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Sample records for burst switching networks

  1. Quantum Key Based Burst Confidentiality in Optical Burst Switched Networks

    PubMed Central

    Balamurugan, A. M.; Sivasubramanian, A.

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS). This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher) to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks. PMID:24578663

  2. Quantum key based burst confidentiality in optical burst switched networks.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, A M; Sivasubramanian, A

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS). This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher) to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks.

  3. QKD-Based Secured Burst Integrity Design for Optical Burst Switched Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balamurugan, A. M.; Sivasubramanian, A.; Parvathavarthini, B.

    2016-03-01

    The field of optical transmission has undergone numerous advancements and is still being researched mainly due to the fact that optical data transmission can be done at enormous speeds. It is quite evident that people prefer optical communication when it comes to large amount of data involving its transmission. The concept of switching in networks has matured enormously with several researches, architecture to implement and methods starting with Optical circuit switching to Optical Burst Switching. Optical burst switching is regarded as viable solution for switching bursts over networks but has several security vulnerabilities. However, this work exploited the security issues associated with Optical Burst Switching with respect to integrity of burst. This proposed Quantum Key based Secure Hash Algorithm (QKBSHA-512) with enhanced compression function design provides better avalanche effect over the conventional integrity algorithms.

  4. Advanced Optical Burst Switched Network Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejabati, Reza; Aracil, Javier; Castoldi, Piero; de Leenheer, Marc; Simeonidou, Dimitra; Valcarenghi, Luca; Zervas, Georgios; Wu, Jian

    In recent years, as the bandwidth and the speed of networks have increased significantly, a new generation of network-based applications using the concept of distributed computing and collaborative services is emerging (e.g., Grid computing applications). The use of the available fiber and DWDM infrastructure for these applications is a logical choice offering huge amounts of cheap bandwidth and ensuring global reach of computing resources [230]. Currently, there is a great deal of interest in deploying optical circuit (wavelength) switched network infrastructure for distributed computing applications that require long-lived wavelength paths and address the specific needs of a small number of well-known users. Typical users are particle physicists who, due to their international collaborations and experiments, generate enormous amounts of data (Petabytes per year). These users require a network infrastructures that can support processing and analysis of large datasets through globally distributed computing resources [230]. However, providing wavelength granularity bandwidth services is not an efficient and scalable solution for applications and services that address a wider base of user communities with different traffic profiles and connectivity requirements. Examples of such applications may be: scientific collaboration in smaller scale (e.g., bioinformatics, environmental research), distributed virtual laboratories (e.g., remote instrumentation), e-health, national security and defense, personalized learning environments and digital libraries, evolving broadband user services (i.e., high resolution home video editing, real-time rendering, high definition interactive TV). As a specific example, in e-health services and in particular mammography applications due to the size and quantity of images produced by remote mammography, stringent network requirements are necessary. Initial calculations have shown that for 100 patients to be screened remotely, the network

  5. Path correlation considered prioritized burst segmentation for quality of service support in optical burst switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Rui; Changyue, Jiana; He, Tingting; Yu, Jianwei; Lei, Bo; Mao, Tengyue

    2013-04-01

    Burst segmentation (BS) is a high-efficiency contention resolution scheme in bufferless optical burst switching (OBS) networks. A prioritized BS scheme for quality of service (QoS) support is developed. Unlike the existing work on the BS scheme, the proposed BS model considers path-correlated factors, such as path length, the adjoining paths carrying traffic on a given path, and the multipriority traffic coming from all paths. Byte loss probability for high-priority and low-priority bursts under the time-based assembly approach and the length-based assembly approach to estimate the performance of the proposed BS scheme by comparing the cumulative distribution function of a burst length in an OBS ingress node (source) with that in an egress node (destination) is introduced. A preemptive BS policy for different priority bursts is proposed to support the QoS of the OBS network. Finally, a simulation is given to validate the proposed analytical model in an existing OBS network with two priority bursts. It is shown that the proposed BS scheme can realize the service differentiation for multipriority traffic under the consideration of network topology-dependent parameters.

  6. Evaluation of a burst aggregation method in an optical burst switched agile all-photonic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parveen, Sonia; Radziwilowicz, Robert; Paredes, Sofia A.; Hall, Trevor J.

    2005-09-01

    This paper presents a burst aggregation method for an Agile All-Photonic Network (AAPN) operating under an asynchronous burst switched mode. The model combines both the timer-based and threshold-based approaches into a single composite burst assembly mechanism. This is evaluated semi-analytically for fixed length packets and Poisson arrivals and used as a special case to verify a more general OPNET Modeler simulation. The dependence of the blocking probability on different burst aggregation parameters is observed as well. The same procedure is extended to 'encapsulate' (aggregate) variable packet length traffic into 'envelopes' (bursts) matched to the time slots in an AAPN operating in a synchronous time-slotted mode. Results are presented for an emulation of this process using real IP network traffic from the local LAN using two encapsulation methods that differ depending upon whether 'envelope' boundaries are allowed to cross constituent packets or otherwise. Bandwidth utilization was measured for different encapsulation parameters and it is confirmed that the model with the boundaries allowed to cross packets (i.e., the model with packet segmentation) is more bandwidth-efficient even if the processing delay is slightly larger. The successful operation of the emulation system suggests as well that a simple, low-cost software implementation would be suitable to perform the burst/slot aggregation process in AAPN.

  7. A novel contention solution strategy based on priority for optical burst switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Ai-Hong; Cui, Fang-Fang

    2010-11-01

    A fundamental issue in optical burst switching (OBS) networks is to solve the burst contention for the core node. In this paper, a novel priority-based contention solution strategy for OBS networks is proposed. When the contention occurs, the burst priority is considered firstly, and then the burst segmentation method is used for the low priority bursts in this strategy. Ensuring the integrity of high priority bursts, part of the segmented bursts can be transmitted to the destination node via combining wavelength conversion and optical buffer method. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme not only ensures the integrity of high priority bursts, but also reduces the packet loss rate of the low priority bursts maximally, so that it can support good quality of service (QoS) for the network.

  8. A novel token protocol in optical burst switch ring network with fixed transmitters and tunable receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xingchen; Wang, Hongxiang; Ji, Yuefeng

    2007-11-01

    Token scheme is one of methods to overcome burst collision problem in Optical Burst Switch Ring Network with Fixed Transmitters and Tunable Receivers, but it brings big End-to-End delay and decreases bandwidth utilization. In this paper a novel token protocol is proposed, which can make better performance on End-to-End delay and bandwidth utilization.

  9. A batch channel-schedule algorithm in optical burst switch networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanjun; Wu, Jian; Lin, Jintong

    2005-02-01

    Contention resolution is one of the critical technologies in optical burst switch network, In this paper, we focused on this challenging issue, and introduce a novel scheme called batch channel-schedule. In a conventional OBS network, core node will process BHP(burst head packet)at once when it arrives, yet in our batch schedule mode, BHP is queued and then processed combining with a certain schedule algorithm at a batch schedule time. In this way, a much better decision can be made about a lot of bursts all-together. Through simulations, our algorithm is proved to improve performance and reduce burst loss probability.

  10. Controlled retransmission scheme for prioritized burst segmentation to support quality-of-service in optical burst switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Rui; He, Tingting; Mao, Tengyue

    2012-10-01

    In optical burst switching (OBS) networks, burst contentions in OBS core nodes may cause data loss. To reduce this data loss, a retransmission scheme has been applied. However, uncontrolled retransmission may significantly increase network load and data loss probability, thus defeating the retransmission purpose. In addition, in a priority traffic existing OBS network, OBS nodes may apply different retransmission mechanisms to priority bursts for quality-of-service (QoS) support. We present a controlled retransmission scheme for prioritized burst segmentation to support QoS in OBS networks. Different from previous work in the literature, we set a different value to retransmission probability at each contention and propose a retransmission analytical model for a burst segmentation contention resolution scheme. In addition, we apply the proposed retransmission scheme to the prioritized burst segmentation for QoS support. We take into account the load at each link due to both the fresh and the retransmitted traffic and calculate the path-blocking probability and the byte loss probability for high-priority and low-priority bursts to evaluate the network performance. An extensive simulation is proposed to validate our analytical model.

  11. A Novel QKD-based Secure Edge Router Architecture Design for Burst Confidentiality in Optical Burst Switched Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balamurugan, A. M.; Sivasubramanian, A.

    2014-06-01

    The Optical Burst Switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology issue that could achieve a viable network in future. They have the ability to meet the bandwidth requisite of those applications that call for intensive bandwidth. The field of optical transmission has undergone numerous advancements and is still being researched mainly due to the fact that optical data transmission can be done at enormous speeds. The concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution and quality of service (QoS). This paper proposes a framework based on QKD based secure edge router architecture design to provide burst confidentiality. The QKD protocol offers high level of confidentiality as it is indestructible. The design architecture was implemented in FPGA using diverse models and the results were taken. The results show that the proposed model is suitable for real time secure routing applications of the Optical burst switched networks.

  12. AOS: adaptive offset time scheduling for TCP fairness in optical burst-switched network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hongyun; Zhao, Yongxiang; Chen, Changjia

    2005-11-01

    Optical Burst-switched (OBS) is a promising switching technology and expected to support the future Internet backbone with dramatically increasing bandwidth demand. In an OBS network, burst contention causes burst loss due to bufferless nature of OBS core network. This kind of burst loss will interact with the above TCP layer. In this paper, we study the impact of this interaction on TCP fairness. We find significant unfairness among TCP flows that share the OBS core network, i.e. one flow obtains higher throughput while any others with much lower throughputs. The cause is the phenomenon called "the bigger eats the smaller (BES)", in which a TCP flow with higher rate occasionally will "see" less burst contentions and increase its rate further, while a TCP with lower rate will see more burst contentions and decrease its rate continually. Discuss a simple model to explain BES and verify that a continuous sequence of bursts will enhance BES. Then observe that offset time will be a good choice to control TCP fairness by a curve of unfairness control with offset time adjustment. Finally an adaptive offset time scheduling (AOS) algorithm is proposed. AOS assigns burst offset time value adaptive to the rate of TCP flow. The simulation results show that the fairness can be significantly improved by our AOS scheme.

  13. Proposal of Novel Optical Burst Signal Receiver for ONU in Optical Switched Access Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Hiromi; Hamasaki, Keita; Kuriyama, Takashi; Tsuboi, Toshinori; Kasai, Hiroyuki

    To realize economical optical burst signal receivers for the Optical Network Unit (ONU) of the Ethernet Optical Switched Access Network (E-OSAN), we previously implemented optical burst receivers with AC-coupling and DC-coupling using off-the-shelf components, and showed that the former offers better performance. This paper proposes a new optical burst signal receiver that uses the transfer function, Gn(s) =1-Hn(s), where Hn(s) denotes a Bessel filter transfer function of order n. We also present a method for designing the proposed receiver and clarify that it has better performance than the conventional AC-coupling one. We then present an LCR circuit synthesis of Gn(s), which is necessary to actually implement a burst receiver based on the proposal.

  14. Two novel batch scheduling algorithms with insufficient wavelength converters in optical burst switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sheng; Pang, Hong-Feng; Li, Ling-Xia

    2013-03-01

    In optical burst switching networks, wavelength converters (WCs) of core nodes are used to decrease the burst loss rate. The implementation of the WCs is difficult in the current technology and the cost of WCs is high. So some core nodes may be configured insufficient WCs to reduce the cost in OBS networks. However, many data channel scheduling algorithms do not count the number of WCs and the performance of burst loss rate is not good in the condition of insufficient WCs. To overcome the defect, two novel batch scheduling algorithm with insufficiency of WC are proposed in this paper. The former algorithm improves the WCs' resource utilization probability to reduce the burst loss rate and the later algorithm saves the WCs' resource for the incoming bursts to use to improve the burst loss performance. The later algorithm can reduce more burst loss rate with the same number of WCs, compared with the other scheduling algorithms. The simulation results show that the later algorithm is more effective in reducing the burst loss rate with insufficient WCs.

  15. A novel ingress node design for video streaming over optical burst switching networks.

    PubMed

    Askar, S; Zervas, G; Hunter, D K; Simeonidou, D

    2011-12-12

    This paper introduces a novel ingress node design which takes advantage of video data partitioning in order to deliver enhanced video streaming quality when using H.264/AVC codec over optical burst switching networks. Ns2 simulations show that the proposed scheme delivers improved video traffic quality without affecting other traffic, such as best effort traffic. Although the extra network load is comparatively small, the average gain in video PSNR was 5 dB over existing burst cloning schemes, with a maximum end-to-end delay of 17 ms, and jitter of less than 0.35 ms.

  16. Burst switching without guard interval in all-optical software-define star intra-data center network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Philip N.; Wang, Ting

    2014-02-01

    Optical switching has been introduced in intra-data center networks (DCNs) to increase capacity and to reduce power consumption. Recently we proposed a star MIMO OFDM-based all-optical DCN with burst switching and software-defined networking. Here, we introduce the control procedure for the star DCN in detail for the first time. The timing, signaling, and operation are described for each step to achieve efficient bandwidth resource utilization. Furthermore, the guidelines for the burst assembling period selection that allows burst switching without guard interval are discussed. The star all-optical DCN offers flexible and efficient control for next-generation data center application.

  17. Binary tree-based fault location algorithm for optical burst switching network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ru-Yan; Liu, Dan; Peng, Huan-Jia; Lv, Ke-Wei

    2009-07-01

    This paper proposes an effective method of fault location based on a binary tree for optical burst switching (OBS) network. To minimize the monitoring cost, we divide the network into several monitor domains by introducing monitoring-cycle algorithms. In order to generate an exclusive code, we modify the monitoring cycle algorithm when two nodes have the same code. Through the binary tree algorithm, a pre-computation of faults in the OBS network can be achieved. When a fault happens, we can locate it immediately and accurately. Examples have proved that the algorithm has general applicability.

  18. A new approach for QoS support in optical burst switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Changbiao; Long, Keping; Zhang, Bibo; Yang, Shizhong

    2005-11-01

    This paper presents a new approach for quality of service (QoS) support in optical burst switching (OBS) networks. In the approach, the data channels of an outgoing link at a core node are divided into multiple groups, with each group corresponding to a service class. The number of data channels in each group is mainly determined by data traffic. In general, a data burst (DB) can be sent on a data channel reserved by its burst head packet (BHP) only in its own group. Upon failing to reserve any bandwidth in its own group, the BHP tries to re-reserve even preempt bandwidth on a data channel in a lower-priority group. A lower-priority BHP can't reserve bandwidth on any data channel in a higherpriority group. In addition, this paper also investigates the reasonable relation between the preempting DB length and the preempted DB length.

  19. An effective implementation scheme of just-in-time protocol for optical burst switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guiling; Li, Xinwan; Chen, Jian-Ping; Wang, Hui

    2005-02-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) has been emerging as a promising technology that can effectively support the next generation IP-oriented transportation networks. JIT signaling protocol for OBS is relatively simple and easy to be implemented by hardware. This paper presented an effective scheme to implement the JIT protocol, which not only can effectively implement reservation and release of optical channels based on JIT, but also can process the failure of channel reservation and release due to loss of burst control packets. The scheme includes: (1) a BHP (burst head packet) path table is designed and built at each OBS node. It is used to guarantee the corresponding burst control packet, i.e. BHP, BEP (burst end packet) and BEP_ACK (BEP acknowledgement), to be transmitted in the same path. (2) The timed retransmission of BEP and the reversed deletion of the item in BHP path tables triggered by the corresponding BEP_ACK are combined to solve the problems caused by the loss of the signaling messages in channel reservation and release process. (3) Burst head packets and BEP_ACK are transmitted using "best-effort" method. Related signaling messages and their formats for the proposed scheme are also given.

  20. Enhanced just-in-time plus protocol for optical burst switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Joel J. P. C.; Gregório, José M. B.; Vasilakos, Athanasios V.

    2010-07-01

    We propose a new one-way resource reservation protocol for optical burst switching (OBS) networks, called Enhanced Just-in-Time Plus (E-JIT+). The protocol is described in detail, and its formal specification is presented, following an extended finite state machine approach. The performance evaluation of E-JIT+ is analyzed in comparison with other proposed OBS protocols (JIT+ and E-JIT) for the following network topologies: rings; degree-two, degree-three, and degree-four chordal rings; mesh-torus; NSFNET; ARPANET; FCCN-NET; and the European Optical Network. We evaluate and compare the performance of the different protocols in terms of burst loss probability, taking into account the most important OBS network parameters. It was shown that E-JIT+ performs better than available one-way resource reservation protocols for all the evaluated network topologies. Moreover, the scalability of E-JIT+ was observed, and when the network traffic increases, the burst loss probability also increases, leading to a worse network performance.

  1. QoS-guaranteed burst transmission for VoIP service over optical burst switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, Takuji; Kasahara, Shoji

    2007-08-01

    We propose a burst transmission method that guarantees the voice over Internet protocol (VoIP) service. The proposed method consists of three techniques: round-robin burst assembly with slotted scheduling, priority control with void filling, and hop-based preemption. Each technique is utilized so that the burst loss probability and the burst transmission delay satisfy VoIP quality of service (QoS). We evaluate by simulation the performance of the proposed method in NSFNET with 14 nodes. Numerical examples show that our proposed method is effective for guaranteeing the VoIP QoS while accommodating a large number of VoIP users.

  2. A class-based scheduling algorithm with high throughput for optical burst switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guiling; Chen, Jianping; Li, Xinwan; Wang, Hui

    2005-02-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) is more efficient and feasible solution to build terabit IP-over-WDM optical network by employing relatively matured photonic and opto-electronic devices and combining the advantage of high bandwidth of optical transmission/switching and high flexibility of electronic control/processing. Channel scheduling algorithm is one of the key issues related to OBS networks. In this paper, a class-based scheduling algorithm is presented with emphasis on fairly utilizing the bandwidth among different services. A maximum reserved channel numbers and a maximum channel search times is introduced for each service based on its class of services, load and available bandwidth resource in the class-based scheduling algorithm. The performance of the scheduling algorithm is studied in detail by simulation. The results show that the scheduling algorithm can allocate the bandwidth more fairly among different services and the total burst loss ratio under high throughput can be lowered with acceptable expense on delay performance of services with lower delay requirement. Problems related with burst loss ratio and the delay requirement of different services can be well solved simultaneously.

  3. Performance Analysis of Particle Swarm Optimization Based Routing Algorithm in Optical Burst Switching Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Rui; Yu, Junle

    2011-12-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) has been regarded as the next generation optical switching technology. In this paper, the routing problem based on particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm in OBS has been studies and analyzed. Simulation results indicate that, the PSO based routing algorithm will optimal than the conversional shortest path first algorithm in space cost and calculation cost. Conclusions have certain theoretical significances for the improvement of OBS routing protocols.

  4. A burst compression and expansion technique for variable-rate users in satellite-switched TDMA networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, James M.

    1990-01-01

    A burst compression and expansion technique is described for asynchronously interconnecting variable-data-rate users with cost-efficient ground terminals in a satellite-switched, time-division-multiple-access (SS/TDMA) network. Compression and expansion buffers in each ground terminal convert between lower rate, asynchronous, continuous-user data streams and higher-rate TDMA bursts synchronized with the satellite-switched timing. The technique described uses a first-in, first-out (FIFO) memory approach which enables the use of inexpensive clock sources by both the users and the ground terminals and obviates the need for elaborate user clock synchronization processes. A continuous range of data rates from kilobits per second to that approaching the modulator burst rate (hundreds of megabits per second) can be accommodated. The technique was developed for use in the NASA Lewis Research Center System Integration, Test, and Evaluation (SITE) facility. Some key features of the technique have also been implemented in the ground terminals developed at NASA Lewis for use in on-orbit evaluation of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) high burst rate (HBR) system.

  5. A burst compression and expansion technique for variable-rate users in satellite-switched TDMA networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, James M.

    1990-01-01

    A burst compression and expansion technique is described for asynchronously interconnecting variable-data-rate users with cost-efficient ground terminals in a satellite-switched, time-division-multiple-access (SS/TDMA) network. Compression and expansion buffers in each ground terminal convert between lower rate, asynchronous, continuous-user data streams and higher-rate TDMA bursts synchronized with the satellite-switched timing. The technique described uses a first-in, first-out (FIFO) memory approach which enables the use of inexpensive clock sources by both the users and the ground terminals and obviates the need for elaborate user clock synchronization processes. A continous range of data rates from kilobits per second to that approaching the modulator burst rate (hundreds of megabits per second) can be accommodated. The technique was developed for use in the NASA Lewis Research Center System Integration, Test, and Evaluation (SITE) facility. Some key features of the technique have also been implemented in the gound terminals developed at NASA Lewis for use in on-orbit evaluation of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) high burst rate (HBR) system.

  6. A burst compression and expansion technique for variable-rate users in satellite-switched TDMA networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, James M.

    1990-01-01

    A burst compression and expansion technique is described for asynchronously interconnecting variable-data-rate users with cost-efficient ground terminals in a satellite-switched, time-division-multiple-access (SS/TDMA) network. Compression and expansion buffers in each ground terminal convert between lower rate, asynchronous, continuous-user data streams and higher-rate TDMA bursts synchronized with the satellite-switched timing. The technique described uses a first-in, first-out (FIFO) memory approach which enables the use of inexpensive clock sources by both the users and the ground terminals and obviates the need for elaborate user clock synchronization processes. A continuous range of data rates from kilobits per second to that approaching the modulator burst rate (hundreds of megabits per second) can be accommodated. The technique was developed for use in the NASA Lewis Research Center System Integration, Test, and Evaluation (SITE) facility. Some key features of the technique have also been implemented in the ground terminals developed at NASA Lewis for use in on-orbit evaluation of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) high burst rate (HBR) system.

  7. Comparative study of contention resolution policies in optical burst-switched WDM networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Myungsik; Qiao, Chunming; Dixit, Sudhir

    2000-10-01

    The offset-time-based QoS scheme has been proposed for the next generation Optical Internet as a way to improve current IP's best effort service. For a single node, it has been shown that the offset-time-based scheme efficiently achieves service differentiation without requiring any buffer at the WDM layer. In this paper, the offset-time-based scheme is applied to the multi-hop base. To this end, we consider various policies to handle blocked bursts such as drop, retransmission, deflection routing and buffering in the multi-hop very high performance Backbone Network Service (vBNS), and compare their performance in terms of average wavelength utilization, the average wavelength efficiency and the average end-to-end extra delay. It is shown that the buffering policy is useful with scarce network resource (e.g., bandwidth), but the dropping policy in conjunction with the offset-time-based scheme is good enough with abundant resources.

  8. Electronic implementation of optical burst switching techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albanese, Ilijc; Darcie, Thomas E.; Ganti, Sudhakar

    2013-10-01

    Extensive research effort is ongoing in energy-efficient Internet-based communications. Optical Flow Switching (OFS) and Optical Burst Switching (OBS) offer potentially efficient alternatives to IP-router-based networks for large data transactions, but significant challenges remain. OFS requires each user to install expensive core network technology, limiting application to highly specialized nodes. OBS can achieve higher scalability but burst assembly/disassembly procedures reduce power efficiency. Finally both OFS and OBS use all-optical switching technologies for which energy efficiency and flexibility remain subject to debate. Our study aims at combining the advantages of both OBS and OFS while avoiding their shortcomings. We consider using a two-way resource reservation protocol for periodic concatenations of large (e.g. 1 Mb) packets or Media Frames (MFs). These chains of MFs (MFCs) are semi-transparent with a periodicity referred to as the "transparency degree". Each MFC is assembled and stored at an end-user machine during the resource reservation procedure and is then switched and buffered electronically along its path. The periodic configuration of each MFC enables interleaving of several chains using buffering only to align the MFs in each MFC in time, largely reducing the buffer requirements with respect to OBS. This periodicity also enables a simple scheduling algorithm to schedule large transactions with minimal control plane processing, achieving link utilization approaching 99.9%. In summary, results indicate that implementing optical burst switching techniques in the electronic domain is a compelling path forward to high-throughput power-efficient networking.

  9. Efficient neighbor channel reservation for contention resolution in optical burst-switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Alam; Aziz, Khurram; Khan, Samee U.

    2013-08-01

    We propose a different reflection-based technique, named efficient neighbor channel reservation, where a contending burst is reflected from a suitable neighbor node and then resumes its original path. Our proposed scheme does not use any extra hardware and addresses several limitations of other schemes including: (a) eliminating the use of bulky fiber delay lines, (b) avoiding complexity required with burst segmentation, (c) preventing resource wastage that occurs with prereservation schemes, and (d) preventing loop formation inherent in most deflection routing schemes.

  10. Proposal of dynamic protection/restoration schemes for QoS support in labeled optical burst switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yawei; Chi, Shuli; Shi, Jindan; Wu, Jian; Hong, Xiaobin; Lin, Jintong

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, two novel protection and restoration schemes were proposed by using the BC and BR schemes which were originally designed to reduce the bursts loss probability due to contention in OBS network. The 1+1 protection scheme in LOBS can be easily carried out using the MPLS 1+1 protection scheme in the 2.5 layer and burst cloning scheme in the OBS layer. By introducing some new OSPF-TE opaque LSA messages, the burst retransmission scheme can be transplanted into the restoration scheme in LOBS network. Furthermore, the dynamic quality of resilience mechanism to inherit these two schemes according to the QoS requirement of the traffic was also investigated. Experimental study using a LOBS network test bed verified that the proposed schemes suited well in the LOBS network.

  11. Enhancing the Quality of Service for Real Time Traffic over Optical Burst Switching (OBS) Networks with Ensuring the Fairness for Other Traffics.

    PubMed

    Al-Shargabi, Mohammed A; Shaikh, Asadullah; Ismail, Abdulsamad S

    2016-01-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) networks have been attracting much consideration as a promising approach to build the next generation optical Internet. A solution for enhancing the Quality of Service (QoS) for high priority real time traffic over OBS with the fairness among the traffic types is absent in current OBS' QoS schemes. In this paper we present a novel Real Time Quality of Service with Fairness Ratio (RT-QoSFR) scheme that can adapt the burst assembly parameters according to the traffic QoS needs in order to enhance the real time traffic QoS requirements and to ensure the fairness for other traffic. The results show that RT-QoSFR scheme is able to fulfill the real time traffic requirements (end to end delay, and loss rate) ensuring the fairness for other traffics under various conditions such as the type of real time traffic and traffic load. RT-QoSFR can guarantee that the delay of the real time traffic packets does not exceed the maximum packets transfer delay value. Furthermore, it can reduce the real time traffic packets loss, at the same time guarantee the fairness for non real time traffic packets by determining the ratio of real time traffic inside the burst to be 50-60%, 30-40%, and 10-20% for high, normal, and low traffic loads respectively.

  12. Enhancing the Quality of Service for Real Time Traffic over Optical Burst Switching (OBS) Networks with Ensuring the Fairness for Other Traffics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shargabi, Mohammed A.; Ismail, Abdulsamad S.

    2016-01-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) networks have been attracting much consideration as a promising approach to build the next generation optical Internet. A solution for enhancing the Quality of Service (QoS) for high priority real time traffic over OBS with the fairness among the traffic types is absent in current OBS’ QoS schemes. In this paper we present a novel Real Time Quality of Service with Fairness Ratio (RT-QoSFR) scheme that can adapt the burst assembly parameters according to the traffic QoS needs in order to enhance the real time traffic QoS requirements and to ensure the fairness for other traffic. The results show that RT-QoSFR scheme is able to fulfill the real time traffic requirements (end to end delay, and loss rate) ensuring the fairness for other traffics under various conditions such as the type of real time traffic and traffic load. RT-QoSFR can guarantee that the delay of the real time traffic packets does not exceed the maximum packets transfer delay value. Furthermore, it can reduce the real time traffic packets loss, at the same time guarantee the fairness for non real time traffic packets by determining the ratio of real time traffic inside the burst to be 50–60%, 30–40%, and 10–20% for high, normal, and low traffic loads respectively. PMID:27583557

  13. ROBS: a novel architecture of reliable optical burst switching with congestion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jiangtao; Zhang, Zhizhong; Qiu, Shaofeng; Wang, Jun

    2005-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel modified architecture of Optical Burst-Switched Networks, called Reliable Optical Burst Switching (ROBS), which introduces congestion control and retransmission mechanisms of TCP to OBS layer. Design scheme of edge and core nodes for ROBS are both demonstrated. Part of the ROBS function has been implemented on ns-2 platform. Performance improvements due to burst retransmission are simulated and presented.

  14. Burst segmentation for void-filling scheduling and its performance evaluation in optical burst switching.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wei; Wang, Sheng; Li, Lemin

    2004-12-27

    As a promising solution for the next generation optical Internet, optical burst switching still has much to be improved, especially the design of core routers. This paper mainly focuses on channel scheduling algorithms of core routers and proposes a new practical scheduling algorithm. In the new algorithm, burst segmentation, one of the contention resolution schemes that are another major concern in core router design, is introduced. The proposed algorithm is analyzed theoretically and evaluated by computer simulations. The results show that the new algorithm, compared with existing traditional scheduling algorithms, can lower the packet loss probability and enhance the link utilization and network performance.

  15. The experimental optical burst switching system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinwan; Chen, Jian-Ping; Wu, Guiling; Wang, Hui; Lu, Jialin; Ye, Ailun

    2005-02-01

    The first optical burst switching (OBS) system has been demonstrated in China, which includes three edge routers and one core-node. A kind of fast wavelength selective optical switching was used in the system. The core OBS node consists of a kind of wavelength selective optical switch we developed. It consists of two SOA switches and one wavelength selective thin film filter with centre wavelength at one wavelength. There are one input optical fiber and two output fibers, each fiber carries two wavelengths. The Dell PE2650 servers act as the edge OBS routers. The wavelength of each data channel is located in C-band and the bit rate is at 1.25Gbps. The control channel uses bit rate of 100Mbps at wavelength of 1310 nm. A novel effective scheme for Just-In-Time (JIT) protocol was proposed and implemented. OBS services, such as Video on Demand (VOD) and file transfer protocol (FTP), have been demonstrated. Assembling and scheduling methods that are capable to guarantee the QoS (quality of service) of the transported service are studied.

  16. Switch for serial or parallel communication networks

    DOEpatents

    Crosette, Dario B.

    1994-01-01

    A communication switch apparatus and a method for use in a geographically extensive serial, parallel or hybrid communication network linking a multi-processor or parallel processing system has a very low software processing overhead in order to accommodate random burst of high density data. Associated with each processor is a communication switch. A data source and a data destination, a sensor suite or robot for example, may also be associated with a switch. The configuration of the switches in the network are coordinated through a master processor node and depends on the operational phase of the multi-processor network: data acquisition, data processing, and data exchange. The master processor node passes information on the state to be assumed by each switch to the processor node associated with the switch. The processor node then operates a series of multi-state switches internal to each communication switch. The communication switch does not parse and interpret communication protocol and message routing information. During a data acquisition phase, the communication switch couples sensors producing data to the processor node associated with the switch, to a downlink destination on the communications network, or to both. It also may couple an uplink data source to its processor node. During the data exchange phase, the switch couples its processor node or an uplink data source to a downlink destination (which may include a processor node or a robot), or couples an uplink source to its processor node and its processor node to a downlink destination.

  17. Switch for serial or parallel communication networks

    DOEpatents

    Crosette, D.B.

    1994-07-19

    A communication switch apparatus and a method for use in a geographically extensive serial, parallel or hybrid communication network linking a multi-processor or parallel processing system has a very low software processing overhead in order to accommodate random burst of high density data. Associated with each processor is a communication switch. A data source and a data destination, a sensor suite or robot for example, may also be associated with a switch. The configuration of the switches in the network are coordinated through a master processor node and depends on the operational phase of the multi-processor network: data acquisition, data processing, and data exchange. The master processor node passes information on the state to be assumed by each switch to the processor node associated with the switch. The processor node then operates a series of multi-state switches internal to each communication switch. The communication switch does not parse and interpret communication protocol and message routing information. During a data acquisition phase, the communication switch couples sensors producing data to the processor node associated with the switch, to a downlink destination on the communications network, or to both. It also may couple an uplink data source to its processor node. During the data exchange phase, the switch couples its processor node or an uplink data source to a downlink destination (which may include a processor node or a robot), or couples an uplink source to its processor node and its processor node to a downlink destination. 9 figs.

  18. A burst segmentation-deflection routing contention resolution mechanism in OBS networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Ai-hong; Wang, Bo-yun

    2012-01-01

    One of the key problems to hinder the realization of optical burst switching (OBS) technology in the core networks is the losses due to the contention among the bursts at the core nodes. Burst segmentation is an effective contention resolution technique used to reduce the number of packets lost due to the burst losses. In our work, a burst segmentation-deflection routing contention resolution mechanism in OBS networks is proposed. When the contention occurs, the bursts are segmented according to the lowest packet loss probability of networks firstly, and then the segmented burst is deflected on the optimum routing. An analytical model is proposed to evaluate the contention resolution mechanism. Simulation results show that high-priority bursts have significantly lower packet loss probability and transmission delay than the low-priority. And the performance of the burst lengths, in which the number of segments per burst distributes geometrically, is more effective than that of the deterministically distributed burst lengths.

  19. Blocking performance of a burst-outputted model considering different service rates and different output port-selected probabilities in an optical burst switching core node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Rui; Changyue, Jiana; He, Tingting; Mao, Tengyue; Yu, Jianwei; Lei, Bo

    2013-04-01

    In an optical burst switching core node, each output port is equipped with a different network interface unit that can provide a specific data rate. Bursts will use different probabilities of select output ports, which is in accordance to the path-length metric-based routing optimal algorithm and wavelength resource situation. Previous studies ignore this issue. We establish a burst-outputted model considering the different service rate of output ports and different port-selected probabilities. We calculate burst-blocking probability and analyze the relationship between service rate and output-port-selected probability in detail.

  20. Performance evaluation of group channel-schedule mechanism used in optical-burst switching system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Li, Y. J.; Wu, J.; Lin, J. T.

    2005-11-01

    Channel scheduling is a key technology in Optical Burst Switch network. In conventional sense, BHP (burst header packet) is always processed at the core node once it is received. Compared with these immediate scheduling algorithms, BHP will be delayed to a time window in Group Channel-Schedule Algorithm before it is scheduled. As for the Group-Channel Schedule Algorithm, analysis was made to investigate the influence caused by the schedule time window ▵t on the performance of OBS network. Then comparison is made between the currently used immediate schedule algorithms and the group-schedule algorithm. Evaluation results show that the packet loss performance is improved.

  1. A novel technique for resolving burst contention in OBS networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Amit Kumar; Kaler, R. S.

    2010-03-01

    In this article, in order to resolve burst contention (burst dropping), a new scheme for an optical burst switching (OBS) network has been proposed which is based on the integration of wavelength selection and burst assignment. The proposed scheme provides proportional differentiated services in bufferless OBS networks by dynamically assigning more and longer periods of wavelengths to higher priority classes. In addition, burst head packets (BHPs) are buffered electrically so that fiber delay lines are unnecessary at core nodes. As a result, BHP of a lower priority class is buffered at the core router when it cannot find an available wavelength. It has an opportunity to reschedule its burst to the wavelengths that have been assigned to higher priority classes but have not yet been reserved. The proposed integrated scheme not only provides proportional differentiated services but also achieves lower average dropping probability without any preemption or segmentation mechanisms. Compared with existing approaches, the proposed integrated scheme does not need to generate any special packets and needs to maintain only a few parameters at core nodes.The proposed scheme has several attractive features such as fast, simple implementation and improved burst dropping performance. Extensive simulation results have been used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme in comparison to traditional schemes.

  2. Autaptic Connections Shift Network Excitability and Bursting

    PubMed Central

    Wiles, Laura; Gu, Shi; Pasqualetti, Fabio; Parvesse, Brandon; Gabrieli, David; Bassett, Danielle S.; Meaney, David F.

    2017-01-01

    We examine the role of structural autapses, when a neuron synapses onto itself, in driving network-wide bursting behavior. Using a simple spiking model of neuronal activity, we study how autaptic connections affect activity patterns, and evaluate if controllability significantly affects changes in bursting from autaptic connections. Adding more autaptic connections to excitatory neurons increased the number of spiking events and the number of network-wide bursts. We observed excitatory synapses contributed more to bursting behavior than inhibitory synapses. We evaluated if neurons with high average controllability, predicted to push the network into easily achievable states, affected bursting behavior differently than neurons with high modal controllability, thought to influence the network into difficult to reach states. Results show autaptic connections to excitatory neurons with high average controllability led to higher burst frequencies than adding the same number of self-looping connections to neurons with high modal controllability. The number of autapses required to induce bursting was lowered by adding autapses to high degree excitatory neurons. These results suggest a role of autaptic connections in controlling network-wide bursts in diverse cortical and subcortical regions of mammalian brain. Moreover, they open up new avenues for the study of dynamic neurophysiological correlates of structural controllability. PMID:28266594

  3. Optical burst add-drop multiplexing technique for sub-wavelength granularity in wavelength multiplexed ring networks.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jeong Sik; Seo, Young Kwang; Yoo, Hark; Park, Paul K; Rhee, June-Koo; Won, Yong Hyub; Kang, Min Ho

    2007-10-01

    We demonstrate optical burst add-drop multiplexing as a practical application of the optical burst switching technology in a wavelength-division-multiplexed ring network. To control optical bursts in the network, a burst identifier (BI) for delivering control information, and a BI processor for handling the BI, were designed. Optical bursts of 10- to 100-mus in length were optically multiplexed or demultiplexed in an intermediate node of the ring network. The demonstration shows that the optical burst add-drop multiplexing technique provides sub-wavelength granularity to a ring network.

