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Sample records for bull semen frozen

  1. Improvement of liquid and frozen-thawed semen quality of Nili-Ravi buffalo bulls (Bubalus bubalis) through supplementation of fat.

    PubMed

    Adeel, M; Ijaz, A; Aleem, M; Rehman, H; Yousaf, M S; Jabbar, M A

    2009-05-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of dietary fat on quality of liquid and frozen-thawed semen of Nili-Ravi buffalo bulls. Adult bulls (n=21) were fed a balanced ration (Con; n=7) or the same ration either containing sunflower oil (SF-O; n=7) or whole sunflower seeds (SF-S; n=7) for 63 days. Body weight and body condition score of each bull was recorded on days 0, 30 and 60 of the experiment. Semen was collected on days 39, 46, 53 and 60, frozen by a fast method and stored at -196 degrees C for 24h. Sperm motility was assessed using a bright field microscope. Plasma membrane integrity of fresh and frozen-thawed spermatozoa was assessed using a hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) assay. The concentration of spermatozoa and volume of semen was not different among groups on various days of collection. Sunflower-enriched diets did not affect the motility and number of HOS-positive spermatozoa in the fresh semen. Motility and HOS of post-thawed spermatozoa were higher (p<0.05) in bulls fed the sunflower-enriched diets. Similarly, diets did not affect the body condition score and body weight of bulls. In conclusion, feeding of sunflower oil or sunflower seed as fat sources can improve the quality of buffalo bull spermatozoa. PMID:19246083

  2. Sperm DNA integrity in frozen-thawed semen from Italian Mediterranean Buffalo bulls and its relationship to in vivo fertility.

    PubMed

    Serafini, Rosanna; Love, Charles C; Coletta, Angelo; Mari, Gaetano; Mislei, Beatrice; Caso, Chiara; Di Palo, Rossella

    2016-09-01

    The relationship among sperm attributes of DNA integrity, sperm motility, morphology, viability, acrosome integrity and in vivo fertility of frozen-thawed Italian Mediterranean Buffalo (IMB) sperm has not been reported. Straws of frozen-thawed semen samples from three bulls were examined. Sperm DNA assays (i.e., neutral Comet assay, Sperm Bos Halomax-SBH and Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay-SCSA) were not correlated to each other (P>0.05). Many neutral Comet assay measures were correlated to total sperm motility-TMOT (% head-H-DNA, r=0.74; Olive moment, r=-0.76; P<0.05) and coiled tails (r-values ranged from% H-DNA, r=-0.80 to tail length, r=-0.71; P<0.05). The COMP-αt was negatively correlated to viable acrosome intact (VAI) sperm, and distal droplets (r=-0.60 and -0.61; P<0.05), whereas Mean-αt and Mode-αt were positively correlated to bent midpieces (r=0.63 and 0.61; P<0.05). The SBH assay was positively correlated to non-viable acrosome damaged (NVAD) sperm (r=0.60; P<0.05) and negatively correlated to viable acrosome damaged (VAD) sperm (r=-0.63; P<0.05). The overall pregnancy rate (PR-at 30 and 45d post artificial insemination-AI) and the calving rate were 57%, 55% and 45%, respectively. Among sperm features analyzed the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) Curve was significant (P<0.05) for TMOT, NVAD, Standard Deviation-αt (SD-αt) and neutral comet measures (Olive tail moment and tail moment, % H- DNA and tail area) in estimating pregnancy. PMID:27421229

  3. Separation of motile sperm for in vitro fertilization from frozen-thawed bull semen using progesterone induction on a microchip.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingchun; Ning, Bolin; Cao, Xinyan; Luo, Yinghua; Guo, Li; Wei, Guosheng; Liu, Shengjun; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Aizhong; Wu, Rui; Li, Yanbing

    2016-09-01

    This study presents a novel method for the separation of motile sperm from non-progressive motile and immotile sperm and in vitro Fertilization (IVF). This separation of bull sperm was accomplished by inducing chemotaxis along a progesterone release agent in a 7.5-mm microchannel microchip composed of a biocompatible polydimethysiloxane layer and a glass gradient. The selected sperm was applied directly for IVF. In the first experiment, we tested the effect of different lengths of microchannnel (5mm, 7.5mm and 10mm) on quality parameter of separated sperm. The results showed that separated sperm using 7.5-mm microchannel chip were improved in sperm motility, swimming velocity, and beat frequency compared with other groups. In the second experiment, a medium containing sperm from swim-up method and outlet reservoir of our 7.5-mm microchannel chip was collected and mitochondrial activity of the sperm was determined by fluorescence microscopy. The sperm from the microchip had higher mitochondria activity (47.6%±6.0%) than the sperm from the swim-up method (23.6%±4.7%) (P<0.05). There were significant differences in rate of acrosome intactness between the swim-up method and the microchip (36.0%±4.1% vs. 66.8±2.1%, respectively, P<0.05). In the third experiment, we compared sperm penetration in the microchip-IVF system with a standard IVF method (droplet-IVF). The microchip-IVF group had the highest percentages of oocytes penetrated (82.2%±1.6% vs. 63.5%±2.4%) and monospermic oocytes (67.8%±3.4% vs. 42.4%±1.5%). In addition, early developmental competence of oocytes to the blastocyst stage was higher when the oocytes were inseminated in the microchip-IVF system compared with those inseminated in a standard droplet-IVF system. These results demonstrate that our microchip based on a sperm chemotaxis system is useful for motile sperm separation from frozen-thawed bull semen for IVF. Therefore, the optimized microchip system provides a good opportunity to sort

  4. Isolation of bluetongue virus from bull semen.

    PubMed

    Howard, T H; Bowen, R A; Pickett, B W

    1985-01-01

    The efficacy of inoculation of Vero cell cultures or intravenous inoculation of chicken embryos in the isolation and titration of seminal bluetongue virus (BTV) was studied, as was the toxicity of bull semen for these 2 isolation systems. Frozen and thawed BTV-contaminated ejaculates collected during periods of viremia from 2 bulls experimentally infected with cell culture-adapted BTV serotype 17 were used in isolation, titration and fractionation studies. Blood collected from the 2 bulls concurrently with the semen was titrated in chicken embryos. Bull semen was toxic for both isolation systems. Toxicity was associated with both the spermatozoa and seminal plasma. Dilution of the semen at least 1:25, addition of peptone or tryptose broth to the diluent, limitation of adsorption time and postinoculation washing of cell culture monolayers all reduced the destructive effects of semen. Isolation of BTV was successful from 11 ejaculates and was titratable in 9 of these. Blind passage of surviving embryos or cell cultures at the endpoints of the titrations produced BTV isolations in 4 instances. The virus was never isolated from semen in the absence of concurrent viremia. Peak seminal BTV titers of 10(5.5) CEIVLD50/ml and 10(5.7) TCID50/ml were observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Breeding soundness evaluation and semen analysis for predicting bull fertility.

    PubMed

    Kastelic, J P; Thundathil, J C

    2008-07-01

    Bull fertility is influenced by numerous factors. Although 20-40% of bulls in an unselected population may have reduced fertility, few are completely sterile. Breeding soundness refers to a bull's ability to get cows pregnant. A standard breeding soundness evaluation identifies bulls with substantial deficits in fertility, but does not consistently identify sub-fertile bulls. In this regard, the use of frozen-thawed semen (from bulls in commercial AI centres) that meets minimum quality standards can result in pregnancy rates that differ by 20-25 percentage points. Although no single diagnostic test can accurately predict variations in fertility among bulls that are producing apparently normal semen, recent studies suggested that a combination of laboratory tests were predictive of fertility. This review is focused on recent developments in prediction of bull fertility, based on assessments at the molecular, cellular and whole-animal levels. PMID:18638148

  6. Butylated hydroxytoluene can reduce oxidative stress and improve quality of frozen-thawed bull semen processed in lecithin and egg yolk based extenders.

    PubMed

    Khumran, A M; Yimer, N; Rosnina, Y; Ariff, M O; Wahid, H; Kaka, Asmatullah; Ebrahimi, M; Sarsaifi, K

    2015-12-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of anti-oxidant butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), when added at different concentrations into lecithin-based Bioxcell(®) (BX) and two egg-yolk-based; Tris (TY) and citrate (CE) semen extenders, on post-thaw bull sperm quality and oxidative stress. A total of 30 ejaculates from three bulls were collected using an electro ejaculator. Ejaculates were extended with one of the BX, TY and CE extenders, which contained different concentrations (0.0 - control, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 3.0mM/ml) of BHT. The extended semen samples were chilled to 4 °C, and then frozen slowly to -196 °C in 0.25 ml straws before being stored in liquid nitrogen for 2 weeks. Results showed that supplementation of BHT improved (P<0.05) general motility, progressive motility, morphology, acrosome integrity, DNA integrity and malondialdehyde of sperm at 0.5mM/ml for BX and at 1-1.5mM/ml of BHT for TY and CE when compared with the control. However, greater concentrations of 2.0 and 3.0mM/ml of BHT had a detrimental (P<0.05) effect compared with the control with all extenders evaluated. In conclusion, BHT supplementation at lesser concentrations (0.5-1.5mM/ml) could improve frozen-thawed bull sperm quality by reducing oxidative stress produced during the freezing-thawing procedures in either lecithin or egg-yolk based extenders.

  7. Dietary α-linolenic acid from flaxseed oil or eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids from fish oil differentially alter fatty acid composition and characteristics of fresh and frozen-thawed bull semen.

    PubMed

    Moallem, Uzi; Neta, Noam; Zeron, Yoel; Zachut, Maya; Roth, Zvi

    2015-04-15

    Incorporation rates of dietary omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FAs) from different sources into bull plasma and sperm and the effects on physiological characteristics of fresh and frozen-thawed semen were determined. Fifteen fertile bulls were assigned to three treatment groups and supplemented for 13 weeks with encapsulated fat: (1) SFA-360 g/d per bull saturated FA; (2) FLX-450 g/d per bull providing 84.2 g/d C18:3n-3 (α-linolenic acid) from flaxseed oil; and (3) FO-450 g/d per bull providing 8.7 g/d C20:5n-3 (eicosapentaenoic acid) and 6.5 g/d C22:6n-3 (docosahexaenoic acid, DHA) from fish oil. Blood samples were taken every 2 weeks and semen was collected weekly. With respect to the FA supplements, the proportion of α-linolenic acid in plasma increased in the FLX bulls, whereas that of DHA was increased in the FO bulls, within 2 weeks. However, changes in the sperm FA fraction were first expressed in the sixth week of supplementation: in the FO and FLX bulls the DHA proportion increased (P < 0.001), whereas that of C22:5n-6 FAs (docosapentaenoic acid [DPA] n-6) decreased (P < 0.001). Sperm motility and progressive motility in fresh semen were higher (P < 0.05), and the fading rate tended to be lower in the FLX than in FO bulls (P < 0.06). Furthermore, sperm motility, progressive motility, and velocity in frozen-thawed semen were higher in FLX than in the other groups (P < 0.008). These findings indicate that the proportion of DHA in sperm can be increased at the expense of DPAn-6 by either FO or FLX supplementation, indicating de novo elongation and desaturation of short- into longer-chain n-3 FAs in testes. Furthermore, the moderate exchange of DHA and DPAn-6 in the FLX group's sperm was associated with changes in the characteristics of both fresh and frozen-thawed semen, suggesting the importance of the ratio between these two FAs for sperm structure and function. PMID:25617988

  8. Dietary α-linolenic acid from flaxseed oil or eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids from fish oil differentially alter fatty acid composition and characteristics of fresh and frozen-thawed bull semen.

    PubMed

    Moallem, Uzi; Neta, Noam; Zeron, Yoel; Zachut, Maya; Roth, Zvi

    2015-04-15

    Incorporation rates of dietary omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FAs) from different sources into bull plasma and sperm and the effects on physiological characteristics of fresh and frozen-thawed semen were determined. Fifteen fertile bulls were assigned to three treatment groups and supplemented for 13 weeks with encapsulated fat: (1) SFA-360 g/d per bull saturated FA; (2) FLX-450 g/d per bull providing 84.2 g/d C18:3n-3 (α-linolenic acid) from flaxseed oil; and (3) FO-450 g/d per bull providing 8.7 g/d C20:5n-3 (eicosapentaenoic acid) and 6.5 g/d C22:6n-3 (docosahexaenoic acid, DHA) from fish oil. Blood samples were taken every 2 weeks and semen was collected weekly. With respect to the FA supplements, the proportion of α-linolenic acid in plasma increased in the FLX bulls, whereas that of DHA was increased in the FO bulls, within 2 weeks. However, changes in the sperm FA fraction were first expressed in the sixth week of supplementation: in the FO and FLX bulls the DHA proportion increased (P < 0.001), whereas that of C22:5n-6 FAs (docosapentaenoic acid [DPA] n-6) decreased (P < 0.001). Sperm motility and progressive motility in fresh semen were higher (P < 0.05), and the fading rate tended to be lower in the FLX than in FO bulls (P < 0.06). Furthermore, sperm motility, progressive motility, and velocity in frozen-thawed semen were higher in FLX than in the other groups (P < 0.008). These findings indicate that the proportion of DHA in sperm can be increased at the expense of DPAn-6 by either FO or FLX supplementation, indicating de novo elongation and desaturation of short- into longer-chain n-3 FAs in testes. Furthermore, the moderate exchange of DHA and DPAn-6 in the FLX group's sperm was associated with changes in the characteristics of both fresh and frozen-thawed semen, suggesting the importance of the ratio between these two FAs for sperm structure and function.

  9. Artificial insemination of cranes with frozen semen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.; Sexton, T.J.; Lewis, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    For the first time (1978) artificial insemination (AI) with frozen greater sandhill crane (Grus canadensis tabida) semen resulted in fertile eggs and chicks. During the 2 year (1977-78) study, 6 of 27 eggs produced were fertile. Three chicks hatched. Semen samples used for insemination were frozen and stored in liquid nitrogen for two months or less. Recent improvements in the laboratory indicated that a more effective sample can be prepared and greater fertility rates should be expected.

  10. Bulls grazing Kentucky 31 tall fescue exhibit impaired growth, semen quality, and decreased semen freezing potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serum prolactin (PRL) and testosterone concentrations, body weight, body composition, semen quality, and semen freezing potential for bulls grazing the toxic tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum [Schreb.] Darbysh. ¼ Schedonorous arundinaceum [Schreb.] Dumort.) cultivar Kentucky 31 (E+) compared with a n...

  11. The in vitro effect of leptin on semen quality of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) bulls.

    PubMed

    Khaki, Amir; Batavani, Rooz Ali; Najafi, Gholamreza

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the probable effects of leptin addition in different levels to the semen extender on sperm quality (motility and motility parameters, viability, sperm membrane integrity, and DNA damage). Semen specimens were evaluated immediately after leptin addition, equilibration time and after thawing the frozen semen. Five healthy buffalo bulls (5 ejaculates from each bull) were used. Each ejaculate was diluted at 37 ˚C with tris-based extender containing 0 (control), 10, 20, 50, 100, and 200 ng mL(-1) leptin. The diluted semen was kept 4 hr in refrigerator to reach to the equilibration time and then packed in 0.5 mL French straws and frozen in liquid nitrogen. Our results showed that, in the fresh semen, no significant difference was observed in all sperm quality parameters evaluated among all of the examined leptin concentrations. Addition of 10 ng mL(-1) leptin into semen extender significantly preserved sperm motility, all of the motility parameters, and viability in equilibrated semen compared to that of control group. However, in vitro addition of 200 ng mL(-1) leptin, significantly decreased theses parameters. In the frozen thawed semen, all leptin concentrations decreased sperm motility and viability, but significant decrease was observed in concentrations of 100 and 200 ng mL(-1). Adding leptin to semen extender did not have any significant influence on sperm DNA damage and sperm membrane integrity in all examined groups. These findings suggest that in vitro addition of 10 ng mL(-1) leptin could preserve sperm motility and viability in cooled semen of buffaloes.

  12. Successful artificial insemination in the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) using chilled and frozen-thawed semen

    PubMed Central

    Thongtip, Nikorn; Mahasawangkul, Sittidet; Thitaram, Chatchote; Pongsopavijitr, Pornsawan; Kornkaewrat, Kornchai; Pinyopummin, Anuchai; Angkawanish, Taweepoke; Jansittiwate, Saran; Rungsri, Ronnachit; Boonprasert, Khajornpat; Wongkalasin, Warut; Homkong, Pongpon; Dejchaisri, Suthathip; Wajjwalku, Worawit; Saikhun, Kulnasan

    2009-01-01

    Background Artificial insemination (AI) using frozen-thawed semen is well established and routinely used for breeding in various mammalian species. However, there is no report of the birth of elephant calves following AI with frozen-thawed semen. The objective of the present study was to investigate the fertilizing ability of chilled and frozen-thawed semen in the Asian elephant following artificial insemination (AI). Methods Semen samples were collected by from 8 bulls (age range, 12-to 42-years) by manual stimulation. Semen with high quality were either cooled to 4°C or frozen in liquid nitrogen (-196°C) before being used for AI. Blood samples collected from ten elephant females (age range, 12-to 52-years) were assessed for estrus cycle and elephants with normal cycling were used for AI. Artificial insemination series were conducted during 2003 to 2008; 55 and 2 AI trials were conducted using frozen-thawed and chilled semen, respectively. Pregnancy was detected using transrectal ultrasonography and serum progestagen measurement. Results One female (Khod) inseminated with chilled semen became pregnant and gave birth in 2007. The gestation length was 663 days and the sex of the elephant calf was male. One female (Sao) inseminated with frozen-thawed semen showed signs of pregnancy by increasing progestagen levels and a fetus was observed for 5 months by transrectal ultrasonography. Conclusion This is the first report showing pregnancy following AI with frozen-thawed semen in the Asian elephant. Successful AI in the Asian elephant using either chilled or frozen-thawed semen is a stepping stone towards applying this technology for genetic improvement of the elephant population. PMID:19615097

  13. Testicular development and its relationship to semen production in Murrah buffalo bulls.

    PubMed

    Pant, H C; Sharma, R K; Patel, S H; Shukla, H R; Mittal, A K; Kasiraj, R; Misra, A K; Prabhakar, J H

    2003-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the relationship of age and body weight to testicular development and to establish norms for breeding soundness evaluations of Murrah buffalo bulls. Testicular measurements of 133 Murrah buffalo bulls of various ages were recorded with a caliper and a tape. Semen was collected twice a week for 5 weeks from groups of bulls which were 25-36 (n=17), 37-48 (n=16), 49-60 (n=14), of >60 (n=10) months of age. After examining volume, sperm concentration, and progressive motility semen was diluted in Tris-citric acid-egg yolk-fructose extender and frozen in 0.5 ml French straws. Testicular measurements of buffalo bulls were lower than those recorded for European breeds of cattle bulls. Nevertheless, like cattle bulls, scrotal circumference was highly correlated with other testicular measurements. Also, it had a significant positive relationship with semen volume and sperm concentration per ejaculate. Average sperm output per week in order of increasing age group was 15.3, 18.2, 19.8 and 23.6 x 10(9). Corresponding values for sperm output per week per gram of testis were 59.1, 45.8, 41.1, 36.2 x 10(6) indicating a reduction in spermatogenesis per unit of testis with advancing age. Compared to European breeds, daily sperm output in Murrah bulls was nearly 45% lower, presumably due to their nearly 40% lower scrotal circumference than Holstein bulls of the same age. These results indicate that in buffalo, as in cattle, scrotal circumference is a useful indicator of potential sperm output and may serve as an important criterion for selecting young bulls as AI sires. PMID:12620577

  14. Sericin supplementation improves semen freezability of buffalo bulls by minimizing oxidative stress during cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradeep; Kumar, Dharmendra; Sikka, P; Singh, P

    2015-01-01

    The variety of mammalian cells has been successfully cryopreserved by use of the silk protein sericin due to its strong free-radical-scavenging and potent antioxidant activity. The present study was conducted to examine the protective role of sericin on buffalo spermatozoa during cryopreservation. Semen of four breeding bulls was collected twice a week using artificial vagina technique. The ejaculates of four bulls were pooled, divided into five equal fractions, diluted with the extender supplemented with different concentrations of sericin (0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.5 and 2%) and then cryopreserved. Post-thawed motility was objectively assessed by computer assisted sperm analyzer. Sperm plasma membrane integrity was assessed by hypo-osmotic swelling test (HOST). Malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were determined in frozen-thawed extended seminal plasma by spectrophotometry. The extender supplemented with 0.25, 0.5 and 1% sericin resulted in the higher sperm motility and GPx acivity. Furthermore, plasma membrane integrity and SOD activity were found to be higher (P<0.05) in group supplemented with 0.25 and 0.5% sericin (P<0.05). The MDA concentration was found to be significantly lower (P<0.05) in 0.25 and 0.5% sericin treated groups than control and other treated groups. In conclusion, the supplementation of 0.25-0.5% sericin in semen extender improves frozen-thawed semen quality through protecting sperm from oxidative stress.

  15. Assessment of semen quality in pure and crossbred Jersey bulls

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Umesh; Gawande, Ajay P.; Sahatpure, Sunil K.; Patil, Manoj S.; Lakde, Chetan K.; Bonde, Sachin W.; Borkar, Pradnyankur L.; Poharkar, Ajay J.; Ramteke, Baldeo R.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To compare the seminal attributes of neat, pre-freeze (at equilibration), and post-freeze (24 h after freezing) semen in pure and crossbred Jersey bulls. Materials and Methods: Total 36 ejaculates (3 ejaculates from each bull) were collected from 6 pure Jersey and 6 crossbred Jersey bulls and evaluated for various seminal attributes during neat, pre-freeze, and post-freeze semen. Results: The mean (±standard error [SE]) values of neat semen characteristics in pure and crossbred Jersey bulls were recorded such as volume (ml), color, consistency, mass activity (scale: 0-5), and sperm concentration (millions/ml). The extended semen was further investigated at pre-freeze and post-freeze stages and the mean (±SE) values recorded at neat, pre-freeze, and post-freeze semen were compared between pure and crossbred Jersey bulls; sperm motility (80.55±1.70%, 62.77±1.35%, 46.11±1.43% vs. 80.00±1.80%, 65.00±1.66%, 47.22±1.08%), live sperm count (83.63±1.08%, 71.72±1.09%, 58.67±1.02% vs. 80.00±1.08%, 67.91±1.20%, 51.63±0.97%), total abnormal sperm count (8.38±0.32%, 12.30±0.39%, 16.75±0.42% vs. 9.00±0.45%, 12.19±0.48%, 18.11±0.64%), hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) reacted spermatozoa (71.88±0.77%, 62.05±0.80%, 47.27±1.05% vs. 72.77±1.02%, 62.11±0.89%, 45.94±1.33%), acrosome integrity (89.05±0.83%, 81.33±0.71%, 71.94±0.86% vs. 86.55±0.57%, 78.66±0.42%, 69.38±0.53%), and DNA integrity (99.88±0.07%, 100, 99.66±0.11% vs. 99.94±0.05%, 100, 99.44±0.18%,). The volume, color, consistency, sperm concentration, and initial motility in pure and crossbred Jersey bulls did not differ significantly (p>0.05). The mass activity was significantly (p<0.05) higher in pure Jersey as compare to crossbred Jersey bulls. Live sperm percentage and acrosome integrity was significantly (p<0.01) higher in pure Jersey bulls as compared to crossbred Jersey bulls. However, no statistical difference (p>0.05) was observed in abnormal sperm; HOS reacted spermatozoa and DNA

  16. Hope for Restoration of Dead Valuable Bulls through Cloning Using Donor Somatic Cells Isolated from Cryopreserved Semen

    PubMed Central

    Selokar, Naresh L.; Saini, Monika; Palta, Prabhat; Chauhan, Manmohan S.; Manik, Radheysham; Singla, Suresh K.

    2014-01-01

    Somatic cells were isolated from cryopreserved semen of 4 buffalo bulls, 3 of which had died over 10 years earlier, and were established in culture. The cells expressed cytokeratin-18, keratin and vimentin indicating that they were of epithelial origin. The cells were used as nuclear donors for hand-made cloning for producing buffalo embryos. The blastocyst rate and quality, as indicated by apoptotic index, were comparable among embryos produced using cells obtained from fresh or frozen-thawed semen or those obtained from conventional cell sources such as skin. Examination of the epigenetic status revealed that the global level of H3K27me3 but not that of H3K9/14ac and H4K5ac differed significantly (P<0.05) among cloned embryos from different bulls. The relative mRNA abundance of HDAC1, DNMT1, P53 and CASPASE 3 but not that of DNMT3a differed in cells and in cloned embryos. Following transfer of 24 cloned embryos produced from fresh semen-derived cells to 12 recipients, one calf weighing 55 kg, which is now 6 months of age and is normal, was born through normal parturition. Following transfer of 20 embryos produced from frozen-thawed semen-derived cells to 10 recipients, 2 became pregnant, one of which aborted in the first trimester; the calf born was severely underweight (17 kg), and died 12 h after birth. The ability of cells derived from fresh and frozen-thawed semen to produce live offspring confirms the ability of these cells to be reprogrammed. Our findings pave the way for restoration of highly precious progeny-tested bulls, which has immense economic importance, and can also be used for restoration of endangered species. PMID:24614586

  17. Hope for restoration of dead valuable bulls through cloning using donor somatic cells isolated from cryopreserved semen.

    PubMed

    Selokar, Naresh L; Saini, Monika; Palta, Prabhat; Chauhan, Manmohan S; Manik, Radheysham; Singla, Suresh K

    2014-01-01

    Somatic cells were isolated from cryopreserved semen of 4 buffalo bulls, 3 of which had died over 10 years earlier, and were established in culture. The cells expressed cytokeratin-18, keratin and vimentin indicating that they were of epithelial origin. The cells were used as nuclear donors for hand-made cloning for producing buffalo embryos. The blastocyst rate and quality, as indicated by apoptotic index, were comparable among embryos produced using cells obtained from fresh or frozen-thawed semen or those obtained from conventional cell sources such as skin. Examination of the epigenetic status revealed that the global level of H3K27me3 but not that of H3K9/14ac and H4K5ac differed significantly (P<0.05) among cloned embryos from different bulls. The relative mRNA abundance of HDAC1, DNMT1, P53 and CASPASE 3 but not that of DNMT3a differed in cells and in cloned embryos. Following transfer of 24 cloned embryos produced from fresh semen-derived cells to 12 recipients, one calf weighing 55 kg, which is now 6 months of age and is normal, was born through normal parturition. Following transfer of 20 embryos produced from frozen-thawed semen-derived cells to 10 recipients, 2 became pregnant, one of which aborted in the first trimester; the calf born was severely underweight (17 kg), and died 12 h after birth. The ability of cells derived from fresh and frozen-thawed semen to produce live offspring confirms the ability of these cells to be reprogrammed. Our findings pave the way for restoration of highly precious progeny-tested bulls, which has immense economic importance, and can also be used for restoration of endangered species.

  18. Enriching the captive elephant population genetic pool through artificial insemination with frozen-thawed semen collected in the wild.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, T B; Hermes, R; Saragusty, J; Potier, R; Schwammer, H M; Balfanz, F; Vielgrader, H; Baker, B; Bartels, P; Göritz, F

    2012-10-01

    The first successful AI in an elephant was reported in 1998, using fresh semen. Since then almost 40 calves have been produced through AI in both Asian and African elephants worldwide. Following these successes, with the objective of enriching the captive population with genetic material from the wild, we evaluated the possibility of using frozen-thawed semen collected from wild bulls for AI in captivity. Semen, collected from a 36-yr-old wild African savanna elephant (Loxodonta africana) in South Africa was frozen using the directional freezing technique. This frozen-thawed semen was used for four inseminations over two consecutive days, two before and two after ovulation, in a 26-yr-old female African savanna elephant in Austria. Insemination dose of 1200 × 10(6) cells per AI with 61% motility resulted in pregnancy, which was confirmed through ultrasound examination 75, 110 and 141 days after the AI procedure. This represents the first successful AI using wild bull frozen-thawed semen in elephants. The incorporation of AI with frozen-thawed semen into the assisted reproduction toolbox opens the way to preserve and transport semen between distant individuals in captivity or, as was done in this study, between wild and captive populations, without the need to transport stressed or potentially disease-carrying animals or to remove animals from the wild. In addition, cryopreserved spermatozoa, in combination with AI, are useful methods to extend the reproductive lifespan of individuals beyond their biological lifespan and an important tool for genetic diversity management and phenotype selection in these endangered mammals.

  19. Fertility of ram semen frozen in Bioexcell and used for cervical artificial insemination.

    PubMed

    Gil, J; Rodriguez-Irazoqui, M; Lundeheim, N; Söderquist, L; Rodríguez-Martínez, H

    2003-03-01

    The current use of ingredients of animal origin, such as egg yolk, in semen extenders presents a risk of microbial contamination, and has led to the search for alternatives. Such an extender is commercially available for bull semen (Bioexcell), IMV, L'Aigle, France), and it has previously been tested in vitro for freezing ram semen, with satisfactory results. The aim of the present study was to compare the fertility results of ewes in Uruguay, after cervical insemination with ram semen that was frozen in Bioexcell versus semen frozen in a conventional milk-egg yolk extender (control). Semen from five Corriedale rams was frozen, using a split sample design, in either milk-egg yolk or Bioexcell extender, using a two-step extension method. The sperm parameters assessed after thawing were subjective motility, membrane integrity (SYBR-14/PI), and capacitation status (CTC). Thawed semen was inseminated intracervically once during spontaneous estrus in 970 Corriedale ewes that grazed in natural pastures, under extensive management conditions. Fertility was recorded as nonreturn rates at 21 days (NRR-21) and 36 days (NRR-36) after artificial insemination (AI), as well as pregnancy rate (PR-US, diagnosed ultrasonographically 50 days after AI of the last ewe). Subjective motility was slightly higher in Bioexcell than in the milk extender (47 vs. 46.5%; NS), as was membrane integrity (38 vs. 37.7%; NS) and the percentage of uncapacitated spermatozoa (28.5 vs. 26.3%; NS). There were no statistically significant differences in fertility rates found between Bioexcell and the control extender: NRR-21 (35.9 vs. 33.2%), NRR-36 (34.8 vs. 32.6%), and PR-US (28.4 vs. 27.2%). In conclusion, Bioexcell appears to be an alternative to the conventional milk-egg yolk extender for freezing ram semen, and provides similar fertility results after cervical AI under extensive management conditions. Thus, Bioexcell, containing no additives of animal origin, can offer a safer alternative when

  20. Effect of butylated hydroxytoluene on bull spermatozoa frozen in egg yolk-citrate extender.

    PubMed

    Shoae, A; Zamiri, M J

    2008-03-01

    Effect of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) on the quality of frozen-thawed Holstein bull sperm in egg yolk-citrate extender was evaluated. High quality semen samples were diluted in egg yolk-citrate extenders containing 0, 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 mM BHT and subsequently frozen in liquid nitrogen. Pre-freeze and post-thaw progressive motility, and live/dead ratio and acrosomal integrity of 200 sperm per slide, stained with Eosin-Nigrosin and Giemsa, were evaluated at 0, 2 and 4 h after thawing. There was a significant decrease in forward motility, livability and acrosomal integrity up to 4 h after thawing the frozen sperm. Upon thawing, sperm progressive motility at 1 mM BHT was significantly (P<0.001) higher (11%) than other groups, but percentages of live sperm and live sperm with intact acrosomes were higher at 0.5 mM BHT. BHT at 4 mM BHT caused a significant decrease in motility, livability and acrosomal integrity during preparatory stages of freezing sperm. It is concluded that 0.5-1.0 mM BHT can be beneficial for freezing Holstein bull spermatozoa in egg yolk-citrate diluent, when inseminated immediately after thawing.

  1. Effect of preputial washing on bacterial load and preservability of semen in Murrah buffalo bulls

    PubMed Central

    Meena, G. S.; Raina, V. S.; Gupta, A. K.; Mohanty, T. K.; Bhakat, M.; Abdullah, M.; Bishist, R.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To study the effect of preputial washing on bacterial load, preservability and semen quality in Murrah buffalo bulls Materials and Methods: A total of 36 collections of three Murrah buffalo bulls maintained at Artificial Breeding Research Centre, ICAR-National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal, were collected at weekly intervals from each bull without preputial washing and latter ejaculates from same bull with preputial washing by infusing normal saline (0.85%), KMnO4 (0.02%) and savlon (2.0%) to first, second and third bull, respectively. The microbial load and semen quality were evaluated during different hours of storage at refrigerated temperature (0, 24 and 48 h) and after thrawing of cryopreserved (at −196°C) semen. Results: The results of preservation of semen at refrigerated temperature showed that bacterial load was markedly lower in ejaculates of bulls subjected to preputial washing. Semen preserved at refrigerator temperature and cryopreserved, the effect of washing solution was significant for individual motility (IM), non-eosiniphilic count, hypo-osmotic swelling reactivity (HOST), total plate count (TPC) and acrosome integrity. KMnO4 was found to be the best in lowering bacterial load, sperm abnormalities and in improving semen quality such as motility, non-eosinophilic count, HOST and acrosome integrity even up to 48 h of preservation and cryopreserved semen. Effect of duration of preservation and stage of cryopreservation was also significant for IM, non-eosiniphilic count, HOST, sperm abnormalities and acrosome integrity. Conclusion: Overall the results suggested that preputial washing with KMnO4 solution improved the semen quality and reduced microbial load of Murrah buffalo bull’s semen preserved at refrigerated temperature and cryopreservation. PMID:27065650

  2. Evaluation of bison (Bison bison) semen from Yellowstone National Park, Montana, USA, bulls for Brucella abortus shedding.

    PubMed

    Frey, Rebecca K; Clarke, P Ryan; McCollum, Matt P; Nol, Pauline; Johnson, Kammy R; Thompson, Brent D; Ramsey, Jennifer M; Anderson, Neil J; Rhyan, Jack C

    2013-07-01

    To determine if bison (Bison bison) bulls from Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Montana, USA, shed an infective dose of Brucella abortus in semen, 50 YNP bulls were captured on public lands in Montana during the winter and early spring (April-May) of 2010 and 2011. The bulls were immobilized, and blood and semen samples were collected for serology and Brucella culture. Thirty-five bulls (70%) were antibody-positive, and B. abortus was cultured from semen in three (9%) of the 35 antibody-positive or suspect bulls, though not at concentrations considered an infective dose. Eight bulls (six antibody-positive, two negative) had palpable lesions of the testes, epididymides, or seminal vesicles consistent with B. abortus infection. Breeding soundness exams and semen analysis suggested that antibody-positive bulls were more likely to have nonviable ejaculate (8/35; 23%) than bulls without detectable antibody (2/15; 13%).

  3. Kinetics of fertilization and development, and sex ratio of bovine embryos produced using the semen of different bulls.

    PubMed

    Alomar, M; Tasiaux, H; Remacle, S; George, F; Paul, D; Donnay, I

    2008-08-01

    The between bulls variation in in vitro fertility and the shift of sex ratio towards male embryos are two problems affecting the in vitro production (IVP) of bovine embryos. Our objective was to evaluate the kinetics of fertilization, embryo development and the sex ratio of the resulting embryos using the frozen/thawed semen of four different bulls. In a first experiment, the kinetics of pronucleus (PN) formation was evaluated at 8, 12 and 18 h post-insemination (hpi). Based upon the pronuclei sizes and the distance between the two pronuclei, inseminated oocytes were classified in three PN stages. Differences between bulls were observed at each time point, but were more important at 12 hpi. At 8 and 12 hpi bull III showed a significantly faster PN evolution by comparison with the three other bulls (P<0.05), while at 18 hpi, the proportion of the three PN stages was similar to those of bulls I and IV, bull II being delayed. In a second experiment, the kinetics of in vitro embryo development was compared using time-lapse cinematography. The analysis of embryos reaching the blastocyst stage revealed significant differences in the mean time of first cleavage (range of 22.7-25.6h, P<0.05), while the lengths of the subsequent three cell cycles did not differ between bulls. The early mean time of first cleavage with bull III was associated with an early blastulation and a high blastocyst rate at Day 7, in opposition to what was observed with bull II showing a later timing of first cleavage (first cleavage 22.1 hpi versus 25.5 hpi; blastulation 140.4 hpi versus 152.5 hpi; D7 blastocyst rates: 31.3% versus 21.9%; P<0.05). In a third experiment, 65-76 Day 8 blastocysts per bull were sexed by PCR. Only blastocysts obtained with bull III showed a shift in sex ratio towards male embryos (76% male embryos; P<0.05). Such shift was already observed at the 2-cell and morula stages. In conclusion, the bull influences the kinetics of PN formation, of embryo development and the sex

  4. Distribution of BHV1 in fractions of semen from a naturally infected bull.

    PubMed

    Guérin, C; Harlay, T; Guérin, B; Thibier, M

    1993-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the distribution of BHV1 (Bovine Herpesvirus 1) in the semen from a naturally infected bull and more particularly, to determine if there were viral particles associated with sperm that could interfere with in-vivo or in-vitro fertilization. Frozen semen from a single ejaculate that had been previously identified as being contaminated with BHV1 was used. The contents of 12 ministraws were mixed. Two aliquotes served as controls, the first was held at 0 degrees C in ice water while the second was held at 4 degrees C in the centrifuge during the procedure. The remaining semen was separated into seminal plasma and sperm cell fractions by centrifugation. The seminal plasma was kept at 0 degrees C until viral titration. The pellet was treated by 10 consecutive washes in PBS and by a trypsin treatment after the fifth wash. Subsequently, the last pellet was macerated to break the cell membranes. Aliquotes for viral titration were taken from all washing fluids, from pellets after the fourth, sixth and tenth washes, and from the last crushed pellet. These aliquotes were kept in ice water until titration. The virus was titrated on secondary cell cultures of fetal calf kidney. The titers were 4.3, 4.2 and 4.4 log TCID50/ml, respectively, in the 2 controls and the seminal plasma. Titers declined from 3.8 log to 0 from the first to the tenth wash. The titer was 2.2 log in the resuspended pellet of sperm cell fraction prior to trypsin treatment. No virus was detected in the sixth pellet, the tenth one or from the crushed cells. It was concluded that a significant proportion of the BHV1 particles was associated with the sperm cells. Ten washes and a trypsin treatment could remove the adsorbed virus. No viral particles were detected within the sperm cells.

  5. Effects of sperm concentration at semen collection and storage period of frozen semen on dairy cow conception.

    PubMed

    Haugan, T; Gröhn, Y T; Kommisrud, E; Ropstad, E; Reksen, O

    2007-01-01

    The present study was based on data obtained from artificial inseminations (AIs) performed with cryopreserved semen from elite bulls used in the Norwegian breeding program. Semen was diluted to standardize the number of spermatozoa to 18 million per AI dose. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the net sperm concentration at semen collection and the storage period in liquid nitrogen have any effect on probability of conception in dairy cattle. We demonstrated that the natural range of sperm concentration at semen collection within some of the bulls was associated with the probability of conception. However, no primary trend among bulls was found on the effect of sperm concentration at semen collection. This appears to be due to differences among bulls in their response to the dilution ratio of seminal plasma to extender. The effect of storage time was investigated in semen that had been stored between 1000 days and 2400 days in AI straws in liquid nitrogen at the AI center. Our findings showed that use of semen with the longest storage period, i.e. 1951-2400 days, resulted in a more than one percentage point lower probability of conception than semen with a shorter storage period. In conclusion, the net sperm concentration at semen collection, which affects the dilution ratio of seminal plasma to extender, should be considered individually among bulls to achieve optimal reproductive performance. Furthermore, this study gives support to the idea that a measurable degree of damage to the spermatozoa could occur during the preservation time in liquid nitrogen.

  6. Preliminary study on effects of bovine frozen semen storage using a liquid nitrogen-independent method on the quality of post-thaw spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Buranaamnuay, K; Seesuwan, K; Saikhun, K

    2016-09-01

    Frozen semen of eight bulls was used to assess effects of storage temperature and length of storage time on frozen-thawed bovine sperm quality. In experiment 1, 25 straws of frozen semen of each bull were allocated to 3 groups. The control was still maintained in liquid nitrogen (LN2). The rest were abruptly moved from LN2 to -80°C and -30°C mechanical freezers, respectively. After thawing, it was found that the sperm motility, vitality and membrane integrity were comparable (P>0.05) between the control and the -80°C samples and were significantly inferior (P<0.001) in the -30°C samples, irrespective of storage time (1-day, 1-week and 1-month). In experiment 2, two out of the three parts (16-18 straws) of frozen semen of each bull were rapidly removed from LN2 and further kept in the freezer (-80°C). One day before being thawed, half of the samples in the freezer were promptly put back to LN2. The results showed that the frozen-thawed sperm quality was not significantly affected (P>0.05) both by storage temperature (-196°C, -80°C and -80 & -196°C) and storage time [day-2, day-8 (1-week) and day-31 (1-month)]. At the same storage times, the quality measures at different temperatures were not significantly different from one another (P>0.05). In conclusion, a -80°C mechanical freezer was as effective as LN2 in preserving in vitro quality of frozen-thawed bovine spermatozoa throughout 1-month of storage. When required for use, frozen semen stored in the freezer could be thawed immediately or transferred to the LN2 tank for thawing elsewhere. PMID:27421230

  7. Assessment of motion and kinematic characteristics of frozen-thawed Sirohi goat semen using computer-assisted semen analysis

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Mukul; Yadav, Sarvajeet

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to determine the motion and kinematics characteristic of frozen-thawed spermatozoa in Sirohi goat using computer-assisted semen analysis. Materials and Methods: A study was carried out in Sirohi buck. Semen collection was made biweekly from each buck with the help of artificial vagina. A total of 12 ejaculates were collected from two bucks (six ejaculates from each buck). Freshly collected semen was pooled and later evaluated. The pooled semen sample was extended with standard glycerolated egg yolk tris extender and later subjected to a process of cryopreservation. The motion and kinematic characteristics of spermatozoa were studied during freez-thawing process. Results: Significantly (p<0.01) higher value of live percent, hypo-osmotic swelling test, and acrosomal integrity were recorded in neat semen followed by diluted and frozen thaw semen. The proportion of spermatozoa showing slow progression were the highest in the neat and diluted semen followed by rapid and non-progressively motile, while a reverse pattern was observed in the frozen thaw semen where the proportion of non-progressively motile spermatozoa were significantly (p<0.01) higher followed by slow and rapid progression. Conclusion: This study showed that the best results for motion, vitality, plasma membrane integrity, and acrosome status were obtained in the neat semen followed by diluted and frozen thaw semen. Further, the process of cryopreservation results in a shift of motility from slow to non-progressive in the post-thaw semen with a significant decrease in the path velocities when compared to neat and diluted semen. Hence, it can be concluded that freezing-thawing process reduces the motility and kinematic characters spermatozoa and may be an important factor affecting the fertilizing ability of spermatozoa resulting in poor conception rate after insemination in goats. PMID:27051209

  8. Bovine herpesvirus 1 in semen of bulls and the risk of transmission: a brief review.

    PubMed

    van Oirschot, J T

    1995-03-01

    Outbreaks of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV1) infections in artificial insemination centres can run a clinical or subclinical course. Clinical signs vary from mild to severe balanoposthitis and may be associated with a decrease in semen quality. After intranasal as well as intrapreputial infection, BHV1 can replicate in the preputial and penile mucosae, although the pattern of virus shedding in semen differs considerably per individual bull. Beyond the primary phase of a genital infection, BHV1 remains latent in sacral ganglia, and consequently a protracted course of intermittent virus excretion may follow. The seminal plasma rather than the sperm cells contains the BHV1. Diluting the semen before inoculating cell cultures appears to be the best method to neutralize its toxic activity and to achieve optimal virus isolation results. Detection of BHV1 in semen by polymerase chain reaction seems to be more sensitive than virus isolation. Not each extended semen straw contains virus when the virus titre in the ejaculate is low. The minimal dose to infect a cow by artificial insemination may be more than 32 infectious virus particles. Such an infection may lead to fertility disturbances, mainly endometritis. The risk of transmitting BHV1 to inseminated cows by using BHV1-seropositive bulls for artificial insemination is substantially reduced if two straws per semen batch are assayed for virus and if each positive batch is destroyed. PMID:7610554

  9. Conventional and fluorescent based semen quality assessment in Karan Fries bulls

    PubMed Central

    Panmei, A.; Gupta, A. K.; Shivahre, P. R.; Bhakat, M.; Upadhyay, A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was carried out on semen ejaculates of 15 Karan Fries (KF) bulls maintained at Artificial Breeding Research Centre, National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal, India with an objective to evaluate the relationship between the conventional and fluorescent based semen quality analysis of the bulls. Materials and Methods: A total of 96 ejaculates were collected from 15 KF (Holstein Friesian [HF] crossbred) bulls. Semen were evaluated for color, volume, mass activity (MA) and percentage of individual motility (IM), sperm concentration, percent live spermatozoa, hypo-osmotic swelling test and acrosome integrity, chromatin integrity, sperm viability, and membrane integrity. Data were analyzed using SPSS software package for descriptive analysis. The correlation between rankings of sires based on conventional and fluorescent semen parameters were calculated by Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient. Results: The average ejaculates volume (ml), sperm concentration (106/ml), MA, IM (%), live (%), morphological abnormalities (%), host (%), acrosome integrity (%), chromomycin A3 (CMA3) (%), SYBR-PI (%), and fluorescent isothiocyanate-peanut agglutinin (FITC-PNA) (%) were 4.57±0.36, 1162.98±97.93, 2.95±0.09, 60.8±1.22, 71.41±2.10, 9.31±1.15, 65.5±1.81, 86.6±1.59, 3.53±0.43, 65.39±2.23 and 74.47±2.53, respectively. Rank correlations were found to be significant for SYBR-PI and FITC-PNA with most of the parameters evaluated by conventional methods. Overall, among conventional criteria, IM revealed ranking of bulls almost similar to that of fluorescent criteria. Conclusion: Overview of our results indicated that, among conventional criteria, MA and IM revealed ranking of bulls almost similar to that of fluorescent criteria. PMID:27047025

  10. Sperm fertility and viability following 48h of refrigeration: evaluation of different extenders for the preservation of bull semen in liquid state.

    PubMed

    Crespilho, A M; Nichi, M; Guasti, P N; Freitas-Dell'Aqua, C P; Sá Filho, M F; Maziero, R R; Dell'aqua, J A; Papa, F O

    2014-05-01

    Two experiments were conducted to compare the effectiveness of different extenders conventionally used for semen cryopreservation to maintain the viability and fertility of cooled bull semen. In Experiment 1, sperm samples obtained from 20 Nellore bulls were preserved at 5°C for 48h using two extenders containing 20% of egg yolk [Tris (TRIS-R) and Botu-Bov(®) (BB)] and another composed of 1% soy lecithin [Botu-Bov(®)-Lecithin (BB-L)] as substitutes for animal origin products. The samples were evaluated at 6, 24 and 48h for plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity, quantification of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (ng of TBARS/10(8) cells) and sperm motility parameters by computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA). In Experiment 2, pregnancy rate (P/AI) of 973 fixed-time artificially inseminated Nellore cows were compared when cows were inseminated with conventionally cryopreserved semen in TRIS-egg yolk glycerol (TRIS-C Control, n=253) or semen cooled for 48h in TRIS-R (n=233), BB (n=247) or BB-L (n=240). Although none of the extenders used was effective on maintaining total progressive motility and cellular integrity throughout the 48-h of the refrigeration period (P<0.01), BB-L conferred greater protection against oxidative stress (P<0.05) than egg yolk-based medias. The P/AI for semen samples preserved in TRIS-C, TRIS-R, BB and BB-L were 39.92(a), 25.32(b), 26.32(b) and 33.33(ab), respectively. These results demonstrate that the three conventional extenders used for semen cryopreservation do not provide the protection required to maintain bull semen fertility under refrigeration for a 48-h period, resulting in reduced pregnancy rates. However, the use of lecithin-based medium instead of egg yolk results in greater protection against lipid peroxidation, producing P/AI results comparable to those obtained using frozen semen. PMID:24685263

  11. 19 Beef cattle pregnancy rates following insemination with aged frozen angus semen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Artificial insemination has proven to be a valuable asset to the cattle industry. It is assumed that once good quality semen is frozen in liquid nitrogen it should remain viable indefinitely; however, semen viability has not been systematically evaluated after being stored for several decades. In th...

  12. Minimum number of spermatozoa per dose in Mediterranean Italian buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) using sexed frozen semen and conventional artificial insemination.

    PubMed

    Gaviraghi, A; Puglisi, R; Balduzzi, D; Severgnini, A; Bornaghi, V; Bongioni, G; Frana, A; Gandini, L M; Lukaj, A; Bonacina, C; Galli, A

    2013-05-01

    In buffaloes, AI with sexed semen is not fully optimized, and the procedure has only been performed using the approach currently in use for cattle. The objective of the present work was to compare the pregnancy rates in Mediterranean Italian buffalo cows inseminated with sexed frozen-thawed semen at 2, 4, 6, and 8 million sperm per dose, using the Ovsynch protocol and conventional AI at a fixed time. Fresh ejaculates from three buffalo bulls were processed according to Beltsville sperm sorting technology, and packaged in 0.25-mL straws with two total concentrations of 2 and 4 million live sorted sperm per straw. After thawing, semen was evaluated for total motility, forward motility, average path velocity, membrane and DNA integrity, and membrane fluidity. Sorting efficiency was estimated using a real time polymerase chain reaction method developed and validated in our laboratory. The artificial inseminations were conducted during the breeding season on 849 Italian Mediterranean buffalo heifers and cows distributed in 13 farms in northern and central Italy. No significant difference in quality parameters was reported between nonsexed and sexed straws produced with 2 and 4 million sperm. Lower pregnancy rate (P < 0.001) was reported when inseminating doses of sexed semen at 2 million were used (53/170; 31.2%), with respect to conventional nonsexed (78/142; 54.9%), and sexed doses at 4, 6, and 8 million spermatozoa (102/205, 49.8%; 84/175, 48.0%; and 74/157, 47.1%, respectively). No differences were evident using conventional doses and sexed semen with sperm numbers equal or higher than 4 million per dose. Pregnancies were not affected by the sire; 39/82 (47.6%), 120/270 (44.4%), and 151/355 (42.5%), respectively, for the three bulls. Variability in pregnancy rates observed in different herds was not significant. Furthermore, no significant difference was reported between pregnancies obtained with sexed semen in heifers and multiparous, respectively, 179/407 (44

  13. Colloid centrifugation of fresh stallion semen before cryopreservation decreased microorganism load of frozen-thawed semen without affecting seminal kinetics.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, T; Lopes, G; Pinto, M; Silva, E; Miranda, C; Correia, M J; Damásio, L; Thompson, G; Rocha, A

    2015-01-15

    Freezability of equine semen may be influenced by microorganism population of semen. The objective of this study was to verify the effect of single-layer density gradient centrifugation (SLC) of fresh semen before cryopreservation on semen's microbial load (ML) and sperm cells kinetics after freezing-thawing. For that, one ejaculate was collected from 20 healthy stallions and split into control (C) samples (cryopreserved without previous SLC) and SLC samples (subjected to SLC). Semen cryopreservation was performed according to the same protocol in both groups. Microbial load of each microorganism species and total microbial load (TML) expressed in colony-forming units (CFU/mL) as well as frozen-thawed sperm kinetics were assessed in both groups. Additional analysis of the TML was performed, subdividing the frozen-thawed samples in "suitable" (total motility ≥ 30%) and "unsuitable" (total motility < 30%) semen for freezing programs, and comparing the C and SLC groups within these subpopulations. After thawing, SLC samples had less (P < 0.05) TML (88.65 × 10(2) ± 83.8 × 10(2) CFU/mL) than C samples (155.69 × 10(2) ± 48.85 × 10(2) CFU/mL), mainly due to a reduction of Enterococcus spp. and Bacillus spp. A relationship between post-thaw motility and SLC effect on ML was noted, as only in samples with more than 30% total motility was ML reduced (P < 0.05) by SLC (from 51.33 × 10(2) ± 33.26 × 10(2) CFU/mL to 26.68 × 10(2) ± 12.39 × 10(2) CFU/mL in "suitable" frozen-thawed semen vs. 240.90 × 10(2) ± 498.20 × 10(2) to 139.30 × 10(2) ± 290.30 × 10(2) CFU/mL in "unsuitable" frozen-thawed semen). The effect of SLC on kinetics of frozen-thawed sperm cells was negligible.

  14. Effect of species, breed, and age on bacterial load in bovine and bubaline semen

    PubMed Central

    Sannat, Chandrahas; Nair, Ajit; Sahu, S. B.; Sahasrabudhe, S. A.; Kumar, Ashish; Gupta, Amit Kumar; Shende, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of species, breed and age on bacterial load in fresh and frozen semen of Cattle and Buffalo bull. Materials and Methods: Present study covered 56 cow and 10 buffalo bulls stationed at Central Semen Station Anjora, Durg (Chhattisgarh). Impact of breeds on bacterial load in semen was assessed using six breeds of cattle viz. Sahiwal, Gir, Red Sindhi, Tharparkar, Jersey and Holstein Friesian (HF) cross. Cow bulls were categorized into four different groups based on their age (<4 years, 4-5 years, 5-6 years and > 6 years) to study variation among age groups. Bacterial load was measured in fresh and frozen semen samples from these bulls using the standard plate count (SPC) method and count was expressed as colony forming unit (CFU) per ml of semen. Results: Higher bacterial load was reported in fresh (2.36 × 104 ± 1943 CFU/ml) and frozen (1.00 × 10 ± 90 CFU/ml) semen of cow bulls as compared to buffalo bulls (1.95 × 104 ± 2882 and 7.75 × 102 ± 160 CFU/ml in fresh and frozen semen, respectively). Jersey bull showed significantly higher bacterial count (p < 0.05) both in fresh (4.07 × 104 ± 13927 CFU/ml) and frozen (1.92 × 103 ± 178 CFU/ml) semen followed by HF cross, Sahiwal, Gir, Red Sindhi and Tharparkar bull. Bulls aged < 4 years and more than 6 years yielded increased bacterial load in their semen. Although a minor variation was reported between species and among age groups, no significant differences were measured. Conclusion: Bacterial load in semen did not differ significantly between species and age groups; however significant variation was reported among different breeds. Bulls of Jersey breed showed significantly higher bacterial load in semen as compared to the crossbred and indigenous bull. PMID:27047115

  15. The concentration of estradiol-17 beta in bovine semen.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, R W; Randel, R D; Forrest, D W; Senger, P L

    1985-03-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the influence of age, breed, epididymectomy and semen processing on the concentration of estradiol-17 beta (E2) in bovine semen. Semen was collected either by electroejaculation or with an artificial vagina. Neat semen samples were stored at -20 C until analysis. Processed, frozen semen and an egg yolk-citrate semen extender were obtained from a commercial semen processing firm and stored in liquid nitrogen at -196 C. The concentration of E2 in semen was determined by radioimmunoassay. Semen from mature (greater than 24 mo), fertile Brahman (n = 19), Brangus (n = 16), Charolais (n = 29), Holstein (n = 15) and Santa Gertrudis (n = 25) bulls was analyzed for E2 concentration, and no difference (P greater than .10) between breeds was found. There was no difference (P greater than .10) in seminal E2 concentration between mature, fertile bulls (n = 104) and epididymectomized bulls (n = 22). In semen collected from prepuberal (12 to 16 mo, n = 21), peripuberal (17 to 20 mo, n = 17) and mature (greater than 24 mo, n = 19), Brahman bulls, the mature bulls had a lower (P less than .01) semen E2 concentration than peripuberal and prepuberal bulls. There were no differences (P greater than .10) in seminal E2 concentration among peripuberal Angus (n = 8), Hereford (n = 8) and Brahman (n = 17) bulls.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3988647

  16. A High Percentage of Beef Bull Pictures in Semen Catalogues Have Feet and Lower Legs that Are Not Visible

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Marcy K.; Grandin, Temple

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary When cattle breeders purchase semen from a website, the only way they can visually appraise a bull’s conformation is by looking at his photograph. Correct foot and leg structure is important to help reduce lameness. Only 19.4% of the bull pictures on four major websites had fully visible feet and lower legs. A possible explanation for this may be deliberate covering of feet and legs with photo editing software to cover up conformation defects. Visibility of feet and lower legs would help semen buyers avoid bulls with obvious feet or leg problems. Abstract A total of 1379 beef bull pictures were surveyed to determine visibility of feet and legs from four American semen company websites. Five different breeds were represented: Angus, Red Angus, Hereford (polled and horned), Simmental, and Charolais. In addition to visibility, data on other variables were collected to establish frequencies and correlations. These included breed, color, material that obscured visibility, such as grass, picture taken at livestock show or outside, semen company, photographer, video, and age of bull. A foot and leg visibility score was given to each bull picture. Only 19.4% of the pictures had fully visible feet and legs. Both the hooves and dewclaws were hidden on 32.5% of the pictures. Correlation between bull’s birthdate and the first four visibility scores was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). As age increased the feet and legs were more likely to be visible in the bull’s picture. This may possibly be due to greater availability of both photo editing software and digital photography. One positive finding was that 6% of the bulls had a video of the bull walking which completely showed his feet and legs. PMID:26479372

  17. Semen quality parameters as fertility predictors of water buffalo bull spermatozoa during low-breeding season.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hussain; Andrabi, S Murtaza Hassan; Jahan, Sarwat

    2016-10-01

    The present study was carried out to assess various postthaw semen quality parameters for the prediction of fertility in buffalo bull during low-breeding season. Semen (30 ejaculates) was collected from five adult buffalo bulls with artificial vagina (42 °C). Sperm motility parameters, velocity distribution, motion kinematics, and subpopulations were analyzed by computer-aided sperm motion analyzer (CASA). Moreover, sperm visual motility, supravital plasma membrane integrity, viability/acrosome integrity, viability/mitochondrial transmembrane potential, DNA fragmentation/integrity, and morphology were analyzed by phase-contrast microscope, supravital hypoosmotic swelling test, Trypan blue/Giemsa staining, propidium iodide/"5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolyl carbocyanine iodide" (JC-1) fluorochromes, neutral comet assay/acridine orange assay and wet mount technique, respectively. Outcome of 528 inseminations was analyzed for in vivo fertility. Pearson's correlation coefficients revealed that sperm progressive motility (%), rapid velocity (%), average path velocity (μm/s), straight line velocity (μm/s), subpopulation one (most rapid, and progressive) of motile spermatozoa (%), supravital plasma membrane integrity (%), and viable spermatozoa with intact acrosome (%) were significantly correlated with in vivo fertility (r = 0.64, P < 0.01; r = 0.57, P < 0.01; r = 0.52, P < 0.01; r = 0.56, P < 0.01; r = 0.73, P < 0.001; r = 0.74, P < 0.001; r = 0.88, P < 0.001); whereas nonviable spermatozoa with damaged acrosome or low-mitochondrial transmembrane potential and comet length (μm) of neutral comet assay were negatively associated with in vivo fertility (r = -0.79, r = -0.75, P < 0.001, and r = -0.60, P < 0.05, respectively). Multiple regression analysis reported that combination of semen quality parameters as predictor of fertility were better (R(2) adjusted = 81.30%, P < 0.001) as compared with single parameter (R(2

  18. Semen quality parameters as fertility predictors of water buffalo bull spermatozoa during low-breeding season.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hussain; Andrabi, S Murtaza Hassan; Jahan, Sarwat

    2016-10-01

    The present study was carried out to assess various postthaw semen quality parameters for the prediction of fertility in buffalo bull during low-breeding season. Semen (30 ejaculates) was collected from five adult buffalo bulls with artificial vagina (42 °C). Sperm motility parameters, velocity distribution, motion kinematics, and subpopulations were analyzed by computer-aided sperm motion analyzer (CASA). Moreover, sperm visual motility, supravital plasma membrane integrity, viability/acrosome integrity, viability/mitochondrial transmembrane potential, DNA fragmentation/integrity, and morphology were analyzed by phase-contrast microscope, supravital hypoosmotic swelling test, Trypan blue/Giemsa staining, propidium iodide/"5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolyl carbocyanine iodide" (JC-1) fluorochromes, neutral comet assay/acridine orange assay and wet mount technique, respectively. Outcome of 528 inseminations was analyzed for in vivo fertility. Pearson's correlation coefficients revealed that sperm progressive motility (%), rapid velocity (%), average path velocity (μm/s), straight line velocity (μm/s), subpopulation one (most rapid, and progressive) of motile spermatozoa (%), supravital plasma membrane integrity (%), and viable spermatozoa with intact acrosome (%) were significantly correlated with in vivo fertility (r = 0.64, P < 0.01; r = 0.57, P < 0.01; r = 0.52, P < 0.01; r = 0.56, P < 0.01; r = 0.73, P < 0.001; r = 0.74, P < 0.001; r = 0.88, P < 0.001); whereas nonviable spermatozoa with damaged acrosome or low-mitochondrial transmembrane potential and comet length (μm) of neutral comet assay were negatively associated with in vivo fertility (r = -0.79, r = -0.75, P < 0.001, and r = -0.60, P < 0.05, respectively). Multiple regression analysis reported that combination of semen quality parameters as predictor of fertility were better (R(2) adjusted = 81.30%, P < 0.001) as compared with single parameter (R(2

  19. TEMPORARY STORAGE OF BOVINE SEMEN CRYOPRESERVED IN LIQUID NITROGEN ON DRY ICE AND REFREEZING OF FROZEN-THAWED SEMEN.

    PubMed

    Abdussamad, A M; Gauly, M; Holtz, W

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted. The purpose of Experiment 1 was to investigate whether viability of bovine semen stored in liquid nitrogen (-196°C) will be adversely affected by temporary exposure to dry ice (-79°C). It was convincingly shown that post thaw-motility was not affected, regardless whether semen was thawed immediately or after being returned to liquid nitrogen. Shipping or temporary storage on dry ice, thus, is a viable option. In Experiment 2, refreezing of frozen-thawed semen was attempted. The proportion of motile spermatozoa was reduced by a factor of ten to between 6.0 % and 7.4 %, regardless whether thawing occurred directly after removal from liquid nitrogen or after an interim period on dry ice. When semen was refrozen on dry ice before being returned to liquid nitrogen, motility rates were significantly improved (13.0 % to 17.0 %, P<0.05). In both experiments sperm cells that remained motile displayed vigorous forward movement and normal morphological appearance. PMID:26576003

  20. Effect of seminal plasma vesicular structures in canine frozen-thawed semen.

    PubMed

    Goericke-Pesch, S; Hauck, S; Failing, K; Wehrend, A

    2015-12-01

    Membrane vesicles (MVs) in the ejaculate have been identified in various species and are considered to affect membrane fluidity due to their characteristic molecular composition. Addition of MV to human frozen semen has been shown to improve post-thaw motility. Similarly, a beneficial effect has been suggested for frozen equine semen. As post-thaw canine semen quality varies widely between dogs, the aim of our study was to test for the effect of addition of canine MV on post-thaw semen quality in dogs. Semen samples from 10 male dogs were purified from MV and prepared for freezing. In experiment 1, three groups were compared: sperm frozen (1) with MV (S1); (2) without MV, but MV added immediately after thawing (S2); and (3) without MV (C). Semen analysis included computer-assisted sperm analysis of motility parameters immediately after thawing (t0), after 10 (t10) and 30 minutes (t30), % living sperm, % membrane intact, % morphologically normal sperm (all t0 and t30). Computer-assisted sperm analysis motility distance and velocity parameters (all P < 0.05) and % living sperm (P < 0.001) were significantly affected by treatment with a temporary increase of distance and velocity parameters at t0 to t10, but a significant decrease of the aforementioned parameters at t30 in samples with MV. In experiment 2, different MV protein concentrations added after thawing were compared: 0.05 mg, 0.1 mg, and 0.2 mg/mL. Computer-assisted sperm motility analysis was performed at t0, t10, and t30. No differences between MV concentrations were identified, only a significant interaction between effect of treatment and time for progressive motility (P < 0.01). Our study identified a short-term beneficial effect of canine MV on post-thaw distance and velocity parameters, whereas at t30 progressive motility, motility parameters and % living sperm were reduced in samples with MV compared to C. The results point to species-specific differences regarding the MV effect on frozen

  1. Effect of seminal plasma vesicular structures in canine frozen-thawed semen.

    PubMed

    Goericke-Pesch, S; Hauck, S; Failing, K; Wehrend, A

    2015-12-01

    Membrane vesicles (MVs) in the ejaculate have been identified in various species and are considered to affect membrane fluidity due to their characteristic molecular composition. Addition of MV to human frozen semen has been shown to improve post-thaw motility. Similarly, a beneficial effect has been suggested for frozen equine semen. As post-thaw canine semen quality varies widely between dogs, the aim of our study was to test for the effect of addition of canine MV on post-thaw semen quality in dogs. Semen samples from 10 male dogs were purified from MV and prepared for freezing. In experiment 1, three groups were compared: sperm frozen (1) with MV (S1); (2) without MV, but MV added immediately after thawing (S2); and (3) without MV (C). Semen analysis included computer-assisted sperm analysis of motility parameters immediately after thawing (t0), after 10 (t10) and 30 minutes (t30), % living sperm, % membrane intact, % morphologically normal sperm (all t0 and t30). Computer-assisted sperm analysis motility distance and velocity parameters (all P < 0.05) and % living sperm (P < 0.001) were significantly affected by treatment with a temporary increase of distance and velocity parameters at t0 to t10, but a significant decrease of the aforementioned parameters at t30 in samples with MV. In experiment 2, different MV protein concentrations added after thawing were compared: 0.05 mg, 0.1 mg, and 0.2 mg/mL. Computer-assisted sperm motility analysis was performed at t0, t10, and t30. No differences between MV concentrations were identified, only a significant interaction between effect of treatment and time for progressive motility (P < 0.01). Our study identified a short-term beneficial effect of canine MV on post-thaw distance and velocity parameters, whereas at t30 progressive motility, motility parameters and % living sperm were reduced in samples with MV compared to C. The results point to species-specific differences regarding the MV effect on frozen

  2. Cryopreservation of bull semen: Evolution from egg yolk based to soybean based extenders.

    PubMed

    Layek, S S; Mohanty, T K; Kumaresan, A; Parks, J E

    2016-09-01

    Since the inception of bovine semen cryopreservation, egg yolk and milk based extenders have been used to protect sperm from the detrimental effects of cooling and freezing. In recent years, demand for alternatives to conventional commercial extenders has arisen as the risk of introducing exotic diseases through transporting egg yolk based products has been recognized. Egg yolk can also interfere with sperm evaluation and the presence of particulate material in the extender may reduce fertility. Soybeans contain lecithin, a phospholipid fraction that can substitute for high molecular weight lipoprotein and phospholipids from egg yolk and prevent or ameliorate damage to the sperm plasma membrane that occurs during extension, cooling, and cryopreservation. Soy lecithin based extenders have been evaluated for processing and freezing bovine semen, although extender from soybean milk has not been studied as extensively. Commercially available soy lecithin based extenders are used increasingly but remain under scrutiny and are not universally accepted. With these observations in mind, this review is intended to examine effects of conventional cryopreservation procedures, methods of assessment, and potential for developing soybean extract as an acceptable alternative to traditional egg yolk and milk based extenders for bull sperm cryopreservation.

  3. Cryopreservation of bull semen: Evolution from egg yolk based to soybean based extenders.

    PubMed

    Layek, S S; Mohanty, T K; Kumaresan, A; Parks, J E

    2016-09-01

    Since the inception of bovine semen cryopreservation, egg yolk and milk based extenders have been used to protect sperm from the detrimental effects of cooling and freezing. In recent years, demand for alternatives to conventional commercial extenders has arisen as the risk of introducing exotic diseases through transporting egg yolk based products has been recognized. Egg yolk can also interfere with sperm evaluation and the presence of particulate material in the extender may reduce fertility. Soybeans contain lecithin, a phospholipid fraction that can substitute for high molecular weight lipoprotein and phospholipids from egg yolk and prevent or ameliorate damage to the sperm plasma membrane that occurs during extension, cooling, and cryopreservation. Soy lecithin based extenders have been evaluated for processing and freezing bovine semen, although extender from soybean milk has not been studied as extensively. Commercially available soy lecithin based extenders are used increasingly but remain under scrutiny and are not universally accepted. With these observations in mind, this review is intended to examine effects of conventional cryopreservation procedures, methods of assessment, and potential for developing soybean extract as an acceptable alternative to traditional egg yolk and milk based extenders for bull sperm cryopreservation. PMID:27509873

  4. Effect of semen preparation on casa motility results in cryopreserved bull spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Contri, Alberto; Valorz, Claudio; Faustini, Massimo; Wegher, Laura; Carluccio, Augusto

    2010-08-01

    Computer-assisted sperm analyzers (CASA) have become the standard tool for evaluating sperm motility and kinetic patterns because they provide objective data for thousands of sperm tracks. However, these devices are not ready-to-use and standardization of analytical practices is a fundamental requirement. In this study, we evaluated the effects of some settings, such as frame rate and frames per field, chamber and time of analysis, and samples preparations, including thawing temperature, sperm sample concentration, and media used for dilution, on the kinetic results of bovine frozen-thawed semen using a CASA. In Experiment 1, the frame rate (30-60 frame/s) significantly affected motility parameters, whereas the number of frames per field (30 or 45) did not seem to affect sperm kinetics. In Experiment 2, the thawing protocol affects sperm motility and kinetic parameters. Sperm sample concentration significantly limited the opportunity to perform the analysis and the kinetic results. A concentration of 100 and 50 x 10(6) sperm/mL limited the device's ability to perform the analysis or gave wrong results, whereas 5, 10, 20, and 30 x 10(6) sperm/mL concentrations allowed the analysis to be performed, but with different results (Experiment 3). The medium used for the dilution of the sample, which is fundamental for a correct sperm head detection, affects sperm motility results (Experiment 4). In this study, Makler and Leja chambers were used to perform the semen analysis with CASA devices. The chamber used significantly affected motility results (Experiment 5). The time between chamber loading and analysis affected sperm velocities, regardless of chamber used. Based on results recorded in this study, we propose that the CASA evaluation of motility of bovine frozen-thawed semen using Hamilton-Thorne IVOS 12.3 should be performed using a frame rate of 60 frame/s and 30 frames per field. Semen should be diluted at least at 20 x 10(6) sperm/mL using PBS. Furthermore, it is

  5. Strategies to improve the fertility of fresh and frozen donkey semen.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, José Victor; Oliveira, Pedro Victor de Luna Freire; Melo e Oña, Cely Marini; Guasti, Priscilla Nascimento; Monteiro, Gabriel Augusto; Sancler da Silva, Yamê Fabres Robaina; Papa, Patrícia de Mello; Alvarenga, Marco Antônio; Dell'Aqua Junior, Jose Antonio; Papa, Frederico Ozanam

    2016-04-15

    Fertility rates of donkey semen in jennies are lower compared to mares. The aims of this study were to evaluate different sperm cryopreservation methods and insemination strategies to improve the fertility of donkey semen in jennies. Three experiments were performed: (1) the comparison of two freezing methods of donkey semen (conventional method and automated method); (2) the determination of a suitable insemination dose of fresh donkey semen for jennies and mares; and (3) the influence of the semen deposition site on fertility of jennies inseminated with frozen donkey semen. For experiment 1, no differences were observed in total motility, angular velocity, curvilinear velocity, straight-line velocity, and plasma membrane integrity between samples frozen with the conventional (Styrofoam box) and the automated method (TK 4000C). However, the automated method provided higher values of progressive motility and rapid cells in frozen-thawed samples in comparison with the conventional method (P < 0.05). For experiment 2, mares were bred using 500 × 10(6) fresh sperm (M); and jennies using 1 × 10(9) (J1) or 500 × 10(6) fresh sperm (J5). Pregnancy rates in M, J1, and J5 were 93% (14/15), 73% (11/15), and 40% (6/15), respectively. When using different insemination doses, 500 × 10(6) or 1 × 10(9) sperm, no significant difference was observed in pregnancy rates of mares (M, 14/15) and jennies (J1, 11/15). Furthermore, there was no significant difference between the two insemination doses in jennies. However, with an insemination dose of 500 × 10(6) fresh sperm, the pregnancy rates were significantly higher in mares (M, 14/15) than in jennies (J5, 6/15; P < 0.05). For experiment 3, the inseminations were carried out in the uterine body (UB) or in the uterine horn of jennies with frozen-thawed donkey semen. No pregnancies were achieved with inseminations performed in the UB (0/12). The pregnancy rate for uterine horn group was 28.26% (13/46) and thus

  6. Strategies to improve the fertility of fresh and frozen donkey semen.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, José Victor; Oliveira, Pedro Victor de Luna Freire; Melo e Oña, Cely Marini; Guasti, Priscilla Nascimento; Monteiro, Gabriel Augusto; Sancler da Silva, Yamê Fabres Robaina; Papa, Patrícia de Mello; Alvarenga, Marco Antônio; Dell'Aqua Junior, Jose Antonio; Papa, Frederico Ozanam

    2016-04-15

    Fertility rates of donkey semen in jennies are lower compared to mares. The aims of this study were to evaluate different sperm cryopreservation methods and insemination strategies to improve the fertility of donkey semen in jennies. Three experiments were performed: (1) the comparison of two freezing methods of donkey semen (conventional method and automated method); (2) the determination of a suitable insemination dose of fresh donkey semen for jennies and mares; and (3) the influence of the semen deposition site on fertility of jennies inseminated with frozen donkey semen. For experiment 1, no differences were observed in total motility, angular velocity, curvilinear velocity, straight-line velocity, and plasma membrane integrity between samples frozen with the conventional (Styrofoam box) and the automated method (TK 4000C). However, the automated method provided higher values of progressive motility and rapid cells in frozen-thawed samples in comparison with the conventional method (P < 0.05). For experiment 2, mares were bred using 500 × 10(6) fresh sperm (M); and jennies using 1 × 10(9) (J1) or 500 × 10(6) fresh sperm (J5). Pregnancy rates in M, J1, and J5 were 93% (14/15), 73% (11/15), and 40% (6/15), respectively. When using different insemination doses, 500 × 10(6) or 1 × 10(9) sperm, no significant difference was observed in pregnancy rates of mares (M, 14/15) and jennies (J1, 11/15). Furthermore, there was no significant difference between the two insemination doses in jennies. However, with an insemination dose of 500 × 10(6) fresh sperm, the pregnancy rates were significantly higher in mares (M, 14/15) than in jennies (J5, 6/15; P < 0.05). For experiment 3, the inseminations were carried out in the uterine body (UB) or in the uterine horn of jennies with frozen-thawed donkey semen. No pregnancies were achieved with inseminations performed in the UB (0/12). The pregnancy rate for uterine horn group was 28.26% (13/46) and thus

  7. Fertility management of bulls to improve beef cattle productivity.

    PubMed

    Thundathil, Jacob C; Dance, Alysha L; Kastelic, John P

    2016-07-01

    Global demand for animal proteins is increasing, necessitating increased efficiency of global food production. Improving reproductive efficiency of beef cattle, especially bull fertility, is particularly critical, as one bull can breed thousands of females (by artificial insemination). Identifying the genetic basis of male reproductive traits that influence male and female fertility, and using this information for selection, would improve herd fertility. Early-life selection of elite bulls by genomic approaches and feeding them to optimize postpubertal reproductive potential are essential for maximizing profitability. Traditional bull breeding soundness evaluation, or systematic analysis of frozen semen, eliminates bulls or semen samples that are grossly abnormal. However, semen samples classified as satisfactory on the basis of traditional approaches differ in fertility. Advanced sperm function assays developed for assessing compensatory and noncompensatory (submicroscopic) sperm traits can predict such variations in bull fertility. New knowledge on epigenetic modulations of sperm DNA, messenger RNA, and proteins is fundamental to refine and expand sperm function assays. Sexed semen, plus advanced reproductive technologies (e.g., ovum pickup and in vitro production of embryos) can maximize the efficiency of beef cattle production. This review is focused on genetic considerations for bull selection, physiology of reproductive development, breeding soundness evaluation, recent advances in assessing frozen semen, and existing and emerging uses of sexed semen in beef cattle production. PMID:27173954

  8. Intravaginal artificial insemination in bitches using frozen/thawed semen after dilution in powdered coconut water (ACP-106c).

