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Sample records for burst switching networks

  1. Quantum Key Based Burst Confidentiality in Optical Burst Switched Networks

    PubMed Central

    Balamurugan, A. M.; Sivasubramanian, A.

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS). This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher) to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks. PMID:24578663

  2. Quantum key based burst confidentiality in optical burst switched networks.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, A M; Sivasubramanian, A

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS). This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher) to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks. PMID:24578663

  3. Advanced Optical Burst Switched Network Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejabati, Reza; Aracil, Javier; Castoldi, Piero; de Leenheer, Marc; Simeonidou, Dimitra; Valcarenghi, Luca; Zervas, Georgios; Wu, Jian

    In recent years, as the bandwidth and the speed of networks have increased significantly, a new generation of network-based applications using the concept of distributed computing and collaborative services is emerging (e.g., Grid computing applications). The use of the available fiber and DWDM infrastructure for these applications is a logical choice offering huge amounts of cheap bandwidth and ensuring global reach of computing resources [230]. Currently, there is a great deal of interest in deploying optical circuit (wavelength) switched network infrastructure for distributed computing applications that require long-lived wavelength paths and address the specific needs of a small number of well-known users. Typical users are particle physicists who, due to their international collaborations and experiments, generate enormous amounts of data (Petabytes per year). These users require a network infrastructures that can support processing and analysis of large datasets through globally distributed computing resources [230]. However, providing wavelength granularity bandwidth services is not an efficient and scalable solution for applications and services that address a wider base of user communities with different traffic profiles and connectivity requirements. Examples of such applications may be: scientific collaboration in smaller scale (e.g., bioinformatics, environmental research), distributed virtual laboratories (e.g., remote instrumentation), e-health, national security and defense, personalized learning environments and digital libraries, evolving broadband user services (i.e., high resolution home video editing, real-time rendering, high definition interactive TV). As a specific example, in e-health services and in particular mammography applications due to the size and quantity of images produced by remote mammography, stringent network requirements are necessary. Initial calculations have shown that for 100 patients to be screened remotely, the network

  4. Supporting differentiated quality of service in optical burst switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bin; Bassiouni, Mostafa A.

    2006-01-01

    We propose and evaluate two new schemes for providing differentiated services in optical burst switched (OBS) networks. The two new schemes are suitable for implementation in OBS networks using just-in-time (JIT) or just-enough-time (JET) scheduling protocols. The first scheme adjusts the size of the search space for a free wavelength based on the priority level of the burst. A simple equation is used to divide the search spectrum into two parts: a base part and an adjustable part. The size of the adjustable part increases as the priority of the burst becomes higher. The scheme is very easy to implement and does not demand any major software or hardware resources in optical cross-connects. The second scheme reduces the dropping probability of bursts with higher priorities through the use of different proactive discarding rates in the network access station (NAS) of the source node. Our extensive simulation tests using JIT show that both schemes are capable of providing tangible quality of service (QoS) differentiation without negatively impacting the throughput of OBS networks.

  5. O/E/O storage mechanism for burst contention resolution in optical burst switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yutong; Zheng, Xiaoping; Zhang, Hanyi; Pu, Tao; Wang, Lei; Guo, Yili

    2005-11-01

    Burst contention resolution is one of the most important issues in optical burst switching (OBS) networks. In this paper, an O/E/O conversion and electronic storage mechanism for contention resolution is proposed. Compared with fiber delay lines (FDL) O/E/O strategy can provide much longer and continuous delay time for the contending bursts, which can significantly reduce burst loss rate. For this mechanism, a new burst scheduling algorithm called Shortest Delay- Best Fit (SD-BF) is proposed here to improve bandwidth utilization. In a network, O/E/O can be implemented with FDL to achieve a better performance while reducing node cost. In this paper, a semi-share structure for this combination strategy is proposed to balance the cost and performance. Numerical results show that a better performance is achieved by the combination strategy in the long haul back-bone networks. We also investigate the maximum electronic RAM capacity needed in the nodes to support O/E/O storage, and how to implement Quality-of-Service (QoS) with O/E/O storage.

  6. Design and analysis of optical burst-switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yijun; Vandenhoute, Marc; Cankaya, Hakki C.

    1999-08-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) is a promising solution for building terabit optical routers and realizing IP over D- WDM. In this paper, we describe the basic concept of OBS and a general architecture of optical routers. The key design issues related to the OBS are discussed, notably, burstification, offset-time management and channel scheduling. A simple channel scheduling algorithm called LAUC (Latest Available Unscheduled Channel) algorithm is presented, which is also called Horizon algorithm in the literature. The performance of optical routers under random and self-similar traffic is thoroughly studied via computer simulations. Our study indicates that the distribution of burst length is not exponential any more. For the FDL (fiber delay line) optical buffer, the burst loss ratio is quite sensitive to the traffic characteristic of bursts when using the LAUC algorithm.

  7. Burst switching without guard interval in all-optical software-define star intra-data center network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Philip N.; Wang, Ting

    2014-02-01

    Optical switching has been introduced in intra-data center networks (DCNs) to increase capacity and to reduce power consumption. Recently we proposed a star MIMO OFDM-based all-optical DCN with burst switching and software-defined networking. Here, we introduce the control procedure for the star DCN in detail for the first time. The timing, signaling, and operation are described for each step to achieve efficient bandwidth resource utilization. Furthermore, the guidelines for the burst assembling period selection that allows burst switching without guard interval are discussed. The star all-optical DCN offers flexible and efficient control for next-generation data center application.

  8. An effective implementation scheme of just-in-time protocol for optical burst switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guiling; Li, Xinwan; Chen, Jian-Ping; Wang, Hui

    2005-02-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) has been emerging as a promising technology that can effectively support the next generation IP-oriented transportation networks. JIT signaling protocol for OBS is relatively simple and easy to be implemented by hardware. This paper presented an effective scheme to implement the JIT protocol, which not only can effectively implement reservation and release of optical channels based on JIT, but also can process the failure of channel reservation and release due to loss of burst control packets. The scheme includes: (1) a BHP (burst head packet) path table is designed and built at each OBS node. It is used to guarantee the corresponding burst control packet, i.e. BHP, BEP (burst end packet) and BEP_ACK (BEP acknowledgement), to be transmitted in the same path. (2) The timed retransmission of BEP and the reversed deletion of the item in BHP path tables triggered by the corresponding BEP_ACK are combined to solve the problems caused by the loss of the signaling messages in channel reservation and release process. (3) Burst head packets and BEP_ACK are transmitted using "best-effort" method. Related signaling messages and their formats for the proposed scheme are also given.

  9. Enhanced just-in-time plus protocol for optical burst switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Joel J. P. C.; Gregório, José M. B.; Vasilakos, Athanasios V.

    2010-07-01

    We propose a new one-way resource reservation protocol for optical burst switching (OBS) networks, called Enhanced Just-in-Time Plus (E-JIT+). The protocol is described in detail, and its formal specification is presented, following an extended finite state machine approach. The performance evaluation of E-JIT+ is analyzed in comparison with other proposed OBS protocols (JIT+ and E-JIT) for the following network topologies: rings; degree-two, degree-three, and degree-four chordal rings; mesh-torus; NSFNET; ARPANET; FCCN-NET; and the European Optical Network. We evaluate and compare the performance of the different protocols in terms of burst loss probability, taking into account the most important OBS network parameters. It was shown that E-JIT+ performs better than available one-way resource reservation protocols for all the evaluated network topologies. Moreover, the scalability of E-JIT+ was observed, and when the network traffic increases, the burst loss probability also increases, leading to a worse network performance.

  10. QoS-guaranteed burst transmission for VoIP service over optical burst switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, Takuji; Kasahara, Shoji

    2007-08-01

    We propose a burst transmission method that guarantees the voice over Internet protocol (VoIP) service. The proposed method consists of three techniques: round-robin burst assembly with slotted scheduling, priority control with void filling, and hop-based preemption. Each technique is utilized so that the burst loss probability and the burst transmission delay satisfy VoIP quality of service (QoS). We evaluate by simulation the performance of the proposed method in NSFNET with 14 nodes. Numerical examples show that our proposed method is effective for guaranteeing the VoIP QoS while accommodating a large number of VoIP users.

  11. A burst compression and expansion technique for variable-rate users in satellite-switched TDMA networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, James M.

    1990-01-01

    A burst compression and expansion technique is described for asynchronously interconnecting variable-data-rate users with cost-efficient ground terminals in a satellite-switched, time-division-multiple-access (SS/TDMA) network. Compression and expansion buffers in each ground terminal convert between lower rate, asynchronous, continuous-user data streams and higher-rate TDMA bursts synchronized with the satellite-switched timing. The technique described uses a first-in, first-out (FIFO) memory approach which enables the use of inexpensive clock sources by both the users and the ground terminals and obviates the need for elaborate user clock synchronization processes. A continous range of data rates from kilobits per second to that approaching the modulator burst rate (hundreds of megabits per second) can be accommodated. The technique was developed for use in the NASA Lewis Research Center System Integration, Test, and Evaluation (SITE) facility. Some key features of the technique have also been implemented in the gound terminals developed at NASA Lewis for use in on-orbit evaluation of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) high burst rate (HBR) system.

  12. A burst compression and expansion technique for variable-rate users in satellite-switched TDMA networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, James M.

    1990-01-01

    A burst compression and expansion technique is described for asynchronously interconnecting variable-data-rate users with cost-efficient ground terminals in a satellite-switched, time-division-multiple-access (SS/TDMA) network. Compression and expansion buffers in each ground terminal convert between lower rate, asynchronous, continuous-user data streams and higher-rate TDMA bursts synchronized with the satellite-switched timing. The technique described uses a first-in, first-out (FIFO) memory approach which enables the use of inexpensive clock sources by both the users and the ground terminals and obviates the need for elaborate user clock synchronization processes. A continuous range of data rates from kilobits per second to that approaching the modulator burst rate (hundreds of megabits per second) can be accommodated. The technique was developed for use in the NASA Lewis Research Center System Integration, Test, and Evaluation (SITE) facility. Some key features of the technique have also been implemented in the ground terminals developed at NASA Lewis for use in on-orbit evaluation of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) high burst rate (HBR) system.

  13. Electronic implementation of optical burst switching techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albanese, Ilijc; Darcie, Thomas E.; Ganti, Sudhakar

    2013-10-01

    Extensive research effort is ongoing in energy-efficient Internet-based communications. Optical Flow Switching (OFS) and Optical Burst Switching (OBS) offer potentially efficient alternatives to IP-router-based networks for large data transactions, but significant challenges remain. OFS requires each user to install expensive core network technology, limiting application to highly specialized nodes. OBS can achieve higher scalability but burst assembly/disassembly procedures reduce power efficiency. Finally both OFS and OBS use all-optical switching technologies for which energy efficiency and flexibility remain subject to debate. Our study aims at combining the advantages of both OBS and OFS while avoiding their shortcomings. We consider using a two-way resource reservation protocol for periodic concatenations of large (e.g. 1 Mb) packets or Media Frames (MFs). These chains of MFs (MFCs) are semi-transparent with a periodicity referred to as the "transparency degree". Each MFC is assembled and stored at an end-user machine during the resource reservation procedure and is then switched and buffered electronically along its path. The periodic configuration of each MFC enables interleaving of several chains using buffering only to align the MFs in each MFC in time, largely reducing the buffer requirements with respect to OBS. This periodicity also enables a simple scheduling algorithm to schedule large transactions with minimal control plane processing, achieving link utilization approaching 99.9%. In summary, results indicate that implementing optical burst switching techniques in the electronic domain is a compelling path forward to high-throughput power-efficient networking.

  14. Efficient neighbor channel reservation for contention resolution in optical burst-switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Alam; Aziz, Khurram; Khan, Samee U.

    2013-08-01

    We propose a different reflection-based technique, named efficient neighbor channel reservation, where a contending burst is reflected from a suitable neighbor node and then resumes its original path. Our proposed scheme does not use any extra hardware and addresses several limitations of other schemes including: (a) eliminating the use of bulky fiber delay lines, (b) avoiding complexity required with burst segmentation, (c) preventing resource wastage that occurs with prereservation schemes, and (d) preventing loop formation inherent in most deflection routing schemes.

  15. Enhancing the Quality of Service for Real Time Traffic over Optical Burst Switching (OBS) Networks with Ensuring the Fairness for Other Traffics.

    PubMed

    Al-Shargabi, Mohammed A; Shaikh, Asadullah; Ismail, Abdulsamad S

    2016-01-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) networks have been attracting much consideration as a promising approach to build the next generation optical Internet. A solution for enhancing the Quality of Service (QoS) for high priority real time traffic over OBS with the fairness among the traffic types is absent in current OBS' QoS schemes. In this paper we present a novel Real Time Quality of Service with Fairness Ratio (RT-QoSFR) scheme that can adapt the burst assembly parameters according to the traffic QoS needs in order to enhance the real time traffic QoS requirements and to ensure the fairness for other traffic. The results show that RT-QoSFR scheme is able to fulfill the real time traffic requirements (end to end delay, and loss rate) ensuring the fairness for other traffics under various conditions such as the type of real time traffic and traffic load. RT-QoSFR can guarantee that the delay of the real time traffic packets does not exceed the maximum packets transfer delay value. Furthermore, it can reduce the real time traffic packets loss, at the same time guarantee the fairness for non real time traffic packets by determining the ratio of real time traffic inside the burst to be 50-60%, 30-40%, and 10-20% for high, normal, and low traffic loads respectively. PMID:27583557

  16. Enhancing the Quality of Service for Real Time Traffic over Optical Burst Switching (OBS) Networks with Ensuring the Fairness for Other Traffics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shargabi, Mohammed A.; Ismail, Abdulsamad S.

    2016-01-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) networks have been attracting much consideration as a promising approach to build the next generation optical Internet. A solution for enhancing the Quality of Service (QoS) for high priority real time traffic over OBS with the fairness among the traffic types is absent in current OBS’ QoS schemes. In this paper we present a novel Real Time Quality of Service with Fairness Ratio (RT-QoSFR) scheme that can adapt the burst assembly parameters according to the traffic QoS needs in order to enhance the real time traffic QoS requirements and to ensure the fairness for other traffic. The results show that RT-QoSFR scheme is able to fulfill the real time traffic requirements (end to end delay, and loss rate) ensuring the fairness for other traffics under various conditions such as the type of real time traffic and traffic load. RT-QoSFR can guarantee that the delay of the real time traffic packets does not exceed the maximum packets transfer delay value. Furthermore, it can reduce the real time traffic packets loss, at the same time guarantee the fairness for non real time traffic packets by determining the ratio of real time traffic inside the burst to be 50–60%, 30–40%, and 10–20% for high, normal, and low traffic loads respectively. PMID:27583557

  17. The experimental optical burst switching system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinwan; Chen, Jian-Ping; Wu, Guiling; Wang, Hui; Lu, Jialin; Ye, Ailun

    2005-02-01

    The first optical burst switching (OBS) system has been demonstrated in China, which includes three edge routers and one core-node. A kind of fast wavelength selective optical switching was used in the system. The core OBS node consists of a kind of wavelength selective optical switch we developed. It consists of two SOA switches and one wavelength selective thin film filter with centre wavelength at one wavelength. There are one input optical fiber and two output fibers, each fiber carries two wavelengths. The Dell PE2650 servers act as the edge OBS routers. The wavelength of each data channel is located in C-band and the bit rate is at 1.25Gbps. The control channel uses bit rate of 100Mbps at wavelength of 1310 nm. A novel effective scheme for Just-In-Time (JIT) protocol was proposed and implemented. OBS services, such as Video on Demand (VOD) and file transfer protocol (FTP), have been demonstrated. Assembling and scheduling methods that are capable to guarantee the QoS (quality of service) of the transported service are studied.

  18. Switch for serial or parallel communication networks

    DOEpatents

    Crosette, Dario B.

    1994-01-01

    A communication switch apparatus and a method for use in a geographically extensive serial, parallel or hybrid communication network linking a multi-processor or parallel processing system has a very low software processing overhead in order to accommodate random burst of high density data. Associated with each processor is a communication switch. A data source and a data destination, a sensor suite or robot for example, may also be associated with a switch. The configuration of the switches in the network are coordinated through a master processor node and depends on the operational phase of the multi-processor network: data acquisition, data processing, and data exchange. The master processor node passes information on the state to be assumed by each switch to the processor node associated with the switch. The processor node then operates a series of multi-state switches internal to each communication switch. The communication switch does not parse and interpret communication protocol and message routing information. During a data acquisition phase, the communication switch couples sensors producing data to the processor node associated with the switch, to a downlink destination on the communications network, or to both. It also may couple an uplink data source to its processor node. During the data exchange phase, the switch couples its processor node or an uplink data source to a downlink destination (which may include a processor node or a robot), or couples an uplink source to its processor node and its processor node to a downlink destination.

  19. Switch for serial or parallel communication networks

    DOEpatents

    Crosette, D.B.

    1994-07-19

    A communication switch apparatus and a method for use in a geographically extensive serial, parallel or hybrid communication network linking a multi-processor or parallel processing system has a very low software processing overhead in order to accommodate random burst of high density data. Associated with each processor is a communication switch. A data source and a data destination, a sensor suite or robot for example, may also be associated with a switch. The configuration of the switches in the network are coordinated through a master processor node and depends on the operational phase of the multi-processor network: data acquisition, data processing, and data exchange. The master processor node passes information on the state to be assumed by each switch to the processor node associated with the switch. The processor node then operates a series of multi-state switches internal to each communication switch. The communication switch does not parse and interpret communication protocol and message routing information. During a data acquisition phase, the communication switch couples sensors producing data to the processor node associated with the switch, to a downlink destination on the communications network, or to both. It also may couple an uplink data source to its processor node. During the data exchange phase, the switch couples its processor node or an uplink data source to a downlink destination (which may include a processor node or a robot), or couples an uplink source to its processor node and its processor node to a downlink destination. 9 figs.

  20. Polyrhythmic synchronization in bursting networking motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilnikov, Andrey; Gordon, René; Belykh, Igor

    2008-09-01

    We study the emergence of polyrhythmic dynamics of motifs which are the building block for small inhibitory-excitatory networks, such as central pattern generators controlling various locomotive behaviors of animals. We discover that the pacemaker determining the specific rhythm of such a network composed of realistic Hodgkin-Huxley-type neurons is identified through the order parameter, which is the ratio of the neurons' burst durations or of duty cycles. We analyze different configurations of the motifs and describe the universal mechanisms for synergetics of the bursting patterns. We discuss also the multistability of inhibitory networks that results in polyrhythmicity of its emergent synchronous behaviors.

  1. Coherence resonance in bursting neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, June Hoan; Lee, Ho Jun; Min, Cheol Hong; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2015-10-01

    Synchronized neural bursts are one of the most noticeable dynamic features of neural networks, being essential for various phenomena in neuroscience, yet their complex dynamics are not well understood. With extrinsic electrical and optical manipulations on cultured neural networks, we demonstrate that the regularity (or randomness) of burst sequences is in many cases determined by a (few) low-dimensional attractor(s) working under strong neural noise. Moreover, there is an optimal level of noise strength at which the regularity of the interburst interval sequence becomes maximal—a phenomenon of coherence resonance. The experimental observations are successfully reproduced through computer simulations on a well-established neural network model, suggesting that the same phenomena may occur in many in vivo as well as in vitro neural networks.

  2. Coherence resonance in bursting neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, June Hoan; Lee, Ho Jun; Min, Cheol Hong; Lee, Kyoung J

    2015-10-01

    Synchronized neural bursts are one of the most noticeable dynamic features of neural networks, being essential for various phenomena in neuroscience, yet their complex dynamics are not well understood. With extrinsic electrical and optical manipulations on cultured neural networks, we demonstrate that the regularity (or randomness) of burst sequences is in many cases determined by a (few) low-dimensional attractor(s) working under strong neural noise. Moreover, there is an optimal level of noise strength at which the regularity of the interburst interval sequence becomes maximal-a phenomenon of coherence resonance. The experimental observations are successfully reproduced through computer simulations on a well-established neural network model, suggesting that the same phenomena may occur in many in vivo as well as in vitro neural networks.

  3. Optical computer switching network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clymer, B.; Collins, S. A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The design for an optical switching system for minicomputers that uses an optical spatial light modulator such as a Hughes liquid crystal light valve is presented. The switching system is designed to connect 80 minicomputers coupled to the switching system by optical fibers. The system has two major parts: the connection system that connects the data lines by which the computers communicate via a two-dimensional optical matrix array and the control system that controls which computers are connected. The basic system, the matrix-based connecting system, and some of the optical components to be used are described. Finally, the details of the control system are given and illustrated with a discussion of timing.

  4. Downhole drilling network using burst modulation techniques

    DOEpatents

    Hall; David R. , Fox; Joe

    2007-04-03

    A downhole drilling system is disclosed in one aspect of the present invention as including a drill string and a transmission line integrated into the drill string. Multiple network nodes are installed at selected intervals along the drill string and are adapted to communicate with one another through the transmission line. In order to efficiently allocate the available bandwidth, the network nodes are configured to use any of numerous burst modulation techniques to transmit data.

  5. Optically-switched multiwavelength networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Gibong

    1997-05-01

    Optical networks are widely regarded as the ultimate solution to the bandwidth needs of future communication systems. With fiber-optic links deployed between nodes, the electronic devices at the switch nodes rather than the transmission medium, limit the bandwidth of a network. Instead, in an optically-switched network, a photonic switch can control connection paths without optical-to-electrical conversion of the signal, thereby avoiding speed and data-format restrictions imposed by such conversions. Despite the recognized potential of optically-switched multiwavelength networks, however, their overall effectiveness remains hampered by problems related to signal impairment such as noise, crosstalk and dispersion accumulating over a transparent path, and a finite number of wavelengths available limiting the network size. This dissertation analyzes the performance of optical networks at both the network and the device levels, and develops techniques to circumvent these problems. To begin with, we investigate the benefits of wavelength translation that has been claimed to be essential to best utilize a limited number of wavelengths in multiwavelength networks. A performance analysis shows that the network size and bandwidth are limited by dispersion, and spontaneous emission noise and crosstalk. First, we propose a technique to adaptively compensate bit skew caused by dispersion. In its basic form, the compensation method measures the skew using a pseudo- white training sequence and controls the read pointers of elastic buffers. The efficacy of this compensation technique is demonstrated for a WDM parallel data link. To better understand signal impairment, then we analyze and optimize the performance of photonic switches based on semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA). SOAs have been used in photonic switches both to overcome loss and to serve as switchable crosspoints. Nonlinear noise figure optimization based on a steady-state analysis is followed by a dynamic model

  6. Optimized scalable network switch

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.

    2010-02-23

    In a massively parallel computing system having a plurality of nodes configured in m multi-dimensions, each node including a computing device, a method for routing packets towards their destination nodes is provided which includes generating at least one of a 2m plurality of compact bit vectors containing information derived from downstream nodes. A multilevel arbitration process in which downstream information stored in the compact vectors, such as link status information and fullness of downstream buffers, is used to determine a preferred direction and virtual channel for packet transmission. Preferred direction ranges are encoded and virtual channels are selected by examining the plurality of compact bit vectors. This dynamic routing method eliminates the necessity of routing tables, thus enhancing scalability of the switch.

  7. Optimized scalable network switch

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2007-12-04

    In a massively parallel computing system having a plurality of nodes configured in m multi-dimensions, each node including a computing device, a method for routing packets towards their destination nodes is provided which includes generating at least one of a 2m plurality of compact bit vectors containing information derived from downstream nodes. A multilevel arbitration process in which downstream information stored in the compact vectors, such as link status information and fullness of downstream buffers, is used to determine a preferred direction and virtual channel for packet transmission. Preferred direction ranges are encoded and virtual channels are selected by examining the plurality of compact bit vectors. This dynamic routing method eliminates the necessity of routing tables, thus enhancing scalability of the switch.

  8. BACODINE/3rd Interplanetary Network burst localization

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, K.; Barthelmy, S.; Butterworth, P.; Cline, T.; Sommer, M.; Boer, M.; Niel, M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Meegan, C.

    1996-08-01

    Even with only two widely separated spacecraft (Ulysses and GRO), 3rd Interplanetary Network (IPN) localizations can reduce the areas of BATSE error circles by two orders of magnitude. Therefore it is useful to disseminate them as quickly as possible following BATSE bursts. We have implemented a system which transmits the light curves of BACODINE/BATSE bursts directly by e-mail to UC Berkeley immediately after detection. An automatic e-mail parser at Berkeley watches for these notices, determines the Ulysses crossing time window, and initiates a search for the burst data on the JPL computer as they are received. In ideal cases, it is possible to retrieve the Ulysses data within a few hours of a burst, generate an annulus of arrival directions, and e-mail it out to the astronomical community by local nightfall. Human operators remain in this loop, but we are developing a fully automated routine which should remove them, at least for intense events, and reduce turn-around times to an absolute minimum. We explain the current operations, the data types used, and the speed/accuracy tradeoffs.

  9. The interplanetary gamma ray burst network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, T.

    The Interplanetary Gamma-Ray Burst Network (IPN) is providing gamma-ray burst (GRB) alerts and localizations at the maximum rate anticipated before the launch of the Swift mission. The arc-minute source precision of the IPN is again permitting searches for GRB afterglows in the radio and optical regimes with delays of only hours up to 2 days. The successful addition of the Mars Odyssey mission has compensated for the loss of the asteroid mission NEAR, to reconstitute a fully long- baseline interplanetary network, with Ulysses at > 5 AU and Konus-Wind and HETE-2 near the Earth. In addition to making unassisted GRB localizations that enable a renewed supply of counterpart observations, the Mars/Ulysses/Wind IPN is confirming and reinforcing GRB source localizations with HETE-2. It has also confirmed and reinforced localizations with the BeppoSAX mission before the BeppoSAX termination in May and has detected and localized both SGRs and an unusual hard x-ray transient that is neither an SGR nor a GRB. This IPN is expected to operate until at least 2004.

  10. Neuronal networks and energy bursts in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y; Liu, D; Song, Z

    2015-02-26

    Epilepsy can be defined as the abnormal activities of neurons. The occurrence, propagation and termination of epileptic seizures rely on the networks of neuronal cells that are connected through both synaptic- and non-synaptic interactions. These complicated interactions contain the modified functions of normal neurons and glias as well as the mediation of excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms with feedback homeostasis. Numerous spread patterns are detected in disparate networks of ictal activities. The cortical-thalamic-cortical loop is present during a general spike wave seizure. The thalamic reticular nucleus (nRT) is the major inhibitory input traversing the region, and the dentate gyrus (DG) controls CA3 excitability. The imbalance between γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibition and glutamatergic excitation is the main disorder in epilepsy. Adjustable negative feedback that mediates both inhibitory and excitatory components affects neuronal networks through neurotransmission fluctuation, receptor and transmitter signaling, and through concomitant influences on ion concentrations and field effects. Within a limited dynamic range, neurons slowly adapt to input levels and have a high sensitivity to synaptic changes. The stability of the adapting network depends on the ratio of the adaptation rates of both the excitatory and inhibitory populations. Thus, therapeutic strategies with multiple effects on seizures are required for the treatment of epilepsy, and the therapeutic functions on networks are reviewed here. Based on the high-energy burst theory of epileptic activity, we propose a potential antiepileptic therapeutic strategy to transfer the high energy and extra electricity out of the foci.

  11. RF switch positioner for communications satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, A. G.; Griesser, H. P.; Grant, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The RF switch positioner is a simple, lightweight, redundant positioning mechanism used to reconfigure the antenna beam on the INTELSAT VI satellite. It simultaneously rotates approximately 100 squareax waveguide switches through a full 360 deg. The RF switch positioner has been space qualified and has performed to expectations in conjunction with the feed networks in range testing.

  12. Burst synchronization transitions in a neuronal network of subnetworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaojuan; Lei, Jinzhi; Perc, Matjaž; Kurths, Jürgen; Chen, Guanrong

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, the transitions of burst synchronization are explored in a neuronal network consisting of subnetworks. The studied network is composed of electrically coupled bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons. Numerical results show that two types of burst synchronization transitions can be induced not only by the variations of intra- and intercoupling strengths but also by changing the probability of random links between different subnetworks and the number of subnetworks. Furthermore, we find that the underlying mechanisms for these two bursting synchronization transitions are different: one is due to the change of spike numbers per burst, while the other is caused by the change of the bursting type. Considering that changes in the coupling strengths and neuronal connections are closely interlaced with brain plasticity, the presented results could have important implications for the role of the brain plasticity in some functional behavior that are associated with synchronization.

  13. Taming desynchronized bursting with delays in the Macaque cortical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing-Yun; Murks, Aleksandra; Perc, Matjaž; Lu, Qi-Shao

    2011-04-01

    Inhibitory coupled bursting Hindmarsh—Rose neurons are considered as constitutive units of the Macaque cortical network. In the absence of information transmission delay the bursting activity is desynchronized, giving rise to spatiotemporally disordered dynamics. This paper shows that the introduction of finite delays can lead to the synchronization of bursting and thus to the emergence of coherent propagating fronts of excitation in the space-time domain. Moreover, it shows that the type of synchronous bursting is uniquely determined by the delay length, with the transitions from one type to the other occurring in a step-like manner depending on the delay. Interestingly, as the delay is tuned close to the transition points, the synchronization deteriorates, which implies the coexistence of different bursting attractors. These phenomena can be observed by different but fixed coupling strengths, thus indicating a new role for information transmission delays in realistic neuronal networks.

  14. LD-pumped acousto-optical Q-switched burst-mode Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hu; Yan, Renpeng; Li, Xudong; Ma, Yufei; Yu, Xin; Chen, Deying

    2016-04-01

    A high-repetition-rate, high-peak-power burst-mode laser for laser-based measurement applications is presented by using a master oscillator power amplifier structure. An laser diode arrays (LDA) side-pumped Nd:YAG acousto-optical (A-O) Q-switched laser serves as the master oscillator. Under pulsed pumping, pulse trains with 2-25 pulses are obtained when the repetition rate changes from 10 kHz to 100 kHz. The maximum pulse burst energy of 31.2 mJ is achieved in the A-O Q-switched pulse burst laser oscillator at 10 kHz. Two LDA side pumped Nd:YAG modules are employed in the amplification stage. After the amplification, the pulse burst energy at 10 kHz reaches ~170 mJ with a single pulse energy of 85.2 mJ and a pulse width of 14.5 ns, generating a peak power of 6.1 MW. At 100 kHz, the total burst energy reaches 220 mJ with a single pulse energy of 8.8 mJ in the pulse burst laser system.

  15. Multi-wavelength synchronous pulse burst generation with a wavelength selective switch.

    PubMed

    Roelens, Michaël A; Bolger, Jeremy A; Williams, David; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2008-07-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous pulse-shaping at different ports of a rapidly tunable wavelength selective switch at a base rate of 40 GHz, based on Fourier-domain pulse shaping. Various pulse bursts are generated and accurately characterized with a linear spectrographic method.

  16. Investigation of primordial black hole bursts using interplanetary network gamma-ray bursts

    DOE PAGES

    Ukwatta, Tilan Niranjan; Hurley, Kevin; MacGibbon, Jane H.; Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Pal'Shin, V. D.; Goldsten, J.; Boynton, W.; et al

    2016-07-25

    The detection of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) in the solar neighborhood would have very important implications for GRB phenomenology. The leading theories for cosmological GRBs would not be able to explain such events. The final bursts of evaporating primordial black holes (PBHs), however, would be a natural explanation for local GRBs. We present a novel technique that can constrain the distance to GRBs using detections from widely separated, non-imaging spacecraft. This method can determine the actual distance to the burst if it is local. We applied this method to constrain distances to a sample of 36 short-duration GRBs detected bymore » the Interplanetary Network (IPN) that show observational properties that are expected from PBH evaporations. These bursts have minimum possible distances in the 1013–1018 cm (7–105 au) range, which are consistent with the expected PBH energetics and with a possible origin in the solar neighborhood, although none of the bursts can be unambiguously demonstrated to be local. Furthermore, assuming that these bursts are real PBH events, we estimate lower limits on the PBH burst evaporation rate in the solar neighborhood.« less

  17. Investigation of Primordial Black Hole Bursts Using Interplanetary Network Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukwatta, T. N.; Hurley, K.; MacGibbon, J. H.; Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Pal'shin, V. D.; Goldsten, J.; Boynton, W.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Rau, A.; von Kienlin, A.; Zhang, X.; Connaughton, V.; Yamaoka, K.; Ohno, M.; Ohmori, N.; Feroci, M.; Frontera, F.; Guidorzi, C.; Cline, T.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; McTiernan, J.

    2016-07-01

    The detection of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) in the solar neighborhood would have very important implications for GRB phenomenology. The leading theories for cosmological GRBs would not be able to explain such events. The final bursts of evaporating primordial black holes (PBHs), however, would be a natural explanation for local GRBs. We present a novel technique that can constrain the distance to GRBs using detections from widely separated, non-imaging spacecraft. This method can determine the actual distance to the burst if it is local. We applied this method to constrain distances to a sample of 36 short-duration GRBs detected by the Interplanetary Network (IPN) that show observational properties that are expected from PBH evaporations. These bursts have minimum possible distances in the 1013–1018 cm (7–105 au) range, which are consistent with the expected PBH energetics and with a possible origin in the solar neighborhood, although none of the bursts can be unambiguously demonstrated to be local. Assuming that these bursts are real PBH events, we estimate lower limits on the PBH burst evaporation rate in the solar neighborhood.

  18. Theta burst stimulation of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex modulates pathological language switching: A case report.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; De Blasi, Pierpaolo; Bergmann, Jürgen; Caleri, Francesca; Tezzon, Frediano; Ladurner, Gunther; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen

    2011-01-10

    Although different lesion and neuroimaging studies had highlighted the importance of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in language switching, the nature of this higher cortical disorder of communication and its neural correlates have not been clearly established. To further investigate the functional involvement of the DLPFC, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) given as theta burst stimulation (TBS) in a bilingual patient showing pathologic language switching after an ischemic stroke involving the left frontal lobe. Inhibitory and excitatory TBS were applied to the left DLPFC, to the right DLPFC, or to an occipital cortical control site. A short-lasting interruption of the pathological language switching occurred after excitatory left DLPFC stimulation, while inhibitory left DLPFC TBS transiently increased the number of utterances produced in the unwanted second language. Effects were non-significant after right DLPFC and occipital TBS. Our findings suggest that left DLPFC is actively involved in language switching. TMS techniques may help in understanding the neural bases of bilingualism.

  19. Modulating the Precision of Recurrent Bursts in Cultured Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Joon Ho; Kim, June Hoan; Heo, Ryoun; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2012-03-01

    Synchronized bursts are a very common feature in biological neural networks, and they play an important role in various brain functions and neurological diseases. This Letter investigates “recurrent synchronized bursts” induced by a single pulse stimulation in cultured networks of rat cortical neurons. We look at how the precision in their arrival times can be modified by a noble time-delayed stimulation protocol, which we term as “Δt training.” The emergence of recurrent bursts and the change of the precision in their arrival times can be explained by the stochastic resonance of a damped, subthreshold, neural oscillation.

  20. The Fragility of Interdependency: Coupled Networks Switching Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    2013-03-01

    Recent disasters ranging from abrupt financial ``flash crashes'' and large-scale power outages to sudden death among the elderly dramatically exemplify the fact that the most dangerous vulnerability is hiding in the many interdependencies among different networks. In the past year, we have quantified failures in model of interconnected networks, and demonstrated the need to consider mutually dependent network properties in designing resilient systems. Specifically, we have uncovered new laws governing the nature of switching phenomena in coupled networks, and found that phenomena that are continuous ``second order'' phase transitions in isolated networks become discontinuous abrupt ``first order'' transitions in interdependent networks [S. V. Buldyrev, R. Parshani, G. Paul, H. E. Stanley, and S. Havlin, ``Catastrophic Cascade of Failures in Interdependent Networks,'' Nature 464, 1025 (2010); J. Gao, S. V. Buldyrev, H. E. Stanley, and S. Havlin, ``Novel Behavior of Networks Formed from Interdependent Networks,'' Nature Physics 8, 40 (2012). We conclude by discussing the network basis for understanding sudden death in the elderly, and the possibility that financial ``flash crashes'' are not unlike the catastrophic first-order failure incidents occurring in coupled networks. Specifically, we study the coupled networks that are responsible for financial fluctuations. It appears that ``trend switching phenomena'' that we uncover are remarkably independent of the scale over which they are analyzed. For example, we find that the same laws governing the formation and bursting of the largest financial bubbles also govern the tiniest finance bubbles, over a factor of 1,000,000,000 in time scale [T. Preis, J. Schneider, and H. E. Stanley, ``Switching Processes in Financial Markets,'' Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108, 7674 (2011); T. Preis and H. E. Stanley, ``Bubble Trouble: Can a Law Describe Bubbles and Crashes in Financial Markets?'' Physics World 24, No. 5, 29 (May 2011

  1. Synchronization of Asynchronous Switched Boolean Network.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Wang, Xingyuan; Lin, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the complete synchronizations for asynchronous switched Boolean network with free Boolean sequence controllers and close-loop controllers are studied. First, the basic asynchronous switched Boolean network model is provided. With the method of semi-tensor product, the Boolean dynamics is translated into linear representation. Second, necessary and sufficient conditions for ASBN synchronization with free Boolean sequence control and close-loop control are derived, respectively. Third, some illustrative examples are provided to show the efficiency of the proposed methods.

  2. Software Defined Networking (SDN) controlled all optical switching networks with multi-dimensional switching architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongli; Ji, Yuefeng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Hui; Xiong, Qianjin; Qiu, Shaofeng

    2014-08-01

    Ultrahigh throughout capacity requirement is challenging the current optical switching nodes with the fast development of data center networks. Pbit/s level all optical switching networks need to be deployed soon, which will cause the high complexity of node architecture. How to control the future network and node equipment together will become a new problem. An enhanced Software Defined Networking (eSDN) control architecture is proposed in the paper, which consists of Provider NOX (P-NOX) and Node NOX (N-NOX). With the cooperation of P-NOX and N-NOX, the flexible control of the entire network can be achieved. All optical switching network testbed has been experimentally demonstrated with efficient control of enhanced Software Defined Networking (eSDN). Pbit/s level all optical switching nodes in the testbed are implemented based on multi-dimensional switching architecture, i.e. multi-level and multi-planar. Due to the space and cost limitation, each optical switching node is only equipped with four input line boxes and four output line boxes respectively. Experimental results are given to verify the performance of our proposed control and switching architecture.

  3. Delayed switching applied to memristor neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Frank Z.; Yang Xiao; Lim Guan; Helian Na; Wu Sining; Guo Yike; Rashid, Md Mamunur

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic flux and electric charge are linked in a memristor. We reported recently that a memristor has a peculiar effect in which the switching takes place with a time delay because a memristor possesses a certain inertia. This effect was named the ''delayed switching effect.'' In this work, we elaborate on the importance of delayed switching in a brain-like computer using memristor neural networks. The effect is used to control the switching of a memristor synapse between two neurons that fire together (the Hebbian rule). A theoretical formula is found, and the design is verified by a simulation. We have also built an experimental setup consisting of electronic memristive synapses and electronic neurons.

  4. A neural network approach to burst detection.

    PubMed

    Mounce, S R; Day, A J; Wood, A S; Khan, A; Widdop, P D; Machell, J

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes how hydraulic and water quality data from a distribution network may be used to provide a more efficient leakage management capability for the water industry. The research presented concerns the application of artificial neural networks to the issue of detection and location of leakage in treated water distribution systems. An architecture for an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) based system is outlined. The neural network uses time series data produced by sensors to directly construct an empirical model for predication and classification of leaks. Results are presented using data from an experimental site in Yorkshire Water's Keighley distribution system. PMID:11936639

  5. Phenotypic switching in gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Philipp; Popović, Nikola; Grima, Ramon

    2014-05-13

    Noise in gene expression can lead to reversible phenotypic switching. Several experimental studies have shown that the abundance distributions of proteins in a population of isogenic cells may display multiple distinct maxima. Each of these maxima may be associated with a subpopulation of a particular phenotype, the quantification of which is important for understanding cellular decision-making. Here, we devise a methodology which allows us to quantify multimodal gene expression distributions and single-cell power spectra in gene regulatory networks. Extending the commonly used linear noise approximation, we rigorously show that, in the limit of slow promoter dynamics, these distributions can be systematically approximated as a mixture of Gaussian components in a wide class of networks. The resulting closed-form approximation provides a practical tool for studying complex nonlinear gene regulatory networks that have thus far been amenable only to stochastic simulation. We demonstrate the applicability of our approach in a number of genetic networks, uncovering previously unidentified dynamical characteristics associated with phenotypic switching. Specifically, we elucidate how the interplay of transcriptional and translational regulation can be exploited to control the multimodality of gene expression distributions in two-promoter networks. We demonstrate how phenotypic switching leads to birhythmical expression in a genetic oscillator, and to hysteresis in phenotypic induction, thus highlighting the ability of regulatory networks to retain memory. PMID:24782538

  6. A novel miniaturized passively Q-switched pulse-burst laser for engine ignition.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yufei; Li, Xudong; Yu, Xin; Fan, Rongwei; Yan, Renpeng; Peng, Jiangbo; Xu, Xinrui; Sun, Rui; Chen, Deying

    2014-10-01

    A novel miniaturized Cr⁴⁺:YAG passively Q-switched Nd:YAG pulse-burst laser under 808 nm diode-laser pulse-pumping was demonstrated for the purpose of laser-induced plasma ignition, in which pulse-burst mode can realize both high repetition rate and high pulse energy simultaneously in a short period. Side-pumping configuration and two different types of laser cavities were employed. The pumping pulse width was constant at 250 μs. For the plane-plane cavity, the output beam profile was flat-top Gaussian and the measured M² value was 4.1 at the maximum incident pump energy of 600 mJ. The pulse-burst laser contained a maximum of 8 pulses, 7 pulses and 6 pulses for pulse-burst repetition rate of 10 Hz, 50 Hz and 100 Hz, respectively. The energy obtained was 15.5 mJ, 14.9 mJ and 13.9 mJ per pulse for pulse-burst repetition rate of 10 Hz, 50 Hz and 100 Hz, respectively. The maximum repetition rate of laser pulses in pulse-burst was 34.6 kHz for 8 pulses at the incident pump energy of 600 mJ and the single pulse width was 13.3 ns. The thermal lensing effect of Nd:YAG rod was investigated, and an plane-convex cavity was adopted to compensate the thermal lensing effect of Nd:YAG rod and improve the mode matching. For the plane-convex cavity, the output beam profile was quasi-Gaussian and the measured M2 value was 2.2 at the incident pump energy of 600 mJ. The output energy was 10.6 mJ per pulse for pulse-burst repetition rate of 100 Hz. The maximum repetition rate of laser pulses in pulse-burst was 27.4 kHz for 6 pulses at the incident pump energy of 600 mJ and the single pulse width was 14.2 ns. The experimental results showed that this pulse-burst laser can produce high repetition rate (>20 kHz) and high pulse energy (>10 mJ) simultaneously in a short period for both two different cavities. PMID:25322040

  7. Effect of network architecture on burst and spike synchronization in a scale-free network of bursting neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Yoon; Lim, Woochang

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the effect of network architecture on burst and spike synchronization in a directed scale-free network (SFN) of bursting neurons, evolved via two independent α- and β-processes. The α-process corresponds to a directed version of the Barabási-Albert SFN model with growth and preferential attachment, while for the β-process only preferential attachments between pre-existing nodes are made without addition of new nodes. We first consider the "pure" α-process of symmetric preferential attachment (with the same in- and out-degrees), and study emergence of burst and spike synchronization by varying the coupling strength J and the noise intensity D for a fixed attachment degree. Characterizations of burst and spike synchronization are also made by employing realistic order parameters and statistical-mechanical measures. Next, we choose appropriate values of J and D where only burst synchronization occurs, and investigate the effect of the scale-free connectivity on the burst synchronization by varying (1) the symmetric attachment degree and (2) the asymmetry parameter (representing deviation from the symmetric case) in the α-process, and (3) the occurrence probability of the β-process. In all these three cases, changes in the type and the degree of population synchronization are studied in connection with the network topology such as the degree distribution, the average path length Lp, and the betweenness centralization Bc. It is thus found that just taking into consideration Lp and Bc (affecting global communication between nodes) is not sufficient to understand emergence of population synchronization in SFNs, but in addition to them, the in-degree distribution (affecting individual dynamics) must also be considered to fully understand for the effective population synchronization. PMID:27131467

  8. Noise-induced burst and spike synchronizations in an inhibitory small-world network of subthreshold bursting neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Yoon; Lim, Woochang

    2015-04-01

    We are interested in noise-induced firings of subthreshold neurons which may be used for encoding environmental stimuli. Noise-induced population synchronization was previously studied only for the case of global coupling, unlike the case of subthreshold spiking neurons. Hence, we investigate the effect of complex network architecture on noise-induced synchronization in an inhibitory population of subthreshold bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons. For modeling complex synaptic connectivity, we consider the Watts-Strogatz small-world network which interpolates between regular lattice and random network via rewiring, and investigate the effect of small-world connectivity on emergence of noise-induced population synchronization. Thus, noise-induced burst synchronization (synchrony on the slow bursting time scale) and spike synchronization (synchrony on the fast spike time scale) are found to appear in a synchronized region of the [Formula: see text]-[Formula: see text] plane ([Formula: see text]: synaptic inhibition strength and [Formula: see text]: noise intensity). As the rewiring probability [Formula: see text] is decreased from 1 (random network) to 0 (regular lattice), the region of spike synchronization shrinks rapidly in the [Formula: see text]-[Formula: see text] plane, while the region of the burst synchronization decreases slowly. We separate the slow bursting and the fast spiking time scales via frequency filtering, and characterize the noise-induced burst and spike synchronizations by employing realistic order parameters and statistical-mechanical measures introduced in our recent work. Thus, the bursting and spiking thresholds for the burst and spike synchronization transitions are determined in terms of the bursting and spiking order parameters, respectively. Furthermore, we also measure the degrees of burst and spike synchronizations in terms of the statistical-mechanical bursting and spiking measures, respectively.

  9. Nanoarchitectonic atomic switch networks for unconventional computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demis, Eleanor C.; Aguilera, Renato; Scharnhorst, Kelsey; Aono, Masakazu; Stieg, Adam Z.; Gimzewski, James K.

    2016-11-01

    Developments in computing hardware are constrained by the operating principles of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, fabrication limits of nanometer scaled features, and difficulties in effective utilization of high density interconnects. This set of obstacles has promulgated a search for alternative, energy efficient approaches to computing inspired by natural systems including the mammalian brain. Atomic switch network (ASN) devices are a unique platform specifically developed to overcome these current barriers to realize adaptive neuromorphic technology. ASNs are composed of a massively interconnected network of atomic switches with a density of ∼109 units/cm2 and are structurally reminiscent of the neocortex of the brain. ASNs possess both the intrinsic capabilities of individual memristive switches, such as memory capacity and multi-state switching, and the characteristics of large-scale complex systems, such as power-law dynamics and non-linear transformations of input signals. Here we describe the successful nanoarchitectonic fabrication of next-generation ASN devices using combined top-down and bottom-up processing and experimentally demonstrate their utility as reservoir computing hardware. Leveraging their intrinsic dynamics and transformative input/output (I/O) behavior enabled waveform regression of periodic signals in the absence of embedded algorithms, further supporting the potential utility of ASN technology as a platform for unconventional approaches to computing.

  10. Neural Network Burst Pressure Prediction in Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Eric v. K.; Dion, Seth-Andrew T.; Karl, Justin O.; Spivey, Nicholas S.; Walker, James L., II

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic emission data were collected during the hydroburst testing of eleven 15 inch diameter filament wound composite overwrapped pressure vessels. A neural network burst pressure prediction was generated from the resulting AE amplitude data. The bottles shared commonality of graphite fiber, epoxy resin, and cure time. Individual bottles varied by cure mode (rotisserie versus static oven curing), types of inflicted damage, temperature of the pressurant, and pressurization scheme. Three categorical variables were selected to represent undamaged bottles, impact damaged bottles, and bottles with lacerated hoop fibers. This categorization along with the removal of the AE data from the disbonding noise between the aluminum liner and the composite overwrap allowed the prediction of burst pressures in all three sets of bottles using a single backpropagation neural network. Here the worst case error was 3.38 percent.

  11. Future large broadband switched satellite communications networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, D. H.; Harvey, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    Critical technical, market, and policy issues relevant to future large broadband switched satellite networks are summarized. Our market projections for the period 1980 to 2000 are compared. Clusters of switched satellites, in lieu of large platforms, etc., are shown to have significant advantages. Analysis of an optimum terrestrial network architecture suggests the proper densities of ground stations and that link reliabilities 99.99% may entail less than a 10% cost premium for diversity protection at 20/30 GHz. These analyses suggest that system costs increase as the 0.6 power of traffic. Cost estimates for nominal 20/30 GHz satellite and ground facilities suggest optimum system configurations might employ satellites with 285 beams, multiple TDMA bands each carrying 256 Mbps, and 16 ft ground station antennas. A nominal development program is outlined.

  12. Inhibition of the lymphocyte metabolic switch by the oxidative burst of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Philip A; Prichard, Lynn; Chacko, Balu; Ravi, Saranya; Overton, E Turner; Heath, Sonya L; Darley-Usmar, Victor

    2015-09-01

    Activation of the phagocytic NADPH oxidase-2 (NOX-2) in neutrophils is a critical process in the innate immune system and is associated with elevated local concentrations of superoxide, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hypochlorous acid. Under pathological conditions, NOX-2 activity has been implicated in the development of autoimmunity, indicating a role in modulating lymphocyte effector function. Notably, T-cell clonal expansion and subsequent cytokine production requires a metabolic switch from mitochondrial respiration to aerobic glycolysis. Previous studies demonstrate that H2O2 generated from activated neutrophils suppresses lymphocyte activation but the mechanism is unknown. We hypothesized that activated neutrophils would prevent the metabolic switch and suppress the effector functions of T-cells through a H2O2-dependent mechanism. To test this, we developed a model co-culture system using freshly isolated neutrophils and lymphocytes from healthy human donors. Extracellular flux analysis was used to assess mitochondrial and glycolytic activity and FACS analysis to assess immune function. The neutrophil oxidative burst significantly inhibited the induction of lymphocyte aerobic glycolysis, caused inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation and suppressed lymphocyte activation through a H2O2-dependent mechanism. Hydrogen peroxide and a redox cycling agent, DMNQ, were used to confirm the impact of H2O2 on lymphocyte bioenergetics. In summary, we have shown that the lymphocyte metabolic switch from mitochondrial respiration to glycolysis is prevented by the oxidative burst of neutrophils. This direct inhibition of the metabolic switch is then a likely mechanism underlying the neutrophil-dependent suppression of T-cell effector function.

  13. Devices for wavelength switching in optical networks

    SciTech Connect

    d`Alessandro, A.; Baran, J.E.; Smith, D.A.

    1994-12-31

    Wavelength routing crossconnects are considered the core of WDM optical networks. They consist of optical switches independently rearrangeable for each wavelength channel and for any input-output configuration so that any path can be chosen almost arbitrarily by the network users. In general the implementation of the wavelength routing function requires complex switch arrays. Very simple wavelength-selection crossconnects can be realized by using acousto-optic switches (AOS), because of their unique ability of processing several optical signals simultaneously and their low driving power consumption, less than 10 mW/channel. AOS`s can be considered a particular evolution of acousto-optical tunable filters, whose integrated optic version on lithium niobate has been developed in several research institutions around the world in the past decade. This paper reviews the last accomplishments of AOS`s, whose specifications are directly tied with optical network requirements, the foremost challenge being a strong suppression of crosstalk. Dilated AOS`s can reduce interport crosstalk to below {minus}30 dB and apodization of acousto-optic interaction can reduce interchannel crosstalk to below {minus}15 dB during multiwavelength operation.

  14. The evolution to global burst synchronization in a modular neuronal network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoli; Wang, Manman

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we investigated the development of global burst synchronization in a modular neuronal network at the mesoscale level. The modular network consists of some subnetworks, each of them presenting a scale-free property. Numerical results have demonstrated that, upon increasing the coupling strength, all neurons in the modular network initially burst in a desynchronous pattern; then the burst synchronization within each subnetwork is followed at the mesoscale; finally, the global burst synchronization at the macroscale is formed by the bursting activities on each subnetwork moving forward in harmony. This implies the network behavior possesses two distinct mesoscopic and macroscopic properties for some coupling strengths, i.e. the mesoscopic dynamics of burst synchronization on subnetworks is different from the macroscopic property of desynchronous activity on the whole network. It is also found that global burst synchronization can be promoted by large interconnection probability and hindered by small interconnection probability.

  15. Neural Network Aided Glitch-Burst Discrimination and Glitch Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampone, Salvatore; Pierro, Vincenzo; Troiano, Luigi; Pinto, Innocenzo M.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the potential of neural-network based classifiers for discriminating gravitational wave bursts (GWBs) of a given canonical family (e.g. core-collapse supernova waveforms) from typical transient instrumental artifacts (glitches), in the data of a single detector. The further classification of glitches into typical sets is explored. In order to provide a proof of concept, we use the core-collapse supernova waveform catalog produced by H. Dimmelmeier and co-Workers, and the data base of glitches observed in laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory (LIGO) data maintained by P. Saulson and co-Workers to construct datasets of (windowed) transient waveforms (glitches and bursts) in additive (Gaussian and compound-Gaussian) noise with different signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Principal component analysis (PCA) is next implemented for reducing data dimensionality, yielding results consistent with, and extending those in the literature. Then, a multilayer perceptron is trained by a backpropagation algorithm (MLP-BP) on a data subset, and used to classify the transients as glitch or burst. A Self-Organizing Map (SOM) architecture is finally used to classify the glitches. The glitch/burst discrimination and glitch classification abilities are gauged in terms of the related truth tables. Preliminary results suggest that the approach is effective and robust throughout the SNR range of practical interest. Perspective applications pertain both to distributed (network, multisensor) detection of GWBs, where some intelligence at the single node level can be introduced, and instrument diagnostics/optimization, where spurious transients can be identified, classified and hopefully traced back to their entry points.

  16. 25-Gbit/s burst-mode optical receiver using high-speed avalanche photodiode for 100-Gbit/s optical packet switching.

    PubMed

    Nada, Masahiro; Nakamura, Makoto; Matsuzaki, Hideaki

    2014-01-13

    25-Gbit/s error-free operation of an optical receiver is successfully demonstrated against burst-mode optical input signals without preambles. The receiver, with a high-sensitivity avalanche photodiode and burst-mode transimpedance amplifier, exhibits sufficient receiver sensitivity and an extremely quick response suitable for burst-mode operation in 100-Gbit/s optical packet switching.

  17. An evaluation of Access Tier local area network switches.

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, John M.; Olsberg, Ronald R.

    2004-06-01

    This reports tabulates the Test and Evaluation results of the Access Class Switch tests conducted by members of Department 9336. About 15 switches were reviewed for use in the enterprise network as access tier switches as defined in a three tier architecture. The Access Switch Tier has several functions including: aggregate customer desktop ports, preserve and apply QoS tags, provide switched LAN access, provide VLAN assignment, as well as others. The typical switch size is 48 or less user ports. The evaluation team reviewed network switch evaluation reports from the Tolly Group as well as other sources. We then used these reports as a starting point to identify particular switches for evaluation. In general we reviewed the products of dominant equipment manufacturers. Also, based on architectural design requirements, the majority of the switches tested were of relatively small monolithic unit variety.

  18. Burst analysis tool for developing neuronal networks exhibiting highly varying action potential dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kapucu, Fikret E; Tanskanen, Jarno M A; Mikkonen, Jarno E; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Narkilahti, Susanna; Hyttinen, Jari A K

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose a firing statistics based neuronal network burst detection algorithm for neuronal networks exhibiting highly variable action potential dynamics. Electrical activity of neuronal networks is generally analyzed by the occurrences of spikes and bursts both in time and space. Commonly accepted analysis tools employ burst detection algorithms based on predefined criteria. However, maturing neuronal networks, such as those originating from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), exhibit highly variable network structure and time-varying dynamics. To explore the developing burst/spike activities of such networks, we propose a burst detection algorithm which utilizes the firing statistics based on interspike interval (ISI) histograms. Moreover, the algorithm calculates ISI thresholds for burst spikes as well as for pre-burst spikes and burst tails by evaluating the cumulative moving average (CMA) and skewness of the ISI histogram. Because of the adaptive nature of the proposed algorithm, its analysis power is not limited by the type of neuronal cell network at hand. We demonstrate the functionality of our algorithm with two different types of microelectrode array (MEA) data recorded from spontaneously active hESC-derived neuronal cell networks. The same data was also analyzed by two commonly employed burst detection algorithms and the differences in burst detection results are illustrated. The results demonstrate that our method is both adaptive to the firing statistics of the network and yields successful burst detection from the data. In conclusion, the proposed method is a potential tool for analyzing of hESC-derived neuronal cell networks and thus can be utilized in studies aiming to understand the development and functioning of human neuronal networks and as an analysis tool for in vitro drug screening and neurotoxicity assays.

  19. Bursting dynamics remarkably improve the performance of neural networks on liquid computing.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiumin; Chen, Qing; Xue, Fangzheng

    2016-10-01

    Burst firings are functionally important behaviors displayed by neural circuits, which plays a primary role in reliable transmission of electrical signals for neuronal communication. However, with respect to the computational capability of neural networks, most of relevant studies are based on the spiking dynamics of individual neurons, while burst firing is seldom considered. In this paper, we carry out a comprehensive study to compare the performance of spiking and bursting dynamics on the capability of liquid computing, which is an effective approach for intelligent computation of neural networks. The results show that neural networks with bursting dynamic have much better computational performance than those with spiking dynamics, especially for complex computational tasks. Further analysis demonstrate that the fast firing pattern of bursting dynamics can obviously enhance the efficiency of synaptic integration from pre-neurons both temporally and spatially. This indicates that bursting dynamic can significantly enhance the complexity of network activity, implying its high efficiency in information processing. PMID:27668020

  20. Bursting dynamics remarkably improve the performance of neural networks on liquid computing.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiumin; Chen, Qing; Xue, Fangzheng

    2016-10-01

    Burst firings are functionally important behaviors displayed by neural circuits, which plays a primary role in reliable transmission of electrical signals for neuronal communication. However, with respect to the computational capability of neural networks, most of relevant studies are based on the spiking dynamics of individual neurons, while burst firing is seldom considered. In this paper, we carry out a comprehensive study to compare the performance of spiking and bursting dynamics on the capability of liquid computing, which is an effective approach for intelligent computation of neural networks. The results show that neural networks with bursting dynamic have much better computational performance than those with spiking dynamics, especially for complex computational tasks. Further analysis demonstrate that the fast firing pattern of bursting dynamics can obviously enhance the efficiency of synaptic integration from pre-neurons both temporally and spatially. This indicates that bursting dynamic can significantly enhance the complexity of network activity, implying its high efficiency in information processing.