  4. Neuromorphic atomic switch networks.

    PubMed

    Avizienis, Audrius V; Sillin, Henry O; Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Shieh, Hsien Hang; Aono, Masakazu; Stieg, Adam Z; Gimzewski, James K

    2012-01-01

    Efforts to emulate the formidable information processing capabilities of the brain through neuromorphic engineering have been bolstered by recent progress in the fabrication of nonlinear, nanoscale circuit elements that exhibit synapse-like operational characteristics. However, conventional fabrication techniques are unable to efficiently generate structures with the highly complex interconnectivity found in biological neuronal networks. Here we demonstrate the physical realization of a self-assembled neuromorphic device which implements basic concepts of systems neuroscience through a hardware-based platform comprised of over a billion interconnected atomic-switch inorganic synapses embedded in a complex network of silver nanowires. Observations of network activation and passive harmonic generation demonstrate a collective response to input stimulus in agreement with recent theoretical predictions. Further, emergent behaviors unique to the complex network of atomic switches and akin to brain function are observed, namely spatially distributed memory, recurrent dynamics and the activation of feedforward subnetworks. These devices display the functional characteristics required for implementing unconventional, biologically and neurally inspired computational methodologies in a synthetic experimental system.

  5. Neuromorphic Atomic Switch Networks

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Shieh, Hsien Hang; Aono, Masakazu; Stieg, Adam Z.; Gimzewski, James K.

    2012-01-01

    Efforts to emulate the formidable information processing capabilities of the brain through neuromorphic engineering have been bolstered by recent progress in the fabrication of nonlinear, nanoscale circuit elements that exhibit synapse-like operational characteristics. However, conventional fabrication techniques are unable to efficiently generate structures with the highly complex interconnectivity found in biological neuronal networks. Here we demonstrate the physical realization of a self-assembled neuromorphic device which implements basic concepts of systems neuroscience through a hardware-based platform comprised of over a billion interconnected atomic-switch inorganic synapses embedded in a complex network of silver nanowires. Observations of network activation and passive harmonic generation demonstrate a collective response to input stimulus in agreement with recent theoretical predictions. Further, emergent behaviors unique to the complex network of atomic switches and akin to brain function are observed, namely spatially distributed memory, recurrent dynamics and the activation of feedforward subnetworks. These devices display the functional characteristics required for implementing unconventional, biologically and neurally inspired computational methodologies in a synthetic experimental system. PMID:22880101

  6. Packet switched networks with photonic code processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas-Fernandez, J. B.; Chen, L. R.; LaRochelle, S.; Leon-Garcia, A.; Plant, D.; Rusch, L. A.

    2006-09-01

    In this paper we present our study of all optical label encoding and ultrafast processing to route packets through optical networks. Our investigations include new network topologies, novel photonic components and performance analysis. We propose a label stacked packet switching system using spectral amplitude codes (SAC) as labels. We have developed enabling technologies to realize key photonic components for generation, correlation (identification) and conversion (swapping) of SAC-labels. We generate and identify the labels with fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) encoders used in transmission. Furthermore, we demonstrate a static, all-photonic code-label converter based on a semiconductor fiber ring laser that can be used for label swapping of SAC-labels. We also address the design of dedicated receivers for optical burst detection. For this, we propose a novel architecture for a burst mode receiver module. In the system studies, we have shown by simulations that the throughput of standard Ethernet passive optical networks (E-PONs) can be substantially increased by the use of data encoded with SACs to achieve optical code division multiple access over passive optical networks (OCDMA-PONs). In the paper, we present recent results for all of these photonic technologies and we discuss how they can enable flexible packet switched networks.

  7. Coherence resonance in bursting neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, June Hoan; Lee, Ho Jun; Min, Cheol Hong; Lee, Kyoung J

    2015-10-01

    Synchronized neural bursts are one of the most noticeable dynamic features of neural networks, being essential for various phenomena in neuroscience, yet their complex dynamics are not well understood. With extrinsic electrical and optical manipulations on cultured neural networks, we demonstrate that the regularity (or randomness) of burst sequences is in many cases determined by a (few) low-dimensional attractor(s) working under strong neural noise. Moreover, there is an optimal level of noise strength at which the regularity of the interburst interval sequence becomes maximal-a phenomenon of coherence resonance. The experimental observations are successfully reproduced through computer simulations on a well-established neural network model, suggesting that the same phenomena may occur in many in vivo as well as in vitro neural networks.

  8. Downhole drilling network using burst modulation techniques

    DOEpatents

    Hall; David R. , Fox; Joe

    2007-04-03

    A downhole drilling system is disclosed in one aspect of the present invention as including a drill string and a transmission line integrated into the drill string. Multiple network nodes are installed at selected intervals along the drill string and are adapted to communicate with one another through the transmission line. In order to efficiently allocate the available bandwidth, the network nodes are configured to use any of numerous burst modulation techniques to transmit data.

  9. Optical computer switching network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clymer, B.; Collins, S. A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The design for an optical switching system for minicomputers that uses an optical spatial light modulator such as a Hughes liquid crystal light valve is presented. The switching system is designed to connect 80 minicomputers coupled to the switching system by optical fibers. The system has two major parts: the connection system that connects the data lines by which the computers communicate via a two-dimensional optical matrix array and the control system that controls which computers are connected. The basic system, the matrix-based connecting system, and some of the optical components to be used are described. Finally, the details of the control system are given and illustrated with a discussion of timing.

  10. Optical Computer Switching Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clymer, B.; Collins, S. A., Jr.

    1985-02-01

    In this paper we present the design for an optical switching system for minicomputers that uses an optical spatial light modulator such as a Hughes liquid crystal light valve. The switching system is designed to connect 80 minicomputers coupled to the switching system by optical fibers. The system has two major parts: the connection system that connects the data lines by which the computers communicate via a two-dimensional optical matrix array and the control system that controls which computers are connected. We first present the basic system, then describe the matrix-based connecting system and review some of the optical components to be used. Finally, the details of the control system are given and illustrated with a discussion of timing.

  11. Optical computer switching network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clymer, B.; Collins, S. A., Jr.

    1985-02-01

    The design for an optical switching system for minicomputers that uses an optical spatial light modulator such as a Hughes liquid crystal light valve is presented. The switching system is designed to connect 80 minicomputers coupled to the switching system by optical fibers. The system has two major parts: the connection system that connects the data lines by which the computers communicate via a two-dimensional optical matrix array and the control system that controls which computers are connected. The basic system, the matrix-based connecting system, and some of the optical components to be used are described. Finally, the details of the control system are given and illustrated with a discussion of timing.

  12. Optical computer switching network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clymer, B.; Collins, S. A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The design for an optical switching system for minicomputers that uses an optical spatial light modulator such as a Hughes liquid crystal light valve is presented. The switching system is designed to connect 80 minicomputers coupled to the switching system by optical fibers. The system has two major parts: the connection system that connects the data lines by which the computers communicate via a two-dimensional optical matrix array and the control system that controls which computers are connected. The basic system, the matrix-based connecting system, and some of the optical components to be used are described. Finally, the details of the control system are given and illustrated with a discussion of timing.

  13. BACODINE/3rd Interplanetary Network burst localization

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, K.; Barthelmy, S.; Butterworth, P.; Cline, T.; Sommer, M.; Boer, M.; Niel, M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Meegan, C.

    1996-08-01

    Even with only two widely separated spacecraft (Ulysses and GRO), 3rd Interplanetary Network (IPN) localizations can reduce the areas of BATSE error circles by two orders of magnitude. Therefore it is useful to disseminate them as quickly as possible following BATSE bursts. We have implemented a system which transmits the light curves of BACODINE/BATSE bursts directly by e-mail to UC Berkeley immediately after detection. An automatic e-mail parser at Berkeley watches for these notices, determines the Ulysses crossing time window, and initiates a search for the burst data on the JPL computer as they are received. In ideal cases, it is possible to retrieve the Ulysses data within a few hours of a burst, generate an annulus of arrival directions, and e-mail it out to the astronomical community by local nightfall. Human operators remain in this loop, but we are developing a fully automated routine which should remove them, at least for intense events, and reduce turn-around times to an absolute minimum. We explain the current operations, the data types used, and the speed/accuracy tradeoffs.

  14. Optimized scalable network switch

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2007-12-04

    In a massively parallel computing system having a plurality of nodes configured in m multi-dimensions, each node including a computing device, a method for routing packets towards their destination nodes is provided which includes generating at least one of a 2m plurality of compact bit vectors containing information derived from downstream nodes. A multilevel arbitration process in which downstream information stored in the compact vectors, such as link status information and fullness of downstream buffers, is used to determine a preferred direction and virtual channel for packet transmission. Preferred direction ranges are encoded and virtual channels are selected by examining the plurality of compact bit vectors. This dynamic routing method eliminates the necessity of routing tables, thus enhancing scalability of the switch.

  15. Optimized scalable network switch

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.

    2010-02-23

    In a massively parallel computing system having a plurality of nodes configured in m multi-dimensions, each node including a computing device, a method for routing packets towards their destination nodes is provided which includes generating at least one of a 2m plurality of compact bit vectors containing information derived from downstream nodes. A multilevel arbitration process in which downstream information stored in the compact vectors, such as link status information and fullness of downstream buffers, is used to determine a preferred direction and virtual channel for packet transmission. Preferred direction ranges are encoded and virtual channels are selected by examining the plurality of compact bit vectors. This dynamic routing method eliminates the necessity of routing tables, thus enhancing scalability of the switch.

  16. Approach and analysis of contention resolution in optical switching network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaolong; Dang, Mingrui; Mao, Youju; Zhang, Min; Li, Lemin

    2002-09-01

    As the Internet traffic exponentially growing, the next generation IP network is forced to scale far beyond its present performances. The more and more mature optical switching technology, such as optical burst switching, is expected to provide an ideal infrastructure for meeting the demands. However in optical switching, there is one critical issue, namely contention, which roots from multiple optical data requesting the same output port How to resolve contention in optical domain will have a significant effect on the performance (in terms of the burst-loss rate, average delay time and network throughput) of optical switching network. The paper proposes a contention resolution scheme based on FDL, AWG and TWC. Here FDL is used as two functions, i.e. forwarding and feedback for smaller or longer buffering time requirements respectively. In the paper we incorporate the scheme into the design of optical switch. We descript the optical data buffering strategy when contention occurs. We also study the performance of the scheme in a Markov process model under the assumption of uniform Bernoulli traffic, and validate the analysis through numerical simulation. The computer simulation results show that the scheme can efficiently use FDL buffering and AWG switching capacities, hence can obviously reduce the contentions.

  17. A self-adapting approach for the detection of bursts and network bursts in neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Pasquale, Valentina; Martinoia, Sergio; Chiappalone, Michela

    2010-08-01

    Dissociated networks of neurons typically exhibit bursting behavior, whose features are strongly influenced by the age of the culture, by chemical/electrical stimulation or by environmental conditions. To help the experimenter in identifying the changes possibly induced by specific protocols, we developed a self-adapting method for detecting both bursts and network bursts from electrophysiological activity recorded by means of micro-electrode arrays. The algorithm is based on the computation of the logarithmic inter-spike interval histogram and automatically detects the best threshold to distinguish between inter- and intra-burst inter-spike intervals for each recording channel of the array. An analogous procedure is followed for the detection of network bursts, looking for sequences of closely spaced single-channel bursts. We tested our algorithm on recordings of spontaneous as well as chemically stimulated activity, comparing its performance to other methods available in the literature.

  18. External excitatory stimuli can terminate bursting in neural network models.

    PubMed

    Franaszczuk, Piotr J; Kudela, Pawel; Bergey, Gregory K

    2003-02-01

    The concept of modulating or terminating seizure activity by brain stimulation is attracting considerable attention. The ability of such external excitatory stimuli to terminate repetitive bursting may depend upon identifiable parameters. We investigate the ability of external stimuli to terminate bursting under various conditions in defined neural network models. Networks of multiple neurons (n=90), with both inhibitory and excitatory synaptic connections were modeled using conductance-based models with a reduced number of variables. Each neuron in the network has synaptic connections from randomly chosen excitatory and inhibitory neurons. The type and number of connections were kept constant. The initial parameters of the networks were chosen to simulate synchronized repetitive bursting activity. Two basic models of repetitive bursting activity were developed. The first model is a single network with constant random excitatory input, the second incorporates two networks with no random background input, but with a feedback loop with a delay of 600-900ms connecting two networks. The ability of external excitatory stimuli to terminate repetitive bursting in each model was studied. External excitatory stimulation terminates repetitive bursting in both models; however, only in the models with a feedback loop, is the burst termination long-lasting. In the single network model with constant random excitatory input, termination is of short duration and recurrent bursting resumes. Timing of the application of the stimulus to the dual network model is critical; long-lasting termination occurs only when the stimuli to the first network are during a time when the connected network is still relatively refractory. The delay in the loop determines the exact timing of the stimulus. Synaptic inhibition is not required for burst termination. Neural network models provide systems for the study of burst termination and can help define the requirements for such stimuli to

  19. Neuronal networks and energy bursts in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y; Liu, D; Song, Z

    2015-02-26

    Epilepsy can be defined as the abnormal activities of neurons. The occurrence, propagation and termination of epileptic seizures rely on the networks of neuronal cells that are connected through both synaptic- and non-synaptic interactions. These complicated interactions contain the modified functions of normal neurons and glias as well as the mediation of excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms with feedback homeostasis. Numerous spread patterns are detected in disparate networks of ictal activities. The cortical-thalamic-cortical loop is present during a general spike wave seizure. The thalamic reticular nucleus (nRT) is the major inhibitory input traversing the region, and the dentate gyrus (DG) controls CA3 excitability. The imbalance between γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibition and glutamatergic excitation is the main disorder in epilepsy. Adjustable negative feedback that mediates both inhibitory and excitatory components affects neuronal networks through neurotransmission fluctuation, receptor and transmitter signaling, and through concomitant influences on ion concentrations and field effects. Within a limited dynamic range, neurons slowly adapt to input levels and have a high sensitivity to synaptic changes. The stability of the adapting network depends on the ratio of the adaptation rates of both the excitatory and inhibitory populations. Thus, therapeutic strategies with multiple effects on seizures are required for the treatment of epilepsy, and the therapeutic functions on networks are reviewed here. Based on the high-energy burst theory of epileptic activity, we propose a potential antiepileptic therapeutic strategy to transfer the high energy and extra electricity out of the foci.

  20. Hybrid burst/packet switching architectures from IP NOBEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leligou, Helen C.; Eilenberger, Gert; Dembeck, Lars; Lautenschlaeger, Wolfram; Bunse, Stephan; Stavdas, A.; Angelopoulos, J.; Politi, Christina T.

    2006-10-01

    In spite of its long term promise, all-optical switching is still plagued by high cost, low efficiency when handling bursty data traffic, immature management and protection and poor output port contention resolution leading to heavy loss. Given the current situation, hybrid approaches that keep the best features of optics, reverting to the electrical plane when expedient, constitute sensible interim steps that can offer cost-effective solutions along the road to an eventual all-optical core. Two such approaches developed in the framework of the European IP project NOBEL are presented in this work. The first is a quite mature solution that extends present day concepts to achieve multiplexing gain while keeping all the management and restoration benefits of SDH. The other mimics early LANs in executing a distributed switching via its electrical control plane using two-way reservations, thus restricting its applicability to smaller domains. Combining the two leads to a system fulfilling most of today's requirements for Tb/s core networks.

  1. INTERPLANETARY NETWORK LOCALIZATIONS OF KONUS SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Pal'shin, V. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Mazets, E. P.; Oleynik, P. P.; Ulanov, M. V.; Hurley, K.; Cline, T.; Trombka, J.; McClanahan, T.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; and others

    2013-08-15

    Between the launch of the Global Geospace Science Wind spacecraft in 1994 November and the end of 2010, the Konus-Wind experiment detected 296 short-duration gamma-ray bursts (including 23 bursts which can be classified as short bursts with extended emission). During this period, the Interplanetary Network (IPN) consisted of up to 11 spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 271 bursts were obtained. We present the most comprehensive IPN localization data on these events. The short burst detection rate, {approx}18 yr{sup -1}, exceeds that of many individual experiments.

  2. RF switch positioner for communications satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, A. G.; Griesser, H. P.; Grant, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The RF switch positioner is a simple, lightweight, redundant positioning mechanism used to reconfigure the antenna beam on the INTELSAT VI satellite. It simultaneously rotates approximately 100 squareax waveguide switches through a full 360 deg. The RF switch positioner has been space qualified and has performed to expectations in conjunction with the feed networks in range testing.

  3. Burst shaping in a fiber-amplifier chain seeded by a gain-switched laser diode.

    PubMed

    Petelin, Jaka; Podobnik, Boštjan; Petkovšek, Rok

    2015-05-20

    A low-power source, such as a gain-switched laser diode, usually requires several amplification stages to reach sufficient power levels. When operating in burst mode, a correct input burst shape must be determined in order to compensate for gain saturation of all amplifier stages. In this paper we report on closed-form equations that enable saturation compensation in multiamplifier setups, which eliminates the need for an adaptive feedback loop. The theoretical model is then evaluated in an experimental setup.

  4. Taming desynchronized bursting with delays in the Macaque cortical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing-Yun; Murks, Aleksandra; Perc, Matjaž; Lu, Qi-Shao

    2011-04-01

    Inhibitory coupled bursting Hindmarsh—Rose neurons are considered as constitutive units of the Macaque cortical network. In the absence of information transmission delay the bursting activity is desynchronized, giving rise to spatiotemporally disordered dynamics. This paper shows that the introduction of finite delays can lead to the synchronization of bursting and thus to the emergence of coherent propagating fronts of excitation in the space-time domain. Moreover, it shows that the type of synchronous bursting is uniquely determined by the delay length, with the transitions from one type to the other occurring in a step-like manner depending on the delay. Interestingly, as the delay is tuned close to the transition points, the synchronization deteriorates, which implies the coexistence of different bursting attractors. These phenomena can be observed by different but fixed coupling strengths, thus indicating a new role for information transmission delays in realistic neuronal networks.

  5. Neural network architecture for crossbar switch control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troudet, Terry P.; Walters, Stephen M.

    1991-01-01

    A Hopfield neural network architecture for the real-time control of a crossbar switch for switching packets at maximum throughput is proposed. The network performance and processing time are derived from a numerical simulation of the transitions of the neural network. A method is proposed to optimize electronic component parameters and synaptic connections, and it is fully illustrated by the computer simulation of a VLSI implementation of 4 x 4 neural net controller. The extension to larger size crossbars is demonstrated through the simulation of an 8 x 8 crossbar switch controller, where the performance of the neural computation is discussed in relation to electronic noise and inhomogeneities of network components.

  6. Neural network architecture for crossbar switch control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troudet, Terry P.; Walters, Stephen M.

    1991-01-01

    A Hopfield neural network architecture for the real-time control of a crossbar switch for switching packets at maximum throughput is proposed. The network performance and processing time are derived from a numerical simulation of the transitions of the neural network. A method is proposed to optimize electronic component parameters and synaptic connections, and it is fully illustrated by the computer simulation of a VLSI implementation of 4 x 4 neural net controller. The extension to larger size crossbars is demonstrated through the simulation of an 8 x 8 crossbar switch controller, where the performance of the neural computation is discussed in relation to electronic noise and inhomogeneities of network components.

  7. Investigation of primordial black hole bursts using interplanetary network gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Ukwatta, Tilan Niranjan; Hurley, Kevin; MacGibbon, Jane H.; Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Pal'Shin, V. D.; Goldsten, J.; Boynton, W.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Rau, A.; von Kienlin, A.; Zhang, X.; Connaughton, V.; Yamaoka, K.; Ohno, M.; Ohmori, N.; Feroci, M.; Cline, T.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; McTiernan, J.

    2016-07-25

    The detection of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) in the solar neighborhood would have very important implications for GRB phenomenology. The leading theories for cosmological GRBs would not be able to explain such events. The final bursts of evaporating primordial black holes (PBHs), however, would be a natural explanation for local GRBs. We present a novel technique that can constrain the distance to GRBs using detections from widely separated, non-imaging spacecraft. This method can determine the actual distance to the burst if it is local. We applied this method to constrain distances to a sample of 36 short-duration GRBs detected by the Interplanetary Network (IPN) that show observational properties that are expected from PBH evaporations. These bursts have minimum possible distances in the 1013–1018 cm (7–105 au) range, which are consistent with the expected PBH energetics and with a possible origin in the solar neighborhood, although none of the bursts can be unambiguously demonstrated to be local. Furthermore, assuming that these bursts are real PBH events, we estimate lower limits on the PBH burst evaporation rate in the solar neighborhood.

  8. Investigation of primordial black hole bursts using interplanetary network gamma-ray bursts

    DOE PAGES

    Ukwatta, Tilan Niranjan; Hurley, Kevin; MacGibbon, Jane H.; ...

    2016-07-25

    The detection of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) in the solar neighborhood would have very important implications for GRB phenomenology. The leading theories for cosmological GRBs would not be able to explain such events. The final bursts of evaporating primordial black holes (PBHs), however, would be a natural explanation for local GRBs. We present a novel technique that can constrain the distance to GRBs using detections from widely separated, non-imaging spacecraft. This method can determine the actual distance to the burst if it is local. We applied this method to constrain distances to a sample of 36 short-duration GRBs detected bymore » the Interplanetary Network (IPN) that show observational properties that are expected from PBH evaporations. These bursts have minimum possible distances in the 1013–1018 cm (7–105 au) range, which are consistent with the expected PBH energetics and with a possible origin in the solar neighborhood, although none of the bursts can be unambiguously demonstrated to be local. Furthermore, assuming that these bursts are real PBH events, we estimate lower limits on the PBH burst evaporation rate in the solar neighborhood.« less

  9. Investigation of primordial black hole bursts using interplanetary network gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Ukwatta, Tilan Niranjan; Hurley, Kevin; MacGibbon, Jane H.; Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Pal'Shin, V. D.; Goldsten, J.; Boynton, W.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Rau, A.; von Kienlin, A.; Zhang, X.; Connaughton, V.; Yamaoka, K.; Ohno, M.; Ohmori, N.; Feroci, M.; Cline, T.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; McTiernan, J.

    2016-07-25

    The detection of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) in the solar neighborhood would have very important implications for GRB phenomenology. The leading theories for cosmological GRBs would not be able to explain such events. The final bursts of evaporating primordial black holes (PBHs), however, would be a natural explanation for local GRBs. We present a novel technique that can constrain the distance to GRBs using detections from widely separated, non-imaging spacecraft. This method can determine the actual distance to the burst if it is local. We applied this method to constrain distances to a sample of 36 short-duration GRBs detected by the Interplanetary Network (IPN) that show observational properties that are expected from PBH evaporations. These bursts have minimum possible distances in the 1013–1018 cm (7–105 au) range, which are consistent with the expected PBH energetics and with a possible origin in the solar neighborhood, although none of the bursts can be unambiguously demonstrated to be local. Furthermore, assuming that these bursts are real PBH events, we estimate lower limits on the PBH burst evaporation rate in the solar neighborhood.

  10. Sampling rare switching events in biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Allen, Rosalind J; Warren, Patrick B; Ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2005-01-14

    Bistable biochemical switches are widely found in gene regulatory networks and signal transduction pathways. Their switching dynamics are difficult to study, however, because switching events are rare, and the systems are out of equilibrium. We present a simulation method for predicting the rate and mechanism of the flipping of these switches. We apply it to a genetic switch and find that it is highly efficient. The path ensembles for the forward and reverse processes do not coincide. The method is widely applicable to rare events and nonequilibrium processes.

  11. LD-pumped acousto-optical Q-switched burst-mode Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hu; Yan, Renpeng; Li, Xudong; Ma, Yufei; Yu, Xin; Chen, Deying

    2016-04-01

    A high-repetition-rate, high-peak-power burst-mode laser for laser-based measurement applications is presented by using a master oscillator power amplifier structure. An laser diode arrays (LDA) side-pumped Nd:YAG acousto-optical (A-O) Q-switched laser serves as the master oscillator. Under pulsed pumping, pulse trains with 2-25 pulses are obtained when the repetition rate changes from 10 kHz to 100 kHz. The maximum pulse burst energy of 31.2 mJ is achieved in the A-O Q-switched pulse burst laser oscillator at 10 kHz. Two LDA side pumped Nd:YAG modules are employed in the amplification stage. After the amplification, the pulse burst energy at 10 kHz reaches ~170 mJ with a single pulse energy of 85.2 mJ and a pulse width of 14.5 ns, generating a peak power of 6.1 MW. At 100 kHz, the total burst energy reaches 220 mJ with a single pulse energy of 8.8 mJ in the pulse burst laser system.

  12. Delay-induced locking in bursting neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jinjie; Liu, Xianbin

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, the collective behaviors for ring structured bursting neuronal networks with electrical couplings and distance-dependent delays are studied. Each neuron is modeled by the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron. Through changing time delays between connected neurons, different spatiotemporal patterns are obtained. These patterns can be explained by calculating the ratios between the bursting period and the delay which exhibit clear locking relations. The holding and the failure of the lockings are investigated via bifurcation analysis. In particular, the bursting death phenomenon is observed for large coupling strengths and small time delays which is in fact the result of the partial amplitude death in the fast subsystem. These results indicate that the collective behaviors of bursting neurons critically depend on the bifurcation structure of individual ones and thus the variety of bifurcation types for bursting neurons may create diverse behaviors in similar neuronal ensembles.

  13. Switching performance of OBS network model under prefetched real traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhenhua; Xu, Du; Lei, Wen

    2005-11-01

    Optical Burst Switching (OBS) [1] is now widely considered as an efficient switching technique in building the next generation optical Internet .So it's very important to precisely evaluate the performance of the OBS network model. The performance of the OBS network model is variable in different condition, but the most important thing is that how it works under real traffic load. In the traditional simulation models, uniform traffics are usually generated by simulation software to imitate the data source of the edge node in the OBS network model, and through which the performance of the OBS network is evaluated. Unfortunately, without being simulated by real traffic, the traditional simulation models have several problems and their results are doubtable. To deal with this problem, we present a new simulation model for analysis and performance evaluation of the OBS network, which uses prefetched IP traffic to be data source of the OBS network model. The prefetched IP traffic can be considered as real IP source of the OBS edge node and the OBS network model has the same clock rate with a real OBS system. So it's easy to conclude that this model is closer to the real OBS system than the traditional ones. The simulation results also indicate that this model is more accurate to evaluate the performance of the OBS network system and the results of this model are closer to the actual situation.

  14. Synchronization of Arbitrarily Switched Boolean Networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongwei; Liang, Jinling; Huang, Tingwen; Cao, Jinde

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigates the complete synchronization problem for the drive-response switched Boolean networks (SBNs) under arbitrary switching signals, where the switching signals of the response SBN follow those generated by the drive SBN at each time instant. First, the definition of complete synchronization is introduced for the drive-response SBNs under arbitrary switching signals. Second, the concept of switching reachable set starting from a given initial state set is put forward. Based on it, a necessary and sufficient condition is derived for the complete synchronization of the drive-response SBNs. Last, we give a simple algebraic expression for the switching reachable set in a given number of time steps, and two computable algebraic criteria are obtained for the complete synchronization of the SBNs. A biological example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the obtained main results.

  15. Modulating the Precision of Recurrent Bursts in Cultured Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Joon Ho; Kim, June Hoan; Heo, Ryoun; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2012-03-01

    Synchronized bursts are a very common feature in biological neural networks, and they play an important role in various brain functions and neurological diseases. This Letter investigates “recurrent synchronized bursts” induced by a single pulse stimulation in cultured networks of rat cortical neurons. We look at how the precision in their arrival times can be modified by a noble time-delayed stimulation protocol, which we term as “Δt training.” The emergence of recurrent bursts and the change of the precision in their arrival times can be explained by the stochastic resonance of a damped, subthreshold, neural oscillation.

  16. Burst-mode gain switched technique for high peak and average optical energy extraction.

    PubMed

    Nikumb, S K; Seguin, H J; Seguin, V A; Willis, R J; Cheng, Z; Reshef, H

    1989-05-01

    The optical performance of a cw PIE CO(2) laser has been substantially improved through the adoption of a burst-mode gain switching technique. The approach has provided a doubling of the average beam power extractable from the device. With appropriate optimization, the process could possibly permit the attainment of pulsed energy extraction in the kilohertz range, and with average optical powers within the several tens of kilowatt category.

  17. The Fragility of Interdependency: Coupled Networks Switching Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    2013-03-01

    Recent disasters ranging from abrupt financial ``flash crashes'' and large-scale power outages to sudden death among the elderly dramatically exemplify the fact that the most dangerous vulnerability is hiding in the many interdependencies among different networks. In the past year, we have quantified failures in model of interconnected networks, and demonstrated the need to consider mutually dependent network properties in designing resilient systems. Specifically, we have uncovered new laws governing the nature of switching phenomena in coupled networks, and found that phenomena that are continuous ``second order'' phase transitions in isolated networks become discontinuous abrupt ``first order'' transitions in interdependent networks [S. V. Buldyrev, R. Parshani, G. Paul, H. E. Stanley, and S. Havlin, ``Catastrophic Cascade of Failures in Interdependent Networks,'' Nature 464, 1025 (2010); J. Gao, S. V. Buldyrev, H. E. Stanley, and S. Havlin, ``Novel Behavior of Networks Formed from Interdependent Networks,'' Nature Physics 8, 40 (2012). We conclude by discussing the network basis for understanding sudden death in the elderly, and the possibility that financial ``flash crashes'' are not unlike the catastrophic first-order failure incidents occurring in coupled networks. Specifically, we study the coupled networks that are responsible for financial fluctuations. It appears that ``trend switching phenomena'' that we uncover are remarkably independent of the scale over which they are analyzed. For example, we find that the same laws governing the formation and bursting of the largest financial bubbles also govern the tiniest finance bubbles, over a factor of 1,000,000,000 in time scale [T. Preis, J. Schneider, and H. E. Stanley, ``Switching Processes in Financial Markets,'' Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108, 7674 (2011); T. Preis and H. E. Stanley, ``Bubble Trouble: Can a Law Describe Bubbles and Crashes in Financial Markets?'' Physics World 24, No. 5, 29 (May 2011

  18. An Efficience Scheme to Reduce Burst Loss Rate and Supporting Differentiated Services in All-Optical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Amit Kumar

    2011-06-01

    Due to their one-way resource reservation mechanism, Optical Burst Switching (OBS) networks experience high bursts (thus packets) loss rate. In OBS networks, the contention is resolved either by dropping one of the contending bursts or more efficiently by dropping from one of the contending bursts only the parts that overlap with the other bursts. In both situations, only one data source will suffer the data loss in favor to the other. In this paper, an efficient scheme to reduce burst loss rate has been proposed in conjunction with an appropriate mechanism to provide differentiated service in order to support the quality of service (QoS) requirements of different applications. Simulation results show that the performance of the proposed scheme is better than existing mechanisms in terms of reducing burst (packets) loss. Numerical results show that the proposed scheme provides an accurate fit for the performance of the highest traffic class and lower bounds for the other traffic classes that are tighter than earlier known results.

  19. Synchronization of Asynchronous Switched Boolean Network.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Wang, Xingyuan; Lin, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the complete synchronizations for asynchronous switched Boolean network with free Boolean sequence controllers and close-loop controllers are studied. First, the basic asynchronous switched Boolean network model is provided. With the method of semi-tensor product, the Boolean dynamics is translated into linear representation. Second, necessary and sufficient conditions for ASBN synchronization with free Boolean sequence control and close-loop control are derived, respectively. Third, some illustrative examples are provided to show the efficiency of the proposed methods.

  20. Software Defined Networking (SDN) controlled all optical switching networks with multi-dimensional switching architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongli; Ji, Yuefeng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Hui; Xiong, Qianjin; Qiu, Shaofeng

    2014-08-01

    Ultrahigh throughout capacity requirement is challenging the current optical switching nodes with the fast development of data center networks. Pbit/s level all optical switching networks need to be deployed soon, which will cause the high complexity of node architecture. How to control the future network and node equipment together will become a new problem. An enhanced Software Defined Networking (eSDN) control architecture is proposed in the paper, which consists of Provider NOX (P-NOX) and Node NOX (N-NOX). With the cooperation of P-NOX and N-NOX, the flexible control of the entire network can be achieved. All optical switching network testbed has been experimentally demonstrated with efficient control of enhanced Software Defined Networking (eSDN). Pbit/s level all optical switching nodes in the testbed are implemented based on multi-dimensional switching architecture, i.e. multi-level and multi-planar. Due to the space and cost limitation, each optical switching node is only equipped with four input line boxes and four output line boxes respectively. Experimental results are given to verify the performance of our proposed control and switching architecture.

  1. The Interaction of Intrinsic Dynamics and Network Topology in Determining Network Burst Synchrony

    PubMed Central

    Gaiteri, Chris; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2011-01-01

    The pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC), within the mammalian respiratory brainstem, represents an ideal system for investigating the synchronization properties of complex neuronal circuits via the interaction of cell-type heterogeneity and network connectivity. In isolation, individual respiratory neurons from the pre-BötC may be tonically active, rhythmically bursting, or quiescent. Despite this intrinsic heterogeneity, coupled networks of pre-BötC neurons en bloc engage in synchronized bursting that can drive inspiratory motor neuron activation. The region's connection topology has been recently characterized and features dense clusters of cells with occasional connections between clusters. We investigate how the dynamics of individual neurons (quiescent/bursting/tonic) and the betweenness centrality of neurons’ positions within the network connectivity graph interact to govern network burst synchrony, by simulating heterogeneous networks of computational model pre-BötC neurons. Furthermore, we compare the prevalence and synchrony of bursting across networks constructed with a variety of connection topologies, analyzing the same collection of heterogeneous neurons in small-world, scale-free, random, and regularly structured networks. We find that several measures of network burst synchronization are determined by interactions of network topology with the intrinsic dynamics of neurons at central network positions and by the strengths of synaptic connections between neurons. Surprisingly, despite the functional role of synchronized bursting within the pre-BötC, we find that synchronized network bursting is generally weakest when we use its specific connection topology, which leads to synchrony within clusters but poor coordination across clusters. Overall, our results highlight the relevance of interactions between topology and intrinsic dynamics in shaping the activity of networks and the concerted effects of connectivity patterns and dynamic heterogeneities

  2. The interaction of intrinsic dynamics and network topology in determining network burst synchrony.

    PubMed

    Gaiteri, Chris; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2011-01-01

    The pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC), within the mammalian respiratory brainstem, represents an ideal system for investigating the synchronization properties of complex neuronal circuits via the interaction of cell-type heterogeneity and network connectivity. In isolation, individual respiratory neurons from the pre-BötC may be tonically active, rhythmically bursting, or quiescent. Despite this intrinsic heterogeneity, coupled networks of pre-BötC neurons en bloc engage in synchronized bursting that can drive inspiratory motor neuron activation. The region's connection topology has been recently characterized and features dense clusters of cells with occasional connections between clusters. We investigate how the dynamics of individual neurons (quiescent/bursting/tonic) and the betweenness centrality of neurons' positions within the network connectivity graph interact to govern network burst synchrony, by simulating heterogeneous networks of computational model pre-BötC neurons. Furthermore, we compare the prevalence and synchrony of bursting across networks constructed with a variety of connection topologies, analyzing the same collection of heterogeneous neurons in small-world, scale-free, random, and regularly structured networks. We find that several measures of network burst synchronization are determined by interactions of network topology with the intrinsic dynamics of neurons at central network positions and by the strengths of synaptic connections between neurons. Surprisingly, despite the functional role of synchronized bursting within the pre-BötC, we find that synchronized network bursting is generally weakest when we use its specific connection topology, which leads to synchrony within clusters but poor coordination across clusters. Overall, our results highlight the relevance of interactions between topology and intrinsic dynamics in shaping the activity of networks and the concerted effects of connectivity patterns and dynamic heterogeneities.

  3. A novel miniaturized passively Q-switched pulse-burst laser for engine ignition.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yufei; Li, Xudong; Yu, Xin; Fan, Rongwei; Yan, Renpeng; Peng, Jiangbo; Xu, Xinrui; Sun, Rui; Chen, Deying

    2014-10-06

    A novel miniaturized Cr⁴⁺:YAG passively Q-switched Nd:YAG pulse-burst laser under 808 nm diode-laser pulse-pumping was demonstrated for the purpose of laser-induced plasma ignition, in which pulse-burst mode can realize both high repetition rate and high pulse energy simultaneously in a short period. Side-pumping configuration and two different types of laser cavities were employed. The pumping pulse width was constant at 250 μs. For the plane-plane cavity, the output beam profile was flat-top Gaussian and the measured M² value was 4.1 at the maximum incident pump energy of 600 mJ. The pulse-burst laser contained a maximum of 8 pulses, 7 pulses and 6 pulses for pulse-burst repetition rate of 10 Hz, 50 Hz and 100 Hz, respectively. The energy obtained was 15.5 mJ, 14.9 mJ and 13.9 mJ per pulse for pulse-burst repetition rate of 10 Hz, 50 Hz and 100 Hz, respectively. The maximum repetition rate of laser pulses in pulse-burst was 34.6 kHz for 8 pulses at the incident pump energy of 600 mJ and the single pulse width was 13.3 ns. The thermal lensing effect of Nd:YAG rod was investigated, and an plane-convex cavity was adopted to compensate the thermal lensing effect of Nd:YAG rod and improve the mode matching. For the plane-convex cavity, the output beam profile was quasi-Gaussian and the measured M2 value was 2.2 at the incident pump energy of 600 mJ. The output energy was 10.6 mJ per pulse for pulse-burst repetition rate of 100 Hz. The maximum repetition rate of laser pulses in pulse-burst was 27.4 kHz for 6 pulses at the incident pump energy of 600 mJ and the single pulse width was 14.2 ns. The experimental results showed that this pulse-burst laser can produce high repetition rate (>20 kHz) and high pulse energy (>10 mJ) simultaneously in a short period for both two different cavities.