    PubMed

    Uchoa, D C; Silva, T F P; Mota Filho, A C; Silva, L D M

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate powdered coconut water extender (ACP-106c; ACP Serviços Tecnológicos Ltda, ACP Biotecnologia, Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil) as a diluent for freezing dog semen and the fertility after vaginal insemination of semen frozen therein. Ten ejaculates were collected from five dogs, evaluated fresh, diluted in ACP-106c, 10% egg yolk and 6% glycerol, cooled and frozen. In the first phase of the study, straws with frozen semen were thawed and immediately subjected to the same analysis as the fresh semen and, in addition, to Computer-Assisted Semen Analysis (CASA). In phase 2, 10 bitches that had been subjected to natural breeding during a preceding oestrous cycle were vaginally inseminated with thawed semen that had been re-diluted in ACP-106c. After thawing, a mean of 77% sperm motility was obtained through subjective analysis and 77.3% through CASA. Following artificial insemination, a 60% pregnancy rate was observed, resulting in a 50% parturition rate and a mean litter size of 3.4 (SEM 0.6), with 47.1% males and 52.9% females. ACP-106c can be successfully used for freezing canine semen, and vaginal deposition of such semen yields similar pregnancy rates to those reported in other studies.

  9. Estimation of genetic parameters and effects of cytoplasmic line on scrotal circumference and semen quality traits in Angus bulls.

    PubMed

    Garmyn, A J; Moser, D W; Christmas, R A; Minick Bormann, J

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the heritability of scrotal circumference (SC) and semen traits, genetic correlations between SC and semen quality traits, and the effect of cytoplasmic line on SC and semen traits. Breeding soundness exam (BSE) data were collected on registered Angus bulls at 4 ranches over 7 yr. The American Angus Association provided historical pedigree information to estimate the effect of cytoplasmic line on SC and semen quality traits. After editing, the evaluated data set contained 1,281 bulls with breeding soundness exam data that traced back to 100 founder dams. Data were analyzed using a 2-trait animal model to obtain heritability, genetic correlation between SC and semen quality traits, as well as the effect of cytoplasmic line as a random effect for SC, percent motility (MOT), percent primary abnormalities (PRIM), percent secondary abnormalities (SEC), and percent total abnormalities (TOT) using multiple-trait derivative-free REML. Fixed effects included source ranch and collection year, and test age was used as a covariate. Estimates of heritability for SC, MOT, PRIM, SEC, and TOT were 0.46, 0.05, 0.27, 0.23, and 0.25, respectively. Genetic correlations between SC and MOT, PRIM, SEC, and TOT were 0.36, -0.19, -0.11, and -0.23, respectively. The proportions of phenotypic variance accounted for by cytoplasmic line for SC, MOT, PRIM, SEC, and TOT were <0.001, 0.013, 0.023, 0.002, and <0.001, respectively. Genetic correlations between SC and semen quality traits were low to moderate and favorable. Cytoplasmic line may have a marginal effect on MOT and PRIM, but is likely not a significant source of variation for SC, SEC, or TOT.

  10. Enhanced early-life nutrition of Holstein bulls increases sperm production potential without decreasing postpubertal semen quality.

    PubMed

    Dance, Alysha; Thundathil, Jacob; Blondin, Patrick; Kastelic, John

    2016-08-01

    Enhanced early-life nutrition (∼130% of required energy and protein) increased testes size and weight (∼20-25%) and reduced age at puberty (∼1 month) in beef and dairy bulls, compared with those fed 70% of dietary requirements. The objective was to determine effects of early-life (2-31 weeks) nutritional modulation on feed costs, predicted number of harvestable sperm and doses of semen, and semen quality. Calves (∼1 week old) were randomly allocated into three groups that were fed 4, 6, or 8 L/day of milk (low [n = 8], medium [n = 9], and high groups [n = 9], respectively) from ages 2 to 8 weeks. Thereafter, they were weaned, transitioned onto barley silage-based diets, to receive ∼70, 100, or 130% of recommended amounts of energy and protein (feed costs were ∼CDN$280 more per bull to feed high versus low diets from 2 to 31 weeks). After 31 weeks, all bulls were fed a medium diet. Semen was collected, by electroejaculation, from 51 to 73 weeks, extended, chilled, and cryopreserved. Bulls fed high nutrition were numerically younger (P = 0.45) at sexual maturity (sperm with ≥30% progressive motility, ≥70% morphologically normal, and ≤20% abnormal heads), first acceptable post-chill sperm motility (>50%; P = 0.66) and first acceptable post-thaw motility (>25% progressive; P = 0.25) than bulls in the low-nutrition group. Semen from three bulls per group was used for in vitro fertilization (total of 1249 bovine oocytes); there were no significant differences among groups in fertilization percentage (mean ± SEM of 68.0 ± 8.7, 77.1 ± 3.5, and 68.7 ± 4.5% for low, medium, and high, respectively) or blastocyst yield (31.5 ± 5.6, 41.4 ± 4.9, and 33.7 ± 4.6%). On the basis of analysis of 2D gels of sperm proteins, 380 spots were identified on the fused master gel, but no spots were differentially expressed across groups. Overall, there were no significant differences in semen quality or sperm function among bulls fed

  11. Comparing ethylene glycol with glycerol and with or without dithiothreitol and sucrose for cryopreservation of bull semen in egg-yolk containing extenders.

    PubMed

    Büyükleblebici, Serhat; Tuncer, Pürhan Barbaros; Bucak, Mustafa N; Taşdemir, Umut; Eken, Ayşe; Büyükleblebici, Olga; Durmaz, Emre; Sarıözkan, Serpil; Endirlik, Burcu Ü

    2014-08-01

    There are few studies performed for investigating the roles of different ratio and cryoprotectants with dithiothreitol or sucrose on sperm motility characteristics and antioxidant capacities of post-thawed bull spermatozoa. The objectives of this study were to compare glycerol (G) and ethylene glycol (EG) at different concentrations as cryoprotectants and dithiothreitol (D) or sucrose (S) (with/without) as antioxidants in Tris extender for cryopreservation of bull semen. Twenty-four ejaculates obtained from three bulls were included in the study. Each ejaculate was split into four equal aliquots and diluted using both of the Tris extenders with glycerol (5% or 7%) or ethylene glycol (3% or 5%). After that, each extenders were split into three equal aliquots and diluted using both of the dithiothreitol 5mM or sucrose 25 mM, and control (without additives) was cooled to 4 °C and frozen in 0.25-ml French straws. when compared to control, different doses cryoprotectants and antioxidants addition no significantly increased the percentages of post-thaw sperm progressive and motitilities, acrosome abnormality and plasma membrane integrity (P>0.05). However, EG3+S yielded the greatest percentages of the total abnormality (P<0.05). As regard to antioxidant activities G7 and EG5 led to lowest MDA activity with or without D or S but, these results were not supported to the GPx activity (P<0.01). The sperm motion characteristics such as VAP, VCL, ALH and BCF gave significantly different results (P<0.05). When compared the DNA integrity, different doses cryoprotectants without antioxidants addition significantly increased the percentages of the tail intensity and tail moment (P<0.05). There were no significant differences observed in non-return rates among all treatment groups (P>0.05). PMID:24858399

  12. Effect of semen collection by transrectal massage of accessory sexual glands or artificial vagina on the outcome of breeding soundness examinations of Italian yearling beef bulls.

    PubMed

    Sylla, Lakamy; Palombi, Claudio; Stradaioli, Giuseppe; Vagniluca, Antonio; Monaci, Maurizio

    2015-03-15

    Although semen quality is one of the major traits that influence breeding soundness examination outcomes in bulls, field conditions occasionally do not allow for the collection of semen samples by means of an artificial vagina. The aims of the present study were to report the results of a large number of semen collections that were performed via the transrectal massage (TRM) of the accessory sexual glands of Italian yearling beef bulls and compare this semen collection method to the artificial vagina (AV) method in term of breeding soundness examination outcomes; furthermore, we determined whether the breed affected the semen characteristics. In the TRM group (n = 475), the semen samples were collected via TRM of the accessory sexual glands, and in the AV group (n = 502), the AV method was used. In the TRM group, semen samples were obtained from 81.3% of the bulls and penile protrusion was observed in 87.6% of the animals during semen collection. The sperm concentrations (920.5 ± 439.0 vs. 281.0 ± 259.8 × 10(6)/mL) and the percentages of total abnormal spermatozoa (22.8 ± 15.0 vs. 18.8 ± 12.9) were significantly higher in the AV group than those in the TRM group. The percentage of bulls that did not meet the minimum requirement for normal cells (≥70%) was 6.2% higher in the AV group than that in the TRM group (P < 0.05). Moreover, the samples collected from Chianina bulls by TRM exhibited a lower percentage of motile sperm and a higher percentage of abnormal spermatozoa when compared with the other two breeds. The major drawbacks of the TRM technique were the inability to conduct complete evaluation of the libido and mating ability of the yearling bulls, a significant reduction of the number of spermatozoa collected, and an increase in the variability of the semen characteristics due to breed. In conclusion, despite the drawbacks, TRM guarantees that semen evaluation can be conducted in cases in which the semen samples cannot be collected

  13. Effect of semen collection by transrectal massage of accessory sexual glands or artificial vagina on the outcome of breeding soundness examinations of Italian yearling beef bulls.

    PubMed

    Sylla, Lakamy; Palombi, Claudio; Stradaioli, Giuseppe; Vagniluca, Antonio; Monaci, Maurizio

    2015-03-15

    Although semen quality is one of the major traits that influence breeding soundness examination outcomes in bulls, field conditions occasionally do not allow for the collection of semen samples by means of an artificial vagina. The aims of the present study were to report the results of a large number of semen collections that were performed via the transrectal massage (TRM) of the accessory sexual glands of Italian yearling beef bulls and compare this semen collection method to the artificial vagina (AV) method in term of breeding soundness examination outcomes; furthermore, we determined whether the breed affected the semen characteristics. In the TRM group (n = 475), the semen samples were collected via TRM of the accessory sexual glands, and in the AV group (n = 502), the AV method was used. In the TRM group, semen samples were obtained from 81.3% of the bulls and penile protrusion was observed in 87.6% of the animals during semen collection. The sperm concentrations (920.5 ± 439.0 vs. 281.0 ± 259.8 × 10(6)/mL) and the percentages of total abnormal spermatozoa (22.8 ± 15.0 vs. 18.8 ± 12.9) were significantly higher in the AV group than those in the TRM group. The percentage of bulls that did not meet the minimum requirement for normal cells (≥70%) was 6.2% higher in the AV group than that in the TRM group (P < 0.05). Moreover, the samples collected from Chianina bulls by TRM exhibited a lower percentage of motile sperm and a higher percentage of abnormal spermatozoa when compared with the other two breeds. The major drawbacks of the TRM technique were the inability to conduct complete evaluation of the libido and mating ability of the yearling bulls, a significant reduction of the number of spermatozoa collected, and an increase in the variability of the semen characteristics due to breed. In conclusion, despite the drawbacks, TRM guarantees that semen evaluation can be conducted in cases in which the semen samples cannot be collected

  14. Sperm in poor quality semen from bulls during heat stress have a lower affinity for binding hydrogen-3 heparin

    SciTech Connect

    Ax, R.L.; Gilbert, G.R.; Shook, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    Binding assays with (/sup 3/H) heparin were performed using spermatozoa collected prior to, during, and following summer heat stress to dairy bulls. Ejaculates collected in August 1983 after a period of ambient temperatures exceeding 29.4/sup 0/C exhibited a high frequency of abnormal sperm, and motility was reduced in some samples. Sperm in samples collected during heat stress possessed dissociation constants for binding (/sup 3/H) heparin ranging from 134.5 to 163.2 nmol. In contrast, sperm in semen collected prior to and after heat stress had significantly lower dissociation constants (higher affinity) for (/sup 3/H)heparin, 12.9 to 56.4 nmol. The number of binding sites for (/sup 3/H) heparin on sperm did not change among collection periods. It was concluded that the binding affinity for (/sup 3/H) heparin may reflect membrane integrity of bull sperm.

  15. Chicks produced in the Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) after cloacal insemination of frozen-thawed semen.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Justine Kellie; Steinman, Karen J; Montano, Gisele A; Dubach, Jean M; Robeck, Todd R

    2016-07-01

    The in vitro and in vivo functionality of cryopreserved spermatozoa was examined over two breeding seasons in a zoological colony of Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus). Frozen-thawed semen was inseminated into five anesthetized females, over a total of eight egg production cycles, with a different male used for each artificial insemination (AI) within each season. Females were maintained within the colony in cordoned nest sites to prevent copulation with their paired male, and were inseminated every 3-10 days until the first oviposition. Semen frozen from seven males using a straw method retained 39.8%, 25.7%, 74.0%, and 52.1% of its initial total motility, progressive motility, average path velocity, and plasma membrane integrity, respectively. Normal morphology of motile cells was reduced (P < 0.05) during freeze-thawing from 76.7% immediately prior to freezing to 65.3% post-thawing. Conceptive females received 1.6 ± 0.2 inseminations before the first oviposition, with 19.2 ± 1.6 × 10(6) motile, morphologically normal spermatozoa per insemination. Overall fertility was 53.3% (8/15 eggs), hatchability was 50.0% (4/8), and genetic analyses confirmed that all embryos and hatchlings were sired by the AI male. Fertile eggs were laid at 4.0-12.1 days after AI, indicating that frozen-thawed spermatozoa resided in the female reproductive tract for up to ∼7.2 days prior to fertilization. Results demonstrate that frozen-thawed Magellanic penguin spermatozoa are fully functional in vivo and support the use of genome banking and AI as tools for managing the sustainability of zoological penguin populations. Zoo Biol. 35:326-338, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Chicks produced in the Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) after cloacal insemination of frozen-thawed semen.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Justine Kellie; Steinman, Karen J; Montano, Gisele A; Dubach, Jean M; Robeck, Todd R

    2016-07-01

    The in vitro and in vivo functionality of cryopreserved spermatozoa was examined over two breeding seasons in a zoological colony of Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus). Frozen-thawed semen was inseminated into five anesthetized females, over a total of eight egg production cycles, with a different male used for each artificial insemination (AI) within each season. Females were maintained within the colony in cordoned nest sites to prevent copulation with their paired male, and were inseminated every 3-10 days until the first oviposition. Semen frozen from seven males using a straw method retained 39.8%, 25.7%, 74.0%, and 52.1% of its initial total motility, progressive motility, average path velocity, and plasma membrane integrity, respectively. Normal morphology of motile cells was reduced (P < 0.05) during freeze-thawing from 76.7% immediately prior to freezing to 65.3% post-thawing. Conceptive females received 1.6 ± 0.2 inseminations before the first oviposition, with 19.2 ± 1.6 × 10(6) motile, morphologically normal spermatozoa per insemination. Overall fertility was 53.3% (8/15 eggs), hatchability was 50.0% (4/8), and genetic analyses confirmed that all embryos and hatchlings were sired by the AI male. Fertile eggs were laid at 4.0-12.1 days after AI, indicating that frozen-thawed spermatozoa resided in the female reproductive tract for up to ∼7.2 days prior to fertilization. Results demonstrate that frozen-thawed Magellanic penguin spermatozoa are fully functional in vivo and support the use of genome banking and AI as tools for managing the sustainability of zoological penguin populations. Zoo Biol. 35:326-338, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27272488

  17. Dimethylformamide as a cryoprotectant for canine semen diluted and frozen in ACP-106C.

    PubMed

    Mota Filho, A C; Teles, C H A; Jucá, R P; Cardoso, J F S; Uchoa, D C; Campello, C C; Silva, A R; Silva, L D M

    2011-10-15

    The objective was to assess the effect of adding various concentrations of dimethylformamide on characteristics of canine semen diluted in powdered coconut water (ACP-106C; ACP Biotecnologia, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil) and frozen at -196°C. Fifteen ejaculates were collected by manual stimulation from five adult Boxer dogs. The sperm-rich fraction was diluted in ACP-106C (ACP Biotecnologia) containing 10% egg yolk and divided into four aliquots. The cryoprotectants used for each aliquot were 6% glycerol (control group; CG) or 2%, 4%, or 6% dimethylformamide (DF2, DF4, and DF6, respectively). After thawing, total motility (mean ± SEM) for CG (58.4 ± 24.6) was higher (P < 0.05) than that of the other groups (2% dimethylformamide, 24.4 ± 12.3; 4% dimethylformamide, 26.5 ± 16.1; and 6% dimethylformamide, 21.7 ± 17.9). Furthermore, there was a greater percentage of fast, average, and slow moving sperm (assessed with computer-aided semen analysis; CASA) in CG in comparison with the other three groups. Therefore, based on concentrations tested in this study, dimethylformamide, together with ACP-106C (ACP Biotecnologia) and 10% egg yolk as a diluent, yielded unsatisfactory in vitro results for freezing canine semen.

  18. Effect of addition of autologous prostatic fluid on the fertility of frozen-thawed dog semen after intravaginal insemination.

    PubMed

    Nöthling, J O; Volkmann, D H

    1993-01-01

    Vaginal insemination of frozen-thawed dog semen usually gives a highly unpredictable fertility rate with poor pregnancy rates in most bitches. This study was designed to establish whether litter size, pregnancy rate and conception rate could be improved by the addition of autologous prostatic fluid to the frozen-thawed semen before insemination. Twenty German shepherd bitches that were free of any clinical reproductive abnormality or suspect breeding history were used. The bitches were stratified according to their ages and randomly assigned within strata to treatment (group T, n = 10) or control groups (group C, n = 10). All bitches were inseminated daily with frozen-thawed semen for the duration of that stage of vaginoscopic oestrus during which the vaginal folds were shrunken and angular. Bitches in group T were inseminated with semen to which 7-10 ml of frozen-thawed sperm-free autologous prostatic fluid has been added immediately before insemination. No prostatic fluid was added to the semen used to inseminate the bitches in group C. Each inseminate contained 100 x 10(6) progressively motile spermatozoa after thawing. Semen was deposited in the vaginal fornix using a disposable plastic bovine artificial insemination pipette. For groups T and C the mean number of conceptuses per cycle (litter size), the mean ratio of conceptuses to corpora lutea (conception rate), and the pregnancy rate were 5.2 +/- 3.01 and 2.4 +/- 2.84, 0.577 +/- 0.35 and 0.23 +/- 0.27, and 100% and 60%, respectively. The addition of autologous prostatic fluid to frozen-thawed canine spermatozoa significantly improved the litter size (P = 0.023), the conception rate (P = 0.0127) and pregnancy rate in bitches (P = 0.043).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8229945

  19. Use of single-layer centrifugation with Androcoll-C to enhance sperm quality in frozen-thawed dog semen.

    PubMed

    Dorado, J; Gálvez, M J; Morrell, J M; Alcaráz, L; Hidalgo, M

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether single-layer centrifugation (SLC) with Androcoll-C could select good quality spermatozoa, including those with specific motility patterns, from doses of frozen dog semen. Semen from five dogs was collected and cryopreserved following a standard protocol. After thawing, the semen samples were divided in two aliquots, one of which was used as a control and the other one processed by SLC. Assessment of sperm motility (assessed by computer-assisted semen analysis), morphology (Diff-Quick staining), viability (dual staining with propidium iodine/acridine orange), and acrosome integrity (dual staining with propidium iodine/isothiocyanate-labeled peanut [Arachis hypogaea] agglutinin) were performed on aliquots of fresh semen, frozen-thawed control samples, and frozen-thawed SLC-treated preparations. A multivariate clustering procedure separated 57,577 motile spermatozoa into three subpopulations (sP): sP1 consisted of poorly active and nonprogressive spermatozoa (48.8%), sP2 consisted of moderately slow but progressive spermatozoa (13.3%), and sP3 consisted of highly active and/or progressive spermatozoa (37.8%). SLC with Androcoll-C yielded sperm suspensions with improved motility, viability, and acrosome integrity (P < 0.01). The frozen-thawed SLC-treated samples were enriched in sP3, representing 38.5% of the sperm population. Likewise, sP2 was more frequently observed after SLC, but not significantly so. From these results, we concluded that for dog semen samples selected by SLC with Androcoll-C after thawing, the sperm quality parameters, including motility patterns, are better than in frozen-thawed control samples.

  20. Effects of a GnRH administration on testosterone profile, libido and semen parameters of dromedary camel bulls.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Davide; Fatnassi, Meriem; Padalino, Barbara; Aubé, Lydiane; Khorchani, Touhami; Hammadi, Mohamed; Lacalandra, Giovanni Michele

    2015-10-01

    GnRH treatment has been suggested to increase testosterone levels temporarily and to stimulate libido in stallions, but its use has not fully ascertained in dromedary camels. The aim of this work was to study the effects of administering 100 μg of GnRH on testosterone profile, libido and semen parameters in dromedary camels. The same bulls were used as self-controls and experimental group. Blood samples were collected every 20 min (T0-T12) for 4h, and semen collections were performed over a 2-hour period after T12. GnRH was administered immediately after T0. In GnRH-treated bulls, testosterone levels showed an upward trend, peaking after 140 min, and then slowly decreasing. GnRH administration also led to a decrease in mating time and an increase in spermatozoa concentration. Overall, it seems that administration of 100 μg GnRH might increase testosterone levels temporarily and enhance camel reproduction performance. PMID:26412546

  1. French field results (1985-2005) on factors affecting fertility of frozen stallion semen.

    PubMed

    Vidament, M

    2005-10-01

    Results on procedures for freezing stallion semen and the subsequent fertility during 20 years are presented. The present system applied in French National Stud includes: (1) a freezing protocol (dilution in milk, centrifugation and addition of freezing extender (INRA82+egg yolk (2%, v/v)+glycerol (2.5%, v/v) at 22 degrees C, a moderate cooling rate to 4 degrees C and freezing at -60 degrees C/min in 0.5-ml straws); (2) selection of ejaculates showing post-thaw rapid motility >35%; and (3) an insemination protocol (mares examined once daily, two AI of 400 x 10(6) spermatozoa 24 h apart before ovulation, sufficient number of straws to have the possibility to perform six AI of 400 x 10(6) total spermatozoa, i.e. 2.4 x 10(9) total spermatozoa available per mare per season). This system was applied to >110 stallions per year, the average post-thaw motility of ejaculates was 50% (>1800 ejaculates) before selection. The semen freezability was defined as the number of selected ejaculates divided by the total number of ejaculates frozen. Of the stallions, 5, 4, 5, 21 and 64% had semen freezability of 0-10, 10-33, 33-60, 60-90 and over 90%, respectively. Per-cycle pregnancy rate was 45-48% (>1500 mares per year, 1.8 cycles per mare) and foaling rate 64%. In comparison, per-cycle pregnancy rate and foaling rate of mares hand-mated to stallions were 57-59% and 64%, respectively. The average number of straws used was 32-35 (1.75 x 10(9) total spermatozoa) per mare per season. According to our results and the literature, the most important factors for improving fertility of frozen equine semen include: (1) a low concentration of glycerol (2-3.5% final concentration); (2) a suitable base extender for freezing like Lactose-Glucose EDTA or INRA82; (3) a post-thaw motility >30-35%; and (4) a sufficient number of spermatozoa per mare per season (1.5-2 x 10(9) total spermatozoa for two to three cycles) divided into small units. Numbers of spermatozoa, lower than 750.10(6) total

  2. Effects of antioxidants and duration of pre-freezing equilibration on frozen-thawed ram semen.

    PubMed

    Câmara, D R; Silva, S V; Almeida, F C; Nunes, J F; Guerra, M M P

    2011-07-15

    The objective was to evaluate the effects of various antioxidants and duration of pre-freezing equilibration on cryopreservation of ram semen. Semen samples from four rams were pooled, diluted with Tris-egg yolk extender without antioxidants (control), or supplemented with reduced glutathione (GSH: 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mM), superoxide dismutase (SOD: 5, 10, and 20 U/mL), or catalase (CAT: 5, 10, and 20 U/mL), and cryopreserved, immediately after thermal equilibrium was reached at 5 °C (0 h), or 12 or 24 h after equilibration. Total antioxidant capacity was determined in the in natura extenders and after addition of semen samples for various durations of processing (fresh/dilute, throughout refrigeration, and post-thaw). Plasma membrane (PI-CFDA), acrosome integrity (FITC-PNA), and mitochondrial membrane potential (JC-1) were determined in fresh/diluted, refrigerated, and post-thaw samples. Post-thaw sperm motility was assessed with a computerized analysis system (CASA). There were no significant differences in acrosome damage or mitochondrial membrane potential after refrigeration and freeze-thaw, regardless of antioxidant addition. Sperm plasma membrane integrity was worse (P < 0.05) with cryopreservation immediately after equilibration (average 20.1 ± 8.3; mean ± SD) than after 12 h of equilibration (average 42.5 ± 10.9); however, the addition of SOD and CAT (10 and 20 U/mL) resulted in no significant difference between post-equilibration intervals of 0 and 12 h. Total antioxidant activity was not different (P > 0.05) among treatments after sperm addition or throughout the refrigeration and post-thaw. In conclusion, adding GSH, SOD or CAT did not increase the total antioxidant capacity of semen, nor did it enhance the quality of the post-thaw sperm. However, maintenance of ram semen at 5 °C for 12 h prior to cryopreservation reduced membrane damage of frozen-thawed sperm. PMID:21529917

  3. Single-layer centrifugation through PureSperm® 80 selects improved quality spermatozoa from frozen-thawed dog semen.

    PubMed

    Dorado, J; Alcaraz, L; Gálvez, M J; Acha, D; Ortiz, I; Urbano, M; Hidalgo, M

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether single-layer centrifugation (SLC) with PureSperm® 80 could select good quality spermatozoa, including those with specific motility patterns, from doses of frozen dog semen. Semen from 5 dogs was collected and cryopreserved following a standard protocol. After thawing, semen samples were divided into two aliquots: one of them was used as control and the other one processed by SLC. Assessment of sperm motility (assessed by computer-assisted semen analysis), morphology (Diff-Quick staining) and viability (triple fluorescent stain of propidium iodine/isothiocyanate-labeled peanut (Arachis hypogaea) agglutinin/Rhodamine 123), were performed on aliquots of fresh semen, frozen-thawed control and frozen-thawed SLC treated samples. A multivariate clustering procedure separated 26,051 motile spermatozoa into three subpopulations (sP): sP1 consisting of highly active but non-progressive spermatozoa (40.3%), sP2 consisting of spermatozoa with high velocity and progressive motility (30.0%), and sP3 consisting of poorly active and non-progressive spermatozoa (29.7%). SLC with PureSperm® 80 yielded sperm suspensions with improved motility, morphology, viability and acrosome integrity (P<0.001). The frozen-thawed SLC treated samples were enriched in sP2, reaching a proportion of 44.1% of the present spermatozoa. From these results, we concluded that SLC with PureSperm® 80 may be an alternative and successful method for improving the quality of frozen-thawed dog spermatozoa. Moreover, sP2 (high-speed and progressive spermatozoa) was more frequently observed after SLC. Finally, this study also demonstrated that the general motile sperm structure present in dogs remained constant despite the effect caused by either cryopreservation or separation by SLC through PureSperm® 80.

  4. Effects of the platelet-activating factor (PAF) on selected quality parameters of cryopreserved bull semen (AI) with reduced sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Lecewicz, M; Kordan, W; Majewska, A; Kamiński, S; Dziekońska, A; Mietelska, K

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effects of platelet-activating factor (PAF) on selected quality parameters of cryopreserved bull semen with reduced sperm motility used for artificial insemination. The aim of experiment 1 was to identify the optimal concentration of the phospholipid able to preserve sperm viability. Cryopreserved semen was treated with different PAF concentrations: 1×10(-5) M, 1×10(-6) M, 1×10(-7) M, 1×10(-8) M and 1×10(-9) M. The experiment demonstrated that PAF at concentration 1×10(-9) M increased most the sperm viability parameters (motility parameters, plasma membrane integrity and mitochondrial function) after 120 min of incubation of thawed semen at 37°C. Cryopreserved bull semen with reduced sperm motility (below 70%) was supplemented with PAF in a concentration of 1×10(-9) M. A statistically significant increase in sperm motility, percentage of linear motile spermatozoa and VSL value was observed after 120 min incubation of sperm with 1×10(-9) M PAF. Sperm supplementation with PAF also had positive effects on plasma membrane integrity and percentage of spermatozoa with preserved mitochondrial transmembrane potential, but the differences were not statistically significant. The results indicated positive effects of PAF supplementation at a concentration of 1×10(-9) M on the selected sperm quality parameters in cryopreserved bull semen with reduced motility. PMID:27096799

  5. Effect of various concentrations of caffeine, pentoxifylline, and kallikrein on hyperactivation of frozen bovine semen.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Ibrahim A H; Danfour, Mohamed A; Galewan, Fatma A M; Dkhil, Mohamed A

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine, pentoxifylline, and kallikrein are substances that affect the efficiency of sperms in the fertilization process; however, they have not been adequately studied. The present study aimed to examine the influence of caffeine, kallikrein, and pentoxifylline on sperm motility in bovine as well as investigate their optimum concentrations for increasing the movement of sperms in bovine. Frozen bovine sperms were thawed in universal IVF medium supplemented with 1, 5, and 10 mM caffeine or pentoxifylline or 1, 4, and 8 U/mL kallikrein and were then incubated for 30 min. Treated semen parameters were analyzed using a computer assisted semen analyzer (CASA). Data analysis showed that the mean values concerning progression and motility of sperm increased in caffeine and pentoxifylline treatments when compared with the kallikrein group. The obtained results revealed that kallikrein is not necessary for the improvement of bovine sperm motility. Additionally, our results revealed that 5 mM from caffeine was the best concentration added to the medium, followed by 1 or 5 mM from pentoxifylline. Therefore, it is concluded from the present study that caffeine has hyperactivation efficacy at 5 mM concentration compared to other treatments.

  6. Effect of Various Concentrations of Caffeine, Pentoxifylline, and Kallikrein on Hyperactivation of Frozen Bovine Semen

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Ibrahim A. H.; Danfour, Mohamed A.; Galewan, Fatma A. M.; Dkhil, Mohamed A.

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine, pentoxifylline, and kallikrein are substances that affect the efficiency of sperms in the fertilization process; however, they have not been adequately studied. The present study aimed to examine the influence of caffeine, kallikrein, and pentoxifylline on sperm motility in bovine as well as investigate their optimum concentrations for increasing the movement of sperms in bovine. Frozen bovine sperms were thawed in universal IVF medium supplemented with 1, 5, and 10 mM caffeine or pentoxifylline or 1, 4, and 8 U/mL kallikrein and were then incubated for 30 min. Treated semen parameters were analyzed using a computer assisted semen analyzer (CASA). Data analysis showed that the mean values concerning progression and motility of sperm increased in caffeine and pentoxifylline treatments when compared with the kallikrein group. The obtained results revealed that kallikrein is not necessary for the improvement of bovine sperm motility. Additionally, our results revealed that 5 mM from caffeine was the best concentration added to the medium, followed by 1 or 5 mM from pentoxifylline. Therefore, it is concluded from the present study that caffeine has hyperactivation efficacy at 5 mM concentration compared to other treatments. PMID:25950005

  7. Resurrection of a bull by cloning from organs frozen without cryoprotectant in a -80 degrees c freezer for a decade.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Yoichiro; Hayashi, Noboru; Taniguchi, Shunji; Kobayashi, Naohiko; Sakai, Kenji; Otani, Tsuyoshi; Iritani, Akira; Saeki, Kazuhiro

    2009-01-01

    Frozen animal tissues without cryoprotectant have been thought to be inappropriate for use as a nuclear donor for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). We report the cloning of a bull using cells retrieved from testicles that had been taken from a dead animal and frozen without cryoprotectant in a -80 degrees C freezer for 10 years. We obtained live cells from defrosted pieces of the spermatic cords of frozen testicles. The cells proliferated actively in culture and were apparently normal. We transferred 16 SCNT embryos from these cells into 16 synchronized recipient animals. We obtained five pregnancies and four cloned calves developed to term. Our results indicate that complete genome sets are maintained in mammalian organs even after long-term frozen-storage without cryoprotectant, and that live clones can be produced from the recovered cells.

  8. Differences in CASA output according to the chamber type when analyzing frozen-thawed bull sperm.

    PubMed

    Ibănescu, Iulian; Leiding, Claus; Ciornei, Ştefan Gregore; Roșca, Petru; Sfartz, Ioana; Drugociu, Dan

    2016-03-01

    As demonstrated by some authors, the type of analyzing chamber can greatly influence the results of computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA). This study aimed to compare three of the disposable chamber types currently available on the market and to determine whether the CASA output may be significantly different among them. The semen from five Fleckvieh bulls was analyzed by CASA using three different disposable chambers: Leja (20μm), MofA (20μm) and Minitube (20μm), at three different time points: immediately after filling the chamber, at 6min, and also at 12min after filling. Sperm concentration was also determined using the Nucleocounter® NC-100™ device and the hemocytometer as standard methods. The results showed higher values in terms of total and progressive sperm motility for MofA compared to the other two chambers immediately after filling (p<0.05), but higher values for Leja and Minitube after 6 and 12min (p<0.05). All three disposable chambers offered lower values for sperm concentration compared to standard methods (Leja: 68.4±4.9×106/mL; MofA: 80.8±9.6×106/mL; Minitube: 67.3±5.4×106/mL; Nucleocounter: 86.5×106/mL; Hemocytometer: 84.0×106/mL). We conclude that for rapid analyses the MofA chambers provide superior results when compared to the other types that we tested. However, when the analysis requires a longer duration, the Minitube type, and especially the Leja type provide a greater degree of confidence. Further, for determining sperm concentration we think that examiners would be more accurate using the Nucleocounter or the hemocytometer and should make use of CASA only when the other methods are not available.

  9. Effects of pipothiazine palmitate on handling stress and on the characteristics of semen collected by electroejaculation in bison (Bison bison) bulls.

    PubMed

    Toosi, B M; Gratton, G; McCorkell, R B; Wynne-Edwards, K E; Woodbury, M R; Lessard, C

    2013-04-01

    Handling North American bison can pose risk to the handler and evoke stress in the animal. Moreover, this induced stress might affect qualities of semen collected by electroejaculation. The objective of this study was to investigate if a long acting neuroleptic tranquilizer (LAN) would reduce the stress of bison and thereby improve the quality of electroejaculated semen. Eight experimental replicates were conducted between May and November. In each replicate, the same six bison bulls were randomly assigned into LAN-treated (n=3) and non-treated control (n=3) groups. Pipothiazine palmitate (Piportil L4) was administered intramuscularly as a single dose of 100 mg in replicates 1-4 or 200 mg in replicates 5-8. Within each replicate, semen was collected by electroejaculation at 4, 6, 11 and 13 days post treatment. Behavioral parameters, sperm morphology and motility parameters were analyzed. A blood sample was collected before each electroejaculation and serum concentrations of testosterone, cortisol and corticosterone were determined. Treatment bulls with 100 mg of Piportil L4 reduced the restraint time and the struggling of bison bulls during handling compared to the control group (P<0.05). Semen motility parameters and serum concentrations of testosterone, cortisol and corticosterone were not significantly affected when 100mg of the LAN was administered (P>0.05). However, giving 200 mg of Piportil L4 reduced the restraint time of bison bulls and the duration of semen collection (P<0.05). Also, this treatment improved total and progressive sperm motilities when compared to the respective controls (P<0.05). Interestingly, serum concentration of corticosterone, as an endocrine stress indicator, was decreased after administration of 200mg of Pipothiazine palmitate, while testosterone concentrations were increased compared to those values in untreated control bulls (corticosterone: 0.10±0.01 compared with 0.15±0.02 ng/mL; testosterone: 9.11±1.68 compared with 5.33±0

  10. Increased conception rates in beef cattle inseminated with nanopurified bull semen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reproductive performance is of paramount importance to the cattle industry. Since recent progress has been achieved by optimizing estrus and ovulation synchronization protocols in cows, improvements are desired to increase the fertility of bulls enrolled in artificial insemination (AI) programs. Thi...

  11. Improved fertility in gilts and sows after artificial insemination of frozen-thawed boar semen by supplementation of semen extender with caffeine and CaCl2.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shoichiro; Funahashi, Hiroaki; Murakami, Tetsuya

    2009-12-01

    Supplementation of semen extender with caffeine and CaCl(2) for artificial insemination (AI) of fresh spermatozoa has been demonstrated to reduce recruitment of uterine polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and the activity of phagocytosis. Here, we determined if addition of caffeine and CaCl(2) to semen extender improves the fertility of frozen-thawed boar semen. In experiment 1, gilts were cervically inseminated twice with frozen-thawed boar spermatozoa (25 x 10(8) cells per dose) suspended in Modena solution (n=7) or modified Beltsville Thawing Solution supplemented with caffeine and CaCl(2) (BCC, n=7). The gilts were slaughtered 4 h later, and their oviducts and uterine horns plus the body of the uterus were flushed to recover PMNs and non-phagocytosed spermatozoa. There was no difference in the total number of uterine PMNs between gilts inseminated with Modena solution and those inseminated with BCC (3.8 x 10(8) vs. 1.5 x 10(8) cells, respectively); however, the total number of uterine spermatozoa was higher when gilts were inseminated with BCC (40.6 x 10(6) cells) compared with those inseminated with Modena solution (1.4 x 10(6) cells, P<0.05). In experiment 2, gilts and sows were subjected to intrauterine insemination twice with frozen-thawed spermatozoa suspended (25 x 10(8) sperm per dose) in Modena (n=21) or BCC (n=21). The overall pregnancy and farrowing rates were higher in females inseminated with BCC (71.4 and 61.9%, respectively) compared with those inseminated with Modena solution (38.1 and 28.6%, respectively, P<0.05). However, no significant difference in litter size of piglets was observed between treatments (7.2 +/- 1.6 piglets for Modena solution vs. 8.2 +/- 0.9 piglets for BCC solution). In conclusion, we demonstrated that use of BCC solution for frozen-thawed boar semen produced better pregnancy and farrowing rates following AI than Modena solution, probably by reducing the phagocytosis of spermatozoa.

  12. Effects of the seminal plasma zinc content and catalase activity on the semen quality of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) bulls.

    PubMed

    Alavi-Shoushtari, S M; Rezai, S Asri; Ansari, M H Kh; Khaki, A

    2009-01-15

    In order to determine zinc and catalase content of seminal plasma in the buffalo and to study their associations with the semen characteristics, 54 semen samples were collected from 10 buffalo bulls; semen volume and sperm concentration, gross and progressive motility and viability were evaluated, seminal plasma was then harvested by centrifugation and its zinc content was estimated by atomic absorption spectrophotometer and its catalase activity determined by using a commercial kit. The zinc content of the seminal plasma (Mean +/- SEM) was recorded as 154.40 +/- 1.74 mg L(-1), while, the mean catalase value was 32.00 +/- 0.42 U mL(-1). The mean zinc values was highly correlated with sperm progressive motility and viability and with catalase values (p = 0.000 for all) and also was associated with gross motility (p = 0.020) and negatively with abnormal morphology (p = 0.049). The catalase values were highly associated with sperm progressive motility, viability and zinc content (p = 0.000 for all) and was associated with sperm gross motility (p = 0.024). For further clarification of these correlations, the samples were categorized in three groups of excellent (Ex, >90% motile, n = 33), good (Go, 80-89% motile, n = 15) and moderate (Mo, <79% motile, n = 6) according to their percentage of sperm motility. The mean progressive motility in Ex group was 92.54 +/- 0.51%, in Go group was 81.66 +/- 0.62% and in Mo group was 71.66 +/- 1.05%. The mean zinc and catalase values were recorded as 161.07 +/- 1.63 mg L(-1) and 33.41 +/- 0.34 U mL(-1) in Ex, 146.70 +/- 1.91 mg L(-1) and 31.01 +/- 0.67 in Go and 136.42 +/- 4.97 mg L(-1) and 26.51 +/- 0.87 U mL(-1) in Mo groups. The mean zinc value in Ex group was highly associated with sperm motility, viability and catalase values, in Go group was associated with catalase values and highly associated with sperm abnormal morphology and in Mo group it was highly associations with catalase values only. The mean catalase value in Ex group

  13. Quantification of leptin in seminal plasma of buffalo bulls and its correlation with antioxidant status, conventional and computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) semen variables.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradeep; Saini, Monika; Kumar, Dharmendra; Jan, M H; Swami, Dheer Singh; Sharma, R K

    2016-03-01

    The present study is the first to quantify leptin in seminal plasma of buffalo and investigate its relationship with seminal attributes. Ten ejaculates each from 10 Murrah buffalo bulls were collected. Semen quality variables such as semen volume, sperm concentration, sperm abnormalities, membrane integrity, antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase and total antioxidant capacity), malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, as well as sperm kinetics and motility variables were evaluated. The leptin concentration in serum and seminal plasma were estimated by the ELISA method. Bulls were classified in two groups on the basis of sperm concentration with Group I having >800 million sperm/mL and Group II <500 million sperm/mL. Greater (P<0.05) mean sperm abnormalities, seminal leptin concentrations and MDA concentrations were recorded in Group II than Group I. The seminal leptin was positively correlated with sperm abnormalities and MDA concentration while being negatively correlated with sperm concentration, but there was no correlation with sperm kinetic and motility variables, sperm membrane integrity and seminal plasma antioxidant enzyme activity. Thus, the data suggest that seminal leptin has a role in spermatogenesis and can be used as a marker for spermatogenesis to predict the capacity of buffalo bulls for semen production.

  14. Butylated hydroxytoluene inclusion in semen extender improves the post-thawed semen quality of Nili-Ravi buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Ijaz, A; Hussain, A; Aleem, M; Yousaf, M S; Rehman, H

    2009-05-01

    The study was carried out to evaluate the potential impact of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) on the frozen-thawed semen quality of Nili-Ravi buffalo bulls. Ejaculated bull semen was extended in a Tris-citrate egg yolk extender containing various concentrations of BHT (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0mM). Semen was frozen at -196 degrees C using 50 x 10(6) spermatozoa per 0.5 mL straws. Five straws from each treatment were thawed to assess the semen quality in terms of sperm motility, viability, plasma membrane integrity and acrosomal integrity. Post-thawed sperm motility was determined using a phase-contrast microscope. Viability, plasma membrane integrity and acrosomal integrity were evaluated by the supravital staining, hypo-osmotic swelling test and normal acrosomal reaction, respectively. The highest (P<0.05) motility, acrosomal integrity and hypo-osmotic swelling response of spermatozoa was achieved by addition of 1.0 and 2.0mM BHT to semen extender. However, highest (P<0.05) viability of spermatozoa was achieved by inclusion of 2.0mM BHT. The higher concentration of BHT (3.0mM) reduced the motility, acrosomal integrity, viability and hypo-osmotic swelling response of the spermatozoa compared to other concentration used. In conclusion, BHT when added in the semen extender can improve the semen quality of buffalo bulls.

  15. Longitudinal study of the detection of Bluetongue virus in bull semen and comparison of real-time polymerase chain reaction assays.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xingnian; Davis, Rodney J; Walsh, Susan J; Melville, Lorna F; Kirkland, Peter D

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Bluetongue virus (BTV) is a significant impediment to the global movement of bovine semen. Repeat testing of blood from donor animals is specified in the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) Manual for the export of semen from regions where BTV may be present. Screening of blood or semen samples has usually been carried out by virus isolation (VI) either by inoculation of chicken embryos followed by passage onto insect and mammalian cell cultures or in vivo inoculation of sheep followed by serology to detect seroconversion. Direct testing of semen for BTV would enable earlier release of semen samples and avoid repeat testing of the donor, as well as provide an option for releasing batches of semen that were collected without certification of the donor. Quantitative (real-time) reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays overcome most of the limitations of other methods and have the potential to provide higher sensitivity. The present study compared 5 qRT-PCR assays, including 2 commercially available kits, for the detection of BTV in semen serially collected from 8 bulls over a period of 90 days after experimental infection. The results of the study show that at least one of the qRT-PCR assays is extremely reproducible and has both very high sensitivity and specificity to reliably detect all available serotypes. The preferred qRT-PCR gave consistently superior results to VI, sheep inoculation, and conventional RT-PCR. Therefore, the assay can be recommended for the screening of bovine semen for freedom from BTV.

  16. Effect of some permeating cryoprotectants on CASA motility results in cryopreserved bull spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Awad, M M

    2011-02-01

    Computer-assisted sperm analyzers (CASA) have become the standard tool for evaluating sperm motility because they provide objective results for thousands of mammalian spermatozoa. Mammalian spermatozoa experience osmotic stress when the glycerol is added to the cells prior to freezing and removal from the cells after thawing. In order to minimize osmotic damage, cryoprotectants having lower molecular weights and greater membrane permeability than glycerol, were evaluated to determine their effectiveness for cryopreserving bull spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to compare the cryopreservation effects of low molecular weight cryoprotectants (ethylene glycol and methanol) to glycerol, on post-thaw CASA sperm parameters. Bull semen was diluted with tris-egg yolk extender containing 3% glycerol, 3, 2 and 1% ethylene glycol or 3, 2 and 1% methanol. Bull semen was frozen in 0.5 straws. Bull spermatozoa exhibited higher percentages (p<0.01) for total (Mot, 72.4%) and progressively (Prog, 29.5%) motilities when frozen in extender containing 3% glycerol compared to 3, 2 and 1% ethylene glycol or 3, 2 and 1% methanol. In conclusion, no advantages were found in using ethylene glycol or methanol to replace glycerol in bull semen freezing. Glycerol provided the best sperm characteristics for bull spermatozoa after freezing and thawing. The possibility of using ethylene glycol or methanol as permeating cryoprotectants for bull semen deserves further investigation, and these cryoprotectants should also be evaluated in extenders that contain disaccharides or cholesterol.

  17. Utilization of frozen-thawed epididymal ram semen to preserve genetic diversity in Scrapie susceptible sheep breeds.

    PubMed

    Ehling, C; Rath, D; Struckmann, C; Frenzel, A; Schindler, L; Niemann, H

    2006-12-01

    The European Union has introduced transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) resistance breeding programmes for several sheep breeds to cope with the genetic susceptibility to Scrapie infections. Due to the different allele frequencies among breeds, strong selection for ARR alleles is associated with a loss of genetic diversity in small populations and in larger populations with unfavourable ARR allele frequencies. To ensure maintenance of genetic diversity, an adhoc cryopreservation programme was initiated employing epididymal sperm from 109 rams representing 16 different breeds within one breeding season. Epididymal semen was chosen for this adhoc programme because time consuming training of rams for ejaculated semen collection via an artificial vagina was not possible. Prior to freezing, average sperm motility was 79.7% and acrosome integrity was 93.7%. After freezing, these levels were decreased to 60.5 and 72.8%, respectively. An insemination trial using frozen-thawed epididymal semen resulted in a lambing rate of 87.5%. Results show that this semen preservation method is robust and efficient and associated with high fertility. It may also be useful for other animal species.

  18. Glutathione supplementation to semen extender improves the quality of frozen-thawed canine spermatozoa for transcervical insemination

    PubMed Central

    OGATA, Kazuko; SASAKI, Aiko; KATO, Yuka; TAKEDA, Arisa; WAKABAYASHI, Mikio; SARENTONGLAGA, Borjigin; YAMAGUCHI, Mio; HARA, Asuka; FUKUMORI, Rika; NAGAO, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate whether supplementation of semen extender with glutathione (GSH) can maintain the quality of frozen-thawed canine spermatozoa. Eighteen ejaculates were obtained from 5 dogs and placed in extender (20% egg yolk, Tris, citric acid, lactose, raffinose, antibiotics and 6.5% glycerol) containing 0 (control), 2.5, 5, 7.5 or 10 mM GSH. The samples were cooled to 4 C and then frozen in liquid nitrogen vapor. Motility parameters of the sperm were evaluated at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 12 and 24 h after thawing. Sperm motility was higher in the 5 mM GSH group than in the control or 2.5 and 10 mM GSH groups; this effect was observed at 1 to 24 h after thawing (P < 0.05). The 5 mM GSH group had a higher sperm viability index at 12 and 24 h after thawing compared with the other groups (P < 0.05). Acrosome integrity, evaluated at 4 h after thawing, was greater in two of the GSH-treated groups (5 and 10 mM) compared with the control. Lipid peroxidation (LP) levels immediately after thawing were lower in the 5 and 10 mM GSH groups compared with the control, while those at 12 h after thawing did not differ significantly. Frozen-thawed semen in the 5 mM GSH group was used for transcervical insemination of 4 bitches, resulting in delivery of 5 puppies from 2 bitches. These results indicate that supplementation of semen extender with 5 mM GSH was effective in improving motility, longevity and acrosomal integrity and inhibiting LP levels in post-thaw canine spermatozoa, without any adverse impacts on full-term development after transcervical insemination. PMID:25736550

  19. Glutathione supplementation to semen extender improves the quality of frozen-thawed canine spermatozoa for transcervical insemination.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Kazuko; Sasaki, Aiko; Kato, Yuka; Takeda, Arisa; Wakabayashi, Mikio; Sarentonglaga, Borjigin; Yamaguchi, Mio; Hara, Asuka; Fukumori, Rika; Nagao, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate whether supplementation of semen extender with glutathione (GSH) can maintain the quality of frozen-thawed canine spermatozoa. Eighteen ejaculates were obtained from 5 dogs and placed in extender (20% egg yolk, Tris, citric acid, lactose, raffinose, antibiotics and 6.5% glycerol) containing 0 (control), 2.5, 5, 7.5 or 10 mM GSH. The samples were cooled to 4 C and then frozen in liquid nitrogen vapor. Motility parameters of the sperm were evaluated at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 12 and 24 h after thawing. Sperm motility was higher in the 5 mM GSH group than in the control or 2.5 and 10 mM GSH groups; this effect was observed at 1 to 24 h after thawing (P < 0.05). The 5 mM GSH group had a higher sperm viability index at 12 and 24 h after thawing compared with the other groups (P < 0.05). Acrosome integrity, evaluated at 4 h after thawing, was greater in two of the GSH-treated groups (5 and 10 mM) compared with the control. Lipid peroxidation (LP) levels immediately after thawing were lower in the 5 and 10 mM GSH groups compared with the control, while those at 12 h after thawing did not differ significantly. Frozen-thawed semen in the 5 mM GSH group was used for transcervical insemination of 4 bitches, resulting in delivery of 5 puppies from 2 bitches. These results indicate that supplementation of semen extender with 5 mM GSH was effective in improving motility, longevity and acrosomal integrity and inhibiting LP levels in post-thaw canine spermatozoa, without any adverse impacts on full-term development after transcervical insemination.

  20. Effect of genistein added to bull semen after thawing on pronuclear and sperm quality.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, M A; Vicente-Fiel, S; Raga, E; Salvador, I; Soler, C; Yániz, J L

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this research was to study the effect of different genistein treatments on bull sperm after thawing on pronuclear formation after in vitro fertilization (IVF) and on different sperm quality variables. Three experiments were performed. In Experiment 1, three treatments (Control, sperm incubation for 1h at 37 °C with or without genistein) and two sperm concentrations during IVF (1 or 3 × 10(6)sperm/mL) were evaluated to study the influence of genistein on pronuclear formation (PNF). Sperm incubation for 1h before IVF reduced PNF regardless of sperm concentration. However, after sperm incubation and with 3 × 10(6)sperm/mL in IVF, the genistein treatment group had greater fertilization rates than the untreated group. In Experiment 2, six treatments plus the control group were performed to study the effect of genistein (presence or not) and incubation conditions (30 min at 37 °C, 1h at 27 °C or at 37 °C) on PNF using 3 × 10(6)sperm/mL for IVF. When incubation time was reduced to 30 min, PNF rate from the genistein treatment group was no different from either the control group or in the group in which incubation occurred for 1h at 27 °C. In Experiment 3, the effect of several genistein treatments (control; genistein treatment for 30 min of incubation at 37 °C; genistein treatment for 1h of incubation at 27 °C) on sperm motility, viability and DNA fragmentation were evaluated. Genistein did not improve sperm motility and, depending on the experimental group or time, it either reduced or had no effect on sperm motility. Genistein treatment did not improve sperm viability after 5h of incubation. However, genistein treatment for 1h at 27 °C decreased sperm DNA fragmentation compared with the control group after 5h of sperm incubation. In conclusion, the treatment of bull sperm with genistein for 1h at 27 °C could decrease sperm DNA fragmentation, although PNF rate after IVF and sperm motility were reduced.

  1. Liquid and Frozen Storage of Agouti (Dasyprocta leporina) Semen Extended with UHT Milk, Unpasteurized Coconut Water, and Pasteurized Coconut Water.

    PubMed

    Mollineau, W M; Adogwa, A O; Garcia, G W

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of semen extension and storage on forward progressive motility % (FPM%) in agouti semen. Three extenders were used; sterilized whole cow's milk (UHT Milk), unpasteurized (CW) and pasteurized coconut water (PCW), and diluted to 50, 100, 150, and 200 × 10(6) spermatozoa/ml. Experiment 1: 200 ejaculates were extended for liquid storage at 5(∘)C and evaluated every day for 5 days to determine FPM% and its rate of deterioration. Experiment 2: 150 ejaculates were extended for storage as frozen pellets in liquid nitrogen at -195(∘)C, thawed at 30(∘) to 70(∘)C for 20 to 50 seconds after 5 days and evaluated for FPM% and its rate of deterioration. Samples treated with UHT milk and storage at concentrations of 100 × 10(6) spermatozoa/ml produced the highest means for FPM% and the slowest rates of deterioration during Experiment 1. During Experiment 2 samples thawed at 30(∘)C for 20 seconds exhibited the highest means for FPM% (12.18 ± 1.33%), 85% rate of deterioration. However, samples were incompletely thawed. This was attributed to the diameter of the frozen pellets which was 1 cm. It was concluded that the liquid storage method was better for short term storage. PMID:20871831

  2. Liquid and Frozen Storage of Agouti (Dasyprocta leporina) Semen Extended with UHT Milk, Unpasteurized Coconut Water, and Pasteurized Coconut Water

    PubMed Central

    Mollineau, W. M.; Adogwa, A. O.; Garcia, G. W.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of semen extension and storage on forward progressive motility % (FPM%) in agouti semen. Three extenders were used; sterilized whole cow's milk (UHT Milk), unpasteurized (CW) and pasteurized coconut water (PCW), and diluted to 50, 100, 150, and 200 × 106 spermatozoa/ml. Experiment 1: 200 ejaculates were extended for liquid storage at 5∘C and evaluated every day for 5 days to determine FPM% and its rate of deterioration. Experiment 2: 150 ejaculates were extended for storage as frozen pellets in liquid nitrogen at −195∘C, thawed at 30∘ to 70∘C for 20 to 50 seconds after 5 days and evaluated for FPM% and its rate of deterioration. Samples treated with UHT milk and storage at concentrations of 100 × 106 spermatozoa/ml produced the highest means for FPM% and the slowest rates of deterioration during Experiment 1. During Experiment 2 samples thawed at 30∘C for 20 seconds exhibited the highest means for FPM% (12.18 ± 1.33%), 85% rate of deterioration. However, samples were incompletely thawed. This was attributed to the diameter of the frozen pellets which was 1 cm. It was concluded that the liquid storage method was better for short term storage. PMID:20871831

  3. Embryo production and possible species preservation by nuclear transfer of somatic cells isolated from bovine semen.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Westhusin, Mark; Long, Charles; Johnson, Gregory; Burghardt, Robert; Kraemer, Duane

    2010-12-01

    Somatic cells in semen are a potential source of nuclei for nuclear transfer to produce genetically identical animals; this is especially important when an animal has died and the only viable genetic material available is frozen semen. Usefulness of somatic cells obtained from fresh (cultured) and frozen (isolated, not cultured) bovine semen for nuclear transfer was evaluated. Twelve ejaculates were collected from nine bulls representing three breeds: Charolais, Brahman, and crossbred Rodeo bull. All samples were processed immediately and cell growth was obtained from seven of the twelve ejaculates (58.3%). Cells from three bulls (with the best growth rates) were evaluated by optical microscopy and used in cloning experiments. In culture, these cells exhibited classic epithelial morphology and expressed cytokeratin and vimentin, indicating they were of epithelial origin. When cells from the three bulls were used as donor cells, 15.9% (18/113), 34.5% (29/84), and 14.4% (13/90) of the fused embryos developed into blastocysts, respectively. Of the blastocyst stage embryos, 38.9% (7/18), 72.4% (21/29), and 61.5% (8/13) hatched, respectively. Somatic cells isolated (not cultured) from frozen bovine semen were also used in the cloning experiments. Although cleavage occurred, no compact morulae or blastocysts were obtained. In conclusion, epithelial cell growth was obtained from fresh bovine ejaculates with relatively high efficiency. Somatic cells from semen can be used as nucleus donors to produce cloned blastocyst-stage embryos.

  4. The g.-165 T>C Rather than Methylation Is Associated with Semen Motility in Chinese Holstein Bulls by Regulating the Transcriptional Activity of the HIBADH Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Zhihua; Wang, Xiuge; Jiang, Qiang; Sun, Yan; Huang, Jinming; Zhong, Jifeng; Wang, Changfa

    2015-01-01

    The 3-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase (HIBADH) is regarded as a human sperm-motility marker. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of expression of the HIBADH gene in bulls remain largely unknown. HIBADH was detected in the testis, epididymis, and sperm via reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. It is also expressed in the seminiferous epithelium, spermatids, and the entire epididymis, as detected by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, HIBADH was expressed in the neck-piece and mid-piece of bull spermatids, as shown in the immunofluorescence assay. Using serially truncated bovine HIBADH promoters and luciferase constructs, we discovered an 878 bp (-703 bp to +175 bp) fragment that constitutes the core promoter region. One SNP g.-165 T>C of HIBADH was identified and genotyped in 307 Chinese Holstein bulls. Correlation analysis revealed that bulls with the TT genotype had higher initial sperm motility than those with the CC genotype (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the T- or C-containing loci (designated as pGL3-T and pGL3-C) were transiently transfected into MLTC-1 to test the effect of SNP on HIBADH expression. The luciferase reporter assay showed that the pGL3-T genotype exhibited 58% higher transcriptional activity than the pGL3-C genotype (P < 0.05). The bisulfite sequencing analysis revealed that the methylation pattern of the core promoter presented hypomethylation in the ejaculated semen in high-motility and low-motility bulls. The results demonstrated for the first time that the g.-165 T>C rather than methylation in the 5'-flanking region could affect the bovine sperm motility through the regulation of HIBADH gene transcriptional activity. PMID:26133183

  5. Effects of semen extenders and storage temperatures on characteristics of frozen-thawed Bryde's (Balaenoptera edeni) whale spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Hiwasa, Mami; Suzuki, Yo; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Bhuiyan, Mohammad Musharraf Uddin; Matsuoka, Kohji; Fujise, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Hajime; Ohsumi, Seiji; Fukui, Yutaka

    2009-12-01

    The present study investigated effects of three semen extenders and storage temperatures on post-thaw characteristics of Bryde's whale spermatozoa. Spermatozoa were collected from the vasa deferens of three mature Bryde's whales captured during the Japanese whale research in the north-west Pacific (May to August 2007) after death. The three semen extenders used for freezing were 1) a commercialized synthetic extender (AndroMed: AM), 2) Tris-based + 10% bovine serum albumin (BSA) and 3) Tris-based + egg yolk (EY). The sperm samples from the three whales were frozen with the three extenders, and the post-thaw spermatozoa were stored at three different temperatures (35 C; 20-25 C, room temperature; and 5 C) for 0, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 96 h. At each time-point, total and progressive motility (PM), viability (live or dead), the hypo-osmotic test, defective acrosomes and malformation were examined. Immediately after thawing, AM resulted in similar recovery rates (60.4 and 83.3%) in 2 of the 3 whales examined and had comparable post-thaw recovery rates to those obtained using the EY and BSA extenders. Immediately after thawing, the proportion of PM in EY (17.6%) was higher (P<0.05) than that in BSA (15.0%). In the hypo-osmotic test, the proportions of AM (26.0%) and BSA (25.2%) were higher (P<0.05) than that of EY (17.3 %). The three extenders had similar viabilities (36.7, 37.9 and 32.1%, respectively), but the viability of BSA was higher (P<0.05) than that of EY. The present study showed that a synthetic semen extender, AndroMed, could be used for cryopreservation of whale spermatozoa in addition to Tris-based extenders containing bovine serum albumin or egg yolk. Storage of the post-thaw Bryde's whale spermatozoa was better at 5 C than at room temperature or 35 C. The frozen-thawed Bryde's whale spermatozoa maintained their motility and viability for at least two days at room temperature and for four days at 5 C.

  6. Intravaginal insemination of bitches with fresh and frozen-thawed semen with addition of prostatic fluid: use of an infusion pipette and the Osiris catheter.

    PubMed

    Nizański, Wojciech

    2006-07-15

    One hundred fifty-two bitches of seven breeds were vaginally inseminated with fresh or frozen-thawed semen of 10 stud dogs of respective breeds. The semen was supplemented with prostatic fluid before insemination. In experiment 1 bitches of each breed were randomly assigned to three treatment groups, consisting of 29 females (group 1), 33 females (group 2) and 32 females (group 3). In group 1 bitches were inseminated into vagina with fresh semen using a bovine infusion pipette. In group 2 bitches were inseminated into vagina with fresh semen using the Osiris catheter. In group 3 bitches were inseminated with frozen-thawed semen with the Osiris catheter. The number of sperms in each insemination dose was adjusted to 300 x 10(6). In experiment two bitches were randomly assigned to two treatment groups, consisting of 30 females (group A) and 28 females (group B). In group A bitches were inseminated with fresh semen, whereas in group B with frozen-thawed semen. Osiris catheter was used in both groups. The total number of sperms was adjusted to provide 250 x 10(6) of progressively motile spermatozoa in each insemination dose. In experiment 1 the pregnancy rates/whelping rates were 86.2/82.8%, 81.8/81.8% and 59.4/59.4% for groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The differences between group 1 and 3 were statistically significant (p < 0.05). The litter sizes at birth/litter sizes at weaning were 5.8+/-2.3/5.4+/-2.0, 6.3+/-1.4/5.7+/-1.0 and 3.9+/-1.2/3.5+/-1.5 in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The litter size at birth and at weaning was reduced (p < 0.05) when frozen-thawed semen was used for insemination (group 3). There were not significant (p > 0.05) differences in the litter size between groups 1 and 2. In experiment 2 pregnancy rates/whelping rates and litter sizes at birth/litter sizes at weaning were 86.7/86.7%, 60.7/57.1% (p < 0.05) and 6.1+/-1.6/5.7+/-1.7, 4.0+/-1.4/3.8+/-1.4 (p < 0.05) in groups A and B, respectively. This study shows that results of AI with a fresh

  7. Testicular, semen and blood parameters in adapted and nonadapted Bos taurus bulls in the semi-arid tropics.

    PubMed

    Wildeus, S; Hammond, A C

    1993-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate differences in testicular, seminal and hematological characteristics in adapted (Senepol) and nonadapted (Holstein) Bos taurus bulls under the semi-arid environmental conditions of St. Croix, Virgin Islands (17 degrees N, 64 degrees W). In Experiment 1 mature, sexually-rested Senepol (n=10) and Holstein (n=9) bulls of similar age (37 months) and body weight (715 kg) and grazing on adjacent native pastures, were tested on the same day in July (28.8 degrees C mean ambient temperature, 81.5% humidity). Senepol bulls had lower (P<0.01) rectal temperatures (39.3 vs 40.0 degrees C) and higher (P<0.01) packed cell volumes (41.4 vs 35.2%) than Holstein bulls. Scrotal circumference was 3 cm larger (P<0.1) and testis tone firmer (P<0.001) in Senepol compared to Holstein bulls. Ejaculates, obtained by electroejaculation, contained 3.2x10(9) more spermatozoa with fewer abnormal tails and detached acrosomes in Senepol than in Holstein bulls (P<0.05). In Experiment 2, Senepol (n=42) and Holstein (n=30) bulls, representing 3 beef and 5 dairy farms, were evaluated during the summer (August/September) and winter (February/March). Again, scrotal circumference was larger (P<0.05) and testis tone firmer (P<0.001) in Senepol than in Holstein bulls, with no effect of season. Seminal fructose was higher (P<0.01) in Senepol than in Holstein bulls and decreased (P<0.01) during the winter collection. Blood plasma urea nitrogen and glucose were similar between breeds, but urea nitrogen was lower (P<0.01) during the summer. Significant (P<0.01) breed-by-age interactions were observed for the frequency of spermatozoa with protoplasmic droplets, decreasing in Holstein but not in Senepol bulls. The data point to differences between the adapted and nonadapted breed type in testicular and ejaculate characteristics, but also suggest that season has only a limited impact on bull reproductive function under the environmental conditions in St. Croix. PMID

  8. Functional SNPs of INCENP Affect Semen Quality by Alternative Splicing Mode and Binding Affinity with the Target Bta-miR-378 in Chinese Holstein Bulls

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Jiang, Qiang; Huang, Jinming; Ju, Zhihua; Wang, Xiuge; Zhong, Jifeng; Wang, Changfa

    2016-01-01

    Inner centromere protein (INCENP) plays an important role in mitosis and meiosis as the main member of chromosomal passenger protein complex (CPC). To investigate the functional markers of the INCENP gene associated with semen quality, the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) g.19970 A>G and g.34078 T>G were identified and analyzed. The new splice variant INCENP-TV is characterized by the deletion of exon 12. The g.19970 A>G in the exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) motif region results in an aberrant splice variant by constructing two minigene expression vectors using the pSPL3 exon capturing vector and transfecting vectors into MLTC-1 cells. INCENP-TV was more highly expressed than INCENP-reference in adult bull testes. The g.34078 T>G located in the binding region of bta-miR-378 could affect the expression of INCENP, which was verified by luciferase assay. To analyze comprehensively the correlation of SNPs with sperm quality, haplotype combinations constructed by g.19970 A>G and g.34078 T>G, as well as g.-692 C>T and g.-556 G>T reported in our previous studies, were analyzed. The bulls with H1H12 and H2H2 exhibited a higher ejaculate volume than those with H2H10 and H9H12, respectively (P < 0.05). Bulls with H11H11 and H2H10 exhibited higher initial sperm motility than those with H2H2 (P < 0.05). The expression levels of INCENP in bulls with H1H12 and H11H11 were significantly higher than those in bulls with H9H12 (P < 0.05), as determined by qRT-PCR. Findings suggest that g.19970 A>G and g.34078 T>G in INCENP both of which appear to change the molecular and biological characteristics of the mRNA transcribed from the locus may serve as a biomarkers of male bovine fertility by affecting alternative splicing mode and binding affinity with the target bta-miR-378. PMID:27669152

  9. Influence of the uterine inflammatory response after insemination with frozen-thawed semen on serum concentrations of acute phase proteins in mares.

    PubMed

    Tuppits, U; Orro, T; Einarsson, S; Kask, K; Kavak, A

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical relevance of measuring blood concentrations of serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp) and fibrinogen (Fib) in horse reproductive management, and changes in response to artificial insemination (AI) with frozen-thawed semen. Standardbred mares (n=18) with different reproductive status (eight healthy mares in first postpartum oestrus, five healthy barren mares and five mares with endometritis) were inseminated with frozen-thawed semen. Endometritis was evaluated during oestrus by bacteriological culture, cytology and presence of ultrasonically visible intrauterine fluid during oestrus. Concentrations of SAA, Hp and Fib were analysed in the blood in every 48h during oestrus and until 5, 6 or 7 days after AI. The day of sampling and number of blood samples varied between mares because of length of the oestrus and time of AI. Changes in concentrations of SAA, Hp and Fib were evaluated based on the day of sampling regard to AI and classification of the mares. There were no differences in SAA, Hp and Fib concentrations over time before or after AI or between the groups of mares. The insemination of mares with frozen-thawed semen did not increase the plasma concentrations of SAA, Hp and Fib above clinical threshold concentration and there were no differences between susceptible or healthy mares. PMID:24636940

  10. 59 Effect of storage duration on post-thaw parameters of bull semen. Reproduction, Fertility and Development 25: 177.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been proposed that once good-quality sperm are collected, extended, and cryopreserved that the post-thaw quality will remain high regardless of the duration of storage. A previous study has suggested that there is no effect on post-thaw sperm motility of bovine semen stored in liquid nitrogen...

  11. Effects of in vitro selenium addition to the semen extender on the spermatozoa characteristics before and after freezing in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Dorostkar, Kamran; Alavi-Shoushtari, Sayed Mortaza; Mokarizadeh, Aram

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of in vitro supplementation of selenium on fresh and frozen spermatozoa quality of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) bulls. Five healthy buffalo bulls (5 ejaculates from each bull) were used. Each ejaculate was diluted at 37 ˚C with tris-based extender containing 0 (control), 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 8 µg mL(-1) sodium selenite and the sperm motility and viability were evaluated at 0 (T0) (immediately after dilution), 60 (T1) and 120 (T2) min after diluting semen. In the second step, semen samples were diluted with tris-egg yolk-glycerol extender containing the same amounts of sodium selenite, cooled to 4 ˚C, equilibrated and semen parameters (motility, viability, membrane integrity and DNA damage) were estimated. Then, the semen was packed in 0.5 mL French straws and frozen in liquid nitrogen. Later, the semen was thawed and analyzed for the same parameters, as well as total antioxidant capacity. Results showed that addition of 1 and 2 µgmL(-1) selenium to the semen extender significantly increased the sperm motility of fresh and equilibrated semen compared to the control without affecting other parameters. However, in frozen-thawed semen, extenders containing 1 and 2 µg mL(-1) selenium significantly improved sperm motility, viability, membrane integrity and semen total antioxidant capacity and also resulted in lower DNA damaged sperms. In this study selenium supplementation of semen extender of 4 and 8 µg mL(-1) had deleterious effects on sperm parameters as early as the samples were prepared for freezing.

  12. Effect of semen extenders on frozen-thawed boar sperm characteristics and distribution in the female genital tract after deep intrauterine insemination in sows.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Michiko; Yoshioka, Koji; Hikono, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Chie; Kikuchi, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    We compared the effects of extenders of frozen-thawed semen on post-thaw sperm characteristics and the distribution of frozen-thawed spermatozoa in the female genital tract after fixed-timed deep intrauterine insemination (DIUI) in sows. Frozen semen samples were thawed and diluted in either modified Modena solution (mMS) or porcine fertilization medium (PFM) containing theophylline, adenosine and cysteine. Sperm quality, assessed in vitro based on motility using a computer-assisted sperm analyzer and the integrity of the plasma and acrosomal membranes using flow cytometry, was evaluated at 0.5, 1.5, 3 and 6h after thawing. Progressive motility and the percentage of spermatozoa with damaged acrosomal membranes in PFM were significantly better than in mMS throughout the 6h. Sows with estrus synchronized using prostaglandin F2 alpha, equine chorionic gonadotropin and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) were inseminated once with mMS- or PFM-diluted 5 × 10(8) frozen-thawed spermatozoa by DIUI at 34 h after the hCG injection. At 4h after DIUI, reproductive tracts were recovered from 30 sows. There were significantly fewer polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and more spermatozoa outside PMNs in the uterine horn after PFM treatment than with mMS. When 22 sows were administered DIUI with 10 × 10(8) frozen-thawed spermatozoa at 36 h after hCG, the pregnancy rates did not differ significantly between the mMS- (36%) and PFM- (64%) treated groups. Thus, PFM enhanced progressive sperm motility but increased sperm membrane damage compared with mMS; it also suppressed the migration of PMNs into the uterine lumen. PMID:26588890

  13. Effect of semen extenders on frozen-thawed boar sperm characteristics and distribution in the female genital tract after deep intrauterine insemination in sows.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Michiko; Yoshioka, Koji; Hikono, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Chie; Kikuchi, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    We compared the effects of extenders of frozen-thawed semen on post-thaw sperm characteristics and the distribution of frozen-thawed spermatozoa in the female genital tract after fixed-timed deep intrauterine insemination (DIUI) in sows. Frozen semen samples were thawed and diluted in either modified Modena solution (mMS) or porcine fertilization medium (PFM) containing theophylline, adenosine and cysteine. Sperm quality, assessed in vitro based on motility using a computer-assisted sperm analyzer and the integrity of the plasma and acrosomal membranes using flow cytometry, was evaluated at 0.5, 1.5, 3 and 6h after thawing. Progressive motility and the percentage of spermatozoa with damaged acrosomal membranes in PFM were significantly better than in mMS throughout the 6h. Sows with estrus synchronized using prostaglandin F2 alpha, equine chorionic gonadotropin and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) were inseminated once with mMS- or PFM-diluted 5 × 10(8) frozen-thawed spermatozoa by DIUI at 34 h after the hCG injection. At 4h after DIUI, reproductive tracts were recovered from 30 sows. There were significantly fewer polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and more spermatozoa outside PMNs in the uterine horn after PFM treatment than with mMS. When 22 sows were administered DIUI with 10 × 10(8) frozen-thawed spermatozoa at 36 h after hCG, the pregnancy rates did not differ significantly between the mMS- (36%) and PFM- (64%) treated groups. Thus, PFM enhanced progressive sperm motility but increased sperm membrane damage compared with mMS; it also suppressed the migration of PMNs into the uterine lumen.

  14. Sperm membrane integrity in fresh and frozen-thawed canine semen samples: a comparison of vital stains with the NucleoCounter SP-100.

    PubMed

    Daub, L; Geyer, A; Reese, S; Braun, J; Otzdorff, C

    2016-07-15

    The objective of this study was to assess sperm membrane integrity in canine semen samples using three different vital stains and the NucleoCounter SP-100 (NC). In addition, the occurrence of half-stained sperm heads, the influence of investigator, and storage-related artifacts using stained smears were examined. Forty fresh (30 dogs) and 40 frozen-thawed (28 dogs) canine semen samples were analyzed. The vital stains eosin (E), eosin-nigrosin (EN), and bromphenolblue-nigrosin (BN) were compared. Two smears per stain were prepared and a total of 200 sperm per slide were classified using bright field microscopy. Each slide was examined twice by three investigators. Spermatozoa with completely red (E, EN) or blue (BN) stained sperm heads were classified as "dead". Half-stained sperm heads were counted separately. Sperm concentration and viability were determined using the NC. The NC works with a built-in fluorescence microscope using propidium iodide as a fluorescence dye. Statistical analysis for comparison of results was made using mean values with standard deviation, Bland-Altman plot and coefficient of variation (CV). Staining with E led to a significant higher percentage of dead sperm compared with EN and BN (P < 0.05), which gave comparable results. Vital stains revealed higher CVs (range 8.8%-32.1%) than the NC (<6.5%). Interobserver viability ranged from 17.5% to 45.4% and was within the same range between stains. If only completely stained sperm heads were considered, best agreement was found between the E and the NC. In case of EN and BN, inclusion of half-stained sperm heads reduced the difference compared with NC. In general, the agreement between methods was better in samples with a low percentage of dead spermatozoa. In smears of fresh semen stored up to 3 months, no increase in the percentage of dead spermatozoa could be observed. In some smears of frozen-thawed samples stained with E (n = 12) or BN (n = 2), all previously unstained spermatozoa

  15. Sperm membrane integrity in fresh and frozen-thawed canine semen samples: a comparison of vital stains with the NucleoCounter SP-100.

