removing this approximation, a new modification of the RP equation is presented considering effect of compressional viscosity of the liquid. This modification leads to addition of a new viscous term to the traditional bubble boundary equation. Influence of this new term in the dynamics of a sonoluminescing bubble has numerically been studied considering effects of heat transfer at the bubble wall, nonequilibrium evaporation and condensation of water vapor, chemical reactions, and diffusion of the reactions products in the liquid. The results show that the new term has a significant damping role in the bubble motion at the end of collapse and during the rebounds, so that its consideration dramatically reduces amplitude of the afterbounces. Dependence of this new damping mechanism on the driving pressure amplitude and on the ambient radius has been investigated. The results indicate that the more intense the collapse, the more important the damping of the liquid compressional viscosity.

  7. Role of liquid compressional viscosity in the dynamics of a sonoluminescing bubble.

    PubMed

    Moshaii, A; Sadighi-Bonabi, R

    2004-01-01

    The well-known Rayleigh-Plesset ( RP ) equation is the basis of almost all hydrodynamical descriptions of single-bubble sonoluminescence ( SBSL ). A major deficiency of the RP equation is that it accounts for viscosity of an incompressible liquid and compressibility, separately. By removing this approximation, a new modification of the RP equation is presented considering effect of compressional viscosity of the liquid. This modification leads to addition of a new viscous term to the traditional bubble boundary equation. Influence of this new term in the dynamics of a sonoluminescing bubble has numerically been studied considering effects of heat transfer at the bubble wall, nonequilibrium evaporation and condensation of water vapor, chemical reactions, and diffusion of the reactions products in the liquid. The results show that the new term has a significant damping role in the bubble motion at the end of collapse and during the rebounds, so that its consideration dramatically reduces amplitude of the afterbounces. Dependence of this new damping mechanism on the driving pressure amplitude and on the ambient radius has been investigated. The results indicate that the more intense the collapse, the more important the damping of the liquid compressional viscosity.

  8. Real viscosity effects in inertial confinement fusion target deuterium-tritium micro-implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, R. J.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Faehl, R. J.

    2014-02-01

    We report on numerical studies of real viscous effects on the implosion characteristics of imploded DT micro-targets. We use the implicit ePLAS code to perform 2D simulations of spherical and slightly ellipsoidal DT shells on DT gas filled ˜40 μm diameter voids. Before their final implosions the shells have been nearly adiabatically compressed up to 102 or 103 g/cm3 densities. While the use of conventional artificial viscosity can lead to high central densities for initially spherical shells, we find that a real physical viscosity from ion-ion collisions can give a high (>20 keV) central temperature but severely reduced central density (<200 g/cm3), while the elliptical shells evidence p = 2 distortion of the heated central fuel region. These results suggest that the general use of artificial viscosities in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) modeling may have lead to overly optimistic yields for current NIF targets and that polar direct drive with more energy for the imploding capsule may be needed for ultimate ICF success.

  9. Sensor for viscosity and shear strength measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Ebadian, M.A.; Dillion, J.; Moore, J.; Jones, K.

    1998-01-01

    Measurement of the physical properties (viscosity and density) of waste slurries is critical in evaluating transport parameters to ensure turbulent flow through transport pipes. The environment for measurement and sensor exposure is extremely harsh; therefore, reliability and ruggedness are critical in the sensor design. Two different viscometer techniques are being investigated in this study, based on: magnetostrictive pulse generated acoustic waves; and an oscillating cylinder. Prototype sensors have been built and tested which are based on both techniques. A base capability instrumentation system has been designed, constructed, and tested which incorporates both of these sensors. It requires manual data acquisition and off-line calculation. A broad range of viscous media has been tested using this system. Extensive test results appear in this report. The concept for each technique has been validated by these test results. This base capability system will need to be refined further before it is appropriate for field tests. The mass of the oscillating system structure will need to be reduced. A robust acoustic probe assembly will need to be developed. In addition, in March 1997 it was made known for the first time that the requirement was for a deliverable automated viscosity instrumentation system. Since then such a system has been designed, and the hardware has been constructed so that the automated concept can be proved. The rest of the hardware, which interfaced to a computer, has also been constructed and tested as far as possible. However, for both techniques the computer software for automated data acquisition, calculation, and logging had not been completed before funding and time ran out.

  10. Viscosity of Mixtures of α-Tocopherol Acetate + Mesitylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwajczaka, Elżbieta; Stagraczyński, Ryszard; Herba, Henryk; Świergielb, Jolanta; Jadżyn, Jan

    2009-08-01

    The paper presents results of the share viscosity measurements performed as a function of temperature and concentration for mixtures of α-tocopherol acetate (vitamine E acetate) and mesitylene, two liquids of essentially different viscosity (four order of magnitude difference at 280 K). The viscosity/ temperature dependence for pure α-tocopherol acetate as well as for the mixtures studied can be well described with the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation. The viscosities of the mixtures exhibit a strong negative deviation from the rule of additive dependence on concentration and for increasing temperature the maximum value of the deviation shows an exponential decreasing.

  11. Fluorescence-based Broad Dynamic Range Viscosity Probes.

    PubMed

    Dragan, Anatoliy; Graham, August E; Geddes, Chris D

    2014-03-01

    We introduce two new fluorescent viscosity probes, SYBR Green (SG) and PicoGreen (PG), that we have studied over a broad range of viscosity and in collagen solutions. In water, both dyes have low quantum yields and excited state lifetimes, while in viscous solvents or in complex with DNA both parameters dramatically (300-1000-fold) increase. We show that in log-log scale the dependence of the dyes' quantum yield vs. viscosity is linear, the slope of which is sensitive to temperature. Application of SG and PG, as a fluorescence-based broad dynamic range viscosity probes, to the life sciences is discussed.

  12. DWPF STARTUP FRIT VISCOSITY MEASUREMENT ROUND ROBIN RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Edwards, Tommy B.; Russell, Renee L.; Workman, Phyllis J.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Schumacher, Ray F.; Smith, Donald E.; Peeler, David K.; Vienna, John D.

    2012-07-31

    A viscosity standard is needed to replace the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) glasses currently being used to calibrate viscosity measurement equipment. The current NIST glasses are either unavailable or less than ideal for calibrating equipment to measure the viscosity of high-level waste glasses. This report documents the results of a viscosity round robin study conducted on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) startup frit. DWPF startup frit was selected because its viscosity-temperature relationship is similar to most DWPF and Hanford high-level waste glass compositions. The glass underwent grinding and blending to homogenize the large (100 lb) batch. Portions of the batch were supplied to the laboratories (named A through H) for viscosity measurements following a specified temperature schedule with a temperature range of 1150 C to 950 C and with an option to measure viscosity at lower temperatures if their equipment was capable of measuring at the higher viscosities. Results were used to fit the Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher and Arrhenius equations to viscosity as a function of temperature for the entire temperature range of 460 C through 1250 C as well as the limited temperature interval of approximately 950 C through 1250 C. The standard errors for confidence and prediction were determined for the fitted models.

  13. Precision assessment of biofluid viscosity measurements using molecular rotors.

    PubMed

    Akers, Walter J; Haidekker, Mark A

    2005-06-01

    Blood viscosity changes with many pathologic conditions, but its importance has not been fully investigated because the current methods of measurement are poorly suited for clinical applications. The use of viscosity-sensitive fluorescent molecular rotors to determine fluid viscosity in a nonmechanical manner has been investigated recently, but it is unknown how the precision of the fluorescence-based method compares to established mechanical viscometry. Human blood plasma viscosity was modulated with high-viscosity plasma expanders, dextran, pentastarch, and hetastarch. The samples were divided into a calibration and a test set. The relationship between fluorescence emission and viscosity was established using the calibration set. Viscosity of the test set was determined by fluorescence and by cone-and-plate viscometer, and the precision of both methods compared. Molecular rotor fluorescence intensity showed a power law relationship with solution viscosity. Mechanical measurements deviated from the theoretical viscosity value by less than 7.6%, while fluorescence-based measurements deviated by less than 6%. The average coefficient of variation was 6.9% (mechanical measurement) and 3.4% to 3.8% (fluorescence-based measurement, depending on the molecular rotor used). Fluorescence-based viscometry exhibits comparable precision to mechanical viscometry. Fluorescence viscometry does not apply shear and is therefore more practical for biofluids which have apparent non-Newtonian properties. In addition, fluorescence instrumentation makes very fast serial measurements possible, thus promising new areas of application in laboratory and clinical settings.

  14. Inference of mantle viscosity for depth resolutions of GIA observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, Masao; Okuno, Jun'ichi

    2016-11-01

    Inference of the mantle viscosity from observations for glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) process has usually been conducted through the analyses based on the simple three-layer viscosity model characterized by lithospheric thickness, upper- and lower-mantle viscosities. Here, we examine the viscosity structures for the simple three-layer viscosity model and also for the two-layer lower-mantle viscosity model defined by viscosities of η670,D (670-D km depth) and ηD,2891 (D-2891 km depth) with D-values of 1191, 1691 and 2191 km. The upper-mantle rheological parameters for the two-layer lower-mantle viscosity model are the same as those for the simple three-layer one. For the simple three-layer viscosity model, rate of change of degree-two zonal harmonics of geopotential due to GIA process (GIA-induced J˙2) of -(6.0-6.5) × 10-11 yr-1 provides two permissible viscosity solutions for the lower mantle, (7-20) × 1021 and (5-9) × 1022 Pa s, and the analyses with observational constraints of the J˙2 and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) sea levels at Barbados and Bonaparte Gulf indicate (5-9) × 1022 Pa s for the lower mantle. However, the analyses for the J˙2 based on the two-layer lower-mantle viscosity model only require a viscosity layer higher than (5-10) × 1021 Pa s for a depth above the core-mantle boundary (CMB), in which the value of (5-10) × 1021 Pa s corresponds to the solution of (7-20) × 1021 Pa s for the simple three-layer one. Moreover, the analyses with the J˙2 and LGM sea level constraints for the two-layer lower-mantle viscosity model indicate two viscosity solutions: η670,1191 > 3 × 1021 and η1191,2891 ˜ (5-10) × 1022 Pa s, and η670,1691 > 1022 and η1691,2891 ˜ (5-10) × 1022 Pa s. The inferred upper-mantle viscosity for such solutions is (1-4) × 1020 Pa s similar to the estimate for the simple three-layer viscosity model. That is, these analyses require a high viscosity layer of (5-10) × 1022 Pa s at least in the deep mantle, and suggest

  15. Quantification of Viscosity and Capillary Pressure Anomalies for Polar Liquids in 2D Hydrophilic Nano-Confinements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, S. A.; Torres-Verdin, C.; Balhoff, M.

    2014-12-01

    Interest in liquid and interfacial behavior within nano-confinements spans many disciplines. Geophysical interest originates from a desire to understand flow mechanisms through hydrocarbon-rich nano-porous shale media, especially communication between fractures and the adjacent nano-porous matrix (imbibition). This work investigates the extent of boundary layer nucleation during polar liquid flows in hydrophilic nano-confinements via discrepancies seen in viscosity and capillary pressure from their bulk values. We perform our experiments in two-dimensional nanochannels of varying size and as small as 30 nm x 60 nm in cross section and still obtain visual data with reflected differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. The simple geometry of the nanochannels enables the comparison against analytical transport solutions. By designing a nanochannel experiment that allows us to monitor the rate of fluid imbibition and volume loss of a trapped air pocket the liquid is imbibing into, we are able to decouple capillary pressure and viscosity from imbibition data, as well as gain information about gas partitioning at the meniscus interface. Our current experiments are performed with organic solvents within siliceous nanochannels and the results of the decoupling scheme indicate that for rectangular nanochannels with heights of 60 nm and varying widths, effective viscosity is consistently between 4-12 times higher than the bulk value and capillary pressure is around 50% less than the macroscopic Young-Laplace equation prediction. These results equate to the nucleation of wall boundary layers on the order of tens of molecular layers thick. Structured boundary layers have an inherently increased viscosity compared to the liquid bulk value, resulting in a significant reduction in imbibition efficacy. This presence of approximately 15 nm boundary layers in on the threshold of two different theories - thin bimolecular boundary layers and exclusion zones (thick boundary

  16. Viscosity controls humidity dependence of N2O5 uptake to citric acid aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gržinić, G.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Berkemeier, T.; Türler, A.; Ammann, M.

    2015-12-01

    The heterogeneous loss of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) to aerosol particles has a significant impact on the night-time nitrogen oxide cycle and therefore the oxidative capacity in the troposphere. Using a 13N short-lived radioactive tracer method, we studied the uptake kinetics of N2O5 on citric acid aerosol particles as a function of relative humidity (RH). The results show that citric acid exhibits lower reactivity than similar dicarboxylic and polycarboxylic acids, with uptake coefficients between ∼ 3 × 10-4-∼ 3 × 10-3 depending on humidity (17-70 % RH). At RH above 50 %, the magnitude and the humidity dependence can be best explained by the viscosity of citric acid as compared to aqueous solutions of simpler organic and inorganic solutes and the variation of viscosity with RH and, hence, diffusivity in the organic matrix. Since the diffusion rates of N2O5 in highly concentrated citric acid solutions are not well established, we present four different parameterizations of N2O5 diffusivity based on the available literature data or estimates for viscosity and diffusivity of H2O. Above 50 % RH, uptake is consistent with the reacto-diffusive kinetic regime whereas below 50 % RH, the uptake coefficient is higher than expected from hydrolysis of N2O5 within the bulk of the particles, and the uptake kinetics is most likely limited by loss on the surface only. This study demonstrates the impact of viscosity in highly oxidized and highly functionalized secondary organic aerosol material on the heterogeneous chemistry of N2O5 and may explain some of the unexpectedly low loss rates to aerosol derived from field studies.

  17. Viscosity of α-pinene secondary organic material and implications for particle growth and reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Grayson, James W.; Bateman, Adam P.; Kuwata, Mikinori; Sellier, Mathieu; Murray, Benjamin J.; Shilling, John E.; Martin, Scot T.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2013-05-14

    Particles composed of secondary organic material (SOM) are abundant in the lower troposphere and play important roles in climate, air quality, and health. The viscosity of these particles is a fundamental property that is presently poorly quantified for conditions relevant to the lower troposphere. Using two new techniques, namely a bead-mobility technique and a poke-flow technique, in conjunction with simulations of fluid flow, we measure the viscosity of the watersoluble component of SOM produced by α-pinene ozonolysis. The viscosity is comparable to that of honey at 90% relative humidity (RH), comparable to that of peanut butter at 70% RH and greater than or comparable to that of bitumen for ≤ 30% RH, implying that the studied SOM ranges from liquid to semisolid/solid at ambient relative humidities. With the Stokes-Einstein relation, the measured viscosities further imply that the growth and evaporation of SOM by the exchange of organic molecules between the gas and condensed phases may be confined to the surface region when RH ≤ 30%, suggesting the importance of an adsorption-type mechanism for partitioning in this regime. By comparison, for RH ≥ 70% partitioning of organic molecules may effectively occur by an absorption mechanism throughout the bulk of the particle. Finally, the net uptake rates of semi-reactive atmospheric oxidants such as O3 are expected to decrease by two to five orders of magnitude for a change in RH from 90% to ≤ 30% RH, with possible implications for the rates of chemical aging of SOM particles in the atmosphere.

  18. Piezoelectric drive circuit

    DOEpatents

    Treu, C.A. Jr.

    1999-08-31

    A piezoelectric motor drive circuit is provided which utilizes the piezoelectric elements as oscillators and a Meacham half-bridge approach to develop feedback from the motor ground circuit to produce a signal to drive amplifiers to power the motor. The circuit automatically compensates for shifts in harmonic frequency of the piezoelectric elements due to pressure and temperature changes. 7 figs.

  19. Piezoelectric drive circuit

    DOEpatents

    Treu, Jr., Charles A.

    1999-08-31

    A piezoelectric motor drive circuit is provided which utilizes the piezoelectric elements as oscillators and a Meacham half-bridge approach to develop feedback from the motor ground circuit to produce a signal to drive amplifiers to power the motor. The circuit automatically compensates for shifts in harmonic frequency of the piezoelectric elements due to pressure and temperature changes.

  20. Electric vehicles: Driving range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempton, Willett

    2016-09-01

    For uptake of electric vehicles to increase, consumers' driving-range needs must be fulfilled. Analysis of the driving patterns of personal vehicles in the US now shows that today's electric vehicles can meet all travel needs on almost 90% of days from a single overnight charge.

  1. Hierarchical viscosity of aqueous solution of tilapia scale collagen investigated via dielectric spectroscopy between 500 MHz and 2.5 THz

    PubMed Central

    Kawamata, H.; Kuwaki, S.; Mishina, T.; Ikoma, T.; Tanaka, J.; Nozaki, R.

    2017-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of biomolecules such as proteins are very important model systems for understanding the functions of biomolecules in actual life processes because interactions between biomolecules and the surrounding water molecules are considered to be important determinants of biomolecules’ functions. Globule proteins have been extensively studied via dielectric spectroscopy; the results indicate three relaxation processes originating from fluctuations in the protein molecule, the bound water and the bulk water. However, the characteristics of aqueous solutions of collagens have rarely been investigated. In this work, based on broadband dielectric measurements between 500 MHz and 2.5 THz, we demonstrate that the high viscosity of a collagen aqueous solution is due to the network structure being constructed of rod-like collagen molecules surrounding free water molecules and that the water molecules are not responsible for the viscosity. We determine that the macroscopic viscosity is related to the mean lifetime of the collagen-collagen interactions supporting the networks and that the local viscosity of the water surrounded by the networks is governed by the viscosity of free water as in the bulk. This hierarchical structure in the dynamics of the aqueous solution of biomolecules has been revealed for the first time. PMID:28345664

  2. Viscosity to entropy ratio of QGP in relativistic heavy ion collisions: The second-order viscose hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabi Pari, Sharareh; Taghavi Shahri, Fatemeh; Javidan, Kurosh

    2016-10-01

    The nuclear suppression factor RAA and elliptic flow ν2 are calculated by considering the effects of shear viscosity to the entropy density ratio η/s, using the viscose hydrodynamics at the first- and second-orders of approximation and considering temperature dependent coupling αs(T). It is shown that the second-order viscose hydrodynamics (varying shear viscosity to entropy ratio) with averaged value of 4πη/s = 1.5 ± 0.1 gives the best results of RAA and ν2 in comparison to the experimental data.

  3. Rheology and tribology of lubricants with polymeric viscosity modifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babak, LotfizadehDehkordi

    Elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) theory has been used to model the lubrication state of antifriction machine elements, where initial viscosity and pressure viscosity coefficients are essential parameters in film thickness modeling. Since the pressures of lubricants in the contact zone can be very high, it is important to know the rheological properties of lubricants in these pressure and temperature regimes. The characteristics of viscosity behavior as a function of pressure are also essential for a universal definition of the pressure viscosity coefficient in order to estimate film thickness in an EHL regime. In this study, viscosities and pressure-viscosity coefficients of ten commercial engine and gear oils and seventeen laboratory-produced oil/polymer viscosity modifiers (VM) additives are measured up to 1.3 GPa at 40, 75 and 100 °C. For the first time, a sharp increase in the viscosity and piezoviscous factor is observed in both mineral-based and synthetic-based oils with different VMs. Analysis of the experimental results indicates that sharp increase in viscosity observed in these experiments are believed to arise from physical changes in the VMs, that is liquid-solid phase transition. Evidence is offered that polymer properties such as molecular weight, concentration and structure influence the onset of the phase transitions. A modified Yasutomi model, which normally describes the pressure dependence of the viscosity of lubricants very well, fails to predict the viscosity of the specimens above the onset of sharp increase in viscosity. A design of experiment (DOE) analysis using Design-Expert software indicates that pressure and temperature are the most critical parameters in the viscosity variation. Tribological tests demonstrate that wear in the contact, zone occurs at temperatures and stresses that coincides with the VM phase transitions in both commercial and laboratory synthesized oil/VMs. Tribological results also indicate that the onset of the

  4. Beyond baking soda: Demonstrating the link between volcanic eruptions and viscosity to all ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithka, I. N.; Walters, R. L.; Harpp, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    Public interest in volcanic eruptions and societal relevance of volcanic hazards provide an excellent basis for successful earth science outreach. During a museum-based earth science outreach event free and open to the public, we used two new interactive experiments to illustrate the relationship between gas content, magma viscosity, and eruption style. Learning objectives for visitors are to understand: how gas drives volcanic eruptions, the differences between effusive and explosive eruption styles, viscosity's control on gas pressure within a magma reservoir, and the role of gas pressure on eruption style. Visitors apply the scientific method by asking research questions and testing hypotheses by conducting the experiments. The demonstrations are framed with real life examples of volcanic eruptions (e.g., Mt. St. Helens eruption in 1980), providing context for the scientific concepts. The first activity demonstrates the concept of fluid viscosity and how gas interacts with fluids of different viscosities. Visitors blow bubbles into water and corn syrup. The corn syrup is so viscous that bubbles are trapped, showing how a more viscous material builds up higher gas pressure. Visitors are asked which kind of magma (high or low viscosity) will produce an explosive eruption. To demonstrate an explosive eruption, visitors add an Alka-Seltzer tablet to water in a snap-top film canister. The reaction rapidly produces carbon dioxide gas, increasing pressure in the canister until the lid pops off and the canister launches a few meters into the air (tinyurl.com/nzsgfoe). Increasing gas pressure in the canister is analogous to gas pressure building within a magma reservoir beneath a volcano. The lid represents high-viscosity magma that prevents degassing, causing gas pressure to reach explosive levels. This interactive activity is combined with a display of an effusive eruption: add vinegar to baking soda in a model volcano to produce a quick-flowing eruption. These

  5. 77 FR 32943 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Pile Driving in the Columbia River, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... Specified Activities; Pile Driving in the Columbia River, WA AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS..., incidental to pile driving during construction of the Terminal 5 Bulk Potash Handling Facility. DATES... (Eumatopius jubatus) ] incidental to pile driving activities conducted during the construction of the...

  6. Green stabilization of microscale iron particles using guar gum: bulk rheology, sedimentation rate and enzymatic degradation.

