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Sample records for bursal disease vaccination

  1. 9 CFR 113.212 - Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.212 Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus. Bursal Disease Vaccine... postvaccination, challenge 20 vaccinates and 10 controls by eyedrop with a virulent infectious bursal...

  2. 9 CFR 113.212 - Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.212 Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus. Bursal Disease Vaccine... postvaccination, challenge 20 vaccinates and 10 controls by eyedrop with a virulent infectious bursal...

  3. 9 CFR 113.212 - Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.212 Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus. Bursal Disease Vaccine... postvaccination, challenge 20 vaccinates and 10 controls by eyedrop with a virulent infectious bursal...

  4. 9 CFR 113.212 - Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.212 Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus. Bursal Disease Vaccine... postvaccination, challenge 20 vaccinates and 10 controls by eyedrop with a virulent infectious bursal...

  5. Investigations on live vaccines against infectious bursal disease of chicks.

    PubMed

    Yadin, H; Hoekstra, J; Oei, H L; van Roozelaar, D J

    1980-01-01

    Summary Four live virus vaccines against Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD) were studied with regard to their safety, immune response and applicability. None of the vaccines caused clinical symptoms or had an adverse impact on bodyweight. Differences between these vaccins were observed in their effect on the Bursa/ Bodyweight Ratio and the severity of the microscopical lesions of the bursa Fabricii. The immunosuppressive effect of IBD vaccination at one day of age on the response to Newcastle disease vaccine applied was rather low. Three of the four vaccines induced antibodies associated with protection against challenge. Vaccination of SPF rearing chickens by drinking water at an age of 15 weeks produced an antibody response (Agar Gel Precipitin Test) whereas at an age of 23, 32 and 60 weeks it did not. Chickens of all age groups responded serologically to an intramusculair vaccination. A correlation was found between the immunological response and the effect of the vaccines on the bursa Fabricii.

  6. Vaccination against Marek's disease and infectious bursal disease. II. Titration and in vivo efficacy of the coinfection-derived bivalent live vaccine for turkey herpesvirus and infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Chang, J D; Eidson, C S; Kleven, S H; Fletcher, O J

    1984-09-01

    The bivalent HVT/IBDV live vaccine, developed by cocultivation of the turkey herpesvirus (HVT) and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) vaccine in cell cultures, was quantitated. The titer of each constituent virus could be successfully determined in vitro by pretreatment of the vaccine with anti-IBDV serum or chloroform (CHCl3). Studies in vivo further demonstrated that the anti-IBDV serum-treated HVT/IBDV vaccine lost its immunogenicity by failing to induce IBDV-neutralizing antibody or to protect vaccinates from bursal atrophy after challenge exposure to infectious bursal disease. The CHCl3 treatment significantly reduced the efficacy of the vaccine to protect vaccinates against Marek's disease challenge.

  7. The affect of infectious bursal disease virus on avian influenza virus vaccine efficacy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immunosuppressive viruses are known to affect vaccinal immunity, however the impact of virally induced immunosuppression on avian influenza vaccine efficacy has not been quantified. In order to determine the effect of exposure to infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) on vaccinal immunity to highly ...

  8. Infectious Bursal Agent Vaccination of Chicks from Infectious Bursal Agent-vaccinated Dams

    PubMed Central

    Ide, P. R.

    1979-01-01

    Chicks from infectious bursal agent-vaccinated broiler breeders were vaccinated with a commercial infectious bursal agent vaccine at intervals after hatching. Bursas from some of these chicks were examined for infectious bursal agent-specific fluorescence four days after vaccination and bursas from others were examined for histological lesions of infectious bursal disease 21 days after vaccination. Serological studies were conducted to determine if active immunity to infectious bursal agent followed vaccination. Chicks failed to develop immunity if their levels of maternally-derived serum neutralizing antibody were in excess of approximately log2 7 at the time of vaccination. When antibody titres fell below this level, vaccination usually resulted in infectious bursal agent virus replication in the bursa and consequential bursal damage but was followed by development of active immunity. PMID:219952

  9. 9 CFR 113.212 - Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... for vaccine production. All serials shall be prepared from the first through the fifth passage from... immunogenicity of vaccine prepared in accordance with the Outline of Production shall be established by a method... Production. The test shall establish that the vaccine, when used as recommended on the label, is capable...

  10. 9 CFR 113.331 - Bursal Disease Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... vaccinate shall receive a predetermined quantity of vaccine virus. Five replicate virus titrations shall be... the titrations by a method acceptable to Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. (3) When the test... requirements. Final container samples of completed product shall be tested for virus titer using the...

  11. 9 CFR 113.331 - Bursal Disease Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... vaccinate shall receive a predetermined quantity of vaccine virus. Five replicate virus titrations shall be... the titrations by a method acceptable to Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. (3) When the test... requirements. Final container samples of completed product shall be tested for virus titer using the...

  12. 9 CFR 113.331 - Bursal Disease Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... vaccinate shall receive a predetermined quantity of vaccine virus. Five replicate virus titrations shall be... the titrations by a method acceptable to Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. (3) When the test... requirements. Final container samples of completed product shall be tested for virus titer using the...

  13. 9 CFR 113.331 - Bursal Disease Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... vaccinate shall receive a predetermined quantity of vaccine virus. Five replicate virus titrations shall be... the titrations by a method acceptable to Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. (3) When the test... requirements. Final container samples of completed product shall be tested for virus titer using the...

  14. 9 CFR 113.331 - Bursal Disease Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... vaccinate shall receive a predetermined quantity of vaccine virus. Five replicate virus titrations shall be... the titrations by a method acceptable to Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. (3) When the test... requirements. Final container samples of completed product shall be tested for virus titer using the...

  15. Molecular characterization of infectious bursal disease viruses detected in vaccinated commercial broiler flocks in Lusaka, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Ndashe, Kunda; Simulundu, Edgar; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Moonga, Ladslav; Ogawa, Hirohito; Takada, Ayato; Mweene, Aaron S

    2016-03-01

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is an acute, highly contagious, and immunosuppressive viral disease of young chickens and remains one of the economically most important diseases threatening the poultry industry worldwide. In this study, 16 and 11 nucleotide sequences of the VP2 hypervariable region (VP2-HVR) and part of VP1, respectively, of IBD virus (IBDV) detected in vaccinated broiler chickens in Lusaka in 2012 were determined. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these Zambian IBDVs separated into three genotypes of very virulent (VV) IBDVs. Although the majority of these viruses belonged to the African VV type (VV1), which consisted of viruses from West Africa, South Africa and Zambia, one virus belonged to the East African VV type (VV2). Interestingly, a Zambian IBDV belonging to the VV3 genotype (composed of viruses from several continents) clustered with attenuated vaccine strains. Although sequence analysis of VP2-HVR showed that all detected Zambian IBDVs had conserved putative virulence marker amino acids (i.e., 222A, 242I, 256I, 294I and 299S), one virus had two unique amino acid substitutions, N280S and E300A. This study demonstrates the diversity of Zambian IBDVs and documents for the first time the possible involvement of attenuated vaccine strains in the epidemiology of IBD in Zambia. Strict biosecurity of poultry farms, monitoring of live vaccine use in the field, surveillance and characterization of IBDV in poultry and development of a vaccine from local or regional IBDV field strains are recommended for improved IBD control in Zambia.

  16. Development and Evaluation of the Protective Efficacy of Novel Marek's Disease Virus Rispens Vector Vaccines Against Infectious Bursal Disease.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yukari; Esaki, Motoyuki; Saitoh, Shuji; Sato, Takanori; Yasuda, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is a major disease affecting the poultry industry and is caused by infection with IBD virus (IBDV). To develop a novel vaccine to prevent IBD in chickens, recombinant Marek's disease virus Rispens viruses carrying the VP2 gene of IBDV driven by five different promoters (Rispens/IBD) were constructed using homologous recombination and a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC). Rispens/IBD driven by the chicken beta-actin (Bac) promoter (Rispens/Bac-IBD), Rous sarcoma virus promoter, or simian virus 40 promoter were administered to 1-day-old SPF chicks, and the protective efficacy against IBDV was evaluated by challenging chicks with virulent IBDV. As a result, Rispens/Bac-IBD showed the best protection (87%). Next, we constructed the virus driven by the Bac-derived Coa5 promoter (Rispens/Coa5-IBD) for a secondary in vivo trial using commercial layer chickens since Rispens/Bac-IBD was thought to be genetically unstable. Rispens/Coa5-IBD showed stability in vitro and exhibited better antibody production and protection during challenge against virulent IBDV at both 5 (95%) and 7 wk of age (91%) compared with that of Rispens/Bac-IBD (90% at 5 wk of age and 84% at 7 wk of age). Thus, Rispens/Coa5-IBD may be a novel promising vaccine against IBD and virulent Marek's disease. PMID:27610721

  17. Characterization of field and vaccine infectious bursal disease viruses from Nigeria revealing possible virulence and regional markers in the VP2 minor hydrophilic peaks.

    PubMed

    Adamu, J; Owoade, A A; Abdu, P A; Kazeem, H M; Fatihu, M Y

    2013-01-01

    Outbreaks of infectious bursal disease in vaccinated chicken flocks are frequent in Nigeria. For the control of infectious bursal disease, live vaccines based on foreign infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) strains are used. The present study investigated the phylogenetic relationship between field and vaccine IBDV strains from northwestern Nigeria. Thirty field IBDV strains and three commercial vaccines strains were characterized through sequencing the VP2 hypervariable region. In addition, the complete genome segment A coding region for two vaccines and two field strains was sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequences (position 212 to 331) of IBDV strains from Nigeria and other regions of the world were aligned and possible regional and virulence markers were identified associated with VP2 minor hydrophilic peaks. Reversion to virulence of a vaccine strain with a Q to L mutation at position 253 was observed. Phylogenetic analyses revealed a unique cluster of northwest Nigerian field IBDV strains alone or related to imported characterized classical and very virulent IBDV vaccines. The results suggest that when IBDV strains spread from their region of origin to a different region they mutate alongside indigenous field strains but may retain their identity on the VP2 region. PMID:23919308

  18. A practical validation approach for virus titer testing of avian infectious bursal disease live vaccine according to current regulatory guidelines.

    PubMed

    Weber Sušanj, Mirta; Košiček, Miljenko; Krnić, Ela Kosor; Ballarin-Perharić, Alenka; Terzić, Svjetlana

    2012-01-01

    The method for virus titer determination of avian infectious bursal disease (IBD) live vaccine, developed long before regulatory validation guidelines is a cell culture based biological assay intended for use in vaccine release testing. The aim of our study was to perform a validation, based on fit-for-purpose principle, of an old 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID(50)) method according to Guidelines of the International Cooperation on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Veterinary Medicinal Products (VICH). This paper addresses challenges and discusses some key aspects that should be considered when validating biological methods. A different statistical approach and non-parametric statistics was introduced in validation protocol in order to derive useful information from experimental data. This approach is applicable for a wide range of methods. In conclusion, the previous virus titration method had showed to be precise, accurate, linear, robust and in accordance with current regulatory standards, which indicates that there is no need for additional re-development or upgrades of the method for its suitability for intended use.

  19. The effect of infectious bursal disease virus induced immunosuppression on avian influenza virus vaccine efficacy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the field, poultry are exposed to a variety of infectious agents, many of which are immunosuppressive. Co-infections between these agents are common, and these co-infections have effects on disease, immune response, and vaccine efficacy. The effect of co-infections in poultry between immunosupp...

  20. Transient expression of VP2 in Nicotiana benthamiana and its use as a plant-based vaccine against infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Evangelina; Lucero, María Soledad; Chimeno Zoth, Silvina; Carballeda, Juan Manuel; Gravisaco, María José; Berinstein, Analía

    2013-05-28

    Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV) is the etiological agent of an immunosuppressive and highly contagious disease that affects young birds. This disease causes important economic losses in the poultry industry worldwide. The VP2 protein has been used for the development of subunit vaccines in a variety of heterologous platforms. In this context, the aim of this study was to investigate VP2 expression and immunogenicity using an experimental plant-based vaccine against IBDV. We determined that the agroinfiltration of N. benthamiana leaves allowed the production of VP2 with no apparent change on its conformational epitopes. Chickens intramuscularly immunized in a dose/boost scheme with crude concentrated extracts developed a specific humoral response with viral neutralizing ability. Given these results, it seems plausible for a plant-based vaccine to have a niche in the veterinary field. Thus, plants can be an adequate system of choice to produce immunogens against IBDV. PMID:23583894

  1. A field study on the significance of vaccination against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) at the optimal time point in broiler flocks with maternally derived IBDV antibodies.

    PubMed

    Block, Hermann; Meyer-Block, Karen; Rebeski, Dierk E; Scharr, Heike; de Wit, Sjaak; Rohn, Karl; Rautenschlein, Silke

    2007-10-01

    The right strategy for infectious bursal disease (IBD) control and its success rate under field conditions depends on hygiene management, IBD field pressure, level and variation in maternally derived IBD antibodies, and the IBD vaccine strains to be used. Usually, standard vaccination programmes are used, which are not always adapted to the specific conditions on the farm and to the immune status of chickens. Employing the "Deventer formula" may help to estimate the optimal time for vaccination for a specific flock based on the maternally derived antibody level, its variation, the genetic background of the chicken, and the IBD vaccine strain. Two field studies with 16 or 20 commercial broiler flocks were conducted, applying an intermediate IBD vaccine before, at the best, and after the estimated optimal vaccination time estimated by the "Deventer formula". These studies showed that flocks IBD-vaccinated between 1 day before, at, or up to 3 days after the estimated optimal time point developed detectable humoral immunity up to 14 days post vaccination. If birds had been vaccinated more than 1 day before the calculated optimal vaccination date, the humoral immune response was delayed or non-detectable until slaughter. The induction of humoral immunity correlated with the incidence of bursa lesions and IBDV detection by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. As indicated in this study, under field conditions bursa lesions may develop later than predicted based on experimental experiences. The late incidence of bursa lesions after vaccination may be confused with field virus-induced lesions, in which case sequencing may offer a valuable tool for differentiation. PMID:17899465

  2. Enhancement of immune responses to infectious bursal disease vaccine by supplement of an extract made from Momordica cochinchinensis (Lour.) Spreng. seeds.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Z I; Xiao, C W; Hu, S H; Habib, M; Soomro, N A

    2010-06-01

    The immunological effect of an extract from Momordica cochinchinensis seed (ECMS) on immune responses against infectious bursal disease (IBD) in chickens was evaluated. Fifty-two birds were equally divided into 4 groups and immunized with inactivated IBD vaccine alone (controls) or IBD vaccine emulsified with ECMS (20, 40, and 80 microg). Serum IgG antibody levels against IBD and BW were measured on 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 d after immunization. The ELISA results revealed that the chickens that received 20 microg of ECMS had significantly enhanced antibody levels on 14, 21, 28, and 35 d when compared with controls (P<0.05). A significant increase in mitogenic stimulated lymphocyte proliferation was also recorded in all ECMS groups as compared with controls (P<0.05; P<0.01). No adverse effect of ECMS was noted on growth performance, although average weight gain was significantly higher in 20 microg (7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 d) and 40 or 80 microg (14 d) of ECMS groups as compared with controls (P<0.05; P<0.01). Further studies are suggested for the investigation of immunological effects of ECMS. PMID:20460658

  3. Enhancement of immune responses to infectious bursal disease vaccine by supplement of an extract made from Momordica cochinchinensis (Lour.) Spreng. seeds.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Z I; Xiao, C W; Hu, S H; Habib, M; Soomro, N A

    2010-06-01

    The immunological effect of an extract from Momordica cochinchinensis seed (ECMS) on immune responses against infectious bursal disease (IBD) in chickens was evaluated. Fifty-two birds were equally divided into 4 groups and immunized with inactivated IBD vaccine alone (controls) or IBD vaccine emulsified with ECMS (20, 40, and 80 microg). Serum IgG antibody levels against IBD and BW were measured on 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 d after immunization. The ELISA results revealed that the chickens that received 20 microg of ECMS had significantly enhanced antibody levels on 14, 21, 28, and 35 d when compared with controls (P<0.05). A significant increase in mitogenic stimulated lymphocyte proliferation was also recorded in all ECMS groups as compared with controls (P<0.05; P<0.01). No adverse effect of ECMS was noted on growth performance, although average weight gain was significantly higher in 20 microg (7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 d) and 40 or 80 microg (14 d) of ECMS groups as compared with controls (P<0.05; P<0.01). Further studies are suggested for the investigation of immunological effects of ECMS.

  4. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis in the diagnosis of infectious bursal disease.

    PubMed

    Raj, G D; Thangavelu, A; Elankumaran, S; Koteeswaran, A

    2000-06-01

    The rocket immunoelectrophoresis (RIE) test was used for the qualitative detection and quantitative estimation of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) specific antigen in experimentally infected chickens and samples collected from suspected outbreaks. The IBDV specific antigen was detected in the bursae of experimentally inoculated chickens up to 5 days post infection (PI) by the agar gel precipitation (AGP) test and 7 days PI by the RIE test. The RIE detected IBDV specific antigen in a significantly greater number of samples collected from the field outbreaks than the conventional AGP test. Exudative bursae were found to have a higher antigen content than haemorrhagic bursae and are recommended as the material of choice for diagnosis of IBD. This test could also be used to quantify IBDV specific antigen in commercial killed vaccines.

  5. Addition of a UL5 helicase-primase subunit point mutation eliminates bursal-thymic atrophy of Marek's disease virus ∆Meq recombinant virus but reduces vaccinal protection.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Evin; Dunn, John R; Cheng, Hans H

    2015-01-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is an oncogenic alphaherpesvirus and the causative agent of Marek's disease (MD), characterized by immunosuppression, paralysis, nerve enlargement and induction of T-cell lymphomas in chickens. Despite widespread usage of vaccines since the 1970s to control MD, more virulent field strains of MDV have emerged that overcome vaccinal protection, necessitating the development of new and more protective MD vaccines. The ∆Meq virus, a recombinant Md5 strain MDV lacking the viral oncogene Meq, is one candidate MD vaccine with great potential but unfortunately it also causes bursal-thymic atrophy (BTA) in maternal antibody negative chickens, raising concerns that impede commercial use as a vaccine. Previously, we identified a point mutation within UL5 that reduced in vivo replication in attenuated viruses. We proposed that introduction of the UL5 point mutation into the ∆Meq virus would reduce in vivo replication and eliminate BTA yet potentially retain high protective abilities. In birds, the ∆Meq+UL5 recombinant MDV had reduced replication compared to the original ∆Meq virus, while weights of lymphoid organs indicated that ∆Meq+UL5 did not induce BTA, supporting the hypothesis that reduction of in vivo replication would also abolish BTA. Vaccine trials of the ∆Meq+UL5 virus compared to other ∆Meq-based viruses and commercial vaccines show that, while the ∆Meq+UL5 does provide vaccinal protection, this protection was also reduced compared to the original ∆Meq virus. Therefore, it appears that a very delicate balance is required between levels of replication able to induce high vaccinal protection, yet not so high as to induce BTA.

  6. Evaluation of infectious bursal disease virus stability at different conditions of temperature and pH.

    PubMed

    Rani, Surabhi; Kumar, Sachin

    2015-11-01

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is one of the highly pathogenic viral diseases of poultry. The disease poses a serious threat to the economy of many developing countries where agriculture serves as the primary source of national income. Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) belongs to the family Birnaviridae. The IBDV is well characterized to cause immunosuppression in poultry. The live attenuated vaccine is the only way to protect the chickens from IBDV infection. The ineffectiveness of vaccine is one of the major causes of IBDV outbreaks in field condition. In the present study, we discuss briefly about the biology of IBDV genome and its proteins under different conditions of temperature and pH in order to evaluate its infectivity under adverse physical conditions. Our results indicate that the IBDV is non-infective above 42 °C and unstable above 72 °C. However, the change in pH does not significantly contribute to the IBDV stability. The study will be useful in estimating an optimum storage condition for IBDV vaccines without causing any deterioration in its viability and effectiveness.

  7. Construction of Recombinant Baculoviruses Expressing Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Main Protective Antigen and Their Immune Effects on Chickens.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jingping; An, Qi; Song, Shanshan; Gao, Dongni; Ping, Wenxiang

    2015-01-01

    In order to overcome the limitations of conventional vaccines for infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), we constructed recombinant dual expression system baculoviruses with VP2 and VP2/4/3, the main protective antigens of IBDV. We compared the immune effects of the baculoviruses in avian cells and detected their control effects on chickens with infectious bursal disease. We used Western blot analysis to measure VP2 protein and VP2/4/3 polyprotein expression in avian cells infected using the Bac-to-Bac baculovirus expression system. The recombinant baculoviruses were used to vaccinate specific pathogen-free chickens, which produced specific protective antibodies and strong cellular immune responses. The results of the virus challenge experiment revealed that the protective efficiency of VP2 and VP2/4/3 virus vaccines were 95.8% and 100%, respectively, both of which were higher than the vaccine group (87.5%), and significantly higher than the control group (50%). The results demonstrated that the immune effect of BV-S-ITRs-VP2/4/3 was superior to that of BV-S-ITRs-VP2. Compared with traditional attenuated vaccine and genetically engineered live vector vaccine, the dual expression viral vector vaccine has good bio-safety. The results of this study provide a foundation for the further development of poultry vaccines, in addition to providing a useful reference for developing non-replicating live vaccines against other viral diseases. PMID:26167907

  8. Genetic characteristics of infectious bursal disease viruses from four continents.

    PubMed

    Jackwood, Daral J; Sommer-Wagner, Susan

    2007-09-01

    Following the initial discovery of very virulent infectious bursal disease virus (vvIBDV) strains in Europe, these viruses spread to many parts of the world. In this study, we examined the phylogenetic relationship of never-before-published IBDV from 18 countries on four continents. All the samples were collected between 1997 and 2005 and were reported to be from broiler flocks experiencing higher than expected mortality which is often associated with acute very virulent infectious bursal disease. A total of 113 samples were imported into the U.S. and viral genetic material was used to determine the nucleotide sequence of the VP2 gene hypervariable region. Although all the samples were reported to be associated clinically with high mortality, genetic analysis suggests that some were not vvIBDV strains. Two viruses from South Africa were genetically similar to U.S. variant viruses. A majority (71/113) of the viruses examined had the amino acid Alanine at position 222 and sixty-seven of these suspect vvIBDV also had amino acids I242, I256, I294 and S299 which are highly conserved among vvIBDV strains. Phylogenetic analysis placed putative vvIBDV strains from many different countries and geographic regions in a single clade with some minor non-significant branching.

  9. An optimized, highly efficient, self-assembled, subvirus-like particle of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV).

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao; Pan, Qing; Lu, Zhen; Li, Kai; Gao, Honglei; Qi, Xiaole; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Xiaomei

    2016-06-24

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) causes immunosuppression in young chickens, leading to increased susceptibility to other diseases and a reduction in the immune response to other vaccines. Thus, IBDV results in great economic losses to the poultry industry. The most effective method of prevention is vaccination. However, medium-virulence vaccines can cause bursal pathological damage and immunosuppression. Here, we describe a safer, self-assembled, subvirus-like particle (sVP) vaccine without a complex purification process. The IBD-VP2 gene was cloned into Pichia pastoris, and the expressed protein self-assembled into T=1 sVPs (∼23nm). Immunization experiments showed that the sVP vaccine elicited high IBDV-neutralizing antibodies in each group, and all birds survived challenge with very virulent IBDV (vvIBDV). Additionally, IBDV RNA was not detected, and sterile immunity was achieved. In conclusion, the IBD-sVP is a suitable candidate for a recombinant subunit vaccine against IBDV. PMID:27164218

  10. Seroprevalence of infectious bursal disease virus in local chickens in Udu Local Government Area of Delta State, South East Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Abraham-Oyiguh, J; Adewumi, M O; Onoja, A B; Suleiman, I; Sulaiman, L K; Ahmed, S J; Jagboro, S T

    2015-01-01

    Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV) poses a great global threat to the poultry industry. Knowledge of the occurrence of the disease is important in the design and implementation of a control program, therefore this study determines the seroprevalence of IBDV in local chickens in Udu Local Government Area of Delta State. 250 chickens were bled by exsanguination and sera obtained were screened using Agar Gel Immunodiffusion (AGID) test. The seropositivity was 51.6%, which is indicates endemicity of the disease. Biosecurity and good sanitary measures are recommended. Molecular characterization of the strains should be carried out for inclusion in generic vaccines.

  11. [Immunogenicity of recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing VP2 protein of infectious bursal disease virus in chickens].

    PubMed

    Lin, Hongli; Hou, Shenda; Wang, Song; Wang, Yupeng; LuanI, Yunyan; Hou, Xilin

    2014-11-01

    In order to determine immunogenicity and protective effect in chickens, we used the IBDV (Infectious bursal disease virus)-Vp2/Lactobacillus casei as antigen transfer system. First, the immunized and control chickens were challenged by IBDV/DQ at lethal dose to determine the protective ratio. Second, chickens were orallyand intranasally vaccinated twice with 10(9) CFU/mL pLA-VP2/L. casei, pLA/L. casei and PBS as negativecontrol and commercial vaccine as positive control. The bursa injury and the lesion score wererecorded post challenge. The level of specific IgG and sIgA in pLA-VP2/L. casei and positive control groups was significantly higher than that in negativecontrol groups. The protection efficacy in pLA-VP2/L. casei oral group was higher than that inintranasal group. The SI. of pLA-VP2/L. casei oral group was significant higher than other groups. The lesion score indicated the pLA-VP2/L. casei was safer than commercial vaccine for bursa. Collectively, the pLA-VP2/L. casei could be a vaccine candidate for IBDV. PMID:25985519

  12. Isolation of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Using Indigenous Chicken Embryos in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Mutinda, W. U.; Njagi, L. W.; Nyaga, P. N.; Bebora, L. C.; Mbuthia, P. G.; Kemboi, D.; Githinji, J. W. K.; Muriuki, A.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) isolates were recovered from outbreaks to initiate activities towards developing a local vaccine strain. Use of indigenous chicken embryos was exploited to determine their potential, promote utilization of local resources for research, and enhance household economic activities. Bursa of Fabricius (BFs) samples from outbreaks shown to be IBDV positive was homogenized and inoculated in 4-week-old specific pathogen-free (SPF) IBDV seronegative white leghorn chicks. The harvested virus was inoculated into 11-day-old indigenous chicken embryos that were IBDV seronegative and passaged serially three times after which they were inoculated into 4-week-old indigenous chicks to test for presence and virulence of propagated virus. Out of 153 BFs collected from outbreaks, 43.8% (67/153) were positive for IBDV antigen and 65.7% (44/67) caused disease in SPF chicks. The embryo mean mortalities were 88% on primary inoculation, 94% in 1st passage, 91% in 2nd passage, and 67% in 3rd passage. After the third passage in embryos all the 44 isolates were virulent in 4-week-old indigenous chicks. The results show that indigenous chicken embryos support growth of IBDV and can be used to propagate the virus as an alternative viral propagating tool for respective vaccine preparation. PMID:27347520

  13. Addition of a UL5 helicase-primase subunit point mutation eliminates bursal-thymic atrophy of Marek’s disease virus delta-Meq recombinant virus but reduces vaccinal protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) is an oncogenic alphaherpesvirus and the causative agent of Marek’s disease (MD), a T-cell lymphoma of chickens. Despite widespread usage of vaccines since the 1970’s to control MD, more virulent field strains of MDV have emerged that overcome vaccinal protection, necessi...

  14. Synbiotic enhances immune responses against infectious bronchitis, infectious bursal disease, Newcastle disease and avian influenza in broiler chickens

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Alireza; Amani, Amir; Pourmahmod, Masoud; Saghaei, Poya; Rezaie, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Increased susceptibility of birds to avian pathogens in intensive husbandry system has emphasized on necessity of improvement of innate and specific immune responses of birds by the fast establishment of a beneficial microflora and immune stimulator factors to guarantee healthy and low-price products. During this study, 192 one-day-old broiler chicks (Ross-380) in four groups with three replicates per group were used to investigate effectiveness of synbiotic Biomin Imbo on immune responses of the chickens following routine vaccination against Newcastle disease (ND), avian influenza (AI), infectious bronchitis (IB) and infectious bursal disease (IBD). The results of this study indicated that supplementation of Biomin Imbo in diet enhanced humoral immune responses significantly in the case of ND, IB, IBD (p = 0.049, p = 0.020, p = 0.036, respectively), but insignificantly in the case of AI (p = 0.160) following vaccination of the chickens against these most common important viral poultry diseases. It was more effective following vaccination with live than killed vaccines. In conclusion, application of synbiotic Biomin Imbo, as a feed-additive adjuvant promotes acquired humoral immune responses of broiler chickens. PMID:26893807

  15. Molecular characterization of Spanish infectious bursal disease virus field isolates.

    PubMed

    Majó, N; El-Attrache, J; Banda, A; Villegas, P; Ramis, A; Pagès, A; Ikuta, N

    2002-01-01

    Nine Spanish isolates of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) were characterized and classified after reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction of a 248-bp fragment of the VP2 gene hypervariable region and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The restriction endonucleases (REs) used were BstNI, Sad, SspI, TaqI, DraI, and StyI. Sequencing of the amplified product and further comparison of these sequences with published sequence data from other IBDV strains were also performed. Very virulent and classic strains were identified. None of the strains identified had molecular characteristics similar to that of the American variant strains. Four very virulent strains (VG-248, 5939, 6145, and 7333) were digested by the TaqI, SspI, and StyI enzymes. The sequences of these strains were closely related to other European and Japanese very virulent IBDV (vvIBDV) strains. Strains VG-311, VG-262, and VG-208 were digested by the BstNI and Sad REs and were classified as classic strains. Strains VG-276 and VG-313 had unique RFLP patterns. VG-276 exhibited the SspI RE site, which has been reported as a characteristic of vvIBDV strains, whereas the VG-313 strain exhibited a Sad and StyI RE site indicative of the classic IBDV Edgar and 52-70 strains. However, nucleotide sequence analysis of the amplified hypervariable region strain VG-276 revealed a higher identity with the classic strains STC, 52/70, and 9109 IBDV strains, whereas strain VG-313 exhibited a higher identity with the vvIBDV strains.

  16. Inhibition of infectious bursal disease virus transmission using bioceramic derived from chicken feces.

    PubMed

    Thammakarn, Chanathip; Ishida, Yuki; Suguro, Atsushi; Hakim, Hakimullah; Nakajima, Katsuhiro; Kitazawa, Minori; Takehara, Kazuaki

    2015-06-01

    Bioceramic powder (BCX), at pH 13.0, derived from chicken feces, was evaluated for its efficacy to inactivate virus and inhibit virus horizontal transmission by fecal-oral route, using infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) vaccine strain D78 as a challenge virus. Three 1-week-old SPF chicks were vaccinated per os and used as seeder birds. Six hours later, 3 sentinel 1-week-old SPF chicks were introduced into the same cage. Results revealed that BCX had excellent efficacy to inactivate IBDV within 3 min. Treating IBDV contaminated litter in the cage with BCX could prevent transmission of IBDV to new sensitive chicks completely. Further, transmission of IBDV to the sentinel chicks was significantly inhibited by adding BCX to litter and chicken feed. These data suggest that BCX at pH 13, derived from chicken feces, has excellent efficacy to inactivate IBDV, which can be applied in bedding materials for preventing viral transmission during production round. It is a good material that can effectively be used for enhancing biosecurity system in poultry farms. PMID:25892716

  17. Circulating strains of variant infectious bursal disease virus may pose a challenge for antibiotic-free chicken farming in Canada.

    PubMed

    Kurukulsuriya, Shanika; Ahmed, Khawaja Ashfaque; Ojkic, Davor; Gunawardana, Thushari; Gupta, Ashish; Goonewardene, Kalhari; Karunaratne, Ruwani; Popowich, Shelly; Willson, Philip; Tikoo, Suresh K; Gomis, Susantha

    2016-10-01

    Antibiotic-free and safe animal products are most desirable among consumers. However, ensuring safe poultry products is a challenging task when the chicken immune system is compromised. Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) causes immunosuppression and predisposes chickens to secondary infections. Breeder vaccination against IBDV is routinely practiced for producing chicks with maternally-derived antibody (MAb) to prevent infection in newly hatched chicks. The majority of IBDV circulating in Canadian farms are variant strains (vIBDV). Whether circulating vIBDV strains are immunosuppressive in chicks or are amenable to current vaccine regimens has not previously been tested through challenge studies. In this study, one-day-old broiler chicks (n=240) carrying MAb were obtained from broiler breeders vaccinated with commercial IBDV vaccines. In the first set of experiments (n=40/group), at six days post-hatch, one group was challenged with a Canadian field isolate, vIBDV (strain-SK09) (3×10(3) EID50). The second and the third groups (controls) were inoculated with non-immunosuppressive IBDV D-78 (10×10(3) TCID50) and saline, respectively. Histopathological examination on days 14 and 30 post-challenge revealed that despite the high level of MAb, vIBDV (SK09) caused severe bursal damage in chicks. Another set of experiments with treatment groups as above, demonstrated that pre-exposure of chicks with vIBDV (SK09) caused immunosuppression resulting in significantly higher mortality and disease severity in chicks challenged with a virulent strain of Escherichia coli (E. coli). Our data provide evidence that IBDV strains circulating in Canada are immunosuppressive, not amenable to current anti-IBDV vaccination strategy, and a potential threat to antibiotic-free chicken farming. PMID:27663370

  18. Influence of the host system on the pathogenicity, immunogenicity, and antigenicity of infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Hassan, M K; Saif, Y M

    1996-01-01

    The effect of the host system on the pathogenicity, immunogenicity, and antigenicity of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) was investigated. One classic (SAL) and one variant strain (IN) of IBDV were passaged separately six times in three host systems, namely BGM-70 continuous cell line, primary chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells, or embryonating chicken eggs (embryos) or one time in the bursa of Fabricius (BF) of specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chickens. Passage in BGM-70 cells or CEF cells resulted in loss of pathogenicity, but viruses passaged in embryos or BF maintained their pathogenicity. For the immunogenicity study, the viruses described above were used to prepare live and inactivated vaccines, containing 10(3) mean embryo infectious doses (EID50s) and 10(5) EID50s respectively. These vaccines induced different levels of protection. It was concluded that the antigen titration methodology employing embryonating chicken eggs was not suitable for titration of viruses propagated in other host systems because of varying degrees of adaptation and/or pathogenicity of the viruses resulting in variability in antigen mass of the tested vaccines. To test this assumption, an antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used as a titration system to compare the antigenicity of viruses propagated in BGM-70 cells or BF. Preparations containing similar antigen masses were inactivated then inoculated into two age groups of SPF chickens and antibody titers were monitored. During the experimental period, the geometric mean virus-neutralizing (VN) antibody titers of the vaccinated groups did not differ significantly (P > 0.05).

  19. Identification and characterization of two distinct bursal B-cell subpopulations following infectious bursal disease virus infection of White Leghorn chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is an immunosuppressive virus which primarily infects IgM, B-cells in the bursa of Fabricius. Flow cytometric analysis was used to phenotype B-cell populations in the bursa and spleen following IBDV infection. In the bursa, two IgM B-cell subpopulations, desig...

  20. Identification and molecular analysis of infectious bursal disease in broiler farms in the Kurdistan Regional Government of Iraq.

    PubMed

    Amin, Oumed Gerjis M; Jackwood, Daral J

    2014-10-01

    The present study was undertaken to characterize field isolates of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). The identification was done using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and partial sequencing of the VP2 gene. Pooled bursal samples were collected from commercial broiler farms located in the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) of Iraq. The genetic material of the IBDV was detected in 10 out of 29 field samples. Sequences of the hypervariable VP2 region were determined for 10 of these viruses. Molecular analysis of the VP2 gene of five IBDVs showed amino acid sequences consistent with the very virulent (vv) IBDV. Two samples were identified as classic vaccine viruses, and three samples were classic vaccine viruses that appear to have mutated during replication in the field. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all five field IBDV strains of the present study were closely related to each other. On the basis of nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, it is very likely that IBD-causing viruses in this part of Iraq are of the very virulent type. These IBDVs appear to be evolving relative to their type strains.

  1. Evaluation of modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing VP2 protein of infectious bursal disease virus as an immunogen in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Zajac, María Paula Del Médico; Taboga, Oscar Alberto; Calamante, Gabriela

    2012-01-01

    A recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) virus expressing mature viral protein 2 (VP2) of the infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) was constructed to develop MVA-based vaccines for poultry. We demonstrated that this recombinant virus was able to induce a specific immune response by observing the production of anti-IBDV-seroneutralizing antibodies in specific pathogen-free chickens. Besides, as the epitopes of VP2 responsible to induce IBDV-neutralizing antibodies are discontinuous, our results suggest that VP2 protein expressed from MVA-VP2 maintained the correct conformational structure. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the usefulness of MVA-based vectors for developing recombinant vaccines for poultry. PMID:22705743

  2. Genomic structure of the large RNA segment of infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, P J; McKern, N M; Power, B E; Azad, A A

    1986-01-01

    The larger RNA segment of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV: Australian strain 002-73) has been characterized by cDNA cloning and nucleotide sequence analysis. We believe IBDV is the first birnavirus to be sequenced and so have confirmed the coding region by N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis of intact viral proteins and several tryptic peptide fragments. The large RNA segment encodes in order the 37-kDa, 28-kDa and 32-kDa proteins within a continuous open reading frame and the primary translation product appears to be subsequently processed into the mature viral proteins. The large protein precursor is still processed into the 32-kDa host protective immunogen when expressed as a fusion protein in E. coli. These results are in marked contrast to the predictions from in vitro translation data that birnavirus genomes are expressed as polycistronic templates. We can now propose that birnaviruses, in particular IBDV, possess monocistronic segments and that the precursor is proteolytically processed in vivo. The sequence data presented for the 32-kDa host protective immunogen may provide the basic information needed for the production of an effective subunit vaccine against this commercially important virus. Images PMID:3014441

  3. Occurrence of Newcastle Disease and Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Antibodies in Double-Spurred Francolins in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Oluwayelu, Daniel Oladimeji; Adebiyi, Adebowale Idris; Olaniyan, Ibukunoluwa; Ezewele, Phyllis; Aina, Oluwasanmi

    2014-01-01

    The double-spurred francolin Francolinus bicalcaratus has been identified as a good candidate for future domestication due to the universal acceptability of its meat and its adaptability to anthropogenically altered environments. Therefore, in investigating the diseases to which they are susceptible, serum samples from 56 francolins in a major live-bird market (LBM) in Ibadan, southwestern Nigeria, were screened for antibodies against Newcastle disease (ND) and infectious bursal disease (IBD) viruses. Haemagglutination inhibition (HI) test and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed 25.0% and 35.7% prevalence of ND virus (NDV) antibodies, respectively, while 5.4% and 57.1% prevalence of IBD virus (IBDV) antibodies was detected by agar gel precipitation test (AGPT) and ELISA, respectively. This first report on the occurrence of NDV and IBDV antibodies in apparently healthy, unvaccinated double-spurred francolins from a LBM suggests that they were subclinically infected with either field or vaccine viruses and could thus serve as possible reservoirs of these viruses to domestic poultry. Furthermore, if they are to be domesticated for intensive rearing, a vaccination plan including ND and IBD should be developed and implemented. PMID:26464918

  4. Detection of infectious bursal disease virus isolates with unknown antigenic properties by reverse genetics.

    PubMed

    Icard, Alan H; Sellers, Holly S; Mundt, Egbert

    2008-12-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) serotype 1 is the causative agent of a highly contagious immunosuppressive disease of young chickens. In the past, a number of antigenic, as well as pathogenic, subtypes have been described. The determination of the antigenic makeup of circulating strains is of vital interest to the poultry industry because changes in the antigenicity of circulating field strains have an impact on the use of vaccines. To obtain a more comprehensive overview of the relationship between the nucleotide and amino acid sequence and the antigenic makeup of field isolates, a system based on reverse genetics of IBDV was established. Using this approach, a database for field isolates from three different states in the United States (Georgia, Alabama, and Louisiana), consisting of nucleotide sequence, amino acid sequence, and a reaction pattern based on a panel of monoclonal antibodies, was established. The obtained results showed that phylogenic analysis, which is based on the similarity of sequences, would lead to false conclusions regarding a possible antigenic makeup of the particular isolate. Sequences of field samples were divided into three groups: 1) those that grouped with variant strain E/Del sequences but were antigenically different, 2) those that did not group with sequences of E/Del but were similar in their antigenic makeup, and 3) those that did not group with E/Del sequences and were antigenically different. In addition, using the reverse-genetics approach, a number of field isolates showed no reactivity with any of the used monoclonal antibodies, indicating that an unknown, antigenic subtype of IBDV serotype 1 is circulating in the field. PMID:19166049

  5. Attenuation of very virulent infectious bursal disease virus and comparison of full sequences of virulent and attenuated strains.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, D; Pasmanik-Chor, M; Gutter, B; Gallili, G; Barbakov, M; Krispel, S; Pitcovski, J

    2008-04-01

    A very virulent strain of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDVks) was isolated from the bursae of Fabricius of IBDV-affected broiler chickens. Following 43 serial passages in specific pathogen-free embryonated eggs, an attenuated strain was established (IBDVmb). Dosages of IBDVmb in the range 10(2) to 10(4) embryo infective dose of 50% were found to be safe and protective for commercial chicks. Chickens vaccinated with live vaccine containing IBDVmb responded with precipitating and type-specific neutralizing antibodies, and were immune to subsequent challenge with a very virulent IBDV. IBDVmb has been used as an attenuated vaccine throughout the world since 1993. A comparison of the full sequences of the virulent and attenuated strains (IBDVks and IBDVmb, respectively) revealed seven nucleotides that were different, four of them leading to changes in the amino-acid sequence. Comparison of the protein sequence of these strains and published sequences of very virulent and attenuated phenotypes lead us to suggest that the novel difference responsible for virulence of the Israeli strains are: residue 272 (VP2, very conserved site) and residue 527 (VP4), both in segment A, and in segment B (VP1) residues 96 and 161 (both conserved). Our study strengthens the possibility that more than one protein is involved in IBDV attenuation. In all reports, including ours, virulence was reduced without affecting antigenicity of the neutralizing epitopes in VP2. This could have practical implications for attenuated-vaccine development.

  6. Cell culture attenuation eliminates rMd5ΔMeq-induced bursal and thymic atrophy and renders the mutant virus as an effective and safe vaccine against Marek's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lucy F; Heidari, Mohammad; Zhang, Huanmin; Lupiani, Blanca; Reddy, Sanjay M; Fadly, Aly

    2012-07-20

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) encodes a basic leucine zipper oncoprotein, Meq, which structurally resembles jun/fos family of transcriptional activators. It has been clearly demonstrated that deletion of Meq results in loss of transformation and oncogenic capacity of MDV. The rMd5ΔMeq virus provided superior protection than CVI988/Rispens vaccine in 15×7 chickens when challenged with a very virulent plus (vv+) strain of MDV, 648A. The rMd5ΔMeq construct was also shown to be an effective vaccine in commercial chickens that were challenged under field conditions by exposure to seeder chicken inoculated with MDV strain 686, a vv+ and arguably the most pathogenic strain of MDV. Although deletion of Meq gene renders the virus non-oncogenic, it still induces lymphoid organ atrophy like that of the parental rMd5, in highly susceptible MDV maternal antibody negative (MAb-) chickens. We have generated 50 cell culture passages of attenuated rMd5ΔMeq viruses and found no significant lymphoid organ atrophy beginning at 40(th) passage onward when compared with the normal control chickens. The protective ability of these attenuated Meq null viruses against challenge with vv+ MDV strain 686 is similar to the original virus at 19(th) passage in maternal antibody negative chickens. The data indicate that attenuation of these Meq null viruses has no influence on their protective efficacy, but eliminated lymphoid organ atrophy and rendered them safe to use even in MAb- chickens, a characteristic that should facilitate commercialization and licensing by vaccine manufacturers. PMID:22687760

  7. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of infectious bursal disease viruses isolated from chicken in South China in 2011.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Zhang, Xiang-Bin; Yan, Zhuan-Qiang; Chen, Feng; Ji, Jun; Qin, Jian-Ping; Li, Hai-Yan; Lu, Jun-Peng; Xue, Yu; Liu, Jia-Jia; Xie, Qing-Mei; Ma, Jing-Yun; Xue, Chun-Yi; Bee, Ying-Zuo

    2013-06-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is a double-stranded RNA virus that causes immunosuppressive disease in young chickens. Thousands of cases of IBDV infection are reported each year in South China, and these infections can result in considerable economic losses to the poultry industry. To monitor variations of the virus during the outbreaks, 30 IBDVs were identified from vaccinated chicken flocks from nine provinces in South China in 2011. VP2 fragments from different virus strains were sequenced and analyzed by comparison with the published sequences of IBDV strains from China and around the world. Phylogenetic analysis of hypervariable regions of the VP2 (vVP2) gene showed that 29 of the isolates were very virulent (vv) IBDVs, and were closely related to vvIBDV strains from Europe and Asia. Alignment analysis of the deduced amino acid (aa) sequences of vVP2 showed the 29 vv isolates had high uniformity, indicated low variability and slow evolution of the virus. The non-vvIBDV isolate JX2-11 was associated with higher than expected mortality, and had high deduced aa sequence similarity (99.2 %) with the attenuated vaccine strain B87 (BJ). The present study has demonstrated the continued circulation of IBDV strains in South China, and emphasizes the importance of reinforcing IBDV surveillance.

  8. Genotypic characterization of Indian isolates of infectious bursal disease virus strains by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Priyadharsini, C V; Senthilkumar, T M A; Raja, P; Kumanan, K

    2016-03-01

    The reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) is used for the differentiation of classical virulent (cv), virulent (v) and very virulent (vv) strains of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) isolates from chicken bursal tissues in southern states of India. In the present study, six different isolates (MB11, HY12, PY12, BGE14, VCN14 and NKL14) of IBDV strains were subjected for genotyping along with vaccine virus (Georgia, intermediate strain) using RT-PCR for amplification of a 743 bp sequence in the hypervariable region of VP2 gene followed by restriction enzyme digestion with 5 different restriction enzymes (BspMI, SacI, HhaI, StuI and SspI). The RT-PCR products obtained from vvIBDV strains were digested by SspI enzyme except PY12, BGE14 and MB11 isolates. The SacI digested the isolate MB11, PY12 and the vaccine strain, but it did not cleave the very virulent isolates of IBDV. HhaI cleaved all the isolates with different restriction profile patterns. StuI digested all the vvIBDV isolates and BspMI was not able to differentiate field isolates from vaccine strain. Though RT-PCR combined with RFLP is a genotypic method, further confirmation of serotypes to distinguish the vvIBDV from cvIBDV has to be carried out using pathogenicity studies.

  9. Outbreaks of Virulent Infectious Bursal Disease in Flocks of Battery Cage Brooding System of Commercial Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Sa'idu, L.; Jamilu, A.; Andamin, A. D.; Akpavie, S. O.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical and pathological investigations were conducted on outbreaks of infectious bursal disease (IBD) in pullets under brooding using the battery cage system in a commercial poultry farm in Kaduna, Nigeria. Two consecutive outbreaks of IBD on the same farm were studied. The onset of the disease and morbidity and mortality rates were recorded. Postmortem examinations were conducted and gross lesions recorded. Tissues were collected and fixed in 10% buffered formalin and processed for histopathological examinations. In the first outbreak, 80 to 100% of the chicks were affected at the age of 4 to 5 weeks and mortality rate was 95.8% and lasted for 9 days. In the second outbreak, the mortality rate was 43.3% and it also lasted for 9 days. At the onset of the disease, the birds were also 4-week-old like in case 1. The disease was diagnosed based on clinical signs, pathology, and agar gel immunodiffusion test (AGID). Clinical signs, gross lesions, and histopathological findings were characteristic of virulent infectious bursal disease. After the first outbreak (case 1) the house was disinfected using polidine® (iodophor compound), V-ox® (inorganic peroxygen compounds), CID20® (quaternary ammonium chloride, aldehydes, and alcohol), terminator III® (phenols), and glutasan® (aldehyde and quaternary ammonium chloride). But they failed to eliminate the IBD virus from the poultry pen. PMID:27597990

  10. Outbreaks of Virulent Infectious Bursal Disease in Flocks of Battery Cage Brooding System of Commercial Chickens.

    PubMed

    Aliyu, H B; Sa'idu, L; Jamilu, A; Andamin, A D; Akpavie, S O

    2016-01-01

    Clinical and pathological investigations were conducted on outbreaks of infectious bursal disease (IBD) in pullets under brooding using the battery cage system in a commercial poultry farm in Kaduna, Nigeria. Two consecutive outbreaks of IBD on the same farm were studied. The onset of the disease and morbidity and mortality rates were recorded. Postmortem examinations were conducted and gross lesions recorded. Tissues were collected and fixed in 10% buffered formalin and processed for histopathological examinations. In the first outbreak, 80 to 100% of the chicks were affected at the age of 4 to 5 weeks and mortality rate was 95.8% and lasted for 9 days. In the second outbreak, the mortality rate was 43.3% and it also lasted for 9 days. At the onset of the disease, the birds were also 4-week-old like in case 1. The disease was diagnosed based on clinical signs, pathology, and agar gel immunodiffusion test (AGID). Clinical signs, gross lesions, and histopathological findings were characteristic of virulent infectious bursal disease. After the first outbreak (case 1) the house was disinfected using polidine® (iodophor compound), V-ox® (inorganic peroxygen compounds), CID20® (quaternary ammonium chloride, aldehydes, and alcohol), terminator III® (phenols), and glutasan® (aldehyde and quaternary ammonium chloride). But they failed to eliminate the IBD virus from the poultry pen. PMID:27597990

  11. Outbreaks of Virulent Infectious Bursal Disease in Flocks of Battery Cage Brooding System of Commercial Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Sa'idu, L.; Jamilu, A.; Andamin, A. D.; Akpavie, S. O.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical and pathological investigations were conducted on outbreaks of infectious bursal disease (IBD) in pullets under brooding using the battery cage system in a commercial poultry farm in Kaduna, Nigeria. Two consecutive outbreaks of IBD on the same farm were studied. The onset of the disease and morbidity and mortality rates were recorded. Postmortem examinations were conducted and gross lesions recorded. Tissues were collected and fixed in 10% buffered formalin and processed for histopathological examinations. In the first outbreak, 80 to 100% of the chicks were affected at the age of 4 to 5 weeks and mortality rate was 95.8% and lasted for 9 days. In the second outbreak, the mortality rate was 43.3% and it also lasted for 9 days. At the onset of the disease, the birds were also 4-week-old like in case 1. The disease was diagnosed based on clinical signs, pathology, and agar gel immunodiffusion test (AGID). Clinical signs, gross lesions, and histopathological findings were characteristic of virulent infectious bursal disease. After the first outbreak (case 1) the house was disinfected using polidine® (iodophor compound), V-ox® (inorganic peroxygen compounds), CID20® (quaternary ammonium chloride, aldehydes, and alcohol), terminator III® (phenols), and glutasan® (aldehyde and quaternary ammonium chloride). But they failed to eliminate the IBD virus from the poultry pen.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence Analysis of a Naturally Reassorted Infectious Bursal Disease Virus from India.

    PubMed

    Raja, P; Senthilkumar, T M A; Parthiban, M; Thangavelu, A; Gowri, A Mangala; Palanisammi, A; Kumanan, K

    2016-01-01

    The novel infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) isolate BGE14/ABT1/MVC/India is a very virulent IBDV that was isolated from broiler flocks in southern parts of India during 2014. Here, we report, for the first time in India, the complete genome sequence of BGE14/ABT1/MVC/India, a reassortment strain with segments A and B derived from a very virulent IBDV strain and an attenuated IBDV, respectively. The findings from this study provide additional insight into the genetic exchange between attenuated and very virulent strains of IBDV circulating in the field.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence Analysis of a Naturally Reassorted Infectious Bursal Disease Virus from India

    PubMed Central

    Raja, P.; Parthiban, M.; Thangavelu, A.; Gowri, A. Mangala; Palanisammi, A.; Kumanan, K.

    2016-01-01

    The novel infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) isolate BGE14/ABT1/MVC/India is a very virulent IBDV that was isolated from broiler flocks in southern parts of India during 2014. Here, we report, for the first time in India, the complete genome sequence of BGE14/ABT1/MVC/India, a reassortment strain with segments A and B derived from a very virulent IBDV strain and an attenuated IBDV, respectively. The findings from this study provide additional insight into the genetic exchange between attenuated and very virulent strains of IBDV circulating in the field. PMID:27445389

  14. Determination of infectious bursal disease virus titration and neutralization endpoints using fluorogenic staining.

    PubMed

    Bayyari, G R; Skeeles, J K; Story, J D; Slavik, M F

    1991-01-01

    An automated method for determining infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) titration and neutralization endpoints is described. The method employs the fluorogenic ester carboxyfluorescein-diacetate (CFDA) to stain cell monolayers in 96-well plates and a fluorescence-concentration analyzer. Titration results are compared with immunofluorescence and plaque assay titers. Virus-neutralization endpoint determination is objective, and the endpoints of replicate tests were equivalent or within one dilution of variability. Tests can be automatically screened as any percentage of a positive control or any standard deviation from a negative control.

  15. Tracking the molecular epidemiology of Brazilian Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) isolates.

    PubMed

    Silva, Fernanda M F; Vidigal, Pedro M P; Myrrha, Luciana W; Fietto, Juliana L R; Silva, Abelardo; Almeida, Márcia R

    2013-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease is a highly contagious disease of young chickens caused by Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). Genome segment A encodes the capsid protein (VP2), while segment B encodes the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (VP1). In the present study, we trace the molecular epidemiology of IBDV in Brazil by analyzing 29 isolates collected in the major regions of poultry production. To genetically characterize the isolates, phylogenetic and population dynamic analyses were conducted using 68 VP1 (2634 nt) and 102 VP2 (1356 nt) coding sequences from IBDV isolates from different regions of the world. Furthermore, the evolution of IBDV was analyzed by characterizing the selective forces that operated during the diversification of viral isolates. We show that IBDV isolates were introduced into Brazil mainly from the Netherlands and the USA. These introductions were associated with all Brazilian poultry production regions analyzed in this work. In addition, we show that the evolution of IBDV has been shaped by a combination of very low recombination rates and relatively high rates of nucleotide substitution (2.988×10(-4) for VP1 and 3.2937×10(-4) for VP2), which themselves are a function of purifying selection operating on VP1 and VP2. Furthermore, our extended Bayesian skyline plot suggests that the increase in the effective population size of isolates of IBDV is consistent with its epidemiological history, with a large increase during the emergence of acute outbreaks of IBD in the 1980s.

  16. A serological survey for infectious bursal disease virus antibodies in free-range village chickens in northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Swai, E S; Kessy, M J; Sanka, P N; Mtui, P F

    2011-03-01

    A study of infectious bursal disease (IBD) or 'Gumboro disease' seroprevalence rates in healthy, non-vaccinated indigenous scavenging chickens in northern Tanzania was conducted in November and December 2009 on 362 chickens raised in a traditional management system. Individual bird and flock-level information was collected using a semi-structured questionnaire, and serum samples were screened for IBD virus (IBDV) antibodies using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The study revealed high rates of IBDV antibodies, yielding an overall seropositive rate of 58.8 % and with at least one positive bird detected in 82.8 % (74/90) of flocks. Univariate logistic regression analysis revealed that seropositivity to IBDV varied significantly (chi2 = 16.1, P < 0.001) between the study sites. The flock seroprevalence was found to vary from 37.5 % to 91 % between districts and from 75 % to 90 % between regions. The results of this study showed that IBD is an endemic and widely distributed disease in northern Tanzania.

  17. Inactivation of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Through Composting of Litter from Poultry Houses.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Rocio; Badcoe, Lyndon M; Williams, Cheryl; Bary, Andrew I

    2016-06-01

    Very virulent infectious bursal disease virus (vvIBDV) was diagnosed in a pullet farm in Washington in 2014. Infectious bursal disease virus is resistant to many environmental stresses and often persists on farms for months. There have been conflicting reports as to whether composting can destroy vvIBDV in the manure. This project investigated the composting of litter from the affected house using an aerated static pile to inactivate the virus. Two weeks before the affected pullet flocks were moved to the layer house, specific-pathogen-free (SPF) birds were placed in the barns. Ten days after they were placed, three SPF birds died and were positive for vvIBDV. Thirty percent of the SPF birds were positive for vvIBDV. After the pullets were moved, at 20 wk of age, the litter in the house was composted using the aerated static pile method. The pile was maintained at above 55 C for 4 wk. After this time, 30 additional SPF birds were placed on the composted material. Two weeks later, the birds were healthy and there was no evidence of vvIBDV. The subsequent pullet flock did not break with vvIBDV. These results demonstrate that this composting method can be used to decontaminate the litter from vvIBDV and help prevent the spread of vvIBDV. PMID:27309296

  18. Immunodeficiency in the chicken. IV. An immunological study of infectious bursal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ivanyi, J; Morris, R

    1976-01-01

    Chickens inoculated orally with infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) 1 day after hatching subsequently showed a 50% incidence of immunodeficiency but little mortality. Antibody responses against IBDV and to immunization with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) or human serum albumin (HSA) were suppressed. Serum IgG concentration was decreased while IgM occurred exclusively in its 7S monomeric form (mIgM). An allotypic marker of chicken IgM (Mla) was lacking in mIgM derived from IBDV-infected birds. The loss of Mla occurred gradually in several birds between 3 and 12 weeks after perinatal infection. Inoculation of IBDV into chickens 3 weeks after hatching resulted in 50% mortality level but little immunodeficiency. Paradoxically, the serum IgG concentration was elevated, in comparison with normal birds. Histology of the bursa showed permanent hypo- or aplasia of follicles irrespective of the age of infection. The results suggest that bursal but not peripheral B cells are targets for IBDV, and immunodeficiency results from impaired peripheral seeding of B cells in infected juvenile chickens. Images Fig. 2 PMID:177236

  19. Small interfering RNAs inhibit infectious bursal disease virus replication in Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Sajjanar, B K; Mishra, A; Sonawane, A; Patel, C L; Saxena, A; Dash, B B; Rai, A; Raut, A A

    2011-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules are considered to be a promising antiviral therapeutics. This study was performed to analyze the application of siRNA against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) replication. Two siRNAs were designed to target common coding sequences of four IBDV proteins. Corresponding vectors were constructed to express anti-IBDV short hairpin RNAs (shRNA) that were tested for their antiviral effect in Vero cells. The results showed that expressed shRNA inhibited the virus replication to a significant extent (92%) as determined by the virus titration in cell culture. This outcome demonstrated the effectiveness of RNA interference (RNAi) based mechanism against the IBDV in vitro.

  20. Infectious bursal disease virus antibodies in eider ducks and Herring Gulls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hollmen, T.; Franson, J.C.; Docherty, D.E.; Kilpi, Mikael; Hario, Martti; Creekmore, L.H.; Petersen, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    We measured antibodies to infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) in blood of nesting Common Eider (Somateria mollissima) females and immature Herring Gulls (Larus argentatus) in the Baltic Sea, and in blood of Spectacled Eider (Somateria fischeri) females nesting in a remote area of western Alaska. Positive (??? 1:16) IBDV titers occurred in 75% of the eiders and 45% of the Herring Gull chicks. In eiders, the prevalence of positive titers differed among locations. We found no evidence that IBDV exposure impaired the immune function of Herring Gull chicks, based on their response to inoculation of sheep red blood cells. We suggest that eider ducks and Herring Gulls have been exposed to IBDV, even in locations where contact with poultry is unlikely. The presence of this virus in wild bird populations is of concern because it causes mortality of up to 30% in susceptible poultry.

  1. A highly sensitive, broad-spectrum infectivity assay for infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, K; Matsumura, T; Mase, M; Imai, K

    1995-01-01

    In order to develop an infectivity assay for infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detecting IBDV antigens was developed using a rabbit antiserum to IBDV. The ELISA detected both serotypes 1 and 2 of IBDV, purified virus proteins at a concentration of about 0.1 ng/well and about 10(4) to 10(5) infectious units/well, and was about 10(3) times more sensitive than an agar gel precipitin test. By using the ELISA for detecting IBDV antigens in the cultured fluids, infectivity titration could be determined within 5 days of cultivation in seven of the 10 virus-cell combinations when chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs), BGM-70 cells, and LSCC-BK3 cells were used. IBDV antigens were not detected in three combinations remaining after 7 days of cultivation. When 18 IBDV strains, including highly virulent, classically virulent, and attenuated strains, were tested for growth in four types of cells using the ELISA, eight strains in CEFs, seven strains in chicken kidney cells, five strains in BGM-70 cells, and 17 strains in LSCC-BK3 cells were detected. These results indicated that LSCC-BK3 cells had the broadest spectrum for IBDV. When 26 field bursal homogenates were tested for infectious IBDV using LSCC-BK3 cells, all 19 field IBDV isolates that were detected by immunostaining of the cells were also detected by the ELISA. These results indicate that this infectivity assay for IBDV using LSCC-BK3 cells and the ELISA has a high sensitivity and a broad spectrum for IBDV and is especially useful for large-scale applications.

  2. Cell culture attenuation eliminates rMd5deltaMeq-induced bursal and thymic atrophy and renders the mutant virus as an effective and safe vaccine against Marek's disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) encodes a basic leucine zipper oncoprotein, meq, which structurally resembles jun/fos family of transcriptional activators. It has been clearly demonstrated that deletion of meq results in loss of transformation and oncogenic capacity of MDV. The rMd5'meq virus provided s...

  3. Eliciting specific humoral immunity from a plasmid DNA encoding infectious bursal disease virus polyprotein gene fused with avian influenza virus hemagglutinin gene.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Yung-Yi C; Hsieh, Ming Kun; Wu, Ching Ching; Lin, Tsang Long

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccine coding for infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) polyprotein gene and that for avian influenza virus (AIV) hemagglutinin (HA) gene have been shown to induce immunity and provide protection against the respective disease. The present study was carried out to determine whether an IBDV polyprotein gene-based DNA fused with AIV HA gene could trigger immune response to both IBDV and AIV. After transfection, VP2 and HA were detected in the cytoplasm and at cell membrane, respectively, by immunofluorescent antibody double staining method, suggesting the fusion strategy did not affect the location of protein expression. VP4 cleavage between VP2 and HA was confirmed by Western blot, indicating the fusion strategy did not affect VP4 function in transfected cells. After vaccination in chickens, the DNA construct VP24-HA/pcDNA induced ELISA and virus neutralizing antibodies against VP2 and hemagglutination inhibition antibody against the HA subtype. The results indicated that a single plasmid construct carrying IBDV VP243 gene-based DNA fused with AIV HA gene can elicit specific antibody responses to both IBDV and AIV by DNA vaccination.

  4. Infectious bursal disease virus changes the potassium current properties of chicken embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Repp, H; Nieper, H; Draheim, H J; Koschinski, A; Müller, H; Dreyer, F

    1998-07-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is the causative agent of an economically significant poultry disease. IBDV infection leads to apoptosis in chicken embryos and cell cultures. Since changes in cellular ion fluxes during apoptosis have been reported, we investigated the membrane ion currents of chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) inoculated with the Cu-1 strain of IBDV using the patch-clamp recording technique. Incubation of CEFs with IBDV led to marked changes in their K+ outward current properties, with respect to both the kinetics of activation and inactivation and the Ca2+ dependence of the activation. The changes occurred in a time-dependent manner and were complete after 8 h. UV-treated noninfectious virions induced the same K+ current changes as live IBDV. When CEFs were inoculated with IBDV after pretreatment with a neutralizing antibody, about 30% of the cells showed a normal K+ current, whereas the rest exhibited K+ current properties identical to or closely resembling those of IBDV-infected cells. Incubation of CEFs with culture supernatant from IBDV-infected cells from which the virus particles were removed had no influence on the K+ current. Our data strongly suggest that the K+ current changes induced by IBDV are not due to virus replication, but are the result of attachment and/or membrane penetration. Possibly, the altered K+ current may delay the apoptotic process in CEFs after IBDV infection. PMID:9657954

  5. VP1 of infectious bursal disease virus is an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    von Einem, Ursula I; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Schirrmeier, Horst; Behrens, Sven-Erik; Letzel, Tobias; Mundt, Egbert

    2004-08-01

    Segment B of the bisegmented, double-stranded RNA genome of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) encodes the viral protein VP1. This has been presumed to represent the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) as it contains motifs that are typical for the RdRp of plus-strand RNA viruses. Here it is demonstrated that baculovirus-expressed wild-type but not motif A mutated VP1 acts as an RdRp on IBDV-specific RNA templates. Thus, on a plus-strand IBDV segment A cRNA template, minus-strand synthesis occurred in such a way that a covalently linked double-stranded RNA product was generated (by a 'copy-back' mechanism). Importantly, enzyme activity was observed only with templates that comprised the 3' non-coding region of plus-strand RNAs transcribed from IBDV segments A and B, indicating template specificity. RdRp activity was shown to have a temperature optimum of 37 degrees C and required magnesium ions for enzyme activity. Thus, it has been demonstrated unequivocally that VP1 represents the RdRp of IBDV.

  6. Histamine levels in embryonic chicken livers infected with very virulent infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinju; He, Lei; Cheng, Xiangchao; Li, Jing; Jia, Yanyan; Yang, Danfang

    2015-11-15

    Histamine is an endogenous nitrogenous compound with extensive effects on immunologic cells and involved in many physiological functions. The current aim was to determine histamine levels in embryonic liver and its association with the pathogenicity of a very virulent infectious bursal disease virus (vvIBDV) isolate serially passaged in chicken embryos. A vvIBDV isolate and the passaged viruses were inoculated into SPF embryonated chicken eggs (0.2 ml per egg) via the chorioallantoic membrane. Embryonic livers were collected at 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h post-inoculation and histamine contents were quantified by fluorescence spectrophotometry analyses. Results showed that the histamine content in embryonic livers infected with the original vvIBDV isolate and the early passaged viruses significantly increased 48 h post-inoculation, as compared with the adapted IBDV isolate (p<0.01) and controls (p<0.01), with the concentration peaking from 72 h to 96 h. Most of the infected chicken embryos died from 48 h to 96 h post-inoculation. Moreover, the histamine content in dead embryos was markedly increased compared with live embryos (p<0.05), peaking at 72 h post-inoculation (p<0.01). There was an association between histamine content in embryonic livers and an elevation in histidine decarboxylase activity. Taken together, our results suggest that an excess of histamine correlates with inflammatory responses during vvIBDV infection. This study provides an incremental step in the understanding of the pathogenesis of vvIBDV.

