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Sample records for burn scar contracture

  1. Burn Patient Acuity Demographics, Scar Contractures and Rehabilitation Treatment Time Related to Patient Outcomes (ACT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    Patient Acuity Demographics, Scar Contractures and Rehabilitation Treatment Time Related to Patient Outcomes (ACT) Mr. Reginald Richard American Burn...and Rehabilitation Treatment Time Related to Patient Outcomes, conveniently referred to as the ACT representing Acuity, Contractures and Time, is...wound leading to scar contracture begins almost immediately after the burning process stops. Rehabilitation treatment delivered prior to beginning

  2. Pressure therapy in treatment of hypertrophic scar, burn contracture and keloid: the Kenyan experience.

    PubMed

    Haq, M A; Haq, A

    1990-11-01

    A preliminary report of the results of pressure therapy for hypertrophic scar, burn contracture and keloid is presented. Thirty four patients over a four year period were treated with four types of pressure therapy. Results showed over 50% improvement in 21 (61.8%) cases. This method obviated the need for repetitive surgery and no recurrence was noted. Pressure therapy is advocated as an adjunct measure for all cases of hypertrophic scarring, burn contracture and keloid.

  3. Perforator-based flaps for the treatment of burn scar contractures: a review.

    PubMed

    Stekelenburg, C M; Marck, R E; Verhaegen, P D H M; Marck, K W; van Zuijlen, P P M

    2017-01-01

    Patients with burn scars often experience functional problems because of scar contractures. Surgical treatment may be indicated for those burn scar contractures. If the contractures are small and linear, the contraction bands can be treated with local transposition flaps like the Z-plasty. Broader, diffuse contractures are more challenging and require a different surgical approach, such as the use of local tissue. The use of perforator-based flaps is promising; however, their true clinical significance for this type of burn reconstructions still needs to be determined. Therefore, we performed a review to evaluate the role of perforator-based flaps for burn scar contracture treatment. Electronic databases were searched using a predefined search strategy. Studies evaluating the long-term outcome of perforator-based flaps for the treatment of burn scar contractures were included. The methodological quality was tested and data was summarized. Five hundred and ten papers were identified of which eleven met the inclusion criteria. One study was a randomized controlled trial; ten were cohort studies of a pre-postoperative design. The papers described outcomes of free flaps and local flaps. Most studies had methodological shortcomings and used inappropriate statistical methods. Perforator-based interposition flaps appear to be highly relevant for burn scar contracture treatment. However, due to the paucity and low quality of the studies that were assessed, no definitive conclusions about the true clinical significance could be reached. And therefore, only recommendations could be given for improvement of the quality of further primary research on the effectiveness of perforator-based flaps for burn scar contracture release.

  4. A systematic review on burn scar contracture treatment: searching for evidence.

    PubMed

    Stekelenburg, Carlijn M; Marck, Roos E; Tuinebreijer, Wim E; de Vet, Henrica C W; Ogawa, Rei; van Zuijlen, Paul P M

    2015-01-01

    Treating burn scar contracture remains a challenging problem for reconstructive surgeons. At present, no consensus exists on when to use what kind of technique. Therefore, a systematic review was performed on the effectiveness of the different surgical techniques after burn scar contracture release. Electronic databases were searched using a predefined search strategy. Studies evaluating the outcome of surgical techniques for the treatment of burn scar contractures were included. The methodological quality was tested and the data were summarized. One thousand six hundred fourty-nine papers were identified of which 17 met the inclusion criteria. Three papers reported on a controlled trial, 14 were cohort studies, including 10 of a pre-post operative design and 4 of a comparative design. The papers described outcomes of grafts, flaps with random or defined vascularization, and dermal substitutes. All studies had methodological shortcomings and most used inappropriate statistical methods. The current evidence on the effectiveness of reconstruction techniques for burn scar contractures was summarized. Due to the scarcity and low quality of the included studies, no definitive conclusions could be reached about the effectiveness of different techniques. Therefore, no direct implications for daily practice could be made. However, recommendations could be given for improvement of the quality of further primary research on the effectiveness of surgical treatment strategies for burn scar contracture release.

  5. Burn Patient Acuity Demographics, Scar Contractures, and Rehabilitation Treatment Time Related to Patient Outcomes (ACT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Scar Contractures, and Rehabilitation Treatment Time Related to Patient Outcomes, conveniently referred to as the ACT for representing Acuity...acute and intermediate phases of burn rehabilitation through the collection of daily treatment information for analysis. In particular, the ACT is...primarily interested in investigating the influence that time spent receiving rehabilitation treatments has on patient outcomes as a reflection of

  6. Identification of cutaneous functional units related to burn scar contracture development.

    PubMed

    Richard, Reginald L; Lester, Mark E; Miller, Sidney F; Bailey, J Kevin; Hedman, Travis L; Dewey, William S; Greer, Michelle; Renz, Evan M; Wolf, Steven E; Blackbourne, Lorne H

    2009-01-01

    The development of burn scar contractures is due in part to the replacement of naturally pliable skin with an inadequate quantity and quality of extensible scar tissue. Predilected skin surface areas associated with limb range of motion (ROM) have a tendency to develop burn scar contractures that prevent full joint ROM leading to deformity, impairment, and disability. Previous study has documented forearm skin movement associated with wrist extension. The purpose of this study was to expand the identification of skin movement associated with ROM to all joint surface areas that have a tendency to develop burn scar contractures. Twenty male subjects without burns had anthropometric measurements recorded and skin marks placed on their torsos and dominant extremities. Each subject performed ranges of motion of nine common burn scar contracture sites with the markers photographed at the beginning and end of motion. The area of skin movement associated with joint ROM was recorded, normalized, and quantified as a percentage of total area. On average, subjects recruited 83% of available skin from a prescribed area to complete movement across all joints of interest (range, 18-100%). Recruitment of skin during wrist flexion demonstrated the greatest amount of variability between subjects, whereas recruitment of skin during knee extension demonstrated the most consistency. No association of skin movement was found related to percent body fat or body mass index. Skin recruitment was positively correlated with joint ROM. Fields of skin associated with normal ROM were identified and subsequently labeled as cutaneous functional units. The amount of skin involved in joint movement extended far beyond the immediate proximity of the joint skin creases themselves. This information may impact the design of rehabilitation programs for patients with severe burns.

  7. A Goniometry Paradigm Shift to Measure Burn Scar Contracture in Burn Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To test more extensively a recently designed Revised Goniometry (RG)method and compare it to Standard Goniometry (SG)used to...Unclassified c. THIS PAGE Unclassified Unclassified 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std...recruitment. While standard GM has been described as reliable in burns, scarring can affect GM results based on patient positioning thereby leading to

  8. A Goniometry Paradigm Shift to Measure Burn Scar Contracture in Burn Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    for GM Measureme nt in the Body Region? Body Region Yes/No Eligibility Status Random Number Body Region Order First GM Measurement Neck ... Neck  flexion contracture  the photograph should be taken from mouth to hip bones including width of chest. Two  photographs of each site should be...ROM Norm ROM SD ROM w/ Tolerance Neck extension 50° 14° 34° Shoulder abduction 180° 9° 162° Shoulder flexion 170° 5° 157° Elbow flexion 145

  9. Scar contractures, hypertrophic scars, and keloids.

    PubMed

    Brissett, A E; Sherris, D A

    2001-11-01

    A scar contracture is the result of a contractile wound-healing process occurring in a scar that has already been reepithelialized and adequately healed. Keloids and hypertrophic scars (HTSs) are fibrous tissue outgrowths that result from a derailment in the normal wound-healing process. The exact incidence of keloids and HTSs remains unknown. Beyond the common belief that trauma is the initiating event of keloid and hypertrophic scar formation, the remainder of the process remains uncertain. A combination of biochemical factors, skin tension, endocrinologic factors, and genetic factors are the likely culprits. Treatment begins by educating the patient about the etiology of the scarring process. All treatment protocols are individualized, but the standard approach to keloids and HTSs begins with corticosteroid injection followed by surgical excision, pressure dressings, and long-term follow-up.

  10. Management of scar contractures, hypertrophic scars, and keloids.

    PubMed

    Sherris, D A; Larrabee, W F; Murakami, C S

    1995-10-01

    Aberrant fibrous tissue formation after surgery or trauma still presents a challenge to surgeons. Current research hopes to identify the characteristics of the population of fibroblasts that lead to hypertrophic or keloid scar formation. Surgical procedures and laser therapy followed by intralesional steroid treatments still are the foundation of treatment; but new modalities are being applied. The pathogenesis and management of hypertrophic scars, keloids, and scar contractures are discussed in this article.

  11. First web space post-burn contracture types: contracture elimination methods.

    PubMed

    Grishkevich, Viktor M

    2011-03-01

    First web space adduction contractures are a common consequence of hand burns. Many reconstructive techniques are used and investigation for more effective methods continues. Effective hand reconstruction usually considers anatomy as its foundation. Based on the experience of over 500 web space contracture elimination cases, three anatomical types of thumb adduction contractures were identified: edge, medial and total. Edge contractures (80% of all thumb adduction contractures) are caused by a fold in which only one sheet is scarred, either the palmar or dorsal surface. The contraction is caused by a trapeze-shaped length deficiency of the scar sheet, which has a surface surplus in width. Reconstruction consists of surface deficiency compensation with trapezoid flap prepared from the non-scarred side and skin-fat tissues of the web space. In most cases, the small scar-fat trapezoid flaps should be prepared from the non-scarred side to cover the donor wounds on both sides of the main flap. Medial contractures (10% of thumb adduction contractures) are caused by the fold, both sheets of which are scarred and have trapeze-shaped surface deficiency in length and surplus in width. Both fold sheets are converted into one or several pairs of trapezoid scar-fat flaps by radial incisions. The oppositely located flaps are transposed towards each other. As a result of the counter flaps transposition, the contracture is eliminated; the web space's shape and depth are restored by the use of flaps alone or in combination with skin grafting. The trapeze-flap plasty is very simple and effective with the length gain of up to 100-200%. Neither flap loss nor re-contracture occurs. Total contractures (about 10% of all) have no fold. Reconstruction consists of the creation of the central zone of the first web space depth with the rectangular subdermal pedicle flap; the wounds on both sides of the flap are skin grafted. The flap sustains normal web depth and prevents the contracture

  12. The cost of post-burn scarring.

    PubMed

    Mirastschijski, U; Sander, J T; Zier, U; Rennekampff, H O; Weyand, B; Vogt, P M

    2015-09-30

    Deep burns lead to scarring and contractures for which there is little or no published data on treatment costs. The purpose of this study was to fill this gap by analysing treatment costs for burn sequelae. To do this, German-DRG for in-patient treatment was collected from the Burn Centre Lower Saxony. DRG-related T95.-coding served as a tool for burn-associated sequelae. Data on scar occurrence, plastic-reconstructive surgery and sick leave were collected by a questionnaire. The findings showed that 44.6% patients reported post-burn scarring and 31% needed surgical intervention. The expected risk for readmission was significantly higher (p=0.0002) with scars compared to without. Significantly higher costs for pressure garments were noted for scarred patients (p=0.04). No differences were found for ointments, silicone dressings or pain medication. Treatment costs for patients with scars were 5.6 times higher compared with no scar assessed by G-DRG. No differences were stated subsuming multiple readmissions for post-burn treatment per individual. Significantly higher costs (p=0.03) were noted for patients with burn sequelae other than scars with regard to individual readmissions. It has been revealed that treatment of scars causes higher costs than for other burn sequelae because of multiple surgical interventions. To reduce post-burn scarring and costs, specialized burn centres provide optimal and state-of-the-art treatment. As well as this, more emphasis should be laid on promoting research for the development of novel anti-scarring therapies.

  13. Ablative fractional laser resurfacing helps treat restrictive pediatric scar contractures.

    PubMed

    Krakowski, Andrew C; Goldenberg, Alina; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Murray, Jill-Peck; Shumaker, Peter R

    2014-12-01

    Conventional management of debilitating pediatric scar contractures, including hand therapy and surgery, may often be beset by delayed treatment, suboptimal results, and additional surgical morbidity. Ablative fractional laser resurfacing is an emerging adjunctive procedural option for scar contractures because of its promising efficacy and safety profile. However, its use to improve function has not been studied in the pediatric population. Herein we report 2 pediatric patients with recalcitrant scar contractures, causing persistent functional deficits, treated with an ablative fractional laser protocol. Both patients experienced rapid and cumulative subjective and objective improvements in range of motion and function as measured by an independent occupational therapist without reported complications. We highlight ablative fractional laser resurfacing as a novel and promising tool in the management of function-limiting scar contractures in children and propose that the technique be incorporated into existing scar treatment paradigms, guided by future research.

  14. An extraordinary case of axillary contracture: trapped healthy skin and its adnexes under contracted scar.

    PubMed

    Nisanci, Mustafa; Sahin, Ismail; Guzey, Serbulent

    2014-01-01

    Although striking improvements have been achieved in overall management of burn injury, postburn contractures are still an ongoing challenge to burn surgeons. Axillary adduction contracture is one of the most common types of these disabling postburn complications that usually result from suboptimal treatment after acute burns. An unusual and complicated case of axillary contracture in which the unburned, healthy axillary dome skin was trapped as a cystic mass under the scarred area was reconstructed by transfer of a big (17×13-cm) thoracodorsal artery perforator flap after contracture release. The result was satisfactory in terms of function and acceptable cosmetically. The underlying reasons for the inadequate treatment the patient received after surviving a severe electrical injury were discussed.

  15. [Burn scars: rehabilitation and skin care].

    PubMed

    Rochet, Jean-Michel; Zaoui, Affif

    2002-12-15

    Burn rehabilitation main goal is to minimize the consequences of hypertrophic scars and concomitant contractures. The treatment principles rely on the association of joint posture, continuous pressure completed with range of motion to prevent joint fusion (which happens to adults but not to children). Throughout the different treatment phases and wound evolution, reassessment is necessary to review rehabilitation goals and activities. During the acute phase the alternance of positioning is prioritized in order to keep the affected extremities in antideformity position using splint or other devices. At the rehabilitation phase, treatment is focussed on active/passive range of motion (skin posture) strengthening exercises and use of dynamic splint is introduced to correct contractures. After their discharge home, patients benefit from outpatient rehab until scar maturation (approximately 18 months). The treatment consists mainly on active/passive range of motion, scar massage, strengthening exercise and endurance retraining. Also modalities (such as thermal bath and high pressure water spray) are used to address itching problems and for scar softening. Finally, reconstructive surgery can be performed to correct excessive scarring or joint contracture for better functional or cosmetic outcome.

  16. Longitudinal burn scar quantification.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Correa, José A; de Oliveira, Ana; LaSalle, Leo; Perrault, Isabelle

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative studies of the clinical recovery of burn scars are currently lacking. Previous reports validate the objective, precise, diagnostic capabilities of high-frequency ultrasound to measure thickness, the Cutometer(®) to measure pliability and the Mexameter(®) to measure erythema and pigmentation of scars. Thus, we prospectively quantified clinical characteristics of patient-matched, after burn hypertrophic scar (HSc), donor site scar (D) and normal skin (N) using these instruments. One investigator measured 3 sites (HSc, D, N) in 46 burn survivors at 3, 6, and 12 months after-burn. A mixed model regression analysis, adjusting p-values for multiplicity of testing, was used to compare means among sites and time points. Participants were 41.2±13.5 years old, 87% males, predominantly Caucasian, with an average of 19.5% body surface area burned. HSc thickness decreased significantly between 3 and 6, 6 and 12, and 3 and 12 months (all p<0.0001), but remained thicker than D and N skin (all p<0.0001). Pliability differed significantly between HSc, D and N sites at all time points (all p<0.0001), with HSc and D increasing between 3 and 12 months (p<0.05) but not reaching normal. HSc and D sites were significantly more erythematous than normal skin (p<0.05) at 3 and 6 months but D sites approached normal by 12 months. The only time points at which pigmentation significantly differed were the HSc and D sites at 6 months. Thickness, pliability, erythema and pigmentation of N skin remained similar over the 12 months. We found that post-burn HSc thickness, pliability and erythema differed significantly from D and N skin at 3, 6, and 12 months and does not return to normal by 12 months after-injury; however, significant improvements towards normal can be expected. Donor sites are redder than normal skin at 3 and 6 months but can be expected to return to normal by 12 months. Although the color of HSc and D sites change markedly with time these color changes are

  17. Surgical management of burn flexion and extension contractures of the toes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jessica B; Kung, Theodore A; Levi, Benjamin; Irwin, Todd; Kadakia, Anish; Cederna, Paul S

    2014-01-01

    Burn contracture of the toes is a devastating sequela of thermal injury to the foot. Without proper treatment of toe burn contractures, patients suffer from significant functional and social limitations, including difficulties with activities of daily living. The authors classify the severity of toe burn scar contractures (TBSCs) by considering important characteristics of the deformity and tailor definitive surgical treatment based on the individual needs of the patient's condition. A retrospective review was performed on 20 patients who underwent a total of 32 reconstructive operations involving 275 TBSC procedures from 2000 to 2010. Multiple clinical, functional, and anatomic criteria were used to describe each patient's contracture as mild, moderate, or severe. Mild TBSC involved scarring of the superficial tissues only with no functional impairment; these were treated with scar release or local tissue rearrangement. Moderate TBSC involved soft tissue shortages requiring skin grafts and occasional closed joint capsulotomy. Severe TBSC caused the greatest impairment in function and involved burn injury to deeper structures. For these difficult contractures, a patient-specific technique was paramount to optimal reconstruction. There were six, three, and 11 patients with mild, moderate, and severe TBSC, respectively. The mean number of primary procedures per toe increased with increasing burn complexity from 1.1 procedures for mild, 1.5 for moderate, and 1.8 for severe groups, with severe TBSC undergoing more primary procedures overall (13.7 in severe vs 2.8 in mild TBSC). Complication rates per toe were highest for severe TBSC (59.0%). Only severe TBSC received secondary operations, and overall contracture recurrence was 35%. An individualized surgical approach based on TBSC severity is recommended for addressing burn contracture of the toes. Careful analysis of the clinical, functional, and anatomic characteristics of the burned foot determines the severity of

  18. A systematic review of the psychometric properties of self-reported scales assessing burn contractures reveals the need for a new tool to measure contracture outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ehanire, Tosan; Vissoci, Joao Ricardo Nickenig; Slaughter, Keimun; Coêlho, Rafael; Bond, Jennifer; Rodrigues, Clarissa; Pietrobon, Ricardo; Levinson, Howard

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 40% of burn patients develop scar contractures. It is unknown which scar contracture therapy best optimizes activities of daily living (ADL).The appropriateness of self-reported outcome tools in measuring anti-scar contracture therapies has not been assessed. We conducted a systematic review to determine the quality of existing self-reported scales in measuring ADL among burn patients by analyzing and comparing psychometric properties-factor analysis, validity, reliability, and responsiveness. EMBASE, LILACS, American Psychological Association PsycNET databases were searched for relevant articles. Forty-one articles discussing 10 burn and non-burn-specific scales met eligibility criteria of ADL assessment, and available psychometric analyses. A common strength in most scales was good overall reliability. Common weaknesses were insufficient data on factor analyses, content validity specific to ADL assessment, and responsiveness. The psychometric analyses studies on these scales had poor sample variability. There is insufficient data on the dimensionality and responsiveness of existing scales to support their use for measuring ADL in burn patients. Existing scales do not comprehensively measure ADLs as an isolated parameter. A psychometrically valid, comprehensive self-reported burn contracture scale that measures ADLs among a diverse group of burn patients needs to be developed to optimize burn contracture treatments and develop new therapies.

  19. Dupuytren’s contracture following burn injury of the hand: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Chenicheri; Sugg, Kristoffer B; Huettner, William; Jarrahnejad, Payam

    2008-01-01

    In burn patients, scar contractures adjacent to or across the joints lead to disabling deformities. In Dupuytren’s disease, the proliferative process involves the fascia of the palm and fingers, resulting in disabling flexion contractures of the fingers and the palm. A single insult involving the hand or even a more proximal injury may lead to Dupuytren’s disease. PMID:19554166

  20. The running Y-V plasty for treatment of linear and cord-like burn contractures.

    PubMed

    Arasteh, Ehsan; Yavari, Masoud

    2012-01-01

    Linear and cord-like burn scar contractures are commonly treated by severing the scar in a transverse direction and skin grafting or performing Z-plasties. However, skin grafts may result in suboptimal take and contract gradually and the Z-plasty requires undermining flaps in scarred skin which may lead to the distal tip necrosis. In this article the authors present their experience with multiple Y-V plasty technique. From May 2005 to September 2009, 44 linear and narrow cord-like burn contractures in various regions of upper and lower extremities of 32 patients were treated by multiple Y-V plasty technique. The contracted scars were treated successfully in all of the patients. No major post-operative complications or contracture recurrence were observed during the follow up period of 6 to 24 months in this series of patients. By creating a longer length, running Y-V plasty can relax the contracted scar. Considering the advantages and excellent results in the treated patients in this study group, and also other presented series, multiple Y-V plasty can be recommended as a very useful and safe technique for the treatment of linear and cordlike burn contractures.

  1. Postburn neck anterior contracture treatment in children with scar-fascial local trapezoid flaps: a new approach.

    PubMed

    Grishkevich, Viktor M; Grishkevich, Max; Menzul, Vasiliy

    2015-01-01

    One of the dramatic consequences of burns is scar contracture and deformities of the neck. Cervical contracture in children is especially dangerous, leading to face disfigurement and kyphosis; therefore, early reconstruction is indicated. Despite the existence of many various surgical techniques, the successful neck contracture treatment in pediatric patients remains a challenge for surgeons. Eleven children (aged 5 to 14 years) with postburn neck anterior contractures were studied to develop a new approach for reconstruction that would employ the use of local scar-fascial flaps. The new approach and technique for postburn pediatric contracture treatment was developed which is especially effective in the treatment of children who cannot undergo complex and long surgical procedures that are aimed at both contracture elimination and neck skin restoration. The technique consists of two trapezoid scar-fascial flaps mobilization which includes all the anterior neck surfaces and consists of scars, fat layer, platysma, and deep cervical fascia. Counter transposition of flaps with tension elongated neck anterior surface was 100 to 200%. The contracture was fully eliminated, and neck contours, mentocervical angle, and head movement were restored. In case of severe contracture, residual wound in submandibular region and above clavicles were skin-grafted. The full range of head motion (functional results) was achieved in all the 11 patients. The flaps continued to grow and the skin grafts shrinkage was moderate. Local trapeze-flap plasty allows neck contracture elimination in children in the cases when a more complex technique is impossible or undesirable to use. Early surgical intervention prevents secondary complications, allotting enough time for patients to mature and be ready for more complex procedures.

  2. Treating burn-associated joint contracture: results of an inpatient rehabilitation stretching protocol.

    PubMed

    Godleski, Matthew; Oeffling, Amy; Bruflat, Angela K; Craig, Emily; Weitzenkamp, David; Lindberg, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    The prevention and treatment of scar contracture is critical after significant burn injuries to avoid functional impairment. However, descriptions of specific contracture treatment interventions and outcomes are limited. Our objective is to provide detailed information and range of motion outcomes regarding the use of an intensive stretching protocol for burn-associated contracture. As part of a quality improvement measure, all patients admitted to inpatient rehabilitation with burn injury were treated with at least 1 hour of daily stretching by experienced therapists and were tracked with standardized range of motion measurements. Eighty-eight joint contractures were treated across nine patients for up to 4 weeks. The average weekly improvement in range of motion was 8.2 degrees (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.5-9.9). The largest gains were seen in the first week of treatment with an average improvement of 11.2 degrees (95% CI, 8.7-13.6). Eighteen digit contractures were treated across four patients. The average weekly improvement in flexion was 7.2 mm (95% CI, 5.2-9.1) again with larger gains in the first week of treatment-12.8 mm (95% CI, 10.3-15.4). Thumb opposition improved across five patients in the first week with an average improvement of 1.4 on the opposition scale (95% CI, 0.4-2.5). Intensive stretching by experienced therapists yielded significant improvements in joint range of motion for patients with burn-associated joint contracture. Defining specific burn contracture interventions remains a key goal in advancing burn rehabilitation in the future.

  3. [Evaluation of Cepan Cream after 15 years of treatment of burn scars].

    PubMed

    Stozkowska, Wiesława

    2002-01-01

    Cepan Cream is used for the topical treatment of scars and keloids resulting from burns, post-operative scars, and contractures. Cepan Cream makes scars more elastic, softer and paler. Plant extracts, heparin and allantoin in Cepan act on the biochemical processes in the developing connective tissue, preventing the formation of hyperplastic scars. These active ingredients enhance swelling, softening and loosening of connective tissue. It exerts softening and smoothing action on indurated and hyperplastic scar tissue, improving collagen structure. It promotes tissue regeneration and reduces exuberant granulation. Cepan is well tolerated.

  4. Thermal Injury Model in the Rabbit Ear with Quantifiable Burn Progression and Hypertrophic Scar.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Emily E; Niknam-Bienia, Solmaz; Xie, Ping; Jia, Sheng-Xian; Hong, Seok Jong; Mustoe, Thomas A; Galiano, Robert D

    2017-04-01

    Hypertrophic scar is a major clinical outcome of deep-partial thickness to full thickness thermal burn injury. Appropriate animal models are a limitation to burn research due to the lack of, or access to, animal models which address the endpoint of hypertrophic scar. Lower species, such as rodents, heal mainly by contracture, which limits the duration of study. Higher species, such as pigs, heal more similarly to humans, but are associated with high cost, long duration for scar development, challenges in quantifying scar hypertrophy, and poor manageability. Here we present a quantifiable deep-partial thickness burn model in the rabbit ear. Burns were created using a dry-heated brass rod for 10 s and 20 s at 90°C. At the time of eschar excision on day 3, excisional wounds were made on the contralateral ear for comparison. Burn wound progression, in which the wound size expands over time is a major distinction between excisional and thermal injuries, was quantified at 1 h and 3 d after the injuries using calibrated photographs and histology and the size of the wounds was found to be unchanged from the initial wound size at 1 h, but 10% in the 20 s burn wounds at 3 d. A quantifiable hypertrophic scar, measured by histology as the scar elevation index, was present in both 20 s burn wounds and excisional wounds at day 35. ImageJ measurements revealed that the 20 s burn wound scars were 22% larger than the excisional wound scars and the 20 s burn scar area measurements from histology were 26% greater than in the excisional wound scar. The ability to measure both burn progression and scar hypertrophy over a 35-day time frame suits this model to screening early intervention burn wound therapeutics or scar treatments in a burn-specific scar model. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Ablative fractional resurfacing for the treatment of traumatic scars and contractures.

    PubMed

    Uebelhoer, Nathan S; Ross, E Victor; Shumaker, Peter R

    2012-06-01

    After a decade of military conflict, thousands of wounded warriors have suffered debilitating and cosmetically disfiguring scars and scar contractures. Clearly, there is a need for effective scar treatment regimens to assist in the functional and cosmetic rehabilitation of these patients. Traditional treatments, including aggressive physical and occupational therapy and dedicated wound care, are essential. Adjunctive treatments with established laser technologies, such as vascular lasers and full-field ablative lasers, have had a somewhat limited role in scar contractures due to modest efficacy and/or an unacceptable side effect profile in compromised skin. Refractory scar contractures often require surgical revision, which can be effective, but is associated with additional surgical morbidity and a significant risk of recurrence. Furthermore, current scar treatment paradigms often dictate scar maturation for approximately a year to allow for spontaneous improvement before surgical intervention. Since 2009, the Dermatology Clinic at the Naval Medical Center San Diego has been treating scars and scar contractures in wounded warriors and others using ablative fractionated laser technology. Although traditionally associated with the rejuvenation of aged and photo-damaged skin, our clinical experience and a handful of early reports indicate that laser ablative fractional resurfacing demonstrates promising efficacy and an excellent side effect profile when applied to the functional and cosmetic enhancement of traumatic scars and contractures. This article discusses our clinical experience with ablative fractional resurfacing and its potential prominent role in rehabilitation from traumatic injuries, including a possible shift in scar treatment paradigms toward earlier procedural intervention. Potential benefits include the optimization of scar trajectory and higher levels of full or adapted function in a more favorable time course.

  6. Management of scar contractures of the hand using Z advancement rotation flap.

    PubMed

    Gümüş, Nazım; Yılmaz, Sarper

    2013-08-01

    Functional consequences of hand contractures may lead to extreme impairment in hand functions so repair of the contractures can solve the problems related to hand functions. Different forms of z plasties have widely been used for the release of scar contractures. In this study, a useful z plasty technique, z advancement rotation flap (ZAR) was adapted for the release of hand contractures in the way of using only local tissues. Fourteen consecutive patients who had hand contractures, were treated successfully with z advancement rotation flap technique. They suffered from hand contractures for at least one year which were localized in wep spaces, flexor surfaces of the digits, first wep space, palmar area and extensor surface of the hand. Contractures are all in mild severity, restricting some of the hand motions moderately. In all patients, hand contractures released completely and clinically normal joint motions were achieved, improving extension, flexion and abduction ranges of fingers without any difficulty. All advanced and rotated flaps healed uneventfully. No major complications appeared such as infection, hematoma, suture dehiscence, flap congestion or necrosis. When dealing with this technique for release of hand contractures, it may offer a versatile alternative to well known z-plasty methods used particularly for hand contractures.

  7. Management of complex pediatric burn scars in a humanitarian collaboration.

    PubMed

    Bassetto, F; Staffieri, A; Reho, F; Facchin, F; Shehata, J; Maged, D; Tiengo, C

    2015-03-31

    Burn scars still represent a challenge to the reconstructive surgeon. Their management requires a specific expertise and set up involving the possibility of long term rehabilitation and follow up. Cases encountered in humanitarian missions present additional issues. Often the local environment is not suitable for an appropriate treatment plan, requiring the case to be transferred to a foreign country for surgical care as part of an integrated international and multidisciplinary management. We present the case of a three year-old patient injured in a bomb explosion during the Arab Spring and suffering from severe scar contracture limiting thoracic and upper limb movement. After initial consultation at distance, transfer to our country was organized and an intensive surgical and rehabilitative program was carried out over three months. After five months, the patient returned to his home country where a supportive network had been set up for continued rehabilitation, ensuring follow up for over a year and ultimate success.

  8. Management of complex pediatric burn scars in a humanitarian collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Bassetto, F.; Staffieri, A.; Reho, F.; Facchin, F.; Shehata, J.; Maged, D.; Tiengo, C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Burn scars still represent a challenge to the reconstructive surgeon. Their management requires a specific expertise and set up involving the possibility of long term rehabilitation and follow up. Cases encountered in humanitarian missions present additional issues. Often the local environment is not suitable for an appropriate treatment plan, requiring the case to be transferred to a foreign country for surgical care as part of an integrated international and multidisciplinary management. We present the case of a three year-old patient injured in a bomb explosion during the Arab Spring and suffering from severe scar contracture limiting thoracic and upper limb movement. After initial consultation at distance, transfer to our country was organized and an intensive surgical and rehabilitative program was carried out over three months. After five months, the patient returned to his home country where a supportive network had been set up for continued rehabilitation, ensuring follow up for over a year and ultimate success. PMID:26668562

  9. Contractures in burn injury part II: investigating joints of the hand.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jeffrey C; Holavanahalli, Radha; Helm, Phala; O'Neil, Carina; Goldstein, Richard; Kowalske, Karen

    2008-01-01

    This study prospectively examines the incidence and severity of hand contractures after burn injury and determines predictors of contracture development. Data were collected prospectively from 1993 to 2002 for adult burn survivors admitted to a regional burn center. Demographic and medical data were collected on each subject. Primary outcome measures include presence of contractures, number of contractures, and the severity of contractures at each of the hand joints at hospital discharge. The metacarpal-phalangeal, proximal inter-phalangeal (PIP), and distal inter-phalangeal joints of all digits and the wrist joints are included in this study. Regression analysis was performed to determine predictors of the presence, severity, and number of contractures. Of the 985 study patients, 23% demonstrated at least one hand contracture at hospital discharge. Those with a contracture averaged ten contractures per person. Most contractures were mild (48%) or moderate (41%) in severity. The wrist was the most frequently affected joint (22%). Statistically significant predictors of contracture development include concomitant medical problems, total body surface area grafted and presence of hand burn and hand grafting (P < .05). Predictors of the number of contractures include length of stay, concomitant medical problems, burn size and presence of hand burn and grafting (P < .05). Contractures of the hand are a significant complication of burn injury. Clinicians can use the contracture predictors to help target interventions for those patients most at risk of developing hand contractures. Given the functional importance of the hand in daily living, the burn care community is challenged to find new ways of preventing and treating hand contractures.

  10. Outcome after burns: an observational study on burn scar maturation and predictors for severe scarring.

    PubMed

    van der Wal, Martijn B A; Vloemans, Jos F P M; Tuinebreijer, Wim E; van de Ven, Peter; van Unen, Ella; van Zuijlen, Paul P M; Middelkoop, Esther

    2012-01-01

    Long-term outcome of burn scars as well as the relation with clinically relevant parameters has not been studied quantitatively. Therefore, we conducted a detailed analysis on the clinical changes of burn scars in a longitudinal setup. In addition, we focused on the differences in scar quality in relation to the depth, etiology of the burn wound and age of the patient. Burn scars of 474 patients were subjected to a scar assessment protocol 3, 6, and 12 months postburn. Three different age groups were defined (≤5, 5-18, and ≥18 years). The observer part of the patient and observer scar assessment scale revealed a significant (p < 0.001) improvement in scar quality at 12 months compared with the 3- and 6-month data. Predictors for severe scarring are depth of the wound (p < 0.001) and total body surface area burned (p < 0.001). Etiology (p = 0.753) and age (p > 0.230) have no significant influence on scar quality when corrected for sex, total body surface area burned, time, and age or etiology, respectively.

  11. Nondestructive measurements of the properties of healing burn scars.

    PubMed

    Chu, B M; Brody, G

    1975-01-01

    A testing protocol and the requisite instrumentation have been developed to nondestructively monitor the temporal and mechanical properties of maturing scar. The maturing scar can become progressively and unpredictably adherent or contractured, producing varying degrees of functional impairment. By plotting these mechanical changes as a temporal function of limb motion history, more accurate prediction and control of the ultimate scarring may result. These same techniques could also be used to study normal skin aging. Extrapolation could be made to connective tissue scars in tendons, ligaments, and other structural elements. Scar contractures may develop slowly along lines of tension or areas of maximum skin defect in large maturing scars once the patient has recovered sufficiently to exercise the underlying joints. Since the present endeavor to monitor potential contractures requires measurement of the "in-plane" stresses and strains, we have chosen to utilize an in situ strip biaxial test configuration.

  12. Postburn contractures of the hand.

    PubMed

    Fufa, Duretti T; Chuang, Shiow-Shuh; Yang, Jui-Yung

    2014-09-01

    Several functionally limiting sequelae can follow deep thermal injury to the hand. Despite appropriate initial management, contractures are common. Whereas acute burn care is often managed by multidisciplinary, specialized burn units, postburn contractures may be referred to hand surgeons, who should be familiar with the patterns of burn contracture and nonsurgical and operative options to improve function and expected outcomes. The most common and functionally limiting sequelae are contractures of the webspace, hand, and digits. Webspace contractures and postburn syndactyly are managed with scar excision and local soft tissue rearrangement or skin grafting. The burn claw hand presents as extension contracture of the metacarpophalangeal joints and flexion contractures of the proximal interphalangeal joints. The mainstays of management of these contractures include complete surgical excision of scar tissue and resurfacing of the resultant soft tissue defect, most commonly with full-thickness skin grafts. If scar contracture release results in major exposure of the tendons or joints, distant tissue transfer may be required. Early motion and rehabilitative modalities are essential to prevent initial contracture formation and recontracture after surgical release.

  13. Reverse-flow anterolateral thigh perforator: an ad hoc flap for severe post-burn knee contracture.

    PubMed

    Ismail, H A; El-Bassiony, L E

    2016-03-31

    We evaluate function outcomes of the reverse-flow ALT perforator flap to reconstruct severe post-burn knee contracture. Between October 2012 and December 2014, 10 patients with severe post-burn knee contracture were subjected to reconstruction with 10 ipsilateral reversed-flow ALT perforator flaps. All the patients were male. Ages ranged from 15 to 47 years (mean = 32 years). Time from burn injury to patient presentation ranged from 2-8 months. All patients demonstrated post-burn flexion contracture of the knee joint, ranging from 35 to 75 degrees. Flap sizes ranged from 8×16 to 12×26 cm. The flaps and skin grafts were carried out without major complications. Only minor complications occurred, such as transient, mild congestion immediately after inset in two flaps. Two flaps developed superficial necrosis at the distal edge. One case sustained partial skin graft loss due to haematoma. One case complained of skin hyperpigmentation and hypertrophic scars around the graft. Secondary debulking procedures were required in two cases. The entire donor sites were closed by partial thickness skin graft with acceptable appearance, except one case that was closed primarily. Eight out of ten patients (80%) demonstrated gradual improvement in range of knee motion after a specialized rehabilitation program. Two patients (20%) did not get back full range of motion. RALT perforator flap is the cornerstone for the reconstruction of soft-tissue defects around the knee with acceptable aesthetic and functional results provided that the following items are fulfilled: inclusion of muscle cuff around the pedicle, the pivot point, prevention of pedicle compression after transfer and early surgical intervention on the post-burn knee contracture.

  14. A novel immune competent murine hypertrophic scar contracture model: a tool to elucidate disease mechanism and develop new therapies.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohamed Magdy; Bond, Jennifer; Bergeron, Andrew; Miller, Kyle J; Ehanire, Tosan; Quiles, Carlos; Lorden, Elizabeth R; Medina, Manuel A; Fisher, Mark; Klitzman, Bruce; Selim, M Angelica; Leong, Kam W; Levinson, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar (HSc) contraction following burn injury causes contractures. Contractures are painful and disfiguring. Current therapies are marginally effective. To study pathogenesis and develop new therapies, a murine model is needed. We have created a validated immune-competent murine HSc model. A third-degree burn was created on dorsum of C57BL/6 mice. Three days postburn, tissue was excised and grafted with ear skin. Graft contraction was analyzed and tissue harvested on different time points. Outcomes were compared with human condition to validate the model. To confirm graft survival, green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice were used, and histologic analysis was performed to differentiate between ear and back skin. Role of panniculus carnosus in contraction was analyzed. Cellularity was assessed with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole. Collagen maturation was assessed with Picro-sirius red. Mast cells were stained with Toluidine blue. Macrophages were detected with F4/80 immune. Vascularity was assessed with CD31 immune. RNA for contractile proteins was detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Elastic moduli of skin and scar tissue were analyzed using a microstrain analyzer. Grafts contracted to ∼45% of their original size by day 14 and maintained their size. Grafting of GFP mouse skin onto wild-type mice, and analysis of dermal thickness and hair follicle density, confirmed graft survival. Interestingly, hair follicles disappeared after grafting and regenerated in ear skin configuration by day 30. Radiological analysis revealed that panniculus carnosus doesn't contribute to contraction. Microscopic analyses showed that grafts show increase in cellularity. Granulation tissue formed after day 3. Collagen analysis revealed increases in collagen maturation over time. CD31 stain revealed increased vascularity. Macrophages and mast cells were increased. qRT-PCR showed up-regulation of transforming growth factor beta, alpha smooth muscle

  15. Expanded thoracoacromial artery perforator flap for reconstruction of full-perioral scar contracture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianwen; Wang, Jiaqi

    2015-03-01

    Various types of anterior chest flaps can be recruited in the reconstruction of faciocervical region. Most of them were created based on the internal mammary artery and the lateral thoracic artery, and the thoracoacromial artery (TAA) is usually used in pectoralis major musculocutaneous flap. An anterior chest flap with TAA perforator (TAAP) will have no sacrifice of the pectoralis major muscle, but less reports, especially expanded pedicled one, can be reviewed. Here, we reported a case using expanded pedicled TAAP flap to reconstruct the perioral scar contracture. In this technique, expanded TAAP flap could be easily harvested without the sophisticated microsurgical technology. Acceptable esthetic and functional results were achieved.

  16. Extensive Burn Scars in Russia's Amur Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Vast areas of southeastern Russia have been scorched by fires over the last few weeks. All across Siberia fires have been raging, and this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from May 15, 2002, shows extensive, dark burn scars along with actively burning fires (red dots) on the north side of the Amur River, which separates Russia (north) and China (south). The southern Amur region is largely devoted to farming and other agriculture, and these fires may have been set intentionally to prepare the land for the growing season. Fire is often used to clear land of unwanted vegetation, and to return the nutrients stored in vegetation back to the soil. However, fires that are too frequent or severe can devastate the soil, eventually making it unsuitable for farming or grazing. Fires can also escape control and spread into protected areas. In this image, fires are mostly concentrated in a lowland area within the drainage basin of the Zeya River, which drains from the frozen lake at the top of the image. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  17. The menace of post-burn contractures: a developing country's perspective.

    PubMed

    Saaiq, M; Zaib, S; Ahmad, S

    2012-09-30

    A study was carried out regarding 213 patients of either gender and all ages who presented with post-burn contractures. The commonest site of contracture was the neck. 92 patients (43.19%) had received their initial burn injury management in general surgery units in tertiary care hospitals compared to 43 patients (20.18%) in district headquarter hospitals. Only 26 patients (12.20%) were managed in plastic surgery/burn wards, and 52 patients (24.41%) received no regular treatment from any hospital. The majority of patients (n=197) had a history of conservative management, with only 16 patients (7.51%) having a split thickness skin graft for part of their initial burns. None of the patients had the appropriate anti-deformity splintage in the affected parts or any physiotherapy during the acute phase of their burns.

  18. Drought and Burn Scars in Southeastern Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    More than 2 million acres were consumed by hundreds of fires between December 2002 and February 2003 in southeastern Australia's national parks, forests, foothills and city suburbs. These images were acquired on February 14, 2002 (left) and February 17, 2003 (right) by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument onboard NASA's Terra satellite. The year 2002 was one of Australia's hottest and driest on record, and the acreage burnt during the summer 2002-2003 fire season in Victoria, the Australian Capital Territory and southern New South Wales, is the largest since 1938-1939, when more than 3 million acres were scorched.

    The extent of the burnt area and the dry conditions as of February 2003 are indicated by these contrasting false-color views. Both image panels display data from the near-infrared, red and blue spectral bands of MISR's downward-viewing (nadir) camera, as red, green and blue, respectively. This display technique causes healthy vegetation to appear red and burnt areas to show as dark brown. The data displayed from the two dates were processed identically to preserve relative brightness variations. Vegetation changes related to the dry conditions (not related to the brown burn scars) are also indicated in the February 2003 panel, where many previously red areas exhibit instead the pale yellow-brown of the underlying soils and geology. Significant reduction in the surface area of several large and important water bodies are also apparent. The diminished extent of Lake Hume (along the left-hand edge) in the later date provides a good example.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82 degrees north and 82 degrees south latitude. These data products were generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during Terra orbits 14999 and 16858. The panels cover an area of about 208 kilometers x 286 kilometers, and utilize data from blocks 118 to

  19. Postburn Neck Lateral Contracture Anatomy and Treatment: A New Approach.

    PubMed

    Grishkevich, Viktor M; Grishkevich, Max

    2015-01-01

    Lateral contracture of the neck is a rare and insufficiently researched burn consequent. Contracture restricts head motion, can cause a secondary face deformity, presents severe cosmetic defects, and, therefore, requires surgical reconstruction. Literature does not sufficiently address the issue; therefore, anatomy not researched and treatment techniques not developed. The anatomy of postburn lateral cervical flexion contracture was studied in 21 operated patients. Using obtained data, new approaches were investigated, which were directed toward maximal efficacy of the local tissues use. Follow-up results were observed from 6 months to 9 years. Lateral cervical contractures were divided into two types based on their anatomy: edge and medial. Edge contractures were caused by burns and scars located on the posterior neck surface and were characterized by the presence of the fold in central lateral zone. In the fold, only one (posterior) sheet is scars that cause the contracture. Medial contractures were caused by scars located on the lateral cervical surface and were characterized by the presence of the fold in which both sheets were scars. In both types, contracture was caused by scar sheet surface deficiency in length, which has a trapezoid form (contracture cause). In all cases, there was surface surplus in the fold's sheets allowed contracture release with local tissue. The technique that allows the maximum local tissue use and ensures full contracture elimination is the trapeze-flap plasty. Two anatomic types of lateral cervical scar contractures were identified: edge and medial. An anatomically justified efficacy reconstructive technique for both types is trapeze-flap plasty.

  20. Malignant Melanoma on a Thermal Burn Scar with an Interval of More Than 70 Years

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Shusuke; Oiso, Naoki; Shiga, Kuriko; Narita, Tomohiko; Kawada, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Cases of malignant melanoma on thermal burn scars have occasionally been reported. We report a 78-year-old Japanese female with malignant melanoma on a thermal burn scar with an interval of more than 70 years. Our case reemphasizes the importance of regular examinations in persons with thermal burn scars. PMID:27721752

  1. Chromatic analysis of burn scar based on ANN by using photoelectrical technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Baikun; Qi, Hongzhi; Ming, Dong; Zhang, Mingjian; Wang, Qifang

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a novel method for the chromatic analysis of burn scar is proposed. The aim of the algorithm is to evaluate the curative effect and set up the treatment plan pertinently, because the scar color is an impersonal parameter reflects the degree of scar hypertrophy. The method is based on artificial neural network (ANN) by using photoelectrical technique, and composed of three main parts: firstly capture the digital color images of the burn scar using CCD camera, then change the RGB color data of the burn scar into that of HSB color space and emend it using ANN, lastly judge the degree of burn scar hypertrophy by chromatic analysis using ANN again. The experimental results were good conformed to the degrees of scar hypertrophy given by clinical evaluations. It suggests that the chromatic analysis technique of the burn scar is valuable for further study and apply to the clinical engineering.

  2. Anesthetic Practices for Laser Rehabilitation of Pediatric Hypertrophic Burn Scars.

    PubMed

    Wong, Brendan M; Keilman, Jeffrey; Zuccaro, Jennifer; Kelly, Charis; Maynes, Jason T; Fish, Joel S

    The use of ablative fractional carbon dioxide laser therapy and pulsed dye laser therapy has led to significant improvements in the rehabilitation of hypertrophic burn scars. However, laser procedures are associated with appreciable pain among pediatric patients. Clinical consensus suggests using general anesthesia for pediatric laser procedures; however, guidelines for perioperative care are lacking. The objective of this quality improvement study is to determine whether a difference exists in postoperative pain outcomes in pediatric patients who receive intraoperative opioid regimens compared with patients who receive opioid-sparing regimens for laser therapy of hypertrophic burn scars. A retrospective review of patients who received laser therapy at a pediatric burn center from April 2014 to May 2015 was performed. Overall, 88 of the 92 procedures reviewed were included. A statistically significant difference was not found between the likelihood of postoperative pain when intraoperative opioid regimens (n = 63) were given compared with opioid-sparing regimens (n = 25) X (1, n = 88) = 2.870, P = .0902. There was also no difference between short-acting (n = 48), long-acting (n = 9), or combination (n = 6) intraoperative opioids compared with opioid-sparing regimens (n = 25) in the likelihood of postoperative pain. Despite the small sample size, the low number of postoperative pain cases is encouraging. Ultimately, these data provide a foundation for developing anesthetic guidelines for pediatric laser procedures. Specifically, clinicians should consider the potential to deliver adequate perioperative care via an opioid-sparing regimen ± adjuvant.

  3. Anaesthetic management of post-burn contractures, a recurrent challenge from oil pipeline vandalization in Nigeria: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Abiodun Oyinpreye

    2009-12-03

    A 13 year- old girl presented to the department with sternomental contractures as a result of facial burns from kerosene explosion. Difficult airway was envisaged. Over the period of time she developed sub-mental contracture with keloids; and was scheduled for release of contractures and flap closure.Anaesthesia was induced with halothane and 100% oxygen. A size 3 laryngeal mask airway (LMA) was inserted and anaesthesia maintained with oxygen/nitrous oxide/halothane/muscle relaxant technique. The successful placement of LMA at 2(nd )attempt was aided by a surgical incision on the submental contracture. Blood loss was 600 mls and a unit of packed red blood cells was transfused. She made full recovery and was discharged home after 1 month.

  4. Severe post-burn neck contracture release and skin graft harvest using tumescent local anaesthesia as the sole anesthetic technique.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Mukesh Kumar; Puneet, Pulak; Rani, Kanchan; Shree, Divya

    2012-02-01

    Severe post-burn contractures in the neck often cause anatomical distortion and restriction of neck movements, resulting in varying degrees of difficulty in airway management. Any mode of anesthesia that may obviate the need for imperative airway control may be desirable in such situations in which a difficult airway may be anticipated. Here we present one such situation where tumescent local anesthesia was employed to manage a case of severe post-burn neck contractures posted for contracture release and split-skin grafting. The other benefits of this method were minimal blood loss and excellent postoperative analgesia. In conclusion, it can be emphasized that the application of tumescent anesthesia is an important anesthetic tool in patients with predicted difficult airway management.

  5. Health professionals' and consumers' opinion: what is considered important when rating burn scars from photographs?

    PubMed

    Simons, Megan; Tyack, Zephanie

    2011-01-01

    With advances in wound care technology, there is a trend toward patients undertaking specialist burns treatment in an outpatient capacity. Photographic scar evaluation is a part of this trend in some health services because it permits scar assessment by different health professionals, both within and across outpatient services, to assess the impact of scar management strategies. The aim of this study was to explore the parameters considered integral to scar assessment when completing photographic scar evaluation. First, opinions were sought from 38 burn health professionals in 2 tertiary pediatric hospitals who participated in focus groups where in-person and in-photograph scar rating were completed using three burn scar rating scales (modified Vancouver scar scale, Manchester scar scale, and patient and observer scar assessment scale) presented with a standard format and instructions. Second, 36 occupational therapists and physiotherapists from Australia and New Zealand completed questionnaires. Third, 10 healthcare consumers from 1 tertiary pediatric hospital participated in face-to-face or telephone interviews. Parameters believed to be assessed using photographic evaluation of burns scarring were vascularity, surface area, color, contour, height, and overall opinion. However, surface area was considered questionable as an indicator of scar maturity. These parameters mostly differ from those considered important in a burn scar outcome measure when rating scars in-person: height/thickness, vascularity, color, pliability, joint function, and patient/client opinion. A categorical scale with visual descriptors, as well as specific strategies to improve photographic technique, may go some way to addressing the perceived difficulty in rating these parameters using burn scar photographs.

  6. A Modeling Approach for Burn Scar Assessment Using Natural Features and Elastic Property

    SciTech Connect

    Tsap, L V; Zhang, Y; Goldgof, D B; Sarkar, S

    2004-04-02

    A modeling approach is presented for quantitative burn scar assessment. Emphases are given to: (1) constructing a finite element model from natural image features with an adaptive mesh, and (2) quantifying the Young's modulus of scars using the finite element model and the regularization method. A set of natural point features is extracted from the images of burn patients. A Delaunay triangle mesh is then generated that adapts to the point features. A 3D finite element model is built on top of the mesh with the aid of range images providing the depth information. The Young's modulus of scars is quantified with a simplified regularization functional, assuming that the knowledge of scar's geometry is available. The consistency between the Relative Elasticity Index and the physician's rating based on the Vancouver Scale (a relative scale used to rate burn scars) indicates that the proposed modeling approach has high potentials for image-based quantitative burn scar assessment.

  7. A Goniometry Paradigm Shift to Measure Burn Scar Contracture in Burn Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    CS) Y1, Month 1-11 Resolve outstanding issues related to the study protocol at individual clinical sites. • Completed (8-20-15), Continuing...review approval(9-18-16) 1b. Finalize facility contracts: (GF) Y1, Month 1- Y3, Month 2 Individual contracts between The Geneva Foundation...complete (7/8 centers) 1c. Fabrication of foam measurement supports: (ISR) Months 1- 2 For the study, position blocks made of foam and cut to

  8. In vivo assessment of human burn scars through automated quantification of vascularity using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Yih Miin; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Gong, Peijun; Wood, Fiona M.; Sampson, David D.

    2013-06-01

    In scars arising from burns, objective assessment of vascularity is important in the early identification of pathological scarring, and in the assessment of progression and treatment response. We demonstrate the first clinical assessment and automated quantification of vascularity in cutaneous burn scars of human patients in vivo that uses optical coherence tomography (OCT). Scar microvasculature was delineated in three-dimensional OCT images using speckle decorrelation. The diameter and area density of blood vessels were automatically quantified. A substantial increase was observed in the measured density of vasculature in hypertrophic scar tissues (38%) when compared against normal, unscarred skin (22%). A proliferation of larger vessels (diameter≥100 μm) was revealed in hypertrophic scarring, which was absent from normal scars and normal skin over the investigated physical depth range of 600 μm. This study establishes the feasibility of this methodology as a means of clinical monitoring of scar progression.

  9. Campfire burns of the palms in crawling infants in Saudi Arabia: results following release and graft of contractures.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M

    2009-01-01

    In Saudi Arabia, camping in the desert is commonly practiced by families. A campfire is usually lit and unsupervised crawling infants are at risk of burns from these campfires. During a 12-year period, a total of 53 children with hand contractures related to campfire burns were treated. The mean age at the time of burn was 9 months (range: 5-12 months). All patients presented with isolated palmar contractures of one (n=24) or both (n=29) hands. Surgical release and skin grafting were performed for a total of 82 hands. Full-thickness skin grafts from the groin area were used in mild cases, and thick split-thickness skin grafts harvested from the thigh were used in severe contractures. Graft take ranged from 90 to 100% "take" in all patients. Follow-up ranged from 6 months to 10 years. Recurrence of contracture was calculated for 30 children (52 grafted hands) who had follow-up for more than 5 years. Twenty hands (group I) had thick split-thickness skin grafts, and 10 (50%) of these required a second release and grafting procedure. The remaining 32 hands (group II) had full-thickness grafts and only 3 (9.4%) required a second release and grafting procedure. The difference was statistically significant (P=.003), indicating that group I are more likely to require secondary surgery on long-term follow-up.

  10. Flexion contractures of fingers: contracture elimination with trapeze-flap plasty.

    PubMed

    Grishkevich, V M

    2011-02-01

    Scar flexion contracture of fingers is one of the most serious consequences of hand burns and patient disability after burn. Many kinds of reconstructive techniques are currently used and new procedures are being investigated. The author presents a new method of finger contracture reconstruction developed in the process of burn reconstructive operations on hands of over a thousand patients. Finger flexion contractures are caused by a semilunar fold, both sheets of which are scars. The sheets have a surface deficiency in length, which causes a contracture, and excess of skin in width, which allows contracture elimination with local flaps. The length deficiency extends from the crest of the fold to the joint rotation axis and has a trapezoid form. To compensate for skin deficiency and to address the contracture, it is necessary to convert both fold sheets into trapezoid flaps by radial incisions. Because the fold is of semilunar (crescent) shape, the flaps accept a trapezoid form. One or several pairs of the flaps are mobilized with the split fat layer from the fold's crest to the joint rotation axis level. The oppositely transposed flaps fully or partially cover the wound in the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) zone first. The remaining smaller wounds are covered with full-thickness skin grafts. The flaps have a reliable blood circulation; partial flap loss is an exception. The flap's surface does not decrease, the skin grafts shrink insufficiently, and the distant results, as a rule, are good. Two hundred and seventy-five patients were operated upon. Scar contractures were satisfactorily addressed in all patients. Incomplete extension was found in 46 patients; this was caused by interphalangeal joint injuries (ligaments, capsule, cartilage), ankylosis or boutonniere deformity.

  11. Study of burn scar extraction automatically based on level set method using remote sensing data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Dai, Qin; Liu, Jianbo; Liu, ShiBin; Yang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Burn scar extraction using remote sensing data is an efficient way to precisely evaluate burn area and measure vegetation recovery. Traditional burn scar extraction methodologies have no well effect on burn scar image with blurred and irregular edges. To address these issues, this paper proposes an automatic method to extract burn scar based on Level Set Method (LSM). This method utilizes the advantages of the different features in remote sensing images, as well as considers the practical needs of extracting the burn scar rapidly and automatically. This approach integrates Change Vector Analysis (CVA), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and the Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) to obtain difference image and modifies conventional Level Set Method Chan-Vese (C-V) model with a new initial curve which results from a binary image applying K-means method on fitting errors of two near-infrared band images. Landsat 5 TM and Landsat 8 OLI data sets are used to validate the proposed method. Comparison with conventional C-V model, OSTU algorithm, Fuzzy C-mean (FCM) algorithm are made to show that the proposed approach can extract the outline curve of fire burn scar effectively and exactly. The method has higher extraction accuracy and less algorithm complexity than that of the conventional C-V model.

  12. Treatment of Burn and Surgical Wounds With Recombinant Human Tropoelastin Produces New Elastin Fibers in Scars.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hua; Lucchesi, Lisa; Zheng, Bo; Ladich, Elena; Pineda, Teresa; Merten, Rose; Gregory, Cynthia; Rutten, Michael; Gregory, Kenton

    2017-02-15

    Tropoelastin (TE), the soluble precursor of insoluble elastin fibers, is produced in minimal amounts in adults. Burn injuries result in inflexible collagen-rich scars because of lack of elastin fiber formation. We studied the feasibility of using recombinant human tropoelastin to enable elastin fiber production in burn and surgical scars to improve skin flexibility. In a swine hypertrophic burn scar model, normal skin and 3 × 3-cm partial thickness thermal burns underwent dermatome resection at 1 week post burn and randomized to four subcutaneous injections of saline or TE (either 0.5, 5, or 10 mg/ml) spaced 3 days apart. Two burn sites received TE injections after wound closure (0.5 or 10 mg/ml). At 90 days, skin hardness, flexibility, and histology were evaluated. All injury sites developed hypertrophic scars. New elastin fibers were found in burn scars in all injuries injected after skin closure with low (5/5) and high (6/6) TE doses (P < .05). No elastin fibers were observed without TE treatment. No significant differences in skin hardness, flexibility, or inflammation were observed. This is the first report demonstrating that subcutaneous injections of TE into surgical and burn injuries can safely produce new elastin fibers in scars. Despite the development of new elastin fibers, skin flexibility was not improved, possibly because of insufficient elastin fiber maturation or the hypertrophic model used. The ability to restore elastin fiber formation in adult skin after burns, trauma, and surgery may improve skin regeneration and reduce disabling complications of scar formation.

  13. Care for the Critically Injured Burn Patient Modulation of Burn Scars Through Laser Deliver of Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    fractional Erbium:YAG Figure 1: Third degree burn immediately after injury. There is loss of epidermis (char) and hair follicles . Blistering is...14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that hypertrophic burn scars can be remodeled by fractional laser treatment and...effectiveness of these novel delivery systems and cell-based therapies for third degree burns in a porcine model. We will test the hypothesis that

  14. Effect of 'Compound R' on thermal burn and full-depth wound contracture in fuzzy rats.

    PubMed

    Noormohamed, S E; Ray, T

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of Compound R emulsion on wound contraction in fuzzy rats. While the rats were under anesthesia, two mirror-image burn wounds were inflicted on the depilated back skin of each. Wounds were assigned randomly to treatment or placebo (oil), and the wound-scar areas were measured when they healed. A second set of wounds was created by taking two 6 millimeter punch biopsies from each rat and treated with Compound R or placebo. Under anesthesia, areas of the wound were measured on days 0, 5, 8 and on healing. Mean+/-SE areas for the healed burn wounds were: 151+/-24 mm2 for the treated and 102+/-26 mm2 for the placebo side (paired Student's t test, t=4.21, p=0.0015). Areas for Compound R-treated punch biopsy-induced wounds were significantly larger than placebo treated at each time point (p < 0.01). Results from this study show that Compound R impeded wound contraction.

  15. Tissue tonometry is a simple, objective measure for pliability of burn scar: is it reliable?

    PubMed

    Lye, Ian; Edgar, Dale W; Wood, Fiona M; Carroll, Sara

    2006-01-01

    Objective measurement of burn scar response to treatment is important to facilitate individual patient care, research, and service development. This work examines the validity and reliability of the tonometer as a means of quantifying scar pliability. Ten burn survivors were recruited into the study. Triplicate measures were taken for each of four scar and one normal skin point. The pliability score from the Vancouver Scar Scale also was used as a comparison. The tonometer demonstrated a high degree of reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients 0.91-0.94). It also was shown to provide a valid measure of pliability by quantifying decreased tissue deformation for scar (2.04 +/- 0.45 mm) compared with normal tissue (3.02 +/- 0.92 mm; t = 4.28, P = .004) and a moderate correlation with Vancouver Scar Scale scores. The tissue tonometer provides a repeatable, objective index of burn scar pliability. Using the methods described, it is a simple, clinically useful technique for monitoring an individual's scar.

  16. Fat Grafting in Burn Scar Alleviates Neuropathic Pain via Anti-Inflammation Effect in Scar and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shu-Hung; Wu, Sheng-Hua; Lee, Su-Shin; Chang, Kao-Ping; Chai, Chee-Yin; Yeh, Jwu-Lai; Lin, Sin-Daw; Kwan, Aij-Lie; David Wang, Hui-Min; Lai, Chung-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Burn-induced neuropathic pain is complex, and fat grafting has reportedly improved neuropathic pain. However, the mechanism of fat grafting in improving neuropathic pain is unclear. Previous investigations have found that neuroinflammation causes neuropathic pain, and anti-inflammatory targeting may provide potential therapeutic opportunities in neuropathic pain. We hypothesized that fat grafting in burn scars improves the neuropathic pain through anti-inflammation. Burn-induced scar pain was confirmed using a mechanical response test 4 weeks after burn injuries, and autologous fat grafting in the scar area was performed simultaneously. After 4 weeks, the animals were sacrificed, and specimens were collected for the inflammation test, including COX-2, iNOS, and nNOS in the injured skin and spinal cord dorsal horns through immunohistochemistry and Western assays. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 β and TNF-α) in the spinal cord were collected. Double immunofluorescent staining images for measuring p-IκB, p-NFκB, p-JNK, and TUNEL as well as Western blots of AKT, Bax/Bcl-2 for the inflammatory process, and apoptosis were analyzed. Fat grafting significantly reduced COX2, nNOS, and iNOS in the skin and spinal cord dorsal horns, as well as IL-1β and TNF-α, compared with the burn group. Moreover, regarding the anti-inflammatory effect, the apoptosis cells in the spinal cord significantly decreased after the fat grafting in the burn injury group. Fat grafting was effective in treating burn-induced neuropathic pain through the alleviation of neuroinflammation and ameliorated spinal neuronal apoptosis. PMID:26368011

  17. The evidence for natural therapeutics as potential anti-scarring agents in burn-related scarring.

    PubMed

    Mehta, M; Branford, O A; Rolfe, K J

    2016-01-01

    Though survival rate following severe thermal injuries has improved, the incidence and treatment of scarring have not improved at the same speed. This review discusses the formation of scars and in particular the formation of hypertrophic scars. Further, though there is as yet no gold standard treatment for the prevention or treatment of scarring, a brief overview is included. A number of natural therapeutics have shown beneficial effects both in vivo and in vitro with the potential of becoming clinical therapeutics in the future. These natural therapeutics include both plant-based products such as resveratrol, quercetin and epigallocatechin gallate as examples and includes the non-plant-based therapeutic honey. The review also includes potential mechanism of action for the therapeutics, any recorded adverse events and current administration of the therapeutics used. This review discusses a number of potential 'treatments' that may reduce or even prevent scarring particularly hypertrophic scarring, which is associated with thermal injuries without compromising wound repair.

