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Sample records for burkholderia xenovorans encoding

  1. Elucidating the reaction mechanism of the benzoate oxidation pathway encoded aldehyde dehydrogenase from Burkholderia xenovorans LB400

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Jasleen; Leon, Rafael; Temke, Kevin G; Boulanger, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    Oxidation of cis-3,4-dehydroadipyl-CoA semialdehyde to cis-3,4-dehydroadipyl-CoA by the aldehyde dehydrogenase, ALDHC (EC.1.2.1.77), is an essential step in the metabolism of benzoate in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400. In a previous study, we established a structural blueprint for this novel group of ALDH enzymes. Here, we build significantly on this initial work and propose a detailed reaction mechanism for ALDHC based on comprehensive structural and functional investigations of active site residues. Kinetic analyses reveal essential roles for C296 as the nucleophile and E257 as the associated general base. Structural analyses of E257Q and C296A variants suggest a dynamic charge repulsion relationship between E257 and C296 that contributes to the inherent flexibility of E257 in the native enzyme, which is further regulated by E496 and E167. A proton relay network anchored by E496 and supported by E167 and K168 serves to reset E257 for the second catalytic step. We also propose that E167, which is unique to ALDHC and its homologs, serves a critical role in presenting the catalytic water to the newly reset E257 such that the enzyme can proceed with deacylation and product release. Collectively, the reaction mechanism proposed for ALDHC promotes a greater understanding of these novel ALDH enzymes, the ALDH super-family in general, and benzoate degradation in B. xenovorans LB400. PMID:21495107

  2. chr genes from adaptive replicons are responsible for chromate resistance by Burkholderia xenovorans LB400.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Gallegos, Rosa I; Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I; Cervantes, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    The chromate ion transporter (CHR) superfamily includes proteins that confer chromate resistance by extruding toxic chromate ions from cytoplasm. Burkholderia xenovorans strain LB400 encodes six CHR homologues in its multireplicon genome and has been reported as highly chromate-resistant. The objective of this work was to analyze the involvement of chr redundant genes in chromate resistance by LB400. It was found that B. xenovorans plant rhizosphere strains lacking the megaplasmid are chromate-sensitive, suggesting that the chr gene present in this replicon is responsible for the chromate-resistance phenotype of the LB400 strain. Transformation of a chromate-sensitive B. xenovorans strain with each of the six cloned LB400 chr genes showed that genes from 'adaptive replicons' (chrA1b and chr1NCb from chromosome 2 and chrA2 from the megaplasmid) conferred higher chromate resistance levels than chr genes from 'central' chromosome 1 (chrA1a, chrA6, and chr1NCa). An LB400 insertion mutant affected in the chrA2 gene displayed a chromate-sensitive phenotype, which was fully reverted by transferring the chrA2 wild-type gene, and partially reverted by chrA1b or chr1NCb genes. These data indicate that chr genes from adaptive replicons, mainly chrA2 from the megaplasmid, are responsible for the B. xenovorans LB400 chromate-resistance phenotype.

  3. The Homogentisate and Homoprotocatechuate Central Pathways Are Involved in 3- and 4-Hydroxyphenylacetate Degradation by Burkholderia xenovorans LB400

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Valentina; Agulló, Loreine; González, Myriam; Seeger, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background Genome characterization of the model PCB-degrading bacterium Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 revealed the presence of eleven central pathways for aromatic compounds degradation, among them, the homogentisate and the homoprotocatechuate pathways. However, the functionality of these central pathways in strain LB400 has not been assessed and related peripheral pathways has not been described. Methodology/Principal Findings The aims of this study were to determine the functionality of the homogentisate and homoprotocatechuate central pathways in B. xenovorans LB400 and to establish their role in 3-hydroxyphenylacetate (3-HPA) and 4-hydroxyphenylacetate (4-HPA) catabolism. Strain LB400 was able to grow using 3-HPA and 4-HPA as sole carbon source. A genomic search in LB400 suggested the presence of mhaAB and hpaBC genes clusters encoding proteins of the 3-hydroxyphenylacetate and 4-hydroxyphenylacetate peripheral pathways. LB400 cells grown with 3-HPA and 4-HPA degraded homogentisate and homoprotocatechuate and showed homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase and homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase activities. Transcriptional analyses by RT-PCR showed the expression of two chromosomally-encoded homogentisate dioxygenases (BxeA2725 and BxeA3900) and the hpaD gene encoding the homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase during 3-HPA and 4-HPA degradation. The proteome analyses by two-dimensional polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis of B. xenovorans LB400 grown in 3-HPA and 4-HPA showed the induction of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase HmgB (BxeA3899). Conclusions/Significance This study revealed that strain LB400 used both homogentisate and homoprotocatechuate ring-cleavage pathways for 3- hydroxyphenylacetate and 4-hydroxyphenylacetate catabolism and that these four catabolic routes are functional, confirming the metabolic versatility of B. xenovorans LB400. PMID:21423751

  4. Mesaconase Activity of Class I Fumarase Contributes to Mesaconate Utilization by Burkholderia xenovorans.

    PubMed

    Kronen, Miriam; Sasikaran, Jahminy; Berg, Ivan A

    2015-08-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Yersinia pestis, and many other bacteria are able to utilize the C5-dicarboxylic acid itaconate (methylenesuccinate). Itaconate degradation starts with its activation to itaconyl coenzyme A (itaconyl-CoA), which is further hydrated to (S)-citramalyl-CoA, and citramalyl-CoA is finally cleaved into acetyl-CoA and pyruvate. The xenobiotic-degrading betaproteobacterium Burkholderia xenovorans possesses a P. aeruginosa-like itaconate degradation gene cluster and is able to grow on itaconate and its isomer mesaconate (methylfumarate). Although itaconate degradation proceeds in B. xenovorans in the same way as in P. aeruginosa, the pathway of mesaconate utilization is not known. Here, we show that mesaconate is metabolized through its hydration to (S)-citramalate. The latter compound is then metabolized to acetyl-CoA and pyruvate with the participation of two enzymes of the itaconate degradation pathway, a promiscuous itaconate-CoA transferase able to activate (S)-citramalate in addition to itaconate and (S)-citramalyl-CoA lyase. The first reaction of the pathway, the mesaconate hydratase (mesaconase) reaction, is catalyzed by a class I fumarase. As this enzyme (Bxe_A3136) has similar efficiencies (kcat/Km) for both fumarate and mesaconate hydration, we conclude that B. xenovorans class I fumarase is in fact a promiscuous fumarase/mesaconase. This promiscuity is physiologically relevant, as it allows the growth of this bacterium on mesaconate as a sole carbon and energy source.

  5. Mesaconase Activity of Class I Fumarase Contributes to Mesaconate Utilization by Burkholderia xenovorans

    PubMed Central

    Kronen, Miriam; Sasikaran, Jahminy

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Yersinia pestis, and many other bacteria are able to utilize the C5-dicarboxylic acid itaconate (methylenesuccinate). Itaconate degradation starts with its activation to itaconyl coenzyme A (itaconyl-CoA), which is further hydrated to (S)-citramalyl-CoA, and citramalyl-CoA is finally cleaved into acetyl-CoA and pyruvate. The xenobiotic-degrading betaproteobacterium Burkholderia xenovorans possesses a P. aeruginosa-like itaconate degradation gene cluster and is able to grow on itaconate and its isomer mesaconate (methylfumarate). Although itaconate degradation proceeds in B. xenovorans in the same way as in P. aeruginosa, the pathway of mesaconate utilization is not known. Here, we show that mesaconate is metabolized through its hydration to (S)-citramalate. The latter compound is then metabolized to acetyl-CoA and pyruvate with the participation of two enzymes of the itaconate degradation pathway, a promiscuous itaconate-CoA transferase able to activate (S)-citramalate in addition to itaconate and (S)-citramalyl-CoA lyase. The first reaction of the pathway, the mesaconate hydratase (mesaconase) reaction, is catalyzed by a class I fumarase. As this enzyme (Bxe_A3136) has similar efficiencies (kcat/Km) for both fumarate and mesaconate hydration, we conclude that B. xenovorans class I fumarase is in fact a promiscuous fumarase/mesaconase. This promiscuity is physiologically relevant, as it allows the growth of this bacterium on mesaconate as a sole carbon and energy source. PMID:26070669

  6. [Enhanced aerobic degradation of low chlorinated biphenyls by constructing surfactants Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 based system].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Yi; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Han; Ren, Yuan

    2014-10-01

    It has been proposed that the increasing of water solubility of PCBs can enhance the biodegradation efficiency. The biodegradation system of PCBs by Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 in the presence of different surfactants, namely TX-100, Tween 80, RL crude and HPCD were established to investigate the effect of surfactants on the biodegradation of hydrophobic organic compounds. The results indicated that the water solubility ratios of PCB5 and PCB31 were 54.7%-100%, 59.8%-100%; 10.5%-40.8%, 6.8%-31.6%; 10.3%-19.9%, 3.3%-11.6% and 19.5%-34.2%, 4.2%-10.7%, which were accordingly enhanced by TX-100 (CMC = 194 mg · L(-1)), Tween 80 (CMC =13.1 mg · L(-1)), and RL crude (CMC = 50 mg · L(-1)) with concentrations of 1-7 CMC, respectively and HPCD with concentrations of 500-1,500 mg · L(-1). Moreover, the growth inhibition ratio of B. xenovorans LB400 was 30.3%-45.8% with TX-100 concentration of 1-7 CMC, while it was 10.0%-15.4% for Tween 80 with concentration of 0.1-1 CMC; RL crude could boost the growth of strain LB400 as substrate while HPCD exerted no impact on it. The addition of surfactants can improve the biodegradation ratios of PCB31 (5 mg · L(-1)) by 23.7%-65.5% for TX-100, 14.6%-44.3% for Tween 80, 9.6%- 27.2% for RL crude and 15.3%-20.7% for HPCD depending on the surfactant concentrations, while it had minor effects on the biodegradation ratios of PCB5 (10 mg · L(-1)). It is concluded that the promoting effects of surfactant on PCBs biodegradation are mainly due to the increased concentrations of PCBs-surfactant micelles in aqueous solution and when TX-100 and Tween 80 concentrations are set as 1 and 7 CMC, the biodegradation ratios of PCB31 can achieve 100% and 81.7% , while the growth inhibition ratios of B. xenovorans LB400 are 30.3% and 5.4%, respectively.

  7. Enhanced Polychlorinated Biphenyl Removal in a Switchgrass Rhizosphere by Bioaugmentation with Burkholderia xenovorans LB400

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yi; Meggo, Richard; Hu, Dingfei; Schnoor, Jerald L.; Mattes, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Phytoremediation makes use of plants and associated microorganisms to clean up soils and sediments contaminated with inorganic and organic pollutants. In this study, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) was used to test for its efficiency in improving the removal of three specific polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners (PCB 52, 77 and 153) in soil microcosms. The congeners were chosen for their ubiquity, toxicity, and recalcitrance. After 24 weeks of incubation, loss of 39.9 ± 0.41% of total PCB molar mass was observed in switchgrass treated soil, significantly higher than in unplanted soil (29.5 ± 3.4%) (p<0.05). The improved PCB removal in switchgrass treated soils could be explained by phytoextraction processes and enhanced microbial activity in the rhizosphere. Bioaugmentation with Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 was performed to further enhance aerobic PCB degradation. The presence of LB400 was associated with improved degradation of PCB 52, but not PCB 77 or PCB 153. Increased abundances of bphA (a functional gene that codes for a subunit of PCB-degrading biphenyl dioxygenase in bacteria) and its transcript were observed after bioaugmentation. The highest total PCB removal was observed in switchgrass treated soil with LB400 bioaugmentation (47.3 ± 1.22 %), and the presence of switchgrass facilitated LB400 survival in the soil. Overall, our results suggest the combined use of phytoremediation and bioaugmentation could be an efficient and sustainable strategy to eliminate recalcitrant PCB congeners and remediate PCB-contaminated soil. PMID:25246731

  8. Genomic and Functional Analyses of the 2-Aminophenol Catabolic Pathway and Partial Conversion of Its Substrate into Picolinic Acid in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400

    PubMed Central

    Agulló, Loreine; González, Myriam; Seeger, Michael

    2013-01-01

    2-aminophenol (2-AP) is a toxic nitrogen-containing aromatic pollutant. Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 possess an amn gene cluster that encodes the 2-AP catabolic pathway. In this report, the functionality of the 2-aminophenol pathway of B. xenovorans strain LB400 was analyzed. The amnRJBACDFEHG cluster located at chromosome 1 encodes the enzymes for the degradation of 2-aminophenol. The absence of habA and habB genes in LB400 genome correlates with its no growth on nitrobenzene. RT-PCR analyses in strain LB400 showed the co-expression of amnJB, amnBAC, amnACD, amnDFE and amnEHG genes, suggesting that the amn cluster is an operon. RT-qPCR showed that the amnB gene expression was highly induced by 2-AP, whereas a basal constitutive expression was observed in glucose, indicating that these amn genes are regulated. We propose that the predicted MarR-type transcriptional regulator encoded by the amnR gene acts as repressor of the amn gene cluster using a MarR-type regulatory binding sequence. This report showed that LB400 resting cells degrade completely 2-AP. The amn gene cluster from strain LB400 is highly identical to the amn gene cluster from P. knackmussi strain B13, which could not grow on 2-AP. However, we demonstrate that B. xenovorans LB400 is able to grow using 2-AP as sole nitrogen source and glucose as sole carbon source. An amnBA− mutant of strain LB400 was unable to grow with 2-AP as nitrogen source and glucose as carbon source and to degrade 2-AP. This study showed that during LB400 growth on 2-AP this substrate was partially converted into picolinic acid (PA), a well-known antibiotic. The addition of PA at lag or mid-exponential phase inhibited LB400 growth. The MIC of PA for strain LB400 is 2 mM. Overall, these results demonstrate that B. xenovorans strain LB400 posses a functional 2-AP catabolic central pathway, which could lead to the production of picolinic acid. PMID:24124510

  9. Genetic and genomic insights into the role of benzoate-catabolic pathway redundancy in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400.

    PubMed

    Denef, V J; Klappenbach, J A; Patrauchan, M A; Florizone, C; Rodrigues, J L M; Tsoi, T V; Verstraete, W; Eltis, L D; Tiedje, J M

    2006-01-01

    Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of Burkholderia xenovorans LB400, a potent polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) degrader, have implicated growth substrate- and phase-dependent expression of three benzoate-catabolizing pathways: a catechol ortho cleavage (ben-cat) pathway and two benzoyl-coenzyme A pathways, encoded by gene clusters on the large chromosome (boxC) and the megaplasmid (boxM). To elucidate the significance of this apparent redundancy, we constructed mutants with deletions of the ben-cat pathway (the DeltabenABCD::kan mutant), the boxC pathway (the DeltaboxABC::kan mutant), and both pathways (the DeltabenABCDDelta boxABC::kan mutant). All three mutants oxidized benzoate in resting-cell assays. However, the DeltabenABCD::kan and DeltabenABCD DeltaboxABC::kan mutants grew at reduced rates on benzoate and displayed increased lag phases. By contrast, growth on succinate, on 4-hydroxybenzoate, and on biphenyl was unaffected. Microarray and proteomic analyses revealed that cells of the DeltabenABCD::kan mutant growing on benzoate expressed both box pathways. Overall, these results indicate that all three pathways catabolize benzoate. Deletion of benABCD abolished the ability of LB400 to grow using 3-chlorobenzoate. None of the benzoate pathways could degrade 2- or 4-chlorobenzoate, indicating that the pathway redundancy does not directly contribute to LB400's PCB-degrading capacities. Finally, an extensive sigmaE-regulated oxidative stress response not present in wild-type LB400 grown on benzoate was detected in these deletion mutants, supporting our earlier suggestion that the box pathways are preferentially active under reduced oxygen tension. Our data further substantiate the expansive network of tightly interconnected and complexly regulated aromatic degradation pathways in LB400. PMID:16391095

  10. Genomic and Functional Analyses of the Gentisate and Protocatechuate Ring-Cleavage Pathways and Related 3-Hydroxybenzoate and 4-Hydroxybenzoate Peripheral Pathways in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Silva, María José; Méndez, Valentina; Agulló, Loreine; Seeger, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the gentisate and protocatechuate pathways in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 were analyzed by genomic and functional approaches, and their role in 3-hydroxybenzoate (3-HBA) and 4-hydroxybenzoate (4-HBA) degradation was proposed. The LB400 genome possesses two identical mhbRTDHI gene clusters encoding the gentisate pathway and one mhbM gene encoding a 3-HBA 6-hydroxylase that converts 3-HBA into gentisate. The pca genes encoding the protocatechuate pathway and the pobA gene encoding the 4-HBA 3-monooxygenase that oxidizes 4-HBA into protocatechuate are arranged in gene clusters and single genes mainly at the minor chromosome, but also at the major chromosome and the megaplasmid. Strain LB400 was able to grow on gentisate, protocatechuate, 3-HBA and 4-HBA. Transcriptional analyses showed that the mhbD gene encoding the gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase was expressed during growth on 3-HBA, 4-HBA and gentisate, whereas the pcaG gene encoding the protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase was expressed only during growth on 4-HBA and protocatechuate. The mhbM gene encoding the 3-HBA 6-hydroxylase was transcribed in strain LB400 during growth on HBAs, gentisate, protocatechuate and glucose. The pobA gene encoding the 4-HBA 3-monooxygenase was expressed during growth on HBAs and glucose. 3-HBA- and 4-HBA-grown LB400 cells showed gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase activity, whereas protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase activity was observed only in 4-HBA-grown cells. The mhbR gene encoding a MarR-type transcriptional regulator that probably regulates the expression of the MhbT transporter, and the pcaQ and pcaR genes encoding LysR-type transcriptional regulators that regulate pcaHG and pcaIJBDC genes, respectively, were transcribed during growth on both HBAs, gentisate, protocatechuate and glucose, suggesting a basal constitutive expression. The results indicate active gentisate, protocatechuate, 3-HBA and 4-HBA catabolic pathways in B. xenovorans LB400 and suggest that 3-HBA is channeled

  11. The Three-Species Consortium of Genetically Improved Strains Cupriavidus necator RW112, Burkholderia xenovorans RW118, and Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes RW120 Grows with Technical Polychlorobiphenyl, Aroclor 1242

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Sánchez, Verónica; Lang, Elke; Wittich, Regina-Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia xenovorans LB400, Cupriavidus necator H850, and Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707 are bacterial strains able to mineralize biphenyl and to co-oxidize many of its halogenated derivatives (PCBs). Only strain LB400 also mineralizes a few mono- and dichlorobiphenyls, due to the presence of a functioning chlorocatechol pathway. Here, we used a Tn5-based minitransposon shuttle system to chromosomically introduce genes tcbRCDEF, encoding the chlorocatechol pathway into KF707, and genes cbdABC encoding a 2-chlorobenzoate 1,2-dioxygenase into KF707 and LB400, as well as transposon Tn4653 from the TOL plasmid, providing genes xylXYZL, encoding a broad-range toluate (methylbenzoate) dioxygenase and its dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, to extend the range for the mineralization of halogenated benzoates in LB400 and in KF707 through co-oxidation of halobenzoates into chlorocatechols. The engineered derivatives of LB400 and KF707 thus gained the ability for the mineralization of all isomeric monochloro- and bromobenzoates of the so-called lower pathway which, consequently, also allowed the mineralization of all monochlorobiphenyls and a number of di- and trichlorobiphenyls, thus preventing the accumulation of halobenzoates and of catabolites thereof. LB400 and KF707 also grow with the two commercial PCB formulations, Aroclor 1221 and Aroclor 1232, as the sole carbon and energy sources, but not with higher halogenated PCB mixtures, similar to the already published strain RW112. Repeated exposition of the modified LB400 to short pulses of UV light, over a prolonged period of time, allowed the isolation of a derivative of LB400, termed RW118, capable of growth with Aroclor 1016 still containing only traces of biphenyl, and in co-culture with modified KF707 termed RW120, and modified H850 (RW112) with Aroclor 1242, the commercial mixture already void of biphenyl and monochlorobiphenyls. PMID:23658554

  12. Identification and In-vivo Characterization of a Novel OhrR Transcriptional Regulator in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nguyen, Tinh T.; Martí-Arbona, Ricardo; Hall, Richard S.; Maity, Tuhin; Valdez, Yolanda E.; Dunbar, John M.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Unkefer, Pat J.

    2013-05-21

    Transcriptional regulators (TRs) are an important and versatile group of proteins, yet very little progress has been achieved towards the discovery and annotation of their biological functions. We have characterized a previously unknown organic hydroperoxide resistance regulator from Burkholderia xenovoransLB400, Bxe_B2842, which is homologous to E. coli’s OhrR. Bxe_B2842 regulates the expression of an organic hydroperoxide resistance protein (OsmC). We utilized frontal affinity chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (FAC-MS) and electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays (EMSA) to identify and characterize the possible effectors of the regulation by Bxe_B2842. Without an effector, Bxe_B2842 binds a DNA operator sequence (DOS) upstream ofmore » osmC. FAC-MS results suggest that 2-aminophenol binds to the protein and is potentially an effector molecule. EMSA analysis shows that 2-aminophenol also attenuates the Bxe_B2842’s affinity for its DOS. EMSA analysis also shows that organic peroxides attenuate Bxe_B2842/DOS affinity, suggesting that binding of the TR to its DOS is regulated by the two-cysteine mechanism, common to TRs in this family. Bxe_B2842 is the first OhrR TR to have both oxidative and effector-binding mechanisms of regulation. Our paper reveals further mechanistic diversity TR mediated gene regulation and provides insights into methods for function discovery of TRs.« less

  13. Identification and In-vivo Characterization of a Novel OhrR Transcriptional Regulator in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Tinh T.; Martí-Arbona, Ricardo; Hall, Richard S.; Maity, Tuhin; Valdez, Yolanda E.; Dunbar, John M.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Unkefer, Pat J.

    2013-05-21

    Transcriptional regulators (TRs) are an important and versatile group of proteins, yet very little progress has been achieved towards the discovery and annotation of their biological functions. We have characterized a previously unknown organic hydroperoxide resistance regulator from Burkholderia xenovoransLB400, Bxe_B2842, which is homologous to E. coli’s OhrR. Bxe_B2842 regulates the expression of an organic hydroperoxide resistance protein (OsmC). We utilized frontal affinity chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (FAC-MS) and electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays (EMSA) to identify and characterize the possible effectors of the regulation by Bxe_B2842. Without an effector, Bxe_B2842 binds a DNA operator sequence (DOS) upstream of osmC. FAC-MS results suggest that 2-aminophenol binds to the protein and is potentially an effector molecule. EMSA analysis shows that 2-aminophenol also attenuates the Bxe_B2842’s affinity for its DOS. EMSA analysis also shows that organic peroxides attenuate Bxe_B2842/DOS affinity, suggesting that binding of the TR to its DOS is regulated by the two-cysteine mechanism, common to TRs in this family. Bxe_B2842 is the first OhrR TR to have both oxidative and effector-binding mechanisms of regulation. Our paper reveals further mechanistic diversity TR mediated gene regulation and provides insights into methods for function discovery of TRs.

  14. Genetic and Functional Analysis of the Biosynthesis of a Non-Ribosomal Peptide Siderophore in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Straube, María José; Cámara, Beatriz; Tello, Mario; Montero-Silva, Francisco; Cárdenas, Franco; Seeger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    B. xenovorans LB400 is a model bacterium for the study of the metabolism of aromatic compounds. The aim of this study was the genomic and functional characterization of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase containing gene cluster that encodes a siderophore in B. xenovorans LB400. The mba gene cluster from strain LB400 encodes proteins involved in the biosynthesis and transport of a hydroxamate-type siderophore. Strain LB400 has a unique mba gene organization, although mba gene clusters have been observed in diverse Burkholderiales. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of promoters in the mba gene cluster that strongly suggest regulation by the ferric uptake regulator protein (Fur) and by the alternative RNA polymerase extracytoplasmic function sigma factor MbaF. Reverse transcriptase PCR analyses showed the expression of iron-regulated transcriptional units mbaFGHIJKL, mbaN, mbaABCE, mbaO, mbaP and mbaD genes under iron limitation. Chrome azurol S (CAS) assay strongly suggests that strain LB400 synthesized a siderophore under iron limitation. Mass spectrometry ESI-MS and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses revealed that the siderophore is a non-ribosomal peptide, and forms an iron complex with a molecular mass of 676 Da. Based on bioinformatic prediction, CAS assay and MS analyses, we propose that the siderophore is L-Nδ-hydroxy-Nδ-formylOrn-D-β-hydroxyAsp-L-Ser-L-Nδ-hydroxy-Nδ-formylOrn-1,4-diaminobutane that is closely related to malleobactin-type siderophores reported in B. thailandensis. PMID:26963250

  15. Genetic and Functional Analysis of the Biosynthesis of a Non-Ribosomal Peptide Siderophore in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Straube, María José; Cámara, Beatriz; Tello, Mario; Montero-Silva, Francisco; Cárdenas, Franco; Seeger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    B. xenovorans LB400 is a model bacterium for the study of the metabolism of aromatic compounds. The aim of this study was the genomic and functional characterization of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase containing gene cluster that encodes a siderophore in B. xenovorans LB400. The mba gene cluster from strain LB400 encodes proteins involved in the biosynthesis and transport of a hydroxamate-type siderophore. Strain LB400 has a unique mba gene organization, although mba gene clusters have been observed in diverse Burkholderiales. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of promoters in the mba gene cluster that strongly suggest regulation by the ferric uptake regulator protein (Fur) and by the alternative RNA polymerase extracytoplasmic function sigma factor MbaF. Reverse transcriptase PCR analyses showed the expression of iron-regulated transcriptional units mbaFGHIJKL, mbaN, mbaABCE, mbaO, mbaP and mbaD genes under iron limitation. Chrome azurol S (CAS) assay strongly suggests that strain LB400 synthesized a siderophore under iron limitation. Mass spectrometry ESI-MS and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses revealed that the siderophore is a non-ribosomal peptide, and forms an iron complex with a molecular mass of 676 Da. Based on bioinformatic prediction, CAS assay and MS analyses, we propose that the siderophore is L-Nδ-hydroxy-Nδ-formylOrn-D-β-hydroxyAsp-L-Ser-L-Nδ-hydroxy-Nδ-formylOrn-1,4-diaminobutane that is closely related to malleobactin-type siderophores reported in B. thailandensis.

  16. Anaerobic crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction data of biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase from Burkholderia xenovorans LB400: addition of agarose improved the quality of the crystals

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pravindra; Gómez-Gil, Leticia; Mohammadi, Mahmood; Sylvestre, Michel; Eltis, Lindsay D.; Bolin, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    Biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase (BPDO; EC 1.14.12.18) catalyzes the initial step in the degradation of biphenyl and some polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). BPDOLB400, the terminal dioxygenase component from Burkholderia xenovorans LB400, a proteobacterial species that degrades a broad range of PCBs, has been crystallized under anaerobic conditions by sitting-drop vapour diffusion. Initial crystals obtained using various polyethylene glycols as precipitating agents diffracted to very low resolution (∼8 Å) and the recorded reflections were diffuse and poorly shaped. The quality of the crystals was significantly improved by the addition of 0.2% agarose to the crystallization cocktail. In the presence of agarose, wild-type BPDOLB400 crystals that diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution grew in space group P1. Crystals of the BPDOP4 and BPDORR41 variants of BPDOLB400 grew in space group P21. PMID:21206025

  17. Degradation of 4-nitrocatechol by Burkholderia cepacia: a plasmid-encoded novel pathway.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, A; Samanta, S K; Jain, R K

    2000-05-01

    Pseudomonas cepacia RKJ200 (now described as Burkholderia cepacia) has been shown to utilize p-nitrophenol (PNP) as sole carbon and energy source. The present work demonstrates that RKJ200 utilizes 4-nitrocatechol (NC) as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen and energy, and is degraded with concomitant release of nitrite ions. Several lines of evidence, including thin layer chromatography, gas chromatography, 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, spectral analyses and quantification of intermediates by high performance liquid chromatography, have shown that NC is degraded via 1,2, 4-benzenetriol (BT) and hydroquinone (HQ) formation. Studies carried out on a PNP- derivative and a PNP+ transconjugant also demonstrate that the genes for the NC degradative pathway reside on the plasmid present in RKJ200; the same plasmid had earlier been shown to encode genes for PNP degradation, which is also degraded via HQ formation. It is likely, therefore, that the same sets of genes encode the further metabolism of HQ in NC and PNP degradation.

  18. The pobA gene of Burkholderia cenocepacia encodes a group I Sfp-type phosphopantetheinyltransferase required for biosynthesis of the siderophores ornibactin and pyochelin.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Atif H; Shastri, Sravanthi; Dave, Emma; Wowk, Irena; Agnoli, Kirsty; Cook, Anne M; Thomas, Mark S

    2011-02-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia produces the siderophores ornibactin and pyochelin under iron-restricted conditions. Biosynthesis of both siderophores requires the involvement of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). Using a transposon containing the lacZ reporter gene, two B. cenocepacia mutants were isolated which were deficient in siderophore production. Mutant IW10 was shown to produce normal amounts of ornibactin but only trace amounts of pyochelin, whereas synthesis of both siderophores was abolished in AHA27. Growth of AHA27, but not IW10, was inhibited under iron-restricted conditions. In both mutants, the transposon had integrated into the pobA gene, which encodes a polypeptide exhibiting similarity to the Sfp-type phosphopantetheinyltransferases (PPTases). These enzymes are responsible for activation of NRPSs by the covalent attachment of the 4'-phosphopantetheine (P-pant) moiety of coenzyme A. Previously characterized PPTase genes from other bacteria were shown to efficiently complement both mutants for siderophore production when provided in trans. The B. cenocepacia pobA gene was also able to efficiently complement an Escherichia coli entD mutant for production of the siderophore enterobactin. Using mutant IW10, in which the lacZ gene carried by the transposon is inserted in the same orientation as pobA, it was shown that pobA is not appreciably iron-regulated. Finally, we confirmed that Sfp-type bacterial PPTases can be subdivided into two distinct groups, and we present the amino acid signature sequences which characterize each of these groups. PMID:20966087

  19. Systematic Mutagenesis of Genes Encoding Predicted Autotransported Proteins of Burkholderia pseudomallei Identifies Factors Mediating Virulence in Mice, Net Intracellular Replication and a Novel Protein Conferring Serum Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Natalie R. Lazar; Stevens, Mark P.; Dean, Rachel E.; Saint, Richard J.; Pankhania, Depesh; Prior, Joann L.; Atkins, Timothy P.; Kessler, Bianca; Nithichanon, Arnone; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Galyov, Edouard E.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of the severe tropical disease melioidosis, which commonly presents as sepsis. The B. pseudomallei K96243 genome encodes eleven predicted autotransporters, a diverse family of secreted and outer membrane proteins often associated with virulence. In a systematic study of these autotransporters, we constructed insertion mutants in each gene predicted to encode an autotransporter and assessed them for three pathogenesis-associated phenotypes: virulence in the BALB/c intra-peritoneal mouse melioidosis model, net intracellular replication in J774.2 murine macrophage-like cells and survival in 45% (v/v) normal human serum. From the complete repertoire of eleven autotransporter mutants, we identified eight mutants which exhibited an increase in median lethal dose of 1 to 2-log10 compared to the isogenic parent strain (bcaA, boaA, boaB, bpaA, bpaC, bpaE, bpaF and bimA). Four mutants, all demonstrating attenuation for virulence, exhibited reduced net intracellular replication in J774.2 macrophage-like cells (bimA, boaB, bpaC and bpaE). A single mutant (bpaC) was identified that exhibited significantly reduced serum survival compared to wild-type. The bpaC mutant, which demonstrated attenuation for virulence and net intracellular replication, was sensitive to complement-mediated killing via the classical and/or lectin pathway. Serum resistance was rescued by in trans complementation. Subsequently, we expressed recombinant proteins of the passenger domain of four predicted autotransporters representing each of the phenotypic groups identified: those attenuated for virulence (BcaA), those attenuated for virulence and net intracellular replication (BpaE), the BpaC mutant with defects in virulence, net intracellular replication and serum resistance and those displaying wild-type phenotypes (BatA). Only BcaA and BpaE elicited a strong IFN-γ response in a restimulation assay using whole blood from seropositive donors and were

  20. Systematic mutagenesis of genes encoding predicted autotransported proteins of Burkholderia pseudomallei identifies factors mediating virulence in mice, net intracellular replication and a novel protein conferring serum resistance.

    PubMed

    Lazar Adler, Natalie R; Stevens, Mark P; Dean, Rachel E; Saint, Richard J; Pankhania, Depesh; Prior, Joann L; Atkins, Timothy P; Kessler, Bianca; Nithichanon, Arnone; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Galyov, Edouard E

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of the severe tropical disease melioidosis, which commonly presents as sepsis. The B. pseudomallei K96243 genome encodes eleven predicted autotransporters, a diverse family of secreted and outer membrane proteins often associated with virulence. In a systematic study of these autotransporters, we constructed insertion mutants in each gene predicted to encode an autotransporter and assessed them for three pathogenesis-associated phenotypes: virulence in the BALB/c intra-peritoneal mouse melioidosis model, net intracellular replication in J774.2 murine macrophage-like cells and survival in 45% (v/v) normal human serum. From the complete repertoire of eleven autotransporter mutants, we identified eight mutants which exhibited an increase in median lethal dose of 1 to 2-log10 compared to the isogenic parent strain (bcaA, boaA, boaB, bpaA, bpaC, bpaE, bpaF and bimA). Four mutants, all demonstrating attenuation for virulence, exhibited reduced net intracellular replication in J774.2 macrophage-like cells (bimA, boaB, bpaC and bpaE). A single mutant (bpaC) was identified that exhibited significantly reduced serum survival compared to wild-type. The bpaC mutant, which demonstrated attenuation for virulence and net intracellular replication, was sensitive to complement-mediated killing via the classical and/or lectin pathway. Serum resistance was rescued by in trans complementation. Subsequently, we expressed recombinant proteins of the passenger domain of four predicted autotransporters representing each of the phenotypic groups identified: those attenuated for virulence (BcaA), those attenuated for virulence and net intracellular replication (BpaE), the BpaC mutant with defects in virulence, net intracellular replication and serum resistance and those displaying wild-type phenotypes (BatA). Only BcaA and BpaE elicited a strong IFN-γ response in a restimulation assay using whole blood from seropositive donors and were

  1. Enhanced degradation of haloacid by heterologous expression in related Burkholderia species.

    PubMed

    Su, Xianbin; Deng, Liyu; Kong, Ka Fai; Tsang, Jimmy S H

    2013-10-01

    Haloacids are environmental pollutant and can be transformed to non-toxic alkanoic acids by microbial dehalogenase. Bacterium Burkholderia species MBA4 was enriched from soil for its ability to bioremediate haloacids such as mono-chloroacetate (MCA), mono-bromoacetate (MBA), 2-mono-chloropropionate, and 2-mono-bromopropionate. MBA4 produces an inducible dehalogenase Deh4a that catalyzes the dehalogenation process. The growth of MBA4 on haloacid also relies on the presence of a haloacid-uptake system. Similar dehalogenase genes can be found in the genome of many related species. However, wildtype Burkholderia caribensis MWAP64, Burkholderia phymatum STM815, and Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 were not able to grow on MCA. When a plasmid containing the regulatory and structural gene of Deh4a was transformed to these species, they were able to grow on haloacid. The specific enzyme activities in these recombinants ranges from 2- to 30-fold that of MBA4 in similar condition. Reverse transcription-quantitative real-time PCR showed that the relative transcript levels in these recombinant strains ranges from 9 to over 1,600 times that of MBA4 in similar condition. A recombinant has produced nearly five times of dehalogenase that MBA4 could ever achieve. While the expressions of Deh4a were more relaxed in these phylogenetically related species, an MCA-uptake activity was found to be inducible. These metabolically engineered strains are better degraders than the haloacid-enriched MBA4.

  2. Burkholderia xernovorans LB400 harbors a multi-replicon, 9.73-Mbp genome shaped for versatility

    SciTech Connect

    Chain, Patrick S. G.; Denef, Vincent; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T; Vergez, Lisa; Agullo, Loreine; Reyes, Valeria Latorre; Hauser, Loren John; Cordova, Macarena; Gomez, Luis; Gonzalez, Myriam; Land, Miriam L; Lao, Victoria; Larimer, Frank W; LiPuma, John J; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Malfatti, Stephanie; Marx, Christopher J; Parnell, J Jacob; Ramette, Alban; Richardson, P M; Seeger, Michael; Smith, Daryl; Spilker, Theodore; Sul, Woo Jun; Tsoi, Tamara V; Zhulin, Igor B; Tiedje, James M.

    2006-01-01

    Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 (LB400), a well studied, effective polychlorinated biphenyl-degrader, has one of the two largest known bacterial genomes and is the first nonpathogenic Burkholderia isolate sequenced. From an evolutionary perspective, we find significant differences in functional specialization between the three replicons of LB400, as well as a more relaxed selective pressure for genes located on the two smaller vs. the largest replicon. High genomic plasticity, diversity, and specialization within the Burkholderia genus are exemplified by the conservation of only 44% of the genes between LB400 and Burkholderia cepacia complex strain 383. Even among four B. xenovorans strains, genome size varies from 7.4 to 9.73 Mbp. The latter is largely explained by our findings that >20% of the LB400 sequence was recently acquired by means of lateral gene transfer. Although a range of genetic factors associated with in vivo survival and intercellular interactions are present, these genetic factors are likely related to niche breadth rather than determinants of pathogenicity. The presence of at least eleven 'central aromatic' and twenty 'peripheral aromatic' pathways in LB400, among the highest in any sequenced bacterial genome, supports this hypothesis. Finally, in addition to the experimentally observed redundancy in benzoate degradation and formaldehyde oxidation pathways, the fact that 17.6% of proteins have a better LB400 paralog than an ortholog in a different genome highlights the importance of gene duplication and repeated acquirement, which, coupled with their divergence, raises questions regarding the role of paralogs and potential functional redundancies in large-genome microbes.

  3. Antibacterial activity of a lectin-like Burkholderia cenocepacia protein

    PubMed Central

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Canck, Evelien; Wattiau, Pierre; Winge, Iris; Loris, Remy; Coenye, Tom; Mot, René

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Bacteriocins of the LlpA family have previously been characterized in the γ-proteobacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas. These proteins are composed of two MMBL (monocot mannose-binding lectin) domains, a module predominantly and abundantly found in lectins from monocot plants. Genes encoding four different types of LlpA-like proteins were identified in genomes from strains belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) and the Burkholderia pseudomallei group. A selected recombinant LlpA-like protein from the human isolate Burkholderia cenocepacia AU1054 displayed narrow-spectrum genus-specific antibacterial activity, thus representing the first functionally characterized bacteriocin within this β-proteobacterial genus. Strain-specific killing was confined to other members of the Bcc, with mostly Burkholderia ambifaria strains being susceptible. In addition to killing planktonic cells, this bacteriocin also acted as an antibiofilm agent. Bacteriocins mediate highly selective antagonism among closely related bacteria but such antimicrobial proteins have not yet been reported in Burkholderia. We identified a lectin-like protein of the LlpA family in a Burkholderia cenocepacia human isolate that strain-specifically and selectively kills planktonic and biofilm cells of other Burkholderia cepacia complex members. PMID:23737242

  4. Antibacterial activity of a lectin-like Burkholderia cenocepacia protein.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; De Canck, Evelien; Wattiau, Pierre; Van Winge, Iris; Loris, Remy; Coenye, Tom; De Mot, René

    2013-08-01

    Bacteriocins of the LlpA family have previously been characterized in the γ-proteobacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas. These proteins are composed of two MMBL (monocot mannose-binding lectin) domains, a module predominantly and abundantly found in lectins from monocot plants. Genes encoding four different types of LlpA-like proteins were identified in genomes from strains belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) and the Burkholderia pseudomallei group. A selected recombinant LlpA-like protein from the human isolate Burkholderia cenocepacia AU1054 displayed narrow-spectrum genus-specific antibacterial activity, thus representing the first functionally characterized bacteriocin within this β-proteobacterial genus. Strain-specific killing was confined to other members of the Bcc, with mostly Burkholderia ambifaria strains being susceptible. In addition to killing planktonic cells, this bacteriocin also acted as an antibiofilm agent.

  5. Antibacterial activity of a lectin-like Burkholderia cenocepacia protein.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; De Canck, Evelien; Wattiau, Pierre; Van Winge, Iris; Loris, Remy; Coenye, Tom; De Mot, René

    2013-08-01

    Bacteriocins of the LlpA family have previously been characterized in the γ-proteobacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas. These proteins are composed of two MMBL (monocot mannose-binding lectin) domains, a module predominantly and abundantly found in lectins from monocot plants. Genes encoding four different types of LlpA-like proteins were identified in genomes from strains belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) and the Burkholderia pseudomallei group. A selected recombinant LlpA-like protein from the human isolate Burkholderia cenocepacia AU1054 displayed narrow-spectrum genus-specific antibacterial activity, thus representing the first functionally characterized bacteriocin within this β-proteobacterial genus. Strain-specific killing was confined to other members of the Bcc, with mostly Burkholderia ambifaria strains being susceptible. In addition to killing planktonic cells, this bacteriocin also acted as an antibiofilm agent. PMID:23737242

  6. Burkholderia: an update on taxonomy and biotechnological potential as antibiotic producers.

    PubMed

    Depoorter, Eliza; Bull, Matt J; Peeters, Charlotte; Coenye, Tom; Vandamme, Peter; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2016-06-01

    Burkholderia is an incredibly diverse and versatile Gram-negative genus, within which over 80 species have been formally named and multiple other genotypic groups likely represent new species. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence and core genome ribosomal multilocus sequence typing analysis indicates the presence of at least three major clades within the genus. Biotechnologically, Burkholderia are well-known for their bioremediation and biopesticidal properties. Within this review, we explore the ability of Burkholderia to synthesise a wide range of antimicrobial compounds ranging from historically characterised antifungals to recently described antibacterial antibiotics with activity against multiresistant clinical pathogens. The production of multiple Burkholderia antibiotics is controlled by quorum sensing and examples of quorum sensing pathways found across the genus are discussed. The capacity for antibiotic biosynthesis and secondary metabolism encoded within Burkholderia genomes is also evaluated. Overall, Burkholderia demonstrate significant biotechnological potential as a source of novel antibiotics and bioactive secondary metabolites. PMID:27115756

  7. Antibiotic resistance in Burkholderia species.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Katherine A; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2016-09-01

    The genus Burkholderia comprises metabolically diverse and adaptable Gram-negative bacteria, which thrive in often adversarial environments. A few members of the genus are prominent opportunistic pathogens. These include Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei of the B. pseudomallei complex, which cause glanders and melioidosis, respectively. Burkholderia cenocepacia, Burkholderia multivorans, and Burkholderia vietnamiensis belong to the Burkholderia cepacia complex and affect mostly cystic fibrosis patients. Infections caused by these bacteria are difficult to treat because of significant antibiotic resistance. The first line of defense against antimicrobials in Burkholderia species is the outer membrane penetration barrier. Most Burkholderia contain a modified lipopolysaccharide that causes intrinsic polymyxin resistance. Contributing to reduced drug penetration are restrictive porin proteins. Efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division family are major players in Burkholderia multidrug resistance. Third and fourth generation β-lactam antibiotics are seminal for treatment of Burkholderia infections, but therapeutic efficacy is compromised by expression of several β-lactamases and ceftazidime target mutations. Altered DNA gyrase and dihydrofolate reductase targets cause fluoroquinolone and trimethoprim resistance, respectively. Although antibiotic resistance hampers therapy of Burkholderia infections, the characterization of resistance mechanisms lags behind other non-enteric Gram-negative pathogens, especially ESKAPE bacteria such as Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:27620956

  8. Phylogenomic Study of Burkholderia glathei-like Organisms, Proposal of 13 Novel Burkholderia Species and Emended Descriptions of Burkholderia sordidicola, Burkholderia zhejiangensis, and Burkholderia grimmiae

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Charlotte; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P.; Verheyde, Bart; De Brandt, Evie; Cooper, Vaughn S.; Vandamme, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Partial gyrB gene sequence analysis of 17 isolates from human and environmental sources revealed 13 clusters of strains and identified them as Burkholderia glathei clade (BGC) bacteria. The taxonomic status of these clusters was examined by whole-genome sequence analysis, determination of the G+C content, whole-cell fatty acid analysis and biochemical characterization. The whole-genome sequence-based phylogeny was assessed using the Genome Blast Distance Phylogeny (GBDP) method and an extended multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) approach. The results demonstrated that these 17 BGC isolates represented 13 novel Burkholderia species that could be distinguished by both genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. BGC strains exhibited a broad metabolic versatility and developed beneficial, symbiotic, and pathogenic interactions with different hosts. Our data also confirmed that there is no phylogenetic subdivision in the genus Burkholderia that distinguishes beneficial from pathogenic strains. We therefore propose to formally classify the 13 novel BGC Burkholderia species as Burkholderia arvi sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29317T = CCUG 68412T), Burkholderia hypogeia sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29322T = CCUG 68407T), Burkholderia ptereochthonis sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29326T = CCUG 68403T), Burkholderia glebae sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29325T = CCUG 68404T), Burkholderia pedi sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29323T = CCUG 68406T), Burkholderia arationis sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29324T = CCUG 68405T), Burkholderia fortuita sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29320T = CCUG 68409T), Burkholderia temeraria sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29319T = CCUG 68410T), Burkholderia calidae sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29321T = CCUG 68408T), Burkholderia concitans sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29315T = CCUG 68414T), Burkholderia turbans sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29316T = CCUG 68413T), Burkholderia catudaia sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29318T = CCUG 68411T) and Burkholderia peredens sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29314T = CCUG

  9. Functional Characterization of Burkholderia pseudomallei Trimeric Autotransporters

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Cristine G.; Byrd, Matthew S.

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a tier 1 select agent and the causative agent of melioidosis, a severe and often fatal disease with symptoms ranging from acute pneumonia and septic shock to a chronic infection characterized by abscess formation in the lungs, liver, and spleen. Autotransporters (ATs) are exoproteins belonging to the type V secretion system family, with many playing roles in pathogenesis. The genome of B. pseudomallei strain 1026b encodes nine putative trimeric AT proteins, of which only four have been described. Using a bioinformatic approach, we annotated putative domains within each trimeric AT protein, excluding the well-studied BimA protein, and found short repeated sequences unique to Burkholderia species, as well as an unexpectedly large proportion of ATs with extended signal peptide regions (ESPRs). To characterize the role of trimeric ATs in pathogenesis, we constructed disruption or deletion mutations in each of eight AT-encoding genes and evaluated the resulting strains for adherence to, invasion of, and plaque formation in A549 cells. The majority of the ATs (and/or the proteins encoded downstream) contributed to adherence to and efficient invasion of A549 cells. Using a BALB/c mouse model of infection, we determined the contributions of each AT to bacterial burdens in the lungs, liver, and spleen. At 48 h postinoculation, only one strain, Bp340::pDbpaC, demonstrated a defect in dissemination and/or survival in the liver, indicating that BpaC is required for wild-type virulence in this model. PMID:23716608

  10. Regulon studies and in planta role of the BraI/R quorum-sensing system in the plant-beneficial Burkholderia cluster.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Bruna G; Mitter, Birgit; Talbi, Chouhra; Sessitsch, Angela; Bedmar, Eulogio J; Halliday, Nigel; James, Euan K; Cámara, Miguel; Venturi, Vittorio

    2013-07-01

    The genus Burkholderia is composed of functionally diverse species, and it can be divided into several clusters. One of these, designated the plant-beneficial-environmental (PBE) Burkholderia cluster, is formed by nonpathogenic species, which in most cases have been found to be associated with plants. It was previously established that members of the PBE group share an N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing (QS) system, designated BraI/R, that produces and responds to 3-oxo-C14-HSL (OC14-HSL). Moreover, some of them also possess a second AHL QS system, designated XenI2/R2, producing and responding to 3-hydroxy-C8-HSL (OHC8-HSL). In the present study, we performed liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis to determine which AHL molecules are produced by each QS system of this group of bacteria. The results showed that XenI2/R2 is mainly responsible for the production of OHC8-HSL and that the BraI/R system is involved in the production of several different AHLs. This analysis also revealed that Burkholderia phymatum STM815 produces greater amounts of AHLs than the other species tested. Further studies showed that the BraR protein of B. phymatum is more promiscuous than other BraR proteins, responding equally well to several different AHL molecules, even at low concentrations. Transcriptome studies with Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 and B. phymatum STM815 revealed that the BraI/R regulon is species specific, with exopolysaccharide production being the only common phenotype regulated by this system in the PBE cluster. In addition, BraI/R was shown not to be important for plant nodulation by B. phymatum strains or for endophytic colonization and growth promotion of maize by B. phytofirmans PsJN. PMID:23686262

  11. Contribution of gene loss to the pathogenic evolution of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei.

    PubMed

    Moore, Richard A; Reckseidler-Zenteno, Shauna; Kim, Heenam; Nierman, William; Yu, Yan; Tuanyok, Apichai; Warawa, Jonathan; DeShazer, David; Woods, Donald E

    2004-07-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis. Burkholderia thailandensis is a closely related species that can readily utilize l-arabinose as a sole carbon source, whereas B. pseudomallei cannot. We used Tn5-OT182 mutagenesis to isolate an arabinose-negative mutant of B. thailandensis. Sequence analysis of regions flanking the transposon insertion revealed the presence of an arabinose assimilation operon consisting of nine genes. Analysis of the B. pseudomallei chromosome showed a deletion of the operon from this organism. This deletion was detected in all B. pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei strains investigated. We cloned the B. thailandensis E264 arabinose assimilation operon and introduced the entire operon into the chromosome of B. pseudomallei 406e via homologous recombination. The resultant strain, B. pseudomallei SZ5028, was able to utilize l-arabinose as a sole carbon source. Strain SZ5028 had a significantly higher 50% lethal dose for Syrian hamsters compared to the parent strain 406e. Microarray analysis revealed that a number of genes in a type III secretion system were down-regulated in strain SZ5028 when cells were grown in l-arabinose, suggesting a regulatory role for l-arabinose or a metabolite of l-arabinose. These results suggest that the ability to metabolize l-arabinose reduces the virulence of B. pseudomallei and that the genes encoding arabinose assimilation may be considered antivirulence genes. The increase in virulence associated with the loss of these genes may have provided a selective advantage for B. pseudomallei as these organisms adapted to survival in animal hosts.

  12. Contribution of Gene Loss to the Pathogenic Evolution of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Richard A.; Reckseidler-Zenteno, Shauna; Kim, Heenam; Nierman, William; Yu, Yan; Tuanyok, Apichai; Warawa, Jonathan; DeShazer, David; Woods, Donald E.

    2004-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis. Burkholderia thailandensis is a closely related species that can readily utilize l-arabinose as a sole carbon source, whereas B. pseudomallei cannot. We used Tn5-OT182 mutagenesis to isolate an arabinose-negative mutant of B. thailandensis. Sequence analysis of regions flanking the transposon insertion revealed the presence of an arabinose assimilation operon consisting of nine genes. Analysis of the B. pseudomallei chromosome showed a deletion of the operon from this organism. This deletion was detected in all B. pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei strains investigated. We cloned the B. thailandensis E264 arabinose assimilation operon and introduced the entire operon into the chromosome of B. pseudomallei 406e via homologous recombination. The resultant strain, B. pseudomallei SZ5028, was able to utilize l-arabinose as a sole carbon source. Strain SZ5028 had a significantly higher 50% lethal dose for Syrian hamsters compared to the parent strain 406e. Microarray analysis revealed that a number of genes in a type III secretion system were down-regulated in strain SZ5028 when cells were grown in l-arabinose, suggesting a regulatory role for l-arabinose or a metabolite of l-arabinose. These results suggest that the ability to metabolize l-arabinose reduces the virulence of B. pseudomallei and that the genes encoding arabinose assimilation may be considered antivirulence genes. The increase in virulence associated with the loss of these genes may have provided a selective advantage for B. pseudomallei as these organisms adapted to survival in animal hosts. PMID:15213162

  13. CHROMOSOMAL MULTIPLICITY IN BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have used CHEF gel electrophoresis to screen preparations of large DNA from different Burkholderia cepacia isolates for the presence of DNA species corresponding to the linearized forms of the three chromosomes of 3.4,2.5, and 0.9 Mb identified in B. cepacia strain 17616. DNA ...

  14. Metabolic profiling of Burkholderia cenocepacia, Burkholderia ambifaria, and Burkholderia pyrrocinia isolates from maize rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Alisi, Chiara; Lasinio, Giovanna Jona; Dalmastri, Claudia; Sprocati, AnnaRosa; Tabacchioni, Silvia; Bevivino, Annamaria; Chiarini, Luigi

    2005-10-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia, Burkholderia ambifaria, and Burkholderia pyrrocinia are the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) species most frequently associated with roots of crop plants. To investigate the ecophysiological diversity of these species, metabolic profiling of maize rhizosphere isolates was carried out by means of the Biolog system, using GN2 and SFN2 plates and different parameters related to optical density (OD). The metabolic profiles produced by the SFN2 and GN2 plates were identical, but the SFN2's narrower range of OD values and significantly longer reaction times made these plates less suitable for differentiation of isolates. Principal component analysis of maximum OD (ODM) and maximum substrate oxidation rate (muM) data generated by GN2 plates allowed the selection of a reduced number of carbon sources. Statistical analysis of ODM values highlighted marked differences between the metabolic profiles of B. cenocepacia and B. ambifaria, whereas metabolic profiles of B. pyrrocinia clustered very often with those of B. cenocepacia. Analysis of the mu(M) parameter resulted in a slightly lower differentiation among the three Bcc species and a higher metabolic diversity within the single species, in particular within B. cenocepacia. Finally, B. cenocepacia and B. pyrrocinia showed generally higher oxidation rates than B. ambifaria on those GN2 substrates that commonly occur in maize root exudates. PMID:16328653

  15. Comparison of Ashdown's medium, Burkholderia cepacia medium, and Burkholderia pseudomallei selective agar for clinical isolation of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Sharon J; Chieng, Grace; Cheng, Allen C; Dance, David A B; Amornchai, Premjit; Wongsuvan, Gumphol; Teerawattanasook, Nittaya; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Day, Nicholas P J; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn

    2005-10-01

    Ashdown's medium, Burkholderia pseudomallei selective agar (BPSA), and a commercial Burkholderia cepacia medium were compared for their abilities to grow B. pseudomallei from 155 clinical specimens that proved positive for this organism. The sensitivity of each was equivalent; the selectivity of BPSA was lower than that of Ashdown's or B. cepacia medium.

  16. Divergent homologs of the predicted small RNA BpCand697 in Burkholderia spp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiri, Nadzirah; Mohd-Padil, Hirzahida; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-09-01

    The small RNA (sRNA) gene candidate, BpCand697 was previously reported to be unique to Burkholderia spp. and is encoded at 3' non-coding region of a putative AraC family transcription regulator gene. This study demonstrates the conservation of BpCand697 sequence across 32 Burkholderia spp. including B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, B. thailandensis and Burkholderia sp. by integrating both sequence homology and secondary structural analyses of BpCand697 within the dataset. The divergent sequence of BpCand697 was also used as a discriminatory power in clustering the dataset according to the potential virulence of Burkholderia spp., showing that B. thailandensis was clearly secluded from the virulent cluster of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. Finally, the differential co-transcript expression of BpCand697 and its flanking gene, bpsl2391 was detected in Burkholderia pseudomallei D286 after grown under two different culture conditions using nutrient-rich and minimal media. It is hypothesized that the differential expression of BpCand697-bpsl2391 co-transcript between the two standard prepared media might correlate with nutrient availability in the culture media, suggesting that the physical co-localization of BpCand697 in B. pseudomallei D286 might be directly or indirectly involved with the transcript regulation of bpsl2391 under the selected in vitro culture conditions.

  17. Use of the phytopathogenic effect for studies of Burkholderia virulence.

    PubMed

    Molchanova, E V; Ageeva, N P

    2015-02-01

    The phytopathogenic effect of the pseudomallei group Burkholderia is demonstrated on the Peireskia aculeata model. A method for evaluation of the effect is suggested. The effect correlates with the levels of Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia mallei, and Burkholderia thailandensis virulence for laboratory animals. P. aculeata can be used as a model for preliminary studies of the virulence of the above species.

  18. Burkholderia humi sp. nov., Burkholderia choica sp. nov., Burkholderia telluris sp. nov., Burkholderia terrestris sp. nov. and Burkholderia udeis sp. nov.: Burkholderia glathei-like bacteria from soil and rhizosphere soil.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Peter; De Brandt, Evie; Houf, Kurt; Salles, Joana Falcão; Dirk van Elsas, Jan; Spilker, Theodore; Lipuma, John J

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of partial gyrB gene sequences revealed six taxa in a group of 17 Burkholderia glathei-like isolates which were further examined by (GTG)5-PCR fingerprinting, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, DNA-DNA hybridizations, determination of the DNA G+C content, whole-cell fatty acid analysis and an analysis of cell and colony morphology and more than 180 biochemical characteristics. The results demonstrated that one taxon consisting of three human clinical isolates represented Burkholderia zhejiangensis, a recently described methyl-parathion-degrading bacterium isolated from a wastewater-treatment system in China. The remaining taxa represented five novel species isolated from soil or rhizosphere soil samples, and could be distinguished by both genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. We therefore propose to formally classify these bacteria as Burkholderia humi sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 22934(T) = CCUG 63059(T)), Burkholderia choica sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 22940(T) = CCUG 63063(T)), Burkholderia telluris sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 22936(T) = CCUG 63060(T)), Burkholderia udeis sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 27134(T) = CCUG 63061(T)) and Burkholderia terrestris sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 22937(T) = CCUG 63062(T)).

  19. Polysaccharides and virulence of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Sarkar-Tyson, M; Thwaite, J E; Harding, S V; Smither, S J; Oyston, P C F; Atkins, T P; Titball, R W

    2007-08-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, an infectious disease of humans and animals. Gene clusters which encode capsular polysaccharide (type I O-PS) and LPS (type II O-PS), both of which play roles in virulence, have previously been identified. Here, the identification of two further putative clusters, type III O-PS and type IV O-PS, is reported. Mice challenged with type III O-PS or type IV O-PS mutants showed increased mean times to death (7.8 and 11.6 days) compared to those challenged with wild-type B. pseudomallei (3 days). To investigate the possible roles of polysaccharides in protection, mice were immunized with killed cells of wild-type B. pseudomallei or killed cells of B. pseudomallei with mutations in the O antigen, capsular polysaccharide, type III O-PS or type IV O-PS gene clusters. Immunization with all polysaccharide mutant strains resulted in delayed time to death compared to the naïve controls, following challenge with wild-type B. pseudomallei strain K96243. However, immunization with killed polysaccharide mutant strains conferred different degrees of protection, demonstrating the immunological importance of the polysaccharide clusters on the surface of B. pseudomallei.

  20. Strategies toward vaccines against Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Bondi, Sara K; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2009-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei are Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria, and are the causative agents of the diseases glanders and melioidosis, respectively. These bacteria have been recognized as important pathogens for over 100 years, yet a relative dearth of available information exists regarding their virulence determinants and immunopathology. Infection with either of these bacteria presents with nonspecific symptoms and can be either acute or chronic, impeding rapid diagnosis. The lack of a vaccine for either bacterium also makes them potential candidates for bioweaponization. Together with their high rate of infectivity via aerosols and resistance to many common antibiotics, both bacteria have been classified as category B priority pathogens by the US NIH and US CDC, which has spurred a dramatic increase in interest in these microorganisms. Attempts have been made to develop vaccines for these infections, which would not only benefit military personnel, a group most likely to be targeted in an intentional release, but also individuals who may come in contact with glanders-infected animals or live in areas where melioidosis is endemic. This review highlights some recent attempts of vaccine development for these infections and the strategies used to improve the efficacy of vaccine approaches. PMID:18980539

  1. Volatile-sulfur-compound profile distinguishes Burkholderia pseudomallei from Burkholderia thailandensis.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Timothy J J; Hahne, Dorothee R; Merritt, Adam J; Clarke, Michael W

    2015-03-01

    Solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GCMS) was used to show that dimethyl sulfide produced by Burkholderia pseudomallei is responsible for its unusual truffle-like smell and distinguishes the species from Burkholderia thailandensis. SPME-GCMS can be safely used to detect dimethyl sulfide produced by agar-grown B. pseudomallei.

  2. Distinct colicin M-like bacteriocin-immunity pairs in Burkholderia

    PubMed Central

    Ghequire, Maarten G. K.; De Mot, René

    2015-01-01

    The Escherichia coli bacteriocin colicin M (ColM) acts via degradation of the cell wall precursor lipid II in target cells. ColM producers avoid self-inhibition by a periplasmic immunity protein anchored in the inner membrane. In this study, we identified colM-like bacteriocin genes in genomes of several β-proteobacterial strains belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) and the Burkholderia pseudomallei group. Two selected Burkholderia ambifaria proteins, designated burkhocins M1 and M2, were produced recombinantly and showed antagonistic activity against Bcc strains. In their considerably sequence-diverged catalytic domain, a conserved aspartate residue equally proved pivotal for cytotoxicity. Immunity to M-type burkhocins is conferred upon susceptible strains by heterologous expression of a cognate gene located either upstream or downstream of the toxin gene. These genes lack homology with currently known ColM immunity genes and encode inner membrane-associated proteins of two distinct types, differing in predicted transmembrane topology and moiety exposed to the periplasm. The addition of burkhocins to the bacteriocin complement of Burkholderia reveals a wider phylogenetic distribution of ColM-like bacteriotoxins, beyond the γ-proteobacterial genera Escherichia, Pectobacterium and Pseudomonas, and illuminates the diversified nature of immunity-providing proteins. PMID:26610609

  3. Distinct colicin M-like bacteriocin-immunity pairs in Burkholderia.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; De Mot, René

    2015-11-27

    The Escherichia coli bacteriocin colicin M (ColM) acts via degradation of the cell wall precursor lipid II in target cells. ColM producers avoid self-inhibition by a periplasmic immunity protein anchored in the inner membrane. In this study, we identified colM-like bacteriocin genes in genomes of several β-proteobacterial strains belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) and the Burkholderia pseudomallei group. Two selected Burkholderia ambifaria proteins, designated burkhocins M1 and M2, were produced recombinantly and showed antagonistic activity against Bcc strains. In their considerably sequence-diverged catalytic domain, a conserved aspartate residue equally proved pivotal for cytotoxicity. Immunity to M-type burkhocins is conferred upon susceptible strains by heterologous expression of a cognate gene located either upstream or downstream of the toxin gene. These genes lack homology with currently known ColM immunity genes and encode inner membrane-associated proteins of two distinct types, differing in predicted transmembrane topology and moiety exposed to the periplasm. The addition of burkhocins to the bacteriocin complement of Burkholderia reveals a wider phylogenetic distribution of ColM-like bacteriotoxins, beyond the γ-proteobacterial genera Escherichia, Pectobacterium and Pseudomonas, and illuminates the diversified nature of immunity-providing proteins.

  4. Burkholderia humisilvae sp. nov., Burkholderia solisilvae sp. nov. and Burkholderia rhizosphaerae sp. nov., isolated from forest soil and rhizosphere soil.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Chan; Whang, Kyung-Sook

    2015-09-01

    Strains Y-12(T) and Y-47(T) were isolated from mountain forest soil and strain WR43(T) was isolated from rhizosphere soil, at Daejeon, Korea. The three strains grew at 10-55 °C (optimal growth at 28-30 °C), at pH 3.0-8.0 (optimal growth at pH 6.0) and in the presence of 0-4.0% (w/v) NaCl, growing optimally in the absence of added NaCl. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the three strains were found to belong to the genus Burkholderia, showing the closest phylogenetic similarity to Burkholderia diazotrophica JPY461(T) (97.2-97.7%); the similarity between the three sequences ranged from 98.3 to 98.7%. Additionally, the three strains formed a distinct group in phylogenetic trees based on the housekeeping genes recA and gyrB. The predominant ubiquinone was Q-8, the major fatty acids were C16 : 0 and C17  : 0 cyclo and the DNA G+C content of the novel isolates was 61.6-64.4 mol%. DNA-DNA relatedness among the three strains and the type strains of the closest species of the genus Burkholderia was less than 50%. On the basis of 16S rRNA, recA and gyrB gene sequence similarities, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic data, the three strains represent three novel species within the genus Burkholderia, for which the names Burkholderia humisilvae sp. nov. (type strain Y-12(T)= KACC 17601(T) = NBRC 109933(T) = NCAIM B 02543(T)), Burkholderia solisilvae sp. nov. (type strain Y-47(T) = KACC 17602(T)= NBRC 109934(T) = NCAIM B 02539(T)) and Burkholderia rhizosphaerae sp. nov. (type strain WR43(T) = KACC 17603(T) = NBRC 109935(T) = NCAIM B 02541(T)) are proposed.

  5. The Burkholderia cenocepacia K56-2 pleiotropic regulator Pbr, is required for stress resistance and virulence.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Christian G; Sousa, Silvia A; Grilo, André M; Eberl, Leo; Leitão, Jorge H

    2010-05-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is one of the most virulent species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex, a group of bacteria that emerged as important pathogens, especially to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. In this study, we report the identification and characterization of a mutant strain derived form the CF isolate Burkholderia cenocepacia K56-2, carrying a plasposon insertion in a gene, located in a 3516 bp chromosomal region with an atypical G+C content, encoding a 80 amino acid putative regulatory protein named Pbr. Besides its inability to produce phenazines, the B. cenocepacia K56-2 pbr mutant exhibited a pleiotropic phenotype, including impaired survival to oxidative and osmotic stress, aromatic amino acid and prolonged nutrient starvation periods. In addition, the pbr mutant exhibited decreased virulence the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Altogether, our results demonstrate the involvement of Pbr on the regulation of phenazine biosynthesis, and an important role for this regulatory protein on several cellular processes related to stress resistance and virulence.

  6. 40 CFR 725.1075 - Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Burkholderia cepacia complex. 725.1075... Specific Microorganisms § 725.1075 Burkholderia cepacia complex. (a) Microorganism and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The microorganisms identified as the Burkholderia cepacia complex defined...

  7. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Parapiptadenia rigida-nodulating Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from a root nodule of Parapiptadenia rigida collected at the Angico plantation, Mandiyu, Uruguay, in December 2006. A survey of symbionts of P. rigida in Uruguay demonstrated that this species is nodulated predominantly by Burkholderia microsymbionts. Moreover, Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 is a highly efficient nitrogen fixing symbiont with this host. Currently, the only other sequenced isolate to fix with this host is Cupriavidus sp. UYPR2.512. Therefore, Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 was selected for sequencing on the basis of its environmental and agricultural relevance to issues in global carbon cycling, alternative energy production, and biogeochemical importance, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413, together with sequence and annotation. The 10,373,764 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 336 scaffolds of 342 contigs, contains 9759 protein-coding genes and 77 RNA-only encoding genes. PMID:26203342

  8. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Parapiptadenia rigida-nodulating Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413

    DOE PAGESBeta

    De Meyer, Sofie E.; Fabiano, Elena; Tian, Rui; Van Berkum, Peter; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; et al

    2015-06-04

    We report that Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from a root nodule of Parapiptadenia rigida collected at the Angico plantation, Mandiyu, Uruguay, in December 2006. A survey of symbionts of P. rigida in Uruguay demonstrated that this species is nodulated predominantly by Burkholderia microsymbionts. Moreover, Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 is a highly efficient nitrogen fixing symbiont with this host. Currently, the only other sequenced isolate to fix with this host is Cupriavidus sp. UYPR2.512. Therefore, Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 was selected for sequencing on the basis of its environmental and agriculturalmore » relevance to issues in global carbon cycling, alternative energy production, and biogeochemical importance, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413, together with sequence and annotation. The 10,373,764 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 336 scaffolds of 342 contigs, contains 9759 protein-coding genes and 77 RNA-only encoding genes.« less

  9. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Parapiptadenia rigida-nodulating Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413

    SciTech Connect

    De Meyer, Sofie E.; Fabiano, Elena; Tian, Rui; Van Berkum, Peter; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Howieson, John; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2015-06-04

    We report that Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from a root nodule of Parapiptadenia rigida collected at the Angico plantation, Mandiyu, Uruguay, in December 2006. A survey of symbionts of P. rigida in Uruguay demonstrated that this species is nodulated predominantly by Burkholderia microsymbionts. Moreover, Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 is a highly efficient nitrogen fixing symbiont with this host. Currently, the only other sequenced isolate to fix with this host is Cupriavidus sp. UYPR2.512. Therefore, Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 was selected for sequencing on the basis of its environmental and agricultural relevance to issues in global carbon cycling, alternative energy production, and biogeochemical importance, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413, together with sequence and annotation. The 10,373,764 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 336 scaffolds of 342 contigs, contains 9759 protein-coding genes and 77 RNA-only encoding genes.

  10. Burkholderia cordobensis sp. nov., from agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Draghi, Walter O; Peeters, Charlotte; Cnockaert, Margo; Snauwaert, Cindy; Wall, Luis G; Zorreguieta, Angeles; Vandamme, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Two Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria were isolated from agricultural soils in Córdoba province in central Argentina. Their 16S rRNA gene sequences demonstrated that they belong to the genus Burkholderia, with Burkholderia zhejiangensis as most closely related formally named species; this relationship was confirmed through comparative gyrB sequence analysis. Whole-cell fatty acid analysis supported their assignment to the genus Burkholderia. Burkholderia sp. strain YI23, for which a whole-genome sequence is available, represents the same taxon, as demonstrated by its highly similar 16S rRNA (100% similarity) and gyrB (99.1-99.7%) gene sequences. The results of DNA-DNA hybridization experiments and physiological and biochemical characterization further substantiated the genotypic and phenotypic distinctiveness of the Argentinian soil isolates, for which the name Burkholderia cordobensis sp. nov. is proposed, with strain MMP81(T) ( = LMG 27620(T) = CCUG 64368(T)) as the type strain.

  11. Burkholderia pyrrocinia in cystic fibrosis lung transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Savi, D; De Biase, R Valerio; Amaddeo, A; Anile, M; Venuta, F; Ruberto, F; Simmonds, N; Cimino, G; Quattrucci, S

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Burkholderia species is typically considered a contraindication leading to transplantation in cystic fibrosis (CF). However, the risks posed by different Burkholderia species on transplantation outcomes are poorly defined. We present the case of a patient with CF who underwent lung transplantation due to a severe respiratory failure from chronic airways infection with Burkholderia pyrrocinia (B. cepacia genomovar IX) and pan-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The postoperative course was complicated by recurrent B. pyrrocinia infections, ultimately lea ding to uncontrollable sepsis and death. This is the first case report in CF of Burkholderia pyrrocinia infection and lung transplantation, providing further evidence of the high risk nature of the Burkholderia species.

  12. Host Evasion by Burkholderia cenocepacia

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Shyamala; Sajjan, Umadevi S.

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic respiratory pathogen of individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). Some strains of B. cenocepacia are highly transmissible and resistant to almost all antibiotics. Approximately one-third of B. cenocepacia infected CF patients go on to develop fatal “cepacia syndrome.” During the last two decades, substantial progress has been made with regards to evasion of host innate defense mechanisms by B. cenocepacia. Almost all strains of B. cenocepacia have the capacity to survive and replicate intracellularly in both airway epithelial cells and macrophages, which are primary sentinels of the lung and play a pivotal role in clearance of infecting bacteria. Those strains of B. cenocepacia, which express both cable pili and the associated 22 kDa adhesin are also capable of transmigrating across airway epithelium and persist in mouse models of infection. In this review, we will discuss how this type of interaction between B. cenocepacia and host may lead to persistence of bacteria as well as lung inflammation in CF patients. PMID:22919590

  13. A Unique Set of the Burkholderia Collagen-Like Proteins Provides Insight into Pathogenesis, Genome Evolution and Niche Adaptation, and Infection Detection.

    PubMed

    Bachert, Beth A; Choi, Soo J; Snyder, Anna K; Rio, Rita V M; Durney, Brandon C; Holland, Lisa A; Amemiya, Kei; Welkos, Susan L; Bozue, Joel A; Cote, Christopher K; Berisio, Rita; Lukomski, Slawomir

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei, classified as category B priority pathogens, are significant human and animal pathogens that are highly infectious and broad-spectrum antibiotic resistant. Currently, the pathogenicity mechanisms utilized by Burkholderia are not fully understood, and correct diagnosis of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei infection remains a challenge due to limited detection methods. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of a set of 13 novel Burkholderia collagen-like proteins (Bucl) that were identified among B. pseudomallei and B. mallei select agents. We infer that several Bucl proteins participate in pathogenesis based on their noncollagenous domains that are associated with the components of a type III secretion apparatus and membrane transport systems. Homology modeling of the outer membrane efflux domain of Bucl8 points to a role in multi-drug resistance. We determined that bucl genes are widespread in B. pseudomallei and B. mallei; Fischer's exact test and Cramer's V2 values indicate that the majority of bucl genes are highly associated with these pathogenic species versus nonpathogenic B. thailandensis. We designed a bucl-based quantitative PCR assay which was able to detect B. pseudomallei infection in a mouse with a detection limit of 50 CFU. Finally, chromosomal mapping and phylogenetic analysis of bucl loci revealed considerable genomic plasticity and adaptation of Burkholderia spp. to host and environmental niches. In this study, we identified a large set of phylogenetically unrelated bucl genes commonly found in Burkholderia select agents, encoding predicted pathogenicity factors, detection targets, and vaccine candidates.

  14. Genome sequence of the Lebeckia ambigua-nodulating “Burkholderia sprentiae” strain WSM5005T

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Wayne; De Meyer, Sofie; Terpolilli, Jason; Melino, Vanessa; Ardley, Julie; Rui, Tian; Tiwari, Ravi; Howieson, John; Yates, Ron; O’Hara, Graham; Lu, Megan; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Wei, Chia-Lin; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, I-Min; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Szeto, Ernest; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Peters, Lin; Pitluck, Sam; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia sprentiae” strain WSM5005T is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated in Australia from an effective N2-fixing root nodule of Lebeckia ambigua collected in Klawer, Western Cape of South Africa, in October 2007. Here we describe the features of “Burkholderia sprentiae” strain WSM5005T, together with the genome sequence and its annotation. The 7,761,063 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in 8 scaffolds of 236 contigs, contains 7,147 protein-coding genes and 76 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 20 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Community Sequencing Program. PMID:24976894

  15. Genomic characterization of JG068, a novel virulent podovirus active against Burkholderia cenocepacia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As is true for many other antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative pathogens, members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) are currently being assessed for their susceptibility to phage therapy as an antimicrobial treatment. The objective of this study was to perform genomic and limited functional characterization of the novel BCC phage JG068 (vB_BceP_JG068). Results JG068 is a podovirus that forms large, clear plaques on Burkholderia cenocepacia K56-2. Host range analysis indicates that this phage can infect environmental, clinical, and epidemic isolates of Burkholderia multivorans, B. cenocepacia, Burkholderia stabilis, and Burkholderia dolosa, likely through interaction with the host lipopolysaccharide as a receptor. The JG068 chromosome is 41,604 base pairs (bp) in length and is flanked by 216 bp short direct terminal repeats. Gene expression originates from both host and phage promoters and is in the forward direction for all 49 open reading frames. The genome sequence shows similarity to Ralstonia phage ϕRSB1, Caulobacter phage Cd1, and uncharacterized genetic loci of blood disease bacterium R229 and Burkholderia pseudomallei 1710b. CoreGenesUniqueGenes analysis indicates that JG068 belongs to the Autographivirinae subfamily and ϕKMV-like phages genus. Modules within the genome encode proteins involved in DNA-binding, morphogenesis, and lysis, but none associated with pathogenicity or lysogeny. Similar to the signal-arrest-release (SAR) endolysin of ϕKMV, inducible expression of the JG068 SAR endolysin causes lysis of Escherichia coli that is dependent on the presence of an N-terminal signal sequence. In an in vivo assay using the Galleria mellonella infection model, treatment of B. cenocepacia K56-2-infected larvae with JG068 results in a significant increase in larval survival. Conclusions As JG068 has a broad host range, does not encode virulence factors, is obligately lytic, and has activity against an epidemic B. cenocepacia strain in vivo

  16. Evaluation of a latex agglutination assay for the identification of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei.

    PubMed

    Duval, Brea D; Elrod, Mindy G; Gee, Jay E; Chantratita, Narisara; Tandhavanant, Sarunporn; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2014-06-01

    Cases of melioidosis and glanders are rare in the United States, but the etiologic agents of each disease (Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei, respectively) are classified as Tier 1 select agents because of concerns about their potential use as bioterrorism agents. A rapid, highly sensitive, and portable assay for clinical laboratories and field use is required. Our laboratory has further evaluated a latex agglutination assay for its ability to identify B. pseudomallei and B. mallei isolates. This assay uses a monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes the capsular polysaccharide produced by B. pseudomallei and B. mallei, but is absent in closely related Burkholderia species. A total of 110 B. pseudomallei and B. mallei were tested, and 36 closely related Burkholderia species. The latex agglutination assay was positive for 109 of 110 (99.1% sensitivity) B. pseudomallei and B. mallei isolates tested.