  1. Network burst activity in hippocampal neuronal cultures: the role of synaptic and intrinsic currents.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Jyothsna; Radojicic, Mihailo; Pesce, Lorenzo L; Bhansali, Anita; Wang, Janice; Tryba, Andrew K; Marks, Jeremy D; van Drongelen, Wim

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this work was to define the contributions of intrinsic and synaptic mechanisms toward spontaneous network-wide bursting activity, observed in dissociated rat hippocampal cell cultures. This network behavior is typically characterized by short-duration bursts, separated by order of magnitude longer interburst intervals. We hypothesize that while short-timescale synaptic processes modulate spectro-temporal intraburst properties and network-wide burst propagation, much longer timescales of intrinsic membrane properties such as persistent sodium (Nap) currents govern burst onset during interburst intervals. To test this, we used synaptic receptor antagonists picrotoxin, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), and 3-(2-carboxypiperazine-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphonate (CPP) to selectively block GABAA, AMPA, and NMDA receptors and riluzole to selectively block Nap channels. We systematically compared intracellular activity (recorded with patch clamp) and network activity (recorded with multielectrode arrays) in eight different synaptic connectivity conditions: GABAA + NMDA + AMPA, NMDA + AMPA, GABAA + AMPA, GABAA + NMDA, AMPA, NMDA, GABAA, and all receptors blocked. Furthermore, we used mixed-effects modeling to quantify the aforementioned independent and interactive synaptic receptor contributions toward spectro-temporal burst properties including intraburst spike rate, burst activity index, burst duration, power in the local field potential, network connectivity, and transmission delays. We found that blocking intrinsic Nap currents completely abolished bursting activity, demonstrating their critical role in burst onset within the network. On the other hand, blocking different combinations of synaptic receptors revealed that spectro-temporal burst properties are uniquely associated with synaptic functionality and that excitatory connectivity is necessary for the presence of network-wide bursting. In addition to confirming the critical contribution of direct

  2. Gamma ray burst source locations with the Ulysses/Compton/PVO network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Hurley, K. C.; Boer, M.; Sommer, M.; Niel, M.; Fishman, G. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Wilson, R. B.

    1992-01-01

    The new interplanetary gamma-ray burst network will determine source fields with unprecedented accuracy. The baseline of the Ulysses mission and the locations of Pioneer-Venus Orbiter and of Mars Observer will ensure precision to a few tens of arc seconds. Combined with the event phenomenologies of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on Compton Observatory, the source locations to be achieved with this network may provide a basic new understanding of the puzzle of gamma ray bursts.

  3. Optimal Intrinsic Dynamics for Bursting in a Three-Cell Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunmyre, Justin R.; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2010-01-01

    Previous numerical and analytical work has shown that synaptic coupling can allow a network of model neurons to synchronize despite heterogeneity in intrinsic parameter values. In particular, synchronous bursting oscillations can arise in a network with excitatory synaptic coupling, even in the absence of intrinsically bursting neurons. In this work, we explore how the intrinsic dynamics of neurons within a reduced three-cell network influence its ability to exhibit synchronous bursting and the frequency range over which such activity can occur. We establish necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of synchronous bursting solutions and perform related numerical experiments in three-cell networks that include a quiescent cell, a tonically active cell, and a third added cell. Our results show that, in most cases, the addition of a quiescent cell is optimal for synchronous network bursting, in a variety of ways, and that intrinsically bursting cells can be detrimental to synchronous bursting, and we explain the mechanisms underlying these effects. These findings may help explain how robust synchronous oscillations arise in neuronal central pattern generators, such as the mammalian inspiratory network, despite the presence of significant cellular heterogeneity. They also support the idea that intrinsic burst capabilities of individual cells need not be central to these networks' rhythms.

  4. THE INTERPLANETARY NETWORK SUPPLEMENT TO THE BURST AND TRANSIENT SOURCE EXPERIMENT 5B CATALOG OF COSMIC GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, K.; Briggs, M. S.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Cline, T.; Trombka, J.; McClanahan, T.; Boynton, W.; Starr, R.; McNutt, R.; Boer, M.

    2011-09-01

    We present Interplanetary Network localization information for 343 gamma-ray bursts observed by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) between the end of the 4th BATSE catalog and the end of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) mission, obtained by analyzing the arrival times of these bursts at the Ulysses, Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR), and CGRO spacecraft. For any given burst observed by CGRO and one other spacecraft, arrival time analysis (or 'triangulation') results in an annulus of possible arrival directions whose half-width varies between 11 arcsec and 21{sup 0}, depending on the intensity, time history, and arrival direction of the burst, as well as the distance between the spacecraft. This annulus generally intersects the BATSE error circle, resulting in an average reduction of the area of a factor of 20. When all three spacecraft observe a burst, the result is an error box whose area varies between 1 and 48,000 arcmin{sup 2}, resulting in an average reduction of the BATSE error circle area of a factor of 87.

  5. Stimulus information stored in lasting active and hidden network states is destroyed by network bursts.

    PubMed

    Dranias, Mark R; Westover, M Brandon; Cash, Sidney; VanDongen, Antonius M J

    2015-01-01

    In both humans and animals brief synchronizing bursts of epileptiform activity known as interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) can, even in the absence of overt seizures, cause transient cognitive impairments (TCI) that include problems with perception or short-term memory. While no evidence from single units is available, it has been assumed that IEDs destroy information represented in neuronal networks. Cultured neuronal networks are a model for generic cortical microcircuits, and their spontaneous activity is characterized by the presence of synchronized network bursts (SNBs), which share a number of properties with IEDs, including the high degree of synchronization and their spontaneous occurrence in the absence of an external stimulus. As a model approach to understanding the processes underlying IEDs, optogenetic stimulation and multielectrode array (MEA) recordings of cultured neuronal networks were used to study whether stimulus information represented in these networks survives SNBs. When such networks are optically stimulated they encode and maintain stimulus information for as long as one second. Experiments involved recording the network response to a single stimulus and trials where two different stimuli were presented sequentially, akin to a paired pulse trial. We broke the sequential stimulus trials into encoding, delay and readout phases and found that regardless of which phase the SNB occurs, stimulus-specific information was impaired. SNBs were observed to increase the mean network firing rate, but this did not translate monotonically into increases in network entropy. It was found that the more excitable a network, the more stereotyped its response was during a network burst. These measurements speak to whether SNBs are capable of transmitting information in addition to blocking it. These results are consistent with previous reports and provide baseline predictions concerning the neural mechanisms by which IEDs might cause TCI.

  6. Synchronization and rhythm dynamics of a neuronal network consisting of mixed bursting neurons with hybrid synapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xia; Xi, Wenqi

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, burst synchronization and rhythm dynamics of a small-world neuronal network consisting of mixed bursting types of neurons coupled via inhibitory-excitatory chemical synapses are explored. Two quantities, the synchronization parameter and average width factor, are used to characterize the synchronization degree and rhythm dynamics of the neuronal network. Numerical results show that the percentage of the inhibitory synapses in the network is the major factor for we get a similarly bell-shaped dependence of synchronization on it, and the decrease of the average width factor of the network. We also find that not only the value of the coupling strength can promote the synchronization degree, but the probability of random edges adding to the small-world network also can. The ratio of the long bursting neurons has little effect on the burst synchronization and rhythm dynamics of the network.

  7. Satellite-matrix-switched, time-division-multiple-access network simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Andro, Monty; Nagy, Lawrence A.; Budinger, James M.; Shalkhauser, Mary JO

    1989-01-01

    A versatile experimental Ka-band network simulator has been implemented at the NASA Lewis Research Center to demonstrate and evaluate a satellite-matrix-switched, time-division-multiple-access (SMS-TDMA) network and to evaluate future digital ground terminals and radiofrequency (RF) components. The simulator was implemented by using proof-of-concept RF components developed under NASA contracts and digital ground terminal and link simulation hardware developed at Lewis. This simulator provides many unique capabilities such as satellite range delay and variation simulation and rain fade simulation. All network parameters (e.g., signal-to-noise ratio, satellite range variation rate, burst density, and rain fade) are controlled and monitored by a central computer. The simulator is presently configured as a three-ground-terminal SMS-TDMA network.

  8. Network burst dynamics under heterogeneous cholinergic modulation of neural firing properties and heterogeneous synaptic connectivity.

    PubMed

    Knudstrup, Scott; Zochowski, Michal; Booth, Victoria

    2016-05-01

    The characteristics of neural network activity depend on intrinsic neural properties and synaptic connectivity in the network. In brain networks, both of these properties are critically affected by the type and levels of neuromodulators present. The expression of many of the most powerful neuromodulators, including acetylcholine (ACh), varies tonically and phasically with behavioural state, leading to dynamic, heterogeneous changes in intrinsic neural properties and synaptic connectivity properties. Namely, ACh significantly alters neural firing properties as measured by the phase response curve in a manner that has been shown to alter the propensity for network synchronization. The aim of this simulation study was to build an understanding of how heterogeneity in cholinergic modulation of neural firing properties and heterogeneity in synaptic connectivity affect the initiation and maintenance of synchronous network bursting in excitatory networks. We show that cells that display different levels of ACh modulation have differential roles in generating network activity: weakly modulated cells are necessary for burst initiation and provide synchronizing drive to the rest of the network, whereas strongly modulated cells provide the overall activity level necessary to sustain burst firing. By applying several quantitative measures of network activity, we further show that the existence of network bursting and its characteristics, such as burst duration and intraburst synchrony, are dependent on the fraction of cell types providing the synaptic connections in the network. These results suggest mechanisms underlying ACh modulation of brain oscillations and the modulation of seizure activity during sleep states.

  9. Network burst dynamics under heterogeneous cholinergic modulation of neural firing properties and heterogeneous synaptic connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Knudstrup, Scott; Zochowski, Michal; Booth, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of neural network activity depend on intrinsic neural properties and synaptic connectivity in the network. In brain networks, both of these properties are critically affected by the type and levels of neuromodulators present. The expression of many of the most powerful neuromodulators, including acetylcholine (ACh), varies tonically and phasically with behavioural state, leading to dynamic, heterogeneous changes in intrinsic neural properties and synaptic connectivity properties. Namely, ACh significantly alters neural firing properties as measured by the phase response curve in a manner that has been shown to alter the propensity for network synchronization. The aim of this simulation study was to build an understanding of how heterogeneity in cholinergic modulation of neural firing properties and heterogeneity in synaptic connectivity affect the initiation and maintenance of synchronous network bursting in excitatory networks. We show that cells that display different levels of ACh modulation have differential roles in generating network activity: weakly modulated cells are necessary for burst initiation and provide synchronizing drive to the rest of the network, whereas strongly modulated cells provide the overall activity level necessary to sustain burst firing. By applying several quantitative measures of network activity, we further show that the existence of network bursting and its characteristics, such as burst duration and intraburst synchrony, are dependent on the fraction of cell types providing the synaptic connections in the network. These results suggest mechanisms underlying ACh modulation of brain oscillations and the modulation of seizure activity during sleep states. PMID:26869313

  10. Neural networks supporting switching, hypothesis testing, and rule application.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiya; Braunlich, Kurt; Wehe, Hillary S; Seger, Carol A

    2015-10-01

    We identified dynamic changes in recruitment of neural connectivity networks across three phases of a flexible rule learning and set-shifting task similar to the Wisconsin Card Sort Task: switching, rule learning via hypothesis testing, and rule application. During fMRI scanning, subjects viewed pairs of stimuli that differed across four dimensions (letter, color, size, screen location), chose one stimulus, and received feedback. Subjects were informed that the correct choice was determined by a simple unidimensional rule, for example "choose the blue letter". Once each rule had been learned and correctly applied for 4-7 trials, subjects were cued via either negative feedback or visual cues to switch to learning a new rule. Task performance was divided into three phases: Switching (first trial after receiving the switch cue), hypothesis testing (subsequent trials through the last error trial), and rule application (correct responding after the rule was learned). We used both univariate analysis to characterize activity occurring within specific regions of the brain, and a multivariate method, constrained principal component analysis for fMRI (fMRI-CPCA), to investigate how distributed regions coordinate to subserve different processes. As hypothesized, switching was subserved by a limbic network including the ventral striatum, thalamus, and parahippocampal gyrus, in conjunction with cortical salience network regions including the anterior cingulate and frontoinsular cortex. Activity in the ventral striatum was associated with switching regardless of how switching was cued; visually cued shifts were associated with additional visual cortical activity. After switching, as subjects moved into the hypothesis testing phase, a broad fronto-parietal-striatal network (associated with the cognitive control, dorsal attention, and salience networks) increased in activity. This network was sensitive to rule learning speed, with greater extended activity for the slowest

  11. Routing and Label Space Reduction in Label Switching Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano, Fernando; Caro, Luis Fernando; Stidsen, Thomas; Papadimitriou, Dimitri

    This chapter is devoted to the analysis and modeling of some problems related to the optimal usage of the label space in label switching networks. Label space problems concerning three different technologies and architectures - namely Multi-protocol Label Switching (MPLS), Ethernet VLAN-Label Switching (ELS) and All-Optical Label Switching (AOLS) - are discussed in this chapter. Each of these cases yields to different constraints of the general label space reduction problem. We propose a generic optimization model and, then, we describe some adaptations aiming at modeling each particular case. Simulation results are briefly discussed at the end of this chapter.

  12. A Reconnection Switch to Trigger gamma-Ray Burst Jet Dissipation

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, Jonathan C.; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.

    2012-03-14

    Prompt gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission requires some mechanism to dissipate an ultrarelativistic jet. Internal shocks or some form of electromagnetic dissipation are candidate mechanisms. Any mechanism needs to answer basic questions, such as what is the origin of variability, what radius does dissipation occur at, and how does efficient prompt emission occur. These mechanisms also need to be consistent with how ultrarelativistic jets form and stay baryon pure despite turbulence and electromagnetic reconnection near the compact object and despite stellar entrainment within the collapsar model. We use the latest magnetohydrodynamical models of ultrarelativistic jets to explore some of these questions in the context of electromagnetic dissipation due to the slow collisional and fast collisionless reconnection mechanisms, as often associated with Sweet-Parker and Petschek reconnection, respectively. For a highly magnetized ultrarelativistic jet and typical collapsar parameters, we find that significant electromagnetic dissipation may be avoided until it proceeds catastrophically near the jet photosphere at large radii (r {approx} 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14}cm), by which the jet obtains a high Lorentz factor ({gamma} {approx} 100-1000), has a luminosity of L{sub j} {approx} 10{sup 50}-10{sup 51} erg s{sup -1}, has observer variability timescales of order 1s (ranging from 0.001-10s), achieves {gamma}{theta}{sub j} {approx} 10-20 (for opening half-angle {theta}{sub j}) and so is able to produce jet breaks, and has comparable energy available for both prompt and afterglow emission. A range of model parameters are investigated and simplified scaling laws are derived. This reconnection switch mechanism allows for highly efficient conversion of electromagnetic energy into prompt emission and associates the observed prompt GRB pulse temporal structure with dissipation timescales of some number of reconnecting current sheets embedded in the jet. We hope this work helps motivate the

  13. Bursting near Bautin bifurcation in a neural network with delay coupling.

    PubMed

    Song, Zigen; Xu, Jian

    2009-10-01

    Bursting behavior is one of the most important firing activities of neural system and plays an important role in signal encoding and transmission. In the present paper, a neural network with delay coupling is modeled to investigate the generation mechanism of bursting behavior. The Andronov-Hopf bifurcation is firstly studied and then the degenerated Andronov-Hopf bifurcation, namely Bautin bifurcation, is analyzed with the external input varying. Classifying dynamics in the neighborhood of the Bautin bifurcation, we obtain the bifurcation sets where the supercritical/subcritical Andronov-Hopf, or the fold limit cycle bifurcation may happen in the system under consideration. For a periodic disturbance occurring in the neighborhood of the Bautin bifurcation, it is seen that the Andronov-Hopf bifurcation and fold limit cycle bifurcation may lead to the transition from quiescent state to firing activities. Complex bursting phenomena, including Hopf/Hopf bursting, Hopf/Fold cycle bursting, SubHopf/Hopf bursting and SubHopf/Fold cycle bursting are found in the firing area. The results show that the dynamical properties of different burstings are related to the dynamical behaviors derived from the bifurcations of the system. Finally, it is seen that the bursting disappears but the periodic spiking appears in the delayed neural network for large values of delay.

  14. Network management technology for Ethernet switch based on cluster system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xian-Cheng; Yun, Xiang

    2004-04-01

    Currently, network administration involves repetitive and time-consuming tasks. Clustering enables network administrators to overcome hurdles when they attempt to manage their LANs. Clustering is proved to be a breakthrough for LANs. Under the cluster management model, all switches can be managed as a cluster based on a single IP address. A single command switch for each cluster would automatically discover and control all switches in a cluster, regardless of where they are located. Switch Clustering is implemented over the TCP/IP protocol. The hardware scheme is present in this paper. Then the cluster communication protocol is analyzed in detail. It involves CTP (Cluster Topology Protocol) and CMP (Cluster Management Protocol). At last we present two typical examples for Switch Clustering.

  15. Switching synchronization in one-dimensional memristive networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slipko, Valeriy A.; Shumovskyi, Mykola; Pershin, Yuriy V.

    2015-11-01

    We report on a switching synchronization phenomenon in one-dimensional memristive networks, which occurs when several memristive systems with different switching constants are switched from the high- to low-resistance state. Our numerical simulations show that such a collective behavior is especially pronounced when the applied voltage slightly exceeds the combined threshold voltage of memristive systems. Moreover, a finite increase in the network switching time is found compared to the average switching time of individual systems. An analytical model is presented to explain our observations. Using this model, we have derived asymptotic expressions for memory resistances at short and long times, which are in excellent agreement with results of our numerical simulations.

  16. Satellite range delay simulator for a matrix-switched time division multiple-access network simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, Lawrence A.

    1989-01-01

    The Systems Integration, Test, and Evaluation (SITE) facility at NASA Lewis Research Center is presently configured as a satellite-switched time division multiple access (SS-TDMA) network simulator. The purpose of SITE is to demonstrate and evaluate advanced communication satellite technologies, presently embodied by POC components developed under NASA contracts in addition to other hardware, such as ground terminals, designed and built in-house at NASA Lewis. Each ground terminal in a satellite communications system will experience a different aspect of the satellite's motion due mainly to daily tidal effects and station keeping, hence a different duration and rate of variation in the range delay. As a result of this and other effects such as local oscillator instability, each ground terminal must constantly adjust its transmit burst timing so that data bursts from separate ground terminals arrive at the satellite in their assigned time slots, preventing overlap and keeping the system in synchronism. On the receiving end, ground terminals must synchronize their local clocks using reference transmissions received through the satellite link. A feature of the SITE facility is its capability to simulate the varying propagation delays and associated Doppler frequency shifts that the ground terminals in the network have to cope with. Delay is achieved by means of two NASA Lewis designed and built range delay simulator (RDS) systems, each independently controlled locally with front panel switches or remotely by an experiment control and monitor (EC/M) computer.

  17. Interconnecting network for switching data packets and method for switching data packets

    DOEpatents

    Benner, Alan Frederic; Minkenberg, Cyriel Johan Agnes; Stunkel, Craig Brian

    2010-05-25

    The interconnecting network for switching data packets, having data and flow control information, comprises a local packet switch element (S1) with local input buffers (I(1,1) . . . I(1,y)) for buffering the incoming data packets, a remote packet switch element (S2) with remote input buffers (I(2,1) . . . I(2,y)) for buffering the incoming data packets, and data lines (L) for interconnecting the local and the remote packet switch elements (S1, S2). The interconnecting network further comprises a local and a remote arbiter (A1, A2) which are connected via control lines (CL) to the input buffers (I(1,1) . . . I(1,y), I(2,1) . . . I(2,y)), and which are formed such that they can provide that the flow control information is transmitted via the data lines (L) and the control lines (CL).

  18. Computer simulations of stimulus dependent state switching in basic circuits of bursting neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, Mikhail; Huerta, Ramón; Bazhenov, Maxim; Kozlov, Alexander K.; Abarbanel, Henry D. I.

    1998-11-01

    We investigate the ability of oscillating neural circuits to switch between different states of oscillation in two basic neural circuits. We model two quite distinct small neural circuits. The first circuit is based on invertebrate central pattern generator (CPG) studies [A. I. Selverston and M. Moulins, The Crustacean Stomatogastric System (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1987)] and is composed of two neurons coupled via both gap junction and inhibitory synapses. The second consists of coupled pairs of interconnected thalamocortical relay and thalamic reticular neurons with both inhibitory and excitatory synaptic coupling. The latter is an elementary unit of the thalamic networks passing sensory information to the cerebral cortex [M. Steriade, D. A. McCormick, and T. J. Sejnowski, Science 262, 679 (1993)]. Both circuits have contradictory coupling between symmetric parts. The thalamocortical model has excitatory and inhibitory connections and the CPG has reciprocal inhibitory and electrical coupling. We describe the dynamics of the individual neurons in these circuits by conductance based ordinary differential equations of Hodgkin-Huxley type [J. Physiol. (London) 117, 500 (1952)]. Both model circuits exhibit bistability and hysteresis in a wide region of coupling strengths. The two main modes of behavior are in-phase and out-of-phase oscillations of the symmetric parts of the network. We investigate the response of these circuits, while they are operating in bistable regimes, to externally imposed excitatory spike trains with varying interspike timing and small amplitude pulses. These are meant to represent spike trains received by the basic circuits from sensory neurons. Circuits operating in a bistable region are sensitive to the frequency of these excitatory inputs. Frequency variations lead to changes from in-phase to out-of-phase coordination or vice versa. The signaling information contained in a spike train driving the network can place the circuit into one or

  19. Crossbar Switches For Optical Data-Communication Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monacos, Steve P.

    1994-01-01

    Optoelectronic and electro-optical crossbar switches called "permutation engines" (PE's) developed to route packets of data through fiber-optic communication networks. Basic network concept described in "High-Speed Optical Wide-Area Data-Communication Network" (NPO-18983). Nonblocking operation achieved by decentralized switching and control scheme. Each packet routed up or down in each column of this 5-input/5-output permutation engine. Routing algorithm ensures each packet arrives at its designated output port without blocking any other packet that does not contend for same output port.

  20. Synchronization in slowly switching networks of coupled oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jie; Zou, Yong; Guan, Shuguang; Liu, Zonghua; Boccaletti, S.

    2016-01-01

    Networks whose structure of connections evolves in time constitute a big challenge in the study of synchronization, in particular when the time scales for the evolution of the graph topology are comparable with (or even longer than) those pertinent to the units’ dynamics. We here focus on networks with a slow-switching structure, and show that the necessary conditions for synchronization, i.e. the conditions for which synchronization is locally stable, are determined by the time average of the largest Lyapunov exponents of transverse modes of the switching topologies. Comparison between fast- and slow-switching networks allows elucidating that slow-switching processes prompt synchronization in the cases where the Master Stability Function is concave, whereas fast-switching schemes facilitate synchronization for convex curves. Moreover, the condition of slow-switching enables the introduction of a control strategy for inducing synchronization in networks with arbitrary structure and coupling strength, which is of evident relevance for broad applications in real world systems. PMID:27779253

  1. Performance evaluation of a burst-mode EDFA in an optical packet and circuit integrated network.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Masaki; Awaji, Yoshinari; Furukawa, Hideaki; Shinada, Satoshi; Puttnam, Benjamin J; Wada, Naoya

    2013-12-30

    We experimentally investigate the performance of burst-mode EDFA in an optical packet and circuit integrated system. In such networks, packets and light paths can be dynamically assigned to the same fibers, resulting in gain transients in EDFAs throughout the network that can limit network performance. Here, we compare the performance of a 'burst-mode' EDFA (BM-EDFA), employing transient suppression techniques and optical feedback, with conventional EDFAs, and those using automatic gain control and previous BM-EDFA implementations. We first measure gain transients and other impairments in a simplified set-up before making frame error-rate measurements in a network demonstration.

  2. Network and external perturbation induce burst synchronisation in cat cerebral cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lameu, Ewandson L.; Borges, Fernando S.; Borges, Rafael R.; Batista, Antonio M.; Baptista, Murilo S.; Viana, Ricardo L.

    2016-05-01

    The brain of mammals are divided into different cortical areas that are anatomically connected forming larger networks which perform cognitive tasks. The cat cerebral cortex is composed of 65 areas organised into the visual, auditory, somatosensory-motor and frontolimbic cognitive regions. We have built a network of networks, in which networks are connected among themselves according to the connections observed in the cat cortical areas aiming to study how inputs drive the synchronous behaviour in this cat brain-like network. We show that without external perturbations it is possible to observe high level of bursting synchronisation between neurons within almost all areas, except for the auditory area. Bursting synchronisation appears between neurons in the auditory region when an external perturbation is applied in another cognitive area. This is a clear evidence that burst synchronisation and collective behaviour in the brain might be a process mediated by other brain areas under stimulation.

  3. Scaling silicon photonic switch fabrics for data center interconnection networks.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Dessislava; Rumley, Sébastien; Calhoun, David; Li, Qi; Hendry, Robert; Samadi, Payman; Bergman, Keren

    2015-01-26

    With the rapidly increasing aggregate bandwidth requirements of data centers there is a growing interest in the insertion of optically interconnected networks with high-radix transparent optical switch fabrics. Silicon photonics is a particularly promising and applicable technology due to its small footprint, CMOS compatibility, high bandwidth density, and the potential for nanosecond scale dynamic connectivity. In this paper we analyze the feasibility of building silicon photonic microring based switch fabrics for data center scale optical interconnection networks. We evaluate the scalability of a microring based switch fabric for WDM signals. Critical parameters including crosstalk, insertion loss and switching speed are analyzed, and their sensitivity with respect to device parameters is examined. We show that optimization of physical layer parameters can reduce crosstalk and increase switch fabric scalability. Our analysis indicates that with current state-of-the-art devices, a high radix 128 × 128 silicon photonic single chip switch fabric with tolerable power penalty is feasible. The applicability of silicon photonic microrings for data center switching is further supported via review of microring operations and control demonstrations. The challenges and opportunities for this technology platform are discussed.

  4. The generation of the synchronized burst in the cultured neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangning; Sun, Jing; Chen, Wenjuan; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2009-02-01

    The spontaneous synchronous activity is a common behavior in a developing brain and plays a critical role in establishing appropriate connections and certain clinical diseases. Therefore, the investigation of the synchronous firing is important for understanding the formation of functional circuits and their implications in the network plasticity. In a limited period of time during development, the neuronal networks show synchronous activities, which occur simultaneously on a large amount of cells and varies wildly among different preparations. In this study, the spontaneous synchronous bursts are observed during the development of cultured neuron networks on multi-electrode array. The initiating site of a round of spontaneous synchronous burst, estimated from the relative delays of onsets of activities between electrodes, distributed randomly from each burst, while our statistical results confirmed that the positions of such initiating sites are stable. By calculating the cross-correlation function of the spike trains recorded from different electrodes simultaneously, the spreading mode and the spreading topography of the synchronized bursting activity were described. To access the changes in firing patterns in disinhibited cultured networks, the spontaneous activities were compared with the firings when the network exposed to bicuculline, the blocker of GABAA receptor. The results showed that the generation of synchronous bursts in cultured neuron networks is governed by the level of spontaneous activities and by the balance between excitation and inhibition circuits.

  5. Multiprotocol label-switching network functional description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Kenneth R.; Kroculick, Joseph

    1999-11-01

    This paper integrates a functional transport and control layer network architecture for MPLS emphasizing Traffic Engineering concepts such as the specification and provisioning of end-to-end QoS service layer agreements. MPLS transport networks are provisioned considering administrator-defined policies on bandwidth allocation, security, and accounting techniques. The MPLS architecture consists of the transport and control layer networks. The transport layer network is concerned with configuration, packet forwarding, signaling, adaptation to higher layers, and support of higher layers. The control layer network is concerned with policy configuration, management, distribution, definitions, schemas, elements, settings, and enforcement.

  6. Resource allocation in circuit-switched all-optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquis, Douglas; Barry, Richard A.; Finn, Steven G.; Parikh, Salil A.; Swanson, Eric A.; Thomas, Robert E.

    1996-03-01

    We describe an all-optical network testbed deployed in the Boston area, and research surrounding the allocation of optical resources -- frequencies and time slots -- within the network. The network was developed by a consortium of AT&T Bell Laboratories, Digital Equipment Corporation, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a grant from ARPA. The network is organized as a hierarchy consisting of local, metropolitan, and wide area nodes tea support optical broadcast and routing modes. Frequencies are shared and reused to enhance network scalability. Electronic access is provided through optical terminals that support multiple services having data rates between 10 Mbps/user and 10 Gbps/user. Of particular interest for this work is the 'B-service,' which simultaneously hops frequency and time slots on each optical terminal to allow frequency sharing within the AON. B-service provides 1.244 Gbps per optical terminal, with bandwidth for individual connections divided in increments as small as 10 Mbps. We have created interfaces between the AON and commercially available electronic circuit-switched and packet-switched networks. The packet switches provide FDDI (datacomm), T3 (telecomm), and ATM/SONET switching at backplane rates of over 3 Gbps. We show results on network applications that dynamically allocate optical bandwidth between electronic packet-switches based on the offered load presented by users. Bandwidth allocation granularity is proportional to B-Service slots (10-1244 Mbps), and switching times are on the order of one second. We have also studied the effects of wavelength changers upon the network capacity and blocking probabilities in wide area all-optical networks. Wavelength changers allow a change in the carrier frequency (within the network) without disturbing the data modulation. The study includes both a theoretical model of blocking probabilities based on network design parameters, and a computer simulation of blocking in networks with and

  7. Identifying repeating motifs in the activation of synchronized bursts in cultured neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Raichman, Nadav; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2008-05-15

    Cultured neuronal networks cultivated on micro-electrode arrays are a widely used tool for the investigation of network mechanisms, providing structural framework for long-term recordings of network electrical activity, as well as the network reaction to electrical or chemical stimulations. The typical activity pattern of the culture takes the form of synchronized bursting events (SBEs), in which a large fraction of the recorded neurons simultaneously fire trains of action potentials in short bursts of several hundreds of a millisecond. We developed a method that identifies clusters of bursts that share a similar activation motif throughout the culture based on the fact that the culture morphology remains relatively unchanged for an extended time interval and that neurons fire in a recognizable and precise manner during a burst initiation. Our method compares accuracies in time delays that occurred between the activation of spike-trains of different neurons. Three culture architectures were studied and analyzed: a large network of 2 million cells, a smaller network limited in size of 100,000 cells, and a large network divided into 4 clusters. In each of the morphologies we identified cultures that showed more than one activation motif. Clustered networks showed more motifs on average than uniform cultures. The algorithm was able to show high fidelity to artificial noise. We also compare the results of our method with another method based on a correlation measure.

  8. Experimental demonstration of OSPF-TE extensions in muiti-domain OBS networks connected by GMPLS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Chunlei; Yin, Yawei; Wu, Jian; Lin, Jintong

    2008-11-01

    The interworking network of Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) and Optical Burst Switching (OBS) is attractive network architecture for the future IP/DWDM network nowadays. In this paper, OSPF-TE extensions for multi-domain Optical Burst Switching networks connected by GMPLS controlled WDM network are proposed, the corresponding experimental results such as the advertising latency are also presented by using an OBS network testbed. The experimental results show that it works effectively on the OBS/GMPLS networks.

  9. Fast packet switching algorithms for dynamic resource control over ATM networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, R.P.; Keattihananant, P.; Chang, T.; Heieh, J.; Du, D.

    1996-12-01

    Real-time continuous media traffic, such as digital video and audio, is expected to comprise a large percentage of the network load on future high speed packet switch networks such as ATM. A major feature which distinguishes high speed networks from traditional slower speed networks is the large amount of data the network must process very quickly. For efficient network usage, traffic control mechanisms are essential. Currently, most mechanisms for traffic control (such as flow control) have centered on the support of Available Bit Rate (ABR), i.e., non real-time, traffic. With regard to ATM, for ABR traffic, two major types of schemes which have been proposed are rate- control and credit-control schemes. Neither of these schemes are directly applicable to Real-time Variable Bit Rate (VBR) traffic such as continuous media traffic. Traffic control for continuous media traffic is an inherently difficult problem due to the time- sensitive nature of the traffic and its unpredictable burstiness. In this study, we present a scheme which controls traffic by dynamically allocating/de- allocating resources among competing VCs based upon their real-time requirements. This scheme incorporates a form of rate- control, real-time burst-level scheduling and link-link flow control. We show analytically potential performance improvements of our rate- control scheme and present a scheme for buffer dimensioning. We also present simulation results of our schemes and discuss the tradeoffs inherent in maintaining high network utilization and statistically guaranteeing many users` Quality of Service.

  10. On-board congestion control for satellite packet switching networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Pong P.

    1991-01-01

    It is desirable to incorporate packet switching capability on-board for future communication satellites. Because of the statistical nature of packet communication, incoming traffic fluctuates and may cause congestion. Thus, it is necessary to incorporate a congestion control mechanism as part of the on-board processing to smooth and regulate the bursty traffic. Although there are extensive studies on congestion control for both baseband and broadband terrestrial networks, these schemes are not feasible for space based switching networks because of the unique characteristics of satellite link. Here, we propose a new congestion control method for on-board satellite packet switching. This scheme takes into consideration the long propagation delay in satellite link and takes advantage of the the satellite's broadcasting capability. It divides the control between the ground terminals and satellite, but distributes the primary responsibility to ground terminals and only requires minimal hardware resource on-board satellite.

  11. Large optical 3D MEMS switches in access networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madamopoulos, Nicholas; Kaman, Volkan; Yuan, Shifu; Jerphagnon, Olivier; Helkey, Roger; Bowers, John E.

    2007-09-01

    Interest is high among residential customers and businesses for advanced, broadband services such as fast Internet access, electronic commerce, video-on-demand, digital broadcasting, teleconferencing and telemedicine. In order to satisfy such growing demand of end-customers, access technologies such as fiber-to-the-home/building (FTTH/B) are increasingly being deployed. Carriers can reduce maintenance costs, minimize technology obsolescence and introduce new services easily by reducing active elements in the fiber access network. However, having a passive optical network (PON) also introduces operational and maintenance challenges. Increased diagnostic monitoring capability of the network becomes a necessity as more and more fibers are provisioned to deliver services to the end-customers. This paper demonstrates the clear advantages that large 3D optical MEMS switches offer in solving these access network problems. The advantages in preventative maintenance, remote monitoring, test and diagnostic capability are highlighted. The low optical insertion loss for all switch optical connections of the switch enables the monitoring, grooming and serving of a large number of PON lines and customers. Furthermore, the 3D MEMS switch is transparent to optical wavelengths and data formats, thus making it easy to incorporate future upgrades, such higher bit rates or DWDM overlay to a PON.

  12. Modeling the effect of transcriptional noise on switching in gene networks in a genetic bistable switch.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Srabanti

    2015-06-01

    Gene regulatory networks in cells allow transitions between gene expression states under the influence of both intrinsic and extrinsic noise. Here we introduce a new theoretical method to study the dynamics of switching in a two-state gene expression model with positive feedback by explicitly accounting for the transcriptional noise. Within this theoretical framework, we employ a semi-classical path integral technique to calculate the mean switching time starting from either an active or inactive promoter state. Our analytical predictions are in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations and experimental observations.

  13. Neural network/acoustic emission burst pressure prediction for impact damaged composite pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.L.; Workman, G.L.; Russell, S.S.; Hill, E.V.K.

    1997-08-01

    Acoustic emission signal analysis has been used to measure the effect impact damage has on the burst pressure of 146 mm (5.75 in.) diameter graphite/epoxy and the organic polymer, Kevlar/epoxy filament wound pressure vessels. Burst pressure prediction models were developed by correlating the differential acoustic emission amplitude distribution collected during low level hydroproof tests to known burst pressures using backpropagation artificial neural networks. Impact damage conditions ranging from barely visible to obvious fiber breakage, matrix cracking, and delamination were included in this work. A simulated (inert) propellant was also cast into a series of the vessels from each material class, before impact loading, to provide boundary conditions during impact that would simulate those found on solid rocket motors. The results of this research effort demonstrate that a quantitative assessment of the effects that impact damage has on burst pressure can be made for both organic polymer/epoxy and graphite/epoxy pressure vessels. Here, an artificial neural network analysis of the acoustic emission parametric data recorded during low pressure hydroproof testing is used to relate burst pressure to the vessel`s acoustic signature. Burst pressure predictions within 6.0% of the actual failure pressure are demonstrated for a series of vessels.

  14. Propagation of Spiking and Burst-Spiking Synchronous States in a Feed-Forward Neuronal Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Huang, Hong-Bin; Li, Pei-Jun; Wu, Fang-Ping; Wu, Wang-Jie; Jiang, Min

    2012-12-01

    Neuronal firing that carries information can propagate stably in neuronal networks. One important feature of the stable states is their spatiotemporal correlation (STC) developed in the propagation. The propagation of synchronous states of spiking and burst-spiking neuronal activities in a feed-forward neuronal network with high STC is studied. Different dynamic regions and synchronous regions of the second layer are clarified for spiking and burst-spiking neuronal activities. By calculating correlation, it is found that five layers are needed for stable propagation. Synchronous regions of the 4th layer and the 10th layer are compared.

  15. Basin stability for burst synchronization in small-world networks of chaotic slow-fast oscillators.

    PubMed

    Maslennikov, Oleg V; Nekorkin, Vladimir I; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    The impact of connectivity and individual dynamics on the basin stability of the burst synchronization regime in small-world networks consisting of chaotic slow-fast oscillators is studied. It is shown that there are rewiring probabilities corresponding to the largest basin stabilities, which uncovers a reason for finding small-world topologies in real neuronal networks. The impact of coupling density and strength as well as the nodal parameters of relaxation or excitability are studied. Dynamic mechanisms are uncovered that most strongly influence basin stability of the burst synchronization regime.

  16. Chaotic phase synchronization in small-world networks of bursting neurons.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Wong, Y K; Chan, W L; Tsang, K M; Yu, Ziqi

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the chaotic phase synchronization in a system of coupled bursting neurons in small-world networks. A transition to mutual phase synchronization takes place on the bursting time scale of coupled oscillators, while on the spiking time scale, they behave asynchronously. It is shown that phase synchronization is largely facilitated by a large fraction of shortcuts, but saturates when it exceeds a critical value. We also study the external chaotic phase synchronization of bursting oscillators in the small-world network by a periodic driving signal applied to a single neuron. It is demonstrated that there exists an optimal small-world topology, resulting in the largest peak value of frequency locking interval in the parameter plane, where bursting synchronization is maintained, even with the external driving. The width of this interval increases with the driving amplitude, but decrease rapidly with the network size. We infer that the externally applied driving parameters outside the frequency locking region can effectively suppress pathologically synchronized rhythms of bursting neurons in the brain.

  17. Chaotic phase synchronization in small-world networks of bursting neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Wong, Y. K.; Chan, W. L.; Tsang, K. M.; Yu, Ziqi

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the chaotic phase synchronization in a system of coupled bursting neurons in small-world networks. A transition to mutual phase synchronization takes place on the bursting time scale of coupled oscillators, while on the spiking time scale, they behave asynchronously. It is shown that phase synchronization is largely facilitated by a large fraction of shortcuts, but saturates when it exceeds a critical value. We also study the external chaotic phase synchronization of bursting oscillators in the small-world network by a periodic driving signal applied to a single neuron. It is demonstrated that there exists an optimal small-world topology, resulting in the largest peak value of frequency locking interval in the parameter plane, where bursting synchronization is maintained, even with the external driving. The width of this interval increases with the driving amplitude, but decrease rapidly with the network size. We infer that the externally applied driving parameters outside the frequency locking region can effectively suppress pathologically synchronized rhythms of bursting neurons in the brain.

  18. Distributed fault detection over sensor networks with Markovian switching topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xiaohua; Han, Qing-Long

    2014-05-01

    This paper deals with the distributed fault detection for discrete-time Markov jump linear systems over sensor networks with Markovian switching topologies. The sensors are scatteredly deployed in the sensor field and the fault detectors are physically distributed via a communication network. The system dynamics changes and sensing topology variations are modeled by a discrete-time Markov chain with incomplete mode transition probabilities. Each of these sensor nodes firstly collects measurement outputs from its all underlying neighboring nodes, processes these data in accordance with the Markovian switching topologies, and then transmits the processed data to the remote fault detector node. Network-induced delays and accumulated data packet dropouts are incorporated in the data transmission between the sensor nodes and the distributed fault detector nodes through the communication network. To generate localized residual signals, mode-independent distributed fault detection filters are proposed. By means of the stochastic Lyapunov functional approach, the residual system performance analysis is carried out such that the overall residual system is stochastically stable and the error between each residual signal and the fault signal is made as small as possible. Furthermore, a sufficient condition on the existence of the mode-independent distributed fault detection filters is derived in the simultaneous presence of incomplete mode transition probabilities, Markovian switching topologies, network-induced delays, and accumulated data packed dropouts. Finally, a stirred-tank reactor system is given to show the effectiveness of the developed theoretical results.

  19. Structure-dynamics relationships in bursting neuronal networks revealed using a prediction framework.

    PubMed

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Aćimović, Jugoslava; Ruohonen, Keijo; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2013-01-01

    The question of how the structure of a neuronal network affects its functionality has gained a lot of attention in neuroscience. However, the vast majority of the studies on structure-dynamics relationships consider few types of network structures and assess limited numbers of structural measures. In this in silico study, we employ a wide diversity of network topologies and search among many possibilities the aspects of structure that have the greatest effect on the network excitability. The network activity is simulated using two point-neuron models, where the neurons are activated by noisy fluctuation of the membrane potential and their connections are described by chemical synapse models, and statistics on the number and quality of the emergent network bursts are collected for each network type. We apply a prediction framework to the obtained data in order to find out the most relevant aspects of network structure. In this framework, predictors that use different sets of graph-theoretic measures are trained to estimate the activity properties, such as burst count or burst length, of the networks. The performances of these predictors are compared with each other. We show that the best performance in prediction of activity properties for networks with sharp in-degree distribution is obtained when the prediction is based on clustering coefficient. By contrast, for networks with broad in-degree distribution, the maximum eigenvalue of the connectivity graph gives the most accurate prediction. The results shown for small ([Formula: see text]) networks hold with few exceptions when different neuron models, different choices of neuron population and different average degrees are applied. We confirm our conclusions using larger ([Formula: see text]) networks as well. Our findings reveal the relevance of different aspects of network structure from the viewpoint of network excitability, and our integrative method could serve as a general framework for structure

  20. Micro-mechanical wavelength-selectable switches for photonic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizukami, Masato; Katagiri, Yoshitada

    2005-12-01

    Reconfigurable wideband photonic networks based on dense wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) are promising for versatile ubiquitous services. In such networks, wavelength-selectable optical switches will be needed for WDM-based routing, which is a primary function of the networks. A critical requirement is a wavelength selection time of 20 ms or less; otherwise, data packets will be lost. Various filters, including acousto-optic filters or Fabry-Perot etalon filters, are candidates for such switches, but all are inadequate because of high driving power or low accuracy in selecting wavelengths. We propose and demonstrate a wavelength-selectable switch that consists of micromechanically movable in/out filters. A series of thirty-two in/out elements with highly wavelength-managed dielectric filter units, which have flat-top spectral responses according to ITU-T grids, are densely packaged into a small space of 45 x24 x11 mm using miniaturized voice-coil motors (VCMs). By accurately arranging the filter elements along a collimating optical beam between fibers, we achieve small total insertion losses of less than 2.5 dB for all elements. By optimizing the VCM torque, we also achieve a wavelength-selection time of 10 ms (The minimum is 5 ms). We also achieve good wavelength reproducibility with an error of less than 0.1 nm, which was confirmed by a repetition test. These results show that the proposed switches are suitable for practical use.

  1. Dynamic transitions among multiple oscillators of synchronized bursts in cultured neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoan Kim, June; Heo, Ryoun; Choi, Joon Ho; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2014-04-01

    Synchronized neural bursts are a salient dynamic feature of biological neural networks, having important roles in brain functions. This report investigates the deterministic nature behind seemingly random temporal sequences of inter-burst intervals generated by cultured networks of cortical cells. We found that the complex sequences were an intricate patchwork of several noisy ‘burst oscillators’, whose periods covered a wide dynamic range, from a few tens of milliseconds to tens of seconds. The transition from one type of oscillator to another favored a particular passage, while the dwelling time between two neighboring transitions followed an exponential distribution showing no memory. With different amounts of bicuculline or picrotoxin application, we could also terminate the oscillators, generate new ones or tune their periods.

  2. Partial synchronization in stochastic dynamical networks with switching communication channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chi; Ho, Daniel W. C.; Lu, Jianquan; Kurths, Jürgen

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, the partial synchronization problem of stochastic dynamical networks (SDNs) is investigated. Unlike the existing models, the SDN considered in this paper suffers from a class of communication constraint—only part of nodes' states can be transmitted. Thus, less nodes' states can be used to synchronize the SDN, which makes the analysis of the synchronization problem much harder. A set of channel matrices are introduced to reflect such kind of constraint. Furthermore, due to unpredictable environmental changes, the channel matrices can switch among some communication modes. The switching considered here is governed by a Markov process. To overcome the difficulty, a regrouping method is employed to derive our main results. The obtained conditions guarantee that partial synchronization can be achieved for SDNs under switching communication constraint. Finally, numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results and how the communication constraint influences synchronization result.

  3. GENERATING OSCILLATORY BURSTS FROM A NETWORK OF REGULAR SPIKING NEURONS WITHOUT INHIBITION

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jing; Lai, Dihui; Meyer, Ulrike; Luksch, Harald; Wessel, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    Avian nucleus isthmi pars parvocellularis (Ipc) neurons are reciprocally connected with the layer 10 (L10) neurons in the optic tectum and respond with oscillatory bursts to visual stimulation. Our in vitro experiments show that both neuron types respond with regular spiking to somatic current injection and that the feedforward and feedback synaptic connections are excitatory, but of different strength and time course. To elucidate mechanisms of oscillatory bursting in this network of regularly spiking neurons, we investigated an experimentally constrained model of coupled leaky integrate-and-fire neurons with spike-rate adaptation. The model reproduces the observed Ipc oscillatory bursting in response to simulated visual stimulation. A scan through the model parameter volume reveals that Ipc oscillatory burst generation can be caused by strong and brief feedforward synaptic conductance changes. The mechanism is sensitive to the parameter values of spike-rate adaptation. In conclusion, we show that a network of regular-spiking neurons with feedforward excitation and spike-rate adaptation can generate oscillatory bursting in response to a constant input. PMID:19572191

  4. Metabotropic glutamate receptors switch visual response mode of lateral geniculate nucleus cells from burst to tonic.

    PubMed

    Godwin, D W; Vaughan, J W; Sherman, S M

    1996-09-01

    1. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) on relay cells of the lateral geniculate nucleus appear to be activated exclusively by cortical inputs. We thus sought to manipulate these receptors in an effort to gain insight into the possible role of the corticogeniculate pathway. We used in vivo recording and pharmacological techniques in cats to activate or inactivate these receptors on geniculate neurons while analyzing their response properties. 2. Iontophoretic application of the mGluR agonist 1-amino-cyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (ACPD) to X and Y cells in the geniculate A laminae diminished or abolished burst activity characteristic of low-threshold Ca2+ spikes. This was accompanied by pronounced changes in the visual response, including a decrease in signal detectability as measured with receiver operating characteristic curves. 3. ACPD effects appear specific to mGluRs, because a specific antagonist of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) failed to affect the ACPD-evoked responses, and antagonists of ACPD failed to affect iGluR-mediated responses. We found that 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine, an agonist reported to be specific for phosphatidylinositol (PI)-linked mGluRs, had effects similar to those of ACPD, implying that these effects are mediated by PI-coupled mGluRs. Furthermore, antagonists reported to be effective against PI-linked mGluRs were effective in antagonizing the ACPD-mediated effects, and substances reported to be agonists to mGluRs coupled to the adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate cascade did not affect neuronal responses on their own. These data, when added to our preliminary anatomic data, indicate that the receptor responsible for the observed effects may be mGluR1, or a functionally equivalent mGluR. 4. Activation of mGluRs produces changes in geniculate relay cell activity consistent with depolarization of these cells seen during in vitro studies. Such membrane depolarization has been shown to control the activation state of a

  5. A Lognormal Recurrent Network Model for Burst Generation during Hippocampal Sharp Waves.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yoshiyuki; Carvalho, Milena M; Inokuchi, Kaoru; Fukai, Tomoki

    2015-10-28

    The strength of cortical synapses distributes lognormally, with a long tail of strong synapses. Various properties of neuronal activity, such as the average firing rates of neurons, the rate and magnitude of spike bursts, the magnitude of population synchrony, and the correlations between presynaptic and postsynaptic spikes, also obey lognormal-like distributions reported in the rodent hippocampal CA1 and CA3 areas. Theoretical models have demonstrated how such a firing rate distribution emerges from neural network dynamics. However, how the other properties also display lognormal patterns remain unknown. Because these features are likely to originate from neural dynamics in CA3, we model a recurrent neural network with the weights of recurrent excitatory connections distributed lognormally to explore the underlying mechanisms and their functional implications. Using multi-timescale adaptive threshold neurons, we construct a low-frequency spontaneous firing state of bursty neurons. This state well replicates the observed statistical properties of population synchrony in hippocampal pyramidal cells. Our results show that the lognormal distribution of synaptic weights consistently accounts for the observed long-tailed features of hippocampal activity. Furthermore, our model demonstrates that bursts spread over the lognormal network much more effectively than single spikes, implying an advantage of spike bursts in information transfer. This efficiency in burst propagation is not found in neural network models with Gaussian-weighted recurrent excitatory synapses. Our model proposes a potential network mechanism to generate sharp waves in CA3 and associated ripples in CA1 because bursts occur in CA3 pyramidal neurons most frequently during sharp waves.

  6. Optical networking by DLP-based switched blazed grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hoang Yan; Chung, Shuang-Chao

    2005-02-01

    All-optical modules are devices which process and transport optical signals without transforming to electronic signals. They get more attention as the optical communication network becomes more and more complicated. Among them, OADM (optical add drop module) is one of the most important devices in the optical DWDM (dense wavelength division multiplex) network. It plays the role of a node in network to upload/download signals or to route signals for optical performance monitoring. Applied broadly in projection display systems, DLP (Digital Light Processing) from Texas Instruments turns out to be a versatile device for optical signal processing. The working principle of DLP is based on so called switched-blazed-grating. Part of its micro-mirror array can be formed as a dynamic blazed grating with a period of 14 μm by tilting the micro-mirrors at an angle of +/-12 degrees. It is expected to function as either a switch or an attenuator by directing total or part of the incident light between the 2nd and -2nd diffraction orders. In this paper, we investigate the optical characteristics of a switched-blazed-grating, its application as a re-configurable OADM, and the performance of such a device. Ray tracing and optical analysis of the OADM are made by using package software ASAP from Breault Research Organization. In conclusion, as a mature and reliable MEMS device, DLP-based switched-blazed-grating provides a very versatile platform for digital optical signal processing and can be used as a dynamic optical-networking device with good performance.

  7. Switched-beam radiometer front-end network analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trew, R. J.; Bilbro, G. L.

    1994-01-01

    The noise figure performance of various delay-line networks fabricated from microstrip lines with varying number of elements was investigated using a computer simulation. The effects of resistive losses in both the transmission lines and power combiners were considered. In general, it is found that an optimum number of elements exists, depending upon the resistive losses present in the network. Small resistive losses are found to have a significant degrading effect upon the noise figure performance of the array. Extreme stability in switching characteristics is necessary to minimize the nondeterministic noise of the array. For example, it is found that a 6 percent tolerance on the delay-line lengths will produce a 0.2 db uncertainty in the noise figure which translates into a 13.67 K temperature uncertainty generated by the network. If the tolerance can be held to 2 percent, the uncertainty in noise figure and noise temperature will be 0.025 db and 1.67 K, respectively. Three phase shift networks fabricated using a commercially available PIN diode switch were investigated. Loaded-line phase shifters are found to have desirable RF and noise characteristics and are attractive components for use in phased-array networks.

  8. Neural Network Burst Pressure Prediction in Graphite/Epoxy Pressure Vessels from Acoustic Emission Amplitude Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Eric v. K.; Walker, James L., II; Rowell, Ginger H.

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) data were taken during hydroproof for three sets of ASTM standard 5.75 inch diameter filament wound graphite/epoxy bottles. All three sets of bottles had the same design and were wound from the same graphite fiber; the only difference was in the epoxies used. Two of the epoxies had similar mechanical properties, and because the acoustic properties of materials are a function of their stiffnesses, it was thought that the AE data from the two sets might also be similar; however, this was not the case. Therefore, the three resin types were categorized using dummy variables, which allowed the prediction of burst pressures all three sets of bottles using a single neural network. Three bottles from each set were used to train the network. The resin category, the AE amplitude distribution data taken up to 25 % of the expected burst pressure, and the actual burst pressures were used as inputs. Architecturally, the network consisted of a forty-three neuron input layer (a single categorical variable defining the resin type plus forty-two continuous variables for the AE amplitude frequencies), a fifteen neuron hidden layer for mapping, and a single output neuron for burst pressure prediction. The network trained on all three bottle sets was able to predict burst pressures in the remaining bottles with a worst case error of + 6.59%, slightly greater than the desired goal of + 5%. This larger than desired error was due to poor resolution in the amplitude data for the third bottle set. When the third set of bottles was eliminated from consideration, only four hidden layer neurons were necessary to generate a worst case prediction error of - 3.43%, well within the desired goal.

  9. Switch-like Transitions Insulate Network Motifs to Modularize Biological Networks.

    PubMed

    Atay, Oguzhan; Doncic, Andreas; Skotheim, Jan M

    2016-08-01

    Cellular decisions are made by complex networks that are difficult to analyze. Although it is common to analyze smaller sub-networks known as network motifs, it is unclear whether this is valid, because these motifs are embedded in complex larger networks. Here, we address the general question of modularity by examining the S. cerevisiae pheromone response. We demonstrate that the feedforward motif controlling the cell-cycle inhibitor Far1 is insulated from cell-cycle dynamics by the positive feedback switch that drives reentry to the cell cycle. Before cells switch on positive feedback, the feedforward motif model predicts the behavior of the larger network. Conversely, after the switch, the feedforward motif is dismantled and has no discernable effect on the cell cycle. When insulation is broken, the feedforward motif no longer predicts network behavior. This work illustrates how, despite the interconnectivity of networks, the activity of motifs can be insulated by switches that generate well-defined cellular states. PMID:27453443

  10. Fast oscillations in cortical-striatal networks switch frequency following rewarding events and stimulant drugs

    PubMed Central

    Berke, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Oscillations may organize communication between components of large-scale brain networks. Although gamma-band oscillations have been repeatedly observed in cortical-basal ganglia circuits, their functional roles are not yet clear. Here I show that, in behaving animals, distinct frequencies of ventral striatal local field potential oscillations show coherence with different cortical inputs. ~50Hz gamma oscillations that normally predominate in awake ventral striatum are coherent with piriform cortex, while ~80-100Hz high-gamma oscillations are consistently coherent with frontal cortex. Within striatum, entrainment to gamma rhythms is selective to fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs), with distinct FSI populations entrained to different gamma frequencies. Administration of the psychomotor stimulant amphetamine or the dopamine agonist apomorphine causes a prolonged decrease in ~50Hz power and increase in ~80-100Hz power. The same frequency switch is observed for shorter epochs spontaneously in awake, undrugged animals, and is consistently provoked for <1s following reward receipt. Individual striatal neurons can participate in these brief high-gamma bursts with, or without, substantial changes in firing rate. Switching between discrete oscillatory states may allow different modes of information processing during decision-making and reinforcement-based learning, and may also be an important systems-level process by which stimulant drugs affect cognition and behavior. PMID:19659455

  11. Emergence of Slow-Switching Assemblies in Structured Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Michael T.; Billeh, Yazan N.; Anastassiou, Costas A.; Koch, Christof; Barahona, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Unraveling the interplay between connectivity and spatio-temporal dynamics in neuronal networks is a key step to advance our understanding of neuronal information processing. Here we investigate how particular features of network connectivity underpin the propensity of neural networks to generate slow-switching assembly (SSA) dynamics, i.e., sustained epochs of increased firing within assemblies of neurons which transition slowly between different assemblies throughout the network. We show that the emergence of SSA activity is linked to spectral properties of the asymmetric synaptic weight matrix. In particular, the leading eigenvalues that dictate the slow dynamics exhibit a gap with respect to the bulk of the spectrum, and the associated Schur vectors exhibit a measure of block-localization on groups of neurons, thus resulting in coherent dynamical activity on those groups. Through simple rate models, we gain analytical understanding of the origin and importance of the spectral gap, and use these insights to develop new network topologies with alternative connectivity paradigms which also display SSA activity. Specifically, SSA dynamics involving excitatory and inhibitory neurons can be achieved by modifying the connectivity patterns between both types of neurons. We also show that SSA activity can occur at multiple timescales reflecting a hierarchy in the connectivity, and demonstrate the emergence of SSA in small-world like networks. Our work provides a step towards understanding how network structure (uncovered through advancements in neuroanatomy and connectomics) can impact on spatio-temporal neural activity and constrain the resulting dynamics. PMID:26176664

  12. Emergence of Slow-Switching Assemblies in Structured Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Michael T; Billeh, Yazan N; Anastassiou, Costas A; Koch, Christof; Barahona, Mauricio

    2015-07-01

    Unraveling the interplay between connectivity and spatio-temporal dynamics in neuronal networks is a key step to advance our understanding of neuronal information processing. Here we investigate how particular features of network connectivity underpin the propensity of neural networks to generate slow-switching assembly (SSA) dynamics, i.e., sustained epochs of increased firing within assemblies of neurons which transition slowly between different assemblies throughout the network. We show that the emergence of SSA activity is linked to spectral properties of the asymmetric synaptic weight matrix. In particular, the leading eigenvalues that dictate the slow dynamics exhibit a gap with respect to the bulk of the spectrum, and the associated Schur vectors exhibit a measure of block-localization on groups of neurons, thus resulting in coherent dynamical activity on those groups. Through simple rate models, we gain analytical understanding of the origin and importance of the spectral gap, and use these insights to develop new network topologies with alternative connectivity paradigms which also display SSA activity. Specifically, SSA dynamics involving excitatory and inhibitory neurons can be achieved by modifying the connectivity patterns between both types of neurons. We also show that SSA activity can occur at multiple timescales reflecting a hierarchy in the connectivity, and demonstrate the emergence of SSA in small-world like networks. Our work provides a step towards understanding how network structure (uncovered through advancements in neuroanatomy and connectomics) can impact on spatio-temporal neural activity and constrain the resulting dynamics.

  13. Satellite range delay simulator for a matrix-switched time division multiple-access network simulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, Lawrence A.

    1990-01-01

    The Systems Integration, Test, and Evaluation (SITE) facility at NASA Lewis Research Center is presently configured as a satellite-switched time division multiple access (SS-TDMA) network simulator. The purpose of SITE is to demonstrate and evaluate advanced communication satellite technologies, presently embodied by POC components developed under NASA contracts in addition to other hardware, such as ground terminals, designed and built in-house at NASA Lewis. Each ground terminal in a satellite communications system will experience a different aspect of the satellite's motion due mainly to daily tidal effects and station keeping, hence a different duration and rate of variation in the range delay. As a result of this and other effects such as local oscillator instability, each ground terminal must constantly adjust its transmit burst timing so that data bursts from separate ground terminals arrive at the satellite in their assigned time slots, preventing overlap and keeping the system in synchronism. On the receiving end, ground terminals must synchronize their local clocks using reference transmissions received through the satellite link. A feature of the SITE facility is its capability to simulate the varying propagation delays and associated Doppler frequency shifts that the ground terminals in the network have to cope with. Delay is ahcieved by means of two NASA Lewis designed and built range delay simulator (RDS) systems, each independently controlled locally with front panel switches or remotely by an experiment control and monitor (EC/M) computer.