    PubMed

    Daub, L; Geyer, A; Reese, S; Braun, J; Otzdorff, C

    2016-07-15

    The objective of this study was to assess sperm membrane integrity in canine semen samples using three different vital stains and the NucleoCounter SP-100 (NC). In addition, the occurrence of half-stained sperm heads, the influence of investigator, and storage-related artifacts using stained smears were examined. Forty fresh (30 dogs) and 40 frozen-thawed (28 dogs) canine semen samples were analyzed. The vital stains eosin (E), eosin-nigrosin (EN), and bromphenolblue-nigrosin (BN) were compared. Two smears per stain were prepared and a total of 200 sperm per slide were classified using bright field microscopy. Each slide was examined twice by three investigators. Spermatozoa with completely red (E, EN) or blue (BN) stained sperm heads were classified as "dead". Half-stained sperm heads were counted separately. Sperm concentration and viability were determined using the NC. The NC works with a built-in fluorescence microscope using propidium iodide as a fluorescence dye. Statistical analysis for comparison of results was made using mean values with standard deviation, Bland-Altman plot and coefficient of variation (CV). Staining with E led to a significant higher percentage of dead sperm compared with EN and BN (P < 0.05), which gave comparable results. Vital stains revealed higher CVs (range 8.8%-32.1%) than the NC (<6.5%). Interobserver viability ranged from 17.5% to 45.4% and was within the same range between stains. If only completely stained sperm heads were considered, best agreement was found between the E and the NC. In case of EN and BN, inclusion of half-stained sperm heads reduced the difference compared with NC. In general, the agreement between methods was better in samples with a low percentage of dead spermatozoa. In smears of fresh semen stored up to 3 months, no increase in the percentage of dead spermatozoa could be observed. In some smears of frozen-thawed samples stained with E (n = 12) or BN (n = 2), all previously unstained spermatozoa

  16. Soya-lecithin in extender improves the freezability and fertility of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) bull spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Akhter, S; Ansari, M S; Andrabi, S M H; Rakha, B A; Ullah, N; Khalid, M

    2012-10-01

    Egg yolk is routinely used as a cryoprotectant in semen extenders. However, it may contain cryoprotective antagonists, and there are hygienic risks associated with its use. Proteins of plant origin, like soya-lecithin, lack these hazards. The aim of this study was to use soya-lecithin as a cryoprotectant in extender and to investigate its effects on in vitro quality and in vivo fertility of buffalo semen. Semen from three buffalo bulls was frozen in tris-citric extender containing 5.0%, 10% or 15% soya-lecithin or 20% egg yolk. Sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity and viability were assessed post-dilution, pre-freezing and post-thaw. In Post-dilution and pre-freezing, the values for motility, plasma membrane integrity and viability remained higher (p ≤ 0.05) in extenders containing 10% soya-lecithin and control compared with extender containing 5% and 15% soya-lecithin. However, motility, plasma membrane integrity and viability were higher (p < 0.05) in extender containing 10% soya-lecithin compared with control and extenders containing 5% and 15% soya-lecithin. Semen from two buffalo bulls was frozen in tris-citric extender containing either 10% soya-lecithin or 20% egg yolk. Higher (p < 0.05) fertility rate was recorded in buffaloes inseminated with semen containing 10% soya-lecithin (56%) compared with 20% egg yolk (41.5%). The results suggest that 10% soya-lecithin in extender improves the freezability and fertility of buffalo bull spermatozoa and can be used as an alternate to egg yolk in cryopreservation of buffalo semen.

  17. Cryopreservation of crane semen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.; Harris, James

    1991-01-01

    The method for the cryopreservation of crane semen at Patuxent Wildlife Research Center is described in detail. Cryopreservation is useful for the long-term storage of crane semen and for specialized propagation needs. A 50% fertility rate from most sandhill cranes, Grus canadensis, inseminated with frozen-thawed semen can be expected. Additional research should improve the fertility rate and determine how applicable the technique is to other crane species.

  18. α-Linolenic acid supplementation in BioXcell® extender can improve the quality of post-cooling and frozen-thawed bovine sperm.

    PubMed

    Kaka, Asmatullah; Wahid, Haron; Rosnina, Yusoff; Yimer, Nurhusien; Khumran, A M; Sarsaifi, Kazhal; Behan, Atique Ahmed; Kaka, Ubedullah; Ebrahimi, M

    2015-02-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effects of supplementing α-linolenic acid (ALA) into BioXcell(®) extender on post-cooling, post-thawed bovine spermatozoa and post thawed fatty acid composition. Twenty-four semen samples were collected from three bulls using an electro-ejaculator. Fresh semen samples were evaluated for general motility using computer assisted semen analyzer (CASA) whereas morphology and viability with eosin-nigrosin stain. Semen samples extended into BioXcell(®) were divided into five groups to which 0, 3, 5, 10 and 15 ng/ml of ALA were added, respectively. The treated samples were incubated at 37°C for 15 min for ALA uptake by sperm cells before being cooled for 2 h at 5°C. After evaluation, the cooled samples were packed into 0.25 ml straws and frozen in liquid nitrogen for 24 h before thawing and evaluation for semen quality. Evaluation of cooled and frozen-thawed semen showed that the percentages of all the sperm parameters improved with 5 ng/ml ALA supplement. ALA was higher in all treated groups than control groups than control group. In conclusion, 5 ng/ml ALA supplemented into BioXcell(®) extender improved the cooled and frozen-thawed quality of bull spermatozoa.

  19. GnRH analogue treatment on LH surge day 0 followed by single transvaginal artificial insemination with frozen semen on day 5 in bitches

    PubMed Central

    OHTAKI, Tadatoshi; KOGA, Yasuna; ONO, Mamiko; WATANABE, Gen; TAYA, Kazuyoshi; TSUMAGARI, Shigehisa

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reproductive parameters were evaluated in 19 and 14 estrous beagles that received 100 µg of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and saline treatment, respectively, on the day of luteinizing hormone (LH) surge (Day 0; estimated by serial progesterone assay) and balloon catheter-aided single transvaginal artificial insemination of frozen semen on Day 5. Although the conception rate and litter size were similar between the GnRH and saline groups, the concentration of LH peak was significantly higher in GnRH-treated bitches (P<0.01). In addition, the actual LH surge did not occur on the estimated Day 0 in one saline-treated bitch. In clinical practice that daily progesterone assay is difficult, administration of GnRH on estimated Day 0 would be recommended to induce or enhance the LH surge for timely and successful insemination. PMID:25311914

  20. Addition of superoxide dismutase mimics during cooling process prevents oxidative stress and improves semen quality parameters in frozen/thawed ram spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Santiani, Alexei; Evangelista, Shirley; Sepúlveda, Néstor; Risopatrón, Jennie; Villegas, Juana; Sánchez, Raúl

    2014-10-01

    High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may be related to reduced semen quality, are detected during semen cryopreservation in some species. The objectives of this study were to measure the oxidative stress during ram semen cryopreservation and to evaluate the effect of adding 2 antioxidant mimics of superoxide dismutase (Tempo and Tempol) during the cooling process on sperm motility, viability, acrosomal integrity, capacitation status, ROS levels, and lipid peroxidation in frozen and/or thawed ram spermatozoa. Measuring of ROS levels during the cooling process at 35, 25, 15, and 5 °C and after freezing and/or thawing showed a directly proportional increase (P < 0.05) when temperatures were lowering. Adding antioxidants at 10 °C confered a higher motility and sperm viability after cryopreservation in comparison with adding at 35 °C or at 35 °C/5 °C. After freezing and/or thawing, sperm motility was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in Tempo and Tempol 1 mM than that in control group. Percentage of capacitated spermatozoa was lower (P < 0.05) in Tempo and Tempol 1 mM in comparison with that in control group. In addition, ROS levels and lipid peroxidation in group Tempo 1 mM were lower (P < 0.05) than those in control group. These results demonstrate that ram spermatozoa are exposed to oxidative stress during the cooling process, specifically when maintained at 5 °C and that lipid peroxidation induced by high levels of ROS decreases sperm motility and induces premature sperm capacitation. In contrast, the addition of Tempo or Tempol at 0.5 to 1 mM during the cooling process (10 °C) protects ram spermatozoa from oxidative stress.

  1. Effects of caffeine on sperm characteristics after thawing and inflammatory response in the uterus after artificial insemination with frozen-thawed boar semen.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, S; Suzuki, C; Noguchi, M; Kasa, S; Mori, M; Isozaki, Y; Ueda, S; Funahashi, H; Kikuchi, K; Nagai, T; Yoshioka, K

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that AI with frozen-thawed boar semen supplemented with caffeine increased the number of uterine sperm by inhibiting migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) into the uterine lumen, and also improved fertility of gilts and sows. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of the addition of caffeine to a thawing solution on postthaw sperm quality and uterine inflammatory response after AI with frozen-thawed boar semen. Incubation of frozen-thawed sperm in Modena solution supplemented with 10 mM caffeine for 90 minutes improved (P < 0.05) percentages of progressive motility, straightness, and linearity of sperm movement compared with no caffeine, without causing damage to plasma or acrosomal membranes. Gilts inseminated once with 2 × 10(9) frozen-thawed sperm suspended in Modena solution with or without caffeine, and gilts that did not receive AI, were slaughtered 4 hours later. Uteri were recovered for analysis of number of uterine PMNs and mRNA expression (quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and cyclooxygenase 2 in the endometrium. Caffeine decreased (P < 0.05) both the number of total uterine PMNs and expression of IL-8 mRNA in the endometrium after AI. The amount of IL-8 and cyclooxygenase 2 mRNA after AI in the absence of caffeine were higher than samples from gilts that did not receive AI (P < 0.05), whereas there were no significant differences between treatments in expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-6, or monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 mRNA. Pregnancy rate in sows inseminated with sperm supplemented with caffeine (16 of 23; 70%) tended (P < 0.1) to exceed that without caffeine (12 of 26; 46%), but litter size was not affected. In conclusion, the addition of caffeine to the thawing solution inhibited migration of uterine PMNs, probably by downregulating IL-8

  2. Cryopreservation of gander semen.

    PubMed

    Tai, J J; Chen, J C; Wu, K C; Wang, S D; Tai, C

    2001-07-01

    1. The effect of dimethylacetamide (DMA) and dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) on the cryopreservation of gander semen were investigated. An improved survival rate of spermatozoa after freeze-thawing was obtained when semen was frozen by a fast-freezing procedure on dry ice with 9% DMA as the cryoprotectant. 2. Gander semen, which was frozen during mid season, was tested for fertilising ability in different times of the season. The percentage of fertility during d 3 to d 9 after 2 consecutive inseminations was 68% to 95%, depending on the date of artificial insemination.

  3. The possibility of obtaining intergeneric hybrids via White Kołuda (Anser anser L.) goose insemination with fresh and frozen-thawed Canada goose (Branta canadensis L.) gander semen.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Artur; Łukaszewicz, Ewa

    2012-02-01

    The objective of the present experiments was to produce the intergeneric hybrids of domesticated and wild goose via artificial insemination with fresh and frozen-thawed semen. The experiments were carried out during two successive goose reproductive seasons, on eight five-year-old Canada Goose (Branta canadensis L.) males used as semen donors and 16 two-year-old White Kołuda geese designated to fertility tests. Pooled semen was collected twice a week by the dorso-abdominal massage. In freshly collected semen, ejaculate volume, color, consistency, degree of fecal or blood contamination, spermatozoa concentration, motility, and morphology were evaluated. Part of the semen collected in the first year of the experiment (Experiment 1) was used for geese insemination with fresh semen, while the remainder was frozen. In Experiment 2 all samples were subjected exclusively to freezing procedure. Geese were inseminated once a week with fresh semen in a dose of 80 μl or 160 μl, and twice a week with frozen-thawed semen in a dose of 80 μl (160 μl per wk) or 100 μl (200 μl per wk). Eggs were set weekly and incubated up to hatching. The volume of ejaculates varied from 0.100 to 0.470 ml; spermatozoa concentration from 140 to 310 million ml(-1); progressive movement was observed in 40 to 60% of spermatozoa; the percentage of total live spermatozoa ranged from 69.3 to 92.0%, the highest percentage (34.0-68.3) was represented by live normal spermatozoa and those with bulb-head (13.3-41.0). Cryopreservation caused a decrease in percentage of motile cells to 30%; total live spermatozoa contribution by 27.2%p, including those live normal by 15.9%p (in relation to the fresh semen), bulb-head spermatozoa by 10.9%p, and increase (by 5.9%p) in number of spermatozoa with other deformations. Goose insemination 1×/week with fresh semen containing about 10.3 million live normal spermatozoa resulted in 66.7% of fertile eggs and with dose higher by 2.8 million spermatozoa (on average

  4. Pregnancy outcome after insemination of frozen-thawed bovine semen packaged in two straw sizes: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, J S; Higgins, J J; Jung, Y

    2009-09-01

    The 0.25-mL French straw has been thoroughly studied and compared with the 0.5-mL French straw for about 40 yr. The 0.25-mL straw has some distinct advantages over the 0.5-mL straw in terms of storage efficiency and extender usage. The 0.25-mL straw is more sensitive to temperature change, which may be an advantage in some freezing systems with a slow freezing rate, but provides no advantage when the freezing rate is accelerated to optimize freezing in 0.5-mL straws. Disadvantages of the 0.25-mL straw include increased sensitivity to post-thaw temperature change, slightly more difficult handling, and inferior readability. Fertility of cattle inseminated with extended semen packaged in 0.25-mL straws assessed in 13 studies (>770,000 inseminations) had a weighted advantage of 0.9% (0.7% unweighted advantage) compared with semen packaged in 0.5-mL straws. In 2 studies in which palpated conception rates were obtained, the weighted advantage of the 0.25-mL versus the 0.5-mL straw was 0.2% (0.4% unweighted advantage). Paired t-tests did not detect a significant difference in pregnancy outcome between straw sizes. Logistic regression of all 15 studies (>780,000 inseminations) detected large variation among studies and tended to detect a small advantage for the 0.25-mL straw. Meta-analyses applied to fixed- or random-effect models of all 15 studies indicated the average odds of having a greater pregnancy outcome with the 0.25-mL straw were either 3 or 4% greater. Based on these odds ratios, the expected proportion of difference in pregnancy outcome translated into a difference of 0.74%. These small differences in pregnancy outcomes do not provide compelling evidence that a transition from 0.50- to 0.25-mL straws in the United States is warranted, especially given the added negative aspects of semen handling and the greater potential for technician x straw type interactions among herdsman inseminators. PMID:19700703

  5. Applications and cost benefits of sexed semen in pasture-based dairy production systems.

    PubMed

    Butler, S T; Hutchinson, I A; Cromie, A R; Shalloo, L

    2014-05-01

    Sexed semen technology is now commercially available in many countries around the world, and is primarily used in dairy cattle breeding. Sperm are sorted by flow cytometry on the basis of a 4% difference in DNA content between sperm containing X and Y chromosomes. Despite reliably producing a 90% gender bias, the fertility of the sexed semen product is compromised compared with conventional semen. The negative implications of the reduced fertility of sexed semen are amplified in seasonal systems of dairy production, as the importance of fertility is greater in these systems compared with year-round calving systems. A review of the literature indicates that conception rates (CR) to 1st service with frozen-thawed sexed semen are ~75% to 80% of those achieved with conventional frozen-thawed semen. Preliminary results from a large-scale field trial carried out in Ireland in 2013 suggest that significant improvements in the performance of sexed semen have been made, with CR of 87% of those achieved with conventional semen. The improved fertility of a sexed semen product that delivers a 90% gender bias has considerable implications for the future of breeding management in pasture-based dairy production systems. Sexed semen may facilitate faster, more profitable dairy herd expansion by increasing the number of dairy heifer replacements born. Biosecurity can be improved by maintaining a closed herd during the period of herd expansion. In a non-expansion scenario, sexed semen may be used to increase the value of beef output from the dairy herd. The replacement heifer requirements for a herd could be met by using sexed semen in the 1st 3 weeks of the breeding season, with the remaining animals bred to beef sires, increasing the sale value over that of a dairy bull calf. Alternatively, very short gestation sires could be used to shorten the calving interval. Market prices have a considerable effect on the economics of sexed semen use, and widespread use of sexed semen should

  6. Pregnancy rate and birth rate of calves from a large-scale IVF program using reverse-sorted semen in Bos indicus, Bos indicus-taurus, and Bos taurus cattle.

    PubMed

    Morotti, F; Sanches, B V; Pontes, J H F; Basso, A C; Siqueira, E R; Lisboa, L A; Seneda, M M

    2014-03-15

    Obtaining sexed sperm from previously frozen doses (reverse-sorted semen [RSS]) provides an important advantage because of the possibility of using the semen of bulls with desired genetic attributes that have died or have become infertile but from whom frozen semen is available. We report the efficiency of RSS on the pregnancy rate and birth rate of calves in a large-scale program using ovum pick-up and in vitro embryo production (IVEP) from Bos indicus, Bos indicus-taurus, and Bos taurus cattle. From 645 ovum pick-up procedures (Holstein, Gir, and Nelore), 9438 viable oocytes were recovered. A dose of frozen semen (Holstein, Nelore, Brahman, Gir, and Braford) was thawed, and the sperm were sex-sorted and cooled for use in IVF. Additionally, IVF with sperm from three Holstein bulls with freeze-thawed, sex-sorted (RSS) or sex-sorted, freeze-thawed (control) was tested. A total of 2729 embryos were produced, exhibiting a mean blastocyst rate of 29%. Heifers and cows selected for adequate body condition, estrus, and health received 2404 embryos, and 60 days later, a 41% average pregnancy rate was observed. A total of 966 calves were born, and 910 were of a predetermined sex, with an average of 94% accuracy in determining the sex. Despite the lower blastocyst rate with freeze-thawed, sex-sorted semen compared with sex-sorted semen, (P < 0.05), the pregnancy rate (bull I, 45% vs. 40%; II, 35% vs. 50%; and III, 47% vs. 48% for RSS and control, respectively; P > 0.05) and sex-sorted efficiency (bull I, 93% vs. 98%; II, 96% vs. 94%; and III, 96% vs. 97% for RSS and control, respectively; P > 0.05) were similar for each of the three bulls regardless of the sperm type used in the IVF. The sexing of previously frozen semen, associated with IVEP, produces viable embryos with a pregnancy rate of up to 40%, and calves of the desired sex are born even if the paternal bull has acquired some infertility, died, or is located a long distance from the sexing laboratory. Furthermore

  7. Profiling of sperm proteins and association of sperm PDC-109 with bull fertility.

    PubMed

    Somashekar, Lakshminarayana; Selvaraju, Sellappan; Parthipan, Sivashanmugam; Ravindra, Janivara Parameswaraiah

    2015-01-01

    The composition of sperm proteins influences the fertilizing ability of sperm and hence the present study was conducted (i) to profile sperm proteins expression patterns in bulls of differing fertility index and (ii) to identify and relate the abundant sperm proteins with bull fertility. The semen samples were collected from Holstein-Friesian bulls (n = 12) varying in conception rate (CR) (high/low). The frozen semen straws (three ejaculates, from each bull) were used to study (a) sperm kinetic parameters, (b) plasmalemma integrity, (c) mitochondrial membrane potential, and (d) chromatin distribution. Three bulls were randomly selected from each group (n = 3) and the neat sperm pellets were subjected to percoll purification, followed by protein isolation using 0.1% Triton X100. The sperm kinetic parameters, plasmalemma integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential, and the chromatin distribution did not differ significantly between groups. The number of acidic (pI; 3.1-5.6, 37%) and basic (pI; 7.9-10.0, 27%) proteins and their pattern of expression varied significantly (p < 0.05) between high and low fertile bulls. The abundant sperm protein spots in 2D-gel electrophoresis (2DE) were identified as seminal plasma protein PDC-109 (i.e., protein with N-terminus aspartic acid, D and carboxy terminus cystine, having 109 amino acids) and its isoform and spermadhesin-1 (SPADH1). The western blot analysis confirmed the presence of PDC-109 isoform proteins at 15.4 kDa (pI 5.3 and 5.5). The seminal plasma protein PDC-109 was abundant in the low fertile when compared to the high fertile group (p < 0.05). This study suggests that the imbalance in acidic and basic sperm proteins may influence sperm fertility and sperm PDC-109 levels above a certain threshold affects bull fertility.

  8. Effect of different thawing temperatures on the viability, in vitro fertilizing capacity and chromatin condensation of frozen boar semen packaged in 5 ml straws.

    PubMed

    Córdova-Izquierdo, A; Oliva, J H; Lleó, B; García-Artiga, C; Corcuera, B D; Pérez-Gutiérrez, J F

    2006-03-01

    The effect of two different thawing temperatures on frozen boar semen viability, in vitro fertilizing capacity and chromatin condensation and stability was studied. Freeze-thaw motility, normal apical ridge (NAR), in vitro fertilizing (IVF) capacity and chromatin condensation and stability were evaluated after thawing at 42 degrees C, 40s and 50 degrees C, 40s. Chromatin condensation degree was determined by flow cytometry, using propidium iodide as fluorochrome intercalating agent, and chromatin stability was evaluated by the same procedure after inducing sperm chromatin decondensation with ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The results showed that thawing straws at 42 degrees C, 40s significantly reduced motility compared to straws thawed at 50 degrees C, 40s. NAR, penetration, monospermy and polyspermy were not different between the two groups of samples thawed at different temperatures. Chromatin was significantly more compact when thawing was performed at 50 degrees C, but its stability did not show any difference relative to thawing at 42 degrees C. It is suggested that the interactions involved in chromatin overcondensation had a non-covalent nature. PMID:15975744

  9. Assessment of different functional parameters of frozen-thawed buffalo spermatozoa by using cytofluorimetric determinations.

    PubMed

    Minervini, F; Guastamacchia, R; Pizzi, F; Dell'Aquila, M E; Barile, V L

    2013-04-01

    Flow cytometry is a useful tool that provides an accurate, objective and rapid evaluation of semen quality. The use of this technique could significantly improve the quality of buffalo semen samples used in artificial insemination. This study was carried out to evaluate, by flow cytometry, frozen-thawed buffalo spermatozoa quality parameters such as sperm viability by SYBR-14/propidium iodide staining; mitochondrial function by JC-1 potentiometric probe; sperm chromatin stability (SCSA) by acridine orange; and acrosome reaction (AR) by FITC-PNA staining. Semen samples from five Italian Mediterranean buffalo bulls were used. Sperm viability was not different between bulls and ranged from 33.4% to 43.6%. A consistent rate (55.1 ± 10.8%) of sperm cells showed high mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ(high)), with no significant differences between subjects. Sperm chromatin structure assay differed significantly between the five buffalo bulls; moreover, data showed high stability within each buffalo. DNA fragmentation indexes (DFI), such as %-DFI, -DFI, SD-DFI, were 11.2 ± 8.6, 153.3 ± 24.6 and 81.6 ± 21.2, respectively. Regarding AR, the percentage of acrosome-reacted live (ARL) and acrosome-reacted dead (ARD) spermatozoa was 0.3 ± 0.2 and 15.3 ± 5.5, respectively. This functional parameter differed significantly between buffalo bulls and showed high stability. Following to Ca(2+) ionophore A23187 for 3 h, AR significantly differed between subjects and was characterized by an increase in both ARL (10.8%) and ARD population (22.0%). This study indicates that flow cytometry could be a useful tool for a quick multiparametric evaluation of sperm quality in buffalo. In particular, SCSA and AR resulted in sperm functional parameters sensitive enough for the diagnosis of frozen-thawed semen fertilizing potential. PMID:22834640

  10. Initial analysis of sperm DNA methylome in Holstein bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aberrant DNA methylation patterns have been associated with abnormal semen parameters, idiopathic male infertility and early embryonic loss in mammals. Using Holstein bulls with high (Bull1) or low (Bull2) fertility rates, we created two representative sperm DNA methylomes at a single-base resolutio...

  11. Evaluation of frozen thawed cauda epididymal sperms and in vitro fertilizing potential of bovine sperm collected from the cauda epididymal

    PubMed Central

    Chaveiro, A; Cerqueira, C; Silva, J; Franco, J; Moreira da Silva, F

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the fertilizing potential of semen recovered from slaughtered bulls epididymis was evaluated after cryopreservation, by conventional techniques and flow cytometry methods. The cauda epididymal was dissected and sperm were recovered and evaluated for volume, sperm concentration, and membrane and acrosome integrity using a flow cytometer. Sperm fertility potential was tested by in vitro fertilization (IVF). For each bull, three trials of IVF were performed. Before freezing, on average, the sperm concentration was 216 ± 27.5 × 106 sperm/ml. Sperm viability averaged 86.5 ± 4%. The mean percentage of sperm with intact plasma membrane and acrosome before and after cryopreservation was 90.7 ± 2.9% and 90.8 ± 1.9% (P≥0.05), respectively. The fertilization rate using frozen/thawed epididymal semen averaged 64.1 ± 3.9% fertilization with no significant differences between bulls (P>0.05). For the bull considered as control, the fertilization rate was 72.2 ± 4.5%, differing significantly (P>0.05) from the frozen/thawed epididymal semen’s fertilization rate. In conclusion, it is possible to use in vitro techniques with cryopreserved spermatozoa obtained from bull’s epididymis using a controlled rate freezing method with a predetermined freezing curve, and with assessment of sperm’s viability by conventional techniques and flow cytometry methods, together with the fertilizing ability of cryopreserved epididymal spermatozoa. PMID:27175174

  12. Avian artificial insemination and semen preservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.; Risser, Arthur C.; Todd, Frank S.

    1983-01-01

    Summary: Artificial insemination is a practical propagation tool that has been successful with a variety of birds. Cooperative, massage, and electroejaculation and modifications of these three basic methods of semen collection are described for a variety of birds. Semen color and consistency and sperm number, moti!ity, and morphology, as discussed, are useful indicators of semen quality, but the most reliable test of semen quality is the production of fertile eggs. Successful cryogenic preservation of avian semen with DMSO or glycerol as the cryoprotectant has been possible. Although the methods for preservation require special equipment, use of frozen semen requires only simple insemination supplies

  13. Relationship between the magnitude of the inbreeding coefficient and milk traits in Holstein and Jersey dairy bull semen used in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Soares, M P; Gaya, L G; Lorentz, L H; Batistel, F; Rovadoscki, G A; Ticiani, E; Zabot, V; Di Domenico, Q; Madureira, A P; Pértile, S F N

    2011-09-06

    Artificial insemination has been used to improve production in Brazilian dairy cattle; however, this can lead to problems due to increased inbreeding. To evaluate the effect of the magnitude of inbreeding coefficients on predicted transmitting abilities (PTAs) for milk traits of Holstein and Jersey breeds, data on 392 Holstein and 92 Jersey sires used in Brazil were tabulated. The second-degree polynomial equations and points of maximum or minimal response were estimated to establish the regression equation of the variables as a function of the inbreeding coefficients. The mean inbreeding coefficient of the Holstein bulls was 5.10%; this did not significantly affect the PTA for percent milk fat, protein percentage and protein (P = 0.479, 0.058 and 0.087, respectively). However, the PTAs for milk yield and fat decreased significantly after reaching inbreeding coefficients of 6.43 (P = 0.034) and 5.75 (P = 0.007), respectively. The mean inbreeding coefficient of Jersey bulls was 6.45%; the PTAs for milk yield, fat and protein, in pounds, decreased significantly after reaching inbreeding coefficients of 15.04, 9.83 and 12.82% (P < 0.001, P = 0.002, and P = 0.001, respectively). The linear regression was only significant for fat and protein percentages in the Jersey breed (P = 0.002 and P = 0.005, respectively). The PTAs of Holstein sires were more affected by smaller magnitudes of inbreeding coefficients than those of Jersey sires. It is necessary to monitor the inbreeding coefficients of sires used for artificial insemination in breeding schemes in Brazil, since the low genetic variability of the available sires may lead to reduced production.

  14. [Study of the effectiveness of some new agents for the deep freezing of bull sperm].

    PubMed

    Stoianov, T; Kostadinov, B

    1975-01-01

    Semen was used of four breeding bulls of the Bulgarian Red breed and the Alpine Brown one. A total of 26 ejaculates were subjected to 344 laboratory investigations. The semen was diluted in a yolk-lactose-glycerine medium and was frozen by the fast method of Nagase-Niwa. Studied were in dynamics some biologic and biochemical indexes, such as: heat resistance at 46 degrees C, percentage of dead and pathologic spermatozoa, intake of oxygen, and release of CO2. The respiratory coefficient was established by the direct method of Umbreit and coll. The survival rate proved better, lower was the number of dead and pathologic spermatozoa in a test medium containing slightly mineralized water. The consumption of oxygen and the amount of the CO2 released by spermatozoa showed a dependable decrease following equilibration and freezing. Similar, however, unreliable were the data of changes observed with the respiratory coefficient. The semen frozen in the new synthetic medium showed higher biologic value and higher fertilizing capacity (12.2 per cent) as compared with the control. PMID:1105956

  15. Saturated, omega-6 and omega-3 dietary fatty acid effects on the characteristics of fresh, frozen-thawed semen and blood parameters in rams.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, V; Shahverdi, A H; Alizadeh, A R; Alipour, H; Chehrazi, M

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of several dietary fatty acids (FAs) on semen quality and blood parameters in rams. We gave diet-supplemented treatments (35 g day(-1) ram(-1)) by C16:0 (palm oil), C18:2 [sunflower oil (SO)] and an n-3 source [fish oil (FO)] to 12 rams, who were fed for 15 weeks during their breeding season. Semen was collected once per week. Semen samples were extended with Tris-based cryoprotective diluents, then cooled to 5 °C and stored in liquid nitrogen. Positive responses were seen with FO after 4 weeks. The mean prefreezing semen characteristics improved with the intake of FO (P < 0.05). Interestingly, maximum sperm output in FO was achieved 7.5 × 10(9) when compared to palm oil 5.3 × 10(9). Rams that received FO had the highest total testosterone concentrations (11.3 ng ml(-1) for FO, 10.8 ng ml(-1) for SO and 10.2 ng ml(-1) for palm oil) during the experiment (P < 0.05). FO also improved the rams' sperm characteristics after thawing (P < 0.05). Although C16:0 is a major saturated FA in ram sperm and all rams have been fed isoenergetic rations, the unique FAs of FO improved fresh semen quality and freezing ability compared to other oils.

  16. The in vitro quality of frozen-thawed Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) spermatozoa in semen supplemented with Equex STM paste and oxytocin during and after cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Buranaamnuay, Kakanang; Mahasawangkul, Sittidet; Saikhun, Kulnasan

    2013-06-01

    The effects of Equex STM paste (Equex) and oxytocin (OT) on the in vitro quality of frozen-thawed Asian elephant sperm were investigated in the study. The viability of frozen-thawed sperm was significantly higher in the Equex-treated (1 and 2%) groups than in the control group. There were no differences in the examined sperm parameters among the control and OT-treated (0.05-5IU) groups. PMID:23719124

  17. Incorporation of taurine and hypotaurine did not improve the efficiency of the Uppsala Equex II extender for dog semen freezing.

    PubMed

    Martins-Bessa, A; Rocha, A; Mayenco-Aguirre, A

    2007-11-01

    The working hypothesis of the present study was that supplementation of the Uppsala Equex II (UE) extender with the amino acid (AA), taurine (T) and hypotaurine (H) would improve dog sperm post-thaw quality, as previously seen for ram and bull semen, respectively. Five pools from 15 ejaculates of 15 dogs were used. Each AA was added to the UE extender at a concentration of 25, 50 and 7 5mM. Amino acid-free extender was used as a control. The following post-thaw parameters were evaluated: sperm motility by light microscopy and by CASA evaluation, longevity, viability (eosin-nigrosin staining), and flow cytometry (FC) was used to assess acrosome integrity and mitochondrial activity after PI/Fitc-PSA and PI-Rhodamine staining, respectively. Post-thaw sperm motility and velocity did not differ among extenders. Amplitude of lateral head displacement was lower for sperm frozen in the 25 mM H-supplemented extender. Semen frozen in the extender with 50 mM of T resulted in higher number of live sperm with damaged acrosomes after thawing. Higher numbers of live sperm with minimal mitochondrial activity were obtained for samples frozen with 25 and 50 mM T-supplemented extenders. Semen frozen in the control and 50 mM T-supplemented extenders had the highest number of live (eosin-nigrosin stain negative) sperm immediately post-thawing. We concluded that supplementation of the Uppsala extender with T or H did not improve sperm post-thaw mitochondrial activity or semen motility and viability.

  18. Sperm macromolecules associated with bull fertility.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Abdullah; Memili, Erdoğan

    2016-06-01

    Bull fertility, ability of the sperm to fertilize and activate the egg that sustain embryo development, is vitally important for effective and efficient production of cattle. Fertility is a complex trait with low heritability. Despite recent advances in genomic selection and possibility of enormous paternal benefits to profitable cattle production, there exist no reliable tests for evaluating semen quality and predicting bull fertility. This review focuses on sperm macromolecules such as transcripts, proteins and the epigenome, i.e., the functional genome that are associated with bull fertility. Generating new information in these systems is important beyond agriculture because such progress advances the fundamental science of the mammalian male gamete while at the same time introduces biotechnology into livestock production. Sperm macromolecules and epigenome markers associated with bull fertility can be used alone or in combination with the current SNP microarrays to determine sperm quality and to indicate bull fertility.

  19. The Knobbed Acrosome Defect in Beef Bulls

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Albert D.

    1986-01-01

    The knobbed acrosome defect was found at levels of 25 to 100 percent of spermatozoa from 16 of 2054 beef bulls. The incidence of this defect appeared to be particularly high in the Charolais breed. Pedigree analysis of some of the affected Charolais bulls indicated there may be a genetic predisposition for this sperm defect. In eosin-nigrosin stained semen smears the most common form of the abnormality was a flattened or indented apex of the sperm head. A refractile bead at the apex of the sperm head was seen less commonly. Electron microscopy of the spermatozoa from one bull showed that the abnormality was similar to the knobbed sperm defect previously described in Friesian bulls. A breeding trial confirmed that bulls producing spermatozoa with a high incidence of knobbed acrosomes are infertile. ImagesFigure 2 and 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6 and 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:17422706

  20. Effect of cysteine and glutamine added to extender on post-thaw sperm functional parameters of buffalo bull.

    PubMed

    Topraggaleh, T R; Shahverdi, A; Rastegarnia, A; Ebrahimi, B; Shafiepour, V; Sharbatoghli, M; Esmaeili, V; Janzamin, E

    2014-09-01

    Amino acids seem to be crucial components for semen freezing extender due to antioxidant properties. Therefore, this study aimed to assess motility parameters, membrane integrity, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and DNA damage to detect the optimum concentrations of cysteine and glutamine for buffalo semen cryopreservation. Twenty ejaculates of four buffalo bulls were diluted in tris-egg yolk extender and divided into seven equal groups consisting of cysteine (5, 7.5 and 10 mmol), glutamine (10, 15 and 20 mmol) and no additive. Supplementation of 5 and 7.5 mmol cysteine and 15 mmol glutamine in cryopreservation extender significantly increased post-thaw motility and plasma membrane integrity of spermatozoa with significant reduction in intracellular ROS when compared with control groups (P < 0.05). Cysteine at 7.5 mmol concentration elevated progressive motility and MMP, compared with control (P < 0.05). No significant differences were observed for motion patterns and DNA damage of frozen-thawed buffalo spermatozoa in extender containing amino acids. The findings of this study showed that supplementation of 7.5 mmol cysteine and 15 mmol glutamine in semen cryopreservation extender has more potential to decrease intracellular ROS, and subsequently elevate motility and membrane integrity of buffalo frozen-thawed spermatozoa.

  1. Bovine viral diarrhea virus in embryo and semen production systems.

    PubMed

    Givens, M Daniel; Waldrop, Julie G

    2004-03-01

    Although BVDV-free offspring have been produced from persistently infected bulls and heifers via advanced reproductive techniques, embryos and semen can potentially transmit the virus. Due to this potential for transmission, appropriate testing is necessary to ensure freedom of semen and embryos from BVDV. In the future, less constraining quality control measures may ensure freedom of embryos and semen from BVDV. These quality control measures require additional research to be validated. PMID:15062472

  2. Effect of single-layer centrifugation or washing on frozen-thawed donkey semen quality: Do they have the same effect regardless of the quality of the sample?

    PubMed

    Ortiz, I; Dorado, J; Morrell, J M; Crespo, F; Gosálvez, J; Gálvez, M J; Acha, D; Hidalgo, M

    2015-07-15

    The aims of this study were to determine the sperm quality of frozen-thawed donkey sperm samples after single-layer centrifugation (SLC) using Androcoll-E in comparison to sperm washing or no centrifugation and to determine if the effect on the sperm quality after SLC or sperm washing depends on the quality of the sample. Frozen-thawed sperm samples from Andalusian donkeys were divided into three aliquots, and they were processed using three different techniques after thawing: uncentrifuged diluted control (UDC), sperm washing (SW), and SLC. Afterward, sperm quality index was estimated by integrating all parameters (total and progressive sperm motility, membrane integrity, and DNA fragmentation) in a single value. The relationship between the sperm quality of thawed UDC samples and the effect on sperm parameters in SW and SLC-selected samples was assessed. Sperm quality index was significantly higher (P < 0.001) in SLC (0.8 ± 0.0) samples than that in UDC (0.6 ± 0.0) and SW (0.6 ± 0.0) samples, regardless of the sperm quality index after thawing of the sperm sample. In conclusion, SLC of frozen-thawed donkey spermatozoa using Androcoll-E-Small can be a suitable procedure for selecting frozen-thawed donkey sperm with better quality, in particular in those samples where an improvement in motility is needed.

  3. "Aging bull'.

    PubMed

    Geelhoed, G W

    1996-12-01

    An old bull, it is said by those who know, can have his troubles. Included among these are vertebral osteosclerosis and ankylosing spondylosis; this stiffening up limits, rather than accentuates, the value and reproductive potential of a stud bull past his prime. Associated with these abnormalities, however-and not seen in age-matched cows of comparable breeds-are fascinating endocrine neoplasms suggestive of a pattern that could be productive as a model of human hereditary endocrine abnormalities. Adjacent to the thyroid gland in other vertebrates are ultimobranchial bodies that are incorporated into the lateral thyroid lobes in primates as the parafollicular "C cells' of the thyroid. These are the cells in man that give rise to medullary thyroid cancer and are associated with calcitonin secretion, useful as a tumor marker. In aging bulls of whatever breed, nearly half exhibit abnormality of these ultimobranchial bodies: 20% show hyperplasia, and 30% have frank neoplasia. These ultimobranchial tumors appear in bulls passing 6 1/2 years in age, and are absent in young bulls and all cows of any age. Calcitonin can be demonstrated in the ultimobranchial tumors from bulls, and secretion is stimulated by calcium infusion, though serum calcium remains normal. The ultimobranchial tumors themselves can range from hyperplasia through adenoma to metastasizing carcinoma-in fact, representing one of the commoner cattle cancers. Parathyroid glands taken from bulls with these ultimobranchial tumors initially show evidence of inhibited secretory activity and morphologic atrophy, but later go on to develop hyperplasia and, eventually, autonomy. Cattle forage on calcium-rich diets. Bulls appear to respond to this calcium excess from the positive balance, but breeding cows have the unique calcium deficits of the high net loss of calcium through lactation and the large requirements of calcifying a fetal skeleton. Chronic stimulation of the APUD-derived ultimobranchial bodies by high

  4. Spermatozoa input concentrations and RNA isolation methods on RNA yield and quality in bull (Bos taurus).

    PubMed

    Parthipan, Sivashanmugam; Selvaraju, Sellappan; Somashekar, Lakshminarayana; Kolte, Atul P; Arangasamy, Arunachalam; Ravindra, Janivara Parameswaraiah

    2015-08-01

    Sperm RNA can be used to understand the past spermatogenic process, future successful fertilization, and embryo development. To study the sperm RNA composition and function, isolation of good quality RNA with sufficient quantity is essential. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of sperm input concentrations and RNA isolation methods on RNA yield and quality in bull sperm. The fresh semen samples from bulls (n = 6) were snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen and stored at -80 °C. The sperm RNA was isolated using membrane-based methods combined with TRIzol (RNeasy+TRIzol and PureLink+TRIzol) and conventional methods (TRIzol, Double TRIzol, and RNAzol RT). Based on fluorometric quantification, combined methods resulted in significantly (P < 0.05) higher total RNA yields (800-900 ng/30-40 × 10(6)) as compared with other methods and yielded 20 to 30 fg of RNA/spermatozoon. The quality of RNA isolated by membrane-based methods was superior to that isolated by conventional methods. The sperm RNA was observed to be intact as well as fragmented (50-2000 bp). The study revealed that the membrane-based methods with a cocktail of lysis solution and an optimal input concentration of 30 to 40 million sperm were optimal for maximum recovery of RNA from bull spermatozoa.

  5. Quantification of damage at different stages of cryopreservation of endangered North American bison (Bison bison) semen and the effects of extender and freeze rate on post-thaw sperm quality.

    PubMed

    Hussain, S A; Lessard, C; Anzar, M

    2011-12-01

    Semen cryopreservation is an important technique for the banking of animal germplasm from endangered species and exploitation of genetically superior sires through artificial insemination. Being a member of bovidae family, bison semen has poor freezing ability as compared to dairy and beef bulls' semen. This study was designed to quantify the damage to bison sperm at different stages of cryopreservation, and to determine the effects of extender (commercial Triladyl(®) vs. custom made tris-citric acid [TCA]) and freeze rate (-10, -25 and -40°C/min) on post-thaw quality of bison semen. Semen was collected from five bison bulls (three woods and two plains) via electroejaculation. In Experiment 1, semen was diluted in Triladyl® extender and frozen with freeze rate -10°C/min. Sperm motility characteristics were recorded in fresh, diluted, cooled (4°C) and freeze-thawed semen using computer-assisted sperm analyzer (CASA). In Experiment 2, semen was diluted in Triladyl® or TCA extender, and frozen with three different freeze rates, i.e. -10, -25 or -40°C/min. Thawing was performed at 37°C for 60s. Post-thaw sperm motility characteristics were assessed using CASA, and sperm structural characteristics (plasma membrane, mitochondrial membrane potential and acrosomes) were evaluated using flow cytometer, at 0 and 3h while incubating semen at 37°C. In Experiment 1, total and progressive motilities did not differ among pre-freeze stages of cryopreservation (P>0.05). However, sperm total and progressive motilities declined (P<0.001) in freeze-thawed semen by 35% and 42%, respectively, compared to after cooling (pre-freeze) semen. In Experiment 2, Triladyl®, as compared to TCA, yielded greater (P<0.05) post-thaw sperm total motility (41% compared to 36%) and progressive motility (34% compared to 29%) at 0h, respectively. The percent change in post-thaw sperm total and progressive motilities, VAP, VCL, VSL, IPM-high ΔΨm and IPM-IACR during 3h incubation at 37°C, was

  6. Applications of sexed semen in cattle production.

    PubMed

    Hohenboken, W D

    1999-12-01

    Sexed semen will contribute to increased profitability of dairy and beef cattle production in a variety of ways. It could be used to produce offspring of the desired sex from a particular mating to take advantage of differences in value of males and females for specific marketing purposes. Commercial dairy farmers, those who produce and market milk, could use sexed semen to produce replacement daughters from genetically superior cows and beef crossbred sons from the remainder of their cow population. To increase the rate of response to selection, seedstock dairy cattle breeders could produce bulls for progeny testing from a smaller number of elite dams by using sexed semen to ensure that all of them produced a son. Using sexed semen could then reduce the cost of progeny testing those bulls, because fewer matings would be necessary to produce any required number of daughters. Commercial beef cattle farmers, producing animals for eventual slaughter, could use sexed semen to capitalize on the higher value of male than female offspring for meat production. They could also use sexed semen to produce specialized, genetically superior replacement heifers from as small a proportion of the herd as possible. This would allow the remainder of the herd to produce male calves from bulls or breeds with superior genetic merit for growth, feed conversion efficiency, and carcass merit. Single-sex, bred-heifer systems, in which each female is sold for slaughter soon after weaning her replacement daughter, would be possible with the use of X-chromosome-sorted semen. Use of sexed semen would make terminal crossbreeding systems more efficient and sustainable in beef cattle. Fewer females would be required to produce specialized maternal crossbred daughters, and more could be devoted to producing highly efficient, terminal crossbred sons. PMID:10735086

  7. Semen Analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Email Other share options Semen analysis is a test on the fluid that is released when a man has an orgasm ©1996 - 2016 SART, Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology . All Rights Reserved. ASRM/SART Nondiscrimination Policy ASRM/ ...

  8. Effect of thaw rates on survival of buffalo spermatozoa frozen straws.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, K

    1984-07-01

    Eighteen ejaculates from three buffalo bulls of Nili-Ravi breed were tested in a 3 X 6 X 3 factorial experiment. Semen was extended in lactose-fructose-egg yolk-glycerol extender containing penicillin (1000 IU/ml) and streptomycin (1000 micrograms/ml). Semen was frozen in .5-ml polyvinyl chloride straws in liquid nitrogen vapor and stored in liquid nitrogen for 24 h. Straws were thawed at water bath temperatures of 0, 37, or 75 degrees C for 2 min, 15 s, and 9 s, respectively. At thawing bath temperature of 0, 37, or 75 degrees C, percentage of motile spermatozoa averaged 30, 40, and 50%. Differences were significant between thaw rates for initial postthaw motility, postthaw sperm survival at 37 degrees C, and absolute index of survival of spermatozoa. Bulls were also different for initial postthaw motility, postthaw sperm survival at 37 degrees C, and absolute index of survival of spermatozoa. Thaw rate of 75 degrees C for 9 s was superior to other rates.

  9. Effect of pre-freeze semen quality, extender and cryoprotectant on the post-thaw quality of Asian elephant (Elephas maximus indicus) semen.

    PubMed

    Imrat, P; Suthanmapinanth, P; Saikhun, K; Mahasawangkul, S; Sostaric, E; Sombutputorn, P; Jansittiwate, S; Thongtip, N; Pinyopummin, A; Colenbrander, B; Holt, W V; Stout, T A E

    2013-02-01

    Semen cryopreservation and artificial insemination (AI) are potentially valuable methods for supporting the breeding management of endangered species like the Asian elephant. Cryopreservation of Asian elephant semen has however proven problematic with respect to maintenance of both adequate semen quality and fertility post-thaw. In this study, nine ejaculates from three adult bulls were used to compare the influence of extender (TEST versus INRA96®) and penetrating cryoprotectants (3% glycerol, 5% glycerol and 4% methylformamide) on post-thaw semen quality. We demonstrate that not only the freezing process, but also the quality of the semen before freezing, significantly influences the freezability of Asian elephant semen. Pre-freeze motility, viability, semen volume, semen pH, sperm concentration and the incidence of sperm mid-piece and tail abnormalities all significantly (p<0.05) affected post-thaw semen quality. While extender and cryoprotectant did not significantly affect any of the above semen quality parameters post-thaw, the skim-milk based extender (INRA96®) preserved DNA integrity better (p<0.05) than the egg yolk extender (TEST). Considerable between-ejaculate variation in all post-thaw semen quality parameters was also noted. It is concluded that strict criteria for semen quality is essential for the selection of Asian elephant bull ejaculates suitable for cryopreservation; stricter initial selection should improve the mean post-thaw quality.

  10. Cryogenic preservation of semen from the Aleutian Canada goose (Branta canadensis leucopareia)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.; Sexton, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    Aleutian Canada geese (Branta canadensis leucopareia) were inseminated with frozen-thawed semen containing 6% or 7% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) resulting in 32 fertile eggs and 17 goslings; with 7% DMSO, 19 of 31 eggs were fertile. Beltsville Poultry Semen Extender (BPSE), adjusted to 270 ? 30 mOs and 7.5 ? 0.4 pH, was used to dilute semen samples and the DMSO before cryopreservation. About half of the live spermatozoa in the fresh semen (92.9 ? 2.5% live cells, laboratory studies; 87.3 ? 7.3%, insemination trials) survived the freeze-thaw process (46.7 ? 7.8%, laboratory; 33.3 ? 17.8%, insemination trials). Samples of frozen-thawed semen contained a greater percentage of bent spermatozoa (27.1 ? 8.4% of live cells) than fresh semen (14.4 ? 3.0% of live cells). Fecal- and urate-contaminated semen (a common problem when collecting goose semen) reduced the sperm motility score from 3.2 ? 0.6 to 2.7? 0.7 and number of live spermatozoa in frozen-thawed semen from 49 ? 9% to 24 ?18%. Other variables examined that had less of an effect on semen quality included semen extenders, semen holding temperature, dilution and equilibration, relationship between hour of semen collection and level of semen contamination, and the relationship between season and sperm concentration.

  11. Unusual observations on a serologically negative bluetongue virus infected bull.

    PubMed

    Schultz, R D; Rhodes, P; Panangala, V S; Kaproth, M

    1985-01-01

    A Holstein bull named "Regency" born in New York in July 1968, maintained in an artificial insemination (AI) stud for 9 years, unremarkable from the point of view of health history or semen production, was discovered "by accident" to have bluetongue (BT) virus (BTV) in his semen. A microscopic study in 1975 and 1977 revealed unusual cytoplasmic vacuoles in the sperm of "Regency" prompting us to send semen to A. J. Luedke, USDA-ARS, Denver, Colorado, USA, to attempt virus isolation. Serotype 13 BTV was isolated from the semen. Serum sent with the semen was negative for antibody by the agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) and complement fixation (CF) tests. Annual AGID serologic tests begun in 1975 and continuing to the present have been negative for antibody to BTV for all bulls in this AI stud. "Regency" was moved to Auburn, Alabama, USA in 1978 and further studies were performed. The bull was maintained with the Veterinary School herd. The BT serologic status of the cattle did not change during the year the bull was in the herd nor were the cows he bred or their calves serologically positive for BT. Studies on insemination of cattle with experimentally contaminated semen indicated that 5X10(4) infectious doses of BTV were required for infection. These results suggest that since "Regency's" semen did not infect cows, the semen probably contained less than this amount of virus. The rete testis was cannulated, rete fluid collected, a testis removed and virus isolation attempted.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2989933

  12. Effect of alternate day collection on semen quality of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) with poor initial fresh semen quality.

    PubMed

    Imrat, P; Mahasawangkul, S; Thitaram, C; Suthanmapinanth, P; Kornkaewrat, K; Sombutputorn, P; Jansittiwate, S; Thongtip, N; Pinyopummin, A; Colenbrander, B; Holt, W V; Stout, T A E

    2014-06-30

    In captivity, male Asian elephants often yield poor quality semen after transrectal manually assisted semen collection; however, the reasons for the disappointing semen quality are not clear. Here we test the hypothesis that accumulation of senescent spermatozoa is a contributory factor, and that semen quality can therefore be improved by more frequent ejaculation. To this end we investigated the effect of collecting semen five times on alternate days, after a long period of sexual rest, on semen quality in Asian elephants known to deliver poor semen during infrequent single collections. All eight bulls initially displayed a high incidence of detached sperm heads and low percentages of motile (close to 0%) spermatozoa. After semen collection on alternate days, the percentages of detached sperm heads, and head and mid-piece abnormalities, were reduced significantly (p<0.05). In particular, one bull showed markedly improved sperm motility (increased from 0% to 60%) and membrane integrity (increased from 5% to 75%). In addition, advancing age significantly (p<0.01) correlated with lower percentages of sperm with intact membranes and a higher frequency of detached sperm heads. In contrast to sperm accumulation problems in other species, a small ampullary diameter correlated significantly (p<0.05) with reduced semen quality.

  13. Effect of alternate day collection on semen quality of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) with poor initial fresh semen quality.

    PubMed

    Imrat, P; Mahasawangkul, S; Thitaram, C; Suthanmapinanth, P; Kornkaewrat, K; Sombutputorn, P; Jansittiwate, S; Thongtip, N; Pinyopummin, A; Colenbrander, B; Holt, W V; Stout, T A E

    2014-06-30

    In captivity, male Asian elephants often yield poor quality semen after transrectal manually assisted semen collection; however, the reasons for the disappointing semen quality are not clear. Here we test the hypothesis that accumulation of senescent spermatozoa is a contributory factor, and that semen quality can therefore be improved by more frequent ejaculation. To this end we investigated the effect of collecting semen five times on alternate days, after a long period of sexual rest, on semen quality in Asian elephants known to deliver poor semen during infrequent single collections. All eight bulls initially displayed a high incidence of detached sperm heads and low percentages of motile (close to 0%) spermatozoa. After semen collection on alternate days, the percentages of detached sperm heads, and head and mid-piece abnormalities, were reduced significantly (p<0.05). In particular, one bull showed markedly improved sperm motility (increased from 0% to 60%) and membrane integrity (increased from 5% to 75%). In addition, advancing age significantly (p<0.01) correlated with lower percentages of sperm with intact membranes and a higher frequency of detached sperm heads. In contrast to sperm accumulation problems in other species, a small ampullary diameter correlated significantly (p<0.05) with reduced semen quality. PMID:24832106

  14. The sequential appearance of sperm abnormalities after scrotal insulation or dexamethasone treatment in bulls.

    PubMed Central

    Barth, A D; Bowman, P A

    1994-01-01

    Scrotal insulation and dexamethasone treatment were used as a model to compare the effect of testicular heating and stress on spermatogenesis. Insulation was applied to the scrotum of eight bulls (insulated) for a period of four days, eight bulls were treated daily for seven days with 20 mg dexamethasone injected intramuscularly, and four bulls were untreated controls. Semen from four bulls in each group was collected and evaluated over a six-week period after treatment. Blood samples for testosterone analysis were taken hourly for eight hours at the beginning and the end of the six-week period from the control bulls and before and after treatment from the four insulated and four dexamethasone-treated bulls that were not used for semen collection. At the end of the last blood sampling period, the four bulls in each group were castrated for the collection of testicular tissue for the determination of testosterone concentrations. Basal, peak episodic, and mean serum testosterone concentrations among control bulls, pre and postinsulated bulls, and pretreatment samples of dexamethasone-treated bulls were not different (p > 0.05); however, bulls that had received dexamethasone treatments had significantly lower basal, peak episodic, and mean testosterone concentrations (p < 0.05). Tissue concentrations of testosterone in control, insulated, and dexamethasone-treated bulls were not significantly different but tended to be lower in dexamethasone-treated bulls (p > 0.13). The spermiograms of the control bulls varied insignificantly over the six-week sampling period; however, there was a marked increase in sperm defects in insulated and dexamethasone-treated bulls. The types of sperm defects and the temporal relationships of rises and declines of sperm defects were quite similar for both treatments. All bulls recovered to approximately pretreatment levels of sperm defects by six weeks after the initiation of treatment. Results indicate that two of the most common types of

  15. Effect of supplemental trace mineral level and form on peripubertal bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives were to determine if different supplemental trace mineral levels and /or forms (sulfate and metal amino acid complexes) influence age at puberty, semen quality, endocrine status and scrotal circumference in peripubertal bulls. Fifty crossbred, peripubertal bulls were blocked by age (...

  16. Evaluation of the semen swim-up method for bovine sperm RNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Han, C M; Chen, R; Li, T; Chen, X L; Zheng, Y F; Ma, M T; Gao, Q H

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of high-quality RNA is important for assessing sperm gene expression, and semen purification methods may affect the integrity of the isolated RNA. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the sperm swim-up method for seminal RNA isolation. Frozen semen samples in straws from three bulls of proven fertility were purified by the swim-up method. RNA extraction was carried out using the E.Z.N.A.(TM) Total RNA kit II, with non-swim-up sperm as a control. Total sperm RNA was analyzed by UV spectrophotometry, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and agarose gel electrophoresis, and expression of the sex-determining region on the Y chromosome (SRY), leptin (LEP), and ribosomal protein subunit 23 (RPS23) genes, were determined. 18S RNA was used as a positive control. Fewer somatic cells were found in sperm swim-up samples than in the non-swim-up counterparts (0 x 10(3) vs 17.33 ± 2.52 x 10(3) sperm, P < 0.05). In addition, high-quality RNA was obtained in about 2 h, with no significant difference between groups. Interestingly, the yields of RNA fragments containing ≥200 nucleotides were significantly reduced in sperm swim-up samples (0.92 ± 0.41 x 10(7) sperm) compared with the non-swim-up samples (1.36 ± 0.33 x 10(7) sperm, P < 0.05). After RT-PCR, clear bands representing SRY, LEP, and RPS23 in sperm cDNA were observed on agarose gel electrophoresis. Finally, no bands corresponding to 18S RNA were found in RNA samples from the sperm swim-up group. Our findings suggest that small amounts of sperm RNA can be efficiently extracted from frozen straw semen samples using the swim-up technique. PMID:27173315

  17. Seasonal and cryopreservation impacts on semen quality in boars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seasonal boar infertility occurs worldwide and contributes to economic loss to the pork industry. The current study evaluated cooled vs cryopreserved semen quality of 11 Duroc boars collected in June (cool season) and August 2014 (warm season). Semen was cooled to 16°C (cooled) or frozen over liquid...

  18. Relationship of nonreturn rates of dairy bulls to binding affinity of heparin to sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, J.L.; Ax, R.L.

    1985-08-01

    The binding of the glycosaminoglycan (3H) heparin to bull spermatozoa was compared with nonreturn rates of dairy bulls. Semen samples from five bulls above and five below an average 71% nonreturn rate were used. Samples consisted of first and second ejaculates on a single day collected 1 d/wk for up to 5 consecutive wk. Saturation binding assays using (TH) heparin were performed to quantitate the binding characteristics of each sample. Scatchard plot analyses indicated a significant difference in the binding affinity for (TH) heparin between bulls of high and low fertility. Dissociation constants were 69.0 and 119.3 pmol for bulls of high and low fertility, respectively. In contrast, the number of binding sites for (TH) heparin did not differ significantly among bulls. Differences in binding affinity of (TH) heparin to bull sperm might be used to predict relative fertility of dairy bulls.

  19. Fertilization rates and in vitro embryo production using sexed or non-sexed semen selected with a silane-coated silica colloid or Percoll.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Villamil, P; Wei, H; Moreira, G; Caccia, M; Fernandez Taranco, M; Bó, G A

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate sperm fertilization rates and in vitro embryo development rates for sexed and non-sexed semen selected using a silane-coated silica colloid method (Isolate) or Percoll. Frozen/thawed, sexed and unsexed semen samples from four Holstein bulls were randomly allocated to one of two different density gradient selection methods. Sperm quality (motility, concentration, morphology and membrane integrity) were evaluated and compared before and after sperm selection. Sperm motility and morphology improved (P < 0.005) after the sperm selection process with no differences between the two methods. For non-sexed semen, Percoll gradient increased the mean (± SEM) percentage of sperm recovered (57.3 ± 2.8) compared to Isolate (46.0 ± 1.8; P < 0.01). However, membrane integrity was higher after Isolate than Percoll (sexed semen: 41.0 ± 0.6 vs. 38.8 ± 0.8 and non-sexed semen 60.8 ± 1.6 vs. 58.8 ± 0.5; P < 0.05). The percentage of blastocysts produced was higher when either sexed or non-sexed semen was selected by Isolate (14.0 ± 1.0; 22.0 ± 1.1) than by Percoll (10.5 ± 1.5; 17.0 ± 2.1, respectively; P < 0.05). In summary, Isolate was a more effective method for the recovery of high quality sperm for in vitro fertilization embryo production.

  20. Sexed-semen usage for Holstein AI in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dairy industry has used sexed-semen to reduce the birth of undesirable bull calves for over a decade. While the efficacy of sexed-semen has been determined experimentally, we sought to tabulate statistics on the generalized use of the technology in the US dairy herd and determine its effectivene...

  1. The Distribution of Mycoplasmas and Ureaplasmas in the Genital Tract of Normal Artificial Insemination Bulls

    PubMed Central

    Fish, Norman A.; Rosendal, Søren; Miller, Richard B.

    1985-01-01

    Bull semen is commonly contaminated with mycoplasmas. To determine the source of contamination, semen and the genital tracts of 45 artificial insemination bulls were cultured for these organisms. The results indicate that mycoplasmas colonize the prepuce and the distal part of the urethra. Only rarely were they found in the ampullae or seminal vesicles. In 92% of the bulls with contaminated semen the same Mycoplasma species or Ureaplasma diversum was isolated from the prepuce and urethral orifice as was found in the semen. This suggests that the prepuce and distal urethra is the source of contamination. Colonization of the genital tracts with Mycoplasmas or U. diversum was not associated with histological changes. PMID:17422489

  2. Effect of zeranol on sexual development of crossbred bulls.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, R W; Randel, R D; Rouquette, F M

    1989-07-01

    Three groups of 1/2 Simmental X 1/4 Brahman X 1/4 Hereford bull calves were used during two different years to study effects of zeranol on sexual development. At 154 d of age, half the calves were implanted with 36 mg zeranol and half, not implanted, served as controls. Implanted calves were reimplanted at 90-d intervals throughout the trial (9 mo) each year. Trial 1 was conducted with 24 calves and Trial 2 was conducted the following year with 10 bulls. Twenty-four days after weaning (200 d of age) and at 28-d intervals thereafter, bulls in drylot in Trial 1 were weighted, scrotal circumference (SC) was measured and an ejaculate of semen was collected by electroejaculation to determine puberty. At these times, bulls were given 200 micrograms of GnRH i.m. and blood was collected at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 h after GnRH. Serum concentrations of LH and testosterone (TEST) were determined. At slaughter, testis weight, length and circumference and pubertal status were recorded. Bulls implanted with zeranol had smaller SC than control bulls during the entire 9-mo period (P less than .0001). More control bulls reached puberty than did implanted bulls (82.4 vs 23.5%, respectively; P less than .001). Control bulls had larger testis measurements at slaughter (P less than .0001). Implants did not alter total weight gain or ADG (P greater than .10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2768123

  3. Effect of zeranol on sexual development of crossbred bulls.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, R W; Randel, R D; Rouquette, F M

    1989-07-01

    Three groups of 1/2 Simmental X 1/4 Brahman X 1/4 Hereford bull calves were used during two different years to study effects of zeranol on sexual development. At 154 d of age, half the calves were implanted with 36 mg zeranol and half, not implanted, served as controls. Implanted calves were reimplanted at 90-d intervals throughout the trial (9 mo) each year. Trial 1 was conducted with 24 calves and Trial 2 was conducted the following year with 10 bulls. Twenty-four days after weaning (200 d of age) and at 28-d intervals thereafter, bulls in drylot in Trial 1 were weighted, scrotal circumference (SC) was measured and an ejaculate of semen was collected by electroejaculation to determine puberty. At these times, bulls were given 200 micrograms of GnRH i.m. and blood was collected at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 h after GnRH. Serum concentrations of LH and testosterone (TEST) were determined. At slaughter, testis weight, length and circumference and pubertal status were recorded. Bulls implanted with zeranol had smaller SC than control bulls during the entire 9-mo period (P less than .0001). More control bulls reached puberty than did implanted bulls (82.4 vs 23.5%, respectively; P less than .001). Control bulls had larger testis measurements at slaughter (P less than .0001). Implants did not alter total weight gain or ADG (P greater than .10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Effect of egg yolk powder on freezability of Murrah buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) semen

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N.; Lone, S. A.; Prasad, J. K.; Jan, M. H.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of commercial egg yolk powder as an alternative to fresh egg yolk on freezability of Murrah buffalo semen. Materials and Methods: Semen samples (12) from 3 Murrah buffaloes (4 from each bull) with mass motility (≥3+) and total motility (70% and above) were utilized in this study. Immediately after collection, each sample was divided into four groups. Groups I was diluted up to 60×106 sperm/ml with tris extender containing 10% fresh egg yolk and Groups II, III, and IV were diluted up to 60×106 sperm/ml with tris extender containing 2%, 4%, and 6% egg yolk powder, respectively. Semen samples were processed and cryopreserved followed by examination of frozen semen samples after 24 h. Semen samples from each group were evaluated for total motility, viability, acrosomal integrity, abnormality, and hypo-osmotic swelling test (HOST) response after dilution, pre-freeze, and post-thaw stage. Results: Pre-freeze total motility was significantly (p<0.05) higher in Groups III and IV as compared to Groups I and II, and post-thaw total motility was significantly (p<0.01) higher in Group III as compared to other three groups. Viability was significantly (p<0.05) higher in Groups II, III, and IV than Group I at the pre-freeze stage. Significantly (p<0.01) higher viability and acrosomal integrity were recorded in Group III as compared to other three groups at the post-thaw stage. Abnormality was significantly (p<0.05) higher in Group IV than other three groups. HOST response was significantly (p<0.05) higher in Groups II and III than Groups I and IV at the pre-freeze and post-thaw stages. Conclusion: Addition of egg yolk powder at 4% level yielded significantly better results in terms of post-thaw semen quality as compared to the fresh egg yolk and other concentrations of egg yolk powder (2% and 6%). PMID:27397983

  5. A comparison of ABAcard(®) p30 and RSID™-Semen test kits for forensic semen identification.

    PubMed

    Boward, Emily S; Wilson, Stacey L

    2013-11-01

    The screening and confirmatory tests available to a forensic laboratory allow evidence to be examined for the presence of bodily fluids. With the majority of evidence being submitted involving sexual assaults, it is important to have confirmatory tests for the identification of semen that are straightforward, quick, and reliable. The purpose of this study was to compare two commonly used semen identification kits utilized by forensic laboratories: ABAcard(®) p30 and Rapid Stain Identification of Human Semen (RSID™-Semen). These kits were assessed with aged semen stains, fresh and frozen post-vasectomy semen, post-coital samples collected on different substrates, post-vasectomy semen mixed with blood, saliva, and urine, a series of swabs collected at increasing time intervals after sexual intercourse, and multiple non-semen samples. The test kits were compared on the basis of sensitivity, specificity, and the cost and time effectiveness of each protocol. Overall, both semen identification tests performed well in the studies. Both kits proved specificity for identifying semen, however the ABAcard(®) p30 test surpassed the RSID™-Semen test in sensitivity, cost per test, and simplified test protocol.

  6. Semen collection methods affect the bacterial composition of post-thawed semen of silver barb (Barbodes gonionotus).

    PubMed

    Boonthai, Traimat; Khaopong, Weerasith; Sangsong, Jumlong; Sooksawat, Treerat; Nimrat, Subuntith; Vuthiphandchai, Verapong

    2016-03-01

    Biosafety issue associated with the risk of pathogenic contamination of cryopreserved semen is a common concern because of associated declines in sperm quality, storage period and disease transmission. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of methods of semen collection on sperm quality and bacterial composition of post-thawed semen of silver barb (Barbodes gonionotus). Semen collection methods consisted of four treatments: (1) hand-stripping of abdomen without rinsing of urogenital area with water, (2) hand-stripping of abdomen after rinsing of urogenital area with water, (3) catheterization without rinsing of urogenital area with water and (4) catheterization after rinsing of urogenital area with water. Semen diluted with calcium-free Hank's balanced salt solution containing 10% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) was frozen at a freezing rate of -8°Cmin(-1) before plunging in liquid nitrogen. Post-thawed semen collected by catheterization after rinsing urogenital area had the lowest bacterial number, about 2-log reduction of total heterotrophic, Gram negative and pseudomonad bacteria, compared with the other three collection treatments. However, percentages of motile and viable sperm were not significantly (P>0.05) different among treatments. This method eliminated Flavobacterium aquatile, Bacillus megaterium, Kocuria varians, Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Aeromonas media in cryopreserved semen. This is the first report demonstrating the effects of semen collection methods on bacteriological quality of frozen-thawed fish semen. PMID:26778122

  7. The effect of nocturnal sampling on semen quality and the efficiency of collection in bovine species.

    PubMed

    Yates, Jennifer H; Chandler, John E; Canal, Anita L; Braden Paul, J

    2003-12-01

    This study evaluated night and day semen collection regimes in Holstein and Brahman bulls (four bulls of each breed) that were collected weekly, each during a morning and a night collection. Ejaculates (n=64) were obtained via artificial vagina over 4 weeks. The first collection of each week alternated between night and day. Two collection teams were employed. Bull behavior parameters included reaction time to first mount, time to ejaculation, a refractory period test, and a thrust intensity test. The numbers of interruptions were counted as a managerial parameter. Pre-freeze semen parameters included total volume, initial motility and concentration. Post-freeze semen parameters measured were: 0- and 3-h post-thaw motility; percent intact acrosomes; and percent sperm abnormalities. Data were analyzed by least squares methods. The bull within breed effect differed (P<0.05) for behavior parameters. The bull within breed effect for total motile sperm harvested was not significant. The bull within breed response was mixed for post-freeze semen viability parameters. Bull within breed was not significant for sperm abnormalities. The night versus day treatment was significant for the managerial parameter (P=0.002). Although a different collection schedule for Bos indicus cattle was not warranted, the efficiency of the collection process was affected by extraneous environmental conditions. PMID:14580649

  8. Maintaining semen quality by improving cold chain equipment used in cattle artificial insemination.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Daniel; McClure, Elizabeth; Harston, Stephen; Madan, Damian

    2016-01-01

    Artificial insemination of dairy cattle is a common practice in the developing world that can improve farmer incomes and food security. Maintaining the fertilizing potential of frozen semen as it is manipulated, transported and stored is crucial to the success of this process. Here we describe simple technological improvements to protect semen from inadvertent thermal fluctuations that occur when users mishandle semen using standard equipment. We show that when frozen semen is mishandled, characteristics of semen biology associated with fertility are negatively affected. We describe several design modifications and results from thermal performance tests of several improved prototypes. Finally, we compare semen that has been mishandled in standard and improved equipment. The data suggest that our canister improvements can better maintain characteristics of semen biology that correlate with fertility when it is mishandled. PMID:27313137

  9. Maintaining semen quality by improving cold chain equipment used in cattle artificial insemination

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Daniel; McClure, Elizabeth; Harston, Stephen; Madan, Damian

    2016-01-01

    Artificial insemination of dairy cattle is a common practice in the developing world that can improve farmer incomes and food security. Maintaining the fertilizing potential of frozen semen as it is manipulated, transported and stored is crucial to the success of this process. Here we describe simple technological improvements to protect semen from inadvertent thermal fluctuations that occur when users mishandle semen using standard equipment. We show that when frozen semen is mishandled, characteristics of semen biology associated with fertility are negatively affected. We describe several design modifications and results from thermal performance tests of several improved prototypes. Finally, we compare semen that has been mishandled in standard and improved equipment. The data suggest that our canister improvements can better maintain characteristics of semen biology that correlate with fertility when it is mishandled. PMID:27313137

  10. Maintaining semen quality by improving cold chain equipment used in cattle artificial insemination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, Daniel; McClure, Elizabeth; Harston, Stephen; Madan, Damian

    2016-06-01

    Artificial insemination of dairy cattle is a common practice in the developing world that can improve farmer incomes and food security. Maintaining the fertilizing potential of frozen semen as it is manipulated, transported and stored is crucial to the success of this process. Here we describe simple technological improvements to protect semen from inadvertent thermal fluctuations that occur when users mishandle semen using standard equipment. We show that when frozen semen is mishandled, characteristics of semen biology associated with fertility are negatively affected. We describe several design modifications and results from thermal performance tests of several improved prototypes. Finally, we compare semen that has been mishandled in standard and improved equipment. The data suggest that our canister improvements can better maintain characteristics of semen biology that correlate with fertility when it is mishandled.

  11. Tarsal lameness of dairy bulls housed at two artificial insemination centers: 24 cases (1975-1987).

    PubMed

    Bargai, U; Cohen, R

    1992-10-01

    Degenerative joint disease of the tarsi was diagnosed in 20 of 24 Holstein bulls with tarsal lameness at 2 artificial insemination centers from 1975 to 1987. Each of the 2 centers housed about 100 bulls/yr. Of the 24 bulls with tarsal lameness, 22 were from the artificial insemination center designated as A, and 2 were from the center designated as B. Examination of the housing and management procedures revealed that center A had concrete floors with cuboidal-shaped yards, whereas center B had deep sand flooring, with long, narrow yards. The only other difference between the 2 centers was that center A used 1- and 2-year-old bulls as teasers for older, heavier bulls to mount, whereas center B used bulls that were at least 6 years old to withstand the stress placed on their hind limbs by the weight of bulls undergoing semen collection. Radiographic lesions of tarsi of bulls from both centers ranged from distention of the tibiotarsal joint pouch to hypertrophic degenerative osteoarthritis of the distal, intertarsal, and tarsometatarsal joints. It was concluded that the concrete flooring and the semen collecting practices were responsible for the high prevalence of tarsal lameness and degenerative joint disease of the tarsi in bulls housed at center A.

  12. The effect of selected staining techniques on bull sperm morphometry.

    PubMed

    Banaszewska, Dorota; Andraszek, Katarzyna; Czubaszek, Magdalena; Biesiada-Drzazga, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Sperm morphometry has some value as an indicator of reproductive capacity in males. In laboratory practice a variety of slide-staining methods are used during morphological evaluation of semen to predict male fertility. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of staining of semen using four different techniques on the morphometry of the bull sperm cell. The material for the study consisted of semen collected from test bulls of the Black-and-White variety of Holstein-Friesians. The results obtained in the study indicate differences in the dimensions of bull sperm heads when different slide staining techniques were used. The most similar results for sperm head dimensions were obtained in the case of SpermBlue(®) and eosin+gentian violet complex, although statistically significant differences were found between all the staining techniques. Extreme values were noted for the other staining techniques - lowest for the Papanicolaou and highest for silver nitrate, which may indicate more interference in the cell by the reagents used in the staining process. However, silver nitrate staining was best at identifying the structures of the sperm cell. Hence it is difficult to determine which of the staining methods most faithfully reveals the dimensions and shape of the bull sperm.

  13. Effects of In Vitro Zinc Sulphate Additive to The Semen Extender on Water Buffalo (Bubalusbubalis) Spermatozoa before and after Freezing

    PubMed Central

    Dorostkar, Kamran; Alavi Shoushtari, Sayed Mortaza; Khaki, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of the study was to investigate the effects of in vitro zinc sulphate additive to semen extender on sperm parameters (progressive motility, viability, membrane integrity and DNA stability) after cryopreservation. Materials and Methods In this Prospective longitudinal laboratory study, semen samples of 5 buffalo bulls of 3-5 years old were collected at 5 different occasions from Iran, Urmia during summer and autumn 2011, 25 samples were used in each treatment. Sperm progressive motility, viability and abnormal morphology were measured before and at 0.5 (T0), 1(T1) and 2(T2) hours after diluting semen(1:10 v/v) in Tris-citric acid based extender (without egg yolk and glycerol) at 37˚C containing none (control group), 0.072, 0.144, 0.288, 0.576 and 1.152 mg/L zinc sulphate to investigate dose and time effects. Next, a Tris-citric acid-egg yolk-glycerol extender (20% egg yolk and 7% glycerol) containing the same amount of zinc sulphate was prepared, diluted semen (1:10 v/v) was cooled and kept into a refrigerated chamber (4˚C) for 4 hours to equilibrate. Sperm progressive motility, viability, abnormal morphology, membrane integrity and DNA damage were estimated.The equilibrated semen was loaded in 0.5 ml French straws and frozen in liquid nitrogen. Later, the frozen semen was thawed and the same parameters as well as total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of the frozen-thawed semen were determined. Results The results showed that zinc sulphate additive at the rate of 0.288 mg/L gave a higher protection of sperm progressive motility (53.7 ± 1.8% vs. 40.5 ± 1.7%), viability (70.8 ± 1.8% vs. 60.1 ± 1.5%), membrane integrity (67.3 ± 1.6% vs. 56.6 ± 1.7%), DNA stability (10.1 ± 0.47% vs. 11.8 ± 0.33% damaged DNA) through the process of dilution, equilibration and freeze-thawing and caused a higher TAC level (81 ± 3.3% vs. 63 ± 3.2 µmol/L) after freez-thawing compared to the control group. Adding 0.576 and 1.152 mg/L zinc sulphate, however

  14. Update on sexed semen technology in cattle.

    PubMed

    Seidel, G E

    2014-05-01

    The technology in current use for sexing sperm represents remarkable feats of engineering. These flow cytometer/cell sorters can make over 30 000 consecutive evaluations of individual sperm each second for each nozzle and sort the sperm into three containers: X-sperm, Y-sperm and unsexable plus dead sperm. Even at these speeds it is not economical to package sperm at standard numbers per inseminate. However, with excellent management, pregnancy rates in cattle with 2 million sexed sperm per insemination dose are about 80% of those with conventional semen at normal sperm doses. This lowered fertility, in part due to damage to sperm during sorting, plus the extra cost of sexed semen limits the applications that are economically feasible. Even so, on the order of 2 million doses of bovine semen are sexed annually in the United States. The main application is for dairy heifers to have heifer calves, either for herd expansion or for sale as replacements, often for eventual export. Breeders of purebred cattle often use sexed semen for specific matings; thawing and then sexing frozen semen and immediately using the few resulting sexed sperm for in vitro fertilization is done with increasing frequency. Beef cattle producers are starting to use sexed semen to produce crossbred female replacements. Proprietary improvements in sperm sexing procedures, implemented in 2013, are claimed to improve fertility between 4 and 6 percentage points, or about 10%. PMID:24680061

  15. Frozen Frozen CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    2 October 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a view of frozen carbon dioxide in the south polar residual cap of Mars. Much of the south polar residual cap exhibits terrain that resembles stacks of sliced Swiss cheese, but this portion of the cap lacks the typical, circular depressions that characterize much of the region. Carbon dioxide on Mars freezes at a temperature of around 148 Kelvins, which is -125oC or about -193oF.

    Location near: 87.2oS, 28.4oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  16. Concurrent testing of breeding bulls for bovineherpes virus 1 infection (BHV-1) in India.