    PubMed

    Gastone, Francesca; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-05-01

    Guar gum can be used to effectively improve stability and mobility of microscale zerovalent iron particles (MZVI) used in groundwater remediation. Guar gum is a food-grade, environment friendly natural polysaccharide, which is often used as thickening agent in a broad range of food, pharmaceutical and industrial applications. Guar gum solutions are non-Newtonian, shear thinning fluids, characterized by high viscosity in static conditions and low viscosity in dynamic conditions. In particular, the high zero shear viscosity guarantees the MZVI dispersion stability, reducing the sedimentation rate of the particles thus enabling its storage and field operations. In this work, a comprehensive rheological characterization of guar gum-based slurries of MZVI particles is provided. First, we derived a model to link the bulk shear viscosity to the concentration of guar gum and then we applied it for the derivation of a modified Stokes law for the prediction of the sedimentation rate of the iron particles. The influence of the preparation procedure (cold or hot dissolution and high shear processing) on the viscosity and on the stability of the suspensions was then assessed. Finally, the dosage and concentration of enzymes - an environment friendly breaker--were studied for enhancing and controlling the degradation kinetics of the suspensions. The derived empirical relationships can be used for the implementation of an iron slurry flow and transport model and for the design of full scale injection interventions.

  7. Driving and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Linda; Molnar, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide primary care physicians with an approach to driving safety concerns when older persons present with memory difficulties. Sources of information The approach is based on an accredited memory clinic training program developed by the Centre for Family Medicine Primary Care Collaborative Memory Clinic. Main message One of the most challenging aspects of dementia care is the assessment of driving safety. Drivers with dementia are at higher risk of motor vehicle collisions, yet many drivers with mild dementia might be safely able to continue driving for several years. Because safe driving is dependent on multiple cognitive and functional skills, clinicians should carefully consider many factors when determining if cognitive concerns affect driving safety. Specific findings on corroborated history and office-based cognitive testing might aid in the physician’s decisions to refer for comprehensive on-road driving evaluation and whether to notify transportation authorities in accordance with provincial reporting requirements. Sensitive communication and a person-centred approach are essential. Conclusion Primary care physicians must consider many factors when determining if cognitive concerns might affect driving safety in older drivers. PMID:28115437

  8. On the shear viscosity of 3D Yukawa liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Donko, Z.; Hartmann, P.

    2008-09-07

    We report calculations of the shear viscosity of three-dimensional strongly-coupled Yukawa liquids, based on two different non-equilibrium molecular dynamics methods. The present simulations intend to improve the accuracy of shear viscosity data, compared to those obtained in earlier studies.

  9. Note: precision viscosity measurement using suspended microchannel resonators.

    PubMed

    Lee, I; Park, K; Lee, J

    2012-11-01

    We report the characterization of a suspended microchannel resonator (SMR) for viscosity measurements in a low viscosity regime (<10 mPa s) using two measurement schemes. First, the quality factor (Q-factor) of the SMR was characterized with glycerol-water mixtures. The measured Q-factor at 20 °C exhibits a bilinear behavior with the sensitivity of 1281 (mPa s)(-1) for a lower (1-4 mPa s) and 355 (mPa s)(-1) for a higher viscosity range (4-8 mPa s), respectively. The second scheme is the vibration amplitude monitoring of the SMR running in a closed loop feedback. When compared in terms of the measurement time, the amplitude-based measurement takes only 0.1 ~ 1 ms while the Q-factor-based measurement takes ~30 s. However, the viscosity resolution of the Q-factor-based measurement is at least three times better than the amplitude-based measurement. By comparing the Q-factors of heavy water and 9.65 wt.% glycerol-water mixture that have very similar viscosities but different densities, we confirmed that the SMR can measure the dynamic viscosity without the density correction. The obtained results demonstrate that the SMR can measure the fluid viscosity with high precision and even real-time monitoring of the viscosity change is possible with the amplitude-based measurement scheme.

  10. Note: Precision viscosity measurement using suspended microchannel resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, I.; Park, K.; Lee, J.

    2012-11-01

    We report the characterization of a suspended microchannel resonator (SMR) for viscosity measurements in a low viscosity regime (<10 mPa s) using two measurement schemes. First, the quality factor (Q-factor) of the SMR was characterized with glycerol-water mixtures. The measured Q-factor at 20 °C exhibits a bilinear behavior with the sensitivity of 1281 (mPa s)-1 for a lower (1-4 mPa s) and 355 (mPa s)-1 for a higher viscosity range (4-8 mPa s), respectively. The second scheme is the vibration amplitude monitoring of the SMR running in a closed loop feedback. When compared in terms of the measurement time, the amplitude-based measurement takes only 0.1 ˜ 1 ms while the Q-factor-based measurement takes ˜30 s. However, the viscosity resolution of the Q-factor-based measurement is at least three times better than the amplitude-based measurement. By comparing the Q-factors of heavy water and 9.65 wt.% glycerol-water mixture that have very similar viscosities but different densities, we confirmed that the SMR can measure the dynamic viscosity without the density correction. The obtained results demonstrate that the SMR can measure the fluid viscosity with high precision and even real-time monitoring of the viscosity change is possible with the amplitude-based measurement scheme.

  11. Viscosity of human bile sampled from the common bile duct.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Walter H; Näf, Gabriela; Werth, Baseli

    2010-01-01

    Cholestasis is a frequent gastroenterological problem, which is tackled by endoscopic procedures. Little is known about bile viscosity, a major determinant of its flow. We measured the viscosity of bile from the common bile duct during endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. Bile was aspirated immediately after cannulation of the papilla and deep-frozen. Viscosity was measured with a rotational viscometer at 37 degrees C and a broad range of shear rates (0.08-69.5 s(-1)). The majority of the 138 patients (64.5%) had bile viscosities between water (0.7 mPa.s) and the lower limit of plasma (1.1 mPa.s). In 20 patients (14.5%) it was above that of plasma (>1.4 mPa.s), and showed a non-Newtonian behaviour, i.e. the viscosity increased exponentially with decreasing shear rate. Cholecystectomized patients had a lower bile viscosity. Bile viscosities did not differ between patient groups with either choledocholithiasis, sludge, cholangitis, biliary pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, or cholangiocarcinoma. We conclude that bile viscosity in the common bile duct is usually lower than that of plasma, in 15% it is higher and increases exponentially with decreasing flow rate, which may lead to a vicious cycle.

  12. Viscosity Reduction in Liquid Suspensions by Electric or Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, R.; Xu, X.

    Reducing the viscosity of liquid suspensions is of great importance in science and engineering. We present a theory and experiments that a suitable electric or magnetic field pulse can effectively reduce the viscosity for several hours with no appreciable change of temperature. Positive experimental results with magnetorheological fluids and crude oil suggest a broad range of practical applications.

  13. Critical exponent for the viscosity of four binary liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1988-01-01

    The viscosity of the following binary mixtures was measured near their consolute points: (1) methanol + cyclohexane, (2) isobutyric acid + water, (3) nitroethane + 3-methylpentane, and (4) 2-butoxyethanol + water. It is shown that the multiplicative hypothesis is valid for these mixtures. It is also found that the concentration closest to critical has the largest viscosity enhancement.

  14. Viscosity of concentrated suspensions of sphere/rod mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Mor, R.; Gottlieb, M.; Graham, A.L.; Mondy, L.A.

    1996-05-01

    This paper discusses the viscosity of concentrated suspensions of sphere/rod mixtures by adopting the Thomas relations for spheres and Milliken`s for randomly oriented rods with aspect ratio of 20. The relative viscosity of a mixed suspension may now be calculated for any combination of rods (of aspect ratio 20) and spheres.

  15. Nucleoplasmic viscosity of living cells investigated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Lifang; Xing, Da; Chen, Tongshen; Pei, Yihui

    2007-11-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a new kind of real-time, high-speed and single-molecule technique. It is used to detect the kinetic characteristics of fluorescent dye such as diffusion coefficient in the aqueous solution. Combined with confocal microscope optics, it has been now widely applied in cell biological research. Through a time correlation analysis of spontaneous intensity fluctuations, this technique with EGFP as a probe is capable of determining viscosity of fluids according to Stokes-Einstein equation. Nucleoplasmic viscosity is an important physical parameter to quantify the rheological characteristics of the nucleoplasm. Investigation on nucleoplasmic viscosity plays an important role in further understanding intranuclear environment. In this paper, FCS is introduced to noninvasively investigate nucleoplasmic viscosity of living cells. The results show that nucleoplasmic viscosity of lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cells is 2.55+/-0.61 cP and nucleoplasmic viscosity is larger than cytoplasmic viscosity at 37 °C (pH 7.4). In addition, significant changes in nucleoplasmic viscosity are detected by FCS when cells are exposed to hyper or hypotonic medium. Our study suggests that FCS can be used to detect the kinetic characteristics of biomolecules in living cells and thus helps to investigate the dynamic changes of the microenvironment in the cell.

  16. Low Viscosity Lubricating Oils with Superior Cold Properties,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The invention concerns low viscosity lubricating oils based on polyakylbenzenes. The patent claims the use of low boiling portions of the...distillation residues occurring in the alkylation of benzene with chloroparaffins or olefins of the C10 to C14 chain length, as low viscosity and low congealing lubricating oils or as congealing point lowering mix components.

  17. Viscosity over entropy ratio in a quark plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czerski, P.; Alberico, W. M.; Chiacchiera, S.; DePace, A.; Hansen, H.; Molinari, A.; Nardi, M.

    2009-02-01

    The quark viscosity in the quark-gluon plasma is evaluated in the hard thermal loop (HTL) approximation. The different contributions to the viscosity arising from the various components of the quark spectral function are discussed. The calculation is extended to finite values of the chemical potential.

  18. Viscosity of bubble- and crystal- bearing magmas: Analogue results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namiki, A.; Manga, M.

    2006-12-01

    Natural magmas often include both phenocrysts and bubbles. Such magmas can be regarded as suspensions including particles and bubbles and should have a viscosity different from the particle- and bubble- free melt. Viscosity is one of the key physical properties that affects eruption dynamics and magma flow. To understand the relation between the viscosity and the volume fraction of bubbles and particles, we directly measure the viscosity of suspensions with both particles and bubbles. Measurements are performed with the 4 degree cone-and-plate type rheometer (Thermo HAAKE Rheoscope 1), which allows us to observe the samples in situ during the measurement. The suspending fluid is corn syrup whose viscosity is 1.7 Pa·s at 23 °C. Particles are Techpolymer (polymethylmethacrylate) 40 μm diameter spheres. Bubbles are made by dissolving baking soda and citric acid; reaction between them generates carbon dioxide. No surfactant is added. The Peclet number is sufficiently large that Brownian motion does not influence our results. The measured viscosity for the suspensions with particles, and with both particles and bubbles, show strong shear thinning. The measured viscosities during increasing and decreasing shear rate differ from each other, indicating that the microstructure is modified by flow. When the deformation of bubbles is not significant, the measured viscosity with bubbles is higher than that without bubbles, and vice versa.

  19. The Temperature Dependence of the Viscosity of Simple Liquids,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The purpose of the work is investigation of the temperature dependence of the viscosity of simple liquids on the basis of the molecular-kinetic...theory. In literature there is vast experimental material on the investigation of the viscosity of liquids and its temperature dependence both based on the

  20. Note: Precision viscosity measurement using suspended microchannel resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, I.; Lee, J.; Park, K.

    2012-11-15

    We report the characterization of a suspended microchannel resonator (SMR) for viscosity measurements in a low viscosity regime (<10 mPa s) using two measurement schemes. First, the quality factor (Q-factor) of the SMR was characterized with glycerol-water mixtures. The measured Q-factor at 20 Degree-Sign C exhibits a bilinear behavior with the sensitivity of 1281 (mPa s){sup -1} for a lower (1-4 mPa s) and 355 (mPa s){sup -1} for a higher viscosity range (4-8 mPa s), respectively. The second scheme is the vibration amplitude monitoring of the SMR running in a closed loop feedback. When compared in terms of the measurement time, the amplitude-based measurement takes only 0.1 {approx} 1 ms while the Q-factor-based measurement takes {approx}30 s. However, the viscosity resolution of the Q-factor-based measurement is at least three times better than the amplitude-based measurement. By comparing the Q-factors of heavy water and 9.65 wt.% glycerol-water mixture that have very similar viscosities but different densities, we confirmed that the SMR can measure the dynamic viscosity without the density correction. The obtained results demonstrate that the SMR can measure the fluid viscosity with high precision and even real-time monitoring of the viscosity change is possible with the amplitude-based measurement scheme.

  1. Multipoint viscosity measurements in microfluidic channels using optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Keen, Stephen; Yao, Alison; Leach, Jonathan; Di Leonardo, Roberto; Saunter, Chris; Love, Gordon; Cooper, Jonathan; Padgett, Miles

    2009-07-21

    We demonstrate the technique of multipoint viscosity measurements incorporating the accurate calibration of micron sized particles. We describe the use of a high-speed camera to measure the residual motion of particles trapped in holographic optical tweezers, enabling us to calculate the fluid viscosity at multiple points across the field-of-view of the microscope within a microfluidic system.

  2. Looking for a bulk point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldacena, Juan; Simmons-Duffin, David; Zhiboedov, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    We consider Lorentzian correlators of local operators. In perturbation theory, singularities occur when we can draw a position-space Landau diagram with null lines. In theories with gravity duals, we can also draw Landau diagrams in the bulk. We argue that certain singularities can arise only from bulk diagrams, not from boundary diagrams. As has been previously observed, these singularities are a clear diagnostic of bulk locality. We analyze some properties of these perturbative singularities and discuss their relation to the OPE and the dimensions of double-trace operators. In the exact nonperturbative theory, we expect no singularity at these locations. We prove this statement in 1+1 dimensions by CFT methods.

  3. 19 CFR 149.4 - Bulk and break bulk cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Importers must still report 24 hours in advance of loading any containerized or non-qualifying break bulk... this chapter that a cargo declaration be filed with Customs and Border Protection (CBP) 24 hours before... Border Protection (CBP) 24 hours before such cargo is laden aboard the vessel at the foreign port,...

  4. Drive System Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.

    2007-01-01

    An overview of the NASA Glenn Research Center Drive Systems Research will be presented. The primary purpose of this research is to improve performance, reliability, and integrity of aerospace drive systems and space mechanisms. The research is conducted through a combination of in-house, academia, and through contractors. Research is conducted through computer code development and validated through component and system testing. The drive system activity currently has four major thrust areas including: thermal behavior of high speed gearing, health and usage monitoring, advanced components, and space mechanisms.

  5. Vision and Driving

    PubMed Central

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    Driving is the primary means of personal travel in many countries and is relies heavily on vision for its successful execution. Research over the past few decades has addressed the role of vision in driver safety (motor vehicle collision involvement) and in driver performance (both on-road and using interactive simulators in the laboratory). Here we critically review what is currently known about the role of various aspects of visual function in driving. We also discuss translational research issues on vision screening for licensure and re-licensure and rehabilitation of visually impaired persons who want to drive. PMID:20580907

  6. The Test Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory shows engineers rehearsing the sol 133 (June 8, 2004) drive into 'Endurance' crater by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. Engineers and scientists have recreated the martian surface and slope the rover will encounter using a combination of bare and thinly sand-coated rocks, simulated martian 'blueberries' and a platform tilted at a 25-degree angle. The results of this test convinced engineers that the rover was capable of driving up and down a straight slope before it attempted the actual drive on Mars.

  7. Fast wave current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Goree, J.; Ono, M.; Colestock, P.; Horton, R.; McNeill, D.; Park, H.

    1985-07-01

    Fast wave current drive is demonstrated in the Princeton ACT-I toroidal device. The fast Alfven wave, in the range of high ion-cyclotron harmonics, produced 40 A of current from 1 kW of rf power coupled into the plasma by fast wave loop antenna. This wave excites a steady current by damping on the energetic tail of the electron distribution function in the same way as lower-hybrid current drive, except that fast wave current drive is appropriate for higher plasma densities.

  8. Effects of fluid viscosity on a moving sonoluminescing bubble.

    PubMed

    Sadighi-Bonabi, Rasoul; Mirheydari, Mona; Rezaee, Nastaran; Ebrahimi, Homa

    2011-08-01

    Based on the quasi-adiabatic model, the parameters of the bubble interior for a moving single bubble sonoluminescence in water, adiponitrile, and N-methylformamide are calculated for various fluid viscosities. By using a complete form of the hydrodynamic force, the bubble trajectory is calculated for a moving single bubble sonoluminescence (m-SBSL). It is found that as the fluid viscosity increases, the unique circular path changes to an ellipsoidal and then linear form and along this incrementally increase of viscosity the light intensity increases. By using the Bremsstrahlung model to describe the bubble radiation, gradual increase of the viscosity results in brighter emissions. It is found that in fluids with higher viscosity the light intensity decreases as time passes.

  9. Lower-mantle viscosity constrained by seismicity around deglaciated regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spada, G.; Sabadini, R.; Boschi, E.; Yuen, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown here that seismicity around the margins of deglaciated areas provides a constraint on the viscosity of the lower mantle. Calculations using a spherical, viscoelastic earth model show that the present-day magnitude of the stress fields induced in the lithosphere beneath the Laurentide and Fennoscandian ice sheets is very sensitive to the value of the lower-mantle viscosity. Stress of about 100 bar, sufficient to cause seismicity, can still remain in the lithosphere for lower-mantle viscosities greater than about 10 to the 22nd Pa-s; for lower-mantle viscosities of about 10 to the 21st Pa-s, only a few tens of bars of stress persist in the lithosphere today. This influence of lower-mantle viscosity on the state of stress in the lithosphere also has implications for the migration of stress from earthquakes, and hence for earthquake recurrence times.

  10. Viscosity and compressibility of diacylglycerol under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malanowski, Aleksander; Rostocki, A. J.; Kiełczyński, P.; Szalewski, M.; Balcerzak, A.; Kościesza, R.; Tarakowski, R.; Ptasznik, S.; Siegoczyński, R. M.

    2013-03-01

    The influence of high pressure on viscosity and compressibility of diacylglycerol (DAG) oil has been presented in this paper. The investigated DAG oil was composed of 82% of DAGs and 18% TAGs (triacylglycerols). The dynamic viscosity of DAG was investigated as a function of the pressure up to 400 MPa. The viscosity was measured by means of the surface acoustic wave method, where the acoustic waveguides were used as sensing elements. As the pressure was rising, the larger ultrasonic wave attenuation was observed, whereas amplitude decreased with the liquid viscosity augmentation. Measured changes of physical properties were most significant in the pressure range near the phase transition. Deeper understanding of DAG viscosity and compressibility changes versus pressure could shed more light on thermodynamic properties of edible oils.

  11. The minimum mantle viscosity of an accreting earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooperman, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    The minimum mantle viscosity in an earth accreting from planetesimals is estimated. A plausible distribution of planetesimal sizes deposits enough energy to melt the outer nine-tenths of earth's mass; however, vigorous convection keeps temperatures near the solidus. Viscosity is significantly lower than prevails now. The temperature-dependent viscosity provides self-regulation so there is a continuing balance between accretional energy input and heat transfer out. This allows calculation of the minimum viscosity necessary to transfer out heat by a Nu/Ra-number relation. Typical viscosities are 0.1 to a million sq m/sec, lowest at mid-accretion when the mass growth rate is largest. Terrestrial planets are compared, and minimum iron descent times to central lithospheres are calculated.

  12. Quantitative characterization of the viscosity of a microemulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Huang, John S.

    1987-01-01

    The viscosity of the three-component microemulsion water/decane/AOT has been measured as a function of temperature and droplet volume fraction. At temperatures well below the phase-separation temperature the viscosity is described by treating the droplets as hard spheres suspended in decane. Upon approaching the two-phase region from low temperature, there is a large (as much as a factor of four) smooth increase of the viscosity which may be related to the percolation-like transition observed in the electrical conductivity. This increase in viscosity is not completely consistent with either a naive electroviscous model or a simple clustering model. The divergence of the viscosity near the critical point (39 C) is superimposed upon the smooth increase. The magnitude and temperature dependence of the critical divergence are similar to that seen near the critical points of binary liquid mixtures.

  13. Turbulence Locality and Granularlike Fluid Shear Viscosity in Collisional Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzi, Diego; Fraccarollo, Luigi

    2015-11-01

    We reanalyze previous experimental measurements of solid volume fraction, mean velocity, and velocity fluctuations in collisional suspensions of plastic cylinders and water flowing over inclined, erodible beds. We show that the particle pressure scales with the granular temperature, as predicted by kinetic theory of granular gases. The assumption that the particle shear stress is also well predicted by kinetic theory permits us to determine the fluid shear stress and the effective fluid viscosity from the experiments. The fluid viscosity can be decomposed into turbulent and granularlike components: the turbulent viscosity can be modeled using a mixing length, which is a decreasing function of the local volume fraction and does not depend upon the distance from the bed; the granularlike viscosity, associated with the transfer of momentum due to the conjugate motion of the fluid mass added to the particles, can be modeled by replacing the particle density with the density of the added fluid mass in the viscosity of kinetic theory.

  14. Development of high viscosity coatings for advanced Space Shuttle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garofalini, S. H.; Banas, R.; Creedon, J.

    1979-01-01

    Laboratory studies for increasing the thermal resistance of high viscosity coatings for silica reusable surface insulation are presented. The coatings are intended for the reentry temperature associated with advanced Space Shuttle applications which will involve aerodynamic shear forces during entry from earth orbits. Coating viscosity was increased by (1) reduction in the concentration of the low viscosity additive B2O3; (2) reduction in the particle size of the constituent powders in coatings; and (3) addition of a high viscosity glass former (GeO2). A coating system was produced by combining the three methods which showed apparent higher viscosity than the current coating, while satisfying all the current Shuttle Orbiter coating requirements.