  14. Performance analysis of signaling protocols on OBS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirci, Pinar; Zaim, A. Halim

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, Just-In-Time (JIT), Just-Enough-Time (JET) and Horizon signalling schemes for Optical Burst Switched Networks (OBS) are presented. These signaling schemes run over a core dWDM network and a network architecture based on Optical Burst Switches (OBS) is proposed to support IP, ATM and Burst traffic. In IP and ATM traffic several packets are assembled in a single packet called burst and the burst contention is handled by burst dropping. The burst length distribution in IP traffic is arbitrary between 0 and 1, and is fixed in ATM traffic at 0,5. Burst traffic on the other hand is arbitrary between 1 and 5. The Setup and Setup ack length distributions are arbitrary. We apply the Poisson model with rate λ and Self-Similar model with pareto distribution rate α to identify inter-arrival times in these protocols. We consider a communication between a source client node and a destination client node over an ingress and one or more multiple intermediate switches.We use buffering only in the ingress node. The communication is based on single burst connections in which, the connection is set up just before sending a burst and then closed as soon as the burst is sent. Our analysis accounts for several important parameters, including the burst setup, burst setup ack, keepalive messages and the optical switching protocol. We compare the performance of the three signalling schemes on the network under as burst dropping probability under a range of network scenarios.

  15. THE INTERPLANETARY NETWORK SUPPLEMENT TO THE FERMI GBM CATALOG OF COSMIC GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, K.; Pal'shin, V. D.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Mazets, E. P.; Svinkin, D. S.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Meegan, C.; Goldsten, J.; Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; and others

    2013-08-15

    We present Interplanetary Network (IPN) data for the gamma-ray bursts in the first Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) catalog. Of the 491 bursts in that catalog, covering 2008 July 12 to 2010 July 11, 427 were observed by at least one other instrument in the nine-spacecraft IPN. Of the 427, the localizations of 149 could be improved by arrival time analysis (or {sup t}riangulation{sup )}. For any given burst observed by the GBM and one other distant spacecraft, triangulation gives an annulus of possible arrival directions whose half-width varies between about 0.'4 and 32 Degree-Sign , depending on the intensity, time history, and arrival direction of the burst, as well as the distance between the spacecraft. We find that the IPN localizations intersect the 1{sigma} GBM error circles in only 52% of the cases, if no systematic uncertainty is assumed for the latter. If a 6 Degree-Sign systematic uncertainty is assumed and added in quadrature, the two localization samples agree about 87% of the time, as would be expected. If we then multiply the resulting error radii by a factor of three, the two samples agree in slightly over 98% of the cases, providing a good estimate of the GBM 3{sigma} error radius. The IPN 3{sigma} error boxes have areas between about 1 arcmin{sup 2} and 110 deg{sup 2}, and are, on the average, a factor of 180 smaller than the corresponding GBM localizations. We identify two bursts in the IPN/GBM sample that did not appear in the GBM catalog. In one case, the GBM triggered on a terrestrial gamma flash, and in the other, its origin was given as ''uncertain''. We also discuss the sensitivity and calibration of the IPN.

  16. Neural network classification of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balastegui, A.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Canal, R.

    2005-07-01

    From a cluster analysis it appeared that a three-class classification of GRBs could be preferable to just the classic separation of short/hard and long/soft GRBs (Balastegui A., Ruiz-Lapuente P. Canal R. MNRAS 328 (2001) 283). A new classification of GRBs obtained via a neural network is presented, with a short/hard class, an intermediate-duration/soft class, and a long/soft class, the latter being a brighter and more inhomogenous class than the intermediate duration one. A possible physical meaning of this new classification is also outlined.

  17. Control of Stochastic and Induced Switching in Biophysical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Daniel K.; Kath, William L.; Motter, Adilson E.

    2015-07-01

    Noise caused by fluctuations at the molecular level is a fundamental part of intracellular processes. While the response of biological systems to noise has been studied extensively, there has been limited understanding of how to exploit it to induce a desired cell state. Here we present a scalable, quantitative method based on the Freidlin-Wentzell action to predict and control noise-induced switching between different states in genetic networks that, conveniently, can also control transitions between stable states in the absence of noise. We apply this methodology to models of cell differentiation and show how predicted manipulations of tunable factors can induce lineage changes, and further utilize it to identify new candidate strategies for cancer therapy in a cell death pathway model. This framework offers a systems approach to identifying the key factors for rationally manipulating biophysical dynamics, and should also find use in controlling other classes of noisy complex networks.

  18. Synchronization in dynamical networks with unconstrained structure switching.

    PubMed

    del Genio, Charo I; Romance, Miguel; Criado, Regino; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    We provide a rigorous solution to the problem of constructing a structural evolution for a network of coupled identical dynamical units that switches between specified topologies without constraints on their structure. The evolution of the structure is determined indirectly from a carefully built transformation of the eigenvector matrices of the coupling Laplacians, which are guaranteed to change smoothly in time. In turn, this allows one to extend the master stability function formalism, which can be used to assess the stability of a synchronized state. This approach is independent from the particular topologies that the network visits, and is not restricted to commuting structures. Also, it does not depend on the time scale of the evolution, which can be faster than, comparable to, or even secular with respect to the dynamics of the units.

  19. Synchronization in dynamical networks with unconstrained structure switching.

    PubMed

    del Genio, Charo I; Romance, Miguel; Criado, Regino; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    We provide a rigorous solution to the problem of constructing a structural evolution for a network of coupled identical dynamical units that switches between specified topologies without constraints on their structure. The evolution of the structure is determined indirectly from a carefully built transformation of the eigenvector matrices of the coupling Laplacians, which are guaranteed to change smoothly in time. In turn, this allows one to extend the master stability function formalism, which can be used to assess the stability of a synchronized state. This approach is independent from the particular topologies that the network visits, and is not restricted to commuting structures. Also, it does not depend on the time scale of the evolution, which can be faster than, comparable to, or even secular with respect to the dynamics of the units. PMID:26764756

  20. Synchronization in dynamical networks with unconstrained structure switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Genio, Charo I.; Romance, Miguel; Criado, Regino; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    We provide a rigorous solution to the problem of constructing a structural evolution for a network of coupled identical dynamical units that switches between specified topologies without constraints on their structure. The evolution of the structure is determined indirectly from a carefully built transformation of the eigenvector matrices of the coupling Laplacians, which are guaranteed to change smoothly in time. In turn, this allows one to extend the master stability function formalism, which can be used to assess the stability of a synchronized state. This approach is independent from the particular topologies that the network visits, and is not restricted to commuting structures. Also, it does not depend on the time scale of the evolution, which can be faster than, comparable to, or even secular with respect to the dynamics of the units.

  1. Multiple-beam, pulse-burst, passively Q-switched ceramic Nd:YAG laser under micro-lens array pumping.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yufei; He, Ying; Yu, Xin; Li, Xudong; Li, Jiang; Yan, Renpeng; Peng, Jiangbo; Zhang, Xinlu; Sun, Rui; Pan, Yubai; Chen, Deying

    2015-09-21

    A novel four-beam (named laserI, laser II, laser III and laser IV, respectively), passively Q-switched, pulse-burst ceramic Nd:YAG laser under 2 × 2 micro-lens array pumping was demonstrated for the purpose of laser-induced plasma ignition (LIPI). Multiple-beam output together with pulse-burst mode in which both high repetition rate and high pulse energy can be realized simultaneously were obtained to greatly improve the performance of LIPI. The pulse-burst contained a maximum of 5 pulses, 3 pulses, 2 pulses and 3 pulses for laserI, laser II, laser III and laser IV, respectively, and the corresponding repetition rate of laser pulses in pulse-burst was 10.8 kHz, 7.2 kHz, 6.8 kHz and 5.2 kHz, respectively. The output energy for single laser pulse in pulse-burst was in the range of 0.12 mJ to 0.22 mJ. PMID:26406695

  2. Stability analysis of switched stochastic neural networks with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaotai; Tang, Yang; Zhang, Wenbing

    2014-03-01

    This paper is concerned with the global exponential stability of switched stochastic neural networks with time-varying delays. Firstly, the stability of switched stochastic delayed neural networks with stable subsystems is investigated by utilizing the mathematical induction method, the piecewise Lyapunov function and the average dwell time approach. Secondly, by utilizing the extended comparison principle from impulsive systems, the stability of stochastic switched delayed neural networks with both stable and unstable subsystems is analyzed and several easy to verify conditions are derived to ensure the exponential mean square stability of switched delayed neural networks with stochastic disturbances. The effectiveness of the proposed results is illustrated by two simulation examples.

  3. Study of the precision of the gamma-ray burst source locations obtained with the Ulysses/PVO/CGRO network

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, T.L. ); Hurley, K.C. ); Sommer, M. ); Boer, M.; Niel, M. ); Fishman, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; Meegan, C.; Paciesas, W.S.; Wilson, R.B. ); Laros, J.G.; Klebesadel, R.W. )

    1994-07-01

    The interplanetary gamma-ray burst network of the [ital Ulysses], [ital Compton]-[ital GRO], and [ital Pioneer]-[ital Venus] [ital Orbiter] missions has made source localizations with fractional-arc-minute precision for a number of events, and with auxiliary data, will provide useful annular-segment loci for many more. These studies have, thus far, yielded one possible counterpart, a [ital Rosat] x-ray association with the 92 May 1 burst. Similar to the historic 1978 November 19 burst/[ital Einstein] association, this possibility gives hope that network studies will provide a fundamental source clue for classical' bursts, just as a second supernova remnant in a network-defined source field has done for sgr events.

  4. Passivity and robust synchronisation of switched interval coupled neural networks with time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Cao, Jinde

    2016-09-01

    This paper is concerned with passivity and robust synchronisation of switched coupled neural networks with uncertain parameters. First, the mathematical model of switched coupled neural networks with interval uncertain parameters is established, which consists of L modes and switches from one mode to another according to the switching rule. Second, by employing passivity theory and linear matrix inequality techniques, delay-independent and delay-dependent conditions are derived to guarantee the passivity of switched interval coupled neural networks. Moreover, based on the proposed passivity results, global synchronisation criteria can be obtained for switched coupled neural networks with or without uncertain parameters. Finally, an illustrative example is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  5. Global exponential stability for switched memristive neural networks with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Xin, Youming; Li, Yuxia; Cheng, Zunshui; Huang, Xia

    2016-08-01

    This paper considers the problem of exponential stability for switched memristive neural networks (MNNs) with time-varying delays. Different from most of the existing papers, we model a memristor as a continuous system, and view switched MNNs as switched neural networks with uncertain time-varying parameters. Based on average dwell time technique, mode-dependent average dwell time technique and multiple Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional approach, two conditions are derived to design the switching signal and guarantee the exponential stability of the considered neural networks, which are delay-dependent and formulated by linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Finally, the effectiveness of the theoretical results is demonstrated by two numerical examples.

  6. Integrated optical buffers for packet-switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmeister, Emily Frances

    Routers form the backbone of the Internet, directing data to the right locations with huge throughput capacity of terabits/second) and very few errors (1 error allowed in 1012 bits). However, as the Internet continues to grow rapidly, so must the capacity of electronic routers, thereby also growing in footprint and power consumption. The energy bill alone has developers looking for an alternate solution. Today's routers can only operate with electrical signals although Internet data is transmitted optically. This requires the data to be converted from the optical domain to the electrical domain and back again. Optical routers have the potential of saving in power by omitting these conversions, but have been held back in part by the lack of a practical optical memory device. This work presents the first integrated optical buffer for next generation optical packet-switched networks. Buffering is required in a router to move packets of data in order to avoid collisions between packets heading to the same destination at the same time. The device presented here uses an InP-based two-by-two switch with a silica waveguide delay to form a recirculating buffer. Packet storage was shown with 98% packet recovery for 5 circulations. Autonomous contention resolution was demonstrated with two buffered channels to show that the technology is a realistic solution for creating multiple element buffers on multiple router ports. This thesis proposes and demonstrates the first integrated optical random access memory, thereby making a great stride toward high capacity optical routers.

  7. Feedback control and output feedback control for the stabilisation of switched Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangfei; Yu, Zhaoxu

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the feedback control and output feedback control for the stabilisation of switched Boolean network. A necessary condition for the existence of a state feedback controller for the stabilisation of switched Boolean networks under arbitrary switching signal is derived first, and constructive procedures for feedback control and output feedback control design are provided. An example is introduced to show the effectiveness of this paper.

  8. Interfacing VoIP to the Public Switch Telephone Network (PSTN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilgrim, Jim

    2001-07-01

    Interfacing VoIP into the current Public Switched Telephone Network is for the most part done through the use of a gateway. This gateway whether H.323, Session Initiation Protocol or Media Gateway Control Protocol is required for access into a traditional switched telephony network.

  9. 47 CFR 68.110 - Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and terminal equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and terminal equipment. 68.110 Section 68.110 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION... Conditions on Use of Terminal Equipment § 68.110 Compatibility of the public switched telephone network...

  10. 47 CFR 68.110 - Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and terminal equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and terminal equipment. 68.110 Section 68.110 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION... Conditions on Use of Terminal Equipment § 68.110 Compatibility of the public switched telephone network...

  11. 47 CFR 68.110 - Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and terminal equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and terminal equipment. 68.110 Section 68.110 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION... Conditions on Use of Terminal Equipment § 68.110 Compatibility of the public switched telephone network...

  12. Holographic perfect shuffle permutation element for a miniaturized switching network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobolla, H.; Schmidt, J.; Gluch, E.; Schwider, J.

    1995-06-01

    A holographic perfect shuffle element with 80 channels for a miniaturized switching network is reported. An array of vertical-cavity, surface-emitting lasers is used as a transmitter. The whole permutation is carried out totally in glass. The 80 channels are permuted within a rectangle with a volume of 3 mm \\times 4 mm \\times 2 mm. Four planes of stacked volume holograms recorded in dichromated gelatin form this perfect shuffle element with an angular spectrum between 7 deg and 35 deg. Changes in the wavelength of the diode lasers to Delta lambda = +/-10 nm can be compensated with this setup. The overall efficiency per channel lies between 40% and 60%. When Fresnel reflections and absorption are taken into account, a transmission per hologram between 78% and 90% is achieved.

  13. RF switching network: a novel technique for IR sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechtel, Deborah M.; Jenkins, R. Brian; Joyce, Peter J.; Nelson, Charles L.

    2016-05-01

    Rapid sensing of near infrared (IR) energy on a composite structure would provide information that could mitigate damage to composite structures. This paper describes a novel technique that implements photoconductive sensors in a radio frequency (RF) switching network designed to locate in real time the position and intensity of IR radiation incident on a composite structure. In the implementation described here, photoconductive sensors act as rapid response switches in a two layer RF network embedded in an FR-4 laminate. To detect radiation, phosphorous doped silicon photoconductive sensors are inserted in GHz range RF transmission lines. Photoconductive sensors use semiconductor materials that are optically sensitive at material dependent wavelengths. Incident radiation at the appropriate wavelength produces hole-electron pairs, so that the semiconductor becomes a conductor. By permitting signal propagation only when a sensor is illuminated, the RF signals are selectively routed from the lower layer transmission lines to the upper layer lines, thereby pinpointing the location and strength of incident radiation on a structure. Simulations based on a high frequency 3D planar electromagnetics model are presented and compared to experimental results. Experimental results are described for GHz range RF signal control for 300 mW and 180 mW incident energy from 975 nm and 1060 nm wavelength lasers respectively, where upon illumination, RF transmission line signal output power doubled when compared to non-illuminated results. Experimental results are reported for 100 W incident energy from a 1060 nm laser. Test results illustrate that real-time signal processing would permit a structure or vehicle to be controlled in response to incident radiation

  14. A comparison of computational methods for detecting bursts in neuronal spike trains and their application to human stem cell-derived neuronal networks

    PubMed Central

    Charlesworth, Paul; Thomas, Christopher W.; Paulsen, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Accurate identification of bursting activity is an essential element in the characterization of neuronal network activity. Despite this, no one technique for identifying bursts in spike trains has been widely adopted. Instead, many methods have been developed for the analysis of bursting activity, often on an ad hoc basis. Here we provide an unbiased assessment of the effectiveness of eight of these methods at detecting bursts in a range of spike trains. We suggest a list of features that an ideal burst detection technique should possess and use synthetic data to assess each method in regard to these properties. We further employ each of the methods to reanalyze microelectrode array (MEA) recordings from mouse retinal ganglion cells and examine their coherence with bursts detected by a human observer. We show that several common burst detection techniques perform poorly at analyzing spike trains with a variety of properties. We identify four promising burst detection techniques, which are then applied to MEA recordings of networks of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons and used to describe the ontogeny of bursting activity in these networks over several months of development. We conclude that no current method can provide “perfect” burst detection results across a range of spike trains; however, two burst detection techniques, the MaxInterval and logISI methods, outperform compared with others. We provide recommendations for the robust analysis of bursting activity in experimental recordings using current techniques. PMID:27098024

  15. A comparison of computational methods for detecting bursts in neuronal spike trains and their application to human stem cell-derived neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Cotterill, Ellese; Charlesworth, Paul; Thomas, Christopher W; Paulsen, Ole; Eglen, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    Accurate identification of bursting activity is an essential element in the characterization of neuronal network activity. Despite this, no one technique for identifying bursts in spike trains has been widely adopted. Instead, many methods have been developed for the analysis of bursting activity, often on an ad hoc basis. Here we provide an unbiased assessment of the effectiveness of eight of these methods at detecting bursts in a range of spike trains. We suggest a list of features that an ideal burst detection technique should possess and use synthetic data to assess each method in regard to these properties. We further employ each of the methods to reanalyze microelectrode array (MEA) recordings from mouse retinal ganglion cells and examine their coherence with bursts detected by a human observer. We show that several common burst detection techniques perform poorly at analyzing spike trains with a variety of properties. We identify four promising burst detection techniques, which are then applied to MEA recordings of networks of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons and used to describe the ontogeny of bursting activity in these networks over several months of development. We conclude that no current method can provide "perfect" burst detection results across a range of spike trains; however, two burst detection techniques, the MaxInterval and logISI methods, outperform compared with others. We provide recommendations for the robust analysis of bursting activity in experimental recordings using current techniques.

  16. Electronic Power Switch for Fault-Tolerant Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volp, J.

    1987-01-01

    Power field-effect transistors reduce energy waste and simplify interconnections. Current switch containing power field-effect transistor (PFET) placed in series with each load in fault-tolerant power-distribution system. If system includes several loads and supplies, switches placed in series with adjacent loads and supplies. System of switches protects against overloads and losses of individual power sources.

  17. Bursting frequency versus phase synchronization in time-delayed neuron networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordenfelt, Anders; Used, Javier; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.

    2013-05-01

    We investigate the dependence of the average bursting frequency on time delay for neuron networks with randomly distributed time-delayed chemical synapses. The result is compared with the corresponding curve for the phase synchronization and it turns out that, in some intervals, these have a very similar shape and appear as almost mirror images of each other. We have analyzed both the map-based chaotic Rulkov model and the continuous Hindmarsh-Rose model, yielding the same conclusions. In order to gain further insight, we also analyzed time-delayed Kuramoto models displaying an overall behavior similar to that observed on the neuron network models. For the Kuramoto models, we were able to derive analytical formulas providing an implicit functional relationship between the mean frequency and the phase synchronization. These formulas suggest a strong dependence between those two measures, which could explain the similarities in shape between the curves.

  18. Neural network burst pressure prediction in impact damaged Kevlar/epoxy bottles from acoustic emission amplitude data

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.L.; Workman, G.L.; Russell, S.S.

    1994-12-31

    Acoustic emission (AE) signal analysis has been used to measure the effect of impact damage on the burst pressure of 5.75 inch diameter filament wound Kevlar/epoxy pressure vessels. A calibrated dead weight drop fixture, featuring both sharp and blunt hemispherical impact tups, generated impact damages with energies up to twenty ft-lb{sub f} in the mid hoop region of each vessel. Burst pressures were obtained by hydrostatically testing twenty-seven damaged and undamaged bottles, eleven of which were filled with inert propellant to simulate a rocket motor. Burst pressure prediction models were developed by correlating the differential AE amplitude distributions, Generated during the first pressure ramp to 25% of the expected burst pressure for the undamaged vessels, to known burst pressures using back propagation neural networks. Independent networks were created for the inert propellant filled vessels and the unfilled vessels using a small subset of each during the training phases. The remaining bottles served as the test sets. The eleven filled vessels had an average prediction error of 5.6%, while the unfilled bottles averaged 5.4%. Both of these results were within the 95% prediction interval, but a portion of the vessel burst pressure errors were greater than the {+-}5% worst case error obtained in previous work. in conclusion, the AE amplitude distribution data collected at low proof loads provided a suitable input for neural network burst pressure prediction in damaged and undamaged Kevlar/epoxy bottles. This included pressure vessels both with and without propellant backing. Work is ongoing to decrease the magnitude of the prediction error through network restructuring.

  19. Global seamless network demonstrator: carrier grade automatic switched transport network implementation in realistic telecom field environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foisel, Hans-Martin; Hanik, Norbert; Braun, Ralf-Peter; Lehr, Georg; Gladisch, Andreas

    2004-04-01

    The Global Seamless Network (GSN) Demonstrator is presented, a joint effort of system vendors and Deutsche Telekom Group R&D to demonstrate network functions and management integration and enable, for the first time, experiences with a carrier grade Automatically Switched Transport Network (ASTN) implementation and the envisaged main ASTN clients, IP and Ethernet. For end-to-end monitoring capability, integrating the view on the ASTN and Ethernet-MAN configuration, an UMS (Upper Monitoring System) is being developed. Furthermore broadband application were implemented to visualise the network functions. The ASTN backbone consists of four cross connects and an ULH-WDM system with 3x 10Gbit/s channels (OCh) between Berlin and Darmstadt, whereby each OCh is treated as a virtual fibre.

  20. Demonstration of 720×720 optical fast circuit switch for intra-datacenter networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Koh; Mori, Yojiro; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Kiyo; Kuwatsuka, Haruhiko; Namiki, Shu; Sato, Ken-ichi

    2016-03-01

    Intra-datacenter traffic is growing more than 20% a year. In typical datacenters, many racks/pods including servers are interconnected via multi-tier electrical switches. The electrical switches necessitate power-consuming optical-to- electrical (OE) and electrical-to-optical (EO) conversion, the power consumption of which increases with traffic. To overcome this problem, optical switches that eliminate costly OE and EO conversion and enable low power consumption switching are being investigated. There are two major requirements for the optical switch. First, it must have a high port count to construct reduced tier intra-datacenter networks. Second, switching speed must be short enough that most of the traffic load can be offloaded from electrical switches. Among various optical switches, we focus on those based on arrayed-waveguide gratings (AWGs), since the AWG is a passive device with minimal power consumption. We previously proposed a high-port-count optical switch architecture that utilizes tunable lasers, route-and-combine switches, and wavelength-routing switches comprised of couplers, erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs), and AWGs. We employed conventional external cavity lasers whose wavelength-tuning speed was slower than 100 ms. In this paper, we demonstrate a large-scale optical switch that offers fast wavelength routing. We construct a 720×720 optical switch using recently developed lasers whose wavelength-tuning period is below 460 μs. We evaluate the switching time via bit-error-ratio measurements and achieve 470-μs switching time (includes 10-μs guard time to handle EDFA surge). To best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of such a large-scale optical switch with practical switching time.

  1. Search for gravitational waves associated with γ-ray bursts detected by the interplanetary network.

    PubMed

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J S; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Augustus, H; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calderón Bustillo, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castaldi, G; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P-F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J-P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Croce, R P; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, C; Dahl, K; Dal Canton, T; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Dickson, J; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dolique, V; Dominguez, E; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H-B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endrőczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J-D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C J; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, J; Hall, E D; Hamilton, W; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C-J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Holt, K; Hopkins, P; Horrom, T; Hoske, D; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Haris, K; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N G; Kim, N; Kim, S; Kim, Y-M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, D Nanda; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Larson, S; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, J; Lee, P J; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leonor, I; Le Roux, A; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B; Lewis, J; Li, T G F; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Lodhia, D; Loew, K; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lopez, E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Ma, Y; Macdonald, E P; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Magee, R; Mageswaran, M; Maglione, C; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Manca, G M; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mangini, N M; Mansell, G; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martinelli, L; Martynov, D; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; May, G; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McLin, K; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meidam, J; Meinders, M; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mingarelli, C M F; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nagy, M F; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nelemans, G; Neri, I; Neri, M; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A H; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Omar, S; Oppermann, P; Oram, R; O'Reilly, B; Ortega, W; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Padilla, C; Pai, A; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pan, H; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Papa, M A; Paris, H; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Pedraza, M; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J; Poggiani, R; Poteomkin, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Privitera, S; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajalakshmi, G; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C; Ramirez, K; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Recchia, S; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Reula, O; Rhoades, E; Ricci, F; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Roddy, S B; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J R; Sankar, S; Sannibale, V; Santiago-Prieto, I; Saracco, E; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Scheuer, J; Schilling, R; Schilman, M; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D A; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Singh, R; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Souradeep, T; Staley, A; Stebbins, J; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Stephens, B C; Steplewski, S; Stevenson, S; Stone, R; Stops, D; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tao, J; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, R; Tellez, G; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Tshilumba, D; Tuennermann, H; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Beuzekom, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vyachanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, M; Wang, X; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Williams, K; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williams, T D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Wolovick, N; Worden, J; Wu, Y; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yoshida, S; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J-P; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zhu, H; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S; Zweizig, J; Aptekar, R L; Atteia, J L; Cline, T; Connaughton, V; Frederiks, D D; Golenetskii, S V; Hurley, K; Krimm, H A; Marisaldi, M; Pal'shin, V D; Palmer, D; Svinkin, D S; Terada, Y; von Kienlin, A

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 223 γ-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the InterPlanetary Network (IPN) in 2005-2010 during LIGO's fifth and sixth science runs and Virgo's first, second, and third science runs. The IPN satellites provide accurate times of the bursts and sky localizations that vary significantly from degree scale to hundreds of square degrees. We search for both a well-modeled binary coalescence signal, the favored progenitor model for short GRBs, and for generic, unmodeled gravitational wave bursts. Both searches use the event time and sky localization to improve the gravitational wave search sensitivity as compared to corresponding all-time, all-sky searches. We find no evidence of a gravitational wave signal associated with any of the IPN GRBs in the sample, nor do we find evidence for a population of weak gravitational wave signals associated with the GRBs. For all IPN-detected GRBs, for which a sufficient duration of quality gravitational wave data are available, we place lower bounds on the distance to the source in accordance with an optimistic assumption of gravitational wave emission energy of 10(-2)M⊙c(2) at 150 Hz, and find a median of 13 Mpc. For the 27 short-hard GRBs we place 90% confidence exclusion distances to two source models: a binary neutron star coalescence, with a median distance of 12 Mpc, or the coalescence of a neutron star and black hole, with a median distance of 22 Mpc. Finally, we combine this search with previously published results to provide a population statement for GRB searches in first-generation LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors and a resulting examination of prospects for the advanced gravitational wave detectors. PMID:25032916

  2. Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts Detected by the Interplanetary Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Blackbum, L.; Camp, J. B.; Gehrels, N.; Graff, P. B.; Slutsky, J.; Cline, T.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 223 gamma ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the InterPlanetary Network (IPN) in 2005-2010 during LIGO's fifth and sixth science runs and Virgo's first, second, and third science runs. The IPN satellites provide accurate times of the bursts and sky localizations that vary significantly from degree scale to hundreds of square degrees. We search for both a well-modeled binary coalescence signal, the favored progenitor model for short GRBs, and for generic, unmodeled gravitational wave bursts. Both searches use the event time and sky localization to improve the gravitational wave search sensitivity as compared to corresponding all-time, all-sky searches. We find no evidence of a gravitational wave signal associated with any of the IPN GRBs in the sample, nor do we find evidence for a population of weak gravitational wave signals associated with the GRBs. For all IPN-detected GRBs, for which a sufficient duration of quality gravitational wave data are available, we place lower bounds on the distance to the source in accordance with an optimistic assumption of gravitational wave emission energy of 10(exp-2) solar mass c(exp 2) at 150 Hz, and find a median of 13 Mpc. For the 27 short-hard GRBs we place 90% confidence exclusion distances to two source models: a binary neutron star coalescence, with a median distance of 12 Mpc, or the coalescence of a neutron star and black hole, with a median distance of 22 Mpc. Finally, we combine this search with previously published results to provide a population statement for GRB searches in first-generation LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors and a resulting examination of prospects for the advanced gravitational wave detectors.

  3. Search for gravitational waves associated with γ-ray bursts detected by the interplanetary network.

    PubMed

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J S; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Augustus, H; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calderón Bustillo, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castaldi, G; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P-F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J-P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Croce, R P; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, C; Dahl, K; Dal Canton, T; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Dickson, J; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dolique, V; Dominguez, E; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H-B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endrőczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J-D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C J; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, J; Hall, E D; Hamilton, W; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C-J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Holt, K; Hopkins, P; Horrom, T; Hoske, D; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Haris, K; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N G; Kim, N; Kim, S; Kim, Y-M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, D Nanda; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Larson, S; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, J; Lee, P J; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leonor, I; Le Roux, A; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B; Lewis, J; Li, T G F; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Lodhia, D; Loew, K; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lopez, E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Ma, Y; Macdonald, E P; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Magee, R; Mageswaran, M; Maglione, C; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Manca, G M; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mangini, N M; Mansell, G; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martinelli, L; Martynov, D; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; May, G; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McLin, K; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meidam, J; Meinders, M; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mingarelli, C M F; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nagy, M F; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nelemans, G; Neri, I; Neri, M; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A H; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Omar, S; Oppermann, P; Oram, R; O'Reilly, B; Ortega, W; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Padilla, C; Pai, A; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pan, H; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Papa, M A; Paris, H; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Pedraza, M; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J; Poggiani, R; Poteomkin, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Privitera, S; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajalakshmi, G; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C; Ramirez, K; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Recchia, S; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Reula, O; Rhoades, E; Ricci, F; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Roddy, S B; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J R; Sankar, S; Sannibale, V; Santiago-Prieto, I; Saracco, E; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Scheuer, J; Schilling, R; Schilman, M; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D A; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Singh, R; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Souradeep, T; Staley, A; Stebbins, J; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Stephens, B C; Steplewski, S; Stevenson, S; Stone, R; Stops, D; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tao, J; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, R; Tellez, G; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Tshilumba, D; Tuennermann, H; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Beuzekom, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vyachanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, M; Wang, X; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Williams, K; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williams, T D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Wolovick, N; Worden, J; Wu, Y; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yoshida, S; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J-P; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zhu, H; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S; Zweizig, J; Aptekar, R L; Atteia, J L; Cline, T; Connaughton, V; Frederiks, D D; Golenetskii, S V; Hurley, K; Krimm, H A; Marisaldi, M; Pal'shin, V D; Palmer, D; Svinkin, D S; Terada, Y; von Kienlin, A

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 223 γ-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the InterPlanetary Network (IPN) in 2005-2010 during LIGO's fifth and sixth science runs and Virgo's first, second, and third science runs. The IPN satellites provide accurate times of the bursts and sky localizations that vary significantly from degree scale to hundreds of square degrees. We search for both a well-modeled binary coalescence signal, the favored progenitor model for short GRBs, and for generic, unmodeled gravitational wave bursts. Both searches use the event time and sky localization to improve the gravitational wave search sensitivity as compared to corresponding all-time, all-sky searches. We find no evidence of a gravitational wave signal associated with any of the IPN GRBs in the sample, nor do we find evidence for a population of weak gravitational wave signals associated with the GRBs. For all IPN-detected GRBs, for which a sufficient duration of quality gravitational wave data are available, we place lower bounds on the distance to the source in accordance with an optimistic assumption of gravitational wave emission energy of 10(-2)M⊙c(2) at 150 Hz, and find a median of 13 Mpc. For the 27 short-hard GRBs we place 90% confidence exclusion distances to two source models: a binary neutron star coalescence, with a median distance of 12 Mpc, or the coalescence of a neutron star and black hole, with a median distance of 22 Mpc. Finally, we combine this search with previously published results to provide a population statement for GRB searches in first-generation LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors and a resulting examination of prospects for the advanced gravitational wave detectors.

  4. Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with γ-ray Bursts Detected by the Interplanetary Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Andersen, M.; Anderson, R. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Augustus, H.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Bergmann, G.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burman, R.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castaldi, G.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Celerier, C.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Croce, R. P.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dickson, J.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Feroz, F.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Ha, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hamilton, W.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Horrom, T.; Hoske, D.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 223 γ-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the InterPlanetary Network (IPN) in 2005-2010 during LIGO's fifth and sixth science runs and Virgo's first, second, and third science runs. The IPN satellites provide accurate times of the bursts and sky localizations that vary significantly from degree scale to hundreds of square degrees. We search for both a well-modeled binary coalescence signal, the favored progenitor model for short GRBs, and for generic, unmodeled gravitational wave bursts. Both searches use the event time and sky localization to improve the gravitational wave search sensitivity as compared to corresponding all-time, all-sky searches. We find no evidence of a gravitational wave signal associated with any of the IPN GRBs in the sample, nor do we find evidence for a population of weak gravitational wave signals associated with the GRBs. For all IPN-detected GRBs, for which a sufficient duration of quality gravitational wave data are available, we place lower bounds on the distance to the source in accordance with an optimistic assumption of gravitational wave emission energy of 10-2M⊙c2 at 150 Hz, and find a median of 13 Mpc. For the 27 short-hard GRBs we place 90% confidence exclusion distances to two source models: a binary neutron star coalescence, with a median distance of 12 Mpc, or the coalescence of a neutron star and black hole, with a median distance of 22 Mpc. Finally, we combine this search with previously published results to provide a population statement for GRB searches in first-generation LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors and a resulting examination of prospects for the advanced gravitational wave detectors.

  5. Clique of functional hubs orchestrates population bursts in developmentally regulated neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torcini, Alessandro; Luccioli, Stefano; Bonifazi, Paolo; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Barzilai, Ari

    2015-03-01

    It has recently been discovered that single neuron stimulation can impact network dynamics in immature and adult neuronal circuits. Here we report a novel mechanism which can explain in developing neuronal circuits, typically composed of only excitatory cells, the peculiar role played by a few specific neurons in promoting/arresting the population activity. For this purpose, we consider a standard neuronal network model, with short-term synaptic plasticity, whose population activity is characterized by bursting behavior. The addition of developmentally regulated constraints on single neuron excitability and connectivity leads to the emergence of functional hub neurons, whose stimulation/deletion is critical for the network activity. Functional hubs form a clique, where a precise sequential activation of the neurons is essential to ignite collective events without any need for a specific topological architecture. Unsupervised time-lagged firings of supra-threshold cells, in connection with coordinated entrainments of near-threshold neurons, are the key ingredients to orchestrate population activity. This work is part of the activity of the Joint Italian-Israeli Laboratory on Integrative Network Neuroscience supported by the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

  6. 47 CFR 68.110 - Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and terminal equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... network and terminal equipment. 68.110 Section 68.110 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Conditions on Use of Terminal Equipment § 68.110 Compatibility of the public switched telephone network...

  7. 47 CFR 68.201 - Connection to the public switched telephone network.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... network. 68.201 Section 68.201 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Terminal Equipment Approval Procedures § 68.201 Connection to the public switched telephone network. Terminal equipment...

  8. 47 CFR 68.110 - Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and terminal equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... network and terminal equipment. 68.110 Section 68.110 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Conditions on Use of Terminal Equipment § 68.110 Compatibility of the public switched telephone network...

  9. 47 CFR 68.201 - Connection to the public switched telephone network.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... network. 68.201 Section 68.201 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Terminal Equipment Approval Procedures § 68.201 Connection to the public switched telephone network. Terminal equipment...

  10. Real-time video transmission over a fast packet-switched network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorhead, Robert J.; Ma, Joong S.; Gonzales, Cesar A.

    1989-04-01

    Realtime transmission of packetized video is a relatively new but important area of research since tomorrow's networks will likely be based on a common fast packet-switching technology, replacing today's heterogeneous networks which are mixtures of circuit-switched and packet-switched networks dedicated for synchronous and asynchronous applications respectively. Unlike fixed bandwidth transmission channels, packet-switched networks can accommodate the bursty and highly variable rate of compressed motion video yet keep a constant level of image quality. Potential applications include motion video databases, video teleconferencing, and broadcasting over private networks. Unfortunately, traditional video-compression techniques which are applicable to synchronous, fixed bandwidth channels--cannot be applied in this new environment without substantial revisions that take into account the statistical nature of packet data transmission. Independent of their topology, fast packet-switched networks present unique challenges to the coding of motion video; one cannot simply divorce the coding of the source from the characteristics of the channel. The potential for loss of data integrity due to packet losses and transmission errors must be taken into account. The problem of re-synchronization must also be addressed since packet-switched networks are asynchronous by nature. In this paper, we evaluate image coding techniques for motion video in view of the constraints imposed by the packetized medium.

  11. Optically triggered high voltage switch network and method for switching a high voltage

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Andexler, George; Silberkleit, Lee I.

    1993-01-19

    An optically triggered solid state switch and method for switching a high voltage electrical current. A plurality of solid state switches (350) are connected in series for controlling electrical current flow between a compensation capacitor (112) and ground in a reactive power compensator (50, 50') that monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b and 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. An optical transmitter (100) controlled by the reactive power compensation system produces light pulses that are conveyed over optical fibers (102) to a switch driver (110') that includes a plurality of series connected optical triger circuits (288). Each of the optical trigger circuits controls a pair of the solid state switches and includes a plurality of series connected resistors (294, 326, 330, and 334) that equalize or balance the potential across the plurality of trigger circuits. The trigger circuits are connected to one of the distribution lines through a trigger capacitor (340). In each switch driver, the light signals activate a phototransistor (300) so that an electrical current flows from one of the energy reservoir capacitors through a pulse transformer (306) in the trigger circuit, producing gate signals that turn on the pair of serially connected solid state switches (350).

  12. Analyses, simulations, and experiments on the performance of the token-based optical burst transport ring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Wen, Gan; Wang, Hongxiang; Bai, Lin; Ji, Yuefeng

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, both numerical and simulated modeling techniques were applied to analyze the influence on the performance of the token-based Optical Burst Transport (OBT) ring networks caused by the parameters, such as the minimum and maximum burst length, the circumference of the ring, and so on. We first analyze the issue by numerical analysis in the case that each node has only one token. After that, we confirm the analytical results and made further researches in the case that each node has multiple tokens by simulated analysis. All the results show that to design a high-performance token-based OBT ring network, not only the common parameters, such as the number of nodes and wavelengths, and the circumference of the ring, but also the special parameters, such as the minimum and maximum burst length, and the offset time should be taken into account. Furthermore, a testbed of Three-node Token-based OBT ring network Using Fixed Transmitter and Tuneable Receiver (FTTR) is constructed. With it, the variations of the network performance caused by the maximum burst length are investigated.1

  13. Proton Single Event Effects (SEE) Testing of the Myrinet Crossbar Switch and Network Interface Card

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, James W., Jr.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Carts, Martin A.; Stattel, Ronald; Irwin, Timothy L.; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As part of the Remote Exploration and Experimentation Project (REE), work was performed to do a proton SEE (Single Event Effect) evaluation of the Myricom network protocol system (Myrinet). This testing included the evaluation of the Myrinet crossbar switch and the Network Interface Card (NIC). To this end, two crossbar switch devices and five components in the NIC were exposed to the proton beam at the University of California at Davis Crocker Nuclear Laboratory (CNL).

  14. Modelling switching-time effects in high-frequency power conditioning networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, H. A.; Sloane, T. H.; Rimer, B. H.; Wilson, T. G.

    1979-01-01

    Power transistor networks which switch large currents in highly inductive environments are beginning to find application in the hundred kilohertz switching frequency range. Recent developments in the fabrication of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors in the power device category have enhanced the movement toward higher switching frequencies. Models for switching devices and of the circuits in which they are imbedded are required to properly characterize the mechanisms responsible for turning on and turning off effects. Easily interpreted results in the form of oscilloscope-like plots assist in understanding the effects of parametric studies using topology oriented computer-aided analysis methods.

  15. Effects of bursting dynamic features on the generation of multi-clustered structure of neural network with symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning rule

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui; Song, Yongduan; Xue, Fangzheng; Li, Xiumin

    2015-11-15

    In this paper, the generation of multi-clustered structure of self-organized neural network with different neuronal firing patterns, i.e., bursting or spiking, has been investigated. The initially all-to-all-connected spiking neural network or bursting neural network can be self-organized into clustered structure through the symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning for both bursting and spiking neurons. However, the time consumption of this clustering procedure of the burst-based self-organized neural network (BSON) is much shorter than the spike-based self-organized neural network (SSON). Our results show that the BSON network has more obvious small-world properties, i.e., higher clustering coefficient and smaller shortest path length than the SSON network. Also, the results of larger structure entropy and activity entropy of the BSON network demonstrate that this network has higher topological complexity and dynamical diversity, which benefits for enhancing information transmission of neural circuits. Hence, we conclude that the burst firing can significantly enhance the efficiency of clustering procedure and the emergent clustered structure renders the whole network more synchronous and therefore more sensitive to weak input. This result is further confirmed from its improved performance on stochastic resonance. Therefore, we believe that the multi-clustered neural network which self-organized from the bursting dynamics has high efficiency in information processing.

  16. Effects of bursting dynamic features on the generation of multi-clustered structure of neural network with symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning rule.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Song, Yongduan; Xue, Fangzheng; Li, Xiumin

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the generation of multi-clustered structure of self-organized neural network with different neuronal firing patterns, i.e., bursting or spiking, has been investigated. The initially all-to-all-connected spiking neural network or bursting neural network can be self-organized into clustered structure through the symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning for both bursting and spiking neurons. However, the time consumption of this clustering procedure of the burst-based self-organized neural network (BSON) is much shorter than the spike-based self-organized neural network (SSON). Our results show that the BSON network has more obvious small-world properties, i.e., higher clustering coefficient and smaller shortest path length than the SSON network. Also, the results of larger structure entropy and activity entropy of the BSON network demonstrate that this network has higher topological complexity and dynamical diversity, which benefits for enhancing information transmission of neural circuits. Hence, we conclude that the burst firing can significantly enhance the efficiency of clustering procedure and the emergent clustered structure renders the whole network more synchronous and therefore more sensitive to weak input. This result is further confirmed from its improved performance on stochastic resonance. Therefore, we believe that the multi-clustered neural network which self-organized from the bursting dynamics has high efficiency in information processing.

  17. Interaction between cellular voltage-sensitive conductance and network parameters in a model of neocortex can generate epileptiform bursting.

    SciTech Connect

    van Drongelen, W.; Lee, H. C.; Koch, H.; Elsen, F.; Carroll, M. S.; Hereld, M.; Stevens, R. L.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago

    2004-01-01

    We examined the effects of both intrinsic neuronal membrane properties and network parameters on oscillatory activity in a model of neocortex. A scalable network model with six different cell types was built with the pGENESIS neural simulator. The neocortical network consisted of two types of pyramidal cells and four types of inhibitory interneurons. All cell types contained both fast sodium and delayed rectifier potassium channels for generation of action potentials. A subset of the pyramidal neurons contained an additional slow inactivating (persistent) sodium current (NaP). The neurons with the NaP current showed spontaneous bursting activity in the absence of external stimulation. The model also included a routine to calculate a simulated electroencephalogram (EEG) trace from the population activity. This revealed emergent network behavior which ranged from desynchronized activity to different types of seizure-like bursting patterns. At settings with weaker excitatory network effects, the propensity to generate seizure-like behavior increased. Strong excitatory network connectivity destroyed oscillatory behavior, whereas weak connectivity enhanced the relative importance of the spontaneously bursting cells. Our findings are in contradiction with the general opinion that strong excitatory synaptic and/or insufficient inhibition effects are associated with seizure initiation, but are in agreement with previously reported behavior in neocortex.

  18. Global exponential stability for switched memristive neural networks with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Xin, Youming; Li, Yuxia; Cheng, Zunshui; Huang, Xia

    2016-08-01

    This paper considers the problem of exponential stability for switched memristive neural networks (MNNs) with time-varying delays. Different from most of the existing papers, we model a memristor as a continuous system, and view switched MNNs as switched neural networks with uncertain time-varying parameters. Based on average dwell time technique, mode-dependent average dwell time technique and multiple Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional approach, two conditions are derived to design the switching signal and guarantee the exponential stability of the considered neural networks, which are delay-dependent and formulated by linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Finally, the effectiveness of the theoretical results is demonstrated by two numerical examples. PMID:27164266

  19. Call for Papers: Photonics in Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosinska, Lena; Glick, Madeleine

    2006-04-01

    Call for Papers: Photonics in Switching

    Guest Editors:

    Lena Wosinska, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) / ICT Sweden Madeleine Glick, Intel Research, Cambridge, UK

    Technologies based on DWDM systems allow data transmission with bit rates of Tbit/s on a single fiber. To facilitate this enormous transmission volume, high-capacity and high-speed network nodes become inevitable in the optical network. Wideband switching, WDM switching, optical burst switching (OBS), and optical packet switching (OPS) are promising technologies for harnessing the bandwidth of WDM optical fiber networks in a highly flexible and efficient manner. As a number of key optical component technologies approach maturity, photonics in switching is becoming an increasingly attractive and practical solution for the next-generation of optical networks. The scope of this special issue is focused on the technology and architecture of optical switching nodes, including the architectural and algorithmic aspects of high-speed optical networks.

    Scope of Submission

    The scope of the papers includes, but is not limited to, the following topics:
    • WDM node architectures
    • Novel device technologies enabling photonics in switching, such as optical switch fabrics, optical memory, and wavelength conversion
    • Routing protocols
    • WDM switching and routing
    • Quality of service
    • Performance measurement and evaluation
    • Next-generation optical networks: architecture, signaling, and control
    • Traffic measurement and field trials
    • Optical burst and packet switching
    • OBS/OPS node architectures
    • Burst/Packet scheduling and routing algorithms
    • Contention resolution/avoidance strategies
    • Services and applications for OBS/OPS (e.g., grid networks, storage-area networks, etc.)
    • Burst assembly and ingress traffic shaping

    • All-optical swapping of spectral amplitude code labels for packet-switched networks

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Chen, Lawrence R.

      2008-08-01

      Packet-switched networks have attracted considerable attention as a basis for next-generation optical networks due to their advantages in terms of flexibility and network efficiency over traditional circuit-switched networks. Optical code multi-protocol label switching (OC-MPLS) promises fast, flexible, power-efficient switching by keeping signals in the optical domain and avoiding costly conversions to the electrical domain. In this paper, we review the use of spectral amplitude codes (SACs) for implementing OC-MPLS labels. We discuss the principles and features, as well as key enabling technologies required for their processing. In particular, we compare three different approaches for low cost all-optical swapping of SAC labels. All approaches are based on semiconductor fiber lasers and exploit nonlinearity in a semiconductor device: the first uses cross-absorption modulation in an electroabsorption modulator, the second uses cross-gain modulation (XGM) in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA), and the third makes use of XGM in an SOA as well as injection locking in a Fabry-Pérot laser. We present the static and dynamic responses of each for swapping a multi-wavelength input label to a multi-wavelength output label. The benefits and limitations of each approach as well as future improvements are discussed. We also present the results of systems experiments which demonstrate error-free all-optical label swapping, recognition, and switching of multi-rate packets in packet-switched networks using multi-wavelength labels.

  1. Demonstration for rearrangeable nonblocking 8×8 matrix optical switches based on extended banyan networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, De-Gui; Zha, Ying; Liu, Tiegen; Zhang, Ying; Li, Xiaoqi; Fu, Xiuhua

    2007-07-01

    Based on the CROSSBAR network (CN) and the BANYAN network (BN), two new rearrangeable nonblocking constructions of extended BANYAN network (EBN) were proposed for implementing 8×8 optical matrix switch. The interconnection characteristics of these two types of rearrangeable nonblocking EBN were studied, and the logic program for driving switching units was provided. The calculated insertion loss is 3.3 dB for 8×8 optical matrix switch. Silica waveguide 8×8 matrix optical switch was designed and fabricated according to the calculated results. The silica waveguide propagation loss of 0.1dB/cm and waveguide-fiber coupling loss of 0.5dB/point were measured. With the fabricated 8×8 matrix optical switch, optical insertion loss of 4.6 dB, cross-talk of -38 dB, polarization dependent loss of 0.4 dB, averaged switching power of 1.6 W, and switching time of 1 ms were obtained. A basic agreement between experimental results and theoretical calculated values was achieved.

  2. DNA-Binding Kinetics Determines the Mechanism of Noise-Induced Switching in Gene Networks.

    PubMed

    Tse, Margaret J; Chu, Brian K; Roy, Mahua; Read, Elizabeth L

    2015-10-20

    Gene regulatory networks are multistable dynamical systems in which attractor states represent cell phenotypes. Spontaneous, noise-induced transitions between these states are thought to underlie critical cellular processes, including cell developmental fate decisions, phenotypic plasticity in fluctuating environments, and carcinogenesis. As such, there is increasing interest in the development of theoretical and computational approaches that can shed light on the dynamics of these stochastic state transitions in multistable gene networks. We applied a numerical rare-event sampling algorithm to study transition paths of spontaneous noise-induced switching for a ubiquitous gene regulatory network motif, the bistable toggle switch, in which two mutually repressive genes compete for dominant expression. We find that the method can efficiently uncover detailed switching mechanisms that involve fluctuations both in occupancies of DNA regulatory sites and copy numbers of protein products. In addition, we show that the rate parameters governing binding and unbinding of regulatory proteins to DNA strongly influence the switching mechanism. In a regime of slow DNA-binding/unbinding kinetics, spontaneous switching occurs relatively frequently and is driven primarily by fluctuations in DNA-site occupancies. In contrast, in a regime of fast DNA-binding/unbinding kinetics, switching occurs rarely and is driven by fluctuations in levels of expressed protein. Our results demonstrate how spontaneous cell phenotype transitions involve collective behavior of both regulatory proteins and DNA. Computational approaches capable of simulating dynamics over many system variables are thus well suited to exploring dynamic mechanisms in gene networks.

  3. Contentionless transmission in buffer-less slotted optical packet switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asghari, Masoud; Ghaffarpour Rahbar, Akbar

    2016-07-01

    Contention of optical packets in optical packet switched (OPS) networks is a major problem, and it is even more critical in buffer-less OPS networks. In this paper, an innovative contention avoidance technique is proposed which uses combination of special traffic shaping at ingress switches and special time slot reservation technique through the path of traffic flows in core network. This novel protocol is called contentionless transmission OPS (CLTOPS) suitable for buffer-less slotted OPS networks. Performance evaluations show that the CLTOPS can outperform the original slotted-OPS architecture in terms of packet loss rate (PLR) performance, with or without using wavelength conversion. It is shown that there is a trade-off between the amount of improvement in PLR and additional delay applied to the users' packets at the ingress switches buffers. However, appropriate parameters can be selected to make the additional delay tolerable for users' applications.

  4. DISCRETE EVENT SIMULATION OF OPTICAL SWITCH MATRIX PERFORMANCE IN COMPUTER NETWORKS

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, Neena; Poole, Stephen W

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present application of a Discrete Event Simulator (DES) for performance modeling of optical switching devices in computer networks. Network simulators are valuable tools in situations where one cannot investigate the system directly. This situation may arise if the system under study does not exist yet or the cost of studying the system directly is prohibitive. Most available network simulators are based on the paradigm of discrete-event-based simulation. As computer networks become increasingly larger and more complex, sophisticated DES tool chains have become available for both commercial and academic research. Some well-known simulators are NS2, NS3, OPNET, and OMNEST. For this research, we have applied OMNEST for the purpose of simulating multi-wavelength performance of optical switch matrices in computer interconnection networks. Our results suggest that the application of DES to computer interconnection networks provides valuable insight in device performance and aids in topology and system optimization.

  5. Gamma-ray burst observations with the [ital Compton]/[ital Ulysses]/[ital Pioneer]-[ital Venus] network

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, T.L. ); Hurley, K.C. ); Sommer, M. ); Boer, M.; Niel, M. ); Fishman, G.J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Meegan, C.A.; Paciesas, W.S.; Wilson, R.B. ); Fenimore, E.E.; Laros, J.G.; Klebesadel, R.W. )

    1993-07-05

    The third and latest interplanetary network for the precise directional analysis of gamma ray bursts consists of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment in [ital Compton] [ital Gamma] [ital Ray] [ital Observatory] and instruments on [ital Pioneer]-[ital Venus] [ital Orbiter] and the deep-space mission [ital Ulysses]. The unsurpassed resolution of the BATSE instrument, the use of refined analysis techniques, and [ital Ulysses]' distance of up to 6 AU all contribute to a potential for greater precision than had been achieved with former networks. Also, the departure of [ital Ulysses] from the ecliptic plane in 1992 avoids any positional alignment of the three instruments that would lessen the source directional accuracy.

  6. Finite-time boundedness and stabilization of uncertain switched neural networks with time-varying delay.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuanyuan; Cao, Jinde; Alofi, Abdulaziz; Al-Mazrooei, Abdullah; Elaiw, Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    This paper deals with the finite-time boundedness and stabilization problem for a class of switched neural networks with time-varying delay and parametric uncertainties. Based on Lyapunov-like function method and average dwell time technique, some sufficient conditions are derived to guarantee the finite-time boundedness of considered uncertain switched neural networks. Furthermore, the state feedback controller is designed to solve the finite-time stabilization problem. Moreover, the proposed sufficient conditions can be simplified into the form of linear matrix equalities for conveniently using Matlab LMI toolbox. Finally, two numerical examples are given to show the effectiveness of the main results.

  7. Digital dual-rate burst-mode receiver for 10G and 1G coexistence in optical access networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado Mendinueta, José Manuel; Mitchell, John E.; Bayvel, Polina; Thomsen, Benn C.

    2011-07-01

    A digital dual-rate burst-mode receiver, intended to support 10 and 1 Gb/s coexistence in optical access networks, is proposed and experimentally characterized. The receiver employs a standard DC-coupled photoreceiver followed by a 20 GS/s digitizer and the detection of the packet presence and line-rate is implemented in the digital domain. A polyphase, 2 samples-per-bit digital signal processing algorithm is then used for efficient clock and data recovery of the 10/1.25 Gb/s packets. The receiver performance is characterized in terms of sensitivity and dynamic range under burst-mode operation for 10/1.25 Gb/s intensity modulated data in terms of both the packet error rate (PER) and the payload bit error rate (pBER). The impact of packet preamble lengths of 16, 32, 48, and 64 bits, at 10 Gb/s, on the receiver performance is investigated. We show that there is a trade-off between pBER and PER that is limited by electrical noise and digitizer clipping at low and high received powers, respectively, and that a 16/2-bit preamble at 10/1.25 Gb/s is sufficient to reliably detect packets at both line-rates over a burst-to-burst dynamic range of 14,5dB with a sensitivity of -18.5dBm at 10 Gb/s.

  8. Digital dual-rate burst-mode receiver for 10G and 1G coexistence in optical access networks.

    PubMed

    Mendinueta, José Manuel Delgado; Mitchell, John E; Bayvel, Polina; Thomsen, Benn C

    2011-07-18

    A digital dual-rate burst-mode receiver, intended to support 10 and 1 Gb/s coexistence in optical access networks, is proposed and experimentally characterized. The receiver employs a standard DC-coupled photoreceiver followed by a 20 GS/s digitizer and the detection of the packet presence and line-rate is implemented in the digital domain. A polyphase, 2 samples-per-bit digital signal processing algorithm is then used for efficient clock and data recovery of the 10/1.25 Gb/s packets. The receiver performance is characterized in terms of sensitivity and dynamic range under burst-mode operation for 10/1.25 Gb/s intensity modulated data in terms of both the packet error rate (PER) and the payload bit error rate (pBER). The impact of packet preamble lengths of 16, 32, 48, and 64 bits, at 10 Gb/s, on the receiver performance is investigated. We show that there is a trade-off between pBER and PER that is limited by electrical noise and digitizer clipping at low and high received powers, respectively, and that a 16/2-bit preamble at 10/1.25 Gb/s is sufficient to reliably detect packets at both line-rates over a burst-to-burst dynamic range of 14,5 dB with a sensitivity of -18.5 dBm at 10 Gb/s. PMID:21934767

  9. Experience with PACS in an ATM/Ethernet switched network environment.

    PubMed

    Pelikan, E; Ganser, A; Kotter, E; Schrader, U; Timmermann, U

    1998-03-01

    Legacy local area network (LAN) technologies based on shared media concepts are not adequate for the growth of a large-scale picture archiving and communication system (PACS) in a client-server architecture. First, an asymmetric network load, due to the requests of a large number of PACS clients for only a few main servers, should be compensated by communication links to the servers with a higher bandwidth compared to the clients. Secondly, as the number of PACS nodes increases, the network throughout should not measurably cut production. These requirements can easily be fulfilled using switching technologies. Here asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) is clearly one of the hottest topics in networking because the ATM architecture provides integrated support for a variety of communication services, and it supports virtual networking. On the other hand, most of the imaging modalities are not yet ready for integration into a native ATM network. For a lot of nodes already joining an Ethernet, a cost-effective and pragmatic way to benefit from the switching concept would be a combined ATM/Ethernet switching environment. This incorporates an incremental migration strategy with the immediate benefits of high-speed, high-capacity ATM (for servers and high-sophisticated display workstations), while preserving elements of the existing network technologies. In addition, Ethernet switching instead of shared media Ethernet improves the performance considerably. The LAN emulation (LANE) specification by the ATM forum defines mechanisms that allow ATM networks to coexist with legacy systems using any data networking protocol. This paper points out the suitability of this network architecture in accordance with an appropriate system design.

  10. Electrooptical adaptive switching network for the hypercube computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, E.; Peterson, J.

    1988-01-01

    An all-optical network design for the hyperswitch network using regular free-space interconnects between electronic processor nodes is presented. The adaptive routing model used is described, and an adaptive routing control example is presented. The design demonstrates that existing electrooptical techniques are sufficient for implementing efficient parallel architectures without the need for more complex means of implementing arbitrary interconnection schemes. The electrooptical hyperswitch network significantly improves the communication performance of the hypercube computer.

  11. A theoretical and experimental study of neuromorphic atomic switch networks for reservoir computing.

    PubMed

    Sillin, Henry O; Aguilera, Renato; Shieh, Hsien-Hang; Avizienis, Audrius V; Aono, Masakazu; Stieg, Adam Z; Gimzewski, James K

    2013-09-27

    Atomic switch networks (ASNs) have been shown to generate network level dynamics that resemble those observed in biological neural networks. To facilitate understanding and control of these behaviors, we developed a numerical model based on the synapse-like properties of individual atomic switches and the random nature of the network wiring. We validated the model against various experimental results highlighting the possibility to functionalize the network plasticity and the differences between an atomic switch in isolation and its behaviors in a network. The effects of changing connectivity density on the nonlinear dynamics were examined as characterized by higher harmonic generation in response to AC inputs. To demonstrate their utility for computation, we subjected the simulated network to training within the framework of reservoir computing and showed initial evidence of the ASN acting as a reservoir which may be optimized for specific tasks by adjusting the input gain. The work presented represents steps in a unified approach to experimentation and theory of complex systems to make ASNs a uniquely scalable platform for neuromorphic computing.

  12. Recursiveness, switching, and fluctuations in a replicating catalytic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2003-09-01

    A protocell model consisting of mutually catalyzing molecules is studied, in order to investigate how chemical compositions are transferred recursively through cell divisions under replication errors. Depending on the numbers of molecules and species, and the path rate, three phases are found: fast switching state without recursive production, recursive production, and itinerancy between the above two states. The number distributions of the molecules in the recursive states are shown to be log-normal except for those species that form a core hypercycle, and are explained with the help of a heuristic argument.