  4. Neuronal Networks during Burst Suppression as Revealed by Source Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reinicke, Christine; Moeller, Friederike; Anwar, Abdul Rauf; Mideksa, Kidist Gebremariam; Pressler, Ronit; Deuschl, Günther; Stephani, Ulrich; Siniatchkin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Burst-suppression (BS) is an electroencephalography (EEG) pattern consisting of alternant periods of slow waves of high amplitude (burst) and periods of so called flat EEG (suppression). It is generally associated with coma of various etiologies (hypoxia, drug-related intoxication, hypothermia, and childhood encephalopathies, but also anesthesia). Animal studies suggest that both the cortex and the thalamus are involved in the generation of BS. However, very little is known about mechanisms of BS in humans. The aim of this study was to identify the neuronal network underlying both burst and suppression phases using source reconstruction and analysis of functional and effective connectivity in EEG. Material/Methods Dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS) was applied to EEG segments of 13 neonates and infants with burst and suppression EEG pattern. The brain area with the strongest power in the analyzed frequency (1–4 Hz) range was defined as the reference region. DICS was used to compute the coherence between this reference region and the entire brain. The renormalized partial directed coherence (RPDC) was used to describe the informational flow between the identified sources. Results/Conclusion Delta activity during the burst phases was associated with coherent sources in the thalamus and brainstem as well as bilateral sources in cortical regions mainly frontal and parietal, whereas suppression phases were associated with coherent sources only in cortical regions. Results of the RPDC analyses showed an upwards informational flow from the brainstem towards the thalamus and from the thalamus to cortical regions, which was absent during the suppression phases. These findings may support the theory that a “cortical deafferentiation” between the cortex and sub-cortical structures exists especially in suppression phases compared to burst phases in burst suppression EEGs. Such a deafferentiation may play a role in the poor neurological outcome of

  5. Effect of network architecture on burst and spike synchronization in a scale-free network of bursting neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Yoon; Lim, Woochang

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the effect of network architecture on burst and spike synchronization in a directed scale-free network (SFN) of bursting neurons, evolved via two independent α- and β-processes. The α-process corresponds to a directed version of the Barabási-Albert SFN model with growth and preferential attachment, while for the β-process only preferential attachments between pre-existing nodes are made without addition of new nodes. We first consider the "pure" α-process of symmetric preferential attachment (with the same in- and out-degrees), and study emergence of burst and spike synchronization by varying the coupling strength J and the noise intensity D for a fixed attachment degree. Characterizations of burst and spike synchronization are also made by employing realistic order parameters and statistical-mechanical measures. Next, we choose appropriate values of J and D where only burst synchronization occurs, and investigate the effect of the scale-free connectivity on the burst synchronization by varying (1) the symmetric attachment degree and (2) the asymmetry parameter (representing deviation from the symmetric case) in the α-process, and (3) the occurrence probability of the β-process. In all these three cases, changes in the type and the degree of population synchronization are studied in connection with the network topology such as the degree distribution, the average path length Lp, and the betweenness centralization Bc. It is thus found that just taking into consideration Lp and Bc (affecting global communication between nodes) is not sufficient to understand emergence of population synchronization in SFNs, but in addition to them, the in-degree distribution (affecting individual dynamics) must also be considered to fully understand for the effective population synchronization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Delayed switching applied to memristor neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Frank Z.; Yang Xiao; Lim Guan; Helian Na; Wu Sining; Guo Yike; Rashid, Md Mamunur

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic flux and electric charge are linked in a memristor. We reported recently that a memristor has a peculiar effect in which the switching takes place with a time delay because a memristor possesses a certain inertia. This effect was named the ''delayed switching effect.'' In this work, we elaborate on the importance of delayed switching in a brain-like computer using memristor neural networks. The effect is used to control the switching of a memristor synapse between two neurons that fire together (the Hebbian rule). A theoretical formula is found, and the design is verified by a simulation. We have also built an experimental setup consisting of electronic memristive synapses and electronic neurons.

  7. Delayed switching applied to memristor neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Frank Z.; Helian, Na; Wu, Sining; Yang, Xiao; Guo, Yike; Lim, Guan; Rashid, Md Mamunur

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic flux and electric charge are linked in a memristor. We reported recently that a memristor has a peculiar effect in which the switching takes place with a time delay because a memristor possesses a certain inertia. This effect was named the "delayed switching effect." In this work, we elaborate on the importance of delayed switching in a brain-like computer using memristor neural networks. The effect is used to control the switching of a memristor synapse between two neurons that fire together (the Hebbian rule). A theoretical formula is found, and the design is verified by a simulation. We have also built an experimental setup consisting of electronic memristive synapses and electronic neurons.

  8. Epigenetic switches and network transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasai, Masaki

    2012-02-01

    We investigate dynamics of gene networks which are regulated by both the fast binding/unbinding of transcription factors to/from DNA and the slow processes of chromatin structural change or histone modification. This heterogeneous dynamics consisting of different time scales is analyzed by the mean-field approximation and the stochastic simulation to show that the network exhibits multiple metastable states and is characterized by transitions among them. We discuss distribution and fluctuation of states of the core gene network of embryonic stem cells as an example of such heterogeneous dynamics and the simulated transitions are compared with the experimental data on the distribution of stem cell states.

  9. Phenotypic switching in gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Philipp; Popović, Nikola; Grima, Ramon

    2014-05-13

    Noise in gene expression can lead to reversible phenotypic switching. Several experimental studies have shown that the abundance distributions of proteins in a population of isogenic cells may display multiple distinct maxima. Each of these maxima may be associated with a subpopulation of a particular phenotype, the quantification of which is important for understanding cellular decision-making. Here, we devise a methodology which allows us to quantify multimodal gene expression distributions and single-cell power spectra in gene regulatory networks. Extending the commonly used linear noise approximation, we rigorously show that, in the limit of slow promoter dynamics, these distributions can be systematically approximated as a mixture of Gaussian components in a wide class of networks. The resulting closed-form approximation provides a practical tool for studying complex nonlinear gene regulatory networks that have thus far been amenable only to stochastic simulation. We demonstrate the applicability of our approach in a number of genetic networks, uncovering previously unidentified dynamical characteristics associated with phenotypic switching. Specifically, we elucidate how the interplay of transcriptional and translational regulation can be exploited to control the multimodality of gene expression distributions in two-promoter networks. We demonstrate how phenotypic switching leads to birhythmical expression in a genetic oscillator, and to hysteresis in phenotypic induction, thus highlighting the ability of regulatory networks to retain memory.

  10. Neural Network Burst Pressure Prediction in Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Eric v. K.; Dion, Seth-Andrew T.; Karl, Justin O.; Spivey, Nicholas S.; Walker, James L., II

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic emission data were collected during the hydroburst testing of eleven 15 inch diameter filament wound composite overwrapped pressure vessels. A neural network burst pressure prediction was generated from the resulting AE amplitude data. The bottles shared commonality of graphite fiber, epoxy resin, and cure time. Individual bottles varied by cure mode (rotisserie versus static oven curing), types of inflicted damage, temperature of the pressurant, and pressurization scheme. Three categorical variables were selected to represent undamaged bottles, impact damaged bottles, and bottles with lacerated hoop fibers. This categorization along with the removal of the AE data from the disbonding noise between the aluminum liner and the composite overwrap allowed the prediction of burst pressures in all three sets of bottles using a single backpropagation neural network. Here the worst case error was 3.38 percent.

  11. 4x4 optical packet switching of asynchronous burst optical packets with a prototype, 4x4 label processing and switching sub-system.

    PubMed

    Urata, Ryohei; Nakahara, Tatsushi; Takenouchi, Hirokazu; Segawa, Toru; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Ohki, Akira; Sugiyama, Hiroki; Nishihara, Susumu; Takahashi, Ryo

    2010-07-19

    We report a prototype, 4x4 (4 input/4 output) label processing and switching sub-system for 10-Gb/s asynchronous burst variable-length optical packets. With the prototype, we perform a 4x4 optical packet switching demonstration, achieving error-free (BER<10(-12)) label processing and switching operation for all possible input/output combinations (16 switching paths) simultaneously. Power consumption and latency of the entire, self-contained sub-system is 83 W (includes fan power) and 300 ns, respectively.

  12. Nanoarchitectonic atomic switch networks for unconventional computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demis, Eleanor C.; Aguilera, Renato; Scharnhorst, Kelsey; Aono, Masakazu; Stieg, Adam Z.; Gimzewski, James K.

    2016-11-01

    Developments in computing hardware are constrained by the operating principles of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, fabrication limits of nanometer scaled features, and difficulties in effective utilization of high density interconnects. This set of obstacles has promulgated a search for alternative, energy efficient approaches to computing inspired by natural systems including the mammalian brain. Atomic switch network (ASN) devices are a unique platform specifically developed to overcome these current barriers to realize adaptive neuromorphic technology. ASNs are composed of a massively interconnected network of atomic switches with a density of ∼109 units/cm2 and are structurally reminiscent of the neocortex of the brain. ASNs possess both the intrinsic capabilities of individual memristive switches, such as memory capacity and multi-state switching, and the characteristics of large-scale complex systems, such as power-law dynamics and non-linear transformations of input signals. Here we describe the successful nanoarchitectonic fabrication of next-generation ASN devices using combined top-down and bottom-up processing and experimentally demonstrate their utility as reservoir computing hardware. Leveraging their intrinsic dynamics and transformative input/output (I/O) behavior enabled waveform regression of periodic signals in the absence of embedded algorithms, further supporting the potential utility of ASN technology as a platform for unconventional approaches to computing.

  13. Future large broadband switched satellite communications networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, D. H.; Harvey, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    Critical technical, market, and policy issues relevant to future large broadband switched satellite networks are summarized. Our market projections for the period 1980 to 2000 are compared. Clusters of switched satellites, in lieu of large platforms, etc., are shown to have significant advantages. Analysis of an optimum terrestrial network architecture suggests the proper densities of ground stations and that link reliabilities 99.99% may entail less than a 10% cost premium for diversity protection at 20/30 GHz. These analyses suggest that system costs increase as the 0.6 power of traffic. Cost estimates for nominal 20/30 GHz satellite and ground facilities suggest optimum system configurations might employ satellites with 285 beams, multiple TDMA bands each carrying 256 Mbps, and 16 ft ground station antennas. A nominal development program is outlined.

  14. Self-organized atomic switch networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieg, Adam Z.; Avizienis, Audrius V.; Sillin, Henry O.; Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Lam, Miu-Ling; Aono, Masakazu; Gimzewski, James K.

    2014-01-01

    The spontaneous emergence of complex behavior in dynamical systems occurs through the collective interaction of nonlinear elements toward a highly correlated, non-equilibrium critical state. Criticality has been proposed as a model for understanding complexity in systems whose behavior can be approximated as a state lying somewhere between order and chaos. Here we present unique, purpose-built devices, known as atomic switch networks (ASN), specifically designed to generate the class of emergent properties which underlie critical dynamics in complex systems. The network is an open, dissipative system comprised of highly interconnected (˜109/cm2) atomic switch interfaces wired through the spontaneous electroless deposition of metallic silver fractal architectures. The functional topology of ASN architectures self-organizes to produce persistent critical dynamics without fine-tuning, indicating a capacity for memory and learning via persistent critical states toward potential utility in real-time, neuromorphic computation.

  15. Neural Network Aided Glitch-Burst Discrimination and Glitch Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampone, Salvatore; Pierro, Vincenzo; Troiano, Luigi; Pinto, Innocenzo M.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the potential of neural-network based classifiers for discriminating gravitational wave bursts (GWBs) of a given canonical family (e.g. core-collapse supernova waveforms) from typical transient instrumental artifacts (glitches), in the data of a single detector. The further classification of glitches into typical sets is explored. In order to provide a proof of concept, we use the core-collapse supernova waveform catalog produced by H. Dimmelmeier and co-Workers, and the data base of glitches observed in laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory (LIGO) data maintained by P. Saulson and co-Workers to construct datasets of (windowed) transient waveforms (glitches and bursts) in additive (Gaussian and compound-Gaussian) noise with different signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Principal component analysis (PCA) is next implemented for reducing data dimensionality, yielding results consistent with, and extending those in the literature. Then, a multilayer perceptron is trained by a backpropagation algorithm (MLP-BP) on a data subset, and used to classify the transients as glitch or burst. A Self-Organizing Map (SOM) architecture is finally used to classify the glitches. The glitch/burst discrimination and glitch classification abilities are gauged in terms of the related truth tables. Preliminary results suggest that the approach is effective and robust throughout the SNR range of practical interest. Perspective applications pertain both to distributed (network, multisensor) detection of GWBs, where some intelligence at the single node level can be introduced, and instrument diagnostics/optimization, where spurious transients can be identified, classified and hopefully traced back to their entry points.

  16. 25-Gbit/s burst-mode optical receiver using high-speed avalanche photodiode for 100-Gbit/s optical packet switching.

    PubMed

    Nada, Masahiro; Nakamura, Makoto; Matsuzaki, Hideaki

    2014-01-13

    25-Gbit/s error-free operation of an optical receiver is successfully demonstrated against burst-mode optical input signals without preambles. The receiver, with a high-sensitivity avalanche photodiode and burst-mode transimpedance amplifier, exhibits sufficient receiver sensitivity and an extremely quick response suitable for burst-mode operation in 100-Gbit/s optical packet switching.

  17. Stochastic neural network model for spontaneous bursting in hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Biswal, B; Dasgupta, C

    2002-11-01

    A biologically plausible, stochastic, neural network model that exhibits spontaneous transitions between a low-activity (normal) state and a high-activity (epileptic) state is studied by computer simulation. Brief excursions of the network to the high-activity state lead to spontaneous population bursting similar to the behavior observed in hippocampal slices bathed in a high-potassium medium. Although the variability of interburst intervals in this model is due to stochasticity, first return maps of successive interburst intervals show trajectories that resemble the behavior expected near unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) of systems exhibiting deterministic chaos. Simulations of the effects of the application of chaos control, periodic pacing, and anticontrol to the network model yield results that are qualitatively similar to those obtained in experiments on hippocampal slices. Estimation of the statistical significance of UPOs through surrogate data analysis also leads to results that resemble those of similar analysis of data obtained from slice experiments and human epileptic activity. These results suggest that spontaneous population bursting in hippocampal slices may be a manifestation of stochastic bistable dynamics, rather than of deterministic chaos. Our results also question the reliability of some of the recently proposed, UPO-based, statistical methods for detecting determinism and chaos in experimental time-series data.

  18. Network transcoder with seamless switching function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Naoki; Hata, Toshihiko; Nozawa, Toshiharu; Vetro, Anthony

    2004-10-01

    In a surveillance system with a huge number of cameras, the number of videos to be transmitted and displayed is usually restricted by network bandwidth and the resource of display terminal. Given that the source video is captured at high quality, a network transcoder is used to send video with lower data rate as the default for ordinary scenes, while only extraordinary or unusual scenes are sent with higher quality. With such a scenario, it is necessary to switch from a low quality version of the video to a higher quality video with low latency and in a seamless manner. This paper presents a network transcoder that is able to change the content and the quality of videos seamlessly and with low latency. The novelty of the proposed scheme is possible to change the quality and camera in the same session. Moreover, this paper describes an RTSP enhancement that enables this dynamic transcoding function. Finally, an evaluation of the results is provided.

  19. Design framework for entanglement-distribution switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drost, Robert J.; Brodsky, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The distribution of quantum entanglement appears to be an important component of applications of quantum communications and networks. The ability to centralize the sourcing of entanglement in a quantum network can provide for improved efficiency and enable a variety of network structures. A necessary feature of an entanglement-sourcing network node comprising several sources of entangled photons is the ability to reconfigurably route the generated pairs of photons to network neighbors depending on the desired entanglement sharing of the network users at a given time. One approach to such routing is the use of a photonic switching network. The requirements for an entanglement distribution switching network are less restrictive than for typical conventional applications, leading to design freedom that can be leveraged to optimize additional criteria. In this paper, we present a mathematical framework defining the requirements of an entanglement-distribution switching network. We then consider the design of such a switching network using a number of 2 × 2 crossbar switches, addressing the interconnection of these switches and efficient routing algorithms. In particular, we define a worst-case loss metric and consider 6 × 6, 8 × 8, and 10 × 10 network designs that optimize both this metric and the number of crossbar switches composing the network. We pay particular attention to the 10 × 10 network, detailing novel results proving the optimality of the proposed design. These optimized network designs have great potential for use in practical quantum networks, thus advancing the concept of quantum networks toward reality.

  20. Fast packet switch architectures for broadband integrated services digital networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobagi, Fouad A.

    1990-01-01

    Background information on networking and switching is provided, and the various architectures that have been considered for fast packet switches are described. The focus is solely on switches designed to be implemented electronically. A set of definitions and a brief description of the functionality required of fast packet switches are given. Three basic types of packet switches are identified: the shared-memory, shared-medium, and space-division types. Each of these is described, and examples are given.

  1. Intermittent synchronization in a network of bursting neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Choongseok; Rubchinsky, Leonid L.

    2011-09-01

    Synchronized oscillations in networks of inhibitory and excitatory coupled bursting neurons are common in a variety of neural systems from central pattern generators to human brain circuits. One example of the latter is the subcortical network of the basal ganglia, formed by excitatory and inhibitory bursters of the subthalamic nucleus and globus pallidus, involved in motor control and affected in Parkinson's disease. Recent experiments have demonstrated the intermittent nature of the phase-locking of neural activity in this network. Here, we explore one potential mechanism to explain the intermittent phase-locking in a network. We simplify the network to obtain a model of two inhibitory coupled elements and explore its dynamics. We used geometric analysis and singular perturbation methods for dynamical systems to reduce the full model to a simpler set of equations. Mathematical analysis was completed using three slow variables with two different time scales. Intermittently, synchronous oscillations are generated by overlapped spiking which crucially depends on the geometry of the slow phase plane and the interplay between slow variables as well as the strength of synapses. Two slow variables are responsible for the generation of activity patterns with overlapped spiking, and the other slower variable enhances the robustness of an irregular and intermittent activity pattern. While the analyzed network and the explored mechanism of intermittent synchrony appear to be quite generic, the results of this analysis can be used to trace particular values of biophysical parameters (synaptic strength and parameters of calcium dynamics), which are known to be impacted in Parkinson's disease.

  2. Burst analysis tool for developing neuronal networks exhibiting highly varying action potential dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kapucu, Fikret E; Tanskanen, Jarno M A; Mikkonen, Jarno E; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Narkilahti, Susanna; Hyttinen, Jari A K

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose a firing statistics based neuronal network burst detection algorithm for neuronal networks exhibiting highly variable action potential dynamics. Electrical activity of neuronal networks is generally analyzed by the occurrences of spikes and bursts both in time and space. Commonly accepted analysis tools employ burst detection algorithms based on predefined criteria. However, maturing neuronal networks, such as those originating from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), exhibit highly variable network structure and time-varying dynamics. To explore the developing burst/spike activities of such networks, we propose a burst detection algorithm which utilizes the firing statistics based on interspike interval (ISI) histograms. Moreover, the algorithm calculates ISI thresholds for burst spikes as well as for pre-burst spikes and burst tails by evaluating the cumulative moving average (CMA) and skewness of the ISI histogram. Because of the adaptive nature of the proposed algorithm, its analysis power is not limited by the type of neuronal cell network at hand. We demonstrate the functionality of our algorithm with two different types of microelectrode array (MEA) data recorded from spontaneously active hESC-derived neuronal cell networks. The same data was also analyzed by two commonly employed burst detection algorithms and the differences in burst detection results are illustrated. The results demonstrate that our method is both adaptive to the firing statistics of the network and yields successful burst detection from the data. In conclusion, the proposed method is a potential tool for analyzing of hESC-derived neuronal cell networks and thus can be utilized in studies aiming to understand the development and functioning of human neuronal networks and as an analysis tool for in vitro drug screening and neurotoxicity assays.

  3. An evaluation of Access Tier local area network switches.

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, John M.; Olsberg, Ronald R.

    2004-06-01

    This reports tabulates the Test and Evaluation results of the Access Class Switch tests conducted by members of Department 9336. About 15 switches were reviewed for use in the enterprise network as access tier switches as defined in a three tier architecture. The Access Switch Tier has several functions including: aggregate customer desktop ports, preserve and apply QoS tags, provide switched LAN access, provide VLAN assignment, as well as others. The typical switch size is 48 or less user ports. The evaluation team reviewed network switch evaluation reports from the Tolly Group as well as other sources. We then used these reports as a starting point to identify particular switches for evaluation. In general we reviewed the products of dominant equipment manufacturers. Also, based on architectural design requirements, the majority of the switches tested were of relatively small monolithic unit variety.

  4. Leader neurons in population bursts of 2D living neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckmann, J.-P.; Jacobi, Shimshon; Marom, Shimon; Moses, Elisha; Zbinden, Cyrille

    2008-01-01

    Eytan and Marom (2006 J. Neurosci. 26 8465-76) recently showed that the spontaneous bursting activity of rat neuron cultures includes 'first-to-fire' cells that consistently fire earlier than others. Here, we analyze the behavior of these neurons in long-term recordings of spontaneous activity of rat hippocampal and rat cortical neuron cultures from three different laboratories. We identify precursor events that may either subside ('aborted bursts') or can lead to a full-blown burst ('pre-bursts'). We find that the activation in the pre-burst typically has a first neuron ('leader'), followed by a localized response in its neighborhood. Locality is diminished in the bursts themselves. The long-term dynamics of the leaders is relatively robust, evolving with a half-life of 23-34 h. Stimulation of the culture alters the leader distribution, but the distribution stabilizes within about 1 h. We show that the leaders carry information about the identity of the burst, as measured by the signature of the number of spikes per neuron in a burst. The number of spikes from leaders in the first few spikes of a precursor event is furthermore shown to be predictive with regard to the transition into a burst (pre-burst versus aborted burst). We conclude that the leaders play a role in the development of the bursts and conjecture that they are part of an underlying sub-network that is excited first and then acts as a nucleation center for the burst.

  5. Finite-time synchronization of uncertain coupled switched neural networks under asynchronous switching.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuanyuan; Cao, Jinde; Li, Qingbo; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Alsaadi, Fuad E

    2017-01-01

    This paper deals with the finite-time synchronization problem for a class of uncertain coupled switched neural networks under asynchronous switching. By constructing appropriate Lyapunov-like functionals and using the average dwell time technique, some sufficient criteria are derived to guarantee the finite-time synchronization of considered uncertain coupled switched neural networks. Meanwhile, the asynchronous switching feedback controller is designed to finite-time synchronize the concerned networks. Finally, two numerical examples are introduced to show the validity of the main results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. THE INTERPLANETARY NETWORK SUPPLEMENT TO THE BURST AND TRANSIENT SOURCE EXPERIMENT 5B CATALOG OF COSMIC GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, K.; Briggs, M. S.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Cline, T.; Trombka, J.; McClanahan, T.; Boynton, W.; Starr, R.; McNutt, R.; Boer, M.

    2011-09-01

    We present Interplanetary Network localization information for 343 gamma-ray bursts observed by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) between the end of the 4th BATSE catalog and the end of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) mission, obtained by analyzing the arrival times of these bursts at the Ulysses, Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR), and CGRO spacecraft. For any given burst observed by CGRO and one other spacecraft, arrival time analysis (or 'triangulation') results in an annulus of possible arrival directions whose half-width varies between 11 arcsec and 21{sup 0}, depending on the intensity, time history, and arrival direction of the burst, as well as the distance between the spacecraft. This annulus generally intersects the BATSE error circle, resulting in an average reduction of the area of a factor of 20. When all three spacecraft observe a burst, the result is an error box whose area varies between 1 and 48,000 arcmin{sup 2}, resulting in an average reduction of the BATSE error circle area of a factor of 87.

  7. Optimal Intrinsic Dynamics for Bursting in a Three-Cell Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunmyre, Justin R.; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2010-01-01

    Previous numerical and analytical work has shown that synaptic coupling can allow a network of model neurons to synchronize despite heterogeneity in intrinsic parameter values. In particular, synchronous bursting oscillations can arise in a network with excitatory synaptic coupling, even in the absence of intrinsically bursting neurons. In this work, we explore how the intrinsic dynamics of neurons within a reduced three-cell network influence its ability to exhibit synchronous bursting and the frequency range over which such activity can occur. We establish necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of synchronous bursting solutions and perform related numerical experiments in three-cell networks that include a quiescent cell, a tonically active cell, and a third added cell. Our results show that, in most cases, the addition of a quiescent cell is optimal for synchronous network bursting, in a variety of ways, and that intrinsically bursting cells can be detrimental to synchronous bursting, and we explain the mechanisms underlying these effects. These findings may help explain how robust synchronous oscillations arise in neuronal central pattern generators, such as the mammalian inspiratory network, despite the presence of significant cellular heterogeneity. They also support the idea that intrinsic burst capabilities of individual cells need not be central to these networks' rhythms.

  8. Stimulus information stored in lasting active and hidden network states is destroyed by network bursts.

    PubMed

    Dranias, Mark R; Westover, M Brandon; Cash, Sidney; VanDongen, Antonius M J

    2015-01-01

    In both humans and animals brief synchronizing bursts of epileptiform activity known as interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) can, even in the absence of overt seizures, cause transient cognitive impairments (TCI) that include problems with perception or short-term memory. While no evidence from single units is available, it has been assumed that IEDs destroy information represented in neuronal networks. Cultured neuronal networks are a model for generic cortical microcircuits, and their spontaneous activity is characterized by the presence of synchronized network bursts (SNBs), which share a number of properties with IEDs, including the high degree of synchronization and their spontaneous occurrence in the absence of an external stimulus. As a model approach to understanding the processes underlying IEDs, optogenetic stimulation and multielectrode array (MEA) recordings of cultured neuronal networks were used to study whether stimulus information represented in these networks survives SNBs. When such networks are optically stimulated they encode and maintain stimulus information for as long as one second. Experiments involved recording the network response to a single stimulus and trials where two different stimuli were presented sequentially, akin to a paired pulse trial. We broke the sequential stimulus trials into encoding, delay and readout phases and found that regardless of which phase the SNB occurs, stimulus-specific information was impaired. SNBs were observed to increase the mean network firing rate, but this did not translate monotonically into increases in network entropy. It was found that the more excitable a network, the more stereotyped its response was during a network burst. These measurements speak to whether SNBs are capable of transmitting information in addition to blocking it. These results are consistent with previous reports and provide baseline predictions concerning the neural mechanisms by which IEDs might cause TCI.

  9. Stimulus information stored in lasting active and hidden network states is destroyed by network bursts

    PubMed Central

    Dranias, Mark R.; Westover, M. Brandon; Cash, Sidney; VanDongen, Antonius M. J.

    2015-01-01

    In both humans and animals brief synchronizing bursts of epileptiform activity known as interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) can, even in the absence of overt seizures, cause transient cognitive impairments (TCI) that include problems with perception or short-term memory. While no evidence from single units is available, it has been assumed that IEDs destroy information represented in neuronal networks. Cultured neuronal networks are a model for generic cortical microcircuits, and their spontaneous activity is characterized by the presence of synchronized network bursts (SNBs), which share a number of properties with IEDs, including the high degree of synchronization and their spontaneous occurrence in the absence of an external stimulus. As a model approach to understanding the processes underlying IEDs, optogenetic stimulation and multielectrode array (MEA) recordings of cultured neuronal networks were used to study whether stimulus information represented in these networks survives SNBs. When such networks are optically stimulated they encode and maintain stimulus information for as long as one second. Experiments involved recording the network response to a single stimulus and trials where two different stimuli were presented sequentially, akin to a paired pulse trial. We broke the sequential stimulus trials into encoding, delay and readout phases and found that regardless of which phase the SNB occurs, stimulus-specific information was impaired. SNBs were observed to increase the mean network firing rate, but this did not translate monotonically into increases in network entropy. It was found that the more excitable a network, the more stereotyped its response was during a network burst. These measurements speak to whether SNBs are capable of transmitting information in addition to blocking it. These results are consistent with previous reports and provide baseline predictions concerning the neural mechanisms by which IEDs might cause TCI. PMID:25755638

  10. Network mechanisms of spindle-burst oscillations in the neonatal rat barrel cortex in vivo.

    PubMed

    Minlebaev, Marat; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Khazipov, Rustem

    2007-01-01

    Early in development, cortical networks generate particular patterns of activity that participate in cortical development. The dominant pattern of electrical activity in the neonatal rat neocortex in vivo is a spatially confined spindle-burst. Here, we studied network mechanisms of generation of spindle-bursts in the barrel cortex of neonatal rats using a superfused cortex preparation in vivo. Both spontaneous and sensory-evoked spindle-bursts were present in the superfused barrel cortex. Pharmacological analysis revealed that spindle-bursts are driven by glutamatergic synapses with a major contribution of AMPA/kainate receptors, but slight participation of NMDA receptors and gap junctions. Although GABAergic synapses contributed minimally to the pacing the rhythm of spindle-burst oscillations, surround GABAergic inhibition appeared to be crucial for their compartmentalization. We propose that local spindle-burst oscillations, driven by glutamatergic synapses and spatially confined by GABAergic synapses, contribute to the development of barrel cortex during the critical period of developmental plasticity.

  11. 40 Gb/s 2R Burst Mode Receiver with a single integrated SOA-MZI switch.

    PubMed

    Kanellos, G T; Pleros, N; Petrantonakis, D; Zakynthinos, P; Avramopoulos, H; Maxwell, G; Poustie, A

    2007-04-16

    We demonstrate a novel scheme for 2R burst mode reception capable of operating error-free with 40 Gb/s variable length, asynchronous optical data packets that exhibit up to 9 dB packet-to-packet power variation. It consists of a single, hybrid integrated, SOA-based Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (SOA-MZI) with unequal splitting ratio couplers, configured to operate as a self-switch. We analyze theoretically the power equalization properties of unequal splitting ratio SOA-MZI switches and show good agreement between theory and experiment.

  12. 76 FR 36154 - In the Matter of Certain Equipment for Communications Networks, Including Switches, Routers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Equipment for Communications Networks, Including Switches, Routers... United States after importation of certain equipment for communications networks, including switches... networks, including switches, routers, gateways, bridges, wireless access points, cable modems, IP...

  13. Lossless photonic switched networks for metro-access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Yara; Rudge Barbosa, F.; Bertoldi, Indaya; Moschim, E.

    2016-02-01

    We evaluate through computer simulation the performance of Photonic switching OPS/OBS networks of various sizes and configurations, based on a lossless (amplified) photonic switching node experimentally demonstrated previously. The great advantage of photonic switching is transparency to signal rate and format. Thus we propose a basic flexible network, with low-energy consumption and high-efficiency. In simulations traffic load is varied and network parameters such as, average number of hops (ANH), network latency (delay) and packet loss fraction are evaluated. Consistent results for the various configurations are presented, analyzed and discussed; and Interesting conclusions emerge.

  14. Interneurone bursts are spontaneously associated with muscle contractions only during early phases of mouse spinal network development: a study in organotypic cultures.

    PubMed

    Rosato-Siri, Marcelo D; Zoccolan, Davide; Furlan, Francesco; Ballerini, Laura

    2004-11-01

    For a short time during development immature circuits in the spinal cord and other parts of the central nervous system spontaneously generate synchronous patterns of rhythmic activity. In the case of the spinal cord, it is still unclear how strongly synchronized bursts generated by interneurones are associated with motoneurone firing and whether the progressive decline in spontaneous bursting during circuit maturation proceeds in parallel for motoneurone and interneurone networks. We used organotypic cocultures of spinal cord and skeletal muscle in order to investigate the ontogenic evolution of endogenous spinal network activity associated with the generation of coordinate muscle fibre contractions. A combination of multiunit electrophysiological recordings, videomicroscopy and optical flow computation allowed us to measure the correlation between interneurone firing and motoneurone outputs after 1, 2 and 3 weeks of in vitro development. We found that, in spinal organotypic slices, there is a developmental switch of spontaneous activity from stable bursting to random patterns after the first week in culture. Conversely, bursting recorded in the presence of strychnine and bicuculline became increasingly regular with time in vitro. The time course of spontaneous activity maturation in organotypic slices is similar to that previously reported for the spinal cord developing in utero. We also demonstrated that spontaneous bursts of interneurone action potentials strongly correlate with muscular contractions only during the first week in vitro and that this is due to the activation of motoneurones via AMPA-type glutamate receptors. These results indicate the occurrence in vitro of motor network development regulating bursting inputs from interneurones to motoneurones.

  15. Structural Controllability of Temporal Networks with a Single Switching Controller.

    PubMed

    Yao, Peng; Hou, Bao-Yu; Pan, Yu-Jian; Li, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Temporal network, whose topology evolves with time, is an important class of complex networks. Temporal trees of a temporal network describe the necessary edges sustaining the network as well as their active time points. By a switching controller which properly selects its location with time, temporal trees are used to improve the controllability of the network. Therefore, more nodes are controlled within the limited time. Several switching strategies to efficiently select the location of the controller are designed, which are verified with synthetic and empirical temporal networks to achieve better control performance.

  16. Structural Controllability of Temporal Networks with a Single Switching Controller

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Peng; Hou, Bao-Yu; Pan, Yu-Jian; Li, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Temporal network, whose topology evolves with time, is an important class of complex networks. Temporal trees of a temporal network describe the necessary edges sustaining the network as well as their active time points. By a switching controller which properly selects its location with time, temporal trees are used to improve the controllability of the network. Therefore, more nodes are controlled within the limited time. Several switching strategies to efficiently select the location of the controller are designed, which are verified with synthetic and empirical temporal networks to achieve better control performance. PMID:28107538

  17. Network burst dynamics under heterogeneous cholinergic modulation of neural firing properties and heterogeneous synaptic connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Knudstrup, Scott; Zochowski, Michal; Booth, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of neural network activity depend on intrinsic neural properties and synaptic connectivity in the network. In brain networks, both of these properties are critically affected by the type and levels of neuromodulators present. The expression of many of the most powerful neuromodulators, including acetylcholine (ACh), varies tonically and phasically with behavioural state, leading to dynamic, heterogeneous changes in intrinsic neural properties and synaptic connectivity properties. Namely, ACh significantly alters neural firing properties as measured by the phase response curve in a manner that has been shown to alter the propensity for network synchronization. The aim of this simulation study was to build an understanding of how heterogeneity in cholinergic modulation of neural firing properties and heterogeneity in synaptic connectivity affect the initiation and maintenance of synchronous network bursting in excitatory networks. We show that cells that display different levels of ACh modulation have differential roles in generating network activity: weakly modulated cells are necessary for burst initiation and provide synchronizing drive to the rest of the network, whereas strongly modulated cells provide the overall activity level necessary to sustain burst firing. By applying several quantitative measures of network activity, we further show that the existence of network bursting and its characteristics, such as burst duration and intraburst synchrony, are dependent on the fraction of cell types providing the synaptic connections in the network. These results suggest mechanisms underlying ACh modulation of brain oscillations and the modulation of seizure activity during sleep states. PMID:26869313

  18. Network burst dynamics under heterogeneous cholinergic modulation of neural firing properties and heterogeneous synaptic connectivity.

    PubMed

    Knudstrup, Scott; Zochowski, Michal; Booth, Victoria

    2016-05-01

    The characteristics of neural network activity depend on intrinsic neural properties and synaptic connectivity in the network. In brain networks, both of these properties are critically affected by the type and levels of neuromodulators present. The expression of many of the most powerful neuromodulators, including acetylcholine (ACh), varies tonically and phasically with behavioural state, leading to dynamic, heterogeneous changes in intrinsic neural properties and synaptic connectivity properties. Namely, ACh significantly alters neural firing properties as measured by the phase response curve in a manner that has been shown to alter the propensity for network synchronization. The aim of this simulation study was to build an understanding of how heterogeneity in cholinergic modulation of neural firing properties and heterogeneity in synaptic connectivity affect the initiation and maintenance of synchronous network bursting in excitatory networks. We show that cells that display different levels of ACh modulation have differential roles in generating network activity: weakly modulated cells are necessary for burst initiation and provide synchronizing drive to the rest of the network, whereas strongly modulated cells provide the overall activity level necessary to sustain burst firing. By applying several quantitative measures of network activity, we further show that the existence of network bursting and its characteristics, such as burst duration and intraburst synchrony, are dependent on the fraction of cell types providing the synaptic connections in the network. These results suggest mechanisms underlying ACh modulation of brain oscillations and the modulation of seizure activity during sleep states. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A Reconnection Switch to Trigger gamma-Ray Burst Jet Dissipation

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, Jonathan C.; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.