    PubMed

    Ravishankar, Chintu; Nandi, Sukdeb; Chander, Vishal; Mohapatra, Tapas Kumar

    2013-01-01

    In this study, sera from 65 breeding and 19 training bulls from Uttar Pradesh State in north India were tested for bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) antibodies by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and virus neutralization test (VNT). The VNT test could detect 56 (86.15%) and 9 (47.37%) of the samples from breeding and training bulls as positive for BHV-1 antibodies whereas in ELISA 63 (96.92%) and 10 (52.63%) were found positive, respectively. Semen samples from the breeding bulls were simultaneously tested by the Taqman based real time PCR (qPCR). Of the 65 samples screened, only 40 (61.54%) were found to contain BHV-1 DNA indicating that all the seropositive bulls are not shedding the virus in semen. When the RT-PCR positive samples were subjected to virus isolation on Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells, no virus isolates could be obtained. The advantages of concomitant testing of serum and semen of breeding bulls and measures for control of BHV-1 infections in bull farms are discussed.

  17. The effects of addition of omega-3, 6, 9 fatty acids on the quality of bovine chilled and frozen-thawed sperm

    PubMed Central

    Kandelousi, M.A. Sheikholeslami; Arshami, J.; Naserian, A.A.; Abavisani, A.

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of omega-3, 6, 9 fatty acids on the characteristics of bovine chilled and frozen-thawed semen. For this purpose, oil containing different levels of omega-3, 6, 9 fatty acids were added to semen extender. To emulsify the oil in semen extender, polyethylene glycol (PEG) was added as a suitable solvent and the solution was finally sonicated. Five proven Holstein bulls were randomly selected and their ejaculates were collected using an artificial vagina. Groups were designed as control, treatments 1, 2, 3 and 4. The control group contained only the basic extender (Tris-citrate buffer, egg yolk and glycerol) without any additives. In treatment 1, only 5% PEG was added to the diluent; while in treatments 2, 3 and 4 different concentrations of omega-3, 6, 9 fatty acids (1.0, 2.5 and 5.0%) in combination with PEG were added to the basic extender. After dilution, the semen samples were packaged into 0.5 ml straws, a process that was followed by cooling the semen straws. Motility, viability and morphology of semen samples were evaluated after 24 and 48 h of storage in refrigerator (5 °C) or after one month of storage in the liquid nitrogen. Immotility was increased and all the other parameters including motility, viability and morphology were significantly decreased in all the groups compared with fresh samples during cold storage and freezing-thawing. Our results demonstrated the following: 1) PEG has significant detrimental effects, especially on the sperm motility; 2) addition of omega-3, 6, 9 fatty acids could not improve the sperm motility in chilled storage condition and after freezing-thawing; and 3) omega-3, 6, 9 fatty acidscould not also attenuate the other deleterious effects of PEG. In conclusion, our findings reveal that addition of these fatty acids to the semen extender does not enhance the resistance of the bovine sperm membrane to cooling and freezing-thawing and that further studies are required to find

  18. The effects of addition of omega-3, 6, 9 fatty acids on the quality of bovine chilled and frozen-thawed sperm.

    PubMed

    Kandelousi, M A Sheikholeslami; Arshami, J; Naserian, A A; Abavisani, A

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of omega-3, 6, 9 fatty acids on the characteristics of bovine chilled and frozen-thawed semen. For this purpose, oil containing different levels of omega-3, 6, 9 fatty acids were added to semen extender. To emulsify the oil in semen extender, polyethylene glycol (PEG) was added as a suitable solvent and the solution was finally sonicated. Five proven Holstein bulls were randomly selected and their ejaculates were collected using an artificial vagina. Groups were designed as control, treatments 1, 2, 3 and 4. The control group contained only the basic extender (Tris-citrate buffer, egg yolk and glycerol) without any additives. In treatment 1, only 5% PEG was added to the diluent; while in treatments 2, 3 and 4 different concentrations of omega-3, 6, 9 fatty acids (1.0, 2.5 and 5.0%) in combination with PEG were added to the basic extender. After dilution, the semen samples were packaged into 0.5 ml straws, a process that was followed by cooling the semen straws. Motility, viability and morphology of semen samples were evaluated after 24 and 48 h of storage in refrigerator (5 °C) or after one month of storage in the liquid nitrogen. Immotility was increased and all the other parameters including motility, viability and morphology were significantly decreased in all the groups compared with fresh samples during cold storage and freezing-thawing. Our results demonstrated the following: 1) PEG has significant detrimental effects, especially on the sperm motility; 2) addition of omega-3, 6, 9 fatty acids could not improve the sperm motility in chilled storage condition and after freezing-thawing; and 3) omega-3, 6, 9 fatty acidscould not also attenuate the other deleterious effects of PEG. In conclusion, our findings reveal that addition of these fatty acids to the semen extender does not enhance the resistance of the bovine sperm membrane to cooling and freezing-thawing and that further studies are required to find

  19. Expected net present value of pure and mixed sexed semen artificial insemination strategies in dairy heifers.

    PubMed

    Olynk, N J; Wolf, C A

    2007-05-01

    Sexed semen has been a long-anticipated tool for dairy farmers to obtain more heifer calves, but challenges exist for integrating sexed semen into commercial dairy farm reproduction programs. The decreased conception rates (CR) experienced with sexed semen make virgin heifers better suited for insemination with sexed semen than lactating dairy cows. This research sought to identify when various sexed semen breeding strategies provided higher expected net present value (NPV) than conventional artificial insemination (AI) breeding schemes, indicating which breeding scheme is advisable under various scenarios. Budgets were developed to calculate the expected NPV of various AI breeding strategies incorporating conventional (non-sexed) and sexed semen. In the base budgets, heifer and bull calf values were held constant at $500 and $110, respectively. The percentage of heifers expected to be born after breeding with conventional and sexed semen used was 49.2 and 90%, respectively. Breeding costs per AI were held constant at $15.00 per AI for conventional semen and $45.00 per AI for sexed semen of approximately the same genetic value. Conventional semen CR of 58 and 65% were used, and an AI submission rate was set at 100%. Breeding strategies with sexed semen were assessed for breakeven heifer calf values and sexed semen costs to obtain a NPV equal to that achieved with conventional semen. Breakeven heifer calf values for pure sexed semen strategies with a constant 58 and 65% base CR in which sexed semen achieved 53% of the base CR are $732.11 and $664.26, respectively. Breakeven sexed semen costs per AI of $17.16 and $22.39, compared with $45.00 per AI, were obtained to obtain a NPV equal to that obtained with pure conventional semen for base CR of 58 and 65%, respectively. The strategy employing purely sexed semen, with base CR of both 58 and 65%, yielded a lower NPV than purely conventional semen in all but the best-case scenario in which sexed semen provides 90% of

  20. Reproduction in nondomestic birds: Physiology, semen collection, artificial insemination and cryopreservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.; Bertschinger, H.; Donoghue, A.M.; Blanco, J.; Soley, J.

    2004-01-01

    Pioneering work by Quinn and Burrows in the late 1930s led to successful artificial insemination (AI) programs in the domestic poultry industry. A variety of species specific modifications to the Quinn and Burrows massage technique made AI possible in nondomestic birds. Massage semen collection and insemination techniques span the entire range of species from sparrows to ostriches. Also, cooperative semen collection and electroejaculation have found limited use in some nondomestic species. Artificial insemination produces good fertility, often exceeding fertility levels in naturally copulating populations. However, aviculturists should explore other ways to improve fertility before resorting to AI. Artificial insemination is labor intensive and may pose risks to nondomestic birds as well as handlers associated with capture and insemination. Semen collection and AI makes semen cryopreservation and germ plasma preservation possible. Yet, semen cryopreservation techniques need improvement before fertility with frozen-thawed semen will equal fertility from AI with fresh semen.

  1. Adapting Bulls to Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adaptation of bulls used for natural breeding purposes to the Gulf Coast region of the United States including all of Florida is an important topic. Nearly 40% of the U.S. cow/calf population resides in the Gulf Coast and Southeast. Thus, as A.I. is relatively rare, the number of bulls used for ...

  2. Effect of dietary energy on growth and reproductive characteristics of Angus and Senepol bulls during summer in Florida.

    PubMed

    Chase, C C; Larsen, R E; Hammond, A C; Randel, R D

    1993-07-01

    Pubertal Angus bulls (n=10, 503 days of age and weighing 366 kg) and Senepol bulls (n=10, 457 days of age and weighing 381 kg) were stratified by age and weight into 2 dietary treatments formulated to provide equal amounts of crude protein and 75% (below) or 150% (above) of the maintenance requirements for metabolizable energy. Measurements to assess body growth and libido were collected at 28-day intervals for 112 days (June through September). Twice during each 28-day interval, the bulls were subjected to breeding soundness examinations. At the end of the experiment, gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) - induced secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone (T) in the serum were determined. At the end of the experiment, bulls fed the above maintenance diet (P<0.0001) were 91 kg heavier, had 1.7 mm more backfat thickness and 12.6 cm(2) larger ribeye area than bulls on a below maintenance diet. Diet affected (P<0.003) the average daily change in scrotal circumference, but not the libido score (P>0.1) or semen quality. In general, Angus bulls had superior initial semen quality (P<0.06); however, during summer, semen quality tended to decrease in Angus but not in Senepol bulls. The final rectal temperature was 0.5 degrees C lower (P<0.003) in Senepol than in Angus bulls. Basal T concentrations and area under the GnRH-induced T curve were greater (P<0.07) for bulls fed the above rather than the below maintenance diet. Angus bulls had a higher (P<0.03) maximal LH response to GnRH and larger area under the GnRH-induced LH curve than Senepol bulls. PMID:16727293

  3. Cytosine methylation of sperm DNA in horse semen after cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Aurich, Christine; Schreiner, Bettina; Ille, Natascha; Alvarenga, Marco; Scarlet, Dragos

    2016-09-15

    Semen processing may contribute to epigenetic changes in spermatozoa. We have therefore addressed changes in sperm DNA cytosine methylation induced by cryopreservation of stallion semen. The relative amount of 5-methylcytosine relative to the genomic cytosine content of sperm DNA was analyzed by ELISA. In experiment 1, raw semen (n = 6 stallions, one ejaculate each) was shock-frozen. Postthaw semen motility and membrane integrity were completely absent, whereas DNA methylation was similar in raw (0.4 ± 0.2%) and shock-frozen (0.3 ± 0.1%) semen (not significant). In experiment 2, three ejaculates per stallion (n = 6) were included. Semen quality and DNA methylation was assessed before addition of the freezing extender and after freezing-thawing with either Ghent (G) or BotuCrio (BC) extender. Semen motility, morphology, and membrane integrity were significantly reduced by cryopreservation but not influenced by the extender (e.g., total motility: G 69.5 ± 2.0, BC 68.4 ± 2.2%; P < 0.001 vs. centrifugation). Cryopreservation significantly (P < 0.01) increased the level of DNA methylation (before freezing 0.6 ± 0.1%, postthaw G 6.4 ± 3.7, BC 4.4 ± 1.5%; P < 0.01), but no differences between the freezing extenders were seen. The level of DNA methylation was not correlated to semen motility, morphology, or membrane integrity. The results demonstrate that semen processing for cryopreservation increases the DNA methylation level in stallion semen. We conclude that assessment of sperm DNA methylation allows for evaluation of an additional parameter characterizing semen quality. The lower fertility rates of mares after insemination with frozen-thawed semen may at least in part be explained by cytosine methylation of sperm-DNA induced by the cryopreservation procedure. PMID:27242182

  4. Effects of tiamulin, neomycin, tetracycline, fluorophenicol, penicillin G, Linco-Spectin, erythromycin and oxytetracycline on controlling bacterial contaminations of the river buffalo (Buballus bubalis) semen.

    PubMed

    Alavi-Shoushtari, S M; Ahmadi, M; Shahvarpour, S; Kolahian, S

    2007-09-15

    In order to investigate the effects of tiamulin, neomycin, tetracycline, fluorophenicol, penicillin G, Linco-Spectin (0.15 mg mL(-1) lincomycin + 0.3 mg mL(-1) spectinomycin), erythromycin and oxytetracycline on controlling bacterial contaminations of the river buffalo semen, 120 mL diluted buffalo bull semen (diluted by tris-egg yolk extender) was divided into 5 mL tubes after initial evaluation and before (control sample) and at 0, 2, 6, 12 and 24 h after adding each of the above antibiotics at the recommended dose (D) and twice the recommended dose (Dx2) to the semen samples, each sample was cultured 4 times on Muller-Hinton agar medium and the results were recorded after 18 h incubation at 37 degrees C. Tiamulin, tetracycline, neomycin and fluorophenicol were ineffective. Oxytetracycline was effective in both D and Dx2 (p < 0.001). Penicillin G in both D and Dx2 was effective (p < 0.001). Linco-Spectin was effective, though not significant, in D at 2 h and in Dx2 at 0 h only. Erythromycin in D was not significantly effective, but, in Dx2 was effective (p < 0.001). Duration of the antibiotic exposure had no significant effect on the antibiotic potentials except for Linco-Spectin at 2 h (p < 0.014). The biochemical tests identified the contaminant bacteria as being a member of Arcanobacter (Corynebacterium) sp. In the next step, the semen sample of the same bull was taken, semen quality tests were carried out and the semen was diluted with the same extender (tris-egg yolk) + 7% glycerol, containing a double dose (Dx2) of these antibiotics and semen quality tests were carried out immediately after dilution, 18 h after storage at 4 degrees C and after the semen was packed in the straws, frozen in liquid nitrogen (-196 degrees C) and later thawed in 37 degrees C water bath to investigate whether these antibiotics have any adverse effect on the spermatozoa during the process of freezing and thawing. The comparison of the results with those of the control group (the

  5. Post mortem studies on infertile buffalo bulls: anatomical and microbiological findings.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, M; Latif, M; Ahmad, M; Khan, I H; Ahmad, N; Anzar, M

    1985-08-01

    Twenty-two buffalo bulls suffering from three different types of infertility were slaughtered and used for this study. Except for the reproductive system, no signs of localised or generalised disease were observed. Microbiological investigations were negative for brucellosis, vibriosis, mycoplasma and other non-specific microorganisms. Nine bulls with type 1 infertility had low bodyweights and underdevelopment of testes, accessory sex glands and endocrine glands. This picture suggests a total dysfunction of the pituitary-growth-gonadal axis. One bull of this type also showed bilateral epididymitis. Four out of 11 bulls with type 2 infertility had low bodyweights and most suffered from underdevelopment of testes, accessory sex glands and endocrine glands. Six bulls of this type had lesions of either epididymitis or orchitis or both. Two of these animals showed adhesions of periorchitis. One also showed seminal vesiculitis. In two bulls with type 3 infertility, bodyweights, reproductive organs and endocrine glands were normal. In later life, they yielded poor quality semen. Semen samples collected a few months before slaughter from nine bulls with type 2 and type 3 infertility were of poor quality and had higher percentages of abnormal spermatozoa in most cases. PMID:4049694

  6. Laboratory diagnosis and transmissibility of bovine viral diarrhea virus from a bull with a persistent testicular infection.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Benjamin W; Toohey-Kurth, Kathy; Zhang, Yan; Brodersen, Bruce W; Marley, M Shonda; Joiner, Kellye S; Zhang, Yijing; Galik, Patricia K; Riddell, Kay P; Givens, M Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Recently, in the United States, a dairy bull was diagnosed as the second confirmed case of persistent testicular infection (PTI) with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). The first objective of this study was to evaluate the testing methodologies currently used by the artificial insemination industry in order to improve the detection of bulls with PTI. This study evaluated the impact of multiple factors ([1] sample tested, [2] sample handling, [3] assay used, and [4] assay methodology) on the sensitivity of detection of BVDV. The second objective of this study was to evaluate the transmissibility of BVDV from the bull through casual or sexual contact. Results from this study indicate that straws of semen should be transported to the diagnostic laboratory in liquid nitrogen dry shippers. PCR proved to be a more sensitive assay than virus isolation; however, certain PCR protocols exhibited greater diagnostic sensitivity than others. Insemination with cryopreserved semen from this infected bull caused viral transmission to a seronegative heifer resulting in viremia and seroconversion. After 42 months of age, the bull appeared to clear the infection. In conclusion, this bull validates that natural exposure to a 1a strain of BVDV can result in a unique PTI causing contamination of semen with detectable infectious virus. Appropriate handling and testing of samples is necessary in order to detect bulls exhibiting PTI. Additionally, PTI with BVDV may potentially be cleared after an extended duration.

  7. Transmission of sexually transmitted diseases by donor semen.

    PubMed

    Shanis, B S; Check, J H; Baker, A F

    1989-01-01

    Therapeutic insemination by donor (TID) is being used with increasing frequency. Because many diseases, some of which are lethal, can be transmitted through semen, the American Fertility Society established guidelines for use of donor sperm. They limit TID to cases of male infertility or hereditary/genetic disorders. Donor selection requires good health and absence of genetic abnormalities; criteria for semen including normal sperm motility, concentration, and normal morphology, and blood screening for infectious agents. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing should be performed initially in donors for fresh semen inseminations. If positive, the assay is verified with a Western blot test; if negative, the donor should be screened at 6-month intervals. Frozen samples should not be used until the 180 day reevaluation of the donor. Many studies show higher pregnancy rates using fresh rather than frozen semen samples for insemination. New methods of cryopreservation minimize the deleterious effects of freezing. If these effects, namely decreased sperm motility and impaired penetration ability, are eliminated, pregnancy rates can be expected to rise. Frozen semen is preferable because it allows time for sexually transmitted diseases to manifest themselves and for specimens from those donors to be rejected prior to use. PMID:2619413

  8. Breed and other effects on reproductive traits and breeding soundness categorization in young beef bulls in Florida.

    PubMed

    Chenoweth, P J; Chase, C C; Thatcher, M J; Wilcox, C J; Larsen, R E

    1996-11-01

    Yearling, grass-fed, beef bulls at the USDA Subtropical Agricultural Research Station, Brooksville, Florida, were assessed for physical and semen traits in January, April, July and October of 1991 (Trial 1) and 1992 (Trial 2). Bulls were given a breeding soundness evaluation (BSE) using revised semen and scrotal circumference (SC) criteria. In Trial 1, the bulls consisted of Angus (n = 15), Brahman (n = 14), Hereford (n = 15) and Senepol (n = 14). In Trial 2, the breeds were Angus (n = 15), Brahman (n = 16), Romosinuano (n = 13) and Nellore x Brahman (n = 9). Trial bulls generally showed delayed growth compared with grain-fed bulls in temperate environments. Breed influenced semen traits (percentage sperm motility, normal spermatozoa and those with primary abnormalities) in both trials. Temperate Bos taurus breeds (Angus, Hereford) were generally superior to Bos indicus breeds (Brahman, Nellore x Brahman). Tropically-adapted Bos taurus breeds (Senepol, Romosinuano) were intermediate for those traits tested. In general, tropically-adapted Bos taurus breeds were more similar in reproductive development to temperate Bos taurus than to Bos indicus breeds. Breed by test period interactions occurred and were mainly influenced by delayed sexual maturity of Bos indicus bulls. Qualitative semen traits increased with bull age, particularly from 12 to 18 mo. Scrotal circumference development was slower in the Bos indicus breeds. Bulls of satisfactory BSE status at 18.1 to 22 mo of age were 73.9% in Trial 1 and 58.5% in Trial 2. Brahman bulls had the least satisfactory BSE scores in both years (Trial 1, 44.4%; Trial 2, 22.2%). Most bulls failed to achieve satisfactory BSE status due to a small SC relative to age (Trial 1, 66%; Trial 2, 72%). The most efficacious use of the BSE was > or = 15 mo in Bos taurus bulls and > 18 mo for Bos indicus bulls. Although the BSE has proven to be useful for the assessment of young, pasture-raised bulls in semi-tropical environments, use of SC

  9. A successful new approach to honeybee semen cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Jakob; May, Tanja; Kamp, Günter; Bienefeld, Kaspar

    2014-10-01

    Honeybee biodiversity is under massive threat, and improved methods for gamete cryopreservation could be a precious tool for both the in situ- and ex situ-conservation of subspecies and ecotypes. Recent cryoprotocols for drone semen have improved the viability and fertility of frozen-thawed semen by using increased diluent:semen-ratios, but there is still much room for progress. As semen cryopreserved after dilution often appeared hyperactive, we speculated that the disruption of sperm-sperm interactions during dilution and cryopreservation could reduce the fertile lifespan of the cells. We therefore developed protocols to reduce admixture, or abolish it altogether by dialyzing semen against a hypertonic solution of cryoprotectant. Additionally, we tested methods to reduce the cryoprotectant concentration after thawing. Insemination of queens with semen cryopreserved after dialysis yielded 49%, 59% and 79% female (= stemming from fertilized eggs) pupae in three separate experiments, and the numbers of sperm found in the spermathecae of the queens were significantly higher than those previously reported. Post-thaw dilution and reconcentration of semen for cryoprotectant removal reduced fertility, but sizeable proportions of female brood were still produced. Workers stemming from cryopreserved semen did not differ from bees stemming from untreated semen with regard to indicators of fluctuating asymmetry, but were slightly heavier. Cryopreservation after dialysis tended to increase the proportion of cells with DNA-nicks, as measured by the TUNEL-assay, but this increase appears small when compared to the baseline variations of this indicator. Overall, we conclude that cryoprotectant-addition through dialysis can improve the quality of cryopreserved drone semen. Testing of offspring for vitality and genetic integrity should continue.

  10. A successful new approach to honeybee semen cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Jakob; May, Tanja; Kamp, Günter; Bienefeld, Kaspar

    2014-10-01

    Honeybee biodiversity is under massive threat, and improved methods for gamete cryopreservation could be a precious tool for both the in situ- and ex situ-conservation of subspecies and ecotypes. Recent cryoprotocols for drone semen have improved the viability and fertility of frozen-thawed semen by using increased diluent:semen-ratios, but there is still much room for progress. As semen cryopreserved after dilution often appeared hyperactive, we speculated that the disruption of sperm-sperm interactions during dilution and cryopreservation could reduce the fertile lifespan of the cells. We therefore developed protocols to reduce admixture, or abolish it altogether by dialyzing semen against a hypertonic solution of cryoprotectant. Additionally, we tested methods to reduce the cryoprotectant concentration after thawing. Insemination of queens with semen cryopreserved after dialysis yielded 49%, 59% and 79% female (= stemming from fertilized eggs) pupae in three separate experiments, and the numbers of sperm found in the spermathecae of the queens were significantly higher than those previously reported. Post-thaw dilution and reconcentration of semen for cryoprotectant removal reduced fertility, but sizeable proportions of female brood were still produced. Workers stemming from cryopreserved semen did not differ from bees stemming from untreated semen with regard to indicators of fluctuating asymmetry, but were slightly heavier. Cryopreservation after dialysis tended to increase the proportion of cells with DNA-nicks, as measured by the TUNEL-assay, but this increase appears small when compared to the baseline variations of this indicator. Overall, we conclude that cryoprotectant-addition through dialysis can improve the quality of cryopreserved drone semen. Testing of offspring for vitality and genetic integrity should continue. PMID:25088062

  11. Red Bull Stratos Presentation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Red Bull Stratos High Performance Director Andy Walshe & Technical Project Director Art Thompson share the Stratos story with JSC. Supported by a team of experts, Felix Baumgartner reached 128,100 ...

  12. Fertility prediction of frozen boar sperm using novel and conventional analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Frozen-thawed boar sperm is seldom used for artificial insemination (AI) because fertility is lower than fresh or cooled semen. Despite the many advantages of AI including reduced pathogen exposure and ease of semen transport, cryo-induced damage to sperm usually results in decreased litter sizes a...

  13. The efficiency of cryopreserved semen versus fresh semen for in vitro fertilization/embryo transfer.

    PubMed

    Yavetz, H; Lessing, J B; Niv, Y; Amit, A; Barak, Y; Yovel, I; David, M P; Peyser, M R; Yogev, L; Homonnai, Z

    1991-06-01

    The efficiency of cryopreserved donor semen versus fresh donor semen in an in vitro fertilization/embryo transfer programme was evaluated. Thirty-nine in vitro fertilization/embryo transfer cycles were performed using fresh donor semen (group A) and 74 cycles were carried out using cryopreserved semen (group B). All patients underwent a uniform controlled ovarian hyperstimulation using high doses of human menopausal gonadotropins. Oocytes were retrieved transvaginally under ultrasound imaging. Semen (fresh or frozen-thawed) were prepared for insemination by a washing technique. Each ovum was inseminated with 500,000-600,000 motile spermatozoa. No significant difference was noted between the two groups regarding female age, duration of infertility, and number of ova retrieved per aspiration. Even though the fertilization rate in group B was significantly lower than in group A (55.5 +/- 3.8 vs 70.4 +/- 3.5, P = 0.008), pregnancy rates per embryo transfer were similar--39.3 and 38.5%, respectively.

  14. Artificial insemination and cryopreservation of semen from nondomestic birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.; Bakst, M.R.; Wishart, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    Studies of Al and cryopreservation of semen from nondomestic birds began because of the increased emphasis on conservation of avian species threatened with extinction. Over the years, aviculturists have developed techniques for Al and cryopreservation of semen obtained from a variety of birds ranging from passerines to Andean condors. Generally, for each new species, we develop a practical semen collection technique and then evaluate the semen. A commercial semen extender (Beltsville Poultry Semen Extender) is modified and used to dilute the semen and provide support for the sperm during the freezing process (the pH and osmolality of the extender is adjusted to reflect the pH and osmolality of the semen being frozen). We find that the freezing schedule developed by Sexton (1977), which utilizes dimethylsulfoxide (DMS0) as cryoprotectant, works well for many species. We cool the sample sequentially in an ethanol bath, in liquid nitrogen vapor, and lastly in liquid nitrogen. Although we have experimented with a variety of freezing protocols, we prefer a 15-min equilibration period in DMSO at 5 C. We begin the freezing process by cooling at -1 C/min from 5 to -20 C in the ethanol bath. The samples are transferred into a vapor tank at a location just above liquid nitrogen and frozen at -50 C/min to -80 C. To complete the freezing process, the samples are plunged into the liquid nitrogen in the bottom of the vapor tank. The samples remain in liquid nitrogen until they are thawed just before insemination. If necessary, the freezing equipment can be transported in a van to remote locations.

  15. The utility of nanowater for ram semen cryopreservation

    PubMed Central

    Murawski, Maciej; Schwarz, Tomasz; Patkowski, Krzysztof; Oszczęda, Zdzisław; Jelkin, Igor; Kosiek, Anna; Gruszecki, Tomasz M; Szymanowska, Anna; Skrzypek, Tomasz; Zieba, Dorota A; Bartlewski, Pawel M

    2015-01-01

    Nanowater (NW; water declusterized in the low-temperature plasma reactor) has specific physicochemical properties that could increase semen viability after freezing and hence fertility after artificial insemination (AI) procedures. The main goal of this study was to evaluate ram semen quality after freezing in the media containing NW. Ejaculates from 10 rams were divided into two equal parts, diluted in a commercially available semen extender (Triladyl®; MiniTüb GmbH, Tiefenbach, Germany) prepared with deionized water (DW) or NW, and then frozen in liquid nitrogen. Semen samples were examined for sperm motility and morphology using the sperm class analyzer system and light microscopy. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) was employed to determine the size of extracellular water crystals in frozen semen samples. Survival time at room temperature, aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) concentrations post-thawing as well as conception/lambing rates after laparoscopic intrauterine AI of 120 ewes were also determined. There were no significant differences between DW and NW groups in sperm progressive motility (26.4 ± 12.2 and 30.8 ± 12.4%) or survival time (266.6 ± 61.3 and 270.9 ± 76.7 min) after thawing and no differences in the percentages of spermatozoa with various morphological defects before or after freezing. There were, however, differences (P < 0.05) in AspAT (DW: 187.1 ± 160.4 vs. NW: 152.7 ± 118.3 U/l) and ALP concentrations (DW: 2198.3 ± 1810.5 vs. NW: 1612.1 ± 1144.8 U/l) in semen samples post-thawing. Extracellular water crystals were larger (P < 0.05) in ejaculates frozen in NW-containing media. Ultrasonographic examinations on day 40 post-AI revealed higher (P < 0.05) conception rates in ewes inseminated with NW (78.3%) compared with DW semen (58.3%), and the percentages of ewes that carried lambs to term were 73.3% and 45.0% in NW and DW groups, respectively (P

  16. The utility of nanowater for ram semen cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Murawski, Maciej; Schwarz, Tomasz; Grygier, Joanna; Patkowski, Krzysztof; Oszczęda, Zdzisław; Jelkin, Igor; Kosiek, Anna; Gruszecki, Tomasz M; Szymanowska, Anna; Skrzypek, Tomasz; Zieba, Dorota A; Bartlewski, Pawel M

    2015-05-01

    Nanowater (NW; water declusterized in the low-temperature plasma reactor) has specific physicochemical properties that could increase semen viability after freezing and hence fertility after artificial insemination (AI) procedures. The main goal of this study was to evaluate ram semen quality after freezing in the media containing NW. Ejaculates from 10 rams were divided into two equal parts, diluted in a commercially available semen extender (Triladyl®; MiniTüb GmbH, Tiefenbach, Germany) prepared with deionized water (DW) or NW, and then frozen in liquid nitrogen. Semen samples were examined for sperm motility and morphology using the sperm class analyzer system and light microscopy. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) was employed to determine the size of extracellular water crystals in frozen semen samples. Survival time at room temperature, aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) concentrations post-thawing as well as conception/lambing rates after laparoscopic intrauterine AI of 120 ewes were also determined. There were no significant differences between DW and NW groups in sperm progressive motility (26.4 ± 12.2 and 30.8 ± 12.4%) or survival time (266.6 ± 61.3 and 270.9 ± 76.7 min) after thawing and no differences in the percentages of spermatozoa with various morphological defects before or after freezing. There were, however, differences (P < 0.05) in AspAT (DW: 187.1 ± 160.4 vs. NW: 152.7 ± 118.3 U/l) and ALP concentrations (DW: 2198.3 ± 1810.5 vs. NW: 1612.1 ± 1144.8 U/l) in semen samples post-thawing. Extracellular water crystals were larger (P < 0.05) in ejaculates frozen in NW-containing media. Ultrasonographic examinations on day 40 post-AI revealed higher (P < 0.05) conception rates in ewes inseminated with NW (78.3%) compared with DW semen (58.3%), and the percentages of ewes that carried lambs to term were 73.3% and 45.0% in NW and DW groups, respectively (P < 0.01). In summary, the use of a semen

  17. Isolation, culture and characterisation of somatic cells derived from semen and milk of endangered sheep and eland antelope.

    PubMed

    Nel-Themaat, L; Gómez, M C; Damiani, P; Wirtu, G; Dresser, B L; Bondioli, K R; Lyons, L A; Pope, C E; Godke, R A

    2007-01-01

    Semen and milk are potential sources of somatic cells for genome banks. In the present study, we cultured and characterised cells from: (1) cooled sheep milk; (2) fresh, cooled and frozen-thawed semen from Gulf Coast native (GCN) sheep (Ovis aries); and (3) fresh eland (Taurotragus oryx) semen. Cells attached to the culture surface from fresh (29%), cooled (43%) and slow-frozen (1 degrees C/min; 14%) ram semen, whereas no attachment occurred in the fast-frozen (10 degrees C/min) group. Proliferation occurred in fresh (50%) and cooled (100%) groups, but no cells proliferated after passage 1 (P1). Eland semen yielded cell lines (100%) that were cryopreserved at P1. In samples from GCN and cross-bred milk, cell attachment (83% and 95%, respectively) and proliferation (60% and 37%, respectively) were observed. Immunocytochemical detection of cytokeratin indicated an epithelial origin of semen-derived cells, whereas milk yielded either fibroblasts, epithelial or a mixture of cell types. Deoxyribonucleic acid microsatellite analysis using cattle-derived markers confirmed that eland cells were from the semen donor. Eland epithelial cells were transferred into eland oocytes and 12 (71%), six (35%) and two (12%) embryos cleaved and developed to morulae or blastocyst stages, respectively. In conclusion, we have developed a technique for obtaining somatic cells from semen. We have also demonstrated that semen-derived cells can serve as karyoplast donors for nuclear transfer. PMID:17524303

  18. Use of combinations of in vitro quality assessments to predict fertility of bovine semen.

    PubMed

    Sellem, E; Broekhuijse, M L W J; Chevrier, L; Camugli, S; Schmitt, E; Schibler, L; Koenen, E P C

    2015-12-01

    Predicting in vivo fertility of bull ejaculates using in vitro-assessed semen quality criteria remains challenging for the breeding industry. New technologies such as computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) and flow cytometry may provide accurate and objective methods to improve semen quality control. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between semen quality parameters and field fertility of bull ejaculates. A total of 153 ejaculates from 19 Holstein bulls have been analyzed using CASA (postthawing semen motility and morphology) and several flow cytometric tests, including sperm DNA integrity, viability (estimated by membrane integrity), acrosomal integrity, mitochondria aerobic functionality and oxidation. Samples were analyzed both immediately after thawing and after 4 hours at 37 °C. A fertility value (FV), based on nonreturn rate at 56 days after insemination and adjusted for environment factors, was calculated for each ejaculate. Simple and multiple regressions have been used to correlate FV with CASA and flow cytometric parameters. Significant simple correlations have been observed between some parameters and FV (e.g., straight line velocity [μm/s], r(2) = -0.12; polarized mitochondria sperm (%), r(2) = 0.07), but the relation between simple parameter and FV was too week to predict the fertility. Partial least square procedure identified several mathematical models combining flow cytometer and CASA variables and had better correlations with FV (adjusted r(2) ranging between 0.24 and 0.40 [P < 0.0001], depending on the number of included variables). In conclusion, this study suggests that quality assessment of thawed bull sperm using CASA and flow cytometry may provide a reasonable prediction of bovine semen fertility. Additional work will be required to increase the prediction reliability and promote this technology in routine artificial insemination laboratory practice.

  19. Effective freezing rate for semen cryopreservation in endangered Mediterranean brown trout (Salmo trutta macrostigma) inhabiting the Biferno river (South Italy).

    PubMed

    Iaffaldano, Nicolaia; Di Iorio, Michele; Manchisi, Angelo; Esposito, Stefano; Gibertoni, Pier Paolo

    2016-10-01

    This study was designed to determine: (i) the in vitro effects of different freezing rates on post-thaw semen quality of Mediterranean brown trout (Salmo trutta macrostigma) from the Biferno river; and (ii) the in vivo fertilization and hatching percentage of freezing rate giving rise to the best post-thaw semen quality. Pooled semen samples were diluted 1:3 (v:v) in a freezing extender composed of 300 mM glucose, 10% egg yolk and 10% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The extended semen was packaged in 0.25 ml plastic straws and frozen at different heights above the liquid nitrogen surface (1, 5 or 10 cm) for 10 min to give three different freezing rates. Semen samples were thawed at 30°C for 10 s. The variables assessed after thawing were sperm motility, duration of motility and viability. Our results clearly indicate a significant effect of freezing rate on post-thaw semen quality. Semen frozen 5 cm above the liquid nitrogen surface showed the best quality after freezing/thawing. Based on these in vitro data, 2 groups of 200 eggs were fertilized with fresh semen or semen frozen 5 cm above the liquid nitrogen surface. Fertilization and hatching rates recorded for eggs fertilized with frozen semen were significantly lower (25.4% and 22.5%, respectively) than the ones obtained using fresh semen (87.8% and 75.5%, respectively). An effective freezing protocol will allow for the creation of a sperm cryobank to recover the original population of Mediterranean brown trout in the Biferno river.

  20. Cryopreservation of boar semen and its future importance to the industry.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Janice L; Lessard, Christian; Jacques, Joannie; Brèque, Christelle; Dobrinski, Ina; Zeng, Wenxian; Galantino-Homer, Hannah L

    2008-11-01

    Whereas AI has arguably been the most important management tool leading to improved herd productivity, long-term storage of semen brings forth additional advantages to producers of agriculturally important animals and the AI industry. Semen cryopreservation greatly facilitates the distribution of agriculturally desirable genes, rapidly increasing herd productivity. Of particular importance to the pig industry, the use of frozen semen would help to control transmission of certain pathogens, thereby protecting the health status of the herd. Moreover, a reserve of cryopreserved semen would minimize the effects of a sudden outbreak of a contagious illness or a natural disaster. Successful cryopreservation of boar semen is necessary for international sales. Finally, effective gene banking depends on the availability of functional, cryopreserved germplasm. Despite these potential advantages of long-term semen storage, porcine sperm are notoriously sensitive to cold temperatures, and frozen-thawed semen is not routinely used by the industry. The objective of our laboratories is to develop protocols for efficient long-term storage of porcine semen using cryopreservation. We hypothesize that since the sperm plasma membrane is the primary site of cold-induced damage, reinforcing the membranes with molecules having particular properties, such as cholesterol, will improve the ability of boar sperm to withstand cold temperatures and cryopreservation protocols. Based on our data, such approaches should help alleviate the problems with sperm function after cooling, thereby resulting in better survival and motility characteristics, and reduced non-regulated capacitation and spontaneous acrosome reactions. PMID:18653225

  1. Enhanced early-life nutrition promotes hormone production and reproductive development in Holstein bulls.

    PubMed

    Dance, Alysha; Thundathil, Jacob; Wilde, Randy; Blondin, Patrick; Kastelic, John

    2015-02-01

    Holstein bull calves often reach artificial insemination centers in suboptimal body condition. Early-life nutrition is reported to increase reproductive performance in beef bulls. The objective was to determine whether early-life nutrition in Holstein bulls had effects similar to those reported in beef bulls. Twenty-six Holstein bull calves were randomly allocated into 3 groups at approximately 1 wk of age to receive a low-, medium-, or high-nutrition diet, based on levels of energy and protein, from 2 to 31 wk of age. Calves were on their respective diets until 31 wk of age, after which they were all fed a medium-nutrition diet. To evaluate secretion profiles and concentrations of blood hormones, a subset of bulls was subjected to intensive blood sampling every 4 wk from 11 to 31 wk of age. Testes of all bulls were measured once a month; once scrotal circumference reached 26cm, semen collection was attempted (by electroejaculation) every 2 wk to confirm puberty. Bulls were maintained until approximately 72 wk of age and then slaughtered at a local abattoir. Testes were recovered and weighed. Bulls fed the high-nutrition diet were younger at puberty (high=324.3 d, low=369.3 d) and had larger testes for the entire experimental period than bulls fed the low-nutrition diet. Bulls fed the high-nutrition diet also had an earlier and more substantial early rise in LH than those fed the low-nutrition diet and had increased concentrations of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) earlier than the bulls fed the low-nutrition diet. Furthermore, we detected a temporal association between increased IGF-I concentrations and an early LH rise in bulls fed the high-nutrition diet. Therefore, we inferred that IGF-I had a role in regulating the early gonadotropin rise (in particular, LH) and thus reproductive development of Holstein bulls. Overall, these results support our hypothesis that Holstein bull calves fed a high-nutrition diet reach puberty earlier and have larger testes than

  2. Factors affecting economics of using sexed semen in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    McCullock, Katelyn; Hoag, Dana L K; Parsons, Jay; Lacy, Michael; Seidel, George E; Wailes, William

    2013-10-01

    The use of sexed semen in the dairy industry has grown rapidly. However, high costs and low fertility have limited the use of this potentially valuable tool. This study used simulation to evaluate 160,000 combinations of key variables in 3 spheres of influence related to profit feasibility: (1) market (e.g., milk and calf prices), (2) dairy farm management (e.g., conception rates), and (3) technology (e.g., accuracy of sexing). These influential variables were used to determine the most favorable circumstances in which managers or technicians can effect change. Three distinct scenarios were created to model 3 initiatives that a producer might take with sexed semen: (1) using sexed semen on heifers, (2) using sexed semen on heifers and a fraction of the genetically superior cows, and (3) using sexed semen on heifers and a fraction of the genetically superior cows, and breeding all other cows with beef semen. Due to the large number of management, market, and technology combinations, a response surface and interpretive graphs were created to map the scope of influence for the key variables. Technology variables such as the added cost of sexed semen had relatively little effect on profitability, defined as net present value gain per cow, whereas management variables such as conception rate had a significant effect. Milk price had relatively little effect within each scenario, but was important across scenarios. Profitability was very sensitive to the price of dairy heifer calves, relative to beef and dairy bull calves. Scenarios 1 and 2 added about $50 to $75 per cow in net present value, which ranged from $0 to $200 and from $100 to $300, respectively. Scenario 3 usually was not profitable, primarily because fewer excess dairy replacement heifers were available for sale. Dairy heifer price proved to be the most influential variable, regardless of scenario.

  3. Ways to improve the biosecurity of bovine semen.

    PubMed

    de Ruigh, L; Bosch, J C; Brus, M C; Landman, B; Merton, J S

    2006-08-01

    Semen production and trade is a worldwide industry. A framework, based on international standards is awaiting international and national regulation. In the perspective of biosecurity of the final product, critical notes can be made according to the semen production regulation and product safety. Process description brings the obligatory health standards for the production bulls, collection and processing of semen, identification, registration, worldwide distribution and insemination into discussion. Test frequency, test quality and demands, way of sampling and test consistency can influence product safety. New scientific knowledge can influence the value of the regulation. Whether a country is free of notifiable disease should influence decisions regarding necessary tests for the production bulls. The biosecurity of the semen production process is influenced by several factors. The effectiveness of the antibiotics used is questionable. The extenders for cryopreservation added to the semen can affect product safety. The way materials and storage containers have to be disinfected must be clear. In modern industry, tracking and tracing is an important issue. Worldwide differences in ways of identification of straws do not benefit a proper identification and registration throughout the process. Regulation could help improve the transparency of production and trade. Before anything concerning biohazard is implemented in regulation, each rule should be thoroughly based on scientific research where possible and furthermore it must be possible to enforce the regulation. The effort it takes to enforce the regulation should be in balance with the benefit it provides. An approach to alter regulation quickly is advisable. To produce a safe product that is accepted for international trade is of vital interest for the survival of artificial insemination (AI) in cattle. PMID:16869880

  4. Application and commercialization of flow cytometrically sex-sorted semen.

    PubMed

    Rath, D; Johnson, L A

    2008-07-01

    The current technology to sort X and Y chromosome bearing sperm population requires individual identification and selection of spermatozoa in a modified high-speed flow cytometer. For farm animal species, the technology is capable of producing sexed sperm at greater than 90% purity. However, only in the bovine, the technology has reached a developmental level that allows its commercial application. Meanwhile, the demand for female calves has grown rapidly, which encourages the demand for sex-sorted semen from high genetic value bulls. The success of the technology will depend mainly on the fertilizing capacity of the sorted spermatozoa, as this is the most affecting and economically relevant factor. To date, fertility is still variable and is quite dependent on post-sort processing. New processing techniques are under investigation and will likely be able to improve the fertility rates after AI with sex-sorted semen. It is of great importance to select the right bulls and to test the sorted samples on a routine basis. In addition to the demand for sex-sorted semen by the cattle industry, there is also a significant demand expressed by pig farmers. However, it is still unknown if the use of sex-sorted semen through commercial pig AI will be economically feasible. For the pig, the combination of in vitro fertilization with sexed semen and non-surgical embryo transfer is an alternative that merits further scientific attention. Recent developments in ovine AI and ET will make it very likely that commercial sheep industry will adopt the sexing technology in their breeding concepts. PMID:18638144

  5. Bull influences on conception percentage and calving date in Angus Hereford, Brahman and Senepol single-sire herds.

    PubMed

    Larsen, R E; Littell, R; Rooks, E; Adams, E L; Falcon, C; Warnick, A C

    1990-09-01

    Bull breeding soundness parameters, semen characteristics and sexual behavior were evaluated for effects on reproductive performance in single-sire beef herds. A total of 155 cow herds (Angus, 50 herds; Hereford, 40 herds; Brahman, 46 herds; and Senepol, 19 herds) bred to bulls of the same breed were observed for 8 yr. All bulls produced adequate quality semen and had scrotal circumference (SC)>or=30 cm. Reproductive performance was evaluated by the conception rate (CON), conception rate during the first 21 d of the breeding season (21dCON), mean calving date (MCD), and mean calving date of the first half of the herd to calve (HHCD). Correlations were determined between breeding soundness parameters and reproductive performance for all bulls combined, by breed, and by age. The Cp statistic was used to select models for the effects of parameters on CON, 21dCON, MCD and HHCD. Breeding season length and breed had significant effects. The percentages of normal cells, proximal droplets, detached heads and the semen score (motility plus percentage of normal cells) had a significant effect on CON when all bulls were considered. After the effect of season was deleted, the most significant parameter affecting CON in the Brahman was the percentage of detached sperm heads. In the Angus, motility was significantly correlated with all reproductive performance indices. In the Hereford, breeding soundness examination score (BSE) was positively correlated with 21dCON. PMID:16726860

  6. Testing usability of butylated hydroxytoluene in conservation of goat semen.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, T A A; Lymberopoulos, A G; El-Saidy, B E

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) could be used as a suitable supporter or alternative of egg yolk during preservation of goat spermatozoa. Three in vitro experiments and a fertility test were conducted to evaluate the effect of BHT on viability of chilled-stored semen as well as motility and kidding rate of frozen-thawed spermatozoa. In the first two experiments, ejaculates (n = 30/experiment) were collected from 10 bucks, split, diluted with egg yolk-based and egg yolk-free extenders supplemented with or without 0.3, 0.6, 2, 5 and 8 mM BHT and stored at 5 degrees C for 168 h. In the third experiment, 30 ejaculates were collected from the above-mentioned bucks, split and diluted with egg yolk-free extenders supplemented with or without 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 mM BHT and egg yolk-based extenders supplemented with or without 5 mM BHT. Diluted semen was cooled to 5 degrees C over a period of 4 h, frozen and thawed in the form of 0.3-ml pellets. In the fertility test, 75 ejaculates were collected from two proven fertile bucks, split, diluted with egg yolk-free extenders containing 0.6 mm BHT and egg yolk-based extenders supplemented with or without 5 mM BHT, frozen and thawed as described above. An insemination volume of 0.6 ml containing 120-140 x 10(6) progressively motile spermatozoa was used for a single cervical insemination of cloprostenol-synchronized does (n = 230). The results showed that addition of 5 mM BHT to egg yolk-deficient (2.5%) extenders significantly improved viability of chilled-stored semen together with motility (48.5%) and fertility (62.5%) of frozen-thawed spermatozoa. Replacement of egg yolk in semen extenders by 0.6 mm BHT could sustain not only viability of chilled-stored semen but also post-thaw motility (47.5%) and fertility (53.75%) of frozen-thawed spermatozoa. In conclusion, supplementation of semen diluents with BHT can ameliorate preservability of goat sperm.

  7. Freezing dog semen in presence of the antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene improves postthaw sperm membrane integrity.

    PubMed

    Neagu, V R; García, B Macías; Sandoval, C Salazar; Rodríguez, A Morillo; Ferrusola, C Ortega; Fernández, L González; Tapia, J A; Peña, F J

    2010-03-15

    In an attempt to evaluate the protective effect of a lipid-soluble antioxidant (butylated hydroxytoluene; BHT), semen from four dogs (Canis familiaris) was frozen in two different extenders (Uppsala or INRA-96 plus glycerol) with or without 1mM BHT. Sperm membrane integrity using flow cytometry and motility using a computerized system were evaluated in each experimental group. The Uppsala extender was superior in all aspects of sperm function. The percentage of sperm membranes was significantly higher in semen samples frozen in presence of BHT. Our results suggest that the Uppsala extender can be improved with the addition of BHT.

  8. BILL E. KUNKLE INTERDISCIPLINARY BEEF SYMPOSIUM: Does tall fescue toxicosis negatively impact bull growth and breeding potential?

    PubMed

    Pratt, S L; Andrae, J G

    2015-12-01

    The predominant cool-season forage in the southeastern United States is the tall fescue cultivar Kentucky 31 (KY31). Kentucky 31 possesses an endophyte (), which produces a family of toxins called ergot alkaloids. These toxins negatively affect the physiology of animals on consumption and result in the syndrome known as fescue toxicosis. Currently, the United States annually produces approximately 11.4 billion kg of beef, of which 25% originates in the southeastern region of the United States where forage systems frequently are tall fescue based. Cattle within this forage system exhibit reduced gains and reproductive performance. The result is a reduction in the nation's beef supply with annual revenue losses recently estimated at approximately US$1 billion. Our hypothesis is that exposure to these ergot alkaloids in conjunction with limited availability of nutrients decreases bull semen quality and fertility. Although the literature is clear that these toxins affect BW, body temperature, blood flow, hair growth, and female reproduction in cattle, their effect on bull reproduction and the mechanisms through which the toxins act are not well defined. Six studies published from 2004 to 2015 assessed bull growth, body composition, and semen quality of young beef bulls exposed to ergot alkaloids. If semen quality or fertility is altered, the mechanisms involved may be either direct effects of ergot alkaloids through neurotransmitter receptors or indirect effects such as inhibiting the release of prolactin (PRL). The possible effects of ergot alkaloids or PRL require establishing the presence or absence of dopamine, adrenergic, serotonin, or PRL receptors in the testis, epididymis, and sperm cell of the bull. The objective of this review is to relate our findings to the few previous studies conducted that evaluated the impact of fescue toxicosis on bull reproduction and to propose possible mechanisms of action for lowered semen quality. PMID:26641162

  9. Prediction of bull fertility.

    PubMed

    Utt, Matthew D

    2016-06-01

    Prediction of male fertility is an often sought-after endeavor for many species of domestic animals. This review will primarily focus on providing some examples of dependent and independent variables to stimulate thought about the approach and methodology of identifying the most appropriate of those variables to predict bull (bovine) fertility. Although the list of variables will continue to grow with advancements in science, the principles behind making predictions will likely not change significantly. The basic principle of prediction requires identifying a dependent variable that is an estimate of fertility and an independent variable or variables that may be useful in predicting the fertility estimate. Fertility estimates vary in which parts of the process leading to conception that they infer about and the amount of variation that influences the estimate and the uncertainty thereof. The list of potential independent variables can be divided into competence of sperm based on their performance in bioassays or direct measurement of sperm attributes. A good prediction will use a sample population of bulls that is representative of the population to which an inference will be made. Both dependent and independent variables should have a dynamic range in their values. Careful selection of independent variables includes reasonable measurement repeatability and minimal correlation among variables. Proper estimation and having an appreciation of the degree of uncertainty of dependent and independent variables are crucial for using predictions to make decisions regarding bull fertility. PMID:26791329

  10. Seasonal effects of semen collection and artificial insemination on dairy cow conception.

    PubMed

    Haugan, T; Reksen, O; Gröhn, Y T; Kommisrud, E; Ropstad, E; Sehested, E

    2005-11-01

    The effects of four seasons of semen collection and of artificial insemination on conception in dairy cows were studied. The solstices and equinoxes (December, March, June and September) defined the beginning and/or end of each season. Semen was collected from 973 progeny-test bulls over 8 years at the two Norwegian AI stations at 60.8 degrees N and 63.4 degrees N where artificial light was used to provide a minimum photoperiod of 10 h/day. The effect of using semen of elite bulls during progeny testing and after selection as elite sires also was investigated. Norwegian Red (NRF) cows were inseminated over a 7-year period using progeny test semen and over the last 4 years of the same period using the semen of the elite sires. The probability of conception to only first inseminations for cows up to, and including, the fifth lactation was assessed by 56-day non-return rate (56d NRR) and calving rate. Two data sets were analysed which excluded cows culled within 270 days of AI or included such cows as non-calving. The reasons for culling were categorised as those for fertility problems or all other reasons. Semen was used for AI irrespective of the season in which it had been collected. Season of semen collection did not affect 56d NRR but calving rate was significantly higher (by 0.5-0.8%, approximately; P < 0.01) for semen collected in the December-March period, when photoperiod was increasing, than at other times of the year. The season in which AI was performed showed a peak of 56d NRR in spring for heifers (P < 0.01) and in summer for parous animals (P < 0.01). For calving rate, however, no seasonal peak was found in heifers, whereas pluriparous cows had much higher calving rates in summer and autumn/early winter than late winter and spring (P < 0.01). Semen of elite sires resulted in higher calving rates by 0.5 (NS) to 1.9% (P < 0.01) when used after selection than when used during progeny testing. The difference between the calving rate achieved when the semen

  11. Effects of dietary energy on sexual maturation and sperm production in Holstein bulls.

    PubMed

    Harstine, B R; Maquivar, M; Helser, L A; Utt, M D; Premanandan, C; DeJarnette, J M; Day, M L

    2015-06-01

    In prepubertal bulls and heifers of dairy and beef breeds, puberty can be induced to occur earlier than typical with targeted high-energy diets due to precocious activation of the endocrine mechanisms that regulate puberty. Precocious activation of puberty in bulls intended for use in the AI industry has the potential to hasten and perhaps increase sperm production. It was hypothesized that feeding bulls a high-energy diet beginning at 8 wk of age would advance the prepubertal rise in LH and lead to advanced testicular maturation and age at puberty. From 58 to 230 ± 0.3 d of age, Holstein bulls received either a high-energy diet (HE;n = 9; targeted ADG 1.5 kg/d) or a control diet (CONT;n = 10; targeted ADG 0.75 kg/d). Thereafter, all bulls were fed a similar diet. The HE treatment increased LH secretion at 125 d of age, testosterone concentrations from 181 to 210 d, and scrotal circumference (SC) from 146 to 360 d of age relative to the CONT treatment. Beginning at 241 ± 5 d of age, semen collection (artificial vagina) was attempted every 14 d in bulls from the HE (n = 8) and CONT (n = 7) treatment until each bull attained puberty (ejaculate containing 50 × 10 spermatozoa with 10% motility). To assess semen production as mature bulls, semen was collected thrice weekly beginning at 541 ± 5 d of age until slaughter at 569 ± 5 d of age. After slaughter, epididymal and testicular measurements were collected and testicular tissue was fixed to determine seminiferous tubule diameter. Age at puberty did not differ between treatments (310 ± 35 d). Although testis and epididymal weight and testis volume were greater (P < 0.05) in the HE than the CONT treatment, sperm production of mature bulls did not differ between treatments. Diameter of seminiferous tubules also did not differ between treatments. We conclude that the HE advanced aspects of sexual maturation and increased testes size, but this was not reflected in hastened puberty or sperm production in the present

  12. Effects of dietary energy on sexual maturation and sperm production in Holstein bulls.

    PubMed

    Harstine, B R; Maquivar, M; Helser, L A; Utt, M D; Premanandan, C; DeJarnette, J M; Day, M L

    2015-06-01

    In prepubertal bulls and heifers of dairy and beef breeds, puberty can be induced to occur earlier than typical with targeted high-energy diets due to precocious activation of the endocrine mechanisms that regulate puberty. Precocious activation of puberty in bulls intended for use in the AI industry has the potential to hasten and perhaps increase sperm production. It was hypothesized that feeding bulls a high-energy diet beginning at 8 wk of age would advance the prepubertal rise in LH and lead to advanced testicular maturation and age at puberty. From 58 to 230 ± 0.3 d of age, Holstein bulls received either a high-energy diet (HE;n = 9; targeted ADG 1.5 kg/d) or a control diet (CONT;n = 10; targeted ADG 0.75 kg/d). Thereafter, all bulls were fed a similar diet. The HE treatment increased LH secretion at 125 d of age, testosterone concentrations from 181 to 210 d, and scrotal circumference (SC) from 146 to 360 d of age relative to the CONT treatment. Beginning at 241 ± 5 d of age, semen collection (artificial vagina) was attempted every 14 d in bulls from the HE (n = 8) and CONT (n = 7) treatment until each bull attained puberty (ejaculate containing 50 × 10 spermatozoa with 10% motility). To assess semen production as mature bulls, semen was collected thrice weekly beginning at 541 ± 5 d of age until slaughter at 569 ± 5 d of age. After slaughter, epididymal and testicular measurements were collected and testicular tissue was fixed to determine seminiferous tubule diameter. Age at puberty did not differ between treatments (310 ± 35 d). Although testis and epididymal weight and testis volume were greater (P < 0.05) in the HE than the CONT treatment, sperm production of mature bulls did not differ between treatments. Diameter of seminiferous tubules also did not differ between treatments. We conclude that the HE advanced aspects of sexual maturation and increased testes size, but this was not reflected in hastened puberty or sperm production in the present

  13. Pregnancy rates following AI with sexed semen in Mediterranean Italian buffalo heifers (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Campanile, G; Gasparrini, B; Vecchio, D; Neglia, G; Senatore, E M; Bella, A; Presicce, G A; Zicarelli, L

    2011-08-01

    The use of sexed semen in farm animal production and genetic improvement has been shown to be feasible with variable degree of efficiency in a number of species, and proved to be economically viable in cattle. In the last two decades, various newly developed reproductive technologies applicable in buffaloes have mushroomed. Recently, following the birth of the first buffalo calves using AI with sexed semen, commercial interest to exploit sexing of semen in this species too is aroused. In order to verify the successful adoption of this technology in the buffalo, the present study on the use of sexed semen for AI was carried out and compared with conventional artificial insemination using nonsexed semen. A total of 379 buffalo heifers were used for synchronization of ovulation using the Presynch protocol in the South of Italy. Selected animals at the time of AI were randomly allocated to three different experiment groups: (1) 102 animals subjected to AI in the body of the uterus with sexed semen (SS body); (2) 104 animals subjected to AI in the horn of the uterus with sexed semen (SS horn); and (3) 106 animals subjected to AI in the body of the uterus with conventional nonsexed semen (NSS body). Semen of three buffalo bulls was sexed by a collaborating company and commercially distributed in 0.25 mL straws with a total of 2 million sexed spermatozoa. Pregnancy rates were first assessed at Day 28 following AI, and rechecked at Day 45 by ultrasound. Pregnancy rates were nonsignificantly different between animals inseminated with sexed or nonsexed semen: 80/206 (38.8%) and 40/106 (37.7%), respectively (P = 0.85). However, site of insemination of sexed semen affected pregnancy rate significantly as higher pregnancy rates were obtained when sexed semen was deposited into the body rather than the horn of the uterus: 46/101 (45.5%) and 34/105 (32.3%), respectively (P = 0.05). In conclusion, the use of sexed semen in buffalo heifers gave satisfactory and similar pregnancy

  14. Freezing African Elephant Semen as a New Population Management Tool

    PubMed Central

    Hermes, Robert; Saragusty, Joseph; Göritz, Frank; Bartels, Paul; Potier, Romain; Baker, Barbara; Streich, W. Jürgen; Hildebrandt, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Background The captive elephant population is not self-sustaining and with a limited number of breeding bulls, its genetic diversity is in decline. One way to overcome this is to import young and healthy animals from the wild. We introduce here a more sustainable alternative method - importation of semen from wild bulls without removing them from their natural habitat. Due to the logistics involved, the only practical option would be to transport cryopreserved sperm. Despite some early reports on African elephant semen cryopreservation, the utility of this new population management tool has not been evaluated. Methodology/Principal Findings Semen was collected by electroejaculation from 14 wild African savanna elephant (Loxodonta africana) bulls and cryopreserved using the directional freezing technique. Sperm treatments evaluated included the need for centrifugation, the use of hen or quail yolk, the concentration of glycerol (3%, 5% or 7%) in the extender, and maintenance of motility over time after thawing. Our results suggest that dilution in an extender containing hen yolk and 7% glycerol after centrifugation best preserved post-thaw sperm motility when compared to all other treatments (P≤0.012 for all). Using this approach we were able to achieve after thawing (mean ± SD) 54.6±3.9% motility, 85.3±2.4% acrosome integrity, and 86.8±4.6% normal morphology with no decrease in motility over 1 h incubation at 37°C. Sperm cryopreserved during this study has already lead to a pregnancy of a captive female elephant following artificial insemination. Conclusions/Significance With working techniques for artificial insemination and sperm cryopreservation of both African and Asian elephants in hand, population managers can now enrich captive or isolated wild elephant populations without removing valuable individuals from their natural habitat. PMID:23483917

  15. Effect of widespread and limited use of sexed semen on genetic progress and reproductive performance of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Khalajzadeh, S; Nejati-Javaremi, A; Mehrbani Yeganeh, H

    2012-09-01

    Stochastic simulation was used for studying the impacts of sexed semen on genetic progress and reproductive performance of dairy cows. Three strategies were compared: WSS (use unsexed semen in cows and heifers), SSH (use sexed semen in heifers and unsexed semen in cows) and SSCH (use sexed semen in both cows and heifers). Conception rate (CR) of unsexed semen was considered to be 35% and 65% in cows and heifers, respectively. CR of sexed semen was considered to be 15 (20% in cows and 50% in heifers), 10, 5 and 0 percentage points lower than unsexed semen. Thus, four subschemes were compared under SSCH (SSCH15, SSCH10, SSCH5, SSCH0) and SSH (SSH15, SSH10, SSH5, SSH0). Moreover, the effect was studied in four distinct paths of selection: active sires (AS), young bulls (YB), bull dams (BD) and milking cows (CW). The average genetic superiority of CW was 12% and 9.5% in SSCH15 and SSH15 strategies relative to a base scheme, respectively. The average genetic superiority of CW was 19% and 10.5% in SSCH0 and SSH0, respectively. Regression analysis showed that genetic superiority of CW increased significantly, that is, 0.5% and 0.1% per every 1% increase in CR in SSCH and SSH, respectively. The result showed that there is a significant difference between genetic superiority of cows in SSCH and SSH schemes. Widespread and limited use of sexed semen in commercial dairy herds resulted in a large genetic advantage in CW. The genetic advantage of gender control was minimal in the selection paths of AS, YB and BD. Open days and services per conception reached to 153 v. 125 days and 5 v. 2.86 under SSCH15 compared with WSS. The age at first calving increased from 774 to 790 days in SSH15 and SSCH15 strategies. Mean of parities decreased to 2.26 v. 2.42 by using sexed semen. The widespread use of sexed semen increased the age average of cows in all parities. Sexed semen increased selection intensity in the CW path, and this contributed to the genetic merit of future cows. On the

  16. The proportion of beef bulls in western Canada with mature spermiograms at 11 to 15 months of age.

    PubMed Central

    Arteaga, A; Baracaldo, M; Barth, A D

    2001-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the proportion of yearling beef bulls that have mature spermiograms at 11 to 15 months of age, and to evaluate the relationship between semen quality traits, age, and scrotal circumference. Semen samples and data on sperm motility and scrotal circumference measurements were obtained from 1641 bulls of 14 breeds. Criteria for a satisfactory spermiogram included sperm concentration > or = 400 x 10(6)/mL, > or = 60% progressively motile sperm, and > or = 70% morphologically normal sperm. The mean scrotal circumference measurements for all bulls combined were 33.4, 34.4, 35.2, 35.8, and 35.3 cm at 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15 months of age, respectively. The percentage of bulls with matures spermiograms at 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15 months of age were 20%, 30%, 51%, 52%, and 61%, respectively. There was a high positive correlation (r = 0.9) between the number of bulls with > or = 70% normal sperm and scrotal circumference measurement. The main types of morphologic defects observed in immature bulls were proximal droplets and midpiece defects. PMID:11665426

  17. 9 CFR 78.14 - Rodeo bulls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.14 Rodeo bulls. (a) A rodeo bull that is test... date of being tested, may be moved interstate only if the bull meets the requirements for cattle...

  18. 9 CFR 78.14 - Rodeo bulls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.14 Rodeo bulls. (a) A rodeo bull that is test... date of being tested, may be moved interstate only if the bull meets the requirements for cattle...

  19. Aflatoxin and aflatoxicosis. III. Effect of dietary aflatoxin on the morphology of buffalo bull spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Hafez, A H; Megalla, S E; Mahmed, A A

    1982-03-19

    The main aim of this study was to determine the effect of aflatoxin on male reproduction by exposure to fodders contaminated by moulds producing toxins as a natural environmental contaminants. Semen was collected from three normal healthy buffalo bulls every ten days for one month before adding the toxin and examined for livability percentages. Moldy rice containing aflatoxin B and G was incorporated into the ration of the studied bulls in a daily amount of 2.0, 3.0 and 4.0 gm respectively for each bull for two weeks. Each gramme of the rice powder contained 15.6 ppm aflatoxin B and 9.84 ppm aflatoxin G as determined spectrophotometrically. Semen was collected in the middle of the two weeks experimental period. Moreover, one week, one month and two months later, semen was collected again and examined for the same parameters. The results showed marked decrease in the alive percentage of spermatozoa from 91.11% to 80.8% after the addition of aflatoxin. Moreover, a very high increase in the sperm abnormalities up to 54% was recorded.

  20. Associations between sperm abnormalities, breed, age, and scrotal circumference in beef bulls

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Ajitkumar G.; Barkema, Herman W.; Wilde, Randy; Kastelic, John P.; Thundathil, Jacob C.

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the associations of breed, age, and scrotal circumference (SC), and their interaction, on the prevalence of sperm abnormalities in beef bulls in Alberta, Canada, and the percentage of satisfactory potential breeders identified during breeding soundness examination solely due to normal sperm morphology. Eosin-nigrosin stained semen smears and evaluation reports of 1642 bull breeding soundness evaluations were procured from 6 veterinary clinics in Alberta. Sperm morphology was determined for at least 100 sperm per bull. The most common defects were detached head [4.86% ± 5.71%; mean ± standard deviation (s)], distal midpiece reflex (6.19% ± 9.13%), and bent tail (1.01% ± 1.54%). Although breed, age, and SC did not significantly affect the prevalence of head or midpiece defects, morphologically normal or abnormal sperm, tail defects were more prevalent in Angus and Hereford bulls compared with other breeds. Overall, solely on the basis of sperm morphology, 1363 (83.0%) bulls were classified as satisfactory potential breeders and the remainder 279 (17.0%) as unsatisfactory (> 30% abnormal sperm, > 20% defective heads, or both). Although not significantly different, the breed with the highest percentage of satisfactory potential breeders was Limousin (90.6%) and the lowest was Hereford (78.8%). That 17% of bulls subjected to breeding soundness evaluation were designated as unsatisfactory solely on the basis of sperm morphology highlights its importance. PMID:22468020

  1. The use of integer programming to select bulls across breeding companies with volume price discounts.

    PubMed

    McConnel, M B; Galligan, D T

    2004-10-01

    Optimization programs are currently used to aid in the selection of bulls to be used in herd breeding programs. While these programs offer a systematic approach to the problem of semen selection, they ignore the impact of volume discounts. Volume discounts are discounts that vary depending on the number of straws purchased. The dynamic nature of volume discounts means that, in order to be adequately accounted for, they must be considered in the optimization routine. Failing to do this creates a missed economic opportunity because the potential benefits of optimally selecting and combining breeding company discount opportunities are not captured. To address these issues, an integer program was created which used binary decision variables to incorporate the effects of quantity discounts into the optimization program. A consistent set of trait criteria was used to select a group of bulls from 3 sample breeding companies. Three different selection programs were used to select the bulls, 2 traditional methods and the integer method. After the discounts were applied using each method, the integer program resulted in the lowest cost portfolio of bulls. A sensitivity analysis showed that the integer program also resulted in a low cost portfolio when the genetic trait goals were changed to be more or less stringent. In the sample application, a net benefit of the new approach over the traditional approaches was a 12.3 to 20.0% savings in semen cost. PMID:15377634

  2. Status of Oregon's Bull Trout.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, David V.; Hanson, Mary L.; Hooton, Robert M.

    1997-10-01

    Limited historical references indicate that bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in Oregon were once widely spread throughout at least 12 basins in the Klamath River and Columbia River systems. No bull trout have been observed in Oregon's coastal systems. A total of 69 bull trout populations in 12 basins are currently identified in Oregon. A comparison of the 1991 bull trout status (Ratliff and Howell 1992) to the revised 1996 status found that 7 populations were newly discovered and 1 population showed a positive or upgraded status while 22 populations showed a negative or downgraded status. The general downgrading of 32% of Oregon's bull trout populations appears largely due to increased survey efforts and increased survey accuracy rather than reduced numbers or distribution. However, three populations in the upper Klamath Basin, two in the Walla Walla Basin, and one in the Willamette Basin showed decreases in estimated population abundance or distribution.

  3. Prognostic value of a pre-freeze hypo-osmotic swelling test on the post-thaw quality of dog semen.

    PubMed

    Karger, S; Geiser, B; Grau, M; Burfeind, O; Heuwieser, W; Arlt, S P

    2016-03-01

    Throughout cryopreservation, sperm are exposed to major osmotic challenges. Only intact membranes of sperm cells are able to regulate these volumetric changes, which can be determined by the hypo-osmotic swelling test (HOS test). Correlations between the HOS test and conventional semen variables are inconsistent. Therefore, the objectives of this study were (1) to examine relationships between HOS test results and standard semen variables before freezing and after thawing and (2) to evaluate the prognostic value of the HOS assessments on post-thaw quality of dog semen. Semen of 35 dogs was collected and analyzed before freezing and after thawing following a 7-day freeze-thaw interval. Conventional semen variables such as sperm cell motility, membrane integrity morphology were evaluated and the HOS test was conducted with results from this test being recorded. In fresh semen the HOS test was positively correlated with progressive motility of sperm cells: r=0.52, sperm cell membrane integrity: r=0.50 and normal sperm cell morphology: r=0.46 (P<0.05). In frozen-thawed semen, the data obtained with the HOS test were positively correlated with progressive sperm cell motility: r=0.67 and membrane integrity: r=0.86 (P<0.05). The data obtained with the HOS test in fresh semen were positively correlated with sperm cell membrane integrity: r=0.50 normal sperm cell morphology: r=0.55 and data from the HOS test (r=0.43; P<0.05) with frozen-thawed semen. For the prediction of individual cryopreservation capacity, results from assessment of the fresh semen variables of good and poor semen quality were statistically compared. Based on these results, it is not possible to predict the quality of frozen-thawed dog semen using the HOS test. PMID:26837622

  4. The relationship between fertility potential measurements on cryobanked semen and fecundity of sperm donors.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, T; Johnson, A; Mixon, B; Wolf, D

    2000-02-01

    Sperm penetration assay (SPA) scores obtained from cryobanked semen were correlated with therapeutic insemination (TI) fecundity in a group of established sperm donors, thereby evaluating the efficacy of the SPA in screening donors for sperm banking. While the SPA has been used to separate fertile from infertile males, we altered assay conditions to use frozen semen and to distinguish performance among fertile donors. Three frozen ejaculates from 11 pregnancy-proven donors were analysed. Of 905 TI cycles, 275 recipients achieved 95 pregnancies. There were no significant relationships between fecundity and donor semen, washed sperm parameters, sperm recoveries or recipient age. A significant relationship was revealed between mean SPA scores (range 8.7-66.6 penetrations/ovum) and donor fecundity (range 0.04-0.16, P < 0.03). Sperm concentration was varied in an effort to establish the most sensitive test condition. Using 0.25x10(6) motile spermatozoa/ml, a highly significant relationship was observed (P < 0.002). The four donors with the lowest SPA scores achieved the four lowest fecundities. It is concluded that a modified SPA can be used on frozen donor semen to estimate donor fertility potential. If applied routinely in donor semen banking, poor quality applicants could be excluded, thereby increasing pregnancy rates while decreasing donor screening costs. PMID:10655306

  5. Effects of bull elk demographics on age categories of harem bulls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bender, L.C.

    2002-01-01

    Many management strategies for elk (Cervus elaphus) emphasize increasing numbers of mature bulls in the population. These strategies are usually assumed to enhance productivity via increased breeding by mature bulls. I compared age classes of harem bulls during the peak of the rut under 4 bull harvest strategies that resulted in different bull:cow ratios, mature bull:cow ratios, bull mortality rates, and proportions of mature bulls in the autumn (pre-hunting season) population. Proportions of harems held by differing age classes of bulls [mature (P84% of harems only in populations where mature bull:cow ratios exceeded 21:100 in the autumn population. Interaction of mature bull ratios in the autumn population, harem size, and bull selectivity in the harvest strategy must be considered if increased breeding by mature harem bulls is a management goal.

  6. Collection, analysis and cryopreservation of semen from Malayan gaur (Bos gaurus hubbacki): A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Iswadi, M I; Ann, Z F; Hafiz, M M; Hafiz, M D; Fahrul, F J; Hajarian, H; Wahid, H; Zawawi, I; Khairiah, M S; Mazni, O A

    2012-01-01

    The Malayan gaur (Bos gaurus hubbacki) or Seladang is classified as vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN). The Malayan gaur is mainly distributed in the tropical woodlands of Peninsular Malaysia and Southern Thailand. The aim of this study was to collect, analyze and cryopreserve the semen of wild Malayan gaur. Transrectal massage (TM) and electroejaculation (EEJ) technique was applied in semen collection of the Malayan gaur. The semen was then cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen using slow freezing technique. Makler counting chamber was used to evaluate sperm concentration and motility, while the sperm viability and morphology of fresh and post-thaw sperm was determined using eosin-nigrosin staining protocol. As a result, we have successfully collected the Malayan gaur semen using EEJ technique. Sperm motility, viability and morphological changes of the post-thaw semen of Malayan gaur were found undesirable due to the complication of the cryopreservation process. On the basis of current study it can be concluded that Malayan gaur bulls semen can be obtain by EEJ with no evidence of rectal trauma. Optimization of the process of cryopreservation for Malayan gaur sperm is needed to maintain the cryoviability of the good sperm quality. The data generated in this study would be useful in conservation of genetic diversity program for Malayan gaur.

  7. Collection, analysis and cryopreservation of semen from Malayan gaur (Bos gaurus hubbacki): A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Iswadi, M.I.; Ann, Z.F.; Hafiz, M.M.; Hafiz, M.D.; Fahrul, F.J.; Hajarian, H.; Wahid, H.; Zawawi, I.; Khairiah, M.S.; Mazni, O.A.

    2012-01-01

    The Malayan gaur (Bos gaurus hubbacki) or Seladang is classified as vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN). The Malayan gaur is mainly distributed in the tropical woodlands of Peninsular Malaysia and Southern Thailand. The aim of this study was to collect, analyze and cryopreserve the semen of wild Malayan gaur. Transrectal massage (TM) and electroejaculation (EEJ) technique was applied in semen collection of the Malayan gaur. The semen was then cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen using slow freezing technique. Makler counting chamber was used to evaluate sperm concentration and motility, while the sperm viability and morphology of fresh and post-thaw sperm was determined using eosin-nigrosin staining protocol. As a result, we have successfully collected the Malayan gaur semen using EEJ technique. Sperm motility, viability and morphological changes of the post-thaw semen of Malayan gaur were found undesirable due to the complication of the cryopreservation process. On the basis of current study it can be concluded that Malayan gaur bulls semen can be obtain by EEJ with no evidence of rectal trauma. Optimization of the process of cryopreservation for Malayan gaur sperm is needed to maintain the cryoviability of the good sperm quality. The data generated in this study would be useful in conservation of genetic diversity program for Malayan gaur. PMID:26623302

  8. Effect of growth rate from 6 to 16 months of age on sexual development and reproductive function in beef bulls.

    PubMed

    Brito, L F C; Barth, A D; Wilde, R E; Kastelic, J P

    2012-04-15

    Sexual development and reproductive function were studied in 22 Angus × Charolais and 17 Angus bulls from 6 to 16 mo of age. Associations of average daily gain (ADG) and body weight with ages at puberty and at maturity (satisfactory semen quality), scrotal circumference, paired-testes volume and weight, testicular vascular cone diameter and fat thickness, scrotal temperature, sperm production and morphology, and testicular histology, were determined. There were no significant correlations between cumulative average daily gain and any of the end points investigated. Body weight at various ages was negatively correlated with ages at puberty and maturity in Angus × Charolais bulls, positively correlated with paired-testes weight in Angus × Charolais and Angus bulls, and positively correlated with seminiferous tubule volume in Angus bulls (P < 0.05). Semen quality improved gradually with age and the interval between puberty and maturity (mean ± SD; 309.4 ± 29.7 and 357 ± 42 days of age) was approximately 50 days. Age, weight, scrotal circumference, and paired-testes volume were all good predictors of pubertal and mature status, with moderate to high sensitivity and specificity (71.6% to 92.4%). In summary, growth rate between 6 and 16 mo of age did not affect sexual development and reproductive function in beef bulls. However, greater body weight at various ages was associated with reduced age at puberty and maturity, and with larger testes at 16 mo of age, indicating that improved nutrition might be beneficial, but only when offered before 6 mo of age. Average daily gains of approximately 1 to 1.6 kg/day did not result in excessive fat accumulation in the scrotum, increased scrotal temperature, or reduction in sperm production and semen quality, and could be considered "safe" targets for growing beef bulls.