  13. Theta-burst Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Alters the Functional Topography of the Cortical Motor Network

    PubMed Central

    NOH, Nor Azila; FUGGETTA, Giorgio; MANGANOTTI, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive tool that is able to modulate the electrical activity of the brain depending upon its protocol of stimulation. Theta burst stimulation (TBS) is a high-frequency TMS protocol that is able to induce prolonged plasticity changes in the brain. The induction of plasticity-like effects by TBS is useful in both experimental and therapeutic settings; however, the underlying neural mechanisms of this modulation remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of continuous TBS (cTBS) on the intrahemispheric and interhemispheric functional connectivity of the resting and active brain. Methods: A total of 26 healthy humans were randomly divided into two groups that received either real cTBS or sham (control) over the left primary motor cortex. Surface electroencephalogram (EEG) was used to quantify the changes of neural oscillations after cTBS at rest and after a choice reaction time test. The cTBS-induced EEG oscillations were computed using spectral analysis of event-related coherence (ERCoh) of theta (4–7.5 Hz), low alpha (8–9.5 Hz), high alpha (10–12.5 Hz), low beta (13–19.5 Hz), and high beta (20–30 Hz) brain rhythms. Results: We observed a global decrease in functional connectivity of the brain in the cTBS group when compared to sham in the low beta brain rhythm at rest and high beta brain rhythm during the active state. In particular, EEG spectral analysis revealed that high-frequency beta, a cortically generated brain rhythm, was the most sensitive band that was modulated by cTBS. Conclusion: Overall, our findings suggest that cTBS, a TMS protocol that mimics the mechanism of long-term depression of synaptic plasticity, modulates motor network oscillations primarily at the cortical level and might interfere with cortical information coding. PMID:27006636

  14. A Scheme to Optimize Flow Routing and Polling Switch Selection of Software Defined Networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan; Li, Lemin; Ren, Jing; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Yangming; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Shizhong

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at minimizing the communication cost for collecting flow information in Software Defined Networks (SDN). Since flow-based information collecting method requires too much communication cost, and switch-based method proposed recently cannot benefit from controlling flow routing, jointly optimize flow routing and polling switch selection is proposed to reduce the communication cost. To this end, joint optimization problem is formulated as an Integer Linear Programming (ILP) model firstly. Since the ILP model is intractable in large size network, we also design an optimal algorithm for the multi-rooted tree topology and an efficient heuristic algorithm for general topology. According to extensive simulations, it is found that our method can save up to 55.76% communication cost compared with the state-of-the-art switch-based scheme. PMID:26690571

  15. Application of remote power-by-light switching in a simplified BOTDA sensor network.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Mikel; Ullan, Angel; Zornoza, Ander; Loayssa, Alayn; Lopez-Amo, Manuel; Lopez-Higuera, Jose Miguel

    2013-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate the use of spatial multiplexing as a means to reduce the costs of distributed sensing networks. We propose a new scheme in which remote power-by-light switching is deployed to scan multiple branches of a distributed sensing network based on Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis (BOTDA) sensors. A proof-of-concept system is assembled with two 5-km sensor fiber branches that are alternatively monitored using a fast remotely controlled and optically powered optical switch. The multiplexed distributed sensor fibers were located 10 km away from the interrogation unit and a Raman pump is used to remotely power the switch. Furthermore, the deployed BOTDA unit uses an alternative configuration that can lead to simplified setups. PMID:24351644

  16. Application of Remote Power-by-Light Switching in a Simplified BOTDA Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Mikel; Ullan, Angel; Zornoza, Ander; Loayssa, Alayn; Lopez-Amo, Manuel; Lopez-Higuera, Jose Miguel

    2013-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate the use of spatial multiplexing as a means to reduce the costs of distributed sensing networks. We propose a new scheme in which remote power-by-light switching is deployed to scan multiple branches of a distributed sensing network based on Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis (BOTDA) sensors. A proof-of-concept system is assembled with two 5-km sensor fiber branches that are alternatively monitored using a fast remotely controlled and optically powered optical switch. The multiplexed distributed sensor fibers were located 10 km away from the interrogation unit and a Raman pump is used to remotely power the switch. Furthermore, the deployed BOTDA unit uses an alternative configuration that can lead to simplified setups. PMID:24351644

  17. A Scheme to Optimize Flow Routing and Polling Switch Selection of Software Defined Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan; Li, Lemin; Ren, Jing; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Yangming; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Shizhong

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at minimizing the communication cost for collecting flow information in Software Defined Networks (SDN). Since flow-based information collecting method requires too much communication cost, and switch-based method proposed recently cannot benefit from controlling flow routing, jointly optimize flow routing and polling switch selection is proposed to reduce the communication cost. To this end, joint optimization problem is formulated as an Integer Linear Programming (ILP) model firstly. Since the ILP model is intractable in large size network, we also design an optimal algorithm for the multi-rooted tree topology and an efficient heuristic algorithm for general topology. According to extensive simulations, it is found that our method can save up to 55.76% communication cost compared with the state-of-the-art switch-based scheme. PMID:26690571

  18. A Scheme to Optimize Flow Routing and Polling Switch Selection of Software Defined Networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan; Li, Lemin; Ren, Jing; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Yangming; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Shizhong

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at minimizing the communication cost for collecting flow information in Software Defined Networks (SDN). Since flow-based information collecting method requires too much communication cost, and switch-based method proposed recently cannot benefit from controlling flow routing, jointly optimize flow routing and polling switch selection is proposed to reduce the communication cost. To this end, joint optimization problem is formulated as an Integer Linear Programming (ILP) model firstly. Since the ILP model is intractable in large size network, we also design an optimal algorithm for the multi-rooted tree topology and an efficient heuristic algorithm for general topology. According to extensive simulations, it is found that our method can save up to 55.76% communication cost compared with the state-of-the-art switch-based scheme.

  19. Transition Mechanisms of Bursting in a Two-Cell Network Model of the Pre-Bötzinger Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lixia; Yuan, Dandan; Chen, Xi; Meng, Xiangying

    Persistent sodium and calcium activated nonspecific cationic currents play important roles in the respiratory rhythm generation of the pre-Bötzinger complex. In this paper, we study the bursting patterns and their transition mechanisms in the two-parameter space of a two-cell network model of the pre-Bötzinger complex with synaptic coupling. Using the methods of fast/slow decomposition and two-parameter bifurcation analysis, we divide the two-parameter space into four different regions according to the multiphase oscillations, and reveal the possible transition mechanisms of bursting between these different regions. We also study the dynamics of the system with varying synaptic coupling strength. This work provides insights of how currents and synaptic coupling work on the respiratory rhythm generation.

  20. Confinement and diffusion modulate bistability and stochastic switching in a reaction network with positive feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynarczyk, Paul J.; Pullen, Robert H.; Abel, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Positive feedback is a common feature in signal transduction networks and can lead to phenomena such as bistability and signal propagation by domain growth. Physical features of the cellular environment, such as spatial confinement and the mobility of proteins, play important but inadequately understood roles in shaping the behavior of signaling networks. Here, we use stochastic, spatially resolved kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to explore a positive feedback network as a function of system size, system shape, and mobility of molecules. We show that these physical properties can markedly alter characteristics of bistability and stochastic switching when compared with well-mixed simulations. Notably, systems of equal volume but different shapes can exhibit qualitatively different behaviors under otherwise identical conditions. We show that stochastic switching to a state maintained by positive feedback occurs by cluster formation and growth. Additionally, the frequency at which switching occurs depends nontrivially on the diffusion coefficient, which can promote or suppress switching relative to the well-mixed limit. Taken together, the results provide a framework for understanding how confinement and protein mobility influence emergent features of the positive feedback network by modulating molecular concentrations, diffusion-influenced rate parameters, and spatiotemporal correlations between molecules.

  1. 76 FR 36154 - In the Matter of Certain Equipment for Communications Networks, Including Switches, Routers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ..., Gateways, Bridges, Wireless Access Points, Cable Modems, IP Phones, and Products Containing Same; Notice of..., routers, gateways, bridges, wireless access points, cable modems, IP phones, and products containing same... networks, including switches, routers, gateways, bridges, wireless access points, cable modems, IP...

  2. Performance evaluation of a multi-granularity and multi-connectivity circuit switched network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Naixing; Xin, Maoqing; Sun, Weiqiang; Jin, Yaohui; Zhu, Yi; Zhang, Chunlei; Hu, Weisheng; Xie, Guowu

    2007-11-01

    This paper introduces a novel notion of multi-granularity and multi-connectivity circuit switched network. Based on this notion, four routing schemes - Fixed Routing (FR), Maximum Remain (MR), Secured Maximum Remain (SMR) and Premium/Punishment Modification (PPM) are proposed. Numerical simulation results about the performance of these four schemes are also presented in this paper.

  3. Confinement and diffusion modulate bistability and stochastic switching in a reaction network with positive feedback.

    PubMed

    Mlynarczyk, Paul J; Pullen, Robert H; Abel, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Positive feedback is a common feature in signal transduction networks and can lead to phenomena such as bistability and signal propagation by domain growth. Physical features of the cellular environment, such as spatial confinement and the mobility of proteins, play important but inadequately understood roles in shaping the behavior of signaling networks. Here, we use stochastic, spatially resolved kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to explore a positive feedback network as a function of system size, system shape, and mobility of molecules. We show that these physical properties can markedly alter characteristics of bistability and stochastic switching when compared with well-mixed simulations. Notably, systems of equal volume but different shapes can exhibit qualitatively different behaviors under otherwise identical conditions. We show that stochastic switching to a state maintained by positive feedback occurs by cluster formation and growth. Additionally, the frequency at which switching occurs depends nontrivially on the diffusion coefficient, which can promote or suppress switching relative to the well-mixed limit. Taken together, the results provide a framework for understanding how confinement and protein mobility influence emergent features of the positive feedback network by modulating molecular concentrations, diffusion-influenced rate parameters, and spatiotemporal correlations between molecules.

  4. Gene switching rate determines response to extrinsic perturbations in the self-activation transcriptional network motif.

    PubMed

    de Franciscis, Sebastiano; Caravagna, Giulio; Mauri, Giancarlo; d'Onofrio, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Gene switching dynamics is a major source of randomness in genetic networks, also in the case of large concentrations of the transcription factors. In this work, we consider a common network motif - the positive feedback of a transcription factor on its own synthesis - and assess its response to extrinsic noises perturbing gene deactivation in a variety of settings where the network might operate. These settings are representative of distinct cellular types, abundance of transcription factors and ratio between gene switching and protein synthesis rates. By investigating noise-induced transitions among the different network operative states, our results suggest that gene switching rates are key parameters to shape network response to external perturbations, and that such response depends on the particular biological setting, i.e. the characteristic time scales and protein abundance. These results might have implications on our understanding of irreversible transitions for noise-related phenomena such as cellular differentiation. In addition these evidences suggest to adopt the appropriate mathematical model of the network in order to analyze the system consistently to the reference biological setting. PMID:27256916

  5. Gene switching rate determines response to extrinsic perturbations in the self-activation transcriptional network motif

    PubMed Central

    de Franciscis, Sebastiano; Caravagna, Giulio; Mauri, Giancarlo; d’Onofrio, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Gene switching dynamics is a major source of randomness in genetic networks, also in the case of large concentrations of the transcription factors. In this work, we consider a common network motif - the positive feedback of a transcription factor on its own synthesis - and assess its response to extrinsic noises perturbing gene deactivation in a variety of settings where the network might operate. These settings are representative of distinct cellular types, abundance of transcription factors and ratio between gene switching and protein synthesis rates. By investigating noise-induced transitions among the different network operative states, our results suggest that gene switching rates are key parameters to shape network response to external perturbations, and that such response depends on the particular biological setting, i.e. the characteristic time scales and protein abundance. These results might have implications on our understanding of irreversible transitions for noise-related phenomena such as cellular differentiation. In addition these evidences suggest to adopt the appropriate mathematical model of the network in order to analyze the system consistently to the reference biological setting. PMID:27256916

  6. Adaptive role switching promotes fairness in networked ultimatum game

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Te; Fu, Feng; Zhang, Yanling; Wang, Long

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, mechanisms favoring fair split in the ultimatum game have attracted growing interests because of its practical implications for international bargains. In this game, two players are randomly assigned two different roles respectively to split an offer: the proposer suggests how to split and the responder decides whether or not to accept it. Only when both agree is the offer successfully split; otherwise both get nothing. It is of importance and interest to break the symmetry in role assignment especially when the game is repeatedly played in a heterogeneous population. Here we consider an adaptive role assignment: whenever the split fails, the two players switch their roles probabilistically. The results show that this simple feedback mechanism proves much more effective at promoting fairness than other alternatives (where, for example, the role assignment is based on the number of neighbors). PMID:23528986

  7. Climbing fiber burst size and olivary sub-threshold oscillations in a network setting.

    PubMed

    De Gruijl, Jornt R; Bazzigaluppi, Paolo; de Jeu, Marcel T G; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2012-01-01

    The inferior olivary nucleus provides one of the two main inputs to the cerebellum: the so-called climbing fibers. Activation of climbing fibers is generally believed to be related to timing of motor commands and/or motor learning. Climbing fiber spikes lead to large all-or-none action potentials in cerebellar Purkinje cells, overriding any other ongoing activity and silencing these cells for a brief period of time afterwards. Empirical evidence shows that the climbing fiber can transmit a short burst of spikes as a result of an olivary cell somatic spike, potentially increasing the information being transferred to the cerebellum per climbing fiber activation. Previously reported results from in vitro studies suggested that the information encoded in the climbing fiber burst is related to the occurrence of the spike relative to the ongoing sub-threshold membrane potential oscillation of the olivary cell, i.e. that the phase of the oscillation is reflected in the size of the climbing fiber burst. We used a detailed three-compartmental model of an inferior olivary cell to further investigate the possible factors determining the size of the climbing fiber burst. Our findings suggest that the phase-dependency of the burst size is present but limited and that charge flow between soma and dendrite is a major determinant of the climbing fiber burst. From our findings it follows that phenomena such as cell ensemble synchrony can have a big effect on the climbing fiber burst size through dendrodendritic gap-junctional coupling between olivary cells.

  8. Demonstration of dynamic point-to-multipoint LSPs in automatic switched optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weiqiang; Wei, Xueqing; Zhang, Guoyin; Jin, Yaohui; Sun, Jun; Guo, Wei; Hu, Weisheng

    2005-11-01

    Automatic Switched Optical Networks, or ASON, is regarded as one promising networking technology for future optical networks. From network operators' perspective, it is well agreed that ASON should provide the following features: fast provisioning, easier network operation, higher network reliability, scalability, simpler planning and design, and multi-vendor inter-operability. Fast provisioning enables ASON to meet the requirements of more dynamic applications such as bandwidth on demand and content distribution. Protection and restoration is crucial because of the extremely high data-rate the network will carry. Mesh type network and fast provisioning capability leave more space for a more reliable and flexible network. Unlike traditional transport networks that are constructed purely for point-to-point connectivity, ASON deployed in regional or metro-area networks needs to provide high connectivity to its clients. And, as a result, the planning and designing problem becomes very complex due to the large number of devices, the variety of interface types and network protocols. It is also important that the network will be able to inter-connect devices from different vendors and provide support to different client signals such as SONET/SDH, Ethernet, IP, ATM and Frame Relay.

  9. How yawning switches the default-mode network to the attentional network by activating the cerebrospinal fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2014-03-01

    Yawning is a behavior to which little research has been devoted. However, its purpose has not yet been demonstrated and remains controversial. In this article, we propose a new theory involving the brain network that is functional during the resting state, that is, the default mode network. When this network is active, yawning manifests a process of switching to the attentional system through its capacity to increase circulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), thereby increasing clearance of somnogenic factors (prostaglandin D(2), adenosine, and others) accumulating in the cerebrospinal fluid.

  10. Emergent criticality in complex turing B-type atomic switch networks.

    PubMed

    Stieg, Adam Z; Avizienis, Audrius V; Sillin, Henry O; Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Aono, Masakazu; Gimzewski, James K

    2012-01-10

    Recent advances in the neuromorphic operation of atomic switches as individual synapse-like devices demonstrate the ability to process information with both short-term and long-term memorization in a single two terminal junction. Here it is shown that atomic switches can be self-assembled within a highly interconnected network of silver nanowires similar in structure to Turing’s “B-Type unorganized machine”, originally proposed as a randomly connected network of NAND logic gates. In these experimental embodiments,complex networks of coupled atomic switches exhibit emergent criticality similar in nature to previously reported electrical activity of biological brains and neuron assemblies. Rapid fluctuations in electrical conductance display metastability and power law scaling of temporal correlation lengths that are attributed to dynamic reorganization of the interconnected electro-ionic network resulting from induced non-equilibrium thermodynamic instabilities. These collective properties indicate a potential utility for realtime,multi-input processing of distributed sensory data through reservoir computation. We propose these highly coupled, nonlinear electronic networks as an implementable hardware-based platform toward the creation of physically intelligent machines. PMID:22329003

  11. Demonstration of all-optical MDM/WDM switching for short-reach networks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhongying; Li, Juhao; Ge, Dawei; Ren, Fang; Zhu, Paikun; Mo, Qi; Li, Zhengbin; Chen, Zhangyuan; He, Yongqi

    2016-09-19

    Mode division multiplexing (MDM) has been widely investigated in optical transmission systems and networks to improve network capacity. However, the MDM receiver is always expensive and complex because coherent detection and multiplex-input-and-multiplex-output (MIMO) digital signal processing (DSP) are required to demultiplex each spatial mode. In this paper, we investigate the application of MDM in short-reach scenarios such as datacenter networking. Two-dimensional MDM and wavelength division multiplexing node structure based on low modal-crosstalk few-mode fiber (FMF) and components is proposed, in which signal in each mode or wavelength can be independently switched. We experimentally demonstrate independent adding, dropping and switching functionalities with two linearly polarized modes and four wavelength channels over a total 11.8-km 2-mode low modal-crosstalk FMFs. The structure is simple without coherent detection or MIMO DSP. Only slight penalties of receiver sensitivity are observed for all switching operations. The influence of modal-crosstalk accumulation for cascaded switching nodes is also investigated. PMID:27661899

  12. Binary synaptic connections based on memory switching in a-Si:H for artificial neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, A. P.; Lamb, J. L.; Moopenn, A.; Khanna, S. K.

    1987-01-01

    A scheme for nonvolatile associative electronic memory storage with high information storage density is proposed which is based on neural network models and which uses a matrix of two-terminal passive interconnections (synapses). It is noted that the massive parallelism in the architecture would require the ON state of a synaptic connection to be unusually weak (highly resistive). Memory switching using a-Si:H along with ballast resistors patterned from amorphous Ge-metal alloys is investigated for a binary programmable read only memory matrix. The fabrication of a 1600 synapse test array of uniform connection strengths and a-Si:H switching elements is discussed.

  13. Building new access network using reconfigurable optical grid network and wireless network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yinghui; Wu, Runze; Ji, Yuefeng; Xu, Daxiong

    2007-11-01

    Recently wireless mesh network has been gaining increasing attention and early versions are being deployed as municipal access solutions to eliminate the wired drop to every wireless router at customer premise. In this paper, we propose a novel access network using reconfigurable optical burst switching grid network and wireless mesh network. The proposed access network architecture saves network deployment cost because fiber need not penetrate to each end user. We also propose a hierarchical routing protocol to enhance the routing efficiency.

  14. Building SDN-Based Agricultural Vehicular Sensor Networks Based on Extended Open vSwitch.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Yan, Siyu; Yang, Fan; Pan, Tian; Liu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Software-defined vehicular sensor networks in agriculture, such as autonomous vehicle navigation based on wireless multi-sensor networks, can lead to more efficient precision agriculture. In SDN-based vehicle sensor networks, the data plane is simplified and becomes more efficient by introducing a centralized controller. However, in a wireless environment, the main controller node may leave the sensor network due to the dynamic topology change or the unstable wireless signal, leaving the rest of network devices without control, e.g., a sensor node as a switch may forward packets according to stale rules until the controller updates the flow table entries. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a novel SDN-based vehicular sensor networks architecture which can minimize the performance penalty of controller connection loss. We achieve this by designing a connection state detection and self-learning mechanism. We build prototypes based on extended Open vSwitch and Ryu. The experimental results show that the recovery time from controller connection loss is under 100 ms and it keeps rule updating in real time with a stable throughput. This architecture enhances the survivability and stability of SDN-based vehicular sensor networks in precision agriculture. PMID:26797616

  15. Building SDN-Based Agricultural Vehicular Sensor Networks Based on Extended Open vSwitch.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Yan, Siyu; Yang, Fan; Pan, Tian; Liu, Jiang

    2016-01-19

    Software-defined vehicular sensor networks in agriculture, such as autonomous vehicle navigation based on wireless multi-sensor networks, can lead to more efficient precision agriculture. In SDN-based vehicle sensor networks, the data plane is simplified and becomes more efficient by introducing a centralized controller. However, in a wireless environment, the main controller node may leave the sensor network due to the dynamic topology change or the unstable wireless signal, leaving the rest of network devices without control, e.g., a sensor node as a switch may forward packets according to stale rules until the controller updates the flow table entries. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a novel SDN-based vehicular sensor networks architecture which can minimize the performance penalty of controller connection loss. We achieve this by designing a connection state detection and self-learning mechanism. We build prototypes based on extended Open vSwitch and Ryu. The experimental results show that the recovery time from controller connection loss is under 100 ms and it keeps rule updating in real time with a stable throughput. This architecture enhances the survivability and stability of SDN-based vehicular sensor networks in precision agriculture.

  16. Building SDN-Based Agricultural Vehicular Sensor Networks Based on Extended Open vSwitch

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Yan, Siyu; Yang, Fan; Pan, Tian; Liu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Software-defined vehicular sensor networks in agriculture, such as autonomous vehicle navigation based on wireless multi-sensor networks, can lead to more efficient precision agriculture. In SDN-based vehicle sensor networks, the data plane is simplified and becomes more efficient by introducing a centralized controller. However, in a wireless environment, the main controller node may leave the sensor network due to the dynamic topology change or the unstable wireless signal, leaving the rest of network devices without control, e.g., a sensor node as a switch may forward packets according to stale rules until the controller updates the flow table entries. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a novel SDN-based vehicular sensor networks architecture which can minimize the performance penalty of controller connection loss. We achieve this by designing a connection state detection and self-learning mechanism. We build prototypes based on extended Open vSwitch and Ryu. The experimental results show that the recovery time from controller connection loss is under 100 ms and it keeps rule updating in real time with a stable throughput. This architecture enhances the survivability and stability of SDN-based vehicular sensor networks in precision agriculture. PMID:26797616

  17. On-chip switch for reconfigurable mode-multiplexing optical network.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chunlei; Yu, Yu; Chen, Guanyu; Zhang, Xinliang

    2016-09-19

    The switching and routing is essential for an advanced and reconfigurable optical network, and great efforts have been done for traditional single-mode system. We propose and demonstrate an on-chip switch compatible with mode-division multiplexing system. By controlling the induced phase difference, the functionalities of dynamically routing data channels can be achieved. The proposed switch is experimentally demonstrated with low insertion loss of ~1 dB and high extinction ratio of ~20 dB over the C-band for OFF-ON switchover. For further demonstration, the non-return-to-zero on-off keying signals at 10 Gb/s carried on the two spatial modes are successfully processed. Open and clear eye diagrams can be observed and the bit error rate measurements indicate a good data routing performance. PMID:27661910

  18. Clustering, coding, switching, hierarchical ordering, and control in a network of chaotic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    1990-03-01

    A Network of chaotic elements is investigated with the use of globally coupled maps. A simple coding of many attractors with clustering is shown. Through the coding, the attractors are organized so that their change exhibits bifurcation-like phenomena. A precision-dependent tree is constructed which leads to the similarity of our attractor with those of spin-glasses. Hierarchical dynamics is constructed on the tree, which leads to the dynamical change of trees and the temporal change of effective degrees of freedom. By a simple input on a site, we can switch among attractors and tune the strength of chaos. A threshold on a cluster size is found, beyond which a peculiar “posi-nega” switch occurs. Possible application to biological information processing is discussed with the emphasis on the fuzzy switch (chaotic search) and hierarchical code (categorization).

  19. Sandia`s network for supercomputing `95: Validating the progress of Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switching

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, T.J.; Vahle, O.; Gossage, S.A.

    1996-04-01

    The Advanced Networking Integration Department at Sandia National Laboratories has used the annual Supercomputing conference sponsored by the IEEE and ACM for the past three years as a forum to demonstrate and focus communication and networking developments. For Supercomputing `95, Sandia elected: to demonstrate the functionality and capability of an AT&T Globeview 20Gbps Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switch, which represents the core of Sandia`s corporate network, to build and utilize a three node 622 megabit per second Paragon network, and to extend the DOD`s ACTS ATM Internet from Sandia, New Mexico to the conference`s show floor in San Diego, California, for video demonstrations. This paper documents those accomplishments, discusses the details of their implementation, and describes how these demonstrations supports Sandia`s overall strategies in ATM networking.

  20. Potential Energy Landscape and Robustness of a Gene Regulatory Network: Toggle Switch

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Keun-Young; Wang, Jin

    2007-01-01

    Finding a multidimensional potential landscape is the key for addressing important global issues, such as the robustness of cellular networks. We have uncovered the underlying potential energy landscape of a simple gene regulatory network: a toggle switch. This was realized by explicitly constructing the steady state probability of the gene switch in the protein concentration space in the presence of the intrinsic statistical fluctuations due to the small number of proteins in the cell. We explored the global phase space for the system. We found that the protein synthesis rate and the unbinding rate of proteins to the gene were small relative to the protein degradation rate; the gene switch is monostable with only one stable basin of attraction. When both the protein synthesis rate and the unbinding rate of proteins to the gene are large compared with the protein degradation rate, two global basins of attraction emerge for a toggle switch. These basins correspond to the biologically stable functional states. The potential energy barrier between the two basins determines the time scale of conversion from one to the other. We found as the protein synthesis rate and protein unbinding rate to the gene relative to the protein degradation rate became larger, the potential energy barrier became larger. This also corresponded to systems with less noise or the fluctuations on the protein numbers. It leads to the robustness of the biological basins of the gene switches. The technique used here is general and can be applied to explore the potential energy landscape of the gene networks. PMID:17397255

  1. Bistability in a Metabolic Network Underpins the De Novo Evolution of Colony Switching in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    PubMed Central

    Gallie, Jenna; Libby, Eric; Bertels, Frederic; Remigi, Philippe; Jendresen, Christian B.; Ferguson, Gayle C.; Desprat, Nicolas; Buffing, Marieke F.; Sauer, Uwe; Beaumont, Hubertus J. E.; Martinussen, Jan; Kilstrup, Mogens; Rainey, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    Phenotype switching is commonly observed in nature. This prevalence has allowed the elucidation of a number of underlying molecular mechanisms. However, little is known about how phenotypic switches arise and function in their early evolutionary stages. The first opportunity to provide empirical insight was delivered by an experiment in which populations of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 evolved, de novo, the ability to switch between two colony phenotypes. Here we unravel the molecular mechanism behind colony switching, revealing how a single nucleotide change in a gene enmeshed in central metabolism (carB) generates such a striking phenotype. We show that colony switching is underpinned by ON/OFF expression of capsules consisting of a colanic acid-like polymer. We use molecular genetics, biochemical analyses, and experimental evolution to establish that capsule switching results from perturbation of the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. Of central importance is a bifurcation point at which uracil triphosphate is partitioned towards either nucleotide metabolism or polymer production. This bifurcation marks a cell-fate decision point whereby cells with relatively high pyrimidine levels favour nucleotide metabolism (capsule OFF), while cells with lower pyrimidine levels divert resources towards polymer biosynthesis (capsule ON). This decision point is present and functional in the wild-type strain. Finally, we present a simple mathematical model demonstrating that the molecular components of the decision point are capable of producing switching. Despite its simple mutational cause, the connection between genotype and phenotype is complex and multidimensional, offering a rare glimpse of how noise in regulatory networks can provide opportunity for evolution. PMID:25763575

  2. Delays-based protein switches in a stochastic single-gene network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chun; Zeng, Jiakui; Tian, Dong; Luo, Hongchun; Yang, Tao; Han, Qinglin; Xiang, Chao; Zeng, Chunhua; Wang, Canjun

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the protein switch in a single-gene network with time delays is investigated, where the gene expression is assumed to be disturbed by multiplicative and additive noises. The impacts of time delays τd and τs in degradation and synthesis processes, time delay τg in global process and cross-correlation between two noises (λi, and i = d , s , g) on the probability distribution and switch time (ST) from low protein level (OFF state) to high one (ON state) are discussed, respectively. Our results show that (1) the increase of the cross-correlation between two noises (λi) can induce protein switches from ON state to OFF one; (2) for λi ⩾ 0, the increase of τd can induce protein switches from OFF state to ON one, while τs (or τg) can induce protein switches from the ON state to the OFF one, but for λi < 0, the τd (or τs) can induce protein switches from the OFF state to the ON one, while τg can induce protein switches from the ON state to the OFF one; (3) the ST as functions of the noise intensities exhibits a maximum, which is the signature of the noise enhanced stability (NES) of the OFF state, while the increase of τd can cause the NES phenomenon to disappear; and (4) τd and τs play opposing roles in the ST, i.e., the impacts of the time delays τd and τs on ST can be canceled each other out.

  3. Novel flat datacenter network architecture based on scalable and flow-controlled optical switch system.

    PubMed

    Miao, Wang; Luo, Jun; Di Lucente, Stefano; Dorren, Harm; Calabretta, Nicola

    2014-02-10

    We propose and demonstrate an optical flat datacenter network based on scalable optical switch system with optical flow control. Modular structure with distributed control results in port-count independent optical switch reconfiguration time. RF tone in-band labeling technique allowing parallel processing of the label bits ensures the low latency operation regardless of the switch port-count. Hardware flow control is conducted at optical level by re-using the label wavelength without occupying extra bandwidth, space, and network resources which further improves the performance of latency within a simple structure. Dynamic switching including multicasting operation is validated for a 4 x 4 system. Error free operation of 40 Gb/s data packets has been achieved with only 1 dB penalty. The system could handle an input load up to 0.5 providing a packet loss lower that 10(-5) and an average latency less that 500 ns when a buffer size of 16 packets is employed. Investigation on scalability also indicates that the proposed system could potentially scale up to large port count with limited power penalty.

  4. All-optical cross-bar network architecture using TOAD based interferometric switch and designing of reconfigurable logic unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanay

    2011-12-01

    The design of all-optical 2 × 2 Terahertz Optical Asymmetric Demultiplexer (TOAD) based interferometric switch is proposed and described in this manuscript. Numerical simulation has been done to achieve the performance of the switch. Using this 2 × 2 TOAD based switch, cross-bar network architecture is designed. A reconfigurable logic unit is also proposed in this manuscript, which can perform 16-Boolean logical operations.

  5. Stability analysis of switched cellular neural networks: A mode-dependent average dwell time approach.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuangxia; Cao, Jie; Cao, Jinde

    2016-10-01

    This paper addresses the exponential stability of switched cellular neural networks by using the mode-dependent average dwell time (MDADT) approach. This method is quite different from the traditional average dwell time (ADT) method in permitting each subsystem to have its own average dwell time. Detailed investigations have been carried out for two cases. One is that all subsystems are stable and the other is that stable subsystems coexist with unstable subsystems. By employing Lyapunov functionals, linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), Jessen-type inequality, Wirtinger-based inequality, reciprocally convex approach, we derived some novel and less conservative conditions on exponential stability of the networks. Comparing to ADT, the proposed MDADT show that the minimal dwell time of each subsystem is smaller and the switched system stabilizes faster. The obtained results extend and improve some existing ones. Moreover, the validness and effectiveness of these results are demonstrated through numerical simulations.

  6. Analysis of Hybrid Buffering and Retransmission in OBS Networks.

    PubMed

    Vanitha, D Veera; Sabrigiriraj, M

    2015-01-01

    Burst contention is a major problem in the Optical Burst Switching (OBS) networks. Due to inadequate contention resolution techniques, the burst loss is prominent in OBS. In order to resolve contention fiber delay lines, wavelength converters, deflection routing, burst segmentation, and retransmission are used. Each one has its own limitations. In this paper, a new hybrid scheme is proposed which combines buffering and retransmission, which increases the mean number of bursts processed in the system. In this hybrid method, retransmission with controllable arrival and uncontrollable arrival is analyzed. Normally all the bursts reach the first hop and few of them go for second hop to reach destination. After all the bursts reach the destination the server may go for maintenance activity or wait for the arrival of next burst. We model it as a batch arrival single server retrial queue with buffer. Numerical results are analyzed to show the mean number of bursts processed in the system with uncontrollable arrival and controllable arrivals.

  7. Highly survivable communications: Complementary media packet switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, D.; Eken, F.; Karavassilis, N.

    1994-07-01

    all NATO nations/industries. These extensive results show that significant improvements in throughput of up to many times are obtained. A similar development for an OSI MB protocol has also been completed and combined with the HF protocol to obtain an OSI HF/MB link layer protocol with unique properties for HSC networks. Description of these protocols and the relevant results are presented. networks using standard COTS transceivers/modems with OSI PRO protocols can provide highly survivable connectivity, by providing the most important ingredient of survivability, media diversity.

  8. Bursting noise in gene expression dynamics: linking microscopic and mesoscopic models

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of short-lived mRNA results in bursts of protein production in gene regulatory networks. We investigate the propagation of bursting noise between different levels of mathematical modelling and demonstrate that conventional approaches based on diffusion approximations can fail to capture bursting noise. An alternative coarse-grained model, the so-called piecewise deterministic Markov process (PDMP), is seen to outperform the diffusion approximation in biologically relevant parameter regimes. We provide a systematic embedding of the PDMP model into the landscape of existing approaches, and we present analytical methods to calculate its stationary distribution and switching frequencies. PMID:26763330

  9. 20 kA PFN capacitor bank with solid-state switching. [pulse forming network for plasma studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posta, S. J.; Michels, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    A compact high-current pulse-forming network capacitor bank using paralleled silicon controlled rectifiers as switches is described. The maximum charging voltage of the bank is 1kV and maximum load current is 20 kA. The necessary switch equalization criteria and performance with dummy load and an arc plasma generator are described.

  10. Properties of switch-like bioregulatory networks studied by simulation of the hypoxia response control system.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Kurt W; Riss, Joseph; Aprelikova, Olga; Weinstein, John N; Pommier, Yves; Barrett, J Carl

    2004-07-01

    A complex bioregulatory network could be more easily comprehended if its essential function could be described by a small "core" subsystem, and if its response characteristics were switch-like. We tested this proposition by simulation studies of the hypoxia response control network. We hypothesized that a small subsystem governs the basics of the cellular response to hypoxia and that this response has a sharp oxygen-dependent transition. A molecular interaction map of the network was prepared, and an evolutionarily conserved core subsystem was extracted that could control the activity of hypoxia response promoter elements on the basis of oxygen concentration. The core subsystem included the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIFalpha:ARNT heterodimer), proline hydroxylase, and the von Hippel-Lindau protein. Simulation studies showed that the same core subsystem can exhibit switch-like responses both to oxygen level and to HIFalpha synthesis rate, thus suggesting a mechanism for hypoxia response promoter element-dependent responses common to both hypoxia and growth factor signaling. The studies disclosed the mechanism responsible for the sharp transitions. We show how parameter sets giving switch-like behavior can be found and how this type of behavior provides a foundation for quantitative studies in cells. PMID:15107465

  11. A second catalog of gamma-ray bursts - 1978-1980 localizations from the interplanetary network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atteia, J.-L.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Evans, W. D.; Fenimore, E. E.; Cline, T.; Desai, U.; Teegarden, B.

    1987-01-01

    A catalog of 84 gamma-ray bursts which occurred between September 14, 1978 and February 13, 1980 is presented. The data presented consist of earth crossing times, given to about the nearest second, and time histories, in the tens of keV to MeV range, for all 84 events, as well as localizations for 80 of the events. The localizations, derived from arrival-time analysis, are given as single error boxes, double error boxes, or annuli of location, and, where possible, have been compared to the Konus localizations. They range in size from less than a square arcminute to over 1000 square degrees. The fluences of the bursts cataloged are in the range 3 x 10 to the -7th ergs/sq cm and above.

  12. Ground-based gamma-ray burst follow-up efforts: Results of the first two years of the BATSE/COMPTEL/NMSU rapid response network

    SciTech Connect

    The Macho Collaboration

    1996-03-01

    In this paper we describe the capabilities of the BATSE/COMPTEL/NMSU Rapid Response Network and report on results obtained during its first 2 years of operation. This network is a worldwide association of 22 radio and optical observatories that perform follow-up searches of newly discovered gamma-ray burst error boxes by the {ital Compton} {ital Gamma} {ital Ray} {ital Observatory}. During the last 2 years, it has deeply imaged 10 gamma-ray error boxes over time frames from a few hours to a month after burst detection, and it finds no sources that can be associated unambiguously with a gamma-ray burst. {ital We} {ital suggest} {ital that} {ital significant} {ital optical} {ital or} {ital radio} {ital emission} {ital is} {ital not} {ital produced} {ital by} {ital gamma}-{ital ray} {ital bursts} {ital more} {ital than} {ital a} {ital day} {ital after} {ital the} {ital burst}. This result is consistent with recent theoretical models by Katz, Papathanassiou, and Paczy{acute n}ski & Rhoads; however, our hours to days optical response time and radio sensitivity limits allow only a weak constraint to be placed on these models. Based upon this study and other published works, we suggest that future work should concentrate on acquiring deep optical images ({ital m}{ge}12) of small gamma-ray error boxes well within a day of the burst. Ideally, radio observations should begin as soon after the burst as possible, reach a sensitivity of {le}1 mJy, and be continued with occasional images being acquired for at least a month following burst detection. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Astronomical Society.}

  13. Calmodulin and calmodulin kinase II mediate emergent bursting activity in the brainstem respiratory network (preBötzinger complex).

    PubMed

    Mironov, S L

    2013-04-01

    Emergence of persistent activity in networks can be controlled by intracellular signalling pathways but the mechanisms involved and their role are not yet fully explored. Using calcium imaging and patch-clamp we examined the rhythmic activity in the preBötzinger complex (preBötC) in the lower brainstem that generates the respiratory motor output. In functionally intact acute slices brief hypoxia, electrical stimulation and activation of AMPA receptors transiently depressed bursting activity which then recovered with augmentation. The effects were abrogated after chelation of intracellular calcium, blockade of L-type calcium channels and inhibition of calmodulin (CaM) and CaM kinase (CaMKII). Rhythmic calcium transients and synaptic drive currents in preBötC neurons in the organotypic slices showed similar CaM- and CaMKII-dependent responses. The stimuli increased the amplitude of spontaneous and miniature excitatory synaptic currents indicating postsynaptic changes at glutamatergic synapses. In the acute and organotypic slices, CaM stimulated and ADP inhibited calcium-dependent TRPM4 channels and CaMKII augmented synaptic drive currents. Experimental data and simulations show the role of ADP and CaMKII in the control of bursting activity and its relation to intracellular signalling. I propose that CaMKII-mediated facilitation of glutamatergic transmission strengthens emergent synchronous activity within preBötC that is then maintained by periodic surges of calcium during the bursts. This may find implications in restoration and consolidation of autonomous activity in the respiratory disorders. PMID:23207595

  14. Spin filtering and switching action in a diamond network with magnetic-nonmagnetic atomic distribution.

    PubMed

    Pal, Biplab; Dutta, Paramita

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple model quantum network consisting of diamond-shaped plaquettes with deterministic distribution of magnetic and non-magnetic atoms in presence of a uniform external magnetic flux in each plaquette and predict that such a simple model can be a prospective candidate for spin filter as well as flux driven spintronic switch. The orientations and the amplitudes of the substrate magnetic moments play a crucial role in the energy band engineering of the two spin channels which essentially gives us a control over the spin transmission leading to a spin filtering effect. The externally tunable magnetic flux plays an important role in inducing a switch on-switch off effect for both the spin states indicating the behavior like a spintronic switch. Even a correlated disorder configuration in the on-site potentials and in the magnetic moments may lead to disorder-induced spin filtering phenomenon where one of the spin channel gets entirely blocked leaving the other one transmitting over the entire allowed energy regime. All these features are established by evaluating the density of states and the two terminal transmission probabilities using the transfer-matrix formalism within a tight-binding framework. Experimental realization of our theoretical study may be helpful in designing new spintronic devices. PMID:27600958

  15. Spin filtering and switching action in a diamond network with magnetic-nonmagnetic atomic distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Biplab; Dutta, Paramita

    2016-09-01

    We propose a simple model quantum network consisting of diamond-shaped plaquettes with deterministic distribution of magnetic and non-magnetic atoms in presence of a uniform external magnetic flux in each plaquette and predict that such a simple model can be a prospective candidate for spin filter as well as flux driven spintronic switch. The orientations and the amplitudes of the substrate magnetic moments play a crucial role in the energy band engineering of the two spin channels which essentially gives us a control over the spin transmission leading to a spin filtering effect. The externally tunable magnetic flux plays an important role in inducing a switch on-switch off effect for both the spin states indicating the behavior like a spintronic switch. Even a correlated disorder configuration in the on-site potentials and in the magnetic moments may lead to disorder-induced spin filtering phenomenon where one of the spin channel gets entirely blocked leaving the other one transmitting over the entire allowed energy regime. All these features are established by evaluating the density of states and the two terminal transmission probabilities using the transfer-matrix formalism within a tight-binding framework. Experimental realization of our theoretical study may be helpful in designing new spintronic devices.

  16. Differentially-charged and sequentially-switched square-wave pulse forming network

    DOEpatents

    North, George G. [Stockton, CA; Vogilin, George E. [Livermore, CA

    1980-04-01

    A pulse forming network for delivering a high-energy square-wave pulse to a load, including a series of inductive-capacitive sections wherein the capacitors are differentially charged higher further from the load. Each charged capacitor is isolated from adjacent sections and the load by means of a normally open switch at the output of each section. The switch between the load and the closest section to the load is closed to begin discharge of the capacitor in that section into the load. During discharge of each capacitor, the voltage thereacross falls to a predetermined potential with respect to the potential across the capacitor in the next adjacent section further from the load. When this potential is reached, it is used to close the switch in the adjacent section further from the load and thereby apply the charge in that section to the load through the adjacent section toward the load. Each successive section further from the load is sequentially switched in this manner to continuously and evenly supply energy to the load over the period of the pulse, with the differentially charged capacitors providing higher potentials away from the load to compensate for the voltage drop across the resistance of each inductor. This arrangement is low in cost and yet provides a high-energy pulse in an acceptable square-wave form.

  17. Differentially-charged and sequentially-switched square-wave pulse forming network

    DOEpatents

    North, G.G.; Vogilin, G.E.

    1980-04-01

    Disclosed is a pulse forming network for delivering a high-energy square-wave pulse to a load, including a series of inductive-capacitive sections wherein the capacitors are differentially charged higher further from the load. Each charged capacitor is isolated from adjacent sections and the load by means of a normally open switch at the output of each section. The switch between the load and the closest section to the load is closed to begin discharge of the capacitor in that section into the load. During discharge of each capacitor, the voltage thereacross falls to a predetermined potential with respect to the potential across the capacitor in the next adjacent section further from the load. When this potential is reached, it is used to close the switch in the adjacent section further from the load and thereby apply the charge in that section to the load through the adjacent section toward the load. Each successive section further from the load is sequentially switched in this manner to continuously and evenly supply energy to the load over the period of the pulse, with the differentially charged capacitors providing higher potentials away from the load to compensate for the voltage drop across the resistance of each inductor. This arrangement is low in cost and yet provides a high-energy pulse in an acceptable square-wave form. 5 figs.

  18. Spin filtering and switching action in a diamond network with magnetic-nonmagnetic atomic distribution

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Biplab; Dutta, Paramita

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple model quantum network consisting of diamond-shaped plaquettes with deterministic distribution of magnetic and non-magnetic atoms in presence of a uniform external magnetic flux in each plaquette and predict that such a simple model can be a prospective candidate for spin filter as well as flux driven spintronic switch. The orientations and the amplitudes of the substrate magnetic moments play a crucial role in the energy band engineering of the two spin channels which essentially gives us a control over the spin transmission leading to a spin filtering effect. The externally tunable magnetic flux plays an important role in inducing a switch on-switch off effect for both the spin states indicating the behavior like a spintronic switch. Even a correlated disorder configuration in the on-site potentials and in the magnetic moments may lead to disorder-induced spin filtering phenomenon where one of the spin channel gets entirely blocked leaving the other one transmitting over the entire allowed energy regime. All these features are established by evaluating the density of states and the two terminal transmission probabilities using the transfer-matrix formalism within a tight-binding framework. Experimental realization of our theoretical study may be helpful in designing new spintronic devices. PMID:27600958

  19. Synchronization in a network of delay coupled maps with stochastically switching topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Mayurakshi; Poria, Swarup

    2016-10-01

    The synchronization behavior of delay coupled chaotic smooth unimodal maps over a ring network with stochastic switching of links at every time step is reported in this paper. It is observed that spatiotemporal synchronization never appears for nearest neighbor connections; however, stochastic switching of connections with homogeneous delay $(\\tau)$ is capable of synchronizing the network to homogeneous steady state or periodic orbit or synchronized chaotically oscillating state depending on the delay parameter, stochasticity parameter and map parameters. Linear stability analysis of the synchronized state is done analytically for unit delay and the value of the critical coupling strength, at which the onset of synchronization occurs is determined analytically. The logistic map $rx(1-x)$ (a smooth unimodal map) is chosen for numerical simulation purpose. Synchronized steady state or synchronized period-2 orbit is stabilized for delay $\\tau=1$. On the other hand for delay $\\tau=2$ the network is stabilized to the fixed point of the local map. Numerical simulation results are in good agreement with the analytically obtained linear stability analysis results. Another interesting observation is the existence of synchronized chaos in the network for delay $\\tau>2$. Calculating synchronization error and plotting time series data and Poincare first return map the existence of synchronized chaos is confirmed. The results hold good for other smooth unimodal maps also.

  20. Simultaneous and coordinated rotational switching of all molecular rotors in a network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Kersell, H.; Stefak, R.; Echeverria, J.; Iancu, V.; Perera, U. G. E.; Li, Y.; Deshpande, A.; Braun, K.-F.; Joachim, C.; Rapenne, G.; Hla, S.-W.

    2016-08-01

    A range of artificial molecular systems has been created that can exhibit controlled linear and rotational motion. In the further development of such systems, a key step is the addition of communication between molecules in a network. Here, we show that a two-dimensional array of dipolar molecular rotors can undergo simultaneous rotational switching when applying an electric field from the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. Several hundred rotors made from porphyrin-based double-decker complexes can be simultaneously rotated when in a hexagonal rotor network on a Cu(111) surface by applying biases above 1 V at 80 K. The phenomenon is observed only in a hexagonal rotor network due to the degeneracy of the ground-state dipole rotational energy barrier of the system. Defects are essential to increase electric torque on the rotor network and to stabilize the switched rotor domains. At low biases and low initial rotator angles, slight reorientations of individual rotors can occur, resulting in the rotator arms pointing in different directions. Analysis reveals that the rotator arm directions are not random, but are coordinated to minimize energy via crosstalk among the rotors through dipolar interactions.

  1. Simultaneous and coordinated rotational switching of all molecular rotors in a network.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Kersell, H; Stefak, R; Echeverria, J; Iancu, V; Perera, U G E; Li, Y; Deshpande, A; Braun, K-F; Joachim, C; Rapenne, G; Hla, S-W

    2016-08-01

    A range of artificial molecular systems has been created that can exhibit controlled linear and rotational motion. In the further development of such systems, a key step is the addition of communication between molecules in a network. Here, we show that a two-dimensional array of dipolar molecular rotors can undergo simultaneous rotational switching when applying an electric field from the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. Several hundred rotors made from porphyrin-based double-decker complexes can be simultaneously rotated when in a hexagonal rotor network on a Cu(111) surface by applying biases above 1 V at 80 K. The phenomenon is observed only in a hexagonal rotor network due to the degeneracy of the ground-state dipole rotational energy barrier of the system. Defects are essential to increase electric torque on the rotor network and to stabilize the switched rotor domains. At low biases and low initial rotator angles, slight reorientations of individual rotors can occur, resulting in the rotator arms pointing in different directions. Analysis reveals that the rotator arm directions are not random, but are coordinated to minimize energy via crosstalk among the rotors through dipolar interactions. PMID:27159740

  2. Burst Packet Loss Concealment Using Multiple Codebooks and Comfort Noise for CELP-Type Speech Coders in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Park, Nam In; Kim, Hong Kook; Jung, Min A; Lee, Seong Ro; Choi, Seung Ho

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a packet loss concealment (PLC) algorithm for CELP-type speech coders is proposed in order to improve the quality of decoded speech under burst packet loss conditions in a wireless sensor network. Conventional receiver-based PLC algorithms in the G.729 speech codec are usually based on speech correlation to reconstruct the decoded speech of lost frames by using parameter information obtained from the previous correctly received frames. However, this approach has difficulty in reconstructing voice onset signals since the parameters such as pitch, linear predictive coding coefficient, and adaptive/fixed codebooks of the previous frames are mostly related to silence frames. Thus, in order to reconstruct speech signals in the voice onset intervals, we propose a multiple codebook-based approach that includes a traditional adaptive codebook and a new random codebook composed of comfort noise. The proposed PLC algorithm is designed as a PLC algorithm for G.729 and its performance is then compared with that of the PLC algorithm currently employed in G.729 via a perceptual evaluation of speech quality, a waveform comparison, and a preference test under different random and burst packet loss conditions. It is shown from the experiments that the proposed PLC algorithm provides significantly better speech quality than the PLC algorithm employed in G.729 under all the test conditions. PMID:22163902

  3. Ultra-stable optical amplifier technologies for dynamic optical switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, M.; Tsang, K. S.; Man, R.; Puttnam, B. J.; Awaji, Y.; Wada, N.

    2015-01-01

    High-capacity fiber-optic communications are promising technologies to satisfy people's continuously growing demands for bandwidth hungry data services. Multi-wavelength optical circuit switching (OCS) technology is already widely deployed, however, with the limited number of transceivers equipped at each optical node and other constraints, the number of lightpaths which can be established and employed simultaneously in an optical network is restricted. This reduces the utilization efficiency of wavelength resources. Comparing to OCS, dynamic optical switching systems such as optical packet switching (OPS) offer higher efficiency in terms of wavelength resource utilization and have the potential to share more of the wavelength resources on fiber-links between larger numbers of users simultaneously. In such networks, bursty input signals or changes in traffic density may cause optical power surges that can damage optical components or impose gain transients on the signals that impair signal quality. A common approach for reducing gain transients is to employ electrical automatic gain control (AGC) or optical gain-clamping by optical feedback (OFB). AGC may be limited by the speed of the feedback circuit and result in additional transients. Meanwhile OFB can clamp the gain of power varying optical signals without transient but can introduce amplitude fluctuations caused by relaxation oscillations in the lasing cavity for large input power fluctuations. We propose and demonstrate a novel scheme for suppressing the power transients and the relaxation oscillations. This scheme can be utilized in optical amplifiers even if the optical feedback is employed.

  4. Switching networks for realisation of variable DC transformers coupled to rectangular arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, S.

    1982-06-01

    The process by which the structure of a rectangular array with variable interconnections is changed can be described by an equivalent circuit in which a nonvariable array is coupled to the load by means of a variable 'DC transformer' (DCT). This kind of array can be applied in cases in which it is necessary to match the source and the load, when either one or both are composed of identical elements which can be organized into a rectangular array structure. Applications of the considered approach are related to maximum power trackers of photovoltaic systems, voltage multipliers, electric cars, and a special type of DC/AC convertor. A description is presented of the realization of a variable array by means of switching networks using a minimum number of switching elements.

  5. Good vibrations switch attention: an affective function for network oscillations in evolutionary simulations.

    PubMed

    Heerebout, Bram T; Phaf, R Hans

    2010-05-01

    In the present study, a new hypothesis on the neural mechanisms linking affect to attention was brought forward by evolutionary simulations on agents navigating a virtual environment while collecting food and avoiding predation. The connection strengths between nodes in the networks controlling the agents were subjected to random variation, and the fittest agents were selected for reproduction. Unexpectedly, oscillations of node activations emerged, which drastically enhanced the agent's fitness. We analyzed the mechanisms involved in the modulation of attention and found that oscillations acted on competitive networks. Response selection depended on the connection structure, but the speed and efficacy of switching between selections was modulated by oscillation frequency. The main focus of the present study was the differential emergence of stimulus-specific oscillation frequencies. Oscillations had a higher frequency in an appetitive motivational state than in an aversive state. We suggest that oscillations in biological networks also mediate the affective modulation of attention. PMID:20498346

  6. Fast edge-detection burst-mode 2.5Gbit/s receiver for gigabit passive optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugues-Salas, E.; Razavi, R.; Quinlan, T.; Walker, S. D.; Parker, Michael C.

    2007-05-01

    Ever-increasing subscriber demand requires higher-bandwidth passive optical networks (PONs), with attendant fast, automatically provisioned, and dynamic optical connections. Burst-mode receivers (BMRs) are critical components in the design of the optical line terminal in PONs. Here we investigate multigigabit per second, differentiator-based, edge detection by simulation and experiment. The main features include: differentiator resistance-capacitance (RC) constant, comparator holding time, channel bandwidth, and the impact of consecutive identical digits. Our experimental results show excellent functionality in the PON environment with commercially available optical and electronic components. Differentiator edge-detection results compare favorably with the alternative ac- and dc-coupled methods at gigabit data rates. Finally, RC edge detection provides a greatly enhanced clock signal, thus mitigating the well-known BMR synchronization problem.

  7. Layer-switching cost and optimality in information spreading on multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byungjoon; Gwak, Sang-Hwan; Lee, Nanoom; Goh, K.-I.

    2016-02-01

    We study a model of information spreading on multiplex networks, in which agents interact through multiple interaction channels (layers), say online vs. offline communication layers, subject to layer-switching cost for transmissions across different interaction layers. The model is characterized by the layer-wise path-dependent transmissibility over a contact, that is dynamically determined dependently on both incoming and outgoing transmission layers. We formulate an analytical framework to deal with such path-dependent transmissibility and demonstrate the nontrivial interplay between the multiplexity and spreading dynamics, including optimality. It is shown that the epidemic threshold and prevalence respond to the layer-switching cost non-monotonically and that the optimal conditions can change in abrupt non-analytic ways, depending also on the densities of network layers and the type of seed infections. Our results elucidate the essential role of multiplexity that its explicit consideration should be crucial for realistic modeling and prediction of spreading phenomena on multiplex social networks in an era of ever-diversifying social interaction layers.

  8. Layer-switching cost and optimality in information spreading on multiplex networks

    PubMed Central

    Min, Byungjoon; Gwak, Sang-Hwan; Lee, Nanoom; Goh, K. -I.

    2016-01-01

    We study a model of information spreading on multiplex networks, in which agents interact through multiple interaction channels (layers), say online vs. offline communication layers, subject to layer-switching cost for transmissions across different interaction layers. The model is characterized by the layer-wise path-dependent transmissibility over a contact, that is dynamically determined dependently on both incoming and outgoing transmission layers. We formulate an analytical framework to deal with such path-dependent transmissibility and demonstrate the nontrivial interplay between the multiplexity and spreading dynamics, including optimality. It is shown that the epidemic threshold and prevalence respond to the layer-switching cost non-monotonically and that the optimal conditions can change in abrupt non-analytic ways, depending also on the densities of network layers and the type of seed infections. Our results elucidate the essential role of multiplexity that its explicit consideration should be crucial for realistic modeling and prediction of spreading phenomena on multiplex social networks in an era of ever-diversifying social interaction layers. PMID:26887527

  9. Use of adaptive network burst detection methods for multielectrode array data and the generation of artificial spike patterns for method evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendis, G. D. C.; Morrisroe, E.; Petrou, S.; Halgamuge, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Multielectrode arrays are an informative extracellular recording technology that enables the analysis of cultured neuronal networks and network bursts (NBs) are a dominant feature observed in these recordings. This paper focuses on the validation of NB detection methods on different network activity patterns and developing a detection method that performs robustly across a wide variety of activity patterns. Approach. A firing rate based approach was used to generate artificial spike timestamps where NBs were introduced as episodes where the probability of spiking increases. Variations in firing and bursting characteristics were also included. In addition, an improved methodology of detecting NBs is proposed, based on time-binned average firing rates and time overlaps of single channel bursts. The robustness of the proposed method was compared against three existing algorithms using simulated, publicly available and newly acquired data. Main results. A range of activity patterns were generated by changing simulation variables that correspond to NB duration (40-2200 ms), intervals (0.3-16 s), firing rates (0.1-1 spikes s-1), local burst percentage (0%-90%), number of channels in local bursts (20-40) as well as the number of tonic and frequently-bursting channels. By extracting simulation parameters directly from real data, we generated synthetic data that closely resemble activity of mouse and rat cortical cultures at native and chemically perturbed states. In 50 simulated data sets with randomly selected parameter values, the improved NB detection method performed better (ascertained by the f-measure) than three existing methods (p < 0.005). The improved method was also able to detect clustered, long-tailed and short-frequent NBs on real data. Significance. This work presents an objective method of assessing the applicability of NB detection methods for different neuronal activity patterns. Furthermore, it proposes an improved NB detection method that can

  10. A sweep algorithm for massively parallel simulation of circuit-switched networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaujal, Bruno; Greenberg, Albert G.; Nicol, David M.

    1992-01-01

    A new massively parallel algorithm is presented for simulating large asymmetric circuit-switched networks, controlled by a randomized-routing policy that includes trunk-reservation. A single instruction multiple data (SIMD) implementation is described, and corresponding experiments on a 16384 processor MasPar parallel computer are reported. A multiple instruction multiple data (MIMD) implementation is also described, and corresponding experiments on an Intel IPSC/860 parallel computer, using 16 processors, are reported. By exploiting parallelism, our algorithm increases the possible execution rate of such complex simulations by as much as an order of magnitude.

  11. Lag Synchronization of Switched Neural Networks via Neural Activation Function and Applications in Image Encryption.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shiping; Zeng, Zhigang; Huang, Tingwen; Meng, Qinggang; Yao, Wei

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates the problem of global exponential lag synchronization of a class of switched neural networks with time-varying delays via neural activation function and applications in image encryption. The controller is dependent on the output of the system in the case of packed circuits, since it is hard to measure the inner state of the circuits. Thus, it is critical to design the controller based on the neuron activation function. Comparing the results, in this paper, with the existing ones shows that we improve and generalize the results derived in the previous literature. Several examples are also given to illustrate the effectiveness and potential applications in image encryption.

  12. A tri-state optical switch for local area network communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simms, Garfield

    1993-01-01

    This novel structure is a heterojunction phototransistor which can be used as an emitter-detector, and when placed in a quiescent mode, the device becomes a passive transmitter. By varying the voltage bias, this novel device will switch between all three modes of operation. Such a device has broad application in network environments with operation speeds of less than 50 MHz and distances of less than 1 km, e.g. automobiles, airplanes, and intra-instrumentation. During this period, the emission mode for this device was studied and mathematically modeled.

  13. Impulsive synchronization schemes of stochastic complex networks with switching topology: average time approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaojie; Yu, Wenwu; Huang, Tingwen

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a novel impulsive control law is proposed for synchronization of stochastic discrete complex networks with time delays and switching topologies, where average dwell time and average impulsive interval are taken into account. The side effect of time delays is estimated by Lyapunov-Razumikhin technique, which quantitatively gives the upper bound to increase the rate of Lyapunov function. By considering the compensation of decreasing interval, a better impulsive control law is recast in terms of average dwell time and average impulsive interval. Detailed results from a numerical illustrative example are presented and discussed. Finally, some relevant conclusions are drawn.