  7. Evidence of genetic drift and reassortment in infectious bursal disease virus and emergence of outbreaks in poultry farms in India.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amrutlal K; Pandey, Vinod C; Pal, Joy K

    2016-06-01

    Recurrent outbreaks of infectious bursal disease (IBD) have become a burning problem to the poultry industry worldwide. Here, we performed genetic analysis of IBD virus (IBDV) field isolates from recent outbreaks in various poultry farms in India. The sequence analysis of IBDV VP2 hypervariable region revealed amino acid pattern similar to that of very virulent (222A, 242I, 253Q, 256I, 272I, 279D, 284A, 294I, 299S and 330S) and intermediate plus virulent (222A, 242I, 253Q, 256I, 272T, 279N, 284A, 294I, 299S and 330S) type whereas analysis of VP1 revealed presence of sequence similar to that of very virulent (61I, 145T) and unique (61I, 141I, 143D, 145S) type in field isolates. Among the eight field isolates, two isolates contained very virulent type VP2 and unique type VP1, three contained intermediate plus virulent type VP2 and unique type VP1 whereas five contained both VP2 and VP1 of very virulent type. The phylogenetic analysis based on VP2 nucleotide sequence showed clustering of all eight isolates close to known very virulent strains whereas based on VP1, five isolates formed unique cluster and three isolates were placed close to very virulent strains. The isolates forming unique VP1 cluster showed highest similarity with classical virulent IBDVs suggesting their possible evolution from segment B of non-very virulent IBDVs. Interestingly, these five isolates were responsible for outbreaks in four different farms located at three different geographic locations in India. These observations indicates genetic reassortment between segment A and segment B from co-infecting IBDV strains leading to emergence of very virulent strains and their widespread prevalence in Indian poultry farms. The presence of 272I and 279D in VP2 protein of five field isolates may explain possible cause of Gumboro intermediate plus vaccine failure in prevention of the outbreaks. However, mortality caused by other three strains which are antigenically similar to VP1 of intermediate plus

  8. Both genome segments contribute to the pathogenicity of very virulent infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Escaffre, Olivier; Le Nouën, Cyril; Amelot, Michel; Ambroggio, Xavier; Ogden, Kristen M; Guionie, Olivier; Toquin, Didier; Müller, Hermann; Islam, Mohammed R; Eterradossi, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) causes an economically significant disease of chickens worldwide. Very virulent IBDV (vvIBDV) strains have emerged and induce as much as 60% mortality. The molecular basis for vvIBDV pathogenicity is not understood, and the relative contributions of the two genome segments, A and B, to this phenomenon are not known. Isolate 94432 has been shown previously to be genetically related to vvIBDVs but exhibits atypical antigenicity and does not cause mortality. Here the full-length genome of 94432 was determined, and a reverse genetics system was established. The molecular clone was rescued and exhibited the same antigenicity and reduced pathogenicity as isolate 94432. Genetically modified viruses derived from 94432, whose vvIBDV consensus nucleotide sequence was restored in segment A and/or B, were produced, and their pathogenicity was assessed in specific-pathogen-free chickens. We found that a valine (position 321) that modifies the most exposed part of the capsid protein VP2 critically modified the antigenicity and partially reduced the pathogenicity of 94432. However, a threonine (position 276) located in the finger domain of the virus polymerase (VP1) contributed even more significantly to attenuation. This threonine is partially exposed in a hydrophobic groove on the VP1 surface, suggesting possible interactions between VP1 and another, as yet unidentified molecule at this amino acid position. The restored vvIBDV-like pathogenicity was associated with increased replication and lesions in the thymus and spleen. These results demonstrate that both genome segments influence vvIBDV pathogenicity and may provide new targets for the attenuation of vvIBDVs.

  9. Vaccines in dermatological diseases.

    PubMed

    Magel, G D; Mendoza, N; Digiorgio, C M; Haitz, K A; Lapolla, W J; Tyring, S K

    2011-06-01

    Vaccines have been a cornerstone in medicine and public health since their inception in the 18th century by Edward Jenner. Today, greater than 20 vaccines are used worldwide for the prevention of both viral and bacterial diseases. This article will review the vaccines used for the following dermatological diseases: smallpox, measles, mumps, rubella, chickenpox, shingles, and human papillomavirus.

  10. Vaccines in dermatological diseases.

    PubMed

    Magel, G D; Mendoza, N; Digiorgio, C M; Haitz, K A; Lapolla, W J; Tyring, S K

    2011-06-01

    Vaccines have been a cornerstone in medicine and public health since their inception in the 18th century by Edward Jenner. Today, greater than 20 vaccines are used worldwide for the prevention of both viral and bacterial diseases. This article will review the vaccines used for the following dermatological diseases: smallpox, measles, mumps, rubella, chickenpox, shingles, and human papillomavirus. PMID:21566552

  11. Comparison between antigen-capture ELISA and conventional methods used for titration of infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Hassan, M K; Saif, Y M; Shawky, S

    1996-01-01

    Two antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (polyclonal and monoclonal AC-ELISAs) were developed and evaluated for titration of infectious bursal disease viruses (IBDVs) propagated in different host systems, namely BGM-70 continuous cell line, primary chicken embryo fibroblast cells, and chicken bursa of Fabricius. The polyclonal system was more sensitive (P < 0.05) than the monoclonal system but both were specific as indicated by the negative results obtained with three non-IBDVs. The results revealed that the conventional systems used for titration of IBDVs (cell cultures and embryonating chicken eggs) were more sensitive than the polyclonal AC-ELISA.

  12. Host Proteolytic Activity Is Necessary for Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Capsid Protein Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Irigoyen, Nerea; Castón, José R.; Rodríguez, José F.

    2012-01-01

    In many viruses, a precursor particle, or procapsid, is assembled and undergoes massive chemical and physical modification to produce the infectious capsid. Capsid assembly and maturation are finely tuned processes in which viral and host factors participate. We show that the precursor of the VP2 capsid protein (pVP2) of the infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), a double-stranded RNA virus, is processed at the C-terminal domain (CTD) by a host protease, the puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase (PurSA). The pVP2 CTD (71 residues) has an important role in determining the various conformations of VP2 (441 residues) that build the T = 13 complex capsid. pVP2 CTD activity is controlled by co- and posttranslational proteolytic modifications of different targets by the VP4 viral protease and by VP2 itself to yield the mature VP2-441 species. Puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase is responsible for the peptidase activity that cleaves the Arg-452-Arg-453 bond to generate the intermediate pVP2-452 polypeptide. A pVP2 R453A substitution abrogates PurSA activity. We used a baculovirus-based system to express the IBDV polyprotein in insect cells and found inefficient formation of virus-like particles similar to IBDV virions, which correlates with the absence of puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase in these cells. Virus-like particle assembly was nonetheless rescued efficiently by coexpression of chicken PurSA or pVP2-452 protein. Silencing or pharmacological inhibition of puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase activity in cell lines permissive for IBDV replication caused a major blockade in assembly and/or maturation of infectious IBDV particles, as virus yields were reduced markedly. PurSA activity is thus essential for IBDV replication. PMID:22619177

  13. Inhibition of infectious bursal disease virus by vector delivered SiRNA in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Sahare, Amol Ashok; Bedekar, Megha Kadam; Jain, Sudhir Kumar; Singh, Azad; Singh, Sanjeev; Sarkhel, Bikas Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD) is major threat to poultry industry. It causes severe immunosuppression and mortality in chicken generally at 3 to 6 weeks of age. RNA intereference (RNAi) emerges as a potent gene regulatory tool in last few years. The present study was conducted to evaluate the efficiency of RNAi to inhibit the IBD virus (IDBV) replication in-vitro. VP2 gene of virus encodes protein involved in capsid formation, cell entry and induction of protective immune responses against it. Thus, VP2 gene of IBDV is the candidate target for the molecular techniques applied for IBDV detection and inhibition assay. In this study, IBDV was isolated from field cases and confirmed by RT-PCR. The virus was then adapted on chicken embryo fibroblast cells (CEF) in which it showed severe cytopathic effects (CPE). The short hairpin RNA (shRNAs) constructs homologous to the VP2 gene were designed and one, having maximum score and fulfilling maximum Reynolds criteria, was selected for evaluation of effective inhibition. Selected shRNA construct (i.e., VP2-shRNA) was observed to be the most effective for inhibiting VP2 gene expression. Real time PCR analysis was performed to measure the relative expression of VP2 gene in different experimental groups. The VP2 gene was less expressed in virus infected cells co-transfected with VP2-shRNA as compared to mock transfected cells and IBDV+ cells (control) at dose 1.6 µ g. The result showed ∼95% efficient down regulation of VP2 gene mRNA in VP2-shRNA treated cells. These findings suggested that designed shRNA construct achieved high level of inhibition of VP2 gene expression in-vitro. PMID:25153457

  14. Viral competition and maternal immunity influence the clinical disease caused by very virulent infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Jackwood, Daral J

    2011-09-01

    The very virulent form of infectious bursal disease virus (vvIBDV) causes an immunosuppressive disease that is further characterized by the rapid onset of morbidity and high mortality in susceptible chickens. In 2009, vvIBDV was first reported in California, U. S. A., and since that time only a few cases of acute infectious bursal disease attributed to vvIBDV have been recognized in California. In other countries where vvIBDV has become established, it rapidly spreads to most poultry-producing regions. Two factors that may be involved in limiting the spread or reducing the severity of the clinical disease caused by vvIBDV in the U. S. A. are maternal immunity and competition with endemic variant strains of the virus. In this study, the ability of vvIBDV to infect and cause disease in maternally immune layer chickens was examined at weekly intervals over a 5-wk period during which their neutralizing maternal antibodies waned. Birds inoculated with vvIBDV at 2, 3, and 4 wk of age seemed healthy throughout the duration of the experiment, but macroscopic and microscopic lesions were observed in their bursa tissues. A real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay also confirmed the presence of vvIBDV RNA in their bursa tissues, indicating this virus was infecting the birds even at 2 wk of age when neutralizing maternal antibodies to infectious bursal disease virus were still relatively high (> 2000 geometric mean antibody titer). No mortality was observed in any birds when inoculated at 2, 3, or 4 wk of age; however, inoculation at 5 and 6 wk of age resulted in 10% and 20% mortality, respectively. Three experiments on the competition between vvIBDV and the two variant viruses T1 and FF6 were conducted. In all three experiments, specific-pathogen-free (SPF) birds that were inoculated with only the vvIBDV became acutely moribund, and except for Experiment 1 (62% mortality) all succumbed to the infection within 4 days of being exposed. When the

  15. Vaccination for Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehen, Stephan; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant virus vaccines that express a limited number of epitopes are currently being developed to prevent disease by changing the relative balance between viral spread and the immune response. Some circumstances, however, were found in infections with a noncytopathic virus in which vaccination caused disease; sensitive parameters included the genetic background of the host, the time or dose of infection, and the constituents of the vaccine. Thus, immunopathologic damage by T cells may be an unwanted consequence of vaccination with the new types of peptide or recombinant vaccines that are being investigated for the human immunodeficiency viruses and other pathogens.

  16. [Does vaccination cause disease?].

    PubMed

    Zingg, W

    2005-10-01

    Not many inventions in medical history have influenced our society as much as vaccination. The concept is old and simple. When Edward Jenner published his work on cowpox, "variolation" was quite common. In this procedure, pus of patients with mild smallpox was transferred to healthy individuals. Meanwhile smallpox has been eradicated worldwide. Diseases such as poliomyelitis, diphtheria or tetanus almost disappeared in industrialized countries. The same happened with epiglottitis and meningitis due to Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) after vaccination against Hib was introduced in Switzerland in 1990. This success was possible because of routine vaccination. Immunization is a save procedure and adverse events are much lower than complications in the natural course of the prevented diseases. However vaccinations were accused to cause diseases themselves such as asthma, multiple sclerosis, diabetes mellitus, chronic arthritis or autism. Hitherto no large cohort study or case-control-study was able to proof responsibility of vaccines in any of these diseases. Public media are eager to publish early data from surveillance reports or case reports which are descriptive and never a principle of cause and effect. In large controlled trials there was no proof that vaccination causes asthma, hepatitis-B-vaccination causes multiple sclerosis or macrophagic myofasciitis, Hib-vaccination causes diabetes mellitus, rubella-vaccination causes chronic arthritis, measles-mumps-rubella-vaccination causes gait disturbance or thiomersal causes autism. These results are rarely published in newspapers or television. Thus, many caring parents are left with negative ideas about immunization. Looking for the best for their children they withhold vaccination and give way to resurgence of preventable diseases in our communities. This must be prevented. There is more evidence than expected that vaccination is safe and this can and must be told to parents. PMID:16277033

  17. Spatiotemporal Phylogenetic Analysis and Molecular Characterisation of Infectious Bursal Disease Viruses Based on the VP2 Hyper-Variable Region

    PubMed Central

    Dolz, Roser; Valle, Rosa; Perera, Carmen L.; Bertran, Kateri; Frías, Maria T.; Majó, Natàlia; Ganges, Llilianne; Pérez, Lester J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Infectious bursal disease is a highly contagious and acute viral disease caused by the infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV); it affects all major poultry producing areas of the world. The current study was designed to rigorously measure the global phylogeographic dynamics of IBDV strains to gain insight into viral population expansion as well as the emergence, spread and pattern of the geographical structure of very virulent IBDV (vvIBDV) strains. Methodology/Principal Findings Sequences of the hyper-variable region of the VP2 (HVR-VP2) gene from IBDV strains isolated from diverse geographic locations were obtained from the GenBank database; Cuban sequences were obtained in the current work. All sequences were analysed by Bayesian phylogeographic analysis, implemented in the Bayesian Evolutionary Analysis Sampling Trees (BEAST), Bayesian Tip-association Significance testing (BaTS) and Spatial Phylogenetic Reconstruction of Evolutionary Dynamics (SPREAD) software packages. Selection pressure on the HVR-VP2 was also assessed. The phylogeographic association-trait analysis showed that viruses sampled from individual countries tend to cluster together, suggesting a geographic pattern for IBDV strains. Spatial analysis from this study revealed that strains carrying sequences that were linked to increased virulence of IBDV appeared in Iran in 1981 and spread to Western Europe (Belgium) in 1987, Africa (Egypt) around 1990, East Asia (China and Japan) in 1993, the Caribbean Region (Cuba) by 1995 and South America (Brazil) around 2000. Selection pressure analysis showed that several codons in the HVR-VP2 region were under purifying selection. Conclusions/Significance To our knowledge, this work is the first study applying the Bayesian phylogeographic reconstruction approach to analyse the emergence and spread of vvIBDV strains worldwide. PMID:23805195

  18. Persistence of Marek's disease virus in a subpopulation of B cells that is transformed by avian leukosis virus, but not in normal bursal B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fynan, E; Block, T M; DuHadaway, J; Olson, W; Ewert, D L

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies have described an augmentation of avian leukosis virus (ALV)-induced lymphoid leukosis in chickens that were coinfected with a serotype 2 Marek's disease virus (MDV) strain, SB-1. As a first step toward understanding the mechanism of this augmentation, we have analyzed the tropism of the MDV for the ALV-transformed B cell. After hatching, chickens were coinfected with ALV and a nonpathogenic strain of MDV, SB-1. Seventy primary and metastatic ALV-induced lymphomas that developed in chickens between 14 and 20 weeks of age were found, with only one exception, to carry SB-1 DNA. The MDV genome was maintained in cell lines derived from the tumors. However, MDV DNA could not be detected in nontransformed bursal B cells from chickens carrying ALV lymphomas. Moreover, during and after the lytic phase of MDV infection, SB-1 DNA was near or below the level of detection in bursal cells, suggesting that MDV most likely infects only a small subpopulation of bursal cells. By contrast, ALV-transformed B cells from MDV-free chickens could be persistently infected with MDV in vitro. These findings indicate that ALV lymphoma cells, unlike nontransformed bursal B cells, are susceptible to persistent MDV infection and can serve as a reservoir of MDV that can potentially influence the physiology of the transformed cell. Images PMID:1326647

  19. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  20. Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  1. Autoimmune diseases and vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Vial, Thierry; Descotes, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    The potential association between vaccination and autoimmune diseases has been largely questioned in the past few years, but this assumption has mostly been based on case reports. The available evidence derived from several negative epidemiological studies is reassuring and at least indicates that vaccines are not a major cause of autoimmune diseases. However, there are still uncertainties as to whether a susceptible subpopulation may be at a higher risk of developing an autoimmune disease without causing an overall increase in the disease incidence. Based on selected examples, this review highlights the difficulties in assessing this issue. We suggest that a potential link between vaccines and autoimmune diseases cannot be definitely ruled out and should be carefully explored during the development of new candidate vaccines. PMID:15196997

  2. Inactivation of infectious bursal disease and Newcastle disease viruses at temperatures below 0 C using chemical disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Guan, J; Chan, M; Brooks, B W; Rohonczy, L

    2014-06-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of bleach, Surface Decontamination Foam (SDF), and Virkon in inactivating infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) at temperatures below 0 C. To simulate the influence of organic load on the effectiveness of disinfectants, as would be encountered in disinfecting farm vehicles and equipment, the viruses were suspended in preparations containing light or heavy levels of organic matter. A small volume of the viral suspension was applied to the upper surface of stainless steel carrier disks and these were then air dried. The dried virus inoculum was covered with disinfectant to which propylene glycol had been added to prevent freezing. The disks were incubated at various temperatures for periods up to 24 hr. With NDV, at -10 C all three disinfectants in both organic preparations achieved a 5 log 10 reduction within 5 min. Results with SDF were similar at -25 and -10 C. To achieve comparable reduction with Virkon and bleach at -25 C, contact periods up to 2 or 24 hr, respectively, were required. With IBDV, to achieve a 5 log 10 to reduction by treatment with Virkon or SDF at -20 C, contact periods of 2 or 24 hr, respectively, were required in both organic preparations. It was concluded that at temperatures as low as -20 to -25 C, SDF was the most effective disinfectant for killing NDV and Virkon was most effective for killing IBDV. The finding that a contact period of up to 2 hr was required to kill IBDV, whereas NDV was killed within 5 min, attests to the greater stability of the former virus.

  3. Inhibition of infectious bursal disease virus infection by artificial microRNAs targeting chicken heat-shock protein 90.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Weifeng; Zhang, Xinyu; Xia, Xiaoli; Sun, Huaichang

    2012-04-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) causes an important disease in young chickens. Chicken heat-shock protein 90 (cHsp90) has been shown to be a functional component of the cellular receptor complex for IBDV infection. This study demonstrates the inhibitory effect of vector-expressed anti-cHsp90α microRNA (miRNA) on IBDV infection. The reporter vectors pcHsp90α-EGFP and pcHsp90β-EGFP were constructed to facilitate effective miRNA selection. Two anti-cHsp90α and one anti-cHsp90β miRNA-expression vectors were constructed for a stable transfection study. Poly(A)-tailed RT-PCR detected sequence-specific miRNA transcription in transfected cells. Semiquantitative RT-PCR showed inhibition of cHsp90 transcription in transfected cells. A virus-titration assay showed that the anti-cHsp90α miRNA, but not the anti-cHsp90β miRNA, had inhibitory effects on IBDV infection. These results suggest that cHsp90α is a functional component of the cellular receptor complex for IBDV infection, and that anti-cHsp90α miRNA could be used as an anti-IBDV reagent.

  4. Inhibition of infectious bursal disease virus infection by artificial microRNAs targeting chicken heat-shock protein 90.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Weifeng; Zhang, Xinyu; Xia, Xiaoli; Sun, Huaichang

    2012-04-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) causes an important disease in young chickens. Chicken heat-shock protein 90 (cHsp90) has been shown to be a functional component of the cellular receptor complex for IBDV infection. This study demonstrates the inhibitory effect of vector-expressed anti-cHsp90α microRNA (miRNA) on IBDV infection. The reporter vectors pcHsp90α-EGFP and pcHsp90β-EGFP were constructed to facilitate effective miRNA selection. Two anti-cHsp90α and one anti-cHsp90β miRNA-expression vectors were constructed for a stable transfection study. Poly(A)-tailed RT-PCR detected sequence-specific miRNA transcription in transfected cells. Semiquantitative RT-PCR showed inhibition of cHsp90 transcription in transfected cells. A virus-titration assay showed that the anti-cHsp90α miRNA, but not the anti-cHsp90β miRNA, had inhibitory effects on IBDV infection. These results suggest that cHsp90α is a functional component of the cellular receptor complex for IBDV infection, and that anti-cHsp90α miRNA could be used as an anti-IBDV reagent. PMID:22238234

  5. Immunomodulatory effect of baculovirus in chickens: How it modifies the immune response against infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Chimeno Zoth, Silvina; Carballeda, Juan Manuel; Gravisaco, María José; Lucero, María Soledad; Richetta, Matías; Gómez, Evangelina; Berinstein, Analía

    2016-07-01

    Several reports have shown that baculoviruses (BVs) have strong adjuvant properties on the mammalian immune system. Recent studies of our group demonstrated the ability of BV to stimulate the innate immunity in chickens. In this investigation, we aimed to assess the potential antiviral effect of BV given both, before and after infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). In the first case, specific pathogen free chickens were intravenously inoculated with 5 × 10(7) pfu of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus and 3 h later were orally administered 2.5 × 10(5) egg infectious doses 50 of IBDV. In the second case, chickens received IBDV 3 h before BV inoculation. Five days later, chickens were bled and euthanized. RNA from the bursa was analyzed for cytokine production. Also, bursae were used for virus recovery, and processed for lymphocyte isolation. The results showed that the administration of BV 3 h after the inoculation with IBDV produced important changes in the effect that IBDV causes in the bursa. BV reduced the infiltration of T lymphocytes, decreased the expression pattern of IL-6 and IFN-γ and inhibited IBDV replication. The results herein presented demonstrate that this Lepidopteran virus shows antiviral activity in chickens under experimental conditions. Investigations under field conditions have to be done to probe this strategy as a valuable sanitary tool for the treatment and prevention of chicken diseases. PMID:27063861

  6. Infectious bursal disease virus infection induces macrophage activation via p38 MAPK and NF-kappaB pathways.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Mahesh; Sharma, Jagdev M

    2006-06-01

    In the present study, we show that infection with infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) causes activation of macrophages, the key cells involved in inflammatory and immune-regulatory functions. Exposure of cultured spleen macrophages (SM) from SPF chickens to IBDV resulted in the production of nitric oxide (NO). In addition, there was upregulation of mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), IL-8 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The signal transduction pathways involved in macrophage activation were examined. The role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) was tested by using specific pharmacological inhibitors. Addition of p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB-203580 and NF-kappaB inhibitor Bay 11-7082, suppressed IBDV-induced NO production and mRNA expression of iNOS, IL-8 and COX-2. The results suggest that IBDV uses cellular signal transduction machinery, in particular the p38 MAPK and NF-kappaB pathways, to elicit macrophage activation. The increased production of NO, IL-8 and COX-2 by macrophages may contribute to bursa inflammatory responses commonly seen during the acute IBDV infection.

  7. Susceptibility of chicken lymphoid cells to infectious bursal disease virus does not correlate with the presence of specific binding sites.

    PubMed

    Nieper, H; Müller, H

    1996-06-01

    Pathogenic serotype 1 strains of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) replicate efficiently in lymphoid cells of the bursa of Fabricius of chicken. Lymphoid cells in other organs are not susceptible. Apathogenic serotype 2 strains do not replicate in lymphoid bursa cells or in other lymphoid cells. Chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF), however, efficiently replicate strains of either serotype. Binding studies showed that strains of both IBDV serotypes bind to lymphoid cells isolated from the bursa, thymus or spleen, indicating that restriction of IBDV replication to lymphoid B cells is not determined by the presence of specific receptor sites. The specificity of binding was demonstrated by saturation and competition experiments. These revealed the presence of different receptors: CEF had receptors common to both serotypes and specific ones for each serotype. Receptor sites common to both serotypes were also present on lymphoid cells; however, additional serotype-specific sites were only demonstrated for the apathogenic serotype 2 strain. Strains of both serotypes specifically bound to proteins with molecular masses of 40 kDa and 46 kDa, exposed on the surface of CEF and lymphoid cells. Competition experiments indicated that these proteins might represent the common receptor sites of IBDV. PMID:8683211

  8. Survey for antibodies to infectious bursal disease virus serotype 2 in wild turkeys and Sandhill Cranes of Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Candelora, Kristen L; Spalding, Marilyn G; Sellers, Holly S

    2010-07-01

    Captive-reared Whooping Cranes (Grus americana) released into Florida for the resident reintroduction project experienced unusually high mortality and morbidity during the 1997-98 and 2001-02 release seasons. Exposure to infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) serotype 2 as evidenced by seroconversion was suspected to be the factor that precipitated these mortality events. Very little is known about the incidence of IBD in wild bird populations. Before this study, natural exposure had not been documented in wild birds of North America having no contact with captive-reared cranes, and the prevalence and transmission mechanisms of the virus in wild birds were unknown. Sentinel chickens (Gallus gallus) monitored on two Whooping Crane release sites in central Florida, USA, during the 2003-04 and 2004-05 release seasons seroconverted, demonstrating natural exposure to IBDV serotype 2. Blood samples collected from Wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) and Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) in eight of 21 counties in Florida, USA, and one of two counties in southern Georgia, USA, were antibody-positive for IBDV serotype 2, indicating that exposure from wild birds sharing habitat with Whooping Cranes is possible. The presence of this virus in wild birds in these areas is a concern for the resident flock of Whooping Cranes because they nest and raise their chicks in Florida, USA. However, passively transferred antibodies may protect them at this otherwise vulnerable period in their lives.

  9. Survey for antibodies to infectious bursal disease virus serotype 2 in wild turkeys and Sandhill Cranes of Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Candelora, Kristen L; Spalding, Marilyn G; Sellers, Holly S

    2010-07-01

    Captive-reared Whooping Cranes (Grus americana) released into Florida for the resident reintroduction project experienced unusually high mortality and morbidity during the 1997-98 and 2001-02 release seasons. Exposure to infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) serotype 2 as evidenced by seroconversion was suspected to be the factor that precipitated these mortality events. Very little is known about the incidence of IBD in wild bird populations. Before this study, natural exposure had not been documented in wild birds of North America having no contact with captive-reared cranes, and the prevalence and transmission mechanisms of the virus in wild birds were unknown. Sentinel chickens (Gallus gallus) monitored on two Whooping Crane release sites in central Florida, USA, during the 2003-04 and 2004-05 release seasons seroconverted, demonstrating natural exposure to IBDV serotype 2. Blood samples collected from Wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) and Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) in eight of 21 counties in Florida, USA, and one of two counties in southern Georgia, USA, were antibody-positive for IBDV serotype 2, indicating that exposure from wild birds sharing habitat with Whooping Cranes is possible. The presence of this virus in wild birds in these areas is a concern for the resident flock of Whooping Cranes because they nest and raise their chicks in Florida, USA. However, passively transferred antibodies may protect them at this otherwise vulnerable period in their lives. PMID:20688680

  10. Effective inhibition of infectious bursal disease virus replication by recombinant avian adeno-associated virus-delivered microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjuan; Sun, Huaichang; Shen, Pengpeng; Zhang, Xinyu; Xia, Xiaoli

    2009-06-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a novel antiviral strategy against a variety of virus infections. Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) causes an economically important disease in young chickens. This study demonstrated efficient inhibition of IBDV replication by recombinant avian adeno-associated virus (rAAAV)-delivered anti-VP1 and anti-VP2 microRNAs (miRNAs). In the viral vector-transduced cells, sequence-specific miRNA expression was detected by poly(A)-tailed RT-PCR. Reporter assays using a pVP2-EGFP vector showed significant and long-lasting inhibition of VP2-EGFP expression in cells transduced with anti-VP2 miRNA-expressing rAAAV-RFPmiVP2E, but not with the control miRNA-expressing rAAAV-RFPmiVP2con or anti-VP1 miRNA-expressing rAAAV-RFPmiVP1. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR and/or virus titration assays showed a significant inhibitory effect on homologous IBDV replication in cells transduced with rAAAV-RFPmiVP1 or rAAAV-RFPmiVP2E. For two heterologous IBDV isolates, transduction with rAAAV-RFPmiVP1 led to slightly weaker but similar inhibitory effects, whereas transduction with rAAAV-RFPmiVP2E resulted in significantly weaker and different inhibitory effects. These results suggest that rAAAV could act as an efficient vector for miRNA delivery into avian cells and that VP1 is the more suitable target for interfering with IBDV replication using RNAi technology.

  11. Chicken Heat Shock Protein 90 Is a Component of the Putative Cellular Receptor Complex of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus▿

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ta-Wei; Lo, Chi-Wen; Lai, Su-Yuan; Fan, Ruey-Jane; Lo, Chao-Jung; Chou, Yu-mei; Thiruvengadam, Rekha; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Wang, Min-Ying

    2007-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) causes a highly contagious disease in young chicks and leads to significant economic losses in the poultry industry. The capsid protein VP2 of IBDV plays an important role in virus binding and cell recognition. VP2 forms a subviral particle (SVP) with immunogenicity similar to that of the IBDV capsid. In the present study, we first showed that SVP could inhibit IBDV infection to an IBDV-susceptible cell line, DF-1 cells, in a dose-dependent manner. Second, the localizations of the SVP on the surface of DF-1 cells were confirmed by fluorescence microscopy, and the specific binding of the SVP to DF-1 cells occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the attachment of SVP to DF-1 cells was inhibited by an SVP-induced neutralizing monoclonal antibody against IBDV but not by denatured-VP2-induced polyclonal antibodies. Third, the cellular factors in DF-1 cells involved in the attachment of SVP were purified by affinity chromatography using SVP bound on the immobilized Ni2+ ions. A dominant factor was identified as being chicken heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) (cHsp90) by mass spectrometry. Results of biotinylation experiments and indirect fluorescence assays indicated that cHsp90 is located on the surface of DF-1 cells. Virus overlay protein binding assays and far-Western assays also concluded that cHsp90 interacts with IBDV and SVP, respectively. Finally, both Hsp90 and anti-Hsp90 can inhibit the infection of DF-1 cells by IBDV. Taken together, for the first time, our results suggest that cHsp90 is part of the putative cellular receptor complex essential for IBDV entry into DF-1 cells. PMID:17522206

  12. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids enrichment alters performance and immune response in infectious bursal disease challenged broilers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Infectious bursal disease (IBD) results in economic loss due to mortality, reduction in production efficiency and increasing the usage of antibiotics. This study was carried out to investigate the modulatory roles of dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) enrichment in immune response and performance of IBD challenged broiler chickens. Methods A total of 300 day old male broiler chicks were assigned to four dietary n-3 PUFA ascending levels as the treatment groups (T1: 0.5; T2: 8.0; T3: 11.5; T4: 16.5) using combinations of tuna oil and sunflower oil. All diets were isocaloric and isonitrogenous. On day 28, all birds were challenged with IBD virus. Antibody titer, cytokine production, bursa lesion pre and post-challenge and lymphoid organ weight were recorded. Results On d 42 the highest body weight was observed in the T2 and T3 and the lowest in T4 chickens. Feed conversion ratio of the T2 broilers was significantly better than the other groups. Although productive parameters were not responded to the dietary n-3 PUFA in a dose-dependent manner, spleen weight, IBD and Newcastle disease antibody titers and IL-2 and IFN-γ concentrations were constantly elevated by n-3 PUFA enrichment. Conclusions Dietary n-3 PUFA enrichment may improve the immune response and IBD resistance, but the optimum performance does not coincide with the optimum immune response. It seems that dietary n-3 PUFA modulates the broiler chicken performance and immune response in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, a moderate level of dietary n-3 PUFA enrichment may help to put together the efficiency of performance and relative immune response enhancement in broiler chickens. PMID:22273277

  13. The Endosomal Pathway and the Golgi Complex Are Involved in the Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Delgui, Laura R.; Rodríguez, José F.

    2013-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), a double-stranded RNA virus belonging to the Birnaviridae family, causes immunosuppression in chickens. In this study, we defined the localization of IBDV replication complexes based on colocalization analysis of VP3, the major protein component of IBDV ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). Our results indicate that VP3 localizes to vesicular structures bearing features of early and late endocytic compartments located in the juxtanuclear region. Interfering with the endocytic pathway with a dominant negative version of Rab5 after the internalization step leads to a reduction in virus titer. Triple-immunostaining studies between VP3, the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase VP1, and viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) showed a well-defined colocalization, indicating that the three critical components of the RNPs colocalize in the same structure, likely representing replication complexes. Interestingly, recombinant expressed VP3 also localizes to endosomes. Employing Golgi markers, we found that VP3-containing vesicles were closely associated with this organelle. Depolymerization of microtubules with nocodazole caused a profound change in VP3 localization, showing a punctate distribution scattered throughout the cytoplasm. However, these VP3-positive structures remained associated with Golgi ministacks. Similarly, brefeldin A (BFA) treatment led to a punctate distribution of VP3, scattered throughout the cytoplasm of infected cells. In addition, analysis of intra- and extracellular viral infective particles after BFA treatment of avian cells suggested a role for the Golgi complex in viral assembly. These results constitute the first study elucidating the localization of IBDV replication complexes (i.e., in endocytic compartments) and establishing a role for the Golgi apparatus in the assembly step of a birnavirus. PMID:23741000

  14. Generation of serotype 1/serotype 2 reassortant viruses of the infectious bursal disease virus and their investigation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zierenberg, Kati; Raue, Rüdiger; Nieper, Hermann; Islam, Md Rafiqul; Eterradossi, Nicolas; Toquin, Didier; Müller, Hermann

    2004-09-15

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is the causative agent of acute or immunosuppressive disease in chickens. Serotype 1 strains are pathogenic whereas serotype 2 strains neither cause disease nor protect against infection with the serotype 1 strains. The target organ of serotype 1 strains is the bursa Fabricii (BF). The molecular determinants of this tropism, and therefore pathogenicity, are poorly understood. IBDV is a non-enveloped icosahedral virus particle of 60 nm in diameter, which contains two genome segments of double-stranded RNA. Here, the generation of interserotypic reassortants using the reverse genetics approach is reported. The results of in vitro and in vivo investigations show that genome segment A determines the bursa tropism of IBDV, whereas segment B is involved in the efficiency of viral replication; they further indicate the significance of the interaction of the polymerase (segment B) with the structural protein VP3 (segment A) or the viral genome for efficient virus formation and replication. PMID:15325078

  15. Combination vaccines against diarrheal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Malabi M; Van de Verg, Lillian L

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Diarrheal diseases remain a leading cause of global childhood mortality and morbidity. Several recent epidemiological studies highlight the rate of diarrheal diseases in different parts of the world and draw attention to the impact on childhood growth and survival. Despite the well-documented global burden of diarrheal diseases, currently there are no combination diarrheal vaccines, only licensed vaccines for rotavirus and cholera, and Salmonella typhi-based vaccines for typhoid fever. The recognition of the impact of diarrheal episodes on infant growth, as seen in resource-poor countries, has spurred action from governmental and non-governmental agencies to accelerate research toward affordable and effective vaccines against diarrheal diseases. Both travelers and children in endemic countries will benefit from a combination diarrheal vaccine, but it can be argued that the greater proportion of any positive impact will be on the public health status of the latter. The history of combination pediatric vaccines indicate that monovalent or single disease vaccines are typically licensed first prior to formulation in a combination vaccine, and that the combinations themselves undergo periodic revision in response to need for improvement in safety or potential for wider coverage of important pediatric pathogens. Nevertheless combination pediatric vaccines have proven to be an effective tool in limiting or eradicating communicable childhood diseases worldwide. The landscape of diarrheal vaccine candidates indicates that there now several in active development that offer options for potential testing of combinations to combat those bacterial and viral pathogens responsible for the heaviest disease burden—rotavirus, ETEC, Shigella, Campylobacter, V. cholera and Salmonella. PMID:25891647

  16. Very Virulent Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Produces More-Severe Disease and Lesions in Specific-Pathogen-Free (SPF) Leghorns Than in SPF Broiler Chickens.

    PubMed

    Sá e Silva, Mariana; Rissi, Daniel R; Swayne, David E

    2016-03-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is an important pathogen of chickens causing negative economic impacts in poultry industries worldwide. IBDV has a variable range of virulence, with very virulent (vvIBDV) strains being responsible for the greatest losses from mortality and decreased performance. Previous vvIBDV studies using conventional broilers reported resistance to lethal effects and decreased performance as compared to specific-pathogen-free (SPF) layers, but the potential contribution of the conventional vs. SPF status to resistance has not been examined. In this study we compared differences in the acute pathologic effects of infection by the California rA strain of vvIBDV for SPF white leghorn egg-laying chickens and SPF white Plymouth Rock broiler chickens over a 7-day experimental period. Based on the clinical signs and mortality observed, as well as on the more-severe pathologic changes in lymphoid tissues and kidneys, white leghorns were shown to be more susceptible to the deleterious effects of vvIBDV infection than were white Plymouth Rocks. This study provides important information on the impact of chicken breed on susceptibility to vvIBDV and the absence of impact from conventional vs. SPF status on the outcome.

  17. Vaccines against invasive Salmonella disease

    PubMed Central

    MacLennan, Calman A; Martin, Laura B; Micoli, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Though primarily enteric pathogens, Salmonellae are responsible for a considerable yet under-appreciated global burden of invasive disease. In South and South-East Asia, this manifests as enteric fever caused by serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A. In sub-Saharan Africa, a similar disease burden results from invasive nontyphoidal Salmonellae, principally serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. The existing Ty21a live-attenuated and Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccines target S. Typhi and are not effective in young children where the burden of invasive Salmonella disease is highest. After years of lack of investment in new Salmonella vaccines, recent times have seen increased interest in the area led by emerging-market manufacturers, global health vaccine institutes and academic partners. New glycoconjugate vaccines against S. Typhi are becoming available with similar vaccines against other invasive serovars in development. With other new vaccines under investigation, including live-attenuated, protein-based and GMMA vaccines, now is an exciting time for the Salmonella vaccine field. PMID:24804797

  18. Impact of Feeding Systems and Vaccination Programs on Salmonella Enteritidis Colonization and Clearance of E. Coli In Broiler Broiler Breeders Pullets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Broiler breeder pullets from a single grandparent flock were in ovo-vaccinated with Marek's vaccines herpesvirus of turkey (HVT) + chicken herpesvirus (SB1) or a vector HVT + Infectious bursal disease (IBD) vaccine+SB1. The chicks were placed in an experimental broiler breeder facility at the Univer...

  19. Impact of Feeding Systems and Hatchery Vaccination Programs on Immune System Development, Salmonella Colonization, Clearance of E. Coli and Reproductive Traits In Broiler Breeder Pullets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Broiler breeder pullets from a single grandparent flock were vaccinated at 19 days of embryonation with Marek's vaccines HVT +SB1 or a Vector HVT + Infectious bursal disease (IBD) vaccine. The birds were placed in an experimental broiler breeder facility at the University of Georgia and fed ad libit...

  20. Humoral immune responses to inactivated oil-emulsified Marek's disease vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lee, L F; Witter, R L

    1991-01-01

    When inactivated Md11/75C vaccine was inoculated into 1-day-old chickens, it stimulated antibodies detectable by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (at a titer of 6400) and indirect fluorescent antibody test (at a titer of 640), but lacking virus-neutralizing activity. Chickens passively inoculated with these antibodies were protected against bursal atrophy, weight loss, and early mortality when challenged with the virulent Md5 strain of Marek's disease virus (MDV). That led to the conclusion that virus-neutralizing activity is not a prerequisite for protection. In another experiment, antibody titers of adult chickens previously primed by exposure to live turkey herpesvirus and MDV did not increase after immunization with inactivated oil-emulsion MDV vaccines. This result provides little hope that Marek's disease can be controlled in progeny chickens by maternal immunity derived from hyperimmunized parents.

  1. [Vaccination therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Tabira, Takeshi

    2009-11-01

    Since AN-1792 vaccine induced autoimmune encephalitis, several pharmaceutical companies are now concentrated in developing antibody therapy in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Each antibody has own characteristics. Thus, it is unpredictable at present which antibody is the most beneficial until we see the result of clinical trials. If disease modifying antibodies were found, they will be widely used for treatment of AD in near future. As a candidate of such antibodies, we have developed TAPIR-like antibody with much higher affinity to Abeta42 than Abeta40, and it effectively deleted senile plaque amyloid and Abeta oligomers without increasing microhemorrhages. Although passive immunization can avoid autoimmune encephalitis, it is expensive and it is not suitable for prevention. Thus, safe vaccines by active immunization would be better. Vaccines that induce Th2 type immune responses such as oral vaccine or per-nasal vaccine would be promising. PMID:20030228

  2. The Oligomerization Domain of VP3, the Scaffolding Protein of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus, Plays a Critical Role in Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Maraver, Antonio; Oña, Ana; Abaitua, Fernando; González, Dolores; Clemente, Roberto; Ruiz-Díaz, Jose A.; Castón, Jose R.; Pazos, Florencio; Rodriguez, Jose F.

    2003-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) capsids are formed by a single protein layer containing three polypeptides, pVP2, VP2, and VP3. Here, we show that the VP3 protein synthesized in insect cells, either after expression of the complete polyprotein or from a VP3 gene construct, is proteolytically degraded, leading to the accumulation of product lacking the 13 C-terminal residues. This finding led to identification of the VP3 oligomerization domain within a 24-amino-acid stretch near the C-terminal end of the polypeptide, partially overlapping the VP1 binding domain. Inactivation of the VP3 oligomerization domain, by either proteolysis or deletion of the polyprotein gene, abolishes viruslike particle formation. Formation of VP3-VP1 complexes in cells infected with a dual recombinant baculovirus simultaneously expressing the polyprotein and VP1 prevented VP3 proteolysis and led to efficient virus-like particle formation in insect cells. PMID:12743301

  3. Lyme disease vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wormser, G P

    1996-01-01

    Subunit vaccines consisting of single recombinant outer surface proteins (Osp) of Borrelia burgdorferi have been highly successful in protecting mice against challenge by borrelial strains closely related to the strain from which the immunogen was derived. Humoral immunity is sufficient for protection. A dual mode of action for these vaccines has been suggested because serum factors ingested by the tick during the blood meal may begin to reduce the spirochete inoculum prior to transmission to the host. At present two different recombinant OspA vaccine preparations (monovalent) are being evaluated in humans in large-scale phase III efficacy trials in the United States. Local discomfort at the intramuscular injection site has been the principal adverse effect seen to date with these vaccines, but further data on safety are being collected. The greater heterogeneity of OspA among Lyme Borrelia in Europe implies that a vaccine preparation containing multiple antigens (multivalent) may be necessary there, although this is also a concern in the United States.

  4. Seven challenges in modeling vaccine preventable diseases.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, C J E; Andreasen, V; Bjørnstad, O N; Eames, K; Edmunds, W J; Funk, S; Hollingsworth, T D; Lessler, J; Viboud, C; Grenfell, B T

    2015-03-01

    Vaccination has been one of the most successful public health measures since the introduction of basic sanitation. Substantial mortality and morbidity reductions have been achieved via vaccination against many infections, and the list of diseases that are potentially controllable by vaccines is growing steadily. We introduce key challenges for modeling in shaping our understanding and guiding policy decisions related to vaccine preventable diseases.

  5. Further observations on serotype 2 Marek's disease virus-induced enhancement of spontaneous avian leukosis virus-like bursal lymphomas in ALVA6 transgenic chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Breeders of the 2009 generation of Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory transgenic chicken line ALVA6, known to be resistant to infection with subgroups A and E avian leukosis virus (ALV), were vaccinated at hatch with a trivalent Marek's disease (MD) vaccine containing serotypes 1, 2, and 3 Marek'...

  6. FAQs about Vaccines and Diseases They Prevent

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletters Events FAQs about Vaccines and Diseases They Prevent Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Are there ... in the United States? What diseases do vaccines prevent? What would happen if we stopped immunizations ? Who ...

  7. Lung Disease Including Asthma and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthcare Professionals Lung Disease including Asthma and Adult Vaccination Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  8. Effective inhibition of replication of infectious bursal disease virus by miRNAs delivered by vectors and targeting the VP2 gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjuan; Sun, Huaichang; Shen, Pengpeng; Zhang, Xinyu; Xia, Xiaoli; Xia, Bing

    2010-05-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a potent mechanism against a variety of viral infections. Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) causes an important disease economically in chickens, which is difficult to control. As part of the development of viral vector-mediated RNAi strategy against the disease, five anti-VP2 small interference RNAs were selected for construction of microRNA (miRNA) expression vectors tailored for avian cells. Transfection of DF-1 cells with the five vectors resulted in significant inhibition of VP2-EGFP reporter gene expression. More effective miVP2A and miVP2E were selected for further study using single or double miRNA expression vectors. After demonstration of specific miRNA expression, the gene silencing effects were determined in the vector-transfected and IBDV-infected cells. Reverse transcriptase PCR and virus titration showed inhibition rates from 76 to 82% on VP2 expression and significant decreases in virus titer by individual and co-expressed miVP2A and miVP2E. The inhibitory effects lasted for at least 120 h after infection with IBDV. These data suggest that the miRNAs targeting the VP2 can inhibit efficiently replication of IBDV.

  9. Vaccine-Preventable Disease Photos

    MedlinePlus

    ... About | A-Z | Contact | Follow Vaccine Information You Need VACCINE BASICS Evaluating Online Health Information FAQs How Vaccines Work Importance of Vaccines Paying for Vaccines State Immunization Programs Tips for Finding Vaccine Records Trusted Sources of Vaccine ... PRETEENS Vaccines You Need ...

  10. Vaccine Preventable Disease on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bart, Kenneth J.

    1984-01-01

    While morbidity and mortality from vaccine preventable diseases have declined, some college students remain susceptible to measles, rubella, diptheria, tetanus, or polio. Colleges and universities have the opportunity to ensure protection of students, faculty, and employees by establishing and enforcing immunization requirements. (Author/DF)

  11. Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  12. Immunomodulatory vaccines against autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Sela, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Vaccines are for healthy people, to prevent them from becoming ill. Such prophylactic vaccines have been a great success. Therapeutic vaccines become more and more important, especially as life expectancy increases. Efforts to develop vaccines against such diseases as cancer, AIDS, hepatitis, tuberculosis, Alzheimer disease, and mad cow disease have not yet reached the stage where they can be successfully used on a daily basis. However, significant progress has been made in the realm of autoimmune diseases, resulting (at least in one case) in an immunomodulatory vaccine against multiple sclerosis that was developed in the author's laboratory, and that is in daily use by about 100,000 patients. The drug or therapeutic vaccine against the exacerbating-remitting type of multiple sclerosis is a copolymer of four amino acid residues, denoted Copaxone, which are related to myelin basic protein. This paper discusses Copaxone as well as a candidate immunomodulatory vaccine against myasthenia gravis, a peptide derived from the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Copolymer 1 (Cop 1, glatiramer acetate, Copaxone) is a synthetic amino acid random copolymer that is immunologically cross-reactive with myelin basic protein and suppresses experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in several animal species. Cop 1 slows the progression of disability and reduces the relapse rate in exacerbating-remitting multiple sclerosis patients. Cop 1 is a potent inducer of T helper 2 (Th2) regulatory cells in mice and humans; and Th2 cells are found in both the brains and spinal cords of Cop 1-treated mice and humans. MG and experimental autoimmune MG are T cell-regulated, antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases. Two peptides, representing sequences of the human AChR-alpha-subunit, p195-212 and p259-271, are immunodominant T-cell epitopes in MG patients and two strains of mice. Altered peptide ligand, composed of the randomly arranged two single amino acid analogs inhibits in vitro and in vivo MG

  13. Enhancing yield of infectious Bursal disease virus structural proteins in baculovirus expression systems: focus on media, protease inhibitors, and dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y C; Bentley, W E

    1999-01-01

    Structural proteins of the poultry pathogen, infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), were expressed in the baculovirus/insect cell expression system. To date, several reports have indicated that animal virus structural proteins are expressed only at low yield in this system. In this article, several factors were examined to enhance yield. These include medium, dissolved oxygen level, and the addition (in vivo and in vitro) of protease inhibitors. Specifically, two media were compared, and SF-900 II was superior to Ex-Cell 401 for cell growth and IBDV protein expression. A cocktail of protease inhibitors including phenylmethyl sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), leupeptin, and ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) minimized proteolysis in vitro. Also, aprotinin and pepstatin A deterred product degradation in vivo and increased the product yield nearly 2-fold. Finally, in 3 L bioreactors, a dissolved oxygen tension of 50% DO (air saturation) was optimal. Results demonstrated that several relatively simple adjustments to the baculovirus system significantly improved the yield of IBD virus structural proteins. PMID:10585191

  14. Molecular characterization of two Bangladeshi infectious bursal disease virus isolates using the hypervariable sequence of VP2 as a genetic marker.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Taohidul; Le, Thanh Hoa; Rahman, Md Mostafizur; Islam, Md Alimul

    2012-12-01

    Two Bangladeshi infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) isolates collected in 2007, termed GB1 and GB3, were subjected to comparative sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Sequence analysis of a 474-bp hypervariable region in the VP2 gene revealed that among four major amino acid substitutions observed in the strains, two were unique to GB1 and GB3 (Ser217Leu and Ala270Thr) while one substitution was only found in GB1 (Asn299Ser). Among IBDVs from Bangladesh including GB1 and GB3, the rate of identity and homology was around 97~99%. The amino acid sequences of GB1 and GB3 differ from those of previous Bangladeshi IBDV isolates and contain amino acid substitutions Pro222Ala and Asn299Ser (in GB3 only). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that GB1 and GB3 are grouped with other very virulent IBDVs of European and American origin in contrast to two previously isolated Bangladeshi IBDV strains (GenBank accession Nos. AF362776 and AF260317), which belong to the Asian group. It was concluded that GB1 and GB3 belong to a very virulent group of IBDVs. However, amino acid sequences of GB1 and GB3 differ from those of the other Bangladeshi IBDVs by one or two amino acids encoded in the hypervariable region of the VP2 gene.

  15. Apoptosis is induced by infectious bursal disease virus replication in productively infected cells as well as in antigen-negative cells in their vicinity.

    PubMed

    Jungmann, A; Nieper, H; Müller, H

    2001-05-01

    The kinetics of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) replication and induction of apoptosis were investigated in vitro and in vivo. After infection of chicken embryo (CE) cells with IBDV strain Cu-1, the proportion of apoptotic cells increased from 5.8% at 4 h post-infection (p.i.) to 64.5% at 48 h p.i. The proportion of apoptotic cells correlated with IBDV replication. UV-inactivated IBDV particles did not induce apoptosis. Double labelling revealed that, early after infection, the majority of antigen-expressing cells were not apoptotic; double-labelled cells appeared more frequently at later times. Remarkably, apoptotic cells were frequently located in the vicinity of antigen-expressing cells. This indicated that an apoptosis-inducing factor(s) might be released by cells that replicate IBDV. Since interferon (IFN) production has been demonstrated after IBDV infection, IFN was considered to be one of several factors. However, supernatants of infected CE cells in which virus infectivity had been neutralized were not sufficient to induce apoptosis. Similar results were observed in the infected bursae of Fabricius: early after infection, most of the cells either showed virus antigens or were apoptotic. Again, double-labelled cells appeared more frequently late after infection. This suggests that indirect mechanisms might also be involved in the induction of apoptosis in vivo, contributing to the rapid depletion of cells in the IBDV-infected bursa. PMID:11297685

  16. Adaptation of Very Virulent Infectious Bursal Disease Virus to Chicken Embryonic Fibroblasts by Site-Directed Mutagenesis of Residues 279 and 284 of Viral Coat Protein VP2

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Boon-Leong; Cao, Yongchang; Yu, Tiffany; Mo, Chi-Wai

    1999-01-01

    The full-length RNA genomes of a chicken embryonic fibroblast (CEF)-nonpermissive, very virulent infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) (strain HK46) were amplified into cDNAs by reverse transcription-PCR. The full-length cDNAs were sequenced and subcloned into a eukaryotic expression vector, from which point mutations were introduced into the VP2 region by site-directed mutagenesis. The wild-type and mutated plasmids were transfected directly into CEFs to examine their ability to generate CEF-permissive recombinant viruses. Substitution of amino acid residues 279 (Asp→Asn) and 284 (Ala→Thr) of the VP2 protein yielded a recombinant virus which was able to be passaged in CEFs, whereas the wild-type cDNAs and an amino acid substitution at residue 330 (Ser→Arg) of the VP2 protein alone did not yield viable virus. The results indicated that mutation of other viral proteins, including VP1, VP3, VP4, and VP5, was not required for CEF adaptation of the virus. The same approach may be used to produce CEF-adapted strains from newly evolved IBDVs or to manipulate the antigenicity of the virus. PMID:10074133

  17. Enhancing yield of infectious Bursal disease virus structural proteins in baculovirus expression systems: focus on media, protease inhibitors, and dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y C; Bentley, W E

    1999-01-01

    Structural proteins of the poultry pathogen, infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), were expressed in the baculovirus/insect cell expression system. To date, several reports have indicated that animal virus structural proteins are expressed only at low yield in this system. In this article, several factors were examined to enhance yield. These include medium, dissolved oxygen level, and the addition (in vivo and in vitro) of protease inhibitors. Specifically, two media were compared, and SF-900 II was superior to Ex-Cell 401 for cell growth and IBDV protein expression. A cocktail of protease inhibitors including phenylmethyl sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), leupeptin, and ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) minimized proteolysis in vitro. Also, aprotinin and pepstatin A deterred product degradation in vivo and increased the product yield nearly 2-fold. Finally, in 3 L bioreactors, a dissolved oxygen tension of 50% DO (air saturation) was optimal. Results demonstrated that several relatively simple adjustments to the baculovirus system significantly improved the yield of IBD virus structural proteins.

  18. Vaccination against salmonid bacterial kidney disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) of salmonid fishes, caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, has presented challenges for development of effective vaccines, despite several decades of research. The only vaccine against BKD that is commercially licensed is an injectable preparation containing live cells ...

  19. Vaccines and Vaccination for Veterinary Viral Diseases: A General Overview.

    PubMed

    Brun, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    A high number of infectious diseases affecting livestock and companion animals are caused by pathogens of viral etiology. Ensuring the maximum standards of quality and welfare in animal production requires developing effective tools to halt and prevent the spread of those infectious diseases affecting animal husbandry. To date, one of the best strategies is to implement vaccination policies whenever possible. However many of the currently manufactured vaccines relies in classical vaccine technologies (killed or attenuated vaccines) which, under some circumstances, may not be optimal in terms of safety or adequate for widespread application in disease-free countries at risk of disease introduction. One step ahead is needed to improve and adapt vaccine manufacturing to the use of new generation vaccine technologies already tested in experimental settings. Here we present in the context of animal viral diseases of veterinary interest, an overview of some current vaccine technologies that can be approached for virus pathogens with a brief insight in the type of immunity elicited.

  20. [Vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Bühler, Silja; Hatz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The number of individuals with autoimmune diseases treated with immunosuppressive drugs is increasing steadily. The variety of immunosuppressive drugs and in particular biological therapies is also rising. The autoimmune disease itself as well as the immunosuppressive therapy increases the risk of infection in this population. Particularly the risk of vaccine-preventable infections is elevated. Thus, preventing infections by the means of vaccination is of utmost importance. The Division of Infectious Diseases of the Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute, University of Zurich, performed a literature search on the topic of vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases upon request by the Swiss Federal Commission for Vaccination Issues. Overall, data are scarce. The following main points were retrieved from the literature: Inactivated vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity may be reduced under immunosuppressive therapy. In addition to the generally recommended basic vaccinations, specific vaccinations, such as influenza and pneumococcal vaccination are indicated in these patient groups. Live vaccines are generally contraindicated under immunosuppressive therapy due to safety concerns. However, specific exceptions apply. Furthermore, certain time intervals for the administration of live vaccines after pausing or ceasing an immunosuppressive therapy should be respected. PMID:27268452

  1. [Autoimmune connective tissue diseases and vaccination].

    PubMed

    Więsik-Szewczyk, Ewa; Jahnz-Różyk, Karina

    2015-12-31

    The idea that infectious agents can induce autoimmune diseases in genetically susceptible subjects has been a matter of discussion for years. Moreover, increased incidence of autoimmune diseases and introduction of prophylactic vaccinations from early childhood suggest that these two trends are linked. In the medical literature and even non-professional media, case reports or events temporally related to vaccination are reported. It raises the issue of vaccination safety. In everyday practice medical professionals, physicians, rheumatologists and other specialists will be asked their opinion of vaccination safety. The decision should be made according to evidence-based medicine and the current state of knowledge. The purpose of this paper is to discuss a potential mechanism which links infections, vaccinations and autoimmunity. We present an overview of published case reports, especially of systemic connective tissue diseases temporally related to vaccination and results from case-nested studies. As yet, no conclusive evidence supports a causal relationship between vaccination and autoimmune diseases. It has to be determined whether the performed studies are sufficiently sensitive to detect the link. The debate is ongoing, and new data may be required to explain the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We would like to underscore the need for prophylactic vaccination in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases and to break down the myth that the vaccines are contraindicated in this target group.

  2. Vaccines for viral diseases with dermatologic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Brentjens, Mathijs H; Yeung-Yue, Kimberly A; Lee, Patricia C; Tyring, Stephen K

    2003-04-01

    Vaccines against infectious diseases have been available since the 1800s, when an immunization strategy against smallpox developed by Jenner gained wide acceptance. Until recently, the only vaccination strategies available involved the use of protein-based, whole killed, and attenuated live virus vaccines. These strategies have led to the development of effective vaccines against a variety of diseases with primary or prominent cutaneous manifestations. Effective and safe vaccines now used worldwide include those directed against measles and rubella (now commonly used together with a mumps vaccine as the trivalent MMR), chickenpox, and hepatitis B. The eradication of naturally occurring smallpox remains one of the greatest successes in the history of modern medicine, but stockpiles of live smallpox exist in the United States and Russia. Renewed interest in the smallpox vaccine reflects concerns about a possible bioterrorist threat using this virus. Yellow fever is a hemorrhagic virus endemic to tropical areas of South America and Africa. An effective vaccine for this virus has existed since 1937, and it is used widely in endemic areas of South America, and to a lesser extent in Africa. This vaccine is recommended once every 10 years for people who are traveling to endemic areas. Advances in immunology have led to a greater understanding of immune system function in viral diseases. Progress in genetics and molecular biology has allowed researchers to design vaccines with novel mechanisms of action (eg, DNA, vector, and VLP vaccines). Vaccines have also been designed to specifically target particular viral components, allowing for stimulation of various arms of the immune system as desired. Ongoing research shows promise in prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination for viral infections with cutaneous manifestations. Further studies are necessary before vaccines for HSV, HPV, and HIV become commercially available.

  3. Vaccines for viral diseases with dermatologic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Brentjens, Mathijs H; Yeung-Yue, Kimberly A; Lee, Patricia C; Tyring, Stephen K

    2003-04-01

    Vaccines against infectious diseases have been available since the 1800s, when an immunization strategy against smallpox developed by Jenner gained wide acceptance. Until recently, the only vaccination strategies available involved the use of protein-based, whole killed, and attenuated live virus vaccines. These strategies have led to the development of effective vaccines against a variety of diseases with primary or prominent cutaneous manifestations. Effective and safe vaccines now used worldwide include those directed against measles and rubella (now commonly used together with a mumps vaccine as the trivalent MMR), chickenpox, and hepatitis B. The eradication of naturally occurring smallpox remains one of the greatest successes in the history of modern medicine, but stockpiles of live smallpox exist in the United States and Russia. Renewed interest in the smallpox vaccine reflects concerns about a possible bioterrorist threat using this virus. Yellow fever is a hemorrhagic virus endemic to tropical areas of South America and Africa. An effective vaccine for this virus has existed since 1937, and it is used widely in endemic areas of South America, and to a lesser extent in Africa. This vaccine is recommended once every 10 years for people who are traveling to endemic areas. Advances in immunology have led to a greater understanding of immune system function in viral diseases. Progress in genetics and molecular biology has allowed researchers to design vaccines with novel mechanisms of action (eg, DNA, vector, and VLP vaccines). Vaccines have also been designed to specifically target particular viral components, allowing for stimulation of various arms of the immune system as desired. Ongoing research shows promise in prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination for viral infections with cutaneous manifestations. Further studies are necessary before vaccines for HSV, HPV, and HIV become commercially available. PMID:12757257

  4. Vaccination against bacterial kidney disease: Chapter 22

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Diane G.; Wiens, Gregory D.; Hammell, K. Larry; Rhodes, Linda D.; Edited by Gudding, Roar; Lillehaug, Atle; Evensen, Øystein

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) of salmonid fishes, caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, has been recognized as a serious disease in salmonid fishes since the 1930s. This chapter discusses the occurrence and significance, etiology, and pathogenesis of BKD. It then describes the different vaccination procedures and the effects and side-effects of vaccination. Despite years of research, however, only a single vaccine has been licensed for prevention of BKD, and has demonstrated variable efficacy. Therefore, in addition to a presentation of the current status of BKD vaccination, a discussion of potential future directions for BKD vaccine development is included in the chapter. This discussion is focused on the unique characteristics of R. salmoninarum and its biology, as well as aspects of the salmonid immune system that might be explored specifically to develop more effective vaccines for BKD prevention.

  5. VP1, the Putative RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus, Forms Complexes with the Capsid Protein VP3, Leading to Efficient Encapsidation into Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Eleuterio; Maraver, Antonio; Castón, José R.; Rivera, José; Fernández-Arias, Armando; Serrano, Antonio; Carrascosa, José L.; Rodriguez, José F.

    1999-01-01

    A cDNA corresponding to the coding region of VP1, the putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) was cloned and inserted into the genome of a vaccinia virus inducible expression vector. The molecular mass and antigenic reactivity of VP1 expressed in mammalian cells are identical to those of its counterpart expressed in IBDV-infected cells. The results presented here demonstrate that VP1 is efficiently incorporated into IBDV virus-like particles (VLPs) produced in mammalian cells coexpressing the IBDV polyprotein and VP1. Incorporation of VP1 into VLPs requires neither the presence of IBDV RNAs nor that of the nonstructural polypeptide VP5. Immunofluorescence, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and immunoprecipitation analyses conclusively showed that VP1 forms complexes with the structural polypeptide VP3. Formation of VP1-VP3 complexes is likely to be a key step for the morphogenesis of IBDV particles. PMID:10400796

  6. Foot and mouth disease virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Luis L; Grubman, Marvin J

    2009-11-01

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly infectious and economically devastating disease of livestock. Although vaccines, available since the early 1900s, have been instrumental in eradicating FMD from parts of the world, the disease still affects millions of animals around the globe and remains the main sanitary barrier to the commerce of animals and animal products. Currently available inactivated antigen vaccines applied intramuscularly to individual animals, confer serotype and subtype specific protection in 1-2 weeks but fail to induce long-term protective immunity. Among the limitations of this vaccine are potential virus escape from the production facility, short shelf life of formulated product, short duration of immunity and requirement of dozens of antigens to address viral antigenic diversity. Here we review novel vaccine approaches that address some of these limitations. Basic research and the combination of reliable animal inoculation models, reverse genetics and computational biology tools will allow the rational design of safe and effective FMD vaccines. These vaccines should address not only the needs of FMD-free countries but also allow the progressive global control and eradication of this devastating disease.

  7. Human Lyme disease vaccines: past and future concerns.

    PubMed

    Nardelli, Dean T; Munson, Erik L; Callister, Steven M; Schell, Ronald F

    2009-05-01

    The development of a vaccine for Lyme disease was intensely pursued in the 1990s. However, citing a lack of demand, the first human Lyme disease vaccine was withdrawn from the market less than 5 years after its approval. The public's concerns about the vaccine's safety also likely contributed to the withdrawal of the vaccine. Nearly a decade later, no vaccine for human Lyme disease exists. The expansion of Lyme disease's endemic range, as well as the difficulty of diagnosing infection and the disease's steady increase in incidence in the face of proven preventative measures, make the pursuit of a Lyme disease vaccine a worthwhile endeavor. Many believe that the negative public perception of the Lyme disease vaccine will have tarnished any future endeavors towards its development. Importantly, many of the drawbacks of the Lyme disease vaccine were apparent or foreseeable prior to its approval. These pitfalls must be confronted before the construction of a new, effective and safe human Lyme disease vaccine.

  8. Marek's disease--the disease and its prevention by vaccination.

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, P. M.

    1975-01-01

    Marek's disease (MD) is a common lymphoproliferative disease of the domestic chicken caused by a cell associated herpesvirus. Vaccines used for the prophylaxis of MD have been derived from non-pathogenic field Marek's disease virus (MDV), pathogenic MDV and the herpesvirus of turkeys (HVT). Vaccines derived from MDV have been developed by attenuation of virus strains which produce the acute form of MD and virus strains which produce the classical form. They have also been developed by suitable modification, where necessary, of non-pathogenic MDV. All MDV derived vaccines have to be used in the cell associated form. The turkey herpesvirus vaccine can be used in either the cell associated or cell free lyophilized form. All these types of vaccine appear to be safe and to provide significant levels of protection under field conditions. PMID:170953

  9. Foot-and-mouth disease vaccines: progress and problems.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yimei; Lu, Zengjun; Liu, Zaixin

    2016-06-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) has been a major threat to livestock across the world. The predominant method of controlling this disease in endemic regions is through regular vaccination with inactivated vaccine. However, there are many limitations. For instance, cultivation of virulent FMD virus (FMDV) in the manufacturing units poses a risk of escape from production sites. Vaccines may sometimes contain traces of FMD viral non-structural proteins (NSPs), therefore, interfering with the NSP-based serological differentiation infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). Moreover, vaccines are unable to eliminate virus from carrier animals. To address the shortcomings of inactivated vaccines, many efforts are currently devoted to develop novel vaccines including attenuated and/or marker inactivated vaccines, recombinant protein vaccines, synthetic peptide vaccines, and empty capsid vaccines. Here, we review the research progress of novel vaccines, problems that remain to be solved, and also raise some suggestions that would help in the development of FMD vaccines.