  15. Viscosity and density dependence during maximal flow in man.

    PubMed

    Staats, B A; Wilson, T A; Lai-Fook, S J; Rodarte, J R; Hyatt, R E

    1980-02-01

    Maximal expiratory flow curves were obtained from ten healthy subjects white breathing air and three other gas mixtures with different densities and viscosities. From these data, the magnitudes of the dependence of maximal flow on gas density and viscosity were obtained. The scaling laws of fluid mechanics, together with a model for the flow-limiting mechanism, were used to obtain a prediction of the relationship between the density dependence and the viscosity dependence of maximal flow. Although the data for individual subjects were too variable to allow a precise comparison with this prediction, the relationship between the mean density dependence and the mean viscosity dependence of all usbjects agreed with the theoretic prediction. This agreement supports the assumption, which is frequently made, that flow resistance rather than tissue visoelasticity is the dominant contributor to peripheral resistance. Information on the relationships between the pressure drop to the flow-limiting segment and flow, gas density and viscosity, and lung volume were also obtained.

  16. Measurement and correlation of jet fuel viscosities at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schruben, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus and procedures were developed to measure jet fuel viscosity for eight current and future jet fuels at temperatures from ambient to near -60 C by shear viscometry. Viscosity data showed good reproducibility even at temperatures a few degrees below the measured freezing point. The viscosity-temperature relationship could be correlated by two linear segments when plotted as a standard log-log type representation (ASTM D 341). At high temperatures, the viscosity-temperature slope is low. At low temperatures, where wax precipitation is significant, the slope is higher. The breakpoint between temperature regions is the filter flow temperature, a fuel characteristic approximated by the freezing point. A generalization of the representation for the eight experimental fuels provided a predictive correlation for low-temperature viscosity, considered sufficiently accurate for many design or performance calculations.

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of self-calibrating ratiometric viscosity sensors.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyung-Jo; Dakanali, Marianna; Lichlyter, Darcy; Chang, Willy M; Nguyen, Karen A; Nipper, Matthew E; Haidekker, Mark A; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A

    2011-05-07

    We describe the design, synthesis and fluorescent profile of a family of self-calibrating dyes that provide ratiometric measurements of fluid viscosity. The design is based on covalently linking a primary fluorophore (reference) that displays a viscosity-independent fluorescence emission with a secondary fluorophore (sensor) that exhibits a viscosity-sensitive fluorescence emission. Characterization of fluorescent properties was made with separate excitation of the units and through Resonance Energy Transfer from the reference to the sensor dye. The chemical structures of both fluorophores and the linker length have been evaluated in order to optimize the overall brightness and sensitivity of the viscosity measurements. We also present an application of such ratiometric dyes for the detection of membrane viscosity changes in a liposome model.

  18. Elongational viscosity of photo-oxidated LDPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolón-Garrido, Víctor H.; Wagner, Manfred H.

    2014-05-01

    Sheets of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) were photo-oxidatively treated at room temperature, and subsequently characterized rheologically in the melt state by shear and uniaxial extensional experiments. For photo-oxidation, a xenon lamp was used to irradiate the samples for times between 1 day and 6 weeks. Linear-viscoelastic characterization was performed in a temperature range of 130 to 220°C to obtain the master curve at 170°C, the reference temperature at which the elongational viscosities were measured. Linear viscoelasticity is increasingly affected by increasing photo-oxidation due to crosslinking of LDPE, as corroborated by an increasing gel fraction as determined by a solvent extraction method. The elongational measurements reveal a strong enhancement of strain hardening until a saturation level is achieved. The elongational data are analyzed in the frame work of two constitutive equations, the rubber-like liquid and the molecular stress function models. Within the experimental window, timedeformation separability is confirmed for all samples, independent of the degree of photo-oxidation.

  19. Elongational viscosity of photo-oxidated LDPE

    SciTech Connect

    Rolón-Garrido, Víctor H. E-mail: manfred.wagner@tu-berlin.de; Wagner, Manfred H. E-mail: manfred.wagner@tu-berlin.de

    2014-05-15

    Sheets of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) were photo-oxidatively treated at room temperature, and subsequently characterized rheologically in the melt state by shear and uniaxial extensional experiments. For photo-oxidation, a xenon lamp was used to irradiate the samples for times between 1 day and 6 weeks. Linear-viscoelastic characterization was performed in a temperature range of 130 to 220°C to obtain the master curve at 170°C, the reference temperature at which the elongational viscosities were measured. Linear viscoelasticity is increasingly affected by increasing photo-oxidation due to crosslinking of LDPE, as corroborated by an increasing gel fraction as determined by a solvent extraction method. The elongational measurements reveal a strong enhancement of strain hardening until a saturation level is achieved. The elongational data are analyzed in the frame work of two constitutive equations, the rubber-like liquid and the molecular stress function models. Within the experimental window, timedeformation separability is confirmed for all samples, independent of the degree of photo-oxidation.

  20. Driving forces: Slab subduction and mantle convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, Bradford H.

    1988-01-01

    Mantle convection is the mechanism ultimately responsible for most geological activity at Earth's surface. To zeroth order, the lithosphere is the cold outer thermal boundary layer of the convecting mantle. Subduction of cold dense lithosphere provides tha major source of negative buoyancy driving mantle convection and, hence, surface tectonics. There are, however, importnat differences between plate tectonics and the more familiar convecting systems observed in the laboratory. Most important, the temperature dependence of the effective viscosity of mantle rocks makes the thermal boundary layer mechanically strong, leading to nearly rigid plates. This strength stabilizes the cold boundary layer against small amplitude perturbations and allows it to store substantial gravitational potential energy. Paradoxically, through going faults at subduction zones make the lithosphere there locally weak, allowing rapid convergence, unlike what is observed in laboratory experiments using fluids with temperature dependent viscosities. This bimodal strength distribution of the lithosphere distinguishes plate tectonics from simple convection experiments. In addition, Earth has a buoyant, relatively weak layer (the crust) occupying the upper part of the thermal boundary layer. Phase changes lead to extra sources of heat and bouyancy. These phenomena lead to observed richness of behavior of the plate tectonic style of mantle convection.

  1. [Driving and Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Roche, Jean

    2005-09-01

    Although most aged people remain safe drivers, a greater risk for crashes due to medical conditions is observed in the elderly. Impairment of important functions for safe driving such as visuospatial skills, attention, memory and judgement are observed in dementia, particularly in Alzheimer's disease. The accident rate increases from 9.4 accidents per million vehicle kilometers traveled for 80 to 85 year-old drivers, but raises to 163.6 for drivers with moderate AD. Patients and their families should be informed that patients with mild dementia related to Alzheimer's disease (stage 1 on the Clinical Dementia Rating, CDR), have a substantially increased rate of traffic accidents and therefore should not drive. But subjects in the pre-dementia phase (stage 0.5 at the CDR, mild cognitive impairment) also pose significant driving safety problems. In most States of the USA, and many European countries, but not in France, law requires regular investigating of driving performance in the elderly.

  2. [Driving and aging].

    PubMed

    Cantón-Cortés, David; Durán Segura, Mercedes; Castro Ramírez, Cándida

    2010-01-01

    The number of older people who continue to drive is constantly increasing. However, whether older people have more traffic accidents than other age groups is unclear. This age group has certain risk factors due to decreased motor, sensory and cognitive functions and also has greater frailty and vulnerability to injury. However, older drivers are aware of their heightened crash risk and employ certain compensatory actions, avoiding traveling under threatening conditions (dense traffic, bad weather or night driving), traveling by well-known routes and driving carefully. In view of these apparent contradictions, the present study attempts to discern the real crash risk and the driving and crash patterns characteristic of this population, which is continually increasing in industrialized countries.

  3. Control rod drive

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, Basil C.

    1986-01-01

    A control rod drive uses gravitational forces to insert one or more control rods upwardly into a reactor core from beneath the reactor core under emergency conditions. The preferred control rod drive includes a vertically movable weight and a mechanism operatively associating the weight with the control rod so that downward movement of the weight is translated into upward movement of the control rod. The preferred control rod drive further includes an electric motor for driving the control rods under normal conditions, an electrically actuated clutch which automatically disengages the motor during a power failure and a decelerator for bringing the control rod to a controlled stop when it is inserted under emergency conditions into a reactor core.

  4. Assessment: A Driving Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakow, Steven J.

    1992-01-01

    Asserts that educational assessment drives the curriculum. Thus, assessment is very important in contemplating reform in science education. Assessment should be an integral part of the instructional process, utilizing diagnostic testing, monitoring, and summative evaluations. (PR)

  5. Effects of Metal Ions on Viscosity of Aqueous Sodium Carboxylmethylcellulose Solution and Development of Dropping Ball Method on Viscosity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Set, Seng; Ford, David; Kita, Masakazu

    2015-01-01

    This research revealed that metal ions with different charges could significantly affect the viscosity of aqueous sodium carboxylmethylcellulose (CMC) solution. On the basis of an Ostwald viscometer, an improvised apparatus using a dropping ball for examining the viscosity of liquids/solutions has been developed. The results indicate that the…

  6. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.

    1960-05-24

    BS>A drive mechanism was invented for the control rod of a nuclear reactor. Power is provided by an electric motor and an outside source of fluid pressure is utilized in conjunction with the fluid pressure within the reactor to balance the loadings on the motor. The force exerted on the drive mechanism in the direction of scramming the rod is derived from the reactor fluid pressure so that failure of the outside pressure source will cause prompt scramming of the rod.

  7. Common drive unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, R. C.; Fink, R. A.; Moore, E. A.

    1987-01-01

    The Common Drive Unit (CDU) is a high reliability rotary actuator with many versatile applications in mechanism designs. The CDU incorporates a set of redundant motor-brake assemblies driving a single output shaft through differential. Tachometers provide speed information in the AC version. Operation of both motors, as compared to the operation of one motor, will yield the same output torque with twice the output speed.

  8. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-07-11

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  9. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2007-02-27

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  10. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett Lee; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-09-19

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  11. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2006-10-10

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  12. Electric Drive Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    Track-Laying Combat Vehicles , and (3) Parametric Study of Electric Drive Component Technologies. The technology survey results are given in a separate...and projections of future electric drive system improvements relative to combat vehicle applications. Unclassified SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS...273 5.7.2.3.1 DC Homopolar Drum Machine, Design and Performance 5-278 APPENDIX A 19.5 TON AND 40.0 TON VEHICLE SPECIFICATION APPENDIX B ELECTRIC

  13. Bulk materials handling equipment roundup

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2007-07-15

    The article reports recent product developments in belt conveyors. Flexco Steel Lancing Co. (Flexco) has a range of light, portable maintenance tools and offers training modules on procedures for belt conveyor maintenance on its website www.flexcosafe.com. Siemens recently fitted a 19 km long conveyor belt drive system at a Texan aluminium plant with five 556-kW Simovent Masterdrive VC drives. Voith recently launched the TPKL-T turbo coupling for users who want an alignment-free drive solution. Belt cleaners newly on the market include the RemaClean SGB brush and ASGCO Manufacturing's Razor-Back with Spray bar. Continental Conveyor has introduced a new line of dead-shaft pulleys offering increased bearing protection. 6 photos.

  14. Self-driving carsickness.

    PubMed

    Diels, Cyriel; Bos, Jelte E

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses the predicted increase in the occurrence and severity of motion sickness in self-driving cars. Self-driving cars have the potential to lead to significant benefits. From the driver's perspective, the direct benefits of this technology are considered increased comfort and productivity. However, we here show that the envisaged scenarios all lead to an increased risk of motion sickness. As such, the benefits this technology is assumed to bring may not be capitalised on, in particular by those already susceptible to motion sickness. This can negatively affect user acceptance and uptake and, in turn, limit the potential socioeconomic benefits that this emerging technology may provide. Following a discussion on the causes of motion sickness in the context of self-driving cars, we present guidelines to steer the design and development of automated vehicle technologies. The aim is to limit or avoid the impact of motion sickness and ultimately promote the uptake of self-driving cars. Attention is also given to less well known consequences of motion sickness, in particular negative aftereffects such as postural instability, and detrimental effects on task performance and how this may impact the use and design of self-driving cars. We conclude that basic perceptual mechanisms need to be considered in the design process whereby self-driving cars cannot simply be thought of as living rooms, offices, or entertainment venues on wheels.

  15. Dementia and driving.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, D; Neubauer, K; Boyle, M; Gerrard, J; Surmon, D; Wilcock, G K

    1992-04-01

    Many European countries test cars, but not their drivers, as they age. There is evidence to suggest that human factors are more important than vehicular factors as causes of motor crashes. The elderly also are involved in more accidents per distance travelled than middle-aged drivers. As the UK relies on self-certification of health by drivers over the age of 70 years, we examined the driving practices of patients with dementia attending a Memory Clinic. Nearly one-fifth of 329 patients with documented dementia continued to drive after the onset of dementia, and impaired driving ability was noted in two-thirds of these. Their families experienced great difficulty in persuading patients to stop driving, and had to invoke outside help in many cases. Neuropsychological tests did not help to identify those who drove badly while activity of daily living scores were related to driving ability. These findings suggest that many patients with dementia drive in an unsafe fashion after the onset of the illness. The present system of self-certification of health by the elderly for driver-licensing purposes needs to be reassessed.

  16. The viscosity of planetary tholeiitic melts: A configurational entropy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehlke, Alexander; Whittington, Alan G.

    2016-10-01

    The viscosity (η) of silicate melts is a fundamental physical property controlling mass transfer in magmatic systems. Viscosity can span many orders of magnitude, strongly depending on temperature and composition. Several models are available that describe this dependency for terrestrial melts quite well. Planetary basaltic lavas however are distinctly different in composition, being dominantly alkali-poor, iron-rich and/or highly magnesian. We measured the viscosity of 20 anhydrous tholeiitic melts, of which 15 represent known or estimated surface compositions of Mars, Mercury, the Moon, Io and Vesta, by concentric cylinder and parallel plate viscometry. The planetary basalts span a viscosity range of 2 orders of magnitude at liquidus temperatures and 4 orders of magnitude near the glass transition, and can be more or less viscous than terrestrial lavas. We find that current models under- and overestimate superliquidus viscosities by up to 2 orders of magnitude for these compositions, and deviate even more strongly from measured viscosities toward the glass transition. We used the Adam-Gibbs theory (A-G) to relate viscosity (η) to absolute temperature (T) and the configurational entropy of the system at that temperature (Sconf), which is in the form of log η =Ae +Be /TSconf . Heat capacities (CP) for glasses and liquids of our investigated compositions were calculated via available literature models. We show that the A-G theory is applicable to model the viscosity of individual complex tholeiitic melts containing 10 or more major oxides as well or better than the commonly used empirical equations. We successfully modeled the global viscosity data set using a constant Ae of -3.34 ± 0.22 log units and 12 adjustable sub-parameters, which capture the compositional and temperature dependence on melt viscosity. Seven sub-parameters account for the compositional dependence of Be and 5 for Sconf. Our model reproduces the 496 measured viscosity data points with a 1

  17. REL - English Bulk Data Input.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Richard Henry

    A bulk data input processor which is available for the Rapidly Extensible Language (REL) English versions is described. In REL English versions, statements that declare names of data items and their interrelationships normally are lines from a terminal or cards in a batch input stream. These statements provide a convenient means of declaring some…

  18. Hydraulic drive system prevents backlash

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acord, J. D.

    1965-01-01

    Hydraulic drive system uses a second drive motor operating at reduced torque. This exerts a relative braking action which eliminates the normal gear train backlash that is intolerable when driving certain heavy loads.

  19. Bulk compositions of chondrules in the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, S. B.; Haggerty, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    The bulk chemistries of 33 chondrules from the Allende meteorite were determined by electron microbeam analyses and the modal recombination model. Chondrules were selected on the basis of a petrographic study of 2755 inclusions, of which 997 are chondrules, classified as recrystallized olivine chondrules, euhedral olivine chondrules, anhedral olivine chondrules, glassy/skeletal olivine chondrules, barred olivine chondrules, and pyroxene type chondrules. The data indicate that nonequilibrium metastable paths of crystallization were followed, a model which is supported by olivine-liquid (glassy mesostases) relationships. Variations in olivine morphology are related to cooling rate, degree of supercooling, normative olivine, and calculated viscosities. The chondrules in Allende were derived from highly undersaturated ultramafic melts in which Fe-Ni-S-O immiscible liquids were produced. The chondrule suite exhibits systematic variations in volatile loss, and this relationship is used to support a melting event (however, neither the nature of this event nor the mechanism of melt formation is established).

  20. Methods of synthesizing hydroxyapatite powders and bulk materials

    DOEpatents

    Luo, P.

    1999-01-12

    Methods are provided for producing non-porous controlled morphology hydroxyapatite granules of less than 8 {micro}m by a spray-drying process. Solid or hollow spheres or doughnuts can be formed by controlling the volume fraction and viscosity of the slurry as well as the spray-drying conditions. Methods of providing for homogeneous cellular structure hydroxyapatite granules are also provided. Pores or channels or varying size and number can be formed by varying the temperature at which a hydroxyapatite slurry formed in basic, saturated ammonium hydroxide is spray-dried. Methods of providing non-porous controlled morphology hydroxyapatite granules in ammonium hydroxide are also provided. The hydroxyapatite granules and bulk materials formed by these methods are also provided. 26 figs.

  1. Methods of synthesizing hydroxyapatite powders and bulk materials

    DOEpatents

    Luo, Ping

    1999-01-12

    Methods are provided for producing non-porous controlled morphology hydroxyapatite granules of less than 8 .mu.m by a spray-drying process. Solid or hollow spheres or doughnuts can be formed by controlling the volume fraction and viscosity of the slurry as well as the spray-drying conditions. Methods of providing for homogenous cellular structure hydroxyapatite granules are also provided. Pores or channels or varying size and number can be formed by varying the temperature at which a hydroxyapatite slurry formed in basic, saturated ammonium hydroxide is spray-dried. Methods of providing non-porous controlled morphology hydroxyapatite granules in ammonium hydroxide are also provided. The hydroxyapatite granules and bulk materials formed by these methods are also provided.

  2. Sensitivity analysis of multi-layered C-axis inclined zigzag zinc oxide thin-film resonators as viscosity sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haifeng; Bao, Yuanye

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of a new zigzag C-axis inclined multi-layer ZnO thin-film bulk acoustic wave resonator (FBAR) as a viscosity sensor to monitor the lubrication performance of engine oil and other liquids. Free vibration and forced vibration for the FBAR loaded with liquids are analyzed. Equations necessary to calculate the sensitivity are derived. The numerical analysis shows that as the number of layers increases, the absolute sensitivity increases as well. The influences on the sensitivity of C-axis inclined angle, Q-factor, and thickness are also investigated. The results provide a foundation for further design of multi-layer FBAR viscosity sensors.

  3. Viscosity of molten lithium, thorium and beryllium fluorides mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merzlyakov, Alexander V.; Ignatiev, Victor V.; Abalin, Sergei S.

    2011-12-01

    Considering development of Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR) concept, following Molten Salt fluorides mixtures have been chosen as an object for viscosity studies in this work (in mol%): 78LiF-22ThF 4; 71LiF-27ThF 4-2BeF 2 and 75LiF-20ThF 4-5BeF 2. Additionally, the effect of the 3 mol% CeF 3 additives on viscosity of the molten 75LiF-20ThF 4-5BeF 2 (mol%) salt mixture has been investigated experimentally. The method of torsional oscillations of cylindrical crucible filled by molten fluorides mixture has been chosen for kinematic viscosity measurement at temperatures up to 800-850 °C. In temperature ranges, where melts behave as normal liquids, dependences on viscosity vs. temperature are received: ν = А exp [B/T(K)], where ν - kinematic viscosity, m 2/s; T - temperature, K. The kinematic viscosity Rout mean squares (RMS) estimated in the assumption about dispersion homoscedasticity is (0.04-0.12) × 10 -6 (m 2/s). Discrepancies left in the data of viscosity for molten mixtures of LiF, BeF 2 and ThF 4 received by different researchers need further investigations in this area to be continued.

  4. GodunovSPH with shear viscosity: implementation and tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Seung-Hoon; Wood, Matt A.

    2016-05-01

    The acceleration and energy dissipation terms due to the shear viscosity have been implemented and tested in GodunovSPH. The double summation method has been employed to avoid the well-known numerical noise of the second derivative in particle based codes. The plane Couette flow with various initial and boundary conditions have been used as tests, and the numerical and analytical results show a good agreement. Not only the viscosity-only calculation, but the full hydrodynamics simulations have been performed, and they show expected results as well. The very low kinematic viscosity simulations show a turbulent pattern when the Reynolds number exceeds ˜102. The critical value of the Reynolds number at the transition point of the laminar and turbulent flows coincides with the previous works approximately. A smoothed dynamic viscosity has been suggested to describe the individual kinematic viscosity of particles. The infinitely extended Couette flow which has two layers of different viscosities has been simulated to check the smoothed dynamic viscosity, and the result agrees well with the analytic solution. In order to compare the standard smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and GodunovSPH, the two layers test has been performed again with a density contrast. GodunovSPH shows less dispersion than the standard SPH, but there is no significant difference in the results. The results of the viscous ring evolution has also been presented as well, and the numerical results agrees with the analytic solution.

  5. Reducing the Viscosity of Blood by Pulsed Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, R.; Huang, K.

    2010-03-01

    Blood viscosity is a major player in heart disease. When blood is viscous, in addition to a high blood pressure required for the blood circulation, blood vessel walls are also easy to be damaged. While this issue is very important, currently the only method to reduce the blood viscosity is to take medicine, such as aspirin. Here we report our new finding that the blood viscosity can be reduced by pulsed magnetic field. Blood is a suspension of red blood cells (erythrocytes), white blood cells (leukocytes) and platelets in plasma, a complex solution of gases, salts, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. The base liquid, plasma, has low viscosity. The effective viscosity of whole blood increases mainly due to the red blood cells, which have a volume fraction about 40% or above. Red blood cells contain iron and are sensitive to magnetic field. Therefore, when we apply a strong magnetic field, the red cells make their diameters align in the field direction to form short chains. This change in rheology reduces the effective viscosity as high as 20-30%. While this reduction is not permanent, it lasts for several hours and repeatable. The reduction rate can be controlled by selecting suitable magnetic field and duration of field application to make blood viscosity within the normal range.

  6. Low Viscosity Highly Concentrated Injectable Nonaqueous Suspensions of Lysozyme Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Maria A.; Engstrom, Joshua D.; Ludher, Baltej S.; Johnston, Keith P.