  14. All-optical packet header and payload separation for un-slotted optical packet switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Zhang, Min; Ye, Peida

    2005-11-01

    A novel all-optical header and payload separation technique that can be utilized in un-slotted optical packet switched networks is presented. The technique uses a modified TOAD for packet header extraction with differential modulation scheme and two SOAs that perform a simple XOR operation between the packet and its self-derived header to get the separated payload. The main virtue of this system is simple structure and need not any additional continuous pulses. Through numerical simulations, the operating characteristics of the scheme are illustrated. In addition, the parameters of the system are discussed and designed to optimize the operation performance.

  15. Convergence Properties of Posttranslationally Modified Protein-Protein Switching Networks with Fast Decay Rates.

    PubMed

    Fan, Gaoyang; Cummins, Bree; Gedeon, Tomáš

    2016-06-01

    A significant conceptual difficulty in the use of switching systems to model regulatory networks is the presence of so-called "black walls," co-dimension 1 regions of phase space with a vector field pointing inward on both sides of the hyperplane. Black walls result from the existence of direct negative self-regulation in the system. One biologically inspired way of removing black walls is the introduction of intermediate variables that mediate the negative self-regulation. In this paper, we study such a perturbation. We replace a switching system with a higher-dimensional switching system with rapidly decaying intermediate proteins, and compare the dynamics between the two systems. We find that the while the individual solutions of the original system can be approximated for a finite time by solutions of a sufficiently close perturbed system, there are always solutions that are not well approximated for any fixed perturbation. We also study a particular example, where global basins of attraction of the perturbed system have a strikingly different form than those of the original system. We perform this analysis using techniques that are adapted to dealing with non-smooth systems. PMID:27271120

  16. High-performance flat data center network architecture based on scalable and flow-controlled optical switching system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabretta, Nicola; Miao, Wang; Dorren, Harm

    2016-03-01

    Traffic in data centers networks (DCNs) is steadily growing to support various applications and virtualization technologies. Multi-tenancy enabling efficient resource utilization is considered as a key requirement for the next generation DCs resulting from the growing demands for services and applications. Virtualization mechanisms and technologies can leverage statistical multiplexing and fast switch reconfiguration to further extend the DC efficiency and agility. We present a novel high performance flat DCN employing bufferless and distributed fast (sub-microsecond) optical switches with wavelength, space, and time switching operation. The fast optical switches can enhance the performance of the DCNs by providing large-capacity switching capability and efficiently sharing the data plane resources by exploiting statistical multiplexing. Benefiting from the Software-Defined Networking (SDN) control of the optical switches, virtual DCNs can be flexibly created and reconfigured by the DCN provider. Numerical and experimental investigations of the DCN based on the fast optical switches show the successful setup of virtual network slices for intra-data center interconnections. Experimental results to assess the DCN performance in terms of latency and packet loss show less than 10^-5 packet loss and 640ns end-to-end latency with 0.4 load and 16- packet size buffer. Numerical investigation on the performance of the systems when the port number of the optical switch is scaled to 32x32 system indicate that more than 1000 ToRs each with Terabit/s interface can be interconnected providing a Petabit/s capacity. The roadmap to photonic integration of large port optical switches will be also presented.

  17. Modulus synchronization in a network of nonlinear systems with antagonistic interactions and switching topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Shidong

    2016-04-01

    This paper studies the collective behavior in a network of nonlinear systems with antagonistic interactions and switching topologies. The concept of modulus synchronization is introduced to characterize the case that the moduli of corresponding components of the agent (node) states reach a synchronization. The network topologies are modeled by a set of directed signed graphs. When all directed signed graphs are structurally balanced and the nonlinear system satisfies a one-sided Lipschitz condition, by using matrix measure and contraction theory, we show that modulus synchronization can be evaluated by the time average of some matrix measures. These matrices are about the second smallest eigenvalue of undirected graphs corresponding to directed signed graphs. Finally, we present two numerical examples to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  18. A code switching technique for distributed spread spectrum packet radio networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, E. S.; Silvester, J. A.

    A protocol for the use of spreading codes in a spread spectrum packet radio network is presented. Throughput results for a single-hop homogeneous network in heavy traffic are given. With the protocol, each terminal is assigned two unique spreading codes: one that the terminal uses to monitor the channel when it is idle, and a different code that the terminal switches to after transmitting an initial addressing header, which is transmitted on the destination's monitoring code. Limiting throughput results are obtained. Under the assumption of exponentially distributed packet lengths a limiting throughput per terminal pair corresponding to a utilization of .3431 for a system with an infinite number of users and infinite bandwidth is obtained.

  19. Magnetar Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) was launched in June 2008. During the last five years the instrument has observed several hundreds of bursts from 8 confirmed magnetars and 19 events from unconfirmed sources. I will discuss the results of the GBM magnetar burst catalog, expand on the different properties of their diverse source population, and compare these results with the bursting activity of past sources. I will then conclude with thoughts of how these properties fit the magnetar theoretical models.

  20. Alternatives for the introduction of optical packet switching networks in this internet world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaroni, Dominique

    2001-09-01

    With the emergence of new services mixing data, voice and video, the expected increase of the traffic volume together with the modification of its profile creates a need for a high throughput multimedia network. In addition, quality-of- service (QoS) management is currently widely debated at the convergence between ATM and IP communities. In the meantime, WDM is widely deployed, giving access to large transport capacities together with a new dimension for routing purposes. This paper present alternatives for a multi- service optical network infrastructure in this Internet world, where WDM is used not only to increase the throughput but also to differentiate the traffic, to alleviate contention issues and to provide cost-effective solutions. On the same optical infrastructure under a self-sufficient management yet, would coexist different logical sub-networks where different routing techniques are used according to QoS and client protocol requirements. The main objective is to save on the transport cost by optimizing through packet switching techniques the resource utilization according traffic characteristics, while providing enough flexibility to adapt the resources to the evolution of the demand, and maintaining a high transmission quality, as provided by SONET today. This work, capitalizes on InP-based fast optical switching technologies demonstrated within the European ACTS KEIPS project. In this paper, the network concepts, packet format considerations, preferred routing techniques and system architecture will be reported and illustrated through physical and logical analysis. Finally, t < o introduction scenario will be presented: one for the backbone and one for the metro.

  1. Destination-directed, packet-switched architecture for a geostationary communications satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Shalkhauser, Mary JO; Bobinsky, Eric A.; Soni, Nitin J.; Quintana, Jorge A.; Kim, Heechul; Wager, Paul; Vanderaar, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A major goal of the Digital Systems Technology Branch at the NASA Lewis Research Center is to identify and develop critical digital components and technologies that either enable new commercial missions or significantly enhance the performance, cost efficiency, and/or reliability of existing and planned space communications systems. NASA envisions a need for low-data-rate, interactive, direct-to-the-user communications services for data, voice, facsimile, and video conferencing. The network would provide enhanced very-small-aperture terminal (VSAT) communications services and be capable of handling data rates of 64 kbps through 2.048 Mbps in 64-kbps increments. Efforts have concentrated heavily on the space segment; however, the ground segment has been considered concurrently to ensure cost efficiency and realistic operational constraints. The focus of current space segment developments is a flexible, high-throughput, fault-tolerant onboard information-switching processor (ISP) for a geostationary satellite communications network. The Digital Systems Technology Branch is investigating both circuit and packet architectures for the ISP. Destination-directed, packet-switched architectures for geostationary communications satellites are addressed.

  2. Networks of coupled circuits: From a versatile toggle switch to collective coherent behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labavić, Darka; Meyer-Ortmanns, Hildegard

    2014-12-01

    We study the versatile performance of networks of coupled circuits. Each of these circuits is composed of a positive and a negative feedback loop in a motif that is frequently found in genetic and neural networks. When two of these circuits are coupled with mutual repression, the system can function as a toggle switch. The variety of its states can be controlled by two parameters as we demonstrate by a detailed bifurcation analysis. In the bistable regimes, switches between the coexisting attractors can be induced by noise. When we couple larger sets of these units, we numerically observe collective coherent modes of individual fixed-point and limit-cycle behavior. It is there that the monotonic change of a single bifurcation parameter allows one to control the onset and arrest of the synchronized oscillations. This mechanism may play a role in biological applications, in particular, in connection with the segmentation clock. While tuning the bifurcation parameter, also a variety of transient patterns emerges upon approaching the stationary states, in particular, a self-organized pacemaker in a completely uniformly equipped ensemble, so that the symmetry breaking happens dynamically.

  3. Stability switches and double Hopf bifurcation in a two-neural network system with multiple delays.

    PubMed

    Song, Zi-Gen; Xu, Jian

    2013-12-01

    Time delay is an inevitable factor in neural networks due to the finite propagation velocity and switching speed. Neural system may lose its stability even for very small delay. In this paper, a two-neural network system with the different types of delays involved in self- and neighbor- connection has been investigated. The local asymptotic stability of the equilibrium point is studied by analyzing the corresponding characteristic equation. It is found that the multiple delays can lead the system dynamic behavior to exhibit stability switches. The delay-dependent stability regions are illustrated in the delay-parameter plane, followed which the double Hopf bifurcation points can be obtained from the intersection points of the first and second Hopf bifurcation, i.e., the corresponding characteristic equation has two pairs of imaginary eigenvalues. Taking the delays as the bifurcation parameters, the classification and bifurcation sets are obtained in terms of the central manifold reduction and normal form method. The dynamical behavior of system may exhibit the quasi-periodic solutions due to the Neimark- Sacker bifurcation. Finally, numerical simulations are made to verify the theoretical results.

  4. Parameters for burst detection

    PubMed Central

    Bakkum, Douglas J.; Radivojevic, Milos; Frey, Urs; Franke, Felix; Hierlemann, Andreas; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    Bursts of action potentials within neurons and throughout networks are believed to serve roles in how neurons handle and store information, both in vivo and in vitro. Accurate detection of burst occurrences and durations are therefore crucial for many studies. A number of algorithms have been proposed to do so, but a standard method has not been adopted. This is due, in part, to many algorithms requiring the adjustment of multiple ad-hoc parameters and further post-hoc criteria in order to produce satisfactory results. Here, we broadly catalog existing approaches and present a new approach requiring the selection of only a single parameter: the number of spikes N comprising the smallest burst to consider. A burst was identified if N spikes occurred in less than T ms, where the threshold T was automatically determined from observing a probability distribution of inter-spike-intervals. Performance was compared vs. different classes of detectors on data gathered from in vitro neuronal networks grown over microelectrode arrays. Our approach offered a number of useful features including: a simple implementation, no need for ad-hoc or post-hoc criteria, and precise assignment of burst boundary time points. Unlike existing approaches, detection was not biased toward larger bursts, allowing identification and analysis of a greater range of neuronal and network dynamics. PMID:24567714

  5. Quasi-Optical Network Analyzers and High-Reliability RF MEMS Switched Capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grichener, Alexander

    The thesis first presents a 2-port quasi-optical scalar network analyzer consisting of a transmitter and receiver both built in planar technology. The network analyzer is based on a Schottky-diode mixer integrated inside a planar antenna and fed differentially by a CPW transmission line. The antenna is placed on an extended hemispherical high-resistivity silicon substrate lens. The LO signal is swept from 3-5 GHz and high-order harmonic mixing in both up- and down- conversion mode is used to realize the 15-50 GHz RF bandwidth. The network analyzer resulted in a dynamic range of greater than 40 dB and was successfully used to measure a frequency selective surface with a second-order bandpass response. Furthermore, the system was built with circuits and components for easy scaling to millimeter-wave frequencies which is the primary motivation for this work. The application areas for a millimeter and submillimeter-wave network analyzer include material characterization and art diagnostics. The second project presents several RF MEMS switched capacitors designed for high-reliability operation and suitable for tunable filters and reconfigurable networks. The first switched-capacitor resulted in a digital capacitance ratio of 5 and an analog capacitance ratio of 5-9. The analog tuning of the down-state capacitance is enhanced by a positive vertical stress gradient in the the beam, making it ideal for applications that require precision tuning. A thick electroplated beam resulted in Q greater than 100 at C to X-band frequencies, and power handling of 0.6-1.1 W. The design also minimized charging in the dielectric, resulting in excellent reliability performance even under hot-switched and high power (1 W) conditions. The second switched-capacitor was designed without any dielectric to minimize charging. The device was hot-switched at 1 W of RF power for greater than 11 billion cycles with virtually no change in the C-V curve. The final project presents a 7-channel

  6. Stochastic switching in gene networks can occur by a single-molecule event or many molecular steps.

    PubMed

    Choi, Paul J; Xie, X Sunney; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2010-02-12

    Due to regulatory feedback, biological networks can exist stably in multiple states, leading to heterogeneous phenotypes among genetically identical cells. Random fluctuations in protein numbers, tuned by specific molecular mechanisms, have been hypothesized to drive transitions between these different states. We develop a minimal theoretical framework to analyze the limits of switching in terms of simple experimental parameters. Our model identifies and distinguishes between two distinct molecular mechanisms for generating stochastic switches. In one class of switches, the stochasticity of a single-molecule event, a specific and rare molecular reaction, directly controls the macroscopic change in a cell's state. In the second class, no individual molecular event is significant, and stochasticity arises from the propagation of biochemical noise through many molecular pathways and steps. As an example, we explore switches based on protein-DNA binding fluctuations and predict relations between transcription factor kinetics, absolute switching rate, robustness, and efficiency that differentiate between switching by single-molecule events or many molecular steps. Finally, we apply our methods to recent experimental data on switching in Escherichia coli lactose metabolism, providing quantitative interpretations of a single-molecule switching mechanism. PMID:19931280

  7. All-Optical Label Swapping Strategies for Spectral Amplitude Code Labels in Packet-Switched Optical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Christian

    There is currently much work focused on developing packet-switched optical networks to overcome the limitations of existing optical networks. Switch design for packet-switched optical networks is particularly challenging, in part due to the lack of a practical optical memory system. As a result, optical labels and all-optical label processing have attracted much attention. This thesis examines a crucial label processing component of an optical packet switch, namely the label swapper. In this thesis, three different tabletop topologies for low-cost all-optical swapping of spectral amplitude code labels for packet-switched networks are examined in a proof-of-concept phase. The first uses cross-absorption modulation in an electro-absorption modulator within a semiconductor fiber ring laser (SFRL), the second uses cross-gain modulation (XGM) in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) within an SFRL, and the third makes use of XGM in a SOA as well as injection locking in a Fabry-Perot laser diode for wavelength conversion. The benefits and limitations of each approach as well as future improvements are discussed. Building on these results, a high-performance integrated version of XGM swapper is designed, simulated, and masks are produced for fabrication using indium phosphide technology.

  8. Optimal design of mixed-media packet-switching networks - Routing and capacity assignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, D.; Kuo, F. F.; Kobayashi, H.

    1977-01-01

    This paper considers a mixed-media packet-switched computer communication network which consists of a low-delay terrestrial store-and-forward subnet combined with a low-cost high-bandwidth satellite subnet. We show how to route traffic via ground and/or satellite links by means of static, deterministic procedures and assign capacities to channels subject to a given linear cost such that the network average delay is minimized. Two operational schemes for this network model are investigated: one is a scheme in which the satellite channel is used as a slotted ALOHA channel; the other is a new multiaccess scheme we propose in which whenever a channel collision occurs, retransmission of the involved packets will route through ground links to their destinations. The performance of both schemes is evaluated and compared in terms of cost and average packet delay tradeoffs for some examples. The results offer guidelines for the design and optimal utilization of mixed-media networks.

  9. Pinning lag synchronization of drive-response complex networks via intermittent control with two different switched periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-an; Ma, Xiaohui; Wen, Xinyu; Sun, Qianlai

    2016-11-01

    This paper develops an intermittent control with two switched periods to study the pinning lag synchronization problem of drive-response complex networks. These two switched periods may have different control rates. By designing appropriate adaptive intermittent pinning controllers and using Lyapunov stability theory, some sufficient conditions for ensuring the lag synchronization between two coupled networks are derived. The minimum number of pinned nodes is determined by node dynamics, coupling strength, inner coupling matrix and a design parameter. Two simple pinning lag synchronization criteria are obtained from the proposed conditions. A numerical example is provided to illustrate the feasibility of the theoretical results.

  10. Intrinsic neuronal properties switch the mode of information transmission in networks.

    PubMed

    Gjorgjieva, Julijana; Mease, Rebecca A; Moody, William J; Fairhall, Adrienne L

    2014-12-01

    Diverse ion channels and their dynamics endow single neurons with complex biophysical properties. These properties determine the heterogeneity of cell types that make up the brain, as constituents of neural circuits tuned to perform highly specific computations. How do biophysical properties of single neurons impact network function? We study a set of biophysical properties that emerge in cortical neurons during the first week of development, eventually allowing these neurons to adaptively scale the gain of their response to the amplitude of the fluctuations they encounter. During the same time period, these same neurons participate in large-scale waves of spontaneously generated electrical activity. We investigate the potential role of experimentally observed changes in intrinsic neuronal properties in determining the ability of cortical networks to propagate waves of activity. We show that such changes can strongly affect the ability of multi-layered feedforward networks to represent and transmit information on multiple timescales. With properties modeled on those observed at early stages of development, neurons are relatively insensitive to rapid fluctuations and tend to fire synchronously in response to wave-like events of large amplitude. Following developmental changes in voltage-dependent conductances, these same neurons become efficient encoders of fast input fluctuations over few layers, but lose the ability to transmit slower, population-wide input variations across many layers. Depending on the neurons' intrinsic properties, noise plays different roles in modulating neuronal input-output curves, which can dramatically impact network transmission. The developmental change in intrinsic properties supports a transformation of a networks function from the propagation of network-wide information to one in which computations are scaled to local activity. This work underscores the significance of simple changes in conductance parameters in governing how neurons

  11. Communication over the Network of Binary Switches Regulates the Activation of A2A Adenosine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoonji; Choi, Sun; Hyeon, Changbong

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics and functions of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are accurately regulated by the type of ligands that bind to the orthosteric or allosteric binding sites. To glean the structural and dynamical origin of ligand-dependent modulation of GPCR activity, we performed total ~ 5 μsec molecular dynamics simulations of A2A adenosine receptor (A2AAR) in its apo, antagonist-bound, and agonist-bound forms in an explicit water and membrane environment, and examined the corresponding dynamics and correlation between the 10 key structural motifs that serve as the allosteric hotspots in intramolecular signaling network. We dubbed these 10 structural motifs “binary switches” as they display molecular interactions that switch between two distinct states. By projecting the receptor dynamics on these binary switches that yield 210 microstates, we show that (i) the receptors in apo, antagonist-bound, and agonist-bound states explore vastly different conformational space; (ii) among the three receptor states the apo state explores the broadest range of microstates; (iii) in the presence of the agonist, the active conformation is maintained through coherent couplings among the binary switches; and (iv) to be most specific, our analysis shows that W246, located deep inside the binding cleft, can serve as both an agonist sensor and actuator of ensuing intramolecular signaling for the receptor activation. Finally, our analysis of multiple trajectories generated by inserting an agonist to the apo state underscores that the transition of the receptor from inactive to active form requires the disruption of ionic-lock in the DRY motif. PMID:25664580

  12. Dependence of synchronized bursting activity on medium stirring and the perfusion rate in a cultured network of neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Ryoun; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2016-05-01

    A cultured network of neurons coupled with a multi-electrode-array (MEA) recording system has been a useful platform for investigating various issues in neuroscience and engineering. The neural activity supported by the system can be sensitive to environmental fluctuations, for example, in the medium's nutrient composition, ph, and temperature, and to mechanical disturbances, yet this issue has not been the subject. Especially, a normal practice in maintaining neuronal cell cultures involves an intermittent sequence of medium exchanges, typically at a time interval of a few days, and one such sudden medium exchange is unavoidably accompanied by many unintended disturbances. Here, based on a quantitative time-series analysis of synchronized bursting events, we explicitly demonstrate that such a medium exchange can, indeed, bring a huge change in the existing neural activity. Subsequently, we develop a medium perfusion-stirring system and an ideal protocol that can be used in conjunction with a MEA recording system, providing long-term stability. Specifically, we systematically evaluate the effects of medium stirring and perfusion rates. Unexpectedly, even some vigorous mechanical agitations do not have any impacts on neural activity. On the other hand, too much replenishment ( e.g., 1.8 ml/day for a 1.8-ml dish) of neurobasal medium results in an excitotoxicity.

  13. An associative capacitive network based on nanoscale complementary resistive switches for memory-intensive computing.

    PubMed

    Kavehei, Omid; Linn, Eike; Nielen, Lutz; Tappertzhofen, Stefan; Skafidas, Efstratios; Valov, Ilia; Waser, Rainer

    2013-06-01

    We report on the implementation of an Associative Capacitive Network (ACN) based on the nondestructive capacitive readout of two Complementary Resistive Switches (2-CRSs). ACNs are capable of performing a fully parallel search for Hamming distances (i.e. similarity) between input and stored templates. Unlike conventional associative memories where charge retention is a key function and hence, they require frequent refresh cycles, in ACNs, information is retained in a nonvolatile resistive state and normal tasks are carried out through capacitive coupling between input and output nodes. Each device consists of two CRS cells and no selective element is needed, therefore, CMOS circuitry is only required in the periphery, for addressing and read-out. Highly parallel processing, nonvolatility, wide interconnectivity and low-energy consumption are significant advantages of ACNs over conventional and emerging associative memories. These characteristics make ACNs one of the promising candidates for applications in memory-intensive and cognitive computing, switches and routers as binary and ternary Content Addressable Memories (CAMs) and intelligent data processing.

  14. An associative capacitive network based on nanoscale complementary resistive switches for memory-intensive computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavehei, Omid; Linn, Eike; Nielen, Lutz; Tappertzhofen, Stefan; Skafidas, Efstratios; Valov, Ilia; Waser, Rainer

    2013-05-01

    We report on the implementation of an Associative Capacitive Network (ACN) based on the nondestructive capacitive readout of two Complementary Resistive Switches (2-CRSs). ACNs are capable of performing a fully parallel search for Hamming distances (i.e. similarity) between input and stored templates. Unlike conventional associative memories where charge retention is a key function and hence, they require frequent refresh cycles, in ACNs, information is retained in a nonvolatile resistive state and normal tasks are carried out through capacitive coupling between input and output nodes. Each device consists of two CRS cells and no selective element is needed, therefore, CMOS circuitry is only required in the periphery, for addressing and read-out. Highly parallel processing, nonvolatility, wide interconnectivity and low-energy consumption are significant advantages of ACNs over conventional and emerging associative memories. These characteristics make ACNs one of the promising candidates for applications in memory-intensive and cognitive computing, switches and routers as binary and ternary Content Addressable Memories (CAMs) and intelligent data processing.

  15. Modeling Markov switching ARMA-GARCH neural networks models and an application to forecasting stock returns.

    PubMed

    Bildirici, Melike; Ersin, Özgür

    2014-01-01

    The study has two aims. The first aim is to propose a family of nonlinear GARCH models that incorporate fractional integration and asymmetric power properties to MS-GARCH processes. The second purpose of the study is to augment the MS-GARCH type models with artificial neural networks to benefit from the universal approximation properties to achieve improved forecasting accuracy. Therefore, the proposed Markov-switching MS-ARMA-FIGARCH, APGARCH, and FIAPGARCH processes are further augmented with MLP, Recurrent NN, and Hybrid NN type neural networks. The MS-ARMA-GARCH family and MS-ARMA-GARCH-NN family are utilized for modeling the daily stock returns in an emerging market, the Istanbul Stock Index (ISE100). Forecast accuracy is evaluated in terms of MAE, MSE, and RMSE error criteria and Diebold-Mariano equal forecast accuracy tests. The results suggest that the fractionally integrated and asymmetric power counterparts of Gray's MS-GARCH model provided promising results, while the best results are obtained for their neural network based counterparts. Further, among the models analyzed, the models based on the Hybrid-MLP and Recurrent-NN, the MS-ARMA-FIAPGARCH-HybridMLP, and MS-ARMA-FIAPGARCH-RNN provided the best forecast performances over the baseline single regime GARCH models and further, over the Gray's MS-GARCH model. Therefore, the models are promising for various economic applications.

  16. Modeling Markov Switching ARMA-GARCH Neural Networks Models and an Application to Forecasting Stock Returns

    PubMed Central

    Bildirici, Melike; Ersin, Özgür

    2014-01-01

    The study has two aims. The first aim is to propose a family of nonlinear GARCH models that incorporate fractional integration and asymmetric power properties to MS-GARCH processes. The second purpose of the study is to augment the MS-GARCH type models with artificial neural networks to benefit from the universal approximation properties to achieve improved forecasting accuracy. Therefore, the proposed Markov-switching MS-ARMA-FIGARCH, APGARCH, and FIAPGARCH processes are further augmented with MLP, Recurrent NN, and Hybrid NN type neural networks. The MS-ARMA-GARCH family and MS-ARMA-GARCH-NN family are utilized for modeling the daily stock returns in an emerging market, the Istanbul Stock Index (ISE100). Forecast accuracy is evaluated in terms of MAE, MSE, and RMSE error criteria and Diebold-Mariano equal forecast accuracy tests. The results suggest that the fractionally integrated and asymmetric power counterparts of Gray's MS-GARCH model provided promising results, while the best results are obtained for their neural network based counterparts. Further, among the models analyzed, the models based on the Hybrid-MLP and Recurrent-NN, the MS-ARMA-FIAPGARCH-HybridMLP, and MS-ARMA-FIAPGARCH-RNN provided the best forecast performances over the baseline single regime GARCH models and further, over the Gray's MS-GARCH model. Therefore, the models are promising for various economic applications. PMID:24977200

  17. Atomic switch networks-nanoarchitectonic design of a complex system for natural computing.

    PubMed

    Demis, E C; Aguilera, R; Sillin, H O; Scharnhorst, K; Sandouk, E J; Aono, M; Stieg, A Z; Gimzewski, J K

    2015-05-22

    Self-organized complex systems are ubiquitous in nature, and the structural complexity of these natural systems can be used as a model to design new classes of functional nanotechnology based on highly interconnected networks of interacting units. Conventional fabrication methods for electronic computing devices are subject to known scaling limits, confining the diversity of possible architectures. This work explores methods of fabricating a self-organized complex device known as an atomic switch network and discusses its potential utility in computing. Through a merger of top-down and bottom-up techniques guided by mathematical and nanoarchitectonic design principles, we have produced functional devices comprising nanoscale elements whose intrinsic nonlinear dynamics and memorization capabilities produce robust patterns of distributed activity and a capacity for nonlinear transformation of input signals when configured in the appropriate network architecture. Their operational characteristics represent a unique potential for hardware implementation of natural computation, specifically in the area of reservoir computing-a burgeoning field that investigates the computational aptitude of complex biologically inspired systems.

  18. Modeling Markov switching ARMA-GARCH neural networks models and an application to forecasting stock returns.

    PubMed

    Bildirici, Melike; Ersin, Özgür

    2014-01-01

    The study has two aims. The first aim is to propose a family of nonlinear GARCH models that incorporate fractional integration and asymmetric power properties to MS-GARCH processes. The second purpose of the study is to augment the MS-GARCH type models with artificial neural networks to benefit from the universal approximation properties to achieve improved forecasting accuracy. Therefore, the proposed Markov-switching MS-ARMA-FIGARCH, APGARCH, and FIAPGARCH processes are further augmented with MLP, Recurrent NN, and Hybrid NN type neural networks. The MS-ARMA-GARCH family and MS-ARMA-GARCH-NN family are utilized for modeling the daily stock returns in an emerging market, the Istanbul Stock Index (ISE100). Forecast accuracy is evaluated in terms of MAE, MSE, and RMSE error criteria and Diebold-Mariano equal forecast accuracy tests. The results suggest that the fractionally integrated and asymmetric power counterparts of Gray's MS-GARCH model provided promising results, while the best results are obtained for their neural network based counterparts. Further, among the models analyzed, the models based on the Hybrid-MLP and Recurrent-NN, the MS-ARMA-FIAPGARCH-HybridMLP, and MS-ARMA-FIAPGARCH-RNN provided the best forecast performances over the baseline single regime GARCH models and further, over the Gray's MS-GARCH model. Therefore, the models are promising for various economic applications. PMID:24977200

  19. Finite-time stabilization control for discontinuous time-delayed networks: New switching design.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling-Ling; Huang, Li-Hong; Cai, Zuo-Wei

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses the finite-time stabilization problem for time-varying delayed neural networks (DNNs) with discontinuous activation functions. By using fixed point theory and set-valued analysis, we establish the existence theorem of equilibrium point. In order to stabilize the states of this class of discontinuous DNNs in finite time, we design two different kinds of switching controllers which are described by discontinuous functions. Under the framework of Filippov solutions, several new and effective criteria are derived to realize finite-time stabilization of discontinuous DNNs based on the famous finite-time stability theory. Besides, the upper bounds of the settling time of stabilization are estimated. Numerical examples are finally provided to illustrate the correctness of the proposed design method and theoretical results.

  20. Multiple-mode reconfigurable electro-optic switching network for optical fiber sensor array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ray T.; Wang, Michael R.; Jannson, Tomasz; Baumbick, Robert

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports the first switching network compatible with multimode fibers. A one-to-many cascaded reconfigurable interconnection was built. A thin glass substrate was used as the guiding medium which provides not only higher coupling efficiency from multimode fiber to waveguide but also better tolerance of phase-matching conditions. Involvement of a total-internal-reflection hologram and multimode waveguide eliminates interface problems between fibers and waveguides. The DCG polymer graft has proven to be reliable from -180 C to +200 C. Survivability of such an electrooptic system in harsh environments is further ensured. LiNbO3 was chosen as the E-O material because of its stability at high temperatures (phase-transition temperature of more than 1000 C) and maturity of E-O device technology. Further theoretical calculation was conducted to provide the optimal interaction length and device capacitance.

  1. H ∞ Cluster Synchronization for a Class of Neutral Complex Dynamical Networks with Markovian Switching

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    H ∞ cluster synchronization problem for a class of neutral complex dynamical networks (NCDNs) with Markovian switching is investigated in this paper. Both the retarded and neutral delays are considered to be interval mode dependent and time varying. The concept of H ∞ cluster synchronization is proposed to quantify the attenuation level of synchronization error dynamics against the exogenous disturbance of the NCDNs. Based on a novel Lyapunov functional, by employing some integral inequalities and the nature of convex combination, mode delay-range-dependent H ∞ cluster synchronization criteria are derived in the form of linear matrix inequalities which depend not only on the disturbance attenuation but also on the initial values of the NCDNs. Finally, numerical examples are given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed theoretical results. PMID:24892088

  2. Rapid, Precise Gamma-Ray Burst Localizations with the 3rd Interplanetary Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, K.; Cline, T.; Trombka, J.; Barthelmy, S.; Mazets, E.; Golenetskii, S.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Feroci, M.; Frontera, F.; Guidorzi, C.

    2000-05-01

    The interplanetary network now has the Ulysses and Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft as its most distant points, and Konus-Wind, BATSE, and the BeppoSAX GRBM as near-Earth points. In this configuration, the IPN triangulates about one GRB per week. The error box sizes are 20 square arcminutes and larger, and the delays are in the 10 hours and longer range. As of March 2000, 14 GRB error boxes have been circulated, resulting in 3 counterpart detections and two spectroscopic redshift determinations. By the time this paper is presented, we expect these numbers to roughly double. We discuss the IPN operations and introduce a service for notifying people via pager and cell phone of an impending GRB localization, prior to the actual issuance of a Global Coordinates Network message. We also compare the IPN detection rate, delay, and error box size with those of other missions, both in operation today (e.g. BeppoSAX) and to be launched in the near future (e.g. HETE-II). We are grateful for support under JPL Contract 958056, NASA grants NAG 5-7810 and NAG 5-3585, and under the NEAR participating scientist program.

  3. Novel conditions on exponential stability of a class of delayed neural networks with state-dependent switching.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guodong; Shen, Yi

    2015-11-01

    This paper is concerned with the global exponential stability on a class of delayed neural networks with state-dependent switching. Under the novel conditions, some sufficient criteria ensuring exponential stability of the proposed system are obtained. In particular, the obtained conditions complement and improve earlier publications on conventional neural networks with continuous or discontinuous right-hand side. Numerical simulations are also presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  4. Circuit-switch architecture for a 30/20-GHz FDMA/TDM geostationary satellite communications network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    1992-01-01

    A circuit-switching architecture is described for a 30/20-GHz frequency-division, multiple-access uplink/time-division-multiplexed downlink (FDMA/TDM) geostationary satellite communications network. Critical subsystems and problem areas are identified and addressed. Work was concentrated primarily on the space segment; however, the ground segment was considered concurrently to ensure cost efficiency and realistic operational constraints.

  5. Destination directed packet switch architecture for a 30/20 GHz FDMA/TDM geostationary communication satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Shalkhauser, Mary JO

    1991-01-01

    Emphasis is on a destination directed packet switching architecture for a 30/20 GHz frequency division multiplex access/time division multiplex (FDMA/TDM) geostationary satellite communication network. Critical subsystems and problem areas are identified and addressed. Efforts have concentrated heavily on the space segment; however, the ground segment was considered concurrently to ensure cost efficiency and realistic operational constraints.

  6. Destination-directed, packet-switching architecture for 30/20-GHz FDMA/TDM geostationary communications satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Shalkhauser, Mary JO

    1992-01-01

    A destination-directed packet switching architecture for a 30/20-GHz frequency division multiple access/time division multiplexed (FDMA/TDM) geostationary satellite communications network is discussed. Critical subsystems and problem areas are identified and addressed. Efforts have concentrated heavily on the space segment; however, the ground segment has been considered concurrently to ensure cost efficiency and realistic operational constraints.

  7. Circuit-switch architecture for a 30/20-GHz FDMA/TDM geostationary satellite communications network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    1992-01-01

    A circuit switching architecture is described for a 30/20 GHz frequency division, multiple access uplink/time division multiplexed downlink (FDMA/TDM) geostationary satellite communications network. Critical subsystems and problem areas are identified and addressed. Work was concentrated primarily on the space segment; however, the ground segment was considered concurrently to ensure cost efficiency and realistic operational constraints.

  8. Wireless Relay Selection in Pocket Switched Networks Based on Spatial Regularity of Human Mobility.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianhui; Cheng, Xiuzhen; Bi, Jingping; Chen, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Pocket switched networks (PSNs) take advantage of human mobility to deliver data. Investigations on real-world trace data indicate that human mobility shows an obvious spatial regularity: a human being usually visits a few places at high frequencies. These most frequently visited places form the home of a node, which is exploited in this paper to design two HomE based Relay selectiOn (HERO) algorithms. Both algorithms input single data copy into the network at any time. In the basic HERO, only the first node encountered by the source and whose home overlaps a destination's home is selected as a relay while the enhanced HERO keeps finding more optimal relay that visits the destination's home with higher probability. The two proposed algorithms only require the relays to exchange the information of their home and/or the visiting frequencies to their home when two nodes meet. As a result, the information update is reduced and there is no global status information that needs to be maintained. This causes light loads on relays because of the low communication cost and storage requirements. Additionally, only simple operations are needed in the two proposed algorithms, resulting in little computation overhead at relays. At last, a theoretical analysis is performed on some key metrics and then the real-world based simulations indicate that the two HERO algorithms are efficient and effective through employing only one or a few relays. PMID:26797609

  9. A network flow model for load balancing in circuit-switched multicomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, Shahid H.

    1990-01-01

    In multicomputers that utilize circuit switching or wormhole routing, communication overhead depends largely on link contention - the variation due to distance between nodes is negligible. This has a major impact on the load balancing problem. In this case, there are some nodes with excess load (sources) and others with deficit load (sinks) and it is required to find a matching of sources to sinks that avoids contention. The problem is made complex by the hardwired routing on currently available machines: the user can control only which nodes communicate but not how the messages are routed. Network flow models of message flow in the mesh and the hypercube were developed to solve this problem. The crucial property of these models is the correspondence between minimum cost flows and correctly routed messages. To solve a given load balancing problem, a minimum cost flow algorithm is applied to the network. This permits one to determine efficiently a maximum contention free matching of sources to sinks which, in turn, tells one how much of the given imbalance can be eliminated without contention.

  10. A network flow model for load balancing in circuit-switched multicomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, Shahid H.

    1993-01-01

    In multicomputers that utilize circuit switching or wormhole routing, communication overhead depends largely on link contention - the variation due to distance between nodes is negligible. This has a major impact on the load balancing problem. In this case, there are some nodes with excess load (sources) and others with deficit load (sinks) and it is required to find a matching of sources to sinks that avoids contention. The problem is made complex by the hardwired routing on currently available machines: the user can control only which nodes communicate but not how the messages are routed. Network flow models of message flow in the mesh and the hypercube were developed to solve this problem. The crucial property of these models is the correspondence between minimum cost flows and correctly routed messages. To solve a given load balancing problem, a minimum cost flow algorithm is applied to the network. This permits one to determine efficiently a maximum contention free matching of sources to sinks which, in turn, tells one how much of the given imbalance can be eliminated without contention.

  11. Wireless Relay Selection in Pocket Switched Networks Based on Spatial Regularity of Human Mobility †

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianhui; Cheng, Xiuzhen; Bi, Jingping; Chen, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Pocket switched networks (PSNs) take advantage of human mobility to deliver data. Investigations on real-world trace data indicate that human mobility shows an obvious spatial regularity: a human being usually visits a few places at high frequencies. These most frequently visited places form the home of a node, which is exploited in this paper to design two HomE based Relay selectiOn (HERO) algorithms. Both algorithms input single data copy into the network at any time. In the basic HERO, only the first node encountered by the source and whose home overlaps a destination’s home is selected as a relay while the enhanced HERO keeps finding more optimal relay that visits the destination’s home with higher probability. The two proposed algorithms only require the relays to exchange the information of their home and/or the visiting frequencies to their home when two nodes meet. As a result, the information update is reduced and there is no global status information that needs to be maintained. This causes light loads on relays because of the low communication cost and storage requirements. Additionally, only simple operations are needed in the two proposed algorithms, resulting in little computation overhead at relays. At last, a theoretical analysis is performed on some key metrics and then the real-world based simulations indicate that the two HERO algorithms are efficient and effective through employing only one or a few relays. PMID:26797609

  12. Delay-dependent criteria for global robust periodicity of uncertain switched recurrent neural networks with time-varying delay.

    PubMed

    Lou, X; Cui, B

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce some ideas of switched systems into the field of neural networks and a large class of switched recurrent neural networks (SRNNs) with time-varying structured uncertainties and time-varying delay is investigated. Some delay-dependent robust periodicity criteria guaranteeing the existence, uniqueness, and global asymptotic stability of periodic solution for all admissible parametric uncertainties are devised by taking the relationship between the terms in the Leibniz-Newton formula into account. Because free weighting matrices are used to express this relationship and the appropriate ones are selected by means of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), the criteria are less conservative than existing ones reported in the literature for delayed neural networks with parameter uncertainties. Some examples are given to show that the proposed criteria are effective and are an improvement over previous ones.

  13. A switching multi-scale dynamical network model of EEG/MEG.

    PubMed

    Olier, Iván; Trujillo-Barreto, Nelson J; El-Deredy, Wael

    2013-12-01

    We introduce a new generative model of the Encephalography (EEG/MEG) data, the inversion of which allows for inferring the locations and temporal evolution of the underlying sources as well as their dynamical interactions. The proposed Switching Mesostate Space Model (SMSM) builds on the multi-scale generative model for EEG/MEG by Daunizeau and Friston (2007). SMSM inherits the assumptions that (1) bioelectromagnetic activity is generated by a set of distributed sources, (2) the dynamics of these sources can be modelled as random fluctuations about a small number of mesostates, and (3) the number of mesostates engaged by a cognitive task is small. Additionally, four generalising assumptions are now included: (4) the mesostates interact according to a full Dynamical Causal Network (DCN) that can be estimated; (5) the dynamics of the mesostates can switch between multiple approximately linear operating regimes; (6) each operating regime remains stable over finite periods of time (temporal clusters); and (7) the total number of times the mesostates' dynamics can switch is small. The proposed model adds, therefore, a level of flexibility by accommodating complex brain processes that cannot be characterised by purely linear and stationary Gaussian dynamics. Importantly, the SMSM furnishes a new interpretation of the EEG/MEG data in which the source activity may have multiple discrete modes of behaviour, each with approximately linear dynamics. This is modelled by assuming that the connection strengths of the underlying mesoscopic DCN are time-dependent but piecewise constant, i.e. they can undergo discrete changes over time. A Variational Bayes inversion scheme is derived to estimate all the parameters of the model by maximising a (Negative Free Energy) lower bound on the model evidence. This bound is used to select among different model choices that are defined by the number of mesostates as well as by the number of stationary linear regimes. The full model is compared

  14. Asynchronous transfer mode distribution network by use of an optoelectronic VLSI switching chip.

    PubMed

    Lentine, A L; Reiley, D J; Novotny, R A; Morrison, R L; Sasian, J M; Beckman, M G; Buchholz, D B; Hinterlong, S J; Cloonan, T J; Richards, G W; McCormick, F B

    1997-03-10

    We describe a new optoelectronic switching system demonstration that implements part of the distribution fabric for a large asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) switch. The system uses a single optoelectronic VLSI modulator-based switching chip with more than 4000 optical input-outputs. The optical system images the input fibers from a two-dimensional fiber bundle onto this chip. A new optomechanical design allows the system to be mounted in a standard electronic equipment frame. A large section of the switch was operated as a 208-Mbits/s time-multiplexed space switch, which can serve as part of an ATM switch by use of an appropriate out-of-band controller. A larger section with 896 input light beams and 256 output beams was operated at 160 Mbits/s as a slowly reconfigurable space switch. PMID:18250868

  15. Artificial neural network based torque calculation of switched reluctance motor without locking the rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucuk, Fuat; Goto, Hiroki; Guo, Hai-Jiao; Ichinokura, Osamu

    2009-04-01

    Feedback of motor torque is required in most of switched reluctance (SR) motor applications in order to control torque and its ripple. An SR motor shows highly nonlinear property which does not allow calculating torque analytically. Torque can be directly measured by torque sensor, but it inevitably increases the cost and has to be properly mounted on the motor shaft. Instead of torque sensor, finite element analysis (FEA) may be employed for torque calculation. However, motor modeling and calculation takes relatively long time. The results of FEA may also differ from the actual results. The most convenient way seems to calculate torque from the measured values of rotor position, current, and flux linkage while locking the rotor at definite positions. However, this method needs an extra assembly to lock the rotor. In this study, a novel torque calculation based on artificial neural networks (ANNs) is presented. Magnetizing data are collected while a 6/4 SR motor is running. They need to be interpolated for torque calculation. ANN is very strong tool for data interpolation. ANN based torque estimation is verified on the 6/4 SR motor and is compared by FEA based torque estimation to show its validity.

  16. Apollo Ring Optical Switch

    SciTech Connect

    Maestas, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    An optical switch was designed, built, and installed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to facilitate the integration of two Apollo computer networks into a single network. This report presents an overview of the optical switch as well as its layout, switch testing procedure and test data, and installation.

  17. Delay-dependent finite-time boundedness of a class of Markovian switching neural networks with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qishui; Cheng, Jun; Zhao, Yuqing

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a novel method is developed for delay-dependent finite-time boundedness of a class of Markovian switching neural networks with time-varying delays. New sufficient condition for stochastic boundness of Markovian jumping neural networks is presented and proved by an newly augmented stochastic Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and novel activation function conditions, the state trajectory remains in a bounded region of the state space over a given finite-time interval. Finally, a numerical example is given to illustrate the efficiency and less conservative of the proposed method.

  18. Including 10-Gigabit-capable Passive Optical Network under End-to-End Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching Provisioned Quality of Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewka, Lukasz; Gavler, Anders; Wessing, Henrik; Dittmann, Lars

    2012-04-01

    End-to-end quality of service provisioning is still a challenging task despite many years of research and development in this area. Considering a generalized multi-protocol label switching based core/metro network and resource reservation protocol capable home gateways, it is the access part of the network where quality of service signaling is bridged. This article proposes strategies for generalized multi-protocol label switching control over next emerging passive optical network standard, i.e., the 10-gigabit-capable passive optical network. Node management and resource allocation approaches are discussed, and possible issues are raised. The analysis shows that consideration of a 10-gigabit-capable passive optical network as a generalized multi-protocol label switching controlled domain is valid and may advance end-to-end quality of service provisioning for passive optical network based customers.

  19. A Study of Quality of Service Communication for High-Speed Packet-Switching Computer Sub-Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Zhenqian

    1999-01-01

    In this thesis, we analyze various factors that affect quality of service (QoS) communication in high-speed, packet-switching sub-networks. We hypothesize that sub-network-wide bandwidth reservation and guaranteed CPU processing power at endpoint systems for handling data traffic are indispensable to achieving hard end-to-end quality of service. Different bandwidth reservation strategies, traffic characterization schemes, and scheduling algorithms affect the network resources and CPU usage as well as the extent that QoS can be achieved. In order to analyze those factors, we design and implement a communication layer. Our experimental analysis supports our research hypothesis. The Resource ReSerVation Protocol (RSVP) is designed to realize resource reservation. Our analysis of RSVP shows that using RSVP solely is insufficient to provide hard end-to-end quality of service in a high-speed sub-network. Analysis of the IEEE 802.lp protocol also supports the research hypothesis.

  20. Percolation network in resistive switching devices with the structure of silver/amorphous silicon/p-type silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yanhong; Gao, Ping; Bi, Kaifeng; Peng, Wei; Jiang, Xuening; Xu, Hongxia

    2014-01-27

    Conducting pathway of percolation network was identified in resistive switching devices (RSDs) with the structure of silver/amorphous silicon/p-type silicon (Ag/a-Si/p-Si) based on its gradual RESET-process and the stochastic complex impedance spectroscopy characteristics (CIS). The formation of the percolation network is attributed to amounts of nanocrystalline Si particles as well as defect sites embedded in a-Si layer, in which the defect sites supply positions for Ag ions to nucleate and grow. The similar percolation network has been only observed in Ag-Ge-Se based RSD before. This report provides a better understanding for electric properties of RSD based on the percolation network.

  1. Broadband hitless silicon electro-optic switch for on-chip optical networks.

    PubMed

    Lira, Hugo L R; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Lipson, Michal

    2009-12-01

    We report on the demonstration of a broadband (60 GHz), spectrally hitless, compact (20 microm x 40 microm), fast (7 ns) electro-optical switch. The device is composed of two coupled resonant cavities, each with an independently addressable PIN diode. This topology enables operation of the switch without perturbing adjacent channels in a wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) system. PMID:20052150

  2. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development. PMID:27034844

  3. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development.

  4. Coupling between feedback loops in autoregulatory networks affects bistability range, open-loop gain and switching times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Abhinav; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2012-10-01

    Biochemical regulatory networks governing diverse cellular processes such as stress-response, differentiation and cell cycle often contain coupled feedback loops. We aim at understanding how features of feedback architecture, such as the number of loops, the sign of the loops and the type of their coupling, affect network dynamical performance. Specifically, we investigate how bistability range, maximum open-loop gain and switching times of a network with transcriptional positive feedback are affected by additive or multiplicative coupling with another positive- or negative-feedback loop. We show that a network's bistability range is positively correlated with its maximum open-loop gain and that both quantities depend on the sign of the feedback loops and the type of feedback coupling. Moreover, we find that the addition of positive feedback could decrease the bistability range if we control the basal level in the signal-response curves of the two systems. Furthermore, the addition of negative feedback has the capacity to increase the bistability range if its dissociation constant is much lower than that of the positive feedback. We also find that the addition of a positive feedback to a bistable network increases the robustness of its bistability range, whereas the addition of a negative feedback decreases it. Finally, we show that the switching time for a transition from a high to a low steady state increases with the effective fold change in gene regulation. In summary, we show that the effect of coupled feedback loops on the bistability range and switching times depends on the underlying mechanistic details.

  5. Bistability in the Rac1, PAK, and RhoA Signaling Network Drives Actin Cytoskeleton Dynamics and Cell Motility Switches

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Kate M.; Monsefi, Naser; Dawson, John C.; Degasperi, Andrea; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Volinsky, Natalia; Dobrzyński, Maciej; Birtwistle, Marc R.; Tsyganov, Mikhail A.; Kiyatkin, Anatoly; Kida, Katarzyna; Finch, Andrew J.; Carragher, Neil O.; Kolch, Walter; Nguyen, Lan K.; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Dynamic interactions between RhoA and Rac1, members of the Rho small GTPase family, play a vital role in the control of cell migration. Using predictive mathematical modeling, mass spectrometry-based quantitation of network components, and experimental validation in MDA-MB-231 mesenchymal breast cancer cells, we show that a network containing Rac1, RhoA, and PAK family kinases can produce bistable, switch-like responses to a graded PAK inhibition. Using a small chemical inhibitor of PAK, we demonstrate that cellular RhoA and Rac1 activation levels respond in a history-dependent, bistable manner to PAK inhibition. Consequently, we show that downstream signaling, actin dynamics, and cell migration also behave in a bistable fashion, displaying switches and hysteresis in response to PAK inhibition. Our results demonstrate that PAK is a critical component in the Rac1-RhoA inhibitory crosstalk that governs bistable GTPase activity, cell morphology, and cell migration switches. PMID:27136688

  6. A novel all-optical label processing based on multiple optical orthogonal codes sequences for optical packet switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chongfu; Qiu, Kun; Xu, Bo; Ling, Yun

    2008-05-01

    This paper proposes an all-optical label processing scheme that uses the multiple optical orthogonal codes sequences (MOOCS)-based optical label for optical packet switching (OPS) (MOOCS-OPS) networks. In this scheme, each MOOCS is a permutation or combination of the multiple optical orthogonal codes (MOOC) selected from the multiple-groups optical orthogonal codes (MGOOC). Following a comparison of different optical label processing (OLP) schemes, the principles of MOOCS-OPS network are given and analyzed. Firstly, theoretical analyses are used to prove that MOOCS is able to greatly enlarge the number of available optical labels when compared to the previous single optical orthogonal code (SOOC) for OPS (SOOC-OPS) network. Then, the key units of the MOOCS-based optical label packets, including optical packet generation, optical label erasing, optical label extraction and optical label rewriting etc., are given and studied. These results are used to verify that the proposed MOOCS-OPS scheme is feasible.

  7. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  8. Wavelength assignment algorithm considering the state of neighborhood links for OBS networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yu; Hirota, Yusuke; Tode, Hideki; Murakami, Koso

    2005-10-01

    Recently, Optical WDM technology is introduced into backbone networks. On the other hand, as the future optical switching scheme, Optical Burst Switching (OBS) systems become a realistic solution. OBS systems do not consider buffering in intermediate nodes. Thus, it is an important issue to avoid overlapping wavelength reservation between partially interfered paths. To solve this problem, so far, the wavelength assignment scheme which has priority management tables has been proposed. This method achieves the reduction of burst blocking probability. However, this priority management table requires huge memory space. In this paper, we propose a wavelength assignment algorithm that reduces both the number of priority management tables and burst blocking probability. To reduce priority management tables, we allocate and manage them for each link. To reduce burst blocking probability, our method announces information about the change of their priorities to intermediate nodes. We evaluate its performance in terms of the burst blocking probability and the reduction rate of priority management tables.

  9. 40-Gbit/s photonic random access memory for photonic packet-switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Ryo; Nakahara, Tatsushi; Takahata, Kiyoto; Takenouchi, Hirokazu; Yasui, Takako; Kondo, Naoto; Suzuki, Hiroyuki

    2004-06-01

    We present a photonic random access memory (RAM) that can write and read high-speed asynchronous burst optical packets freely by specifying addresses. The photonic RAM consists of an optical clock-pulse generator, an all-optical serial-to-parallel converter, a photonic parallel-to-serial converter, all developed by us, and a CMOS RAM as a storage medium. Unlike conventional optical buffers, which merely function as optical delay lines, the photonic RAM provides various advantages, such as compactness, large capacity, long-term storage, and random access at an arbitrary timing for ultrafast asynchronous burst optical packets. We experimentally confirm its basic operation for 40-Gbit/s 16-bit optical packets.

  10. New results on anti-synchronization of switched neural networks with time-varying delays and lag signals.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuting; Wen, Shiping; Chen, Michael Z Q; Huang, Tingwen; Zeng, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the problem of global exponential anti-synchronization of a class of switched neural networks with time-varying delays and lag signals. Considering the packed circuits, the controller is dependent on the output of the system as the inner states are very hard to measure. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the controller based on the output of the neuron cell. Through theoretical analysis, it is obvious that the obtained ones improve and generalize the results derived in the previous literature. To illustrate the effectiveness, a simulation example with applications in image encryptions is also presented in the paper.

  11. A new switching design to finite-time stabilization of nonlinear systems with applications to neural networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Ho, Daniel W C; Yu, Wenwu; Cao, Jinde

    2014-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the optimal finite-time stabilization problem for nonlinear systems. For the given stabilization strength, a new switching protocol is designed to stabilize the system with a fast speed. The obtained protocol covers both continuous control and discontinuous one under the framework of Filippov solutions. Some criteria are discussed in detail on how to choose an optimal protocol such that the finite stabilization time can be shortened. Finally, the main theory results are applied to the general neural networks by one numerical example to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed design method.

  12. New results on anti-synchronization of switched neural networks with time-varying delays and lag signals.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuting; Wen, Shiping; Chen, Michael Z Q; Huang, Tingwen; Zeng, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the problem of global exponential anti-synchronization of a class of switched neural networks with time-varying delays and lag signals. Considering the packed circuits, the controller is dependent on the output of the system as the inner states are very hard to measure. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the controller based on the output of the neuron cell. Through theoretical analysis, it is obvious that the obtained ones improve and generalize the results derived in the previous literature. To illustrate the effectiveness, a simulation example with applications in image encryptions is also presented in the paper. PMID:27295505

  13. All-optical packet header and payload separation based on two TOADs for optical packet switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Zhang, Min; Ye, Peida

    2006-09-01

    We present a novel all-optical header and payload separation technique that can be utilized in Un-Slotted optical packet switched networks. The technique uses two modified TOADs, one is for packet header extraction with differential modulation scheme and the other performs a simple XOR operation between the packet and its self-derived header to get the separated payload. The main virtue of this system is simple structure and low power consumption. Through numerical simulations, the operating characteristics of the scheme are illustrated. In addition, the system parameters are discussed and designed to optimize the performance of the proposed scheme.

  14. Observations of optical components of gamma-bursts by means of the network of MASTER robotic telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbovskoy, E. S.

    2012-05-01

    We present results of the prompt, early, and afterglow optical observations of five gamma-ray bursts, GRBs 100901A, 100902A, 100905A, 100906A, and 101020A, made with the Mobile Astronomical System of TElescope-Robots in Russia (MASTER-II net), the 1.5-m telescope of the Sierra Nevada Observatory, and the 2.56-m Nordic Optical Telescope. For two sources, GRB100901A and GRB100906A, we detected optical counterparts and obtained light curves starting before cessation of gamma-ray emission, at 113 s and 48 s after the trigger, respectively. Observations of GRB100906A were conducted in two polarizing filters. Observations of the other three bursts gave the upper limits on the optical flux; their properties are briefly discussed. More detailed analysis of GRB100901A and GRB100906A supplemented by Swift data provides the following results and indicates a different origin of the prompt optical radiation in the two bursts. The light curves patterns and spectral distributions suggest a common production site of the prompt optical and high-energy emission in GRB100901A. Results of spectral fits for GRB100901A in the range from the optical to X-rays favor power law energy distributions and a consistent value of the optical extinction in the host galaxy. GRB100906A produced a smoothly peaking optical light curve suggesting that the prompt optical radiation in this GRB originated in a front shock. This is supported by a spectral analysis.We have found that the Amati and Ghirlanda relations are satisfied for GRB100906A. An upper limit on the value of the optical extinction on the host of GRB100906A is obtained.

  15. The benefits of converged packet/TDM/DWDM switching in metro aggregation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar On, Dror; Voll, Stefan; Au-Yang, Robert

    2012-12-01

    Next generation metro aggregation systems are expected to use integrated lambda, circuit and packet switching platforms. We analyzed a typical Tier 1 aggregation scenario using a converged transport platform offering OTN, MPLS-TP and lambda switching. Vertical integration (multiple transport technologies) and horizontal integration (multiple service types) yielded about one third savings over a traditional L3 over DWDM approach. The number of wavelengths needed was roughly halved. The usage of hybrid interfaces which allow sharing the wavelength between OTN and MPLS services leads to additional savings which will increase as the line rate shifts from 10G to 40G and 100G.

  16. Cell differentiation modeled via a coupled two-switch regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Schittler, D; Hasenauer, J; Allgöwer, F; Waldherr, S

    2010-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells can give rise to bone and other tissue cells, but their differentiation still escapes full control. In this paper we address this issue by mathematical modeling. We present a model for a genetic switch determining the cell fate of progenitor cells which can differentiate into osteoblasts (bone cells) or chondrocytes (cartilage cells). The model consists of two switch mechanisms and reproduces the experimentally observed three stable equilibrium states: a progenitor, an osteogenic, and a chondrogenic state. Conventionally, the loss of an intermediate (progenitor) state and the entailed attraction to one of two opposite (differentiated) states is modeled as a result of changing parameters. In our model in contrast, we achieve this by distributing the differentiation process to two functional switch parts acting in concert: one triggering differentiation and the other determining cell fate. Via stability and bifurcation analysis, we investigate the effects of biochemical stimuli associated with different system inputs. We employ our model to generate differentiation scenarios on the single cell as well as on the cell population level. The single cell scenarios allow to reconstruct the switching upon extrinsic signals, whereas the cell population scenarios provide a framework to identify the impact of intrinsic properties and the limiting factors for successful differentiation.

  17. A programming environment to control switching networks based on STC104 packet routing chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, I. C.; Schwendicke, U.; Leich, H.; Medinnis, M.; Koehler, A.; Wegner, P.; Sulanke, K.; Dippel, R.; Gellrich, A.

    1997-02-01

    The software environment used to control a large switching architecture based on SGS-Thomson STC104 (an asynchronous 32-way dynamic packet routing chip) is presented. We are evaluating this switching technology for large scale, real-time parallel systems. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) written as a multi-thread application in Java allows to set the switch configuration and to continuously monitor the state of each link. This GUI connects to a multi-thread server via TCP/IP sockets. The server is running on a PC-Linux system and implements the virtual channel protocol in communicating with the STC104 switching units using the Data Strobe link or the VME bus. Linux I/O drivers to control the Data Strobe link parallel adaptor (STC101) were developed. For each client the server creates a new thread and allocates a new socket for communications. The Java code of the GUI may be transferred to any client using the http protocol providing a user friendly interface to the system with real-time monitoring which is also platform independent.

  18. Single-chip MEMS 5 × 5 and 20 × 20 double-pole single-throw switch arrays for automating telecommunication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, S.; Oberhammer, J.; Stemme, G.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on microelectromechanical (MEMS) switch arrays with 5 × 5 and 20 × 20 double-pole single-throw (DPST) switches embedded and packaged on a single chip, which are intended for automating main distribution frames in copper-wire telecommunication networks. Whenever a customer requests a change in his telecommunication services, the copper-wire network has to be reconfigured which is currently done manually by a costly physical re-routing of the connections in the main distribution frames. To reduce the costs, new methods for automating the network reconfiguration are sought after by the network providers. The presented devices comprise 5 × 5 or 20 × 20 double switches, which allow us to interconnect any of the 5 or 20 input lines to any of the 5 or 20 output lines. The switches are based on an electrostatic S-shaped film actuator with the switch contact on a flexible membrane, moving between a top and a bottom electrode. The devices are fabricated in two parts which are designed to be assembled using selective adhesive wafer bonding, resulting in a wafer-scale package of the switch array. The on-chip routing network consists of thick metal lines for low resistance and is embedded in bencocyclobutene (BCB) polymer layers. The packaged 5 × 5 switch arrays have a size of 6.7 × 6.4 mm2 and the 20 × 20 arrays are 14 × 10 mm2 large. The switch actuation voltages for closing/opening the switches averaged over an array were measured to be 21.2 V/15.3 V for the 5 × 5 array and 93.2 V/37.3 V for the 20 × 20 array, respectively. The total signal line resistances vary depending on the switch position within the array between 0.13 Ω and 0.56 Ω for the 5 × 5 array and between 0.08 Ω to 2.33 Ω for the 20 × 20 array, respectively. The average resistance of the switch contacts was determined to be 0.22 Ω with a standard deviation of 0.05 Ω.