  9. Deep-freezing of boar semen in plastic film 'cochettes'.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, B M; Rodriguez-Martinez, H

    2000-03-01

    The motility and membrane integrity of spermatozoa from nine boars frozen with a programmable freezing machine in plastic bags, 'cochettes', and in 'maxi-straws', in total doses of 5 x 10(9) spermatozoa/5 ml with glycerol (3%) used as cryoprotectant, were assessed after thawing. A computer-based cell motion analyser was used to evaluate sperm motility, while the integrity of the plasmalemma was assessed with fluorescent supravital dyes (C-FDA/PI). The fertilizing capacity of the semen frozen in the two containers was investigated by inseminating (AI) gilts. Pregnancy was monitored by Doppler-ultrasound, and the numbers of corpora lutea and viable embryos counted at slaughter, between days 30 and 38 after AI. The cochettes sustained the overall procedure of freezing/thawing (FT), with 30 min post-thaw (PT) sperm motility being significantly higher than for straws, 46.9 vs. 39.5%. The only significant difference in motility patterns detected when comparing the packages was a higher sperm velocity (VCL) in cochettes at 30 min PT. However, percentages of FT-spermatozoa with intact membranes, detected with the supravital probes, were higher in maxi-straws than in cochettes, 46.8 vs. 43.0% (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences found in fertilizing capacity between spermatozoa frozen in maxi-straws and those frozen in cochettes. The results indicate that although the deep-freezing of AI-doses of boar semen in large plastic bags is feasible, problems such as their inconvenient size for storage and inconsistent thawing must be solved before this type of container can be used for the commercial cryopreservation of boar semen.

  10. In vitro and in vivo fertility of ram semen cryopreserved in different extenders.

    PubMed

    Valente, S S; Pereira, R M; Baptista, M C; Marques, C C; Vasques, M I; Pereira, M V C Silva; Horta, A E M; Barbas, J P

    2010-01-01

    Seminal traits of frozen-thawed (FT) ram semen and in vitro and field fertility in native Portuguese breeds were evaluated in 4 experiments. In exp. 1 and 2 the cryopreservation capacity of 2 extenders, E1 (15% egg yolk-EY) and E2 (4.5% EY and trehalose) was compared through morphological evaluation and in vitro fertilizability of FT ram semen. Exp. 3 aimed to determine the usefulness of in vitro homologous/heterologous fertilization tests as tools for predicting ram fertility. Exp. 4 was conducted to verify if the identified differences between the 2 extenders could be confirmed by field fertility. E1 showed a better cryoprotective action expressed by higher in vitro and field fertility results. In conclusion, EY is difficult to be replaced in ram semen extenders. Heterologous fertilization seems to be a useful tool for predicting fertility of FT ram semen.

  11. The integrity of sperm chromatin in young tropical composite bulls.

    PubMed

    Fortes, M R S; Holroyd, R G; Reverter, A; Venus, B K; Satake, N; Boe-Hansen, G B

    2012-07-15

    Sperm chromatin fragmentation is associated with subfertility, but its relationship with age progression in young bulls is poorly understood. The objective was to assess sperm chromatin fragmentation during the early post-pubertal development of 20 tropical composite bulls, using a sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) and sperm-bos-halomax (SBH). Bulls were subjected to bull breeding soundness evaluation (BBSE) at mean ages of 13, 18, and 24 mo. Traits measured included liveweight (WT), body condition score (BCS) and scrotal circumference (SC). Semen samples were collected by electroejaculation and assessed for mass activity (MA), motility (Mot), concentration (conc), sperm morphology and chromatin fragmentation. Concentration (r=0.34, P=0.0076), Mot (r=0.36, P=0.0041) and percentage of morphologic normal sperm (percent normal sperm (PNS); r=0.31, P=0.0132) were positively correlated with age. The percentage of sperm with proximal droplets (PD) was negatively correlated with age (r=-0.28, P=0.0348), whereas neither SCSA nor SBH results were significantly correlated with age. The percentage of sperm with chromatin fragmentation using SCSA was correlated with PNS (r=-0.53, P<0.0001), the percentage of sperm with head abnormalities (r=0.68, P<0.0001) and the percentage of intact sperm (Int) with SBH (r=-0.26, P=0.0456). In summary, for assessment of sperm chromatin fragmentation, samples could be equally collected at 13, 18 or 24 mo of age, as results did not vary with age. PMID:22494672

  12. Search for the genome of bovine herpesvirus types 1, 4 and 5 in bovine semen

    PubMed Central

    Morán, P.E.; Favier, P.A.; Lomónaco, M.; Catena, M.C.; Chiapparrone, M.L.; Odeón, A.C.; Verna, A.E.; Pérez, S.E.

    2013-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) causes respiratory and reproductive disorders in cattle. Recently, bovine herpesvirus type 5 (BoHV-5) and bovine herpesvirus type 4 (BoHV-4) have been identified to be associated with genital disease. In this study, the presence of the genome of BoHV-1, BoHV-4 and BoHV-5 in bovine semen of Argentinean and international origin was analyzed by PCR assays. The most important finding of this study is the detection of the genome of BoHV-1 and BoHV-4 in semen of bulls maintained at artificial insemination centers. It is particularly relevant that BoHV-1 DNA was also identified in one sample of international origin suggesting the need for extensive quality control measures on international transport of bovine semen. PMID:26623325

  13. Visual Detection of Brucella spp. in Spiked Bovine Semen Using Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) Assay.

    PubMed

    Prusty, Bikash R; Chaudhuri, Pallab; Chaturvedi, V K; Saini, Mohini; Mishra, B P; Gupta, Praveen K

    2016-06-01

    Several pathogens including Brucella spp. are shed in semen of infected bulls and can be transmitted to cows through contaminated semen during artificial insemination. The present study reports omp2a and bcsp31 gene based loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assays for detection of Brucella genomic DNA in semen from infected bulls. The positive results could be interpreted visually by change in colour of reaction mixture containing hydroxyl naphthol blue (HNB) dye from violet to sky blue. LAMP assays based on omp2a and bcsp31 could detect as little as 10 and 100 fg of B. abortus S19 genomic DNA, respectively. Sensitivity of omp2a and bcsp31 LAMP assays for direct detection of organisms in bovine semen was 2.28 × 10(1) CFU and 2.28 × 10(2) CFU of B. abortus S19 in spiked bovine semen, respectively. The omp2a LAMP assay was found equally sensitive to TaqMan probe based real-time PCR and 100 times more sensitive than conventional PCR in identifying Brucella in spiked semen. The diagnostic applicability of the omp2a LAMP assay was evaluated with seventy-nine bovine semen samples and results were re-evaluated through TaqMan probe based real-time PCR and conventional PCR. Taken together, the omp2a LAMP assay is easy to perform, rapid and sensitive in diagnosis of Brucella spp. in bovine semen. PMID:27570305

  14. Growth, puberty, and carcass characteristics of Brahman-, Senepol-, and Tuli-sired F1 Angus bulls.

    PubMed

    Chase, C C; Chenoweth, P J; Larsen, R E; Hammond, A C; Olson, T A; West, R L; Johnson, D D

    2001-08-01

    Postweaning growth, sexual development, libido, and carcass data were collected from two consecutive calf crops using 31 Brahman x Angus (B x A), 41 Senepol x Angus (S x A), and 38 Tuli x Angus (T x A) F1 bulls. Following weaning (by mid-September) and preconditioning, at the start of the study (late September) bulls were fed concentrate (three times each week at a rate equivalent to 4.5 kg/d) on bahiagrass pasture for approximately 250 d. At the start of the study and at 28-d intervals, BW, hip height, and scrotal circumference (SC) were measured. Concurrently at 28-d intervals, when the SC of a bull was > or = 23 cm, semen collection was attempted using electroejaculation. Ejaculates were evaluated for presence of first spermatozoa (FS), 50 x 10(6) sperm with at least 10% motility (PU), and 500 x 10(6) sperm with at least 50% motility (PP). After all bulls reached PP they were subjected to two libido tests. Carcass data were collected on all bulls (n = 110) and Warner-Bratzler shear (WBS) force values were assessed on a subset (n = 80). For both years, B x A bulls were heavier (P < 0.05) and taller (P < 0.05) than S x A and T x A bulls at the start and end of the study. However, breed type did not influence (P > 0.10) gain in BW or hip height during the study. Scrotal circumference of T x A bulls was larger (P < 0.05) than that of B x A or S x A bulls at the start of the study, but there was no effect (P > 0.10) of breed type by the end of the study. At PU and PP, B x A bulls were older (P < 0.05), heavier (P < 0.05), and taller (P < 0.05) and had larger (P < 0.05) SC than S x A and T x A bulls. Tuli x Angus bulls were younger (P < 0.05) than S x A bulls at PU and PP but had similar SC. Libido scores tended (P < 0.10) to be lower for B x A than for S x A and T x A bulls. Breed type affected (P < 0.05) carcass traits; B x A bulls had the heaviest (P < 0.05) hot carcass weight, greatest (P < 0.05) dressing percentage, larger (P < 0.05) longissimus muscle area than

  15. Growth, puberty, and carcass characteristics of Brahman-, Senepol-, and Tuli-sired F1 Angus bulls.

    PubMed

    Chase, C C; Chenoweth, P J; Larsen, R E; Hammond, A C; Olson, T A; West, R L; Johnson, D D

    2001-08-01

    Postweaning growth, sexual development, libido, and carcass data were collected from two consecutive calf crops using 31 Brahman x Angus (B x A), 41 Senepol x Angus (S x A), and 38 Tuli x Angus (T x A) F1 bulls. Following weaning (by mid-September) and preconditioning, at the start of the study (late September) bulls were fed concentrate (three times each week at a rate equivalent to 4.5 kg/d) on bahiagrass pasture for approximately 250 d. At the start of the study and at 28-d intervals, BW, hip height, and scrotal circumference (SC) were measured. Concurrently at 28-d intervals, when the SC of a bull was > or = 23 cm, semen collection was attempted using electroejaculation. Ejaculates were evaluated for presence of first spermatozoa (FS), 50 x 10(6) sperm with at least 10% motility (PU), and 500 x 10(6) sperm with at least 50% motility (PP). After all bulls reached PP they were subjected to two libido tests. Carcass data were collected on all bulls (n = 110) and Warner-Bratzler shear (WBS) force values were assessed on a subset (n = 80). For both years, B x A bulls were heavier (P < 0.05) and taller (P < 0.05) than S x A and T x A bulls at the start and end of the study. However, breed type did not influence (P > 0.10) gain in BW or hip height during the study. Scrotal circumference of T x A bulls was larger (P < 0.05) than that of B x A or S x A bulls at the start of the study, but there was no effect (P > 0.10) of breed type by the end of the study. At PU and PP, B x A bulls were older (P < 0.05), heavier (P < 0.05), and taller (P < 0.05) and had larger (P < 0.05) SC than S x A and T x A bulls. Tuli x Angus bulls were younger (P < 0.05) than S x A bulls at PU and PP but had similar SC. Libido scores tended (P < 0.10) to be lower for B x A than for S x A and T x A bulls. Breed type affected (P < 0.05) carcass traits; B x A bulls had the heaviest (P < 0.05) hot carcass weight, greatest (P < 0.05) dressing percentage, larger (P < 0.05) longissimus muscle area than

  16. Cryopreserving turkey semen in straws and nitrogen vapour using DMSO or DMA: effects of cryoprotectant concentration, freezing rate and thawing rate on post-thaw semen quality.

    PubMed

    Iaffaldano, N; Di Iorio, M; Miranda, M; Zaniboni, L; Manchisi, A; Cerolini, S

    2016-04-01

    1. This study was designed to identify a suitable protocol for freezing turkey semen in straws exposed to nitrogen vapour by examining the effects of dimethylacetamide (DMA) or dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) as cryoprotectant (CPA), CPA concentration, freezing rate and thawing rate on in vitro post-thaw semen quality. 2. Pooled semen samples were diluted 1:1 (v:v) with a freezing extender composed of Tselutin diluent containing DMA or DMSO to give final concentrations of 8% or 18% DMA and 4% or 10% DMSO. The semen was packaged in 0.25 ml plastic straws and frozen at different heights above the liquid nitrogen (LN2) surface (1, 5 and 10 cm) for 10 min. Semen samples were thawed at 4°C for 5 min or at 50°C for 10 s. After thawing, sperm motility, viability and osmotic tolerance were determined. 3. Cryosurvival of turkey sperm was affected by DMSO concentration. Freezing rate affected the motility of sperm cryopreserved using both CPAs, while thawing rates showed an effect on the motility of sperm cryopreserved using DMA and on the viability of sperm cryopreserved using DMSO. Significant interactions between freezing rate × thawing rate on sperm viability in the DMA protocol were found. 4. The most effective freezing protocol was the use of 18% DMA or 10% DMSO with freezing 10 cm above the LN2 surface and a thawing temperature of 50°C. An efficient protocol for turkey semen would improve prospects for sperm cryobanks and the commercial use of frozen turkey semen.

  17. History of commercializing sexed semen for cattle.

    PubMed

    Garner, D L; Seidel, G E

    2008-04-15

    Although the basic principles controlling the sex of mammalian offspring have been known for a relatively long time, recent application of certain modern cellular methodologies has led to development of a flow cytometric system capable of differentiating and separating living X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm in amounts suitable for AI and therefore, commercialization of this sexing technology. After a very long history of unsuccessful attempts to differentiate between mammalian sperm that produce males from those that produce females, a breakthrough came in 1981 when it was demonstrated that precise DNA content could be measured. Although these initial measurements of DNA content killed the sperm in the process, they led to the ultimate development of a sperm sorting system that was capable, not only of differentiating between live X- and Y-sperm, but of sorting them into relatively pure X- and Y-sperm populations without obvious cellular damage. Initial efforts to predetermine the sex of mammalian offspring in 1989 required surgical insemination, but later enhancements provided sex-sorted sperm in quantities suitable for use with IVF. Subsequent advances in flow sorting provided minimal numbers of sperm sufficient for use in AI. It was not until the flow cytometric sorting system was improved greatly and successful cryopreservation of sex-sorted bull sperm was developed that efficacious approaches to commercialization of sexed semen could be implemented worldwide in cattle. A number of companies now offer sex-sorted bovine sperm. Innovative approaches by a diverse group of scientists along with advances in computer science, biophysics, cell biology, instrumentation, and applied reproductive physiology provided the basis for commercializing sexed semen in cattle. PMID:18343491

  18. Effects of cooling time on membrane integrity and motility of frozen-thawed canine spermatozoa using two different commercial egg yolk-based extenders at two different cooldown equilibration times.

    PubMed

    du Bois, S; Len, J A; Parlevliet, J M; Eilts, B E

    2012-12-01

    Two commercially available egg yolk-based semen extenders, one marketed for human semen freezing (HEYE) and one marketed for canine semen freezing (CEYE), were used to cryopreserve semen from single ejaculates of 11 different dogs. For each extender, a 30- and a 60-min cooldown period was used prior to the addition of the extender containing glycerol and then immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen vapours. Sperm motility was measured using a computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) system. Sperm intact membranes were measured using SYBER-14 and propidium iodide. Semen in the HEYE cooled for 60 min had a significantly greater percentage of intact membranes than the semen in the HEYE cooled for 30 min (p = 0.02). Semen in the HEYE cooled for 60 min had significantly greater total motility (p = 0.007) and progressive motility (p = 0.004) than semen cooled for 60 min in the CEYE and semen cooled for 30 min in the HEYE (total motility p = 0.02 and progressive motility p = 0.02). Semen cooled for 60 min in the CEYE did not differ significantly in total (p = 0.6) or progressive motility (p = 0.4) than semen cooled for 30 min in the CEYE. There was no difference in total (p = 0.8) or progressive motility (p = 0.8) between the semen cooled for 30 min in the HEYE and the semen cooled for 30 min in the CEYE.

  19. Effect of cryopreservation on sperm parameters, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activity in fowl semen.

    PubMed

    Partyka, Agnieszka; Łukaszewicz, Ewa; Niżański, Wojciech

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of chicken semen cryopreservation on sperm parameters, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activities. Pooled semen from 10 Black Minorca roosters was used in the study. Semen samples were subjected to cryopreservation using the "pellet" method and dimethylacetamide (DMA) as a cryoprotectant. In the fresh and the frozen-thawed semen sperm membrane integrity (SYBR-14/propidium iodide (PI)), acrosomal damage (PNA-Alexa Fluor(®)488) and mitochondrial activity (Rhodamine 123) were assessed using flow cytometry. Malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were determined in sperm cells and seminal plasma by spectrophotometry. All sperm characteristics evaluated using flow cytometry were affected by cryopreservation. After freezing-thawing, there was significant (P < 0.01) reduction in sperm membrane integrity, sperm acrosome integrity and mitochondrial activity. Following cryopreservation, MDA concentration significantly increased in chicken seminal plasma and spermatozoa (P < 0.01, P < 0.05). The CAT activity in seminal plasma significantly decreased (P < 0.05), while intracellular activity of this enzyme did not significantly change in frozen-thawed semen. In seminal plasma of frozen-thawed semen the significant increase (P < 0.01) in GPx activity was detected. Whereas GPx activity in spermatozoa remained statistically unchanged after thawing. The SOD activity significantly increased (P < 0.01) in cryopreserved seminal plasma with simultaneous decrease (P < 0.01) of its activity in cells. In conclusion, this is probably the first report describing the level of antioxidant enzymes in frozen-thawed avian semen. The present study showed that the activity of CAT, GPx and SOD in chicken semen was affected by cryopreservation, what increased the intensity of lipid peroxidation (LPO). Catalase appeared to play an important role

  20. Mathematical prediction of freezing times of bovine semen in straws placed in static vapor over liquid nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Santos, M V; Sansinena, M; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    2013-02-01

    A widespread practice in cryopreservation is to freeze spermatozoa by suspending the straws in stagnant nitrogen vapor over liquid nitrogen (N(2)V/LN(2)) for variable periods of time before plunging into liquid nitrogen (-196°C) for indefinite storage. A mathematical heat transfer model was developed to predict freezing times (phase change was considered) required for bull semen and extender packaged in 0.5ml plastic straws and suspended in static liquid nitrogen vapor. Thermophysical properties (i.e. thermal conductivity, specific heat, density, initial freezing temperature) of bovine semen and extender as a function of temperature were determined considering the water change of phase. The non-stationary heat transfer partial differential equations with variable properties (nonlinear mathematical problem) were numerically solved considering in series thermal resistances (semen suspension-straw) and the temperature profiles were obtained for both semen suspension and plastic straw. It was observed both the external heat transfer coefficient in stagnant nitrogen vapor and its temperature (controlled by the distance from the surface of liquid nitrogen to the straw) affected freezing times. The accuracy of the model to estimate freezing times of the straws was further confirmed by comparing with experimental literature data. Results of this study will be useful to select "safe" holding times of bull semen in plastic straws placed N(2)V/LN(2) to ensure that complete freezing of the sample has occurred in the nitrogen vapor and avoid cryodamage when plunging in LN(2). Freezing times predicted by the numerical model can be applied to optimize freezing protocols of bull semen in straws.

  1. Preservation of honey bee semen.

    PubMed

    TABER, S; BLUM, M S

    1960-06-10

    Fertilized eggs have been obtained from queen honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) inseminated with sperm that had been stored in vitro at above-freezing temperatures for up to 68 days. The effects of various experimental storage treatments on semen are described. Semen shipped by ordinary mail has been successfully used for artificial insemination. PMID:13836523

  2. Preservation of honey bee semen.

    PubMed

    TABER, S; BLUM, M S

    1960-06-10

    Fertilized eggs have been obtained from queen honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) inseminated with sperm that had been stored in vitro at above-freezing temperatures for up to 68 days. The effects of various experimental storage treatments on semen are described. Semen shipped by ordinary mail has been successfully used for artificial insemination.

  3. Seminal quality and sperm production in beef bulls with chronic dietary vitamin A deficiency and subsequent re-alimentation.

    PubMed

    Rode, L M; Coulter, G H; Kastelic, J P; Bailey, D R

    1995-05-01

    Sixteen Hereford bulls (16 mo of age, 462 kg average body weight) were used in each of 2 yr to evaluate the effects of hypovitaminosis A on seminal quality and sperm production. Bulls were fed a high-concentrate diet with (+VIT) or without (-VIT) supplemental Vitamin A until the apparent onset of hypovitaminosis A (28 and 32 wk in Year 1 and 2, respectively). Half of the bulls on each treatment were then slaughtered and those remaining were re-alimented with Vitamin A. Plasma retinol concentration in -VIT bulls reached a nadir at approximately 25 wk. In Year 1, the proportion of progressively motile spermatozoa was lower in -VIT bulls after 17 wk but returned to that of the +VIT group after re-alimentation. The proportion of spermatozoa with primary morphological defects appeared to be greater in -VIT bulls compared to +VIT bulls by 26 and 24 wk in Year 1 and 2, respectively. The incidence of these defects declined in -VIT bulls upon re-alimentation, and approached the incidence observed in +VIT bulls by 8 to 12 wk of re-alimentation. Hypovitaminosis A decreased paired testes weight, daily sperm production, and epididymal sperm reserves but did not affect daily gain. Prolonged dietary Vitamin A deficiency impaired semen quality and sperm production in the absence of other clinical symptoms. However, under practical feeding conditions, diets that result in long-term, marginal Vitamin A deficiency or a relatively short-term absence of Vitamin A intake probably would have minimal effects on spermatogenesis.

  4. Prediction of breeding values for tenderness of market animals from measurements on bulls.

    PubMed

    Barkhouse, K L; Van Vleck, L D; Cundiff, L V; Koohmaraie, M; Lunstra, D D; Crouse, J D

    1996-11-01

    Data were tenderness measures on steaks from 237 bulls (Group II) slaughtered after producing freezable semen and on 1,431 related steers and heifers (market animals, Group I) from Angus, Hereford, Pinzgauer, Brahman, and Sahiwal crosses from the Germ Plasm Evaluation project at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center. Tenderness was assessed through Warner-Bratzler Shear Force (SF), taste panel tenderness (TPT), marbling score (MS), and myofibrillar fragmentation index (MFI). For all traits, as fraction Bos indicus inheritance increased, implied tenderness decreased. Heritability estimates were generally not significantly different from zero. Genetic correlations generally indicated favorable associations among the traits. The range in predicted breeding values of bulls for market animal tenderness was small and from -.34 to .32 kg for market animal shear force. Because of low estimates of heritability for SF or TPT, results from this experiment indicate that selection based on tenderness of steaks sampled from intact or late castrate males slaughtered following collection of freezable quality semen would not be very effective in improving average tenderness of steaks from steers of heifer progeny. If a mean of heritability estimates reported in the literature of .27 for shear value was assumed for market steer and heifer progeny instead of .02 as found in the present study, then selection based on estimates of shear force in young bulls would be relatively more effective in improving shear force of market progeny. PMID:8923175

  5. Effect of butylated hydroxytoluene on cryopreservation of Boer goat semen in Tris egg yolk extender.

    PubMed

    Memon, Akeel Ahmed; Wahid, H; Rosnina, Y; Goh, Y M; Ebrahimi, M; Nadia, F M; Audrey, G

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), a lipid-soluble anti-oxidant added in different concentrations to the Tris egg yolk extenders on semen cytological parameters pre freezing and post thawing (motility, morphology, viability, acrosome integrity and membrane integrity) of Boer goat spermatozoa. A total of 40 ejaculates from four Boer goat bucks were collected using an artificial vagina. Ten replicates of the ejaculates were diluted with a Tris egg yolk based extender which contained various concentrations (0.5mM, 1.0mM, 2.0mM and 3.0mM) of butylated hydroxytoluene while one sample was processed without supplementation of antioxidant and served as control. The diluted semen was cooled at 4°C and loaded into the straw and then stored in liquid nitrogen. It was evident that supplementation of BHT produces positive effect in terms of motility, membrane integrity and acrosome integrity in comparison with the control group in cooled and frozen Boer goat semen. Results showed significant differences in motility, membrane integrity, acrosome integrity and viability of cooled and frozen Boer goat spermatozoa at different concentrations. Motility, membrane integrity, acrosome integrity and viability was significantly higher in all treated groups than the control group (P<0.05) while there was no significant differences (P>0.05) in morphology trait between all group in cooled semen. However, improvement (P<0.05) was observed only in terms of the membrane integrity and acrosome integrity compared to the control and other treated groups in frozen semen. In conclusion, BHT can be used in cryopreservation of Boer goat semen in order to reduce the oxidative stress on spermatozoa.

  6. Alternative splicing, promoter methylation, and functional SNPs of sperm flagella 2 gene in testis and mature spermatozoa of Holstein bulls.

    PubMed

    Guo, F; Yang, B; Ju, Z H; Wang, X G; Qi, C; Zhang, Y; Wang, C F; Liu, H D; Feng, M Y; Chen, Y; Xu, Y X; Zhong, J F; Huang, J M

    2014-02-01

    The sperm flagella 2 (SPEF2) gene is essential for development of normal sperm tail and male fertility. In this study, we characterized first the splice variants, promoter and its methylation, and functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the SPEF2 gene in newborn and adult Holstein bulls. Four splice variants were identified in the testes, epididymis, sperm, heart, spleen, lungs, kidneys, and liver tissues through RT-PCR, clone sequencing, and western blot analysis. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the SPEF2 was specifically expressed in the primary spermatocytes, elongated spermatids, and round spermatids in the testes and epididymis. SPEF2-SV1 was differentially expressed in the sperms of high-performance and low-performance adult bulls; SPEF2-SV2 presents the highest expression in testis and epididymis; SPEF2-SV3 was only detected in testis and epididymis. An SNP (c.2851G>T) in exon 20 of SPEF2, located within a putative exonic splice enhancer, potentially produced SPEF2-SV3 and was involved in semen deformity rate and post-thaw cryopreserved sperm motility. The luciferase reporter and bisulfite sequencing analysis suggested that the methylation pattern of the core promoter did not significantly differ between the full-sib bulls that presented hypomethylation in the ejaculated semen and testis. This finding indicates that sperm quality is unrelated to SPEF2 methylation pattern. Our data suggest that alternative splicing, rather than methylation, is involved in the regulation of SPEF2 expression in the testes and sperm and is one of the determinants of sperm motility during bull spermatogenesis. The exonic SNP (c.2851G>T) produces aberrant splice variants, which can be used as a candidate marker for semen traits selection breeding of Holstein bulls.

  7. Studies on Freezing RAM Semen in Absence of Glycerol.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelnaby, Abdelhady Abdelhakeam

    1988-12-01

    Glycerol is widely used as a major cryoprotective agent for freezing spermatozoa of almost all species. However, it reduces fertility of sheep inseminated cervically compared with intrauterine insemination. Studies were conducted to develop a method and procedure for freezing ram semen in the absence of glycerol. Post -thaw survival of ram spermatozoa frozen in the absence of glycerol was affected by time and temperature after collection and before dilution and time after dilution and before freezing. Increase in time at 5^ circC before or after dilution and before freezing increased both post-thaw motility and number of cells passing through Sephadex filter. A cold dilution method was developed. Slow cooling of fresh ram semen and diluting at 5^circ C 2-3 hr. after collection, then freezing 1 hr. after dilution improved both post-thaw motility and number of cells passing through Sephadex filter compared with immediate dilution at 30-37^circC after collection and freezing 3-4 hr. later (P < 0.05). An extender was developed to freeze ram semen in the absence of glycerol. An increase in post-thaw motility was obtained when semen was extended in TES titrated with Tris to pH 7.0 (TEST) and osmotic pressure of 375-400 mOsm/kg, containing 25-30% (v/v) egg yolk and 10% (v/v) maltose. A special device (boat) for freezing was constructed to insure the same height of the sample above LN _2 and thus the same freezing rate from freeze to freeze. Freezing of semen in 0.25cc straws at 5-10 cm above LN_2 (73.8 to 49.5 ^circC/min) yielded higher post-thaw motility than the rates resulted from freezing at 15 cm above LN_2 or 1 cm above LN _2. Faster Thawing in 37^ circC water for 30 sec. (7.8^ circC/sec.) increased post-thaw motility compared with slower thawing in 5 or 20^circ C water (P < 0.05). A lambing rate of 52.2% was obtained in one fertility trial conducted with ram semen frozen without glycerol and 17.1% in a second trial. One injection (IM) of 15 mg PGF_{2alpha}/ewe for

  8. 29 CFR 1918.84 - Bulling cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... shall be done with the bull line led directly from the heel block. However, bulling may be done from the..., falling, or being pulled from their stationary attachment. (e) Falls led from cargo booms of vessels...

  9. 29 CFR 1918.84 - Bulling cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... shall be done with the bull line led directly from the heel block. However, bulling may be done from the..., falling, or being pulled from their stationary attachment. (e) Falls led from cargo booms of vessels...

  10. 29 CFR 1918.84 - Bulling cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... shall be done with the bull line led directly from the heel block. However, bulling may be done from the..., falling, or being pulled from their stationary attachment. (e) Falls led from cargo booms of vessels...

  11. Relationship of conventional and fluorescent microscopic technique to assess in vitro semen quality status of Murrah buffalo males

    PubMed Central

    Shivahre, P. R; Gupta, A. K; Panmei, A; Yadav, B. R; Bhakat, M; Mohanty, T. K; Kumaresan, A; Kumar, V; Dash, S. K; Singh, S

    2015-01-01

    In vitro fertility assessment using fluorescent technique is a better predictor of fertility status of bulls as compared to traditional semen quality assessment techniques, therefore, the study was planned to assess in vitro fertility status of bulls based on conventional and fluorescent techniques. Seventy-three ejaculates were collected from 12 Murrah buffalo bulls maintained at Artificial Breeding Research Centre, NDRI, Karnal, India for the experiment and subjected to statistical analysis using SYSTAT. The mean values of ejaculate volume (ml), mass activity, individual motility (%), sperm concentration (millions/ml), live sperm (%), total abnormalities (%), HOST (%) and acrosomal integrity (%) were 2.70 ± 0.28, 2.8 ± 0.14, 63.8 ± 2.16, 1749.7 ± 122.24, 77.3 ± 2.48, 6.2 ± 0.51, 75.1 ± 1.81 and 84.5 ± 2.26, respectively. The repeatability estimates were significant (P<0.05) for ejaculate volume (0.34 ± 0.137), acrosomal integrity (0.29 ± 0.134) and live percentage (0.28 ± 0.133), indicating sufficient bull to bull variation for the parameters. The mean values of seminal attributes of fluorescent based criteria of CMA3 (Chromomycin A3), SYBR-PI and FITC-PNA (fluorescent isothiocynate-conjugated peanut agglutinin) were 5.25 ± 0.41, 67.91 ± 1.24 and 82.00 ± 1.25 percent, respectively. Bulls were ranked on the basis of expected producing ability (EPA) for semen characteristics assessed by conventional and fluorescent criteria. Rank correlations were found to be significant for FITC with most of the parameters evaluated by conventional methods. In conclusion, among the conventional criteria, individual motility (%) revealed ranking of bulls almost similar to that of fluorescent criteria. PMID:27175204

  12. Laparoscopic cryptorchidectomy in standing bulls

    PubMed Central

    KANEKO, Yasuyuki; TORISU, Shidow; KITAHARA, Go; HIDAKA, Yuichi; SATOH, Hiroyuki; ASANUMA, Taketoshi; MIZUTANI, Shinya; OSAWA, Takeshi; NAGANOBU, Kiyokazu

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic cryptorchidectomy without insufflation was applied in 10 standing bulls aged 3 to 15 months. Nine bulls were preoperatively pointed out intra-abdominal testes by computed tomography. Preoperative fasting for a minimum of 24 hr provided laparoscopic visualization of intra-abdominal area from the kidney to the inguinal region. Surgical procedure was interrupted by intra-abdominal fat and testis size. It took 0.6 to 1.5 hr in 4 animals weighing 98 to 139 kg, 0.8 to 2.8 hr in 4 animals weighing 170 to 187 kg, and 3 and 4 hr in 2 animals weighing 244 and 300 kg to complete the cryptorchidectomy. In conclusion, standing gasless laparoscopic cryptorchidectomy seems to be most suitable for bulls weighing from 100 to 180 kg. PMID:25715955

  13. Simple and effective methods of freezing capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus L.) semen.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Artur; Łukaszewicz, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    A continuous decline in the number and range of capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus L.) in many European countries can be observed, mostly due to habitat destruction by human activity, unecological forestry management, and increased density of natural predators. Ex situ in vitro gene banks provide a unique opportunity to preserve the genetic material for future generations. Simple and effective cryopreservation methods for capercaillie semen are discussed. Semen was collected from seven males kept in the Capercaillie Breeding Centre at Forestry Wisła in Poland. Within five minutes after collection, ejaculates were diluted with EK diluent, then divided into two parts, and subjected to two freezing procedures: in pellets and in straws. In fresh semen, ejaculate clearness, viscosity, color and volume, as well as sperm concentration, motility and morphology, were evaluated, while in frozen-thawed semen only motility and morphology of sperm were determined. Fertilizing ability of thawed semen was examined for samples frozen in straws. Significant (P<0.05) differences between individual males were found in relation to the majority of fresh semen traits: ejaculate volume averaged 102.1 µL (varying from 49.0 to 205.0); average sperm concentration was 632.5 x 10⁶ mL⁻¹ (178.8-1257.1); percentage of live normal cells varied from 39.2 to 70.3% (58.7% on an average); percentage of motile cells ranged from 76.0 to 85.7%) and motility parameters were male dependent, as well. Both cryopreservation methods had a negative effect on morphology and motility of frozen-thawed semen; however, the straw method yielded 60.7% and the pellet method 42.5% of live cells in total in thawed semen (P<0.05), while the number of live normal (intact) cells was similar (22.4 and 22.2%, respectively). Egg fertility varied between 77.8 and 91.7% (average 84.4%). Both freezing procedures seem to be effective in obtaining acceptable viability and high fertilizing potency of thawed sperm and can be used

  14. Evaluation of an animal protein-free semen extender for cryopreservation of epididymal sperm from North American bison (Bison bison).

    PubMed

    Krishnakumar, S; Whiteside, D P; Elkin, B; Thundathil, J C

    2011-07-15

    The objective was to evaluate the suitability of an animal protein-free semen extender for cryopreservation of epididymal sperm from the two subspecies of North American bison: plains (Bison bison bison) and wood (Bison bison athabascae) bison. Both cauda epididymides (from six plains and five wood bison) were minced and incubated in Sp-TALPH buffer for approximately 2 h at 37 °C to release actively motile sperm. Sperm suspensions were filtered, centrifuged and the sperm pellet from each bull was divided into two fractions and diluted either in egg yolk containing extender, Triladyl, or in an animal protein-free extender, Andromed, and equilibrated for 20 min at 37 °C. Thereafter, samples were chilled and cryopreserved. Frozen-thawed sperm were evaluated for motility (computer assisted sperm analysis), viability (SYBR 14 and propidium iodide), acrosome integrity (FITC conjugated PSA), cryocapacitation (tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm proteins as a biomarker), and fertilizing ability (in a heterologous IVF system). There was no significant difference for progressive motility, viability, and acrosome integrity between the two extenders for plains bison (36.8 ± 9.0, 60.5 ± 17.4, and 77.3 ± 4.6%; overall mean ± SD) as well as for wood bison (11.7 ± 8.1, 13.7 ± 5.6, and 73.4 ± 4.2%). Levels of tyrosine phosphorylation did not differ for sperm preserved in the two extenders for both subspecies, although an inter-bull variability in the response to tyrosine phosphorylation between extenders was suggested for plains bison. Fertilization percent did not differ significantly between extenders for plains bison (84.16 ± 9.92%, overall mean ± SD) and for wood bison (59.53 ± 19.99%). In conclusion, in the absence of significant difference between extenders in post-thaw sperm characteristics, we inferred that Andromed (animal protein-free) was suitable for cryopreservation of epididymal sperm from North American bison.

  15. Effects of different cryoprotectants and freezing methods on post-thaw boar semen quality.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chung-Hsun; Wu, Ting-Wen; Cheng, Feng-Pang; Wang, Jiann-Hsiung; Wu, Jui-Te

    2016-03-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the effects of different concentrations of glycerol (0%, 1%, 2%, 3%, and 5%) and dimethylacetamide (DMA: 0%, 1%, 3%, and 5%) on post-sperm quality characteristics following semen freezing in dry ice (D) or liquid nitrogen (N). Semen was collected from Duroc boars and was allocated to 32 treatment groups for cryopreservation. Analysis of post-thaw semen quality and fertility after artificial insemination (AI) was used to examine the combinatorial effects of different treatments. The best scores for post-thaw sperm motility, sperm viability, and sperm acrosomal integrity were observed in semen frozen in: (a) dry ice in the presence of 5% glycerol and no DMA (16D-treatment); (b) dry ice in the presence of 3% glycerol and no DMA (9D-treatment); and (c) liquid nitrogen in the presence of 3% glycerol and 1% DMA (10N-treatment), with no significant difference observed among these three treatments. The farrowing rates after AI with post-thawed semen after 9D- and 10N-treatments were 33% and 50%, respectively. To summarize, the results of the present study indicated that the freezing extender containing 3% glycerol in combination with the straw-freezing method using dry ice produced the best post-thaw quality parameters of boar semen. Combinations of glycerol and DMA did not enhance the cryosurvival of boar spermatozoa. PMID:26952752

  16. Effects of different cryoprotectants and freezing methods on post-thaw boar semen quality.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chung-Hsun; Wu, Ting-Wen; Cheng, Feng-Pang; Wang, Jiann-Hsiung; Wu, Jui-Te

    2016-03-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the effects of different concentrations of glycerol (0%, 1%, 2%, 3%, and 5%) and dimethylacetamide (DMA: 0%, 1%, 3%, and 5%) on post-sperm quality characteristics following semen freezing in dry ice (D) or liquid nitrogen (N). Semen was collected from Duroc boars and was allocated to 32 treatment groups for cryopreservation. Analysis of post-thaw semen quality and fertility after artificial insemination (AI) was used to examine the combinatorial effects of different treatments. The best scores for post-thaw sperm motility, sperm viability, and sperm acrosomal integrity were observed in semen frozen in: (a) dry ice in the presence of 5% glycerol and no DMA (16D-treatment); (b) dry ice in the presence of 3% glycerol and no DMA (9D-treatment); and (c) liquid nitrogen in the presence of 3% glycerol and 1% DMA (10N-treatment), with no significant difference observed among these three treatments. The farrowing rates after AI with post-thawed semen after 9D- and 10N-treatments were 33% and 50%, respectively. To summarize, the results of the present study indicated that the freezing extender containing 3% glycerol in combination with the straw-freezing method using dry ice produced the best post-thaw quality parameters of boar semen. Combinations of glycerol and DMA did not enhance the cryosurvival of boar spermatozoa.

  17. TRIHALOMETHANE LEVELS AND SEMEN QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trihalomethanes (THMs) are common byproducts of chlorinating drinking water. The effects of disinfection byproducts on semen quality have not yet been studied in humans, despite animal studies linking exposure to sperm abnormalities. We are currently analyzing the relationship of...

  18. Microfluidic Chips for Semen Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Segerink, L.I.; Sprenkels, A.J.; Oosterhuis, G.J.E.; Vermes, I.; van den Berg, A.

    2012-01-01

    The gold standard of semen analysis is still an manual method, which is time-consuming, labour intensive and needs thorough quality control. Microfluidics can also offer advantages for this application. Therefore a first step in the development of a microfluidic chip has been made, which enables the man the semen analysis at home. In this article recent efforts to determine the concentration and motility using a microfluidic chip are summarized.

  19. Effect of ruminally undegradable protein from fish meal on growth and reproduction of peripuberal Brahman bulls.

    PubMed

    Rocha, A; Carpena, M; Triplett, B; Forrest, D W; Randel, R D

    1995-04-01

    Thirty-nine Brahman bulls (301.7 +/- 4.1 d; 202.7 +/- 4.7 kg) were allotted to one of two treatments and fed soybean meal (SBM)- or fish meal (FIS)-based supplements and hay to examine the effects of source of protein on growth and reproductive development. The fish meal supplement had 72% ruminally undegradable protein (RUP) and the soybean meal supplement had 47% RUP. Bulls assigned to the FIS treatment had higher (P < .01) total weight gain (81.2 +/- 1.4 vs 71.2 +/- 2.2 kg), higher (P < .01) ADG (.97 +/- .02 vs .85 +/- .03 kg), and better (P < .05) feed:gain ratio (7.6 +/- .1 vs 8.6 +/- .1 feed/BW gain for FIS vs SBM, respectively). Age at first motile spermatozoa was not affected (P > .05) by source of protein (429.9 +/- 9.6 vs 427.2 +/- 9.5 d, for bulls receiving FIS or SBM supplements, respectively). Likewise, age at puberty (473.3 +/- 21.7 d vs 465.9 +/- 12.9 d for bulls receiving FIS and SBM supplements, respectively) was similar for both treatment groups. There were no differences between treatments in scrotal circumference at those stages. At puberty semen quality was similar for bulls receiving FIS or SBM treatments, and no differences existed in LH and testosterone concentrations between treatments. We conclude that fish meal supplement increased growth but did not alter reproductive parameters in Brahman bulls. PMID:7628971

  20. The 1000 bull genome project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To meet growing global demands for high value protein from milk and meat, rates of genetic gain in domestic cattle must be accelerated. At the same time, animal health and welfare must be considered. The 1000 bull genomes project supports these goals by providing annotated sequence variants and ge...

  1. Gobbledygook and the golden bull.

    PubMed

    1987-12-19

    Once again the Department of Health and Social Security is among the main contenders for this year's Golden Bull Awards. This is not an acknowledgement of its [Illegible word] entrepreneurialism, or even a rosette for being on target. It's a booby prize for producing gobbledygook. PMID:27319524

  2. Long-term Effects of Pyrethrin and Cyfluthrin, a Type II Synthetic Pyrethroid, Insecticide Applications on Bull Reproductive Parameters.

    PubMed

    Stewart, J L; Shipley, C F; Ireland, F A; Jarrell, V L; Timlin, C L; Shike, D W; Felix, T L

    2016-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine effects of cyfluthrin and pyrethrin spray products, used in combination with cyfluthrin topical and ear tag applications, on bull reproductive parameters over 18 weeks. Angus or Angus x Simmental bulls were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: (i) no exposure to pyrethrins/cyfluthrin (CONT; n = 10), (ii) cyfluthrin ear tag and topical applications (ET; n = 10), or (iii) cyfluthrin ear tag, topical, premise spray and pyrethrin fog spray applications (ET+S; n = 8). Bull body weight was measured every 3 week, and body condition score and scrotal circumference were recorded on weeks 0, 9 and 18. Semen and serum were collected every 3 weeks for sperm evaluation and testosterone measurement, respectively. There was a treatment × week interaction (p < 0.01) for sperm with primary defects; bulls in CONT group had a greater (p = 0.01) percentage of sperm with primary defects than bulls treated with insecticides at week 18. Overall and progressive sperm motility, normal sperm morphology, secondary sperm defects and serum testosterone concentrations changed (p < 0.01) over time in all bulls; however, treatment did not affect (p ≥ 0.13) any of these parameters. There were also no treatment effects (p ≥ 0.08) on bull body weight, body condition score or scrotal circumference. The use of pyrethrin- and cyfluthrin-based insecticides, regardless of application, did not negatively affect reproductive parameters in beef bulls when administered over 18 weeks. PMID:27411861

  3. Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) provides antioxidant protection for boar semen cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Malo, C; Gil, L; Cano, R; González, N; Luño, V

    2012-05-01

    Boar semen is extremely vulnerable to cold shock and it is also sensitive to peroxidation due to the high content of unsaturated fatty acids in the plasma membrane. Antioxidants exert a protective effect on the plasma membrane of frozen boar sperm. Fennel has been shown to contain antioxidant substances. Therefore, this study was performed to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of fennel added to the freezing extender on boar semen quality and lipid peroxidation after thawing. Semen collected from four boars was cryopreserved in lactose-egg-yolk extender or in the same extender with varying concentration of fennel essences: low (LF); medium (MF); high (HF). Analysis of data clearly indicated that higher concentrations of fennel produced significant improvement in total motility. Moreover, when fennel was included in the extender, a dose-dependent tendency to increase sperm viability was observed. In contrast, the addition of fennel had no effect on acrosome integrity or hypoosmotic swelling test (HOST) compared with the control. Malondialdehyde (MDA) formation decreased significantly in fennel groups, yielding similar results for MF and HF. Fennel seems a new antioxidant for use in sperm cryopreservation, but its particular effects on sperm physiology must be further studied, especially the causes of motility stimulation and its effect on lipoxidation.

  4. Cryopreservation increases coating of bull sperm by seminal plasma binder of sperm proteins BSP1, BSP3, and BSP5.

    PubMed

    Ardon, Florencia; Suarez, Susan S

    2013-08-01

    Artificial insemination with frozen semen allows affordable, worldwide dissemination of gametes with superior genetics. Nevertheless, sperm are damaged by the cryopreservation process. Elucidating the molecular effects of cryopreservation on sperm could suggest methods for improving fertility of frozen/thawed semen. This study was undertaken to examine the effect of cryopreservation on the coating of sperm by binder of sperm (BSP) proteins in seminal plasma. BSP proteins are secreted by the seminal vesicles and coat the surface of sperm by partially intercalating into the outer leaflet of the sperm plasma membrane. The BSP proteins are known to play roles in the formation of the oviductal sperm storage reservoir and in sperm capacitation. We investigated the effects of cryopreservation on the sperm BSP protein coat using Bovipure to separate live sperm from extended semen and then assaying the amounts of BSP proteins on sperm using quantitative western blotting with custom-made antibodies against unique sequences of each BSP protein. Greater amounts of all three BSP proteins (BSP1, BSP3, and BSP5) were detected on frozen/thawed sperm than on fresh sperm. Furthermore, the reduction of BSP3 from 15 to 13 kDa in mass, which occurs during incubation of sperm under mild capacitating conditions, was enhanced by cryopreservation. We concluded that freezing alters the BSP protein coating on sperm, which could account in part for reduced fertility of cryopreserved semen samples.

  5. The effect of Curcuma longa extracted (curcumin) on the quality of cryopreserved boar semen.

    PubMed

    Chanapiwat, Panida; Kaeoket, Kampon

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the optimal concentration of curcumin needed for cryopreservation of boar semen. Semen samples (n = 9) were collected from nine Duroc boars which having proven fertility were used for routine artificial insemination. Semen samples were collected and divided into six groups (groups A-F) according to various concentrations of curcumin in freezing extender (i.e. 0, 0.125, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.0 mmol/L, respectively). The semen was frozen by traditional liquid nitrogen vapor method and stored at -196°C in the liquid nitrogen tank. After storage, frozen semen samples were thawed at 50°C for 12 s and evaluated for progressive motility, viability and acrosome integrity. The present results indicated that the addition of curcumin at 0.25 (group C) or 0.50 mmol/L curcumin (group D) yielded the higher percentage of progressive motility (33.3 and 36.1%, respectively) (P < 0.001). A significantly higher percentage of acrosome integrity was found in groups B (29.7%), C (31.1%) and D (30.2%) than in the other groups (P < 0.01). However, there was no significant difference in percentage of viability among groups. In conclusion, addition to the freezing extender of curcumin during cryopreservation at a concentration of 0.25 or 0.50 mmol/L is the optimal concentration of curcumin for improving the quality (i.e. increased progressive motility and acrosome integrity) of cryopreserved boar semen.

  6. Collection and preservation of pygmy hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis) semen.

    PubMed

    Saragusty, J; Hildebrandt, T B; Bouts, T; Göritz, F; Hermes, R

    2010-09-01

    Knowledge about the reproduction of the endangered pygmy hippopotamus is almost non-existent. This study takes the first step toward changing this by devising a protocol for the collection, evaluation, and short-term preservation of semen of this endangered species. Semen was collected successfully from seven bulls by electroejaculation, using a specially designed rectal probe. Mean +/- SEM values of native sperm parameters from combined best fractions were: motility-80.0 +/- 4.1%, concentration-2421 +/- 1530 x 10(6) cells/mL, total collected cell number-759 +/- 261 x 10(6) cells, intact acrosome-87.8 +/- 1.2%, intact morphology-52.7 +/- 4.3%, and, for some, hypoosmotic swelling test-79.3 +/- 4.4% and seminal plasma osmolarity-297.5 +/- 3.3 mOsm. Seven different extenders were tested for sperm storage under chilling conditions: Berliner Cryomedium (BC), Biladyl, modification of Kenney modified Tyrode's medium (KMT), MES medium, Androhep((R)), boar M III() extender and Human Sperm Refrigeration Medium. While differences between males were apparent, the BC was consistently superior to all other extenders in sperm motility and facilitated storage for 7 d with up to 30% motility and some motility even after 3 weeks. With this knowledge in hand, the obvious two directions for future research are to conduct artificial insemination and to develop a technique for sperm cryopreservation.

  7. Collection and preservation of pygmy hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis) semen.

    PubMed

    Saragusty, J; Hildebrandt, T B; Bouts, T; Göritz, F; Hermes, R

    2010-09-01

    Knowledge about the reproduction of the endangered pygmy hippopotamus is almost non-existent. This study takes the first step toward changing this by devising a protocol for the collection, evaluation, and short-term preservation of semen of this endangered species. Semen was collected successfully from seven bulls by electroejaculation, using a specially designed rectal probe. Mean +/- SEM values of native sperm parameters from combined best fractions were: motility-80.0 +/- 4.1%, concentration-2421 +/- 1530 x 10(6) cells/mL, total collected cell number-759 +/- 261 x 10(6) cells, intact acrosome-87.8 +/- 1.2%, intact morphology-52.7 +/- 4.3%, and, for some, hypoosmotic swelling test-79.3 +/- 4.4% and seminal plasma osmolarity-297.5 +/- 3.3 mOsm. Seven different extenders were tested for sperm storage under chilling conditions: Berliner Cryomedium (BC), Biladyl, modification of Kenney modified Tyrode's medium (KMT), MES medium, Androhep((R)), boar M III() extender and Human Sperm Refrigeration Medium. While differences between males were apparent, the BC was consistently superior to all other extenders in sperm motility and facilitated storage for 7 d with up to 30% motility and some motility even after 3 weeks. With this knowledge in hand, the obvious two directions for future research are to conduct artificial insemination and to develop a technique for sperm cryopreservation. PMID:20416932

  8. Sex-sorting of spermatozoa affects developmental competence of in vitro fertilized oocytes in a bull-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    INABA, Yasushi; ABE, Reika; GESHI, Masaya; MATOBA, Satoko; NAGAI, Takashi; SOMFAI, Tamás

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify if flow-cytometric sex-sorting of bovine sperm affected in vitro blastocyst production in different bulls, either in terms of its ability to fertilize the oocyte or by interfering with post-fertilization embryo development. We performed in vitro fertilization (IVF) using both commercially available frozen-thawed X-sorted and non-sorted sperm of 4 Holstein bulls at 3 concentrations (1 × 106, 2 × 106, and 5 × 106 sperm/ml). When fertilization rates were compared, a variation in fertilization rates among different sperm concentrations was detected in 2 bulls, with similar results for X-sorted and non-sorted sperm. However, we found no evidence that the fertilization rates were affected by the sorting process. To investigate effects on embryo development, we determined the optimum sperm concentration for IVF in each bull, which resulted in similar fertilization rates among bulls. We next performed IVF using both X-sorted and non-sorted sperm of the 4 bulls at their optimum sperm concentration and compared in vitro embryo development. Cleavage rates with X-sorted sperm were similar to their non-sorted counterparts. However, significantly reduced blastocyst development was associated with the use of X-sorted sperm in one bull, whereas in the other three bulls, blastocyst development after IVF with X-sorted and non-sorted sperm was similar. In conclusion, in our system, X-sorting affects in vitro blastocyst production by reducing the developmental competence of fertilized oocytes rather than affecting the fertilization ability of the sperm. However, the occurrence of this phenomenon varies among bulls. PMID:27301424

  9. Impact of pig insemination technique and semen preparation on profitability.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Peña, D; Knox, R V; Pettigrew, J; Rodriguez-Zas, S L

    2014-01-01

    Artificial insemination technique and semen preparation impact boar utilization efficiency, genetic dissemination, and biosecurity. Intrauterine (IUI) and deep intrauterine (DUI) AI techniques require lower number of spermatozoa per dose compared to conventional (CON) AI. Frozen semen (FRO) has been associated with lower reproductive performance compared to fresh semen (FRE) preparation. The combined effects of 3 AI techniques (CON, IUI, and DUI) and 2 semen preparations (FRE and FRO) on the financial indicators of a pig crossbreeding system were studied. A 3-tier system was simulated in ZPLAN and the genetic improvement in a representative scenario was characterized. The cross of nucleus lines B and A generated 200,000 BA sows at the multiplier level. The BA sows were inseminated (CON, IUI, or DUI) with FRE or FRO from line C boars at the commercial level. Semen preparation and AI technique were represented by distinct sow:boar ratios in the C × BA cross. A range of farrowing rates (60 to 90%) and litter sizes (8 to 14 liveborn pigs) were tested. Genetic improvement per year for number born alive, adjusted 21-d litter weight, days to 113.5 kg, backfat, and ADG were 0.01 pigs per litter, 0.06 kg, -0.09 d, -0.29 mm, and 0.88 g, respectively. On average, the net profit for FRE (FRO) increased (P-value < 0.0001) from CON to IUI and DUI by 2.2 (3.2%) and 2.6% (4%), respectively. The differences in profit between techniques were driven by differences in costs. Differences in fixed costs between IUI and DUI relative to CON were -2.4 (-5.2%) and -3.4% (-7.4%), respectively. The differences in total costs between FRE and FRO were lower than -5%. The difference in variable costs between FRE and FRO ranged from -5.3 (CON) to -24.7% (DUI). Overall, insemination technique and semen preparation had a nonlinear effect on profit. The average relative difference in profit between FRE and FRO was less than 3% for the scenarios studied.

  10. Recent advances in cooled-semen technology.

    PubMed

    Aurich, Christine

    2008-09-01

    The majority of horse registries approve the use of artificial insemination, and horse breeding has widely taken benefit from the use of cooled-stored semen. New insights into cooled-semen technology open possibilities to reduce problems such as impaired semen quality after cooled-storage in individual stallions. The stallion itself has major impacts on quality and fertility of cooled-stored semen. Dietary supplementation of antioxidants and polyunsaturated fatty acids improves semen quality in a variety of species, but only few studies on this topic exist in the horse. Proper semen collection and handling is the main key to the maintenance of semen quality during cooled-storage. Semen collection should be achieved by minimal sexual stimulation with a single mount; this results in high sperm concentration, low content of seminal plasma and minimal contamination with bacteria. Milk-based semen extenders are most popular for semen processing and storage. The development of more defined extenders containing only the beneficial milk ingredients has made extender quality more constant and reliable. Semen is often centrifuged to decrease the seminal plasma content. Centrifugation results in a recovery rate of only 75% of spermatozoa in the semen pellet. Recovery rates after centrifugation may be improved with use of a "cushion technique" allowing higher centrifugation force and duration. However, this is not routinely used in cooled-semen technology. After slow-cooling, semen-storage and shipping is best performed at 5 degrees C, maintaining semen motility, membrane integrity and DNA integrity for up to 40 h after collection. Shipping containers created from Styrofoam boxes provide maintenance of semen quality at low cost.

  11. Frozen shoulder - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome - aftercare; Pericapsulitis - aftercare; Stiff shoulder - aftercare; Shoulder pain - frozen shoulder ... Call your doctor if: The pain in your shoulder is getting worse You re-injure your arm or shoulder Your frozen shoulder is making you feel sad or depressed

  12. Disease risks to animal health from artificial insemination with bovine semen.

    PubMed

    Eaglesome, M D; Garcia, M M

    1997-04-01

    Two of the major goals of artificial insemination of domesticated animals are to achieve continuous genetic improvement and to prevent or eliminate venereal disease. In comparison with natural service, fewer males are needed to artificially inseminate the same number of females and to produce the same number of offspring. However, there are risks associated with artificial insemination, which has the potential to disseminate genetic defects and also to spread infectious disease nationally and internationally. This paper focuses on the risk of six specific diseases which are transmitted in bull semen and outlines the appropriate measures to prevent these risks. PMID:9329119

  13. Cloned embryos from semen. Part 1: in vitro proliferation of epithelial cells on embryonic fibroblasts after isolation from semen by gradient centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Nel-Themaat, Liesl; Gómez, Martha C; Pope, C Earle; Lopez, Monica; Wirtu, Gemechu; Cole, Alex; Dresser, Betsy L; Lyons, Leslie A; Bondioli, Kenneth R; Godke, Robert A

    2008-03-01

    Although epithelial-like somatic cells have been previously isolated from semen, cell proliferation rates were low. Culture of whole semen samples resulted in loss of potentially valuable spermatozoa. The aims of the present study were to: (1) isolate somatic cells from semen, while preserving sperm viability, and (2) optimize in vitro culture conditions for semen-derived epithelial cells. Density gradient centrifugation of washed ejaculates of two rams (Ovis aries) (n = 24) and one eland bull (Taurotragus oryx) (n = 4) was performed using a three-layer discontinuous Percoll column consisting of 90% (P-90), 50% (P-50), and 20% (P-20) Percoll. In vitro culture and Trypan Blue staining indicated that live somatic cells settled in the P-20 layer. Nonmotile spermatozoa were recovered at the P-50 and P-90 interfaces, whereas motile spermatozoa were collected in the pellet from the P-90 layer. Subsequently, somatic cells isolated from the P-20 layer were plated either on inactivated 3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder layers, collagen-coated plates with 3T3 feeder cell inserts, or on collagen-coated plates. Initial somatic cell plating was similar among treatments, but proliferation significantly increased when cocultured with 3T3 cells (feeder or insert). Furthermore, two different types of epithelial cells were obtained. The exact origin of the cells in the male reproduction system is uncertain and probably variable. The present method of cell isolation and in vitro culture may be of value for preserving endangered species. Specifically, cells isolated and cultured from cryopreserved semen of nonliving males could be used for producing embryos by somatic cell nuclear transfer. PMID:18241128

  14. Successful ram semen cryopreservation with lyophilized egg yolk-based extender.

    PubMed

    Alcay, Selim; Berk Toker, M; Gokce, Elif; Ustuner, Burcu; Tekin Onder, N; Sagirkaya, Hakan; Nur, Zekariya; Kemal Soylu, M

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of lyophilized egg yolk extender on ram semen cryopreservation. Ejaculates with a thick consistency, rapid wave motion (3-5 on a 0-5 scale) and >75% initial motility were pooled. Sperm were diluted to final concentration of 1/5 (semen/extender) in lyophilized egg yolk or fresh egg yolk extenders using two-step dilution method. The equilibrated semen was frozen in 0.25 mL straws. Semen samples were assessed for sperm motility, plasma membrane functional integrity using hypoosmotic swelling test (HOST), damaged acrosome using FITC-Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA-FITC) and DNA integrity using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) at three time points: after dilution with extender A, equilibration and post-thaw. The results showed that freezing and thawing procedures (dilution, equilibration and thawing) had negative effects on motility (P<0.001), plasma membrane integrity (P<0.001), acrosome integrity (P<0.001) and DNA integrity (P<0.001). In the study, there were no significant differences between lyophilized and fresh egg yolk extenders when comparing motility, plasma membrane integrity, acrosome integrity and DNA integrity between groups. In conclusion, lyophilized egg yolk extender provided similar cryoprotective effects with fresh egg yolk extender to cryopreserve ram semen.

  15. Cryopreservation of semen in the dog: use of ultra-freezers of -152 degrees C as a viable alternative to liquid nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Alamo, Desirée; Batista, Miguel; González, Fernando; Rodríguez, Noemí; Cruz, Guadalupe; Cabrera, Fernando; Gracia, Anselmo

    2005-01-01

    This experimental work was carried out to validate the use of a -152 degrees C ultra-low temperature freezer to freeze and store canine semen. The semen of three dogs was pooled and processed to obtain a final dilution with a concentration of 100 x 10(6) spermatozoa/mL, glycerol at 5% and Equex at 0.5%. Then, four freezing protocols were tested to evaluate the cryosurvival of sperm at 1, 7, 30, 60 and 120 days after freezing: (I) semen was frozen and stored in liquid nitrogen; (II) semen was frozen in liquid nitrogen and stored in the ultra-low freezer at -152 degrees C; (III) semen was frozen in the vapour of liquid nitrogen and stored in the ultra-low freezer at -152 degrees C; (IV) semen was frozen and stored in the ultra-low freezer at -152 degrees C. Data were statistically analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance to determine the effect of the freezing protocol and time on the sperm characteristics assessed. The percentages of sperm motility and of dead/live spermatozoa were similar throughout the experimental period, with no significant differences (P < 0.05) to be observed between four different freezing techniques tested. At 120 days after freezing, the percentage of abnormal cells and the percentage of sperm cells with abnormal acrosome were not significantly different between the freezing techniques. Although the number of dogs used was slightly low, in vitro results of this preliminary study showed that the use of ultra-freezers at -152 degrees C to freeze and store canine semen could be a viable alternative to liquid nitrogen. PMID:15589274

  16. Artificial insemination of captive European brown hares (Lepus europaeus PALLAS, 1778) with fresh and cryopreserved semen derived from free-ranging males.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, T B; Roellig, K; Goeritz, F; Fassbender, M; Krieg, R; Blottner, S; Behr, B; Hermes, R

    2009-11-01

    This study aimed to establish artificial insemination (AI) protocols to predictably initiate pregnancy during the breeding season in the European brown hare (EBH) (Lepus europaeus PALLAS, 1778). Semen was collected from seven captive and eight free-ranging males by means of electroejaculation. Semen from the free-ranging males was cryopreserved using directional freezing. Total motility/integrity of fresh and frozen-thawed semen was 91.6%/87.7% and 46.9%/53.8%, respectively. Ovulation was induced in ultrasonographically preselected females using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue. Each female was inseminated with 1 mL fresh (Group A, n=16) or frozen-thawed semen (Group B, n=9) at a concentration of 100x10(6) spermatozoa/mL. The use of ultrasonography (10 to 22 MHz) confirmed the intracervical semen deposit, the success of artificial ovulation induction (formation of postovulatory corpus luteum), and permitted the monitoring of individual pregnancies. Although sperm motility/integrity was significantly different between groups, no significant difference was detected in conception rates (A, 87.50%; B, 77.78%). Because of embryonic resorption, there was a slight difference in fertility rate between groups (A, 62.5%; B, 77.78%). Overall, AI in captive EBH using fresh and frozen-thawed semen achieved successful fertility rates. Long-term cryopreserved semen was used to bring new genetic material from the wild into a genetically limited captive population without extensive animal transport. Therefore, AI has the potential to enhance breeding programs for EBH especially when cryopreserved semen from wild donors is used. PMID:19740536

  17. Development of teaser bulls under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Gregor L; Dawson, Lionel J

    2008-11-01

    A teaser bull is a term describing a bull whose reproductive system has been surgically altered to render him sterile. The purpose of such bulls is to aid in detection of cows in estrus to facilitate when to artificially inseminate. The bull is sterilized by either vasectomy or caudal epididymectomy. In addition to sterilization, other surgical options are described that prevent intromission and the spread of venereal disease. This article describes briefly some of those options. The procedures described are those preferred by the authors and can be performed in the field. Some of the pros and cons of these procedures are discussed.

  18. Frozen gene pools - A future for species otherwise destined for extinction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.

    1986-01-01

    Conclusion: Semen banks and ova and embryo banks can be practical methods to maintain gene pools. Gene pool preservation is desperately needed today due to the rapid decline in number of species and their habitat, a matter that is of concern to.biologists, economists, and politicians worldwide. Techniques are available for the cryopreservation of semen from many animals (and embryos from a few mammals) and adaptations of these techniques to other animals should be possible. A frozen gene pool in conjunction with existing programs makes it possible to preserve gene pools at less cost or in.some cases where no other alternative to extinction existed.

  19. Tris-egg yolk-glycerol (TEY) extender developed for freezing dog semen is a good option to cryopreserve bovine epididymal sperm cells.

    PubMed

    Lopes, G; Soares, L; Ferreira, P; Rocha, A

    2015-02-01

    Cryopreservation of epididymal spermatozoa is often performed after shipping the excised testis-epididymis complexes, under refrigeration, to a specialized laboratory. However, epididymal spermatozoa can be collected immediately after excision of the epididymis and sent extended and refrigerated to a laboratory for cryopreservation. In this experiment, we evaluated the effect of both methods of cold storage bovine epididymal spermatozoa as well as of two different extenders on spermatozoa characteristics after freeze-thawing. For that, spermatozoa collected from the caudae epididymis of 19 bulls were extended and cryopreserved in either AndroMed(®) or a Tris-egg yolk (TEY)-based extender. Cryopreservation of sperm cells was performed immediately after castration (Group A, n = 9) or after cold storage for 24 h diluted in the two extenders and (Group B, n = 9) and also after cold storage for 24 h within the whole epididymis (Group C, n = 10). Sperm subjective progressive motility (light microscopy), plasma membrane integrity (hypoosmotic swelling test) and sperm viability (eosin-nigrosin) were evaluated. In vitro fertilization and culture (IVF) was performed to assess the blastocyst rate. No differences (p > 0.05) were observed on post-thaw sperm parameters between samples from Group A, B and C. TEY extended samples presented a higher (p < 0.01) percentage of progressive motile and live sperm, than those extended in AndroMed(®) . Blastocyst rate after IVF differed only (p < 0.05) between the reference group (IVF performed with frozen semen with known in vitro fertility) and Group A extended in AndroMed(®) . We conclude that when cryopreservation facilities are distant from the collection site, bovine epididymal sperm can be shipped chilled overnight either within the epididymal tail or after dilution without deleterious effect on post-thaw sperm quality. TEY extender was more suitable for cold storage and freezing bovine epididymal sperm, than the commercial

  20. Seminal plasma protein profiles of ejaculates obtained by internal artificial vagina and electroejaculation in Brahman bulls.

    PubMed

    Rego, J P A; Moura, A A; Nouwens, A S; McGowan, M R; Boe-Hansen, G B

    2015-09-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate if differences exist in the seminal plasma protein profile from mature Brahman bulls using two methods of semen collection: internal artificial vagina (IAV) and electroejaculation (EEJ). Semen was collected four times from three bulls on the same day and parameters were assessed immediately post-collection. Seminal plasma proteins were evaluated by 2-D fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and identified by mass spectrometry. Semen volume was greater (P < 0.05) for EEJ (4.6 ± 0.35 mL) than for IAV (1.86 ± 0.24 mL) but sperm concentration was greater in IAV (1505 ± 189 × 10(6) sperm/mL) than in EEJ samples (344 ± 87 × 10(6) sperm/mL). Sperm motility and the percentage of normal sperm were not different between treatments. Total concentration of seminal plasma proteins was greater for samples collected by IAV as compared to EEJ (19.3 ± 0.9 compared with 13.0 ± 1.8 mg/mL, P < 0.05; respectively). Based on 2-D gels, 22 spots had a greater volume (P < 0.05) in gels derived from IAV samples, corresponding to 21 proteins identified as transferrin, albumin, epididymal secretory glutathione peroxidase, among others. Thirty-three spots, corresponding to 26 proteins, had a greater volume (P < 0.05) in gels derived from EEJ samples. These proteins were identified as spermadhesin-1, Bovine Sperm Protin 1, 3 and 5 isoforms, angiogenin-1, alpha-1B-glycoprotein, clusterin, nucleobindin-1, cathepsins, spermadhesin Z13, annexins, among others. Thus, proteins in greater amounts in samples obtained by IAV and EEJ were mainly of epididymal origin and accessory sex glands, respectively. PMID:26282524

  1. Influence of season on the freezability of free-range poultry semen.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Moreno, J; Castaño, C; Toledano-Díaz, A; Coloma, M A; López-Sebastián, A; Prieto, M T; Campo, J L

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the seasonal variation in freezing damage in free-range rooster sperm. Over a period of 1 year, heterospermic semen samples were collected weekly by massage from the roosters of 14 Spanish chicken breeds, all housed under natural photoperiod and climatic conditions. All samples were frozen in straws using DMA as a cryoprotectant, placing them first in nitrogen vapour and then plunging them into liquid nitrogen. No seasonal effects on fresh sperm quality were found. Neither did season affect the percentage of viable frozen-thawed spermatozoa nor the percentage with an intact acrosome. However, the collection season influenced (p < 0.05) most frozen-thawed sperm motility values. The percentage of immotile frozen-thawed spermatozoa was lower (p < 0.05) in spring-collected sperm than in summer- or autumn-collected samples. The percentage of spermatozoa showing progressive motility was higher in spring-collected sperm compared with winter-, summer- or autumn-collected samples (p < 0.05). The curvilinear velocity (VCL), straight-line velocity (VSL) and average path velocity (VAP) values of spring-collected sperm were also higher (p < 0.05). In conclusion, spring would appear to be the best season for collecting and freezing the semen of free-range Mediterranean chicken breeds.

  2. Expanding the dairy herd in pasture-based systems: The role of sexed semen within alternative breeding strategies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, C; Shalloo, L; Hutchinson, I A; Butler, S T

    2016-08-01

    A simulation model was developed to determine the effects of sexed semen use in heifers and lactating cows on replacement heifer numbers and rate of herd expansion in a seasonal dairy production system. Five separate artificial insemination (AI) protocols were established according to the type of semen used: (1) conventional frozen-thawed semen (CONV); (2) sexed semen in heifers and conventional semen used in cows (SS-HEIFER); (3) sexed semen in heifers and a targeted group of cows (body condition score ≥3 and calved ≥63 d), with conventional semen used in the remainder of cows (SS-CONV); (4) sexed semen in heifers and a targeted group of cows, with conventional semen in the remainder of cows for the first AI and conventional beef semen used for the second AI (SS-BEEF); or (5) sexed semen in heifers and a targeted group of cows, with conventional semen in the remainder of cows for the first AI and short gestation length semen used for the second AI (SS-SGL). Each AI protocol was assessed under 3 scenarios of sexed semen conception rate (SS-CR): 100, 94, and 87% relative to that of conventional semen. Artificial insemination was used on heifers for the first 3 wk and on cows for the first 6 wk of the 12-wk breeding season. The initial herd size was 100 cows, and all available replacement heifers were retained to facilitate herd expansion, up to a maximum herd size of 300 cows. Once maximum herd size was reached, all excess heifer calves were sold at 1 mo old. All capital expenditure associated with expansion was financed with a 15-yr loan. Each AI protocol was evaluated in terms of annual farm profit, annual cash flow, and total discounted net profit. The SS-CONV protocol generated more replacement heifers than all other AI protocols, facilitating faster expansion, and reached maximum herd size in yr 9, 9, and 10 for 100, 94, and 87% SS-CR, respectively. All AI protocols, except SS-BEEF and SS-SGL at 87% SS-CR, reached maximum herd size within the 15-yr period

  3. A comparative study on the cryogenic preservation of semen from the sandhill crane and the domestic fowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sexton, T.J.; Gee, G.F.; Watson, P.F.

    1978-01-01

    SYNOPSIS: Recent findings on the cryogenic preservation of semen from the crane, Grus canadensis pratensis and the domestic fowl, Gallus domesticus, are compared. Highest levels of post-thaw motility for crane semen (55%) were obtained when semen was diluted 1:1 with the Beltsville Poultry Semen Extender (BPSE) and held for 30 min at 5 C before it was equilibrated with 4% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for 15 min. In contrast, post-thaw motility for fowl spermatozoa was highest (80%) when semen was diluted 1:3 with BPSE and held for 60 min at 5 C before it was equilibrated with 4% DMSO for 60 min. Post-thaw motility of spermatozoa of both species was highest when the following freezing rates were used: l C per min from +5 to -20 C, 50 C per min from -20 to -80 C, then plunging into liquid nitrogen which resulted in a rate of 160 C per min from -80 to -196 C. One of four crane eggs resulting from insemination with frozen-thawed semen was fertile, whereas 27 of 55 fowl eggs were fertile, but this difference may have been due largely to fewer spermatozoa being inseminated into the female crane than into the fowl.

  4. Factors affecting spermatozoa morphology in beef bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate factors affecting sperm morphology of bulls (n=908) collected at 320 days of age. Bulls were a composite breed (50% Red Angus, 25% Charolais, and 25% Tarentaise) born from 2002 to 2008 to dams fed levels of feed during mid and late gestation that were expe...

  5. 9 CFR 78.14 - Rodeo bulls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS BRUCELLOSIS Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.14 Rodeo bulls. (a) A rodeo bull that is test... classified as brucellosis negative based upon an official test conducted less than 365 days before the...

  6. Effects of Taurine or Trehalose supplementation on functional competence of cryopreserved Karan Fries semen.

    PubMed

    Chhillar, Shivani; Singh, Vivek Kumar; Kumar, Raj; Atreja, Suresh Kumar

    2012-11-01

    Cryopreserved semen is commonly used for assisted reproduction in livestock including cattle. However, spermatozoa undergo numerous physiological and biochemical changes during freezing and thawing process that affects their fertilizing ability. The aim of present study was to improve the post thaw quality of crossbreed cattle "Karan Fries" (Holstein-Friesian×Tharparkar) spermatozoa. A total of nine ejaculates from three randomly chosen Karan Fries bulls were extended and cryopreserved in Tris-egg yolk citrate (EYTC) extender supplemented with 50mM Taurine or 100mM Trehalose. Semen samples cryopreserved without these additives in EYTC extender were taken as a control. Cryopreserved semen were thawed and assessed for semen quality parameters like sperm motility, viability and plasma membrane integrity. Extent of capacitation was measured by estimating the number of sperm that underwent an acrosome reaction with Lysophosphatidyl choline (LPC) addition by dual staining with giemsa and trypan blue stains. Oxidative stress in terms of rate of H(2)O(2) production and membrane lipid peroxidation were assessed in spermatozoa. Intracellular calcium concentration was also measured using fluorescent dye Fura-2AM. Post-thaw semen evaluation showed that supplementation of Taurine or Trehalose to EYTC extender significantly (P<0.05) increased motility, viability and membrane integrity of spermatozoa. Percentage of cryocapacitated spermatozoa was also significantly (P<0.05) decreased in presence of these additives. Similarly, rate of H(2)O(2) production, lipid peroxidation and intracellular calcium were found to be significantly (P<0.05) higher in spermatozoa cryopreserved in absence of these additives. The results obtained clearly indicated that supplementation of Taurine or Trehalose to EYTC extender prior to cryopreservation improves Karan Fries sperm quality. PMID:22974707

  7. Efficacy of caudal epidural injection of lidocaine, xylazine and xylazine plus hyaluronidase in reducing discomfort produced by electroejaculation in bulls

    PubMed Central

    PAGLIOSA, Ronaldo C.; DEROSSI, Rafael; COSTA, Deiler S.; FARIA, Fabio J.C.

    2015-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that epidural administration of lidocaine, xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase provides reduced pain and stress during electroejaculation in bulls, eight 30-month-old Nellore bulls received saline solution (control), 2% lidocaine, 2% xylazine or 2% xylazine plus hyaluronidase injected into the first intercoccygeal (Co1–Co2) epidural space in randomized order. Heart rate, respiratory rate, mean arterial pressure, analgesia, animal behavior and motor blockade were evaluated before treatment and at predetermined intervals during and after treatment. Pain and stress were scored subjectively, and semen quality was evaluated. The onset of anesthetic action was significantly faster with lidocaine (3.0 ± 1.2 min) than with xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase (8.9 ± 1.5 and 5.5 ± 2.6 min, P=0.021 and P=0.012, respectively), and the onset of anesthesia with xylazine plus hyaluronidase was significantly faster than that with xylazine alone (P=0.032). Treatment with xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase resulted in less discomfort than treatment with lidocaine, as indicated by animal behavior. Changes in heart rate, respiratory rate and arterial pressure were within acceptable limits. Penile protrusion and semen emission occurred in all animals during all four treatments. Our results suggest that xylazine plus hyaluronidase reduced discomfort during electroejaculation more effectively than xylazine or lidocaine alone. Further experiments are necessary to determine whether electroejaculation with xylazine plus hyaluronidase is feasible for obtaining semen from Nellore bulls unaccustomed to being handled or restrained. PMID:26097016

  8. Ejaculate collection efficiency and post-thaw semen quality in wild-caught Griffon vultures from the Sardinian population

    PubMed Central

    Madeddu, Manuela; Berlinguer, Fiammetta; Ledda, Massimo; Leoni, Giovanni G; Satta, Valentina; Succu, Sara; Rotta, Andrea; Pasciu, Valeria; Zinellu, Angelo; Muzzeddu, Marco; Carru, Ciriaco; Naitana, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to test the feasibility of a programme of semen collection and cryopreservation in Griffon vultures. Four wild-caught individuals kept in captivity because of unrecoverable traumas were used. Semen collection attempts were made twice a week during three consecutive reproductive seasons (December – March) using the abdominal massage method. Ejaculation was successfully induced between late January and late February. Semen collection efficiency was rather low (27.9%) and it did not vary among individuals (p > 0.05). No differences were found in ejaculate volumes (12.5 +/- 9.1 μl), spermatozoa concentration (28.4 +/- 30.9 million cells/ml) and viability (61.3 +/- 13.9%) among the 4 vultures. ATP values differed among the four vultures (p < 0.001); B showed higher nucleotide concentration than both C and D, while it did not differ form A, whose values were higher compared with D. After freezing and thawing, semen in vitro viability, DNA integrity and ATP intracellular concentration were determined. Spermatozoa viability after thawing did not differ among the four individuals (52.6 +/- 5.8 in A, 53.4 +/- 4.6 in B, 50.4 +/- 3.2 in C, 42.5 +/- 2.7 in D), but it decreased significantly compared to fresh semen (p < 0.05). During 4 hrs in vitro culture, spermatozoa collected from B maintained over time a higher viability in vitro when compared to A, C and D. As evaluated by the comet assay method, DNA fragmentation after freezing and thawing did not differ in the 4 vultures. ATP concentration in frozen/thawed semen was significantly lower than in fresh semen (p < 0.0001). This study indicates that semen cryopreservation can be considered as a useful tool in the conservation of Griffon vulture genetic resources, but further studies are needed to optimize this technique. PMID:19228408

  9. Ejaculate collection efficiency and post-thaw semen quality in wild-caught Griffon vultures from the Sardinian population.