    2011-01-01

    Subcutaneous injection of concentrated protein and peptide solutions, in the range of 100–400 mg/mL, is often not possible with a 25- to 27-gauge needle, as the viscosity can be well above 50 cP. Apparent viscosities below this limit are reported for suspensions of milled lysozyme microparticles up to nearly 400 mg/mL in benzyl benzoate or benzyl benzoate mixtures with safflower oils through a syringe with a 25- to 27-gauge needle at room temperature. These apparent viscosities were confirmed using a cone-and-plate rheometer. The intrinsic viscosity regressed from the Kreiger–Dougherty model was only slightly above the Einstein value of 2.5, indicating the increase in viscosity relative to that of the solvent was caused primarily by the excluded volume. Thus, the increases in viscosity from electrical double layer interactions (electroviscous effects), solvation of the particles, or deviations of the particle shape from a spherical geometry were minimal, and much smaller than typically observed for proteins dissolved in aqueous solutions. The small electroviscous effects are expected given the negligible zeta potential and thin double layers in the low dielectric constant organic solvent. The suspensions were resuspendable after a year, with essentially constant particle size after two months as measured by static light scattering. The lower apparent viscosities for highly concentrated protein suspensions relative to protein solutions, coupled with these favorable characteristics upon resuspension, may offer novel opportunities for subcutaneous injection of therapeutic proteins. PMID:19803503

  7. Self-similarity criteria in anisotropic flows with viscosity stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danaila, L.; Voivenel, L.; Varea, E.

    2017-02-01

    Variable-viscosity flows exhibit a faster trend towards a fully developed turbulent state since fluctuations are produced at a larger amount. A legitimate expectation is that self-similarity to be tenable earlier than in classical, single-viscosity flows. The question which begs to be answered is: which are the self-similarity criteria for variable-viscosity, density-matched, flows? The similarity assumption, i.e., all scales evolve in a similar fashion in space/time, is applied to the transport equation for one- and two-point statistics of anisotropic, variable-viscosity flows. It is shown that the similarity assumption is valid for regions of the flow where viscosity (mean values and the fluctuations root-mean-square) is uniform. In regions where viscosity gradients are important, such as the sheared region and jet boundaries, similarity is not tenable. Our claims are applicable to any decaying flow, isotropic or anisotropic. Support is provided by experimental data obtained in the near field region of a jet issuing into a more viscous environment. The viscosity ratio is 3.5.

  8. Effect of viscosity on metachrony in mucus propelling cilia.

    PubMed

    Gheber, L; Korngreen, A; Priel, Z

    1998-01-01

    In the present work we report that increasing the viscosity of the medium caused not only a decrease in the ciliary beat frequency but also changes in the metachrony and correlation between cilia. The study was performed using double and triple simultaneous photoelectric measurements on cultured ciliary cells from the frog esophagus in the viscosity range of 1-2,000 cp. We observed that increasing the viscosity intensified the fluctuations in all the measured parameters. Ciliary beat frequency decreased moderately. Even at quite high viscosities (circa 2000 cp.), cilia were still active with beating frequencies of 3-5 Hz. In addition, the degree of correlation between cilia parallel to the effective stroke direction (ESD) decreased, while that perpendicular to the ESD at a low range of viscosities remained unchanged and even increased at high viscosities. Medium viscosities in the range of 30-1,500 cp. altered the metachronal wave properties of cultured frog esophagus. The metachronal wavelength increased by up to 50%, and the wave direction changed towards more orthoplectic type of coordination. According to our recently suggested model [Gheber and Priel, 1990: Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 16:167-181], these effects can be explained by a decrease in the temporal asymmetry of the ciliary beat. Since similar results were observed in water propelling cilia of Paramecium subjected to medium viscosity ranges of up to 40 cp. [Machemer, 1972: J. Exp. Biol. 57:239-259], we conclude that hydrodynamic interactions govern the metachronal wave properties of both mucus and water propelling cilia, though mucus propelling cilia, with their better adaptation to increased load, are affected at much higher viscosities than water propelling cilia.

  9. Mental workload and driving

    PubMed Central

    Paxion, Julie; Galy, Edith; Berthelon, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to identify the most representative measures of subjective and objective mental workload in driving, and to understand how the subjective and objective levels of mental workload influence the performance as a function of situation complexity and driving experience, i.e., to verify whether the increase of situation complexity and the lack of experience increase the subjective and physiological levels of mental workload and lead to driving performance impairments. This review will be useful to both researchers designing an experimental study of mental workload and to designers of drivers’ training content. In the first part, we will broach the theoretical approach with two factors of mental workload and performance, i.e., situation complexity and driving experience. Indeed, a low complex situation (e.g., highways), or conversely a high complex situation (e.g., town) can provoke an overload. Additionally, performing the driving tasks implies producing a high effort for novice drivers who have not totally automated the driving activity. In the second part, we will focus on subjective measures of mental workload. A comparison of questionnaires usually used in driving will allow identifying the most appropriate ones as a function of different criteria. Moreover, we will review the empirical studies to verify if the subjective level of mental workload is high in simple and very complex situations, especially for novice drivers compared to the experienced ones. In the third part, we will focus on physiological measures. A comparison of physiological indicators will be realized in order to identify the most correlated to mental workload. An empirical review will also take the effect of situation complexity and experience on these physiological indicators into consideration. Finally, a more nuanced comparison between subjective and physiological measures will be established from the impact on situation complexity and experience. PMID:25520678

  10. Bulk micromachined quasistatic torsional micromirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiessling, Torsten; Wolter, Alexander; Schenk, Harald; Lakner, Hubert

    2004-01-01

    One dimensional torsional micro mirrors for laser steering applications have been developed and manufactured at Fraunhofer Institute of Photonic Microsystems. Several design variations with rectangular plates are available. The device can be operated in resonant mode and quasistatic mode as well. The device is fabricated out of a BSOI wafer and a second conductive silicon wafer. The structure is assembled by conductive adhesive bonding. Torsional springs connect the mirror plate to the mirror frame mechanically and electrically. Filled isolation trench structures separate volumes of different electrical potentials at the frame and at the deflective mirror respectively. Comb drive structures at both sides of the deflectable mirror and the part of frame located opposite increases capacitance at both mirror half sides. Applying a low level drive voltage between the combs, the mirror can be operated in resonant mode. The second silicon wafer is placed below the deflective mirror and is electrically at ground. Applying a electrical potential of higher level to one side of the deflectable mirror, the mirror can be driven quasistatic and resonant as well. While the drive voltage is applied to one side of the mirror, the comb drive structure of the opposite side can be used for capacitance based position read out.

  11. Viscosity of Liquid Crystal Mixtures in the Presence of Electroconvection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaya, Tomoyuki; Satou, Yuki; Goto, Yoshitomo; Hidaka, Yoshiki; Orihara, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    We have experimentally investigated the viscosity of nematic liquid crystal mixtures of p-methoxybenzylidene-p'-n-butylaniline (MBBA) and p-ethoxybenzylidene-p'-cyanoaniline (EBCA) in the presence of electroconvection under an ac electric field with 60 Hz. Although the viscosity of the mixtures with negative dielectric anisotropy shows a characteristic decrease in the high-voltage regime, that with positive dielectric anisotropy shows a monotonic increase as the applied voltage is increased. The experimental results suggest that the decrease in viscosity observed only for the mixtures with negative dielectric anisotropy is attributed to the negative contribution of electric stress caused by the anisotropic director distribution of the turbulent state.

  12. Static and Dynamic Viscosity of a Single Layer Dusty Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, Peter; Sandor, Mate Cs.; Kovacs, Aniko; Donko, Zoltan

    2011-11-29

    We measured the static and dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a single layer complex plasma by applying, respectively, a stationary and a periodically modulated shear stress induced by the light pressure of manipulating laser beams. Under static conditions the shear viscosity reproduced the numerically predicted shear rate dependence, the so called shear-thinning effect. Under oscillating shear both the magnitude and the ratio of the dissipative and elastic contributions to the complex viscosity show strong frequency dependence. Accompanying molecular dynamics simulations explain and support the experimental observations.

  13. Shear viscosities of photons in strongly coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Di-Lun; Müller, Berndt

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the shear viscosity of thermalized photons in the quark gluon plasma (QGP) at weak coupling and N = 4 super Yang-Mills plasma (SYMP) at both strong and weak couplings. We find that the shear viscosity due to the photon-parton scattering up to the leading order of electromagnetic coupling is suppressed when the coupling of the QGP/SYMP is increased, which stems from the blue-shift of the thermal-photon spectrum at strong coupling. In addition, the shear viscosity rapidly increases near the deconfinement transition in a phenomenological model analogous to the QGP.

  14. Plasma viscosity increase with progression of peripheral arterial atherosclerotic disease.

    PubMed

    Poredos, P; Zizek, B

    1996-03-01

    Increased blood and plasma viscosity has been described in patients with coronary and peripheral arterial disease. However, the relation of viscosity to the extent of arterial wall deterioration--the most important determinant of clinical manifestation and prognosis of the disease--is not well known. Therefore, the authors studied plasma viscosity as one of the major determinants of blood viscosity in patients with different stages of arterial disease of lower limbs (according to Fontaine) and its relation to the presence of some risk factors of atherosclerosis. The study encompassed four groups of subjects: 19 healthy volunteers (group A), 18 patients with intermittent claudication up to 200 m (stage II; group B), 15 patients with critical ischemia of lower limbs (stage III and IV; group C), and 16 patients with recanalization procedures on peripheral arteries. Venous blood samples were collected from an antecubital vein without stasis for the determination of plasma viscosity (with a rotational capillary microviscometer, PAAR), fibrinogen, total cholesterol, alpha-2-macroglobulin, and glucose concentrations. In patients with recanalization procedure local plasma viscosity was also determined from blood samples taken from a vein on the dorsum of the foot. Plasma viscosity was most significantly elevated in the patients with critical ischemia (1.78 mPa.sec) and was significantly higher than in the claudicants (1.68 mPa.sec), and the claudicants also had significantly higher viscosity than the controls (1.58 mPa.sec). In patients in whom a recanalization procedure was performed, no differences in systemic and local plasma viscosity were detected, neither before nor after recanalization of the diseased artery. In all groups plasma viscosity was correlated with fibrinogen concentration (r=0.70, P < 0.01) and total cholesterol concentration (r=0.24, P < 0.05), but in group C (critical ischemia) plasma viscosity was most closely linked to the concentration of alpha-2

  15. Astronaut Mike Fincke Conducts Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement (FMVM) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Astronaut Mike Fincke places droplets of honey onto the strings for the Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement (FMVM) investigation onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The FMVM experiment measures the time it takes for two individual highly viscous fluid droplets to coalesce or merge into one droplet. Different fluids and droplet size combinations were tested in the series of experiments. By using the microgravity environment, researchers can measure the viscosity or 'thickness' of fluids without the influence of containers and gravity using this new technique. Understanding viscosity could help scientists understand industrially important materials such as paints, emulsions, polymer melts and even foams used to produce pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic products.

  16. Self-calibrating viscosity probes: design and subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Dakanali, Marianna; Do, Thai H; Horn, Austin; Chongchivivat, Akaraphon; Jarusreni, Tuptim; Lichlyter, Darcy; Guizzunti, Gianni; Haidekker, Mark A; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A

    2012-07-15

    We describe the design, synthesis and fluorescence profiles of new self-calibrating viscosity dyes in which a coumarin (reference fluorophore) has been covalently linked with a molecular rotor (viscosity sensor). Characterization of their fluorescence properties was made with separate excitation of the units and through resonance energy transfer from the reference to the sensor dye. We have modified the linker and the substitution of the rotor in order to change the hydrophilicity of these probes thereby altering their subcellular localization. For instance, hydrophilic dye 12 shows a homogeneous distribution inside the cell and represents a suitable probe for viscosity measurements in the cytoplasm.

  17. DEDRICK DRIVE, LOOKING NORTH FROM SOUTH END OF DEDRICK DRIVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DEDRICK DRIVE, LOOKING NORTH FROM SOUTH END OF DEDRICK DRIVE NEAR BUILDING 80 - Pacific Coast Torpedo Station, Keyport Industrial District, Both sides of Second Street, between Dedrick Drive and Liberty Bay and one building west of Dedrick Drive and south of Second Street, Keyport, Kitsap County, WA

  18. Driving Anger and Driving Behavior in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Tracy L.; Deffenbacher, Jerry L.; Rosen, Lee A.; Barkley, Russell A.; Rodricks, Trisha

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study assesses whether anger in the context of driving is associated with the negative driving outcomes experienced by individuals with ADHD. Method: ADHD adults (n = 56) complete measures of driving anger, driving anger expression, angry thoughts behind the wheel, and aggressive, risky, and crash-related behavior. Results are…

  19. Driving anger in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sullman, Mark J M; Stephens, Amanda N; Yong, Michelle

    2014-10-01

    The present study examined the types of situations that cause Malaysian drivers to become angry. The 33-item version of the driver anger scale (Deffenbacher et al., 1994) was used to investigate driver anger amongst a sample of 339 drivers. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the fit of the original six-factor model (discourtesy, traffic obstructions, hostile gestures, slow driving, illegal driving and police presence), after removing one item and allowing three error pairs to covary, was satisfactory. Female drivers reported more anger, than males, caused by traffic obstruction and hostile gestures. Age was also negatively related to five (discourtesy, traffic obstructions, hostile gestures, slow driving and police presence) of the six factors and also to the total DAS score. Furthermore, although they were not directly related to crash involvement, several of the six forms of driving anger were significantly related to the crash-related conditions of: near misses, loss of concentration, having lost control of a vehicle and being ticketed. Overall the pattern of findings made in the present research were broadly similar to those from Western countries, indicating that the DAS is a valid measure of driving anger even among non-European based cultures.

  20. Piezoelectric Measurement Of Bulk Modulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Barry L.

    1992-01-01

    In method of measuring bulk modulus of elasticity of elastomeric material, piezoelectric crystals of various sizes and energized by alternating voltage embedded in material. Concept demonstrated in test cell in which piezoelectric crystal mounted either unconstrained or between two rubber pads and connected as actuator in loud-speaker. The 1-in. diameter crystal excited with 24 Vac at 60 Hz. When crystal was unconstrained, it drew current of 0.8 mA. When crystal was constrained between rubber pads, current fell to 0.65 mA. Low current, minimal heating, and absence of arcing makes technique suitable for measurement of bulk moduli of elasticity of flammable or explosive rubbery materials.

  1. Longitudinal bulk acoustic mass sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J. H.; Teva, J.; Boisen, A.; Davis, Z. J.

    2009-07-20

    A polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever is fabricated and operated in air at 51 MHz. A mass sensitivity of 100 Hz/fg (1 fg=10{sup -15} g) is obtained from the preliminary experiments where a minute mass is deposited on the device by means of focused ion beam. The total noise in the currently applied measurement system allows for a minimum detectable mass of 0.5 fg in air.

  2. TNT Equivalency of Bulk Nitrocellulose

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    9TIN ’IN AD-E400 576 CONTRACTOR REPORT ARLCD-CR-81007 TNT EQUIVALENCY OF BULK NITROCELLULOSE F. L. MCINTYRE COMPUTER SCIENCES CORPORATION NSTL...September 1978 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(S) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(e) F. L. Mc~ntyre, Computer Sciences Corporation P. Price...PROJECT. TASK Computer Sciences Corporation AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS NSTL Station, MS 39529 MMT-5784285 II. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12

  3. Longitudinal bulk acoustic mass sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, J. H.; Teva, J.; Boisen, A.; Davis, Z. J.

    2009-07-01

    A polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever is fabricated and operated in air at 51 MHz. A mass sensitivity of 100 Hz/fg (1 fg=10-15 g) is obtained from the preliminary experiments where a minute mass is deposited on the device by means of focused ion beam. The total noise in the currently applied measurement system allows for a minimum detectable mass of 0.5 fg in air.

  4. U.S. DRIVE

    SciTech Connect

    2012-03-16

    U.S. DRIVE, which stands for United States Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability, is an expanded government-industry partnership among the U.S. Department of Energy; USCAR, representing Chrysler Group LLC, Ford Motor Company and General Motors; Tesla Motors; five energy companies – BP America, Chevron Corporation, ConocoPhillips, ExxonMobil Corporation, and Shell Oil Products US; two utilities – Southern California Edison and Michigan-based DTE Energy; and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The U.S. DRIVE mission is to accelerate the development of pre-competitive and innovative technologies to enable a full range of affordable and clean advanced light-duty vehicles, as well as related energy infrastructure.

  5. Ceramic vane drive joint

    DOEpatents

    Smale, Charles H.

    1981-01-01

    A variable geometry gas turbine has an array of ceramic composition vanes positioned by an actuating ring coupled through a plurality of circumferentially spaced turbine vane levers to the outer end of a metallic vane drive shaft at each of the ceramic vanes. Each of the ceramic vanes has an end slot of bow tie configuration including flared end segments and a center slot therebetween. Each of the vane drive shafts has a cross head with ends thereof spaced with respect to the sides of the end slot to define clearance for free expansion of the cross head with respect to the vane and the cross head being configured to uniformly distribute drive loads across bearing surfaces of the vane slot.

  6. Linking structure to fragility in bulk metallic glass-forming liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Shuai E-mail: m.stolpe@mx.uni-saarland.de; Stolpe, Moritz E-mail: m.stolpe@mx.uni-saarland.de; Gross, Oliver; Gallino, Isabella; Hembree, William; Busch, Ralf; Evenson, Zach; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kruzic, Jamie J.

    2015-05-04

    Using in-situ synchrotron X-ray scattering, we show that the structural evolution of various bulk metallic glass-forming liquids can be quantitatively connected to their viscosity behavior in the supercooled liquid near T{sub g}. The structural signature of fragility is identified as the temperature dependence of local dilatation on distinct key atomic length scales. A more fragile behavior results from a more pronounced thermally induced dilatation of the structure on a length scale of about 3 to 4 atomic diameters, coupled with shallower temperature dependence of structural changes in the nearest neighbor environment. These findings shed light on the structural origin of viscous slowdown during undercooling of bulk metallic glass-forming liquids and demonstrate the promise of predicting the properties of bulk metallic glasses from the atomic scale structure.

  7. Measurements of fluid viscosity using a miniature ball drop device.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jay X

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes measurement of fluid viscosity using a small ball drop device. It requires as little as 100 μl of fluid. Each measurement can be performed in seconds. The experiment is designed to yield reliable viscosity values by operating at properly chosen tilt angles and with calibration using well-characterized Newtonian fluids such as mixtures of glycerol and water. It also yields dynamical viscosity of non-Newtonian fluids at moderate shear rates. The device is easy to assemble and it allows for the measurement of viscosity even when the fluid samples are too small to measure using most commercial viscometers or rheometers. Therefore, the technique is particularly useful in characterizing biological fluids such as solutions of proteins, DNA, and polymers frequently used in biomaterial applications.

  8. Absolute viscosity measured using instrumented parallel plate system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broyles, H. H.

    1967-01-01

    An automatic system measures the true average shear viscosity of liquids and viscoelastic materials, using the parallel plate method and automatically displays the results on a graphic record. This eliminates apparatus setup and extensive calculations.

  9. An inverse method for non-invasive viscosity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullana, J.-M.; Dispot, N.; Flaud, P.; Rossi, M.

    2007-04-01

    A procedure is presented which allows to compute in a non-invasive manner, blood viscosity through flow measurements obtained at a fixed vessel cross-section. The data set is made of measurements (artery radius and spatially discrete velocity profiles) performed at given time intervals for which the signal to noise ratio is typical of U.S. Doppler velocimetry in clinical situation. This identification approach is based on the minimization, through a backpropagation algorithm, of a cost function quantifying the distance between numerical data obtained through Navier-Stokes simulations and experimental measurements. Since this cost function implicitly depends on the value of viscosity used in numerical simulations, its minimization determines an effective viscosity which is shown to be robust to measurement errors and sampling time. Such an approach is shown to work in an in vitro experiment, and seems to be suitable for in vivo measurements of viscosity by the atraumatic techniques of Doppler echography.

  10. Textured-surface quartz resonator fluid density and viscosity monitor

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Stephen J.; Wiczer, James J.; Cernosek, Richard W.; Frye, Gregory C.; Gebert, Charles T.; Casaus, Leonard; Mitchell, Mary A.

    1998-08-25

    A pair of thickness-shear mode resonators, one smooth and one with a textured surface, allows fluid density and viscosity to be independently resolved. A textured surface, either randomly rough or regularly patterned, leads to trapping of liquid at the device surface. The synchronous motion of this trapped liquid with the oscillating device surface allows the device to weigh the liquid; this leads to an additional response that depends on liquid density. This additional response enables a pair of devices, one smooth and one textured, to independently resolve liquid density and viscosity; the difference in responses determines the density while the smooth device determines the density-viscosity product, and thus, the pair determines both density and viscosity.

  11. Utilization of Low Gravity Environment for Measuring Liquid Viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.; Ethridge, Edwin

    1998-01-01

    The method of drop coalescence is used for determining the viscosity of highly viscous undercooled liquids. Low gravity environment is necessary in order to allow for examining large volumes affording much higher accuracy for the viscosity calculations than possible for smaller volumes available under 1 - g conditions. The drop coalescence method is preferred over the drop oscillation technique since the latter method can only be applied for liquids with vanishingly small viscosities. The technique developed relies on both the highly accurate solution of the Navier-Stokes equations as well as on data from experiments conducted in near zero gravity environment. Results are presented for method validation experiments recently performed on board the NASA/KC-135 aircraft. While the numerical solution was produced using the Boundary Element Method. In these tests the viscosity of a highly viscous liquid, glycerine at room temperature, was determined using the liquid coalescence method. The results from these experiments will be discussed.