    2012-03-14

    Prompt gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission requires some mechanism to dissipate an ultrarelativistic jet. Internal shocks or some form of electromagnetic dissipation are candidate mechanisms. Any mechanism needs to answer basic questions, such as what is the origin of variability, what radius does dissipation occur at, and how does efficient prompt emission occur. These mechanisms also need to be consistent with how ultrarelativistic jets form and stay baryon pure despite turbulence and electromagnetic reconnection near the compact object and despite stellar entrainment within the collapsar model. We use the latest magnetohydrodynamical models of ultrarelativistic jets to explore some of these questions in the context of electromagnetic dissipation due to the slow collisional and fast collisionless reconnection mechanisms, as often associated with Sweet-Parker and Petschek reconnection, respectively. For a highly magnetized ultrarelativistic jet and typical collapsar parameters, we find that significant electromagnetic dissipation may be avoided until it proceeds catastrophically near the jet photosphere at large radii (r {approx} 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14}cm), by which the jet obtains a high Lorentz factor ({gamma} {approx} 100-1000), has a luminosity of L{sub j} {approx} 10{sup 50}-10{sup 51} erg s{sup -1}, has observer variability timescales of order 1s (ranging from 0.001-10s), achieves {gamma}{theta}{sub j} {approx} 10-20 (for opening half-angle {theta}{sub j}) and so is able to produce jet breaks, and has comparable energy available for both prompt and afterglow emission. A range of model parameters are investigated and simplified scaling laws are derived. This reconnection switch mechanism allows for highly efficient conversion of electromagnetic energy into prompt emission and associates the observed prompt GRB pulse temporal structure with dissipation timescales of some number of reconnecting current sheets embedded in the jet. We hope this work helps motivate the

  20. Satellite-matrix-switched, time-division-multiple-access network simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Andro, Monty; Nagy, Lawrence A.; Budinger, James M.; Shalkhauser, Mary JO

    1990-01-01

    A versatile experimental Ka-band network simulator has been implemented at the NASA Lewis Research Center to demonstrate and evaluate a satellite-matrix-switched, time-division-multiple-access (SMS-TDMA) network and to evaluate future digital ground terminals and radiofrequency (RF) components. The simulator was implemented by using proof-of-concept RF components developed under NASA contracts and digital ground terminal and link simulation hardware developed at Lewis. This simulator provides many unique capabilities such as satellite range delay and variation simulation and rain fade simulation. All network parameters (e.g., signal-to-noise ratio, satellite range variation rate, burst density, and rain fade) are controlled and monitored by a central computer. The simulator is presently configured as a three-ground-terminal SMS-TDMA network.

  1. Satellite-matrix-switched, time-division-multiple-access network simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Andro, Monty; Nagy, Lawrence A.; Budinger, James M.; Shalkhauser, Mary JO

    1989-01-01

    A versatile experimental Ka-band network simulator has been implemented at the NASA Lewis Research Center to demonstrate and evaluate a satellite-matrix-switched, time-division-multiple-access (SMS-TDMA) network and to evaluate future digital ground terminals and radiofrequency (RF) components. The simulator was implemented by using proof-of-concept RF components developed under NASA contracts and digital ground terminal and link simulation hardware developed at Lewis. This simulator provides many unique capabilities such as satellite range delay and variation simulation and rain fade simulation. All network parameters (e.g., signal-to-noise ratio, satellite range variation rate, burst density, and rain fade) are controlled and monitored by a central computer. The simulator is presently configured as a three-ground-terminal SMS-TDMA network.

  2. Changing excitation and inhibition in simulated neural networks: effects on induced bursting behavior.

    PubMed

    Kudela, Pawel; Franaszczuk, Piotr J; Bergey, Gregory K

    2003-04-01

    The development of synchronous bursting in neuronal ensembles represents an important change in network behavior. To determine the influences on development of such synchronous bursting behavior we study the dynamics of small networks of sparsely connected excitatory and inhibitory neurons using numerical simulations. The synchronized bursting activities in networks evoked by background spikes are investigated. Specifically, patterns of bursting activity are examined when the balance between excitation and inhibition on neuronal inputs is varied and the fraction of inhibitory neurons in the network is changed. For quantitative comparison of bursting activities in networks, measures of the degree of synchrony are used. We demonstrate how changes in the strength of excitation on inputs of neurons can be compensated by changes in the strength of inhibition without changing the degree of synchrony in the network. The effects of changing several network parameters on the network activity are analyzed and discussed. These changes may underlie the transition of network activity from normal to potentially pathologic (e.g., epileptic) states.

  3. Synchronization of bursting Hodgkin-Huxley-type neurons in clustered networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, T. de L.; Lopes, S. R.; Batista, C. A. S.; Kurths, J.; Viana, R. L.

    2014-09-01

    We considered a clustered network of bursting neurons described by the Huber-Braun model. In the upper level of the network we used the connectivity matrix of the cat cerebral cortex network, and in the lower level each cortex area (or cluster) is modelled as a small-world network. There are two different coupling strengths related to inter- and intracluster dynamics. Each bursting cycle is composed of a quiescent period followed by a rapid chaotic sequence of spikes, and we defined a geometric phase which enables us to investigate the onset of synchronized bursting, as the state in which the neuron start bursting at the same time, whereas their spikes may remain uncorrelated. The bursting synchronization of a clustered network has been investigated using an order parameter and the average field of the network in order to identify regimes in which each cluster may display synchronized behavior, whereas the overall network does not. We introduce quantifiers to evaluate the relative contribution of each cluster in the partial synchronized behavior of the whole network. Our main finding is that we typically observe in the clustered network not a complete phase synchronized regime but instead a complex pattern of partial phase synchronization in which different cortical areas may be internally synchronized at distinct phase values, hence they are not externally synchronized, unless the coupling strengths are too large.

  4. Synchronization of bursting Hodgkin-Huxley-type neurons in clustered networks.

    PubMed

    Prado, T de L; Lopes, S R; Batista, C A S; Kurths, J; Viana, R L

    2014-09-01

    We considered a clustered network of bursting neurons described by the Huber-Braun model. In the upper level of the network we used the connectivity matrix of the cat cerebral cortex network, and in the lower level each cortex area (or cluster) is modelled as a small-world network. There are two different coupling strengths related to inter- and intracluster dynamics. Each bursting cycle is composed of a quiescent period followed by a rapid chaotic sequence of spikes, and we defined a geometric phase which enables us to investigate the onset of synchronized bursting, as the state in which the neuron start bursting at the same time, whereas their spikes may remain uncorrelated. The bursting synchronization of a clustered network has been investigated using an order parameter and the average field of the network in order to identify regimes in which each cluster may display synchronized behavior, whereas the overall network does not. We introduce quantifiers to evaluate the relative contribution of each cluster in the partial synchronized behavior of the whole network. Our main finding is that we typically observe in the clustered network not a complete phase synchronized regime but instead a complex pattern of partial phase synchronization in which different cortical areas may be internally synchronized at distinct phase values, hence they are not externally synchronized, unless the coupling strengths are too large.

  5. Modeling of synchronization behavior of bursting neurons at nonlinearly coupled dynamical networks.

    PubMed

    Çakir, Yüksel

    2016-01-01

    Synchronization behaviors of bursting neurons coupled through electrical and dynamic chemical synapses are investigated. The Izhikevich model is used with random and small world network of bursting neurons. Various currents which consist of diffusive electrical and time-delayed dynamic chemical synapses are used in the simulations to investigate the influences of synaptic currents and couplings on synchronization behavior of bursting neurons. The effects of parameters, such as time delay, inhibitory synaptic strengths, and decay time on synchronization behavior are investigated. It is observed that in random networks with no delay, bursting synchrony is established with the electrical synapse alone, single spiking synchrony is observed with hybrid coupling. In small world network with no delay, periodic bursting behavior with multiple spikes is observed when only chemical and only electrical synapse exist. Single-spike and multiple-spike bursting are established with hybrid couplings. A decrease in the synchronization measure is observed with zero time delay, as the decay time is increased in random network. For synaptic delays which are above active phase period, synchronization measure increases with an increase in synaptic strength and time delay in small world network. However, in random network, it increases with only an increase in synaptic strength.

  6. Neural networks supporting switching, hypothesis testing, and rule application

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiya; Braunlich, Kurt; Wehe, Hillary S.; Seger, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    We identified dynamic changes in recruitment of neural connectivity networks across three phases of a flexible rule learning and set-shifting task similar to the Wisconsin Card Sort Task: switching, rule learning via hypothesis testing, and rule application. During fMRI scanning, subjects viewed pairs of stimuli that differed across four dimensions (letter, color, size, screen location), chose one stimulus, and received feedback. Subjects were informed that the correct choice was determined by a simple unidimensional rule, for example “choose the blue letter.” Once each rule had been learned and correctly applied for 4-7 trials, subjects were cued via either negative feedback or visual cues to switch to learning a new rule. Task performance was divided into three phases: Switching (first trial after receiving the switch cue), hypothesis testing (subsequent trials through the last error trial), and rule application (correct responding after the rule was learned). We used both univariate analysis to characterize activity occurring within specific regions of the brain, and a multivariate method, constrained principal component analysis for fMRI (fMRI-CPCA), to investigate how distributed regions coordinate to subserve different processes. As hypothesized, switching was subserved by a limbic network including the ventral striatum, thalamus, and parahippocampal gyrus, in conjunction with cortical salience network regions including the anterior cingulate and frontoinsular cortex. Activity in the ventral striatum was associated with switching regardless of how switching was cued; visually cued shifts were associated with additional visual cortical activity. After switching, as subjects moved into the hypothesis testing phase, a broad fronto-parietal-striatal network (associated with the cognitive control, dorsal attention, and salience networks) increased in activity. This network was sensitive to rule learning speed, with greater extended activity for the slowest

  7. Defense Switched Network Technology and Experiments Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-30

    steps are grouped below into two categories, associated respec- tively with the voice interface to the telephone switch and with the signaling...interface to the RCP. Voice Interface with Telephone Switch:- The telephone connections to the PCI/TOE without and with a RCP are shown in Figures 10 and 11

  8. Membrane resonance in bursting pacemaker neurons of an oscillatory network is correlated with network frequency.

    PubMed

    Tohidi, Vahid; Nadim, Farzan

    2009-05-20

    Network oscillations typically span a limited range of frequency. In pacemaker-driven networks, including many central pattern generators (CPGs), this frequency range is determined by the properties of bursting pacemaker neurons and their synaptic connections; thus, factors that affect the burst frequency of pacemaker neurons should play a role in determining the network frequency. We examine the role of membrane resonance of pacemaker neurons on the network frequency in the crab pyloric CPG. The pyloric oscillations (frequency of approximately 1 Hz) are generated by a group of pacemaker neurons: the anterior burster (AB) and the pyloric dilator (PD). We examine the impedance profiles of the AB and PD neurons in response to sinusoidal current injections with varying frequency and find that both neuron types exhibit membrane resonance, i.e., demonstrate maximal impedance at a given preferred frequency. The membrane resonance frequencies of the AB and PD neurons fall within the range of the pyloric network oscillation frequency. Experiments with pharmacological blockers and computational modeling show that both calcium currents I(Ca) and the hyperpolarization-activated inward current I(h) are important in producing the membrane resonance in these neurons. We then demonstrate that both the membrane resonance frequency of the PD neuron and its suprathreshold bursting frequency can be shifted in the same direction by either direct current injection or by using the dynamic-clamp technique to inject artificial conductances for I(h) or I(Ca). Together, these results suggest that membrane resonance of pacemaker neurons can be strongly correlated with the CPG oscillation frequency.

  9. Routing and Label Space Reduction in Label Switching Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano, Fernando; Caro, Luis Fernando; Stidsen, Thomas; Papadimitriou, Dimitri

    This chapter is devoted to the analysis and modeling of some problems related to the optimal usage of the label space in label switching networks. Label space problems concerning three different technologies and architectures - namely Multi-protocol Label Switching (MPLS), Ethernet VLAN-Label Switching (ELS) and All-Optical Label Switching (AOLS) - are discussed in this chapter. Each of these cases yields to different constraints of the general label space reduction problem. We propose a generic optimization model and, then, we describe some adaptations aiming at modeling each particular case. Simulation results are briefly discussed at the end of this chapter.

  10. Switching synchronization in one-dimensional memristive networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slipko, Valeriy A.; Shumovskyi, Mykola; Pershin, Yuriy V.

    2015-11-01

    We report on a switching synchronization phenomenon in one-dimensional memristive networks, which occurs when several memristive systems with different switching constants are switched from the high- to low-resistance state. Our numerical simulations show that such a collective behavior is especially pronounced when the applied voltage slightly exceeds the combined threshold voltage of memristive systems. Moreover, a finite increase in the network switching time is found compared to the average switching time of individual systems. An analytical model is presented to explain our observations. Using this model, we have derived asymptotic expressions for memory resistances at short and long times, which are in excellent agreement with results of our numerical simulations.

  11. Performance evaluation of a burst-mode EDFA in an optical packet and circuit integrated network.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Masaki; Awaji, Yoshinari; Furukawa, Hideaki; Shinada, Satoshi; Puttnam, Benjamin J; Wada, Naoya

    2013-12-30

    We experimentally investigate the performance of burst-mode EDFA in an optical packet and circuit integrated system. In such networks, packets and light paths can be dynamically assigned to the same fibers, resulting in gain transients in EDFAs throughout the network that can limit network performance. Here, we compare the performance of a 'burst-mode' EDFA (BM-EDFA), employing transient suppression techniques and optical feedback, with conventional EDFAs, and those using automatic gain control and previous BM-EDFA implementations. We first measure gain transients and other impairments in a simplified set-up before making frame error-rate measurements in a network demonstration.

  12. Performance issues in SCM label switched networks due to tunable laser switching events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, F.; Barry, L. P.

    2006-09-01

    Optical Packet Switched (OPS) networks employing Optical Label Switching (OLS) techniques have the potential to enable an all-optical internet. In these networks, data remains in optical format throughout the entire network and routing is performed using a separate optical label. The label information is used to control fast tunable lasers that will transfer data packets to different wavelengths for routing and contention resolution. In this paper we investigate interference between subcarrier multiplexed (SCM) labels in such a network, due to switching events in the tunable laser transmitter. This interference may place a limitation on the channel spacing and subcarrier frequency used. Two 50GHz spaced optical carriers were modulated with 2.5Gbit/s SCM labels at 20GHz. Bit error rate measurements were taken with two lasers fixed 50 GHz apart, and also with one of the lasers (an SG-DBR) switching between this channel and another one 800GHz away. When the SG-DBR laser is not switching, a power penalty of approximately 0.25 dB is introduced due to interference through the optical filter. However, when the SG-DBR laser is switching between wavelengths an error floor of 1x10-5 is introduced due to the time it takes the tunable laser to settle to its target channel. In a systems application, this would result in packets being incorrectly routed.

  13. Network and external perturbation induce burst synchronisation in cat cerebral cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lameu, Ewandson L.; Borges, Fernando S.; Borges, Rafael R.; Batista, Antonio M.; Baptista, Murilo S.; Viana, Ricardo L.

    2016-05-01

    The brain of mammals are divided into different cortical areas that are anatomically connected forming larger networks which perform cognitive tasks. The cat cerebral cortex is composed of 65 areas organised into the visual, auditory, somatosensory-motor and frontolimbic cognitive regions. We have built a network of networks, in which networks are connected among themselves according to the connections observed in the cat cortical areas aiming to study how inputs drive the synchronous behaviour in this cat brain-like network. We show that without external perturbations it is possible to observe high level of bursting synchronisation between neurons within almost all areas, except for the auditory area. Bursting synchronisation appears between neurons in the auditory region when an external perturbation is applied in another cognitive area. This is a clear evidence that burst synchronisation and collective behaviour in the brain might be a process mediated by other brain areas under stimulation.

  14. Satellite range delay simulator for a matrix-switched time division multiple-access network simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, Lawrence A.

    1989-01-01

    The Systems Integration, Test, and Evaluation (SITE) facility at NASA Lewis Research Center is presently configured as a satellite-switched time division multiple access (SS-TDMA) network simulator. The purpose of SITE is to demonstrate and evaluate advanced communication satellite technologies, presently embodied by POC components developed under NASA contracts in addition to other hardware, such as ground terminals, designed and built in-house at NASA Lewis. Each ground terminal in a satellite communications system will experience a different aspect of the satellite's motion due mainly to daily tidal effects and station keeping, hence a different duration and rate of variation in the range delay. As a result of this and other effects such as local oscillator instability, each ground terminal must constantly adjust its transmit burst timing so that data bursts from separate ground terminals arrive at the satellite in their assigned time slots, preventing overlap and keeping the system in synchronism. On the receiving end, ground terminals must synchronize their local clocks using reference transmissions received through the satellite link. A feature of the SITE facility is its capability to simulate the varying propagation delays and associated Doppler frequency shifts that the ground terminals in the network have to cope with. Delay is achieved by means of two NASA Lewis designed and built range delay simulator (RDS) systems, each independently controlled locally with front panel switches or remotely by an experiment control and monitor (EC/M) computer.

  15. Interconnecting network for switching data packets and method for switching data packets

    DOEpatents

    Benner, Alan Frederic; Minkenberg, Cyriel Johan Agnes; Stunkel, Craig Brian

    2010-05-25

    The interconnecting network for switching data packets, having data and flow control information, comprises a local packet switch element (S1) with local input buffers (I(1,1) . . . I(1,y)) for buffering the incoming data packets, a remote packet switch element (S2) with remote input buffers (I(2,1) . . . I(2,y)) for buffering the incoming data packets, and data lines (L) for interconnecting the local and the remote packet switch elements (S1, S2). The interconnecting network further comprises a local and a remote arbiter (A1, A2) which are connected via control lines (CL) to the input buffers (I(1,1) . . . I(1,y), I(2,1) . . . I(2,y)), and which are formed such that they can provide that the flow control information is transmitted via the data lines (L) and the control lines (CL).

  16. Crossbar Switches For Optical Data-Communication Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monacos, Steve P.

    1994-01-01

    Optoelectronic and electro-optical crossbar switches called "permutation engines" (PE's) developed to route packets of data through fiber-optic communication networks. Basic network concept described in "High-Speed Optical Wide-Area Data-Communication Network" (NPO-18983). Nonblocking operation achieved by decentralized switching and control scheme. Each packet routed up or down in each column of this 5-input/5-output permutation engine. Routing algorithm ensures each packet arrives at its designated output port without blocking any other packet that does not contend for same output port.

  17. Dynamic switching of neural codes in networks with gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Katori, Yuichi; Masuda, Naoki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2006-12-01

    Population rate coding and temporal coding are common neural codes. Recent studies suggest that these two codes may be alternatively used in one neural system. Based on the fact that there are massive gap junctions in the brain, we explore how this switching behavior may be related to neural codes in networks of neurons connected by gap junctions. First, we show that under time-varying inputs, such neural networks show switching between synchronous and asynchronous states. Then, we quantify network dynamics by three mutual information measures to show that population rate coding carries more information in asynchronous states and temporal coding does so in synchronous states.

  18. Crossbar Switches For Optical Data-Communication Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monacos, Steve P.

    1994-01-01

    Optoelectronic and electro-optical crossbar switches called "permutation engines" (PE's) developed to route packets of data through fiber-optic communication networks. Basic network concept described in "High-Speed Optical Wide-Area Data-Communication Network" (NPO-18983). Nonblocking operation achieved by decentralized switching and control scheme. Each packet routed up or down in each column of this 5-input/5-output permutation engine. Routing algorithm ensures each packet arrives at its designated output port without blocking any other packet that does not contend for same output port.

  19. Synchronization in slowly switching networks of coupled oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jie; Zou, Yong; Guan, Shuguang; Liu, Zonghua; Boccaletti, S.

    2016-01-01

    Networks whose structure of connections evolves in time constitute a big challenge in the study of synchronization, in particular when the time scales for the evolution of the graph topology are comparable with (or even longer than) those pertinent to the units’ dynamics. We here focus on networks with a slow-switching structure, and show that the necessary conditions for synchronization, i.e. the conditions for which synchronization is locally stable, are determined by the time average of the largest Lyapunov exponents of transverse modes of the switching topologies. Comparison between fast- and slow-switching networks allows elucidating that slow-switching processes prompt synchronization in the cases where the Master Stability Function is concave, whereas fast-switching schemes facilitate synchronization for convex curves. Moreover, the condition of slow-switching enables the introduction of a control strategy for inducing synchronization in networks with arbitrary structure and coupling strength, which is of evident relevance for broad applications in real world systems. PMID:27779253

  20. Synchronization in slowly switching networks of coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Zou, Yong; Guan, Shuguang; Liu, Zonghua; Boccaletti, S

    2016-10-25

    Networks whose structure of connections evolves in time constitute a big challenge in the study of synchronization, in particular when the time scales for the evolution of the graph topology are comparable with (or even longer than) those pertinent to the units' dynamics. We here focus on networks with a slow-switching structure, and show that the necessary conditions for synchronization, i.e. the conditions for which synchronization is locally stable, are determined by the time average of the largest Lyapunov exponents of transverse modes of the switching topologies. Comparison between fast- and slow-switching networks allows elucidating that slow-switching processes prompt synchronization in the cases where the Master Stability Function is concave, whereas fast-switching schemes facilitate synchronization for convex curves. Moreover, the condition of slow-switching enables the introduction of a control strategy for inducing synchronization in networks with arbitrary structure and coupling strength, which is of evident relevance for broad applications in real world systems.

  1. Synchronization in slowly switching networks of coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jie; Zou, Yong; Guan, Shuguang; Liu, Zonghua; Boccaletti, S.

    2016-10-01

    Networks whose structure of connections evolves in time constitute a big challenge in the study of synchronization, in particular when the time scales for the evolution of the graph topology are comparable with (or even longer than) those pertinent to the units’ dynamics. We here focus on networks with a slow-switching structure, and show that the necessary conditions for synchronization, i.e. the conditions for which synchronization is locally stable, are determined by the time average of the largest Lyapunov exponents of transverse modes of the switching topologies. Comparison between fast- and slow-switching networks allows elucidating that slow-switching processes prompt synchronization in the cases where the Master Stability Function is concave, whereas fast-switching schemes facilitate synchronization for convex curves. Moreover, the condition of slow-switching enables the introduction of a control strategy for inducing synchronization in networks with arbitrary structure and coupling strength, which is of evident relevance for broad applications in real world systems.

  2. Network switching strategy for energy conservation in heterogeneous networks.

    PubMed

    Song, Yujae; Choi, Wooyeol; Baek, Seungjae

    2017-01-01

    In heterogeneous networks (HetNets), the large-scale deployment of small base stations (BSs) together with traditional macro BSs is an economical and efficient solution that is employed to address the exponential growth in mobile data traffic. In dense HetNets, network switching, i.e., handovers, plays a critical role in connecting a mobile terminal (MT) to the best of all accessible networks. In the existing literature, a handover decision is made using various handover metrics such as the signal-to-noise ratio, data rate, and movement speed. However, there are few studies on handovers that focus on energy efficiency in HetNets. In this paper, we propose a handover strategy that helps to minimize energy consumption at BSs in HetNets without compromising the quality of service (QoS) of each MT. The proposed handover strategy aims to capture the effect of the stochastic behavior of handover parameters and the expected energy consumption due to handover execution when making a handover decision. To identify the validity of the proposed handover strategy, we formulate a handover problem as a constrained Markov decision process (CMDP), by which the effects of the stochastic behaviors of handover parameters and consequential handover energy consumption can be accurately reflected when making a handover decision. In the CMDP, the aim is to minimize the energy consumption to service an MT over the lifetime of its connection, and the constraint is to guarantee the QoS requirements of the MT given in terms of the transmission delay and call-dropping probability. We find an optimal policy for the CMDP using a combination of the Lagrangian method and value iteration. Simulation results verify the validity of the proposed handover strategy.

  3. Network switching strategy for energy conservation in heterogeneous networks

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yujae; Choi, Wooyeol; Baek, Seungjae

    2017-01-01

    In heterogeneous networks (HetNets), the large-scale deployment of small base stations (BSs) together with traditional macro BSs is an economical and efficient solution that is employed to address the exponential growth in mobile data traffic. In dense HetNets, network switching, i.e., handovers, plays a critical role in connecting a mobile terminal (MT) to the best of all accessible networks. In the existing literature, a handover decision is made using various handover metrics such as the signal-to-noise ratio, data rate, and movement speed. However, there are few studies on handovers that focus on energy efficiency in HetNets. In this paper, we propose a handover strategy that helps to minimize energy consumption at BSs in HetNets without compromising the quality of service (QoS) of each MT. The proposed handover strategy aims to capture the effect of the stochastic behavior of handover parameters and the expected energy consumption due to handover execution when making a handover decision. To identify the validity of the proposed handover strategy, we formulate a handover problem as a constrained Markov decision process (CMDP), by which the effects of the stochastic behaviors of handover parameters and consequential handover energy consumption can be accurately reflected when making a handover decision. In the CMDP, the aim is to minimize the energy consumption to service an MT over the lifetime of its connection, and the constraint is to guarantee the QoS requirements of the MT given in terms of the transmission delay and call-dropping probability. We find an optimal policy for the CMDP using a combination of the Lagrangian method and value iteration. Simulation results verify the validity of the proposed handover strategy. PMID:28241083

  4. Scaling silicon photonic switch fabrics for data center interconnection networks.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Dessislava; Rumley, Sébastien; Calhoun, David; Li, Qi; Hendry, Robert; Samadi, Payman; Bergman, Keren

    2015-01-26

    With the rapidly increasing aggregate bandwidth requirements of data centers there is a growing interest in the insertion of optically interconnected networks with high-radix transparent optical switch fabrics. Silicon photonics is a particularly promising and applicable technology due to its small footprint, CMOS compatibility, high bandwidth density, and the potential for nanosecond scale dynamic connectivity. In this paper we analyze the feasibility of building silicon photonic microring based switch fabrics for data center scale optical interconnection networks. We evaluate the scalability of a microring based switch fabric for WDM signals. Critical parameters including crosstalk, insertion loss and switching speed are analyzed, and their sensitivity with respect to device parameters is examined. We show that optimization of physical layer parameters can reduce crosstalk and increase switch fabric scalability. Our analysis indicates that with current state-of-the-art devices, a high radix 128 × 128 silicon photonic single chip switch fabric with tolerable power penalty is feasible. The applicability of silicon photonic microrings for data center switching is further supported via review of microring operations and control demonstrations. The challenges and opportunities for this technology platform are discussed.

  5. Technical network equipment qualification : cubicle-class switches.

    SciTech Connect

    Kellogg, Brian Richard; Brenkosh, Joseph Peter

    2003-12-01

    As part of the Testing Evaluation and Qualification Project, which was contracted by Organization 9336, this paper compares three cubicle-class switches from various vendors to assess how well they would perform in the unclassified networks at Sandia National Laboratories. The switches tested were the SMC TigerSwitch 6709L2, the Cisco Catalyst 2950G-12, and the Extreme Summit 5i. Each switch was evaluated by testing performance, functionality, interoperability, security, and total cost of ownership. The results of this report show the SMC TigerSwitch as being the best choice for cubicle use because of its high performance and very low cost. The Cisco Catalyst is also rated highly for cubicle use and in some cases may be preferred over the SMC TigerSwitch. The Extreme Summit 5i is not recommended for cubicle use due to its size and extremely loud fans but is a full featured, high performance switch that would work very well for access layer switching.

  6. Resource allocation in circuit-switched all-optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquis, Douglas; Barry, Richard A.; Finn, Steven G.; Parikh, Salil A.; Swanson, Eric A.; Thomas, Robert E.

    1996-03-01

    We describe an all-optical network testbed deployed in the Boston area, and research surrounding the allocation of optical resources -- frequencies and time slots -- within the network. The network was developed by a consortium of AT&T Bell Laboratories, Digital Equipment Corporation, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a grant from ARPA. The network is organized as a hierarchy consisting of local, metropolitan, and wide area nodes tea support optical broadcast and routing modes. Frequencies are shared and reused to enhance network scalability. Electronic access is provided through optical terminals that support multiple services having data rates between 10 Mbps/user and 10 Gbps/user. Of particular interest for this work is the 'B-service,' which simultaneously hops frequency and time slots on each optical terminal to allow frequency sharing within the AON. B-service provides 1.244 Gbps per optical terminal, with bandwidth for individual connections divided in increments as small as 10 Mbps. We have created interfaces between the AON and commercially available electronic circuit-switched and packet-switched networks. The packet switches provide FDDI (datacomm), T3 (telecomm), and ATM/SONET switching at backplane rates of over 3 Gbps. We show results on network applications that dynamically allocate optical bandwidth between electronic packet-switches based on the offered load presented by users. Bandwidth allocation granularity is proportional to B-Service slots (10-1244 Mbps), and switching times are on the order of one second. We have also studied the effects of wavelength changers upon the network capacity and blocking probabilities in wide area all-optical networks. Wavelength changers allow a change in the carrier frequency (within the network) without disturbing the data modulation. The study includes both a theoretical model of blocking probabilities based on network design parameters, and a computer simulation of blocking in networks with and

  7. Defense Switched Network Technology and Experiments Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    traffic- generation and statistics-collection features. The simulator was initially delivered to DCEC in February 1984; a second delivery, including all... initiated of the general requirements for switch fea- tures that will permit implementation of DSN routing and preemption capabilities by means of...must be able to cope with a variety of behaviors * on the part of implementations at other sites, and general design principles cannot assume com- plete

  8. The 4X6 network: A new power switching scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R.; Nishikawara, K.; Stromotich, F. )

    1989-10-01

    This paper describes a new power delivery switching concept which is patented in the USA and Canada. The basic network has 4 nodes and 6 branches and so is called a 4 x 6 switching network. For larger substations, it has substantial advantages over the traditional double breaker, breaker and one-half, and breaker and one-third: up to 40% fewer breakers; higher reliability; and reduced station area in some cases. For some applications, it can provide lower short-circuit levels and bus ampacity ratings thorugh the judicious use of normally open circuit breakers. The concept is applicable to all types of conventional switchgear including SF6.

  9. Experimental demonstration of OSPF-TE extensions in muiti-domain OBS networks connected by GMPLS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Chunlei; Yin, Yawei; Wu, Jian; Lin, Jintong

    2008-11-01

    The interworking network of Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) and Optical Burst Switching (OBS) is attractive network architecture for the future IP/DWDM network nowadays. In this paper, OSPF-TE extensions for multi-domain Optical Burst Switching networks connected by GMPLS controlled WDM network are proposed, the corresponding experimental results such as the advertising latency are also presented by using an OBS network testbed. The experimental results show that it works effectively on the OBS/GMPLS networks.

  10. Basin stability for burst synchronization in small-world networks of chaotic slow-fast oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslennikov, Oleg V.; Nekorkin, Vladimir I.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    The impact of connectivity and individual dynamics on the basin stability of the burst synchronization regime in small-world networks consisting of chaotic slow-fast oscillators is studied. It is shown that there are rewiring probabilities corresponding to the largest basin stabilities, which uncovers a reason for finding small-world topologies in real neuronal networks. The impact of coupling density and strength as well as the nodal parameters of relaxation or excitability are studied. Dynamic mechanisms are uncovered that most strongly influence basin stability of the burst synchronization regime.

  11. Fast packet switching algorithms for dynamic resource control over ATM networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, R.P.; Keattihananant, P.; Chang, T.; Heieh, J.; Du, D.

    1996-12-01

    Real-time continuous media traffic, such as digital video and audio, is expected to comprise a large percentage of the network load on future high speed packet switch networks such as ATM. A major feature which distinguishes high speed networks from traditional slower speed networks is the large amount of data the network must process very quickly. For efficient network usage, traffic control mechanisms are essential. Currently, most mechanisms for traffic control (such as flow control) have centered on the support of Available Bit Rate (ABR), i.e., non real-time, traffic. With regard to ATM, for ABR traffic, two major types of schemes which have been proposed are rate- control and credit-control schemes. Neither of these schemes are directly applicable to Real-time Variable Bit Rate (VBR) traffic such as continuous media traffic. Traffic control for continuous media traffic is an inherently difficult problem due to the time- sensitive nature of the traffic and its unpredictable burstiness. In this study, we present a scheme which controls traffic by dynamically allocating/de- allocating resources among competing VCs based upon their real-time requirements. This scheme incorporates a form of rate- control, real-time burst-level scheduling and link-link flow control. We show analytically potential performance improvements of our rate- control scheme and present a scheme for buffer dimensioning. We also present simulation results of our schemes and discuss the tradeoffs inherent in maintaining high network utilization and statistically guaranteeing many users` Quality of Service.

  12. Interconnection between packet switching national networks and local packet radio communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talone, P.; Trigila, S.

    1985-07-01

    Multipoint topology networks based on a single statistically distributed radiocommunication channel are considered, referring only to restricted area networks with line of sight type links. The architecture and protocols of such networks are reviewed. The problems related to the interconnection of such networks with large public packet switching communication networks are examined. Several hypothesis are studied concluding that mainly in the case of emergencies or catastrophic events these networks are an extremely useful resource.

  13. High-performance multicasting schemes in optical packet switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yuefeng; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Min

    2009-11-01

    Current trends in communications indicate that multicasting is becoming increasingly popular and important in networking applications. Since multicasting can be supported more efficiently in optical domain by utilizing the inherent light-splitting capacity of optical devices, such as optical splitters, than by copying data in electronic domain, issues concerning running multicast sessions in the all-optical networks have received much attention in recent years. In this paper, different multicasting schemes and their performance in the Optical Packet Switched networks are investigated, including the parallel mode, serial mode, and hybrid mode multicasting schemes. Computer simulation results show that compared with the parallel-mode and serial-mode multicasting schemes, hybrid-mode multicasting scheme is the best way to deliver multicast sessions in the Optical Packet Switched networks due to its highest performance.

  14. Switched Internetwork: a New Networking Paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Jose E.

    Today, internetworking is undergoing significant change, driven primarily by business demands, the need to support new applications, and by ongoing advances in communications technology. As networks evolve in response to these forces of change, the challenge is to provide increased bandwidth in a scalable fashion, while also delivering class of service support for new multimedia applications. It is also important to build a flexible networking infrastructure that can accommodate the constant changes businesses undergo, and that simplifies the administration of user moves, adds and changes, while reducing the complexity associated with managing the network. Today's enterprise-wide internetworks are running mission-critical applications, and cannot be used as testbeds for trying out new technology. Consequently, it is essential that the new network maintain the highest levels of availability and reliability.

  15. On-board congestion control for satellite packet switching networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Pong P.

    1991-01-01

    It is desirable to incorporate packet switching capability on-board for future communication satellites. Because of the statistical nature of packet communication, incoming traffic fluctuates and may cause congestion. Thus, it is necessary to incorporate a congestion control mechanism as part of the on-board processing to smooth and regulate the bursty traffic. Although there are extensive studies on congestion control for both baseband and broadband terrestrial networks, these schemes are not feasible for space based switching networks because of the unique characteristics of satellite link. Here, we propose a new congestion control method for on-board satellite packet switching. This scheme takes into consideration the long propagation delay in satellite link and takes advantage of the the satellite's broadcasting capability. It divides the control between the ground terminals and satellite, but distributes the primary responsibility to ground terminals and only requires minimal hardware resource on-board satellite.

  16. Control of bursting synchronization in networks of Hodgkin-Huxley-type neurons with chemical synapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, C. A. S.; Viana, R. L.; Ferrari, F. A. S.; Lopes, S. R.; Batista, A. M.; Coninck, J. C. P.

    2013-04-01

    Thermally sensitive neurons present bursting activity for certain temperature ranges, characterized by fast repetitive spiking of action potential followed by a short quiescent period. Synchronization of bursting activity is possible in networks of coupled neurons, and it is sometimes an undesirable feature. Control procedures can suppress totally or partially this collective behavior, with potential applications in deep-brain stimulation techniques. We investigate the control of bursting synchronization in small-world networks of Hodgkin-Huxley-type thermally sensitive neurons with chemical synapses through two different strategies. One is the application of an external time-periodic electrical signal and another consists of a time-delayed feedback signal. We consider the effectiveness of both strategies in terms of protocols of applications suitable to be applied by pacemakers.

  17. Control of bursting synchronization in networks of Hodgkin-Huxley-type neurons with chemical synapses.

    PubMed

    Batista, C A S; Viana, R L; Ferrari, F A S; Lopes, S R; Batista, A M; Coninck, J C P

    2013-04-01

    Thermally sensitive neurons present bursting activity for certain temperature ranges, characterized by fast repetitive spiking of action potential followed by a short quiescent period. Synchronization of bursting activity is possible in networks of coupled neurons, and it is sometimes an undesirable feature. Control procedures can suppress totally or partially this collective behavior, with potential applications in deep-brain stimulation techniques. We investigate the control of bursting synchronization in small-world networks of Hodgkin-Huxley-type thermally sensitive neurons with chemical synapses through two different strategies. One is the application of an external time-periodic electrical signal and another consists of a time-delayed feedback signal. We consider the effectiveness of both strategies in terms of protocols of applications suitable to be applied by pacemakers.

  18. Dynamic transitions among multiple oscillators of synchronized bursts in cultured neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoan Kim, June; Heo, Ryoun; Choi, Joon Ho; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2014-04-01

    Synchronized neural bursts are a salient dynamic feature of biological neural networks, having important roles in brain functions. This report investigates the deterministic nature behind seemingly random temporal sequences of inter-burst intervals generated by cultured networks of cortical cells. We found that the complex sequences were an intricate patchwork of several noisy ‘burst oscillators’, whose periods covered a wide dynamic range, from a few tens of milliseconds to tens of seconds. The transition from one type of oscillator to another favored a particular passage, while the dwelling time between two neighboring transitions followed an exponential distribution showing no memory. With different amounts of bicuculline or picrotoxin application, we could also terminate the oscillators, generate new ones or tune their periods.