    PubMed

    Madeddu, Manuela; Berlinguer, Fiammetta; Ledda, Massimo; Leoni, Giovanni G; Satta, Valentina; Succu, Sara; Rotta, Andrea; Pasciu, Valeria; Zinellu, Angelo; Muzzeddu, Marco; Carru, Ciriaco; Naitana, Salvatore

    2009-02-19

    This study aimed to test the feasibility of a programme of semen collection and cryopreservation in Griffon vultures. Four wild-caught individuals kept in captivity because of unrecoverable traumas were used. Semen collection attempts were made twice a week during three consecutive reproductive seasons (December - March) using the abdominal massage method. Ejaculation was successfully induced between late January and late February. Semen collection efficiency was rather low (27.9%) and it did not vary among individuals (p > 0.05). No differences were found in ejaculate volumes (12.5 +/- 9.1 microl), spermatozoa concentration (28.4 +/- 30.9 million cells/ml) and viability (61.3 +/- 13.9%) among the 4 vultures. ATP values differed among the four vultures (p < 0.001); B showed higher nucleotide concentration than both C and D, while it did not differ form A, whose values were higher compared with D. After freezing and thawing, semen in vitro viability, DNA integrity and ATP intracellular concentration were determined. Spermatozoa viability after thawing did not differ among the four individuals (52.6 +/- 5.8 in A, 53.4 +/- 4.6 in B, 50.4 +/- 3.2 in C, 42.5 +/- 2.7 in D), but it decreased significantly compared to fresh semen (p < 0.05). During 4 hrs in vitro culture, spermatozoa collected from B maintained over time a higher viability in vitro when compared to A, C and D. As evaluated by the comet assay method, DNA fragmentation after freezing and thawing did not differ in the 4 vultures. ATP concentration in frozen/thawed semen was significantly lower than in fresh semen (p < 0.0001). This study indicates that semen cryopreservation can be considered as a useful tool in the conservation of Griffon vulture genetic resources, but further studies are needed to optimize this technique.

  10. Semen Anxiety: Materiality, Agency and the Internet.

    PubMed

    Shand, Alex

    2007-12-01

    Semen is a potent cultural symbol of masculinity. The social life of semen is poorly understood because of the intensely personal nature of its being. But the Internet has opened up new avenues for people to explore sensitive issues without disclosing their identity. This paper examines a set of questions submitted anonymously for answering by a medical team over a three month period to a UK-based consumer health website. The questions are analysed for emergent themes and these are divided into three groups: those concerning the material quality of semen; semen relating to masturbation; and those that concern semen and potency. It argues that far from being a phenomenon isolated to non-western cultures, semen anxiety is present in the UK in the twenty-first century and is the expression of anxieties surrounding shifting gender roles and masculine identities.

  11. Polymorphisms in luteinizing hormone receptor and hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone genes and their effects on sperm quality traits in Chinese Holstein bulls.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li-Ping; Du, Qing-Zhi; Song, Ya-Pan; Yu, Jun-Na; Wang, Shu-Juan; Sang, Lei; Song, Luo-Wen; Yue, Yao-Min; Lian, Yu-Ze; Zhang, Sheng-Li; Hua, Guo-Hua; Zhang, Shu-Jun; Yang, Li-Guo

    2012-06-01

    Genes of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis play a key role in male reproductive performance. This study evaluated the polymorphisms of luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) and hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) genes and their effects on sperm quality traits including semen volume per ejaculate (VOL), sperm density (SD), fresh sperm motility (FSM), thawed sperm motility (TSM), acrosome integrity rate (AIR), and abnormal sperm rate (ASR) collected from 205 Chinese Hostein bulls. The study bulls consisted of 205 mature Chinese Holstein, 27 Simmental, 28 Charolais, and 14 German yellow cattle. One single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (A883G) in exon 2 of GnRH and two SNPs (A51703G and G51656T) in intron 9 of LHR were identified in 274 bulls. Analysis of variance in 205 Chinese Holstein bulls showed that age had significant effect on both SD and FSM (P < 0.01), and ASR (P < 0.05). With regards to genotype and its interaction with age, only the SNP of G51656T in LHR gene had significant effect on SD (P < 0.05, P < 0.01; respectively). The association result showed that bulls with AG genotype had higher FSM than bulls with AA and GG genotype in LHR at 51,703 locus (P < 0.10), and bulls with GG genotype had higher SD than bulls with TT genotype in LHR at G51656T locus (P < 0.10). Phenotypic correlation among the traits revealed that significant negative correlations were observed between ASR and AIR (r = -0.736, P < 0.01), ASR and AIR (r = -0.500, P < 0.01). There were moderate positive correlations between VOL and SD (r = 0.422, P < 0.01), as well as FSM (r = 0.411, P < 0.01). In conclusion, LHR may be a potential marker for sperm quality of SD and FSM.

  12. 9 CFR 98.34 - Import permits for poultry semen and animal semen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... will be denied for semen from ruminants or swine from any region where it has been declared, under... rinderpest or foot-and-mouth disease exists. Importation of semen of ruminants or swine, originating in any...-mouth disease is determined to exist, is prohibited, except that semen from ruminants or...

  13. 9 CFR 98.34 - Import permits for poultry semen and animal semen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... will be denied for semen from ruminants or swine from any region where it has been declared, under... rinderpest or foot-and-mouth disease exists. Importation of semen of ruminants or swine, originating in any...-mouth disease is determined to exist, is prohibited, except that semen from ruminants or...

  14. Evaluation of semen from nondomestic birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.; Bakst, M.R.; Cecil, H.C.

    1997-01-01

    Aspects of poultry Al technology are applicable to nondomestic birds. However, modifications in the methods of semen collection, evaluation, and insemination are often necessary to accomodate either the bird's size, sperm numbers, or. female anatomy. This section provides a brief overview of procedures used to evaluate semen from nondomestic birds. Unless specified, materials, reagents, etc., are identical to those used in evaluating poultry semen (see appropriate chapters).

  15. Polymorphisms in the bone morphogenetic protein 15 gene and their effect on sperm quality traits in Chinese Holstein bulls.

    PubMed

    Sun, L P; Song, Y P; Du, Q Z; Song, L W; Tian, Y Z; Zhang, S L; Hua, G H; Yang, L G

    2014-03-17

    Bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP-15) expression has been detected in the testis, but its roles in this organ has not been well elucidated. We evaluated polymorphisms of the BMP-15 gene by PCR-SSCP and PCR-RFLP in 212 Chinese Holstein bulls, and investigated possible associations with sperm quality traits, including semen volume per ejaculate, sperm density, fresh sperm motility, thawed sperm motility, acrosome integrity rate, and abnormal sperm rate. A single nucleotide polymorphism (C5697T) in intron 1 of the BMP-15 gene was identified in these bulls. Age was found to have significant effects on both fresh sperm motility and abnormal sperm rate. A significant effect of genotype on fresh sperm motility was also observed. Least square analysis showed that CT genotype bulls had significantly lower fresh sperm motility than CC or TT genotype bulls. In conclusion, BMP-15 should be considered as a potential genetic marker for sperm quality, based on its association with fresh sperm motility.

  16. Predictive value of CASA parameters in IUI with frozen donor sperm.

    PubMed

    Freour, Thomas; Jean, Miguel; Mirallie, Sophie; Langlois, Marie-Laure; Dubourdieu, Sophie; Barriere, Paul

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if characteristics of sperm motion determined by computer-aided semen analysis (CASA) after thawing and preparation on discontinuous gradient could predict pregnancy outcome after intrauterine insemination (IUI) from frozen donor sperm. A retrospective analysis of 100 non-selected women undergoing 171 consecutive donor insemination cycles was conducted between January 2006 and April 2007. Semen samples from all donors were analysed after thawing and density gradient preparation. Women who became pregnant and those who did not were comparable in terms of age, ovarian stimulation regimen and indication of IUI with donor semen. Pregnancy rate per cycle was 21.8%, and pregnancy occurred after 2.5 IUI cycles on average. Motility parameters of sperm measured by CASA (VAP, VCL, VSL, LIN, STR, and ALH) and total spermatozoa concentration after preparation on discontinuous gradient showed no difference in both groups. Progressive and total motile spermatozoa concentration, as well as progressive and total motile percentages was significantly higher in pregnancy group. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed that total motile percentage >17% and motile concentration >0.9 x 10(6)/mL best predicted pregnancy. In a multivariate analysis, only total motility percentage was able to predict pregnancy. Sperm motility parameters of frozen-thawed prepared donor sperm obtained by CASA do not seem to predict pregnancy in IUI cycles. Total motile and progressive percentages and concentrations remain the best prognostic elements for pregnancy in IUI with donor semen.

  17. The benefits of cooling boar semen in long-term extenders prior to cryopreservation on sperm quality characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wasilewska, K; Zasiadczyk, Ł; Fraser, L; Mogielnicka-Brzozowska, M; Kordan, W

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of long-term extenders on post-thaw sperm quality characteristics following different holding times (HT) of boar semen at 17 and 10°C. Sperm-rich fractions, collected from five boars, were diluted in Androhep(®) Plus (AHP), Androstar(®) Plus (ASP), Safecell(®) Plus and TRIXcell(®) Plus (TCP) extenders. The extended semen samples were held for 2 hr at 17°C (HT 1) and additionally for 24 hr at 10°C (HT 2), after they were evaluated and frozen. CASA sperm motility and motion patterns, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), plasma membrane integrity (PMI) and normal apical ridge (NAR) acrosome integrity were assessed in the pre-freeze and frozen-thawed semen. The Vybrant Apoptosis Assay Kit was used to analyse the proportions of viable and plasma membrane apoptotic-like changes in spermatozoa. Results indicated that boar variability, extender and HT significantly affected the sperm quality characteristics, particularly after freezing-thawing. Differences in the pre-freeze semen were more marked in the sperm motion patterns between the HTs. Pre-freeze semen in HT 2 showed significantly higher VCL and VAP, whereas no marked effects were observed in the sperm membrane integrity and viability (YO-PRO-1(-) /PI(-) ) among the extenders. Post-thaw sperm TMOT and PMOT were significantly higher in the AHP and ASP extenders of HT 2 group, whereas VSL, VCL and VAP were markedly lower in the TCP extender. Furthermore, spermatozoa from the AHP- and ASP-extended semen of HT 2 group were characterized by higher MMP, PMI and NAR acrosome integrity following freezing-thawing. In most of the extenders, the incidence of frozen-thawed spermatozoa with apoptotic-like changes was greater in HT 1. The findings of this study indicate that holding of boar semen at 10°C for 24 hr in long-term preservation extenders modulates post-thaw sperm quality characteristics in an extender-dependent manner. These results will further contribute to the

  18. Management and Breeding Soundness of Mature Bulls.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Colin W

    2016-07-01

    Mature bulls must be fed a balanced ration, vaccinated appropriately, and undergo a breeding soundness evaluation to ensure they meet what is required of a short, but intense breeding season. To be classified as a satisfactory potential breeder, minimum standards for physical soundness, scrotal circumference, sperm motility, and sperm morphology must be achieved using an accepted bull-breeding soundness evaluation format. Sperm production requires approximately 70 days. Heat and stress are the most common insults to spermatogenesis, causing an increase in morphologic abnormalities with obesity-associated scrotal fat accumulation being the most frequent cause of elevated testicular temperature in mature bulls.

  19. Cryopreservation of rabbit semen using non-permeable cryoprotectants: effectiveness of different concentrations of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) from egg yolk versus egg yolk or sucrose.

    PubMed

    Iaffaldano, N; Di Iorio, M; Rosato, M P; Manchisi, A

    2014-12-30

    This study was designed to identify the most effective non-permeable cryoprotectant (CPA) for the cryopreservation of rabbit semen by comparing the effects of different concentrations of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) on post-thaw sperm quality with those of whole egg yolk or sucrose. In a second experiment, the performance of the non-permeable CPAs identified as most effective was assessed in vivo by determining reproductive performances. Pooled semen samples were diluted to a ratio of 1:1 (v:v) in freezing extender (Tris-citrate-glucose and 16% dimethylsulfoxide as permeable CPA) containing as non-permeable CPAs 6, 8, 10 or 15% LDL from egg yolk, 0.1M sucrose, or 15% egg yolk. The semen was loaded in 0.25mL straws and frozen in liquid nitrogen vapor. After thawing, we determined sperm motility, viability, osmotic resistance, and acrosome and DNA integrity. Our results clearly revealed a significant effect of LDL concentration on semen quality. Also, at an optimal concentration of 10%, motility and acrosome integrity were improved over the values recorded for egg yolk (P<0.05). Based on the in vitro data, 3 groups of does (n=30 each) were inseminated with fresh semen or semen frozen using sucrose or 10% LDL. Sucrose led to a significantly higher conception rate than LDL and reproductive performance was similar to that observed for fresh semen. Our findings indicate the markedly better performance of sucrose in vivo as a non-permeable CPA for the cryopreservation of rabbit semen. PMID:25465902

  20. Cryopreservation of rabbit semen using non-permeable cryoprotectants: effectiveness of different concentrations of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) from egg yolk versus egg yolk or sucrose.

    PubMed

    Iaffaldano, N; Di Iorio, M; Rosato, M P; Manchisi, A

    2014-12-30

    This study was designed to identify the most effective non-permeable cryoprotectant (CPA) for the cryopreservation of rabbit semen by comparing the effects of different concentrations of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) on post-thaw sperm quality with those of whole egg yolk or sucrose. In a second experiment, the performance of the non-permeable CPAs identified as most effective was assessed in vivo by determining reproductive performances. Pooled semen samples were diluted to a ratio of 1:1 (v:v) in freezing extender (Tris-citrate-glucose and 16% dimethylsulfoxide as permeable CPA) containing as non-permeable CPAs 6, 8, 10 or 15% LDL from egg yolk, 0.1M sucrose, or 15% egg yolk. The semen was loaded in 0.25mL straws and frozen in liquid nitrogen vapor. After thawing, we determined sperm motility, viability, osmotic resistance, and acrosome and DNA integrity. Our results clearly revealed a significant effect of LDL concentration on semen quality. Also, at an optimal concentration of 10%, motility and acrosome integrity were improved over the values recorded for egg yolk (P<0.05). Based on the in vitro data, 3 groups of does (n=30 each) were inseminated with fresh semen or semen frozen using sucrose or 10% LDL. Sucrose led to a significantly higher conception rate than LDL and reproductive performance was similar to that observed for fresh semen. Our findings indicate the markedly better performance of sucrose in vivo as a non-permeable CPA for the cryopreservation of rabbit semen.

  1. Exogenous melatonin does not improve the freezability of Blanca Andaluza goat semen over exposure to two months of short days.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Calvo, L; Gatica, M C; Santiago-Moreno, J; Guzmán, J L; Zarazaga, L A

    2015-06-01

    This paper compares the effects of exposure to exogenous melatonin (MEL), short days (SD, 8h of light) and long days (LD, 16 h of light), on reproductive activity, sperm motility and other reproductive variables, in Blanca Andaluza bucks. Fourteen males were spilt into two groups of seven animals (G1 and G2). They were subjected to five alternations of 2 months of LD followed by 2 months of SD or MEL before the experimental period of three consecutive intervals of: (1) 2 months of SD (G1, N=7) or MEL (G2, N=7); (2) 2 months of LD (G1+G2, N=14); and (3) 2 months of SD (G2, N=7) or MEL (G1, N=7). Plasma testosterone concentration, live weight, testicular weight and fresh semen quality were determined weekly. Semen was also cooled and frozen-thawed every fortnight, and the same quality variables measured as for fresh sperm. When the bucks were under LD treatment, the testosterone concentration was lower than when under MEL or SD treatment (P<0.01); values for the semen concentration and total number of sperm per ejaculate were also higher (P<0.001). No differences were observed between the MEL and SD treatments in terms of fresh, cooled or frozen-thawed sperm quality. Only some quality variables on fresh semen were improved by MEL and SD treatment (P<0.05). In conclusion the results of the present experiment showed that MEL improved the fresh semen motility variables, but this did not improve the motility of frozen-thawed sperm over that recorded for either SD or LD treatment.

  2. Cryoprotectant redistribution along the frozen straw probed by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Karpegina, Yu A; Okotrub, K A; Brusentsev, E Yu; Amstislavsky, S Ya; Surovtsev, N V

    2016-04-01

    The distribution of cryoprotectant (10% glycerol) and ice along the frozen plastic straw (the most useful container for freezing mammalian semen, oocytes and embryos) was studied by Raman scattering technique. Raman spectroscopy being a contactless, non-invasive tool was applied for the straws filled with the cryoprotectant solution and frozen by controlled rate programs commonly used for mammalian embryos freezing. Analysis of Raman spectra measured at different points along the straw reveals a non-uniform distribution of the cryoprotectant. The ratio between non-crystalline solution and ice was found to be increased by several times at the bottom side of the solution column frozen by the standard freezing program. The increase of the cryoprotectant fraction occurs in the area where embryos or oocytes are normally placed during their freezing. Possible effects of the cooling rate and the ice nucleation temperature on the cryoprotectant fraction at the bottom side of the solution column were considered. Our findings highlight that the ice fraction around cryopreserved embryos or oocytes can differ significantly from the averaged one in the frozen plastic straws. PMID:26794460

  3. Effects of open-entry spike-bull, limited-entry branched-bull harvesting on elk composition in Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bender, L.C.; Fowler, P.E.; Bernatowicz, J.A.; Musser, J.L.; Stream, L.E.

    2002-01-01

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented an open-entry spike-bull, limited-entry branched-bull elk (Cervus elaphus) harvest strategy in the Blue Mountains (1989), Yakima (1994), and Colockum (1994) herd areas of Washington state with goals of increasing numbers of adult bulls to increase breeding efficiency and possibly calf recruitment. Numbers of total bulls/100 cows (x??=5.4) and branched bulls/100 cows (x??=5.3) increased with the change in harvest strategy, while yearling bulls/100 cows remained unchanged; calves/100 cows declined (x??=-8.6). Calves/100 cows were always negatively correlated with both total bulls/100 cows and branched bulls/100 cows in each area; correlations were significant in 5 of 9 comparisons with total-bull ratios and 5 of 9 comparisons with branched-bull ratios. Open-entry spike-bull, limited-entry branched-bull harvesting can be used to increase total-bull and branched-bulls ratios in hunted elk populations. However, the increased ratios of bulls and branched bulls were unimportant in influencing calf recruitment, likely because of the importance of female condition on production and survival of young.

  4. Use of Aloe vera-based extender for chilling and freezing collared peccary (Pecari tajacu) semen.

    PubMed

    Souza, A L P; Lima, G L; Peixoto, G C X; Silva, A M; Oliveira, M F; Silva, A R

    2016-05-01

    As an alternative for the conservation of collared peccary semen, this research aims at evaluating the use of Aloe vera (AV) extract as a cryoprotectant for semen chilling and freezing. Five ejaculates were divided in two aliquots that were diluted in Tris plus egg yolk (EY; 20%) or AV extract (20%) and chilled at 5 °C. In both treatments, an adequate semen conservation was achieved and values closer to 40% motile sperm with viability and osmotic response ranging from 20% to 40%, and normal morphology of 80% were found after 36 hours of storage. Moreover, 12 other ejaculates were diluted in Tris plus EY (20%) or AV extract (5, 10, or 20%) and glycerol (3%). Samples were frozen in liquid nitrogen and thawed after 1 week. After thawing, all the treatments containing EY or AV provided similar values for sperm morphology, viability, osmotic response, membrane integrity, sperm motility, amplitude of lateral head, beat cross frequency, and rapid, low, and static subpopulations, but the highest values for straightness and the lowest values for curvilinear velocity were found using 20% AV (P < 0.05). In conclusion, we found that AV extract at a 20% concentration could be used as an alternative substitute to EY in the formulation of Tris extenders for collared peccaries' semen chilling or freezing.

  5. Study of enzyme activities and protein content of beluga (Huso huso) semen before and after cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Aramli, M S

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge gained regarding the biochemical processes that occur during sperm collection, processing and freezing-thawing might improve current sperm cryopreservation techniques. In our present study, we determined the effect of cryopreservation on the total protein concentration (TP) and the activities of certain enzymes in semen samples from the beluga (Huso huso). The TP content of the seminal plasma of fresh semen was 0.47 ± 0.026 g/l, and the TP after cryopreservation was 1.86 ± 0.6 g/l. The activities of acid phosphatase (0.82 ± 0.042 U/l), lactate dehydrogenase (234.4 ± 19.4 U/l), arylsulfatase (143.1 ± 32.5 U/l) and β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (58.39 ± 4.14 U/l) in the seminal plasma of fresh semen were significantly lower than those in the supernatant of frozen-thawed semen samples (7.43 ± 0.64, 3224.6 ± 167.2, 422.6 ± 21.3 and 90.2 ± 5.37 U/l respectively). These parameters may be useful as biomarkers for estimating damage to the cell membrane of spermatozoa caused by freezing-thawing.

  6. Effect of cholesterol-loaded-cyclodextrin on sperm viability and acrosome reaction in boar semen cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Seung; Lee, Seunghyung; Lee, Sang-Hee; Yang, Boo-Keun; Park, Choon-Keun

    2015-08-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect of cholesterol-loaded-cyclodextrin (CLC) on boar sperm viability and spermatozoa cryosurvival during boar semen cryopreservation, and methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MBCD) was treated for comparing with CLC. Boar semen treated with CLC and MBCD before freezing process to monitor the effect on survival and capacitation status by flow cytometry with appropriate fluorescent probes. Sperm viability was higher in 1.5mg CLC-treated sperm (76.9±1.01%, P<0.05) than un-treated and MBCD-treated sperm before cryopreservation (58.7±1.31% and 60.3±0.31%, respectively). For CTC patterns, F-pattern was higher in CLC treated sperm than MBCD-treated sperm, for B-pattern was higher in CLC-treated sperm than fresh sperm (P<0.05). For AR pattern (an acrosome-reacted sperm) was lower in CLC-treated sperm than MBCD-treated sperm (P<0.05). Moreover, we examined in vitro development of porcine oocytes after in vitro fertilization using CLC-treated frozen-thawed semen, in which CLC treatment prior to freezing and thawing increased the development of oocytes to blastocyst stage in vitro. In conclusion, CLC could protect the viability of spermatozoa from cryodamage prior to cryopreservation in boar semen. PMID:26091957

  7. In vivo validation of in vitro quality tests for cryopreserved honey bee semen.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Jakob; May, Tanja; Knollmann, Ulrich; Kamp, Günter; Müller, Karin; Bienefeld, Kaspar

    2012-10-01

    Development of cryopreservation protocols for honey bee semen is hampered by the lack of validated laboratory tests that allow the prediction of in vivo performance of frozen-thawed semen. Here we analyzed correlations between seven in vitro tests and indicators of semen performance after insemination. These tests included measures of motility, cell conformation, and membrane permeability before and after exposure to physiochemical stress. We show that the proposed protocol for motility measurement yields results that correlate well with the number of sperm reaching the storage organ of queens (correlation coefficient ρ=0.67) and the proportion of viable eggs in inseminated queens (ρ=0.48). The conventional live/dead assay of membrane permeability by dual fluorescent staining and a new test based on the leakage of the glycolytic enzyme glucose-phosphate-isomerase (GPI) from damaged cells were also correlated to the number of sperm reaching the spermatheca (ρ=0.54 and -0.61, respectively). We conclude that motility, live/dead-staining and the assay for GPI-leakage are valuable tools for the improvement of cryopreservation of honey bee semen.

  8. Use of Aloe vera-based extender for chilling and freezing collared peccary (Pecari tajacu) semen.

    PubMed

    Souza, A L P; Lima, G L; Peixoto, G C X; Silva, A M; Oliveira, M F; Silva, A R

    2016-05-01

    As an alternative for the conservation of collared peccary semen, this research aims at evaluating the use of Aloe vera (AV) extract as a cryoprotectant for semen chilling and freezing. Five ejaculates were divided in two aliquots that were diluted in Tris plus egg yolk (EY; 20%) or AV extract (20%) and chilled at 5 °C. In both treatments, an adequate semen conservation was achieved and values closer to 40% motile sperm with viability and osmotic response ranging from 20% to 40%, and normal morphology of 80% were found after 36 hours of storage. Moreover, 12 other ejaculates were diluted in Tris plus EY (20%) or AV extract (5, 10, or 20%) and glycerol (3%). Samples were frozen in liquid nitrogen and thawed after 1 week. After thawing, all the treatments containing EY or AV provided similar values for sperm morphology, viability, osmotic response, membrane integrity, sperm motility, amplitude of lateral head, beat cross frequency, and rapid, low, and static subpopulations, but the highest values for straightness and the lowest values for curvilinear velocity were found using 20% AV (P < 0.05). In conclusion, we found that AV extract at a 20% concentration could be used as an alternative substitute to EY in the formulation of Tris extenders for collared peccaries' semen chilling or freezing. PMID:26830302

  9. Frozen-intensity test research of frozen coal with steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Huang, Cheng; Liu, Weibo

    2002-05-01

    As a sort of multiple component, and dispersed state granule aggregation, frozen coal behaves similar to frozen soil. On the basis of its unique ice-cementation effect and not-frozen water along with dynamical balance state between the frameworks of mineral granule, the mechanical behavior of frozen coal is more complex than usual in compact medium, restrictedly with force amount, process time period and temperature. In all factors which impact on frozen intensity of frozen coal frozen with steel plate, water content is relatively easy to control. From results of this test research, values of frozen intensity is changeable under different water content. Up to the critical water content, the value of frozen intensity increase rapidly till a certain steady value. Under a certain temperature and water content condition, the granule component of frozen coal has somewhat effect on the frozen intensity. Usually, the frozen intensity of large granule coal is greater than the small granule's However, the distributing of coal granule size present a steady probability rule. So the effect from granule size is tiny.

  10. The Frozen Price Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alden, Lori

    2003-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the educational frozen price game she developed to teach the basic economic principle of price allocation. In addition to demonstrating the advantages of price allocation, the game also illustrates such concepts as opportunity costs, cost benefit comparisons, and the trade-off between efficiency and equity.…

  11. Ebola Virus Persistence in Semen Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Robert J; Judson, Seth; Miazgowicz, Kerri; Bushmaker, Trent; Munster, Vincent J

    2016-02-01

    On March 20, 2015, a case of Ebola virus disease was identified in Liberia that most likely was transmitted through sexual contact. We assessed the efficiency of detecting Ebola virus in semen samples by molecular diagnostics and the stability of Ebola virus in ex vivo semen under simulated tropical conditions. PMID:26811984

  12. Ebola Virus Persistence in Semen Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Robert J; Judson, Seth; Miazgowicz, Kerri; Bushmaker, Trent; Munster, Vincent J

    2016-02-01

    On March 20, 2015, a case of Ebola virus disease was identified in Liberia that most likely was transmitted through sexual contact. We assessed the efficiency of detecting Ebola virus in semen samples by molecular diagnostics and the stability of Ebola virus in ex vivo semen under simulated tropical conditions.

  13. Ebola Virus Persistence in Semen Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Robert J.; Judson, Seth; Miazgowicz, Kerri; Bushmaker, Trent

    2016-01-01

    On March 20, 2015, a case of Ebola virus disease was identified in Liberia that most likely was transmitted through sexual contact. We assessed the efficiency of detecting Ebola virus in semen samples by molecular diagnostics and the stability of Ebola virus in ex vivo semen under simulated tropical conditions. PMID:26811984

  14. Liquid storage of miniature boar semen.

    PubMed

    Shimatsu, Yoshiki; Uchida, Masaki; Niki, Rikio; Imai, Hiroshi

    2002-04-01

    The effects of liquid storage at 15 degrees C on the fertilizing ability of miniature pig semen were investigated. Characterization of ejaculated semen from 3 miniature boars was carried out. Semen volume and pH were similar among these boars. In one of the boars, sperm motility was slightly low, and sperm concentration and total number of sperm were significantly lower than in the others (P < 0.01). Seminal plasma of the semen was substituted with various extenders (Kiev, Androhep, BTS and Modena) by centrifugation and semen was stored for 7 days at 15 degrees C. Sperm motility was estimated daily at 37 degrees C. For complete substitution of seminal plasma, Modena was significantly more efficient than the other extenders (P < 0.001) in retaining sperm motility. Semen from each of the 3 miniature boars that had been stored for 5 to 7 days at 15 degrees C in Modena was used for artificial insemination of 15 miniature sows. The farrowing rates were 100, 100 and 60%, and litter sizes were 6.4 +/- 1.5, 5.8 +/- 0.8 and 5.0 +/- 1.0 for each boar semen, respectively. The boar that sired the smallest farrowing rate was the same one that showed lower seminal quality with respect to sperm motility, sperm concentration and total number of sperm. These results suggest that miniature boar semen can be stored for at least 5 days at 15 degrees C by the substitution of seminal plasma with Modena extender.

  15. 21 CFR 160.110 - Frozen eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Frozen eggs. (a) Frozen eggs, frozen whole eggs, frozen mixed eggs is the food prepared by freezing liquid eggs that conform to § 160.115, with such precautions that the finished food is free of...

  16. 21 CFR 160.110 - Frozen eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Frozen eggs. (a) Frozen eggs, frozen whole eggs, frozen mixed eggs is the food prepared by freezing liquid eggs that conform to § 160.115, with such precautions that the finished food is free of...

  17. 21 CFR 160.110 - Frozen eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Frozen eggs. (a) Frozen eggs, frozen whole eggs, frozen mixed eggs is the food prepared by freezing liquid eggs that conform to § 160.115, with such precautions that the finished food is free of...

  18. 21 CFR 160.110 - Frozen eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Frozen eggs. (a) Frozen eggs, frozen whole eggs, frozen mixed eggs is the food prepared by freezing liquid eggs that conform to § 160.115, with such precautions that the finished food is free of...

  19. Foods - fresh vs. frozen or canned

    MedlinePlus

    Frozen foods vs. fresh or canned; Fresh foods vs. frozen or canned; Frozen vegetables versus fresh ... a well-balanced diet. Many people wonder if frozen and canned vegetables are as healthy for you ...

  20. Effects of toxicosis on bull growth, semen characteristics and breeding soundness evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) possesses heat, drought, and pest resistance conferred to the plant by its mutualistic relationship with the ergot alkaloid producing fungal endophyte, Neotyphodium coenophialum. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of ergot alkaloid consumption on...

  1. [Advances in identification of semen stains].

    PubMed

    Fan, Guang-Yao; Zhao, Gui-Sen; Mo, Yao-Nan

    2010-08-01

    Stain identification has long been a task in forensic biology. The identification of semen stain, one of the most common human stains, can provide crucial information for crime scene reconstruction and forensic investigation. Traditional detection of semen stain depends largely on the microscopic identification of spermatozoa, enzyme activity-based methods or antigen-antibody reactions. These morphological, proteinological and zymological approaches, however, are apparently inadequate in identifying tiny, admixed, degraded or contaminated samples. With the development of transcriptomics and epigenetics, many semen-specific mRNA markers, such as protamine-1 (PRM1) and -2 (PRM2), have been applied to semen and semen stain identification. Messenger RNA profiling shows great promise in identifying tissues as demonstrated by the recognition of specific markers. Further more, studies on tis-sue-specific differential DNA methylation will provide a scrumptious way of identifying difficult samples. PMID:21090352

  2. Curation of Frozen Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, L. A.; Allen, C. C.; Bastien, R.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) and the Astromaterials Curator are charged by NPD 7100.10D with the curation of all of NASA s extraterrestrial samples, including those from future missions. This responsibility includes the development of new sample handling and preparation techniques; therefore, the Astromaterials Curator must begin developing procedures to preserve, prepare and ship samples at sub-freezing temperatures in order to enable future sample return missions. Such missions might include the return of future frozen samples from permanently-shadowed lunar craters, the nuclei of comets, the surface of Mars, etc. We are demonstrating the ability to curate samples under cold conditions by designing, installing and testing a cold curation glovebox. This glovebox will allow us to store, document, manipulate and subdivide frozen samples while quantifying and minimizing contamination throughout the curation process.

  3. Texture of Frozen Food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wani, Kohmei

    Quantitative determination of textural quality of frozen food due to freezing and storage conditions is complicated,since the texture is consisted of multi-dimensiona1 factors. The author reviewed the importance of texture in food quality and the factors which is proposed by a priori estimation. New classification of expression words of textural properties by subjective evaluation and an application of four elements mechanical model for analysis of physical characteristics was studied on frozen meat patties. Combination of freezing-thawing condition on the subjective properties and physiochemical characteristics of beef lean meat and hamachi fish (Yellow-tail) meat was studied. Change of the plasticity and the deformability of these samples differed by freezing-thawing rate and cooking procedure. Also optimum freezing-thawing condition was differed from specimens.

  4. Colloid centrifugation selects normal spermatozoa from polymorphic bull ejaculates: a case study.

    PubMed

    Morrell, J M; Rodriguez-Martinez, H; Andersson, M

    2014-04-01

    Semen from a Western Finncattle bull exhibiting a highly polymorphic spermiogram was processed by colloid centrifugation using Androcoll-B, a species-specific silane-coated silica colloid. In the first experiment, Single Layer Centrifugation (SLC) was used to identify which density colloids were needed to separate different cell populations. Colloids of the two chosen densities were then used in a density gradient resulting in two sperm subpopulations, one containing nearly all normally sized spermatozoa and the other enriched for the macrocephalic spermatozoa. Microcephalic spermatozoa did not appear in either of the selected subpopulations. Using a combination of SLC and DGC with this species-specific colloid, it was possible to separate the spermatozoa into different subpopulations, that is, a subpopulation containing nearly all normally sized spermatozoa, and another one enriched for the macrocephalic spermatozoa. Thus, colloid centrifugation could be used to select sufficient normal spermatozoa from a highly polymorphic ejaculate for AI, if desired.

  5. ESR (electron spin resonance)-determined osmotic behavior of bull spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Du, J.; Kleinhans, F.W.; Spitzer, V.J.; Critser, J.K. . Dept. of Medical Research); Horstman, L. . School of Veterinary Medicine); Mazur, P. )

    1990-01-01

    Our laboratories are pursuing a fundamental approach to the problems of semen cryopreservation. For many cell types (human red cells, yeast, HeLa) it has been demonstrated that there is an optimum cooling rate for cryopreservation. Faster rates allow insufficient time for cell dehydration and result in intracellular ice formation and cell death. It is possible to predict this optimal rate provided that the cell acts as an ideal osmometer and several other cell parameters are known such as the membrane hydraulic conductivity. It is the purpose of this work to examine the osmotic response of bull sperm to sucrose and NaCl utilizing electron spin resonance (ESR) to measure cell volume. For calibration purposes we also measured the ESR response of human red cells (RBC), the osmotic response of which is well documented with other methods. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  6. FROZEN HYDROCARBONS IN COMETS

    SciTech Connect

    Simonia, Irakli

    2011-02-15

    Recent investigations of the luminescence of frozen hydrocarbon particles of icy cometary halos have been carried out. The process of luminescence of organic icy particles in a short-wavelength solar radiation field is considered. A comparative analysis of observed and laboratory data leads to 72 luminescent emission lines in the spectrum of the comet 153P/Ikeya-Zhang. The concept of cometary relict matter is presented, and the creation of a database of unidentified cometary emission lines is proposed.

  7. Frozen cultural plasticity.

    PubMed

    Houdek, Petr; Novakova, Julie

    2016-01-01

    We discuss cultural group selection under the view of the frozen plasticity theory and the different explanatory power and predictions of this framework. We present evidence that cultural adaptations and their influence on the degree of cooperation may be more complex than presented by Richerson et al., and conclude with the gene-environment-culture relationship and its impacts on cultural group selection. PMID:27561647

  8. Effect of freezing extender composition and male line on semen traits and reproductive performance in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Viudes-de-Castro, M P; Lavara, R; Safaa, H M; Marco-Jiménez, F; Mehaisen, G M K; Vicente, J S

    2014-05-01

    This study was conducted to elucidate the effect of different freezing extenders on two lines selected for hyperprolificacy and longevity (H and LP, respectively). In extender A, dimethyl sulphoxide (Me2SO) and sucrose were used as cryoprotectants. In extenders B and C, the sucrose was replaced by 20% egg yolk, and in extender C the Me2SO was substituted by acetamide. Semen was packaged in 0.25 ml plastic straws and cooled at 5°C for 45 min, and then was frozen in liquid nitrogen vapour for 10 min before being plunged into the liquid nitrogen. Thawing was carried out by immersing the straws in a water bath at 50°C for 10 s. Frozen-thawed semen characteristics and reproductive parameters were affected by freezing. Extender C showed significantly lower post-thawing quality traits than any of the three extenders. Acrosome integrity was significantly improved when Me2SO was used as cryoprotectant. Sucrose replacement by 20% egg yolk had no effect on acrosome integrity but provided significantly lower sperm motility and viability. Freezing extender affected fertility rate, total born, number of implantation sites and gestational losses, obtaining better results when extender A was used. The acrosomal integrity after frozen-thawed process showed a significant correlation with fertility at 12th day and also at birth, indicating that an increase in acrosomal integrity leads to an increase in both fertilities (12th day and at birth). A positive correlation between motility of semen and implantation sites was found. The post-thawing quality traits of semen were not affected by the genetic line, although LP line showed higher total born and lower foetal and gestational losses. The findings of this study suggest that freezing extender composition has a significant effect on the success of rabbit sperm for preservation, and when Me2SO was used as permeable cryoprotectant sucrose provided better protection compared with egg yolk and improved reproductive traits, and, on the

  9. Role of amino acids as additives on sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity and lipid peroxidation levels at pre-freeze and post-thawed ram semen.

    PubMed

    Sangeeta, Sharon; Arangasamy, A; Kulkarni, S; Selvaraju, S

    2015-10-01

    The possibility of including amino acids for cryopreservation of ram semen to improve the quality of frozen semen was explored in this study in sheep model. 24 samples were collected in triplicate from 8 rams of 2-3 year old Bannur cross bred rams maintained at the Institute Experimental Livestock Unit. Semen was diluted in tris-egg yolk glycerol diluent and made into 7 aliquots as follows: aliquot 1 served as control, "l-alanine" was added at 100 and 135mM in the aliquots 2 and 3, "l-glutamine" was added at 20 and 25mM in the aliquots 4 and 5 and "l-proline" was added at 25 and 50mM in the aliquots 6 and 7, respectively. Diluted semen was filled in 0.25ml French straws and frozen in LN2. Inclusion of "l-proline" and "l-glutamine" in the diluent increased the percent live sperm (P<0.001), total motility (P<0.05) and maintained higher functional membrane and acrosomal integrity (P<0.001) by decreasing lipid peroxidation (P<0.001) compared to the control group. In contrast, "l-alanine" decreased the percentage of total motility, fast progressive spermatozoa and increased (P<0.01) the percentage of immotile spermatozoa. It can be concluded that 20mM "l-glutamine" and 25mM "l-proline" can be used as semen additive to freeze ram semen as they prevented cryoinjuries to sperm and improved the pre-freeze and post-thaw semen characteristics. PMID:26362050

  10. Role of amino acids as additives on sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity and lipid peroxidation levels at pre-freeze and post-thawed ram semen.

    PubMed

    Sangeeta, Sharon; Arangasamy, A; Kulkarni, S; Selvaraju, S

    2015-10-01

    The possibility of including amino acids for cryopreservation of ram semen to improve the quality of frozen semen was explored in this study in sheep model. 24 samples were collected in triplicate from 8 rams of 2-3 year old Bannur cross bred rams maintained at the Institute Experimental Livestock Unit. Semen was diluted in tris-egg yolk glycerol diluent and made into 7 aliquots as follows: aliquot 1 served as control, "l-alanine" was added at 100 and 135mM in the aliquots 2 and 3, "l-glutamine" was added at 20 and 25mM in the aliquots 4 and 5 and "l-proline" was added at 25 and 50mM in the aliquots 6 and 7, respectively. Diluted semen was filled in 0.25ml French straws and frozen in LN2. Inclusion of "l-proline" and "l-glutamine" in the diluent increased the percent live sperm (P<0.001), total motility (P<0.05) and maintained higher functional membrane and acrosomal integrity (P<0.001) by decreasing lipid peroxidation (P<0.001) compared to the control group. In contrast, "l-alanine" decreased the percentage of total motility, fast progressive spermatozoa and increased (P<0.01) the percentage of immotile spermatozoa. It can be concluded that 20mM "l-glutamine" and 25mM "l-proline" can be used as semen additive to freeze ram semen as they prevented cryoinjuries to sperm and improved the pre-freeze and post-thaw semen characteristics.

  11. Effects of acrosomal conditions of frozen-thawed spermatozoa on the results of artificial insemination in Japanese Black cattle

    PubMed Central

    KISHIDA, Kazumi; SAKASE, Mitsuhiro; MINAMI, Kenta; ARAI, Miyuki M.; SYOJI, Reiko; KOHAMA, Namiko; AKIYAMA, Takayuki; OKA, Akio; HARAYAMA, Hiroshi; FUKUSHIMA, Moriyuki

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the relationship between male artificial insemination (AI) fertility and sperm acrosomal conditions assessed by new and conventional staining techniques and to identify possible reproductive dysfunctions causing low conception rates in AI using frozen-thawed spermatozoa with poor acrosomal conditions in Japanese Black bulls. We investigated individual differences among bulls in the results concerning (1) acrosomal conditions of frozen-thawed spermatozoa as assessed by not merely peanut agglutinin-lectin staining (a conventional staining technique) but also immunostaining of acrosomal tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins (a new staining technique), (2) routine AI using frozen-thawed spermatozoa as assessed by pregnancy diagnosis, (3) in vivo fertilization of frozen-thawed spermatozoa and early development of fertilized eggs as assessed by superovulation/AI-embryo collection tests and (4) in vitro fertilization of frozen-thawed spermatozoa with oocytes. The percentages of frozen-thawed spermatozoa with normal acrosomal conditions assessed by the abovementioned staining techniques were significantly correlated with the conception rates of routine AI, rates of transferable embryos in superovulation/AI-embryo collection tests and in vitro fertilization rates. These results are consistent with new suggestions that the distribution of acrosomal tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins as well as the acrosomal morphology of frozen-thawed spermatozoa are AI fertility-associated markers that are valid for the prediction of AI results and that low conception rates in AI using frozen-thawed spermatozoa with poor acrosomal conditions result from reproductive dysfunctions in the processes between sperm insemination into females and early embryo development, probably failed fertilization of frozen-thawed spermatozoa with oocytes. PMID:26300347

  12. Critical swimming speeds of wild bull trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, M.G.; Weiland, L.K.; Zydlewski, G.B.

    2004-01-01

    We estimated the critical swimming speeds (Ucrit) of wild bull trout at 6??, 11??, and 15??C in laboratory experiments. At 11??C, 5 fish ranging from 11 to 19 cm in length had a mean Ucrit of 48.24 cm/s or 3.22 body lengths per second (BL/s). Also at 11??C , 6 fish from 32 to 42 cm had a mean Ucrit of 73.99 cm/s or 2.05 BL/s. At 15??C, 5 fish from 14 to 23 cm had a mean Ucrit of 54.66 cm/s or 2.88 BL/s. No fish successfully swam at 6??C. Swim speed was significantly influenced by fish length. Many bull trout performed poorly in our enclosed respirometers: of 71 Ucrit tests we attempted, only the 16 described above were successful. Bull trout that refused to swim held station within tunnels by using their pectoral fins as depressors, or they rested and later became impinged against a downstream screen. Several common techniques did not stimulate consistent swimming activity in these fish. Our estimates of U crit for bull trout provide an understanding of their performance capacity and will be useful in modeling efforts aimed at improving fish passage structures. We recommend that fishway or culvert designers concerned with bull trout passage maintain velocities within their structures at or below our estimates of Ucrit, thus taking a conservative approach to ensuring that these fish can ascend migratory obstacles safely.

  13. Semen effects on insemination outcomes in sows.

    PubMed

    McPherson, F J; Nielsen, S G; Chenoweth, P J

    2014-12-10

    Sows (n=1205) were artificially inseminated with semen from single sires (n=166). Semen was previously analysed for sperm concentration, motility, velocity, morphology (using DIC microscopy) and membrane integrity, sperm clump score, temperature on arrival and pH. Percent normal sperm influenced both numbers of pigs born alive (P<0.01) and litter size (P<0.05) which, in turn, was also influenced by abnormal sperm head morphology (P<0.05) and retained distal cytoplasmic droplets (P<0.01). Percent stillbirths were influenced by sperm flagellar beat cross frequency (P<0.05) and semen arrival temperature (P<0.05). PMID:25455259

  14. 58. DETAIL OF PINION AND BULL GEARS: Detail view towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. DETAIL OF PINION AND BULL GEARS: Detail view towards northeast of the pinion and bull gears of the winding machinery. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  15. Protein expression pattern of PAWP in bull spermatozoa is associated with sperm quality and fertility following artificial insemination.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Chelsey E; Krieger, Kari Beth; Sutovsky, Miriam; Xu, Wei; Vargovič, Peter; Didion, Bradley A; Ellersieck, Mark R; Hennessy, Madison E; Verstegen, John; Oko, Richard; Sutovsky, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Post-acrosomal WW-domain binding protein (PAWP) is a signaling molecule located in the post-acrosomal sheath (PAS) of mammalian spermatozoa. We hypothesized that the proper integration of PAWP in the sperm PAS is reflective of bull-sperm quality and fertility. Cryopreserved semen samples from 298 sires of acceptable, but varied, fertility used in artificial insemination services were analyzed using immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry for PAWP protein. In normal spermatozoa, PAWP fluorescence formed a regular band around the proximal PAS. Anomalies of PAWP labeling in defective spermatozoa were reflected in flow cytometry by varied intensities of PAWP-induced fluorescence. Distinct sperm phenotypes were also identified, including morphologically normal and some defective spermatozoa with moderate levels of PAWP; grossly defective spermatozoa with low/no PAWP; and defective spermatozoa with high PAWP. Analysis by ImageStream flow cytometry confirmed the prevalence of abnormal sperm phenotypes in the spermatozoa with abnormal PAWP content. Live/dead staining and video recording showed that some abnormal spermatozoa are viable and capable of progressive motility. Conventional flow-cytometric measurements of PAWP correlated significantly with semen quality and fertility parameters that reflect the sires' artificial insemination fertility, including secondary sperm morphology, conception rate, non-return rate, and residual value. A multiplex, flow-cytometric test detecting PAWP, aggresomes (ubiquitinated protein aggregates), and acrosomal integrity (peanut-agglutinin-lectin labeling) had a predictive value for conception rate, as demonstrated by step-wise regression analysis. We conclude that PAWP correlates with semen/fertility parameters used in the cattle artificial insemination industry, making PAWP a potential biomarker of bull fertility.

  16. Sexual development in beef bulls following zeranol implants.

    PubMed

    Staigmiller, R B; Brownson, R M; Kartchner, R J; Williams, J H

    1985-02-01

    Two trials were conducted to study the effect of zeranol implants on growth and sexual development of bull calves. Trial 1 compared the effects of implanting with 72 mg of zeranol at 48 d of age (branding), at 215 d of age, or at both times with nonimplanted control bulls. Implanting at branding resulted in decreased scrotal circumference, testicle weight and proportion of bulls that could produce an ejaculate at 14 mo of age (P less than .01). Implanting at 215 d of age had no effect on any of these traits. Growth rate was not increased by implanting at either time but was decreased (P less than .02) in animals implanted at both times when compared with control bulls. In trial 2, both bulls and steers were implanted with zeranol and compared with nonimplanted control bulls and steers. Thirty-six-milligram implants were given at 21, 103, 260 and 343 d of age. Scrotal circumference, testicle weight and serum testosterone concentrations decreased (P less than .01) and the occurrence of penis abnormalities increased (P less than .01) in implanted bulls compared with control bulls. By the time of slaughter, however, testosterone concentrations were equal in control and implanted bulls; and the difference in scrotal circumference was diminishing. This is interpreted as evidence that as the bulls get older, they can overcome the effect of the implants. Carcass weights were heavier in implanted steers than in control steers but were lighter in implanted bulls than in control bulls (P less than .02). Carcasses of implanted bulls had higher quality scores and more marbling than control bulls, but carcasses of implanted steers had lower quality scores and less marbling than control steers (both interactions, P less than .01). Implanting bulls with zeranol at an early age resulted in restricted sexual development but not in total sterility. Repeated zeranol implants throughout the growing and finishing phase enhanced carcass quality in bulls slaughtered at 14 to 16 mo of age.

  17. Associations between feed efficiency, sexual maturity and fertility-related measures in young beef bulls.

    PubMed

    Fontoura, A B P; Montanholi, Y R; Diel de Amorim, M; Foster, R A; Chenier, T; Miller, S P

    2016-01-01

    The beef industry has emphasized the improvement of feed utilization, as measured by modeling feed intake through performance traits to calculate residual feed intake (RFI). Evidence supports an inverse relationship between feed efficiency and reproductive function. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship of reproductive assessments and RFI unadjusted (RFI(Koch)) or adjusted for body composition (RFI(us)) and the relationship among fertility-related parameters. In total, 34 crossbred bulls were housed together for 112 days of performance evaluation, followed by assessment of scrotum IR imaging, scrotal circumference, testes ultrasonography and semen quality parameters at 377±33.4 days of age. Bulls were slaughtered at 389±34.0 days of age, and analyses of carcass composition, biometrics and histomorphometry of the testis and epididymis were conducted. Bulls were grouped into two subpopulations based on divergence of RFI, and within each RFI model either by including 50% of the population (Halves, high and low RFI, n=17) or 20.6% extremes of the population (Tails, high and low RFI, n=7). The means of productive performance and fertility-related measures were compared through these categories. Pearson's correlation was calculated among fertility-related measures. In the Halves subpopulation of the RFI(us), sperm of low-RFI bulls had decreased progressive motility (47.30% v. 59.90%) and higher abundance of tail abnormalities (4.30% v. 1.80%) than that of high-RFI bulls. In the Tails subpopulation of the RFI(Koch), low RFI displayed less variation in the scrotum surface temperature (0.62°C v. 1.16°C), decreased testis echogenicity (175.50 v 198.00 pixels) and larger (60.90 v. 56.80 mm(2)) but less-developed seminiferous tubules than high-RFI bulls. The evaluation of fertility-related parameters indicated that a higher percentage of immature seminiferous tubules was correlated with occurrence of sperm with distal droplets (r=0.59), a larger

  18. Frozen Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    1 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a south polar residual cap landscape, formed in frozen carbon dioxide. There is no place on Earth that one can go to visit a landscape covering thousands of square kilometers with frozen carbon dioxide, so mesas, pits, and other landforms of the martian south polar region are as alien as they are beautiful. The scarps of the south polar region are known from thousands of other MGS MOC images to retreat at a rate of about 3 meters (3 yards) per martian year, indiating that slowly, over the course of the MGS mission, the amount of carbon dioxide in the martian atmosphere has probably been increasing.

    Location near: 86.9oS, 25.5oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  19. 21 CFR 160.110 - Frozen eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Frozen eggs. (a) Frozen eggs, frozen whole eggs, frozen mixed eggs is the food prepared by freezing... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frozen eggs. 160.110 Section 160.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR...

  20. Advances in cooled semen technologies: seminal plasma and semen extender.

    PubMed

    Rigby, S L; Brinsko, S P; Cochran, M; Blanchard, T L; Love, C C; Varner, D D

    2001-12-01

    This study evaluated motility and fertility of uncentrifuged and centrifuged equine semen following dilution in a skim milk-glucose extender with or without supplemental Tyrode's medium. In addition, the effect of seminal plasma addition to each extender was evaluated. For Experiment 1, motility of 48h cooled, stored spermatozoa was evaluated following eight dilution treatments: uncentrifuged and diluted 1:4 (v/v) in skim milk-glucose extender (EZ Mixin CSTJ; CST-1:4) or in CST supplemented 65:35 (v/v) with modified Tyrode's medium (KMT-1:4); uncentrifuged and diluted to 25x10(6) spermatozoa/ml in CST (CST-1:9) or in KMT (KMT-1:9); centrifuged and diluted in CST with 0% seminal plasma (CST-0) or 20% seminal plasma (CST-20) or centrifuged and diluted in KMT containing 0% seminal plasma (KMT-0) or in KMT containing 20% seminal plasma (KMT-20). Sperm motility parameters evaluated included percentage of total motile sperm (% TMOT), percentage of progressively motile sperm (% PMOT), curvilinear velocity (VCL) and straight-line velocity (VSL). Mean % PMOT was lower (P<0.05) for spermatozoa extended in CST-1:4 compared to CST-1:9, whereas, all motility parameters were reduced (P<0.05) in KMT-1:4 compared to KMT-1:9. Spermatozoa extended in CST-1:4 had greater % TMOT, % PMOT and VSL (P<0.05) than in KMT-1:4. Spermatozoa extended in CST-1:9 had greater (P<0.05) % PMOT than in KMT-1:9, however, VCL was greater (P<0.05) in KMT-1:9. Mean VCL and VSL were lower (P<0.05) for spermatozoa extended in CST-0 compared with CST-20, whereas, spermatozoa extended in KMT-0 had greater (P<0.05) % TMOT, % PMOT and VSL compared to spermatozoa extended in KMT-20. Mean % TMOT and % PMOT were greater (P<0.05) in CST-20 compared to KMT-20, however, KMT-0 increased (P<0.05) velocity measures (VCL and VSL) compared to CST-0. In Experiment 2, fertility of centrifuged spermatozoa diluted in either CST-20 or KMT-0 was similar (P>0.05). We conclude that modified Tyrode's medium was not detrimental to

  1. 9 CFR 98.34 - Import permits for poultry semen and animal semen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... certificates concerning specific diseases to which the animals are susceptible, as well as vaccinations or... section 306 of the Act of June 17, 1930, that foot-and-mouth disease or rinderpest has been determined to... poultry semen or animal semen may also be denied because of: Communicable disease conditions in the...

  2. Sequential generations of honey bee (Apis mellifera) queens produced using cryopreserved semen.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Brandon K; Herr, Charles; Sheppard, Walter S

    2012-01-01

    Much of the world's food production is dependent on honey bees for pollination, and expanding food production will further increase the demand for managed pollination services. Apiculturists outside the native range of the honey bee, in the Americas, Australia and eastern Asia, have used only a few of the 27 described subspecies of honey bees (Apis mellifera) for beekeeping purposes. Within the endemic ranges of a particular subspecies, hybridisation can threaten native subspecies when local beekeepers import and propagate non-native honey bees. For many threatened species, cryopreserved germplasm can provide a resource for the preservation of diversity and recovery of endangered populations. However, although instrumental insemination of queen honey bees is well established, the absence of an effective means to cryopreserve honey bee semen has limited the success of efforts to preserve genetic diversity within the species or to develop repositories of honey bee germplasm for breeding purposes. Herein we report that some queens inseminated with cryopreserved semen were capable of producing a substantial number of fertilised offspring. These diploid female larvae were used to produce two additional sequential generations of new queens, which were then back-crossed to the same stock of frozen semen. Our results demonstrate the ability to produce queens using cryopreserved honey bee spermatozoa and the potential for the establishment of a honey bee genetic repository.

  3. Comparison of quality and freezability of water buffalo semen after washing or Sephadex filtration.

    PubMed

    Goyal, R L; Tuli, R K; Georgie, G C; Chand, D

    1996-09-01

    Split aliquots of pooled buffalo semen samples were processed before freezing 1) by washing twice with Tris-citric acid buffer by centrifugation and re-suspension to the original volume in the same buffer, or 2) or by passage through a G-15 Sephadex column. The effect of these procedures on progressive motility, percentages of live spermatozoa, sperm abnormalities and intact acrosomes and release of glutamate oxatoacetate transaminase (GOT) into the medium were assessed after extension, after equilibration and after 18 to 24 h or 15 d of frozen storage. Prior to extension, gel filtration reduced sperm concentration and enhanced progressive motility, whereas washing produced little effect on these attributes. Except in the case of GOT release, which was significantly (P < 0.05) lower after the washing of semen (34.3 +/- 16.40) than the filtering of semen (45.7 +/- 12.35), the 2 procedures did not cause significant effects (P > 0.05). Damage to spermatozoa due to freeze-processing was also similar in the 2 treatments, and the extent of beneficial effect in improved motility and live spermatozoan numbers after thawing was also similar.

  4. Semen characteristics of transwomen referred for sperm banking before sex transition: a case series.

    PubMed

    Hamada, A; Kingsberg, S; Wierckx, K; T'Sjoen, G; De Sutter, P; Knudson, G; Agarwal, A

    2015-09-01

    Transwomen (TW) can now turn to cryopreserve spermatozoa before gender reassignment (GR). The objective is to assess semen quality of TW and evaluate adequacy for assisted reproduction technology (ART). Pre-freezing (PF) and post-thaw (PT) semen parameters of 2 and PF data of 27 TW who were referred for sperm banking in Cleveland Clinic/USA and Ghent Center/Belgium, before GR, were retrospectively analysed. The study period was between February, 2003 and October, 2011. We also evaluated adequacy of 24-h PT data for ART. PF data of 29 TW, mean age of 28.9 years, showed high incidence of oligozoospermia (27.58%), asthenozoospermia (31%) and teratozoospermia (31%). Mean sperm concentration was 46.9 × 10(6) /ml, mean per cent motility was 42.9 and mean per cent sperm morphology (Kruger's) was 7.98. The 24-h PT data, for 2 TW, showed mean motility 22.4%, mean total motile sperm count 13.7 × 10(6) and total motile sperm concentration 8.7 × 106/ml. Single patient had used the frozen spermatozoon for intrauterine insemination (IUI) of a surrogate mother resulting in birth of healthy newborn. It is concluded that poor PF and 24-h PT semen quality is frequently seen among TW. As such, considerable proportion of TW should use more expensive method of ART, for example IVF/ICSI rather than inexpensive IUI.

  5. Primary mandibular hemangiosarcoma in a bull

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Keith P.; McSloy, Alexandra C.; Perrier, Melanie; Prichard, Michael A.; Steinberg, Howard; Semrad, Susan D.

    2008-01-01

    Disseminated pulmonary and subcutaneous-muscular hemangiosarcoma at the left hemimandible was diagnosed postmortem in a 2-year-old Jersey bull that presented with a 7-day history of facial swelling from suspected traumatic injury. Hemangiosarcoma is uncommon in cattle and has never been reported to affect the bones of the skull. PMID:19043489

  6. Bull Run Fossil Plant toxicity biomonitoring study

    SciTech Connect

    Hackney, P.A.; Moses, J.

    1986-11-01

    This report presents the results of toxicity testing of the whole waste discharge from the Bull Run Steam-Electric Plant ashpond. Water chemistry tests were conducted for heavy metals content and suspended solids. Both acute and chronic toxicity tests were conducted on Daphnia pulex, Ceriodaphnia spp., Pimephales promelas, Micropterus salmoides, Lepomis macrochirus, and Cyprinus carpio. (ACR)

  7. Semen production by the emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae). 1. Methods for collection of semen.

    PubMed

    Malecki, I A; Martin, G B; Lindsay, D R

    1997-04-01

    Two methods for collecting semen from male emus using an artificial cloaca (AC) have been developed. In the first method, the male mounts the female teaser and the collector effects erection and subsequent ejaculation using the AC. The second method takes advantage of the development of sexual behaviour directed towards the semen collector and semen is collected when the male mounts the collector's back. Eight of 11 males were successfully trained with teasers and 5 of the 7 males trained without teasers ejaculated successfully. The ease of training varied between birds. The use of a teaser was very valuable, as the crouching behavior of the teaser elicited mating attempts in every male. The training and collection of semen was done by one person. Both methods can be used for routine collection of semen, as they take advantage of natural stimulation and the voluntary ejaculation reflex to which the birds adapted readily. PMID:9106890

  8. Fertility of boar semen cryopreserved in extender supplemented with butylated hydroxytoluene.

    PubMed

    Trzcińska, Monika; Bryła, Magdalena; Gajda, Barbara; Gogol, Piotr

    2015-02-01

    The present study was to determine the effect of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) on quality and fertilizing ability of frozen-thawed boar semen. In the first experiment, five crossbreds of Polish Landrace and Large White boars (five ejaculates per boar) were frozen in 0.5 mL straws after dilution with lactose-egg yolk-glycerol extender supplemented with 0 (control), 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mM BHT. The sperm quality was verified based on the motility (computer-assisted sperm analysis; total motility, %; progressive motility, %), membrane integrity (YO-PRO-1/propidium iodide [PI] assay), acrosome integrity (fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated with peanut agglutinin/PI), and lipid peroxidation (chemiluminescence method) at 15 minutes postthaw. In the second experiment, the semen cryopreserved in extender supplemented with 1.0 and 2.0 mM BHT were selected for intrauterine artificial insemination of synchronized gilts. An intrauterine artificial insemination with low numbers of spermatozoa (500 × 10(6)) was surgically infused into each uterine horn. The highest (P < 0.001) progressive motility (%), membrane integrity, and acrosomal integrity were noted by the addition of 1.0 and 2.0 mM BHT to the freezing extender. Moreover, the various concentrations (0.5-2.0 mM) of BHT caused a considerable decrease in lipid peroxidation in relation to the control extender (P < 0.001). The highest reproductive performance of inseminated gilts (farrowing rate, 86.7%; litter size, 10.8 ± 1.6) was observed when semen was cryopreserved in extender supplemented with 1.0 mM BHT. These findings demonstrate that the addition of 1.0 mM BHT to the freezing extender efficiently improves the fertilizing ability of postthaw boar spermatozoa.

  9. Fertility of boar semen cryopreserved in extender supplemented with butylated hydroxytoluene.

    PubMed

    Trzcińska, Monika; Bryła, Magdalena; Gajda, Barbara; Gogol, Piotr

    2015-02-01

    The present study was to determine the effect of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) on quality and fertilizing ability of frozen-thawed boar semen. In the first experiment, five crossbreds of Polish Landrace and Large White boars (five ejaculates per boar) were frozen in 0.5 mL straws after dilution with lactose-egg yolk-glycerol extender supplemented with 0 (control), 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mM BHT. The sperm quality was verified based on the motility (computer-assisted sperm analysis; total motility, %; progressive motility, %), membrane integrity (YO-PRO-1/propidium iodide [PI] assay), acrosome integrity (fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated with peanut agglutinin/PI), and lipid peroxidation (chemiluminescence method) at 15 minutes postthaw. In the second experiment, the semen cryopreserved in extender supplemented with 1.0 and 2.0 mM BHT were selected for intrauterine artificial insemination of synchronized gilts. An intrauterine artificial insemination with low numbers of spermatozoa (500 × 10(6)) was surgically infused into each uterine horn. The highest (P < 0.001) progressive motility (%), membrane integrity, and acrosomal integrity were noted by the addition of 1.0 and 2.0 mM BHT to the freezing extender. Moreover, the various concentrations (0.5-2.0 mM) of BHT caused a considerable decrease in lipid peroxidation in relation to the control extender (P < 0.001). The highest reproductive performance of inseminated gilts (farrowing rate, 86.7%; litter size, 10.8 ± 1.6) was observed when semen was cryopreserved in extender supplemented with 1.0 mM BHT. These findings demonstrate that the addition of 1.0 mM BHT to the freezing extender efficiently improves the fertilizing ability of postthaw boar spermatozoa. PMID:25468554

  10. Demonstration of DSI-semen--A novel DNA methylation-based forensic semen identification assay.

    PubMed

    Wasserstrom, Adam; Frumkin, Dan; Davidson, Ariane; Shpitzen, Moshe; Herman, Yael; Gafny, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Determining whether the source tissue of biological material is semen is important in confirming sexual assaults, which account for a considerable percentage of crime cases. The gold standard for confirming the presence of semen is microscopic identification of sperm cells, however, this method is labor intensive and operator-dependent. Protein-based immunologic assays, such as PSA, are highly sensitive and relatively fast, but suffer from low specificity in some situations. In addition, proteins are less stable than DNA under most environmental insults. Recently, forensic tissue identification advanced with the development of several approaches based on mRNA and miRNA for identification of various body fluids. Herein is described DNA source identifier (DSI)-semen, a DNA-based assay that determines whether the source tissue of a sample is semen based on detection of semen-specific methylation patterns in five genomic loci. The assay is comprised of a simple single tube biochemical procedure, similar to DNA profiling, followed by automatic software analysis, yielding the identification (semen/non-semen) accompanied by a statistical confidence level. Three additional internal control loci are used to ascertain the reliability of the results. The assay, which aims to replace microscopic examination, can easily be integrated by forensic laboratories and is automatable. The kit was tested on 135 samples of semen, saliva, venous blood, menstrual blood, urine, and vaginal swabs and the identification of semen vs. non-semen was correct in all cases. In order to test the assay's applicability in "real-life" situations, 33 actual casework samples from the forensic biological lab of the Israeli police were analyzed, and the results were compared with microscopic examination performed by Israeli police personnel. There was complete concordance between both analyses except for one sample, in which the assay identified semen whereas no sperm was seen in the microscope. This

  11. Performance, growth, and maturity of Nellore bulls.

    PubMed

    Costa e Silva, Luiz Fernando; Valadares Filho, Sebastião de Campos; Detmann, Edenio; Rotta, Polyana Pizzi; Zanetti, Diego; Villadiego, Faider Alberto Castaño; Pellizzoni, Samantha Gusmão; Pereira, Rafael Moura Guimarães

    2013-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the dry matter intake (DMI), digestibility, average daily gain (ADG), microbial efficiency, empty body weight (EBW) gain, and body composition of Nellore bulls. Additionally, Nellore bull maturity was estimated, and the prediction equation for DMI, suggested by the Brazilian nutrient requirements system (BR CORTE; Azevêdo et al. 2010), was evaluated. Thirty-three Nellore bulls, with a mean initial weight of 259 ± 25 kg and age of 14 ± 1 months, were used in this study. Five animals were slaughtered at the beginning of the experiment (control group), and the remaining 28 were divided into 4 groups, each slaughtered at 42-day intervals. Their diet was composed of corn silage and concentrate (55:45). The power model was used to estimate muscle tissue, bone tissue, crude protein (CP), mineral matter (MM), and water present in the empty body, while the exponential model was used to estimate adipose tissue and ether extract (EE) present in the empty body. When expressed in kilograms per day, differences were observed (P < 0.05) only for the intake of EE and neutral detergent fiber as a function of feedlot time periods. Although there was a difference in relation to nutrient intake, it did not affect (P > 0.05) digestibility, with the exception of EE digestibility. The equation suggested by BR CORTE correctly estimates the DMI of Nellore bulls. ADG was not affected (P > 0.05) by time spent in the feedlot. No differences were observed (P > 0.05) for microbial efficiency; a mean value of 142 g microbial crude protein/kg total digestible nutrients was achieved. The muscle and bone tissues, CP, MM, and water present in the empty body increased as the animal grew, although at a lower rate. The adipose tissue and EE present in the empty body increased their deposition rate when the animal reached its mature weight. Maturity is defined as when an animal reaches 22 % EE in the empty body, which

  12. Improving bovine semen diluents: insights from the male and female reproductive tracts, and the potential relevance of cervical mucins.

    PubMed

    McGetrick, J A; Reid, C J; Carrington, S D

    2014-05-01

    The commercial applicability of bovine artificial insemination (AI) depends on the effectiveness of diluents for maintaining sperm fertility. Challenges faced by the AI industry due to recent advances in assisted reproduction, and the limitations inherent in using fresh and frozen-thawed sperm for AI, could be overcome with the development of better semen diluents. Research into the different microenvironments of bovine sperm as they progress towards maturity, capacitation and fertilisation is revealing various mechanisms that could be exploited to improve the formulation of semen diluents. These are reviewed here. A rationale for a more detailed investigation of bovine cervical mucus for factors that may allow further progress towards this goal are also discussed. PMID:24680194

  13. Semen quality in Peruvian pesticide applicators: association between urinary organophosphate metabolites and semen parameters

    PubMed Central

    Yucra, Sandra; Gasco, Manuel; Rubio, Julio; Gonzales, Gustavo F

    2008-01-01

    Background Organophosphates are broad class of chemicals widely used as pesticides throughout the world. We performed a cross-sectional study of associations between dialkylphosphate metabolites of organophosphates and semen quality among pesticide applicators in Majes (Arequipa), Peru. Methods Thirty-one men exposed to organophosphate (OP) pesticides and 31 non-exposed were recruited (age, 20–60 years). In exposed subjects, semen and a blood sample were obtained one day after the last pesticide application. Subjects were grouped according to levels of OP metabolites in urine. Semen samples were analyzed for sperm concentration, percentage of sperm motility, percentage of normal morphology, semen leucocytes and concentrations of fructose and zinc. Exposure to OP was assessed by measuring six urinary OP metabolites (dimethyl and diethyl phosphates and thiophosphates) by gas chromatography using a single flame photometric detector. Results Diethyldithiophosphate (p = 0.04) and diethylthiophosphate (p = 0.02) better reflected occupational pesticide exposure than other OP metabolites. Semen analysis revealed a significant reduction of semen volume and an increase in semen pH in men with OP metabolites. Multiple regression analysis showed that both occupational exposure to pesticides and the time of exposure to pesticides were more closely related to alterations in semen quality parameters than the single measurement of OP metabolites in urine. Conclusion The study demonstrated that occupational exposure to OP pesticides was more closely related to alterations in semen quality than a single measurement of urine OP metabolites. Current measurement of OP metabolites in urine may not reflect the full risk. PMID:19014632

  14. Frozen beverage machine

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.D.

    1988-04-12

    A frozen beverage machine is described, comprising: a. a frame having an exterior, an interior, a front and a back; b. a cylinder, having an interior and an exterior as well as first and second ends and further having an opening in each of the ends, the cylinder being horizontally and fixedly positioned within the interior of the frame with the second end facing the front of the frame; c. a means, sealingly attached to the opening in the second end of the cylinder, for emptying the cylinder; d. a means, positioned within the frame and communicating with the exterior of the cylinder, for removing heat from the cylinder; e. at least one support bracket; f. a shaft, rotatably attached within the opening in the support bracket and rotatably and sealingly attached within the opening in the first end of the cylinder and extending to the interior of the cylinder; g. a motor assembly, operatively connected to a portion of the shaft exterior to the cylinder and suspended from the shaft such that the weight of the motor assembly is supported only by the shaft; h. a contact switch; and i. a resilient means, connected to the frame and the motor assembly, for maintaining the position of the motor assembly relative to the shaft until a desired threshold resistance to rotation of the shaft within the cylinder occur, and then allowing the motor assembly to rotate to a desired position relative to the shaft.

  15. Bull heading to kill live gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    Oudeman, P.; Avest, D. ter; Grodal, E.O.; Asheim, H.A.; Meissner, R.J.H.

    1994-12-31

    To kill a live closed-in gas well by bull heading down the tubing, the selected pump rate should be high enough to ensure efficient displacement of the gas into the formation (i.e., to avoid the kill fluid bypassing the gas). On the other hand, the pressures that develop during bull heading at high rate must not exceed wellhead pressure rating, tubing or casing burst pressures or the formation breakdown gradient, since this will lead, at best, to a very inefficient kill job. Given these constraints, the optimum kill rate, requited hydraulic horsepower, density and type of kill fluids have to be selected. For this purpose a numerical simulator has been developed, which predicts the sequence of events during bull heading. Pressures and flow rates in the well during the kill job are calculated, taking to account slip between the gas and kill fluid, hydrostatic and friction pressure drop, wellbore gas compression and leak-off to the formation. Comparison with the results of a dedicated field test demonstrates that these parameters can be estimated accurately. Example calculations will be presented to show how the simulator can be used to identify an optimum kill scenario.

  16. A field study on artificial insemination of swamp and crossbred buffaloes with sexed semen from river buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yangqing; Liao, Yanqiong; Zhang, Ming; Yang, Bingzhuang; Liang, Xianwei; Yang, Xiaogan; Lu, Shengsheng; Wu, Zhuyue; Xu, Huiyan; Liang, Yunbin; Lu, Kehuan

    2015-10-01

    Sex preselection by flow sorting of X- and Y-sperm has been proven to be an efficient and economically feasible strategy for use in Holstein dairy cow breeding, and previous reports have demonstrated the feasibility of altering the sex ratio in buffalo species by using sexed semen in either artificial insemination or IVF. However, because buffalo reproductive physiology and farm management are different from Holsteins, factors involved in artificial insemination by sexed semen need to be further addressed before being applied in buffalo breeding at village-level husbandry. In this study, a total of 4521 swamp or crossbred (F1 or F2) buffaloes with natural estrus were inseminated with X-sorted sperm from river buffaloes, resulting in a 48.5% (2194 of 4521) pregnancy rate and 87.6% (1895 of 2163) sex accuracy in the derived calves. The pregnancy rate obtained with sexed semen from Murrah bulls was higher than that of Nili-Ravi, 52.5% (895 of 1706) versus 46.1% (1299 of 2815; P < 0.01), respectively. Also, significant variations were seen in pregnancy rates from inseminations performed in different seasons (P < 0.01) and by different technicians (P < 0.01). In contrast to Holsteins, no difference was seen in the pregnancy rate between heifers and parous buffalo cows, and buffalo cows with different genetic backgrounds (swamp type, crossbred F1 and F2) showed similar fertility after insemination with sexed semen. The findings in the present study under field conditions pave the way for application of sexing technology to buffalo breeding under village-level husbandry and diverse genetic backgrounds. PMID:26149075

  17. Effects of seasons on some semen parameters and bacterial contamination of Awassi ram semen.

    PubMed

    Azawi, O I; Ismaeel, M A

    2012-06-01

    The objectives of the present study were to determine the effects of season on some semen parameters and bacterial contamination of Awassi ram semen. Semen samples from six mature Awassi rams were used in this study. Semen collection was performed with artificial vagina every week, from September 2009 to October 2010. Volume, sperm concentration, mass motility, individual motility, percentage live sperm and sperm abnormalities were evaluated. Moreover, determination of viable bacterial count of the rams was also recorded weekly. Higher (p < 0.05) semen volume in the hot summer and spring months was observed of August (1.55 ± 0.08 ml) and March (1.27 ± 0.15 ml). Sperm concentration was highest (p < 0.05) in the breeding season (late summer to early autumn) of September (4.21 ± 0.86 × 10(9) sperm/ml). Sperm individual motility and percent of live sperm observed in August (summer) and May (end of spring) when the environmental temperature started to increase were recorded highest values and differed significantly (p < 0.05) from December and January (winter). The highest value of the mean sperm acrosomal defects (13.33 ± 0.63%) was recorded in December. The highest value of the mean viable bacterial count (138.3 ± 21.6) was recorded in July (summer). A significant decrease (p < 0.01) in the mean viable bacterial count was observed from the middle of winter towards the end of spring. The lowest bacterial count was noted in January (60.5 ± 2.98). It could be concluded from the results of the present study that there is an effect of season on ram semen quality, and summer high temperature in northern Iraq has no effect on Awassi ram semen. There is a significant effect of season on bacterial count on Awassi ram semen.