  19. Burst assembly with EN differentiation in OBS under unsymmetrical traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chenlu; Cai, Shuri; Wu, Jian; Lin, Jintong

    2007-11-01

    On account of the glary future of Optical Burst Switching (OBS) network and the abundant Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) traffic, study of TCP combing OBS are prevail in the recent years. In this paper, we address the issue of assembly algorithm in OBS network based on unsymmetrical TCP traffic. The Optimal Maximum Assembly Length (OMAL) in Max-Time-Min-Max-Length Assembly Algorithm is studied in this paper and an assembly algorithm with edge node differentiation based on unsymmetrical traffic is presented by investigating the feature of TCP flow. We also propose client's Average Download Rate (ADR) as an evaluation standard and the simulation results show that the Assembly Algorithm with EN Differentiation will improve client's ADR a lot.

  20. Spatial-spectral flexible optical networking: enabling switching solutions for a simplified and efficient SDM network platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomkos, I.; Zakynthinos, P.; Klonidis, D.; Marom, D.; Sygletos, S.; Ellis, A.; Salvadori, E.; Siracusa, D.; Angelou, M.; Papastergiou, G.; Psaila, N.; Ferran, J. F.; Ben-Ezra, S.; Jimenez, F.; Fernández-Palacios, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    The traffic carried by core optical networks grows at a steady but remarkable pace of 30-40% year-over-year. Optical transmissions and networking advancements continue to satisfy the traffic requirements by delivering the content over the network infrastructure in a cost and energy efficient manner. Such core optical networks serve the information traffic demands in a dynamic way, in response to requirements for shifting of traffics demands, both temporally (day/night) and spatially (business district/residential). However as we are approaching fundamental spectral efficiency limits of singlemode fibers, the scientific community is pursuing recently the development of an innovative, all-optical network architecture introducing the spatial degree of freedom when designing/operating future transport networks. Spacedivision- multiplexing through the use of bundled single mode fibers, and/or multi-core fibers and/or few-mode fibers can offer up to 100-fold capacity increase in future optical networks. The EU INSPACE project is working on the development of a complete spatial-spectral flexible optical networking solution, offering the network ultra-high capacity, flexibility and energy efficiency required to meet the challenges of delivering exponentially growing traffic demands in the internet over the next twenty years. In this paper we will present the motivation and main research activities of the INSPACE consortium towards the realization of the overall project solution.

  1. Destination directed packet switch architecture for a geostationary communication satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, W. D.; Shalkhauser, M. J.; Bobinsky, E. A.; Soni, N. J.; Quintana, J. A.; Kim, H.; Wagner, P.; Vanderaar, M.

    1992-01-01

    A major effort at NASA/Lewis is to identify and develop critical digital technologies and components that enable new commercial missions or significantly improve the performance, cost efficiency, and/or reliability of existing and planned space comunications systems. NASA envisions the need for low data rate, direct to the user communications services, for data, facsimile, voice, and video conferencing. A report that focuses on destination directed packet switching architectures for geostationary communication satellites is presented.

  2. Shape-dependent control of cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis: switching between attractors in cell regulatory networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, S.; Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    Development of characteristic tissue patterns requires that individual cells be switched locally between different phenotypes or "fates;" while one cell may proliferate, its neighbors may differentiate or die. Recent studies have revealed that local switching between these different gene programs is controlled through interplay between soluble growth factors, insoluble extracellular matrix molecules, and mechanical forces which produce cell shape distortion. Although the precise molecular basis remains unknown, shape-dependent control of cell growth and function appears to be mediated by tension-dependent changes in the actin cytoskeleton. However, the question remains: how can a generalized physical stimulus, such as cell distortion, activate the same set of genes and signaling proteins that are triggered by molecules which bind to specific cell surface receptors. In this article, we use computer simulations based on dynamic Boolean networks to show that the different cell fates that a particular cell can exhibit may represent a preprogrammed set of common end programs or "attractors" which self-organize within the cell's regulatory networks. In this type of dynamic network model of information processing, generalized stimuli (e.g., mechanical forces) and specific molecular cues elicit signals which follow different trajectories, but eventually converge onto one of a small set of common end programs (growth, quiescence, differentiation, apoptosis, etc.). In other words, if cells use this type of information processing system, then control of cell function would involve selection of preexisting (latent) behavioral modes of the cell, rather than instruction by specific binding molecules. Importantly, the results of the computer simulation closely mimic experimental data obtained with living endothelial cells. The major implication of this finding is that current methods used for analysis of cell function that rely on characterization of linear signaling pathways or

  3. Chimera states in bursting neurons.

    PubMed

    Bera, Bidesh K; Ghosh, Dibakar; Lakshmanan, M

    2016-01-01

    We study the existence of chimera states in pulse-coupled networks of bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with nonlocal, global, and local (nearest neighbor) couplings. Through a linear stability analysis, we discuss the behavior of the stability function in the incoherent (i.e., disorder), coherent, chimera, and multichimera states. Surprisingly, we find that chimera and multichimera states occur even using local nearest neighbor interaction in a network of identical bursting neurons alone. This is in contrast with the existence of chimera states in populations of nonlocally or globally coupled oscillators. A chemical synaptic coupling function is used which plays a key role in the emergence of chimera states in bursting neurons. The existence of chimera, multichimera, coherent, and disordered states is confirmed by means of the recently introduced statistical measures and mean phase velocity.

  4. Chimera states in bursting neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Ghosh, Dibakar; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-01-01

    We study the existence of chimera states in pulse-coupled networks of bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with nonlocal, global, and local (nearest neighbor) couplings. Through a linear stability analysis, we discuss the behavior of the stability function in the incoherent (i.e., disorder), coherent, chimera, and multichimera states. Surprisingly, we find that chimera and multichimera states occur even using local nearest neighbor interaction in a network of identical bursting neurons alone. This is in contrast with the existence of chimera states in populations of nonlocally or globally coupled oscillators. A chemical synaptic coupling function is used which plays a key role in the emergence of chimera states in bursting neurons. The existence of chimera, multichimera, coherent, and disordered states is confirmed by means of the recently introduced statistical measures and mean phase velocity.

  5. Gravitational wave bursts from cosmic strings

    PubMed

    Damour; Vilenkin

    2000-10-30

    Cusps of cosmic strings emit strong beams of high-frequency gravitational waves (GW). As a consequence of these beams, the stochastic ensemble of gravitational waves generated by a cosmological network of oscillating loops is strongly non-Gaussian, and includes occasional sharp bursts that stand above the rms GW background. These bursts might be detectable by the planned GW detectors LIGO/VIRGO and LISA for string tensions as small as G&mgr; approximately 10(-13). The GW bursts discussed here might be accompanied by gamma ray bursts. PMID:11041921

  6. Numerical solution of the chemical master equation uniqueness and stability of the stationary distribution for chemical networks, and mRNA bursting in a gene network with negative feedback regulation.

    PubMed

    Zeron, E S; Santillán, M

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we introduce a couple of algorithms to compute the stationary probability distribution for the chemical master equation (CME) of arbitrary chemical networks. We further find the conditions guaranteeing the algorithms' convergence and the unity and stability of the stationary distribution. Next, we employ these algorithms to study the mRNA and protein probability distributions in a gene regulatory network subject to negative feedback regulation. In particular, we analyze the influence of the promoter activation/deactivation speed on the shape of such distributions. We find that a reduction of the promoter activation/deactivation speed modifies the shape of those distributions in a way consistent with the phenomenon known as mRNA (or transcription) bursting.

  7. Design and Demonstration of a 4×4 SFQ Network Switch Prototype System and 10-Gbps Bit-Error-Rate Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Yoshio; Hashimoto, Yoshihito; Yorozu, Shinichi

    We developed a 4×4 SFQ network switch prototype system and demonstrated its operation at 10Gbps. The system's core is composed of two SFQ chips: a 4×4 switch and a 6-channel voltage driver. The 4×4 switch chip contained both a switch fabric (i. e. a data path) and a switch scheduler (i. e. a controller). Both chips were attached to a multichip-module (MCM) carrier, which was then installed in a cryocooled system with 32 10-Gbps ports. Each chip contained about 2100 Josephson junctions on a 5-mm×5-mm die. An NEC standard 2.5-kA/cm2 fabrication process was used for the switch chip. We increased the critical current density to 10kA/cm2 for the driver chip to improve speed while maintaining wide bias margins. MCM implementation enabled us to use a hybrid critical current density technology. Voltage pulses were transferred between two chips through passive transmission lines on the MCM carrier. The cryocooled system was cooled down to about 4K using a two-stage 1-W cryocooler. We correctly operated the whole system at 10Gbps. The switch scheduler, which is driven by an on-chip clock generator, operated at 40GHz. The speed gap between SFQ and room temperature devices was filled by on-chip SFQ FIFO buffers or shift registers. We measured the bit error rate at 10Gbps and found that it was on the order of 10-13 for the 4×4 SFQ switch fabric. In addition, using semiconductor interface circuitry, we built a four-port SFQ Ethernet switch. All the components except for a compressor were installed in a standard 19-inch rack, filling a space 21 U (933.5mm or 36.75 inches) in height. After four personal computers (PCs) were connected to the switch, we have successfully transferred video data between them.

  8. Mutations in RNA Polymerase Bridge Helix and Switch Regions Affect Active-Site Networks and Transcript-Assisted Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Schäfer, Jorrit; Sharma, Amit; Rayner, Lucy; Zhang, Xiaodong; Tuma, Roman; Stockley, Peter; Buck, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP), the bridge helix and switch regions form an intricate network with the catalytic active centre and the main channel. These interactions are important for catalysis, hydrolysis and clamp domain movement. By targeting conserved residues in Escherichia coli RNAP, we are able to show that functions of these regions are differentially required during σ70-dependent and the contrasting σ54-dependent transcription activations and thus potentially underlie the key mechanistic differences between the two transcription paradigms. We further demonstrate that the transcription factor DksA directly regulates σ54-dependent activation both positively and negatively. This finding is consistent with the observed impacts of DksA on σ70-dependent promoters. DksA does not seem to significantly affect RNAP binding to a pre-melted promoter DNA but affects extensively activity at the stage of initial RNA synthesis on σ54-regulated promoters. Strikingly, removal of the σ54 Region I is sufficient to invert the action of DksA (from stimulation to inhibition or vice versa) at two test promoters. The RNAP mutants we generated also show a strong propensity to backtrack. These mutants increase the rate of transcript-hydrolysis cleavage to a level comparable to that seen in the Thermus aquaticus RNAP even in the absence of a non-complementary nucleotide. These novel phenotypes imply an important function of the bridge helix and switch regions as an anti-backtracking ratchet and an RNA hydrolysis regulator. PMID:26365052

  9. Mutations in RNA Polymerase Bridge Helix and Switch Regions Affect Active-Site Networks and Transcript-Assisted Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Schäfer, Jorrit; Sharma, Amit; Rayner, Lucy; Zhang, Xiaodong; Tuma, Roman; Stockley, Peter; Buck, Martin

    2015-11-01

    In bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP), the bridge helix and switch regions form an intricate network with the catalytic active centre and the main channel. These interactions are important for catalysis, hydrolysis and clamp domain movement. By targeting conserved residues in Escherichia coli RNAP, we are able to show that functions of these regions are differentially required during σ(70)-dependent and the contrasting σ(54)-dependent transcription activations and thus potentially underlie the key mechanistic differences between the two transcription paradigms. We further demonstrate that the transcription factor DksA directly regulates σ(54)-dependent activation both positively and negatively. This finding is consistent with the observed impacts of DksA on σ(70)-dependent promoters. DksA does not seem to significantly affect RNAP binding to a pre-melted promoter DNA but affects extensively activity at the stage of initial RNA synthesis on σ(54)-regulated promoters. Strikingly, removal of the σ(54) Region I is sufficient to invert the action of DksA (from stimulation to inhibition or vice versa) at two test promoters. The RNAP mutants we generated also show a strong propensity to backtrack. These mutants increase the rate of transcript-hydrolysis cleavage to a level comparable to that seen in the Thermus aquaticus RNAP even in the absence of a non-complementary nucleotide. These novel phenotypes imply an important function of the bridge helix and switch regions as an anti-backtracking ratchet and an RNA hydrolysis regulator.

  10. Mutations in RNA Polymerase Bridge Helix and Switch Regions Affect Active-Site Networks and Transcript-Assisted Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Schäfer, Jorrit; Sharma, Amit; Rayner, Lucy; Zhang, Xiaodong; Tuma, Roman; Stockley, Peter; Buck, Martin

    2015-11-01

    In bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP), the bridge helix and switch regions form an intricate network with the catalytic active centre and the main channel. These interactions are important for catalysis, hydrolysis and clamp domain movement. By targeting conserved residues in Escherichia coli RNAP, we are able to show that functions of these regions are differentially required during σ(70)-dependent and the contrasting σ(54)-dependent transcription activations and thus potentially underlie the key mechanistic differences between the two transcription paradigms. We further demonstrate that the transcription factor DksA directly regulates σ(54)-dependent activation both positively and negatively. This finding is consistent with the observed impacts of DksA on σ(70)-dependent promoters. DksA does not seem to significantly affect RNAP binding to a pre-melted promoter DNA but affects extensively activity at the stage of initial RNA synthesis on σ(54)-regulated promoters. Strikingly, removal of the σ(54) Region I is sufficient to invert the action of DksA (from stimulation to inhibition or vice versa) at two test promoters. The RNAP mutants we generated also show a strong propensity to backtrack. These mutants increase the rate of transcript-hydrolysis cleavage to a level comparable to that seen in the Thermus aquaticus RNAP even in the absence of a non-complementary nucleotide. These novel phenotypes imply an important function of the bridge helix and switch regions as an anti-backtracking ratchet and an RNA hydrolysis regulator. PMID:26365052

  11. All-optical encryption based on interleaved waveband switching modulation for optical network security.

    PubMed

    Fok, Mable P; Prucnal, Paul R

    2009-05-01

    All-optical encryption for optical code-division multiple-access systems with interleaved waveband-switching modulation is experimentally demonstrated. The scheme explores dual-pump four-wave mixing in a 35 cm highly nonlinear bismuth oxide fiber to achieve XOR operation of the plaintext and the encryption key. Bit 0 and bit 1 of the encrypted data are represented by two different wavebands. Unlike on-off keying encryption methods, the encrypted data in this approach has the same intensity for both bit 0 and bit 1. Thus no plaintext or ciphertext signatures are observed.

  12. Deficit in switching between functional brain networks underlies the impact of multitasking on working memory in older adults.

    PubMed

    Clapp, Wesley C; Rubens, Michael T; Sabharwal, Jasdeep; Gazzaley, Adam

    2011-04-26

    Multitasking negatively influences the retention of information over brief periods of time. This impact of interference on working memory is exacerbated with normal aging. We used functional MRI to investigate the neural basis by which an interruption is more disruptive to working memory performance in older individuals. Younger and older adults engaged in delayed recognition tasks both with and without interruption by a secondary task. Behavioral analysis revealed that working memory performance was more impaired by interruptions in older compared with younger adults. Functional connectivity analyses showed that when interrupted, older adults disengaged from a memory maintenance network and reallocated attentional resources toward the interrupting stimulus in a manner consistent with younger adults. However, unlike younger individuals, older adults failed to both disengage from the interruption and reestablish functional connections associated with the disrupted memory network. These results suggest that multitasking leads to more significant working memory disruption in older adults because of an interruption recovery failure, manifest as a deficient ability to dynamically switch between functional brain networks.

  13. Costs for switching partners reduce network dynamics but not cooperative behaviour.

    PubMed

    Bednarik, Peter; Fehl, Katrin; Semmann, Dirk

    2014-10-01

    Social networks represent the structuring of interactions between group members. Above all, many interactions are profoundly cooperative in humans and other animals. In accordance with this natural observation, theoretical work demonstrates that certain network structures favour the evolution of cooperation. Yet, recent experimental evidence suggests that static networks do not enhance cooperative behaviour in humans. By contrast, dynamic networks do foster cooperation. However, costs associated with dynamism such as time or resource investments in finding and establishing new partnerships have been neglected so far. Here, we show that human participants are much less likely to break links when costs arise for building new links. Especially, when costs were high, the network was nearly static. Surprisingly, cooperation levels in Prisoner's Dilemma games were not affected by reduced dynamism in social networks. We conclude that the mere potential to quit collaborations is sufficient in humans to reach high levels of cooperative behaviour. Effects of self-structuring processes or assortment on the network played a minor role: participants simply adjusted their cooperative behaviour in response to the threats of losing a partner or of being expelled. PMID:25122233

  14. Alternative packet switch architectures for a 30/20 GHz FDMA/TDMA geostationary communication satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stehle, Roy; Ogier, Richard G.

    1995-01-01

    This study has investigated alternatives for realizing a packet-based network switch for deployment on a communication satellite. The emphasis was on the avoidance of contention problems that can occur due to the simultaneous arrival of an excessive number of packets destined for the same downlink dwell. The study was to look ahead, beyond the current Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) capability, to the next generation of satellites. The study has not been limited by currently available technology, but has used university and commercial research efforts as a basis for designs that can be readily constructed and launched within the next five years. Tradeoffs in memory requirement, power requirement, and architecture have been considered as a part of our study.

  15. Localised polymer networks in chiral nematic liquid crystals for high speed photonic switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartan, Chloe C.; Salter, Patrick S.; Booth, Martin J.; Morris, Stephen M.; Elston, Steve J.

    2016-05-01

    Self-assembled periodic structures based upon chiral liquid crystalline materials have significant potential in the field of photonics ranging from fast-switching optoelectronic devices to low-threshold lasers. The flexoelectro-optic effect, which is observed in chiral nematic liquid crystals (LCs) when an electric field is applied perpendicular to the helical axis, has significant potential as it exhibits analogue switching in 10-100 μs. However, the major technological barrier that prohibits the commercial realisation of this electro-optic effect is the requirement of a uniform, in-plane alignment of the helix axis between glass substrates. Here, it is shown that periodic polymer structures engineered in the nematic phase of a chiral nematic LC device using direct laser writing can result in the spontaneous formation of the necessary uniform lying helix (ULH) state. Specifically, two-photon polymerization is used in conjunction with a spatial light modulator so as to correct for aberrations introduced by the bounding glass substrates enabling the polymer structures to be fabricated directly into the device. The ULH state appears to be stable in the absence of an externally applied electric field, and the optimum contrast between the bright and dark states is obtained using polymer structures that have periodicities of the order of the device thickness.

  16. Dynamics Correlation Network for Allosteric Switching of PreQ1 Riboswitch

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Jiang, Cheng; Zhang, Jinmai; Ye, Wei; Luo, Ray; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Riboswitches are a class of metabolism control elements mostly found in bacteria. Due to their fundamental importance in bacteria gene regulation, riboswitches have been proposed as antibacterial drug targets. Prequeuosine (preQ1) is the last free precursor in the biosynthetic pathway of queuosine that is crucial for translation efficiency and fidelity. However, the regulation mechanism for the preQ1 riboswitch remains unclear. Here we constructed fluctuation correlation network based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the regulation mechanism. The results suggest that the correlation network in the bound riboswitch is distinctly different from that in the apo riboswitch. The community network indicates that the information freely transfers from the binding site of preQ1 to the expression platform of the P3 helix in the bound riboswitch and the P3 helix is a bottleneck in the apo riboswitch. Thus, a hypothesis of “preQ1-binding induced allosteric switching” is proposed to link riboswitch and translation regulation. The community networks of mutants support this hypothesis. Finally, a possible allosteric pathway of A50-A51-A52-U10-A11-G12-G56 was also identified based on the shortest path algorithm and confirmed by mutations and network perturbation. The novel fluctuation network analysis method can be used as a general strategy in studies of riboswitch structure-function relationship. PMID:27484311

  17. Integrated network analysis identifies fight-club nodes as a class of hubs encompassing key putative switch genes that induce major transcriptome reprogramming during grapevine development.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Maria Concetta; Zenoni, Sara; Fasoli, Marianna; Massonnet, Mélanie; Farina, Lorenzo; Castiglione, Filippo; Pezzotti, Mario; Paci, Paola

    2014-12-01

    We developed an approach that integrates different network-based methods to analyze the correlation network arising from large-scale gene expression data. By studying grapevine (Vitis vinifera) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) gene expression atlases and a grapevine berry transcriptomic data set during the transition from immature to mature growth, we identified a category named "fight-club hubs" characterized by a marked negative correlation with the expression profiles of neighboring genes in the network. A special subset named "switch genes" was identified, with the additional property of many significant negative correlations outside their own group in the network. Switch genes are involved in multiple processes and include transcription factors that may be considered master regulators of the previously reported transcriptome remodeling that marks the developmental shift from immature to mature growth. All switch genes, expressed at low levels in vegetative/green tissues, showed a significant increase in mature/woody organs, suggesting a potential regulatory role during the developmental transition. Finally, our analysis of tomato gene expression data sets showed that wild-type switch genes are downregulated in ripening-deficient mutants. The identification of known master regulators of tomato fruit maturation suggests our method is suitable for the detection of key regulators of organ development in different fleshy fruit crops.

  18. Competition of two distinct actin networks for actin defines a bistable switch for cell polarization

    PubMed Central

    Lomakin, Alexis J.; Lee, Kun-Chun; Han, Sangyoon J.; Bui, D A.; Davidson, Michael; Mogilner, Alex; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-01-01

    Symmetry-breaking polarization enables functional plasticity of cells and tissues and is yet not well understood. Here we show that epithelial cells, hard-wired to maintain a static morphology and to preserve tissue organization, can spontaneously switch to a migratory polarized phenotype upon relaxation of the actomyosin cytoskeleton. We find that myosin-II engages actin in the formation of cortical actomyosin bundles and thus makes it unavailable for deployment in the process of dendritic growth normally driving cell motility. At low contractility regimes epithelial cells polarize in a front-back manner due to emergence of actin retrograde flows powered by dendritic polymerization of actin. Coupled to cell movement, the flows transport myosin-II from the front to the back of the cell, where the motor locally “locks” actin in contractile bundles. This polarization mechanism could be employed by embryonic and cancer epithelial cells in microenvironments where high contractility-driven cell motion is inefficient. PMID:26414403

  19. Reaching a consensus in networks of high-order integral agents under switching directed topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Long; Wang, Hanlei; Hou, Zeng-Guang; Tan, Min

    2016-06-01

    Consensus problem of high-order integral multi-agent systems under switching directed topology is considered in this study. Depending on whether the agent's full state is available or not, two distributed protocols are proposed to ensure that states of all agents can be convergent to a same stationary value. In the proposed protocols, the gain vector associated with the agent's (estimated) state and the gain vector associated with the relative (estimated) states between agents are designed in a sophisticated way. By this particular design, the high-order integral multi-agent system can be transformed into a first-order integral multi-agent system. Also, the convergence of the transformed first-order integral agent's state indicates the convergence of the original high-order integral agent's state, if and only if all roots of the polynomial, whose coefficients are the entries of the gain vector associated with the relative (estimated) states between agents, are in the open left-half complex plane. Therefore, many analysis techniques in the first-order integral multi-agent system can be directly borrowed to solve the problems in the high-order integral multi-agent system. Due to this property, it is proved that to reach a consensus, the switching directed topology of multi-agent system is only required to be 'uniformly jointly quasi-strongly connected', which seems the mildest connectivity condition in the literature. In addition, the consensus problem of discrete-time high-order integral multi-agent systems is studied. The corresponding consensus protocol and performance analysis are presented. Finally, three simulation examples are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  20. On-board closed-loop congestion control for satellite based packet switching networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Pong P.; Ivancic, William D.; Kim, Heechul

    1993-01-01

    NASA LeRC is currently investigating a satellite architecture that incorporates on-board packet switching capability. Because of the statistical nature of packet switching, arrival traffic may fluctuate and thus it is necessary to integrate congestion control mechanism as part of the on-board processing unit. This study focuses on the closed-loop reactive control. We investigate the impact of the long propagation delay on the performance and propose a scheme to overcome the problem. The scheme uses a global feedback signal to regulate the packet arrival rate of ground stations. In this scheme, the satellite continuously broadcasts the status of its output buffer and the ground stations respond by selectively discarding packets or by tagging the excessive packets as low-priority. The two schemes are evaluated by theoretical queuing analysis and simulation. The former is used to analyze the simplified model and to determine the basic trends and bounds, and the later is used to assess the performance of a more realistic system and to evaluate the effectiveness of more sophisticated control schemes. The results show that the long propagation delay makes the closed-loop congestion control less responsive. The broadcasted information can only be used to extract statistical information. The discarding scheme needs carefully-chosen status information and reduction function, and normally requires a significant amount of ground discarding to reduce the on-board packet loss probability. The tagging scheme is more effective since it tolerates more uncertainties and allows a larger margin of error in status information. It can protect the high-priority packets from excessive loss and fully utilize the downlink bandwidth at the same time.

  1. Transcript degradation and noise of small RNA-controlled genes in a switch activated network in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Arbel-Goren, Rinat; Tal, Asaf; Parasar, Bibudha; Dym, Alvah; Costantino, Nina; Muñoz-García, Javier; Court, Donald L; Stavans, Joel

    2016-08-19

    Post-transcriptional regulatory processes may change transcript levels and affect cell-to-cell variability or noise. We study small-RNA downregulation to elucidate its effects on noise in the iron homeostasis network of Escherichia coli In this network, the small-RNA RyhB undergoes stoichiometric degradation with the transcripts of target genes in response to iron stress. Using single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization, we measured transcript numbers of the RyhB-regulated genes sodB and fumA in individual cells as a function of iron deprivation. We observed a monotonic increase of noise with iron stress but no evidence of theoretically predicted, enhanced stoichiometric fluctuations in transcript numbers, nor of bistable behavior in transcript distributions. Direct detection of RyhB in individual cells shows that its noise is much smaller than that of these two targets, when RyhB production is significant. A generalized two-state model of bursty transcription that neglects RyhB fluctuations describes quantitatively the dependence of noise and transcript distributions on iron deprivation, enabling extraction of in vivo RyhB-mediated transcript degradation rates. The transcripts' threshold-linear behavior indicates that the effective in vivo interaction strength between RyhB and its two target transcripts is comparable. Strikingly, the bacterial cell response exhibits Fur-dependent, switch-like activation instead of a graded response to iron deprivation. PMID:27085802

  2. Transcript degradation and noise of small RNA-controlled genes in a switch activated network in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Arbel-Goren, Rinat; Tal, Asaf; Parasar, Bibudha; Dym, Alvah; Costantino, Nina; Muñoz-García, Javier; Court, Donald L; Stavans, Joel

    2016-08-19

    Post-transcriptional regulatory processes may change transcript levels and affect cell-to-cell variability or noise. We study small-RNA downregulation to elucidate its effects on noise in the iron homeostasis network of Escherichia coli In this network, the small-RNA RyhB undergoes stoichiometric degradation with the transcripts of target genes in response to iron stress. Using single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization, we measured transcript numbers of the RyhB-regulated genes sodB and fumA in individual cells as a function of iron deprivation. We observed a monotonic increase of noise with iron stress but no evidence of theoretically predicted, enhanced stoichiometric fluctuations in transcript numbers, nor of bistable behavior in transcript distributions. Direct detection of RyhB in individual cells shows that its noise is much smaller than that of these two targets, when RyhB production is significant. A generalized two-state model of bursty transcription that neglects RyhB fluctuations describes quantitatively the dependence of noise and transcript distributions on iron deprivation, enabling extraction of in vivo RyhB-mediated transcript degradation rates. The transcripts' threshold-linear behavior indicates that the effective in vivo interaction strength between RyhB and its two target transcripts is comparable. Strikingly, the bacterial cell response exhibits Fur-dependent, switch-like activation instead of a graded response to iron deprivation.

  3. Five-stage free-space optical switching network with field-effect transistor self-electro-optic-effect-device smart-pixel arrays.

    PubMed

    McCormick, F B; Cloonan, T J; Lentine, A L; Sasian, J M; Morrison, R L; Beckman, M G; Walker, S L; Wojcik, M J; Hinterlong, S J; Crisci, R J; Novotny, R A; Hinton, H S

    1994-03-10

    The design, construction, and operational testing of a five-stage, fully interconnected 32 × 16 switching fabric by the use of smart-pixel (2, 1, 1) switching nodes are described. The arrays of switching nodes use monolithically integrated GaAs field-effect transistors, multiple-quantum-well p-i-n detectors, and self-electro-optic-device modulators. Each switching node incorporates 25 field-effect transistors and 17 p-i-n diodes to realize two differential optical receivers, the 2 × 1 node switching logic, a single-bit node control memory, and one differential optical transmitter. The five stages of node arrays are interconnected to form a two-dimensional banyan network by the use of Fourier-plane computer-generated holograms. System input and output are made by two-dimensional fiber-bundle matrices, and the system optical hardware design incorporates frequency-stabilized lasers, pupil-division beam combination, and a hybrid micro-macro lens for fiber-bundle imaging. Optomechanical packaging of the system ut lizes modular kinematic component positioning and active thermal control to enable simple rapid assembly. Two preliminary operational experiments are completed. In the first experiment, five stages are operated at 50 Mbits/s with 15 active inputs and outputs. The second experiment attempts to operate two stages of second-generation node arrays at 155 Mbits/s, with eight of the 15 active nodes functioning correctly along the straight switch-routing paths. PMID:20862186

  4. Lysogen stability is determined by the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene.

    PubMed

    Zong, Chenghang; So, Lok-hang; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A; Skinner, Samuel O; Golding, Ido

    2010-11-30

    The ability of living cells to maintain an inheritable memory of their gene-expression state is key to cellular differentiation. Bacterial lysogeny serves as a simple paradigm for long-term cellular memory. In this study, we address the following question: in the absence of external perturbation, how long will a cell stay in the lysogenic state before spontaneously switching away from that state? We show by direct measurement that lysogen stability exhibits a simple exponential dependence on the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene, cI. We quantify these gene-activity bursts using single-molecule-resolution mRNA measurements in individual cells, analyzed using a stochastic mathematical model of the gene-network kinetics. The quantitative relation between stability and gene activity is independent of the fine details of gene regulation, suggesting that a quantitative prediction of cell-state stability may also be possible in more complex systems. PMID:21119634

  5. A developmental switch in the excitability and function of the starburst network in the mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ji-Jian; Lee, Seunghoon; Zhou, Z Jimmy

    2004-12-01

    Dual patch-clamp recording and Ca2+ uncaging revealed Ca2+-dependent corelease of ACh and GABA from, and the presence of reciprocal nicotinic and GABAergic synapses between, starburst cells in the perinatal rabbit retina. With maturation, the nicotinic synapses between starburst cells dramatically diminished, whereas the GABAergic synapses remained and changed from excitatory to inhibitory, indicating a coordinated conversion of the starburst network excitability from an early hyperexcitatory to a mature nonepileptic state. We show that this transition allows the starburst cells to use their neurotransmitters for two completely different functions. During early development, the starburst network mediates recurrent excitation and spontaneous retinal waves, which are important for visual system development. After vision begins, starburst cells release GABA in a prolonged and Ca2+-dependent manner and inhibit each other laterally via direct GABAergic synapses, which may be important for visual integration, such as the detection of motion direction.

  6. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, Bernard T.; Dreifuerst, Gary R.

    1994-01-01

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1500 A peak, 1.0 .mu.s pulsewidth, and 4500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry.

  7. A hybrid optical switch architecture to integrate IP into optical networks to provide flexible and intelligent bandwidth on demand for cloud computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Hall, Trevor J.

    2013-12-01

    The Internet is entering an era of cloud computing to provide more cost effective, eco-friendly and reliable services to consumer and business users. As a consequence, the nature of the Internet traffic has been fundamentally transformed from a pure packet-based pattern to today's predominantly flow-based pattern. Cloud computing has also brought about an unprecedented growth in the Internet traffic. In this paper, a hybrid optical switch architecture is presented to deal with the flow-based Internet traffic, aiming to offer flexible and intelligent bandwidth on demand to improve fiber capacity utilization. The hybrid optical switch is capable of integrating IP into optical networks for cloud-based traffic with predictable performance, for which the delay performance of the electronic module in the hybrid optical switch architecture is evaluated through simulation.

  8. On the performance of a scalable optical switching architecture for flat intercluster data center network with centralized control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Qian; Huang, Shanguo; Zhou, Yu; Guo, Bingli; Zhao, Yongli; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Jie; Gu, Wanyi

    2014-07-01

    Data centers have to sustain the rapid growth of data traffic due to the increasing demand of bandwidth-hungry Internet services. The current fat tree topology causes communication bottlenecks in the server interaction process, resulting in power-hungry O-E-O conversions that limit the minimum latency and the power efficiency of these systems. As a result, recent efforts have advocated that all optical data center networks (DCNs) have the capability to adapt to traffic requirements on demand. We present the design, implementation, and evaluation of a cascaded microelectromechanical systems switches-based DCN architecture which dynamically changes its topology and link capacities, thereby achieving unprecedented flexibility to adapt to dynamic traffic patterns. We analyze it under a data center traffic model to determine its suitability for this type of environment. The proposed architecture can be scaled to 3300 input/output ports by available experimental components with low blocking probability and latency. The blocking probability and latency are about 0.03 and 72 ms at a moderate traffic load for 32 input/output ports based on our numerical results, which are much smaller than the results for 4 input/output ports which are 0.13 and 235 ms, respectively.

  9. Identification and validation of effective connectivity networks in functional magnetic resonance imaging using switching linear dynamic systems.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jason F; Pillai, Ajay; Chen, Kewei; Horwitz, Barry

    2010-09-01

    Dynamic connectivity networks identify directed interregional interactions between modeled brain regions in neuroimaging. However, problems arise when the regions involved in a task and their interconnections are not fully known a priori. Objective measures of model adequacy are necessary to validate such models. We present a connectivity formalism, the Switching Linear Dynamic System (SLDS), that is capable of identifying both Granger-Geweke and instantaneous connectivity that vary according to experimental conditions. SLDS explicitly models the task condition as a Markov random variable. The series of task conditions can be estimated from new data given an identified model providing a means to validate connectivity patterns. We use SLDS to model functional magnetic resonance imaging data from five regions during a finger alternation task. Using interregional connectivity alone, the identified model predicted the task condition vector from a different subject with a different task ordering with high accuracy. In addition, important regions excluded from a model can be identified by augmenting the model state space. A motor task model excluding primary motor cortices was augmented with a new neural state constrained by its connectivity with the included regions. The augmented variable time series, convolved with a hemodynamic kernel, was compared to all brain voxels. The right primary motor cortex was identified as the best region to add to the model. Our results suggest that the SLDS model framework is an effective means to address several problems with modeling connectivity including measuring overall model adequacy and identifying important regions missing from models.

  10. Eddy current technique for predicting burst pressure

    DOEpatents

    Petri, Mark C.; Kupperman, David S.; Morman, James A.; Reifman, Jaques; Wei, Thomas Y. C.

    2003-01-01

    A signal processing technique which correlates eddy current inspection data from a tube having a critical tubing defect with a range of predicted burst pressures for the tube is provided. The method can directly correlate the raw eddy current inspection data representing the critical tubing defect with the range of burst pressures using a regression technique, preferably an artificial neural network. Alternatively, the technique deconvolves the raw eddy current inspection data into a set of undistorted signals, each of which represents a separate defect of the tube. The undistorted defect signal which represents the critical tubing defect is related to a range of burst pressures utilizing a regression technique.

  11. Fully-elastic multi-granular network with space/frequency/time switching using multi-core fibres and programmable optical nodes.

    PubMed

    Amaya, N; Irfan, M; Zervas, G; Nejabati, R; Simeonidou, D; Sakaguchi, J; Klaus, W; Puttnam, B J; Miyazawa, T; Awaji, Y; Wada, N; Henning, I

    2013-04-01

    We present the first elastic, space division multiplexing, and multi-granular network based on two 7-core MCF links and four programmable optical nodes able to switch traffic utilising the space, frequency and time dimensions with over 6000-fold bandwidth granularity. Results show good end-to-end performance on all channels with power penalties between 0.75 dB and 3.7 dB. PMID:23571976

  12. Multiserver switch scheduling for high speed optical switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golla, Prasad; Blanton, John; Damm, Gerard

    2003-10-01

    A switch matrix implemented as an optical crossbar using semiconductor optical amplifiers is able to accommodate extreme concentrations of data traffic. Due to the need to reduce optical guard band overhead it is beneficial to switch fixed size bursts of data cells on a time slot basis. The high capacity of the optical matrix supports multiple optical ports per burst card, and the implementation of multiple queue servers per burst card helps make better use of the multiplicity of ports. Problems associated with arbitrating multiple ports and multiple servers per burst card have been resolved by extending the operation of existing iterative, single server scheduling algorithms. The multiserver arbitration time will be in proportion to the number of servers -- corresponding to the channels of DWDM link -- unless a reconciliation stage is used after each iteration when an arbiter per server is used. The reconciliation stage sets the problem of broken data dependencies between server arbitrations in this case. Further, to address the time limitations for computing the scheduling solution, parallel arbiter implementations have been developed and tested against single arbiter designs. Again, the broken dependencies between iterations of an arbitration are addressed through the use of a grant reconciliation stage. The use of multiple queue servers per burst card also resolves some of the data loss problems related to polarized traffic. Simulations of the multiple server and parallel arbiter implementations have demonstrated their efficiency compared to previous implementations. Compounded to this problem is maintaining high throughput of the switch matrix while observing data transit time limits. This involves balancing two contradictory requirements; switch or line card efficiency and data transit times. To improve efficiency it is desirable to transmit only full packets. However, to prevent loss of data due to timeout it will be necessary to transmit some incomplete

  13. Optical Circuit Switched Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monacos, Steve P. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a system and method embodied in an optical circuit switched protocol for the transmission of data through a network. The optical circuit switched protocol is an all-optical circuit switched network and includes novel optical switching nodes for transmitting optical data packets within a network. Each optical switching node comprises a detector for receiving the header, header detection logic for translating the header into routing information and eliminating the header, and a controller for receiving the routing information and configuring an all optical path within the node. The all optical path located within the node is solely an optical path without having electronic storage of the data and without having optical delay of the data. Since electronic storage of the header is not necessary and the initial header is eliminated by the first detector of the first switching node. multiple identical headers are sent throughout the network so that subsequent switching nodes can receive and read the header for setting up an optical data path.

  14. Integrating mitosis, toxicity, and transgene expression in a telecommunications packet-switched network model of lipoplex-mediated gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Martin, Timothy M; Wysocki, Beata J; Beyersdorf, Jared P; Wysocki, Tadeusz A; Pannier, Angela K

    2014-08-01

    Gene delivery systems transport exogenous genetic information to cells or biological systems with the potential to directly alter endogenous gene expression and behavior with applications in functional genomics, tissue engineering, medical devices, and gene therapy. Nonviral systems offer advantages over viral systems because of their low immunogenicity, inexpensive synthesis, and easy modification but suffer from lower transfection levels. The representation of gene transfer using models offers perspective and interpretation of complex cellular mechanisms,including nonviral gene delivery where exact mechanisms are unknown. Here, we introduce a novel telecommunications model of the nonviral gene delivery process in which the delivery of the gene to a cell is synonymous with delivery of a packet of information to a destination computer within a packet-switched computer network. Such a model uses nodes and layers to simplify the complexity of modeling the transfection process and to overcome several challenges of existing models. These challenges include a limited scope and limited time frame, which often does not incorporate biological effects known to affect transfection. The telecommunication model was constructed in MATLAB to model lipoplex delivery of the gene encoding the green fluorescent protein to HeLa cells. Mitosis and toxicity events were included in the model resulting in simulation outputs of nuclear internalization and transfection efficiency that correlated with experimental data. A priori predictions based on model sensitivity analysis suggest that increasing endosomal escape and decreasing lysosomal degradation, protein degradation, and GFP-induced toxicity can improve transfection efficiency by three-fold. Application of the telecommunications model to nonviral gene delivery offers insight into the development of new gene delivery systems with therapeutically relevant transfection levels.

  15. Design and analysis of a conceptual wavelength-division multiplexing optical network based on self-similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Shu-Tsung; Kao, Ming-Seng

    2010-02-01

    We propose a novel multilevel wavelength-division multiplexing optical network based on the concept of self-similarity to simplify network structure and operation. Our approach lies on a simple network topology as well as an efficient wavelength management scheme being uniformly applied to all network levels. The proposed network is a compound packet-switched and wavelength-routed network with packet switching performed on the bottom level and wavelength routing on all upper levels. This network retains the efficiency of packet-switched networks and the simplicity of wavelength-routed networks. Switching operations are concentrated at some special nodes in the multilevel network, significantly simplifying the node configuration and wavelength routing. Moreover, the idea of λ bands is applied to unify wavelength management on all network levels. Network analysis is performed to assess the feasibility of our approach. A queueing model using the quality of service enhanced optical burst switching protocol is employed to analyze the blocking performance of the proposed network. Also, the numerical results based on the queueing model are provided.

  16. Burst-by-burst laser frequency monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esproles, Carlos (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a system for real-time frequency monitoring and display of an RF burst where the burst frequency is analyzed and displayed on a burst-by-burst basis in order to allow for frequency control. Although the invention was made for monitoring the laser frequency of a LIDAR system, it has other applications where realtime monitoring is required. The novelty of the invention resides in the use of a counter that is reset at the beginning of each unit time of monitoring and then gated for a unit of time. The invention also has an LED bar graph for displaying the measure of frequency at the end of each unit time in either a bar length mode or a moving dot mode. In the latter mode, the operator makes necessary adjustments to maintain the dot at the center of the bar graph.

  17. The Case of the Disappearing Spindle Burst

    PubMed Central

    Tiriac, Alexandre; Blumberg, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles are brief cortical oscillations at 10–15 Hz that occur predominantly during non-REM (quiet) sleep in adult mammals and are thought to contribute to learning and memory. Spindle bursts are phenomenologically similar to sleep spindles, but they occur predominantly in early infancy and are triggered by peripheral sensory activity (e.g., by retinal waves); accordingly, spindle bursts are thought to organize neural networks in the developing brain and establish functional links with the sensory periphery. Whereas the spontaneous retinal waves that trigger spindle bursts in visual cortex are a transient feature of early development, the myoclonic twitches that drive spindle bursts in sensorimotor cortex persist into adulthood. Moreover, twitches—and their associated spindle bursts—occur exclusively during REM (active) sleep. Curiously, despite the persistence of twitching into adulthood, twitch-related spindle bursts have not been reported in adult sensorimotor cortex. This raises the question of whether such spindle burst activity does not occur in adulthood or, alternatively, occurs but has yet to be discovered. If twitch-related spindle bursts do occur in adults, they could contribute to the calibration, maintenance, and repair of sensorimotor systems. PMID:27119028

  18. How long does a burst burst?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael S.; Zhang, Bing; Murase, Kohta

    2014-05-20

    Several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) last much longer (∼hours) in γ-rays than typical long GRBs (∼minutes), and it has recently been proposed that these 'ultra-long GRBs' may form a distinct population, probably with a different (e.g., blue supergiant) progenitor than typical GRBs. However, Swift observations suggest that many GRBs have extended central engine activities manifested as flares and internal plateaus in X-rays. We perform a comprehensive study on a large sample of Swift GRBs with X-Ray Telescope observations to investigate GRB central engine activity duration and to determine whether ultra-long GRBs are unusual events. We define burst duration t {sub burst} based on both γ-ray and X-ray light curves rather than using γ-ray observations alone. We find that t {sub burst} can be reliably measured in 343 GRBs. Within this 'good' sample, 21.9% GRBs have t {sub burst} ≳ 10{sup 3} s and 11.5% GRBs have t {sub burst} ≳ 10{sup 4} s. There is an apparent bimodal distribution of t {sub burst} in this sample. However, when we consider an 'undetermined' sample (304 GRBs) with t {sub burst} possibly falling in the gap between GRB duration T {sub 90} and the first X-ray observational time, as well as a selection effect against t {sub burst} falling into the first Swift orbital 'dead zone' due to observation constraints, the intrinsic underlying t {sub burst} distribution is consistent with being a single component distribution. We found that the existing evidence for a separate ultra-long GRB population is inconclusive, and further multi-wavelength observations are needed to draw a firmer conclusion. We also discuss the theoretical implications of our results. In particular, the central engine activity duration of GRBs is generally much longer than the γ-ray T {sub 90} duration and it does not even correlate with T {sub 90}. It would be premature to make a direct connection between T {sub 90} and the size of the progenitor star.

  19. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles; Bhat, Narayana; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Greiner, Jochen; Kippen, R. Marc; vonKienlin, Andreas; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Lichti, Giselher; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Steinle, Helmut; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2007-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) comprises an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors designed to enhance the scientific return from GLAST in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). By observing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV energy range, GBM extends the spectral coverage of GRBs more than 3 decades below the LAT energy threshold. GBM computes burst locations on-board, allowing repointing of the GLAST Observatory to place strong bursts within the LAT field-of-view to observe delayed high-energy emission.

  20. Gamma Ray Burst Follow-Ups with Bootes-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guziy, Sergey; Castro-Tirado, Guziy, Alberto J.; Jelinek, Martin; Gorosabel, Javier; Kubanek, Petr; Cunniffe, Ronan; Lara-Gil, Oscar; Tello, Juan C.; Jeong, Soomin; Oates, Samantha R.; Xu, Youdong; Perez-Ramirez, Dolores; Cui, Chenzou; Fan, Yufeng; Wan, Chuanjun; Bai, Jinming; Kheyfets, I.

    The Burst Observer and Optical Transient Exploring System (BOOTES), is a global robotic observatory network, which started in 1998 with Spanish leadership devoted to study optical emissions from gamma ray bursts (GRBs) that occur in the Universe. We present shot history and current status of BOOTES-4 telescope. Some details of 38 GRBs followed-up with BOOTES-4 are discussed.

  1. Gamma-Ray Bursts Analyses with Photographic Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, R.; Krizek, M.

    2006-04-01

    The Optical Monitors, despite of lower detection limits, are still valuable for detection of prompt real-time and (hypothetical) pre-burst optical emission of Gamma-Ray Bursts. We refer on the ongoing project at the Astronomical Institute in Ondrejov based on digitized data from the photographic EN network.

  2. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, B.T.; Dreifuerst, G.R.

    1994-07-19

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1,500 A peak, 1.0 [mu]s pulsewidth, and 4,500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry. 6 figs.

  3. Observer-based consensus in networks of discrete-time switched linear dynamics under a fixed topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Youming; Li, Yuxia

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers the consensus problem of discrete-time switched linear multi-agent systems under a fixed communication topology. An observer-based protocol with sampled data is proposed for solving such a problem. Assume that the digraph has a directed spanning tree and that all switched subsystem of each agent are stabilisable and detectable. It is shown that the proposed protocol solves the consensus problem when the sampling period is sufficiently small and the average dwell time of the switching signal is sufficiently large. Moreover, to reduce the conservatism, a sufficient condition for consensus is obtained to design the feedback gain matrices and the observer gain matrices by linear matrix inequalities, which guarantee that consensus can be achieved when the sampling period and the average dwell time are in the general case. Finally, the effectiveness of the theoretical results is demonstrated through an example.

  4. Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Woosley, Stan

    2012-11-01

    Prologue C. Kouveliotou, R. A . M. J. Wijers and S. E. Woosley; 1. The discovery of the gamma-ray burst phenomenon R. W. Klebesadel; 2. Instrumental principles E. E. Fenimore; 3. The BATSE era G. J. Fishman and C. A. Meegan; 4. The cosmological era L. Piro and K. Hurley; 5. The Swift era N. Gehrels and D. N. Burrows; 6. Discoveries enabled by multi-wavelength afterglow observations of gamma-ray bursts J. Greiner; 7. Prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts T. Piran, R. Sari and R. Mochkovitch; 8. Basic gamma-ray burst afterglows P. Mészáros and R. A. M. J. Wijers; 9. The GRB-supernova connection J. Hjorth and J. S. Bloom; 10. Models for gamma-ray burst progenitors and central engines S. E. Woosley; 11. Jets and gamma-ray burst unification schemes J. Granot and E. Ramirez-Ruiz; 12. High-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos E. Waxman; 13. Long gamma-ray burst host galaxies and their environments J. P. U. Fynbo, D. Malesani and P. Jakobsson; 14. Gamma-ray burst cosmology V. Bromm and A. Loeb; 15. Epilogue R. D. Blandford; Index.

  5. Gamma Ray Bursts - Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    We are in an exciting period of discovery for gamma-ray bursts. The Swift observatory is detecting 100 bursts per year, providing arcsecond localizations and sensitive observations of the prompt and afterglow emission. The Fermi observatory is observing 250 bursts per year with its medium-energy GRB instrument and about 10 bursts per year with its high-energy LAT instrument. In addition, rapid-response telescopes on the ground are providing new capabilities to study optical emission during the prompt phase and spectral signatures of the host galaxies. The combined data set is enabling great advances in our understanding of GRBs including afterglow physics, short burst origin, and high energy emission.

  6. Sawtooth bursts: observations and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, M.; Bárta, M.; Klassen, A.; Aurass, H.; Mann, G.

    2002-12-01

    An example of the sawtooth burst observed during the November 3, 1997 flare is shown. Basic parameters of the sawtooth bursts are summarized and compared with those of fibers, fiber chains, zebras, EEL bursts and lace bursts. The sawtooth bursts are found to be most similar to the lace bursts, therefore the lace bursts model is proposed also for them. Then using this model the dynamic spectrum with the sawtooth burst is modelled. The model considers accelerated electrons with an unstable distribution function on the double resonance frequency and quasi-periodic variations of the electron plasma density and/or magnetic field in the radio source.

  7. Artificial neural networks for control of a grid-connected rectifier/inverter under disturbance, dynamic and power converter switching conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuhui; Fairbank, Michael; Johnson, Cameron; Wunsch, Donald C; Alonso, Eduardo; Proaño, Julio L

    2014-04-01

    Three-phase grid-connected converters are widely used in renewable and electric power system applications. Traditionally, grid-connected converters are controlled with standard decoupled d-q vector control mechanisms. However, recent studies indicate that such mechanisms show limitations in their applicability to dynamic systems. This paper investigates how to mitigate such restrictions using a neural network to control a grid-connected rectifier/inverter. The neural network implements a dynamic programming algorithm and is trained by using back-propagation through time. To enhance performance and stability under disturbance, additional strategies are adopted, including the use of integrals of error signals to the network inputs and the introduction of grid disturbance voltage to the outputs of a well-trained network. The performance of the neural-network controller is studied under typical vector control conditions and compared against conventional vector control methods, which demonstrates that the neural vector control strategy proposed in this paper is effective. Even in dynamic and power converter switching environments, the neural vector controller shows strong ability to trace rapidly changing reference commands, tolerate system disturbances, and satisfy control requirements for a faulted power system.

  8. A Study of Quality of Service Communication for High-Speed Packet-Switching Computer Sub-Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Zhenqian

    1999-01-01

    With the development of high-speed networking technology, computer networks, including local-area networks (LANs), wide-area networks (WANs) and the Internet, are extending their traditional roles of carrying computer data. They are being used for Internet telephony, multimedia applications such as conferencing and video on demand, distributed simulations, and other real-time applications. LANs are even used for distributed real-time process control and computing as a cost-effective approach. Differing from traditional data transfer, these new classes of high-speed network applications (video, audio, real-time process control, and others) are delay sensitive. The usefulness of data depends not only on the correctness of received data, but also the time that data are received. In other words, these new classes of applications require networks to provide guaranteed services or quality of service (QoS). Quality of service can be defined by a set of parameters and reflects a user's expectation about the underlying network's behavior. Traditionally, distinct services are provided by different kinds of networks. Voice services are provided by telephone networks, video services are provided by cable networks, and data transfer services are provided by computer networks. A single network providing different services is called an integrated-services network.

  9. Future Optical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mahony, Michael J.; Politi, Christina; Klonidis, Dimitrios; Nejabati, Reza; Simeonidou, Dimitra

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents views on the future of optical networking. A historical look at the emergence of optical networking is first taken, followed by a discussion on the drivers pushing for a new and pervasive network, which is based on photonics and can satisfy the needs of a broadening base of residential, business, and scientific users. Regional plans and targets for optical networking are reviewed to understand which current approaches are judged important. Today, two thrusts are driving separate optical network infrastructure models, namely 1) the need by nations to provide a ubiquitous network infrastructure to support all the future services and telecommunication needs of residential and business users and 2) increasing demands by the scientific community for networks to support their requirements with respect to large-scale data transport and processing. This paper discusses these network models together with the key enabling technologies currently being considered for future implementation, including optical circuit, burst and packet switching, and optical code-division multiplexing. Critical subsystem functionalities are also reviewed. The discussion considers how these separate models might eventually merge to form a global optical network infrastructure.

  10. Theta-burst LTP.

    PubMed

    Larson, John; Munkácsy, Erin

    2015-09-24

    This review covers the spatial and temporal rules governing induction of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) by theta-burst stimulation. Induction of LTP in field CA1 by high frequency stimulation bursts that resemble the burst discharges (complex-spikes) of hippocampal pyramidal neurons involves a multiple-step mechanism. A single burst is insufficient for LTP induction because it evokes both excitatory and inhibitory currents that partially cancel and limit postsynaptic depolarization. Bursts repeated at the frequency (~5 Hz) of the endogenous theta rhythm induce maximal LTP, primarily because this frequency disables feed-forward inhibition and allows sufficient postsynaptic depolarization to activate voltage-sensitive NMDA receptors. The disinhibitory process, referred to as "priming", involves presynaptic GABA autoreceptors that inhibit GABA release. Activation of NMDA receptors allows a calcium flux into dendritic spines that serves as the proximal trigger for LTP. We include new data showing that theta-burst stimulation is more efficient than other forms of stimulation for LTP induction. In addition, we demonstrate that associative interactions between synapses activated during theta-bursts are limited to major dendritic domains since such interactions occur within apical or basal dendritic trees but not between them. We review evidence that recordings of electrophysiological responses during theta burst stimulation can help to determine if experimental manipulations that affect LTP do so by affecting events antecedent to the induction process, such as NMDA receptor activation, or downstream signaling cascades that result from postsynaptic calcium fluxes. Finally, we argue that theta-burst LTP represents a minimal model for stable, non-decremental LTP that is more sensitive to a variety of experimental manipulations than is LTP induced by other stimulation paradigms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Brain and Memory.

  11. Theta-Burst LTP

    PubMed Central

    Larson, John; Munkácsy, Erin

    2014-01-01

    This review covers the spatial and temporal rules governing induction of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) by theta-burst stimulation. Induction of LTP in field CA1 by high frequency stimulation bursts that resemble the burst discharges (complex-spikes) of hippocampal pyramidal neurons involves a multiple-step mechanism. A single burst is insufficient for LTP induction because it evokes both excitatory and inhibitory currents that partially cancel and limit postsynaptic depolarization. Bursts repeated at the frequency (~5 Hz) of the endogenous theta rhythm induce maximal LTP, primarily because this frequency disables feed-forward inhibition and allows sufficient postsynaptic depolarization to activate voltage-sensitive NMDA receptors. The disinhibitory process, referred to as “priming”, involves presynaptic GABA autoreceptors that inhibit GABA release. Activation of NMDA receptors allows a calcium flux into dendritic spines that serves as the proximal trigger for LTP. We include new data showing that theta-burst stimulation is more efficient than other forms of stimulation for LTP induction. In addityion, we demonstrate that associative interactions between synapses activated during theta-bursts are limited to major dendritic domains since such interactions occur within apical or basal dendritic trees but not between them. We review evidence that recordings of electrophysiological responses during theta burst stimulation can help to determine if experimental manipulations that affect LTP do so by affecting events antecedent to the induction process, such as NMDA receptor activation, or downstream signaling cascades that result from postsynaptic calcium fluxes. Finally, we argue that theta-burst LTP represents a minimal model for stable, non-decremental LTP that is more sensitive to a variety of experimental manipulations than is LTP induced by other stimulation paradigms. PMID:25452022

  12. Secure videoconferencing equipment switching system and method

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Michael E.

    2009-01-13

    A switching system and method are provided to facilitate use of videoconference facilities over a plurality of security levels. The system includes a switch coupled to a plurality of codecs and communication networks. Audio/Visual peripheral components are connected to the switch. The switch couples control and data signals between the Audio/Visual peripheral components and one but nor both of the plurality of codecs. The switch additionally couples communication networks of the appropriate security level to each of the codecs. In this manner, a videoconferencing facility is provided for use on both secure and non-secure networks.

  13. Switch wear leveling

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hunter; Sealy, Kylee; Gilchrist, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    An apparatus for switch wear leveling includes a switching module that controls switching for two or more pairs of switches in a switching power converter. The switching module controls switches based on a duty cycle control technique and closes and opens each switch in a switching sequence. The pairs of switches connect to a positive and negative terminal of a DC voltage source. For a first switching sequence a first switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than a second switch of the pair of switches. The apparatus includes a switch rotation module that changes the switching sequence of the two or more pairs of switches from the first switching sequence to a second switching sequence. The second switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than the first switch of the pair of switches during the second switching sequence.

  14. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Paciesas, W.S. ); Fishman, G.J. )

    1992-01-01

    This proceedings represents the works presented at the Gamma-Ray Bursts Workshop -- 1991 which was held on the campus of theUniversity of Alabama in Huntsville, October 16-18. The emphasis ofthe Workshop was to present and discuss new observations of gamma-ray bursts made recently by experiments on the Compton Gamma-RayObservatory (CGRO), Granat, Ginga, Pioneer Venus Orbiter, Prognozand Phobos. These presentations were complemented by some groundbased observations, reanalysis of older data, descriptions offuture gamma-ray burst experiments and a wide-ranging list oftheoretical discussions. Over seventy papers are included in theproceedings. Eleven of them are abstracted for the database. (AIP)

  15. Compound semiconductor optical waveguide switch

    DOEpatents

    Spahn, Olga B.; Sullivan, Charles T.; Garcia, Ernest J.

    2003-06-10

    An optical waveguide switch is disclosed which is formed from III-V compound semiconductors and which has a moveable optical waveguide with a cantilevered portion that can be bent laterally by an integral electrostatic actuator to route an optical signal (i.e. light) between the moveable optical waveguide and one of a plurality of fixed optical waveguides. A plurality of optical waveguide switches can be formed on a common substrate and interconnected to form an optical switching network.

  16. GABA-A receptor antagonists increase firing, bursting and synchrony of spontaneous activity in neuronal networks grown on microelectrode arrays: a step towards chemical "fingerprinting"

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of effects on spontaneous network activity in neurons grown on MEAs is a proposed method to screen chemicals for potential neurotoxicity. In addition, differential effects on network activity (chemical "fingerprints") could be used to classify chemical modes of action....

  17. Spike Bursts from an Excitable Optical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios Leite, Jose R.; Rosero, Edison J.; Barbosa, Wendson A. S.; Tredicce, Jorge R.

    Diode Lasers with double optical feedback are shown to present power drop spikes with statistical distribution controllable by the ratio of the two feedback times. The average time between spikes and the variance within long time series are studied. The system is shown to be excitable and present bursting of spikes created with specific feedback time ratios and strength. A rate equation model, extending the Lang-Kobayashi single feedback for semiconductor lasers proves to match the experimental observations. Potential applications to construct network to mimic neural systems having controlled bursting properties in each unit will be discussed. Brazilian Agency CNPQ.