  19. Large optical 3D MEMS switches in access networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madamopoulos, Nicholas; Kaman, Volkan; Yuan, Shifu; Jerphagnon, Olivier; Helkey, Roger; Bowers, John E.

    2007-09-01

    Interest is high among residential customers and businesses for advanced, broadband services such as fast Internet access, electronic commerce, video-on-demand, digital broadcasting, teleconferencing and telemedicine. In order to satisfy such growing demand of end-customers, access technologies such as fiber-to-the-home/building (FTTH/B) are increasingly being deployed. Carriers can reduce maintenance costs, minimize technology obsolescence and introduce new services easily by reducing active elements in the fiber access network. However, having a passive optical network (PON) also introduces operational and maintenance challenges. Increased diagnostic monitoring capability of the network becomes a necessity as more and more fibers are provisioned to deliver services to the end-customers. This paper demonstrates the clear advantages that large 3D optical MEMS switches offer in solving these access network problems. The advantages in preventative maintenance, remote monitoring, test and diagnostic capability are highlighted. The low optical insertion loss for all switch optical connections of the switch enables the monitoring, grooming and serving of a large number of PON lines and customers. Furthermore, the 3D MEMS switch is transparent to optical wavelengths and data formats, thus making it easy to incorporate future upgrades, such higher bit rates or DWDM overlay to a PON.

  20. Modeling the effect of transcriptional noise on switching in gene networks in a genetic bistable switch.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Srabanti

    2015-06-01

    Gene regulatory networks in cells allow transitions between gene expression states under the influence of both intrinsic and extrinsic noise. Here we introduce a new theoretical method to study the dynamics of switching in a two-state gene expression model with positive feedback by explicitly accounting for the transcriptional noise. Within this theoretical framework, we employ a semi-classical path integral technique to calculate the mean switching time starting from either an active or inactive promoter state. Our analytical predictions are in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations and experimental observations.

  1. Network bursting using experimentally constrained single compartment CA3 hippocampal neuron models with adaptation.

    PubMed

    Dur-e-Ahmad, Muhammad; Nicola, Wilten; Campbell, Sue Ann; Skinner, Frances K

    2012-08-01

    The hippocampus is a brain structure critical for memory functioning. Its network dynamics include several patterns such as sharp waves that are generated in the CA3 region. To understand how population outputs are generated, models need to consider aspects of network size, cellular and synaptic characteristics and context, which are necessarily 'balanced' in appropriate ways to produce particular outputs. Thick slice hippocampal preparations spontaneously produce sharp waves that are initiated in CA3 regions and depend on the right balance of glutamatergic activities. As a step toward developing network models that can explain important balances in the generation of hippocampal output, we develop models of CA3 pyramidal cells. Our models are single compartment in nature, use an Izhikevich-type structure and involve parameter values that are specifically designed to encompass CA3 intrinsic properties. Importantly, they incorporate spike frequency adaptation characteristics that are directly comparable to those measured experimentally. Excitatory networks using these model cells are able to produce bursting suggesting that the amount of spike frequency adaptation expressed in the biological cells is an essential contributor to network bursting, and as such, may be important for sharp wave generation. The network bursting mechanism is numerically dissected showing the critical balance between adaptation and excitatory drive. The compact nature of our models allows large network simulations to be efficiently computed. This, together with the linkage of our models to cellular characteristics, will allow us to develop an understanding of population output of CA3 hippocampus with direct biological comparisons.

  2. Adding the GLAST Burst Monitor to the 3rd Interplanetary Network

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, Kevin

    2007-07-12

    The addition of the GLAST Burst Monitor to the interplanetary network is discussed. The IPN can detect about 32% of the GBM events, and reduce the sizes of their error boxes substantially. These error boxes have a wide variety of uses.

  3. Single-column thalamocortical network model exhibiting gamma oscillations, sleep spindles, and epileptogenic bursts.

    PubMed

    Traub, Roger D; Contreras, Diego; Cunningham, Mark O; Murray, Hilary; LeBeau, Fiona E N; Roopun, Anita; Bibbig, Andrea; Wilent, W Bryan; Higley, Michael J; Whittington, Miles A

    2005-04-01

    To better understand population phenomena in thalamocortical neuronal ensembles, we have constructed a preliminary network model with 3,560 multicompartment neurons (containing soma, branching dendrites, and a portion of axon). Types of neurons included superficial pyramids (with regular spiking [RS] and fast rhythmic bursting [FRB] firing behaviors); RS spiny stellates; fast spiking (FS) interneurons, with basket-type and axoaxonic types of connectivity, and located in superficial and deep cortical layers; low threshold spiking (LTS) interneurons, which contacted principal cell dendrites; deep pyramids, which could have RS or intrinsic bursting (IB) firing behaviors, and endowed either with nontufted apical dendrites or with long tufted apical dendrites; thalamocortical relay (TCR) cells; and nucleus reticularis (nRT) cells. To the extent possible, both electrophysiology and synaptic connectivity were based on published data, although many arbitrary choices were necessary. In addition to synaptic connectivity (by AMPA/kainate, NMDA, and GABA(A) receptors), we also included electrical coupling between dendrites of interneurons, nRT cells, and TCR cells, and--in various combinations--electrical coupling between the proximal axons of certain cortical principal neurons. Our network model replicates several observed population phenomena, including 1) persistent gamma oscillations; 2) thalamocortical sleep spindles; 3) series of synchronized population bursts, resembling electrographic seizures; 4) isolated double population bursts with superimposed very fast oscillations (>100 Hz, "VFO"); 5) spike-wave, polyspike-wave, and fast runs (about 10 Hz). We show that epileptiform bursts, including double and multiple bursts, containing VFO occur in rat auditory cortex in vitro, in the presence of kainate, when both GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors are blocked. Electrical coupling between axons appears necessary (as reported previously) for persistent gamma and additionally plays

  4. Factors Underlying Bursting Behavior in a Network of Cultured Hippocampal Neurons Exposed to Zero Magnesium

    PubMed Central

    Mangan, Patrick S.; Kapur, Jaideep

    2010-01-01

    Factors contributing to reduced magnesium-induced neuronal action potential bursting were investigated in primary hippocampal cell culture at high and low culture density. In nominally zero external magnesium medium, pyramidal neurons from high-density cultures produced recurrent spontaneous action potential bursts superimposed on prolonged depolarizations. These bursts were partially attenuated by the NMDA receptor antagonist D-APV. Pharmacological analysis of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) revealed 2 components: one sensitive to D-APV and another to the AMPA receptor antagonist DNQX. The components were kinetically distinct. Participation of NMDA receptors in reduced magnesium-induced synaptic events was supported by the localization of the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor with the presynaptic vesicular protein synaptophysin. Presynaptically, zero magnesium induced a significant increase in EPSC frequency likely attributable to increased neuronal hyperexcitability induced by reduced membrane surface charge screening. Mean quantal content was significantly increased in zero magnesium. Cells from low-density cultures did not exhibit action potential bursting in zero magnesium but did show increased EPSC frequency. Low-density neurons had less synaptophysin immunofluorescence and fewer active synapses as determined by FM1-43 analysis. These results demonstrate that multiple factors are involved in network bursting. Increased probability of transmitter release presynaptically, enhanced NMDA receptor-mediated excitability postsynaptically, and extent of neuronal interconnectivity contribute to initiation and maintenance of elevated network excitability. PMID:14534286

  5. Distributed fault detection over sensor networks with Markovian switching topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xiaohua; Han, Qing-Long

    2014-05-01

    This paper deals with the distributed fault detection for discrete-time Markov jump linear systems over sensor networks with Markovian switching topologies. The sensors are scatteredly deployed in the sensor field and the fault detectors are physically distributed via a communication network. The system dynamics changes and sensing topology variations are modeled by a discrete-time Markov chain with incomplete mode transition probabilities. Each of these sensor nodes firstly collects measurement outputs from its all underlying neighboring nodes, processes these data in accordance with the Markovian switching topologies, and then transmits the processed data to the remote fault detector node. Network-induced delays and accumulated data packet dropouts are incorporated in the data transmission between the sensor nodes and the distributed fault detector nodes through the communication network. To generate localized residual signals, mode-independent distributed fault detection filters are proposed. By means of the stochastic Lyapunov functional approach, the residual system performance analysis is carried out such that the overall residual system is stochastically stable and the error between each residual signal and the fault signal is made as small as possible. Furthermore, a sufficient condition on the existence of the mode-independent distributed fault detection filters is derived in the simultaneous presence of incomplete mode transition probabilities, Markovian switching topologies, network-induced delays, and accumulated data packed dropouts. Finally, a stirred-tank reactor system is given to show the effectiveness of the developed theoretical results.

  6. A scalable control plane for optical-packet-switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, J.; Reed, M. J.

    2005-02-01

    This paper describes the design considerations and architecture of a Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS)-based scalable control plane that we are prototyping for optical packet switched (OPS) networks. Functional components of the control plane include a user network interface (UNI), optical label coding, multi-layer routing/traffic engineering algorithm and integrated signaling protocol. Initial implementation and experimentation has demonstrated the feasibility of our prototype as a testbed for various control schemes for OPS networks. One key element of the architecture proposed is the use of external MPLS labeling controlled by the UNI. This proposal reduces the load on the OPS domain header processing while having little impact on the MPLS domain.

  7. High performance packet switches for broadband satellite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liang; Luo, Fengguang; Luo, Zhixiang

    2005-11-01

    Buffered crossbar switches are now becoming very attractive for the high performance packet switches. An architecture that combines the VOQ architecture and internal buffers can eradicate the HOL problems and reducing the output contention. The architecture predominance and the internal distributed arbitration can fit the broadband satellite networks very well. We propose a new scheduling scheme named Rate Durative (RD), which a VOQ is served continuously at the same time considering its priority level under certain rules. Our scheme was shown to handle traffic more efficiently and better than previous schemes. In addition, this scheduling scheme also supports QoS very well

  8. Measuring Predictability of Autonomous Network Transitions into Bursting Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mofakham, Sima; Zochowski, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Understanding spontaneous transitions between dynamical modes in a network is of significant importance. These transitions may separate pathological and normal functions of the brain. In this paper, we develop a set of measures that, based on spatio-temporal features of network activity, predict autonomous network transitions from asynchronous to synchronous dynamics under various conditions. These metrics quantify spike-timing distributions within a narrow time window as a function of the relative location of the active neurons. We applied these metrics to investigate the properties of these transitions in excitatory-only and excitatory-and-inhibitory networks and elucidate how network topology, noise level, and cellular heterogeneity affect both the reliability and the timeliness of the predictions. The developed measures can be calculated in real time and therefore potentially applied in clinical situations. PMID:25855975

  9. Measuring predictability of autonomous network transitions into bursting dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mofakham, Sima; Zochowski, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Understanding spontaneous transitions between dynamical modes in a network is of significant importance. These transitions may separate pathological and normal functions of the brain. In this paper, we develop a set of measures that, based on spatio-temporal features of network activity, predict autonomous network transitions from asynchronous to synchronous dynamics under various conditions. These metrics quantify spike-timing distributions within a narrow time window as a function of the relative location of the active neurons. We applied these metrics to investigate the properties of these transitions in excitatory-only and excitatory-and-inhibitory networks and elucidate how network topology, noise level, and cellular heterogeneity affect both the reliability and the timeliness of the predictions. The developed measures can be calculated in real time and therefore potentially applied in clinical situations.

  10. How to Switch a Gamma-Ray Burst On and Off through a Magnetar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, M. G.; Campana, S.; Ghisellini, G.; D'Avanzo, P.; Burlon, D.; Covino, S.; Ghirlanda, G.; Melandri, A.; Salvaterra, R.; Vergani, S. D.; D'Elia, V.; Fugazza, D.; Sbarufatti, B.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2013-09-01

    One of the most elusive features of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is the sporadic emission prior to the main prompt event observed in at least ~15% of cases. These precursors have spectral and temporal properties similar to the main prompt emission, and smaller, but comparable, energetics. They are separated from the main event by a quiescent time that may be extremely long, and, in some cases, more than one precursor has been observed in the same burst. Precursors are still a puzzle: despite many attempts, none of the proposed models can account for all the observed features. Based on the complete sample of bright long GRBs observed by Swift (BAT6), we propose a new scenario for which precursors are explained by assuming that the central GRB engine is a newly born magnetar. In this model the precursor and the prompt emission arise from accretion of matter onto the surface of the magnetar. The accretion process can be halted by the centrifugal drag exerted by the rotating magnetosphere onto the infalling matter, allowing for multiple precursors and very long quiescent times.

  11. HOW TO SWITCH A GAMMA-RAY BURST ON AND OFF THROUGH A MAGNETAR

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardini, M. G.; Campana, S.; Ghisellini, G.; D'Avanzo, P.; Covino, S.; Ghirlanda, G.; Melandri, A.; Fugazza, D.; Sbarufatti, B.; Tagliaferri, G.; Burlon, D.; Salvaterra, R.; Vergani, S. D.; D'Elia, V.

    2013-09-20

    One of the most elusive features of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is the sporadic emission prior to the main prompt event observed in at least ∼15% of cases. These precursors have spectral and temporal properties similar to the main prompt emission, and smaller, but comparable, energetics. They are separated from the main event by a quiescent time that may be extremely long, and, in some cases, more than one precursor has been observed in the same burst. Precursors are still a puzzle: despite many attempts, none of the proposed models can account for all the observed features. Based on the complete sample of bright long GRBs observed by Swift (BAT6), we propose a new scenario for which precursors are explained by assuming that the central GRB engine is a newly born magnetar. In this model the precursor and the prompt emission arise from accretion of matter onto the surface of the magnetar. The accretion process can be halted by the centrifugal drag exerted by the rotating magnetosphere onto the infalling matter, allowing for multiple precursors and very long quiescent times.

  12. A second catalog of gamma ray bursts: 1978 - 1980 localizations from the interplanetary network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atteia, J. L.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Evans, W. D.; Fenimore, E. E.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.; Cline, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    Eighty-two gamma ray bursts were detected between 1978 September 14 and 1980 February 13 by the experiments of the interplanetary network (Prognoz 7, Venera 11 and 12 SIGNE experiments, Pioneer Venus Orbiter, International Sun-Earth Explorer 3, Helios 2, and Vela). Sixty-five of these events have been localized to annuli or error boxes by the method of arrival time analysis. The distribution of sources is consistent with isotropy, and there is no statistically convincing evidence for the detection of more than one burst from any source position. The localizations are compared with those of two previous catalogs.

  13. Principle and verification of novel optical virtual private networks over multiprotocol label switching/optical packet switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chongfu; Wang, Zhengsuan; Jin, Wei; Qiu, Kun

    2012-11-01

    A novel realization method of the optical virtual private networks (OVPN) over multiprotocol label switching/optical packet switching (MPLS/OPS) networks is proposed. In this scheme, the introduction of MPLS control plane makes OVPN over OPS networks more reliable and easier; OVPN makes use of the concept of high reconfiguration of light-paths offered by MPLS, to set up secure tunnels of high bandwidth across intelligent OPS networks. Through resource management, the signal mechanism, connection control, and the architecture of the creation and maintenance of OVPN are efficiently realized. We also present an OVPN architecture with two traffic priorities, which is used to analyze the capacity, throughput, delay time of the proposed networks, and the packet loss rate performance of the OVPN over MPLS/OPS networks based on full mesh topology. The results validate the applicability of such reliable connectivity to high quality services in the OVPN over MPLS/OPS networks. Along with the results, the feasibility of the approach as the basis for the next generation networks is demonstrated and discussed.

  14. Stream Traffic Communication in Packet Switched Networks,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    of the UCLA computing facility. Special thanks to my sons, Jason and Bret, who have request- ed and received very Little of my ti%P these past several...routing scheme by using the flow deviation method [ Gert 73J for example. Notice that fixed routing always performed better than the foreground routing...February 1977, pp 42-45. [ Gert 73) GerLa, M. "The Design of Store-and-Forward (S/F) Networks for Computer Communication." Computer Science Department

  15. Partial synchronization in stochastic dynamical networks with switching communication channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chi; Ho, Daniel W. C.; Lu, Jianquan; Kurths, Jürgen

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, the partial synchronization problem of stochastic dynamical networks (SDNs) is investigated. Unlike the existing models, the SDN considered in this paper suffers from a class of communication constraint—only part of nodes' states can be transmitted. Thus, less nodes' states can be used to synchronize the SDN, which makes the analysis of the synchronization problem much harder. A set of channel matrices are introduced to reflect such kind of constraint. Furthermore, due to unpredictable environmental changes, the channel matrices can switch among some communication modes. The switching considered here is governed by a Markov process. To overcome the difficulty, a regrouping method is employed to derive our main results. The obtained conditions guarantee that partial synchronization can be achieved for SDNs under switching communication constraint. Finally, numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results and how the communication constraint influences synchronization result.

  16. Quality of service in optical packet switched DWDM transport networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjornstad, Steinar; Stol, Norvald; Hjelme, Dag R.

    2002-09-01

    For support of multimedia applications in Internet, at least four service classes are normally outlined. We expect optical packet switching to be of special interest in terabit capacity networks with a high number of wavelengths. Our analysis shows that when the wavelength dimension is used for contention resolution, and number of wavelengths is 32 or higher, node-delay is negligible. However buffering in optical packet switches is a scarce resource which use should be minimized. Based on the requirement of the future network, and on our packet switch performance analysis, we suggest reducing the number of service classes to two: A normal class (NCT) with medium low packet loss and a low need for buffering, and a high class (HCT) with a minimum of packet loss. Performance of a buffer reservation scheme is analyzed by simulation. Assuming the network of today with 10 % HCT traffic, assigning four buffer inputs to the HCT traffic, a difference in optical packet loss ratio of three orders of magnitude can be obtained. The same difference in optical packet loss ratio can be obtained if 50 % HCT traffic is assumed (network of tomorrow), by assigning a higher number of buffer inputs.

  17. Neural Network Burst Pressure Prediction in Graphite/Epoxy Pressure Vessels from Acoustic Emission Amplitude Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Eric v. K.; Walker, James L., II; Rowell, Ginger H.

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) data were taken during hydroproof for three sets of ASTM standard 5.75 inch diameter filament wound graphite/epoxy bottles. All three sets of bottles had the same design and were wound from the same graphite fiber; the only difference was in the epoxies used. Two of the epoxies had similar mechanical properties, and because the acoustic properties of materials are a function of their stiffnesses, it was thought that the AE data from the two sets might also be similar; however, this was not the case. Therefore, the three resin types were categorized using dummy variables, which allowed the prediction of burst pressures all three sets of bottles using a single neural network. Three bottles from each set were used to train the network. The resin category, the AE amplitude distribution data taken up to 25 % of the expected burst pressure, and the actual burst pressures were used as inputs. Architecturally, the network consisted of a forty-three neuron input layer (a single categorical variable defining the resin type plus forty-two continuous variables for the AE amplitude frequencies), a fifteen neuron hidden layer for mapping, and a single output neuron for burst pressure prediction. The network trained on all three bottle sets was able to predict burst pressures in the remaining bottles with a worst case error of + 6.59%, slightly greater than the desired goal of + 5%. This larger than desired error was due to poor resolution in the amplitude data for the third bottle set. When the third set of bottles was eliminated from consideration, only four hidden layer neurons were necessary to generate a worst case prediction error of - 3.43%, well within the desired goal.

  18. Routing in circuit and Packet Switched Networks: An Annotated Bibliography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-14

    papers. These reviews focus on parts of the papers relevant to the DSN. 2. INDEX TO SELECTED TOPICS 2.1 Circuit-Switched Networks 2.1.1 Routing Bernas and...engineering - Bell System. 2.1.3 Event-by-Event Simulations Bernas and Grieco (1978) POLYGRID vs. adaptive vs. flood search routing - AUTOVON simula- tion...Enhance Survivability Bernas and Grieco (1978) POLYGRID, adaptive and flood search routing. Gafni and Bertsekas (1981) Distributed routing for packet radio

  19. Switched-beam radiometer front-end network analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trew, R. J.; Bilbro, G. L.

    1994-01-01

    The noise figure performance of various delay-line networks fabricated from microstrip lines with varying number of elements was investigated using a computer simulation. The effects of resistive losses in both the transmission lines and power combiners were considered. In general, it is found that an optimum number of elements exists, depending upon the resistive losses present in the network. Small resistive losses are found to have a significant degrading effect upon the noise figure performance of the array. Extreme stability in switching characteristics is necessary to minimize the nondeterministic noise of the array. For example, it is found that a 6 percent tolerance on the delay-line lengths will produce a 0.2 db uncertainty in the noise figure which translates into a 13.67 K temperature uncertainty generated by the network. If the tolerance can be held to 2 percent, the uncertainty in noise figure and noise temperature will be 0.025 db and 1.67 K, respectively. Three phase shift networks fabricated using a commercially available PIN diode switch were investigated. Loaded-line phase shifters are found to have desirable RF and noise characteristics and are attractive components for use in phased-array networks.

  20. [Electrical activities of bursting-firing neurons in epileptic network reestablishment of rat hippocampus].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Ting; Qin, Xing-Kui; Yin, Shi-Jin; Han, Dan

    2003-12-25

    The purpose of our present work was to study the discharge of bursting-firing neurons (BFNs) in ipsilateral or contralateral hippocampus (HPC), and its relations to the reestablishment of local epileptic networks. The experiments were performed on 140 Sprague Dawley male rats (150-250 g). Acute tetanization (60 Hz, 2 s, 0.4 -0.6 mA) of the right posterior dorsal hippocampus (ATPDH) was administered to establish rat epilepsy model. The single unit discharges and the depth electrographs were simultaneously recorded from ipsilateral or contralateral HPC. In other experimental rats, acute tetanization of the right anterior dorsal HPC (ATADH) was used. Extracellular unit discharges in the CA1 region were simultaneously recorded from bilateral anterior dorsal hippocampi. Analysis of hippocampal BFN firing patterns before or after administration of the tetanization was focused on according to their location in the HPC epileptic networks in vivo. Single unit discharges of 138 hippocampal neurons were recorded from ipsilateral and/or contralateral anterior dorsal HPC. Of the 138 neurons recorded, 19 were BFNs. 13 BFNs were tetanus-evoked and the remaining 6 were spontaneous ones. The evoked reactions of the single hippocampal neuron induced by the tetanization mainly included: (1) the firing patterns of the BFNs in ipsilateral anterior dorsal HPC were obviously modulated by the ATPDH from tonic firing into rhythmic bursting. The bursting interspike intervals (BISI) decreased. (2) There were mild modulations of the firing patterns of the BFNs in contralateral anterior dorsal HPC following post-inhibition of the firing rate of single neuron induced by the ATPDH. The interspike intervals (ISI) increased obviously. (3) Post-facilitation of rhythmic bursting-firing of the BFNs in contralateral anterior dorsal HPC was induced by ATADH; both the ISI and the IBI increased. (4) Synchronous or asynchronous rhythmic bursting-firing of the BFNs and the network epileptiform events

  1. The Interplanetary Network Supplement to the Fermi GBM Catalog of Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, K.; Pal'shin, V. D.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Mazets, E. P.; Svinkin, D. S.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Meegan, C.; Goldsten, J.; Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; Rau, A.; von Kienlin, A.; Zhang, X.; Yamaoka, K.; Fukazawa, Y.; Hanabata, Y.; Ohno, M.; Takahashi, T.; Tashiro, M.; Terada, Y.; Murakami, T.; Makishima, K.; Barthelmy, S.; Cline, T.; Gehrels, N.; Cummings, J.; Krimm, H. A.; Smith, D. M.; Del Monte, E.; Feroci, M.; Marisaldi, M.

    2013-08-01

    We present Interplanetary Network (IPN) data for the gamma-ray bursts in the first Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) catalog. Of the 491 bursts in that catalog, covering 2008 July 12 to 2010 July 11, 427 were observed by at least one other instrument in the nine-spacecraft IPN. Of the 427, the localizations of 149 could be improved by arrival time analysis (or "triangulation"). For any given burst observed by the GBM and one other distant spacecraft, triangulation gives an annulus of possible arrival directions whose half-width varies between about 0.'4 and 32°, depending on the intensity, time history, and arrival direction of the burst, as well as the distance between the spacecraft. We find that the IPN localizations intersect the 1σ GBM error circles in only 52% of the cases, if no systematic uncertainty is assumed for the latter. If a 6° systematic uncertainty is assumed and added in quadrature, the two localization samples agree about 87% of the time, as would be expected. If we then multiply the resulting error radii by a factor of three, the two samples agree in slightly over 98% of the cases, providing a good estimate of the GBM 3σ error radius. The IPN 3σ error boxes have areas between about 1 arcmin2 and 110 deg2, and are, on the average, a factor of 180 smaller than the corresponding GBM localizations. We identify two bursts in the IPN/GBM sample that did not appear in the GBM catalog. In one case, the GBM triggered on a terrestrial gamma flash, and in the other, its origin was given as "uncertain." We also discuss the sensitivity and calibration of the IPN.

  2. THE INTERPLANETARY NETWORK SUPPLEMENT TO THE FERMI GBM CATALOG OF COSMIC GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, K.; Pal'shin, V. D.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Mazets, E. P.; Svinkin, D. S.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Meegan, C.; Goldsten, J.; Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; and others

    2013-08-15

    We present Interplanetary Network (IPN) data for the gamma-ray bursts in the first Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) catalog. Of the 491 bursts in that catalog, covering 2008 July 12 to 2010 July 11, 427 were observed by at least one other instrument in the nine-spacecraft IPN. Of the 427, the localizations of 149 could be improved by arrival time analysis (or {sup t}riangulation{sup )}. For any given burst observed by the GBM and one other distant spacecraft, triangulation gives an annulus of possible arrival directions whose half-width varies between about 0.'4 and 32 Degree-Sign , depending on the intensity, time history, and arrival direction of the burst, as well as the distance between the spacecraft. We find that the IPN localizations intersect the 1{sigma} GBM error circles in only 52% of the cases, if no systematic uncertainty is assumed for the latter. If a 6 Degree-Sign systematic uncertainty is assumed and added in quadrature, the two localization samples agree about 87% of the time, as would be expected. If we then multiply the resulting error radii by a factor of three, the two samples agree in slightly over 98% of the cases, providing a good estimate of the GBM 3{sigma} error radius. The IPN 3{sigma} error boxes have areas between about 1 arcmin{sup 2} and 110 deg{sup 2}, and are, on the average, a factor of 180 smaller than the corresponding GBM localizations. We identify two bursts in the IPN/GBM sample that did not appear in the GBM catalog. In one case, the GBM triggered on a terrestrial gamma flash, and in the other, its origin was given as ''uncertain''. We also discuss the sensitivity and calibration of the IPN.

  3. Noise-induced polarization switching in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerter, Jan O.; Díaz-Guilera, Albert; Serrano, M. Ángeles

    2017-04-01

    The combination of bistability and noise is ubiquitous in complex systems, from biology to social interactions, and has important implications for their functioning and resilience. Here we use a simple three-state dynamical process, in which nodes go from one pole to another through an intermediate state, to show that noise can induce polarization switching in bistable systems if dynamical correlations are significant. In large, fully connected networks, where dynamical correlations can be neglected, increasing noise yields a collapse of bistability to an unpolarized configuration where the three possible states of the nodes are equally likely. In contrast, increased noise induces abrupt and irreversible polarization switching in sparsely connected networks. In multiplexes, where each layer can have a different polarization tendency, one layer is dominant and progressively imposes its polarization state on the other, offsetting or promoting the ability of noise to switch its polarization. Overall, we show that the interplay of noise and dynamical correlations can yield discontinuous transitions between extremes, which cannot be explained by a simple mean-field description.

  4. Distributed H ∞ filtering for sensor networks with switching topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan; Yu, Li; Song, Hongbo; Wang, Qing-Guo

    2013-11-01

    In this article, the distributed H ∞ filtering problem is investigated for a class of sensor networks under topology switching. The main purpose is to design the distributed H ∞ filter that allows one to regulate the sensor's working modes. Firstly, a switched system model is proposed to reflect the working mode change of the sensors. Then, a stochastic sequence is adopted to model the packet dropout phenomenon occurring in the channels from the plant to the networked sensors. By utilising the Lyapunov functional method and stochastic analysis, some sufficient conditions are established to ensure that the filtering error system is mean-square exponentially stable with a prescribed H ∞ performance level. Furthermore, the filter parameters are determined by solving a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Our results relates the decay rate of the filtering error system to the switching frequency of the topology directly and shows the existence of such a distributed filter when the topology is not varying very frequently, which is helpful for the sensor state regulation. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed design method is demonstrated by two numerical examples.

  5. Intermittent Theta-Burst Stimulation of the Lateral Cerebellum Increases Functional Connectivity of the Default Network

    PubMed Central

    Farzan, Faranak; Eldaief, Mark C.; Schmahmann, Jeremy D.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral cortical intrinsic connectivity networks share topographically arranged functional connectivity with the cerebellum. However, the contribution of cerebellar nodes to distributed network organization and function remains poorly understood. In humans, we applied theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation, guided by subject-specific connectivity, to regions of the cerebellum to evaluate the functional relevance of connections between cerebellar and cerebral cortical nodes in different networks. We demonstrate that changing activity in the human lateral cerebellar Crus I/II modulates the cerebral default mode network, whereas vermal lobule VII stimulation influences the cerebral dorsal attention system. These results provide novel insights into the distributed, but anatomically specific, modulatory impact of cerebellar effects on large-scale neural network function. PMID:25186750

  6. Bidirectional Control of Generalized Epilepsy Networks via Rapid Real-Time Switching of Firing Mode.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Jordan M; Davidson, Thomas J; Frechette, Eric; Abramian, Armen M; Deisseroth, Karl; Huguenard, John R; Paz, Jeanne T

    2017-01-04

    Thalamic relay neurons have well-characterized dual firing modes: bursting and tonic spiking. Studies in brain slices have led to a model in which rhythmic synchronized spiking (phasic firing) in a population of relay neurons leads to hyper-synchronous oscillatory cortico-thalamo-cortical rhythms that result in absence seizures. This model suggests that blocking thalamocortical phasic firing would treat absence seizures. However, recent in vivo studies in anesthetized animals have questioned this simple model. Here we resolve this issue by developing a real-time, mode-switching approach to drive thalamocortical neurons into or out of a phasic firing mode in two freely behaving genetic rodent models of absence epilepsy. Toggling between phasic and tonic firing in thalamocortical neurons launched and aborted absence seizures, respectively. Thus, a synchronous thalamocortical phasic firing state is required for absence seizures, and switching to tonic firing rapidly halts absences. This approach should be useful for modulating other networks that have mode-dependent behaviors.

  7. Emergence of Slow-Switching Assemblies in Structured Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Michael T; Billeh, Yazan N; Anastassiou, Costas A; Koch, Christof; Barahona, Mauricio

    2015-07-01

    Unraveling the interplay between connectivity and spatio-temporal dynamics in neuronal networks is a key step to advance our understanding of neuronal information processing. Here we investigate how particular features of network connectivity underpin the propensity of neural networks to generate slow-switching assembly (SSA) dynamics, i.e., sustained epochs of increased firing within assemblies of neurons which transition slowly between different assemblies throughout the network. We show that the emergence of SSA activity is linked to spectral properties of the asymmetric synaptic weight matrix. In particular, the leading eigenvalues that dictate the slow dynamics exhibit a gap with respect to the bulk of the spectrum, and the associated Schur vectors exhibit a measure of block-localization on groups of neurons, thus resulting in coherent dynamical activity on those groups. Through simple rate models, we gain analytical understanding of the origin and importance of the spectral gap, and use these insights to develop new network topologies with alternative connectivity paradigms which also display SSA activity. Specifically, SSA dynamics involving excitatory and inhibitory neurons can be achieved by modifying the connectivity patterns between both types of neurons. We also show that SSA activity can occur at multiple timescales reflecting a hierarchy in the connectivity, and demonstrate the emergence of SSA in small-world like networks. Our work provides a step towards understanding how network structure (uncovered through advancements in neuroanatomy and connectomics) can impact on spatio-temporal neural activity and constrain the resulting dynamics.

  8. Emergence of Slow-Switching Assemblies in Structured Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Michael T.; Billeh, Yazan N.; Anastassiou, Costas A.; Koch, Christof; Barahona, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Unraveling the interplay between connectivity and spatio-temporal dynamics in neuronal networks is a key step to advance our understanding of neuronal information processing. Here we investigate how particular features of network connectivity underpin the propensity of neural networks to generate slow-switching assembly (SSA) dynamics, i.e., sustained epochs of increased firing within assemblies of neurons which transition slowly between different assemblies throughout the network. We show that the emergence of SSA activity is linked to spectral properties of the asymmetric synaptic weight matrix. In particular, the leading eigenvalues that dictate the slow dynamics exhibit a gap with respect to the bulk of the spectrum, and the associated Schur vectors exhibit a measure of block-localization on groups of neurons, thus resulting in coherent dynamical activity on those groups. Through simple rate models, we gain analytical understanding of the origin and importance of the spectral gap, and use these insights to develop new network topologies with alternative connectivity paradigms which also display SSA activity. Specifically, SSA dynamics involving excitatory and inhibitory neurons can be achieved by modifying the connectivity patterns between both types of neurons. We also show that SSA activity can occur at multiple timescales reflecting a hierarchy in the connectivity, and demonstrate the emergence of SSA in small-world like networks. Our work provides a step towards understanding how network structure (uncovered through advancements in neuroanatomy and connectomics) can impact on spatio-temporal neural activity and constrain the resulting dynamics. PMID:26176664

  9. Networks on the Edge of Forever: Examining the Feasibility of using Meteor Burst (MB) Communication Networks on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charania, A.

    2002-01-01

    The envisioned future may include continuous operating outposts and networks on other worlds supporting human and robotic exploration. Given this possibility, a feasibility analysis is performed of a communications architecture based upon reflection of ion trails from meteors in planetary atmospheres. Meteor Burst (MB) communication systems use meteoritic impacts on planetary atmospheres as two-way, short burst communication nodes. MB systems consist of semi-continuous, low bandwidth networks. These systems possess both long distance capability (hundred of kilometers) and have lower susceptibility to atmospheric perturbations. Every day millions of meteors come into Earth's upper atmosphere with enough energy to ionize gas molecules suitably to reflect radio waves and facilitate communications beyond line of site. The ionized trail occurs at altitudes of 100 km with lengths reaching 30 km. The trial sustains itself long enough to support typical network distances of 1800 km. The initial step to use meteors in this fashion includes detection of a usable ionic trail. A probe signal is sent from one station to another in the network. If there is a meteor trail present, the probe signal is reflected to a receiving station. When another station receives the probe signal, it sends an acknowledgement to the originating station to proceed with transfer on that trail in a high-speed digital data burst. This probe-main signal handshaking occurs each time a burst of data is sent and can occur several times over the course of just one useable meteor trail. Given the need for non-data sending probe signals and error correcting bits; typical transmission data rates vary from a few kilobits per second to over 100 kilobits per second. On Earth, MB links open up hundreds of time per hour depending upon daily and seasonal variations. Meteor bursts were first noticed in detail in the 1930s. With the capabilities of modern computer processing, MB systems have become both technically

  10. Strategies to Maximize Burst Lengths in Rhythmic Anti-Phase Activity of Networks with Reciprocal Inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Amitabha; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2015-06-01

    We consider repetitive activity patterns in which a pair of oscillators take turns becoming active, motivated by anti-phase bursting activity in neuronal networks. In our framework, when one unit is active, it inhibits the other, as occurs with inhibitory synaptic coupling of neurons; when the inhibition is strong enough, the inhibited unit is prevented from activating. We assume that the coupling resources available to each oscillator are constrained and allow each unit to select the amount of input that it provides to the other each time that it activates. In this setting, we investigate the strategies that each oscillator should utilize in order to maximize the number of spikes it can fire (or equivalently the amount of time it is active), corresponding to a burst of spikes in a neuron, before the other unit takes over. We derive a one-dimensional map whose fixed points correspond to periodic anti-phase bursting solutions. We introduce a novel numerical method to obtain the graph of this map and we extend the analysis to select solutions that achieve consistency between coupling resource use and recovery. Our analysis shows that corresponding to each fixed point of the map, there is actually an infinite number of related strategies that yield the same number of spikes per burst.

  11. An optimally evolved connective ratio of neural networks that maximizes the occurrence of synchronized bursting behavior

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Synchronized bursting activity (SBA) is a remarkable dynamical behavior in both ex vivo and in vivo neural networks. Investigations of the underlying structural characteristics associated with SBA are crucial to understanding the system-level regulatory mechanism of neural network behaviors. Results In this study, artificial pulsed neural networks were established using spike response models to capture fundamental dynamics of large scale ex vivo cortical networks. Network simulations with synaptic parameter perturbations showed the following two findings. (i) In a network with an excitatory ratio (ER) of 80-90%, its connective ratio (CR) was within a range of 10-30% when the occurrence of SBA reached the highest expectation. This result was consistent with the experimental observation in ex vivo neuronal networks, which were reported to possess a matured inhibitory synaptic ratio of 10-20% and a CR of 10-30%. (ii) No SBA occurred when a network does not contain any all-positive-interaction feedback loop (APFL) motif. In a neural network containing APFLs, the number of APFLs presented an optimal range corresponding to the maximal occurrence of SBA, which was very similar to the optimal CR. Conclusions In a neural network, the evolutionarily selected CR (10-30%) optimizes the occurrence of SBA, and APFL serves a pivotal network motif required to maximize the occurrence of SBA. PMID:22462685

  12. Satellite range delay simulator for a matrix-switched time division multiple-access network simulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, Lawrence A.