  18. New triterpene glycosides from Ziziphi Spinosae Semen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Ding, Bo; Luo, Dan; Chen, Liu-Yuan; Hou, Yun-Long; Dai, Yi; Yao, Xin-Sheng

    2013-10-01

    Four new dammarane-type triterpene glycosides, named jujubosides I-IV (1-4), were isolated from Ziziphi Spinosae Semen, along with seven known saponins (5-11). The structures of new compounds were established on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis. All compounds were evaluated for the effects on neonatal rat cardiomyocyte injury induced by hydrogen peroxide in vitro. PMID:23912064

  19. Correlation of phthalate exposures with semen quality

    SciTech Connect

    Pant, Niraj Shukla, Manju; Kumar Patel, Devendra; Shukla, Yogeshwar; Mathur, Neeraj; Kumar Gupta, Yogendra; Saxena, Daya Krishna

    2008-08-15

    Phthalates are widely used man-made chemical released in the environment and human exposure is mainly through diet. As the phthalate plasticizers are not covalently bound to PVC, they can leach, migrate or evaporate into the environment and as a result have become ubiquitously contaminants. The present study investigates the correlation, if any, between the phthalate esters (DEP, DEHP, DBP, DMP, DOP) and sperm mitochondrial status, ROS, LPO, SCSA, and sperm quality. The study was conducted in the urban/rural population of Lucknow visiting Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, CSMMU, Lucknow. Semen analysis was performed according to the WHO guidelines while phthalate analysis by HPLC and LPO by spectrophotometer and the sperm mitochondrial status, ROS, SCSA using flow cytometry. The questionnaire data showed no significant difference in the demographic characteristics among the groups. In general, urban population was found to have statistically significant higher levels of phthalate esters than the rural. Further, infertile men showed statistically significant (p < 0.05) higher levels of pollutants in the semen than fertile men. A negative correlation between semen phthalate level viz DEHP and sperm quality and positive association with depolarized mitochondria, elevation in ROS production and LPO, DNA fragmentation was established. The findings are suggestive that phthalates might be one among the contributing factors associated with the deterioration in semen quality and these adverse effects might be ROS, LPO and mitochondrial dysfunction mediated.

  20. AIR POLLUTION EFFECTS ON SEMEN QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential impact of exposure to periods of high air pollution on male reproductive health was examined within the framework of an international project conducted in the Czech Republic. Semen quality was evaluated in young men (age 18) living in the Teplice District who are ex...

  1. Influences of a diet supplemented with linseed oil and antioxidants on quality of equine semen after cooling and cryopreservation during winter.

    PubMed

    Schmid-Lausigk, Yvonne; Aurich, Christine

    2014-04-15

    Seasonal changes in the reproductive physiology of stallions contribute to a decrease in the quality of frozen-thawed semen during late winter. Changes in the lipid composition of the sperm plasma membrane may contribute to this phenomenon. In the present study, we have, therefore, investigated the effects of adding linseed oil (LO) in combination with antioxidants to the diet of breeding stallions on the motility and membrane integrity of cooled-stored and cryopreserved semen. Starting in November, the diet of LO stallions (n = 6) but not control (C) stallions (n = 5) was supplemented with LO (100 mL once daily) plus an antioxidant (Myostem Protect; Audevard, Clichy, France) for a total of 84 days. Before (November) and at the end of this period (February), ejaculates were processed for cryopreservation (n = 3 ejaculates per stallion) and cooled shipping at 5 °C. Frozen-thawed and cooled-shipped semen was sent to the laboratory for computer-assisted semen analysis of total motility, progressive motility, and velocity parameters (average path velocity [VAP], curved line velocity [VCL], and straight-line velocity [VSL]) and evaluation of membrane integrity. The quality of frozen-thawed semen decreased (P < 0.05) from November (e.g., total motility LO 69 ± 3% and C 67 ± 3%) to February (total motility: LO 55 ± 4% and C 59 ± 3%) independent of treatment (P > 0.05). A decrease in the velocity parameters VAP, VCL, and VSL was more pronounced in LO stallions than in C stallions (e.g., VSL: November LO 67 ± 1 μm/s, C 64 ± 2 μm/s; February LO 59 ± 2 μm/s, C 63 ± 2 μm/s; interaction month by treatment, P < 0.05). In cooled-stored semen, total motility, progressive motility, and membrane integrity were lower in February than in November (P < 0.001 for all parameters). Supplementation of the diet with LO and antioxidants attenuated this decrease (e.g., Day 1 of cooled storage = 24 hours after semen collection: total motility in November LO 88 ± 1% and C 87

  2. Semen production by the emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae). 2. Effect of collection frequency on the production of semen and spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Malecki, I A; Martin, G B; Lindsay, D R

    1997-04-01

    This experiment tested the hypothesis that frequent collection of semen from emus would increase the total output of semen and spermatozoa over less frequent collection. Semen was collected from trained male emus using an artificial cloaca. In Experiment 1, semen was collected from males every 4th d (96-h interval), every 2nd d (48-h interval), and every day (24-h interval) for 16 d. In Experiment 2, semen was collected daily (24-h interval), twice daily (6-h interval), and three times per day (3-h interval) over 6 d. Twice-daily collections yielded twice as much volume and number of spermatozoa than daily collections. Collecting semen three times per day did not yield extra semen, as it adversely affected the libido of males. Twice-daily collections appears to yield the optimum output over the 6 d of this experiment, but longer periods of collection need to be studied. PMID:9106891

  3. Scrotal infrared digital thermography as a predictor of seasonal effects on sperm traits in Braford bulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegassi, Silvio Renato Oliveira; Barcellos, Júlio Otavio Jardim; Dias, Eduardo Antunes; Koetz, Celso; Pereira, Gabriel Ribas; Peripolli, Vanessa; McManus, Concepta; Canozzi, Maria Eugênia Andrighetto; Lopes, Flávio Guiselli

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the seasonal effects of the environment on semen quality in bulls, using infrared thermography. Sperm motility (M), mass motion (MM), and vigor (VIG) were evaluated in sperm samples from 17 Bradford bulls aged approximately 24 months at the beginning of the study. Infrared thermography images and data were collected using an infrared FLIR T 300 camera and Quick Report 1.2 SP2 software to determine the temperature of the proximal and distal poles of the testis and to assess the testicular temperature gradient. The seasonal effects on physiological, seminal, and climatic variables were analyzed by the GLM ANOVA and CORR procedures using SAS®. The microclimatic factors were recorded in hourly intervals, and the daily mean temperature and mean relative humidity were calculated to determine the daily temperature-humidity index (THI) every day for 1 year. The temperature gradient (TG) variations of the testes were significantly higher in the autumn (4.5 °C), winter (4.0 °C), and spring (2.9 °C) compared to summer (0.9 °C) ( P < 0.05). Ocular globe temperatures were lower in the winter (27.6 °C) and autumn (26.8 °C) compared to summer (33.9 °C) and spring (31.1 °C) ( P < 0.05). The average MM (2.58), M (52.64), and VIG (2.70) of the semen decreased in the summer compared to other seasons ( P < 0.01). The TG was negatively correlated with THI (-0.44; P < 0.05). For the seminal variables, MaD (-0.45; P < 0.05) and TD (-0.50; P < 0.01) presented a negative correlation with TG. The TG had a positive correlation between M and VIG, which had values of 0.36 and 0.35, respectively ( P < 0.05). We have concluded that infrared thermography can be used to assess the testicular temperature gradient and its consequences on physical and quantitative aspects of sperm.

  4. The uses of infrared thermography to evaluate the effects of climatic variables in bull's reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegassi, Silvio Renato Oliveira; Pereira, Gabriel Ribas; Dias, Eduardo Antunes; Koetz, Celso; Lopes, Flávio Guiselli; Bremm, Carolina; Pimentel, Concepta; Lopes, Rubia Branco; da Rocha, Marcela Kuczynski; Carvalho, Helena Robattini; Barcellos, Júlio Otavio Jardim

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the seasonal effects of the environment on sperm quality in subtropical region determined by temperature and humidity index (THI). We used 20 Brangus bulls (5/8 Angus × 3/8 Nellore) aged approximately 24 months at the beginning of the study. Semen evaluations were performed twice per season during 1 year. Climate THI data were collected from an automatic weather station from the National Institute of Meteorology. Infrared thermography images were used to determine the temperature of the proximal and distal poles of the testis to assess the testicular temperature gradient (TG). The seasonal effects on seminal and climatic variables were analyzed with ANOVA using MIXED procedure of SAS. Sperm motility in spring (60.1 %), summer (57.6 %), and autumn (64.5 %) showed difference compared to winter (73.0 %; P < 0.01). TG was negatively correlated with THI at 18 days (spermiogenesis) (-0.76; P < 0.05) and at 12 days (epididymal transit) (-0.85; P < 0.01). Ocular temperature (OcT) had a positive correlation with THI at 18 days (0.78; P < 0.05) and at 12 days (0.84; P < 0.01). Motility showed a negative correlation with THI only at 18 days (-0.79; P < 0.05). During spermiogenesis, the TG had higher negative correlation compared to OcT (-0.97; P < 0.01) and rectal temperature (-0.72; P < 0.05). Spermatozoa with distal midpiece reflex were correlated with THI during transit epididymis (0.72; P < 0.05). Seminal parameters are not affected when THI reaches 93.0 (spermiogenesis) and 88.0 (epididymal transit). We concluded that infrared thermography can be adopted as an indirect method in order to assess the effect of environmental changes in TG and OcT of Brangus bulls.

  5. Differences in the ability of spermatozoa from individual boar ejaculates to withstand different semen-processing techniques.

    PubMed

    Parrilla, Inma; del Olmo, David; Sijses, Laurien; Martinez-Alborcia, María J; Cuello, Cristina; Vazquez, Juan M; Martinez, Emilio A; Roca, Jordi

    2012-05-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the ability of spermatozoa from individual boar ejaculates to withstand different semen-processing techniques. Eighteen sperm-rich ejaculate samples from six boars (three per boar) were diluted in Beltsville Thawing Solution and split into three aliquots. The aliquots were (1) further diluted to 3×10(7) sperm/mL and stored as a liquid at 17°C for 72 h, (2) frozen-thawed (FT) at 1×10(9) sperm/mL using standard 0.5-mL straw protocols, or (3) sex-sorted with subsequent liquid storage (at 17°C for 6 h) or FT (2×10(7) sperm/mL using a standard 0.25-mL straw protocol). The sperm quality was evaluated based on total sperm motility (the CASA system), viability (plasma membrane integrity assessed using flow cytometry and the LIVE/DEAD Sperm Viability Kit), lipid peroxidation (assessed via indirect measurement of the generation of malondialdehyde (MDA) using the BIOXYTECH MDA-586 Assay Kit) and DNA fragmentation (sperm chromatin dispersion assessed using the Sperm-Sus-Halomax(®) test). Data were normalized to the values assessed for the fresh (for liquid-stored and FT samples) or the sorted semen samples (for liquid stored and the FT sorted spermatozoa). All of the four sperm-processing techniques affected sperm quality (P<0.01), regardless of the semen donor, with reduced percentages of motile and viable sperm and increased MDA generation and percentages of sperm with fragmented DNA. Significant (P<0.05) inter-boar (effect of boars within each semen-processing technique) and intra-boar (effect of semen-processing techniques within each boar) differences were evident for all of the sperm quality parameters assessed, indicating differences in the ability of spermatozoa from individual boars to withstand the semen-processing techniques. These results are the first evidence that ejaculate spermatozoa from individual boars can respond in a boar-dependent manner to different semen-processing techniques. PMID:22554791

  6. Protocol for determining bull trout presence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, James; Dunham, Jason B.; Howell, Philip; Thurow, Russell; Bonar, Scott

    2002-01-01

    The Western Division of the American Fisheries Society was requested to develop protocols for determining presence/absence and potential habitat suitability for bull trout. The general approach adopted is similar to the process for the marbled murrelet, whereby interim guidelines are initially used, and the protocols are subsequently refined as data are collected. Current data were considered inadequate to precisely identify suitable habitat but could be useful in stratifying sampling units for presence/absence surveys. The presence/absence protocol builds on previous approaches (Hillman and Platts 1993; Bonar et al. 1997), except it uses the variation in observed bull trout densities instead of a minimum threshold density and adjusts for measured differences in sampling efficiency due to gear types and habitat characteristics. The protocol consists of: 1. recommended sample sizes with 80% and 95% detection probabilities for juvenile and resident adult bull trout for day and night snorkeling and electrofishing adjusted for varying habitat characteristics for 50m and 100m sampling units, 2. sampling design considerations, including possible habitat characteristics for stratification, 3. habitat variables to be measured in the sampling units, and 3. guidelines for training sampling crews. Criteria for habitat strata consist of coarse, watershed-scale characteristics (e.g., mean annual air temperature) and fine-scale, reach and habitat-specific features (e.g., water temperature, channel width). The protocols will be revised in the future using data from ongoing presence/absence surveys, additional research on sampling efficiencies, and development of models of habitat/species occurrence.

  7. Semen collection and fertility in naturally fertile sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, G.; Gee, G.F.; Nicolich, Jane M.; Taylor, J.A.; Urbanek, R.P.; Stahlecker, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    Aviculturists often ask if semen collection will interfere with fertility in naturally fertile pairs of cranes. We used 12 naturally fertile Florida sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pratensis) pairs for this study, 6 control and 6 experimental. All pairs had produced fertile eggs in previous years and were in out-of-doors pens scattered throughout different pen complexes, within auditory range but physically isolated. Semen was collected on Tuesday mornings and Friday afternoons from 26 February 1993 to 4 June 1993. We used standard artificial insemination methods to collect and to evaluate the semen and spermatozoa. Semen collection did not affect semen quality or quantity. Semen volume, sperm density, sperm motility, sperm morphology, sperm live, sperm number per collection, and male response to semen collection exhibited significant daily variation (P < 0.05). Although semen collection began 13 days before the first egg in the experimental group, we observed no differences in the date of first egg laid or in fertility between experimental and control groups. Also, we observed no differences in the interval between clutches or in the percentage of broken eggs between experimental and control groups. Sires consistently producing better semen samples produced fewer fertile eggs than sires producing poorer semen samples (r = 0.60).

  8. Effect of recombinant bovine somatotropin on plasma concentrations of insulin-like growth factor I, insulin and membrane integrity of bull spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Vieira, M B; Bianchi, I; Madeira, E M; Roll, V F B; Oliveira, C A; Viau, P; Pivato, I; Severo, N C; Del Pino, F A B; Schneider, A; Corrêa, M N

    2010-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the exogenous recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) on plasma concentrations of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), insulin and semen quality of bulls. Twenty bulls (Aberdeen Angus and Brangus) were divided by breed into two groups. Placebo group was injected with NaCl 0.9% (s.c.) and treatment group with rbST (s.c., 500 mg) at days 0 and 14 of the experiment. Immediately after semen collection, blood samples were taken on days 0, 14, 28, 42 and 56 of the experiment. Semen was also collected on day 70 of the experiment. Evaluation of sperm motility was performed at pre-freezing and post-thawing stage, whereas assessment of sperm membrane integrity was performed after freezing and thawing. Analysis of data revealed that the effect of treatment and treatment-by-collection day on plasma concentrations of IGF-I and insulin was not significant. However, mean plasma concentrations of IGF-I and insulin were affected (p < 0.0001) by days of blood sampling. Effect of treatment and treatment-by-collection day on motility of spermatozoa was similar (p > 0.05) at pre-freezing and post-thawing stage. Intactness of plasmalemma and tail membrane of spermatozoa at post-thawing stage was higher (p < 0.05) in rbST-treated group than in control. In conclusion, rbST did not affect plasma concentrations of IGF-I and insulin, however, it did improve post-thaw sperm membrane integrity. PMID:19663813

  9. Evaluation of thermal comfort, physiological, hematological, and seminal features of buffalo bulls in an artificial insemination station in a tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Barros, Daniel Vale; Silva, Lilian Kátia Ximenes; de Brito Lourenço, José; da Silva, Aluizio Otávio Almeida; E Silva, André Guimarães Maciel; Franco, Irving Montanar; Oliveira, Carlos Magno Chaves; Tholon, Patrícia; Martorano, Lucieta Guerreiro; Garcia, Alexandre Rossetto

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the variation over time in thermal comfort indices and the behavior of physiological parameters related to thermolysis, blood parameters, and semen in natura of buffalo bulls reared in tropical climate. The study was carried out in an artificial insemination station under a humid tropical climate (Afi according to Köppen). Ten water buffalo bulls (Bubalus bubalis) were used during the 5 months (April to August) of study. The environmental Temperature Humidity Index (THId) and the pen microclimate Temperature Humidity Index (THIp) were calculated. Every 25 days, respiratory rate (RR), heart rate (HR), rectal temperature (RT), and Benezra's thermal comfort index (BTCI) were assessed in the morning and in the afternoon. A blood assay was performed every month, while semen was collected weekly. THIp did not vary over the months (P > 0.05) and was higher in the afternoon than in the morning (77.7 ± 2.6 versus 81.8 ± 2.1, P < 0.05). RR, HR, and BTCI significantly increased over the months and were different between the periods of the day (P > 0.05) but within the physiological limits. RT varied between the periods of the day and decreased over the months, being the lowest in August (37.8 ± 0.7 °C), time-impacted hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, hemoglobin levels, and spermatic gross motility and vigor (P < 0.05). Thus, buffalo bulls reared under a humid tropical climate may have variations in thermal comfort during the hotter periods but are able to efficiently activate thermoregulatory mechanisms and maintain homeothermy, hence preserving their physiological and seminal parameters at normal levels.

  10. MALLEABLE IRON BULL LADLE, HOLDS IRON AFTER IT IS TAPPED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MALLEABLE IRON BULL LADLE, HOLDS IRON AFTER IT IS TAPPED OUT OF THE CUPOLA UNTIL IT NEEDED BY POURERS ON THE CONVEYOR LINES WHO FILL MOBILE LADLES ATTACHED TO OVERHEAD RAIL SYSTEMS AS THE BULL LADLE TIPS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Malleable Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  11. Microheterogeneity in Frozen Protein Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Twomey, Alan; Kurata, Kosaku; Nagare, Yutaka; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; Aksan, Alptekin

    2015-01-01

    In frozen and lyophilized systems, the biological to be stabilized (e.g. therapeutic protein, biomarker, drug-delivery vesicle) and the cryo-/lyoprotectant should be co-localized for successful stabilization. During freezing and drying, many factors cause physical separation of the biological from the cryo-/lyoprotectant, called microheterogeneity (MH), which may result in poor stabilization efficiency. We have developed a novel technique that utilized confocal Raman microspectroscopy in combination with counter-gradient freezing to evaluate the effect of a wide range of freezing temperatures (−20 < TF < 0°C) on the MH generated within a frozen formulation in only a few experiments. The freezing experiments conducted with a model system (albumin and trehalose) showed the presence of different degrees of MH in the freeze-concentrated liquid (FCL) in all solutions tested. Mainly, albumin tended to accumulate near the ice interface, where it was physically separated from the cryoprotectant. In frozen 10 wt% trehalose solutions, heterogeneity in FCL was relatively low at any TF. In frozen 20 wt% trehalose solutions, the optimum albumin to trehalose ratio in the FCL can only be ensured if the solution was frozen within a narrow range of temperatures (−16 < TF < −10°C). In the 30 wt% trehalose solutions, freezing within a much more narrow range (−12 < TF < −10°C) was needed to ensure a fairly homogeneous FCL. The method developed here will be helpful for the development of uniformly frozen and stable formulations and freezing protocols for biological as MH is presumed to directly impact stability. PMID:25888798

  12. The effect of superoxide dismutase mimetic and catalase on the quality of postthawed goat semen.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Mojtaba; Forouzanfar, Mohsen; Hosseini, Sayyed Morteza; Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein Nasr

    2015-05-01

    Manganese(III) meso-tetrakis(N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin chloride (MnTE) is a cell-permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic agent which can convert superoxide to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Supplementation of MnTE to a commercial semen extender can protect sperm from superoxide but not H2O2. Therefore, we proposed that addition of catalase (0.0, 200, or 400 IU/mL) in combination with MnTE (0.1 μM) may further improve the cryopreservation efficiency of goat semen in commercially optimized freezing media such as Andromed. Therefore, ejaculates were obtained from three adult bucks twice a week during the breeding season and diluted with Andromed supplemented with or without MnTE and catalase and were frozen in liquid nitrogen. Sperm parameters and reactive oxygen species contents were evaluated 2 hours after dilution (before freezing) and after freezing/thawing. The results revealed that all the treatments significantly (P ≤ 0.05) improved sperm motility, viability, and membrane integrity after freezing and reduced reactive oxygen species content compared with the control group, but maximum improvement was obtained in MnTE + 400 IU/mL catalase. In addition, supplementation with these antioxidants significantly (P ≤ 0.05) increases the cleavage rate after IVF. In conclusion, the results of present study suggest that addition of antioxidant MnTE or catalase to commercial optimized media, such as Andromed, improves total motility, membrane integrity, and viability of goat semen samples after thawing. But the degree of improvement for these parameters significantly (P ≤ 0.05) higher when MnTE and catalase were simultaneously added to the cryopreservation media.

  13. The effect of superoxide dismutase mimetic and catalase on the quality of postthawed goat semen.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Mojtaba; Forouzanfar, Mohsen; Hosseini, Sayyed Morteza; Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein Nasr

    2015-05-01

    Manganese(III) meso-tetrakis(N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin chloride (MnTE) is a cell-permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic agent which can convert superoxide to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Supplementation of MnTE to a commercial semen extender can protect sperm from superoxide but not H2O2. Therefore, we proposed that addition of catalase (0.0, 200, or 400 IU/mL) in combination with MnTE (0.1 μM) may further improve the cryopreservation efficiency of goat semen in commercially optimized freezing media such as Andromed. Therefore, ejaculates were obtained from three adult bucks twice a week during the breeding season and diluted with Andromed supplemented with or without MnTE and catalase and were frozen in liquid nitrogen. Sperm parameters and reactive oxygen species contents were evaluated 2 hours after dilution (before freezing) and after freezing/thawing. The results revealed that all the treatments significantly (P ≤ 0.05) improved sperm motility, viability, and membrane integrity after freezing and reduced reactive oxygen species content compared with the control group, but maximum improvement was obtained in MnTE + 400 IU/mL catalase. In addition, supplementation with these antioxidants significantly (P ≤ 0.05) increases the cleavage rate after IVF. In conclusion, the results of present study suggest that addition of antioxidant MnTE or catalase to commercial optimized media, such as Andromed, improves total motility, membrane integrity, and viability of goat semen samples after thawing. But the degree of improvement for these parameters significantly (P ≤ 0.05) higher when MnTE and catalase were simultaneously added to the cryopreservation media. PMID:25698161

  14. Involuntary reduction in vigour of calves born from sexed semen.

    PubMed

    Djedović, Radica; Bogdanović, Vladan; Stanojević, Dragan; Nemes, Zsolt; Gáspárdy, András; Cseh, Sándor

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the reproductive traits of heifers and the development characteristics of their calves following artificial insemination (AI) with sexed and non-sexed semen. The analysed characteristics included conception rate, gestation length, calf birth weight, calf vigour, stillbirth rate, and twinning rate. Data of 530 calves produced with sexed and 1,163 calves produced with non-sexed semen were analysed. The General Linear Model (GLM) was applied to assess the influence of semen type, farm, season of insemination, the calf's sex and the inseminating sire on gestation length and calf birth weight. With the exception of gestation length (P > 0.05), all other traits studied were significantly (P < 0.01) influenced by the type of semen. The conception rate was 55% for conventional and 44% for sexed semen, and the average gestation length was 274.6 and 274.9 days, respectively. The mean calf birth weight was 37.47 kg for non-sexed and 36.75 kg for sexed semen. The stillbirth rate was 6.19% for conventional and 7.54% for sexed semen, while the twinning rate was 3.78% for conventional and 1.13% for sexed semen. The calves produced with non-sexed and sexed semen differed significantly in viability (P < 0.001), the latter having a lower calf vigour score. The use of conventional semen did not affect the ratio of female and male calves (52.7:47.3%; P > 0.05); however, artificial insemination with X-sorted sexed semen significantly altered the sex ratio of calves (85.1:14.9%, P < 0.01). The results obtained in this investigation are in agreement with the majority of studies which compared the fertility traits, sex ratio and calf characteristics depending on the application of artificial insemination with sexed or conventional semen. PMID:27342094

  15. Effect of ascorbic acid concentrations, methods of cooling and freezing on Boer goat semen cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Memon, A A; Wahid, H; Rosnina, Y; Goh, Y M; Ebrahimi, M; Nadia, F M

    2013-04-01

    To improve the Boer goat semen quality during cryopreservation process, three experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of (i) different concentration of ascorbic acid supplementation (ii) rate of cooling with chilled semen characteristics and (iii) method of freezing on post-thaw Boer goat sperm using Tris-based extender. Ascorbic acid at 8.5 mg/ml improved the sperm parameters (motility, integrity of membrane and acrosome, morphology and viability), compared to control in cooled samples (p < 0.05). With regard to other concentrations and post-thawed parameters, ascorbic acid at 2.5-8.5 mg/ml led to higher percentages of sperm motility and integrities of membrane and acrosome when compared to control (p < 0.05). Slow cooling rises to higher percentages of sperm motility, acrosome integrity and viability, in comparison with fast cooling, in terms of cooled and frozen samples (p < 0.05). Programmable freezing method produced the higher percentages of sperm motility, integrities of membrane and acrosome and viability when compared to the freezing method of polystyrene box during goat sperm freezing (p < 0.05). In conclusion, chilled and post-thawed sperm quality of Boer goat was improved when a Tris-based extender supplemented with ascorbic acid was used at stages of different cooling rates and freezing methods.

  16. Frozen shoulder: a sympathetic dystrophy?

    PubMed

    Müller, L P; Müller, L A; Happ, J; Kerschbaumer, F

    2000-01-01

    Diagnostic and clinical features of the frozen shoulder syndrome and the Sudeck syndrome are similar in many aspects. Radioisotope bone scan shows an increased uptake in affected areas in both diseases, while native radiographs show a progressive demineralisation. Measurement of bone mineral density (BMD) by quantitative digital radiography objectified these local decalcification processes in an early stage of the frozen shoulder syndrome; 10 of 12 patients with primary frozen shoulder had BMD decreases greater 21% in the humeral head of the affected shoulder compared to the non-affected side. In the immobilised control group with degenerative changes of the rotator cuff, calcifying tendinitis and shoulder instability (n = 12) and in the group of healthy probands (n = 20), the difference between the affected and non-affected side (left and right humerus of the healthy probands) was only more than 21% in one case each. There are several references in the literature that assume frozen shoulder to be an algoneurodystrophic process; our observations support this hypothesis, possibly leading to earlier diagnoses and extended therapeutic management. PMID:10653111

  17. Frozen Scope and Grammatical Optimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The literature on quantifier scope has repeatedly observed that some otherwise expected permutations of scope taking elements are unavailable. Various methods have been proffered explaining these facts. This thesis aims to unify three disparate areas where the scope of operators seems to be frozen: the interaction of universal quantifiers with…

  18. Sperm ubiquitination in epididymal feline semen.

    PubMed

    Vernocchi, Valentina; Morselli, Maria Giorgia; Varesi, Sara; Nonnis, Simona; Maffioli, Elisa; Negri, Armando; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Luvoni, Gaia Cecilia

    2014-09-01

    Ubiquitin is a 8.5-kDa peptide that tags other proteins for proteasomal degradation. It has been proposed that ubiquitination might be responsible for the elimination of defective spermatozoa during transit through the epididymis in humans and cattle, but its exact biological function in seminal plasma has not yet been clarified. In the domestic cat (Felis catus), the percentage of immature, unviable, and abnormal spermatozoa decreases during the epididymal transit, indicating the existence of a mechanism that removes defective spermatozoa. Magnetic cell separation techniques, based on the use of magnetic beads coated with anti-ubiquitin antibodies, may allow the selective capture of ubiquitinated spermatozoa from semen, thus contributing to the identification of a potential correlation between semen quality and ubiquitination process. Moreover, the selective identification of all the ubiquitinated proteins in different epididymal regions could give a better understanding of the ubiquitin role in feline sperm maturation. The aims of this study were as follows: (1) to verify the possibility of separating ubiquitinated spermatozoa with magnetic ubiquitin beads and identify the morphological and acrosomal differences between whole sample and unbound gametes, (2) to characterize all the ubiquitinated proteins in spermatozoa retrieved in the three epididymal regions by a proteomic approach. The data indicated the presence of ubiquitinated proteins in cat epididymal semen. However, a correlation between abnormal and ubiquitinated spermatozoa has not been found, and ubiquitin cannot be considered as a biomarker of quality of epididymal feline spermatozoa. To the author's knowledge, this is the first identification of all the ubiquitinated proteins of cat spermatozoa collected from different epididymal regions. The proteomic pattern allows a further characterization of cat epididymal semen and represents a contribute to a better understanding of the ubiquitin role in

  19. 7 CFR 58.327 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.327 Frozen cream. To produce frozen cream eligible for official certification, the quality...

  20. Uranium quantification in semen by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Todor I; Ejnik, John W; Guandalini, Gustavo; Xu, Hanna; Hoover, Dennis; Anderson, Larry; Squibb, Katherine; McDiarmid, Melissa A; Centeno, Jose A

    2013-01-01

    In this study we report uranium analysis for human semen samples. Uranium quantification was performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. No additives, such as chymotrypsin or bovine serum albumin, were used for semen liquefaction, as they showed significant uranium content. For method validation we spiked 2g aliquots of pooled control semen at three different levels of uranium: low at 5 pg/g, medium at 50 pg/g, and high at 1000 pg/g. The detection limit was determined to be 0.8 pg/g uranium in human semen. The data reproduced within 1.4-7% RSD and spike recoveries were 97-100%. The uranium level of the unspiked, pooled control semen was 2.9 pg/g of semen (n=10). In addition six semen samples from a cohort of Veterans exposed to depleted uranium (DU) in the 1991 Gulf War were analyzed with no knowledge of their exposure history. Uranium levels in the Veterans' semen samples ranged from undetectable (<0.8 pg/g) to 3350 pg/g. This wide concentration range for uranium in semen is consistent with known differences in current DU body burdens in these individuals, some of whom have retained embedded DU fragments.

  1. Cryopreservation of turkey semen: effect of breeding line and freezing method on post-thaw sperm quality, fertilization, and hatching.

    PubMed

    Long, Julie A; Purdy, Phillip H; Zuidberg, Kees; Hiemstra, Sipke-Joost; Velleman, Sandra G; Woelders, Henri

    2014-06-01

    Cryopreservation methods for poultry semen are not reliable for germplasm preservation, especially for turkeys, where fertility rates from frozen/thawed semen are particularly low. The objective was to evaluate cryopreservation methods for effectiveness in promoting cryosurvival and post-thaw function of sperm from five turkey lines: one commercial line and four research (RBC1; E; RBC2; F) lines from Ohio State University (OSU). The model for cryopreservation was set up as a 2×2×2×5 design for cryoprotectant (glycerol or dimethylacetamide (DMA)), cryopreservation medium (Lake or ASG), method of dilution (fixed dilution volume versus fixed sperm concentration) and turkey line, respectively. The final cryoprotectant concentrations were 11% glycerol or 6% DMA. Thawed sperm were evaluated for plasma membrane integrity and quality, motility, acrosome integrity and, after artificial insemination, for egg fertility and hatchability. Commercial turkey hens were used for all fertility trials, regardless of semen source. Turkey sperm frozen with glycerol exhibited higher membrane integrity and membrane quality upon thawing than turkey sperm frozen with DMA although no differences in total motility, and only minimal differences in progressive motility, were detected among the eight cryopreservation treatments. Within line, fertility was affected by cryoprotectant, medium and dilution method, where the overall highest percentages of fertile, viable embryos (Day 7) occurred for the DMA/ASG/fixed sperm concentration method, while high percentages (15.8-31.5%) of fertile, non-viable embryos (Day 1-6) were observed for multiple cryopreservation methods, including two glycerol treatments. From a single insemination, the duration of true and viable fertility in all lines was 10-13 weeks and 9-10 weeks, respectively. The duration of hatchability was 4-6 weeks after insemination for four of the turkey lines. The highest percentage of viable embryos was observed for the commercial

  2. Chronic boron exposure and human semen parameters.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Wendie A; Xun, Lin; Jia, Juan; Kennedy, Nola; Elashoff, David A; Ping, Liu

    2010-04-01

    Boron found as borates in soil, food, and water has important industrial and medical applications. A panel reviewing NTP reproductive toxicants identified boric acid as high priority for occupational studies to determine safe versus adverse reproductive effects. To address this, we collected boron exposure/dose measures in workplace inhalable dust, dietary food/fluids, blood, semen, and urine from boron workers and two comparison worker groups (n=192) over three months and determined correlations between boron and semen parameters (total sperm count, sperm concentration, motility, morphology, DNA breakage, apoptosis and aneuploidy). Blood boron averaged 499.2 ppb for boron workers, 96.1 and 47.9 ppb for workers from high and low environmental boron areas (p<0.0001). Boron concentrated in seminal fluid. No significant correlations were found between blood or urine boron and adverse semen parameters. Exposures did not reach those causing adverse effects published in animal toxicology work but exceeded those previously published for boron occupational groups. PMID:19962437

  3. A review of nutritional influences on reproduction in boars, bulls and rams.

    PubMed

    Brown, B W

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, nutritional influences on reproduction in boars, bulls and rams during prepubertal life and in the adult is reviewed. Reproductive functions in young animals appear to be more susceptible to dietary restrictions of energy and protein than in the adult and severe feed restriction may even result in permanent damage to gonadal and neural tissue. Whilst restricted feed intake in adult animals can reduce androgen secretion and semen quality, such effects are temporal as re-feeding previously underfed adult animals usually restores reproductive function. There is now considerable evidence suggesting that the influence of nutrition on reproductive processes is mediated via effects of dietary constituents on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, although there is some indication that dietary changes may affect the testis directly. That some nutritional regimes imposed on animals can alter volume of ejaculates and androgen activity without necessarily affecting spermatogenesis, suggests that certain constituents of the diet can differentially affect the production and/or the release of LH and FSH.

  4. 7 CFR 58.327 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Frozen cream. 58.327 Section 58.327 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.327 Frozen cream. To produce frozen cream eligible for official certification, the quality...

  5. 7 CFR 58.327 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Frozen cream. 58.327 Section 58.327 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.327 Frozen cream. To produce frozen cream eligible for official certification, the quality...

  6. 7 CFR 58.327 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Frozen cream. 58.327 Section 58.327 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.327 Frozen cream. To produce frozen cream eligible for official certification, the quality...

  7. 7 CFR 58.327 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Frozen cream. 58.327 Section 58.327 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.327 Frozen cream. To produce frozen cream eligible for official certification, the quality...

  8. Nutritional composition analysis of meat from human lactoferrin transgenic bulls.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Xu, Jianxiang; Wang, Jianwu; Li, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic technology has many potential advantages in food production. However, the transgenic technology process may influence the composition of food products derived from genetically engineered (GE) animals, which may be adverse to human health. Therefore, it is very important to research the compositions of GE animal products. Here, we analyzed the compositions of meat from the offspring of human lactoferrin (hLF) transgenic cows, which can express human lactoferrin proteins in their mammary gland. Six hLF transgenic bulls and three wide-type (WT) bulls, 10 months of age, were slaughtered for meat composition analysis. To determine the comparative health of hLF bulls for meat analysis, hematological analyses, organ/body weight analyses and pathology analyses were conducted. Results of the meat analysis show that there were no significant differences in the hematological parameters, organ/body weight ratios of hLF and WT bulls (P>0.05), and histopathological examination of the main organs of hLF bulls revealed no abnormalities. Nutrient parameters of meat compositions of hLF and WT bulls did not show any significant differences (P>0.05). All of these results suggest that the hLF transgene did not have an impact on the meat nutrient compositions of hLF bulls.

  9. Milk quality, coagulation properties, and curd firmness modeling of purebred Holsteins and first- and second-generation crossbred cows from Swedish Red, Montbéliarde, and Brown Swiss bulls.

    PubMed

    Malchiodi, F; Cecchinato, A; Penasa, M; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Bittante, G

    2014-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate how the crossbreeding of Holstein (HO) cows with bulls from Nordic and Alpine European breeds affect milk quality traits, traditional milk coagulation properties (MCP), and curd firmness modeling obtained from individual milk samples. A total of 506 individual milk samples were collected from evening milking at 3 commercial farms located in Northern Italy. Over the past decade, the 3 farms have followed crossbreeding programs in part of their herds, whereas the remainder of the animals consisted of purebred HO. The basic scheme was a 3-breed rotation based on the use of Swedish Red (SR) semen on HO cows (SR × HO), the use of Montbéliarde (MO) semen on first-cross cows [MO × (SR × HO)], and the use of HO semen in the third cross. In all herds, a smaller proportion of purebred HO were mated to M and Brown Swiss (BS) bulls, and these first crosses were mated to SR and MO bulls, respectively. Milk samples were analyzed for milk composition and MCP, and parameters for curd firmness were modeled. Compared with purebred HO, crossbred cows produced less milk with lower lactose content, higher fat and protein content, and a tendency for higher casein content. Crossbred cows generally produced milk with a more favorable curd-firming rate (k₂₀) and curd firmness 30 min after rennet addition, among traditional MCP, and better trends of curd firmness measures as shown by model parameters: estimated rennet coagulation time, asymptotical potential value of curd firmness, and curd-firming instant rate constant. Among crossbred cows, SR × HO presented longer rennet coagulation time compared with MO × HO and BS × HO cows, and MO × HO showed shorter k₂₀ compared with BS × HO cows. Among second-generation cows, those sired by SR bulls showed a lower incidence of noncoagulated samples, higher curd firmness 30 min after rennet addition and asymptotical potential value of curd firmness, and faster curd-firming instant

  10. Heritability estimate and genetic correlations of reproductive features in Nellore bulls, offspring of super precocious, precocious and normal cows under extensive farming conditions.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, J B; Oba, E; Pinho, R O; Quintino, H P; Eler, J P; Miranda Neto, T; Guimarães, S E F; Guimarães, J D

    2012-04-01

    The present work aimed to estimate heritability and genetic correlations of reproductive features of Nellore bulls, offspring of mothers classified as superprecocious (M1), precocious (M2) and normal (M3). Twenty one thousand hundred and eighty-six animals with average age of 21.29 months were used, evaluated through the breeding soundness evaluation from 1999 to 2008. The breeding soundness features included physical semen evaluation (progressive sperm motility and sperm vigour), semen morphology (major, minor and total sperm defects), scrotal circumference (SC), testicular volume (TV) and SC at 18 months of age (SC18). The components of variance, heritability and genetic correlations for and between the features were estimated simultaneously by restricted maximum likelihood, with the use of the vce software system vs 6. The heritability estimates were high for SC18, SC and TV (0.43, 0.63 and 0.54; 0.45, 0.45 and 0.44; 0.42, 0.45 and 0.41, respectively for the categories of mothers M1, M2 and M3) and low for physical and morphological semen aspects. The genetic correlations between SC18 and SC were high, as well as between these variables with TV. High and positive genetic correlations were recorded among SC18, SC and TV with the physical aspects of the semen, although no favourable association was verified with the morphological aspects, for the three categories of mothers. It can be concluded that the mother's sexual precocity did not affect the heritability of their offspring reproduction features.

  11. Semen phthalate metabolites, semen quality parameters and serum reproductive hormones: A cross-sectional study in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Xin; Zeng, Qiang; Sun, Yang; Yang, Pan; Wang, Peng; Li, Jin; Huang, Zhen; You, Ling; Huang, Yue-Hui; Wang, Cheng; Li, Yu-Feng; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2016-04-01

    Exposure to phthalates has been found to have adverse effects on male reproductive function in animals. However, the findings from human studies are inconsistent. Here we examined the associations of phthalate exposure with semen quality and reproductive hormones in a Chinese population using phthalate metabolite concentrations measured in semen as biomarkers. Semen (n = 687) and blood samples (n = 342) were collected from the male partners of sub-fertile couples who presented to the Reproductive Center of Tongji Hospital in Wuhan, China. Semen quality parameters and serum reproductive hormone levels were determined. Semen concentrations of 8 phthalate metabolites were assessed using high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Associations of the semen phthalate metabolites with semen quality parameters and serum reproductive hormones were assessed using confounder-adjusted linear and logistic regression models. Semen phthalate metabolites were significantly associated with decreases in semen volume [mono-n-butyl phthalate (MBP), mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), mono(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate (MEHHP), mono(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate (MEOHP)], sperm curvilinear velocity [monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP), MEHP, the percentage of di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate metabolites excreted as MEHP (%MEHP)], and straight-line velocity (MBzP, MEHP, %MEHP), and also associated with an increased percentage of abnormal heads and tails (MBzP) (all p for trend <0.05). These associations remained suggestive or significant after adjustment for multiple testing. There were no significant associations between semen phthalate metabolites and serum reproductive hormones. Our findings suggest that environmental exposure to phthalates may impair human semen quality.

  12. The JLab Frozen Spin Target

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, C. D.

    2009-08-04

    A polarized, frozen spin target has been designed and constructed at Jefferson Lab for use inside the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Protons in TEMPO-doped butanol are polarized via dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to approximately 90% using microwaves and an external, 5 T solenoid magnet. The target sample is then cooled to approximately 30 mK while an internal 0.56 T superconducting magnet is used to maintain the polarization. Relaxation times in excess of 3500 hours have been observed.

  13. Ebola May Be Present in Semen for Year or More

    MedlinePlus

    ... found in older men, researchers report. The deadly virus can be transmitted through semen. Preliminary findings from 429 male Ebola survivors taking part in a national screening program in the African nation of Liberia showed that 9 percent (38) had fragments of Ebola in their semen. Of those 38 ...

  14. Heat Diffusion with Frozen Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florescu, Laura; Ganguly, Shirshendu; Peres, Yuval; Spencer, Joel

    2015-11-01

    Consider "frozen random walk" on Z: n particles start at the origin. At any discrete time, the leftmost and rightmost lfloor {n/4}rfloor particles are "frozen" and do not move. The rest of the particles in the "bulk" independently jump to the left and right uniformly. The goal of this note is to understand the limit of this process under scaling of mass and time. To this end we study the following deterministic mass splitting process: start with mass 1 at the origin. At each step the extreme quarter mass on each side is "frozen". The remaining "free" mass in the center evolves according to the discrete heat equation. We establish diffusive behavior of this mass evolution and identify the scaling limit under the assumption of its existence. It is natural to expect the limit to be a truncated Gaussian. A naive guess for the truncation point might be the 1 / 4 quantile points on either side of the origin. We show that this is not the case and it is in fact determined by the evolution of the second moment of the mass distribution.

  15. 27. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, BULL WHEEL, BRAKE AIR CYLINDER. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, BULL WHEEL, BRAKE AIR CYLINDER. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  16. 28. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, BULL WHEEL ROOM, SAFETY BRAKE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, BULL WHEEL ROOM, SAFETY BRAKE ADJUSTING MACHINERY. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  17. 26. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, BULL WHEEL. Monongahela Incline ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, BULL WHEEL. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  18. POURING IRON FROM BULL LADLE INTO MOBILE LADLES USED TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    POURING IRON FROM BULL LADLE INTO MOBILE LADLES USED TO FILL MOLDS ON CONVEYOR LINES AFTER FERRO-SILICON IS ADDED TO ENHANCE DUCTILITY AND FLUIDITY. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  19. 13. Bull Wheel Core Showing Name of Manufacturer (National Supply ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Bull Wheel Core Showing Name of Manufacturer (National Supply Co.), Looking Southwest - David Renfrew Oil Rig, East side of Connoquenessing Creek, 0.4 mile North of confluence with Thorn Creek, Renfrew, Butler County, PA

  20. 17. View of disassembled reduction gear parts including bull and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. View of disassembled reduction gear parts including bull and intermediate gears and pedestal bearing. - Hacienda Azucarera La Esperanza, Steam Engine & Mill, 2.65 Mi. N of PR Rt. 2 Bridge over Manati River, Manati, Manati Municipio, PR

  1. POURING IRON FROM ELECTRIC FURNACE INTO BULL LADLE AFTER MAGNESIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    POURING IRON FROM ELECTRIC FURNACE INTO BULL LADLE AFTER MAGNESIUM HAD BEEN ADDED TO GENERATE DUCTILE IRON WHEN IT COOLS IN THE MOLD. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  2. [Variation trend of male fertility and semen parameters].

    PubMed

    Gu, Yi-Qun

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, the variation trend of male fertility and semen parameters has aroused much academic controversy and become a focus of public attention. For the assessment of male fertility, female pregnancy is regarded as a gold standard, but semen parameters are commonly used as surrogate or indirect evidence in clinical practice and laboratory research. The reference range of se- men parameters being used in China is based on the WHO recommended data and lacks the specific reference value for healthy Chinese men. No definite conclusion has yet been derived from studies at home and abroad on the general variation trend of semen parameters worldwide, but many researchers agree on the decline of semen quality in some areas of the world. Long-term continuous prospective studies are needed for the evaluation and prediction of the general variation trend of semen quality. PMID:25597168

  3. Indian story on semen loss and related Dhat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Om; Kar, Sujit Kumar; Sathyanarayana Rao, T S

    2014-10-01

    India is a country of many religions and ancient cultures. Indian culture is largely directed by the Vedic culture since time immemorial. Later Indian culture is influenced by Buddhism, Islam, and Christianity. Indian belief system carries the footprints of these cultures. Every culture describes human behaviors and an interpretation of each human behavior is largely influenced by the core cultural belief system. Sexuality is an important domain which is colored by different cultural colors. Like other cultures, Indian culture believes "semen" as the precious body fluid which needs to be preserved. Most Indian beliefs consider loss of semen as a threat to the individual. Ancient Indian literature present semen loss as a negative health related event. Dhat syndrome (related to semen loss) is a culture-bound syndrome seen in the natives of Indian subcontinent. This article gathers the Indian concepts related to semen loss. It also outlines belief systems behind problems of Dhat syndrome. PMID:25568479

  4. [Advances in researches on polymorphonuclear neutrophil elastase in semen].

    PubMed

    Feng, Rui-xiang; Lu, Kun-gang; Zhang, Hong-ye; Lu, Jin-chun

    2011-11-01

    Reproductive tract infection is one of the important factors of male reproduction. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil elastase (PMNE) in semen, as a marker of male reproductive tract inflammation, especially recessive infection, potentially affects male fertility. The concentration of PMNE in semen is correlated significantly not only with semen white blood cell count and seminal plasma ROS level, but also with the levels of other inflammation related cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-alpha. Furthermore, PMNE has a negative impact on sperm quality by decreasing sperm motility, increasing the percentage of morphologically abnormal sperm and interfering with DNA integrity. PMNE inhibitors in semen can form a compound with PMNE, and the imbalanced proportions of the two may promote the development of chronic inflammation, and consequently lead to male infertility. At present, PMNE in semen is detected mainly by enzyme immunoassay, but this method still needs to be standardized, and the diagnostic standards to be unified. PMID:22141276

  5. Preparation of teaser bulls by dorsal scrotal penile deflection.

    PubMed

    Jillella, D; Baker, A A; Eaton, R J

    1978-07-01

    A simple, quick and reliable technique of preparing teaser bulls has been developed. Four Bos indicus aged between 1 year 6 months and 2 years were subjected to this method by deflecting their penes backwards about 2 to 3 cm posterior and dorsal to the attachment of the scrotum. No serious postoperative complications were recorded. The sexual behaviour and libido of the bulls did not change after subjecting them to this technique. PMID:708335

  6. Genomewide analysis of bull sperm quality and fertility traits.

    PubMed

    Puglisi, R; Gaspa, G; Balduzzi, D; Severgnini, A; Vanni, R; Macciotta, Npp; Galli, A

    2016-10-01

    Because the priority of AI industry is to identify subfertile bulls, a predictive model that allowed for the prediction of 91% bulls of low fertility was implemented based on seminological (motility) parameters and DNA status assessed both as DNA fragmentation index (DFI) and by TUNEL assay using sperm of 105 Holstein-Friesian bulls (four batches per bull) selected based on in vivo estimated relative conception rates (ERCR). Thereafter, sperm quality and male fertility traits of bulls were explored by GWAS using a high-density (777K) Illumina chip. After data editing, 85 bulls and 591,988 SNPs were retained for GWAS. Of 12 SNPs with false discovery rate <0.2, four SNPs located on BTA28 and BTA18 were significantly associated (LD-adjusted Bonferroni <0.05) with the non-compensatory sperm parameters DFI and TUNEL. Other SNPs of interest for potential association with TUNEL were found on BTA3, in the same chromosome where associations with non-compensatory in vivo bull fertility were already reported. Further suggestive SNPs for sperm membrane integrity were located on BTA28, the chromosome where QTL studies previously reported associations with sperm quality traits. Suggestive SNPs for ERCR were found on BTA18 in the vicinity of a site already associated with in vivo bull fertility. Additional SNPs associated with ERCR and sperm kinetic parameters were also identified. In contrast to other, but very few GWAS on fertility traits in bovine spermatozoa, which reported significant SNPs located on BTX, we have not identified SNPs of interest in this sexual chromosome.

  7. Genomewide analysis of bull sperm quality and fertility traits.

    PubMed

    Puglisi, R; Gaspa, G; Balduzzi, D; Severgnini, A; Vanni, R; Macciotta, Npp; Galli, A

    2016-10-01

    Because the priority of AI industry is to identify subfertile bulls, a predictive model that allowed for the prediction of 91% bulls of low fertility was implemented based on seminological (motility) parameters and DNA status assessed both as DNA fragmentation index (DFI) and by TUNEL assay using sperm of 105 Holstein-Friesian bulls (four batches per bull) selected based on in vivo estimated relative conception rates (ERCR). Thereafter, sperm quality and male fertility traits of bulls were explored by GWAS using a high-density (777K) Illumina chip. After data editing, 85 bulls and 591,988 SNPs were retained for GWAS. Of 12 SNPs with false discovery rate <0.2, four SNPs located on BTA28 and BTA18 were significantly associated (LD-adjusted Bonferroni <0.05) with the non-compensatory sperm parameters DFI and TUNEL. Other SNPs of interest for potential association with TUNEL were found on BTA3, in the same chromosome where associations with non-compensatory in vivo bull fertility were already reported. Further suggestive SNPs for sperm membrane integrity were located on BTA28, the chromosome where QTL studies previously reported associations with sperm quality traits. Suggestive SNPs for ERCR were found on BTA18 in the vicinity of a site already associated with in vivo bull fertility. Additional SNPs associated with ERCR and sperm kinetic parameters were also identified. In contrast to other, but very few GWAS on fertility traits in bovine spermatozoa, which reported significant SNPs located on BTX, we have not identified SNPs of interest in this sexual chromosome. PMID:27550832

  8. Novel Flow Cytometry Analyses of Boar Sperm Viability: Can the Addition of Whole Sperm-Rich Fraction Seminal Plasma to Frozen-Thawed Boar Sperm Affect It?

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Rommy; Boguen, Rodrigo; Martins, Simone Maria Massami Kitamura; Ravagnani, Gisele Mouro; Leal, Diego Feitosa; Oliveira, Melissa de Lima; Muro, Bruno Bracco Donatelli; Parra, Beatriz Martins; Meirelles, Flávio Vieira; Papa, Frederico Ozanan; Dell’Aqua, José Antônio; Alvarenga, Marco Antônio; Moretti, Aníbal de Sant’Anna; Sepúlveda, Néstor

    2016-01-01

    Boar semen cryopreservation remains a challenge due to the extension of cold shock damage. Thus, many alternatives have emerged to improve the quality of frozen-thawed boar sperm. Although the use of seminal plasma arising from boar sperm-rich fraction (SP-SRF) has shown good efficacy; however, the majority of actual sperm evaluation techniques include a single or dual sperm parameter analysis, which overrates the real sperm viability. Within this context, this work was performed to introduce a sperm flow cytometry fourfold stain technique for simultaneous evaluation of plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential. We then used the sperm flow cytometry fourfold stain technique to study the effect of SP-SRF on frozen-thawed boar sperm and further evaluated the effect of this treatment on sperm movement, tyrosine phosphorylation and fertility rate (FR). The sperm fourfold stain technique is accurate (R2 = 0.9356, p > 0.01) for simultaneous evaluation of plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential (IPIAH cells). Centrifugation pre-cryopreservation was not deleterious (p > 0.05) for any analyzed variables. Addition of SP-SRF after cryopreservation was able to improve total and progressive motility (p < 0.05) when boar semen was cryopreserved without SP-SRF; however, it was not able to decrease tyrosine phosphorylation (p > 0.05) or improve IPIAH cells (p > 0.05). FR was not (p > 0.05) statistically increased by the addition of seminal plasma, though females inseminated with frozen-thawed boar semen plus SP-SRF did perform better than those inseminated with sperm lacking seminal plasma. Thus, we conclude that sperm fourfold stain can be used to simultaneously evaluate plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential, and the addition of SP-SRF at thawed boar semen cryopreserved in absence of SP-SRF improve its total and progressive motility. PMID:27529819

  9. Microarray analysis of microRNA expression patterns in the semen of infertile men with semen abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Te; Cheng, Weiwei; Gao, Yongtao; Wang, Hui; Liu, Zhixue

    2012-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a crucial role in tissue development and the pathology of many diseases, however, the effects and roles of miRNAs in the development of semen abnormalities in infertile males have not yet been investigated. In this study, we analyzed and compared the miRNA expression profiles of abnormal semen from 86 infertile males with normal semen from 86 healthy males using an miRNA microarray. In total, 52 miRNAs were differentially expressed between the abnormal semen of infertile males and the normal semen of healthy males. The differential expression of selected miRNAs was validated by real time qRT-PCR and northern blotting: miR-574-5p, miR-297, miR-122, miR-1275, miR-373, miR-185 and miR-193b were upregulated (fold change>1.5, p<0.001) and miR-100, miR-512-3p, miR-16, miR-19b, miR-23b and miR-26a were downregulated (fold change<0.667, p<0.001) in the semen of infertile males with semen abnormalities. In conclusion, this study provides new insights into specific miRNAs that are associated with semen abnormalities in infertile males.

  10. Schofield memorial lecture. Bull semen and muscle ATP: some evidence of the dawn of medical science in ancient Egypt.

    PubMed Central

    Schwabe, C W

    1986-01-01

    The importance of animal experimentation to human and animal health is not well understood by an increasingly articulate segment of the public. This could have very unfortunate consequences for man and his domestic animals. Even veterinarians and physicians are not as conversant as they need be about the great extent to which advances in human health have depended upon animal observations and experiments. Some believe that resort to "animal models" of biomedical phenomena, including diseases--a comparative or analogical approach to medical studies--is a relatively recent event. Even medical historians often treat these subjects as occasionally recurring aberrations which began with the Greeks, thus largely overlooking the historical meaning and continuing importance of "one medicine" irrespective of species. In fact, comparative medicine has probably been basic to medical progress ever since the dawn of a medical science. Recent research indicates that this approach to biomedical mysteries began to evolve in the minds of Egypt's healer-priests long before Aristotle and the later Alexandrian Greeks made the whole process explicit. Here we examine the origins of what were possibly the first two biomedical theories profounded from inferences based upon dissections, confirmed in at least one instance by experiment, and then applied to medical practice. PMID:3530413

  11. In vitro and in vivo fertilization potential of cryopreserved spermatozoa from bull epididymides stored for up to 30 hours at ambient temperature (18 °C-20 °C).

    PubMed

    Bertol, Melina Andrea Formighieri; Weiss, Romildo Romualdo; Kozicki, Luiz Ernandes; Abreu, Ana Claudia Machinski Rangel de; Pereira, João Filipi Scheffer; da Silva, Jonathan Jesus

    2016-09-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the viability and in vivo and in vitro fertilization potential post-thaw sperm collected at different times postorchiectomy from bull epididymides (EP) at 18 °C to 20 °C, with those of semen collected by electroejaculation (EJ) from the same bulls. Semen samples were collected by EJ from 10 Zebu bulls and cryopreserved. A week later 20 epididymides from these bulls were obtained by orchiectomy and randomly divided into five groups (G) to be maintained at ambient temperature for 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30 hours before sperm recovery by retrograde flow. The sperm were cryopreserved, and post-thaw parameters were determined by both computer-assisted sperm analysis and morphologic analysis. In vitro fertilization of oocytes was performed to assess the cleavage rate, blastocyst rate, total number of cells, and hatching rate of embryos. The G30 sperm samples were also used for fixed time artificial insemination (FTAI) of Zebu heifers (n = 10). The results of post-thaw sperm viability showed that total and progressive motility and plasma membrane integrity were lower in sperm in which cryopreservation was delayed for 30 hours, showing a negative correlation of these parameters with delay before cryopreservation. In all groups, it was possible to obtain viable embryos, and embryos from G6 samples had more cells than the other groups. The greatest embryo production rates were observed in G6, G12 and G18 (27.2 to 32.2%) and it was significantly lower in G24 and G30 samples. For EJ, many individual variations were observed in embryo production potential between bulls. G30 samples, with only 5.2% of post-thaw progressive motility, were able to fertilize and produced a pregnancy. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time in vitro embryos up to 8 days of development and a pregnancy after FTAI have been produced with sperm from bull epididymides that had been stored at 18 °C to 20 °C for up to 30 hours. PMID:27156681

  12. Effect of semen extender and storage temperature on ram sperm motility over time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Storage of ram semen for long period of time depends on a number of factors, including type of extender and storage temperature. A study compared the effect of semen extender and storage temperature on motility of ram semen stored for 72 h. Semen collected via electroejaculator from 5 mature Katahd...

  13. Localization of CD9 Molecule on Bull Spermatozoa: Its Involvement in the Sperm-Egg Interaction.

    PubMed

    Antalíková, J; Jankovičová, J; Simon, M; Cupperová, P; Michalková, K; Horovská, Ľ

    2015-06-01

    Tetraspanin CD9 is one of the egg membrane proteins known to be essential in fertilization process. The presence and localization of CD9 molecule in spermatozoa and its possible function in reproduction are still unclear. In our study, we describe the localization of CD9 on bull spermatozoa. In the immunofluorescence assay, the positive signal has been observed in the high proportion of sperm cells as a fine grains either on the apical part or through the entire anterior region of sperm head. CD9 recognized by monoclonal antibody IVA-50 was detected on freshly ejaculated (83.4 ± 3.7%) and frozen-thawed (84.3 ± 2.3%) sperm. The same reaction pattern was observed on sperm capacitated for 1 h, 2 h, 3 h and 4 h (83.6 ± 2.0%; 84.0 ± 1.5%; 85.7 ± 0.8%; 77.5 ± 10.8%). The presence of CD9 exclusively on plasma membrane of the bovine sperm has been detected by Western blot analysis of the protein fractions after the discontinuous sucrose gradient fractionation of the bull sperm. Moreover, probable role of the sperm CD9 molecule in fertilization process of cattle has been suggested as sperm treatment with anti-CD9 antibody significantly reduced (by 25%, p ≤ 0.001) the number of fertilized oocytes compared to control group in fertilization assay in vitro.

  14. Deep freezing of concentrated boar semen for intra-uterine insemination: effects on sperm viability.

    PubMed

    Saravia, Fernando; Wallgren, Margareta; Nagy, Szabolcs; Johannisson, Anders; Rodríguez-Martínez, Heriberto

    2005-03-15

    The use of deep-frozen boar semen for artificial insemination (AI) is constrained by the need for high sperm numbers per dose, yielding few doses per ejaculate. With the advancement of new, intra-uterine insemination strategies, there is an opportunity for freezing small volumes containing high sperm numbers, provided the spermatozoa properly sustain cryopreservation. The present study aimed to concentrate (2 x 10(9) spz/mL) and freeze boar spermatozoa packed in a 0.5 mL volume plastic medium straw (MS) or a multiple FlatPack (MFP) (four 0.7 mL volume segments of a single FlatPack [SFP]) intended as AI doses for intra-uterine AI. A single freezing protocol was used, with a conventional FlatPack (SFP, 5 x 10(9) spz/5 mL volume) as control. Sperm viability post-thaw was monitored as sperm motility (measured by computer-assisted sperm analysis, CASA), as plasma membrane integrity (PMI, assessed either by SYBR-14/PI, combined with flow cytometry, or a rapid hypo-osmotic swelling test [sHOST]). Sperm motility did not differ statistically (NS) between test-packages and control, neither in terms of overall sperm motility (range of means: 37-46%) nor sperm velocity. The percentages of linearly motile spermatozoa were, however, significantly higher in controls (SFP) than in the test packages. Spermatozoa frozen in the SFP (control) and MFP depicted the highest PMI (54 and 49%, respectively) compared to MS (38%, P < 0.05) when assessed with flow cytometry. In absolute numbers, more viable spermatozoa post-thaw were present in the MFP dose than in the MS (P < 0.05). Inter-boar variation was present, albeit only significant for MS (sperm motility) and SFP (PMI). In conclusion, the results indicate that boar spermatozoa can be successfully frozen when concentrated in a small volume. PMID:15725440

  15. Interpretation of semen analysis among infertile couples.

    PubMed Central

    Small, D R; Collins, J A; Wilson, E H; Wrixon, W

    1987-01-01

    Among the male partners of 1074 infertile couples the mean results of semen analysis were sperm count 78 X 10(6)/ml, seminal volume 4.0 ml, proportion of progressively motile sperm 54%, proportion of sperm with normal morphologic features 81.4% and total motile sperm count 152.3 X 10(6) per ejaculate. After excluding 65 couples who chose donor insemination and 300 with known female causes of infertility, the cumulative pregnancy rates in the remaining 709 couples were higher with increasing sperm density and motility and seminal volume, but the higher rates were significant only when these variables were combined into total motile sperm count per ejaculate. The cumulative pregnancy rates were 20% with a total motile sperm count of 9 X 10(6) or less, 37% with a count of 10 to 19 X 10(6) and 52% with a count of 20 X 10(6) or more (p = 0.001). Counts higher than 20 X 10(6) were not associated with a further improvement in pregnancy rates, but variability in the results was high, which suggests that the test should be repeated as necessary to determine the true range. Although standards for these and other seminal variables are ill defined, the total motile sperm count incorporates the most useful prognostic information from semen analysis, and the associated pregnancy rates can help guide clinical decisions. PMID:3567795

  16. Environmental Exposure to Triclosan and Semen Quality.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenting; Zhang, Hao; Tong, Chuanliang; Xie, Chong; Fan, Guohua; Zhao, Shasha; Yu, Xiaogang; Tian, Ying; Zhang, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Triclosan (2,4,4'-trichloro-2'-hydroxy-diphenyl ether, TCS) is widely used in personal care, household, veterinary and industrial products. It was considered as a potential male reproductive toxicant in previous in vitro and in vivo studies. However, evidence from human studies is scarce. Our study aims to investigate the relationship between TCS exposure and semen quality. We measured urinary TCS concentrations in 471 men recruited from a male reproductive health clinic. TCS was detected in 96.7% of urine samples, with a median concentration of 0.97 ng (mg·creatinine)(-1) (interquartile range, 0.41-2.95 ng (mg·creatinine)(-1)). A multiple linear regression analysis showed a negative association between natural logarithm (Ln) transformed TCS concentration (Ln-TCS) and Ln transformed number of forward moving sperms (adjusted coefficient β = -0.17; 95% confidence interval (CI) (-0.32, -0.02). Furthermore, among those with the lowest tertile of TCS level, Ln-TCS was negatively associated with the number of forward moving sperms (β = -0.35; 95% CI (-0.68, -0.03)), percentage of sperms with normal morphology (β = -1.64; 95% CI (-3.05, -0.23)), as well as number of normal morphological sperms, sperm concentration and count. Our findings suggest that the adverse effect of TCS on semen quality is modest at the environment-relevant dose in humans. Further studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:26901211

  17. Effect of environmental pollutants on human semen

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, S.

    1988-01-01

    With the increased release of numerous chemical substances into the biosphere, careful assessment of health effects of polluted environment must be made for maintaining and enhancing the quality of human life on this earth. Significant number of malformed children are born each year. Sixty-five to 70% of all birth defects have an unknown etiology. More than one-third of early human conception and up to 15% of recognized pregnancies are terminated by spontaneous abortion. The extent of the effect of environmental pollution on human reproductive performance is for the most part unknown. Of the approximately five million chemicals in existence, humans could be expose to a sufficient quantity of an estimated 53,000 for toxicity to be of potential problem. Methods that do not require autopsy or surgery such as semen analysis would be attractive for assessing the effect of environmental toxicology on quality of human life. Therefore, the present study was conducted to observe the effects of heavily polluted environment of industrial area of Ludhiana and relatively clean, pollution free environment of Chandigarh on the human semen quality. It was believed that the function of the male reproductive system may often be the most sensitive to toxic effects.

  18. Environmental Exposure to Triclosan and Semen Quality.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenting; Zhang, Hao; Tong, Chuanliang; Xie, Chong; Fan, Guohua; Zhao, Shasha; Yu, Xiaogang; Tian, Ying; Zhang, Jun

    2016-02-17

    Triclosan (2,4,4'-trichloro-2'-hydroxy-diphenyl ether, TCS) is widely used in personal care, household, veterinary and industrial products. It was considered as a potential male reproductive toxicant in previous in vitro and in vivo studies. However, evidence from human studies is scarce. Our study aims to investigate the relationship between TCS exposure and semen quality. We measured urinary TCS concentrations in 471 men recruited from a male reproductive health clinic. TCS was detected in 96.7% of urine samples, with a median concentration of 0.97 ng (mg·creatinine)(-1) (interquartile range, 0.41-2.95 ng (mg·creatinine)(-1)). A multiple linear regression analysis showed a negative association between natural logarithm (Ln) transformed TCS concentration (Ln-TCS) and Ln transformed number of forward moving sperms (adjusted coefficient β = -0.17; 95% confidence interval (CI) (-0.32, -0.02). Furthermore, among those with the lowest tertile of TCS level, Ln-TCS was negatively associated with the number of forward moving sperms (β = -0.35; 95% CI (-0.68, -0.03)), percentage of sperms with normal morphology (β = -1.64; 95% CI (-3.05, -0.23)), as well as number of normal morphological sperms, sperm concentration and count. Our findings suggest that the adverse effect of TCS on semen quality is modest at the environment-relevant dose in humans. Further studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  19. Energy Conversion in Bull Sperm Flagella

    PubMed Central

    Rikmenspoel, Robert; Sinton, Sandra; Janick, John J.

    1969-01-01

    With the use of a specially developed incubation chamber the rates of motility, respiration, and fructolysis were measured simultaneously on semen samples. By inhibiting the respiration with antimycin A, and/or the fructolysis with 2-deoxyglucose, the rates of each of the two ATP-producing pathways could be reduced independently. In this way the ratio of the amount of free energy produced by respiration and by fructolysis could be varied at will from 1 to 0. In uninhibited preparations approximately 75% of the free energy derives from respiration, and 25% from fructolysis. By the use of the absolute rates of respiration, fructolysis, and motility, the efficiency of the conversion of free energy into hydrodynamic work was calculated. After correction for the decay of the preparation during the experiment, this conversion efficiency was found to be 30–45% lower for free energy from respiration than for free energy from fructolysis. The difference in distribution of the enzymes for fructolysis and respiration over the flagellum was ruled out as the cause of the efficiency difference. The respiration could be 70% inhibited by oligomycin. It is concluded that approximately one-third of the free energy from respiration is used for maintenance of the mitochondria. PMID:5357194

  20. Energy conversion in bull sperm flagella.

    PubMed

    Rikmenspoel, R; Sinton, S; Janick, J J

    1969-12-01

    With the use of a specially developed incubation chamber the rates of motility, respiration, and fructolysis were measured simultaneously on semen samples. By inhibiting the respiration with antimycin A, and/or the fructolysis with 2-deoxyglucose, the rates of each of the two ATP-producing pathways could be reduced independently. In this way the ratio of the amount of free energy produced by respiration and by fructolysis could be varied at will from 1 to 0. In uninhibited preparations approximately 75% of the free energy derives from respiration, and 25% from fructolysis. By the use of the absolute rates of respiration, fructolysis, and motility, the efficiency of the conversion of free energy into hydrodynamic work was calculated. After correction for the decay of the preparation during the experiment, this conversion efficiency was found to be 30-45% lower for free energy from respiration than for free energy from fructolysis. The difference in distribution of the enzymes for fructolysis and respiration over the flagellum was ruled out as the cause of the efficiency difference. The respiration could be 70% inhibited by oligomycin. It is concluded that approximately one-third of the free energy from respiration is used for maintenance of the mitochondria.

  1. Site of semen deposition in cattle: a review.

    PubMed

    López-Gatius, F

    2000-04-15

    The breeding of cattle using conventional artificial insemination methods involves the deposition of semen in the uterine body. However, it has been recently proposed by several authors that the site of semen deposition be changed to the uterine horns. This suggestion is based on 2 facts: the acceptance that the major preovulatory sperm reservoir may be the uterotubal junction rather than the cervical canal, and the lack of accuracy by inseminators in depositing semen. In over 50% of cases, inseminators were not sufficiently trained to deposit semen into the uterine body, so that intracervical insemination was often performed resulting in reduced fertility. The advantage of deep uterine insemination, whether bicornual or unicornual, is that it favors the deposition of semen nearer to the uterotubal junction and thus reduces the incidence of cervical deposition. This review updates the literature on the ideal site of semen deposition, including cervical, uterine body, cornual and intraperitoneal. Also analyzed are the effects of right vs. left side activity of the female reproductive tract on the optimum site of semen deposition as it affects fertilization. Finally, the question of whether the clinical training of inseminators should be reevaluated is discussed. PMID:10898210

  2. Influence of cooling and thawing conditions and cryoprotectant concentration on frozen-thawed survival of white-naped crane (Antigone vipio) spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Panyaboriban, Saritvich; Pukazhenthi, Budhan; Brown, Megan E; Crowe, Chris; Lynch, Warren; Singh, Ram P; Techakumphu, Mongkol; Songsasen, Nucharin

    2016-10-01

    To assist in genetic resource management and recovery efforts of the white-naped crane (Antigone vipio), we conducted two experiments to evaluate the effect of cooling condition, thawing rate, and cryoprotectant concentration on sperm survival post-thaw. Semen was collected from four mature males during breeding season (March and April) and evaluated for volume, sperm concentration, motility, and membrane integrity. In Experiment 1, ejaculates (n = 8) were diluted with Beltsville Poultry Semen Extender (BPSE) containing 10% dimethylsulfoxide (Me2SO) and frozen using either one (average cooling rate = 2.5 °C/min) or two step (average cooling rate = 7 and 9 °C/min, respectively) cooling method. The frozen samples were thawed using one of two thawing rates: 37 °C 30 s vs. 4 °C 1 min. In Experiment 2, samples were diluted with crane semen extender containing either 6% or 10% Me2SO, frozen using two-step method and then thawed at 37 °C for 30 s. Both cooling condition (two-step > one-step) and thawing rate (37 °C 30 s > 4 °C 1 min) impacted sperm motility, progression and kinetic characteristics (P < 0.05), but did not (P > 0.05) affect plasma membrane or acrosomal integrity. Concentration of Me2SO did not impact frozen-thaw survival. We conclude that white-naped crane sperm cryopreserved using a combination of two-step cooling and thawing at 37 °C 30 s was superior to other cooling and thawing combinations regarding to sustaining sperm motility with good motility kinetics. Findings represent the first steps towards the development of effective cryopreservation protocols and establishment of a genome resource bank for this threatened species.

  3. Meiotic recombination in normal and clone bulls and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Hart, E J; Pinton, A; Powell, A; Wall, R; King, W A

    2008-01-01

    Homologous chromosome pairing and recombination are essential components of meiosis and sexual reproduction. The reshuffling of genetic material through breakage and reunion of chromatids ensure proper segregation of homologous chromosomes in reduction division and genetic diversity in the progeny. The advent of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) as a reproductive biotechnology for use in livestock industry has made it easy to bypass these vital steps. However, few studies have been carried out on the impact of SCNT on the reproductive characteristics of cloned animals and, none to date, on the meiotic processes in animals, which were created by circumventing meiosis. In an attempt to assess the impact of cloning by SCNT on the meiotic processes, we undertook an immunocytological comparison of recombination in normal and clone bulls using antibodies raised against the synaptonemal complex protein 3 (SCP3) to label the lateral elements and the mismatch repair protein 1 (MLH1) foci on bivalents as indicators of recombination events. Our studies involving five normal bulls of proven fertility, two SCNT-derived bulls, and four mature offspring of SCNT bulls showed that the mean number of crossing over per spermatocyte for normal bulls (42 +/- 4 SD; ranging from 33 to 56), was not significantly different from that of SCNT-derived bulls (43 +/- 5 SD; ranging from 35 to 56), and the offspring of SCNT-derived bulls (43 +/- 5 SD; ranging from 37 to 58). It would appear that circumventing meiosis to produce these animals does not influence the meiotic processes revealed by MLH1 foci detected in spermatocytes.

  4. Tritrichomonas foetus: prevalence study in naturally mating bulls in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, Ch; Bodmer, M; Doherr, M G; Janett, F; Thomann, A; Spycher, C; Iten, C; Hentrich, B; Gottstein, B; Müller, N; Frey, C F

    2014-03-01

    Switzerland is officially free from bovine Tritrichomonas foetus. While bulls used for artificial insemination (AI) are routinely examined for this pathogen, bulls engaged in natural mating, as well as aborted fetuses, are only very sporadically investigated, indicating that the disease awareness for bovine tritrichomoniasis is low. Natural mating in cattle is becoming increasingly popular in Switzerland. Accordingly, a re-introduction/re-occurrence of T. foetus in cattle seems possible either via resurgence from a yet unknown bovine reservoir, or via importation of infected cattle. The low disease awareness for bovine tritrichomoniasis might favor an unnoticed re-establishment of T. foetus in the Swiss cattle population. The aim of our study was thus to search for the parasite, and if found, to assess the prevalence of bovine T. foetus in Switzerland. We included (1) bulls over two years of age used in natural mating and sent to slaughter, (2) bulls used for natural service in herds with or without fertility problems and (3) aborted fetuses. Furthermore, the routinely examined bulls used for AI (4) were included in this study. In total, 1362 preputial samples from bulls and 60 abomasal fluid samples of aborted fetuses were analyzed for the presence of T. foetus by both in vitro cultivation and molecular analyses. The parasite could not be detected in any of the samples, indicating that the maximal prevalence possibly missed was about 0.3% (95% confidence). Interestingly, in preputial samples of three bulls of category 1, apathogenic Tetratrichomonas sp. was identified, documenting a proof-of-principle for the methodology used in this study. PMID:24447668

  5. The uses of infrared thermography to evaluate the effects of climatic variables in bull's reproduction.

    PubMed

    Menegassi, Silvio Renato Oliveira; Pereira, Gabriel Ribas; Dias, Eduardo Antunes; Koetz, Celso; Lopes, Flávio Guiselli; Bremm, Carolina; Pimentel, Concepta; Lopes, Rubia Branco; da Rocha, Marcela Kuczynski; Carvalho, Helena Robattini; Barcellos, Júlio Otavio Jardim

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the seasonal effects of the environment on sperm quality in subtropical region determined by temperature and humidity index (THI). We used 20 Brangus bulls (5/8 Angus × 3/8 Nellore) aged approximately 24 months at the beginning of the study. Semen evaluations were performed twice per season during 1 year. Climate THI data were collected from an automatic weather station from the National Institute of Meteorology. Infrared thermography images were used to determine the temperature of the proximal and distal poles of the testis to assess the testicular temperature gradient (TG). The seasonal effects on seminal and climatic variables were analyzed with ANOVA using MIXED procedure of SAS. Sperm motility in spring (60.1%), summer (57.6%), and autumn (64.5%) showed difference compared to winter (73.0%; P < 0.01). TG was negatively correlated with THI at 18 days (spermiogenesis) (-0.76; P < 0.05) and at 12 days (epididymal transit) (-0.85; P < 0.01). Ocular temperature (OcT) had a positive correlation with THI at 18 days (0.78; P < 0.05) and at 12 days (0.84; P < 0.01). Motility showed a negative correlation with THI only at 18 days (-0.79; P < 0.05). During spermiogenesis, the TG had higher negative correlation compared to OcT (-0.97; P < 0.01) and rectal temperature (-0.72; P < 0.05). Spermatozoa with distal midpiece reflex were correlated with THI during transit epididymis (0.72; P < 0.05). Seminal parameters are not affected when THI reaches 93.0 (spermiogenesis) and 88.0 (epididymal transit). We concluded that infrared thermography can be adopted as an indirect method in order to assess the effect of environmental changes in TG and OcT of Brangus bulls. PMID:26049285

  6. The uses of infrared thermography to evaluate the effects of climatic variables in bull's reproduction.

    PubMed

    Menegassi, Silvio Renato Oliveira; Pereira, Gabriel Ribas; Dias, Eduardo Antunes; Koetz, Celso; Lopes, Flávio Guiselli; Bremm, Carolina; Pimentel, Concepta; Lopes, Rubia Branco; da Rocha, Marcela Kuczynski; Carvalho, Helena Robattini; Barcellos, Júlio Otavio Jardim

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the seasonal effects of the environment on sperm quality in subtropical region determined by temperature and humidity index (THI). We used 20 Brangus bulls (5/8 Angus × 3/8 Nellore) aged approximately 24 months at the beginning of the study. Semen evaluations were performed twice per season during 1 year. Climate THI data were collected from an automatic weather station from the National Institute of Meteorology. Infrared thermography images were used to determine the temperature of the proximal and distal poles of the testis to assess the testicular temperature gradient (TG). The seasonal effects on seminal and climatic variables were analyzed with ANOVA using MIXED procedure of SAS. Sperm motility in spring (60.1%), summer (57.6%), and autumn (64.5%) showed difference compared to winter (73.0%; P < 0.01). TG was negatively correlated with THI at 18 days (spermiogenesis) (-0.76; P < 0.05) and at 12 days (epididymal transit) (-0.85; P < 0.01). Ocular temperature (OcT) had a positive correlation with THI at 18 days (0.78; P < 0.05) and at 12 days (0.84; P < 0.01). Motility showed a negative correlation with THI only at 18 days (-0.79; P < 0.05). During spermiogenesis, the TG had higher negative correlation compared to OcT (-0.97; P < 0.01) and rectal temperature (-0.72; P < 0.05). Spermatozoa with distal midpiece reflex were correlated with THI during transit epididymis (0.72; P < 0.05). Seminal parameters are not affected when THI reaches 93.0 (spermiogenesis) and 88.0 (epididymal transit). We concluded that infrared thermography can be adopted as an indirect method in order to assess the effect of environmental changes in TG and OcT of Brangus bulls.