  18. A novel approach to ablative fractional treatment of mature thermal burn scars.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Robert E

    2010-04-01

    This report details the use of a fractionated ablative Er:YAG laser in treating two cases of thermal burn injuries using a novel approach which matches the energy required to the depth of the burn scar. This method is termed "selective objective fractional technique (SOFT)".

  19. Incidences of malignancy in chronic burn scar ulcers: experience from Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Das, Kishore Kumar; Chakaraborty, Anjana; Rahman, Ashrafur; Khandkar, Sazzad

    2015-09-01

    Malignant transformation on any scar tissue is known as Marjolin's ulcer. Most cases of Marjolin's ulcer reported so far occur in post-burn scars but not all ulcers that occur in post-burn scar are malignant. One hundred and forty cases of chronic non-healing ulcers in post-burn scar were included in this prospective observational study. The study was conducted in the Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery Unit of Dhaka Medical College Hospital. Mean age of the patients was 40.63±18.44 with a range from 12 to 75 years. Two third of the patients were male. All patients underwent excision biopsy and coverage with either split thickness skin graft or flap. Histopathological analysis of the resected specimen revealed malignancy in 46 cases and pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia in four cases and verruca plantaris in one case. The rest of the cases were chronic non-healing benign ulcers. All 46 cases of Marjolin's ulcer were squamous cell carcinoma with a mean latency period of 26.73 years. The commonest site of chronic ulcer was in the lower extremities (n-80, 57%), and malignancy was also found to be more common there (n-18). The most common type of burn was flame burn (68.57%). The Marjolin's ulcers were significantly larger in size than benign ulcers, and were mostly exophytic or ulcerative in appearance whereas benign ulcers were mostly flat. A non-healing ulcer in a post-burn scar should be addressed promptly because of its potential to develop into a malignant ulcer. Emphasis should be given to early surgical treatment of deep partial to full thickness burns to prevent scar formation, particularly over joints, and thus reduce the risk of development of Marjolin's ulcer.

  20. Effect of intense pulsed light on immature burn scars: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Arindam; Dewangan, Yatindra Kumar; Bain, Jayanta; Rakshit, Pritha; Dhruw, Krishnanand; Basu, Sandip Kanti; Saha, Jayanta Kumar; Majumdar, Bijay Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: As intense pulsed light (IPL) is widely used to treat cutaneous vascular malformations and also used as non-ablative skin rejunuvation to remodel the skin collagen. A study has been undertaken to gauze the effect of IPL on immature burn scars with regard to vascularity, pliability and height. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted between June 2013 and May 2014, among patients with immature burn scars that healed conservatively within 2 months. Photographic evidence of appearance of scars and grading and rating was done with Vancouver Scar Scale parameters. Ratings were done for both case and control scar after the completion of four IPL treatment sessions and were compared. Results: Out of the 19 cases, vascularity, pliability and height improved significantly (P < 0.05) in 13, 14 and 11 scars respectively following IPL treatment. Conclusions: Intense pulsed light was well-tolerated by patients, caused good improvement in terms of vascularity, pliability, and height of immature burn scar. PMID:25593424

  1. Burn Patient Acuity Demographics, Scar Contractures, and Rehabilitation Treatment Time Related to Patient Outcomes (ACT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Part 1 of 2  Daily Log General Status  Daily Log  Edema  Control  Daily Log Exposed Bone/Joint o Daily Log Part 2 of 2  Daily Log Positioning...Minutes) ................................................................................................................. 11  DAILY LOG  EDEMA  CONTROL...12    Body Area  Edema  Control

  2. Identification of Cutaneous Functional Units Related to Burn Scar Contracture Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    documented forearm skin movement associ- ated with wrist extension. The purpose of this study was to expand the identification of skin movement associated...excluded if they had a history of skin disease or orthopedic conditions affecting joint ROM. Demo- graphic and anthropometric measurements were re- corded as...2.5 cm) spaced markings were placed on the ventral arm, dorsal forearm , and hand as well as the posterior thigh and leg. The test areas and asso

  3. Wildfires, smoke, and burn scars, near Yakutsk, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Lena River in central Siberia is hidden beneath a veil of smoke from multiple wildfires burning around the city of Yakutsk, Russia. Fires have been burning in the region off and on since late May 2002, and may be agricultural in cause. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on July 23, 2002. In the false=-color image, vegetation is bright green, smoke is blueish-white, and burned areas are reddish-brown. In both images, fire detections are marked with red outlines. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  4. The effects of conservative treatments on burn scars: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Anthonissen, Mieke; Daly, Daniel; Janssens, Thaïs; Van den Kerckhove, Eric

    2016-05-01

    A variety of conservative treatments for burn scars are available, but there is no clear consensus on the evidence. The purpose of this study was to summarize the available literature on the effects of conservative treatments of burn scars in adults. RCTs and CCTs were sought in three databases, reference lists of retrieved articles and relevant reviews. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network scoring system was used to assess the quality of the selected studies. Information on the study characteristics, results and interventions was extracted. Twenty-two articles were included into the review and categorized in six topics: 5 on massage therapy, 4 on pressure therapy, 6 on silicone gel application, 3 on combined therapy of pressure and silicone, 3 on hydration and 1 on ultrasound. Pressure and silicone therapy are evidence-based conservative treatments of hypertrophic scar formation after a burn producing clinically relevant improvement of scar thickness, redness and pliability. Massage therapy could have a positive result on scar pliability, pain and pruritus, but with less supporting evidence. The use of moisturizers and lotions could have an effect on itching, but the findings are contradictory. Of all other non-invasive treatments such as splinting, casting, physical activity, exercise and mobilizations no RCTs or CCTs were found.

  5. Treatment of cervical contractures utilising a closed platysmotomy like approach: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Haik, Josef; Prat, Daphna; Kornhaber, Rachel; Tessone, Ariel

    2016-09-01

    Contractures to the cervical region as a result of burns has the capacity to cause restrictions in range of movement, function of the lower face, cervical spine distortion and poor aesthetic outcomes that remain a surgical challenge. Consequently, physical and aesthetic deformities as a result of cervical contractures are reported to cause depression having implications for patients' quality of life and psychosocial wellbeing. At the time this research was conducted, there were no case reports describing a closed platysmotomy approach in burn patients. In this article, we review the literature surrounding closed platysmotomies and present what we believe to be the first reported case in the treatment of cervical contractures utilising a closed platysmotomy approach in a burns patient. A closed platysmotomy approach for the treatment of cervical contractures is a less invasive technique. Further investigation is warranted to determine the feasibility of this reconstructive approach in the area of burn scar management.

  6. ICG angiography predicts burn scarring within 48 h of injury in a porcine vertical progression burn model.

    PubMed

    Fourman, Mitchell S; McKenna, Peter; Phillips, Brett T; Crawford, Laurie; Romanelli, Filippo; Lin, Fubao; McClain, Steve A; Khan, Sami U; Dagum, Alexander B; Singer, Adam J; Clark, Richard A F

    2015-08-01

    The current standard of care in determining the need to excise and graft a burn remains with the burn surgeon, whose clinical judgment is often variable. Prior work suggests that minimally invasive perfusion technologies are useful in burn prognostication. Here we test the predictive capabilities of Laser Doppler Imaging (LDI) and indocyanine green dye (ICG) angiography in the prediction of burn scarring 28 days after injury using a previously validated porcine burn model that shows vertical progression injury. Twelve female Yorkshire swine were burned using a 2.5 × 2.5 cm metal bar at variable temperature and application times to create distinct burn depths. Six animals (48 injuries total) each were analyzed with LDI or ICG angiography at 1, 24, 48, and 72 h following injury. A linear regression was then performed correlating perfusion measurements against wound contraction at 28 days after injury. ICG angiography showed a peak linear correlate (r(2)) of .63 (95% CI .34 to .92) at 48 h after burn. This was significantly different from the LDI linear regression (p < .05), which was measured at r(2) of .20 (95% CI .02 to .39). ICG angiography linear regression was superior to LDI at all timepoints. Findings suggest that ICG angiography may have significant potential in the prediction of long-term burn outcomes.

  7. A new CO2 laser technique for the treatment of pediatric hypertrophic burn scars

    PubMed Central

    Żądkowski, Tomasz; Nachulewicz, Paweł; Mazgaj, Maciej; Woźniak, Magdalena; Cielecki, Czesław; Wieczorek, Andrzej Paweł; Beń-Skowronek, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Treatment of hypertrophic scars arising as a result of thermal burns in children is still a big problem. The results of the treatment are not satisfactory for patients and parents, and new methods of treatment are still investigated. We present the use of one of the most modern carbon dioxide (CO2) lasers (Lumenis Encore laser equipped with a Synergistic Coagulation and Ablation for Advanced Resurfacing module) in the treatment of hypertrophic scars in children after burns. From March to April of 2013, a group of 47 patients aged 6 to 16 years underwent 57 laser surgery treatments. The average time from accident was 7.5 years. The results of treatment were investigated in 114 areas. The assessed areas were divided into 2 groups: 9-cm2 area 1, where the thickness of the scar measured by physician was the lowest and 9-cm2 area 2, where the thickness of the scar was the biggest. The results were considered on the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) independently by the surgeon and by parents 1, 4, and 8 months after the procedure. In addition, ultrasound evaluation of the scar thickness before and after laser procedure was made. VSS total score improved in all areas assessed by both the physician and parents. The biggest change in total VSS score in area 1 in the evaluation of the investigator was obtained at follow-up after the 1st month of treatment (average 7.23 points before and 5.18 points after the 1st month after surgery—a difference of 2.05 points). Scar ratings by parents and the physician did not differ statistically (P < 0.05). In the ultrasound assessment, the improvement was statistically significant, more frequently for both minimum and maximum thickness of the scars (B-mode measures) (P < 0.05). The use of a CO2 laser in the treatment of hypertrophic scars in children is an effective and safe method. The use of a CO2 laser improves the appearance and morphology of scarring assessed using the VSS by both the parents and the physician. The

  8. Reconstructive Surgery of Extensive Face and Neck Burn Scars Using Tissue Expanders

    PubMed Central

    Ashab Yamin, Mohammad Reza; Mozafari, Naser; Mozafari, Mohadase; Razi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Neck reconstruction is considered as one of the most important surgeries in cosmetic and reconstructive surgery. The present study aimed to assess the results of reconstructive surgery of extensive face and neck burning scars using tissue expanders. METHODS This descriptive prospective study was conducted on 36 patients with extensive burning scars on the neck and face. Operation for tissue expander insertion was performed and tissue distension started two or three weeks later, depending on the patients’ incisions. After sufficient time for tissue expansion, while removing the expander and excision of the lesion, the expanded flap was used to cover the lesion. Overall, 43 cosmetic surgeries were done. RESULTS Rectangular expanders were employed in most patients (73.81%) and were located in the neck in most of them (60.78%). Complications were detected in five patients (13.89%), with exposure of the prosthesis being the most common one. Scar tissues at the reconstruction site and the flap donor site were acceptable in 94.44% and 98.18% of the cases, respectively. Overall, most of the patients (77.78%) were satisfied with the operation results.  CONCLUSION Using tissue expanders in tissue reconstruction of extensive neck and facial burning scars results in highly desirable outcomes. PMID:25606476

  9. Immediate tangential excision accelerates wound closure but does not reduce scarring of mid-dermal porcine burns.

    PubMed

    Macri, L K; Singer, A J; McClain, S A; Crawford, L; Prasad, A; Kohn, J; Clark, R A F

    2016-03-31

    Current evidence supports the use of excision to remove eschar from deep dermal and full-thickness burns. However, the role of excision of mid-dermal burns remains unclear. This study aimed to develop a porcine model that could produce reproducible middermal thermal burns that undergo tangential excision; and investigate the effects of immediate tangential excision (30 minutes postburn) on healing and scarring. An aluminum bar preheated in hot water (70°C) was applied for 20 or 30 s to produce a total of sixteen mid-dermal burns per pig on each of six pigs. Thirty minutes after burn creation, half of the burns were tangentially excised. Four partial- thickness wounds per pig were created as controls. Depth of burn injury (1 and 24 h), reepithelialization (7 and 10 d) and scar depth (28 d) were assessed microscopically. Total scar surface area was grossly evaluated on day 28. Exposure of porcine skin to a preheated aluminum bar at 70 °C for 20 or 30 sec resulted in reproducible mid-dermal burns, where immediate excision enhanced complete wound closure as judged by complete re-epithelialization, but did not reduce initial depth of injury, scar contraction and scar depth. Immediate surgical intervention is sufficient to enhance wound closure, but not to mitigate mid-dermal burn scar formation. This work provides a suitable animal model to evaluate novel therapies that may be used to inhibit burn progression, accelerate wound closure and decrease scarring, especially those therapies unable to penetrate burn eschar.

  10. Psychopathology and psychological problems in patients with burn scars: epidemiology and management.

    PubMed

    Van Loey, Nancy E E; Van Son, Maarten J M

    2003-01-01

    Burn injury is often a devastating event with long-term physical and psychosocial effects. Burn scars after deep dermal injury are cosmetically disfiguring and force the scarred person to deal with an alteration in body appearance. In addition, the traumatic nature of the burn accident and the painful treatment may induce psychopathological responses. Depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which are prevalent in 13-23% and 13-45% of cases, respectively, have been the most common areas of research in burn patients. Risk factors related to depression are pre-burn depression and female gender in combination with facial disfigurement. Risk factors related to PTSD are pre-burn depression, type and severity of baseline symptoms, anxiety related to pain, and visibility of burn injury. Neuropsychological problems are also described, mostly associated with electrical injuries. Social problems include difficulties in sexual life and social interactions. Quality of life initially seems to be lower in burn patients compared with the general population. Problems in the mental area are more troublesome than physical problems. Over a period of many years, quality of life was reported to be rather good. Mediating variables such as low social support, emotion and avoidant coping styles, and personality traits such as neuroticism and low extraversion, negatively affect adjustment after burn injury. Few studies of psychological treatments in burn patients are available. From general trauma literature, it is concluded that cognitive (behavioral) and pharmacological (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) interventions have a positive effect on depression. With respect to PTSD, exposure therapy and eye movement reprocessing and desensitization are successful. Psychological debriefing aiming to prevent chronic post-trauma reactions has not, thus far, shown a positive effect in burn patients. Treatment of problems in the social area includes cognitive-behavioral therapy

  11. The experience of scar management for adults with burns: An interpretative phenomenological analysis.

    PubMed

    Martin, C; Bonas, S; Shepherd, L; Hedges, E

    2016-09-01

    Burns can have both physical and psychological effects on individuals. Pressure garments and silicone gels are used to improve the aesthetic appearance and functions of the skin, but these treatments have been associated with various physical, emotional, sexual and social difficulties. Interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) was used to explore participants' experiences of scar management. IPA examines individual experiences before comparing results across cases, and is suited to capture the different ways in which individuals experience a phenomena as well as cautiously looking at patterns across cases. Eight burn patients who had experienced scar management, including pressure garments, were interviewed. Two superordinate themes were identified: Assimilation of Pressure Garment Identity, and Psychosocial Functions of the Pressure Garments. The findings offered insight into the positive and negative experiences of scar management, describing the diverse personal and social functions of the pressure garments and how they became integrated into participants' identities. By understanding the individual nature of these experiences, healthcare professionals can enhance support around these issues and potentially aid adherence to treatment. Further research with different demographic groups as well as for other burn treatments would be useful to develop and contextualise these findings.

  12. [Advances in the research of prevention and treatment of postburn contractures of hand].

    PubMed

    Wang, K A; Wu, G S; Sun, Y; Xia, Z F

    2017-01-20

    Scar contracture deformity, which can lead to dysfunction of hand and low quality of life, is one of the common complication after hand burns. The prevention measures of scar contracture after hand burns include large skin grafting, prevention of infection, insistence on wearing pressure gloves, use of silicone sheets, wearing orthosis, accepting proper physical therapy, and early functional exercise. The primary treatments of postburn contractures of the hand are surgery, drugs, laser treatment, and rehabilitation therapy. Excision of scars, release of muscle, joints or bones, and soft tissue transplantation are the core of surgery. Laser treatment has a bright future but still needs to be further studied. Additionally, some novel treatments such as molecular targeted therapy, cell therapy, fat injection, and botulinum toxin injection will play important roles in prevention and treatment of postburn contractures in the future. The purpose of this article is to review the literature concerning postburn contractures of the hand, and summarize the present situation of prevention and treatment of such disease comprehensively.

  13. Effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on scar pain in burn patients

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoon Soo; Joo, So Young; Cui, Huisong; Cho, Sung-Rae; Yim, Haejun; Seo, Cheong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been used to reduce pain in patients with various musculoskeletal diseases and wounds. We investigated the effect of ESWT on scar pain after complete wound epithelialization in burn patients. Methods: A prospective, single-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted from February 2014 to 2015. Forty patients with burn scar pain despite standard therapy (medication, physical therapy, and burn rehabilitation massage therapy) were randomized into ESWT or control (sham ESWT) groups. ESWT was administered at 100 impulses/cm2 (0.05–0.15 mJ/mm2) once per week for 3 weeks. The treatment effects were assessed using the numerical rating scale (NRS), pain threshold, Nirschl pain phase system, and Roles and Maudsley scores. Results: The characteristics of patients between the 2 study groups were balanced (P >0.05) for age, sex, and total burn surface area (%). In both groups, the NRS, pain threshold (Ib/cm2), and Nirschl pain phase system values significantly improved (P <0.05) after 3 sessions of ESWT or sham therapy, and there were significant differences between the 2 groups in terms of these 3 variables (P <0.001, P <0.001, P = 0.013, respectively). The Roles and Maudsley scores significantly improved; among 20 patients, 17 reported a score of poor (85%) and 3 reported fair (15%) before ESWT, whereas 3 reported poor (15%), 8 reported fair (40%), 5 reported good (25%), and 4 reported excellent (20%) after ESWT (P = 0.004). The scores did not improve in the control group (P = 0.128). Conclusion: ESWT significantly reduced scar pain in burn patients after wound recovery. PMID:27512886

  14. Contracture deformity

    MedlinePlus

    ... following: Brain and nervous system disorders, such as cerebral palsy or stroke Inherited disorders (such as muscular dystrophy ) ... gov/pubmed/22938881 . Read More Becker muscular dystrophy Cerebral palsy Duchenne muscular dystrophy Dupuytren contracture Volkmann ischemic contracture ...

  15. Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause swelling, blistering, scarring and, in serious cases, shock, and even death. They also can lead to infections because they damage your skin's protective barrier. Treatment for burns depends on the cause of the ...

  16. What score on the Vancouver Scar Scale constitutes a hypertrophic scar? Results from a survey of North American burn-care providers

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Callie M.; Sood, Ravi F.; Honari, Shari; Carrougher, Gretchen J.; Gibran, Nicole S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Reliable characterization of a hypertrophic scar (HTS) is integral to epidemiologic studies designed to identify clinical and genetic risk factors for HTS. The Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) has been widely used for this purpose; however, no publication has defined what score on this scale corresponds to a clinical diagnosis of HTS. Methods In a survey of 1000 burn care providers, we asked respondents what VSS score indicates a HTS and asked them to score scar photos using the VSS. We used receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curves to evaluate VSS subscores and their combinations in diagnosis of HTS. Results Of 130 responses (13.5%), most were physicians (43.9%) who had worked in burn care for over 10 years (63.1%) and did not use the VSS in clinical practice (58.5%). There was no consensus as to what VSS score indicates a diagnosis of HTS. VSS height score (0–3) performed best for diagnosis of HTS; using a cut-off of ≥1, height score was 99.5% sensitive and 85.9% specific for HTS. Conclusions Burn clinicians do not routinely use the VSS and perceptions vary widely regarding what constitutes a HTS. When a dichotomous variable is needed, the VSS height score with a cut-off of ≥1 may be optimal. Our findings underscore the need for an objective tool to reproducibly characterize HTS across burn centers. PMID:26141527

  17. Treatment of Post-Burn Scar Deformations Using Tissue Expansion and Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sharobaro, V.I.; Moroz, V.Y.; Starkov, Y.G.; Yudenich, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background. The essential drawbacks of conventional tissue expansion, a technique widely used in reconstructive surgery, are its significant duration and the high complications rate. The experience of our clinic covers 329 patients treated with this method from 1987 to 2006. The mean time of expansion was previously 72 ± 2 days (± SD) and the rate of local complications was 38.6%. We applied effective new approaches to this method in order to reduce its drawbacks, i.e. the endoscopic implantation of expanders, intensive expansion, and a modified technique of elevation of an expanded flap. Methods. Twenty-seven patients treated in the A.V. Vishnevsky Institute of Surgery between 2001 and 2006 for post-burn scar deformities underwent endoscopic implantations of 46 silicone expanders in various anatomical areas. High-grade tissue expansion was initiated immediately after implantation. The elevation of the reconstructed flap was performed, including defective tissues in the flap, after which the expander was removed and the expanded tissues were transposed. Results. With the help of the techniques developed, it was possible to reduce the mean expansion time from 72 days to 34 (less than half) and to reduce the complications rate from 38.6% to 6.5%. Conclusions. Endoscopic expander implantation, the accelerated technique of tissue expansion, and modified elevation of the expanded flap enabled us to considerably improve results in the treatment of post-burn scar deformities, using the tissue expansion method. PMID:21991107

  18. Management of pediatric perineal and genital burns: twenty-year review.

    PubMed

    Alghanem, A A; McCauley, R L; Robson, M C; Rutan, R L; Herndon, D N

    1990-01-01

    Between 1966 and 1986, fifty-seven pediatric patients with partial and/or full-thickness perineal and genital burns with a minimum of 1-year follow-up were identified. Fifty percent of the patients with genital burns and 20% of the patients with perineal and/or buttock burns required skin grafting in the acute stage. No patient required suprapubic cystostomies, diverting colostomies, or local flap coverage of exposed testicles. Burn scar contractures were the most frequent complications. Thirty-two patients (56%) required contracture release of the perineum and coverage with either skin grafts or local skin flaps. In three patients (6%) contracture required release of the penis and scrotum. One patient lost a testicle. Three patients developed rectal prolapse and were treated without surgery. Four patients developed rectal stenosis with fecal incontinence because of burn scar contracture and were treated by anal dilatation, local transposition flaps, and/or excision of the scar and primary closure. Acute management of pediatric patients with such injuries can be conservative. Delayed complications of contractures of the perineum and genitals can be easily corrected with scar excisions, skin grafts, or the use of local skin flaps.

  19. Spatial and temporal corroboration of a fire-scar-based fire history in a frequently burned ponderosa pine forest.

    PubMed

    Farris, Calvin A; Baisan, Christopher H; Falk, Donald A; Yool, Stephen R; Swetnam, Thomas W

    2010-09-01

    Fire scars are used widely to reconstruct historical fire regime parameters in forests around the world. Because fire scars provide incomplete records of past fire occurrence at discrete points in space, inferences must be made to reconstruct fire frequency and extent across landscapes using spatial networks of fire-scar samples. Assessing the relative accuracy of fire-scar fire history reconstructions has been hampered due to a lack of empirical comparisons with independent fire history data sources. We carried out such a comparison in a 2780-ha ponderosa pine forest on Mica Mountain in southern Arizona (USA) for the time period 1937-2000. Using documentary records of fire perimeter maps and ignition locations, we compared reconstructions of key spatial and temporal fire regime parameters developed from documentary fire maps and independently collected fire-scar data (n = 60 plots). We found that fire-scar data provided spatially representative and complete inventories of all major fire years (> 100 ha) in the study area but failed to detect most small fires. There was a strong linear relationship between the percentage of samples recording fire scars in a given year (i.e., fire-scar synchrony) and total area burned for that year (y = 0.0003x + 0.0087, r2 = 0.96). There was also strong spatial coherence between cumulative fire frequency maps interpolated from fire-scar data and ground-mapped fire perimeters. Widely reported fire frequency summary statistics varied little between fire history data sets: fire-scar natural fire rotations (NFR) differed by < 3 yr from documentary records (29.6 yr); mean fire return intervals (MFI) for large-fire years (i.e., > or = 25% of study area burned) were identical between data sets (25.5 yr); fire-scar MFIs for all fire years differed by 1.2 yr from documentary records. The known seasonal timing of past fires based on documentary records was furthermore reconstructed accurately by observing intra-annual ring position of fire

  20. Reduction of burn scar formation by halofuginone-eluting silicone gel sheets: a controlled study on nude mice.

    PubMed

    Zeplin, Philip H

    2012-03-01

    Burn scar formations can cause disfiguration and loss of dermal function. The purpose of this study was to examine whether application of modified silicone gel sheets with an antifibrotic drug halofuginone-eluting hybrid surface produce an effect on scar development. There were a total of 2 animal groups. The athymic nude mice (nu/nu) of both groups underwent transplantation of full-thickness human skin grafts onto their backs and setting of partial thickness burn injury. The status of local scar development was observed over a period of 3 months after the application of silicone gel sheets and also after application of surface-modified halofuginone-eluting silicone gel sheets. Subsequently, via real-time polymerase chain reaction, the cDNA levels from key mediators of scar formation (transforming growth factor beta, COL1A1, connective tissue growth factor, fibroblast growth factor 2, matrix metalloproteinase 2, matrix metalloproteinase 9) were established and statistically evaluated. In comparison with uncoated silicone gel sheets, the application of halofuginone-eluting silicone gel sheets lead to a significant difference in gene expression activity in scar tissue. Halofuginone-eluting hybrid surface silicone gel sheets significantly increase the antiscarring effect of adhesive silicone gel sheets by deceleration and downregulation of scar development by normalization of the expression activity.

  1. Nanolayered siRNA delivery platforms for local silencing of CTGF reduce cutaneous scar contraction in third-degree burns.

    PubMed

    Castleberry, Steven A; Golberg, Alexander; Sharkh, Malak Abu; Khan, Saiqa; Almquist, Benjamin D; Austen, William G; Yarmush, Martin L; Hammond, Paula T

    2016-07-01

    Wound healing is an incredibly complex biological process that often results in thickened collagen-enriched healed tissue called scar. Cutaneous scars lack many functional structures of the skin such as hair follicles, sweat glands, and papillae. The absence of these structures contributes to a number of the long-term morbidities of wound healing, including loss of function for tissues, increased risk of re-injury, and aesthetic complications. Scar formation is a pervasive factor in our daily lives; however, in the case of serious traumatic injury, scars can create long-lasting complications due to contraction and poor tissue remodeling. Within this report we target the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a key mediator of TGFβ pro-fibrotic response in cutaneous wound healing, with controlled local delivery of RNA interference. Through this work we describe both a thorough in vitro analysis of nanolayer coated sutures for the controlled delivery of siRNA and its application to improve scar outcomes in a third-degree burn induced scar model in rats. We demonstrate that the knockdown of CTGF significantly altered the local expression of αSMA, TIMP1, and Col1a1, which are known to play roles in scar formation. The knockdown of CTGF within the healing burn wounds resulted in improved tissue remodeling, reduced scar contraction, and the regeneration of papillary structures within the healing tissue. This work adds support to a number of previous reports that indicate CTGF as a potential therapeutic target for fibrosis. Additionally, we believe that the controlled local delivery of siRNA from ultrathin polymer coatings described within this work is a promising approach in RNA interference that could be applied in developing improved cancer therapies, regenerative medicine, and fundamental scientific research.

  2. The effects of electroacupuncture on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds in patients with burn scar pain.

    PubMed

    Cuignet, Olivier; Pirlot, A; Ortiz, S; Rose, T

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to observe if the effects of electro-acupuncture (EA) on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds are transposable from the model of heat pain in volunteers to the clinical setting of burn scar pain. After severe burns, pathological burn scars (PPBS) may occur with excruciating pain that respond poorly to treatment and prevent patients from wearing their pressure garments, thereby leading to unesthetic and function-limiting scars. EA might be of greater benefit in terms of analgesia and functional recovery, should it interrupt this vicious circle by counteracting the peripheral hyperalgesia characterizing PPBS. Therefore we enrolled 32 patients (22 males/10 females) aged of 46±11 years with clinical signs of PPBS and of neuropathic pain despite treatment. The study protocol consisted in 3 weekly 30-min sessions of standardized EA with extra individual needles in accordance to Traditional Chinese Medicine, in addition of previous treatments. We assessed VAS for pain and quantitative sensory testing (QST) twice: one week before and one after protocol. QST measured electrical thresholds for non-nociceptive A-beta fibers, nociceptive A-delta and C fibers in 2 dermatomes, respectively from the PPBS and from the contralateral pain-free areas. Based on heat pain studies, EA consisted in sessions at the extremity points of the main meridian flowing through PPBS (0.300s, 5Hz, sub noxious intensity, 15min) and at the bilateral paravertebral points corresponding to the same metameric level, 15min. VAS reduction of 3 points or below 3 on a 10 points scale was considered clinically relevant. Paired t-test compared thresholds (mean [SD]) and Wilcoxon test compared VAS (median [IQR]) pre and after treatment, significant p<0.05. The reduction of VAS for pain reached statistical but not clinical relevance (6.8 [3] vs. 4.5 [3.6]). This was due to a large subgroup of 14 non-responders whose VAS did not change after treatment (6.6 [2.7] vs. 7.2 [3

  3. A new CO2 laser technique for the treatment of pediatric hypertrophic burn scars: An observational study.

    PubMed

    Żądkowski, Tomasz; Nachulewicz, Paweł; Mazgaj, Maciej; Woźniak, Magdalena; Cielecki, Czesław; Wieczorek, Andrzej Paweł; Beń-Skowronek, Iwona

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of hypertrophic scars arising as a result of thermal burns in children is still a big problem. The results of the treatment are not satisfactory for patients and parents, and new methods of treatment are still investigated.We present the use of one of the most modern carbon dioxide (CO2) lasers (Lumenis Encore laser equipped with a Synergistic Coagulation and Ablation for Advanced Resurfacing module) in the treatment of hypertrophic scars in children after burns.From March to April of 2013, a group of 47 patients aged 6 to 16 years underwent 57 laser surgery treatments. The average time from accident was 7.5 years. The results of treatment were investigated in 114 areas. The assessed areas were divided into 2 groups: 9-cm area 1, where the thickness of the scar measured by physician was the lowest and 9-cm area 2, where the thickness of the scar was the biggest. The results were considered on the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) independently by the surgeon and by parents 1, 4, and 8 months after the procedure. In addition, ultrasound evaluation of the scar thickness before and after laser procedure was made.VSS total score improved in all areas assessed by both the physician and parents. The biggest change in total VSS score in area 1 in the evaluation of the investigator was obtained at follow-up after the 1st month of treatment (average 7.23 points before and 5.18 points after the 1st month after surgery-a difference of 2.05 points). Scar ratings by parents and the physician did not differ statistically (P < 0.05). In the ultrasound assessment, the improvement was statistically significant, more frequently for both minimum and maximum thickness of the scars (B-mode measures) (P < 0.05).The use of a CO2 laser in the treatment of hypertrophic scars in children is an effective and safe method. The use of a CO2 laser improves the appearance and morphology of scarring assessed using the VSS by both the parents and the physician. The treatment also reduced

  4. Living with burn scars caused by self-immolation among women in Iraqi Kurdistan: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Mirlashari, Jila; Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht; Amin, Pakestan Mohammad

    2017-03-01

    Patients with burns have to live with a variety of long-term physical and psychosocial consequences. Burns lead to prolonged hospital stay, disfiguring scars, disability, and even death. Since self-immolation is common in women of Iraqi Kurdistan, the present study sought to explore the experiences of women living with scars caused by self-immolation. This paper was part of a qualitative research study. A purposive sample of 18 female self-immolation survivors from Iraqi Kurdistan was selected, and 21 individual interviews were conducted and analyzed using conventional content analysis. Four categories emerged during the data analysis: (1) feelings of disbelief, regret, and anger caused by post-burn scars; (2) desperately seeking solutions; (3) grief due to disappointment and surrender to despair; and (4) rejection and isolation. In conclusion, individuals with scars and disfigurements sometimes adopted inappropriate measures to deal with the psychological problems caused by others' behaviors and wrong perceptions. Educational and support programs are hence indicated to promote awareness levels of self-immolation survivors, their families, and the whole society.

  5. Derivation of Burn Scar Depths with Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) in Indonesian Peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballhorn, U.; Siegert, F.

    2009-04-01

    more CO2 per year than the fourth-largest industrial nation, Germany, saved to achieve its Kyoto target. Since 1990, emissions from peat burning and peat decomposition have exceeded that of above ground biomass deforestation. These numbers show how important it is to have more accurate estimations for peat burn depth in the future. Until now few field measurements were made, which would require to know the fire affected area in advance or ignite peatland on purpose. Furthermore fire scars are quickly covered by regenerating vegetation. Another problem is the lack of a method without actually having to go into the field (e.g. through remote sensing techniques), due to the fact that many of the fire locations are remote and very difficult to access. We investigated if airborne light detection and ranging (LIDAR), an active laser pulse technology by which the height of objects can be precisely measured, can be used to determine the amount of peat burned during a fire event. From a LIDAR data set acquired in Central Kalimantan, Borneo, in 2007, one year after severe fires resulting from the 2006 El Niño drought, we calculated that the average depth of a burn scar was 0.30 ± 0.15 m .This was achieved through the construction of digital terrain models (DTMs) by interpolating the LIDAR ground return signals in burnt and adjacent unburned peatland. These calculated depths were compared to in situ measurements, which came to similar results. We believe that the method presented here to estimate burnt peat depth has the potential to considerably improve the accuracy of regional and global carbon emission models but would also be helpful for monitoring projects under the Kyoto Protocol like the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) or the proposed Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) mechanism.

  6. Derivation of burn scar depths and estimation of carbon emissions with LIDAR in Indonesian peatlands

    PubMed Central

    Ballhorn, Uwe; Siegert, Florian; Mason, Mike; Limin, Suwido

    2009-01-01

    During the 1997/98 El Niño-induced drought peatland fires in Indonesia may have released 13–40% of the mean annual global carbon emissions from fossil fuels. One major unknown in current peatland emission estimations is how much peat is combusted by fire. Using a light detection and ranging data set acquired in Central Kalimantan, Borneo, in 2007, one year after the severe peatland fires of 2006, we determined an average burn scar depth of 0.33 ± 0.18 m. Based on this result and the burned area determined from satellite imagery, we estimate that within the 2.79 million hectare study area 49.15 ± 26.81 megatons of carbon were released during the 2006 El Niño episode. This represents 10–33% of all carbon emissions from transport for the European Community in the year 2006. These emissions, originating from a comparatively small area (approximately 13% of the Indonesian peatland area), underline the importance of peat fires in the context of green house gas emissions and global warming. In the past decade severe peat fires occurred during El Niño-induced droughts in 1997, 2002, 2004, 2006, and 2009. Currently, this important source of carbon emissions is not included in IPCC carbon accounting or in regional and global carbon emission models. Precise spatial measurements of peat combusted and potential avoided emissions in tropical peat swamp forests will also be required for future emission trading schemes in the framework of Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation in developing countries. PMID:19940252

  7. Physical rehabilitation of pediatric burns

    PubMed Central

    Atiyeh, B.; Janom, H.H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Significant improvements have been made in the acute treatment of pediatric burn injuries over the past 3 decades which have significantly decreased mortality. Each year, more burned children are necessitating serious medical attention during their convalescence. For children with serious consequences resulting from burns that can persist from childhood through adolescence into adulthood, the value of long-term rehabilitation cannot be over stated. Burn injury management should not focus only on the immediate treatment. Long-term functional outcome and the required rehabilitation that burn victims must go through should be given equal if not more attention. The present is a review of the available modalities utilized for the physical rehabilitation of convalescent pediatric burns in order to overcome the catabolic state, improve muscle power and fitness, reduce disfiguring scars and prevent contractures. PMID:25249846

  8. Physical rehabilitation of pediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, B; Janom, H H

    2014-03-31

    Significant improvements have been made in the acute treatment of pediatric burn injuries over the past 3 decades which have significantly decreased mortality. Each year, more burned children are necessitating serious medical attention during their convalescence. For children with serious consequences resulting from burns that can persist from childhood through adolescence into adulthood, the value of long-term rehabilitation cannot be over stated. Burn injury management should not focus only on the immediate treatment. Long-term functional outcome and the required rehabilitation that burn victims must go through should be given equal if not more attention. The present is a review of the available modalities utilized for the physical rehabilitation of convalescent pediatric burns in order to overcome the catabolic state, improve muscle power and fitness, reduce disfiguring scars and prevent contractures.

  9. Treatment of split-thickness skin graft-related forearm scar contractures with a carbon dioxide laser protocol: 3 case reports.

    PubMed

    Kroonen, Leo; Shumaker, Peter R; Kwan, Julia M; Uebelhoer, Nathan; Hofmeister, Eric

    2013-11-01

    Split-thickness skin grafts in the forearm can lead to motion restriction and disability through the dense scarring of the skin and formation of graft-tendon adhesions. Three patients were referred for laser treatment of motion-limiting scar-associated split-thickness skin grafts to the forearm. All patients had reached a plateau in range of motion despite aggressive hand therapy and underwent serial laser scar treatments at 6- to 8-week intervals. Treatments were performed in a clinic setting and were initiated 2 to 5 months after reconstructive surgery. Rapid subjective functional and objective improvements in range of motion were noted after laser therapy. Results were cumulative and durable at final follow-up ranging from 10 to 15 months after the initial treatment. No complications were noted. Fractionated carbon dioxide laser therapy is a promising adjunct to hand therapy when the main restraint to motion is superficial skin scarring and skin-tendon adhesions.

  10. Combination of medical needling and non-cultured autologous skin cell transplantation (renovacell) for repigmentation of hypopigmented burn scars in children and young people

    PubMed Central

    Busch, K.H.; Bender, R.; Walezko, N.; Aziz, H.; Altintas, M.A.; Aust, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Burn scars remain a serious physical and psychological problem for the affected. Clinical studies as well as basic scientific research have shown that Medical Needling can significantly increase the quality of burn scars with comparatively low risk and stress for the patient with regards to skin elasticity, moisture, erythema and transepidermal water loss. However, Medical Needling has no influence on repigmentation of large hypopigmented scars. The goal is to evaluate whether both established methods – Needling (improvement of scar quality) and ReNovaCell (repigmentation) – can be combined. So far, eight patients with mean age of 20 years (6-28 years) with deep second and third degree burn scars have been treated. The average treated tissue surface was 76cm² (15-250cm²) and was focused on areas like face, neck, chest and arm. Medical Needling is performed using a roller covered with 3mm long needles. The roller is vertically, horizontally and diagonally rolled over the scar, inducing microtrauma. Then, non-cultured autologous skin cell suspension (ReNovaCell) is applied, according to the known protocol. The patients were followed 12 months postoperatively. Pigmentation changes were measured objectively, and with patient and observer ratings. Patient satisfaction/preference was also obtained. We present the final study results. Taken together, pigmentation ratings and objective measures indicate improvement in six of the study participants. Melanin increase seen 12 months after ReNovaCell treatment in the study group as a whole is notable. Medical Needling in combination with ReNovaCell shows promise for repigmentation of burn scars. PMID:28149233

  11. Combination of medical needling and non-cultured autologous skin cell transplantation (renovacell) for repigmentation of hypopigmented burn scars in children and young people.

    PubMed

    Busch, K H; Bender, R; Walezko, N; Aziz, H; Altintas, M A; Aust, M C

    2016-06-30

    Burn scars remain a serious physical and psychological problem for the affected. Clinical studies as well as basic scientific research have shown that Medical Needling can significantly increase the quality of burn scars with comparatively low risk and stress for the patient with regards to skin elasticity, moisture, erythema and transepidermal water loss. However, Medical Needling has no influence on repigmentation of large hypopigmented scars. The goal is to evaluate whether both established methods - Needling (improvement of scar quality) and ReNovaCell (repigmentation) - can be combined. So far, eight patients with mean age of 20 years (6-28 years) with deep second and third degree burn scars have been treated. The average treated tissue surface was 76cm² (15-250cm²) and was focused on areas like face, neck, chest and arm. Medical Needling is performed using a roller covered with 3mm long needles. The roller is vertically, horizontally and diagonally rolled over the scar, inducing microtrauma. Then, non-cultured autologous skin cell suspension (ReNovaCell) is applied, according to the known protocol. The patients were followed 12 months postoperatively. Pigmentation changes were measured objectively, and with patient and observer ratings. Patient satisfaction/preference was also obtained. We present the final study results. Taken together, pigmentation ratings and objective measures indicate improvement in six of the study participants. Melanin increase seen 12 months after ReNovaCell treatment in the study group as a whole is notable. Medical Needling in combination with ReNovaCell shows promise for repigmentation of burn scars.

  12. Rehabilitation of the burn patient

    PubMed Central

    Procter, Fiona

    2010-01-01

    Rehabilitation is an essential and integral part of burn treatment. It is not something which takes place following healing of skin grafts or discharge from hospital; instead it is a process that starts from day one of admission and continues for months and sometimes years after the initial event. Burns rehabilitation is not something which is completed by one or two individuals but should be a team approach, incorporating the patient and when appropriate, their family. The term ‘Burns Rehabilitation’ incorporates the physical, psychological and social aspects of care and it is common for burn patients to experience difficulties in one or all of these areas following a burn injury. Burns can leave a patient with severely debilitating and deforming contractures, which can lead to significant disability when left untreated. The aims of burn rehabilitation are to minimise the adverse effects caused by the injury in terms of maintaining range of movement, minimising contracture development and impact of scarring, maximising functional ability, maximising psychological wellbeing, maximising social integration PMID:21321643

  13. In vivo label-free lymphangiography of cutaneous lymphatic vessels in human burn scars using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Peijun; Es’haghian, Shaghayegh; Harms, Karl-Anton; Murray, Alexandra; Rea, Suzanne; Wood, Fiona M.; Sampson, David D.; McLaughlin, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    We present an automated, label-free method for lymphangiography of cutaneous lymphatic vessels in humans in vivo using optical coherence tomography (OCT). This method corrects for the variation in OCT signal due to the confocal function and sensitivity fall-off of a spectral-domain OCT system and utilizes a single-scattering model to compensate for A-scan signal attenuation to enable reliable thresholding of lymphatic vessels. A segment-joining algorithm is then incorporated into the method to mitigate partial-volume effects with small vessels. The lymphatic vessel images are augmented with images of the blood vessel network, acquired from the speckle decorrelation with additional weighting to differentiate blood vessels from the observed high decorrelation in lymphatic vessels. We demonstrate the method with longitudinal scans of human burn scar patients undergoing ablative fractional laser treatment, showing the visualization of the cutaneous lymphatic and blood vessel networks. PMID:28018713

  14. In vivo label-free lymphangiography of cutaneous lymphatic vessels in human burn scars using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Gong, Peijun; Es'haghian, Shaghayegh; Harms, Karl-Anton; Murray, Alexandra; Rea, Suzanne; Wood, Fiona M; Sampson, David D; McLaughlin, Robert A

    2016-12-01

    We present an automated, label-free method for lymphangiography of cutaneous lymphatic vessels in humans in vivo using optical coherence tomography (OCT). This method corrects for the variation in OCT signal due to the confocal function and sensitivity fall-off of a spectral-domain OCT system and utilizes a single-scattering model to compensate for A-scan signal attenuation to enable reliable thresholding of lymphatic vessels. A segment-joining algorithm is then incorporated into the method to mitigate partial-volume effects with small vessels. The lymphatic vessel images are augmented with images of the blood vessel network, acquired from the speckle decorrelation with additional weighting to differentiate blood vessels from the observed high decorrelation in lymphatic vessels. We demonstrate the method with longitudinal scans of human burn scar patients undergoing ablative fractional laser treatment, showing the visualization of the cutaneous lymphatic and blood vessel networks.

  15. MiR-1908 promotes scar formation post-burn wound healing by suppressing Ski-mediated inflammation and fibroblast proliferation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chunhui; Shi, Kai; Zhang, Xi; Zhao, Jingchun; Yu, Jiaao

    2016-11-01

    The cell biological basis for scar formation is mainly via excessive fibroblast proliferation accompanied by hypernomic Col I accumulation and inflammation. The role of miR-1908 in scar formation has not been investigated. In this study, we found that miR-1908 expression was inversely associated with the scar suppressor Ski in normal, burn-wounded, healing and scar dermal tissues in humans. Bioinformatics and luciferase reporter gene assays confirmed that miR-1908 targeted the 3'UTR region of Ski mRNA and suppressed Ski expression. Next, human scar epidermal fibroblasts were isolated and the miR-1908 oligonucleotide mimic and inhibitor were respectively transfected into the cells. Western blot analysis proved that Ski expression was sharply reduced by the miR-1908 mimic. MTT and Cell Counting Kit-8 analyses showed that miR-1908 mimic transfection promoted cell proliferation. Simultaneously, data on real-time qPCR analysis indicated that expression of the fibrotic master gene TGF-β1, Ski-suppressing gene Meox2, Col I and proinflammatory markers IL-1α and TNF-α, were all significantly upregulated. In contrast, the miR-1908 inhibitor had a completely opposite effect on cell proliferation and gene expression. The mimic and inhibitor were locally injected into rats with abdominal burn-wounded scars during a 180-day, post-healing experiment. The miR-1908 mimic injection significantly reduced Ski expression, as well as the area, volume and fibrosis of scars in vivo. And, in contrast, the miR-1908 inhibitor injection had an opposite effect to that of the miR-1908 mimic injection. In conclusion, miR-1908 had a positive role in scar formation by suppressing Ski-mediated inflammation and fibroblast proliferation in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Epidemiology of skin cancer arisen from the burn scars in Nigerian Ibos.

    PubMed

    Onuigbo, Wilson I B

    2006-08-01

    During the period 20 February 1970-19 February 2000, burns resulting in squamous cell carcinoma of the skin were documented by using a histopathology data pool of surgical specimens kept by the author as regards his Ibos ethnic group in Nigeria, West Africa. There were 21 cases. The males outnumbered the females in the ratio of 3:1. The youngest patient was aged 8 years and the oldest 75 years (mean age 39 years). Most of the antecedent injuries occurred during childhood. The two etiologic agents of albinism and burns were combined in one patient while another rarity was the presentation of the cancer within keloids. In conclusion, in dark skinned races, research should be directed on the comparative role of burns in predisposing to squamous cell carcinoma in individuals whose skin is compromised by either albinism or keloids.

  17. Burn Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Programs - Fire and Burn Prevention - - Fire Safe Kids - - Senior Smoke Alarm Program - - National Scald Campaign - - Community Services - Burn Survivor Support - - Camp Beyond the Scars - - Retreats - - Burn Survivor & Caregiver Support Groups - - Scholarship Program - - Emergency Needs & Special Assistance Fund - - Red ...

  18. Silk fibroin/gelatin electrospun nanofibrous dressing functionalized with astragaloside IV induces healing and anti-scar effects on burn wound.

    PubMed

    Shan, Ying-Hui; Peng, Li-Hua; Liu, Xin; Chen, Xi; Xiong, Jie; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2015-02-20

    Functional wound dressing has provided new challenges for researchers who focus on burn to improve skin graft quality, reduce scarring, and develop a pluristratified dermal or epidermal construct of a burn wound. This study aimed to investigate the effect of a silk fibroin/gelatin (SF/GT) electrospun nanofibrous dressing loaded with astragaloside IV (AS) on deep partial-thickness burn wound. AS-loaded SF/GT-blended nanofibrous dressing was prepared by electrospinning nanotechnology. The optimal ratio (25:75) of silk fibroin to gelatin was further optimized by evaluating ATR-FTIR characteristics, mechanical properties, porosity, swelling rate, degradation, and release profile of the AS-loaded SF/GT nanofibrous dressing. In contrast to the blank control, the AS-loaded SF/GT nanofibrous dressing promoted cell adhesion and proliferation with good biocompatibility in vitro (p<0.01). This dressing also accelerated wound healing and inhibited scar formation in vivo by stimulating wound closure (p<0.05), increasing angiogenesis, regulating newly formed types of collagen, and improving collagen organization. These results showed that SF/GT nanofibrous dressing is a promising topical drug delivery system. Furthermore, AS-functionalized SF/GT nanofibrous dressing is an excellent topical therapeutic that could be applied to promote healing and elicit anti-scar effects on partial-thickness burn wound.

  19. A fully automatic processing chain to produce Burn Scar Mapping products, using the full Landsat archive over Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontoes, Charalampos; Papoutsis, Ioannis; Herekakis, Themistoklis; Michail, Dimitrios; Ieronymidi, Emmanuela

    2013-04-01

    Remote sensing tools for the accurate, robust and timely assessment of the damages inflicted by forest wildfires provide information that is of paramount importance to public environmental agencies and related stakeholders before, during and after the crisis. The Institute for Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote Sensing of the National Observatory of Athens (IAASARS/NOA) has developed a fully automatic single and/or multi date processing chain that takes as input archived Landsat 4, 5 or 7 raw images and produces precise diachronic burnt area polygons and damage assessments over the Greek territory. The methodology consists of three fully automatic stages: 1) the pre-processing stage where the metadata of the raw images are extracted, followed by the application of the LEDAPS software platform for calibration and mask production and the Automated Precise Orthorectification Package, developed by NASA, for image geo-registration and orthorectification, 2) the core-BSM (Burn Scar Mapping) processing stage which incorporates a published classification algorithm based on a series of physical indexes, the application of two filters for noise removal using graph-based techniques and the grouping of pixels classified as burnt to form the appropriate pixels clusters before proceeding to conversion from raster to vector, and 3) the post-processing stage where the products are thematically refined and enriched using auxiliary GIS layers (underlying land cover/use, administrative boundaries, etc.) and human logic/evidence to suppress false alarms and omission errors. The established processing chain has been successfully applied to the entire archive of Landsat imagery over Greece spanning from 1984 to 2012, which has been collected and managed in IAASARS/NOA. The number of full Landsat frames that were subject of process in the framework of the study was 415. These burn scar mapping products are generated for the first time to such a temporal and spatial

  20. Reconstruction of severe hand contractures: An illustrative series

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, S. C.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: An overview of a series of severe burn contractures in 44 hands reconstructed over a 20 month period with an easy to follow algorithm. Settings and Design: The series was carried out by a single surgeon at Green Pastures Rehabilitation Centre in Pokhara, Nepal. All patients attending with severe burn contractures to the hand were included in the series. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective review of burn contractures in a total of 44 hands. All the contractures involved limitation of movement by 60 degrees in two or more joints or by 80 degrees in one joint. The decision making process is presented as a flow chart indicating when and which flaps were used. Results: Illustrations demonstrate what was achieved, with all hands obtaining an improvement in function. Conclusions: Although many of these contractures can be dealt with by skin grafting the series clearly illustrates the indications for flap coverage. PMID:21713162

  1. A modern method of treatment: The role of silver dressings in promoting healing and preventing pathological scarring in patients with burn wounds

    PubMed Central

    Munteanu, A; Florescu, IP; Nitescu, C

    2016-01-01

    Burn wounds are a global public health problem, which affects all countries, no matter the development stage and occurs in all age groups, from toddlers to elderly. In spite of burns being the cause of numerous household and work accidents, there are still no clear stated unanimous rules for their treatment. Every day new products appear on the market, each of them trying to prove more effective. Since ancient times, silver has been known for its antimicrobial properties, so it has been used for a long time in the treatment of burns and other types of wounds. One of the relatively modern methods of treatment is applying silver sheets on the scald lesions. In this paper, which was part of a larger study (research for a PhD thesis), concerning prevention and treatment of the post-burn pathological scars, the cases of some patients with burns, who were treated by using the above mentioned method were presented and analyzed. The results obtained by applying silver sheets were then commented and interpreted, pointing out the advantages and disadvantages compared to silver sulfadiazine creams and ointments, which have already been used at a large scale. The prevention and treatment of post-burn pathological (hypertrophic and keloid) scars is a field in which still little is known and in which there are also no clearly set therapy plans. We hope that through this research and the following ones we will manage to establish some major guidelines concerning the prevention of pathological scars, which are not only disabling, but also a major aesthetic issue for any patient, in order to obtain better outcomes. PMID:27974941

  2. A modern method of treatment: The role of silver dressings in promoting healing and preventing pathological scarring in patients with burn wounds.

    PubMed

    A, Munteanu; Ip, Florescu; C, Nitescu

    2016-01-01

    Burn wounds are a global public health problem, which affects all countries, no matter the development stage and occurs in all age groups, from toddlers to elderly. In spite of burns being the cause of numerous household and work accidents, there are still no clear stated unanimous rules for their treatment. Every day new products appear on the market, each of them trying to prove more effective. Since ancient times, silver has been known for its antimicrobial properties, so it has been used for a long time in the treatment of burns and other types of wounds. One of the relatively modern methods of treatment is applying silver sheets on the scald lesions. In this paper, which was part of a larger study (research for a PhD thesis), concerning prevention and treatment of the post-burn pathological scars, the cases of some patients with burns, who were treated by using the above mentioned method were presented and analyzed. The results obtained by applying silver sheets were then commented and interpreted, pointing out the advantages and disadvantages compared to silver sulfadiazine creams and ointments, which have already been used at a large scale. The prevention and treatment of post-burn pathological (hypertrophic and keloid) scars is a field in which still little is known and in which there are also no clearly set therapy plans. We hope that through this research and the following ones we will manage to establish some major guidelines concerning the prevention of pathological scars, which are not only disabling, but also a major aesthetic issue for any patient, in order to obtain better outcomes.

  3. Estimation of aerosol transport from biomass burning areas during the SCAR-B experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trosnikov, Igor V.; Nobre, Carlos A.

    1998-12-01

    A transport model for the estimation of tracers spreading from biomass burning areas has been developed on the basis of the semi-Lagrangian technique. The model consists of a three-dimensional Lagrangian form transport equation for tracers and uses the quasi-monotone local cubic-spline interpolation for calculation of unknown values at irregular points. A mass-conserving property of the model is based on the flux-corrected transport method using the algorithm of Priestley. The transport of the smoke particles from Amazonia was simulated for the period from August 20 to 29, 1995. During this period the air mass located below 2 km moved to the south and carried the smoke particles until 30°S.

  4. Mechanobiology of scarring.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Rei

    2011-09-01

    The mechanophysiological conditions of injured skin greatly influence the degree of scar formation, scar contracture, and abnormal scar progression/generation (e.g., keloids and hypertrophic scars). It is important that scar mechanobiology be understood from the perspective of the extracellular matrix and extracellular fluid, in order to analyze mechanotransduction pathways and develop new strategies for scar prevention and treatment. Mechanical forces such as stretching tension, shear force, scratch, compression, hydrostatic pressure, and osmotic pressure can be perceived by two types of skin receptors. These include cellular mechanoreceptors/mechanosensors, such as cytoskeleton (e.g., actin filaments), cell adhesion molecules (e.g., integrin), and mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels (e.g., Ca(2+) channel), and sensory nerve fibers (e.g., MS nociceptors) that produce the somatic sensation of mechanical force. Mechanical stimuli are received by MS nociceptors and signals are transmitted to the dorsal root ganglia that contain neuronal cell bodies in the afferent spinal nerves. Neuropeptides are thereby released from the peripheral terminals of the primary afferent sensory neurons in the skin, modulating scarring via skin and immune cell functions (e.g., cell proliferation, cytokine production, antigen presentation, sensory neurotransmission, mast cell degradation, vasodilation, and increased vascular permeability under physiological or pathophysiological conditions). Mechanoreceptor or MS nociceptor inhibition and mechanical force reduction should propel the development of novel methods for scar prevention and treatment.

  5. California Burn Scars

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... The images were created by displaying red, near-infrared and green spectral band data from MISR's nadir (downward-looking) camera as red, ... x 162 kilometers and use data from blocks 63 to 64 within World Reference System-2 path 41. MISR was built and is managed by NASA's ...

  6. Forty-Year Follow-up of Full-Thickness Skin Graft After Thermal Burn Injury to the Volar Hand

    PubMed Central

    Kasdan, Morton L.; Wilhelmi, Bradon J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The hands are commonly affected in severe thermal burn injuries. Resulting contractures lead to significant loss of function. Burn contracture release and skin grafting are necessary to restore hand function. We report a case in which surgical reconstruction of a volar hand burn was performed with full-thickness skin grafting. The patient had a 40-year follow-up to assess the function and cosmesis of the repaired hand. Methods: We report a case in which a 15-month-old boy presented after receiving third-degree burns to the left volar hand, including the flexural aspects of the index, long, and ring fingers by placing it on a hot kitchen stove burner. The patient subsequently underwent scar contracture release and full-thickness skin grafting. Results: Eleven years after reconstruction, further contractures developed associated with the patient's growth, which were reconstructed with repeat full-thickness skin graft from the inguinal region. No recurrence was witnessed afterward and 40 years after initial injury, the patient maintains full activities of daily living and use of his hand in his occupation. Conclusions: There is debate regarding the superiority of split-thickness versus full-thickness grafts during reconstruction. Our case strengthens the argument for durability of a full-thickness skin graft following thermal burn injury. PMID:27555888

  7. [Unusual breast scars].

    PubMed

    Petit, F; Divaris, M; Guilbert, F

    1999-12-01

    The authors report the case of an unusual form of skin tattoo, discovered on the breasts of a young woman, corresponding to several scars forming a symbolic image, performed deliberately with a burning object. This form of mutilation is called "branding". Imported from England, it is developing in France as a result of fashion, but its followers could one day regret the permanent scars left by this deep burn.

  8. Assessing the Potential Impact of the 2015-2016 El Niño on the California Rim Fire Burn Scar Through Debris Flow Hazard Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larcom, S.; Grigsby, S.; Ustin, S.

    2015-12-01

    Wildfires are a perennial issue for California, and the current record-breaking drought is exacerbating the potential problems for the state. Fires leave behind burn scars characterized by diminished vegetative cover and abundant bare soil, and these areas are especially susceptible to storm events that pose an elevated risk of debris flows and sediment-rich sheet wash. This study focused on the 2013 Rim Fire that devastated significant portions of Stanislaus National Forest and Yosemite National Park, and utilized readily available NASA JPL SRTM elevation data and AVIRIS spectral imaging data to construct a debris flow hazard map that assesses mass wasting risk for the Rim Fire burn scar. This study consisted entirely of remotely sensed data, which was processed in software programs such as ENVI, GRASS GIS, ArcMap, and Google Earth. Parameters that were taken into consideration when constructing this map include hill slope (greater than 30 percent rise), burn severity (assessed by calculating NDVI), and erodibility of the soil (by comparing spectral reflectance of AVIRIS images with the reference spectra of illite). By calculating percent of total burn area, 6% was classified as low risk, 55% as medium risk, and 39% as high risk. In addition, this study assessed the importance of the 2015-2016 El Niño, which is projected to be one of the strongest on record, by studying historic rainfall records and storm events of past El Niño's. Hydrological and infrastructural problems that could be caused by short-term convective or long-term synoptic storms and subsequent debris flows were explored as well.

  9. Experience with corrective surgery for postburn contractures in Mumbai, India.

    PubMed

    Kim, Francis S; Tran, Huong H; Sinha, Indranil; Patel, Anup; Nelson, Rebecca A; Pandya, Ankur N; Keswani, Sunil; Watkins, James F

    2012-01-01

    Postburn contracture is a source of significant morbidity in India, even though its occurrence can be reduced significantly by comprehensive postburn injury care, including surgical intervention. This study investigates whether limited access to initial medical care after burn injury has been associated with increased contracture formation among lower socioeconomic class patients in Mumbai, India. During a surgical mission in Mumbai, India, patients presenting with functionally debilitating burn contractures and minimal income were surveyed for initial care received immediately after burn injury. The survey consisted of questions regarding the history of burn injury and details of any initial treatment. Demographic data were collected by chart review. Thirty-eight patients from the state of Maharashtra participated in the study (mean age 28.1 years). The most common etiology of burn injury was from kerosene stove blasts (74%), and the most common morbidities were contractures of the neck and upper extremity. On average, time elapsed since the original injury was 2.8 years. Nearly all patients sought initial medical care at hospitals (97%) with the majority receiving only dressing changes for their full-thickness or deep-dermal burns (61%). The most common reason for not seeking out delayed burn reconstruction was perceived cost (65%). Ultimately, 60 operations were performed, of which 9 (15%) developed postsurgical complications. These data suggest that a subset of lower socioeconomic class burn patients in Maharashtra received suboptimal initial intervention. Comprehensive initial therapy after burn injury may provide better outcomes and limit the number of patients requiring delayed reconstruction.

  10. In-vivo cutaneous burn characterization and scar assay with multi-functional optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bumju; Yoon, Yeorum; Le, Viet-Hoan; Yoon, Calvin J.; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-03-01

    Research about the cutaneous burn was separated by assessment of burn depth and development of wound healing therapy. Various in vivo optical techniques were used to determined burn depth and observe the wound healing process. In this paper, we report the usage of multimodal optical coherence tomography system, which containing angiographic and polarization sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) with conventional OCT system, at burn studies. Burn was induced at 4 different degrees by control the attachment time of 75 Celsius degree heated brass rod at dorsal skin of the rat. For the burn depth assessment, we imaged the different burn degrees area. Changes of polarization sensitive signal were providing burn depth information. To see the wound healing process, each wound area imaged at long period. Conventional OCT shows the structural information about the tissue, like layer and hair follicle. Angiographic OCT provides vascular distribution and diameter of blood vessel information and PS-OCT shows birefringence tissue information. Based on the multimodal OCT data, burn depth assessment were well matched with burn induced time and wound healing process was consistent with previous wound healing report. Therefore, the multimodal OCT holds potential for burn study.