  17. Comparison of four selective media for the isolation of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Glass, Mindy B; Beesley, Cari A; Wilkins, Patricia P; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2009-06-01

    Currently there are no commercially available selective media indicated for the isolation of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Ashdown's agar, a custom selective medium for isolation of B. pseudomallei, is well described in the literature but unavailable commercially. Three commercially available media, Burkholderia cepacia selective agar (BCSA), oxidative-fermentative-polymyxin B-bacitracin-lactose (OFPBL) agar, and Pseudomonas cepacia (PC) agar are recommended for isolation of B. cepacia from respiratory secretions of cystic fibrosis patients. We evaluated the sensitivity and selectivity of these four media using 20 B. mallei, 20 B. pseudomallei, 20 Burkholderia spp., and 15 diagnostically challenging organisms. Ashdown's agar was the most sensitive medium for the isolation of B. pseudomallei, but it was unable to support growth of B. mallei. Pseudomonas cepacia agar was highly sensitive and selective for both organisms. In non-endemic areas, we suggest the use of the commercially available PC agar for the isolation of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei.

  18. Burkholderia stagnalis sp. nov. and Burkholderia territorii sp. nov., two novel Burkholderia cepacia complex species from environmental and human sources.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Birgit; Mayo, Mark; Peeters, Charlotte; Zlosnik, James E A; Spilker, Theodore; Hird, Trevor J; LiPuma, John J; Kidd, Timothy J; Kaestli, Mirjam; Ginther, Jennifer L; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul; Bell, Scott C; Jacobs, Jan A; Currie, Bart J; Vandamme, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Nine Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria were isolated during environmental surveys for the ecological niche of Burkholderia pseudomallei, the aetiological agent of melioidosis, in the Northern Territory of Australia. They represented two multi-locus sequence analysis-based clusters, referred to as Bcc B and Bcc L. Three additional environmental and clinical Bcc B isolates were identified upon deposition of the sequences in the PubMLST database. Analysis of the concatenated nucleotide sequence divergence levels within both groups (1.4 and 1.9%, respectively) and towards established Bcc species (4.0 and 3.9%, respectively) demonstrated that the two taxa represented novel Bcc species. All 12 isolates were further characterized using 16S rRNA and recA gene sequence analysis, RAPD analysis, DNA base content determination, fatty acid methyl ester analysis and biochemical profiling. Analysis of recA gene sequences revealed a remarkable diversity within each of these taxa, but, together, the results supported the affiliation of the two taxa to the Bcc. Bcc B strains can be differentiated from most other Bcc members by the assimilation of maltose. Bcc L strains can be differentiated from other Bcc members by the absence of assimilation of N-acetylglucosamine. The names Burkholderia stagnalis sp. nov. with type strain LMG 28156(T) ( = CCUG 65686(T)) and Burkholderia territorii sp. nov. with type strain LMG 28158(T) ( = CCUG 65687(T)) are proposed for Bcc B and Bcc L bacteria, respectively.

  19. Burkholderia novacaledonica sp. nov. and B. ultramafica sp. nov. isolated from roots of Costularia spp. pioneer plants of ultramafic soils in New Caledonia.

    PubMed

    Guentas, Linda; Gensous, Simon; Cavaloc, Yvon; Ducousso, Marc; Amir, Hamid; De Georges de Ledenon, Benjamin; Moulin, Lionel; Jourand, Philippe

    2016-05-01

    The taxonomic status of eleven rhizospheric bacterial strains belonging to the genus Burkholderia and isolated from roots of Costularia (Cyperaceae), tropical herbaceous pioneer plants growing on ultramafic soils in New Caledonia, was investigated using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The genetic analyses (16S rRNA genes, gyrB, recA, nreB and cnr) confirmed that all strains are Burkholderia and cluster into two separated groups. The DNA hybridization results showed low relatedness values to the closest relatives Burkholderia species. The phenotypic analyses confirmed that the two groups of strains could be differentiated from each other and from other known Burkholderia species. This polyphasic study revealed that these two groups of strains represent each a novel species of Burkholderia, for which the names Burkholderia novacaledonica sp. nov. (type strain STM10272(T)=LMG28615(T)=CIP110887(T)) and B. ultramafica sp. nov. (type strain STM10279(T)=LMG28614(T)=CIP110886(T)) are proposed, respectively. These strains of Burkholderia presented specific ecological traits such as the tolerance to the extreme edaphic constraints of ultramafic soils: they grew at pH between 4 and 8 and tolerate the strong unbalanced Ca/Mg ratio (1/19) and the high concentrations of heavy metals i.e. Co, Cr, Mn and Ni. Noteworthy B. ultramafica tolerated nickel until 10mM and B. novacaledonica up to 5mM. The presence of the nickel (nreB) and cobalt/nickel (cnr) resistance determinants encoding for protein involved in metal tolerance was found in all strains of both groups. Moreover, most of the strains were able to produce plant growth promoting molecules (ACC, IAA, NH3 and siderophores). Such ecological traits suggest that these new species of Burkholderia might be environmentally adaptable plant-associated bacteria and beneficial to plants. PMID:27049869

  20. Burkholderia vaccines: are we moving forward?

    PubMed

    Choh, Leang-Chung; Ong, Guang-Han; Vellasamy, Kumutha M; Kalaiselvam, Kaveena; Kang, Wen-Tyng; Al-Maleki, Anis R; Mariappan, Vanitha; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2013-01-01

    The genus Burkholderia consists of diverse species which includes both "friends" and "foes." Some of the "friendly" Burkholderia spp. are extensively used in the biotechnological and agricultural industry for bioremediation and biocontrol. However, several members of the genus including B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, and B. cepacia, are known to cause fatal disease in both humans and animals. B. pseudomallei and B. mallei are the causative agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively, while B. cepacia infection is lethal to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Due to the high rate of infectivity and intrinsic resistance to many commonly used antibiotics, together with high mortality rate, B. mallei and B. pseudomallei are considered to be potential biological warfare agents. Treatments of the infections caused by these bacteria are often unsuccessful with frequent relapse of the infection. Thus, we are at a crucial stage of the need for Burkholderia vaccines. Although the search for a prophylactic therapy candidate continues, to date development of vaccines has not advanced beyond research to human clinical trials. In this article, we review the current research on development of safe vaccines with high efficacy against B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, and B. cepacia. It can be concluded that further research will enable elucidation of the potential benefits and risks of Burkholderia vaccines.

  1. Natural Burkholderia mallei infection in Dromedary, Bahrain.

    PubMed

    Wernery, Ulrich; Wernery, Renate; Joseph, Marina; Al-Salloom, Fajer; Johnson, Bobby; Kinne, Joerg; Jose, Shanti; Jose, Sherry; Tappendorf, Britta; Hornstra, Heidie; Scholz, Holger C

    2011-07-01

    We confirm a natural infection of dromedaries with glanders. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis of a Burkholderia mallei strain isolated from a diseased dromedary in Bahrain revealed close genetic proximity to strain Dubai 7, which caused an outbreak of glanders in horses in the United Arab Emirates in 2004.

  2. Genome Sequence of Burkholderia pseudomallei NCTC 13392

    PubMed Central

    Sahl, Jason W.; Stone, Joshua K.; Gelhaus, H. Carl; Warren, Richard L.; Cruttwell, Caroline J.; Funnell, Simon G.; Keim, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Here, we describe the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia pseudomallei NCTC 13392. This isolate has been distributed as K96243, but distinct genomic differences have been identified. The genomic sequence of this isolate will provide the genomic context for previously conducted functional studies. PMID:23704173

  3. GENOME ANALYSIS OF BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA AC1100

    EPA Science Inventory

    Burkholderia cepacia is an important organism in bioremediation of environmental pollutants and it is also of increasing interest as a human pathogen. The genomic organization of B. cepacia is being studied in order to better understand its unusual adaptive capacity and genome pl...

  4. Burkholderia monticola sp. nov., isolated from mountain soil.

    PubMed

    Baek, Inwoo; Seo, Boram; Lee, Imchang; Yi, Hana; Chun, Jongsik

    2015-02-01

    An ivory/yellow, Gram-stain-negative, short-rod-shaped, aerobic bacterial strain, designated JC2948(T), was isolated from a soil sample taken from Gwanak Mountain, Republic of Korea. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain JC2948(T) belongs to the genus Burkholderia. The test strain showed highest sequence similarities to Burkholderia tropica LMG 22274(T) (97.6 %), Burkholderia acidipaludis NBRC 101816(T) (97.5 %), Burkholderia tuberum LMG 21444(T) (97.5 %), Burkholderia sprentiae LMG 27175(T) (97.4 %), Burkholderia terricola LMG 20594(T) (97.3 %) and Burkholderia diazotrophica LMG 26031(T) (97.1 %). Based on average nucleotide identity (ANI) values, the new isolate represents a novel genomic species as it shows less than 90 % ANI values with other closely related species. Also, other phylosiological and biochemical comparisons allowed the phenotypic differentiation of strain JC2948(T) from other members of the genus Burkholderia. Therefore, we suggest that this strain should be classified as the type strain of a novel species of the genus Burkholderia. The name Burkholderia monticola sp. nov. (type strain, JC2948(T) = JCM 19904(T) = KACC 17924(T)) is proposed.

  5. Genetic Analysis of the CDI Pathway from Burkholderia pseudomallei 1026b

    PubMed Central

    Edman, Natasha; Chaudhuri, Swarnava; Poole, Stephen J.; Manoil, Colin; Hayes, Christopher S.; Low, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) is a mode of inter-bacterial competition mediated by the CdiB/CdiA family of two-partner secretion systems. CdiA binds to receptors on susceptible target bacteria, then delivers a toxin domain derived from its C-terminus. Studies with Escherichia coli suggest the existence of multiple CDI growth-inhibition pathways, whereby different systems exploit distinct target-cell proteins to deliver and activate toxins. Here, we explore the CDI pathway in Burkholderia using the CDIIIBp1026b system encoded on chromosome II of Burkholderia pseudomallei 1026b as a model. We took a genetic approach and selected Burkholderia thailandensis E264 mutants that are resistant to growth inhibition by CDIIIBp1026b. We identified mutations in three genes, BTH_I0359, BTH_II0599, and BTH_I0986, each of which confers resistance to CDIIIBp1026b. BTH_I0359 encodes a small peptide of unknown function, whereas BTH_II0599 encodes a predicted inner membrane transport protein of the major facilitator superfamily. The inner membrane localization of BTH_II0599 suggests that it may facilitate translocation of CdiA-CTIIBp1026b toxin from the periplasm into the cytoplasm of target cells. BTH_I0986 encodes a putative transglycosylase involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis. ∆BTH_I0986 mutants have altered LPS structure and do not interact with CDI+ inhibitor cells to the same extent as BTH_I0986+ cells, suggesting that LPS could function as a receptor for CdiAIIBp1026b. Although ∆BTH_I0359, ∆BTH_II0599, and ∆BTH_I0986 mutations confer resistance to CDIIIBp1026b, they provide no protection against the CDIE264 system deployed by B. thailandensis E264. Together, these findings demonstrate that CDI growth-inhibition pathways are distinct and can differ significantly even between closely related species. PMID:25786241

  6. Saturation mutagenesis of a CepR binding site as a means to identify new quorum-regulated promoters in Burkholderia cenocepacia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Burkholderia cenocepacia, an opportunistic pathogen of humans, encodes the CepI and CepR proteins, which resemble the LuxI and LuxR quorum sensing proteins of Vibrio fischeri. CepI directs the synthesis of octanoylhomoserine lactone (OHL), while CepR is an OHL dependent transcription factor. In pr...

  7. Burkholderia megalochromosomata sp. nov., isolated from grassland soil.

    PubMed

    Baek, Inwoo; Seo, Boram; Lee, Imchang; Lee, Kihyun; Park, Sang-Cheol; Yi, Hana; Chun, Jongsik

    2015-03-01

    A Gram-stain negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming, obligate aerobic bacterial strain, JC2949(T), was isolated from grassland soil in Gwanak Mountain, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Phylogenetic analysis, based on 16S rRNA sequences, indicated that strain JC2949(T) belongs to the genus Burkholderia, showing highest sequence similarities with Burkholderia grimmiae R27(T) (98.8 %), Burkholderia cordobensis LMG 27620(T) (98.6 %), Burkholderia jiangsuensis MP-1T(T) (98.6 %), Burkholderia zhejiangensis OP-1(T) (98.5 %), Burkholderia humi LMG 22934(T) (97.5 %), Burkholderia terrestris LMG 22937(T) (97.3 %), Burkholderia telluris LMG 22936(T) (97.2 %) and Burkholderia glathei ATCC 29195(T) (97.0 %). The major fatty acids of strain JC2949(T) were C18 : 1ω7c, summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c) and C16 : 0. Its predominant polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and an unknown amino phospholipid. The dominant isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone Q-8. The pairwise average nucleotide identity values between strain JC2949(T) and the genomes of 30 other species of the genus Burkholderia ranged from 73.4-90.4 %, indicating that the isolate is a novel genomic species within this genus. Based on phenotypic and chemotaxonomic comparisons, it is clear that strain JC2949(T) represents a novel species of the genus Burkholderia. We propose the name for this novel species to be Burkholderia megalochromosomata sp. nov. The type strain is JC2949(T) ( = KACC 17925(T) = JCM 19905(T)).

  8. Multiplex qPCR for reliable detection and differentiation of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei are two closely related species of highly virulent bacteria that can be difficult to detect. Pathogenic Burkholderia are endemic in many regions worldwide and cases of infection, sometimes brought by travelers from unsuspected regions, also occur elsewhere. Rapid, sensitive methods for identification of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei are urgently needed in the interests of patient treatment and epidemiological surveillance. Methods Signature sequences for sensitive, specific detection of pathogenic Burkholderia based on published genomes were identified and a qPCR assay was designed and validated. Results A single-reaction quadruplex qPCR assay for the detection of pathogenic Burkholderia, which includes a marker for internal control of DNA extraction and amplification, was developed. The assay permits differentiation of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei strains, and probit analysis showed a very low detection limit. Use of a multicopy signature sequence permits detection of less than 1 genome equivalent per reaction. Conclusions The new assay permits rapid detection of pathogenic Burkholderia and combines enhanced sensitivity, species differentiation, and inclusion of an internal control for both DNA extraction and PCR amplification. PMID:23409683

  9. Members of the genus Burkholderia: good and bad guys

    PubMed Central

    Eberl, Leo; Vandamme, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In the 1990s several biocontrol agents on that contained Burkholderia strains were registered by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). After risk assessment these products were withdrawn from the market and a moratorium was placed on the registration of Burkholderia-containing products, as these strains may pose a risk to human health. However, over the past few years the number of novel Burkholderia species that exhibit plant-beneficial properties and are normally not isolated from infected patients has increased tremendously. In this commentary we wish to summarize recent efforts that aim at discerning pathogenic from beneficial Burkholderia strains. PMID:27303639

  10. Cross-Species Comparison of the Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, and Burkholderia mallei Quorum-Sensing Regulons

    PubMed Central

    Majerczyk, Charlotte D.; Brittnacher, Mitchell J.; Jacobs, Michael A.; Armour, Christopher D.; Radey, Matthew C.; Bunt, Richard; Hayden, Hillary S.; Bydalek, Ryland

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, and Burkholderia mallei (the Bptm group) are close relatives with very different lifestyles: B. pseudomallei is an opportunistic pathogen, B. thailandensis is a nonpathogenic saprophyte, and B. mallei is a host-restricted pathogen. The acyl-homoserine lactone quorum-sensing (QS) systems of these three species show a high level of conservation. We used transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) to define the quorum-sensing regulon in each species, and we performed a cross-species analysis of the QS-controlled orthologs. Our analysis revealed a core set of QS-regulated genes in all three species, as well as QS-controlled factors shared by only two species or unique to a given species. This global survey of the QS regulons of B. pseudomallei, B. thailandensis, and B. mallei serves as a platform for predicting which QS-controlled processes might be important in different bacterial niches and contribute to the pathogenesis of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. PMID:25182491

  11. Cross-species comparison of the Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, and Burkholderia mallei quorum-sensing regulons.

    PubMed

    Majerczyk, Charlotte D; Brittnacher, Mitchell J; Jacobs, Michael A; Armour, Christopher D; Radey, Matthew C; Bunt, Richard; Hayden, Hillary S; Bydalek, Ryland; Greenberg, E Peter

    2014-11-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, and Burkholderia mallei (the Bptm group) are close relatives with very different lifestyles: B. pseudomallei is an opportunistic pathogen, B. thailandensis is a nonpathogenic saprophyte, and B. mallei is a host-restricted pathogen. The acyl-homoserine lactone quorum-sensing (QS) systems of these three species show a high level of conservation. We used transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) to define the quorum-sensing regulon in each species, and we performed a cross-species analysis of the QS-controlled orthologs. Our analysis revealed a core set of QS-regulated genes in all three species, as well as QS-controlled factors shared by only two species or unique to a given species. This global survey of the QS regulons of B. pseudomallei, B. thailandensis, and B. mallei serves as a platform for predicting which QS-controlled processes might be important in different bacterial niches and contribute to the pathogenesis of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei.

  12. Discrimination of Burkholderia multivorans and Burkholderia vietnamiensis from Burkholderia cepacia genomovars I, III, and IV by PCR.

    PubMed

    Bauernfeind, A; Schneider, I; Jungwirth, R; Roller, C

    1999-05-01

    We present a PCR procedure for identification of Burkholderia cepacia, Burkholderia multivorans, and Burkholderia vietnamiensis. 16S and 23S ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs) of B. multivorans and B. vietnamiensis were sequenced and aligned with published sequences for definition of species-specific 18-mer oligonucleotide primers. Specific antisense 16S rDNA primers (for B. cepacia, 5'-AGC ACT CCC RCC TCT CAG-3'; for B. multivorans, 5'-AGC ACT CCC GAA TCT CTT-3') and 23S rDNA primers (for B. vietnamiensis, 5'-TCC TAC CAT GCG TGC AA-3') were paired with a general sense primer of 16S rDNAs (5'-AGR GTT YGA TYM TGG CTC AG-3') or with a sense primer of 23S rDNA (5'-CCT TTG GGT CAT CCT GGA-3'). PCR with these primers under optimized conditions is appropriate to specifically and rapidly identify B. multivorans, B. vietnamiensis, and B. cepacia (genomovars I, III, and IV are not discriminated). In comparison with the polyphasic taxonomic analyses presently necessary for species and genomovar identification within the B. cepacia complex, our procedure is more rapid and easier to perform and may contribute to clarifying the clinical significance of individual members of the complex in cystic fibrosis.

  13. South African Papilionoid Legumes Are Nodulated by Diverse Burkholderia with Unique Nodulation and Nitrogen-Fixation Loci

    PubMed Central

    Beukes, Chrizelle W.; Venter, Stephanus N.; Law, Ian J.; Phalane, Francina L.; Steenkamp, Emma T.

    2013-01-01

    The root-nodule bacteria of legumes endemic to the Cape Floristic Region are largely understudied, even though recent reports suggest the occurrence of nodulating Burkholderia species unique to the region. In this study, we considered the diversity and evolution of nodulating Burkholderia associated with the endemic papilionoid tribes Hypocalypteae and Podalyrieae. We identified distinct groups from verified rhizobial isolates by phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA and recA housekeeping gene regions. In order to gain insight into the evolution of the nodulation and diazotrophy of these rhizobia we analysed the genes encoding NifH and NodA. The majority of these 69 isolates appeared to be unique, potentially representing novel species. Evidence of horizontal gene transfer determining the symbiotic ability of these Cape Floristic Region isolates indicate evolutionary origins distinct from those of nodulating Burkholderia from elsewhere in the world. Overall, our findings suggest that Burkholderia species associated with fynbos legumes are highly diverse and their symbiotic abilities have unique ancestries. It is therefore possible that the evolution of these bacteria is closely linked to the diversification and establishment of legumes characteristic of the Cape Floristic Region. PMID:23874611

  14. Inactivation of Burkholderia cepacia Complex Phage KS9 gp41 Identifies the Phage Repressor and Generates Lytic Virions▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Karlene H.; Seed, Kimberley D.; Stothard, Paul; Dennis, Jonathan J.

    2010-01-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) is made up of at least 17 species of Gram-negative opportunistic bacterial pathogens that cause fatal infections in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic granulomatous disease. KS9 (vB_BcenS_KS9), one of a number of temperate phages isolated from BCC species, is a prophage of Burkholderia pyrrocinia LMG 21824. Transmission electron micrographs indicate that KS9 belongs to the family Siphoviridae and exhibits the B1 morphotype. The 39,896-bp KS9 genome, comprised of 50 predicted genes, integrates into the 3′ end of the LMG 21824 GTP cyclohydrolase II open reading frame. The KS9 genome is most similar to uncharacterized prophage elements in the genome of B. cenocepacia PC184 (vB_BcenZ_ PC184), as well as Burkholderia thailandensis phage φE125 and Burkholderia pseudomallei phage φ1026b. Using molecular techniques, we have disrupted KS9 gene 41, which exhibits similarity to genes encoding phage repressors, producing a lytic mutant named KS9c. This phage is incapable of stable lysogeny in either LMG 21824 or B. cenocepacia strain K56-2 and rescues a Galleria mellonella infection model from experimental B. cenocepacia K56-2 infections at relatively low multiplicities of infection. These results readily demonstrate that temperate phages can be genetically engineered to lytic form and that these modified phages can be used to treat bacterial infections in vivo. PMID:19939932

  15. South african papilionoid legumes are nodulated by diverse burkholderia with unique nodulation and nitrogen-fixation Loci.

    PubMed

    Beukes, Chrizelle W; Venter, Stephanus N; Law, Ian J; Phalane, Francina L; Steenkamp, Emma T

    2013-01-01

    The root-nodule bacteria of legumes endemic to the Cape Floristic Region are largely understudied, even though recent reports suggest the occurrence of nodulating Burkholderia species unique to the region. In this study, we considered the diversity and evolution of nodulating Burkholderia associated with the endemic papilionoid tribes Hypocalypteae and Podalyrieae. We identified distinct groups from verified rhizobial isolates by phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA and recA housekeeping gene regions. In order to gain insight into the evolution of the nodulation and diazotrophy of these rhizobia we analysed the genes encoding NifH and NodA. The majority of these 69 isolates appeared to be unique, potentially representing novel species. Evidence of horizontal gene transfer determining the symbiotic ability of these Cape Floristic Region isolates indicate evolutionary origins distinct from those of nodulating Burkholderia from elsewhere in the world. Overall, our findings suggest that Burkholderia species associated with fynbos legumes are highly diverse and their symbiotic abilities have unique ancestries. It is therefore possible that the evolution of these bacteria is closely linked to the diversification and establishment of legumes characteristic of the Cape Floristic Region. PMID:23874611

  16. Survival of Burkholderia pseudomallei on Environmental Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shams, Alicia M; Rose, Laura J; Hodges, Lisa; Arduino, Matthew J

    2007-12-01

    The survival of the biothreat agent Burkholderia pseudomallei on the surfaces of four materials was measured by culture and esterase activity analyses. The culture results demonstrated that this organism persisted for <24 h to <7 days depending on the material, bacterial isolate, and suspension medium. The persistence determined by analysis of esterase activity, as measured with a ScanRDI solid-phase cytometer, was always longer than the persistence determined by culture analysis.

  17. Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei: the causative micro-organisms of glanders and melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Gilad, Jacob

    2007-11-01

    Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei are the causative micro-organisms of Glanders and Melioidosis, respectively. Although now rare in Western countries, both micro-organisms have recently gained much interest because of their unique potential as bioterrorism agents. This paper reviews the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of Melioidosis and Glanders. Recent patents relating to these micro-organisms, especially potential vaccines, are presented. Continued research and development is urgently needed, especially in regard to rapid and accurate diagnosis of melioidosis and glanders, efficacious therapy and primary and secondary prevention.

  18. Burkholderia cenocepacia Differential Gene Expression during Host–Pathogen Interactions and Adaptation to the Host Environment

    PubMed Central

    O’Grady, Eoin P.; Sokol, Pamela A.

    2011-01-01

    Members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) are important in medical, biotechnological, and agricultural disciplines. These bacteria naturally occur in soil and water environments and have adapted to survive in association with plants and animals including humans. All Bcc species are opportunistic pathogens including Burkholderia cenocepacia that causes infections in cystic fibrosis and chronic granulomatous disease patients. The adaptation of B. cenocepacia to the host environment was assessed in a rat chronic respiratory infection model and compared to that of high cell-density in vitro grown cultures using transcriptomics. The distribution of genes differentially expressed on chromosomes 1, 2, and 3 was relatively proportional to the size of each genomic element, whereas the proportion of plasmid-encoded genes differentially expressed was much higher relative to its size and most genes were induced in vivo. The majority of genes encoding known virulence factors, components of types II and III secretion systems and chromosome 2-encoded type IV secretion system were similarly expressed between in vitro and in vivo environments. Lower expression in vivo was detected for genes encoding N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthase CepI, orphan LuxR homolog CepR2, zinc metalloproteases ZmpA and ZmpB, LysR-type transcriptional regulator ShvR, nematocidal protein AidA, and genes associated with flagellar motility, Flp type pilus formation, and type VI secretion. Plasmid-encoded type IV secretion genes were markedly induced in vivo. Additional genes induced in vivo included genes predicted to be involved in osmotic stress adaptation or intracellular survival, metal ion, and nutrient transport, as well as those encoding outer membrane proteins. Genes identified in this study are potentially important for virulence during host–pathogen interactions and may be associated with survival and adaptation to the host environment during chronic lung infections. PMID:22919581

  19. Development of Burkholderia mallei and pseudomallei vaccines.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ediane B; Dow, Steven W

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei are Gram-negative bacteria that cause glanders and melioidosis, respectively. Inhalational infection with either organism can result in severe and rapidly fatal pneumonia. Inoculation by the oral and cutaneous routes can also produce infection. Chronic infection may develop after recovery from acute infection with both agents, and control of infection with antibiotics requires prolonged treatment. Symptoms for both meliodosis and glanders are non-specific, making diagnosis difficult. B. pseudomallei can be located in the environment, but in the host, B. mallei and B. psedomallei are intracellular organisms, and infection results in similar immune responses to both agents. Effective early innate immune responses are critical to controlling the early phase of the infection. Innate immune signaling molecules such as TLR, NOD, MyD88, and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ and TNF-α play key roles in regulating control of infection. Neutrophils and monocytes are critical cells in the early infection for both microorganisms. Both monocytes and macrophages are necessary for limiting dissemination of B. pseudomallei. In contrast, the role of adaptive immune responses in controlling Burkholderia infection is less well understood. However, T cell responses are critical for vaccine protection from Burkholderia infection. At present, effective vaccines for prevention of glanders or meliodosis have not been developed, although recently development of Burkholderia vaccines has received renewed attention. This review will summarize current and past approaches to develop B. mallei and B. pseudomalllei vaccines, with emphasis on immune mechanisms of protection and the challenges facing the field. At present, immunization with live attenuated bacteria provides the most effective and durable immunity, and it is important therefore to understand the immune correlates of protection induced by live attenuated vaccines. Subunit

  20. Whole-Genome Assemblies of 56 Burkholderia Species

    PubMed Central

    Daligault, H. E.; Davenport, K. W.; Minogue, T. D.; Bishop-Lilly, K. A.; Broomall, S. M.; Bruce, D. C.; Chain, P. S.; Coyne, S. R.; Frey, K. G.; Gibbons, H. S.; Jaissle, J.; Koroleva, G. I.; Ladner, J. T.; Lo, C.-C.; Munk, C.; Palacios, G. F.; Redden, C. L.; Rosenzweig, C. N.; Scholz, M. B.

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia is a genus of betaproteobacteria that includes three notable human pathogens: B. cepacia, B. pseudomallei, and B. mallei. While B. pseudomallei and B. mallei are considered potential biowarfare agents, B. cepacia infections are largely limited to cystic fibrosis patients. Here, we present 56 Burkholderia genomes from 8 distinct species. PMID:25414490

  1. Draft Genomes for Eight Burkholderia mallei Isolates from Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Daligault, H. E.; Davenport, K. W.; Minogue, T. D.; Bishop-Lilly, K. A.; Broomall, S. M.; Bruce, D. C.; Coyne, S. R.; Frey, K. G.; Gibbons, H. S.; Jaissle, J.; Koroleva, G. I.; Ladner, J. T.; Lo, C.-C.; Munk, C.; Wolcott, M. J.; Palacios, G. F.; Redden, C. L.; Rosenzweig, C. N.; Scholz, M. B.; Chain, P. S.

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei, the etiologic agent of glanders, is a Gram-negative, nonmotile, facultative intracellular pathogen. Although glanders has been eradicated from many parts of the world, the threat of B. mallei being used as a weapon is very real. Here we present draft genome assemblies of 8 Burkholderia mallei strains that were isolated in Turkey. PMID:26744368

  2. 40 CFR 725.1075 - Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS Significant New Uses for Specific Microorganisms § 725.1075 Burkholderia cepacia complex. (a) Microorganism and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The microorganisms identified as the Burkholderia cepacia complex defined...

  3. Draft Genomes for Eight Burkholderia mallei Isolates from Turkey

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Daligault, H. E.; Johnson, Shannon L.; Davenport, K. W.; Minogue, T. D.; Bishop-Lilly, K. A.; Broomall, S. M.; Bruce, D. C.; Coyne, S. R.; Frey, K. G.; Gibbons, H. S.; et al

    2016-01-07

    Burkholderia mallei, the etiologic agent of glanders, is a Gram-negative, nonmotile, facultative intracellular pathogen. Though glanders have been eradicated from many parts of the world, the threat ofB. malleibeing used as a weapon is very real. We, then, present draft genome assemblies of 8Burkholderia malleistrains that were isolated in Turkey.

  4. 40 CFR 725.1075 - Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS Significant New Uses for Specific Microorganisms § 725.1075 Burkholderia cepacia complex. (a) Microorganism and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The microorganisms identified as the Burkholderia cepacia complex defined...

  5. Complete Genome Sequences for 59 Burkholderia Isolates, Both Pathogenic and Near Neighbor

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Shannon L.; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.; Ladner, Jason T.; Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Davenport, Karen W.; Jaissle, James; Frey, Kenneth G.; Koroleva, Galina I.; Bruce, David C.; Coyne, Susan R.; Broomall, Stacey M.; Li, Po-E; Teshima, Hazuki; Gibbons, Henry S.; Palacios, Gustavo F.; Rosenzweig, C. Nicole; Redden, Cassie L.; Xu, Yan; Minogue, Timothy D.; Chain, Patrick S.

    2015-04-30

    The genus Burkholderia encompasses both pathogenic (including Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Category B listed), and nonpathogenic Gram-negative bacilli. Presented in this document are full genome sequences for a panel of 59 Burkholderia strains, selected to aid in detection assay development.

  6. Complete Genome Sequences for 59 Burkholderia Isolates, Both Pathogenic and Near Neighbor

    PubMed Central

    Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.; Ladner, Jason T.; Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Davenport, Karen W.; Jaissle, James; Frey, Kenneth G.; Koroleva, Galina I.; Bruce, David C.; Coyne, Susan R.; Broomall, Stacey M.; Li, Po-E; Teshima, Hazuki; Gibbons, Henry S.; Palacios, Gustavo F.; Rosenzweig, C. Nicole; Redden, Cassie L.; Xu, Yan; Minogue, Timothy D.; Chain, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    The genus Burkholderia encompasses both pathogenic (including Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Category B listed), and nonpathogenic Gram-negative bacilli. Here we present full genome sequences for a panel of 59 Burkholderia strains, selected to aid in detection assay development. PMID:25931592

  7. Dioxygenases in Burkholderia ambifaria and Yersinia pestis that hydroxylate the outer Kdo unit of lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hak Suk; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2011-01-01

    Several Gram-negative pathogens, including Yersinia pestis, Burkholderia cepacia, and Acinetobacter haemolyticus, synthesize an isosteric analog of 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo), known as d-glycero-d-talo-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Ko), in which the axial hydrogen atom at the Kdo 3-position is replaced with OH. Here we report a unique Kdo 3-hydroxylase (KdoO) from Burkholderia ambifaria and Yersinia pestis, encoded by the bamb_0774 (BakdoO) and the y1812 (YpkdoO) genes, respectively. When expressed in heptosyl transferase-deficient Escherichia coli, these genes result in conversion of the outer Kdo unit of Kdo2-lipid A to Ko in an O2-dependent manner. KdoO contains the putative iron-binding motif, HXDXn>40H. Reconstitution of KdoO activity in vitro with Kdo2-lipid A as the substrate required addition of Fe2+, α-ketoglutarate, and ascorbic acid, confirming that KdoO is a Fe2+/α-ketoglutarate/O2-dependent dioxygenase. Conversion of Kdo to Ko in Kdo2-lipid A conferred reduced susceptibility to mild acid hydrolysis. Although two enzymes that catalyze Fe2+/α-ketoglutarate/O2-dependent hydroxylation of deoxyuridine in fungal extracts have been reported previously, kdoO is the first example of a gene encoding a deoxy-sugar hydroxylase. Homologues of KdoO are found exclusively in Gram-negative bacteria, including the human pathogens Burkholderia mallei, Yersinia pestis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Legionella longbeachae, and Coxiella burnetii, as well as the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. PMID:21178073

  8. The Identification and Differentiation between Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei Using One Gene Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Gilling, Damian H.; Luna, Vicki Ann; Pflugradt, Cori

    2014-01-01

    The etiologic agents for melioidosis and glanders, Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei respectively, are genetically similar making identification and differentiation from other Burkholderia species and each other challenging. We used pyrosequencing to determine the presence or absence of an insertion sequence IS407A within the flagellin P (fliP) gene and to exploit the difference in orientation of this gene in the two species. Oligonucleotide primers were designed to selectively target the IS407A-fliP interface in B. mallei and the fliP gene specifically at the insertion point in B. pseudomallei. We then examined DNA from ten B. mallei, ten B. pseudomallei, 14 B. cepacia, eight other Burkholderia spp., and 17 other bacteria. Resultant pyrograms encompassed the target sequence that contained either the fliP gene with the IS407A interruption or the fully intact fliP gene with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. These pyrosequencing assays based upon a single gene enable investigators to reliably identify the two species. The information obtained by these assays provides more knowledge of the genomic reduction that created the new species B. mallei from B. pseudomallei and may point to new targets that can be exploited in the future. PMID:27350960

  9. Genomic plasticity of the causative agent of melioidosis, Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Holden, Matthew T G; Titball, Richard W; Peacock, Sharon J; Cerdeño-Tárraga, Ana M; Atkins, Timothy; Crossman, Lisa C; Pitt, Tyrone; Churcher, Carol; Mungall, Karen; Bentley, Stephen D; Sebaihia, Mohammed; Thomson, Nicholas R; Bason, Nathalie; Beacham, Ifor R; Brooks, Karen; Brown, Katherine A; Brown, Nat F; Challis, Greg L; Cherevach, Inna; Chillingworth, Tracy; Cronin, Ann; Crossett, Ben; Davis, Paul; DeShazer, David; Feltwell, Theresa; Fraser, Audrey; Hance, Zahra; Hauser, Heidi; Holroyd, Simon; Jagels, Kay; Keith, Karen E; Maddison, Mark; Moule, Sharon; Price, Claire; Quail, Michael A; Rabbinowitsch, Ester; Rutherford, Kim; Sanders, Mandy; Simmonds, Mark; Songsivilai, Sirirurg; Stevens, Kim; Tumapa, Sarinna; Vesaratchavest, Monkgol; Whitehead, Sally; Yeats, Corin; Barrell, Bart G; Oyston, Petra C F; Parkhill, Julian

    2004-09-28

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a recognized biothreat agent and the causative agent of melioidosis. This Gram-negative bacterium exists as a soil saprophyte in melioidosis-endemic areas of the world and accounts for 20% of community-acquired septicaemias in northeastern Thailand where half of those affected die. Here we report the complete genome of B. pseudomallei, which is composed of two chromosomes of 4.07 megabase pairs and 3.17 megabase pairs, showing significant functional partitioning of genes between them. The large chromosome encodes many of the core functions associated with central metabolism and cell growth, whereas the small chromosome carries more accessory functions associated with adaptation and survival in different niches. Genomic comparisons with closely and more distantly related bacteria revealed a greater level of gene order conservation and a greater number of orthologous genes on the large chromosome, suggesting that the two replicons have distinct evolutionary origins. A striking feature of the genome was the presence of 16 genomic islands (GIs) that together made up 6.1% of the genome. Further analysis revealed these islands to be variably present in a collection of invasive and soil isolates but entirely absent from the clonally related organism B. mallei. We propose that variable horizontal gene acquisition by B. pseudomallei is an important feature of recent genetic evolution and that this has resulted in a genetically diverse pathogenic species.

  10. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Lebeckia ambigua-nodulating Burkholderia sp. strain WSM4176

    DOE PAGESBeta

    De Meyer, Sofie E.; Tian, Rui; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, TBK; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Yates, Ron; et al

    2015-10-16

    We report that Burkholderia sp. strain WSM4176 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective N2-fixing root nodule of Lebeckia ambigua collected in Nieuwoudtville, Western Cape of South Africa, in October 2007. This plant persists in infertile, acidic and deep sandy soils, and is therefore an ideal candidate for a perennial based agriculture system in Western Australia. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain WSM4176, which represents a potential inoculant quality strain for L. ambigua, together with sequence and annotation. The 9,065,247 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in 13 scaffolds of 65 contigs,more » contains 8369 protein-coding genes and 128 RNA-only encoding genes, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project proposal (Project ID 882).« less

  11. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Lebeckia ambigua-nodulating Burkholderia sp. strain WSM4176

    SciTech Connect

    De Meyer, Sofie E.; Tian, Rui; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, TBK; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Yates, Ron; Howieson, John; Reeve, Wayne

    2015-10-16

    We report that Burkholderia sp. strain WSM4176 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective N2-fixing root nodule of Lebeckia ambigua collected in Nieuwoudtville, Western Cape of South Africa, in October 2007. This plant persists in infertile, acidic and deep sandy soils, and is therefore an ideal candidate for a perennial based agriculture system in Western Australia. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain WSM4176, which represents a potential inoculant quality strain for L. ambigua, together with sequence and annotation. The 9,065,247 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in 13 scaffolds of 65 contigs, contains 8369 protein-coding genes and 128 RNA-only encoding genes, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project proposal (Project ID 882).

  12. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors from Burkholderia Thailandensis

    PubMed Central

    Klausmeyer, Paul; Shipley, Suzanne; Zuck, Karina M.; McCloud, Thomas G.

    2011-01-01

    Bioactivity guided fractionation of an extract of Burkholderia thailandensis led to the isolation and identification of a new cytotoxic depsipeptide and its dimer. Both compounds potently inhibited the function of histone deacetylases 1 and 4. The monomer, spiruchostatin C (2), was tested side-by-side with the clinical depsipeptide FK228 (1, Istodax®, romidepsin) in a murine hollow fiber assay consisting of 12 implanted tumor cell lines. Spiruchostatin C (2) showed good activity towards LOX IMVI melanoma cells and NCI-H522 non small cell lung cancer cells. Overall, however, FK228 (1) showed a superior in vivo antitumor profile compared to the new compound. PMID:21967146

  13. Burkholderia rhynchosiae sp. nov., isolated from Rhynchosia ferulifolia root nodules.

    PubMed

    De Meyer, Sofie E; Cnockaert, Margo; Ardley, Julie K; Trengove, Robert D; Garau, Giovanni; Howieson, John G; Vandamme, Peter

    2013-11-01

    Two strains of Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped bacteria were isolated from root nodules of the South African legume Rhynchosia ferulifolia and authenticated on this host. Based on phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene, strains WSM3930 and WSM3937(T) belonged to the genus Burkholderia, with the highest degree of sequence similarity to Burkholderia terricola (98.84 %). Additionally, the housekeeping genes gyrB and recA were analysed since 16S rRNA gene sequences are highly similar between closely related species of the genus Burkholderia. The results obtained for both housekeeping genes, gyrB and recA, showed the highest degree of sequence similarity of the novel strains towards Burkholderia caledonica LMG 19076(T) (94.2 % and 94.5 %, respectively). Chemotaxonomic data, including fatty acid profiles and respiratory quinone data supported the assignment of strains WSM3930 and WSM3937(T) to the genus Burkholderia. DNA-DNA hybridizations, and physiological and biochemical tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strains WSM3930 and WSM3937(T) from the most closely related species of the genus Burkholderia with validly published names. We conclude, therefore, that these strains represent a novel species for which the name Burkholderia rhynchosiae sp. nov. is proposed, with strain WSM3937(T) ( = LMG 27174(T) = HAMBI 3354(T)) as the type strain.

  14. Burkholderia humi sp. nov., isolated from peat soil.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sathiyaraj; Kim, Jinsoo; Kang, Sang-Rim; Jheong, Weon-Hwa; Lee, Sang-Seob

    2013-03-01

    A Gram-negative, aerobic, short-rod-shaped, non-motile bacterium designated Rs7(T), was isolated from peat soil collected from Russia and was characterized to determine its taxonomic position. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the strain Rs7(T) belongs to the class Betaproteobacteria. The highest degree of sequence similarities were determined to be with Burkholderia tropica Ppe8(T) (98.4 %), Burkholderia unamae MTI-641(T) (97.8 %), Burkholderia bannensis E25(T) (97.7 %), Burkholderia heleia SA41(T) (97.0 %), and Burkholderia sacchari IPT101(T) (97.0 %). Chemotaxonomic data revealed that the strain Rs7(T) possesses ubiquinone Q-8. The polar lipid profile of strain Rs7(T) contained phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, and an unknown amino phospholipid. The predominant fatty acids were C(16:0), C(19:0) cyclo ω8c, and C(17:0) cyclo, all of which corroborated the assignment of the strain to the genus Burkholderia. The DNA G+C content was 63.2 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments showed less than 37.8 % DNA relatedness with closely related type strains, thus confirming separate species status. The results of physiological and biochemical tests allowed phenotypic differentiation of strain Rs7(T) from the members of the genus Burkholderia. Based on these data, Rs7(T) (=KEMC 7302-068(T) = JCM 18069(T)) should be classified as the type strain for a novel Burkholderia species, for which the name Burkholderia humi sp. nov. is proposed.

  15. A Unique Set of the Burkholderia Collagen-Like Proteins Provides Insight into Pathogenesis, Genome Evolution and Niche Adaptation, and Infection Detection

    PubMed Central

    Bachert, Beth A.; Choi, Soo J.; Snyder, Anna K.; Rio, Rita V. M.; Durney, Brandon C.; Holland, Lisa A.; Amemiya, Kei; Welkos, Susan L.; Bozue, Joel A.; Cote, Christopher K.; Berisio, Rita; Lukomski, Slawomir

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei, classified as category B priority pathogens, are significant human and animal pathogens that are highly infectious and broad-spectrum antibiotic resistant. Currently, the pathogenicity mechanisms utilized by Burkholderia are not fully understood, and correct diagnosis of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei infection remains a challenge due to limited detection methods. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of a set of 13 novel Burkholderia collagen-like proteins (Bucl) that were identified among B. pseudomallei and B. mallei select agents. We infer that several Bucl proteins participate in pathogenesis based on their noncollagenous domains that are associated with the components of a type III secretion apparatus and membrane transport systems. Homology modeling of the outer membrane efflux domain of Bucl8 points to a role in multi-drug resistance. We determined that bucl genes are widespread in B. pseudomallei and B. mallei; Fischer’s exact test and Cramer’s V2 values indicate that the majority of bucl genes are highly associated with these pathogenic species versus nonpathogenic B. thailandensis. We designed a bucl-based quantitative PCR assay which was able to detect B. pseudomallei infection in a mouse with a detection limit of 50 CFU. Finally, chromosomal mapping and phylogenetic analysis of bucl loci revealed considerable genomic plasticity and adaptation of Burkholderia spp. to host and environmental niches. In this study, we identified a large set of phylogenetically unrelated bucl genes commonly found in Burkholderia select agents, encoding predicted pathogenicity factors, detection targets, and vaccine candidates. PMID:26356298

  16. Encoding Dictionaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ide, Nancy

    1995-01-01

    Describes problems in devising a Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) encoding format for dictionaries. Asserts that the high degree of structuring and compression of information are among the most complex text types treated in the TEI. Concludes that the source of some TEI problems lies in the design of Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML). (CFR)

  17. Plant host and sugar alcohol induced exopolysaccharide biosynthesis in the Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    PubMed

    Bartholdson, S Josefin; Brown, Alan R; Mewburn, Ben R; Clarke, David J; Fry, Stephen C; Campopiano, Dominic J; Govan, John R W

    2008-08-01

    The species that presently constitute the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) have multiple roles; they include soil and water saprophytes, bioremediators, and plant, animal and human pathogens. Since the first description of pathogenicity in the Bcc was based on sour skin rot of onion bulbs, this study returned to this plant host to investigate the onion-associated phenotype of the Bcc. Many Bcc isolates, which were previously considered to be non-mucoid, produced copious amounts of exopolysaccharide (EPS) when onion tissue was provided as the sole nutrient. EPS production was not species-specific, was observed in isolates from both clinical and environmental sources, and did not correlate with the ability to cause maceration of onion tissue. Chemical analysis suggested that the onion components responsible for EPS induction were primarily the carbohydrates sucrose, fructose and fructans. Additional sugars were investigated, and all alcohol sugars tested were able to induce EPS production, in particular mannitol and glucitol. To investigate the molecular basis for EPS biosynthesis, we focused on the highly conserved bce gene cluster thought to be involved in cepacian biosynthesis. We demonstrated induction of the bce gene cluster by mannitol, and found a clear correlation between the inability of representatives of the Burkholderia cenocepacia ET12 lineage to produce EPS and the presence of an 11 bp deletion within the bceB gene, which encodes a glycosyltransferase. Insertional inactivation of bceB in Burkholderia ambifaria AMMD results in loss of EPS production on sugar alcohol media. These novel and surprising insights into EPS biosynthesis highlight the metabolic potential of the Bcc and show that a potential virulence factor may not be detected by routine laboratory culture. Our results also highlight a potential hazard in the use of inhaled mannitol as an osmolyte to improve mucociliary clearance in individuals with cystic fibrosis. PMID:18667584

  18. Membrane-active mechanism of LFchimera against Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia thailandensis.

    PubMed

    Kanthawong, Sakawrat; Puknun, Aekkalak; Bolscher, Jan G M; Nazmi, Kamran; van Marle, Jan; de Soet, Johannes J; Veerman, Enno C I; Wongratanacheewin, Surasakdi; Taweechaisupapong, Suwimol

    2014-10-01

    LFchimera, a construct combining two antimicrobial domains of bovine lactoferrin, lactoferrampin265-284 and lactoferricin17-30, possesses strong bactericidal activity. As yet, no experimental evidence was presented to evaluate the mechanisms of LFchimera against Burkholderia isolates. In this study we analyzed the killing activity of LFchimera on the category B pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei in comparison to the lesser virulent Burkholderia thailandensis often used as a model for the highly virulent B. pseudomallei. Killing kinetics showed that B. thailandensis E264 was more susceptible for LFchimera than B. pseudomallei 1026b. Interestingly the bactericidal activity of LFchimera appeared highly pH dependent; B. thailandensis killing was completely abolished at and below pH 6.4. FITC-labeled LFchimera caused a rapid accumulation within 15 min in the cytoplasm of both bacterial species. Moreover, freeze-fracture electron microscopy demonstrated extreme effects on the membrane morphology of both bacterial species within 1 h of incubation, accompanied by altered membrane permeability monitored as leakage of nucleotides. These data indicate that the mechanism of action of LFchimera is similar for both species and encompasses disruption of the plasma membrane and subsequently leakage of intracellular nucleotides leading to cell dead.

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of burkholderia species by multilocus sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Estrada-de los Santos, Paulina; Vinuesa, Pablo; Martínez-Aguilar, Lourdes; Hirsch, Ann M; Caballero-Mellado, Jesús

    2013-07-01

    Burkholderia comprises more than 60 species of environmental, clinical, and agro-biotechnological relevance. Previous phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA, recA, gyrB, rpoB, and acdS gene sequences as well as genome sequence comparisons of different Burkholderia species have revealed two major species clusters. In this study, we undertook a multilocus sequence analysis of 77 type and reference strains of Burkholderia using atpD, gltB, lepA, and recA genes in combination with the 16S rRNA gene sequence and employed maximum likelihood and neighbor-joining criteria to test this further. The phylogenetic analysis revealed, with high supporting values, distinct lineages within the genus Burkholderia. The two large groups were named A and B, whereas the B. rhizoxinica/B. endofungorum, and B. andropogonis groups consisted of two and one species, respectively. The group A encompasses several plant-associated and saprophytic bacterial species. The group B comprises the B. cepacia complex (opportunistic human pathogens), the B. pseudomallei subgroup, which includes both human and animal pathogens, and an assemblage of plant pathogenic species. The distinct lineages present in Burkholderia suggest that each group might represent a different genus. However, it will be necessary to analyze the full set of Burkholderia species and explore whether enough phenotypic features exist among the different clusters to propose that these groups should be considered separate genera.

  20. Environmental Transmission of the Gut Symbiont Burkholderia to Phloem-Feeding Blissus insularis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yao; Buss, Eileen A.; Boucias, Drion G.

    2016-01-01

    The plant-phloem-feeding Blissus insularis possesses specialized midgut crypts, which harbor a dense population of the exocellular bacterial symbiont Burkholderia. Most individual B. insularis harbor a single Burkholderia ribotype in their midgut crypts; however, a diverse Burkholderia community exists within a host population. To understand the mechanism underlying the consistent occurrence of various Burkholderia in B. insularis and their specific association, we investigated potential gut symbiont transmission routes. PCR amplification detected a low titer of Burkholderia in adult reproductive tracts; however, fluorescence in situ hybridization assays failed to produce detectable signals in these tracts. Furthermore, no Burkholderia-specific PCR signals were detected in eggs and neonates, suggesting that it is unlikely that B. insularis prenatally transmits gut symbionts via ovarioles. In rearing experiments, most nymphs reared on St. Augustinegrass treated with cultured Burkholderia harbored the cultured Burkholderia strains. Burkholderia was detected in the untreated host grass of B. insularis, and most nymphs reared on untreated grass harbored a Burkholderia ribotype that was closely related to a plant-associated Burkholderia strain. These findings revealed that B. insularis neonates acquired Burkholderia primarily from the environment (i.e., plants and soils), even though the possibility of acquisition via egg surface cannot be excluded. In addition, our study explains how the diverse Burkholderia symbiont community in B. insularis populations can be maintained. PMID:27548682

  1. Environmental Transmission of the Gut Symbiont Burkholderia to Phloem-Feeding Blissus insularis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yao; Buss, Eileen A; Boucias, Drion G

    2016-01-01

    The plant-phloem-feeding Blissus insularis possesses specialized midgut crypts, which harbor a dense population of the exocellular bacterial symbiont Burkholderia. Most individual B. insularis harbor a single Burkholderia ribotype in their midgut crypts; however, a diverse Burkholderia community exists within a host population. To understand the mechanism underlying the consistent occurrence of various Burkholderia in B. insularis and their specific association, we investigated potential gut symbiont transmission routes. PCR amplification detected a low titer of Burkholderia in adult reproductive tracts; however, fluorescence in situ hybridization assays failed to produce detectable signals in these tracts. Furthermore, no Burkholderia-specific PCR signals were detected in eggs and neonates, suggesting that it is unlikely that B. insularis prenatally transmits gut symbionts via ovarioles. In rearing experiments, most nymphs reared on St. Augustinegrass treated with cultured Burkholderia harbored the cultured Burkholderia strains. Burkholderia was detected in the untreated host grass of B. insularis, and most nymphs reared on untreated grass harbored a Burkholderia ribotype that was closely related to a plant-associated Burkholderia strain. These findings revealed that B. insularis neonates acquired Burkholderia primarily from the environment (i.e., plants and soils), even though the possibility of acquisition via egg surface cannot be excluded. In addition, our study explains how the diverse Burkholderia symbiont community in B. insularis populations can be maintained. PMID:27548682

  2. Exploitation of host cells by Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Mark P; Galyov, Edouard E

    2004-04-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved mechanisms to enter and exit eukaryotic cells using the power of actin polymerisation and to subvert the activity of cellular enzymes and signal transduction pathways. The proteins deployed by bacteria to subvert cellular processes often mimic eukaryotic proteins in their structure or function. Studies on the exploitation of host cells by the facultative intracellular pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei are providing novel insights into the pathogenesis of melioidosis, a serious invasive disease of animals and humans that is endemic in tropical and subtropical areas. B. pseudomallei can invade epithelial cells, survive and proliferate inside phagocytes, escape from endocytic vesicles, form actin-based membrane protrusions and induce host cell fusion. Here we review current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes.

  3. Curcumin rescues Caenorhabditis elegans from a Burkholderia pseudomallei infection

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Su-Anne; Nathan, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    The tropical pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei requires long-term parenteral antimicrobial treatment to eradicate the pathogen from an infected patient. However, the development of antibiotic resistance is emerging as a threat to this form of treatment. To meet the need for alternative therapeutics, we proposed a screen of natural products for compounds that do not kill the pathogen, but in turn, abrogate bacterial virulence. We suggest that the use of molecules or compounds that are non-bactericidal (bacteriostatic) will reduce or abolish the development of resistance by the pathogen. In this study, we adopted the established Caenorhabditis elegans-B. pseudomallei infection model to screen a collection of natural products for any that are able to extend the survival of B. pseudomallei infected worms. Of the 42 natural products screened, only curcumin significantly improved worm survival following infection whilst not affecting bacterial growth. This suggested that curcumin promoted B. pseudomallei-infected worm survival independent of pathogen killing. To validate that the protective effect of curcumin was directed toward the pathogen, bacteria were treated with curcumin prior to infection. Worms fed with curcumin-treated bacteria survived with a significantly extended mean-time-to-death (p < 0.0001) compared to the untreated control. In in vitro assays, curcumin reduced the activity of known virulence factors (lipase and protease) and biofilm formation. To determine if other bacterial genes were also regulated in the presence of curcumin, a genome-wide transcriptome analysis was performed on curcumin-treated pathogen. A number of genes involved in iron acquisition and transport as well as genes encoding hypothetical proteins were induced in the presence of curcumin. Thus, we propose that curcumin may attenuate B. pseudomallei by modulating the expression of a number of bacterial proteins including lipase and protease as well as biofilm formation whilst

  4. Biogeography of Burkholderia pseudomallei in the Torres Strait Islands of Northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Baker, Anthony; Mayo, Mark; Owens, Leigh; Burgess, Graham; Norton, Robert; McBride, William John Hannan; Currie, Bart J; Warner, Jeffrey

    2013-08-01

    It has been hypothesized that biogeographical boundaries are a feature of Burkholderia pseudomallei ecology, and they impact the epidemiology of melioidosis on a global scale. This study examined the relatedness of B. pseudomallei sourced from islands in the Torres Strait of Northern Australia to determine if the geography of isolated island communities is a determinant of the organisms' dispersal. Environmental sampling on Badu Island in the Near Western Island cluster recovered a single clone. An additional 32 clinical isolates from the region were sourced. Isolates were characterized using multilocus sequence typing and a multiplex PCR targeting the flagellum gene cluster. Gene cluster analysis determined that 69% of the isolates from the region encoded the ancestral Burkholderia thailandensis-like flagellum and chemotaxis gene cluster, a proportion significantly lower than that reported from mainland Australia and consistent with observations of isolates from southern Papua New Guinea. A goodness-of-fit test indicated that there was geographic localization of sequence types throughout the archipelago, with the exception of Thursday Island, the economic and cultural hub of the region. Sequence types common to mainland Australia and Papua New Guinea were identified. These findings demonstrate for the first time an environmental reservoir for B. pseudomallei in the Torres Strait, and multilocus sequence typing suggests that the organism is not randomly distributed throughout this region and that seawater may provide a barrier to dispersal of the organism. Moreover, these findings support an anthropogenic dispersal hypothesis for the spread of B. pseudomallei throughout this region.

  5. Interbacterial signaling via Burkholderia contact-dependent growth inhibition system proteins.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Erin C; Perault, Andrew I; Marlatt, Sara A; Cotter, Peggy A

    2016-07-19

    In prokaryotes and eukaryotes, cell-cell communication and recognition of self are critical to coordinate multicellular functions. Although kin and kind discrimination are increasingly appreciated to shape naturally occurring microbe populations, the underlying mechanisms that govern these interbacterial interactions are insufficiently understood. Here, we identify a mechanism of interbacterial signal transduction that is mediated by contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) system proteins. CDI systems have been characterized by their ability to deliver a polymorphic protein toxin into the cytoplasm of a neighboring bacterium, resulting in growth inhibition or death unless the recipient bacterium produces a corresponding immunity protein. Using the model organism Burkholderia thailandensis, we show that delivery of a catalytically active CDI system toxin to immune (self) bacteria results in gene expression and phenotypic changes within the recipient cells. Termed contact-dependent signaling (CDS), this response promotes biofilm formation and other community-associated behaviors. Engineered strains that are isogenic with B. thailandensis, except the DNA region encoding the toxin and immunity proteins, did not display CDS, whereas a strain of Burkholderia dolosa producing a nearly identical toxin-immunity pair induced signaling in B. thailandensis Our data indicate that bcpAIOB loci confer dual benefits; they direct antagonism toward non-self bacteria and promote cooperation between self bacteria, with self being defined by the bcpAIOB allele and not by genealogic relatedness. PMID:27335458

  6. An enantioselective amidase from Burkholderia multivorans for the stereoselective synthesis of esfenvalerate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Park, Oh-Jin; Shin, Hyun-Jae

    2014-07-01

    Using racemic (R,S)-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-methylbutyramide, an intermediate for the chiral pyrethroid insecticide Esfenvalerate, as a sole nitrogen source in a minimal medium, several strains with high enatioselectivity (≥98%) were isolated by enrichment techniques. One of the strains, LG 31-3, was identified as Burkholderia multivorans, based on physiological and morphological tests by a standardized Biolog station for carbon source utilization. A novel amidase was purified from B. mutivorans LG 31-3 and characterized. The enzyme exhibited (S)- selective amidase activity on racemic (R,S)-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-methylbutyramide. Addition of the racemic amide induced the production of the enantioselective amidase. The molecular mass of the amidase on SDS-PAGE analysis was shown to be 50 kDa. The purified amidase was subjected to proteolytic digestion with a modified trypsin. The N-terminal and internal amino acid sequences of the purified amidase showed a high sequence homology with those deduced from a gene named YP_366732.1 encoding indole acetimide hydrolase from Burkholderia sp. 383. PMID:24722372

  7. HemX is required for production of 2-ketogluconate, the predominant organic anion required for inorganic phosphate solubilization by Burkholderia sp. Ha185.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Pei-Chun Lisa; Condron, Leo; O'Callaghan, Maureen; Hurst, Mark R H

    2015-12-01

    The bacterium Burkholderia sp. Ha185 readily solubilizes inorganic phosphate by releasing the low molecular weight organic anion, 2-ketogluconate. Using random transposon mutagenesis and in silico analysis, a mutation that caused almost complete abolition of phosphate solubilization was located within hemX, which is part of the hem operon. Burkholderia sp. Ha185 HemX is a multidomain protein, predicted to encode a bifunctional uroporphyrinogen-III synthetase/uroporphyrin-III C-methyltransferase, which has not previously been implicated in phosphate solubilization. Complementation of hemX restored the ability of the mutant to solubilize phosphate in both plate and liquid cultures. Based on a combination of organic-anion profiling, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and in silico analyses, hemX was confirmed to be solely responsible for hydroxyapatite solubilization in Burkholderia sp. Ha185. It is proposed that the biosynthesis of a yet to be determined redox cofactor by HemX is the main pathway for generating 2-ketogluconate via a haem-dependent gluconate 2-dehydrogenase in Burkholderia sp. Ha185.

  8. Identification of the conserved hypothetical protein BPSL0317 in Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusoff, Nur Syamimi; Damiri, Nadzirah; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2014-09-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243 is the causative agent of melioidosis, a disease which is endemic in Northern Australia and Southeastern Asia. The genome encodes several essential proteins including those currently annotated as hypothetical proteins. We studied the conservation and the essentiality of expressed hypothetical proteins in normal and different stress conditions. Based on the comparative genomics, we identified a hypothetical protein, BPSL0317, a potential essential gene that is being expressed in all normal and stress conditions. BPSL0317 is also phylogenetically conserved in the Burkholderiales order suggesting that this protein is crucial for survival among the order's members. BPSL0317 therefore has a potential to be a candidate antimicrobial drug target for this group of bacteria.

  9. A putative porin gene of Burkholderia sp. NK8 involved in chemotaxis toward β-ketoadipate.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Tamura, Kimiko; Kawagishi, Ikuro; Ogawa, Naoto; Fujii, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. NK8 can utilize 3-chlorobenzoate (3CB) as a sole source of carbon because it has a megaplasmid (pNK8) that carries the gene cluster (tfdT-CDEF) encoding chlorocatechol-degrading enzymes. The expression of tfdT-CDEF is induced by 3CB. In this study, we found that NK8 cells were attracted to 3CB and its degradation products, 3- and 4-chlorocatechol, and β-ketoadipate. Capillary assays revealed that a pNK8-eliminated strain (NK82) was defective in chemotaxis toward β-ketoadipate. The introduction of a plasmid carrying a putative outer membrane porin gene, which we name ompNK8, into strain NK82 restored chemotaxis toward β-ketoadipate. RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that the transcription of the ompNK8 gene was enhanced in the presence of 3CB.

  10. Burkholderia sprentiae sp. nov., isolated from Lebeckia ambigua root nodules.

    PubMed

    De Meyer, Sofie E; Cnockaert, Margo; Ardley, Julie K; Maker, Garth; Yates, Ron; Howieson, John G; Vandamme, Peter

    2013-11-01

    Seven Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped bacteria were isolated from Lebeckia ambigua root nodules and authenticated on this host. Based on the 16S rRNA gene phylogeny, they were shown to belong to the genus Burkholderia, with the representative strain WSM5005(T) being most closely related to Burkholderia tuberum (98.08 % sequence similarity). Additionally, these strains formed a distinct group in phylogenetic trees based on the housekeeping genes gyrB and recA. Chemotaxonomic data including fatty acid profiles and analysis of respiratory quinones supported the assignment of the strains to the genus Burkholderia. Results of DNA-DNA hybridizations, and physiological and biochemical tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of our strains from the closest species of the genus Burkholderia with a validly published name. Therefore, these strains represent a novel species for which the name Burkholderia sprentiae sp. nov. (type strain WSM5005(T) = LMG 27175(T) = HAMBI 3357(T)) is proposed.

  11. Burkholderia dilworthii sp. nov., isolated from Lebeckia ambigua root nodules.

    PubMed

    De Meyer, Sofie E; Cnockaert, Margo; Ardley, Julie K; Van Wyk, Ben-Erik; Vandamme, Peter A; Howieson, John G

    2014-04-01

    Three strains of Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped bacteria were isolated from Lebeckia ambigua root nodules and authenticated on this host. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence phylogeny, they were shown to belong to the genus Burkholderia, with the representative strain WSM3556(T) being most closely related to Burkholderia caledonica LMG 23644(T) (98.70 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) and Burkholderia rhynchosiae WSM3937(T) (98.50 %). Additionally, these strains formed a distinct group in phylogenetic trees of the housekeeping genes gyrB and recA. Chemotaxonomic data, including fatty acid profiles and analysis of respiratory quinones, supported the assignment of our strains to the genus Burkholderia. Results of DNA-DNA hybridizations, MALDI-TOF MS analysis and physiological and biochemical tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of our strains from their nearest neighbour species. Therefore, these strains represent a novel species, for which the name Burkholderia dilworthii sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain WSM3556(T) ( = LMG 27173(T) = HAMBI 3353(T)).

  12. Characterization of the Burkholderia thailandensis SOS Response by Using Whole-Transcriptome Shotgun Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Ricky L.; DeShazer, David; Kenny, Tara A.; Ulrich, Melanie P.; Moravusova, Anna; Opperman, Timothy; Bavari, Sina; Bowlin, Terry L.; Moir, Donald T.

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial SOS response is a well-characterized regulatory network encoded by most prokaryotic bacterial species and is involved in DNA repair. In addition to nucleic acid repair, the SOS response is involved in pathogenicity, stress-induced mutagenesis, and the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Using high-throughput sequencing technology (SOLiD RNA-Seq), we analyzed the Burkholderia thailandensis global SOS response to the fluoroquinolone antibiotic, ciprofloxacin (CIP), and the DNA-damaging chemical, mitomycin C (MMC). We demonstrate that a B. thailandensis recA mutant (RU0643) is ∼4-fold more sensitive to CIP in contrast to the parental strain B. thailandensis DW503. Our RNA-Seq results show that CIP and MMC treatment (P < 0.01) resulted in the differential expression of 344 genes in B. thailandensis and 210 genes in RU0643. Several genes associated with the SOS response were induced and include lexA, uvrA, dnaE, dinB, recX, and recA. At the genome-wide level, we found an overall decrease in gene expression, especially for genes involved in amino acid and carbohydrate transport and metabolism, following both CIP and MMC exposure. Interestingly, we observed the upregulation of several genes involved in bacterial motility and enhanced transcription of a B. thailandensis genomic island encoding a Siphoviridae bacteriophage designated ϕE264. Using B. thailandensis plaque assays and PCR with B. mallei ATCC 23344 as the host, we demonstrate that CIP and MMC exposure in B. thailandensis DW503 induces the transcription and translation of viable bacteriophage in a RecA-dependent manner. This is the first report of the SOS response in Burkholderia spp. to DNA-damaging agents. We have identified both common and unique adaptive responses of B. thailandensis to chemical stress and DNA damage. PMID:23872555

  13. Characterization of the Burkholderia thailandensis SOS response by using whole-transcriptome shotgun sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Ricky L; Deshazer, David; Kenny, Tara A; Ulrich, Melanie P; Moravusova, Anna; Opperman, Timothy; Bavari, Sina; Bowlin, Terry L; Moir, Donald T; Panchal, Rekha G

    2013-10-01

    The bacterial SOS response is a well-characterized regulatory network encoded by most prokaryotic bacterial species and is involved in DNA repair. In addition to nucleic acid repair, the SOS response is involved in pathogenicity, stress-induced mutagenesis, and the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Using high-throughput sequencing technology (SOLiD RNA-Seq), we analyzed the Burkholderia thailandensis global SOS response to the fluoroquinolone antibiotic, ciprofloxacin (CIP), and the DNA-damaging chemical, mitomycin C (MMC). We demonstrate that a B. thailandensis recA mutant (RU0643) is ∼4-fold more sensitive to CIP in contrast to the parental strain B. thailandensis DW503. Our RNA-Seq results show that CIP and MMC treatment (P < 0.01) resulted in the differential expression of 344 genes in B. thailandensis and 210 genes in RU0643. Several genes associated with the SOS response were induced and include lexA, uvrA, dnaE, dinB, recX, and recA. At the genome-wide level, we found an overall decrease in gene expression, especially for genes involved in amino acid and carbohydrate transport and metabolism, following both CIP and MMC exposure. Interestingly, we observed the upregulation of several genes involved in bacterial motility and enhanced transcription of a B. thailandensis genomic island encoding a Siphoviridae bacteriophage designated E264. Using B. thailandensis plaque assays and PCR with B. mallei ATCC 23344 as the host, we demonstrate that CIP and MMC exposure in B. thailandensis DW503 induces the transcription and translation of viable bacteriophage in a RecA-dependent manner. This is the first report of the SOS response in Burkholderia spp. to DNA-damaging agents. We have identified both common and unique adaptive responses of B. thailandensis to chemical stress and DNA damage.

  14. Bacterial cell wall synthesis gene uppP is required for Burkholderia colonization of the Stinkbug Gut.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Lee, Ho Jin; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Kitagawa, Wataru; Nikoh, Naruo; Fukatsu, Takema; Lee, Bok Luel

    2013-08-01

    To establish a host-bacterium symbiotic association, a number of factors involved in symbiosis must operate in a coordinated manner. In insects, bacterial factors for symbiosis have been poorly characterized at the molecular and biochemical levels, since many symbionts have not yet been cultured or are as yet genetically intractable. Recently, the symbiotic association between a stinkbug, Riptortus pedestris, and its beneficial gut bacterium, Burkholderia sp., has emerged as a promising experimental model system, providing opportunities to study insect symbiosis using genetically manipulated symbiotic bacteria. Here, in search of bacterial symbiotic factors, we targeted cell wall components of the Burkholderia symbiont by disruption of uppP gene, which encodes undecaprenyl pyrophosphate phosphatase involved in biosynthesis of various bacterial cell wall components. Under culture conditions, the ΔuppP mutant showed higher susceptibility to lysozyme than the wild-type strain, indicating impaired integrity of peptidoglycan of the mutant. When administered to the host insect, the ΔuppP mutant failed to establish normal symbiotic association: the bacterial cells reached to the symbiotic midgut but neither proliferated nor persisted there. Transformation of the ΔuppP mutant with uppP-encoding plasmid complemented these phenotypic defects: lysozyme susceptibility in vitro was restored, and normal infection and proliferation in the midgut symbiotic organ were observed in vivo. The ΔuppP mutant also exhibited susceptibility to hypotonic, hypertonic, and centrifugal stresses. These results suggest that peptidoglycan cell wall integrity is a stress resistance factor relevant to the successful colonization of the stinkbug midgut by Burkholderia symbiont.

  15. Bacterial Cell Wall Synthesis Gene uppP Is Required for Burkholderia Colonization of the Stinkbug Gut

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Lee, Ho Jin; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Kitagawa, Wataru; Nikoh, Naruo

    2013-01-01

    To establish a host-bacterium symbiotic association, a number of factors involved in symbiosis must operate in a coordinated manner. In insects, bacterial factors for symbiosis have been poorly characterized at the molecular and biochemical levels, since many symbionts have not yet been cultured or are as yet genetically intractable. Recently, the symbiotic association between a stinkbug, Riptortus pedestris, and its beneficial gut bacterium, Burkholderia sp., has emerged as a promising experimental model system, providing opportunities to study insect symbiosis using genetically manipulated symbiotic bacteria. Here, in search of bacterial symbiotic factors, we targeted cell wall components of the Burkholderia symbiont by disruption of uppP gene, which encodes undecaprenyl pyrophosphate phosphatase involved in biosynthesis of various bacterial cell wall components. Under culture conditions, the ΔuppP mutant showed higher susceptibility to lysozyme than the wild-type strain, indicating impaired integrity of peptidoglycan of the mutant. When administered to the host insect, the ΔuppP mutant failed to establish normal symbiotic association: the bacterial cells reached to the symbiotic midgut but neither proliferated nor persisted there. Transformation of the ΔuppP mutant with uppP-encoding plasmid complemented these phenotypic defects: lysozyme susceptibility in vitro was restored, and normal infection and proliferation in the midgut symbiotic organ were observed in vivo. The ΔuppP mutant also exhibited susceptibility to hypotonic, hypertonic, and centrifugal stresses. These results suggest that peptidoglycan cell wall integrity is a stress resistance factor relevant to the successful colonization of the stinkbug midgut by Burkholderia symbiont. PMID:23747704

  16. Oropharyngeal Aspiration of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schully, Kevin L.; Bell, Matthew G.; Ward, Jerrold M.; Keane-Myers, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei are potentially lethal pathogens categorized as biothreat agents due, in part, to their ability to be disseminated via aerosol. There are no protective vaccines against these pathogens and treatment options are limited and cumbersome. Since disease severity is greatest when these agents are inhaled, efforts to develop pre- or post-exposure prophylaxis focus largely on inhalation models of infection. Here, we demonstrate a non-invasive and technically simple method for affecting the inhalational challenge of BALB/c mice with B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. In this model, two investigators utilized common laboratory tools such as forceps and a micropipette to conduct and characterize an effective and reproducible inhalational challenge of BALB/c mice with B. mallei and B. pseudomallei. Challenge by oropharyngeal aspiration resulted in acute disease. Additionally, 50% endpoints for B. pseudomallei K96243 and B. mallei ATCC 23344 were nearly identical to published aerosol challenge methods. Furthermore, the pathogens disseminated to all major organs typically targeted by these agents where they proliferated. The pro-inflammatory cytokine production in the proximal and peripheral fluids demonstrated a rapid and robust immune response comparable to previously described murine and human studies. These observations demonstrate that OA is a viable alternative to aerosol exposure. PMID:25503969

  17. Ornibactin production and transport properties in strains of Burkholderia vietnamiensis and Burkholderia cepacia (formerly Pseudomonas cepacia).

    PubMed

    Meyer, J M; Van, V T; Stintzi, A; Berge, O; Winkelmann, G

    1995-10-01

    Several strains of Burkholderia vietnamiensis, isolated from the rhizosphere of rice plants, and four strains formerly known as Pseudomonas cepacia including two collection strains and two clinical isolates were compared for siderophore production and iron uptake. The B. vietnamiensis (TVV strains) as well as the B. cepacia strains (ATCC 25416 and ATCC 17759) and the clinical isolates K132 and LMG 6999 were all found to produce ornibactins under iron starvation. The two ATCC strains of B. cepacia additionally produced the previously described siderophores, pyochelin and cepabactin. Analysis of the ratio of isolated ornibactins (C4, C6 and C8) by HPLC revealed nearly identical profiles. Supplementation of the production medium with ornithine (20 mM) resulted in a 2.5-fold increase in ornibactin synthesis. Ornibactin-mediated iron uptake was independent of the length of the acyl side chain and was observed with all strains of B. vietnamiensis and B. cepacia, but was absent with strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas stutzeri, known to produce pyoverdines or desferriferrioxamines as siderophores. These results suggest that ornibactin production is a common feature of all Burkholderia strains and that these strains develop an ornibactin-specific iron transport system which is distinct from the pyoverdine-specific transport in Pseudomonas strains. PMID:7580051

  18. Experimental Phage Therapy for Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection

    PubMed Central

    Leang-Chung, Choh; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Mariappan, Vanitha; Li-Yen, Chang; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an intracellular Gram-negative bacterial pathogen intrinsically resistant to a variety of antibiotics. Phages have been developed for use as an alternative treatment therapy, particularly for bacterial infections that do not respond to conventional antibiotics. In this study, we investigated the use of phages to treat cells infected with B. pseudomallei. Phage C34 isolated from seawater was purified and characterised on the basis of its host range and morphology using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Phage C34 was able to lyse 39.5% of B. pseudomallei clinical strains. Due to the presence of contractile tail, phage C34 is classified as a member of the family Myoviridae, a tailed double-stranded DNA virus. When 2 × 105 A549 cells were exposed to 2 × 107 PFU of phage C34, 24 hours prior to infection with 2 × 106 CFU of B. pseudomallei, it was found that the survivability of the cells increased to 41.6 ± 6.8% as compared to 22.8 ± 6.0% in untreated control. Additionally, application of phage successfully rescued 33.3% of mice infected with B. pseudomallei and significantly reduced the bacterial load in the spleen of the phage-treated mice. These findings indicate that phage can be a potential antimicrobial agent for B. pseudomallei infections. PMID:27387381

  19. Experimental Phage Therapy for Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection.

    PubMed

    Guang-Han, Ong; Leang-Chung, Choh; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Mariappan, Vanitha; Li-Yen, Chang; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an intracellular Gram-negative bacterial pathogen intrinsically resistant to a variety of antibiotics. Phages have been developed for use as an alternative treatment therapy, particularly for bacterial infections that do not respond to conventional antibiotics. In this study, we investigated the use of phages to treat cells infected with B. pseudomallei. Phage C34 isolated from seawater was purified and characterised on the basis of its host range and morphology using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Phage C34 was able to lyse 39.5% of B. pseudomallei clinical strains. Due to the presence of contractile tail, phage C34 is classified as a member of the family Myoviridae, a tailed double-stranded DNA virus. When 2 × 105 A549 cells were exposed to 2 × 107 PFU of phage C34, 24 hours prior to infection with 2 × 106 CFU of B. pseudomallei, it was found that the survivability of the cells increased to 41.6 ± 6.8% as compared to 22.8 ± 6.0% in untreated control. Additionally, application of phage successfully rescued 33.3% of mice infected with B. pseudomallei and significantly reduced the bacterial load in the spleen of the phage-treated mice. These findings indicate that phage can be a potential antimicrobial agent for B. pseudomallei infections. PMID:27387381

  20. Strategies for Intracellular Survival of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Allwood, Elizabeth M.; Devenish, Rodney J.; Prescott, Mark; Adler, Ben; Boyce, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a disease with high mortality that is prevalent in tropical regions of the world. A key component of the pathogenesis of melioidosis is the ability of B. pseudomallei to enter, survive, and replicate within mammalian host cells. For non-phagocytic cells, bacterial adhesins have been identified both on the bacterial surface and associated with Type 4 pili. Cell invasion involves components of one or more of the three Type 3 Secretion System clusters, which also mediate, at least in part, the escape of bacteria from the endosome into the cytoplasm, where bacteria move by actin-based motility. The mechanism of actin-based motility is not clearly understood, but appears to differ from characterized mechanisms in other bacterial species. A small proportion of intracellular bacteria is targeted by host cell autophagy, involving direct recruitment of LC3 to endosomes rather than through uptake by canonical autophagosomes. However, the majority of bacterial cells are able to circumvent autophagy and other intracellular defense mechanisms such as the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase, and then replicate in the cytoplasm and spread to adjacent cells via membrane fusion, resulting in the formation of multi-nucleated giant cells. A potential role for host cell ubiquitin in the autophagic response to bacterial infection has recently been proposed. PMID:22007185

  1. Burkholderia cepacia Complex Vaccines: Where Do We Go from here?

    PubMed Central

    Pradenas, Gonzalo A.; Ross, Brittany N.; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia comprises a wide variety of environmental Gram-negative bacteria. Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) includes several Burkholderia species that pose a health hazard as they are able to cause respiratory infections in patients with chronic granulomatous disease and cystic fibrosis. Due to the intrinsic resistance to a wide array of antibiotics and naturally occurring immune evasion strategies, treatment of Bcc infections often proves to be unsuccessful. To date, limited work related to vaccine development has been performed for Bcc pathogens. In this review, we have gathered key aspects of Bcc research that have been reported in recent years related to vaccine efforts, virulence, immune responses, and animal models, and use this information to inform the research community of areas of opportunity toward development of a viable Bcc vaccine. PMID:27092530

  2. Efflux pump-mediated drug resistance in Burkholderia.

    PubMed

    Podnecky, Nicole L; Rhodes, Katherine A; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2015-01-01

    Several members of the genus Burkholderia are prominent pathogens. Infections caused by these bacteria are difficult to treat because of significant antibiotic resistance. Virtually all Burkholderia species are also resistant to polymyxin, prohibiting use of drugs like colistin that are available for treatment of infections caused by most other drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Despite clinical significance and antibiotic resistance of Burkholderia species, characterization of efflux pumps lags behind other non-enteric Gram-negative pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although efflux pumps have been described in several Burkholderia species, they have been best studied in Burkholderia cenocepacia and B. pseudomallei. As in other non-enteric Gram-negatives, efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND) family are the clinically most significant efflux systems in these two species. Several efflux pumps were described in B. cenocepacia, which when expressed confer resistance to clinically significant antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. Three RND pumps have been characterized in B. pseudomallei, two of which confer either intrinsic or acquired resistance to aminoglycosides, macrolides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, trimethoprim, and in some instances trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole. Several strains of the host-adapted B. mallei, a clone of B. pseudomallei, lack AmrAB-OprA, and are therefore aminoglycoside and macrolide susceptible. B. thailandensis is closely related to B. pseudomallei, but non-pathogenic to humans. Its pump repertoire and ensuing drug resistance profile parallels that of B. pseudomallei. An efflux pump in B. vietnamiensis plays a significant role in acquired aminoglycoside resistance. Summarily, efflux pumps are significant players in Burkholderia drug resistance.