  10. Foot-and-mouth disease vaccines: progress and problems.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yimei; Lu, Zengjun; Liu, Zaixin

    2016-06-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) has been a major threat to livestock across the world. The predominant method of controlling this disease in endemic regions is through regular vaccination with inactivated vaccine. However, there are many limitations. For instance, cultivation of virulent FMD virus (FMDV) in the manufacturing units poses a risk of escape from production sites. Vaccines may sometimes contain traces of FMD viral non-structural proteins (NSPs), therefore, interfering with the NSP-based serological differentiation infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). Moreover, vaccines are unable to eliminate virus from carrier animals. To address the shortcomings of inactivated vaccines, many efforts are currently devoted to develop novel vaccines including attenuated and/or marker inactivated vaccines, recombinant protein vaccines, synthetic peptide vaccines, and empty capsid vaccines. Here, we review the research progress of novel vaccines, problems that remain to be solved, and also raise some suggestions that would help in the development of FMD vaccines. PMID:26760264

  11. Vaccines to combat the neglected tropical diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bethony, Jeffrey M.; Cole, Rhea N.; Guo, Xiaoti; Kamhawi, Shaden; Lightowlers, Marshall W.; Loukas, Alex; Petri, William; Reed, Steven; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Hotez, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) represent a group of parasitic and related infectious diseases such as amebiasis, Chagas disease, cysticercosis, echinococcosis, hookworm, leishmaniasis, and schistosomiasis. Together, these conditions are considered the most common infections in low- and middle-income countries, where they produce a level of global disability and human suffering equivalent to better known conditions such as human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and malaria. Despite their global public health importance, progress on developing vaccines for NTD pathogens has lagged because of some key technical hurdles and the fact that these infections occur almost exclusively in the world’s poorest people living below the World Bank poverty line. In the absence of financial incentives for new products, the multinational pharmaceutical companies have not embarked on substantive research and development programs for the neglected tropical disease vaccines. Here, we review the current status of scientific and technical progress in the development of new neglected tropical disease vaccines, highlighting the successes that have been achieved (cysticercosis and echinococcosis) and identifying the challenges and opportunities for development of new vaccines for NTDs. Also highlighted are the contributions being made by non-profit product development partnerships that are working to overcome some of the economic challenges in vaccine manufacture, clinical testing, and global access. PMID:21198676

  12. Efficacy of HVT-IBD vector vaccine compared to attenuated live vaccine using in-ovo vaccination against a Korean very virulent IBDV in commercial broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Roh, J-H; Kang, M; Wei, B; Yoon, R-H; Seo, H-S; Bahng, J-Y; Kwon, J-T; Cha, S-Y; Jang, H-K

    2016-05-01

    The production performance, efficacy, and safety of two types of vaccines for infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) were compared with in-ovo vaccination of Cobb 500 broiler chickens for gross and microscopic examination of the bursa of Fabricius, bursa/body weight (b/B) ratio, flow cytometry, and serologic response to Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccination. One vaccine was a recombinant HVT-IBD vector vaccine (HVT as for herpesvirus of turkeys) and the other was an intermediate plus live IBDV vaccine. A significant difference was detected at 21 d. Eight of 10 chickens that received the IBDV live vaccine had severe bursal lesions and a relatively low b/B ratio of 0.95, and an inhibited NDV vaccine response. On the other hand, the HVT-IBD vector vaccine resulted in mild bursal lesions and a b/B ratio of 1.89. Therefore, the live vaccine had lower safety than that of the HVT-IBD vector vaccine. To determine the protective efficacy, chickens were intraocularly challenged at 24 d. Eight of 10 chickens in the IBDV live vaccination group showed gross and histological lesions characterized by hemorrhage, cyst formation, lymphocytic depletion, and a decreased b/B ratio. In contrast, the HVT-IBD vector vaccinated chickens showed mild gross and histological lesions in three of 10 chickens with a b/B ratio of 1.36, which was similar to that of the unchallenged controls. Vaccinated chickens showed a significant increase in IBDV antibody titers, regardless of the type of vaccine used. In addition, significantly better broiler flock performance was observed with the HVT-IBD vector vaccine compared to that of the live vaccine. Our results revealed that the HVT-IBD vector vaccine could be used as an alternative vaccine to increase efficacy, and to have an improved safety profile compared with the IBDV live vaccine using in-ovo vaccination against the Korean very virulent IBDV in commercial broiler chickens. PMID:26944964

  13. Inflammation and therapeutic vaccination in CNS diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, Howard L.; Selkoe, Dennis J.

    2002-12-01

    The spectrum of inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system has been steadily expanding from classical autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis to far more diverse diseases. Evidence now suggests that syndromes such as Alzheimer's disease and stroke have important inflammatory and immune components and may be amenable to treatment by anti-inflammatory and immunotherapeutic approaches. The notion of 'vaccinating' individuals against a neurodegenerative disorder such as Alzheimer's disease is a marked departure from classical thinking about mechanism and treatment, and yet therapeutic vaccines for both Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis have been validated in animal models and are in the clinic. Such approaches, however, have the potential to induce unwanted inflammatory responses as well as to provide benefit.

  14. Vaccination against cysticercosis and hydatid disease.

    PubMed

    Lightowlers, M W; Flisser, A; Gauci, C G; Heath, D D; Jensen, O; Rolfe, R

    2000-05-01

    Infections with the larval stages of taeniid cestode parasites cause substantial human morbidity as well as economic losses in domestic livestock species. Despite ongoing efforts around the world, few countries have been able substantially to reduce or eradicate these infections through the use of anthelmintics and lifestyle changes. Vaccines offer an additional potential tool to assist with the control of parasite transmission. Here, Marshall Lightowlers and colleagues review the substantial progress that has been made towards developing practical vaccines against hydatid disease in sheep and cysticercosis in sheep and cattle. Recombinant antigens have been used to induce more than 90% protection against challenge infections. Such success in animals encourages investigation of the potential use of vaccines in humans to prevent hydatid disease arising from infection with Echinococcus granulosus and cysticercosis from infection with Taenia solium.

  15. [Pneumococcal vaccine recommendations in chronic respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Casas Maldonado, F; Alfageme Michavila, I; Barchilón Cohen, V S; Peis Redondo, J I; Vargas Ortega, D A

    2014-09-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is an acute respiratory infectious disease which has an incidence of 3-8 cases/1,000 inhabitants, and increases with age and comorbidities. The pneumococcus is the organism most frequently involved in community-acquired pneumonia in the adult (30-35%). Around 40% of patients with community-acquired pneumonia require hospital admission, and around 10% need to be admitted to an intensive care unit. The most serious forms of pneumococcal infection include invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), which covers cases of bacteremia (associated or not to pneumonia), meningitis, pleuritis, arthritis, primary peritonitis and pericarditis. Currently, the biggest problem with the pneumococcus is the emergence of resistance to antimicrobial agents, and its high morbimortality, despite the use of appropriate antibiotics and proper medical treatment. Certain underlying medical conditions increase the risk of IPD and its complications, especially, from the respiratory diseases point of view, smoking and chronic respiratory diseases. Pneumococcal disease, according to the WHO, is the first preventable cause of death worldwide in children and adults. Among the strategies to prevent IPD is vaccination. WHO considers that its universal introduction and implementation against pneumococcus is essential and a priority in all countries. There are currently 2 pneumococcal vaccines for adults: the 23 serotypes polysaccharide and conjugate 13 serotypes. The scientific societies represented here have worked to develop some recommendations, based on the current scientific evidence, regarding the pneumococcal vaccination in the immunocompetent adult with chronic respiratory disease and smokers at risk of suffering from IPD.

  16. [Pneumococcal vaccine recommendations in chronic respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Casas Maldonado, F; Alfageme Michavila, I; Barchilón Cohen, V S; Peis Redondo, J I; Vargas Ortega, D A

    2014-09-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is an acute respiratory infectious disease which has an incidence of 3-8 cases/1,000 inhabitants, and increases with age and comorbidities. The pneumococcus is the organism most frequently involved in community-acquired pneumonia in the adult (30-35%). Around 40% of patients with community-acquired pneumonia require hospital admission, and around 10% need to be admitted to an intensive care unit. The most serious forms of pneumococcal infection include invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), which covers cases of bacteremia (associated or not to pneumonia), meningitis, pleuritis, arthritis, primary peritonitis and pericarditis. Currently, the biggest problem with the pneumococcus is the emergence of resistance to antimicrobial agents, and its high morbimortality, despite the use of appropriate antibiotics and proper medical treatment. Certain underlying medical conditions increase the risk of IPD and its complications, especially, from the respiratory diseases point of view, smoking and chronic respiratory diseases. Pneumococcal disease, according to the WHO, is the first preventable cause of death worldwide in children and adults. Among the strategies to prevent IPD is vaccination. WHO considers that its universal introduction and implementation against pneumococcus is essential and a priority in all countries. There are currently 2 pneumococcal vaccines for adults: the 23 serotypes polysaccharide and conjugate 13 serotypes. The scientific societies represented here have worked to develop some recommendations, based on the current scientific evidence, regarding the pneumococcal vaccination in the immunocompetent adult with chronic respiratory disease and smokers at risk of suffering from IPD. PMID:25107494

  17. [Dengue fever: from disease to vaccination].

    PubMed

    Teyssou, R

    2009-08-01

    Dengue is a tropical disease affecting 110 countries throughout the world and placing over 3 billion people at risk of infection. According the World Health Organization 70 to 500 million persons are infected every year including 2 million who develop hemorrhagic form and 20,000 who die. Children are at highest risk for death. Due to the absence of specialized laboratories in most endemic regions and to the lack of specifici clinical presentation, the incidence of dengue and its economic costs are certainly underestimated. Dengue iscaused by an arbovirus belonging to the Flavivirus genus of the family Flaviviridae. There are four dengue virus serotypes and no cross protection between them. The disease is transmitted through the bites of mosquitoes belonging to the Aedes genus, mainly Aedes aegypti. However A. albopictus has played an important role in the spread of the disease and other species may be involved in specific locations (e.g., A. polynesiensis in the South Pacific). There is no specific treatment for dengue. Management of severe forms depends on symptomatic treatment of hemorrhagic complications and hypovolemic shock. Prevention requires control of vector mosquitoes that is difficult to implement and maintain. Dengue is a major emerging infectious disease with a heavy impact on public health. The high human and economic costs as well as the absence of specific preventive measures underscore the need to develop a vaccine. However finding and distributing such a vaccine to populations at risk is hampered by numerous obstacles. The most notable challenges standing in the way of development of a candidate vaccine are as follows: absence of an animal model, which has important implications for the preclinical development strategy; need to develop a live attenuated vaccine; existence of 4 antigenically distinct serotypes with the resulting risk of competition between vaccine strains; immunologic risks related to antibody-dependent enhancement that has been

  18. Recent progress in vaccines against fungal diseases.

    PubMed

    Cassone, Antonio; Casadevall, Arturo

    2012-08-01

    Diseases caused by fungi are increasingly impacting the health of the human population and now account for a large fraction of infectious disease complications in individuals with impaired immunity or breached tissue defenses. Antifungal therapy is often of limited effectiveness in these patients, resulting into treatment failures, chronic infections and unacceptable rates of mortality, morbidity and their associated costs. Consequently there is a real medical need for new treatments and preventive measures to combat fungal diseases and, toward this goal, safe and efficacious vaccines would constitute major progress. After decades of complacency and neglect of this critically important field of research, remarkable progress has been made in recent years. A number of highly immunogenic and protective vaccine formulations in preclinical setting have been developed, and at least two have undergone Phase 1 clinical trials as preventive and/or therapeutic tools against candidiasis.

  19. [Prevention of virus-related neurological diseases by vaccines].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M

    1997-04-01

    Prevention of virus-related neurological diseases are surveyed. Patients of poliomyelitis has recently been drastically reduced by world-wide administrating live vaccines. In view of rare incidence of paralysis after giving live vaccine, adoption of inactivated vaccine has recently been reconsidered. A live varicella vaccine was developed and has been world-wide used for normal and high-risk children. Incidence of zoster in vaccinated acute leukemic children is several times higher in those who with rash after vaccination as compared with those without rash, and as no or few rash appears after vaccination of normal children, it is expected that vaccination of normal children would lead to reduction of zoster after their aging. Measles encephalitis has rapidly been reduced by world-wide use of live vaccines. Mouse-brain derived vaccine against Japanese encephalitis(JE) has been used in Asian countries. Development of tissue-culture derived JE vaccine is under way. PMID:9103901

  20. Newcastle disease: current vaccine research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle disease (ND) is one of the most important infectious diseases that affect poultry due to its devastating economic impact and world-wide distribution and contribution towards malnutrition in countries that rely on production of village chickens as a source of animal protein. Besides biosec...

  1. Use of vaccines as probes to define disease burden.

    PubMed

    Feikin, Daniel R; Scott, J Anthony G; Gessner, Bradford D

    2014-05-17

    Vaccine probe studies have emerged in the past 15 years as a useful way to characterise disease. By contrast, traditional studies of vaccines focus on defining the vaccine effectiveness or efficacy. The underlying basis for the vaccine probe approach is that the difference in disease burden between vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals can be ascribed to the vaccine-specific pathogen. Vaccine probe studies can increase understanding of a vaccine's public health value. For instance, even when a vaccine has a seemingly low efficacy, a high baseline disease incidence can lead to a large vaccine-preventable disease burden and thus that population-based vaccine introduction would be justified. So far, vaccines have been used as probes to characterise disease syndromes caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b, pneumococcus, rotavirus, and early infant influenza. However, vaccine probe studies have enormous potential and could be used more widely in epidemiology, for example, to define the vaccine-preventable burden of malaria, typhoid, paediatric influenza, and dengue, and to identify causal interactions between different pathogens.

  2. Vaccination strategies for Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Ramos, Marina; von Euler Chelpin, Marianne; Sanchez-Guajardo, Vanesa

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease in the world, but there is currently no available cure for it. Current treatments only alleviate some of the symptoms for a few years, but they become ineffective in the long run and do not stop the disease. Therefore it is of outmost importance to develop therapeutic strategies that can prevent, stop, or cure Parkinson disease. A very promising target for these therapies is the peripheral immune system due to its probable involvement in the disease and its potential as a tool to modulate neuroinflammation. But for such strategies to be successful, we need to understand the particular state of the peripheral immune system during Parkinson disease in order to avoid its weaknesses. In this review we examine the available data regarding how dopamine regulates the peripheral immune system and how this regulation is affected in Parkinson disease; the specific cytokine profiles observed during disease progression and the alterations documented to date in patients’ peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We also review the different strategies used in Parkinson disease animal models to modulate the adaptive immune response to salvage dopaminergic neurons from cell death. After analyzing the evidence, we hypothesize the need to prime the immune system to restore natural tolerance against α-synuclein in Parkinson disease, including at the same time B and T cells, so that T cells can reprogram microglia activation to a beneficial pattern and B cell/IgG can help neurons cope with the pathological forms of α-synuclein. PMID:24670306

  3. Infectious bursal disease virus activates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway by interaction of VP5 protein with the p85{alpha} subunit of PI3K

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Li; Hou Lei; Zhu Shanshan; Wang Jing; Zhou Jiao; Liu Jue

    2011-08-15

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling is commonly activated upon virus infection and has been implicated in the regulation of diverse cellular functions such as proliferation and apoptosis. The present study demonstrated for the first time that infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), the causative agent of a highly contagious disease in chickens, can induce Akt phosphorylation in cultured cells, by a mechanism that is dependent on PI3K. Inhibition of PI3K activation greatly enhanced virus-induced cytopathic effect and apoptotic cell death as evidenced by cleavage of poly-ADP ribose polymerase and activation of caspase-3. Investigations into the mechanism of PI3K/Akt activation revealed that IBDV activates PI3K/Akt signaling through binding of the non-structural protein VP5 to regulatory subunit p85{alpha} of PI3K resulting in the suppression of premature apoptosis and improved virus growth after infection. The results presented here provide a basis for understanding molecular mechanism of IBDV infection.

  4. Lyme disease: pathogenesis and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Simon, M M; Bauer, Y; Zhong, W; Hofmann, H; Wallich, R

    1999-12-01

    Research of recent years on Lyme disease has greatly increased our understanding on antigenic structures and genotypic variability of the aetiological agent, Borrelia (B.) burgdorferi sensu lato, as well as on mechanisms underlying host-parasite interactions and induction/mode of action of protective immune responses. A vaccine formula on the basis of the outer surface lipoprotein A (OspA), previously developed in our laboratory, has successfully been tested in a clinical trial involving nearly 10,000 subjects in the USA. The OspA vaccine is unique in that it protects the mammalian host from infection by eliminating spirochaetes from the vector, but does not cure an established disease. This is because spirochaetes express OspA exclusively in the tick, but not when transmitted into the vertebrate host. For Europe, a more complex vaccine formula is required in order to achieve full protection. This is due to the higher degree of heterogeneity of OspA molecules among isolates of B. burgdorferi in Europe and the inability of the monovalent vaccine to convey complete cross-protection.

  5. The foot-and-mouth disease carrier state divergence in vaccinated and non-vaccinated cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pathogenesis of persistent foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection was investigated following simulated-natural virus exposure of 43 cattle that were either naïve or vaccinated using a recombinant, adenovirus-vectored vaccine. Although vaccinated cattle were protected against clinical dise...

  6. Vaccine demand driven by vaccine side effects: dynamic implications for SIR diseases.

    PubMed

    d'Onofrio, Alberto; Manfredi, Piero

    2010-05-21

    For infections for which the perceived risk of serious disease is steadily low, the perceived risk of suffering some vaccine side effects might become the driving force of the vaccine demand. We investigate the dynamics of SIR infections in homogeneously mixing populations where the vaccine uptake is a decreasing function of the current (or past) incidence, or prevalence, of vaccine side effects. We define an appropriate model where vaccine side-effects are modelled as functions of the age since vaccination. It happens that the vaccine uptake follows its own dynamics independent of epidemiological variables. We show the conditions under which the vaccine uptake lands on a globally stable equilibrium, or steadily oscillates, and the implications of such behaviour for the dynamics of epidemiological variables. We finally report some unexpected scenarios caused by trends in vaccine side effects.

  7. Social contact networks and disease eradicability under voluntary vaccination.

    PubMed

    Perisic, Ana; Bauch, Chris T

    2009-02-01

    Certain theories suggest that it should be difficult or impossible to eradicate a vaccine-preventable disease under voluntary vaccination: Herd immunity implies that the individual incentive to vaccinate disappears at high coverage levels. Historically, there have been examples of declining coverage for vaccines, such as MMR vaccine and whole-cell pertussis vaccine, that are consistent with this theory. On the other hand, smallpox was globally eradicated by 1980 despite voluntary vaccination policies in many jurisdictions. Previous modeling studies of the interplay between disease dynamics and individual vaccinating behavior have assumed that infection is transmitted in a homogeneously mixing population. By comparison, here we simulate transmission of a vaccine-preventable SEIR infection through a random, static contact network. Individuals choose whether to vaccinate based on infection risks from neighbors, and based on vaccine risks. When neighborhood size is small, rational vaccinating behavior results in rapid containment of the infection through voluntary ring vaccination. As neighborhood size increases (while the average force of infection is held constant), a threshold is reached beyond which the infection can break through partially vaccinated rings, percolating through the whole population and resulting in considerable epidemic final sizes and a large number vaccinated. The former outcome represents convergence between individually and socially optimal outcomes, whereas the latter represents their divergence, as observed in most models of individual vaccinating behavior that assume homogeneous mixing. Similar effects are observed in an extended model using smallpox-specific natural history and transmissibility assumptions. This work illustrates the significant qualitative differences between behavior-infection dynamics in discrete contact-structured populations versus continuous unstructured populations. This work also shows how disease eradicability in

  8. Ebolavirus Vaccines: Progress in the Fight Against Ebola Virus Disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Xin; Yao, Hang-Ping; Wu, Nan-Ping; Gao, Hai-Nv; Wu, Hai-Bo; Jin, Chang-Zhong; Lu, Xiang-Yun; Xie, Tian-Shen; Li, Lan-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Ebolaviruses are highly infectious pathogens that cause lethal Ebola virus disease (EVD) in humans and non-human primates (NHPs). Due to their high pathogenicity and transmissibility, as well as the potential to be misused as a bioterrorism agent, ebolaviruses would threaten the health of global populations if not controlled. In this review, we describe the origin and structure of ebolaviruses and the development of vaccines from the beginning of the 1980s, including conventional ebolavirus vaccines, DNA vaccines, Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs), vaccinia virus-based vaccines, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV)-like replicon particles, Kunjin virus-based vaccine, recombinant Zaire Ebolavirusx2206;VP30, recombinant cytomegalovirus (CMV)-based vaccines, recombinant rabies virus (RABV)-based vaccines, recombinant paramyxovirus-based vaccines, adenovirus-based vaccines and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based vaccines. No licensed vaccine or specific treatment is currently available to counteract ebolavirus infection, although DNA plasmids and several viral vector approaches have been evaluated as promising vaccine platforms. These vaccine candidates have been confirmed to be successful in protecting NHPs against lethal infection. Moreover, these vaccine candidates were successfully advanced to clinical trials. The present review provides an update of the current research on Ebola vaccines, with the aim of providing an overview on current prospects in the fight against EVD.

  9. Ebolavirus Vaccines: Progress in the Fight Against Ebola Virus Disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Xin; Yao, Hang-Ping; Wu, Nan-Ping; Gao, Hai-Nv; Wu, Hai-Bo; Jin, Chang-Zhong; Lu, Xiang-Yun; Xie, Tian-Shen; Li, Lan-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Ebolaviruses are highly infectious pathogens that cause lethal Ebola virus disease (EVD) in humans and non-human primates (NHPs). Due to their high pathogenicity and transmissibility, as well as the potential to be misused as a bioterrorism agent, ebolaviruses would threaten the health of global populations if not controlled. In this review, we describe the origin and structure of ebolaviruses and the development of vaccines from the beginning of the 1980s, including conventional ebolavirus vaccines, DNA vaccines, Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs), vaccinia virus-based vaccines, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV)-like replicon particles, Kunjin virus-based vaccine, recombinant Zaire Ebolavirusx2206;VP30, recombinant cytomegalovirus (CMV)-based vaccines, recombinant rabies virus (RABV)-based vaccines, recombinant paramyxovirus-based vaccines, adenovirus-based vaccines and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based vaccines. No licensed vaccine or specific treatment is currently available to counteract ebolavirus infection, although DNA plasmids and several viral vector approaches have been evaluated as promising vaccine platforms. These vaccine candidates have been confirmed to be successful in protecting NHPs against lethal infection. Moreover, these vaccine candidates were successfully advanced to clinical trials. The present review provides an update of the current research on Ebola vaccines, with the aim of providing an overview on current prospects in the fight against EVD. PMID:26535889

  10. Vaccines for the prevention of neglected diseases--dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Pang, Tikki

    2003-06-01

    Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever have spread to all tropical areas of the developing world, but still remain largely neglected diseases. Several promising vaccine candidates in the form of live attenuated and chimeric vaccines have been developed and are currently in human clinical trials. However, significant practical, logistic, and scientific challenges remain before these vaccines can widely and safely be applied to vulnerable populations. Vector control, community education and public health measures must be pursued in parallel with vaccine development.

  11. [Vaccination prior to travelling for patients with rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Ehrenstein, B

    2011-06-01

    Rheumatologists increasingly face patient questions about the need, the safety and the effectiveness of travel-related vaccinations. Currently, there are no guidelines on travel vaccinations for patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases. The use of live attenuated vaccines remains contraindicated in patients receiving relevant immunosuppressive therapy despite some encouraging results from initial pilot studies. However, many inactivated travel vaccines can safely be used for patients with rheumatic diseases. Furthermore, rheumatologists should be vigilant in identifying and closing gaps in the routine vaccinations for patients.

  12. Transmission-Blocking Vaccines: Focus on Anti-Vector Vaccines against Tick-Borne Diseases.

    PubMed

    Neelakanta, Girish; Sultana, Hameeda

    2015-06-01

    Tick-borne diseases are a potential threat that account for significant morbidity and mortality in human population worldwide. Vaccines are not available to treat several of the tick-borne diseases. With the emergence and resurgence of several tick-borne diseases, emphasis on the development of transmission-blocking vaccines remains increasing. In this review, we provide a snap shot on some of the potential candidates for the development of anti-vector vaccines (a form of transmission-blocking vaccines) against wide range of hard and soft ticks that include Ixodes, Haemaphysalis, Dermacentor, Amblyomma, Rhipicephalus and Ornithodoros species.

  13. Recent Advances of Vaccine Adjuvants for Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Minh Trang

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines are the most effective and cost-efficient method for preventing diseases caused by infectious pathogens. Despite the great success of vaccines, development of safe and strong vaccines is still required for emerging new pathogens, re-emerging old pathogens, and in order to improve the inadequate protection conferred by existing vaccines. One of the most important strategies for the development of effective new vaccines is the selection and usage of a suitable adjuvant. Immunologic adjuvants are essential for enhancing vaccine potency by improvement of the humoral and/or cell-mediated immune response to vaccine antigens. Thus, formulation of vaccines with appropriate adjuvants is an attractive approach towards eliciting protective and long-lasting immunity in humans. However, only a limited number of adjuvants is licensed for human vaccines due to concerns about safety and toxicity. We summarize current knowledge about the potential benefits of adjuvants, the characteristics of adjuvants and the mechanisms of adjuvants in human vaccines. Adjuvants have diverse modes of action and should be selected for use on the basis of the type of immune response that is desired for a particular vaccine. Better understanding of current adjuvants will help exploring new adjuvant formulations and facilitate rational design of vaccines against infectious diseases. PMID:25922593

  14. Vaccines for prevention of group B meningococcal disease: Not your father's vaccines.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Lee H

    2015-11-27

    For decades, there was no licensed vaccine for prevention of endemic capsular group B meningococcal disease, despite the availability of vaccines for prevention of the other most common meningococcal capsular groups. Recently, however, two new vaccines have been licensed for prevention of group B disease. Although immunogenic and considered to have an acceptable safety profile, there are many scientific unknowns about these vaccines, including effectiveness against antigenically diverse endemic meningococcal strains; duration of protection; whether they provide any herd protection; and whether there will be meningococcal antigenic changes that will diminish effectiveness over time. In addition, these vaccines present societal dilemmas that could influence how they are used in the U.S., including high vaccine cost in the face of a historically low incidence of meningococcal disease. These issues are discussed in this review. PMID:26116255

  15. Vaccines for Prevention of Group B Meningococcal Disease: Not Your Father's Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Lee H

    2015-12-01

    For decades, there was no licensed vaccine for prevention of endemic capsular group B meningococcal disease, despite the availability of vaccines for prevention of the other most common meningococcal capsular groups. Recently, however, two new vaccines have been licensed for prevention of group B disease. Although immunogenic and considered to have an acceptable safety profile, there are many scientific unknowns about these vaccines, including effectiveness against antigenically diverse endemic meningococcal strains; duration of protection; whether they provide any herd protection; and whether there will be meningococcal antigenic changes that will diminish effectiveness over time. In addition, these vaccines present societal dilemmas that could influence how they are used in the U.S., including high vaccine cost in the face of a historically low incidence of meningococcal disease. These issues are discussed in this review.

  16. Vaccines for prevention of group B meningococcal disease: Not your father's vaccines.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Lee H

    2015-11-27

    For decades, there was no licensed vaccine for prevention of endemic capsular group B meningococcal disease, despite the availability of vaccines for prevention of the other most common meningococcal capsular groups. Recently, however, two new vaccines have been licensed for prevention of group B disease. Although immunogenic and considered to have an acceptable safety profile, there are many scientific unknowns about these vaccines, including effectiveness against antigenically diverse endemic meningococcal strains; duration of protection; whether they provide any herd protection; and whether there will be meningococcal antigenic changes that will diminish effectiveness over time. In addition, these vaccines present societal dilemmas that could influence how they are used in the U.S., including high vaccine cost in the face of a historically low incidence of meningococcal disease. These issues are discussed in this review.

  17. Engineering Enhanced Vaccine Cell Lines To Eradicate Vaccine-Preventable Diseases: the Polio End Game

    PubMed Central

    van der Sanden, Sabine M. G.; Wu, Weilin; Dybdahl-Sissoko, Naomi; Weldon, William C.; Brooks, Paula; O'Donnell, Jason; Jones, Les P.; Brown, Cedric; Tompkins, S. Mark; Karpilow, Jon; Tripp, Ralph A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vaccine manufacturing costs prevent a significant portion of the world's population from accessing protection from vaccine-preventable diseases. To enhance vaccine production at reduced costs, a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen was performed to identify gene knockdown events that enhanced poliovirus replication. Primary screen hits were validated in a Vero vaccine manufacturing cell line using attenuated and wild-type poliovirus strains. Multiple single and dual gene silencing events increased poliovirus titers >20-fold and >50-fold, respectively. Host gene knockdown events did not affect virus antigenicity, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas9-mediated knockout of the top candidates dramatically improved viral vaccine strain production. Interestingly, silencing of several genes that enhanced poliovirus replication also enhanced replication of enterovirus 71, a clinically relevant virus to which vaccines are being targeted. The discovery that host gene modulation can markedly increase virus vaccine production dramatically alters mammalian cell-based vaccine manufacturing possibilities and should facilitate polio eradication using the inactivated poliovirus vaccine. IMPORTANCE Using a genome-wide RNAi screen, a collection of host virus resistance genes was identified that, upon silencing, increased poliovirus and enterovirus 71 production by from 10-fold to >50-fold in a Vero vaccine manufacturing cell line. This report provides novel insights into enterovirus-host interactions and describes an approach to developing the next generation of vaccine manufacturing through engineered vaccine cell lines. The results show that specific gene silencing and knockout events can enhance viral titers of both attenuated (Sabin strain) and wild-type polioviruses, a finding that should greatly facilitate global implementation of inactivated polio vaccine as well as further reduce costs for live-attenuated oral polio vaccines

  18. Herd immunity to Newcastle disease virus in poultry by vaccination.

    PubMed

    van Boven, Michiel; Bouma, Annemarie; Fabri, Teun H F; Katsma, Elly; Hartog, Leo; Koch, Guus

    2008-02-01

    Newcastle disease is an economically important disease of poultry for which vaccination is applied as a preventive measure in many countries. Nevertheless, outbreaks have been reported in vaccinated populations. This suggests that either the vaccination coverage level is too low or that vaccination does not provide perfect immunity, allowing the virus to spread in partially vaccinated populations. Here we study the requirements of an epidemiologically effective vaccination program against Newcastle disease in poultry, based on data from experimental transmission studies. The transmission studies indicate that vaccinated birds with low or undetectable antibody titres may be protected against disease and mortality but that infection and transmission may still occur. In fact, our quantitative analyses show that Newcastle disease virus is highly transmissible in poultry with low antibody titres. As a consequence, herd immunity can only be achieved if a high proportion of birds (>85%) have a high antibody titre (log(2) haemagglutination inhibition titre > or =3) after vaccination. We discuss the implications for the control of Newcastle disease in poultry by vaccination.

  19. Titration of Marek's disease cell-associated vaccine virus (CVI 988) of reconstituted vaccine and vaccine ampoules from Dutch hatcheries.

    PubMed

    Landman, W J M; Verschuren, S B E

    2003-01-01

    Thirty-one outbreaks of Marek's disease (MD) were reported in the Netherlands and retrospectively analyzed. The outbreaks occurred mostly in vaccinated commercial layer and a few breeder flocks of several breeds; however, the cause of the outbreaks could not be established. Therefore, in a prospective study, the occurrence of true vaccine failures was assessed onfive hatcheries. The plaque-forming units (PFU) of MD vaccine per chicken dose were determined through in vitro assays on vacine ampoules (2 to 5 per hatchery) and samples of reconstituted vaccine (approximately 22 per hatchery). All forty reconstituted vaccine samples of hatcheries 1 and 4 showed PFU doses <10(3). In hatchery 4, 14 samples showed extreme low PFU (< or = 10 PFU). In hatcheries 2, 3, and 5, the numbers of MD vaccine suspensions with a titer > or = 10(3) PFU, which is the standard required, were 1 (5%), 17 (77%), and 3 (14%), respectively. Some vaccine ampoules showed < 10(3) PFU per chicken dose. This study shows the usefulness to assess the PFU per chicken dose of reconstituted MD vaccine and vaccine ampoules to unravel true vaccine failures, which could result in disease outbreaks in the field.

  20. Novel approaches to foot-and-mouth disease vaccine development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The need for better Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines is not new, a report from the Research Commission on FMD, authored by F. Loeffler and P. Frosch in 1897, highlighted the need for developing a vaccine against FMD and qualified this as a devastating disease causing “severe economic damage to ...

  1. [Pneumococcal vaccination in obstructive lung diseases -- what can we expect?].

    PubMed

    Rose, M; Lode, H; de Roux, A; Zielen, S

    2005-03-01

    Many countries' guidelines recommend pneumococcal vaccination for patients suffering from obstructive airway disease. This paper reviews the literature as to immunogenicity and safety of this immunization. There is no evidence for a negative effect of pneumococcal vaccination on these patients. Only a few data exist on the preventive impact of pneumococcal vaccination as to exacerbations of obstructive airway diseases. Existing studies mostly took up this question as a side aspect. The effect in children and adults appears limited. On the other hand, the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine prevents life-threatening invasive infections in children younger than 5 years, and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine protects healthy adults against bacteriaemic pneumonia. Thus, pneumococcal vaccination of patients suffering from obstructive airway disease is recommendable.

  2. Modelling vaccination strategies against foot-and-mouth disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeling, M. J.; Woolhouse, M. E. J.; May, R. M.; Davies, G.; Grenfell, B. T.

    2003-01-01

    Vaccination has proved a powerful defence against a range of infectious diseases of humans and animals. However, its potential to control major epidemics of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in livestock is contentious. Using an individual farm-based model, we consider either national prophylactic vaccination campaigns in advance of an outbreak, or combinations of reactive vaccination and culling strategies during an epidemic. Consistent with standard epidemiological theory, mass prophylactic vaccination could reduce greatly the potential for a major epidemic, while the targeting of high-risk farms increases efficiency. Given sufficient resources and preparation, a combination of reactive vaccination and culling might control ongoing epidemics. We also explore a reactive strategy, `predictive' vaccination, which targets key spatial transmission loci and can reduce markedly the long tail that characterizes many FMD epidemics. These analyses have broader implications for the control of human and livestock infectious diseases in heterogeneous spatial landscapes.

  3. Economics and financing of vaccines for diarrheal diseases.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Sarah M; Lee, Bruce Y

    2014-01-01

    The considerable burden of infectious disease-caused diarrhea around the world has motivated the continuing development of a number of vaccine candidates over the past several decades with some reaching the market. As with all major public health interventions, understanding the economics and financing of vaccines against diarrheal diseases is essential to their development and implementation. This review focuses on each of the major infectious pathogens that commonly cause diarrhea, the current understanding of their economic burden, the status of vaccine development, and existing economic evaluations of the vaccines. While the literature on the economics and financing of vaccines against diarrhea diseases is growing, there is considerable room for more inquiry. Substantial gaps exist for many pathogens, circumstances, and effects. Economics and financing studies are integral to vaccine development and implementation.

  4. The VP2 variable region of African and German isolates of infectious bursal disease virus: comparison with very virulent, "classical" virulent, and attenuated tissue culture-adapted strains.

    PubMed

    Zierenberg, K; Nieper, H; van den Berg, T P; Ezeokoli, C D; Voss, M; Müller, H

    2000-01-01

    11 African and two German IBDV strains isolated in the mid '80s from field outbreaks in vaccinated and unvaccinated chicken flocks displayed features of very virulent (vv) IBDV strains. The sequence data of the VP2 variable region and phylogenetic analysis confirm that these strains can be grouped within vv IBDV strains which appeared at the same time on the three continents Africa, Asia, and Europe. Strain Cu-1wt, responsible for severe IBD outbreaks in Germany 13 years earlier, showed some relatedness to these strains, but also significant differences at the genomic level, even though this strain has also features of the vv IBDV strains. PMID:10664410

  5. Model for product development of vaccines against neglected tropical diseases: a vaccine against human hookworm.

    PubMed

    Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Brown, Ami Shah

    2008-12-01

    This article provides an overview of the advances in product development and technology transfer of the vaccine against human hookworm, with particular emphasis on the lessons learned and the challenges of developing a vaccine in the nonprofit sector. The comprehensive approach to vaccine development established by the Human Hookworm Vaccine Initiative (HHVI) identifies key operational and technical aspects that are essential for a successful partnership with a developing country vaccine manufacturer. This article also highlights the importance of a global access roadmap to guide the vaccine development program. The advancement of new products for the control of neglected tropical diseases portends great challenges for global access, including aspects related to vaccine design, product development and manufacture, vaccine introduction and distribution, financing, knowledge dissemination and intellectual property management. With only three vaccines for neglected tropical diseases in clinical trials - hookworm, leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis - we are at the nascent stages of developing vaccines for neglected populations. Product development public-private partnerships, such as the HHVI, continue to show great promise on this front and will eventually provide significant control tools for achieving millennium development goals related to poverty reduction, as well as child and maternal health.

  6. Newcastle Disease Virus as a Vaccine Vector for Development of Human and Veterinary Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin-Hee; Samal, Siba K.

    2016-01-01

    Viral vaccine vectors have shown to be effective in inducing a robust immune response against the vaccine antigen. Newcastle disease virus (NDV), an avian paramyxovirus, is a promising vaccine vector against human and veterinary pathogens. Avirulent NDV strains LaSota and B1 have long track records of safety and efficacy. Therefore, use of these strains as vaccine vectors is highly safe in avian and non-avian species. NDV replicates efficiently in the respiratory track of the host and induces strong local and systemic immune responses against the foreign antigen. As a vaccine vector, NDV can accommodate foreign sequences with a good degree of stability and as a RNA virus, there is limited possibility for recombination with host cell DNA. Using NDV as a vaccine vector in humans offers several advantages over other viral vaccine vectors. NDV is safe in humans due to host range restriction and there is no pre-existing antibody to NDV in the human population. NDV is antigenically distinct from common human pathogens. NDV replicates to high titer in a cell line acceptable for human vaccine development. Therefore, NDV is an attractive vaccine vector for human pathogens for which vaccines are currently not available. NDV is also an attractive vaccine vector for animal pathogens. PMID:27384578

  7. Vaccine administration in children with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Mastrolia, Maria Vincenza; Prada, Elisabetta; Pietrasanta, Carlo; Principi, Nicola

    2014-11-20

    Pediatric patients with severe chronic kidney disease (CKD) on conservative treatment, on dialysis, and those with renal transplantation are at a higher risk for infectious diseases as the result of impaired immune responses against infectious agents. Infections in these patients can have drastic consequences for disease morbidity and mortality. Immunization is a crucial preventive strategy for disease management in this pediatric population. However, vaccination coverage among children with CKD remains low due to safety concerns and doubts about vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy. In this study, we reviewed why children with CKD are at higher risk of infections, the importance of vaccinations among these children, barriers to vaccinations, and recommend the best vaccination schedules. Overall, vaccines have acceptable immunogenicity, efficacy, and safety profiles in children with CKD. However, in some cases, the protective antibody levels induced by vaccines and the benefits and risks of booster vaccine doses must be individually managed. Furthermore, close contacts and household members of these children should complete age-appropriate vaccination schedules to increase the child's indirect protection.

  8. Role of vaccinations and prophylaxis in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Despoina; Tsoulas, Christos; Tragiannidis, Athanassios; Sipsas, Nikolaos V

    2015-04-01

    Targeted strategies for reducing the increased risk of infection in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases include vaccinations as well as antibiotic prophylaxis in selected patients. However, there are still issues under debate: Is vaccination in patients with rheumatic diseases immunogenic? Is it safe? What is the impact of immunosuppressive drugs on vaccine immunogenicity and safety? Does vaccination cause disease flares? In which cases is prophylaxis against Pneumocystis jirovecii required? This review addresses these important questions to which clinicians and researchers still do not have definite answers. The first part includes immunization recommendations and reviews current data on vaccine efficacy and safety in patients with rheumatic diseases. The second part discusses prophylaxis for Pneumocystis pneumonia.

  9. Association Between Vaccine Refusal and Vaccine-Preventable Diseases in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Varun K.; Bednarczyk, Robert A.; Salmon, Daniel A.; Omer, Saad B.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Parents hesitant to vaccinate their children may delay routine immunizations or seek exemptions from state vaccine mandates. Recent outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases in the United States have drawn attention to this phenomenon. Improved understanding of the association between vaccine refusal and the epidemiology of these diseases is needed. OBJECTIVE To review the published literature to evaluate the association between vaccine delay, refusal, or exemption and the epidemiology of measles and pertussis, 2 vaccine-preventable diseases with recent US outbreaks. EVIDENCE REVIEW Search of PubMed through November 30, 2015, for reports of US measles outbreaks that have occurred since measles was declared eliminated in the United States (after January 1, 2000), endemic and epidemic pertussis since the lowest point in US pertussis incidence (after January 1, 1977), and for studies that assessed disease risk in the context of vaccine delay or exemption. FINDINGS We identified 18 published measles studies (9 annual summaries and 9 outbreak reports), which described 1416 measles cases (individual age range, 2 weeks-84 years; 178 cases younger than 12 months) and more than half (56.8%) had no history of measles vaccination. Of the 970 measles cases with detailed vaccination data, 574 cases were unvaccinated despite being vaccine eligible and 405 (70.6%) of these had nonmedical exemptions (eg, exemptions for religious or philosophical reasons, as opposed to medical contraindications; 41.8%of total). Among 32 reports of pertussis outbreaks, which included 10 609 individuals for whom vaccination status was reported (age range, 10 days-87 years), the 5 largest statewide epidemics had substantial proportions (range, 24%–45%) of unvaccinated or undervaccinated individuals. However, several pertussis outbreaks also occurred in highly vaccinated populations, indicating waning immunity. Nine reports (describing 12 outbreaks) provided detailed vaccination data on

  10. Vaccinations for Neuroinfectious Disease: A Global Health Priority.

    PubMed

    Leibovitch, Emily C; Jacobson, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Vaccines for neuroinfectious diseases are becoming an ever-increasing global health priority, as neurologic manifestations and sequelae from existing and emerging central nervous system infections account for significant worldwide morbidity and mortality. The prevention of neurotropic infections can be achieved through globally coordinated vaccination campaigns, which have successfully eradicated nonzoonotic agents such as the variola viruses and, hopefully soon, poliovirus. This review discusses vaccines that are currently available or under development for zoonotic flaviviruses and alphaviruses, including Japanese and tick-borne encephalitis, yellow fever, West Nile, dengue, Zika, encephalitic equine viruses, and chikungunya. Also discussed are nonzoonotic agents, including measles and human herpesviruses, as well as select bacterial, fungal, and protozoal pathogens. While therapeutic vaccines will be required to treat a multitude of ongoing infections of the nervous system, the ideal vaccination strategy is pre-exposure vaccination, with the ultimate goals of minimizing disease associated with zoonotic viruses and the total eradication of nonzoonotic agents. PMID:27365085

  11. A review of factors affecting vaccine preventable disease in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Norimitsu; Ching, Michael S L

    2014-12-01

    Japan is well known as a country with a strong health record. However its incidence rates of vaccine preventable diseases (VPD) such as hepatitis B, measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella remain higher than other developed countries. This article reviews the factors that contribute to the high rates of VPD in Japan. These include historical and political factors that delayed the introduction of several important vaccines until recently. Access has also been affected by vaccines being divided into government-funded "routine" (eg, polio, pertussis) and self-pay "voluntary" groups (eg, hepatitis A and B). Routine vaccines have higher rates of administration than voluntary vaccines. Administration factors include differences in well child care schedules, the approach to simultaneous vaccination, vaccination contraindication due to fever, and vaccination spacing. Parental factors include low intention to fully vaccinate their children and misperceptions about side effects and efficacy. There are also provider knowledge gaps regarding indications, adverse effects, interval, and simultaneous vaccination. These multifactorial issues combine to produce lower population immunization rates and a higher incidence of VPD than other developed countries. This article will provide insight into the current situation of Japanese vaccinations, the issues to be addressed and suggestions for public health promotion. PMID:25628969

  12. A Review of Factors Affecting Vaccine Preventable Disease in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Michael SL

    2014-01-01

    Japan is well known as a country with a strong health record. However its incidence rates of vaccine preventable diseases (VPD) such as hepatitis B, measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella remain higher than other developed countries. This article reviews the factors that contribute to the high rates of VPD in Japan. These include historical and political factors that delayed the introduction of several important vaccines until recently. Access has also been affected by vaccines being divided into government-funded “routine” (eg, polio, pertussis) and self-pay “voluntary” groups (eg, hepatitis A and B). Routine vaccines have higher rates of administration than voluntary vaccines. Administration factors include differences in well child care schedules, the approach to simultaneous vaccination, vaccination contraindication due to fever, and vaccination spacing. Parental factors include low intention to fully vaccinate their children and misperceptions about side effects and efficacy. There are also provider knowledge gaps regarding indications, adverse effects, interval, and simultaneous vaccination. These multifactorial issues combine to produce lower population immunization rates and a higher incidence of VPD than other developed countries. This article will provide insight into the current situation of Japanese vaccinations, the issues to be addressed and suggestions for public health promotion. PMID:25628969

  13. Hepatitis B vaccination in chronic kidney disease patients: a call for novel vaccines.

    PubMed

    Grzegorzewska, Alicja E

    2014-11-01

    The protective immunization rates in response to hepatitis B vaccination in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients are lower than response rates in the general population because of genetic and CKD-related factors as well as logistic problems with a proper providing of the recommended vaccination schedules. This review focuses on third-generation vaccines and adjuvanted vaccines commercially introduced in some countries, investigated in clinical trials, especially involving CKD patients or used only in the experimental studies. In order to improve the immunization rate, the use of third-generation vaccines (yeast-derived pre-S2/S HBV vaccines, mammalian cell-derived pre-S2/S HBV vaccines, mammalian cell-derived pre-S1/pre-S2/S HBV vaccines), novel adjuvants (AS04, AS02, phosphorothioate oligodeoxyribonucleotide, hemokinin-1, a polysaccharide based on delta inulin, nano-complex Hep-c, cyclic diguanylate) or immunostimulants for enhancement of immunogenicity of existing recombinant hepatitis B vaccines is tried to improve results of hepatitis B vaccination prior to dialysis commencement or already on renal replacement therapy.

  14. Vaccines for the prevention of meningococcal disease in children.

    PubMed

    Soriano-Gabarró, M; Stuart, James M; Rosenstein, Nancy E

    2002-07-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is one of the most feared infections in pediatrics as the result of its rapid progression, high fatality rate, and frequent occurrence of sequelae. The 5 major meningococcal serogroups associated with disease are A, B, C, Y, and W-135. Currently available polysaccharide vaccines are effective in preventing disease caused by serogroups A, C, Y, and W-135 in older children and adults but do not elicit good long-term protection in young children. Vaccines that protect against serogroup B disease are still in development. As with the Haemophilus influenzae type b and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccines, conjugation of the polysaccharide vaccine to a protein carrier dramatically changes vaccine characteristics, with resulting efficacy in infants. New meningococcal conjugate vaccines against serogroups A, C, Y, and W-135 are being developed. A serogroup C conjugate vaccine has been introduced successfully into the routine childhood schedule in the United Kingdom. New meningococcal conjugate vaccines are likely to have a dramatic effect on the burden of meningococcal disease within the next decade.

  15. Prophylactic vaccinations in chronic kidney disease: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Grzegorzewska, Alicja E

    2015-01-01

    In this review, recent data on results concerning prophylactic vaccinations against hepatitis B virus, influenza viruses, and pneumococci are presented. Effects of active immunization in chronic kidney disease depend on category of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The lower GFR category the better results of response to vaccination. Abnormalities in toll-like receptors and down-regulation of B-cell activating factor receptor in transitional B cells were recently included into uremia-associated deficits in immunocompetence. Development of novel, more potent vaccines containing toll-like receptor agonists as adjuvants may help to achieve more effective immunization against hepatitis B virus in immunocompromised patients. Experimental studies announce further vaccine adjuvants. A vaccine against hepatitis C virus is not available yet, but promising results were already obtained in the experimental and preliminary clinical studies. Prophylactic vaccinations against influenza viruses and pneumococci become increasingly popular in dialysis facilities due to their proved benefits. PMID:25911956

  16. Influenza vaccination in children at high risk of respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Patria, Maria Francesca; Tagliabue, Claudia; Longhi, Benedetta; Esposito, Susanna

    2013-05-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs) are a heterogeneous group of diseases that can affect the pediatric population and health authorities throughout the world recommend influenza vaccination because of the significant risk of influenza-related complications. However, despite this recommendation, vaccine coverage is generally unsatisfactory. The aim of this review is to analyze the impact of influenza on children at high risk of respiratory disease, and the immunogenicity, safety and efficacy of influenza vaccination in such children. The results show that there is a significant risk of influenza-related complications in preterm neonates and infants, in whom influenza vaccines are immunogenic and safe (although their efficacy has not been specifically studied). There are conflicting data concerning the effect of influenza infection on asthma morbidity in children, and whether or not influenza vaccination helps to prevent asthma exacerbations. Recent data provide no evidence that influenza is more frequent in patients with cystic fibrosis than in healthy subjects, or that it is responsible for increased lower respiratory tract morbidity. The lack of any clear correlate of protection suggests that future studies should also consider the efficacy of the different influenza vaccines and not only evaluate them in terms of immunogenicity. Furthermore, there is a need for clinical studies to assess the effectiveness of the available vaccines in patients with other rare CRDs and other chronic underlying diseases with possibly severe respiratory involvement. It is also important to determine whether children with recurrent respiratory tract infections should be included in the list of those for whom influenza vaccination is recommended. In the meantime, given the increasing evidence of the burden of influenza on the population as a whole and the benefits associated with vaccination, annual influenza vaccinations should be recommended for all children at high risk of

  17. Effect of attenuated viral vaccines on suckling mice infected with LCMV.

    PubMed

    Csatáry, L K; Szeri, I; Bános, Z; Anderlik, P; Nász, I

    1986-01-01

    A single intraperitoneal treatment with live Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) containing attenuated NDV vaccine, and with live infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) containing attenuated IBDV vaccine, one day before intracerebral infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) increased, whereas a similar treatment with inactivated NDV or IBDV vaccine did not influence the death rate of suckling mice from experimental lymphocytic choriomeningitis. Thus the attenuated live vaccine stimulated, whereas the inactivated ones failed to affect the cell-mediated immune response to LCMV. Control studies set up with the supernatant of plain tissue culture routinely used for the propagation of IBDV have shown that unlike the attenuated NDV vaccine, the immunostimulatory action is associated not so much with the virus itself, as with an as yet unidentified component of the tissue culture supernatant.

  18. Pneumococcal vaccination rates in VHA patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Case, David J; Copeland, Laurel A; Stock, Eileen M; Herrera, Henry R; Pfanner, Timothy P

    2015-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an inflammatory condition of the digestive tract not caused by infectious agents. Symptoms of IBD, such as diarrhea and pain, diminish one's quality of life. Underlying immune dysregulation may put IBD patients at risk for severe infectious disease making preventative vaccination highly recommended. Therefore, this study sought to assess rates of pneumococcal vaccination in patients with IBD.A cross-sectional observational study was employed utilizing administrative data extracts from the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) to identify patients diagnosed with IBD per International Classification of Diseases, Version 9, Clinical Modification codes. Their pneumococcal vaccine histories were determined from Common Procedural Terminology codes. Data were aggregated to the patient level and subjected to multivariable logistic regression to assess factors associated with receipt of the vaccination and 1-year mortality; survival analyses extended follow-up to as much as 4 years following IBD diagnosis.From October 2004 to September 2009, 49,350 patients were diagnosed with IBD in the VHA. Incidence was approximately 6000 cases/y. Patients averaged 62 years (±15, range 19-98) with 45% aged 65 or older. Approximately 6% were women, 21% were highly disabled from a military service-connected condition, 46% had hypertension, 38% dyslipidemia, and 18% diabetes. Only 20% of the cohort received pneumococcal vaccination including 5% vaccinated prior to IBD diagnosis, 2% on the date of diagnosis, and 13% subsequently. Being married, living outside the Northeast, and having more comorbidities were associated with vaccination before IBD diagnosis; models of vaccination at or after diagnosis demonstrated poor fit: little better than chance. Vaccinations before, after, and at diagnosis were protective against 1-year mortality adjusting for clinical and demographic covariates. Living in the South was an independent risk factor for death among IBD

  19. Vaccination against Lyme disease: Are we ready for it?

    PubMed

    Kaaijk, Patricia; Luytjes, Willem

    2016-03-01

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness in the Northern hemisphere and is caused by spirochetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex. A first sign of Borrelia infection is a circular skin rash, erythema migrans, but it can develop to more serious manifestations affecting skin, nervous system, joints, and/or heart. The marked increase in Lyme disease incidence over the past decades, the severity of the disease, and the associated high medical costs of, in particular, the persistent forms of Lyme disease requires adequate measures for control. Vaccination would be the most effective intervention for prevention, but at present no vaccine is available. In the 1990s, 2 vaccines against Lyme disease based on the OspA protein from the predominant Borrelia species of the US showed to be safe and effective in clinical phase III studies. However, failed public acceptance led to the demise of these monovalent OspA-based vaccines. Nowadays, public seem to be more aware of the serious health problems that Lyme disease can cause and seem more ready for the use of a broadly protective vaccine. This article discusses several aspects that should be considered to enable the development and implementation of a vaccine to prevent Lyme disease successfully.

  20. Vaccination against Lyme disease: Are we ready for it?

    PubMed Central

    Kaaijk, Patricia; Luytjes, Willem

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness in the Northern hemisphere and is caused by spirochetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex. A first sign of Borrelia infection is a circular skin rash, erythema migrans, but it can develop to more serious manifestations affecting skin, nervous system, joints, and/or heart. The marked increase in Lyme disease incidence over the past decades, the severity of the disease, and the associated high medical costs of, in particular, the persistent forms of Lyme disease requires adequate measures for control. Vaccination would be the most effective intervention for prevention, but at present no vaccine is available. In the 1990s, 2 vaccines against Lyme disease based on the OspA protein from the predominant Borrelia species of the US showed to be safe and effective in clinical phase III studies. However, failed public acceptance led to the demise of these monovalent OspA-based vaccines. Nowadays, public seem to be more aware of the serious health problems that Lyme disease can cause and seem more ready for the use of a broadly protective vaccine. This article discusses several aspects that should be considered to enable the development and implementation of a vaccine to prevent Lyme disease successfully. PMID:26337648

  1. Yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Roger E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess those published cases of yellow fever (YF) vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease that meet the Brighton Collaboration criteria and to assess the safety of YF vaccine with respect to viscerotropic disease. Literature search Ten electronic databases were searched with no restriction of date or language and reference lists of retrieved articles. Methods All abstracts and titles were independently read by two reviewers and data independently entered by two reviewers. Results All serious adverse events that met the Brighton Classification criteria were associated with first YF vaccinations. Sixty-two published cases (35 died) met the Brighton Collaboration viscerotropic criteria, with 32 from the US, six from Brazil, five from Peru, three from Spain, two from the People’s Republic of China, one each from Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Ecuador, France, Germany, Ireland, New Zealand, Portugal, and the UK, and four with no country stated. Two cases met both the viscerotropic and YF vaccine-associated neurologic disease criteria. Seventy cases proposed by authors as viscerotropic disease did not meet any Brighton Collaboration viscerotropic level of diagnostic certainty or any YF vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease causality criteria (37 died). Conclusion Viscerotropic disease is rare in the published literature and in pharmacovigilance databases. All published cases were from developing countries. Because the symptoms are usually very severe and life threatening, it is unlikely that cases would not come to medical attention (but might not be published). Because viscerotropic disease has a highly predictable pathologic course, it is likely that viscerotropic disease post-YF vaccine occurs in low-income countries with the same incidence as in developing countries. YF vaccine is a very safe vaccine that likely confers lifelong immunity. PMID:27784992

  2. EV71 vaccines: a first step towards multivalent hand, foot and mouth disease vaccines.

    PubMed

    Klein, Michel H

    2015-03-01

    Enterovirus A infections are the primary cause of hand, foot and mouth disease in infants and young children. Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 have emerged as neurotropic viruses responsible for severe neurological complications and a serious public health threat across the Asia-Pacific region. Formalin-inactivated EV71 vaccines have elicited protection against EV71 but not against coxsackievirus A16 infections. The development of a bivalent formalin-inactivated EV71/FI coxsackievirus A16 vaccine should be the next step towards that of multivalent hand, foot and mouth disease vaccines which should ultimately include other prevalent pathogenic coxsackieviruses and echovirus 30. This editorial summarizes the major challenges faced by the development of hand, foot and mouth disease vaccines.

  3. [Vaccine coverage related to lower mortality for respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Bós, Angelo José Gonçalves; Mirandola, Andrea Ribeiro

    2013-05-01

    Respiratory infections are a group of diseases commonly related to the elderly, since the influenza virus is one of the main etiological agents. Vaccination of these individuals is considered by the World Health Organization to be the most effective strategy to reduce morbidity and mortality from the disease. Brazil has sought in recent years to vaccinate 80% of the target population. This study sought to relate the vaccination coverage for influenza and the mortality rate from respiratory diseases in the elderly. This was a cross-sectional study with secondary data analysis. Data on vaccination coverage in 2010 of the 496 municipalities of the elderly in Rio Grande do Sul were obtained from the website of the National Immunization Program and mortality in the Mortality Information System. The results showed that 49% of municipalities reached the target of 80% of seniors vaccinated. In municipalities with below target vaccination coverage, the number of deaths was 5.2 per 1,000 elderly. This average is significantly higher than in municipalities with coverage equal to or above 80%. The conclusion is that the target proposed by the Brazilian Ministry of Health to vaccinate 80% or more of the elderly is effective in reducing mortality from respiratory diseases. PMID:23670474

  4. Autoimmune disease and vaccination: impact on infectious disease prevention and a look at future applications.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, John E; Maksimowicz-McKinnon, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines hold promise both for the prevention of infections and as potential immunologic therapy for patients with autoimmune disease (AD). These patients are at high risk for both common and opportunistic infections, but this risk can be significantly reduced and even obviated with the use of recommended available vaccines. Unfortunately, patients with ADs are not routinely offered or provided indicated vaccinations and have higher rates of complications from vaccine-preventable illnesses than patients without ADs. In addition, vaccine therapy is currently under study for the treatment of autoimmune disorders, with early studies demonstrating immunomodulatory effects that may counter undesired immune activation and alleviate disease activity.

  5. Updates in vaccination: Recommendations for adult inflammatory bowel disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Chaudrey, Khadija; Salvaggio, Michelle; Ahmed, Aftab; Mahmood, Sultan; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Treatment regimens for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) incorporate the use of a variety of immunosuppressive agents that increase the risk of infections. Prevention of many of these infections can be achieved by the timely and judicious use of vaccinations. IBD patients tend to be under-immunized. Some of the contributing factors are lack of awareness regarding the significance of vaccinating IBD patients, misperception about safety of vaccinations in immunocompromised patients, ambiguity about the perceived role of the gastroenterologist in contrast to the primary care physician and unavailability of vaccination guidelines focused on IBD population. In general, immunocompetent IBD patients can be vaccinated using standard vaccination recommendations. However there are special considerations for IBD patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy, IBD travelers and pregnant women with IBD. This review discusses current vaccination recommendations with updates for adult IBD patients. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2013 vaccination guidelines with 2014 updates and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommendations have been highlighted as a primary source of recommendations. PMID:25805924

  6. [VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Bellver Capella, Vincente

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines are an extraordinary instrument of immunization of the population against infectious diseases. Around them there are many ethical issues. One of the most debated is what to do with certain groups opposition to vaccination of their children. States have managed in different ways the conflict between the duty of vaccination and the refusal to use vaccines: some impose the vaccination and others simply promote it. In this article we deal with which of these two approaches is the most suitable from an ethical and legal point of view. We stand up for the second option, which is the current one in Spain, and we propose some measures which should be kept in mind to improve immunization programs.

  7. Teenagers’ understandings of and attitudes towards vaccines and vaccine-preventable diseases: A qualitative study☆

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, S.; Patterson, C.; Smith, E.; Bedford, H.; Hunt, K.

    2013-01-01

    Background To examine immunisation information needs of teenagers we explored understandings of vaccination and vaccine-preventable diseases, attitudes towards immunisation and experiences of immunisation. Diseases discussed included nine for which vaccines are currently offered in the UK (human papillomavirus, meningitis, tetanus, diphtheria, polio, whooping cough, measles, mumps and rubella), and two not currently included in the routine UK schedule (hepatitis B and chickenpox). Methods Twelve focus groups conducted between November 2010 and March 2011 with 59 teenagers (29 girls and 30 boys) living in various parts of Scotland. Results Teenagers exhibited limited knowledge and experience of the diseases, excluding chickenpox. Measles, mumps and rubella were perceived as severe forms of chickenpox-like illness, and rubella was not associated with foetal damage. Boys commonly believed that human papillomavirus only affects girls, and both genders exhibited confusion about its relationship with cancer. Participants considered two key factors when assessing the threat of diseases: their prevalence in the UK, and their potential to cause fatal or long-term harm. Meningitis was seen as a threat, but primarily to babies. Participants explained their limited knowledge as a result of mass immunisation making once-common diseases rare in the UK, and acknowledged immunisation's role in reducing disease prevalence. Conclusions While it is welcome that fewer teenagers have experienced vaccine-preventable diseases, this presents public health advocates with the challenge of communicating benefits of immunisation when advantages are less visible. The findings are timely in view of the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation's recommendation that a booster of meningitis C vaccine should be offered to teenagers; that teenagers did not perceive meningitis C as a significant threat should be a key concern of promotional information. While teenagers’ experiences of

  8. Vaccination against Alzheimer disease: an update on future strategies.

    PubMed

    Fettelschoss, Antonia; Zabel, Franziska; Bachmann, Martin F

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is a devastating chronic disease without adequate therapy. More than 10 years ago, it was demonstrated in transgenic mouse models that vaccination may be a novel, disease-modifying therapy for Alzheimer. Subsequent clinical development has been a roller-coaster with some positive and many negative news. Here, we would like to summarize evidence that next generation vaccines optimized for old people and focusing on patients with mild disease stand a good chance to proof efficacious for the treatment of Alzheimer. PMID:24535580

  9. Vaccination against Alzheimer disease: an update on future strategies.

    PubMed

    Fettelschoss, Antonia; Zabel, Franziska; Bachmann, Martin F

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is a devastating chronic disease without adequate therapy. More than 10 years ago, it was demonstrated in transgenic mouse models that vaccination may be a novel, disease-modifying therapy for Alzheimer. Subsequent clinical development has been a roller-coaster with some positive and many negative news. Here, we would like to summarize evidence that next generation vaccines optimized for old people and focusing on patients with mild disease stand a good chance to proof efficacious for the treatment of Alzheimer.

  10. Measles -- Q&A about Disease & Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Autism Top of Page Related Page Measles Vaccination File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  11. Diarrheal Diseases Hospitalization in Yemen before and after Rotavirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Al-Areqi, Lina; Mujally, Abulatif; Alkarshy, Fawzya; Nasser, Arwa; Jumaan, Aisha O.

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to assess the impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on diarrheal diseases hospitalization and to identify the rotavirus genotypes most prevalent before and after vaccine introduction among children ≤ 5 years of age. Rotarix™ ® rotavirus vaccine is currently licensed for infants in Yemen and was introduced in 2012. The vaccination course consists of two doses. The first dose is administrated at 6 weeks of age and the second dose is completed by 10 weeks. Based on a longitudinal observational study, we assessed the impact of vaccination on rotavirus hospitalization before and after vaccination among children ≤ 5 years of age at the Yemeni-Swedish Hospital (YSH) in Taiz, Yemen. Prevaccination covered January 2009–July 2012 during which 2335 fecal samples were collected from children ≤ 5 years old. Postvaccination covered January 2013–December 2014 during which 1114 fecal samples were collected. Rotavirus was detected by Enzyme Linkage Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). The incidence of rotavirus hospitalization decreased from 43.79% in 2009 to 10.54% in 2014. Hospitalization due to rotavirus diarrhea was reduced by 75.93%. Vaccine coverage increased from 23% in 2012 to 72% in 2014. Also, the results showed that the most predominant genotypes in prevaccination period were G2P[4] (55.0%), followed by G1P[8] (15.0%), while in postvaccination period G1P[8] (31%) was the predominant genotype, followed by G9P[8] (27.5%). In conclusion, rotavirus vaccination in Yemen resulted in sharp reduction in diarrheal hospitalization. A successful rotavirus vaccination program in Yemen will rely upon efficient vaccine delivery systems and sustained vaccine efficacy against diverse and evolving rotavirus strains. PMID:27437161

  12. Diarrheal Diseases Hospitalization in Yemen before and after Rotavirus Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Amood Al-Kamarany, Mohammed; Al-Areqi, Lina; Mujally, Abulatif; Alkarshy, Fawzya; Nasser, Arwa; Jumaan, Aisha O

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to assess the impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on diarrheal diseases hospitalization and to identify the rotavirus genotypes most prevalent before and after vaccine introduction among children ≤ 5 years of age. Rotarix™ ® rotavirus vaccine is currently licensed for infants in Yemen and was introduced in 2012. The vaccination course consists of two doses. The first dose is administrated at 6 weeks of age and the second dose is completed by 10 weeks. Based on a longitudinal observational study, we assessed the impact of vaccination on rotavirus hospitalization before and after vaccination among children ≤ 5 years of age at the Yemeni-Swedish Hospital (YSH) in Taiz, Yemen. Prevaccination covered January 2009-July 2012 during which 2335 fecal samples were collected from children ≤ 5 years old. Postvaccination covered January 2013-December 2014 during which 1114 fecal samples were collected. Rotavirus was detected by Enzyme Linkage Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). The incidence of rotavirus hospitalization decreased from 43.79% in 2009 to 10.54% in 2014. Hospitalization due to rotavirus diarrhea was reduced by 75.93%. Vaccine coverage increased from 23% in 2012 to 72% in 2014. Also, the results showed that the most predominant genotypes in prevaccination period were G2P[4] (55.0%), followed by G1P[8] (15.0%), while in postvaccination period G1P[8] (31%) was the predominant genotype, followed by G9P[8] (27.5%). In conclusion, rotavirus vaccination in Yemen resulted in sharp reduction in diarrheal hospitalization. A successful rotavirus vaccination program in Yemen will rely upon efficient vaccine delivery systems and sustained vaccine efficacy against diverse and evolving rotavirus strains. PMID:27437161

  13. Healthcare providers as sources of vaccine-preventable diseases.

    PubMed

    Sydnor, Emily; Perl, Trish M

    2014-08-27

    Vaccine-preventable infectious diseases may be introduced into the healthcare setting and pose a serious risk to vulnerable populations including immunocompromised patients. Healthcare providers (HCPs) are exposed to these pathogens through their daily tasks and may serve as a reservoir for ongoing disease transmission in the healthcare setting. The primary method of protection from work-related infection risk is vaccination that protects not only an individual HCP from disease, but also subsequent patients in contact with that HCP. Individual HCPs and healthcare institutions must balance the ethical and professional responsibility to protect their patients from nosocomial transmission of preventable infections with HCP autonomy. This article reviews known cases of HCP-to-patient transmission of the most common vaccine-preventable infections encountered in the healthcare setting including hepatitis B virus, influenza virus, Bordetella pertussis, varicella-zoster virus, measles, mumps and rubella virus. The impact of HCP vaccination on patient care and current recommendations for HCP vaccination against vaccine-preventable infectious diseases are also reviewed.

  14. Telling stories of vaccine-preventable diseases: why it works.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Rachel M; Boom, Julie A

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the benefits of storytelling in health communication and, in particular, immunization education. During the mid-20th century polio epidemic, both personal stories and scientific information abounded in the media. However, as rates of vaccine-preventable diseases declined, narratives about the dangers of such diseases faded as did the public fear of them. Meanwhile, anti-vaccine advocates flooded the media and Internet with stories of injured children and tied those injuries, such as autism, to vaccines. Medical experts often counter anti-vaccine concerns with scientific information which can fail to persuade parents. Furthermore, evidence suggests that many people misunderstand quantitative information resulting in a misinterpretation of risk. Compared to scientific information, stories relate life lessons and values. They are effective because they are memorable and relatable. Evidence also suggests that storytelling can effectively improve health knowledge and behaviors. Inspired by In Harm's Way--True Stories of Uninsured Texas Children by the Children's Defense Fund and Faces of Influenza by the American Lung Association, we published Vaccine-Preventable Disease: The Forgotten Story, a collection of photographs and personal stories of families affected by vaccine-preventable diseases. We have found that the stories included in our booklet capture all the benefits of storytelling. Given the many benefits of storytelling, providers should strive to include stories along with medical facts in their daily practice. PMID:23444587

  15. Telling stories of vaccine-preventable diseases: why it works.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Rachel M; Boom, Julie A

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the benefits of storytelling in health communication and, in particular, immunization education. During the mid-20th century polio epidemic, both personal stories and scientific information abounded in the media. However, as rates of vaccine-preventable diseases declined, narratives about the dangers of such diseases faded as did the public fear of them. Meanwhile, anti-vaccine advocates flooded the media and Internet with stories of injured children and tied those injuries, such as autism, to vaccines. Medical experts often counter anti-vaccine concerns with scientific information which can fail to persuade parents. Furthermore, evidence suggests that many people misunderstand quantitative information resulting in a misinterpretation of risk. Compared to scientific information, stories relate life lessons and values. They are effective because they are memorable and relatable. Evidence also suggests that storytelling can effectively improve health knowledge and behaviors. Inspired by In Harm's Way--True Stories of Uninsured Texas Children by the Children's Defense Fund and Faces of Influenza by the American Lung Association, we published Vaccine-Preventable Disease: The Forgotten Story, a collection of photographs and personal stories of families affected by vaccine-preventable diseases. We have found that the stories included in our booklet capture all the benefits of storytelling. Given the many benefits of storytelling, providers should strive to include stories along with medical facts in their daily practice.