  11. Study on Surgical Management of Post Burn Hand Deformities

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Firdos; Jash, Prabir Kumar; Gupta, Madhumita; Suba, Santanu

    2015-01-01

    Context Functionality of the hands is the major determinants of the quality of life in burns survivors. If contractures or scarring affect the dominant hand, as they do on most occasions, the vocation and there by the economic status of the patient suffer. Aim The aim of this study is to evaluate the different surgical procedures for resurfacing after release of post-burn hand contractures in terms of functional recovery and aesthetic outcome. Settings and Design It’s a prospective, non-randomised study of 50 patients admitted and undergoing surgical reconstructive procedures for post burn hand contractures in our plastic surgery department. Materials and Methods Resurfacing procedures were done according to type of contracture with individualisation for each case. All cases were followed up with physiotherapy and splinting advices. Functional and aesthetic outcome and recurrence of contracture for each procedure was noted at 6 months. Results Forty seven percent of the cases were reconstructed with skin grafting, 30% cases with Z plasties and 23% with flap coverage. Split thickness skin grafts (STSG) and full thickness graft (FTSG) reconstructed cases had good recovery of joint mobility in 43% and 75% of cases respectively. Reconstructive procedures were aesthetically acceptable to the patients in 63%, 75% and 94% of STSG, FTSG and Z plasty cases respectively. Recurrence was seen in 17% of STSG done cases. Conclusion Most of the cases can be resurfaced with skin grafting and few cases have clear indication for flap coverage which needs to be planned and executed cautiously. Z plasties with proper planning gives maximum length gain with no donor morbidity as other procedures. Postoperative physiotherapy and splinting is must for better outcome in all cases. PMID:26435994

  12. The effectiveness of pressure therapy (15–25 mmHg) for hypertrophic burn scars: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Jin-Wei; Liu, Jiang-tao; Pei, Sheng-Duo; Liu, Yu; Li, De-Sheng; Lin, Hong-ming; Pei, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Although pressure therapy (PT) represents the standard care for prevention and treatment of hypertrophic scar (HS) from burns, its practice is largely based on empirical evidence and its effectiveness remains controversial. To clarify the effect of PT (15–25 mmHg) for HS, we performed the systematic review and meta-analysis. Several electronic databases were screened to identify related randomized controlled trials (RCTs). 12 RCTs involving 710 patients with 761 HS resulting from burn injuries were included. Compared with non/low-PT, cases treated with PT (15–25 mmHg) showed significant differences in Vancouver Scar Scale score (MD = −0.58, 95% CI = −0.78–−0.37), thickness (SMD = −0.25, 95% CI = −0.40–−0.11), brightness (MD = 2.00, 95% CI = 0.59–3.42), redness (MD = −0.79, 95% CI = −1.52–−0.07), pigmentation (MD = −0.16, 95% CI = −0.32–−0.00) and hardness (SMD = −0.65, 95% CI = −1.07–−0.23). However, there was no difference in vascularity (MD = 0.03, 95% CI = −0.43–0.48). Our analysis indicated that patients with HS who were managed with PT (15–25 mmHg) showed significant improvements. Due to limitations, more large and well-designed studies are needed to confirm our findings and the side-effects of the PT may also need to be evaluated. PMID:28054644

  13. Scarring, stem cells, scaffolds and skin repair.

    PubMed

    Markeson, Daniel; Pleat, Jonathon M; Sharpe, Justin R; Harris, Adrian L; Seifalian, Alexander M; Watt, Suzanne M

    2015-06-01

    The treatment of full thickness skin loss, which can be extensive in the case of large burns, continues to represent a challenging clinical entity. This is due to an on-going inability to produce a suitable tissue engineered substrate that can satisfactorily replicate the epidermal and dermal in vivo niches to fulfil both aesthetic and functional demands. The current gold standard treatment of autologous skin grafting is inadequate because of poor textural durability, scarring and associated contracture, and because of a paucity of donor sites in larger burns. Tissue engineering has seen exponential growth in recent years with a number of 'off-the-shelf' dermal and epidermal substitutes now available. Each has its own limitations. In this review, we examine normal wound repair in relation to stem/progenitor cells that are intimately involved in this process within the dermal niche. Endothelial precursors, in particular, are examined closely and their phenotype, morphology and enrichment from multiple sources are described in an attempt to provide some clarity regarding the controversy surrounding their classification and role in vasculogenesis. We also review the role of the next generation of cellularized scaffolds and smart biomaterials that attempt to improve the revascularisation of artificial grafts, the rate of wound healing and the final cosmetic and functional outcome.

  14. Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... if signs of infection develop. These signs include: Drainage or pus from the burned skin Fever Increased pain Red streaks spreading from the burn Swollen lymph nodes Also call a provider right away if ...

  15. Joint Contracture Orthosis (JCO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunsford, Thomas R.; Parsons, Ken; Krouskop, Thomas; McGee, Kevin

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop an advanced orthosis which is effective in reducing upper and lower limb contractures in significantly less time than currently required with conventional methods. The team that developed the JCO consisted of an engineer, orthotist, therapist, and physician.

  16. Avoiding unfavorable results in postburn contracture hand

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Sameek

    2013-01-01

    Deformities of the hands are a fairly common sequel of burn especially in the developing world. This is because of high incidence of burns, limited access to standard treatment and rehabilitation. The best outcome of a burnt hand is when deformities are prevented from developing. A good functional result is possible when due consideration is paid to hands during resuscitation, excisional surgery, reconstructive surgery and physiotherapy. The post-burns deformities of hand develop due direct thermal damage or secondary to intrinsic minus position due to oedema or vascular insufficiency. During the acute phase the concerns are, maintenance circulation minimize oedema prevent unphysiological positioning and wound closure with autogenous tissue as soon as possible. The rehabilitation program during the acute phase starts from day one and goes on till the hand has healed and has regained full range of motion. Full blown hand contractures are challenging to correct and become more difficult as time passes. Long-standing cases often land up with attenuation of extensor apparatus leading to swan neck and boutonniere deformity, muscle shortening and bony ankylosis. The major and most common pitfall after contracture release is relapse. The treatment protocol of contracture is solely directed towards countering this tendency. This article aims to guide a surgeon in obtaining optimal hand function and avoid pit falls at different stages of management of hand burns. The reasons of an unfavourable outcome of a burnt hand are possible lack of optimal care in the acute phase, while planning and performing reconstructive procedure and during aftercare and rehabilitation. PMID:24501479

  17. Safety and efficacy of excision and direct closure in acute burns surgery: outcome analysis in a prospective series of 100 patients and a survey of UK burns surgeons' attitudes.

    PubMed

    Bain, Charles J; Wang, Tim; McArthur, Gordon; Williams, Greg; Atkins, Joanne; Jones, Isabel

    2014-12-01

    Many burns surgeons avoid excision and direct closure of acute burns owing to concerns over wound dehiscence, scarring and infection. There is no evidence in the literature to support this practice. We present outcomes of a prospective series of 100 patients who underwent excision and direct closure of 138 burns over a 2-year period, along with results from a survey sent to 33 senior burns surgeons to gauge attitudes towards direct closure in burns surgery. 47% of survey respondents never perform direct closure. Dehiscence was cited as the most common concern, followed by hypertrophic scarring (HTS). In our cohort, the superficial dehiscence rate was 12% and the HTS rate was 16%, with no scarring contractures. Patients with healing time greater than 14 days were more likely to develop HTS (p=0.008), as were those with wound dehiscence (p=0.014). Patients undergoing part-grafting in addition to direct closure took significantly longer to heal than those undergoing direct closure alone (p=0.0002), with the donor site or graft delaying healing in the majority. Excision and direct closure of acute burn wounds avoids donor site morbidity and has an acceptable complication rate. It is a safe and effective treatment for full thickness burns in selected cases.

  18. Flooding after fire: Impacts of the 2013 Colorado Front Range floods on the High Park Fire burn scar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, S. K.; Schmeer, S.; MacDonald, L. H.; Brogan, D. J.; Nelson, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    In June 2012, the High Park Fire west of Fort Collins, CO burned 350 km2 of steep forested terrain, leading to elevated runoff and erosion in watersheds draining the burned area. Under the auspices of a NSF RAPID grant we began monitoring precipitation, hillslope-scale sediment production, stream stage, and channel geomorphic change in Skin Gulch and Hill Gulch, two 15 km2 watersheds within the High Park Fire. Short-duration summer thunderstorms are typically the dominant cause of post-fire runoff and erosion in the central and southern Rocky Mountains, but in September 2013 an extreme, long duration storm dropped more than 200 mm of rain in 48 hours. This storm provided a unique opportunity to compare the hydrologic and geomorphic effects of smaller summer thunderstorms to those of the long duration, high magnitude September event. Mean June-August 2013 precipitation in these watersheds was 125 mm, less than half the total for the September 2013 event, but this summer precipitation led to a mean sediment yield of 8 Mg ha-1, about double the mean sediment yield of the much larger September storm. Hillslope sediment production was highest during summer storms that were shorter duration but had higher 5-15 minute precipitation intensities than the September storm. These localized summer 2013 storms led to flashy pulses of flow in the channel network that caused relatively small amounts of channel aggradation or incision. In contrast, the September 2013 event produced sustained high flows that led to substantial geomorphic change throughout the channel network, with more than 2 m of aggradation at the outlet of Skin Gulch. These results indicate that the high intensity summer thunderstorms were most effective at mobilizing sediment from hillslopes, but the more spatially uniform rainfall during the September event produced much more dramatic downstream channel geomorphic change.

  19. Chemical burns from assault: a review of seven cases seen in a Nigerian tertiary institution.

    PubMed

    Tahir, C; Ibrahim, B M; Terna-Yawe, E H

    2012-09-30

    Chemical burns represent a major challenge for reconstructive surgeons. They are caused by exposure to acids, alkalis or other corrosive substances which result in various degrees of injury. This report highlights the challenges faced in managing such patients in a Nigerian teaching hospital. The medical records of seven patients (four females and three males) treated for chemical burns injury from January 2001 to December 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were younger than 30, with a mean age of 23.3. Most of them (85.7%) had sustained full thickness burns ranging from 8% to 33% of their body surface area. All cases were result of assaults. The male to female ratio was 1:1.3, and the average duration of hospital stay was 7.5 months. The face was affected in all patients. Patients presented with multiple deformities, like ectropion of eyelids, keratopathies, blindness, nasal deformities, microstomia, loss or deformities of the pinna, mentosternal contractures, and severe scarring of the face. Twenty-nine surgical procedures were performed, which included nasal and lip reconstruction, ectropion release, commissuroplasty, contracture release, and wound resurfacing. Management of chemical burns, especially in a developing country lacking specialised burn centres with appropriate facilities, is challenging. Prevention through public awareness campaigns, legislation for control of corrosive substances, and severe punishment for perpetrators of assaults using these substances will go a long way in reducing the incidence of chemical burns.

  20. Volkmann ischemic contracture

    MedlinePlus

    ... the nerves and muscles, causing them to become stiff (scarred) and shortened. When the muscle shortens, it ... it were normally contracted. But because it is stiff, the joint remains bent and stuck. This condition ...

  1. Emerging Therapies for Scar Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Block, Lisa; Gosain, Ankush; King, Timothy W.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: There are ∼12 million traumatic lacerations treated in the United States emergency rooms each year, 250 million surgical incisions created worldwide every year, and 11 million burns severe enough to warrant medical treatment worldwide. In the United States, over $20 billion dollars per year are spent on the treatment and management of scars. Recent Advances: Investigations into the management of scar therapies over the last decade have advanced our understanding related to the care of cutaneous scars. Scar treatment methods are presented including topical, intralesional, and mechanical therapies in addition to cryotherapy, radiotherapy, and laser therapy. Critical Issues: Current treatment options for scars have significant limitations. This review presents the current and emerging therapies available for scar management and the scientific evidence for scar management is discussed. Future Directions: Based upon our new understanding of scar formation, innovative scar therapies are being developed. Additional research on the basic science of scar formation will lead to additional advances and novel therapies for the treatment of cutaneous scars. PMID:26487979

  2. Scar revision

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mohit; Wakure, Abhijeet

    2013-01-01

    Most surgical patients end up with a scar and most of these would want at least some improvement in the appearance of the scar. Using sound techniques for wound closure surgeons can, to a certain extent, prevent suboptimal scars. This article reviews the principles of prevention and treatment of suboptimal scars. Surgical techniques of scar revision, i.e., Z plasty, W plasty, and geometrical broken line closure are described. Post-operative care and other adjuvant therapies of scars are described. A short description of dermabrasion and lasers for management of scars is given. It is hoped that this review helps the surgeon to formulate a comprehensive plan for management of scars of these patients. PMID:24516292

  3. Acne Scars

    MedlinePlus

    ... How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Acne Scars Treatment Options Learn more about treatment options ... and flawless as the original skin. Why treat acne scarring Physical, emotional and social reasons for treating ...

  4. Evaluating an outreach service for paediatric burns follow up.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Jonathan J; Chesney, Amy; Brown, Liz; Nguyen, Dai Q

    2015-09-01

    Complications following paediatric burns are well documented and care needs to be taken to ensure the appropriate follow up of these patients. Historically this has meant follow up into adulthood however this is often not necessary. The centralisation of burns services in the UK means that patients and their parents may have to travel significant distances to receive this follow up care. To optimise our burns service we have introduced a burns outreach service to enable the patients to be treated closer to home. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of the introduction of the burns outreach service and within this environment define the optimum length of time needed to follow up these patients. A retrospective analysis was carried out of 100 consecutive paediatric burns patients who underwent surgical management of their burn. During the follow up period there were 43 complications in 32 patients (32%). These included adverse scarring (either hypertrophic or keloid), delayed healing (taking >1 month to heal) and contractures (utilising either splinting or surgical correction). Fifty-nine percent of these complications occurred within 6 months of injury and all occurred within 18 months. Size of burn was directly correlated to the risk of developing a complication. The outreach service reduced the distance the patient needs to travel for follow up by more than 50%. There was also a significant financial benefit for the service as the follow up clinics were on average 50% cheaper with burns outreach than burns physician. Burns outreach is a feasible service that not only benefits the patients but also is cheaper for the burns service. The optimum length of follow up for paediatric burns in 18 months, after which if there have not been any complications they can be discharged.

  5. Deltoid contracture: a case with multiple muscle contractures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Chang; Huang, Tung-Fu; Chou, Po-Hsin; Chen, Tain-Hsiung

    2008-11-01

    Deltoid contracture is relatively uncommon. The literature consists primarily of case reports and few articles on large case series. The pathogenesis has been well studied. Muscle contractures can occur in the deltoid, biceps, triceps, gluteus and quadriceps muscles; however, cases of multiple muscle contractures are rare. We reported a patient with multiple contractures of the bilateral deltoid, bilateral gluteus, and bilateral quadriceps muscles, who had received repeated intramuscular injections during childhood and adulthood. The radiographic, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), features of the bone and joint abnormalities are presented. Some literatures reported that damage to the structures of the body due to intramuscular injection is related to the site of injection, age of the patient, and the volume, pH, chemical composition, and diffusional capacity of the injectate. Our patient had muscular contracture induced by needle injection regardless of her age, medication and injection site.

  6. Dupuytren's Contracture: Fibroblast Contraction?

    PubMed Central

    Gabbiani, Giulio; Majno, Guido

    1972-01-01

    In 6 cases of Dupuytren's disease and 1 of Ledderhose's disease, the nodules of the palmar and plantar aponeurosis were examined by light and electron microscopy. The cells composing these nodules, presumably fibroblasts, showed three significant ultrastructural features: (1) a fibrillar system similar to that of smooth muscle cells; (2) nuclear deformations such as are found in contracted cells, the severest being recognizable by light microscopy (cross-banded nuclei); (3) cell-to-cell and cell-to-stroma attachments. Based on these data and on recent information about the biology of the fibroblasts, it is suggested that these cells are fibroblasts that have modulated into contractile cells (myofibroblasts), and that their contraction plays a role in the pathogenesis of the contracture observed clinically. ImagesFig 10Fig 5Fig 11Fig 6 and 7Fig 8Fig 1Fig 2Fig 9Fig 3Fig 4 PMID:5009249

  7. Congenital bilateral sternocleidomastoid contracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Babu, Manohar K V; Lee, Peter; Mahadev, Arjandas; Lee, Eng Hin

    2009-05-01

    Unilateral sternocleidomastoid muscle contracture causing torticollis and other secondary deformities such as facial scoliosis, plagiocephaly and scoliosis of cervical spine are well known. The aetiology and pathogenesis is still intriguing. Although unilateral contracture of sternocleidomastoid is seen quite often, bilateral sternocleidomastoid contracture is almost unheard of. A review of the English literature revealed no cases of bilateral congenital sternocleidomastoid contracture being reported. We present a case report of a 19-year-old girl with congenital bilateral sternocleidomastoid contracture.

  8. Active range of motion outcomes after reconstruction of burned wrist and hand deformities.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Ahmed M; Mahboub, Tarek A; Ibrahim Fouad, Amr; Azari, Kodi; Khalil, Haitham H; McCarthy, James E

    2016-06-01

    This works aim is to evaluate the efficacy of skin grafts and flaps in reconstruction of post-burn hand and wrist deformities. A prospective study of 57 burn contractures of the wrist and dorsum of the hand was performed. Flaps were used only if there was a non-vascularized structure after contracture release, otherwise a skin graft was used. Active range of motion (ROM) was used to assess hand function. The extension deformity cohort uniformly underwent skin graft following contracture release with a mean improvement of 71 degrees (p<0.0001). The flexion deformity cohort was treated with either skin grafts (8 patients) or flaps (9 patients) with a mean improvement of 44 degrees (p<0.0001). Skin grafts suffice for dorsal hand contractures to restore functional wrist ROM. For flexion contractures, flaps were more likely for contractures >6 months. Early release of burn contracture is advisable to avoid deep structure contracture.

  9. Ablative fractionated erbium:YAG laser for the treatment of ice pick alar scars due to neodymium:YAG laser burns.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel L; Babcock, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    The authors present a case of ice pick scars forming in the nasal alar grooves of a patient who was treated with a 1064-nm neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser for facial telangiectasias. Treatment options for these types of scars are reviewed and specifically we report the success of an ablative fractionated 2940-nm erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser.

  10. Burns functional disabilities among burn survivors: a study in Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Agbenorku, Pius

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To determine the types of functional disabilities in adult and paediatric burns survivors, with specific emphasis on potential risk and socio-economic factors of burn disabilities present in Ghana. Patients and Methods: The descriptive study was carried out in Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana from May 2011 to April 2012. Burn survivors who came for follow-up visits after been discharged home and had functional disability were the participants of the study. They were physically examined and interviewed using a pre-tested questionnaire after their informed consent/or that of their parents (in the cases of paediatrics burns survivors) was sought. Results: A total of 70 participants consented for the study. Their ages ranged from 8/12 – 78 years, with a mean age of 12±1.7 years. Majority (60.0%, N=42) of the participants had third degree burns. The nature of disabilities of participants were mostly scar contractures (42.9%, N=30) of which 36.7% (N=11) had impeded arm elevation; 23.3% (N=7) could not fold the palm or move the digits. From the multiple regression analysis risk factors for burn victim to have disability were paediatric age (OR=11.1, P=0.043), third degree of burn (OR=6.2, P=0.001) and anatomical part affected (OR=18.3, P=0.031). Socio-economic factors that affected burn disability victims were nuclear family compensation (OR=4.2, P=0.021), community mockery/stigmatization (OR=0.1, P=0.052) and caretakers time and finance (OR=5.2, P=0.033). Conclusion: The commonest functional disabilities recorded were scar contractions of the axilla region which had impeded the ability of the patients to lift the arm. Risk factors for burns disability included childhood age, third degree of burn incurred and anatomical part affected. Social factors influencing the lives of burn survivors with disability were good family and negative community interactions. Significant economical factors recorded were caretakers’ time and financial constrains. PMID

  11. Pentazocine-induced fibromyositis and contracture

    PubMed Central

    Das, C; Thussu, A; Prabhakar, S; Banerjee, A

    1999-01-01

    We report a case of myopathy, accompanied by widespread contractures predominantly involving the elbow and knee joints, following long-standing pentazocine abuse.


Keywords: pentazocine; myopathy; contractures PMID:10435175

  12. Select practices in management and rehabilitation of burns: a survey report.

    PubMed

    Holavanahalli, Radha K; Helm, Phala A; Parry, Ingrid S; Dolezal, Cynthia A; Greenhalgh, David G

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to document the organization and current practices in physical rehabilitation across burn centers. An online survey developed for the specific purposes of this study sought information regarding a) logistics of the burn center; b) inpatient and outpatient treatment of patients with burn injury; and c) specific protocols in the treatment of a few complications secondary to burn injuries. Of the 159 responses received, 115 were received from the United States, 20 from Australia, 16 from Canada, and 7 from New Zealand. The overall sample included responses from 76 physical therapists (PTs) and 78 occupational therapists. Seventy-three of those surveyed considered themselves primarily a burn therapist. Nurses (86%) were reported as primarily responsible for wound care of inpatients, followed by wound care technicians (24%). Ninety-seven percent of the therapists reported following their own treatment plans. The trunk and areas of head and neck were treated by both PTs and occupational therapists, whereas the lower extremities continue to be treated predominantly by PTs. Some common practices regarding treatment of a few complications secondary to burn injuries such as splinting to prevent contractures, treatment of exposed or ruptured extensor tendons, exposed Achilles tendons, heterotopic ossification, postoperative ambulation, conditioning, scar massage, and use of compression garments are described. Opportunities exist for 1) developing a common document for practice guidelines in physical rehabilitation of burns; and 2) conducting collaborative studies to evaluate treatment interventions and outcomes.

  13. Partial fasciectomy for Dupuytren's contractures.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Spyridonos, Sarantis G; Ignatiadis, Ioannis A; Antonopoulos, Dimitrios; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2009-01-01

    One hundred ninety-six patients with Dupuytren's contractures were treated by partial fasciectomy and adequate postoperative rehabilitation. All patients had flexion contracture of the proximal interphalangeal joint of >20 degrees ; 93 patients had flexion contracture of the associated metacarpophalangeal joint of >30 degrees ; 143 patients had risk factors for Dupuytren's disease. Primary skin closure and splinting were done in all patients. Range of motion was begun by the 1st week. Splinting was discontinued by the 2nd week, followed by night-time splinting until the 8th week. The mean follow-up was 6.6 years (range, 2-9 years). At the latest examination, 72.5% of the patients had complete range of motion of the metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints; 20.2% had 5 degrees -10 degrees of extension deficit and 7.3% had recurrent contractures of >20 degrees at the proximal interphalangeal joint and were subjected to reoperation. Complications included digital neurovascular injury in 5%, complex regional pain syndrome in 10.1%, and wound-healing problems and superficial infections in 15.1%.

  14. Treatment of nasal burns: analysis of 150 cases

    PubMed Central

    Prousskaia, E.; El-Muttardi, N.; Philp, B.; Dziewulski, P.; Shelley, O.P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nasal burns present a challenge for the plastic surgeon in terms of immediate management, choice of primary treatment and secondary reconstruction with the goals of good aesthetic and functional outcome. We present a retrospective analysis of the management of 150 patients with nasal burns treated in our center between July 2005 and July 2011. We rationalized our conservative and all surgical treatments of this subset of burns patients and organized them in a simple and structured way. The reconstructive options for most complex full thickness nasal injury is determined by the integrity of adjacent facial tissues which would always be preferred when available. Microsurgical free tissue transfer is dependent upon the fitness of the patient and the availability of unburned skin at the donor site. Secondary nasal reconstruction is based on an assessment of the residual functional and cosmetic problems. Airways narrowing from scar contracture or loss of support are managed using standard plastic surgical and rhinoplasty principles. Cosmetic refinements range from flap debulking to the importation of new tissue on to the nose. Our experience with this challenging group of patients has led us to develop a simple treatment algorithm for the management of nasal burns. PMID:27252610

  15. Treatment of nasal burns: analysis of 150 cases.

    PubMed

    Prousskaia, E; El-Muttardi, N; Philp, B; Dziewulski, P; Shelley, O P

    2015-06-30

    Nasal burns present a challenge for the plastic surgeon in terms of immediate management, choice of primary treatment and secondary reconstruction with the goals of good aesthetic and functional outcome. We present a retrospective analysis of the management of 150 patients with nasal burns treated in our center between July 2005 and July 2011. We rationalized our conservative and all surgical treatments of this subset of burns patients and organized them in a simple and structured way. The reconstructive options for most complex full thickness nasal injury is determined by the integrity of adjacent facial tissues which would always be preferred when available. Microsurgical free tissue transfer is dependent upon the fitness of the patient and the availability of unburned skin at the donor site. Secondary nasal reconstruction is based on an assessment of the residual functional and cosmetic problems. Airways narrowing from scar contracture or loss of support are managed using standard plastic surgical and rhinoplasty principles. Cosmetic refinements range from flap debulking to the importation of new tissue on to the nose. Our experience with this challenging group of patients has led us to develop a simple treatment algorithm for the management of nasal burns.

  16. Construction of Skin Graft Seams in Burn Patients: A Prospective Randomized Double-Blinded Study.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Kathryn; Umraw, Nisha; Cartotto, Robert

    Prominent scars and contractures may form along the seams between adjacent skin grafts. Seams may be constructed either by approximating the graft edges (AP), or by slightly overlapping the graft edges (OV), but it is not known if one technique creates a less conspicuous seam scar. The purpose of this study was to compare seam scars between seams constructed using the AP and OV techniques. This was a prospective within-patient and within-seam controlled study in adult burn patients treated at an American Burn Association-verified burn center. At skin graft application and seam construction, study seams were divided in half. One half of the seam was made by approximating the graft edges (AP group), while the other half was made by overlapping graft edges (OV group), before identical staple or suture fixation of each half. The AP or OV technique was randomly assigned to the medial or lateral ends of transversely oriented seams or to the proximal and distal ends of longitudinally oriented seams. At 3, 6, and 12 months post surgery, a blinded rater compared the two halves of each study seam scar using the Vancouver Scar Score (VSS). Subjects were also blinded and rated each half of their study seam using a 0 (poor) to 10 (excellent) visual analogue scale. Values are shown as the median (Q1-Q3). There were 44 study seams among 19 subjects (age 51 [36-70] years, with % TBSA burn 10 [7-18], % BSA full-thickness burn 8 [6-15]). Study seams were constructed at 10 (4-15) days post burn. Study seam length was 14.5 (10.3-18.0) cm, with 25% transversely oriented and 75% longitudinally oriented, and with 35/44 seams (80%) between meshed grafts and 9/44 (20%) between sheet grafts. There were no significant differences in any of the individual domain VSS scores (height, pliability, vascularity, and pigmentation) or total VSS score between AP and OV seams at 3, 6, and 12 months. At 12 months, among the 30 study seams that were visible to the subjects, the visual analogue scale

  17. Scar revision

    MedlinePlus

    ... an entire, full thickness of skin, fat, nerves, blood vessels, and muscle from a healthy part of the body to the injured site. These techniques are used when a large amount of skin has been lost in the original injury, when a thin scar ...

  18. Epidemiology and Outcome of Chemical Burn Patients Admitted in Burn Unit of JNMC Hospital, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India: A 5-year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Md Sohaib; Ahmad, Imran; Khurram, M. Fahud; Kanungo, Srikanta

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objective: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the epidemiology, clinical variable of chemical burns, and their outcomes to prevent or reduce the frequency and morbidity of such injuries. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on all the patients with chemical burns admitted at author's center between November 2008 and December 2013. All the patients were evaluated in terms of age, sex, total body surface area, etiology, treatment given, morbidity, mortality, final outcome, and then educated regarding specific preventive measures. Results: A total of 96 patients (2.4% of total burn admissions) (42 males and 54 females) were admitted to our hospital with chemical burn injuries. Most of the patients were in the age group of 16–30 years. Incidence in females was slightly higher than in males. Acid was found to be the most common cause of injury. We found 55% patients admitted had <10% total body surface area (TBSA) involvement, 35% had burns involving between 11 and 20% TBSA, and 4% had burns involving 21–30% TBSA, and 6% had burns in >30% TBSA. Morbidity was noticed in the form of skin defect in 80% of cases, soft tissue defect with exposed tendon, bone, or vessels in 16% of cases, and 4% of patients developed contracture and hypertrophic scar. Eighty-six percent of patients required operative intervention. A total of three deaths (3%) were recorded. Conclusion: It was found that chemical burns, though not very common, are deeper burns and can be accidental or non-accidental, and the high-risk age group is 16–25 years. Chemical burns are largely preventable and if properly managed have a good outcome. PMID:25810999

  19. The use of the artificial dermis (Integra) in combination with vacuum assisted closure for reconstruction of an extensive burn scar--a case report.

    PubMed

    Leffler, M; Horch, R E; Dragu, A; Bach, A D

    2010-01-01

    The artificial dermis Integra (Ethicon, Johnson & Johnson Medical, Norderstedt, Germany) is widely used in the treatment of excessive burn injuries. It is also used in reconstructive surgery when large soft-tissue defects could not be covered with local or free flaps. In this article a 25-year old patient who presented with an early childhood burn of the trunk and lower extremity was treated with Integra in combination with the vacuum assisted closure (V.A.C., KCI, Texas, U.S.A.) and split thickness skin grafting. The combination of the artificial dermal substitute with negative pressure therapy has lead to a complete healing of Integra and the skin graft. During the whole treatment sterile wound conditions were present and time-consuming dressing changes could be prevented. Hospital stay was shortened because the patient could be treated as an outpatient with an ambulant vacuum assisted closure device.

  20. Antecedent thermal injury worsens split-thickness skin graft quality: A clinically relevant porcine model of full-thickness burn, excision and grafting.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Anders H; Rose, Lloyd F; Fletcher, John L; Wu, Jesse C; Leung, Kai P; Chan, Rodney K

    2017-02-01

    Current standard of care for full-thickness burn is excision followed by autologous split-thickness skin graft placement. Skin grafts are also frequently used to cover surgical wounds not amenable to linear closure. While all grafts have potential to contract, clinical observation suggests that antecedent thermal injury worsens contraction and impairs functional and aesthetic outcomes. This study evaluates the impact of antecedent full-thickness burn on split-thickness skin graft scar outcomes and the potential mediating factors. Full-thickness contact burns (100°C, 30s) were created on the backs of anesthetized female Yorkshire Pigs. After seven days, burn eschar was tangentially excised and covered with 12/1000th inch (300μm) split-thickness skin graft. For comparison, unburned wounds were created by sharp excision to fat before graft application. From 7 to 120days post-grafting, planimetric measurements, digital imaging and biopsies for histology, immunohistochemistry and gene expression were obtained. At 120days post-grafting, the Observer Scar Assessment Scale, colorimetry, contour analysis and optical graft height assessments were performed. Twenty-nine porcine wounds were analyzed. All measured metrics of clinical skin quality were significantly worse (p<0.05) in burn injured wounds. Histological analysis supported objective clinical findings with marked scar-like collagen proliferation within the dermis, increased vascular density, and prolonged and increased cellular infiltration. Observed differences in contracture also correlated with earlier and more prominent myofibroblast differentiation as demonstrated by α-SMA staining. Antecedent thermal injury worsens split-thickness skin graft quality, likely by multiple mechanisms including burn-related inflammation, microscopically inadequate excision, and dysregulation of tissue remodeling. A valid, reliable, clinically relevant model of full-thickness burn, excision and skin replacement therapy has been

  1. Monitoring the influence of compression therapy on pathophysiology and structure of a swine scar model using multispectral imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Travis, Taryn E.; Shuppa, Jeffrey W.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Ramella-Romana, Jessica C.

    2014-03-01

    Scar contractures can lead to significant reduction in function and inhibit patients from returning to work, participating in leisure activities and even render them unable to provide care for themselves. Compression therapy has long been a standard treatment for scar prevention but due to the lack of quantifiable metrics of scar formation scant evidence exists of its efficacy. We have recently introduced a multispectral imaging system to quantify pathophysiology (hemoglobin, blood oxygenation, melanin, etc) and structural features (roughness and collagen matrix) of scar. In this study, hypertrophic scars are monitored in-vivo in a porcine model using the imaging system to investigate influence of compression therapy on its quality.

  2. Solanidine and tomatidine trigger scar pruritus.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Pedro E; Rioja, Luis F

    2016-05-01

    Scar pruritus is frequently encountered in clinical practice (particularly in burn patients) owing to its poorly known pathogenesis and difficult treatment. In previous work, we demonstrated the usefulness of a diet excluding edible solanaceae (viz., potatoes, tomatoes, peppers and aubergines) in patients with antihistamine-resistant scar pruritus. We hypothesized that alkaloids in solanaceae (particularly their secondary metabolites or aglycones) might be the actual pruritogens. In order to test this hypothesis, we conducted a single-blind prospective study on patients responding favourably to a solanaceae-free diet whose scar pruritus could be ascribed to one of the four foods. The study involved applying the aglycones solanidine and tomatidine to each scar and checking whether, and which, had a pruritogenic effect. A total of 18 patients (90%) responded by developing pruritus; also, the triggering aglycone coincided with that prevailing in the pruritogenic food. We concluded that solanaceae aglycones are directly involved in the pathogenesis of scar pruritus.

  3. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Trust your face to a facial plastic surgeon Facial Scar Revision Understanding Facial Scar Treatment When ... face like the eyes or lips. A facial plastic surgeon has many options for treating and improving facial ...

  4. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Trust your face to a facial plastic surgeon Facial Scar Revision Understanding Facial Scar Treatment ... face like the eyes or lips. A facial plastic surgeon has many options for treating and improving ...

  5. Values of a Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale to Evaluate the Facial Skin Graft Scar

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Jin Kyung; Kim, Eun Jung; Park, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Background The patient and observer scar assessment scale (POSAS) recently emerged as a promising method, reflecting both observer's and patient's opinions in evaluating scar. This tool was shown to be consistent and reliable in burn scar assessment, but it has not been tested in the setting of skin graft scar in skin cancer patients. Objective To evaluate facial skin graft scar applied to POSAS and to compare with objective scar assessment tools. Methods Twenty three patients, who diagnosed with facial cutaneous malignancy and transplanted skin after Mohs micrographic surgery, were recruited. Observer assessment was performed by three independent rates using the observer component of the POSAS and Vancouver scar scale (VSS). Patient self-assessment was performed using the patient component of the POSAS. To quantify scar color and scar thickness more objectively, spectrophotometer and ultrasonography was applied. Results Inter-observer reliability was substantial with both VSS and the observer component of the POSAS (average measure intraclass coefficient correlation, 0.76 and 0.80, respectively). The observer component consistently showed significant correlations with patients' ratings for the parameters of the POSAS (all p-values<0.05). The correlation between subjective assessment using POSAS and objective assessment using spectrophotometer and ultrasonography showed low relationship. Conclusion In facial skin graft scar assessment in skin cancer patients, the POSAS showed acceptable inter-observer reliability. This tool was more comprehensive and had higher correlation with patient's opinion. PMID:27746642

  6. Co-Graft of Acellular Dermal Matrix and Autogenous Microskin in a Child with Extensive Burns

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X.L.; Xia, Z.F.; Fang, L.S.; Wang, Y.J.; Wang, C.H.

    2008-01-01

    Summary A 6-yr-old boy was the victim of a burns accident in a public bathhouse. The burns involved the face, neck, upper and lower extremities, anterior and posterior trunk, and both buttocks, covering 72% of the total body surface area (TBSA). The lesions in the lower extremities and parts of the right upper extremity were deep partial-thickness, comprising 40% TBSA. On day 5 post-burn, the lesions in both lower extremities were excised to the extent of the fascia under general anaesthesia. Meshed J1 Jayya Acellular Dermis®, a kind of acellular allodermal (ADM) matrix, was then placed on the left knee joint. The right knee joint served as control. The wounds in both lower extremities were then overlaid with microskin autografting. At 19 days post-application, the lesions in both lower extremities had almost completely resurfaced. Follow-up at six months revealed well-healed and stable skin of acellular ADM and microskin autografts on the left knee. However, the skin of the right knee was unstable and there was a chronic residual ulcer. Both legs showed some significant hypertrophic scars. The left knee joint (acellular ADM grafted site) showed mild contractures, while the right knee joint developed a significant contracture. The "skin" of the co-graft covered site appeared thicker and more elastic. The movement range of the left knee joint was much larger than that of the right knee joint. These results suggest that co-graft of acellular dermal matrix and autogenous microskin may be an effective way to repair this functional site in children with extensive burns and to improve the functional and cosmetic results. PMID:21991120

  7. Management of posttraumatic proximal interphalangeal joint contracture.

    PubMed

    Houshian, Shirzad; Jing, Shan Shan; Chikkamuniyappa, Chandrasekar; Kazemian, Gholam Hussein; Emami-Moghaddam-Tehrani, Mohammad

    2013-08-01

    Chronic flexion contracture of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint presents a common yet challenging problem to hand surgeons. Over the years, multiple treatment modalities have been described for this problem, producing limited results. Nonoperative treatment using serial casting and splints should be tried before attempting open surgical release, which should be done in selected patients. The use of external fixation for treating PIP contracture has been encouraging and can be a useful alterative. This review provides an update on the current management of PIP joint contractures and presents a flowchart of treatment to aid decision making.

  8. Hypertrophic Scarring and Keloids: Pathomechanisms and Current and Emerging Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Gauglitz, Gerd G; Korting, Hans C; Pavicic, Tatiana; Ruzicka, Thomas; Jeschke, Marc G

    2011-01-01

    Excessive scars form as a result of aberrations of physiologic wound healing and may arise following any insult to the deep dermis. By causing pain, pruritus and contractures, excessive scarring significantly affects the patient’s quality of life, both physically and psychologically. Multiple studies on hypertrophic scar and keloid formation have been conducted for decades and have led to a plethora of therapeutic strategies to prevent or attenuate excessive scar formation. However, most therapeutic approaches remain clinically unsatisfactory, most likely owing to poor understanding of the complex mechanisms underlying the processes of scarring and wound contraction. In this review we summarize the current understanding of the pathophysiology underlying keloid and hypertrophic scar formation and discuss established treatments and novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:20927486

  9. Positioning, Splinting, and Contracture Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    method of preventing hand deformities in children . J Burn Care Rehabil 1989; 10:83–5. 74. Schwanholt C, Daugherty MB, Gaboury T, et al. Splinting the...for Children . a U.S. Army Burn Center Rehabilitation Department, U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research, 3400 Rawley E. Chambers Avenue, Building...3611, Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, TX 78234-6315, USA b Shriners Hospital for Children —Northern California, 2425 Stockton Boulevard, Sacramento, CA

  10. Acne scar subcision.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, Bs; Nandini, As

    2010-05-01

    Subcision is a simple and safe office surgery procedure for treatment of depressed acne scars. It can easily be combined with other treatments such as laser, dermaroller and scar revisions for maximum efficacy.

  11. Acne Scar Subcision

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekar, BS; Nandini, AS

    2010-01-01

    Subcision is a simple and safe office surgery procedure for treatment of depressed acne scars. It can easily be combined with other treatments such as laser, dermaroller and scar revisions for maximum efficacy. PMID:21031076

  12. Surgical treatment of burns sequelae. our experience in the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Pristina, Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Buja, Z; Arifi, H; Hoxha, E; Duqi, S

    2015-09-30

    Burn injuries are very frequent in Kosovo, leading to long-lasting physical, functional, aesthetic, psychological and social consequences directly proportional to the time of healing; the longer it takes for the burn wound to heal, the more serious are the sequelae. The objectives of the present study are to review the epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of burn patients presenting with post-burn sequelae and treated at the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Pristina, Kosovo, from January 2005 until December 2011. This study included 188 patients with burns sequelae. The following variables were considered: age, sex, anatomical location, pathological types, and surgical procedure. There were 82 men (43.6%) and 106 women (56.4%), ranging in age from 0 to 67 years (mean age 33.5 years), most of the patients were children (139 = 73.9%). Burn contractures were observed in 135 (71.8%) patients, hypertrophic scars in 32 (17%), keloids in 10 (5.3%), alopecia in 6 (3.2%), syndactyly in 12 (6.4%), ectropion in 4 (2.1%) and ear deformity in 1 (0.53%) cases. To correct the deformities the most common choice was the Z-plasty technique, used in 31.4% of cases, followed by Z-plasty+full thickness skin grafts in 21.8%, full thickness skin grafts in 18.1%, tissue expansion in 8%, Z-plasty+local flaps in 4.8%, flaps (local, fascio-cutaneous, radial forearm) in 6.9% and direct closure in 6.4%. Timely wound closure and the development of an individual programme for surgical treatment of burns sequelae are crucial for optimal outcomes in patients with burns.

  13. Nasal scarring by joss stick burns.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, G; Khanijow, V J

    1994-03-01

    Vasomotor rhinitis is a common condition in Malaysia. Patients' dissatisfaction with medical treatment of this recurring condition leads them to seek other forms of traditional cures. This paper highlights the complications in such patients who seek traditional cures for their chronic condition.

  14. Dupuytren contracture in the pediatric population: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Izadpanah, Ali; Viezel-Mathieu, Alex; Izadpanah, Arash; Luc, Mario

    2015-04-01

    Dupuytren contracture of the palm is a relatively common benign fibroproliferative disease of the palmar fascia typically affecting the adult population. There have however been several reported cases of Dupuytren contracture in children. We sought to review the literature for Dupuytren contracture and highlight the main clinical features and management of the disease in children.

  15. Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita: Multiple Congenital Joint Contractures

    PubMed Central

    Sucuoglu, Hamza; Ornek, Nurettin Irem; Caglar, Cagkan

    2015-01-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is a syndrome characterized by nonprogressive multiple congenital joint contractures. The etiology of disease is multifactorial; it is most commonly suspected from absent fetal movements and genetic defects. AMC affects mainly limbs; also it might present with other organs involvement. It is crucial that the diagnosis of AMC should be kept in mind by musculoskeletal physicians in newborns with multiple joint contractures and patients must begin rehabilitation in early stage after accurate diagnosis in terms of functional independence. We present the diagnosis, types, clinical features, and treatment approaches of this disease in our case with literature reviews. PMID:26604929

  16. Preventing Scars after Injury with Partial Irreversible Electroporation.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Alexander; Villiger, Martin; Khan, Saiqa; Quinn, Kyle P; Lo, William C Y; Bouma, Brett E; Mihm, Martin C; Austen, William G; Yarmush, Martin L

    2016-11-01

    Preventing the formation of hypertrophic scars, especially those that are a result of major trauma or burns, would have enormous impact in the fields of regenerative and trauma medicine. In this report, we introduce a noninvasive method to prevent scarring based on nonthermal partial irreversible electroporation. Contact burn injuries in rats were treated with varying treatment parameters to optimize the treatment protocol. Scar surface area and structural properties of the scar were assessed with histology and non-invasive, longitudinal imaging with polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography. We found that partial irreversible electroporation using 200 pulses of 250 V and 70 μs duration, delivered at 3 Hz every 20 days during a total of five therapy sessions after the initial burn injury, resulted in a 57.9% reduction of the scar area compared with untreated scars and structural features approaching those of normal skin. Unlike humans, rats do not develop hypertrophic scars. Therefore, the use of a rat animal model is the limiting factor of this work.

  17. The year in burns 2011.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Steven E; Arnoldo, Brett D

    2012-12-01

    For 2011, approximately 1746 original research articles in burns were published in English in scientific journals. This article reviews those with the most potential impact on for burn therapeutics and outcomes according to the Editor of one of the major journals (Burns) and his colleague. As done previously, articles were found and divided into these topic areas: epidemiology of injury and burn prevention, wound and scar characterisation, acute care and critical care, inhalation injury, infection, psychological considerations, pain and itching management, rehabilitation and long-term outcomes, and burn reconstruction. Each selected article is mentioned briefly with editorial comment.

  18. Management of scars: updated practical guidelines and use of silicones.

    PubMed

    Meaume, Sylvie; Le Pillouer-Prost, Anne; Richert, Bertrand; Roseeuw, Diane; Vadoud, Javid

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars and keloids resulting from surgery, burns, trauma and infection can be associated with substantial physical and psychological distress. Various non-invasive and invasive options are currently available for the prevention and treatment of these scars. Recently, an international multidisciplinary group of 24 experts on scar management (dermatologists; plastic and reconstructive surgeons; general surgeons; physical medicine, rehabilitation and burns specialists; psychosocial and behavioural researchers; epidemiologists; beauticians) convened to update a set of practical guidelines for the prevention and treatment of hypertrophic and keloid scars on the basis of the latest published clinical evidence on existing scar management options. Silicone-based products such as sheets and gels are recommended as the gold standard, first-line, non-invasive option for both the prevention and treatment of scars. Other general scar preventative measures include avoiding sun exposure, compression therapy, taping and the use of moisturisers. Invasive treatment options include intralesional injections of corticosteroids and/or 5-fluorouracil, cryotherapy, radiotherapy, laser therapy and surgical excision. All of these options may be used alone or as part of combination therapy. Of utmost importance is the regular re-evaluation of patients every four to eight weeks to evaluate whether additional treatment is warranted. The amount of scar management measures that are applied to each wound depends on the patient's risk of developing a scar and their level of concern about the scar's appearance. The practical advice presented in the current guidelines should be combined with clinical judgement when deciding on the most appropriate scar management measures for an individual patient.

  19. [Mastopexy with minimal scar].

    PubMed

    Tepavicharova-Romanska, P; Romanski, R K

    2004-01-01

    The image of the breast as a symbol of femininity plays an essential role in the way a woman looks at herself and contributes to her personal and social development. Fashion nowadays uncovers rather than covers a woman's body, and long scars resulting from mammaplasty are less accepted now than they were in the past, more so because the scar quality is unforeseeable. The main concern of mastopexy is to limit the scars, creating a nice breast shape. Ideally scarring is confined to the periareolar circle.

  20. Laser scar revision.

    PubMed

    Lupton, Jason R; Alster, Tina S

    2002-01-01

    A variety of lasers can be used to treat scars and striae effectively. It is of paramount importance that the type of scar be properly classified on initial examination so that the most appropriate method of treatment can be chosen. Classification also allows the laser surgeon to discuss with the patient the anticipated response to treatment. The 585-nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) is the most appropriate system for treating hypertrophic scars, keloids, erythematous scars, and striae. The PDL carries a low risk of side effects and complications when operated at appropriate treatment parameters and time intervals. Atrophic scars are best treated with ablative CO2 and Er:YAG lasers; however, proliferative keloids and hypertrophic scars should not be vaporized because of the high risk of scar recurrence or progression. The appropriate choice and use of lasers can significantly improve most scars. As research in laser-skin interaction continues, further refinements in laser technology coupled with the addition of alternate treatment procedures will allow improved clinical efficacy and predictability.

  1. [Collagenase Clostridum histolyticum in the management of Dupuytren's contracture].

    PubMed

    Holzer, L A; Holzer, G

    2011-10-01

    Dupuytren's contracture is a fibroproliferate disease of the palmar aponeurosis with a formation of nodules and cords. Surgical treatment is the gold standard for Dupuytren's contracture at the moment. A short while ago Collagenase clostridium histolyticum was licensed as a non-surgical method to treat Dupuytren's contracture. Collagenase clostridium histolyticum is injected directly into the Dupuytren's cord and after 24 h the contracture is distended by manual rupturing. Collagenase clostridium histolyticum causes a depletion of collagen, however neurovascular structures are spared. 2 clinical phase III studies showed that contractures could be effectively reduced when using Collagenase clostridium histolyticum. However, there are no long-term results regarding effectiveness and side effects, or comparative studies using surgical methods. This paper presents a review of Collagenase clostridium histolyticum and its role in the management of Dupuytren's contracture. Indication, technical procedure, treatment results and complications are described.

  2. Prevention and management of limb contractures in neuromuscular diseases.

    PubMed

    Skalsky, Andrew J; McDonald, Craig M

    2012-08-01

    Limb contractures are a common impairment in neuromuscular diseases. They contribute to increased disability from decreased motor performance, mobility limitations, reduced functional range of motion, loss of function for activities of daily living, and increased pain. The pathogenesis of contractures is multifactorial. Myopathic conditions are associated with more severe limb contractures compared with neuropathic disorders. Although the evidence supporting the efficacy of multiple interventions to improve range of motion in neuromuscular diseases in a sustained manner is lacking, there are generally accepted principles with regard to splinting, bracing, stretching, and surgery that help minimize the impact or disability from contractures.

  3. Leg contracture in mice: an assay of normal tissue response

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, H.B.

    1984-07-01

    Leg contracture, defined as the difference in extensibility of the control and irradiated hind legs of mice, was found to correlate with single doses of radiation from about 20 to 80 Gy. The time of development of the early phase of the response coincided with that reported for the appearance of the acute skin response, and in some cases, partially reversed as this reaction healed. The contracture then progressed again at a moderate rate through 90 days, and then more slowly through one year. Skin contraction, measured by decrease in intertattoo distance, was assayed in the same mice. It followed the same time course as leg contracture, but had a different dose-response relationship. To determine the contribution of skin contraction to the overall leg contracture response, mice were sacrificed and the leg contracture measured before and after the removal of the skin of the leg. After doses of up to 30 Gy, little contracture remained from skinning the leg, indicating that skin contraction was largely responsible for leg contracture in this dose range. After doses of about 45 Gy and above, some contracture remained in the skinned legs, although less than in intact legs. There was little or no enhancement of either skin contraction or leg contracture by the hypoxic cell sensitizers metronidazole or misonidazole.

  4. PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT OF LIMB CONTRACTURES IN NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    Skalsky, Andrew J.; McDonald, Craig M.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Limb contractures are a common impairment in neuromuscular diseases (NMD). They contribute to increased disability due to decreased motor performance, mobility limitations, reduced functional range of motion, loss of function for activities of daily living (ADL), and increased pain. The pathogenesis of contractures is multifactorial. Myopathic conditions are associated with more severe limb contractures in comparison to neuropathic disorders. Although the evidence supporting the efficacy of multiple interventions to improve ROM in NMD in a sustained manner is lacking, there are generally accepted principles with regard to splinting, bracing, stretching, and surgery that help minimize the impact or disability from the contractures. PMID:22938881

  5. Scars and Wounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Problems Dry Skin Itching Skin Color Changes Pressure Sores Scars and Wounds Treatments and Side Effects Managing ... purple bruising of skin Scaly, broken skin (see Pressure Sores ) Crusts, scabs, or cuts in the skin Bleeding ...

  6. Establishing a Reproducible Hypertrophic Scar following Thermal Injury: A Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, Scott J.; Rumberg, Aaron; Visscher, Marty; Billmire, David A.; Schwentker, Ann S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Our complete understanding of hypertrophic scarring is still deficient, as portrayed by the poor clinical outcomes when treating them. To address the need for alternative treatment strategies, we assess the swine animal burn model as an initial approach for immature scar evaluation and therapeutic application. Methods: Thermal contact burns were created on the dorsum of 3 domestic swine with the use of a branding iron at 170°F for 20 seconds. Deep partial-thickness burns were cared for with absorptive dressings over 10 weeks and wounds evaluated with laser and negative pressure transduction, histology, photographic analysis, and RNA isolation. Results: Overall average stiffness (mm Hg/mm) increased and elasticity (mm) decreased in the scars from the initial burn injury to 8 weeks when compared with normal skin (P < 0.01). Scars were thicker, more erythematous, and uniform in the caudal dorsum. The percent change of erythema in wounds increased from weeks 6 to 10. Histology demonstrated loss of dermal papillae, increased myofibroblast presence, vertically oriented vessels, epidermal and dermal hypercellularity, and parallel-layered collagen deposition. Immature scars remained elevated at 10 weeks, and minimal RNA was able to be isolated from the tissue. Conclusions: Deep partial-thickness thermal injury to the back of domestic swine produces an immature hypertrophic scar by 10 weeks following burn with thickness appearing to coincide with the location along the dorsal axis. With minimal pig to pig variation, we describe our technique to provide a testable immature scar model. PMID:25750848

  7. Updated scar management practical guidelines: non-invasive and invasive measures.

    PubMed

    Monstrey, Stan; Middelkoop, Esther; Vranckx, Jan Jeroen; Bassetto, Franco; Ziegler, Ulrich E; Meaume, Sylvie; Téot, Luc

    2014-08-01

    Hypertrophic scars and keloids can be aesthetically displeasing and lead to severe psychosocial impairment. Many invasive and non-invasive options are available for the plastic (and any other) surgeon both to prevent and to treat abnormal scar formation. Recently, an updated set of practical evidence-based guidelines for the management of hypertrophic scars and keloids was developed by an international group of 24 experts from a wide range of specialities. An initial set of strategies to minimize the risk of scar formation is applicable to all types of scars and is indicated before, during and immediately after surgery. In addition to optimal surgical management, this includes measures to reduce skin tension, and to provide taping, hydration and ultraviolet (UV) protection of the early scar tissue. Silicone sheeting or gel is universally considered as the first-line prophylactic and treatment option for hypertrophic scars and keloids. The efficacy and safety of this gold-standard, non-invasive therapy has been demonstrated in many clinical studies. Other (more specialized) scar treatment options are available for high-risk patients and/or scars. Pressure garments may be indicated for more widespread scarring, especially after burns. At a later stage, more invasive or surgical procedures may be necessary for the correction of permanent unaesthetic scars and can be combined with adjuvant measures to achieve optimal outcomes. The choice of scar management measures for a particular patient should be based on the newly updated evidence-based recommendations taking individual patient and wound characteristics into consideration.

  8. [Razemon's lateral digital rotation flap in severe Dupuytren contracture of the fifth finger].

    PubMed

    Ould-Slimane, M; Guinet, V; Foulongne, E; Melconian, A; Beccari, R; Milliez, P-Y; Auquit-Auckbur, I

    2013-10-01

    In Dupuytren's disease, correction of severe contracture deformities and excision of dermal lesions are often responsible for palmar skin defects. This study aimed to assess the results of the lateral digital flap described by Razemon. Thirty-seven patients were analysed retrospectively for functional and trophic results. Twelve months of follow-up were at least required. The lack of extension was appreciated through Thomine's coefficient. Subjective patient's opinion was noted about function of fifth finger and hand. The flap trophicity was evaluated through softness, coverage quality and esthetic aspect. In the preoperative period, the average lack of extension was 105°; 89% of the patients were ranked as stages 3 or 4 of Tubiana's classification. At the 12th month, the average Thomine's coefficient was 0.74; 70% of the patients were very satisfied. Two patients exhibited some lack of suppleness and seven a dyschromic scars. The lateral digital rotation flap is a quite simple surgical procedure. It allows satisfactory results corresponding to functional and trophic coverage in severe Dupuytren's contracture involving the fifth finger.

  9. Acute Marjolin's Ulcer in a Postauricular Scar after Mastoidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Bukhari, Sumaiyah M.; Hajjaj, Mutawakel F.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Marjolin's ulcer is a rare, aggressive cutaneous malignancy that arises primarily in burn scars but can occur in other types of scars. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common variant, and while malignant degeneration usually takes a long time, it can develop acutely. Case Report. a 30-year-old man who developed Marjolin's ulcer acutely in a right postauricular scar after mastoidectomy and the incision and drainage of a mastoid abscess. To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first to describe a Marjolin's ulcer in a postauricular surgical scar. However, it has been reported in others areas in the head and neck. Conclusion. Marjolin's ulcer is most commonly observed after postburn scars, but it may be observed after any type of scars, as our patient developed an SCC with a postsurgical scar. Early diagnosis is essential, and a biopsy should be performed on any nonhealing wound or chronic wound that undergoes a sudden change. Tissue samples should be taken from both the centre and the margins of the wound. PMID:28050297

  10. Custom Knee Device for Knee Contractures After Internal Femoral Lengthening.

    PubMed

    Bhave, Anil; Shabtai, Lior; Ong, Peck-Hoon; Standard, Shawn C; Paley, Dror; Herzenberg, John E

    2015-07-01

    The development of knee flexion contractures is among the most common problems and complications associated with lengthening the femur with an internal device or external fixator. Conservative treatment strategies include physical therapy, serial casting, and low-load prolonged stretching with commercially available splinting systems. The authors developed an individually molded, low-cost custom knee device with polyester synthetic conformable casting material to treat knee flexion contractures. The goal of this study was to evaluate the results of treatment with a custom knee device and specialized physical therapy in patients who had knee flexion contracture during femoral lengthening with an intramedullary lengthening femoral nail. This retrospective study included 23 patients (27 limbs) who underwent femoral lengthening with an internal device for the treatment of limb length discrepancy. All patients had a knee flexion contracture raging from 10° to 90° during the lengthening process and were treated with a custom knee device and specialized physical therapy. The average flexion contracture before treatment was 36°. The mean amount of lengthening was 5.4 cm. After an average of 3.8 weeks of use of the custom knee device, only 2 of 27 limbs (7.5%) had not achieved complete resolution of the flexion contracture. The average final extension was 1.4°. Only 7 of 27 limbs (26%) required additional soft tissue release. The custom knee device is an inexpensive and effective method for treating knee flexion contracture after lengthening with an internal device.

  11. Surgical Scar Revision: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Shilpa; Dahiya, Naveen; Gupta, Somesh

    2014-01-01

    Scar formation is an inevitable consequence of wound healing from either a traumatic or a surgical intervention. The aesthetic appearance of a scar is the most important criteria to judge the surgical outcome. An understanding of the anatomy and wound healing along with experience, meticulous planning and technique can reduce complications and improve the surgical outcome. Scar revision does not erase a scar but helps to make it less noticeable and more acceptable. Both surgical and non-surgical techniques, used either alone or in combination can be used for revising a scar. In planning a scar revision surgeon should decide on when to act and the type of technique to use for scar revision to get an aesthetically pleasing outcome. This review article provides overview of methods applied for facial scar revision. This predominantly covers surgical methods. PMID:24761092

  12. Can Acne Scars Be Removed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Can Acne Scars Be Removed? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can Acne ... eliminar las cicatrices del acné? Different Types of Acne Scars from acne can seem like double punishment — ...

  13. Scar revision - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100098.htm Scar revision - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 4 Go to slide 2 ...

  14. Involvement of impaired desmosome-related proteins in hypertrophic scar intraepidermal blister formation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jianglin; He, Weifeng; Luo, Gaoxing; Wu, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Hypertrophic scar is one of the unique fibrotic diseases in human. Intraepidermal blister is a common clinical symptom following the hypertrophic scar formation. However, little is known about the reason of blister creation. In this study, we selected three patients with hypertrophic scar as manifested by raised, erythematous, pruritic, blister and thickened appearance undergoing scar resection. The first scar sample was 6 months after burn from the neck of a 3 years old male patient with 10 score by Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS). The second scar sample was 12 months after burn from the dorsal foot of a 16 years old female patient with 13 score by VSS. The third one was 9 months after burn from the elbow of a 34 years old male patients with 13 score by VSS. In order to understand the molecular mechanism of blister formation, we screened the different protein expression between hypertrophic scar and normal skin tissue by means of isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling technology and high throughput 2D LC-MS/MS. There were 48 proteins found to be downregulated in hypertrophic scar. Among the downregulated ones, plakophilin1 (PKP1), plakophilin3 (PKP3) and desmoplakin (DSP) were the desmosome-related proteins which were validated by immunohistochemistry and western blotting assay. Transmission electron microscopy further showed the considerably reduced size and intensity of hemidesmosome and desmosome in hypertrophic scar tissue, compared to control normal skin. Our data indicted for the first time that downregulation of DSP, PKP1 and PKP3 in hypertrophic scar might be responsible for intraepidermal blister formation.

  15. The successful treatment of pain associated with scar tissue using acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Fang, Sheng

    2014-10-01

    In this case report, a 48-year-old female who had suffered severe scar pain for 3 months was treated with acupuncture using the Wei Ci technique (surrounding the dragon). Scar tissue usually forms after deep trauma, such as piercings, burns, and surgery, to the dermis. In Chinese Medicine, scar tissue causes local Qi and blood stagnation which lead to pain. The Wei Ci technique (surrounding the dragon) and distal points Hegu-LI-4, Taichong-LIV-3, Zusanli-ST-36 were used. The patient received a total of eight treatments in 5 weeks. The scar pain decreased from 7 to 1 or 2 on a Likert scale of 0-10, with 0 being no pain and 10 being the worst pain. Acupuncture may have a good short-term pain-relieving effect on scar pain but its long-term scar-pain-relieving effects are still unclear.

  16. [Forum on tissue expansion. Repair of sequelae of facial burns by cervical cutaneous expansion].

    PubMed

    Foyatier, J L; Comparin, J P; Latarjet, J; Delay, E; Spitalier, P; Masson, C L

    1993-02-01

    Burn scars of the lower part of the face are a difficult problem in plastic surgery. Full thickness skin graft or local flaps usually give poor cosmetic result. Over the last 5 years, we used 24 skin expanders in the neck area to cover burn scars of the chin and jaw. Discussion of the method and 4 cases are reported.

  17. [Management of Flexion Contracture in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Hube, R; Mayr, H O; Pfitzner, T; von Roth, P

    2015-06-01

    Flexion contracture is a common deformity of the arthritic knee. The present publication describes causes, clinical relevance and surgical technique in the presence of flexion contractures in total knee arthroplasty. Flexion contracture can be attributed to different causes. Basically it is a mismatch between flexion and extension gaps. Moderate and severe deformities have to be corrected by additional surgical interventions. In most cases soft tissue techniques with release of contracted structures, the removal of osteophytes and additional distal femoral bone resection are necessary. The goal of these interventions is to achieve full extension of the knee. During rehabilitation attention has to be paid to maintain it with intensive physical therapy. A remaining flexion contracture is associated with inferior functional outcome and persistent pain.

  18. Burn Rehabilitation and Research: Proceedings of a Consensus Summit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    tool has yet to be de- signed. Accurate instrumentation is necessary to study the efficacy of scar treatment, such as the ability of pressure garments to...reduce hypertrophic scar. A variety of electronic instruments for possible burn scar research application are now commercially avail- able, some of...sured and assessed with a variety of devices: 1. Pliability: a number of different instruments have been proposed and tested, including the durometer,148

  19. The year in burns 2013.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Steven E; Phelan, Herbert A; Arnoldo, Brett D

    2014-12-01

    Approximately 3415 research articles were published with burns in the title, abstract, and/or keyword in 2013. We have continued to see an increase in this number; the following reviews articles selected from these by the Editor of one of the major journals (Burns) and colleagues that in their opinion are most likely to have effects on burn care treatment and understanding. As we have done before, articles were found and divided into the following topic areas: epidemiology of injury and burn prevention, wound and scar characterization, acute care and critical care, inhalation injury, infection, psychological considerations, pain and itching management, rehabilitation and long-term outcomes, and burn reconstruction. The articles are mentioned briefly with notes from the authors; readers are referred to the full papers for details.

  20. Update on hypertrophic scar treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rabello, Felipe Bettini; Souza, Cleyton Dias; Júnior, Jayme Adriano Farina

    2014-01-01

    Scar formation is a consequence of the wound healing process that occurs when body tissues are damaged by a physical injury. Hypertrophic scars and keloids are pathological scars resulting from abnormal responses to trauma and can be itchy and painful, causing serious functional and cosmetic disability. The current review will focus on the definition of hypertrophic scars, distinguishing them from keloids and on the various methods for treating hypertrophic scarring that have been described in the literature, including treatments with clearly proven efficiency and therapies with doubtful benefits. Numerous methods have been described for the treatment of abnormal scars, but to date, the optimal treatment method has not been established. This review will explore the differences between different types of nonsurgical management of hypertrophic scars, focusing on the indications, uses, mechanisms of action, associations and efficacies of the following therapies: silicone, pressure garments, onion extract, intralesional corticoid injections and bleomycin. PMID:25141117

  1. Treatment of hypertrophic scars using a long-pulsed dye laser with cryogen-spray cooling.

    PubMed

    Kono, Taro; Erçöçen, Ali Rza; Nakazawa, Hiroaki; Nozaki, Motohiro

    2005-05-01

    Hypertrophic scars are common and cause functional and psychologic morbidity. The conventional pulsed dye laser (585 nm) has been shown previously to be effective in the treatment of a variety of traumatic and surgical scars, with improvement in scar texture, color, and pliability, with minimal side effects. This prospective study was performed to determine the effectiveness of the long-pulsed dye laser (595 nm) with cryogen-spray cooling device in the treatment of hypertrophic scars. Fifteen Asian patients with 22 hypertrophic scars were treated by the long-pulsed dye laser (595 nm) with cryogen-spray cooling device. In 5 patients, the scar area was divided into halves, one half of which was treated with the laser, whereas the other half was not treated and was used as a negative control. All patients received 2 treatments at 4-week intervals, and evaluations were done by photographic and clinical assessment and histologic evaluation before the treatment and 1 month after the last laser treatment. Treatment outcome was graded by a blind observer using the Vancouver General Hospital (VGH) Burn Scar Assessment Scale. Symptoms such as pain, pruritus, and burning of the scar improved significantly. VGH scores improved in all treated sites, and there was a significant difference between the baseline and posttreatment scores, corresponding to an improvement of 51.4 +/- 14.7% (P < 0.01). Compared with the baseline, the mean percentage of scar flattening and erythema elimination was 40.7 +/- 20.7 and 65.3 +/- 25.5%, respectively (P < 0.01). The long-pulsed dye laser (595-nm) equipped with cryogen spray cooling device is an effective treatment of hypertrophic scars and can improve scar pliability and texture and decrease scar erythema and associated symptoms.