    1990-01-01

    The Systems Integration, Test, and Evaluation (SITE) facility at NASA Lewis Research Center is presently configured as a satellite-switched time division multiple access (SS-TDMA) network simulator. The purpose of SITE is to demonstrate and evaluate advanced communication satellite technologies, presently embodied by POC components developed under NASA contracts in addition to other hardware, such as ground terminals, designed and built in-house at NASA Lewis. Each ground terminal in a satellite communications system will experience a different aspect of the satellite's motion due mainly to daily tidal effects and station keeping, hence a different duration and rate of variation in the range delay. As a result of this and other effects such as local oscillator instability, each ground terminal must constantly adjust its transmit burst timing so that data bursts from separate ground terminals arrive at the satellite in their assigned time slots, preventing overlap and keeping the system in synchronism. On the receiving end, ground terminals must synchronize their local clocks using reference transmissions received through the satellite link. A feature of the SITE facility is its capability to simulate the varying propagation delays and associated Doppler frequency shifts that the ground terminals in the network have to cope with. Delay is ahcieved by means of two NASA Lewis designed and built range delay simulator (RDS) systems, each independently controlled locally with front panel switches or remotely by an experiment control and monitor (EC/M) computer.

  13. Rhythmic Oscillations of Excitatory Bursting Hodkin-Huxley Neuronal Network with Synaptic Learning.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qi; Han, Fang; Wang, Zhijie; Li, Caiyun

    2016-01-01

    Rhythmic oscillations of neuronal network are actually kind of synchronous behaviors, which play an important role in neural systems. In this paper, the properties of excitement degree and oscillation frequency of excitatory bursting Hodkin-Huxley neuronal network which incorporates a synaptic learning rule are studied. The effects of coupling strength, synaptic learning rate, and other parameters of chemical synapses, such as synaptic delay and decay time constant, are explored, respectively. It is found that the increase of the coupling strength can weaken the extent of excitement, whereas increasing the synaptic learning rate makes the network more excited in a certain range; along with the increasing of the delay time and the decay time constant, the excitement degree increases at the beginning, then decreases, and keeps stable. It is also found that, along with the increase of the synaptic learning rate, the coupling strength, the delay time, and the decay time constant, the oscillation frequency of the network decreases monotonically.

  14. Rhythmic Oscillations of Excitatory Bursting Hodkin-Huxley Neuronal Network with Synaptic Learning

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qi; Han, Fang; Wang, Zhijie; Li, Caiyun

    2016-01-01

    Rhythmic oscillations of neuronal network are actually kind of synchronous behaviors, which play an important role in neural systems. In this paper, the properties of excitement degree and oscillation frequency of excitatory bursting Hodkin-Huxley neuronal network which incorporates a synaptic learning rule are studied. The effects of coupling strength, synaptic learning rate, and other parameters of chemical synapses, such as synaptic delay and decay time constant, are explored, respectively. It is found that the increase of the coupling strength can weaken the extent of excitement, whereas increasing the synaptic learning rate makes the network more excited in a certain range; along with the increasing of the delay time and the decay time constant, the excitement degree increases at the beginning, then decreases, and keeps stable. It is also found that, along with the increase of the synaptic learning rate, the coupling strength, the delay time, and the decay time constant, the oscillation frequency of the network decreases monotonically. PMID:27073393

  15. Noise-induced coherence and network oscillations in a reduced bursting model.

    PubMed

    Reinker, Stefan; Li, Yue-Xian; Kuske, Rachel

    2006-08-01

    The dynamics of the Hindmarsh-Rose (HR) model of bursting thalamic neurons is reduced to a system of two linear differential equations that retains the subthreshold resonance properties of the HR model. Introducing a reset mechanism after a threshold crossing, we turn this system into a resonant integrate-and-fire (RIF) model. Using Monte-Carlo simulations and mathematical analysis, we examine the effects of noise and the subthreshold dynamic properties of the RIF model on the occurrence of coherence resonance (CR). Synchronized burst firing occurs in a network of such model neurons with excitatory pulse-coupling. The coherence level of the network oscillations shows a stochastic resonance-like dependence on the noise level. Stochastic analysis of the equations shows that the slow recovery from the spike-induced inhibition is crucial in determining the frequencies of the CR and the subthreshold resonance in the original HR model. In this particular type of CR, the oscillation frequency strongly depends on the intrinsic time scales but changes little with the noise intensity. We give analytical quantities to describe this CR mechanism and illustrate its influence on the emerging network oscillations. We discuss the profound physiological roles this kind of CR may have in information processing in neurons possessing a subthreshold resonant frequency and in generating synchronized network oscillations with a frequency that is determined by intrinsic properties of the neurons.

  16. A rapid protection switching method in carrier ethernet ring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Liang; Ji, Meng

    2008-11-01

    Abstract: Ethernet is the most important Local Area Network (LAN) technology since more than 90% data traffic in access layer is carried on Ethernet. From 10M to 10G, the improving Ethernet technology can be not only used in LAN, but also a good choice for MAN even WAN. MAN are always constructed in ring topology because the ring network could provide resilient path protection by using less resource (fibre or cable) than other network topologies. In layer 2 data networks, spanning tree protocol (STP) is always used to protect transmit link and preventing the formation of logic loop in networks. However, STP cannot guarantee the efficiency of service convergence when link fault happened. In fact, convergent time of networks with STP is about several minutes. Though Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP) and Multi-Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) improve the STP technology, they still need a couple of seconds to achieve convergence, and can not provide sub-50ms protection switching. This paper presents a novel rapid ring protection method (RRPM) for carrier Ethernet. Unlike other link-fault detection method, it adopts distributed algorithm to detect link fault rapidly (sub-50ms). When networks restore from link fault, it can revert to the original working state. RRPM can provide single ring protection and interconnected ring protection without the formation of super loop. In normal operation, the master node blocks the secondary port for all non-RRPM Ethernet frames belonging to the given RRPM Ring, thereby avoiding a loop in the ring. When link fault happens, the node on which the failure happens moves from the "ring normal" state to the "ring fault" state. It also sends "link down" frame immediately to other nodes and blocks broken port and flushes its forwarding database. Those who receive "link down" frame will flush forwarding database and master node should unblock its secondary port. When the failure restores, the whole ring will revert to the normal state. That is

  17. Control of Stochastic and Induced Switching in Biophysical Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Daniel K.; Kath, William L.; Motter, Adilson E.

    2015-01-01

    Noise caused by fluctuations at the molecular level is a fundamental part of intracellular processes. While the response of biological systems to noise has been studied extensively, there has been limited understanding of how to exploit it to induce a desired cell state. Here we present a scalable, quantitative method based on the Freidlin-Wentzell action to predict and control noise-induced switching between different states in genetic networks that, conveniently, can also control transitions between stable states in the absence of noise. We apply this methodology to models of cell differentiation and show how predicted manipulations of tunable factors can induce lineage changes, and further utilize it to identify new candidate strategies for cancer therapy in a cell death pathway model. This framework offers a systems approach to identifying the key factors for rationally manipulating biophysical dynamics, and should also find use in controlling other classes of noisy complex networks. PMID:26451275

  18. Control of Stochastic and Induced Switching in Biophysical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Daniel K.; Kath, William L.; Motter, Adilson E.

    2015-07-01

    Noise caused by fluctuations at the molecular level is a fundamental part of intracellular processes. While the response of biological systems to noise has been studied extensively, there has been limited understanding of how to exploit it to induce a desired cell state. Here we present a scalable, quantitative method based on the Freidlin-Wentzell action to predict and control noise-induced switching between different states in genetic networks that, conveniently, can also control transitions between stable states in the absence of noise. We apply this methodology to models of cell differentiation and show how predicted manipulations of tunable factors can induce lineage changes, and further utilize it to identify new candidate strategies for cancer therapy in a cell death pathway model. This framework offers a systems approach to identifying the key factors for rationally manipulating biophysical dynamics, and should also find use in controlling other classes of noisy complex networks.

  19. Synchronization in dynamical networks with unconstrained structure switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Genio, Charo I.; Romance, Miguel; Criado, Regino; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    We provide a rigorous solution to the problem of constructing a structural evolution for a network of coupled identical dynamical units that switches between specified topologies without constraints on their structure. The evolution of the structure is determined indirectly from a carefully built transformation of the eigenvector matrices of the coupling Laplacians, which are guaranteed to change smoothly in time. In turn, this allows one to extend the master stability function formalism, which can be used to assess the stability of a synchronized state. This approach is independent from the particular topologies that the network visits, and is not restricted to commuting structures. Also, it does not depend on the time scale of the evolution, which can be faster than, comparable to, or even secular with respect to the dynamics of the units.

  20. Synchronization in dynamical networks with unconstrained structure switching.

    PubMed

    del Genio, Charo I; Romance, Miguel; Criado, Regino; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    We provide a rigorous solution to the problem of constructing a structural evolution for a network of coupled identical dynamical units that switches between specified topologies without constraints on their structure. The evolution of the structure is determined indirectly from a carefully built transformation of the eigenvector matrices of the coupling Laplacians, which are guaranteed to change smoothly in time. In turn, this allows one to extend the master stability function formalism, which can be used to assess the stability of a synchronized state. This approach is independent from the particular topologies that the network visits, and is not restricted to commuting structures. Also, it does not depend on the time scale of the evolution, which can be faster than, comparable to, or even secular with respect to the dynamics of the units.

  1. Initiation of network bursts by Ca2+-dependent intrinsic bursting in the rat pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sanabria, E R; Su, H; Yaari, Y

    2001-04-01

    Chronically epileptic rats, produced by prior injection of pilocarpine, were used to investigate whether changes in intrinsic neuronal excitability may contribute to the epileptogenicity of the hippocampus in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Paired extra-/intracellular electrophysiological recordings were made in the CA1 pyramidal layer in acute hippocampal slices prepared from control and epileptic rats and perfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF). Whereas orthodromic activation of CA1 neurons evoked only a single, stimulus-graded population spike in control slices, it produced an all-or-none burst of population spikes in epileptic slices. The intrinsic firing patterns of CA1 pyramidal cells were determined by intrasomatic positive current injection. In control slices, the vast majority (97%) of the neurons were regular firing cells. In epileptic slices, only 53% the pyramidal cells fired in a regular mode. The remaining 47% of the pyramidal cells were intrinsic bursters. These neurons generated high-frequency bursts of three to six spikes in response to threshold depolarizations. A subgroup of these neurons (10.1% of all cells) also burst fired spontaneously even after suppression of synaptic activity. In epileptic slices, burst firing in most cases (ca 70%) was completely blocked by adding the Ca2+ channel blocker Ni2+ (1 mM) to, or removing Ca2+ from, the ACSF, but not by intracellular application of the Ca2+ chelater 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N ',N '-tetra-acetic acid (BAPTA), suggesting it was driven by a Ca2+ current. Spontaneously recurring population bursts were observed in a subset of epileptic slices. They were abolished by adding 2 M 6-cyano-7-nitro-quinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) to the ACSF, indicating that synaptic excitation is critical for the generation of these events. All sampled pyramidal cells fired repetitively during each population burst. The firing of spontaneously active bursters anteceded the population

  2. Radio frequency switching network: a technique for infrared sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechtel, Deborah M.; Jenkins, R. Brian; Joyce, Peter J.; Nelson, Charles L.

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes a unique technique that implements photoconductive sensors in a radio frequency (RF) switching network designed to locate in real-time the position and intensity of IR radiation incident on a composite structure. In the implementation described here, photoconductive sensors act as rapid response switches in a two-layer RF network embedded in an FR-4 laminate. To detect radiation, phosphorous-doped silicon photoconductive sensors are inserted in GHz range RF transmission lines. By permitting signal propagation only when a sensor is illuminated, the RF signals are selectively routed from lower layer transmission lines to upper layer lines, thereby pinpointing the location and strength of incident radiation. Simulations based on a high frequency three-dimensional planar electromagnetics model are presented and compared to the experimental results. The experimental results are described for GHz range RF signal control for 300- and 180-mW incident energy from 975- to 1060-nm wavelength lasers, respectively, where upon illumination, RF transmission line signal output power doubled when compared to nonilluminated results. The experimental results are also reported for 100-W incident energy from a 1060-nm laser. Test results illustrate real-time signal processing would permit a structure to be controlled in response to incident radiation.

  3. Anticipatory processes in brain state switching - evidence from a novel cued-switching task implicating default mode and salience networks.

    PubMed

    Sidlauskaite, Justina; Wiersema, Jan R; Roeyers, Herbert; Krebs, Ruth M; Vassena, Eliana; Fias, Wim; Brass, Marcel; Achten, Eric; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund

    2014-09-01

    The default mode network (DMN) is the core brain system supporting internally oriented cognition. The ability to attenuate the DMN when switching to externally oriented processing is a prerequisite for effective performance and adaptive self-regulation. Right anterior insula (rAI), a core hub of the salience network (SN), has been proposed to control the switching from DMN to task-relevant brain networks. Little is currently known about the extent of anticipatory processes subserved by DMN and SN during switching. We investigated anticipatory DMN and SN modulation using a novel cued-switching task of between-state (rest-to-task/task-to-rest) and within-state (task-to-task) transitions. Twenty healthy adults performed the task implemented in an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) design. Increases in activity were observed in the DMN regions in response to cues signalling upcoming rest. DMN attenuation was observed for rest-to-task switch cues. Obversely, DMN was up-regulated by task-to-rest cues. The strongest rAI response was observed to rest-to-task switch cues. Task-to-task switch cues elicited smaller rAI activation, whereas no significant rAI activation occurred for task-to-rest switches. Our data provide the first evidence that DMN modulation occurs rapidly and can be elicited by short duration cues signalling rest- and task-related state switches. The role of rAI appears to be limited to certain switch types - those implicating transition from a resting state and to tasks involving active cognitive engagement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Recruitment of an inhibitory hippocampal network after bursting in a single granule cell.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masahiro; Gähwiler, Beat H; Gerber, Urs

    2007-05-01

    The hippocampal CA3 area, an associational network implicated in memory function, receives monosynaptic excitatory as well as disynaptic inhibitory input through the mossy-fiber axons of the dentate granule cells. Synapses made by mossy fibers exhibit low release probability, resulting in high failure rates at resting discharge frequencies of 0.1 Hz. In recordings from functionally connected pairs of neurons, burst firing of a granule cell increased the probability of glutamate release onto both CA3 pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons, such that subsequent low-frequency stimulation evoked biphasic excitatory/inhibitory responses in a CA3 pyramidal cell, an effect lasting for minutes. Analysis of the unitary connections in the circuit revealed that granule cell bursting caused powerful activation of an inhibitory network, thereby transiently suppressing excitatory input to CA3 pyramidal cells. This phenomenon reflects the high incidence of spike-to-spike transmission at granule cell to interneuron synapses, the numerically much greater targeting by mossy fibers of inhibitory interneurons versus principal cells, and the extensively divergent output of interneurons targeting CA3 pyramidal cells. Thus, mossy-fiber input to CA3 pyramidal cells appears to function in three distinct modes: a resting mode, in which synaptic transmission is ineffectual because of high failure rates; a bursting mode, in which excitation predominates; and a postbursting mode, in which inhibitory input to the CA3 pyramidal cells is greatly enhanced. A mechanism allowing the transient recruitment of inhibitory input may be important for controlling network activity in the highly interconnected CA3 pyramidal cell region.

  5. Integrated optical buffers for packet-switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmeister, Emily Frances

    Routers form the backbone of the Internet, directing data to the right locations with huge throughput capacity of terabits/second) and very few errors (1 error allowed in 1012 bits). However, as the Internet continues to grow rapidly, so must the capacity of electronic routers, thereby also growing in footprint and power consumption. The energy bill alone has developers looking for an alternate solution. Today's routers can only operate with electrical signals although Internet data is transmitted optically. This requires the data to be converted from the optical domain to the electrical domain and back again. Optical routers have the potential of saving in power by omitting these conversions, but have been held back in part by the lack of a practical optical memory device. This work presents the first integrated optical buffer for next generation optical packet-switched networks. Buffering is required in a router to move packets of data in order to avoid collisions between packets heading to the same destination at the same time. The device presented here uses an InP-based two-by-two switch with a silica waveguide delay to form a recirculating buffer. Packet storage was shown with 98% packet recovery for 5 circulations. Autonomous contention resolution was demonstrated with two buffered channels to show that the technology is a realistic solution for creating multiple element buffers on multiple router ports. This thesis proposes and demonstrates the first integrated optical random access memory, thereby making a great stride toward high capacity optical routers.

  6. Feedback control and output feedback control for the stabilisation of switched Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangfei; Yu, Zhaoxu

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the feedback control and output feedback control for the stabilisation of switched Boolean network. A necessary condition for the existence of a state feedback controller for the stabilisation of switched Boolean networks under arbitrary switching signal is derived first, and constructive procedures for feedback control and output feedback control design are provided. An example is introduced to show the effectiveness of this paper.

  7. Interfacing VoIP to the Public Switch Telephone Network (PSTN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilgrim, Jim

    2001-07-01

    Interfacing VoIP into the current Public Switched Telephone Network is for the most part done through the use of a gateway. This gateway whether H.323, Session Initiation Protocol or Media Gateway Control Protocol is required for access into a traditional switched telephony network.

  8. Holographic perfect shuffle permutation element for a miniaturized switching network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobolla, H.; Schmidt, J.; Gluch, E.; Schwider, J.

    1995-06-01

    A holographic perfect shuffle element with 80 channels for a miniaturized switching network is reported. An array of vertical-cavity, surface-emitting lasers is used as a transmitter. The whole permutation is carried out totally in glass. The 80 channels are permuted within a rectangle with a volume of 3 mm \\times 4 mm \\times 2 mm. Four planes of stacked volume holograms recorded in dichromated gelatin form this perfect shuffle element with an angular spectrum between 7 deg and 35 deg. Changes in the wavelength of the diode lasers to Delta lambda = +/-10 nm can be compensated with this setup. The overall efficiency per channel lies between 40% and 60%. When Fresnel reflections and absorption are taken into account, a transmission per hologram between 78% and 90% is achieved.

  9. A comparison of computational methods for detecting bursts in neuronal spike trains and their application to human stem cell-derived neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Cotterill, Ellese; Charlesworth, Paul; Thomas, Christopher W; Paulsen, Ole; Eglen, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    Accurate identification of bursting activity is an essential element in the characterization of neuronal network activity. Despite this, no one technique for identifying bursts in spike trains has been widely adopted. Instead, many methods have been developed for the analysis of bursting activity, often on an ad hoc basis. Here we provide an unbiased assessment of the effectiveness of eight of these methods at detecting bursts in a range of spike trains. We suggest a list of features that an ideal burst detection technique should possess and use synthetic data to assess each method in regard to these properties. We further employ each of the methods to reanalyze microelectrode array (MEA) recordings from mouse retinal ganglion cells and examine their coherence with bursts detected by a human observer. We show that several common burst detection techniques perform poorly at analyzing spike trains with a variety of properties. We identify four promising burst detection techniques, which are then applied to MEA recordings of networks of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons and used to describe the ontogeny of bursting activity in these networks over several months of development. We conclude that no current method can provide "perfect" burst detection results across a range of spike trains; however, two burst detection techniques, the MaxInterval and logISI methods, outperform compared with others. We provide recommendations for the robust analysis of bursting activity in experimental recordings using current techniques.

  10. RF switching network: a novel technique for IR sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechtel, Deborah M.; Jenkins, R. Brian; Joyce, Peter J.; Nelson, Charles L.

    2016-05-01

    Rapid sensing of near infrared (IR) energy on a composite structure would provide information that could mitigate damage to composite structures. This paper describes a novel technique that implements photoconductive sensors in a radio frequency (RF) switching network designed to locate in real time the position and intensity of IR radiation incident on a composite structure. In the implementation described here, photoconductive sensors act as rapid response switches in a two layer RF network embedded in an FR-4 laminate. To detect radiation, phosphorous doped silicon photoconductive sensors are inserted in GHz range RF transmission lines. Photoconductive sensors use semiconductor materials that are optically sensitive at material dependent wavelengths. Incident radiation at the appropriate wavelength produces hole-electron pairs, so that the semiconductor becomes a conductor. By permitting signal propagation only when a sensor is illuminated, the RF signals are selectively routed from the lower layer transmission lines to the upper layer lines, thereby pinpointing the location and strength of incident radiation on a structure. Simulations based on a high frequency 3D planar electromagnetics model are presented and compared to experimental results. Experimental results are described for GHz range RF signal control for 300 mW and 180 mW incident energy from 975 nm and 1060 nm wavelength lasers respectively, where upon illumination, RF transmission line signal output power doubled when compared to non-illuminated results. Experimental results are reported for 100 W incident energy from a 1060 nm laser. Test results illustrate that real-time signal processing would permit a structure or vehicle to be controlled in response to incident radiation

  11. Bursting frequency versus phase synchronization in time-delayed neuron networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordenfelt, Anders; Used, Javier; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.

    2013-05-01

    We investigate the dependence of the average bursting frequency on time delay for neuron networks with randomly distributed time-delayed chemical synapses. The result is compared with the corresponding curve for the phase synchronization and it turns out that, in some intervals, these have a very similar shape and appear as almost mirror images of each other. We have analyzed both the map-based chaotic Rulkov model and the continuous Hindmarsh-Rose model, yielding the same conclusions. In order to gain further insight, we also analyzed time-delayed Kuramoto models displaying an overall behavior similar to that observed on the neuron network models. For the Kuramoto models, we were able to derive analytical formulas providing an implicit functional relationship between the mean frequency and the phase synchronization. These formulas suggest a strong dependence between those two measures, which could explain the similarities in shape between the curves.

  12. Synchronization of Switched Neural Networks With Communication Delays via the Event-Triggered Control.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shiping; Zeng, Zhigang; Chen, Michael Z Q; Huang, Tingwen

    2017-10-01

    This paper addresses the issue of synchronization of switched delayed neural networks with communication delays via event-triggered control. For synchronizing coupled switched neural networks, we propose a novel event-triggered control law which could greatly reduce the number of control updates for synchronization tasks of coupled switched neural networks involving embedded microprocessors with limited on-board resources. The control signals are driven by properly defined events, which depend on the measurement errors and current-sampled states. By using a delay system method, a novel model of synchronization error system with delays is proposed with the communication delays and event-triggered control in the unified framework for coupled switched neural networks. The criteria are derived for the event-triggered synchronization analysis and control synthesis of switched neural networks via the Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional method and free weighting matrix approach. A numerical example is elaborated on to illustrate the effectiveness of the derived results.

  13. Exact computation of probability landscape of stochastic networks of Single Input and Coupled Toggle Switch Modules.

    PubMed

    Terebus, Anna; Cao, Youfang; Liang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks depict the interactions between genes, proteins, and other components of the cell. These interactions often are stochastic that can influence behavior of the cells. Discrete Chemical Master Equation (dCME) provides a general framework for understanding the stochastic nature of these networks. However solving dCME is challenging due to the enormous state space, one effective approach is to study the behavior of individual modules of the stochastic network. Here we used the finite buffer dCME method and directly calculated the exact steady state probability landscape for the two stochastic networks of Single Input and Coupled Toggle Switch Modules. The first example is a switch network consisting of three genes, and the second example is a double switching network consisting of four coupled genes. Our results show complex switching behavior of these networks can be quantified.

  14. Neural network burst pressure prediction in impact damaged Kevlar/epoxy bottles from acoustic emission amplitude data

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.L.; Workman, G.L.; Russell, S.S.

    1994-12-31

    Acoustic emission (AE) signal analysis has been used to measure the effect of impact damage on the burst pressure of 5.75 inch diameter filament wound Kevlar/epoxy pressure vessels. A calibrated dead weight drop fixture, featuring both sharp and blunt hemispherical impact tups, generated impact damages with energies up to twenty ft-lb{sub f} in the mid hoop region of each vessel. Burst pressures were obtained by hydrostatically testing twenty-seven damaged and undamaged bottles, eleven of which were filled with inert propellant to simulate a rocket motor. Burst pressure prediction models were developed by correlating the differential AE amplitude distributions, Generated during the first pressure ramp to 25% of the expected burst pressure for the undamaged vessels, to known burst pressures using back propagation neural networks. Independent networks were created for the inert propellant filled vessels and the unfilled vessels using a small subset of each during the training phases. The remaining bottles served as the test sets. The eleven filled vessels had an average prediction error of 5.6%, while the unfilled bottles averaged 5.4%. Both of these results were within the 95% prediction interval, but a portion of the vessel burst pressure errors were greater than the {+-}5% worst case error obtained in previous work. in conclusion, the AE amplitude distribution data collected at low proof loads provided a suitable input for neural network burst pressure prediction in damaged and undamaged Kevlar/epoxy bottles. This included pressure vessels both with and without propellant backing. Work is ongoing to decrease the magnitude of the prediction error through network restructuring.

  15. An optical circuit switching network architecture and reconfiguration schemes for datacenter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Luying; Xu, Zhaowen; Cheng, Xiaofei; Huang, Qirui

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents an optical circuit switching network architecture and its control and traffic scheduling schemes. This optical switch network is built on a 32×32 AWG and fast wavelength tunable transmitters and is able to support up to 128 interface ports. The feasibility of the architecture is verified through an experimental study. The traffic scheduling scheme takes into account the transmitter wavelength tuning time so as to avoid frequent connection reconfiguration. The simulation results show that fast connection reconfiguration speed and efficient traffic scheduling scheme enable optical circuit switching network to deliver high transmission bandwidth and low packet delay performance in datacenter network.

  16. Delay Analysis of Networked Control Systems Based on 100 M Switched Ethernet

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    For the delay may degrade the performance of networked control systems, networked control systems based on 100 M switched Ethernet are proposed in this paper. According to the working principle of Ethernet switch, the formulas of the upper bound delay of the single-level switched Ethernet and the multiple-level switched Ethernet are deduced by the timing diagram method, and the values of the upper bound delay are also given. The key factors that influence the upper bound delay of switched Ethernet are analyzed; then, the characteristics of the upper bound delay are presented, which show that the delay induced by the single-level 100 M switched Ethernet has little effect on the performance of control systems, while the delay induced by the multiple-level 100 M switched Ethernet may meet the time requirements of all classes of control systems if the numbers of levels and the numbers of nodes connecting to switches are set properly. Finally, the performance of networked control systems is simulated by TrueTime, and the results further show the feasibility and superiority of 100 M switched Ethernet based networked control systems without modification of the network protocols. PMID:25003152

  17. Search for gravitational waves associated with γ-ray bursts detected by the interplanetary network.

    PubMed

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Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Recchia, S; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Reula, O; Rhoades, E; Ricci, F; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Roddy, S B; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J R; Sankar, S; Sannibale, V; Santiago-Prieto, I; Saracco, E; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Scheuer, J; Schilling, R; Schilman, M; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D A; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Singh, R; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Souradeep, T; Staley, A; Stebbins, J; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Stephens, B C; Steplewski, S; Stevenson, S; Stone, R; Stops, D; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tao, J; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, R; Tellez, G; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Tshilumba, D; Tuennermann, H; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Beuzekom, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vyachanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, M; Wang, X; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Williams, K; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williams, T D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Wolovick, N; Worden, J; Wu, Y; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yoshida, S; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J-P; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zhu, H; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S; Zweizig, J; Aptekar, R L; Atteia, J L; Cline, T; Connaughton, V; Frederiks, D D; Golenetskii, S V; Hurley, K; Krimm, H A; Marisaldi, M; Pal'shin, V D; Palmer, D; Svinkin, D S; Terada, Y; von Kienlin, A

    2014-07-04

    We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 223 γ-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the InterPlanetary Network (IPN) in 2005-2010 during LIGO's fifth and sixth science runs and Virgo's first, second, and third science runs. The IPN satellites provide accurate times of the bursts and sky localizations that vary significantly from degree scale to hundreds of square degrees. We search for both a well-modeled binary coalescence signal, the favored progenitor model for short GRBs, and for generic, unmodeled gravitational wave bursts. Both searches use the event time and sky localization to improve the gravitational wave search sensitivity as compared to corresponding all-time, all-sky searches. We find no evidence of a gravitational wave signal associated with any of the IPN GRBs in the sample, nor do we find evidence for a population of weak gravitational wave signals associated with the GRBs. For all IPN-detected GRBs, for which a sufficient duration of quality gravitational wave data are available, we place lower bounds on the distance to the source in accordance with an optimistic assumption of gravitational wave emission energy of 10(-2)M⊙c(2) at 150 Hz, and find a median of 13 Mpc. For the 27 short-hard GRBs we place 90% confidence exclusion distances to two source models: a binary neutron star coalescence, with a median distance of 12 Mpc, or the coalescence of a neutron star and black hole, with a median distance of 22 Mpc. Finally, we combine this search with previously published results to provide a population statement for GRB searches in first-generation LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors and a resulting examination of prospects for the advanced gravitational wave detectors.

  18. Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts Detected by the Interplanetary Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Blackbum, L.; Camp, J. B.; Gehrels, N.; Graff, P. B.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 223 gamma ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the InterPlanetary Network (IPN) in 2005-2010 during LIGO's fifth and sixth science runs and Virgo's first, second, and third science runs. The IPN satellites provide accurate times of the bursts and sky localizations that vary significantly from degree scale to hundreds of square degrees. We search for both a well-modeled binary coalescence signal, the favored progenitor model for short GRBs, and for generic, unmodeled gravitational wave bursts. Both searches use the event time and sky localization to improve the gravitational wave search sensitivity as compared to corresponding all-time, all-sky searches. We find no evidence of a gravitational wave signal associated with any of the IPN GRBs in the sample, nor do we find evidence for a population of weak gravitational wave signals associated with the GRBs. For all IPN-detected GRBs, for which a sufficient duration of quality gravitational wave data are available, we place lower bounds on the distance to the source in accordance with an optimistic assumption of gravitational wave emission energy of 10(exp-2) solar mass c(exp 2) at 150 Hz, and find a median of 13 Mpc. For the 27 short-hard GRBs we place 90% confidence exclusion distances to two source models: a binary neutron star coalescence, with a median distance of 12 Mpc, or the coalescence of a neutron star and black hole, with a median distance of 22 Mpc. Finally, we combine this search with previously published results to provide a population statement for GRB searches in first-generation LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors and a resulting examination of prospects for the advanced gravitational wave detectors.

  19. Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with γ-ray Bursts Detected by the Interplanetary Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Andersen, M.; Anderson, R. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Augustus, H.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Bergmann, G.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burman, R.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castaldi, G.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Celerier, C.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Croce, R. P.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dickson, J.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Feroz, F.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Ha, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hamilton, W.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Horrom, T.; Hoske, D.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jaranowski, P.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karlen, J.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, D. Nanda; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, P. J.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leonor, I.; Le Roux, A.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Lodhia, D.; Loew, K.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lopez, E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Ma, Y.; Macdonald, E. P.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Manca, G. M.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mangini, N. M.; Mansell, G.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martinelli, L.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; May, G.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nagy, M. F.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, I.; Neri, M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A. H.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Omar, S.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pan, H.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Pedraza, M.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Poggiani, R.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C.; Ramirez, K.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Recchia, S.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Reula, O.; Rhoades, E.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S. B.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sankar, S.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Saracco, E.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schilman, M.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Stops, D.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tao, J.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, R.; Tellez, G.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Tshilumba, D.; Tuennermann, H.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, K.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williams, T. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Wolovick, N.; Worden, J.; Wu, Y.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yoshida, S.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.; Aptekar, R. L.; Atteia, J. L.; Cline, T.; Connaughton, V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Hurley, K.; Krimm, H. A.; Marisaldi, M.; Pal'shin, V. D.; Palmer, D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Terada, Y.; von Kienlin, A.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; IPN Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 223 γ-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the InterPlanetary Network (IPN) in 2005-2010 during LIGO's fifth and sixth science runs and Virgo's first, second, and third science runs. The IPN satellites provide accurate times of the bursts and sky localizations that vary significantly from degree scale to hundreds of square degrees. We search for both a well-modeled binary coalescence signal, the favored progenitor model for short GRBs, and for generic, unmodeled gravitational wave bursts. Both searches use the event time and sky localization to improve the gravitational wave search sensitivity as compared to corresponding all-time, all-sky searches. We find no evidence of a gravitational wave signal associated with any of the IPN GRBs in the sample, nor do we find evidence for a population of weak gravitational wave signals associated with the GRBs. For all IPN-detected GRBs, for which a sufficient duration of quality gravitational wave data are available, we place lower bounds on the distance to the source in accordance with an optimistic assumption of gravitational wave emission energy of 10-2M⊙c2 at 150 Hz, and find a median of 13 Mpc. For the 27 short-hard GRBs we place 90% confidence exclusion distances to two source models: a binary neutron star coalescence, with a median distance of 12 Mpc, or the coalescence of a neutron star and black hole, with a median distance of 22 Mpc. Finally, we combine this search with previously published results to provide a population statement for GRB searches in first-generation LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors and a resulting examination of prospects for the advanced gravitational wave detectors.

  20. Electronic Power Switch for Fault-Tolerant Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volp, J.

    1987-01-01

    Power field-effect transistors reduce energy waste and simplify interconnections. Current switch containing power field-effect transistor (PFET) placed in series with each load in fault-tolerant power-distribution system. If system includes several loads and supplies, switches placed in series with adjacent loads and supplies. System of switches protects against overloads and losses of individual power sources.

  1. Stochastic modeling and numerical simulation of gene regulatory networks with protein bursting.

    PubMed

    Pájaro, Manuel; Alonso, Antonio A; Otero-Muras, Irene; Vázquez, Carlos

    2017-05-21

    Gene expression is inherently stochastic. Advanced single-cell microscopy techniques together with mathematical models for single gene expression led to important insights in elucidating the sources of intrinsic noise in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. In addition to the finite size effects due to low copy numbers, translational bursting is a dominant source of stochasticity in cell scenarios involving few short lived mRNA transcripts with high translational efficiency (as is typically the case for prokaryotes), causing protein synthesis to occur in random bursts. In the context of gene regulation cascades, the Chemical Master Equation (CME) governing gene expression has in general no closed form solution, and the accurate stochastic simulation of the dynamics of complex gene regulatory networks is a major computational challenge. The CME associated to a single gene self regulatory motif has been previously approximated by a one dimensional time dependent partial integral differential equation (PIDE). However, to the best of our knowledge, multidimensional versions for such PIDE have not been developed yet. Here we propose a multidimensional PIDE model for regulatory networks involving multiple genes with self and cross regulations (in which genes can be regulated by different transcription factors) derived as the continuous counterpart of a CME with jump process. The model offers a reliable description of systems with translational bursting. In order to provide an efficient numerical solution, we develop a semilagrangian method to discretize the differential part of the PIDE, combined with a composed trapezoidal quadrature formula to approximate the integral term. We apply the model and numerical method to study sustained stochastic oscillations and the development of competence, a particular case of transient differentiation attained by certain bacterial cells under stress conditions. We found that the resulting probability distributions are distinguishable

  2. Clique of functional hubs orchestrates population bursts in developmentally regulated neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torcini, Alessandro; Luccioli, Stefano; Bonifazi, Paolo; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Barzilai, Ari

    2015-03-01

    It has recently been discovered that single neuron stimulation can impact network dynamics in immature and adult neuronal circuits. Here we report a novel mechanism which can explain in developing neuronal circuits, typically composed of only excitatory cells, the peculiar role played by a few specific neurons in promoting/arresting the population activity. For this purpose, we consider a standard neuronal network model, with short-term synaptic plasticity, whose population activity is characterized by bursting behavior. The addition of developmentally regulated constraints on single neuron excitability and connectivity leads to the emergence of functional hub neurons, whose stimulation/deletion is critical for the network activity. Functional hubs form a clique, where a precise sequential activation of the neurons is essential to ignite collective events without any need for a specific topological architecture. Unsupervised time-lagged firings of supra-threshold cells, in connection with coordinated entrainments of near-threshold neurons, are the key ingredients to orchestrate population activity. This work is part of the activity of the Joint Italian-Israeli Laboratory on Integrative Network Neuroscience supported by the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

  3. A three-sided rearrangeable switching network for a binary fat tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Mao-Hsu; Yu, Chu; Shin, Haw-Yun; Chen, Sao-Jie

    2011-06-01

    A binary fat tree needs an internal node to interconnect the left-children, right-children and parent terminals to each other. In this article, we first propose a three-stage, 3-sided rearrangeable switching network for the implementation of a binary fat tree. The main component of this 3-sided switching network (3SSN) consists of a polygonal switch block (PSB) interconnected by crossbars. With the same size and the same number of switches as our 3SSN, a three-stage, 3-sided clique-based switching network is shown to be not rearrangeable. Also, the effects of the rearrangeable structure and the number of terminals on the network switch-efficiency are explored and a proper set of parameters has been determined to minimise the number of switches. We derive that a rearrangeable 3-sided switching network with switches proportional to N 3/2 is most suitable to interconnect N terminals. Moreover, we propose a new Polygonal Field Programmable Gate Array (PFPGA) that consists of logic blocks interconnected by our 3SSN, such that the logic blocks in this PFPGA can be grouped into clusters to implement different logic functions. Since the programmable switches usually have high resistance and capacitance and occupy a large area, we have to consider the effect of the 3SSN structure and the granularity of its cluster logic blocks on the switch efficiency of PFPGA. Experiments on benchmark circuits show that the switch and speed performances are significantly improved. Based on the experimental results, we can determine the parameters of PFPGA for the VLSI implementation.