  3. Efflux pump-mediated drug resistance in Burkholderia

    PubMed Central

    Podnecky, Nicole L.; Rhodes, Katherine A.; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    2015-01-01

    Several members of the genus Burkholderia are prominent pathogens. Infections caused by these bacteria are difficult to treat because of significant antibiotic resistance. Virtually all Burkholderia species are also resistant to polymyxin, prohibiting use of drugs like colistin that are available for treatment of infections caused by most other drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Despite clinical significance and antibiotic resistance of Burkholderia species, characterization of efflux pumps lags behind other non-enteric Gram-negative pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although efflux pumps have been described in several Burkholderia species, they have been best studied in Burkholderia cenocepacia and B. pseudomallei. As in other non-enteric Gram-negatives, efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND) family are the clinically most significant efflux systems in these two species. Several efflux pumps were described in B. cenocepacia, which when expressed confer resistance to clinically significant antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. Three RND pumps have been characterized in B. pseudomallei, two of which confer either intrinsic or acquired resistance to aminoglycosides, macrolides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, trimethoprim, and in some instances trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole. Several strains of the host-adapted B. mallei, a clone of B. pseudomallei, lack AmrAB-OprA, and are therefore aminoglycoside and macrolide susceptible. B. thailandensis is closely related to B. pseudomallei, but non-pathogenic to humans. Its pump repertoire and ensuing drug resistance profile parallels that of B. pseudomallei. An efflux pump in B. vietnamiensis plays a significant role in acquired aminoglycoside resistance. Summarily, efflux pumps are significant players in Burkholderia drug resistance. PMID:25926825

  4. Recent Advances in Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei Research

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Christopher L.; Muruato, Laura A.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei are Gram-negative organisms, which are etiological agents of glanders and melioidosis, respectively. Although only B. pseudomallei is responsible for a significant number of human cases, both organisms are classified as Tier 1 Select Agents and their diseases lack effective diagnosis and treatment. Despite a recent resurgence in research pertaining to these organisms, there are still a number of knowledge gaps. This article summarizes the latest research progress in the fields of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei pathogenesis, vaccines, and diagnostics. PMID:25932379

  5. Groundwater seeps facilitate exposure to Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Baker, Anthony; Tahani, Donald; Gardiner, Christopher; Bristow, Keith L; Greenhill, Andrew R; Warner, Jeffrey

    2011-10-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a saprophytic bacterium which is the causative agent of melioidosis, a common cause of fatal bacterial pneumonia and sepsis in the tropics. The incidence of melioidosis is clustered spatially and temporally and is heavily linked to rainfall and extreme weather events. Clinical case clustering has recently been reported in Townsville, Australia, and has implicated Castle Hill, a granite monolith in the city center, as a potential reservoir of infection. Topsoil and water from seasonal groundwater seeps were collected around the base of Castle Hill and analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR targeting the type III secretion system genes for the presence of B. pseudomallei. The organism was identified in 65% (95% confidence interval [CI], 49.5 to 80.4) of soil samples (n = 40) and 92.5% (95% CI, 83.9 to 100) of seasonal groundwater samples (n = 40). Further sampling of water collected from roads and gutters in nearby residential areas after an intense rainfall event found that 88.2% (95% CI, 72.9 to 100) of samples (n = 16) contained viable B. pseudomallei at concentrations up to 113 CFU/ml. Comparison of isolates using multilocus sequence typing demonstrated clinical matches and close associations between environmental isolates and isolates derived from clinical samples from patients in Townsville. This study demonstrated that waterborne B. pseudomallei from groundwater seeps around Castle Hill may facilitate exposure to B. pseudomallei and contribute to the clinical clustering at this site. Access to this type of information will advise the development and implementation of public health measures to reduce the incidence of melioidosis.

  6. Novel lytic bacteriophages from soil that lyse Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Yordpratum, Umaporn; Tattawasart, Unchalee; Wongratanacheewin, Surasakdi; Sermswan, Rasana W

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative saprophytic bacterium that causes severe sepsis with a high mortality rate in humans and a vaccine is not available. Bacteriophages are viruses of bacteria that are ubiquitous in nature. Several lysogenic phages of Burkholderia spp. have been found but information is scarce for lytic phages. Six phages, ST2, ST7, ST70, ST79, ST88 and ST96, which lyse B. pseudomallei, were isolated from soil in an endemic area. The phages belong to the Myoviridae family. The range of estimated genome sizes is 24.0-54.6 kb. Phages ST79 and ST96 lysed 71% and 67% of tested B. pseudomallei isolates and formed plaques on Burkholderia mallei but not other tested bacteria, with the exception of closely related Burkholderia thailandensis which was lysed by ST2 and ST96 only. ST79 and ST96 were observed to clear a mid-log culture by lysis within 6 h when infected at a multiplicity of infection of 0.1. As ST79 and ST96 phages effectively lysed B. pseudomallei, their potential use as a biocontrol of B. pseudomallei in the environment or alternative treatment in infected hosts could lead to benefits from phages that are available in nature. PMID:21091532

  7. Burkholderia pseudomallei: A potential zoonosis in the southeastern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is an underreported zoonosis in many countries where environmental conditions may be favorable for B. pseudomallei. This soil saprophyte is most often detected in tropical areas such as Southeast Asia and Northern Australia where the cas...

  8. 40 CFR 725.1075 - Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Burkholderia cepacia complex. 725.1075 Section 725.1075 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES... significant new use is any use other than research and development in the degradation of chemicals...

  9. 40 CFR 725.1075 - Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Burkholderia cepacia complex. 725.1075 Section 725.1075 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES... significant new use is any use other than research and development in the degradation of chemicals...

  10. Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates in 2 pet iguanas, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Zehnder, Ashley M; Hawkins, Michelle G; Koski, Marilyn A; Lifland, Barry; Byrne, Barbara A; Swanson, Alexandra A; Rood, Michael P; Gee, Jay E; Elrod, Mindy Glass; Beesley, Cari A; Blaney, David D; Ventura, Jean; Hoffmaster, Alex R; Beeler, Emily S

    2014-02-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, was isolated from abscesses of 2 pet green iguanas in California, USA. The international trade in iguanas may contribute to importation of this pathogen into countries where it is not endemic and put persons exposed to these animals at risk for infection.

  11. Bacterial production of the biodegradable plastics polyhydroxyalkanoates.

    PubMed

    Urtuvia, Viviana; Villegas, Pamela; González, Myriam; Seeger, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Petroleum-based plastics constitute a major environmental problem due to their low biodegradability and accumulation in various environments. Therefore, searching for novel biodegradable plastics is of increasing interest. Microbial polyesters known as polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biodegradable plastics. Life cycle assessment indicates that PHB is more beneficial than petroleum-based plastics. In this report, bacterial production of PHAs and their industrial applications are reviewed and the synthesis of PHAs in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 is described. PHAs are synthesized by a large number of microorganisms during unbalanced nutritional conditions. These polymers are accumulated as carbon and energy reserve in discrete granules in the bacterial cytoplasm. 3-hydroxybutyrate and 3-hydroxyvalerate are two main PHA units among 150 monomers that have been reported. B. xenovorans LB400 is a model bacterium for the degradation of polychlorobiphenyls and a wide range of aromatic compounds. A bioinformatic analysis of LB400 genome indicated the presence of pha genes encoding enzymes of pathways for PHA synthesis. This study showed that B. xenovorans LB400 synthesize PHAs under nutrient limitation. Staining with Sudan Black B indicated the production of PHAs by B. xenovorans LB400 colonies. The PHAs produced were characterized by GC-MS. Diverse substrates for the production of PHAs in strain LB400 were analyzed.

  12. Understanding the Pathogenicity of Burkholderia contaminans, an Emerging Pathogen in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nunvar, Jaroslav; Kalferstova, Lucie; Bloodworth, Ruhi A M; Kolar, Michal; Degrossi, Jose; Lubovich, Silvina; Cardona, Silvia T; Drevinek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Several bacterial species from the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) are feared opportunistic pathogens that lead to debilitating lung infections with a high risk of developing fatal septicemia in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. However, the pathogenic potential of other Bcc species is yet unknown. To elucidate clinical relevance of Burkholderia contaminans, a species frequently isolated from CF respiratory samples in Ibero-American countries, we aimed to identify its key virulence factors possibly linked with an unfavorable clinical outcome. We performed a genome-wide comparative analysis of two isolates of B. contaminans ST872 from sputum and blood culture of a female CF patient in Argentina. RNA-seq data showed significant changes in expression for quorum sensing-regulated virulence factors and motility and chemotaxis. Furthermore, we detected expression changes in a recently described low-oxygen-activated (lxa) locus which encodes stress-related proteins, and for two clusters responsible for the biosynthesis of antifungal and hemolytic compounds pyrrolnitrin and occidiofungin. Based on phenotypic assays that confirmed changes in motility and in proteolytic, hemolytic and antifungal activities, we were able to distinguish two phenotypes of B. contaminans that coexisted in the host and entered her bloodstream. Whole genome sequencing revealed that the sputum and bloodstream isolates (each representing a distinct phenotype) differed by over 1,400 mutations as a result of a mismatch repair-deficient hypermutable state of the sputum isolate. The inferred lack of purifying selection against nonsynonymous mutations and the high rate of pseudogenization in the derived isolate indicated limited evolutionary pressure during evolution in the nutrient-rich, stable CF sputum environment. The present study is the first to examine the genomic and transcriptomic differences between longitudinal isolates of B. contaminans. Detected activity of a number of putative virulence

  13. The multiple roles of hypothetical gene BPSS1356 in Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Yam, Hokchai; Rahim, Ainihayati Abdul; Mohamad, Suriani; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Manaf, Uyub Abdul; Shu-Chien, Alexander Chong; Najimudin, Nazalan

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an opportunistic pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis. It is able to adapt to harsh environments and can live intracellularly in its infected hosts. In this study, identification of transcriptional factors that associate with the β' subunit (RpoC) of RNA polymerase was performed. The N-terminal region of this subunit is known to trigger promoter melting when associated with a sigma factor. A pull-down assay using histidine-tagged B. pseudomallei RpoC N-terminal region as bait showed that a hypothetical protein BPSS1356 was one of the proteins bound. This hypothetical protein is conserved in all B. pseudomallei strains and present only in the Burkholderia genus. A BPSS1356 deletion mutant was generated to investigate its biological function. The mutant strain exhibited reduced biofilm formation and a lower cell density during the stationary phase of growth in LB medium. Electron microscopic analysis revealed that the ΔBPSS1356 mutant cells had a shrunken cytoplasm indicative of cell plasmolysis and a rougher surface when compared to the wild type. An RNA microarray result showed that a total of 63 genes were transcriptionally affected by the BPSS1356 deletion with fold change values of higher than 4. The expression of a group of genes encoding membrane located transporters was concurrently down-regulated in ΔBPSS1356 mutant. Amongst the affected genes, the putative ion transportation genes were the most severely suppressed. Deprivation of BPSS1356 also down-regulated the transcriptions of genes for the arginine deiminase system, glycerol metabolism, type III secretion system cluster 2, cytochrome bd oxidase and arsenic resistance. It is therefore obvious that BPSS1356 plays a multiple regulatory roles on many genes. PMID:24927285

  14. Understanding the Pathogenicity of Burkholderia contaminans, an Emerging Pathogen in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nunvar, Jaroslav; Kalferstova, Lucie; Bloodworth, Ruhi A M; Kolar, Michal; Degrossi, Jose; Lubovich, Silvina; Cardona, Silvia T; Drevinek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Several bacterial species from the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) are feared opportunistic pathogens that lead to debilitating lung infections with a high risk of developing fatal septicemia in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. However, the pathogenic potential of other Bcc species is yet unknown. To elucidate clinical relevance of Burkholderia contaminans, a species frequently isolated from CF respiratory samples in Ibero-American countries, we aimed to identify its key virulence factors possibly linked with an unfavorable clinical outcome. We performed a genome-wide comparative analysis of two isolates of B. contaminans ST872 from sputum and blood culture of a female CF patient in Argentina. RNA-seq data showed significant changes in expression for quorum sensing-regulated virulence factors and motility and chemotaxis. Furthermore, we detected expression changes in a recently described low-oxygen-activated (lxa) locus which encodes stress-related proteins, and for two clusters responsible for the biosynthesis of antifungal and hemolytic compounds pyrrolnitrin and occidiofungin. Based on phenotypic assays that confirmed changes in motility and in proteolytic, hemolytic and antifungal activities, we were able to distinguish two phenotypes of B. contaminans that coexisted in the host and entered her bloodstream. Whole genome sequencing revealed that the sputum and bloodstream isolates (each representing a distinct phenotype) differed by over 1,400 mutations as a result of a mismatch repair-deficient hypermutable state of the sputum isolate. The inferred lack of purifying selection against nonsynonymous mutations and the high rate of pseudogenization in the derived isolate indicated limited evolutionary pressure during evolution in the nutrient-rich, stable CF sputum environment. The present study is the first to examine the genomic and transcriptomic differences between longitudinal isolates of B. contaminans. Detected activity of a number of putative virulence

  15. Understanding the Pathogenicity of Burkholderia contaminans, an Emerging Pathogen in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nunvar, Jaroslav; Kalferstova, Lucie; Bloodworth, Ruhi A. M.; Kolar, Michal; Degrossi, Jose; Lubovich, Silvina; Cardona, Silvia T.; Drevinek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Several bacterial species from the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) are feared opportunistic pathogens that lead to debilitating lung infections with a high risk of developing fatal septicemia in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. However, the pathogenic potential of other Bcc species is yet unknown. To elucidate clinical relevance of Burkholderia contaminans, a species frequently isolated from CF respiratory samples in Ibero-American countries, we aimed to identify its key virulence factors possibly linked with an unfavorable clinical outcome. We performed a genome-wide comparative analysis of two isolates of B. contaminans ST872 from sputum and blood culture of a female CF patient in Argentina. RNA-seq data showed significant changes in expression for quorum sensing-regulated virulence factors and motility and chemotaxis. Furthermore, we detected expression changes in a recently described low-oxygen-activated (lxa) locus which encodes stress-related proteins, and for two clusters responsible for the biosynthesis of antifungal and hemolytic compounds pyrrolnitrin and occidiofungin. Based on phenotypic assays that confirmed changes in motility and in proteolytic, hemolytic and antifungal activities, we were able to distinguish two phenotypes of B. contaminans that coexisted in the host and entered her bloodstream. Whole genome sequencing revealed that the sputum and bloodstream isolates (each representing a distinct phenotype) differed by over 1,400 mutations as a result of a mismatch repair-deficient hypermutable state of the sputum isolate. The inferred lack of purifying selection against nonsynonymous mutations and the high rate of pseudogenization in the derived isolate indicated limited evolutionary pressure during evolution in the nutrient-rich, stable CF sputum environment. The present study is the first to examine the genomic and transcriptomic differences between longitudinal isolates of B. contaminans. Detected activity of a number of putative virulence

  16. Burkholderia pseudomallei known siderophores and hemin uptake are dispensable for lethal murine melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Kvitko, Brian H; Goodyear, Andrew; Propst, Katie L; Dow, Steven W; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a mostly saprophytic bacterium, but can infect humans where it causes the difficult-to-manage disease melioidosis. Even with proper diagnosis and prompt therapeutic interventions mortality rates still range from >20% in Northern Australia to over 40% in Thailand. Surprisingly little is yet known about how B. pseudomallei infects, invades and survives within its hosts, and virtually nothing is known about the contribution of critical nutrients such as iron to the bacterium's pathogenesis. It was previously assumed that B. pseudomallei used iron-acquisition systems commonly found in other bacteria, for example siderophores. However, our previous discovery of a clinical isolate carrying a large chromosomal deletion missing the entire malleobactin gene cluster encoding the bacterium's major high-affinity siderophore while still being fully virulent in a murine melioidosis model suggested that other iron-acquisition systems might make contributions to virulence. Here, we deleted the major siderophore malleobactin (mba) and pyochelin (pch) gene clusters in strain 1710b and revealed a residual siderophore activity which was unrelated to other known Burkholderia siderophores such as cepabactin and cepaciachelin, and not due to increased secretion of chelators such as citrate. Deletion of the two hemin uptake loci, hmu and hem, showed that Hmu is required for utilization of hemin and hemoglobin and that Hem cannot complement a Hmu deficiency. Prolonged incubation of a hmu hem mutant in hemoglobin-containing minimal medium yielded variants able to utilize hemoglobin and hemin suggesting alternate pathways for utilization of these two host iron sources. Lactoferrin utilization was dependent on malleobactin, but not pyochelin synthesis and/or uptake. A mba pch hmu hem quadruple mutant could use ferritin as an iron source and upon intranasal infection was lethal in an acute murine melioidosis model. These data suggest that B. pseudomallei may employ

  17. Removal of Burkholderia cepacia biofilms with oxidants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, D. W.; Mishra, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    Iodine is used to disinfect the water system aboard US space shuttles and is the anticipated biocide for the international space station. Water quality on spacecraft must be maintained at the highest possible levels for the safety of the crew. Furthermore, the treatment process used to maintain the quality of water on research must be robust and operate for long periods with minimal crew intervention. Biofilms are recalcitrant and pose a major threat with regard to chronic contamination of spacecraft water systems. We measured the effectiveness of oxidizing biocides on the removal and regrowth of Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia biofilms. B. cepacia, isolated from the water distribution system of the space shuttle Discovery, was grown in continuous culture to produce a bacterial contamination source for biofilm formation and removal studies. A 10(7) CFU ml-1 B. cepacia suspension, in distilled water, was used to form biofilms on 3000 micrometers2 glass surfaces. Rates of attachment were measured directly with image analysis and were found to be 7.8, 15.2, and 22.8 attachment events h-1 for flow rates of 20.7, 15.2, and 9.8 ml min-1, respectively. After 18 h of formation, the B. cepacia biofilms were challenged with oxidants (ozone, chlorine, and iodine) and the rates of biofilm removal determined by image analysis. Fifty percent of the biofilm material was removed in the first hour of continous treatment with 24 mg l-1 chlorine or 2 mg l-1 ozone. Iodine (48 mg l-1) did not remove any measurable cellular material after 6 h continuous contact. After this first removal of biofilms by the oxidants, the surface was allowed to refoul and was again treated with the biocide. Iodine was the only compound that was unable to remove cellular debris from either primary or secondary biofilms. Moreover, treating primary biofilms with iodine increased the rate of formation of secondary biofilms, from 4.4 to 5.8 attachment events h-1. All the oxidants tested inactivated the B

  18. Removal of Burkholderia cepacia biofilms with oxidants.

    PubMed

    Koenig, D W; Mishra, S K; Pierson, D L

    1995-01-01

    Iodine is used to disinfect the water system aboard US space shuttles and is the anticipated biocide for the international space station. Water quality on spacecraft must be maintained at the highest possible levels for the safety of the crew. Furthermore, the treatment process used to maintain the quality of water on research must be robust and operate for long periods with minimal crew intervention. Biofilms are recalcitrant and pose a major threat with regard to chronic contamination of spacecraft water systems. We measured the effectiveness of oxidizing biocides on the removal and regrowth of Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia biofilms. B. cepacia, isolated from the water distribution system of the space shuttle Discovery, was grown in continuous culture to produce a bacterial contamination source for biofilm formation and removal studies. A 10(7) CFU ml-1 B. cepacia suspension, in distilled water, was used to form biofilms on 3000 micrometers2 glass surfaces. Rates of attachment were measured directly with image analysis and were found to be 7.8, 15.2, and 22.8 attachment events h-1 for flow rates of 20.7, 15.2, and 9.8 ml min-1, respectively. After 18 h of formation, the B. cepacia biofilms were challenged with oxidants (ozone, chlorine, and iodine) and the rates of biofilm removal determined by image analysis. Fifty percent of the biofilm material was removed in the first hour of continous treatment with 24 mg l-1 chlorine or 2 mg l-1 ozone. Iodine (48 mg l-1) did not remove any measurable cellular material after 6 h continuous contact. After this first removal of biofilms by the oxidants, the surface was allowed to refoul and was again treated with the biocide. Iodine was the only compound that was unable to remove cellular debris from either primary or secondary biofilms. Moreover, treating primary biofilms with iodine increased the rate of formation of secondary biofilms, from 4.4 to 5.8 attachment events h-1. All the oxidants tested inactivated the B

  19. Genomic analysis and relatedness of P2-like phages of the Burkholderia cepacia complex

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) is comprised of at least seventeen Gram-negative species that cause infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Because BCC bacteria are broadly antibiotic resistant, phage therapy is currently being investigated as a possible alternative treatment for these infections. The purpose of our study was to sequence and characterize three novel BCC-specific phages: KS5 (vB_BceM-KS5 or vB_BmuZ-ATCC 17616), KS14 (vB_BceM-KS14) and KL3 (vB_BamM-KL3 or vB_BceZ-CEP511). Results KS5, KS14 and KL3 are myoviruses with the A1 morphotype. The genomes of these phages are between 32317 and 40555 base pairs in length and are predicted to encode between 44 and 52 proteins. These phages have over 50% of their proteins in common with enterobacteria phage P2 and so can be classified as members of the Peduovirinae subfamily and the "P2-like viruses" genus. The BCC phage proteins similar to those encoded by P2 are predominantly structural components involved in virion morphogenesis. As prophages, KS5 and KL3 integrate into an AMP nucleosidase gene and a threonine tRNA gene, respectively. Unlike other P2-like viruses, the KS14 prophage is maintained as a plasmid. The P2 E+E' translational frameshift site is conserved among these three phages and so they are predicted to use frameshifting for expression of two of their tail proteins. The lysBC genes of KS14 and KL3 are similar to those of P2, but in KS5 the organization of these genes suggests that they may have been acquired via horizontal transfer from a phage similar to λ. KS5 contains two sequence elements that are unique among these three phages: an ISBmu2-like insertion sequence and a reverse transcriptase gene. KL3 encodes an EcoRII-C endonuclease/methylase pair and Vsr endonuclease that are predicted to function during the lytic cycle to cleave non-self DNA, protect the phage genome and repair methylation-induced mutations. Conclusions KS5, KS14 and KL3 are the first BCC-specific phages

  20. Gene and Protein Expression in Response to Different Growth Temperatures and Oxygen Availability in Burkholderia thailandensis

    PubMed Central

    Peano, Clelia; Chiaramonte, Fabrizio; Motta, Sara; Pietrelli, Alessandro; Jaillon, Sebastien; Rossi, Elio; Consolandi, Clarissa; Champion, Olivia L.; Michell, Stephen L.; Freddi, Luca; Falciola, Luigi; Basilico, Fabrizio; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mauri, Pierluigi; De Bellis, Gianluca; Landini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis, although normally avirulent for mammals, can infect macrophages in vitro and has occasionally been reported to cause pneumonia in humans. It is therefore used as a model organism for the human pathogen B. pseudomallei, to which it is closely related phylogenetically. We characterized the B. thailandensis clinical isolate CDC2721121 (BtCDC272) at the genome level and studied its response to environmental cues associated with human host colonization, namely, temperature and oxygen limitation. Effects of the different growth conditions on BtCDC272 were studied through whole genome transcription studies and analysis of proteins associated with the bacterial cell surface. We found that growth at 37°C, compared to 28°C, negatively affected cell motility and flagella production through a mechanism involving regulation of the flagellin-encoding fliC gene at the mRNA stability level. Growth in oxygen-limiting conditions, in contrast, stimulated various processes linked to virulence, such as lipopolysaccharide production and expression of genes encoding protein secretion systems. Consistent with these observations, BtCDC272 grown in oxygen limitation was more resistant to phagocytosis and strongly induced the production of inflammatory cytokines from murine macrophages. Our results suggest that, while temperature sensing is important for regulation of B. thailandensis cell motility, oxygen limitation has a deeper impact on its physiology and constitutes a crucial environmental signal for the production of virulence factors. PMID:24671187

  1. Vertical transmission explains the specific Burkholderia pattern in Sphagnum mosses at multi-geographic scale

    PubMed Central

    Bragina, Anastasia; Cardinale, Massimiliano; Berg, Christian; Berg, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    The betaproteobacterial genus Burkholderia is known for its versatile interactions with its hosts that can range from beneficial to pathogenic. A plant-beneficial-environmental (PBE) Burkholderia cluster was recently separated from the pathogen cluster, yet still little is known about burkholderial diversity, distribution, colonization, and transmission patterns on plants. In our study, we applied a combination of high-throughput molecular and microscopic methods to examine the aforementioned factors for Burkholderia communities associated with Sphagnum mosses – model plants for long-term associations – in Austrian and Russian bogs. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons libraries revealed that most of the Burkholderia are part of the PBE group, but a minor fraction was closely related to B. glathei and B. andropogonis from the pathogen cluster. Notably, Burkholderia showed highly similar composition patterns for each moss species independent of the geographic region, and Burkholderia-specific fluorescent in situ hybridization of Sphagnum gametophytes exhibited similar colonization patterns in different Sphagnum species at multi-geographic scales. To explain these patterns, we compared the compositions of the surrounding water, gametophyte-, and sporophyte-associated microbiome at genus level and discovered that Burkholderia were present in the Sphagnum sporophyte and gametophyte, but were absent in the flark water. Therefore, Burkholderia is a part of the core microbiome transmitted from the moss sporophyte to the gametophyte. This suggests a vertical transmission of Burkholderia strains, and thus underlines their importance for the plants themselves. PMID:24391630

  2. Molecular method to assess the diversity of Burkholderia species in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Salles, Joana Falcão; De Souza, Francisco Adriano; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2002-04-01

    In spite of the importance of many members of the genus Burkholderia in the soil microbial community, no direct method to assess the diversity of this genus has been developed so far. The aim of this work was the development of soil DNA-based PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), a powerful tool for studying the diversity of microbial communities, for detection and analysis of the Burkholderia diversity in soil samples. Primers specific for the genus Burkholderia were developed based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence and were evaluated in PCRs performed with genomic DNAs from Burkholderia and non-Burkholderia species as the templates. The primer system used exhibited good specificity and sensitivity for the majority of established species of the genus Burkholderia. DGGE analyses of the PCR products obtained showed that there were sufficient differences in migration behavior to distinguish the majority of the 14 Burkholderia species tested. Sequence analysis of amplicons generated with soil DNA exclusively revealed sequences affiliated with sequences of Burkholderia species, demonstrating that the PCR-DGGE method is suitable for studying the diversity of this genus in natural settings. A PCR-DGGE analysis of the Burkholderia communities in two grassland plots revealed differences in diversity mainly between bulk and rhizosphere soil samples; the communities in the latter samples produced more complex patterns.

  3. Molecular Method To Assess the Diversity of Burkholderia Species in Environmental Samples

    PubMed Central

    Salles, Joana Falcão; De Souza, Francisco Adriano; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2002-01-01

    In spite of the importance of many members of the genus Burkholderia in the soil microbial community, no direct method to assess the diversity of this genus has been developed so far. The aim of this work was the development of soil DNA-based PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), a powerful tool for studying the diversity of microbial communities, for detection and analysis of the Burkholderia diversity in soil samples. Primers specific for the genus Burkholderia were developed based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence and were evaluated in PCRs performed with genomic DNAs from Burkholderia and non-Burkholderia species as the templates. The primer system used exhibited good specificity and sensitivity for the majority of established species of the genus Burkholderia. DGGE analyses of the PCR products obtained showed that there were sufficient differences in migration behavior to distinguish the majority of the 14 Burkholderia species tested. Sequence analysis of amplicons generated with soil DNA exclusively revealed sequences affiliated with sequences of Burkholderia species, demonstrating that the PCR-DGGE method is suitable for studying the diversity of this genus in natural settings. A PCR-DGGE analysis of the Burkholderia communities in two grassland plots revealed differences in diversity mainly between bulk and rhizosphere soil samples; the communities in the latter samples produced more complex patterns. PMID:11916673

  4. Genome sequence of the acid-tolerant Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2232 from Karijini National Park, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Robert; Watkin, Elizabeth; Tian, Rui; Bräu, Lambert; O’Hara, Graham; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, James; Reddy, Tatiparthi; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2232 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming acid-tolerant rod that was trapped in 2001 from acidic soil collected from Karijini National Park (Australia) using Gastrolobium capitatum as a host. WSM2232 was effective in nitrogen fixation with G. capitatum but subsequently lost symbiotic competence during long-term storage. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2232, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 7,208,311 bp standard-draft genome is arranged into 72 scaffolds of 72 contigs containing 6,322 protein-coding genes and 61 RNA-only encoding genes. The loss of symbiotic capability can now be attributed to the loss of nodulation and nitrogen fixation genes from the genome. This rhizobial genome is one of 100 sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project. PMID:25197442

  5. The oxalic acid biosynthetic activity of Burkholderia mallei is encoded by a single locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although it is known that oxalic acid provides a selective advantage to the secreting microbe, our understanding of how this acid is biosynthesized remains incomplete. This study reports the identification, cloning, and partial characterization of the oxalic acid biosynthetic enzyme from the animal ...

  6. Oxalic acid biosynthesis is encoded by an operon in Burkholderia glumae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although the biosynthesis of oxalic acid is known to occur in a number of bacteria, the mechanism(s) regulating its production remains largely unknown. To date, there is no report on the identification of an oxalic acid biosynthetic pathway gene from bacteria. In an attempt to identify such a gene...

  7. Phylogenetic Analysis of Ara+ and Ara− Burkholderia pseudomallei Isolates and Development of a Multiplex PCR Procedure for Rapid Discrimination between the Two Biotypes

    PubMed Central

    Dharakul, Tararaj; Tassaneetrithep, Boonratn; Trakulsomboon, Suwanna; Songsivilai, Sirirurg

    1999-01-01

    A Burkholderia pseudomallei-like organism has recently been identified among some soil isolates of B. pseudomallei in an area with endemic melioidosis. This organism is almost identical to B. pseudomallei in terms of morphological and biochemical profiles, except that it differs in ability to assimilate l-arabinose. These Ara+ isolates are also less virulent than the Ara− isolates in animal models. In addition, clinical isolates of B. pseudomallei available to date are almost exclusively Ara−. These features suggested that these two organisms may belong to distinctive species. In this study, the 16S rRNA-encoding genes from five clinical (four Ara− and one Ara+) and nine soil isolates (five Ara− and four Ara+) of B. pseudomallei were sequenced. The nucleotide sequences and phylogenetic analysis indicated that the 16S rRNA-encoding gene of the Ara+ biotype was similar to but distinctively different from that of the Ara− soil isolates, which were identical to the classical clinical isolates of B. pseudomallei. The nucleotide sequence differences in the 16S rRNA-encoding gene appeared to be specific for the Ara+ or Ara− biotypes. The differences were, however, not sufficient for classification into a new species within the genus Burkholderia. A simple and rapid multiplex PCR procedure was developed to discriminate between Ara− and Ara+ B. pseudomallei isolates. This new method could also be incorporated into our previously reported nested PCR system for detecting B. pseudomallei in clinical specimens. PMID:10325345

  8. Nodulation of Cyclopia spp. (Leguminosae, Papilionoideae) by Burkholderia tuberum

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Geoffrey N.; Chen, Wen-Ming; Bontemps, Cyril; Chou, Jui-Hsing; Young, J. Peter W.; Sprent, Janet I.; James, Euan K.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Species of the genus Burkholderia, from the Betaproteobacteria, have been isolated from legume nodules, but so far they have only been shown to form symbioses with species of Mimosa, sub-family Mimosoideae. This work investigates whether Burkholderia tuberum strains STM678 (isolated from Aspalathus carnosa) and DUS833 (from Aspalathus callosa) can nodulate species of the South African endemic papilionoid genera Cyclopia (tribe Podalyrieae) and Aspalathus (Crotalarieae) as well as the promiscuous legume Macroptilium atropurpureum (Phaseoleae). Method Bacterial strains and the phylogeny of their symbiosis-related (nod) genes were examined via 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Seedlings were grown in liquid culture and inoculated with one of the two strains of B. tuberum or with Sinorhizobium strain NGR 234 (from Lablab purpureus), Mesorhizobium strain DUS835 (from Aspalathus linearis) or Methylobacterium nodulans (from Crotalaria podocarpa). Some nodules, inoculated with green fluorescence protein (GFP)-tagged strains, were examined by light and electron microscopy coupled with immunogold labelling with a Burkholderia-specific antibody. The presence of active nitrogenase was checked by immunolabelling of nitrogenase and by the acetylene reduction assay. B. tuberum STM678 was also tested on a wide range of legumes from all three sub-families. Key Results Nodules were not formed on any of the Aspalathus spp. Only B. tuberum nodulated Cyclopia falcata, C. galioides, C. genistoides, C. intermedia and C. pubescens. It also effectively nodulated M. atropurpureum but no other species tested. GFP-expressing inoculant strains were located inside infected cells of C. genistoides, and bacteroids in both Cyclopia spp. and M. atropurpureum were immunogold-labelled with antibodies against Burkholderia and nitrogenase. Nitrogenase activity was also shown using the acetylene reduction assay. This is the first demonstration that a β-rhizobial strain can effectively

  9. Exploiting molecular virulence determinants in Burkholderia to develop vaccine antigens.

    PubMed

    Casey, William Thomas; McClean, Siobhán

    2015-01-01

    The Burkholderia genus is a highly diverse group of species that are distributed throughout a wide range of environments and habitats. Among this group, which is remarkable for its adaptability to a wider range of environmental conditions including disinfectants and organic solvents, are a subgroup that represents some of the most difficult to treat infections. This subgroup includes Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis; B. mallei, the causative agent of glanders and B. cepacia complex (Bcc) which causes opportunistic infections in people with cystic fibrosis and immunocompromised patients. The latter pathogen is itself a group of 18 distinct, but, closely related species. The adaptability of this group allows the expression of a rich selection of molecular virulence determinants to facilitate its survival in the diverse habitats that it colonises. This review will describe a selection of these associated with human infection; comparing them across the three pathogens and highlighting their potential roles as vaccine candidates. Better integration of the knowledge on the pathogenesis and molecular determinants of virulence for these Burkholderia spp may allow the development of more efficacious vaccines.

  10. Accurate and rapid identification of the Burkholderia pseudomallei near-neighbour, Burkholderia ubonensis, using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Price, Erin P; Sarovich, Derek S; Webb, Jessica R; Ginther, Jennifer L; Mayo, Mark; Cook, James M; Seymour, Meagan L; Kaestli, Mirjam; Theobald, Vanessa; Hall, Carina M; Busch, Joseph D; Foster, Jeffrey T; Keim, Paul; Wagner, David M; Tuanyok, Apichai; Pearson, Talima; Currie, Bart J

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia ubonensis is an environmental bacterium belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc), a group of genetically related organisms that are associated with opportunistic but generally nonfatal infections in healthy individuals. In contrast, the near-neighbour species Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis, a disease that can be fatal in up to 95% of cases if left untreated. B. ubonensis is frequently misidentified as B. pseudomallei from soil samples using selective culturing on Ashdown's medium, reflecting both the shared environmental niche and morphological similarities of these species. Additionally, B. ubonensis shows potential as an important biocontrol agent in B. pseudomallei-endemic regions as certain strains possess antagonistic properties towards B. pseudomallei. Current methods for characterising B. ubonensis are laborious, time-consuming and costly, and as such this bacterium remains poorly studied. The aim of our study was to develop a rapid and inexpensive real-time PCR-based assay specific for B. ubonensis. We demonstrate that a novel B. ubonensis-specific assay, Bu550, accurately differentiates B. ubonensis from B. pseudomallei and other species that grow on selective Ashdown's agar. We anticipate that Bu550 will catalyse research on B. ubonensis by enabling rapid identification of this organism from Ashdown's-positive colonies that are not B. pseudomallei.

  11. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Lebeckia - nodulating Burkholderia dilworthii strain WSM3556T

    DOE PAGESBeta

    De Meyer, Sofie E.; Tian, Rui; Seshadri, Rekha; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Yates, Ron; Howieson, John; Kyrpides, Nikos; et al

    2015-09-19

    Burkholderia dilworthii strain WSM3556T is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective N2-fixing root nodule of Lebeckia ambigua collected near Grotto Bay Nature Reserve, in the Western Cape of South Africa, in October 2004. This plant persists in infertile and deep sandy soils with acidic pH, and is therefore an ideal candidate for a perennial based agriculture system in Western Australia. WSM3556T thus represents a potential inoculant quality strain for L. ambigua for which we describe the general features, together with genome sequence and annotation. Lastly, the 7,679,067 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arrangedmore » in 140 scaffolds of 141 contigs, contains 7,059 protein-coding genes and 64 RNA-only encoding genes, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project proposal.« less

  12. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Lebeckia - nodulating Burkholderia dilworthii strain WSM3556T

    SciTech Connect

    De Meyer, Sofie E.; Tian, Rui; Seshadri, Rekha; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Yates, Ron; Howieson, John; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2015-09-19

    Burkholderia dilworthii strain WSM3556T is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective N2-fixing root nodule of Lebeckia ambigua collected near Grotto Bay Nature Reserve, in the Western Cape of South Africa, in October 2004. This plant persists in infertile and deep sandy soils with acidic pH, and is therefore an ideal candidate for a perennial based agriculture system in Western Australia. WSM3556T thus represents a potential inoculant quality strain for L. ambigua for which we describe the general features, together with genome sequence and annotation. Lastly, the 7,679,067 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 140 scaffolds of 141 contigs, contains 7,059 protein-coding genes and 64 RNA-only encoding genes, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project proposal.

  13. Whole-Genome Analysis of Quorum-Sensing Burkholderia sp. Strain A9

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian Woon; Tee, Kok Keng; Chang, Chien-Yi; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Xin-Yue

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia spp. rely on N-acyl homoserine lactone as quorum-sensing signal molecules which coordinate their phenotype at the population level. In this work, we present the whole genome of Burkholderia sp. strain A9, which enables the discovery of its N-acyl homoserine lactone synthase gene. PMID:25745000

  14. Burkholderia bacteria infectiously induce the proto-farming symbiosis of Dictyostelium amoebae and food bacteria.

    PubMed

    DiSalvo, Susanne; Haselkorn, Tamara S; Bashir, Usman; Jimenez, Daniela; Brock, Debra A; Queller, David C; Strassmann, Joan E

    2015-09-01

    Symbiotic associations can allow an organism to acquire novel traits by accessing the genetic repertoire of its partner. In the Dictyostelium discoideum farming symbiosis, certain amoebas (termed "farmers") stably associate with bacterial partners. Farmers can suffer a reproductive cost but also gain beneficial capabilities, such as carriage of bacterial food (proto-farming) and defense against competitors. Farming status previously has been attributed to amoeba genotype, but the role of bacterial partners in its induction has not been examined. Here, we explore the role of bacterial associates in the initiation, maintenance, and phenotypic effects of the farming symbiosis. We demonstrate that two clades of farmer-associated Burkholderia isolates colonize D. discoideum nonfarmers and infectiously endow them with farmer-like characteristics, indicating that Burkholderia symbionts are a major driver of the farming phenomenon. Under food-rich conditions, Burkholderia-colonized amoebas produce fewer spores than uncolonized counterparts, with the severity of this reduction being dependent on the Burkholderia colonizer. However, the induction of food carriage by Burkholderia colonization may be considered a conditionally adaptive trait because it can confer an advantage to the amoeba host when grown in food-limiting conditions. We observed Burkholderia inside and outside colonized D. discoideum spores after fruiting body formation; this observation, together with the ability of Burkholderia to colonize new amoebas, suggests a mixed mode of symbiont transmission. These results change our understanding of the D. discoideum farming symbiosis by establishing that the bacterial partner, Burkholderia, is an important causative agent of the farming phenomenon.

  15. Reliability of automated biochemical identification of Burkholderia pseudomallei is regionally dependent.

    PubMed

    Podin, Yuwana; Kaestli, Mirjam; McMahon, Nicole; Hennessy, Jann; Ngian, Hie Ung; Wong, Jin Shyan; Mohana, Anand; Wong, See Chang; William, Timothy; Mayo, Mark; Baird, Robert W; Currie, Bart J

    2013-09-01

    Misidentifications of Burkholderia pseudomallei as Burkholderia cepacia by Vitek 2 have occurred. Multidimensional scaling ordination of biochemical profiles of 217 Malaysian and Australian B. pseudomallei isolates found clustering of misidentified B. pseudomallei isolates from Malaysian Borneo. Specificity of B. pseudomallei identification in Vitek 2 and potentially other automated identification systems is regionally dependent.

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia cenocepacia Strain CEIB S5-2, a Methyl Parathion- and p-Nitrophenol-Degrading Bacterium, Isolated from Agricultural Soils in Morelos, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Ocampo, Fernando; Fernández López, Maikel Gilberto; Lozano-Aguirre Beltrán, Luis Fernando; Popoca-Ursino, Elida Carolina; Ortiz-Hernández, M. Laura; Sánchez-Salinas, Enrique; Ramos Quintana, Fernando; Villalobos-López, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen that belongs to Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC). Burkholderia cenocepacia strain CEIB S5-2 was isolated from agricultural soils in Morelos, Mexico, and previously has shown its abilities for bioremediation. In this study, we report the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia cenocepacia strain CEIB S5-2. PMID:27125479

  17. Mechanisms of Disease: Host-Pathogen Interactions between Burkholderia Species and Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    David, Jonathan; Bell, Rachel E.; Clark, Graeme C.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Burkholderia species can cause a range of severe, often fatal, respiratory diseases. A variety of in vitro models of infection have been developed in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism by which Burkholderia spp. gain entry to and interact with the body. The majority of studies have tended to focus on the interaction of bacteria with phagocytic cells with a paucity of information available with regard to the lung epithelium. However, the lung epithelium is becoming more widely recognized as an important player in innate immunity and the early response to infections. Here we review the complex relationship between Burkholderia species and epithelial cells with an emphasis on the most pathogenic species, Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei. The current gaps in knowledge in our understanding are highlighted along with the epithelial host-pathogen interactions that offer potential opportunities for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26636042

  18. Diversity and distribution of Burkholderia cepacia complex in the rhizosphere of rice and maize.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lixin; Xie, Guanlin

    2007-01-01

    A survey of Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) species was conducted in agricultural fields within Hangzhou, China. Out of the 251 bacterial isolates recovered on the selective media from the rhizosphere of rice and maize, 112 of them were assigned to Bcc by PCR assays. The species composition of the Bcc isolates was analyzed by a combination of recA-restriction fragment length polymorphism assays, species-specific PCR tests and recA gene sequencing. The results revealed that the majority belong to B. cepacia, Burkholderia cenocepacia recA lineage IIIB, Burkholderia vietnamiensis and Burkholderia pyrrocinia. Burkholderia cenocepacia and B. vietnamiensis dominated the rhizosphere of maize and rice, respectively, indicating that species composition and abundance of Bcc may vary dramatically in different crop rhizospheres. In addition, one isolate (R456) formed a single discrete cluster within the phylogenetic analysis of the Bcc recA gene, and it may belong to a new genomovar. PMID:17233735

  19. Strategies for PCR based detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei DNA in paraffin wax embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Hagen, R M; Gauthier, Y P; Sprague, L D; Vidal, D R; Zysk, G; Finke, E-J; Neubauer, H

    2002-12-01

    Recently, several cases of melioidosis imported to Europe have been reported. The diagnosis of the acute or chronic infection remains challenging. This report describes an optimised protocol for fast and reliable DNA preparation for use in two different polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, namely: (1) a seminested PCR assay targeting a genus specific sequence of the ribosomal protein subunit 21 (rpsU) gene and (2) a nested PCR assay targeting the gene encoding the filament forming flagellin (fliC). Various strains of Burkholderia spp, strains of closely related genera, and spleen tissue samples of experimentally infected mice were investigated. The combination of PCR and sequencing of the amplicons resulted in high sensitivity and specificity. These procedures may allow rapid, sensitive, and reliable detection of B pseudomallei DNA in routinely formalin fixed and paraffin wax embedded samples, thus providing a safe diagnostic tool and avoiding the cultivation of a risk group 3 agent. In addition, this method could be useful for retrospective histopathological investigations.

  20. Candidate Essential Genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 Identified by Genome-Wide TraDIS

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yee-Chin; Abd El Ghany, Moataz; Naeem, Raeece; Lee, Kok-Wei; Tan, Yung-Chie; Pain, Arnab; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia infection often leads to fatal cepacia syndrome in cystic fibrosis patients. However, antibiotic therapy rarely results in complete eradication of the pathogen due to its intrinsic resistance to many clinically available antibiotics. Recent attention has turned to the identification of essential genes as the proteins encoded by these genes may serve as potential targets for development of novel antimicrobials. In this study, we utilized TraDIS (Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing) as a genome-wide screening tool to facilitate the identification of B. cenocepacia genes essential for its growth and viability. A transposon mutant pool consisting of approximately 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed, with more than 400,000 unique transposon insertion sites identified by computational analysis of TraDIS datasets. The saturated library allowed for the identification of 383 genes that were predicted to be essential in B. cenocepacia. We extended the application of TraDIS to identify conditionally essential genes required for in vitro growth and revealed an additional repertoire of 439 genes to be crucial for B. cenocepacia growth under nutrient-depleted conditions. The library of B. cenocepacia mutants can subsequently be subjected to various biologically related conditions to facilitate the discovery of genes involved in niche adaptation as well as pathogenicity and virulence. PMID:27597847

  1. In silico analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei genome sequence for potential drug targets.

    PubMed

    Chong, Chan-Eng; Lim, Boon-San; Nathan, Sheila; Mohamed, Rahmah

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have enabled elucidation of whole genome information from a plethora of organisms. In parallel with this technology, various bioinformatics tools have driven the comparative analysis of the genome sequences between species and within isolates. While drawing meaningful conclusions from a large amount of raw material, computer-aided identification of suitable targets for further experimental analysis and characterization, has also led to the prediction of non-human homologous essential genes in bacteria as promising candidates for novel drug discovery. Here, we present a comparative genomic analysis to identify essential genes in Burkholderia pseudomallei. Our in silico prediction has identified 312 essential genes which could also be potential drug candidates. These genes encode essential proteins to support the survival of B. pseudomallei including outer-inner membrane and surface structures, regulators, proteins involved in pathogenenicity, adaptation, chaperones as well as degradation of small and macromolecules, energy metabolism, information transfer, central/intermediate/miscellaneous metabolism pathways and some conserved hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Therefore, our in silico approach has enabled rapid screening and identification of potential drug targets for further characterization in the laboratory.

  2. The Twin Arginine Translocation System Is Essential for Aerobic Growth and Full Virulence of Burkholderia thailandensis

    PubMed Central

    Wagley, Sariqa; Hemsley, Claudia; Thomas, Rachael; Moule, Madeleine G.; Vanaporn, Muthita; Andreae, Clio; Robinson, Matthew; Goldman, Stan; Wren, Brendan W.; Butler, Clive S.

    2014-01-01

    The twin arginine translocation (Tat) system in bacteria is responsible for transporting folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane, and in some bacteria, Tat-exported substrates have been linked to virulence. We report here that the Tat machinery is present in Burkholderia pseudomallei, B. mallei, and B. thailandensis, and we show that the system is essential for aerobic but not anaerobic growth. Switching off of the Tat system in B. thailandensis grown anaerobically resulted in filamentous bacteria, and bacteria showed increased sensitivity to some β-lactam antibiotics. In Galleria mellonella and zebrafish infection models, the Tat conditional mutant was attenuated. The aerobic growth-restricted phenotype indicates that Tat substrates may play a functional role in oxygen-dependent energy conservation. In other bacteria, aerobic growth restriction in Tat mutants has been attributed to the inability to translocate PetA, the Rieske iron-sulfur protein which forms part of the quinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase complex. Here, we show that PetA is not responsible for aerobic growth restriction in B. thailandensis. However, we have identified an operon encoding 2 proteins of unknown function (BTH_I2176 and BTH_I2175) that play a role in aerobic growth restriction, and we present evidence that BTH_I2176 is Tat translocated. PMID:24214943

  3. Candidate Essential Genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 Identified by Genome-Wide TraDIS

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yee-Chin; Abd El Ghany, Moataz; Naeem, Raeece; Lee, Kok-Wei; Tan, Yung-Chie; Pain, Arnab; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia infection often leads to fatal cepacia syndrome in cystic fibrosis patients. However, antibiotic therapy rarely results in complete eradication of the pathogen due to its intrinsic resistance to many clinically available antibiotics. Recent attention has turned to the identification of essential genes as the proteins encoded by these genes may serve as potential targets for development of novel antimicrobials. In this study, we utilized TraDIS (Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing) as a genome-wide screening tool to facilitate the identification of B. cenocepacia genes essential for its growth and viability. A transposon mutant pool consisting of approximately 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed, with more than 400,000 unique transposon insertion sites identified by computational analysis of TraDIS datasets. The saturated library allowed for the identification of 383 genes that were predicted to be essential in B. cenocepacia. We extended the application of TraDIS to identify conditionally essential genes required for in vitro growth and revealed an additional repertoire of 439 genes to be crucial for B. cenocepacia growth under nutrient-depleted conditions. The library of B. cenocepacia mutants can subsequently be subjected to various biologically related conditions to facilitate the discovery of genes involved in niche adaptation as well as pathogenicity and virulence.

  4. Candidate Essential Genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 Identified by Genome-Wide TraDIS.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yee-Chin; Abd El Ghany, Moataz; Naeem, Raeece; Lee, Kok-Wei; Tan, Yung-Chie; Pain, Arnab; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia infection often leads to fatal cepacia syndrome in cystic fibrosis patients. However, antibiotic therapy rarely results in complete eradication of the pathogen due to its intrinsic resistance to many clinically available antibiotics. Recent attention has turned to the identification of essential genes as the proteins encoded by these genes may serve as potential targets for development of novel antimicrobials. In this study, we utilized TraDIS (Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing) as a genome-wide screening tool to facilitate the identification of B. cenocepacia genes essential for its growth and viability. A transposon mutant pool consisting of approximately 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed, with more than 400,000 unique transposon insertion sites identified by computational analysis of TraDIS datasets. The saturated library allowed for the identification of 383 genes that were predicted to be essential in B. cenocepacia. We extended the application of TraDIS to identify conditionally essential genes required for in vitro growth and revealed an additional repertoire of 439 genes to be crucial for B. cenocepacia growth under nutrient-depleted conditions. The library of B. cenocepacia mutants can subsequently be subjected to various biologically related conditions to facilitate the discovery of genes involved in niche adaptation as well as pathogenicity and virulence. PMID:27597847

  5. Characterization of the Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243 Capsular Polysaccharide I Coding Region

    PubMed Central

    Cuccui, Jon; Milne, Timothy S.; Harmer, Nicholas; George, Alison J.; Harding, Sarah V.; Dean, Rachel E.; Scott, Andrew E.; Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Wren, Brendan W.; Prior, Joann L.

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a disease endemic to regions of Southeast Asia and Northern Australia. Both humans and a range of other animal species are susceptible to melioidosis, and the production of a group 3 polysaccharide capsule in B. pseudomallei is essential for virulence. B. pseudomallei capsular polysaccharide (CPS) I comprises unbranched manno-heptopyranose residues and is encoded by a 34.5-kb locus on chromosome 1. Despite the importance of this locus, the role of all of the genes within this region is unclear. We inactivated 18 of these genes and analyzed their phenotype using Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining. Furthermore, by combining this approach with bioinformatic analysis, we were able to develop a model for CPS I biosynthesis and export. We report that inactivating gmhA, wcbJ, and wcbN in B. pseudomallei K96243 retains the immunogenic integrity of the polysaccharide despite causing attenuation in the BALB/c murine infection model. Mice immunized with the B. pseudomallei K96243 mutants lacking a functional copy of either gmhA or wcbJ were afforded significant levels of protection against a wild-type B. pseudomallei K96243 challenge. PMID:22252864

  6. Pivotal role of anthranilate dioxygenase genes in the adaptation of Burkholderia multivorans ATCC 17616 in soil.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Eri; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Nagata, Yuji; Tsuda, Masataka

    2012-05-01

    In our recent screen for soil-induced genes, the expression of andA operon (andAcAdAbAa) for anthranilate catabolism in Burkholderia multivorans ATCC 17616 was found to increase dramatically in a soil sample (Nishiyama et al., Environ Microbiol 12: 2539, 2010). The operon was preceded by andR encoding a putative transcriptional regulator for the andA operon. In this study, the andA promoter was induced by tryptophan and anthranilate in an andR-dependent manner. The andA promoter in a deletion mutant lacking tryptophan dioxygenase (one of enzymes for the catabolism of tryptophan to anthranilate) did not respond to tryptophan, indicating that not tryptophan but anthranilate is the effector of AndR. Although both anthranilate and tryptophan were under the detection levels in the soil sample, andA promoter showed higher activity in the soil sample than in a laboratory medium. Such induction required andR and was moderately dependent on the ferric uptake regulator (Fur). The proliferation ability of andAc mutant in the sterile soil was low compared with the co-incubated wild-type cells. These findings suggested that in the soil environment, anthranilate dioxygenase genes are induced by AndR and Fur, and play a pivotal role in the proliferation in the soil environment. PMID:22360670

  7. Purification, biochemical characterization, and genetic cloning of the phytase produced by Burkholderia sp. strain a13.

    PubMed

    Graminho, Eduardo Rezende; Takaya, Naoki; Nakamura, Akira; Hoshino, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    A phytase-producing bacterium, Burkholderia sp. a13 (JCM 30421), was isolated from Lake Kasumigaura by enrichment cultivation using minimum medium containing phytic acid as the sole phosphorus source. The phytase production by strain a13 was induced by the presence of phytic acid and repressed by the addition of glucose. The purified enzyme had a molecular weight of 44 kDa and a phytase activity of 174 μmol min(-1) mg(-1). The enzyme showed broad substrate specificity, but the highest activity was observed with phytic acid. The enzyme activity was strongly inhibited by Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Hg(2+), and iodoacetic acid, indicating the requirement of a thiol group for the activity. Genetic cloning reveals that the mature portion of this enzyme consists of 428 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 46 kDa. The amino acid sequence showed the highest similarity to the phytase produced by Hafnia alvei with 48% identity; it also contained histidine acid phosphatase (HAP) motifs (RHGXRXP and HD), indicating the classification of this enzyme in the HAP phytase family. We have successfully expressed the cloned gene in Escherichia coli from its putative initiation codon, showing that the gene actually encodes the phytase. PMID:25833676

  8. Burkholderia fungorum sp. nov. and Burkholderia caledonica sp. nov., two new species isolated from the environment, animals and human clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Coenye, T; Laevens, S; Willems, A; Ohlén, M; Hannant, W; Govan, J R; Gillis, M; Falsen, E; Vandamme, P

    2001-05-01

    A polyphasic taxonomic study that included DNA-DNA hybridizations, DNA base ratio determinations, 16S rDNA sequence analyses, whole-cell protein and fatty acid analyses and an extensive biochemical characterization was performed on 16 strains isolated from the environment, animals and human clinical samples. The isolates belonged to the genus Burkholderia, were phylogenetically closely related to Burkholderia graminis, Burkholderia caribensis and Burkholderia phenazinium and had G+C contents between 61.9 and 62.2 mol%. Seven strains isolated from the rhizosphere were assigned to Burkholderia caledonica sp. nov. [type strain LMG 19076T (= CCUG 42236T)]. Nine strains isolated from the environment, animals and human clinical samples were assigned to Burkholderia fungorum sp. nov. [type strain LMG 16225T (= CCUG 31961T)]. Differential tests for B. graminis, B. caribensis, B. phenazinium, B. caledonica and B. fungorum include the following: assimilation of trehalose, citrate, DL-norleucine, adipate and sucrose; nitrate reduction; growth in the presence of 0.5% NaCl; and beta-galactosidase activity. PMID:11411678

  9. Molecular signatures and phylogenomic analysis of the genus Burkholderia: proposal for division of this genus into the emended genus Burkholderia containing pathogenic organisms and a new genus Paraburkholderia gen. nov. harboring environmental species

    PubMed Central

    Sawana, Amandeep; Adeolu, Mobolaji; Gupta, Radhey S.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Burkholderia contains large number of diverse species which include many clinically important organisms, phytopathogens, as well as environmental species. However, currently, there is a paucity of biochemical or molecular characteristics which can reliably distinguish different groups of Burkholderia species. We report here the results of detailed phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses of 45 sequenced species of the genus Burkholderia. In phylogenetic trees based upon concatenated sequences for 21 conserved proteins as well as 16S rRNA gene sequence based trees, members of the genus Burkholderia grouped into two major clades. Within these main clades a number of smaller clades including those corresponding to the clinically important Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) and the Burkholderia pseudomallei groups were also clearly distinguished. Our comparative analysis of protein sequences from Burkholderia spp. has identified 42 highly specific molecular markers in the form of conserved sequence indels (CSIs) that are uniquely found in a number of well-defined groups of Burkholderia spp. Six of these CSIs are specific for a group of Burkholderia spp. (referred to as Clade I in this work) which contains all clinically relevant members of the genus (viz. the BCC and the B. pseudomallei group) as well as the phytopathogenic Burkholderia spp. The second main clade (Clade II), which is composed of environmental Burkholderia species, is also distinguished by 2 identified CSIs that are specific for this group. Additionally, our work has also identified multiple CSIs that serve to clearly demarcate a number of smaller groups of Burkholderia spp. including 3 CSIs that are specific for the B. cepacia complex, 4 CSIs that are uniquely found in the B. pseudomallei group, 5 CSIs that are specific for the phytopathogenic Burkholderia spp. and 22 other CSI that distinguish two groups within Clade II. The described molecular markers provide highly specific means for

  10. Burkholderia eburnea sp. nov., isolated from peat soil.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sang Rim; Srinivasan, Sathiyaraj; Lee, Sang Seob

    2014-04-01

    A novel aerobic bacterium, designated strain RR11(T), was isolated from peat soil and was characterized by using a polyphasic taxonomic approach and identified in order to determine its taxonomic position. Strain RR11(T) is a Gram-negative, non-sporulating, motile, short-rod-shaped bacterium. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis identified this strain as a member of the genus Burkholderia of the class Betaproteobacteria. The highest degrees of gene sequence similarity were found with Burkholderia tropica Ppe8(T) (98.0 %), B. bannensis E25(T) (97.3 %), B. ferrariae FeGI01(T) (97.1 %), B. unamae MTI-641(T) (97.1 %) and B. heleia SA41(T) (97.1 %). Strain RR11(T) had the following chemotaxonomic characteristics: the major ubiquinone was Q-8, the DNA G+C content was 60.8 mol%, the major fatty acids were C16 : 0, C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c and C17 : 0 cyclo and the polar lipid profile contained phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and an unknown aminophospholipid. Based on its morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomic characteristics, together with 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison results, strain RR11(T) represents a novel species, for which the name Burkholderia eburnea sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is strain RR11(T) ( = KEMC 7302-065(T) = JCM 18070(T)).

  11. Characterization of BcaA, a Putative Classical Autotransporter Protein in Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Cristine G.; Borst, Luke

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a tier 1 select agent, and the causative agent of melioidosis, a disease with effects ranging from chronic abscesses to fulminant pneumonia and septic shock, which can be rapidly fatal. Autotransporters (ATs) are outer membrane proteins belonging to the type V secretion system family, and many have been shown to play crucial roles in pathogenesis. The open reading frame Bp1026b_II1054 (bcaA) in B. pseudomallei strain 1026b is predicted to encode a classical autotransporter protein with an approximately 80-kDa passenger domain that contains a subtilisin-related domain. Immediately 3′ to bcaA is Bp11026_II1055 (bcaB), which encodes a putative prolyl 4-hydroxylase. To investigate the role of these genes in pathogenesis, large in-frame deletion mutations of bcaA and bcaB were constructed in strain Bp340, an efflux pump mutant derivative of the melioidosis clinical isolate 1026b. Comparison of Bp340ΔbcaA and Bp340ΔbcaB mutants to wild-type B. pseudomallei in vitro demonstrated similar levels of adherence to A549 lung epithelial cells, but the mutant strains were defective in their ability to invade these cells and to form plaques. In a BALB/c mouse model of intranasal infection, similar bacterial burdens were observed after 48 h in the lungs and liver of mice infected with Bp340ΔbcaA, Bp340ΔbcaB, and wild-type bacteria. However, significantly fewer bacteria were recovered from the spleen of Bp340ΔbcaA-infected mice, supporting the idea of a role for this AT in dissemination or in survival in the passage from the site of infection to the spleen. PMID:23340315

  12. Structure prediction and evolution of a halo-acid dehalogenase of Burkholderia mallei.

    PubMed

    Rai, Alok R; Singh, Raghvendra Pratap; Srivastava, Alok Kumar; Dubey, Ramesh Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Environmental pollutants containing halogenated organic compounds e.g. haloacid, can cause a plethora of health problems. The structural and functional analyses of the gene responsible of their degradation are an important aspect for environmental studies and are important to human well-being. It has been shown that some haloacids are toxic and mutagenic. Microorganisms capable of degrading these haloacids can be found in the natural environment. One of these, a soil-borne Burkholderia mallei posses the ability to grow on monobromoacetate (MBA). This bacterium produces a haloacid dehalogenase that allows the cell to grow on MBA, a highly toxic and mutagenic environmental pollutant. For the structural and functional analysis, a 346 amino acid encoding protein sequence of haloacid dehalogenase is retrieve from NCBI data base. Primary and secondary structure analysis suggested that the high percentage of helices in the structure makes the protein more flexible for folding, which might increase protein interactions. The consensus protein sub-cellular localization predictions suggest that dehalogenase protein is a periplasmic protein 3D2GO server, suggesting that it is mainly employed in metabolic process followed by hydrolase activity and catalytic activity. The tertiary structure of protein was predicted by homology modeling. The result suggests that the protein is an unstable protein which is also an important characteristic of active enzyme enabling them to bind various cofactors and substrate for proper functioning. Validation of 3D structure was done using Ramachandran plot ProsA-web and RMSD score. This predicted information will help in better understanding of mechanism underlying haloacid dehalogenase encoding protein and its evolutionary relationship.

  13. Effect of phosphoglycerate mutase and fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase deficiency on symbiotic Burkholderia phymatum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ming; Prell, Jurgen; James, Euan K; Sheu, Der-Shyan; Sheu, Shih-Yi

    2012-04-01

    Burkholderia phymatum STM815 is a β-rhizobial strain that can effectively nodulate several species of the large legume genus Mimosa. Two Tn5-induced mutants of this strain, KM16-22 and KM51, failed to form root nodules on Mimosa pudica, but still caused root hair deformation, which is one of the early steps of rhizobial infection. Both mutants grew well in a complex medium. However, KM16-22 could not grow on minimal medium unless a sugar and a metabolic intermediate such as pyruvate were provided, and KM51 also could not grow on minimal medium unless a sugar was added. The Tn5-interrupted genes of the mutants showed strong homologies to pgm, which encodes 2,3-biphosphoglycerate-dependent phosphoglycerate mutase (dPGM), and fbp, which encodes fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase). Both enzymes are known to be involved in obligate steps in carbohydrate metabolism. Enzyme assays confirmed that KM16-22 and KM51 had indeed lost dPGM and FBPase activity, respectively, whilst the activities of these enzymes were expressed normally in both free-living bacteria and symbiotic bacteroids of the parental strain STM815. Both mutants recovered their enzyme activity after the introduction of wild-type pgm or fbp genes, were subsequently able to use carbohydrate as a carbon source, and were able to form root nodules on M. pudica and to fix nitrogen as efficiently as the parental strain. We conclude that the enzymes dPGM and FBPase are essential for the formation of a symbiosis with the host plant. PMID:22282515

  14. Combined use of a specific probe and PCAT medium to study Burkholderia in soil.

    PubMed

    Pallud, C; Viallard, V; Balandreau, J; Normand, P; Grundmann, G

    2001-10-01

    Due to its pathogenic traits and agricultural benefits, there is some challenge in detecting Burkholderia in the soil environment. In this perspective, an existing semi-selective medium, (PCAT), was combined with a Burkholderia specific molecular probe. Using the complete 16S rRNA sequences of all available Burkholderia species type strains, we selected the following sequence: 5'-ACCCTCTGTTCCGACCATTGTATGA-3'. The probe was validated against GenBank sequences, with dot blots and colony hybridization tests. A diversity study of all strains growing on a PCAT plate after plating a soil dilution (75 strains) was carried out with ARDRA analysis and colony hybridization tests. All the hybridizing strains belonged to genus Burkholderia. The major type of non-hybridizing isolates belonged to Pseudomonas (16S rRNA sequencing). Both tools were combined to compare the Burkholderia populations in a rhizosphere (maize) and a non-rhizosphere soil. Based on hybridizing PCAT isolates, we were able to show an increase in Burkholderia populations in the maize rhizosphere. This genus represented 2% and 16% of the total cultivable microflora in the non-rhizosphere and rhizosphere soils, respectively. Although PCAT was shown not to be appropriate to routinely enumerate Burkholderia populations in soil, it allowed environmental investigations at the genus level, when combined with a molecular specific probe. PMID:11566224

  15. Mannitol promotes adherence of an outbreak strain of Burkholderia multivorans via an exopolysaccharide-independent mechanism that is associated with upregulation of newly identified fimbrial and afimbrial adhesins.

    PubMed

    Denman, Carmen C; Brown, Alan R

    2013-04-01

    Burkholderia multivorans, a member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc), is an important pathogen of the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. Mannitol, approved as an inhaled osmolyte therapy for use in CF patients, promotes exopolysaccharide (EPS) production by the Bcc. In the present study, we investigated the role of mannitol-induced EPS in the adherence of B. multivorans. We report that mannitol promoted adherence of two representative B. multivorans strains. However, whilst this enhanced adherence was largely EPS-dependent in an environmental isolate, it was EPS-independent within a CF outbreak strain, suggesting strain-to-strain variation in adhesins. Genome sequencing of the outbreak strain enabled the identification of two distinct loci encoding putative fimbrial and afimbrial adhesins. The putative fimbriae-encoding locus was found to be widely distributed amongst clinical and environmental B. multivorans. In contrast, the locus encoding the putative afimbrial adhesin (of the filamentous haemagglutinin family, FHA) was restricted to clinical isolates. Both loci contributed to biofilm formation and mucin adherence. Furthermore, we report that mannitol promoted expression of both loci, and that the locus encoding the putative FHA-family adhesin is a key determinant of the enhanced adherence observed following growth in mannitol. Our studies provide the first characterization, to our knowledge, of B. multivorans adhesins, and in so doing highlight the strain-dependent role of EPS in the Bcc and the difficulties in assigning phenotypic traits to Bcc EPS due to the wider response to mannitol. Our observations also highlight the need to monitor the microbiological effects of inhaled mannitol therapy in Bcc-infected CF patients.

  16. Comparison of diagnostic laboratory methods for identification of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Timothy J J; Merritt, Adam; Chidlow, Glenys; Aravena-Roman, Max; Harnett, Gerry

    2005-05-01

    Limited experience and a lack of validated diagnostic reagents make Burkholderia pseudomallei, the cause of melioidosis, difficult to recognize in the diagnostic microbiology laboratory. We compared three methods of confirming the identity of presumptive B. pseudomallei strains using a collection of Burkholderia species drawn from diverse geographic, clinical, and environmental sources. The 95 isolates studied included 71 B. pseudomallei and 3 B. thailandensis isolates. The API 20NE method identified only 37% of the B. pseudomallei isolates. The agglutinating antibody test identified 82% at first the attempt and 90% including results of a repeat test with previously negative isolates. Gas-liquid chromatography analysis of bacterial fatty acid methyl esters (GLC-FAME) identified 98% of the B. pseudomallei isolates. The agglutination test produced four false positive results, one B. cepacia, one B. multivorans, and two B. thailandensis. API produced three false positive results, one positive B. cepacia and two positive B. thailandensis. GLC-FAME analysis was positive for one B. cepacia isolate. On the basis of these results, the most robust B. pseudomallei discovery pathway combines the previously recommended isolate screening tests (Gram stain, oxidase test, gentamicin and polymyxin susceptibility) with monoclonal antibody agglutination on primary culture, followed by a repeat after 24 h incubation on agglutination-negative isolates and GLC-FAME analysis. Incorporation of PCR-based identification within this schema may improve percentages of recognition further but requires more detailed evaluation. PMID:15872242

  17. Characterization of the Poly-β-1,6-N-Acetylglucosamine Polysaccharide Component of Burkholderia Biofilms ▿

    PubMed Central

    Yakandawala, Nandadeva; Gawande, Purushottam V.; LoVetri, Karen; Cardona, Silvia T.; Romeo, Tony; Nitz, Mark; Madhyastha, Srinivasa

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrated the production of poly-β-1,6-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) polysaccharide in the biofilms of Burkholderia multivorans, Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Burkholderia ambifaria, Burkholderia cepacia, and Burkholderia cenocepacia using an immunoblot assay for PNAG. These results were confirmed by further studies, which showed that the PNAG hydrolase, dispersin B, eliminated immunoreactivity of extracts from the species that were tested (B. cenocepacia and B. multivorans). Dispersin B also inhibited biofilm formation and dispersed preformed biofilms of Burkholderia species. These results imply a role for PNAG in the maintenance of Burkholderia biofilm integrity. While PNAG was present in biofilms of all of the wild-type test organisms, a ΔpgaBC mutant of B. multivorans (Mu5) produced no detectable PNAG, indicating that these genes are needed for Burkholderia PNAG formation. Furthermore, restoration of PNAG production in PNAG negative E. coli TRXWMGΔC (ΔpgaC) by complementation with B. multivorans pgaBCD confirmed the involvement of these genes in Burkholderia PNAG production. While the confocal scanning laser microscopy of untreated wild-type B. multivorans showed thick, multilayered biofilm, Mu5 and dispersin B-treated wild-type biofilms were thin, poorly developed, and disrupted, confirming the involvement of PNAG in B. multivorans biofilm formation. Thus, PNAG appears to be an important component of Burkholderia biofilms, potentially contributing to its resistance to multiple antibiotics and persistence during chronic infections, including cystic fibrosis-associated infection. PMID:21984237

  18. Identification of a Novel Virulence Factor in Burkholderia cenocepacia H111 Required for Efficient Slow Killing of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Birgit; Feldmann, Friederike; Köthe, Manuela; Vandamme, Peter; Wopperer, Julia; Riedel, Kathrin; Eberl, Leo

    2004-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia H111, which was isolated from a cystic fibrosis patient, employs a quorum-sensing (QS) system, encoded by cep, to control the expression of virulence factors as well as the formation of biofilms. The QS system is thought to ensure that pathogenic traits are expressed only when the bacterial population density is high enough to overwhelm the host before it is able to mount an efficient response. While the wild-type strain effectively kills the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the pathogenicity of mutants with defective quorum sensing is attenuated. To date, very little is known about the cep-regulated virulence factors required for nematode killing. Here we report the identification of a cep-regulated gene, whose predicted amino acid sequence is highly similar to the QS-regulated protein AidA of the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. By use of polyclonal antibodies directed against AidA, it is demonstrated that the protein is expressed in the late-exponential phase and accumulates during growth arrest. We show that B. cenocepacia H111 AidA is essential for slow killing of C. elegans but has little effect on fast killing, suggesting that the protein plays a role in the accumulation of the strain in the nematode gut. Thus, AidA appears to be required for establishing an infection-like process rather than acting as a toxin. Furthermore, evidence is provided that AidA is produced not only by B. cenocepacia but also by many other strains of the Burkholderia cepacia complex. PMID:15557647

  19. The genome of the fungal-interactive soil bacterium Burkholderia terrae BS001-a plethora of outstanding interactive capabilities unveiled.

    PubMed

    Haq, Irshad Ul; Graupner, Katharina; Nazir, Rashid; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2014-07-01

    Burkholderia terrae strain BS001, obtained as an inhabitant of the mycosphere of Laccaria proxima (a close relative of Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten), actively interacts with Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten. We here summarize the remarkable ecological behavior of B. terrae BS001 in the mycosphere and add key data to this. Moreover, we extensively analyze the approximately 11.5-Mb five-replicon genome of B. terrae BS001 and highlight its remarkable features. Seventy-nine regions of genomic plasticity (RGP), that is, 16.48% of the total genome size, were found. One 70.42-kb RGP, RGP76, revealed a typical conjugal element structure, including a full type 4 secretion system. Comparative analyses across 24 related Burkholderia genomes revealed that 95.66% of the total BS001 genome belongs to the variable part, whereas the remaining 4.34% constitutes the core genome. Genes for biofilm formation and several secretion systems, under which a type 3 secretion system (T3SS), were found, which is consistent with the hypothesis that T3SSs play a role in the interaction with Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten. The high number of predicted metabolic pathways and membrane transporters suggested that strain BS001 can take up and utilize a range of sugars, amino acids and organic acids. In particular, a unique glycerol uptake system was found. The BS001 genome further contains genetic systems for the degradation of complex organic compounds. Moreover, gene clusters encoding nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) and hybrid polyketide synthases/NRPS were found, highlighting the potential role of secondary metabolites in the ecology of strain BS001. The patchwork of genetic features observed in the genome is consistent with the notion that 1) horizontal gene transfer is a main driver of B. terrae BS001 adaptation and 2) the organism is very flexible in its ecological behavior in soil. PMID:24923325

  20. φX216, a P2-like bacteriophage with broad Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei strain infectivity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei are closely related Category B Select Agents of bioterrorism and the causative agents of the diseases melioidosis and glanders, respectively. Rapid phage-based diagnostic tools would greatly benefit early recognition and treatment of these diseases. There is extensive strain-to-strain variation in B. pseudomallei genome content due in part to the presence or absence of integrated prophages. Several phages have previously been isolated from B. pseudomallei lysogens, for example φK96243, φ1026b and φ52237. Results We have isolated a P2-like bacteriophage, φX216, which infects 78% of all B. pseudomallei strains tested. φX216 also infects B. mallei, but not other Burkholderia species, including the closely related B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis. The nature of the φX216 host receptor remains unclear but evidence indicates that in B. mallei φX216 uses lipopolysaccharide O-antigen but a different receptor in B. pseudomallei. The 37,637 bp genome of φX216 encodes 47 predicted open reading frames and shares 99.8% pairwise identity and an identical strain host range with bacteriophage φ52237. Closely related P2-like prophages appear to be widely distributed among B. pseudomallei strains but both φX216 and φ52237 readily infect prophage carrying strains. Conclusions The broad strain infectivity and high specificity for B. pseudomallei and B. mallei indicate that φX216 will provide a good platform for the development of phage-based diagnostics for these bacteria. PMID:23217012

  1. Knock-out and pull-out recombineering protocols for naturally transformable Burkholderia thailandensis and Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yun; Norris, Michael H.; Wilcox, Bruce A.; Tuanyok, Apichai; Keim, Paul S.; Hoang, Tung T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Phage λ Red proteins are powerful tools for pulling- and knocking-out chromosomal fragments but have been limited to the γ-proteobacteria. Procedures are described here to easily knock-out (KO) and pull-out (PO) chromosomal DNA fragments from naturally transformable Burkholderia thailandensis and Burkholderia pseudomallei. This system takes advantage of published compliant counter-selectable and selectable markers (sacB, pheS, gat, and the arabinose utilization operon) and λ Red mutant proteins. pheS-gat (KO) or oriT-ColE1ori-gat-ori1600-rep (PO) PCR fragments are generated with flanking 40–45 bp homologies to targeted regions incorporated on PCR primers. One-step recombination is achieved by incubating the PCR product with cells expressing λ Red proteins and subsequent selection on glyphosate-containing medium. This procedure takes approximately 10 days and is advantageous over previously published protocols: i) smaller PCR products reduce primer numbers and amplification steps, ii) PO fragments for downstream manipulation in E. coli, and iii) chromosomal KO increases flexibility for downstream processing. PMID:21738123

  2. Interim report on updated microarray probes for the LLNL Burkholderia pseudomallei SNP array

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S; Jaing, C

    2012-03-27

    The overall goal of this project is to forensically characterize 100 unknown Burkholderia isolates in the US-Australia collaboration. We will identify genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from B. pseudomallei and near neighbor species including B. mallei, B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis. We will design microarray probes to detect these SNP markers and analyze 100 Burkholderia genomic DNAs extracted from environmental, clinical and near neighbor isolates from Australian collaborators on the Burkholderia SNP microarray. We will analyze the microarray genotyping results to characterize the genetic diversity of these new isolates and triage the samples for whole genome sequencing. In this interim report, we described the SNP analysis and the microarray probe design for the Burkholderia SNP microarray.