  16. DNA vaccines against viral diseases of farmed fish.

    PubMed

    Evensen, Øystein; Leong, Jo-Ann C

    2013-12-01

    Immunization by an antigen-encoding DNA was approved for commercial sale in Canada against a Novirhabdovirus infection in fish. DNA vaccines have been particularly successful against the Novirhabdoviruses while there are reports on the efficacy against viral pathogens like infectious pancreatic necrosis virus, infectious salmon anemia virus, and lymphocystis disease virus and these are inferior to what has been attained for the novirhabdoviruses. Most recently, DNA vaccination of Penaeus monodon against white spot syndrome virus was reported. Research efforts are now focused on the development of more effective vectors for DNA vaccines, improvement of vaccine efficacy against various viral diseases of fish for which there is currently no vaccines available and provision of co-expression of viral antigen and immunomodulatory compounds. Scientists are also in the process of developing new delivery methods. While a DNA vaccine has been approved for commercial use in farmed salmon in Canada, it is foreseen that it is still a long way to go before a DNA vaccine is approved for use in farmed fish in Europe.

  17. Modeling the economic value of a Chagas’ disease therapeutic vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bruce Y.; Bacon, Kristina M.; Wateska, Angela R.; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Dumonteil, Eric; Hotez, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The health burden of Chagas’ disease (resulting from Trypanosoma cruzi infection) in Latin America (estimated to outweigh that of malaria by 5-fold and affect 2–6 million people in Mexico alone) has motivated development of therapeutic vaccines to prevent infection progression to severe disease. Our economic model for a Chagas’ therapeutic vaccine in Mexico suggests that a vaccine would be highly cost-effective and in many cases economically dominant (providing both cost savings and health benefits) throughout a range of protection durations, severe adverse event risk, and dosing regimens and would be most likely to provide a positive return on investment if the vaccine prevented (rather than delayed) the onset of cardiomyopathy. PMID:22894964

  18. The immunological underpinnings of vaccinations to prevent cytomegalovirus disease.

    PubMed

    McCormick, A Louise; Mocarski, Edward S

    2015-03-01

    A universal cytomegalovirus (CMV) vaccination promises to reduce the burden of the developmental damage that afflicts up to 0.5% of live births worldwide. An effective vaccination that prevents transplacental transmission would reduce CMV congenital disease and CMV-associated still births and leave populations less susceptible to opportunistic CMV disease. Thus, a vaccination against this virus has long been recognized for the potential of enormous health-care savings because congenital damage is life-long and existing anti-viral options are limited. Vaccine researchers, industry leaders, and regulatory representatives have discussed the challenges posed by clinical efficacy trials that would lead to a universal CMV vaccine, reviewing the links between infection and disease, and identifying settings where disrupting viral transmission might provide a surrogate endpoint for disease prevention. Reducing the complexity of such trials would facilitate vaccine development. Children and adolescents are the targets for universal vaccination, with the expectation of protecting the offspring of immunized women. Given that a majority of females worldwide experience CMV infection during childhood, a universal vaccine must boost natural immunity and reduce transmission due to reactivation and re-infection as well as primary infection during pregnancy. Although current vaccine strategies recognize the value of humoral and cellular immunity, the precise mechanisms that act at the placental interface remain elusive. Immunity resulting from natural infection appears to limit rather than prevent reactivation of latent viruses and susceptibility to re-infection, leaving a challenge for universal vaccination to improve upon natural immunity levels. Despite these hurdles, early phase clinical trials have achieved primary end points in CMV seronegative subjects. Efficacy studies must be expanded to mixed populations of CMV-naive and naturally infected subjects to understand the overall

  19. The immunological underpinnings of vaccinations to prevent cytomegalovirus disease

    PubMed Central

    Louise McCormick, A.; Mocarski, Edward S.

    2015-01-01

    A universal cytomegalovirus (CMV) vaccination promises to reduce the burden of the developmental damage that afflicts up to 0.5% of live births worldwide. An effective vaccination that prevents transplacental transmission would reduce CMV congenital disease and CMV-associated still births and leave populations less susceptible to opportunistic CMV disease. Thus, a vaccination against this virus has long been recognized for the potential of enormous health-care savings because congenital damage is life-long and existing anti-viral options are limited. Vaccine researchers, industry leaders, and regulatory representatives have discussed the challenges posed by clinical efficacy trials that would lead to a universal CMV vaccine, reviewing the links between infection and disease, and identifying settings where disrupting viral transmission might provide a surrogate endpoint for disease prevention. Reducing the complexity of such trials would facilitate vaccine development. Children and adolescents are the targets for universal vaccination, with the expectation of protecting the offspring of immunized women. Given that a majority of females worldwide experience CMV infection during childhood, a universal vaccine must boost natural immunity and reduce transmission due to reactivation and re-infection as well as primary infection during pregnancy. Although current vaccine strategies recognize the value of humoral and cellular immunity, the precise mechanisms that act at the placental interface remain elusive. Immunity resulting from natural infection appears to limit rather than prevent reactivation of latent viruses and susceptibility to re-infection, leaving a challenge for universal vaccination to improve upon natural immunity levels. Despite these hurdles, early phase clinical trials have achieved primary end points in CMV seronegative subjects. Efficacy studies must be expanded to mixed populations of CMV-naive and naturally infected subjects to understand the overall

  20. Vaccination with a multicomponent meningococcal B vaccine in prevention of disease in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Terry; O'Ryan, Miguel; Wassil, James; Abitbol, Véronique; Dull, Peter

    2015-08-26

    Vaccination programs employing capsular-based meningococcal vaccines have proved successful in a variety of settings globally since first introduced over 40 years ago. Similar successes have been demonstrated using meningococcal vaccines for use against serogroup B (MenB) outbreak strains but the diversity of MenB strains has limited vaccine use outside targeted geographic regions. MenB continues to be a significant cause of outbreaks in adolescents and young adults, as recently demonstrated in university settings in the US (Princeton, New Jersey and Santa Barbara, California) and has the potential for hyperendemic disease levels such as currently experienced in Québec and the United Kingdom. In adolescents, increased endemic disease rates and outbreak potential are likely associated with social behaviors putting individuals at risk for carriage acquisition and may explain regional and temporal variations in epidemiology. A protein-based, multi-component MenB vaccine (4CMenB) is currently licensed for use in 37 countries including EU/EEA countries, Australia, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Uruguay, and the US. In this article we review the most recent clinical trial data with 4CMenB with a focus on adolescents and young adults. The vaccine appears to have an acceptable safety profile and is well-tolerated in adolescents and young adults while providing robust, persistent levels of bactericidal antibodies considered protective for each of the four antigenic components of the vaccine. With the recent availability of this vaccine, health care providers have the first comprehensive opportunity to control meningococcal disease, a highly disruptive public health problem with a disproportionate impact on adolescents and young adults.

  1. Vaccination with a multicomponent meningococcal B vaccine in prevention of disease in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Terry; O'Ryan, Miguel; Wassil, James; Abitbol, Véronique; Dull, Peter

    2015-08-26

    Vaccination programs employing capsular-based meningococcal vaccines have proved successful in a variety of settings globally since first introduced over 40 years ago. Similar successes have been demonstrated using meningococcal vaccines for use against serogroup B (MenB) outbreak strains but the diversity of MenB strains has limited vaccine use outside targeted geographic regions. MenB continues to be a significant cause of outbreaks in adolescents and young adults, as recently demonstrated in university settings in the US (Princeton, New Jersey and Santa Barbara, California) and has the potential for hyperendemic disease levels such as currently experienced in Québec and the United Kingdom. In adolescents, increased endemic disease rates and outbreak potential are likely associated with social behaviors putting individuals at risk for carriage acquisition and may explain regional and temporal variations in epidemiology. A protein-based, multi-component MenB vaccine (4CMenB) is currently licensed for use in 37 countries including EU/EEA countries, Australia, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Uruguay, and the US. In this article we review the most recent clinical trial data with 4CMenB with a focus on adolescents and young adults. The vaccine appears to have an acceptable safety profile and is well-tolerated in adolescents and young adults while providing robust, persistent levels of bactericidal antibodies considered protective for each of the four antigenic components of the vaccine. With the recent availability of this vaccine, health care providers have the first comprehensive opportunity to control meningococcal disease, a highly disruptive public health problem with a disproportionate impact on adolescents and young adults. PMID:26187261

  2. Vaccination against Lyme disease: past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Embers, Monica E.; Narasimhan, Sukanya

    2013-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a zoonotic disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato bacteria transmitted to humans and domestic animals by the bite of an Ixodes spp. tick (deer tick). Despite improvements in diagnostic tests and public awareness of Lyme disease, the reported cases have increased over the past decade to approximately 30,000 per year. Limitations and failed public acceptance of a human vaccine, comprised of the outer surface A (OspA) lipoprotein of B. burgdorferi, led to its demise, yet current research has opened doors to new strategies for protection against Lyme disease. In this review we discuss the enzootic cycle of B. burgdorferi, and the unique opportunities it poses to block infection or transmission at different levels. We present the correlates of protection for this infectious disease, the pros and cons of past vaccination strategies, and new paradigms for future vaccine design that would include elements of both the vector and the pathogen. PMID:23407755

  3. Vaccination against Lyme disease: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Embers, Monica E; Narasimhan, Sukanya

    2013-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a zoonotic disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato bacteria transmitted to humans and domestic animals by the bite of an Ixodes spp. tick (deer tick). Despite improvements in diagnostic tests and public awareness of Lyme disease, the reported cases have increased over the past decade to approximately 30,000 per year. Limitations and failed public acceptance of a human vaccine, comprised of the outer surface A (OspA) lipoprotein of B. burgdorferi, led to its demise, yet current research has opened doors to new strategies for protection against Lyme disease. In this review we discuss the enzootic cycle of B. burgdorferi, and the unique opportunities it poses to block infection or transmission at different levels. We present the correlates of protection for this infectious disease, the pros and cons of past vaccination strategies, and new paradigms for future vaccine design that would include elements of both the vector and the pathogen.

  4. Successful vaccines for naturally occurring protozoal diseases of animals should guide human vaccine research. A review of protozoal vaccines and their designs.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Milton M

    2014-04-01

    Effective vaccines are available for many protozoal diseases of animals, including vaccines for zoonotic pathogens and for several species of vector-transmitted apicomplexan haemoparasites. In comparison with human diseases, vaccine development for animals has practical advantages such as the ability to perform experiments in the natural host, the option to manufacture some vaccines in vivo, and lower safety requirements. Although it is proper for human vaccines to be held to higher standards, the enduring lack of vaccines for human protozoal diseases is difficult to reconcile with the comparatively immense amount of research funding. Common tactical problems of human protozoal vaccine research include reliance upon adapted rather than natural animal disease models, and an overwhelming emphasis on novel approaches that are usually attempted in replacement of rather than for improvement upon the types of designs used in effective veterinary vaccines. Currently, all effective protozoal vaccines for animals are predicated upon the ability to grow protozoal organisms. Because human protozoal vaccines need to be as effective as animal vaccines, researchers should benefit from a comparison of existing veterinary products and leading experimental vaccine designs. With this in mind, protozoal vaccines are here reviewed.

  5. [Role of vaccination in chronic disease prevention and control].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuoqun; Huang, Shue; Zhao, Yanfang; Zhao, Wenhua; Liang, Xiaofeng

    2015-08-01

    Chronic non-communicable disease is a major public health problem affecting the health of residents in china. Evidence shows that, in addition to four major risk factors, i.e. unreasonable dietary, lack of physical activity, smoking and drinking, epidemic and severe outcome of chronic disease is associated with many infectious diseases. Increasingly cancers have been shown to have an infectious etiology. There is also a significantly increased risk of infectious disease such as influenza, pneumonia and other infectious disease in people with pre-existing chronic non-communicable diseases like diabetes, heart disease, and lung diseases. And more than that, there is a high risk of susceptibility to death and severe outcomes among them. Epidemiological studies has confirmed, that through targeted vaccine inoculation, liver cancer, cervical cancer can be effectively prevented, while influenza or pneumonia vaccine are related to reduced risk of hospitalization or death and hospitalization expenses regarding with a variety of chronic diseases. World Health Organization and several other professional organizations have put forward recommendations on vaccine inoculation of chronic disease patients. Programs targeting infectious factors are also an important aspect of chronic diseases prevention and control, therefore, related researches need to be strengthened in the future. PMID:26733040

  6. Foot and mouth disease: the future of vaccine banks.

    PubMed

    Forman, A J; Garland, A J M

    2002-12-01

    The authors briefly review the history of vaccine banks for foot and mouth disease, their current location and their constituent serotypes and strains, together with the occasions on which they have been activated. Experimental studies on emergency vaccines are summarised and areas identified for further investigation. The future of such banks is considered, including the principal strengths and weaknesses of existing banks, and suggestions are made for potential improvements. The fact that the banks have been activated on relatively few occasions over the 25 years of their existence testifies in part to the relatively rare calls which have been made upon them, but also reflects the difficulty in deciding when and how to utilise emergency vaccination. Nevertheless, in an era of increasing global risks of the spread of foot and mouth disease, banks will most certainly continue to have strategic and tactical importance in the control of this most readily communicable of animal diseases.

  7. Effectiveness of vaccines and vaccination programs for the control of foot-and-mouth disease in Uganda, 2001-2010.

    PubMed

    Muleme, Michael; Barigye, Robert; Khaitsa, Margaret L; Berry, Eugene; Wamono, Anthony W; Ayebazibwe, Chrisostom

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. In Uganda, FMD outbreaks are mainly controlled by ring vaccination and restriction of animal movements. Vaccination stimulates immunity and prevents animals from developing clinical signs which include lameness, inappetence, and decreased production. Ring vaccination and restriction of animal movements have, however, not successfully controlled FMD in Uganda and outbreaks reoccur annually. The objective of this study was to review the use of FMD virus (FMDV) vaccines and assess the effectiveness of vaccination programs for controlling FMD in Uganda (2001-2010), using retrospective data. FMD vaccine distribution patterns in Uganda (2001-2010) matched occurrence of outbreaks with districts reporting the highest number of outbreaks also receiving the largest quantity of vaccines. This was possibly due to "fire brigade" response of vaccinating animals after outbreaks have been reported. On average, only 10.3 % of cattle within districts that reported outbreaks during the study period were vaccinated. The average minimum time between onset of outbreaks and vaccination was 7.5 weeks, while the annual cost of FMDV vaccines used ranged from US $58,000 to 1,088,820. Between 2001 and 2010, serotyping of FMD virus was done in only 9/121 FMD outbreaks, and there is no evidence that vaccine matching or vaccine potency tests have been done in Uganda. The probability of FMDV vaccine and outbreak mismatch, the delayed response to outbreaks through vaccination, and the high costs associated with importation of FMDV vaccines could be reduced if virus serotyping and subtyping as well as vaccine matching were regularly done, and the results were considered for vaccine manufacture.

  8. Framework for Optimal Global Vaccine Stockpile Design for Vaccine-Preventable Diseases: Application to Measles and Cholera Vaccines as Contrasting Examples.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kimberly M; Duintjer Tebbens, Radboud J

    2016-07-01

    Managing the dynamics of vaccine supply and demand represents a significant challenge with very high stakes. Insufficient vaccine supplies can necessitate rationing, lead to preventable adverse health outcomes, delay the achievements of elimination or eradication goals, and/or pose reputation risks for public health authorities and/or manufacturers. This article explores the dynamics of global vaccine supply and demand to consider the opportunities to develop and maintain optimal global vaccine stockpiles for universal vaccines, characterized by large global demand (for which we use measles vaccines as an example), and nonuniversal (including new and niche) vaccines (for which we use oral cholera vaccine as an example). We contrast our approach with other vaccine stockpile optimization frameworks previously developed for the United States pediatric vaccine stockpile to address disruptions in supply and global emergency response vaccine stockpiles to provide on-demand vaccines for use in outbreaks. For measles vaccine, we explore the complexity that arises due to different formulations and presentations of vaccines, consideration of rubella, and the context of regional elimination goals. We conclude that global health policy leaders and stakeholders should procure and maintain appropriate global vaccine rotating stocks for measles and rubella vaccine now to support current regional elimination goals, and should probably also do so for other vaccines to help prevent and control endemic or epidemic diseases. This work suggests the need to better model global vaccine supplies to improve efficiency in the vaccine supply chain, ensure adequate supplies to support elimination and eradication initiatives, and support progress toward the goals of the Global Vaccine Action Plan. PMID:25109229

  9. Framework for Optimal Global Vaccine Stockpile Design for Vaccine-Preventable Diseases: Application to Measles and Cholera Vaccines as Contrasting Examples.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kimberly M; Duintjer Tebbens, Radboud J

    2016-07-01

    Managing the dynamics of vaccine supply and demand represents a significant challenge with very high stakes. Insufficient vaccine supplies can necessitate rationing, lead to preventable adverse health outcomes, delay the achievements of elimination or eradication goals, and/or pose reputation risks for public health authorities and/or manufacturers. This article explores the dynamics of global vaccine supply and demand to consider the opportunities to develop and maintain optimal global vaccine stockpiles for universal vaccines, characterized by large global demand (for which we use measles vaccines as an example), and nonuniversal (including new and niche) vaccines (for which we use oral cholera vaccine as an example). We contrast our approach with other vaccine stockpile optimization frameworks previously developed for the United States pediatric vaccine stockpile to address disruptions in supply and global emergency response vaccine stockpiles to provide on-demand vaccines for use in outbreaks. For measles vaccine, we explore the complexity that arises due to different formulations and presentations of vaccines, consideration of rubella, and the context of regional elimination goals. We conclude that global health policy leaders and stakeholders should procure and maintain appropriate global vaccine rotating stocks for measles and rubella vaccine now to support current regional elimination goals, and should probably also do so for other vaccines to help prevent and control endemic or epidemic diseases. This work suggests the need to better model global vaccine supplies to improve efficiency in the vaccine supply chain, ensure adequate supplies to support elimination and eradication initiatives, and support progress toward the goals of the Global Vaccine Action Plan.

  10. A fresh perspective from immunologists and vaccine researchers: Active vaccination strategies to prevent and reverse Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Agadjanyan, M.G.; Petrovsky, N.; Ghochikyan, A.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional vaccination against infectious diseases relies on generation of cellular and humoral immune responses that act to protect the host from overt disease even although they do not induce sterilizing immunity. More recently, attempts have been made with mixed success to generate therapeutic vaccines against a wide range of non-infectious diseases including neurodegenerative disorders. Following the exciting first report of successful vaccine prevention of progression of an AD animal model in 1999, various epitope-based vaccines targeting beta-amyloid (Aβ) have proceeded to human clinical trials, with varied results. More recently, AD vaccines based on tau protein have advanced into clinical testing too. This review seeks to put perspective to the mixed results obtained so far in clinical trials of AD vaccines, and discuss the many pitfalls and misconceptions encountered on the path to a successful AD vaccine, including better standardization of immunological efficacy measures of antibodies, immunogenicity of platform/carrier and adjuvants. PMID:26192465

  11. Proper quality control of formulated foot-and-mouth disease vaccines in countries with prophylactic vaccination is necessary.

    PubMed

    Jamal, S M; Shah, S I; Ali, Q; Mehmood, A; Afzal, M; Afzal, M; Dekker, A

    2014-12-01

    Vaccination is considered as an important tool to control foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). A good quality vaccine containing relevant serotypes and matching strains is a pre-requisite for vaccination to be effective. The present study investigated the quality of different brands of FMD vaccine available in Pakistan, including three locally produced and two imported products. All the vaccines were found free of bacterial or fungal contamination. No adverse effects were noted in suckling mice and buffalo calves inoculated with the vaccines, showing that the vaccines were sterile and safe. The humoral immune response to the FMD vaccines was determined in buffalo calves for 234 days post-vaccination. Very low humoral immune responses against FMD serotypes O, A and Asia 1 viruses were detected to the locally produced vaccines. The imported vaccines, however, elicited a higher antibody response which persisted for a long period in one of the 2 vaccines. The present study highlights the need of assessing an independent vaccine quality control of finished FMD vaccine products.

  12. Vaccination with Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (AMDV) capsid proteins enhances disease, while vaccination with the major non-structural AMDV protein causes partial protection from disease.

    PubMed

    Aasted, B; Alexandersen, S; Christensen, J

    1998-07-01

    Vaccination studies were performed with partially purified recombinant AMDV VP1/2 capsids as well as with the major AMDV non-structural protein (NS1). All vaccine constructs induced an antibody response, but did not prevent infection upon challenge with AMDV. The severity of Aleutian disease (AD) was judged by the serum gammaglobulin level, the quantity of peripheral blood CD8 lymphocytes, antibody titers to VP1/2 and NS1 proteins and mink death rates. The VP1/2 vaccine constructs enhanced the disease process with drastic death rates for the vaccinated mink. On the contrary, the NS1 vaccine constructs resulted in milder AD than seen in the non-vaccinated mink. PMID:9682374

  13. What to do about pertussis vaccines? Linking what we know about pertussis vaccine effectiveness, immunology and disease transmission to create a better vaccine.

    PubMed

    Bolotin, Shelly; Harvill, Eric T; Crowcroft, Natasha S

    2015-11-01

    Pertussis (whooping cough) is a respiratory disease caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis. Despite the implementation of immunization programs and high vaccine coverage in most jurisdictions, pertussis is still one of the most common vaccine-preventable diseases, suggesting that the current vaccines and immunization schedules have not been sufficiently effective. Several factors are thought to contribute to this. The acellular pertussis vaccine that has been used in many jurisdictions since the 1990s is less effective than the previously used whole-cell vaccine, with immunity waning over time. Both whole-cell and acellular pertussis vaccines are effective at reducing disease severity but not transmission, resulting in outbreaks in vaccinated cohorts. In this review, we discuss various limitations of the current approaches to protection from pertussis and outline various options for reducing the burden of pertussis on a population level.

  14. Prophylactic and therapeutic DNA vaccines against Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Arce-Fonseca, Minerva; Rios-Castro, Martha; Carrillo-Sánchez, Silvia del Carmen; Martínez-Cruz, Mariana; Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is a zoonosis caused by Trypanosoma cruzi in which the most affected organ is the heart. Conventional chemotherapy has a very low effectiveness; despite recent efforts, there is currently no better or more effective treatment available. DNA vaccines provide a new alternative for both prevention and treatment of a variety of infectious disorders, including Chagas disease. Recombinant DNA technology has allowed some vaccines to be developed using recombinant proteins or virus-like particles capable of inducing both a humoral and cellular specific immune response. This type of immunization has been successfully used in preclinical studies and there are diverse models for viral, bacterial and/or parasitic diseases, allergies, tumors and other diseases. Therefore, several research groups have been given the task of designing a DNA vaccine against experimental infection with T. cruzi. In this review we explain what DNA vaccines are and the most recent studies that have been done to develop them with prophylactic or therapeutic purposes against Chagas disease.

  15. Experimental Vaccines against Chagas Disease: A Journey through History.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia; Monteón-Padilla, Víctor; Carrillo-Sánchez, Silvia C; Rios-Castro, Martha; Martínez-Cruz, Mariana; Carabarin-Lima, Alejandro; Arce-Fonseca, Minerva

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, or American trypanosomiasis, which is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is primarily a vector disease endemic in 21 Latin American countries, including Mexico. Although many vector control programs have been implemented, T. cruzi has not been eradicated. The development of an anti-T. cruzi vaccine for prophylactic and therapeutic purposes may significantly contribute to the transmission control of Chagas disease. Immune protection against experimental infection with T. cruzi has been studied since the second decade of the last century, and many types of immunogens have been used subsequently, such as killed or attenuated parasites and new DNA vaccines. This primary prevention strategy appears feasible, effective, safe, and inexpensive, although problems remain. The objective of this review is to summarize the research efforts about the development of vaccines against Chagas disease worldwide. A thorough literature review was conducted by searching PubMed with the terms "Chagas disease" and "American trypanosomiasis" together with "vaccines" or "immunization". In addition, reports and journals not cited in PubMed were identified. Publications in English, Spanish, and Portuguese were reviewed.

  16. The Lyme disease vaccine--a public health perspective.

    PubMed

    Shen, Angela K; Mead, Paul S; Beard, Charles B

    2011-02-01

    Lyme disease, which is caused by the spirochetal agent Borrelia burgdoferi, is the most common vector-borne illness in the United States. In 1998, the US Food and Drug Administration approved a recombinant Lyme disease vaccine that was later voluntarily withdrawn from the market by the manufacturer. Current Lyme disease prevention efforts focus on a combination of methods and approaches, including area acaricides, landscape management, host-targeted interventions, management of deer populations, and personal protective measures, such as the use of insect repellant and tick checks. Although these methods are generally safe and relatively inexpensive, the primary limitations of these methods are that their effectiveness has been difficult to demonstrate conclusively and that rates of compliance are generally poor. An effective human Lyme disease vaccine that has been adequately evaluated in the highest-risk population groups could be very beneficial in preventing Lyme disease; however, it would need to meet high standards regarding safety, efficacy, cost, and public acceptance.

  17. [Comparison of 2 inactivated vaccines against Aujeszky's disease in pigs].

    PubMed

    Smíd, B; Valícek, L; Rodák, L; Mensík, J

    1981-06-01

    Equal efficiency was proved by comparing two inactivated vaccines against Aujeszky's disease (AD) virus manufactured in Czechoslovakia. Fifteen porkers at the age of four weeks were included in the experiment, not possessing any specific antibodies to AD virus. Each vaccine was inoculated intramuscularly to five porkers (2 ml) in the interval of three weeks. The third group of five porkers was control. The samples of blood serum were subjected to the serum neutralizing test and radioimmunoassay (RIA) 21 and 35 days after vaccination. Three weeks after vaccination, antibody titers were demonstrated in nine from ten vaccinated porkers by RIA, in one pig by SNT. All 15 porkers were challenged with live virulent strain of the virus on the 35th day after the start of the experiment. The ten vaccinated porkers survived the infection after a short feverish disorder. Out of the five unvaccinated controls four pigs died; the patho-anatomic findings demonstrated necrotic tonsillitis and lobar bronchopneumonia. The finding in the fifth control porker was identical; the porker was killed 15 days after infection.

  18. Advancing a vaccine to prevent hookworm disease and anemia.

    PubMed

    Hotez, Peter J; Beaumier, Coreen M; Gillespie, Portia M; Strych, Ulrich; Hayward, Tara; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2016-06-01

    A human hookworm vaccine is under development and in clinical trials in Africa and the Americas. The vaccine contains the Na-APR-1 and Na-GST-1 antigens. It elicits neutralizing antibodies that interfere with establishment of the adult hookworm in the gut and the ability of the parasite to feed on blood. The vaccine target product profile is focused on the immunization of children to prevent hookworm infection and anemia caused by Necator americanus. It is intended for use in low- and middle-income countries where hookworm is highly endemic and responsible for at least three million disability-adjusted life years. So far, the human hookworm vaccine is being developed in the non-profit sector through the Sabin Vaccine Institute Product Development Partnership (PDP), in collaboration with the HOOKVAC consortium of European and African partners. We envision the vaccine to be incorporated into health systems as part of an elimination strategy for hookworm infection and other neglected tropical diseases, and as a means to reduce global poverty and address the Sustainable Development Goals.

  19. Advancing a vaccine to prevent hookworm disease and anemia.

    PubMed

    Hotez, Peter J; Beaumier, Coreen M; Gillespie, Portia M; Strych, Ulrich; Hayward, Tara; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2016-06-01

    A human hookworm vaccine is under development and in clinical trials in Africa and the Americas. The vaccine contains the Na-APR-1 and Na-GST-1 antigens. It elicits neutralizing antibodies that interfere with establishment of the adult hookworm in the gut and the ability of the parasite to feed on blood. The vaccine target product profile is focused on the immunization of children to prevent hookworm infection and anemia caused by Necator americanus. It is intended for use in low- and middle-income countries where hookworm is highly endemic and responsible for at least three million disability-adjusted life years. So far, the human hookworm vaccine is being developed in the non-profit sector through the Sabin Vaccine Institute Product Development Partnership (PDP), in collaboration with the HOOKVAC consortium of European and African partners. We envision the vaccine to be incorporated into health systems as part of an elimination strategy for hookworm infection and other neglected tropical diseases, and as a means to reduce global poverty and address the Sustainable Development Goals. PMID:27040400

  20. Capripox disease in Ethiopia: Genetic differences between field isolates and vaccine strain, and implications for vaccination failure.

    PubMed

    Gelaye, Esayas; Belay, Alebachew; Ayelet, Gelagay; Jenberie, Shiferaw; Yami, Martha; Loitsch, Angelika; Tuppurainen, Eeva; Grabherr, Reingard; Diallo, Adama; Lamien, Charles Euloge

    2015-07-01

    Sheeppox virus (SPPV), goatpox virus (GTPV) and lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) of the genus Capripoxvirus (CaPV) cause capripox disease in sheep, goats and cattle, respectively. These viruses are not strictly host-specific and their geographical distribution is complex. In Ethiopia, where sheep, goats and cattle are all affected, a live attenuated vaccine strain (KS1-O180) is used for immunization of both small ruminants and cattle. Although occurrences of the disease in vaccinated cattle are frequently reported, information on the circulating isolates and their relation to the vaccine strain in use are still missing. The present study addressed the parameters associated with vaccination failure in Ethiopia. Retrospective outbreak data were compiled and isolates collected from thirteen outbreaks in small ruminants and cattle at various geographical locations and years were analyzed and compared to the vaccine strain. Isolates of GTPV and LSDV genotypes were responsible for the capripox outbreaks in small ruminants and cattle, respectively, while SPPV was absent. Pathogenic isolates collected from vaccinated cattle were identical to those from the non-vaccinated ones. The vaccine strain, genetically distinct from the outbreak isolates, was not responsible for these outbreaks. This study shows capripox to be highly significant in Ethiopia due to low performance of the local vaccine and insufficient vaccination coverage. The development of new, more efficient vaccine strains, a GTPV strain for small ruminants and a LSDV for cattle, is needed to promote the acceptance by farmers, thus contribute to better control of CaPVs in Ethiopia.

  1. New vaccines for neglected parasitic diseases and dengue.

    PubMed

    Beaumier, Coreen M; Gillespie, Portia M; Hotez, Peter J; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2013-09-01

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are a significant source of morbidity and socioeconomic burden among the world's poor. Virtually all of the 2.4 billion people who live on less than $2 per d, more than a third of the world's population, are at risk for these debilitating NTDs. Although chemotherapeutic measures exist for many of these pathogens, they are not sustainable countermeasures on their own because of rates of reinfection, risk of drug resistance, and inconsistent maintenance of drug treatment programs. Preventative and therapeutic NTD vaccines are needed as long-term solutions. Because there is no market in the for-profit sector of vaccine development for these pathogens, much of the effort to develop vaccines is driven by nonprofit entities, mostly through product development partnerships. This review describes the progress of vaccines under development for many of the NTDs, with a specific focus on those about to enter or that are currently in human clinical trials. Specifically, we report on the progress on dengue, hookworm, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, Chagas disease, and onchocerciasis vaccines. These products will be some of the first with specific objectives to aid the world's poorest populations. PMID:23578479

  2. Review article: hepatitis vaccination in patients with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Reiss, G; Keeffe, E B

    2004-04-01

    Evidence regarding the outcomes of viral super-infection in patients with chronic liver disease and practical strategies for hepatitis A and B vaccination of these individuals are reviewed. Patients with acute hepatitis A and chronic hepatitis B have a more severe clinical course and a higher death rate compared with otherwise healthy individuals with hepatitis A, and these differences are most pronounced in older patients and those with histological evidence of chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis, rather than in asymptomatic hepatitis B carriers. Patients with acute hepatitis A super-infection and chronic hepatitis C have an increased risk of fulminant hepatitis and death. In addition, patients with other chronic liver diseases also appear to be at increased risk for more severe disease with superimposed hepatitis A. Patients with chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus co-infection have more severe laboratory abnormalities, more severe histological disease, a greater frequency of cirrhosis and complications of cirrhosis, and a higher incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma. Vaccines for both hepatitis A and B are safe and effective if used early in the course of chronic liver disease. Hepatitis A and B vaccination should be part of the routine management of patients with chronic liver disease, preferably as early as possible in the natural course of their disease.

  3. Eradicating diseases: The effect of conditional cash transfers on vaccination coverage in rural Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Barham, Tania; Maluccio, John A

    2009-05-01

    Despite significant global efforts to improve vaccination coverage against major childhood diseases, vaccination rates are below 90%. To eradicate diseases such as measles, however, vaccination rates close to 95% are needed. We use a randomized experiment to investigate the effect of a demand incentive, a conditional cash transfer program, in improving vaccination coverage in rural Nicaragua. Double-difference estimates show the program led to large increases in vaccination coverage, and these resulted in vaccination levels greater than 95% for some vaccines. Effects were especially large for children who are typically harder to reach with traditional supply-side interventions.

  4. Optimizing strategies for meningococcal C disease vaccination in Valencia (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Meningococcal C (MenC) conjugate vaccines have controlled invasive diseases associated with this serogroup in countries where they are included in National Immunization Programs and also in an extensive catch-up program involving subjects up to 20 years of age. Catch-up was important, not only because it prevented disease in adolescents and young adults at risk, but also because it decreased transmission of the bacteria, since it was in this age group where the organism was circulating. Our objective is to develop a new vaccination schedule to achieve maximum seroprotection in these groups. Methods A recent study has provided detailed age-structured information on the seroprotection levels against MenC in Valencia (Spain), where vaccination is routinely scheduled at 2 months and 6 months, with a booster dose at 18 months of age. A complementary catch-up campaign was also carried out in n for children from 12 months to 19 years of age. Statistical analyses of these data have provided an accurate picture on the evolution of seroprotection in the last few years. Results An agent-based model has been developed to study the future evolution of the seroprotection histogram. We have shown that the optimum strategy for achieving high protection levels in all infants, toddlers and adolescents is a change to a 2 months, 12 months and 12 years of age vaccination pattern. If the new schedule were implemented in January 2014, high-risk subjects between 15-19 years of age would have very low seroprotection for the next 6 years, thereby threatening the program. Conclusions High protection levels and a low incidence of meningococcal C disease can be achieved in the future by means of a cost-free change in vaccination program. However, we recommend a new catch-up program simultaneous to the change in regular vaccination program. PMID:24886054

  5. Genetics and vaccine efficacy: host genetic variation affecting Marek's disease vaccine efficacy in White Leghorn chickens.

    PubMed

    Chang, S; Dunn, J R; Heidari, M; Lee, L F; Song, J; Ernst, C W; Ding, Z; Bacon, L D; Zhang, H

    2010-10-01

    Marek's disease (MD) is a T-cell lymphoma disease of domestic chickens induced by MD virus (MDV), a naturally oncogenic and highly contagious cell-associated α-herpesvirus. Earlier reports have shown that the MHC haplotype as well as non-MHC genes are responsible for genetic resistance to MD. The MHC was also shown to affect efficiency of vaccine response. Using specific-pathogen-free chickens from a series of 19 recombinant congenic strains and their 2 progenitor lines (lines 6(3) and 7(2)), vaccine challenge experiments were conducted to examine the effect of host genetic variation on vaccine efficacy. The 21 inbred lines of White Leghorns share the same B*2 MHC haplotype and the genome of each recombinant congenic strain differs by a random 1/8 sample of the susceptible donor line (7(2)) genome. Chickens from each of the lines were divided into 2 groups. One was vaccinated with turkey herpesvirus strain FC126 at the day of hatch and the other was treated as a nonvaccinated control. Chickens of both groups were inoculated with a very virulent plus strain of MDV on the fifth day posthatch. Analyses of the MD data showed that the genetic line significantly influenced MD incidence and days of survival post-MDV infection after vaccination of chickens (P<0.01). The protective indices against MD varied greatly among the lines with a range of 0 up to 84%. This is the first evidence that non-MHC host genetic variation significantly affects MD vaccine efficacy in chickens in a designed prospective study.

  6. Routinely vaccinating adolescents against meningococcus: targeting transmission & disease

    PubMed Central

    Vetter, Volker; Baxter, Roger; Denizer, Gülhan; Sáfadi, Marco A. P.; Silfverdal, Sven-Arne; Vyse, Andrew; Borrow, Ray

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adolescents have the highest rates of meningococcal carriage and transmission. Interrupting the adolescent habitat in order to reduce carriage and transmission within adolescents and to other age groups could help to control meningococcal disease at a population level. Compared to immunization strategies restricted to young children, a strategy focused on adolescents may have more profound and long-lasting indirect impacts, and may be more cost effective. Despite challenges in reaching this age-group, experience with other vaccines show that high vaccine coverage of adolescents is attainable. PMID:26651380

  7. Routinely vaccinating adolescents against meningococcus: targeting transmission & disease.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Volker; Baxter, Roger; Denizer, Gülhan; Sáfadi, Marco A P; Silfverdal, Sven-Arne; Vyse, Andrew; Borrow, Ray

    2016-05-01

    Adolescents have the highest rates of meningococcal carriage and transmission. Interrupting the adolescent habitat in order to reduce carriage and transmission within adolescents and to other age groups could help to control meningococcal disease at a population level. Compared to immunization strategies restricted to young children, a strategy focused on adolescents may have more profound and long-lasting indirect impacts, and may be more cost effective. Despite challenges in reaching this age-group, experience with other vaccines show that high vaccine coverage of adolescents is attainable. PMID:26651380

  8. Hepatitis A and B superimposed on chronic liver disease: vaccine-preventable diseases.

    PubMed

    Keeffe, Emmet B

    2006-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that the acquisition of hepatitis A or hepatitis B in patients with chronic liver disease is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Superimposition of acute hepatitis A in patients with chronic hepatitis C has been associated with a particularly high mortality rate, and chronic hepatitis B virus coinfection with hepatitis C virus is associated with an accelerated progression of chronic liver disease to cirrhosis, decompensated liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. With the availability of vaccines against hepatitis B and hepatitis A since 1981 and 1995, respectively, these are vaccine-preventable diseases. Studies have confirmed that hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccines are safe and immunogenic in patients with mild to moderate chronic liver disease. However, hepatitis A and B vaccination is less effective in patients with advanced liver disease and after liver transplantation. These observations have led to the recommendation that patients undergo hepatitis A and B vaccination early in the natural history of their chronic liver disease. Vaccination rates are low in clinical practice, and public health and educational programs are needed to overcome barriers to facilitate timely implementation of these recommendations.

  9. Immunity of foot-and-mouth disease serotype Asia 1 by sublingual vaccination.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao-tai; Liu, Yong-sheng

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals, with severe agricultural and economic losses. Here we present study using a sublingual (SL) route with the killed serotype Asia 1 FMDV vaccine. Guinea pigs were vaccinated using a commercially available vaccine formulation at the manufacturer's recommended full, 1/4, and 1/16 antigen doses. Animals were challenged with homologous FMDV Asia1 strain at various times following vaccination. All control guinea pigs exhibited clinical disease, including fever, viremia, and lesions, specifically vesicle formation in feet. Animals vaccinated with the 1/16 and 1/4 doses were protected after challenge at days 7, 28, and 35 post vaccination. These data suggest that effective protection against foot-and-mouth disease can be achieved with 1/16 of the recommended vaccine dose using SL vaccination, indicating that the sublingual route is an attractive alternative for the administration of the FMDV vaccine. PMID:23717497

  10. Booster vaccinations: can immunologic memory outpace disease pathogenesis?

    PubMed

    Pichichero, Michael E

    2009-12-01

    Almost all current vaccines work by the induction of antibodies in serum or on the mucosa to block adherence of pathogens to epithelial cells or interfere with microbial invasion of the bloodstream. However, antibody levels usually decline after vaccination to undetectable amounts if further vaccination does not occur. Persistence of vaccine-induced antibodies usually goes well beyond the time when they should have decayed to undetectable levels because of ongoing "natural" boosting or other immunologic mechanisms. The production of memory B and T cells is of clear importance, but the likelihood that a memory response will be fast enough in the absence of a protective circulating antibody level likely depends on the pace of pathogenesis of a specific organism. This concept is discussed with regard to Haemophilus influenzae type b, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Neisseria meningitidis; hepatitis A and B; diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis; polio, measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella; rotavirus; and human papilloma virus. With infectious diseases for which the pace of pathogenesis is less rapid, some individuals will contract infection before the memory response is fully activated and implemented. With infectious diseases for which the pace of pathogenesis is slow, immune memory should be sufficient to prevent disease.

  11. Self-disseminating vaccines for emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Aisling A; Redwood, Alec J; Jarvis, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Modern human activity fueled by economic development is profoundly altering our relationship with microorganisms. This altered interaction with microbes is believed to be the major driving force behind the increased rate of emerging infectious diseases from animals. The spate of recent infectious disease outbreaks, including Ebola virus disease and Middle East respiratory syndrome, emphasize the need for development of new innovative tools to manage these emerging diseases. Disseminating vaccines are one such novel approach to potentially interrupt animal to human (zoonotic) transmission of these pathogens.

  12. Self-disseminating vaccines for emerging infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Aisling A.; Redwood, Alec J.; Jarvis, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Modern human activity fueled by economic development is profoundly altering our relationship with microorganisms. This altered interaction with microbes is believed to be the major driving force behind the increased rate of emerging infectious diseases from animals. The spate of recent infectious disease outbreaks, including Ebola virus disease and Middle East respiratory syndrome, emphasize the need for development of new innovative tools to manage these emerging diseases. Disseminating vaccines are one such novel approach to potentially interrupt animal to human (zoonotic) transmission of these pathogens. PMID:26524478

  13. Vaccines for mucosal immunity to combat emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed Central

    van Ginkel, F. W.; Nguyen, H. H.; McGhee, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    The mucosal immune system consists of molecules, cells, and organized lymphoid structures intended to provide immunity to pathogens that impinge upon mucosal surfaces. Mucosal infection by intracellular pathogens results in the induction of cell- mediated immunity, as manifested by CD4-positive (CD4 + ) T helper-type 1 cells, as well as CD8 + cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. These responses are normally accompanied by the synthesis of secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) antibodies, which provide an important first line of defense against invasion of deeper tissues by these pathogens. New-generation live, attenuated viral vaccines, such as the cold-adapted, recombinant nasal influenza and oral rotavirus vaccines, optimize this form of mucosal immune protection. Despite these advances, new and reemerging infectious diseases are tipping the balance in favor of the parasite; continued mucosal vaccine development will be needed to effectively combat these new threats. PMID:10756145

  14. Bovine respiratory disease: commercial vaccines currently available in Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Bowland, S L; Shewen, P E

    2000-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) remains a significant cost to both the beef and dairy industries. In the United States, an estimated 640 million dollars is lost annually due to BRD. Losses are largely a result of pneumonic pasteurellosis ("shipping fever"), enzootic pneumonia of calves, and atypical interstitial pneumonia. In Canada, over 80% of the biologics licensed for use in cattle are against agents associated with BRD. The objectives of this paper were (a) to summarize information available concerning commercial vaccines currently used in Canada for protection against BRD, and (b) to provide an easily accessible resource for veterinary practitioners and researchers. Information from the most recent Compendium of Veterinary Products has been tabulated for each vaccine by trade name, according to vaccine type, and the pathogens against which they are designed to protect. Additional information from published articles (peer-reviewed and other) has been provided and referenced. PMID:10642871

  15. Is a multivalent hand, foot, and mouth disease vaccine feasible?

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Michel; Chong, Pele

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus A infections are the primary cause of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in infants and young children. Although enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16) are the predominant causes of HFMD epidemics worldwide, EV-A71 has emerged as a major neurovirulent virus responsible for severe neurological complications and fatal outcomes. HFMD is a serious health threat and economic burden across the Asia-Pacific region. Inactivated EV-A71 vaccines have elicited protection against EV-A71 but not against CV-A16 infections in large efficacy trials. The current development of a bivalent inactivated EV-A71/CV-A16 vaccine is the next step toward that of multivalent HFMD vaccines. These vaccines should ultimately include other prevalent pathogenic coxsackieviruses A (CV-A6 and CV-A10), coxsackieviruses B (B3 and B5) and echovirus 30 that often co-circulate during HFMD epidemics and can cause severe HFMD, aseptic meningitis and acute viral myocarditis. The prospect and challenges for the development of such multivalent vaccines are discussed. PMID:26009802

  16. Evaluation of novel oral vaccine candidates and validation of a caprine model of Johne's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Murray E.; Turnquist, Sue E.; Ilha, Marcia R. S.; Rajeev, Sreekumari; Jones, Arthur L.; Whittington, Lisa; Bannantine, John P.; Barletta, Raúl G.; Gröhn, Yrjö T.; Katani, Robab; Talaat, Adel M.; Li, Lingling; Kapur, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Johne's disease (JD) caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is a major threat to the dairy industry and possibly some cases of Crohn's disease in humans. A MAP vaccine that reduced of clinical disease and/or reduced fecal shedding would aid in the control of JD. The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate the efficacy of 5 attenuated strains of MAP as vaccine candidates compared to a commercial control vaccine using the protocol proposed by the Johne's Disease Integrated Program (JDIP) Animal Model Standardization Committee (AMSC), and (2) to validate the AMSC Johne's disease goat challenge model. Eighty goat kids were vaccinated orally twice at 8 and 10 weeks of age with an experimental vaccine or once subcutaneously at 8 weeks with Silirum® (Zoetis), or a sham control oral vaccine at 8 and 10 weeks. Kids were challenged orally with a total of approximately 1.44 × 109 CFU divided in two consecutive daily doses using MAP ATCC-700535 (K10-like bovine isolate). All kids were necropsied at 13 months post-challenge. Results indicated that the AMSC goat challenge model is a highly efficient and valid model for JD challenge studies. None of the experimental or control vaccines evaluated prevented MAP infection or eliminated fecal shedding, although the 329 vaccine lowered the incidence of infection, fecal shedding, tissue colonization and reduced lesion scores, but less than the control vaccine. Based on our results the relative performance ranking of the experimental live-attenuated vaccines evaluated, the 329 vaccine was the best performer, followed by the 318 vaccine, then 316 vaccine, 315 vaccine and finally the 319 vaccine was the worst performer. The subcutaneously injected control vaccine outperformed the orally-delivered mutant vaccine candidates. Two vaccines (329 and 318) do reduce presence of JD gross and microscopic lesions, slow progression of disease, and one vaccine (329) reduced fecal shedding and tissue colonization. PMID

  17. Vaccines against Lyme disease: What happened and what lessons can we learn?

    PubMed

    Poland, Gregory A

    2011-02-01

    This article reviews events that led to the withdrawal of the only vaccine to prevent Lyme disease licensed in the United States. The primary issues that led to the vaccine's withdrawal appear to be a combination of vaccine safety concerns, sparked by a molecular mimicry hypothesis that suggested that the vaccine antigen, outer surface protein A, serves as an autoantigen and hence was arthritogenic; concerns raised by anti-vaccine groups regarding vaccine safety; vaccine cost; a difficult vaccination schedule and the potential need for boosters; class action lawsuits; uncertainty regarding risk of disease; and low public demand. This article reviews lessons learned from these events and proposes that future candidate Lyme disease vaccines are unlikely to be developed, tested, and used within the United States in the near future, thus leaving at-risk populations unprotected.

  18. Vaccination of hens decreases virus contamination in eggs after challenge with the virulent Newcastle disease virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle disease is an important infectious disease of poultry causing economic losses worldwide. The control is routinely performed by vaccination, however vaccinated birds can shed virus, creating a barrier for trade exports. To determine if vaccination could mitigate these negative outcomes, h...

  19. An alternate delivery system improves vaccine performance against foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV).

    PubMed

    Pandya, Mital; Pacheco, Juan M; Bishop, Elizabeth; Kenney, Mary; Milward, Francis; Doel, Timothy; Golde, William T

    2012-04-26

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals with severe agricultural and economic implications. One of the most highly infectious and contagious livestock pathogens known, the disease spreads rapidly in naïve populations making it critical to have rapidly acting vaccines. Needle inoculation of killed virus vaccine is an efficient method of swiftly vaccinating large numbers of animals, either in eradication efforts or in outbreak situations in disease free countries, although, to be efficient, this requires utilizing the same needle with multiple animals. Here we present studies using a needle free system for vaccination with killed virus vaccine, FMDV strain O1 Manisa, as a rapid and consistent delivery platform. Cattle were vaccinated using a commercially available vaccine formulation at the manufacturer's recommended dose as well as four and sixteen fold less antigen load per dose. Animals were challenged intradermalingually (IDL) with live, virulent virus, homologous strain O1 Manisa, at various times following vaccination. All non-vaccinated control cattle exhibited clinical disease, including fever, viremia and lesions, specifically vesicle formation. Cattle vaccinated with the 1/16× and 1/4× doses using the needle free device were protected when challenged at both 7 and 28 days after vaccination. These data suggest that effective protection against disease can be achieved with 1/16 of the recommended vaccine dose when delivered using the needle free, intradermal delivery system, indicating the current vaccine stockpile that can be extended by many fold using this system.

  20. Experimental Vaccines against Chagas Disease: A Journey through History

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia; Monteón-Padilla, Víctor; Carrillo-Sánchez, Silvia C.; Rios-Castro, Martha; Martínez-Cruz, Mariana; Carabarin-Lima, Alejandro; Arce-Fonseca, Minerva

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, or American trypanosomiasis, which is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is primarily a vector disease endemic in 21 Latin American countries, including Mexico. Although many vector control programs have been implemented, T. cruzi has not been eradicated. The development of an anti-T. cruzi vaccine for prophylactic and therapeutic purposes may significantly contribute to the transmission control of Chagas disease. Immune protection against experimental infection with T. cruzi has been studied since the second decade of the last century, and many types of immunogens have been used subsequently, such as killed or attenuated parasites and new DNA vaccines. This primary prevention strategy appears feasible, effective, safe, and inexpensive, although problems remain. The objective of this review is to summarize the research efforts about the development of vaccines against Chagas disease worldwide. A thorough literature review was conducted by searching PubMed with the terms “Chagas disease” and “American trypanosomiasis” together with “vaccines” or “immunization”. In addition, reports and journals not cited in PubMed were identified. Publications in English, Spanish, and Portuguese were reviewed. PMID:26090490

  1. The influence of social norms on the dynamics of vaccinating behaviour for paediatric infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Oraby, Tamer; Thampi, Vivek; Bauch, Chris T

    2014-04-01

    Mathematical models that couple disease dynamics and vaccinating behaviour often assume that the incentive to vaccinate disappears if disease prevalence is zero. Hence, they predict that vaccine refusal should be the rule, and elimination should be difficult or impossible. In reality, countries with non-mandatory vaccination policies have usually been able to maintain elimination or very low incidence of paediatric infectious diseases for long periods of time. Here, we show that including injunctive social norms can reconcile such behaviour-incidence models to observations. Adding social norms to a coupled behaviour-incidence model enables the model to better explain pertussis vaccine uptake and disease dynamics in the UK from 1967 to 2010, in both the vaccine-scare years and the years of high vaccine coverage. The model also illustrates how a vaccine scare can perpetuate suboptimal vaccine coverage long after perceived risk has returned to baseline, pre-vaccine-scare levels. However, at other model parameter values, social norms can perpetuate depressed vaccine coverage during a vaccine scare well beyond the time when the population's baseline vaccine risk perception returns to pre-scare levels. Social norms can strongly suppress vaccine uptake despite frequent outbreaks, as observed in some small communities. Significant portions of the parameter space also exhibit bistability, meaning long-term outcomes depend on the initial conditions. Depending on the context, social norms can either support or hinder immunization goals. PMID:24523276

  2. The influence of social norms on the dynamics of vaccinating behaviour for paediatric infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Oraby, Tamer; Thampi, Vivek; Bauch, Chris T.

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models that couple disease dynamics and vaccinating behaviour often assume that the incentive to vaccinate disappears if disease prevalence is zero. Hence, they predict that vaccine refusal should be the rule, and elimination should be difficult or impossible. In reality, countries with non-mandatory vaccination policies have usually been able to maintain elimination or very low incidence of paediatric infectious diseases for long periods of time. Here, we show that including injunctive social norms can reconcile such behaviour-incidence models to observations. Adding social norms to a coupled behaviour-incidence model enables the model to better explain pertussis vaccine uptake and disease dynamics in the UK from 1967 to 2010, in both the vaccine-scare years and the years of high vaccine coverage. The model also illustrates how a vaccine scare can perpetuate suboptimal vaccine coverage long after perceived risk has returned to baseline, pre-vaccine-scare levels. However, at other model parameter values, social norms can perpetuate depressed vaccine coverage during a vaccine scare well beyond the time when the population's baseline vaccine risk perception returns to pre-scare levels. Social norms can strongly suppress vaccine uptake despite frequent outbreaks, as observed in some small communities. Significant portions of the parameter space also exhibit bistability, meaning long-term outcomes depend on the initial conditions. Depending on the context, social norms can either support or hinder immunization goals. PMID:24523276

  3. Vaccination against Lyme disease caused by diverse Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Fikrig, E; Telford, S R; Wallich, R; Chen, M; Lobet, Y; Matuschka, F R; Kimsey, R B; Kantor, F S; Barthold, S W; Spielman, A; Flavell, R A

    1995-01-01

    Diversity and mutations in the genes for outer surface proteins (Osps) A and B of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (B. burgdorferi), the spirochetal agent of Lyme disease, suggests that a monovalent OspA or OspB vaccine may not provide protection against antigenically variable naturally occurring B. burgdorferi. We now show that OspA or OspB immunizations protect mice from tick-borne infection with heterogeneous B. burgdorferi from different geographic regions. This result is in distinct contrast to in vitro killing analyses and in vivo protection studies using syringe injections of B. burgdorferi as the challenge inoculum. Evaluations of vaccine efficacy against Lyme disease and other vector-borne infections should use the natural mode of transmission and not be predicated on classification systems or assays that do not rely upon the vector to transmit infection.

  4. Vaccination and herd immunity to infectious diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Roy M.; May, Robert M.

    1985-11-01

    An understanding of the relationship between the transmission dynamics of infectious agents and herd immunity provides a template for the design of effective control programmes based on mass immunization. Mathematical models of the spread and persistence of infection provide important insights into the problem of how best to protect the community against disease.

  5. Pathogenesis of primary foot-and-mouth disease virus infection in the nasopharynx of vaccinated and non-vaccinated cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A time-course pathogenesis study was performed to compare and contrast primary foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection in vaccinated and non-vaccinated cattle following simulated-natural virus exposure. FMDV genome and infectious virus were detected during the initial phase of infection from b...

  6. Comparative Evaluation of Vaccine Efficacy of Recombinant Marek's Disease Virus Vaccine Lacking Meq Oncogene in Commercial Chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek's disease virus oncogene meq has been identified as the gene involved in tumorigenesis in chickens. We have recently developed a Meq-null virus, rMd5delMeq, in which the oncogene Meq was deleted. Vaccine efficacy experiments conducted in ADOL 15I5 x 71 chickens vaccinated with rMd5delMeq virus...

  7. Vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease is influenced by hemagglutinin and neuraminidase in whole inactivated influenza virus vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple subtypes and many antigenic variants of influenza A virus (IAV) co-circulate in swine in the USA, complicating effective use of commercial vaccines to control disease and transmission. Whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccines may provide partial protection against IAV with substantial antigen...

  8. Biodegradable polymeric microsphere-based vaccines and their applications in infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chi-Ying; Lin, Shih-Jie; Yang, Yi-Chen; Wang, Der-Yuan; Cheng, Hwei-Fang; Yeh, Ming-Kung

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination, which provides effective, safe infectious disease protection, is among the most important recent public health and immunological achievements. However, infectious disease remains the leading cause of death in developing countries because several vaccines require repeated administrations and children are often incompletely immunized. Microsphere-based systems, providing controlled release delivery, can obviate the need for repeat immunizations. Here, we review the function of sustained and pulsatile release of biodegradable polymeric microspheres in parenteral and mucosal single-dose vaccine administration. We also review the active-targeting function of polymeric particles. With their shield and co-delivery functions, polymeric particles are applied to develop single-dose and mucosally administered vaccines as well as to improve subunit vaccines. Because polymeric particles are easily surface-modified, they have been recently used in vaccine development for cancers and many infectious diseases without effective vaccines (e.g., human immunodeficiency virus infection). These polymeric particle functions yield important vaccine carriers and multiple benefits.

  9. Peste des petits ruminants vaccine and vaccination in India: sharing experience with disease endemic countries.

    PubMed

    Singh, R P; Bandyopadhyay, S K

    2015-12-01

    Peste des petits ruminants, a viral disease of small ruminants, the control of which is important for poverty alleviation and to ensure livelihood security in Asia, Middle East and Africa. In recognition of these issues, we developed and applied vaccine and diagnostics to demonstrate effective control of PPR during preceding 6 years in a sub-population of small ruminants in India. Two south Indian states, namely Andhra Pradesh and Karnataka, strongly indicated possibility of PPR control with more than 90 % reduction in number of reported outbreaks of PPR, mostly through mass vaccination. Similarly, the situation at the national level also demonstrated a decline of more than 75 % in the number of reported outbreaks. Sharing these experiences may motivate other countries for similar initiatives leading to progressive control of PPR, which is in line with the initiatives of the organizations like FAO/OIE and the recent platforms on global PPR research alliance. PMID:26645031

  10. Nontyphoidal salmonella disease: Current status of vaccine research and development.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; MacLennan, Calman A; Simon, Raphael; Martin, Laura B; Khan, M Imran

    2016-06-01

    Among more than 2500 nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica (NTS) serovars, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. enterica serovar Enteritidis account for approximately fifty percent of all human isolates of NTS reported globally. The global incidence of NTS gastroenteritis in 2010 was estimated to be 93 million cases, approximately 80 million of which were contracted via food-borne transmission. It is estimated that 155,000 deaths resulted from NTS in 2010. NTS also causes severe, extra-intestinal, invasive bacteremia, referred to as invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease. iNTS disease usually presents as a febrile illness, frequently without gastrointestinal symptoms, in both adults and children. Symptoms of iNTS are similar to malaria, often including fever (>90%) and splenomegaly (>40%). The underlying reasons for the high rates of iNTS disease in Africa are still being elucidated. Evidence from animal and human studies supports the feasibility of developing a safe and effective vaccine against iNTS. Both antibodies and complement can kill Salmonella species in vitro. Proof-of-principle studies in animal models have demonstrated efficacy for live attenuated and subunit vaccines that target the O-antigens, flagellin proteins, and other outer membrane proteins of serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. More recently, a novel delivery strategy for NTS vaccines has been developed: the Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA) technology which presents surface polysaccharides and outer membrane proteins in their native conformation. GMMA technology is self-adjuvanting, as it delivers multiple pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules. GMMA may be particularly relevant for low- and middle-income countries as it has the potential for high immunologic potency at a low cost and involves a relatively simple production process without the need for complex conjugation. Several vaccines for the predominant NTS serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis, are

  11. Nontyphoidal salmonella disease: Current status of vaccine research and development.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; MacLennan, Calman A; Simon, Raphael; Martin, Laura B; Khan, M Imran

    2016-06-01

    Among more than 2500 nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica (NTS) serovars, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. enterica serovar Enteritidis account for approximately fifty percent of all human isolates of NTS reported globally. The global incidence of NTS gastroenteritis in 2010 was estimated to be 93 million cases, approximately 80 million of which were contracted via food-borne transmission. It is estimated that 155,000 deaths resulted from NTS in 2010. NTS also causes severe, extra-intestinal, invasive bacteremia, referred to as invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease. iNTS disease usually presents as a febrile illness, frequently without gastrointestinal symptoms, in both adults and children. Symptoms of iNTS are similar to malaria, often including fever (>90%) and splenomegaly (>40%). The underlying reasons for the high rates of iNTS disease in Africa are still being elucidated. Evidence from animal and human studies supports the feasibility of developing a safe and effective vaccine against iNTS. Both antibodies and complement can kill Salmonella species in vitro. Proof-of-principle studies in animal models have demonstrated efficacy for live attenuated and subunit vaccines that target the O-antigens, flagellin proteins, and other outer membrane proteins of serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. More recently, a novel delivery strategy for NTS vaccines has been developed: the Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA) technology which presents surface polysaccharides and outer membrane proteins in their native conformation. GMMA technology is self-adjuvanting, as it delivers multiple pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules. GMMA may be particularly relevant for low- and middle-income countries as it has the potential for high immunologic potency at a low cost and involves a relatively simple production process without the need for complex conjugation. Several vaccines for the predominant NTS serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis, are

  12. [Measles: the disease, epidemiology, history and vaccination programs in Chile].

    PubMed

    Delpiano, Luis; Astroza, Leonor; Toro, Jorge

    2015-08-01

    Measles, one of most important inmuno-preventable diseases, remains as a worldwide concern issue with an important morbidity and mortality. Particularly in the America region declared free of measles in 2010 by WHO, they still appear imported cases that origin outbreaks of variable magnitude in susceptible subjects usually none vaccinated which is the current situation in Santiago, the capital city of Chile. In this review we present characteristics of the etiological agent, the disease, epidemiological aspects with national historical focus, impact of immunization programs and outbreaks in Chile, in order to contribute to knowledge and management of this always present public health problem. PMID:26436786

  13. Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics for the Treatment of Malignant Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aldrich, Joel F.; Lowe, Devin B.; Shearer, Michael H.; Winn, Richard E.; Jumper, Cynthia A.; Kennedy, Ronald C.

    2010-01-01

    The employment of the immune system to treat malignant disease represents an active area of biomedical research. The specificity of the immune response and potential for establishing long-term tumor immunity compels researchers to continue investigations into immunotherapeutic approaches for cancer. A number of immunotherapeutic strategies have arisen for the treatment of malignant disease, including various vaccination schemes, cytokine therapy, adoptive cellular therapy, and monoclonal antibody therapy. This paper describes each of these strategies and discusses some of the associated successes and limitations. Emphasis is placed on the integration of techniques to promote optimal scenarios for eliminating cancer. PMID:20936120

  14. [Measles: the disease, epidemiology, history and vaccination programs in Chile].

    PubMed

    Delpiano, Luis; Astroza, Leonor; Toro, Jorge

    2015-08-01

    Measles, one of most important inmuno-preventable diseases, remains as a worldwide concern issue with an important morbidity and mortality. Particularly in the America region declared free of measles in 2010 by WHO, they still appear imported cases that origin outbreaks of variable magnitude in susceptible subjects usually none vaccinated which is the current situation in Santiago, the capital city of Chile. In this review we present characteristics of the etiological agent, the disease, epidemiological aspects with national historical focus, impact of immunization programs and outbreaks in Chile, in order to contribute to knowledge and management of this always present public health problem.

  15. Vaccination of chickens using raw rice coated with novel trehalose nano-organogels containing Newcastle disease (strain I-2) vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wambura, P N

    2009-06-01

    The formulation and evaluation of trehalose nano-organogels for storage and oral delivery of Newcastle disease (ND) strain I-2 vaccine to chickens were carried out in this study. Trehalose sugar was blended with vegetable oil to form nano-organogels where trehalose also acted as a stabilizer against thermal inactivation of I-2 ND virus. Results from infectivity titration assay indicated that the titre of 10(7.5) EID(50)/0.1 mL was maintained after 12 weeks of storage of nano-organogel I-2 vaccine at ambient room temperature. Serology results showed that 33% chickens which were vaccinated with nano-organogel I-2 vaccine after 14 days had HI antibody titres of > or = 3.0 log(2) with GMT of 2.3. Moreover, results showed 100% of chickens vaccinated with nano-organogel I-2 vaccine had the mean antibody titres of 3.4 and 3.7 log(2) at 21 and 28 days after vaccination, respectively. All vaccinated chickens (100%) survived the challenge of virulent ND virus whereas all unvaccinated chickens succumbed to challenge and died of signs consistent with ND. The findings from this study showed that the nano-organogel I-2 vaccine was stable at room temperature, safe and produced protective antibody response in vaccinated chickens. Moreover the nano-organogel I-2 vaccine was used for oral administration and hence is suitable for mass vaccination. However, optimization of the formulation of trehalose nano-organogel vaccine is required in order to achieve its application potentials.

  16. Routine pediatric immunization, special cases in pediatrics: prematurity, chronic disease, congenital heart disease: recent advancements/changes in pediatric vaccines.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    Vaccination is a powerful and dynamic weapon in reducing the impact of infectious diseases in children. The field and schedules are constantly evolving, with significant changes resulting in new and exciting vaccines almost yearly. Special cases in pediatrics represent unique challenges and differences in vaccinations. Health care providers need to be knowledgable about the current vaccines and to remain up to date with the constant evolution, as well as be aware of the latest recommendations, warnings, and news about vaccines and their use. This article updates and discusses current but ever-changing routine pediatric vaccination programs.