  2. Quantitative measurement of hypertrophic scar: interrater reliability and concurrent validity.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Correa, José A; Rachelska, Grazyna; Armour, Alexis; LaSalle, Léo

    2008-01-01

    Research into the pathophysiology and treatment of hypertrophic scar (HSc) remains limited by the heterogeneity of scar and the imprecision with which its severity is measured. The objective of this study was to test the interrater reliability and concurrent validity of the Cutometer measurement of elasticity, the Mexameter measurement of erythema and pigmentation, and total thickness measure of the DermaScan C relative to the modified Vancouver Scar Scale (mVSS) in patient-matched normal skin, normal scar, and HSc. Three independent investigators evaluated 128 sites (severe HSc, moderate or mild HSc, donor site, and normal skin) on 32 burn survivors using all of the above measurement tools. The intraclass correlation coefficient, which was used to measure interrater reliability, reflects the inherent amount of error in the measure and is considered acceptable when it is >0.75. Interrater reliability of the totals of the height, pliability, and vascularity subscales of the mVSS fell below the acceptable limit ( congruent with0.50). The individual subscales of the mVSS fell well below the acceptable level (< or =0.3). The Cutometer reading of elasticity provided acceptable reliability (>0.89) for each study site with the exception of severe scar. Mexameter and DermaScan C reliability measurements were acceptable for all sites (>0.82). Concurrent validity correlations with the mVSS were significant except for the comparison of the mVSS pliability subscale and the Cutometer maximum deformation measure comparison in severe scar. In conclusion, the Mexameter and DermaScan C measurements of scar color and thickness of all sites, as well as the Cutometer measurement of elasticity in all but the most severe scars shows high interrater reliability. Their significant concurrent validity with the mVSS confirms that these tools are measuring the same traits as the mVSS, and in a more objective way.

  3. Biomass Burning

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-07-27

    Projects:  Biomass Burning Definition/Description:  Biomass Burning: This data set represents the geographical and temporal distribution of total amount of biomass burned. These data may be used in general circulation models (GCMs) and ...

  4. Gluteal muscle contracture: diagnosis and management options

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Saroj; Meng, Chunqing; Wang, Xiaohong; Chaudhary, Nabin; Jin, Shengyang; Yang, Shuhua; Wang, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Gluteal muscle contracture (GMC), a debilitating disease, exists all over the globe but it is much more prevalent in China. Patients typically present with abduction and external rotation of the hip and are unable to bring both the knees together while squatting. Multiple etiologies have been postulated, the commonest being repeated intramuscular injection into the buttocks. The disease is diagnosed primarily by clinical features but radiological features are necessary for the exclusion of other pathological conditions. Non-operative treatment with physiotherapy can be tried before surgery is considered but it usually fails. Different surgical techniques have been described and claimed to have a better outcome of one over another but controversy still exists. Based on published literatures, the clinical outcome is exceptionally good in all established methods of surgery. However, endoscopic surgery is superior to conventional open surgery in terms of cosmetic outcome with fewer complications. Nevertheless, its use has been limited by lack of adequate knowledge, instrumentations, and some inherent limitations. Above all, post-operative rehabilitation plays a key role in better outcome, which however should be started gradually. PMID:28059055

  5. Mapping Fire Scars in the Brazilian Cerrado Using AVHRR Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlavka, C. A.; Ambrosia, V. G.; Brass, J. A.; Rezendez, A.; Alexander, S.; Guild, L. S.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The Brazilian cerrado, or savanna, spans an area of 1,800,000 square kilometers on the great plateau of Central Brazil. Large fires covering hundreds of square kilometers, frequently occur in wildland areas of the cerrado, dominated by grasslands or grasslands mixed with shrubs and small trees, and also within area in the cerrado used for agricultural purposes, particularly for grazing. Smaller fires, typically extending over arm of a few square kilometers or less, are associated with the clewing of crops, such as dry land rice. A method for mapping fire scars and differentiating them from extensive areas of bare sod with AVHRR bands 1 (.55 -.68 micrometer) and 3 (3.5 - 3.9 micrometers) and measures of performance based on comparison with maps of fires with Landsat imagery will be presented. Methods of estimating total area burned from the AVHRR fire scar map will be discussed and related to land use and scar size.

  6. Dune Avalanche Scars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    05 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows large, low albedo (dark) sand dunes in Kaiser Crater near 47.2oS, 340.4oW. The dunes are--ever so slowly--moving east to west (right to left) as sand avalanches down the steeper, slip face slopes of each. Avalanching sand in the Kaiser dune field has left deep scars on these slopes, suggesting that the sand is not loose but is instead weakly cemented. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  7. An automated image processing method to quantify collagen fibre organization within cutaneous scar tissue.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Kyle P; Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G Felix; Khan, Saiqa; Villiger, Martin; Bouma, Brett; Austen, William G; Sheridan, Robert L; Mihm, Martin C; Yarmush, Martin L; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Standard approaches to evaluate scar formation within histological sections rely on qualitative evaluations and scoring, which limits our understanding of the remodelling process. We have recently developed an image analysis technique for the rapid quantification of fibre alignment at each pixel location. The goal of this study was to evaluate its application for quantitatively mapping scar formation in histological sections of cutaneous burns. To this end, we utilized directional statistics to define maps of fibre density and directional variance from Masson's trichrome-stained sections for quantifying changes in collagen organization during scar remodelling. Significant increases in collagen fibre density are detectable soon after burn injury in a rat model. Decreased fibre directional variance in the scar was also detectable between 3 weeks and 6 months after injury, indicating increasing fibre alignment. This automated analysis of fibre organization can provide objective surrogate endpoints for evaluating cutaneous wound repair and regeneration.

  8. An automated image processing method to quantify collagen fiber organization within cutaneous scar tissue

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Kyle P.; Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G. Felix; Khan, Saiqa; Villiger, Martin; Bouma, Brett; Austen, William G.; Sheridan, Robert L.; Mihm, Martin C.; Yarmush, Martin L.; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Standard approaches to evaluate scar formation within histological sections rely on qualitative evaluations and scoring, which limits our understanding of the remodeling process. We have recently developed an image analysis technique for the rapid quantification of fiber alignment at each pixel location. The goal of this study was to evaluate its application for quantitatively mapping scar formation in histological sections of cutaneous burns. To this end, we utilized directional statistics to define maps of fiber density and directional variance from Masson’s Trichrome stained sections for quantifying changes in collagen organization during scar remodeling. Significant increases in collagen fiber density are detectable soon after burn injury in a rat model. Decreased fiber directional variance in the scar was also detectable between 3 weeks and 6 months after injury, indicating increasing fiber alignment. This automated analysis of fiber organization can provide objective surrogate endpoints for evaluating cutaneous wound repair and regeneration. PMID:25256009

  9. Halothane cooling contractures of skinned mammalian muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Sudo, R T; Zapata-Sudo, G; Suarez-Kurtz, G

    1990-11-01

    The effects of halothane or cooling on Ca2(+)-activated tensions and on the uptake and release of Ca2+ by the sarcoplasmic reticulum were investigated in chemically skinned fibers of the extensor digitorum longus muscle of adult rabbits. At 22 degrees C, halothane (greater than 0.46 mM) induced Ca2+ release from the SR of Ca2(+)-loaded skinned fibers that resulted in transient tensions. Higher concentrations of halothane (greater than 4.65 mM) reduced the steady-state accumulation of Ca2+ in the SR at 22 degrees C. Cooling (to less than 10 degrees C) elicited transient contractures (cooling-induced contractures [CC]) in Ca2(+)-loaded skinned fibers, despite the fact that the tensions elicited by adding Ca2+ to the bath were depressed at these low temperatures. The skinned fibers did not develop CCs at 12-16 degrees C. Halothane cooling contractures could be elicited at these temperatures by exposing the fibers to halothane concentrations that failed to elicit Ca2+ release at 22 degrees C. The halothane cooling contractures were blocked by procaine but not by lidocaine. It was concluded that these contractures resulted from a synergistic interaction between halothane and cooling that stimulates Ca2+ release from, and reduces Ca2+ uptake by, the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  10. Arthroscopic gluteal muscle contracture release with radiofrequency energy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Jie; Wang, Yan; Xue, Jing; Lui, Pauline Po-Yee; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-03-01

    Gluteal muscle contracture is common after repeated intramuscular injections and sometimes is sufficiently debilitating to require open surgery. We asked whether arthroscopic release of gluteal muscle contracture using radiofrequency energy would decrease complications with clinically acceptable results. We retrospectively reviewed 108 patients with bilateral gluteal muscle contractures (57 males, 51 females; mean age, 23.7 years). We used inferior, anterosuperior, and posterosuperior portals. With the patient lying laterally, we developed and enlarged a potential space between the gluteal muscle group and the subcutaneous fat using blunt dissection. Under arthroscopic guidance through the inferior portal, we débrided and removed fatty tissue overlying the contractile band of the gluteal muscle group using a motorized shaver introduced through the superior portal. Radiofrequency then was introduced through the superior portal to gradually excise the contracted bands from superior to inferior. Finally, hemostasis was ensured using radiofrequency. Patients were followed a minimum of 7 months (mean, 17.4 months; range, 7-42 months). At last followup, the adduction and flexion ranges of the hip were 45.3 degrees +/- 8.7 degrees and 110.2 degrees +/- 11.9 degrees, compared with 10.4 degrees +/- 7.2 degrees and 44.8 degrees +/- 14.1 degrees before surgery. No hip abductor contracture recurred and no patient had residual hip pain or gluteal muscle wasting. We found gluteal muscle contracture could be released effectively with radiofrequency energy.

  11. Three Point Extension Splint To Treat Flexion Contractures About Limb Synovial Hinge Joints.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    rehabilitating flexion contractures caused by soft tissue injury. More particularly, the invention relates to a three point extension splint to treat flexion contractures about the knee, elbow and/or finger.

  12. [Comparative characteristics of depolarization (potassium) and acetylcholine contracture of Lampetra fluviatilis lamprey phasic muscle].

    PubMed

    Skorobovichuk, N F; Nasledov, G A

    1978-01-01

    Acetylcholine (Ach) contractures of thin bundle from m. longitudinal linguae of the lamprey differs by several parameters from depolarization (potassium) contracture, although Ach similar to K ions totally depolarizes the surface membrane of muscle fibers. Maximum tension of Ach contracture is 30--100% higher than that of K contracture, maximum of both contractures being observed at the same membrane potential level (approximately -10mV). The rate of rise of Ach contracture is 10 times higher, whereas the latent period is 3 times shorter as compared with the same parameters of K contracture. At higher Ach concentrations (10(-5)--10(-4) g/ml) the latent period of contracture is shorter than that of depolarization.

  13. A New Distal Arthrogryposis Syndrome Characterized by Plantar Flexion Contractures

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, D.A.; Swoboda, K.J.; Sanders, R.K.; Bamshad, M.

    2011-01-01

    The distal arthrogryposis (DA) syndromes are a distinct group of disorders characterized by contractures of two or more different body areas. More than a decade ago, we revised the classification of DAs and distinguished several new syndromes. This revision has facilitated the identification of five genes (i.e., TNNI2, TNNT3, MYH3, MYH8, and TPM2) that encode components of the contractile apparatus of fast-twitch myofibers and cause DA syndromes. We now report the phenotypic features of a novel DA disorder characterized primarily by plantar flexion contractures in a large five-generation Utah family. Contractures of hips, elbows, wrists, and fingers were much milder though they varied in severity among affected individuals. All affected individuals had normal neurological examinations; electromyography and creatinine kinase levels were normal on selected individuals. We have tentatively labeled this condition distal arthrogryposis type 10 (DA10). PMID:17103435

  14. Dupuytren's Contracture: A Bibliometric Study of the Most Cited Papers.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Cormac Weekes; Joyce, Kenneth Mary; Rahmani, George; Carroll, Sean Michael; Kelly, Jack Laurence; Regan, Padraic James

    2015-10-01

    The literature on Dupuytren's contracture is vast yet little information is known as to which papers have been the most influential. The purpose of this study was to identify the 50 most cited papers on Dupuytren's contracture and perform a citation analysis. Utilizing the Web of Science, 23 surgical, medical, plastic and hand surgery journals were searched for papers on Dupuytren's contracture. Resulting articles were ranked in order of times cited and each paper was analyzed for article-type, year of publication, country of origin, institution and level of evidence. The 50 most cited articles represent many important landmarks in Dupuytren's treatment and contain several seminal works by experts in the field. Whilst the top 50 list highlights the important papers on the condition, they certainly do not provide information about the quality of the evidence of the research, as most papers presented level 4 or 5 evidence.

  15. New innovations in scar management.

    PubMed

    Widgerow, A D; Chait, L A; Stals, R; Stals, P J

    2000-01-01

    As current aesthetic surgical techniques become more standardized and results more predictable, a fine scar may be the demarcating line between acceptable and unacceptable aesthetic results. With this in mind, a scar management program has been adopted based on the modalities of wound support, hydration, and hastened maturity, all factors gleaned from scientific evidence published over the past 25 years. Tension on a scar in one axis will result in a stretched scar, probably initiated by neutrophils and their neutral proteases [18,26]. Tension on a scar from many directions or intermittently will result in a hypertrophic scar, possibly initiated by lymphocytes but definitely related to a prolongation of the inflammatory process, with increased fibroblast activity and overabundant extracellular matrix secretion [24,26]. The common initiating factor is the tension on the scar, and the critical element needed to counteract this tension is scar support. Clinical experience has shown us that the most reliable way to support a scar is by using microporous tape. Hydration is a second beneficial influence on scar control and is the basis of the use of silicone sheeting and gel [7,29,36]. Alpha Centella cream has two main components. The first is an extract from the plant Bulbine frutescens. This increases hydration under the tape by leaving a layer of fatty vesicles of glycoprotein on the skin surface. This also has antibacterial properties. The second component is the principal terpenoids extracted from the Centella asiatica plant. These include asiatic acid, madecassic acid, and asiaticoside. Centella asiatica has been documented to aid wound healing in a large number of scientific reports [5,12,21,22,33,34,40]. The most beneficial effect appears to be the stimulation of maturation of the scar by the production of type I collagen [4,19] and the resulting decrease in the inflammatory reaction and myofibroblast production. Thus these components have been incorporated into

  16. Multiple collagenase injections are safe for treatment of Dupuytren's contractures.

    PubMed

    Gajendran, Varun K; Hentz, Vincent; Kenney, Deborah; Curtin, Catherine M

    2014-07-01

    The authors report the case of a 65-year-old, right-hand-dominant man who had severe Dupuytren's disease with multiple cords and flexion contractures of the metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints of both hands and underwent repeated collagenase injections for treatment. Collagenase has been shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of Dupuytren's contractures when administered as a single dose, but the results of multiple injections over a prolonged period are unknown. Antibodies to collagenase develop in all patients after several treatments, raising concerns about safety and efficacy as a result of sensitization from repeated exposures. The antibodies generated as a result of repeated exposure to collagenase could theoretically render it less effective with time and could also lead to immune reactions as severe as anaphylaxis. The authors present the case of a single patient who experienced continued correction of his contractures with only minor and self-limited adverse reactions after administration of 12 collagenase doses through 15 injections during a 4-year period. Over time, the injections continued to be effective at correcting metacarpophalangeal joint contractures, but less effective at correcting proximal interphalangeal joint contractures. The patient did eventually require a fasciectomy, but the safety and modest success of the repeated collagenase injections shows promise for a less invasive treatment with a better risk profile than open fasciectomy. Although further studies are needed, repeated administration of collagenase appears to be safe and modestly effective for severe Dupuytren's contractures, although a fasciectomy may ultimately be required in the most severe cases.

  17. Comparison of the effectiveness of nonablative fractional laser versus ablative fractional laser in thyroidectomy scar prevention: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hei Sung; Lee, Ji Hae; Park, Young Min; Lee, Jun Young

    2012-04-01

    A scar is a mark that remains after the healing of a wound or other morbid processes. In the past, treatment was mainly focused on severe scarring, such as the hypertrophic and burn scars. However, scars from relatively minor wounds can also be stressful. The site of an open thyroidectomy is the anterior neck, a prominently exposed part of the body, where postoperative scarring can cause patients distress. The cosmetic outcome of the scar after thyroidectomy is of particular importance to women, who constitute the majority of patients with thyroid disease. Active prevention is more likely to yield better cosmetic results and would require fewer treatment sessions and less expense than scar revision procedures. Many interventions have been proposed, but there is yet no universal consensus on optimal treatment. Recently, focus has been made on 'laser scar prevention', where various types of lasers have been used to improve the appearance of scars. The purpose of this study was to improve the appearance of scars, by laser intervention of the wound healing process. In this pilot study, we comparatively examined the effect of non-ablative 1550-nm fractional Er: glass laser and ablative 2940-nm fractional Er: YAG laser on fresh surgical scars of patients with Fitzpatrick skin type III-IV.

  18. Quantitative measurement of hypertrophic scar: intrarater reliability, sensitivity, and specificity.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Correa, José A; Rachelska, Grazyna; Armour, Alexis; LaSalle, Léo

    2008-01-01

    The comparison of scar evaluation over time requires measurement tools with acceptable intrarater reliability and the ability to discriminate skin characteristics of interest. The objective of this study was to evaluate the intrarater reliability and sensitivity and specificity of the Cutometer, the Mexameter, and the DermaScan C relative to the modified Vancouver Scar Scale (mVSS) in patient-matched normal skin, normal scar (donor sites), and hypertrophic scar (HSc). A single investigator evaluated four tissue types (severe HSc, less severe HSc, donor site, and normal skin) in 30 burn survivors with all four measurement tools. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for the Cutometer was acceptable (> or =0.75) for the maximum deformation measure for the donor site and normal skin (>0.78) but was below the acceptable range for the HSc sites and all other parameters. The ICC for the Mexameter erythema (>0.75) and melanin index (>0.89) and the DermaScan C total thickness measurement (>0.82) were acceptable for all sites. The ICC for the total of the height, pliability, and vascularity subscales of the mVSS was acceptable (0.81) for normal scar but below the acceptable range for the scar sites. The DermaScan C was clearly able to discriminate HSc from normal scar and normal skin based on the total thickness measure. The Cutometer was less discriminating but was still able to discriminate HSc from normal scar and normal skin. The Mexameter erythema index was not a good discriminator of HSc and normal scar. Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated to establish the best cutoff point for the DermaScan C total thickness and the Cutometer maximum deformation, which were 2.034 and 0.387 mm, respectively. This study showed that although the Cutometer, the DermaScan C, and the Mexameter have measurement properties that make them attractive substitutes for the mVSS, caution must be used when interpreting results since the Cutometer has a ceiling effect when

  19. Congenital contractural arachnodactyly with neurogenic muscular atrophy: case report.

    PubMed

    Scola, R H; Werneck, L C; Iwamoto, F M; Ribas, L C; Raskin, S; Correa Neto, Y

    2001-06-01

    We report the case of a 3-(1/2)-year-old girl with hypotonia, multiple joint contractures, hip luxation, arachnodactyly, adducted thumbs, dolichostenomelia, and abnormal external ears suggesting the diagnosis of congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA). The serum muscle enzymes were normal and the needle electromyography showed active and chronic denervation. The muscle biopsy demonstrated active and chronic denervation compatible with spinal muscular atrophy. Analysis of exons 7 and 8 of survival motor neuron gene through polymerase chain reaction did not show deletions. Neurogenic muscular atrophy is a new abnormality associated with CCA, suggesting that CCA is clinically heterogeneous.

  20. Triceps surae contracture: implications for foot and ankle surgery.

    PubMed

    Abdulmassih, Sami; Phisitkul, Phinit; Femino, John E; Amendola, Annunziato

    2013-07-01

    Restricted ankle dorsiflexion secondary to contracture of the gastrocnemius-soleus complex is frequently encountered in patients with foot and ankle pain and is well documented in the literature. During gait, decreased dorsiflexion shifts weight-bearing pressures from the heel to the forefoot, which may result in or exacerbate one of several pathologic conditions. Modest success has been achieved with nonsurgical management of triceps surae contracture, including splinting and stretching exercises. Surgical lengthening of the gastrocnemius-soleus complex at multiple levels has been described, and early clinical results have been promising. Additional research is required to further elucidate the long-term outcomes of various lengthening techniques.

  1. Case of extreme growth deceleration after burns.

    PubMed

    Bline, Cheryl; Dylewski, Maggie L; Driscoll, Daniel N; Fuzaylov, Gennadiy

    2014-05-01

    Studies have demonstrated deceleration in both weight and height following burns in children. It is expected patients will display catch up growth and return to normal weight within three years but continued height deficiency may remain in cases of severe burns. We describe a case of severe growth retardation of 8 years old orphan child from Ukraine who suffered of burn less than 40% of total body surface area when he was a 3 years of life. His case was complicated by domestic abuse, neglect and limited medical care. He initially presented to the United States for surgical care of his contractures but his treatment quickly focused on his profound growth retardation. Despite aggressive nutritional supplementation and evaluation he did not demonstrate any weight gain.

  2. Bilateral flexor tendon contracture following onychectomy in 2 cats.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Maureen A; Laverty, Peter H; Soiderer, Emily E

    2005-03-01

    Two cats presented with bilateral flexor tendon contracture following onychectomy. This previously unreported complication proved to be painful and debilitating. Deep digital flexor tenectomy successfully resolved the problem. Twelve months after surgery, the first cat remains free of complications. The second cat recovered full limb function, but died of unrelated causes.

  3. Bilateral flexor tendon contracture following onychectomy in 2 cats

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Two cats presented with bilateral flexor tendon contracture following onychectomy. This previously unreported complication proved to be painful and debilitating. Deep digital flexor tenectomy successfully resolved the problem. Twelve months after surgery, the first cat remains free of complications. The second cat recovered full limb function, but died of unrelated causes. PMID:15884646

  4. Surgical Release of Severe Flexion Contracture for Oncologic Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Vincent Y.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Severe postoperative knee contractures after arthroplasty or megaprosthesis reconstruction occur rarely, but are devastating complications. Management of preoperative flexion contractures is well-described, but there is a paucity of literature for surgical treatment of postoperative contractures. A retrospective chart review was performed for a single surgeon of cases between 1996 and 2014. Results: Nine patients (5 of 66 for pediatrics; 4 of 95 for adults) underwent surgical release for severe stiffness after implantation of knee megaprosthesis. The total arc of motion was improved from a preoperative mean of 34° (range, 10° to 70°) to a postoperative mean 89° (63° to 125°). The amount of extension improved by a mean of 27° (range, -3° to +70°) and the amount of flexion improved by a mean of 28° (range, -10° to +75°). Conclusion: Surgical release of severe postoperative knee contracture is a challenging procedure, but in most cases, the amount of extension and flexion can be improved, yielding a greater total arc of motion.

  5. Burn Wise

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Burn Wise is a partnership program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that emphasizes the importance of burning the right wood, the right way, in the right appliance to protect your home, health, and the air we breathe.

  6. Early dermabrasion of deep dermal burns with sandpaper. Case reports.

    PubMed

    Floccard, B; Tixier, F; Chatot-Henry, D; Lacotte, B; Mehdaoui, H; Drault, J N

    1998-12-01

    Deep dermal burns are initially difficult to evaluate, and they sometimes heal spontaneously. We present our experience of dermabrasion with sandpaper in four patients. It is a useful alternative to early excision of the scar. Skin grafts are not always required and the aesthetic results are excellent. Dermabrasion should be considered routinely for all deep dermal burns and particularly for facial burns and those caused by scalds.

  7. A new bromelain-based enzyme for the release of Dupuytren’s contracture

    PubMed Central

    Rinott, M.; Wolovelsky, A.; Rosenberg, L.; Shoham, Y.; Rozen, N.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Injectable Bromelain Solution (IBS) is a modified investigational derivate of the medical grade bromelain-debriding pharmaceutical agent (NexoBrid) studied and approved for a rapid (four-hour single application), eschar-specific, deep burn debridement. We conducted an ex vivo study to determine the ability of IBS to dissolve-disrupt (enzymatic fasciotomy) Dupuytren’s cords. Materials and Methods Specially prepared medical grade IBS was injected into fresh Dupuytren’s cords excised from patients undergoing surgical fasciectomy. These cords were tested by tension-loading them to failure with the Zwick 1445 (Zwick GmbH & Co. KG, Ulm, Germany) tension testing system. Results We completed a pilot concept-validation study that proved the efficacy of IBS to induce enzymatic fasciotomy in ten cords compared with control in ten cords. We then completed a dosing study with an additional 71 cords injected with IBS in descending doses from 150 mg/cc to 0.8 mg/cc. The dosing study demonstrated that the minimal effective dose of 0.5 cc of 6.25 mg/cc to 5 mg/cc could achieve cord rupture in more than 80% of cases. Conclusions These preliminary results indicate that IBS may be effective in enzymatic fasciotomy in Dupuytren’s contracture. Cite this article: Dr G. Rubin. A new bromelain-based enzyme for the release of Dupuytren’s contracture: Dupuytren’s enzymatic bromelain-based release. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:175–177. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.55.BJR-2016-0072. PMID:27174554

  8. [The scars of Andy Warhol].

    PubMed

    Scholz, A

    1996-02-01

    The biographical and artistic documents describing to the attempted assassination of the artist Andy Warhol are reviewed. The visible scars are interpreted as symbols of the damaged integrity of the skin.

  9. [Present and future of cell therapy in burns].

    PubMed

    Bargues, L; Prat, M; Leclerc, T; Bey, E; Lataillade, J-J

    2011-06-01

    Severe burned patients need definitive and efficient wound coverage. Outcome of massive burns has been improved by using cultured epithelial autografts (CEA). Despite fragility, percentages of success take, cost of treatment and long-term tendency to contracture, this surgical technique has been developed in few burn centres. First improvements were to combine CEA and dermis-like substitute. Cultured skin substitutes provide earlier skin closure and satisfying functional result. These methods have been used successfully in massive burns. Second improvement was to allow skin regeneration by using epidermal stem cells. Stem cells have capacity to differentiate into keratinocytes, to promote wound repair and to regenerate skin appendages. Human mesenchymal stem cells contribute to wound healing and were evaluated in cutaneous radiation syndrome. Skin regeneration and tissue engineering methods remain a complex challenge and offer the possibility of new treatment for injured and burned patients.

  10. Fire scars and ancient sand dunes in southern Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The rectangular green areas in this view of southern Australia are protected areas of natural forest (national parks and biospheric reserves), and the lighter surrounding colors (tan-brown) are agricultural croplands occupying land which once must have looked as green as the nature reserves but are now cleared of forest. The major green patch has been recently burned, as shown by the irregular pattern of a large, multiple burn scar. The pattern of the fire scar indicates that the fires were driven by winds blowing from left to right. Close examination of the view shows that the forests are rooted in a soil made up of a widespread sheet of ancient dune sand. The dunes can be seen best within the area of the large fire scar where the characteristic wavy, scalloped pattern of crescent dunes can be detected. The crescents indicate that the sand was heaped up by winds blowing from right to left in this view, in the opposite direction to the winds which fanned the fires. A few straight dunes

  11. Global Burned Area and Biomass Burning Emissions from Small Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randerson, J. T.; Chen, Y.; vanderWerf, G. R.; Rogers, B. M.; Morton, D. C.

    2012-01-01

    In several biomes, including croplands, wooded savannas, and tropical forests, many small fires occur each year that are well below the detection limit of the current generation of global burned area products derived from moderate resolution surface reflectance imagery. Although these fires often generate thermal anomalies that can be detected by satellites, their contributions to burned area and carbon fluxes have not been systematically quantified across different regions and continents. Here we developed a preliminary method for combining 1-km thermal anomalies (active fires) and 500 m burned area observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to estimate the influence of these fires. In our approach, we calculated the number of active fires inside and outside of 500 m burn scars derived from reflectance data. We estimated small fire burned area by computing the difference normalized burn ratio (dNBR) for these two sets of active fires and then combining these observations with other information. In a final step, we used the Global Fire Emissions Database version 3 (GFED3) biogeochemical model to estimate the impact of these fires on biomass burning emissions. We found that the spatial distribution of active fires and 500 m burned areas were in close agreement in ecosystems that experience large fires, including savannas across southern Africa and Australia and boreal forests in North America and Eurasia. In other areas, however, we observed many active fires outside of burned area perimeters. Fire radiative power was lower for this class of active fires. Small fires substantially increased burned area in several continental-scale regions, including Equatorial Asia (157%), Central America (143%), and Southeast Asia (90%) during 2001-2010. Globally, accounting for small fires increased total burned area by approximately by 35%, from 345 Mha/yr to 464 Mha/yr. A formal quantification of uncertainties was not possible, but sensitivity

  12. In vitro mechanical compression induces apoptosis and regulates cytokines release in hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Renò, Filippo; Sabbatini, Maurizio; Lombardi, Francesca; Stella, Maurizio; Pezzuto, Carla; Magliacani, Gilberto; Cannas, Mario

    2003-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars resulting from severe burns are usually treated by continuous elastic compression. Although pressure therapy reaches success rates of 60-85% its mechanisms of action are still poorly understood. In this study, apoptosis induction and release of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were evaluated in normal (n = 3) and hypertrophic (=7) scars from burns after in vitro mechanical compression. In the absence of compression (basal condition) apoptotic cells, scored using terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase assay, were present after 24 hours in the derma of both normal scar (23 +/- 0.4% of total cell) and hypertrophic scar (11.3 +/- 1.4%). Mechanical compression (constant pressure of 35 mmHg for 24 hours) increased apoptotic cell percentage both in normal scar (29.5 +/- 0.4%) and hypertrophic scar (29 +/- 1.7%). IL-1beta released in the medium was undetectable in normal scar under basal conditions while in hypertrophic scar the IL-1beta concentration was 3.48 +/- 0.2 ng/g. Compression in hypertrophic scar-induced secretion of IL-1beta twofold higher compared to basal condition. (7.72 +/- 0.2 ng/g). TNF-alpha basal concentration measured in normal scar medium was 8.52 +/- 4.01 ng/g and compression did not altered TNF-alpha release (12.86 +/- 7.84 ng/g). TNF-alpha basal release was significantly higher in hypertrophic scar (14.74 +/- 1.42 ng/g) compared to normal scar samples and TNF-alpha secretion was diminished (3.52 +/- 0.97 ng/g) after compression. In conclusion, in our in vitro model, mechanical compression resembling the clinical use of elastocompression was able to strongly increase apoptosis in the hypertrophic scar derma as observed during granulation tissue regression in normal wound healing. Moreover, the observed modulation of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha release by mechanical loading could play a key role in hypertrophy regression induced by elastocompression.

  13. Biologicals and Fetal Cell Therapy for Wound and Scar Management

    PubMed Central

    Hirt-Burri, Nathalie; Ramelet, Albert-Adrien; Raffoul, Wassim; de Buys Roessingh, Anthony; Scaletta, Corinne; Pioletti, Dominique; Applegate, Lee Ann

    2011-01-01

    Few biopharmaceutical preparations developed from biologicals are available for tissue regeneration and scar management. When developing biological treatments with cellular therapy, selection of cell types and establishment of consistent cell banks are crucial steps in whole-cell bioprocessing. Various cell types have been used in treatment of wounds to reduce scar to date including autolog and allogenic skin cells, platelets, placenta, and amniotic extracts. Experience with fetal cells show that they may provide an interesting cell choice due to facility of outscaling and known properties for wound healing without scar. Differential gene profiling has helped to point to potential indicators of repair which include cell adhesion, extracellular matrix, cytokines, growth factors, and development. Safety has been evidenced in Phase I and II clinical fetal cell use for burn and wound treatments with different cell delivery systems. We present herein that fetal cells present technical and therapeutic advantages compared to other cell types for effective cell-based therapy for wound and scar management. PMID:22363853

  14. A comparative study to evaluate the effect of honey dressing and silver sulfadiazene dressing on wound healing in burn patients.

    PubMed

    Baghel, P S; Shukla, S; Mathur, R K; Randa, R

    2009-07-01

    wound sterile in lesser time, has a better outcome in terms of prevention of hypertrophic scarring and post-burn contractures, and decreases the need of debridement irrespective of time of admission, when compared to SSD dressing.

  15. Burn sepsis and burn toxin

    PubMed Central

    Allgöwer, Martin; Städtler, Karl; Schoenenberger, Guido A

    1974-01-01

    The salient steps of a 20-year programme of research into the nature of burn disease are described. By burn disease we mean the late mortality and morbidity following burns. We have isolated a burn toxin which is derived from a thermal polymerization of cell membrane lipoproteins within the dermis and have studied its influence on the effects of sepsis. We have also used it in the development of active and passive immunization therapy of severe burns. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9 PMID:4429330

  16. Cement Burns

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Munir; Moynagh, M.; Lawlor, C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Cement burns account for relatively few admissions to a burn unit; however, these burns deserve separate consideration because of special features of diagnosis and management. Cement burns, even though potentially disabling, have rarely been reported in literature. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all patients admitted with cement burns injuries to the national burns unit at the St James's Hospital in Dublin, Ireland, over a 10-year period for the years 1996–2005. Results: A total of 46 patients with cement burns were admitted. The majority of patients were aged 16–74 years (mean age = 32 years). Eighty-seven percent of injuries occurred in an industrial and 13% in a domestic setting. The upper and lower extremities were involved in all the patients, and the mean total body surface area affected was 6.5%. The mean length of hospital stay was 21 days with a range of 1–40 days. Thirty-eight (82%) were surgically managed involving debridement and split-thickness skin graft (SSG) and four (9%) were conservatively managed. A further four did not have data available. Conclusion: Widespread inexperience in dealing with this group of cement burns patients and delays in referral to burns unit highlights the potential for greater levels of general awareness and knowledge in both prevention and treatment of these burns. As well, early debridement and split-thickness skin grafting at diagnosis constitutes the best means of reducing the high socioeconomic costs and allows for early return to work. PMID:18091981

  17. Chemical burns

    PubMed Central

    Cartotto, Robert C.; Peters, Walter J.; Neligan, Peter C.; Douglas, Leith G.; Beeston, Jeff

    1996-01-01

    Objectives To report a burn unit’s experience with chemical burns and to discuss the fundamental principles in managing chemical burns. Design A chart review. Setting A burn centre at a major university-affiliated hospital. Patients Twenty-four patients with chemical burns, representing 2.6% of all burn admissions over an 8-year period at the Ross Tilley Regional Adult Burn Centre. Seventy-five percent of the burn injuries were work-related accidents. Chemicals involved included hydrofluoric acid, sulfuric acid, black liquor, various lyes, potassium permanganate and phenol. Results Fourteen patients required excision and skin grafting. Complications were frequent and included ocular chemical contacts, wound infections, tendon exposures, toe amputation and systemic reactions from absorption of chemical. One patient died from a chemical scald burn to 98% of the body surface area. Conclusions The key principles in the management of chemical burns include removal of the chemical, copious irrigation, limited use of antidotes, correct estimation of the extent of injury, identification of systemic toxicity, treatment of ocular contacts and management of chemical inhalation injury. Individualized treatment is emphasized. PMID:8640619

  18. Scar remodeling after strabismus surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, I H

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with overcorrected strabismus (and several patients with undercorrection after extraocular muscle resection) underwent exploration of previously operated muscles, with the intention of advancing their tendons to prevent the need for surgery on additional muscles. Unexpectedly, it was found that, in many cases, an elongated scar segment of variable length was interposed between the muscle and its insertion site on the sclera. Laboratory investigations were carried out to elucidate the underlying mechanism(s) and to create an animal model of the disorder. METHODS: Lengthened scars were repaired on 198 muscles during 134 procedures performed on 123 patients. The scars consisted of amorphous connective tissue interposed between the globe and normal tendon. Repair was accomplished by excision of the scar and reattachment of the muscle to sclera, using absorbable sutures in 64 cases and nonabsorbable sutures in 70 cases. Histopathologic examination was performed on 82 clinical specimens, and tissue culture studies were performed on 7 specimens. To develop an animal model, 10 New Zealand white rabbits underwent bilateral superior rectus resection. Half of the eyes received sub-Tenon's injections of collagenase over the operative site during weeks 2, 3, 5, and 6 postoperatively; the other half received saline solution injections on the same schedule. At 10 weeks, half the sites were studied histologically, and the other half underwent collagen creep analysis. In a second study, the use of absorbable versus nonabsorbable sutures was compared in the rabbit model. RESULTS: In the clinical cases, the mean length of the elongated scar segments was 4.2 mm. A total of 105 of the 134 repair procedures were judged successful. Thirty-one procedures resulted in recurrence of the original overcorrection; 7 of these had documented restretches. Factors that distinguished patients with stretched scars from patients with classic slipped muscles included minimal or no

  19. Neck Contracture Release With Matriderm Collagen/Elastin Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, John E.; Mackie, Ian P.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: To demonstrate success with immediate split-skin graft application over Matriderm dermal matrix in a difficult neck contracture release. Methods: An aggressive neck contracture release, accompanied by complete platysmectomy, was followed by application of Matriderm, split-skin graft, Mepitel, and vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) dressing. Results: At VAC removal (day 7), graft take was almost complete over the dermal matrix and with minor “touch-up” were complete by day 9 postrepair. Results at 4 months show graft contraction and a marked diminution of the release obtained. The results, however, are still good and the patient is very happy. Conclusion: Immediate grafting over a dermal matrix appears to provide a good solution, with a gentle surgical learning curve, in this difficult postburn scenario. Postrelease contraction is, however, as inevitable as with other techniques. PMID:21451729

  20. Paraplegic flexion contracture of hip joints: An unsolvable problem

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sailendra

    2016-01-01

    Paraplegic flexion contracture of hip joints beyond 90° is a difficult condition to treat for any orthopedic surgeon. There is no fixed protocol of treatment described, by and large it is individualized. A 20 year old female presented with paraplegia for last 15 years due to irrecoverable spinal cord disease with complete sensory and motor loss of both lower extremities and was admitted with acute flexion contracture of both hip joints with trunk resting on thighs. She underwent bilateral proximal femoral resection. Both hip joints were straight immediately after surgery and patient could lie on her back. In a course of time, she started sitting on her buttocks, led a comfortable wheelchair life with a sitting balance. Proximal femoral resection is an effective method to treat long standing irrecoverable paraplegic acute flexion deformity of the hip joint. PMID:27904226

  1. Surgical correction of bladder neck contracture following prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Bugeja, Simon; Andrich, Daniela E; Mundy, Anthony R

    2014-01-01

    The surgical and non-surgical treatment of localised prostate cancer may be complicated by bladder neck contractures, prostatic urethral stenoses and bulbomembranous urethral strictures. In general, such complications following radical prostatectomy are less extensive, easier to treat and associated with a better outcome and more rapid recovery than the same complications following radiotherapy, high-intensity focussed ultrasound and cryotherapy. Treatment options range from minimally invasive endoscopic procedures to more complex and specialised open surgical reconstruction.In this chapter the surgical management of bladder neck contractures following the treatment of prostate cancer is described together with the management of prostatic urethral stenoses and bulbomembranous urethral strictures, given the difficulty in distinguishing them from one another clinically.

  2. Paraplegic flexion contracture of hip joints: An unsolvable problem.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sailendra

    2016-01-01

    Paraplegic flexion contracture of hip joints beyond 90° is a difficult condition to treat for any orthopedic surgeon. There is no fixed protocol of treatment described, by and large it is individualized. A 20 year old female presented with paraplegia for last 15 years due to irrecoverable spinal cord disease with complete sensory and motor loss of both lower extremities and was admitted with acute flexion contracture of both hip joints with trunk resting on thighs. She underwent bilateral proximal femoral resection. Both hip joints were straight immediately after surgery and patient could lie on her back. In a course of time, she started sitting on her buttocks, led a comfortable wheelchair life with a sitting balance. Proximal femoral resection is an effective method to treat long standing irrecoverable paraplegic acute flexion deformity of the hip joint.

  3. Microsurgery "without borders": new limits for reconstruction of post-burn sequelae in the humanitarian setting.

    PubMed

    Tocco-Tussardi, I; Presman, B; Cherubino, M; Garusi, C; Bassetto, F

    2016-03-31

    Post-burn contractures account for up to 50% of the workload of a plastic surgery team volunteering in developing nations. Best possible outcome most likely requires extensive surgery. However, extensive approaches such as microsurgery are generally discouraged in these settings. We report two successful cases of severe hand contractures reconstructed with free flaps on a surgical mission in Kenya. Microsurgery can be safely performed in the humanitarian setting by an integration of: personal skills; technical means; education of local personnel; follow-up services; and an effective network for communication.

  4. Intraoperative Manipulation for Flexion Contracture During Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshio; Minoda, Yukihide; Fumiaki, Inori; Nakagawa, Sigeru; Okajima, Yoshiaki; Kobayashi, Akio

    2016-11-01

    Joint gap balancing during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is important for ensuring postoperative joint stability and range of motion. Although the joint gap should be balanced to ensure joint stability, it is not easy to achieve perfect balancing during TKA. In particular, relative extension gap shortening can induce flexion contracture. Intraoperative manipulation is often empirically performed. This study evaluated the tension required for this manipulation and investigated the influence of intraoperative manipulation on the joint gap in cadaveric knees. Total knee arthroplasty was performed in 6 cadaveric knees from whole body cadavers. Flexion contracture was induced using an insert that was 4 mm thicker than the extension gap, and intraoperative manipulation was performed. Study measurements included the changes in the joint gap after manipulation at 6 positions, with the knee bending from extension to 120° flexion, and the manipulation tension that was required to create a 4-mm increase in the gap. The manipulation tension needed to create a 4-mm increase in the extension gap was 303±17 N. The changes in the joint gap after manipulation were 0.4 mm, 0.6 mm, 0.2 mm, -0.2 mm, -0.4 mm, and -0.6 mm at 0°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 90°, and 120° flexion, respectively. Therefore, the joint gap was not significantly changed by the manipulation. Intraoperative manipulation does not resolve flexion contracture. Therefore, if flexion contracture occurs during TKA, treatment with additional bone cutting and soft tissue release is likely more appropriate than manipulation. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1070-e1074.].

  5. Ischemic contracture of the left ventricle. Production and prevention.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, D C; Wilson, G J; Tanaka, S; Holness, D E; Lixfeld, W; Silver, M D; Rubis, L J; Goldstein, W; Gunstensen, J; Bigelow, W G

    1975-12-01

    Ischemic contracture of the left ventricle ("stone heart") is a recognized complication of prolonged periods of interruption of the coronary circulation during open-heart surgery. We have examined the effects of moderate hypothermia (28 degrees C.) and preoperative beta-adrenergic blockade (propranolol, 0.5 mg. per kilogram; 1.0 mg. per kilogram) on contracture development during ischemic arrest of the heart. Four groups of 8 dogs each were placed on total cardiopulmonary bypass, and ischemic arrest of the heart was produced by cross-clamping the ascending aorta and venting the left ventricle. Intramyocardial carbon dioxide tension was continuously monitored by mass spectrometry. When anaerobic energy production ceased, as indicated by a final plateau in the intramyocardial carbon dioxide accumulation curve, the ischemic arrest was terminated and the contractile state of the heart observed. These results are given in the text. We conclude that beta-adrenergic blockade delays, but does not prevent, the onset of ischemic contracture of the left ventricle under normothermic conditions. Moderate hypothermia appears to prevent this complication completely.

  6. Aesthetic septorhinoplasty in the burned nose.

    PubMed

    Hafezi, Farhad; Karimi, Hamid; Nouhi, Amirhosein

    2005-03-01

    Patients who have survived thermal injuries to the face suffer severe disfigurement from the devastating deformities of full-thickness facial burns. The nose is the prominent central organ of the face, which has crucial effect on Aesthetic appearance. The plastic surgeon's role to deal with such cases is to undertake procedures to produce a more pleasant look although the target organ could be the non-burned areas of the face. It is a common belief that surgical intervention under the scarred or grafted nose is risky and may result in skin or covering graft necrosis. For this reason, plastic surgeons are cautious and hesitate to perform Aesthetic surgery on burn scarred tissue. We present 13 cases, 10 women and three men with complete or subtotal nasal burn. Classic Aesthetic Rhinoplasty operations were performed to create a better appearance and correct any internal or external deviations. These procedures are carried out under severely burned skins, or previously grafted and reconstructed noses. Cases were followed for about a one-year period. There was no necrosis in any part of skin after surgery. We believe that Aesthetic rhinoplasty can be done safely in these victims with pleasing outcome. The problems that we encountered in these cases were irregularities of burned alar margins, multiple operations and intractable nasal deviation in severe cases.

  7. Feasibility and reliability of using an exoskeleton to emulate muscle contractures during walking.

    PubMed

    Attias, M; Bonnefoy-Mazure, A; De Coulon, G; Cheze, L; Armand, S

    2016-10-01

    Contracture is a permanent shortening of the muscle-tendon-ligament complex that limits joint mobility. Contracture is involved in many diseases (cerebral palsy, stroke, etc.) and can impair walking and other activities of daily living. The purpose of this study was to quantify the reliability of an exoskeleton designed to emulate lower limb muscle contractures unilaterally and bilaterally during walking. An exoskeleton was built according to the following design criteria: adjustable to different morphologies; respect of the principal lines of muscular actions; placement of reflective markers on anatomical landmarks; and the ability to replicate the contractures of eight muscles of the lower limb unilaterally and bilaterally (psoas, rectus femoris, hamstring, hip adductors, gastrocnemius, soleus, tibialis posterior, and peroneus). Sixteen combinations of contractures were emulated on the unilateral and bilateral muscles of nine healthy participants. Two sessions of gait analysis were performed at weekly intervals to assess the reliability of the emulated contractures. Discrete variables were extracted from the kinematics to analyse the reliability. The exoskeleton did not affect normal walking when contractures were not emulated. Kinematic reliability varied from poor to excellent depending on the targeted muscle. Reliability was good for the bilateral and unilateral gastrocnemius, soleus, and tibialis posterior as well as the bilateral hamstring and unilateral hip adductors. The exoskeleton can be used to replicate contracture on healthy participants. The exoskeleton will allow us to differentiate primary and compensatory effects of muscle contractures on gait kinematics.

  8. Deltoid contracture mimicking shoulder dislocation in a 7-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Lian, L Y; Zhang, L J; Zhao, Q

    2010-09-01

    Contracture of the deltoid muscle, a relatively uncommon disorder in children, can be caused by repeated intramuscular injection, trauma, or congenital disease. The typical clinical manifestations of deltoid contracture (i.e., a palpable fibrous cord within the deltoid muscle, abduction contracture of the shoulder, winged scapula, and skin dimpling over the fibrous bands), however, may be atypical or even lacking, thus, leading to misdiagnosis. The procedure going from misdiagnosis to recognition of the correct diagnosis is reviewed in a 7-year-old boy with deltoid contracture.

  9. Soft tissue trauma and scar revision.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Steven R; Sjogren, Phayvanh P

    2014-11-01

    Numerous techniques and treatments have been described for scar revision, with most studies focusing on the adult population. A comprehensive review of the literature reveals a paucity of references related specifically to scar revision in children. This review describes the available modalities in pediatric facial scar revision. The authors have integrated current practices in soft tissue trauma and scar revision, including closure techniques and materials, topical therapy, steroid injection, cutaneous laser therapy, and tissue expanders.

  10. Intrauterine endometriotic cyst at the site of previous cesarean scar; scar endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Isci, H; Gonenc, G; Yigiter, A B; Guducu, N; Dünder, I

    2015-01-01

    Uterine scar endometriosis is an extremely rare entitiy. As the surgical procedures of the uterus increases through time, scar endometriosis may be diagnosed more often in the future. A case of uterine scar endometriosis is presented with complaints of menstruation lasting one day with associated pelvic pain. When a cystic mass in the site of previous surgery is diagnosed, scar endometriosis must be considered.

  11. Stimulated infrared thermography applied to differentiate scar tissue from peri-scar tissue: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Riquet, Damien; Houel, Nicolas; Bodnar, Jean-Luc

    2016-08-01

    Every human injury leads to a scar formation. The healing process leads to the formation of new tissue: the scar, which is different from the original tissue. This process is influenced by mechanical strength and the local vasculature is modified. The purpose of this study is to show that there are various temperatures between the scar and the peri-scar area associated with the healing process that can be estimated using the thermal infrared camera. In the study, 12 scars were stimulated by cold. Several changes of temperature were observed between scar and peri-scar area for 10 min. Scars appeared significantly colder with a Wilcoxon test (p = 0.01). Results showed that stimulated infrared thermography can be used to monitor the temperature difference between the scar and peri-scar tissue.

  12. The incidence of burns among sex-trafficking victims in India.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Nadia; Sinha, Indranil; Husain, Fatima; Shah, Ajul; Patel, Anup

    2014-09-01

    Sex trafficking remains a flagrant violation of human rights, creating many public health concerns. During the initiation period, these victims experience acts of violence including gang rapes, subjecting them to traumatic injuries that include burns. Furthermore, lack of access to health care, particularly surgical, keeps them from receiving treatment for these functionally debilitating contractures caused by burns. This piece provides an overview of burns among sex-trafficked victims in India and the efforts by Cents of Relief to address the associated surgical burden of disease.

  13. The Incidence of Burns Among Sex-Trafficking Victims in India

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Nadia; Sinha, Indranil; Husain, Fatima; Shah, Ajul; Patel, Anup

    2014-01-01

    Sex trafficking remains a flagrant violation of human rights, creating many public health concerns. During the initiation period, these victims experience acts of violence including gang rapes, subjecting them to traumatic injuries that include burns. Furthermore, lack of access to health care, particularly surgical, keeps them from receiving treatment for these functionally debilitating contractures caused by burns. This piece provides an overview of burns among sex-trafficked victims in India and the efforts by Cents of Relief to address the associated surgical burden of disease. PMID:25191142

  14. Burn Pits

    MedlinePlus

    ... unexploded ordnance, petroleum and lubricant products, plastics, rubber, wood, and discarded food. Burning waste in open air ... Regulations Web Policies No FEAR Act Whistleblower Rights & Protections Site Index USA.gov White House Inspector General ...

  15. Potassium Chloride Versus Voltage Clamp Contractures in Ventricular Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morad, M.; Reeck, S.; Rao, M.

    1981-01-01

    In frog ventricle, developed tension was markedly larger in response to depolarization caused by a voltage clamp step than to depolarization induced by high concentrations of potassium chloride. Measurement of extracellular potassium activity at the surface and at the depth of muscle during the development of contractures showed that the diffusion of potassium is much slower than the spread of depolarization through the cross section of muscle. These two observations suggest that competition between the depolarizing and the negative inotropic effects of an increase in the extracellular potassium ion concentration may determine the time course and magnitude of contractile tension in heart muscle.

  16. Smoke, Clouds, and Radiation-Brazil (SCAR-B) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Hobbs, P. V.; Kirchoff, V. W. J. H.; Artaxo, P.; Remer, L. A.; Holben, B. N.; King, M. D.; Ward, D. E.; Prins, E. M.; Longo, K. M.; Mattos, L. F.; Nobre, C. A.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Ji, Q.; Thompson, A. M.; Gleason, J. F.; Christopher, S. A.; Tsay, S.-C.

    1998-01-01

    The Smoke, Clouds, and Radiation-Brazil (SCAR-B) field project took place in the Brazilian Amazon and cerrado regions in August-September 1995 as a collaboration between Brazilian and American scientists. SCAR-B, a comprehensive experiment to study biomass burning, emphasized measurements of surface biomass, fires, smoke aerosol and trace gases, clouds, and radiation. their climatic effects, and remote sensing from aircraft and satellites. It included aircraft and ground-based in situ measurements of smoke emission factors and the compositions, sizes, and optical properties of the smoke particles; studies of the formation of ozone; the transport and evolution of smoke; and smoke interactions with water vapor and clouds. This overview paper introduces SCAR-B and summarizes some of the main results obtained so far. (1) Fires: measurements of the size distribution of fires, using the 50 m resolution MODIS Airborne Simulator, show that most of the fires are small (e.g. 0.005 square km), but the satellite sensors (e.g., AVHRR and MODIS with I km resolution) can detect fires in Brazil which are responsible for 60-85% of the burned biomass: (2) Aerosol: smoke particles emitted from fires increase their radius by as much as 60%, during their first three days in the atmosphere due to condensation and coagulation, reaching a mass median radius of 0.13-0.17 microns: (3) Radiative forcing: estimates of the globally averaged direct radiative forcing due to smoke worldwide, based on the properties of smoke measured in SCAR-B (-O.l to -0.3 W m(exp -2)), are smaller than previously modeled due to a lower single-scattering albedo (0.8 to 0.9), smaller scattering efficiency (3 square meters g(exp -2) at 550 nm), and low humidification factor; and (4) Effect on clouds: a good relationship was found between cloud condensation nuclei and smoke volume concentrations, thus an increase in the smoke emission is expected to affect cloud properties. In SCAR-B, new techniques were developed

  17. Physiological Implications of Myocardial Scar Structure.

    PubMed

    Richardson, William J; Clarke, Samantha A; Quinn, T Alexander; Holmes, Jeffrey W

    2015-09-20

    Once myocardium dies during a heart attack, it is replaced by scar tissue over the course of several weeks. The size, location, composition, structure, and mechanical properties of the healing scar are all critical determinants of the fate of patients who survive the initial infarction. While the central importance of scar structure in determining pump function and remodeling has long been recognized, it has proven remarkably difficult to design therapies that improve heart function or limit remodeling by modifying scar structure. Many exciting new therapies are under development, but predicting their long-term effects requires a detailed understanding of how infarct scar forms, how its properties impact left ventricular function and remodeling, and how changes in scar structure and properties feed back to affect not only heart mechanics but also electrical conduction, reflex hemodynamic compensations, and the ongoing process of scar formation itself. In this article, we outline the scar formation process following a myocardial infarction, discuss interpretation of standard measures of heart function in the setting of a healing infarct, then present implications of infarct scar geometry and structure for both mechanical and electrical function of the heart and summarize experiences to date with therapeutic interventions that aim to modify scar geometry and structure. One important conclusion that emerges from the studies reviewed here is that computational modeling is an essential tool for integrating the wealth of information required to understand this complex system and predict the impact of novel therapies on scar healing, heart function, and remodeling following myocardial infarction.

  18. Physiological Implications of Myocardial Scar Structure

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, WJ; Clarke, SA; Quinn, TA; Holmes, JW

    2016-01-01

    Once myocardium dies during a heart attack, it is replaced by scar tissue over the course of several weeks. The size, location, composition, structure and mechanical properties of the healing scar are all critical determinants of the fate of patients who survive the initial infarction. While the central importance of scar structure in determining pump function and remodeling has long been recognized, it has proven remarkably difficult to design therapies that improve heart function or limit remodeling by modifying scar structure. Many exciting new therapies are under development, but predicting their long-term effects requires a detailed understanding of how infarct scar forms, how its properties impact left ventricular function and remodeling, and how changes in scar structure and properties feed back to affect not only heart mechanics but also electrical conduction, reflex hemodynamic compensations, and the ongoing process of scar formation itself. In this article, we outline the scar formation process following an MI, discuss interpretation of standard measures of heart function in the setting of a healing infarct, then present implications of infarct scar geometry and structure for both mechanical and electrical function of the heart and summarize experiences to date with therapeutic interventions that aim to modify scar geometry and structure. One important conclusion that emerges from the studies reviewed here is that computational modeling is an essential tool for integrating the wealth of information required to understand this complex system and predict the impact of novel therapies on scar healing, heart function, and remodeling following myocardial infarction. PMID:26426470

  19. Cooling of burns: Mechanisms and models.

    PubMed

    Wright, E H; Harris, A L; Furniss, D

    2015-08-01

    The role of cooling in the acute management of burns is widely accepted in clinical practice, and is a cornerstone of basic first aid in burns. This has been underlined in a number of animal models. The mechanism by which it delivers its benefit is poorly understood, but there is a reduction in burns progression over the first 48 h, reduced healing time, and some subjective improvements in scarring when cooling is administered after burning. Intradermal temperature normalises within a matter of seconds to a few minutes, yet the benefits of even delayed cooling persist, implying it is not simply the removal of thermal energy from the damaged tissues. Animal models have used oedema formation, preservation of dermal perfusion, healing time and hair retention as indicators of burns severity, and have shown cooling to improve these indices, but pharmacological or immunological blockade of humoural and cellular mediators of inflammation did not reproduce the benefit of cooling. More recently, some studies of tissue from human and animal burns have shown consistent, reproducible, temporal changes in gene expression in burned tissues. Here, we review the experimental evidence of the role and mechanism of cooling in burns management, and suggest future research directions that may eventually lead to improved treatment outcomes.

  20. Evaluating the accuracy of a MODIS direct broadcast algorithm for mapping burned areas over Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, A.; Hao, W. M.; Nordgren, B.; Corley, R.; Urbanski, S. P.; Ponomarev, E. I.

    2012-12-01

    Emission inventories for open area biomass burning rely on burned area estimates as a key component. We have developed an automated algorithm based on MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite instrument data for estimating burned area from biomass fires. The algorithm is based on active fire detections, burn scars from MODIS calibrated radiances (MOD02HKM), and MODIS land cover classification (MOD12Q1). Our burned area product combines active fires and burn scar detections using spatio-temporal criteria, and has a resolution of 500 x 500 meters. The algorithm has been used for smoke emission estimates over the western United States. We will present the assessed accuracy of our algorithm in different regions of Russia with intense wildfire activity by comparing our results with the burned area product from the Sukachev Institute of Forest (SIF) of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Krasnoyarsk, Russia, as well as burn scars extracted from Landsat imagery. Landsat burned area extraction was based on threshold classification using the Jenks Natural Breaks algorithm to the histogram for each singe scene Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) image. The final evaluation consisted of a grid-based approach, where the burned area in each 3 km x 3 km grid cell was calculated and compared with the other two sources. A comparison between our burned area estimates and those from SIF showed strong correlation (R2=0.978), although our estimate is approximately 40% lower than the SIF burned areas. The linear fit between the burned area from Landsat scenes and our MODIS algorithm over 18,754 grid cells resulted with a slope of 0.998 and R2=0.7, indicating that our algorithm is suitable for mapping burned areas for fires in boreal forests and other ecosystems. The results of our burned area algorithm will be used for estimating emissions of trace gasses and aerosol particles (including black carbon) from biomass burning in Northern Eurasia for the period of 2002-2011.

  1. Outcomes of ablative fractional laser scar treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deok-Woo; Hwang, Na-Hyun; Yoon, Eul-Sik; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Park, Seung-Ha

    2015-04-01

    Ablative fractional laser (AFL) systems are commonly used to treat various scars, and recent reports have indicated that early scar treatment with fractional lasers has good aesthetic results. Some scars respond dramatically to AFL treatment, incurring high levels of patient satisfaction; however, other scars respond poorly or became worse after treatment. This study was designed to clarify prognostic factors that predict AFL scar treatment outcomes. A total of 108 patients were included in this study. The fractional laser treatments were repeated every 4 weeks until the scar site was acceptable and no additional improvement was expected or the patient discontinued the treatment. The scar improvements were defined as changes in the Manchester scar scale (MSS) from before to after laser treatment. A digital camera was used to acquire digital photographs of the scars under the same light source, the same background, exposure, and white balance. This study developed a modification of the MSS for image analysis in which colour assessment was based on L*a*b* colour co-ordinates of the digital images. The mean MSS values prior to and after laser treatments were 11.6 ± 3.6 and 9.5 ± 2.9, respectively (p < 0.01). AFL treatment improved the qualities of each scar, and the improvements were evident in colour and contour. Scar elevation, pigmentation, high vascularity, early onset of treatment, and the number of treatment sessions were directly related to scar improvement after AFL therapy (p < 0.05). AFL treatments were effective methods for scar treatment. Clinicians can use these prognostic factors to determine treatment plans and to estimate scar improvement after AFL treatment.

  2. Scar formation and ligament healing.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, K A; Frank, C B

    1998-12-01

    Ligaments are highly organized, dense, fibrous connective-tissue structures that provide stability to joints and participate in joint proprioception. Injuries to ligaments induce a healing response that is characterized by the formation of a scar. The scar tissue is weaker, larger and creeps more than normal ligament and is associated with an increased amount of minor collagens (types III, V and VI), decreased collagen cross-links and an increased amount of glycosaminoglycans. Studies have shown that certain surgical variables alter the healing of ligaments. Such factors include the size of gap between the healing ligament, ends, the use of motion in a stable joint and the presence of multiple ligamentous injuries. Research on ligament healing includes studies on low-load and failure-load properties, alterations in the expression of matrix molecules, cytokine modulation of healing and gene therapy as a method to alter matrix protein and cytokine production.

  3. Two dimensional unstable scar statistics.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Lee, Kelvin S. H. (ITT Industries/AES Los Angeles, CA)

    2006-12-01

    This report examines the localization of time harmonic high frequency modal fields in two dimensional cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This paper examines the enhancements for these unstable orbits when the opposing mirrors are both convex and concave. In the latter case the construction includes the treatment of interior foci.

  4. Quantification of scar margin in keloid different from atrophic scar by multiphoton microscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zheng, Liqin; Jiang, Xingshan; Chen, Jianxin; Lin, Bifang

    2011-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was applied to examine the marginal region at dermis of keloid compared with atrophic scar. High-resolution large-area image showed an obvious boundary at the scar margin and different morphological patterns of elastin and collagen on the two sides, further visualized by the focused three-dimensional images. Content alteration of elastin or collagen between the two sides of boundary was quantified to show significant difference between keloid and atrophic scar. Owing to the raised property of keloid with overproduced collagen on the scar side, the content alteration was positive for elastin and negative for collagen. On the contrary, the content alteration was negative for elastin and positive for collagen in the atrophic scar case due to the atrophic collagen on the scar side. It indicated that examination of the scar margin by MPM may lead a new way to discriminate different types of scars and better understand the scarring mechanisms.

  5. The Mast Cell Stabilizer Ketotifen Fumarate Lessens Contracture Severity and Myofibroblast Hyperplasia: A Study of a Rabbit Model of Posttraumatic Joint Contractures

    PubMed Central

    Monument, Michael J.; Hart, David A.; Befus, A. Dean; Salo, Paul T.; Zhang, Mei; Hildebrand, Kevin A.

    2010-01-01

    Background The propensity of the elbow to become stiff after trauma is widely appreciated and in this setting, the joint capsule is commonly recognized as the major motion-limiting anatomical structure. Affected joint capsules become fibrotic, characterized by myofibroblast hyperplasia and excessive collagen deposition. Mast cell hyperplasia is common within fibrotic tissue and mast cells are known to synthesize many profibrotic mediators. We have hypothesized that mast cell inhibition after skeletal injury will lessen the degree of contracture severity and will reduce myofibroblast hyperplasia within the joint capsule. Methods Posttraumatic contractures of the knee were created using a combination of intra-articular injury coupled to internal immobilization in skeletally mature, New Zealand white rabbits. Four groups of animals were studied: a non-operative control group (CON), an operative contracture group (ORC) and two-operative groups treated with a mast cell stabilizer, Ketotifen fumarate at doses of 0.5mg/kg (KF0.5) and 1.0mg/kg (KF1.0) twice daily, respectively. After 8 weeks of immobilization, flexion contractures were measured biomechanically and the posterior joint capsule was harvested for quantification of myofibroblast and mast cell numbers. Results Flexion contractures developed in the ORC group (58 ± 14°) and the severity of contracture was significantly reduced in both groups treated with Ketotifen (KF0.5: 42 ± 17° and KF1.0: 45 ± 10°, p<0.02). Joint capsule myofibroblast and mast cell numbers were significantly increased within the operative contracture group (p<0.001). In both surgical groups treated with Ketotifen, myofibroblast and mast cell numbers were significantly reduced (p<0.001). Conclusions The use of a mast cell stabilizer, Ketotifen was effective in reducing the biomechanical and cellular manifestations of joint capsule fibrosis in a rabbit model of posttraumatic joint contracture. This is suggestive that an inflammatory pathway

  6. Acne Scars: Pathogenesis, Classification and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fabbrocini, Gabriella; Annunziata, M. C.; D'Arco, V.; De Vita, V.; Lodi, G.; Mauriello, M. C.; Pastore, F.; Monfrecola, G.