  4. Exponential sensitivity of noise-driven switching in genetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Pankaj; Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan; Wingreen, Ned

    2008-03-01

    Cells are known to utilize biochemical noise to probabilistically switch between distinct gene expression states. We demonstrate that such noise-driven switching is dominated by tails of probability distributions and is therefore exponentially sensitive to changes in physiological parameters such as transcription and translation rates. However, provided mRNA lifetimes are short, switching can still be accurately simulated using protein-only models of gene expression. Exponential sensitivity limits the robustness of noise-driven switching, suggesting cells may use other mechanisms in order to switch reliably.

  5. Demonstration of 720×720 optical fast circuit switch for intra-datacenter networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Koh; Mori, Yojiro; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Kiyo; Kuwatsuka, Haruhiko; Namiki, Shu; Sato, Ken-ichi

    2016-03-01

    Intra-datacenter traffic is growing more than 20% a year. In typical datacenters, many racks/pods including servers are interconnected via multi-tier electrical switches. The electrical switches necessitate power-consuming optical-to- electrical (OE) and electrical-to-optical (EO) conversion, the power consumption of which increases with traffic. To overcome this problem, optical switches that eliminate costly OE and EO conversion and enable low power consumption switching are being investigated. There are two major requirements for the optical switch. First, it must have a high port count to construct reduced tier intra-datacenter networks. Second, switching speed must be short enough that most of the traffic load can be offloaded from electrical switches. Among various optical switches, we focus on those based on arrayed-waveguide gratings (AWGs), since the AWG is a passive device with minimal power consumption. We previously proposed a high-port-count optical switch architecture that utilizes tunable lasers, route-and-combine switches, and wavelength-routing switches comprised of couplers, erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs), and AWGs. We employed conventional external cavity lasers whose wavelength-tuning speed was slower than 100 ms. In this paper, we demonstrate a large-scale optical switch that offers fast wavelength routing. We construct a 720×720 optical switch using recently developed lasers whose wavelength-tuning period is below 460 μs. We evaluate the switching time via bit-error-ratio measurements and achieve 470-μs switching time (includes 10-μs guard time to handle EDFA surge). To best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of such a large-scale optical switch with practical switching time.

  6. A novel network of multipolar bursting interneurons generates theta frequency oscillations in neocortex.

    PubMed

    Blatow, Maria; Rozov, Andrei; Katona, Istvan; Hormuzdi, Sheriar G; Meyer, Axel H; Whittington, Miles A; Caputi, Antonio; Monyer, Hannah

    2003-06-05

    GABAergic interneurons can phase the output of principal cells, giving rise to oscillatory activity in different frequency bands. Here we describe a new subtype of GABAergic interneuron, the multipolar bursting (MB) cell in the mouse neocortex. MB cells are parvalbumin positive but differ from fast-spiking multipolar (FS) cells in their morphological, neurochemical, and physiological properties. MB cells are reciprocally connected with layer 2/3 pyramidal cells and are coupled with each other by chemical and electrical synapses. MB cells innervate FS cells but not vice versa. MB to MB cell as well as MB to pyramidal cell synapses exhibit paired-pulse facilitation. Carbachol selectively induced synchronized theta frequency oscillations in MB cells. Synchrony required both gap junction coupling and GABAergic chemical transmission, but not excitatory glutamatergic input. Hence, MB cells form a distinct inhibitory network, which upon cholinergic drive can generate rhythmic and synchronous theta frequency activity, providing temporal coordination of pyramidal cell output.

  7. Network bursting dynamics in excitatory cortical neuron cultures results from the combination of different adaptive mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Masquelier, Timothée; Deco, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    In the brain, synchronization among cells of an assembly is a common phenomenon, and thought to be functionally relevant. Here we used an in vitro experimental model of cell assemblies, cortical cultures, combined with numerical simulations of a spiking neural network (SNN) to investigate how and why spontaneous synchronization occurs. In order to deal with excitation only, we pharmacologically blocked GABAAergic transmission using bicuculline. Synchronous events in cortical cultures tend to involve almost every cell and to display relatively constant durations. We have thus named these "network spikes" (NS). The inter-NS-intervals (INSIs) proved to be a more interesting phenomenon. In most cortical cultures NSs typically come in series or bursts ("bursts of NSs", BNS), with short (~1 s) INSIs and separated by long silent intervals (tens of s), which leads to bimodal INSI distributions. This suggests that a facilitating mechanism is at work, presumably short-term synaptic facilitation, as well as two fatigue mechanisms: one with a short timescale, presumably short-term synaptic depression, and another one with a longer timescale, presumably cellular adaptation. We thus incorporated these three mechanisms into the SNN, which, indeed, produced realistic BNSs. Next, we systematically varied the recurrent excitation for various adaptation timescales. Strong excitability led to frequent, quasi-periodic BNSs (CV~0), and weak excitability led to rare BNSs, approaching a Poisson process (CV~1). Experimental cultures appear to operate within an intermediate weakly-synchronized regime (CV~0.5), with an adaptation timescale in the 2-8 s range, and well described by a Poisson-with-refractory-period model. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the INSI statistics are indeed informative: they allowed us to infer the mechanisms at work, and many parameters that we cannot access experimentally.

  8. Network Bursting Dynamics in Excitatory Cortical Neuron Cultures Results from the Combination of Different Adaptive Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Masquelier, Timothée; Deco, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    In the brain, synchronization among cells of an assembly is a common phenomenon, and thought to be functionally relevant. Here we used an in vitro experimental model of cell assemblies, cortical cultures, combined with numerical simulations of a spiking neural network (SNN) to investigate how and why spontaneous synchronization occurs. In order to deal with excitation only, we pharmacologically blocked GABAAergic transmission using bicuculline. Synchronous events in cortical cultures tend to involve almost every cell and to display relatively constant durations. We have thus named these “network spikes” (NS). The inter-NS-intervals (INSIs) proved to be a more interesting phenomenon. In most cortical cultures NSs typically come in series or bursts (“bursts of NSs”, BNS), with short (∼1 s) INSIs and separated by long silent intervals (tens of s), which leads to bimodal INSI distributions. This suggests that a facilitating mechanism is at work, presumably short-term synaptic facilitation, as well as two fatigue mechanisms: one with a short timescale, presumably short-term synaptic depression, and another one with a longer timescale, presumably cellular adaptation. We thus incorporated these three mechanisms into the SNN, which, indeed, produced realistic BNSs. Next, we systematically varied the recurrent excitation for various adaptation timescales. Strong excitability led to frequent, quasi-periodic BNSs (CV∼0), and weak excitability led to rare BNSs, approaching a Poisson process (CV∼1). Experimental cultures appear to operate within an intermediate weakly-synchronized regime (CV∼0.5), with an adaptation timescale in the 2–8 s range, and well described by a Poisson-with-refractory-period model. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the INSI statistics are indeed informative: they allowed us to infer the mechanisms at work, and many parameters that we cannot access experimentally. PMID:24146781

  9. Analyses, simulations, and experiments on the performance of the token-based optical burst transport ring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Wen, Gan; Wang, Hongxiang; Bai, Lin; Ji, Yuefeng

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, both numerical and simulated modeling techniques were applied to analyze the influence on the performance of the token-based Optical Burst Transport (OBT) ring networks caused by the parameters, such as the minimum and maximum burst length, the circumference of the ring, and so on. We first analyze the issue by numerical analysis in the case that each node has only one token. After that, we confirm the analytical results and made further researches in the case that each node has multiple tokens by simulated analysis. All the results show that to design a high-performance token-based OBT ring network, not only the common parameters, such as the number of nodes and wavelengths, and the circumference of the ring, but also the special parameters, such as the minimum and maximum burst length, and the offset time should be taken into account. Furthermore, a testbed of Three-node Token-based OBT ring network Using Fixed Transmitter and Tuneable Receiver (FTTR) is constructed. With it, the variations of the network performance caused by the maximum burst length are investigated.1

  10. Low expression of Kv7/M channels facilitates intrinsic and network bursting in the developing rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Safiulina, Victoria F; Zacchi, Paola; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Yaari, Yoel; Cherubini, Enrico

    2008-01-01

    Early in development, network activity in the hippocampus is characterized by recurrent synchronous bursts, whose cellular correlates are giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs). The propensity for generating GDPs is attributed to GABAergic synaptic transmission being depolarizing and excitatory in neonatal neurons. However, developmental regulation of intrinsic conductances may also influence GDPs generation. A likely candidate is the non-inactivating, low-threshold, muscarinic-sensitive K+ current (M current; Im), which down-regulates intrinsic bursting activity in adult hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Western blot analysis of homogenates of the CA3 hippocampal region showed that expression of the Kv7.2 subunit, one of the constituents of neuronal M channels, is weak in neonatal neurons, and markedly increases after the first postnatal week. Likewise, the density of Im was very low in neonatal CA3 pyramidal cells and increased later on. Spontaneously occurring intrinsic bursts in neonatal neurons were longer and more robust, and recurred more regularly, than in juvenile neurons. The Im blocker linopirdine only mildly affected intrinsic bursting in neonatal neurons, but strongly facilitated and regularized it in juvenile neurons. We conclude that the low expression of Kv7/M channels and the depolarizing action of GABA early after birth enhance intrinsic bursting and neuronal synchronization leading to generation of GDPs within the hippocampal network. PMID:18801845

  11. Clique of functional hubs orchestrates population bursts in developmentally regulated neural networks.

    PubMed

    Luccioli, Stefano; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Barzilai, Ari; Bonifazi, Paolo; Torcini, Alessandro

    2014-09-01

    It has recently been discovered that single neuron stimulation can impact network dynamics in immature and adult neuronal circuits. Here we report a novel mechanism which can explain in neuronal circuits, at an early stage of development, the peculiar role played by a few specific neurons in promoting/arresting the population activity. For this purpose, we consider a standard neuronal network model, with short-term synaptic plasticity, whose population activity is characterized by bursting behavior. The addition of developmentally inspired constraints and correlations in the distribution of the neuronal connectivities and excitabilities leads to the emergence of functional hub neurons, whose stimulation/deletion is critical for the network activity. Functional hubs form a clique, where a precise sequential activation of the neurons is essential to ignite collective events without any need for a specific topological architecture. Unsupervised time-lagged firings of supra-threshold cells, in connection with coordinated entrainments of near-threshold neurons, are the key ingredients to orchestrate population activity.

  12. Support for the Interplanetary Network of Gamma-Ray Burst Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Kevin

    This proposal requests two years of support for a portion of the Interplanetary Network (IPN). The network consists of nine spacecraft, each of which is in a different category with respect to NASA funding. One, AGILE, is an Italian mission which never received NASA support, while three others (Fermi, MESSENGER, and Swift) are NASA missions which are currently supported. Although their data are used in the network, they are not the object of this proposal. Financial support is requested for the remaining 5 missions (INTEGRAL, Odyssey, RHESSI, Suzaku, and Wind), some of which continue to have guest investigator (GI) programs, but none of which supports GI s financially. The data for all of them are public (Odyssey data are in NASA s Planetary Data System (PDS)). Gamma-ray burst data are received continuously by these missions, at a rate of 0.9 GRB/day. Because the IPN is a full-time, all-sky monitor of GRB activity, its data are well suited to the three particular projects proposed here: gravitational lensing, neutrino emission, and primordial black hole evaporation. The present proposal requests two years of support to analyze and publish data which have been archived up to the time of submission (i.e. data received up to May 2014). The PI has accepted GI proposals for INTEGRAL and Suzaku, and is an unfunded co-investigator with the Odyssey mission. All data are in the public domain and are archived.

  13. Programs for control of an analog-signal switching network

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ottavio, T.; Enriquez, R.; Katz, R.; Skelly, J.

    1989-01-01

    A suite of programs has been developed to control the network of analog-signal switching multiplexers in the AGS complex. The software is driven by a relational database which describes the architecture of the multiplexer tree and the set of available analog signals. Signals are routed through a three-layer multiplexer tree, to be made available at four consoles each with three 4-trace oscilloscopes. A menu-structured operator interface program is available at each console, to accept requests to route any available analog signal to any of that console's 12 oscilloscope traces. A common routing-server program provides automatic routing-server program provides automatic routing of requested signals through the layers of multiplexers, maintaining a reservation database to denote free and in-use trunks. Expansion of the analog signal system is easily accommodated in software by adding new signals, trunks, multiplexers, or consoles to the database. Programmatic control of the triggering signals for each of the oscilloscopes is also provided. 3 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Combined networked switching output feedback control with ?-region stability for performance improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolakopoulos, George; Dritsas, Leonidas; Delshad, Saleh S.

    2014-06-01

    In this article, a combined networked switching output feedback control scheme, with a ?-region stability performance improvement module is presented. The network induced time delays, that are considered to be time varying and integer multiples of the sampling period, are being embedded in the system model, by state augmentation. The resulting model of the overall networked closed-loop system is switching, with the current measured round-trip time delay acting as the switching rule. Based on this modelling approach, a Linear Matrix Inequality (LMI) tuned switching output feedback controller is designed. The proposed approach establishes robustness against time delays and is able to guarantee the overall stability of the switching closed-loop system. Integrated in the controlled synthesis phase, an LMI tuned performance improvement module is being introduced, based on ?-region stability. Multiple simulation results are being presented that prove the efficacy of the proposed scheme.

  15. Switch probability context (in)sensitivity within the cognitive control network.

    PubMed

    De Baene, Wouter; Brass, Marcel

    2013-08-15

    Cognitive control processes refer to the ability to flexibly adapt one's thoughts and actions in the pursuit of an internal goal. Task preparation is a central aspect of cognitive control and has generally been studied using explicitly cued task-switching paradigms. Over the last decade, numerous fMRI studies have identified a fronto-parietal network to exhibit greater activity during the preparation of task switches than during the preparation of task repetitions, which is assumed to reflect endogenous cognitive control processes. There is, however, a huge variability in preparatory switch-specific brain activity reported in the imaging literature on task-switching. One factor that might explain this heterogeneity is the difference in switch probability across studies. In the current fMRI study, we examined which preparation-related cognitive control areas are susceptible to such contextual differences by manipulating the switch probability within subjects. In the low switch probability (30% switch trials) blocks, we found the frequently observed switch-related preparatory activation in fronto-parietal areas. In the high switch probability (50% switch trials) blocks, however, only part of these areas (more particularly the (pre-) SMA, extending into the dorsal ACC and the superior parietal lobule) showed higher activation in switch compared to repeat trials. The activation levels in the other areas (the lateral prefrontal cortex, inferior parietal lobule and middle temporal gyrus) were very similar for switch and repeat trials. Our results suggest a functional dissociation within the cognitive control network with some brain areas being sensitive to the switch probability context while others are not.

  16. Interaction between cellular voltage-sensitive conductance and network parameters in a model of neocortex can generate epileptiform bursting.

    SciTech Connect

    van Drongelen, W.; Lee, H. C.; Koch, H.; Elsen, F.; Carroll, M. S.; Hereld, M.; Stevens, R. L.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago

    2004-01-01

    We examined the effects of both intrinsic neuronal membrane properties and network parameters on oscillatory activity in a model of neocortex. A scalable network model with six different cell types was built with the pGENESIS neural simulator. The neocortical network consisted of two types of pyramidal cells and four types of inhibitory interneurons. All cell types contained both fast sodium and delayed rectifier potassium channels for generation of action potentials. A subset of the pyramidal neurons contained an additional slow inactivating (persistent) sodium current (NaP). The neurons with the NaP current showed spontaneous bursting activity in the absence of external stimulation. The model also included a routine to calculate a simulated electroencephalogram (EEG) trace from the population activity. This revealed emergent network behavior which ranged from desynchronized activity to different types of seizure-like bursting patterns. At settings with weaker excitatory network effects, the propensity to generate seizure-like behavior increased. Strong excitatory network connectivity destroyed oscillatory behavior, whereas weak connectivity enhanced the relative importance of the spontaneously bursting cells. Our findings are in contradiction with the general opinion that strong excitatory synaptic and/or insufficient inhibition effects are associated with seizure initiation, but are in agreement with previously reported behavior in neocortex.

  17. Effects of bursting dynamic features on the generation of multi-clustered structure of neural network with symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Song, Yongduan; Xue, Fangzheng; Li, Xiumin

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the generation of multi-clustered structure of self-organized neural network with different neuronal firing patterns, i.e., bursting or spiking, has been investigated. The initially all-to-all-connected spiking neural network or bursting neural network can be self-organized into clustered structure through the symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning for both bursting and spiking neurons. However, the time consumption of this clustering procedure of the burst-based self-organized neural network (BSON) is much shorter than the spike-based self-organized neural network (SSON). Our results show that the BSON network has more obvious small-world properties, i.e., higher clustering coefficient and smaller shortest path length than the SSON network. Also, the results of larger structure entropy and activity entropy of the BSON network demonstrate that this network has higher topological complexity and dynamical diversity, which benefits for enhancing information transmission of neural circuits. Hence, we conclude that the burst firing can significantly enhance the efficiency of clustering procedure and the emergent clustered structure renders the whole network more synchronous and therefore more sensitive to weak input. This result is further confirmed from its improved performance on stochastic resonance. Therefore, we believe that the multi-clustered neural network which self-organized from the bursting dynamics has high efficiency in information processing.

  18. Effects of bursting dynamic features on the generation of multi-clustered structure of neural network with symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning rule.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Song, Yongduan; Xue, Fangzheng; Li, Xiumin

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the generation of multi-clustered structure of self-organized neural network with different neuronal firing patterns, i.e., bursting or spiking, has been investigated. The initially all-to-all-connected spiking neural network or bursting neural network can be self-organized into clustered structure through the symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning for both bursting and spiking neurons. However, the time consumption of this clustering procedure of the burst-based self-organized neural network (BSON) is much shorter than the spike-based self-organized neural network (SSON). Our results show that the BSON network has more obvious small-world properties, i.e., higher clustering coefficient and smaller shortest path length than the SSON network. Also, the results of larger structure entropy and activity entropy of the BSON network demonstrate that this network has higher topological complexity and dynamical diversity, which benefits for enhancing information transmission of neural circuits. Hence, we conclude that the burst firing can significantly enhance the efficiency of clustering procedure and the emergent clustered structure renders the whole network more synchronous and therefore more sensitive to weak input. This result is further confirmed from its improved performance on stochastic resonance. Therefore, we believe that the multi-clustered neural network which self-organized from the bursting dynamics has high efficiency in information processing.

  19. Effects of bursting dynamic features on the generation of multi-clustered structure of neural network with symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning rule

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui; Song, Yongduan; Xue, Fangzheng; Li, Xiumin

    2015-11-15

    In this paper, the generation of multi-clustered structure of self-organized neural network with different neuronal firing patterns, i.e., bursting or spiking, has been investigated. The initially all-to-all-connected spiking neural network or bursting neural network can be self-organized into clustered structure through the symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning for both bursting and spiking neurons. However, the time consumption of this clustering procedure of the burst-based self-organized neural network (BSON) is much shorter than the spike-based self-organized neural network (SSON). Our results show that the BSON network has more obvious small-world properties, i.e., higher clustering coefficient and smaller shortest path length than the SSON network. Also, the results of larger structure entropy and activity entropy of the BSON network demonstrate that this network has higher topological complexity and dynamical diversity, which benefits for enhancing information transmission of neural circuits. Hence, we conclude that the burst firing can significantly enhance the efficiency of clustering procedure and the emergent clustered structure renders the whole network more synchronous and therefore more sensitive to weak input. This result is further confirmed from its improved performance on stochastic resonance. Therefore, we believe that the multi-clustered neural network which self-organized from the bursting dynamics has high efficiency in information processing.

  20. 47 CFR 68.110 - Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and terminal equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... network and terminal equipment. 68.110 Section 68.110 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Conditions on Use of Terminal Equipment § 68.110 Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and...

  1. 47 CFR 68.110 - Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and terminal equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... network and terminal equipment. 68.110 Section 68.110 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Conditions on Use of Terminal Equipment § 68.110 Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and...

  2. 47 CFR 68.201 - Connection to the public switched telephone network.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... network. 68.201 Section 68.201 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Terminal Equipment Approval Procedures § 68.201 Connection to the public switched telephone network. Terminal equipment may...

  3. 47 CFR 68.201 - Connection to the public switched telephone network.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... network. 68.201 Section 68.201 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Terminal Equipment Approval Procedures § 68.201 Connection to the public switched telephone network. Terminal equipment may...

  4. 47 CFR 68.201 - Connection to the public switched telephone network.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... network. 68.201 Section 68.201 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Terminal Equipment Approval Procedures § 68.201 Connection to the public switched telephone network. Terminal equipment may...

  5. 47 CFR 68.110 - Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and terminal equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... network and terminal equipment. 68.110 Section 68.110 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Conditions on Use of Terminal Equipment § 68.110 Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and...

  6. 47 CFR 68.201 - Connection to the public switched telephone network.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... network. 68.201 Section 68.201 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Terminal Equipment Approval Procedures § 68.201 Connection to the public switched telephone network. Terminal equipment may...

  7. 47 CFR 68.201 - Connection to the public switched telephone network.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... network. 68.201 Section 68.201 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Terminal Equipment Approval Procedures § 68.201 Connection to the public switched telephone network. Terminal equipment may...

  8. 47 CFR 68.110 - Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and terminal equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... network and terminal equipment. 68.110 Section 68.110 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Conditions on Use of Terminal Equipment § 68.110 Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and...

  9. 47 CFR 68.110 - Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and terminal equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... network and terminal equipment. 68.110 Section 68.110 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Conditions on Use of Terminal Equipment § 68.110 Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and...

  10. Complexity, Robustness, and Multistability in Network Systems with Switching Topologies: A Hierarchical Hybrid Control Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-22

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0282 Complexity, Robustness, and Multistability in Network Systems with Switching Topologies A Hierarchical Hybrid Control ...concentrated on the development of a unified discontinuous dynamical framework for nonlinear network systems. In particular, control algorithms were... network systems, large-scale systems, adaptive control , discontinuous systems 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF

  11. Packet Switching Networks: An Introduction with Some Attention to Selected Vendors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, James Joseph

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the history, development, and services of the packet switching network services that currently exist in the United States. The character of packet switching, a computerized method of transmitting data, is used as the basis for tracing the development of the industry itself. Contending that the…

  12. Exponential sensitivity of noise-driven switching in genetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Pankaj; Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2008-06-01

    There is increasing experimental evidence that cells can utilize biochemical noise to switch probabilistically between distinct gene-expression states. In this paper, we demonstrate that such noise-driven switching is dominated by tails of probability distributions and is therefore exponentially sensitive to changes in physiological parameters such as transcription and translation rates. Exponential sensitivity limits the robustness of noise-driven switching, suggesting cells may use other mechanisms in order to switch reliably. We discuss our results in the context of competence in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis.

  13. Real-time video transmission over a fast packet-switched network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorhead, Robert J.; Ma, Joong S.; Gonzales, Cesar A.

    1989-04-01

    Realtime transmission of packetized video is a relatively new but important area of research since tomorrow's networks will likely be based on a common fast packet-switching technology, replacing today's heterogeneous networks which are mixtures of circuit-switched and packet-switched networks dedicated for synchronous and asynchronous applications respectively. Unlike fixed bandwidth transmission channels, packet-switched networks can accommodate the bursty and highly variable rate of compressed motion video yet keep a constant level of image quality. Potential applications include motion video databases, video teleconferencing, and broadcasting over private networks. Unfortunately, traditional video-compression techniques which are applicable to synchronous, fixed bandwidth channels--cannot be applied in this new environment without substantial revisions that take into account the statistical nature of packet data transmission. Independent of their topology, fast packet-switched networks present unique challenges to the coding of motion video; one cannot simply divorce the coding of the source from the characteristics of the channel. The potential for loss of data integrity due to packet losses and transmission errors must be taken into account. The problem of re-synchronization must also be addressed since packet-switched networks are asynchronous by nature. In this paper, we evaluate image coding techniques for motion video in view of the constraints imposed by the packetized medium.

  14. Optically triggered high voltage switch network and method for switching a high voltage

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Andexler, George; Silberkleit, Lee I.

    1993-01-19

    An optically triggered solid state switch and method for switching a high voltage electrical current. A plurality of solid state switches (350) are connected in series for controlling electrical current flow between a compensation capacitor (112) and ground in a reactive power compensator (50, 50') that monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b and 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. An optical transmitter (100) controlled by the reactive power compensation system produces light pulses that are conveyed over optical fibers (102) to a switch driver (110') that includes a plurality of series connected optical triger circuits (288). Each of the optical trigger circuits controls a pair of the solid state switches and includes a plurality of series connected resistors (294, 326, 330, and 334) that equalize or balance the potential across the plurality of trigger circuits. The trigger circuits are connected to one of the distribution lines through a trigger capacitor (340). In each switch driver, the light signals activate a phototransistor (300) so that an electrical current flows from one of the energy reservoir capacitors through a pulse transformer (306) in the trigger circuit, producing gate signals that turn on the pair of serially connected solid state switches (350).

  15. Stability analysis of switched stochastic neural networks with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaotai; Tang, Yang; Zhang, Wenbing

    2014-03-01

    This paper is concerned with the global exponential stability of switched stochastic neural networks with time-varying delays. Firstly, the stability of switched stochastic delayed neural networks with stable subsystems is investigated by utilizing the mathematical induction method, the piecewise Lyapunov function and the average dwell time approach. Secondly, by utilizing the extended comparison principle from impulsive systems, the stability of stochastic switched delayed neural networks with both stable and unstable subsystems is analyzed and several easy to verify conditions are derived to ensure the exponential mean square stability of switched delayed neural networks with stochastic disturbances. The effectiveness of the proposed results is illustrated by two simulation examples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pinning Synchronization of Directed Networks With Switching Topologies: A Multiple Lyapunov Functions Approach.

    PubMed

    Wen, Guanghui; Yu, Wenwu; Hu, Guoqiang; Cao, Jinde; Yu, Xinghuo

    2015-12-01

    This paper studies the global pinning synchronization problem for a class of complex networks with switching directed topologies. The common assumption in the existing related literature that each possible network topology contains a directed spanning tree is removed in this paper. Using tools from M -matrix theory and stability analysis of the switched nonlinear systems, a new kind of network topology-dependent multiple Lyapunov functions is proposed for analyzing the synchronization behavior of the whole network. It is theoretically shown that the global pinning synchronization in switched complex networks can be ensured if some nodes are appropriately pinned and the coupling is carefully selected. Interesting issues of how many and which nodes should be pinned for possibly realizing global synchronization are further addressed. Finally, some numerical simulations on coupled neural networks are provided to verify the theoretical results.

  17. Optical packet switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekel, Eyal; Ruschin, Shlomo; Majer, Daniel; Levy, Jeff; Matmon, Guy; Koenigsberg, Lisa; Vecht, Jacob; Geron, Amir; Harlavan, Rotem; Shfaram, Harel; Arbel, Arnon; McDermott, Tom; Brewer, Tony

    2005-02-01

    We report here a scalable, multichassis, 6.3 terabit core router, which utilizes our proprietary optical switch. The router is commercially available and deployed in several customer sites. Our solution combines optical switching with electronic routing. An internal optical packet switching network interconnects the router"s electronic line cards, where routing and buffering functions take place electronically. The system architecture and performance will be described. The optical switch is based on Optical Phased Array (OPA) technology. It is a 64 x 64, fully non-blocking, optical crossbar switch, capable of switching in a fraction of a nanosecond. The basic principles of operation will be explained. Loss and crosstalk results will be presented, as well as the results of BER measurements of a 160 Gbps transmission through one channel. Basic principles of operation and measured results will be presented for the burst-mode-receivers, arbitration algorithm and synchronization. Finally, we will present some of our current research work on a next-generation optical switch. The technological issues we have solved in our internal optical packet network can have broad applicability to any global optical packet network.

  18. Proton Single Event Effects (SEE) Testing of the Myrinet Crossbar Switch and Network Interface Card

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, James W., Jr.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Carts, Martin A.; Stattel, Ronald; Irwin, Timothy L.; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As part of the Remote Exploration and Experimentation Project (REE), work was performed to do a proton SEE (Single Event Effect) evaluation of the Myricom network protocol system (Myrinet). This testing included the evaluation of the Myrinet crossbar switch and the Network Interface Card (NIC). To this end, two crossbar switch devices and five components in the NIC were exposed to the proton beam at the University of California at Davis Crocker Nuclear Laboratory (CNL).

  19. Implementation of a terminal switching network supervisor: SAURON, an interactive extension of PACX IV control techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Vahle, M O; Tolendino, L F

    1982-04-01

    The rapidly growing number of interactive terminals at Sandia National Laboratories which compete for a limited number of computer ports has given rise to the development of a Terminal Switching Network. This paper describes a minicomputer-based supervisory node which interacts with the switches comprising the network and the operators. The supervisor amplifies the control capabilities of the operators, provides a realtime display of the system status, and records usage statistics.

  20. High-Speed Burst-Mode Clock and Data Recovery Circuits for Multiaccess Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shastri, Bhavin J.

    Optical multiaccess networks, and specifically passive optical networks (PONs) are considered to be the most promising technologies for the deployment of fiber-to-the-premises/home/user (FTTx) to solve the problem of limited bandwidth in local area networks with a low-cost solution and a guaranteed quality of service. In a PON, multiple users share the fiber infrastructure in a point-to-multipoint (P2MP) network. This topology introduce optical path delays which inherently cause the data packets to undergo amplitude variations up to 20 dB and phase variations from --2pi to +2pi rad--burst-mode traffic. Consequently, this creates new challenges for the design and test of optical receivers front-ends and clock and data recovery circuits (CDRs), in particular, burst-mode CDRs (BM-CDRs). The research presented in this thesis investigates BM-CDRs, both theoretically and experimentally. We demonstrate two novel BM-CDR architectures. These BM-CDRs achieve error-free operation [bit error rate (BER) <10e--10] while providing instantaneous (0 preamble bit) clock phase acquisition for any phase step (+/-2pi rad) between successive bursts. Instantaneous phase acquisition improves the physical efficiency of upstream PON traffic, and increases the effective throughput of the system by raising the information rate. Our eloquent, scalable BM-CDR architectures leverage the design of low complexity commercial electronics providing a cost-effective solution for PONs. The first BM-CDR (rated at 5 Gb/s) is based on phase-tracking time domain oversampling (semiblind) CDR operated at 2x the bit rate and a clock phase aligner (CPA) that makes use of a phase picking algorithm. The second BM-CDR (rate at 10 Gb/s) is based on semiblind space domain oversampling and employs a phase-tracking CDR with multiphase clocks at the bit rate and a CPA with a novel phase picking algorithm. We experimentally demonstrate these BM-CDRs in optical test beds and study the effect of channel-impairments in

  1. Protection Switching and Local Area Network Emulation in Passive Optical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadarajah, Nishaanthan; Wong, Elaine; Attygalle, Manik; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai Thas

    2006-05-01

    This paper proposes and experimentally demonstrates an automatic-protection-switching (APS) mechanism against distribution fiber breaks in passive optical networks (PONs). The protection of optical-network units (ONUs) that are located at the customer premises is carried out by monitoring the distribution fiber using the traffic that is transported among the customers in the PON. This configuration emulates a local area network (LAN) over the existing PON while facilitating the switching of signal transmissions to a predetermined protection path in an event of a distribution fiber break. As failure detection and APS are performed independently by each ONU in a distributed manner, the processing complexities and delays are reduced at the central office (CO). The restoration of the traffic transported between the CO and an ONU in the event of the distribution fiber break is performed by interconnecting adjacent ONUs and carrying out signal transmissions via an independent but interconnected ONU. Such a protection mechanism enables multiple adjacent ONUs to be simultaneously protected by a single ONU utilizing its maximum available bandwidth. This paper experimentally verifies the feasibility of the proposed protection mechanism in conjunction with two different LAN-emulation schemes with a 1.25-Gb/s upstream baseband transmission to the CO and a 155-Mb/s LAN data transmission on a radio-frequency carrier. The experimental results obtained from both schemes are compared, and the power budgets are calculated to analyze the scalability of each scheme.

  2. Order parameter for bursting polyrhythms in multifunctional central pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, Jeremy; Clewley, Robert; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2011-05-01

    We examine multistability of several coexisting bursting patterns in a central pattern generator network composed of three Hodgkin-Huxley type cells coupled reciprocally by inhibitory synapses. We establish that the control of switching between bursting polyrhythms and their bifurcations are determined by the temporal characteristics, such as the duty cycle, of networked interneurons and the coupling strength asymmetry. A computationally effective approach to the reduction of dynamics of the nine-dimensional network to two-dimensional Poincaré return mappings for phase lags between the interneurons is presented.

  3. Order parameter for bursting polyrhythms in multifunctional central pattern generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, Jeremy; Clewley, Robert; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2011-05-01

    We examine multistability of several coexisting bursting patterns in a central pattern generator network composed of three Hodgkin-Huxley type cells coupled reciprocally by inhibitory synapses. We establish that the control of switching between bursting polyrhythms and their bifurcations are determined by the temporal characteristics, such as the duty cycle, of networked interneurons and the coupling strength asymmetry. A computationally effective approach to the reduction of dynamics of the nine-dimensional network to two-dimensional Poincaré return mappings for phase lags between the interneurons is presented.

  4. Modelling switching-time effects in high-frequency power conditioning networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, H. A.; Sloane, T. H.; Rimer, B. H.; Wilson, T. G.

    1979-01-01

    Power transistor networks which switch large currents in highly inductive environments are beginning to find application in the hundred kilohertz switching frequency range. Recent developments in the fabrication of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors in the power device category have enhanced the movement toward higher switching frequencies. Models for switching devices and of the circuits in which they are imbedded are required to properly characterize the mechanisms responsible for turning on and turning off effects. Easily interpreted results in the form of oscilloscope-like plots assist in understanding the effects of parametric studies using topology oriented computer-aided analysis methods.

  5. Coincidence and coherent data analysis methods for gravitational wave bursts in a network of interferometric detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, Nicolas; Barsuglia, Matteo; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Brisson, Violette; Cavalier, Fabien; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Kreckelbergh, Stephane; Porter, Edward K.

    2003-11-01

    Network data analysis methods are the only way to properly separate real gravitational wave (GW) transient events from detector noise. They can be divided into two generic classes: the coincidence method and the coherent analysis. The former uses lists of selected events provided by each interferometer belonging to the network and tries to correlate them in time to identify a physical signal. Instead of this binary treatment of detector outputs (signal present or absent), the latter method involves first the merging of the interferometer data and looks for a common pattern, consistent with an assumed GW waveform and a given source location in the sky. The thresholds are only applied later, to validate or not the hypothesis made. As coherent algorithms use more complete information than coincidence methods, they are expected to provide better detection performances, but at a higher computational cost. An efficient filter must yield a good compromise between a low false alarm rate (hence triggering on data at a manageable rate) and a high detection efficiency. Therefore, the comparison of the two approaches is achieved using so-called receiving operating characteristics (ROC), giving the relationship between the false alarm rate and the detection efficiency for a given method. This paper investigates this question via Monte Carlo simulations, using the network model developed in a previous article. Its main conclusions are the following. First, a three-interferometer network such as Virgo-LIGO is found to be too small to reach good detection efficiencies at low false alarm rates: larger configurations are suitable to reach a confidence level high enough to validate as true GW a detected event. In addition, an efficient network must contain interferometers with comparable sensitivities: studying the three-interferometer LIGO network shows that the 2-km interferometer with half sensitivity leads to a strong reduction of performances as compared to a network of three

  6. The InterPlanetary Network Supplement to the Second Fermi GBM Catalog of Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, K.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Pal’shin, V. D.; Briggs, M. S.; Meegan, C.; Connaughton, V.; Goldsten, J.; Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; Rau, A.; von Kienlin, A.; Zhang, X.; Yamaoka, K.; Fukazawa, Y.; Ohno, M.; Tashiro, M.; Terada, Y.; Barthelmy, S.; Cline, T.; Gehrels, N.; Cummings, J.; Krimm, H. A.; Smith, D. M.; Del Monte, E.; Feroci, M.; Marisaldi, M.

    2017-04-01

    InterPlanetary Network (IPN) data are presented for the gamma-ray bursts in the second Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) catalog. Of the 462 bursts in that catalog between 2010 July 12 and 2012 July 11, 428, or 93%, were observed by at least 1 other instrument in the 9-spacecraft IPN. Of the 428, the localizations of 165 could be improved by triangulation. For these bursts, triangulation gives one or more annuli whose half-widths vary between about 2.‧3° and 16°, depending on the peak flux, fluence, time history, arrival direction, and the distance between the spacecraft. We compare the IPN localizations with the GBM 1σ, 2σ, and 3σ error contours and find good agreement between them. The IPN 3σ error boxes have areas between about 8 square arcminutes and 380 square degrees, and are an average of 2500 times smaller than the corresponding GBM 3σ localizations. We identify four bursts in the IPN/GBM sample whose origins were given as “uncertain,” but may in fact be cosmic. This leads to an estimate of over 99% completeness for the GBM catalog.

  7. Silicon photonic switch technology for optical networks in telecom and datacom areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Shigeru; Yanagimachi, Shigeyuki; Takeshita, Hitoshi; Tajima, Akio

    2017-01-01

    As a promising platform technology for optical switches, silicon photonics is recently attracting much attention. In this paper, we demonstrate compact 8 × 8 silicon photonic switch modules with low loss, low polarization sensitivity, and low cross-talk properties. An optical circuit including 152 thermo-optical switch elements and spot size converters were formed within a silicon chip size of 12 mm × 14 mm. The developed module where a silicon photonic chip was assembled with a fiber array showed about 6-dB average excess optical loss, including optical coupling loss, on all 64 paths of the 8 × 8 optical switch. Measured polarization dependent loss was about 0.6 dB on average over 64 paths and cross-talk was less than -35 dB. These optical switch modules are intended for applying to ROADMs in telecom optical networks, but, the port count extensibility using multiple compact modules and the faster switching capability of the optical switch are also useful for datacenter applications where hybrid network scheme with electronic packet switches and optical circuit switches is intensively investigated.