  17. Hepatitis B vaccination in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Ben Musa, Ruwaida; Gampa, Anuhya; Basu, Sanjib; Keshavarzian, Ali; Swanson, Garth; Brown, Michael; Abraham, Rana; Bruninga, Keith; Losurdo, John; DeMeo, Mark; Mobarhan, Sohrab; Shapiro, David; Mutlu, Ece

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and HBV screening and vaccination practices for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: This study is a retrospective, cross-sectional observational study. A retrospective chart review was performed in 500 patients who have been consecutively treated for IBD between September 2008 and January 2013 at the Rush University Medical Center Gastroenterology section. The patients were identified through the electronic medical record with the criteria that they attended the gastroenterology clinic, and that they had a diagnosis of IBD at the time of visit discharge. Once identified, each record was analyzed to determine whether the subject had been infected with HBV in the past, already been vaccinated against HBV, or advised to get vaccinated and followed through with the recommended vaccination. RESULTS: About 254 out of 500 patients (51%) had HBV screening ordered. Among those ordered to have screening tests, 86% followed through with HBV serology. Gastroenterology physicians had significantly different screening ratios from each other (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in the ratios of HBV screening when IBD specialists were compared to other gastroenterology physicians (0.505 ± 0.023 vs 0.536 ± 0.066, P = 0.66). Of those 220 patients screened, 51% of IBD patients were found not to be immune against HBV. Approximately 50% of gastroenterology physicians recommended HBV vaccinations to their patients in whom serology was negative for antibodies against HBV. IBD specialists recommended vaccinations to a higher percentage of their patients compared to other gastroenterology physicians (0.168 ± 0.019 vs 0.038 ± 0.026, P = 0.015). Present and/or past HBV infection was found in 3.6% of the patients who had serology checked. There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) between our study and that reported in previous studies done in

  18. Vaccinating Italian infants with a new multicomponent vaccine (Bexsero®) against meningococcal B disease: A cost-effectiveness analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Roberto; Landa, Paolo; Amicizia, Daniela; Icardi, Giancarlo; Ricciardi, Walter; de Waure, Chiara; Tanfani, Elena; Bonanni, Paolo; Lucioni, Carlo; Testi, Angela; Panatto, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The European Medicines Agency has approved a multicomponent serogroup B meningococcal vaccine (Bexsero®) for use in individuals of 2 months of age and older. A cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) from the societal and Italian National Health Service perspectives was performed in order to evaluate the impact of vaccinating Italian infants less than 1 y of age with Bexsero®, as opposed to non-vaccination. The analysis was carried out by means of Excel Version 2011 and the TreeAge Pro® software Version 2012. Two basal scenarios that differed in terms of disease incidence (official and estimated data to correct for underreporting) were considered. In the basal scenarios, we considered a primary vaccination cycle with 4 doses (at 2, 4, 6 and 12 months of age) and 1 booster dose at the age of 11 y, the societal perspective and no cost for death. Sensitivity analyses were carried out in which crucial variables were changed over probable ranges. In Italy, on the basis of official data on disease incidence, vaccination with Bexsero® could prevent 82.97 cases and 5.61 deaths in each birth cohort, while these figures proved to be three times higher on considering the estimated incidence. The results of the CEA showed that the Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) per QALY was €109,762 in the basal scenario if official data on disease incidence are considered and €26,599 if estimated data are considered. The tornado diagram indicated that the most influential factor on ICER was the incidence of disease. The probability of sequelae, the cost of the vaccine and vaccine effectiveness also had an impact. Our results suggest that vaccinating infants in Italy with Bexsero® has the ability to significantly reduce meningococcal disease and, if the probable underestimation of disease incidence is considered, routine vaccination is advisable. PMID:27163398

  19. Global Foot-and-Mouth Disease Research Update and Gap Analysis: 3 - Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Robinson, L; Knight-Jones, T J D; Charleston, B; Rodriguez, L L; Gay, C G; Sumption, K J; Vosloo, W

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed research knowledge gaps in the field of FMDV (foot-and-mouth disease virus) vaccines. The study took the form of a literature review (2011-15) combined with research updates collected in 2014 from 33 institutes from across the world. Findings were used to identify priority areas for future FMD vaccine research. Vaccines play a vital role in FMD control, used both to limit the spread of the virus during epidemics in FMD-free countries and as the mainstay of disease management in endemic regions, particularly where sanitary controls are difficult to apply. Improvements in the performance or cost-effectiveness of FMD vaccines will allow more widespread and efficient disease control. FMD vaccines have changed little in recent decades, typically produced by inactivation of whole virus, the quantity and stability of the intact viral capsids in the final preparation being key for immunogenicity. However, these are exciting times and several promising novel FMD vaccine candidates have recently been developed. This includes the first FMD vaccine licensed for manufacture and use in the USA; this adenovirus-vectored FMD vaccine causes in vivo expression of viral capsids in vaccinated animals. Another promising vaccine candidate comprises stabilized empty FMDV capsids produced in vitro in a baculovirus expression system. Recombinant technologies are also being developed to improve otherwise conventionally produced inactivated vaccines, for example, by creating a chimeric vaccine virus to increase capsid stability and by inserting sequences into the vaccine virus for desired antigen expression. Other important areas of ongoing research include enhanced adjuvants, vaccine quality control procedures and predicting vaccine protection from immune correlates, thus reducing dependency on animal challenge studies. Globally, the degree of independent vaccine evaluation is highly variable, and this is essential for vaccine quality. Previously neglected, the

  20. Global Foot-and-Mouth Disease Research Update and Gap Analysis: 3 - Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Robinson, L; Knight-Jones, T J D; Charleston, B; Rodriguez, L L; Gay, C G; Sumption, K J; Vosloo, W

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed research knowledge gaps in the field of FMDV (foot-and-mouth disease virus) vaccines. The study took the form of a literature review (2011-15) combined with research updates collected in 2014 from 33 institutes from across the world. Findings were used to identify priority areas for future FMD vaccine research. Vaccines play a vital role in FMD control, used both to limit the spread of the virus during epidemics in FMD-free countries and as the mainstay of disease management in endemic regions, particularly where sanitary controls are difficult to apply. Improvements in the performance or cost-effectiveness of FMD vaccines will allow more widespread and efficient disease control. FMD vaccines have changed little in recent decades, typically produced by inactivation of whole virus, the quantity and stability of the intact viral capsids in the final preparation being key for immunogenicity. However, these are exciting times and several promising novel FMD vaccine candidates have recently been developed. This includes the first FMD vaccine licensed for manufacture and use in the USA; this adenovirus-vectored FMD vaccine causes in vivo expression of viral capsids in vaccinated animals. Another promising vaccine candidate comprises stabilized empty FMDV capsids produced in vitro in a baculovirus expression system. Recombinant technologies are also being developed to improve otherwise conventionally produced inactivated vaccines, for example, by creating a chimeric vaccine virus to increase capsid stability and by inserting sequences into the vaccine virus for desired antigen expression. Other important areas of ongoing research include enhanced adjuvants, vaccine quality control procedures and predicting vaccine protection from immune correlates, thus reducing dependency on animal challenge studies. Globally, the degree of independent vaccine evaluation is highly variable, and this is essential for vaccine quality. Previously neglected, the

  1. T cell immunity and vaccines against invasive fungal diseases.

    PubMed

    Ito, James Isami

    2011-01-01

    Over the past two decades much has been learned about the immunology of invasive fungal infection, especially invasive candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis. Although quite different in their pathogenesis, the major common protective host response is Th1 mediated. It is through Th1 cytokine production that the effector cells, phagocytes, are activated to kill the fungus. A more thorough understanding of the pathogenesis of disease, the elicited protective Th1 immune response, the T cell antigen(s) which elicit this response, and the mechanism(s) whereby one can enhance, reconstitute, or circumvent the immunosuppressed state will, hopefully, lead to the development of a vaccine(s) capable of protecting even the most immunocompromised of hosts.

  2. Invasive pneumococcal disease in England and Wales: vaccination implications.

    PubMed

    Sleeman, K; Knox, K; George, R; Miller, E; Waight, P; Griffiths, D; Efstratiou, A; Broughton, K; Mayon-White, R T; Moxon, E R; Crook, D W

    2001-01-15

    Knowledge of the epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) will aid in planning the use of pneumococcal vaccines. A United Kingdom (UK)-based surveillance in England and Wales (1995-1997) of 11,528 individuals with IPD and a local enhanced surveillance in the Oxford (UK) area (1995-1999) have been analyzed. IPD has a high attack rate in children, with 37.1-48.1 cases per 100,000 infants <1 year old per year, and in older persons, with 21.2-36.2 cases per 100,000 persons >65 years old per year, for England, Wales, and Oxford. The 7-valent conjugate vaccine includes serotypes causing < or =79% of IPD in children <5 years old, but only 66% in adults >65 years old. The data also indicate that IPD varies by serotype, age, and country, emphasizing that the epidemiology of IPD is heterogeneous and requires continued surveillance. PMID:11120930

  3. Vaccinations

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  4. [Non-vaccinal prophylaxis for orally transmitted diseases].

    PubMed

    Buisson, Y; Teyssou, R; Nicand, E

    1997-01-01

    Many diseases are transmitted to man by consumption of contaminated food and drinking water. Orally transmitted diseases are among the main risks for travelers in developing and tropical countries. A variety of clinical manifestations can be observed but the diarrhea is the most common. In many cases bacterial gastroenteritis, typho-paratyphoidal fever, brucellosis, viral hepatitis, and various parasitic diseases can develop after various periods of incubation following consumption of contaminated food or drink with no initial reaction. Vaccination can afford protection against only few diseases. Prevention by applying good hygiene and common sense is the best method. By following the standard list of food precautions, travelers can minimize the main risks. Drug prophylaxis is recommended only under special circumstances. Travel medicine providers must have up-to-date information and possess the persuasive powers necessary to convince travelers to apply recommendations despite the major inconveniences.

  5. A case suspected for yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van de Pol, Eva M; Gisolf, Elizabeth H; Richter, Clemens

    2014-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine is one of the most successful vaccines ever developed. Since 2001, 56 cases of yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease (YEL-AVD) have been published in the peer-reviewed literature. Here, we report a new case suspected for YEL-AVD in the Netherlands. Further research is needed to determine the true incidence of YEL-AVD and to clarify host and vaccine-associated factors in the pathogenesis of YEL-AVD. Because of the potential adverse events, healthcare providers should carefully consider vaccination only in people who are truly at risk for YF infection, especially in primary vaccine recipients.

  6. Foot and mouth disease virus transmission among vaccinated pigs after exposure to virus shedding pigs.

    PubMed

    Orsel, K; de Jong, M C M; Bouma, A; Stegeman, J A; Dekker, A

    2007-08-21

    The aim of this study was to design a transmission experiment that enabled quantification of the effectiveness of vaccination against foot and mouth disease (FMD) virus in groups of pigs. Previous experiments showed that intradermal injection of pigs with FMD virus 14 days after vaccination was not suitable to start an infection chain, as inoculated vaccinated pigs resisted challenge. Therefore, we carried out two experiments in which we used direct contact to a non-vaccinated pig as route of infection. In the first experiment only the vaccine effect on susceptibility was quantified by exposing pigs, either vaccinated 14 days before or not vaccinated, each to a non-vaccinated seeder pig inoculated with FMD virus O/NET/2001. Since no significant differences were observed between contact infections in vaccinated or non-vaccinated pigs, we performed a second experiment in which both susceptibility and infectivity were subject to vaccination. We quantified virus transmission in homogenous groups of vaccinated or non-vaccinated pigs in which the infection chain was started by exposure to a third group of non-vaccinated infected pigs. Transmission occurred to all contact-exposed pigs in the non-vaccinated groups and to 9 out of 10 contact-exposed pigs in the vaccinated groups. The rate of transmission (beta) was significantly reduced in the vaccine group. Yet, the estimated reproduction ratio in both groups was still above 1. In conclusion, by adjusting our transmission study design and challenge method, we were able to quantify transmission of FMDV among vaccinated pigs. According to this study a single vaccination was not sufficient to stop pig to pig virus transmission. With these results major outbreaks may still be expected, even in groups of vaccinated pigs. PMID:17658199

  7. EV-A71 vaccine licensure: a first step for multivalent enterovirus vaccine to control HFMD and other severe diseases.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qunying; Wang, Yiping; Bian, Lianlian; Xu, Miao; Liang, Zhenglun

    2016-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) are the most common viral agents in humans. Although most infections are mild or asymptomatic, there is a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations that may be caused by EV infections with varying degrees of severity. Among these viruses, EV-A71 and coxsackievirus (CV) CV-A16 from group A EVs attract the most attention because they are responsible for hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Other EV-A viruses such as CV-A6 and CV-A10 were also reported to cause HFMD outbreaks in several countries or regions. Group B EVs such as CV-B3, CV-B5 and echovirus 30 were reported to be the main pathogens responsible for myocarditis and encephalitis epidemics and were also detected in HFMD patients. Vaccines are the best tools to control infectious diseases. In December 2015, China's Food and Drug Administration approved two inactivated EV-A71 vaccines for preventing severe HFMD.The CV-A16 vaccine and the EV-A71-CV-A16 bivalent vaccine showed substantial efficacy against HFMD in pre-clinical animal models. Previously, research on EV-B group vaccines was mainly focused on CV-B3 vaccine development. Because the HFMD pathogen spectrum has changed, and the threat from EV-B virus-associated severe diseases has gradually increased, it is necessary to develop multivalent HFMD vaccines. This study summarizes the clinical symptoms of diseases caused by EVs, such as HFMD, myocarditis and encephalitis, and the related EV vaccine development progress. In conclusion, developing multivalent EV vaccines should be strongly recommended to prevent HFMD, myocarditis, encephalitis and other severe diseases. PMID:27436364

  8. Neurological disease in man following administration of suckling mouse brain antirabies vaccine*

    PubMed Central

    Held, J. R.; Adaros, H. Lopez

    1972-01-01

    In Latin America, suckling mouse brain (SMB) vaccine has become the most commonly used vaccine for immunization of both man and animals against rabies. This vaccine is highly immunogenic, is relatively economical and easy to produce, and is believed to be free of the immunoencephalitogenic factor. From 1964 to the end of 1969, there were 40 reported cases of neurological disease following administration of SMB vaccine, 32 of which met the criteria for inclusion in this report. These 32 cases occurred in 8 different countries. In contrast to neurological disease following the administration of other types of nervous tissue vaccine, the majority of the cases following vaccination with SMB vaccine had a Guillain—Barré-type syndrome with peripheral nervous system involvement and a higher case—fatality rate. The causative agent has not been demonstrated. Modifications in the production and handling of the vaccine may be producing changes that are responsible. PMID:4339746

  9. Vaccination of pigs against Aujeszky's disease by the intradermal route using live attenuated and inactivated virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Vannier, P; Cariolet, R

    1989-09-01

    A study was undertaken of the protection induced by inactivated and live Aujeszky's disease virus vaccines. The vaccines were administered using a special device which, without the use of a needle, delivered the preparation intradermally. The trials were performed on 88 pigs which were vaccinated at the beginning of the fattening period both in experimental conditions and in pig herds. All the pigs were challenged at the end of the fattening period in isolation units. The results obtained were compared with those obtained using the same vaccines injected intramuscularly. It was shown that vaccination via the intradermal route induced good protection in the vaccinated animals and was similar to that conferred by live virus vaccine injected intramuscularly. The results, with the inactivated virus vaccine, were not so good when it was injected via the intradermal route. Studies with intradermal vaccination showed no local lesion or very small nodules strictly localized to the dermis. The results also confirmed that the effects of challenge exposure depended on the health status of animals prior to infection and show the necessity to use a synthetic value (delta G) to interpret the data and mainly to compare the results objectively. In fattening pigs this vaccination procedure is attractive because (i) less animal constraint is needed than would be for intramuscular injections, (ii) injection can be checked by the presence of a visible papula at the site of inoculation and, (iii) pigs can be vaccinated in the ham while they are feeding. Injection without a needle also contributes to avoiding bacterial contamination under practical farm conditions of vaccination.

  10. Intentions to receive a potentially available Lyme disease vaccine in an urban sample

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Joshua; Kusz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The only human Lyme disease vaccine of LYMErix was voluntarily removed from the market in the United States in 2002 for a number of reasons. A new human Lyme disease vaccine is currently being developed. We would like any future approved human Lyme disease vaccine to be of interest and marketable to consumers. Methods: We surveyed 714 participants to determine variables associated with intentions to receive a Lyme disease vaccine. Predictor variables included demographics, protection motivational theory, Lyme disease knowledge, Lyme disease preventive behaviors, beliefs and perceived health. Results: We found in multivariate linear regression analyses that Asian/Asian American race/ethnicity (p < 0.001), South Asian race/ethnicity (p = 0.01) and coping appraisal variables of response efficacy (p < 0.001) and self-efficacy (p < 0.001) were each significantly associated with increased intentions. The belief that vaccines are typically not safe was significantly associated with decreased intentions (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Asian/Asian American and South Asian race/ethnicities have a strong interest in receiving a Lyme disease vaccine. Although pharmaceutical companies may benefit by advertising a Lyme disease vaccine to Asian/Asian Americans and South Asians, marketers need to address and use approaches to interest those from other race/ethnicities. Also, marketers need to address the erroneous belief that vaccines are typically not safe in order to interest those with such beliefs to use a Lyme disease vaccine. PMID:27551427

  11. Serotype specificity of B-haplotype influence on the relative efficacy of Marek's disease vaccines.

    PubMed

    Bacon, L D; Witter, R L

    1994-01-01

    B-haplotype genes in the chicken were previously shown to differentially influence vaccine efficacy against challenge with very virulent Marek's disease virus according to the type of Marek's disease (MD) vaccine used. To determine whether MD vaccines of the same serotype gave comparable levels of protection against MD in chickens of the same haplotype challenged with MD virus strain Md5, two serotype 1 and two serotype 2 vaccines were compared with one serotype 3 vaccine using chickens of 15-B-congenic lines. There was a strong correlation in development of MD lesions among chickens of the different lines receiving the two serotype 2 vaccines (r = 0.94) as well as among chickens receiving the two serotype 1 vaccines (r = 0.76). The serotype 1 vaccines were preferable for B2, B13, B15, and B21, but serotype 2 vaccines were more protective for B5 chickens. The two serotype 2 vaccines gave equivalent protection; however, of the serotype 1 vaccines, CVI988/Rispens provided more protection than Md11/75c/R2/23. We conclude that the B-haplotype influence on MD vaccine efficacy is dependent on the serotype of the vaccine.

  12. [Recent advances in DNA vaccines against allergic airway disease: a review].

    PubMed

    Ou, Jin; Xu, Yu; Shi, Wendan

    2013-12-01

    DNA vaccine is used in infectious diseases initially, and later is applied in neoplastic diseases, allergic diseases and other fields with the further understanding of DNA vaccine and the development of genetic engineering. DNA vaccine transfers the genes encoding exogenous antigens to plasmid vector and then is introduced into organism. It controls the antigen proteins synthesis, thus induces specific humoral and cellular immune responses. So it has a broad application prospect in allergic diseases. Compared with the traditional protein vaccines used in specific immunotherapy, DNA vaccine has many advantages, including high purity and specificity, and improvement of patients' compliance etc. However, there are still two unsolved problems. First, the transfection rate of unmodified naked DNA plasmid is not high, Second, it's difficult to induce ideal immune response. In this study, we will review the progress of DNA vaccine applications in respiratory allergic diseases and its various optimization strategies.

  13. Gene-deleted live-attenuated Trypanosoma cruzi parasites as vaccines to protect against Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Valdéz, Fernando J; Pérez Brandán, Cecilia; Ferreira, Arturo; Basombrío, Miguel Ángel

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. This illness is now becoming global, mainly due to congenital transmission, and so far, there are no prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines available to either prevent or treat Chagas disease. Therefore, different approaches aimed at identifying new protective immunogens are urgently needed. Live vaccines are likely to be more efficient in inducing protection, but safety issues linked with their use have been raised. The development of improved protozoan genetic manipulation tools and genomic and biological information has helped to increase the safety of live vaccines. These advances have generated a renewed interest in the use of genetically attenuated parasites as vaccines against Chagas disease. This review discusses the protective capacity of genetically attenuated parasite vaccines and the challenges and perspectives for the development of an effective whole-parasite Chagas disease vaccine.

  14. Issues in pediatric vaccine-preventable diseases in low- to middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Dbaibo, Ghassan; Tatochenko, Vladimir; Wutzler, Peter

    2016-09-01

    The highest burden of pediatric vaccine-preventable disease is found in developing nations where resource constraints pose the greatest challenge, impacting disease diagnosis and surveillance as well as the implementation of large scale vaccination programmes. In November 2012, a Working Group Meeting convened in Casablanca to describe and discuss the status with respect to 8 vaccine-preventable diseases (pertussis, pneumococcal disease, measles-mumps-rubella-varicella (MMRV), rotavirus and meningococcal meningitis) to identify and consider ways of overcoming obstacles to pediatric vaccine implementation. Experts from Europe, Russia, the Commonwealth of Independent States, the Middle East, Africa and South East Asia participated in the meeting. A range of region-specific needs and barriers to uptake were discussed. The aim of this article is to provide a summary of the ongoing status with respect to pediatric vaccine preventable disease in the countries represented, and the experts' opinions and recommendations with respect to pediatric vaccine implementation. PMID:27322436

  15. Issues in pediatric vaccine-preventable diseases in low- to middle-income countries

    PubMed Central

    Dbaibo, Ghassan; Tatochenko, Vladimir; Wutzler, Peter

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The highest burden of pediatric vaccine-preventable disease is found in developing nations where resource constraints pose the greatest challenge, impacting disease diagnosis and surveillance as well as the implementation of large scale vaccination programmes. In November 2012, a Working Group Meeting convened in Casablanca to describe and discuss the status with respect to 8 vaccine-preventable diseases (pertussis, pneumococcal disease, measles-mumps-rubella-varicella (MMRV), rotavirus and meningococcal meningitis) to identify and consider ways of overcoming obstacles to pediatric vaccine implementation. Experts from Europe, Russia, the Commonwealth of Independent States, the Middle East, Africa and South East Asia participated in the meeting. A range of region-specific needs and barriers to uptake were discussed. The aim of this article is to provide a summary of the ongoing status with respect to pediatric vaccine preventable disease in the countries represented, and the experts' opinions and recommendations with respect to pediatric vaccine implementation. PMID:27322436

  16. Randomised field trial to evaluate serological response after foot-and-mouth disease vaccination in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Knight-Jones, T J D; Bulut, A N; Gubbins, S; Stärk, K D C; Pfeiffer, D U; Sumption, K J; Paton, D J

    2015-02-01

    Despite years of biannual mass vaccination of cattle, foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remains uncontrolled in Anatolian Turkey. To evaluate protection after mass vaccination we measured post-vaccination antibodies in a cohort of cattle (serotypes O, A and Asia-1). To obtain results reflecting typical field protection, participants were randomly sampled from across Central and Western Turkey after routine vaccination. Giving two-doses one month apart is recommended when cattle are first vaccinated against FMD. However, due to cost and logistics, this is not routinely performed in Turkey, and elsewhere. Nested within the cohort, we conducted a randomised trial comparing post-vaccination antibodies after a single-dose versus a two-dose primary vaccination course. Four to five months after vaccination, only a third of single-vaccinated cattle had antibody levels above a threshold associated with protection. A third never reached this threshold, even at peak response one month after vaccination. It was not until animals had received three vaccine doses in their lifetime, vaccinating every six months, that most (64% to 86% depending on serotype) maintained antibody levels above this threshold. By this time cattle would be >20 months old with almost half the population below this age. Consequently, many vaccinated animals will be unprotected for much of the year. Compared to a single-dose, a primary vaccination course of two-doses greatly improved the level and duration of immunity. We concluded that the FMD vaccination programme in Anatolian Turkey did not produce the high levels of immunity required. Higher potency vaccines are now used throughout Turkey, with a two-dose primary course in certain areas. Monitoring post-vaccination serology is an important component of evaluation for FMD vaccination programmes. However, consideration must be given to which antigens are present in the test, the vaccine and the field virus. Differences between these antigens affect the

  17. A New Wave of Vaccines for Non-Communicable Diseases: What Are the Regulatory Challenges?

    PubMed

    Darrow, Jonathan J; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines represent one of the greatest achievements of medicine, dramatically reducing the incidence of serious or life-threatening infectious diseases and allowing people to live longer, healthier lives. As life expectancy has increased, however, the burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as cancer, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and diabetes has increased. This shifting burden of disease has heightened the already urgent need for therapies that treat or prevent NCDs, a need that is now being met with increased efforts to develop NCD vaccines. Like traditional vaccines, NCD vaccines work by modulating the human immune system, but target cells, proteins or other molecules that are associated with the NCD in question rather than pathogens or pathogen-infected cells. Efforts are underway to develop NCD vaccines to address not only cancer and hypertension, but also addiction, obesity, asthma, arthritis, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, and Crohn's disease, among others. NCD vaccines present an interesting challenge for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which is tasked with approving new treatments on the basis of efficacy and safety. Should NCD vaccines be evaluated under the same analytic frame as traditional vaccines, or that of biologic drugs? Despite the borrowed nomenclature, NCD vaccines differ in important ways from infectious disease vaccines. Because infectious disease vaccines are generally administered to healthy individuals, often children, tolerance for adverse events is low and willingness to pay is limited. It is important to have infectious disease vaccines even for rare or eradicated disease (e.g., smallpox), in the event of an outbreak. The efficacy of infectious disease vaccines is generally high, and the vaccines convey population level benefits associated with herd immunity and potential eradication. The combination of substantial population-level benefits, low willingness to pay, and low tolerance for adverse events explains the

  18. Immunogenicity and mechanisms impairing the response to vaccines in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Alicia C; Gisbert, Javier P; Chaparro, María

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an immunological disorder that is usually treated with immunosuppressive therapy, potentially leading to increases in vulnerability to infections. Although many infections can be prevented by vaccination, vaccination coverage in these patients in clinical practice is insufficient. Therefore, the seroprotection condition should be verified, even for routine vaccines, such as hepatitis B or pneumococcus. Response to vaccines in IBD patients is thought to be impaired due to the immunological alterations generated by the disease and to the immunomodulatory treatments. The immunogenicity of hepatitis B, influenza, and pneumococcal vaccines is impaired in IBD patients, whereas the response to papillomavirus vaccine seems similar to that observed in the healthy population. On the other hand, data on the immunogenicity of tetanus vaccine in IBD patients are conflicting. Studies assessing the response to measles-mumps-rubella, varicella, and herpes zoster vaccines in IBD patients are scarce. The cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the impairment of the response to vaccination in IBD patients are poorly understood. Studies aiming to assess the response to vaccines in IBD patients and to identify the mechanisms involved in their immunogenicity are warranted. A better understanding of the immune response, specifically to vaccines, in patients with immune-mediated diseases (such as IBD), is crucial when developing vaccines that trigger more potent immunologic responses. PMID:26527572

  19. Vaccine preventable diseases and vaccination coverage in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, Australia 2006-2010.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Latika; Chiu, Clayton; Habig, Andrew; Lowbridge, Christopher; Jayasinghe, Sanjay; Wang, Han; McIntyre, Peter; Menzies, Robert

    2013-12-31

    This report outlines the major positive impacts of vaccines on the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people from 2007 to 2010, as well as highlighting areas that require further attention. Hepatitis A disease is now less common in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children than in their non-Indigenous counterparts. Hepatitis A vaccination for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children was introduced in 2005 in the high incidence jurisdictions of the Northern Territory, Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia. In 2002–2005, there were 20 hospitalisations for hepatitis A in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged<5 years--over 100 times more common than in other children--compared to none in 2006/07–2009/10. With respect to invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), there has been a reduction of 87% in notifications of IPD caused by serotypes contained in 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (7vPCV) since the introduction of the childhood 7vPCV program among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. However, due to a lower proportion of IPD caused by 7vPCV types prior to vaccine introduction, the decline in total IPD notifications has been less marked in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children than in other children. Higher valency vaccines (10vPCV and 13vPCV) which replaced 7vPCV from 2011 are likely to result in a greater impact on IPD and potentially also non-invasive disease, although disease caused by non-vaccine serotypes appears likely to be an ongoing problem. Among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged ≥50 years, there have been recent increases in IPD, which appear related to low vaccination coverage and highlight the need for improved coverage in this high-risk target group. Since routine meningococcal C vaccination for infants and the high-school catch-up program were implemented in 2003, there has been a significant decrease in cases caused by serogroup C. However, the predominant

  20. Vaccine preventable diseases and vaccination coverage in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, Australia 2006-2010.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Latika; Chiu, Clayton; Habig, Andrew; Lowbridge, Christopher; Jayasinghe, Sanjay; Wang, Han; McIntyre, Peter; Menzies, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This report outlines the major positive impacts of vaccines on the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people from 2007 to 2010, as well as highlighting areas that require further attention. Hepatitis A disease is now less common in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children than in their non-Indigenous counterparts. Hepatitis A vaccination for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children was introduced in 2005 in the high incidence jurisdictions of the Northern Territory, Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia. In 2002–2005, there were 20 hospitalisations for hepatitis A in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged<5 years--over 100 times more common than in other children--compared to none in 2006/07–2009/10. With respect to invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), there has been a reduction of 87% in notifications of IPD caused by serotypes contained in 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (7vPCV) since the introduction of the childhood 7vPCV program among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. However, due to a lower proportion of IPD caused by 7vPCV types prior to vaccine introduction, the decline in total IPD notifications has been less marked in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children than in other children. Higher valency vaccines (10vPCV and 13vPCV) which replaced 7vPCV from 2011 are likely to result in a greater impact on IPD and potentially also non-invasive disease, although disease caused by non-vaccine serotypes appears likely to be an ongoing problem. Among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged ≥50 years, there have been recent increases in IPD, which appear related to low vaccination coverage and highlight the need for improved coverage in this high-risk target group. Since routine meningococcal C vaccination for infants and the high-school catch-up program were implemented in 2003, there has been a significant decrease in cases caused by serogroup C. However, the predominant

  1. Vaccine-preventable disease and immunization in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Bart, K J; Lin, K F

    1990-06-01

    Vaccines have given health care providers control over a substantial portion of the morbidity and mortality in the developing world. Global efforts have immunized two-thirds of the world's children with DTP and polio vaccines; 72% have received BCG and 59% measles vaccine; but only 29% of pregnant women have received two doses of tetanus toxoid. In addition, vaccines against yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, hepatitis B, rubella, and mumps and meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine are being used in specific regions of the world. New vaccine candidates will enhance the vaccine armamentarium over the next decade to include the causes of pneumonia, diarrhea, and meningitis: Haemophilus influenzae type b, pneumococcal and meningococcal protein conjugate vaccines, typhoid and rotavirus vaccine. Genetically engineered vaccine vehicles, genetic reassortants, and genetic deletions are being investigated as new vaccine candidates. PMID:2190145

  2. Retrospective evaluation of foot-and-mouth disease vaccine effectiveness in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Knight-Jones, T J D; Bulut, A N; Gubbins, S; Stärk, K D C; Pfeiffer, D U; Sumption, K J; Paton, D J

    2014-04-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is present in much of Turkey and its control is largely based on vaccination. The arrival of the FMD Asia-1 serotype in Turkey in 2011 caused particular concern, spreading rapidly westwards across the country towards the FMD free European Union. With no prior natural immunity, control of spread would rely heavily on vaccination. Unlike human vaccines, field protection is rarely evaluated directly for FMD vaccines. Between September 2011 and July 2012 we performed four retrospective outbreak investigations to assess the vaccine effectiveness (VE) of FMD Asia-1 vaccines in Turkey. Vaccine effectiveness is defined as the reduction in risk in vaccinated compared to unvaccinated individuals with similar virus exposure in the field. The four investigations included 12 villages and 1230 cattle >4 months of age. One investigation assessed the FMD Asia-1 Shamir vaccine, the other three evaluated the recently introduced FMD Asia-1 TUR 11 vaccine made using a field isolate of the FMD Asia-1 Sindh-08 lineage that had recently entered Turkey. After adjustment for confounding, the TUR 11 vaccine provided moderate protection against both clinical disease VE=69% [95% CI: 50%-81%] and infection VE=63% [95% CI: 29%-81%]. However, protection was variable with some herds with high vaccine coverage still experiencing high disease incidence. Some of this variability will be the result of the variation in virus challenge and immunity that occurs under field conditions. In the outbreak investigated there was no evidence that the Asia-1 Shamir vaccine provided adequate protection against clinical FMD with an incidence of 89% in single vaccinated cattle and 69% in those vaccinated two to five times. Based on these effectiveness estimates, vaccination alone is unlikely to produce the high levels of herd immunity needed to control FMD without additional control measures.

  3. Treg inducing adjuvants for therapeutic vaccination against chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Keijzer, Chantal; van der Zee, Ruurd; van Eden, Willem; Broere, Femke

    2013-01-01

    Many existing therapies in autoimmune diseases are based on systemic suppression of inflammation and the observed side effects of these therapies illustrate the pressing need for more specific interventions. Regulatory T-cells (Treg) are pivotal controllers of (auto-aggressive) immune responses and inflammation, and decreased Treg numbers and/or functioning have been associated with autoimmune disease. Therefore, Treg became frequently studied targets for more specific immunotherapy. Especially antigen-specific targeting of Treg would enable local and tailor made interventions, while obviating the negative side effect of general immuno-suppression. Self-antigens that participate in inflammation, irrespective of the etiology of the different autoimmune diseases, are held to be candidate antigens for antigen-specific interventions. Rather than tolerance induction to disease inciting self-antigens, which are frequently unknown, general self-antigens expressed at sites of inflammation would allow targeting of disease independent, but inflammatory-site specific, regulatory mechanisms. Preferably, such self-antigens should be abundantly expressed and up-regulated at the inflammatory-site. In this perspective heat shock proteins (Hsp) have several characteristics that make them highly attractive targets for antigen-specific Treg inducing therapy. The development of an antigen-specific Treg inducing vaccine is a major novel goal in the field of immunotherapy in autoimmune diseases. However, progress is hampered not only by the lack of effective antigens, but also by the fact that other factors such as dose, route, and the presence or absence of an adjuvant, turned out to be critical unknowns, with respect to the effective induction of Treg. In addition, the use of a Treg inducing adjuvant might be required to achieve an effective regulatory response, in the case of ongoing inflammation. Future goals in clinical trials will be the optimization of natural Treg expansion (or

  4. Requirements for improved vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease epidemics.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hyeon

    2013-01-01

    Inactivated foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines are currently used worldwide. With the emergence of various FMD virus serotypes and subtypes, vaccines must become more suitable for field-based uses under the current circumstances in terms of the fast and proper selection of vaccine strains, an extended vaccine development period for new viruses, protecting against the risk of virus leakage during vaccine manufacture, counteracting the delayed onset of immune response, counteracting shorter durations of immunity, and the accurate serological differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals and multiple vaccination. The quality of vaccines should then be improved to effectively control FMD outbreaks and minimize the problems that can arise among livestock after vaccinations. Vaccine improvement should be based on using attenuated virus strains with high levels of safety. Moreover, when vaccines are urgently required for newly spread field strains, the seed viruses for new vaccines should be developed for only a short period. Improved vaccines should offer superior immunization to all susceptible animals including cattle and swine. In addition, they should have highly protective effects without persistent infection. In this way, if vaccines are developed using new methods such as reverse genetics or vector vaccine technology, in which live viruses can be easily made by replacing specific protective antigens, even a single vaccination is likely to generate highly protective effects with an extended duration of immunity, and the safety and stability of the vaccines will be assured. We therefore reviewed the current FMD vaccines and their adjuvants, and evaluated if they provide superior immunization to all susceptible animals including cattle and swine.

  5. Human adenovirus-vectored foot-and-mouth disease vaccines: establishment of a vaccine product profile through in vitro testing.

    PubMed

    Brake, D A; McIlhaney, M; Miller, T; Christianson, K; Keene, A; Lohnas, G; Purcell, C; Neilan, J; Schutta, C; Barrera, J; Burrage, T; Brough, D E; Butman, B T

    2012-01-01

    Next generation, foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) molecular vaccines based on replication deficient human adenovirus serotype 5 viral vectored delivery of FMD capsid genes (AdFMD) are being developed by the United States Dept. of Homeland Security and industry partners. The strategic goal of this program is to develop AdFMD licensed vaccines for the USA National Veterinary Stockpile for use, if needed, as emergency response tools during an FMD outbreak. This vaccine platform provides a unique opportunity to develop a set of in vitro analytical parameters to generate an AdFMD vaccine product profile to replace the current lot release test for traditional, inactivated FMD vaccines that requires FMDV challenge in livestock. The possibility of an indirect FMD vaccine potency test based on a serological alternative was initially investigated for a lead vaccine candidate, Adt.A24. Results show that serum virus neutralization (SVN) based serology testing for Adt.A24 vaccine lot release is not feasible, at least not in the context of vaccine potency assessment at one week post-vaccination. Thus, an in vitro infectious titer assay (tissue culture infectious dose 50, TCID50) which measures FMD infectious (protein expression) titer was established. Pre-validation results show acceptable assay variability and linearity and these data support further studies to validate the TCID50 assay as a potential potency release test. In addition, a quantitative physiochemical assay (HPLC) and three immunochemical assays (Fluorescent Focus-Forming Unit (FFU); tissue culture expression dose 50 (TCED50); Western blot) were developed for potential use as in vitro assays to monitor AdFMD vaccine lot-to-lot consistency and other potential applications. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using a traditional modified-live vaccine virus infectivity assay in combination with a set of physiochemical and immunochemical tests to build a vaccine product profile that will ensure the each Ad

  6. 9 CFR 113.205 - Newcastle Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... unsatisfactory. (b) Potency test. A vaccination-challenge test shall be conducted using susceptible chickens 2 to 6 weeks of age at time of vaccination, properly identified and obtained from the same source and... observation for at least 14 days. (2) After at least 14 days post-vaccination, the vaccinates and at least...

  7. 9 CFR 113.205 - Newcastle Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... unsatisfactory. (b) Potency test. A vaccination-challenge test shall be conducted using susceptible chickens 2 to 6 weeks of age at time of vaccination, properly identified and obtained from the same source and... observation for at least 14 days. (2) After at least 14 days post-vaccination, the vaccinates and at least...

  8. 9 CFR 113.205 - Newcastle Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... unsatisfactory. (b) Potency test. A vaccination-challenge test shall be conducted using susceptible chickens 2 to 6 weeks of age at time of vaccination, properly identified and obtained from the same source and... observation for at least 14 days. (2) After at least 14 days post-vaccination, the vaccinates and at least...

  9. 9 CFR 113.205 - Newcastle Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... unsatisfactory. (b) Potency test. A vaccination-challenge test shall be conducted using susceptible chickens 2 to 6 weeks of age at time of vaccination, properly identified and obtained from the same source and... observation for at least 14 days. (2) After at least 14 days post-vaccination, the vaccinates and at least...

  10. 9 CFR 113.205 - Newcastle Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... unsatisfactory. (b) Potency test. A vaccination-challenge test shall be conducted using susceptible chickens 2 to 6 weeks of age at time of vaccination, properly identified and obtained from the same source and... observation for at least 14 days. (2) After at least 14 days post-vaccination, the vaccinates and at least...

  11. Efficacy of combined killed-in-oil emulsion and live Newcastle disease vaccines in chickens.

    PubMed

    Folitse, R; Halvorson, D A; Sivanandan, V

    1998-01-01

    Following the introduction of routine vaccination regimes with different types of Newcastle disease (ND) vaccines, the incidence of velogenic viscerotropic Newcastle disease (VVND) in commercial poultry worldwide has declined dramatically. Unfortunately, these vaccination regimes are not feasible in free-range and backyard systems of poultry production practiced in many developing countries. In this study, we sought to develop a single vaccination regime in chickens with ND vaccines to elicit a long-lasting high level of ND virus (NDV) antibodies adequate to protect chickens against ND. The level of antibody response, as measured by the hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) test, and the degree of protection against the virulent strain of NDV were studied in chickens immunized with different vaccines. The vaccines used were: killed-in-oil emulsion (subcutaneous; s.c.) plus live virus (oculanasal; o.n.), given concurrently; experimental vaccine (s.c.) plus live virus (o.n.), given concurrently; killed-in-oil (s.c.); experimental vaccine prepared by homogenizing commercial live vaccine and oil emulsion (s.c.); and live virus (o.n.). The results obtained in this study indicate that concurrent administration of oil emulsion and live NDV vaccines induced the best antibody response, but there was no significant difference in protection among the vaccinated groups.

  12. Vaccines and immunotherapies for the prevention of infectious diseases having cutaneous manifestations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jashin J; Huang, David B; Pang, Katie R; Tyring, Stephen K

    2004-04-01

    Although the development of antimicrobial drugs has advanced rapidly in the past several years, such agents act against only certain groups of microbes and are associated with increasing rates of resistance. These limitations of treatment force physicians to continue to rely on prevention, which is more effective and cost-effective than therapy. From the use of the smallpox vaccine by Jenner in the 1700s to the current concerns about biologic warfare, the technology for vaccine development has seen numerous advances. The currently available vaccines for viral illnesses include Dryvax for smallpox; the combination measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine; inactivated vaccine for hepatitis A; plasma-derived vaccine for hepatitis B; and the live attenuated Oka strain vaccine for varicella zoster. Vaccines available against bacterial illnesses include those for anthrax, Haemophilus influenzae, and Neisseria meningitidis. Currently in development for both prophylactic and therapeutic purposes are vaccines for HIV, herpes simplex virus, and human papillomavirus. Other vaccines being investigated for prevention are those for cytomegalovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus, hepatitis C, and dengue fever, among many others. Fungal and protozoan diseases are also subjects of vaccine research. Among immunoglobulins approved for prophylactic and therapeutic use are those against cytomegalovirus, hepatitis A and B, measles, rabies, and tetanus. With this progress, it is hoped that effective vaccines soon will be developed for many more infectious diseases with cutaneous manifestations. PMID:15034501

  13. Emergency vaccination use in a modelled foot and mouth disease outbreak in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Miller, G; Gale, S B; Eshelman, C E; Wells, S J

    2015-12-01

    Epidemiological modelling is an important approach used by the Veterinary Services of the United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service to evaluate the potential effectiveness of different strategies for handling foot and mouth disease (FMD). Identifying the potential spread of FMD by modelling an outbreak, and then considering the impacts of FMD vaccination, is important in helping to inform decision-makers about the potential outcomes of vaccination programmes. The objective of this study was to evaluate emergency vaccination control strategies used in a simulated FMD outbreak in Minnesota. The North American Animal Disease Spread Model (NAADSM, Version 3.2.18) was used to simulate the outbreak. Large-scale (1,500 herds per day) emergency vaccination reduced the size of the modelled outbreak in both swine and dairy production types, but the effect was larger when the outbreak began in a dairy herd. Large-scale vaccination also overcame limitations caused by delays in vaccine delivery. Thus, even if vaccination did not begin until 21 days into the outbreak, large-scale vaccination still reduced the size and duration of the outbreak. The quantity of vaccine used was markedly larger when large-scale vaccination was used, compared with small-scale (50 herds per day) vaccine administration. In addition, the number of animals and herds vaccinated in an outbreak originating in a herd of swine was substantially lower than in an outbreak beginning in a herd of dairy cattle.

  14. Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccination Rates in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Jason S.; Miller, Hannah L.; Wasan, Sharmeel K.; Noronha, Ansu; Ardagna, Eileen; Sullivan, Kathleen; Jacobson, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at an increased risk for vaccine-preventable illnesses, such as pneumococcal pneumonia and influenza. We hypothesized that a patient-directed educational program would increase vaccination rates of patients with IBD. We developed a written educational form that was given to all patients over a 15-month period. The form included information about the importance of vaccination and asked patients about their vaccination status. If patients indicated that they were not vaccinated, they were offered a vaccination at the time of their visit. For influenza, the vaccination rates during 3 seasons were compared. For pneumococcal pneumonia, the vaccination rates during a 6-month period before the introduction of the educational program and the rates during the 15-month period after implementation of the intervention were compared. Our form increased the percentage of patients who reported having an influenza vaccination (23% vs 47%; P<.001) and the percentage of patients who reported having a pneumococcal pneumonia vaccination (21% vs 32%; P<.001). We concluded that a simple written educational form designed to assess vaccination status and enable providers to offer same-day influenza and pneumococcal pneumonia vaccinations resulted in a significant increase in influenza and pneumococcal pneumonia vaccination rates among patients in an IBD specialty clinic. PMID:27118933

  15. Successful vaccination for Lyme disease: a novel mechanism?

    PubMed

    Exner, M

    2001-09-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato is the aetiologic agent of Lyme disease, which is a multi-system disorder resulting from the transmission of organisms from an infected tick. According to the US Centers for Disease Control, the incidence of Lyme disease in the US has increased 25-fold since national surveillance began and the geographical spread of Lyme disease causing spirochetes would indicate that the annual number of cases will continue to rise. Humoral immunity has been shown to play a role in protection and this has spurred efforts towards developing a Lyme disease vaccine. A number of protective immunogens have been characterised to date, but due to the heterogeneity of Lyme disease Borreliae, no single molecule has proven to be completely effective as a vaccinogen. This review will describe the immunogens that have been used to protect against B. burgdorferi infection, with a focus on the inherent challenges involved with providing successful immunity to B. burgdorferi. In addition, the promising aspects and the limitations of each protective immunogen will be discussed. PMID:11728214

  16. Effect of vaccination on transmission characteristics of highly virulent Newcastle disease virus in experimentally infected chickens.

    PubMed

    Fentie, Tsegaw; Dadi, Kara; Kassa, Tesfu; Sahle, Mesfin; Cattoli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the effect of vaccines produced in Ethiopia from vaccine strains used worldwide on the transmission characteristics of velogenic Newcastle disease virus field strain after different vaccination schemes. Chickens were vaccinated with Hitchner B1, La Sota or I-2 via the intraocular and intranasal routes. Vaccine and challenge viruses induced high antibody levels, both in inoculated and contact birds. Prime-boost vaccination protected birds against morbidity and mortality and significantly reduced the incidence of viral shedding from chickens compared with single vaccinated and unvaccinated birds. Protection from disease and mortality was correlated with the presence of positive antibody titres (>4 log2) at day of challenge. Most of the unvaccinated and in-contact birds excreted the virus and showed a high level of antibody titres, indicating the high infectivity of the challenge virus. The detection of the challenge virus in most of vaccinated birds demonstrated that the tested vaccination protocols cannot fully protect birds from viral infection, replication and shedding, and vaccinated-infected birds can act as a source of infection for susceptible flocks. The high mortality observed in unvaccinated birds and their contacts confirmed the virulence of the challenge virus and indicated that this field virus strain can easily spread in an unvaccinated poultry population and cause major outbreaks. Progressive vaccinations supported by biosecurity measures should therefore be implemented to control the disease and introduction of the virus to the poultry farms.

  17. Development of a novel thermostable Newcastle disease virus vaccine vector for expression of a heterologous gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The thermostable Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccines have been used widely to control Newcastle disease (ND) for village flocks, due to their independence of cold chains for delivery and storage. To explore the potential use of the thermostable NDV as a vaccine vector, an infectious clone of the...

  18. Development of an improved vaccine evaluation protocol to compare the efficacy of Newcastle disease vaccines.

    PubMed

    Cardenas-Garcia, Stivalis; Diel, Diego G; Susta, Leonardo; Lucio-Decanini, Eduardo; Yu, Qingzhong; Brown, Corrie C; Miller, Patti J; Afonso, Claudio L

    2015-03-01

    While there is typically 100% survivability in birds challenged with vNDV under experimental conditions, either with vaccines formulated with a strain homologous or heterologous (different genotype) to the challenge virus, vaccine deficiencies are often noted in the field. We have developed an improved and more stringent protocol to experimentally evaluate live NDV vaccines, and showed for the first time under experimental conditions that a statistically significant reduction in mortality can be detected with genotype matched vaccines. Using both vaccine evaluation protocols (traditional and improved), birds were challenged with a vNDV of genotype XIII and the efficacy of live heterologous (genotype II) and homologous (genotype XIII) NDV vaccines was compared. Under traditional vaccination conditions there were no differences in survival upon challenge, but the homologous vaccine induced significantly higher levels of antibodies specific to the challenge virus. With the more stringent challenge system (multiple vaccine doses and early challenge with high titers of vNDV), the birds administered the homologous vaccine had superior humoral responses, reduced clinical signs, and reduced mortality levels than those vaccinated with the heterologous vaccine. These results provide basis for the implementation of more sensitive methods to evaluate vaccine efficacy.

  19. Effects of Chicken Interferon Gamma on Newcastle Disease Virus Vaccine Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas-Garcia, Stivalis; Dunwoody, Robert P.; Marcano, Valerie; Diel, Diego G.; Williams, Robert J.; Gogal, Robert M.; Brown, Corrie C.; Miller, Patti J.; Afonso, Claudio L.

    2016-01-01

    More effective vaccines are needed to control avian diseases. The use of chicken interferon gamma (chIFNγ) during vaccination is a potentially important but controversial approach that may improve the immune response to antigens. In the present study, three different systems to co-deliver chIFNγ with Newcastle disease virus (NDV) antigens were evaluated for their ability to enhance the avian immune response and their protective capacity upon challenge with virulent NDV. These systems consisted of: 1) a DNA vaccine expressing the Newcastle disease virus fusion (F) protein co-administered with a vector expressing the chIFNγ gene for in ovo and booster vaccination, 2) a recombinant Newcastle disease virus expressing the chIFNγ gene (rZJ1*L/IFNγ) used as a live vaccine delivered in ovo and into juvenile chickens, and 3) the same rZJ1*L/IFNγ virus used as an inactivated vaccine for juvenile chickens. Co-administration of chIFNγ with a DNA vaccine expressing the F protein resulted in higher levels of morbidity and mortality, and higher amounts of virulent virus shed after challenge when compared to the group that did not receive chIFNγ. The live vaccine system co-delivering chIFNγ did not enhanced post-vaccination antibody response, nor improved survival after hatch, when administered in ovo, and did not affect survival after challenge when administered to juvenile chickens. The low dose of the inactivated vaccine co-delivering active chIFNγ induced lower antibody titers than the groups that did not receive the cytokine. The high dose of this vaccine did not increase the antibody titers or antigen-specific memory response, and did not reduce the amount of challenge virus shed or mortality after challenge. In summary, regardless of the delivery system, chIFNγ, when administered simultaneously with the vaccine antigen, did not enhance Newcastle disease virus vaccine immunogenicity. PMID:27409587

  20. Effects of Chicken Interferon Gamma on Newcastle Disease Virus Vaccine Immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Cardenas-Garcia, Stivalis; Dunwoody, Robert P; Marcano, Valerie; Diel, Diego G; Williams, Robert J; Gogal, Robert M; Brown, Corrie C; Miller, Patti J; Afonso, Claudio L

    2016-01-01

    More effective vaccines are needed to control avian diseases. The use of chicken interferon gamma (chIFNγ) during vaccination is a potentially important but controversial approach that may improve the immune response to antigens. In the present study, three different systems to co-deliver chIFNγ with Newcastle disease virus (NDV) antigens were evaluated for their ability to enhance the avian immune response and their protective capacity upon challenge with virulent NDV. These systems consisted of: 1) a DNA vaccine expressing the Newcastle disease virus fusion (F) protein co-administered with a vector expressing the chIFNγ gene for in ovo and booster vaccination, 2) a recombinant Newcastle disease virus expressing the chIFNγ gene (rZJ1*L/IFNγ) used as a live vaccine delivered in ovo and into juvenile chickens, and 3) the same rZJ1*L/IFNγ virus used as an inactivated vaccine for juvenile chickens. Co-administration of chIFNγ with a DNA vaccine expressing the F protein resulted in higher levels of morbidity and mortality, and higher amounts of virulent virus shed after challenge when compared to the group that did not receive chIFNγ. The live vaccine system co-delivering chIFNγ did not enhanced post-vaccination antibody response, nor improved survival after hatch, when administered in ovo, and did not affect survival after challenge when administered to juvenile chickens. The low dose of the inactivated vaccine co-delivering active chIFNγ induced lower antibody titers than the groups that did not receive the cytokine. The high dose of this vaccine did not increase the antibody titers or antigen-specific memory response, and did not reduce the amount of challenge virus shed or mortality after challenge. In summary, regardless of the delivery system, chIFNγ, when administered simultaneously with the vaccine antigen, did not enhance Newcastle disease virus vaccine immunogenicity. PMID:27409587

  1. Meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine: a new conjugate vaccine against invasive meningococcal disease

    PubMed Central

    Hedari, Carine P; Khinkarly, Rima W; Dbaibo, Ghassan S

    2014-01-01

    Invasive meningococcal disease is a serious infection that occurs worldwide. It is caused by Neisseria meningitidis, of which six serogroups (A, B, C, W-135, X, and Y) are responsible for most infections. The case fatality rate of meningococcal disease remains high and can lead to significant sequelae. Vaccination remains the best strategy to prevent meningococcal disease. Polysaccharide vaccines were initially introduced in the late 1960s but their limitations (poor immunogenicity in infants and toddlers and hyporesponsiveness after repeated doses) have led to the development and use of meningococcal conjugate vaccines, which overcome these limitations. Two quadrivalent conjugated meningococcal vaccines – MenACWY-DT (Menactra®) and MenACWY-CRM197 (Menveo®) – using diphtheria toxoid or a mutant protein, respectively, as carrier proteins have already been licensed in the US. Recently, a quadrivalent meningococcal vaccine conjugated to tetanus toxoid (MenACWY-TT; Nimenrix®) was approved for use in Europe in 2012. The immunogenicity of MenACWY-TT, its reactogenicity and safety profile, as well as its coadministration with other vaccines are discussed in this review. Clinical trials showed that MenACWY-TT was immunogenic in children above the age of 12 months, adolescents, and adults, and has an acceptable reactogenicity and safety profile. Its coadministration with several other vaccines that are commonly used in children, adolescents, and adults did not affect the immunogenicity of MenACWY-TT or the coadministered vaccine, nor did it affect its reactogenicity and safety. Other studies are now ongoing in order to determine the immunogenicity, reactogenicity, and safety of MenACWY-TT in infants from the age of 6 weeks. PMID:24729718

  2. [Aujeszky's disease: sanitation of swine herds in enzootically infected areas using labelled vaccines].

    PubMed

    Pittler, H; Rojahn, A

    1990-01-01

    Both in the Federal Republic of Germany and in some neighbouring countries the epizootic situation of Aujeszky's disease has been unsatisfactory for a long time, especially in areas with a high pig density. New findings on vaccines with certain protein deletions have recently indicated the possibility that the disease might be eradicated even in vaccinated herds. By using labelled vaccines it seems possible to distinguish the carriers of vaccine virus antibodies from the carriers of field virus antibodies and to eliminate the animals infected with field virus, while leaving the other animals in the herd and protecting them from infection by vaccination. This procedure would also be practicable in epizootically infected areas and would be less expensive than eradicating the disease on the basis of serological tests without using vaccines. A skeleton of an eradication programme, which was discussed and agreed with scientific experts and with the Federal Laender, as well as rough estimates of costs are being presented.

  3. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

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  4. Vaccines against diseases transmitted from animals to humans: a one health paradigm.

    PubMed

    Monath, Thomas P

    2013-11-01

    This review focuses on the immunization of animals as a means of preventing human diseases (zoonoses). Three frameworks for the use of vaccines in this context are described, and examples are provided of successes and failures. Framework I vaccines are used for protection of humans and economically valuable animals, where neither plays a role in the transmission cycle. The benefit of collaborations between animal health and human health industries and regulators in developing such products is discussed, and one example (West Nile vaccine) of a single product developed for use in animals and humans is described. Framework II vaccines are indicated for domesticated animals as a means of preventing disease in both animals and humans. The agents of concern are transmitted directly or indirectly (e.g. via arthropod vectors) from animals to humans. A number of examples of the use of Framework II vaccines are provided, e.g. against brucellosis, Escherichia coli O157, rabies, Rift Valley fever, Venezuelan equine encephalitis, and Hendra virus. Framework III vaccines are used to immunize wild animals as a means of preventing transmission of disease agents to humans and domesticated animals. Examples are reservoir-targeted, oral bait rabies, Mycobacterium bovis and Lyme disease vaccines. Given the speed and lost cost of veterinary vaccine development, some interventions based on the immunization of animals could lead to rapid and relatively inexpensive advances in public health. Opportunities for vaccine-based approaches to preventing zoonotic and emerging diseases that integrate veterinary and human medicine (the One Health paradigm) are emphasized.

  5. Therapeutic passive vaccination against chronic Lyme disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhong, W; Stehle, T; Museteanu, C; Siebers, A; Gern, L; Kramer, M; Wallich, R; Simon, M M

    1997-11-11

    Passive and active immunization against outer surface protein A (OspA) has been successful in protecting laboratory animals against subsequent infection with Borrelia burgdorferi. Antibodies (Abs) to OspA convey full protection, but only when they are present at the time of infection. Abs inactivate spirochetes within the tick and block their transmission to mammals, but do not affect established infection because of the loss of OspA in the vertebrate host. Our initial finding that the presence of high serum titers of anti-OspC Abs (5 to 10 microg/ml) correlates with spontaneous resolution of disease and infection in experimentally challenged immunocompetent mice suggested that therapeutic vaccination with OspC may be feasible. We now show that polyclonal and monospecific mouse immune sera to recombinant OspC, but not to OspA, of B. burgdorferi resolve chronic arthritis and carditis and clear disseminated spirochetes in experimentally infected C.B.-17 severe combined immunodeficient mice in a dose-dependent manner. This was verified by macroscopical and microscopical examination of affected tissues and recultivation of spirochetes from ear biopsies. Complete resolution of disease and infection was achieved, independent of whether OspC-specific immune sera (10 microg OspC-specific Abs) were repeatedly given (4x in 3- to 4-day intervals) before the onset (day 10 postinfection) or at the time of fully established arthritis and carditis (days 19 or 60 postinfection). The results indicate that in mice spirochetes constitutively express OspC and are readily susceptible to protective OspC-specific Abs throughout the infection. Thus, an OspC-based vaccine appears to be a candidate for therapy of Lyme disease.

  6. Herd immunity after vaccination: how to quantify it and how to use it to halt disease.

    PubMed

    De Jong, M C; Bouma, A

    2001-03-21

    In comparison to unvaccinated individuals, vaccinated individuals have fewer clinical symptoms, reduced susceptibility and reduced infectivity. The first two effects of vaccination can mean that each vaccinated individual is protected against clinical symptoms. From experiments and field trials, the extent of individual protection can be determined by a statistical analysis of the resulting data. In addition, there is an effect of the vaccination on the populations in which one or more individuals are vaccinated. This effect on the population is due to the effects of vaccination on susceptibility and infectivity of the vaccinated individuals. The population effect is called herd immunity and is observed as a reduction in chance of becoming infected when being part of a population with some of the individuals vaccinated. Note that the protection by herd immunity applies to vaccinated individuals as well as to unvaccinated individuals. Thus, protection against disease can be achieved not only by vaccinating the individuals that have to be protected but also by vaccinating other individuals in the same population. Such an application of herd immunity is especially important in protecting farm animals. To plan and evaluate vaccination at the population level, the herd immunity needs to be quantified. It will be illustrated that it is possible, not only theoretically but also practically, to quantify herd immunity among farm animals with data from small-scale experiments as well as with data from field trials.

  7. The serological response against foot and mouth disease virus elicited by repeated vaccination of dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Elnekave, Ehud; Dekker, Aldo; Eble, Phaedra; van Hemert-Kluitenberg, Froukje; Gelman, Boris; Storm, Nick; Klement, Eyal

    2016-09-22

    In Israel, cattle are annually vaccinated against foot and mouth disease (FMD). If infections with FMD virus occur in dairy farms it mainly involves heifers and calves, while older dairy cows seldom become infected. We hypothesized that this difference in susceptibility between adult cows and the young heifers and calves is due to stronger and more stable immune response elicited by multiple vaccinations. In order to test this hypothesis, 99 dairy cattle, divided into six groups according to number of prior vaccinations, were annually vaccinated with a trivalent vaccine (A, O and Asia-1) and followed during two consecutive years. In total 988 sera were sampled at 11 time points. Virus neutralization tests (VNT) were performed in order to determine the neutralizing antibody titers (NAT) against the vaccine homologous serotypes: O-4625, O-Manisa, Asia-1-Shamir and the heterologous serotype A-Turkey-20/2006. A similar NAT pattern was observed to all serotypes and therefore statistical analysis was restricted to O-4625 serotype. In the 'high vaccination' groups (cows that were vaccinated at least four times before the study), high NAT were found on the beginning of the trial and no or only a mild increase of NAT was observed following further vaccinations. Additionally, in the 'high vaccination' groups, the percentage of cows that had a NAT higher than 2.0 (log10) by the end of the 1st year was significantly higher than in the 'low vaccination' groups (cows vaccinated only three times or less before the study). We conclude that starting from the 5th vaccination, the NAT increase following vaccination is mild and NAT are persistent, suggesting reduction of the frequency of routine vaccination after multiple vaccinations is possible. PMID:27576078

  8. The serological response against foot and mouth disease virus elicited by repeated vaccination of dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Elnekave, Ehud; Dekker, Aldo; Eble, Phaedra; van Hemert-Kluitenberg, Froukje; Gelman, Boris; Storm, Nick; Klement, Eyal

    2016-09-22

    In Israel, cattle are annually vaccinated against foot and mouth disease (FMD). If infections with FMD virus occur in dairy farms it mainly involves heifers and calves, while older dairy cows seldom become infected. We hypothesized that this difference in susceptibility between adult cows and the young heifers and calves is due to stronger and more stable immune response elicited by multiple vaccinations. In order to test this hypothesis, 99 dairy cattle, divided into six groups according to number of prior vaccinations, were annually vaccinated with a trivalent vaccine (A, O and Asia-1) and followed during two consecutive years. In total 988 sera were sampled at 11 time points. Virus neutralization tests (VNT) were performed in order to determine the neutralizing antibody titers (NAT) against the vaccine homologous serotypes: O-4625, O-Manisa, Asia-1-Shamir and the heterologous serotype A-Turkey-20/2006. A similar NAT pattern was observed to all serotypes and therefore statistical analysis was restricted to O-4625 serotype. In the 'high vaccination' groups (cows that were vaccinated at least four times before the study), high NAT were found on the beginning of the trial and no or only a mild increase of NAT was observed following further vaccinations. Additionally, in the 'high vaccination' groups, the percentage of cows that had a NAT higher than 2.0 (log10) by the end of the 1st year was significantly higher than in the 'low vaccination' groups (cows vaccinated only three times or less before the study). We conclude that starting from the 5th vaccination, the NAT increase following vaccination is mild and NAT are persistent, suggesting reduction of the frequency of routine vaccination after multiple vaccinations is possible.

  9. Evaluation of different adjuvants for foot-and-mouth disease vaccine containing all the SAT serotypes.

    PubMed

    Cloete, M; Dungu, B; Van Staden, L I; Ismail-Cassim, N; Vosloo, W

    2008-03-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is an economically important disease of cloven-hoofed animals that is primarily controlled by vaccination of susceptible animals and movement restrictions for animals and animal-derived products in South Africa. Vaccination using aluminium hydroxide gel-saponin (AS) adjuvanted vaccines containing the South African Territories (SAT) serotypes has been shown to be effective both in ensuring that disease does not spread from the endemic to the free zone and in controlling outbreaks in the free zone. Various vaccine formulations containing antigens derived from the SAT serotypes were tested in cattle that were challenged 1 year later. Both the AS and ISA 206B vaccines adjuvanted with saponin protected cattle against virulent virus challenge. The oil-based ISA 206B-adjuvanted vaccine with and without stimulators was evaluated in a field trial and both elicited antibody responses that lasted for 1 year. Furthermore, the ISA 206 adjuvanted FMD vaccine protected groups of cattle against homologous virus challenge at very low payloads, while pigs vaccinated with an emergency ISA 206B-based FMD vaccine containing the SAT 1 vaccine strains were protected against the heterologous SAT 1 outbreak strain. PMID:18575060

  10. Modelling the effect of conjugate vaccines in pneumococcal disease: cohort or population models?

    PubMed

    Standaert, Baudouin; Demarteau, Nadia; Talbird, Sandra; Mauskopf, Josephine

    2010-11-19

    Cohort and population models estimate vaccine impact on disease events, and yield different estimates in countries with different demographic compositions. We compared administration of the new 10-valent pneumococcal Haemophilus influenzae-protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV) with no vaccination in two countries, the United Kingdom (UK) and Mexico, using two modelling strategies: a cohort model and a population model. The cohort model followed a birth cohort over a lifetime, beginning 10 years after initiation of the vaccine program, when vaccine efficacy steady state had been reached. The population model examined the country-specific population over 1 year, also beginning 10 years after initiation of the vaccine program. Both models included the same age-specific disease rates of meningitis, bacteraemia, pneumonia, and otitis media. The output variables were the numbers of specific events, with and without indirect vaccine effects. Without indirect effects, the cohort and population models produced similar results for both countries (deviation of <20% difference per output measure for most outcomes). The difference between the model types was much greater when indirect vaccine effects were included, especially in Mexico (up to 120% difference). Cohort and population modelling methods produce different results depending on the disease, the intervention, the demographic composition, and the time horizon evaluated. Results from the two model types provide different information about the impact of interventions on events: accumulated vaccine benefit for an individual in a cohort model; vaccine benefit for a whole population at a specific time point in a population model.

  11. Daedalic DNA vaccination against self antigens as a treatment for chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan Min; Zhou, Jimmy Jianheng; Wang, Ya; Watson, Debbie; Zhang, Geoff Yu; Hu, Min; Wu, Huiling; Zheng, Guoping; Wang, Yiping; Durkan, Anne M; Harris, David CH; Alexander, Stephen I

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major cause of death and morbidity in Australia and worldwide. DNA vaccination has been used for targeting foreign antigens to induce immune responses and prevent autoimmune disease, viral infection and cancer. However, the use of DNA vaccination has been restricted by a limited ability to induce strong immune responses, especially against self-antigens which are limited by mechanisms of self-tolerance. Furthermore, there have been few studies on the potential of DNA vaccination in chronic inflammatory diseases, including CKD. We have established strategies of DNA vaccination targeting specific self-antigens in the immune system including co-stimulatory pathways, T cell receptors and chemokine molecules, which have been effective in protecting against the development of CKD in a variety of animal models. In particular, we find that the efficacy of DNA vaccination is improved by dendritic cell (DC) targeting and can protect against animal models of autoimmune nephritis mimicking human membranous nephropathy. In this review, we summarize several approaches that have been tested to improve the efficacy of DNA vaccination in CKD models, including enhanced DNA vaccine delivery methods, DNA vaccine modifications and new molecular targets for DNA vaccination. Finally, we discuss the specific application of DNA vaccination for preventing and treating CKD. PMID:23412421

  12. International bank for foot-and-mouth disease vaccine: stability studies with virus concentrates and vaccines prepared from them.

    PubMed

    Doel, T R; Pullen, L

    1990-10-01

    An international bank foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccine has been established at the Pirbright Laboratory of the AFRC Institute for Animal Health. The bank is based on concentrated virus preparations stored in the gaseous phase of liquid nitrogen and is capable of producing up to 0.5 million cattle doses of each of five common strains of the virus (FMDV) for the member nations of the bank. This paper describes the initial and subsequent testing of the virus concentrates and vaccines prepared from them. There was no evidence of deterioration of the virus concentrates during liquid nitrogen storage. High levels of protection of cattle and guinea-pig were achieved when vaccines were used immediately following preparation from the recently thawed virus concentrates. In contrast, storage of vaccines at 4 degrees C for one or more months resulted in loss of potency in guinea-pigs and was attributed, in part to proteolytic enzymes in the virus concentrates. PMID:2174597

  13. Efficacy of experimental Newcastle disease water-in-oil oil-emulsion vaccines formulated from squalane and squalene.

    PubMed

    Stone, H D; Xie, Z X

    1990-01-01

    Water-in-oil inactivated Newcastle disease oil-emulsion vaccines were formulated with the terpene oils squalane or squalene, or mixtures thereof, and injected into 4-week-old broilers. Vaccine efficacy based on hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) titers was comparable to that of control mineral oil vaccines. Tissue reaction to intramuscular injection of the terpene oil emulsion vaccines was greatly reduced 3 weeks post-vaccination compared with that of mineral oil-based vaccine. Viscosity of the terpene oil vaccines was satisfactory but increased three to four times that of mineral oil vaccine when the antigen phase volume increased from 5% to 20%.