  18. Burst diaphragm leak detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascolla, J. A.

    1969-01-01

    New method replaces flowmeter approach with readily available burst diaphragm leak detector assembly mounted to all drain ports. This allows simultaneous leak detection of all flange seals under operating conditions.

  19. INTEGRAL burst alert service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, H.; Jennings, D.; Mereghetti, S.; Teegarden, B.

    1997-01-01

    The detection, accurate positioning, and spectral analysis of cosmic gamma ray bursts is an objective of the International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) mission. Due to their unpredictable nature, gamma ray bursts can only be observed in serendipity mode. In order to allow and promote multiwavelength follow-up observations of such events, it is desirable to make the information available to the astrophysics community with a minimum delay through the use of Internet. Ideally, the data dissemination should occur within a few seconds of the start of the burst event so that follow up observations can proceed while gamma rays are still being emitted. The technical feasibility of building such a system to disseminate INTEGRAL burst alerts in real time is currently under consideration, the preliminary results of which are presented. It is concluded that such an alert service is technically feasible.

  20. The LOFT burst alert system and its burst onboard trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanne, Stéphane; Götz, Diego; Le Provost, Hervé; Château, Frédéric; Bozzo, Enrico; Brandt, Søren

    2014-07-01

    The ESA M3 candidate mission LOFT (Large Observatory For x-ray Timing) has been designed to study strong gravitational fields by observing compact objects, such as black-hole binaries or neutron-star systems and supermassive black-holes, based on the temporal analysis of photons collected by the primary instrument LAD (Large Area Detector), sensitive to X-rays from 2 to 50 keV, offering a very large effective area (>10 m2), but a small field of view (ø<1°). Simultaneously the second instrument WFM (Wide Field Monitor), composed of 5 coded-mask camera pairs (2-50 keV), monitors a large part of the sky, in order to detect and localize eruptive sources, to be observed with the LAD after ground-commanded satellite repointing. With its large field of view (>π sr), the WFM actually detects all types of transient sources, including Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), which are of primary interest for a world-wide observers community. However, observing the quickly decaying GRB afterglows with ground-based telescopes needs the rapid knowledge of their precise localization. The task of the Loft Burst Alert System (LBAS) is therefore to detect in near-real- time GRBs (about 120 detections expected per year) and other transient sources, and to deliver their localization in less than 30 seconds to the observers, via a VHF antenna network. Real-time full resolution data download to ground being impossible, the real-time data processing is performed onboard by the LBOT (LOFT Burst On-board Trigger system). In this article we present the LBAS and its components, the LBOT and the associated ground-segment.

  1. Olivary subthreshold oscillations and burst activity revisited

    PubMed Central

    Bazzigaluppi, Paolo; De Gruijl, Jornt R.; van der Giessen, Ruben S.; Khosrovani, Sara; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; de Jeu, Marcel T. G.

    2012-01-01

    The inferior olive (IO) forms one of the major gateways for information that travels to the cerebellar cortex. Olivary neurons process sensory and motor signals that are subsequently relayed to Purkinje cells. The intrinsic subthreshold membrane potential oscillations of the olivary neurons are thought to be important for gating this flow of information. In vitro studies have revealed that the phase of the subthreshold oscillation determines the size of the olivary burst and may gate the information flow or encode the temporal state of the olivary network. Here, we investigated whether the same phenomenon occurred in murine olivary cells in an intact olivocerebellar system using the in vivo whole-cell recording technique. Our in vivo findings revealed that the number of wavelets within the olivary burst did not encode the timing of the spike relative to the phase of the oscillation but was related to the amplitude of the oscillation. Manipulating the oscillation amplitude by applying Harmaline confirmed the inverse relationship between the amplitude of oscillation and the number of wavelets within the olivary burst. Furthermore, we demonstrated that electrotonic coupling between olivary neurons affect this modulation of the olivary burst size. Based on these results, we suggest that the olivary burst size might reflect the “expectancy” of a spike to occur rather than the spike timing, and that this process requires the presence of gap junction coupling. PMID:23189043

  2. A multi-ring optical packet and circuit integrated network with optical buffering.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Hideaki; Shinada, Satoshi; Miyazawa, Takaya; Harai, Hiroaki; Kawasaki, Wataru; Saito, Tatsuhiko; Matsunaga, Koji; Toyozumi, Tatuya; Wada, Naoya

    2012-12-17

    We newly developed a 3 × 3 integrated optical packet and circuit switch-node. Optical buffers and burst-mode erbium-doped fiber amplifiers with the gain flatness are installed in the 3 × 3 switch-node. The optical buffer can prevent packet collisions and decrease packet loss. We constructed a multi-ring optical packet and circuit integrated network testbed connecting two single-ring networks and a client network by the 3 × 3 switch-node. For the first time, we demonstrated 244 km fiber transmission and 5-node hopping of multiplexed 14-wavelength 10 Gbps optical paths and 100 Gbps optical packets encapsulating 10 Gigabit Ethernet frames on the testbed. Error-free (frame error rate < 1 × 10(-4)) operation was achieved with optical packets of various packet lengths. In addition, successful avoidance of packet collisions by optical buffers was confirmed.

  3. Adaptive neural network tracking control for a class of switched stochastic pure-feedback nonlinear systems with backlash-like hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Ben; Qin, Tian; Fan, Xiaodong

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, an adaptive neural network tracking control approach is proposed for a class of switched stochastic pure-feedback nonlinear systems with backlash-like hysteresis. In the design procedure, an affine variable is constructed, which avoids the use of the mean value theorem, and the additional first-order low-pass filter is employed to deal with the problem of explosion of complexity. Then, a common Lyapunov function and a state feedback controller are explicitly obtained for all subsystems. It is proved that the proposed controller that guarantees all signals in the closed-loop system are semi-globally uniformly ultimately bounded and the tracking error remains an adjustable neighbourhood of the origin. Finally, simulation results show the effectiveness of the presented control design approach.

  4. OCDMA PON supporting ONU inter-networking based on gain-switched Fabry-Pérot lasers with external dual-wavelength injection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Zeng, Duoduo; Guo, Changjian; Xu, Lei; He, Sailing

    2010-10-25

    We propose and demonstrate an OCDMA-PON scheme with optical network unit (ONU) internetworking capability, which utilizes low-cost gain-switched Fabry-Pérot (GS-FP) lasers with external dual-wavelength injection as the pulse sources on the ONU side. The injection-generated optical pulses in two wavelengths from the same GS-FP laser are used separately for the PON uplink transmission and ONU internetworking. Experimental results based on a two-user OCDMA system confirm the feasibility of the proposed scheme. With OCDMA technologies, separate ONU-internetworking groups can be established using different optical codes. We also give experiment results to analyze the performance of the ONU-ONU transmission at different power of interference signals when two ONU-internetworking groups are present in the OCDMA-PON.

  5. Pre-dispositions and epigenetic inheritance in the Escherichia coli lactose operon bistable switch.

    PubMed

    Robert, Lydia; Paul, Gregory; Chen, Yong; Taddei, François; Baigl, Damien; Lindner, Ariel B

    2010-04-13

    The lactose operon regulation in Escherichia coli is a primary model of phenotypic switching, reminiscent of cell fate determination in higher organisms. Under conditions of bistability, an isogenic cell population partitions into two subpopulations, with the operon's genes turned on or remaining off. It is generally hypothesized that the final state of a cell depends solely on stochastic fluctuations of the network's protein concentrations, particularly on bursts of lactose permease expression. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying the cell switching decision are not fully understood. We designed a microfluidic system to follow the formation of a transiently bimodal population within growing microcolonies. The analysis of genealogy and cell history revealed the existence of pre-disposing factors for switching that are epigenetically inherited. Both the pre-induction expression stochasticity of the lactose operon repressor LacI and the cellular growth rate are predictive factors of the cell's response upon induction, with low LacI concentration and slow growth correlating with higher switching probability. Thus, stochasticity at the local level of the network and global physiology are synergistically involved in cell response determination. PMID:20393577

  6. Optical switches and switching methods

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, Michael

    2008-03-04

    A device and method for collecting subject responses, particularly during magnetic imaging experiments and testing using a method such as functional MRI. The device comprises a non-metallic input device which is coupled via fiber optic cables to a computer or other data collection device. One or more optical switches transmit the subject's responses. The input device keeps the subject's fingers comfortably aligned with the switches by partially immobilizing the forearm, wrist, and/or hand of the subject. Also a robust nonmetallic switch, particularly for use with the input device and methods for optical switching.

  7. Integrated Network Analysis Identifies Fight-Club Nodes as a Class of Hubs Encompassing Key Putative Switch Genes That Induce Major Transcriptome Reprogramming during Grapevine Development[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Maria Concetta; Zenoni, Sara; Fasoli, Marianna; Massonnet, Mélanie; Farina, Lorenzo; Castiglione, Filippo; Pezzotti, Mario; Paci, Paola

    2014-01-01

    We developed an approach that integrates different network-based methods to analyze the correlation network arising from large-scale gene expression data. By studying grapevine (Vitis vinifera) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) gene expression atlases and a grapevine berry transcriptomic data set during the transition from immature to mature growth, we identified a category named “fight-club hubs” characterized by a marked negative correlation with the expression profiles of neighboring genes in the network. A special subset named “switch genes” was identified, with the additional property of many significant negative correlations outside their own group in the network. Switch genes are involved in multiple processes and include transcription factors that may be considered master regulators of the previously reported transcriptome remodeling that marks the developmental shift from immature to mature growth. All switch genes, expressed at low levels in vegetative/green tissues, showed a significant increase in mature/woody organs, suggesting a potential regulatory role during the developmental transition. Finally, our analysis of tomato gene expression data sets showed that wild-type switch genes are downregulated in ripening-deficient mutants. The identification of known master regulators of tomato fruit maturation suggests our method is suitable for the detection of key regulators of organ development in different fleshy fruit crops. PMID:25490918

  8. Experimental demonstration of software defined data center optical networks with Tbps end-to-end tunability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongli; Zhang, Jie; Ji, Yuefeng; Li, Hui; Wang, Huitao; Ge, Chao

    2015-10-01

    The end-to-end tunability is important to provision elastic channel for the burst traffic of data center optical networks. Then, how to complete the end-to-end tunability based on elastic optical networks? Software defined networking (SDN) based end-to-end tunability solution is proposed for software defined data center optical networks, and the protocol extension and implementation procedure are designed accordingly. For the first time, the flexible grid all optical networks with Tbps end-to-end tunable transport and switch system have been online demonstrated for data center interconnection, which are controlled by OpenDayLight (ODL) based controller. The performance of the end-to-end tunable transport and switch system has been evaluated with wavelength number tuning, bit rate tuning, and transmit power tuning procedure.

  9. Local cortical dynamics of burst suppression in the anaesthetized brain.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Laura D; Ching, Shinung; Weiner, Veronica S; Peterfreund, Robert A; Eskandar, Emad N; Cash, Sydney S; Brown, Emery N; Purdon, Patrick L

    2013-09-01

    Burst suppression is an electroencephalogram pattern that consists of a quasi-periodic alternation between isoelectric 'suppressions' lasting seconds or minutes, and high-voltage 'bursts'. It is characteristic of a profoundly inactivated brain, occurring in conditions including hypothermia, deep general anaesthesia, infant encephalopathy and coma. It is also used in neurology as an electrophysiological endpoint in pharmacologically induced coma for brain protection after traumatic injury and during status epilepticus. Classically, burst suppression has been regarded as a 'global' state with synchronous activity throughout cortex. This assumption has influenced the clinical use of burst suppression as a way to broadly reduce neural activity. However, the extent of spatial homogeneity has not been fully explored due to the challenges in recording from multiple cortical sites simultaneously. The neurophysiological dynamics of large-scale cortical circuits during burst suppression are therefore not well understood. To address this question, we recorded intracranial electrocorticograms from patients who entered burst suppression while receiving propofol general anaesthesia. The electrodes were broadly distributed across cortex, enabling us to examine both the dynamics of burst suppression within local cortical regions and larger-scale network interactions. We found that in contrast to previous characterizations, bursts could be substantially asynchronous across the cortex. Furthermore, the state of burst suppression itself could occur in a limited cortical region while other areas exhibited ongoing continuous activity. In addition, we found a complex temporal structure within bursts, which recapitulated the spectral dynamics of the state preceding burst suppression, and evolved throughout the course of a single burst. Our observations imply that local cortical dynamics are not homogeneous, even during significant brain inactivation. Instead, cortical and, implicitly

  10. Photonic MEMS switch applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Anis

    2001-07-01

    As carriers and service providers continue their quest for profitable network solutions, they have shifted their focus from raw bandwidth to rapid provisioning, delivery and management of revenue generating services. Inherently transparent to data rate the transmission wavelength and data format, MEMS add scalability, reliability, low power and compact size providing flexible solutions to the management and/or fiber channels in long haul, metro, and access networks. MEMS based photonic switches have gone from the lab to commercial availability and are now currently in carrier trials and volume production. 2D MEMS switches offer low up-front deployment costs while remaining scalable to large arrays. They allow for transparent, native protocol transmission. 2D switches enable rapid service turn-up and management for many existing and emerging revenue rich services such as storage connectivity, optical Ethernet, wavelength leasing and optical VPN. As the network services evolve, the larger 3D MEMS switches, which provide greater scalability and flexibility, will become economically viable to serve the ever-increasing needs.

  11. Biological switches and clocks

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, John J.; Albert, Reka; Goldbeter, Albert; Ruoff, Peter; Sible, Jill

    2008-01-01

    To introduce this special issue on biological switches and clocks, we review the historical development of mathematical models of bistability and oscillations in chemical reaction networks. In the 1960s and 1970s, these models were limited to well-studied biochemical examples, such as glycolytic oscillations and cyclic AMP signalling. After the molecular genetics revolution of the 1980s, the field of molecular cell biology was thrown wide open to mathematical modellers. We review recent advances in modelling the gene–protein interaction networks that control circadian rhythms, cell cycle progression, signal processing and the design of synthetic gene networks. PMID:18522926

  12. Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) Switch Technology and Vendor Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Noemi

    1995-01-01

    Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switch and software features are described and compared in order to make switch comparisons meaningful. An ATM switch's performance cannot be measured solely based on its claimed switching capacity; traffic management and congestion control are emerging as the determining factors in an ATM network's ultimate throughput. Non-switch ATM products and experiences with actual installations of ATM networks are described. A compilation of select vendor offerings as of October 1994 is provided in chart form.

  13. A Burst to See

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-04-01

    On 19 March, Nature was particularly generous and provided astronomers with the wealth of four gamma-ray bursts on the same day. But that was not all: one of them is the most luminous object ever observed in the Universe. Despite being located in a distant galaxy, billions of light years away, it was so bright that it could have been seen, for a brief while, with the unaided eye. ESO PR Photo 08a/08 ESO PR Photo 08a/08 The REM Telescope and TORTORA Camera Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short flashes of energetic gamma-rays lasting from less than a second to several minutes. They release a tremendous quantity of energy in this short time making them the most powerful events since the Big Bang. It is now widely accepted that the majority of the gamma-ray bursts signal the explosion of very massive, highly evolved stars that collapse into black holes. Gamma-ray bursts, which are invisible to our eyes, are discovered by telescopes in space. After releasing their intense burst of high-energy radiation, they become detectable for a short while in the optical and in the near-infrared. This 'afterglow' fades very rapidly, making detailed analysis possible for only a few hours after the gamma-ray detection. This analysis is important in particular in order to determine the GRB's distance and, hence, intrinsic brightness. The gamma-ray burst GRB 080319B was detected by the NASA/STFC/ASI Swift satellite. "It was so bright that it almost blinded the Swift instruments for a while," says Guido Chincarini, Italian principal investigator of the mission. A bright optical counterpart was soon identified in the Boötes Constellation (the "Bear Driver" or "Herdsman"). A host of ground-based telescopes reacted promptly to study this new object in the sky. In particular, the optical emission was detected by a few wide-field cameras on telescopes that constantly monitor a large fraction of the sky, including the TORTORA camera in symbiosis with the 0.6-m REM telescope located at La Silla

  14. Competition for actin between two distinct F-actin networks defines a bistable switch for cell polarization.

    PubMed

    Lomakin, Alexis J; Lee, Kun-Chun; Han, Sangyoon J; Bui, Duyen A; Davidson, Michael; Mogilner, Alex; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-11-01

    Symmetry-breaking polarization enables functional plasticity of cells and tissues and is yet not well understood. Here we show that epithelial cells, hard-wired to maintain a static morphology and to preserve tissue organization, can spontaneously switch to a migratory polarized phenotype after relaxation of the actomyosin cytoskeleton. We find that myosin II engages actin in the formation of cortical actomyosin bundles and thus makes it unavailable for deployment in the process of dendritic growth normally driving cell motility. Under low-contractility regimes, epithelial cells polarize in a front-back manner owing to the emergence of actin retrograde flows powered by dendritic polymerization of actin. Coupled to cell movement, the flows transport myosin II from the front to the back of the cell, where the motor locally 'locks' actin in contractile bundles. This polarization mechanism could be employed by embryonic and cancer epithelial cells in microenvironments where high-contractility-driven cell motion is inefficient.

  15. The Locations of Gamma-Ray Bursts Measured by Comptel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kippen, R. Marc; Ryan, James M.; Connors, Alanna; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Winkler, Christoph; Kuiper, Lucien; Varendorff, Martin; McConnell, Mark L.; Hurley, Kevin; Hermsen, Wim; Schoenfelder, Volker

    1998-01-01

    The COMPTEL instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory is used to measure the locations of gamma-ray bursts through direct imaging of MeV photons. In a comprehensive search, we have detected and localized 29 bursts observed between 1991 April 19 and 1995 May 31. The average location accuracy of these events is 1.25 deg (1 sigma), including a systematic error of approx. 0.5 deg, which is verified through comparison with Interplanetary Network (IPN) timing annuli. The combination of COMPTEL and IPN measurements results in locations for 26 of the bursts with an average "error box" area of only approx. 0.3 deg (1 sigma). We find that the angular distribution of COMPTEL burst locations is consistent with large-scale isotropy and that there is no statistically significant evidence of small-angle autocorrelations. We conclude that there is no compelling evidence for burst repetition since no more than two of the events (or approx. 7% of the 29 bursts) could possibly have come from the same source. We also find that there is no significant correlation between the burst locations and either Abell clusters of galaxies or radio-quiet quasars. Agreement between individual COMPTEL locations and IPN annuli places a lower limit of approx. 100 AU (95% confidence) on the distance to the stronger bursts.

  16. Feasibility study of an integrated optic switching center. [satellite tracking application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design of a high data rate switching center for a satellite tracking station is discussed. The feasibility of a switching network using an integrated switching matrix is assessed. The preferred integrated optical switching scheme was found to be an electro-optic Bragg diffraction switch. To ascertain the advantages of the integrated optics switching center, its properties are compared to those of opto-electronic and to electronics switching networks.

  17. ION SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Cook, B.

    1959-02-10

    An ion switch capable of transferring large magnitudes of power is described. An ion switch constructed in accordance with the invention includes a pair of spaced control electrodes disposed in a highly evacuated region for connection in a conventional circuit to control the passing of power therethrough. A controllable ionic conduction path is provided directiy between the control electrodes by a source unit to close the ion switch. Conventional power supply means are provided to trigger the source unit and control the magnitude, durations and pulse repetition rate of the aforementioned ionic conduction path.

  18. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles A.

    2004-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) observatory, scheduled for launch in 2007, comprises the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM). spectral changes that are known to occur within GRBs. between the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics. It consists of an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors operating in the 10 kev to 25 MeV range. The field of view includes the entire unocculted sky when the observatory is pointing close to the zenith. The GBM will enhance LAT observations of GRBs by extending the spectral coverage into the range of current GRB databases, and will provide a trigger for reorienting the spacecraft to observe delayed emission from bursts outside the LAT field of view. GBM is expected to trigger on about 200 bursts per year, and will provide on-board locations of strong bursts accurate to better than 10 degrees.

  19. Electromechanical switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonuzzi, Anthony P.; Carignan, Donald J.

    1986-06-01

    A hardened electromechanical switch is disclosed. When appropriate electrical contacts and pick-offs are aligned, four switches close. The possible number of switch combinations selectable are 4095 based upon a base eight counting system. The switch has a counter section and a memory section. The counter section uses an odometer like device based upon octal. Each counter wheel of the counter section has an electrical pick-off that interacts with the memory section. In the memory section, a plurality of octal numbers, four, are entered into and locked thereon such that each counter set disk, four, therein has one octal number thereon. Electrical contacts are placed on the counter set disks of the memory section and these touch the pick-offs of the counter wheels which will simultaneously close on the four contacts of the counter set disk in only one of the 4095 combinations noted above.

  20. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  1. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  2. Reconfigurable thermo-optic polymer switch based true-time-delay network utilizing imprinting and inkjet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zeyu; Subbaraman, Harish; Zhang, Cheng; Panday, Ashwin; Li, Qiaochu; Zhang, Xingyu; Zou, Yi; Xu, Xiaochuan; Guo, L. J.; Chen, Ray T.

    2015-03-01

    Previously, we introduced a novel and an etch-free solution based procedure utilizing a combination of imprinting and inkjet printing for developing polymer photonic devices to overcome the limitations of conventional polymer photonic device fabrication techniques, such as RIE or direct pattern writing. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of developing very large-area photonic systems on both rigid and flexible substrates. Specifically, a complete reconfigurable 4-bit true-time-delay module, comprising of an array of five interconnected TO switches and polymer delay lines, with a dimension of 25 mm × 18 mm is developed. Because of the roll-to-roll (R2R) compatibility of the employed solution processing techniques, photonic system development over large areas at high-throughput on rigid or flexible substrates is possible, which will lead to tremendous cost savings. Moreover, these devices can be integrated with other printed photonic and electronic components, such as light sources, modulators, antennas, etc., on the same substrate, thus enabling integrated systems that can be conformably integrated on any platform.

  3. Switching power pulse system

    DOEpatents

    Aaland, K.

    1983-08-09

    A switching system for delivering pulses of power from a source to a load using a storage capacitor charged through a rectifier, and maintained charged to a reference voltage level by a transistor switch and voltage comparator. A thyristor is triggered to discharge the storage capacitor through a saturable reactor and fractional turn saturable transformer having a secondary to primary turn ratio N of n:l/n = n[sup 2]. The saturable reactor functions as a soaker'' while the thyristor reaches saturation, and then switches to a low impedance state. The saturable transformer functions as a switching transformer with high impedance while a load coupling capacitor charges, and then switches to a low impedance state to dump the charge of the storage capacitor into the load through the coupling capacitor. The transformer is comprised of a multilayer core having two secondary windings tightly wound and connected in parallel to add their output voltage and reduce output inductance, and a number of single turn windings connected in parallel at nodes for the primary winding, each single turn winding linking a different one of the layers of the multilayer core. The load may be comprised of a resistive beampipe for a linear particle accelerator and capacitance of a pulse forming network. To hold off discharge of the capacitance until it is fully charged, a saturable core is provided around the resistive beampipe to isolate the beampipe from the capacitance until it is fully charged. 5 figs.

  4. The Double Firing Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    Astronomers from around the world combined data from ground- and space-based telescopes to paint a detailed portrait of the brightest explosion ever seen. The observations reveal that the jets of the gamma-ray burst called GRB 080319B were aimed almost directly at the Earth. Uncovering the disc ESO PR Photo 28/08 A Gamma-Ray Burst with Two Jets Read more on this illuminating blast in the additional story. GRB 080319B was so intense that, despite happening halfway across the Universe, it could have been seen briefly with the unaided eye (ESO 08/08). In a paper to appear in the 11 September issue of Nature, Judith Racusin of Penn State University, Pennsylvania (USA), and a team of 92 co-authors report observations across the electromagnetic spectrum that began 30 minutes before the explosion and followed it for months afterwards. "We conclude that the burst's extraordinary brightness arose from a jet that shot material almost directly towards Earth at almost the speed of light - the difference is only 1 part in 20 000," says Guido Chincarini, a member of the team. Gamma-ray bursts are the Universe's most luminous explosions. Most occur when massive stars run out of fuel. As a star collapses, it creates a black hole or neutron star that, through processes not fully understood, drives powerful gas jets outward. As the jets shoot into space, they strike gas previously shed by the star and heat it, thereby generating bright afterglows. The team believes the jet directed toward Earth contained an ultra-fast component just 0.4 degrees across (this is slightly smaller than the apparent size of the Full Moon). This jet is contained within another slightly less energetic jet about 20 times wider. The broad component is more typical of other bursts. "Perhaps every gamma-ray burst has a narrow jet, but astronomers miss it most of the time," says team member Stefano Covino. "We happened to view this monster down the barrel of the very narrow and energetic jet, and the chance for

  5. A repeating fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star. PMID:26934226

  6. A repeating fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  7. Theta-Burst Stimulation of Hippocampal Slices Induces Network-Level Calcium Oscillations and Activates Analogous Gene Transcription to Spatial Learning

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, John J.; Murphy, Keith J.

    2014-01-01

    Over four decades ago, it was discovered that high-frequency stimulation of the dentate gyrus induces long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission. LTP is believed to underlie how we process and code external stimuli before converting it to salient information that we store as 'memories'. It has been shown that rats performing spatial learning tasks display theta-frequency (3–12 Hz) hippocampal neural activity. Moreover, administering theta-burst stimulation (TBS) to hippocampal slices can induce LTP. TBS triggers a sustained rise in intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i in neurons leading to new protein synthesis important for LTP maintenance. In this study, we measured TBS-induced [Ca2+]i oscillations in thousands of cells at increasing distances from the source of stimulation. Following TBS, a calcium wave propagates radially with an average speed of 5.2 µm/s and triggers multiple and regular [Ca2+]i oscillations in the hippocampus. Interestingly, the number and frequency of [Ca2+]i fluctuations post-TBS increased with respect to distance from the electrode. During the post-tetanic phase, 18% of cells exhibited 3 peaks in [Ca2+]i with a frequency of 17 mHz, whereas 2.3% of cells distributed further from the electrode displayed 8 [Ca2+]i oscillations at 33 mHz. We suggest that these observed [Ca2+]i oscillations could lead to activation of transcription factors involved in synaptic plasticity. In particular, the transcription factor, NF-κB, has been implicated in memory formation and is up-regulated after LTP induction. We measured increased activation of NF-κB 30 min post-TBS in CA1 pyramidal cells and also observed similar temporal up-regulation of NF-κB levels in CA1 neurons following water maze training in rats. Therefore, TBS of hippocampal slice cultures in vitro can mimic the cell type-specific up-regulations in activated NF-κB following spatial learning in vivo. This indicates that TBS may induce similar transcriptional changes to spatial learning

  8. Burst predicting neurons survive an in vitro glutamate injury model of cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Kuebler, Eric S.; Tauskela, Joseph S.; Aylsworth, Amy; Zhao, Xigeng; Thivierge, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal activity in vitro exhibits network bursts characterized by brief periods of increased spike rates. Recent work shows that a subpopulation of neurons reliably predicts the occurrence of network bursts. Here, we examined the role of burst predictors in cultures undergoing an in vitro model of cerebral ischemia. Dissociated primary cortical neurons were plated on multielectrode arrays and spontaneous activity was recorded at 17 days in vitro (DIV). This activity was characterized by neuronal avalanches where burst statistics followed a power law. We identified burst predictors as channels that consistently fired immediately prior to network bursts. The timing of these predictors relative to bursts followed a skewed distribution that differed sharply from a null model based on branching ratio. A portion of cultures were subjected to an excitotoxic insult (DIV 18). Propidium iodine and fluorescence imaging confirmed cell death in these cultures. While the insult did not alter the distribution of avalanches, it resulted in alterations in overall spike rates. Burst predictors, however, maintained baseline levels of activity. The resilience of burst predictors following excitotoxic insult suggests a key role of these units in maintaining network activity following injury, with implications for the selective effects of ischemia in the brain. PMID:26648112

  9. Burst predicting neurons survive an in vitro glutamate injury model of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kuebler, Eric S; Tauskela, Joseph S; Aylsworth, Amy; Zhao, Xigeng; Thivierge, Jean-Philippe

    2015-12-09

    Neuronal activity in vitro exhibits network bursts characterized by brief periods of increased spike rates. Recent work shows that a subpopulation of neurons reliably predicts the occurrence of network bursts. Here, we examined the role of burst predictors in cultures undergoing an in vitro model of cerebral ischemia. Dissociated primary cortical neurons were plated on multielectrode arrays and spontaneous activity was recorded at 17 days in vitro (DIV). This activity was characterized by neuronal avalanches where burst statistics followed a power law. We identified burst predictors as channels that consistently fired immediately prior to network bursts. The timing of these predictors relative to bursts followed a skewed distribution that differed sharply from a null model based on branching ratio. A portion of cultures were subjected to an excitotoxic insult (DIV 18). Propidium iodine and fluorescence imaging confirmed cell death in these cultures. While the insult did not alter the distribution of avalanches, it resulted in alterations in overall spike rates. Burst predictors, however, maintained baseline levels of activity. The resilience of burst predictors following excitotoxic insult suggests a key role of these units in maintaining network activity following injury, with implications for the selective effects of ischemia in the brain.

  10. Burst predicting neurons survive an in vitro glutamate injury model of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kuebler, Eric S; Tauskela, Joseph S; Aylsworth, Amy; Zhao, Xigeng; Thivierge, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal activity in vitro exhibits network bursts characterized by brief periods of increased spike rates. Recent work shows that a subpopulation of neurons reliably predicts the occurrence of network bursts. Here, we examined the role of burst predictors in cultures undergoing an in vitro model of cerebral ischemia. Dissociated primary cortical neurons were plated on multielectrode arrays and spontaneous activity was recorded at 17 days in vitro (DIV). This activity was characterized by neuronal avalanches where burst statistics followed a power law. We identified burst predictors as channels that consistently fired immediately prior to network bursts. The timing of these predictors relative to bursts followed a skewed distribution that differed sharply from a null model based on branching ratio. A portion of cultures were subjected to an excitotoxic insult (DIV 18). Propidium iodine and fluorescence imaging confirmed cell death in these cultures. While the insult did not alter the distribution of avalanches, it resulted in alterations in overall spike rates. Burst predictors, however, maintained baseline levels of activity. The resilience of burst predictors following excitotoxic insult suggests a key role of these units in maintaining network activity following injury, with implications for the selective effects of ischemia in the brain. PMID:26648112

  11. Neuronal plasticity in hibernation and the proposed role of the microtubule-associated protein tau as a "master switch" regulating synaptic gain in neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Thomas; Bullmann, Torsten

    2013-09-01

    The present paper provides an overview of adaptive changes in brain structure and learning abilities during hibernation as a behavioral strategy used by several mammalian species to minimize energy expenditure under current or anticipated inhospitable environmental conditions. One cellular mechanism that contributes to the regulated suppression of metabolism and thermogenesis during hibernation is reversible phosphorylation of enzymes and proteins, which limits rates of flux through metabolic pathways. Reversible phosphorylation during hibernation also affects synaptic membrane proteins, a process known to be involved in synaptic plasticity. This mechanism of reversible protein phosphorylation also affects the microtubule-associated protein tau, thereby generating a condition that in the adult human brain is associated with aggregation of tau protein to paired helical filaments (PHFs), as observed in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we put forward the concept that phosphorylation of tau is a neuroprotective mechanism to escape NMDA-mediated hyperexcitability of neurons that would otherwise occur during slow gradual cooling of the brain. Phosphorylation of tau and its subsequent targeting to subsynaptic sites might, thus, work as a kind of "master switch," regulating NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic gain in a wide array of neuronal networks, thereby enabling entry into torpor. If this condition lasts too long, however, it may eventually turn into a pathological trigger, driving a cascade of events leading to neurodegeneration, as in Alzheimer's disease or other "tauopathies".

  12. Demonstration of 20Gb/s polarization-insensitive wavelength switching system for high-speed free-space optical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Feng-chen; Ye, Ya-lin; Wen, Yu; Duan, Tao; Feng, Huan

    2015-10-01

    A 20Gb/s polarization-insensitive all-optical wavelength switching system for high-speed free-space optical communication (FSO) network is experimentally demonstrated All-optical wavelength conversion (AOWC) is implemented using four-wave mixing (FWM) by highly-nonlinear fiber (HNLF). In the experimental setup, a simple actively mode-locked fiber ring laser (AML-FRL) with repetition frequency from 1 to 15 GHz is used to generate eight 2.5Gb/s tributary signals, which are multiplexed into one 20Gb/s optical data stream. At the receiver, the 20 Gb/s OTDM data stream is demultiplexed down to 2.5 Gb/s via a polarization-insensitive FWM scheme. The whole space communication distance is over 10 meters in building hallway. The experimental results show that this system can stably run over 24 hours at 10-9 BER level, thus the proposed architecture can work at higher rate with wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) and high order modulation schemes.

  13. Network topology mapper

    DOEpatents

    Quist, Daniel A.; Gavrilov, Eugene M.; Fisk, Michael E.

    2008-01-15

    A method enables the topology of an acyclic fully propagated network to be discovered. A list of switches that comprise the network is formed and the MAC address cache for each one of the switches is determined. For each pair of switches, from the MAC address caches the remaining switches that see the pair of switches are located. For each pair of switches the remaining switches are determined that see one of the pair of switches on a first port and the second one of the pair of switches on a second port. A list of insiders is formed for every pair of switches. It is determined whether the insider for each pair of switches is a graph edge and adjacent ones of the graph edges are determined. A symmetric adjacency matrix is formed from the graph edges to represent the topology of the data link network.

  14. Optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    An optical switching device (10) is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber (16) or a second glass fiber (14) may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber (18). Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system (26, 28, 30). In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber (16) is reflected by a planar mirror (36) into the third glass fiber (18). In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber (14) passes directly into the third glass fiber (18). The planar mirror (36) is attached to a rotatable table (32) which is rotated to provide the optical switching.

  15. LAT Onboard Science: Gamma-Ray Burst Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, Frederick; Bonnell, Jerry; Hughes, Richard; Norris, Jay; Ritz, Steven; Russell, James; Smith, Patrick; Winer, Brian; /Ohio State U.

    2007-10-15

    The main goal of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard science program is to provide quick identification and localization of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) onboard the LAT for follow-up observations by other observatories. The GRB identification and localization algorithm will provide celestial coordinates with an error region that will be distributed via the Gamma ray burst Coordinate Network (GCN). We present results that show our sensitivity to bursts as characterized using Monte Carlo simulations of the GLAST observatory. We describe and characterize the method of onboard track determination and the GRB identification and localization algorithm. Onboard track determination is considerably different than in the onground case, resulting in a substantially altered point spread function. The algorithm contains tunable parameters which may be adjusted after launch when real bursts characteristics at very high energies have been identified.

  16. LAT Onboard Science: Gamma-Ray Burst Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, Frederick; Hughes, Richard; Smith, Patrick; Winer, Brian; Bonnell, Jerry; Norris, Jay; Ritz, Steven; Russell, James

    2007-07-12

    The main goal of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard science program is to provide quick identification and localization of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) onboard the LAT for follow-up observations by other observatories. The GRB identification and localization algorithm will provide celestial coordinates with an error region that will be distributed via the Gamma ray burst Coordinate Network (GCN). We present results that show our sensitivity to bursts as characterized using Monte Carlo simulations of the GLAST observatory. We describe and characterize the method of onboard track determination and the GRB identification and localization algorithm. Onboard track determination is considerably different than in the on-ground case, resulting in a substantially altered point spread function. The algorithm contains tunable parameters which may be adjusted after launch when real bursts characteristics at very high energies have been identified.

  17. Fast reconfigurable optical image switching/routing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paek, Eung Gi; Hong, John H.; Chang, Tallis Y.; Pletcher, David

    1995-09-01

    A novel system that is capable of switching/routing two-dimensional images in arbitrary configurations is described. The switching network can be reconfigured in a few microseconds with high light efficiency.

  18. Reflection-Based Deflection Routing in OPS Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Masayuki; Tode, Hideki; Murakami, Koso

    An important issue in the realization of optical packetswitched (OPS) networks is the resolution of packet contention caused by the lack of RAM-like optical buffering. Although an optical buffer using fiber delay lines (FDLs) has been proposed, its capacity is extremely limited. There have been several studies of this problem. One approach is deflection routing, which is widely used in electronic packet-switched networks or optical burst-switched (OBS) networks. However, in OPS networks, packet lengths are short, so that the speed requirement for route lookup is very stringent. If the network topology is geometric, such as a Manhattan Street Network (MSN), hop-by-hop routing can be implemented by simple optical logic devices without an electronic routing table. However, if the topology is not geometric, it is hard to implement deflection routing electronically or optically. Another approach is reflection routing, which is easy to implement but has a higher probability of packet loss than does deflection routing. In this paper, we propose a packet contention resolution scheme, reflection-based deflection routing, which is based on reflection routing and enables switching the reflected packet to an alternate path if its primary path remains congested. Our method alleviates the time limitation on setting an alternate path by making use of the packet reflection latency and also reduces the probability of packet loss. We evaluate the performance of the proposed method by simulation experiments and show its effectiveness.

  19. Switching Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation's D60T transistors are used primarily as switching devices for controlling high power in electrical circuits. It enables reduction in the number and size of circuit components and promotes more efficient use of energy. Wide range of application from a popcorn popper to a radio frequency generator for solar cell production.

  20. Burst Mode Receiver for 112 Gb/s DP-QPSK with parallel DSP.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Benn C; Maher, Robert; Millar, David S; Savory, Seb J

    2011-12-12

    A burst mode 112 Gb/s DP-QPSK digital coherent optical receiver with parallel DSP suitable for implementation in a CMOS ASIC with a 218.75 MHz clock speed is presented. The receiver performance is validated in a five channel 50 GHz grid WDM burst switching experiment using a commercially available wavelength tunable laser as the local oscillator. A new equalizer initialization scheme that overcomes the degenerate convergence problem and ensures rapid convergence is introduced. We show that the performance of the tunable local oscillator is commensurate with burst mode coherent reception when differential decoding in employed and that required parallel DSP implementation does not seriously impair the polarization and frequency tracking performance of a digital coherent receiver under burst mode operation. We report a burst acquisition time of less than 200 ns.

  1. Improving short-term forecasting during ramp events by means of Regime-Switching Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, C.; Costa, A.; Cuerva, A.

    2010-09-01

    Since nowadays wind energy can't be neither scheduled nor large-scale storaged, wind power forecasting has been useful to minimize the impact of wind fluctuations. In particular, short-term forecasting (characterised by prediction horizons from minutes to a few days) is currently required by energy producers (in a daily electricity market context) and the TSO's (in order to keep the stability/balance of an electrical system). Within the short-term background, time-series based models (i.e., statistical models) have shown a better performance than NWP models for horizons up to few hours. These models try to learn and replicate the dynamic shown by the time series of a certain variable. When considering the power output of wind farms, ramp events are usually observed, being characterized by a large positive gradient in the time series (ramp-up) or negative (ramp-down) during relatively short time periods (few hours). Ramp events may be motivated by many different causes, involving generally several spatial scales, since the large scale (fronts, low pressure systems) up to the local scale (wind turbine shut-down due to high wind speed, yaw misalignment due to fast changes of wind direction). Hence, the output power may show unexpected dynamics during ramp events depending on the underlying processes; consequently, traditional statistical models considering only one dynamic for the hole power time series may be inappropriate. This work proposes a Regime Switching (RS) model based on Artificial Neural Nets (ANN). The RS-ANN model gathers as many ANN's as different dynamics considered (called regimes); a certain ANN is selected so as to predict the output power, depending on the current regime. The current regime is on-line updated based on a gradient criteria, regarding the past two values of the output power. 3 Regimes are established, concerning ramp events: ramp-up, ramp-down and no-ramp regime. In order to assess the skillness of the proposed RS-ANN model, a single

  2. Alternator-driven, magnetically switched modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kihara, R.; Kirbie, H. C.

    The technique of magnetically switching high-power pulses was recently revitalized with the development of amorphous magnetic alloys and the new power conditioning requirements of pulsed lasers and high-brightness particle accelerators. The most common magnetic switching technique for generating high-repetition-rate pulses consists of a dc power supply, a triggered switch (thyratron or solid-state), and a repeated network of magnetic switches and capacitors. The life of this type of pulser is limited by the aging of liquid and solid dielectric materials and by the reliability of the triggered switch. An alternator-driven, magnetically switched modulator differs from the conventional magnetic modulator in the replacement of the dc power supply and triggered switch with a high-frequency motor-generator set and an all-magnetic circuit. The power conditioning network converts each cycle of the applied ac power into a single, compressed, unipolar pulse. Consequently, the modulator produces a train of pulses with an interpulse separation equal to the period of the alternator. Additional compression can be attained by the addition of successive stages of magnetic switching. The absence of active switches within the network improves the system reliability and extends the service life of the modulator to the limits of component insulation fatigue and alternator bearing wear. This style of magnetic pulse compression was first described by Melville and reproduced at LLNL in order to quantify the network efficiency, jitter and reliability when modern magnetic materials are employed.

  3. Development of a Pulse-Burst Laser System for Fast Thomson Scattering on the MST RFP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Hartog, D. J.

    2006-10-01

    A ``pulse-burst'' laser system is being developed for addition to the Thomson scattering diagnostic on the MST RFP. This laser will produce a burst of up to 200 approximately 1 J Q-switched pulses at repetition frequencies 5-250 kHz. The planned laser system will operate at 1064 nm and is based on existing Nd:YAG systems used to study fluid dynamics [Brian Thurow et al., Appl. Opt. 43, 5064 (2004)]. The burst train of laser pulses will enable the study of Te and ne dynamics in a single MST shot, and with ensembling, will enable correlation of Te and ne fluctuations with other fluctuating quantities.

  4. X-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, W. H. G.

    1986-01-01

    There are about 100 bright X-ray sources in the Galaxy that are accretion-driven systems composed of a neutron star and a low mass companion that fills its critical Roche lobe. Many of these systems generate recurring X-ray bursts that are the result of thermonuclear flashes in the neutron star's surface layers, and are accompanied by a somewhat delayed optical burst due to X-ray heating of accretion disk. The Rapid Burster discovered in 1976 exhibits an interval between bursts that is strongly correlated with the energy in the preceding burst. There is no optical identification for this object.

  5. UWB dual burst transmit driver

    SciTech Connect

    Dallum, Gregory E.; Pratt, Garth C.; Haugen, Peter C.; Zumstein, James M.; Vigars, Mark L.; Romero, Carlos E.

    2012-04-17

    A dual burst transmitter for ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems generates a pair of precisely spaced RF bursts from a single trigger event. An input trigger pulse produces two oscillator trigger pulses, an initial pulse and a delayed pulse, in a dual trigger generator. The two oscillator trigger pulses drive a gated RF burst (power output) oscillator. A bias driver circuit gates the RF output oscillator on and off and sets the RF burst packet width. The bias driver also level shifts the drive signal to the level that is required for the RF output device.

  6. Gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    A review of recent results in gamma-ray burst spectroscopy is given. Particular attention is paid to the recent discovery of emission and absorption features in the burst spectra. These lines represent the strongest evidence to date that gamma-ray bursts originate on or near neutron stars. Line parameters give information on the temperature, magnetic field and possibly the gravitational potential of the neutron star. The behavior of the continuum spectrum is also discussed. A remarkably good fit to nearly all bursts is obtained with a thermal-bremsstrahlung-like continuum. Significant evolution is observed of both the continuum and line features within most events.

  7. Multistage optical system for broadcasting and switching information.

    PubMed

    Mendlovic, D; Leibner, B; Cohen, N

    1999-10-10

    Conventional switching systems connect each input channel to one output channel. Broadcasting systems permit the connection of each input channel to more than a single output. A broadcast 2 x 2 switch is presented. This switch is an extension of the standard bypass-exchange switch. It allows for the broadcasting of the inputs in addition to the conventional modes. Multistage interconnection networks can be constructed with this switch as the basic building block. Such networks will extend their capabilities, allowing for broadcasting features. Three implementations of this type are described, and experimental results for the 2 x 2 switch are also presented.

  8. Gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-24

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow. PMID:22923573

  9. Blocking Probability of a Preemption-Based Bandwidth-Allocation Scheme for Service Differentiation in OBS Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuritatkul, Jumpot; Ji, Yusheng; Zhang, Yongbing

    2006-08-01

    For the next generation optical Internet, optical burst switching (OBS) is considered as a promising solution to exploit the capacity provided by wavelength-division-multiplexing technology. In this paper, the authors analyze preemption-based bandwidth-allocation (PBA) scheme for supporting service differentiation in OBS networks. They first propose the mathematical analysis of burst blocking probability (BBP) for a general case of probabilistic wavelength-preemption algorithm. The BBP of a new arrival burst for a K-channel N-class system is presented. They then apply this model to PBA. The results of analytical loss model are investigated and compared with simulations. The simulation results validate their analytical model and show that a BBP can be controlled for different service classes with the PBA scheme.

  10. Controlled Photon Switch Assisted by Coupled Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Ma, Song-Ya; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Wang, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Quantum switch is a primitive element in quantum network communication. In contrast to previous switch schemes on one degree of freedom (DOF) of quantum systems, we consider controlled switches of photon system with two DOFs. These controlled photon switches are constructed by exploring the optical selection rules derived from the quantum-dot spins in one-sided optical microcavities. Several double controlled-NOT gate on different joint systems are greatly simplified with an auxiliary DOF of the controlling photon. The photon switches show that two DOFs of photons can be independently transmitted in quantum networks. This result reduces the quantum resources for quantum network communication.

  11. Controlled Photon Switch Assisted by Coupled Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Ma, Song-Ya; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Wang, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Quantum switch is a primitive element in quantum network communication. In contrast to previous switch schemes on one degree of freedom (DOF) of quantum systems, we consider controlled switches of photon system with two DOFs. These controlled photon switches are constructed by exploring the optical selection rules derived from the quantum-dot spins in one-sided optical microcavities. Several double controlled-NOT gate on different joint systems are greatly simplified with an auxiliary DOF of the controlling photon. The photon switches show that two DOFs of photons can be independently transmitted in quantum networks. This result reduces the quantum resources for quantum network communication. PMID:26095049

  12. Switching power pulse system

    DOEpatents

    Aaland, Kristian

    1983-01-01

    A switching system for delivering pulses of power from a source (10) to a load (20) using a storage capacitor (C3) charged through a rectifier (D1, D2), and maintained charged to a reference voltage level by a transistor switch (Q1) and voltage comparator (12). A thyristor (22) is triggered to discharge the storage capacitor through a saturable reactor (18) and fractional turn saturable transformer (16) having a secondary to primary turn ratio N of n:l/n=n.sup.2. The saturable reactor (18) functions as a "soaker" while the thyristor reaches saturation, and then switches to a low impedance state. The saturable transformer functions as a switching transformer with high impedance while a load coupling capacitor (C4) charges, and then switches to a low impedance state to dump the charge of the storage capacitor (C3) into the load through the coupling capacitor (C4). The transformer is comprised of a multilayer core (26) having two secondary windings (28, 30) tightly wound and connected in parallel to add their output voltage and reduce output inductance, and a number of single turn windings connected in parallel at nodes (32, 34) for the primary winding, each single turn winding linking a different one of the layers of the multilayer core. The load may be comprised of a resistive beampipe (40) for a linear particle accelerator and capacitance of a pulse forming network (42). To hold off discharge of the capacitance until it is fully charged, a saturable core (44) is provided around the resistive beampipe (40) to isolate the beampipe from the capacitance (42) until it is fully charged.

  13. Swift's 500th Gamma Ray Burst

    NASA Video Gallery

    On April 13, 2010, NASA's Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer satellite discovered its 500th burst. Swift's main job is to quickly localize each gamma-ray burst (GRB), report its position so that others...

  14. The Ulysses Supplement to the BATSE 3B Catalog of Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, K.

    1998-01-01

    We present Interplanetary Network Localization information for 219 gamma-ray burst of the 3rd BATSE catalog, obtained by analyzing the arrival times of these bursts at the Ulysses and Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) spacecraft. For any given burst observed by these two spacecraft, arrival time analysis (triangulation) results in an annulus of possible arrival directions whose width varies between 7 arcseconds and 32 arcminutes, depending on the intensity and time history of the burst, and the distance of the Ulysses spacecraft from Earth. This annulus generally intersects the BATSE error circle, resulting in an average reduction of the error box area by a factor of 30.

  15. Burst Firing Enhances Neural Output Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ho Ka; Yang, Dong-Ping; Zhou, Changsong; Nowotny, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Neurons communicate and transmit information predominantly through spikes. Given that experimentally observed neural spike trains in a variety of brain areas can be highly correlated, it is important to investigate how neurons process correlated inputs. Most previous work in this area studied the problem of correlation transfer analytically by making significant simplifications on neural dynamics. Temporal correlation between inputs that arises from synaptic filtering, for instance, is often ignored when assuming that an input spike can at most generate one output spike. Through numerical simulations of a pair of leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) neurons receiving correlated inputs, we demonstrate that neurons in the presence of synaptic filtering by slow synapses exhibit strong output correlations. We then show that burst firing plays a central role in enhancing output correlations, which can explain the above-mentioned observation because synaptic filtering induces bursting. The observed changes of correlations are mostly on a long time scale. Our results suggest that other features affecting the prevalence of neural burst firing in biological neurons, e.g., adaptive spiking mechanisms, may play an important role in modulating the overall level of correlations in neural networks. PMID:27242499

  16. Burst propagation in Texas Helimak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, F. A. C.; Toufen, D. L.; Guimarães-Filho, Z. O.; Caldas, I. L.; Gentle, K. W.

    2016-05-01

    We present investigations of extreme events (bursts) propagating in the Texas Helimak, a toroidal plasma device in which the radial electric field can be changed by application of bias. In the experiments analyzed, a large grid of Langmuir probes measuring ion saturation current fluctuations is used to study the burst propagation and its dependence on the applied bias voltage. We confirm previous results reported on the turbulence intermittency in the Texas Helimak, extending them to a larger radial interval with a density ranging from a uniform decay to an almost uniform value. For our analysis, we introduce an improved procedure, based on a multiprobe bidimensional conditional averaging method, to assure precise determination of burst statistical properties and their spatial profiles. We verify that intermittent bursts have properties that vary in the radial direction. The number of bursts depends on the radial position and on the applied bias voltage. On the other hand, the burst characteristic time and size do not depend on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage modifies the vertical and radial burst velocity profiles differently. The burst velocity is smaller than the turbulence phase velocity in almost all the analyzed region.

  17. Network Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vietzke, Robert; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This special section explains the latest developments in networking technologies, profiles school districts benefiting from successful implementations, and reviews new products for building networks. Highlights include ATM (asynchronous transfer mode), cable modems, networking switches, Internet screening software, file servers, network management…

  18. The Structure of Evolution LOCBURST: The BATSE Burst Location Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Kippen, R. March; Paciesas, William S.; Stollberg, Mark; Woods, Pete; Meegan, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; McCollough, M. L.; Connaughton, V.

    1998-01-01

    The gamma-ray bursts (GRB) location algorithm used to produce the BATSE GRB locations is described. The general flow of control of the current location algorithm is presented and the significant properties of the various physical inputs required are identified. The development of the burst location algorithm during the releases of the BATSE 1B, 2B, and 3B gamma-ray burst catalogs is presented so that the reasons for the differences in the positions and error estimates between the catalogs can be understood. In particular, differences between the 2B and 3B locations are discussed for events that have moved significantly and the reasons for the changes explained. The locations of bursts located independently by the interplanetary network are used to illustrate the effect on burst location accuracy of various components of the algorithm. IPN data as well as locations from other gamma-ray instruments are used to calculate estimates of the systematic errors on BATSE burst locations.

  19. Identifying Crucial Parameter Correlations Maintaining Bursting Activity

    PubMed Central

    Doloc-Mihu, Anca; Calabrese, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent experimental and computational studies suggest that linearly correlated sets of parameters (intrinsic and synaptic properties of neurons) allow central pattern-generating networks to produce and maintain their rhythmic activity regardless of changing internal and external conditions. To determine the role of correlated conductances in the robust maintenance of functional bursting activity, we used our existing database of half-center oscillator (HCO) model instances of the leech heartbeat CPG. From the database, we identified functional activity groups of burster (isolated neuron) and half-center oscillator model instances and realistic subgroups of each that showed burst characteristics (principally period and spike frequency) similar to the animal. To find linear correlations among the conductance parameters maintaining functional leech bursting activity, we applied Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to each of these four groups. PCA identified a set of three maximal conductances (leak current, Leak; a persistent K current, K2; and of a persistent Na+ current, P) that correlate linearly for the two groups of burster instances but not for the HCO groups. Visualizations of HCO instances in a reduced space suggested that there might be non-linear relationships between these parameters for these instances. Experimental studies have shown that period is a key attribute influenced by modulatory inputs and temperature variations in heart interneurons. Thus, we explored the sensitivity of period to changes in maximal conductances of Leak, K2, and P, and we found that for our realistic bursters the effect of these parameters on period could not be assessed because when varied individually bursting activity was not maintained. PMID:24945358

  20. Burst Detector Sensitivity: Past, Present and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.

    2005-01-01

    I compare the burst detection sensitivity of CGRO's BATSE, Swift's BAT, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) and EXIST as a function of a burst s spectrum and duration. A detector's overall burst sensitivity depends on its energy sensitivity and set of accumulations times (Delta)t; these two factors shape the detected burst population. For example, relative to BATSE, the BAT s softer energy band decreases the detection rate of short, hard bursts, while the BAT s longer accumulation times increase the detection rate of long, soft bursts. Consequently, Swift is detecting long, low fluence bursts (2-3 x fainter than BATSE).

  1. Bursts de raios gama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, J.

    2003-02-01

    Nos últimos anos, graças principalmente aos dados obtidos pelo Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory e pelo satélite ítalo-holandês BeppoSAX, grandes avanços foram obtidos no nosso conhecimento sobre os fascinantes e enigmáticos fenômenos conhecidos por "bursts"de raios gama. Neste trabalho é feita uma revisão sobre a fenomenologia desses misteriosos objetos e são apresentados os desenvolvimentos recentes nessa área palpitante da astrofísica moderna, ressaltando tanto os resultados observacionais obtidos até o momento quanto os modelos teóricos propostos para explixá-los.

  2. Script for Monitoring Infiniband Switch Links

    SciTech Connect

    Hanley, Jesse Alonzo

    2015-09-08

    This script ingests a configuration file and parses it to determine an Infiniband network topology, specifically the port information for switches. It then loops over the fabric to determine which, if any, ports do not meet their desired configuration.

  3. Ka-band reliable and compact 3-bit true-time-delay phase shifter using MEMS single-pole-eight-throw switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koul, Shiban K.; Dey, Sukomal; Poddar, Ajay K.; Rohde, Ulrich L.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a radio frequency micro-electromechanical system (RF MEMS) based 3-bit phase shifter using MEMS single-pole-eight-throw (SP8T) switches. Devices are fabricated on 635 µm alumina substrate utilizing on the coplanar waveguide (CPW) transmission line. Single switch dimensions are 0.14  ×  0.23 mm2 which is much smaller than Si-on-insulator switches. The symmetric and compact SP8T switch is the primary building block of the 3-bit phase shifter. The SP8T switch results in isolation levels of 31-15 dB, return loss of 33-18 dB and insertion loss of 0.6-1.9 dB, respectively, at 26-40 GHz. Later, two SP8T switches are connected back to back to develop the 3-bit phase shifter using different delay lines at 35 GHz. Finally, the phase shifter provides average return loss of better than 14 dB and average insertion loss of 4.4 dB over the 34.75-35.25 GHz. Measured average phase error is less than 0.98° at 35 GHz. The total area of the fabricated 3-bit phase shifter is 5.95 mm2. SP8T switches are capable of handling 0.1-1 W of power up to 100 million cycles which is sufficient power handling capability for wireless communication systems. Reliability of the phase shifter is extensively characterized with different incident RF powers at room temperature (25°C) and discussed in detail. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first reported MEMS 3-bit phase shifter in the literature that has used a minimum number of switching elements per phase state.

  4. Shaping bursting by electrical coupling and noise.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Georgi S; Zhuravytska, Svitlana

    2012-02-01

    Gap-junctional coupling is an important way of communication between neurons and other excitable cells. Strong electrical coupling synchronizes activity across cell ensembles. Surprisingly, in the presence of noise synchronous oscillations generated by an electrically coupled network may differ qualitatively from the oscillations produced by uncoupled individual cells forming the network. A prominent example of such behavior is the synchronized bursting in islets of Langerhans formed by pancreatic β-cells, which in isolation are known to exhibit irregular spiking (Sherman and Rinzel, Biophys J 54:411-425, 1988; Sherman and Rinzel, Biophys J 59:547-559, 1991). At the heart of this intriguing phenomenon lies denoising, a remarkable ability of electrical coupling to diminish the effects of noise acting on individual cells. In this paper, building on an earlier analysis of denoising in networks of integrate-and-fire neurons (Medvedev, Neural Comput 21 (11):3057-3078, 2009) and our recent study of spontaneous activity in a closely related model of the Locus Coeruleus network (Medvedev and Zhuravytska, The geometry of spontaneous spiking in neuronal networks, submitted, 2012), we derive quantitative estimates characterizing denoising in electrically coupled networks of conductance-based models of square wave bursting cells. Our analysis reveals the interplay of the intrinsic properties of the individual cells and network topology and their respective contributions to this important effect. In particular, we show that networks on graphs with large algebraic connectivity (Fiedler, Czech Math J 23(98):298-305, 1973) or small total effective resistance (Bollobas, Modern graph theory, Graduate Texts in Mathematics, vol. 184, Springer, New York, 1998) are better equipped for implementing denoising. As a by-product of the analysis of denoising, we analytically estimate the rate with which trajectories converge to the synchronization subspace and the stability of the latter to

  5. Cosmological gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paczynski, Bohdan

    1991-01-01

    The distribution in angle and flux of gamma-ray bursts indicates that the majority of gamma-ray bursters are at cosmological distances, i.e., at z of about 1. The rate is then about 10 exp -8/yr in a galaxy like the Milky Way, i.e., orders of magnitude lower than the estimated rate for collisions between neutron stars in close binary systems. The energy per burst is about 10 exp 51 ergs, assuming isotropic emission. The events appear to be less energetic and more frequent if their emission is strongly beamed. Some tests for the distance scale are discussed: a correlation between the burst's strength and its spectrum; the absorption by the Galactic gas below about 2 keV; the X-ray tails caused by forward scattering by the Galactic dust; about 1 month recurrence of some bursts caused by gravitational lensing by foreground galaxies; and a search for gamma-ray bursts in M31. The bursts appear to be a manifestation of something exotic, but conventional compact objects can provide an explanation. The best possibility is offered by a decay of a bindary composed of a spinning-stellar-mass black-hole primary and a neutron or a strange-quark star secondary. In the final phase the secondary is tidally disrupted, forms an accretion disk, and up to 10 exp 54 ergs are released. A very small fraction of this energy powers the gamma-ray burst.

  6. Three precise gamma-ray burst source locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Evans, W. D.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The precise source regions of three moderately intense gamma ray bursts are derived. These events were observed with the first interplanetary burst sensor network. The optimum locations of the detectors, widely separated throughout the inner solar system, allowed for high accuracy, over-determined source fields of size 0.7 to 7.0 arc-min(2). All three locations are at fairly high galactic latitude in regions of low source confusion; none can be identified with a steady source object. Archived photographs were searched for optical transients that are able to be associated with these source fields; one such association was made.

  7. Are Abell Clusters Correlated with Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, K.; Hartmann, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Laros, J.; Cline, T.; Boer, M.