  3. BIOAUGMENTATION WITH BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA PR1301 FOR IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER (RESEARCH BRIEF)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot field study was conducted at the Moffett Federal Airfield, Mountain View, California, to determine whether effective in-situ aerobic cometabolic biodegradation of TCE could be accomplished through bioaugmentation with a genetically modified strain of Burkholderia cepacia ...

  4. AQUIFER PROTIST RESPONSE AND THE POTENTIAL FOR TCE BIOREMEDIATION WITH BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA G4 PR1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The introduction of bacteria into the environment for bioremediation purposes (bioaugmentation) requires analysis and monitoring of the persistence and activity of microbial population for efficacy and risk assessment purposes. Burkholderia cepacia G4 PR123 and PR131 constitutive...

  5. A fine-scale phylogenetic analysis of free-living Burkholderia species in sugarcane field soil.

    PubMed

    Tago, Kanako; Itoh, Hideomi; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Hori, Tomoyuki; Sato, Yuya; Nagayama, Atsushi; Okubo, Takashi; Navarro, Ronald; Aoyagi, Tomo; Hayashi, Kentaro; Hayatsu, Masahito

    2014-01-01

    The diversity and abundance of Burkholderia species in sugarcane field soils were investigated by a 16S rRNA gene-based approach using genus-specific primers. A total of 365,721 sequences generated by the Illumina MiSeq platform were assigned to the genus Burkholderia. Nearly 58% of these sequences were placed in a previously defined cluster, including stinkbug symbionts. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed a consistent number of 16S rRNA gene copies for Burkholderia species (10(7) g(-1) soil) across the sampled fields. C/N, pH, and nitrate concentrations were important factors shaping the Burkholderia community structure; however, their impacts were not significant considering the overall genus size.

  6. An ERp57-mediated disulphide exchange promotes the interaction between Burkholderia cenocepacia and epithelial respiratory cells

    PubMed Central

    Pacello, Francesca; D’Orazio, Melania; Battistoni, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that extracellular glutathione reduces the ability of the Cystic Fibrosis pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia to infect primary or immortalized epithelial respiratory cells. We report here that the adhesion and invasion ability of B. cenocepacia is limited also by thiol-oxidizing and disulphide-reducing agents and by protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) inhibitors. PDI inhibitors also reduce the proinflammatory response elicited by cells in response to Burkholderia. These findings indicate that a membrane-associated PDI catalyzes thiol/disulphide exchange reactions which favor bacterial infection. The combined use of selective PDI inhibitors, RNA silencing and specific antibodies identified ERp57 as a major PDI involved in the interaction between B. cenocepacia and epithelial cells. This study contributes to the elucidation of the Burkholderia pathogenic mechanisms by showing that this microorganism exploits a membrane-associated host protein to infect epithelial cells and identifies ERp57 as a putative pharmacological target for the treatment of Burkholderia lung infections. PMID:26879174

  7. The role of siderophores in metal homeostasis of members of the genus Burkholderia.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Anugraha; Jenul, Christian; Carlier, Aurelien L; Eberl, Leo

    2016-02-01

    Although members of the genus Burkholderia can utilize a high-affinity iron uptake system to sustain growth under iron-limiting conditions, many strains also produce siderophores, suggesting that they may serve alternative functions. Here we demonstrate that the two Burkholderia siderophores pyochelin and ornibactin can protect the cells from metal toxicity and thus play an alternative role in metal homeostasis. We also demonstrate that metals such as copper and zinc induce the production of ornibactin. PMID:26621188

  8. Burkholderia bacteria infectiously induce the proto-farming symbiosis of Dictyostelium amoebae and food bacteria

    PubMed Central

    DiSalvo, Susanne; Haselkorn, Tamara S.; Bashir, Usman; Jimenez, Daniela; Brock, Debra A.; Queller, David C.; Strassmann, Joan E.

    2015-01-01

    Symbiotic associations can allow an organism to acquire novel traits by accessing the genetic repertoire of its partner. In the Dictyostelium discoideum farming symbiosis, certain amoebas (termed “farmers”) stably associate with bacterial partners. Farmers can suffer a reproductive cost but also gain beneficial capabilities, such as carriage of bacterial food (proto-farming) and defense against competitors. Farming status previously has been attributed to amoeba genotype, but the role of bacterial partners in its induction has not been examined. Here, we explore the role of bacterial associates in the initiation, maintenance, and phenotypic effects of the farming symbiosis. We demonstrate that two clades of farmer-associated Burkholderia isolates colonize D. discoideum nonfarmers and infectiously endow them with farmer-like characteristics, indicating that Burkholderia symbionts are a major driver of the farming phenomenon. Under food-rich conditions, Burkholderia-colonized amoebas produce fewer spores than uncolonized counterparts, with the severity of this reduction being dependent on the Burkholderia colonizer. However, the induction of food carriage by Burkholderia colonization may be considered a conditionally adaptive trait because it can confer an advantage to the amoeba host when grown in food-limiting conditions. We observed Burkholderia inside and outside colonized D. discoideum spores after fruiting body formation; this observation, together with the ability of Burkholderia to colonize new amoebas, suggests a mixed mode of symbiont transmission. These results change our understanding of the D. discoideum farming symbiosis by establishing that the bacterial partner, Burkholderia, is an important causative agent of the farming phenomenon. PMID:26305954

  9. Burkholderia susongensis sp. nov., a mineral-weathering bacterium isolated from weathered rock surface.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jia-Yu; Zang, Sheng-Gang; Sheng, Xia-Fang; He, Lin-Yan; Huang, Zhi; Wang, Qi

    2015-03-01

    A novel type of mineral-weathering bacterium was isolated from the weathered surface of rock (mica schist) collected from Susong (Anhui, China). Cells of strain L226(T) were Gram-stain-negative. The strain grew optimally at 30 °C, with 1 % (w/v) NaCl and at pH 7.0 in trypticase soy broth. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene phylogeny, strain L226(T) was shown to belong to the genus Burkholderia and the closest phylogenetic relatives were Burkholderia sprentiae WSM5005(T) (98.3 %), Burkholderia acidipaludis NBRC 101816(T) (98.2 %), Burkholderia tuberum STM678(T) (97.2 %) and Burkholderia diazotrophica JPY461(T) (97.1 %). The DNA G+C content was 63.5 mol% and the respiratory quinone was Q-8. The major fatty acids were C16 : 0, C17 : 0 cyclo and C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c. The polar lipid profile of strain L226(T) consisted of a mixture of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, unknown lipids and unidentified aminophospholipids. Based on the low level of DNA-DNA relatedness (ranging from 25.8 % to 34.4 %) to the tested type strains of species of the genus Burkholderia and unique phenotypic characteristics, it is suggested that strain L226(T) represents a novel species of the genus Burkholderia, for which the name Burkholderia susongensis sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is L226(T) ( = CCTCC AB2014142(T) = JCM 30231(T)).

  10. In-Frame and Unmarked Gene Deletions in Burkholderia cenocepacia via an Allelic Exchange System Compatible with Gateway Technology

    PubMed Central

    Fazli, Mustafa; Harrison, Joe J.; Gambino, Michela; Givskov, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an emerging opportunistic pathogen causing life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals and in patients with cystic fibrosis, which are often difficult, if not impossible, to treat. Understanding the genetic basis of virulence in this emerging pathogen is important for the development of novel treatment regimes. Generation of deletion mutations in genes predicted to encode virulence determinants is fundamental to investigating the mechanisms of pathogenesis. However, there is a lack of appropriate selectable and counterselectable markers for use in B. cenocepacia, making its genetic manipulation problematic. Here we describe a Gateway-compatible allelic exchange system based on the counterselectable pheS gene and the I-SceI homing endonuclease. This system provides efficiency in cloning homology regions of target genes and allows the generation of precise and unmarked gene deletions in B. cenocepacia. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate its utility by deleting the Bcam1349 gene, encoding a cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP)-responsive regulator protein important for biofilm formation. PMID:25795676

  11. Molecular mechanisms underlying the close association between soil Burkholderia and fungi.

    PubMed

    Stopnisek, Nejc; Zühlke, Daniela; Carlier, Aurélien; Barberán, Albert; Fierer, Noah; Becher, Dörte; Riedel, Katharina; Eberl, Leo; Weisskopf, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial species belonging to the genus Burkholderia have been repeatedly reported to be associated with fungi but the extent and specificity of these associations in soils remain undetermined. To assess whether associations between Burkholderia and fungi are widespread in soils, we performed a co-occurrence analysis in an intercontinental soil sample collection. This revealed that Burkholderia significantly co-occurred with a wide range of fungi. To analyse the molecular basis of the interaction, we selected two model fungi frequently co-occurring with Burkholderia, Alternaria alternata and Fusarium solani, and analysed the proteome changes caused by cultivation with either fungus in the widespread soil inhabitant B. glathei, whose genome we sequenced. Co-cultivation with both fungi led to very similar changes in the B. glathei proteome. Our results indicate that B. glathei significantly benefits from the interaction, which is exemplified by a lower abundance of several starvation factors that were highly expressed in pure culture. However, co-cultivation also gave rise to stress factors, as indicated by the increased expression of multidrug efflux pumps and proteins involved in oxidative stress response. Our data suggest that the ability of Burkholderia to establish a close association with fungi mainly lies in the capacities to utilize fungal-secreted metabolites and to overcome fungal defense mechanisms. This work indicates that beneficial interactions with fungi might contribute to the survival strategy of Burkholderia species in environments with sub-optimal conditions, including acidic soils. PMID:25989372

  12. Molecular mechanisms underlying the close association between soil Burkholderia and fungi.

    PubMed

    Stopnisek, Nejc; Zühlke, Daniela; Carlier, Aurélien; Barberán, Albert; Fierer, Noah; Becher, Dörte; Riedel, Katharina; Eberl, Leo; Weisskopf, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial species belonging to the genus Burkholderia have been repeatedly reported to be associated with fungi but the extent and specificity of these associations in soils remain undetermined. To assess whether associations between Burkholderia and fungi are widespread in soils, we performed a co-occurrence analysis in an intercontinental soil sample collection. This revealed that Burkholderia significantly co-occurred with a wide range of fungi. To analyse the molecular basis of the interaction, we selected two model fungi frequently co-occurring with Burkholderia, Alternaria alternata and Fusarium solani, and analysed the proteome changes caused by cultivation with either fungus in the widespread soil inhabitant B. glathei, whose genome we sequenced. Co-cultivation with both fungi led to very similar changes in the B. glathei proteome. Our results indicate that B. glathei significantly benefits from the interaction, which is exemplified by a lower abundance of several starvation factors that were highly expressed in pure culture. However, co-cultivation also gave rise to stress factors, as indicated by the increased expression of multidrug efflux pumps and proteins involved in oxidative stress response. Our data suggest that the ability of Burkholderia to establish a close association with fungi mainly lies in the capacities to utilize fungal-secreted metabolites and to overcome fungal defense mechanisms. This work indicates that beneficial interactions with fungi might contribute to the survival strategy of Burkholderia species in environments with sub-optimal conditions, including acidic soils.

  13. Genus-wide acid tolerance accounts for the biogeographical distribution of soil Burkholderia populations.

    PubMed

    Stopnisek, Nejc; Bodenhausen, Natacha; Frey, Beat; Fierer, Noah; Eberl, Leo; Weisskopf, Laure

    2014-06-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Burkholderia are highly versatile with respect to their ecological niches and lifestyles, ranging from nodulating tropical plants to causing melioidosis and fatal infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Despite the clinical importance and agronomical relevance of Burkholderia species, information about the factors influencing their occurrence, abundance and diversity in the environment is scarce. Recent findings have demonstrated that pH is the main predictor of soil bacterial diversity and community structure, with the highest diversity observed in neutral pH soils. As many Burkholderia species have been isolated from low pH environments, we hypothesized that acid tolerance may be a general feature of this genus, and pH a good predictor of their occurrence in soils. Using a combination of environmental surveys at trans-continental and local scales, as well as in vitro assays, we show that, unlike most bacteria, Burkholderia species have a competitive advantage in acidic soils, but are outcompeted in alkaline soils. Physiological assays and diversity analysis based on 16S rRNA clone libraries demonstrate that pH tolerance is a general phenotypic trait of the genus Burkholderia. Our results provide a basis for building a predictive understanding of the biogeographical patterns exhibited by Burkholderia sp.

  14. Burkholderia Species Are Major Inhabitants of White Lupin Cluster Roots▿†

    PubMed Central

    Weisskopf, Laure; Heller, Stefanie; Eberl, Leo

    2011-01-01

    The formation of cluster roots by plants represents a highly efficient strategy for acquisition of sparingly available phosphate. This particular root type is characterized by a densely branched structure and high exudation of organic acids and protons, which are likely to influence the resident bacterial community. Until now, the identity of the bacterial populations living in cluster roots has not been investigated. We applied cultivation-dependent and cultivation-independent methods to characterize the dominant bacterial genera inhabiting the growing cluster roots of white lupin. We observed a high relative abundance of Burkholderia species (up to 58% of all isolated strains and 44% of all retrieved 16S rRNA sequences) and a significant enrichment with increasing cluster root age. Most of the sequences retrieved clustered together with known plant- or fungus-associated Burkholderia species, while only one of 98 sequences was affiliated with the Burkholderia cepacia complex. In vitro assays revealed that Burkholderia strains were much more tolerant to low pH than non-Burkholderia strains. Moreover, many strains produced large amounts of siderophores and were able to utilize citrate and oxalate as carbon sources. These features seem to represent important traits for the successful colonization and maintenance of Burkholderia species in white lupin cluster roots. PMID:21908626

  15. Detection of cultured and uncultured Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria naturally occurring in the maize rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Pirone, Luisa; Chiarini, Luigi; Dalmastri, Claudia; Bevivino, Annamaria; Tabacchioni, Silvia

    2005-11-01

    The species composition of a Burkholderia cepacia complex population naturally occurring in the maize rhizosphere was investigated by using both culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. B. cepacia complex isolates were recovered from maize root slurry on the two selective media Pseudomonas cepacia azelaic acid tryptamine (PCAT) and trypan blue tetracycline (TB-T) and subjected to identification by a combination of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests of the recA gene. DNA extracted directly from root slurry was examined by means of nested PCR to amplify recA gene with species-specific B. cepacia complex primers and to obtain a library of PCR amplified recA genes. Using the culture-dependent method the species Burkholderia cepacia, Burkholderia cenocepacia, Burkholderia ambifaria and Burkholderia pyrrocinia were identified, whereas using the culture-independent method also the species Burkholderia vietnamiensis was detected. The latter method also allowed us to highlight a higher diversity within the B. cenocepacia species. In fact, by using the culture-independent method the species B. cenocepacia recA lineages IIIA and IIID besides B. cenocepacia recA lineage IIIB were detected. Moreover, higher heterogeneity of recA RFLP patterns was observed among clones assigned to the species B. cenocepacia than among B. cenocepacia isolates from selective media. PMID:16232288

  16. Glanders: off to the races with Burkholderia mallei.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, Gregory C; Estes, D Mark; Torres, Alfredo G

    2007-12-01

    Burkholderia mallei, the etiologic agent of the disease known as glanders, is primarily a disease affecting horses and is transmitted to humans by direct contact with infected animals. The use of B. mallei as a biological weapon has been reported and currently, there is no vaccine available for either humans or animals. Despite the history and highly infective nature of B. mallei, as well as its potential use as a bio-weapon, B. mallei research to understand the pathogenesis and the host responses to infection remains limited. Therefore, this minireview will focus on current efforts to elucidate B. mallei virulence, the associated host immune responses elicited during infection and discuss the feasibility of vaccine development.

  17. Strains from the Burkholderia cepacia Complex: Relationship to Opportunistic Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Vandamme, Peter; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2003-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia-like organisms attract much interest from the agricultural industry as natural promoters of plant growth and biological control agents, and for bioremediation. Some of these organisms, however, cause life-threatening infections, particularly in cystic fibrosis patients for whom this multi-resistant bacterium is a major pathogen. The biodiversity of this group of bacteria is severely underestimated, and current identification procedures are inadequate. Presumed B. cepacia isolates belong to at least nine distinct genomic species (genomovars), referred to collectively as the B. cepacia complex. All these B. cepacia complex genomovars have been isolated from clinical and environmental sources. There are no phenotypic, genomic, or taxonomic grounds to differentiate environmental and clinical strains of the B. cepacia complex or to use the source of isolation to assess the safety of biopesticides containing members of the B. cepacia complex. PMID:19265996

  18. Aerosol Phage Therapy Efficacy in Burkholderia cepacia Complex Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Semler, Diana D.; Goudie, Amanda D.; Finlay, Warren H.

    2014-01-01

    Phage therapy has been suggested as a potential treatment for highly antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as the species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC). To address this hypothesis, experimental B. cenocepacia respiratory infections were established in mice using a nebulizer and a nose-only inhalation device. Following infection, the mice were treated with one of five B. cenocepacia-specific phages delivered as either an aerosol or intraperitoneal injection. The bacterial and phage titers within the lungs were assayed 2 days after treatment, and mice that received the aerosolized phage therapy demonstrated significant decreases in bacterial loads. Differences in phage activity were observed in vivo. Mice that received phage treatment by intraperitoneal injection did not demonstrate significantly reduced bacterial loads, although phage particles were isolated from their lung tissue. Based on these data, aerosol phage therapy appears to be an effective method for treating highly antibiotic-resistant bacterial respiratory infections, including those caused by BCC bacteria. PMID:24798268

  19. Burkholderia pseudomallei Genotype Distribution in the Northern Territory, Australia.

    PubMed

    Chapple, Stephanie N J; Price, Erin P; Sarovich, Derek S; McRobb, Evan; Mayo, Mark; Kaestli, Mirjam; Spratt, Brian G; Currie, Bart J

    2016-01-01

    Melioidosis is a tropical disease of high mortality caused by the environmental bacterium, Burkholderia pseudomallei. We have collected clinical isolates from the highly endemic Northern Territory of Australia routinely since 1989, and animal and environmental B. pseudomallei isolates since 1991. Here we provide a complete record of all B. pseudomallei multilocus sequence types (STs) found in the Northern Territory to date, and distribution maps of the eight most common environmental STs. We observed surprisingly restricted geographic distributions of STs, which is contrary to previous reports suggesting widespread environmental dissemination of this bacterium. Our data suggest that B. pseudomallei from soil and water does not frequently disperse long distances following severe weather events or by migration of infected animals.

  20. Genetic diversity of Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates in Australia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Allen C; Ward, Linda; Godoy, Daniel; Norton, Robert; Mayo, Mark; Gal, Daniel; Spratt, Brian G; Currie, Bart J

    2008-01-01

    Melioidosis is caused by the gram-negative saprophytic bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, which is endemic to southeast Asia and northern Australia. We have previously found evidence of geographic localization of strains based on multilocus sequence typing (MLST). In this study, we examined the diversity of 277 isolates from northern Australia, which were resolved into 159 different sequence types. No sequence types were common to both Queensland and the Northern Territory, and there was significant differentiation between the alleles present in the two regions. The considerable diversity in sequence types contrasts with the limited diversity of alleles at MLST loci, supporting previous work suggesting a high rate of recombination relative to mutation in B. pseudomallei, where new sequence types are primarily generated by reassortment of existing alleles.

  1. The global distribution of Burkholderia pseudomallei and melioidosis: an update.

    PubMed

    Currie, Bart J; Dance, David A B; Cheng, Allen C

    2008-12-01

    While Southeast Asia and northern Australia are well recognized as the major endemic regions for melioidosis, recent reports have expanded the endemic zone. Severe weather events and environmental disasters such as the 2004 Asian tsunami have unmasked locations of sporadic cases and have reconfirmed endemicity in Indonesia. The endemic region now includes the majority of the Indian subcontinent, southern China, Hong Kong and Taiwan. Sporadic cases have occurred in Brazil and elsewhere in the Americas and in island communities such as New Caledonia, in the Pacific Ocean, and Mauritius in the Indian Ocean. Some of the factors that are critical to further elucidating the global distribution of Burkholderia pseudomallei and melioidosis include improved access to diagnostic laboratory facilities and formal confirmation of the identity of bacterial isolates from suspected cases.

  2. Diffusion and activity of antibiotics against Burkholderia pseudomallei biofilms.

    PubMed

    Pibalpakdee, Phannarai; Wongratanacheewin, Surasakdi; Taweechaisupapong, Suwimol; Niumsup, Pannika R

    2012-04-01

    The diffusion and activity of ceftazidime (CAZ), imipenem (IPM) and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) against Burkholderia pseudomallei biofilms were comparatively tested using the high biofilm-producing strain B. pseudomallei 377 and the biofilm-defective mutant B. pseudomallei M6. Biofilms were generated by inoculation of bacteria on polycarbonate membranes placed on the surface of tryptic soy agar plates. The results showed that diffusion of TMP/SMX through B. pseudomallei biofilms was similar for both strains. However, diffusion of CAZ and IPM was significantly faster through strain M6 biofilm in comparison with strain 377 biofilm. The viabilities of strain 377 biofilm were significantly higher than those observed with strain M6 for all antibiotics challenged at 4 h, suggesting that the biofilm-forming capacity may be involved in antibiotic susceptibilities in B. pseudomallei. These results re-emphasise the importance of biofilm for antibiotic resistance in B. pseudomallei.

  3. ENCODE data at the ENCODE portal.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Cricket A; Chan, Esther T; Davidson, Jean M; Malladi, Venkat S; Strattan, J Seth; Hitz, Benjamin C; Gabdank, Idan; Narayanan, Aditi K; Ho, Marcus; Lee, Brian T; Rowe, Laurence D; Dreszer, Timothy R; Roe, Greg; Podduturi, Nikhil R; Tanaka, Forrest; Hong, Eurie L; Cherry, J Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project is in its third phase of creating a comprehensive catalog of functional elements in the human genome. This phase of the project includes an expansion of assays that measure diverse RNA populations, identify proteins that interact with RNA and DNA, probe regions of DNA hypersensitivity, and measure levels of DNA methylation in a wide range of cell and tissue types to identify putative regulatory elements. To date, results for almost 5000 experiments have been released for use by the scientific community. These data are available for searching, visualization and download at the new ENCODE Portal (www.encodeproject.org). The revamped ENCODE Portal provides new ways to browse and search the ENCODE data based on the metadata that describe the assays as well as summaries of the assays that focus on data provenance. In addition, it is a flexible platform that allows integration of genomic data from multiple projects. The portal experience was designed to improve access to ENCODE data by relying on metadata that allow reusability and reproducibility of the experiments.

  4. Use of the common marmoset to study Burkholderia mallei infection.

    PubMed

    Jelesijevic, Tomislav; Zimmerman, Shawn M; Harvey, Stephen B; Mead, Daniel G; Shaffer, Teresa L; Estes, D Mark; Michel, Frank; Quinn, Frederick D; Hogan, Robert J; Lafontaine, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is a host-adapted bacterium that does not persist outside of its equine reservoir. The organism causes the zoonosis glanders, which is endemic in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America. Infection by B. mallei typically occurs via the respiratory or percutaneous route, and the most common manifestations are life-threatening pneumonia and bacteremia. Glanders is difficult to diagnose and requires prolonged antibiotic therapy with low success rates. There is no vaccine to protect against B. mallei and there is concern regarding its use as a biothreat agent. Thus, experiments were performed to establish a non-human primate model of intranasal infection to study the organism and develop countermeasures. Groups of marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) were inoculated intranasally with B. mallei strain ATCC 23344 and monitored for clinical signs of illness for up to 13 days. We discovered that 83% of marmosets inoculated with doses of 2.5 X 10(4) to 2.5 X 10(5) bacteria developed acute lethal infection within 3-4 days. Signs of disease were severe and included lethargy, inappetence, conjunctivitis, mucopurulent and hemorrhagic nasal discharges, and increased respiratory effort with abdominal lifts. Burkholderia mallei was cultured from the lungs, spleen and liver of these animals, and pathologic examination of tissues revealed lesions characteristic of glanders. Challenge experiments also revealed that 91% of animals infected with doses ranging from 25 to 2.5 X 10(3) bacteria exhibited mild non-specific signs of illness and were culture negative. One marmoset inoculated with 2.5 X 10(3) organisms developed moderate signs of disease and reached humane end-points 8 days post-infection. The liver and spleen of this animal were colonized with the agent and pathological analysis of tissues showed nasal, splenic and hepatic lesions. Taken together, these data indicate that the marmoset is a suitable model to study respiratory infection by B. mallei.

  5. Use of the Common Marmoset to Study Burkholderia mallei Infection

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Stephen B.; Mead, Daniel G.; Shaffer, Teresa L.; Estes, D. Mark; Michel, Frank; Quinn, Frederick D.; Hogan, Robert J.; Lafontaine, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is a host-adapted bacterium that does not persist outside of its equine reservoir. The organism causes the zoonosis glanders, which is endemic in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America. Infection by B. mallei typically occurs via the respiratory or percutaneous route, and the most common manifestations are life-threatening pneumonia and bacteremia. Glanders is difficult to diagnose and requires prolonged antibiotic therapy with low success rates. There is no vaccine to protect against B. mallei and there is concern regarding its use as a biothreat agent. Thus, experiments were performed to establish a non-human primate model of intranasal infection to study the organism and develop countermeasures. Groups of marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) were inoculated intranasally with B. mallei strain ATCC 23344 and monitored for clinical signs of illness for up to 13 days. We discovered that 83% of marmosets inoculated with doses of 2.5 X 104 to 2.5 X 105 bacteria developed acute lethal infection within 3–4 days. Signs of disease were severe and included lethargy, inappetence, conjunctivitis, mucopurulent and hemorrhagic nasal discharges, and increased respiratory effort with abdominal lifts. Burkholderia mallei was cultured from the lungs, spleen and liver of these animals, and pathologic examination of tissues revealed lesions characteristic of glanders. Challenge experiments also revealed that 91% of animals infected with doses ranging from 25 to 2.5 X 103 bacteria exhibited mild non-specific signs of illness and were culture negative. One marmoset inoculated with 2.5 X 103 organisms developed moderate signs of disease and reached humane end-points 8 days post-infection. The liver and spleen of this animal were colonized with the agent and pathological analysis of tissues showed nasal, splenic and hepatic lesions. Taken together, these data indicate that the marmoset is a suitable model to study respiratory infection by B. mallei. PMID

  6. Production of bioactive volatiles by different Burkholderia ambifaria strains.

    PubMed

    Groenhagen, Ulrike; Baumgartner, Rita; Bailly, Aurélien; Gardiner, Amber; Eberl, Leo; Schulz, Stefan; Weisskopf, Laure

    2013-07-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that volatile compounds emitted by bacteria can influence the growth of other organisms. In this study, the volatiles produced by three different strains of Burkholderia ambifaria were analysed and their effects on the growth of plants and fungi, as well as on the antibiotic resistance of target bacteria, were assessed. Burkholderia ambifaria emitted highly bioactive volatiles independently of the strain origin (clinical environment, rhizosphere of pea, roots of maize). These volatile blends induced significant biomass increase in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana as well as growth inhibition of two phytopathogenic fungi (Rhizoctonia solani and Alternaria alternata). In Escherichia coli exposed to the volatiles of B. ambifaria, resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics gentamicin and kanamycin was found to be increased. The volatile blends of the three strains were similar, and dimethyl disulfide was the most abundant compound. Sulfur compounds, ketones, and aromatic compounds were major groups in all three volatile profiles. When applied as pure substance, dimethyl disulfide led to increased plant biomass, as did acetophenone and 3-hexanone. Significant fungal growth reduction was observed with high concentrations of dimethyl di- and trisulfide, 4-octanone, S-methyl methanethiosulphonate, 1-phenylpropan-1-one, and 2-undecanone, while dimethyl trisulfide, 1-methylthio-3-pentanone, and o-aminoacetophenone increased resistance of E. coli to aminoglycosides. Comparison of the volatile profile produced by an engineered mutant impaired in quorum-sensing (QS) signalling with the corresponding wild-type led to the conclusion that QS is not involved in the regulation of volatile production in B. ambifaria LMG strain 19182. PMID:23832658

  7. Colony Morphology Variation of Burkholderia pseudomallei Is Associated with Antigenic Variation and O-Polysaccharide Modification

    PubMed Central

    Wikraiphat, Chanthiwa; Saiprom, Natnaree; Tandhavanant, Sarunporn; Heiss, Christian; Azadi, Parastoo; Wongsuvan, Gumphol; Tuanyok, Apichai; Holden, Matthew T. G.; Burtnick, Mary N.; Brett, Paul J.; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a CDC tier 1 select agent that causes melioidosis, a severe disease in humans and animals. Persistent infections are common, and there is currently no vaccine available. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a potential vaccine candidate. B. pseudomallei expresses three serologically distinct LPS types. The predominant O-polysaccharide (OPS) is an unbranched heteropolymer with repeating d-glucose and 6-deoxy-l-talose residues in which the 6-deoxy-l-talose residues are variably replaced with O-acetyl and O-methyl modifications. We observed that primary clinical B. pseudomallei isolates with mucoid and nonmucoid colony morphologies from the same sample expressed different antigenic types distinguishable using an LPS-specific monoclonal antibody (MAb). MAb-reactive (nonmucoid) and nonreactive (mucoid) strains from the same patient exhibited identical LPS banding patterns by silver staining and indistinguishable genotypes. We hypothesized that LPS antigenic variation reflected modification of the OPS moieties. Mutagenesis of three genes involved in LPS synthesis was performed in B. pseudomallei K96243. Loss of MAb reactivity was observed in both wbiA (encoding a 2-O-acetyltransferase) and wbiD (putative methyl transferase) mutants. The structural characteristics of the OPS moieties from isogenic nonmucoid strain 4095a and mucoid strain 4095c were further investigated. Utilizing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we found that B. pseudomallei 4095a and 4095c OPS antigens exhibited substitution patterns that differed from the prototypic OPS structure. Specifically, 4095a lacked 4-O-acetylation, while 4095c lacked both 4-O-acetylation and 2-O-methylation. Our studies indicate that B. pseudomallei OPS undergoes antigenic variation and suggest that the 9D5 MAb recognizes a conformational epitope that is influenced by both O-acetyl and O-methyl substitution patterns. PMID:25776750

  8. Membrane-Bound PenA β-Lactamase of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Linnell B.; Dobos, Karen; Papp-Wallace, Krisztina M.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the etiologic agent of melioidosis, a difficult-to-treat disease with diverse clinical manifestations. β-Lactam antibiotics such as ceftazidime are crucial to the success of melioidosis therapy. Ceftazidime-resistant clinical isolates have been described, and the most common mechanism is point mutations affecting expression or critical amino acid residues of the chromosomally encoded class A PenA β-lactamase. We previously showed that PenA was exported via the twin arginine translocase system and associated with the spheroplast fraction. We now show that PenA is a membrane-bound lipoprotein. The protein and accompanying β-lactamase activity are found in the membrane fraction and can be extracted with Triton X-114. Treatment with globomycin of B. pseudomallei cells expressing PenA results in accumulation of the prolipoprotein. Mass spectrometric analysis of extracted membrane proteins reveals a protein peak whose mass is consistent with a triacylated PenA protein. Mutation of a crucial lipobox cysteine at position 23 to a serine residue results in loss of β-lactamase activity and absence of detectable PenAC23S protein. A concomitant isoleucine-to-alanine change at position 20 in the signal peptide processing site in the PenAC23S mutant results in a nonlipidated protein (PenAI20A C23S) that is processed by signal peptidase I and exhibits β-lactamase activity. The resistance profile of a B. pseudomallei strain expressing this protein is indistinguishable from the profile of the isogenic strain expressing wild-type PenA. The data show that PenA membrane association is not required for resistance and must serve another purpose. PMID:26711764

  9. Colony morphology variation of Burkholderia pseudomallei is associated with antigenic variation and O-polysaccharide modification.

    PubMed

    Wikraiphat, Chanthiwa; Saiprom, Natnaree; Tandhavanant, Sarunporn; Heiss, Christian; Azadi, Parastoo; Wongsuvan, Gumphol; Tuanyok, Apichai; Holden, Matthew T G; Burtnick, Mary N; Brett, Paul J; Peacock, Sharon J; Chantratita, Narisara

    2015-05-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a CDC tier 1 select agent that causes melioidosis, a severe disease in humans and animals. Persistent infections are common, and there is currently no vaccine available. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a potential vaccine candidate. B. pseudomallei expresses three serologically distinct LPS types. The predominant O-polysaccharide (OPS) is an unbranched heteropolymer with repeating d-glucose and 6-deoxy-l-talose residues in which the 6-deoxy-l-talose residues are variably replaced with O-acetyl and O-methyl modifications. We observed that primary clinical B. pseudomallei isolates with mucoid and nonmucoid colony morphologies from the same sample expressed different antigenic types distinguishable using an LPS-specific monoclonal antibody (MAb). MAb-reactive (nonmucoid) and nonreactive (mucoid) strains from the same patient exhibited identical LPS banding patterns by silver staining and indistinguishable genotypes. We hypothesized that LPS antigenic variation reflected modification of the OPS moieties. Mutagenesis of three genes involved in LPS synthesis was performed in B. pseudomallei K96243. Loss of MAb reactivity was observed in both wbiA (encoding a 2-O-acetyltransferase) and wbiD (putative methyl transferase) mutants. The structural characteristics of the OPS moieties from isogenic nonmucoid strain 4095a and mucoid strain 4095c were further investigated. Utilizing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we found that B. pseudomallei 4095a and 4095c OPS antigens exhibited substitution patterns that differed from the prototypic OPS structure. Specifically, 4095a lacked 4-O-acetylation, while 4095c lacked both 4-O-acetylation and 2-O-methylation. Our studies indicate that B. pseudomallei OPS undergoes antigenic variation and suggest that the 9D5 MAb recognizes a conformational epitope that is influenced by both O-acetyl and O-methyl substitution patterns. PMID:25776750

  10. Characterization and analysis of the Burkholderia pseudomallei BsaN virulence regulon

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is a facultative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis. A conserved type III secretion system (T3SS3) and type VI secretion system (T6SS1) are critical for intracellular survival and growth. The T3SS3 and T6SS1 genes are coordinately and hierarchically regulated by a TetR-type regulator, BspR. A central transcriptional regulator of the BspR regulatory cascade, BsaN, activates a subset of T3SS3 and T6SS1 loci. Results To elucidate the scope of the BsaN regulon, we used RNAseq analysis to compare the transcriptomes of wild-type B. pseudomallei KHW and a bsaN deletion mutant. The 60 genes positively-regulated by BsaN include those that we had previously identified in addition to a polyketide biosynthesis locus and genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis. BsaN was also found to repress the transcription of 51 genes including flagellar motility loci and those encoding components of the T3SS3 apparatus. Using a promoter-lacZ fusion assay in E. coli, we show that BsaN together with the chaperone BicA directly control the expression of the T3SS3 translocon, effector and associated regulatory genes that are organized into at least five operons (BPSS1516-BPSS1552). Using a mutagenesis approach, a consensus regulatory motif in the promoter regions of BsaN-regulated genes was shown to be essential for transcriptional activation. Conclusions BsaN/BicA functions as a central regulator of key virulence clusters in B. pseudomallei within a more extensive network of genetic regulation. We propose that BsaN/BicA controls a gene expression program that facilitates the adaption and intracellular survival of the pathogen within eukaryotic hosts. PMID:25085508

  11. A Burkholderia cenocepacia orphan LuxR homolog is involved in quorum-sensing regulation.

    PubMed

    Malott, Rebecca J; O'Grady, Eoin P; Toller, Jessica; Inhülsen, Silja; Eberl, Leo; Sokol, Pamela A

    2009-04-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia utilizes quorum sensing to control gene expression, including the expression of genes involved in virulence. In addition to CepR and CciR, a third LuxR homolog, CepR2, was found to regulate gene expression and virulence factor production. All B. cenocepacia strains examined contained this orphan LuxR homolog, which was not associated with an adjacent N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthase gene. Expression of cepR2 was negatively autoregulated and was negatively regulated by CciR in strain K56-2. Microarray analysis and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR determined that CepR2 did not influence expression of cepIR or cciIR. However, in strain K56-2, CepR2 negatively regulated expression of several known quorum-sensing-controlled genes, including genes encoding zinc metalloproteases. CepR2 exerted positive and negative regulation on genes on three chromosomes, including strong negative regulation of a gene cluster located adjacent to cepR2. In strain H111, which lacks the CciIR quorum-sensing system, CepR2 positively regulated pyochelin production by controlling transcription of one of the operons required for the biosynthesis of the siderophore in an N-acyl-homoserine lactone-independent manner. CepR2 activation of a luxI promoter was demonstrated in a heterologous Escherichia coli host, providing further evidence that CepR2 can function in the absence of signaling molecules. This study demonstrates that the orphan LuxR homolog CepR2 contributes to the quorum-sensing regulatory network in two distinct strains of B. cenocepacia. PMID:19201791

  12. Burkholderia denitrificans sp. nov., isolated from the soil of Dokdo Island, Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Muk; Weon, Hang-Yeon; Yoon, Sang-Hong; Kim, Soo-Jin; Koo, Bon-Sung; Kwon, Soon-Wo

    2012-10-01

    A novel, Gram-negative, bacterial strain KIS30-44(T) was identified from wet forest soil collected on the Korean island of Dokdo. Growth of the strain was observed at 15-30°C, pH 5-9, 0-3% NaCl, and 950 mM KNO(3). KIS30-44(T) reduced nitrate to nitrogen gas. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that KIS30-44(T) was phylogenetically related to Burkholderia sacchari, Burkholderia mimosarum, and Burkholderia oxyphila (98.1%, 98.0%, and 98.0% sequence similarity, respectively). The genomic G+C content was 63.5 mol%. KIS30-44(T) exhibited less than 52% DNA-DNA relatedness with the type strains of 9 closely related Burkholderia species. The major isoprenoid quinone was Q-8. The polar lipid profile consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and two unknown aminolipids. The major fatty acids in KIS30-44(T) were C(16:0), C(18:1) ω7c and summed feature 3 (iso-C(15:0) 2-OH and C(16:1) ω7c), and the strain contained half the amount of C(17:0) cyclo found in the 9 closely related Burkholderia species. The results of these phenotypic, 16S rRNA gene sequence, DNA-DNA hybridization, and chemotaxonomic data indicate that KIS30-44(T) represents a novel species within the genus Burkholderia, for which the name Burkholderia denitrificans (Type strain KIS30-44(T) =KACC 12733(T) =DSM 24336(T)) is proposed.

  13. Activity of Tobramycin against Cystic Fibrosis Isolates of Burkholderia cepacia Complex Grown as Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Sarah; Beaudoin, Trevor; Yau, Yvonne C W; Caraher, Emma; Zlosnik, James E A; Speert, David P; LiPuma, John J; Tullis, Elizabeth; Waters, Valerie

    2015-10-26

    Pulmonary infection with Burkholderia cepacia complex in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is associated with more-rapid lung function decline and earlier death than in CF patients without this infection. In this study, we used confocal microscopy to visualize the effects of various concentrations of tobramycin, achievable with systemic and aerosolized drug administration, on mature B. cepacia complex biofilms, both in the presence and absence of CF sputum. After 24 h of growth, biofilm thickness was significantly reduced by exposure to 2,000 μg/ml of tobramycin for Burkholderia cepacia, Burkholderia multivorans, and Burkholderia vietnamiensis; 200 μg/ml of tobramycin was sufficient to reduce the thickness of Burkholderia dolosa biofilm. With a more mature 48-h biofilm, significant reductions in thickness were seen with tobramycin at concentrations of ≥100 μg/ml for all Burkholderia species. In addition, an increased ratio of dead to live cells was observed in comparison to control with tobramycin concentrations of ≥200 μg/ml for B. cepacia and B. dolosa (24 h) and ≥100 μg/ml for Burkholderia cenocepacia and B. dolosa (48 h). Although sputum significantly increased biofilm thickness, tobramycin concentrations of 1,000 μg/ml were still able to significantly reduce biofilm thickness of all B. cepacia complex species with the exception of B. vietnamiensis. In the presence of sputum, 1,000 μg/ml of tobramycin significantly increased the dead-to-live ratio only for B. multivorans compared to control. In summary, although killing is attenuated, high-dose tobramycin can effectively decrease the thickness of B. cepacia complex biofilms, even in the presence of sputum, suggesting a possible role as a suppressive therapy in CF.

  14. Genetic and phenotypic diversity in Burkholderia: contributions by prophage and phage-like elements

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Burkholderia species exhibit enormous phenotypic diversity, ranging from the nonpathogenic, soil- and water-inhabiting Burkholderia thailandensis to the virulent, host-adapted mammalian pathogen B. mallei. Genomic diversity is evident within Burkholderia species as well. Individual isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. thailandensis, for example, carry a variety of strain-specific genomic islands (GIs), including putative pathogenicity and metabolic islands, prophage-like islands, and prophages. These GIs may provide some strains with a competitive advantage in the environment and/or in the host relative to other strains. Results Here we present the results of analysis of 37 prophages, putative prophages, and prophage-like elements from six different Burkholderia species. Five of these were spontaneously induced to form bacteriophage particles from B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis strains and were isolated and fully sequenced; 24 were computationally predicted in sequenced Burkholderia genomes; and eight are previously characterized prophages or prophage-like elements. The results reveal numerous differences in both genome structure and gene content among elements derived from different species as well as from strains within species, due in part to the incorporation of additional DNA, or 'morons' into the prophage genomes. Implications for pathogenicity are also discussed. Lastly, RNAseq analysis of gene expression showed that many of the genes in ϕ1026b that appear to contribute to phage and lysogen fitness were expressed independently of the phage structural and replication genes. Conclusions This study provides the first estimate of the relative contribution of prophages to the vast phenotypic diversity found among the Burkholderiae. PMID:20667135

  15. Oxalotrophy, a widespread trait of plant-associated Burkholderia species, is involved in successful root colonization of lupin and maize by Burkholderia phytofirmans

    PubMed Central

    Kost, Thomas; Stopnisek, Nejc; Agnoli, Kirsty; Eberl, Leo

    2014-01-01

    Plant roots and shoots harbor complex bacterial communities. Early seed and plantlet colonization plays a key role in determining which bacterial populations will successfully invade plant tissues, yet the mechanisms enabling plants to select for beneficial rather than harmful populations are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate a role of oxalate as a determinant in this selection process, using members of the genus Burkholderia as model organisms. Oxalotrophy, i.e., the ability to use oxalate as a carbon source, was found to be a property strictly associated with plant-beneficial species of the Burkholderia genus, while plant pathogenic (B. glumae, B. plantarii) or human opportunistic pathogens (Burkholderia cepacia complex strains) were unable to degrade oxalate. We further show that oxalotrophy is required for successful plant colonization by the broad host endophyte Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN: an engineered Δoxc mutant, which lost the ability to grow on oxalate, was significantly impaired in early colonization of both lupin and maize compared with the wild-type. This work suggests that in addition to the role of oxalate in heavy metal tolerance of plants and in virulence of phytopathogenic fungi, it is also involved in specifically recruiting plant-beneficial members from complex bacterial communities. PMID:24409174

  16. Burkholderia zhejiangensis sp. nov., a methyl-parathion-degrading bacterium isolated from a wastewater-treatment system.

    PubMed

    Lu, Peng; Zheng, Liu-Qiang; Sun, Jin-Jin; Liu, Hong-Ming; Li, Shun-Peng; Hong, Qing; Li, Wen-Jun

    2012-06-01

    The taxonomic status of a methyl-parathion-degrading strain, OP-1(T), isolated from a wastewater-treatment system in China, was determined using a polyphasic approach. The rod-shaped cells were Gram-staining-negative, non-spore-forming and non-motile. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the novel strain belonged to the genus Burkholderia, as it appeared closely related to Burkholderia glathei ATCC 29195(T) (97.4 % sequence similarity), Burkholderia sordidicola KCTC 12081(T) (96.5 %) and Burkholderia bryophila LMG 23644(T) (96.3 %). The major cellular fatty acids, C(16:0), C(17:0) cyclo and C(18:1)ω7c, were also similar to those found in established members of the genus Burkholderia. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain OP-1(T) was 59.4 mol%. The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between the novel strain and the closest recognized species, Burkholderia glathei ATCC 29195(T), was only 30 %. Based on the phenotypic, genotypic and phylogenetic evidence, strain OP-1(T) represents a novel species of the genus Burkholderia, for which the name Burkholderia zhejiangensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is OP-1(T) ( = CCTCC AB 2010354(T) = KCTC 23300(T)).

  17. Phylogenetically Diverse Burkholderia Associated with Midgut Crypts of Spurge Bugs, Dicranocephalus spp. (Heteroptera: Stenocephalidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kuechler, Stefan Martin; Matsuura, Yu; Dettner, Konrad; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo

    2016-01-01

    Diverse phytophagous heteropteran insects, commonly known as stinkbugs, are associated with specific gut symbiotic bacteria, which have been found in midgut cryptic spaces. Recent studies have revealed that members of the stinkbug families Coreidae and Alydidae of the superfamily Coreoidea are consistently associated with a specific group of the betaproteobacterial genus Burkholderia, called the “stinkbug-associated beneficial and environmental (SBE)” group, and horizontally acquire specific symbionts from the environment every generation. However, the symbiotic system of another coreoid family, Stenocephalidae remains undetermined. We herein investigated four species of the stenocephalid genus Dicranocephalus. Examinations via fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the typical arrangement and ultrastructures of midgut crypts and gut symbionts. Cloning and molecular phylogenetic analyses of bacterial genes showed that the midgut crypts of all species are colonized by Burkholderia strains, which were further assigned to different subgroups of the genus Burkholderia. In addition to the SBE-group Burkholderia, a number of stenocephalid symbionts belonged to a novel clade containing B. sordidicola and B. udeis, suggesting a specific symbiont clade for the Stenocephalidae. The symbiotic systems of stenocephalid bugs may provide a unique opportunity to study the ongoing evolution of symbiont associations in the stinkbug-Burkholderia interaction. PMID:27265344

  18. Burkholderia of Plant-Beneficial Group are Symbiotically Associated with Bordered Plant Bugs (Heteroptera: Pyrrhocoroidea: Largidae).

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Kazutaka; Matsuura, Yu; Itoh, Hideomi; Navarro, Ronald; Hori, Tomoyuki; Sone, Teruo; Kamagata, Yoichi; Mergaert, Peter; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo

    2015-01-01

    A number of phytophagous stinkbugs (order Heteroptera: infraorder Pentatomomorpha) harbor symbiotic bacteria in a specific midgut region composed of numerous crypts. Among the five superfamilies of the infraorder Pentatomomorpha, most members of the Coreoidea and Lygaeoidea are associated with a specific group of the genus Burkholderia, called the "stinkbug-associated beneficial and environmental (SBE)" group, which is not vertically transmitted, but acquired from the environment every host generation. A recent study reported that, in addition to these two stinkbug groups, the family Largidae of the superfamily Pyrrhocoroidea also possesses a Burkholderia symbiont. Despite this recent finding, the phylogenetic position and biological nature of Burkholderia associated with Largidae remains unclear. Based on the combined results of fluorescence in situ hybridization, cloning analysis, Illumina deep sequencing, and egg inspections by diagnostic PCR, we herein demonstrate that the largid species are consistently associated with the "plant-associated beneficial and environmental (PBE)" group of Burkholderia, which are phylogenetically distinct from the SBE group, and that they maintain symbiosis through the environmental acquisition of the bacteria. Since the superfamilies Coreoidea, Lygaeoidea, and Pyrrhocoroidea are monophyletic in the infraorder Pentatomomorpha, it is plausible that the symbiotic association with Burkholderia evolved at the common ancestor of the three superfamilies. However, the results of this study strongly suggest that a dynamic transition from the PBE to SBE group, or vice versa, occurred in the course of stinkbug evolution.

  19. Plant-associated symbiotic Burkholderia species lack hallmark strategies required in mammalian pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Angus, Annette A; Agapakis, Christina M; Fong, Stephanie; Yerrapragada, Shailaja; Estrada-de los Santos, Paulina; Yang, Paul; Song, Nannie; Kano, Stephanie; Caballero-Mellado, Jésus; de Faria, Sergio M; Dakora, Felix D; Weinstock, George; Hirsch, Ann M

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia is a diverse and dynamic genus, containing pathogenic species as well as species that form complex interactions with plants. Pathogenic strains, such as B. pseudomallei and B. mallei, can cause serious disease in mammals, while other Burkholderia strains are opportunistic pathogens, infecting humans or animals with a compromised immune system. Although some of the opportunistic Burkholderia pathogens are known to promote plant growth and even fix nitrogen, the risk of infection to infants, the elderly, and people who are immunocompromised has not only resulted in a restriction on their use, but has also limited the application of non-pathogenic, symbiotic species, several of which nodulate legume roots or have positive effects on plant growth. However, recent phylogenetic analyses have demonstrated that Burkholderia species separate into distinct lineages, suggesting the possibility for safe use of certain symbiotic species in agricultural contexts. A number of environmental strains that promote plant growth or degrade xenobiotics are also included in the symbiotic lineage. Many of these species have the potential to enhance agriculture in areas where fertilizers are not readily available and may serve in the future as inocula for crops growing in soils impacted by climate change. Here we address the pathogenic potential of several of the symbiotic Burkholderia strains using bioinformatics and functional tests. A series of infection experiments using Caenorhabditis elegans and HeLa cells, as well as genomic characterization of pathogenic loci, show that the risk of opportunistic infection by symbiotic strains such as B. tuberum is extremely low.

  20. Genome Annotation of Burkholderia sp. SJ98 with Special Focus on Chemotaxis Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shailesh; Vikram, Surendra; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain SJ98 has the chemotactic activity towards nitroaromatic and chloronitroaromatic compounds. Recently our group published draft genome of strain SJ98. In this study, we further sequence and annotate the genome of stain SJ98 to exploit the potential of this bacterium. We specifically annotate its chemotaxis genes and methyl accepting chemotaxis proteins. Genome of Burkholderia sp. SJ98 was annotated using PGAAP pipeline that predicts 7,268 CDSs, 52 tRNAs and 3 rRNAs. Our analysis based on phylogenetic and comparative genomics suggest that Burkholderia sp. YI23 is closest neighbor of the strain SJ98. The genes involved in the chemotaxis of strain SJ98 were compared with genes of closely related Burkholderia strains (i.e. YI23, CCGE 1001, CCGE 1002, CCGE 1003) and with well characterized bacterium E. coli K12. It was found that strain SJ98 has 37 che genes including 19 methyl accepting chemotaxis proteins that involved in sensing of different attractants. Chemotaxis genes have been found in a cluster along with the flagellar motor proteins. We also developed a web resource that provides comprehensive information on strain SJ98 that includes all analysis data (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/genomesrs/burkholderia/). PMID:23940608

  1. The art of persistence-the secrets to Burkholderia chronic infections.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Eric R G; Torres, Alfredo G

    2016-08-01

    The Gram-negative proteobacteria genus Burkholderia encompasses multiple bacterial species that are pathogenic to humans and other vertebrates. Two pathogenic species of interest within this genus are Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bpm) and the B. cepacia complex (Bcc); the former is the causative agent of melioidosis in humans and other mammals, and the latter is associated with pneumonia in immunocompromised patients. One understudied and shared characteristic of these two pathogenic groups is their ability to persist and establish chronic infection within the host. In this review, we will explore the depth of knowledge about chronic infections caused by persistent Bpm and Bcc. We examine the host risk factors and immune responses associated with more severe chronic infections. We also discuss host adaptation and phenotypes associated with persistent Burkholderia species. Lastly, we survey how other intracellular bacteria associated with chronic infections are combatted and explore possible future applications to target Burkholderia Our goal is to highlight understudied areas that should be addressed for a more thorough understanding of chronic Burkholderia infections and how to combat them. PMID:27440810

  2. Genome annotation of Burkholderia sp. SJ98 with special focus on chemotaxis genes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shailesh; Vikram, Surendra; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain SJ98 has the chemotactic activity towards nitroaromatic and chloronitroaromatic compounds. Recently our group published draft genome of strain SJ98. In this study, we further sequence and annotate the genome of stain SJ98 to exploit the potential of this bacterium. We specifically annotate its chemotaxis genes and methyl accepting chemotaxis proteins. Genome of Burkholderia sp. SJ98 was annotated using PGAAP pipeline that predicts 7,268 CDSs, 52 tRNAs and 3 rRNAs. Our analysis based on phylogenetic and comparative genomics suggest that Burkholderia sp. YI23 is closest neighbor of the strain SJ98. The genes involved in the chemotaxis of strain SJ98 were compared with genes of closely related Burkholderia strains (i.e. YI23, CCGE 1001, CCGE 1002, CCGE 1003) and with well characterized bacterium E. coli K12. It was found that strain SJ98 has 37 che genes including 19 methyl accepting chemotaxis proteins that involved in sensing of different attractants. Chemotaxis genes have been found in a cluster along with the flagellar motor proteins. We also developed a web resource that provides comprehensive information on strain SJ98 that includes all analysis data (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/genomesrs/burkholderia/).

  3. Selection of nitrogen-fixing deficient Burkholderia vietnamiensis strains by cystic fibrosis patients: involvement of nif gene deletions and auxotrophic mutations.

    PubMed

    Menard, Aymeric; Monnez, Claire; Estrada de Los Santos, Paulina; Segonds, Christine; Caballero-Mellado, Jesus; Lipuma, John J; Chabanon, Gerard; Cournoyer, Benoit

    2007-05-01

    Burkholderia vietnamiensis is the third most prevalent species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) found in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Its ability at fixing nitrogen makes it one of the main Bcc species showing strong filiations with environmental reservoirs. In this study, 83% (29 over 35) of the B. vietnamiensis CF isolates and 100% of the environmental ones (over 29) were found expressing the dinitrogenase complex (encoded by the nif cluster) which is essential in N(2) fixation. Among the deficient strains, two were found growing with ammonium chloride suggesting that they were defective in N(2) fixation, and four with amino acids supplements suggesting that they were harbouring auxotrophic mutations. To get insights about the genetic events that led to the emergence of the N(2)-fixing defective strains, a genetic analysis of B. vietnamiensis nitrogen-fixing property was undertaken. A 40-kb-long nif cluster and nif regulatory genes were identified within the B. vietnamiensis strain G4 genome sequence, and analysed. Transposon mutagenesis and nifH genetic marker exchanges showed the nif cluster and several other genes like gltB (encoding a subunit of the glutamate synthase) to play a key role in B. vietnamiensis ability at growing in nitrogen-free media. nif cluster DNA probings of restricted genomic DNA blots showed a full deletion of the nif cluster for one of the N(2)-fixing defective strain while the other one showed a genetic organization similar to the one of the G4 strain. For 17% of B. vietnamiensis clinical strains, CF lungs appeared to have favoured the selection of mutations or deletions leading to N(2)-fixing deficiencies.

  4. Identification of quorum sensing-controlled genes in Burkholderia ambifaria

    PubMed Central

    Chapalain, Annelise; Vial, Ludovic; Laprade, Natacha; Dekimpe, Valérie; Perreault, Jonathan; Déziel, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) comprises strains with a virulence potential toward immunocompromised patients as well as plant growth–promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). Owing to the link between quorum sensing (QS) and virulence, most studies among Bcc species have been directed toward QS of pathogenic bacteria. We have investigated the QS of B. ambifaria, a PGPR only infrequently recovered from patients. The cepI gene, responsible for the synthesis of the main signaling molecule N-octanoylhomoserine lactone (C8-HSL), was inactivated. Phenotypes of the B. ambifaria cepI mutant we observed, such as increased production of siderophores and decreased proteolytic and antifungal activities, are in agreement with those of other Bcc cepI mutants. The cepI mutant was then used as background strain for a whole-genome transposon-insertion mutagenesis strategy, allowing the identification of 20 QS-controlled genes, corresponding to 17 loci. The main functions identified are linked to antifungal and antimicrobial properties, as we have identified QS-controlled genes implicated in the production of pyrrolnitrin, burkholdines (occidiofungin-like molecules), and enacyloxins. This study provides insights in the QS-regulated functions of a PGPR, which could lead to beneficial potential biotechnological applications. PMID:23382083

  5. Incidence of Burkholderia mallei infection among indigenous equines in India

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Praveen; Singha, Harisankar; Goyal, Sachin K; Khurana, Sandip K; Tripathi, Badri Naryan; Dutt, Abha; Singh, Dabal; Sharma, Neeraj; Jain, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is the causative agent of glanders which is a highly contagious and fatal disease of equines. Considering the nature and severity of the disease in equines, and potential of transmission to human beings, glanders is recognised as a ‘notifiable’ disease in many countries. An increasing number of glanders outbreaks throughout the Asian continents, including India, have been noticed recently. In view of the recent re-emergence of the disease, the present study was undertaken to estimate the prevalence of glanders among indigenous equines from different parts of India. Serum samples were analysed by complement fixation test (CFT) and ELISA for the detection of B mallei specific antibodies. A total of 7794 equines, which included 4720 horses, 1881 donkeys and 1193 mules were sampled from April 2011 to December 2014 from 10 states of India. Serologically, 36 equines (pony=7, mules=10, horses=19) were found to be positive for glanders by CFT and indirect-ELISA. The highest number of cases were detected in Uttar Pradesh (n=31) followed by Himachal Pradesh (n=4) and Chhattisgarh (n=1). Isolation of B mallei was attempted from nasal and abscess swabs collected from seropositive equines. Four isolates of B mallei were cultured from nasal swabs of two mules and two ponies. Identity of the isolates was confirmed by PCR and sequencing of fliP gene fragment. The study revealed circulation of B mallei in northern India and the need for continued surveillance to support the eradication. PMID:26457190

  6. Mouse model of sublethal and lethal intraperitoneal glanders (Burkholderia mallei).

    PubMed

    Fritz, D L; Vogel, P; Brown, D R; Deshazer, D; Waag, D M

    2000-11-01

    Sixty male BALB/c mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with either a sublethal or a lethal dose of Burkholderia mallei China 7 strain, then killed at multiple time points postinoculation. Histopathologic changes were qualitatively similar in both groups and consisted of pyogranulomatous inflammation. In sublethal study mice, changes were first seen at 6 hours in mediastinal lymph nodes, then in spleen, liver, peripheral lymph nodes, and bone marrow at day 3. These changes generally reached maximal incidence and severity by day 4 but decreased by comparison in all tissues except the liver. Changes were first seen in lethal study mice also at 6 hours in mediastinal lymph nodes and in spleens. At day 1, changes were present in liver, peripheral lymph nodes, and bone marrow. The incidence and severity of these changes were maximal at day 2. In contrast to sublethal study mice, the incidence and severity of the changes did not decrease through the remainder of the study. The most significant difference between the two groups was the rapid involvement of the spleen in the lethal study mice. Changes indicative of impaired vascular perfusion were more frequently seen in the sublethal study mice. Our findings indicate that mice are susceptible to B. mallei infection and may serve as an appropriate model for glanders infection in a resistant host such as human beings. Additionally, by immunoelectron microscopy, we showed the presence of type I O-antigenic polysaccharide (capsular) antigen surrounding B. mallei.

  7. Burkholderia cenocepacia zinc metalloproteases influence resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Kooi, Cora; Sokol, Pamela A

    2009-09-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia secretes two zinc-dependent metalloproteases, designated ZmpA and ZmpB. Previously, ZmpA and ZmpB have been shown to cleave several proteins important in host defence. In this study, the ability of ZmpA and ZmpB to digest and inactivate antimicrobial peptides involved in innate immunity was examined. ZmpB but not ZmpA cleaved beta-defensin-1. ZmpA but not ZmpB cleaved the cathelicidin LL-37. Both enzymes cleaved elafin and secretory leukocyte inhibitor, which are antimicrobial peptides as well as neutrophil elastase inhibitors. Both ZmpA and ZmpB cleaved protamine, a fish antimicrobial peptide, and a zmpA zmpB mutant was more sensitive to protamine killing than the parental strain. ZmpA or ZmpB cleavage of elafin inactivated its anti-protease activity. The effect of ZmpA and ZmpB on the neutrophil proteases elastase and cathepsin G was also examined but neither enzyme was active against these host proteases. These studies suggest that ZmpA and ZmpB may influence the resistance of B. cenocepacia to host antimicrobial peptides as well as alter the host protease/anti-protease balance in chronic respiratory infections.

  8. Predicted global distribution of Burkholderia pseudomallei and burden of melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Golding, Nick; Dance, David A B; Messina, Jane P; Pigott, David M; Moyes, Catherine L; Rolim, Dionne B; Bertherat, Eric; Day, Nicholas P J; Peacock, Sharon J; Hay, Simon I

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, a highly pathogenic bacterium that causes melioidosis, is commonly found in soil in Southeast Asia and Northern Australia(1,2). Melioidosis can be difficult to diagnose due to its diverse clinical manifestations and the inadequacy of conventional bacterial identification methods(3). The bacterium is intrinsically resistant to a wide range of antimicrobials, and treatment with ineffective antimicrobials may result in case fatality rates (CFRs) exceeding 70%(4,5). The importation of infected animals has, in the past, spread melioidosis to non-endemic areas(6,7). The global distribution of B. pseudomallei and the burden of melioidosis, however, remain poorly understood. Here, we map documented human and animal cases and the presence of environmental B. pseudomallei and combine this in a formal modelling framework(8-10) to estimate the global burden of melioidosis. We estimate there to be 165,000 (95% credible interval 68,000-412,000) human melioidosis cases per year worldwide, from which 89,000 (36,000-227,000) people die. Our estimates suggest that melioidosis is severely underreported in the 45 countries in which it is known to be endemic and that melioidosis is probably endemic in a further 34 countries that have never reported the disease. The large numbers of estimated cases and fatalities emphasize that the disease warrants renewed attention from public health officials and policy makers.

  9. Burkholderia pseudomallei: First case of melioidosis in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Pelerito, Ana; Nunes, Alexandra; Coelho, Susana; Piedade, Cátia; Paixão, Paulo; Cordeiro, Rita; Sampaio, Daniel; Vieira, Luís; Gomes, João Paulo; Núncio, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative bacillus and the causative agent of melioidosis, a serious infection associated with high mortality rate in humans. It can be naturally found as an environmental saprophyte in soil or stagnant water, and rice paddies that predominate in regions of endemicity such as Northeast Thailand. B. pseudomallei is a Biosafety Level 3 organism due to risks of aerosolization and severe disease and is now included in formal emergency preparedness plans and guidelines issued by various authorities in the United States and Europe. Here, we report the first case of imported melioidosis in Portugal. B. pseudomallei was isolated from the patient's blood as well as from a left gluteal abscess pus. The isolate strain showed the unusual resistance profile to first-line eradication therapy trimethroprim/sulfamethoxazole. Whole genome sequencing revealed its similarity with isolates from Southeast Asia, suggesting the Thai origin of this Portuguese isolate, which is in agreement with a recent patient's travel to Thailand. PMID:26962474

  10. Incidence of Burkholderia mallei infection among indigenous equines in India.

    PubMed

    Malik, Praveen; Singha, Harisankar; Goyal, Sachin K; Khurana, Sandip K; Tripathi, Badri Naryan; Dutt, Abha; Singh, Dabal; Sharma, Neeraj; Jain, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is the causative agent of glanders which is a highly contagious and fatal disease of equines. Considering the nature and severity of the disease in equines, and potential of transmission to human beings, glanders is recognised as a 'notifiable' disease in many countries. An increasing number of glanders outbreaks throughout the Asian continents, including India, have been noticed recently. In view of the recent re-emergence of the disease, the present study was undertaken to estimate the prevalence of glanders among indigenous equines from different parts of India. Serum samples were analysed by complement fixation test (CFT) and ELISA for the detection of B mallei specific antibodies. A total of 7794 equines, which included 4720 horses, 1881 donkeys and 1193 mules were sampled from April 2011 to December 2014 from 10 states of India. Serologically, 36 equines (pony=7, mules=10, horses=19) were found to be positive for glanders by CFT and indirect-ELISA. The highest number of cases were detected in Uttar Pradesh (n=31) followed by Himachal Pradesh (n=4) and Chhattisgarh (n=1). Isolation of B mallei was attempted from nasal and abscess swabs collected from seropositive equines. Four isolates of B mallei were cultured from nasal swabs of two mules and two ponies. Identity of the isolates was confirmed by PCR and sequencing of fliP gene fragment. The study revealed circulation of B mallei in northern India and the need for continued surveillance to support the eradication.

  11. Ribotype differences between clinical and environmental isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Trakulsomboon, S; Dance, D A; Smith, M D; White, N J; Pitt, T L

    1997-07-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is isolated frequently from the soil in regions where the disease melioidosis occurs. However, recent surveys in Thailand have shown that the frequency of isolation of the organism from soil samples is not directly related to the incidence of melioidosis in an area. To determine whether strain populations of B. pseudomallei prevalent in soil are gentypically related to strains causing clinical disease, rRNA BamHI restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) of 139 soil environmental isolates and 228 human isolates were compared. Two groups of ribotype patterns were found. Group I comprised 37 different ribotype patterns which were characterised by five to eight hybridisation bands of 2.8- > 23 kb. All of these ribotypes were identified among the clinical isolates, and 18 of them were also found in 59 environmental isolates. Group II was represented by 12 ribotypes found only in environmental strains. These ribotype patterns comprised one to five bands in the size range 9- > 23 kb. All but one of the 73 isolates in this group grew on a minimal medium supplemented with L-arabinose. In contrast, only 3% of the 66 isolates from the environment with group I ribotype patterns could utilise this sugar as their sole energy source. These findings suggest that B. pseudomallei strains that utilise arabinose constitute a population that is genetically distinct from other environmental and clinical strains.

  12. Burkholderia Sepsis in Children as a Hospital-Acquired Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyu Yeun; Yong, Dongeun; Lee, Kyungwon; Kim, Ho-Seong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Hospital-acquired Burkholderia cepacia (B. cepacia) infection are not commonly recorded in patients without underlying lung disease, such as cystic fibrosis and chronic granulomatous disease. However, in 2014, B. cepacia appeared more frequently in pediatric blood samples than in any other year. In order to access this situation, we analyzed the clinical characteristics of B. cepacia infections in pediatric patients at our hospital. Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective study of blood isolates of B. cepacia taken at our hospital between January 2004 and December 2014. Patient clinical data were obtained by retrospective review of electronic medical records. We constructed a dendrogram for B. cepacia isolates from two children and five adult patients. Results A total of 14 pediatric patients and 69 adult patients were identified as having B. cepacia bacteremia. In 2014, higher rates of B. cepacia bacteremia were observed in children. Most of them required Intensive Care Unit (ICU) care (12/14). In eleven children, sputum cultures were examined, and five of these children had the same strain of B. cepacia that grew out from their blood samples. Antibiotics were administered based on antibiotic sensitivity results. Four children expired despite treatment. Compared to children, there were no demonstrative differences in adults, except for history of ICU care. Conclusion Although there were not many pediatric cases at our hospital, awareness of colonization through hospital-acquired infection and effective therapy for infection of B. cepacia is needed, as it can cause mortality and morbidity. PMID:26632388

  13. Predicted global distribution of Burkholderia pseudomallei and burden of melioidosis

    PubMed Central

    Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Golding, Nick; Dance, David AB; Messina, Jane P; Pigott, David M; Moyes, Catherine L; Rolim, Dionne B; Bertherat, Eric; Day, Nicholas PJ; Peacock, Sharon J; Hay, Simon I

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, a highly pathogenic bacterium that causes melioidosis, is commonly found in soil in Southeast Asia and Northern Australia1,2. Melioidosis can be difficult to diagnose due to its diverse clinical manifestations and the inadequacy of conventional bacterial identification methods3. The bacterium is intrinsically resistant to a wide range of antimicrobials, and treatment with ineffective antimicrobials may result in case fatality rates (CFRs) exceeding 70%4,5. The importation of infected animals has, in the past, spread melioidosis to non-endemic areas6,7. The global distribution of B. pseudomallei and burden of melioidosis, however, remain poorly understood. Here, we map documented human and animal cases, and the presence of environmental B. pseudomallei, and combine this in a formal modelling framework8-10 to estimate the global burden of melioidosis. We estimate there to be 165,000 (95% credible interval 68,000-412,000) human melioidosis cases per year worldwide, of which 89,000 (36,000-227,000) die. Our estimates suggest that melioidosis is severely underreported in the 45 countries in which it is known to be endemic and that melioidosis is likely endemic in a further 34 countries which have never reported the disease. The large numbers of estimated cases and fatalities emphasise that the disease warrants renewed attention from public health officials and policy makers. PMID:26877885

  14. [Pharyngitis due to Burkholderia cepacia. Person-to-person transmission].

    PubMed

    Fajardo Olivares, M; Cordero Carrasco, J L; Beteta López, A; Escobar Izquierdo, A B; Sacristán Enciso, B

    2004-06-01

    Burkholderia cepacia is a Gram-negative bacillus that is widely distributed in nature; it is isolated from the ground, water, plants and vegetables. Generally, it produces nosocomial infection due to contamination of disinfectants, medical equipment, prosthetic material and drugs, such as anesthetics or liquids used in urological irrigation. The most probable mechanism of transmission is through hospital material or through fomites among people after contact for several weeks or months. Recently, it has been considered as an important pathogen in immunocompromised patients, or in those with significant underlying diseases, such as chronic granulomastosis or cystic fibrosis. We present a case of pharyngitis due to B. cepacia and its transmission within a few days in two immunocompetent twin siblings without previous underlying diseases. The infection disappeared after specific treatment for this microorganism was started. We believe that samples should be taken from the pharynx and nasal pits in patients with acute upper respiratory tract processes that do not respond to empiric antibiotic treatment, before classifying them as viral infection without etiologic diagnosis.

  15. Genetic Control of Weight Loss During Pneumonic Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Felicia D.; Parvathareddy, Jyothi; Pandey, Ashutosh K.; Cui, Yan; Williams, Robert W.; Miller, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) is the causal agent of a high morbidity/mortality disease syndrome known as melioidosis. This syndrome can range from acute fulminate disease to chronic, local, and disseminated infections that are often difficult to treat because Bp exhibits resistance to many antibiotics. Bp is a prime candidate for use in biological warfare/terrorism and is classified as a Tier-1 Select Agent by HHS and APHIS. It is known that inbred mouse strains display a range of susceptibility to Bp and that the murine infection model is ideal for studying acute melioidosis. Here we exploit a powerful mouse genetics resource that consists of a large family of BXD type recombinant inbred strains, to perform genome-wide linkage analysis of the weight loss phenotype following pneumonic infection with Bp. We infected parental mice and 32 BXD strains with 50-100 CFU of Bp (strain 1026b) and monitored weight retention each day over an eleven-day time course. Using the computational tools in GeneNetwork, we performed genome-wide linkage analysis to identify an interval on chromosome 12 that appears to control the weight retention trait. We then analysed and ranked positional candidate genes in this interval, several of which have intriguing connections with innate immunity, calcium homeostasis, lipid transport, host cell growth and development, and autophagy. PMID:24687986

  16. Ultrastructural effects and antibiofilm activity of LFchimera against Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Puknun, Aekkalak; Kanthawong, Sakawrat; Anutrakunchai, Chitchanok; Nazmi, Kamran; Tigchelaar, Wikky; Hoeben, Kees A; Veerman, Enno C I; Bolscher, Jan G M; Taweechaisupapong, Suwimol

    2016-02-01

    Lactoferrin chimera (LFchimera), a hybrid peptide containing the two antimicrobial stretches of the innate immunity factor bovine lactoferrin, viz. LFampin265-284 and LFcin17-30, has strikingly high antimicrobial activity against the category B pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei. The action mechanisms of LFchimera against B. pseudomallei is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to further investigate the effect of treated B. pseudomallei with LFchimera using (immune) electron microscopy. The effects of LFchimera on biofilm formation and against preformed biofilm of B. pseudomallei were also determined. After exposure to LFchimera, transmission electron microscopy revealed swelling of the periplasmic space of B. pseudomallei and a highly inhomogeneous electron density in the intracellular DNA region. Localization of LFchimera in B. pseudomallei using immunoelectron microscopy showed gold particles in intracellular structures without accumulation on the membranes. LFchimera also possessed stronger bactericidal activity than ceftazidime against B. pseudomallei grown in biofilm. Moreover, limited exposure of B. pseudomallei to LFchimera at subcidal concentration could reduce biofilm formation. Altogether, the results indicate that LFchimera possesses antibacterial and antibiofilm activities and can modulate B. pseudomallei colonization. Therefore, the efficacy of LFchimera merits further development of this agent for the therapy of melioidosis. PMID:26754671

  17. Burkholderia pseudomallei: First case of melioidosis in Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Pelerito, Ana; Nunes, Alexandra; Coelho, Susana; Piedade, Cátia; Paixão, Paulo; Cordeiro, Rita; Sampaio, Daniel; Vieira, Luís; Gomes, João Paulo; Núncio, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative bacillus and the causative agent of melioidosis, a serious infection associated with high mortality rate in humans. It can be naturally found as an environmental saprophyte in soil or stagnant water, and rice paddies that predominate in regions of endemicity such as Northeast Thailand. B. pseudomallei is a Biosafety Level 3 organism due to risks of aerosolization and severe disease and is now included in formal emergency preparedness plans and guidelines issued by various authorities in the United States and Europe. Here, we report the first case of imported melioidosis in Portugal. B. pseudomallei was isolated from the patient's blood as well as from a left gluteal abscess pus. The isolate strain showed the unusual resistance profile to first-line eradication therapy trimethroprim/sulfamethoxazole. Whole genome sequencing revealed its similarity with isolates from Southeast Asia, suggesting the Thai origin of this Portuguese isolate, which is in agreement with a recent patient's travel to Thailand. PMID:26962474

  18. Predicted global distribution of Burkholderia pseudomallei and burden of melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Golding, Nick; Dance, David A B; Messina, Jane P; Pigott, David M; Moyes, Catherine L; Rolim, Dionne B; Bertherat, Eric; Day, Nicholas P J; Peacock, Sharon J; Hay, Simon I

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, a highly pathogenic bacterium that causes melioidosis, is commonly found in soil in Southeast Asia and Northern Australia(1,2). Melioidosis can be difficult to diagnose due to its diverse clinical manifestations and the inadequacy of conventional bacterial identification methods(3). The bacterium is intrinsically resistant to a wide range of antimicrobials, and treatment with ineffective antimicrobials may result in case fatality rates (CFRs) exceeding 70%(4,5). The importation of infected animals has, in the past, spread melioidosis to non-endemic areas(6,7). The global distribution of B. pseudomallei and the burden of melioidosis, however, remain poorly understood. Here, we map documented human and animal cases and the presence of environmental B. pseudomallei and combine this in a formal modelling framework(8-10) to estimate the global burden of melioidosis. We estimate there to be 165,000 (95% credible interval 68,000-412,000) human melioidosis cases per year worldwide, from which 89,000 (36,000-227,000) people die. Our estimates suggest that melioidosis is severely underreported in the 45 countries in which it is known to be endemic and that melioidosis is probably endemic in a further 34 countries that have never reported the disease. The large numbers of estimated cases and fatalities emphasize that the disease warrants renewed attention from public health officials and policy makers. PMID:27571754

  19. Genetic structure of a lotic population of Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, M.G.; Shimkets, L.J.; McArthur, J.V.

    1995-05-01

    The genetic structure of a population of Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia isolated from a southeastern blackwater stream was investigated by using multilocus enzyme electrophoresis to examine the allelic variation in eight structural gene loci. Overall, 213 isolates were collected at transect points along the stream continuum, from both the sediments along the bank and the water column. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis analysis revealed 164 distinct electrophoretic types, and the mean genetic diversity of the entire population was 0.574. Genetic diversity values did not vary spatially along the stream continuum. From a canonical discriminant analysis, Mahalonobis distances (measurements of genetic similarity between populations) revealed significant differences among the subpopulations at the sediment sampling points, suggesting bacterial adaptation to a heterogeneous (or patchy) microgeographical environment. Multilocus linkage disequilibrium analysis of the isolates revealed only limited association between alleles, suggesting frequent recombination, relative to binary fission, in this population. Furthermore, the dendrogram created from the data of this study and the allele mismatch distribution are typical of a population characterized by extensive genetic mixing. We suggest that B. cepacia be added to the growing list of bacteria that are not obligatorily clonal. 41 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. 2-Naphthoate catabolic pathway in Burkholderia strain JT 1500.