  14. Comparative evaluation of vaccine efficacy of recombinant Marek's disease virus vaccine lacking Meq oncogene in commercial chickens.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lucy F; Kreager, K S; Arango, J; Paraguassu, A; Beckman, B; Zhang, Huanmin; Fadly, Aly; Lupiani, B; Reddy, S M

    2010-02-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) oncogene meq has been identified as the gene involved in tumorigenesis in chickens. We have recently developed a Meq-null virus, rMd5 Delta Meq, in which the oncogene meq was deleted. Vaccine efficacy experiments conducted in Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory (ADOL) 15I(5) x 7(1) chickens vaccinated with rMd5 Delta Meq virus or an ADOL preparation of CVI988/Rispens indicated that rMd5 Delta Meq provided superior protection than CVI988/Rispens when challenged with the very virulent plus MDV 648A strain. In the present study we set to investigate the vaccine efficacy of rMd5 Delta Meq in the field compared to several commercial preparations of CVI988/Rispens. Three large-scale field experiments, in which seeder chickens were inoculated with a very virulent plus strain of 686, vv+ MDV, were conducted in a model developed by Hy-Line International. In addition, comparisons were made with bivalent vaccine (HVT+SB-1), HVT alone and several serotype 3 HVT-vectored vaccines individually or in combination with CVI988/Rispens. Experimental results showed that addition of HVT to either of the two commercial CVI988/Rispens preparations tested (A or B) did not enhance protection conferred by CVI988/Rispens alone and that rMd5 Delta Meq was a better or equal vaccine compared to any of the CVI988/Rispens vaccines tested under the conditions of the field trials presented herein. Our results also emphasized the complexity of factors affecting vaccine efficacy and the importance of challenge dose in protection. PMID:19941987

  15. New approaches and omics tools for mining of vaccine candidates against vector-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Kuleš, Josipa; Horvatić, Anita; Guillemin, Nicolas; Galan, Asier; Mrljak, Vladimir; Bhide, Mangesh

    2016-08-16

    Vector-borne diseases (VBDs) present a major threat to human and animal health, as well as place a substantial burden on livestock production. As a way of sustainable VBD control, focus is set on vaccine development. Advances in genomics and other "omics" over the past two decades have given rise to a "third generation" of vaccines based on technologies such as reverse vaccinology, functional genomics, immunomics, structural vaccinology and the systems biology approach. The application of omics approaches is shortening the time required to develop the vaccines and increasing the probability of discovery of potential vaccine candidates. Herein, we review the development of new generation vaccines for VBDs, and discuss technological advancement and overall challenges in the vaccine development pipeline. Special emphasis is placed on the development of anti-tick vaccines that can quell both vectors and pathogens.

  16. Immunity of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Serotype Asia 1 by Sublingual Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao-tai; Liu, Yong-sheng

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals, with severe agricultural and economic losses. Here we present study using a sublingual (SL) route with the killed serotype Asia 1 FMDV vaccine. Guinea pigs were vaccinated using a commercially available vaccine formulation at the manufacturer’s recommended full, 1/4, and 1/16 antigen doses. Animals were challenged with homologous FMDV Asia1 strain at various times following vaccination. All control guinea pigs exhibited clinical disease, including fever, viremia, and lesions, specifically vesicle formation in feet. Animals vaccinated with the 1/16 and 1/4 doses were protected after challenge at days 7, 28, and 35 post vaccination. These data suggest that effective protection against foot-and-mouth disease can be achieved with 1/16 of the recommended vaccine dose using SL vaccination, indicating that the sublingual route is an attractive alternative for the administration of the FMDV vaccine. PMID:23717497

  17. Therapeutic vaccination to treat chronic infectious diseases: current clinical developments using MVA-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Boukhebza, Houda; Bellon, Nadine; Limacher, Jean Marc; Inchauspé, Geneviève

    2012-12-01

    A famous milestone in the vaccine field has been the first successful vaccination against smallpox, in 1798, by Edward Jenner. Using the vaccinia cowpox virus, Jenner was able to protect vaccinees from variola or smallpox. The Modified Virus Ankara (MVA) poxvirus strain has been one of the vaccines subsequently developed to prevent smallpox infection and was selected by the US government in their Biodefense strategy. Progress in molecular biology and immunology associated with MVA infection has led to the development of MVA as vaccine platform, both in the field of preventive and therapeutic vaccines. This later class of therapeutics has witnessed growing interest that has translated into an increasing number of vaccine candidates reaching the clinics. Among those, MVA-based therapeutic vaccines have addressed four major chronic infections including viral hepatitis, AIDS, human papillomavirus-linked pathologies and tuberculosis. Clinical trials encompass phase 1 and 2 and have started to show significant results and promises. PMID:22894957

  18. Vaccine-preventable diseases: the role of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control.

    PubMed

    Kramarz, P; Lopalco, P L; Huitric, E; Pastore Celentano, L

    2014-05-01

    The role of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) is to strengthen the capacity of the European Union (EU) Member States to protect human health through the prevention and control of infectious diseases. The main objective of the programme on vaccine-preventable diseases and invasive bacterial infections (VPD) is to provide robust evidence and high-quality technical support to the EU Member States to help them in their efforts to prevent and control VPD. Since the establishment of ECDC, several existing VPD surveillance networks have been transferred to ECDC, namely EU-IBIS, DIPNET and EUVAC. In addition to surveillance of diseases, ECDC is collecting information and monitoring other parameters that are of crucial importance for a well-functioning immunization system, including vaccination coverage. The VPD programme also provides independent scientific opinions in the area of immunization and initiates and coordinates scientific studies in the area of vaccination to answer specific questions of public health importance, including risk perception and analysis of behaviour in different population groups. One of the overall ECDC priorities over recent years is the Centre's involvement in measles elimination. The 'Message' tool and the 'Measles Atlas' are examples of work aiming at supporting the efforts of Member States in the elimination phase.

  19. Is gonococcal disease preventable? The importance of understanding immunity and pathogenesis in vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Jennings, Michael P.; Apicella, Michael A.; Seib, Kate L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gonorrhea is a major, global public health problem for which there is no vaccine. The continuing emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains raises concerns that untreatable Neisseria gonorrhoeae may become widespread in the near future. Consequently, there is an urgent need for increased efforts towards the development of new anti-gonococcal therapeutics and vaccines, as well as suitable models for potential pre-clinical vaccine trials. Several current issues regarding gonorrhea are discussed herein, including the global burden of disease, the emergence of antibiotic-resistance, the status of vaccine development and, in particular, a focus on the model systems available to evaluate drug and vaccine candidates. Finally, alternative approaches to evaluate vaccine candidates are presented. Such approaches may provide valuable insights into the protective mechanisms, and correlates of protection, required to prevent gonococcal transmission, local infection and disease sequelae. PMID:26805040

  20. Is gonococcal disease preventable? The importance of understanding immunity and pathogenesis in vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Jennifer L; Jennings, Michael P; Apicella, Michael A; Seib, Kate L

    2016-11-01

    Gonorrhea is a major, global public health problem for which there is no vaccine. The continuing emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains raises concerns that untreatable Neisseria gonorrhoeae may become widespread in the near future. Consequently, there is an urgent need for increased efforts towards the development of new anti-gonococcal therapeutics and vaccines, as well as suitable models for potential pre-clinical vaccine trials. Several current issues regarding gonorrhea are discussed herein, including the global burden of disease, the emergence of antibiotic-resistance, the status of vaccine development and, in particular, a focus on the model systems available to evaluate drug and vaccine candidates. Finally, alternative approaches to evaluate vaccine candidates are presented. Such approaches may provide valuable insights into the protective mechanisms, and correlates of protection, required to prevent gonococcal transmission, local infection and disease sequelae. PMID:26805040

  1. Assessing the Immunogenic Response of a Single Center's Pneumococcal Vaccination Protocol in Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Jonathan D; Myers, Leann; Kanter, Julie

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common inherited hematologic disorder in the United States. Patients with SCD are at increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease and are reliant on both early penicillin prophylaxis and antipneumococcal vaccination for prevention of infection. Although studies examining vaccine response have demonstrated a drop-off of titer response after 3 years, an optimal vaccination regimen has not been identified. Our study sought to assess the immunogenicity of our center's pneumococcal vaccination strategy, which included Prevnar (PCV-7) (before the introduction of PCV-13) followed by Pneumovax (PPV-23) given routinely at 2 and 5 years of age and then every 5 years thereafter. Our goal was to assess vaccine response in a population of patients with SCD who had received vaccines according to this regimen using multiplex bead analysis. Our study demonstrated a significant percentage of persons with SCD do not maintain a sufficient vaccination response to PPV-23 for 5 years. Our study revealed that only 36% of patients had protective levels of antipneumococcal antibody titers at an average of 37 months after vaccination. Most alarmingly, within the group of patients with subtherapeutic titers, 64% demonstrated vaccine response to <25% of the tested serotypes. These findings were significantly associated with duration of time since last vaccine administration, but the mean age of lack of response was below the 3-year window where vaccine response was previously reported to wane. Our results indicate antipneumococcal immunity may not be optimally maintained using this vaccination strategy in patients with SCD leaving them vulnerable to invasive pneumococcal disease. Many pediatric hematologists stop prophylactic penicillin at 5 years of age making these results alarming. We recommend further investigation into an optimal vaccine schedule and monitoring of antipneumococcal titers in at-risk patients. PMID:26886376

  2. Assessing the Immunogenic Response of a Single Center's Pneumococcal Vaccination Protocol in Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Jonathan D; Myers, Leann; Kanter, Julie

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common inherited hematologic disorder in the United States. Patients with SCD are at increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease and are reliant on both early penicillin prophylaxis and antipneumococcal vaccination for prevention of infection. Although studies examining vaccine response have demonstrated a drop-off of titer response after 3 years, an optimal vaccination regimen has not been identified. Our study sought to assess the immunogenicity of our center's pneumococcal vaccination strategy, which included Prevnar (PCV-7) (before the introduction of PCV-13) followed by Pneumovax (PPV-23) given routinely at 2 and 5 years of age and then every 5 years thereafter. Our goal was to assess vaccine response in a population of patients with SCD who had received vaccines according to this regimen using multiplex bead analysis. Our study demonstrated a significant percentage of persons with SCD do not maintain a sufficient vaccination response to PPV-23 for 5 years. Our study revealed that only 36% of patients had protective levels of antipneumococcal antibody titers at an average of 37 months after vaccination. Most alarmingly, within the group of patients with subtherapeutic titers, 64% demonstrated vaccine response to <25% of the tested serotypes. These findings were significantly associated with duration of time since last vaccine administration, but the mean age of lack of response was below the 3-year window where vaccine response was previously reported to wane. Our results indicate antipneumococcal immunity may not be optimally maintained using this vaccination strategy in patients with SCD leaving them vulnerable to invasive pneumococcal disease. Many pediatric hematologists stop prophylactic penicillin at 5 years of age making these results alarming. We recommend further investigation into an optimal vaccine schedule and monitoring of antipneumococcal titers in at-risk patients.

  3. Liposome encapsulated subunit (VP1) and virion vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Vasantha, S; Antony, A; Lal, S M

    1987-03-01

    Subunit vaccine prepared from VP1 protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) types 0 and Asia 1 protected guinea pigs against FMD and also induced high levels of antibody. Liposomes have been used as a safe and potent immunological adjuvant for FMD vaccines. Vaccines prepared from inactivated virus types 0 and Asia 1 encapsulated in liposomes protected guinea pigs against challenge with homologous virus and showed good antibody response in pigs on a small scale field trial. PMID:2886019

  4. Real-time quantitative PCR for Marek's disease vaccine virus in feather samples: applications and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Baigent, S; Nair, V; Currie, R

    2006-01-01

    Marek's disease, an economically-important lymphoid neoplasm of chickens, is controlled by vaccination with CVI988 strain of Marek's disease herpesvirus. Sub-optimal vaccinal protection can have multiple causes. Accurate quantification of CVI988 in vaccinated chickens will assist in understanding the causes of these vaccine breaks. We developed, optimised and validated a real-time PCR assay for quantification of CVI988 vaccine virus (in terms of CVI988 genomes per 10,000 cells) in the feather tips, a rich source of viral DNA which can easily be sampled in a non-invasive manner. CVI988 load in feathers was predictive of CVI988 load in spleen, so is anticipated to be a good predictor of protection. The optimal age of chicks for feather collection is between two to five weeks, and feathers are preferentially taken from the axillary tract. This PCR test is now used to monitor vaccine virus levels in commercial chicks. For each flock under test, fifty birds are feather sampled for q-PCR. We describe how the feather CVI988 genome profile can show the flock's response to vaccination, and the likelihood of vaccine breaks. Furthermore, the q-PCR test can be applied to researching optimal timing and vaccine delivery routes, and optimal vaccination regimes for different breeds of chick. PMID:17058503

  5. BCG vaccine-induced neuroprotection in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yong, Jing; Lacan, Goran; Dang, Hoa; Hsieh, Terry; Middleton, Blake; Wasserfall, Clive; Tian, Jide; Melega, William P; Kaufman, Daniel L

    2011-01-31

    There is a growing interest in using vaccination with CNS antigens to induce autoreactive T cell responses that home to damaged areas in the CNS and ameliorate neurodegenerative disease. Neuroprotective vaccine studies have focused on administering oligodendrocyte antigens or Copaxone® in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Theoretical considerations, however, suggest that vaccination with a neuronal antigen may induce more robust neuroprotective immune responses. We assessed the neuroprotective potential of vaccines containing tyrosine hydroxylase (a neuronal protein involved in dopamine synthesis) or Copaxone® in CFA in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Surprisingly, we observed that the main beneficial factor in these vaccines was the CFA. Since the major immunogenic component in CFA is Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which closely related to the bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) that is used in human vaccines, we tested BCG vaccination in the MPTP mouse model. We observed that BCG vaccination partially preserved markers of striatal dopamine system integrity and prevented an increase in activated microglia in the substantia nigra of MPTP-treated mice. These results support a new neuroprotective vaccine paradigm in which general (nonself-reactive) immune stimulation in the periphery can limit potentially deleterious microglial responses to a neuronal insult and exert a neurorestorative effect in the CNS. Accordingly, BCG vaccination may provide a new strategy to augment current treatments for a wide range of neuropathological conditions.

  6. BCG Vaccine-Induced Neuroprotection in a Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Jing; Lacan, Goran; Dang, Hoa; Hsieh, Terry; Middleton, Blake; Wasserfall, Clive; Tian, Jide; Melega, William P.; Kaufman, Daniel L.

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing interest in using vaccination with CNS antigens to induce autoreactive T cell responses that home to damaged areas in the CNS and ameliorate neurodegenerative disease. Neuroprotective vaccine studies have focused on administering oligodendrocyte antigens or Copaxone® in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Theoretical considerations, however, suggest that vaccination with a neuronal antigen may induce more robust neuroprotective immune responses. We assessed the neuroprotective potential of vaccines containing tyrosine hydroxylase (a neuronal protein involved in dopamine synthesis) or Copaxone® in CFA in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Surprisingly, we observed that the main beneficial factor in these vaccines was the CFA. Since the major immunogenic component in CFA is Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which closely related to the bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) that is used in human vaccines, we tested BCG vaccination in the MPTP mouse model. We observed that BCG vaccination partially preserved markers of striatal dopamine system integrity and prevented an increase in activated microglia in the substantia nigra of MPTP-treated mice. These results support a new neuroprotective vaccine paradigm in which general (nonself-reactive) immune stimulation in the periphery can limit potentially deleterious microglial responses to a neuronal insult and exert a neurorestorative effect in the CNS. Accordingly, BCG vaccination may provide a new strategy to augment current treatments for a wide range of neuropathological conditions. PMID:21304945

  7. Vaccines based on structure-based design provide protection against infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sunil; Luxon, Bruce A

    2013-11-01

    Vaccines elicit immune responses, provide protection against microorganisms and are considered as one of the most successful medical interventions against infectious diseases. Vaccines can be produced using attenuated virus or bacteria, recombinant proteins, bacterial polysaccharides, carbohydrates or plasmid DNA. Conventional vaccines rely on the induction of immune responses against antigenic proteins to be effective. The genetic diversity of microorganisms, coupled with the high degree of sequence variability in antigenic proteins, presents a challenge to developing broadly effective conventional vaccines. The observation that whole protein antigens are not necessarily essential for inducing immunity has led to the emergence of a new branch of vaccine design termed 'structural vaccinology'. Structure-based vaccines are designed on the rationale that protective epitopes should be sufficient to induce immune responses and provide protection against pathogens. Recent studies demonstrated that designing structure-based vaccine candidates with multiple epitopes induce a higher immune response. As yet there are no commercial vaccines available based on structure-based design and most of the structure-based vaccine candidates are in the preclinical stages of development. This review focuses on recent advances in structure-based vaccine candidates and their application in providing protection against infectious diseases.

  8. Influence of serotype and virus strain on synergism between Marek's disease vaccine viruses.

    PubMed

    Witter, R L

    1992-12-01

    The enhanced protective effect (synergism) when certain Marek's disease (MD) vaccine viruses are combined has been widely used in the development of improved vaccines, but the mechanism is poorly understood. To better characterize the basis for synergism among MD vaccine viruses, three vaccine viruses from each of the three MD viral serotypes were evaluated alone and in various combinations for protection against early challenge with very virulent MD viruses in four replicate trials. Synergism seemed to be influenced by viral serotype because significant enhancement occurred frequently between viruses of serotypes 2 and 3 (five of nine bivalent vaccines positive), but rarely between viruses of serotypes 1 and 3 (one of nine bivalent vaccines positive) and 1 and 2 (one of nine bivalent vaccines positive), and was not detectable between viruses of the same serotype (none of nine bivalent vaccines positive). With some exceptions, the degree of synergism tended to vary inversely with the mean protective efficacy of the most protective component virus. Little effect of virus dose, virus dose ratio or type and route of viral challenge was noted. The combination of strains 281MI/1 (serotype 2) and WTHV-1/1 (serotype 3), both poorly protective as monovalent vaccines, consistently demonstrated high levels of synergism (over 300%) in antibody-positive chickens challenged 5 days post-vaccination with Md5 virus. This protocol may be a useful model system for further studies on mechanisms of synergism. However, mixtures that optimize synergism are not necessarily as protective as commercial vaccines.

  9. Genome-based vaccine design: the promise for malaria and other infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Doolan, Denise L; Apte, Simon H; Proietti, Carla

    2014-10-15

    Vaccines are one of the most effective interventions to improve public health, however, the generation of highly effective vaccines for many diseases has remained difficult. Three chronic diseases that characterise these difficulties include malaria, tuberculosis and HIV, and they alone account for half of the global infectious disease burden. The whole organism vaccine approach pioneered by Jenner in 1796 and refined by Pasteur in 1857 with the "isolate, inactivate and inject" paradigm has proved highly successful for many viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute disease but has failed with respect to malaria, tuberculosis and HIV as well as many other diseases. A significant advance of the past decade has been the elucidation of the genomes, proteomes and transcriptomes of many pathogens. This information provides the foundation for new 21st Century approaches to identify target antigens for the development of vaccines, drugs and diagnostic tests. Innovative genome-based vaccine strategies have shown potential for a number of challenging pathogens, including malaria. We advocate that genome-based rational vaccine design will overcome the problem of poorly immunogenic, poorly protective vaccines that has plagued vaccine developers for many years.

  10. Using Plasmids as DNA Vaccines for Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tregoning, John S; Kinnear, Ekaterina

    2014-12-01

    DNA plasmids can be used to induce a protective (or therapeutic) immune response by delivering genes encoding vaccine antigens. That naked DNA (without the refinement of coat proteins or host evasion systems) can cross from outside the cell into the nucleus and be expressed is particularly remarkable given the sophistication of the immune system in preventing infection by pathogens. As a result of the ease, low cost, and speed of custom gene synthesis, DNA vaccines dangle a tantalizing prospect of the next wave of vaccine technology, promising individual designer vaccines for cancer or mass vaccines with a rapid response time to emerging pandemics. There is considerable enthusiasm for the use of DNA vaccination as an approach, but this enthusiasm should be tempered by the successive failures in clinical trials to induce a potent immune response. The technology is evolving with the development of improved delivery systems that increase expression levels, particularly electroporation and the incorporation of genetically encoded adjuvants. This review will introduce some key concepts in the use of DNA plasmids as vaccines, including how the DNA enters the cell and is expressed, how it induces an immune response, and a summary of clinical trials with DNA vaccines. The review also explores the advances being made in vector design, delivery, formulation, and adjuvants to try to realize the promise of this technology for new vaccines. If the immunogenicity and expression barriers can be cracked, then DNA vaccines may offer a step change in mass vaccination.

  11. [Vaccinations in patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases--EULAR recommendations for pediatric and adult patients].

    PubMed

    Müller-Ladner, Claudia; Müller-Ladner, Ulf

    2012-10-01

    Since patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases are prone to infectious complications--on one hand due to the rheumatic disease itself, on the other hand due to the immunosuppressive therapy--vaccination is an essential tool to prevent these infectious complications. Although there exist several recommendations for the vaccination of immunocompromised patients, many questions still remain for the distinct clinical situations of patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases. In addition, there are several questions concerning the safety and efficacy of various vaccinations, especially with regard to live-attenuated vaccines. Therefore, EULAR (European League Against Rheumatism) assembled two expert panels to clarify as much of these clinical problems as possible. After extensive literature review and evidence grading, the expert panels published recommendations for the vaccination of adult and pediatric patients, which are outlined in this review article.

  12. First case of yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease (YEL-AVD) in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Leung, Wai Shing; Chan, Man Chun; Chik, Shiu Hong; Tsang, Tak Yin

    2016-04-01

    Yellow fever is an important and potentially fatal infection in tropical regions of Africa, South America, eastern Panama in Central America and Trinidad in the Caribbean. Yellow fever vaccination is not only crucial to reduce the disease risk and mortality in individuals travelling to these areas, but also an important public health measure to prevent the spread of the disease. Despite generally considered as a safe vaccine, yellow fever vaccine can rarely be associated with severe adverse reactions including yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease (YEL-AVD). Here, we report the first case of YEL-AVD in Hong Kong. Clinicians should alert to the possibility of YEL-AVD in vaccinees presenting with compatible symptoms after yellow fever vaccination, particularly in people at higher risk of adverse events.

  13. First case of yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease (YEL-AVD) in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Leung, Wai Shing; Chan, Man Chun; Chik, Shiu Hong; Tsang, Tak Yin

    2016-04-01

    Yellow fever is an important and potentially fatal infection in tropical regions of Africa, South America, eastern Panama in Central America and Trinidad in the Caribbean. Yellow fever vaccination is not only crucial to reduce the disease risk and mortality in individuals travelling to these areas, but also an important public health measure to prevent the spread of the disease. Despite generally considered as a safe vaccine, yellow fever vaccine can rarely be associated with severe adverse reactions including yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease (YEL-AVD). Here, we report the first case of YEL-AVD in Hong Kong. Clinicians should alert to the possibility of YEL-AVD in vaccinees presenting with compatible symptoms after yellow fever vaccination, particularly in people at higher risk of adverse events. PMID:27087559

  14. Optimal Control for TB disease with vaccination assuming endogeneous reactivation and exogeneous reinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggriani, N.; Wicaksono, B. C.; Supriatna, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the deadliest infectious disease in the world which caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The disease is spread through the air via the droplets from the infectious persons when they are coughing. The World Health Organization (WHO) has paid a special attention to the TB by providing some solution, for example by providing BCG vaccine that prevent an infected person from becoming an active infectious TB. In this paper we develop a mathematical model of the spread of the TB which assumes endogeneous reactivation and exogeneous reinfection factors. We also assume that some of the susceptible population are vaccinated. Furthermore we investigate the optimal vaccination level for the disease.

  15. Effects of chicken interferon Gamma on Newcastle disease virus vaccine immunogenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More effective vaccines are needed to control avian diseases. The use of chicken interferon gamma (chIFN') during vaccination is a potentially important but controversial approach that may improve the immune response to antigens. In the present study, three different systems to co-deliver chIFN' wit...

  16. Adjuvant effects of chitosan and calcium phosphate particles in an inactivated Newcastle disease vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adjuvant activity of chitosan and calcium phosphate-particles (CAP) was studied following intranasal coadministration of commercial chickens with inactivated Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccine. After three vaccinations with inactivated NDV in combination with chitosan or CAP an increase in an...

  17. Presence of vaccine-derived newcastle disease viruses in wild birds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our study demonstrates the repeated isolation of vaccine-derived Newcastle disease viruses from different species of wild birds across four continents from 1997 through 2014. The data indicate that at least 17 species from ten avian orders occupying different habitats excrete vaccine-derived Newcast...

  18. Presence of virulent Newcastle disease virus in vaccinated chickens in farms in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Rehmani, Shafqat Fatima; Wajid, Abdul; Bibi, Tasra; Nazir, Bushra; Mukhtar, Nadia; Hussain, Abid; Lone, Nazir Ahmad; Yaqub, Tahir; Afonso, Claudio L

    2015-05-01

    One year after a virulent Newcastle disease virus (vNDV) outbreak in Pakistan, the causative strain was present in vaccinated chickens of multiple farms despite the existence of high-average NDV-specific antibody titers (>4.75 log2). The data suggest a possible role of vaccinated birds as reservoirs of vNDV.

  19. Vaccine hesitancy

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, Eve; Laberge, Caroline; Guay, Maryse; Bramadat, Paul; Roy, Réal; Bettinger, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite being recognized as one of the most successful public health measures, vaccination is perceived as unsafe and unnecessary by a growing number of individuals. Lack of confidence in vaccines is now considered a threat to the success of vaccination programs. Vaccine hesitancy is believed to be responsible for decreasing vaccine coverage and an increasing risk of vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks and epidemics. This review provides an overview of the phenomenon of vaccine hesitancy. First, we will characterize vaccine hesitancy and suggest the possible causes of the apparent increase in vaccine hesitancy in the developed world. Then we will look at determinants of individual decision-making about vaccination. PMID:23584253

  20. Estimating the clinical benefits of vaccinating boys and girls against HPV-related diseases in Europe

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HPV is related to a number of cancer types, causing a considerable burden in both genders in Europe. Female vaccination programs can substantially reduce the incidence of HPV-related diseases in women and, to some extent, men through herd immunity. The objective was to estimate the incremental benefit of vaccinating boys and girls using the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in Europe versus girls-only vaccination. Incremental benefits in terms of reduction in the incidence of HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18-related diseases (including cervical, vaginal, vulvar, anal, penile, and head and neck carcinomas and genital warts) were assessed. Methods The analysis was performed using a model constructed in Microsoft®Excel, based on a previously-published dynamic transmission model of HPV vaccination and published European epidemiological data on incidence of HPV-related diseases. The incremental benefits of vaccinating 12-year old girls and boys versus girls-only vaccination was assessed (70% vaccine coverage were assumed for both). Sensitivity analyses around vaccine coverage and duration of protection were performed. Results Compared with screening alone, girls-only vaccination led to 84% reduction in HPV 16/18-related carcinomas in females and a 61% reduction in males. Vaccination of girls and boys led to a 90% reduction in HPV 16/18-related carcinomas in females and 86% reduction in males versus screening alone. Relative to a girls-only program, vaccination of girls and boys led to a reduction in female and male HPV-related carcinomas of 40% and 65%, respectively and a reduction in the incidence of HPV 6/11-related genital warts of 58% for females and 71% for males versus girls-only vaccination. Conclusions In Europe, the vaccination of 12-year old boys and girls against HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18 would be associated with substantial additional clinical benefits in terms of reduced incidence of HPV-related genital warts and carcinomas versus girls-only vaccination. The incremental

  1. Newcastle disease virus-like particles as a platform for the development of vaccines for human and agricultural pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Trudy G

    2011-01-01

    Vaccination is the single most effective way to control viral diseases. However, many currently used vaccines have safety concerns, efficacy issues or production problems. For other viral pathogens, classic approaches to vaccine development have, thus far, been unsuccessful. Virus-like particles (VLPs) are increasingly being considered as vaccine candidates because they offer significant advantages over many currently used vaccines or developing vaccine technologies. VLPs formed with structural proteins of Newcastle disease virus, an avian paramyxovirus, are a potential vaccine candidate for Newcastle disease in poultry. More importantly, these VLPs are a novel, uniquely versatile VLP platform for the rapid construction of effective vaccine candidates for many human pathogens, including genetically complex viruses and viruses for which no vaccines currently exist. PMID:21339837

  2. The first case of Kawasaki disease in a 20-month old baby following immunization with rotavirus vaccine and hepatitis A vaccine in China: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shi; Liubao, Peng; Chongqing, Tan; Xiaomin, Wan

    2015-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) after rotavirus and hepatitis A vaccination has not previously been reported in a baby in China. Herein, we describe a 20-month-old child who developed Kawasaki disease after receiving her second dose of Lanzhou lamb rotavirus vaccine (LLR) and her first dose of freeze-dried live attenuated hepatitis A vaccine. The case report was conducted by collecting and analyzing the hospital in-patient medical records and reviewing both the domestic and foreign pertinent literature. These findings will be important to note this possible side effect and to further investigate the association between the above 2 vaccines and Kawasaki disease.

  3. Varicella (Chickenpox) Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... product containing Measles Vaccine, Mumps Vaccine, Rubella Vaccine, Varicella Vaccine) ... Why get vaccinated?Chickenpox (also called varicella) is a common childhood disease. It is usually mild, but it can be serious, especially in ...

  4. 75 FR 54589 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Foot-and-Mouth Disease Vaccine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... Foot-and-Mouth Disease Vaccine, Live Adenovirus Vector AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection... purpose of field testing, and then to field test, an unlicensed foot-and-mouth disease vaccine, live... field testing of this vaccine, examines the potential effects that field testing this veterinary...

  5. Increase in Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Infections in Children with Sickle Cell Disease since Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Licensure

    PubMed Central

    McCavit, Timothy L.; Quinn, Charles T.; Techasaensiri, Chonnamet; Rogers, Zora R.

    2010-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) has decreased with prophylactic penicillin, pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, and pneumococcal protein-conjugate vaccine (PCV7) usage. We report 10 IPD cases since PCV7 licensure, including a recent surge of non-vaccine serotypes. IPD continues to be a serious risk in SCD. PMID:21193205

  6. From regional pulse vaccination to global disease eradication: insights from a mathematical model of poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Browne, Cameron J; Smith, Robert J; Bourouiba, Lydia

    2015-07-01

    Mass-vaccination campaigns are an important strategy in the global fight against poliomyelitis and measles. The large-scale logistics required for these mass immunisation campaigns magnifies the need for research into the effectiveness and optimal deployment of pulse vaccination. In order to better understand this control strategy, we propose a mathematical model accounting for the disease dynamics in connected regions, incorporating seasonality, environmental reservoirs and independent periodic pulse vaccination schedules in each region. The effective reproduction number, Re, is defined and proved to be a global threshold for persistence of the disease. Analytical and numerical calculations show the importance of synchronising the pulse vaccinations in connected regions and the timing of the pulses with respect to the pathogen circulation seasonality. Our results indicate that it may be crucial for mass-vaccination programs, such as national immunisation days, to be synchronised across different regions. In addition, simulations show that a migration imbalance can increase Re and alter how pulse vaccination should be optimally distributed among the patches, similar to results found with constant-rate vaccination. Furthermore, contrary to the case of constant-rate vaccination, the fraction of environmental transmission affects the value of Re when pulse vaccination is present.

  7. Vaccines against meningococcal serogroup B disease containing outer membrane vesicles (OMV)

    PubMed Central

    Holst, Johan; Oster, Philipp; Arnold, Richard; Tatley, Michael V.; Næss, Lisbeth M.; Aaberge, Ingeborg S.; Galloway, Yvonne; McNicholas, Anne; O’Hallahan, Jane; Rosenqvist, Einar; Black, Steven

    2013-01-01

    The utility of wild-type outer membrane vesicle (wtOMV) vaccines against serogroup B (MenB) meningococcal disease has been explored since the 1970s. Public health interventions in Cuba, Norway and New Zealand have demonstrated that these protein-based vaccines can prevent MenB disease. Data from large clinical studies and retrospective statistical analyses in New Zealand give effectiveness estimates of at least 70%. A consistent pattern of moderately reactogenic and safe vaccines has been seen with the use of approximately 60 million doses of three different wtOMV vaccine formulations. The key limitation of conventional wtOMV vaccines is their lack of broad protective activity against the large diversity of MenB strains circulating globally. The public health intervention in New Zealand (between 2004–2008) when MeNZB was used to control a clonal MenB epidemic, provided a number of new insights regarding international and public-private collaboration, vaccine safety surveillance, vaccine effectiveness estimates and communication to the public. The experience with wtOMV vaccines also provide important information for the next generation of MenB vaccines designed to give more comprehensive protection against multiple strains. PMID:23857274

  8. EV71 vaccine, a new tool to control outbreaks of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD).

    PubMed

    Mao, Qun-ying; Wang, Yiping; Bian, Lianlian; Xu, Miao; Liang, Zhenglun

    2016-05-01

    On December 3rd 2015, the China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) approved the first inactivated Enterovirus 71 (EV71) whole virus vaccine for preventing severe hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). As one of the few preventive vaccines for children's infectious diseases generated by the developing countries in recent years, EV71 vaccine is a blessing to children's health in China and worldwide. However, there are still a few challenges facing the worldwide use of EV71 vaccine, including the applicability against various EV71 pandemic strains in other countries, international requirements on vaccine production and quality control, standardization and harmonization on different pathogen monitoring and detecting methods, etc. In addition, the affordability of EV71 vaccine in other countries is a factor to be considered in HFMD prevention. Therefore, with EV71 vaccine commercially available, there is still a long way to go before reaching effective protection against severe HFMD after EV71 vaccines enter the market. In this paper, the bottlenecks and prospects for the wide use of EV71 vaccine after its approval are evaluated.

  9. Inadvertent yellow fever vaccination of a patient with Crohn's disease treated with infliximab and methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Ekenberg, Christina; Friis-Møller, Nina; Ulstrup, Thomas; Aalykke, Claus

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 56-year-old woman with Crohn's disease, treated with methotrexate and infliximab, who inadvertently received yellow fever vaccination (YFV) prior to a journey to Tanzania. She was not previously vaccinated against YF. YFV contains live-attenuated virus, and is contraindicated in patients treated with immunosuppressive drugs. Following vaccination, the patient fell ill with influenza-like illness. Elevated transaminase levels and YF viremia were detected. Despite being immunocompromised, the patient did not develop more severe adverse effects. Neutralising antibodies to YF virus were detected on day 14 following vaccination and remained protective at least 10 months after vaccination. Limited data is available on outcomes of YFV in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy, including biologics, and we report this case as a reminder of vigilance of vaccine recommendations in this population.

  10. Inadvertent yellow fever vaccination of a patient with Crohn's disease treated with infliximab and methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Ekenberg, Christina; Friis-Møller, Nina; Ulstrup, Thomas; Aalykke, Claus

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 56-year-old woman with Crohn's disease, treated with methotrexate and infliximab, who inadvertently received yellow fever vaccination (YFV) prior to a journey to Tanzania. She was not previously vaccinated against YF. YFV contains live-attenuated virus, and is contraindicated in patients treated with immunosuppressive drugs. Following vaccination, the patient fell ill with influenza-like illness. Elevated transaminase levels and YF viremia were detected. Despite being immunocompromised, the patient did not develop more severe adverse effects. Neutralising antibodies to YF virus were detected on day 14 following vaccination and remained protective at least 10 months after vaccination. Limited data is available on outcomes of YFV in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy, including biologics, and we report this case as a reminder of vigilance of vaccine recommendations in this population. PMID:27571912

  11. [Development of transcutaneous vaccination system for infectious disease countermeasure].

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    The recent vigorous transnational migration of people and materials reflecting the development of transportation facilities, changes in social structure, and war disasters has increased the global spread of emerging and re-emerging infections. Once, as the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus, person-to-person transmission was achieved, the spread of pandemic cannot be contained in reality. Thus enhancement of the crisis-management structure against pandemic is critically important to maintain national function. On the basis of this social background, the development of vaccination, which is the only fundamental prophylaxis, is in attention, and earliest possible establishment of system that supply mass-vaccines in a short time is required. Even if, however, rapid manufacture of vaccine antigen is actualized, there are several problems that vaccine is not easily spread across the developing country and mass vaccination is not performed immediately at the time of the crisis, because conventional vaccination is performed mainly by injection. Our research group developed transcutaneous vaccine devices; a hydrogel patch and a dissolving microneedle array which delivered antigens to antigen-presenting cells in the epidermal layer. Our transcutaneous vaccination system receives a high evaluation as novel, easy-to-use, and less-invasive vaccination method against infections from home and abroad. In this review, we introduce the research progress resulted from our basic, preclinical, and clinical study for practical use. PMID:23208052

  12. Accelerating the development of a therapeutic vaccine for human Chagas disease: rationale and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Bin; Heffernan, Michael J; Jones, Kathryn; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Kamhawi, Shaden; Ortega, Jaime; de Leon Rosales, Samuel Ponce; Lee, Bruce Y; Bacon, Kristina M; Fleischer, Bernhard; Slingsby, BT; Cravioto, Miguel Betancourt; Tapia-Conyer, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease is a leading cause of heart disease affecting approximately 10 million people in Latin America and elsewhere worldwide. The two major drugs available for the treatment of Chagas disease have limited efficacy in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected adults with indeterminate (patients who have seroconverted but do not yet show signs or symptoms) and determinate (patients who have both seroconverted and have clinical disease) status; they require prolonged treatment courses and are poorly tolerated and expensive. As an alternative to chemotherapy, an injectable therapeutic Chagas disease vaccine is under development to prevent or delay Chagasic cardiomyopathy in patients with indeterminate or determinate status. The bivalent vaccine will be comprised of two recombinant T. cruzi antigens, Tc24 and TSA-1, formulated on alum together with the Toll-like receptor 4 agonist, E6020. Proof-of-concept for the efficacy of these antigens was obtained in preclinical testing at the Autonomous University of Yucatan. Here the authors discuss the potential for a therapeutic Chagas vaccine as well as the progress made towards such a vaccine, and the authors articulate a roadmap for the development of the vaccine as planned by the nonprofit Sabin Vaccine Institute Product Development Partnership and Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development in collaboration with an international consortium of academic and industrial partners in Mexico, Germany, Japan, and the USA. PMID:23151163

  13. Allergens are not pathogens: why immunization against allergy differs from vaccination against infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Richard; Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Thalhamer, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination against infectious diseases has been one of the major breakthroughs in human medical history, saving the lives of millions of people each year. More recently, prophylactic vaccination against non-infectious diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, and type I allergy is being investigated. Particularly in case of IgE-driven allergic disorders, which afflict almost a quarter of the population in highly developed countries, preventative measures would represent a major improvement for patients' health as well as an economic relief for public health services. As an alternative to allergen-specific immunotherapy, prophylactic vaccination against type I allergic diseases could slow down or even stop the progress of the allergy pandemic. Allergen-encoding gene-based vaccines, i.e., plasmid DNA and mRNA vaccines, provide the advantage of purity over crude allergen extracts, which involve the risk of de novo sensitizations. Furthermore, these formulations have been demonstrated to induce T helper 1 as well as T regulatory immune responses--a pre-requisite for prophylactic intervention against allergies. However, prophylactic vaccines against environmental allergens strikingly differ from conventional vaccines against infectious diseases or therapeutic approaches concerning the underlying immunological mechanisms.

  14. [Anti-hepatitis B vaccination and postvaccinal immunity stimulation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Kostinov, M P; Chikina, E Y; Kulakova, N A; Borisova, V N; Magarshak, O O

    2015-01-01

    The problem of the anti-hepatitis B vaccination of patients with chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) was discussed due to the lack of studies concerning the developing of the postvaccinal immunity, especially when vaccination is combined with the immunomodulating treatment. The data on the vaccination safety and its influence on the clinical course of COPD are also insufficient. Therefore, in this work we investigated the efficiency of the antihepatitis B vaccination in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease under the treatment with the immunomodulating Affonoleikin drug. A total of 93 patients were tested including 59 patients with severe and moderate COPD (aged from 35 to 65 years). 34 of these 59 patients were vaccinated against hepatitis B (Kombioteh) according to 0-1-6 month scheme, and 25 of them were vaccinated against hepatitis B during the treatment with Affinoleikin. The control group, consisted of 34 healthy patients. Our study demonstrated good tolerance and high immune efficiency of the anti-hepatitis B vaccine. However, after the first vaccination the level of HBs-AT was below protective level in patients with COPD compared to healthy patients. Also, 64 to 70 % of patients with COPD were seronegative excluding the patients receiving the Affinoleikin treatment, whose antibody titer was protective after the first vaccine dose, but did not reach the level typical of healthy patients. After the second vaccination we detected low and medium protective antibody levels in 58.9% of patients from the 1st group, whereas 41% were seronegative. Introduction of the third vaccine-dose led to fast and significant increase in the antibody level mainly in high concentrations with 100% seroconversion in all patients. Combined antihepatitis B vaccination and Affinoleikin treatment in patients with COPD leads to faster biosynthesis of HBs- AT in protective concentrations and decrease of seronegative response, but it has no effect on frequency and type of

  15. FMD vaccines: reflections on quality aspects for applicability in European disease control policy.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, K; Goris, N; Barnett, P V; MacKay, D K

    2008-01-01

    Most foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines used around the world are inactivated vaccines for prophylactic or emergency use, generally manufactured by the same basic methodology outlined in the OIE Manual and, for Europe, in the European Pharmacopoeia, and for the EU Member States in compliance with Directive 2001/82/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 6 November 2001 on the Community code relating to veterinary medicinal products as amended by Directive 2004/28/EC. Most of the requirements that apply to all immunological veterinary medicinal products apply equally to FMD vaccines. There are, however, some unique features of the disease and vaccines used against it that require a different approach to fulfil the requirements of the relevant legislation, if a vaccinate-to-live policy will be applied with 'authorized' vaccines. Several aspects of vaccine efficacy and safety are elaborated with emphasis on quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC). The purity of the vaccine in respect of the presence of non-structural protein antibodies could be checked indirectly by serology after vaccination. The viability of a vaccine bank approach was greatly aided by the principle of storing inactivated concentrated FMD viral antigen (Ag) over liquid nitrogen for subsequent formulation into vaccine. A worldwide Ag bank network might be an option for the far future and a solution to the problem of covering many different FMDV serotypes and strains. The producers should respect the strict FMD biosecurity rules worked out by the FAO EUFMD and described in Council Directive 2003/85/EC. Making the experience related to vaccine QA/QC available to all countries will reduce the risk of an FMD outbreak within these countries and consequently will reduce the FMD risk around the world.

  16. Biodegradable polymeric microsphere-based vaccines and their applications in infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chi-Ying; Lin, Shih-Jie; Yang, Yi-Chen; Wang, Der-Yuan; Cheng, Hwei-Fang; Yeh, Ming-Kung

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination, which provides effective, safe infectious disease protection, is among the most important recent public health and immunological achievements. However, infectious disease remains the leading cause of death in developing countries because several vaccines require repeated administrations and children are often incompletely immunized. Microsphere-based systems, providing controlled release delivery, can obviate the need for repeat immunizations. Here, we review the function of sustained and pulsatile release of biodegradable polymeric microspheres in parenteral and mucosal single-dose vaccine administration. We also review the active-targeting function of polymeric particles. With their shield and co-delivery functions, polymeric particles are applied to develop single-dose and mucosally administered vaccines as well as to improve subunit vaccines. Because polymeric particles are easily surface-modified, they have been recently used in vaccine development for cancers and many infectious diseases without effective vaccines (e.g., human immunodeficiency virus infection). These polymeric particle functions yield important vaccine carriers and multiple benefits. PMID:25839217

  17. Biodegradable polymeric microsphere-based vaccines and their applications in infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chi-Ying; Lin, Shih-Jie; Yang, Yi-Chen; Wang, Der-Yuan; Cheng, Hwei-Fang; Yeh, Ming-Kung

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination, which provides effective, safe infectious disease protection, is among the most important recent public health and immunological achievements. However, infectious disease remains the leading cause of death in developing countries because several vaccines require repeated administrations and children are often incompletely immunized. Microsphere-based systems, providing controlled release delivery, can obviate the need for repeat immunizations. Here, we review the function of sustained and pulsatile release of biodegradable polymeric microspheres in parenteral and mucosal single-dose vaccine administration. We also review the active-targeting function of polymeric particles. With their shield and co-delivery functions, polymeric particles are applied to develop single-dose and mucosally administered vaccines as well as to improve subunit vaccines. Because polymeric particles are easily surface-modified, they have been recently used in vaccine development for cancers and many infectious diseases without effective vaccines (e.g., human immunodeficiency virus infection). These polymeric particle functions yield important vaccine carriers and multiple benefits. PMID:25839217

  18. Improvement of DNA vaccination by adjuvants and sophisticated delivery devices: vaccine-platforms for the battle against infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Advantages of DNA vaccination against infectious diseases over more classical immunization methods include the possibilities for rapid manufacture, fast adaptation to newly emerging pathogens and high stability at ambient temperatures. In addition, upon DNA immunization the antigen is produced by the cells of the vaccinated individual, which leads to activation of both cellular and humoral immune responses due to antigen presentation via MHC I and MHC II molecules. However, so far DNA vaccines have shown most efficient immunogenicity mainly in small rodent models, whereas in larger animals including humans there is still the need to improve effectiveness. This is mostly due to inefficient delivery of the DNA plasmid into cells and nuclei. Here, we discuss technologies used to overcome this problem, including physical means such as in vivo electroporation and co-administration of adjuvants. Several of these methods have already entered clinical testing in humans. PMID:25648133

  19. An oral Aujeszky's disease vaccine (YS-400) induces neutralizing antibody in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Aujeszky's disease (AD) is an economically important disease affecting both wild and domestic pigs of the species Sus scrofa. A previous study yielded serological evidence of AD in Korean wild boars, which could spread AD to other animals. A new Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV) bait vaccine is required to prevent AD outbreaks in swine. In the present study, we investigated the safety and immunogenicity of a gE-deleted marker vaccine, strain YS-400, in young domestic pigs. Materials and Methods The YS-400 strain was propagated in Vero cells, and the trial ADV bait vaccine (a vaccine blister in a matrix including an attractant) was prepared. Pigs were orally immunized with the vaccine (2 mL, 107.5 TCID50/mL) delivered using a syringe or in the bait vaccine. The animals were observed for 9 weeks after vaccination, and immunogenicity was assessed using a virus neutralization (VN) test and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Results The YS-400 strain was non-pathogenic to pigs when given orally and induced high VN titers (1:32-1:128) 6 weeks post-administration. Of the pigs given the ADV bait vaccine twice or three times, 40% were seropositive by 2 weeks, and 100% were seropositive by 7 weeks after the first dose. Pigs that consumed the AD bait vaccine three times developed VN titers that were slightly higher than those of pigs given the vaccine twice. Conclusion Domestic pigs given the trial ADV bait vaccine exhibited no adverse effects and developed high VN titers against ADV, indicating that the YS-400 strain is safe and can prevent ADV infection in domestic pigs. PMID:27489803

  20. Effects of biological and non-biological immunomodulatory therapies on the immunogenicity of vaccines in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    McMahan, Zsuzsanna H; Bingham, Clifton O

    2014-12-23

    Vaccinations are administered to patients to induce a protective immune response, resulting in immunological memory. Preventing infection through the use of vaccines is particularly important in immunocompromised and immunosuppressed individuals given their increased frequency and severity of infections relative to healthy individuals. Recent surveys show that the vaccination rate is still alarmingly low in patients with rheumatic disease. In this review we briefly discuss the different types of vaccines and then critically examine evidence related to vaccination efficacy in patients with autoimmune disease and the effects of immunomodulatory therapy, with an aim to provide guidance and optimize the administration of vaccines in such individuals.

  1. The Case for Live Attenuated Vaccines against the Neglected Zoonotic Diseases Brucellosis and Bovine Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Aseem; Cabello, Ana; Akoolo, Lavoisier; Rice-Ficht, Allison; Arenas-Gamboa, Angela; McMurray, David; Ficht, Thomas A.; de Figueiredo, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination of humans and animals with live attenuated organisms has proven to be an effective means of combatting some important infectious diseases. In fact, the 20th century witnessed tremendous improvements in human and animal health worldwide as a consequence of large-scale vaccination programs with live attenuated vaccines (LAVs). Here, we use the neglected zoonotic diseases brucellosis and bovine tuberculosis (BTb) caused by Brucella spp. and Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis), respectively, as comparative models to outline the merits of LAV platforms with emphasis on molecular strategies that have been pursued to generate LAVs with enhanced vaccine safety and efficacy profiles. Finally, we discuss the prospects of LAV platforms in the fight against brucellosis and BTb and outline new avenues for future research towards developing effective vaccines using LAV platforms. PMID:27537413

  2. The Case for Live Attenuated Vaccines against the Neglected Zoonotic Diseases Brucellosis and Bovine Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Aseem; Cabello, Ana; Akoolo, Lavoisier; Rice-Ficht, Allison; Arenas-Gamboa, Angela; McMurray, David; Ficht, Thomas A; de Figueiredo, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Vaccination of humans and animals with live attenuated organisms has proven to be an effective means of combatting some important infectious diseases. In fact, the 20th century witnessed tremendous improvements in human and animal health worldwide as a consequence of large-scale vaccination programs with live attenuated vaccines (LAVs). Here, we use the neglected zoonotic diseases brucellosis and bovine tuberculosis (BTb) caused by Brucella spp. and Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis), respectively, as comparative models to outline the merits of LAV platforms with emphasis on molecular strategies that have been pursued to generate LAVs with enhanced vaccine safety and efficacy profiles. Finally, we discuss the prospects of LAV platforms in the fight against brucellosis and BTb and outline new avenues for future research towards developing effective vaccines using LAV platforms. PMID:27537413

  3. Biological and phylogenetic characterization of a genotype VII Newcastle disease virus from Venezuela: Efficacy of vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we describe the characterization a virulent genotype VII Newcastle disease virus (NDV) from Venezuela and evaluate the efficacy of heterologous genotype commercial vaccination under field and controlled rearing conditions. Biological pathotyping and molecular analysis were applied. Results sh...

  4. Advances in vaccines against neglected tropical diseases: enhancing physical stability of a recombinant hookworm vaccine through biophysical and formulation studies.

    PubMed

    Plieskatt, Jordan L; Rezende, Wanderson C; Olsen, Chris M; Trefethen, Jared M; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Middaugh, C Russell; Hotez, Peter J; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2012-06-01

    A bivalent recombinant vaccine for human hookworm disease is under development. One of the lead candidate antigens in the vaccine is a glutathione S-transferase cloned from the hookworm Necator americanus (Na-GST-1) which is expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Based on preliminary studies demonstrating that the recombinant protein was not stable in an acetate buffer at pH 6, we undertook an extensive stability analysis of the molecule. To improve and optimize stability we complemented traditional methods employed for macromolecule and vaccine stabilization with biophysical techniques that were incorporated into a systematic process based on an eigenvector approach. Large data sets, obtained from a variety of experimental methods were used to establish a color map ("empirical phase diagram") of the physical stability of the vaccine antigen over a wide range of temperature and pH. The resulting map defined "apparent phase boundaries" that were used to develop high throughput screening assays. These assays were then employed to identify excipients that stabilized the antigen against physical degradation that could otherwise result in losses of physicochemical integrity, immunogenicity, and potency of the vaccine. Based on these evaluations, the recombinant Na-GST-1 antigen was reformulated and ultimately produced under Good Manufacturing Practices and with an acceptable stability profile.

  5. Protective efficacy of commercial Newcastle disease vaccines against challenge of goose origin virulent Newcastle disease virus in geese.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yabin; Liu, Mei; Li, Wenliang

    2008-09-01

    Since 1997, severe outbreaks of Newcastle disease (ND) in geese in many regions throughout China have resulted in high morbidity and mortality, and great economic loss to farmers; however, no licensed, specific vaccine is yet available for this disease in China. In this study, goslings were immunized with different combinations and dosages of several commercial ND vaccines including La Sota vaccine, Mukteswar vaccine, recombinant live vaccine against avian influenza (AI) and ND (rL-H5 strain), and inactivated ND oil-emulsion vaccine (La Sota strain). The protective effects were evaluated based upon the level of antibody response and the degree of protection against the goose-origin virulent NDV strain. The result showed that two doses (i.e., one more than that for chicken) of La Sota vaccine priming, followed by 2-5 doses of Mukteswar vaccine boosting 2-3 weeks later, not only induced higher HI antibody levels, but also conferred longer-lasting protection. This immunization procedure can be recommended for prevention of ND in geese.

  6. Toward a global foot and mouth disease vaccine bank network.

    PubMed

    Barnett, P V; Bashiruddin, J B; Hammond, J M; Geale, D W; Paton, D J

    2010-12-01

    A network of foot and mouth (FMD) vaccine banks has been initiated with the support of vaccine bank managers and technical advisors that participated in a workshop held at the Institute for Animal Health, Pirbright, in the United Kingdom in April 2006. Terms of Reference that provide guidance for coordinated activities are under consultation. Practical and economic benefits can be realised from collaboration, which will be achieved through mutually acceptable mechanisms for the exchange of information and materials relevant to vaccine banks and their management. If administrative and technical hurdles can be overcome, the network has the potential to contribute significantly to the improved control of FMD worldwide. A 'global' and interactive vaccine bank association could be created by agreeing a system of resource sharing that could orchestrate additional emergency cover with vaccine or antigen from the reserves of network members.

  7. Parents’ and adolescents’ willingness to be vaccinated against serogroup B meningococcal disease during a mass vaccination in Saguenay–Lac-St-Jean (Quebec)

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, Eve; Gagnon, Dominique; Hamel, Denis; Belley, Sylvie; Gagné, Hélène; Boulianne, Nicole; Landry, Monique; Bettinger, Julie A

    2015-01-01

    A mass vaccination campaign with the 4CMenB vaccine (Bexsero®; Novartis Pharmaceutical Canada Inc) was launched in a serogroup B endemic area in Quebec. A telephone survey was conducted to assess parental and adolescent opinions about the acceptability of the vaccine. Intent to receive the vaccine or vaccine receipt was reported by the majority of parents (93%) and adolescents (75%). Meningitis was perceived as being a dangerous disease by the majority of parents and adolescents. The majority of respondents also considered the 4CMenB vaccine to be safe and effective. The main reason for positive vaccination intention or behaviour was self-protection, while a negative attitude toward vaccination in general was the main reason mentioned by parents who did not intend to have their child vaccinated. Adolescents mainly reported lack of interest, time or information, and low perceived susceptibility and disease severity as the main reasons for not intending to be vaccinated or not being vaccinated. PMID:26236359

  8. Vaccination against pancreas disease in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., reduces shedding of salmonid alphavirus.

    PubMed

    Skjold, Pål; Sommerset, Ingunn; Frost, Petter; Villoing, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    Salmon pancreas disease virus, often referred to as salmonid alphavirus (SAV), causes pancreas disease (PD) in European salmonids. SAV transmits horizontally from fish shedding virus into the water and ocean currents are believed to be a main contributor of viral spread between marine farms. Vaccination against PD is previously shown to reduce mortality and severity of clinical PD. In this study, we demonstrate that vaccination against PD significantly reduces viral shedding from infected individuals. The results suggest that PD vaccination can be an important tool to reduce the infection pressure, a known key risk for PD outbreaks at neighbouring farms. PMID:27496170

  9. Bursal depths of lesser snow and small Canada geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higgins, K.F.

    1969-01-01

    Bursa of Fabricius depths of 88 lesser snow geese (Anser c. caerulescens) and 69 small Canada geese (Branta canadensis hutchinsii/parvipes complex) were measured. Bursal depths were unreliable indicators of age-classes of lesser snow geese and small Canada geese; previously, the same had been found to be true for large Canada geese (B. c. interior). Regression in size or closure of the bursa first occurred at 17-20 months of age (yearlings) in lesser snow geese and small Canada geese, but at 29-32 months of age (2-year-olds) in large Canada geese.

  10. Network-based vaccination improves prospects for disease control in wild chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Rushmore, Julie; Caillaud, Damien; Hall, Richard J.; Stumpf, Rebecca M.; Meyers, Lauren Ancel; Altizer, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Many endangered wildlife populations are vulnerable to infectious diseases for which vaccines exist; yet, pragmatic considerations often preclude large-scale vaccination efforts. These barriers could be reduced by focusing on individuals with the highest contact rates. However, the question then becomes whether targeted vaccination is sufficient to prevent large outbreaks. To evaluate the efficacy of targeted wildlife vaccinations, we simulate pathogen transmission and control on monthly association networks informed by behavioural data from a wild chimpanzee community (Kanyawara N = 37, Kibale National Park, Uganda). Despite considerable variation across monthly networks, our simulations indicate that targeting the most connected individuals can prevent large outbreaks with up to 35% fewer vaccines than random vaccination. Transmission heterogeneities might be attributed to biological differences among individuals (e.g. sex, age, dominance and family size). Thus, we also evaluate the effectiveness of a trait-based vaccination strategy, as trait data are often easier to collect than interaction data. Our simulations indicate that a trait-based strategy can prevent large outbreaks with up to 18% fewer vaccines than random vaccination, demonstrating that individual traits can serve as effective estimates of connectivity. Overall, these results suggest that fine-scale behavioural data can help optimize pathogen control efforts for endangered wildlife. PMID:24872503

  11. Edible vaccines against veterinary parasitic diseases--current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Siju S; Cherian, Susan; Sumithra, T G; Raina, O K; Sankar, M

    2013-04-01

    Protection of domestic animals against parasitic infections remains a major challenge in most of the developing countries, especially in the surge of drug resistant strains. In this circumstance vaccination seems to be the sole practical strategy to combat parasites. Most of the presently available live or killed parasitic vaccines possess many disadvantages. Thus, expression of parasitic antigens has seen a continued interest over the past few decades. However, only a limited success was achieved using bacterial, yeast, insect and mammalian expression systems. This is witnessed by an increasing number of reports on transgenic plant expression of previously reported and new antigens. Oral delivery of plant-made vaccines is particularly attractive due to their exceptional advantages. Moreover, the regulatory burden for veterinary vaccines is less compared to human vaccines. This led to an incredible investment in the field of transgenic plant vaccines for veterinary purpose. Plant based vaccine trials have been conducted to combat various significant parasitic diseases such as fasciolosis, schistosomosis, poultry coccidiosis, porcine cycticercosis and ascariosis. Besides, passive immunization by oral delivery of antibodies expressed in transgenic plants against poultry coccidiosis is an innovative strategy. These trials may pave way to the development of promising edible veterinary vaccines in the near future. As the existing data regarding edible parasitic vaccines are scattered, an attempt has been made to assemble the available literature. PMID:23485715

  12. Intranasal DNA Vaccine for Protection against Respiratory Infectious Diseases: The Delivery Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yingying; Yuen, Pak-Wai; Lam, Jenny Ka-Wing

    2014-01-01

    Intranasal delivery of DNA vaccines has become a popular research area recently. It offers some distinguished advantages over parenteral and other routes of vaccine administration. Nasal mucosa as site of vaccine administration can stimulate respiratory mucosal immunity by interacting with the nasopharyngeal-associated lymphoid tissues (NALT). Different kinds of DNA vaccines are investigated to provide protection against respiratory infectious diseases including tuberculosis, coronavirus, influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) etc. DNA vaccines have several attractive development potential, such as producing cross-protection towards different virus subtypes, enabling the possibility of mass manufacture in a relatively short time and a better safety profile. The biggest obstacle to DNA vaccines is low immunogenicity. One of the approaches to enhance the efficacy of DNA vaccine is to improve DNA delivery efficiency. This review provides insight on the development of intranasal DNA vaccine for respiratory infections, with special attention paid to the strategies to improve the delivery of DNA vaccines using non-viral delivery agents. PMID:25014738

  13. Custom-engineered chimeric foot-and-mouth disease vaccine elicits protective immune responses in pigs.

    PubMed

    Blignaut, Belinda; Visser, Nico; Theron, Jacques; Rieder, Elizabeth; Maree, Francois F

    2011-04-01

    Chimeric foot-and-mouth disease viruses (FMDV) of which the antigenic properties can be readily manipulated is a potentially powerful approach in the control of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in sub-Saharan Africa. FMD vaccine application is complicated by the extensive variability of the South African Territories (SAT) type viruses, which exist as distinct genetic and antigenic variants in different geographical regions. A cross-serotype chimeric virus, vKNP/SAT2, was engineered by replacing the external capsid-encoding region (1B-1D/2A) of an infectious cDNA clone of the SAT2 vaccine strain, ZIM/7/83, with that of SAT1 virus KNP/196/91. The vKNP/SAT2 virus exhibited comparable infection kinetics, virion stability and antigenic profiles to the KNP/196/91 parental virus, thus indicating that the functions provided by the capsid can be readily exchanged between serotypes. As these qualities are necessary for vaccine manufacturing, high titres of stable chimeric virus were obtained. Chemically inactivated vaccines, formulated as double-oil-in-water emulsions, were produced from intact 146S virion particles of both the chimeric and parental viruses. Inoculation of guinea pigs with the respective vaccines induced similar antibody responses. In order to show compliance with commercial vaccine requirements, the vaccines were evaluated in a full potency test. Pigs vaccinated with the chimeric vaccine produced neutralizing antibodies and showed protection against homologous FMDV challenge, albeit not to the same extent as for the vaccine prepared from the parental virus. These results provide support that chimeric vaccines containing the external capsid of field isolates can be successfully produced and that they induce protective immune responses in FMD host species. PMID:21177923

  14. Drug Treatment Combined with BCG Vaccination Reduces Disease Reactivation in Guinea Pigs Infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Shaobin; Shanley, Crystal A.; Caraway, Megan L.; Orme, Eileen A.; Henao-Tamayo, Marcela; Hascall-Dove, Laurel; Ackart, David; Orme, Ian M.; Ordway, Diane J.; Basaraba, Randall J.

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin (BCG), the only human tuberculosis vaccine, primes a partially protective immune response against M. tuberculosis infection in humans and animals. In guinea pigs, BCG vaccination slows the progression of disease and reduces the severity of necrotic granulomas, which harbor a population of drug-tolerant bacilli. The objective of this study was to determine if reducing disease severity by BCG vaccination of guinea pigs prior to M. tuberculosis challenge enhanced the efficacy of combination drug therapy. At 20 days of infection, treatment of vaccinated and non-vaccinated animals with rifampin, isoniazid, and pyrizinamide (RHZ) was initiated for 4 or 8 weeks. On days 50, 80 and 190 of infection (10 weeks after drug were withdrawn), treatment efficacy was evaluated by quantifying clinical condition, bacterial loads, lesion severity, and dynamic changes in peripheral blood and lung leukocyte numbers by flow cytometry. In a separate, long-term survival study, treatment efficacy was evaluated by determining disease reactivation frequency post-mortem. BCG vaccination alone delayed pulmonary and extra-pulmonary disease progression, but failed to prevent dissemination of bacilli and the formation of necrotic granulomas. Drug therapy either alone or in combination with BCG, was more effective at lessening clinical disease and lesion severity compared to control animals or those receiving BCG alone. Fewer residual lesions in BCG vaccinated and drug treated animals, equated to a reduced frequency of reactivation disease and improvement in survival even out to 500 days of infection. The combining of BCG vaccination and drug therapy was more effective at resolving granulomas such that fewer animals had evidence of residual infection and thus less reactivation disease. PMID:22244979

  15. Field trial of vaccination against American trypanosomiasis (Chagas' disease) in dogs.

    PubMed

    Basombrio, M A; Segura, M A; Mora, M C; Gomez, L

    1993-07-01

    In Santiago del Estero, an area endemic for Chagas' disease in northwestern Argentina, household dogs were vaccinated with live-attenuated Trypanosoma cruzi, and the prospective incidence of natural infection by this parasite was assessed during a two-year followup period. Vaccinated dogs received 10(7) attenuated, TCC strain T. cruzi epimastigotes and were given booster vaccinations two and 14 months later. The number of animals that could be evaluated in vaccinated versus control groups was 73 and 75 after one year and 49 and 40 after two years, respectively. Parasitologic evaluation by xenodiagnosis indicated that vaccination had reduced natural T. cruzi infection from 26.7% to 12.3% after one year (P = 0.015). The preventive effect of vaccination after the second year was less significant in spite of the booster vaccinations. Inclusion of indirect hemagglutination data for the diagnosis of infection slightly increased the number of infected dogs without affecting the evidence for protection in the first year. Serologic, parasitologic, and isoenzyme studies indicated that protection was mediated by an attenuated, self-cured infection. In 15 dogs in which the vaccination failed to completely prevent natural infection, immunization nevertheless impaired their ability to infect the natural insect vectors of the disease in humans. PMID:8352387

  16. Importance of foot and mouth disease vaccine purity in interpreting serological surveys.

    PubMed

    Smitsaart, E; Espinoza, A M; Maradei, E; Cosentino, B; Guinzburg, M; Madonni, G; Cadenazzi, G; Bottini, R; Filippi, J; Bergmann, I

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the degree of purity achieved in conventional vaccines against the foot and mouth disease virus in Argentina interferes with the interpretation of seroepidemiological surveys for confirming the absence of viral activity, which are performed to support the recognition of free zones practising vaccination. The evaluation of 168 vaccine series due to be marketed in Argentina (2006-2012) and subjected to official control testing in cattle, as well as repeated vaccination of cattle and other species using vaccines with high antigen concentrations, demonstrated that they did not induce antibodies to non-structural proteins (NSPs). The results show clearly that vaccines with satisfactory potency do not induce a response to NSPs, even by forcing the immune response through more concentrated doses with multiple valences and revaccination protocols at shorter irtervals than in vaccination campaigns. These results confirm that the vaccines used in routine vaccination programmes have a degree of antigen purification consistent with the needs observed on the basis of sampling for serological surveillance. Moreover, serological surveys conducted in 2006-2011 by Argentina's official Veterinary Services--the National Health and Agrifood Quality Service (SENASA)--on more than 23,000 sera per year from cattle included in the vaccination programme, in order to confirm the absence of virus circulation, revealed an average 0.05% of reactive results, consistent with the specificity of the tests. In conclusion, the vaccines produced by conventional methods and with proven potencythat are available in Argentina are sufficiently purified to ensure thatthey do not interfere with the interpretation of sampling for serological surveillance performed to support the recognition of FMD-free zones practising vaccination.

  17. The impact of 10-valent and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines on serotype 19A invasive pneumococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    The circulation in the community of pneumococcal serotype 19A, a highly invasive and frequently extremely resistant pneumococcal strain, has increased the focus on methods to control its presence and effect. Two vaccines have been developed: the 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) and the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13). Available data indicate that PCV13 is highly effective in reducing the risk of serotype 19A invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in both vaccinated children and unvaccinated adults. Positive data have also been published for PCV10 that suggest that the conjugated serotype 19F included in the vaccine could evoke a cross-reactive antibody response with serotype 19A. However, a great number of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) cases are associated with serotypes not included in either of the vaccines, and preparation of a vaccine containing all the serotypes is unrealistic. Protein vaccines are the real future to definitively reduce the pneumococcal disease burden.