    2010-01-01

    Acne has a prevalence of over 90% among adolescents and persists into adulthood in approximately 12%–14% of cases with psychological and social implications. Possible outcomes of the inflammatory acne lesions are acne scars which, although they can be treated in a number of ways, may have a negative psychological impact on social life and relationships. The main types of acne scars are atrophic and hypertrophic scars. The pathogenesis of acne scarring is still not fully understood, but several hypotheses have been proposed. There are numerous treatments: chemical peels, dermabrasion/microdermabrasion, laser treatment, punch techniques, dermal grafting, needling and combined therapies for atrophic scars: silicone gels, intralesional steroid therapy, cryotherapy, and surgery for hypertrophic and keloidal lesions. This paper summarizes acne scar pathogenesis, classification and treatment options. PMID:20981308

  7. Leg contracture in mice after single and multifractionated 137Cs exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, K.; Hunter, N.; Stone, H.B.; Withers, H.R.

    1987-08-01

    This is a report of studies of time-dose relationships for post-irradiation leg contractures in mice. The isoeffect doses for various degrees of contracture, measured 250 days after irradiation, increased with the number of fractions, but not with the overall treatment times, throughout 30 days. The isoeffect curves relating the total doses for given levels of responses to the doses per fraction were steeper for leg contractures than for acute skin reactions. The alpha/beta ratios ranged from 1.4 to 5.0 Gy, depending on the degrees of contracture. They were less than the 7.5 to 50 Gy for acute skin reactions as determined in previous experiments using the same animals and irradiation systems. Thus, the data resembled those from other slowly-responding normal tissues such as the spinal cord, kidney and lung. The leg contracture consisted of dermatogenic, myogenic, and arthrogenic components; after the mice were sacrificed there was residual contracture following removal of the skin and muscle. Inhibition of bone growth accounted for only a small proportion of the contracture. The overall response reflected responses of several tissue types.

  8. Noninflammatory Joint Contractures Arising from Immobility: Animal Models to Future Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kayleigh; Trudel, Guy; Laneuville, Odette

    2015-01-01

    Joint contractures, defined as the limitation in the passive range of motion of a mobile joint, can be classified as noninflammatory diseases of the musculoskeletal system. The pathophysiology is not well understood; limited information is available on causal factors, progression, the pathophysiology involved, and prediction of response to treatment. The clinical heterogeneity of joint contractures combined with the heterogeneous contribution of joint connective tissues to joint mobility presents challenges to the study of joint contractures. Furthermore, contractures are often a symptom of a wide variety of heterogeneous disorders that are in many cases multifactorial. Extended immobility has been identified as a causal factor and evidence is provided from both experimental and epidemiology studies. Of interest is the involvement of the joint capsule in the pathophysiology of joint contractures and lack of response to remobilization. While molecular pathways involved in the development of joint contractures are being investigated, current treatments focus on physiotherapy, which is ineffective on irreversible contractures. Future treatments may include early diagnosis and prevention. PMID:26247029

  9. A method to evaluate contractures effects during the gait of children with Duchenne dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Nathaly; Gravel, Denis; Nadeau, Sylvie; Desjardins, Pierre; Brière, Anabèle

    2007-03-01

    Joint contractures are the second major impairment affecting the locomotor system of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). While the negative influence of joint contractures has been documented, the passive moments produced by joint contractures could benefit the gait of patients with muscle weakness. We describe a biomechanical model that quantifies the mechanical contribution of ankle and hip flexion contractures to the gait of DMD children. Kinematic and kinetic parameters were measured under the same experimental conditions during the gait and passive resistance assessment of two subjects: one healthy child as a control, and one child with DMD. The child with DMD had a plantar flexion contracture and a greater ankle stiffness coefficient than the control child. During gait, the contribution of the ankle passive moment to the net moment was more important for the child with DMD than for the control child. At the hip, passive joint moments and passive moment contribution were more important for the control child but this was not related to the presence of hip flexion contracture. These preliminary results suggest the model might be used to evaluate contractures effect on a larger cohort of subjects.

  10. Noninflammatory Joint Contractures Arising from Immobility: Animal Models to Future Treatments.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kayleigh; Trudel, Guy; Laneuville, Odette

    2015-01-01

    Joint contractures, defined as the limitation in the passive range of motion of a mobile joint, can be classified as noninflammatory diseases of the musculoskeletal system. The pathophysiology is not well understood; limited information is available on causal factors, progression, the pathophysiology involved, and prediction of response to treatment. The clinical heterogeneity of joint contractures combined with the heterogeneous contribution of joint connective tissues to joint mobility presents challenges to the study of joint contractures. Furthermore, contractures are often a symptom of a wide variety of heterogeneous disorders that are in many cases multifactorial. Extended immobility has been identified as a causal factor and evidence is provided from both experimental and epidemiology studies. Of interest is the involvement of the joint capsule in the pathophysiology of joint contractures and lack of response to remobilization. While molecular pathways involved in the development of joint contractures are being investigated, current treatments focus on physiotherapy, which is ineffective on irreversible contractures. Future treatments may include early diagnosis and prevention.

  11. The Timing of Implant Exchange in the Development of Capsular Contracture After Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Weintraub, Jennifer L.; Kahn, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Capsular contracture is a common complication associated with reconstructive breast surgery. The optimal time interval between the completion of tissue expansion and placement of the permanent implant is arbitrary and incompletely studied in the literature. The aim of the study was to determine whether the time interval between completion of expansion and placement of the permanent implant would affect the incidence of capsular contracture. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of 112 patients with breast cancer, including 140 breasts, who underwent postmastectomy tissue expander placement between 1997 and 2004. All patients underwent replacement of tissue expander with a permanent prosthesis. Data were collected retrospectively, including whether the patient smoked, underwent radiation therapy, had saline or silicone implant reconstruction, required reoperation after tissue expander placement or after permanent implant placement, Baker classification, and the interval between completion of expansion and placement of permanent implant. Results: We used a logistic regression model to incorporate the predictors of capsular contracture. Keeping all other predictors constant, we found that the time interval between implant exchange had no effect on capsular contracture. The only significant predictor of capsular contracture was whether the patient required a reoperation after the permanent implant was placed (P = .0001). Conclusions: Allowing the capsule around a tissue expander to mature does not significantly affect development of capsular contracture. However, a complication that necessitates disrupting the periprosthetic capsule of the permanent implant with an operation significantly increases odds of developing contracture. PMID:18587490

  12. 4-aminopyridine-induced contracture in frog ventricle is due to calcium released from intracellular stores.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, A; Subbanna, P K; Arasan, S; Rajapathy, J; Rao, J P; Subramani, S

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study is to demonstrate the presence of intracellular calcium store in frog ventricle based on contractures induced by 4-aminopyridine in calcium-free media. Frog-ventricular strips were subjected to field stimulation at 0.2 Hz and the force of contraction was recorded after stabilization. The preparation was then kept quiescent for some time in solutions with different sodium concentrations, containing 0 or 1 mmol/L calcium. Caffeine, 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), or tetraethylammonium chloride was then added. Frog skeletal muscle preparations were used as positive controls for the caffeine experiments. Frog ventricular preparations did not develop contractures (sustained contractions) in the presence of caffeine (25 mmol/L), while frog skeletal muscle preparations developed caffeine-induced contractures. However, 4-AP (16 mmol/L) was able to induce contractures in quiescent frog ventricular preparations, even when they were superfused with calcium-free solution. 4-AP contractures in frog ventricle were seen in the presence of nifedipine also. Amplitude of 4-AP evoked contractures in frog ventricle were much larger in low sodium (30 mmol/L) and sodium-free (sodium substituted by lithium) solutions than in normal sodium solution, suggesting that the route of extrusion of the cytosolic calcium (released from intracellular stores by 4-AP) is the sodium calcium exchanger, which gets reversed in low sodium solutions. Tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA) was not able to induce contractures in frog ventricle suggesting that the contracture evoked by 4-AP is not due to its potassium channel blocking effect. In quiescent frog skeletal muscle preparations, caffeine as well as 4-AP induced contractures in calcium-free solutions. We therefore conclude that there is a caffeine-insensitive, 4-AP sensitive intracellular calcium store in the frog ventricle.

  13. Effective Treatments of Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bingrong

    2015-01-01

    Atrophic scarring is often an unfortunate and permanent complication of acne vulgaris. It has high prevalence, significant impact on quality of life, and therapeutic challenge for dermatologists. The treatment of atrophic acne scars varies depending on the types of acne scars and the limitations of the treatment modalities in their ability to improve scars. Therefore, many options are available for the treatment of acne scarring, including chemical peeling, dermabrasion, laser treatment, punch techniques, fat transplantation, other tissue augmenting agents, needling, subcision, and combined therapy. Various modalities have been used to treat scars, but limited efficacy and problematic side effects have restricted their application. In order to optimally treat a patient’s scar, we need to consider which treatment offers the most satisfactory result. There are also promising procedures in the future, such as stem cell therapy. In this article, the authors review the different treatment options of atrophic acne scars. This may be useful for selecting the best therapeutic strategy, whether it be single or combined therapy, in the treatment of atrophic acne scars while reducing or avoiding the side effects and complications. PMID:26029333

  14. Burning Man

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2006-01-01

    Former Baltimore cop and teacher Ed Burns isn't a masochist. The writer-producer for "The Wire," a critically applauded HBO series about life and death on the streets of Baltimore, is just feverishly trying to save public schools. He thinks American education is hopelessly screwed up, but that it's also the country's only hope. So it…

  15. Scars

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stretch Marks Sun-damaged Skin Unwanted Hair Unwanted Tattoos Varicose Veins Vitiligo Wrinkles Treatments and Procedures Ambulatory ... Stretch Marks Sun-damaged Skin Unwanted Hair Unwanted Tattoos Varicose Veins Vitiligo Wrinkles Treatments and Procedures Ambulatory ...

  16. Reclaiming body image: the hidden burn.

    PubMed

    Willis-Helmich, J J

    1992-01-01

    At the age of 4, I incurred a major burn injury that left 45% of my body with permanent scars. Normal clothing covers most of the scars. I was able to reclaim a positive body image through a gradual process of verbal and "body" disclosure. As an adult, I joined a burn survivors' self-help group; as a result of talking with other burn survivors, my self expectations increased. Later, I joined a facilitated group in which nudity and personal growth were the norm. In this group, I was the only person who had experienced a major physical trauma. I replaced my strongly held beliefs that others could not accept my unclothed, burn-injured body with the belief that some persons can, and I came to a personal understanding of why others could not. Fun, exercise, and relaxation led to a reclamation of positive feelings about my unclothed body and allowed my femininity and the character of my body image to emerge and become integrated.

  17. Dynamic splinting for knee flexion contracture following total knee arthroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Finger, Eric; Willis, F Buck

    2008-12-29

    Total Knee Arthroplasty operations are increasing in frequency, and knee flexion contracture is a common pathology, both pre-existing and post-operative. A 61-year-old male presented with knee flexion contracture following a total knee arthroplasty. Physical therapy alone did not fully reduce the contracture and dynamic splinting was then prescribed for daily low-load, prolonged-duration stretch. After 28 physical therapy sessions, the active range of motion improved from -20 degrees to -12 degrees (stiff knee still lacking full extension), and after eight additional weeks with nightly wear of dynamic splint, the patient regained full knee extension, (active extension improved from -12 degrees to 0 degrees ).

  18. The Relationship of Bacterial Biofilms and Capsular Contracture in Breast Implants

    PubMed Central

    Ajdic, Dragana; Zoghbi, Yasmina; Gerth, David; Panthaki, Zubin J.; Thaller, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Capsular contracture is a common sequelae of implant-based breast augmentation. Despite its prevalence, the etiology of capsular contracture remains controversial. Numerous studies have identified microbial biofilms on various implantable materials, including breast implants. Furthermore, biofilms have been implicated in subclinical infections associated with other surgical implants. In this review, we discuss microbial biofilms as a potential etiology of capsular contracture. The review also outlines the key diagnostic modalities available to identify the possible infectious agents found in biofilm, as well as available preventative and treatment measures. PMID:26843099

  19. Burn Wise - Outreach Materials

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Burn Wise outreach material. Burn Wise is a partnership program of that emphasizes the importance of burning the right wood, the right way, in the right wood-burning appliance to protect your home, health, and the air we breathe.

  20. MicroRNA 181b regulates decorin production by dermal fibroblasts and may be a potential therapy for hypertrophic scar.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Peter; Ding, Jie; Tredget, Edward E

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic scarring is a frequent fibroproliferative complication following deep dermal burns leading to impaired function and lifelong disfigurement. Decorin reduces fibrosis and induces regeneration in many tissues, and is significantly downregulated in hypertrophic scar and normal deep dermal fibroblasts. It was hypothesized that microRNAs in these fibroblasts downregulate decorin and blocking them would increase decorin and may prevent hypertrophic scarring. Lower decorin levels were found in hypertrophic scar as compared to normal skin, and in deep as compared to superficial dermis. A decorin 3' un-translated region reporter assay demonstrated microRNA decreased decorin in deep dermal fibroblasts, and microRNA screening predicted miR- 24, 181b, 421, 526b, or 543 as candidates. After finding increased levels of mir-181b in deep dermal fibroblasts, it was demonstrated that TGF-β1 stimulation decreased miR-24 but increased miR-181b and that hypertrophic scar and deep dermis contained increased levels of miR-181b. By blocking miR-181b with an antagomiR, it was possible to increase decorin protein expression in dermal fibroblasts. This suggests miR-181b is involved in the differential expression of decorin in skin and wound healing. Furthermore, blocking miR-181b reversed TGF-β1 induced decorin downregulation and myofibroblast differentiation in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts, suggesting a potential therapy for hypertrophic scar.

  1. Results of neurolysis in established upper limb Volkmann's ischemic contracture

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Dinesh K; Thalanki, Srikiran; Patni, Poornima; Meena, Ram Khiladi; Bairawa, Dinesh; Bhatia, Chirag

    2016-01-01

    Background: Treatment of established cases of Volkmann's ischemic contracture (VIC) of upper limb is very tedious. Since the period of Volkmann, various experimental works are being performed for its treatment, but none are effective. Disabilities from nerve palsy and hand muscle paralysis are more problematic than any other deformity in VIC. To solve these problems, we conducted a study to see the result of neurolysis of median and ulnar nerve and their subcutaneous placement in established cases of VIC. Materials and Methods: Twelve cases of established VIC operated between July 2007 and August 2010 with complete records and followup were included in the study. VIC of lower limb and contracture of nonischemic etiology were excluded from the study. Their evaluation was done by the British Medical Research Council grading system for sensory and motor recovery. Followup was done for an average period of 24.3 months (range 15-30 months) (the average age was 8.3 years). Results: To study the results, we divided the cases into two series. One group consisted of cases which were operated within 6 months from onset of VIC. The second group consisted of cases which were operated after 6 months from onset of VIC. Our results revealed that there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups operated, though both had significant improvement in motor and sensory recovery in both median and ulnar nerve distribution. Conclusions: Neurolysis of the nerves definitely improved the outcome for motor and sensory components of median and ulnar nerves but the timing of the surgery did not play a role in the outcome contrary to the clinical assumption. This study can serve as a template and further such studies could help us find the answer to a long standing issue. PMID:27904214

  2. [Molecular mechanisms of wound scarring].

    PubMed

    Borel, J P; Maquart, F X

    1998-01-01

    A few years ago, the discovery of growth factors, their pharmaceutical obtention at a purified grade, their powerful effects on cells in vitro, resulted in demeasured hopes that they could be applied easily and successfully to the treatment of wounds. Now, the process of healing is still uncompletely understood. The interplay of epithelial and matrix cells, the multiplicity of cell types involved, the huge number of growth factors implicated and the difficulties in describing the specific timing of their action on the cells present in wounds, explain why therapy of wound has not yet been revolutioned. An important distinction must be made between normal healing, which leads to a solid functional, reparation tissue, and scarring which opposes any functional healing by making extensive granulation tissue or even keloids. Recent studies pointed out the necessity of a convenient balance between the concentrations of growth factors present in the wound during the different stages of healing. Excess connective tissue production (scarring) would be more particularly due to an excess of TGF beta 1, whereas predominance of TGF beta 3 conducts to harmonious healing.

  3. Localized hand burns with or without concurrent blast injuries from fireworks.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M; Al-Tamimi, A S

    2009-05-01

    This is a retrospective study of 32 cases with localized hand burns from fireworks. All cases occurred during two national festivals of our country. The majority (54%) were children between 5 and 14 years, and 94% were males. All patients had localized hand burns. Patients were divided into two groups. Group I (n=10) patients had isolated burn injuries and Group II (n=22) patients had other concurrent hand injuries from the 'blast' of the fireworks such as tendon avulsion, nerve injury, fracture, dislocations, and amputations. Primary management of concurrent injuries along with dressing to the burn injury in a "flamazine bag" was done. All burns healed within 3 weeks and all surgical wounds/fractures healed without infection. Three patients required secondary release of contractures and skin grafting. Eventually, all patients were able to use their injured hands in daily activities.

  4. Current concepts on burn wound conversion-A review of recent advances in understanding the secondary progressions of burns.

    PubMed

    Salibian, Ara A; Rosario, Angelica Tan Del; Severo, Lucio De Almeida Moura; Nguyen, Long; Banyard, Derek A; Toranto, Jason D; Evans, Gregory R D; Widgerow, Alan D

    2016-08-01

    Burn wound conversion describes the process by which superficial partial thickness burns convert into deeper burns necessitating surgical intervention. Fully understanding and thus controlling this phenomenon continues to defy burn surgeons. However, potentially guiding burn wound progression so as to obviate the need for surgery while still bringing about healing with limited scarring is the major unmet challenge. Comprehending the pathophysiologic background contributing to deeper progression of these burns is an essential prerequisite to planning any intervention. In this study, a review of articles examining burn wound progression over the last five years was conducted to analyze trends in recent burn progression research, determine changes in understanding of the pathogenesis of burn conversion, and subsequently examine the direction for future research in developing therapies. The majority of recent research focuses on applying therapies from other disease processes to common underlying pathogenic mechanisms in burn conversion. While ischemia, inflammation, and free oxygen radicals continue to demonstrate a critical role in secondary necrosis, novel mechanisms such as autophagy have also been shown to contribute affect significantly burn progression significantly. Further research will have to determine whether multiple mechanisms should be targeted when developing clinical therapies.

  5. Prevention and treatment of excessive dermal scarring.

    PubMed Central

    Roseborough, Ingrid E.; Grevious, Mark A.; Lee, Raphael C.

    2004-01-01

    Today, wound management to avoid excessive scar formation is increasingly important, especially in populations with Fitzpatrick 3 or higher skin pigmentation. Medical science and industrial development are devoting more effort toward understanding and offering better therapy to control scars. However, advances in scar management have been hampered by the confusing or ambiguous terminology. There is no consensus on what amount of post-traumatic skin scar formation is "normal" and what should be considered "hypertrophic". In the World Health Organization's ICD-9, there is no diagnostic code for hypertrophic scar--only keloid is listed. Yet, the medical and scientific literature distinguishes them as different conditions. Our experience suggests that the diagnosis of keloid disease is greatly over-rendered. For black patients, an elevated scar seems, by default, diagnosed as keloid by most. This confusion results in inappropriate management of scar formation, and occasionally contributes to decision making related to elective or cosmetic surgery. Given that patients are expecting better outcomes from wound care today than in the past, this review article attempts to capture the essential biological factors related to wound scar production and discusses treatment options and indications used by the authors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:14746360

  6. Endometriosis of episiotomy scar: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mihmanli, V; Ózkan, T; Genc, S; Cetinkaya, N; Uctas, H

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is characterized by the presence of histologically normal endometrial glands and stroma outside the uterine cavity. Endometriosis predominantly locates on peritoneal surfaces, but it also affects the vagina, vulva, and perineum, usually secondary to surgical or obstetric trauma. Endometriosis in an episiotomy scar is a fairly rare phenomenon. The authors present a case of endometriosis in an episiotomy scar.

  7. Total Knee Arthroplasty for Severe Flexion Contracture in Rheumatoid Arthritis Knees

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Youn Soo; Moon, Kyu Pill; Kim, Kyung Taek; Kim, Jin Wan; Park, Won Seok

    2016-01-01

    Flexion contracture deformities, as well as severe varus and valgus deformities of the knee joint, accompany osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In particular, severe flexion contracture deformity of the knee joint is often found in patients with RA, which renders them nonambulatory. This report describes a 26-year-old female patient diagnosed with RA 10 years ago. She had chronic joint pain, severe flexion contracture, valgus deformity in both knees, and limited range of motion in both knees and became nonambulatory. She underwent a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and serial casting and physical therapy to restore stable joint movement and correct knee joint deformity. Her pain was successfully relieved, and she was able to walk after surgery. Here, we report the excellent results of TKA in this RA patient with severe flexion contracture of both knees. PMID:27894181

  8. HINGED CAST BRACE FOR PERSISTENT FLEXION CONTRACTURE FOLLOWING TOTAL KNEE REPLACEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Matthew D; Pugely, Andrew; Callaghan, John J; Shurr, Donald

    2011-01-01

    The reported incidence of persistent knee flexion contracture following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has varied from 1-15 percent Various treatment modalities have been described in attempts to manage this often difficult problem. This paper describes a novel method of treatment by using a hinged cast brace (previously reported for treatment of femur fractures and knee contractures secondary to hemophilia and cerebral palsy) for use in patients with symptomatic knee flexion contractures. Application of this cast brace with frequent adjustment (every three to four days, initially) toward full extension can often improve knee extension, after physical therapy and other modalities such as extension-assist braces have failed. Care must be taken in the application and use of this device which utilizes frequent manipulations to reduce and maintain the knee flexion angle. We report two clinical cases in which this protocol was effectively used in decreasing symptomatic knee flexion contractures. PMID:22096423

  9. Burn Resuscitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    areas involving large areas of skin the patient is exposed to death first from shock . . .’’ [10]. In describing the pathophysiology leading to the shock...state seen in burns he postulated that various irritants , mental and physical, caused vasomotor paresis leading to accumulation of blood in the...resuscitation volumes. Subsequent studies suggested a decrease in abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). Oda et al., in 2006, published their experience

  10. The Northwestern Abdominoplasty Scar Model: A Novel Human Model for Scar Research and Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Steven T; Liu, Jing; Chavez-Munoz, Claudia; Mustoe, Thomas A; Galiano, Robert D

    2016-09-01

    There is a growing interest in the development and evaluation of therapeutic agents that improve the cosmetic appearance of scars. Existing nonhuman animal models to study scarring, while valuable, have well-acknowledged limitations, as it is accepted that the biology of human scarring differs significantly from scarring in other species. Moreover, human clinical trials of scarring require large numbers of subjects to achieve statistical power and are plagued by inherent intersubject variability because of the complex nature of wound healing in human beings. As a better alternative, we have developed the Northwestern Abdominoplasty Scar Model-a novel human clinical model that permits analysis of up to 20 cutaneous scars in a single subject and allows for not only visual scar comparison, but also histologic and molecular analyses of factors involved in scarring and wound healing. We have utilized this model in 5 early phase clinical trials designed to test the safety and efficacy of a variety of scar therapeutics without any complications to date. The model not only is applicable to scar therapeutics, but also can be utilized for other applications, such as the testing of implantable biomaterials, injectable products, therapies such as lasers, or even for in vivo study of wound healing processes in humans.

  11. Keloid and Hypertrophic Scars Are the Result of Chronic Inflammation in the Reticular Dermis

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Rei

    2017-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars are caused by cutaneous injury and irritation, including trauma, insect bite, burn, surgery, vaccination, skin piercing, acne, folliculitis, chicken pox, and herpes zoster infection. Notably, superficial injuries that do not reach the reticular dermis never cause keloidal and hypertrophic scarring. This suggests that these pathological scars are due to injury to this skin layer and the subsequent aberrant wound healing therein. The latter is characterized by continuous and histologically localized inflammation. As a result, the reticular layer of keloids and hypertrophic scars contains inflammatory cells, increased numbers of fibroblasts, newly formed blood vessels, and collagen deposits. Moreover, proinflammatory factors, such as interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α are upregulated in keloid tissues, which suggests that, in patients with keloids, proinflammatory genes in the skin are sensitive to trauma. This may promote chronic inflammation, which in turn may cause the invasive growth of keloids. In addition, the upregulation of proinflammatory factors in pathological scars suggests that, rather than being skin tumors, keloids and hypertrophic scars are inflammatory disorders of skin, specifically inflammatory disorders of the reticular dermis. Various external and internal post-wounding stimuli may promote reticular inflammation. The nature of these stimuli most likely shapes the characteristics, quantity, and course of keloids and hypertrophic scars. Specifically, it is likely that the intensity, frequency, and duration of these stimuli determine how quickly the scars appear, the direction and speed of growth, and the intensity of symptoms. These proinflammatory stimuli include a variety of local, systemic, and genetic factors. These observations together suggest that the clinical differences between keloids and hypertrophic scars merely reflect differences in the intensity, frequency, and duration of

  12. Strong quantum scarring by local impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luukko, Perttu J. J.; Drury, Byron; Klales, Anna; Kaplan, Lev; Heller, Eric J.; Räsänen, Esa

    2016-11-01

    We discover and characterise strong quantum scars, or quantum eigenstates resembling classical periodic orbits, in two-dimensional quantum wells perturbed by local impurities. These scars are not explained by ordinary scar theory, which would require the existence of short, moderately unstable periodic orbits in the perturbed system. Instead, they are supported by classical resonances in the unperturbed system and the resulting quantum near-degeneracy. Even in the case of a large number of randomly scattered impurities, the scars prefer distinct orientations that extremise the overlap with the impurities. We demonstrate that these preferred orientations can be used for highly efficient transport of quantum wave packets across the perturbed potential landscape. Assisted by the scars, wave-packet recurrences are significantly stronger than in the unperturbed system. Together with the controllability of the preferred orientations, this property may be very useful for quantum transport applications.

  13. Strong quantum scarring by local impurities

    PubMed Central

    Luukko, Perttu J. J.; Drury, Byron; Klales, Anna; Kaplan, Lev; Heller, Eric J.; Räsänen, Esa

    2016-01-01

    We discover and characterise strong quantum scars, or quantum eigenstates resembling classical periodic orbits, in two-dimensional quantum wells perturbed by local impurities. These scars are not explained by ordinary scar theory, which would require the existence of short, moderately unstable periodic orbits in the perturbed system. Instead, they are supported by classical resonances in the unperturbed system and the resulting quantum near-degeneracy. Even in the case of a large number of randomly scattered impurities, the scars prefer distinct orientations that extremise the overlap with the impurities. We demonstrate that these preferred orientations can be used for highly efficient transport of quantum wave packets across the perturbed potential landscape. Assisted by the scars, wave-packet recurrences are significantly stronger than in the unperturbed system. Together with the controllability of the preferred orientations, this property may be very useful for quantum transport applications. PMID:27892510

  14. Collagenase Treatment in Dupuytren Contractures: A Review of the Current State Versus Future Needs.

    PubMed

    Degreef, Ilse

    2016-06-01

    Dupuytren disease is highly prevalent and the finger contractures can be very extensile, compromising the patients' hand function. To restore full function, contractures have been addressed by cutting the causative strands for nearly 200 years, ever since Baron Guillaume Dupuytren demonstrated his technique at the beginning of the nineteenth century. Surgery can be minimal (fasciotomy) or quite invasive (fasciectomy and even skin replacement). However, in the last decade translational research has introduced the non-surgical technique of enzymatic fasciotomy with collagenase injections. Now, finger contractures can be released with single injections on monthly intervals, to address one joint contracture at a time. However, in hands affected with Dupuytren contractures to the extent that the patient calls for treatment, most often more than one joint is involved. In surgical treatment options all contracted joints are addressed in a single procedure. Nevertheless, extensile surgery withholds inherent risks of complications and intense rehabilitation. Today, the minimally-invasive method with enzymatic fasciotomy by collagenase injection has demonstrated reliable outcomes with few morbidities and early recovery. However, single-site injection is todays' standard procedure and multiple joints are addressed in several sessions with monthly intervals. This triggers a longer recovery and treatment burden in severely affected hands even though surgery is avoided. Therefore, further treatment modalities of collagenase use are explored. Adjustments in the treatment regimes' flexibility and collagenase injections addressing more than one joint contracture simultaneously will improve the burden of multiple sessions and, therefore, enzymatic fasciotomy may become the preferred method in more extensile Dupuytren contractures. In this independent review, the challenge of Dupuytren disease affecting a single versus multiple joints is presented. The pros and cons of collagenase

  15. Partial excision of residual burn lesions.

    PubMed

    Engrav, L H; Gottlieb, J R; Millard, S P; Walkinshaw, M D; Heimbach, D M; Marvin, J A

    1987-01-01

    Most burn victims have unattractive residual lesions, which may include hypertrophic donor sites, unsightly skin grafts, hypertrophic scars, and mature scars with altered pigmentation or texture. Some of these lesions can be treated by total excision in one or more stages or they can be reconstructed utilizing grafts, flaps, Z-plasties, or tissue expansion. But frequently these procedures are either not indicated or not elected by the patient. In such a situation, the only surgical option is partial excision, with the goal of making the lesion less conspicuous and more easily concealed by clothing. Whether or not such partial excisions are worthwhile is the obvious question. We could not find an answer in the literature and therefore decided to review our own experience. Between 6/30/81 and 3/12/86, 92 such procedures were performed and followed in 25 patients. Partial excision of hypertrophic donor sites, unsightly skin grafts, and hypertrophic scars did yield improved appearance in most patients. However, partial excision of mature scars, ie, areas of altered pigmentation or texture, did not have the same success. We continue to treat the first three types of lesions in this fashion but no longer include the latter.

  16. Fibroblasts from phenotypically normal palmar fascia exhibit molecular profiles highly similar to fibroblasts from active disease in Dupuytren's Contracture

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dupuytren's contracture (DC) is a fibroproliferative disorder characterized by the progressive development of a scar-like collagen-rich cord that affects the palmar fascia of the hand and leads to digital flexion contractures. DC is most commonly treated by surgical resection of the diseased tissue, but has a high reported recurrence rate ranging from 27% to 80%. We sought to determine if the transcriptomic profiles of fibroblasts derived from DC-affected palmar fascia, adjacent phenotypically normal palmar fascia, and non-DC palmar fascial tissues might provide mechanistic clues to understanding the puzzle of disease predisposition and recurrence in DC. Methods To achieve this, total RNA was obtained from fibroblasts derived from primary DC-affected palmar fascia, patient-matched unaffected palmar fascia, and palmar fascia from non-DC patients undergoing carpal tunnel release (6 patients in each group). These cells were grown on a type-1 collagen substrate (to better mimic their in vivo environments). Microarray analyses were subsequently performed using Illumina BeadChip arrays to compare the transcriptomic profiles of these three cell populations. Data were analyzed using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM v3.02), hierarchical clustering, concordance mapping and Venn diagram. Results We found that the transcriptomic profiles of DC-disease fibroblasts and fibroblasts from unaffected fascia of DC patients exhibited a much greater overlap than fibroblasts derived from the palmar fascia of patients undergoing carpal tunnel release. Quantitative real time RT-PCR confirmed the differential expression of select genes validating the microarray data analyses. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that predisposition and recurrence in DC may stem, at least in part, from intrinsic similarities in the basal gene expression of diseased and phenotypically unaffected palmar fascia fibroblasts. These data also demonstrate that a collagen

  17. [Preventive measures for the prophylaxis of contractures in geriatric nursing. A systematic review].

    PubMed

    Scheffel, Sonja; Hantikainen, Virpi

    2011-06-01

    Contractures constitute a health problem in mobility-restricted geriatric patients. Contractures are clinically important due to their impact on functional outcome. Prophylactic interventions seem to be indispensable. We performed a systematic review studying the interventions used to prevent immobility-related contractures in the geriatric long-term care. The efficacy and safety of preventive methods was assessed. Electronic literature searches covered the databases PubMed, PEDro, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library (May 2010). Eligibility criteria for studies were: Investigation of an intervention aimed to prevent contractures, conducted in a geriatric and long-term care setting, inclusion of participants aged>65 years. The primary search focused on RCTs, systematic reviews und meta-analysis published between 1990 and May 2010 in English or German. The included studies were analysed and evaluated by one author while a second author checked the results. Methodological quality was critically evaluated using internationally accepted criteria. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria. Prophylactic interventions comprise mobility-encouraging and position-supportive interventions. Mobility-encouraging interventions aim to prevent contractures and immobility, for example offering range-of-motion exercises. Position-supportive interventions are transformations of motion and position, which are conducted with nurses' support. Due to limited methodological quality of these studies, the efficacy of certain measures remains unclear. Further studies on contracture prophylaxis investigating patient-relevant outcomes, interventions' adverse effects and costs are required.

  18. DERMABRASIVE ABLATION OF ACNE SCARS

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Adolph M.

    1958-01-01

    Dermabrasion offers cosmetic improvement of acne pits and scars, but only well-adjusted patients should be selected for this esthetic improvement. In the dermabrasion operation the deep cup-shaped pits are made shallow by saucerization, for the deep sharp shadows are eliminated as the pits are shallowed. It is the elimination of the shadow effect which is so gratifying to the patient. Although dermabrasion is a superficial skin operation, it involves dangerous instruments and thousands of minute incisions. The procedure is a surgical operation, whether done in an office or in a hospital. The author performs the operation entirely as a hospital procedure, using pentothal anesthesia with meperidine added in small increments during the operation. Thus the operation may be unhurriedly and meticulously performed. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:13561125

  19. Analysis of frequency of use of different scar assessment scales based on the scar condition and treatment method.

    PubMed

    Bae, Seong Hwan; Bae, Yong Chan

    2014-03-01

    Analysis of scars in various conditions is essential, but no consensus had been reached on the scar assessment scale to select for a given condition. We reviewed papers to determine the scar assessment scale selected depending on the scar condition and treatment method. We searched PubMed for articles published since 2000 with the contents of the scar evaluation using a scar assessment scale with a Journal Citation Report impact factor >0.5. Among them, 96 articles that conducted a scar evaluation using a scar assessment scale were reviewed and analyzed. The scar assessment scales were identified and organized by various criteria. Among the types of scar assessment scales, the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) was found to be the most frequently used scale. As for the assessment of newly developed operative scars, the POSAS was most used. Meanwhile, for categories depending on the treatment methods for preexisting scars, the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) was used in 6 studies following a laser treatment, the POSAS was used in 7 studies following surgical treatment, and the POSAS was used in 7 studies following a conservative treatment. Within the 12 categories of scar status, the VSS showed the highest frequency in 6 categories and the POSAS showed the highest frequency in the other 6 categories. According to our reviews, the POSAS and VSS are the most frequently used scar assessment scales. In the future, an optimal, universal scar scoring system is needed in order to better evaluate and treat pathologic scarring.

  20. Joint contractures in the absence of inflammation may indicate mucopolysaccharidosis

    PubMed Central

    Cimaz, Rolando; Coppa, Giovanni Valentino; Koné-Paut, Isabelle; Link, Bianca; Pastores, Gregory M; Elorduy, Maria Rua; Spencer, Charles; Thorne, Carter; Wulffraat, Nico; Manger, Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    Background Undiagnosed patients with the attenuated form of mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type I often have joint symptoms in childhood that prompt referral to a rheumatologist. A survey conducted by Genzyme Corporation of 60 European and Canadian rheumatologists and pediatric rheumatologists demonstrated that < 20% recognized signs and symptoms of MPS I or could identify appropriate diagnosis tests. These results prompted formation of an international working group of rheumatologists, pediatric rheumatologists, and experts on MPS I to formulate a rheumatology-based diagnostic algorithm. The resulting algorithm applies to all MPS disorders with musculoskeletal manifestations. Bone and joint manifestations are prominent among most patients with MPS disorders. These life-threatening lysosomal storage diseases are caused by deficient activity of specific enzymes involved in the degradation of glycosaminoglycans. Patients with attenuated MPS disease often experience diagnostic delays. Enzyme replacement therapy is now commercially available for MPS I (laronidase), MPS II (idursulfase), and MPS VI (galsulfase). Presentation of the hypothesis Evolving joint pain and joint contractures in the absence of inflammation should always raise the suspicion of an MPS disorder. All such patients should undergo urinary glycosaminoglycan (uGAG) analysis (not spot tests for screening) in a reputable laboratory. Elevated uGAG levels and/or an abnormal uGAG pattern confirms an MPS disorder and specific enzyme testing will determine the MPS type. If uGAG analysis is unavailable and the patient exhibits any other common sign or symptom of an MPS disorder, such as corneal clouding, history of hernia surgery, frequent respiratory and/or ear, nose and throat infections; carpal tunnel syndrome, or heart murmur, proceed directly to enzymatic testing. Refer patients with confirmed MPS to a geneticist or metabolic specialist for further evaluation and treatment. Testing of the hypothesis We

  1. Dupuytren's disease or Cooper's contracture?: Kenneth Fitzpatrick Russell Memorial Lecture.

    PubMed

    Thurston, Alan

    2003-07-01

    In his position as curator of the Cowlishaw collection of historical medical books in the Library of the College, Kenneth Russell prepared the definitive catalogue of the collection. This catalogue is comprehensive and for almost all entries there is an annotation that demonstrates his meticulous attention to detail and the love of the book collection that he managed to secure for the College. It is from this catalogue that I have chosen two books in particular that bring together two great surgeons of the turn of the 19th century. Although he was a pupil of the great John Hunter, the young Astley Cooper possessed good manners and a gift of oratory of which the Scot, his teacher, was devoid. After his apprenticeship with Henry Cline senior, Cooper came to share the podium with Cline at Guy's and St Thomas' hospitals and the two dominated surgical teaching in London for some 22 years, until Cline's retirement in 1811. It was the latter who was first to recognize the true nature of the condition now known as Dupuytren's disease. Later, in 1822, Cooper wrote a detailed description of the contracture of the palmar aponeurosis and recommended fasciotomy as being curative. His book A Treatise on Dislocations and Fractures of the Joints, which contains this description of Dupuytren's contracture, is held in the Cowlishaw Collection. On the other side of the English Channel, M. le Baron Dupuytren repeatedly misquoted Cooper and stated that Cooper believed that the disease was incurable. In his famous lecture given to the staff of the Hôtel Dieu in Paris on 5th December 1931, he admitted to having seen 30 or 40 cases over 20 years of practice. It seems likely that he was not aware of the true cause of the condition before 1831 when he treated his first case. This lecture, along with others, are recorded in his Leçons Orales de Clinique Chirurgicale, a copy of which is also to be found in the Cowlishaw Collection.

  2. Phase and Texture Characterizations of Scar Collagen Second-Harmonic Generation Images Varied with Scar Duration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guannan; Liu, Yao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Zufang; Cai, Jianyong; Chen, Rong; Xiong, Shuyuan; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-08-01

    This work developed a phase congruency algorithm combined with texture analysis to quantitatively characterize collagen morphology in second-harmonic generation (SHG) images from human scars. The extracted phase and texture parameters of the SHG images quantified collagen directionality, homogeneity, and coarseness in scars and varied with scar duration. Phase parameters showed an increasing tendency of the mean of phase congruency with scar duration, indicating that collagen fibers are better oriented over time. Texture parameters calculated from local difference local binary pattern (LD-LBP) and Haar wavelet transform, demonstrated that the LD-LBP variance decreased and the energy of all subimages increased with scar duration. It implied that collagen has a more regular pattern and becomes coarser with scar duration. In addition, the random forest regression was used to predict scar duration, demonstrating reliable performance of the extracted phase and texture parameters in characterizing collagen morphology in scar SHG images. Results indicate that the extracted parameters using the proposed method can be used as quantitative indicators to monitor scar progression with time and can help understand the mechanism of scar progression.

  3. Microneedling Therapy for Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Manal; Awad, Sherif; Medhat, Walid; El-Fakahany, Hasan; Farag, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Treatment of acne scarring is always a challenge. Microneedling therapy or percutaneous collagen induction is a new addition to the treatment modalities for such scars and has been reported to be simple and effective in atrophic acne scar treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical effect and objectively quantify the histological changes of acne scarring in response to skin microneedling. Design: A prospective clinical study. Participants: Ten patients with different types of atrophic acne scars were subjected to three months of skin microneedling treatment (six sessions at two-week intervals). Measurements: Patients were photographed, and skin biopsies were obtained at baseline as well as one and three months from the start of treatment. Histometry for epidermal thickness and quantitative evaluation of total elastin; newly synthesized tropoelastin; collagen types I, III, and VII; and newly synthesized collagen were performed for all biopsies. Results: Compared to the baseline, patients’ evaluations revealed noticeable clinical improvement in atrophic post-acne scars in response to skin microneedling. There was a statistically significant increase (p<0.05) in the mean of collagen types I, III, and VII and newly synthesized collagen, while total elastin was significantly decreased (p<0.05) after the end of treatment. Conclusions: Multiple minimally invasive sessions of skin microneedling are an effective treatment for post-acne atrophic scars as it stimulates the repair processes with the advantage of being a relatively risk-free, in-office procedure with minimal patient recovery time. PMID:26203319

  4. Astrocyte scar formation aids CNS axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Mark A.; Burda, Joshua E.; Ren, Yilong; Ao, Yan; O’Shea, Timothy M.; Kawaguchi, Riki; Coppola, Giovanni; Khakh, Baljit S.; Deming, Timothy J.; Sofroniew, Michael V.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Transected axons fail to regrow in the mature central nervous system (CNS). Astrocyte scars are widely regarded as causal in this failure. Here, using three genetically targeted loss-of-function manipulations in adult mice, we show that preventing astrocyte scar formation, attenuating scar-forming astrocytes, or deleting chronic astrocyte scars all failed to result in spontaneous regrowth of transected corticospinal, sensory or serotonergic axons through severe spinal cord injury (SCI) lesions. In striking contrast, sustained local delivery via hydrogel depots of required axon-specific growth factors not present in SCI lesions, plus growth-activating priming injuries, stimulated robust, laminin-dependent sensory axon regrowth past scar-forming astrocytes and inhibitory molecules in SCI lesions. Preventing astrocyte scar formation significantly reduced this stimulated axon regrowth. RNA sequencing revealed that astrocytes and non-astrocyte cells in SCI lesions express multiple axon-growth supporting molecules. Our findings show that contrary to prevailing dogma, astrocyte scar formation aids rather than prevents CNS axon regeneration. PMID:27027288

  5. A quantitative approach to scar analysis.

    PubMed

    Khorasani, Hooman; Zheng, Zhong; Nguyen, Calvin; Zara, Janette; Zhang, Xinli; Wang, Joyce; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia

    2011-02-01

    Analysis of collagen architecture is essential to wound healing research. However, to date no consistent methodologies exist for quantitatively assessing dermal collagen architecture in scars. In this study, we developed a standardized approach for quantitative analysis of scar collagen morphology by confocal microscopy using fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis. Full-thickness wounds were created on adult mice, closed by primary intention, and harvested at 14 days after wounding for morphometrics and standard Fourier transform-based scar analysis as well as fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis. In addition, transmission electron microscopy was used to evaluate collagen ultrastructure. We demonstrated that fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis were superior to Fourier transform analysis in discriminating scar versus unwounded tissue in a wild-type mouse model. To fully test the robustness of this scar analysis approach, a fibromodulin-null mouse model that heals with increased scar was also used. Fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis effectively discriminated unwounded fibromodulin-null versus wild-type skin as well as healing fibromodulin-null versus wild-type wounds, whereas Fourier transform analysis failed to do so. Furthermore, fractal dimension and lacunarity data also correlated well with transmission electron microscopy collagen ultrastructure analysis, adding to their validity. These results demonstrate that fractal dimension and lacunarity are more sensitive than Fourier transform analysis for quantification of scar morphology.

  6. First Aid: Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old First Aid: Burns KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Burns A A A Scald burns from hot water and other liquids are the most common burns in early childhood. Because burns range from mild ...

  7. Enlargement and Contracture of C2-Ceramide Channels

    PubMed Central

    Siskind, Leah J.; Davoody, Amirparviz; Lewin, Naomi; Marshall, Stephanie; Colombini, Marco

    2003-01-01

    Ceramides are known to play a major regulatory role in apoptosis by inducing cytochrome c release from mitochondria. We have previously reported that ceramide, but not dihydroceramide, forms large and stable channels in phospholipid membranes and outer membranes of isolated mitochondria. C2-ceramide channel formation is characterized by conductance increments ranging from <1 to >200 nS. These conductance increments often represent the enlargement and contracture of channels rather than the opening and closure of independent channels. Enlargement is supported by the observation that many small conductance increments can lead to a large decrement. Also the initial conductances favor cations, but this selectivity drops dramatically with increasing total conductance. La+3 causes rapid ceramide channel disassembly in a manner indicative of large conducting structures. These channels have a propensity to contract by a defined size (often multiples of 4 nS) indicating the formation of cylindrical channels with preferred diameters rather than a continuum of sizes. The results are consistent with ceramides forming barrel-stave channels whose size can change by loss or insertion of multiple ceramide columns. PMID:12944273

  8. Degree of Contracture Related to Residual Muscle Shoulder Strength in Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Lesions

    PubMed Central

    van Gelein Vitringa, Valerie M.; van Noort, Arthur; Ritt, Marco J. P. F.; van Royen, Barend J.; van der Sluijs, Johannes A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives  Little is known about the relation between residual muscle strength and joint contracture formation in neuromuscular disorders. This study aimed to investigate the relation between residual muscle strength and shoulder joint contractures in children with sequelae of obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL). In OBPL a shoulder joint contracture is a frequent finding. We hypothesize that residual internal and external rotator strength and their balance are related to the extent of shoulder joint contracture. Methods  Clinical assessment was performed in 34 children (mean 10.0 years) with unilateral OBPL and Narakas classes I–III. External and internal rotation strengths were measured with the shoulder in neutral position using a handheld dynamometer. Strength on the affected side was given as percentage of the normal side. Contracture was assessed by passive internal and external rotations in degrees (in 0° abduction). Mallet classification was used for active shoulder function. Results  External and internal rotation strengths on the affected side were approximately 50% of the normal side and on average both equally affected: 56% (SD 18%) respectively 51% (SD 27%); r = 0.600, p = 0.000. Residual strengths were not related to passive internal or external rotation (p > 0.200). Internal rotation strength (r =  − 0.425, p <0.05) was related to Narakas class. Mallet score was related to external and internal rotation strengths (r = 0.451 and r = 0.515, respectively; p < 0.01). Conclusion  The intuitive notion that imbalances in residual muscle strength influence contracture formation cannot be confirmed in this study. Our results are of interest for the understanding of contracture formation in OBPL. PMID:27917235

  9. Collagenase Dupuytren Contracture: Achieving Single Treatment Success with a Hand Therapist-Based Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Malafa, Menyoli M.; Lehrman, Craig; Criley, Jerry W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgery remains the gold standard in the treatment of Dupuytren contracture but is technically demanding, carries significant risk of complications, and requires prolonged recovery time. Collagenase injection is an efficacious alternative to surgery; however, contracture release often requires multiple treatments spaced a month apart. We report our experience with a new collagenase treatment protocol aimed to minimize the total treatment time per joint contracture. Methods: We performed a single institution retrospective review of patients with Dupuytren contracture treated with collagenase using our protocol from 2011 to 2013. Patients returned 24 hours after collagenase injection for cord manipulation by a certified hand therapist while under digital block. Treatment success was defined as reduction in contracture to 5 degrees or less. Successfully treated joints were evaluated for recurrence (>10 degrees contracture) at 30-day and 6-month follow-up appointments. Serious adverse events, including skin tears, were recorded. Results: Success was achieved in 36 of 47 treated joints (76.6%) after a single injection. There were 2 recurrences in 32 joints at 30-day follow-up (6.2%) and no recurrences in 17 joints available at 6-month follow-up. Skin tears were the only serious adverse event occurring in 18 of 47 cord ruptures (38.3%). All healed secondarily without complication. Conclusions: Our protocol preserves treatment efficacy while maximizing efficiency. Achieving successful cord rupture with a single injection allows earlier return of function, reduced cost of treatment, and increased convenience for the patient. Patients, particularly those with greater contractures, should be counseled regarding the risk of skin tear during cord manipulation. PMID:27014558

  10. Measuring pressure under burns pressure garments using the Oxford Pressure Monitor.

    PubMed

    Harries, C A; Pegg, S P

    1989-06-01

    Pressure garments are used extensively in the treatment of hypertrophic scarring following burn injuries. The Oxford Pressure Monitor was used to measure garment-scar interface pressure (mmHg) using a number of fabric types over various body parts. The results indicate a wide range of pressure values between different garments and body parts with the greatest pressures found over the dorsum of hands and feet. The problems of achieving 'optimal pressure' over hypertrophic scarring are discussed with emphasis on the need for more accurate measuring equipment.

  11. Medical makeup for concealing facial scars.

    PubMed

    Mee, Donna; Wong, Brian J F

    2012-10-01

    Surgical, laser, and pharmacological therapies are all used to correct scars and surgical incisions, though have limits with respect to how well facial skin can be restored or enhanced. The use of cosmetics has long been a relevant adjunct to all scar treatment modalities. In recent years, technical advancements in the chemistry and composition of cosmetic products have provided the patient with a broader range of products to employ for concealing scars. This review will provide an overview of contemporary methods for concealing facial scars, birthmarks, and pigmentary changes without the use of traditional/dated, heavy appearing camouflage products. Additionally, general guidelines and information will be provided with respect to identifying competent makeup artists for care of the medical patient. The article by no means is meant to be a tutorial, but rather serves as a starting point in this allied field of medicine.

  12. Proceedings of the SCAR Conference, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Supersonic Cruise Aircraft Research (SCAR) team analyzed six major topics: (1) aerodynamics, (2) stability and control, (3) propulsion, (4) environmental factor, (5) airframe structures and materials, and (6) design integration.

  13. Answers to Common Questions about Scars

    MedlinePlus

    ... off the skin and fairly stiff to the touch. Reaching a peak after several months, the scar ... have received your message and will be in touch as soon as possible. Cleft Connection An Interview ...

  14. Ram Burn Observations (RAMBO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Ram Burn Observations (RAMBO) is a Department of Defense experiment that observes shuttle Orbital Maneuvering System engine burns for the purpose of improving plume models. On STS-107 the appropriate sensors will observe selected rendezvous and orbit adjust burns.

  15. The "Sea" should not be operated on in scar revision for "Island-Like" scars.

    PubMed

    Nagasao, Tomohisa; Hamamoto, Yusuke; Tamai, Motoki; Kudo, Hiroo; Ensako, Toshiya; Kogure, Tetsukuni; Takano, Naoki; Tanaka, Yoshio

    2015-08-01

    Scars developing on body surfaces not only restrict body movement, but are also problematic from a cosmetic standpoint. Hence, revision is conducted by removing the scar and re-suturing the resultant defects. In performing scar revision, care should be taken to prevent the re-sutured wounds from developing hypertrophy again. Scars often present a pattern where hard, red parts are separated by soft parts in between. As the hard and soft parts may be analogized as islands and seas respectively, we call this the "Island-Like" scar. Two strategies can be taken to treat scars of this type. The first is to remove the entire scar-including both hard and soft parts; the second is to remove only the hard parts and leave the soft parts untouched. The authors conducted a biomechanical study using finite element analyses and found that as a body moves, greater stresses occur in the peri-wound regions with the first strategy than with the second strategy. A wound's likelihood to develop hypertrophy increases as the stresses working on it increase. Hence, it is hypothesized that the second strategy carries less risk of the operated wounds developing re-hypertrophy than the first strategy. Based on this logic, in performing scar revision for scars consisting of hard and soft parts, it is recommended only to remove only hard parts and not to operate on soft parts in between.

  16. Wetland fire scar monitoring and analysis using archival Landsat data for the Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, John W.; Hall, Annette E.; Foster, Ann M.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to document the frequency, extent, and severity of fires in wetlands, as well as the dynamics of post-fire wetland land cover, informs fire and wetland science, resource management, and ecosystem protection. Available information on Everglades burn history has been based on field data collection methods that evolved through time and differ by land management unit. Our objectives were to (1) design and test broadly applicable and repeatable metrics of not only fire scar delineation but also post-fire land cover dynamics through exhaustive use of the Landsat satellite data archives, and then (2) explore how those metrics relate to various hydrologic and anthropogenic factors that may influence post-fire land cover dynamics. Visual interpretation of every Landsat scene collected over the study region during the study time frame produced a new, detailed database of burn scars greater than 1.6 ha in size in the Water Conservation Areas and post-fire land cover dynamics for Everglades National Park fires greater than 1.6 ha in area. Median burn areas were compared across several landscape units of the Greater Everglades and found to differ as a function of administrative unit and fire history. Some burned areas transitioned to open water, exhibiting water depths and dynamics that support transition mechanisms proposed in the literature. Classification tree techniques showed that time to green-up and return to pre-burn character were largely explained by fire management practices and hydrology. Broadly applicable as they use data from the global, nearly 30-year-old Landsat archive, these methods for documenting wetland burn extent and post-fire land cover change enable cost-effective collection of new data on wetland fire ecology and independent assessment of fire management practice effectiveness.

  17. Overview of surgical scar prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Son, Daegu; Harijan, Aram

    2014-06-01

    Management of incisional scar is intimately connected to stages of wound healing. The management of an elective surgery patient begins with a thorough informed consent process in which the patient is made aware of personal and clinical circumstances that cannot be modified, such as age, ethnicity, and previous history of hypertrophic scars. In scar prevention, the single most important modifiable factor is wound tension during the proliferative and remodeling phases, and this is determined by the choice of incision design. Traditional incisions most often follow relaxed skin tension lines, but no such lines exist in high surface tension areas. If such incisions are unavoidable, the patient must be informed of this ahead of time. The management of a surgical incision does not end when the sutures are removed. Surgical scar care should be continued for one year. Patient participation is paramount in obtaining the optimal outcome. Postoperative visits should screen for signs of scar hypertrophy and has a dual purpose of continued patient education and reinforcement of proper care. Early intervention is a key to control hyperplastic response. Hypertrophic scars that do not improve by 6 months are keloids and should be managed aggressively with intralesional steroid injections and alternate modalities.

  18. The Impact of Aerosols Generated from Biomass Burning, Dust Storms, and Volcanoes Upon the Earth's Radiative Energy Budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, Sundar A.

    1997-01-01

    A new technique for detecting aerosols from biomass burning and dust is developed. The radiative forcing of aerosols is estimated over four major ecosystems in South America. A new smoke and fire detection scheme is developed for biomass burning aerosols over South America. Surface shortware irradiance calculations are developed in the presence of biomass burning aerosols during the SCAR-B experiment. This new approach utilizes ground based, aircraft, and satellite measurements.

  19. Muscle stretching for treatment and prevention of contracture in people with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Harvey, L A; Herbert, R D

    2002-01-01

    Contracture, or reduced joint mobility, is a common and disabling sequel of spinal cord injury. The primary intervention for the treatment and prevention of contracture is regular stretch to soft tissues. While the rationale for this intervention appears sound, the effectiveness of stretching has not been verified with well designed clinical trials. One recent randomised trial suggests there is no clinically worthwhile effect from a typical stretch protocol applied to spinal cord injured patients. Despite the negative results of this first trial, we argue that therapists should continue administering stretch for the treatment and prevention of contracture until the results of further studies emerge. To maximise the probability of attaining a clinically worthwhile effect, we suggest that therapists stretch soft tissues for long periods (at least 20 min, and perhaps for as long as 12 h a day). Practical suggestions are given on how to readily provide spinal cord injured patients with sustained stretch to key joints and muscle groups. Stretch is most likely to be effective if started before the onset of contracture. Soft tissues most at risk should be targeted, particularly if contracture is likely to impose functionally important limitations.

  20. Posttraumatic elbow joint contractures: defining pathologic capsular mechanisms and potential future treatment paradigms.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Kevin A

    2013-11-01

    The Andrew J. Weiland Medal is presented by the American Society for Surgery of the Hand to a midcareer researcher who is dedicated to advancing patient care in the field of hand surgery. This essay, awarded the Weiland Medal in 2012, focuses on posttraumatic elbow joint contractures. Joint contractures are well known to hand surgeons because they limit function of our patients. There is a thorough understanding of the pathoanatomy underlying joint contractures. However, the mechanisms leading to the pathoanatomy are either unknown or partially understood, depending on the etiology of the particular clinical condition. This review describes our research over the past 14 years on posttraumatic elbow joint contractures. It defines pathologic cellular, matrix, and growth factor changes in the joint capsule, elaborates on the development of an animal model of posttraumatic joint contractures, presents an evaluation of a potential prevention strategy based on our research, and outlines future plans to bring this work to the clinical realm for the benefit of patients.

  1. Localized type Volkmann's contracture treated with tendon transfer and tension-reduced early mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Kaji, Yoshio; Nakamura, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Konosuke; Tobiume, Sachiko; Yamamoto, Tetsuji

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: For localized type Volkmann's contracture, in which degeneration of the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) muscle to one or two fingers and restriction of finger extension occur, dissection or excision of the affected muscle is usually recommended. However, these surgical procedures need relatively wide exposure of the muscle, because the FDP muscle is in the deep portion of the forearm. Patient concerns: In this report, the case of a 35-year-old woman with localized type Volkmann's contracture is presented. Her left forearm had been compressed with an industrial roller 4 months earlier, and severe flexion contracture of the long finger and mild flexion contracture of the ring finger developed gradually. Diagnoses: localized type Volkmann's contracture. Intervention: Five months after the injury, transection of the FDP tendon to the long finger and transfer of the transected tendon to the FDP tendon to the index finger was performed after adjusting the tonus of these two tendons using a small skin incision. This procedure was followed by a tension-reduced early mobilization technique in which a tension-reduced position of the tendon suture site was maintained by taping the long finger to the volar side of the index finger, and then immediate active range of motion (ROM) exercise was started. Outcomes: Within 9 weeks after surgery, full ROM had been regained. Lessons: Using the treatment procedure presented in this case report, a good clinical result was obtained in a minimally invasive manner. PMID:28072735

  2. Burning Mouth Syndrome and "Burning Mouth Syndrome".

    PubMed

    Rifkind, Jacob Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is distressing to both the patient and practitioner unable to determine the cause of the patient's symptoms. Burning mouth syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion, which is used only after nutritional deficiencies, mucosal disease, fungal infections, hormonal disturbances and contact stomatitis have been ruled out. This article will explore the many causes and treatment of patients who present with a chief complaint of "my mouth burns," including symptomatic treatment for those with burning mouth syndrome.

  3. Wound healing in a fetal, adult, and scar tissue model: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Coolen, Neeltje A; Schouten, Kelly C W M; Boekema, Bouke K H L; Middelkoop, Esther; Ulrich, Magda M W

    2010-01-01

    Early gestation fetal wounds heal without scar formation. Understanding the mechanism of this scarless healing may lead to new therapeutic strategies for improving adult wound healing. The aims of this study were to develop a human fetal wound model in which fetal healing can be studied and to compare this model with a human adult and scar tissue model. A burn wound (10 x 2 mm) was made in human ex vivo fetal, adult, and scar tissue under controlled and standardized conditions. Subsequently, the skin samples were cultured for 7, 14, and 21 days. Cells in the skin samples maintained their viability during the 21-day culture period. Already after 7 days, a significantly higher median percentage of wound closure was achieved in the fetal skin model vs. the adult and scar tissue model (74% vs. 28 and 29%, respectively, p<0.05). After 21 days of culture, only fetal wounds were completely reepithelialized. Fibroblasts migrated into the wounded dermis of all three wound models during culture, but more fibroblasts were present earlier in the wound area of the fetal skin model. The fast reepithelialization and prompt presence of many fibroblasts in the fetal model suggest that rapid healing might play a role in scarless healing.

  4. Effectiveness of Onion Extract Gel on Surgical Scars in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Chanprapaph, Kumutnart; Tanrattanakorn, Somsak; Wattanakrai, Penpun; Wongkitisophon, Pranee; Vachiramon, Vasanop

    2012-01-01

    Background. Onion extracts have been shown in vitro to accelerate wound healing. Results from clinical studies on surgical scars in Caucasians were disappointing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of onion extract gel in improving the cosmetic and symptoms of surgical scars in Asians. Patients/Methods. Twenty Asians who had new Pfannenstiel's cesarean section scars were recruited in this prospective double-blinded, split-scar study. Each side was randomly assigned treatment with onion extract gel or placebo at 7 days after surgery. The product was applied three times daily for 12 weeks. Subjects were evaluated at baseline and 4th and 12th weeks. Scar redness was assessed by calorimeter, scar height and pliability were assessed by blinded investigators, and scar symptoms and overall cosmetic improvement were assessed by subjects. Results. Sixteen subjects completed the study. A statistically significant difference between two sides of scar in terms of scar height and scar symptoms was found. There was no statistically significant difference in scar redness, scar pliability, and overall cosmetic appearance between two sides. Conclusions. The early use of topical 12% onion extract gel on Pfannenstiel's cesarean section scar in Asians resulted in the improvement of scar height and scar symptoms. PMID:22924037

  5. A new autosomal recessive congenital contractural syndrome in an Israeli Bedouin kindred.

    PubMed

    Landau, Daniella; Mishori-Dery, Anat; Hershkovitz, Reli; Narkis, Ginat; Elbedour, Khalil; Carmi, Rivka

    2003-02-15

    We describe 23 cases with a syndrome of congenital contractures belonging to a large, inbred Israeli-Bedouin kindred. The phenotype described is similar to the Finnish type lethal congenital contracture syndrome yet differs in the following ways: by some additional craniofacial/ocular findings, by the lack of hydrops, multiple pterygia, and fractures, and by the normal duration of pregnancy. The major unique and previously undescribed clinical feature in our patients is a markedly distended urinary bladder as well as other urinary abnormalities. The vast majority of the cases died shortly after birth. Sonographic prenatal diagnosis was possible as early as 15 weeks gestation by demonstrating fetal akinesia, limb contractures, hydramnios, and distended urinary bladder. Linkage to 5q and 9q34 loci has been excluded.

  6. Percutaneous quadriceps tendon pie-crusting release of extension contracture of the knee.

    PubMed

    Liu, H X; Wen, H; Hu, Y Z; Yu, H C; Pan, X Y

    2014-05-01

    To release extension contracture of the knee, the authors used a minimally invasive technique: percutaneous quadriceps tendon pie-crusting release. Percutaneous pie-crusting release was performed using an 18-gauge needle to puncture the stiff fibrous band of the distal and lateral quadriceps tendon under maximum knee flexion. Quadriceps contracture was gradually released by multiple needle punctures. A knee brace was prescribed for one week and knee flexion exercises were performed on the first postoperative day. This technique was performed in seven post-traumatic stiff knees and five stiff total knee arthroplasties. Mean maximum flexion increased from 37° preoperatively to 50° after arthrolysis and 107(o) after pie-crusting. At a mean follow-up of eight months, mean maximum flexion was 103°. There were no major complications. The technique of quadriceps tendon pie-crusting release is a simple, minimally invasive and effective treatment for knee extension contracture.