    PubMed

    Morawski, B; Eaton, R W; Rossiter, J T; Guoping, S; Griengl, H; Ribbons, D W

    1997-01-01

    Burkholderia strain (JT 1500), able to use 2-naphthoate as the sole source of carbon, was isolated from soil. On the basis of growth characteristics, oxygen uptake experiments, enzyme assays, and detection of intermediates, a degradation pathway of 2-naphthoate is proposed. The features of this pathway are convergent with those for phenanthrene. We propose a pathway for the conversion of 2-naphthoate to 1 mol (each) of pyruvate, succinate, and acetyl coenzyme A and 2 mol of CO2. During growth in the presence of 2-naphthoate, six metabolites were detected by thin-layer chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, and spectroscopy. 1-Hydroxy-2-naphthoate accumulated in the culture broth during growth on 2-naphthoate. Also, the formation of 2'-carboxybenzalpyruvate, phthalaldehydate, phthalate, protocatechuate, and beta-carboxy-cis,cis-muconic acid was demonstrated. (1R,2S)-cis-1,2-Dihydro-1,2-dihydroxy-2-naphthoate was thus considered an intermediate between 2-naphthoate and 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoate, but it was not transformed by whole cells or their extracts. We conclude that this diol is not responsible for the formation of 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoate from 2-naphthoate but that one of the other three diastereomers is not eliminated as a potential intermediate for a dehydration reaction.

  1. A Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Variant Necessary for Gastric Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Austin, C. R.; Goodyear, A. W.; Bartek, I. L.; Stewart, A.; Sutherland, M. D.; Silva, E. B.; Zweifel, A.; Vitko, N. P.; Tuanyok, A.; Highnam, G.; Mittelman, D.; Keim, P.; Schweizer, H. P.; Vázquez-Torres, A.; Dow, S. W. C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT  Diverse colony morphologies are a hallmark of Burkholderia pseudomallei recovered from infected patients. We observed that stresses that inhibit aerobic respiration shifted populations of B. pseudomallei from the canonical white colony morphotype toward two distinct, reversible, yet relatively stable yellow colony variants (YA and YB). As accumulating evidence supports the importance of B. pseudomallei enteric infection and gastric colonization, we tested the response of yellow variants to hypoxia, acidity, and stomach colonization. Yellow variants exhibited a competitive advantage under hypoxic and acidic conditions and alkalized culture media. The YB variant, although highly attenuated in acute virulence, was the only form capable of colonization and persistence in the murine stomach. The accumulation of extracellular DNA (eDNA) was a characteristic of YB as observed by 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining of gastric tissues, as well as in an in vitro stomach model where large amounts of eDNA were produced without cell lysis. Transposon mutagenesis identified a transcriptional regulator (BPSL1887, designated YelR) that when overexpressed produced the yellow phenotype. Deletion of yelR blocked a shift from white to the yellow forms. These data demonstrate that YB is a unique B. pseudomallei pathovariant controlled by YelR that is specifically adapted to the harsh gastric environment and necessary for persistent stomach colonization. PMID:25650400

  2. Morphological Alteration and Survival of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Soil Microcosms.

    PubMed

    Kamjumphol, Watcharaporn; Chareonsudjai, Pisit; Taweechaisupapong, Suwimol; Chareonsudjai, Sorujsiri

    2015-11-01

    The resilience of Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, was evaluated in control soil microcosms and in soil microcosms containing NaCl or FeSO4 at 30°C. Iron (Fe(II)) promoted the growth of B. pseudomallei during the 30-day observation, contrary to the presence of 1.5% and 3% NaCl. Scanning electron micrographs of B. pseudomallei in soil revealed their morphological alteration from rod to coccoid and the formation of microcolonies. The smallest B. pseudomallei cells were found in soil with 100 μM FeSO4 compared with in the control soil or soil with 0.6% NaCl (P < 0.05). The colony count on Ashdown's agar and bacterial viability assay using the LIVE/DEAD(®) BacLight(™) stain combined with flow cytometry showed that B. pseudomallei remained culturable and viable in the control soil microcosms for at least 120 days. In contrast, soil with 1.5% NaCl affected their culturability at day 90 and their viability at day 120. Our results suggested that a low salinity and iron may influence the survival of B. pseudomallei and its ability to change from a rod-like to coccoid form. The morphological changes of B. pseudomallei cells may be advantageous for their persistence in the environment and may increase the risk of their transmission to humans. PMID:26324731

  3. Evolving serodiagnostics by rationally designed peptide arrays: the Burkholderia paradigm in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Peri, Claudio; Gori, Alessandro; Gagni, Paola; Sola, Laura; Girelli, Daniela; Sottotetti, Samantha; Cariani, Lisa; Chiari, Marcella; Cretich, Marina; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Efficient diagnosis of emerging and novel bacterial infections is fundamental to guide decisions on therapeutic treatments. Here, we engineered a novel rational strategy to design peptide microarray platforms, which combines structural and genomic analyses to predict the binding interfaces between diverse protein antigens and antibodies against Burkholderia cepacia complex infections present in the sera of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. The predicted binding interfaces on the antigens are synthesized in the form of isolated peptides and chemically optimized for controlled orientation on the surface. Our platform displays multiple Burkholderia-related epitopes and is shown to diagnose infected individuals even in presence of superinfections caused by other prevalent CF pathogens, with limited cost and time requirements. Moreover, our data point out that the specific patterns determined by combined probe responses might provide a characterization of Burkholderia infections even at the subtype level (genomovars). The method is general and immediately applicable to other bacteria. PMID:27615705

  4. Evolving serodiagnostics by rationally designed peptide arrays: the Burkholderia paradigm in Cystic Fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peri, Claudio; Gori, Alessandro; Gagni, Paola; Sola, Laura; Girelli, Daniela; Sottotetti, Samantha; Cariani, Lisa; Chiari, Marcella; Cretich, Marina; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-09-01

    Efficient diagnosis of emerging and novel bacterial infections is fundamental to guide decisions on therapeutic treatments. Here, we engineered a novel rational strategy to design peptide microarray platforms, which combines structural and genomic analyses to predict the binding interfaces between diverse protein antigens and antibodies against Burkholderia cepacia complex infections present in the sera of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. The predicted binding interfaces on the antigens are synthesized in the form of isolated peptides and chemically optimized for controlled orientation on the surface. Our platform displays multiple Burkholderia-related epitopes and is shown to diagnose infected individuals even in presence of superinfections caused by other prevalent CF pathogens, with limited cost and time requirements. Moreover, our data point out that the specific patterns determined by combined probe responses might provide a characterization of Burkholderia infections even at the subtype level (genomovars). The method is general and immediately applicable to other bacteria.

  5. Bacterial cell motility of Burkholderia gut symbiont is required to colonize the insect gut.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Beom; Byeon, Jin Hee; Jang, Ho Am; Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Yoo, Jin Wook; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Lee, Bok Luel

    2015-09-14

    We generated a Burkholderia mutant, which is deficient of an N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine amidase, AmiC, involved in peptidoglycan degradation. When non-motile ΔamiC mutant Burkholderia cells harboring chain form were orally administered to Riptortus insects, ΔamiC mutant cells were unable to establish symbiotic association. But, ΔamiC mutant complemented with amiC gene restored in vivo symbiotic association. ΔamiC mutant cultured in minimal medium restored their motility with single-celled morphology. When ΔamiC mutant cells harboring single-celled morphology were administered to the host insect, this mutant established normal symbiotic association, suggesting that bacterial motility is essential for the successful symbiosis between host insect and Burkholderia symbiont.

  6. Evolving serodiagnostics by rationally designed peptide arrays: the Burkholderia paradigm in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Peri, Claudio; Gori, Alessandro; Gagni, Paola; Sola, Laura; Girelli, Daniela; Sottotetti, Samantha; Cariani, Lisa; Chiari, Marcella; Cretich, Marina; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Efficient diagnosis of emerging and novel bacterial infections is fundamental to guide decisions on therapeutic treatments. Here, we engineered a novel rational strategy to design peptide microarray platforms, which combines structural and genomic analyses to predict the binding interfaces between diverse protein antigens and antibodies against Burkholderia cepacia complex infections present in the sera of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. The predicted binding interfaces on the antigens are synthesized in the form of isolated peptides and chemically optimized for controlled orientation on the surface. Our platform displays multiple Burkholderia-related epitopes and is shown to diagnose infected individuals even in presence of superinfections caused by other prevalent CF pathogens, with limited cost and time requirements. Moreover, our data point out that the specific patterns determined by combined probe responses might provide a characterization of Burkholderia infections even at the subtype level (genomovars). The method is general and immediately applicable to other bacteria. PMID:27615705

  7. Evolving serodiagnostics by rationally designed peptide arrays: the Burkholderia paradigm in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Peri, Claudio; Gori, Alessandro; Gagni, Paola; Sola, Laura; Girelli, Daniela; Sottotetti, Samantha; Cariani, Lisa; Chiari, Marcella; Cretich, Marina; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Efficient diagnosis of emerging and novel bacterial infections is fundamental to guide decisions on therapeutic treatments. Here, we engineered a novel rational strategy to design peptide microarray platforms, which combines structural and genomic analyses to predict the binding interfaces between diverse protein antigens and antibodies against Burkholderia cepacia complex infections present in the sera of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. The predicted binding interfaces on the antigens are synthesized in the form of isolated peptides and chemically optimized for controlled orientation on the surface. Our platform displays multiple Burkholderia-related epitopes and is shown to diagnose infected individuals even in presence of superinfections caused by other prevalent CF pathogens, with limited cost and time requirements. Moreover, our data point out that the specific patterns determined by combined probe responses might provide a characterization of Burkholderia infections even at the subtype level (genomovars). The method is general and immediately applicable to other bacteria.

  8. Investigation of quorum sensing-dependent gene expression in Burkholderia gladioli BSR3 through RNA-seq analyses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunyoung; Park, Jungwook; Choi, Okhee; Kim, Jinwoo; Seo, Young-Su

    2014-12-28

    The plant pathogen Burkholderia gladioli, which has a broad host range that includes rice and onion, causes bacterial panicle blight and sheath rot. Based on the complete genome sequence of B. gladioli BSR3 isolated from infected rice sheaths, the genome of B. gladioli BSR3 contains the luxI/luxR family of genes. Members of this family encode N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum sensing (QS) signal synthase and the LuxR-family AHL signal receptor, which are similar to B. glumae BGR1. In B. glumae, QS has been shown to play pivotal roles in many bacterial behaviors. In this study, we compared the QS-dependent gene expression between B. gladioli BSR3 and a QS-defective B. gladioli BSR3 mutant in two different culture states (10 and 24 h after incubation, corresponding to an exponential phase and a stationary phase) using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). RNA-seq analyses including gene ontology and pathway enrichment revealed that the B. gladioli BSR3 QS system regulates genes related to motility, toxin production, and oxalogenesis, which were previously reported in B. glumae. Moreover, the uncharacterized polyketide biosynthesis is activated by QS, which was not detected in B. glumae. Thus, we observed not only common QS-dependent genes between B. glumae BGR1 and B. gladioli BSR3, but also unique QS-dependent genes in B. gladioli BSR3. PMID:25223327

  9. Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei toxin-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis using a Caenorhabditis elegans ugt–29 biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Rui-Rui; Kong, Cin; Lee, Song-Hua; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Toxins are believed to play a crucial role in Burkholderia pseudomallei pathogenicity, however to date, only a few have been identified. The discovery of additional toxic molecules is limited by the lack of a sensitive indicator of B. pseudomallei toxicity. Previously, from a whole genome transcriptome analysis of B. pseudomallei-infected Caenorhabditis elegans, we noted significant overexpression of a number of worm genes encoding detoxification enzymes, indicating the host’s attempt to clear bacterial toxic molecules. One of these genes, ugt–29, a family member of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases, was the most robustly induced phase II detoxification gene. In this study, we show that strong induction of ugt–29 is restricted to infections by the most virulent species among the pathogens tested. We also noted that ugt–29 is activated upon disruption of host protein synthesis. Hence, we propose that UGT–29 could be a promising biosensor to detect B. pseudomallei toxins that compromise host protein synthesis. The identification of bactobolin, a polyketide-peptide hybrid molecule, as a toxic molecule of B. pseudomallei further verifies the utilization of this surveillance system to search for bacterial toxins. Hence, a ugt–29 based reporter should be useful in screening for other molecules that inhibit host protein synthesis. PMID:27273550

  10. Cloning and expression of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene in Burkholderia sp. strain DNT for enhancement of 2,4-dinitrotoluene degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, S.M.; Stark, B.C.; Hwang, K.W.; Dikshit, K.L.; Webster, D.A.

    2000-02-01

    The gene (vgb) encoding the hemoglobin (VHb) of Vitreoscilla sp. was cloned into a broad host range vector and stably transformed into Burkholderia (formerly Pseudomonas) sp. strain DNT, which is able to degrade and metabolize 1,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT). Vgb was stably maintained and expressed in functional form in this recombinant strain (YV1). When growth of YV1, in both tryptic soy broth and minimal salts broth containing DNT and yeast extract, was compared with that of the untransformed strain, YV1 grew significantly better on a cell mass basis (A{sub 600}) and reached slightly higher maximum viable cell numbers. YV1 also had roughly twice the respiration as strain DNT on a cell mass basis, and in DNT-containing medium, YV1 degraded DNT faster than the untransformed strain. YV1 cells pregrown in medium containing DNT plus succinate showed the fastest degradation: 100% of the initial 200 ppm DNT was removed from the medium within 3 days.

  11. Substrate diversity and expression of the 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid oxygenase from Burkholderia cepacia AC1100.

    PubMed Central

    Danganan, C E; Shankar, S; Ye, R W; Chakrabarty, A M

    1995-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia AC1100 uses the chlorinated aromatic compound 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid as a sole source of carbon and energy. The genes encoding the proteins involved in the first step (tftA and tftB [previously designated tftA1 and tftA2, respectively]) have been cloned and sequenced. The oxygenase, TftAB, is capable of converting not only 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid to 2,4,5-trichlorophenol but also a wide range of chlorinated aromatic phenoxyacetates to their corresponding phenolic derivatives, as shown by whole-cell and cell-free assays. The rate of substrate utilization by TftAB depends upon the extent of chlorination of the substrate, the positions of the chlorines, and the phenoxy group. These results indicate a mechanistic similarity between TftAB and the 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid/alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase, TfdA, from Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134. The promoter of the oxygenase genes was localized by promoter-probe analysis, and the transcriptional start site was identified by primer extension. The beta-galactosidase activity of the construct containing the promoter region cloned upstream of the beta-galactosidase gene in the promoter-probe vector pKRZ-1 showed that this construct is constitutively expressed in Escherichia coli and in AC1100. The -35 and -10 regions of the oxygenase genes show significant sequence identity to typical Escherichia coli sigma 70 promoters. PMID:8534119

  12. Construction of a deep-rough mutant of Burkholderia cepacia ATCC 25416 and characterization of its chemical and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Gronow, Sabine; Noah, Christian; Blumenthal, Antje; Lindner, Buko; Brade, Helmut

    2003-01-17

    Burkholderia cepacia is a bacterium with increasing importance as a pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis. The deep-rough mutant Ko2b was generated from B. cepacia type strain ATCC 25416 by insertion of a kanamycin resistance cassette into the gene waaC encoding heptosyltransferase I. Mass spectrometric analysis of the de-O-acylated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the mutant showed that it consisted of a bisphosphorylated glucosamine backbone with two 3-hydroxyhexadecanoic acids in amide-linkage, 4-amino-4-deoxyarabinose (Ara4N) residues on both phosphates, and a core oligosaccharide of the sequence Ara4N-(1 --> 8) D-glycero-D-talo-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Ko)-(2 --> 4)3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo). The mutant allowed investigations on the biosynthesis of the LPS as well as on its role in human infection. Mutant Ko2b showed no difference in its ability to invade human macrophages as compared with the wild type. Furthermore, isolated LPS of both strains induced the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha from macrophages to the same extent. Thus, the truncation of the LPS did not decrease the biological activity of the mutant or its LPS in these aspects.

  13. Hopanoid Production Is Required for Low-pH Tolerance, Antimicrobial Resistance, and Motility in Burkholderia cenocepacia▿†

    PubMed Central

    Schmerk, Crystal L.; Bernards, Mark A.; Valvano, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Hopanoids are pentacyclic triterpenoids that are thought to be bacterial surrogates for eukaryotic sterols, such as cholesterol, acting to stabilize membranes and to regulate their fluidity and permeability. To date, very few studies have evaluated the role of hopanoids in bacterial physiology. The synthesis of hopanoids depends on the enzyme squalene-hopene cyclase (Shc), which converts the linear squalene into the basic hopene structure. Deletion of the 2 genes encoding Shc enzymes in Burkholderia cenocepacia K56-2, BCAM2831 and BCAS0167, resulted in a strain that was unable to produce hopanoids, as demonstrated by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Complementation of the Δshc mutant with only BCAM2831 was sufficient to restore hopanoid production to wild-type levels, while introducing a copy of BCAS0167 alone into the Δshc mutant produced only very small amounts of the hopanoid peak. The Δshc mutant grew as well as the wild type in medium buffered to pH 7 and demonstrated no defect in its ability to survive and replicate within macrophages, despite transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealing defects in the organization of the cell envelope. The Δshc mutant displayed increased sensitivity to low pH, detergent, and various antibiotics, including polymyxin B and erythromycin. Loss of hopanoid production also resulted in severe defects in both swimming and swarming motility. This suggests that hopanoid production plays an important role in the physiology of B. cenocepacia. PMID:21965564

  14. Burkholderia species are the most common and preferred nodulating symbionts of the Piptadenia group (tribe Mimoseae).

    PubMed

    Bournaud, Caroline; de Faria, Sergio Miana; dos Santos, José Miguel Ferreira; Tisseyre, Pierre; Silva, Michele; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Gross, Eduardo; James, Euan K; Prin, Yves; Moulin, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia legume symbionts (also called α-rhizobia) are ancient in origin and are the main nitrogen-fixing symbionts of species belonging to the large genus Mimosa in Brazil. We investigated the extent of the affinity between Burkholderia and species in the tribe Mimoseae by studying symbionts of the genera Piptadenia (P.), Parapiptadenia (Pp.), Pseudopiptadenia (Ps.), Pityrocarpa (Py.), Anadenanthera (A.) and Microlobius (Mi.), all of which are native to Brazil and are phylogenetically close to Mimosa, and which together with Mimosa comprise the "Piptadenia group". We characterized 196 strains sampled from 18 species from 17 locations in Brazil using two neutral markers and two symbiotic genes in order to assess their species affiliations and the evolution of their symbiosis genes. We found that Burkholderia are common and highly diversified symbionts of species in the Piptadenia group, comprising nine Burkholderia species, of which three are new ones and one was never reported as symbiotic (B. phenoliruptrix). However, α-rhizobia were also detected and were occasionally dominant on a few species. A strong sampling site effect on the rhizobial nature of symbionts was detected, with the symbiont pattern of the same legume species changing drastically from location to location, even switching from β to α-rhizobia. Coinoculation assays showed a strong affinity of all the Piptadenia group species towards Burkholderia genotypes, with the exception of Mi. foetidus. Phylogenetic analyses of neutral and symbiotic markers showed that symbiosis genes in Burkholderia from the Piptadenia group have evolved mainly through vertical transfer, but also by horizontal transfer in two species.

  15. Burkholderia Species Are the Most Common and Preferred Nodulating Symbionts of the Piptadenia Group (Tribe Mimoseae)

    PubMed Central

    Bournaud, Caroline; de Faria, Sergio Miana; dos Santos, José Miguel Ferreira; Tisseyre, Pierre; Silva, Michele; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Gross, Eduardo; James, Euan K.; Prin, Yves; Moulin, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia legume symbionts (also called α-rhizobia) are ancient in origin and are the main nitrogen-fixing symbionts of species belonging to the large genus Mimosa in Brazil. We investigated the extent of the affinity between Burkholderia and species in the tribe Mimoseae by studying symbionts of the genera Piptadenia (P.), Parapiptadenia (Pp.), Pseudopiptadenia (Ps.), Pityrocarpa (Py.), Anadenanthera (A.) and Microlobius (Mi.), all of which are native to Brazil and are phylogenetically close to Mimosa, and which together with Mimosa comprise the “Piptadenia group”. We characterized 196 strains sampled from 18 species from 17 locations in Brazil using two neutral markers and two symbiotic genes in order to assess their species affiliations and the evolution of their symbiosis genes. We found that Burkholderia are common and highly diversified symbionts of species in the Piptadenia group, comprising nine Burkholderia species, of which three are new ones and one was never reported as symbiotic (B. phenoliruptrix). However, α-rhizobia were also detected and were occasionally dominant on a few species. A strong sampling site effect on the rhizobial nature of symbionts was detected, with the symbiont pattern of the same legume species changing drastically from location to location, even switching from β to α-rhizobia. Coinoculation assays showed a strong affinity of all the Piptadenia group species towards Burkholderia genotypes, with the exception of Mi. foetidus. Phylogenetic analyses of neutral and symbiotic markers showed that symbiosis genes in Burkholderia from the Piptadenia group have evolved mainly through vertical transfer, but also by horizontal transfer in two species. PMID:23691052

  16. Burkholderia, a genus rich in plant-associated nitrogen fixers with wide environmental and geographic distribution.

    PubMed

    Estrada-De Los Santos, P; Bustillos-Cristales, R; Caballero-Mellado, J

    2001-06-01

    The genus Burkholderia comprises 19 species, including Burkholderia vietnamiensis which is the only known N(2)-fixing species of this bacterial genus. The first isolates of B. vietnamiensis were recovered from the rhizosphere of rice plants grown in a phytotron, but its existence in natural environments and its geographic distribution were not reported. In the present study, most N(2)-fixing isolates recovered from the environment of field-grown maize and coffee plants cultivated in widely separated regions of Mexico were phenotypically identified as B. cepacia using the API 20NE system. Nevertheless, a number of these isolates recovered from inside of maize roots, as well as from the rhizosphere and rhizoplane of maize and coffee plants, showed similar or identical features to those of B. vietnamiensis TVV75(T). These features include nitrogenase activity with 10 different carbon sources, identical or very similar nifHDK hybridization patterns, very similar protein electrophoregrams, identical amplified 16S rDNA restriction (ARDRA) profiles, and levels of DNA-DNA reassociation higher than 70% with total DNA from strain TVV75(T). Although the ability to fix N(2) is not reported to be a common feature among the known species of the genus Burkholderia, the results obtained show that many diazotrophic Burkholderia isolates analyzed showed phenotypic and genotypic features different from those of the known N(2)-fixing species B. vietnamiensis as well as from those of B. kururiensis, a bacterium identified in the present study as a diazotrophic species. DNA-DNA reassociation assays confirmed the existence of N(2)-fixing Burkholderia species different from B. vietnamiensis. In addition, this study shows the wide geographic distribution and substantial capability of N(2)-fixing Burkholderia spp. for colonizing diverse host plants in distantly separated environments. PMID:11375196

  17. Burkholderia ginsengiterrae sp. nov. and Burkholderia panaciterrae sp. nov., antagonistic bacteria against root rot pathogen Cylindrocarpon destructans, isolated from ginseng soil.

    PubMed

    Farh, Mohamed El-Agamy; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Van An, Hoang; Sukweenadhi, Johan; Singh, Priyanka; Huq, Md Amdadul; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2015-04-01

    Strain DCY85(T) and DCY85-1(T), isolated from rhizosphere of ginseng, were rod-shaped, Gram-reaction-negative, strictly aerobic, catalase positive and oxidase negative. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain DCY85(T) as well as DCY85-1(T) belonged to the genus Burkholderia and were closely related to Burkholderia fungorum KACC 12023(T) (98.1 and 98.0 % similarity, respectively). The major polar lipids of strain DCY85(T) and DCY85-1(T) were phosphatidylethanolamine, one unidentified aminolipid and two unidentified phospholipids. The major fatty acids of both strains are C16:0, C18:1 ω7c and summed feature 3 (C16:1 ω6c and/or C16:1 ω7c). The predominant isoprenoid quinone of each strain DCY85(T) and DCY85-1(T) was ubiquinone (Q-8) and the G+C content of their genomic DNA was 66.0 and 59.4 mol%, respectively, which fulfill the characteristic range of the genus Burkholderia. The polyamine content of both DCY85(T) and DCY85-1(T) was putrescine. Although both DCY85(T) and DCY85-1(T) have highly similar 16S rRNA and identical RecA and gyrB sequences, they show differences in phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics. DNA-DNA hybridization results proved the consideration of both strains as two different species. Based on the results from our polyphasic characterization, strain DCY85(T) and DCY85-1(T) are considered novel Burkholderia species for which the name Burkholderia ginsengiterrae sp. nov and Burkholderia panaciterrae sp. nov are, respectively, proposed. An emended description of those strains is also proposed. DCY85(T) and DCY85-1(T) showed antagonistic activity against the common root rot pathogen of ginseng, Cylindrocarpon destructans. The proposed type strains are DCY85(T) (KCTC 42054(T) = JCM 19888(T)) and DCY85-1(T) (KCTC 42055(T) = JCM 19889(T)). PMID:25537097

  18. Burkholderia ginsengiterrae sp. nov. and Burkholderia panaciterrae sp. nov., antagonistic bacteria against root rot pathogen Cylindrocarpon destructans, isolated from ginseng soil.

    PubMed

    Farh, Mohamed El-Agamy; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Van An, Hoang; Sukweenadhi, Johan; Singh, Priyanka; Huq, Md Amdadul; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2015-04-01

    Strain DCY85(T) and DCY85-1(T), isolated from rhizosphere of ginseng, were rod-shaped, Gram-reaction-negative, strictly aerobic, catalase positive and oxidase negative. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain DCY85(T) as well as DCY85-1(T) belonged to the genus Burkholderia and were closely related to Burkholderia fungorum KACC 12023(T) (98.1 and 98.0 % similarity, respectively). The major polar lipids of strain DCY85(T) and DCY85-1(T) were phosphatidylethanolamine, one unidentified aminolipid and two unidentified phospholipids. The major fatty acids of both strains are C16:0, C18:1 ω7c and summed feature 3 (C16:1 ω6c and/or C16:1 ω7c). The predominant isoprenoid quinone of each strain DCY85(T) and DCY85-1(T) was ubiquinone (Q-8) and the G+C content of their genomic DNA was 66.0 and 59.4 mol%, respectively, which fulfill the characteristic range of the genus Burkholderia. The polyamine content of both DCY85(T) and DCY85-1(T) was putrescine. Although both DCY85(T) and DCY85-1(T) have highly similar 16S rRNA and identical RecA and gyrB sequences, they show differences in phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics. DNA-DNA hybridization results proved the consideration of both strains as two different species. Based on the results from our polyphasic characterization, strain DCY85(T) and DCY85-1(T) are considered novel Burkholderia species for which the name Burkholderia ginsengiterrae sp. nov and Burkholderia panaciterrae sp. nov are, respectively, proposed. An emended description of those strains is also proposed. DCY85(T) and DCY85-1(T) showed antagonistic activity against the common root rot pathogen of ginseng, Cylindrocarpon destructans. The proposed type strains are DCY85(T) (KCTC 42054(T) = JCM 19888(T)) and DCY85-1(T) (KCTC 42055(T) = JCM 19889(T)).

  19. Solubilization of insoluble inorganic phosphate by Burkholderia cepacia DA23 isolated from cultivated soil

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ok-Ryul; Lee, Seung-Jin; Lee, Yong-Seok; Lee, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Keun-Ki; Choi, Yong-Lark

    2008-01-01

    A mineral phosphate solubilizing bacterium, Burkholderia cepacia DA23 has been isolated from cultivated soils. Phosphate-solubilizing activities of the strain against three types of insoluble phosphate were quantitatively determined. When 3% of glucose concentration was used for carbon source, the strain had a marked mineral phosphate-solubilizing activity. Mineral phosphate solubilization was directly related to the pH drop by the strain. Analysis of the culture medium by high pressure liquid chromatography identified gluconic acid as the main organic acid released by Burkholderia cepacia DA23. Gluconic acid production was apparently the result of the glucose dehydrogenase activity and glucose dehydrogenase was affected by phosphate regulation. PMID:24031195

  20. Transcriptional response of Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 sessile cells to treatments with high doses of hydrogen peroxide and sodium hypochlorite

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria are opportunistic pathogens, which can cause severe respiratory tract infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). As treatment of infected CF patients is problematic, multiple preventive measures are taken to reduce the infection risk. Besides a stringent segregation policy to prevent patient-to-patient transmission, clinicians also advise patients to clean and disinfect their respiratory equipment on a regular basis. However, problems regarding the efficacy of several disinfection procedures for the removal and/or killing of B. cepacia complex bacteria have been reported. In order to unravel the molecular mechanisms involved in the resistance of biofilm-grown Burkholderia cenocepacia cells against high concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the present study focussed on the transcriptional response in sessile B. cenocepacia J2315 cells following exposure to high levels of H2O2 or NaOCl. Results The exposure to H2O2 and NaOCl resulted in an upregulation of the transcription of 315 (4.4%) and 386 (5.4%) genes, respectively. Transcription of 185 (2.6%) and 331 (4.6%) genes was decreased in response to the respective treatments. Many of the upregulated genes in the NaOCl- and H2O2-treated biofilms are involved in oxidative stress as well as general stress response, emphasizing the importance of the efficient neutralization and scavenging of ROS. In addition, multiple upregulated genes encode proteins that are necessary to repair ROS-induced cellular damage. Unexpectedly, a prolonged treatment with H2O2 also resulted in an increased transcription of multiple phage-related genes. A closer inspection of hybridisation signals obtained with probes targeting intergenic regions led to the identification of a putative 6S RNA. Conclusion Our results reveal that the transcription of a large fraction of B. cenocepacia J2315 genes is altered upon exposure of sessile cells to ROS. These observations have highlighted

  1. Miniaturised optical encoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, John; Desmulliez, Marc P. Y.; Weston, Nick; McKendrick, David; Cunningham, Graeme; McFarland, Geoff; Meredith, Wyn; McKee, Andrew; Langton, Conrad; Eddie, Iain

    2008-08-01

    Optical encoders are pervasive in many sectors of industry including metrology, motion systems, electronics, medical, scanning/ printing, scientific instruments, space research and specialist machine tools. The precision of automated manufacture and assembly has been revolutionised by the adoption of optical diffractive measurement methods. Today's optical encoders comprise discrete components: light source(s), reference and analyser gratings, and a photodiode array that utilise diffractive optic methods to achieve high resolution. However the critical alignment requirements between the optical gratings and to the photodiode array, the bulky nature of the encoder devices and subsequent packaging mean that optical encoders can be prohibitively expensive for many applications and unsuitable for others. We report here on the design, manufacture and test of a miniaturised optical encoder to be used in precision measurement systems. Microsystems manufacturing techniques facilitate the monolithic integration of the traditional encoder components onto a single compound semiconductor chip, radically reducing the size, cost and set-up time. Fabrication of the gratings at the wafer level, by standard photo-lithography, allows for the simultaneous alignment of many devices in a single process step. This development coupled with a unique photodiode configuration not only provides increased performance but also significantly improves the alignment tolerances in both manufacture and set-up. A National Research and Development Corporation type optical encoder chip has been successfully demonstrated under test conditions on both amplitude and phase scales with pitches of 20 micron, 8 micron and 4 micron, showing significantly relaxed alignment tolerances with signal-to-noise ratios greater than 60:1. Various reference mark schemes have also been investigated. Results are presented here.

  2. Nematode Peptides with Host-Directed Anti-inflammatory Activity Rescue Caenorhabditis elegans from a Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mei-Perng; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is among a growing number of bacterial pathogens that are increasingly antibiotic resistant. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been investigated as an alternative approach to treat microbial infections, as generally, there is a lower likelihood that a pathogen will develop resistance to AMPs. In this study, 36 candidate Caenorhabditis elegans genes that encode secreted peptides of <150 amino acids and previously shown to be overexpressed during infection by B. pseudomallei were identified from the expression profile of infected nematodes. RNA interference (RNAi)-based knockdown of 12/34 peptide-encoding genes resulted in enhanced nematode susceptibility to B. pseudomallei without affecting worm fitness. A microdilution test demonstrated that two peptides, NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3, exhibited anti-B. pseudomallei activity in a dose dependent manner on different pathogens. Time kill analysis proposed that these peptides were bacteriostatic against B. pseudomallei at concentrations up to 8× MIC90. The SYTOX green assay demonstrated that NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3 did not disrupt the B. pseudomallei membrane. Instead, gel retardation assays revealed that both peptides were able to bind to DNA and interfere with bacterial viability. In parallel, microscopic examination showed induction of cellular filamentation, a hallmark of DNA synthesis inhibition, of NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3 treated cells. In addition, the peptides also regulated the expression of inflammatory cytokines in B. pseudomallei infected macrophage cells. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the potential of NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3 as anti-B. pseudomallei peptides based on their function as immune modulators. PMID:27672387

  3. Nematode Peptides with Host-Directed Anti-inflammatory Activity Rescue Caenorhabditis elegans from a Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Mei-Perng; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is among a growing number of bacterial pathogens that are increasingly antibiotic resistant. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been investigated as an alternative approach to treat microbial infections, as generally, there is a lower likelihood that a pathogen will develop resistance to AMPs. In this study, 36 candidate Caenorhabditis elegans genes that encode secreted peptides of <150 amino acids and previously shown to be overexpressed during infection by B. pseudomallei were identified from the expression profile of infected nematodes. RNA interference (RNAi)-based knockdown of 12/34 peptide-encoding genes resulted in enhanced nematode susceptibility to B. pseudomallei without affecting worm fitness. A microdilution test demonstrated that two peptides, NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3, exhibited anti-B. pseudomallei activity in a dose dependent manner on different pathogens. Time kill analysis proposed that these peptides were bacteriostatic against B. pseudomallei at concentrations up to 8× MIC90. The SYTOX green assay demonstrated that NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3 did not disrupt the B. pseudomallei membrane. Instead, gel retardation assays revealed that both peptides were able to bind to DNA and interfere with bacterial viability. In parallel, microscopic examination showed induction of cellular filamentation, a hallmark of DNA synthesis inhibition, of NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3 treated cells. In addition, the peptides also regulated the expression of inflammatory cytokines in B. pseudomallei infected macrophage cells. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the potential of NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3 as anti-B. pseudomallei peptides based on their function as immune modulators.

  4. Nematode Peptides with Host-Directed Anti-inflammatory Activity Rescue Caenorhabditis elegans from a Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mei-Perng; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is among a growing number of bacterial pathogens that are increasingly antibiotic resistant. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been investigated as an alternative approach to treat microbial infections, as generally, there is a lower likelihood that a pathogen will develop resistance to AMPs. In this study, 36 candidate Caenorhabditis elegans genes that encode secreted peptides of <150 amino acids and previously shown to be overexpressed during infection by B. pseudomallei were identified from the expression profile of infected nematodes. RNA interference (RNAi)-based knockdown of 12/34 peptide-encoding genes resulted in enhanced nematode susceptibility to B. pseudomallei without affecting worm fitness. A microdilution test demonstrated that two peptides, NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3, exhibited anti-B. pseudomallei activity in a dose dependent manner on different pathogens. Time kill analysis proposed that these peptides were bacteriostatic against B. pseudomallei at concentrations up to 8× MIC90. The SYTOX green assay demonstrated that NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3 did not disrupt the B. pseudomallei membrane. Instead, gel retardation assays revealed that both peptides were able to bind to DNA and interfere with bacterial viability. In parallel, microscopic examination showed induction of cellular filamentation, a hallmark of DNA synthesis inhibition, of NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3 treated cells. In addition, the peptides also regulated the expression of inflammatory cytokines in B. pseudomallei infected macrophage cells. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the potential of NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3 as anti-B. pseudomallei peptides based on their function as immune modulators.

  5. Nematode Peptides with Host-Directed Anti-inflammatory Activity Rescue Caenorhabditis elegans from a Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Mei-Perng; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is among a growing number of bacterial pathogens that are increasingly antibiotic resistant. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been investigated as an alternative approach to treat microbial infections, as generally, there is a lower likelihood that a pathogen will develop resistance to AMPs. In this study, 36 candidate Caenorhabditis elegans genes that encode secreted peptides of <150 amino acids and previously shown to be overexpressed during infection by B. pseudomallei were identified from the expression profile of infected nematodes. RNA interference (RNAi)-based knockdown of 12/34 peptide-encoding genes resulted in enhanced nematode susceptibility to B. pseudomallei without affecting worm fitness. A microdilution test demonstrated that two peptides, NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3, exhibited anti-B. pseudomallei activity in a dose dependent manner on different pathogens. Time kill analysis proposed that these peptides were bacteriostatic against B. pseudomallei at concentrations up to 8× MIC90. The SYTOX green assay demonstrated that NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3 did not disrupt the B. pseudomallei membrane. Instead, gel retardation assays revealed that both peptides were able to bind to DNA and interfere with bacterial viability. In parallel, microscopic examination showed induction of cellular filamentation, a hallmark of DNA synthesis inhibition, of NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3 treated cells. In addition, the peptides also regulated the expression of inflammatory cytokines in B. pseudomallei infected macrophage cells. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the potential of NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3 as anti-B. pseudomallei peptides based on their function as immune modulators. PMID:27672387

  6. Production of p-hydroxybenzoic acid from p-coumaric acid by Burkholderia glumae BGR1.

    PubMed

    Jung, Da-Hye; Kim, Eun-Jung; Jung, Eunok; Kazlauskas, Romas J; Choi, Kwon-Young; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2016-07-01

    p-Coumaric acid (pCA) is abundant in biomass with low lignin content, such as straw and stubble from rye, wheat, and barley. pCA can be isolated from biomass and used for the synthesis of aromatic hydrocarbons. Here, we report engineering of the natural pathway for conversion of pCA into p-hydroxybenzoic acid (pHBA) to increase the amount of pHBA that accumulates more than 100-fold. Burkholderia glumae strain BGR1 (BGR1) grows efficiently on pCA as a sole carbon source via a CoA-dependent non-β-oxidation pathway. This pathway removes two carbons from pCA as acetyl-CoA yielding p-hydroxybenzaldehyde and subsequently oxidizes it to pHBA. To increase the amount of accumulated pHBA in BGR1, we first deleted two genes encoding enzymes that degrade pHBA in the β-ketoadipate pathway. At 10 mM of pCA, the double deletion mutant BGR1_PB4 (Δphb3hΔbcl) accumulated pHBA with 95% conversion, while the control BGR1 accumulated only with 11.2% conversion. When a packed bed reactor containing immobilized BGR1_PB4 cells was operated at a dilution rate 0.2 h(-1) , the productivity of pHBA was achieved at 9.27 mg/L/h for 134 h. However, in a batch reactor at 20 mM pCA, growth of BGR1_PB4 was strongly inhibited, resulting in a low conversion of 19.3%. To further increase the amount of accumulated pCA, we identified the first enzyme in the pathway, p-hydroxcinnmaoyl-CoA synthetase II (phcs II), as the rate-limiting enzyme. Over expression of phcs II using a Palk promoter in a batch reaction at 20 mM of pCA yielded 99.0% conversion to pHBA, which is the highest concentration of pHBA ever reported using a biological process. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1493-1503. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26693833

  7. Less is more: Burkholderia pseudomallei and chronic melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Tannistha; Tan, Patrick

    2013-09-24

    The Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a serious infectious disease of humans and animals. Once considered an esoteric tropical disease confined to Southeast Asia and northern Australia, research on B. pseudomallei has recently gained global prominence due to its classification as a potential bioterrorism agent by countries such as the United States and also by increasing numbers of case reports from regions where it is not endemic. An environmental bacterium typically found in soil and water, assessing the true global prevalence of melioidosis is challenged by the fact that clinical symptoms associated with B. pseudomallei infection are extremely varied and may be confused with diverse conditions such as lung cancer, tuberculosis, or Staphyloccocus aureus infection. These diagnostic challenges, coupled with lack of awareness among clinicians, have likely contributed to underdiagnosis and the high mortality rate of melioidosis, as initial treatment is often either inappropriate or delayed. Even after antibiotic treatment, relapses are frequent, and after resolution of acute symptoms, chronic melioidosis can also occur, and the symptoms can persist for months to years. In a recent article, Price et al. [mBio 4(4):e00388-13, 2013, doi:10.1128/mBio.00388-13] demonstrate how comparative genomic sequencing can reveal the repertoire of genetic changes incurred by B. pseudomallei during chronic human infection. Their results have significant clinical ramifications and highlight B. pseudomallei's ability to survive in a wide range of potential niches within hosts, through the acquisition of genetic adaptations that optimize fitness and resource utilization.

  8. Genomic islands from five strains of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Tuanyok, Apichai; Leadem, Benjamin R; Auerbach, Raymond K; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M; Beckstrom-Sternberg, James S; Mayo, Mark; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Brettin, Thomas S; Nierman, William C; Peacock, Sharon J; Currie, Bart J; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is the etiologic agent of melioidosis, a significant cause of morbidity and mortality where this infection is endemic. Genomic differences among strains of B. pseudomallei are predicted to be one of the major causes of the diverse clinical manifestations observed among patients with melioidosis. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of genomic islands (GIs) as sources of genomic diversity in this species. Results We found that genomic islands (GIs) vary greatly among B. pseudomallei strains. We identified 71 distinct GIs from the genome sequences of five reference strains of B. pseudomallei: K96243, 1710b, 1106a, MSHR668, and MSHR305. The genomic positions of these GIs are not random, as many of them are associated with tRNA gene loci. In particular, the 3' end sequences of tRNA genes are predicted to be involved in the integration of GIs. We propose the term "tRNA-mediated site-specific recombination" (tRNA-SSR) for this mechanism. In addition, we provide a GI nomenclature that is based upon integration hotspots identified here or previously described. Conclusion Our data suggest that acquisition of GIs is one of the major sources of genomic diversity within B. pseudomallei and the molecular mechanisms that facilitate horizontally-acquired GIs are common across multiple strains of B. pseudomallei. The differential presence of the 71 GIs across multiple strains demonstrates the importance of these mobile elements for shaping the genetic composition of individual strains and populations within this bacterial species. PMID:19038032

  9. Investigation of the multifaceted iron acquisition strategies of Burkholderia cenocepacia.

    PubMed

    Tyrrell, J; Whelan, N; Wright, C; Sá-Correia, I; McClean, S; Thomas, M; Callaghan, Máire

    2015-04-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is a bacterial pathogen which causes severe respiratory infections in cystic fibrosis (CF). These studies were aimed at gaining an insight into the iron acquisition strategies of B. cenocepacia. In iron restricted conditions, genes associated with the synthesis and utilisation of ornibactin (pvdA, orbA, orb F) were significantly upregulated compared to the expression of pyochelin associated genes (pchD, fptA). In the absence of alternative iron sources, B. cenocepacia J2315 and 715j utilised ferritin and haemin, but not transferrin or lactoferrin for growth. Significantly, mutants unable to produce ornibactin, (715j-orbI) or ornibactin and pyochelin, (715j-pobA), utilised haemin and ferritin more efficiently than the wild-type. Moreover, both mutants were also able to utilise lactoferrin for growth (P ≤ 0.01) and additionally 715j-pobA utilised transferrin (P ≤ 0.01), potentially facilitating adaptation to the host environment. Furthermore, B. cenocepacia increased ornibactin gene expression in response to pyoverdine from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P ≤ 0.01), demonstrating the capacity to compete for iron in co-colonised niches. Pyoverdine also significantly diminished the growth of B. cenocepacia (P < 0.001) which was related to its iron chelating activity. In a study of three B. cenocepacia sequential clonal isolates obtained from a CF patient over a 3.5 year period, ornibactin upregulation in response to pyoverdine was less pronounced in the last isolate compared to the earlier isolates, as was growth in the presence of haemin and ferritin, indicating alternative iron acquisition mechanism(s) may dominate as chronic infection progresses. These data demonstrate the multifaceted iron acquisition strategies of B. cenocepacia and their capacity to be differentially activated in the presence of P. aeruginosa and during chronic infection. PMID:25725797

  10. Burkholderia pseudomallei Capsular Polysaccharide Conjugates Provide Protection against Acute Melioidosis

    PubMed Central

    Burtnick, Mary N.; Stokes, Margaret G. M.; Whelan, Adam O.; Williamson, E. Diane; Atkins, Timothy P.; Prior, Joann L.; Brett, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiologic agent of melioidosis, is a CDC tier 1 select agent that causes severe disease in both humans and animals. Diagnosis and treatment of melioidosis can be challenging, and in the absence of optimal chemotherapeutic intervention, acute disease is frequently fatal. Melioidosis is an emerging infectious disease for which there are currently no licensed vaccines. Due to the potential malicious use of B. pseudomallei as well as its impact on public health in regions where the disease is endemic, there is significant interest in developing vaccines for immunization against this disease. In the present study, type A O-polysaccharide (OPS) and manno-heptose capsular polysaccharide (CPS) antigens were isolated from nonpathogenic, select-agent-excluded strains of B. pseudomallei and covalently linked to carrier proteins. By using these conjugates (OPS2B1 and CPS2B1, respectively), it was shown that although high-titer IgG responses against the OPS or CPS component of the glycoconjugates could be raised in BALB/c mice, only those animals immunized with CPS2B1 were protected against intraperitoneal challenge with B. pseudomallei. Extending upon these studies, it was also demonstrated that when the mice were immunized with a combination of CPS2B1 and recombinant B. pseudomallei LolC, rather than with CPS2B1 or LolC individually, they exhibited higher survival rates when challenged with a lethal dose of B. pseudomallei. Collectively, these results suggest that CPS-based glycoconjugates are promising candidates for the development of subunit vaccines for immunization against melioidosis. PMID:24866807

  11. In vitro activity of BAL30072 against Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Mima, Takehiko; Kvitko, Brian H; Rholl, Drew A; Page, Malcolm G P; Desarbre, Eric; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2011-08-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an intrinsically antibiotic-resistant Category B priority pathogen and the aetiological agent of melioidosis. Treatment of B. pseudomallei infection is biphasic and lengthy in order to combat the acute and chronic phases of the disease. Acute-phase treatment preferably involves an intravenous cephalosporin (ceftazidime) or a carbapenem (imipenem or meropenem). In this study, the anti-B. pseudomallei efficacy of a new monosulfactam, BAL30072, was tested against laboratory strains 1026b and 1710b and several isogenic mutant derivatives as well as a collection of clinical and environmental B. pseudomallei strains from Thailand. More than 93% of the isolates had minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) in the range 0.004-0.016 μg/mL. For the laboratory strain 1026b, the MIC of BAL30072 was 0.008 μg/mL, comparable with the MICs of 1.5 μg/mL for ceftazidime, 0.5 μg/mL for imipenem and 1 μg/mL for meropenem. Time-kill curves revealed that BAL30072 was rapidly bactericidal, killing >99% of bacteria in 2 h. BAL30072 activity was not significantly affected by efflux, it was only a marginal substrate of PenA β-lactamase, and activity was independent of malleobactin production and transport and the ability to transport pyochelin. In summary, BAL30072 has superior in vitro activity against B. pseudomallei compared with ceftazidime, meropenem or imipenem and it is rapidly bactericidal. PMID:21596528

  12. Construction and characterization of stable, constitutively expressed, chromosomal green and red fluorescent transcriptional fusions in the select agents, Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Burkholderia mallei, and Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shengchang; Bangar, Hansraj; Saldanha, Roland; Pemberton, Adin; Aronow, Bruce; Dean, Gary E; Lamkin, Thomas J; Hassett, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Here, we constructed stable, chromosomal, constitutively expressed, green and red fluorescent protein (GFP and RFP) as reporters in the select agents, Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Burkholderia mallei, and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Using bioinformatic approaches and other experimental analyses, we identified P0253 and P1 as potent promoters that drive the optimal expression of fluorescent reporters in single copy in B. anthracis and Burkholderia spp. as well as their surrogate strains, respectively. In comparison, Y. pestis and its surrogate strain need two chromosomal copies of cysZK promoter (P2cysZK) for optimal fluorescence. The P0253-, P2cysZK-, and P1-driven GFP and RFP fusions were first cloned into the vectors pRP1028, pUC18R6KT-mini-Tn7T-Km, pmini-Tn7-gat, or their derivatives. The resultant constructs were delivered into the respective surrogates and subsequently into the select agent strains. The chromosomal GFP- and RFP-tagged strains exhibited bright fluorescence at an exposure time of less than 200 msec and displayed the same virulence traits as their wild-type parental strains. The utility of the tagged strains was proven by the macrophage infection assays and lactate dehydrogenase release analysis. Such strains will be extremely useful in high-throughput screens for novel compounds that could either kill these organisms, or interfere with critical virulence processes in these important bioweapon agents and during infection of alveolar macrophages. PMID:25044501

  13. Construction and characterization of stable, constitutively expressed, chromosomal green and red fluorescent transcriptional fusions in the select agents, Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Burkholderia mallei, and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Su, Shengchang; Bangar, Hansraj; Saldanha, Roland; Pemberton, Adin; Aronow, Bruce; Dean, Gary E; Lamkin, Thomas J; Hassett, Daniel J

    2014-10-01

    Here, we constructed stable, chromosomal, constitutively expressed, green and red fluorescent protein (GFP and RFP) as reporters in the select agents, Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Burkholderia mallei, and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Using bioinformatic approaches and other experimental analyses, we identified P0253 and P1 as potent promoters that drive the optimal expression of fluorescent reporters in single copy in B. anthracis and Burkholderia spp. as well as their surrogate strains, respectively. In comparison, Y. pestis and its surrogate strain need two chromosomal copies of cysZK promoter (P2cysZK) for optimal fluorescence. The P0253-, P2cysZK-, and P1-driven GFP and RFP fusions were first cloned into the vectors pRP1028, pUC18R6KT-mini-Tn7T-Km, pmini-Tn7-gat, or their derivatives. The resultant constructs were delivered into the respective surrogates and subsequently into the select agent strains. The chromosomal GFP- and RFP-tagged strains exhibited bright fluorescence at an exposure time of less than 200 msec and displayed the same virulence traits as their wild-type parental strains. The utility of the tagged strains was proven by the macrophage infection assays and lactate dehydrogenase release analysis. Such strains will be extremely useful in high-throughput screens for novel compounds that could either kill these organisms, or interfere with critical virulence processes in these important bioweapon agents and during infection of alveolar macrophages.

  14. Polarization encoded color camera.

    PubMed

    Schonbrun, Ethan; Möller, Guðfríður; Di Caprio, Giuseppe

    2014-03-15

    Digital cameras would be colorblind if they did not have pixelated color filters integrated into their image sensors. Integration of conventional fixed filters, however, comes at the expense of an inability to modify the camera's spectral properties. Instead, we demonstrate a micropolarizer-based camera that can reconfigure its spectral response. Color is encoded into a linear polarization state by a chiral dispersive element and then read out in a single exposure. The polarization encoded color camera is capable of capturing three-color images at wavelengths spanning the visible to the near infrared. PMID:24690806

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia cenocepacia Strain 869T2, a Plant-Beneficial Endophytic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ying-Ning

    2015-01-01

    An endophytic bacterium, Burkholderia cenocepacia 869T2, isolated from vetiver grass, has shown its abilities for both in planta biocontrol and plant growth promotion. Its draft genome sequence was determined to provide insights into those metabolic pathways involved in plant-beneficial activity. This is the first genome report for endophytic B. cenocepacia. PMID:26564046

  16. [In vitro antibiotic susceptibility compliance with efficacy of chemotherapy in infections due to pathogenic Burkholderias].

    PubMed

    Iliukhin, V I; Senina, T V; Trushkina, M N; Shubnikova, E V; Antonov, Iu V; Andropova, N V

    2009-01-01

    Among the known species of Burkholderia only two are obligate pathogens, i.e., B. mallei and B. pseudomallei, causative agents of glanders and melioidosis respectively. The other species are saprophytes as natural inhabitants of water reservoirs and soil, still capable of causing opportunistic infections in humans and animals under definite conditions. All the species of Burkholderia are characterized by high resistance to antibacterials, including antibiotics. By the MICs, the most efficient chemotherapeutics against pathogenic burkholderias are tetracyclines, fluoroquinolones, penems and combined sulfanilamides. In the treatment of experimental glanders and melioidosis the set of the effective drugs had the inverse variation dependence on the infection severity and the desease process rate. Co-trimoxasole showed the best results, then followed doxicycline, ciprofioxacin and ceftazidime in the diminishing succession. The modification of the method for determination of antibiotic susceptibility with addition of native blood to the medium and the subculture under the atmosphere of 5% CO2 was shown useful in estimation of the prospects of the use of chemotherapeutics for the treatment of Burkholderia infections. PMID:20201399

  17. Antimicrobial Properties of an Oxidizer Produced by Burkholderia cenocepacia P525

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A compound with both oxidizing properties and antibiotic properties was extracted and purified from broth cultures of Burkholderia cenocepacia strain P525. A four step purification procedure was used to increase its specific activity ~ 400 fold and to yield a HPLC- UV chromatogram containing a sing...

  18. NOVEL ORGANIZATION OF THE GENES FOR PHTHALATE DEGRADATION FROM BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA DBO1

    EPA Science Inventory

    Burkholderia cepacia DBO1 is able to utilize phthalate as the sole source of carbon and energy for growth. Two overlapping cosmid clones containing the genes for phthalate degradation were isolated from this strain. Subcloning and activity analysis localized the genes for phthala...

  19. The relationship of biofilm production to biocontrol activity of Burkholderia pyrrocinia FP62

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foliar biocontrol agent (BCA) efficacy is often inconsistent due to poor colonization and survival on plant surfaces. Burkholderia pyrrocinia FP62, a superior leaf colonist and BCA of Botrytis cinerea, forms unsaturated biofilms on plant surfaces. To determine the relationship between biocontrol act...

  20. Burkholderia aspalathi sp. nov., isolated from root nodules of the South African legume Aspalathus abietina Thunb.

    PubMed

    Mavengere, Natasha R; Ellis, Allan G; Le Roux, Johannes J

    2014-06-01

    During a study to investigate the diversity of rhizobia associated with native legumes in South Africa's Cape Floristic Region, a Gram-negative bacterium designated VG1C(T) was isolated from the root nodules of Aspalathus abietina Thunb. Based on phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA and recA genes, VG1C(T) belongs to the genus Burkholderia, with the highest degree of sequence similarity to the type strain of Burkholderia sediminicola (98.5% and 98%, respectively). The DNA G+C content of strain VG1C(T) was 60.1 mol%, and DNA-DNA relatedness values to the type strain of closely related species were found to be substantially lower than 70%. As evidenced by results of genotypic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic tests provided here, we conclude that isolate VG1C(T) represents a novel rhizosphere-associated species in the genus Burkholderia, for which the name Burkholderia aspalathi sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain VG1C(T) ( = DSM 27239(T) = LMG 27731(T)).

  1. Burkholderia and Cupriavidus spp. are the preferred symbionts of Mimosa spp. in southern China.

    PubMed

    Liu, XiaoYun; Wei, Shuang; Wang, Fang; James, Euan K; Guo, XiaoYe; Zagar, Catherine; Xia, Liu Gui; Dong, Xin; Wang, Yi Peng

    2012-05-01

    Rhizobia were isolated from invasive Mimosa spp. (M. diplotricha and M. pudica) in Dehong district of the province of Yunnan in subtropical southern China. Almost all of the 98 isolates were β-rhizobia in the genera Burkholderia and Cupriavidus. These strains were analysed for their distribution characteristics together with strains from a previous study from Sishuangbanna. The proportion of nodules containing each β-rhizobial genus varied between Mimosa species, with Cupriavidus being predominant in M. diplotricha nodules (63.3% compared to 36.7% occupation with Burkholderia), but with M. pudica showing a slight preference for Burkholderia over Cupriavidus, with them occupying 56.5% and 43.5% of nodules, respectively. The symbiosis-essential genes nodA and nifH were present in all the Burkholderia and Cupriavidus strains tested, and their phylogenies indicated that these Mimosa symbionts share symbiotic genes with native South American rhizobia. The evolutionary discrepancies among 16S rRNA genes, nodA and nifH of Mimosa spp. symbionts, suggests that the nod and nif genes of β-rhizobia evolved independently.

  2. Symbiotic factors in Burkholderia essential for establishing an association with the bean bug, Riptortus pedestris.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Lee, Bok Luel

    2015-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria are common in insects and intimately affect the various aspects of insect host biology. In a number of insect symbiosis models, it has been possible to elucidate the effects of the symbiont on host biology, whereas there is a limited understanding of the impact of the association on the bacterial symbiont, mainly due to the difficulty of cultivating insect symbionts in vitro. Furthermore, the molecular features that determine the establishment and persistence of the symbionts in their host (i.e., symbiotic factors) have remained elusive. However, the recently established model, the bean bug Riptortus pedestris, provides a good opportunity to study bacterial symbiotic factors at a molecular level through their cultivable symbionts. Bean bugs acquire genus Burkholderia cells from the environment and harbor them as gut symbionts in the specialized posterior midgut. The genome of the Burkholderia symbiont was sequenced, and the genomic information was used to generate genetically manipulated Burkholderia symbiont strains. Using mutant symbionts, we identified several novel symbiotic factors necessary for establishing a successful association with the host gut. In this review, these symbiotic factors are classified into three categories based on the colonization dynamics of the mutant symbiont strains: initiation, accommodation, and persistence factors. In addition, the molecular characteristics of the symbiotic factors are described. These newly identified symbiotic factors and on-going studies of the Riptortus-Burkholderia symbiosis are expected to contribute to the understanding of the molecular cross-talk between insects and bacterial symbionts that are of ecological and evolutionary importance.

  3. Complete genome sequence of the lipase producing strain Burkholderia glumae PG1.

    PubMed

    Voget, Sonja; Knapp, Andreas; Poehlein, Anja; Vollstedt, Christel; Streit, Wolfgang; Daniel, Rolf; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2015-06-20

    The Gram-negative proteobacterium Burkholderia glumae PG1 produces a lipase of biotechnological interest, which is used for the production of enantiopure pharmaceuticals. In order to better understand the underlying mechanisms and provide a basis for further studies, we present here the complete genome sequence of B. glumae PG1.

  4. The symbiotic role of O-antigen of Burkholderia symbiont in association with host Riptortus pedestris.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Park, Ha Young; Lee, Bok Luel

    2016-07-01

    Riptortus pedestris harboring Burkholderia symbiont is a useful symbiosis model to study the molecular interactions between insects and bacteria. We recently reported that the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen is absent in the Burkholderia symbionts isolated from Riptortus guts. Here, we investigated the symbiotic role of O-antigen comprehensively in the Riptortus-Burkholderia model. Firstly, Burkholderia mutant strains deficient of O-antigen biosynthesis genes were generated and confirmed for their different patterns of the lipopolysaccharide by electrophoretic analysis. The O-antigen-deficient mutant strains initially exhibited a reduction of infectivity, having significantly lower level of symbiont population at the second-instar stage. However, both the wild-type and O-antigen mutant symbionts exhibited a similar level of symbiont population from the third-instar stage, indicating that the O-antigen deficiency did not affect the bacterial persistence in the host midgut. Taken together, we showed that the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen of gut symbiont plays an exclusive role in the initial symbiotic association.

  5. Genome Sequence of the Historical Clinical Isolate Burkholderia pseudomallei PHLS 6

    DOE PAGESBeta

    D’haeseleer, Patrik; Johnson, Shannon L.; Davenport, Karen W.; Chain, Patrick S.; Schoeniger, Joe; Ray, Debjit; Sinha, Anupama; Williams, Kelly P.; Peña, José; Branda, Steven S.; et al

    2016-06-30

    We present the draft genome sequence ofBurkholderia pseudomalleiPHLS 6, a virulent clinical strain isolated from a melioidosis patient in Bangladesh in 1960. This draft genome consists of 39 contigs and is 7,322,181 bp long.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia gladioli Strain UCD-UG_CHAPALOTE (Phylum Proteobacteria)

    PubMed Central

    Ettinger, Cassandra L.; Shehata, Hanan R.; Johnston-Monje, David; Raizada, Manish N.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of Burkholderia gladioli strain UCD-UG_CHAPALOTE. This strain is an endophyte isolated from surface sterilized seeds of an ancient Mexican landrace of corn, Chapalote. The genome contains 8,527,129 bp in 109 scaffolds. PMID:25614570

  7. Polyphasic characterisation of Burkholderia cepacia complex species isolated from children with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Vicenzi, Fernando José; Pillonetto, Marcelo; de Souza, Helena Aguilar Peres Homem de Mello; Palmeiro, Jussara Kasuko; Riedi, Carlos Antônio; Rosario-Filho, Nelson Augusto; Dalla-Costa, Libera Maria

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) pulmonary infections have high morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to compare different methods for identification of Bcc species isolated from paediatric CF patients. Oropharyngeal swabs from children with CF were used to obtain isolates of Bcc samples to evaluate six different tests for strain identification. Conventional (CPT) and automatised (APT) phenotypic tests, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-recA, restriction fragment length polymorphism-recA, recAsequencing, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) were applied. Bacterial isolates were also tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. PCR-recA analysis showed that 36 out of the 54 isolates were Bcc. Kappa index data indicated almost perfect agreement between CPT and APT, CPT and PCR-recA, and APT and PCR-recA to identify Bcc, and MALDI-TOF and recAsequencing to identify Bcc species. The recAsequencing data and the MALDI-TOF data agreed in 97.2% of the isolates. Based on recA sequencing, the most common species identified were Burkholderia cenocepacia IIIA (33.4%),Burkholderia vietnamiensis (30.6%), B. cenocepaciaIIIB (27.8%), Burkholderia multivorans (5.5%), and B. cepacia (2.7%). MALDI-TOF proved to be a useful tool for identification of Bcc species obtained from CF patients, although it was not able to identify B. cenocepacia subtypes. PMID:26814642

  8. Burkholderia phymatum Strains Capable of Nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris Are Present in Moroccan Soils ▿

    PubMed Central

    Talbi, C.; Delgado, M. J.; Girard, L.; Ramírez-Trujillo, A.; Caballero-Mellado, J.; Bedmar, E. J.

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA, nodC, and nifH genes of four bacterial strains isolated from root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris grown in Morocco soils were identified as Burkholderia phymatum. All four strains formed N2-fixing nodules on P. vulgaris and Mimosa, Acacia, and Prosopis species and reduced acetylene to ethylene when cultured ex planta. PMID:20472732

  9. Complete genome sequence of the lipase producing strain Burkholderia glumae PG1.

    PubMed

    Voget, Sonja; Knapp, Andreas; Poehlein, Anja; Vollstedt, Christel; Streit, Wolfgang; Daniel, Rolf; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2015-06-20

    The Gram-negative proteobacterium Burkholderia glumae PG1 produces a lipase of biotechnological interest, which is used for the production of enantiopure pharmaceuticals. In order to better understand the underlying mechanisms and provide a basis for further studies, we present here the complete genome sequence of B. glumae PG1. PMID:25848987

  10. Quorum-Sensing-Regulated Bactobolin Production by Burkholderia thailandensis E264

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial acyl-homoserine lactones upregulated an uncharacterized gene cluster (bta) in Burkholderia thailandensis E264 to produce an uncharacterized polar antibiotic. The antibiotic is identified as a mixture of four bactobolins. Annotation of the bta cluster allows us to propose a biosynthetic scheme for bactobolin and reveals unusual enzymatic reactions for further study. PMID:20095633

  11. Genome Sequence of the Historical Clinical Isolate Burkholderia pseudomallei PHLS 6

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Karen W.; Chain, Patrick S.; Schoeniger, Joe; Ray, Debjit; Sinha, Anupama; Williams, Kelly P.; Peña, José; El-Etr, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia pseudomallei PHLS 6, a virulent clinical strain isolated from a melioidosis patient in Bangladesh in 1960. The draft genome consists of 39 contigs and is 7,322,181 bp long. PMID:27365360

  12. Genome Sequence of the Historical Clinical Isolate Burkholderia pseudomallei PHLS 6.

    PubMed

    D'haeseleer, Patrik; Johnson, Shannon L; Davenport, Karen W; Chain, Patrick S; Schoeniger, Joe; Ray, Debjit; Sinha, Anupama; Williams, Kelly P; Peña, José; Branda, Steven S; El-Etr, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia pseudomallei PHLS 6, a virulent clinical strain isolated from a melioidosis patient in Bangladesh in 1960. The draft genome consists of 39 contigs and is 7,322,181 bp long. PMID:27365360

  13. Development of antibodies to Burkholderia pseudomallei during childhood in melioidosis-endemic northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Langa, Sayan; Chaowagul, Wipada; Panpitpat, Chanathip; Saipan, Penchan; Thoujaikong, Thaksinaporn; Day, Nicholas P; Peacock, Sharon J

    2006-06-01

    A cross-sectional serological survey of 2,214 children living in northeast Thailand was conducted to define the antibody response to Burkholderia pseudomallei from birth to 14 years. There was a sharp rise in detectable antibodies from birth to 4 years followed by reactivity in approximately 60-70% of children thereafter.

  14. Multilocus sequence typing and evolutionary relationships among the causative agents of melioidosis and glanders, Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Daniel; Randle, Gaynor; Simpson, Andrew J; Aanensen, David M; Pitt, Tyrone L; Kinoshita, Reimi; Spratt, Brian G

    2003-05-01

    A collection of 147 isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei, B. mallei, and B. thailandensis was characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The 128 isolates of B. pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, were obtained from diverse geographic locations, from humans and animals with disease, and from the environment and were resolved into 71 sequence types. The utility of the MLST scheme for epidemiological investigations was established by analyzing isolates from captive marine mammals and birds and from humans in Hong Kong with melioidosis. MLST gave a level of resolution similar to that given by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and identified the same three clones causing disease in animals, each of which was also associated with disease in humans. The average divergence between the alleles of B. thailandensis and B. pseudomallei was 3.2%, and there was no sharing of alleles between these species. Trees constructed from differences in the allelic profiles of the isolates and from the concatenated sequences of the seven loci showed that the B. pseudomallei isolates formed a cluster of closely related lineages that were fully resolved from the cluster of B. thailandensis isolates, confirming their separate species status. However, isolates of B. mallei, the causative agent of glanders, recovered from three continents over a 30-year period had identical allelic profiles, and the B. mallei isolates clustered within the B. pseudomallei group of isolates. Alleles at six of the seven loci in B. mallei were also present within B. pseudomallei isolates, and B. mallei is a clone of B. pseudomallei that, on population genetics grounds, should not be given separate species status.

  15. Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei Cluster 1 Type VI Secretion System Gene Expression Is Negatively Regulated by Iron and Zinc

    PubMed Central

    Burtnick, Mary N.; Brett, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes glanders in humans and animals. Previous studies have demonstrated that the cluster 1 type VI secretion system (T6SS-1) expressed by this organism is essential for virulence in hamsters and is positively regulated by the VirAG two-component system. Recently, we have shown that T6SS-1 gene expression is up-regulated following internalization of this pathogen into phagocytic cells and that this system promotes multinucleated giant cell formation in infected tissue culture monolayers. In the present study, we further investigated the complex regulation of this important virulence factor. To assess T6SS-1 expression, B. mallei strains were cultured in various media conditions and Hcp1 production was analyzed by Western immunoblotting. Transcript levels of several VirAG-regulated genes (bimA, tssA, hcp1 and tssM) were also determined using quantitative real time PCR. Consistent with previous observations, T6SS-1 was not expressed during growth of B. mallei in rich media. Curiously, growth of the organism in minimal media (M9G) or minimal media plus casamino acids (M9CG) facilitated robust expression of T6SS-1 genes whereas growth in minimal media plus tryptone (M9TG) did not. Investigation of this phenomenon confirmed a regulatory role for VirAG in this process. Additionally, T6SS-1 gene expression was significantly down-regulated by the addition of iron and zinc to M9CG. Other genes under the control of VirAG did not appear to be as tightly regulated by these divalent metals. Similar results were observed for B. pseudomallei, but not for B. thailandensis. Collectively, our findings indicate that in addition to being positively regulated by VirAG, B. mallei and B. pseudomallei T6SS-1 gene expression is negatively regulated by iron and zinc. PMID:24146925

  16. Burkholderia diazotrophica sp. nov., isolated from root nodules of Mimosa spp.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Shih-Yi; Chou, Jui-Hsing; Bontemps, Cyril; Elliott, Geoffrey N; Gross, Eduardo; dos Reis Junior, Fabio Bueno; Melkonian, Rémy; Moulin, Lionel; James, Euan K; Sprent, Janet I; Young, J Peter W; Chen, Wen-Ming

    2013-02-01

    Five strains, JPY461(T), JPY359, JPY389, DPU-3 and STM4206 were isolated from nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of Mimosa spp. and their taxonomic positions were investigated using a polyphasic approach. All five strains grew at 15-40 °C (optimum, 30-37 °C), at pH 4.0-8.0 (optimum, pH 6.0-7.0) and with 0-1 % (w/v) NaCl [optimum, 0 % (w/v)]. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, a representative strain (JPY461(T)) showed 97.2 % sequence similarity to the closest related species Burkholderia acidipaludis SA33(T), a similarity of 97.2 % to Burkholderia terrae KMY02(T), 97.1 % to Burkholderia phymatum STM815(T) and 97.1 % to Burkholderia hospita LMG 20598(T). The predominant fatty acids of the five novel strains were summed feature 2 (comprising C(16 : 1) iso I and/or C(14 : 0) 3-OH), summed feature 3 (comprising C(16 : 1)ω7c and/or C(16 : 1)ω6c), C(16 : 0) , C(16 : 0) 3-OH, C(17 : 0) cyclo, C(18 : 1)ω7c and C(19 : 0) cyclo ω8c. The major isoprenoid quinone was Q-8 and the DNA G+C content of the strains was 63.0-65.0 mol%. The polar lipid profile consisted of a mixture of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, an unidentified aminophospholipid, an unidentified aminolipid and several unidentified phospholipids. The DNA-DNA relatedness of the novel strain with respect to recognized species of the genus Burkholderia was less than 54 %. On the basis of 16S rRNA and recA gene sequence similarities, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic data, the five strains represent a novel species in the genus Burkholderia, for which the name Burkholderia diazotrophica sp. nov. is proposed with the type strain, JPY461(T) ( = LMG 26031(T) = BCRC 80259(T) = KCTC 23308(T)).

  17. Plasmids encoding therapeutic agents

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.

    2007-08-07

    Plasmids encoding anti-HIV and anti-anthrax therapeutic agents are disclosed. Plasmid pWKK-500 encodes a fusion protein containing DP178 as a targeting moiety, the ricin A chain, an HIV protease cleavable linker, and a truncated ricin B chain. N-terminal extensions of the fusion protein include the maltose binding protein and a Factor Xa protease site. C-terminal extensions include a hydrophobic linker, an L domain motif peptide, a KDEL ER retention signal, another Factor Xa protease site, an out-of-frame buforin II coding sequence, the lacZ.alpha. peptide, and a polyhistidine tag. More than twenty derivatives of plasmid pWKK-500 are described. Plasmids pWKK-700 and pWKK-800 are similar to pWKK-500 wherein the DP178-encoding sequence is substituted by RANTES- and SDF-1-encoding sequences, respectively. Plasmid pWKK-900 is similar to pWKK-500 wherein the HIV protease cleavable linker is substituted by a lethal factor (LF) peptide-cleavable linker.

  18. Video Time Encoding Machines

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Aurel A.; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate architectures for time encoding and time decoding of visual stimuli such as natural and synthetic video streams (movies, animation). The architecture for time encoding is akin to models of the early visual system. It consists of a bank of filters in cascade with single-input multi-output neural circuits. Neuron firing is based on either a threshold-and-fire or an integrate-and-fire spiking mechanism with feedback. We show that analog information is represented by the neural circuits as projections on a set of band-limited functions determined by the spike sequence. Under Nyquist-type and frame conditions, the encoded signal can be recovered from these projections with arbitrary precision. For the video time encoding machine architecture, we demonstrate that band-limited video streams of finite energy can be faithfully recovered from the spike trains and provide a stable algorithm for perfect recovery. The key condition for recovery calls for the number of neurons in the population to be above a threshold value. PMID:21296708

  19. Video time encoding machines.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Aurel A; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A

    2011-03-01

    We investigate architectures for time encoding and time decoding of visual stimuli such as natural and synthetic video streams (movies, animation). The architecture for time encoding is akin to models of the early visual system. It consists of a bank of filters in cascade with single-input multi-output neural circuits. Neuron firing is based on either a threshold-and-fire or an integrate-and-fire spiking mechanism with feedback. We show that analog information is represented by the neural circuits as projections on a set of band-limited functions determined by the spike sequence. Under Nyquist-type and frame conditions, the encoded signal can be recovered from these projections with arbitrary precision. For the video time encoding machine architecture, we demonstrate that band-limited video streams of finite energy can be faithfully recovered from the spike trains and provide a stable algorithm for perfect recovery. The key condition for recovery calls for the number of neurons in the population to be above a threshold value.

  20. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  1. Genetic diversity of Burkholderia (Proteobacteria) species from the Caatinga and Atlantic rainforest biomes in Bahia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santini, A C; Santos, H R M; Gross, E; Corrêa, R X

    2013-03-11

    The genus Burkholderia (β-Proteobacteria) currently comprises more than 60 species, including parasites, symbionts and free-living organisms. Several new species of Burkholderia have recently been described showing a great diversity of phenotypes. We examined the diversity of Burkholderia spp in environmental samples collected from Caatinga and Atlantic rainforest biomes of Bahia, Brazil. Legume nodules were collected from five locations, and 16S rDNA and recA genes of the isolated microorganisms were analyzed. Thirty-three contigs of 16S rRNA genes and four contigs of the recA gene related to the genus Burkholderia were obtained. The genetic dissimilarity of the strains ranged from 0 to 2.5% based on 16S rDNA analysis, indicating two main branches: one distinct branch of the dendrogram for the B. cepacia complex and another branch that rendered three major groups, partially reflecting host plants and locations. A dendrogram designed with sequences of this research and those designed with sequences of Burkholderia-type strains and the first hit BLAST had similar topologies. A dendrogram similar to that constructed by analysis of 16S rDNA was obtained using sequences of the fragment of the recA gene. The 16S rDNA sequences enabled sufficient identification of relevant similarities and groupings amongst isolates and the sequences that we obtained. Only 6 of the 33 isolates analyzed via 16S rDNA sequencing showed high similarity with the B. cepacia complex. Thus, over 3/4 of the isolates have potential for biotechnological applications.

  2. Insecticide applications to soil contribute to the development of Burkholderia mediating insecticide resistance in stinkbugs.

    PubMed

    Tago, Kanako; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Nakaoka, Sinji; Katsuyama, Chie; Hayatsu, Masahito

    2015-07-01

    Some soil Burkholderia strains are capable of degrading the organophosphorus insecticide, fenitrothion, and establish symbiosis with stinkbugs, making the host insects fenitrothion-resistant. However, the ecology of the symbiotic degrading Burkholderia adapting to fenitrothion in the free-living environment is unknown. We hypothesized that fenitrothion applications affect the dynamics of fenitrothion-degrading Burkholderia, thereby controlling the transmission of symbiotic degrading Burkholderia from the soil to stinkbugs. We investigated changes in the density and diversity of culturable Burkholderia (i.e. symbiotic and nonsymbiotic fenitrothion degraders and nondegraders) in fenitrothion-treated soil using microcosms. During the incubation with five applications of pesticide, the density of the degraders increased from less than the detection limit to around 10(6)/g of soil. The number of dominant species among the degraders declined with the increasing density of degraders; eventually, one species predominated. This process can be explained according to the competitive exclusion principle using V(max) and K(m) values for fenitrothion metabolism by the degraders. We performed a phylogenetic analysis of representative strains isolated from the microcosms and evaluated their ability to establish symbiosis with the stinkbug Riptortus pedestris. The strains that established symbiosis with R. pedestris were assigned to a cluster including symbionts commonly isolated from stinkbugs. The strains outside the cluster could not necessarily associate with the host. The degraders in the cluster predominated during the initial phase of degrader dynamics in the soil. Therefore, only a few applications of fenitrothion could allow symbiotic degraders to associate with their hosts and may cause the emergence of symbiont-mediated insecticide resistance.

  3. The In vitro Antibiotic Tolerant Persister Population in Burkholderia pseudomallei is Altered by Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nierman, William C.; Yu, Yan; Losada, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persistence due to antibiotic tolerance is a critical aspect of antibiotic treatment failure, disease latency, and chronic or reemergent infections. The levels of persisters is especially notable for the opportunistic Gram-negative pathogens from the Burkholderia and Pseudomonas genera. We examined the rate of drug tolerant persisters in Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, Burkholderia cepacia complex organisms, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at mid-log growth in LB broth culture. We found that a fraction of the antibiotic-sensitive cells from every species were tolerant to a 24 h high-dose antibiotic challenge. All tested Burkholderia strains demonstrated a drug tolerant persister population at a rate that was at least 100–500 times higher than P. aeruginosa. When challenged with at least a 10X minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 24 h exposure to three different antibiotics with different modes of action we found that in B. pseudomallei Bp82 each of the tree antibiotics revealed different persister fractions at each of two different growth states. This observation suggests that our assay is detecting heterogeneous persister subpopulations. Persistence in B. pseudomallei Bp82 was highly dependent on growth stage, with a surprisingly high persister fraction of >64% of the late stationary phase cells being antibiotic tolerant to 100XMIC cefotaxime. Adaptation of B. pseudomallei to distilled water storage resulted in a population of drug tolerant cells up to 100% of the non-drug-challenged viable cell count in the same cefotaxime assay. Cultivation of B. pseudomallei with a sub-inhibitory concentration of several antibiotics resulted in altered persister fractions within the population relative to cultures lacking the antibiotic. Our study provides insight into the sensitivity of the persister fraction within the population of B. pseudomallei due to environmental variables and suggests diversity within the persister population revealed by

  4. The In vitro Antibiotic Tolerant Persister Population in Burkholderia pseudomallei is Altered by Environmental Factors.