  18. Continuous cell lines from the Muscovy duck as potential replacement for primary cells in the production of avian vaccines.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Ingo; John, Katrin; Höwing, Kristin; Lohr, Verena; Penzes, Zoltán; Gubucz-Sombor, Erzsébet; Fu, Yan; Gao, Peng; Harder, Timm; Zádori, Zoltán; Sandig, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Veterinary vaccines contribute to food security, interrupt zoonotic transmissions, and help to maintain overall health in livestock. Although vaccines are usually cost-effective, their adoption depends on a multitude of factors. Because poultry vaccines are usually given to birds with a short life span, very low production cost per dose is one important challenge. Other hurdles are to ensure a consistent and reliable supply of very large number of doses, and to have flexible production processes to accommodate a range of different pathogens and dosage requirements. Most poultry vaccines are currently being produced on primary avian cells derived from chicken or waterfowl embryos. This production system is associated with high costs, logistic complexities, rigid intervals between harvest and production, and supply limitations. We investigated whether the continuous cell lines Cairina retina and CR.pIX may provide a substrate independent of primary cell cultures or embryonated eggs. Viruses examined for replication in these cell lines are strains associated with, or contained in vaccines against egg drop syndrome, Marek's disease, Newcastle disease, avian influenza, infectious bursal disease and Derzsy's disease. Each of the tested viruses required the development of unique conditions for replication that are described here and can be used to generate material for in vivo efficacy studies and to accelerate transfer of the processes to larger production volumes. PMID:26814192

  19. Effectiveness of Ring Vaccination as Control Strategy for Ebola Virus Disease.

    PubMed

    Kucharski, Adam J; Eggo, Rosalind M; Watson, Conall H; Camacho, Anton; Funk, Sebastian; Edmunds, W John

    2016-01-01

    Using an Ebola virus disease transmission model, we found that addition of ring vaccination at the outset of the West Africa epidemic might not have led to containment of this disease. However, in later stages of the epidemic or in outbreaks with less intense transmission or more effective control, this strategy could help eliminate the disease.

  20. Correcting a public health fiasco: The need for a new vaccine against Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Plotkin, Stanley A

    2011-02-01

    A vaccine against Lyme disease was licensed in the United States in 1998 but was subsequently removed from the market because of lack of sales. I believe that the poor acceptance of the vaccine was based on tepid recommendations by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), undocumented and probably nonexistent safety issues, and insufficient education of physicians. A new vaccine is feasible but will not be developed unless there is a demand by infectious diseases specialists, epidemiologists, authorities in affected states and the public that is evident to manufacturers. The fact that there is no vaccine for an infection causing ∼20,000 annual cases is an egregious failure of public health.

  1. Vaccine-preventable diseases in humanitarian emergencies among refugee and internally-displaced populations.

    PubMed

    Lam, Eugene; McCarthy, Amanda; Brennan, Muireann

    2015-01-01

    Humanitarian emergencies may result in breakdown of regular health services including routine vaccination programs. Displaced populations including refugees and internally displaced persons are particularly susceptible to outbreaks of communicable diseases such as vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs). Common VPDs encountered in humanitarian emergencies include measles, polio, and depending on geographical location, meningococcal meningitis, yellow fever, hepatitis A, and cholera. We conducted a review of 50 published articles from 2000 to 2015 concerning VPDs in humanitarian emergencies. This article provides an update on the available literature regarding vaccinations among this highly vulnerable population and describes the unique challenges of VPDs during humanitarian emergencies. Humanitarian emergencies place affected populations at risk for elevated morbidity and mortality from VPDs due to creation or exacerbation of factors associated with disease transmission such as mass population movements, overcrowding, malnutrition, and poor water and sanitation conditions. Vaccination is one of the most basic and critical health interventions for protecting vulnerable populations during emergencies. Growing insecurity, as seen in the increasing number of targeted attacks on health workers in recent years, as well as destruction of cold chain and infrastructure for transportation of supplies, are creating new challenges in provision of life saving vaccines in conflict settings. Population displacement can also threaten global VPD eradication and elimination efforts. While highly effective vaccines and guidelines to combat VPDs are available, the trend of increasing number of humanitarian emergencies globally poses new and emerging challenges in providing vaccination among displaced populations. PMID:26406333

  2. Vaccine-preventable diseases in humanitarian emergencies among refugee and internally-displaced populations.

    PubMed

    Lam, Eugene; McCarthy, Amanda; Brennan, Muireann

    2015-01-01

    Humanitarian emergencies may result in breakdown of regular health services including routine vaccination programs. Displaced populations including refugees and internally displaced persons are particularly susceptible to outbreaks of communicable diseases such as vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs). Common VPDs encountered in humanitarian emergencies include measles, polio, and depending on geographical location, meningococcal meningitis, yellow fever, hepatitis A, and cholera. We conducted a review of 50 published articles from 2000 to 2015 concerning VPDs in humanitarian emergencies. This article provides an update on the available literature regarding vaccinations among this highly vulnerable population and describes the unique challenges of VPDs during humanitarian emergencies. Humanitarian emergencies place affected populations at risk for elevated morbidity and mortality from VPDs due to creation or exacerbation of factors associated with disease transmission such as mass population movements, overcrowding, malnutrition, and poor water and sanitation conditions. Vaccination is one of the most basic and critical health interventions for protecting vulnerable populations during emergencies. Growing insecurity, as seen in the increasing number of targeted attacks on health workers in recent years, as well as destruction of cold chain and infrastructure for transportation of supplies, are creating new challenges in provision of life saving vaccines in conflict settings. Population displacement can also threaten global VPD eradication and elimination efforts. While highly effective vaccines and guidelines to combat VPDs are available, the trend of increasing number of humanitarian emergencies globally poses new and emerging challenges in providing vaccination among displaced populations.

  3. Vaccine-preventable diseases in humanitarian emergencies among refugee and internally-displaced populations

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Eugene; McCarthy, Amanda; Brennan, Muireann

    2015-01-01

    Humanitarian emergencies may result in breakdown of regular health services including routine vaccination programs. Displaced populations including refugees and internally displaced persons are particularly susceptible to outbreaks of communicable diseases such as vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs). Common VPDs encountered in humanitarian emergencies include measles, polio, and depending on geographical location, meningococcal meningitis, yellow fever, hepatitis A, and cholera. We conducted a review of 50 published articles from 2000 to 2015 concerning VPDs in humanitarian emergencies. This article provides an update on the available literature regarding vaccinations among this highly vulnerable population and describes the unique challenges of VPDs during humanitarian emergencies. Humanitarian emergencies place affected populations at risk for elevated morbidity and mortality from VPDs due to creation or exacerbation of factors associated with disease transmission such as mass population movements, overcrowding, malnutrition, and poor water and sanitation conditions. Vaccination is one of the most basic and critical health interventions for protecting vulnerable populations during emergencies. Growing insecurity, as seen in the increasing number of targeted attacks on health workers in recent years, as well as destruction of cold chain and infrastructure for transportation of supplies, are creating new challenges in provision of life saving vaccines in conflict settings. Population displacement can also threaten global VPD eradication and elimination efforts. While highly effective vaccines and guidelines to combat VPDs are available, the trend of increasing number of humanitarian emergencies globally poses new and emerging challenges in providing vaccination among displaced populations. PMID:26406333

  4. Presence of Vaccine-Derived Newcastle Disease Viruses in Wild Birds

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Andrea J.; Dimitrov, Kiril M.; Becker, Cassidy R.; Goraichuk, Iryna V.; Arns, Clarice W.; Bolotin, Vitaly I.; Ferreira, Helena L.; Gerilovych, Anton P.; Goujgoulova, Gabriela V.; Martini, Matheus C.; Muzyka, Denys V.; Orsi, Maria A.; Scagion, Guilherme P.; Silva, Renata K.; Solodiankin, Olexii S.; Stegniy, Boris T.; Miller, Patti J.; Afonso, Claudio L.

    2016-01-01

    Our study demonstrates the repeated isolation of vaccine-derived Newcastle disease viruses from different species of wild birds across four continents from 1997 through 2014. The data indicate that at least 17 species from ten avian orders occupying different habitats excrete vaccine-derived Newcastle disease viruses. The most frequently reported isolates were detected among individuals in the order Columbiformes (n = 23), followed in frequency by the order Anseriformes (n = 13). Samples were isolated from both free-ranging (n = 47) and wild birds kept in captivity (n = 7). The number of recovered vaccine-derived viruses corresponded with the most widely utilized vaccines, LaSota (n = 28) and Hitchner B1 (n = 19). Other detected vaccine-derived viruses resembled the PHY-LMV2 and V4 vaccines, with five and two cases, respectively. These results and the ubiquitous and synanthropic nature of wild pigeons highlight their potential role as indicator species for the presence of Newcastle disease virus of low virulence in the environment. The reverse spillover of live agents from domestic animals to wildlife as a result of the expansion of livestock industries employing massive amounts of live virus vaccines represent an underappreciated and poorly studied effect of human activity on wildlife. PMID:27626272

  5. Presence of Vaccine-Derived Newcastle Disease Viruses in Wild Birds.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Andrea J; Dimitrov, Kiril M; Becker, Cassidy R; Goraichuk, Iryna V; Arns, Clarice W; Bolotin, Vitaly I; Ferreira, Helena L; Gerilovych, Anton P; Goujgoulova, Gabriela V; Martini, Matheus C; Muzyka, Denys V; Orsi, Maria A; Scagion, Guilherme P; Silva, Renata K; Solodiankin, Olexii S; Stegniy, Boris T; Miller, Patti J; Afonso, Claudio L

    2016-01-01

    Our study demonstrates the repeated isolation of vaccine-derived Newcastle disease viruses from different species of wild birds across four continents from 1997 through 2014. The data indicate that at least 17 species from ten avian orders occupying different habitats excrete vaccine-derived Newcastle disease viruses. The most frequently reported isolates were detected among individuals in the order Columbiformes (n = 23), followed in frequency by the order Anseriformes (n = 13). Samples were isolated from both free-ranging (n = 47) and wild birds kept in captivity (n = 7). The number of recovered vaccine-derived viruses corresponded with the most widely utilized vaccines, LaSota (n = 28) and Hitchner B1 (n = 19). Other detected vaccine-derived viruses resembled the PHY-LMV2 and V4 vaccines, with five and two cases, respectively. These results and the ubiquitous and synanthropic nature of wild pigeons highlight their potential role as indicator species for the presence of Newcastle disease virus of low virulence in the environment. The reverse spillover of live agents from domestic animals to wildlife as a result of the expansion of livestock industries employing massive amounts of live virus vaccines represent an underappreciated and poorly studied effect of human activity on wildlife. PMID:27626272

  6. Vaccines for Prevention of Bluetongue and Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease in Livestock: A North American Perspective.

    PubMed

    McVey, D Scott; MacLachlan, N James

    2015-06-01

    Bluetongue (BT) and epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) are noncontagious, insect-transmitted diseases of domestic and wild ruminants caused by related but distinct viruses. There are significant gaps in our scientific knowledge and available countermeasures to control an outbreak of orbivirus-induced disease, whether BT or EHD. Both BT virus (BTV) and EHD virus (EHDV) cause hemorrhagic fevers in susceptible ruminants; however, BT is principally a disease of domestic livestock whereas EHD is principally a disease of certain species of wild, non-African ungulates, notably white-tailed deer. The live-attenuated (modified live virus [MLV]) vaccines available in the United States for use in small ruminant livestock do provide good protection against clinical disease following infection with the homologous virus serotype. Although there is increasing justification that the use of MLV vaccines should be avoided if possible, these are the only vaccines currently available in the United States. Specifically, MLVs are used in California to protect sheep against infection with BTV serotypes 10, 11, and 17, and a MLV to BTV serotype 10 is licensed for use in sheep throughout the United States. These MLV vaccines may need to continue to be used in the immediate future for protective immunization of sheep and goats against BT. There are currently no licensed vaccines available for EHD in the United States other than autogenous vaccines. If there is a need to rapidly develop a vaccine to meet an emerging crisis associated with either BTV or EHDV infections, development of an inactivated virus vaccine in a conventional adjuvanted formulation will likely be required. With two doses of vaccine (and in some instances just one dose), inactivated vaccines can provide substantial immunity to the epizootic serotype of either BTV or EHDV. This strategy is similar to that used in the 2006-2008 BTV serotype 8 outbreaks in northern Europe that provided vaccine to the field within 2 years of

  7. [Vaccination perspectives].

    PubMed

    Saliou, P; Plotkin, S

    1994-01-01

    The aim of vaccinology is to improve the available vaccines and to develop new ones in the light of progress in immunology, molecular biology and biotechnologies. But it must go beyond this, and aim to protect all populations and control diseases, even eradicate them where possible. New vaccine strategies must be developed taking into account the epidemiology of diseases and the inherent logistic problems of implementing these strategies under local conditions. There are three major thrusts to the progress of the discipline. The improvement of the vaccines available. One of the drives of vaccinology is not only to deliver vaccines of increasing safety (replacement of the current vaccine for whooping cough with an acellular vaccine for example), but also to improve vaccine efficacy and immunogenicity (in particular for flu, tuberculosis, cholera and rabies vaccines). The optimisation of vaccination programmes and strategies for vaccinations. The ideal is to protect against the greatest possible number of diseases with the smallest number of vaccinations. The development of combinations of vaccines is central to this goal. The objective for the year 2000 is a hexavalent vaccine DTPP Hib HB. The development of new vaccines. Classic techniques continue to be successfully used (inactivated hepatitis A vaccine; attenuated live vaccines for chicken pox and dengue fever; conjugated polyosidic bacterial vaccines for meningococci and Streptococcus pneumoniae). However, it will become possible to prepare vaccines against most transmissible diseases using genetic engineering techniques.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Invasive pneumococcal disease in patients with haematological malignancies before routine use of conjugate vaccines in Finland.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Vesa; Aittoniemi, Janne; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Klemets, Peter; Ollgren, Jukka; Silvennoinen, Raija; Nuorti, J Pekka; Sinisalo, Marjatta

    2016-01-01

    The baseline national invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence rate, serotype distribution and serotype coverage of pneumococcal vaccines were evaluated in patients with Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, myeloma and leukaemia within 1 year after haematological diagnosis during 1995-2002, before introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. Pneumococcal serotype distribution among these patients was different from serotypes causing IPD in the general population. The serotype coverages of PCV13 and PPSV23 were 57% and 64%, respectively, lower than in the general population. This reflects a higher predisposition to IPD in vaccinated patients with haematological malignancies and possibly less benefit of herd immunity gained with the wide use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in the general population. This data will be useful as a baseline for determining the future role of adult PCV vaccination in these patient groups.

  9. [Advances in reverse genetics-based vaccines of foot and mouth disease].

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Yang, Fan; Wang, Song-Hao; Zhang, Yan; Cao, Wei-Jun; Yin, Hong; Zheng, Hai-Xue

    2014-03-01

    Reverse-genetic engineering of foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) can improve the productivity, antigen matching, antigen stability, immune response ability, and biological safety of vaccines, so vaccine candidates with anticipated biological characteristics can be promptly achieved. Negative influence in taming of virulent strains can also be decreased or avoided. Reverse genetics not only make up for deficiencies like limitation of viral nature, low success rate, and time and energy consuming, but also realize more active designing of vaccines. Therefore, reverse genetics is significant in improving integral quality and efficiency of vaccines. In this review, we use FMDV vaccines as an example to summarize improvement in biological characteristics of virulent strains and provide a reference for related researches.

  10. Experiments on the preparations and testing of associated vaccine against foot and mouth disease and vesicular disease in swine.

    PubMed

    Mitev, G; Tekerlekov, P; Dilovsky, M; Ognianov, D; Nikolova, E

    1978-01-01

    Tests for associated immunization of swine against Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) and Vesicular Disease (SVD) of swine were carried out. As a result of this investigation, it was established that the prepared and tested inactivated oil vaccine is harmless and immunogenic in sensitive animals. In investigating the course of immunity, the presence of antibody against both antigens was demonstrated in vaccinated animals. All once-vaccinated animals were defended against the virus of SVD during challenge, and 75% of them were defended against FMD. After revaccination, all immunized swine were defended against infection with both viruses. The question of the quality of the associated vaccine and the possibilities of its massive use in industrial swine rearing was discussed.

  11. Cohort study of effect of vaccination on pancreas disease in Norwegian salmon aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Bang Jensen, Britt; Kristoffersen, Anja B; Myr, Camilla; Brun, Edgar

    2012-12-01

    Pancreas disease (PD) is an economically important viral disease in Norwegian aquaculture, with 75 to 89 annual outbreaks from 2009 to 2011. To hinder further spread of disease from an initial endemic area on the west coast of Norway, measures for surveillance and control are in place, and the disease is notifiable on a national level. Since 2008, the Norwegian coastline has been divided into 2 administrative zones separated by a production-free area of 10 nautical miles at approximately 63°N. At the same time, a vaccination program involving most marine salmonid farms was initiated by the industry, using a vaccine against PD that was made commercially available in 2007. The effects of the vaccine in the field have been questioned, since the annual number of PD outbreaks has not decreased as expected. However, other production parameters can be used for evaluation of vaccine effect, and in this study the effects of vaccination on cumulative mortality, growth rate, feed conversion factor and number of discarded fish were analyzed using data collected from fish cohorts with and without PD put to sea between spring 2007 and spring 2009. The results show that vaccination against PD has a positive effect in reducing the number of outbreaks, and decreasing cumulative mortality and the number of fish discarded at slaughter.

  12. Allergen-specific immunotherapy: towards combination vaccines for allergic and infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Edlmayr, Johanna; Niespodziana, Katarzyna; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Linhart, Birgit; Valenta, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    IgE-mediated allergies affect more than 25% of the population. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is an antigen-specific and disease-modifying form of treatment. It is based on the therapeutic administration of the disease-causing allergens to allergic patients. However, the fact that only allergen extracts of insufficient quality are currently available and the possible occurrence of side effects during treatment limit the broad use of SIT and prophylactic vaccination is has not yet been performed. In the last 20 years the DNA sequences of the most common allergens have been isolated and the corresponding allergens have been produced as recombinant allergens. Based on the progress made in the field of allergen characterization it is possible to improve the quality and safety of allergy vaccines and to develop new, more effective strategies for a broad application of SIT and even for prophylactic treatment. Here we discuss the development of combination vaccines for allergy and infectious diseases. This approach is based on the selection of allergen-derived peptides with reduced IgE- and T cell reactivity in order to minimize IgE- and T cell-mediated side effects as well as the potential of the vaccine to induce allergic sensitization. These peptides are fused by recombinant technology onto a viral carrier protein to obtain a combination vaccine which induces protective immunity against allergy and viral infections. The application of such combination vaccines for therapy and prophylaxis of allergy and infectious diseases is discussed.

  13. Heterologous challenge of weaned piglets in the presence of maternal derived antibodies results in vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective vaccine immunization against influenza A viruses (IAV) in pigs in the United States is challenging because of the great antigenic diversity of co-circulating viruses. Maternally derived antibodies (MDA) interfere with vaccine efficacy and can lead to vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease (V...

  14. Maternal derived antibodies induce vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease in weaned pigs challenged with heterologous virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective vaccine immunization against influenza A viruses (IAV) in pigs in the United States is a challenge because of the great antigenic diversity of co-circulating viruses. Maternally derived antibodies (MDA) interfere with vaccine efficacy and can lead to vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease (V...

  15. Predicted outcomes of vaccinating wildlife to reduce human risk of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Kimberly; Fish, Durland; Galvani, Alison P

    2012-07-01

    Vaccination efforts for Lyme disease prevention in humans have focused on wildlife reservoirs to target the causative agent, Borrelia burgdorferi, for elimination in vector ticks. Multiple host species are involved in the transmission and maintenance of the bacterium, but not all host species can be vaccinated effectively. To evaluate vaccinating a subset of hosts in the context of host-tick interactions, we constructed and evaluated a dynamic model of B. burgdorferi transmission in mice. Our analyses indicate that on average, a mouse-targeted vaccine is expected to proportionally reduce infection prevalence among ticks by 56%. However, relative to mouse vaccination, human risk of exposure is dominated by the number of tick bites received per person, the proportion of tick blood meals taken from the highly reservoir-competent white-footed mouse relative to other hosts, and the average number of tick bites per mouse. Variation in these factors reduces the predictability of vaccination outcomes. Additionally, contributions of nonmouse hosts to pathogen maintenance preclude elimination of B. burgdorferi through mouse vaccination alone. Our findings indicate that to increase the impact of wildlife vaccination, reducing tick populations by acaricide application, in addition to targeting additional reservoir-competent host species, should be employed.

  16. Highlights of the 8th International Conference on Vaccines for Enteric Diseases: the Scottish Encounter To Defeat Diarrheal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; Steele, A Duncan; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2016-04-01

    Infectious diarrhea is a leading cause of morbidity and of mortality; the burden of disease affects individuals of all ages but particularly young children, especially those living in poor regions where the disease is endemic. It is also a health concern for international travelers to these areas. Experts on vaccines and enteric infections and advocates for global health improvement gathered in Scotland from 8 to 10 July 2015 to discuss recent advances in the assessment and understanding of the burden of enteric diseases and progress in the development and implementation of strategies to prevent these infections. Highlights of the meeting included description of advances in molecular assays to estimate pathogen-specific prevalence, methods to model epidemiologic trends, novel approaches to generate broad-spectrum vaccines, new initiatives to evaluate vaccine performance where they are most needed, renewed interest in human challenge models, immunological readouts as predictors of vaccine efficacy, maternal immunization to prevent enteric infections, and the impact of maternal immunity on the vaccine take of infants. A follow-up scientific gathering to advance Shigella and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) vaccine efforts will be held from 28 to 30 June 2016 in Washington, DC. PMID:26936100

  17. Highlights of the 8th International Conference on Vaccines for Enteric Diseases: the Scottish Encounter To Defeat Diarrheal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Sharon M.; Steele, A. Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diarrhea is a leading cause of morbidity and of mortality; the burden of disease affects individuals of all ages but particularly young children, especially those living in poor regions where the disease is endemic. It is also a health concern for international travelers to these areas. Experts on vaccines and enteric infections and advocates for global health improvement gathered in Scotland from 8 to 10 July 2015 to discuss recent advances in the assessment and understanding of the burden of enteric diseases and progress in the development and implementation of strategies to prevent these infections. Highlights of the meeting included description of advances in molecular assays to estimate pathogen-specific prevalence, methods to model epidemiologic trends, novel approaches to generate broad-spectrum vaccines, new initiatives to evaluate vaccine performance where they are most needed, renewed interest in human challenge models, immunological readouts as predictors of vaccine efficacy, maternal immunization to prevent enteric infections, and the impact of maternal immunity on the vaccine take of infants. A follow-up scientific gathering to advance Shigella and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) vaccine efforts will be held from 28 to 30 June 2016 in Washington, DC. PMID:26936100

  18. Application of mouse model for effective evaluation of foot-and-mouth disease vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seo-Yong; Ko, Mi-Kyeong; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; Choi, Joo-Hyung; You, Su-Hwa; Pyo, Hyun-Mi; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Kim, Byounghan; Lee, Jong-Soo; Park, Jong-Hyeon

    2016-07-19

    Efficacy evaluation of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines has been conducted in target animals such as cows and pigs. In particular, handling FMD virus requires a high level of biosafety management and facilities to contain the virulent viruses. The lack of a laboratory animal model has resulted in inconvenience when it comes to using target animals for vaccine evaluation, bringing about increased cost, time and labor for the experiments. The FMD mouse model has been studied, but most FMD virus (FMDV) strains are not known to cause disease in adult mice. In the present study, we created a series of challenge viruses that are lethal to adult C57BL/6 mice. FMDV types O, A, and Asia1, which are related to frequent FMD outbreaks, were adapted for mice and the pathogenesis of each virus was evaluated in the mouse model. Challenge experiments after vaccination using in-house and commercial vaccines demonstrated vaccine-mediated protection in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, we propose that FMD vaccine evaluation should be carried out using mouse-adapted challenge viruses as a swift, effective efficacy test of experimental or commercial vaccines. PMID:27340094

  19. Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease in China: Critical Community Size and Spatial Vaccination Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Van Boeckel, Thomas P.; Takahashi, Saki; Liao, Qiaohong; Xing, Weijia; Lai, Shengjie; Hsiao, Victor; Liu, Fengfeng; Zheng, Yaming; Chang, Zhaorui; Yuan, Chen; Metcalf, C. Jessica E.; Yu, Hongjie; Grenfell, Bryan T.

    2016-01-01

    Hand Foot and Mouth Disease (HFMD) constitutes a considerable burden for health care systems across China. Yet this burden displays important geographic heterogeneity that directly affects the local persistence and the dynamics of the disease, and thus the ability to control it through vaccination campaigns. Here, we use detailed geographic surveillance data and epidemic models to estimate the critical community size (CCS) of HFMD associated enterovirus serotypes CV-A16 and EV-A71 and we explore what spatial vaccination strategies may best reduce the burden of HFMD. We found CCS ranging from 336,979 (±225,866) to 722,372 (±150,562) with the lowest estimates associated with EV-A71 in the southern region of China where multiple transmission seasons have previously been identified. Our results suggest the existence of a regional immigration-recolonization dynamic driven by urban centers. If EV-A71 vaccines doses are limited, these would be optimally deployed in highly populated urban centers and in high-prevalence areas. If HFMD vaccines are included in China’s National Immunization Program in order to achieve high coverage rates (>85%), routine vaccination of newborns largely outperforms strategies in which the equivalent number of doses is equally divided between routine vaccination of newborns and pulse vaccination of the community at large. PMID:27125917

  20. Farming of Plant-Based Veterinary Vaccines and Their Applications for Disease Prevention in Animals

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Pit Sze; Hair-Bejo, Mohd

    2015-01-01

    Plants have been studied for the production of pharmaceutical compounds for more than two decades now. Ever since the plant-made poultry vaccine against Newcastle disease virus made a breakthrough and went all the way to obtain regulatory approval, research to use plants for expression and delivery of vaccine proteins for animals was intensified. Indeed, in view of the high production costs of veterinary vaccines, plants represent attractive biofactories and offer many promising advantages in the production of recombinant vaccine proteins. Furthermore, the possibility of conducting immunogenicity and challenge studies in target animals has greatly exaggerated the progress. Although there are no edible plant-produced animal vaccines in the market, plant-based vaccine technology has great potentials. In this review, development, uses, and advantages of plant-based recombinant protein production in various expression platforms are discussed. In addition, examples of plant-based veterinary vaccines showing strong indication in terms of efficacy in animal disease prevention are also described. PMID:26351454

  1. Norovirus P particle: an excellent vaccine platform for antibody production against Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lu; Li, Yingnan; Hu, Yue; Yu, Bin; Zhang, Haihong; Wu, Jiaxin; Wu, Hui; Yu, Xianghui; Kong, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Active vaccination against amyloid β (Aβ42) is considered a potential therapeutic approach for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, immunization with synthetic human Aβ1-42 has resulted in meningoencephalitis in 6% of patients and generated only low-titer anti-Aβ42 antibodies. In order to develop a safe and effective vaccine against Alzheimer's disease, the Aβ1-6 peptide was used as the novel immunogen and Norovirus P particles as the vaccine platform in this study. By inserting and presenting Aβ1-6 on the outermost surface of the P particle, we showed that the chimeric P particle-based AD protein vaccine could elicit a strong immune response, inducing highly specific antibody titers against Aβ42 without causing T-cell activation. Furthermore, antibodies induced by the AD protein vaccines were demonstrated to be effective at the cellular level. In addition, we also compared the immunogenicity of the chimeric P particles with different insertional loci in the loop structure domain and demonstrated that insertion of the antigen into all three loops of the P particle at the same time could significantly improve immune responses to the vaccine. In conclusion, the Norovirus P particle is an excellent vaccine platform for stimulating Aβ42 antibody production, and chimeric P particles may be developed as an effective therapy for AD.

  2. Immunization coverage and timeliness of vaccination in Italian children with chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Pandolfi, E; Carloni, E; Marino, M G; Ciofi degli Atti, M L; Gesualdo, F; Romano, M; Giannattasio, A; Guarino, A; Carloni, R; Borgia, P; Volpe, E; Perrelli, F; Pizzuti, R; Tozzi, A E

    2012-07-20

    Since children with chronic diseases represent a primary target for immunization strategies, it is important that their immunization coverage and timeliness of vaccines is optimal. We performed a study to measure immunization coverage and timeliness of vaccines in children with type 1 diabetes, HIV infection, Down syndrome, cystic fibrosis, and neurological diseases. A total of 275 children aged 6 months-18 years were included in the study. Coverage for diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP), polio (Pol), and hepatitis B (HBV) vaccines approximated 85% at 24 months, while measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) coverage was 62%. Immunization coverage for seasonal influenza was 59%. The analysis of timeliness revealed that there was heterogeneity among children with different chronic diseases. A proportional hazard model showed that children with HIV infection had the longest time to complete three doses of DTP, Pol, and HBV, and those with neurological diseases received the first dose of MMR later than the other categories. Causes of missing or delayed vaccination mostly included a concurrent acute disease. Children with chronic diseases should be strictly monitored for routine and recommended vaccinations, and health care providers and families should be properly informed to avoid false contraindications.

  3. Expert-Novice Differences in Mental Models of Viruses, Vaccines, and the Causes of Infectious Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Benjamin D.; Uttal, David H.; Spiegel, Amy; Diamond, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Humans are exposed to viruses everywhere they live, play, and work. Yet people’s beliefs about viruses may be confused or inaccurate, potentially impairing their understanding of scientific information. This study used semi-structured interviews to examine people’s beliefs about viruses, vaccines, and the causes of infectious disease. We compared people at different levels of science expertise: middle school students, teachers, and professional virologists. The virologists described more entities involved in microbiological processes, how these entities behaved, and why. Quantitative and qualitative analyses revealed distinctions in the cognitive organization of several concepts, including infection and vaccination. For example, some students and teachers described viral replication in terms of cell division, independent of a host. Interestingly, most students held a mental model for vaccination in which the vaccine directly attacks a virus that is present in the body. Our findings have immediate implications for how to communicate about infectious disease to young people. PMID:23959975

  4. Vaccination to Alzheimer Disease. Is it a Promising Tool or a Blind Way?

    PubMed

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is an irreversible neurodegenerative disorder associated with cognitive dysfunction. The disease incidence has growing tendency worldwide with strong impact on healthcare funds. The fact that there is no effective therapy makes the disorder more serious. Currently, AD manifestation can be suppressed by having impact on enzyme acetylcholinesterase: donepezil, rivastigmine, and galantamine or ionotropic glutamate NMDA receptor ( memanitine). Contrary to the drugs effecting symptomatically, vaccination against amyloid plaques or neurofibrillary tangles and their precursors amyloid beta and hyperphosphorylated tau are expected to be more suitable. Huge numbers of works have been done on the issue. Unfortunately, the promising vaccines like the AN 1792 were halted during clinical trials because of adverse effects like meningoencephalitis. Monoclonal antibody specific to amyloid plaques, Bapineuzumab, was closest to the practical performance but the clinical trials were also stopped. The review summarizes facts about AD, opportunities in AD vaccination, and obstacles that limit the vaccination including reasons why the recent trials have fallen. PMID:27087245

  5. Vaccination against foot-and-mouth disease virus using peptides conjugated to nano-beads.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Deanne L V; Dynon, Kemperly; Kalkanidis, Martha; Xiang, Sue; Plebanski, Magdalena; Scheerlinck, Jean-Pierre Y

    2008-05-23

    Vaccination against foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is a major problem as current vaccines do not allow easy differentiation between infected and vaccinated animals. Furthermore, large scale production of inactivated virus poses significant risks. To address this we investigated the feasibility of using inert nano-beads that target antigen to dendritic cells (DCs) to induce immune responses against FMDV-specific synthetic peptides in sheep. Our results demonstrate that while single peptides induce responses in most sheep, the combination of multiple peptides either conjugated separately to individual nano-beads or conjugated as a mixture induce significant cell-mediated (CM) and humoral immune responses.

  6. Small fiber neuropathy following vaccination for rabies, varicella or Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Souayah, Nizar; Ajroud-Driss, Senda; Sander, Howard W; Brannagan, Thomas H; Hays, Arthur P; Chin, Russell L

    2009-12-01

    Neuropathy following vaccination has been reported; however, biopsy-confirmed small fiber neuropathy has not been described. We report five patients who developed paresthesias within one day to two months following vaccination for rabies, varicella zoster, or Lyme disease. On examination, there was mild sensory loss in distal extremities, preserved strength, normal or minimally abnormal electrodiagnostic findings, and decreased epidermal nerve fiber densities per skin biopsy. Empiric immunomodulatory therapy was tried in two patients and was ineffective. All patients' symptoms have improved, but persist. We conclude that an acute or subacute, post-vaccination small fiber neuropathy may occur and follow a chronic course.

  7. The threat of human influenza: the viruses, disease impacts, and vaccine solutions.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jiehui Kevin; Salkeld, Glenn; Heron, Leon; Khandaker, Gulam; Rashid, Harunor; Booy, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Influenza is an acute respiratory illness that remains an important cause of excessive morbidity and mortality with substantial economic cost to the population. Influenza, being a virus that frequently mutates, is not amenable to elimination. Vaccination remains the most effective preventive measure. This review summarises the latest developments in the fields of biology and epidemiology relating to clinical and economic impacts of influenza disease, and vaccination. We suggest that future efforts should focus on developing safer, more effective, and cost-effective prophylactic vaccines for influenza.

  8. Age at vaccination and timing of infection do not alter vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease in influenza A virus infected pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccines are widely used in the swine industry to reduce clinical disease against homologous influenza A virus (IAV) infection. In pigs experimentally challenged with antigenically distinct heterologous IAV of the same hemagglutinin subtype, WIV vaccinates have been sho...

  9. Effects of DDA, CpG-ODN, and plasmid-encoded chicken IFN-gamma on protective immunity by a DNA vaccine against IBDV in chickens.

    PubMed

    Roh, Ha Jung; Sung, Haan Woo; Kwon, Hyuk Moo

    2006-12-01

    This study examined the adjuvant effects of dimethyl dioctadecyl ammonium bromide (DDA), CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN), and chicken interferon-gamma (ChIFN-gamma) on a DNA vaccine (pcDNA-VP243) against the infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). A plasmid encoding chicken IFN-ã was constructed. Twice at 2-week intervals, two-week-old chickens were injected intramuscularly and intraperitoneally with either a DNA vaccine alone or a DNA vaccine together with the respective adjuvants. On week 2 after the second immunization, the chickens were orally challenged with the highly virulent IBDV. The groups that received the DNA vaccines plus either DDA or CpG-ODN showed significantly lower survival rates than the group that received the DNA vaccine alone. However, the survival rates for the DNA vaccine alone and for the DNA vaccine plus ChIFN-gamma were similar. The chickens had no detectable antibodies to the IBDV before the challenge but all the surviving chickens in all groups except for the normal control group showed the induction of antibodies to the IBDV at day 10 after the challenge. As judged by the lymphocyte proliferation assays using the a WST-8 solution performed on the peripheral blood and splenic lymphocytes, the stimulation indices (SI) of the peripheral blood lymphocytes in all groups except for the normal control group were similar immediately before the challenge. At 10 days post-challenge, the SI for DNA vaccine plus either CpG-ODN or ChIFN-gamma was similar to that of the DNA vaccine control group. For splenic lymphocytes, the SI in the DNA vaccine plus CpG-ODN and DNA vaccine plus ChIFN-gamma groups were higher than for the DNA vaccine control. These results suggest that DDA actually compromises the protection against the IBDV by DNA vaccine, and CpG-ODN and IFN-gamma had no significant effect. PMID:17106228

  10. Preparing for the scale-up of rotavirus vaccine introduction in Africa: establishing surveillance platforms to monitor disease burden and vaccine impact.

    PubMed

    Mwenda, Jason M; Tate, Jacqueline E; Steele, A Duncan; Parashar, Umesh D

    2014-01-01

    Countries in Africa have begun introducing rotavirus vaccines in their national immunization programs, and wide-scale rollout across the continent is expected during the next few years. In preparation for vaccine introduction, many countries initiated surveillance for rotavirus and other studies to document disease burden, to describe the epidemiology and to monitor circulating rotavirus strains in Africa. In addition, 2 countries sought to systematically investigate cases of intussusception, a rare adverse event that has been associated with rotavirus vaccines in some settings. The ongoing surveillance provided data that will serve as a baseline against which the impact of rotavirus vaccines in Africa can be assessed.

  11. Immunogenicity and safety of the human papillomavirus vaccine in patients with autoimmune diseases: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Paolo; Radice, Sonia; Clementi, Emilio

    2015-07-01

    Whereas safety and efficacy of HPV vaccines in healthy women have been shown in several randomised controlled clinical trials and in post marketing analyses, only few data exist in patients affected by autoimmune diseases. These issues are significant as autoimmune conditions are recognised as a risk factor for the persistence of HPV infection. Herein we review and systematise the existing literature to assess immunogenicity and safety of HPV vaccination in patients with autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The results of our literature revision suggest that the HPV vaccines are efficacious and safe in most of the patients affected by autoimmune diseases. Yet, some points of concern remain to be tackled, including the effects of concomitant therapies, the risk of disease exacerbation and the cost-effectiveness of such immunisation programmes in these populations. PMID:26036945

  12. Optimal vaccine stockpile design for an eradicated disease: application to polio.

    PubMed

    Tebbens, Radboud J Duintjer; Pallansch, Mark A; Alexander, James P; Thompson, Kimberly M

    2010-06-11

    Eradication of a disease promises significant health and financial benefits. Preserving those benefits, hopefully in perpetuity, requires preparing for the possibility that the causal agent could re-emerge (unintentionally or intentionally). In the case of a vaccine-preventable disease, creation and planning for the use of a vaccine stockpile becomes a primary concern. Doing so requires consideration of the dynamics at different levels, including the stockpile supply chain and transmission of the causal agent. This paper develops a mathematical framework for determining the optimal management of a vaccine stockpile over time. We apply the framework to the polio vaccine stockpile for the post-eradication era and present examples of solutions to one possible framing of the optimization problem. We use the framework to discuss issues relevant to the development and use of the polio vaccine stockpile, including capacity constraints, production and filling delays, risks associated with the stockpile, dynamics and uncertainty of vaccine needs, issues of funding, location, and serotype dependent behavior, and the implications of likely changes over time that might occur. This framework serves as a helpful context for discussions and analyses related to the process of designing and maintaining a stockpile for an eradicated disease. PMID:20430122

  13. Assessment of newcastle disease vaccination of houbara bustard breeders (Chlamydotis undulata undulata).

    PubMed

    Facon, Charles; Guerin, Jean-Luc; Lacroix, Frédéric

    2005-10-01

    The houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata undulata) is endangered in North Africa. Through a captive-breeding program established in Morocco by The Emirates Center for Wildlife Propagation, wild populations are being supplemented by the releasing of captive-reared birds. Newcastle disease, which is caused by Newcastle disease virus (NDV; Avian paramyxovirus type 1), can infect houbara bustards and is a significant threat through contact with backyard poultry and possibly wild birds. Three vaccination schedules for Newcastle disease were evaluated by serologic monitoring to assess the efficiency and safety of various types of vaccines (live vs. inactivated), vaccine strains (Hitchner B1 and Clone 30), and administration routes (intranasal vs. injection). We evaluated antibody titers in 211 adult houbara bustards for 10 mo. Antibody titers to NDV in both sera and egg yolks were monitored by hemagglutination inhibition test. The inactivated vaccine provided a high, homogeneous, and durable serologic response in breeders; titers were higher than log2 11 after 4 wk and remained higher than log2 7 after 10 mo. The response to the two live vaccines was similar, and antibody titers did not exceed log2 6 at sero-conversion. Maternally derived antibodies were efficiently transmitted in vitellus, further confirming that offspring of females hyperimmunized with the inactivated vaccine received high titers of maternal antibodies. PMID:16456166

  14. Assessment of newcastle disease vaccination of houbara bustard breeders (Chlamydotis undulata undulata).

    PubMed

    Facon, Charles; Guerin, Jean-Luc; Lacroix, Frédéric

    2005-10-01

    The houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata undulata) is endangered in North Africa. Through a captive-breeding program established in Morocco by The Emirates Center for Wildlife Propagation, wild populations are being supplemented by the releasing of captive-reared birds. Newcastle disease, which is caused by Newcastle disease virus (NDV; Avian paramyxovirus type 1), can infect houbara bustards and is a significant threat through contact with backyard poultry and possibly wild birds. Three vaccination schedules for Newcastle disease were evaluated by serologic monitoring to assess the efficiency and safety of various types of vaccines (live vs. inactivated), vaccine strains (Hitchner B1 and Clone 30), and administration routes (intranasal vs. injection). We evaluated antibody titers in 211 adult houbara bustards for 10 mo. Antibody titers to NDV in both sera and egg yolks were monitored by hemagglutination inhibition test. The inactivated vaccine provided a high, homogeneous, and durable serologic response in breeders; titers were higher than log2 11 after 4 wk and remained higher than log2 7 after 10 mo. The response to the two live vaccines was similar, and antibody titers did not exceed log2 6 at sero-conversion. Maternally derived antibodies were efficiently transmitted in vitellus, further confirming that offspring of females hyperimmunized with the inactivated vaccine received high titers of maternal antibodies.

  15. Mass vaccination, immunity and coverage: modelling population protection against foot-and-mouth disease in Turkish cattle

    PubMed Central

    Knight-Jones, T. J. D.; Gubbins, S.; Bulut, A. N.; Stärk, K. D. C.; Pfeiffer, D. U.; Sumption, K. J.; Paton, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in Turkey is controlled using biannual mass vaccination of cattle. However, vaccine protection is undermined by population turnover and declining immunity. A dynamic model of the Turkish cattle population was created. Assuming biannual mass vaccination with a single-dose primary course, vaccine history was calculated for the simulated population (number of doses and time since last vaccination). This was used to estimate population immunity. Six months after the last round of vaccination almost half the cattle aged <24 months remain unvaccinated. Only 50% of all cattle would have received >1 vaccine dose in their life with the last dose given ≤6 months ago. Five months after the last round of vaccination two-thirds of cattle would have low antibody titres (<70% protection threshold). Giving a two-dose primary vaccination course reduces the proportion of 6–12 month old cattle with low titres by 20–30%. Biannual mass vaccination of cattle leaves significant immunity gaps and over-reliance on vaccine protection should be avoided. Using more effective vaccines and vaccination strategies will increase population immunity, however, the extent to which FMD can be controlled by vaccination alone without effective biosecurity remains uncertain. PMID:26916556

  16. Mass vaccination, immunity and coverage: modelling population protection against foot-and-mouth disease in Turkish cattle.

    PubMed

    Knight-Jones, T J D; Gubbins, S; Bulut, A N; Stärk, K D C; Pfeiffer, D U; Sumption, K J; Paton, D J

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in Turkey is controlled using biannual mass vaccination of cattle. However, vaccine protection is undermined by population turnover and declining immunity. A dynamic model of the Turkish cattle population was created. Assuming biannual mass vaccination with a single-dose primary course, vaccine history was calculated for the simulated population (number of doses and time since last vaccination). This was used to estimate population immunity. Six months after the last round of vaccination almost half the cattle aged < 24 months remain unvaccinated. Only 50% of all cattle would have received > 1 vaccine dose in their life with the last dose given ≤ 6 months ago. Five months after the last round of vaccination two-thirds of cattle would have low antibody titres (< 70% protection threshold). Giving a two-dose primary vaccination course reduces the proportion of 6-12 month old cattle with low titres by 20-30%. Biannual mass vaccination of cattle leaves significant immunity gaps and over-reliance on vaccine protection should be avoided. Using more effective vaccines and vaccination strategies will increase population immunity, however, the extent to which FMD can be controlled by vaccination alone without effective biosecurity remains uncertain.

  17. Effects of Rispens CVI988 vaccination followed by challenge with Marek's disease viruses of differing virulence on the replication kinetics and shedding of the vaccine and challenge viruses.

    PubMed

    Ralapanawe, Sithara; Walkden-Brown, Stephen W; Islam, A F M Fakhrul; Renz, Katrin G

    2016-02-01

    Vaccination with "imperfect" vaccines that prevent disease but not infection is strongly implicated in the observed increased virulence of Marek's disease virus (MDV) over the past six decades. The current "gold standard" vaccine, Rispens CVI988 (Rispens), has maintained efficacy despite use for five decades, raising the question of whether it too favours higher virulence MDVs. To investigate this, we studied the kinetics of Rispens CVI988 (Rispens) and two MDV strains of different virulence in 236 commercial ISA Brown chickens vaccinated with Rispens at hatch and challenged with vMDV isolate MPF57 or vvMDV isolate FT158 on day five. Each treatment was replicated in two isolators and from 7 to 56 days post infection (dpi) peripheral blood leucocytes (PBL), feather and dust samples were collected and subjected to differential quantitative PCR (qPCR). Rispens vaccination significantly reduced challenge MDV viral load in a sample-dependant manner with evidence of a differentially greater inhibitory effect on the less virulent MDV. Similarly, challenge with the more virulent MDV reduced the Rispens viral load in PBL. Rispens virus load displayed a distinctive pattern of viral load that was similar in PBL and feathers, but different in dust. The clear effects of vaccination and challenge evident in PBL and feather samples were less clearly reflected in dust samples. The data are consistent with the Rispens vaccine reducing replication of lesser virulent MDVs to a greater extent like the HVT vaccine. Likely reasons for the persistent efficacy of Rispens vaccine are discussed.

  18. Development of a baited oral vaccine for use in reservoir-targeted strategies against Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Debaditya; Bensaci, Mekki; Luker, Kathryn E; Luker, Gary; Wisdom, Steven; Telford, Sam R; Hu, Linden T

    2011-10-13

    Lyme disease is a major human health problem which continues to increase in incidence and geographic distribution. As a vector-borne zoonotic disease, Lyme disease may be amenable to reservoir targeted strategies for control. We have previously reported that a vaccinia virus (VV) based vaccine expressing outer surface protein A (OspA) of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, protects inbred strains of laboratory mice against infection by feeding ticks and clears the ticks of infection when administered by gavage. Here we extend these studies to develop an effective bait formulation for delivery of the VV based vaccine and test its characteristics under simulated environmental conditions. We show that this vaccine is efficacious in decreasing acquisition of B. burgdorferi by uninfected larval ticks as well as in decreasing transmission from infected ticks to its natural reservoir, Peromyscus leucopus, when fed to mice in oral baits. Using live, in vivo imaging techniques, we describe the distribution of vaccinia virus infection after ingestion of the baited vaccines and establish the use of in vivo imaging technology for optimization of bait delivery. In summary, a VV based OspA vaccine is stable in an oral bait preparation and provides protection against infection for both the natural reservoir and the tick vector of Lyme disease. PMID:21816190

  19. Development of a novel thermostable Newcastle disease virus vaccine vector for expression of a heterologous gene.

    PubMed

    Wen, Guoyuan; Chen, Chen; Guo, Jing; Zhang, Zhenyu; Shang, Yu; Shao, Huabin; Luo, Qingping; Yang, Jun; Wang, Hongling; Wang, Hongcai; Zhang, Tengfei; Zhang, Rongrong; Cheng, Guofu; Yu, Qingzhong

    2015-06-01

    Thermostable Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccines have been used widely to control Newcastle disease for village poultry flocks, due to their independence of cold chains for delivery and storage. To explore the potential use of thermostable NDV as a vaccine vector, an infectious clone of thermostable avirulent NDV strain TS09-C was developed using reverse genetics technology. The GFP gene, along with the self-cleaving 2A gene of foot-and-mouth disease virus and ubiquitin monomer (2AUbi), were inserted immediately upstream of the NP (nucleocapsid protein), M (matrix protein) or L (large polymerase protein) gene translation start codon in the TS09-C infectious clone. Detection of GFP expression in the recombinant virus-infected cells showed that the recombinant virus, rTS-GFP/M, with the GFP gene inserted into the M gene expressed the highest level of GFP. The rTS-GFP/M virus retained the same thermostability, growth dynamics and pathogenicity as its parental rTS09-C virus. Vaccination of specific-pathogen-free chickens with the rTS-GFP/M virus conferred complete protection against virulent NDV challenge. Taken together, the data suggested that the rTS09-C virus could be used as a vaccine vector to develop bivalent thermostable vaccines against Newcastle disease and the target avian diseases for village chickens, especially in the developing and least-developed countries. PMID:25626679

  20. Development of a baited oral vaccine for use in reservoir-targeted strategies against Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Debaditya; Bensaci, Mekki; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary; Wisdom, Steven; Telford, Sam R.; Hu, Linden T.

    2013-01-01

    Lyme disease is a major human health problem which continues to increase in incidence and geographic distribution. As a vector-borne zoonotic disease, Lyme disease may be amenable to reservoir targeted strategies for control. We have previously reported that a vaccinia virus (VV) based vaccine expressing outer surface protein A (OspA) of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, protects inbred strains of laboratory mice against infection by feeding ticks and clears the ticks of infection when administered by gavage. Here we extend these studies to develop an effective bait formulation for delivery of the VV based vaccine and test its characteristics under simulated environmental conditions. We show that this vaccine is efficacious in decreasing acquisition of B. burgdorferi by uninfected larval ticks as well as in decreasing transmission from infected ticks to its natural reservoir, Peromyscus leucopus, when fed to mice in oral baits. Using live, in vivo imaging techniques, we describe the distribution of vaccinia virus infection after ingestion of the baited vaccines and establish the use of in vivo imaging technology for optimization of bait delivery. In summary, a VV based OspA vaccine is stable in an oral bait preparation and provides protection against infection for both the natural reservoir and the tick vector of Lyme disease. PMID:21816190

  1. Development of a baited oral vaccine for use in reservoir-targeted strategies against Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Debaditya; Bensaci, Mekki; Luker, Kathryn E; Luker, Gary; Wisdom, Steven; Telford, Sam R; Hu, Linden T

    2011-10-13

    Lyme disease is a major human health problem which continues to increase in incidence and geographic distribution. As a vector-borne zoonotic disease, Lyme disease may be amenable to reservoir targeted strategies for control. We have previously reported that a vaccinia virus (VV) based vaccine expressing outer surface protein A (OspA) of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, protects inbred strains of laboratory mice against infection by feeding ticks and clears the ticks of infection when administered by gavage. Here we extend these studies to develop an effective bait formulation for delivery of the VV based vaccine and test its characteristics under simulated environmental conditions. We show that this vaccine is efficacious in decreasing acquisition of B. burgdorferi by uninfected larval ticks as well as in decreasing transmission from infected ticks to its natural reservoir, Peromyscus leucopus, when fed to mice in oral baits. Using live, in vivo imaging techniques, we describe the distribution of vaccinia virus infection after ingestion of the baited vaccines and establish the use of in vivo imaging technology for optimization of bait delivery. In summary, a VV based OspA vaccine is stable in an oral bait preparation and provides protection against infection for both the natural reservoir and the tick vector of Lyme disease.

  2. The effects of demographic change on disease transmission and vaccine impact in a household structured population.

    PubMed

    Geard, Nicholas; Glass, Kathryn; McCaw, James M; McBryde, Emma S; Korb, Kevin B; Keeling, Matt J; McVernon, Jodie

    2015-12-01

    The demographic structure of populations in both more developed and less developed countries is changing: increases in life expectancy and declining fertility have led to older populations and smaller households. The implications of these demographic changes for the spread and control of infectious diseases are not fully understood. Here we use an individual based model with realistic and dynamic age and household structure to demonstrate the marked effect that demographic change has on disease transmission at the population and household level. The decline in fertility is associated with a decrease in disease incidence and an increase in the age of first infection, even in the absence of vaccination or other control measures. Although large households become rarer as fertility decreases, we show that there is a proportionate increase in incidence of disease in these households as the accumulation of susceptible clusters increases the potential for explosive outbreaks. By modelling vaccination, we provide a direct comparison of the relative importance of demographic change and vaccination on incidence of disease. We highlight the increased risks associated with unvaccinated households in a low fertility setting if vaccine behaviour is correlated with household membership. We suggest that models that do not account for future demographic change, and especially its effect on household structure, may potentially overestimate the impact of vaccination. PMID:26616042

  3. [Consensus document by the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the advisory committee on vaccines of the Spanish Paediatrics Association on vaccination in immunocompromised children].

    PubMed

    Mellado Peña, M J; Moreno-Pérez, D; Ruíz Contreras, J; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, T; Navarro Gómez, M L

    2011-12-01

    Vaccination in immunocompromised infants, children and adolescents is a major aspect in the follow-up of this complex pathology in specific Paediatric Units. Vaccination is also an important prevention tool, as this can, to a certain extent, determine the morbidity and mortality in these patients. This consensus document was jointly prepared by Working Groups of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Paediatric Association, who are usually involved in updating the management of vaccinations in immunocompromised children, and reflects their opinions. The consensus specifically summarises indications for vaccination in the following special paediatric populations: Solid organ and haematopoietic transplant-recipients; primary immunodeficiency; asplenic children; non-previously transplanted immunocompromised patients; chronically ill patients; HIV-infected children and also the vaccines recommended for immunodeficient children who travel.

  4. Normal or defective immune response to Hepatitis B vaccine in patients with diabetes and celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Zanoni, Giovanna; Contreas, Giovanna; Valletta, Enrico; Gabrielli, Oretta; Mengoli, Carlo; Veneri, Dino

    2014-01-01

    A defective production of protective levels of antibodies to Hepatitis B (HB) vaccine is reported to occur in 4–10% of healthy subjects and a correlation with the presence of specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules, including DQ2, which also confers genetic predisposition to celiac disease (CD) and type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM), has been suggested. The aim of this study was to analyze the serological response to HB vaccine and measles-containing vaccines in 69 diabetic patients (T1DM), 42 patients with celiac disease (CD) and 79 healthy control subjects (CT). The median interval between the third dose of HB vaccine and serum collection was 6.8, 3.5, and 4.7 years for T1DM, CD and CT groups, respectively. 50/69 (72%) T1DM patients, 32/42 (76%) CD patients and 61/79 (77%) CT subjects showed protective anti-HBs antibodies after vaccination, with no statistically significant difference. On the contrary, a lower statistically significant difference was found in the mean HBsAb level of T1DM subjects when compared with the other two groups. No correlation between HLA DQ2 expression in T1DM and vaccine response was detected. The comparison of serological response to measles after vaccination also showed no statistically significant differences in the three groups. Contrasting results between these data and those reported in the literature might be due to differences in the time intervals between vaccination and testing. Prospective studies in pathological and healthy groups with the same age at HBV vaccination and with the same time interval for blood sample collection to determine antibody titers are necessary in order to provide more conclusive data. PMID:25483516

  5. Normal or defective immune response to Hepatitis B vaccine in patients with diabetes and celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Zanoni, Giovanna; Contreas, Giovanna; Valletta, Enrico; Gabrielli, Oretta; Mengoli, Carlo; Veneri, Dino

    2015-01-01

    A defective production of protective levels of antibodies to Hepatitis B (HB) vaccine is reported to occur in 4-10% of healthy subjects and a correlation with the presence of specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules, including DQ2, which also confers genetic predisposition to celiac disease (CD) and type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM), has been suggested.   The aim of this study was to analyze the serological response to HB vaccine and measles-containing vaccines in 69 diabetic patients (T1DM), 42 patients with celiac disease (CD) and 79 healthy control subjects (CT). The median interval between the third dose of HB vaccine and serum collection was 6.8, 3.5, and 4.7 years for T1DM, CD and CT groups, respectively. 50/69 (72%) T1DM patients, 32/42 (76%) CD patients and 61/79 (77%) CT subjects showed protective anti-HBs antibodies after vaccination, with no statistically significant difference. On the contrary, a lower statistically significant difference was found in the mean HBsAb level of T1DM subjects when compared with the other two groups. No correlation between HLA DQ2 expression in T1DM and vaccine response was detected. The comparison of serological response to measles after vaccination also showed no statistically significant differences in the three groups. Contrasting results between these data and those reported in the literature might be due to differences in the time intervals between vaccination and testing. Prospective studies in pathological and healthy groups with the same age at HBV vaccination and with the same time interval for blood sample collection to determine antibody titers are necessary in order to provide more conclusive data.

  6. Evaluation of goat based 'indigenous vaccine' against bovine Johne's disease in endemically infected native cattle herds.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shoor Vir; Singh, Pravin Kumar; Kumar, Naveen; Gupta, Saurabh; Chaubey, Kundan Kumar; Singh, Brajesh; Srivastav, Abhishek; Yadav, Sharad; Dhama, Kuldeep

    2015-01-01

    'Indigenous vaccine' prepared from 'Indian Bison Type' a native bio-type of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis strain 'S5' of goat origin (goat based) was evaluated in indigenous cattle herds located in gaushalas (cow shelters), endemic for Bovine Johne's disease. Cows (893) were randomly divided into vaccinated (702 = 626 adults + 76 calves) and control (191 = 173 adults + 18 calves) groups. Response to vaccination was evaluated on the basis of health (mortality, morbidity), productivity (growth rate, reproductive performance, total milk yield), immunological parameters (LTT, ELISA titer), survivability of animals naturally infected with MAP, bacterimia (by specific blood PCR), seroconversion (by indigenous ELISA) and status of shedding of MAP in feces (by microscopy) in the two groups before and after vaccination. Reduction in MAP shedding [to the extent of 100% in Herd A; and from 82.1% (0 DPV) to 10.7% (270 DPV) in Herd C] was the major finding in vaccinated cows. Whereas, the control group cows have shown no improvement. As the first indicator of vaccine efficacy, MAP bacilli disappeared from the blood circulation as early as 15 days post vaccination, however, peak titers were achieved around 90 DPV. Peak titers initially declined slightly but were maintained later throughout the study period. Control animals did not show any pattern in antibody titers. Mortality was low in vaccinated as compared to the control groups. Vaccination of endemically infected native cattle herds with inactivated whole-cell bacterin of novel 'Indian Bison Type' bio-type of goat origin strain 'S5' effectively restored health and productivity and reduced clinical BJD. Application of goat based 'indigenous vaccine' for therapeutic management of BJD in native cattle herds (gaushalas) is the first of its kind. PMID:25675707

  7. The influence of major histocompatibility complex and vaccination with turkey herpesvirus on Marek's disease virus evolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the last five decades, the pathogenicity of the Marek’s disease virus (MDV) has evolved from the relatively mild strains (mMDV) observed in the 1960s to the more severe very-virulent-plus strains currently observed in today’s outbreaks. The use of vaccines to control Marek’s disease (MD), but n...

  8. Enhancing the role of veterinary vaccines reducing zoonotic diseases of humans: linking systems biology with vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Adams, L Garry; Khare, Sangeeta; Lawhon, Sara D; Rossetti, Carlos A; Lewin, Harris A; Lipton, Mary S; Turse, Joshua E; Wylie, Dennis C; Bai, Yu; Drake, Kenneth L

    2011-09-22

    The aim of research on infectious diseases is their prevention, and brucellosis and salmonellosis as such are classic examples of worldwide zoonoses for application of a systems biology approach for enhanced rational vaccine development. When used optimally, vaccines prevent disease manifestations, reduce transmission of disease, decrease the need for pharmaceutical intervention, and improve the health and welfare of animals, as well as indirectly protecting against zoonotic diseases of people. Advances in the last decade or so using comprehensive systems biology approaches linking genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics, and biotechnology with immunology, pathogenesis and vaccine formulation and delivery are expected to enable enhanced approaches to vaccine development. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the role of computational systems biology analysis of host:pathogen interactions (the interactome) as a tool for enhanced rational design of vaccines. Systems biology is bringing a new, more robust approach to veterinary vaccine design based upon a deeper understanding of the host-pathogen interactions and its impact on the host's molecular network of the immune system. A computational systems biology method was utilized to create interactome models of the host responses to Brucella melitensis (BMEL), Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP), Salmonella enterica Typhimurium (STM), and a Salmonella mutant (isogenic ΔsipA, sopABDE2) and linked to the basis for rational development of vaccines for brucellosis and salmonellosis as reviewed by Adams et al. and Ficht et al. [1,2]. A bovine ligated ileal loop biological model was established to capture the host gene expression response at multiple time points post infection. New methods based on Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN) machine learning were employed to conduct a comparative pathogenicity analysis of 219 signaling and metabolic pathways and 1620 gene ontology (GO) categories that defined the host's biosignatures

  9. Enhancing the role of veterinary vaccines reducing zoonotic diseases of humans: Linking systems biology with vaccine development

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Leslie G.; Khare, Sangeeta; Lawhon, Sara D.; Rossetti, Carlos A.; Lewin, Harris A.; Lipton, Mary S.; Turse, Joshua E.; Wylie, Dennis C.; Bai, Yu; Drake, Kenneth L.

    2011-09-22

    The aim of research on infectious diseases is their prevention, and brucellosis and salmonellosis as such are classic examples of worldwide zoonoses for application of a systems biology approach for enhanced rational vaccine development. When used optimally, vaccines prevent disease manifestations, reduce transmission of disease, decrease the need for pharmaceutical intervention, and improve the health and welfare of animals, as well as indirectly protecting against zoonotic diseases of people. Advances in the last decade or so using comprehensive systems biology approaches linking genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics, and biotechnology with immunology, pathogenesis and vaccine formulation and delivery are expected to enable enhanced approaches to vaccine development. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the role of computational systems biology analysis of host:pathogen interactions (the interactome) as a tool for enhanced rational design of vaccines. Systems biology is bringing a new, more robust approach to veterinary vaccine design based upon a deeper understanding of the host pathogen interactions and its impact on the host's molecular network of the immune system. A computational systems biology method was utilized to create interactome models of the host responses to Brucella melitensis (BMEL), Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP), Salmonella enterica Typhimurium (STM), and a Salmonella mutant (isogenic *sipA, sopABDE2) and linked to the basis for rational development of vaccines for brucellosis and salmonellosis as reviewed by Adams et al. and Ficht et al. [1,2]. A bovine ligated ileal loop biological model was established to capture the host gene expression response at multiple time points post infection. New methods based on Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN) machine learning were employed to conduct a comparative pathogenicity analysis of 219 signaling and metabolic pathways and 1620 gene ontology (GO) categories that defined the host's biosignatures

  10. Chicken IL-7 as a potent adjuvant enhances IBDV VP2 DNA vaccine immunogenicity and protective efficacy.

    PubMed

    Huo, Shanshan; Zuo, Yuzhu; Li, Nan; Li, Xiujin; Zhang, Yonghong; Wang, Liyue; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Jianlou; Cui, Dan; He, Pingyou; Xu, Jian; Li, Yan; Zhu, Xiutong; Zhong, Fei

    2016-09-25

    Our previous work has demonstrated that the mammalian interleukin-7 (IL-7) gene can enhance the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine. Whether chicken IL-7 (chIL-7) possesses the ability to enhance the immunogenicity of VP2 DNA vaccine of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) remained unknown. To investigate this, we constructed a VP2 antigenic region (VP2366) gene and chIL-7 gene vectors, co-immunized chicken with these vectors and analyzed the effects of the chIL-7 gene on VP2366 gene immunogenicity. Results showed that co-administrated chIL-7 gene with VP2 DNA vaccine significantly increased specific serum antibody titers against IBDV, and enhanced lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ and IL-4 productions. More importantly, chIL-7 gene significantly increased VP2366 gene-induced protection against virulent IBDV infection, indicating that the chIL-7 gene possessed the capacity to enhance VP2366 DNA vaccine immunogenicity, and therefore might function as a novel adjuvant for IBDV VP2 DNA vaccine. Mechanically, chIL-7 could stimulate the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) expressions in vitro and in vivo, which might be involved in chIL-7 enhancement of the immunogenicity of VP2 DNA vaccine. PMID:27599941

  11. Distribution and expression in vitro and in vivo of DNA vaccine against lymphocystis disease virus in Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fengrong; Sun, Xiuqin; Liu, Hongzhan; Wu, Xingan; Zhong, Nan; Wang, Bo; Zhou, Guodong

    2010-01-01

    Lymphocystis disease, caused by the lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV), is a significant worldwide problem in fish industry causing substantial economic losses. In this study, we aimed to develop the DNA vaccine against LCDV, using DNA vaccination technology. We evaluated plasmid pEGFP-N2-LCDV1.3 kb as a DNA vaccine candidate. The plasmid DNA was transiently expressed after liposome transfection into the eukaryotic COS 7 cell line. The distribution and expression of the DNA vaccine (pEGFP-N2-LCDV1.3kb) were also analyzed in tissues of the vaccinated Japanese flounder by PCR, RT-PCR and fluorescent microscopy. Results from PCR analysis indicated that the vaccine-containing plasmids were distributed in injected muscle, the muscle opposite the injection site, the hind intestine, gill, spleen, head, kidney and liver, 6 and 25 days after vaccination. The vaccine plasmids disappeared 100 d post-vaccination. Fluorescent microscopy revealed green fluorescence in the injected muscle, the muscle opposite the injection site, the hind intestine, gill, spleen, head, kidney and liver of fish 48 h post-vaccination, green fluorescence did not appear in the control treated tissue. Green fluorescence became weak at 60 days post-vaccination. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the mcp gene was expressed in all tested tissues of vaccinated fish 6-50 days post-vaccination. These results demonstrate that the antigen encoded by the DNA vaccine is distributed and expressed in all of the tissues analyzed in the vaccinated fish. The antigen would therefore potentially initiate a specific immune response. the plasmid DNA was injected into Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus) intramuscularly and antibodies against LCDV were evaluated. The results indicate that the plasmid encoded DNA vaccine could induce an immune response to LCDV and would therefore offer immune protection against LCD. Further studies are required for the development and application of this promising DNA vaccine.

  12. Predicting the Vulnerability of Great Apes to Disease: The Role of Superspreaders and Their Potential Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Carne, Charlotte; Semple, Stuart; Morrogh-Bernard, Helen; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Lehmann, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Disease is a major concern for the conservation of great apes, and one that is likely to become increasingly relevant as deforestation and the rise of ecotourism bring humans and apes into ever closer proximity. Consequently, it is imperative that preventative measures are explored to ensure that future epidemics do not wipe out the remaining populations of these animals. In this paper, social network analysis was used to investigate vulnerability to disease in a population of wild orang-utans and a community of wild chimpanzees. Potential ‘superspreaders’ of disease - individuals with disproportionately central positions in the community or population - were identified, and the efficacy of vaccinating these individuals assessed using simulations. Three resident female orang-utans were identified as potential superspreaders, and females and unflanged males were predicted to be more influential in disease spread than flanged males. By contrast, no superspreaders were identified in the chimpanzee network, although males were significantly more central than females. In both species, simulating the vaccination of the most central individuals in the network caused a greater reduction in potential disease pathways than removing random individuals, but this effect was considerably more pronounced for orang-utans. This suggests that targeted vaccinations would have a greater impact on reducing disease spread among orang-utans than chimpanzees. Overall, these results have important implications for orang-utan and chimpanzee conservation and highlight the role that certain individuals may play in the spread of disease and its prevention by vaccination. PMID:24386405

  13. Predicting the vulnerability of great apes to disease: the role of superspreaders and their potential vaccination.

    PubMed

    Carne, Charlotte; Semple, Stuart; Morrogh-Bernard, Helen; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Lehmann, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Disease is a major concern for the conservation of great apes, and one that is likely to become increasingly relevant as deforestation and the rise of ecotourism bring humans and apes into ever closer proximity. Consequently, it is imperative that preventative measures are explored to ensure that future epidemics do not wipe out the remaining populations of these animals. In this paper, social network analysis was used to investigate vulnerability to disease in a population of wild orang-utans and a community of wild chimpanzees. Potential 'superspreaders' of disease--individuals with disproportionately central positions in the community or population--were identified, and the efficacy of vaccinating these individuals assessed using simulations. Three resident female orang-utans were identified as potential superspreaders, and females and unflanged males were predicted to be more influential in disease spread than flanged males. By contrast, no superspreaders were identified in the chimpanzee network, although males were significantly more central than females. In both species, simulating the vaccination of the most central individuals in the network caused a greater reduction in potential disease pathways than removing random individuals, but this effect was considerably more pronounced for orang-utans. This suggests that targeted vaccinations would have a greater impact on reducing disease spread among orang-utans than chimpanzees. Overall, these results have important implications for orang-utan and chimpanzee conservation and highlight the role that certain individuals may play in the spread of disease and its prevention by vaccination. PMID:24386405

  14. Predicting the vulnerability of great apes to disease: the role of superspreaders and their potential vaccination.

    PubMed

    Carne, Charlotte; Semple, Stuart; Morrogh-Bernard, Helen; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Lehmann, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Disease is a major concern for the conservation of great apes, and one that is likely to become increasingly relevant as deforestation and the rise of ecotourism bring humans and apes into ever closer proximity. Consequently, it is imperative that preventative measures are explored to ensure that future epidemics do not wipe out the remaining populations of these animals. In this paper, social network analysis was used to investigate vulnerability to disease in a population of wild orang-utans and a community of wild chimpanzees. Potential 'superspreaders' of disease--individuals with disproportionately central positions in the community or population--were identified, and the efficacy of vaccinating these individuals assessed using simulations. Three resident female orang-utans were identified as potential superspreaders, and females and unflanged males were predicted to be more influential in disease spread than flanged males. By contrast, no superspreaders were identified in the chimpanzee network, although males were significantly more central than females. In both species, simulating the vaccination of the most central individuals in the network caused a greater reduction in potential disease pathways than removing random individuals, but this effect was considerably more pronounced for orang-utans. This suggests that targeted vaccinations would have a greater impact on reducing disease spread among orang-utans than chimpanzees. Overall, these results have important implications for orang-utan and chimpanzee conservation and highlight the role that certain individuals may play in the spread of disease and its prevention by vaccination.