  12. Experimental Study of Additives on Viscosity biodiesel at Low Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajar, Berkah; Sukarno

    2015-09-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to find out the viscosity of additive and biodiesel fuel mixture in the temperature range from 283 K to 318 K. Solutions to reduce the viscosity of biodiesel is to add the biodiesel with some additive. The viscosity was measured using a Brookfield Rheometer DV-II. The additives were the generic additive (Diethyl Ether/DDE) and the commercial additive Viscoplex 10-330 CFI. Each biodiesel blends had a concentration of the mixture: 0.0; 0.25; 0.5; 0.75; 1.0; and 1.25% vol. Temperature of biodiesel was controlled from 40°C to 0°C. The viscosity of biodiesel and additive mixture at a constant temperature can be approximated by a polynomial equation and at a constant concentration by exponential equation. The optimum mixture is at 0.75% for diethyl ether and 0.5% for viscoplex.

  13. Poiseuille flow to measure the viscosity of particle model fluids.

    PubMed

    Backer, J A; Lowe, C P; Hoefsloot, H C J; Iedema, P D

    2005-04-15

    The most important property of a fluid is its viscosity, it determines the flow properties. If one simulates a fluid using a particle model, calculating the viscosity accurately is difficult because it is a collective property. In this article we describe a new method that has a better signal to noise ratio than existing methods. It is based on using periodic boundary conditions to simulate counter-flowing Poiseuille flows without the use of explicit boundaries. The viscosity is then related to the mean flow velocity of the two flows. We apply the method to two quite different systems. First, a simple generic fluid model, dissipative particle dynamics, for which accurate values of the viscosity are needed to characterize the model fluid. Second, the more realistic Lennard-Jones fluid. In both cases the values we calculated are consistent with previous work but, for a given simulation time, they are more accurate than those obtained with other methods.

  14. Splash Suppression by Solvent Viscosity in Dense Suspension Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wendy; Dodge, Kevin; Peters, Ivo; Klein Schaarsberg, Martin; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2015-03-01

    When a dense suspension droplet impacts a hard surface, it will either break apart (``splash'') or remain in a compact configuration without ejecting any particles. We use experiments and discrete particle simulations in which relative particle motions are penalized by lubrication-flow drag to analyze the influence of solvent viscosity on splashing. We find that suspension splash is driven by particle inertia. It can be suppressed in 2 different ways. At low solvent viscosity, lubrication drag due to viscous flow has a negligible effect. Splash is suppressed by surface tension overcoming particle inertia. At high solvent viscosity, lubrication drag alone suppresses splashing. Because impact produces an expanding flow that stretches the suspension radially, suppression in the high-viscosity regime is largely accomplished by lubrication-flow drag preventing initially nearby particle pairs from separating fully. Energy dissipation by viscous flow during collisions plays a smaller role. Present Address: Physics of Fluids Group, University of Twente.

  15. Viscosity measurements of metallic melts using the oscillating drop technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heintzmann, P.; Yang, F.; Schneider, S.; Lohöfer, G.; Meyer, A.

    2016-06-01

    By means of benchmarking reduced gravity experiments, we have verified the measured viscosity of binary Zr-Ni glass forming liquids utilizing the oscillating drop technique combined with ground-based electrostatic levitation (ESL). Reliable viscosity data can be obtained as long as internal viscous damping of a single oscillation mode of a levitated drop dominates external perturbations. This can be verified by the absence of a sample mass dependence of the results. Hence, ESL is an excellent tool for studying the viscosity of metallic glass forming melts in the range of about 10-250 mPa s, with sample masses below 100 mg. To this end, we show that, for binary Zr-Ni melts, the viscosity is qualitatively controlled by the packing density.

  16. Peristalsis of nonconstant viscosity Jeffrey fluid with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvi, N.; Latif, T.; Hussain, Q.; Asghar, S.

    Mixed convective peristaltic activity of variable viscosity nanofluids is addressed. Unlike the conventional consideration of constant viscosity; the viscosity is taken as temperature dependent. Constitutive relations for linear viscoelastic Jeffrey fluid are employed and uniform magnetic field is applied in the transverse direction. For nanofluids, the formulation is completed in presence of Brownian motion, thermophoresis, viscous dissipation and Joule heating. Consideration of temperature dependence of viscosity is not a choice but the realistic requirement of the wall temperature and the heat generated due to the viscous dissipation. Well established large wavelength and small Reynolds number approximations are invoked. Non-linear coupled system is analytically solved for the convergent series solutions identifying the interval of convergence explicitly. A comparative study between analytical and numerical solution is made for certainty. Influence of the parameters undertaken for the description of the problem is pointed out and its physics explained.

  17. Quetol 651: Not just a low viscosity resin.

    PubMed

    Ellis, E Ann

    2016-01-01

    Quetol 651, a low viscosity epoxy resin, is miscible with alcohols, acetone, and water. It is versatile and can be used as a single epoxide or mixed with other epoxides and anhydrides. The most important characteristic is that the addition of Quetol 651 to a formulation results in a lower viscosity embedding medium and allows for good detection of antigenic activity. Properly formulated and mixed resins containing Quetol 651 have excellent sectioning properties and good beam stability. The decrease in viscosity lends to lower specific gravity of the embedding medium and less interfering electron density between specimen elements resulting in better spatial resolution. New formulations and viscosity data are presented and compared to long used, embedding formulations and the extensive uses of Quetol 651 are reviewed.

  18. Laboratory Procedures in Thermal Expansion and Viscosity of Liquids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Paul Dow

    1974-01-01

    Describes the laboratory procedures for the measurement of thermal expansion and viscosity of liquids. These experiments require inexpensive equipment and are suitable for secondary school physical science classes. (JR)

  19. Relating Fresh Concrete Viscosity Measurements from Different Rheometers

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, Chiara F.; Martys, Nicos S.

    2003-01-01

    Concrete rheological properties need to be properly measured and predicted in order to characterize the workability of fresh concrete, including special concretes such as self-consolidating concrete (SCC). It was shown by a round-robin test held in 2000 [1,2] that different rheometer designs gave different values of viscosity for the same concrete. While empirical correlation between different rheometers was possible, for a procedure that is supposed to “scientifically” improve on the empirical slump tests, this situation is unsatisfactory. To remedy this situation, a new interpretation of the data was developed. In this paper, it is shown that all instruments tested could be directly and quantitatively compared in terms of relative plastic viscosity instead of the plastic viscosity alone. This should eventually allow the measurements from various rheometer designs to be directly calibrated against known standards of plastic viscosity, putting concrete rheometry and concrete workability on a sounder materials science basis. PMID:27413607

  20. Measurements of fluid viscosity using a miniature ball drop device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jay X.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes measurement of fluid viscosity using a small ball drop device. It requires as little as 100 μl of fluid. Each measurement can be performed in seconds. The experiment is designed to yield reliable viscosity values by operating at properly chosen tilt angles and with calibration using well-characterized Newtonian fluids such as mixtures of glycerol and water. It also yields dynamical viscosity of non-Newtonian fluids at moderate shear rates. The device is easy to assemble and it allows for the measurement of viscosity even when the fluid samples are too small to measure using most commercial viscometers or rheometers. Therefore, the technique is particularly useful in characterizing biological fluids such as solutions of proteins, DNA, and polymers frequently used in biomaterial applications.

  1. Viscosity of α-pinene secondary organic material and implications for particle growth and reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Grayson, James W.; Bateman, Adam P.; Kuwata, Mikinori; Sellier, Mathieu; Murray, Benjamin J.; Shilling, John E.; Martin, Scot T.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2013-01-01

    Particles composed of secondary organic material (SOM) are abundant in the lower troposphere. The viscosity of these particles is a fundamental property that is presently poorly quantified yet required for accurate modeling of their formation, growth, evaporation, and environmental impacts. Using two unique techniques, namely a “bead-mobility” technique and a “poke-flow” technique, in conjunction with simulations of fluid flow, the viscosity of the water-soluble component of SOM produced by α-pinene ozonolysis is quantified for 20- to 50-μm particles at 293–295 K. The viscosity is comparable to that of honey at 90% relative humidity (RH), similar to that of peanut butter at 70% RH, and at least as viscous as bitumen at ≤30% RH, implying that the studied SOM ranges from liquid to semisolid or solid across the range of atmospheric RH. These data combined with simple calculations or previous modeling studies are used to show the following: (i) the growth of SOM by the exchange of organic molecules between gas and particle may be confined to the surface region of the particles for RH ≤ 30%; (ii) at ≤30% RH, the particle-mass concentrations of semivolatile and low-volatility organic compounds may be overpredicted by an order of magnitude if instantaneous equilibrium partitioning is assumed in the bulk of SOM particles; and (iii) the diffusivity of semireactive atmospheric oxidants such as ozone may decrease by two to five orders of magnitude for a drop in RH from 90% to 30%. These findings have possible consequences for predictions of air quality, visibility, and climate. PMID:23620520

  2. A nonlinear description of the viscosity and dilatancy of granular suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsorno, Davide; Varsakelis, Christos; Papalexandris, Miltiadis

    2016-11-01

    In the first part of this talk we present a rheology law for granular suspensions based on the representation theorem of isotropic tensors. The proposed law has a number of desirable properties, namely, it is free of singularities, it vanishes at equilibrium, and it predicts non-zero bulk viscosity as well as shear-rate dependent normal viscous stresses. Next, we present an evolution equation for the volume fraction of the granular phase that can describe the dilatancy of granular suspensions in a consistent manner. Its derivation is based upon the introduction of the volume fraction and its gradient as internal degrees of freedom. The resulting model has been applied to a number of well-known test cases, such as plane-shear and pressure-driven flows, and its predictions are presented and compared with experimental data. In particular, we show that this model can successfully predict important features of granular suspensions such as normal stress differences and particle migration.

  3. Microlinear piezo drive experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azin, A. V.; Bogdanov, E. P.; Rikkonen, S. V.; Ponomarev, S. V.; Khramtsov, A. M.

    2017-02-01

    The article embraces the experimental description of the micro linear piezo drive intended for the peripheral cord tensioner in the reflecting surface shape regulator system for large-sized transformable spacecraft antenna reflectors. The research target is the experimental investigation of the micro linear piezo drive to determine the stable oscillatory system operating modes which would include improved energy conversion parameters. The following points are briefly presented: test stand construction-design of the peripheral cord tensioner; the determined frequency characteristics and the identified resonant and actual frequencies of an oscillatory system under inertia load. A series of experiments has been conducted for both different preliminary voltages and inertia mass values.

  4. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.; Rogers, I.

    1961-06-27

    Accurate and controlled drive for the control rod is from an electric motor. A hydraulic arrangement is provided to balance a piston against which a control rod is urged by the application of fluid pressure. The electric motor drive of the control rod for normal operation is made through the aforementioned piston. In the event scramming is required, the fluid pressure urging the control rod against the piston is relieved and an opposite fluid pressure is applied. The lack of mechanical connection between the electric motor and control rod facilitates the scramming operation.

  5. Viscosity measurements on very small capillary blood samples.

    PubMed

    Eugster, M; Häusler, K; Reinhart, W H

    2007-01-01

    Viscosity measurements on very small capillary blood samples could be of considerable clinical interest. We have developed an oscillating viscometer for very small volumes, which consists of a glass capillary containing 7 mul of blood, which is part of an oscillating torsional resonator. The damping of the sinusoidal oscillations depends on the density and viscosity of the fluid, which allows blood viscosity measurements. The instrument was first evaluated in comparison with a standard blood viscometer (Contraves LS 30). Blood from healthy volunteers anticoagulated with EDTA was adjusted to hematocrit levels of 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60%, respectively. A strong correlation was found between hematocrit and oscillating viscosity (y=0.17x-2.05, r=0.969, p<0.0001) and between oscillating and conventional high shear viscosity (y=1.11x-0.62, r=0.971, p<0.0001). Blood viscosity measured in venous or capillary blood of normal subjects was similar (p=0.63). Bedside viscosity measurements on capillary blood drawn from a finger prick during routine blood glucose measurements in patients with diabetes mellitus showed lower blood viscosity than controls (3.62+/-0.87 vs 4.79+/-0.59 mPa.s, p=0.0007), which is in contrast to earlier publications, and may be explained by the lower hematocrit in our diabetic patients (34.7+/-6.0% vs. 43.1+/-1.9%, p<0.0001). Blood viscosity was independent of the actual glucose level (range 3-17 mmol/l). Capillary blood anticoagulated with EDTA was drawn by heel prick from 23 newborns. Blood viscosity was higher (5.66 +/-2.47 mPa.s) than in adult controls (see above), which could be explained by the dependence on the higher hematocrit (46.4 +/-8.6%). We conclude that viscosity measurements can be made on very small samples such as capillary blood from diabetic patients or newborn babies with this new oscillating viscometer. It remains to be determined if such new informations have clinical implications.

  6. Seismic Constraints on the Mantle Viscosity Structure beneath Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiens, Douglas; Heeszel, David; Aster, Richard; Nyblade, Andrew; Wilson, Terry

    2015-04-01

    Lateral variations in upper mantle viscosity structure can have first order effects on glacial isostatic adjustment. These variations are expected to be particularly large for the Antarctic continent because of the stark geological contrast between ancient cratonic and recent tectonically active terrains in East and West Antarctica, respectively. A large misfit between observed and predicted GPS rates for West Antarctica probably results in part from the use of a laterally uniform viscosity structure. Although not linked by a simple relationship, mantle seismic velocities can provide important constraints on mantle viscosity structure, as they are both largely controlled by temperature and water content. Recent higher resolution seismic models for the Antarctic mantle, derived from data acquired by new seismic stations deployed in the AGAP/GAMSEIS and ANET/POLENET projects, offer the opportunity to use the seismic velocity structure to place new constraints on the viscosity of the Antarctic upper mantle. We use an Antarctic shear wave velocity model derived from array analysis of Rayleigh wave phase velocities [Heeszel et al, in prep] and examine a variety of methodologies for relating seismic, thermal and rheological parameters to compute a suite of viscosity models for the Antarctic mantle. A wide variety of viscosity structures can be derived using various assumptions, but they share several robust common elements. There is a viscosity contrast of at least two orders of magnitude between East and West Antarctica at depths of 80-250 km, reflecting the boundary between cold cratonic lithosphere in East Antarctica and warm upper mantle in West Antarctica. The region beneath the Ellsworth-Whitmore Mtns and extending to the Pensacola Mtns. shows intermediate viscosity between the extremes of East and West Antarctica. There are also significant variations between different parts of West Antarctica, with the lowest viscosity occurring beneath the Marie Byrd Land (MBL

  7. Bulk elastic fingering instability in Hele-Shaw cells.

    PubMed

    Saintyves, B; Dauchot, O; Bouchaud, E

    2013-07-26

    We demonstrate experimentally the existence of a purely elastic, nonviscous fingering instability which arises when air penetrates into an elastomer confined in a Hele-Shaw cell. Fingers appear sequentially and propagate within the bulk of the material as soon as a critical strain, independent of the elastic modulus, is exceeded. Key elements in the driving force of the instability are the confinement of the gel and its adhesion to the plates of the cell, which result in a considerable expense of elastic energy during the growth of the air bubble.

  8. Density and viscosity of tetralin and trans-decalin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, F. A.; Hamano, K.; Sengers, J. V.

    1989-07-01

    New measurements are reported for the density and viscosity of tetralin and trans-decalin. The density was determined from room temperature to 60°C for tetralin and to 95°C for trans-decalin. The kinematic viscosity was measured up to temperatures slightly above 100°C. Our results improve upon the values recommended by the American Petroleum Institute for these liquids.

  9. Cytokine modulation of human blood viscosity from vivax malaria patients.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Edson Fredulin; Cantarini, Déborah Giovanna; Siqueira, Renan; Ribeiro, Elton Brito; Braga, Érika Martins; Honório-França, Adenilda Cristina; França, Eduardo Luzía

    2016-06-01

    Malaria is a major infectious disease in several countries and is caused by protozoa of the genus Plasmodium. In vivax malaria patients, inflammatory processes occur, as well as changes in cytokines and blood flow. The present study analyzed the cytokine modulation of blood viscosity from patients infected with Plasmodium vivax (P. vivax). Blood samples were collected from 42 non-infected individuals (control group) and 37 individuals infected with P. vivax. The IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNFα, TGF-β and IL-17 cytokine concentrations in the serum were assessed, and the blood rheological properties were determined. The analysis of blood viscosity for shear rates revealed that the blood viscosity of the infected patients was significantly greater than that of the non-infected individuals. The viscosity of the blood was greater in the infected individuals than in the non-infected subjects. The serum from individuals with P. vivax infections exhibited higher IFN-γ and IL-17 concentrations and lower TGF-β levels. Incubation of the blood from infected individuals with IL-17 or IL-17 associated with IFN-γ reduced the viscosity to rates equivalent to the blood from non-infected individuals. Independently of cytokine modulation, no correlation was found between the parasitemia and blood viscosity of the infected patients. These data suggest that the alterations of blood viscosity are relevant as an auxiliary tool for the clinical diagnosis of disease. In malaria, erythrocytes are more sensitive to osmotic shock, and the reduction of viscosity by IL-17 may be related to a possible immunomodulator agent during infection.

  10. Viscosity measurements of crystallizing andesite from Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador).

    PubMed

    Chevrel, Magdalena Oryaëlle; Cimarelli, Corrado; deBiasi, Lea; Hanson, Jonathan B; Lavallée, Yan; Arzilli, Fabio; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-03-01

    Viscosity has been determined during isothermal crystallization of an andesite from Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador). Viscosity was continuously recorded using the concentric cylinder method and employing a Pt-sheathed alumina spindle at 1 bar and from 1400°C to subliquidus temperatures to track rheological changes during crystallization. The disposable spindle was not extracted from the sample but rather left in the sample during quenching thus preserving an undisturbed textural configuration of the crystals. The inspection of products quenched during the crystallization process reveals evidence for heterogeneous crystal nucleation at the spindle and near the crucible wall, as well as crystal alignment in the flow field. At the end of the crystallization, defined when viscosity is constant, plagioclase is homogeneously distributed throughout the crucible (with the single exception of experiment performed at the lowest temperature). In this experiments, the crystallization kinetics appear to be strongly affected by the stirring conditions of the viscosity determinations. A TTT (Time-Temperature-Transformation) diagram illustrating the crystallization "nose" for this andesite under stirring conditions and at ambient pressure has been constructed. We further note that at a given crystal content and distribution, the high aspect ratio of the acicular plagioclase yields a shear-thinning rheology at crystal contents as low as 13 vol %, and that the relative viscosity is higher than predicted from existing viscosity models. These viscosity experiments hold the potential for delivering insights into the relative influences of the cooling path, undercooling, and deformation on crystallization kinetics and resultant crystal morphologies, as well as their impact on magmatic viscosity.

  11. Viscosity measurements of crystallizing andesite from Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador)

    PubMed Central

    Cimarelli, Corrado; deBiasi, Lea; Hanson, Jonathan B.; Lavallée, Yan; Arzilli, Fabio; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Viscosity has been determined during isothermal crystallization of an andesite from Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador). Viscosity was continuously recorded using the concentric cylinder method and employing a Pt‐sheathed alumina spindle at 1 bar and from 1400°C to subliquidus temperatures to track rheological changes during crystallization. The disposable spindle was not extracted from the sample but rather left in the sample during quenching thus preserving an undisturbed textural configuration of the crystals. The inspection of products quenched during the crystallization process reveals evidence for heterogeneous crystal nucleation at the spindle and near the crucible wall, as well as crystal alignment in the flow field. At the end of the crystallization, defined when viscosity is constant, plagioclase is homogeneously distributed throughout the crucible (with the single exception of experiment performed at the lowest temperature). In this experiments, the crystallization kinetics appear to be strongly affected by the stirring conditions of the viscosity determinations. A TTT (Time‐Temperature‐Transformation) diagram illustrating the crystallization “nose” for this andesite under stirring conditions and at ambient pressure has been constructed. We further note that at a given crystal content and distribution, the high aspect ratio of the acicular plagioclase yields a shear‐thinning rheology at crystal contents as low as 13 vol %, and that the relative viscosity is higher than predicted from existing viscosity models. These viscosity experiments hold the potential for delivering insights into the relative influences of the cooling path, undercooling, and deformation on crystallization kinetics and resultant crystal morphologies, as well as their impact on magmatic viscosity. PMID:27656114

  12. Viscosity and mutual diffusion in strongly asymmetric binary ionic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, Sorin

    2005-05-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results for the viscosity and mutual diffusion constant of a strongly asymmetric binary ionic mixture. We compare the results with available theoretical models previously tested for much smaller asymmetries. For the case of viscosity we propose a predictive framework based on the linear mixing rule, while for mutual diffusion we discuss some consistency problems of widely used Boltzmann-equation-based models.

  13. Viscosity and mutual diffusion in strongly asymmetric plasma mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, S

    2004-09-07

    The authors present molecular dynamics simulation results for the viscosity and mutual diffusion constant of a strongly asymmetric two-component plasma (TCP). They compare the results with available theoretical models previously tested for much smaller asymmetries. for the case of viscosity they propose a new predictive framework based on the linear mixing rule, while for mutual diffusion they point out some consistency problems of widely used Boltzmann equation based models.

  14. Highly branched polyethylenes as lubricant viscosity and friction modifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Joshua W.; Zhou, Yan; Qu, Jun; Bays, J. Timothy; Cosimbescu, Lelia

    2016-10-08

    A series of highly branched polyethylene (BPE) were prepared and evaluated in a Group I base oil as potential viscosity and friction modifiers. The performance of these BPEs supports the expected dual functionality. Changes in polarity, topology, and molecular weight of the BPEs showed significant effects on the lubricants' performance with respect to viscosity index and friction reduction. In conclusion, this study provides scientific insights into polymer design for future lubricant development activities.

  15. Measurement of viscosity, density and gas solubility of refrigerant blends

    SciTech Connect

    Cavestri, R.C.; Munk, J. )

    1993-04-01

    Liquid/liquid miscibilities of four different 32 ISO VG polyolesters and one alkylbenzene at three concentrations were determined. Also a full vapor lubricant equilibrium (VLE) viscosity reduction of a 32 ISO VG mineral oil with HCFC-22 is complete. Partial viscosity reduction information by the fractionate components from R-502 in 32 ISO VG mineral oil is presented from 40C (104C) and 70C (158F) isotherms.