  7. The use of skeletal extension torque in reversing Dupuytren contractures of the proximal interphalangeal joint.

    PubMed

    Agee, John M; Goss, Ben C

    2012-07-01

    Dupuytren contracture of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint can be reversed by an extension torque transmitted from an external device, the Digit Widget, by skeletal pins to the middle phalanx. This extension torque, generated by the same elastic bands dentists use to align teeth, gradually restores length to soft tissues palmar to the PIP joint's axis of rotation. Simultaneously, tissues dorsal to the joint's axis will shorten toward normal length as the PIP progressively straightens. Although the contractile nodules and bands of Dupuytren disease may be excised either before or after reversal of the joint's contracture, a 2-staged approach is preferred: (1) reverse the PIP flexion contracture, and (2) excise the diseased tissue from the straightened finger. We believe this 2-staged approach yields better results. In addition, it is technically easier to avoid injury to nerves and arteries while excising the nodules and bands, when one operates through palmar skin of more nearly normal length.

  8. Papular Acne Scars of the Nose and Chin: An Under-recognised Variant of Acne Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Faisal R; Kirk, Michael; Madan, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Scarring following acne vulgaris is common and can be of profound psychosocial consequence. Aims and Objectives: We have clinically noted a variant of acne scarring, overlooked by previous categorisation schemes, which we have denominated as papular acne scars of the nose and chin. We sought to characterise these novel entities further. Materials and Methods: Initially, we identified 14 patients with papular acne scars of the nose and chin in a cosmetic dermatology clinic, of whom two were female and rest were male. We then prospectively evaluated 100 consecutive patients attending our tertiary referral acne isotretinoin clinic and 49 patients attending a general dermatology clinic. Results: Amongst 149 patients, from a general dermatology and tertiary acne clinic, soft papular scars were noted in four patients, distributed on the nose and chin. Three of the four patients were male, three patients had additional acne scars and the median age was 23.5. Conclusions: We have identified 18 patients with papular acne scars of the nose and chin and propose that this new category should be added to acne scarring classification schemes. Future work should be directed at corroborating the epidemiology of such lesions and describing effective treatment modalities. PMID:28163455

  9. Anterior Dislocation of the Shoulder Due to an Idiopathic Deltoid Contracture-the Report of a Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Vadapalli, Satyadev

    2013-01-01

    Post injection fibrosis leading to muscle contracture is a known complication. Deltoid fibrosis is known to occur following trauma or an intramuscular injection. Idiopathic Deltoid fibrosis leading to abduction contracture and anterior dislocation of the shoulder is a rare entity. Prompt diagnosis and surgery by distal release of fibrosed Deltoid muscle will lead to good functional recovery. PMID:23543744

  10. Soil surface CO2 flux increases with successional time in a fire scar chronosequence of Canadian boreal jack pine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. R.; Kaduk, J. D.; Balzter, H.; Wooster, M. J.; Mottram, G. N.; Hartley, G.; Lynham, T. J.; Studens, J.; Curry, J.; Stocks, B. J.

    2010-05-01

    To fully understand the carbon (C) cycle impacts of forest fires, both C emissions during the fire and post-disturbance fluxes need to be considered. The latter are dominated by soil surface CO2 flux (Fs), which is still subject to large uncertainties. Fire is generally regarded as the most important factor influencing succession in the boreal forest biome and fire dependant species such as jack pine are widespread. In May 2007, we took concurrent Fs and soil temperature (Ts) measurements in boreal jack pine fire scars aged between 0 and 59 years since fire. To allow comparisons between scars, we adjusted Fs for Ts (FsT) using a Q10 of 2. Mean FsT ranged from 0.56 (± 0.30 sd) to 1.94 (± 0.74 sd) μmol CO2 m-2 s-1. Our results indicate a difference in mean FsT between recently burned (4 to 8 days post fire) and non-burned mature (59 years since fire) forest (P < 0.001), though no difference was detected between recently burned (4 to 8 days post fire) and non-burned young (16 years since fire) forest (P = 0.785). There was a difference in mean FsT between previously young (16 years since fire) and intermediate aged (32 years since fire) scars that were both subject to fire in 2007 (P < 0.001). However, there was no difference in mean FsT between mature (59 years since fire) and intermediate aged (32 years since fire) scars that were both subjected to fire in 2007 (P = 0.226). Furthermore, there was no difference in mean FsT between mature (59 years since fire) and young scars (16 years since fire) that were both subjected to fire in 2007 (P = 0.186). There was an increase in FsT with time since fire for the chronosequence 0, 16 and 59 years post fire (P < 0.001). Our results lead us to hypothesise that the autotrophic:heterotrophic soil respiration ratio increases over post-fire successional time in boreal jack pine systems, though this should be explored in future research. The results of this study contribute to a better quantitative understanding of Fs in boreal

  11. Burns due to acid assaults in Bogotá, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Linda

    2013-08-01

    Acid burns are not very frequent, occupying between 3% and maximum 14% of all etiologies. They mostly occur at home or at work, however there has been an increase in publications outlining chemical burns where aggression is the cause of this burn. There is a different epidemiological profile between developed countries and developing ones. It seems an ongoing upsurge is occurring in the number of registered attacks within developing countries in recent years. A cross sectional retrospective review of attacks by acid was done in Bogota, Colombia from 1995 to the first trimester 2012. A cumulative number of 35 burn patients were registered during the study period. It is found that the main target, almost the unique target, of this attack are young women belonging to low socioeconomic status with low education degree and high dependence on her partner. The patient's age mean was 22.7 years, ranging from 13 to 41 years. The physical and psychological scars were very severe.

  12. Management of full thickness burns to lactating breasts.

    PubMed

    Giele, H P; Nguyen, H; Wood, F; Crocker, A D

    1994-06-01

    A 19-year-old female sustained 8 per cent full thickness petrol flame burns to the neck, chest, breasts, upper abdomen and portions of the right upper limb. The patient had been breast-feeding until the time of the injury. Following assessment of the risks of potential complications such as engorgement, hyperprolactinaemia, mastitis, milk fistulae, glandular loss, scarring and nipple distortion, surgical tangential excision was delayed until bromocriptine produced cessation of lactation and breast involution occurred. This case report demonstrates that consideration of the potential problems in burns to the lactating breasts and prophylactic management can lead to successful healing and probable restoration of function.

  13. Posterior femoral condylar offset after total knee replacement in the risk of knee flexion contracture.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Tomohiro; Majima, Tokifumi; Nishiike, Osamu; Kasahara, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Daisuke

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the risk of knee flexion contracture associated with a posterior femoral condylar offset after total knee replacement (TKR). Radiographs from 100 healthy Japanese volunteers were included in the study. We evaluated femoral component posterior offset in various implants and compared them with the normal Japanese knee. Posterior offset of the femoral condyle is up to a maximum of 4.7 times greater than that of the healthy Japanese knee in all knee implants. Excess posterior offset of the femoral condyle in TKR prostheses may cause knee joint flexion contracture due to the relative shortening of the posterior soft tissue.

  14. Development of an in vitro burn wound model.

    PubMed

    Coolen, Neeltje A; Vlig, Marcel; van den Bogaerdt, Antoon J; Middelkoop, Esther; Ulrich, Magda M W

    2008-01-01

    Healing of a deeper burn wound is a complex process that often leads to scar formation. Skin wound model systems are important for the development of treatments preventing scarring. The aim of this study is to develop a standardized in vitro burn wound model that resembles the in vivo situation. A burn wound (10 x 2 mm) was made in ex vivo skin and the skin samples were cultured at the air-liquid interface for 7, 14, and 21 days. Cells in the skin biopsies maintained their viability during the 21-day culture period. During culture, reepithelialization of the wound took place from the surrounding tissue and fibroblasts migrated into the wound area. Cells of the epithelial tongue and fibroblasts near the wound margin were proliferating. During culture, skin-derived antileukoproteinase and keratin 17 were expressed only in the epithelial tongue. Both collagen type IV and laminin were present underneath the newly formed epidermis, indicating that the basement membrane was restored. These results show that the burn wound model has many similarities to in vivo wound healing. This burn wound model may be useful to study different aspects of wound healing and testing pharmaceuticals and cosmetics on, e.g., migration and reepithelialization.

  15. Psychiatry of the medically ill in the burn unit.

    PubMed

    Ilechukwu, Sunny T

    2002-03-01

    Clinical experience and burn survivor testimony show that the experience of being burned can be associated with catastrophic stress and lead to drastic permanent body image changes from scarring and limb-function loss. Close relatives, if not killed in the fire, often also experience clinically significant bystander stress. Closeness of relationships may be lost, and self-image may suffer. Property damage and loss of crucial resources may be associated with fires. Although many burns result from accidents, most result from preventable causes associated with psychiatric disorders, which include mood disorders, psychoses, cognitive disorders, and substance-use disorders. Burns then result from: Deliberate self-harm Impaired judgment and poor coordination associated with substance intoxication Risk-taking behavior Poor supervision of children and impaired elderly persons Careless handling of flammable materials. Many clinical syndromes, such as delirium, ASD, acute psychosis, suicidality, and pain need to be addressed by the consulting psychiatrist to facilitate surgical treatment of the burn injury. Other psychiatric disorders, such as PTSD, major depression, and adjustment disorder, need to be treated to expedite long-term adjustment. Hospital length of stay and RTW/RTS are major outcome variables. The psychiatry consultant can positively affect both variables substantially using both pharmacologic and psychosocial measures. The important role of psychiatric issues both before and after burn injury support the need for more consistent and comprehensive medical insurance coverage for psychiatric consultation to burn units and clinics. Burn Support Groups are an invaluable asset.

  16. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crow, Heidi C; Gonzalez, Yoly

    2013-02-01

    Pain in the tongue or oral tissues described as "burning" has been referred to by many terms including burning mouth syndrome. When a burning sensation in the mouth is caused by local or systemic factors, it is called secondary burning mouth syndrome and when these factors are treated the pain will resolve. When burning mouth syndrome occurs in the absence of identified risk indicators, the term primary burning mouth syndrome is utilized. This article focuses on descriptions, etiologic theories, and management of primary burning mouth syndrome, a condition for which underlying causative agents have been ruled out.

  17. Inflammation and cutaneous nervous system involvement in hypertrophic scarring

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shao-hua; Yang, Heng-lian; Xiao, Hu; Wang, Yi-bing; Wang, De-chang; Huo, Ran

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to use a mouse model of hypertrophic scarring by mechanical loading on the dorsum of mice to determine whether the nervous system of the skin and inflammation participates in hypertrophic scarring. Results of hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that inflammation contributed to the formation of a hypertrophic scar and increased the nerve density in scar tissue.Western blot assay verified that interleukin-13 expression was increased in scar tissue. These findings suggest that inflammation and the cutaneous nervous system play a role in hypertrophic scar formation. PMID:26692869

  18. Fraxelated radiofrequency device for acne scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Babar K.; Khokher, Sairah

    2012-09-01

    Acne scars can be improved with various treatments such as topical creams, chemical peels, dermal fillers, microdermabrasion, laser, and radiofrequency devices. Some of these treatments especially lasers and deep chemical peels can have significant side effects such as post inflammatory hyperpigmentation in darker skin types. Fraxelated RF Laser devices have been reported to have lower incidence of side effects in all skin phototypes. Nine patients between ages 18 and 35 of various skin phototypes were selected from a private practice and treated with a RF fraxelated device (E-matrix) for acne scars. Outcomes were measured by physician observation, subjective feedback received by patients, and comparison of before and after photographs. In this small group of patients with various skin phototypes, fraxelated radiofrequency device improved acne scars with minimal side effects and downtime.

  19. [Surgical therapy of wounds and scars].

    PubMed

    Koller, J

    2013-08-01

    Surgery can be very useful in all phases of wound healing and in treating scars. It can be employed along with conservative therapy, either simultaneously or in a sequential manner. The spectrum of surgical measures includes debridement with excision of wound edges or necrotic areas, skin transplantation to cover granulating wounds, and simple excision or complex reconstructive approaches to scars. The advantages of surgical treatment are seen in all phases of wound healing and include rapid onset of action, avoidance of secondary infection and improved function. The shortened healing time helps save personal and material costs.

  20. Scar treatment variations by skin type.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Marty O; Bailey, J Kevin; Hom, David B

    2014-08-01

    Patients and clinicians use skin color attributes such as color uniformity, color distribution, and texture to infer physiologic health status. Normalization of skin color, surface texture, and height are important treatment goals in the treatment of scars. Skin color, structure, and response to trauma, vary with ethnicity. The incidence of hypertrophic and keloid scar formation is influenced by these inherent skin attributes. Skin type influences the response to various modalities including laser therapy and surgical intervention, and skin differences must be considered in treatment planning to achieve optimal results.

  1. A recessive form of congenital contractures and torticollis associated with malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed Central

    Froster-Iskenius, U G; Waterson, J R; Hall, J G

    1988-01-01

    Two families are presented, each with two affected sibs, all four of whom seem to have a newly described and specific form of congenital contractures (arthrogryposis). The affected subjects have congenital torticollis, dysmorphic, asymmetrical, myopathic facial features, and progressive scoliosis. Two sibs had cleft palate. Malignant hyperthermia has occurred in two of the patients. Images PMID:3346884

  2. Adjustable bracing technique for the prevention of knee flexion contracture during tibial lengthening.

    PubMed

    Segev, Eitan; Hayek, Shlomo

    2003-01-01

    The authors present a simple thigh-knee brace that prevents flexion contracture during tibial lengthening. The brace is strapped to the thigh and connected to the Ilizarov frame via two simple hinges. While in the brace the knee can be mobilized for physiotherapy and locked in extension during rest.

  3. The Scarbase Duo(®): Intra-rater and inter-rater reliability and validity of a compact dual scar assessment tool.

    PubMed

    Fell, Matthew; Meirte, Jill; Anthonissen, Mieke; Maertens, Koen; Pleat, Jonathon; Moortgat, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Objective scar assessment tools were designed to help identify problematic scars and direct clinical management. Their use has been restricted by their measurement of a single scar property and the bulky size of equipment. The Scarbase Duo(®) was designed to assess both trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) and colour of a burn scar whilst being compact and easy to use. Twenty patients with a burn scar were recruited and measurements taken using the Scarbase Duo(®) by two observers. The Scarbase Duo(®) measures TEWL via an open-chamber system and undertakes colorimetry via narrow-band spectrophotometry, producing values for relative erythema and melanin pigmentation. Validity was assessed by comparing the Scarbase Duo(®) against the Dermalab(®) and the Minolta Chromameter(®) respectively for TEWL and colorimetry measurements. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess reliability with standard error of measurement (SEM) used to assess reproducibility of measurements. The Pearson correlation coefficient (r) was used to assess the convergent validity. The Scarbase Duo(®) TEWL mode had excellent reliability when used on scars for both intra- (ICC=0.95) and inter-rater (ICC=0.96) measurements with moderate SEM values. The erythema component of the colorimetry mode showed good reliability for use on scars for both intra-(ICC=0.81) and inter-rater (ICC=0.83) measurements with low SEM values. Pigmentation values showed excellent reliability on scar tissue for both intra- (ICC=0.97) and inter-rater (ICC=0.97) with moderate SEM values. The Scarbase Duo(®) TEWL function had excellent correlation with the Dermalab(®) (r=0.93) whilst the colorimetry erythema value had moderate correlation with the Minolta Chromameter (r=0.72). The Scarbase Duo(®) is a reliable and objective scar assessment tool, which is specifically designed for burn scars. However, for clinical use, standardised measurement conditions are recommended.

  4. Differences in collagen architecture between keloid, hypertrophic scar, normotrophic scar, and normal skin: An objective histopathological analysis.

    PubMed

    Verhaegen, Pauline D H M; van Zuijlen, Paul P M; Pennings, Noor M; van Marle, Jan; Niessen, Frank B; van der Horst, Chantal M A M; Middelkoop, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Normotrophic, hypertrophic, and keloidal scars are different types of scar formation, which all need a different approach in treatment. Therefore, it is important to differentiate between these types of scar, not only clinically but also histopathologically. Differences were explored for collagen orientation and bundle thickness in 25 normal skin, 57 normotrophic scar, 56 hypertrophic scar, and 56 keloid biopsies, which were selected on clinical diagnosis. Image analysis was performed by fast fourier transformation. The calculated collagen orientation index ranged from 0 (random orientation) to 1 (parallel orientation). The bundle distance was calculated by the average distance between the centers of the collagen bundles. The results showed that compared with all three types of scars, the collagen orientation index was significantly lower in normal skin, which indicates that scars are organized in a more parallel manner. No differences were found between the different scars. Secondly, compared with normal skin, normotrophic scar, and hypertrophic scar, the bundle distance was significantly larger in keloidal scar, which suggests that thicker collagen bundles are present in keloidal scar. This first extensive histological study showed objective differences between normal skin, normotrophic, hypertrophic, and keloidal scar.

  5. The Use of Stem Cells in Burn Wound Healing: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ghieh, Fadi; Jurjus, Rosalyn; Ibrahim, Amir; Geagea, Alice Gerges; Daouk, Hisham; El Baba, Bassel; Chams, Sana; Matar, Michel; Zein, Wadih; Jurjus, Abdo

    2015-01-01

    Burn wound healing involves a series of complex processes which are subject to intensive investigations to improve the outcomes, in particular, the healing time and the quality of the scar. Burn injuries, especially severe ones, are proving to have devastating effects on the affected patients. Stem cells have been recently applied in the field to promote superior healing of the wounds. Not only have stem cells been shown to promote better and faster healing of the burn wounds, but also they have decreased the inflammation levels with less scar progression and fibrosis. This review aims to highlight the beneficial therapeutic effect of stem cells in burn wound healing and to discuss the involved pathways and signaling molecules. The review covers various types of burn wound healing like skin and corneal burns, along with the alternative recent therapies being studied in the field of burn wound healing. The current reflection of the attitudes of people regarding the use of stem cells in burn wound healing is also stated. PMID:26236731

  6. Preserving plantar flexion strength after surgical treatment for contracture of the triceps surae: a computer simulation study.

    PubMed

    Delp, S L; Statler, K; Carroll, N C

    1995-01-01

    Contractures of the triceps surae commonly are treated by surgical lengthening of the gastrocnemius aponeurosis or the Achilles tendon. Although these procedures generally relieve contractures, patients sometimes are left with dramatically decreased plantar flexion strength (i.e., decreased capacity to generate plantar flexion moment). The purpose of this study was to examine the trade-off between restoring range of motion and maintaining plantar flexion strength after surgical treatment for contracture of the triceps surae. A computer model representing the normal moment-generating characteristics of the triceps surae was altered to represent two conditions: isolated contracture of the gastrocnemius and contracture of both the gastrocnemius and the soleus. The effects of lengthening the gastrocnemius aponeurosis and the Achilles tendon were simulated for each condition. The simulations showed that nearly normal moment-generating characteristics could be restored when isolated gastrocnemius contracture was treated with lengthening of the gastrocnemius aponeurosis. However, when isolated gastrocnemius contracture was treated with lengthening of the Achilles tendon, the moment-generating capacity of the plantar flexors decreased greatly. This suggests that lengthening of the Achilles tendon should be avoided in persons with isolated gastrocnemius contracture. Our simulations also suggest that neither lengthening of the gastrocnemius aponeurosis nor lengthening of the Achilles tendon by itself is an effective treatment for combined contracture of the gastrocnemius and soleus. Lengthening the gastrocnemius aponeurosis did not decrease the excessive passive moment developed by the contracted soleus. Lengthening the Achilles tendon restored the normal passive range of motion but substantially decreased the active force-generating capacity of the muscles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Hamstring Contracture After ACL Reconstruction Is Associated With an Increased Risk of Cyclops Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Francisco Guerra; Thaunat, Mathieu; Daggett, Matt; Kajetanek, Charles; Marques, Tiago; Guimares, Tales; Quelard, Bénédicte; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cyclops syndrome is characterized by loss of terminal knee extension due to proliferative fibrous nodule formation in the intercondylar notch. This complication occurs in the early postoperative period after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). The pathogenesis of Cyclops syndrome is not well understood. Hypothesis: Persistent hamstring contracture after ACLR is associated with an increased risk of subsequent Cyclops syndrome. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: The files of 45 patients who underwent arthroscopic debridement of a Cyclops lesion after ACLR were analyzed. Recorded data included demographic information and technical details of surgery. Preoperative magnetic resonance images were also analyzed, and patients with femoral bone bruising were identified. Passive and active range of motion were recorded in all patients preoperatively and at 3 and 6 weeks after surgery to address the Cyclops lesion. Passive extension deficit was evaluated in comparison with the contralateral limb and classified as secondary to hamstring contracture when contracture was observed and palpated in the prone position and when the extension deficit was reversed after exercises performed to fatigue the hamstrings. A control group was selected using a random numbers table among our entire ACLR cohort. Statistical analysis was performed to analyze differences between the 2 groups. Results: There was no significant difference between the groups with regard to age at ACLR, sex distribution, time from injury to surgery (P > .05), proportion of professional athletes, presence of femoral bone bruise, or technical aspects of surgery. The overall extension deficit incidence was significantly higher in the Cyclops group at 3 weeks (Cyclops, 71%; control, 22%) (P < .001) and at 6 weeks (Cyclops, 60%; control, 7%) (P < .001). The extension deficit related to hamstring contracture was significantly higher in the Cyclops group at 3 weeks

  8. Open Capsulotomy: An Effective but Overlooked Treatment for Capsular Contracture after Breast Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: The prevailing theory for capsular contracture after breast augmentation is a subclinical capsular infection. A capsulectomy, site change, and implant replacement are recommended. An open capsulotomy leaves the capsule in the patient. Theoretically, such a procedure would be ineffective because it does not remove the infected tissue. Recurrences occurred frequently in women treated in the 1970s when leaky silicone gel implants were in use. Open capsulotomy has not been studied in women implanted with third-generation devices. Methods: Seventy-five consecutive women with Baker III/IV capsular contractures after breast augmentation treated with open capsulotomies between 1996 and 2016 were retrospectively evaluated. The original implants were usually saline-filled (72.2%). Replacements were all smooth and round, and 92.6% were also saline-filled. Results: Seventeen women (22.7%) developed a recurrent capsular contracture. Two patients (2.7%) experienced a second recurrence. Patients with ruptured silicone gel implants (n = 13) had a significantly greater risk of recurrence (P = 0.01). There was no significant difference in recurrence rates comparing patients whose intact implants were reinserted (12.5%) with women whose intact implants were replaced (18.2%). Povidone–iodine irrigation did not affect the recurrence rate. Capsular contracture was corrected with 1 procedure in 77.3% of patients and 2 procedures in 97.3% of patients. Conclusions: Open capsulotomy is a safe and effective treatment that avoids the additional morbidity and cost of a capsulectomy. The findings challenge the infected biofilm theory of capsular contracture. Open capsulotomy deserves reconsideration by plastic surgeons. PMID:27826488

  9. Laparoscopic Treatment of Cesarean Scar Ectopic Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Felsingerová, Zuzana; Felsinger, Michal; Jandakova, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: An ectopic pregnancy within a Cesarean scar represents a rare type of extrauterine pregnancy in which the fertilized egg nidates in the myometrium of the uterine wall within a scar left from a previous Cesarean delivery. An unrecognized growing Cesarian scar pregnancy may result in uterine rupture, uncontrollable metrorrhagia, and bleeding into the abdominal cavity; therefore, early diagnosis and therapy are necessary to prevent the development of severe complications. Case: A 34-year-old woman after a previous Cesarean delivery presented with amenorrhoa of 7 weeks' duration. Transvaginal ultrasonography revealed an ectopic pregnancy in the Cesarean scar, and a laparoscopic removal of the gestational sac was performed with no complications. Results: Three months later, another laparoscopy with chromopertubation showed no signs of penetration in the suture, both the Fallopian tubes being bilaterally passable. The patient was advised that she could try to achieve pregnancy through spontaneous conception, after which monitoring of the gestational development and a careful assessment of the nidation site would be needed. Conclusions: Laparoscopic surgical management of a viable ectopic pregnancy is technically simple, and is followed by a good recovery. (J GYNECOL SURG 30:309) PMID:25336858

  10. Botulinum toxin to minimize facial scarring.

    PubMed

    Jablonka, Eric M; Sherris, David A; Gassner, Holger G

    2012-10-01

    Chemoimmobilization with botulinum toxin A is an ideal biochemical agent that allows near-total elimination of muscle pull on the healing facial wound. The goal of chemoimmobilization of facial cutaneous wounds is to eliminate dynamic tension on the healing tissues to improve wound healing and minimize scarring for optimal aesthetic results.

  11. Microtopography of the skin and scar formation.

    PubMed

    Tring, F C

    1976-11-01

    The surface microtopography of normal human skin varies from one anatomical region to another. The patterns at different sites are considered to reflect different orientations of dermal fibers. A simple technique is described that enables such orientations to be accurately delineated. Various scars resulting from lacerations, surgical incisions, and steroid-induced striae were examined in the manner described.

  12. Necrobiotic xanthogranuloma occurring in an eyelid scar.

    PubMed

    Rayner, S A; Duncombe, A S; Keefe, M; Theaker, J; Manners, R M

    2008-01-01

    We present a case report of necrobiotic xanthogranuloma (NXG) in a 76-year-old Caucasian lady occurring as a nodule in a blepharoplasty scar. NXG is a rare histiocytic disease with progressive orbital and systemic features. Management options of excision biopsy or chemotherapy are discussed.

  13. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scar rule. 11.3 Section 11.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL... inflammation, and, other bilateral evidence of abuse indicative of soring including, but not limited...

  14. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Scar rule. 11.3 Section 11.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL... inflammation, and, other bilateral evidence of abuse indicative of soring including, but not limited...

  15. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Scar rule. 11.3 Section 11.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL... inflammation, and, other bilateral evidence of abuse indicative of soring including, but not limited...

  16. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Scar rule. 11.3 Section 11.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL... inflammation, and, other bilateral evidence of abuse indicative of soring including, but not limited...

  17. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Scar rule. 11.3 Section 11.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL... inflammation, and, other bilateral evidence of abuse indicative of soring including, but not limited...

  18. Propolis and amnion reepithelialise second-degree burns in rats.

    PubMed

    Pessolato, Alicia Greyce Turatti; Martins, Daniele dos Santos; Ambrósio, Carlos Eduardo; Mançanares, Celina Almeida Furlanetto; de Carvalho, Ana Flávia

    2011-11-01

    Burns are serious consequences of trauma in terms of both imminent mortality and prolonged periods of morbidity. They are often accompanied by unsatisfactory cosmetic as well as functional and psychological outcomes. These complications emphasise the need for stronger efforts in achieving greater diversity and effectiveness in the treatment of skin burns. This study aimed to verify the effectiveness of gross and microscopic epidermal and dermal responses in the process of regenerative repair or healing of burns in rats that were treated either daily with 5% propolis ointment or by autologous amnion graft. Second-degree burns were inflicted in the neck region of female rats by contact with a hot metal (at 130 °C) for 5 s. Propolis treatment accelerated the process of tissue repair and led to decreased local inflammation, which indicates that treatment with propolis was successful in the initial period (7 days) and stimulated the production of collagen fibre (assessed by morphometry) in all the periods evaluated (14 and 21 days). Amnion treatment inhibited local inflammation (assessed macroscopically), stimulated local epithelial regeneration (assessed microscopically) and stimulated the production of collagen fibre (assessed by morphometry) in the days following burn. These treatments offer new therapeutic strategies for treating severe skin burns; these strategies may allow the minimisation of scar formation, a more rapid return of function and, ultimately, a better quality of life for burn patients.

  19. Heparin Reduced Mortality and Sepsis in Severely Burned Children

    PubMed Central

    Zayas, G.J.; Bonilla, A.M.; Saliba, M.J

    2007-01-01

    Summary Objectives. In El Salvador, before 1999, morbidity and mortality in severely burned children were high. In 1998, all children with burns of 40% or larger size died and sepsis was found. With heparin use in 1999, some similarly burned children survived, and sepsis, pain, procedures, and scars were noted to be less. This retrospective study presents the details. Methods. A study was conducted at the National Children's Hospital in El Salvador of all children with burns over 20% size treated in 1998, when no heparin was used, and in 1999, when heparin was added to burns treatment, using an ethics committee approved protocol in use in twelve other countries. Sodium aqueous heparin solution USP from an intestinal source was infused intravenously and applied topically onto burn surfaces and within blisters for the first 1-3 days post-burn. Then heparin, in diminishing doses, was continued only topically until healing. The treatments in 1998 and 1999 were otherwise the same, except that fewer procedures were needed in 1999. Results. There were no significant differences in gender, age, weight, burn aetiology, or burn size between the burned children in 1998 and those in 1999. Burn pain was relieved and pain medicine was not needed in children treated with heparin in 1999. In 1998, one child survived who had a 35% size burn, and the eight children died who had burns of 40% and over. The survival rate was one out of nine (11%). The average burn size was 51.7%. With heparin use in 1999, six of the ten children survived burns of 50.7% average size. The increase in survival with heparin from 11% to 60% and, therefore, the decrease in mortality from 89% to 40% were significant (p < 0.04). Clinical symptoms and positive blood cultures documented bacterial sepsis in the nine children in 1998. In 1999, the blood cultures for sepsis were positive in the four children who died and negative in the six who survived. The nine versus four differences in the incidence of sepsis

  20. A Rat Excised Larynx Model of Vocal Fold Scar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welham, Nathan V.; Montequin, Douglas W.; Tateya, Ichiro; Tateya, Tomoko; Choi, Seong Hee; Bless, Diane M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a rat excised larynx model for the measurement of acoustic, aerodynamic, and vocal fold vibratory changes resulting from vocal fold scar. Method: Twenty-four 4-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to 1 of 4 experimental groups: chronic vocal fold scar, chronic vocal fold scar treated with 100-ng basic…

  1. Combination Therapy in the Management of Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Shilpa; Baveja, Sukriti

    2014-01-01

    Background: Atrophic acne scars are difficult to treat. The demand for less invasive but highly effective treatment for scars is growing. Objective: To assess the efficacy of combination therapy using subcision, microneedling and 15% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) peel in the management of atrophic scars. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with atrophic acne scars were graded using Goodman and Baron Qualitative grading. After subcision, dermaroller and 15% TCA peel were performed alternatively at 2-weeks interval for a total of 6 sessions of each. Grading of acne scar photographs was done pretreatment and 1 month after last procedure. Patients own evaluation of improvement was assessed. Results: Out of 16 patients with Grade 4 scars, 10 (62.5%) patients improved to Grade 2 and 6 (37.5%) patients improved to Grade 3 scars. Out of 22 patients with Grade 3 scars, 5 (22.7%) patients were left with no scars, 2 (9.1%) patients improved to Grade 1and 15 (68.2%) patients improved to Grade 2. All 11 (100%) patients with Grade 2 scars were left with no scars. There was high level of patient satisfaction. Conclusion: This combination has shown good results in treating not only Grade 2 but also severe Grade 4 and 3 scars. PMID:24761094

  2. Myocardial Scar Detection by Standard CT Coronary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Jeevarethinam, Anand; Venuraju, Shreenidhi; Mehta, Vishal Shahil; Atwal, Satvir; Raval, Usha; Rakhit, Roby; Davar, Joseph; Lahiri, Avijit

    2014-01-01

    We have described a myocardial infarct scar identified by a standard dual source CT coronary angiography (CTCA). We were able to detect the scar during the routine coronary assessment without contrast late enhancement and without additional radiation exposure. It is therefore feasible to assess chronic scar using a standard CTCA technique.

  3. Scar formation and revision after the removal of orthodontic miniscrews

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jeong; Lee, Dong-Won; Kim, Kyung-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Many clinicians expect complete healing after the removal of temporary anchorage devices, but clinical examination may reveal scar-like tissue. This report presents the typical features of scarring detected after the removal of miniscrews, and the clinical outcome of scar revision along with its pathologic features. PMID:26023543

  4. The Use of Silicone Adhesives for Scar Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Bleasdale, Benjamin; Finnegan, Simon; Murray, Kathyryn; Kelly, Sean; Percival, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: This article discusses the history and developments of silicone gel sheeting (SGS) scar therapy. Furthermore, we review a breadth of literature to gain an insight into how and why topical silicone gels remain the favored treatment of medical experts in scar management. We also analyze an ever increasing number of alternative therapies claiming to provide enhanced scar reduction performance. Recent Advances: Topical silicone gel treatments seem to remain the first point of clinical recommendation in scar management. SGS has been used in scar therapy for over 30 years, during which its efficacy has been the subject of numerous clinical evaluations. Critical Issues: While the exact mechanisms by which SGS improves hypertrophic scars, keloid development and recovery are yet to be fully agreed upon, its ability to do so remains largely undisputed at present. However, there still is ongoing deliberation over the exact mechanism of action of silicone in improving a scar. At present it is likely that through occlusion of the scar site and hydration of the wound bed, the overactivity of scar-related cells is suppressed, and their activity normalized. Future Direction: The clinical support of topical silicone gel products, relative to all alternative scar therapies, is considered the internationally recommended first-line form of scar management, and favored by consensus among healthcare professionals. However, there still remains the need for further clinical evidence and a better understanding of the mechanism behind the benefit of silicone gel for use in the prevention of abnormal scarring. PMID:26155385

  5. Treatable Bedridden Elderly―Recovery from Flexion Contracture after Cortisol Replacement in a Patient with Isolated Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takamasa; Terada, Norihiko; Fujikawa, Yoshiki; Fujimoto, Takushi

    2016-01-01

    Isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency (IAD) is a rare disorder with diverse clinical presentations. A 79-year-old man was bedridden for six months due to flexion contractures of the bilateral hips and knees, along with hyponatremia. He was diagnosed with IAD based on the results of endocrine tests. After one month of corticosteroid replacement, he recovered and was able to stand up by himself. Although flexion contracture is a rare symptom of IAD, steroid replacement therapy may be effective, even for seemingly irreversibly bedridden elderly patients. In bedridden elderly patients with flexion contractures, we should consider and look for any signs of adrenal insufficiency. PMID:27746435

  6. Treatable Bedridden Elderly -Recovery from Flexion Contracture after Cortisol Replacement in a Patient with Isolated Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takamasa; Terada, Norihiko; Fujikawa, Yoshiki; Fujimoto, Takushi

    Isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency (IAD) is a rare disorder with diverse clinical presentations. A 79-year-old man was bedridden for six months due to flexion contractures of the bilateral hips and knees, along with hyponatremia. He was diagnosed with IAD based on the results of endocrine tests. After one month of corticosteroid replacement, he recovered and was able to stand up by himself. Although flexion contracture is a rare symptom of IAD, steroid replacement therapy may be effective, even for seemingly irreversibly bedridden elderly patients. In bedridden elderly patients with flexion contractures, we should consider and look for any signs of adrenal insufficiency.

  7. Detecting Moorland Wildfire Scars and their Persistence in the Landscape using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) in the Peak District National Park, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millin-chalabi, G. R.; McMorrow, J.; Agnew, C.

    2012-12-01

    The overall aim of this research is to assess the ability of SAR to detect moorland wildfire scars and their persistence in the landscape using the Peak District National Park (PDNP) in the UK as a case study. Spatially-robust data to monitor wildfire scar size and severity in UK moorlands is currently rare. Fires can burn deep into peat soils and contribute to the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere and may also affect the water quality of nearby streams. Information on fire extent would be useful for conservation organisations such as Moors For The Future who are trying to preserve the delicate peatland environment. Knowing the size and location of fire scars would help the Fire and Rescue Service to plan future response to moorland fires. Fire scar boundaries can be mapped in the field using Global Positioning Systems (GPS), however this is labour intensive. Indeed in the PDNP wildfire scar mapping is conducted by park rangers which provides essential ground truth data for assessing against the SAR data. Therefore this particular area provides a unique opportunity for testing an alternative SAR technique for monitoring wildfire scars in the moorland landscape. Previous research shows that SAR has been successfully applied for wildfire scar detection in other types of environments such as boreal (Bourgeau-Chavez et al, 1997) and the tropics (Huang and Siegert, 2004). This research presents some of the first results of the project which tests the capability of ERS 2; ASAR (C-band) and PALSAR (L-band) data to detect several wildfire scars from 2003 - 2008 of various spatial scales and fire severity. Some of the key areas of interest the paper will explore are at Bleaklow and the Kinder plateau. The Bleaklow peat fire of 18th April 2003 was larger (7km2) and more severe than at Kinder, which burned between 26-29th May 2008 and covered an area of 10 ha. All the wildfire scars were GPS, mapped just after the fire event. Archival time-series SAR imagery was

  8. Vertical scar versus the inverted-T scar reduction mammaplasty: a 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Bouwer, Lesley R; van der Biezen, Jan Jaap; Spronk, Cees A; van der Lei, Berend

    2012-10-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate whether the initial outcome of two types of reduction mammaplasty techniques (vertical scar reduction mammaplasty vs. the inverted-T scar reduction mammaplasty) remains stable in the long term: Sixty-nine patients who had undergone breast reduction surgery in the period 1997-2000 at the Department of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery at the Medical Center of Leeuwarden were willing and able to participate in this study. A structured questionnaire was used to assess the degree of patient satisfaction. For subjective evaluation, the Strasser Grading System on photographs at the 3 months after surgery and after long-term follow-up (10 years) was used. The median general appreciation mark for the entire surgical procedure given by patients was 8 (1-10) on a scale from 1 to 10. Forty-six of the 69 patients could be scored according to Strasser: at 3 months in 17 patients (37%) the result was 'good', in 21 patients (46%) 'mediocre' and in eight patients (17%) 'poor'. After 10 years, in 37 of the patients (80%) the result was 'good', in six patients (13%) 'mediocre' and in three patients (7%) 'poor'. At 3 months, there was a higher incidence of bottoming out in the vertical scar group (one on two patients) as compared to the inverted-T scar group (one on 10 patients); however, at the 10-years follow-up bottoming out was 50% in the inverted-T scar group and 20% in the vertical scar group. Despite bottoming out, in both the vertical scar reduction mammaplasty technique and the inverted-T scar reduction mammaplasty technique, high patient satisfaction rates are achieved that remains for years.

  9. American Burn Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the Journal's website MONTHLY HEADLINES from MSKTC (Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center) The American Burn Association Web site contains general information for burn care professionals. The ABA Web site is not intended ...

  10. First Aid: Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Kitchen: Household Safety Checklist Fireworks Safety First Aid: Sunburn Firesetting Fire Safety Burns ... Being Safe in the Kitchen Finding Out About Fireworks Safety Playing With Fire? Dealing With Burns Fireworks ...

  11. Burning Rate Emulator

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Burning Rate Emulator is a gas fuel investigation attempting to emulate the burning of solids to improve our understanding of materials''flammability over a wide range of conditions. The approa...

  12. [Estimating Biomass Burned Areas from Multispectral Dataset Detected by Multiple-Satellite].

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao; Chen, Liang-fu; Li, Shen-shen; Tao, Jin-hua; Su, Lin

    2015-03-01

    Biomass burning makes up an important part of both trace gases and particulate matter emissions, which can efficiently degrade air quality and reduce visibility, destabilize the global climate system at regional to global scales. Burned area is one of the primary parameters necessary to estimate emissions, and considered to be the largest source of error in the emission inventory. Satellite-based fire observations can offer a reliable source of fire occurrence data on regional and global scales, a variety of sensors have been used to detect and map fires in two general approaches: burn scar mapping and active fire detection. However, both of the two approaches have limitations. In this article, we explore the relationship between hotspot data and burned area for the Southeastern United States, where a significant amount of biomass burnings from both prescribed and wild fire took place. MODIS (Moderate resolution imaging spectrometer) data, which has high temporal-resolution, can be used to monitor ground biomass. burning in time and provided hot spot data in this study. However, pixel size of MODIS hot spot can't stand for the real ground burned area. Through analysis of the variation of vegetation band reflectance between pre- and post-burn, we extracted the burned area from Landsat-5 TM (Thematic Mapper) images by using the differential normalized burn ratio (dNBR) which is based on TM band4 (0.84 μm) and TM band 7(2.22 μm) data. We combined MODIS fire hot spot data and Landsat-5 TM burned scars data to build the burned area estimation model, results showed that the linear correlation coefficient is 0.63 and the relationships vary as a function of vegetation cover. Based on the National Land Cover Database (NLCD), we built burned area estimation model over different vegetation cover, and got effective burned area per fire pixel, values for forest, grassland, shrub, cropland and wetland are 0.69, 1.27, 0.86, 0.72 and 0.94 km2 respectively. We validated the

  13. Minor burns - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... the burn: Use cool water, not ice. The extreme cold from ice can injure the tissue even more. If possible, especially if the burn is caused by chemicals, hold the burned skin under cool running water for 10 to 15 minutes until it ...

  14. Electric heating pad burns.

    PubMed

    Bill, T J; Edlich, R F; Himel, H N

    1994-01-01

    Patients with sensory deficits are especially prone to heating pad burns. Two cases are reported of patients with anesthetic skin who received partial and full-thickness burns of their feet from an electric heating pad. These burn injuries could have been prevented if the patients understood the potential hazard of heating pads.

  15. Repigmentation of cutaneous scars depends on original wound type

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Sarah L; Yip, Christina; Ferguson, Mark W J; Shah, Mamta

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous scarring is currently an inevitable outcome following skin injury. Abnormal pigmentation within scars makes them more noticeable, causing distress for patients, particularly as there is no reliable and effective treatment available to date. The Duroc pig, known to scar badly, was used to investigate repigmentation of scars resulting from three different wound types: incisional, partial thickness excisional and full thickness excisional. Wounds were created on the backs of Duroc pigs and the resulting scars harvested at days 35, 56, 70 and 90 days post-injury. Scars were processed for histology and immunohistochemistry, quantitatively analysed using image analysis software and subjected to statistical analysis. Photographs of the macroscopic appearance of scars were scored for pigmentation using a visual analogue scale. Results demonstrated temporal and spatial differences in melanocyte repopulation and function within scars from different wound types. The microscopic pigment deposition did not correlate with macroscopic appearances in mature scars. Pigmentation of scars is dependent on the width and depth of wounds. This study has provided important information on which we can base future studies to investigate factors controlling the repigmentation of scars. PMID:23668313

  16. Extensive burns caused by the abusive use of photosensitizing agents.

    PubMed

    Braye, F; Latarjet, J; Foyatier, J L; Comparin, J P; Tranchand, P; Boucaud, C

    1997-01-01

    Psoralens are photosensitizing agents used in dermatology as reinforcements in psoralen ultraviolet A-range therapy. We report observations of 14 young women hospitalized for severe burns caused by abusive use of psoralens. The burns were of superficial and deep second-degree depth and covered more than 76% of the body surface on average. All patients needed fluid resuscitation. Hospital stay was 11 days on average. Healing was obtained without skin grafting in all cases. Among the six patients who responded to the mailed questionnaire, negative effects are now present in all patients as inflammatory peaks. Two patients have esthetic sequelae such as dyschromia and scars. The misuse of photosensitizing agents poses many problems. These accidents are very expensive. The largeness of the burned surface can involve a fatal prognosis. And finally, one can suspect that a much larger portion of the population regularly uses these products without any serious accident. In this case carcinogenesis can be expected.

  17. Crouched gait in myelomeningocele: a comparison between the degree of knee flexion contracture in the clinical examination and during gait.

    PubMed

    Moen, Todd; Gryfakis, Nicholas; Dias, Luciano; Lemke, Laura

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate, in patients with low lumbar and sacral level myelomeningocele who have knee flexion contractures, whether there are significant differences between the degree of knee flexion contracture measured clinically and the degree of actual knee flexion during gait, measured by computerized gait analysis. Patients were divided into two groups, those who walked with ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) alone and those who walked with AFOs and crutches. In both groups, the patient's knee flexion contractures were measured clinically, and the degree of knee flexion was measured dynamically at two representative points in the gait cycle. In both groups and at both points of the gait cycle, the degree of knee flexion during gait was significantly greater than the degree of clinical knee flexion contracture. This should be taken into account when evaluating the crouch gait of children with myelomeningocele and planning the proper treatment.

  18. Practice guidelines for the application of nonsilicone or silicone gels and gel sheets after burn injury.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Carter, Alissa; Forbes, Lisa; Hsu, Shu-Chuan Chen; McMahon, Margaret; Parry, Ingrid; Ryan, Colleen M; Serghiou, Michael A; Schneider, Jeffrey C; Sharp, Patricia A; de Oliveira, Ana; Boruff, Jill

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this review was to systematically evaluate available clinical evidence for the application of nonsilicone or silicone gels and gel sheets on hypertrophic scars and keloids after a burn injury so that practice guidelines could be proposed. This review provides evidence based recommendations, specifically for the rehabilitation interventions required for the treatment of aberrant wound healing after burn injury with gels or gel sheets. These guidelines are designed to assist all healthcare providers who are responsible for initiating and supporting scar management interventions prescribed for burn survivors. Summary recommendations were made after the literature, retrieved by systematic review, was critically appraised and the level of evidence determined according to Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine criteria.

  19. Suppressed inflammatory gene expression during human hypertrophic scar compared to normotrophic scar formation.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Lenie J; van der Veer, Willem M; de Jong, Etty H; Gibbs, Susan; Niessen, Frank B

    2015-08-01

    Hypertrophic scar formation is a result of adverse cutaneous wound healing. The pathogenesis of hypertrophic scar formation is still poorly understood. A problem next to the lack of suitable animal models is that often normal skin is compared to hypertrophic scar (HTscar) and not to normotrophic scar (NTscar) tissue. Another drawback is that often only one time period after wounding is studied, while scar formation is a dynamic process over a period of several months. In this study, we compared the expression of genes involved in inflammation, angiogenesis and extracellular matrix (ECM) formation and also macrophage infiltration in biopsies obtained before and up to 52 weeks after standard surgery in five patients who developed HTscar and six patients who developed NTscar. It was found that HTscar formation coincided with a prolonged decreased expression of inflammatory genes (TNFα, IL-1α, IL-1RN, CCL2, CCL3, CXCL2, CXCR2, C3 and IL-10) and an extended increased expression of ECM-related genes (PLAU, Col3A1, TGFβ3). This coincided with a delayed but prolonged infiltration of macrophages (type 2) in HTscar tissue compared to NTscar tissue. These findings were supported by immunohistochemical localization of proteins coding for select genes named above. Our study emphasizes that human cutaneous wound healing is a dynamic process that is needed to be studied over a period of time rather than a single point of time. Taken together, our results suggest innate immune stimulatory therapies may be a better option for improving scar quality than the currently used anti-inflammatory scar therapies.

  20. Translation into Brazilian Portuguese and validation of the "Quantitative Global Scarring Grading System for Post-acne Scarring" *

    PubMed Central

    Cachafeiro, Thais Hofmann; Escobar, Gabriela Fortes; Maldonado, Gabriela; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    The "Quantitative Global Scarring Grading System for Postacne Scarring" was developed in English for acne scar grading, based on the number and severity of each type of scar. The aims of this study were to translate this scale into Brazilian Portuguese and verify its reliability and validity. The study followed five steps: Translation, Expert Panel, Back Translation, Approval of authors and Validation. The translated scale showed high internal consistency and high test-retest reliability, confirming its reproducibility. Therefore, it has been validated for our population and can be recommended as a reliable instrument to assess acne scarring. PMID:25184939

  1. Investigation of optical attenuation imaging using optical coherence tomography for monitoring of scars undergoing fractional laser treatment.

    PubMed

    Es'haghian, Shaghayegh; Gong, Peijun; Chin, Lixin; Harms, Karl-Anton; Murray, Alexandra; Rea, Suzanne; Kennedy, Brendan F; Wood, Fiona M; Sampson, David D; McLaughlin, Robert A

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate the use of the near-infrared attenuation coefficient, measured using optical coherence tomography (OCT), in longitudinal assessment of hypertrophic burn scars undergoing fractional laser treatment. The measurement method incorporates blood vessel detection by speckle decorrelation and masking, and a robust regression estimator to produce 2D en face parametric images of the attenuation coefficient of the dermis. Through reliable co-location of the field of view across pre- and post-treatment imaging sessions, the study was able to quantify changes in the attenuation coefficient of the dermis over a period of ∼20 weeks in seven patients. Minimal variation was observed in the mean attenuation coefficient of normal skin and control (untreated) mature scars, as expected. However, a significant decrease (13 ± 5%, mean ± standard deviation) was observed in the treated mature scars, resulting in a greater distinction from normal skin in response to localized damage from the laser treatment. By contrast, we observed an increase in the mean attenuation coefficient of treated (31 ± 27%) and control (27 ± 20%) immature scars, with numerical values incrementally approaching normal skin as the healing progressed. This pilot study supports conducting a more extensive investigation of OCT attenuation imaging for quantitative longitudinal monitoring of scars. En face 2D OCT attenuation coefficient map of a treated immature scar derived from the pre-treatment (top) and the post-treatment (bottom) scans. (Vasculature (black) is masked out.) The scale bars are 0.5 mm.

  2. Timing constraints on remote sensing of wildland fire burned area in the southeastern US

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Picotte, J.J.; Robertson, K.

    2011-01-01

    Remote sensing using Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite imagery is increasingly used for mapping wildland fire burned area and burn severity, owing to its frequency of collection, relatively high resolution, and availability free of charge. However, rapid response of vegetation following fire and frequent cloud cover pose challenges to this approach in the southeastern US. We assessed these timing constraints by using a series of Landsat TM images to determine how rapidly the remotely sensed burn scar signature fades following prescribed burns in wet flatwoods and depression swamp community types in the Apalachicola National Forest, Florida, USA during 2006. We used both the Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) of reflectance bands sensitive to vegetation and exposed soil cover, as well as the change in NBR from before to after fire (dNBR), to estimate burned area. We also determined the average and maximum amount of time following fire required to obtain a cloud-free image for burns in each month of the year, as well as the predicted effect of this time lag on percent accuracy of burn scar estimates. Using both NBR and dNBR, the detectable area decreased linearly 9% per month on average over the first four months following fire. Our findings suggest that the NBR and dNBR methods for monitoring burned area in common southeastern US vegetation community types are limited to an average of 78-90% accuracy among months of the year, with individual burns having values as low as 38%, if restricted to use of Landsat 5 TM imagery. However, the majority of burns can still be mapped at accuracies similar to those in other regions of the US, and access to additional sources of satellite imagery would improve overall accuracy. ?? 2011 by the authors.

  3. Timing constraints on remote sensing of wildland fire burned area in the southeastern US

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Picotte, Joshua J.; Robertson, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Remote sensing using Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite imagery is increasingly used for mapping wildland fire burned area and burn severity, owing to its frequency of collection, relatively high resolution, and availability free of charge. However, rapid response of vegetation following fire and frequent cloud cover pose challenges to this approach in the southeastern US. We assessed these timing constraints by using a series of Landsat TM images to determine how rapidly the remotely sensed burn scar signature fades following prescribed burns in wet flatwoods and depression swamp community types in the Apalachicola National Forest, Florida, USA during 2006. We used both the Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) of reflectance bands sensitive to vegetation and exposed soil cover, as well as the change in NBR from before to after fire (dNBR), to estimate burned area. We also determined the average and maximum amount of time following fire required to obtain a cloud-free image for burns in each month of the year, as well as the predicted effect of this time lag on percent accuracy of burn scar estimates. Using both NBR and dNBR, the detectable area decreased linearly 9% per month on average over the first four months following fire. Our findings suggest that the NBR and dNBR methods for monitoring burned area in common southeastern US vegetation community types are limited to an average of 78–90% accuracy among months of the year, with individual burns having values as low as 38%, if restricted to use of Landsat 5 TM imagery. However, the majority of burns can still be mapped at accuracies similar to those in other regions of the US, and access to additional sources of satellite imagery would improve overall accuracy.

  4. Botulinum toxin to minimize facial scarring.

    PubMed

    Sherris, David A; Gassner, Holger G

    2002-02-01

    Botulinum toxin injection has been used for a variety of indications in humans, including blepharospasm and hyperfunctional facial lines. This article describes a novel formulation of botulinum toxin, which supplies immediate feedback to the injecting physician. Additionally, recent findings are described that indicate the immediate injection of botulinum toxin into the muscles underlying a wound can improve the cosmetic outcome of the facial cutaneous scar. Future applications of these findings are discussed.

  5. Umbilical scarring in hatchling American alligators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiebe, J.J.; Sepulveda, M.S.; Buckland, J.E.; Anderson, S.R.; Gross, T.S.

    2004-01-01

    Umbilical scarring is the presence of excess scar tissue deposited between abdominal dermal layers at the site of yolk sac absorption in hatchling American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis). The presence of this dermal condition plays a key evaluatory role in the overall quality and subsequent value for various commercial leather products. Despite the prevalent nature of this condition, currently the industry has no standardized protocols for its quantification. The objectives of this study were to examine the relationship between hatchling weight and age and incidence of umbilical scarring and to develop a quantifiable and reproducible technique to measure this dermal condition in hatchling American alligators. Thirty eggs from each of nine clutches were incubated in two separate incubators at different facilities and hatchling umbilical scarring was measured at 2 and 10 days of age using digital calipers. Umbilical area was calculated by multiplying umbilical length times umbilical width. There was a significant effect of both age and clutch on umbilical area (overall decline of 64%) by 10 days post-hatch. However, only five of the nine clutches utilized expressed a noticeable decline in the size of this dermal condition (range 67-74%). We had hypothesized that larger hatchlings would have larger umbilical areas and a slower rate of improvement in this condition during the first few days post-hatch. The differences in umbilical area and percent decline with age across clutches, however, were not associated with differences in initial hatchling weights. Within clutches and time periods, hatchling weight had no significant effect on the size and/or rate of decline of this condition. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Rabbit knee model of post-traumatic joint contractures: the long-term natural history of motion loss and myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Kevin A; Sutherland, Craig; Zhang, Mei

    2004-03-01

    Our objective is to describe the natural history of motion loss with time and myofibroblast numbers in a rabbit knee model of post-traumatic joint contractures. Twenty-eight skeletally mature New Zealand White female rabbits had five-mm-squares of cortical bone removed from the medial and lateral femoral condyles of the right knee. A Kirschner wire (K-wire) was used to immobilize the knee joint in maximum flexion. A second operation was performed 8 weeks later to remove the K-wire. The rabbits were divided into four groups depending on the time of remobilization; 0, 8, 16 or 32 weeks. The average flexion contracture of the experimental knees in the 0-week and 8-week remobilization groups (38 degrees and 33 degrees, respectively) were significantly greater when compared with the values of the unoperated contralateral knees (8 degrees). The average flexion contractures of the experimental knees in the 16-week and 32-week remobilization groups were also greater than the unoperated contralateral knees, although they were not statistically significant. The average flexion contractures of the 16-week and 32-week groups were 19 degrees and 18 degrees, respectively, indicating a stabilization of the motion loss. Myofibroblast numbers in the posterior joint capsules were elevated 4-5x in the knees with contractures when compared to the contralateral knees. The initial decrease in severity followed by stabilization of motion loss and the association of motion loss with myofibroblasts mimics the human scenario of permanent post-traumatic joint contractures.

  7. Digital imaging analysis to assess scar phenotype.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian J; Nidey, Nichole; Miller, Steven F; Moreno Uribe, Lina M; Baum, Christian L; Hamilton, Grant S; Wehby, George L; Dunnwald, Martine

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the link between the genetic background of patients and wound clinical outcomes, it is critical to have a reliable method to assess the phenotypic characteristics of healed wounds. In this study, we present a novel imaging method that provides reproducible, sensitive, and unbiased assessments of postsurgical scarring. We used this approach to investigate the possibility that genetic variants in orofacial clefting genes are associated with suboptimal healing. Red-green-blue digital images of postsurgical scars of 68 patients, following unilateral cleft lip repair, were captured using the 3dMD imaging system. Morphometric and colorimetric data of repaired regions of the philtrum and upper lip were acquired using ImageJ software, and the unaffected contralateral regions were used as patient-specific controls. Repeatability of the method was high with intraclass correlation coefficient score > 0.8. This method detected a very significant difference in all three colors, and for all patients, between the scarred and the contralateral unaffected philtrum (p ranging from 1.20(-05) to 1.95(-14) ). Physicians' clinical outcome ratings from the same images showed high interobserver variability (overall Pearson coefficient = 0.49) as well as low correlation with digital image analysis results. Finally, we identified genetic variants in TGFB3 and ARHGAP29 associated with suboptimal healing outcome.

  8. Digital imaging analysis to assess scar phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Brian J.; Nidey, Nichole; Miller, Steven F.; Moreno, Lina M.; Baum, Christian L.; Hamilton, Grant S.; Wehby, George L.; Dunnwald, Martine

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the link between the genetic background of patients and wound clinical outcomes, it is critical to have a reliable method to assess the phenotypic characteristics of healed wounds. In this study, we present a novel imaging method that provides reproducible, sensitive and unbiased assessments of post-surgical scarring. We used this approach to investigate the possibility that genetic variants in orofacial clefting genes are associated with suboptimal healing. Red-green-blue (RGB) digital images of post-surgical scars of 68 patients, following unilateral cleft lip repair, were captured using the 3dMD image system. Morphometric and colorimetric data of repaired regions of the philtrum and upper lip were acquired using ImageJ software and the unaffected contralateral regions were used as patient-specific controls. Repeatability of the method was high with interclass correlation coefficient score > 0.8. This method detected a very significant difference in all three colors, and for all patients, between the scarred and the contralateral unaffected philtrum (P ranging from 1.20−05 to 1.95−14). Physicians’ clinical outcome ratings from the same images showed high inter-observer variability (overall Pearson coefficient = 0.49) as well as low correlation with digital image analysis results. Finally, we identified genetic variants in TGFB3 and ARHGAP29 associated with suboptimal healing outcome. PMID:24635173

  9. [Therapeutically effect of the physical procedures on the elbow contractures in children with supracondylar humerus fractures].

    PubMed

    Jandrić, S Dj

    2007-01-01

    Supracondylar humerus fractures are the most common fracture around the elbow in the pediatric population. These fractures in children may lead to functional disturbance with loss or reduction of range of motion in the elbow joint. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the physical therapy on the range of the motion of the elbow joint in the post-traumatic elbow contractures in the childhood after supracondylar fractures. We analyzed in this research 34 children (average age 8.57+/-2.94 years) with elbow contractures that were treated by physical therapy after orthopedic treatment. Functional outcome was presented in degree from 1 to 3 (Flynn). The difference in the grade at the beginning and the end of the therapy is statistically significant (t=16.38, p<0.001). 91.18 %, of the children had excellent result. Complex of various therapeutically physical procedures can significant improve range of motion of the elbow joint.

  10. New Innovations for Deep Partial-Thickness Burn Treatment with ACell MatriStem Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Justine S.; Kaminsky, Alexander J.; Summitt, J. Blair; Thayer, Wesley P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Burn injuries remain a large financial burden on the healthcare system. According to CDC statistics (2010), nonfatal and hospitalized burns in the U.S. cost $1.8 billion for an annual incidence of ∼486,000 cases. To date, no technique proves to be the ideal therapy of deep partial-thickness burns. In this study, we review a trial usage of ACell (ACell, Inc.) wound matrix on deep partial-thickness burns. Approach: Burn patients were admitted through the Vanderbilt Emergency Department. Three were consented to receive ACell therapy. Each patient suffered extremity burns, to which ACell MatriStem matrix was applied. Time to epithelialization and healing was monitored up to 1 month postintervention. Results: ACell MatriStem matrix use in deep partial-thickness burns enabled healing by 29 days on average without requiring autografts. The average total body surface area (TBSA) of injury was 7.2% with average TBSA treated with ACell equal to 2.5%. All burn sites underwent re-epithelialization after 5.6 days on average (range 4–7 days). Average length of stay after ACell placement totaled 2 days. All patients fully healed without the need for subsequent grafting or contracture development. No postoperative complications were noted. Innovation: To the extent of our knowledge, this is one of the first reported series to utilize ACell MatriStem product in deep partial-thickness extremity burns. Conclusion: Despite numerous products currently available for burn reconstruction, no one product embodies all the characteristics of an ideal graft. ACell biological extracellular matrix scaffolding appears promising, allowing for healing without use of an autograft. PMID:28078188

  11. Burning mouth syndrome and secondary oral burning.

    PubMed

    Minor, Jacob S; Epstein, Joel B

    2011-02-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is a complex disorder of unclear etiology that is most prevalent in perimenopausal women. It is often accompanied by dysguesia and subjective xerostomia. Recent evidence implicates both central and peripheral neuropathies, possibly representing a phantom pain syndrome in some patients. Ensuring that the patient's oral burning is not secondary to some other local or systemic factor is central to appropriate management. Current standard therapies include clonazepam, paroxetine, and cognitive behavioral therapy, and several promising new alternatives are described.

  12. Occurrence and severity of upper eyelid skin contracture in facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Ziahosseini, K; Venables, V; Neville, C; Nduka, C; Patel, B; Malhotra, R

    2016-05-01

    PurposeTo describe the occurrence and severity of upper eyelid skin contracture in facial nerve palsy (FNP).MethodsWe enroled consecutive patients with unilateral FNP into this study. Patients with previous upper eyelid surgery for either side were excluded. We developed a standardised technique to measure the distance between the upper eyelid margin and the lower border of brow (LMBD). FNP was graded using the Sunnybrook grading scale. Its aetiology, duration, and treatment were noted. Upper and lower marginal reflex distance and lagophthalmos were also noted.ResultsSixty-six patients (mean age 51 years) were included. FNP was owing to a variety of aetiologies. LMBD on the paralytic side was shorter than the normal contralateral side in 47 (71%), equal in 15 (23%), and larger in four (6%) patients. The mean contracture was 3.4 mm (median: 3, range: 1-12) with 11 (17%) patients showing 5 mm or more of skin contracture. The mean LMBD on the paralytic side in all patients was significantly smaller than the contralateral side; 30±3.7 (median: 30; 95% CI 29-31) compared with 32±3.7 (median: 32; 95% CI 32-33), respectively, P<0.0001, two-tailed paired t-test.ConclusionTo our knowledge, this is the first study that quantitatively demonstrates contraction of the upper eyelid skin in FNP. This finding is valuable in directing optimal early management to minimise skin contracture and to caution surgeons against unnecessary upper eyelid skin excision.

  13. Bizarre paediatric facial burns.

    PubMed

    Ho, W S; Ying, S Y; Wong, T W

    2000-08-01

    Child abuse and neglect account for a significant number of paediatric burn injuries. It is of great importance because of the high mortality, high frequency of repeated abuse, as well as the physical, psychological and social sequelae that it causes. Burn abuse is often under-recognized and under-reported because it is difficult to define non-accidental injury. On the other hand, false accusation of burn abuse is extremely damaging to the family. Bizarre and unusual burn injuries can be caused by accident and should not automatically be assumed to be deliberate injury. Three boys of age 1-7 years with bizarre facial burns were admitted to the Burns Unit at the Prince of Wales Hospital between February 1995 and July 1999. One was burned by his baby-sitter with hot water steam and the other two were burned by their mothers with hot boiled eggs. The unusual causes of their burns raised the suspicion of child abuse and formal investigations were carried out by the Social Services Department. Detail assessment including a developmental history of the child and the psychosocial assessment of the family revealed that these three boys were burned because of poor medical advice and innocent cultural belief.

  14. [The pain from burns].