    PubMed

    Nierman, William C; Yu, Yan; Losada, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persistence due to antibiotic tolerance is a critical aspect of antibiotic treatment failure, disease latency, and chronic or reemergent infections. The levels of persisters is especially notable for the opportunistic Gram-negative pathogens from the Burkholderia and Pseudomonas genera. We examined the rate of drug tolerant persisters in Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, Burkholderia cepacia complex organisms, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at mid-log growth in LB broth culture. We found that a fraction of the antibiotic-sensitive cells from every species were tolerant to a 24 h high-dose antibiotic challenge. All tested Burkholderia strains demonstrated a drug tolerant persister population at a rate that was at least 100-500 times higher than P. aeruginosa. When challenged with at least a 10X minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 24 h exposure to three different antibiotics with different modes of action we found that in B. pseudomallei Bp82 each of the tree antibiotics revealed different persister fractions at each of two different growth states. This observation suggests that our assay is detecting heterogeneous persister subpopulations. Persistence in B. pseudomallei Bp82 was highly dependent on growth stage, with a surprisingly high persister fraction of >64% of the late stationary phase cells being antibiotic tolerant to 100XMIC cefotaxime. Adaptation of B. pseudomallei to distilled water storage resulted in a population of drug tolerant cells up to 100% of the non-drug-challenged viable cell count in the same cefotaxime assay. Cultivation of B. pseudomallei with a sub-inhibitory concentration of several antibiotics resulted in altered persister fractions within the population relative to cultures lacking the antibiotic. Our study provides insight into the sensitivity of the persister fraction within the population of B. pseudomallei due to environmental variables and suggests diversity within the persister population revealed by

  5. Molecular evidence of Burkholderia pseudomallei genotypes based on geographical distribution

    PubMed Central

    Zulkefli, Noorfatin Jihan; Mariappan, Vanitha; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Chong, Chun Wie; Thong, Kwai Lin; Ponnampalavanar, Sasheela; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2016-01-01

    Background. Central intermediary metabolism (CIM) in bacteria is defined as a set of metabolic biochemical reactions within a cell, which is essential for the cell to survive in response to environmental perturbations. The genes associated with CIM are commonly found in both pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains. As these genes are involved in vital metabolic processes of bacteria, we explored the efficiency of the genes in genotypic characterization of Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates, compared with the established pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) schemes. Methods. Nine previously sequenced B. pseudomallei isolates from Malaysia were characterized by PFGE, MLST and CIM genes. The isolates were later compared to the other 39 B. pseudomallei strains, retrieved from GenBank using both MLST and sequence analysis of CIM genes. UniFrac and hierachical clustering analyses were performed using the results generated by both MLST and sequence analysis of CIM genes. Results. Genetic relatedness of nine Malaysian B. pseudomallei isolates and the other 39 strains was investigated. The nine Malaysian isolates were subtyped into six PFGE profiles, four MLST profiles and five sequence types based on CIM genes alignment. All methods demonstrated the clonality of OB and CB as well as CMS and THE. However, PFGE showed less than 70% similarity between a pair of morphology variants, OS and OB. In contrast, OS was identical to the soil isolate, MARAN. To have a better understanding of the genetic diversity of B. pseudomallei worldwide, we further aligned the sequences of genes used in MLST and genes associated with CIM for the nine Malaysian isolates and 39 B. pseudomallei strains from NCBI database. Overall, based on the CIM genes, the strains were subtyped into 33 profiles where majority of the strains from Asian countries were clustered together. On the other hand, MLST resolved the isolates into 31 profiles which formed three clusters

  6. Burkholderia pseudomallei: Its Detection in Soil and Seroprevalence in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Robayet, Jamshedul Alam Mohammad; Mohiuddin, Md.; Hasan, Md. Rokib

    2016-01-01

    Background Melioidosis, caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an endemic disease in Bangladesh. No systematic study has yet been done to detect the environmental source of the organism and its true extent in Bangladesh. The present study attempted to isolate B. pseudomallei in soil samples and to determine its seroprevalence in several districts in Bangladesh. Methodology and Results Soil samples were collected from rural areas of four districts of Bangladesh from where culture confirmed melioidosis cases were detected earlier. Multiple soil samples, collected from 5–7 sampling points of 3–5 sites of each district, were cultured in Ashdown selective media. Suspected colonies of B. pseudomallei were identified by biochemical and serological test, and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using 16s rRNA specific primers. Blood samples were collected from 940 healthy individuals of four districts to determine anti- B. pseudomallei IgG antibody levels by indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using sonicated crude antigen. Out of 179 soil samples, B. pseudomallei was isolated from two samples of Gazipur district which is located 58 km north of capital Dhaka city. Both the isolates were phenotypically identical, arabinose negative and showed specific 550bp band in PCR. Out of 940 blood samples, anti- B. pseudomallei IgG antibody, higher than the cut-off value (>0.8), was detected in 21.5% individuals. Seropositivity rate was 22.6%-30.8% in three districts from where melioidosis cases were detected earlier, compared to 9.8% in a district where no melioidosis case was either detected or reported (p<0.01). Seropositivity increased with the advancement of age from 5.3% to 30.4% among individuals aged 1–10 years and > 50 years respectively. The seropositivity rates were 26.0% and 20.6% in male and female respectively, while it was 20–27% among different occupational groups. No significant association was observed with gender (χ2 = 3.441, p = 0.064) or any

  7. Porin Involvement in Cephalosporin and Carbapenem Resistance of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Aunkham, Anuwat; Schulte, Albert; Winterhalter, Mathias; Suginta, Wipa

    2014-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bps) is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes frequently lethal melioidosis, with a particularly high prevalence in the north and northeast of Thailand. Bps is highly resistant to many antimicrobial agents and this resistance may result from the low drug permeability of outer membrane proteins, known as porins. Principal Findings Microbiological assays showed that the clinical Bps strain was resistant to most antimicrobial agents and sensitive only to ceftazidime and meropenem. An E. coli strain defective in most porins, but expressing BpsOmp38, exhibited considerably lower antimicrobial susceptibility than the control strain. In addition, mutation of Tyr119, the most prominent pore-lining residue in BpsOmp38, markedly altered membrane permeability, substitution with Ala (mutant BpsOmp38Y119A) enhanced uptake of the antimicrobial agents, while substitution with Phe (mutant BpsOmp38Y119F) inhibited uptake. Channel recordings of BpsOmp38 reconstituted in a planar black lipid membrane (BLM) suggested that the higher permeability of BpsOmp38Y119A was caused by widening of the pore interior through removal of the bulky side chain. In contrast, the lower permeability of BpsOmp38Y119F was caused by introduction of the hydrophobic side chain (Phe), increasing the ‘greasiness’ of the pore lumen. Significantly, liposome swelling assays showed no permeation through the BpsOmp38 channel by antimicrobial agents to which Bps is resistant (cefoxitin, cefepime, and doripenem). In contrast, high permeability to ceftazidime and meropenem was observed, these being agents to which Bps is sensitive. Conclusion/Significance Our results, from both in vivo and in vitro studies, demonstrate that membrane permeability associated with BpsOmp38 expression correlates well with the antimicrobial susceptibility of the virulent bacterium B. pseudomallei, especially to carbapenems and cephalosporins. In addition, substitution of the residue Tyr119 affects

  8. Evidence of Environmental and Vertical Transmission of Burkholderia Symbionts in the Oriental Chinch Bug, Cavelerius saccharivorus (Heteroptera: Blissidae)

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Hideomi; Aita, Manabu; Nagayama, Atsushi; Meng, Xian-Ying; Kamagata, Yoichi; Navarro, Ronald; Hori, Tomoyuki; Ohgiya, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    The vertical transmission of symbiotic microorganisms is omnipresent in insects, while the evolutionary process remains totally unclear. The oriental chinch bug, Cavelerius saccharivorus (Heteroptera: Blissidae), is a serious sugarcane pest, in which symbiotic bacteria densely populate the lumen of the numerous tubule-like midgut crypts that the chinch bug develops. Cloning and sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA genes revealed that the crypts were dominated by a specific group of bacteria belonging to the genus Burkholderia of the Betaproteobacteria. The Burkholderia sequences were distributed into three distinct clades: the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), the plant-associated beneficial and environmental (PBE) group, and the stinkbug-associated beneficial and environmental group (SBE). Diagnostic PCR revealed that only one of the three groups of Burkholderia was present in ∼89% of the chinch bug field populations tested, while infections with multiple Burkholderia groups within one insect were observed in only ∼10%. Deep sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene confirmed that the Burkholderia bacteria specifically colonized the crypts and were dominated by one of three Burkholderia groups. The lack of phylogenetic congruence between the symbiont and the host population strongly suggested host-symbiont promiscuity, which is probably caused by environmental acquisition of the symbionts by some hosts. Meanwhile, inspections of eggs and hatchlings by diagnostic PCR and egg surface sterilization demonstrated that almost 30% of the hatchlings vertically acquire symbiotic Burkholderia via symbiont-contaminated egg surfaces. The mixed strategy of symbiont transmission found in the oriental chinch bug might be an intermediate stage in evolution from environmental acquisition to strict vertical transmission in insects. PMID:25038101

  9. Evidence of environmental and vertical transmission of Burkholderia symbionts in the oriental chinch bug, Cavelerius saccharivorus (Heteroptera: Blissidae).

    PubMed

    Itoh, Hideomi; Aita, Manabu; Nagayama, Atsushi; Meng, Xian-Ying; Kamagata, Yoichi; Navarro, Ronald; Hori, Tomoyuki; Ohgiya, Satoru; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo

    2014-10-01

    The vertical transmission of symbiotic microorganisms is omnipresent in insects, while the evolutionary process remains totally unclear. The oriental chinch bug, Cavelerius saccharivorus (Heteroptera: Blissidae), is a serious sugarcane pest, in which symbiotic bacteria densely populate the lumen of the numerous tubule-like midgut crypts that the chinch bug develops. Cloning and sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA genes revealed that the crypts were dominated by a specific group of bacteria belonging to the genus Burkholderia of the Betaproteobacteria. The Burkholderia sequences were distributed into three distinct clades: the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), the plant-associated beneficial and environmental (PBE) group, and the stinkbug-associated beneficial and environmental group (SBE). Diagnostic PCR revealed that only one of the three groups of Burkholderia was present in ∼89% of the chinch bug field populations tested, while infections with multiple Burkholderia groups within one insect were observed in only ∼10%. Deep sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene confirmed that the Burkholderia bacteria specifically colonized the crypts and were dominated by one of three Burkholderia groups. The lack of phylogenetic congruence between the symbiont and the host population strongly suggested host-symbiont promiscuity, which is probably caused by environmental acquisition of the symbionts by some hosts. Meanwhile, inspections of eggs and hatchlings by diagnostic PCR and egg surface sterilization demonstrated that almost 30% of the hatchlings vertically acquire symbiotic Burkholderia via symbiont-contaminated egg surfaces. The mixed strategy of symbiont transmission found in the oriental chinch bug might be an intermediate stage in evolution from environmental acquisition to strict vertical transmission in insects.

  10. The roles of the shikimate pathway genes, aroA and aroB, in virulence, growth and UV tolerance of Burkholderia glumae strain 411gr-6.

    PubMed

    Karki, Hari Sharan; Ham, Jong Hyun

    2014-12-01

    Burkholderia glumae is the major causal agent of bacterial panicle blight of rice, which is a growing disease problem for rice growers worldwide. In our previous study, some B. glumae strains showed pigmentation phenotypes producing at least two (yellow-green and purple) pigment compounds in casein-peptone-glucose agar medium. The B. glumae strains LSUPB114 and LSUPB116 are pigment-deficient mutant derivatives of the virulent and pigment-proficient strain 411gr-6, having mini-Tn5gus insertions in aroA encoding 3-phosphoshikimate 1-carboxyvinyltransferase and aroB encoding 3-dehydroquinate synthase, respectively. Both enzymes are known to be involved in the shikimate pathway, which leads to the synthesis of aromatic amino acids. Here, we demonstrate that aroA and aroB are required for normal virulence in rice and onion, growth in M9 minimal medium and tolerance to UV light, but are dispensable for the production of the phytotoxin toxoflavin. These results suggest that the shikimate pathway is involved in bacterial pathogenesis by B. glumae without a significant role in the production of toxoflavin, a major virulence factor of this pathogen.

  11. Burkholderia jiangsuensis sp. nov., a methyl parathion degrading bacterium, isolated from methyl parathion contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu-Yun; Li, Chun-Xiu; Luo, Xiao-Jing; Lai, Qi-Liang; Xu, Jian-He

    2014-09-01

    A methyl parathion (MP) degrading bacterial strain, designated MP-1(T), was isolated from a waste land where pesticides were formerly manufactured in Jiangsu province, China. Polyphasic taxonomic studies showed that MP-1(T) is a Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped and motile bacterium. The bacterium could grow at salinities of 0-1 % (w/v) and temperatures of 15-40 °C. Strain MP-1(T) could reduce nitrate to nitrite, utilize d-glucose and l-arabinose, but not produce indole, or hydrolyse gelatin. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences demonstrated that MP-1(T) belongs to the genus Burkholderia, showing highest sequence similarity to Burkholderia grimmiae DSM 25160(T) (98.5 %), and similar strains including Burkholderia zhejiangensis OP-1(T) (98.2 %), Burkholderia choica LMG 22940(T) (97.5 %), Burkholderia glathei DSM 50014(T) (97.4 %), Burkholderia terrestris LMG 22937(T) (97.2 %) and Burkholderia telluris LMG 22936(T) (97.0 %). In addition, the gyrB and recA gene segments of strain MP-1(T) exhibited less than 89.0 % and 95.1 % similarities with the most highly-related type strains indicated above. The G+C content of strain MP-1(T) was 62.6 mol%. The major isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone Q-8. The predominant polar lipids comprised phosphatidyl ethanolamine, phosphatidyl glycerol, aminolipid and phospholipid. The principal fatty acids in strain MP-1(T) were C18 : 1ω7c/C18 : 1ω6c (23.3 %), C16 : 0 (16.8 %), cyclo-C17 : 0 (15.0 %), C16 : 1ω7c/C16 : 1ω6 (8.5 %), cyclo-C19 : 0ω8c (8.1 %), C16 : 1 iso I/C14 : 0 3-OH (5.7 %), C16 : 0 3-OH (5.6 %) and C16 : 02-OH (5.1 %). The DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain MP-1(T) and the three type strains (B. grimmiae DSM 25160(T), B. zhejiangensis OP-1(T) and B. glathei DSM 50014(T)) ranged from 24.6 % to 37.4 %. In accordance with phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, strain MP-1(T) represents a novel

  12. The Text Encoding Initiative: Flexible and Extensible Document Encoding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, David T.; Ide, Nancy M.

    1997-01-01

    The Text Encoding Initiative (TEI), an international collaboration aimed at producing a common encoding scheme for complex texts, examines the requirement for generality versus the requirement to handle specialized text types. Discusses how documents and users tax the limits of fixed schemes requiring flexible extensible encoding to support…

  13. Burkholderia caballeronis sp. nov., a nitrogen fixing species isolated from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) with the ability to effectively nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Aguilar, Lourdes; Salazar-Salazar, Corelly; Méndez, Rafael Díaz; Caballero-Mellado, Jesús; Hirsch, Ann M; Vásquez-Murrieta, María Soledad; Estrada-de los Santos, Paulina

    2013-12-01

    During a survey of Burkholderia species with potential use in agrobiotechnology, a group of 12 strains was isolated from the rhizosphere and rhizoplane of tomato plants growing in Mexico (Nepantla, Mexico State). A phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the strains are related to Burkholderia kururiensis and Burkholderia mimosarum (97.4 and 97.1 %, respectively). However, they induced effective nitrogen-fixing nodules on roots of Phaseolus vulgaris. Based on polyphasic taxonomy, the group of strains represents a novel species for which the name Burkholderia caballeronis sp. nov. is proposed. The type species is TNe-841(T) (= LMG 26416(T) = CIP 110324(T)).

  14. The phn Genes of Burkholderia sp. Strain RP007 Constitute a Divergent Gene Cluster for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Laurie, Andrew D.; Lloyd-Jones, Gareth

    1999-01-01

    Cloning and molecular ecological studies have underestimated the diversity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) catabolic genes by emphasizing classical nah-like (nah, ndo, pah, and dox) sequences. Here we report the description of a divergent set of PAH catabolic genes, the phn genes, which although isofunctional to the classical nah-like genes, show very low homology. This phn locus, which contains nine open reading frames (ORFs), was isolated on an 11.5-kb HindIII fragment from phenanthrene-degrading Burkholderia sp. strain RP007. The phn genes are significantly different in sequence and gene order from previously characterized genes for PAH degradation. They are transcribed by RP007 when grown at the expense of either naphthalene or phenanthrene, while in Escherichia coli the recombinant phn enzymes have been shown to be capable of oxidizing both naphthalene and phenanthrene to predicted metabolites. The locus encodes iron sulfur protein α and β subunits of a PAH initial dioxygenase but lacks the ferredoxin and reductase components. The dihydrodiol dehydrogenase of the RP007 pathway, PhnB, shows greater similarity to analogous dehydrogenases from described biphenyl pathways than to those characterized from naphthalene/phenanthrene pathways. An unusual extradiol dioxygenase, PhnC, shows no similarity to other extradiol dioxygenases for naphthalene or biphenyl oxidation but is the first member of the recently proposed class III extradiol dioxygenases that is specific for polycyclic arene diols. Upstream of the phn catabolic genes are two putative regulatory genes, phnR and phnS. Sequence homology suggests that phnS is a LysR-type transcriptional activator and that phnR, which is divergently transcribed with respect to phnSFECDAcAdB, is a member of the ς54-dependent family of positive transcriptional regulators. Reverse transcriptase PCR experiments suggest that this gene cluster is coordinately expressed and is under regulatory control which may involve

  15. Proteomic Analysis of the Burkholderia pseudomallei Type II Secretome Reveals Hydrolytic Enzymes, Novel Proteins, and the Deubiquitinase TssM

    PubMed Central

    Burtnick, Mary N.; Brett, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiologic agent of melioidosis, is an opportunistic pathogen that harbors a wide array of secretion systems, including a type II secretion system (T2SS), three type III secretion systems (T3SS), and six type VI secretion systems (T6SS). The proteins exported by these systems provide B. pseudomallei with a growth advantage in vitro and in vivo, but relatively little is known about the full repertoire of exoproducts associated with each system. In this study, we constructed deletion mutations in gspD and gspE, T2SS genes encoding an outer membrane secretin and a cytoplasmic ATPase, respectively. The secretion profiles of B. pseudomallei MSHR668 and its T2SS mutants were noticeably different when analyzed by SDS-PAGE. We utilized liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to identify proteins present in the supernatants of B. pseudomallei MSHR668 and B. pseudomallei ΔgspD grown in rich and minimal media. The MSHR668 supernatants contained 48 proteins that were either absent or substantially reduced in the supernatants of ΔgspD strains. Many of these proteins were putative hydrolytic enzymes, including 12 proteases, two phospholipases, and a chitinase. Biochemical assays validated the LC-MS/MS results and demonstrated that the export of protease, phospholipase C, and chitinase activities is T2SS dependent. Previous studies had failed to identify the mechanism of secretion of TssM, a deubiquitinase that plays an integral role in regulating the innate immune response. Here we present evidence that TssM harbors an atypical signal sequence and that its secretion is mediated by the T2SS. This study provides the first in-depth characterization of the B. pseudomallei T2SS secretome. PMID:24866793

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of BipD, a virulence factor from Burkholderia pseudomallei

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, M. J.; Ruaux, A.; Mikolajek, H.; Erskine, P. T.; Gill, R.; Wood, S. P.; Wood, M.; Cooper, J. B.

    2006-08-01

    BipD is likely to be a component of a type-III protein secretion system (TTSS) in B. pseudomallei. Native and selenomethionyl-BipD proteins have been expressed and crystals have been obtained which diffract to 2.1 Å. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, possesses a protein-secretion apparatus that is similar to those found in Salmonella and Shigella. A major function of these secretion systems is to secrete virulence-associated proteins into target cells of the host organism. The BipD gene of B. pseudomallei encodes a secreted virulence factor that is similar in sequence and most likely functionally analogous to IpaD from Shigella and SipD from Salmonella. Thus, the BipD protein is likely to be a component of a type III protein-secretion system (TTSS) in B. pseudomallei. Proteins in the same class as BipD, such as IpaD and SipD, are thought to act as extracellular chaperones to help the hydrophobic translocator proteins enter the target cell membrane, where they form a pore and might even link the translocon pore with the secretion needle. There is evidence that the translocator proteins also bind an integrin which stimulates actin-mediated insertion of the bacterium into the host-cell membrane. Native BipD has been crystallized in a monoclinic crystal form that diffracts X-rays to 2.5 Å resolution. BipD protein which incorporates selenomethionine (SeMet-BipD) has also been expressed and forms crystals which diffract to a higher resolution of 2.1 Å.

  17. The Burkholderia pseudomallei Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase FabI1 Is Essential for In Vivo Growth and Is the Target of a Novel Chemotherapeutic with Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Jason E.; Kingry, Luke C.; Rholl, Drew A.; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis pathway is a validated target for the development of novel chemotherapeutics. However, since Burkholderia pseudomallei carries genes that encode both FabI and FabV enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase homologues, the enoyl-ACP reductase that is essential for in vivo growth needs to be defined so that the correct drug target can be chosen for development. Accordingly, ΔfabI1, ΔfabI2, and ΔfabV knockout strains were constructed and tested in a mouse model of infection. Mice infected with a ΔfabI1 strain did not show signs of morbidity, mortality, or dissemination after 30 days of infection compared to the wild-type and ΔfabI2 and ΔfabV mutant strains that had times to mortality of 60 to 84 h. Although signs of morbidity and mortality of ΔfabI2 and ΔfabV strains were not significantly different from those of the wild-type strain, a slight delay was observed. A FabI1-specific inhibitor was used to confirm that inhibition of FabI1 results in reduced bacterial burden and efficacy in an acute B. pseudomallei murine model of infection. This work establishes that FabI1 is required for growth of Burkholderia pseudomallei in vivo and is a potential molecular target for drug development. PMID:24277048

  18. Use of a Safe, Reproducible, and Rapid Aerosol Delivery Method to Study Infection by Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lafontaine, Eric R.; Zimmerman, Shawn M.; Shaffer, Teresa L.; Michel, Frank; Gao, Xiudan; Hogan, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiologic agent of melioidosis, is a saprophytic bacterium readily isolated from wet soils of countries bordering the equator. Burkholderia mallei is a host-adapted clone of B. pseudomallei that does not persist outside of its equine reservoir and causes the zoonosis glanders, which is endemic in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America. Infection by these organisms typically occurs via percutaneous inoculation or inhalation of aerosols, and the most common manifestation is severe pneumonia leading to fatal bacteremia. Glanders and melioidosis are difficult to diagnose and require prolonged antibiotic therapy with low success rates. There are no vaccines available to protect against either Burkholderia species, and there is concern regarding their use as biological warfare agents given that B. mallei has previously been utilized in this manner. Hence, experiments were performed to establish a mouse model of aerosol infection to study the organisms and develop countermeasures. Using a hand-held aerosolizer, BALB/c mice were inoculated intratracheally with strains B. pseudomallei 1026b and B. mallei ATCC23344 and growth of the agents in the lungs, as well as dissemination to the spleen, were examined. Mice infected with 102, 103 and 104 organisms were unable to control growth of B. mallei in the lungs and bacteria rapidly disseminated to the spleen. Though similar results were observed in mice inoculated with 103 and 104 B. pseudomallei cells, animals infected with 102 organisms controlled bacterial replication in the lungs, dissemination to the spleen, and the extent of bacteremia. Analysis of sera from mice surviving acute infection revealed that animals produced antibodies against antigens known to be targets of the immune response in humans. Taken together, these data show that small volume aerosol inoculation of mice results in acute disease, dose-dependent chronic infection, and immune responses that correlate with those

  19. Use of a safe, reproducible, and rapid aerosol delivery method to study infection by Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei in mice.

    PubMed

    Lafontaine, Eric R; Zimmerman, Shawn M; Shaffer, Teresa L; Michel, Frank; Gao, Xiudan; Hogan, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiologic agent of melioidosis, is a saprophytic bacterium readily isolated from wet soils of countries bordering the equator. Burkholderia mallei is a host-adapted clone of B. pseudomallei that does not persist outside of its equine reservoir and causes the zoonosis glanders, which is endemic in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America. Infection by these organisms typically occurs via percutaneous inoculation or inhalation of aerosols, and the most common manifestation is severe pneumonia leading to fatal bacteremia. Glanders and melioidosis are difficult to diagnose and require prolonged antibiotic therapy with low success rates. There are no vaccines available to protect against either Burkholderia species, and there is concern regarding their use as biological warfare agents given that B. mallei has previously been utilized in this manner. Hence, experiments were performed to establish a mouse model of aerosol infection to study the organisms and develop countermeasures. Using a hand-held aerosolizer, BALB/c mice were inoculated intratracheally with strains B. pseudomallei 1026b and B. mallei ATCC23344 and growth of the agents in the lungs, as well as dissemination to the spleen, were examined. Mice infected with 10(2), 10(3) and 10(4) organisms were unable to control growth of B. mallei in the lungs and bacteria rapidly disseminated to the spleen. Though similar results were observed in mice inoculated with 10(3) and 10(4) B. pseudomallei cells, animals infected with 10(2) organisms controlled bacterial replication in the lungs, dissemination to the spleen, and the extent of bacteremia. Analysis of sera from mice surviving acute infection revealed that animals produced antibodies against antigens known to be targets of the immune response in humans. Taken together, these data show that small volume aerosol inoculation of mice results in acute disease, dose-dependent chronic infection, and immune responses that correlate

  20. Use of a safe, reproducible, and rapid aerosol delivery method to study infection by Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei in mice.

    PubMed

    Lafontaine, Eric R; Zimmerman, Shawn M; Shaffer, Teresa L; Michel, Frank; Gao, Xiudan; Hogan, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiologic agent of melioidosis, is a saprophytic bacterium readily isolated from wet soils of countries bordering the equator. Burkholderia mallei is a host-adapted clone of B. pseudomallei that does not persist outside of its equine reservoir and causes the zoonosis glanders, which is endemic in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America. Infection by these organisms typically occurs via percutaneous inoculation or inhalation of aerosols, and the most common manifestation is severe pneumonia leading to fatal bacteremia. Glanders and melioidosis are difficult to diagnose and require prolonged antibiotic therapy with low success rates. There are no vaccines available to protect against either Burkholderia species, and there is concern regarding their use as biological warfare agents given that B. mallei has previously been utilized in this manner. Hence, experiments were performed to establish a mouse model of aerosol infection to study the organisms and develop countermeasures. Using a hand-held aerosolizer, BALB/c mice were inoculated intratracheally with strains B. pseudomallei 1026b and B. mallei ATCC23344 and growth of the agents in the lungs, as well as dissemination to the spleen, were examined. Mice infected with 10(2), 10(3) and 10(4) organisms were unable to control growth of B. mallei in the lungs and bacteria rapidly disseminated to the spleen. Though similar results were observed in mice inoculated with 10(3) and 10(4) B. pseudomallei cells, animals infected with 10(2) organisms controlled bacterial replication in the lungs, dissemination to the spleen, and the extent of bacteremia. Analysis of sera from mice surviving acute infection revealed that animals produced antibodies against antigens known to be targets of the immune response in humans. Taken together, these data show that small volume aerosol inoculation of mice results in acute disease, dose-dependent chronic infection, and immune responses that correlate

  1. Disorders of phonological encoding.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, B

    1992-03-01

    Studies of phonological disturbances in aphasic speech are reviewed. It is argued that failure to test for error consistency in individual patients makes it generally improper to draw inferences about specific disorders of phonological encoding. A minimalist interpretation of available data on phonological errors is therefore proposed that involves variable loss of information in transmission between processing subsystems. Proposals for systematic loss or corruption of phonological information in lexical representations or in translation subsystems is shown to be inadequately grounded. The review concludes with some simple methodological prescriptions for future research.

  2. Distinct human antibody response to the biological warfare agent Burkholderia mallei.

    PubMed

    Varga, John J; Vigil, Adam; DeShazer, David; Waag, David M; Felgner, Philip; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2012-10-01

    The genetic similarity between Burkholderia mallei (glanders) and Burkholderia pseudomallei (melioidosis) had led to the general assumption that pathogenesis of each bacterium would be similar. In 2000, the first human case of glanders in North America since 1945 was reported in a microbiology laboratory worker. Leveraging the availability of pre-exposure sera for this individual and employing the same well-characterized protein array platform that has been previously used to study a large cohort of melioidosis patients in southeast Asia, we describe the antibody response in a human with glanders. Analysis of 156 peptides present on the array revealed antibodies against 17 peptides with a > 2-fold increase in this infection. Unexpectedly, when the glanders data were compared with a previous data set from B. pseudomallei infections, there were only two highly increased antibodies shared between these two infections. These findings have implications in the diagnosis and treatment of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei infections.

  3. Workshop on treatment of and postexposure prophylaxis for Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei Infection, 2010.

    PubMed

    Lipsitz, Rebecca; Garges, Susan; Aurigemma, Rosemarie; Baccam, Prasith; Blaney, David D; Cheng, Allen C; Currie, Bart J; Dance, David; Gee, Jay E; Larsen, Joseph; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Morrow, Meredith G; Norton, Robert; O'Mara, Elizabeth; Peacock, Sharon J; Pesik, Nicki; Rogers, L Paige; Schweizer, Herbert P; Steinmetz, Ivo; Tan, Gladys; Tan, Patrick; Wiersinga, W Joost; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Smith, Theresa L

    2012-12-01

    The US Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise convened subject matter experts at the 2010 HHS Burkholderia Workshop to develop consensus recommendations for postexposure prophylaxis against and treatment for Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei infections, which cause melioidosis and glanders, respectively. Drugs recommended by consensus of the participants are ceftazidime or meropenem for initial intensive therapy, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole or amoxicillin/clavulanic acid for eradication therapy. For postexposure prophylaxis, recommended drugs are trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole or co-amoxiclav. To improve the timely diagnosis of melioidosis and glanders, further development and wide distribution of rapid diagnostic assays were also recommended. Standardized animal models and B. pseudomallei strains are needed for further development of therapeutic options. Training for laboratory technicians and physicians would facilitate better diagnosis and treatment options.

  4. σ54-Dependent Response to Nitrogen Limitation and Virulence in Burkholderia cenocepacia Strain H111.

    PubMed

    Lardi, Martina; Aguilar, Claudio; Pedrioli, Alessandro; Omasits, Ulrich; Suppiger, Angela; Cárcamo-Oyarce, Gerardo; Schmid, Nadine; Ahrens, Christian H; Eberl, Leo; Pessi, Gabriella

    2015-06-15

    Members of the genus Burkholderia are versatile bacteria capable of colonizing highly diverse environmental niches. In this study, we investigated the global response of the opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia H111 to nitrogen limitation at the transcript and protein expression levels. In addition to a classical response to nitrogen starvation, including the activation of glutamine synthetase, PII proteins, and the two-component regulatory system NtrBC, B. cenocepacia H111 also upregulated polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) accumulation and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production in response to nitrogen shortage. A search for consensus sequences in promoter regions of nitrogen-responsive genes identified a σ(54) consensus sequence. The mapping of the σ(54) regulon as well as the characterization of a σ(54) mutant suggests an important role of σ(54) not only in control of nitrogen metabolism but also in the virulence of this organism. PMID:25841012

  5. Quorum Sensing Controls Swarming Motility of Burkholderia glumae through Regulation of Rhamnolipids.

    PubMed

    Nickzad, Arvin; Lépine, François; Déziel, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia glumae is a plant pathogenic bacterium that uses an acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing system to regulate protein secretion, oxalate production and major virulence determinants such as toxoflavin and flagella. B. glumae also releases surface-active rhamnolipids. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia thailandensis, rhamnolipids, along with flagella, are required for the social behavior called swarming motility. In the present study, we demonstrate that quorum sensing positively regulates the production of rhamnolipids in B. glumae and that rhamnolipids are necessary for swarming motility also in this species. We show that a rhlA- mutant, which is unable to produce rhamnolipids, loses its ability to swarm, and that this can be complemented by providing exogenous rhamnolipids. Impaired rhamnolipid production in a quorum sensing-deficient B. glumae mutant is the main factor responsible for its defective swarming motility behaviour. PMID:26047513

  6. Synthesis of the tetrasaccharide outer core fragment of Burkholderia multivorans lipooligosaccharide.

    PubMed

    Ziaco, Marcello; De Castro, Cristina; Silipo, Alba; Corsaro, Maria Michela; Molinaro, Antonio; Iadonisi, Alfonso; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Bedini, Emiliano

    2015-02-11

    The first synthesis of the outer core fragment of Burkholderia multivorans lipooligosaccharide [β-D-Glc-(1→3)-α-D-GalNAc-(1→3)-β-D-GalNAc-(1→3)-L-Rha] as α-allyl tetrasaccharide was accomplished. The glycosylations involving GalNAc units were studied in depth testing them under several conditions. This allowed the building of both the α- and the β-configured glycosidic bonds by employing the same GalNAc glycosyl donor, thus considerably shortening the total number of synthetic steps. The target tetrasaccharide was synthesized with an allyl aglycone to allow its future conjugation with an immunogenic protein en route to the development of a synthetic neoglycoconjugate vaccine against the Burkholderia cepacia pathogens.

  7. Properties of Polyhydroxyalkanoate Granules and Bioemulsifiers from Pseudomonas sp. and Burkholderia sp. Isolates Growing on Glucose.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Laís Postai; Castellane, Tereza Cristina Luque; Lopes, Erica Mendes; de Macedo Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes; Alves, Lúcia Maria Carareto

    2016-03-01

    A Burkholderia and Pseudomonas species designated as AB4 and AS1, respectively, were isolated from soil containing decomposing straw or sugar cane bagasse collected from Brazil. This study sought to evaluate the capacities of culture media, cell-free medium, and crude lysate preparations (containing PHB inclusion bodies) from bacterial cell cultures to stabilize emulsions with several hydrophobic compounds. Four conditions showed good production of bioemulsifiers (E24 ≥ 50 %), headed by substantially cell-free media from bacterial cell cultures in which bacterial isolates from Burkholderia sp. strain AB4 and Pseudomonas sp. strain AS1 were grown. Our results revealed that the both isolates (AB4 and AS1 strains) exhibited high emulsification indices (indicating usefulness in bioremediation) and good stabilities. PMID:26578147

  8. Enhanced bioconversion of ethylene glycol to glycolic acid by a newly isolated Burkholderia sp. EG13.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaoxin; Ma, Zhengfei; Yang, Limin; Ma, Jiangquan

    2014-10-01

    Burkholderia sp. EG13 with high ethylene glycol-oxidizing activity was isolated from soil, which could be used for the synthesis of glycolic acid from the oxidation of ethylene glycol. Using the resting cells of Burkholderia sp. EG13 as biocatalysts, the optimum reaction temperature and pH were 30 °C and 6.0, respectively. After 24 h of biotransformation, the yield of glycolic acid from 200 mM ethylene glycol was 98.8 %. Furthermore, an integrated bioprocess for the production of glycolic acid which involved in situ product removal (ISPR) was investigated. Using fed-batch method with ISPR, a total of 793 mM glycolic acid has been accumulated in the reaction mixture after the 4th feed.

  9. σ54-Dependent Response to Nitrogen Limitation and Virulence in Burkholderia cenocepacia Strain H111

    PubMed Central

    Lardi, Martina; Aguilar, Claudio; Pedrioli, Alessandro; Omasits, Ulrich; Suppiger, Angela; Cárcamo-Oyarce, Gerardo; Schmid, Nadine; Ahrens, Christian H.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the genus Burkholderia are versatile bacteria capable of colonizing highly diverse environmental niches. In this study, we investigated the global response of the opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia H111 to nitrogen limitation at the transcript and protein expression levels. In addition to a classical response to nitrogen starvation, including the activation of glutamine synthetase, PII proteins, and the two-component regulatory system NtrBC, B. cenocepacia H111 also upregulated polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) accumulation and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production in response to nitrogen shortage. A search for consensus sequences in promoter regions of nitrogen-responsive genes identified a σ54 consensus sequence. The mapping of the σ54 regulon as well as the characterization of a σ54 mutant suggests an important role of σ54 not only in control of nitrogen metabolism but also in the virulence of this organism. PMID:25841012

  10. Prevalence and Identification of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Near-Neighbor Species in the Malabar Coastal Region of India.

    PubMed

    Peddayelachagiri, Bhavani V; Paul, Soumya; Nagaraj, Sowmya; Gogoi, Madhurjya; Sripathy, Murali H; Batra, Harsh V

    2016-09-01

    Accurate identification of pathogens with biowarfare importance requires detection tools that specifically differentiate them from near-neighbor species. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of a fatal disease melioidosis, is one such biothreat agent whose differentiation from its near-neighbor species is always a challenge. This is because of its phenotypic similarity with other Burkholderia species which have a wide spread geographical distribution with shared environmental niches. Melioidosis is a major public health concern in endemic regions including Southeast Asia and northern Australia. In India, the disease is still considered to be emerging. Prevalence surveys of this saprophytic bacterium in environment are under-reported in the country. A major challenge in this case is the specific identification and differentiation of B. pseudomallei from the growing list of species of Burkholderia genus. The objectives of this study included examining the prevalence of B. pseudomallei and near-neighbor species in coastal region of South India and development of a novel detection tool for specific identification and differentiation of Burkholderia species. Briefly, we analyzed soil and water samples collected from Malabar coastal region of Kerala, South India for prevalence of B. pseudomallei. The presumptive Burkholderia isolates were identified using recA PCR assay. The recA PCR assay identified 22 of the total 40 presumptive isolates as Burkholderia strains (22.72% and 77.27% B. pseudomallei and non-pseudomallei Burkholderia respectively). In order to identify each isolate screened, we performed recA and 16S rDNA sequencing. This two genes sequencing revealed that the presumptive isolates included B. pseudomallei, non-pseudomallei Burkholderia as well as non-Burkholderia strains. Furthermore, a gene termed D-beta hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (bdha) was studied both in silico and in vitro for accurate detection of Burkholderia genus. The optimized bdha

  11. Prevalence and Identification of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Near-Neighbor Species in the Malabar Coastal Region of India

    PubMed Central

    Peddayelachagiri, Bhavani V.; Paul, Soumya; Nagaraj, Sowmya; Gogoi, Madhurjya; Sripathy, Murali H.; Batra, Harsh V.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate identification of pathogens with biowarfare importance requires detection tools that specifically differentiate them from near-neighbor species. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of a fatal disease melioidosis, is one such biothreat agent whose differentiation from its near-neighbor species is always a challenge. This is because of its phenotypic similarity with other Burkholderia species which have a wide spread geographical distribution with shared environmental niches. Melioidosis is a major public health concern in endemic regions including Southeast Asia and northern Australia. In India, the disease is still considered to be emerging. Prevalence surveys of this saprophytic bacterium in environment are under-reported in the country. A major challenge in this case is the specific identification and differentiation of B. pseudomallei from the growing list of species of Burkholderia genus. The objectives of this study included examining the prevalence of B. pseudomallei and near-neighbor species in coastal region of South India and development of a novel detection tool for specific identification and differentiation of Burkholderia species. Briefly, we analyzed soil and water samples collected from Malabar coastal region of Kerala, South India for prevalence of B. pseudomallei. The presumptive Burkholderia isolates were identified using recA PCR assay. The recA PCR assay identified 22 of the total 40 presumptive isolates as Burkholderia strains (22.72% and 77.27% B. pseudomallei and non-pseudomallei Burkholderia respectively). In order to identify each isolate screened, we performed recA and 16S rDNA sequencing. This two genes sequencing revealed that the presumptive isolates included B. pseudomallei, non-pseudomallei Burkholderia as well as non-Burkholderia strains. Furthermore, a gene termed D-beta hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (bdha) was studied both in silico and in vitro for accurate detection of Burkholderia genus. The optimized bdha

  12. Mining Host-Pathogen Protein Interactions to Characterize Burkholderia mallei Infectivity Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Memišević, Vesna; Zavaljevski, Nela; Rajagopala, Seesandra V.; Kwon, Keehwan; Pieper, Rembert; DeShazer, David; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pathogenicity relies on protein virulence factors to control and promote bacterial internalization, survival, and replication within eukaryotic host cells. We recently used yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screening to identify a small set of novel Burkholderia proteins that were shown to attenuate disease progression in an aerosol infection animal model using the virulent Burkholderia mallei ATCC 23344 strain. Here, we performed an extended analysis of primarily nine B. mallei virulence factors and their interactions with human proteins to map out how the bacteria can influence and alter host processes and pathways. Specifically, we employed topological analyses to assess the connectivity patterns of targeted host proteins, identify modules of pathogen-interacting host proteins linked to processes promoting infectivity, and evaluate the effect of crosstalk among the identified host protein modules. Overall, our analysis showed that the targeted host proteins generally had a large number of interacting partners and interacted with other host proteins that were also targeted by B. mallei proteins. We also introduced a novel Host-Pathogen Interaction Alignment (HPIA) algorithm and used it to explore similarities between host-pathogen interactions of B. mallei, Yersinia pestis, and Salmonella enterica. We inferred putative roles of B. mallei proteins based on the roles of their aligned Y. pestis and S. enterica partners and showed that up to 73% of the predicted roles matched existing annotations. A key insight into Burkholderia pathogenicity derived from these analyses of Y2H host-pathogen interactions is the identification of eukaryotic-specific targeted cellular mechanisms, including the ubiquitination degradation system and the use of the focal adhesion pathway as a fulcrum for transmitting mechanical forces and regulatory signals. This provides the mechanisms to modulate and adapt the host-cell environment for the successful establishment of host infections

  13. Structural investigation of the lipopolysaccharide O-chain isolated from Burkholderia fungorum strain DSM 17061.

    PubMed

    De Felice, Antonia; Di Lorenzo, Flaviana; Scherlach, Kirstin; Ross, Claudia; Silipo, Alba; Hertweck, Christian; Molinaro, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Gram-negative bacteria exhibit lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) on their outer membrane surface. LPS is considered one of the most potent bacterial virulence factors. Here we report the elucidation of the LPS O-chain structure isolated from Burkholderia fungorum, a bacterium isolated from the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium that can act as a pathogen for plants and domesticated animals. The structure was determined by the employment of detailed chemical and NMR spectroscopy analyses as the following.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia sp. Strain CCA53, Isolated from Leaf Soil

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Zen-ichiro; Yusoff, Mohd Zulkhairi Mohd; Nakashima, Nobutaka; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain CCA53 was isolated from leaf soil collected in Higashi-Hiroshima City in Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan. Here, we present a draft genome sequence of this strain, which consists of a total of 4 contigs containing 6,647,893 bp, with a G+C content of 67.0% and comprising 9,329 predicted coding sequences. PMID:27389268

  15. Burkholderia kirstenboschensis sp. nov. nodulates papilionoid legumes indigenous to South Africa.

    PubMed

    Steenkamp, Emma T; van Zyl, Elritha; Beukes, Chrizelle W; Avontuur, Juanita R; Chan, Wai Yin; Palmer, Marike; Mthombeni, Lunghile S; Phalane, Francina L; Sereme, T Karabo; Venter, Stephanus N

    2015-12-01

    Despite the diversity of Burkholderia species known to nodulate legumes in introduced and native regions, relatively few taxa have been formally described. For example, the Cape Floristic Region of South Africa is thought to represent one of the major centres of diversity for the rhizobial members of Burkholderia, yet only five species have been described from legumes occurring in this region and numerous are still awaiting taxonomic treatment. Here, we investigated the taxonomic status of 12 South African root-nodulating Burkholderia isolates from native papilionoid legumes (Hypocalyptus coluteoides, H. oxalidifolius, H. sophoroides and Virgilia oroboides). Analysis of four gene regions (16S rRNA, recA, atpD and rpoB) revealed that the isolates represent a genealogically unique and exclusive assemblage within the genus. Its distinctness was supported by all other aspects of the polyphasic approach utilized, including the genome-based criteria DNA-DNA hybridization (≥70.9%) and average nucleotide identities (≥96%). We accordingly propose the name B. kirstenboschensis sp. nov. for this taxon with isolate Kb15(T) (=LMG 28727(T); =SARC 695(T)) as its type strain. Our data showed that intraspecific genome size differences (≥0.81 Mb) and the occurrence of large DNA regions that are apparently unique to single individuals (16-23% of an isolate's genome) can significantly limit the value of data obtained from DNA-DNA hybridization experiments. Substitution of DNA-DNA hybridization with whole genome sequencing as a prerequisite for the description of Burkholderia species will undoubtedly speed up the pace at which their diversity are documented, especially in hyperdiverse regions such as the Cape Floristic Region.

  16. Burkholderia grimmiae sp. nov., isolated from a xerophilous moss (Grimmia montana).

    PubMed

    Tian, Yang; Kong, Bi He; Liu, Su Lin; Li, Chun Li; Yu, Rong; Liu, Lei; Li, Yan Hong

    2013-06-01

    A Gram-staining-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming bacterium, designated strain R27(T), was isolated from the moss Grimmia montana, collected from Beijing Songshan National Nature Reserve, China, and characterized by using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The predominant fatty acids of strain R27(T) were C18:1ω7c (33.6%), C16:0 (16.3%), summed feature 3 (C16:1ω7c and/or C16:1ω6c; 15.8%) and C17:0 cyclo (8.7%) and its major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, three uncharacterized aminolipids and an unknown phospholipid. Strain R27(T) contained Q-8 as the dominant isoprenoid quinone and the G+C content of its genomic DNA was 64.6 mol%. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison, strain R27(T) showed 99.1% similarity to the closest related type strain, Burkholderia zhejiangensis OP-1(T), and 97.6% similarity to Burkholderia glathei ATCC 29195(T). However, the DNA-DNA relatedness between strain R27(T) and B. zhejiangensis CCTCC AB 2010354(T) and B. glathei ATCC 29195(T) was 10.2 and 14.9%, respectively. Based on 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequence similarities and phenotypic and chemotaxonomic data, strain R27(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Burkholderia, for which the name Burkholderia grimmiae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is R27(T) (=CGMCC 1.11013(T) =DSM 25160(T)).

  17. Insights into the role of extracellular polysaccharides in Burkholderia adaptation to different environments.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana S; Silva, Inês N; Oliveira, Vítor H; Cunha, Raquel; Moreira, Leonilde M

    2011-01-01

    The genus Burkholderia comprises more than 60 species able to adapt to a wide range of environments such as soil and water, and also colonize and infect plants and animals. They have large genomes with multiple replicons and high gene number, allowing these bacteria to thrive in very different niches. Among the properties of bacteria from the genus Burkholderia is the ability to produce several types of exopolysaccharides (EPSs). The most common one, cepacian, is produced by the majority of the strains examined irrespective of whether or not they belong to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). Cepacian biosynthesis proceeds by a Wzy-dependent mechanism, and some of the B. cepacia exopolysaccharide (Bce) proteins have been functionally characterized. In vitro studies showed that cepacian protects bacterial cells challenged with external stresses. Regarding virulence, bacterial cells with the ability to produce EPS are more virulent in several animal models of infection than their isogenic non-producing mutants. Although the production of EPS within the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients has not been demonstrated, the in vitro assessment of the mucoid phenotype in serial Bcc isolates from CF patients colonized for several years showed that mucoid to non-mucoid transitions are relatively frequent. This morphotype variation can be induced under laboratory conditions by exposing cells to stress such as high antibiotic concentration. Clonal isolates where mucoid to non-mucoid transition had occurred showed that during lung infection, genomic rearrangements, and mutations had taken place. Other phenotypic changes include variations in motility, chemotaxis, biofilm formation, bacterial survival rate under nutrient starvation and virulence. In this review, we summarize major findings related to EPS biosynthesis by Burkholderia and the implications in broader regulatory mechanisms important for cell adaptation to the different niches colonized by these bacteria.

  18. Toluene 2-monooxygenase-dependent growth of Burkholderia cepacia G4/PR1 on diethyl ether

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, H.G.; Newman, L.M.; Wackett, L.P.; Sadowsky, M.J.

    1997-04-01

    There is considerable interest in the biodegradation of solvents and fuel additives such as diethyl ether and tert-butyl methyl either. The present study investigated if toluene 2-monooxygenase would allow Burkholderia cepacia G4/PR1 to grow on either compounds via novel metabolic pathways. In addition, the role of enzyme induction in allowing growth on compounds not resembling toluene or phenol was studied. 29 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Improved cultural detection of Burkholderia cepacia from sputum in patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, R; Moore, J; Shaw, A; Dunbar, K; Dodd, M; Webb, K; Redmond, A; Crowe, M; Murphy, P; Peacock, S; Elborn, J

    2001-01-01

    Aims—To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of two selective media for the isolation of Burkholderia cepacia from sputum specimens in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Methods—In total, 149 expectorated sputum specimens from 113 patients with CF (32 cepacia colonised patients and 81 non-cepacia colonised patients) attending three CF centres were examined for the presence of B cepacia on two selective media: (1) MAST selective agar, a commercially available selective medium widely used in the UK and (2) BCSA (B cepacia selective agar), a new medium recently described, which is used predominantly in North America. Results—Burkholderia cepacia was isolated from 53 of 149 (35.6%) specimens examined, representing 32 of 113 (28.3%) patients, using both the MAST and BCSA media. Growth was most rapid on BCSA with all (53 of 53) isolates detectable after 48 hours, compared with 50 of the 53 isolates on MAST agar, with the remaining three isolates detectable at five days. Twenty eight contaminants were identified on MAST agar and 13 on BCSA agar; mainly Alcaligenes xylosoxidans and yeast on MAST agar and Flavobacterium indologenes on BCSA medium. BCSA was equivalent to MAST agar in its ability to isolate B cepacia from patients with CF with a history of B cepacia infection. Conclusions—The increased selectivity and reduced time to detection of BCSA makes it an attractive alternative to MAST. However, its present limited commercial availability in the UK may delay its use in routine diagnostic laboratories because of complications with media preparation and quality control. Key Words: Burkholderia cepacia • Burkholderia cepacia selective agar • MAST agar • cystic fibrosis PMID:11577134

  20. Evaluation of six commercial DNA extraction kits for recovery of Burkholderia pseudomallei DNA.

    PubMed

    Marques, Maria Angela de Mello; Zimmermann, Pia; Messelhäußer, Ute; Sing, Andreas

    2012-12-01

    Six commercially available DNA extraction kits, as well as thermal lysis and proteinase K DNA extraction were evaluated regarding bacterial inactivation, DNA yield and purity, and their use in a Burkholderia pseudomallei real-time PCR. While all methods successfully inactivated the bacteria, by measuring DNA purity and the level of detection by real-time PCR, the proteinase K method was the most sensitive.

  1. Structural and immunological characterization of Burkholderia pseudomallei O-polysaccharide-flagellin protein conjugates.

    PubMed Central

    Brett, P J; Woods, D E

    1996-01-01

    The O-polysaccharide moiety of Burkholderia pseudomallei 319a lipopolysaccharide was covalently linked to flagellin protein isolated from the same strain. A glycoconjugate incorporating adipic acid dihydrazide as a spacer molecule elicited high-titer immunoglobulin G responses to both the protein and carbohydrate components of the construct. This immunoglobulin G was capable of protecting diabetic rats from challenge with a heterologous B. pseudomallei strain. PMID:8698517

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia sp. Strain CCA53, Isolated from Leaf Soil.

    PubMed

    Akita, Hironaga; Kimura, Zen-Ichiro; Yusoff, Mohd Zulkhairi Mohd; Nakashima, Nobutaka; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain CCA53 was isolated from leaf soil collected in Higashi-Hiroshima City in Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan. Here, we present a draft genome sequence of this strain, which consists of a total of 4 contigs containing 6,647,893 bp, with a G+C content of 67.0% and comprising 9,329 predicted coding sequences. PMID:27389268

  3. Biodegradation of PAHs by Burkholderia sp. VITRSB1 Isolated from Marine Sediments.

    PubMed

    Revathy, T; Jayasri, M A; Suthindhiran, K

    2015-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) pollution to the environment is a major threat to the living organisms, and hence the degradation of these PAHs is necessary. Studies on PAHs degrading bacteria have focussed on terrestrial microbes and the potential of marine derived microbes is undermined. Herein we report the isolation and characterization of PAHs degrading Burkholderia sp. from lagoon sediments collected at the Southern coast of India. The strain was Gram negative, rod-shaped, motile, and ∼2-5 μm in length. Based on the phylogenetic data the strain was identified as Burkholderia and designated as VITRSB1. Initial PAHs degradation ability of the strain was assessed using basal salt medium supplemented with diesel, kerosene, toluene, aniline, naphthalene, and phenol. The strain was found to be effectively degrading kerosene, diesel, toluene, and aniline even at higher concentration (1%). However, naphthalene and aniline were degraded only at lower concentration (0.1%) and phenol, camphor, and DAP inhibited the growth of the strain. Furthermore, the degraded end products of the PAHs were determined using FTIR. Notably, none of the end products were found to be toxic to the biosphere. Our results indicate that the isolated Burkholderia sp. could be a prospective candidate for the effective degradation of selective PAHs. PMID:26605106

  4. Extreme antimicrobial peptide and polymyxin B resistance in the genus Burkholderia.

    PubMed

    Loutet, Slade A; Valvano, Miguel A

    2011-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides and polymyxins are a group of naturally occurring antibiotics that can also possess immunomodulatory activities. They are considered a new source of antibiotics for treating infections by bacteria that are resistant to conventional antibiotics. Members of the genus Burkholderia, which includes various human pathogens, are inherently resistant to antimicrobial peptides. The resistance is several orders of magnitude higher than that of other Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This review summarizes our current understanding of antimicrobial peptide and polymyxin B resistance in the genus Burkholderia. These bacteria possess major and minor resistance mechanisms that will be described in detail. Recent studies have revealed that many other emerging Gram-negative opportunistic pathogens may also be inherently resistant to antimicrobial peptides and polymyxins and we propose that Burkholderia sp. are a model system to investigate the molecular basis of the resistance in extremely resistant bacteria. Understanding resistance in these types of bacteria will be important if antimicrobial peptides come to be used regularly for the treatment of infections by susceptible bacteria because this may lead to increased resistance in the species that are currently susceptible and may also open up new niches for opportunistic pathogens with high inherent resistance.

  5. Functional and genomic insights into the pathogenesis of Burkholderia species to rice.

    PubMed

    Naughton, Lynn M; An, Shi-qi; Hwang, Ingyu; Chou, Shan-Ho; He, Yong-Qiang; Tang, Ji-Liang; Ryan, Robert P; Dow, J Maxwell

    2016-03-01

    A number of species of bacteria from the genus Burkholderia have been shown to be causal agents of diseases of rice. These diseases, caused by Burkholderia glumae, B. gladioli and B. plantarii, are becoming increasingly common across the globe. This is particularly so for B. glumae, whose ability to grow at elevated temperatures suggests that it may become a prevalent problem in an era of global warming. Despite the increasing threat to rice, relatively little is known about the virulence mechanisms employed by these pathogens. Work over the last 5 years has provided an increasing insight into these factors and their control by environmental and other cues. In addition, the determination of a number of genome sequences has allowed bioinformatic predictions of further possible mechanisms, which can now be investigated experimentally. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of virulence of Burkholderia to rice, to include discussion of the roles of toxins, type II secreted enzymes, type III secreted effectors and motility as well as their regulation by quorum sensing, two-component systems and cyclic di-GMP signalling. Finally, we consider a number of approaches for the control of bacterial virulence through the modulation of quorum sensing and toxin degradation.

  6. Extreme antimicrobial Peptide and polymyxin B resistance in the genus burkholderia.

    PubMed

    Loutet, Slade A; Valvano, Miguel A

    2011-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides and polymyxins are a group of naturally occurring antibiotics that can also possess immunomodulatory activities. They are considered a new source of antibiotics for treating infections by bacteria that are resistant to conventional antibiotics. Members of the genus Burkholderia, which includes various human pathogens, are inherently resistant to antimicrobial peptides. The resistance is several orders of magnitude higher than that of other Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This review summarizes our current understanding of antimicrobial peptide and polymyxin B resistance in the genus Burkholderia. These bacteria possess major and minor resistance mechanisms that will be described in detail. Recent studies have revealed that many other emerging Gram-negative opportunistic pathogens may also be inherently resistant to antimicrobial peptides and polymyxins and we propose that Burkholderia sp. are a model system to investigate the molecular basis of the resistance in extremely resistant bacteria. Understanding resistance in these types of bacteria will be important if antimicrobial peptides come to be used regularly for the treatment of infections by susceptible bacteria because this may lead to increased resistance in the species that are currently susceptible and may also open up new niches for opportunistic pathogens with high inherent resistance. PMID:21811491

  7. Short Chain N-acyl Homoserine Lactone Production by Soil Isolate Burkholderia sp. Strain A9

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian Woon; Koh, Chong-Lek; Sam, Choon-Kook; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2013-01-01

    In the bacteria kingdom, quorum sensing (QS) is a cell-to-cell communication that relies on the production of and response to specific signaling molecules. In proteobacteria, N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) are the well-studied signaling molecules. The present study aimed to characterize the production of AHL of a bacterial strain A9 isolated from a Malaysian tropical soil. Strain A9 was identified as Burkholderia sp. using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and 16S rDNA nucleotide sequence analysis. AHL production by A9 was detected with two biosensors, namely Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Escherichia coli [pSB401]. Thin layer chromatography results showed N–hexanoylhomoserine lactone (C6-HSL) and N–octanoylhomoserine lactone (C8-HSL) production. Unequivocal identification of C6-HSL and C8-HSL was achieved by high resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. We have demonstrated that Burkholderia sp. strain A9 produces AHLs that are known to be produced by other Burkholderia spp. with CepI/CepR homologs. PMID:24084115

  8. Invasion of Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates into lung epithelial cells involves glycolipid receptors.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Tracy; Callaghan, Máire; McClean, Siobhán

    2010-12-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is a group of opportunistic cystic fibrosis (CF) pathogens that invade lung epithelial cells. The mechanisms of invasion are poorly understood, in particular, the receptors utilised by this bacterium in the invasion process have not been identified. The aim of this study was to investigate the epithelial receptors involved in the invasion of Bcc isolates. We confirmed that invasion into two lung epithelial cell lines (16HBE14o- and CFBE41o-) which have a non-CF and CF phenotype, respectively, is receptor mediated and showed that pre-treatment of these epithelial cell lines with α- or β-galactosidase reduced invasion of isolates of two species of Bcc, Burkholderia multivorans and Burkholderia cenocepacia. In contrast, removal of mucin had no significant effect. Biotinylated Bcc strains were shown to bind to purified glycolipids separated by thin layer chromatography, albeit different patterns of binding were associated with different strains. Invasion of CF lung epithelial cells (CFBE41o-) by all three Bcc strains examined was significantly reduced by treatment of cells with inhibitors of glycolipid biosynthesis. Although the specific glycolipid involved in each case has not been elucidated, it is apparent that invasion of lung epithelial cells is mediated via binding to glycosphingolipid receptors.

  9. Global Analysis of the Burkholderia thailandensis Quorum Sensing-Controlled Regulon

    PubMed Central

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Brittnacher, Mitchell; Jacobs, Michael; Armour, Christopher D.; Radey, Mathew; Schneider, Emily; Phattarasokul, Somsak; Bunt, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis contains three acyl-homoserine lactone quorum sensing circuits and has two additional LuxR homologs. To identify B. thailandensis quorum sensing-controlled genes, we carried out transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses of quorum sensing mutants and their parent. The analyses were grounded in the fact that we identified genes coding for factors shown previously to be regulated by quorum sensing among a larger set of quorum-controlled genes. We also found that genes coding for contact-dependent inhibition were induced by quorum sensing and confirmed that specific quorum sensing mutants had a contact-dependent inhibition defect. Additional quorum-controlled genes included those for the production of numerous secondary metabolites, an uncharacterized exopolysaccharide, and a predicted chitin-binding protein. This study provides insights into the roles of the three quorum sensing circuits in the saprophytic lifestyle of B. thailandensis, and it provides a foundation on which to build an understanding of the roles of quorum sensing in the biology of B. thailandensis and the closely related pathogenic Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei. PMID:24464461

  10. Biodegradation of PAHs by Burkholderia sp. VITRSB1 Isolated from Marine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Revathy, T.; Jayasri, M. A.; Suthindhiran, K.

    2015-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) pollution to the environment is a major threat to the living organisms, and hence the degradation of these PAHs is necessary. Studies on PAHs degrading bacteria have focussed on terrestrial microbes and the potential of marine derived microbes is undermined. Herein we report the isolation and characterization of PAHs degrading Burkholderia sp. from lagoon sediments collected at the Southern coast of India. The strain was Gram negative, rod-shaped, motile, and ∼2–5 μm in length. Based on the phylogenetic data the strain was identified as Burkholderia and designated as VITRSB1. Initial PAHs degradation ability of the strain was assessed using basal salt medium supplemented with diesel, kerosene, toluene, aniline, naphthalene, and phenol. The strain was found to be effectively degrading kerosene, diesel, toluene, and aniline even at higher concentration (1%). However, naphthalene and aniline were degraded only at lower concentration (0.1%) and phenol, camphor, and DAP inhibited the growth of the strain. Furthermore, the degraded end products of the PAHs were determined using FTIR. Notably, none of the end products were found to be toxic to the biosphere. Our results indicate that the isolated Burkholderia sp. could be a prospective candidate for the effective degradation of selective PAHs. PMID:26605106

  11. Burkholderia silvatlantica sp. nov., a diazotrophic bacterium associated with sugar cane and maize.

    PubMed

    Perin, L; Martínez-Aguilar, L; Paredes-Valdez, G; Baldani, J I; Estrada-de Los Santos, P; Reis, V M; Caballero-Mellado, J

    2006-08-01

    In a previous study, nitrogen-fixing isolates were recovered from the rhizosphere of maize and from surface-sterilized leaves of sugar cane cultivated in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, these isolates were identified as belonging to the genus Burkholderia, and whole-cell-protein profiles demonstrated that they are closely related to each other. In the present study, novel isolates were recovered from the roots of different sugar-cane varieties cultivated in diverse geographical regions of Brazil. Twenty-one nitrogen-fixing isolates were analysed using polyphasic taxonomy criteria, including DNA-DNA relatedness, 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, fatty acid profiles, whole-cell-protein patterns and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis profiles, as well as morphological, physiological and biochemical characterization. The analysis confirmed that these isolates belong to a novel species within the genus Burkholderia, for which the name Burkholderia silvatlantica sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain, SRMrh-20(T) (=LMG 23149(T)=ATCC BAA-1244(T)), was isolated from the rhizosphere of maize var. Avantis A2345 cultivated in Seropédica, Rio de Janeiro. PMID:16902033

  12. Diverse Burkholderia Species Isolated from Soils in the Southern United States with No Evidence of B. pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Hall, Carina M; Busch, Joseph D; Shippy, Kenzie; Allender, Christopher J; Kaestli, Mirjam; Mayo, Mark; Sahl, Jason W; Schupp, James M; Colman, Rebecca E; Keim, Paul; Currie, Bart J; Wagner, David M

    2015-01-01

    The global distribution of the soil-dwelling bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, causative agent of melioidosis, is poorly understood. We used established culturing methods developed for B. pseudomallei to isolate Burkholderia species from soil collected at 18 sampling sites in three states in the southern United States (Arizona (n = 4), Florida (n = 7), and Louisiana (n = 7)). Using multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) of seven genes, we identified 35 Burkholderia isolates from these soil samples. All species belonged to the B. cepacia complex (Bcc), including B. cenocepacia, B. cepacia, B. contaminans, B. diffusa, B. metallica, B. seminalis, B. vietnamiensis and two unnamed members of the Bcc. The MLST analysis provided a high level of resolution among and within these species. Despite previous clinical cases within the U.S. involving B. pseudomallei and its close phylogenetic relatives, we did not isolate any of these taxa. The Bcc contains a number of opportunistic pathogens that cause infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Interestingly, we found that B. vietnamiensis was present in soil from all three states, suggesting it may be a common component in southern U.S. soils. Most of the Burkholderia isolates collected in this study were from Florida (30/35; 86%), which may be due to the combination of relatively moist, sandy, and acidic soils found there compared to the other two states. We also investigated one MLST gene, recA, for its ability to identify species within Burkholderia. A 365bp fragment of recA recovered nearly the same species-level identification as MLST, thus demonstrating its cost effective utility when conducting environmental surveys for Burkholderia. Although we did not find B. pseudomallei, our findings document that other diverse Burkholderia species are present in soils in the southern United States.

  13. Burkholderia sp. induces functional nodules on the South African invasive legume Dipogon lignosus (Phaseoleae) in New Zealand soils.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wendy Y Y; Ridgway, Hayley J; James, Trevor K; James, Euan K; Chen, Wen-Ming; Sprent, Janet I; Young, J Peter W; Andrews, Mitchell

    2014-10-01

    The South African invasive legume Dipogon lignosus (Phaseoleae) produces nodules with both determinate and indeterminate characteristics in New Zealand (NZ) soils. Ten bacterial isolates produced functional nodules on D. lignosus. The 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences identified one isolate as Bradyrhizobium sp., one isolate as Rhizobium sp. and eight isolates as Burkholderia sp. The Bradyrhizobium sp. and Rhizobium sp. 16S rRNA sequences were identical to those of strains previously isolated from crop plants and may have originated from inocula used on crops. Both 16S rRNA and DNA recombinase A (recA) gene sequences placed the eight Burkholderia isolates separate from previously described Burkholderia rhizobial species. However, the isolates showed a very close relationship to Burkholderia rhizobial strains isolated from South African plants with respect to their nitrogenase iron protein (nifH), N-acyltransferase nodulation protein A (nodA) and N-acetylglucosaminyl transferase nodulation protein C (nodC) gene sequences. Gene sequences and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) PCR and repetitive element palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) banding patterns indicated that the eight Burkholderia isolates separated into five clones of one strain and three of another. One strain was tested and shown to produce functional nodules on a range of South African plants previously reported to be nodulated by Burkholderia tuberum STM678(T) which was isolated from the Cape Region. Thus, evidence is strong that the Burkholderia strains isolated here originated in South Africa and were somehow transported with the plants from their native habitat to NZ. It is possible that the strains are of a new species capable of nodulating legumes.

  14. Burkholderia insulsa sp. nov., a facultatively chemolithotrophic bacterium isolated from an arsenic-rich shallow marine hydrothermal system.

    PubMed

    Rusch, Antje; Islam, Shaer; Savalia, Pratixa; Amend, Jan P

    2015-01-01

    Enrichment cultures inoculated with hydrothermally influenced nearshore sediment from Papua New Guinea led to the isolation of an arsenic-tolerant, acidophilic, facultatively aerobic bacterial strain designated PNG-April(T). Cells of this strain were Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, motile and did not form spores. Strain PNG-April(T) grew at temperatures between 4 °C and 40 °C (optimum 30-37 °C), at pH 3.5 to 8.3 (optimum pH 5-6) and in the presence of up to 2.7% NaCl (optimum 0-1.0%). Both arsenate and arsenite were tolerated up to concentrations of at least 0.5 mM. Metabolism in strain PNG-April(T) was strictly respiratory. Heterotrophic growth occurred with O2 or nitrate as electron acceptors, and aerobic lithoautotrophic growth was observed with thiosulfate or nitrite as electron donors. The novel isolate was capable of N2-fixation. The respiratory quinones were Q-8 and Q-7. Phylogenetically, strain PNG-April(T) belongs to the genus Burkholderia and shares the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with the type strains of Burkholderia fungorum (99.8%), Burkholderia phytofirmans (98.8%), Burkholderia caledonica (98.4%) and Burkholderia sediminicola (98.4%). Differences from these related species in several physiological characteristics (lipid composition, carbohydrate utilization, enzyme profiles) and DNA-DNA hybridization suggested the isolate represents a novel species of the genus Burkholderia, for which we propose the name Burkholderia insulsa sp. nov. The type strain is PNG-April(T) ( = DSM 28142(T) = LMG 28183(T)).

  15. Diverse Burkholderia Species Isolated from Soils in the Southern United States with No Evidence of B. pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Carina M.; Busch, Joseph D.; Shippy, Kenzie; Allender, Christopher J.; Kaestli, Mirjam; Mayo, Mark; Sahl, Jason W.; Schupp, James M.; Colman, Rebecca E.; Keim, Paul; Currie, Bart J.; Wagner, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The global distribution of the soil-dwelling bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, causative agent of melioidosis, is poorly understood. We used established culturing methods developed for B. pseudomallei to isolate Burkholderia species from soil collected at 18 sampling sites in three states in the southern United States (Arizona (n = 4), Florida (n = 7), and Louisiana (n = 7)). Using multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) of seven genes, we identified 35 Burkholderia isolates from these soil samples. All species belonged to the B. cepacia complex (Bcc), including B. cenocepacia, B. cepacia, B. contaminans, B. diffusa, B. metallica, B. seminalis, B. vietnamiensis and two unnamed members of the Bcc. The MLST analysis provided a high level of resolution among and within these species. Despite previous clinical cases within the U.S. involving B. pseudomallei and its close phylogenetic relatives, we did not isolate any of these taxa. The Bcc contains a number of opportunistic pathogens that cause infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Interestingly, we found that B. vietnamiensis was present in soil from all three states, suggesting it may be a common component in southern U.S. soils. Most of the Burkholderia isolates collected in this study were from Florida (30/35; 86%), which may be due to the combination of relatively moist, sandy, and acidic soils found there compared to the other two states. We also investigated one MLST gene, recA, for its ability to identify species within Burkholderia. A 365bp fragment of recA recovered nearly the same species-level identification as MLST, thus demonstrating its cost effective utility when conducting environmental surveys for Burkholderia. Although we did not find B. pseudomallei, our findings document that other diverse Burkholderia species are present in soils in the southern United States. PMID:26600238

  16. Effect of gamma irradiation on Burkholderia thailandensis ( Burkholderia pseudomallei surrogate) survival under combinations of pH and NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Yohan; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Choi, Kyoung-Hee; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2010-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of gamma irradiation on Burkholderia thailandensis ( Burkholderia pseudomallei surrogate; potential bioterrorism agent) survival under different levels of NaCl and pH. B. thailandensis in Luria Bertani broth supplemented with NaCl (0-3%), and pH-adjusted to 4-7 was treated with gamma irradiation (0-0.5 kGy). Surviving cell counts of bacteria were then enumerated on tryptic soy agar. Data for the cell counts were also used to calculate D10 values (the dose required to reduce 1 log CFU/mL of B. thailandensis). Cell counts of B. thailandensis were decreased ( P<0.05) as irradiation dose increased, and no differences ( P≥0.05) in cell counts of the bacteria were observed among different levels of NaCl and pH. D10 values ranged from 0.04 to 0.07 kGy, regardless of NaCl and pH level. These results indicate that low doses of gamma irradiation should be a useful treatment in decreasing the potential bioterrorism bacteria, which may possibly infect humans through foods.

  17. Indole-3-Acetic Acid Produced by Burkholderia heleia Acts as a Phenylacetic Acid Antagonist to Disrupt Tropolone Biosynthesis in Burkholderia plantarii

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mengcen; Tachibana, Seiji; Murai, Yuta; Li, Li; Lau, Sharon Yu Ling; Cao, Mengchao; Zhu, Guonian; Hashimoto, Makoto; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia heleia PAK1-2 is a potent biocontrol agent isolated from rice rhizosphere, as it prevents bacterial rice seedling blight disease caused by Burkholderia plantarii. Here, we isolated a non-antibacterial metabolite from the culture fluid of B. heleia PAK1-2 that was able to suppress B. plantarii virulence and subsequently identified as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). IAA suppressed the production of tropolone in B. plantarii in a dose-dependent manner without any antibacterial and quorum quenching activity, suggesting that IAA inhibited steps of tropolone biosynthesis. Consistent with this, supplementing cultures of B. plantarii with either L-[ring-2H5]phenylalanine or [ring-2H2~5]phenylacetic acid revealed that phenylacetic acid (PAA), which is the dominant metabolite during the early growth stage, is a direct precursor of tropolone. Exposure of B. plantarii to IAA suppressed production of both PAA and tropolone. These data particularly showed that IAA produced by B. heleia PAK1-2 disrupts tropolone production during bioconversion of PAA to tropolone via the ring-rearrangement on the phenyl group of the precursor to attenuate the virulence of B. plantarii. B. heleia PAK1-2 is thus likely a microbial community coordinating bacterium in rhizosphere ecosystems, which never eliminates phytopathogens but only represses production of phytotoxins or bacteriocidal substances. PMID:26935539

  18. Rotary encoding device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A device for position encoding of a rotating shaft in which a polygonal mirror having a number of facets is mounted to the shaft and a light beam is directed towards the facets is presented. The facets of the polygonal mirror reflect the light beam such that a light spot is created on a linear array detector. An analog-to-digital converter is connected to the linear array detector for reading the position of the spot on the linear array detector. A microprocessor with memory is connected to the analog-to-digital converter to hold and manipulate the data provided by the analog-to-digital converter on the position of the spot and to compute the position of the shaft based upon the data from the analog-to-digital converter.

  19. Time encoded radiation imaging

    DOEpatents

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  20. Linear encoding device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A Linear Motion Encoding device for measuring the linear motion of a moving object is disclosed in which a light source is mounted on the moving object and a position sensitive detector such as an array photodetector is mounted on a nearby stationary object. The light source emits a light beam directed towards the array photodetector such that a light spot is created on the array. An analog-to-digital converter, connected to the array photodetector is used for reading the position of the spot on the array photodetector. A microprocessor and memory is connected to the analog-to-digital converter to hold and manipulate data provided by the analog-to-digital converter on the position of the spot and to compute the linear displacement of the moving object based upon the data from the analog-to-digital converter.

  1. 40 CFR 180.1325 - Heat-killed Burkholderia spp. strain A396 cells and spent fermentation media exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... A396 cells and spent fermentation media exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1325 Section...-killed Burkholderia spp. strain A396 cells and spent fermentation media exemption from the requirement of...-killed Burkholderia spp. strain A396 cells and spent fermentation media in or on all food...

  2. A reliable method for the selection and confirmation of transconjugants of plant growth-promoting bacteria especially plant-associated Burkholderia spp.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Mohsin; Lum, Michelle R; Chong, Allan W; Amirapu, Anjana B; Hameed, Sohail; Hirsch, Ann M

    2015-10-01

    Selectable markers, e.g., antibiotic resistance, for conjugation experiments are not always effective for slow-growing plant growth promoting bacteria such as Burkholderia. We used PCAT medium containing Congo Red for selecting Burkholderia transconjugants. This method allows for the reliable selection of transconjugants of these novel plant growth-promoting bacteria.

  3. A reverse-phase protein microarray-based screen identifies host signaling dynamics upon Burkholderia spp. infection

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chih-Yuan; Uzoma, Ijeoma; Lane, Douglas J.; Memišević, Vesna; Alem, Farhang; Yao, Kuan; Kota, Krishna P.; Bavari, Sina; Wallqvist, Anders; Hakami, Ramin M.; Panchal, Rekha G.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia is a diverse genus of gram-negative bacteria that causes high mortality rate in humans, equines and cattle. The lack of effective therapeutic treatments poses serious public health threats. Developing insights toward host-Burkholderia spp. interaction is critical for understanding the pathogenesis of infection as well as identifying therapeutic targets for drug development. Reverse-phase protein microarray technology was previously proven to identify and characterize novel biomarkers and molecular signatures associated with infectious disease and cancer. In the present study, this technology was utilized to interrogate changes in host protein expression and phosphorylation events in macrophages infected with a collection of geographically diverse strains of Burkholderia spp. The expression or phosphorylation state of 25 proteins was altered during Burkholderia spp. infections of which eight proteins were selected for further characterization by immunoblotting. Increased phosphorylation of AMPK-α1, Src, and GSK3β suggested the importance of their roles in regulating Burkholderia spp. mediated innate immune response. Modulating the inflammatory response by perturbing their activities may provide therapeutic routes for future treatments. PMID:26284031

  4. Recombinant Salmonella Expressing Burkholderia mallei LPS O Antigen Provides Protection in a Murine Model of Melioidosis and Glanders

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Dina A.; Scarff, Jennifer M.; Garcia, Preston P.; Cassidy, Sara K. B.; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Waag, David M.; Inzana, Thomas J.; Goldberg, Joanna B.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are the etiologic agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively. These bacteria are highly infectious via the respiratory route and can cause severe and often fatal diseases in humans and animals. Both species are considered potential agents of biological warfare; they are classified as category B priority pathogens. Currently there are no human or veterinary vaccines available against these pathogens. Consequently efforts are directed towards the development of an efficacious and safe vaccine. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an immunodominant antigen and potent stimulator of host immune responses. B. mallei express LPS that is structurally similar to that expressed by B. pseudomallei, suggesting the possibility of constructing a single protective vaccine against melioidosis and glanders. Previous studies of others have shown that antibodies against B. mallei or B. pseudomallei LPS partially protect mice against subsequent lethal virulent Burkholderia challenge. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of recombinant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen against lethal intranasal infection with Burkholderia thailandensis, a surrogate for biothreat Burkholderia spp. in a murine model that mimics melioidosis and glanders. All vaccine-immunized mice developed a specific antibody response to B. mallei and B. pseudomallei O antigen and to B. thailandensis and were significantly protected against challenge with a lethal dose of B. thailandensis. These results suggest that live-attenuated SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen is a promising platform for developing a safe and effective vaccine. PMID:26148026

  5. Recombinant Salmonella Expressing Burkholderia mallei LPS O Antigen Provides Protection in a Murine Model of Melioidosis and Glanders.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Dina A; Scarff, Jennifer M; Garcia, Preston P; Cassidy, Sara K B; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Waag, David M; Inzana, Thomas J; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are the etiologic agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively. These bacteria are highly infectious via the respiratory route and can cause severe and often fatal diseases in humans and animals. Both species are considered potential agents of biological warfare; they are classified as category B priority pathogens. Currently there are no human or veterinary vaccines available against these pathogens. Consequently efforts are directed towards the development of an efficacious and safe vaccine. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an immunodominant antigen and potent stimulator of host immune responses. B. mallei express LPS that is structurally similar to that expressed by B. pseudomallei, suggesting the possibility of constructing a single protective vaccine against melioidosis and glanders. Previous studies of others have shown that antibodies against B. mallei or B. pseudomallei LPS partially protect mice against subsequent lethal virulent Burkholderia challenge. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of recombinant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen against lethal intranasal infection with Burkholderia thailandensis, a surrogate for biothreat Burkholderia spp. in a murine model that mimics melioidosis and glanders. All vaccine-immunized mice developed a specific antibody response to B. mallei and B. pseudomallei O antigen and to B. thailandensis and were significantly protected against challenge with a lethal dose of B. thailandensis. These results suggest that live-attenuated SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen is a promising platform for developing a safe and effective vaccine.