  16. A microfluidic mixer with self-excited 'turbulent' fluid motion for wide viscosity ratio applications.

    PubMed

    Xia, H M; Wang, Z P; Koh, Y X; May, K T

    2010-07-07

    In micromixer studies, compared with the design, modeling and characterization, the influence of the fluid properties on mixing has been less discussed. This topic is of practical significance as the properties of diverse biological and chemical liquids to be mixed have large variations. Here, we report a microfluidic mixer for mixing fluids with widely different viscosities. It contains an interconnected multi-channel network through which the bulk fluid volumes are divided into smaller ones and chaotically reorganized. Then, the multiple fluid streams are driven into an expansion chamber which triggers viscous flow instabilities. Experiments with the co-flow of glycerol and aqueous solutions show an automatic transition of the flow from a steady state to a 'turbulent' state, significantly enhancing the mixing. This observation is rather interesting considering that it occurs in a passive flow and the average Reynolds number involved is small. Further testing indicates that this mixer works well at viscosity ratio (chi) up to the order of 10(4).

  17. Viscosity-density sensor with resonant torsional paddle for direct detection in liquid.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Wang, J; Li, X; Chen, D

    2011-12-01

    A novel micro-machined biosensor based on the resonant torsional paddle with electromagnetic excitation which can work in liquid directly is presented. The sensor designed consists of two paddles with resonant torsional mode, in which the energy loss of the resonator during the vibration is so lower that it can be suitable for detection in liquid. Finite element method analysis was carried out to guarantee the sensitivity of the sensor. Micro electro-mechanical system (MEMS) bulk silicon processes were adopted to accomplish the fabrication. A positive-feedback circuit with energy compensation is designed to improve the characteristics of the sensor in liquid. Experiments show that the resonant torsional paddle can work directly in liquid and the Q-factor of the sensor in liquid can be improved from 2.65 to 40 with energy compensation. Viscosity tests and density tests for the sensor show that the decrease in frequency and the decrease in Q-factor are related to density and viscosity of the solutions, respectively.

  18. Optimization of NMR spectroscopy of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low viscosity fluids

    PubMed Central

    Nucci, Nathaniel V.; Marques, Bryan S.; Bédard, Sabrina; Dogan, Jakob; Gledhill, John M.; Moorman, Veronica R.; Peterson, Ronald W.; Valentine, Kathleen G.; Wand, Alison L.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive application of solution NMR spectroscopy to studies of macromolecules remains fundamentally limited by the molecular rotational correlation time. For proteins, molecules larger than 30 kDa require complex experimental methods, such as TROSY in conjunction with isotopic labeling schemes that are often expensive and generally reduce the potential information available. We have developed the reverse micelle encapsulation strategy as an alternative approach. Encapsulation of proteins within the protective nano-scale water pool of a reverse micelle dissolved in ultra-low viscosity nonpolar solvents overcomes the slow tumbling problem presented by large proteins. Here, we characterize the contributions from the various components of the protein-containing reverse micelle system to the rotational correlation time of the encapsulated protein. Importantly, we demonstrate that the protein encapsulated in the reverse micelle maintains a hydration shell comparable in size to that seen in bulk solution. Using moderate pressures, encapsulation in ultra-low viscosity propane or ethane can be used to magnify this advantage. We show that encapsulation in liquid ethane can be used to reduce the tumbling time of the 43 kDa maltose binding protein from ~23 ns to ~10 ns. These conditions enable, for example, acquisition of TOCSY-type data resolved on the adjacent amide NH for the 42 kDa encapsulated maltose binding protein dissolved in liquid ethane, which is typically impossible for proteins of such size without use of extensive deuteration or the TROSY effect. PMID:21748265

  19. A Structurally Based Viscosity Model for Oxide Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guo-Hua; Chou, Kuo-Chih; Mills, Ken

    2014-04-01

    A structurally based viscosity model is proposed to represent the viscosity of oxide melts as functions of both temperature and composition; The oxide melts cover the following constituents: Li2O, Na2O, K2O, MgO, CaO, SrO, BaO, FeO, MnO, Al2O3, SiO2, CaF2, TiO2, Fe2O3, and P2O5. The model describes the slag structure in terms of the various forms of oxygen ions which are classified according to the metal cations they bond with. Approximate methods for calculating the concentrations of these oxygen ions are proposed and are then used to describe the effect of melt structure on viscosity. The model provides a good description of the variations in viscosity with composition and temperature. The measured viscosities were compared with values calculated with the model, and the current model was found to provide reliable estimates of viscosities of slags used in various industrial processes ( e.g., blast furnace, basic oxygen steelmaking, ladle refining, continuous casting of steel, coal gasification, and electroslag remelting).

  20. Reference Correlation for the Viscosity of Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laesecke, Arno; Muzny, Chris D.

    2017-03-01

    A comprehensive database of experimental and computed data for the viscosity of carbon dioxide (CO2) was compiled and a new reference correlation was developed. Literature results based on an ab initio potential energy surface were the foundation of the correlation of the viscosity in the limit of zero density in the temperature range from 100 to 2000 K. Guided symbolic regression was employed to obtain a new functional form that extrapolates correctly to 0 and to 10 000 K. Coordinated measurements at low density made it possible to implement the temperature dependence of the Rainwater-Friend theory in the linear-in-density viscosity term. The residual viscosity could be formulated with a scaling term ργ/T, the significance of which was confirmed by symbolic regression. The final viscosity correlation covers temperatures from 100 to 2000 K for gaseous CO2 and from 220 to 700 K with pressures along the melting line up to 8000 MPa for compressed and supercritical liquid states. The data representation is more accurate than with the previous correlations, and the covered pressure and temperature range is significantly extended. The critical enhancement of the viscosity of CO2 is included in the new correlation.

  1. Ras Diffusion Is Sensitive to Plasma Membrane Viscosity

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, J. Shawn; Drake, Kimberly R.; Remmert, Catha L.; Kenworthy, Anne K.

    2005-01-01

    The cell surface contains a variety of barriers and obstacles that slow the lateral diffusion of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored and transmembrane proteins below the theoretical limit imposed by membrane viscosity. How the diffusion of proteins residing exclusively on the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane is regulated has been largely unexplored. We show here that the diffusion of the small GTPase Ras is sensitive to the viscosity of the plasma membrane. Using confocal fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we examined the diffusion of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged HRas, NRas, and KRas in COS-7 cells loaded with or depleted of cholesterol, a well-known modulator of membrane bilayer viscosity. In cells loaded with excess cholesterol, the diffusional mobilities of GFP-HRas, GFP-NRas, and GFP-KRas were significantly reduced, paralleling the behavior of the viscosity-sensitive lipid probes DiIC16 and DiIC18. However, the effects of cholesterol depletion on protein and lipid diffusion in cell membranes were highly dependent on the depletion method used. Cholesterol depletion with methyl-β-cyclodextrin slowed Ras diffusion by a viscosity-independent mechanism, whereas overnight cholesterol depletion slightly increased both protein and lipid diffusion. The ability of Ras to sense membrane viscosity may represent a general feature of proteins residing on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. PMID:15923235

  2. Ras diffusion is sensitive to plasma membrane viscosity.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, J Shawn; Drake, Kimberly R; Remmert, Catha L; Kenworthy, Anne K

    2005-08-01

    The cell surface contains a variety of barriers and obstacles that slow the lateral diffusion of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored and transmembrane proteins below the theoretical limit imposed by membrane viscosity. How the diffusion of proteins residing exclusively on the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane is regulated has been largely unexplored. We show here that the diffusion of the small GTPase Ras is sensitive to the viscosity of the plasma membrane. Using confocal fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we examined the diffusion of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged HRas, NRas, and KRas in COS-7 cells loaded with or depleted of cholesterol, a well-known modulator of membrane bilayer viscosity. In cells loaded with excess cholesterol, the diffusional mobilities of GFP-HRas, GFP-NRas, and GFP-KRas were significantly reduced, paralleling the behavior of the viscosity-sensitive lipid probes DiIC(16) and DiIC(18). However, the effects of cholesterol depletion on protein and lipid diffusion in cell membranes were highly dependent on the depletion method used. Cholesterol depletion with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin slowed Ras diffusion by a viscosity-independent mechanism, whereas overnight cholesterol depletion slightly increased both protein and lipid diffusion. The ability of Ras to sense membrane viscosity may represent a general feature of proteins residing on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane.

  3. An Improved Comprehensive Model for the Apparent Viscosity of Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobitz, Frank; Anderson, Spencer

    2008-11-01

    An improved comprehensive model for the apparent viscosity of blood is developed and used in simulations of the microcirculation in capillary bundles of rat spinotrapezius muscle fascia. In the microcirculation, the apparent viscosity of blood depends on the local vessel diameter, hematocrit, and shear rate. The proposed comprehensive model extends the apparent viscosity model developed by Pries, Secomb, Gaehtgens, and Gross (Circulation Research, 67, 826-834, 1990), which describes the effect of vessel diameter and hematocrit on the apparent viscosity. A shear thinning term is developed using the experimental data of Lipowsky, Usami, and Chien (Microvascular Research, 19, 297-319, 1980). Curve fits of this data can be combined with equations given in the Pries et al. work to create a system of equations that can be used to find the shear thinning factor. The simulations based on the improved apparent viscosity model use realistic vessel topology for the microvasculature, reconstructed from microscope images of tissue samples, and consider passive and active vessel properties. The numerical method is based on a Hagen-Poiseuille balance in the microvessels and a sparse matrix solver is used to obtain the solution. It was found that the inclusion of the shear factor decreases the overall flowrate in the capillary bundle. Many vessel connections in the fascia are characterized by relatively low shear rates and therefore increased apparent viscosity.

  4. Viscosity of alumina nanoparticles dispersed in car engine coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Kole, Madhusree; Dey, T.K.

    2010-09-15

    The present paper, describes our experimental results on the viscosity of the nanofluid prepared by dispersing alumina nanoparticles (<50 nm) in commercial car coolant. The nanofluid prepared with calculated amount of oleic acid (surfactant) was tested to be stable for more than 80 days. The viscosity of the nanofluids is measured both as a function of alumina volume fraction and temperature between 10 and 50 C. While the pure base fluid display Newtonian behavior over the measured temperature, it transforms to a non-Newtonian fluid with addition of a small amount of alumina nanoparticles. Our results show that viscosity of the nanofluid increases with increasing nanoparticle concentration and decreases with increase in temperature. Most of the frequently used classical models severely under predict the measured viscosity. Volume fraction dependence of the nanofluid viscosity, however, is predicted fairly well on the basis of a recently reported theoretical model for nanofluids that takes into account the effect of Brownian motion of nanoparticles in the nanofluid. The temperature dependence of the viscosity of engine coolant based alumina nanofluids obeys the empirical correlation of the type: log ({mu}{sub nf}) = A exp(BT), proposed earlier by Namburu et al. (author)

  5. Effect of Viscosity on the Crystallization of Undercooled Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    There have been numerous studies of glasses indicating that low-gravity processing enhances glass formation. NASA PI s are investigating the effect of low-g processing on the nucleation and crystal growth rates. Dr. Ethridge is investigating a potential mechanism for glass crystallization involving shear thinning of liquids in 1-g. For shear thinning liquids, low-g (low convection) processing will enhance glass formation. The study of the viscosity of glass forming substances at low shear rates is important to understand these new crystallization mechanisms. The temperature dependence of the viscosity of undercooled liquids is also very important for NASA s containerless processing studies. In general, the viscosity of undercooled liquids is not known, yet knowledge of viscosity is required for crystallization calculations. Many researchers have used the Turnbull equation in error. Subsequent nucleation and crystallization calculations can be in error by many orders of magnitude. This demonstrates the requirement for better methods for interpolating and extrapolating the viscosity of undercooled liquids. This is also true for undercooled water. Since amorphous water ice is the predominant form of water in the universe, astrophysicists have modeled the crystallization of amorphous water ice with viscosity relations that may be in error by five orders-of-magnitude.

  6. Impact of aggregate formation on the viscosity of protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Nicoud, Lucrèce; Lattuada, Marco; Yates, Andrew; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2015-07-21

    Gaining knowledge on the stability and viscosity of concentrated therapeutic protein solutions is of great relevance to the pharmaceutical industry. In this work, we borrow key concepts from colloid science to rationalize the impact of aggregate formation on the changes in viscosity of a concentrated monoclonal antibody solution. In particular, we monitor the kinetics of aggregate growth under thermal stress by static and dynamic light scattering, and we follow the rise in solution viscosity by measuring the diffusion coefficient of tracer nanoparticles with dynamic light scattering. Moreover, we characterize aggregate morphology in the frame of the fractal geometry. We show that the curves of the increase in viscosity with time monitored at three different protein concentrations collapse on one single master curve when the reaction profiles are normalized based on an effective volume fraction occupied by the aggregates, which depends on the aggregate size, concentration and morphology. Importantly, we find that the viscosity of an aggregate sample is lower than the viscosity of a monomeric sample of a similar occupied volume fraction due to the polydispersity of the aggregate distribution.

  7. [Nucleoplasmic viscosity of living cells investigated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Liang, Li-Fang; Da, Xing; Chen, Tong-Sheng; Pei, Yi-Hui

    2009-02-01

    In order to non-invasively investigate nucleoplasmic viscosity in real time with good temporal resolution, the present study firstly introduced a new method based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). FCS is a kind of single-molecule technique with high temporal and spatial resolution to analyze the dynamics of fluorescent molecules in nanomolar concentration. Through a time correlation analysis of spontaneous intensity fluctuations, this technique in conjunction with EGFP as a probe is capable of determining nucleoplasmic viscosity in terms of Stokes-Einstein equation as well as its corresponding analysis of the diffusion coefficient for EGFP in the nucleus. The results showed that nucleoplasmic viscosity of ASTC-a-1 cells and HeLa cells were respectively (2.55 +/- 0.61) cP and (2.04 +/- 0.49) cP at pH 7.4 and 37 degrees C, consistent with the results by traditional methods, and nucleoplasmic viscosity was found to be larger than cytoplasmic viscosity. Meanwhile, the real-time analysis of nucleoplasmic viscosity in living cells exposed to hypotonic media proved that FCS could be used to track the changing rheological characteristics of the nucleoplasm in living cells. Taken together, this study suggests that FCS provides an accurate and non-invasive method to investigate the microenvironment in living cells on the femtoliter scale and it can be used as a powerful tool in researches on the dynamical processes of intracellular molecules.

  8. Does the magnetic field of a multipole stator winding drive flow of a ferrofluid in a cylindrical container?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Díaz, Isaac; Rinaldi, Carlos

    The flow of a ferrofluid in a stationary cylindrical container driven by a rotating magnetic field has received considerable attention since the inception of the field of ferrohydrodynamics. Much controversy has resulted regarding the existence, or lack thereof, of bulk flow under conditions of a rotating uniform magnetic field, which can be generated for example, using a two-pole stator winding. The original observations of flow at the interface showed counter-rotation of field and fluid, whereas recent observations of bulk flow using the ultrasound technique have shown co-rotation of field and fluid. Various theories have been advanced over the years to explain the observed phenomena, including the spin diffusion theory of Shliomis and the hypothesis that it is field non-uniformity, generated by non-ideal stator winding distributions, that actually drives the flow, as first proposed by Glazov. We have revisited this problem from an analytical perspective by solving the ferrohydrodynamic and magnetoquasistatic equations self-consistently for the case of ferrofluid in a cylindrical container, with and without an internal co-axial cylinder, and driven by the field generated by a multipole stator winding distribution. In such a winding increasing the number of poles results in increasingly non-uniform fields. It is shown that regardless of the number of poles in the stator winding the ferrohydrodynamic equations do not predict any flow in either geometry as long as the spin viscosity parameter is assumed to be zero. Velocity profiles are obtained for both geometries and arbitrary number of poles for the case of non-zero spin viscosity. It is shown that only for the case of a two-pole stator winding and ferrofluid constrained to the annular space between an inner and outer cylinder do the ferrohydrodynamic equations predict co-rotation of fluid and field close to the outer cylinder and counter-rotation of fluid and field close to the inner cylinder, in qualitative

  9. Teachers with Drive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coggins, Celine; Diffenbaugh, P. K.

    2013-01-01

    For students in U.S. classrooms today, the odds of being assigned to an inexperienced teacher are higher than they have ever been because so many teachers, some in the top 20 percent of effectiveness are leaving the classroom in their first five years. Coggins and Diffenbaugh turn to Daniel Pink's work on drive to determine how to motivate…

  10. DrivePy

    SciTech Connect

    King, Ryan; Guo, Yi

    2014-08-30

    DrivePy is physics-based drivetrain model that sizes drivetrain components based on aerodynamic and operational loads for use in a systems engineering model. It also calculates costs based on empirical data collected by NREL's National Wind Technology Center.

  11. Magnetized drive fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Rosensweig, R.E.; Zahn, M.

    1986-04-01

    A process is described for recovering a first fluid from a porous subterranean formation which comprises injecting a displacement fluid in an effective amount to displace the first fluid, injecting a ferrofluid, applying a magnetic field containing a gradient of field intensity within the formation, driving the displacement fluid through the formation with the ferrofluid and recovering first fluid.

  12. Drive-Through Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Margie

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how the early childhood field's approach to staff training reflects the drive-through, fast-food culture. Year after year directors send their teachers to workshops to get some quick refresher techniques. The author suggests that rather than focusing professional development on topics, focus on observing…

  13. Flywheel sickle drive mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Guinn, R.K.

    1989-03-21

    A releasable, eccentric drive mechanism is described, comprising: a first shaft extending along a central axis and presenting a generally cylindrical portion; a second shaft extending along a reference axis substantially parallel to the central axis in offset relation to the latter and having a generally cylindrical portion; a drive member having structure defining an opening including a first, generally cylindrical region receiving over one half of the circumference of the first shaft portion and a second, generally cylindrical region receiving over one half of the circumference of the second shaft portion, the second region being in side-by-side relationship to the first region and in open communication with the latter, the first shaft portion and the second shaft portion each including a substantially flat wall section extending in a plane substantially perpendicular to a reference plane passing through the central axis and the reference axis, each of the wall sections being inclined relative to the central axis in complemental, flat engagement with each other; and means coupled to one of the drive member and the second shaft for urging the first shaft in a longitudinal direction generally toward the second shaft in order to bring the wall section of the first shaft into a position of flat, wedging contact with the wall section of the second shaft and in contact with the structure defining the opening in order to securely interconnect the first shaft, the second shaft and the drive member.

  14. Driving While Intoxicated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brick, John

    Alcohol intoxication increases the risk of highway accidents, the relative risk of crash probability increasing as a function of blood alcohol content (BAC). Because alcohol use is more prevalent than use of other drugs, more is known about the relationship between alcohol use and driving. Most states presume a BAC of .10% to be evidence of drunk…

  15. The Drive to Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Diego

    2017-01-01

    At the heart of the educational vocation is a drive to influence, to meaningfully affect the learning and development of others. For adult educators working in higher education, daily activities--from teaching classes to supervising student research to attending faculty meetings to sitting on advisory boards--are full of opportunities to…

  16. CSI: Hard Drive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Acting on information from students who reported seeing a classmate looking at inappropriate material on a school computer, school officials used forensics software to plunge the depths of the PC's hard drive, searching for evidence of improper activity. Images were found in a deleted Internet Explorer cache as well as deleted file space.…

  17. Development of Viscosity Model for Petroleum Industry Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motahhari, Hamed reza

    Heavy oil and bitumen are challenging to produce and process due to their very high viscosity, but their viscosity can be reduced either by heating or dilution with a solvent. Given the key role of viscosity, an accurate viscosity model suitable for use with reservoir and process simulators is essential. While there are several viscosity models for natural gases and conventional oils, a compositional model applicable to heavy petroleum and diluents is lacking. The objective of this thesis is to develop a general compositional viscosity model that is applicable to natural gas mixtures, conventional crudes oils, heavy petroleum fluids, and their mixtures with solvents and other crudes. The recently developed Expanded Fluid (EF) viscosity correlation was selected as a suitable compositional viscosity model for petroleum applications. The correlation relates the viscosity of the fluid to its density over a broad range of pressures and temperatures. The other inputs are pressure and the dilute gas viscosity. Each fluid is characterized for the correlation by a set of fluid-specific parameters which are tuned to fit data. First, the applicability of the EF correlation was extended to asymmetric mixtures and liquid mixtures containing dissolved gas components. A new set of mass-fraction based mixing rules was developed to calculate the fluid-specific parameters for mixtures. The EF correlation with the new set of mixing rules predicted the viscosity of over 100 mixtures of hydrocarbon compounds and carbon dioxide with overall average absolute relative deviations (AARD) of less than 10% either with measured densities or densities estimated by Advanced Peng-Robinson equation of state (APR EoS). To improve the viscosity predictions with APR EoS-estimated densities, general correlations were developed for non-zero viscosity binary interaction parameters. The EF correlation was extended to non-hydrocarbon compounds typically encountered in natural gas industry. It was

  18. Shear viscosity for a heated granular binary mixture at low density.

    PubMed

    Montanero, José María; Garzó, Vicente

    2003-02-01

    The shear viscosity for a heated granular binary mixture of smooth hard spheres at low density is analyzed. The mixture is heated by the action of an external driving force (Gaussian thermostat) that exactly compensates for cooling effects associated with the dissipation of collisions. The study is made from the Boltzmann kinetic theory, which is solved by using two complementary approaches. First, a normal solution of the Boltzmann equation via the Chapman-Enskog method is obtained up to first order in the spatial gradients. The mass, heat, and momentum fluxes are determined and the corresponding transport coefficients identified. As in the free cooling case [V. Garzó and J. W. Dufty, Phys. Fluids 14, 1476 (2002)], practical evaluation requires a Sonine polynomial approximation, and here it is mainly illustrated in the case of the shear viscosity. Second, to check the accuracy of the Chapman-Enskog results, the Boltzmann equation is numerically solved by means of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. The simulation is performed for a system under uniform shear flow, using the Gaussian thermostat to control inelastic cooling. The comparison shows an excellent agreement between theory and simulation over a wide range of values of the restitution coefficients and the parameters of the mixture (masses, concentrations, and sizes).