    PubMed

    Latarjet, J

    2002-03-01

    The painful events associated with the treatment of a severe burn can, because of their long-lasting and repetitive characteristics, be one of the most excruciating experiences in clinical practice. Moreover, burn pain has been shown to be detrimental to burn patients. Although nociception and peripheral hyperalgesia are considered the major causes of burn pain, the study of more hypothetical mechanisms like central hyperalgesia and neuropathic pain may lead to a better understanding of burn pain symptoms and to new therapeutic approaches. Continuous pain and intermittent pain due to therapeutic procedures are two distinct components of burn pain. They have to be evaluated and managed separately. Although continuous pain is by far less severe than intermittent pain, the treatment is, in both cases, essentially pharmacological relying basically on opioids. Because of wide intra- and inter-individual variations, protocols will have to leave large possibilities of adaptation for each case, systematic pain evaluation being mandatory to achieve the best risk/benefit ratio. Surprisingly, the dose of medication decreases only slowly with time, a burn often remaining painful for long periods after healing. Non pharmacological treatments are often useful and sometimes indispensable adjuncts; but their rationale and their feasibility depends entirely on previous optimal pharmacological control of burn pain. Several recent studies show that burn pain management is inadequate in most burn centres.

  15. Evaluation of plantar flexion contracture contribution during the gait of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Nathaly; Gravel, Denis; Nadeau, Sylvie

    2009-06-01

    Because of extensor weakness, children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) maintain internal flexion moments at the joints of the lower extremities when they walk. We believe that at the ankle, the plantar flexion moments caused by contractures may contribute significantly to the production of the net ankle flexion moment during the gait in these children. The goal of the present study is to quantify ankle plantar flexion passive moments that may be associated with the presence of flexion contractures and to estimate their contribution to the net moment during the gait of children with DMD. Kinematic and kinetic parameters were collected during gait of eleven subjects with DMD. Ankle plantar flexion passive moments were also measured experimentally during the same session. Fourteen control children participated in the study in order to have normal reference values. The presence of ankle plantar flexion contractures in children with DMD was reflected by a rigidity coefficient obtained at a common moment of -7 Nm that was higher for these children (0.75 Nm/degrees vs. 0.48 Nm/degrees; p<0.05). The relative passive moment contribution to the net plantar flexion moments was higher for the children with DMD at the end of the lengthening phase of the plantar flexors (25% vs. 18%; p<0.05). We believe that the passive moments can compensate for the presence of progressive muscle weakness in the children with DMD and help these children with gait.

  16. Reconstruction of Postburn Contracture of the Forefoot Using the Anterolateral Thigh Flap

    PubMed Central

    An, Sung Jin; Kim, Nu Ri; Kim, Um Ji; Kim, Jeung Il

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe forefoot deformities, particularly those involving the dorsum of the foot, cause inconvenience in daily activities of living including moderate pain on the dorsal aspect of the contracted foot while walking and difficulty in wearing nonsupportive shoes due to toe contractures. This paper presents clinical results of reconstruction of severe forefoot deformity using the anterolateral thigh (ALT) free flap. Methods Severe forefoot deformities were reconstructed using ALT flaps in 7 patients (8 cases) between March 2012 and December 2015. The mean contracture duration was 28.6 years. Results All the flaps survived completely. The size of the flaps ranged from 8 cm × 5 cm to 19 cm × 8 cm. The mean follow-up period was 10 months (range, 7 to 15 months). There was no specific complication at both the recipient and donor sites. There was one case where the toe contracture could not be completely treated after surgery. All of the patients were able to wear shoes and walk without pain. Also, the patients were highly satisfied with cosmetic results. Conclusions The ALT flap may be considered ideal for the treatment of severe forefoot deformity. PMID:27904728

  17. Transverse musculocutaneous gracilis flap for treatment of capsular contracture in tertiary breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Pülzl, Petra; Huemer, Georg M; Schoeller, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Capsular contracture is a common complication associated with implant-based breast reconstruction and augmentation leading to pain, displacement, and rupture. After capsulectomy and implant exchange, the problem often reappears. We performed 52 deepithelialized free transverse musculocutaneous gracilis (TMG) flaps in 33 patients for tertiary breast reconstruction or augmentation of small- and medium-sized breasts. The indications for implant removal were unnatural feel and emotion of their breasts with foreign body feel, asymmetry, pain, and sensation of cold. Anyway, most of the patients did not have a severe capsular contracture deformity. The TMG flap is formed into a cone shape by bringing the tips of the ellipse together. Depending on the contralateral breast, the muscle can also be shaped in an S-form to get more projection if needed. The operating time for unilateral TMG flap breast reconstruction or augmentation was on average 3 hours and for bilateral procedure 5 hours. One patient had a secondary revision of the donor site due to disruption of the normal gluteal fold. Eighty percent of the unilateral TMG flap reconstructions had a lipofilling procedure afterward to correct small irregularities or asymmetry. The advantages of the TMG flap such as short harvesting time, inconspicuous donor site, and the possibility of having a natural breast shape make it our first choice to treat capsular contracture after breast reconstruction and augmentation.

  18. Using transurethral Ho:YAG-laser resection to treat urethral stricture and bladder neck contracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Juanjie; Dai, Shengguo; Huang, Xuyuan; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Huiguo; Shi, Hongmin

    2005-07-01

    Objective: Ho:YAG laser had been used to treat the common diseases of urinary system such as bladder cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia in our hospital. This study is to assess the efficacy and safety of transurethral Ho:YAG-laser resection to treat the urethral stricture and bladder neck contracture. Methods: From May 1997 to August 2004, 26 cases of urethral stricture and 33 cases of bladder neck contracture were treated by transurethral Ho:YAG-laser resection. These patients were followed up at regular intervals after operation. The uroflow rate of these patients was detected before and one-month after operation. The blood loss and the energy consumption of holmium-laser during the operation as well as the complications and curative effect after operation were observed. Results: The therapeutic effects were considered successful, with less bleeding and no severe complications. The Qmax of one month postoperation increased obviously than that of preoperation. Of the 59 cases, restenosis appeared in 11 cases (19%) with the symptoms of dysuria and weak urinary stream in 3-24 months respectively. Conclusions: The Ho:YAG-laser demonstrated good effect to treat the obstructive diseases of lower urinary tract such as urethral stricture and bladder neck contracture. It was safe, minimal invasive and easy to operate.

  19. Periostin induces fibroblast proliferation and myofibroblast persistence in hypertrophic scarring.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Justin; Nygard, Karen; Gan, Bing Siang; O'Gorman, David Brian

    2015-02-01

    Hypertrophic scarring is characterized by the excessive development and persistence of myofibroblasts. These cells contract the surrounding extracellular matrix resulting in the increased tissue density characteristic of scar tissue. Periostin is a matricellular protein that is abnormally abundant in fibrotic dermis, however, its roles in hypertrophic scarring are largely unknown. In this report, we assessed the ability of matrix-associated periostin to promote the proliferation and myofibroblast differentiation of dermal fibroblasts isolated from the dermis of hypertrophic scars or healthy skin. Supplementation of a thin type-I collagen cell culture substrate with recombinant periostin induced a significant increase in the proliferation of hypertrophic scar fibroblasts but not normal dermal fibroblasts. Periostin induced significant increases in supermature focal adhesion formation, α smooth muscle actin levels and collagen contraction in fibroblasts cultured from hypertrophic scars under conditions of increased matrix tension in three-dimensional type-I collagen lattices. Inhibition of Rho-associated protein kinase activity significantly attenuated the effects of matrix-associated periostin on hypertrophic scar fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Depletion of endogenous periostin expression in hypertrophic scar myofibroblasts resulted in a sustained decrease in α smooth muscle actin levels under conditions of reducing matrix tension, while matrix-associated periostin levels caused the cells to retain high levels of a smooth muscle actin under these conditions. These findings indicate that periostin promotes Rho-associated protein kinase-dependent proliferation and myofibroblast persistence of hypertrophic scar fibroblasts and implicate periostin as a potential therapeutic target to enhance the resolution of scars.

  20. Treatment of sandal burns of the feet in children in a moist environment.

    PubMed

    Shakirov, Babur M

    2014-05-01

    Burns to children's feet are often due to scalds, from hot tap water, as an infant's skin is thinner and hence more susceptible to a full-thickness injury. In Central Asia, and particularly in Uzbekistan, many episodes of burns take place at homes because of using sandal heaters. In the case of sandal burns of the foot, it usually is not only skin that is injured but also underlying tissues: subcutaneous fat, fasciae, muscles and even bones. Many controlled studies have confirmed that wounds heal more readily in a moist, physiological environment. After performing the toilet of burn wounds of the foot, we applied Dermazin cream on the affected areas and then the foot was placed onto a polyethylene packet of large size and fixed by a bandage. Measurement of wound water evaporation was performed every day post-burn. Surgery was usually performed 15-17 days after burn by applying a perforated skin graft or a 0.2-0.3-mm-thick non-perforated skin graft. The procedures helped to improve the general condition of patients, shortened their stay in hospital and also reduced expenses and lessened joint deformities and contracture deformities.

  1. A Prospective Study of Burn Trauma in Adults at the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar (South Eastern Nigeria)

    PubMed Central

    Asuquo, Maurice E.; Ekpo, R.; Ngim, Ogbu; Agbor, C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Burn injuries are among the most devastating injuries seen in the emergency units. The epidemiology of this injury varies from one part of the world to another. This is a 3-year report in an attempt to provide information on the current epidemiology of burns in this center. Method: Patients admitted into the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, with burn injuries were prospectively studied between February 2005 and January 2008. Results: The 59 patients (33 males and 26 females) accounted for 3.7% of trauma patients and their ages ranged from 15 to 70 years (mean 29.4 years). Flame burn was the commonest injury seen in 48 (81.3%) patients because of petrol and kerosene, whereas chemical burn that involved 7 (11.9%) patients ranked second. Morbidity included burns wound infection in 13 (22%) patients and contractures in 6 (10.2%) patients. The outcome was fatal in 15 (25.4%) patients. Conclusion: The establishment of burn support groups dedicated to publicity on prevention based on areas of risk highlighted in this study and provision of financial aid as well as provision of modern burn care facilities would improve outcome. PMID:18716653

  2. Exhaust system-related burns affecting children: a UK perspective and literature review.

    PubMed

    Vermaak, P V; Deall, C E; McArdle, C; Burge, T

    2016-06-30

    Burns caused by exhaust systems in children may be associated with considerable morbidity. Current epidemiological data varies, but no data are available for the UK population. We aim to identify the pattern of exhaust-related burns affecting children who presented to a regional centre for paediatric burn care in the UK. Patients who sustained burns related to exhaust mechanisms between May 2005 and August 2012 were identified via the departmental database. Data collected included patient demographics, burn injury information, management and outcomes. Thirty-nine patients sustained 43 burns from contact with exhaust mechanisms, and the majority were less than 5 years of age. 77% of the patients were male. Burns affected critical areas such as the hands and feet in 26% of cases. Most burns involved a total body surface area of ≤1% and were partial thickness in depth. Thirty-three percent of patients required operative intervention. Time to heal was less than 3 weeks in 69% of cases and 3 patients healed with hypertrophic scarring. The majority of burns were small in size and partial thickness in depth. Most were treated conservatively and healed with low complication rates. More than 1 in 5 injuries involved critical burn areas, highlighting the potential for considerable morbidity. The age profile in our study contrasted with other results worldwide. Our study highlights the need for vigilant supervision of children around motorcycles. We recommend the wearing of protective long trousers when riding motorcycles and the fitting of external shields to motorcycle exhaust pipes.

  3. Exhaust system-related burns affecting children: a UK perspective and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Vermaak, P.V.; Deall, C.E.; McArdle, C.; Burge, T.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Burns caused by exhaust systems in children may be associated with considerable morbidity. Current epidemiological data varies, but no data are available for the UK population. We aim to identify the pattern of exhaust-related burns affecting children who presented to a regional centre for paediatric burn care in the UK. Patients who sustained burns related to exhaust mechanisms between May 2005 and August 2012 were identified via the departmental database. Data collected included patient demographics, burn injury information, management and outcomes. Thirty-nine patients sustained 43 burns from contact with exhaust mechanisms, and the majority were less than 5 years of age. 77% of the patients were male. Burns affected critical areas such as the hands and feet in 26% of cases. Most burns involved a total body surface area of ≤1% and were partial thickness in depth. Thirty-three percent of patients required operative intervention. Time to heal was less than 3 weeks in 69% of cases and 3 patients healed with hypertrophic scarring. The majority of burns were small in size and partial thickness in depth. Most were treated conservatively and healed with low complication rates. More than 1 in 5 injuries involved critical burn areas, highlighting the potential for considerable morbidity. The age profile in our study contrasted with other results worldwide. Our study highlights the need for vigilant supervision of children around motorcycles. We recommend the wearing of protective long trousers when riding motorcycles and the fitting of external shields to motorcycle exhaust pipes. PMID:28149228

  4. Development of a Synthetic Polymer Burn Covering.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-07-18

    covering that will re- duce dehydration , seps is, sodium loss , scar formation , morbidity, and mortality in burn patients. The material is to be...7 .62 7 0 5 2 .88 -- no 12 . Ac_~ t .ne . Ethano l 9/1 10.1 7.62 6.5 — — Fair , ri C • - ; • - • C-f . Methyl Ethyl K• e’n~- Ethanol 82/14 9.92 7...Fair C 18. Acetone Ethanol 90/10 10.1 7.62 6.9 - — 19. Methyl Ethy l Ketone Ethano l 82/18 9.92 7.74 6.04 ~~- 40. Methy l Ethy l Ketone Et henol 75/25

  5. One Burn, One Standard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    for supporting burn treatment has induced a rethinking of current medical documentation processes of burns, especially with respect to the Lund...Browder burn diagram. In the past, the lack of comparability, scientific evalu- ation possibilities, and as a consequence, missing medical evidence in...to interested parties after registration. To that end, a protected (everyone is able to read the content, one has to register to edit) wiki (www

  6. Novel Insights on Understanding of Keloid Scar: Article Review.

    PubMed

    Mari, Walid; Alsabri, Sami G; Tabal, Najib; Younes, Sara; Sherif, Abdulamagid; Simman, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Keloid scar, dermal benign fibro-proliferative growth that extends outside the original wound and invades adjacent dermal tissue due to extensive production of extracellular matrix, especially collagen, which caused by over expression of cytokines and growth factors. Although many attempts were made to understand the exact pathophysiology and the molecular abnormalities, the pathogenesis of keloid scar is yet to be determined. Even though there are several treatment options for keloid scars include combination of medical and surgical therapies like combination of surgical removal followed by cryotherapy or intralesional steroid therapy, the reoccurrence rate is still high despite the present treatment. In this review, PubMed, clinical key and Wright State Library web site have been used to investigate any update regarding Keloid disease. We used Keloid, scar formation, hypertrophic scar and collagen as key words. More than 40 articles have been reviewed. This paper reviews literature about keloid scar formation mechanism, the most recent therapeutic options including the ones under research.

  7. [Experiments on the mechanism of action of vascular spasmolytic agents. II. Action of nitroprusside sodium, nitroglycerin, prenylamine and verapamil on the lanthanum contracture of isolated coronary arteries].

    PubMed

    Fermum, R; Klinner, U; Meisel, P

    1976-01-01

    On isolated coronary arteries of cattle, lanthanum causes after preceding calcium depletion by EGTA a contracture which is independent of the presence of extracellular calcium. Nitroprusside sodium and nitroglycerol act on this contracture strongly relaxing in the same concentrations that were active on the potassium contracture. In contrast, a very low spasmolytic effect is demonstrable for verapamil on the lanthanum contracture, and prenylamine is without any statistically significant influence. Nitroprusside sodium and nitroglycerol and act by a mechanism entirely different from that of verapamil and prenylamine.

  8. Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Church, Deirdre; Elsayed, Sameer; Reid, Owen; Winston, Brent; Lindsay, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Burns are one of the most common and devastating forms of trauma. Patients with serious thermal injury require immediate specialized care in order to minimize morbidity and mortality. Significant thermal injuries induce a state of immunosuppression that predisposes burn patients to infectious complications. A current summary of the classifications of burn wound infections, including their diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, is given. Early excision of the eschar has substantially decreased the incidence of invasive burn wound infection and secondary sepsis, but most deaths in severely burn-injured patients are still due to burn wound sepsis or complications due to inhalation injury. Burn patients are also at risk for developing sepsis secondary to pneumonia, catheter-related infections, and suppurative thrombophlebitis. The introduction of silver-impregnated devices (e.g., central lines and Foley urinary catheters) may reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections due to prolonged placement of these devices. Improved outcomes for severely burned patients have been attributed to medical advances in fluid resuscitation, nutritional support, pulmonary and burn wound care, and infection control practices. PMID:16614255

  9. Choosing Wood Burning Appliances

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information to assist consumers in choosing a wood burning appliance, including types of appliances, the differences between certified and non-certified appliances, and alternative wood heating options.

  10. Burn Wound Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    wound invasion was identified only Nine of 97 patients (9%) with histologic burn wound after septic or cardiogenic shock had been present in invasion...051= ADA12589 Th JouRHAL oP TRAUMA Vol. 21, No. 9 Copyright 0 1981 by The Williams & Wilkins Co. ,r, Prin U.S.A. . Burn Wound Infection WILLIAM F...admitted to a burn center during a 3-year period C had histologically confirmed bacterial or tungal burn wound invasion. Nine of t X Q these 97

  11. The reported effects of bullying on burn-surviving children.

    PubMed

    Rimmer, Ruth B; Foster, Kevin N; Bay, Curtis R; Floros, Jim; Rutter, Cindy; Bosch, Jim; Wadsworth, Michelle M; Caruso, Daniel M

    2007-01-01

    There is a trend of increasing childhood aggression in America, which has been tied to bullying. Although there is growing research concerning bullying in the general pediatric population, there are limited data on bullying and its effects on children with disfigurements and physical limitations. This study was conducted to assess burned children's experience with bullying. A pretest was administered regarding experience with bullying and teasing. A curriculum regarding bullying, which incorporated the Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone movie, was presented. After reviewing bullying depicted in the film and participating in a class regarding bullying, children were invited to complete a survey regarding their experience with bullying. A total of 61% of these children reported being bullied at school; 25% reported experiencing headaches or stomachaches due to bullying, and 12% reported staying home from school. Nearly 25% reported bullying as a big problem. Of those with visible scars (55%), a full 68% reported bullying as a problem, versus 54% with hidden scars (P < .05). However, those with visible scars were no more likely to tell an adult (54%) than those without (56%). Children were much more willing to disclose personal bullying experiences after participating in the class (57%) than before (45%) (P < .01). This study revealed that bullying impacts many burn-injured children and has negative effects on their physical and mental well-being. Many children (with visible or hidden scars) did not seek adult intervention for the problem. Participation in a bullying course appears to give children a forum that increases their willingness to disclose personal bullying experiences and can provide them with prevention information and a safe place to seek help.

  12. Analysis of state of vehicular scars on Arctic Tundra, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathram, E. H.

    1974-01-01

    Identification on ERTS images of severe vehicular scars in the northern Alaska tundra suggests that, if such scars are of an intensity or have spread to a dimension such that they can be resolved by ERTS sensors (20 meters), they can be identified and their state monitored by the use of ERTS images. Field review of the state of vehicular scars in the Umiat area indicates that all are revegetating at varying rates and are approaching a stable state.

  13. Dermal tunneling: a proposed treatment for depressed scars.

    PubMed

    Lima, Emerson Vasconcelos de Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Depressed facial scars are still a challenge in medical literature, despite the wide range of proposed treatments. Subcision is a technique that is frequently performed to improve this type of lesions. This article proposes a new method to release depressed scars, reported and named by the author as dermal tunneling. This study presents a simple and didactic manner to perform this method. The results in 17 patients with facial scars were considered promising. Thus, the technique was deemed to be safe and reproducible.

  14. Supraclavicular artery perforator flap in management of post-burn neck reconstruction: clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, H.; Elshobaky, A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Anterior cervical contractures of the neck represent a great challenge for plastic and reconstructive surgeons. Necks can be reconstructed with a wide range of surgical techniques, including chimeric flaps, supercharged flap, pre-expanded flaps, “superthin” flaps and perforator flaps. The supraclavicular flap is easy to harvest without the need for free tissue transfer. It provides a relatively large flap for neck resurfacing with tissue very similar to that of the neck. Between January 2013 and March 2015, 20 patients suffering from postburn neck contracture underwent reconstruction with 20 unilateral supraclavicular artery perforator flaps. Nineteen patients had post-burn neck contractures (9 cases type Іc, 10 cases type Пc) while only one had post-burn granulation tissue in the neck. We harvested fifteen flaps from the right side and five from the left. Size of the reconstructed defect ranged from 23x10 to14x6, and flap size varied from 25/11 to 16/7cm. Period of follow up ranged from 27-2months (average 12.3). Nineteen flaps survived well (95% survival rate): only one was lost due to iatrogenic extensive dissection over the pedicle. Five cases showed distal superficial epidermolysis, and 2 cases showed 2 cm complete distal necrosis. All patients were managed conservatively. Our results coincide with other literature results confirming the efficacy and rich vascularity of this flap. In all cases with distal partial necrosis, flaps were 23 cm or more. We recommend that supraclavicular flaps of more than 22 cm in length are not harvested immediately and that flaps are expanded before harvesting. Expanding the supraclavicular flap increases its surface area and decreases donor site morbidity. PMID:28149252

  15. Supraclavicular artery perforator flap in management of post-burn neck reconstruction: clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Ismail, H; Elshobaky, A

    2016-09-30

    Anterior cervical contractures of the neck represent a great challenge for plastic and reconstructive surgeons. Necks can be reconstructed with a wide range of surgical techniques, including chimeric flaps, supercharged flap, pre-expanded flaps, "superthin" flaps and perforator flaps. The supraclavicular flap is easy to harvest without the need for free tissue transfer. It provides a relatively large flap for neck resurfacing with tissue very similar to that of the neck. Between January 2013 and March 2015, 20 patients suffering from postburn neck contracture underwent reconstruction with 20 unilateral supraclavicular artery perforator flaps. Nineteen patients had post-burn neck contractures (9 cases type Іc, 10 cases type Пc) while only one had post-burn granulation tissue in the neck. We harvested fifteen flaps from the right side and five from the left. Size of the reconstructed defect ranged from 23x10 to14x6, and flap size varied from 25/11 to 16/7cm. Period of follow up ranged from 27-2months (average 12.3). Nineteen flaps survived well (95% survival rate): only one was lost due to iatrogenic extensive dissection over the pedicle. Five cases showed distal superficial epidermolysis, and 2 cases showed 2 cm complete distal necrosis. All patients were managed conservatively. Our results coincide with other literature results confirming the efficacy and rich vascularity of this flap. In all cases with distal partial necrosis, flaps were 23 cm or more. We recommend that supraclavicular flaps of more than 22 cm in length are not harvested immediately and that flaps are expanded before harvesting. Expanding the supraclavicular flap increases its surface area and decreases donor site morbidity.

  16. Interactive visualization for scar transmurality in cardiac resynchronization therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiml, Sabrina; Toth, Daniel; Panayiotou, Maria; Fahn, Bernhard; Karim, Rashed; Behar, Jonathan M.; Rinaldi, Christopher A.; Razavi, Reza; Rhode, Kawal S.; Brost, Alexander; Mountney, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Heart failure is a serious disease affecting about 23 million people worldwide. Cardiac resynchronization therapy is used to treat patients suffering from symptomatic heart failure. However, 30% to 50% of patients have limited clinical benefit. One of the main causes is suboptimal placement of the left ventricular lead. Pacing in areas of myocardial scar correlates with poor clinical outcomes. Therefore precise knowledge of the individual patient's scar characteristics is critical for delivering tailored treatments capable of improving response rates. Current research methods for scar assessment either map information to an alternative non-anatomical coordinate system or they use the image coordinate system but lose critical information about scar extent and scar distribution. This paper proposes two interactive methods for visualizing relevant scar information. A 2-D slice based approach with a scar mask overlaid on a 16 segment heart model and a 3-D layered mesh visualization which allows physicians to scroll through layers of scar from endocardium to epicardium. These complementary methods enable physicians to evaluate scar location and transmurality during planning and guidance. Six physicians evaluated the proposed system by identifying target regions for lead placement. With the proposed method more target regions could be identified.

  17. Intralesional Cryotherapy for the Treatment of Keloid Scars: Evaluating Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Bulstra, Anne Eva J.; Ket, Johannes C. F.; Ritt, Marco J. P. F.; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.; Niessen, Frank B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intralesional (IL) cryotherapy is a novel treatment technique for keloid scars, in which the scar is frozen from inside. Over the past decade, several studies have been published with varying outcomes. A critical analysis of the current literature is, therefore, warranted to determine whether IL cryotherapy is an alternative to established keloid scar treatments. Methods: A comprehensive review was performed, based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis. PubMed and EMBASE were searched from inception. Studies and level of recommendation were graded according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons criteria. Results: Eight studies meeting the inclusion criteria were selected. The average scar volume decrease ranged from 51% to 63%, but no complete scar eradication was achieved on average. Scar recurrence ranged from 0% to 24%. Hypopigmentation posttreatment was seen mostly in Fitzpatrick 4–6 skin type patients. Finally, complaints of pain and pruritus decreased significantly in most studies. Conclusions: IL cryotherapy for the treatment of keloid scars shows favorable results in terms of volume reduction and alleviated complaints of pain and pruritus. However, no complete scar eradication is established, and recurrences are seen. Also, persistent hypopigmentation proved a problem in Fitzpatrick 4–6 skin type patients. Summarized, the evidence proved limited and inconsistent resulting in an American Society of Plastic Surgeons grade C recommendation for this type of treatment of keloid scars. PMID:26180738

  18. The role of scar origin in shaping men's body image.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Anne; Mayer-Eckhard, Lennart; White, Andrew J; Alpers, Georg W

    2015-03-01

    Men generally have a more positive body image than women. However, the extent to which scars negatively influence men's body image is uncertain. The aim of the current study was to assess body image in men with and without scars while taking scar origin into account (nonsuicidal self-harming injuries [NSSI] vs. accidents or surgery). One hundred and nine men (n = 19 with NSSI) and 185 women (n = 96 with NSSI) filled in multidimensional body image questionnaires. Results indicate that on most clinical subscales women had a significantly more negative body image compared with men. However, within a subsample whose scars resulted from NSSI, gender differences vanished. Among men, scar origin was significantly associated with negative body image after partialling out scar characteristics, age, and borderline symptomatology. The visibility of scars was not associated with more severe body image disturbances. The results of our study indicate that self-inflicted scars adversely affect body image. Although women generally reported having a more negative body image, disturbances in body image should not be neglected among men, especially in those who have self-inflicted scars.

  19. NEW MOLECULAR MEDICINE-BASED SCAR MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES

    PubMed Central

    Arno, Anna I; Gauglitz, Gerd G; Barret, Juan P; Jeschke, Marc G

    2014-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars are prevalent disabling conditions with still suboptimal treatments. Basic science and molecular-based medicine research has contributed to unravel new bench-to-bedside scar therapies, and to dissect the complex signaling pathways involved. Peptides such as transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily, with SMADs, Ski, SnoN, Fussels, endoglin, DS-Sily, Cav-1p, AZX100, thymosin-β4 and other related molecules may emerge as targets to prevent and treat keloids and hypertrophic scars. The aim of this review is to describe the basic complexity of these new molecular scar management strategies, and point out new fibrosis research lines. PMID:24438742

  20. Abnormal pigmentation within cutaneous scars: A complication of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Sarah; Heath, Rebecca; Shah, Mamta

    2012-01-01

    Abnormally pigmented scars are an undesirable consequence of cutaneous wound healing and are a complication every single individual worldwide is at risk of. They present a challenge for clinicians, as there are currently no definitive treatment options available, and render scars much more noticeable making them highly distressing for patients. Despite extensive research into both wound healing and the pigment cell, there remains a scarcity of knowledge surrounding the repigmentation of cutaneous scars. Pigment production is complex and under the control of many extrinsic and intrinsic factors and patterns of scar repigmentation are unpredictable. This article gives an overview of human skin pigmentation, repigmentation following wounding and current treatment options. PMID:23162241

  1. Burns and military clothing.

    PubMed

    McLean, A D

    2001-02-01

    Burn injury is a ubiquitous threat in the military environment. The risks during combat are well recognised, but the handling of fuel, oil, munitions and other hot or flammable materials during peacetime deployment and training also imposes an inherent risk of accidental burn injury. Over the last hundred years, the burn threat in combat has ranged from nuclear weapons to small shoulder-launched missiles. Materials such as napalm and white phosphorus plainly present a risk of burn, but the threat extends to encompass personnel in vehicles attacked by anti-armour weapons, large missiles, fuel-air explosives and detonations/conflagrations on weapons platforms such as ships. Large numbers of burn casualties were caused at Pearl Harbor, in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Vietnam, during the Arab/Israeli Wars and in the Falkland Islands conflict. The threat from burns is unlikely to diminish, indeed new developments in weapons seek to exploit the vulnerability of the serviceman and servicewoman to burns. Clothing can be a barrier to some types of burn--both inherently in the properties of the material, but also by trapping air between clothing layers. Conversely, ignition of the clothing may exacerbate a burn. There is hearsay that burnt clothing products within a wound may complicate the clinical management, or that materials that melt (thermoplastic materials) should not be worn if there is a burn threat. This paper explores the incidence of burn injury, the mechanisms of heat transfer to bare skin and skin covered by materials, and the published evidence for the complication of wound management by materials. Even light-weight combat clothing can offer significant protection to skin from short duration flash burns; the most vulnerable areas are the parts of the body not covered--face and hands. Multilayered combat clothing can offer significant protection for short periods from engulfment by flames; lightweight tropical wear with few layers offers little protection. Under

  2. Efficacy and Safety of a Novel 100% Silicone Scar Gel Treatment for Early Intervention in Scar Management

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a new topical silicone gel for the early intervention in the management of scars. Design: In this 12-week, observational study, healthy subjects (n=15) with an accessible linear or hypertrophic scar were given the test product and instructed to apply twice daily. Subjects returned 14, 28, 56, and 84 days later for evaluation and recording of adverse events. Setting: Private practice of the author. Participants: Eligible subjects had a scar with a Vancouver Scar Scale total score ≥3 at baseline. Measurements: Improvement was evaluated by the Vancouver Scar Scale and Observer Scar Assessment Scale at baseline and at four follow-up visits. Results: The median total Vancouver Scar Scale score and median total Observer Scar Assessment Scale score decreased significantly from baseline at each visit, showing rapid and continuing improvement in the appearance of the scars. For Vancouver Scar Scale, significant differences of individual parameters from baseline began at 28 days for pliability and height, 56 days for vascularity, and 84 days for pigmentation. For Observer Scar Assessment Scale parameters, significant differences from baseline began at 14 days and continued until 84 days for vascularization, thickness, and pigmentation. Pain and pruritis scores were low at each visit. Overall, 84.6 percent of subjects rated the treatment as excellent, very good, or good after three months of treatment. No adverse events were reported. Conclusion: The test product improved the appearance of scars after three months of twice-daily treatment and without adverse events. PMID:28210394

  3. Use of split thickness plantar skin grafts in the treatment of hyperpigmented skin-grafted fingers and palms in previously burned patients.

    PubMed

    Moon, Suk-Ho; Lee, So-Young; Jung, Sung-No; Kim, Sang-Wha; Seo, Bommie F; Kwon, Ho; Sohn, Won-Il

    2011-06-01

    Palmar and finger burns are often seen in children, and are usually as a result of contact burns. Some patients with deep hand burns are treated with full-thickness or split-thickness skin grafts. Skin graft is commonly used for hand reconstruction. However, the grafted skin would be more pigmented than the adjacent skin and different from skin texture. 19 patients who showed hyperpigmentation after skin graft of finger and palm were treated. They all were injured by hand burns. We performed mechanical dermabrasion of the hyperpigmentation scar and application of a split thickness skin harvested from medial aspect of plantar of foot. Patients were asked about their level of satisfaction with the procedure and scar appearance was assessed using a five-point Likert scale. Also scar appearances were assessed using a Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS). The grafts were completely taken in all 19 patients. The color of the graft became similar to adjacent tissue. 15 patients were very satisfied, and four patients were relatively satisfied. The average score of the patients postoperative appearance improvement was 4.5 (improved to significantly improved postoperative appearance). Average VSS score was improved from 9.53 to 2.53. There was no hypertrophic scar on plantar donor site. The technique of the split-thickness plantar skin graft after mechanical dermabrasion is simple and provided good results in both color and texture for the patients who showed hyperpigmentation after grafting.

  4. Burns Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... for fluid resuscitation, wound cleaning, skin replacement, infection control and nutritional support. What is on the horizon for burn research? Improving methods for wound healing and tissue repair offer tremendous opportunities to enhance the quality of life for burn patients and may also ...

  5. Pain in burn patients.

    PubMed

    Latarjet, J; Choinère, M

    1995-08-01

    While severe pain is a constant component of the burn injury, inadequate pain management has been shown to be detrimental to burn patients. Pain-generating mechanisms in burns include nociception, primary and secondary hyperalgesia and neuropathy. The clinical studies of burn pain characteristics reveal very clear-cut differences between continuous pain and pain due to therapeutic procedures which have to be treated separately. Some of the main features of burn pain are: (1) its long-lasting course, often exceeding healing time, (2) the repetition of highly nociceptive procedures which can lead to severe psychological disturbances if pain control is inappropriate. Pharmaco-therapy with opioids is the mainstay for analgesia in burned patients, but non-pharmacological techniques may be useful adjuncts. Routine pain evaluation is mandatory for efficient and safe analgesia. Special attention must be given to pain in burned children which remains too often underestimated and undertreated. More educational efforts from physicians and nursing staff are necessary to improve pain management in burned patients.

  6. Burning Mouth Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kamala, K A; Sankethguddad, S; Sujith, S G; Tantradi, Praveena

    2016-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is multifactorial in origin which is typically characterized by burning and painful sensation in an oral cavity demonstrating clinically normal mucosa. Although the cause of BMS is not known, a complex association of biological and psychological factors has been identified, suggesting the existence of a multifactorial etiology. As the symptom of oral burning is seen in various pathological conditions, it is essential for a clinician to be aware of how to differentiate between symptom of oral burning and BMS. An interdisciplinary and systematic approach is required for better patient management. The purpose of this study was to provide the practitioner with an understanding of the local, systemic, and psychosocial factors which may be responsible for oral burning associated with BMS, and review of treatment modalities, therefore providing a foundation for diagnosis and treatment of BMS.

  7. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele

    2012-01-01

    According to the International Association for the Study of Pain, burning mouth Syndrome (BMS) is defined as a burning pain in the tongue or other oral mucous membrane in the absence of clinical signs or laboratory findings. The etiology is unknown and presents a challenge for both researchers and clinicians. The management of BMS is still not satisfactory. The prognosis is poor and the burning sensation can last for many years causing a dramatic impact on the patient's quality of life. It is important to distinguish between true BMS and symptomatic burning sensation which occurs when the burning sensation is secondary to a local or systemic pathologic condition. Currently, there are no defined diagnostic criteria for BMS. A diagnosis is usually reached by exclusion of other diseases. This may lead to misdiagnoses, presenting an obstacle to successful treatment.

  8. Effectiveness of rosiglitazone in reducing flexion contracture in a rabbit model of arthrofibrosis with surgical capsular release

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, J. D.; Morrey, M. E.; Hartzler, R. U.; Arsoy, D.; Riester, S.; van Wijnen, A. J.; Morrey, B. F.; Sanchez-Sotelo, J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Animal models have been developed that allow simulation of post-traumatic joint contracture. One such model involves contracture-forming surgery followed by surgical capsular release. This model allows testing of antifibrotic agents, such as rosiglitazone. Methods A total of 20 rabbits underwent contracture-forming surgery. Eight weeks later, the animals underwent a surgical capsular release. Ten animals received rosiglitazone (intramuscular initially, then orally). The animals were sacrificed following 16 weeks of free cage mobilisation. The joints were tested biomechanically, and the posterior capsule was assessed histologically and via genetic microarray analysis. Results There was no significant difference in post-traumatic contracture between the rosiglitazone and control groups (33° (standard deviation (sd) 11) vs 37° (sd14), respectively; p = 0.4). There was no difference in number or percentage of myofibroblasts. Importantly, there were ten genes and 17 pathways that were significantly modulated by rosiglitazone in the posterior capsule. Discussion Rosiglitazone significantly altered the genetic expression of the posterior capsular tissue in a rabbit model, with ten genes and 17 pathways demonstrating significant modulation. However, there was no significant effect on biomechanical or histological properties. Cite this article: M. P. Abdel. Effectiveness of rosiglitazone in reducing flexion contracture in a rabbit model of arthrofibrosis with surgical capsular release: A biomechanical, histological, and genetic analysis. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:11–17. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.51.2000593 PMID:26813567

  9. Lentivirus-mediated ERK2 siRNA reduces joint capsule fibrosis in a rat model of post-traumatic joint contracture.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengfeng; Liu, Shen; Fan, Cunyi

    2013-10-17

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-2 is presumed to play an important role in the development of post-traumatic joint contractures. Using a rat injury model, we investigated whether treatment with ERK2 small interfering RNA (siRNA) could reduce the extent of joint capsule fibrosis after an induced injury. Rats were separated into three groups (n = 32 each): non-operated control group, operated contracture group and contracture-treatment group. Stable post-traumatic joint contracture was created through surgical intra-articular joint injury followed by eight weeks of immobilization. In the contracture-treatment group, the rats were treated with lentivirus (LV)-mediated ERK2 siRNA at days 3 and 7 post-surgery. The posterior joint capsule was assessed by western blotting, immunohistochemistry and biochemical analysis for changes in ERK2, phosphorylated (p)-ERK2, myofibroblast, total collagen and relative collagen Type III expression level. Biomechanical testing was used to assess the development of flexion contractures. Statistical analysis was performed using an analysis of variance. In the operated contracture group, rats that developed flexion contractures also showed elevated phosphorylated p-ERK2 expression. In the contracture-treatment group, ERK2 siRNA significantly reduced p-ERK2 expression levels, as well as the severity of flexion contracture development (p < 0.01). Myofibroblast numbers and measurements of total collagen content were also significantly reduced following ERK2 siRNA (p < 0.01). Relative collagen type III expression as a proportion of total of Types I and III collagen, however, was significantly increased in response to ERK2 siRNA (p < 0.01). Our findings demonstrate a role for ERK2 in the induction of joint capsule fibrosis after injury. Furthermore, we show that development of flexion contractures and the resultant increase of joint capsule fibrosis can be reduced by LV-mediated ERK2 siRNA treatment.

  10. Total obstetric brachial plexus palsy in children with internal rotation contracture of the shoulder, flexion contracture of the elbow, and poor hand function: improving the cosmetic appearance of the limb with rotation osteotomy of the humerus.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M

    2010-07-01

    Rotation osteotomy of the humerus has been described by several authors to treat the internal rotation contracture of the shoulder in Erb palsy. The main aim of the osteotomy in Erb patients is to bring the functioning hand to the face which greatly improves function. The author has performed the rotation humeral osteotomy in children with total obstetric brachial plexus palsy aiming for the improvement of the cosmetic appearance of the limb rather than improvement function. This article specifically reports on this group of patients.Over the last 15 years, the author has performed rotation humeral osteotomy in 13 children (mean age 6 years; range, 4.5-9 years) with total obstetric brachial plexus palsy aiming for improvement of the cosmetic appearance of the limb rather than improvement of function. All children had a triad of severe internal rotation contracture of the shoulder, severe flexion contracture of the elbow, and poor hand function.After a mean follow-up of 2 years following the humeral osteotomy, all patients/parents were satisfied with the result and a panel of plastic surgeons confirmed the significant improvement in aesthetics. Reasons for this improvement following the osteotomy were as follows: the child no longer needed to stand with shoulder slightly abducted, the antecubital fossa became visible in the standing position, and the forearm no longer appeared excessively pronated. Of more importance, was the improvement in elbow flexion contracture which had major contribution in improving limb appearance and the perception of length discrepancy between the affected and the contralateral normal limb.The humeral osteotomy improves the cosmetic appearance of children with total palsy and the triad of severe internal rotation contracture of the shoulder, severe flexion contracture of the elbow and poor hand function.

  11. Breast conservation therapy without capsular contracture in young augmented women using interstitial brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe a breast-conserving technique using interstitial brachytherapy after lumpectomy and axillary nodal sampling in selected women who are diagnosed with breast cancer in the presence of augmentation mammoplasty. Material and methods Over the past 20 years, we have developed and improved a technique of “pinch view” image-guided catheter insertion that avoids implant puncture. Selection criteria include: 1) women of any age with either subpectoral or retroglandular, augmentation implants (silicone or saline) who were diagnosed with stages Tis, T1, T2, N0, or N1 breast cancer; 2) any pathologic subtype of malignant breast cancer was accepted; 3) microscopic tumor extent ≤ 3 cm; 4) axillary node negative or metastasis to 1 to 3 nodes without extracapsular extension; and 5) surgical margins clear by the NSABP “no ink on tumor” definition. More than 250 women have been successfully treated. Patients were treated with high dose rate Iridium-192 brachytherapy to 34 Gy in 10 or 32 Gy in 8 twice daily fractions. The target volume was the surgical cavity edge with 1.5 to 2 cm margin using 3-D treatment planning systems. Results The implant technique as currently employed is described. There have been no implant ruptures, and the Planning Treatment Volume (PTV-eval) exhibited at least 90% coverage by the 90% isodose line in the vast majority of cases. Dose Homogeneity Index exceeded 70% in most cases. The maximum skin dose was below the prescription dose in every case. Other than some patients with pre-existing capsular contracture, less than 5% experience new capsular contracture after interstitial brachytherapy. Conclusions A technique of reliable and reproducible accelerated partial breast irradiation is described that minimizes the risk of capsular contracture by avoiding circumferential dose to the foreign body in the breast. PMID:25097566

  12. Cosmetic evaluation of surgical scars after external dacryocystorhinostomy

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Syed Ali Raza; Saquib, Mohammad; Maheshwari, Rakesh; Gupta, Yogesh; Iqbal, Zafar; Maheshwari, Puneet

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the surgical scars of external dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) cosmetically. METHODS Totally 50 consecutive cases of primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction (PANDO) were included in the study. Surgical scars were assessed by the patients and two independent observers at 2, 6 and 12wk postoperatively on the basis of visibility of the scars and still photographs respectively and were graded from 0-3. Kappa test was utilised to check the agreement of scar grading between the two observers. Wilcoxan signed ranks test was used to analyse the improvement of scar grading. RESULTS Thirty-four (68%) patients graded their incision site as very visible (grade 3) at 2wk. At 6 and 12wk, incision site was observed as grade 3 by 7 (14%) and 1 (2%) patients respectively. Photographic evaluation of patients by 2 observers showed an average score of 2.75, 1.94 and 0.94 at 2, 6 and 12wk respectively. Change in scar grading from grade 3 to grade 0 in consecutive follow-up (2, 6 and 12wk) was found to be highly significant both for the patient as well for the observers (P<0.0001). CONCLUSION The external DCR is a highly effective and safe procedure and in view of low percentage of cases who complained of marked scarring in the present study, thus scarring should not be the main ground for deciding the approach to DCR surgery, even in young cosmetically conscious patients. PMID:28003973

  13. Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser in Treatment of Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Andrej; Pljakovska, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Scars appear as a result of skin damage during the process of the skin healing. There are two types of acne scars, depending on whether there is a loss or accumulation of collagen: atrophic and hypertrophic. In 80-90% it comes to scars with loss of collagen compared to smaller number of hypertrophic scars and keloids. AIM: The aim of the study was to determine efficiency and safety of fractional carbon dioxide laser in the treatment of acne scars. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was carried out in Acibadem Sistina Clinical Hospital, Skopje at the Department of Dermatovenerology, with a total of 40 patients treated with fractional carbon dioxide laser (Lutronic eCO2). The study included patients with residual acne scars of a different type. RESULTS: Comedogenic and papular acne in our material were proportionately presented in 50% of cases, while the other half were the more severe clinical forms of acne - pustular inflammatory acne and nodulocystic acne that leave residual lesions in the form of second, third and fourth grade of scars. CONCLUSION: The experiences of our work confirm the world experiences that the best result with this method is achieved in dotted ice pick or V-shaped acne scars. PMID:27275326

  14. Scar-modulating treatments for central nervous system injury.

    PubMed

    Shen, Dingding; Wang, Xiaodong; Gu, Xiaosong

    2014-12-01

    Traumatic injury to the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) leads to complex cellular responses. Among them, the scar tissue formed is generally recognized as a major obstacle to CNS repair, both by the production of inhibitory molecules and by the physical impedance of axon regrowth. Therefore, scar-modulating treatments have become a leading therapeutic intervention for CNS injury. To date, a variety of biological and pharmaceutical treatments, targeting scar modulation, have been tested in animal models of CNS injury, and a few are likely to enter clinical trials. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of the scar-modulating treatments according to their specific aims: (1) inhibition of glial and fibrotic scar formation, and (2) blockade of the production of scar-associated inhibitory molecules. The removal of existing scar tissue is also discussed as a treatment of choice. It is believed that only a combinatorial strategy is likely to help eliminate the detrimental effects of scar tissue on CNS repair.

  15. Regenerative healing, scar-free healing and scar formation across the species: current concepts and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ud-Din, Sara; Volk, Susan W; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2014-09-01

    All species have evolved mechanisms of repair to restore tissue function following injury. Skin scarring is an inevitable and permanent endpoint for many postnatal organisms except for non-amniote vertebrates such as amphibians, which are capable of tissue regeneration. Furthermore, mammalian foetuses through mid-gestation are capable of rapid wound repair in the absence of scar formation. Notably, excessive cutaneous scar formation, such as hypertrophic and keloid scars, is a species limited clinical entity as it occurs only in humans, although wounds on the distal limbs of horses are also prone to heal with fibroproliferative pathology known as equine exuberant granulation tissue. Currently, there are no reliable treatment options to eradicate or prevent scarring in humans and vertebrates. The limited number of vertebrate models for either hypertrophic or keloid scarring has been an impediment to mechanistic studies of these diseases and the development of therapies. In this viewpoint essay, we highlight the current concepts of regenerative, scar-free and scar-forming healing compared across a number of species and speculate on areas for future research. Furthermore, in-depth investigative research into the mechanisms of scarless repair may allow for the development of improved animal models and novel targets for scar prevention. As the ability to heal in both a scarless manner and propensity for healing with excessive scar formation is highly species dependent, understanding similarities and differences in healing across species as it relates to the regenerative process may hold the key to improve scarring and guide translational wound-healing studies.

  16. RGTA OTR4120, a heparan sulfate mimetic, is a possible long-term active agent to heal burned skin.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Filipe, S; Barbier-Chassefiere, V; Alexakis, C; Huet, E; Ledoux, D; Kerros, M E; Petit, E; Barritault, D; Caruelle, J P; Kern, P

    2007-01-01

    Burn-related skin fibrosis leads to loss of tissue function and hypertrophic scar formation with damaging consequences for the patient. There is therefore a great need for an efficient agent to treat burned skin. We report that ReGeneraTing Agent (RGTA) reduces burn-induced skin alteration. The tissue-regenerating effect of RGTA OTR4120 was evaluated after 1-6 days and after 10 months in a rat skin burn model. This effect was also examined in vitro using fibroblasts isolated from control and 6-day-old burned skins. We measured production of dermal collagen I, III, and V and activities of metalloproteinases 2 and 9 (MMP-2 and MMP-9). Ratio of collagen III over collagen I production increased 6 days after the burn, because of a decrease in collagen I production. After 10 months, ratio of collagen III over collagen I in burn sites was still increased compared with control skin, because of an increase in collagen III production. Both abnormalities were corrected by OTR4120. OTR4120 increased pro- and active MMP-2 and MMP-9, compared with healthy and burned controls and therefore accelerated remodeling. Similar data were obtained with cultured fibroblasts from healthy and burned skins. OTR4120 enhanced healing in short- and long-term after burns, reducing the formation of fibrotic tissue, and then represents a potential agent to improve burned skin healing.

  17. Surgical Correction of Rigid Equinovarus Contracture Utilizing Extensive Soft Tissue Release.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Christopher L; Shane, Amber M; Zappasodi, Francesca; Payne, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    Although deforming contractures of the lower extremities after acute cerebrovascular events are well documented in the literature, there is limited literature regarding specific surgical considerations for the correction of these deformities, which are nonosseus in nature. The equinovarus foot, regardless of its origin, is a challenging pathologic condition for the foot and ankle surgeon. It is critical to have a firm understanding of the cause and symptoms behind an equinovarus deformity before treatment. The clinical presentation is discussed with special attention to deformities in adults with rigid equinovarus deformities after cerebrovascular-related accidents or peripheral ischemic events.

  18. Old-scar mass and changing surgical perspective: Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Aktimur, Recep; Aktimur, Sude Hatun; Çolak, Elif; Alıcı, Ömer; Demirağ, Mehmet Derya

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic inflammatory disease of an unknown etiology. Skin is involved in 25% of all cases, and 29% of them present as a scar sarcoidosis. Asymptomatic old-scar masses are generally regarded as a foreign body reaction by surgeons and often result in excisional biopsy. We describe a case of a patient who developed sarcoidosis in a 34-year-old appendectomy scar and adjacent inguinal lymph nodes without any local or systemic symptom and radiologic finding. Surgeons should not underestimate the importance of such lesions as a simple condition. Scar sarcoidosis may resolve spontaneously, or the treatment with some topical agents is effective. Furthermore, scar sarcoidosis may be the initial manifestation of systemic sarcoidosis. PMID:25931946

  19. Causes of shell scarring in dog cockles Glycymeris glycymeris L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, K.; Richardson, C. A.; Kaiser, M. J.

    2001-05-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to investigate the possible causes of shell scars in the bivalve mollusc Glycymeris glycymeris, including fishing disturbance, predator attacks and burrowing activity. Individuals collected from an area of sea bed experimentally fished once by a scallop dredge 12 months previously did not display significantly more shell scars than those collected before fishing or from a control area. In the laboratory, Glycymeris offered to the predatory crab Cancer pagurus had a significantly higher incidence of scars seen in acetate peels of shell cross-sections than control shells. However, scarring on Glycymeris excavated from the sediment and left to reburrow was not significantly different from those in an undisturbed control group. Currently, it is not possible in G. glycymeris to differentiate between scars caused by fishing disturbance or natural disturbances, either on the grounds of visual appearance or position of damage.

  20. Endometrial cancer implanted within a cesarean section scar.

    PubMed

    Baba, Tsukasa; Mandai, Masaki; Yamanishi, Yukio; Suzuki, Ayako; Kang, Hyun Sook; Konishi, Ikuo

    2011-03-01

    Several reports have documented adenocarcinoma arising from endometriotic implants within cesarean section (C-S) scars on the serosal surface of the uterus; however, endometrial cancer invading the C-S scar from the uterine cavity has not been described. We report a case of a grade 1 endometrioid adenocarcinoma 'drop' lesion invading a previous C-S scar with resultant cervical stromal invasion. Using both MR images and a thorough review of the pathology, the tumor at the C-S scar was determined to be an implant derived from a primary lesion at the uterine fundus. With increases in the incidence of both endometrial cancer and births by C-S, it is likely we will encounter more cases of iatrogenic implants of endometrial cancers in C-S scars.

  1. Burn encephalopathy in children.

    PubMed

    Mohnot, D; Snead, O C; Benton, J W

    1982-07-01

    Among 287 children with burns treated over a recent two-year period, 13 (5%) showed evidence of encephalopathy. The major clinical symptoms were an altered sensorium and seizures. The majority of symptoms began later than 48 hours after the burn and were accompanied by multiple metabolic aberrations including hypocalcemia. Three children had a relapsing course, and 1 had temporarily enlarged cerebral ventricles. Eleven children improved to normal. In the majority of instances, burn encephalopathy probably reflects central nervous system dysfunction resulting from complex metabolic, hematological, and hemodynamic abnormalities rather than from a single metabolic abnormality.

  2. Prophylactic Leukotriene Inhibitor Therapy for the Reduction of Capsular Contracture in Primary Silicone Breast Augmentation: Experience with over 1100 Cases

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background: The role of leukotriene inhibitors used immediately postoperatively to potentially influence the development of capsular contracture is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of capsular contracture among women undergoing primary smooth silicone gel breast augmentation, with or without postoperative leukotriene inhibitor therapy. Methods: Between 2007 and 2013, 1122 consecutive women undergoing primary silicone gel breast augmentation were evaluated retrospectively. All underwent augmentation with smooth, Mentor Memory Gel implants, using a dual-plane technique, with periareolar or inframammary approaches. Patients were treated voluntarily with either no leukotriene inhibitor, montelukast (Singulair), or zafirlukast (Accolate) for 3 months. All patients received informed consent for the off-label use of leukotriene inhibitors. Liver function studies were obtained for all patients undergoing Accolate therapy after 1 month of therapy. The presence of capsular contracture was measured by the Baker scale at 1 year postoperatively. Results: Patients receiving Accolate therapy (n = 520) demonstrated an encapsulation rate of 2.19 percent. Women receiving Singulair therapy (n = 247) had an encapsulation rate of 3.27 percent. Patients not receiving leukotriene inhibitor therapy had an encapsulation rate of 5.02 percent. There were no long-term complications among patients evaluated. Conclusions: Accolate therapy used for 3 months postoperatively was associated with significantly lower capsular contracture rates compared with untreated patients at 1-year follow-up (p < 0.05). Patients treated with Singulair demonstrated lower contracture rates compared with controls, but the differences were not statistically significant. The findings suggest that Accolate therapy, with monitoring and consent, reduces the incidence of capsular contracture following primary smooth silicone gel breast augmentation. CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE

  3. Assessment of vaccination coverage, vaccination scar rates, and smallpox scarring in five areas of West Africa*

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Ralph H.; Davis, Hillard; Eddins, Donald L.; Foege, William H.

    1973-01-01

    In 1966, nineteen countries of West and Central Africa began a regional smallpox eradication and measles control programme in cooperation with the World Health Organization. This paper summarizes sample survey data collected to assess the results of the programme in Northern Nigeria (Sokoto and Katsina Provinces), Western Nigeria, Niger, Dahomey, and Togo. These data indicate that the programme, which used mass vaccination campaigns based on a collecting-point strategy, was generally successful in reaching a high proportion of the population. Analysis of vaccination coverage and vaccination scar rates by age underlined the importance to the programme of newborn children who accumulate rapidly following the mass campaign. Of all persons without vaccination scars at the time of the surveys, 34.4% were under 5 years of age; in the absence of a maintenance programme, this figure would rise to 40% after 1 year. PMID:4541684

  4. Reliability of biomass burning estimates from savanna fires: Biomass burning in northern Australia during the 1999 Biomass Burning and Lightning Experiment B field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell-Smith, Jeremy; Edwards, Andrew C.; Cook, Garry D.

    2003-02-01

    This paper estimates the two-daily extent of savanna burning and consumption of fine (grass and litter) fuels from an extensive 230,000 km2 region of northern Australia during August-September 1999 encompassing the Australian continental component of the Biomass Burning and Lightning Experiment B (BIBLE B) campaign [, 2002]. The extent of burning for the study region was derived from fire scar mapping of imagery from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) on board the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellite. The mapping was calibrated and verified with reference to one Landsat scene and associated aerial transect validation data. Fine fuel loads were estimated using published fuel accumulation relationships for major regional fuel types. It is estimated that more than 43,000 km2 was burnt during the 25 day study period, with about 19 Mt of fine (grass and litter) fuels. This paper examines assumptions and errors associated with these estimates. It is estimated from uncalibrated fire mapping derived from AVHRR imagery that 417,500 km2 of the northern Australian savanna was burnt in 1999, of which 136,405 km2, or 30%, occurred in the Northern Territory study region. Using generalized fuel accumulation equations, such biomass burning consumed an estimated 212.3 Mt of fine fuels, but no data are available for consumption of coarse fuels. This figure exceeds a recent estimate, based on fine fuels only, for the combined Australian savanna and temperate grassland biomass burning over the period 1990-1999 but is lower than past estimates derived from classification approaches. We conclude that (1) fire maps derived from coarse-resolution optical imagery can be applied relatively reliably to estimate the extent of savanna fires, generally with 70-80% confidence using the approach adopted here, over the major burning period in northern Australia and (2) substantial further field assessment and associated modeling of fuel accumulation

  5. Subcutaneous sarcoidosis in a rhinoplasty scar

    PubMed Central

    Dulguerov, Nicolas; Vankatova, Lenka; Landis, Basile Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a subcutaneous hard bony-like lump at the lateral nasal wall after a septorhinoplasty procedure is an unfavourable result. The reported patient developed this complication 2 years after a revision surgery, in which percutaneous osteotomies were performed. An excision biopsy of the lump took place and the histopathological analysis revealed a granulomatous gigantocellular inflammation with absence of birefringent particles on polarised lamp and negative mycobacteria culture. After additional investigations, the final diagnosis was consistent with grade 2 pulmonary sarcoidosis associated with subcutaneous sarcoidosis. No treatment was initiated. The facial symptoms resolved without any additional treatment and the pulmonary function tests have not deteriorated after 1 year of follow-up. The polymorphism of cutaneous lesions in sarcoidosis, the absence of systemic symptoms and the unrecognised entity of subcutaneous sarcoidosis in a scar illustrate the diagnostic challenge with this patient. PMID:25819832

  6. [Verapamil in conjunction with pressure therapy in the treatment of pathologic scar due burn injury].

    PubMed

    Ramos-Gallardo, Guillermo; Miranda-Altamirano, Ariel; Valdes-López, Rebeca; Figueroa-Jiménez, Sandra; García-Benavides, Leonel

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: la cicatriz queloide y la hipertrófica son desordenes fibro-proliferativos únicos de los humanos, su tratamiento representa un reto en con pocas opciones. El uso de prendas de compresión resulta útil, sin embargo el proceso de maduración no es tan rápido; decidimos usar verapamilo para facilitar este proceso y poder mejorar la calidad de vida de nuestros pacientes. El objetivo de este estudio es evaluar el uso del verapamilo y las prendas de compresión en pacientes con cicatrización patológica como consecuencia de quemadura. Métodos: incluimos pacientes con cicatrización patológica, ya sea queloide o hipertrófica, causada por quemadura. La cicatriz fue evaluada con fotografías seriadas, escala de Vancouver y Posas. Los resultados fueron comparados con la prueba de t de Student. Resultados: incluimos 13 cicatrices en 11 pacientes. La localización de las cicatrices fue en: brazos 4, piernas 4, cara y cuello 1, y abdomen 1. La dosis de verapamilo se calculó a .03 mg por kg de peso. Las inyecciones se aplicaron de manera intralesional y se administraron cada 7 a 10 días, hasta completar 6 sesiones. Encontramos mejoría en los siguientes parámetros de la escala de Posas: pigmentación, pliabilidad, endurecimiento y superficie. En la escala de Vancouver: elevación, pigmentación, vascularidad, flexibilidad y prurito. No encontramos efectos adversos con la administración de verapamilo. Conclusiones: el verapamilo fue útil en conjunto con las prendas de compresión para mejorar las condiciones de la cicatriz queloide e hipertrófica causadas por lesiones por quemadura.

  7. Reliability and validity of the body image quality of life inventory: version for Brazilian burn victims.

    PubMed

    Assunção, Flávia Fernanda Oliveira; Dantas, Rosana Aparecida Spadoti; Ciol, Márcia Aparecida; Gonçalves, Natália; Farina, Jayme Adriano; Rossi, Lidia Aparecida

    2013-06-01

    The aims of this study were to adapt the Body Image Quality of Life Inventory (BIQLI) into Brazilian Portuguese (BP) and to assess the psychometric properties of the adapted version. Construct validity was assessed by correlating the BIQLI-BP scores with the Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale, with Burns Specific Health Scale-Revised (BSHS-R), and with gender, total body surface area burned, and visibility of the scars. Participants were 77 adult burn patients. Cronbach's alpha for the adapted version was .90 and moderate linear correlations were found between body image and self-esteem and between BIQLI-BP scores and two domains of the BSHS-R: affect and body image and interpersonal relationships. The BIQLI-BP showed acceptable levels of reliability and validity for Brazilian burn patients.

  8. Comparison between Stromal Vascular Fraction and Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Remodeling Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Maumus, Marie; Toupet, Karine; Frouin, Eric; Rigau, Valérie; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Magalon, Guy; Jorgensen, Christian; Noël, Danièle

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS) are characterized by excessive amount of collagen deposition and principally occur following burn injuries or surgeries. In absence of effective treatments, the use of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, which have been shown to attenuate fibrosis in various applications, seems of interest. The objectives of the present study were therefore to evaluate the effect of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASC) on a pre-existing HTS in a humanized skin graft model in Nude mice and to compare the efficacy of hASCs versus stromal vascular fraction (SVF). We found that injection of SVF or hASCs resulted in an attenuation of HTS as noticed after clinical evaluation of skin thickness, which was associated with lower total collagen contents in the skins of treated mice and a reduced dermis thickness after histological analysis. Although both SVF and hASCs were able to significantly reduce the clinical and histological parameters of HTS, hASCs appeared to be more efficient than SVF. The therapeutic effect of hASCs was attributed to higher expression of TGFβ3 and HGF, which are important anti-fibrotic mediators, and to higher levels of MMP-2 and MMP-2/TIMP-2 ratio, which reflect the remodelling activity responsible for fibrosis resorption. These results demonstrated the therapeutic potential of hASCs for clinical applications of hypertrophic scarring. PMID:27227960

  9. Burns and Fire Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mickalide A. Hot tap water legislation in the United States. J Burn Care Res . 2010; 31(6): 918-925. 13 Safe Kids Worldwide, Public Policy Department, 2005. 14 AntiScald, Inc. Available from: http:// ...

  10. Burns (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... arrives. previous continue What to Do (continued) For Flame Burns: Extinguish the flames by having your child roll on the ground. ... a hot-steam one. Choose sleepwear that's labeled flame retardant (either polyester or treated cotton). Cotton sweatshirts ...

  11. New Fashioned Book Burning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Reports on results of a teacher's experiment in book burning as a lesson accompanying the teaching of Ray Bradbury's "Fahrenheit 451." Discusses student reactions and the purpose of or justification for the experimental lesson. (TB)

  12. Burns (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... you drowsy, or in bed. Don't use fireworks or sparklers. Bathroom Set the thermostat on your ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Fireworks Safety First Aid: Burns First Aid: Sunburn Sun ...