  6. Nitrous oxide emission potentials of Burkholderia species isolated from the leaves of a boreal peat moss Sphagnum fuscum.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yanxia; Li, Li; Wang, Mengcen; Tahvanainen, Teemu; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Using a culture-based nitrous oxide (N2O) emission assay, three active N2O emitters were isolated from Sphagnum fuscum leaves and all identified as members of Burkholderia. These isolates showed N2O emission in the medium supplemented with [Formula: see text] but not with [Formula: see text], and Burkholderia sp. SF-E2 showed the most efficient N2O emission (0.20 μg·vial(-1)·day(-1)) at 1.0 mM KNO3. In Burkholderia sp. SF-E2, the optimum pH for N2O production was 5.0, close to that of the phyllosphere of Sphagnum mosses, while the optimum temperature was uniquely over 30 °C. The stimulating effect of additional 1.5 mM sucrose on N2O emission was ignorable, but Burkholderia sp. SF-E2 upon exposure to 100 mg·L(-1) E-caffeic acid showed uniquely 67-fold higher N2O emission. All of the three N2O emitters were negative in both acetylene inhibition assay and PCR assay for nosZ-detection, suggesting that N2O reductase or the gene itself is missing in the N2O-emitting Burkholderia.

  7. Nitrous oxide emission potentials of Burkholderia species isolated from the leaves of a boreal peat moss Sphagnum fuscum.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yanxia; Li, Li; Wang, Mengcen; Tahvanainen, Teemu; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Using a culture-based nitrous oxide (N2O) emission assay, three active N2O emitters were isolated from Sphagnum fuscum leaves and all identified as members of Burkholderia. These isolates showed N2O emission in the medium supplemented with [Formula: see text] but not with [Formula: see text], and Burkholderia sp. SF-E2 showed the most efficient N2O emission (0.20 μg·vial(-1)·day(-1)) at 1.0 mM KNO3. In Burkholderia sp. SF-E2, the optimum pH for N2O production was 5.0, close to that of the phyllosphere of Sphagnum mosses, while the optimum temperature was uniquely over 30 °C. The stimulating effect of additional 1.5 mM sucrose on N2O emission was ignorable, but Burkholderia sp. SF-E2 upon exposure to 100 mg·L(-1) E-caffeic acid showed uniquely 67-fold higher N2O emission. All of the three N2O emitters were negative in both acetylene inhibition assay and PCR assay for nosZ-detection, suggesting that N2O reductase or the gene itself is missing in the N2O-emitting Burkholderia. PMID:26167675

  8. A reverse-phase protein microarray-based screen identifies host signaling dynamics upon Burkholderia spp. infection.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chih-Yuan; Uzoma, Ijeoma; Lane, Douglas J; Memišević, Vesna; Alem, Farhang; Yao, Kuan; Kota, Krishna P; Bavari, Sina; Wallqvist, Anders; Hakami, Ramin M; Panchal, Rekha G

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia is a diverse genus of gram-negative bacteria that causes high mortality rate in humans, equines and cattle. The lack of effective therapeutic treatments poses serious public health threats. Developing insights toward host-Burkholderia spp. interaction is critical for understanding the pathogenesis of infection as well as identifying therapeutic targets for drug development. Reverse-phase protein microarray technology was previously proven to identify and characterize novel biomarkers and molecular signatures associated with infectious disease and cancer. In the present study, this technology was utilized to interrogate changes in host protein expression and phosphorylation events in macrophages infected with a collection of geographically diverse strains of Burkholderia spp. The expression or phosphorylation state of 25 proteins was altered during Burkholderia spp. infections of which eight proteins were selected for further characterization by immunoblotting. Increased phosphorylation of AMPK-α1, Src, and GSK3β suggested the importance of their roles in regulating Burkholderia spp. mediated innate immune response. Modulating the inflammatory response by perturbing their activities may provide therapeutic routes for future treatments. PMID:26284031

  9. Space vehicle onboard command encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A flexible onboard encoder system was designed for the space shuttle. The following areas were covered: (1) implementation of the encoder design into hardware to demonstrate the various encoding algorithms/code formats, (2) modulation techniques in a single hardware package to maintain comparable reliability and link integrity of the existing link systems and to integrate the various techniques into a single design using current technology. The primary function of the command encoder is to accept input commands, generated either locally onboard the space shuttle or remotely from the ground, format and encode the commands in accordance with the payload input requirements and appropriately modulate a subcarrier for transmission by the baseband RF modulator. The following information was provided: command encoder system design, brassboard hardware design, test set hardware and system packaging, and software.

  10. N-Consecutive-Phase Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Lee, Ho-Kyoung; Weber, Charles

    1995-01-01

    N-consecutive-phase encoder (NCPE) is conceptual encoder for generating alphabet of N consecutive full-response continuous-phase-modulation (CPM) signals. Enables use of binary preencoder of higher rate than used with simple continuous-phase encoder (CPE). NCPE makes possible to achieve power efficiencies and bandwidth efficiencies greater than conventional trellis coders with continuous-phase frequency-shift keying (CPFSK).

  11. Direct detection of the plant pathogens Burkholderia glumae, Burkholderia gladioli pv. gladioli, and Erwinia chrysanthemi pv. zeae in infected rice seedlings using matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    The plant pathogens Burkholderia glumae, Burkholderia gladioli pv. gladioli, and Erwinia chrysanthemi pv. zeae were directly detected in extracts from infected rice seedlings by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). This method did not require culturing of the pathogens on artificial medium. In the MALDI-TOF MS analysis, peaks originating from bacteria were found in extracts from infected rice seedlings. The spectral peaks showed significantly high scores, in spite of minor differences in spectra. The spectral peaks originating from host plant tissues did not affect this direct MALDI-TOF MS analysis for the rapid identification of plant pathogens.

  12. Burkholderia cenocepacia Requires a Periplasmic HtrA Protease for Growth under Thermal and Osmotic Stress and for Survival In Vivo▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Flannagan, Ronald S.; Aubert, Daniel; Kooi, Cora; Sokol, Pamela A.; Valvano, Miguel A.

    2007-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia, a member of the B. cepacia complex, is an opportunistic pathogen that causes serious infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. We identified a six-gene cluster in chromosome 1 encoding a two-component regulatory system (BCAL2831 and BCAL2830) and an HtrA protease (BCAL2829) hypothesized to play a role in the B. cenocepacia stress response. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis of these six genes confirmed they are cotranscribed and comprise an operon. Genes in this operon, including htrA, were insertionally inactivated by recombination with a newly created suicide plasmid, pGPΩTp. Genetic analyses and complementation studies revealed that HtrABCAL2829 was required for growth of B. cenocepacia upon exposure to osmotic stress (NaCl or KCl) and thermal stress (44°C). In addition, replacement of the serine residue in the active site with alanine (S245A) and deletion of the HtrABCAL2829 PDZ domains demonstrated that these areas are required for protein function. HtrABCAL2829 also localizes to the periplasmic compartment, as shown by Western blot analysis and a colicin V reporter assay. Using the rat agar bead model of chronic lung infection, we also demonstrated that inactivation of the htrA gene is associated with a bacterial survival defect in vivo. Together, our data demonstrate that HtrABCAL2829 is a virulence factor in B. cenocepacia. PMID:17220310

  13. Characterization of genes involved in biosynthesis of a novel antibiotic from Burkholderia cepacia BC11 and their role in biological control of Rhizoctonia solani

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.; Carlson, R.; Tharpe, W.; Schell, M.A.

    1998-10-01

    Genetic manipulation of fluorescent pseudomonads has provided major insight into their production of antifungal molecules and their role in biological control of plant disease. Burkholderia cepacia also produces antifungal activities, but its biological control activity is much less well characterized, in part due to difficulties in applying genetic tools. Here the authors report genetic and biochemical characterization of a soil isolate of B. cepacia relating to its production of an unusual antibiotic that is very active against a variety of soil fungi. Purification and preliminary structural analyses suggest that this antibiotic (called AFC-BC11) is a novel lipopeptide associated largely with the cell membrane. Analysis of conditions for optimal production of AFC-BC11 indicated stringent environmental regulation of its synthesis. Furthermore, the authors show that production of AFC-BC11 is largely responsible for the ability of B. cepacia BC11 to effectively control the damping-Off of cotton caused by the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani in a gnotobiotic system. Using Tn5 mutagenesis, they identified, cloned, and characterized a region of the genome of strain BC11 that is required for production of this antifungal metabolite. DNA sequence analysis suggested that this region encodes proteins directly involved in the production of a nonribosomally synthesized lipopeptide.

  14. Characterization of genes involved in biosynthesis of a novel antibiotic from Burkholderia cepacia BC11 and their role in biological control of Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Kang, Y; Carlson, R; Tharpe, W; Schell, M A

    1998-10-01

    Genetic manipulation of fluorescent pseudomonads has provided major insight into their production of antifungal molecules and their role in biological control of plant disease. Burkholderia cepacia also produces antifungal activities, but its biological control activity is much less well characterized, in part due to difficulties in applying genetic tools. Here we report genetic and biochemical characterization of a soil isolate of B. cepacia relating to its production of an unusual antibiotic that is very active against a variety of soil fungi. Purification and preliminary structural analyses suggest that this antibiotic (called AFC-BC11) is a novel lipopeptide associated largely with the cell membrane. Analysis of conditions for optimal production of AFC-BC11 indicated stringent environmental regulation of its synthesis. Furthermore, we show that production of AFC-BC11 is largely responsible for the ability of B. cepacia BC11 to effectively control the damping-off of cotton caused by the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani in a gnotobiotic system. Using Tn5 mutagenesis, we identified, cloned, and characterized a region of the genome of strain BC11 that is required for production of this antifungal metabolite. DNA sequence analysis suggested that this region encodes proteins directly involved in the production of a nonribosomally synthesized lipopeptide.

  15. Role of Burkholderia pseudomallei Sigma N2 in Amino Acids Utilization and in Regulation of Catalase E Expression at the Transcriptional Level

    PubMed Central

    Diep, Duong Thi Hong; Phuong, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Hlaing, Mya Myintzu; Srimanote, Potjanee; Tungpradabkul, Sumalee

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis. The complete genome sequences of this pathogen have been revealed, which explain some pathogenic mechanisms. In various hostile conditions, for example, during nitrogen and amino acid starvation, bacteria can utilize alternative sigma factors such as RpoS and RpoN to modulate genes expression for their adaptation and survival. In this study, we demonstrate that mutagenesis of rpoN2, which lies on chromosome 2 of B. pseudomallei and encodes a homologue of the sigma factor RpoN, did not alter nitrogen and amino acid utilization of the bacterium. However, introduction of B. pseudomallei rpoN2 into E. coli strain deficient for rpoN restored the ability to utilize amino acids. Moreover, comparative partial proteomic analysis of the B. pseudomallei wild type and its rpoN2 isogenic mutant was performed to elucidate its amino acids utilization property which was comparable to its function found in the complementation assay. By contrast, the rpoN2 mutant exhibited decreased katE expression at the transcriptional and translational levels. Our finding indicates that B. pseudomallei RpoN2 is involved in a specific function in the regulation of catalase E expression. PMID:26904748

  16. Burkholderia symbiotica sp. nov., isolated from root nodules of Mimosa spp. native to north-east Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Shih-Yi; Chou, Jui-Hsing; Bontemps, Cyril; Elliott, Geoffrey N; Gross, Eduardo; James, Euan K; Sprent, Janet I; Young, J Peter W; Chen, Wen-Ming

    2012-09-01

    Four strains, designated JPY-345(T), JPY-347, JPY-366 and JPY-581, were isolated from nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of two species of Mimosa, Mimosa cordistipula and Mimosa misera, that are native to North East Brazil, and their taxonomic positions were investigated by using a polyphasic approach. All four strains grew at 15-43 °C (optimum 35 °C), at pH 4-7 (optimum pH 5) and with 0-2 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 0 % NaCl). On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain JPY-345(T) showed 97.3 % sequence similarity to the closest related species Burkholderia soli GP25-8(T), 97.3 % sequence similarity to Burkholderia caryophylli ATCC25418(T) and 97.1 % sequence similarity to Burkholderia kururiensis KP23(T). The predominant fatty acids of the strains were C(18 : 1)ω7c (36.1 %), C(16 : 0) (19.8 %) and summed feature 3, comprising C(16 : 1)ω7c and/or C(16 : 1)ω6c (11.5 %). The major isoprenoid quinone was Q-8 and the DNA G+C content of the strains was 64.2-65.7 mol%. The polar lipid profile consisted of a mixture of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol and several uncharacterized aminophospholipids and phospholipids. DNA-DNA hybridizations between the novel strain and recognized species of the genus Burkholderia yielded relatedness values of <51.8 %. On the basis of 16S rRNA and recA gene sequence similarities and chemotaxonomic and phenotypic data, the four strains represent a novel species in the genus Burkholderia, for which the name Burkholderia symbiotica sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JPY-345(T) (= LMG 26032(T) = BCRC 80258(T) = KCTC 23309(T)).

  17. Prosodic Encoding in Silent Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkenfeld, Deborah

    In silent reading, short-memory tasks, such as semantic and syntactic processing, require a stage of phonetic encoding between visual representation and the actual extraction of meaning, and this encoding includes prosodic as well as segmental features. To test for this suprasegmental coding, an experiment was conducted in which subjects were…

  18. Comparison of TaqMan PCR assays for detection of the melioidosis agent Burkholderia pseudomallei in clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Kaestli, Mirjam; Richardson, Leisha J; Colman, Rebecca E; Tuanyok, Apichai; Price, Erin P; Bowers, Jolene R; Mayo, Mark; Kelley, Erin; Seymour, Meagan L; Sarovich, Derek S; Pearson, Talima; Engelthaler, David M; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul S; Schupp, James M; Currie, Bart J

    2012-06-01

    Melioidosis is an emerging infectious disease caused by the soil bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. In diagnostic and forensic settings, molecular detection assays need not only high sensitivity with low limits of detection but also high specificity. In a direct comparison of published and newly developed TaqMan PCR assays, we found the TTS1-orf2 assay to be superior in detecting B. pseudomallei directly from clinical specimens. The YLF/BTFC multiplex assay (targeting the Yersinia-like fimbrial/Burkholderia thailandensis-like flagellum and chemotaxis region) also showed high diagnostic sensitivity and provides additional information on possible geographic origin.

  19. Isolation and Characterization of Burkholderia rinojensis sp. nov., a Non-Burkholderia cepacia Complex Soil Bacterium with Insecticidal and Miticidal Activities

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Lorena E.; Koivunen, Marja; Yang, April; Flor-Weiler, Lina; Marrone, Pamela G.

    2013-01-01

    Isolate A396, a bacterium isolated from a Japanese soil sample demonstrated strong insecticidal and miticidal activities in laboratory bioassays. The isolate was characterized through biochemical methods, fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis, sequencing of 16S rRNA, multilocus sequence typing and analysis, and DNA-DNA hybridization. FAME analysis matched A396 to Burkholderia cenocepacia, but this result was not confirmed by 16S rRNA or DNA-DNA hybridization. 16S rRNA sequencing indicated closest matches with B. glumae and B. plantarii. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments with B. plantarii, B. glumae, B. multivorans, and B. cenocepacia confirmed the low genetic similarity (11.5 to 37.4%) with known members of the genus. PCR-based screening showed that A396 lacks markers associated with members of the B. cepacia complex. Bioassay results indicated two mechanisms of action: through ingestion and contact. The isolate effectively controlled beet armyworms (Spodoptera exigua; BAW) and two-spotted spider mites (Tetranychus urticae; TSSM). In diet overlay bioassays with BAW, 1% to 4% (vol/vol) dilution of the whole-cell broth caused 97% to 100% mortality 4 days postexposure, and leaf disc treatment bioassays attained 75% ± 22% mortality 3 days postexposure. Contact bioassays led to 50% larval mortality, as well as discoloration, stunting, and failure to molt. TSSM mortality reached 93% in treated leaf discs. Activity was maintained in cell-free supernatants and after heat treatment (60°C for 2 h), indicating that a secondary metabolite or excreted thermostable enzyme might be responsible for the activity. Based on these results, we describe the novel species Burkholderia rinojensis, a good candidate for the development of a biocontrol product against insect and mite pests. PMID:24096416

  20. Isolation and characterization of Burkholderia rinojensis sp. nov., a non-Burkholderia cepacia complex soil bacterium with insecticidal and miticidal activities.

    PubMed

    Cordova-Kreylos, Ana Lucia; Fernandez, Lorena E; Koivunen, Marja; Yang, April; Flor-Weiler, Lina; Marrone, Pamela G

    2013-12-01

    Isolate A396, a bacterium isolated from a Japanese soil sample demonstrated strong insecticidal and miticidal activities in laboratory bioassays. The isolate was characterized through biochemical methods, fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis, sequencing of 16S rRNA, multilocus sequence typing and analysis, and DNA-DNA hybridization. FAME analysis matched A396 to Burkholderia cenocepacia, but this result was not confirmed by 16S rRNA or DNA-DNA hybridization. 16S rRNA sequencing indicated closest matches with B. glumae and B. plantarii. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments with B. plantarii, B. glumae, B. multivorans, and B. cenocepacia confirmed the low genetic similarity (11.5 to 37.4%) with known members of the genus. PCR-based screening showed that A396 lacks markers associated with members of the B. cepacia complex. Bioassay results indicated two mechanisms of action: through ingestion and contact. The isolate effectively controlled beet armyworms (Spodoptera exigua; BAW) and two-spotted spider mites (Tetranychus urticae; TSSM). In diet overlay bioassays with BAW, 1% to 4% (vol/vol) dilution of the whole-cell broth caused 97% to 100% mortality 4 days postexposure, and leaf disc treatment bioassays attained 75% ± 22% mortality 3 days postexposure. Contact bioassays led to 50% larval mortality, as well as discoloration, stunting, and failure to molt. TSSM mortality reached 93% in treated leaf discs. Activity was maintained in cell-free supernatants and after heat treatment (60°C for 2 h), indicating that a secondary metabolite or excreted thermostable enzyme might be responsible for the activity. Based on these results, we describe the novel species Burkholderia rinojensis, a good candidate for the development of a biocontrol product against insect and mite pests.

  1. Purine biosynthesis-deficient Burkholderia mutants are incapable of symbiotic accommodation in the stinkbug.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Jang, Ho Am; Won, Yeo Jin; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Han, Sang Heum; Kim, Chan-Hee; Nikoh, Naruo; Fukatsu, Takema; Lee, Bok Luel

    2014-03-01

    The Riptortus-Burkholderia symbiotic system represents a promising experimental model to study the molecular mechanisms involved in insect-bacterium symbiosis due to the availability of genetically manipulated Burkholderia symbiont. Using transposon mutagenesis screening, we found a symbiosis-deficient mutant that was able to colonize the host insect but failed to induce normal development of host's symbiotic organ. The disrupted gene was identified as purL involved in purine biosynthesis. In vitro growth impairment of the purL mutant and its growth dependency on adenine and adenosine confirmed the functional disruption of the purine synthesis gene. The purL mutant also showed defects in biofilm formation, and this defect was not rescued by supplementation of purine derivatives. When inoculated to host insects, the purL mutant was initially able to colonize the symbiotic organ but failed to attain a normal infection density. The low level of infection density of the purL mutant attenuated the development of the host's symbiotic organ at early instar stages and reduced the host's fitness throughout the nymphal stages. Another symbiont mutant-deficient in a purine biosynthesis gene, purM, showed phenotypes similar to those of the purL mutant both in vitro and in vivo, confirming that the purL phenotypes are due to disrupted purine biosynthesis. These results demonstrate that the purine biosynthesis genes of the Burkholderia symbiont are critical for the successful accommodation of symbiont within the host, thereby facilitating the development of the host's symbiotic organ and enhancing the host's fitness values.

  2. Inhibition of co-colonizing cystic fibrosis-associated pathogens by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia multivorans.

    PubMed

    Costello, Anne; Reen, F Jerry; O'Gara, Fergal; Callaghan, Máire; McClean, Siobhán

    2014-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a recessive genetic disease characterized by chronic respiratory infections and inflammation causing permanent lung damage. Recurrent infections are caused by Gram-negative antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) and the emerging pathogen genus Pandoraea. In this study, the interactions between co-colonizing CF pathogens were investigated. Both Pandoraea and Bcc elicited potent pro-inflammatory responses that were significantly greater than Ps. aeruginosa. The original aim was to examine whether combinations of pro-inflammatory pathogens would further exacerbate inflammation. In contrast, when these pathogens were colonized in the presence of Ps. aeruginosa the pro-inflammatory response was significantly decreased. Real-time PCR quantification of bacterial DNA from mixed cultures indicated that Ps. aeruginosa significantly inhibited the growth of Burkholderia multivorans, Burkholderia cenocepacia, Pandoraea pulmonicola and Pandoraea apista, which may be a factor in its dominance as a colonizer of CF patients. Ps. aeruginosa cell-free supernatant also suppressed growth of these pathogens, indicating that inhibition was innate rather than a response to the presence of a competitor. Screening of a Ps. aeruginosa mutant library highlighted a role for quorum sensing and pyoverdine biosynthesis genes in the inhibition of B. cenocepacia. Pyoverdine was confirmed to contribute to the inhibition of B. cenocepacia strain J2315. B. multivorans was the only species that could significantly inhibit Ps. aeruginosa growth. B. multivorans also inhibited B. cenocepacia and Pa. apista. In conclusion, both Ps. aeruginosa and B. multivorans are capable of suppressing growth and virulence of co-colonizing CF pathogens.

  3. Burkholderia unamae sp. nov., an N2-fixing rhizospheric and endophytic species.

    PubMed

    Caballero-Mellado, Jesús; Martínez-Aguilar, Lourdes; Paredes-Valdez, Guadalupe; Santos, Paulina Estrada-De los

    2004-07-01

    It was shown recently that the genus Burkholderia is rich in N2-fixing bacteria that are associated with plants. A group of these diazotrophic isolates with identical or very similar 16S rDNA restriction patterns [designated amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) genotypes 13, 14 and 15] was selected and a polyphasic taxonomic study was performed, which included new isolates that were recovered from rhizospheres, rhizoplanes or internal tissues of maize, sugarcane and coffee plants. Morphological, physiological and biochemical features, as well as multi-locus enzyme electrophoresis profiles and whole-cell protein patterns, of 20 strains were analysed. In addition, analysis of cellular fatty acid profiles, 16S rDNA sequence analysis and DNA-DNA reassociation experiments were performed with representative strains. The taxonomic data indicated that the strains analysed belong to a novel diazotrophic Burkholderia species, for which the name Burkholderia unamae sp. nov. is proposed. Strain MTl-641T (=ATCC BAA-744T=CIP 107921T), isolated from the rhizosphere of maize, was designated as the type strain. B. unamae was found as an endophyte of plants grown in regions with climates ranging from semi-hot subhumid to hot humid, but not from plants grown in regions with semi-hot or hot dry climates. Moreover, B. unamae was isolated from rhizospheres and plants growing in soils with pH values in the range 4.5-7.1, but not from soils with pH values higher than 7.5. PMID:15280286

  4. Comparative analysis of two phenotypically-similar but genomically-distinct Burkholderia cenocepacia-specific bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genomic analysis of bacteriophages infecting the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) is an important preliminary step in the development of a phage therapy protocol for these opportunistic pathogens. The objective of this study was to characterize KL1 (vB_BceS_KL1) and AH2 (vB_BceS_AH2), two novel Burkholderia cenocepacia-specific siphoviruses isolated from environmental samples. Results KL1 and AH2 exhibit several unique phenotypic similarities: they infect the same B. cenocepacia strains, they require prolonged incubation at 30°C for the formation of plaques at low titres, and they do not form plaques at similar titres following incubation at 37°C. However, despite these similarities, we have determined using whole-genome pyrosequencing that these phages show minimal relatedness to one another. The KL1 genome is 42,832 base pairs (bp) in length and is most closely related to Pseudomonas phage 73 (PA73). In contrast, the AH2 genome is 58,065 bp in length and is most closely related to Burkholderia phage BcepNazgul. Using both BLASTP and HHpred analysis, we have identified and analyzed the putative virion morphogenesis, lysis, DNA binding, and MazG proteins of these two phages. Notably, MazG homologs identified in cyanophages have been predicted to facilitate infection of stationary phase cells and may contribute to the unique plaque phenotype of KL1 and AH2. Conclusions The nearly indistinguishable phenotypes but distinct genomes of KL1 and AH2 provide further evidence of both vast diversity and convergent evolution in the BCC-specific phage population. PMID:22676492

  5. Information encoder/decoder using chaotic systems

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Samuel Lee; Miller, William Michael; McWhorter, Paul Jackson

    1997-01-01

    The present invention discloses a chaotic system-based information encoder and decoder that operates according to a relationship defining a chaotic system. Encoder input signals modify the dynamics of the chaotic system comprising the encoder. The modifications result in chaotic, encoder output signals that contain the encoder input signals encoded within them. The encoder output signals are then capable of secure transmissions using conventional transmission techniques. A decoder receives the encoder output signals (i.e., decoder input signals) and inverts the dynamics of the encoding system to directly reconstruct the original encoder input signals.

  6. Information encoder/decoder using chaotic systems

    DOEpatents

    Miller, S.L.; Miller, W.M.; McWhorter, P.J.

    1997-10-21

    The present invention discloses a chaotic system-based information encoder and decoder that operates according to a relationship defining a chaotic system. Encoder input signals modify the dynamics of the chaotic system comprising the encoder. The modifications result in chaotic, encoder output signals that contain the encoder input signals encoded within them. The encoder output signals are then capable of secure transmissions using conventional transmission techniques. A decoder receives the encoder output signals (i.e., decoder input signals) and inverts the dynamics of the encoding system to directly reconstruct the original encoder input signals. 32 figs.

  7. Eradication of Burkholderia cepacia Using Inhaled Aztreonam Lysine in Two Patients with Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, A.; Artiles, I.; Cabanillas, J. J.; Álvarez-Sala, R.; Prados, C.

    2014-01-01

    There are not many articles about the chronic bronchial infection/colonization in patients with underlying lung disease other than cystic fibrosis (CF), especially with non-CF bronchiectasis (NCFBQ). The prevalence of B. cepacia complex is not well known in NCFBQ. The vast majority of published clinical data on Burkholderia infection in individuals with CF is comprised of uncontrolled, anecdotal, and/or single center experiences, and no consensus has emerged regarding treatment. We present two cases diagnosed with bronchiectasis (BQ) of different etiology, with early pulmonary infection by B. cepacia complex, which was eradicated with inhaled aztreonam lysine. PMID:25295210

  8. Burkholderia cepacia endophthalmitis, in a penicillin allergic patient, following a ranibizumab injection.

    PubMed

    Saffra, Norman; Moriarty, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia, a Gram-negative bacterium commonly found in water and soil, is a rare cause of endophthalmitis. The authors report a case of a penicillin-allergic patient who presented 15 days after an uneventful injection of ranibizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration with culture-positive B cepacia endophthalmitis. Initial antibiotic therapy using non-penicillin-based medications was not successful in eradicating the bacteria. Subsequent treatment with a third-generation cephalosporin resulted in complete resolution of the infection. B cepacia should be included among the bacterial species that may cause endophthalmitis after intravitreal injections. PMID:24526197

  9. Investigating early stages of biocorrosion with XPS: AISI 304 stainless steel exposed to Burkholderia species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Saastamoinen, Tuomas

    1999-04-01

    We have investigated the interactions of an exopolymer-producing bacteria, Burkholderia sp. with polished AISI 304 stainless steel substrates using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Steel coupons were exposed to the pure bacteria culture in a specially designed flowcell for 6 h during which the experiment was monitored in situ with an optical microscope. XPS results verified the formation of biofilm containing extracellular polymer on all the samples exposed to bacteria. Sputter results indicated that some ions needed for metabolic processes were trapped within the biofilm. Changes in the relative Fe concentration and Fe 2p peak shape indicated that also iron had accumulated into the biofilm.

  10. Identification and cloning of four riboswitches from Burkholderia pseudomallei strain K96243

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munyati-Othman, Noor; Fatah, Ahmad Luqman Abdul; Piji, Mohd Al Akmarul Fizree Bin Md; Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan; Raih, Mohd Firdaus

    2015-09-01

    Structured RNAs referred as riboswitches have been predicted to be present in the genome sequence of Burkholderia pseudomallei strain K96243. Four of the riboswitches were identified and analyzed through BLASTN, Rfam search and multiple sequence alignment. The RNA aptamers belong to the following riboswitch classifications: glycine riboswitch, cobalamin riboswitch, S-adenosyl-(L)-homocysteine (SAH) riboswitch and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) riboswitch. The conserved nucleotides for each aptamer were identified and were marked on the secondary structure generated by RNAfold. These riboswitches were successfully amplified and cloned for further study.

  11. Social interactions in the Burkholderia cepacia complex: biofilms and quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Coenye, Tom

    2010-07-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria are opportunistic pathogens that cause respiratory tract infections in susceptible patients, mainly people with cystic fibrosis. There is convincing evidence that B. cepacia complex bacteria can form biofilms, not only on abiotic surfaces (e.g., glass and plastics), but also on biotic surfaces such as epithelial cells, leading to the suggestion that biofilm formation plays a key role in persistent infection of cystic fibrosis lungs. This article presents an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in B. cepacia complex biofilm formation, the increased resistance of sessile B. cepacia complex cells and the role of quorum sensing in B. cepacia complex biofilm formation.

  12. Advances and remaining uncertainties in the epidemiology of Burkholderia pseudomallei and melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Currie, Bart J

    2008-03-01

    Major advances have been made in molecular studies of Burkholderia pseudomallei and the immunology of melioidosis. However, there remain large gaps in understanding of the epidemiology of this enigmatic disease. Identified global distribution boundaries of melioidosis continue to expand. Recent data suggest Australian strains of B. pseudomallei may be ancestral to those from Southeast Asia, but the ecology of this environmental bacterium remains elusive. Despite the potential for rapidly progressive septicaemia, the critical virulence factors in B. pseudomallei remain to be clarified. Inhalation following aerosolization of B. pseudomallei may account for the high mortality when melioidosis occurs after severe weather events.

  13. The Promise of Bacteriophage Therapy for Burkholderia cepacia Complex Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Semler, Diana D.; Lynch, Karlene H.; Dennis, Jonathan J.

    2012-01-01

    In recent times, increased attention has been given to evaluating the efficacy of phage therapy, especially in scenarios where the bacterial infectious agent of interest is highly antibiotic resistant. In this regard, phage therapy is especially applicable to infections caused by the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) since members of the BCC are antibiotic pan-resistant. Current studies in BCC phage therapy are unique from many other avenues of phage therapy research in that the investigation is not only comprised of phage isolation, in vitro phage characterization and assessment of in vivo infection model efficacy, but also adapting aerosol drug delivery techniques to aerosol phage formulation delivery and storage. PMID:22919592

  14. Endocarditis due to Burkholderia cepacia and an intracardiac foreign body in a renal transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Falcão Pedrosa Costa, André; Castelo Branco Cavalcanti, Frederico; Modesto dos Santos, Vitorino

    2014-02-01

    The authors describe the case of a renal transplant patient who developed late infective endocarditis associated with an intracardiac fragment of a catheter inserted 16 years before. Clinical presentation was anemia of undetermined cause and weight loss. Three blood cultures were positive for Burkholderia cepacia. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed a foreign body in the right atrium and right ventricle, confirmed by computed tomography. The patient underwent intravenous antibiotic therapy, followed by cardiac surgery to remove the foreign body. There were no postoperative complications, with improvement of anemia and stabilization of renal function.

  15. Burkholderia cepacia complex: distribution of genomovars among isolates from the maize rhizosphere in Italy.

    PubMed

    Fiore, A; Laevens, S; Bevivino, A; Dalmastri, C; Tabacchioni, S; Vandamme, P; Chiarini, L

    2001-02-01

    Burkholderia cepacia is a 'complex' in which seven genomic species or genomovars have so far been identified. It appears that all seven B. cepacia genomovars are capable of causing infections in vulnerable persons; in particular, the importance of Burkholderia multivorans (genomovar II) and B. cepacia genomovar III among cystic fibrosis isolates, especially epidemic ones, has been emphasized. In order to acquire a better comprehension of the genomovar composition of environmental populations of B. cepacia, 120 strains were isolated from the rhizosphere of maize plants cultivated in fields located in northern, central and southern Italy. The identification of the different genomovars was accomplished by a combination of molecular polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based techniques, such as restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of 16S rDNA (ARDRA), genomovar-specific PCR tests and RFLP analyses based on polymorphisms in the recA gene whole-cell protein electrophoresis. ARDRA analysis allowed us to distinguish between all B. cepacia genomovars except B. cepacia genomovar I, B. cepacia genomovar III and Burkholderia ambifaria (genomovar VII). The latter genomovars were differentiated by means of recA PCR tests and RFLP analyses. Among the rhizospheric isolates of B. cepacia, we found only B. cepacia genomovar I, B. cepacia genomovar III, Burkholderia vietnamiensis (genomovar V) and B. ambifaria. B. cepacia genomovars I and III and B. ambifaria were recovered from all three fields, whereas B. vietnamiensis was detected only in the population isolated from the field located in central Italy. Among strains isolated from northern and southern Italy, the most abundant genomovars were B. ambifaria and B. cepacia genomovar III respectively; in contrast, the population isolated in central Italy showed an even distribution of strains among genomovars. These results indicate that it is not possible to differentiate clinical and environmental strains, or

  16. Ligand-Binding Pocket Bridges DNA-Binding and Dimerization Domains of the Urate-Responsive MarR Homologue MftR from Burkholderia thailandensis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Members of the multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR) family often regulate gene activity by responding to a specific ligand. In the absence of ligand, most MarR proteins function as repressors, while ligand binding causes attenuated DNA binding and therefore increased gene expression. Previously, we have shown that urate is a ligand for MftR (major facilitator transport regulator), which is encoded by the soil bacterium Burkholderia thailandensis. We show here that both mftR and the divergently oriented gene mftP encoding a major facilitator transport protein are upregulated in the presence of urate. MftR binds two cognate sites in the mftR-mftP intergenic region with equivalent affinity and sensitivity to urate. Mutagenesis of four conserved residues previously reported to be involved in urate binding to Deinococcus radiodurans HucR and Rhizobium radiobacter PecS significantly reduced protein stability and DNA binding affinity but not ligand binding. These data suggest that residues equivalent to those implicated in ligand binding to HucR and PecS serve structural roles and that MftR relies on distinct residues for ligand binding. MftR exhibits a two-step melting transition suggesting independent unfolding of the dimerization and DNA-binding regions; urate binding or mutations in the predicted ligand-binding sites result in one-step unfolding transitions. We suggest that MftR binds the ligand in a cleft between the DNA-binding lobes and the dimer interface but that the mechanism of ligand-mediated attenuation of DNA binding differs from that proposed for other urate-responsive MarR homologues. Since DNA binding by MftR is attenuated at 37 °C, our data also suggest that MftR responds to both ligand and a thermal upshift by attenuated DNA binding and upregulation of the genes under its control. PMID:24955985

  17. PNA-encoded chemical libraries.

    PubMed

    Zambaldo, Claudio; Barluenga, Sofia; Winssinger, Nicolas

    2015-06-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-encoded chemical libraries along with DNA-encoded libraries have provided a powerful new paradigm for library synthesis and ligand discovery. PNA-encoding stands out for its compatibility with standard solid phase synthesis and the technology has been used to prepare libraries of peptides, heterocycles and glycoconjugates. Different screening formats have now been reported including selection-based and microarray-based methods that have yielded specific ligands against diverse target classes including membrane receptors, lectins and challenging targets such as Hsp70.

  18. Two digital video encoder circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldon, John A.

    1992-11-01

    Central to `multimedia' image processing is the desire to encode computer graphics data into a standard television signal, complete with line, field, and color subcarrier synchronizing information. The numerous incompatibilities between television and computer display standards render this operation far less trivial than it sounds to anyone who hasn't worked with both types of signals. To simplify the task of encoding computer graphics signals into standard NTSC (North America and Japan) or PAL (most of Europe) television format for display, broadcast, or recording, TRW LSI Products Inc. has introduced the two newest members of it multimedia integrated circuit family, the TMC22090 and TMC22190 digital video encoders.

  19. ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate) deaminase activity, a widespread trait in Burkholderia species, and its growth-promoting effect on tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Onofre-Lemus, Janette; Hernández-Lucas, Ismael; Girard, Lourdes; Caballero-Mellado, Jesús

    2009-10-01

    The genus Burkholderia includes pathogens of plants and animals and some human opportunistic pathogens, such as the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc), but most species are nonpathogenic, plant associated, and rhizospheric or endophytic. Since rhizobacteria expressing ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate) deaminase may enhance plant growth by lowering plant ethylene levels, in this work we investigated the presence of ACC deaminase activity and the acdS gene in 45 strains, most of which are plant associated, representing 20 well-known Burkholderia species. The results demonstrated that ACC deaminase activity is a widespread feature in the genus Burkholderia, since 18 species exhibited ACC deaminase activities in the range from 2 to 15 mumol of alpha-ketobutyrate/h/mg protein, which suggests that these species may be able to modulate ethylene levels and enhance plant growth. In these 18 Burkholderia species the acdS gene sequences were highly conserved (76 to 99% identity). Phylogenetic analysis of acdS gene sequences in Burkholderia showed tight clustering of the Bcc species, which were clearly distinct from diazotrophic plant-associated Burkholderia species. In addition, an acdS knockout mutant of the N(2)-fixing bacterium Burkholderia unamae MTl-641(T) and a transcriptional acdSp-gusA fusion constructed in this strain showed that ACC deaminase could play an important role in promotion of the growth of tomato plants. The widespread ACC deaminase activity in Burkholderia species and the common association of these species with plants suggest that this genus could be a major contributor to plant growth under natural conditions.

  20. Influence of the molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis on anaerobic respiration, biofilm formation and motility in Burkholderia thailandensis.

    PubMed

    Andreae, Clio A; Titball, Richard W; Butler, Clive S

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis is closely related to Burkholderia pseudomallei, a bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis. B. pseudomallei can survive and persist within a hypoxic environment for up to one year and has been shown to grow anaerobically in the presence of nitrate. Currently, little is known about the role of anaerobic respiration in pathogenesis of melioidosis. Using B. thailandensis as a model, a library of 1344 transposon mutants was created to identify genes required for anaerobic nitrate respiration. One transposon mutant (CA01) was identified with an insertion in BTH_I1704 (moeA), a gene required for the molybdopterin biosynthetic pathway. This pathway is involved in the synthesis of a molybdopterin cofactor required for a variety of molybdoenzymes, including nitrate reductase. Disruption of molybdopterin biosynthesis prevented growth under anaerobic conditions, when using nitrate as the sole terminal electron acceptor. Defects in anaerobic respiration, nitrate reduction, motility and biofilm formation were observed for CA01. Mutant complementation with pDA-17:BTH_I1704 was able to restore anaerobic growth on nitrate, nitrate reductase activity and biofilm formation, but did not restore motility. This study highlights the potential importance of molybdoenzyme-dependent anaerobic respiration in the survival and virulence of B. thailandensis.

  1. Use of a recombinant burkholderia intracellular motility a protein for immunodiagnosis of glanders.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Subodh; Malik, Praveen; Verma, Shailendra Kumar; Pal, Vijai; Gautam, Vandana; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay; Rai, Ganga Prasad

    2011-09-01

    Glanders, caused by the Gram-negative, nonmotile bacterium Burkholderia mallei, is a contagious and highly fatal disease of equines. During the last decade, the number of glanders outbreaks has increased steadily. The disease also has high zoonotic significance and B. mallei is listed biological warfare agent. The complement fixation test (CFT) is a routinely used and internationally recognized test to screen equine sera for the glanders. However, discrepant results have been observed using the CFT. The low sensitivity and specificity of the CFT and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) have been linked to the use of crude test antigens. We expressed a novel recombinant Burkholderia intracellular motility A (rBimA) protein in Escherichia coli for the diagnosis of equine glanders. Purified rBimA was used in an indirect ELISA format. All of the 21 true-positive serum samples used in the study tested positive, whereas only 17 of the 1,524 potentially negative sera tested positive by indirect ELISA, thus exhibiting 100% sensitivity and 98.88% specificity. Also, rBimA protein did not react with melioidosis patient and normal healthy human serum samples, showing its high specificity. The developed assay can be used as a simple and rapid tool for diagnosis of glanders in equine serum samples. An Indian patent (1328/DEL/2010) has been filed for the reagent.

  2. Burkholderia mallei CLH001 Attenuated Vaccine Strain Is Immunogenic and Protects against Acute Respiratory Glanders.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, Christopher L; Mott, Tiffany M; Muruato, Laura A; Sbrana, Elena; Torres, Alfredo G

    2016-08-01

    Burkholderia mallei is the causative agent of glanders, an incapacitating disease with high mortality rates in respiratory cases. Its endemicity and ineffective treatment options emphasize its public health threat and highlight the need for a vaccine. Live attenuated vaccines are considered the most viable vaccine strategy for Burkholderia, but single-gene-deletion mutants have not provided complete protection. In this study, we constructed the select-agent-excluded B. mallei ΔtonB Δhcp1 (CLH001) vaccine strain and investigated its ability to protect against acute respiratory glanders. Here we show that CLH001 is attenuated, safe, and effective at protecting against lethal B. mallei challenge. Intranasal administration of CLH001 to BALB/c and NOD SCID gamma (NSG) mice resulted in complete survival without detectable colonization or abnormal organ histopathology. Additionally, BALB/c mice intranasally immunized with CLH001 in a prime/boost regimen were fully protected against lethal challenge with the B. mallei lux (CSM001) wild-type strain.

  3. Protective response to subunit vaccination against intranasal Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei challenge

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Gregory C.; Deeraksa, Arpaporn; Qazi, Omar; Judy, Barbara M.; Taylor, Katherine; Propst, Katie L.; Duffy, Angie J.; Johnson, Kate; Kitto, G. Barrie; Brown, Katherine A.; Dow, Steven W.; Torres, Alfredo G.; Estes, D. Mark

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei are Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, responsible for the diseases glanders and melioidosis, respectively. Furthermore, there is currently no vaccine available against these Burkholderia species. In this study, we aimed to identify protective proteins against these pathogens. Immunization with recombinant B. mallei Hcp1 (type VI secreted/structural protein), BimA (autotransporter protein), BopA (type III secreted protein), and B. pseudomallei LolC (ABC transporter protein) generated significant protection against lethal inhaled B. mallei ATCC23344 and B. pseudomallei 1026b challenge. Immunization with BopA elicited the greatest protective activity, resulting in 100% and 60% survival against B. mallei and B. pseudomallei challenge, respectively. Moreover, sera from recovered mice demonstrated reactivity with the recombinant proteins. Dendritic cells stimulated with each of the different recombinant proteins showed distinct cytokine patterns. In addition, T cells from immunized mice produced IFN-γ following in vitro re-stimulation. These results indicated therefore that it was possible to elicit cross-protective immunity against both B. mallei and B. pseudomallei by vaccinating animals with one or more novel recombinant proteins identified in B. mallei. PMID:24379895

  4. Protective response to subunit vaccination against intranasal Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei challenge.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, Gregory C; Deeraksa, Arpaporn; Qazi, Omar; Judy, Barbara M; Taylor, Katherine; Propst, Katie L; Duffy, Angie J; Johnson, Kate; Kitto, G Barrie; Brown, Katherine A; Dow, Steven W; Torres, Alfredo G; Estes, D Mark

    2010-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei are Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, responsible for the diseases glanders and melioidosis, respectively. Furthermore, there is currently no vaccine available against these Burkholderia species. In this study, we aimed to identify protective proteins against these pathogens. Immunization with recombinant B. mallei Hcp1 (type VI secreted/structural protein), BimA (autotransporter protein), BopA (type III secreted protein), and B. pseudomallei LolC (ABC transporter protein) generated significant protection against lethal inhaled B. mallei ATCC23344 and B. pseudomallei 1026b challenge. Immunization with BopA elicited the greatest protective activity, resulting in 100% and 60% survival against B. mallei and B. pseudomallei challenge, respectively. Moreover, sera from recovered mice demonstrated reactivity with the recombinant proteins. Dendritic cells stimulated with each of the different recombinant proteins showed distinct cytokine patterns. In addition, T cells from immunized mice produced IFN-γ following in vitro re-stimulation. These results indicated therefore that it was possible to elicit cross-protective immunity against both B. mallei and B. pseudomallei by vaccinating animals with one or more novel recombinant proteins identified in B. mallei.

  5. Comparative Burkholderia pseudomallei natural history virulence studies using an aerosol murine model of infection

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Shane; Yeager, Linsey A.; Blumentritt, Carla A.; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Sbrana, Elena; Peterson, Johnny W.; Brasel, Trevor; LeDuc, James W.; Endsley, Janice J.; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2014-01-01

    Melioidosis is an endemic disease caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. Concerns exist regarding B. pseudomallei use as a potential bio-threat agent causing persistent infections and typically manifesting as severe pneumonia capable of causing fatal bacteremia. Development of suitable therapeutics against melioidosis is complicated due to high degree of genetic and phenotypic variability among B. pseudomallei isolates and lack of data establishing commonly accepted strains for comparative studies. Further, the impact of strain variation on virulence, disease presentation, and mortality is not well understood. Therefore, this study evaluate and compare the virulence and disease progression of B. pseudomallei strains K96243 and HBPUB10303a, following aerosol challenge in a standardized BALB/c mouse model of infection. The natural history analysis of disease progression monitored conditions such as weight, body temperature, appearance, activity, bacteremia, organ and tissue colonization (pathological and histological analysis) and immunological responses. This study provides a detailed, direct comparison of infection with different B. pseudomallei strains and set up the basis for a standardized model useful to test different medical countermeasures against Burkholderia species. Further, this protocol serves as a guideline to standardize other bacterial aerosol models of infection or to define biomarkers of infectious processes caused by other intracellular pathogens. PMID:24603493

  6. Cyanide Toxicity to Burkholderia cenocepacia Is Modulated by Polymicrobial Communities and Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, Steve P.; Workentine, Matthew L.; Li, Xiang; Magarvey, Nathan A.; O'Toole, George A.; Surette, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Microbes within polymicrobial communities can establish positive and negative interactions that have the potential to influence the overall behavior of the community. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) can co-exist in the lower airways, however several studies have shown that P. aeruginosa can effectively kill the Bcc in vitro, for which hydrogen cyanide (HCN) was recently proposed to play a critical role. Here we show that modification of the environment (i.e., culture medium), long-term genetic adaptation of P. aeruginosa to the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung, or the addition of another bacterial species to the community can alter the sensitivity of Burkholderia cenocepacia to P. aeruginosa toxins. We specifically demonstrate that undefined rich media leads to higher susceptibility of B. cenocepacia to P. aeruginosa toxins like cyanide as compared to a synthetic medium (SCFM), that mimics the CF lung nutritional content. Overall, our study shows that the polymicrobial environment can have profound effects on negative interactions mediated by P. aeruginosa against B. cenocepacia. In fact, evolved P. aeruginosa or the presence of other species such as Staphylococcus aureus can directly abolish the direct competition mediated by cyanide and consequently maintaining a higher level of species diversity within the community. PMID:27242743

  7. Stenotrophomonas, Achromobacter, and nonmelioid Burkholderia species: antimicrobial resistance and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Iain J; Peleg, Anton Y

    2015-02-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, and nonmelioid Burkholderia species, namely, Burkholderia cepacia complex, collectively are a group of troublesome nonfermenters. Although not inherently virulent organisms, these environmental Gram negatives can complicate treatment in those who are immunocompromised, critically ill in the intensive care unit and those patients with suppurative lung disease, such as cystic fibrosis. Through a range of intrinsic antimicrobial resistance mechanisms, virulence factors, and the ability to survive in biofilms, these opportunistic pathogens are well suited to persist, both in the environment and the host. Treatment recommendations are hindered by the difficulties in laboratory identification, the lack of reproducibility of antimicrobial susceptibility testing, the lack of clinical breakpoints, and the absence of clinical outcome data. Despite trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole often being the mainstay of treatment, resistance is widely encountered, and alternative regimens, including combination therapy, are often used. This review will highlight the important aspects and unique challenges that these three nonfermenters pose, and, in the absence of clinical outcome data, our therapeutic recommendations will be based on reported antimicrobial susceptibility and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profiles.

  8. Understanding the direction of evolution in Burkholderia glumae through comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Hee; Park, Jungwook; Kim, Jinnyun; Park, Inmyoung; Seo, Young-Su

    2016-02-01

    Members of the genus Burkholderia occupy remarkably diverse niches, with genome sizes ranging from ~3.75 to 11.29 Mbp. The genome of Burkholderia glumae ranges in size from ~5.81 to 7.89 Mbp. Unlike other plant pathogenic bacteria, B. glumae can infect a wide range of monocot and dicot plants. Comparative genome analysis of B. glumae strains can provide insight into genome variation as well as differential features of whole metabolism or pathways between multiple strains of B. glumae infecting the same host. Comparative analysis of complete genomes among B. glumae BGR1, B. glumae LMG 2196, and B. glumae PG1 revealed the largest departmentalization of genes onto separate replicons in B. glumae BGR1 and considerable downsizing of the genome in B. glumae LMG 2196. In addition, the presence of large-scale evolutionary events such as rearrangement and inversion and the development of highly specialized systems were found to be related to virulence-associated features in the three B. glumae strains. This connection may explain why this bacterium broadens its host range and reinforces its interaction with hosts.

  9. Intraspecific variation in Burkholderia caledonica: Europe vs. Africa and soil vs. endophytic isolates.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, Brecht; Peeters, Charlotte; van Wyk, Braam; Smets, Erik; Dessein, Steven; Vandamme, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The best-known interaction between bacteria and plants is the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis, but other bacteria-plant interactions exist, such as between Burkholderia and Rubiaceae (coffee family). A number of bacterial endophytes in Rubiaceae are closely related to the soil bacterium Burkholderia caledonica. This intriguing observation is explored by investigating isolates from different geographic regions (Western Europe vs. sub-Saharan Africa) and from different niches (free-living bacteria in soil vs. endophytic bacteria in host plants). The multilocus sequence analysis shows five clades, of which clade 1 with two basal isolates deviates from the rest and is therefore not considered further. All other isolates belong to the species B. caledonica, but two genetically different groups are identified. Group A holds only European isolates and group B holds isolates from Africa, with the exception of one European isolate. Although the European and African isolates are considered one species, some degree of genetic differentiation is evident. Endophytic isolates of B. caledonica are found in certain members of African Rubiaceae, but only in group B. Within this group, the endophytes cannot be distinguished from the soil isolates, which indicates a possible exchange of bacteria between soil and host plant.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia in cystic fibrosis: genome evolution, interactions and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Eberl, Leo; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2004-09-01

    The Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia are opportunistic human pathogens that are responsible for severe nosocomial infections in immunocompromised patients and are the major pathogens in cystic fibrosis (CF). The two bacteria not only inhabit the same environmental niches but can also form mixed biofilms in the lungs of CF patients. Hence, it appears very likely that the two organisms are capable of interacting with each other. Work of the past few years has shown that both bacteria utilize quorum-sensing systems, which rely on N-acyl-homoserine lactone signal molecules, to control the expression of virulence factors and biofilm development. Most importantly, evidence has been presented that these signal molecules also serve as a universal language for communication between the two organisms. Moreover, analyses of the diversity in P. aeruginosa revealed the presence of genome islands that contain genes that are highly homologous to genes identified in strains of Burkholderia sp. This finding suggests that there is a frequent exchange of genetic material between the two organisms.

  11. Polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis and simultaneous remotion of organic inhibitors from sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate by Burkholderia sp.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Mateus Schreiner Garcez; Gomez, José Gregório Cabrera; Taciro, Marilda Keico; Mendonça, Thatiane Teixeira; Silva, Luiziana Ferreira

    2014-09-01

    Burkholderia sp. F24, originally isolated from soil, was capable of growth on xylose and removed organic inhibitors present in a hemicellulosic hydrolysate and simultaneously produced poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (P3HB). Using non-detoxified hydrolysate, Burkholderia sp. F24 reached a cell dry weight (CDW) of 6.8 g L(-1), containing 48 % of P3HB and exhibited a volumetric productivity (PP3HB) of 0.10 g L(-1) h(-1). Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate copolymers (P3HB-co-3HV) were produced using xylose and levulinic acid (LA) as carbon sources. In shake flask cultures, the 3HV content in the copolymer increased from 9 to 43 mol% by adding LA from 1.0 to 5.0 g L(-1). In high cell density cultivation using concentrated hemicellulosic hydrolysate F24 reached 25.04 g L(-1) of CDW containing 49 % of P3HB and PP3HB of 0.28 g L(-1 )h(-1). Based on these findings, second-generation ethanol and bioplastics from sugarcane bagasse is proposed. PMID:25059637

  12. Outbreak of Subclinical Mastitis in a Flock of Dairy Sheep Associated with Burkholderia cepacia Complex Infection

    PubMed Central

    Berriatua, E.; Ziluaga, I.; Miguel-Virto, C.; Uribarren, P.; Juste, R.; Laevens, S.; Vandamme, P.; Govan, J. R. W.

    2001-01-01

    An outbreak of subclinical mastitis in a flock of 620 milking sheep was investigated. Microbiological and epidemiological analyses identified the causative agent as belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (formerly Pseudomonas cepacia). Every ewe in the milking flock was individually tested for subclinical mastitis on two separate occasions, 6 weeks apart, by the California (rapid) mastitis test (CMT). The proportion of CMT-positive ewes was 69 of 393 (17.6%) on the first sampling and 27 of 490 (5.5%) on the second sampling. Pure B. cepacia cultures identified with the API 20 NE system were grown from 64 of 96 (66.7%) CMT-positive ewes and from 1 of 33 (3.0%) CMT-negative ewes. Statistical analysis confirmed the significant association between a positive CMT result and a positive culture result for B. cepacia complex. Additional polyphasic taxonomic analyses of eight isolates showed that seven belonged to B. cepacia genomovar III; the remaining isolate was identified as Burkholderia vietnamiensis (formerly B. cepacia genomovar V). Bacteriological investigation of samples from milking equipment and other environmental sites failed to identify “B. cepacia” in any of the samples taken. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an outbreak of natural infection in animals caused by B. cepacia complex and the first description of B. cepacia complex infection in sheep. PMID:11230416

  13. Synthesis of a selective inhibitor of a fucose binding bacterial lectin from Burkholderia ambifaria.

    PubMed

    Richichi, Barbara; Imberty, Anne; Gillon, Emilie; Bosco, Rosa; Sutkeviciute, Ieva; Fieschi, Franck; Nativi, Cristina

    2013-06-28

    Burkholderia ambifaria is a bacterium member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), a closely related group of Gram-negative bacteria responsible for "cepacia syndrome" in immunocompromised patients. B. ambifaria produces BambL, a fucose-binding lectin that displays fine specificity to human fucosylated epitopes. Here, we report the first example of a synthetic ligand able to selectively bind, in the micromolar range, the pathogen-lectin BambL. The synthetic routes for the preparation of the α conformationally constrained fucoside are described, focusing on a totally diastereoselective inverse electron demand [4 + 2] Diels-Alder reaction. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) demonstrated that this compound binds to the pathogen-associated lectin BambL with an affinity comparable to that of natural fucose-containing oligosaccharides. No binding was observed by LecB, a fucose-binding lectin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the differences in affinity between the two lectins could be rationalized by modeling. Furthermore, SPR analyses showed that this fucomimetic does not bind to the human fucose-binding lectin DC-SIGN, thus supporting the selective binding profile towards B. ambifaria lectin.

  14. Incidental Splenic Granuloma Due to Burkholderia pseudomallei: A Case of Asymptomatic Latent Melioidosis?

    PubMed

    Chow, Tak Kuan; Eu, Lin Chuan; Chin, Kin Fah; Ong, Kien Chai; Pailoor, Jayalakshmi; Vadivelu, Jamunarani; Wong, Kum Thong

    2016-03-01

    We report a rare case of an asymptomatic latent melioidosis lesion in a posttraumatic splenectomy specimen from a diabetic patient. The 2-cm yellowish, lobulated lesion was found in the splenic parenchyma well away from the traumatized areas. Microscopically, it consisted of a central area of necrosis and exudate surrounded by macrophages, epithelioid cells, lymphocytes, and occasional multinucleated giant cells. Burkholderia bacilli were detected by a novel in situ hybridization (ISH) assay, and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction and sequencing to be Burkholderia pseudomallei. As melioidosis was not suspected initially, bacterial culture was not done but electron microscopy showed morphologically viable and dividing bacilli in the lesion. Moreover, the surgical wound became infected with B. pseudomallei several days post-surgery. After treatment with ceftazidime and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, the wound infection cleared. We believe this could be a unique case of asymptomatic latent melioidosis in the spleen. In endemic countries, chronic granulomas should be investigated for B. pseudomallei infection, and if available, ISH may be helpful for diagnosis.

  15. Application of lipase from Burkholderia cepacia in the degradation of agro-industrial effluent.

    PubMed

    Mello Bueno, Pabline Rafaella; de Oliveira, Tatianne Ferreira; Castiglioni, Gabriel Luis; Soares Júnior, Manoel Soares; Ulhoa, Cirano Jose

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the physical and chemical characteristics of Amano PS commercial lipase - Burkholderia cepacia and lipase produced by Burkholderia cepacia strain ATCC 25416, in addition to studying the hydrolysis of agro-industrial effluent collected in a fried potato industry. The optimum temperature for increasing lipase activity was 37 °C. The temperature increase caused a decrease in thermostability of lipase, and the commercial lipase was less stable, with values of 10.5, 4.6 and 4.9%, respectively, lower than those obtained by lipase from strain ATCC 25416, at temperatures of 40, 50 and 60 °C. The enzymatic activity was higher in alkaline conditions, achieving better results at pH 8.0. The pH was the variable that most influenced the hydrolysis of triacylglycerides of the agro-industrial effluent, followed by enzyme concentration, and volume of gum arabic used in the reaction medium. Thus, it can be observed that the enzymatic hydrolytic process of the studied effluent presents a premising contribution to reduction of environmental impacts of potato chip processing industries. PMID:25860696

  16. Tangled bank of experimentally evolved Burkholderia biofilms reflects selection during chronic infections.

    PubMed

    Traverse, Charles C; Mayo-Smith, Leslie M; Poltak, Steffen R; Cooper, Vaughn S

    2013-01-15

    How diversity evolves and persists in biofilms is essential for understanding much of microbial life, including the uncertain dynamics of chronic infections. We developed a biofilm model enabling long-term selection for daily adherence to and dispersal from a plastic bead in a test tube. Focusing on a pathogen of the cystic fibrosis lung, Burkholderia cenocepacia, we sequenced clones and metagenomes to unravel the mutations and evolutionary forces responsible for adaptation and diversification of a single biofilm community during 1,050 generations of selection. The mutational patterns revealed recurrent evolution of biofilm specialists from generalist types and multiple adaptive alleles at relatively few loci. Fitness assays also demonstrated strong interference competition among contending mutants that preserved genetic diversity. Metagenomes from five other independently evolved biofilm lineages revealed extraordinary mutational parallelism that outlined common routes of adaptation, a subset of which was found, surprisingly, in a planktonic population. These mutations in turn were surprisingly well represented among mutations that evolved in cystic fibrosis isolates of both Burkholderia and Pseudomonas. These convergent pathways included altered metabolism of cyclic diguanosine monophosphate, polysaccharide production, tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes, global transcription, and iron scavenging. Evolution in chronic infections therefore may be driven by mutations in relatively few pathways also favored during laboratory selection, creating hope that experimental evolution may illuminate the ecology and selective dynamics of chronic infections and improve treatment strategies.

  17. Effect of Fusarium verticillioides on maize-root-associated Burkholderia cenocepacia populations.

    PubMed

    Bevivino, Annamaria; Peggion, Verena; Chiarini, Luigi; Tabacchioni, Silvia; Cantale, Cristina; Dalmastri, Claudia

    2005-12-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria are naturally present in the rhizosphere of several crop plants and have been found to antagonize a wide range of important plant pathogens. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the pathogenic fungus Fusarium verticillioides on Bcc populations recovered from the roots of Zea mays plants. Maize plants were cultivated under greenhouse conditions and bacterial colonies were randomly isolated from distinct root portions of Fusarium-treated and control plants. We obtained a total of 120 Bcc isolates which all belonged to the species Burkholderia cenocepacia, a species of the Bcc widely distributed in natural habitats such as the rhizosphere of several crop plants. Results obtained revealed that the presence of the plant pathogen F. verticillioides had an effect at the root colonization level of B. cenocepacia populations, since an increase in indigenous B. cenocepacia bacteria was found in the rhizospheres of maize plants grown in infested soil, compared to the rhizospheres of control plants. The analysis of diversity indices as well as the investigation of genetic polymorphism of B. cenocepacia strains, isolated from Fusarium-treated and control root portions, revealed greater genetic variability in the presence of F. verticillioides, especially in the terminal root system portion. Finally, all B. cenocepacia isolates were also tested for in vitro inhibition of F. verticillioides growth as a functional property. Our results revealed that all B. cenocepacia isolates were able to restrict in vitro fungal growth, suggesting that there was no relationship between genetic polymorphism and biocontrol traits. PMID:16085398

  18. Polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis and simultaneous remotion of organic inhibitors from sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate by Burkholderia sp.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Mateus Schreiner Garcez; Gomez, José Gregório Cabrera; Taciro, Marilda Keico; Mendonça, Thatiane Teixeira; Silva, Luiziana Ferreira

    2014-09-01

    Burkholderia sp. F24, originally isolated from soil, was capable of growth on xylose and removed organic inhibitors present in a hemicellulosic hydrolysate and simultaneously produced poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (P3HB). Using non-detoxified hydrolysate, Burkholderia sp. F24 reached a cell dry weight (CDW) of 6.8 g L(-1), containing 48 % of P3HB and exhibited a volumetric productivity (PP3HB) of 0.10 g L(-1) h(-1). Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate copolymers (P3HB-co-3HV) were produced using xylose and levulinic acid (LA) as carbon sources. In shake flask cultures, the 3HV content in the copolymer increased from 9 to 43 mol% by adding LA from 1.0 to 5.0 g L(-1). In high cell density cultivation using concentrated hemicellulosic hydrolysate F24 reached 25.04 g L(-1) of CDW containing 49 % of P3HB and PP3HB of 0.28 g L(-1 )h(-1). Based on these findings, second-generation ethanol and bioplastics from sugarcane bagasse is proposed.

  19. Use of Whole-Genome Sequencing to Link Burkholderia pseudomallei from Air Sampling to Mediastinal Melioidosis, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Price, Erin P.; Mayo, Mark; Kaestli, Mirjam; Theobald, Vanessa; Harrington, Ian; Harrington, Glenda; Sarovich, Derek S.

    2015-01-01

    The frequency with which melioidosis results from inhalation rather than percutaneous inoculation or ingestion is unknown. We recovered Burkholderia pseudomallei from air samples at the residence of a patient with presumptive inhalational melioidosis and used whole-genome sequencing to link the environmental bacteria to B. pseudomallei recovered from the patient. PMID:26488732

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia stabilis LA20W, a Trehalose Producer That Uses Levulinic Acid as a Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yuya; Koike, Hideaki; Kondo, Susumu; Hori, Tomoyuki; Kanno, Manabu; Kimura, Nobutada; Morita, Tomotake; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia stabilis LA20W produces trehalose using levulinic acid (LA) as a substrate. Here, we report the 7.97-Mb draft genome sequence of B. stabilis LA20W, which will be useful in investigations of the enzymes involved in LA metabolism and the mechanism of LA-induced trehalose production. PMID:27491978

  1. Live imaging of symbiosis: spatiotemporal infection dynamics of a GFP-labelled Burkholderia symbiont in the bean bug Riptortus pedestris.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Fukatsu, Takema

    2014-03-01

    Many insects possess endosymbiotic bacteria inside their body, wherein intimate interactions occur between the partners. While recent technological advancements have deepened our understanding of metabolic and evolutionary features of the symbiont genomes, molecular mechanisms underpinning the intimate interactions remain difficult to approach because the insect symbionts are generally uncultivable. The bean bug Riptortus pedestris is associated with the betaproteobacterial Burkholderia symbiont in a posterior region of the midgut, which develops numerous crypts harbouring the symbiont extracellularly. Distinct from other insect symbiotic systems, R. pedestris acquires the Burkholderia symbiont not by vertical transmission but from the environment every generation. By making use of the cultivability and the genetic tractability of the symbiont, we constructed a transgenic Burkholderia strain labelled with green fluorescent protein (GFP), which enabled detailed observation of spatiotemporal dynamics and the colonization process of the symbiont in freshly prepared specimens. The symbiont live imaging revealed that, at the second instar, colonization of the symbiotic midgut M4 region started around 6 h after inoculation (hai). By 24 hai, the symbiont cells appeared in the main tract and also in several crypts of the M4. By 48 hai, most of the crypts were colonized by the symbiont cells. By 72 hai, all the crypts were filled up with the symbiont cells and the symbiont localization pattern continued during the subsequent nymphal development. Quantitative PCR of the symbiont confirmed the infection dynamics quantitatively. These results highlight the stinkbug-Burkholderia gut symbiosis as an unprecedented model for comprehensive understanding of molecular mechanisms underpinning insect symbiosis.

  2. Strains of Burkholderia cenocepacia genomovar IIIA possessing the cblA gene that are distinct from ET12.

    PubMed

    Turton, Jane F; O'Brien, Emily; Megson, Brian; Kaufmann, Mary E; Pitt, Tyrone L

    2009-05-01

    Three strains of Burkholderia cenocepacia genomovar IIIA that were polymerase chain reaction positive for cblA, bcrA, and the epidemic strain marker, but were distinct from representatives of ET12 by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, are described. One of these strains was shown to express cable pili by electron microscopy.

  3. Association of the melioidosis agent Burkholderia pseudomallei with water parameters in rural water supplies in Northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Draper, A D K; Mayo, M; Harrington, G; Karp, D; Yinfoo, D; Ward, L; Haslem, A; Currie, B J; Kaestli, M

    2010-08-01

    We analyzed water parameters and the occurrence of the melioidosis agent Burkholderia pseudomallei in 47 water bores in Northern Australia. B. pseudomallei was associated with soft, acidic bore water of low salinity but high iron levels. This finding aids in identifying water supplies at risk of contamination with this pathogenic bacterium.

  4. Degradation of Chlorobenzenes at Nanomolar Concentrations by Burkholderia sp. Strain PS14 in Liquid Cultures and in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, Peter; Timmis, Kenneth N.

    1999-01-01

    The utilization of 1,2,4,5-tetrachloro-, 1,2,4-trichloro-, the three isomeric dichlorobenzenes and fructose as the sole carbon and energy sources at nanomolar concentrations was studied in batch experiments with Burkholderia sp. strain PS14. In liquid culture, all chlorobenzenes were metabolized within 1 h from their initial concentration of 500 nM to below their detection limits of 0.5 nM for 1,2,4,5-tetrachloro- and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene and 7.5 nM for the three dichlorobenzene isomers, with 63% mineralization of the tetra- and trichloroisomers. Fructose at the same initial concentration was, in contrast, metabolized over a 4-h incubation period down to a residual concentration of approximately 125 nM with 38% mineralization during this time. In soil microcosms, Burkholderia sp. strain PS14 metabolized tetrachlorobenzene present at 64.8 ppb and trichlorobenzene present at 54.4 ppb over a 72-h incubation period to below the detection limits of 0.108 and 0.09 ppb, respectively, with approximately 80% mineralization. A high sorptive capacity of Burkholderia sp. strain PS14 for 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene was found at very low cell density. The results demonstrate that Burkholderia sp. strain PS14 exhibits a very high affinity for chlorobenzenes at nanomolar concentrations. PMID:10347041

  5. Chronic Burkholderia multivorans bronchial infection in a non-cystic fibrosis individual with mannose binding lectin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, J; Exley, A; Foweraker, J; Bilton, D

    2005-01-01

    The case history is presented of a woman with multiple respiratory infections and mannose binding lectin (MBL) deficiency but no evidence of bronchiectasis who developed a chronic Burkholderia multivorans infection. Careful microbiological assessment is needed in patients with recurrent respiratory infection and the presence of B multivorans should trigger further immunological investigation including assessment of MBL status. PMID:15681508

  6. Burkholderia cenocepacia Strain CEIB S5-1, a Rhizosphere-Inhabiting Bacterium with Potential in Bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Ocampo, Fernando; Lozano-Aguirre Beltrán, Luis Fernando; Hernández-Mendoza, Armando; Rojas-Espinoza, Luis Enrique; Popoca-Ursino, Elida Carolina; Ortiz-Hernández, María Laura; Sánchez-Salinas, Enrique; Ramos Quintana, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is considered an opportunistic pathogen from humans and may cause disease in plants. A bioprospection from a plaguicide-contaminated agricultural field in Mexico identified several methyl parathion-degrading bacteria. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of B. cenocepacia strain CEIB S5-1, which gave us clues into ecological biodiversity. PMID:25744996

  7. Serial position encoding of signs.

    PubMed

    Miozzo, Michele; Petrova, Anna; Fischer-Baum, Simon; Peressotti, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Reduced short-term memory (STM) capacity has been reported for sign as compared to speech when items have to be recalled in a specific order. This difference has been attributed to a more precise and efficient serial position encoding in verbal STM (used for speech) than visuo-spatial STM (used for sign). We tested in the present investigation whether the reduced STM capacity with signs stems from a lack of positional encoding available in verbal STM. Error analyses reported in prior studies have revealed that positions are defined in verbal STM by distance from both the start and the end of the sequence (both-edges positional encoding scheme). Our analyses of the errors made by deaf participants with finger-spelled letters revealed that the both-edges positional encoding scheme underlies the STM representation of signs. These results indicate that the cause of the STM disadvantage is not the type of positional encoding but rather the difficulties in binding an item in visuo-spatial STM to its specific position in the sequence. Both-edges positional encoding scheme could be specific of sign, since it has not been found in visuo-spatial STM tasks conducted with hearing participants. PMID:27244095

  8. Proof that Burkholderia Strains Form Effective Symbioses with Legumes: a Study of Novel Mimosa-Nodulating Strains from South America

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Ming; de Faria, Sergio M.; Straliotto, Rosângela; Pitard, Rosa M.; Simões-Araùjo, Jean L.; Chou, Jui-Hsing; Chou, Yi-Ju; Barrios, Edmundo; Prescott, Alan R.; Elliott, Geoffrey N.; Sprent, Janet I.; Young, J. Peter W.; James, Euan K.

    2005-01-01

    Twenty Mimosa-nodulating bacterial strains from Brazil and Venezuela, together with eight reference Mimosa-nodulating rhizobial strains and two other β-rhizobial strains, were examined by amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis. They fell into 16 patterns and formed a single cluster together with the known β-rhizobia, Burkholderia caribensis, Burkholderia phymatum, and Burkholderia tuberum. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of 15 of the 20 strains were determined, and all were shown to belong to the genus Burkholderia; four distinct clusters could be discerned, with strains isolated from the same host species usually clustering very closely. Five of the strains (MAP3-5, Br3407, Br3454, Br3461, and Br3469) were selected for further studies of the symbiosis-related genes nodA, the NodD-dependent regulatory consensus sequences (nod box), and nifH. The nodA and nifH sequences were very close to each other and to those of B. phymatum STM815, B. caribensis TJ182, and Cupriavidus taiwanensis LMG19424 but were relatively distant from those of B. tuberum STM678. In addition to nodulating their original hosts, all five strains could also nodulate other Mimosa spp., and all produced nodules on Mimosa pudica that had nitrogenase (acetylene reduction) activities and structures typical of effective N2-fixing symbioses. Finally, both wild-type and green fluorescent protein-expressing transconjugant strains of Br3461 and MAP3-5 produced N2-fixing nodules on their original hosts, Mimosa bimucronata (Br3461) and Mimosa pigra (MAP3-5), and hence this confirms strongly that Burkholderia strains can form effective symbioses with legumes. PMID:16269788

  9. Proof that Burkholderia strains form effective symbioses with legumes: a study of novel Mimosa-nodulating strains from South America.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ming; de Faria, Sergio M; Straliotto, Rosângela; Pitard, Rosa M; Simões-Araùjo, Jean L; Chou, Jui-Hsing; Chou, Yi-Ju; Barrios, Edmundo; Prescott, Alan R; Elliott, Geoffrey N; Sprent, Janet I; Young, J Peter W; James, Euan K

    2005-11-01

    Twenty Mimosa-nodulating bacterial strains from Brazil and Venezuela, together with eight reference Mimosa-nodulating rhizobial strains and two other beta-rhizobial strains, were examined by amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis. They fell into 16 patterns and formed a single cluster together with the known beta-rhizobia, Burkholderia caribensis, Burkholderia phymatum, and Burkholderia tuberum. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of 15 of the 20 strains were determined, and all were shown to belong to the genus Burkholderia; four distinct clusters could be discerned, with strains isolated from the same host species usually clustering very closely. Five of the strains (MAP3-5, Br3407, Br3454, Br3461, and Br3469) were selected for further studies of the symbiosis-related genes nodA, the NodD-dependent regulatory consensus sequences (nod box), and nifH. The nodA and nifH sequences were very close to each other and to those of B. phymatum STM815, B. caribensis TJ182, and Cupriavidus taiwanensis LMG19424 but were relatively distant from those of B. tuberum STM678. In addition to nodulating their original hosts, all five strains could also nodulate other Mimosa spp., and all produced nodules on Mimosa pudica that had nitrogenase (acetylene reduction) activities and structures typical of effective N2-fixing symbioses. Finally, both wild-type and green fluorescent protein-expressing transconjugant strains of Br3461 and MAP3-5 produced N2-fixing nodules on their original hosts, Mimosa bimucronata (Br3461) and Mimosa pigra (MAP3-5), and hence this confirms strongly that Burkholderia strains can form effective symbioses with legumes.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia sp. Strain PML1(12), an Ectomycorrhizosphere-Inhabiting Bacterium with Effective Mineral-Weathering Ability.

    PubMed

    Uroz, Stéphane; Oger, Phil

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia sp. PML1(12), a soil bacterium isolated from the Oak-Scleroderma citrinum ectomycorrhizosphere in the experimental forest site of Breuil-Chenue (France). PMID:26205858

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia sp. Strain PML1(12), an Ectomycorrhizosphere-Inhabiting Bacterium with Effective Mineral-Weathering Ability

    PubMed Central

    Oger, Phil

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia sp. PML1(12), a soil bacterium isolated from the Oak-Scleroderma citrinum ectomycorrhizosphere in the experimental forest site of Breuil-Chenue (France). PMID:26205858

  12. IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE USING BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA G4 PR1: ANALYSIS OF MICROBIAL ECOLOGY PARAMETERS FOR RISK ASSESSMENT (RESEARCH BRIEF)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The introduction of bacteria into aquifers for bioremediation purposes requires monitoring of the persistence and activity of microbial populations for efficacy and risk assessment purposes. Burkholderia cepacia G4 PR1 constitutively expresses a toluene ortho-monooxygenase (tom) ...

  13. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled.