  7. [Human semen lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes in fertility studies (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Buitrago, J M; García Díez, L C; de Castro, S

    1981-01-01

    The lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme pattern has been obtained in the semen of 87 males undergoing fertility studies. The proportion of LDH-X, the isoenzyme specific to the spermatozoa, is reduced in proportion to the reduction of the sperm density and motility. LDH-X is the most abundant isoenzyme in the semen of normospermic subjects. As to the other isoenzymes, the most abundant ones are the LDH-2 and the LDH-3. The results obtained lead us to conclude that the measurement of the lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes may be useful in studies of fertility as an indicative parameter of the quality of the semen.

  8. Bacterial Communities in Semen from Men of Infertile Couples: Metagenomic Sequencing Reveals Relationships of Seminal Microbiota to Semen Quality

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Shun-Long; Chiu, Chih-Min; Lin, Feng-Mao; Huang, Wei-Chih; Liang, Chao; Yang, Ting; Yang, Tzu-Ling; Liu, Chia-Yu; Wu, Wei-Yun; Chang, Yi-An; Chang, Tzu-Hao; Huang, Hsien-Da

    2014-01-01

    Some previous studies have identified bacteria in semen as being a potential factor in male infertility. However, only few types of bacteria were taken into consideration while using PCR-based or culturing methods. Here we present an analysis approach using next-generation sequencing technology and bioinformatics analysis to investigate the associations between bacterial communities and semen quality. Ninety-six semen samples collected were examined for bacterial communities, measuring seven clinical criteria for semen quality (semen volume, sperm concentration, motility, Kruger's strict morphology, antisperm antibody (IgA), Atypical, and leukocytes). Computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) was also performed. Results showed that the most abundant genera among all samples were Lactobacillus (19.9%), Pseudomonas (9.85%), Prevotella (8.51%) and Gardnerella (4.21%). The proportion of Lactobacillus and Gardnerella was significantly higher in the normal samples, while that of Prevotella was significantly higher in the low quality samples. Unsupervised clustering analysis demonstrated that the seminal bacterial communities were clustered into three main groups: Lactobacillus, Pseudomonas, and Prevotella predominant group. Remarkably, most normal samples (80.6%) were clustered in Lactobacillus predominant group. The analysis results showed seminal bacteria community types were highly associated with semen health. Lactobacillus might not only be a potential probiotic for semen quality maintenance, but also might be helpful in countering the negative influence of Prevotella and Pseudomonas. In this study, we investigated whole seminal bacterial communities and provided the most comprehensive analysis of the association between bacterial community and semen quality. The study significantly contributes to the current understanding of the etiology of male fertility. PMID:25340531

  9. Should single layer centrifugation of dog semen be done before or after the semen is cooled?

    PubMed

    Gálvez, M J; Ortiz, I; Hidalgo, M; Morrell, J M; Dorado, J

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of sperm selection by single layer centrifugation (SLC) on canine sperm quality when SLC was performed before or after the cooling process, or when double SLC (before and after cooling) was performed. Twenty ejaculates from four dogs were divided into four aliquots as follows: unselected: no SLC was performed; SLC prior to cooling (SLC-PC): sperm selection was carried out before cooling; SLC after cooling (SLC-AC): sperm selection was performed after cooling; and double SLC: sperm selection was carried out before and after cooling. Sperm motility (by computer-assisted semen analysis), morphology (Diff-Quick staining), sperm membrane integrity (Vital-Test kit) and acrosome integrity (double fluorescent stain) were assessed in re-warmed semen samples. Four sperm subpopulations (sP) were detected using a pattern analysis technique (sP1: highly active, non-progressive; sP2: low velocity, highly progressive; sP3: less vigorous, poorly progressive; sP4: highly progressive motility). A higher proportion of sperm were classified as sP4 in SLC-AC samples. Most of the sperm parameters assessed showed higher values in the SLC-AC group. We conclude that SLC-AC is the best protocol to improve sperm quality in chilled canine semen in comparison to the other procedures tested.

  10. Short communication: Use of young bulls in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, J L; Cole, J B; Bickhart, D M

    2014-05-01

    The availability of genomic evaluations since 2008 has resulted in many changes to dairy cattle breeding programs. One such change has been the increased contribution of young bulls (0.8 to 3.9 yr old) to those programs. The increased use of young bulls was investigated using pedigree data and breeding records obtained from the US national dairy database (Beltsville, MD). The adoption of genotyping was so rapid that by 2009, >90% of all Holstein artificial insemination (AI) service sires and 86% of Jersey AI service sires were genotyped, regardless of age. The percentage of sons sired by young bulls increased by 49 percentage points (10% in 2008 compared with 59% in 2012) due to the onset of genomic evaluations for Holsteins and by 46 percentage points for Jerseys (11 and 57%, respectively). When limiting these data to sons retained for breeding purposes through AI, the increase was even more dramatic, increasing approximately 80 percentage points from 2008 to 2012 for both Holsteins and Jerseys (1, 5, 28, 52, and 81% for Holsteins and 3, 4, 43, 46, and 82% for Jerseys from 2008 through 2012). From US breeding records from 2007 through 2012, 24,580,793 Holstein and 1,494,095 Jersey breedings were examined. Young bulls accounted for 28% and 25% of Holstein and Jersey breedings in 2007, respectively. These percentages increased to 51% of Holstein and 52% of Jersey breedings in 2012, representing 23- and 27-percentage-unit increases, respectively. Matings to genotyped young bulls have rapidly increased while the use of nongenotyped bulls has diminished since the onset of genomics. Mean sire age for Holstein male progeny born in 2012 was 2.7 yr younger than males born in 2006, and 1.3 yr younger for females; corresponding values for Jerseys were 2.3 and 0.9 yr. Holstein male offspring had an increase of 281 kg between 2006 and 2012, compared with 197 kg between 2000 and 2006 for parent averages (PA) for milk, an increase of 84 kg between the 2 periods. Jersey male

  11. Spawning and rearing behavior of bull trout in a headwaterlake ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lora B. Tennant,; Gresswell, Bob; Guy, Christopher S.; Michael H. Meeuwig,

    2015-01-01

    Numerous life histories have been documented for bull trout Salvelinus confluentus. Lacustrine-adfluvial bull trout populations that occupy small, headwater lake ecosystems and migrate short distances to natal tributaries to spawn are likely common; however, much of the research on potamodromous bull trout has focused on describing the spawning and rearing characteristics of bull trout populations that occupy large rivers and lakes and make long distance spawning migrations to natal headwater streams. This study describes the spawning and rearing characteristics of lacustrine-adfluvial bull trout in the Quartz Lake drainage, Glacier National Park, USA, a small headwater lake ecosystem. Many spawning and rearing characteristics of bull trout in the Quartz Lake drainage are similar to potamodromous bull trout that migrate long distances. For example, subadult bull trout distribution was positively associated with slow-water habitat unit types and maximum wetted width, and negatively associated with increased stream gradient. Bull trout spawning also occurred when water temperatures were between 5 and 9 °C, and redds were generally located in stream segments with low stream gradient and abundant gravel and cobble substrates. However, this study also elucidated characteristics of bull trout biology that are not well documented in the literature, but may be relatively widespread and have important implications regarding general characteristics of bull trout ecology, use of available habitat by bull trout, and persistence of lacustrine-adfluvial bull trout in small headwater lake ecosystems.

  12. The relationship of bull fertility to sperm nuclear shape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostermeier, G.C.; Sargeant, G.A.; Yandell, B.S.; Parrish, J.J.

    2001-01-01

    group had a linear relationship (r .89, P .05) with fertility. To construct a plot of mean sperm shapes, a novel technique to automatically orient and identify the anterior tip of the sperm head was developed. The mean nuclear shape of high-fertility sperm was more elongated and tapered than those of lower fertility. A discriminant function (P .05) was also constructed that separated the 6 bulls into 2 groups based only on the harmonic amplitudes or sperm nuclear shape. The bulls were correctly classified into the 2 fertility groups. A comparison of sperm chromatin structure analysis (SCSA) and harmonic amplitudes found that overall size variance, anterior roundness, and posterior taperedness of sperm nuclei were related to chromatin stability (P .05). Some of the differences observed in sperm nuclear shape between the high- and lower-fertility bulls may be explained by varying levels of chromatin stability. However, sperm nuclear shape appears to contain additional information from chromatin stability alone. In this particular study, with 6 bulls, all with good chromatin quality, sperm nuclear shape was a better predictor of bull fertility.

  13. Semen analysis workshops: 17 years’ experience

    PubMed Central

    Franken, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    The study reports on the results recorded during a series of semenology workshops presented from 1997 to 2014. The results were obtained from training workshops that were conducted in 6 continents in 38 cities including 1124 individuals. All workshops consisted of 2 sessions namely a pre-and post-training session. Results recorded from the pre-training sessions were used as a baseline value of current knowledge. In most cases pooled fresh or cryopreserved semen samples were provided by the organizing institution. The mixed effect linear regression model showed a significant decrease in the mean scores from the pre-training scores, p < .001. Training of technicians as well as regular proficiency testing will ensure continuous communication with the referring laboratory. PMID:26977266

  14. Indian story on semen loss and related Dhat syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Om; Kar, Sujit Kumar; Sathyanarayana Rao, T. S.

    2014-01-01

    India is a country of many religions and ancient cultures. Indian culture is largely directed by the Vedic culture since time immemorial. Later Indian culture is influenced by Buddhism, Islam, and Christianity. Indian belief system carries the footprints of these cultures. Every culture describes human behaviors and an interpretation of each human behavior is largely influenced by the core cultural belief system. Sexuality is an important domain which is colored by different cultural colors. Like other cultures, Indian culture believes “semen” as the precious body fluid which needs to be preserved. Most Indian beliefs consider loss of semen as a threat to the individual. Ancient Indian literature present semen loss as a negative health related event. Dhat syndrome (related to semen loss) is a culture-bound syndrome seen in the natives of Indian subcontinent. This article gathers the Indian concepts related to semen loss. It also outlines belief systems behind problems of Dhat syndrome. PMID:25568479

  15. Scientists Map DNA of Zika Virus from Semen

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The first complete genetic "blueprint" -- genome -- of a sample of Zika virus derived from ... new study, published Oct. 13 in the journal Genome Announcements . "Isolating Zika virus from semen has been ...

  16. [Communication between clinicians and laboratorians in semen analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-jun; Cao, Xing-wu

    2015-05-01

    By direct communication between clinicians and laboratorians, obstacles between clinical work and laboratory diagnosis were unequivocally found at an academic conference. Many clinical physicians feel disappointed and frustrated at the laboratory diagnosis by semen analysis and frankly express their expectations, as to recognize the role and significance of laboratory diagnosis, understand the value of routine semen analysis, work out the puzzles in the analysis of sperm morphology, fulfil the requirements for the identification of cells in semen, and obtain responses from and initiate discussions among laboratorians about the relevant questions. Both laboratorians and clinicians are appealing for strengthened management and earlier establishment of national standards and operating specifications for laboratory diagnosis by semen analysis. PMID:26117933

  17. The presence of bacteria species in semen and sperm quality

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Elena; Capitani, Serena; Figura, Natale; Pammolli, Andrea; Federico, Maria Grazia; Giannerini, Valentina

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To verify the prevalence of semen bacterial contamination and whether the contamination could decrease sperm quality. Methods Spermiogram, semen culture, and sperm transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis were performed. TEM data were elaborated using a mathematical formula that calculates a fertility index (FI)—able to define patients as fertile or infertile—and the percentage of sperm apoptosis, immaturity and necrosis. We aligned the amino acid sequence of beta-tubulin with protein of the most frequent species isolated from semen. Results Patients were divided according to the contaminating species; in each group, we observed fertile individuals, in whom the semen quality was similar to that of controls and infertile men whose sperm quality was significantly decreased, in terms of motility, FI, apoptosis and necrosis. Partial homology between β-tubulin and bacterial proteins was observed. Conclusion Sperm bacterial contamination is quite frequent and could contribute to the deterioration of the sperm quality of infertile men. PMID:19089609

  18. Environmental Exposure to Triclosan and Semen Quality

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenting; Zhang, Hao; Tong, Chuanliang; Xie, Chong; Fan, Guohua; Zhao, Shasha; Yu, Xiaogang; Tian, Ying; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan (2,4,4′-trichloro-2′-hydroxy-diphenyl ether, TCS) is widely used in personal care, household, veterinary and industrial products. It was considered as a potential male reproductive toxicant in previous in vitro and in vivo studies. However, evidence from human studies is scarce. Our study aims to investigate the relationship between TCS exposure and semen quality. We measured urinary TCS concentrations in 471 men recruited from a male reproductive health clinic. TCS was detected in 96.7% of urine samples, with a median concentration of 0.97 ng (mg·creatinine)−1 (interquartile range, 0.41–2.95 ng (mg·creatinine)−1). A multiple linear regression analysis showed a negative association between natural logarithm (Ln) transformed TCS concentration (Ln-TCS) and Ln transformed number of forward moving sperms (adjusted coefficient β = −0.17; 95% confidence interval (CI) (−0.32, −0.02). Furthermore, among those with the lowest tertile of TCS level, Ln-TCS was negatively associated with the number of forward moving sperms (β = −0.35; 95% CI (−0.68, −0.03)), percentage of sperms with normal morphology (β = −1.64; 95% CI (−3.05, −0.23)), as well as number of normal morphological sperms, sperm concentration and count. Our findings suggest that the adverse effect of TCS on semen quality is modest at the environment-relevant dose in humans. Further studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:26901211

  19. Shoulder pain in primary care: frozen shoulder.

    PubMed

    Cadogan, Angela; Mohammed, Khalid D

    2016-03-01

    BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT Frozen shoulder is a painful condition that follows a protracted clinical course. We aim to review the management of patients with a diagnosis of frozen shoulder who are referred for specialist orthopaedic evaluation against existing guidelines in primary care. ASSESSMENT OF PROBLEM Referrals and clinical records were reviewed for all patients referred for orthopaedic specialist assessment who received a specialist diagnosis of frozen shoulder. Diagnostic, investigation and management practices from a regional primary health care setting in New Zealand were compared with guideline-recommended management. RESULTS Eighty patients with frozen shoulder were referred for orthopaedic evaluation in the 13 month study period, mostly from general practice. Fifteen patients (19%) were identified as having a frozen shoulder in their medical referral. Most (99%) had received previous imaging. Seven patients (12%) had received guideline recommended treatment. STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVEMENT Education of all clinicians involved in patient management is important to ensure an understanding of the long natural history of frozen shoulder and provide reassurance that outcomes are generally excellent. HealthPathways now include more information regarding diagnosis, imaging and evidence-based management for frozen shoulder. LESSONS Frozen shoulder may be under-diagnosed among patients referred for orthopaedic review. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used and may identify occult and unrelated pathology in this age-group. When managed according to clinical guidelines, patients report significant clinical and functional improvement with most reporting 80% function compared with normal after 1 year. KEYWORDS Adhesive capsulitis; bursitis; injections; practice guideline; primary health care; ultrasound.

  20. 7 CFR 58.349 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Frozen cream. 58.349 Section 58.349 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.349 Frozen cream. The flavor shall be sweet,...

  1. 7 CFR 58.349 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Frozen cream. 58.349 Section 58.349 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.349 Frozen cream. The flavor shall be sweet,...

  2. 7 CFR 58.349 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Frozen cream. 58.349 Section 58.349 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.349 Frozen cream. The flavor shall be sweet,...

  3. 21 CFR 158.170 - Frozen peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frozen peas. 158.170 Section 158.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN.... (a) Identity—(1) Product definition. Frozen peas is the food in “package” form as that term...

  4. Cryopreservation of lar gibbon semen collected by manual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Takasu, Masaki; Morita, Natsumi; Tajima, Shunichiro; Almunia, Julio; Maeda, Masami; Kamiguchi, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    We confirmed ejaculation as a result of manual stimulation in a lar gibbon, and attempted to cryopreserve the semen using TES-Tris-egg yolk-based (TTE) extender. After measuring the amount of semen (g), we first diluted the semen with TTE extender, and calculated sperm concentration (sperm/ml), total sperm count (sperm), and progressive sperm motility (%). Then, we cooled diluted semen slowly to 4 °C over 2 h, and added an equal volume of secondary extender containing glycerol over 30 min. Finally, we flash-froze the semen solution by plunging into liquid nitrogen. In addition, we freeze-thawed the solution to determine the recovery rate of the motile sperm. Collection of semen was successful on four of the five occasions. The median (min-max) quantity of ejaculate was 0.19 g (0.09-0.26 g), the median sperm concentration was 1.38 × 10(9) sperm/ml (1.20-1.53 × 10(9) sperm/ml), and the median total sperm count was 0.26 × 10(9) sperm (0.11-0.40 × 10(9) sperm). Moreover, the median sperm motility immediately after ejaculation was 65 % (60-75 %), the median sperm motility after freeze-thawing was 30 % (25-35 %), and the median recovery rate was 42.3 % (40.0-58.3 %). We were able to (1) collect semen from a lar gibbon by manual stimulation, (2) reveal andrological findings regarding semen characteristics, and (3) preserve the genetic resource using TTE cryopreservation.

  5. Testing the frozen flow approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchin, Francesco; Matarrese, Sabino; Melott, Adrian L.; Moscardini, Lauro

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the accuracy of the frozen-flow approximation (FFA), recently proposed by Matarrese, et al. (1992), for following the nonlinear evolution of cosmological density fluctuations under gravitational instability. We compare a number of statistics between results of the FFA and n-body simulations, including those used by Melott, Pellman & Shandarin (1993) to test the Zel'dovich approximation. The FFA performs reasonably well in a statistical sense, e.g. in reproducing the counts-in-cell distribution, at small scales, but it does poorly in the crosscorrelation with n-body which means it is generally not moving mass to the right place, especially in models with high small-scale power.

  6. Perineal Bull Gore with Urinary Bladder Perforation and Pneumoperitoneum

    PubMed Central

    R, Santhosh; Barad, Arun Kumar; Ghalige, Hemanth Sureshwara; K, Sridartha; Sharma M, Birkumar

    2013-01-01

    Animal related injuries are frequently reported in India and other countries, where bulls are used for sporting events as well as in places where farming and livestock rearing is practised. The presentation is, many times, atypical and misleading as well. They have unique mechanics of injury. The patterns of the injury are reviewed. An intra-peritoneal urinary bladder injury which is caused by a perineal bull gore with a pneumoperitoneum is unusual and it has not been reported in the literature which was reviewed. We are reporting a successfully treated 25 years old male patient from the slopes of the southern district of Manipur, India, who had presented 40 hours after he was injured. The identification and prompt exploration, keeping in mind the mechanics of bull goring, helps the surgeons to adequately deal such atypical injuries, for optimal outcomes. PMID:23814738

  7. A new translocation t(1p;18) in an Italian Mediterranean river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis, 2n = 50) bull: cytogenetic, fertility and inheritance studies.

    PubMed

    Albarella, S; Ciotola, F; Coletta, A; Genualdo, V; Iannuzzi, L; Peretti, V

    2013-01-01

    In recent years increasing attention has been paid to the cytogenetic control of Italian Mediterranean river buffalo (BBU) bulls authorized as sires which are registered in the stud book. Chromosome abnormalities described in this species are mainly numerical and affecting sex chromosomes. During routine cytogenetic analyses performed on young Italian Mediterranean river buffalo bulls in the progeny test, 1 animal was found to be carrier of a never before reported translocation t(1p;18) originated by fission of BBU1 and subsequent centric fusion of BBU1p with BBU18 as demonstrated by both R-banding and FISH-mapping techniques using specific molecular markers of BBU1p (DEFB1) and BBU18 (GPI). According to sperm analyses the semen characteristics were in physiological ranges, but the calf crop percentage was only 48.77% instead of 70-80%. Cytogenetic analyses performed on 50 offspring (36 females and 14 males) showed that 15 of them (30%) were carriers of the same translocation. PMID:22986410

  8. New Approaches to Boar Semen Evaluation, Processing and Improvement.

    PubMed

    Sutovsky, P

    2015-07-01

    The improvement of boar reproductive performance may be the next frontier in reproductive management of swine herd in Unites States, facilitated by better understanding of boar sperm function and by the introduction of new advanced instrumentation in the andrology field. Objective single ejaculate evaluation and individual boar fertility prediction may be possible by introducing automated flow cytometric semen analysis with vital stains (e.g. acrosomal integrity and mito-potential), DNA fragmentation analysis and biomarkers (ubiquitin, PAWP, ALOX15, aggresome) associated with normal or defective sperm phenotypes. Measurement of sperm-produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a helpful indicator of normal semen sample. Semen ROS levels could be managed by the addition of ROS-scavenging antioxidants. Alternative energy regeneration substrates and sperm stimulants such as inorganic pyrophosphate and caffeine could increase sperm lifespan in extended semen and within the female reproductive system. Such technology could be combined with timed sperm release in the female reproductive system after artificial insemination. Sperm phenotype analysis by the image-based flow cytometry will go hand in hand with the advancement of swine genomics, linking aberrant sperm phenotype to the fertility influencing gene polymorphisms. Finally, poor-quality ejaculates could be rescued and acceptable ejaculates improved by semen purification methods such as the nanoparticle-based semen purification and magnetic-activated sperm sorting. Altogether, these scientific and technological advances could benefit swine industry, provided that the challenges of new technology adoption, dissemination and cost reduction are met. PMID:26174914

  9. Thalidomide is distributed into human semen after oral dosing.

    PubMed

    Teo, S K; Harden, J L; Burke, A B; Noormohamed, F H; Youle, M; Johnson, M A; Peters, B S; Stirling, D I; Thomas, S D

    2001-10-01

    As part of a double-blind placebo-controlled study of the effect of thalidomide on body weight and the viral load of human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive patients, plasma and semen samples were analyzed for the presence of thalidomide. Patients were orally dosed with 100 mg of thalidomide/day for 8 weeks. Blood samples were obtained at baseline and weeks 4, 8, and 12, and semen was obtained at baseline and weeks 4 and 8. Samples were extracted with solid-phase cartridges and analyzed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in the negative ion mode. Two of four patients taking thalidomide were able to provide semen samples. Both had detectable levels of thalidomide in their plasma (10-350 ng/ml) and semen (10-250 ng/g) at weeks 4 and 8. There was an apparent correlation between plasma and semen levels. Semen levels could be significantly greater for therapeutic doses of more than 100 mg/day. Since the threshold dose for birth defects and thalidomide exposure is not known, male patients are advised to use barrier contraception.

  10. Successful transfer of frozen N'Dama embryos from the Gambia to Kenya.

    PubMed

    Jordt, T; Mahon, G D; Touray, B N; Ngulo, W K; Morrison, W I; Rawle, J; Murray, M

    1986-05-01

    Frozen embryos from N'Dama cattle were successfully transferred from The Gambia to Kenya. Of the 26 N'Dama cows used 12 were successfully programmed to superovulate and of these seven produced 30 embryos that were collected seven days after oestrus/service. Five N'Dama bulls were used for natural service. In Kenya 29 embryos were implanted into 29 Boran heifers seven days (+/- 1) after the induction of synchronised oestrus. Eleven pregnancies were established and after one abortion of unknown aetiology at seven and a half months five female and five male calves were born and subsequently reared. During programming the N'Dama cows showed prolonged anoestrus leading to the necessity of oestrus induction using intravaginal progesterone releasing coils; pregnant mare serum gonadotrophin gave better superovulation than follicle stimulating hormone. One N'Dama bull proved to be subfertile. The success of the project has demonstrated the potential of this technique to make disease-free N'Dama available for research purposes and for the promotion of livestock development programmes in tsetse-infested areas using trypanotolerant cattle. PMID:3738996

  11. Use of Near Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy to Predict Intake and Digestibility in Bulls and Steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fecal samples were collected from 282 growing Angus bulls over 4 yr to predict DMI of corn-silage-based diet. Contemporaneous digestion trials were conducted with the same diet in 12 steers for 3 yr and 12 bulls in 1 yr. Near-infrared spectra (n = 735 for growing bulls, n= = 240 for digestion trials...

  12. 75 FR 2269 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Designation of Critical Habitat for Bull...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ...-history form of bull trout is unique to the Coastal-Puget Sound population (64 FR 58921; November 1, 1999... bull trout (69 FR 35767). The decline of bull trout is primarily due to habitat degradation and..., impoundments, dams, water diversions, and the introduction of nonnative species (63 FR 31647; June 10, 1998;...

  13. "As if Reviewing His Life": Bull Lodge's Narrative and the Mediation of Self-Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gone, Joseph P.

    2006-01-01

    In 1980, on behalf of the Gros Ventre people, George P. Horse Capture published "The Seven Visions of Bull Lodge, as Told by His Daughter, Garter Snake." "The Seven Visions" describes a lifetime of personal encounters with Powerful other-than-human Persons by the noted Gros Ventre warrior and ritual leader, Bull Lodge (ca. 1802-86). Bull Lodge…

  14. 75 FR 63897 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Designation of Critical Habitat for Bull...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... 14, 2010 (75 FR 2269). Description, Distribution, Habitat and Recovery Bull trout are members of the... population (64 FR 58921, November 1, 1999). For additional information on the biology of this life form, see..., and Saint Mary-Belly River populations of bull trout (69 FR 35767). The decline of bull trout...

  15. 77 FR 14965 - Special Local Regulations; Red Bull Candola, New River, Fort Lauderdale, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Red Bull Candola, New River... east of the South Andrews Avenue Bascule Bridge in Fort Lauderdale, Florida for the Red Bull Candola... this rule because the Coast Guard did not receive necessary information about the Red Bull...

  16. Effects of storage in different semen extenders on the pre-freezing and post-thawing quality of boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Dziekońska, A; Zasiadczyk, Ł; Lecewicz, M; Strzeżek, R; Koziorowska-Gilun, M; Fraser, L; Mogielnicka-Brzozowska, M; Kordan, W

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of storage of semen in different commercial extenders on the pre-freezing and post-thawing quality of boar spermatozoa. Semen was diluted in BTS, Androhep (AH) and Gedil (GD), stored for 24 h at 17°C, and then frozen in accordance with the cryopreservation protocol. Analyses of the quality of spermatozoa included: motility, normal apical ridge (NAR) acrosome, plasma membrane integrity (PMI), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), measurements of ATP content and activity of superoxidase dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Prior to the freezing process, no significant effect of the extender on the sperm quality parameters was noted. After thawing the spermatozoa it was demonstrated that the type of extender used influenced PMI, MMP, ATP content and activity of GPx. In the AH extender the percentage of spermatozoa with PMI and ATP content in spermatozoa was significantly higher (P<0.05) as compared to the BTS or GD extenders. In addition, semen stored in the AH was characterised by a statistically higher (P<0.05) percentage of spermatozoa with MMP and increased activity of GPx as compared with the BTS. The results obtained indicate that for the cryopreservation process, boar spermatozoa stored for 24 hours in liquid state can be used. However, the type of extender used prior to freezing may have a significant effect on the post-thawing quality of the spermatozoa. The AH extender better secured the quality of thawed boar spermatozoa as compared with the BTS or GD. PMID:26812814

  17. Comparative Examination of Capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus L.) Behaviour Responses and Semen Quality to Two Methods of Semen Collection

    PubMed Central

    Łukaszewicz, Ewa Teresa; Kowalczyk, Artur Mikołaj; Rzońca, Zenon

    2015-01-01

    Artificial insemination (AI) is very helpful in solving the reproductive and biodiversity problems observed in small, closed avian populations. The successful production of fertilized eggs using AI is dependent on the collection of good quality semen. Two methods of male sexual stimulation and semen collection from captive kept capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus L.), one of the most seriously endangered grouse species in Europe, are compared in this study. Ejaculates were obtained either with the use of a dummy female or by the dorso-abdominal massage method. Differences in the individual responses of the males to the two methods of semen collection as well as in their semen quality were noted. Only sperm concentration (432.4 x 106 mL-1 with dummy female and 614.5 x 106 mL-1 for massage method) was significantly affected by capercaillie stimulation method. Sperm motility and morphology were not affected (P≥0.05). Thus, for semen collection from captive kept capercaillie both methods can be used successfully. The dummy female can be an alternative to dorso-abdominal massage method, commonly used for semen collection from domesticated bird species. PMID:26397704

  18. Supplementation of different concentrations of Orvus Es Paste (OEP) to ostrich egg yolk lipoprotein extender improves post-thaw boar semen quality.

    PubMed

    Fraser, L; Jasiewicz, E; Kordan, W

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to compare post-thaw quality of boar semen following freezing in an ostrich egg yolk lipoprotein (LPFo) extender supplemented with 0%, 0.25% and 0.50% Orvus Es Paste (OEP). Sperm assessments included total motility (TMOT), mitochondrial function (MF), plasma membrane integrity (PMI) and acrosome integrity (normal apical ridge, NAR). Considerable variations among boars and OEP treatments had a significant effect (P < 0.001) on post-thaw sperm characteristics. It was observed that post-thaw sperm characteristics were significantly compromised in semen samples frozen in the absence of OEP. By contrast, lactose-LPFo-glycerol extender supplemented with either 0.25% OEP or 0.50% OEP markedly enhanced post-thaw sperm characteristics. In all boars, there were no marked differences in post-thaw sperm TMOT between the freezing extenders supplemented with 0.25% and 0.50% OEP. However, a decline in the percentage of post-thaw motile spermatozoa was more pronounced in the extender supplemented with 0.50% OEP following a 120-min incubation period. Furthermore, the proportions of frozen-thawed spermatozoa with MF, PMI and NAR acrosomes varied significantly among the boars in the OEP-supplemented extenders. The findings of this study indicate that different OEP concentrations, in the presence of ostrich egg yolk lipoproteins, could have varying effects on post-thaw sperm survival. PMID:24988847

  19. The Semen Microbiome and Its Relationship with Local Immunology and Viral Load in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cindy M.; Osborne, Brendan J. W.; Hungate, Bruce A.; Shahabi, Kamnoosh; Huibner, Sanja; Lester, Richard; Dwan, Michael G.; Kovacs, Colin; Contente-Cuomo, Tania L.; Benko, Erika; Aziz, Maliha

    2014-01-01

    Semen is a major vector for HIV transmission, but the semen HIV RNA viral load (VL) only correlates moderately with the blood VL. Viral shedding can be enhanced by genital infections and associated inflammation, but it can also occur in the absence of classical pathogens. Thus, we hypothesized that a dysregulated semen microbiome correlates with local HIV shedding. We analyzed semen samples from 49 men who have sex with men (MSM), including 22 HIV-uninfected and 27 HIV-infected men, at baseline and after starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) using 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR. We studied the relationship of semen bacteria with HIV infection, semen cytokine levels, and semen VL by linear regression, non-metric multidimensional scaling, and goodness-of-fit test. Streptococcus, Corynebacterium, and Staphylococcus were common semen bacteria, irrespective of HIV status. While Ureaplasma was the more abundant Mollicutes in HIV-uninfected men, Mycoplasma dominated after HIV infection. HIV infection was associated with decreased semen microbiome diversity and richness, which were restored after six months of ART. In HIV-infected men, semen bacterial load correlated with seven pro-inflammatory semen cytokines, including IL-6 (p = 0.024), TNF-α (p = 0.009), and IL-1b (p = 0.002). IL-1b in particular was associated with semen VL (r2 = 0.18, p = 0.02). Semen bacterial load was also directly linked to the semen HIV VL (r2 = 0.15, p = 0.02). HIV infection reshapes the relationship between semen bacteria and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and both are linked to semen VL, which supports a role of the semen microbiome in HIV sexual transmission. PMID:25058515

  20. Toxicity of cryoprotectants to honey bee semen and queens.

    PubMed

    Wegener, J; Bienefeld, K

    2012-02-01

    Given the threats to the intraspecific biodiversity of Apis mellifera and the pressure on bee breeding to come up with disease-tolerant lines, techniques to cryopreserve drone semen are of great interest. Freeze-thawed drone semen of high viability and/or motility has repeatedly been obtained, but fertility of such semen, when it was measured, was always low. The cryoprotective agent (CPA) most frequently used with drone semen is dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), although this substance has been suspected of causing genetic damage in sperm. No form of sperm washing is currently performed. Using a membrane permeability assay, we measured the short-term toxicity of four possible replacements for DMSO, 1,3-propane diol, 2,3-butane diol, ethylene glycol, and dimethyl formamide. We also tested whether the practice of inseminating queens with CPA-containing semen affects sperm numbers in the storage organs of queens, or sperm fertility. Finally, we tested whether CPA-toxicity in vivo can be reduced by using mixtures of two CPAs, DMSO, and ethylene glycol. Our results show that, although short-term toxicity of all CPAs tested was low, the presence of single CPAs in insemination mixtures at concentrations required for slow freezing greatly reduced the number of sperm reaching the spermatheca. Contrary to earlier reports, this was also true for DMSO. Ethylene glycol was additionally shown to reduce the viability of spermatozoa reaching the storage organ. Mixtures of DMSO and EthGly performed better than either substance used singly at the same concentration. We conclude that the toxicity of CPAs, including DMSO, on honey bee semen and/or queens has been underestimated in the past. This could partly explain the discrepancy between in vitro and in vivo quality of cryopreserved drone semen, described by others. Combinations of several CPAs and techniques to partly remove CPAs after thawing could help to solve this problem. PMID:22115807

  1. Toxicity of cryoprotectants to honey bee semen and queens.

    PubMed

    Wegener, J; Bienefeld, K

    2012-02-01

    Given the threats to the intraspecific biodiversity of Apis mellifera and the pressure on bee breeding to come up with disease-tolerant lines, techniques to cryopreserve drone semen are of great interest. Freeze-thawed drone semen of high viability and/or motility has repeatedly been obtained, but fertility of such semen, when it was measured, was always low. The cryoprotective agent (CPA) most frequently used with drone semen is dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), although this substance has been suspected of causing genetic damage in sperm. No form of sperm washing is currently performed. Using a membrane permeability assay, we measured the short-term toxicity of four possible replacements for DMSO, 1,3-propane diol, 2,3-butane diol, ethylene glycol, and dimethyl formamide. We also tested whether the practice of inseminating queens with CPA-containing semen affects sperm numbers in the storage organs of queens, or sperm fertility. Finally, we tested whether CPA-toxicity in vivo can be reduced by using mixtures of two CPAs, DMSO, and ethylene glycol. Our results show that, although short-term toxicity of all CPAs tested was low, the presence of single CPAs in insemination mixtures at concentrations required for slow freezing greatly reduced the number of sperm reaching the spermatheca. Contrary to earlier reports, this was also true for DMSO. Ethylene glycol was additionally shown to reduce the viability of spermatozoa reaching the storage organ. Mixtures of DMSO and EthGly performed better than either substance used singly at the same concentration. We conclude that the toxicity of CPAs, including DMSO, on honey bee semen and/or queens has been underestimated in the past. This could partly explain the discrepancy between in vitro and in vivo quality of cryopreserved drone semen, described by others. Combinations of several CPAs and techniques to partly remove CPAs after thawing could help to solve this problem.

  2. The use of crossbreeding with beef bulls in dairy herds: effects on calving difficulty and gestation length.

    PubMed

    Fouz, R; Gandoy, F; Sanjuán, M L; Yus, E; Diéguez, F J

    2013-02-01

    This study was designed to analyse the evolution in the use of beef bull semen for dairy cattle insemination and, mainly, to assess calving difficulty, gestation length and proportion of stillbirths after breeding pure Holsteins or crossbreeding. Data were collected during 2004 to 2011 for 552 571 Holstein calvings (457 070 Holstein × Holstein, 43 384 Holstein × Limousine, 32 174 Holstein × Belgian Blue and 19 943 Holstein × Galician Blonde). The highest calving difficulty, compared with pure Holsteins was for crosses with Belgian Blue followed by Limousine and Galician Blonde. The Holstein × Limousine and Holstein × Galician Blonde crossbred calves had significantly longer gestation lengths than Holstein × Holstein and Holstein × Belgian Blue calves. Between the latter two, pure Holstein had the shortest gestation length. Calving difficulty and gestation length decreased as the age of the dam advanced. The most difficult calvings were observed in twin calvings, followed by the calvings of male calves and female calves. The gestations leading to the birth of male calves were longer than those leading to female calves and twin calves. Stillbirths were not related to the breed used for mating. Through examining these parameters, sire breed should be considered when selecting a beef breed for the insemination of milk-producing dams.

  3. Relationships among temperament, behavior, and growth during performance testing of bulls.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, S A; Kattesh, H G; Krawczel, P D; Kirkpatrick, F D; Saxton, A M; Rhinehart, J D; Wilkerson, J B

    2015-12-01

    Excitable cattle are dangerous to personnel and have reduced individual performance. The aim of this study was to 1) identify objective criteria for evaluating bull temperament and 2) examine relationships among temperament, behavior, and performance of bulls during an 84-d performance test. Angus bulls ( = 60) were reared in 6 pens based on BW and age. Pen scores (PS; 1 = docile and 5 = very aggressive) were assigned on d -1, 27, 55, and 83. Exit velocity (EV), BW, time to exit the chute, and order through the chute were recorded on d 0, 28, 56, and 84. The ADG was calculated for the 84-d test period, and ultrasound data and frame score calculations were recorded on d 84. Dataloggers measured steps taken, lying time, number of lying bouts, and lying bout duration of bulls ( = 27; 3 pens) from d 3 to 28 and d 59 to 84. Bulls with a d -1 PS of 1 or 2 were categorized as calm (PScalm; = 40), whereas bulls with a PS of 3 or 4 were categorized as excitable (PSexcitable; = 20). Bulls were separated into 2 groups based on the bottom 20 EV (EVcalm) and top 20 EV (EVexcitable) on d 0. Mixed model ANOVA (SAS 9.3) was used to compare groups for the two temperament assessment methods, behavior, and growth performance. Mean EV decreased ( < 0.05) by d 84. Total lying time from d 3 to 28 was greater ( < 0.05) for PScalm bulls when compared with PSexcitable bulls. However, total lying time from d 59 to 84 was greater ( < 0.05) for EVexcitable bulls when compared with EVcalm bulls. Regardless of initial contemporary group assignment, all bulls exited the chute slower ( < 0.001) on d 84 than on d 0. The PSexcitable bulls had greater ( < 0.01) frame scores and greater ADG than PScalm bulls. The PSexcitable bulls had more ( < 0.01) backfat than PScalm bulls. However, ribeye area was smaller ( < 0.01) in EVexcitable bulls than EVcalm bulls. Based on these results, bulls appeared to have habituated over the testing period. Additionally, the potential lack of innate temperament

  4. Bulls, Goats, and Pedagogy: Engaging Students in Overseas Development Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, William F. S.

    2009-01-01

    This article illustrates the profound learning that occurs--for students and instructor alike--when a class on third-world development attempts to undertake foreign aid. With undergraduate, graduate, and departmental money, I purchased bulls and carts for farmers, and goats for widows, in two West African villages. Such experiential learning…

  5. The Case for Bull Dogs and Mother Hens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Bonnie; Neugebauer, Roger

    1996-01-01

    Describes traits of effective child care team members: instigator--develops ideas; day-dream believer--suggests solutions; jester--relieves tension; mother hen--ensures fair treatment; nervous Nellie--critiques ideas; keeper of the faith--focuses on center's mission; bull dog--keeps on task; compromiser--preserves unity; and mover and…

  6. Economic evaluations of beef bulls in an integrated supply chain.

    PubMed

    Van Groningen, C; Devitt, C J B; Wilton, J W; Cranfield, J A L

    2006-12-01

    Economic benefits from the use of expected progeny of a sample of beef bulls with genetic evaluations were calculated over an integrated supply chain for combinations of price discounts for intramuscular fat and LM area. Fixed backfat finish and marketing at the point of optimized gross margins were considered. An economic model was used to calculate average expected gross margins for a sample of bulls. Across-breed, age-constant genetic evaluations were used to predict carcass characteristics of progeny including weight, retail yield, intramuscular fat, and LM area, as well as input requirements including feed and housing as a function of time on feed. Proportion of retail cuts affected by price discounts was included in the calculations. Optimizing endpoints did not affect rankings to any extent relative to a fixed end point in this sample of bulls, as a result of fixed endpoints being similar to optimized endpoints for the economic situation considered. However, rank correlations were only 0.63 and 0.71 between rankings for no discount being applied and rankings with discounts for intramuscular fat and LM area, for fixed and optimized endpoints, respectively. We conclude that market prices are necessary considerations in choices of bulls to use in commercial beef production.

  7. Exploring Essential Conditions: A Commentary on Bull et al. (2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borthwick, Arlene; Hansen, Randall; Gray, Lucy; Ziemann, Irina

    2008-01-01

    The editorial by Bull et al. (2008) on connections between informal and formal learning made explicit one element of solving what Koehler and Mishra (2008) termed a "wicked problem." This wicked (complex, ill-structured) problem involves working with teachers for effective integration of technology in support of student learning. The…

  8. Cultural Connections: Bowl with Frieze of Lions Attacking Bulls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts: The Art Education Magazine for Teachers, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This article gives a brief description of the piece of art titled "Bowl with Frieze of Lions Attacking Bulls" which is thought to be the product of a court or palace of the Neo-Assyrian period and dates to the late seventh to eighth century BC, between the reigns of Sargon and Ashurbanipal. The article highlights the piece's most notable cultural…

  9. Training Tribal Lay Advocates at Sitting Bull College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelley, W. L.

    2015-01-01

    Students in Sitting Bull College's lay advocate program develop a well-rounded understanding of the law, enabling them to represent defendants in tribal courts. The program offers legal training for its students--and illustrates how American Indian nations can broaden legal representation for Native defendants in tribal courts. It is one of only…

  10. The Bull's-Eye Values Survey: A Psychometric Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundgren, Tobias; Luoma, Jason B.; Dahl, JoAnne; Strosahl, Kirk; Melin, Lennart

    2012-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to develop and evaluate an instrument intended to identify and measure personal values, values attainment, and persistence in the face of barriers. Study 1 describes a content validity approach to the construction and preliminary validation of the Bull's Eye Values Survey (BEVS), using a sample of institutionalized…

  11. The White Bull effect: abusive coauthorship and publication parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, L

    2005-01-01

    Junior researchers can be abused and bullied by unscrupulous senior collaborators. This article describes the profile of a type of serial abuser, the White Bull, who uses his academic seniority to distort authorship credit and who disguises his parasitism with carefully premeditated deception. Further research into the personality traits of such perpetrators is warranted. PMID:16131560

  12. The White Bull effect: abusive coauthorship and publication parasitism.

    PubMed

    Kwok, L S

    2005-09-01

    Junior researchers can be abused and bullied by unscrupulous senior collaborators. This article describes the profile of a type of serial abuser, the White Bull, who uses his academic seniority to distort authorship credit and who disguises his parasitism with carefully premeditated deception. Further research into the personality traits of such perpetrators is warranted.

  13. Sitting Bull, The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoop, Faith Yingling

    Sitting Bull was a complex man, living in complicated times. A Hunkpapa Sioux, he grew up on the Great Plains of South Dakota. His early years, as described in this biography, were taken up with the hunt, forays against Crow Indians, and his development as a warrior and leader through the Vision Quest and Sun Dance. A man of considerable talents,…

  14. Single layer centrifugation (SLC) improves sperm quality of cryopreserved Blanca-Celtibérica buck semen.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Rabadán, P; Morrell, J M; Johannisson, A; Ramón, M; García-Álvarez, O; Maroto-Morales, A; Alvaro-García, P J; Pérez-Guzmán, M D; Fernández-Santos, M R; Garde, J J; Soler, A J

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of sperm selection by means of single layer centrifugation (SLC) on sperm quality after cryopreservation, either when SLC is used before freezing or after thawing, using Blanca-Celtibérica buck semen collected by electroejaculation (EE). Ejaculates from six bucks were collected by EE and divided into two aliquots. One of them (unselected) was diluted with Biladyl(®) by the two-step method and frozen over nitrogen vapor. The other aliquot was selected by the SLC technique and subsequently frozen in the same way as the unselected samples (SLC before freezing). In a further treatment, two unselected straws were thawed and SLC was carried out (SLC after thawing). At thawing, sperm motility of all samples ((i) unselected; (ii) selected before freezing and (iii) selected after thawing) was evaluated by CASA. In addition, integrity of the plasma membrane, mitochondrial membrane potential, ROS production and DNA fragmentation index were assessed by flow cytometry. Most of the sperm parameters were improved (P≤0.001) in samples selected by SLC after thawing in relation to unselected or selected by SLC before freezing. The percentage of progressive motile spermatozoa was greater (86%) for sperm samples selected after thawing compared with unselected (58%) or selected before freezing (54%). Moreover, percentages of spermatozoa with intact plasma membrane and spermatozoa with high mitochondrial membrane potential (hMMP) were also greater for sperm samples selected after thawing compared to sperm samples unselected or selected before freezing (spermatozoa with intact plasma membrane: 80% vs. 32% vs. 12%; spermatozoa with hMMP: 54% vs. 1% vs. 15%; respectively). Therefore, sperm quality after cryopreservation is improved in Blanca-Celtibérica buck ejaculates collected by EE when a sperm selection technique such as SLC is carried out after thawing.

  15. Demographic characteristics of an adfluvial bull trout population in Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCubbins, Jonathan L; Hansen, Michael J.; DosSantos, Joseph M; Dux, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Introductions of nonnative species, habitat loss, and stream fragmentation have caused the Bull Trout Salvelinus confluentus to decline throughout much of its native distribution. Consequently, in June 1998, the Bull Trout was listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act as threatened. The Bull Trout has existed in Lake Pend Oreille and its surrounding tributaries since the last ice age, and the lake once supported a world-renowned Bull Trout fishery. To quantify the current status of the Bull Trout population in Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, we compared the mean age, growth, maturity, and abundance with reports in a study conducted one decade earlier. Abundance was estimated by mark–recapture for Bull Trout caught in trap nets and gill nets set in Lake Pend Oreille during ongoing suppression netting of Lake Trout S. namaycushin 2007–2008. Bull Trout sampled in 2006–2008 were used to estimate age structure, survival, growth, and maturity. Estimated Bull Trout abundance was similar to that estimated one decade earlier in Lake Pend Oreille. Bull Trout residing in Lake Pend Oreille between 2006 and 2008 were between ages 4 and 14 years; their growth was fastest between ages 1 and 2 and slowed thereafter. Male and female Bull Trout matured at a similar age, but females grew faster than males, thereby maturing at a larger size. Our findings suggest that management has effectively addressed current threats to increase the likelihood of long-term persistence of the Bull Trout population in Lake Pend Oreille.

  16. EVALUATION OF CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE AND DNA INTEGRITY IN SPERM: AN INVESTIGATION OF REMOTE SEMEN COLLECTION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Home collection of ejaculated semen would facilitate participation rates and geographic diversity in reproductive epidemiology studies. Our study addressed concerns that home collection and overnight mail return might induce chromosome/DNA damage. We collected semen from 10 hea...

  17. Multiscale hydrogeomorphic influences on bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) spawning habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bean, Jared R; Wilcox, Andrew C.; Woessner, William W; Muhlfeld, Clint C.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated multiscale hydrogeomorphic influences on the distribution and abundance of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) spawning in snowmelt-dominated streams of the upper Flathead River basin, northwestern Montana. Within our study reaches, bull trout tended to spawn in the finest available gravel substrates. Analysis of the mobility of these substrates, based on one-dimensional hydraulic modeling and calculation of dimensionless shear stresses, indicated that bed materials in spawning reaches would be mobilized at moderate (i.e., 2-year recurrence interval) high-flow conditions, although the asynchronous timing of the fall–winter egg incubation period and typical late spring – early summer snowmelt high flows in our study area may limit susceptibility to redd scour under current hydrologic regimes. Redd occurrence also tended to be associated with concave-up bedforms (pool tailouts) with downwelling intragravel flows. Streambed temperatures tracked stream water diurnal temperature cycles to a depth of at least 25 cm, averaging 6.1–8.1 °C in different study reaches during the spawning period. Ground water provided thermal moderation of stream water for several high-density spawning reaches. Bull trout redds were more frequent in unconfined alluvial valley reaches (8.5 versus 5.0 redds·km−1 in confined valley reaches), which were strongly influenced by hyporheic and groundwater – stream water exchange. A considerable proportion of redds were patchily distributed in confined valley reaches, however, emphasizing the influence of local physical conditions in supporting bull trout spawning habitat. Moreover, narrowing or “bounding” of these alluvial valley segments did not appear to be important. Our results suggest that geomorphic, thermal, and hydrological factors influence bull trout spawning occurrence at multiple spatial scales.

  18. Frozen shoulder--an algoneurodystrophic process?

    PubMed

    Müller, L P; Rittmeister, M; John, J; Happ, J; Kerschbaumer, F

    1998-12-01

    The frozen shoulder syndrome and the Sudeck syndrome are clinically in many aspects similar. Radioisotope bone scan shows an increased uptake in the affected areas in both diseases, while standard radiographs show a progressive demineralization. With measurement of bone-mineral density by quantitative digital radiography these local decalcification processes were diagnosed in an early stage of the frozen shoulder syndrome: of 12 patients with primary frozen shoulder 10 had a bone-mineral density decrease of more than 21% in the humeral head of the affected shoulder compared to the unaffected side. In the control groups (n = 32) the difference between affected and unaffected side (left and right humerus of the healthy probands) was in only one case each above 21%. There are several indications in the literature assuming the frozen shoulder to be an algoneurodystrophic process. Our observation supports this hypothesis, and may possibly lead to earlier diagnosis and improved therapeutic management. PMID:9922549

  19. Group for frozen soil and rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The American Society for Testing and Materials wants participants for D18.19, its new subcommittee on frozen soil and rock. The group will write standards for engineering practices in northern Canada, Alaska, and other areas where soil and rock are commonly in the frozen or recently thawed state. Three standards are currently under development: axial compressive load tests o n piles in frozen soils, laboratory rate of frost-heave tests, and laboratory creep testing of frozen soil.The next D18.19 meeting is June 26 in St. Louis, Mo. Scientists who want to work on the subcommittee should contact Bill Lovell, School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47904, tel. 317-494- 5034; or Wendy Dyer, ASTM, 1916 Race Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103, tel. 215-299-5526.

  20. 7 CFR 58.349 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Requirements for Finished Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.349 Frozen cream. The flavor shall be sweet,...

  1. Chemical Effects during Storage of Frozen Foods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powrie, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses (1) characteristics, interrelationships, and distribution of food constituents (including water) in unfrozen food systems; (2) the freezing process; and (3) chemical changes in food during frozen storage. Protein alterations and lipid oxidation are emphasized. (JN)

  2. Influence of different anaesthetic protocols over the sperm quality on the fresh, chilled (4°C) and frozen-thawed epididymal sperm samples in domestic dogs.

    PubMed

    Batista, M; Vilar, J; Rosario, I; Terradas, E

    2016-10-01

    This study assessed the influence of three different anaesthetic protocols on semen quality obtained from the epididymis. Sixty male dogs undergoing to routine sterilization were assigned to three anaesthetic protocols: thiopental group (TG, n = 20), propofol group (PG, n = 20) and ketamine-dexmedetomidine group (KDG, n = 20). Immediately after orchidectomy, the cauda epididymides and vas deferent ducts were isolated and then a retrograde flushing was performed to collect spermatozoa. In experiment 1, after the initial evaluation of the semen (sperm concentration, sperm motility and the percentages of live spermatozoa, abnormal spermatozoa and acrosome membrane integrity), semen samples were diluted in Tris-glucose-egg yolk extender and chilled for 48 hr, and the sperm motility was assessed at 6, 24 and 48 hr. In experiment 2, semen samples were diluted in Tris-glucose-egg yolk extender and chilled for 24 hr, and then samples were frozen in two extenders with different glycerol concentrations, to reach a final concentration of 50-100 × 10(6) spermatozoa ml(-1) , 20% egg yolk, 0.5% Equex and 4% and 5% glycerol, respectively. Mean values of total sperm concentration, sperm viability and the percentages of intact acrosome and abnormal spermatozoa were not significantly different between experimental groups, and therefore, the anaesthetic protocols assessed did not affect sperm parameters mentioned above. However, our study confirmed a detrimental effect of the use of thiopental (TG) over the total sperm motility (p < 0.05) and progressive sperm motility (p < 0.05) of the fresh and chilled epididymal sperm samples. The anaesthetic protocols including the application of propofol or ketamine-dexmedetomidine can be used to recover sperm in domestic canids without significant changes in sperm quality compared when semen is collected routinely and these techniques could be applicable to endangered wild canids. PMID:27495735

  3. Cryopreservation of collared peccaries (Tayassu tajacu) semen using a powdered coconut water (ACP-116c) based extender plus various concentrations of egg yolk and glycerol.

    PubMed

    Silva, M A; Peixoto, G C X; Lima, G L; Bezerra, J A B; Campos, L B; Paiva, A L C; Paula, V V; Silva, A R

    2012-08-01

    The objective was to determine the effectiveness of a powdered coconut water-based extender (ACP-116c), plus various concentrations of egg-yolk and glycerol, as an alternative for cryopreservation of collared peccary semen. Twelve ejaculates were obtained from captive adult males by electroejaculation, and evaluated for sperm motility, kinetic rating, viability, morphology, and functional membrane integrity. The ejaculates were apportioned into aliquots that were diluted in Tris plus 10% egg yolk and 3% glycerol, or in ACP-116c plus 10 or 20% egg yolk and 1.5 or 3% glycerol. Samples were frozen in liquid nitrogen and, after 1 mo, thawed at 37 °C for 1 min. After thawing, samples were evaluated as reported for fresh semen, and also for sperm membrane integrity (fluorescent probes) and kinematic parameters (computerized analysis). Results were presented as means ± SEM. Freezing and thawing decreased sperm characteristics relative to fresh semen. Overall, ACP-116c plus 20% egg yolk and 3% glycerol provided better (P < 0.05) sperm motility and kinetic rating (48 ± 6.1% and 2.8 ± 0.2, respectively) after thawing than Tris extender (30.4 ± 5.7% and 2.4 ± 0.2). However, there were no differences (P > 0.05) among treatments with regard to the other sperm characteristics. Based on computerized motion analysis, total (26.5 ± 5.9%) and progressive (8.1 ± 2.2%) motility were best preserved (P < 0.05) with the above-mentioned treatment. In conclusion, a coconut water-based extender, ACP-116c, plus 20% egg yolk and 3% glycerol, was effective for cryopreservation of semen from collared peccaries.

  4. Cryopreservation of Dog Semen in a Tris Extender with 1% or 2% Soya Bean Lecithin as a Replacement of Egg Yolk.

    PubMed

    Axnér, E; Lagerson, E

    2016-04-01

    Egg yolk is usually included in extenders used for preservation of dog semen. Lecithin is an interesting animal-protein free alternative to egg yolk for semen preservation. The aim of our study was to evaluate soya bean lecithin for cryopreservation of dog semen. Five ejaculate replicates were divided in three equal parts, centrifuged and each pellet diluted with one of the three Tris-based extenders containing 20% egg yolk, 1% soya bean lecithin or 2% soya bean lecithin. Extended semen was loaded in 0.5-ml straws, cooled and diluted a second time and frozen in liquid nitrogen vapours. Sperm motility parameters (CASA), acrosome integrity (FITC-PNA/PI) and sperm membrane integrity (C-FDA) were evaluated 5 min post-thaw and after 2 and 4 h of incubation. Total motility was significantly better in the egg yolk extender than in any of the lecithin-based extender and was better in the 1% lecithin extender than in the 2% lecithin extender. Sperm membrane integrity was significantly better in the egg yolk extender than in any of the lecithin-based extenders but did not differ significantly between the 1% and 2% lecithin extenders. Acrosome integrity was significantly better in the egg yolk extender than in the 2% lecithin extender but did not differ between the egg yolk extender and the 1% lecithin extender or between the two lecithin extenders. In conclusion, egg yolk was superior to lecithin in our study. The extender with 1% lecithin preserved sperm motility better than the extender with 2% lecithin. PMID:26946310

  5. Frozen singularities in M and F theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Yuji

    2016-06-01

    We revisit the duality between ALE singularities in M-theory and 7-branes on a circle in F-theory. We see that a frozen M-theory singularity maps to a circle compactification involving a rotation of the plane transverse to the 7-brane, showing an interesting correspondence between commuting triples in simply-laced groups and Kodaira's classification of singular elliptic fibrations. Our analysis strongly suggests that the O7+ plane is the only completely frozen F-theory singularity.

  6. Correlation between lead and cadmium concentration and semen quality.

    PubMed

    Pant, N; Kumar, G; Upadhyay, A D; Gupta, Y K; Chaturvedi, P K

    2015-10-01

    There are contrary reports of association of lead and cadmium with the decline in semen quality. This study evaluates whether seminal lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) at environmental concentration are associated with altered semen quality. We conducted a study of healthy fertile and infertile men 20-43 years of age attending the Andrology Laboratory of Reproductive Biology Department for semen analysis. The semen analysis was carried out according to the WHO 2010 guidelines. Seminal lead and cadmium were estimated by ICP-AES. The lead and cadmium values were significantly higher in infertile subjects. A negative association between seminal lead or cadmium concentration and sperm concentration, sperm motility and per cent abnormal spermatozoa was found. This study shows that exposure to Pb (5.29-7.25 μg dl(-1) ) and cadmium (4.07-5.92 μg dl(-1) ) might affect semen profile in men. Age, diet, smoking and tobacco chewing habits may have an influence on the increase in exposure to Pb and Cd in the individual subjects.

  7. [In vitro assessment of semen for the prediction of fertility].

    PubMed

    Waberski, D; Petrounkina, A; Weitze, K F; Töpfer-Petersen, E

    1999-02-01

    The prediction of fertility is a primary goal in the field of reproductive medicine. The aim of the present paper is to describe the value of conventional and modern sperm analysis systems considering the process of fertilization. The classical assessment of motility and morphology enables the rough estimation of semen quality in order to select ejaculates for the use in artificial insemination. Recent methods for sperm diagnosis, such as fluorescent marking for the detection of sperm plasma membrane integrity, the hypoosmotic swelling test, and computer assisted semen analysis allow for the evaluation of a large number of spermatozoa and the assessment of sperm dynamics under in vitro-fertilization conditions. The oocyte penetration test investigates the ability of spermatozoa for capacitation, hyperactivation and acrosome reaction in vitro. The amount of specific seminal plasma proteins is related to fertility and thereby provides an additional semen evaluation method. For the use of a given semen test the specific in vitro condition has to be considered. In addition, the evaluated criteria relevant for the process of fertilization need to be defined. The combination of selected semen tests gives a higher accuracy for the prediction of fertilizing capacity compared with a single test. PMID:10077807

  8. Semen and the diagnosis of infertility in Aristotle.

    PubMed

    Trompoukis, C; Kalaitzis, C; Giannakopoulos, S; Sofikitis, N; Touloupidis, S

    2007-02-01

    Aristotle (384-322bc) was one of the leading intellectual figures of all time. In his work he systematised a massive amount of knowledge on a diverse range of subjects, including medicine. This article discusses the observations and hypotheses of this great philosopher on semen and infertility, as they are presented in his work Generation of Animals. This is combined with an evaluation of his positions in relation to those of the Hippocratic Corpus on the same subject. An extensive review of Aristotle's work Generation of Animals was performed with particular focus on his perspectives about semen and infertility. Publications referring to this work were also reviewed. According to Aristotle, semen is that which contains the principles that come from both parents when they unite. He believed that semen was formed by the secretion of nutriments by the body, developing his theories of sterility on this basic principle. A lack of fertility is attributed to genetic or acquired causes. He proposed methods for diagnosing sterility, primarily the 'water test' for men and the 'pessary' method for women. Even if his observations contain clear mistakes, such as attributing only secondary functions to male testicles and the identification of menses as women's 'seed', Aristotle's views also contain keen observations and exceptional thinking, both on the characteristics of semen and the causes of sterility (infertility).

  9. 21 CFR 160.190 - Frozen egg yolks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Frozen egg yolks. 160.190 Section 160.190 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.190 Frozen egg yolks. (a) Frozen egg yolks, frozen yolks is the food prepared by freezing egg yolks...

  10. 21 CFR 160.190 - Frozen egg yolks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Frozen egg yolks. 160.190 Section 160.190 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.190 Frozen egg yolks. (a) Frozen egg yolks, frozen yolks is the food prepared by freezing egg yolks...

  11. 21 CFR 160.190 - Frozen egg yolks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Frozen egg yolks. 160.190 Section 160.190 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.190 Frozen egg yolks. (a) Frozen egg yolks, frozen yolks is the food prepared by freezing egg yolks...

  12. 21 CFR 160.150 - Frozen egg whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... § 160.150 Frozen egg whites. (a) Frozen egg whites, frozen egg albumen is the food prepared by freezing liquid egg whites that conform to § 160.140, with such precautions that the finished food is free of viable Salmonella microorganisms. (b) When frozen egg whites are prepared from liquid egg...

  13. 21 CFR 160.150 - Frozen egg whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... § 160.150 Frozen egg whites. (a) Frozen egg whites, frozen egg albumen is the food prepared by freezing liquid egg whites that conform to § 160.140, with such precautions that the finished food is free of viable Salmonella microorganisms. (b) When frozen egg whites are prepared from liquid egg...

  14. 21 CFR 160.150 - Frozen egg whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... § 160.150 Frozen egg whites. (a) Frozen egg whites, frozen egg albumen is the food prepared by freezing liquid egg whites that conform to § 160.140, with such precautions that the finished food is free of viable Salmonella microorganisms. (b) When frozen egg whites are prepared from liquid egg...

  15. 21 CFR 160.150 - Frozen egg whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... § 160.150 Frozen egg whites. (a) Frozen egg whites, frozen egg albumen is the food prepared by freezing liquid egg whites that conform to § 160.140, with such precautions that the finished food is free of viable Salmonella microorganisms. (b) When frozen egg whites are prepared from liquid egg...

  16. 21 CFR 160.190 - Frozen egg yolks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Frozen egg yolks. 160.190 Section 160.190 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.190 Frozen egg yolks. (a) Frozen egg yolks, frozen yolks is the food prepared by freezing egg yolks...

  17. 21 CFR 146.126 - Frozen concentrate for colored lemonade.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Frozen concentrate for colored lemonade. 146.126... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.126 Frozen concentrate for colored lemonade. (a) Frozen concentrate for colored lemonade conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for frozen concentrate...

  18. 21 CFR 160.150 - Frozen egg whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... § 160.150 Frozen egg whites. (a) Frozen egg whites, frozen egg albumen is the food prepared by freezing... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frozen egg whites. 160.150 Section 160.150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  19. 21 CFR 160.190 - Frozen egg yolks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Frozen egg yolks. (a) Frozen egg yolks, frozen yolks is the food prepared by freezing egg yolks that... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frozen egg yolks. 160.190 Section 160.190 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR...

  20. Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir; White River Bull Trout Enumeration Project Summary, Progress Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Cope, R.

    2004-02-01

    This report summarizes the first year of a three-year bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) enumeration project on the White River and is a co-operative initiative of the British Columbia Ministry of Water, Land, and Air Protection and Bonneville Power Administration. The White River has been identified as an important bull trout spawning tributary of the upper Kootenay River in southeastern British Columbia. The objective was to collect information on the returning adult spawning population to the White River through the use of a fish fence and traps, and to conduct redd surveys at the conclusion of spawning to provide an index of spawning escapement and distribution. The fence was installed on September 9th, 2003 and was operated continuously (i.e. no high-water or breaching events) until the fence was removed on October 9th, 2003. Estimation of the spawning population of White River bull trout was incomplete. This was due to a larger and more protracted out-migration than expected. As a result, the bull trout spawning population of the White River was estimated to be somewhere above 899 fish. In comparison, this represents approximately one third the population estimate of the 2003 Wigwam River bull trout spawning population. Based on redd index data, the number of bull trout per redd was over twice that of the Wigwam River or Skookumchuck Creek. This was expected as the index sites on the Wigwam River and Skookumchuck Creek cover the majority of the spawning area. This is not true on the White River. From previous redd counts, it is known that there are approximately twice as many redds in Blackfoot Creek as there are in the index site. Additionally, given the large size of the White River watershed and in particular, the large number of tributaries, there is a high likelihood that important bull trout spawning areas remain unidentified. Both floy tag and radio-telemetry data for the White River bull trout have identified extensive life history migrations

  1. Analysis of chromatin integrity and DNA damage of buffalo spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, K. Gh. M.; El-Sokary, A. A. E.; Abdel-Ghaffar, A. E.; Abou El-Roos, M. E. A.; Ahmed, Y. F.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine chromatin integrity and DNA damage by DNA electrophoresis and comet assays of buffalo fresh and frozen semen. Semen samples were collected from four buffalo bulls and evaluated after freezing for semen motility, viability, sperm abnormalities, chromatin integrity and DNA damage. A significant variation was found in semen parameters after thawing. Highly significant differences (P<0.001) in chromatin integrity were observed between fresh and frozen semen. For the fresh semen, there was no significant difference between the bulls for chromatin integrity; however, a significant variation (P<0.05) was detected in their frozen semen. No DNA fragmentation was observed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The percentage of sperm with damaged DNA detected by comet assay differed significantly between fresh and frozen semen. A significant negative correlation was recorded between motility and DNA damage (r=-0.68, P<0.05). Sperm abnormalities and DNA fragmentation were significantly positively correlated (r=0.59, P<0.05). In conclusion, DNA damage evaluation can provide reassurance about genomic normalcy and guide the development of improved methods of selecting spermatozoa with intact DNA to be used in artificial insemination. PMID:27175169

  2. Analysis of chromatin integrity and DNA damage of buffalo spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, K Gh M; El-Sokary, A A E; Abdel-Ghaffar, A E; Abou El-Roos, M E A; Ahmed, Y F

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine chromatin integrity and DNA damage by DNA electrophoresis and comet assays of buffalo fresh and frozen semen. Semen samples were collected from four buffalo bulls and evaluated after freezing for semen motility, viability, sperm abnormalities, chromatin integrity and DNA damage. A significant variation was found in semen parameters after thawing. Highly significant differences (P<0.001) in chromatin integrity were observed between fresh and frozen semen. For the fresh semen, there was no significant difference between the bulls for chromatin integrity; however, a significant variation (P<0.05) was detected in their frozen semen. No DNA fragmentation was observed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The percentage of sperm with damaged DNA detected by comet assay differed significantly between fresh and frozen semen. A significant negative correlation was recorded between motility and DNA damage (r=-0.68, P<0.05). Sperm abnormalities and DNA fragmentation were significantly positively correlated (r=0.59, P<0.05). In conclusion, DNA damage evaluation can provide reassurance about genomic normalcy and guide the development of improved methods of selecting spermatozoa with intact DNA to be used in artificial insemination. PMID:27175169

  3. The effects of semen collection on fertility in captive, naturally fertile, sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, G.; Gee, G.F.; Nicolich, Jane M.; Taylor, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    We tested to see if semen collection interferes with fertility in naturally fertile pairs of cranes. We used 12 naturally fertile, Florida sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pratensis) pairs for this study, 6 control and 6 experimental. All pairs had previously produced fertile eggs. Semen was collected on Tuesday mornings and Friday afternoons from 26 February 1993 to 4 June 1993. We used standard artificial insemination methods to collect and to evaluate the semen and spermatozoa. Semen collection had minimal effect on semen quality and semen quantity. Semen volume, sperm density, sperm motility, sperm morphology, sperm viability, sperm number per collection, and male response to semen collection exhibited significant daily variation. Although semen collection began 13 days before the first egg in the experimental group, we did not observe differences in the date of first egg laid or in fertility between experimental and control groups. Also, we observed no statistically significant differences in the interval between clutches or in the percentage of broken eggs between experimental and control groups. However, 4 eggs were broken by adults during the disturbance associated with capturing birds for semen collection. We found that females with mates from which we consistently gathered better semen samples produced fewer fertile eggs than females with sires producing poorer semen samples (r = 0.60). We interpret these results to mean that males that were successfully breeding with their mates had little left at the time of our collection.

  4. Effect of the addition of two superoxide dismutase analogues (Tempo and Tempol) to alpaca semen extender for cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Santiani, Alexei; Acosta, Alexei Santiani; Evangelista, Shirley; Vargas, Shirley Evangelista; Valdivia, Martha; Cuya, Martha Valdivia; Risopatrón, Jennie; González, Jennie Risopatrón; Sánchez, Raúl; Gutiérrez, Raúl Sánchez

    2013-03-15

    The main objective was to study the effects, on sperm function, of the addition of two superoxide dismutase (SOD) analogues (Tempo and Tempol) to alpaca semen extender for cryopreservation. Twelve alpaca semen samples were collected using an artificial vagina and then diluted at a 1:3 ratio in an extender based on skim milk, egg yolk, and fructose. Each semen sample was divided into three equal parts to form the following groups: control, Tempo (1 mM), and Tempol (1 mM). Groups were cooled to 5 °C in 90 minutes (-1 °C in 3 minutes); when samples reached approximately 10 °C, SOD analogues were added to the respective groups. At 5 °C, ethylene glycol (final concentration, 0.1 M) was added to each group. After 30 minutes at 5 °C, samples were loaded in 0.25 mL plastic straws, placed in liquid nitrogen vapor for 15 minutes, and then plunged. Percentages of sperm motility, functional sperm membrane integrity, and viable sperm with intact acrosomes were evaluated before and after freeze-thaw using visual analysis, the hypoosmotic swelling test, and the double-stain trypan blue/giemsa technique, respectively. The Terminal deoxymucleotidyl transferase dUTP Nick End Labeling assay was performed for evaluation of sperm DNA fragmentation of frozen-thawed sperm. Sperm motility was higher (P < 0.05) in the Tempol and Tempo groups than in the control group (mean, 22.1%, 19.7%, and 11.2%, respectively), with similar results for functional sperm membrane integrity. Additionally, DNA fragmentation was lower (P < 0.05) in the Tempol group (16.7%) than in the control group (38.8%). Viable sperm with intact acrosomes were not affected by the use of SOD analogues. There was a negative correlation (r = -0.58) between DNA fragmentation of alpaca sperm and sperm motility after freeze-thawing, but DNA damage was neither related to functional membrane integrity nor viable sperm with intact acrosomes. We concluded that DNA fragmentation and loss of motility during cryopreservation of

  5. Association of Blood and Semen Lead and Zinc Level with Semen Parameter in the Male Partner of Infertile Couple.

    PubMed

    Fatima, P; Hossain, M M; Rahman, D; Rahman, M W; Mugni, C R; Sumon, G M; Hossain, H B; Hossain, H N

    2015-07-01

    This cross sectional study was carried out in Center for Assisted Reproduction, Dhaka, and in the Department of Biochemistry, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh from July 2012 to December 2012. The study population was 71 consecutive male partners of infertile couple suffering from at least one year of infertility. Lead and Zinc level was measured in blood and semen in the male partner of infertile couple and compared with semen parameters. Serum zinc at different values did not show any statistically significant change in semen volume, total count of sperm and total motility of sperm. At serum zinc level 80-< 90 μg/dl blood lead and semen lead level was lowest 20.6 ± 8.60 μg/dl and 48.17 ± 51.33 μg/dl respectively and showed highest total count of sperm (54.00 ± 46.67 million/ml) but was not statistically significant. Rapid linear motility and normal sperm morphology was also highest at values 80-< 90 μg/dl and was 45.33 ± 26.62% and 36.67 ± 11.60% respectively and was statistically significant. At serum zinc level > 90 μg/dl semen lead level was significantly higher (120.73 ± 58.02 μg/dl) and showed statistically significant decrease in rapid linear motility and normal sperm morphology. Total count of sperm was lowest at blood zinc level of 70-< 80 μg/dl. Sperm morphology also showed statistically significant improvement at Serum zinc values of 80-< 90 μg/dl. The results suggest that Serum zinc level of values 80-< 90 μg/dl is the optimum level to have the best impact on semen parameter as well it is the critical level at which the semen lead level is lowest. Serum zinc levels higher as well as lower than values 80-< 90 μg/dl was associated with increased semen lead values and with negative impact on semen parameters.

  6. Rotation of Boar Semen Doses During Storage Affects Sperm Quality.

    PubMed

    Schulze, M; Rüdiger, K; Waberski, D

    2015-08-01

    It is common practice to rotate boar semen doses during storage for prevention of sperm sedimentation. In this study, the effect of rotation of boar semen doses during storage on sperm quality was investigated. Manual turning twice daily and automatic rotation five times per hour resulted in the following effects: alkalinization of the BTS-extender, loss of membrane integrity at day 3, and loss of motility and changes in sperm kinematics during a thermoresistance test at day 5. Using a pH-stabilized variant of BTS extender, sperm motility and velocity decreased in continuously rotated samples, whereas membrane integrity and mitochondrial activity remain unaffected. It is concluded that rotation of semen samples adversely affects sperm quality and, therefore, should no longer be recommended for AI practice. PMID:25974759

  7. Impact of a deep saturation dive on semen quality.

    PubMed

    Aitken, R J; Buckingham, D; Richardson, D; Gardiner, J C; Irvine, D S

    2000-04-01

    The demonstration dive 'Aurora' has provided an opportunity to study the impact of extreme hyperbaric conditions on male fertility. This operation involved a 33-day diving programme during which divers were exposed to a maximum pressure of 4.6 Mega Pascals (Mpa) for 7 days. At days - 4, + 27, + 34, + 82 and + 263 relative to the initiation of the dive, semen samples were analysed to determine the quality of spermatogenesis and the functional competence of the spermatozoa. A dramatic fall in semen quality was observed in association with the dive and by day + 82 the potential fertility of the men was seriously compromised as evidenced by oligoasthenoteratozoospermic semen profiles and the poor fertilizing potential of the spermatozoa. These studies indicate, for the first time, that the severe hyperbaric conditions associated with deep saturation dives have a profound effect on male reproductive function.

  8. Analysis of PAEs in semen of infertile men

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng-Yuan; Wang, Yu; Xie, Fang-Qin; Li, Yan-Xing; Wan, Xue-Lian; Ma, Wei-Wei; Wang, De-Cai; Wu, Yong-Hui

    20