  13. Burn Wise Awareness Kit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Health and safety outreach materials in the form of an awareness kit. Designed specifically for state, local, and tribal air agencies working to reduce wood smoke pollution, it includes best burn tips, social media m

  14. Elbow Flexion Contractures in Childhood in Obstetric Brachial Plexus Lesions: A Longitudinal Study of 20 Neurosurgically Reconstructed Infants with 8-Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    van der Sluijs, Maaike J.; van Ouwerkerk, Willem-Jan R.; van der Sluijs, Johannes A.; van Royen, Barend J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective  Little knowledge exists on the development of elbow flexion contractures in children with obstetrical brachial plexus lesion (OBPL). This study aims to evaluate the prognostic significance of several neuromuscular parameters in infants with OBPL regarding the later development of elbow flexion contractures. Methods  Twenty infants with OBPL with insufficient signs of recovery in the first months of life who were neurosurgically reconstructed were included. At a mean age of 4.6 months, the following neuromuscular parameters were assessed: existence of flexion contractures, cross-sectional area (CSA) of upper arm muscles on MRI, Narakas classification, EMG results, and elbow muscle function using the Gilbert score. In childhood at follow-up at mean age of 7.7 years, we measured the amount of flexion contractures and the upper arm peak force (Newton). Statistical analysis is used to assess relations between these parameters. Results  Flexion contractures of greater than 10 degrees occurred in 55% of our patient group. The relation between the parameters in infancy and the flexion contractures in childhood is almost nonexistent. Only the Narakas classification was related to the development of flexion contractures in childhood (p = 0.006). Infant muscle CSA is related to childhood peak muscle force. Conclusion  The role of infancy upper arm muscle hypotrophy/hypertrophy, reinnervation, and early elbow muscle function in the development of childhood elbow contractures remains unclear. In this cohort prediction of childhood flexion, contractures were not possible using infancy neuromuscular parameters. We suggest that contractures might be an adaptive process to optimize residual muscle function. PMID:27917234

  15. Burn Depth Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Supra Medical Systems is successfully marketing a device that detects the depth of burn wounds in human skin. To develop the product, the company used technology developed by NASA Langley physicists looking for better ultrasonic detection of small air bubbles and cracks in metal. The device is being marketed to burn wound analysis and treatment centers. Through a Space Act agreement, NASA and the company are also working to further develop ultrasonic instruments for new medical applications

  16. Burn Depth Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Supra Medical Systems is successfully marketing a device that detects the depth of burn wounds in human skin. To develop the product, the companyused technology developed by NASA Langley physicists looking for better ultrasonic detection of small air bubbles and cracks in metal. The device is being marketed to burn wound analysis and treatment centers. Through a Space Act agreement, NASA and the company are also working to further develop ultrasonic instruments for new medical applications.

  17. Burn Depth Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Supra Medical Systems is successfully marketing a device that detects the depth of burn wounds in human skin. To develop the product, the company used technology developed by NASA Langley physicists looking for better ultrasonic detection of small air bubbles and cracks in metal. The device is being marketed to burn wound analysis and treatment centers. Through a Space Act agreement, NASA and the company are also working to further develop ultrasonic instruments for new medical applications.

  18. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thoppay, Jaisri R; De Rossi, Scott S; Ciarrocca, Katharine N

    2013-07-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic condition that is characterized by burning symptoms of the oral mucosa without obvious clinical examination findings. This syndrome has complex characteristics, but its cause remains largely enigmatic, making treatment and management of patients with BMS difficult. Despite not being accompanied by evident organic changes, BMS can significantly reduce the quality of life for such patients. Therefore, it is incumbent on dental professionals to diagnose and manage patients with BMS as a part of comprehensive care.

  19. PBXN-110 Burn Rate Estimate

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, E

    2008-08-11

    It is estimated that PBXN-110 will burn laminarly with a burn function of B = (0.6-1.3)*P{sup 1.0} (B is the burn rate in mm/s and P is pressure in MPa). This paper provides a brief discussion of how this burn behavior was estimated.

  20. Quantitative assessment of graded burn wounds in a porcine model using spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI)

    PubMed Central

    Ponticorvo, Adrien; Burmeister, David M.; Yang, Bruce; Choi, Bernard; Christy, Robert J.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and timely assessment of burn wound severity is a critical component of wound management and has implications related to course of treatment. While most superficial burns and full thickness burns are easily diagnosed through visual inspection, burns that fall between these extremes are challenging to classify based on clinical appearance. Because of this, appropriate burn management may be delayed, increasing the risk of scarring and infection. Here we present an investigation that employs spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI) as non-invasive technologies to characterize in-vivo burn severity. We used SFDI and LSI to investigate controlled burn wounds of graded severity in a Yorkshire pig model. Burn wounds were imaged starting at one hour after the initial injury and daily at approximately 24, 48 and 72 hours post burn. Biopsies were taken on each day in order to correlate the imaging data to the extent of burn damage as indicated via histological analysis. Changes in reduced scattering coefficient and blood flow could be used to categorize burn severity as soon as one hour after the burn injury. The results of this study suggest that SFDI and LSI information have the potential to provide useful metrics for quantifying the extent and severity of burn injuries. PMID:25360365

  1. Necessity of routine histopathological evaluation subsequent to bladder neck contracture resection

    PubMed Central

    Kaynar, Mehmet; Kucur, Mustafa; Çelik, Esin; Bugday, M. Serdar; Goktas, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bladder neck contracture is a well-known complication following some urologic surgical procedures. Regardless of the surgical procedure, any specimen resected should be submitted for histopathological evaluation worldwide. However, the charges of histopathological evaluation may bring a heavy burden to the hospital and health care system. Also, waiting the period of the pathological evaluation process can be an anxious time for patients. Hence, we aimed to investigate the necessity of routine histopathological evaluation of bladder neck contracture bladder neck contraction specimens. Material and methods Patients undergoing bladder neck contraction resection, from 2010 to 2015 were identified. Patient demographics, type of surgery and histopathological diagnosis and cost of histopathological analyses of the specimens were recorded and analyzed. Results Findings of the histopathologic evaluations of 340 bladder neck specimens were reviewed. Out of these, 294 had underwent transurethral resection of the prostate, 38 open prostatectomy, and 8 radical prostatectomy. Evidence of malignant disease involving prostate cancer was present in only 2 specimens. Both of the specimens had a known preexisting history of malignant disease. The remaining 338 specimens showed chronic inflammation (n = 176), chronic active inflammation (n = 64), adenomatous hyperplasia (n = 78) or cystitis (n = 20). Conclusions Our results indicate that routine histopathological examination of bladder neck contraction specimens is clinically unnecessary. We recommend that the surgeon should decide the need for histological examination on individual basis, depending on known preoperative risk factors. PMID:28127450

  2. Muscle contracture emulating system for studying artificially induced pathological gait in intact individuals.

    PubMed

    Olensek, Andrej; Matjacic, Zlatko; Bajd, Tadej

    2005-11-01

    When studying pathological gait it is important to correctly identify primary gait anomalies originating from damage to the central nervous and musculoskeletal system and separate them from compensatory changes of gait pattern, which is often challenging due to the lack of knowledge related to biomechanics of pathological gait. A mechanical system consisting of specially designed trousers, special shoe arrangement, and elastic ropes attached to selected locations on the trousers and shoes is proposed to allow emulation of muscle contractures of soleus (SOL) and gastrocnemius (GAS) muscles and both SOL-GAS. The main objective of this study was to evaluate and compare gait variability as recorded in normal gait and when being constrained with the proposed system. Six neurologically and orthopedically intact volunteers walked along a 7-m walkway while gait kinematics and kinetics were recorded using VICON motion analysis system and two AMTI forceplates. Statistical analysis of coefficient of variation of kinematics and kinetics as recorded in normal walking and during the most constrained SOL-GAS condition showed comparable gait variability. Inspection of resulting group averaged gait patterns revealed considerable resemblance to a selected clinical example of spastic diplegia, indicating that the proposed mechanical system potentially represents a novel method for studying emulated pathological gait arising from artificially induced muscle contractures in neurologically intact individuals.

  3. Delayed breast implant reconstruction: is radiation therapy associated with capsular contracture or reoperations?

    PubMed

    Hvilsom, Gitte Bjørn; Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Steding-Jessen, Marianne; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Henriksen, Trine Foged; Lipworth, Loren; McLaughlin, Joseph; Elberg, Jens Jørgen; Damsgaard, Tine Engberg; Friis, Søren

    2012-03-01

    We evaluated the association between radiation therapy and severe capsular contracture or reoperation after 717 delayed breast implant reconstruction procedures (288 1- and 429 2-stage procedures) identified in the prospective database of the Danish Registry for Plastic Surgery of the Breast during the period between 1999 and 2006. A history of radiation therapy was associated with increased risk of severe capsular contracture for 1- and 2-stage procedures, with adjusted hazard ratios (HR) of 3.3 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9-12.4) and 7.2 (95% CI: 2.4-21.4), respectively. Similarly, a history of radiation therapy was associated with a non-significantly increased risk of reoperation after both 1-stage (HR = 1.4; 95% CI: 0.7-2.5) and 2-stage (HR = 1.6; 95% CI: 0.9-3.1) procedures. Reconstruction failure was highest (13.2%) in the 2-stage procedures with a history of radiation therapy. Breast reconstruction approaches other than implants should be seriously considered among women who have received radiation therapy.

  4. Application of a vibrating device for the prevention of flexion contracture after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Manó, Sándor; Pálinkás, Judit; Szabó, János; Nagy, Judit T; Bakó, Katalin; Csernátony, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Our research team developed a new, heel support-based static and vibrating complementary treatment method for the prevention of flexion contractures often arising after total knee arthroplasty. We examined the efficiency of the method performing a randomized clinical trial with 144 patients undergoing total knee replacement. Seventy-nine patients were treated for 1 week with a generally used continuous passive motion (CPM) device complemented with our new method, which was based on the application of a static and an alternating heel support. The 65 patients in the control group were treated with only a CPM device as in usual clinical practice. The femoro-tibial angle was measured immediately following surgery, and after 1 week of treatment. At the end of the 1 week treatment, the target extension angle (0° ± 5°) was achieved by significantly more patients with the new combined method. This way the elevated heel rest and the vibrating device proved to be a good adjunct treatment along with the CPM used in routine clinical practice in the first place for the prevention of flexion contractures.

  5. Keratin-based products for effective wound care management in superficial and partial thickness burns injuries.

    PubMed

    Loan, Fiona; Cassidy, Sharon; Marsh, Clive; Simcock, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    This n=40 cohort study on superficial and partial thickness burns compares novel keratin-based products with the standard products used at our facility. The keratin products are found to facilitate healing with minimal scarring, be well tolerated with minimal pain and itch, be easy to use for the health professional and be cost effective for the health care provider. For these reasons they are being adopted into use at our facility.

  6. Physical outcomes of patients with burn injuries--a 12 month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Mark; McMahon, Margaret; Stiller, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    There is only limited research documenting functional ability, physical fitness, and health related quality of life after burn injury. The objective of this study was to measure a comprehensive range of physiotherapy-related outcomes over a 12-month period for patients with significant burn injuries. A prospective study was performed on consecutive patients admitted to the Royal Adelaide Hospital over a 12-month period. Outcomes were measured at admission and discharge from hospital and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months, and comprised the: Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire, Lower Extremity Functional Scale questionnaire, shuttle walk test, grip strength and scar appearance using the Matching Assessment with Photographs of Scars. A total of 86 patients (74 male, mean age 38 years) participated. There was a significant deterioration in all outcomes in the first few months after burn injury, with most outcomes improving towards baseline levels by 6 months. However, lower limb function (Lower Extremity Functional Scale) remained significantly reduced at 12 months and functional exercise capacity (shuttle walk test) was still markedly reduced at 6 months compared with predicted normal values. The total burn surface area significantly affected many of the outcomes. In conclusion, for this sample of patients after burn injury, there was an acceptable rate of recovery for physiotherapy-related outcomes, in that most measures had returned to near baseline levels by 6 months postinjury, with the exception of lower limb function and functional exercise capacity.

  7. The media glorifying burns: a hindrance to burn prevention.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, David G; Palmieri, Tina L

    2003-01-01

    The media have a profound influence on the actions of children and adults. Burns and burn prevention tend to be ignored or even mocked. The purpose of this presentation is to reveal the callousness of the media in its dealings with burns and burn prevention. Printed materials with a relationship to burns, risk of burning, or disrespect for the consequences of burns were collected. The materials were tabulated into four categories: comics, advertisements (ads), articles that made light of burns, and television shows that portrayed behavior that would risk burn injury. Most burn-related materials were found in comics or advertisements. Several comics made light of high-risk behavior with flames, scald injury, contact injury, or burns. In addition, several advertisements showed people on fire or actions that could easily lead to burns. Several articles and televisions shows portrayed high-risk behavior that, in some instances, led to copycat injuries. Flames are frequently used to sell items that target adolescent boys or young men. The high incidence injuries that frequent this population parallel the high-risk behaviors portrayed by the media. The media portrays flames and high-risk behavior for burn injury as being cool, funny, and without consequence. The use of flames on clothing and recreational equipment (skateboards, hot rods) particularly targets the high-risk adolescent male. The burn community should make the media aware of the harm it causes with its callous depiction and glorification of burns.

  8. A novel device to create consistent deep dermal burns in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Menon, Seema; Chan, Queenie; Bertinetti, Monique; Harvey, John G; Hei, Erik R La; Holland, Andrew Ja

    2016-01-01

    We conducted this study to evaluate a novel device to create a consistent and reproducible deep partial thickness burn in a porcine model. A thermostatically controlled, heated aluminium disc device was fashioned by the Biomedical Department of our institution. Contact burns were made on the flank of two Great White pigs by applying the device heated to 92°C at intervals of 5, 10, 15 and 20 seconds to four separate test areas area of skin. Biopsies for histological analysis of burn depth were taken on day 0 at 10 minutes post burn and on day 8. Biopsies taken at day 0 revealed superficial to mid-dermal burns, with minimal dermal edema and necrosis. Those from day 8 showed mid to deep dermal edema and necrosis in all four test areas following a 20 second contact duration burn. The new contact burn device was able to create a consistent deep dermal burn after 20 seconds of contact. We anticipate that this new device could be used to investigate the development of hypertrophic scarring in a porcine model.

  9. Release of insulin from PLGA-alginate dressing stimulates regenerative healing of burn wounds in rats.

    PubMed

    Dhall, Sandeep; Silva, João P; Liu, Yan; Hrynyk, Michael; Garcia, Monika; Chan, Alex; Lyubovitsky, Julia; Neufeld, Ronald J; Martins-Green, Manuela

    2015-12-01

    Burn wound healing involves a complex set of overlapping processes in an environment conducive to ischaemia, inflammation and infection costing $7.5 billion/year in the U.S.A. alone, in addition to the morbidity and mortality that occur when the burns are extensive. We previously showed that insulin, when topically applied to skin excision wounds, accelerates re-epithelialization and stimulates angiogenesis. More recently, we developed an alginate sponge dressing (ASD) containing insulin encapsulated in PLGA [poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)] microparticles that provides a sustained release of bioactive insulin for >20 days in a moist and protective environment. We hypothesized that insulin-containing ASD accelerates burn healing and stimulates a more regenerative, less scarring healing. Using heat-induced burn injury in rats, we show that burns treated with dressings containing 0.04 mg insulin/cm(2) every 3 days for 9 days have faster closure, a higher rate of disintegration of dead tissue and decreased oxidative stress. In addition, in insulin-treated wounds, the pattern of neutrophil inflammatory response suggests faster clearing of the burned dead tissue. We also observe faster resolution of the pro-inflammatory macrophages. We also found that insulin stimulates collagen deposition and maturation with the fibres organized more like a basket weave (normal skin) than aligned and cross-linked (scar tissue). In summary, application of ASD-containing insulin-loaded PLGA particles on burns every 3 days stimulates faster and more regenerative healing. These results suggest insulin as a potential therapeutic agent in burn healing and, because of its long history of safe use in humans, insulin could become one of the treatments of choice when repair and regeneration are critical for proper tissue function.

  10. Modeling fibrosis using fibroblasts isolated from scarred rat vocal folds

    PubMed Central

    Kishimoto, Yo; Kishimoto, Ayami Ohno; Ye, Shuyun; Kendziorski, Christina; Welham, Nathan V.

    2016-01-01

    Following injury, pathologically activated vocal fold fibroblasts (VFFs) can engage in disordered extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling, leading to VF fibrosis and impaired voice function. Given the importance of scar VFFs to phenotypically appropriate in vitro modeling of VF fibrosis, we pursued detailed characterization of scar VFFs obtained from surgically injured rat VF mucosae, compared to those obtained from experimentally naïve, age-matched tissue. Scar VFFs initially exhibited a myofibroblast phenotype characterized by increased proliferation, increased Col1a1 transcription and collagen, type I synthesis, increased Acta2 transcription and α-smooth muscle actin synthesis, and enhanced contractile function. These features were most distinct at passage 1 (P1); we observed a coalescence of the scar and naïve VFF phenotypes at later passages. An empirical Bayes statistical analysis of the P1 cell transcriptome identified 421 genes that were differentially expressed by scar, compared to naïve, VFFs. These genes were primarily associated with the wound response, ECM regulation, and cell proliferation. Follow-up comparison of P1 scar VFFs and their in vivo tissue source showed substantial transcriptomic differences. Finally, P1 scar VFFs responded to treatment with hepatocyte growth factor and transforming growth factor-β3, two biologics with reported therapeutic value. Despite the practical limitations inherent to working with early passage cells, this experimental model is easily implemented in any suitably equipped laboratory and has the potential to improve the applicability of preclinical VF fibrosis research. PMID:27111284

  11. Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Wang, Su-Juan; Chen, Jian-Yu; Xin, Hai-Liang; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar is a complication of wound healing and has a high recurrence rate which can lead to significant abnormity in aesthetics and functions. To date, no ideal treatment method has been established. Meanwhile, the underlying mechanism of hypertrophic scarring has not been clearly defined. Although a large amount of scientific research has been reported on the use of medicinal plants as a natural source of treatment for hypertrophic scarring, it is currently scattered across a wide range of publications. Therefore, a systematic summary and knowledge for future prospects are necessary to facilitate further medicinal plant research for their potential use as antihypertrophic scar agents. A bibliographic investigation was accomplished by focusing on medicinal plants which have been scientifically tested in vitro and/or in vivo and proved as potential agents for the treatment of hypertrophic scars. Although the chemical components and mechanisms of action of medicinal plants with antihypertrophic scarring potential have been investigated, many others remain unknown. More investigations and clinical trials are necessary to make use of these medical plants reasonably and phytotherapy is a promising therapeutic approach against hypertrophic scars. PMID:25861351

  12. A case report of a chemical burn due to the misuse of glacial acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jun-Ho; Roh, Si-Gyun; Lee, Nae-Ho; Yang, Kyung-Moo; Moon, Ji-Hyun

    2010-12-01

    As young and elastic skin is what everyone dreams of, various measures have been implemented including chemical, laser resurfacing and dermabrasion to improve the condition of ageing skin. However, the high cost of these procedures prevents the poor from having access to treatment. Glacial acetic acid is widely used as a substitute for chemical peeling because it is readily easily available and affordable. However, its use can result in a number of serious complications. A 28-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital with deep second-degree chemical burns on her face caused by the application of a mixture of glacial acetic acid and flour for chemical peeling. During a 6-month follow-up, hypertrophic scarring developed on the both nasolabial folds despite scar management. Glacial acetic acid is a concentrated form of the organic acid, which gives vinegar its sour taste and pungent smell, and it is also an important reagent during the production of organic compounds. Unfortunately, misleading information regarding the use of glacial acetic acid for chemical peeling is causing serious chemical burns. Furthermore, there is high possibility of a poor prognosis, which includes inflammation, hypertrophic scar formation and pigmentation associated with its misuse. Therefore, we report a case of facial chemical burning, due to the misuse of glacial acetic acid, and hope that this report leads to a better understanding regarding the use of this reagent.

  13. Microneedling Therapy in Atrophic Facial Scars: An Objective Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Imran

    2009-01-01

    Background: Atrophic facial scars are always a challenge to treat, especially the ones that are deep-seated and/or involve much of the face. Microneedling or dermaroller therapy is a new addition to the treatment armamentarium for such scars that offers a simple and reportedly effective management of these scars. Aims: The aim of the present study was to perform an objective evaluation of the efficacy of dermaroller treatment in atrophic facial scars of varying etiology. Materials and Methods: Thirty-seven patients of atrophic facial scarring were offered multiple sittings of microneedling (dermaroller) treatment and their scars were evaluated and graded clinically and by serial photography at the start as well as at two months after the conclusion of the treatment protocol. Any change in the grading of scars after the end of treatment and follow-up period was noted down. The patients were also asked to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment received on a 1-10 point scale. The efficacy of dermaroller treatment was thus assessed both subjectively by the patients as well as objectively by a single observer. Results: Overall 36 out of the total of 37 patients completed the treatment schedule and were evaluated for its efficacy. Out of these 36 patients, 34 achieved a reduction in the severity of their scarring by one or two grades. More than 80% of patients assessed their treatment as ‘excellent’ on a 10-point scale. No significant adverse effects were noted in any patient. Conclusions: Microneedling therapy seems to be a simple and effective treatment option for the management of atrophic facial scars. PMID:20300368

  14. External rhinoplasty for the Arabian nose: a columellar scar analysis.

    PubMed

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate columellar scar problems after external rhinoplasty in the Arabian population, and to analyze the technical factors that help prevent such problems and maximize the scar cosmesis. The investigation was conducted in university and private practice settings of the author in Alexandria, Egypt. A total of 600 Arab patients who underwent external rhinoplasty were included in the study. All the patients underwent surgery using the external rhinoplasty approach, in which bilateral alar marginal incisions were connected by an inverted V-shaped transcolumellar incision. At completion of the procedure, a two-layer closure of the columellar incision was performed. At a minimum of 1 year postoperatively, the columellar scar was evaluated subjectively by means of a patient questionnaire, and objectively by clinical examination and comparison of the close-up pre- and postoperative basal view photographs. Objectively, anything less than a barely visible, leveled, thin, linear scar was considered unsatisfactory. Subjectively, 95.5% of the patients rated the scar as unnoticeable, 3% as noticeable but acceptable, and 1.5% as unacceptable. Objectively, the scar was unsatisfactory in 7% of the cases. This was because of scar widening with or without depression (5%), hyperpigmentation (1.5%), and columellar rim notching (0.5%). The use of a deep 6/0 polydioxanon (PDS) suture significantly decreased the incidence of scar widening (p < 0.005).The columellar incision can be used safely in the Arab population regardless of their thick, dark, and oily skin. Technical factors that contributed to the favorable outcome of the columellar scar included proper planning of location and design of the incision used, precise execution, meticulous multilayered closure, and good postoperative care.

  15. Defect Scars on Flexible Surfaces with Crystalline Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohyama, Tamotsu; Gompper, Gerhard

    2007-05-01

    The crystallography of two-dimensional particle packings on flexible surfaces of spherical topology is investigated. Examples are viral capsids and crystalline vesicles. Computer simulations of dynamically triangulated surfaces are employed to study the shape and structure of lattice defects as a function of the Föppl von Kármán number γ. We find that grain-boundary scars become much more fuzzy with increasing temperature, that the size of grain-boundary scars saturates with increasing vesicle radius, and that the buckling transition shifts to higher values of γ due to the presence of scars.

  16. Dermal tunneling: a proposed treatment for depressed scars*

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Emerson Vasconcelos de Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Depressed facial scars are still a challenge in medical literature, despite the wide range of proposed treatments. Subcision is a technique that is frequently performed to improve this type of lesions. This article proposes a new method to release depressed scars, reported and named by the author as dermal tunneling. This study presents a simple and didactic manner to perform this method. The results in 17 patients with facial scars were considered promising. Thus, the technique was deemed to be safe and reproducible. PMID:27828658

  17. Corneal tattooing: an alternative treatment for disfiguring corneal scars

    PubMed Central

    Pitz, S; Jahn, R; Frisch, L; Duis, A; Pfeiffer, N

    2002-01-01

    Background: The performance and results of corneal tattooing are described in a case series of 11 patients suffering from a disfiguring corneal scar using a technique similar to conventional dermatography. Methods: Drawing ink in different shades was applied into the anterior corneal stroma by punctures performed with a conventional spatula needle. Results: Up to 4 years after surgery all patients still had satisfactory staining of the formerly cosmetically disfiguring corneal scar. Conclusion: Tattooing of unsightly corneal scars proved to be an efficient and easy to perform technique, yielding acceptable results during follow up. PMID:11914207

  18. Bifurcated Superficial Temporal Artery Island Flap for the Reconstruction of a Periorbital Burn: An Innovation

    PubMed Central

    Elbatawy, Amr; Aly, Gaber M.; Ayad, Wael; Helmy, Yasser; Helmy, Emad; Sholkamy, Khallad; Dahshan, Hazem; Al-Hady, Abdallah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Facial burns represent between one-fourth and one-third of all burns. The long-term sequelae of periorbital burns include significant ectropion and lagophthalmos as a result of secondary burn contractures in the lower and upper eyelids, in addition to complete or incomplete alopecia of the eyebrows. Methods: A retrospective study of 14 reconstructive procedures for 12 postburn faces was conducted with all procedures performed since 2010 at the Department of Plastic Surgery, Al-Hussein University Hospital, and at the Craniofacial Unit, Nasser Institute Hospital. Four patients experienced chemical burns, and 8 patients experienced thermal burns. All patients underwent periorbital reconstruction using a bifurcated superficial temporal artery island flap to reconstruct the eyebrows, correct the lagophthalmos, and release the ectropion in both the upper and the lower eyelids. Two patients underwent bilateral periorbital flap reconstruction. The mean age of patients was 29 years, and the study was conducted on 8 males and 4 females. Patient satisfaction was assessed using a questionnaire completed by all patients postoperatively. Results: The complete release of both the upper and the lower eyelids was achieved in all cases, together with ideal replacement of brow hair; no complications were noted, apart from one case in which a loss of hair density in the new eyebrow was observed, combined with the partial loss of the flap in the lower eyelid. Patient satisfaction results were collected and assembled in a table. Conclusion: A bifurcated superficial temporal artery island flap is an innovative flap for reconstructing both burned eyebrows and eyelids. PMID:27482487

  19. Dupuytrens contracture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Over time, it thickens into a cord-like band. Usually, there is no pain. In rare cases, ... affected area to divide and cut the thickened bands of tissue. There is usually little pain afterward. ...

  20. A second case of contractures, webbed neck, micrognathia, hypoplastic nipples, and distinctive facial features: confirmation of the Dinno syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wall, Nerilee; McGaughran, Julie

    2012-04-01

    We report on a child with micrognathia, a short, webbed neck, joint contractures, hypoplastic nipples, and a number of other anomalies. There are striking similarities to a patient reported by [Dinno and Weisskopf (1976); Synd Ident, 4:10-12], and we postulate that this child represents the second patient with this condition.

  1. Fire history in western Patagonia from paired tree-ring fire-scar and charcoal records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holz, A.; Haberle, S.; Veblen, T. T.; de Pol-Holz, R.; Southon, J.

    2012-03-01

    Fire history reconstructions are typically based on tree ages and tree-ring fire scars or on charcoal in sedimentary records from lakes or bogs, but rarely on both. In this study of fire history in western Patagonia (47-48° S) in southern South America (SSA) we compared three sedimentary charcoal records collected in bogs with tree-ring fire-scar data collected at 13 nearby sample sites. We examined the temporal and spatial correspondence between the two fire proxies and also compared them to published charcoal records from distant sites in SSA, and with published proxy reconstructions of regional climate variability and large-scale climate modes. Two of our three charcoal records record fire activity for the last 4 ka yr and one for the last 11 ka yr. For the last ca. 400 yr, charcoal accumulation peaks tend to coincide with high fire activity in the tree-ring fire scar records, but the charcoal records failed to detect some of the fire activity recorded by tree rings. Potentially, this discrepancy reflects low-severity fires that burn in herbaceous and other fine fuels without depositing charcoal in the sedimentary record. Periods of high fire activity tended to be synchronous across sample areas, across proxy types, and with proxy records of regional climatic variability as well as major climate drivers. Fire activity throughout the Holocene in western Patagonia has responded to regional climate variation affecting a broad region of southern South America that is teleconnected to both tropical- and high-latitude climate drivers-El Niño-Southern Oscillation and the Southern Annular Mode. An early Holocene peak in fire activity pre-dates any known human presence in our study area, and consequently implicates lightning as the ignition source. In contrast, the increased fire activity during the 20th century, which was concomitantly recorded by charcoal from all the sampled bogs and at all fire-scar sample sites, is attributed to human-set fires and is outside the

  2. Preclinical Study of Novel Gene Silencer Pyrrole-Imidazole Polyamide Targeting Human TGF-β1 Promoter for Hypertrophic Scars in a Common Marmoset Primate Model.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Jun; Fukuda, Noboru; Inoue, Takashi; Nakai, Shigeki; Saito, Kosuke; Fujiwara, Kyoko; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Yoshiaki; Watanabe, Takayoshi; Nagase, Hiroki; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Itoh, Toshio; Soma, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    We report a preclinical study of a pyrrole-imidazole (PI) polyamide that targets the human transforming growth factor (hTGF)-β1 gene as a novel transcriptional gene silencer in a common marmoset primate model. We designed and then synthesized PI polyamides to target the hTGF-β1 promoter. We examined effects of seven PI polyamides (GB1101-1107) on the expression of hTGF-β1 mRNA stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) in human vascular smooth muscle cells. GB1101, GB1105 and GB1106 significantly inhibited hTGF-β1 mRNA expression. We examined GB1101 as a PI polyamide to hTGF-β1 for hypertrophic scars in marmosets in vivo. Injection of GB1101 completely inhibited hypertrophic scar formation at 35 days post-incision and inhibited cellular infiltration, TGF-β1 and vimentin staining, and epidermal thickness. Mismatch polyamide did not affect hypertrophic scarring or histological changes. Epidermis was significantly thinner with GB1101 than with water and mismatch PI polyamides. We developed the PI polyamides for practical ointment medicines for the treatment of hypertrophic scars. FITC-labeled GB1101 with solbase most efficiently distributed in the nuclei of epidermal keratinocytes, completely suppressed hypertropic scarring at 42 days after incision, and considerably inhibited epidermal thickness and vimentin-positive fibroblasts. PI polyamides targeting hTGF-β1 promoter with solbase ointment will be practical medicines for treating hypertrophic scars after surgical operations and skin burns.

  3. Preclinical Study of Novel Gene Silencer Pyrrole-Imidazole Polyamide Targeting Human TGF-β1 Promoter for Hypertrophic Scars in a Common Marmoset Primate Model

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Jun; Fukuda, Noboru; Inoue, Takashi; Nakai, Shigeki; Saito, Kosuke; Fujiwara, Kyoko; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Yoshiaki; Watanabe, Takayoshi; Nagase, Hiroki; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Itoh, Toshio; Soma, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    We report a preclinical study of a pyrrole-imidazole (PI) polyamide that targets the human transforming growth factor (hTGF)-β1 gene as a novel transcriptional gene silencer in a common marmoset primate model. We designed and then synthesized PI polyamides to target the hTGF-β1 promoter. We examined effects of seven PI polyamides (GB1101-1107) on the expression of hTGF-β1 mRNA stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) in human vascular smooth muscle cells. GB1101, GB1105 and GB1106 significantly inhibited hTGF-β1 mRNA expression. We examined GB1101 as a PI polyamide to hTGF-β1 for hypertrophic scars in marmosets in vivo. Injection of GB1101 completely inhibited hypertrophic scar formation at 35 days post-incision and inhibited cellular infiltration, TGF-β1 and vimentin staining, and epidermal thickness. Mismatch polyamide did not affect hypertrophic scarring or histological changes. Epidermis was significantly thinner with GB1101 than with water and mismatch PI polyamides. We developed the PI polyamides for practical ointment medicines for the treatment of hypertrophic scars. FITC-labeled GB1101 with solbase most efficiently distributed in the nuclei of epidermal keratinocytes, completely suppressed hypertropic scarring at 42 days after incision, and considerably inhibited epidermal thickness and vimentin-positive fibroblasts. PI polyamides targeting hTGF-β1 promoter with solbase ointment will be practical medicines for treating hypertrophic scars after surgical operations and skin burns. PMID:25938472

  4. A new method to measure post-traumatic joint contractures in the rabbit knee.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Kevin A; Holmberg, Michael; Shrive, Nigel

    2003-12-01

    A new device and method to measure rabbit knee joint angles are described. The method was used to measure rabbit knee joint angles in normal specimens and in knee joints with obvious contractures. The custom-designed and manufactured gripping device has two clamps. The femoral clamp sits on a pinion gear that is driven by a rack attached to a materials testing system. A 100 N load cell in series with the rack gives force feedback. The tibial clamp is attached to a rotatory potentiometer. The system allows the knee joint multiple degrees-of-freedom (DOF). There are two independent DOF (compression-distraction and internal-external rotation) and two coupled motions (medial-lateral translation coupled with varus-valgus rotation; anterior-posterior translation coupled with flexion-extension rotation). Knee joint extension-flexion motion is measured, which is a combination of the materials testing system displacement (converted to degrees of motion) and the potentiometer values (calibrated to degrees). Internal frictional forces were determined to be at maximum 2% of measured loading. Two separate experiments were performed to evaluate rabbit knees. First, normal right and left pairs of knees from four New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits were subjected to cyclic loading. An extension torque of 0.2 Nm was applied to each knee. The average change in knee joint extension from the first to the fifth cycle was 1.9 deg +/- 1.5 deg (mean +/- sd) with a total of 49 tests of these eight knees. The maximum extension of the four left knees (tested 23 times) was 14.6 deg +/- 7.1 deg, and of the four right knees (tested 26 times) was 12.0 deg +/- 10.9 deg. There was no significant difference in the maximum extension between normal left and right knees. In the second experiment, nine skeletally mature NZW rabbits had stable fractures of the femoral condyles of the right knee that were immobilized for five, six or 10 weeks. The left knee served as an unoperated control. Loss of knee joint

  5. Elastic Stiffness of Grain Boundary Scars and Dislocation Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Homin; Bowick, Mark

    2006-03-01

    We analytically calculate the stiffness of finite-length grain boundaries (scars) on a spherical crystal within the continuum elasticity theory. The scar is composed of an isolated disclination with +1 topological charge together with a finite number of dislocations. We determine the elastic free energy of a single finite-grain boundary scar by considering interacting defects, such as Disclination-Disclination (D-D), Disclination-dislocation (D-d), and dislocation-dislocation (d-d). The harmonic potential binding dislocations to the scar is obtained by determining the free energy of a single dislocation perturbed away from its equilibrium position. The elastic spring constants so obtained are compared to experimental data on dislocation dynamics [1]. We conclude with some comments on interstitial dynamics. [1] Lipowsky, P., Bowick, M. J., Meinke, J. H., Nelson, D. R. and Bausch, A. R. Nature Mater. 4, 407-411 (2005).

  6. Innovative Therapies in the Treatment of Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Viera, Martha H.; Amini, Sadegh; Valins, Whitney

    2010-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars are benign fibrous overgrowths of scar tissue, which results from an abnormal response to trauma. Several therapeutic modalities have been described for the treatment and prevention of these conditions, but the optimal management approach has not yet been defined. This article reviews the most recent, innovative, therapeutic strategies for the management of hypertrophic scars and keloids, including mitomycin-C, tamoxifen citrate, methotrexate, imidazolaquinolines, retinoids, calcineurin inhibitors, phenylakylamine calcium channel blockers, botulinum toxin, vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors, hepatocyte growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, interleukin-10, manosa-6-phosphate, transforming growth factor beta, antihistamines, and prostaglandin E2. No consensus in treatment regimens has been reached due to the limited evidence-based information found in the literature. Most therapeutic options have potential effectiveness as both monotherapy and as combination therapy. However, recent reports offer novel modalities that may approach scarring from different angles. PMID:20725565

  7. Burning trees and bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    1990-01-01

    Most burning of biomass is the result of human activity, and on a global scale it is increasing. Tropospheric concentrations of CO2, CO, CH4, non-methane hydrocarbons, and ozone are all increasing with time; global biomass burning may make an important contribution to this increase and thus to potential global climate change. The nitrogen cycle also can have important climatic effects. Nitrous oxide put into the atmosphere by biomass burning is a greenhouse gas 250 times more powerful (molecule for molecule) than carbon dioxide. Nitric oxide, as well as being a photochemical precursor of ozone, a major pollutant in the troposphere, produces nitric acid, the fastest-growing component of acid rain. Hence, the new bridge in the nitrogen cycle is of more than mere technical interest.

  8. Double free flaps harvested from one or two donor sites for one or two-staged burn reconstruction: models of sequential-link and independent-link microanastomoses.

    PubMed

    Mardini, Samir; Tsai, Feng-Chou; Yang, Jui-yung

    2004-11-01

    Extensive burn injuries and subsequent scarring result in functional and aesthetic impairments. The use of free flaps in burn reconstructions provides superior outcomes especially when other, more conservative reconstructive methods fail and curtail efforts of relentless rehabilitation. Multiple chronic scar-associated problems and extensive acute burn defects are conventionally resolved by multiple procedures. Thus, two or extensive scar regions are typically reconstructed using two free flaps (double free flaps) in two separate, procedures utilizing two independent donor sites. This leads to a protracted course of repetitive operations, hospitalizations, and rehabilitation, causing a prolonged period of discomfort and disability. The definition of double free flaps is two independent free flaps with two sets of microanastomoses. This paper illustrates, via a case-series, that double free flaps could be performed in one procedure, with both flaps harvested from either one or two donor sites. Two flaps are then utilized to resolve one large or two problem areas at the same time. Revascularization of the flaps is achieved via either a sequential-link or independent-link microanastomoses. The advantages of harvesting double free flaps from one region and using them in one stage to reconstruct one or two defect area include: (1) providing a large area of soft, pliable skin from one region for re-surfacing burn injuries or resolving scar associated problems, (2) decreasing the treatment course and potential disability, (3) decreasing donor site morbidities, (4) increasing maneuverability and conformability of the flap, and (5) affording a better functional and aesthetic outcome.

  9. Suppression of scarring in peripheral nerve implants by drug elution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FitzGerald, James J.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Medical implants made of non-biological materials provoke a chronic inflammatory response, resulting in the deposition of a collagenous scar tissue (ST) layer on their surface, that gradually thickens over time. This is a critical problem for neural interfaces. Scar build-up on electrodes results in a progressive decline in signal level because the scar tissue gradually separates axons away from the recording contacts. In regenerative sieves and microchannel electrodes, progressive scar deposition will constrict and may eventually choke off the sieve hole or channel lumen. Interface designs need to address this issue if they are to be fit for long term use. This study examines a novel method of inhibiting the formation and thickening of the fibrous scar. Approach. Research to date has mainly focused on methods of preventing stimulation of the foreign body response by implant surface modification. In this paper a pharmacological approach using drug elution to suppress chronic inflammation is introduced. Microchannel implants made of silicone doped with the steroid drug dexamethasone were implanted in the rat sciatic nerve for periods of up to a year. Tissue from within the microchannels was compared to that from control devices that did not release any drug. Main results. In the drug eluting implants the scar layer was significantly thinner at all timepoints, and unlike the controls it did not continue to thicken after 6 months. Control implants supported axon regeneration well initially, but axon counts fell rapidly at later timepoints as scar thickened. Axon counts in drug eluting devices were initially much lower, but increased rather than declined and by one year were significantly higher than in controls. Significance. Drug elution offers a potential long term solution to the problem of performance degradation due to scarring around neural implants.

  10. Scar tissue and microvolt T-wave alternans.

    PubMed

    Kraaier, Karin; Olimulder, Marlon A G M; Galjee, Michel A; van Dessel, Pascal F H M; van der Palen, Job; Wilde, Arthur A M; Scholten, Marcoen F

    2014-04-01

    Microvolt T-wave alternans (MTWA) is an electrocardiographic marker for predicting sudden cardiac death. In this study, we aimed to study the relation between MTWA and scar assessed with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) or dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Sixty-eight patients with positive or negative MTWA and analysable CMR examination were included. Using CMR and the delayed enhancement technique, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), volumes, wall motion and scar characteristics were assessed. Overall, positive MTWA (n = 40) was related to male gender (p = 0.04), lower LVEF (p = 0.04) and increased left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) (p < 0.01). After multivariate analysis, male gender (p = 0.01) and lower LVEF remained significant (p = 0.02). Scar characteristics (presence, transmurality, and scar score) were not related to MTWA (all p > 0.5). In the patients with ICM (n = 40) scar was detected in 38. Positive MTWA (n = 18) was related to higher LVEDV (p = 0.05). In patients with DCM (n = 28), scar was detected in 11. Trends were found between positive MTWA (n = 15) and male gender (p = 0.10), lower LVEF (p = 0.10), and higher LVEDV (p = 0.09). In both subgroups, the presence, transmurality or extent of scar was not related to MTWA (all p > 0.45). In this small study, neither in patients with ICM or DCM a relation was found between the occurrence of MTWA and the presence, transmurality or extent of myocardial scar. Overall there was a significant relation between heart failure remodeling parameters and positive MTWA.

  11. Perennial plate tectonics with lasting mantle lithosphere scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, P.; Pysklywec, R. N.; Stephenson, R.

    2015-12-01

    Although the conventional theory of plate tectonics can explain non-rigid behaviour at plate boundaries, it cannot adequately explain the processes involved in deformation and seismicity within plate interiors. Here, we consider that the pre-existing deformation or "scarring" within the mantle lithosphere may have a very long lived presence that could incorporate deformation of the plate interior and plate boundary. Mantle lithosphere scars from continent-continent collisions could generate virtual plate boundaries that remain over long timescales, producing "perennial" plate tectonics. Local geophysical studies can map the crustal environment well, and global whole mantle tomography models are rapidly improving, yet high-resolution images of the mantle lithosphere are often not available in regions where scarring may be present. Where mantle lithosphere heterogeneities have been observed (usually interpreted simply as subduction scars), the same attention has not been afforded to them as, for example, re-activation of faults within the Earth's crust. In idealized numerical simulations, we compare how relic scarring at varying depths in the lithosphere affects patterns of deformation. High-resolution thermal-mechanical numerical experiments explore continental lithospheric deformation featuring a weakened crust and mantle lithosphere scars. Our models show that deep lithospheric scars can control the tectonic evolution of a region over shallow geological features, indicating the importance of mantle lithosphere heterogeneities. The Altyn Tagh Fault (ATF) in central China is an example of an ancient continental collision zone that undergoes periodic deformation during times of regional compression. We suggest that the ATF may be a locale where a long-lasting mantle lithosphere scar can control the subsequent crustal evolution and deformation, with ancient plate boundaries having a "perennial" plate tectonic presence.

  12. Scar Functions, Barriers for Chemical Reactivity, and Vibrational Basis Sets.

    PubMed

    Revuelta, F; Vergini, E; Benito, R M; Borondo, F

    2016-07-14

    The performance of a recently proposed method to efficiently calculate scar functions is analyzed in problems of chemical interest. An application to the computation of wave functions associated with barriers relevant for the LiNC ⇄ LiCN isomerization reaction is presented as an illustration. These scar functions also constitute excellent elements for basis sets suitable for quantum calculation of vibrational energy levels. To illustrate their efficiency, a calculation of the LiNC/LiCN eigenfunctions is also presented.

  13. Tar burns in the southwest.

    PubMed

    Schiller, W R

    1983-07-01

    The burns which result from contact of human skin with hot tar may be quite serious in proportion to the body surface area involved. Although tending toward partial thickness burns, patchy areas of full thickness skin loss are commonly observed. The use of petrolatum-based ointments on the burn initially to dissolve the tar into the dressings seems like the most efficient and humane method of tar removal. Subsequently, care of the wound is like that of any other burn. Tar burns involving greater than 10 per cent of the body surface area are likely to be the most serious and require intravenous fluid resuscitation. Many tar burns appear to be preventable.

  14. Rocket plume burn hazard.

    PubMed

    Stoll, A M; Piergallini, J R; Chianta, M A

    1980-05-01

    By use of miniature rocket engines, the burn hazard posed by exposure to ejection seat rocket plume flames was determined in the anaesthetized rat. A reference chart is provided for predicting equivalent effects in human skin based on extrapolation of earlier direct measurements of heat input for rat and human burns. The chart is intended to be used in conjunction with thermocouple temperature measurements of the plume environment for design and modification of escape seat system to avoid thermal injury on ejection from multiplace aircraft.

  15. Burning mouth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jimson, Sudha; Rajesh, E.; Krupaa, R. Jayasri; Kasthuri, M.

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a complex disorder that is characterized by warm or burning sensation in the oral mucosa without changes on physical examination. It occurs more commonly in middle-aged and elderly women and often affects the tip of the tongue, lateral borders, lips, hard and soft palate. This condition is probably of multi-factorial origin, often idiopathic, and its etiopathogensis is unknown. BMS can be classified into two clinical forms namely primary and secondary BMS. As a result, a multidisciplinary approach is required for better control of the symptoms. In addition, psychotherapy and behavioral feedback may also help eliminate the BMS symptoms. PMID:26015707

  16. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Torgerson, Rochelle R

    2010-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic condition characterized by burning of the oral mucosa, with or without dysgeusia and xerostomia, in the setting of no underlying systemic disease or identifiable abnormalities on physical examination or laboratory testing. BMS disproportionately affects postmenopausal women. The pathophysiology of the disease is unknown; no single treatment has proven universally successful. In light of these shortcomings, having a practical approach to the evaluation and management of patients with BMS can improve both patient quality of life and physician satisfaction.

  17. Burn Safety Awareness on Playgrounds: Thermal Burns from Playground Equipment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Awareness on Playgrounds Thermal Burns from Playground Equipment The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission CPSC wants ... of the risk of thermal burns from playground equipment. You may remember the metal slides of your ...

  18. Arthrogryposis (multiple congenital contractures): diagnostic approach to etiology, classification, genetics, and general principles.

    PubMed

    Hall, Judith G

    2014-08-01

    Arthrogryposis has been the term used to describe multiple congenital contractures for over a century. It is a descriptive term and present in over 400 specific conditions. Responsible gene abnormalities have been found for more than 150 specific types of arthrogryposis. Decreased fetal movement is present in all affected individuals which leads to a variety of secondary deformations. Decreased fetal movement (fetal akinesia) is associated with increased connective tissue around the immobilized joint, skin dimpling overlying the immobilized joint, disuse atrophy of the muscles that mobilize the joint and abnormal surface of the joint depending on the immobilized position. Other frequently observed features include: micrognathia, mildly shortened limbs, intrauterine growth restriction, pulmonary hypoplasia and short and/or immature gut. Primary etiologies include neuropathic processes; myopathic processes; end-plate abnormalities; maternal illness, trauma and drugs; limitation of fetal space; vascular compromise; and metabolic disorders to the developing embryo/fetus.

  19. Beals syndrome (congenital contractural arachnodactyly): prenatal ultrasound findings and molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Inbar-Feigenberg, M; Meirowitz, N; Nanda, D; Toi, A; Okun, N; Chitayat, D

    2014-10-01

    We report the prenatal findings in two cases of Beals syndrome. Both pregnancies presented with clinical features of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita/fetal akinesia syndrome (AMC/FAS), including clenched fists and multiple joint contractures on repeat prenatal ultrasound examinations. The first case was diagnosed as having Beals syndrome on physical examination shortly after birth and the diagnosis was confirmed by DNA analysis, shown as a point mutation in the fibrillin 2 (FBN2) gene. The second case was diagnosed with Beals syndrome following microarray analysis on amniocytes, which showed a deletion of the FBN2 gene. Although most cases with AMC/FAS carry a poor prognosis, Beals syndrome is consistent with normal cognitive development and a better prognosis. Thus, making the correct diagnosis is crucial, both pre- and postnatally, for accurate counseling and management.

  20. Effects of cannabinoids on caffeine contractures in slow and fast skeletal muscle fibers of the frog.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Miguel; Ortiz-Mesina, Mónica; Trujillo, Xóchitl; Sánchez-Pastor, Enrique; Vásquez, Clemente; Castro, Elena; Velasco, Raymundo; Montoya-Pérez, Rocío; Onetti, Carlos

    2009-05-01

    The effect of cannabinoids on caffeine contractures was investigated in slow and fast skeletal muscle fibers using isometric tension recording. In slow muscle fibers, WIN 55,212-2 (10 and 5 microM) caused a decrease in tension. These doses reduced maximum tension to 67.43 +/- 8.07% (P = 0.02, n = 5) and 79.4 +/- 14.11% (P = 0.007, n = 5) compared to control, respectively. Tension-time integral was reduced to 58.37 +/- 7.17% and 75.10 +/- 3.60% (P = 0.002, n = 5), respectively. Using the CB(1) cannabinoid receptor agonist ACPA (1 microM) reduced the maximum tension of caffeine contractures by 68.70 +/- 11.63% (P = 0.01, n = 5); tension-time integral was reduced by 66.82 +/- 6.89% (P = 0.02, n = 5) compared to controls. When the CB(1) receptor antagonist AM281 was coapplied with ACPA, it reversed the effect of ACPA on caffeine-evoked tension. In slow and fast muscle fibers incubated with the pertussis toxin, ACPA had no effect on tension evoked by caffeine. In fast muscle fibers, ACPA (1 microM) also decreased tension; the maximum tension was reduced by 56.48 +/- 3.4% (P = 0.001, n = 4), and tension-time integral was reduced by 57.81 +/- 2.6% (P = 0.006, n = 4). This ACPA effect was not statistically significant with respect to the reduction in tension in slow muscle fibers. Moreover, we detected the presence of mRNA for the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor on fast and slow skeletal muscle fibers, which was significantly higher in fast compared to slow muscle fiber expression. In conclusion, our results suggest that in the slow and fast muscle fibers of the frog cannabinoids diminish caffeine-evoked tension through a receptor-mediated mechanism.

  1. Comparison of scar thickness measurements using trans-vaginal sonography and MRI in cases of pregnancy with previous caesarean section. Do they correlate with actual scar thickness?

    PubMed

    Singh, N; Tripathi, R; Mala, Y M; Dixit, R; Tyagi, S; Batra, A

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate scar thickness in cases of pregnancy with previous caesarean section, by trans-vaginal sonography (TVS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to correlate precision of radiologically-measured scar thickness with actual measurement of scar thickness. A total of 35 pregnant patients with previous caesarean section planned for elective caesarean section, were evaluated prospectively. Their scar thickness was measured by TVS and MRI on the day of elective repeat caesarean section. These measurements were correlated with each other and with scar thickness measured during elective repeat caesarean section by using a caliper. The correlation coefficients between scar thickness measured by TVS and MRI with peroperative evaluation with a caliper, were +0.72 and +0.59, respectively. The study concluded that as MRI is a costlier modality and TVS has better correlation coefficient with actual scar thickness, TVS can be considered to be the better modality for antenatal scar thickness measurement.

  2. Scar prevention and remodeling: a review of the medical, surgical, topical and light treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Kerwin, Leonard Y; El Tal, Abdel Kader; Stiff, Mark A; Fakhouri, Tarek M

    2014-08-01

    Cosmetic, functional, and structural sequelae of scarring are innumerable, and measures exist to optimize and ultimately minimize these sequelae. To evaluate the innumerable methods available to decrease the cosmetic, functional, and structural repercussions of scarring, pubMed search of the English literature with key words scar, scar revision, scar prevention, scar treatment, scar remodeling, cicatrix, cicatrix treatment, and cicatrix remodeling was done. Original articles and reviews were examined and included. Seventy-nine manuscripts were reviewed. Techniques, comparisons, and results were reviewed and tabulated. Overall, though topical modalities are easier to use and are usually more attractive to the patient, the surgical approaches still prove to be superior and more reliable. However, advances in topical medications for scar modification are on the rise and a change towards medical treatment of scars may emerge as the next best approach. Comparison studies of the innumerable specific modalities for scar revision and prevention are impossible. Standardization of techniques is lacking. Scarring, the body's natural response to a wound, can create many adverse effects. At this point, the practice of sound, surgical fundamentals still trump the most advanced preventative methods and revision techniques. Advances in medical approaches are available, however, to assist the scarring process, which even the most advanced surgical fundamentals will ultimately lead to. Whether through newer topical therapies, light treatment, or classical surgical intervention, our treatment armamentarium of scars has expanded and will allow us to maximize scar prevention and to minimize scar morbidity.

  3. Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Professionals Phoenix Society is the leader in connecting the burn recovery community and creating resources for survivors. Since 1977, we have partnered with survivors, families, health care professionals, burn centers, and the fire ...

  4. [Burns in an aeronautic environment].

    PubMed

    Rigotti, G

    1979-10-27

    Following an examination of the aetiology of burns in aeronautic environments, the physiopathology, classification and general and local treatment of the burn case is discussed. Special mention is then made of aircraft as an extremely useful means of transport.

  5. Discovery Performs Terminal Initiation Burn

    NASA Video Gallery

    The terminal initiation burn, a left Orbital Maneuvering System engine firing that gave Discovery one last big push toward the space station, took place Feb. 26, 2011 at 10:33 a.m. The burn lasted ...

  6. Combination Therapy for Acne Scarring: Personal Experience and Clinical Suggestions.

    PubMed

    Kroepfl, Lucija; Emer, Jason J

    2016-11-01

    Acne is one of the most prevalent skin conditions seen by dermatologists. The cosmetic sequelae of severe acne, including scarring and pigmentation, have a profound psychological impact on those in icted. Topical (eg, retinoids, antibiotics, dapsone, hydroxyacids) and oral treatments (eg, antibiotics and/or spironolactone) are often bene cial to control acne or in the instance of oral isotretinoin use, rid the acne permanently; however, these treatments have very little affect on the ultimate cosmetic outcome of the acne scarring and skin texture that results. Given the variety of scar types that can form and the variability of responses seen in various skin types and textures, treatment options are vast without appropriate guidelines for pathways that dictate best timing, combinations, and options in given clinical scenarios. Current treatment options include solo or combina- tions of energy-based (eg, laser, radiofrequency), chemical-based (eg, peels, TCA cross), surgical-based options (eg, subcision, punch excision), microneedling, and llers and/or fat injections. Most recently, fractional radiofrequency-based treatments have been used to improve acne scarring with less reported downtime as compared to lasers or chemical peels and the ability to treat darker or sensitive skin types with less risk of scarring or hyperpigmentation. In severe cystic ares, scarring treatments are often postposed till the acne is under control and in many instances this can limit the dermatologists ability to affect future cosmetic treatments. Based on personal experience of various clinical scenarios in a busy laser practice that treats a signi cant number of patients with acne scarring, fractional radiofrequency is an excellent choice for treating all forms of acne scars with minimal risk to patients, even those on concurrent treatments such as isotretinoin. Additionally, fractional radiofrequency can be used in combination with all other treatment options to speed the time to

  7. Burning Your Own CDs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekhaml, Leticia

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the use of CDs (Compact Disks) for backing up data as an alternative to using floppy disks and explains how to burn, or record, a CD. Topics include differences between CD-R (CD-Recordable) and CD-RW (CD-Rewritable); advantages of CD-R and CD-RW; selecting a CD burner; technology trends; and care of CDs. (LRW)

  8. The Burn Wound Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Lloyd F.; Chan, Rodney K.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: While the survival rate of the severely burned patient has improved significantly, relatively little progress has been made in treatment or prevention of burn-induced long-term sequelae, such as contraction and fibrosis. Recent Advances: Our knowledge of the molecular pathways involved in burn wounds has increased dramatically, and technological advances now allow large-scale genomic studies, providing a global view of wound healing processes. Critical Issues: Translating findings from a large number of in vitro and preclinical animal studies into clinical practice represents a gap in our understanding, and the failures of a number of clinical trials suggest that targeting single pathways or cytokines may not be the best approach. Significant opportunities for improvement exist. Future Directions: Study of the underlying molecular influences of burn wound healing progression will undoubtedly continue as an active research focus. Increasing our knowledge of these processes will identify additional therapeutic targets, supporting informed clinical studies that translate into clinical relevance and practice. PMID:26989577

  9. Burn Care in Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    tent configuration and later occupied Ibn Sina Hospital, in the international zone in Baghdad, Iraq. In the tent configura- tion, the 28th CSH provided...at Ibn Sina Hos- pital continuously. In a relatively austere general hospital environment, burn care has been provided with a focus on the

  10. Burn and Scald Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... dry oven mitts or potholders. Hot cookware can heat moisture in a potholder or hot pad, resulting in a scald burn. • Wear short, close-fitting or tightly rolled sleeves when cooking. • Have a “kid-free zone” of at least 3 feet around the stove. ...

  11. Fungal Burn Wound Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    severely limits the may prove to be useful in burn patients. Clotrimazole , applied clinical utility of such a culture. Biopsy and frozen-section and as...useful in wound and permit prompt institution of appropriate the treatment of systemic fungal infections. Clotrimazole is treatment. poorly absorbed

  12. TIRES, OPEN BURNING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter describes available information on the health effects from open burning of rubber tires. It concentrates on the three known sources of detailed measurements: (1) a small-scale emissions characterization study performed by the U.S. EPA in a facility designed to simulat...

  13. The Earth Could Burn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarrow, Ruth

    1982-01-01

    Environmental educators are worried about the ultimate ecological threat--nuclear war, which could burn thousands of square miles, sterilize the soil, destroy 70 percent of the ozone layer letting in lethal ultraviolet rays, and cause severe radiation sickness. Educators must inform themselves, teach others, contact government representatives, and…

  14. Carbon dioxide laser ablation with immediate autografting in a full-thickness porcine burn model.

    PubMed Central

    Glatter, R D; Goldberg, J S; Schomacker, K T; Compton, C C; Flotte, T J; Bua, D P; Greaves, K W; Nishioka, N S; Sheridan, R L

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the long-term clinical and histologic outcome of immediate autografting of full-thickness burn wounds ablated with a high-power continuous-wave CO2 laser to sharply débrided wounds in a porcine model. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Continuous-wave CO2 lasers have performed poorly as tools for burn excision because the large amount of thermal damage to viable subeschar tissues precluded successful autografting. However, a new technique, in which a high-power laser is rapidly scanned over the eschar, results in eschar vaporization without significant damage to underlying viable tissues, allowing successful immediate autografting. METHODS: Full-thickness paravertebral burn wounds measuring 36 cm2 were created on 11 farm swine. Wounds were ablated to adipose tissue 48 hours later using either a surgical blade or a 150-Watt continuous-wave CO2 laser deflected by an x-y galvanometric scanner that translated the beam over the tissue surface, removing 200 microm of tissue per scan. Both sites were immediately autografted and serially evaluated clinically and histologically for 180 days. RESULTS: The laser-treated sites were nearly bloodless. The mean residual thermal damage was 0.18+/-0.05 mm. The mean graft take was 96+/-11% in manual sites and 93+/-8% in laser sites. On postoperative day 7, the thickness of granulation tissue at the graft-wound bed interface was greater in laser-debrided sites. By postoperative day 180, the manual and laser sites were histologically identical. Vancouver scar assessment revealed no differences in scarring at postoperative day 180. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term scarring, based on Vancouver scar assessments and histologic evaluation, was equivalent at 6 months in laser-ablated and sharply excised sites. Should this technology become practical, the potential clinical implications include a reduction in surgical blood loss without sacrifice of immediate engraftment rates or long-term outcome. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3

  15. Full-thickness burn to the hand from an automobile airbag.

    PubMed

    Vitello, W; Kim, M; Johnson, R M; Miller, S

    1999-01-01

    An 18-year-old male was involved in a single car motor vehicle accident in which the driver's side airbag was deployed. He presented to the trauma center with complex injuries to the left hand, lacerations to the scalp, and a full-thickness burn to the ulnar aspect of the right hand that included the hypothenar area and the fifth digit. The patient was admitted to the trauma center and received immediate consultation from the burn service. He underwent debridement and split-thickness skin grafting of 50 cm2 of the right hand on postburn day 3. The graft became necrotic and the patient underwent debridement of the skin and the abductor minimi muscle of the right hand on postburn day 32. Split-thickness skin grafting and release of flexion contracture were successfully completed 18 days later. The police and fire departments reported that the airbag showed signs of thermal destruction. Upon request, Honda motors submitted information from the TRW safety systems and material safety data sheet (Mesa, Ariz, issued 1989) that showed that airbag canisters contain the chemicals sodium azide and cupric oxide. Water may react with sodium azide to form highly toxic and explosive hyfrazoic acid. These chemicals are converted to sodium hydroxide, which can cause significant chemical burns. In addition, these chemicals may ignite when exposed to live electrical wires or temperatures greater than 300 degrees F. We conclude that burns associated with damaged deployed airbags in motor vehicle accidents may be the results of both chemical and thermal injury. The extent of the burn wound may be underestimated, as our case illustrates. Full-thickness burns resulting from airbag deployment may require more aggressive initial debridement and treatment.

  16. Burning Mouth Syndrome: update.

    PubMed

    Spanemberg, Juliana Cassol; Rodríguez de Rivera Campillo, Eugenia; Salas, Enric Jané; López López, José

    2014-06-01

    Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is a chronic disorder that predominately affects middle-aged women in the postmenopausal period. The condition is distinguished by burning symptoms of the oral mucosa and the absence of any clinical signs. The etiology of BMS is complex and it includes a variety of factors. Local, systemic and psychological factors such as stress, anxiety and depression are listed among the possible causes of BMS. BMS may sometimes be classified as BMS Type I, II or III. Although this syndrome is not accompanied by evident organic alterations and it does not present health risks, it can significantly reduce the patient's quality of life. This study analyzes the available literature related to BMS, and makes special reference to its therapeutic management. The pages that follow will also discuss the diagnostic criteria that should be respected, etiological factors, and clinical aspects. We used the PubMed database and searched it by using the keywords "burning mouth syndrome", "BMS and review", and "burning mouth and review", in the title or abstract of the publication. BMS treatment usually steers towards the management of the symptoms; however, the specific local factors that could play a significant role in worsening the oral burning sensation should be eradicated. The most widely accepted treatment options that show variable results include tricyclic antidepressants, benzodiazepines and antipsychotic drugs; nevertheless there are other therapies that can also be carried out. Professionals that work in the field of dentistry should formulate standardized symptomatic and diagnostic criteria in order to more easily identify the most effective and reliable strategies in BMS treatment through multidisciplinary research.

  17. Sensitivity of vegetation indices to different burn and vegetation ratios using LANDSAT-5 satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleniou, M.; Koutsias, N.

    2013-08-01

    The application of vegetation indices is a very common approach in remote sensing of burned areas to either map the fire scar or estimate burn severity since they minimize the effect of exogenous factors and enhance the correlation with the internal parameters of vegetation. In a recent study we found that the original spectral channels, based on which these indices are estimated, are sensitive to external parameters of the vegetation as for example the spectral reflectance of the background soil. In such cases, the influence of the soil in the reflectance values is different in the various spectral regions depending on its type. These problems are further enhanced by the non-homogeneous pixels, as created from fractions of different types of land cover. Parnitha (Greece), where a wildfire occurred on July 2007, was established as test site. The purpose of this work is to explore the sensitivity of vegetation indices when used to estimate and map different fractions of fire-scorched (burned) and non fire-scorched (vegetated) areas. IKONOS, a very high resolution satellite imagery, was used to create a three-class thematic map to extract the percentages of vegetation, burned surfaces, and bare soil. Using an overlaid fishnet we extracted samples of completely "burned", completely "vegetated" pixels and proportions with different burn/vegetation ratios (45%-55% burned - 45%-55% vegetation, 20%-30% burned - 70%- 80% vegetation, 70%-80% burned - 20%-30% vegetation). Vegetation indices were calculated (NDVI, IPVI, SAVI) and their values were extracted to characterize the mentioned classes. The main findings of our recent research were that vegetation indices are less sensitive to external parameters of the vegetation by minimizing external effects. Thus, the semi-burned classes were spectrally more consistent to their different fractions of scorched and non-scorched vegetation, than the original spectral channels based on which these indices are estimated.

  18. Burn Wise Outreach Materials for Retailers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Burn Wise outreach material. Burn Wise is a partnership program of that emphasizes the importance of burning the right wood, the right way, in the right wood-burning appliance to protect your home, health, and the air we breathe.

  19. 40 CFR 49.10411 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.10411 Section 49.10411 Protection of... for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. (a) Beginning... obtain approval of a permit under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and silvicultural burning permits....

  20. Biomass Burning Data and Information

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-04-21

    Biomass Burning Data and Information This data set represents ... geographical and temporal distribution of total amount of biomass burned. These data may be used in general circulation models (GCMs) and ... models of the atmosphere. Project Title:  Biomass Burning Discipline:  Tropospheric Composition ...