  14. Fly Photoreceptors Encode Phase Congruency

    PubMed Central

    Friederich, Uwe; Billings, Stephen A.; Hardie, Roger C.; Juusola, Mikko; Coca, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    More than five decades ago it was postulated that sensory neurons detect and selectively enhance behaviourally relevant features of natural signals. Although we now know that sensory neurons are tuned to efficiently encode natural stimuli, until now it was not clear what statistical features of the stimuli they encode and how. Here we reverse-engineer the neural code of Drosophila photoreceptors and show for the first time that photoreceptors exploit nonlinear dynamics to selectively enhance and encode phase-related features of temporal stimuli, such as local phase congruency, which are invariant to changes in illumination and contrast. We demonstrate that to mitigate for the inherent sensitivity to noise of the local phase congruency measure, the nonlinear coding mechanisms of the fly photoreceptors are tuned to suppress random phase signals, which explains why photoreceptor responses to naturalistic stimuli are significantly different from their responses to white noise stimuli. PMID:27336733

  15. Fly Photoreceptors Encode Phase Congruency.

    PubMed

    Friederich, Uwe; Billings, Stephen A; Hardie, Roger C; Juusola, Mikko; Coca, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    More than five decades ago it was postulated that sensory neurons detect and selectively enhance behaviourally relevant features of natural signals. Although we now know that sensory neurons are tuned to efficiently encode natural stimuli, until now it was not clear what statistical features of the stimuli they encode and how. Here we reverse-engineer the neural code of Drosophila photoreceptors and show for the first time that photoreceptors exploit nonlinear dynamics to selectively enhance and encode phase-related features of temporal stimuli, such as local phase congruency, which are invariant to changes in illumination and contrast. We demonstrate that to mitigate for the inherent sensitivity to noise of the local phase congruency measure, the nonlinear coding mechanisms of the fly photoreceptors are tuned to suppress random phase signals, which explains why photoreceptor responses to naturalistic stimuli are significantly different from their responses to white noise stimuli. PMID:27336733

  16. The Burkholderia cenocepacia OmpA-like protein BCAL2958: identification, characterization, and detection of anti-BCAL2958 antibodies in serum from B. cepacia complex-infected Cystic Fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Sílvia A; Morad, Mostafa; Feliciano, Joana R; Pita, Tiago; Nady, Soad; El-Hennamy, Rehab E; Abdel-Rahman, Mona; Cavaco, José; Pereira, Luísa; Barreto, Celeste; Leitão, Jorge H

    2016-12-01

    Respiratory infections by bacteria of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality among cystic fibrosis patients, highlighting the need for novel therapeutic strategies. In the present work we have studied the B. cenocepacia protein BCAL2958, a member of the OmpA-like family of proteins, demonstrated as highly immunogenic in other pathogens and capable of eliciting strong host immune responses. The encoding gene was cloned and the protein, produced as a 6× His-tagged derivative, was used to produce polyclonal antibodies. Bioinformatics analyses led to the identification of sequences encoding proteins with a similarity higher than 96 % to BCAL2958 in all the publicly available Bcc genomes. Furthermore, using the antibody it was experimentally demonstrated that this protein is produced by all the 12 analyzed strains from 7 Bcc species. In addition, results are also presented showing the presence of anti-BCAL2958 antibodies in sera from cystic fibrosis patients with a clinical record of respiratory infection by Bcc, and the ability of the purified protein to in vitro stimulate neutrophils. The widespread production of the protein by Bcc members, together with its ability to stimulate the immune system and the detection of circulating antibodies in patients with a documented record of Bcc infection strongly suggest that the protein is a potential candidate for usage in preventive therapies of infections by Bcc.

  17. Synaptic encoding of temporal contiguity

    PubMed Central

    Ostojic, Srdjan; Fusi, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Often we need to perform tasks in an environment that changes stochastically. In these situations it is important to learn the statistics of sequences of events in order to predict the future and the outcome of our actions. The statistical description of many of these sequences can be reduced to the set of probabilities that a particular event follows another event (temporal contiguity). Under these conditions, it is important to encode and store in our memory these transition probabilities. Here we show that for a large class of synaptic plasticity models, the distribution of synaptic strengths encodes transitions probabilities. Specifically, when the synaptic dynamics depend on pairs of contiguous events and the synapses can remember multiple instances of the transitions, then the average synaptic weights are a monotonic function of the transition probabilities. The synaptic weights converge to the distribution encoding the probabilities also when the correlations between consecutive synaptic modifications are considered. We studied how this distribution depends on the number of synaptic states for a specific model of a multi-state synapse with hard bounds. In the case of bistable synapses, the average synaptic weights are a smooth function of the transition probabilities and the accuracy of the encoding depends on the learning rate. As the number of synaptic states increases, the average synaptic weights become a step function of the transition probabilities. We finally show that the information stored in the synaptic weights can be read out by a simple rate-based neural network. Our study shows that synapses encode transition probabilities under general assumptions and this indicates that temporal contiguity is likely to be encoded and harnessed in almost every neural circuit in the brain. PMID:23641210

  18. Biodiesel production from Jatropha oil catalyzed by immobilized Burkholderia cepacia lipase on modified attapulgite.

    PubMed

    You, Qinghong; Yin, Xiulian; Zhao, Yuping; Zhang, Yan

    2013-11-01

    Lipase from Burkholderia cepacia was immobilized on modified attapulgite by cross-linking reaction for biodiesel production with jatropha oil as feedstock. Effects of various factors on biodiesel production were studied by single-factor experiment. Results indicated that the best conditions for biodiesel preparation were: 10 g jatropha oil, 2.4 g methanol (molar ratio of oil to methanol is 1:6.6) being added at 3h intervals, 7 wt% water, 10 wt% immobilized lipase, temperature 35°C, and time 24h. Under these conditions, the maximum biodiesel yield reached 94%. The immobilized lipase retained 95% of its relative activity during the ten repeated batch reactions. The half-life time of the immobilized lipase is 731 h. Kinetics was studied and the Vmax of the immobilized lipases were 6.823 mmol L(-1). This immobilized lipase catalyzed process has potential industrial use for biodiesel production to replace chemical-catalyzed method.

  19. Microbial pathogenesis in cystic fibrosis: mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia.

    PubMed Central

    Govan, J R; Deretic, V

    1996-01-01

    Respiratory infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia play a major role in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). This review summarizes the latest advances in understanding host-pathogen interactions in CF with an emphasis on the role and control of conversion to mucoidy in P. aeruginosa, a phenomenon epitomizing the adaptation of this opportunistic pathogen to the chronic chourse of infection in CF, and on the innate resistance to antibiotics of B. cepacia, person-to-person spread, and sometimes rapidly fatal disease caused by this organism. While understanding the mechanism of conversion to mucoidy in P. aeruginosa has progressed to the point where this phenomenon has evolved into a model system for studying bacterial stress response in microbial pathogenesis, the more recent challenge with B. cepacia, which has emerged as a potent bona fide CF pathogen, is discussed in the context of clinical issues, taxonomy, transmission, and potential modes of pathogenicity. PMID:8840786

  20. Clinafloxacin for Treatment of Burkholderia cenocepacia Infection in a Cystic Fibrosis Patient.

    PubMed

    Balwan, Akshu; Nicolau, David P; Wungwattana, Minkey; Zuckerman, Jonathan B; Waters, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory infection with Burkholderia cenocepacia is associated with accelerated decline in lung function and increased mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients (A. M. Jones, M. E. Dodd, J. R. W. Govan, V. Barcus, C. J. Doherty, J. Morris, and A. K. Webb, Thorax 59:948-951, 2004, http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/thx.2003.017210). B. cenocepacia often possesses innate resistance to multiple antimicrobial classes, making eradication uncommon in established infection (P. B. Davis, Am J Respir Crit Care Med 173:475-482, 2006, http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/rccm.200505-840OE). We report the use of clinafloxacin in a CF patient with advanced B. cenocepacia infection, present pharmacokinetic (PK) data, and discuss the potential therapeutic role of clinafloxacin in patients with this condition.

  1. Mycotic aneurysm caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei in a previously healthy returning traveller

    PubMed Central

    Bodilsen, Jacob; Vammen, Sten; Fuursted, Kurt; Hjort, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a common cause of serious, difficult to treat infections in South-East Asia and Northern Australia, but is a rare imported pathogen in the USA and Europe. We report a case of a patient with a mycotic aneurysm caused by B. pseudomallei in a previously healthy returning traveller. The patient presented with 4 weeks of abdominal pain and intermittent fever after a brief vacation in Thailand. The aneurysm was excised and replaced by an autologous deep vein graft, and the patient was treated for 6 months with antibiotics adjusted according to postoperative renal impairment. Twenty-four months after surgery the patient is well and without relapse. PMID:25246454

  2. Evaluation of a Burkholderia pseudomallei Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccine in Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Hailey; Nieves, Wildaliz; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi; Roy, Chad J; Morici, Lisa A

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bps)is the causative agent of melioidosis and is endemic in regions of northern Australia and Southeast Asia. Bps is inherently resistant to multiple antibiotics and is considered a potential biological warfare agent by the U.S. DHHS. Therefore, effective vaccines are necessary to prevent natural infection and to safeguard against biological attack with this organism. In our previous work we have shown that immunization with naturally derived outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from Bps provides significant protection against lethal aerosol and systemic infection in BALB/c mice. In this work, we evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of escalating doses of OMV vaccine in rhesus macaques. We show that immunization of rhesus macaques with Bps OMVs generates humoral immuneresponses to protective protein and polysaccharide antigens without any associated toxicity or reactogenicity. These results lay the groundwork for evaluation of protective efficacy of the OMV vaccine in the nonhuman primate model of melioidosis.

  3. Evaluation of a Burkholderia pseudomallei Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccine in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Hailey; Nieves, Wildaliz; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi; Roy, Chad J.; Morici, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bps)is the causative agent of melioidosis and is endemic in regions of northern Australia and Southeast Asia. Bps is inherently resistant to multiple antibiotics and is considered a potential biological warfare agent by the U.S. DHHS. Therefore, effective vaccines are necessary to prevent natural infection and to safeguard against biological attack with this organism. In our previous work we have shown that immunization with naturally derived outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from Bps provides significant protection against lethal aerosol and systemic infection in BALB/c mice. In this work, we evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of escalating doses of OMV vaccine in rhesus macaques. We show that immunization of rhesus macaques with Bps OMVs generates humoral immuneresponses to protective protein and polysaccharide antigens without any associated toxicity or reactogenicity. These results lay the groundwork for evaluation of protective efficacy of the OMV vaccine in the nonhuman primate model of melioidosis. PMID:25165491

  4. Short report: Failure of Burkholderia pseudomallei to grow in an automated blood culture system.

    PubMed

    Teerawattanasook, Nittaya; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Day, Nicholas P J; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn

    2014-12-01

    We compared the organisms isolated from 30,210 pairs of blood culture bottles by using BacT/Alert system and the conventional system. Overall, 2,575 (8.5%) specimens were culture positive for pathogenic organisms. The sensitivity for detection of pathogenic organisms with the BACT/Alert system (85.6%, 2,203 of 2,575) was significantly higher than that with the conventional method (74.1%, 1,908 of 2,575; P < 0.0001). However, Burkholderia pseudomallei was isolated less often with the BacT/ALERT system (73.5%, 328 of 446) than with the conventional system (90.3%, 403 of 446; P < 0.0001). This finding suggests that use of the conventional culture method in conjunction with the BacT/Alert system may improve the isolation rate for B. pseudomallei in melioidosis-endemic areas.

  5. A PCR-BASED DETECTION OF BURKHOLDERIA PSEUDOMALLEI DIVERSITY USING MYOVIRIDAE PROPHAGE TYPING.

    PubMed

    Nakornpakdee, Yaowarin; Sermswan, Rasana W; Tattawasart, Unchalee; Yordpratum, Umaporn; Wongratanacheewin, Surasakdi

    2015-01-01

    PCR-based detection of Myoviridae lysogenic phages in Burkholderia pseudomallei was developed using primers targeting K96243 prophage GI2, phiE12-2 and phi52237/phiX216. Investigation of 50 clinical and 50 environmental (soil) isolates revealed that K96243 prophage GI2 was the most common (48%) among the isolates, followed by phiE12-2 (38%) and phi52237/phiX216 (35%), with K96243 prophage GI2 being significantly more frequent in soil (64%) than clinical (32%) samples. Twenty-four percent of soil isolates contained all three prophage types, while clinical isolates harbored no more than two types. Although B. pseudomallei isolates from soil were found to be more diverse based on prophage typing, all isolates were equally susceptible to a battery of lytic phages (although to different extents), suggesting the possibility of using lytic phages to control environmental B. pseudomallei. PMID:26513903

  6. Burkholderia gut symbionts enhance the innate immunity of host Riptortus pedestris.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Lee, Jun Beom; Huh, Ye Rang; Jang, Ho Am; Kim, Chan-Hee; Yoo, Jin Wook; Lee, Bok Luel

    2015-11-01

    The relation between gut symbiosis and immunity has been reported in various animal model studies. Here, we corroborate the effect of gut symbiont to host immunity using the bean bug model. The bean bug, Riptortus pedestris, is a useful gut symbiosis model due to the monospecific gut symbiont, genus Burkholderia. To examine the effect of gut symbiosis to host immunity, we generated the gut symbiont-harboring (symbiotic) insect line and the gut symbiont-lacking (aposymbiotic) insect line. Upon bacterial challenges, the symbiotic Riptortus exhibited better survival than aposymbiotic Riptortus. When cellular immunity was inhibited, the symbiotic Riptortus still survived better than aposymbioic Riptortus, suggesting stronger humoral immunity. The molecular basis of the strong humoral immunity was further confirmed by the increase of hemolymph antimicrobial activity and antimicrobial peptide expression in the symbiotic insects. Taken together, our data clearly demonstrate that Burkhoderia gut symbiont positively affect the Riptortus systemic immunity.

  7. Phylogenetic and degradation characterization of Burkholderia cepacia WZ1 degrading herbicide quinclorac.

    PubMed

    Lü, Zhenmei; Min, Hang; Wu, Shuwen; Ruan, Aidong

    2003-11-01

    Strain WZI capable of degrading quinclorac was isolated from a pesticide manufactory soil and considered to be Burkholderia cepacia, belonged to bacteria, Proteobacteria, beta-Proteobacteria, based on morphology, physio-biochemical properties, whole cell fatty acid analysis and a partial sequencing of 16S rDNA. Strain WZ1 decomposed 90% of quinclorac at original concentration of 1000 mg L(-1) within 11 days. GC/MS analysis showed that the strain degraded quinclorac to 3,7-dichloro-8-quinoline and the cracked residue 2-chloro, 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid, indicating that the metabolic pathway was initiated by process of decarboxylation followed by cleavage of the aromatic ring. Stain WZ1 was also able to degrade some other herbicides and aromatic compounds, including 2,4,5-T, phenol, naphthalene and hydrochinone etc. This paper describes for the first time Phylogenetic and degradation characterization of a pure bacterium which, is able to mineralize quinclorac.

  8. Biodiesel production from Jatropha oil catalyzed by immobilized Burkholderia cepacia lipase on modified attapulgite.

    PubMed

    You, Qinghong; Yin, Xiulian; Zhao, Yuping; Zhang, Yan

    2013-11-01

    Lipase from Burkholderia cepacia was immobilized on modified attapulgite by cross-linking reaction for biodiesel production with jatropha oil as feedstock. Effects of various factors on biodiesel production were studied by single-factor experiment. Results indicated that the best conditions for biodiesel preparation were: 10 g jatropha oil, 2.4 g methanol (molar ratio of oil to methanol is 1:6.6) being added at 3h intervals, 7 wt% water, 10 wt% immobilized lipase, temperature 35°C, and time 24h. Under these conditions, the maximum biodiesel yield reached 94%. The immobilized lipase retained 95% of its relative activity during the ten repeated batch reactions. The half-life time of the immobilized lipase is 731 h. Kinetics was studied and the Vmax of the immobilized lipases were 6.823 mmol L(-1). This immobilized lipase catalyzed process has potential industrial use for biodiesel production to replace chemical-catalyzed method. PMID:24055964

  9. Understanding pathogenic Burkholderia glumae metabolic and signaling pathways within rice tissues through in vivo transcriptome analyses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunyoung; Park, Jungwook; Lee, Jongyun; Shin, Dongjin; Park, Dong-Soo; Lim, Jong-Sung; Choi, Ik-Young; Seo, Young-Su

    2014-08-15

    Burkholderia glumae is a causal agent of rice grain and sheath rot. Similar to other phytopathogens, B. glumae adapts well to the host environment and controls its biology to induce diseases in the host plant; however, its molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. To gain a better understating of the actual physiological changes that occur in B. glumae during infection, we analyzed B. glumae transcriptome from infected rice tissues using an RNA-seq technique. To accomplish this, we analyzed differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and identified 2653 transcripts that were significantly altered. We then performed KEGG pathway and module enrichment of the DEGs. Interestingly, most genes involved bacterial chemotaxis-mediated motility, ascorbate and trehalose metabolisms, and sugar transporters including l-arabinose and d-xylose were found to be highly enriched. The in vivo transcriptional profiling of pathogenic B. glumae will facilitate elucidation of unknown plant-pathogenic bacteria interactions, as well as the overall infection processes.

  10. Two quorum sensing systems control biofilm formation and virulence in members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex

    PubMed Central

    Suppiger, Angela; Schmid, Nadine; Aguilar, Claudio; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo

    2013-01-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) consists of 17 closely related species that are problematic opportunistic bacterial pathogens for cystic fibrosis patients and immunocompromised individuals. These bacteria are capable of utilizing two different chemical languages: N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) and cis-2-unsaturated fatty acids. Here we summarize the current knowledge of the underlying molecular architectures of these communication systems, showing how they are interlinked and discussing how they regulate overlapping as well as specific sets of genes. A particular focus is laid on the role of these signaling systems in the formation of biofilms, which are believed to be highly important for chronic infections. We review genes that have been implicated in the sessile lifestyle of this group of bacteria. The new emerging role of the intracellular second messenger cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) as a downstream regulator of the fatty acid signaling cascade and as a key factor in biofilm formation is also discussed. PMID:23799665

  11. Cometabolic degradation of trichloroethylene by Burkholderia cepacia G4 with poplar leaf homogenate.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jun Won; Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    2014-07-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), a chlorinated organic solvent, is one of the most common and widespread groundwater contaminants worldwide. Among the group of TCE-degrading aerobic bacteria, Burkholderia cepacia G4 is the best-known representative. This strain requires the addition of specific substrates, including toluene, phenol, and benzene, to induce the enzymes to degrade TCE. However, the substrates are toxic and introducing them into the soil can result in secondary contamination. In this study, poplar leaf homogenate containing natural phenolic compounds was tested for the ability to induce the growth of and TCE degradation by B. cepacia G4. The results showed that the G4 strain could grow and degrade TCE well with the addition of phytochemicals. The poplar leaf homogenate also functioned as an inducer of the toluene-ortho-monooxygenase (TOM) gene in B. cepacia G4.

  12. Activity of Cysteamine against the Cystic Fibrosis Pathogen Burkholderia cepacia Complex

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Derry; Lovie, Emma; Robertson, Jennifer; O'Neil, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    There are no wholly successful chemotherapeutic strategies against Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) colonization in cystic fibrosis (CF). We assessed the impact of cysteamine (Lynovex) in combination with standard-of-care CF antibiotics in vitro against BCC CF isolates by the concentration at which 100% of bacteria were killed (MIC100) and checkerboard assays under CLSI standard conditions. Cysteamine facilitated the aminoglycoside-, fluoroquinolone- and folate pathway inhibitor-mediated killing of BCC organisms that were otherwise resistant or intermediately sensitive to these antibiotic classes. Slow-growing BCC strains are often recalcitrant to treatment and form biofilms. In assessing the impact of cysteamine on biofilms, we demonstrated inhibition of BCC biofilm formation at sub-MIC100s of cysteamine. PMID:27503654

  13. Identification of aldolase and ferredoxin reductase within the dbt operon of Burkholderia fungorum DBT1.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Stefano; Andreolli, Marco; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Zordan, Fabio; Lampis, Silvia; Vallini, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    Burkholderia fungorum DBT1, first isolated from settling particulate matter of an oil refinery wastewater, is a bacterial strain which has been shown capable of utilizing several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) including dibenzothiophene (DBT). In particular, this microbe is able to efficiently degrade DBT through the Kodama pathway. Previous investigations have lead to the identification of six genes, on a total of eight, required for DBT degradation. In the present study, a combined experimental/computational approach was adopted to identify and in silico characterize the two missing genes, namely a ferredoxin reductase and a hydratase-aldolase. Thus, the finding of all enzymatic components of the Kodama pathway in B. fungorum DBT1 makes this bacterial strain amenable for possible exploitation in soil bioremediation protocols.

  14. Molecular Typing and Exopolysaccharide Biosynthesis of Burkholderia cepacia Isolates from a Portuguese Cystic Fibrosis Center

    PubMed Central

    Richau, João A.; Leitão, Jorge H.; Correia, Manuela; Lito, Luís; Salgado, Maria José; Barreto, Celeste; Cescutti, Paola; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2000-01-01

    This work describes the first epidemiological survey of Burkholderia cepacia involved in pulmonary infections among the Portuguese population with cystic fibrosis (CF) who attended the major CF treatment Center in Lisbon at Sta. Maria Hospital from 1995 to the end of 1997. The characterization of the genomic relatedness of the isolates was based on the analysis of their ribopatterns (with EcoRI) followed by construction of a ribotype-based phylogenetic tree. This study was complemented with macrorestriction fragment analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. After optimization of the solid growth medium, we found that exopolysaccharide (EPS) production by B. cepacia CF isolates is not as rare a phenomenon as was thought before; indeed, 70% of the isolates examined were EPS producers. PMID:10747161

  15. Quantitative proteomic analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei Bsa type III secretion system effectors using hypersecreting mutants.

    PubMed

    Vander Broek, Charles W; Chalmers, Kevin J; Stevens, Mark P; Stevens, Joanne M

    2015-04-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis, a severe disease of humans and animals. One of the virulence factors critical for early stages of infection is the Burkholderia secretion apparatus (Bsa) Type 3 Secretion System (T3SS), a molecular syringe that injects bacterial proteins, called effectors, into eukaryotic cells where they subvert cellular functions to the benefit of the bacteria. Although the Bsa T3SS itself is known to be important for invasion, intracellular replication, and virulence, only a few genuine effector proteins have been identified and the complete repertoire of proteins secreted by the system has not yet been fully characterized. We constructed a mutant lacking bsaP, a homolog of the T3SS "gatekeeper" family of proteins that exert control over the timing and magnitude of effector protein secretion. Mutants lacking BsaP, or the T3SS translocon protein BipD, were observed to hypersecrete the known Bsa effector protein BopE, providing evidence of their role in post-translational control of the Bsa T3SS and representing key reagents for the identification of its secreted substrates. Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantification (iTRAQ), a gel-free quantitative proteomics technique, was used to compare the secreted protein profiles of the Bsa T3SS hypersecreting mutants of B. pseudomallei with the isogenic parent strain and a bsaZ mutant incapable of effector protein secretion. Our study provides one of the most comprehensive core secretomes of B. pseudomallei described to date and identified 26 putative Bsa-dependent secreted proteins that may be considered candidate effectors. Two of these proteins, BprD and BapA, were validated as novel effector proteins secreted by the Bsa T3SS of B. pseudomallei.

  16. Interrogation of the Burkholderia pseudomallei genome to address differential virulence among isolates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Challacombe, Jean F.; Stubben, Chris J.; Klimko, Christopher P.; Welkos, Susan L.; Kern, Steven J.; Bozue, Joel A.; Worsham, Patricia L.; Cote, Christopher K.; Wolfe, Daniel N.; Badger, Jonathan H.

    2014-12-23

    Infection by the Gram-negative pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei results in the disease melioidosis, acquired from the environment in parts of southeast Asia and northern Australia. Clinical symptoms of melioidosis range from acute (fever, pneumonia, septicemia, and localized infection) to chronic (abscesses in various organs and tissues, most commonly occurring in the lungs, liver, spleen, kidney, prostate and skeletal muscle), and persistent infections in humans are difficult to cure. Understanding the basic biology and genomics of B. pseudomallei is imperative for the development of new vaccines and therapeutic interventions. This formidable task is becoming more tractable due to the increasing number ofmore » B. pseudomallei genomes that are being sequenced and compared. Here, we compared three B. pseudomallei genomes, from strains MSHR668, K96243 and 1106a, to identify features that might explain why MSHR668 is more virulent than K96243 and 1106a in a mouse model of B. pseudomallei infection. Our analyses focused on metabolic, virulence and regulatory genes that were present in MSHR668 but absent from both K96243 and 1106a. We also noted features present in K96243 and 1106a but absent from MSHR668, and identified genomic differences that may contribute to variations in virulence noted among the three B. pseudomallei isolates. While this work contributes to our understanding of B. pseudomallei genomics, more detailed experiments are necessary to characterize the relevance of specific genomic features to B. pseudomallei metabolism and virulence. Functional analyses of metabolic networks, virulence and regulation shows promise for examining the effects of B. pseudomallei on host cell metabolism and will lay a foundation for future prediction of the virulence of emerging strains. Continued emphasis in this area will be critical for protection against melioidosis, as a better understanding of what constitutes a fully virulent Burkholderia isolate may provide for

  17. Determining the Biochemical Properties of the Oxalate Biosynthetic Component (Obc)1 from Burkholderia mallei

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Oxalic acid is produced by a variety of organisms ranging from simple microbes to complex animals. This acid has been proposed to fulfill various physiological and pathological functions which vary between organisms. In bacteria from the Burkholderia genus, oxalate secretion has been shown to be quorum sensing dependent and to support pathogenicity and cell viability. In light of the critical roles of oxalate in Burkholderia as well as other organisms, it is surprising that our understanding of how this simple dicarboxylate is biosynthesized remains incomplete. Here we report the expression, purification, and partial characterization of the first intact bacterial oxalate biosynthetic enzyme, Obc1, from B. mallei. An N-terminal His-tagged Bmobc1 was cloned into pDUET, expressed in E. coli BLR (DE3), and the recombinant enzyme purified by affinity chromatography. Oxalate biosynthetic enzyme assays coupled with HPLC analysis revealed that BmObc1 catalyzed the biosynthesis of oxalate, acetoacetate, and free CoA from oxaloacetate and a short chain acyl-CoA following Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Optimal enzyme activity was measured at pH 8.0 and a temperature around 44°C. Kinetic analysis conducted under conditions of saturating acetyl-CoA and varying oxaloacetate concentrations resulted in a calculated Km value for oxaloacetate of 94.3± 9.2 μM (mean ± SE). Under conditions of saturating oxaloacetate concentration and varying acyl-CoA (acetyl- or propionyl-CoA) concentrations kinetic analysis generated a calculated Km value of 26.8 ± 2.3 μM (mean ± SE) for acetyl-CoA and 104.4 ± 12.7 μM for propionyl-CoA. The significantly lower Km for acetyl-CoA suggests that it is strongly favored as a substrate over propionyl-CoA. PMID:27643499

  18. Using multispectral imaging flow cytometry to assess an in vitro intracellular Burkholderia thailandensis infection model.

    PubMed

    Jenner, Dominic; Ducker, Catherine; Clark, Graeme; Prior, Jo; Rowland, Caroline A

    2016-04-01

    The use of in vitro models to understand the interaction of bacteria with host cells is well established. In vitro bacterial infection models are often used to quantify intracellular bacterial load by lysing cell populations and subsequently enumerating the bacteria. Modern established techniques employ the use of fluorescence technologies such as flow cytometry, fluorescent microscopy, and/or confocal microscopy. However, these techniques often lack either the quantification of large data sets (microscopy) or use of gross fluorescence signal which lacks the visual confirmation that can provide additional confidence in data sets. Multispectral imaging flow cytometry (MIFC) is a novel emerging field of technology. This technology captures a bright field and fluorescence image of cells in a flow using a charged coupled device camera. It allows the analysis of tens of thousands of single cell images, making it an extremely powerful technology. Here MIFC was used as an alternative method of analyzing intracellular bacterial infection using Burkholderia thailandensis E555 as a model organism. It has been demonstrated that the data produced using traditional enumeration is comparable to data analyzed using MIFC. It has also been shown that by using MIFC it is possible to generate other data on the dynamics of the infection model rather than viable counts alone. It has been demonstrated that it is possible to inhibit the uptake of bacteria into mammalian cells and identify differences between treated and untreated cell populations. The authors believe this to be the first use of MIFC to analyze a Burkholderia bacterial species during intracellular infection. © 2016 Crown copyright. Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of ISAC. PMID:26841315

  19. Snake Cathelicidin NA-CATH and Smaller Helical Antimicrobial Peptides Are Effective against Burkholderia thailandensis

    PubMed Central

    Blower, Ryan J.; Barksdale, Stephanie M.; van Hoek, Monique L.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis is a Gram-negative soil bacterium used as a model organism for B. pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis and an organism classified category B priority pathogen and a Tier 1 select agent for its potential use as a biological weapon. Burkholderia species are reportedly “highly resistant” to antimicrobial agents, including cyclic peptide antibiotics, due to multiple resistance systems, a hypothesis we decided to test using antimicrobial (host defense) peptides. In this study, a number of cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) were tested in vitro against B. thailandensis for both antimicrobial activity and inhibition of biofilm formation. Here, we report that the Chinese cobra (Naja atra) cathelicidin NA-CATH was significantly antimicrobial against B. thailandensis. Additional cathelicidins, including the human cathelicidin LL-37, a sheep cathelicidin SMAP-29, and some smaller ATRA peptide derivatives of NA-CATH were also effective. The D-enantiomer of one small peptide (ATRA-1A) was found to be antimicrobial as well, with EC50 in the range of the L-enantiomer. Our results also demonstrate that human alpha-defensins (HNP-1 & -2) and a short beta-defensin-derived peptide (Peptide 4 of hBD-3) were not bactericidal against B. thailandensis. We also found that the cathelicidin peptides, including LL-37, NA-CATH, and SMAP-29, possessed significant ability to prevent biofilm formation of B. thailandensis. Additionally, we show that LL-37 and its D-enantiomer D-LL-37 can disperse pre-formed biofilms. These results demonstrate that although B. thailandensis is highly resistant to many antibiotics, cyclic peptide antibiotics such as polymyxin B, and defensing peptides, some antimicrobial peptides including the elapid snake cathelicidin NA-CATH exert significant antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity towards B. thailandensis. PMID:26196513

  20. Construction of a large-scale Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 transposon mutant library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Yee-Chin; Pain, Arnab; Nathan, Sheila

    2014-09-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia, a pathogenic member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc), has emerged as a significant threat towards cystic fibrosis patients, where infection often leads to the fatal clinical manifestation known as cepacia syndrome. Many studies have investigated the pathogenicity of B. cenocepacia as well as its ability to become highly resistant towards many of the antibiotics currently in use. In addition, studies have also been undertaken to understand the pathogen's capacity to adapt and survive in a broad range of environments. Transposon based mutagenesis has been widely used in creating insertional knock-out mutants and coupled with recent advances in sequencing technology, robust tools to study gene function in a genome-wide manner have been developed based on the assembly of saturated transposon mutant libraries. In this study, we describe the construction of a large-scale library of B. cenocepacia transposon mutants. To create transposon mutants of B. cenocepacia strain J2315, electrocompetent bacteria were electrotransformed with the EZ-Tn5 transposome. Tetracyline resistant colonies were harvested off selective agar and pooled. Mutants were generated in multiple batches with each batch consisting of ˜20,000 to 40,000 mutants. Transposon insertion was validated by PCR amplification of the transposon region. In conclusion, a saturated B. cenocepacia J2315 transposon mutant library with an estimated total number of 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed. This mutant library can now be further exploited as a genetic tool to assess the function of every gene in the genome, facilitating the discovery of genes important for bacterial survival and adaptation, as well as virulence.

  1. Determining the Biochemical Properties of the Oxalate Biosynthetic Component (Obc)1 from Burkholderia mallei.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Peter M; Nakata, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Oxalic acid is produced by a variety of organisms ranging from simple microbes to complex animals. This acid has been proposed to fulfill various physiological and pathological functions which vary between organisms. In bacteria from the Burkholderia genus, oxalate secretion has been shown to be quorum sensing dependent and to support pathogenicity and cell viability. In light of the critical roles of oxalate in Burkholderia as well as other organisms, it is surprising that our understanding of how this simple dicarboxylate is biosynthesized remains incomplete. Here we report the expression, purification, and partial characterization of the first intact bacterial oxalate biosynthetic enzyme, Obc1, from B. mallei. An N-terminal His-tagged Bmobc1 was cloned into pDUET, expressed in E. coli BLR (DE3), and the recombinant enzyme purified by affinity chromatography. Oxalate biosynthetic enzyme assays coupled with HPLC analysis revealed that BmObc1 catalyzed the biosynthesis of oxalate, acetoacetate, and free CoA from oxaloacetate and a short chain acyl-CoA following Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Optimal enzyme activity was measured at pH 8.0 and a temperature around 44°C. Kinetic analysis conducted under conditions of saturating acetyl-CoA and varying oxaloacetate concentrations resulted in a calculated Km value for oxaloacetate of 94.3± 9.2 μM (mean ± SE). Under conditions of saturating oxaloacetate concentration and varying acyl-CoA (acetyl- or propionyl-CoA) concentrations kinetic analysis generated a calculated Km value of 26.8 ± 2.3 μM (mean ± SE) for acetyl-CoA and 104.4 ± 12.7 μM for propionyl-CoA. The significantly lower Km for acetyl-CoA suggests that it is strongly favored as a substrate over propionyl-CoA. PMID:27643499

  2. Snake Cathelicidin NA-CATH and Smaller Helical Antimicrobial Peptides Are Effective against Burkholderia thailandensis.

    PubMed

    Blower, Ryan J; Barksdale, Stephanie M; van Hoek, Monique L

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis is a Gram-negative soil bacterium used as a model organism for B. pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis and an organism classified category B priority pathogen and a Tier 1 select agent for its potential use as a biological weapon. Burkholderia species are reportedly "highly resistant" to antimicrobial agents, including cyclic peptide antibiotics, due to multiple resistance systems, a hypothesis we decided to test using antimicrobial (host defense) peptides. In this study, a number of cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) were tested in vitro against B. thailandensis for both antimicrobial activity and inhibition of biofilm formation. Here, we report that the Chinese cobra (Naja atra) cathelicidin NA-CATH was significantly antimicrobial against B. thailandensis. Additional cathelicidins, including the human cathelicidin LL-37, a sheep cathelicidin SMAP-29, and some smaller ATRA peptide derivatives of NA-CATH were also effective. The D-enantiomer of one small peptide (ATRA-1A) was found to be antimicrobial as well, with EC50 in the range of the L-enantiomer. Our results also demonstrate that human alpha-defensins (HNP-1 & -2) and a short beta-defensin-derived peptide (Peptide 4 of hBD-3) were not bactericidal against B. thailandensis. We also found that the cathelicidin peptides, including LL-37, NA-CATH, and SMAP-29, possessed significant ability to prevent biofilm formation of B. thailandensis. Additionally, we show that LL-37 and its D-enantiomer D-LL-37 can disperse pre-formed biofilms. These results demonstrate that although B. thailandensis is highly resistant to many antibiotics, cyclic peptide antibiotics such as polymyxin B, and defensing peptides, some antimicrobial peptides including the elapid snake cathelicidin NA-CATH exert significant antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity towards B. thailandensis. PMID:26196513

  3. Systematic Review and Consensus Guidelines for Environmental Sampling of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Dance, David A. B.; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Kaestli, Mirjam; Mayo, Mark; Warner, Jeffrey; Wagner, David M.; Tuanyok, Apichai; Wertheim, Heiman; Yoke Cheng, Tan; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay; Puthucheary, Savithiri; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Steinmetz, Ivo; Currie, Bart J.; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei, a Tier 1 Select Agent and the cause of melioidosis, is a Gram-negative bacillus present in the environment in many tropical countries. Defining the global pattern of B. pseudomallei distribution underpins efforts to prevent infection, and is dependent upon robust environmental sampling methodology. Our objective was to review the literature on the detection of environmental B. pseudomallei, update the risk map for melioidosis, and propose international consensus guidelines for soil sampling. Methods/Principal Findings An international working party (Detection of Environmental Burkholderia pseudomallei Working Party (DEBWorP)) was formed during the VIth World Melioidosis Congress in 2010. PubMed (January 1912 to December 2011) was searched using the following MeSH terms: pseudomallei or melioidosis. Bibliographies were hand-searched for secondary references. The reported geographical distribution of B. pseudomallei in the environment was mapped and categorized as definite, probable, or possible. The methodology used for detecting environmental B. pseudomallei was extracted and collated. We found that global coverage was patchy, with a lack of studies in many areas where melioidosis is suspected to occur. The sampling strategies and bacterial identification methods used were highly variable, and not all were robust. We developed consensus guidelines with the goals of reducing the probability of false-negative results, and the provision of affordable and ‘low-tech’ methodology that is applicable in both developed and developing countries. Conclusions/Significance The proposed consensus guidelines provide the basis for the development of an accurate and comprehensive global map of environmental B. pseudomallei. PMID:23556010

  4. Chemotaxis of Burkholderia sp. Strain SJ98 towards chloronitroaromatic compounds that it can metabolise

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Burkholderia sp. strain SJ98 is known for its chemotaxis towards nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) that are either utilized as sole sources of carbon and energy or co-metabolized in the presence of alternative carbon sources. Here we test for the chemotaxis of this strain towards six chloro-nitroaromatic compounds (CNACs), namely 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol (2C4NP), 2-chloro-3-nitrophenol (2C3NP), 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol (4C2NP), 2-chloro-4-nitrobenzoate (2C4NB), 4-chloro-2-nitrobenzoate (4C2NB) and 5-chloro-2-nitrobenzoate (5C2NB), and examine its relationship to the degradation of such compounds. Results Strain SJ98 could mineralize 2C4NP, 4C2NB and 5C2NB, and co-metabolically transform 2C3NP and 2C4NB in the presence of an alternative carbon source, but was unable to transform 4C2NP under these conditions. Positive chemotaxis was only observed towards the five metabolically transformed CNACs. Moreover, the chemotaxis was induced by growth in the presence of the metabolisable CNAC. It was also competitively inhibited by the presence of nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) that it could metabolise but not by succinate or aspartate. Conclusions Burkholderia sp. strain SJ98 exhibits metabolic transformation of, and inducible chemotaxis towards CNACs. Its chemotactic responses towards these compounds are related to its previously demonstrated chemotaxis towards NACs that it can metabolise, but it is independently inducible from its chemotaxis towards succinate or aspartate. PMID:22292983

  5. How Infants Encode Spatial Extent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Sean; Huttenlocher, Janellen; Levine, Susan; Duffy, Renee

    2005-01-01

    This study explores how infants encode an object's spatial extent. We habituated 6.5-month-old infants to a dowel inside a container and then tested whether they dishabituate to a change in absolute size when the relation between dowel and container is held constant (by altering the size of both container and dowel) and when the relation changes…

  6. Encoding Standards for Linguistic Corpora.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ide, Nancy

    The demand for extensive reusability of large language text collections for natural languages processing research requires development of standardized encoding formats. Such formats must be capable of representing different kinds of information across the spectrum of text types and languages, capable of representing different levels of…

  7. Genome-Wide RNA Sequencing Analysis of Quorum Sensing-Controlled Regulons in the Plant-Associated Burkholderia glumae PG1 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Rong; Krysciak, Dagmar; Petersen, Katrin; Utpatel, Christian; Knapp, Andreas; Schmeisser, Christel; Daniel, Rolf; Voget, Sonja; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia glumae PG1 is a soil-associated motile plant-pathogenic bacterium possessing a cell density-dependent regulation system called quorum sensing (QS). Its genome contains three genes, here designated bgaI1 to bgaI3, encoding distinct autoinducer-1 (AI-1) synthases, which are capable of synthesizing QS signaling molecules. Here, we report on the construction of B. glumae PG1 ΔbgaI1, ΔbgaI2, and ΔbgaI3 mutants, their phenotypic characterization, and genome-wide transcriptome analysis using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) technology. Knockout of each of these bgaI genes resulted in strongly decreased motility, reduced extracellular lipase activity, a reduced ability to cause plant tissue maceration, and decreased pathogenicity. RNA-seq analysis of all three B. glumae PG1 AI-1 synthase mutants performed in the transition from exponential to stationary growth phase revealed differential expression of a significant number of predicted genes. In comparison with the levels of gene expression by wild-type strain B. glumae PG1, 481 genes were differentially expressed in the ΔbgaI1 mutant, 213 were differentially expressed in the ΔbgaI2 mutant, and 367 were differentially expressed in the ΔbgaI3 mutant. Interestingly, only a minor set of 78 genes was coregulated in all three mutants. The majority of the QS-regulated genes were linked to metabolic activities, and the most pronounced regulation was observed for genes involved in rhamnolipid and Flp pilus biosynthesis and the type VI secretion system and genes linked to a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-cas gene cluster. PMID:26362987

  8. Protein Engineering of a Nitrilase from Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 for Efficient and Enantioselective Production of (R)-o-Chloromandelic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hualei; Gao, Wenyuan; Sun, Huihui; Chen, Lifeng; Zhang, Lujia

    2015-01-01

    The nitrilase-mediated pathway has significant advantages in the production of optically pure aromatic α-hydroxy carboxylic acids. However, low enantioselectivity and activity are observed on hydrolyzing o-chloromandelonitrile to produce optically pure (R)-o-chloromandelic acid. In the present study, a protein engineering approach was successfully used to enhance the performance of nitrilase obtained from Burkholderia cenocepacia strain J2315 (BCJ2315) in hydrolyzing o-chloromandelonitrile. Four hot spots (T49, I113, Y199, and T310) responsible for the enantioselectivity and activity of BCJ2315 were identified by random mutagenesis. An effective double mutant (I113M/Y199G [encoding the replacement of I with M at position 113 and Y with G at position 199]), which demonstrated remarkably enhanced enantioselectivity (99.1% enantiomeric excess [ee] compared to 89.2% ee for the wild type) and relative activity (360% of the wild type), was created by two rounds of site saturation mutagenesis, first at each of the four hot spots and subsequently at position 199 for combination with the selected beneficial mutation I113M. Notably, this mutant also demonstrated dramatically enhanced enantioselectivity and activity toward other mandelonitrile derivatives and, thus, broadened the substrate scope of this nitrilase. Using an ethyl acetate-water (1:9) biphasic system, o-chloromandelonitrile (500 mM) was completely hydrolyzed in 3 h by this mutant with a small amount of biocatalyst (10 g/liter wet cells), resulting in a high concentration of (R)-o-chloromandelic acid with 98.7% ee, to our knowledge the highest ever reported. This result highlights a promising method for industrial production of optically pure (R)-o-chloromandelic acid. Insight into the source of enantioselectivity and activity was gained by homology modeling and molecular docking experiments. PMID:26431972

  9. Nitric Oxide from IFNγ-Primed Macrophages Modulates the Antimicrobial Activity of β-Lactams against the Intracellular Pathogens Burkholderia pseudomallei and Nontyphoidal Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Jones-Carson, Jessica; Zweifel, Adrienne E.; Tapscott, Timothy; Austin, Chad; Brown, Joseph M.; Jones, Kenneth L.; Voskuil, Martin I.; Vázquez-Torres, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Our investigations show that nonlethal concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) abrogate the antibiotic activity of β-lactam antibiotics against Burkholderia pseudomallei, Escherichia coli and nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. NO protects B. pseudomallei already exposed to β-lactams, suggesting that this diatomic radical tolerizes bacteria against the antimicrobial activity of this important class of antibiotics. The concentrations of NO that elicit antibiotic tolerance repress consumption of oxygen (O2), while stimulating hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) synthesis. Transposon insertions in genes encoding cytochrome c oxidase-related functions and molybdenum assimilation confer B. pseudomallei a selective advantage against the antimicrobial activity of the β-lactam antibiotic imipenem. Cumulatively, these data support a model by which NO induces antibiotic tolerance through the inhibition of the electron transport chain, rather than by potentiating antioxidant defenses as previously proposed. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of terminal oxidases and nitrate reductases tolerizes aerobic and anaerobic bacteria to β-lactams. The degree of NO-induced β-lactam antibiotic tolerance seems to be inversely proportional to the proton motive force (PMF), and thus the dissipation of ΔH+ and ΔΨ electrochemical gradients of the PMF prevents β-lactam-mediated killing. According to this model, NO generated by IFNγ-primed macrophages protects intracellular Salmonella against imipenem. On the other hand, sublethal concentrations of imipenem potentiate the killing of B. pseudomallei by NO generated enzymatically from IFNγ-primed macrophages. Our investigations indicate that NO modulates the antimicrobial activity of β-lactam antibiotics. PMID:25121731

  10. Burkholderia pseudomallei Capsule Exacerbates Respiratory Melioidosis but Does Not Afford Protection against Antimicrobial Signaling or Bacterial Killing in Human Olfactory Ensheathing Cells.

    PubMed

    Dando, Samantha J; Ipe, Deepak S; Batzloff, Michael; Sullivan, Matthew J; Crossman, David K; Crowley, Michael; Strong, Emily; Kyan, Stephanie; Leclercq, Sophie Y; Ekberg, Jenny A K; St John, James; Beacham, Ifor R; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-07-01

    Melioidosis, caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an often severe infection that regularly involves respiratory disease following inhalation exposure. Intranasal (i.n.) inoculation of mice represents an experimental approach used to study the contributions of bacterial capsular polysaccharide I (CPS I) to virulence during acute disease. We used aerosol delivery of B. pseudomallei to establish respiratory infection in mice and studied CPS I in the context of innate immune responses. CPS I improved B. pseudomallei survival in vivo and triggered multiple cytokine responses, neutrophil infiltration, and acute inflammatory histopathology in the spleen, liver, nasal-associated lymphoid tissue, and olfactory mucosa (OM). To further explore the role of the OM response to B. pseudomallei infection, we infected human olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) in vitro and measured bacterial invasion and the cytokine responses induced following infection. Human OECs killed >90% of the B. pseudomallei in a CPS I-independent manner and exhibited an antibacterial cytokine response comprising granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and several regulatory cytokines. In-depth genome-wide transcriptomic profiling of the OEC response by RNA-Seq revealed a network of signaling pathways activated in OECs following infection involving a novel group of 378 genes that encode biological pathways controlling cellular movement, inflammation, immunological disease, and molecular transport. This represents the first antimicrobial program to be described in human OECs and establishes the extensive transcriptional defense network accessible in these cells. Collectively, these findings show a role for CPS I in B. pseudomallei survival in vivo following inhalation infection and the antibacterial signaling network that exists in human OM and OECs.

  11. Common Duckweed (Lemna minor) Is a Versatile High-Throughput Infection Model For the Burkholderia cepacia Complex and Other Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Euan L. S.; Dennis, Jonathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) have emerged in recent decades as problematic pulmonary pathogens of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, with severe infections progressing to acute necrotizing pneumonia and sepsis. This study presents evidence that Lemna minor (Common duckweed) is useful as a plant model for the Bcc infectious process, and has potential as a model system for bacterial pathogenesis in general. To investigate the relationship between Bcc virulence in duckweed and Galleria mellonella (Greater wax moth) larvae, a previously established Bcc infection model, a duckweed survival assay was developed and used to determine LD50 values. A strong correlation (R2 = 0.81) was found between the strains’ virulence ranks in the two infection models, suggesting conserved pathways in these vastly different hosts. To broaden the application of the duckweed model, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and five isogenic mutants with previously established LD50 values in the larval model were tested against duckweed, and a strong correlation (R2 = 0.93) was found between their raw LD50 values. Potential virulence factors in B. cenocepacia K56-2 were identified using a high-throughput screen against single duckweed plants. In addition to the previously characterized antifungal compound (AFC) cluster genes, several uncharacterized genes were discovered including a novel lysR regulator, a histidine biosynthesis gene hisG, and a gene located near the gene encoding the recently characterized virulence factor SuhBBc. Finally, to demonstrate the utility of this model in therapeutic applications, duckweed was rescued from Bcc infection by treating with bacteriophage at 6-h intervals. It was observed that phage application became ineffective at a timepoint that coincided with a sharp increase in bacterial invasion of plant tissue. These results indicate that common duckweed can serve as an effective infection model for the investigation of bacterial virulence

  12. Burkholderia pseudomallei Capsule Exacerbates Respiratory Melioidosis but Does Not Afford Protection against Antimicrobial Signaling or Bacterial Killing in Human Olfactory Ensheathing Cells.

    PubMed

    Dando, Samantha J; Ipe, Deepak S; Batzloff, Michael; Sullivan, Matthew J; Crossman, David K; Crowley, Michael; Strong, Emily; Kyan, Stephanie; Leclercq, Sophie Y; Ekberg, Jenny A K; St John, James; Beacham, Ifor R; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-07-01

    Melioidosis, caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an often severe infection that regularly involves respiratory disease following inhalation exposure. Intranasal (i.n.) inoculation of mice represents an experimental approach used to study the contributions of bacterial capsular polysaccharide I (CPS I) to virulence during acute disease. We used aerosol delivery of B. pseudomallei to establish respiratory infection in mice and studied CPS I in the context of innate immune responses. CPS I improved B. pseudomallei survival in vivo and triggered multiple cytokine responses, neutrophil infiltration, and acute inflammatory histopathology in the spleen, liver, nasal-associated lymphoid tissue, and olfactory mucosa (OM). To further explore the role of the OM response to B. pseudomallei infection, we infected human olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) in vitro and measured bacterial invasion and the cytokine responses induced following infection. Human OECs killed >90% of the B. pseudomallei in a CPS I-independent manner and exhibited an antibacterial cytokine response comprising granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and several regulatory cytokines. In-depth genome-wide transcriptomic profiling of the OEC response by RNA-Seq revealed a network of signaling pathways activated in OECs following infection involving a novel group of 378 genes that encode biological pathways controlling cellular movement, inflammation, immunological disease, and molecular transport. This represents the first antimicrobial program to be described in human OECs and establishes the extensive transcriptional defense network accessible in these cells. Collectively, these findings show a role for CPS I in B. pseudomallei survival in vivo following inhalation infection and the antibacterial signaling network that exists in human OM and OECs. PMID:27091931

  13. Common duckweed (Lemna minor) is a versatile high-throughput infection model for the Burkholderia cepacia complex and other pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Euan L S; Dennis, Jonathan J

    2013-01-01

    Members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) have emerged in recent decades as problematic pulmonary pathogens of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, with severe infections progressing to acute necrotizing pneumonia and sepsis. This study presents evidence that Lemna minor (Common duckweed) is useful as a plant model for the Bcc infectious process, and has potential as a model system for bacterial pathogenesis in general. To investigate the relationship between Bcc virulence in duckweed and Galleria mellonella (Greater wax moth) larvae, a previously established Bcc infection model, a duckweed survival assay was developed and used to determine LD50 values. A strong correlation (R(2) = 0.81) was found between the strains' virulence ranks in the two infection models, suggesting conserved pathways in these vastly different hosts. To broaden the application of the duckweed model, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and five isogenic mutants with previously established LD50 values in the larval model were tested against duckweed, and a strong correlation (R(2) = 0.93) was found between their raw LD50 values. Potential virulence factors in B. cenocepacia K56-2 were identified using a high-throughput screen against single duckweed plants. In addition to the previously characterized antifungal compound (AFC) cluster genes, several uncharacterized genes were discovered including a novel lysR regulator, a histidine biosynthesis gene hisG, and a gene located near the gene encoding the recently characterized virulence factor SuhB(Bc). Finally, to demonstrate the utility of this model in therapeutic applications, duckweed was rescued from Bcc infection by treating with bacteriophage at 6-h intervals. It was observed that phage application became ineffective at a timepoint that coincided with a sharp increase in bacterial invasion of plant tissue. These results indicate that common duckweed can serve as an effective infection model for the investigation of bacterial

  14. The Ornibactin Biosynthesis and Transport Genes of Burkholderia cenocepacia Are Regulated by an Extracytoplasmic Function σ Factor Which Is a Part of the Fur Regulon†

    PubMed Central

    Agnoli, Kirsty; Lowe, Carolyn A.; Farmer, Kate L.; Husnain, Seyyed I.; Thomas, Mark S.

    2006-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia mutants that fail to produce the siderophore ornibactin were obtained following mutagenesis with mini-Tn5Tp. These mutants were shown to be growth restricted under conditions of iron depletion. In eight of the mutants, the transposon had integrated into one of two genes, orbI and orbJ, encoding nonribosomal peptide synthetases. In the other mutant, the transposon had inserted into an open reading frame, orbS, located upstream from orbI. The polypeptide product of orbS exhibits a high degree of similarity to the Pseudomonas aeruginosa extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factor PvdS but possesses an N-terminal extension of approximately 29 amino acids that is not present in PvdS. Three predicted OrbS-dependent promoters were identified within the ornibactin gene cluster, based on their similarity to PvdS-dependent promoters. The iron-regulated activity of these promoters was shown to require OrbS. Transcription of the orbS gene was found to be under the control of an iron-regulated σ70-dependent promoter. This promoter, but not the OrbS-dependent promoters, was shown to be a target for repression by the global regulator Fur. Our results demonstrate that production of ornibactin by B. cenocepacia in response to iron starvation requires transcription of an operon that is dependent on the Fur-regulated ECF σ factor gene orbS. A mechanism is also proposed for the biosynthesis of ornibactin. PMID:16672617

  15. Dioxygenation of the Biphenyl Dioxygenation Product

    PubMed Central

    Overwin, Heike; González, Myriam; Méndez, Valentina; Seeger, Michael; Wray, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Two biphenyl dioxygenases (BphAs) were shown to catalyze dioxygenation of biphenyldienediol in the nonoxidized ring to form the respective symmetrical biphenyl-bis-dienediol. This novel metabolite served as a growth substrate for both BphA source strains. Its catabolism through the upper bph pathway of Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 was analyzed. PMID:22504819

  16. In vitro antibiotic susceptibilities of Burkholderia mallei (causative agent of glanders) determined by broth microdilution and E-test.

    PubMed

    Heine, H S; England, M J; Waag, D M; Byrne, W R

    2001-07-01

    In vitro susceptibilities to 28 antibiotics were determined for 11 strains of Burkholderia mallei by the broth microdilution method. The B. mallei strains demonstrated susceptibility to aminoglycosides, macrolides, quinolones, doxycycline, piperacillin, ceftazidime, and imipenem. For comparison and evaluation, 17 antibiotic susceptibilities were also determined by the E-test. E-test values were always lower than the broth dilution values. Establishing and comparing antibiotic susceptibilities of specific B. mallei strains will provide reference information for assessing new antibiotic agents.

  17. Identification of volatile compounds produced by the bacterium Burkholderia tropica that inhibit the growth of fungal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Tenorio-Salgado, Silvia; Tinoco, Raunel; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael; Caballero-Mellado, Jesus; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    It has been documented that bacteria from the Burkholderia genera produce different kinds of compounds that inhibit plant pathogens, however in Burkholderia tropica, an endophytic diazotrophic and phosphate-solubilizing bacterium isolated from a wide diversity of plants, the capacity to produce antifungal compounds has not been evaluated. In order to expand our knowledge about Burkholderia tropica as a potential biological control agent, we analyzed 15 different strains of this bacterium to evaluate their capacities to inhibit the growth of four phytopathogenic fungi, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotium rolffsi. Diverse analytical techniques, including plant root protection and dish plate growth assays and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy showed that the fungal growth inhibition was intimately associated with the volatile compounds produced by B. tropica and, in particular, two bacterial strains (MTo293 and TTe203) exhibited the highest radial mycelial growth inhibition. Morphological changes associated with these compounds, such as disruption of fungal hyphae, were identified by using photomicrographic analysis. By using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy technique, 18 volatile compounds involved in the growth inhibition mechanism were identified, including α-pinene and limonene. In addition, we found a high proportion of bacterial strains that produced siderophores during growth with different carbon sources, such as alanine and glutamic acid; however, their roles in the antagonism mechanism remain unclear. PMID:23680857

  18. The melioidosis agent Burkholderia pseudomallei and related opportunistic pathogens detected in faecal matter of wildlife and livestock in northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Höger, A C R; Mayo, M; Price, E P; Theobald, V; Harrington, G; Machunter, B; Choy, J Low; Currie, B J; Kaestli, M

    2016-07-01

    The Darwin region in northern Australia has experienced rapid population growth in recent years, and with it, an increased incidence of melioidosis. Previous studies in Darwin have associated the environmental presence of Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, with anthropogenic land usage and proximity to animals. In our study, we estimated the occurrence of B. pseudomallei and Burkholderia spp. relatives in faecal matter of wildlife, livestock and domestic animals in the Darwin region. A total of 357 faecal samples were collected and bacteria isolated through culture and direct DNA extraction after enrichment in selective media. Identification of B. pseudomallei, B. ubonensis, and other Burkholderia spp. was carried out using TTS1, Bu550, and recA BUR3-BUR4 quantitative PCR assays, respectively. B. pseudomallei was detected in seven faecal samples from wallabies and a chicken. B. cepacia complex spp. and Pandoraea spp. were cultured from wallaby faecal samples, and B. cenocepacia and B. cepacia were also isolated from livestock animals. Various bacteria isolated in this study represent opportunistic human pathogens, raising the possibility that faecal shedding contributes to the expanding geographical distribution of not just B. pseudomallei but other Burkholderiaceae that can cause human disease. PMID:26935879

  19. The melioidosis agent Burkholderia pseudomallei and related opportunistic pathogens detected in faecal matter of wildlife and livestock in northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Höger, A C R; Mayo, M; Price, E P; Theobald, V; Harrington, G; Machunter, B; Choy, J Low; Currie, B J; Kaestli, M

    2016-07-01

    The Darwin region in northern Australia has experienced rapid population growth in recent years, and with it, an increased incidence of melioidosis. Previous studies in Darwin have associated the environmental presence of Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, with anthropogenic land usage and proximity to animals. In our study, we estimated the occurrence of B. pseudomallei and Burkholderia spp. relatives in faecal matter of wildlife, livestock and domestic animals in the Darwin region. A total of 357 faecal samples were collected and bacteria isolated through culture and direct DNA extraction after enrichment in selective media. Identification of B. pseudomallei, B. ubonensis, and other Burkholderia spp. was carried out using TTS1, Bu550, and recA BUR3-BUR4 quantitative PCR assays, respectively. B. pseudomallei was detected in seven faecal samples from wallabies and a chicken. B. cepacia complex spp. and Pandoraea spp. were cultured from wallaby faecal samples, and B. cenocepacia and B. cepacia were also isolated from livestock animals. Various bacteria isolated in this study represent opportunistic human pathogens, raising the possibility that faecal shedding contributes to the expanding geographical distribution of not just B. pseudomallei but other Burkholderiaceae that can cause human disease.

  20. Monolithic-integrated microlaser encoder.

    PubMed

    Sawada, R; Higurashi, E; Ito, T; Ohguchi, O; Tsubamoto, M

    1999-11-20

    We have developed an extremely small integrated microencoder whose sides are less than 1 mm long. It is 1/100 the size of conventional encoders. This microencoder consists of a laser diode, monolithic photodiodes, and fluorinated polyimide waveguides with total internal reflection mirrors. The instrument can measure the relative displacement between a grating scale and the encoder with a resolution of the order of 0.01 microm; it can also determine the direction in which the scale is moving. By using the two beams that were emitted from the two etched mirrors of the laser diode, by monolithic integration of the waveguide and photodiodes, and by fabrication of a step at the edge of the waveguide, we were able to eliminate conventional bulky optical components such as the beam splitter, the quarter-wavelength plate, bulky mirrors, and bulky photodetectors. PMID:18324228

  1. Encoding information into precipitation structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Kirsten; Bena, Ioana; Droz, Michel; Rácz, Zoltan

    2008-12-01

    Material design at submicron scales would be profoundly affected if the formation of precipitation patterns could be easily controlled. It would allow the direct building of bulk structures, in contrast to traditional techniques which consist of removing material in order to create patterns. Here, we discuss an extension of our recent proposal of using electrical currents to control precipitation bands which emerge in the wake of reaction fronts in A+ + B- → C reaction-diffusion processes. Our main result, based on simulating the reaction-diffusion-precipitation equations, is that the dynamics of the charged agents can be guided by an appropriately designed time-dependent electric current so that, in addition to the control of the band spacing, the width of the precipitation bands can also be tuned. This makes straightforward the encoding of information into precipitation patterns and, as an amusing example, we demonstrate the feasibility by showing how to encode a musical rhythm.

  2. Burkholderia genome mining for nonribosomal peptide synthetases reveals a great potential for novel siderophores and lipopeptides synthesis.

    PubMed

    Esmaeel, Qassim; Pupin, Maude; Kieu, Nam Phuong; Chataigné, Gabrielle; Béchet, Max; Deravel, Jovana; Krier, François; Höfte, Monica; Jacques, Philippe; Leclère, Valérie

    2016-06-01

    Burkholderia is an important genus encompassing a variety of species, including pathogenic strains as well as strains that promote plant growth. We have carried out a global strategy, which combined two complementary approaches. The first one is genome guided with deep analysis of genome sequences and the second one is assay guided with experiments to support the predictions obtained in silico. This efficient screening for new secondary metabolites, performed on 48 gapless genomes of Burkholderia species, revealed a total of 161 clusters containing nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs), with the potential to synthesize at least 11 novel products. Most of them are siderophores or lipopeptides, two classes of products with potential application in biocontrol. The strategy led to the identification, for the first time, of the cluster for cepaciachelin biosynthesis in the genome of Burkholderia ambifaria AMMD and a cluster corresponding to a new malleobactin-like siderophore, called phymabactin, was identified in Burkholderia phymatum STM815 genome. In both cases, the siderophore was produced when the strain was grown in iron-limited conditions. Elsewhere, the cluster for the antifungal burkholdin was detected in the genome of B. ambifaria AMMD and also Burkholderia sp. KJ006. Burkholderia pseudomallei strains harbor the genetic potential to produce a novel lipopeptide called burkhomycin, containing a peptidyl moiety of 12 monomers. A mixture of lipopeptides produced by Burkholderia rhizoxinica lowered the surface tension of the supernatant from 70 to 27 mN·m(-1) . The production of nonribosomal secondary metabolites seems related to the three phylogenetic groups obtained from 16S rRNA sequences. Moreover, the genome-mining approach gave new insights into the nonribosomal synthesis exemplified by the identification of dual C/E domains in lipopeptide NRPSs, up to now essentially found in Pseudomonas strains.

  3. Vector Encoding in Biochemical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Garrett; Sun, Bo

    Encoding of environmental cues via biochemical signaling pathways is of vital importance in the transmission of information for cells in a network. The current literature assumes a single cell state is used to encode information, however, recent research suggests the optimal strategy utilizes a vector of cell states sampled at various time points. To elucidate the optimal sampling strategy for vector encoding, we take an information theoretic approach and determine the mutual information of the calcium signaling dynamics obtained from fibroblast cells perturbed with different concentrations of ATP. Specifically, we analyze the sampling strategies under the cases of fixed and non-fixed vector dimension as well as the efficiency of these strategies. Our results show that sampling with greater frequency is optimal in the case of non-fixed vector dimension but that, in general, a lower sampling frequency is best from both a fixed vector dimension and efficiency standpoint. Further, we find the use of a simple modified Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process as a model qualitatively captures many of our experimental results suggesting that sampling in biochemical networks is based on a few basic components.

  4. Lessons from modENCODE.

    PubMed

    Brown, James B; Celniker, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    The modENCODE (Model Organism Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) Consortium aimed to map functional elements-including transcripts, chromatin marks, regulatory factor binding sites, and origins of DNA replication-in the model organisms Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. During its five-year span, the consortium conducted more than 2,000 genome-wide assays in developmentally staged animals, dissected tissues, and homogeneous cell lines. Analysis of these data sets provided foundational insights into genome, epigenome, and transcriptome structure and the evolutionary turnover of regulatory pathways. These studies facilitated a comparative analysis with similar data types produced by the ENCODE Consortium for human cells. Genome organization differs drastically in these distant species, and yet quantitative relationships among chromatin state, transcription, and cotranscriptional RNA processing are deeply conserved. Of the many biological discoveries of the modENCODE Consortium, we highlight insights that emerged from integrative studies. We focus on operational and scientific lessons that may aid future projects of similar scale or aims in other, emerging model systems. PMID:26133010

  5. Burkholderia dipogonis sp. nov., isolated from root nodules of Dipogon lignosus in New Zealand and Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Shih-Yi; Chen, Ming-Hui; Liu, Wendy Y Y; Andrews, Mitchell; James, Euan K; Ardley, Julie K; De Meyer, Sofie E; James, Trevor K; Howieson, John G; Coutinho, Bruna G; Chen, Wen-Ming

    2015-12-01

    Seven strains, ICMP 19430T, ICMP 19429, ICMP 19431, WSM4637, WSM4638, WSM4639 and WSM4640, were isolated from nitrogen-fixing nodules on roots of the invasive South African legume Dipogon lignosus (subfamily Papilionoideae, tribe Phaseoleae) in New Zealand and Western Australia, and their taxonomic positions were investigated by using a polyphasic approach. All seven strains grew at 10-37 °C (optimum, 25-30 °C), at pH 4.0-9.0 (optimum, pH 6.0-7.0) and with 0-2 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum growth in the absence of NaCl). On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the strains showed 99.0-99.5 % sequence similarity to the closest type strain, Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJNT, and 98.4-99.7 % sequence similarity to Burkholderia caledonica LMG 19076T. The predominant fatty acids were C18 : 1ω7c (21.0 % of the total fatty acids in strain ICMP 19430T), C16 : 0 (19.1 %), C17 : 0 cyclo (18.9 %), summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c; 10.7 %) and C19 : 0 cyclov ω8c (7.5 %). The polar lipid profile consisted of a mixture of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol and several uncharacterized aminophospholipids and phospholipids. The major isoprenoid quinone was Q-8 and the DNA G+C content of strain ICMP 19430T was 63.2 mol%. The DNA–DNA relatedness of the novel strains with respect to the closest neighbouring members of the genus Burkholderia was 55 % or less. On the basis of 16S rRNA and recA gene sequence similarities and chemotaxonomic and phenotypic data,these strains represent a novel symbiotic species in the genus Burkholderia, for which the name Burkholderia dipogonis sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain ICMP 19430T (=LMG28415T=HAMBI 3637T).

  6. Outbreak of bacteremia due to Burkholderia contaminans linked to intravenous fentanyl from an institutional compounding pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Moehring, Rebekah W; Lewis, Sarah S; Isaacs, Pamela J; Schell, Wiley A; Thomann, Wayne R; Althaus, Mary M; Hazen, Kevin C; Dicks, Kristen V; Lipuma, John J; Chen, Luke F; Sexton, Daniel J

    2014-04-01

    IMPORTANCE Many health care facilities compound medications on site to fulfill local demands when customized formulations are needed, national supply is critically low, or costs for manufactured pharmaceuticals are excessive. Small, institutional compounding facilities may perform the same high-risk procedures as large distributors of compounded medications. OBJECTIVES To investigate an outbreak related to contamination of compounded sterile preparations and to determine processes to prevent future outbreaks. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We performed an outbreak investigation of inpatients at Duke University Hospital from August 31 through September 6, 2012. The investigation included a case-control study, compounding facility inspection and environmental sampling, observation of a mock compounding demonstration, and microbiologic and molecular testing of sequestered medication. EXPOSURES Intravenous fentanyl prepared by an institutional compounding pharmacy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Microbiologic and molecular evidence of contamination of a compounded sterile preparation and failure of routine sterility testing. RESULTS Blood cultures of 7 patients during a 7-day period at Duke University Hospital yielded pan-susceptible Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria. The risk factor common to all patients was receipt of continuous fentanyl infusion prepared by our institutional compounding pharmacy (odds ratio, 11.22; 95% CI, 2.09-∞; P = .01). The outbreak was terminated after sequestration of compounded fentanyl. An intensive evaluation of the compounding facility, its practice, and its procedures was completed. Investigators evaluated the clean room, collected targeted microbiologic samples within the compounding pharmacy environment, and observed a mock demonstration of compounding practice. The B cepacia complex was found in the anteroom sink drain and pH probe calibration fluid from the compounding clean room. Multiple microbiologic analyses of

  7. Interrogation of the Burkholderia pseudomallei genome to address differential virulence among isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Challacombe, Jean F.; Stubben, Chris J.; Klimko, Christopher P.; Welkos, Susan L.; Kern, Steven J.; Bozue, Joel A.; Worsham, Patricia L.; Cote, Christopher K.; Wolfe, Daniel N.; Badger, Jonathan H.

    2014-12-23

    Infection by the Gram-negative pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei results in the disease melioidosis, acquired from the environment in parts of southeast Asia and northern Australia. Clinical symptoms of melioidosis range from acute (fever, pneumonia, septicemia, and localized infection) to chronic (abscesses in various organs and tissues, most commonly occurring in the lungs, liver, spleen, kidney, prostate and skeletal muscle), and persistent infections in humans are difficult to cure. Understanding the basic biology and genomics of B. pseudomallei is imperative for the development of new vaccines and therapeutic interventions. This formidable task is becoming more tractable due to the increasing number of B. pseudomallei genomes that are being sequenced and compared. Here, we compared three B. pseudomallei genomes, from strains MSHR668, K96243 and 1106a, to identify features that might explain why MSHR668 is more virulent than K96243 and 1106a in a mouse model of B. pseudomallei infection. Our analyses focused on metabolic, virulence and regulatory genes that were present in MSHR668 but absent from both K96243 and 1106a. We also noted features present in K96243 and 1106a but absent from MSHR668, and identified genomic differences that may contribute to variations in virulence noted among the three B. pseudomallei isolates. While this work contributes to our understanding of B. pseudomallei genomics, more detailed experiments are necessary to characterize the relevance of specific genomic features to B. pseudomallei metabolism and virulence. Functional analyses of metabolic networks, virulence and regulation shows promise for examining the effects of B. pseudomallei on host cell metabolism and will lay a foundation for future prediction of the virulence of emerging strains. Continued emphasis in this area will be critical for protection against melioidosis, as a better understanding of what

  8. Correlation of rpsU Gene Sequence Clusters and Biochemical Properties, Gc–Ms Spectra and Resistance Profiles of Clinical Burkholderia Spp. Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ostermann, Maria Franziska; Neubauer, Heinrich; Frickmann, Hagen; Hagen, Ralf Matthias

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the variation of phenotypic features of clinical isolates of Burkholderia spp. from common rpsU gene sequence clusters. A total of 41 clinical Burkholderia spp. isolates from German mucoviscidosis patients was subjected to rpsU gene sequencing. Biochemical assessment included the API systems 20 NE and 50 CHE as well as the Micronaut NF system. Fatty acid patterns were assessed using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). Broth microdilution was used to identify minimum inhibitory concentrations. Five rpsU gene sequence clusters comprised more than one clinical isolate. Altogether, assignments to three species and seven clusters comprising more than one Burkholderia species were performed. Inhomogeneity of biochemical reactions within the clusters ranged from 0/28 to 45/50 reactions. The standard deviation for fatty acid distributions ranged from 0% to 11.5%. Minimum inhibitory concentrations within the clusters showed a wide variation but only minor differences between the clusters. Broad variations within identified rpsU gene sequence clusters regarding biochemical reactions, fatty acid patterns, and resistance patterns of clinical Burkholderia spp. isolates make the application of rpsU gene sequence analysis as a stand-alone procedure for discriminations within the Burkholderia cepacia complex unreliable. PMID:27141312

  9. Correlation of rpsU Gene Sequence Clusters and Biochemical Properties, Gc-Ms Spectra and Resistance Profiles of Clinical Burkholderia Spp. Isolates.

    PubMed

    Ostermann, Maria Franziska; Neubauer, Heinrich; Frickmann, Hagen; Hagen, Ralf Matthias

    2016-03-01

    This study assessed the variation of phenotypic features of clinical isolates of Burkholderia spp. from common rpsU gene sequence clusters. A total of 41 clinical Burkholderia spp. isolates from German mucoviscidosis patients was subjected to rpsU gene sequencing. Biochemical assessment included the API systems 20 NE and 50 CHE as well as the Micronaut NF system. Fatty acid patterns were assessed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Broth microdilution was used to identify minimum inhibitory concentrations. Five rpsU gene sequence clusters comprised more than one clinical isolate. Altogether, assignments to three species and seven clusters comprising more than one Burkholderia species were performed. Inhomogeneity of biochemical reactions within the clusters ranged from 0/28 to 45/50 reactions. The standard deviation for fatty acid distributions ranged from 0% to 11.5%. Minimum inhibitory concentrations within the clusters showed a wide variation but only minor differences between the clusters. Broad variations within identified rpsU gene sequence clusters regarding biochemical reactions, fatty acid patterns, and resistance patterns of clinical Burkholderia spp. isolates make the application of rpsU gene sequence analysis as a stand-alone procedure for discriminations within the Burkholderia cepacia complex unreliable. PMID:27141312

  10. Novel optical encoder for harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Bernard; Mueller, Ulrich; Brac-de-la-Perriere, Vincent

    2014-09-01

    We are presenting a new optical encoder architecture for shaft encoding, both in incremental and absolute modes. This encoder is based on a diffractive optics technology platform. We have developed various disk based rotary diffractive encoders previously. This encoder is different in the way it is not a disk composed of successive gratings or computer generated holograms, but rather composed of a single element placed on the shaft. It is thus best suited for hollow shaft or end of shaft applications such as in encoder controlled electrical motors. This new architecture aims at solving some of the problems encountered with previous implementations of diffractive encoders such as disk wobble, disk to shaft centering and also encoding in harsh environments.

  11. Rapid identification of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei by intact cell Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation mass spectrometric typing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Burkholderia (B.) pseudomallei and B. mallei are genetically closely related species. B. pseudomallei causes melioidosis in humans and animals, whereas B. mallei is the causative agent of glanders in equines and rarely also in humans. Both agents have been classified by the CDC as priority category B biological agents. Rapid identification is crucial, because both agents are intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has the potential of rapid and reliable identification of pathogens, but is limited by the availability of a database containing validated reference spectra. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of MALDI-TOF MS for the rapid and reliable identification and differentiation of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei and to build up a reliable reference database for both organisms. Results A collection of ten B. pseudomallei and seventeen B. mallei strains was used to generate a library of reference spectra. Samples of both species could be identified by MALDI-TOF MS, if a dedicated subset of the reference spectra library was used. In comparison with samples representing B. mallei, higher genetic diversity among B. pseudomallei was reflected in the higher average Eucledian distances between the mass spectra and a broader range of identification score values obtained with commercial software for the identification of microorganisms. The type strain of B. pseudomallei (ATCC 23343) was isolated decades ago and is outstanding in the spectrum-based dendrograms probably due to massive methylations as indicated by two intensive series of mass increments of 14 Da specifically and reproducibly found in the spectra of this strain. Conclusions Handling of pathogens under BSL 3 conditions is dangerous and cumbersome but can be minimized by inactivation of bacteria with ethanol, subsequent protein extraction under BSL 1 conditions and MALDI-TOF MS analysis being faster than

  12. Time Course of Grammatical Encoding in Agrammatism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jiyeon

    2011-01-01

    Producing a sentence involves encoding a preverbal message into a grammatical structure by retrieving lexical items and integrating them into a functional (semantic-to-grammatical) structure. Individuals with agrammatism are impaired in this grammatical encoding process. However, it is unclear what aspect of grammatical encoding is impaired and…

  13. Four genes from Pseudomonas fluorescens that encode the biosynthesis of pyrrolnitrin.

    PubMed

    Hammer, P E; Hill, D S; Lam, S T; Van Pée, K H; Ligon, J M

    1997-06-01

    Pyrrolnitrin is a secondary metabolite of Pseudomonas and Burkholderia sp. strains with strong antifungal activity. Production of pyrrolnitrin has been correlated with the ability of some bacteria to control plant diseases caused by fungal pathogens, including the damping-off pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. Pseudomonas fluorescens BL915 has been reported to produce pyrrolnitrin and to be an effective biocontrol agent for this pathogen. We have isolated a 32-kb genomic DNA fragment from this strain that contains genes involved in the biosynthesis of pyrrolnitrin. Marker-exchange mutagenesis of this DNA with Tn5 revealed the presence of a 6.2-kb region that contains genes required for the synthesis of pyrrolnitrin. The nucleotide sequence of the 6.2-kb region was determined and found to contain a cluster of four genes that are required for the production of pyrrolnitrin. Deletion mutations in any of the four genes resulted in a pyrrolnitrin-nonproducing phenotype. The putative coding sequences of the four individual genes were cloned by PCR and fused to the tac promoter from Escherichia coli. In each case, the appropriate tac promoter-pyrrolnitrin gene fusion was shown to complement the pyrrolnitrin-negative phenotype of the corresponding deletion mutant. Transfer of the four gene cluster to E. coli resulted in the production of pyrrolnitrin by this organism, thereby demonstrating that the four genes are sufficient for the production of this metabolite and represent all of the genes required to encode the pathway for pyrrolnitrin biosynthesis.

  14. Screening of Burkholderia sp. WGB31 producing anisic acid from anethole and optimization of fermentation conditions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Peihong; Song, Zhangyang; Zhang, Zhenyong; Zeng, Huahe; Tang, Xianlai; Jiang, Chengjian; Li, Junfang; Wu, Bo

    2014-11-01

    Anisic acid, the precursor of a variety of food flavors and industrial raw materials, can be bioconversed from anethole which extracted from star anise fruits. WGB31 strain with anisic acid molar production rate of 10.25% was isolated and identified as Burkholderia sp. Three significant influential factors, namely, glucose concentration, initial pH value, and medium volume were selected and their effects were evaluated by Box-Behnken Design (BBD). Regression analysis was performed to determine response surface methodology and the significance was tested to obtain the process model of optimal conditions for producing anisic acid. The fermentation conditions at the stable point of the model were obtained: glucose 6 g L(-1) , pH 6.2, culture medium volume 61 mL in a triangular flask with 250 ml volume. Verification test indicated that the production rate of anisic acid was 30.7%, which was three times of that before optimizing. The results provide a basis and reference for producing anisic acid by microbial transformation. PMID:25100156