  19. High-Temperature Liquid Metal Infusion Considering Surface Tension-Viscosity Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vinod; Harris, Christopher K.; Bronson, Arturo; Shantha-Kumar, Sanjay; Medina, Arturo

    2016-02-01

    In considering the significant effect of the surface tension-viscosity dissipation driving the fluid flow within a capillary, high-temperature liquid metal infusion was analyzed for titanium, yttrium, hafnium, and zirconium penetrating into a packed bed. A model of the dissipation considers the momentum balance within the capillary to determine the rate of infusion, which is compared with the Semlak-Rhines model developed for liquid metal penetration into a packed bed assumed as a bundle of tubes mimicking the porosity of a packed bed. For liquid Ti, the penetration rate was calculated from 0.2 µs to 1 ms and rose to a maximum of 7 m/s at approximately 1 µs; after which, the rate decreased to 0.7 m/s at 1 ms. Beyond 10 µs, the decreasing trend of the rate of penetration determined by the model of dissipation compared favorably with the Semlak-Rhines equation.

  20. Sheared E×B flow and plasma turbulence viscosity in a Reversed Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, N.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Regnoli, G.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Bergsåker, H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2004-11-01

    The relationship between electromagnetic turbulence and sheared plasma flow in Reversed Field Pinch configuration is addressed. The momentum balance equation for a compressible plasma is considered and the terms involved are measured in the outer region of Extrap-T2R RFP device. It results that electrostatic fluctuations determine the plasma flow through the electrostatic component of Reynolds Stress tensor. This term involves spatial and temporal scales comparable to those of MHD activity. The derived experimental perpendicular viscosity is consistent with anomalous diffusion, the latter being discussed in terms of electrostatic turbulence background and coherent structures emerging from fluctuations. The results indicate a dynamical interplay between turbulence, anomalous transport and mean E×B profiles. The momentum balance has been studied also in non-stationary condition during the application of Pulsed Poloidal Current Drive, which is known to reduce the amplitude of MHD modes.

  1. Viscosity Relaxation in Molten HgZnTe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, James K.

    2002-01-01

    Because of its narrow electronic band-gap, HgZnTe solid solutions have been proposed as effective detectors for infrared radiation. To produce the best single crystals of these materials for this application, knowledge of the phase diagram that governs the freezing of the liquid is essential. Besides the phase diagram, however, some information concerning the thermophysical properties of the melt, such as viscosity, density, specific heat, and enthalpy of mixing, can also be useful. Of these thermophysical properties, the viscosity is perhaps of the most interest scientifically. Measurements using the oscillating cup method have shown that the isothermal melt requires tens of hours of equilibration time before a steady value of the viscosity can be achieved. Over this equilibration time, which depends upon temperature, the viscosity can increase by as much as a factor of two before reaching a steady state. We suggest that this relaxation phenomenon may be due to a slight polymerization of Te atoms in the melt. To account for the time dependence of the viscosity in the HgZnTe melt, we propose that the liquid acts as a solvent that favors the formation of Te atom chains. We suggest that as the melt is cooled from a high temperature to the temperature for measurement of the viscosity, a free radical polymerization of Te atoms begins. To estimate this average molecular weight, we use a simple free radical polymerization mechanism, including a depolymerization step, to calculate the time dependence to the concentration of each Te polymer molecular weight fraction. From these molecular weight fractions, we compute the weight average molecular weight of the distribution. Using the semi-empirical relation between average molecular weight and viscosity, we obtain a formula for the time dependence of the viscosity of the melt. Upon examining this formula, we find that the viscosity achieves a steady value when a balance is achieved between the rate of formation of the chains

  2. Bulk Moisture and Salinity Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurge, Mark; Monje, Oscar; Prenger, Jessica; Catechis, John

    2013-01-01

    Measurement and feedback control of nutrient solutions in plant root zones is critical to the development of healthy plants in both terrestrial and reduced-gravity environments. In addition to the water content, the amount of fertilizer in the nutrient solution is important to plant health. This typically requires a separate set of sensors to accomplish. A combination bulk moisture and salinity sensor has been designed, built, and tested with different nutrient solutions in several substrates. The substrates include glass beads, a clay-like substrate, and a nutrient-enriched substrate with the presence of plant roots. By measuring two key parameters, the sensor is able to monitor both the volumetric water content and salinity of the nutrient solution in bulk media. Many commercially available moisture sensors are point sensors, making localized measurements over a small volume at the point of insertion. Consequently, they are more prone to suffer from interferences with air bubbles, contact area of media, and root growth. This makes it difficult to get an accurate representation of true moisture content and distribution in the bulk media. Additionally, a network of point sensors is required, increasing the cabling, data acquisition, and calibration requirements. measure the dielectric properties of a material in the annular space of the vessel. Because the pore water in the media often has high salinity, a method to measure the media moisture content and salinity simultaneously was devised. Characterization of the frequency response for capacitance and conductance across the electrodes was completed for 2-mm glass bead media, 1- to 2-mm Turface (a clay like media), and 1- to 2-mm fertilized Turface with the presence of root mass. These measurements were then used to find empirical relationships among capacitance (C), the dissipation factor (D), the volumetric water content, and the pore water salinity.

  3. Fracture and deformation of a zirconium based bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Katharine Marie

    Combining low density, high strength, large elastic strains, and a high fracture toughness, bulk metallic glasses are ideal for a variety of applications. This study focuses on the fracture and plastic deformation mechanisms of a recently developed Zr-Ti-Ni-Cu-Be bulk metallic glass. These alloys exhibit failure strengths of ˜2 GPa and toughness values of 10--30 MPa√m with remarkably little plastic deformation. Intense shear bands, associated with localized changes in free volume and glass viscosity, form and propagate seemingly unimpeded through the material, causing catastrophic failure. Shear band formation is associated with localized melting of the glass, as evidenced by molten droplets and vein patterns on the fracture surface. A central question regarding the formation of shear bands is whether this melting is a result of adiabatic heating or due to a mean stress induced free volume dilatation. To address these issues, the temperature increase on the side face of fracture samples was measured. Utilizing heat conduction and dissipation models, a crack tip temperature increase of 139 K was predicted at fracture initiation, consistent with the dissipation of plastic work as heat. The effect of mean stresses on the softening behavior of the metallic glass was also examined. A superimposed mean stress alters the initial free volume, changing the stress required for strain localization in a shear band. Experimental results indicated that a constant tensile mean stress characterized failure, and that this stress was sufficient to cause a significant viscosity decrease. In the vicinity of crack tips, shear bands form stable damage zones. When properly stabilized, these zones increase the apparent toughness to more than 80 MPa√m. By modeling the damage zone as an array of branch cracks, we show that the intrinsic toughness of the material is ˜15 MPa√m, consistent with estimates based on Taylor's fluid meniscus instability. This has important implications for

  4. Preface: Bulk nitride workshop 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Jaime A.; Pasova, Tania; Bockowski, Michal; Fujioka, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    The 9th ;International Workshop on Bulk Nitride Semiconductors; (IWBNS-IX) was held in Wonju, South Korea, from November 2-6, 2015, following the eight previous workshops held in November 2000 (Brazil), May 2002 (Brazil), September 2004 (Poland), October 2006 (Japan), September 2007 (Brazil), August 2009 (Poland), March 2011 (Japan), and October 2013 (Germany). The quietude and the beautiful surrounding nature of the Hansol Oak Valley provided the right environment to host the latest edition of this workshop series, the first one held in South Korea.

  5. Measuring Venus' Bulk Elemental Composition with BECA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, A. M.; Grau, J.; Lawrence, D. J.; Miles, J.; Peplowski, P. N.; Perkins, L.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Starr, R. D.

    2016-10-01

    The Bulk Elemental Composition Analyzer (BECA) instrument uses high energy neutrons and gamma rays to measure the bulk elemental composition of Venus beneath a landed probe. We will present the results of a BECA prototype tested at NASA/GSFC.

  6. Measurement of the Surface Dilatational Viscosity of an Insoluble Surfactant Monolayer at the Air/Water Interface Using a Pendant Drop Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Jose; Couzis, Alex; Maldarelli, Charles; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    When a fluid interface with surfactants is at rest, the interfacial stress is isotropic (as given by the equilibrium interfacial tension), and is described by the equation of state which relates the surface tension to the surfactant surface concentration. When surfactants are subjected to shear and dilatational flows, flow induced interaction of the surfactants; can create interfacial stresses apart from the equilibrium surface tension. The simplest relationship between surface strain rate and surface stress is the Boussinesq-Scriven constitutive equation completely characterized by three coefficients: equilibrium interfacial tension, surface shear viscosity, and surface dilatational viscosity Equilibrium interfacial tension and surface shear viscosity measurements are very well established. On the other hand, surface dilatational viscosity measurements are difficult because a flow which change the surface area also changes the surfactant surface concentration creating changes in the equilibrium interfacial tension that must be also taken into account. Surface dilatational viscosity measurements of existing techniques differ by five orders of magnitude and use spatially damped surface waves and rapidly expanding bubbles. In this presentation we introduce a new technique for measuring the surface dilatational viscosity by contracting an aqueous pendant drop attached to a needle tip and having and insoluble surfactant monolayer at the air-water interface. The isotropic total tension on the surface consists of the equilibrium surface tension and the tension due to the dilation. Compression rates are undertaken slow enough so that bulk hydrodynamic stresses are small compared to the surface tension force. Under these conditions we show that the total tension is uniform along the surface and that the Young-Laplace equation governs the drop shape with the equilibrium surface tension replaced by the constant surface isotropic stress. We illustrate this technique using

  7. Non-Arrhenian Multicomponent Melts Viscosity: Extension of the Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangiacapra, A.; Giordano, D.; Potuzak, M.; Dingwell, D. B.; Russell, J. K.

    2003-12-01

    Viscosity exerts a strong control on many magmatic and petrological processes on micro- and macroscopic scales. Furthermore, knowledge of such a property gives important constraints for structural theories of silicate melts. Giordano and Dingwell (GD)[1] recently described the viscosity of a large number of silicate melts coping a wide compositional range, on the basis of an empirical parameter (SM), sum on a molar basis of the network modifying cations. That model does not consider the contribution of the iron oxidation state to influencing the viscosity. Here, this is rectified. In this experimental study we have doubled (over 700 data) the number of viscosity determinations input into the model provided by [1] extending the compositional basis to further rhyolitic, trachytic, moldavitic, andesitic, latitic, pantelleritic, basaltic and basanitic melt compositions. The effect of Fe2+/Fe3+ on viscosity has been expressly examined. The temperature-dependence of the new liquid compositions have been investigated at high temperature (1050-1600° C) and low temperature (616-860° C) by using a concentric cylinder apparatus and the micropenetration technique, respectively. Fe2+/Fe3+ ratio has been determined by combining a wet chemistry technique (potassium dichromate titration) with microprobe analysis for each sample, before and after the high and low-T viscometry. Viscosity parameterization along the lines of the GD model, and incorporating the constraint that the high-T viscosities converge to a common value [2], reveal very good agreement with those calculated by [1]. Explicit redox influences appear to be small. [1] D.Giordano, D.B. Dingwell, 2003. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 208, 337-349; [2] J.K. Russell, D. Giordano, D.B. Dingwell, 2003, Am. Mineral. 88, 1390-1394.

  8. Variable-reluctance motor drives for electric vehicle propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, J. H.; Vallese, F. J.

    1985-05-01

    A methodology is presented for the design of a variable reluctance motor drive having high specific torque, power output and efficiency. Models are developed that describe the magnetic terminal relations of the VRM. These models are based on a flux-tube analysis that is motivated by numerically obtained finite-difference magnetic simulations. The result is a model for the flux-linkage/phase-current characteristic of the VRM. Intrinsic to this model is the estimation of maximum and minimum inductance as well the incremental inductance during bulk saturation. Also fundamental is the behavior of the flux linkage during local pole-tip saturation and due to bulk core saturation. The drive-oriented treatment of modelling and design uncovered important design interactions between the VRM, its inverter, and its excitation. The experimental 3.8-kW drive operated as expected, verifying the models and the design optimizations developed for VRM drives. These experimental results were projected to the 60-kW level, indicating that a 60-kW drive could be constructed with a VRM having a mass of approximately 65 kg, and an efficiency in excess of 95% at and below peak power output.

  9. Experiments on granular rheology: effects of particle size and fluid viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumita, I.; Higashi, N.

    2009-12-01

    We report the results of shear experiments of a thick layer of dry and liquid-saturated glass beads, a simplified model of fault gouge, in order to clarify and to compare how the particle size and fluid viscosity affect the granular rheology. We sheared sorted glass beads and measured the temporal variation of stress that fluctuates due to stick-slip behavior.We found that the stress drop and slip recurrence intervals increase with the particle size because of larger static bulk friction. The forms of stress - time series data for different particle size are not self-similar; it changes towards a saw-tooth-like temporal variation as the particle size increases, which can be characterized using two newly defined dimensionless numbers. In addition, we show that there is a continuous transition from constant slip velocity towards constant stress drop time as the particle size increases. We also determined the shear band width using the time-lapsed images of the sheared glass beads and found that the number of particles comprising the shear band decreases with the particle size. When the glass beads are saturated with viscous liquid, lubrication causes the rheology to change from frictional to viscous and to increase the slip recurrence interval, and these properties can be used to distinguish from the particle size effects. Under a fixed loading rate, there is a viscosity that minimizes the stress needed for shearing, at which we can separate the frictional and viscous regimes. Reference: Higashi, N. and I. Sumita, 2009, Experiments on granular rheology: effects of particle size and fluid viscosity, J. Geophys. Res., 114, B04413, doi.10.1029/2008JB005999 An example of raw time-series data of torque measurements during the time interval of 250 (s) for the dry glass beads sheared at 0.1 rpm. Here 1 torque% corresponds to 2.17 Pa.The solid and open circles indicate local maximum and minimum, respectively, which characterize each stick-slip event.The particle diameter d

  10. 49 CFR 172.514 - Bulk packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bulk packagings. 172.514 Section 172.514... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.514 Bulk packagings. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, each person who offers for transportation a bulk packaging which contains a hazardous...

  11. [Driving ability with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Küst, J; Dettmers, C

    2014-07-01

    Driving is an important issue for young patients, especially for those whose walking capacity is impaired. Driving might support the patient's social and vocational participation. The question as to whether a patient with multiple sclerosis (MS) is restricted in the ability to drive a car depends on neurological and neuropsychological deficits, self-awareness, insight into deficits and ability to compensate for loss of function. Because of the enormous variability of symptoms in MS the question is highly individualized. A practical driving test under supervision of a driving instructor (possibly accompanied by a neuropsychologist) might be helpful in providing both patient and relatives adequate feedback on driving abilities.

  12. Sex Chromosome Drive

    PubMed Central

    Helleu, Quentin; Gérard, Pierre R.; Montchamp-Moreau, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosome drivers are selfish elements that subvert Mendel's first law of segregation and therefore are overrepresented among the products of meiosis. The sex-biased progeny produced then fuels an extended genetic conflict between the driver and the rest of the genome. Many examples of sex chromosome drive are known, but the occurrence of this phenomenon is probably largely underestimated because of the difficulty to detect it. Remarkably, nearly all sex chromosome drivers are found in two clades, Rodentia and Diptera. Although very little is known about the molecular and cellular mechanisms of drive, epigenetic processes such as chromatin regulation could be involved in many instances. Yet, its evolutionary consequences are far-reaching, from the evolution of mating systems and sex determination to the emergence of new species. PMID:25524548

  13. [Cannabis affects driving skills].

    PubMed

    Khiabani, Hassan Z; Christophersen, Asbjørg S; Mørland, Jørg

    2007-03-01

    Delta (9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the most important psychoactive substance in cannabis, is frequently detected in blood from apprehended drivers suspected for drugged driving. Both experimental and epidemiological studies have demonstrated the negative effects of THC upon cognitive functions and psychomotor skills. These effects could last longer than a measurable concentration of THC in blood. Culpability studies have recently demonstrated an increased risk of becoming responsible in fatal or injurious traffic accidents, even with low blood concentrations of THC. It has also been demonstrated that there is a correlation between the degree of impairment, the drug dose and the THC blood concentration. It is very important to focus on the negative effect of cannabis on fitness to drive in order to prevent injuries and loss of human life and to avoid large economic consequences to the society.

  14. Magnetostrictive direct drive motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Dipak; Dehoff, P. H.

    1990-01-01

    Developing magnetostrictive direct drive research motors to power robot joints is discussed. These type motors are expected to produce extraordinary torque density, to be able to perform microradian incremental steps and to be self-braking and safe with the power off. Several types of motor designs have been attempted using magnetostrictive materials. One of the candidate approaches (the magnetostrictive roller drive) is described. The method in which the design will function is described as is the reason why this approach is inherently superior to the other approaches. Following this, the design will be modelled and its expected performance predicted. This particular candidate design is currently undergoing detailed engineering with prototype construction and testing scheduled for mid 1991.

  15. Advanced Motor Drives Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehsani, M.; Tchamdjou, A.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents an evaluation of advanced motor drive systems as a replacement for the hydrazine fueled APU units. The replacement technology must meet several requirements which are particular to the space applications and the Orbiter in general. Some of these requirements are high efficiency, small size, high power density. In the first part of the study several motors are compared, based on their characteristics and in light of the Orbiter requirements. The best candidate, the brushless DC is chosen because of its particularly good performance with regards to efficiency. Several power electronics drive technologies including the conventional three-phase hard switched and several soft-switched inverters are then presented. In the last part of the study, a soft-switched inverter is analyzed and compared to its conventional hard-switched counterpart. Optimal efficiency is a basic requirement for space applications and the soft-switched technology represents an unavoidable trend for the future.

  16. Driving on the Descartes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut John W. Young, Apollo 16 mission commander, drives the 'Rover', Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) to its final parking place near the end of the third extravehicular activity (EVA-3) at the Descartes landing site. Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., Lunar Module pilot, took this photograph looking southward. The flank of Stone Mountain can be seen on the horizon at left. The shadow of the Lunar Module 'Orion' is visible in the foreground.

  17. Gear Drive Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Philadelphia Gear Corporation used two COSMIC computer programs; one dealing with shrink fit analysis and the other with rotor dynamics problems in computerized design and test work. The programs were used to verify existing in-house programs to insure design accuracy by checking its company-developed computer methods against procedures developed by other organizations. Its specialty is in custom units for unique applications, such as Coast Guard ice breaking ships, steel mill drives, coal crusher, sewage treatment equipment and electricity.

  18. Variable reluctance drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Lipo, T.A.; Liang, F.

    1995-10-17

    A variable reluctance drive system including a motor and corresponding converter for improved current commutation is described. The motor incorporates a salient pole rotor and a salient pole stator having one or more full pitch windings which operate by mutual inductance to transfer the current from the active short pitch winding following phase alignment. This increases output torque and/or speed and permits a number of simple and economical converter circuits. 17 figs.

  19. Butalbital and driving impairment.

    PubMed

    Yeakel, Jillian K; Logan, Barry K

    2013-07-01

    Butalbital (Fiorinal(®)), used in the treatment of migraines and muscle pain, is the most commonly encountered barbiturate in impaired driving cases. It has central nervous system (CNS) depressant properties, including sedation, drowsiness, and feelings of intoxication, which can contribute to driving impairment. Twenty-six driving under the influence cases are reviewed including results from field sobriety tests and toxicology testing. Blood samples were screened using enzyme multiplied immunoassay technique immunoassay, and the presence of butalbital was confirmed and quantified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, gas chromatography with flame ionization detection, or gas chromatography nitrogen/phosphorus detection. Butalbital concentrations ranged from 1.0 to 30.2 mg/L, with a mean and median of 16.0 mg/L. General impairment indicators in these cases included horizontal and vertical nystagmus, lack of convergence, poor motor coordination, and balance and speech problems, which are common to CNS depressant intoxication, similar to that associated with alcohol. These findings indicate the importance of toxicological testing for butalbital in cases where CNS depressants are indicated.

  20. Structural and molecular basis of starch viscosity in hexaploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Ral, J-P; Cavanagh, C R; Larroque, O; Regina, A; Morell, M K

    2008-06-11

    Wheat starch is considered to have a low paste viscosity relative to other starches. Consequently, wheat starch is not preferred for many applications as compared to other high paste viscosity starches. Increasing the viscosity of wheat starch is expected to increase the functionality of a range of wheat flour-based products in which the texture is an important aspect of consumer acceptance (e.g., pasta, and instant and yellow alkaline noodles). To understand the molecular basis of starch viscosity, we have undertaken a comprehensive structural and rheological analysis of starches from a genetically diverse set of wheat genotypes, which revealed significant variation in starch traits including starch granule protein content, starch-associated lipid content and composition, phosphate content, and the structures of the amylose and amylopectin fractions. Statistical analysis highlighted the association between amylopectin chains of 18-25 glucose residues and starch pasting properties. Principal component analysis also identified an association between monoesterified phosphate and starch pasting properties in wheat despite the low starch-phosphate level in wheat as compared to tuber starches. We also found a strong negative correlation between the phosphate ester content and the starch content in flour. Previously observed associations between internal starch granule fatty acids and the swelling peak time and pasting temperature have been confirmed. This study has highlighted a range of parameters associated with increased starch viscosity that could be used in prebreeding/breeding programs to modify wheat starch pasting properties.

  1. On the viscosity stratification in temporal mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danaila, Luminita; Taguelmimt, Noureddine; Hadjadj, Abdellah; Turbulence Team

    2015-11-01

    We assess the effects of viscosity variations in low-speed temporally-evolving turbulent mixing layer. The two streams are density-matched, but the slow fluid is Rv times more viscous than the rapid stream. Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) are performed for several viscosity ratios, Rv varying between 1 and 9. The space-time evolution of Variable-Viscosity Flow (VVF) is compared with that of the Constant-Viscosity Flow (CVF). The velocity fluctuations occur earlier and are more enhanced for VVF. In particular, the kinetic energy peaks earlier and is up to three times larger for VVF than for CVF at the earliest stages of the flow. Over the first stages of the flow, the temporal growth rate of the fluctuations kinetic energy is exponential, in full agreement with linear stability theory. The transport equation for the fluctuations kinetic energy is favourably compared with simulations data. The enhanced kinetic energy for VVF is mainly due to an increased production at the interface between the two fluids, in tight correlation with enlarged values of mean velocity gradient at the inflection point of the mean velocity profile. The transport equations of the one-and two-point kinetic energy show that self-preservation cannot be complete in variable-viscosity flows. ANR is acknowledged for financial support.