  15. B haplotype influence on the relative efficacy of Marek's disease vaccines in commercial chickens.

    PubMed

    Bacon, L D; Witter, R L

    1994-04-01

    The objectives were to investigate whether or not B haplotypes influence vaccinal immunity against Marek's disease (MD) in commercial chickens and to evaluate whether retrospective analysis would detect the influence. This method involved evaluating the B haplotypes of turkey herpesvirus (HVT)-vaccinated sick vs normal chickens from a flock afflicted with MD symptoms. An analysis of the retrospective data disclosed that MD symptoms were present in a higher proportion of B2B19 than B2B21 chickens. A prospective study was then conducted with blood-typed chickens of the strain vaccinated with HVT or HVT + 301B bivalent MD vaccines prior to inoculation of the very virulent Md5 virus. The bivalent vaccine provided better protection than HVT alone, but with either vaccine fewer B2B21 chickens developed MD lesions. We conclude that the B haplotype influence on vaccinal immunity against MD previously demonstrated in B-congenic strains of chickens is also significant in commercial chickens and that the influence can be detected through analysis of B haplotypes in sick vs normal chickens of an affected flock.

  16. Prospect and challenges for the development of multivalent vaccines against hand, foot and mouth diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Chyi; Chow, Yen-Hung; Chong, Pele; Klein, Michel

    2014-10-29

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71), an emerging neurotropic virus and coxsackieviruses (CV) are the major causative agents of hand, foot and mouth diseases (HFMD). These viruses have become a serious public health threat in the Asia Pacific region. Formalin-inactivated EV71 (FI-EV71) vaccines have been developed, evaluated in human clinical trials and were found to elicit full protection against EV71. Their failure to prevent CVA16 infections could compromise the acceptability of monovalent EV71 vaccines. Bivalent FI-EV71/FI-CVA16 vaccines have been found to elicit strong neutralizing antibody responses against both viruses in animal models but did not protect against CVA6 and CVA10 viral infections in cell culture neutralization assay. In this review, we discuss the critical bottlenecks in the development of multivalent HFMD vaccines, including the selection of vaccine strains, animal models to assess vaccine potency, the definition of end-points for efficacy trials, and the need for improved manufacturing processes to produce affordable vaccines.

  17. 9 CFR 113.329 - Newcastle Disease Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... receive a predetermined quantity of vaccine virus. Five replicate virus titrations shall be conducted on... titration shall have at least one dilution with between 50 and 100 percent positives and at least one... container samples of completed product shall be tested for virus titer using the titration method used...

  18. 9 CFR 113.329 - Newcastle Disease Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... receive a predetermined quantity of vaccine virus. Five replicate virus titrations shall be conducted on... titration shall have at least one dilution with between 50 and 100 percent positives and at least one... container samples of completed product shall be tested for virus titer using the titration method used...

  19. 9 CFR 113.329 - Newcastle Disease Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... receive a predetermined quantity of vaccine virus. Five replicate virus titrations shall be conducted on... titration shall have at least one dilution with between 50 and 100 percent positives and at least one... container samples of completed product shall be tested for virus titer using the titration method used...

  20. 9 CFR 113.329 - Newcastle Disease Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... receive a predetermined quantity of vaccine virus. Five replicate virus titrations shall be conducted on... titration shall have at least one dilution with between 50 and 100 percent positives and at least one... container samples of completed product shall be tested for virus titer using the titration method used...

  1. 9 CFR 113.329 - Newcastle Disease Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... receive a predetermined quantity of vaccine virus. Five replicate virus titrations shall be conducted on... titration shall have at least one dilution with between 50 and 100 percent positives and at least one... container samples of completed product shall be tested for virus titer using the titration method used...

  2. B-cell differentiation in the chicken: expression of immunoglobulin genes in the bursal and peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Mansikka, A; Veromaa, T; Vainio, O; Toivanen, P

    1989-03-01

    We have studied the expression of immunoglobulin genes in the chicken B-cell precursors, and of a B-cell surface marker (Bu-1) on the bursal and peripheral B cells during normal ontogeny. Since there is no way of distinguishing the precursor cells from the more mature bursal lymphocytes on the basis of surface markers, we chose to study the total bursal lymphocyte population at ages when the numbers of the various precursor cells (bursal, early post-bursal, and post-bursal stem cells) in the bursa are estimated to be at their highest. Thereafter, comparisons with the more mature lymphocytes in the peripheral organs were made. As a result, levels of the lambda and mu transcripts and expression of Bu-1 antigen in the chicken B-cell precursors were found to be unchanged during the post-hatching period. In the light of these experiments, the later events of B-cell differentiation, i.e. the development from the bursal to post-bursal B lymphocytes, occurs without the lambda, mu, and Bu-1 gene loci involved. On the other hand, the higher level of lambda and mu expression in the splenic B lymphocytes indicates that the post-bursal stem cells mature into highly active plasma cells after seeding to the peripheral organs.

  3. Time for T? Immunoinformatics addresses vaccine design for neglected tropical and emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Terry, Frances E; Moise, Leonard; Martin, Rebecca F; Torres, Melissa; Pilotte, Nils; Williams, Steven A; De Groot, Anne S

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines have been invaluable for global health, saving lives and reducing healthcare costs, while also raising the quality of human life. However, newly emerging infectious diseases (EID) and more well-established tropical disease pathogens present complex challenges to vaccine developers; in particular, neglected tropical diseases, which are most prevalent among the world's poorest, include many pathogens with large sizes, multistage life cycles and a variety of nonhuman vectors. EID such as MERS-CoV and H7N9 are highly pathogenic for humans. For many of these pathogens, while their genomes are available, immune correlates of protection are currently unknown. These complexities make developing vaccines for EID and neglected tropical diseases all the more difficult. In this review, we describe the implementation of an immunoinformatics-driven approach to systematically search for key determinants of immunity in newly available genome sequence data and design vaccines. This approach holds promise for the development of 21st century vaccines, improving human health everywhere.

  4. Time for T? Immunoinformatics addresses vaccine design for neglected tropical and emerging infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Frances E; Moise, Leonard; Martin, Rebecca F; Torres, Melissa; Pilotte, Nils; Williams, Steven A; De Groot, Anne S

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines have been invaluable for global health, saving lives and reducing healthcare costs, while also raising the quality of human life. However, newly emerging infectious diseases (EID) and more well-established tropical disease pathogens present complex challenges to vaccine developers; in particular, neglected tropical diseases, which are most prevalent among the world’s poorest, include many pathogens with large sizes, multistage life cycles and a variety of nonhuman vectors. EID such as MERS-CoV and H7N9 are highly pathogenic for humans. For many of these pathogens, while their genomes are available, immune correlates of protection are currently unknown. These complexities make developing vaccines for EID and neglected tropical diseases all the more difficult. In this review, we describe the implementation of an immunoinformatics-driven approach to systematically search for key determinants of immunity in newly available genome sequence data and design vaccines. This approach holds promise for the development of 21st century vaccines, improving human health everywhere. PMID:25193104

  5. Neonatal group B streptococcus disease in developing countries: are we ready to deploy a vaccine?

    PubMed

    Iroh Tam, Pui-Ying; Delair, Shirley F; Obaro, Stephen K

    2015-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) disease is the leading cause of neonatal sepsis in developed countries and has high case fatality rates. In developing countries, however, the burden of GBS is less clear; this is due to a lack of studies using optimal diagnostic, clinical and laboratory techniques and is complicated by the wide availability of non-prescription antibiotics to the general population and in peripartum patients. There is an urgent need for prospective, population-based surveillance to provide an accurate assessment of neonatal GBS disease burden in developing countries, which remains largely unrecognized, and consequently obscures the potential relevance of GBS vaccination in these populations. Preliminary data on GBS vaccines are promising as a preventive tool for neonatal GBS infection, more so than any other currently available public health initiative. However, how do we assess the true impact of a GBS vaccine without accurate surveillance data on the real burden of disease? PMID:26289974

  6. Adjuvants for foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccines: recent progress.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yimei

    2014-11-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious and rapidly spreading disease of cloven-hoofed animals. In most countries, animals are immunized with inactivated whole virus vaccines to control the spread of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV); however, there are safety and efficacy (especially, cell-mediated immunity) concerns. Many efforts are currently devoted to the development of effective vaccines by combining the application of protective antigens together with the search for specific and targeting adjuvants that maximizes the immunogenicity with a desired immune response. In this review, we outline previous studies performed with both traditional adjuvants as well as the most promising new generation adjuvants such as ligands for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) or different cytokines, focusing mostly on their efficacy when used with FMD vaccine, and somewhat on mechanisms by which adjuvants mediate their effects.

  7. Neonatal group B streptococcus disease in developing countries: are we ready to deploy a vaccine?

    PubMed

    Iroh Tam, Pui-Ying; Delair, Shirley F; Obaro, Stephen K

    2015-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) disease is the leading cause of neonatal sepsis in developed countries and has high case fatality rates. In developing countries, however, the burden of GBS is less clear; this is due to a lack of studies using optimal diagnostic, clinical and laboratory techniques and is complicated by the wide availability of non-prescription antibiotics to the general population and in peripartum patients. There is an urgent need for prospective, population-based surveillance to provide an accurate assessment of neonatal GBS disease burden in developing countries, which remains largely unrecognized, and consequently obscures the potential relevance of GBS vaccination in these populations. Preliminary data on GBS vaccines are promising as a preventive tool for neonatal GBS infection, more so than any other currently available public health initiative. However, how do we assess the true impact of a GBS vaccine without accurate surveillance data on the real burden of disease?

  8. Tetanus disease and deaths in men reveal need for vaccination.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Shona; Samuelson, Julia; Reed, Jason; Yakubu, Ahmadu; Ncube, Buhle; Baggaley, Rachel

    2016-08-01

    With efforts focused on the elimination of maternal and neonatal tetanus, less attention has been given to tetanus incidence and mortality among men. Since 2007 voluntary medical male circumcision has been scaled-up in 14 sub-Saharan African countries as an effective intervention to reduce the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition among men. As part of a review of adverse events from these programmes, we identified 13 cases of tetanus from five countries reported to the World Health Organization (WHO) up to March 2016. Eight patients died and only one patient had a known history of tetanus vaccination. Tetanus after voluntary medical male circumcision was rare among more than 11 million procedures conducted. Nevertheless, the cases prompted a review of the evidence on tetanus vaccination coverage and case notifications in sub-Saharan Africa, supplemented by a literature review of non-neonatal tetanus in Africa over the years 2003-2014. The WHO African Region reported the highest number of non-neonatal tetanus cases per million population and lowest historic coverage of tetanus-toxoid-containing vaccine. Coverage of the third dose of diphtheria-tetanus-polio vaccine ranged from 65% to 98% across the 14 countries in 2013. In hospital-based studies, non-neonatal tetanus comprised 0.3-10.7% of admissions, and a median of 71% of patients were men. The identification of tetanus cases following voluntary medical male circumcision highlights a gender gap in tetanus morbidity disproportionately affecting men. Incorporating tetanus vaccination for boys and men into national programmes should be a priority to align with the goal of universal health coverage.

  9. Tetanus disease and deaths in men reveal need for vaccination.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Shona; Samuelson, Julia; Reed, Jason; Yakubu, Ahmadu; Ncube, Buhle; Baggaley, Rachel

    2016-08-01

    With efforts focused on the elimination of maternal and neonatal tetanus, less attention has been given to tetanus incidence and mortality among men. Since 2007 voluntary medical male circumcision has been scaled-up in 14 sub-Saharan African countries as an effective intervention to reduce the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition among men. As part of a review of adverse events from these programmes, we identified 13 cases of tetanus from five countries reported to the World Health Organization (WHO) up to March 2016. Eight patients died and only one patient had a known history of tetanus vaccination. Tetanus after voluntary medical male circumcision was rare among more than 11 million procedures conducted. Nevertheless, the cases prompted a review of the evidence on tetanus vaccination coverage and case notifications in sub-Saharan Africa, supplemented by a literature review of non-neonatal tetanus in Africa over the years 2003-2014. The WHO African Region reported the highest number of non-neonatal tetanus cases per million population and lowest historic coverage of tetanus-toxoid-containing vaccine. Coverage of the third dose of diphtheria-tetanus-polio vaccine ranged from 65% to 98% across the 14 countries in 2013. In hospital-based studies, non-neonatal tetanus comprised 0.3-10.7% of admissions, and a median of 71% of patients were men. The identification of tetanus cases following voluntary medical male circumcision highlights a gender gap in tetanus morbidity disproportionately affecting men. Incorporating tetanus vaccination for boys and men into national programmes should be a priority to align with the goal of universal health coverage. PMID:27516639

  10. Bovine herpesvirus-1: Genetic diversity of field strains from cattle with respiratory disease, genital, fetal disease and systemic neonatal disease and their relationship to vaccine strains.

    PubMed

    Fulton, R W; d'Offay, J M; Dubovi, E J; Eberle, R

    2016-09-01

    Bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1) causes disease in cattle with varied clinical forms. In the U.S. there are two BoHV1 subtypes, BoHV-1.1 and BoHV-1.2b. Control programs in North America incorporate modified live (MLV) or killed (KV) viral vaccines. However, BoHV-1 strains continue to be isolated from diseased animals or fetuses after vaccination. It is possible to differentiate BoHV-1 wild-type from MLV vaccine strains by determining their single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) patterns through either whole-genome sequencing or PCR sequencing of genomic regions containing vaccine-defining SNPs. To determine the BoHV-1 subtype in clinical isolates and their relationship to MLV strains, 8 isolates from varied clinical disease at three different laboratories in the U.S. were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. Five samples were isolated within the past 5 years from New York and 3 were archived samples recovered 35 years prior from Oklahoma and Louisiana. Based on phylogenetic analysis, four of the cases appeared to be due to an MLV vaccine: 3 cases of aborted fetuses and one neonate with systemic BoHV-1 disease. One aborted fetus was from a herd with no reported history of MLV vaccination in two years. The remaining four isolates did not group with any MLV vaccines: two were associated with bovine respiratory disease, one with vulvovaginitis, and a fourth was determined to be a BoHV-1.2b respiratory isolate. Recovery of BoHV-1.1 that is very closely related to an MLV vaccine virus from a herd not receiving vaccines in an extended period prior to its isolation suggests that MLV viruses may remain latent or circulate within herds for long periods. PMID:27374060

  11. Carriage Rate and Effects of Vaccination after Outbreaks of Serogroup C Meningococcal Disease, Brazil, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Carvalhanas, Telma Regina Marques Pinto; Paula de Lemos, Ana; Gorla, Maria Cecilia Outeiro; Salgado, Maristela; Fukasawa, Lucila O.; Gonçalves, Maria Gisele; Higa, Fabio; Brandileone, Maria Cristina Cunto; Sacchi, Claudio Tavares; Ribeiro, Ana Freitas; Sato, Helena Keico; Bricks, Lucia Ferro; Cassio de Moraes, José

    2014-01-01

    During 2010, outbreaks of serogroup C meningococcal (MenC) disease occurred in 2 oil refineries in São Paulo State, Brazil, leading to mass vaccination of employees at 1 refinery with a meningococcal polysaccharide A/C vaccine. A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the prevalence of meningococci carriage among workers at both refineries and to investigate the effect of vaccination on and the risk factors for pharyngeal carriage of meningococci. Among the vaccinated and nonvaccinated workers, rates of overall meningococci carriage (21.4% and 21.6%, respectively) and of MenC carriage (6.3% and 4.9%, respectively) were similar. However, a MenC strain belonging to the sequence type103 complex predominated and was responsible for the increased incidence of meningococcal disease in Brazil. A low education level was associated with higher risk of meningococci carriage. Polysaccharide vaccination did not affect carriage or interrupt transmission of the epidemic strain. These findings will help inform future vaccination strategies. PMID:24751156

  12. Carriage rate and effects of vaccination after outbreaks of serogroup C meningococcal disease, Brazil, 2010.

    PubMed

    Sáfadi, Marco Aurelio Palazzi; Carvalhanas, Telma Regina Marques Pinto; Paula de Lemos, Ana; Gorla, Maria Cecilia Outeiro; Salgado, Maristela; Fukasawa, Lucila O; Gonçalves, Maria Gisele; Higa, Fabio; Brandileone, Maria Cristina Cunto; Sacchi, Claudio Tavares; Ribeiro, Ana Freitas; Sato, Helena Keico; Bricks, Lucia Ferro; Cassio de Moraes, José

    2014-05-01

    During 2010, outbreaks of serogroup C meningococcal (MenC) disease occurred in 2 oil refineries in São Paulo State, Brazil, leading to mass vaccination of employees at 1 refinery with a meningococcal polysaccharide A/C vaccine. A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the prevalence of meningococci carriage among workers at both refineries and to investigate the effect of vaccination on and the risk factors for pharyngeal carriage of meningococci. Among the vaccinated and nonvaccinated workers, rates of overall meningococci carriage (21.4% and 21.6%, respectively) and of MenC carriage (6.3% and 4.9%, respectively) were similar. However, a MenC strain belonging to the sequence type103 complex predominated and was responsible for the increased incidence of meningococcal disease in Brazil. A low education level was associated with higher risk of meningococci carriage. Polysaccharide vaccination did not affect carriage or interrupt transmission of the epidemic strain. These findings will help inform future vaccination strategies.

  13. Vaccine-preventable disease and the under-utilization of immunizations in complex humanitarian emergencies.

    PubMed

    Close, Ryan M; Pearson, Catherine; Cohn, Jennifer

    2016-09-01

    Complex humanitarian emergencies affect 40-60 million people annually and are a growing public health concern worldwide. Despite efforts to provide medical and public health services to populations affected by complex emergencies, significant morbidity and mortality persist. Measles is a major communicable disease threat, but through vaccination of broader target age groups beyond the traditional immunization schedule, measles-related mortality has been significantly reduced during crises. Yet, a limited number of vaccine-preventable diseases continue to contribute disproportionately to morbidity and mortality in complex emergencies. The literature suggests that Streptococcus pneumoniae, Rotavirus, and Haemophilus influenzae type-b should be key targets for vaccination programs. Because of the significant contribution of these three pathogens to complex humanitarian emergencies in low and middle-income countries regardless of disaster type, geography, or population, their vaccines should be considered essential components of the standard emergency response effort. We discuss the barriers to vaccine distribution and provide evidence for strategies to improve distribution, including expanded target age-range and reduced dose schedules. Our review includes specific recommendations for the expanded use of these three vaccines in complex emergencies in low and middle-income countries as a way to guide future policy discussions. PMID:27527818

  14. Carriage rate and effects of vaccination after outbreaks of serogroup C meningococcal disease, Brazil, 2010.

    PubMed

    Sáfadi, Marco Aurelio Palazzi; Carvalhanas, Telma Regina Marques Pinto; Paula de Lemos, Ana; Gorla, Maria Cecilia Outeiro; Salgado, Maristela; Fukasawa, Lucila O; Gonçalves, Maria Gisele; Higa, Fabio; Brandileone, Maria Cristina Cunto; Sacchi, Claudio Tavares; Ribeiro, Ana Freitas; Sato, Helena Keico; Bricks, Lucia Ferro; Cassio de Moraes, José

    2014-05-01

    During 2010, outbreaks of serogroup C meningococcal (MenC) disease occurred in 2 oil refineries in São Paulo State, Brazil, leading to mass vaccination of employees at 1 refinery with a meningococcal polysaccharide A/C vaccine. A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the prevalence of meningococci carriage among workers at both refineries and to investigate the effect of vaccination on and the risk factors for pharyngeal carriage of meningococci. Among the vaccinated and nonvaccinated workers, rates of overall meningococci carriage (21.4% and 21.6%, respectively) and of MenC carriage (6.3% and 4.9%, respectively) were similar. However, a MenC strain belonging to the sequence type103 complex predominated and was responsible for the increased incidence of meningococcal disease in Brazil. A low education level was associated with higher risk of meningococci carriage. Polysaccharide vaccination did not affect carriage or interrupt transmission of the epidemic strain. These findings will help inform future vaccination strategies. PMID:24751156

  15. Revaccination with Marek's disease vaccines induces productive infection and superior immunity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changxin; Gan, Junji; Jin, Qiao; Chen, Chuangfu; Liang, Ping; Wu, Yantao; Liu, Xuefen; Ma, Li; Davison, Fred

    2009-02-01

    The most common lymphoproliferative disease in chickens is Marek's disease (MD), which is caused by the oncogenic herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV). The emergence of hypervirulent pathotypes of MDV has led to vaccine failures, which have become common and which have resulted in serious economic losses in some countries, and a revaccination strategy has been introduced in practice. The mechanism by which revaccination invokes superior immunity against MD is unknown. After field trials which showed that revaccination provided protection superior to that provided by a single vaccination were performed, experiments were conducted to explore the interaction between revaccinated chickens and MDV. The results showed that the chickens in the revaccination groups experienced two consecutive productive infections but that the chickens in the single-vaccination groups experienced one productive infection, demonstrating that revaccination of viruses caused the chickens to have productive and then latent infections. Revaccination of the virus induced in the chickens a higher and a longer temporary expansion of the CD8(+), CD4(+), and CD3(+) T-lymphocyte subpopulations, stronger peripheral blood lymphocyte proliferative activity; and higher levels of neutralizing antibody than single vaccination. These findings disagree with the postulate that MDV antigens persist, stimulate the immune system, and maintain a high level immunity after vaccination. The suppression of productive infection by maternal antibodies in chickens receiving the primary vaccination and a lower level of productive infection in the revaccination groups challenged with MDV were observed. The information obtained in this study suggests that the productive infection with revaccinated MDV in chickens plays a crucial role in the induction of superior immunity. This finding may be exploited for the development of a novel MD vaccine that results in the persistence of the antigen supply and that maintains a

  16. Revaccination with Marek's Disease Vaccines Induces Productive Infection and Superior Immunity▿

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Changxin; Gan, Junji; Jin, Qiao; Chen, Chuangfu; Liang, Ping; Wu, Yantao; Liu, Xuefen; Ma, Li; Davison, Fred

    2009-01-01

    The most common lymphoproliferative disease in chickens is Marek's disease (MD), which is caused by the oncogenic herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV). The emergence of hypervirulent pathotypes of MDV has led to vaccine failures, which have become common and which have resulted in serious economic losses in some countries, and a revaccination strategy has been introduced in practice. The mechanism by which revaccination invokes superior immunity against MD is unknown. After field trials which showed that revaccination provided protection superior to that provided by a single vaccination were performed, experiments were conducted to explore the interaction between revaccinated chickens and MDV. The results showed that the chickens in the revaccination groups experienced two consecutive productive infections but that the chickens in the single-vaccination groups experienced one productive infection, demonstrating that revaccination of viruses caused the chickens to have productive and then latent infections. Revaccination of the virus induced in the chickens a higher and a longer temporary expansion of the CD8+, CD4+, and CD3+ T-lymphocyte subpopulations, stronger peripheral blood lymphocyte proliferative activity; and higher levels of neutralizing antibody than single vaccination. These findings disagree with the postulate that MDV antigens persist, stimulate the immune system, and maintain a high level immunity after vaccination. The suppression of productive infection by maternal antibodies in chickens receiving the primary vaccination and a lower level of productive infection in the revaccination groups challenged with MDV were observed. The information obtained in this study suggests that the productive infection with revaccinated MDV in chickens plays a crucial role in the induction of superior immunity. This finding may be exploited for the development of a novel MD vaccine that results in the persistence of the antigen supply and that maintains a high

  17. European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases consensus recommendations for rotavirus vaccination in Europe: update 2014.

    PubMed

    Vesikari, Timo; Van Damme, Pierre; Giaquinto, Carlo; Dagan, Ron; Guarino, Alfredo; Szajewska, Hania; Usonis, Vytautas

    2015-06-01

    The first evidence-based recommendations for rotavirus (RV) vaccination in Europe were prepared at the time of licensure of 2 live oral RV vaccines (Rotarix, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, and RotaTeq, Sanofi Pasteur MSD) in 2006 and published in 2008. Since then several countries in Europe and more globally have adopted universal RV vaccination of all healthy infants as part of their national immunization programs (NIPs). The experience from these NIPs has produced a wealth of post-introduction effectiveness data that, together with the evidence from prelicensure efficacy trials presented in the 2008 Recommendations, support the case of RV vaccination in Europe. The prelicensure safety trials of Rotarix and RotaTeq, each in populations of more than 60,000 infants, did not reveal risk of intussusception (IS), but postvaccination surveillance in several countries, particularly Australia and Mexico, has established that the risk of IS for both vaccines after the first dose might be between 1:50,000 and 1:80,000. Although it may be argued that the risk is acceptable vis-à-vis the great benefits of RV vaccination, this argument alone may not suffice, and every effort should be made to reduce the risk of IS. Considerable evidence, including postvaccination surveillance data from Germany, suggests that the risk of IS can be reduced by early administration of the first dose of oral RV vaccine. The previous European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases/European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition recommendations held that the first dose of oral RV vaccine should be given between 6 and 12 weeks of age; this recommendation is sustained but with an emphasis toward the lower range of the recommended age, that is, preferably between 6 and 8 weeks of age. At the time of the earlier recommendations, experience of RV vaccination in premature infants and other special target groups was limited. It is now recommended with greater confidence than

  18. European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases consensus recommendations for rotavirus vaccination in Europe: update 2014.

    PubMed

    Vesikari, Timo; Van Damme, Pierre; Giaquinto, Carlo; Dagan, Ron; Guarino, Alfredo; Szajewska, Hania; Usonis, Vytautas

    2015-06-01

    The first evidence-based recommendations for rotavirus (RV) vaccination in Europe were prepared at the time of licensure of 2 live oral RV vaccines (Rotarix, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, and RotaTeq, Sanofi Pasteur MSD) in 2006 and published in 2008. Since then several countries in Europe and more globally have adopted universal RV vaccination of all healthy infants as part of their national immunization programs (NIPs). The experience from these NIPs has produced a wealth of post-introduction effectiveness data that, together with the evidence from prelicensure efficacy trials presented in the 2008 Recommendations, support the case of RV vaccination in Europe. The prelicensure safety trials of Rotarix and RotaTeq, each in populations of more than 60,000 infants, did not reveal risk of intussusception (IS), but postvaccination surveillance in several countries, particularly Australia and Mexico, has established that the risk of IS for both vaccines after the first dose might be between 1:50,000 and 1:80,000. Although it may be argued that the risk is acceptable vis-à-vis the great benefits of RV vaccination, this argument alone may not suffice, and every effort should be made to reduce the risk of IS. Considerable evidence, including postvaccination surveillance data from Germany, suggests that the risk of IS can be reduced by early administration of the first dose of oral RV vaccine. The previous European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases/European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition recommendations held that the first dose of oral RV vaccine should be given between 6 and 12 weeks of age; this recommendation is sustained but with an emphasis toward the lower range of the recommended age, that is, preferably between 6 and 8 weeks of age. At the time of the earlier recommendations, experience of RV vaccination in premature infants and other special target groups was limited. It is now recommended with greater confidence than

  19. The evaluation of hypersensitivity tests in cattle after foot-and-mouth disease vaccination.

    PubMed Central

    Black, L.; Pay, T. W.

    1975-01-01

    The response to passive cutaneous anaphylaxis, dermal hypersensitivity and intravenous provocation tests has been compared in 30, 40, 31 and 24 cattle injected with foot-and-mouth disease vaccine 0, 1, 2 and 3 times respectively, using vaccine components and other substances as test materials. Reaginic antibodies demonstrated by passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in goats, were directed against BHK 21 cell extracts (20), hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (3) and an unidentified vaccine component (3), and distributed in 0, 5, 19 and 75 per cent of the cattle vaccinated 0, 1, 2 and 3 times. None of the animals showed clinical signs of allergy after vaccination. When BHK 21 cell extract was injected intradermally a significant correlation was noted between the development of large weals and the presence of reagins although the size of the weals was not correlated with the reagin titres. In the case of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose a similar trend was evident. The majority of cattle with large dermal weals possessed reagins but the number of reactions was too small for statistical evaluation. Dermal reactions to sodium penicillin, sodium carboxymethylcellulose, saponin and whole vaccine occurred in both unvaccinated and vaccinated cattle but BHK 21 cell lysate and normal bovine serum provoked weals which increased in frequency according to the number of vaccinations experienced. Intravenous hydroxypropylmethylcellulose elicited a response in all the animals previously injected with certain batches of vaccine but cell extract intravenously produced a clinical response in half the tested animals which was uncorrelated with the results of the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis or dermal hypersensitivity tests. Images Plate 1 PMID:1054725

  20. Heterogeneity in the Antibody Response to Foot-and-Mouth Disease Primo-vaccinated Calves.

    PubMed

    Di Giacomo, S; Brito, B P; Perez, A M; Bucafusco, D; Pega, J; Rodríguez, L; Borca, M V; Pérez-Filgueira, M

    2015-06-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines are routinely used as effective control tools in large regions worldwide and to limit outbreaks during epidemics. Vaccine-induced protection in cattle has been largely correlated with the FMD virus (FMDV)-specific antibodies. Genetic control of cattle immune adaptive responses has been demonstrated only for peptide antigens derived from FMDV structural proteins. Here, we quantify the heterogeneity in the antibody response of cattle primo-vaccinated against FMD and study its association with the genetic background in Holstein and Jersey sires. A total of 377 FMDV-seronegative calves (122 and 255 calves from 16 and 15 Holstein and Jersey sires, respectively) were included in the study. Samples were taken the day prior to primo-vaccination and 45 days post-vaccination (dpv). Animals received commercial tetravalent FMD single emulsion oil vaccines formulated with inactivated FMDV. Total FMDV-specific antibody responses were studied against three viral strains included in the vaccine, and antibody titres were determined by liquid-phase blocking ELISA. Three linear hierarchical mixed regression models, one for each strain, were formulated to assess the heterogeneity in the immune responses to vaccination. The dependent variables were the antibody titres induced against each FMDV strain at 45 dpv, whereas sire's 'breed' was included as a fixed effect, 'sire' was included as a random effect, and 'farm' was considered as a hierarchical factor to account for lack of independence of within herd measurements. A significant association was found between anti-FMDV antibody responses and sire's breed, with lower immune responses found in the Jersey sires' offspring compared with those from Holstein sires. No significant intrabreed variation was detected. In addition, farm management practices were similar in this study, and results of the serological assays were shown to be repeatable. It therefore seems plausible that differences in the

  1. Probabilistic Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Vaccination for Mild or Moderate Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kuen-Cheh; Chen, Hsiu-Hsi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies on the immunotherapy for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have increasingly gained attention since 1990s. However, there are pros (preventing of AD) and cons (incurred cost and side effects) regarding the administration of immunotherapy. Up to date, there has been lacking of economic evaluation for immunotherapy of AD. We aimed to assess the cost-effectiveness analysis of the vaccination for AD. Methods: A meta-analysis of randomized control trials after systemic review was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of the vaccine. A Markov decision model was constructed and applied to a 120,000-Taiwanese cohort aged ≥65 years. Person years and quality-adjusted life years (QALY) were computed between the vaccinated group and the the unvaccinated group. Economic evaluation was performed to calculate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) and cost-effectiveness acceptability curve (CEAC). Results: Vaccinated group gained an additional 0.84 life years and 0.56 QALYs over 10-years and an additional 0.35 life years and 0.282 QALYs over 5-years of follow-up. The vaccinated group dominated the unvaccinated group by ICER over 5-years of follow-up. The ICERs of 10-year follow-up for the vaccinated group against the unvaccinated group were $13,850 per QALY and $9,038 per life year gained. Given the threshold of $20,000 of willingness to pay (WTP), the CEAC showed the probability of being cost-effective for vaccination with QALY was 70.7% and 92% for life years gained after 10-years of follow-up. The corresponding figures were 87.3% for QALY and 93.5% for life years gained over 5-years follow-up. Conclusion: The vaccination for AD was cost-effective in gaining QALY and life years compared with no vaccination, under the condition of a reasonable threshold of WTP. PMID:26825097

  2. Recent advances in the development of vaccines for Ebola virus disease.

    PubMed

    Ohimain, Elijah Ige

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus is one of the most dangerous microorganisms in the world causing hemorrhagic fevers in humans and non-human primates. Ebola virus (EBOV) is a zoonotic infection, which emerges and re-emerges in human populations. The 2014 outbreak was caused by the Zaire strain, which has a kill rate of up to 90%, though 40% was recorded in the current outbreak. The 2014 outbreak is larger than all 20 outbreaks that have occurred since 1976, when the virus was first discovered. It is the first time that the virus was sustained in urban centers and spread beyond Africa into Europe and USA. Thus far, over 22,000 cases have been reported with about 50% mortality in one year. There are currently no approved therapeutics and preventive vaccines against Ebola virus disease (EVD). Responding to the devastating effe1cts of the 2014 outbreak and the potential risk of global spread, has spurred research for the development of therapeutics and vaccines. This review is therefore aimed at presenting the progress of vaccine development. Results showed that conventional inactivated vaccines produced from EBOV by heat, formalin or gamma irradiation appear to be ineffective. However, novel vaccines production techniques have emerged leading to the production of candidate vaccines that have been demonstrated to be effective in preclinical trials using small animal and non-human primates (NHP) models. Some of the promising vaccines have undergone phase 1 clinical trials, which demonstrated their safety and immunogenicity. Many of the candidate vaccines are vector based such as Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), Rabies Virus (RABV), Adenovirus (Ad), Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA), Cytomegalovirus (CMV), human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3) and Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus (VEEV). Other platforms include virus like particle (VLP), DNA and subunit vaccines.

  3. Protection by attenuated and polyvalent vaccines against highly virulent strains of Marek's disease virus.

    PubMed

    Witter, R L

    1982-01-01

    Tests confirmed that turkey herpesvirus (HVT) vaccine protected chickens poorly against challenge with the highly virulent Md5 strain of Marek's disease (MD) virus, especially in chickens with homologous HVT antibodies. The naturally avirulent SB-1 vaccine virus was likewise poorly protective against challenge with the Md5 strain. Homologous antibodies reduced the protective efficacy of both vaccines, but SB-1 was not affected by HVT antibodies. In order to provide better protection against strains of MD virus poorly protected against by HVT, such as Md5, the Md11 strain of MD virus was attenuated by 75 cell culture passages and evaluated for protective efficacy. This vaccine virus, designated Mdl 1/75C, provided good protection against challenge with Md5 and most other highly virulent MD viruses tested, but was less efficacious against challenge with the JM/102W strain, a prototype MD virus protected against well by HVT and SB-1 vaccines. Furthermore, its efficacy was consistently lower in chicks with HVT antibody. Thus, although HVT, SB-1, and Md11/75C were all efficacious against certain MD viruses, none of these vaccines protected optimally against all MD challenge viruses in all chickens. A polyvalent vaccine composed of Md11/75C, HVT and SB-1 viruses protected chickens better against a battery of five highly virulent MD challenge viruses, including three strains poorly protected against by HVT, than any single vaccine and was not influenced by HVT antibody. These data suggest that vaccinal immunity may be partially viral strain specific.

  4. Recent advances in the development of vaccines for Ebola virus disease.

    PubMed

    Ohimain, Elijah Ige

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus is one of the most dangerous microorganisms in the world causing hemorrhagic fevers in humans and non-human primates. Ebola virus (EBOV) is a zoonotic infection, which emerges and re-emerges in human populations. The 2014 outbreak was caused by the Zaire strain, which has a kill rate of up to 90%, though 40% was recorded in the current outbreak. The 2014 outbreak is larger than all 20 outbreaks that have occurred since 1976, when the virus was first discovered. It is the first time that the virus was sustained in urban centers and spread beyond Africa into Europe and USA. Thus far, over 22,000 cases have been reported with about 50% mortality in one year. There are currently no approved therapeutics and preventive vaccines against Ebola virus disease (EVD). Responding to the devastating effe1cts of the 2014 outbreak and the potential risk of global spread, has spurred research for the development of therapeutics and vaccines. This review is therefore aimed at presenting the progress of vaccine development. Results showed that conventional inactivated vaccines produced from EBOV by heat, formalin or gamma irradiation appear to be ineffective. However, novel vaccines production techniques have emerged leading to the production of candidate vaccines that have been demonstrated to be effective in preclinical trials using small animal and non-human primates (NHP) models. Some of the promising vaccines have undergone phase 1 clinical trials, which demonstrated their safety and immunogenicity. Many of the candidate vaccines are vector based such as Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), Rabies Virus (RABV), Adenovirus (Ad), Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA), Cytomegalovirus (CMV), human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3) and Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus (VEEV). Other platforms include virus like particle (VLP), DNA and subunit vaccines. PMID:26596227

  5. Efficacy of bovine viral diarrhea virus vaccination to prevent reproductive disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Benjamin W; Walz, Paul H; Givens, M Daniel; Wilson, Alan E

    2015-02-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an important reproductive pathogen of cattle worldwide. The reproductive outcome of BVDV infection is largely dependent on the immune status of the dam and the stage of gestation at the time of infection. Potential sequelae include failure of conception, abortion, a variety of congenital malformations, and fetal infection. Vaccination is a possible tool in the control of BVDV, and there has been a recently renewed focus on providing fetal protection through vaccination. Consequently, the aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of BVDV vaccination to prevent reproductive disease by performing a quantitative synthesis of previously published studies. Pertinent articles to be included in the analysis were identified by performing a search in four relevant scientific databases (PubMed, CAB abstracts, National Agricultural Library catalog, and Web of Science) and examining the reference lists of 10 germane review articles. Inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis mandated that the studies were controlled, primary studies that included necessary data for use in the meta-analysis (e.g., group size, number of abortions). Forty-six studies in 41 separate articles matched the inclusion criteria. Risk ratio effect sizes were used in random effects, weighted meta-analyses to assess the impact of BVDV vaccination on three outcomes: risk of fetal infection, abortion risk, and pregnancy risk. Within each outcome, subanalyses were performed to evaluate the effect of a variety of interventions, including modified live, inactivated, polyvalent and monovalent vaccination, homologous, heterologous, or field challenge, and studies with only bovine subjects. The analysis revealed a decrease in abortions of nearly 45% and a nearly 85% decrease in fetal infection rate in cattle vaccinated for BVDV compared with unvaccinated cohorts. Additionally, pregnancy risk was increased by approximately 5% in field trials of BVDV vaccinates. This meta

  6. Comparison of Test Methodologies for Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Serotype A Vaccine Matching

    PubMed Central

    Tekleghiorghis, Tesfaalem; Weerdmeester, Klaas; van Hemert-Kluitenberg, Froukje; Moormann, Rob J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination has been one of the most important interventions in disease prevention and control. The impact of vaccination largely depends on the quality and suitability of the chosen vaccine. To determine the suitability of a vaccine strain, antigenic matching is usually studied by in vitro analysis. In this study, we performed three in vitro test methods to determine which one gives the lowest variability and the highest discriminatory capacity. Binary ethylenimine inactivated vaccines, prepared from 10 different foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus serotype A strains, were used to vaccinate cattle (5 animals for each strain). The antibody titers in blood serum samples 3 weeks postvaccination (w.p.v.) were determined by a virus neutralization test, neutralization index test, and liquid-phase blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The titers were then used to calculate relationship coefficient (r1) values. These r1 values were compared to the genetic lineage using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. In the two neutralization test methods, the median titers observed against the test strains differed considerably, and the sera of the vaccinated animals did not always show the highest titers against their respective homologous virus strains. When the titers were corrected for test strain effect (scaling), the variability (standard error of the mean per vaccinated group) increased because the results were on a different scale, but the discriminatory capacity improved. An ROC analysis of the r1 value calculated on both observed and scaled titers showed that only r1 values of the liquid-phase blocking ELISA gave a consistent statistically significant result. Under the conditions of the present study, the liquid-phase blocking ELISA showed less variation and still had a higher discriminatory capacity than the other tests. PMID:24623625

  7. Comparison of test methodologies for foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A vaccine matching.

    PubMed

    Tekleghiorghis, Tesfaalem; Weerdmeester, Klaas; van Hemert-Kluitenberg, Froukje; Moormann, Rob J M; Dekker, Aldo

    2014-05-01

    Vaccination has been one of the most important interventions in disease prevention and control. The impact of vaccination largely depends on the quality and suitability of the chosen vaccine. To determine the suitability of a vaccine strain, antigenic matching is usually studied by in vitro analysis. In this study, we performed three in vitro test methods to determine which one gives the lowest variability and the highest discriminatory capacity. Binary ethylenimine inactivated vaccines, prepared from 10 different foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus serotype A strains, were used to vaccinate cattle (5 animals for each strain). The antibody titers in blood serum samples 3 weeks postvaccination (w.p.v.) were determined by a virus neutralization test, neutralization index test, and liquid-phase blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The titers were then used to calculate relationship coefficient (r1) values. These r1 values were compared to the genetic lineage using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. In the two neutralization test methods, the median titers observed against the test strains differed considerably, and the sera of the vaccinated animals did not always show the highest titers against their respective homologous virus strains. When the titers were corrected for test strain effect (scaling), the variability (standard error of the mean per vaccinated group) increased because the results were on a different scale, but the discriminatory capacity improved. An ROC analysis of the r1 value calculated on both observed and scaled titers showed that only r1 values of the liquid-phase blocking ELISA gave a consistent statistically significant result. Under the conditions of the present study, the liquid-phase blocking ELISA showed less variation and still had a higher discriminatory capacity than the other tests.

  8. Plant-made oral vaccines against human infectious diseases-Are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Chan, Hui-Ting; Daniell, Henry

    2015-10-01

    Although the plant-made vaccine field started three decades ago with the promise of developing low-cost vaccines to prevent infectious disease outbreaks and epidemics around the globe, this goal has not yet been achieved. Plants offer several major advantages in vaccine generation, including low-cost production by eliminating expensive fermentation and purification systems, sterile delivery and cold storage/transportation. Most importantly, oral vaccination using plant-made antigens confers both mucosal (IgA) and systemic (IgG) immunity. Studies in the past 5 years have made significant progress in expressing vaccine antigens in edible leaves (especially lettuce), processing leaves or seeds through lyophilization and achieving antigen stability and efficacy after prolonged storage at ambient temperatures. Bioencapsulation of antigens in plant cells protects them from the digestive system; the fusion of antigens to transmucosal carriers enhances efficiency of their delivery to the immune system and facilitates successful development of plant vaccines as oral boosters. However, the lack of oral priming approaches diminishes these advantages because purified antigens, cold storage/transportation and limited shelf life are still major challenges for priming with adjuvants and for antigen delivery by injection. Yet another challenge is the risk of inducing tolerance without priming the host immune system. Therefore, mechanistic aspects of these two opposing processes (antibody production or suppression) are discussed in this review. In addition, we summarize recent progress made in oral delivery of vaccine antigens expressed in plant cells via the chloroplast or nuclear genomes and potential challenges in achieving immunity against infectious diseases using cold-chain-free vaccine delivery approaches. PMID:26387509

  9. Efficacy of bovine viral diarrhea virus vaccination to prevent reproductive disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Benjamin W; Walz, Paul H; Givens, M Daniel; Wilson, Alan E

    2015-02-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an important reproductive pathogen of cattle worldwide. The reproductive outcome of BVDV infection is largely dependent on the immune status of the dam and the stage of gestation at the time of infection. Potential sequelae include failure of conception, abortion, a variety of congenital malformations, and fetal infection. Vaccination is a possible tool in the control of BVDV, and there has been a recently renewed focus on providing fetal protection through vaccination. Consequently, the aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of BVDV vaccination to prevent reproductive disease by performing a quantitative synthesis of previously published studies. Pertinent articles to be included in the analysis were identified by performing a search in four relevant scientific databases (PubMed, CAB abstracts, National Agricultural Library catalog, and Web of Science) and examining the reference lists of 10 germane review articles. Inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis mandated that the studies were controlled, primary studies that included necessary data for use in the meta-analysis (e.g., group size, number of abortions). Forty-six studies in 41 separate articles matched the inclusion criteria. Risk ratio effect sizes were used in random effects, weighted meta-analyses to assess the impact of BVDV vaccination on three outcomes: risk of fetal infection, abortion risk, and pregnancy risk. Within each outcome, subanalyses were performed to evaluate the effect of a variety of interventions, including modified live, inactivated, polyvalent and monovalent vaccination, homologous, heterologous, or field challenge, and studies with only bovine subjects. The analysis revealed a decrease in abortions of nearly 45% and a nearly 85% decrease in fetal infection rate in cattle vaccinated for BVDV compared with unvaccinated cohorts. Additionally, pregnancy risk was increased by approximately 5% in field trials of BVDV vaccinates. This meta

  10. Plant-made oral vaccines against human infectious diseases-Are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Chan, Hui-Ting; Daniell, Henry

    2015-10-01

    Although the plant-made vaccine field started three decades ago with the promise of developing low-cost vaccines to prevent infectious disease outbreaks and epidemics around the globe, this goal has not yet been achieved. Plants offer several major advantages in vaccine generation, including low-cost production by eliminating expensive fermentation and purification systems, sterile delivery and cold storage/transportation. Most importantly, oral vaccination using plant-made antigens confers both mucosal (IgA) and systemic (IgG) immunity. Studies in the past 5 years have made significant progress in expressing vaccine antigens in edible leaves (especially lettuce), processing leaves or seeds through lyophilization and achieving antigen stability and efficacy after prolonged storage at ambient temperatures. Bioencapsulation of antigens in plant cells protects them from the digestive system; the fusion of antigens to transmucosal carriers enhances efficiency of their delivery to the immune system and facilitates successful development of plant vaccines as oral boosters. However, the lack of oral priming approaches diminishes these advantages because purified antigens, cold storage/transportation and limited shelf life are still major challenges for priming with adjuvants and for antigen delivery by injection. Yet another challenge is the risk of inducing tolerance without priming the host immune system. Therefore, mechanistic aspects of these two opposing processes (antibody production or suppression) are discussed in this review. In addition, we summarize recent progress made in oral delivery of vaccine antigens expressed in plant cells via the chloroplast or nuclear genomes and potential challenges in achieving immunity against infectious diseases using cold-chain-free vaccine delivery approaches.

  11. Evolving perception on the benefits of vaccination as a foot and mouth disease control policy: contributions of South America.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Ingrid E; Malirat, Viviana; Falczuk, Abraham J

    2005-12-01

    Within the past decade, changes in perceptions on the benefits of vaccination as an appropriate tool to achieve complete foot and mouth disease eradication have become evident. The former negative view was derived from misconceptions, resulting mainly from the belief that vaccines are not entirely effective and that vaccination masks asymptomatic viral circulation. The advent in the 1990s of vaccination policies implemented within a strategic eradication plan in South America, and during recurrence of the disease in disease-free regions contributed towards generating more reliable and visible outcomes of vaccination programs, paving the way towards a new perception. Particularly relevant was the development and application of novel serodiagnostic approaches to assess silent viral circulation, irrespective of vaccination. The use in South America of vaccination allied to serosurveys to accompany viral clarification during eradication campaigns and after emergencies clearly established the importance of this control tool to stop the spread of viral infection. This alliance gave input to break many myths associated with the use of vaccines, including the belief that immunized carrier animals pose an epidemiologic risk. This experience launched new concepts that supported the internationally recognized status of foot and mouth disease-free regions with vaccination and the 'vaccination to live' policy as an alternative to 'stamping out'. PMID:16372885

  12. Evolving perception on the benefits of vaccination as a foot and mouth disease control policy: contributions of South America.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Ingrid E; Malirat, Viviana; Falczuk, Abraham J

    2005-12-01

    Within the past decade, changes in perceptions on the benefits of vaccination as an appropriate tool to achieve complete foot and mouth disease eradication have become evident. The former negative view was derived from misconceptions, resulting mainly from the belief that vaccines are not entirely effective and that vaccination masks asymptomatic viral circulation. The advent in the 1990s of vaccination policies implemented within a strategic eradication plan in South America, and during recurrence of the disease in disease-free regions contributed towards generating more reliable and visible outcomes of vaccination programs, paving the way towards a new perception. Particularly relevant was the development and application of novel serodiagnostic approaches to assess silent viral circulation, irrespective of vaccination. The use in South America of vaccination allied to serosurveys to accompany viral clarification during eradication campaigns and after emergencies clearly established the importance of this control tool to stop the spread of viral infection. This alliance gave input to break many myths associated with the use of vaccines, including the belief that immunized carrier animals pose an epidemiologic risk. This experience launched new concepts that supported the internationally recognized status of foot and mouth disease-free regions with vaccination and the 'vaccination to live' policy as an alternative to 'stamping out'.

  13. [Safety of thimerosal containing vaccines. Statement of the Consultive Committee of Immunizations on behalf of the Chilean Infectious Diseases Society].

    PubMed

    Muñoz M, Alma; Abarca V, Katia; Jiménez de la J, Jorge; Luchslnger F, Vivían; O'Ryan G, Miguel; Ripoll M, Erna; Valenzuela B, M Teresa; Vergara F, Rodrigo

    2007-10-01

    Thimerosal is a mercury derivative included in vaccines since 1930 with the aim to prevent microbial contamination. During the last decades, the use of thimerosal has been questioned, specifically because of a potential association with neurotoxicity. After a thorough review of published studies on pediatric use of thimerosal-containing vaccines, and of position papers from international expert groups, the Consultive Committee of Immunizations of the Chilean Society of Infectious Diseases concludes that there is no solid evidence of adverse events associated with the use of thimerosal containing vaccines in infants and children. Therefore, a change in current vaccine practices refererred to thimerosal-containing vaccines is not justified in Chile.

  14. Vaccine-Preventable Diseases of Childhood. January 1986 through August 1988. Current Bibliographies in Medicine No. 88-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Library of Medicine (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    Unless there are contraindications, there are seven diseases for which the Centers for Disease Control recommends all children be vaccinated: (1) diphtheria; (2) measles; (3) mumps; (4) pertussis; (5) poliomyelitis; (6) rubella; and (7) tetanus. The 748 references in this bibliography relate to various aspects of these vaccines and the diseases…

  15. Plant-based vaccines for Alzheimer's disease: an overview.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Rubio-Infante, Néstor; Zarazúa, Sergio; Govea-Alonso, Dania O; Martel-Gallegos, Guadalupe; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia

    2014-03-01

    Plants are considered advantageous platforms for biomanufacturing recombinant vaccines. This constitutes a field of intensive research and some plant-derived vaccines are expected to be marketed in the near future. In particular, plant-based production of immunogens targeting molecules with implications on the pathology of Alzheimer's has been explored over the last decade. These efforts involve targeting amyloid beta and β-secretase with several immunogen configurations that have been evaluated in test animals. The results of these developments are analyzed in this review. Perspectives on the topic are identified, such as exploring additional antigen configurations and adjuvants in order to improve immunization schemes, characterizing in detail the elicited immune responses, and immunological considerations in the achievement of therapeutic humoral responses via mucosal immunization. Safety concerns related to these therapies will also be discussed. PMID:24405291

  16. Exploring Staphylococcus aureus pathways to disease for vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    DeDent, Andrea; Kim, Hwan Keun; Missiakas, Dominique; Schneewind, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal of the human skin or nares and a pathogen that frequently causes skin and soft tissue infections as well as bacteremia and sepsis. Recent efforts in understanding the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis revealed key virulence strategies of S. aureus in host tissues: bacterial scavenging of iron, induction of coagulation pathways to promote staphylococcal agglutination in the vasculature, and suppression of innate and adaptive immune responses. Advances in all three areas have been explored for opportunities in vaccine design in an effort to identify the critical protective antigens of S. aureus. Human clinical trials with specific subunit vaccines have failed, yet provide important insights for the design of future trials that must address the current epidemic of S. aureus infections with drug-resistant isolates (MRSA, methicillin-resistant S. aureus). PMID:22130613

  17. Pneumococcal Disease Prevention Among Adults: Strategies for the Use of Pneumococcal Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Pilishvili, Tamara; Bennett, Nancy M

    2015-12-01

    Use of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines among children in the U.S. since 2000 has dramatically reduced pneumococcal disease burden among adults. Significant vaccine-preventable morbidity and mortality from pneumococcal infections still remains, especially among older adults. The U.S. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has recently recommended the routine use of both pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13) and polysaccharide vaccines (PPSV23) for adults ≥65 years. These recommendations were based on the remaining burden of illness among adults and the importance of non-bacteremic pneumonia prevention in light of new evidence confirming the efficacy of PCV13 to prevent pneumococcal pneumonia among older adults. This paper reviews the evidence that led ACIP to make recommendations for PCV13 and PPSV23 use among adults, and highlights potential gaps to be addressed by future studies to inform adult vaccination policy. The changing epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease and pneumonia should be closely monitored to evaluate the effectiveness and continued utility of the current vaccination strategy, and to identify future directions for pneumococcal disease prevention among older adults.

  18. Pneumococcal disease prevention among adults: Strategies for the use of pneumococcal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Pilishvili, Tamara; Bennett, Nancy M

    2015-11-27

    Use of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines among children in the US since 2000 has dramatically reduced pneumococcal disease burden among adults. Significant vaccine-preventable morbidity and mortality from pneumococcal infections still remains, especially among older adults. The US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has recently recommended the routine use of both pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13) and polysaccharide vaccines (PPSV23) for adults ≥65 years. These recommendations were based on the remaining burden of illness among adults and the importance of non-bacteremic pneumonia prevention in light of new evidence confirming the efficacy of PCV13 to prevent pneumococcal pneumonia among older adults. This paper reviews the evidence that led the ACIP to make recommendations for PCV13 and PPSV23 use among adults, and highlights potential gaps to be addressed by future studies to inform adult vaccination policy. The changing epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease and pneumonia should be closely monitored to evaluate the effectiveness and continued utility of the current vaccination strategy, and to identify future directions for pneumococcal disease prevention among older adults.

  19. Hepatitis A: the costs and benefits of the disease prevention by vaccine, Paraná, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Zahdi, Mariana Ribas; Maluf, Ivan; Maluf, Eliane Mara Cesário Pereira

    2009-08-01

    This study evaluated the epidemiological behavior of the hepatitis A in Paraná state and compared the costs of the disease and the vaccination. This is an epidemiological descriptive study including a pharmacoeconomy analysis. We collected information in the national database reported cases (SINAN), in the mortality information system (SIM) and in the hospital information system (AIH) among 2000/2003 (Paraná State Public Health Department). We estimated the probability of one cohort of children to acquire hepatitis A during their lifetime and the costs with their treatment. We compared those costs with the cost of vaccinating the children. 14,682 hepatitis A cases were registered during the period studied, and 12,102 (82.4%) occurred in the 0-15 years-old age group. The annual incidence in the general population was 37.5/100,000. We observed 20 deaths caused by this disease; 7 of those occurred by liver failure. The estimated costs with the disease included the hospital costs, liver transplantation, liver failure treatment, and laboratory tests were high. The price of the vaccine is 10 USD/dose. Two doses are necessary to get the protection. The results showed a positive cost - benefit relation when we vaccinate children. We save 2.26 USD in treatment for each dollar invested in the vaccine. Paraná record high number of hepatitis A cases each year. We confirmed the positive cost - benefit relation when we vaccinate children against hepatitis A, reducing suffering, hospitalization, death and social costs. Vaccination against hepatitis A should be recommended in the routine of immunization program in Paraná state.

  20. Gene-based vaccines and immunotherapeutic strategies against neurodegenerative diseases: Potential utility and limitations.

    PubMed

    Kudrna, Jeremy J; Ugen, Kenneth E

    2015-01-01

    There has been a recent expansion of vaccination and immunotherapeutic strategies from controlling infectious diseases to the targeting of non-infectious conditions including neurodegenerative disorders. In addition to conventional vaccine and immunotherapeutic modalities, gene-based methods that express antigens for presentation to the immune system by either live viral vectors or non-viral naked DNA plasmids have been developed and evaluated. This mini-review/commentary summarizes the advantages and disadvantages, as well as the research findings to date, of both of these gene-based vaccination approaches in terms of how they can be targeted against appropriate antigens within the Alzheimer and Parkinson disease pathogenesis processes as well as potentially against targets in other neurodegenerative diseases. Most recently, the novel utilization of these viral vector and naked DNA gene-based technologies includes the delivery of immunoglobulin genes from established biologically active monoclonal antibodies. This modified passive immunotherapeutic strategy has recently been applied to deliver passive antibody immunotherapy against the pathologically relevant amyloid β protein in Alzheimer disease. The advantages and disadvantages of this technological application of gene-based immune interventions, as well as research findings to date are also summarized. In sum, it is suggested that further evaluation of gene based vaccines and immunotherapies against neurodegenerative diseases are warranted to determine their potential clinical utility.

  1. Effective synthetic peptide vaccine for foot-and-mouth disease in swine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang Yi; Chang, Tseng Yuan; Walfield, Alan M; Ye, John; Shen, Ming; Chen, Shih Ping; Li, Ming Chang; Lin, Yeou Liang; Jong, Ming Hwa; Yang, Ping Cheng; Chyr, Nancy; Kramer, Ed; Brown, Fred

    2002-06-01

    We have designed a peptide-based vaccine for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) effective in swine. The peptide immunogen has a G-H loop domain from the VP1 capsid protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) and a novel promiscuous T helper (Th) site for broad immunogenicity in multiple species. The G-H loop VP1 site was optimised for cross-reactivity to FMDV by the inclusion into the peptide of cyclic constraint and adjoining sequences. The incorporation of consensus residues into the hypervariable positions of the VP1 site provided for broad immunogenicity. The vaccine protected 20 out of 21 immunised pigs from infectious challenge by FMDV O1 Taiwan using peptide doses as low as 12.5 microg, and a mild adjuvant that caused no lesions. A safe chemically-defined product would have considerable advantages for vaccination against FMD. PMID:12057619

  2. Vector-transmitted disease vaccines: targeting salivary proteins in transmission (SPIT).

    PubMed

    McDowell, Mary Ann

    2015-08-01

    More than half the population of the world is at risk for morbidity and mortality from vector-transmitted diseases, and emerging vector-transmitted infections are threatening new populations. Rising insecticide resistance and lack of efficacious vaccines highlight the need for novel control measures. One such approach is targeting the vector-host interface by incorporating vector salivary proteins in anti-pathogen vaccines. Debate remains about whether vector saliva exposure exacerbates or protects against more severe clinical manifestations, induces immunity through natural exposure or extends to all vector species and associated pathogens. Nevertheless, exploiting this unique biology holds promise as a viable strategy for the development of vaccines against vector-transmitted diseases.

  3. Severe perianal shingles during azathioprine and budesonide treatment for Crohn's disease-preventable with zoster vaccine?

    PubMed

    Elliott, Timothy Ross; Miller, Charles; Macrae, Finlay A

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), particularly those on immunosuppressive medications, suffer a high incidence of, and worse clinical outcomes relating to, herpes zoster (HZ) reactivation. We report on the presentation and management of a patient with Crohn's disease who developed severe perianal HZ after starting azathioprine and oral budesonide treatment. The zoster vaccine may prevent such zoster reactivation in patients with IBD. The zoster vaccine is effective in decreasing the risk of HZ in older adults but its role in younger adults and those with IBD has not been tested prospectively. A review of the potential risks and benefits of this live vaccine in patients with IBD and an approach to further determining its role in this patient population is discussed. PMID:27440857

  4. The Ebola Vaccine Team B: a model for promoting the rapid development of medical countermeasures for emerging infectious disease threats.

    PubMed

    Osterholm, Michael; Moore, Kristine; Ostrowsky, Julie; Kimball-Baker, Kathleen; Farrar, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    In support of accelerated development of Ebola vaccines from preclinical research to clinical trials, in November, 2014, the Wellcome Trust and the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP) at the University of Minnesota established the Wellcome Trust-CIDRAP Ebola Vaccine Team B initiative. This ongoing initiative includes experts with global experience in various phases of bringing new vaccines to market, such as funding, research and development, manufacturing, determination of safety and efficacy, regulatory approval, and vaccination delivery. It also includes experts in community engagement strategies and ethical issues germane to vaccination policies, including eight African scientists with direct experience in developing and implementing vaccination policies in Africa. Ebola Vaccine Team B members have worked on a range of vaccination programmes, such as polio eradication (Africa and globally), development of meningococcal A disease vaccination campaigns in Africa, and malaria and HIV/AIDS vaccine research. We also provide perspective on how this experience can inform future situations where urgent development of vaccines is needed, and we comment on the role that an independent, expert group such as Team B can have in support of national and international public health authorities toward addressing a public health crisis.

  5. A proposal for an alternative quality control test procedure for inactivated vaccines against food-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Molin-Capeti, K C; Sepulveda, L; Terra, F; Torres-Pioli, M F; Costa-Casagrande, T; França, S C; Thomaz-Soccol, V

    2013-02-18

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) control in Brazil includes a strict mandatory vaccination program with vaccines produced in certified laboratories subject to inspection by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, and Food Supply (MAPA). The FMD vaccine's potency is tested through antibodies titration against structural viral proteins in sera from cattle that have not had any exposure to food-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), at 28 days post-vaccination. Biological product testing using large animals is expensive and unwieldy. Thus, alternative testing procedures using laboratory animals have been proposed for quality control of these products. Such biological methods for vaccine evaluation using animals from vivarium facilities can have a significant impact through reduced costs, easier handling, and shorter testing times. The present study was designed to access Balb/C mice's humoral immune responses to a FMDV experimental vaccine, the composition of which contains three virus serotypes of FMDV (O1 Campos, A24 Cruzeiro, and C3 Indaial). Balb/C mice were immunized at doses that were 5% and 10% of the vaccine volume administered in cattle. Immunized mice had their antibody titers probed at 14, 21, and 28 DPV (days post vaccination). The results obtained were compared to those previously known from cattle's immune responses to the FMDV vaccine. An adequate immune response to the vaccine was seen with 10% formulation at 21 DPV. The study results are encouraging and indicate that the mouse model can be used for quality control in experimental vaccine testing.

  6. The Ebola Vaccine Team B: a model for promoting the rapid development of medical countermeasures for emerging infectious disease threats.

    PubMed

    Osterholm, Michael; Moore, Kristine; Ostrowsky, Julie; Kimball-Baker, Kathleen; Farrar, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    In support of accelerated development of Ebola vaccines from preclinical research to clinical trials, in November, 2014, the Wellcome Trust and the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP) at the University of Minnesota established the Wellcome Trust-CIDRAP Ebola Vaccine Team B initiative. This ongoing initiative includes experts with global experience in various phases of bringing new vaccines to market, such as funding, research and development, manufacturing, determination of safety and efficacy, regulatory approval, and vaccination delivery. It also includes experts in community engagement strategies and ethical issues germane to vaccination policies, including eight African scientists with direct experience in developing and implementing vaccination policies in Africa. Ebola Vaccine Team B members have worked on a range of vaccination programmes, such as polio eradication (Africa and globally), development of meningococcal A disease vaccination campaigns in Africa, and malaria and HIV/AIDS vaccine research. We also provide perspective on how this experience can inform future situations where urgent development of vaccines is needed, and we comment on the role that an independent, expert group such as Team B can have in support of national and international public health authorities toward addressing a public health crisis. PMID:26526664

  7. QS-21 enhances the early antibody response to oil adjuvant foot-and-mouth disease vaccine in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose One of the most important tools against foot-and-mouth disease, a highly contagious and variable viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals, is vaccination. However, the effectiveness of foot-and-mouth disease vaccines on slowing the spread of the disease is questionable. In contrast, high potency vaccines providing early protection may solve issues with the spread of the disease, escaping mutants, and persistency. To increase the potency of the vaccine, additives such as saponin and aluminium hydroxide are used. However, the use of saponin with an oil adjuvant is not common and is sometimes linked to toxicity. QS-21, which is less toxic than Quil A, has been presented as an alternative for use with saponin. In this study, the addition of QS-21 to a commercially available foot-and-mouth disease water-in-oil-in-water emulsion vaccine was evaluated in cattle. Materials and Methods After vaccination, serum samples were collected periodically over 3 months. Sera of the QS-21 and normal oil vaccine groups were compared via serum virus neutralization antibody titre and liquid phase blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antibody titre. Results The results showed that there was a significant early antibody increase in the QS-21 group. Conclusion Strong early virus neutralizing antibody response will be useful for emergency or ring vaccinations against foot-and-mouth disease in target animals. PMID:27489804

  8. The haematological profile of female bronze turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) vaccinated with various commercial strains of Newcastle disease.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Elizabeth M d S; Santos, Ivan F C; Paulillo, António C; Martins, Gislaine R V; Denadai, Janine; Lapela, Ivan M

    2014-08-25

    The effects of vaccination on avian blood parameters are poorly understood. The present study was designed to evaluate whether different strains (Ulster 2C, B1, live LaSota and inactivated LaSota) of Newcastle disease vaccines had an effect on the haematological profile of female turkeys. Seventy-five female turkeys were allocated to treatment groups according to vaccination strain. All the birds, except those in the control group, were vaccinated at 32 weeks of age and revaccinated at 40 and 48 weeks of age. Blood samples were obtained for haematological analyses and serum samples for the haemagglutination inhibition test. Haemoglobin concentration was significantly lower (p < 0.05) in vaccinated female turkeys than in the control birds 28 days after vaccination. Monocytes were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in 44-week-old female turkeys vaccinated with inactivated LaSota strain compared with the other groups. Turkeys vaccinated with the B1 strain showed significantly higher (p < 0.05) total white blood cell counts compared with the other groups vaccinated with various commercial strains of the Newcastle disease virus. In conclusion, female turkeys showed signific