    1997-01-01

    A recent study has presented marginal statistical evidence that gamma-ray burst (GRB) sources are correlated with Abell clusters, based on analyses of bursts in the BATSE 3B catalog. Using precise localization information from the Third Interplanetary Network, we have reanalyzed this possible correlation. We find that most of the Abell clusters that are in the relatively large 3B error circles are not in the much smaller IPN/BATSE error regions. We believe that this argues strongly against an Abell cluster-GRB correlation.

  8. Fast high-temperature superconductor switch for high current applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyov, Vyacheslav F.; Li, Qiang

    2013-07-01

    Reversible operation of a high current superconductor switch based on the quench of high-resistance second generation high temperature superconducting wire is demonstrated. The quench is induced by a burst of an ac field generated by an inductively coupled radio-frequency coil. The switch makes a superconducting-to-normal transition within 5 ms and also has a rapid recovery to the superconducting state. The device has potential applications as an active current limiter or as a storage switch for superconducting magnetic energy storage systems. Operation in a full flux penetration/flow regime can effectively minimize the detrimental effects of the intrinsic conductor non-uniformity.

  9. Next-Generation WDM Network Design and Routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Danny H. K.; Bensaou, Brahim

    2003-10-01

    Call for Papers The Editors of JON are soliciting papers on WDM Network Design and Routing. The aim in this focus issue is to publish original research on topics including - but not limited to - the following: - WDM network architectures and protocols - GMPLS network architectures - Wavelength converter placement in WDM networks - Routing and wavelength assignment (RWA) in WDM networks - Protection and restoration strategies and algorithms in WDM networks - Traffic grooming in WDM networks - Dynamic routing strategies and algorithms - Optical burst switching - Support of multicast - Protection and restoration in WDM networks - Performance analysis and optimization in WDM networks Manuscript Submission To submit to this special issue, follow the normal procedure for submission to JON, indicating "WDM Network Design" in the "Comments" field of the online submission form. For all other questions relating to this focus issue, please send an e-mail to jon@osa.org, subject line "WDM Network Design." Additional information can be found on the JON website: http://www.osa-jon.org/submission/. Schedule - Paper Submission Deadline: November 1, 2003 - Notification to Authors: January 15, 2004 - Final Manuscripts to Publisher: February 15, 2004 - Publication of Focus Issue: February/March 2004

  10. Next-Generation WDM Network Design and Routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Danny H. K.; Bensaou, Brahim

    2003-08-01

    Call for Papers The Editors of JON are soliciting papers on WDM Network Design and Routing. The aim in this focus issue is to publish original research on topics including - but not limited to - the following: - WDM network architectures and protocols - GMPLS network architectures - Wavelength converter placement in WDM networks - Routing and wavelength assignment (RWA) in WDM networks - Protection and restoration strategies and algorithms in WDM networks - Traffic grooming in WDM networks - Dynamic routing strategies and algorithms - Optical Burst Switching - Support of Multicast - Protection and restoration in WDM networks - Performance analysis and optimization in WDM networks Manuscript Submission To submit to this special issue, follow the normal procedure for submission to JON, indicating "WDM Network Design" in the "Comments" field of the online submission form. For all other questions relating to this focus issue, please send an e-mail to jon@osa.org, subject line "WDM Network Design." Additional information can be found on the JON website: http://www.osa-jon.org/submission/. Schedule Paper Submission Deadline: November 1, 2003 Notification to Authors: January 15, 2004 Final Manuscripts to Publisher: February 15, 2004 Publication of Focus Issue: February/March 2004

  11. Next-Generation WDM Network Design and Routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Danny H. K.; Bensaou, Brahim

    2003-09-01

    Call for Papers The Editors of JON are soliciting papers on WDM Network Design and Routing. The aim in this focus issue is to publish original research on topics including - but not limited to - the following: - WDM network architectures and protocols - GMPLS network architectures - Wavelength converter placement in WDM networks - Routing and wavelength assignment (RWA) in WDM networks - Protection and restoration strategies and algorithms in WDM networks - Traffic grooming in WDM networks - Dynamic routing strategies and algorithms - Optical burst switching - Support of multicast - Protection and restoration in WDM networks - Performance analysis and optimization in WDM networks Manuscript Submission To submit to this special issue, follow the normal procedure for submission to JON, indicating "WDM Network Design" in the "Comments" field of the online submission form. For all other questions relating to this focus issue, please send an e-mail to jon@osa.org, subject line "WDM Network Design." Additional information can be found on the JON website: http://www.osa-jon.org/submission/. Schedule - Paper Submission Deadline: November 1, 2003 - Notification to Authors: January 15, 2004 - Final Manuscripts to Publisher: February 15, 2004 - Publication of Focus Issue: February/March 2004

  12. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons...

  13. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons...

  14. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons...

  15. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons...

  16. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons...

  17. Brain Activation of Identity Switching in Multiple Identity Tracking Task.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Chuang; Hu, Siyuan; Wei, Liuqing; Zhang, Xuemin; Talhelm, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    When different objects switch identities in the multiple identity tracking (MIT) task, viewers need to rebind objects' identity and location, which requires attention. This rebinding helps people identify the regions targets are in (where they need to focus their attention) and inhibit unimportant regions (where distractors are). This study investigated the processing of attentional tracking after identity switching in an adapted MIT task. This experiment used three identity-switching conditions: a target-switching condition (where the target objects switched identities), a distractor-switching condition (where the distractor objects switched identities), and a no-switching condition. Compared to the distractor-switching condition, the target-switching condition elicited greater activation in the frontal eye fields (FEF), intraparietal sulcus (IPS), and visual cortex. Compared to the no-switching condition, the target-switching condition elicited greater activation in the FEF, inferior frontal gyrus (pars orbitalis) (IFG-Orb), IPS, visual cortex, middle temporal lobule, and anterior cingulate cortex. Finally, the distractor-switching condition showed greater activation in the IFG-Orb compared to the no-switching condition. These results suggest that, in the target-switching condition, the FEF and IPS (the dorsal attention network) might be involved in goal-driven attention to targets during attentional tracking. In addition, in the distractor-switching condition, the activation of the IFG-Orb may indicate salient change that pulls attention away automatically.

  18. Architecture Design and Experimental Platform Demonstration of Optical Network based on OpenFlow Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Fangyuan; Wang, Honghuan; Yin, Hongxi; Li, Ming; Luo, Shenzi; Wu, Chenguang

    2016-02-01

    With the extensive application of cloud computing and data centres, as well as the constantly emerging services, the big data with the burst characteristic has brought huge challenges to optical networks. Consequently, the software defined optical network (SDON) that combines optical networks with software defined network (SDN), has attracted much attention. In this paper, an OpenFlow-enabled optical node employed in optical cross-connect (OXC) and reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexer (ROADM), is proposed. An open source OpenFlow controller is extended on routing strategies. In addition, the experiment platform based on OpenFlow protocol for software defined optical network, is designed. The feasibility and availability of the OpenFlow-enabled optical nodes and the extended OpenFlow controller are validated by the connectivity test, protection switching and load balancing experiments in this test platform.

  19. Pulse switching for high energy lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudenslager, J. B.; Pacala, T. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A saturable inductor switch for compressing the width and sharpening the rise time of high voltage pulses from a relatively slow rise time, high voltage generator to an electric discharge gas laser (EDGL) also provides a capability for efficient energy transfer from a high impedance primary source to an intermediate low impedance laser discharge network. The switch is positioned with respect to a capacitive storage device, such as a coaxial cable, so that when a charge build-up in the storage device reaches a predetermined level, saturation of the switch inductor releases or switches energy stored in the capactive storage device to the EDGL. Cascaded saturable inductor switches for providing output pulses having rise times of less than ten nanoseconds and a technique for magnetically biasing the saturable inductor switch are disclosed.

  20. Do gamma-ray burst sources repeat?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, C. A.; Hartmann, D. H.; Brainerd, J. J.; Briggs, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Pendleton, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Blumenthal, G.; Brock, M.

    1994-01-01

    The demonstration of repeated gamma-ray bursts from an individual source would severely constrain burst source models. Recent reports of evidence for repetition in the first BATSE burst catalog have generated renewed interest in this issue. Here, we analyze the angular distribution of 585 bursts of the second BATSE catalog (Meegan et al. 1994). We search for evidence of burst recurrence using the nearest and farthest neighbor statistic ad the two-point angular correlation function. We find the data to be consistent with the hypothesis that burst sources do not repeat; however, a repeater fraction of up to about 20% of the bursts cannot be excluded.

  1. THYRATRON SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.; Bourgeois, N.A. Jr.

    1959-04-21

    An arrangement for utilizing a thyratron as a noise free switch is described. It has been discovered that the voltage between plate and cathode of a thyratron will oscillate, producing voltage spikes, if the tube carries only a fraction of its maximum rated current. These voltage spikes can produce detrimental effects where the thyratron is used in critical timing circuits. To alleviate this problem the disclosed circuit provides a charged capacitor and a resistor in parallel with the tube and of such value that the maximum current will flow from the capacitor through the thyratron when it is triggered. During this time the signal current is conducted through the tube, before the thyratron voltage starts to oscillate, and the signal current output is free of noise spikes.

  2. Cosmological gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Fenimore, E.; Epstein, R.; Ho, C.; Intzand, J.

    1996-04-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Gamma-ray bursts are brief events that dominate the emission from all other gamma-ray objects in the sky, flicker for tens of seconds, and then turn off. Their nature remains uncertain despite years of efforts to understand them. One hypothesis is that the bursts arise within our galaxy albeit in an extended halo of neutron stars. Another hypothesis uses the isotropic distribution of gamma-ray bursts to argue that they come from nearly the edge of the universe. If gamma-ray bursts originate from cosmological distances, then the expansion of the universe should cause the dimmer (and presumably further) bursts to last longer. The authors have developed methods for measuring this time stretching, related the time stretching to the distance to the bursts, determined how the detailed physics causes temporal variations, and found the amount of total energy and peak luminosity that the events must be producing.

  3. X-ray bursts: Observation versus theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, W. H. G.

    1981-01-01

    Results of various observations of common type I X-ray bursts are discussed with respect to the theory of thermonuclear flashes in the surface layers of accreting neutron stars. Topics covered include burst profiles; irregular burst intervals; rise and decay times and the role of hydrogen; the accuracy of source distances; accuracy in radii determination; radius increase early in the burst; the super Eddington limit; temperatures at burst maximum; and the role of the magnetic field.

  4. Sensory-evoked and spontaneous gamma and spindle bursts in neonatal rat motor cortex.

    PubMed

    An, Shuming; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2014-08-13

    Self-generated neuronal activity originating from subcortical regions drives early spontaneous motor activity, which is a hallmark of the developing sensorimotor system. However, the neural activity patterns and role of primary motor cortex (M1) in these early movements are still unknown. Combining voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDI) with simultaneous extracellular multielectrode recordings in postnatal day 3 (P3)-P5 rat primary somatosensory cortex (S1) and M1 in vivo, we observed that tactile forepaw stimulation induced spindle bursts in S1 and gamma and spindle bursts in M1. Approximately 40% of the spontaneous gamma and spindle bursts in M1 were driven by early motor activity, whereas 23.7% of the M1 bursts triggered forepaw movements. Approximately 35% of the M1 bursts were uncorrelated to movements and these bursts had significantly fewer spikes and shorter burst duration. Focal electrical stimulation of layer V neurons in M1 mimicking physiologically relevant 40 Hz gamma or 10 Hz spindle burst activity reliably elicited forepaw movements. We conclude that M1 is already involved in somatosensory information processing during early development. M1 is mainly activated by tactile stimuli triggered by preceding spontaneous movements, which reach M1 via S1. Only a fraction of M1 activity transients trigger motor responses directly. We suggest that both spontaneously occurring and sensory-evoked gamma and spindle bursts in M1 contribute to the maturation of corticospinal and sensorimotor networks required for the refinement of sensorimotor coordination.

  5. OBS/GMPLS Interworking Network with Scalable Resource Discovery for Global Grid Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Liu, L.; Hong, X. B.; Lin, J. T.

    In recent years, Grid computing is more common in the industry and research community and will open to the consumer market in the future. The final objective is the achievement of global Grid computing, which means that the computing and networks are flexibly integrated across the world and a scalable resource discovery scheme is implemented. In this paper, a promising architecture, i.e., optical burst switching (OBS)/generalized multi-protocol label switching (GMPLS) interworking network with Peer-to-Peer (P2P)-based scheme for resource discovery is investigated to realize a highly scalable and flexible platform for Grids. Experimental results show that this architecture is suitable and efficient for future global Grid computing.

  6. Comet Bursting Through Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Seth A.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2012-10-01

    Comets may be excited and occupy non-principal axis (complex) rotation states for a large fraction of their lifetimes. Many comet nuclei have been identified or are suspected to occupy non-principal axis (complex) rotation [Belton 2005, etc.] as well as have evolving rotation rates [Belton 2011, etc.]. Comet orbits drive these rotation states through cycles of excitation due to surface jets and relaxation due to time variable internal stresses that dissipate energy in the anelastic comet interior. Furthermore, relaxation from complex rotation can increase the loads along the symmetry axis of prolate comets. These loads stretch the body along the symmetry axis and may be the cause of the characteristic ``bowling pin’’ shape and eventually may lead to failure. This is an alternative model for comet bursting. Each cycle deposits only a small amount of energy and stress along the axis, but this process is repeated every orbit during which jets are activated. Our model for the evolution of comet nuclei includes torques due to a number of discrete jets located on the surface based on Neishtadt et al. [2002]. The model also includes internal dissipation using an approach developed by Sharma et al. [2005] and Vokrouhlicky et al. [2009]. These equations are averaged over the instantaneous spin state and the heliocentric orbit so the long-term evolution of the comet can be determined. We determine that even after the inclusion of internal dissipation there still exist non-principal axis equilibrium states for certain jet geometries. For ranges of dissipation factors and jet geometries, prolate comets are found to occupy states that have time variable internal loads over long time periods. These periodic loadings along the symmetry axis may lead to ``necking’’ as the body extends along the axis to release the stress and eventually disruption.

  7. HETEROGENEITY IN SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, Jay P.; Gehrels, Neil

    2011-07-01

    We analyze the Swift/BAT sample of short gamma-ray bursts, using an objective Bayesian Block procedure to extract temporal descriptors of the bursts' initial pulse complexes (IPCs). The sample is comprised of 12 and 41 bursts with and without extended emission (EE) components, respectively. IPCs of non-EE bursts are dominated by single pulse structures, while EE bursts tend to have two or more pulse structures. The medians of characteristic timescales-durations, pulse structure widths, and peak intervals-for EE bursts are factors of {approx}2-3 longer than for non-EE bursts. A trend previously reported by Hakkila and colleagues unifying long and short bursts-the anti-correlation of pulse intensity and width-continues in the two short burst groups, with non-EE bursts extending to more intense, narrower pulses. In addition, we find that preceding and succeeding pulse intensities are anti-correlated with pulse interval. We also examine the short burst X-ray afterglows as observed by the Swift/X-Ray Telescope (XRT). The median flux of the initial XRT detections for EE bursts ({approx}6x10{sup -10} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) is {approx}>20x brighter than for non-EE bursts, and the median X-ray afterglow duration for EE bursts ({approx}60,000 s) is {approx}30x longer than for non-EE bursts. The tendency for EE bursts toward longer prompt-emission timescales and higher initial X-ray afterglow fluxes implies larger energy injections powering the afterglows. The longer-lasting X-ray afterglows of EE bursts may suggest that a significant fraction explode into denser environments than non-EE bursts, or that the sometimes-dominant EE component efficiently powers the afterglow. Combined, these results favor different progenitors for EE and non-EE short bursts.

  8. Heterogeneity in Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jay P.; Gehrels Neil; Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the Swift/BAT sample of short gamma-ray bursts, using an objective Bayesian Block procedure to extract temporal descriptors of the bursts' initial pulse complexes (IPCs). The sample comprises 12 and 41 bursts with and without extended emission (EE) components, respectively. IPCs of non-EE bursts are dominated by single pulse structures, while EE bursts tend to have two or more pulse structures. The medians of characteristic timescales - durations, pulse structure widths, and peak intervals - for EE bursts are factors of approx 2-3 longer than for non-EE bursts. A trend previously reported by Hakkila and colleagues unifying long and short bursts - the anti-correlation of pulse intensity and width - continues in the two short burst groups, with non-EE bursts extending to more intense, narrower pulses. In addition we find that preceding and succeeding pulse intensities are anti-correlated with pulse interval. We also examine the short burst X-ray afterglows as observed by the Swift/XRT. The median flux of the initial XRT detections for EE bursts (approx 6 X 10(exp -10) erg / sq cm/ s) is approx > 20 x brighter than for non-EE bursts, and the median X-ray afterglow duration for EE bursts (approx 60,000 s) is approx 30 x longer than for non-EE bursts. The tendency for EE bursts toward longer prompt-emission timescales and higher initial X-ray afterglow fluxes implies larger energy injections powering the afterglows. The longer-lasting X-ray afterglows of EE bursts may suggest that a significant fraction explode into more dense environments than non-EE bursts, or that the sometimes-dominant EE component efficiently p()wers the afterglow. Combined, these results favor different progenitors for EE and non-EE short bursts.

  9. Switch Transcripts in Immunoglobulin Class Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Matthias; Jung, Steffen; Radbruch, Andreas

    1995-03-01

    B cells can exchange gene segments for the constant region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain, altering the class and effector function of the antibodies that they produce. Class switching is directed to distinct classes by cytokines, which induce transcription of the targeted DNA sequences. These transcripts are processed, resulting in spliced "switch" transcripts. Switch recombination can be directed to immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) by the heterologous human metallothionein II_A promoter in mutant mice. Induction of the structurally conserved, spliced switch transcripts is sufficient to target switch recombination to IgG1, whereas transcription alone is not.

  10. Scheduling and performance evaluation of high line-rate space-wavelength routed switch for datacenter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qirui; Cheng, Xiaofei; Zhou, Luying

    In this paper, we investigate the performance of a high line-rate space-wavelength routed switch to assess its potential for use in large-scale datacenters. A scheduling technique is introduced for the switch to address challenges in packet arbitration taking into account a high line rate and large port-count. The traffic performance in terms of packet loss rate and latency of the switch is evaluated by simulations under various traffic patterns. The results show that even under burst traffic conditions, the packet loss rate and latency of the switch are almost independent of the switch size, which indicates that the switch could support a large number of nodes for switching without significant performance deterioration for both fixed and variable packet sizes. It is also found that a slight increase in the number of tunable transmitters in each node could lead to a great reduction in packet loss and latency for the switch.

  11. Broadband Spectral Study of Magnetar Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirmizibayrak, Demet; Gogus, Ersin; Sasmaz Mus, Sinem; Kaneko, Yuki

    2016-07-01

    Magnetar bursts occur sporadically on random occasions, and every burst-active episode carries unique information about the bursting magnetar. Therefore, in-depth spectral and temporal analyses of each of the magnetar bursts provide new insights into the bursting and radiation mechanisms. There have been a number of studies over the last decade, investigating the spectral and temporal properties of magnetar bursts. The spectra of typical magnetar bursts were generally described with the Comptonized model or the sum of two blackbody functions. However, it was recently shown that the actual spectral nature of these bursts can be conclusively determined if the spectral analysis is performed on a wide energy coverage. We present the results of in-depth systematic broadband (2 - 250 keV) spectral analysis of a large number of bursts originated from three magnetars: SGR 1806-20, SGR 1900+14, and SGR J1550-5418, observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer.

  12. Analysis of Q burst waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Toshio; Komatsu, Masayuki

    2007-04-01

    The electric field changes in ELF to VLF were observed with a ball antenna in fair weather at Kochi (latitude 33.3°N, longitude 133.4°E) during 2003-2004. Some 376 Q bursts were obtained, seven examples of which are analyzed in the present study. The continuous frequency spectra of the Q bursts and the background noises from 1.0 Hz to 11 kHz are compared, and it was found that the Q bursts prevail over the background in the frequency range from 1 to 300 Hz. The surplus is 20 dB (in amplitude) near the fundamental mode frequency. The "W"-type changes found in the initial portion of the Q burst waveforms are interpreted as the combined electromagnetic waveform of direct and antipodal waves from the causative lightning strokes. From the time intervals between the two waves, the source-receiver distances are estimated as far as 19 Mm. The pulses to excite the Schumann resonances in the Q bursts are clearly identified.

  13. Burst Firing in the Electrosensory System of Gymnotiform Weakly Electric Fish: Mechanisms and Functional Roles

    PubMed Central

    Metzen, Michael G.; Krahe, Rüdiger; Chacron, Maurice J.

    2016-01-01

    Neurons across sensory systems and organisms often display complex patterns of action potentials in response to sensory input. One example of such a pattern is the tendency of neurons to fire packets of action potentials (i.e., a burst) followed by quiescence. While it is well known that multiple mechanisms can generate bursts of action potentials at both the single-neuron and the network level, the functional role of burst firing in sensory processing is not so well understood to date. Here we provide a comprehensive review of the known mechanisms and functions of burst firing in processing of electrosensory stimuli in gymnotiform weakly electric fish. We also present new evidence from existing data showing that bursts and isolated spikes provide distinct information about stimulus variance. It is likely that these functional roles will be generally applicable to other systems and species. PMID:27531978

  14. The Structure and Evolution of LOCBURST: The BATSE Burst Location Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Kippen, R. Marc; Paciesas, William S.; Stollberg, Mark; Woods, Pete; Meegan, Charles A.; Fishman, Gerald J.; McCollough, Mike L.; Connaughton, Valerie

    1999-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst (GRB) location algorithm used to produce the BATSE GRB locations is described. The general flow of control of the current location algorithm is presented, and the significant properties of the various physical inputs required are identified. The development of the burst location algorithm during the releases of the BATSE IB, 2B, and 3B GRB catalogs is presented so that the reasons for the differences in the positions and error estimates between the catalogs can be understood. In particular, differences between the 2B and 3B locations are discussed for events that have moved significantly and the reasons for the changes explained. The locations of bursts located independently by the interplanetary network (IPN) are used to illustrate the effect on burst location accuracy of various components of the algorithm. IPN data and locations from other gamma-ray instruments are used to calculate estimates of the systematic errors on BATSE burst locations.

  15. The Ulysses Supplement to the BATSE 4B Catalog of Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, K.; Briggs, Michael S.; Kippen, Richard M.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Meegan, Charles A.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Cline, T. L.; Boer, M.

    1998-01-01

    We present Interplanetary Network Localization information for 150 gamma-ray bursts observed by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment(BATSE) between the end of the 3rd BATSE catalog and the end of the 4th BATSE catalog obtained by analyzing the arrival times of these bursts at the Ulysses and Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) spacecraft. For any given burst observed by these two spacecraft, arrival time analysis (triangulation) results in an annulus of possible arrival directions whose width varies between 7 arcseconds and 2.3 degrees, depending on the intensity and time history of the burst, and the distance of the Ulysses spacecraft from Earth. This annulus generally intersects the BATSE error circle, resulting in an average reduction of the error box area by a factor of 25.

  16. Stochastic gene expression with bursting and positive feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platini, Thierry; Pendar, Hodjat; Kulkarni, Rahul

    2012-02-01

    Stochasticity (or noise) in the process of gene expression can play a critical role in cellular circuits that control switching between probabilistic cell-fate decisions in diverse organisms. Such circuits often include positive feedback loops as critical elements. In some cases (e.g. HIV-1 viral infections), switching between different cell fates occurs even in the absence of bistability in the underlying deterministic model. To characterize the role of noise in such systems, we analyze a simple gene expression circuit that includes contributions from both transcriptional and translational bursting and positive feedback effects. Using a combination of analytical approaches and stochastic simulations, we explore how the underlying parameters control the corresponding mean and variance in protein distributions.

  17. Stability switches and multistability coexistence in a delay-coupled neural oscillators system.

    PubMed

    Song, Zigen; Xu, Jian

    2012-11-21

    In this paper, we present a neural network system composed of two delay-coupled neural oscillators, where each of these can be regarded as the dynamical system describing the average activity of neural population. Analyzing the corresponding characteristic equation, the local stability of rest state is studied. The system exhibits the switch phenomenon between the rest state and periodic activity. Furthermore, the Hopf bifurcation is analyzed and the bifurcation curve is given in the parameters plane. The stability of the bifurcating periodic solutions and direction of the Hopf bifurcation are exhibited. Regarding time delay and coupled weight as the bifurcation parameters, the Fold-Hopf bifurcation is investigated in detail in terms of the central manifold reduction and normal form method. The neural system demonstrates the coexistence of the rest states and periodic activities in the different parameter regions. Employing the normal form of the original system, the coexistence regions are illustrated approximately near the Fold-Hopf singularity point. Finally, numerical simulations are performed to display more complex dynamics. The results illustrate that system may exhibit the rich coexistence of the different neuro-computational properties, such as the rest states, periodic activities, and quasi-periodic behavior. In particular, some periodic activities can evolve into the bursting-type behaviors with the varying time delay. It implies that the coexistence of the quasi-periodic activity and bursting-type behavior can be obtained if the suitable value of system parameter is chosen.

  18. Distribution of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Rodriguez, Mariangelly; Smith, M.; Tešic, G.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are known to be bright, irregular flashes of gamma rays that typically last just a few seconds, believed to be caused by stellar collapse or the merger of a pair of compact objects. Through previous work, it has been found that GRBs are distributed roughly uniformly over the entire sky, rather than being confined to the relatively narrow band of the Milky Way. Using the Python programming language, we generated a model of GRBs over cosmological distances, based on current empirical GRB distributions. The grbsim python module uses the acceptance-rejection Monte Carlo method to simulate the luminosity and redshift of a large population of GRBs, including cosmological effects such as dark energy and dark matter terms that modify the large-scale structure of space-time. The results of running grbsim are demonstrated to match the distribution of GRBs observed by the Burst Alert Telescope on NASA’s Swift satellite. The grbsim module will subsequently be used to simulate gamma ray and neutrino events for the Astrophysical Multimessenger Observatory Network.

  19. Latching relay switch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Duimstra, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    A latching relay switch assembly which includes a coil section and a switch or contact section. The coil section includes at least one permanent magnet and at least one electromagnet. The respective sections are, generally, arranged in separate locations or cavities in the assembly. The switch is latched by a permanent magnet assembly and selectively switched by an overriding electromagnetic assembly.

  20. Project BudBurst: People, Plants, and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S.; Ward, D.; Havens, K.; Gardiner, L. S.; Alaback, P.

    2010-12-01

    Providing opportunities for individuals to contribute to a better understanding of climate change is the hallmark of Project BudBurst (www.budburst.org). This highly successful, national citizen science program, now in its third year, is bringing climate change education outreach to thousands of individuals. Project BudBurst is a national citizen science initiative designed to engage the public in observations of phenological (plant life cycle) events that raise awareness of climate change, and create a cadre of informed citizen scientists. Citizen science programs such as Project BudBurst provide the opportunity for students and interested laypersons to actively participate in scientific research. Such programs are important not only from an educational perspective, but because they also enable scientists to broaden the geographic and temporal scale of their observations. The goals of Project BudBurst are to 1) increase awareness of phenology as an area of scientific study; 2) Increase awareness of the impacts of changing climates on plants; and 3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process. From its 2008 launch in February, this on-line educational and data-entry program, engaged participants of all ages and walks of life in recording the timing of the leafing and flowering of wild and cultivated species found across the continent. Thus far, thousands of participants from all 50 states have submitted data. Project BudBurst has been the subject of almost 200 media outlets including NPR, national and regional television broadcasts, and most of the major national and regional newspapers. This presentation will provide an overview of Project BudBurst and will report on the results of the 2009 field campaign and discuss plans to expand Project BudBurst in 2010 including the use of mobile phones applications for data collection and reporting from the field. Project BudBurst co managed by the National Ecological Observatory Network and

  1. Bursts in discontinuous Aeolian saltation

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, M. V.; Rasmussen, K. R.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Close to the onset of Aeolian particle transport through saltation we find in wind tunnel experiments a regime of discontinuous flux characterized by bursts of activity. Scaling laws are observed in the time delay between each burst and in the measurements of the wind fluctuations at the fluid threshold Shields number θc. The time delay between each burst decreases on average with the increase of the Shields number until sand flux becomes continuous. A numerical model for saltation including the wind-entrainment from the turbulent fluctuations can reproduce these observations and gives insight about their origin. We present here also for the first time measurements showing that with feeding it becomes possible to sustain discontinuous flux even below the fluid threshold. PMID:26073305

  2. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-01-01

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  3. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-03-06

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  4. Emergence of Bursting Activity in Connected Neuronal Sub-Populations

    PubMed Central

    Pasquale, Valentina; Berdondini, Luca; Chiappalone, Michela

    2014-01-01

    Uniform and modular primary hippocampal cultures from embryonic rats were grown on commercially available micro-electrode arrays to investigate network activity with respect to development and integration of different neuronal populations. Modular networks consisting of two confined active and inter-connected sub-populations of neurons were realized by means of bi-compartmental polydimethylsiloxane structures. Spontaneous activity in both uniform and modular cultures was periodically monitored, from three up to eight weeks after plating. Compared to uniform cultures and despite lower cellular density, modular networks interestingly showed higher firing rates at earlier developmental stages, and network-wide firing and bursting statistics were less variable over time. Although globally less correlated than uniform cultures, modular networks exhibited also higher intra-cluster than inter-cluster correlations, thus demonstrating that segregation and integration of activity coexisted in this simple yet powerful in vitro model. Finally, the peculiar synchronized bursting activity shown by confined modular networks preferentially propagated within one of the two compartments (‘dominant’), even in cases of perfect balance of firing rate between the two sub-populations. This dominance was generally maintained during the entire monitored developmental frame, thus suggesting that the implementation of this hierarchy arose from early network development. PMID:25250616

  5. BudBurst Buddies: Introducing Young Citizen Scientists to Plants and Environmental Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D.; Gardiner, L. S.; Henderson, S.

    2011-12-01

    As part of Project BudBurst, the BudBurst Buddies recently moved to the National Ecological Network (NEON) as part of its Education and Public Engagement efforts. The BudBurst Buddies (www.budburstbuddies.org) were created to engage elementary school age children in the science of observing plants and the timing of phenological (life cycle) events. BudBurst Buddies is a part of the Project BudBurst national citizen science initiative (www.budburst.org), which allows individuals to engage in the scientific process, contributing to a better understanding of climate change while increasing public awareness of phenology and the impacts of climate change on plants. As a first step towards engaging the next generation of citizen scientists, BudBurst Buddies provides the opportunity for children to gain experience with scientific research and increases awareness of how plants change throughout the year. Hundreds of young students have participated in the inaugural year of BudBurst Buddies. Children can participate in BudBurst Buddies on their own, with their families, or in formal or informal education settings. The program was recently highlighted by education staff at the New York Hall of Science and numerous classrooms have been implementing this resource as part of their curriculum. Each child who participates creates a journal about a plant of his or her choosing, makes observations of the plant over the growing season and submits findings online, earning an official BudBurst Buddies certificate. An online storybook for kids tells how two children, Lily and Sage, observed plants in their neighborhood and became BudBurst Buddies. This presentation will provide an overview of the BudBurst Buddies resources including a new implementation guide and will also share feedback from the first year of implementation.

  6. High Redshift Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    The Swift Observatory has been detecting 100 gamma-ray bursts per year for 7 years and has greatly stimulated the field with new findings. Observations are made of the X-ray and optical afterglow from 1 minute after the burst, continuing for days. GRBs are providing a new tool to study the high redshift universe. Swift has detected several events at z>5 and one at z=9.4 giving information on metallicity, star formation rate and reionization. The talk will present the latest results.

  7. Project BudBurst: Continental-scale citizen science for all seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S.; Newman, S. J.; Ward, D.; Havens-Young, K.; Alaback, P.; Meymaris, K.

    2011-12-01

    Project BudBurst's (budburst.org) recent move to the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) has benefitted both programs. NEON has been able to use Project BudBurst as a testbed to learn best practices, network with experts in the field, and prototype potential tools for engaging people in continental-scale ecology as NEON develops its citizen science program. Participation in Project BudBurst has grown significantly since the move to NEON. Project BudBurst is a national citizen science initiative designed to engage the public in observations of phenological (plant life cycle) events that raise awareness of climate change, and create a cadre of informed citizen scientists. Citizen science programs such as Project BudBurst provide the opportunity for students and interested laypersons to actively participate in scientific research. Such programs are important not only from an educational perspective, but because they also enable scientists to broaden the geographic and temporal scale of their observations. The goals of Project BudBurst are to 1) increase awareness of phenology as an area of scientific study; 2) Increase awareness of the impacts of changing climates on plants at a continental-scale; and 3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process. From its 2008 launch in February, this on-line educational and data-entry program, engaged participants of all ages and walks of life in recording the timing of the leafing and flowering of wild and cultivated species found across the continent. Thus far, thousands of participants from all 50 states have submitted data. This presentation will provide an overview of Project BudBurst and will report on the results of the 2010 field campaign and discuss plans to expand Project BudBurst in 2012 including the use of mobile phones applications for data collection and reporting from the field. Project BudBurst is co-managed by the National Ecological Observatory Network and the Chicago

  8. Switched-capacitor isolated LED driver

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, Seth R.; Kline, Mitchell

    2016-03-22

    A switched-capacitor voltage converter which is particularly well-suited for receiving a line voltage from which to drive current through a series of light emitting diodes (LEDs). Input voltage is rectified in a multi-level rectifier network having switched capacitors in an ascending-bank configuration for passing voltages in uniform steps between zero volts up to full received voltage V.sub.DC. A regulator section, operating on V.sub.DC, comprises switched-capacitor stages of H-bridge switching and flying capacitors. A current controlled oscillator drives the states of the switched-capacitor stages and changes its frequency to maintain a constant current to the load. Embodiments are described for isolating the load from the mains, utilizing an LC tank circuit or a multi-primary-winding transformer.

  9. mPing: The bursting transposon

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Ken; Monden, Yuki; Yasuda, Kanako; Saito, Hiroki; Okumoto, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Though transposable elements (TEs) have been considered as an efficient source of evolution, it has never been possible to test this hypothesis because most of TE insertions had occurred millions of years ago, or because currently active TEs have very few copies in a host genome. However, mPing, the first active DNA transposon in rice, was revealed to hold a key to answer this question. mPing has attained high copy numbers and still retained very high activity in a traditional rice strain, which enabled direct observation of behavior and impact of a bursting TE. A comprehensive analysis of mPing insertion sites has revealed it avoids exons but prefers promoter regions and thus moderately affects transcription of neighboring genes. Some of the mPing insertions have introduced possibly useful expression profile to adjacent genes that indicated TE’s potential in de novo formation of gene regulatory network. PMID:25053919

  10. Separating burst from background spikes in multichannel neuronal recordings using return map analysis.

    PubMed

    Martens, M B; Chiappalone, M; Schubert, D; Tiesinga, P H E

    2014-06-01

    We propose a preprocessing method to separate coherent neuronal network activity, referred to as “bursts”, from background spikes. High background activity in neuronal recordings reduces the effectiveness of currently available burst detection methods. For long-term, stationary recordings, burst and background spikes have a bimodal ISI distribution which makes it easy to select the threshold to separate burst and background spikes. Finite, nonstationary recordings lead to noisy ISIs for which the bimodality is not that clear. We introduce a preprocessing method to separate burst from background spikes to improve burst detection reliability because it efficiently uses both single and multichannel activity. The method is tested using a stochastic model constrained by data available in the literature and recordings from primary cortical neurons cultured on multielectrode arrays. The separation between burst and background spikes is obtained using the interspike interval return map. The cutoff threshold is the key parameter to separate the burst and background spikes. We compare two methods for selecting the threshold. The 2-step method, in which threshold selection is based on fixed heuristics. The iterative method, in which the optimal cutoff threshold is directly estimated from the data. The proposed preprocessing method significantly increases the reliability of several established burst detection algorithms, both for simulated and real recordings. The preprocessing method makes it possible to study the effects of diseases or pharmacological manipulations, because it can deal efficiently with nonstationarity in the data.

  11. Design of a 2*2 fault-tolerant switching element

    SciTech Connect

    Woei Lin; Chuan-lin Wu

    1982-01-01

    The architecture of a 2*2 fault-tolerant switching element which can be used to modularly construct interconnection networks for multiprocessing and local computer networking is described. The switching element uses distributed control and circuit switching. Its good gate-to-pin ratio can facilitate VLSI implementation. 18 references.

  12. Mixed-mode oscillations and population bursting in the pre-Bötzinger complex

    PubMed Central

    Bacak, Bartholomew J; Kim, Taegyo; Smith, Jeffrey C; Rubin, Jonathan E; Rybak, Ilya A

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on computational and theoretical investigations of neuronal activity arising in the pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC), a medullary region generating the inspiratory phase of breathing in mammals. A progressive increase of neuronal excitability in medullary slices containing the pre-BötC produces mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs) characterized by large amplitude population bursts alternating with a series of small amplitude bursts. Using two different computational models, we demonstrate that MMOs emerge within a heterogeneous excitatory neural network because of progressive neuronal recruitment and synchronization. The MMO pattern depends on the distributed neuronal excitability, the density and weights of network interconnections, and the cellular properties underlying endogenous bursting. Critically, the latter should provide a reduction of spiking frequency within neuronal bursts with increasing burst frequency and a dependence of the after-burst recovery period on burst amplitude. Our study highlights a novel mechanism by which heterogeneity naturally leads to complex dynamics in rhythmic neuronal populations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13403.001 PMID:26974345

  13. Sensitivity of Type I X-Ray Bursts to rp-Process Reaction Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amthor, Matthew A.; Galaviz, Daniel; Heger, Alexander; Sakharuk, Alexander; Schatz, Hendrik; Smith, Karl

    PoS(NIC-IX)068 First steps have been taken in a more comprehensive study of the dependence of observables in Type I X-ray bursts on uncertain (p,γ) reaction rates along the rp-process path. We use the multi- zone hydrodynamics code KEPLER which implicitly couples a full nuclear reaction network of more than 1000 isotopes, as needed, to follow structure and evolution of the X-ray burst layer and its ashes. This allows us to incorporate the full rp-process network, including all relevant nuclear reactions, and individually study changes in the X-ray burst light curves when modifying selected key nuclear reaction rates. In this work we considered all possible proton captures to nuclei with 10 < Z < 28 and N ≤ Z. When varying individual reaction rates within a symmetric full width uncertainty of a factor of 104 , early results for some rates show changes in the burst light curve as large as 10 percent of peak luminosity. This change is large enough to be detectable by current X-ray burst light curve observations. More precise reaction rates are therefore needed to test current X-ray burst models, particularly of the burst rise, with observational data and to constrain astrophysical parameters.

  14. Mixed-mode oscillations and population bursting in the pre-Bötzinger complex.

    PubMed

    Bacak, Bartholomew J; Kim, Taegyo; Smith, Jeffrey C; Rubin, Jonathan E; Rybak, Ilya A

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on computational and theoretical investigations of neuronal activity arising in the pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC), a medullary region generating the inspiratory phase of breathing in mammals. A progressive increase of neuronal excitability in medullary slices containing the pre-BötC produces mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs) characterized by large amplitude population bursts alternating with a series of small amplitude bursts. Using two different computational models, we demonstrate that MMOs emerge within a heterogeneous excitatory neural network because of progressive neuronal recruitment and synchronization. The MMO pattern depends on the distributed neuronal excitability, the density and weights of network interconnections, and the cellular properties underlying endogenous bursting. Critically, the latter should provide a reduction of spiking frequency within neuronal bursts with increasing burst frequency and a dependence of the after-burst recovery period on burst amplitude. Our study highlights a novel mechanism by which heterogeneity naturally leads to complex dynamics in rhythmic neuronal populations. PMID:26974345

  15. Cosmology: Home of a fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorimer, Duncan

    2016-02-01

    Our understanding of fast radio bursts -- intense pulses of radio waves -- and their use as cosmic probes promises to be transformed now that one burst has been associated with a galaxy of known distance from Earth. See Letter p.453

  16. A novel burst-mode all-optical wavelength converter based on gain-clamping structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, B.; Ke, C. J.; Zhao, Y.; Liu, D. M.

    2011-02-01

    A novel gain-clamped wavelength converter (GCWC) is proposed to make the hybrid TDM-WDM PON architecture based on wavelength conversion feasible, and its operation principle is also demonstrated. The power budget of this network is measured to identify the architecture can support 4096 users who share 40Gbit/s accessing capacity on a single trunk fiber. And optical power equalization functionality and burst transparency characteristic of GCWC is experimentally evaluated, and the results show that the GCWC makes burst signals from different transmitters with up to 5 dB dynamic range equalized and is transparency for burst signals.

  17. BeppoSAX/Ulysses observations of cosmic gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, K.; Cline, T.; Frontera, F.; Dal Fiume, D.; Orlandini, M.

    1998-05-16

    BeppoSAX has been added to the 3rd Interplanetary Network of gamma-ray burst detectors. Of the {approx_equal}8 events observed to date by Ulysses and the BeppoSAX Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GRBM), four have been localized by triangulation, resulting in annuli whose 3 {sigma} widths are as small as 63{sup ''}. These data give error boxes whose sizes can be as much as an order of magnitude smaller than those obtained with the SAX Wide Field Camera (WFC). They can be used to confirm the association between fading X-ray and optical sources and gamma-ray bursts.

  18. Temporal switching jitter in photoconductive switches

    SciTech Connect

    GAUDET,JOHN A.; SKIPPER,MICHAEL C.; ABDALLA,MICHAEL D.; AHERN,SEAN M.; MAR,ALAN; LOUBRIEL,GUILLERMO M.; ZUTAVERN,FRED J.; O'MALLEY,MARTIN W.; HELGESON,WESLEY D.; ROMERO,SAMUEL P.

    2000-04-13

    This paper reports on a recent comparison made between the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) gallium arsenide, optically-triggered switch test configuration and the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) gallium arsenide, optically-triggered switch test configuration. The purpose of these measurements was to compare the temporal switch jitter times. It is found that the optical trigger laser characteristics are dominant in determining the PCSS jitter.

  19. Type I X-ray burst simulation code

    SciTech Connect

    Fisker, J. L.; Hix, W. R.; Liebendoerfer, M.

    2007-07-01

    dAGILE is an astrophysical code that simulates accretion of matter onto a neutron star and the subsequent x-ray burst. It is a one-dimensional time-dependent spherically symmetric code with generalized nuclear reaction networks, diffusive radiation/conduction, realistic boundary conditions, and general relativistic hydrodynamics. The code is described in more detail in Astrophysical Journal 650(2006)332 and Astrophysical Journal Supplements 174(2008)261.

  20. GRB 080407: An Ultra-long Burst Discovered by the IPN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, J; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H.; Palmer, D.; Palshin, V.; Hurley, K.; Goldsten, J.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Boynton, W.; vonKienlln, A.; Feroci, M.; Aptekar, R.; Frederiks, D.; Golenetskli, S.; Mazets, E.; Svinkin, D.; Golovin, D.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K.; Starr, R.; Rau, A.; Zhang, X.

    2012-01-01

    We present observations of the extremely long GRB 080704 obtained with the instruments of the Interplanetary Network (IPN). The observations reveal two distinct emission episodes, separated by a approx.1500 s long period of quiescence. The total burst duration is about 2100 s. We compare the temporal and spectral characteristics of this burst with those obtained for other ultra-long GRBs and discuss these characteristics in the context of different models.

  1. Preliminary spatial analysis of combined BATSE/Ulysses gamma-ray burst locations

    SciTech Connect

    Kippen, R. Marc; Hurley, Kevin; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.

    1998-05-16

    We present the preliminary spatial analysis of 278 bursts that have been localized by BATSE and the two-spacecraft Compton/Ulysses Interplanetary Network. The large number and superior accuracy of the combined BATSE/Ulysses locations provides improved sensitivity to small-angle source properties. We find that the locations are consistent with large- and small-scale isotropy, with no significant small-angle clustering. We constrain the fraction of sources in clusters and discuss the implications for burst repetition.

  2. Class E/F switching power amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor); Rutledge, David B. (Inventor); Kee, Scott David (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention discloses a new family of switching amplifier classes called class E/F amplifiers. These amplifiers are generally characterized by their use of the zero-voltage-switching (ZVS) phase correction technique to eliminate of the loss normally associated with the inherent capacitance of the switching device as utilized in class-E amplifiers, together with a load network for improved voltage and current wave-shaping by presenting class-F.sup.-1 impedances at selected overtones and class-E impedances at the remaining overtones. The present invention discloses a several topologies and specific circuit implementations for achieving such performance.

  3. Throughput gains obtained from dynamic reconfiguration of the switching mode allocation in a SS/TDMA satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maral, G.; Bousquet, M.; Wattier, P.

    Fully variable demand assignment in a SS/TDMA satellite system requires frequent burst time plan chanes with reconfiguration of the on-board switch matrix state sequence. This implies that the switching mode allocation which describes both the succession and the duration of each switch state be dynamically reconfigurated. Improved performance in terms of throughput gains is demonstrated from simulation results on three different SS/TDMA systems. The influencing factors are: time slot assignment algorithm, characteristics and nature of the traffic demand, reconfiguration criterions. Appropriate real time burst management strategies are proposed.

  4. Latching micro optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J; Polosky, Marc A

    2013-05-21

    An optical switch reliably maintains its on or off state even when subjected to environments where the switch is bumped or otherwise moved. In addition, the optical switch maintains its on or off state indefinitely without requiring external power. External power is used only to transition the switch from one state to the other. The optical switch is configured with a fixed optical fiber and a movable optical fiber. The movable optical fiber is guided by various actuators in conjunction with a latching mechanism that configure the switch in one position that corresponds to the on state and in another position that corresponds to the off state.

  5. Project BudBurst: Citizen Science for All Seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meymaris, K.; Henderson, S.; Alaback, P.; Havens, K.

    2008-12-01

    Providing opportunities for individuals to contribute to a better understanding of climate change is the hallmark of Project BudBurst (www.budburst.org). This highly successful, national citizen science program, now in its second year, is bringing climate change education outreach to thousands of individuals. Project BudBurst is a national citizen science initiative designed to engage the public in observations of phenological (plant life cycle) events that raise awareness of climate change, and create a cadre of informed citizen scientists. Citizen science programs such as Project BudBurst provide the opportunity for students and interested laypersons to actively participate in scientific research. Such programs are important not only from an educational perspective, but because they also enable scientists to broaden the geographic and temporal scale of their observations. The goals of Project BudBurst are to 1) increase awareness of phenology as an area of scientific study; 2) Increase awareness of the impacts of changing climates on plants; and 3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process. From its 2008 launch in February, this on-line educational and data-entry program, engaged participants of all ages and walks of life in recording the timing of the leafing and flowering of wild and cultivated species found across the continent. Thus far, participants from 49 states have submitted data that is being submitted to the USA National Phenology Network (www.usanpn.org) database. Project BudBurst has been the subject of almost 200 media outlets including NPR, national and regional television broadcasts, and most of the major national and regional newspapers. This presentation will provide an overview of Project Budburst and will report on the results of the 2008 field campaign and discuss plans to expand Project BudBurst in 2009. Project BudBurst is a Windows to the Universe Citizen Science program managed by the University

  6. Network-timing-dependent plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Delattre, Vincent; Keller, Daniel; Perich, Matthew; Markram, Henry; Muller, Eilif B.

    2015-01-01

    Bursts of activity in networks of neurons are thought to convey salient information and drive synaptic plasticity. Here we report that network bursts also exert a profound effect on Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP). In acute slices of juvenile rat somatosensory cortex we paired a network burst, which alone induced long-term depression (LTD), with STDP-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) and LTD. We observed that STDP-induced LTP was either unaffected, blocked or flipped into LTD by the network burst, and that STDP-induced LTD was either saturated or flipped into LTP, depending on the relative timing of the network burst with respect to spike coincidences of the STDP event. We hypothesized that network bursts flip STDP-induced LTP to LTD by depleting resources needed for LTP and therefore developed a resource-dependent STDP learning rule. In a model neural network under the influence of the proposed resource-dependent STDP rule, we found that excitatory synaptic coupling was homeostatically regulated to produce power law distributed burst amplitudes reflecting self-organized criticality, a state that ensures optimal information coding. PMID:26106298

  7. The Error Distribution of BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Michael S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Kippen, R. Marc; Brainerd, J. J.; Hurley, Kevin; Connaughton, Valerie; Meegan, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    Empirical probability models for BATSE gamma-ray burst (GRB) location errors are developed via a Bayesian analysis of the separations between BATSE GRB locations and locations obtained with the Interplanetary Network (IPN). Models are compared and their parameters estimated using 392 GRBs with single IPN annuli and 19 GRBs with intersecting IPN annuli. Most of the analysis is for the 4Br BATSE catalog; earlier catalogs are also analyzed. The simplest model that provides a good representation of the error distribution has 78% of the probability in a "core" term with a systematic error of 1.85 deg and the remainder in an extended tail with a systematic error of 5.1 deg, which implies a 68% confidence radius for bursts with negligible statistical uncertainties of 2.2 deg. There is evidence for a more complicated model in which the error distribution depends on the BATSE data type that was used to obtain the location. Bright bursts are typically located using the CONT data type, and according to the more complicated model, the 68% confidence radius for CONT-located bursts with negligible statistical uncertainties is 2.0 deg.

  8. Integrated Circuit Chip Improves Network Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Prior to 1999 and the development of SpaceWire, a standard for high-speed links for computer networks managed by the European Space Agency (ESA), there was no high-speed communications protocol for flight electronics. Onboard computers, processing units, and other electronics had to be designed for individual projects and then redesigned for subsequent projects, which increased development periods, costs, and risks. After adopting the SpaceWire protocol in 2000, NASA implemented the standard on the Swift mission, a gamma ray burst-alert telescope launched in November 2004. Scientists and developers on the James Webb Space Telescope further developed the network version of SpaceWire. In essence, SpaceWire enables more science missions at a lower cost, because it provides a standard interface between flight electronics components; new systems need not be custom built to accommodate individual missions, so electronics can be reused. New protocols are helping to standardize higher layers of computer communication. Goddard Space Flight Center improved on the ESA-developed SpaceWire by enabling standard protocols, which included defining quality of service and supporting plug-and-play capabilities. Goddard upgraded SpaceWire to make the routers more efficient and reliable, with features including redundant cables, simultaneous discrete broadcast pulses, prevention of network blockage, and improved verification. Redundant cables simplify management because the user does not need to worry about which connection is available, and simultaneous broadcast signals allow multiple users to broadcast low-latency side-band signal pulses across the network using the same resources for data communication. Additional features have been added to the SpaceWire switch to prevent network blockage so that more robust networks can be designed. Goddard s verification environment for the link-and-switch implementation continuously randomizes and tests different parts, constantly anticipating

  9. BudBurst Buddies: A New Tool for Engaging the Youngest Citizen Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, L. S.; Henderson, S.; Ward, D.

    2010-12-01

    BudBurst Buddies (www.budburstbuddies.org) introduces elementary school age children to the science of observing plants and the timing of phenological (life cycle) events. BudBurst Buddies is a new part of the Project BudBurst national citizen science initiative (www.budburst.org), which allows individuals to engage in the scientific process, contributing to a better understanding of climate change while increasing public awareness of phenology and the impacts of climate change on plants. As a first step towards engaging the next generation of citizen scientists, BudBurst Buddies provides the opportunity for children to gain experience with scientific research and increases awareness of how plants change throughout the year. Children can participate in BudBurst Buddies on their own, with their families, or in formal or informal education settings. Each child who participates creates a journal about a plant of his or her choosing, makes observations of the plant over the growing season and submits findings online, earning an official BudBurst Buddies certificate. An online storybook for kids tells how two children, Lily and Sage, observed plants in their neighborhood and became BudBurst Buddies. This presentation will provide an overview of the BudBurst Buddies newly developed resources. BudBurst Buddies is a part of Project BudBurst, a national citizen science program coordinated by the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) and the Chicago Botanic Garden. Funding for this resource was provided by NEON, NSF, NASA, and the National Geographic Education Foundation.

  10. Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    Some basic observed properties of gamma-ray bursts are reviewed. Although some properties were known 25 years ago, new and more detailed observations have been made by the Compton Observatory in the past three years. The new observation with the greatest impact has been the observed isotropic distribution of bursts along with a deficiency of weak bursts which would be expected from a homogeneous burst distribution. This is not compatible with any known Galactic population of objects. Gamma-ray bursts show an enormous variety of burst morphologies and a wide spread in burst durations. The spectra of gamma-ray bursts are characterized by rapid variations and peak power which is almost entirely in the gamma-ray energy range. Delayed gamma-ray burst photons extending to GeV energies have been detected for the first time. A time dilation effect has also been reported to be observed in gamma-ray, bursts. The observation of a gamma-ray burst counterpart in another wavelength region has yet to be made.

  11. Solar Radio Bursts and Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk,

    2012-01-01

    Radio bursts from the Sun are produced by electron accelerated to relativistic energies by physical processes on the Sun such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The radio bursts are thus good indicators of solar eruptions. Three types of nonthermal radio bursts are generally associated with CMEs. Type III bursts due to accelerated electrons propagating along open magnetic field lines. The electrons are thought to be accelerated at the reconnection region beneath the erupting CME, although there is another view that the electrons may be accelerated at the CME-driven shock. Type II bursts are due to electrons accelerated at the shock front. Type II bursts are also excellent indicators of solar energetic particle (SEP) events because the same shock is supposed accelerate electrons and ions. There is a hierarchical relationship between the wavelength range of type /I bursts and the CME kinetic energy. Finally, Type IV bursts are due to electrons trapped in moving or stationary structures. The low frequency stationary type IV bursts are observed occasionally in association with very fast CMEs. These bursts originate from flare loops behind the erupting CME and hence indicate tall loops. This paper presents a summary of radio bursts and their relation to CMEs and how they can be useful for space weather predictions.

  12. Do gamma-ray burst sources repeat?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles A.; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Brainerd, J. J.; Briggs, Michael S.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald; Blumenthal, George; Brock, Martin

    1995-01-01

    The demonstration of repeated gamma-ray bursts from an individual source would severely constrain burst source models. Recent reports (Quashnock and Lamb, 1993; Wang and Lingenfelter, 1993) of evidence for repetition in the first BATSE burst catalog have generated renewed interest in this issue. Here, we analyze the angular distribution of 585 bursts of the second BATSE catalog (Meegan et al., 1994). We search for evidence of burst recurrence using the nearest and farthest neighbor statistic and the two-point angular correlation function. We find the data to be consistent with the hypothesis that burst sources do not repeat; however, a repeater fraction of up to about 20% of the observed bursts cannot be excluded.

  13. Cryogenic Quad-Redundant Thermal Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, B. C.; Lloyd, B.; Schick, S. H.; Li, L.

    2008-03-01

    A Quad-Redundant Thermal Switch (QRTS) for the James Webb Space Telescope has been successfully designed, fabricated, and tested at the Space Dynamics Laboratory (SDL). A flight-like prototype successfully passed thermal and structural qualification tests in a representative space environment and achieved Technology Readiness Level 6. The QRTS serves as a high thermal conductance, high reliability thermal connect/disconnect between heat sources and sinks. The switch design is passively closed over the entire operational range of 32-300 K. The construction is an all metallic core packaged in a cross-strapped quad-redundant configuration. Actuation of the switch is based on differential thermal expansion and is opened by applying heat to the mechanism. Key qualification tests included: robust characterization of thermal closed and open performance from 32 to 313 K; and a full suite of vibration testing (sine, random, and sine burst). This paper presents an overview of the QRTS functionality, thermal and structural qualification tests, and resulting switch performance.

  14. Heat Switches for ADRs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Heat switches are key elements in the cyclic operation of Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs). Several of the types of heat switches that have been used for ADRs are described in this paper. Key elements in selection and design of these switches include not only ON/OFF switching ratio, but also method of actuation, size, weight, and structural soundness. Some of the trade-off are detailed in this paper.

  15. Triggered plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, Clifford W.

    1988-01-01

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  16. Triggered plasma opening switch

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, C W

    1988-02-23

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  17. Switching the poles in sexual and reproductive health research: implementing a research capacity-strengthening network in West and North Africa.

    PubMed

    Dossou, Jean-Paul; Assarag, Bouchra; Delamou, Alexandre; Van der Veken, Karen; Belaid, Loubna; Ouédraogo, Moctar; Khalfallah, Sonia; Aouras, Hayet; Diadhiou, Mohamed; Fassassi, Raïmi; Delvaux, Thérèse

    2016-01-01

    Health research capacities have been improved in Africa but still remain weak as compared to other regions of the World. To strengthen these research capacities, international collaboration and networking for knowledge and capacity transfer are needed. In this commentary, we present the Network for Scientific Support in the field of Sexual and Reproductive Health in West and North Africa, its priority research topics and discuss its implementation process. Established in January 2014, the Network aims at generating human rights and gender-based research fully carried out and driven by South based institutions. It is composed of 12 institutions including the Institute of Tropical Medicine of Antwerp (Belgium) and 11 institutions from eight Francophone West and North African countries. The key areas of interest of this network are health policies analysis and health system research in family planning, HIV prevention among vulnerable groups, quality of care and breast cancers. Since it started, seventeen research proposals based on locally relevant research questions have been developed. Among the seventeen proposals, eleven have been implemented. Several research institutions enhanced linkages with local representations of international partners such as UNFPA. The network is committed to strengthening methodological research capacities and soft skills such as fundraising, advocacy and leadership. Such competencies are strongly needed for developing an effective South-based leadership in Sexual and Reproductive Health research, and for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. PMID:27502593

  18. Predicting rock bursts in mines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1979-01-01

    The microseismic method relies on observational data, amply demonstrated in laboratory experiments, that acoustic noise occurs in rocks subjected to high differential stresses. Acoustic emission becomes most pronounced as the breaking strength of the rock is reached. Laboratory studies have shown that the acoustic emission is linked with the release of stored strain energy as the rock mass undergoes small-scale adjustments such as the formation of cracks. Studies in actual mines have shown that acoustic noises often precede failure of rock masses in rock bursts or in coal bumps. Seismologists are, therefore, very interested in whether these results can be applied to large-scale failures; that is, earthquakes. An active research program in predicting rock bursts in mines is being conducted by Brian T. Brady and his colleagues at the U.S Bureau of Mines, Denver Colo.  

  19. Electronic Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambe, John; Moopen, Alexander; Thakoor, Anilkumar P.

    1988-01-01

    Memory based on neural network models content-addressable and fault-tolerant. System includes electronic equivalent of synaptic network; particular, matrix of programmable binary switching elements over which data distributed. Switches programmed in parallel by outputs of serial-input/parallel-output shift registers. Input and output terminals of bank of high-gain nonlinear amplifiers connected in nonlinear-feedback configuration by switches and by memory-prompting shift registers.

  20. Development of pacemaker properties and rhythmogenic mechanisms in the mouse embryonic respiratory network

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Marc; Toporikova, Natalia; Simmers, John; Thoby-Brisson, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Breathing is a vital rhythmic behavior generated by hindbrain neuronal circuitry, including the preBötzinger complex network (preBötC) that controls inspiration. The emergence of preBötC network activity during prenatal development has been described, but little is known regarding inspiratory neurons expressing pacemaker properties at embryonic stages. Here, we combined calcium imaging and electrophysiological recordings in mouse embryo brainstem slices together with computational modeling to reveal the existence of heterogeneous pacemaker oscillatory properties relying on distinct combinations of burst-generating INaP and ICAN conductances. The respective proportion of the different inspiratory pacemaker subtypes changes during prenatal development. Concomitantly, network rhythmogenesis switches from a purely INaP/ICAN-dependent mechanism at E16.5 to a combined pacemaker/network-driven process at E18.5. Our results provide the first description of pacemaker bursting properties in embryonic preBötC neurons and indicate that network rhythmogenesis undergoes important changes during prenatal development through alterations in both circuit properties and the biophysical characteristics of pacemaker neurons. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16125.001 PMID:27434668