  2. Viscosity and thermal conductivity of stable graphite suspensions near percolation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lei; Wang, Jianjian; Marconnet, Amy M; Barbati, Alexander C; McKinley, Gareth H; Liu, Wei; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-14

    Nanofluids have received much attention in part due to the range of properties possible with different combinations of nanoparticles and base fluids. In this work, we measure the viscosity of suspensions of graphite particles in ethylene glycol as a function of the volume fraction, shear rate, and temperature below and above the percolation threshold. We also measure and contrast the trends observed in the viscosity with increasing volume fraction to the thermal conductivity behavior of the same suspensions: above the percolation threshold, the slope that describes the rate of thermal conductivity enhancement with concentration reduces compared to below the percolation threshold, whereas that of the viscosity enhancement increases. While the thermal conductivity enhancement is independent of temperature, the viscosity changes show a strong dependence on temperature and exhibit different trends with respect to the temperature at different shear rates above the percolation threshold. Interpretation of the experimental observations is provided within the framework of Stokesian dynamics simulations of the suspension microstructure and suggests that although diffusive contributions are not important for the observed thermal conductivity enhancement, they are important for understanding the variations in the viscosity with changes of temperature and shear rate above the percolation threshold. The experimental results can be collapsed to a single master curve through calculation of a single dimensionless parameter (a Péclet number based on the rotary diffusivity of the graphite particles).

  3. Dynamic viscosity measurement in non-Newtonian graphite nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Duan, Fei; Wong, Ting Foong; Crivoi, Alexandru

    2012-07-02

    : The effective dynamic viscosity was measured in the graphite water-based nanofluids. The shear thinning non-Newtonian behavior is observed in the measurement. On the basis of the best fitting of the experimental data, the viscosity at zero shear rate or at infinite shear rate is determined for each of the fluids. It is found that increases of the particle volume concentration and the holding time period of the nanofluids result in an enhancement of the effective dynamic viscosity. The maximum enhancement of the effective dynamic viscosity at infinite rate of shear is more than 24 times in the nanofluids held for 3 days with the volume concentration of 4% in comparison with the base fluid. A transmission electron microscope is applied to reveal the morphology of aggregated nanoparticles qualitatively. The large and irregular aggregation of the particles is found in the 3-day fluids in the drying samples. The Raman spectra are extended to characterize the D and G peaks of the graphite structure in the nanofluids. The increasing intensity of the D peak indicates the nanoparticle aggregation growing with the higher concentration and the longer holding time of the nanofluids. The experimental results suggest that the increase on effective dynamic viscosity of nanofluids is related to the graphite nanoparticle aggregation in the fluids.

  4. The Larger the Viscosity, the Higher the Bounce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Menachem; Klein Schaarsberg, Martin; Peters, Ivo; Dodge, Kevin; Zhang, Wendy; Jaeger, Heinrich

    A low-viscosity liquid drop can bounce upon impact onto a solid. A high-viscosity drop typically just flattens, i.e., it splats. Surprisingly, our experiments with a droplet made of densely packed glass beads in silicone oil display the opposite behavior: the low-viscosity oil suspension drop splats. The high-viscosity oil suspension bounces. Increasing solvent viscosity increases the rebound energy. To gain insight into the underlying mechanism, we model the suspension as densely packed elastic spheres experiencing viscous lubrication drag between neighbors. The model reproduces the observed trends. Plots of elastic compression and drag experienced by the particles show that rebounds are made possible by (1) a fraction of the impact energy being stored during initial contact via elastic compression, (2) a rapid broadening of local lubrication drag interactions at the initial impact site into a spatially uniform upward force throughout the drop. Including finite wall drag due to the presence of ambient air into the numerical model diminishes and eventually cuts off the rebound.

  5. Chemically exfoliating large sheets of phosphorene via choline chloride urea viscosity-tuning.

    PubMed

    Ng, A; Sutto, T E; Matis, B R; Deng, Y; Ye, P D; Stroud, R M; Brintlinger, T H; Bassim, N D

    2017-04-18

    Exfoliation of two-dimensional phosphorene from bulk black phosphorous through chemical means is demonstrated where the solvent system of choice (choline chloride urea diluted with ethanol) has the ability to successfully exfoliate large-area multi-layer phosphorene sheets and further protect the flakes from ambient degradation. The intercalant solvent molecules, aided by low-powered sonication, diffuse between the layers of the bulk black phosphorus, allowing for the exfoliation of the multi-layer phosphorene through breaking of the interlayer van der Waals bonds. Through viscosity tuning, the optimal parameters (1:1 ratio between the intercalant and the diluting solvent) at which the exfoliation takes place is determined. Our exfoliation technique is shown to produce multi-layer phosphorene flakes with surface areas greater than 3 μm(2) (a factor of three larger than what has previously been reported for a similar exfoliation method) while limiting exposure to the ambient environment, thereby protecting the flakes from degradation. Characterization techniques such as optical microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and (scanning) transmission electron microscopy are used to investigate the quality, quantity, and thickness of the exfoliated flakes.

  6. Chemically exfoliating large sheets of phosphorene via choline chloride urea viscosity-tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, A.; Sutto, T. E.; Matis, B. R.; Deng, Y.; Ye, P. D.; Stroud, R. M.; Brintlinger, T. H.; Bassim, N. D.

    2017-04-01

    Exfoliation of two-dimensional phosphorene from bulk black phosphorous through chemical means is demonstrated where the solvent system of choice (choline chloride urea diluted with ethanol) has the ability to successfully exfoliate large-area multi-layer phosphorene sheets and further protect the flakes from ambient degradation. The intercalant solvent molecules, aided by low-powered sonication, diffuse between the layers of the bulk black phosphorus, allowing for the exfoliation of the multi-layer phosphorene through breaking of the interlayer van der Waals bonds. Through viscosity tuning, the optimal parameters (1:1 ratio between the intercalant and the diluting solvent) at which the exfoliation takes place is determined. Our exfoliation technique is shown to produce multi-layer phosphorene flakes with surface areas greater than 3 μm2 (a factor of three larger than what has previously been reported for a similar exfoliation method) while limiting exposure to the ambient environment, thereby protecting the flakes from degradation. Characterization techniques such as optical microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, and (scanning) transmission electron microscopy are used to investigate the quality, quantity, and thickness of the exfoliated flakes.

  7. Surface tension, viscosity, and rheology of water-based nanofluids: a microscopic interpretation on the molecular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gui; Duan, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Xiao-Dong

    2014-09-01

    Nanofluids are suspensions of nanometer-sized particles which significantly modify the properties of the base fluids. Nanofluids exhibit attractive properties, such as high thermal conductivity, tunable surface tension, viscosity, and rheology. Various attempts have been made to understand the mechanisms for these property modifications caused by adding nanoparticles; however, due to the lack of direct nanoscale evidence, these explanations are still controversial. This work calculated the surface tension, viscosity, and rheology of gold-water nanofluids using molecular dynamics simulations which provide a microscopic interpretation for the modified properties on the molecular level. The gold-water interaction potential parameters were changed to mimic various nanoparticle types. The results show that the nanoparticle wettability is responsible for the modified surface tension. Hydrophobic nanoparticles always tend to stay on the free surface so they behave like a surfactant to reduce the surface tension. Hydrophilic nanoparticles immersed into the bulk fluid impose strong attractive forces on the water molecules at the free surface which reduces the free surface thickness and increases the surface tension of the nanofluid. Solid-like absorbed water layers were observed around the nanoparticles which increase the equivalent nanoparticle radius and reduce the mobility of the nanoparticles within the base fluid which increases the nanofluid viscosity. The results show the water molecule solidification between two or many nanoparticles at high nanoparticle loadings, but the solidification effect is suppressed for shear rates greater than a critical shear rate; thus Newtonian nanofluids can present shear-thinning non-Newtonian behavior.

  8. [Automobile driving capacity in dementia].

    PubMed

    Seeger, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Dementia influences at an early stage the driving aptitude of motor vehicle steering persons. Every year in Switzerland, around 16'000 driving permit holders suffer newly from dementia; therefore the driving aptitude is questioned, especially because of possibly limited executive functions. Individuals with early-stage dementia often may show a dangerous driving stile. However, a mild dementia does not a priori exclude the driving aptitude, and less than half of these drivers can continue driving for another 1 - 3 years. In contrast, there is no further driving aptitude in presence of moderate dementia. In the assessment of driving aptitude, the underlying cause of dementia is always taken into account. Cognitive short tests such as the Mini-Mental Status Exam, Clock Drawing Test and Trail-Making Test are not suitable to make reliable statements about the aptitude to drive, but these tests are very important for the initial diagnosis of dementia in primary care practice and can lead the way for further examination concerning driving aptitude. The legally prescribed regular check-up for motorists aged over 70 years in Switzerland provides an ideal opportunity for early detection of incipient dementia. The practical procedure for the assessment of aptitude to drive in the primary care practice is presented. The physician-guided on-road driving test represents a meaningful, practical and relatively cost-effective tool for the evaluation of driving aptitude in cases of doubt.

  9. An analytic model of convection in a system with layered viscosity and plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, John W.; O'Connell, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    We present an analytic boundary layer model for thermal convection with a finite-strength plate and depth-dependent viscosity. The model permits solutions in which convective flow rates in the mantle exceed the plate velocity. The energy balance equations for the lithosphere and convective cell are distinct and the model yields the plate velocity, plate thickness and heat flow, as well as the laterally averaged horizontal flow profile for a convective cell. We demonstrate, by inspection of the lithospheric energy balance, that the dominant plate driving force depends not only on the material properties of the mantle and lithosphere, but also on the velocity of the plate. Multiple solutions are possible with three solution branches for the plate velocity representing three distinct modes of thermal convection. The branch of solutions with the largest plate velocity corresponds to the classic boundary layer solution, with a plate velocity approximately equal to the maximum mantle velocity. This branch reproduces the classic convective scaling laws for an isoviscous fluid and its dynamics are controlled by the mantle material properties. The branch of solutions with intermediate plate velocity represents a convective cell with a sluggish-lid and a plate velocity that is less than the underlying mantle velocity. The dynamics for this solution branch depend on the material properties of both the mantle and the lithosphere. Finally, the lower branch of solutions for the plate velocity yields a convective solution in which the plate velocity is determined entirely by the local dynamics of a thick and strong (relative to the mantle) lithosphere. The dynamics of this solution branch are independent of the material properties of the mantle and depend entirely on the properties of the lithosphere. The introduction of an asthenosphere or low viscosity layer (LVL) beneath the plate can significantly alter the dynamics of the system by affecting plate-mantle coupling. Lowering

  10. Prediction of the Viscoelastic Bulk Modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiaxi; Simon, Sindee

    2010-03-01

    The bulk and shear viscoelastic responses for several materials appear to arise from the same molecular mechanisms at short times, i.e., Andrade creep where the KWW beta parameter is approximately 0.3. If this is indeed the case, prediction and placement of the bulk viscoelastic response can be made simply by knowing the limiting elastic and rubbery bulk moduli and the viscoelastic shear response. The proposed methodology, which uses only easily measured functions, is considerably less time- and labor-intensive than direct measurement of the viscoelastic bulk modulus. Here we investigate this hypothesis and compare the calculated viscoelastic bulk responses for several materials to existing data in the literature.

  11. Effects of viscosity and temperature on the kinetics of the electron-transfer reaction between the triplet state of zinc cytochrome c and cupriplastocyanin.

    PubMed

    Ivković-Jensen, M M; Kostić, N M

    1997-07-01

    This is a study of the effects of viscosity (in the range of 0.8-790 cP), of temperature (in the range of 260.7-307.7 K), and of ionic strength (in the range of 2.5-20.0 mM) on the kinetics of photoinduced electron-transfer reaction 3Zncyt/pc(II) --> Zncyt+/pc(I) within the electrostatic complex of zinc cytochrome c and cupriplastocyanin at pH 7.0. The unimolecular rate constant is kF. The apparent activation parameters DeltaH*, DeltaS*, and DeltaG* for this reaction were obtained in experiments with aqueous glycerol solutions having a constant composition. The interpolation of kF values obtained at the constant composition into the dependence of kF on temperature at constant viscosity gave the proper activation parameters, which agree with those obtained in experiments with solutions having a constant viscosity. This agreement validates the latter method, which is more efficient than the former, for determining activation parameters of processes that are modulated by viscosity. The smooth change in kF is governed by the change in viscosity, not in other properties of the solvent, and it does not depend on the choice of the viscosigen. Donor/acceptor electronic coupling (HAB) and reorganizational energy (lambda), obtained by fitting of the temperature dependence of kF to the Marcus equation, are consistent with true electron transfer and with electron transfer that is coupled to, or gated by, a preceding structural rearrangement of the diprotein complex 3Zncyt/pc(II). The fact that at very high viscosity kF approaches zero shows that the reaction is probably gated throughout the investigated range of viscosity. Kinetic effects and noneffects of ionic strength, viscosity, and thermodynamic driving force indicate, but do not prove, that the reaction under consideration is gated. The kinetic effect of viscosity is analyzed in terms of two models. Because ln kF is a nonlinear function of ln eta, protein friction has to be considered in the analysis of viscosity effects

  12. New fermions in the bulk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Brito, K. P. S.; da Rocha, Roldão

    2016-10-01

    The spinor fields on 5-dimensional Lorentzian manifolds are classified according to the geometric Fierz identities, which involve their bilinear covariants. Based upon this classification, which generalises the celebrated 4-dimensional Lounesto classification of spinor fields, new non-trivial classes of 5-dimensional spinor fields are hence found, with important potential applications regarding bulk fermions and their subsequent localisation on brane-worlds. In addition, quaternionic bilinear covariants are used to derive the quaternionic spin density through the truncated exterior bundle. In order to accomplish the realisation of these new spinors, a Killing vector field is constructed on the horizon of a 5-dimensional Kerr black hole. This Killing vector field is shown to reach the time-like Killing vector field at spatial infinity through a current 1-form density, constructed with the new derived spinor fields. The current density is, moreover, expressed as the fünfbein component, assuming a condensed form.

  13. Pluto's atmospheric bulk near perihelion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trafton, L.

    1981-01-01

    The detection of CH4 frost on Pluto's surface implies a significant atmosphere for Pluto. Although Pluto's mass is small, about 7% of Triton's mass, the rapid escape ('blowoff') of gaseous CH4 can be prevented by the presence of a heavy gas mixed with the CH4. The resulting slow escape ('Jeans escape') of CH4 can be accommodated by sublimation of the surface CH4 frost so that an atmosphere exists in the steady state. A heavier gas must exist, otherwise the CH4 frost would have sublimated away long ago because of solar heat and rapid blowoff of gaseous CH4. Pluto is currently near perihelion where the CH4 component of the atmosphere may be 500 times denser than at apehelion. Significant seasonal changes in the atmospheric bulk are therefore possible.

  14. Processing of bulk metallic glass.

    PubMed

    Schroers, Jan

    2010-04-12

    Bulk metallic glass (BMG) formers are multicomponent alloys that vitrify with remarkable ease during solidification. Technological interest in these materials has been generated by their unique properties, which often surpass those of conventional structural materials. The metastable nature of BMGs, however, has imposed a barrier to broad commercial adoption, particularly where the processing requirements of these alloys conflict with conventional metal processing methods. Research on the crystallization of BMG formers has uncovered novel thermoplastic forming (TPF)-based processing opportunities. Unique among metal processing methods, TPF utilizes the dramatic softening exhibited by a BMG as it approaches its glass-transition temperature and decouples the rapid cooling required to form a glass from the forming step. This article reviews crystallization processes in BMG former and summarizes and compares TPF-based processing methods. Finally, an assessment of scientific and technological advancements required for broader commercial utilization of BMGs will be made.

  15. The effect of viscosity and diffusion on the HO2 uptake by sucrose and secondary organic aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakey, Pascale S. J.; Berkemeier, Thomas; Krapf, Manuel; Dommen, Josef; Steimer, Sarah S.; Whalley, Lisa K.; Ingham, Trevor; Baeza-Romero, Maria T.; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Ammann, Markus; Heard, Dwayne E.

    2016-10-01

    We report the first measurements of HO2 uptake coefficients, γ, for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles and for the well-studied model compound sucrose which we doped with copper(II). Above 65 % relative humidity (RH), γ for copper(II)-doped sucrose aerosol particles equalled the surface mass accommodation coefficient α  =  0.22 ± 0.06, but it decreased to γ  =  0.012 ± 0.007 upon decreasing the RH to 17 %. The trend of γ with RH can be explained by an increase in aerosol viscosity and the contribution of a surface reaction, as demonstrated using the kinetic multilayer model of aerosol surface and bulk chemistry (KM-SUB). At high RH the total uptake was driven by reaction in the near-surface bulk and limited by mass accommodation, whilst at low RH it was limited by surface reaction. SOA from two different precursors, α-pinene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (TMB), was investigated, yielding low uptake coefficients of γ  <  0.001 and γ  =  0.004 ± 0.002, respectively. It is postulated that the larger values measured for TMB-derived SOA compared to α-pinene-derived SOA are either due to differing viscosity, a different liquid water content of the aerosol particles, or an HO2 + RO2 reaction occurring within the aerosol particles.

  16. Isotopic signatures by bulk analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Efurd, D.W.; Rokop, D.J.

    1997-12-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a series of measurement techniques for identification of nuclear signatures by analyzing bulk samples. Two specific applications for isotopic fingerprinting to identify the origin of anthropogenic radioactivity in bulk samples are presented. The first example is the analyses of environmental samples collected in the US Arctic to determine the impact of dumping of radionuclides in this polar region. Analyses of sediment and biota samples indicate that for the areas sampled the anthropogenic radionuclide content of sediments was predominantly the result of the deposition of global fallout. The anthropogenic radionuclide concentrations in fish, birds and mammals were very low. It can be surmised that marine food chains are presently not significantly affected. The second example is isotopic fingerprinting of water and sediment samples from the Rocky Flats Facility (RFP). The largest source of anthropogenic radioactivity presently affecting surface-waters at RFP is the sediments that are currently residing in the holding ponds. One gram of sediment from a holding pond contains approximately 50 times more plutonium than 1 liter of water from the pond. Essentially 100% of the uranium in Ponds A-1 and A-2 originated as depleted uranium. The largest source of radioactivity in the terminal Ponds A-4, B-5 and C-2 was naturally occurring uranium and its decay product radium. The uranium concentrations in the waters collected from the terminal ponds contained 0.05% or less of the interim standard calculated derived concentration guide for uranium in waters available to the public. All of the radioactivity observed in soil, sediment and water samples collected at RFP was naturally occurring, the result of processes at RFP or the result of global fallout. No extraneous anthropogenic alpha, beta or gamma activities were detected. The plutonium concentrations in Pond C-2 appear to vary seasonally.

  17. Viscosity and thermal conductivity of moderately dense gas mixtures.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakeham, W. A.; Kestin, J.; Mason, E. A.; Sandler, S. I.

    1972-01-01

    Derivation of a simple, semitheoretical expression for the initial density dependence of the viscosity and thermal conductivity of gaseous mixtures in terms of the appropriate properties of the pure components and of their interaction quantities. The derivation is based on Enskog's theory of dense gases and yields an equation in which the composition dependence of the linear factor in the density expansion is explicit. The interaction quantities are directly related to those of the mixture extrapolated to zero density and to a universal function valid for all gases. The reliability of the formulation is assessed with respect to the viscosity of several binary mixtures. It is found that the calculated viscosities of binary mixtures agree with the experimental data with a precision which is comparable to that of the most precise measurements.

  18. Intermonolayer Friction and Surface Shear Viscosity of Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    den Otter, W. K.; Shkulipa, S. A.

    2007-01-01

    The flow behavior of lipid bilayer membranes is characterized by a surface viscosity for in-plane shear deformations, and an intermonolayer friction coefficient for slip between the two leaflets of the bilayer. Both properties have been studied for a variety of coarse-grained double-tailed model lipids, using equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. For lipids with two identical tails, the surface shear viscosity rises rapidly with tail length, while the intermonolayer friction coefficient is less sensitive to the tail length. Interdigitation of lipid tails across the bilayer midsurface, as observed for lipids with two distinct tails, strongly enhances the intermonolayer friction coefficient, but hardly affects the surface shear viscosity. The simulation results are compared against the available experimental data. PMID:17468168

  19. Multiple Effects of the Second Fluid on Suspension Viscosity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Hui; Li, Weifeng; Xu, Menghan; Liu, Haifeng

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that adding a small amount of a second immiscible fluid to particulate suspension can result in a significant influence on viscosity. In this study, the effects of the second fluid addition over a small dosage range on the rheological properties of particle suspension were investigated. As the dosage of the second fluid was increased, the viscosity and yield stress initially decreased then increased and finally decreased again. The microstructure of the suspension was observed using a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and showed three different states with the increasing dosage of the second fluid: a dispersive sate, cluster state and cell state in sequence. The presence of these states interpreted the non-monotonic trend of viscosity and yield stress in the suspensions. PMID:26522331

  20. Measurement of solution viscosity by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Nabil; Nino, Diego F.; Moy, Vincent T.

    2001-06-01

    We report on studies aimed at employing the atomic force microscope (AFM) to measure the viscosity of aqueous solutions. At ambient temperature, the AFM cantilever undergoes thermal fluctuations that are highly sensitive to the local environment. Here, we present measurements of the cantilever's resonant frequency in aqueous solutions of glycerol, sucrose, ethanol, sodium chloride, polyethylene glycol, and bovine plasma albumin. The measurements revealed that variations in the resonant frequency of the cantilever in the different solutions are largely dependent on the viscosity of the medium. An application of this technique is to monitor the progression of a chemical reaction where a change in viscosity is expected to occur. An example is demonstrated through monitoring of the hydrolysis of double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid by DNase I.