  8. Effect of arousal increase in predictable and random task switching: evidence for the involvement of the anterior attentional network in random but not in predictable task switching.

    PubMed

    Solano Galvis, César Augusto; Tornay Mejías, Francisco; Gómez Milán, Emilio

    2010-11-01

    Switch cost does not disappear as more preparation time for the next task is allowed. Tornay and Milán showed that the residual cost is smaller when tasks switch randomly than when they alternate in predictable sequences. They proposed that the difference was due to control mechanisms (anterior attentional network) being activated in the random condition because of its overall difficulty. Besides, it has been shown that increasing arousal levels inhibits the anterior attentional network. Therefore, Tornay and Milán's account predicts that high arousal should result in switch cost for the random condition increasing to the levels of predictable switching. In this work, this prediction was tested by assessing the interaction between increased arousal and switch cost with both predictable and random-task switching. The results may help to solve the ongoing controversy about the causes of switch cost.

  9. High-performance optoelectronic switching network with vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Fyodorov, V B

    2003-03-31

    A schematic solution is proposed for creating a highly efficient switching network with fully connected switching topology for use in supercomputers and telecommunication systems. An important characteristic of this solution is the use of vertical-cavity surface-emitting semiconductor laser arrays and polarising beamsplitters. Estimates show that the commercially available elemental base can be used for a practical realisation of an optoelectronic switching network with basic parameters and functional properties that are superior to those in known electronic analogues. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  10. Gene regulatory network plasticity predates a switch in function of a conserved transcription regulator.

    PubMed

    Nocedal, Isabel; Mancera, Eugenio; Johnson, Alexander D

    2017-03-22

    The rewiring of gene regulatory networks can generate phenotypic novelty. It remains an open question, however, how the large number of connections needed to form a novel network arise over evolutionary time. Here, we address this question using the network controlled by the fungal transcription regulator Ndt80. This conserved protein has undergone a dramatic switch in function-from an ancestral role regulating sporulation to a derived role regulating biofilm formation. This switch in function corresponded to a large-scale rewiring of the genes regulated by Ndt80. However, we demonstrate that the Ndt80-target gene connections were undergoing extensive rewiring prior to the switch in Ndt80's regulatory function. We propose that extensive drift in the Ndt80 regulon allowed for the exploration of alternative network structures without a loss of ancestral function, thereby facilitating the formation of a network with a new function.

  11. Parallel access alignment network with barrel switch implementation for d-ordered vector elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, George H. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An alignment network between N parallel data input ports and N parallel data outputs includes a first and a second barrel switch. The first barrel switch fed by the N parallel input ports shifts the N outputs thereof and in turn feeds the N-1 input data paths of the second barrel switch according to the relationship X=k.sup.y modulo N wherein x represents the output data path ordering of the first barrel switch, y represents the input data path ordering of the second barrel switch, and k equals a primitive root of the number N. The zero (0) ordered output data path of the first barrel switch is fed directly to the zero ordered output port. The N-1 output data paths of the second barrel switch are connected to the N output ports in the reverse ordering of the connections between the output data paths of the first barrel switch and the input data paths of the second barrel switch. The second switch is controlled by a value m, which in the preferred embodiment is produced at the output of a ROM addressed by the value d wherein d represents the incremental spacing or distance between data elements to be accessed from the N input ports, and m is generated therefrom according to the relationship d=k.sup.m modulo N.

  12. Global exponential stability for switched memristive neural networks with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Xin, Youming; Li, Yuxia; Cheng, Zunshui; Huang, Xia

    2016-08-01

    This paper considers the problem of exponential stability for switched memristive neural networks (MNNs) with time-varying delays. Different from most of the existing papers, we model a memristor as a continuous system, and view switched MNNs as switched neural networks with uncertain time-varying parameters. Based on average dwell time technique, mode-dependent average dwell time technique and multiple Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional approach, two conditions are derived to design the switching signal and guarantee the exponential stability of the considered neural networks, which are delay-dependent and formulated by linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Finally, the effectiveness of the theoretical results is demonstrated by two numerical examples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Call for Papers: Photonics in Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosinska, Lena; Glick, Madeleine

    2006-04-01

    Call for Papers: Photonics in Switching

    Guest Editors:

    Lena Wosinska, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) / ICT Sweden Madeleine Glick, Intel Research, Cambridge, UK

    Technologies based on DWDM systems allow data transmission with bit rates of Tbit/s on a single fiber. To facilitate this enormous transmission volume, high-capacity and high-speed network nodes become inevitable in the optical network. Wideband switching, WDM switching, optical burst switching (OBS), and optical packet switching (OPS) are promising technologies for harnessing the bandwidth of WDM optical fiber networks in a highly flexible and efficient manner. As a number of key optical component technologies approach maturity, photonics in switching is becoming an increasingly attractive and practical solution for the next-generation of optical networks. The scope of this special issue is focused on the technology and architecture of optical switching nodes, including the architectural and algorithmic aspects of high-speed optical networks.

    Scope of Submission

    The scope of the papers includes, but is not limited to, the following topics:
    • WDM node architectures
    • Novel device technologies enabling photonics in switching, such as optical switch fabrics, optical memory, and wavelength conversion
    • Routing protocols
    • WDM switching and routing
    • Quality of service
    • Performance measurement and evaluation
    • Next-generation optical networks: architecture, signaling, and control
    • Traffic measurement and field trials
    • Optical burst and packet switching
    • OBS/OPS node architectures
    • Burst/Packet scheduling and routing algorithms
    • Contention resolution/avoidance strategies
    • Services and applications for OBS/OPS (e.g., grid networks, storage-area networks, etc.)
    • Burst assembly and ingress traffic shaping

    • All-optical swapping of spectral amplitude code labels for packet-switched networks

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Chen, Lawrence R.

      2008-08-01

      Packet-switched networks have attracted considerable attention as a basis for next-generation optical networks due to their advantages in terms of flexibility and network efficiency over traditional circuit-switched networks. Optical code multi-protocol label switching (OC-MPLS) promises fast, flexible, power-efficient switching by keeping signals in the optical domain and avoiding costly conversions to the electrical domain. In this paper, we review the use of spectral amplitude codes (SACs) for implementing OC-MPLS labels. We discuss the principles and features, as well as key enabling technologies required for their processing. In particular, we compare three different approaches for low cost all-optical swapping of SAC labels. All approaches are based on semiconductor fiber lasers and exploit nonlinearity in a semiconductor device: the first uses cross-absorption modulation in an electroabsorption modulator, the second uses cross-gain modulation (XGM) in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA), and the third makes use of XGM in an SOA as well as injection locking in a Fabry-Pérot laser. We present the static and dynamic responses of each for swapping a multi-wavelength input label to a multi-wavelength output label. The benefits and limitations of each approach as well as future improvements are discussed. We also present the results of systems experiments which demonstrate error-free all-optical label swapping, recognition, and switching of multi-rate packets in packet-switched networks using multi-wavelength labels.

    • Complexity-Enabled Sensor Networks and Photonic Switching Devices

      DTIC Science & Technology

      2008-12-20

      slow diffusion of atoms out of the pump laser beams. The Doppler -broadened linewidth of the transition at this temperature was ~550 MHz. To prevent...Transverse Patterns for All-Optical Switching,’ Quantum Electronics and Laser Science 2008, San Jose, CA, May 5, 2008. Z. Gao and D.J. Gauthier...2007. A. M. C. Dawes and D. J. Gauthier, `Using Transverse Patterns for All-Optical Switching,’ Ninth Rochester Conference on Coherence & Quantum

    • Gamma-ray burst observations with the [ital Compton]/[ital Ulysses]/[ital Pioneer]-[ital Venus] network

      SciTech Connect

      Cline, T.L. ); Hurley, K.C. ); Sommer, M. ); Boer, M.; Niel, M. ); Fishman, G.J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Meegan, C.A.; Paciesas, W.S.; Wilson, R.B. ); Fenimore, E.E.; Laros, J.G.; Klebesadel, R.W. )

      1993-07-05

      The third and latest interplanetary network for the precise directional analysis of gamma ray bursts consists of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment in [ital Compton] [ital Gamma] [ital Ray] [ital Observatory] and instruments on [ital Pioneer]-[ital Venus] [ital Orbiter] and the deep-space mission [ital Ulysses]. The unsurpassed resolution of the BATSE instrument, the use of refined analysis techniques, and [ital Ulysses]' distance of up to 6 AU all contribute to a potential for greater precision than had been achieved with former networks. Also, the departure of [ital Ulysses] from the ecliptic plane in 1992 avoids any positional alignment of the three instruments that would lessen the source directional accuracy.

    • The Role of Automated Subject Switching in a Distributed Information Network.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Kwasny, S.; Niehoff, R. T.

      1979-01-01

      Discusses forces at work within today's on-line data base environment which could lead to the emergence of a distributed information network; identifies several important modules in such a network, including an automated subject switching module; and reports research investigations, critical issues, and preliminary findings with regard to…

    • An Algorithm for Contention Resolution in Label-Switched Networks

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Singh, Anshu; Chandra, Vinod

      In this article, we are comparing two schemes of contention resolution, one through loopless deflection routing and other through criticality-based contention resolution. The comparison is done on the basis of packet loss probability and average delay in the network. The networks considered for analysis are NSFnet network and 6-node network.

    • DNA-Binding Kinetics Determines the Mechanism of Noise-Induced Switching in Gene Networks.

      PubMed

      Tse, Margaret J; Chu, Brian K; Roy, Mahua; Read, Elizabeth L

      2015-10-20

      Gene regulatory networks are multistable dynamical systems in which attractor states represent cell phenotypes. Spontaneous, noise-induced transitions between these states are thought to underlie critical cellular processes, including cell developmental fate decisions, phenotypic plasticity in fluctuating environments, and carcinogenesis. As such, there is increasing interest in the development of theoretical and computational approaches that can shed light on the dynamics of these stochastic state transitions in multistable gene networks. We applied a numerical rare-event sampling algorithm to study transition paths of spontaneous noise-induced switching for a ubiquitous gene regulatory network motif, the bistable toggle switch, in which two mutually repressive genes compete for dominant expression. We find that the method can efficiently uncover detailed switching mechanisms that involve fluctuations both in occupancies of DNA regulatory sites and copy numbers of protein products. In addition, we show that the rate parameters governing binding and unbinding of regulatory proteins to DNA strongly influence the switching mechanism. In a regime of slow DNA-binding/unbinding kinetics, spontaneous switching occurs relatively frequently and is driven primarily by fluctuations in DNA-site occupancies. In contrast, in a regime of fast DNA-binding/unbinding kinetics, switching occurs rarely and is driven by fluctuations in levels of expressed protein. Our results demonstrate how spontaneous cell phenotype transitions involve collective behavior of both regulatory proteins and DNA. Computational approaches capable of simulating dynamics over many system variables are thus well suited to exploring dynamic mechanisms in gene networks.

    • Structure of the Transcriptional Network Controlling White-Opaque Switching in Candida albicans

      PubMed Central

      Hernday, Aaron D.; Lohse, Matthew B.; Fordyce, Polly M.; Nobile, Clarissa J.; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Johnson, Alexander D.

      2013-01-01

      Summary The human fungal pathogen Candida albicans can switch between two phenotypic cell types, termed “white” and “opaque.” Both cell types are heritable for many generations, and the switch between the two types occurs epigenetically, that is, without a change in the primary DNA sequence of the genome. Previous work identified six key transcriptional regulators important for white-opaque switching: Wor1, Wor2, Wor3, Czf1, Efg1, and Ahr1. In this work, we describe the structure of the transcriptional network that specifies the white and opaque cell types and governs the ability to switch between them. In particular, we use a combination of genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation, gene expression profiling, and microfluidics-based DNA binding experiments to determine the direct and indirect regulatory interactions that form the switch network. The six regulators are arranged together in a complex, interlocking network with many seemingly redundant and overlapping connections. We propose that the structure (or topology) of this network is responsible for the epigenetic maintenance of the white and opaque states, the switching between them, and the specialized properties of each state. PMID:23855748

  1. Structure of the transcriptional network controlling white-opaque switching in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hernday, Aaron D; Lohse, Matthew B; Fordyce, Polly M; Nobile, Clarissa J; DeRisi, Joseph L; Johnson, Alexander D

    2013-10-01

    The human fungal pathogen Candida albicans can switch between two phenotypic cell types, termed 'white' and 'opaque'. Both cell types are heritable for many generations, and the switch between the two types occurs epigenetically, that is, without a change in the primary DNA sequence of the genome. Previous work identified six key transcriptional regulators important for white-opaque switching: Wor1, Wor2, Wor3, Czf1, Efg1, and Ahr1. In this work, we describe the structure of the transcriptional network that specifies the white and opaque cell types and governs the ability to switch between them. In particular, we use a combination of genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation, gene expression profiling, and microfluidics-based DNA binding experiments to determine the direct and indirect regulatory interactions that form the switch network. The six regulators are arranged together in a complex, interlocking network with many seemingly redundant and overlapping connections. We propose that the structure (or topology) of this network is responsible for the epigenetic maintenance of the white and opaque states, the switching between them, and the specialized properties of each state.

  2. Large Scale Cortical Functional Networks Associated with Slow-Wave and Spindle-Burst-Related Spontaneous Activity

    PubMed Central

    McVea, David A.; Murphy, Timothy H.; Mohajerani, Majid H.

    2016-01-01

    Cortical sensory systems are active with rich patterns of activity during sleep and under light anesthesia. Remarkably, this activity shares many characteristics with those present when the awake brain responds to sensory stimuli. We review two specific forms of such activity: slow-wave activity (SWA) in the adult brain and spindle bursts in developing brain. SWA is composed of 0.5–4 Hz resting potential fluctuations. Although these fluctuations synchronize wide regions of cortex, recent large-scale imaging has shown spatial details of their distribution that reflect underlying cortical structural projections and networks. These networks are regulated, as prior awake experiences alter both the spatial and temporal features of SWA in subsequent sleep. Activity patterns of the immature brain, however, are very different from those of the adult. SWA is absent, and the dominant pattern is spindle bursts, intermittent high frequency oscillations superimposed on slower depolarizations within sensory cortices. These bursts are driven by intrinsic brain activity, which act to generate peripheral inputs, for example via limb twitches. They are present within developing sensory cortex before they are mature enough to exhibit directed movements and respond to external stimuli. Like in the adult, these patterns resemble those evoked by sensory stimulation when awake. It is suggested that spindle-burst activity is generated purposefully by the developing nervous system as a proxy for true external stimuli. While the sleep-related functions of both slow-wave and spindle-burst activity may not be entirely clear, they reflect robust regulated phenomena which can engage select wide-spread cortical circuits. These circuits are similar to those activated during sensory processing and volitional events. We highlight these two patterns of brain activity because both are prominent and well-studied forms of spontaneous activity that will yield valuable insights into brain function in

  3. Digital dual-rate burst-mode receiver for 10G and 1G coexistence in optical access networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado Mendinueta, José Manuel; Mitchell, John E.; Bayvel, Polina; Thomsen, Benn C.

    2011-07-01

    A digital dual-rate burst-mode receiver, intended to support 10 and 1 Gb/s coexistence in optical access networks, is proposed and experimentally characterized. The receiver employs a standard DC-coupled photoreceiver followed by a 20 GS/s digitizer and the detection of the packet presence and line-rate is implemented in the digital domain. A polyphase, 2 samples-per-bit digital signal processing algorithm is then used for efficient clock and data recovery of the 10/1.25 Gb/s packets. The receiver performance is characterized in terms of sensitivity and dynamic range under burst-mode operation for 10/1.25 Gb/s intensity modulated data in terms of both the packet error rate (PER) and the payload bit error rate (pBER). The impact of packet preamble lengths of 16, 32, 48, and 64 bits, at 10 Gb/s, on the receiver performance is investigated. We show that there is a trade-off between pBER and PER that is limited by electrical noise and digitizer clipping at low and high received powers, respectively, and that a 16/2-bit preamble at 10/1.25 Gb/s is sufficient to reliably detect packets at both line-rates over a burst-to-burst dynamic range of 14,5dB with a sensitivity of -18.5dBm at 10 Gb/s.

  4. DISCRETE EVENT SIMULATION OF OPTICAL SWITCH MATRIX PERFORMANCE IN COMPUTER NETWORKS

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, Neena; Poole, Stephen W

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present application of a Discrete Event Simulator (DES) for performance modeling of optical switching devices in computer networks. Network simulators are valuable tools in situations where one cannot investigate the system directly. This situation may arise if the system under study does not exist yet or the cost of studying the system directly is prohibitive. Most available network simulators are based on the paradigm of discrete-event-based simulation. As computer networks become increasingly larger and more complex, sophisticated DES tool chains have become available for both commercial and academic research. Some well-known simulators are NS2, NS3, OPNET, and OMNEST. For this research, we have applied OMNEST for the purpose of simulating multi-wavelength performance of optical switch matrices in computer interconnection networks. Our results suggest that the application of DES to computer interconnection networks provides valuable insight in device performance and aids in topology and system optimization.

  5. All-optical fast packet-switched networks: physical and logical limits of operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaroni, Dominique; Lavigne, Bruno; Barroso, Angeline; Hamon, Laure; Jourdan, Amaury

    1998-10-01

    One of the objectives of the European ACTS 043 KEOPS project, was to assess the feasibility of a high capacity all-optical packet switching network to face the dramatic increase of traffic needs. The initial objective was to cascade a maximum of 16 network sections (involving transmission links up to 100 km and one optical packet switching node) at 10 Gbit/s to validate the concept. In this paper we present both the experimental validation and a logical analysis. The physical performance has been assessed through a loop cascade of 40 network sections including 160 Gbit/s throughput switching nodes and 100 km of transmission. Recent experimental results have shown that such a network could be extended to a world scale. The limits of operation have been checked by regarding interferometric noise influence in the cascade and evolution of power discrepancies through the network. For the first time, these results really indicate that it is possible to provide high capacity, full flexibility and total expandability at the network level without any opto- electronic conversion. Finally, we will give simulation results exhibiting the packet loss rate, the packet delay and the occupation rate in the buffer. In particular, we demonstrate that the packet loss rate was preserved during the cascade. Results are comparable with ATM constraints as well as with other data transmission formats. This set of results demonstrates the feasibility of an all-optical packet switched network while providing both high quality of signal and high traffic performance.

  6. A cross-stacked plasmonic nanowire network for high-contrast femtosecond optical switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuanhai; Zhang, Xinping; Fang, Xiaohui; Liang, Shuyan

    2016-01-01

    We report an ultrafast optical switching device constructed by stacking two layers of gold nanowires into a perpendicularly crossed network, which works at a speed faster than 280 fs with an on/off modulation depth of about 22.4%. The two stacks play different roles in enhancing consistently the optical switching performance due to their different dependence on the polarization of optical electric fields. The cross-plasmon resonance based on the interaction between the perpendicularly stacked gold nanowires and its Fano-coupling with Rayleigh anomaly is the dominant mechanism for such a high-contrast optical switching device.

  7. Cooperative Adaptive Output Regulation for Second-Order Nonlinear Multiagent Systems With Jointly Connected Switching Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Huang, Jie

    2017-01-11

    This paper studies the cooperative global robust output regulation problem for a class of heterogeneous second-order nonlinear uncertain multiagent systems with jointly connected switching networks. The main contributions consist of the following three aspects. First, we generalize the result of the adaptive distributed observer from undirected jointly connected switching networks to directed jointly connected switching networks. Second, by performing a new coordinate and input transformation, we convert our problem into the cooperative global robust stabilization problem of a more complex augmented system via the distributed internal model principle. Third, we solve the stabilization problem by a distributed state feedback control law. Our result is illustrated by the leader-following consensus problem for a group of Van der Pol oscillators.

  8. Theta-burst Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Alters the Functional Topography of the Cortical Motor Network

    PubMed Central

    NOH, Nor Azila; FUGGETTA, Giorgio; MANGANOTTI, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive tool that is able to modulate the electrical activity of the brain depending upon its protocol of stimulation. Theta burst stimulation (TBS) is a high-frequency TMS protocol that is able to induce prolonged plasticity changes in the brain. The induction of plasticity-like effects by TBS is useful in both experimental and therapeutic settings; however, the underlying neural mechanisms of this modulation remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of continuous TBS (cTBS) on the intrahemispheric and interhemispheric functional connectivity of the resting and active brain. Methods: A total of 26 healthy humans were randomly divided into two groups that received either real cTBS or sham (control) over the left primary motor cortex. Surface electroencephalogram (EEG) was used to quantify the changes of neural oscillations after cTBS at rest and after a choice reaction time test. The cTBS-induced EEG oscillations were computed using spectral analysis of event-related coherence (ERCoh) of theta (4–7.5 Hz), low alpha (8–9.5 Hz), high alpha (10–12.5 Hz), low beta (13–19.5 Hz), and high beta (20–30 Hz) brain rhythms. Results: We observed a global decrease in functional connectivity of the brain in the cTBS group when compared to sham in the low beta brain rhythm at rest and high beta brain rhythm during the active state. In particular, EEG spectral analysis revealed that high-frequency beta, a cortically generated brain rhythm, was the most sensitive band that was modulated by cTBS. Conclusion: Overall, our findings suggest that cTBS, a TMS protocol that mimics the mechanism of long-term depression of synaptic plasticity, modulates motor network oscillations primarily at the cortical level and might interfere with cortical information coding. PMID:27006636

  9. Discrete-time systems with random switches: From systems stability to networks synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yao; Lin, Wei; Ho, Daniel W. C.

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we develop some approaches, which enable us to more accurately and analytically identify the essential patterns that guarantee the almost sure stability of discrete-time systems with random switches. We allow for the case that the elements in the switching connection matrix even obey some unbounded and continuous-valued distributions. In addition to the almost sure stability, we further investigate the almost sure synchronization in complex dynamical networks consisting of randomly connected nodes. Numerical examples illustrate that a chaotic dynamics in the synchronization manifold is preserved when statistical parameters enter some almost sure synchronization region established by the developed approach. Moreover, some delicate configurations are considered on probability space for ensuring synchronization in networks whose nodes are described by nonlinear maps. Both theoretical and numerical results on synchronization are presented by setting only a few random connections in each switch duration. More interestingly, we analytically find it possible to achieve almost sure synchronization in the randomly switching complex networks even with very large population sizes, which cannot be easily realized in non-switching but deterministically connected networks.

  10. Toward exa-scale optical circuit switch interconnect networks for future datacenter/HPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Kiyo; Inoue, Takashi; Namiki, Shu

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses how to realize an optical circuit switching interconnect capable of more than 10 Tbps link bandwidth and more than 100,000 end points scalability. To keep continuous performance improvement of datacenters or high performance computers, high capacity and low latency interconnect network is essential. To handle such large bandwidth interconnect networks with low energy consumption, optical switch technologies will become inevitable. This paper firstly examines the scaling of the energy consumption of optical circuit switching networks based on the state of the art silicon photonics switch technology. Secondly to achieve Tbps-class link bandwidth, the WDM transmission technology and a shared WDM light source mechanism named "wavelength bank" are introduced. Due to the shared light source, each optical transceiver does not have to carry individual light sources, which enables simple WDM transceivers with cost-efficient silicon photonics technologies. Then a new optical switch control approach which reduces the control overhead time is discussed. In the proposed approach, the optical data plane itself represents the path destination, which enables a simple distributed-like control procedure. The proposed approach is expected to achieve the scalability and flexibility supporting more than 10 Tbps link bandwidth and more than 100,000 endpoints with 40 WDM channels. The proposed interconnect architecture offers direct end-to-end optical paths enabling low latencies with the "speed of light". The paper also discusses some of the challenges which should be resolved to practically realize the future large bandwidth optical interconnect networks.

  11. Discrete-time systems with random switches: From systems stability to networks synchronization

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yao; Lin, Wei; Ho, Daniel W. C.

    2016-03-15

    In this article, we develop some approaches, which enable us to more accurately and analytically identify the essential patterns that guarantee the almost sure stability of discrete-time systems with random switches. We allow for the case that the elements in the switching connection matrix even obey some unbounded and continuous-valued distributions. In addition to the almost sure stability, we further investigate the almost sure synchronization in complex dynamical networks consisting of randomly connected nodes. Numerical examples illustrate that a chaotic dynamics in the synchronization manifold is preserved when statistical parameters enter some almost sure synchronization region established by the developed approach. Moreover, some delicate configurations are considered on probability space for ensuring synchronization in networks whose nodes are described by nonlinear maps. Both theoretical and numerical results on synchronization are presented by setting only a few random connections in each switch duration. More interestingly, we analytically find it possible to achieve almost sure synchronization in the randomly switching complex networks even with very large population sizes, which cannot be easily realized in non-switching but deterministically connected networks.

  12. Design and Analysis of Packet Switched Networks for Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Custodi, G.L.

    1999-08-11

    This paper contains a methodology for analyzing and designing a computer network for application to complex control systems. The focus is on the analysis and design of a local area network (LAN) for realizing the high-level control network that interconnects input-output controllers with devices for monitoring and analysis and with high-level controllers such as supervisory PLCs. Part of the development given in this paper can also be applied to the device-level network (fieldbus) that interconnects input-output controllers with sensors, actuators, and other devices in the system being controlled. The high-level network and the device-level network form a two-layer architecture that is typical in control applications. A procedure is given for generating a network design with a hierarchical hub topology having full redundancy. Then in terms of a graph model of the network, procedures are given for studying network availability and analyzing the information flow rates through the links and internal nodes of the network'

  13. Study on Congestion and Bursting in Small-World Networks with Time Delay from the Viewpoint of Nonlinear Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Liu, Li-Guang; Wang, Hang

    2012-06-01

    The small-world network model represented by a set of evolution equations with time delay is used to investigate the nonlinear dynamics of networks, and the nature of instability phenomena in traffic, namely, congestion and bursting in the networks, are studied and explained from bifurcation analysis. Then, the governing equation in the vector field is further reduced into a map, and the ensuing period-doubling bifurcation, sequence of period-doubling bifurcation and period-3 are studied intuitively. The existence of chaos is verified numerically. In particular, the influences of time delay on the nonlinear dynamics are presented. The results show that there are a rich variety of nonlinear dynamics related to the intermittency of the traffic flows in the system, and the results can gain a fundamental understanding of the instability in the networks, and the time delay can be used as a key parameter in the control of the systems.

  14. Analyzing Space-Based Interferometric Measurements of Stars and Network Measurements of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taff, L. G.

    1998-01-01

    Since the announcement of the discovery of sources of bursts of gamma-ray radiation in 1973, hundreds more reports of such bursts have now been published. Numerous artificial satellites have been equipped with gamma-ray detectors including the very successful Compton Gamma Ray Observatory BATSE instrument. Unfortunately, we have made no progress in identifying the source(s) of this high energy radiation. We suspected that this was a consequence of the method used to define gamma-ray burst source "error boxes." An alternative procedure to compute gamma-ray burst source positions, with a purely physical underpinning, was proposed in 1988 by Taff. Since then we have also made significant progress in understanding the analytical nature of the triangulation problem and in computing actual gamma-ray burst positions and their corresponding error boxes. For the former, we can now mathematically illustrate the crucial role of the area occupied by the detectors, while for the latter, the Atteia et al. (1987) catalog has been completely re-reduced. There are very few discrepancies in locations between our results and those of the customary "time difference of arrival" procedure. Thus, we have numerically demonstrated that the end result, for the positions, of these two very different-looking procedures is the same. Finally, for the first time, we provide a sample of realistic "error boxes" whose non-simple shapes vividly portray the difficulty of burst source localization.

  15. Proposal of a multi-layer network architecture for OBS/GMPLS network interworking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongxiang; Tsuritani, Takehiro; Yin, Yawei; Otani, Tomohiro; Wu, Jian

    2007-11-01

    In order to enable the existing optical circuit switching (OCS) network to support both wavelength and subwavelength granularities, this paper proposes overlay-based multi-layer network architecture for interworking the generalized multi-protocol label switching (GMPLS) controlled OCS network with optical burst switching (OBS) networks. A dedicated GMPLS border controller with necessary GMPLS extensions, including group label switching path (LSP) provisioning, node capability advertisement, and standard wavelength label as well as wavelength availability advertisement, is introduced in this multi-layer network to enable a simple but flexible interworking operation. The feasibility of this proposal is experimentally confirmed by demonstrating an OBS/GMPLS testbed, in which the extended node capability advertisement and group LSP functions successfully enabled the burst header packet (BHP) and data burst (DB) to transmit over a GMPLS-controlled transparent OCS network.

  16. High-density, fail-in-place switches for computer and data networks

    DOEpatents

    Coteus, Paul W.; Doany, Fuad E.; Hall, Shawn A.; Schultz, Mark D.; Takken, Todd E.; Tian, Shurong

    2017-04-25

    A structure for a network switch. The network switch may include a plurality of spine chips arranged on a plurality of spine cards, where one or more spine chips are located on each spine card; and a plurality of leaf chips arranged on a plurality of leaf cards, wherein one or more leaf chips are located on each leaf card, where each spine card is connected to every leaf chip and the plurality of spine chips are surrounded on at least two sides by leaf cards.

  17. Finite-time boundedness and stabilization of uncertain switched neural networks with time-varying delay.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuanyuan; Cao, Jinde; Alofi, Abdulaziz; Al-Mazrooei, Abdullah; Elaiw, Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    This paper deals with the finite-time boundedness and stabilization problem for a class of switched neural networks with time-varying delay and parametric uncertainties. Based on Lyapunov-like function method and average dwell time technique, some sufficient conditions are derived to guarantee the finite-time boundedness of considered uncertain switched neural networks. Furthermore, the state feedback controller is designed to solve the finite-time stabilization problem. Moreover, the proposed sufficient conditions can be simplified into the form of linear matrix equalities for conveniently using Matlab LMI toolbox. Finally, two numerical examples are given to show the effectiveness of the main results.

  18. Finite time control of uncertain networked switched linear systems with quantizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoling; Zhou, Guopeng; Tian, Fengxia; Liu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the finite-time control problem for uncertain networked switched linear systems with both state and control input quantizations. By employing average well dwell time (ADT) and Lyapunov-like function method, a feedback controller is designed to guarantee that the dynamic augment closed-loop system is finite-time boundedness. Then based on this, some sufficient conditions which ensure the finite-time boundedness of networked switched systems are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities. Finally, a numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed design approach.

  19. Electrooptical adaptive switching network for the hypercube computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, E.; Peterson, J.

    1988-01-01

    An all-optical network design for the hyperswitch network using regular free-space interconnects between electronic processor nodes is presented. The adaptive routing model used is described, and an adaptive routing control example is presented. The design demonstrates that existing electrooptical techniques are sufficient for implementing efficient parallel architectures without the need for more complex means of implementing arbitrary interconnection schemes. The electrooptical hyperswitch network significantly improves the communication performance of the hypercube computer.

  20. Electrooptical adaptive switching network for the hypercube computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, E.; Peterson, J.

    1988-01-01

    An all-optical network design for the hyperswitch network using regular free-space interconnects between electronic processor nodes is presented. The adaptive routing model used is described, and an adaptive routing control example is presented. The design demonstrates that existing electrooptical techniques are sufficient for implementing efficient parallel architectures without the need for more complex means of implementing arbitrary interconnection schemes. The electrooptical hyperswitch network significantly improves the communication performance of the hypercube computer.

  1. Allocation of computer ports within a terminal switching network: an application of queuing theory to gandalf port contenders

    SciTech Connect

    Vahle, M.O.

    1982-03-01

    Queuing theory is applied to the problem of assigning computer ports within a terminal switching network to maximize the likelihood of instant connect. A brief background of the network is included to focus on the statement of the problem.

  2. Climbing Fiber Burst Size and Olivary Sub-threshold Oscillations in a Network Setting

    PubMed Central

    de Jeu, Marcel T. G.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2012-01-01

    The inferior olivary nucleus provides one of the two main inputs to the cerebellum: the so-called climbing fibers. Activation of climbing fibers is generally believed to be related to timing of motor commands and/or motor learning. Climbing fiber spikes lead to large all-or-none action potentials in cerebellar Purkinje cells, overriding any other ongoing activity and silencing these cells for a brief period of time afterwards. Empirical evidence shows that the climbing fiber can transmit a short burst of spikes as a result of an olivary cell somatic spike, potentially increasing the information being transferred to the cerebellum per climbing fiber activation. Previously reported results from in vitro studies suggested that the information encoded in the climbing fiber burst is related to the occurrence of the spike relative to the ongoing sub-threshold membrane potential oscillation of the olivary cell, i.e. that the phase of the oscillation is reflected in the size of the climbing fiber burst. We used a detailed three-compartmental model of an inferior olivary cell to further investigate the possible factors determining the size of the climbing fiber burst. Our findings suggest that the phase-dependency of the burst size is present but limited and that charge flow between soma and dendrite is a major determinant of the climbing fiber burst. From our findings it follows that phenomena such as cell ensemble synchrony can have a big effect on the climbing fiber burst size through dendrodendritic gap-junctional coupling between olivary cells. PMID:23271962

  3. Flexible-rate optical packet generation/detection and label swapping for optical label switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhongying; Li, Juhao; Tian, Yu; Ge, Dawei; Zhu, Paikun; Chen, Yuanxiang; Chen, Zhangyuan; He, Yongqi

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, optical label switching (OLS) gains lots of attentions due to its intrinsic advantages to implement protocol, bit-rate, granularity and data format transparency packet switching. In this paper, we propose a novel scheme to realize flexible-rate optical packet switching for OLS networks. At the transmitter node, flexible-rate packet is generated by parallel modulating different combinations of optical carriers generated from the optical multi-carrier generator (OMCG), among which the low-speed optical label occupies one carrier. At the switching node, label is extracted and re-generated in label processing unit (LPU). The payloads are switched based on routing information and new label is added after switching. At the receiver node, another OMCG serves as local oscillators (LOs) for optical payloads coherent detection. The proposed scheme offers good flexibility for dynamic optical packet switching by adjusting the payload bandwidth and could also effectively reduce the number of lasers, modulators and receivers for packet generation/detection. We present proof-of-concept demonstrations of flexible-rate packet generation/detection and label swapping in 12.5 GHz grid. The influence of crosstalk for cascaded label swapping is also investigated.

  4. Design of a Reliable Wireless Switch for the Intersection Area on Vehicular Telematics Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junghoon; Park, Gyung-Leen; Kwak, Ho-Young; Lee, Sang Joon; Kang, Mikyung

    This paper proposes an efficient message switch scheme for an intersection area in vehicular telematics network, where routing decision may be complex due to dynamic vehicle distribution change. Installed at each corner of an intersection, each switch node opens an external interface to exchange messages with vehicles proceeding to the intersection from the pre-assigned branch, while switching the received messages via the internal interfaces, accessing two shared channels according to slot-based MAC. The difference in the access phases across two channels further enhances the switch speed and message discard ratio. The performance measurement result obtained by simulation using SMPL shows that the proposed scheme can improve the access delay by up to 16.4 %, showing over 85 % delivery ratio for all discard interval range.

  5. Investigations into the Performance of a Distributed Routing Protocol for Packet Switching Networks.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    SWITCHING :-ONCEPr The purpose of aiy communicitions network is to provide paths for the transmission of iaformation. It is desirable that the process ...pa.e switchin; concept requires that each station (rode) iLn the network be capable of processing cer-tainT data corcerning the structare of tha...network. rhis is necessary so --hat the correct :cuti-ng ca.2 be assigned to each packet as it is released oy the nole into the network. T~ process can be

  6. Application of remote power-by-light switching in a simplified BOTDA sensor network.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Mikel; Ullan, Angel; Zornoza, Ander; Loayssa, Alayn; Lopez-Amo, Manuel; Lopez-Higuera, Jose Miguel

    2013-12-17

    We propose and demonstrate the use of spatial multiplexing as a means to reduce the costs of distributed sensing networks. We propose a new scheme in which remote power-by-light switching is deployed to scan multiple branches of a distributed sensing network based on Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis (BOTDA) sensors. A proof-of-concept system is assembled with two 5-km sensor fiber branches that are alternatively monitored using a fast remotely controlled and optically powered optical switch. The multiplexed distributed sensor fibers were located 10 km away from the interrogation unit and a Raman pump is used to remotely power the switch. Furthermore, the deployed BOTDA unit uses an alternative configuration that can lead to simplified setups.

  7. A Fully Implemented 12 × 12 Data Vortex Optical Packet Switching Interconnection Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shacham, Assaf; Small, Benjamin A.; Liboiron-Ladouceur, Odile; Bergman, Keren

    2005-10-01

    A fully functional optical packet switching (OPS) interconnection network based on the data vortex architecture is presented. The photonic switching fabric uniquely capitalizes on the enormous bandwidth advantage of wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) wavelength parallelism while delivering minimal packet transit latency. Utilizing semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA)-based switching nodes and conventional fiber-optic technology, the 12-port system exhibits a capacity of nearly 1 Tb/s. Optical packets containing an eight-wavelength WDM payload with 10 Gb/s per wavelength are routed successfully to all 12 ports while maintaining a bit error rate (BER) of 10-12 or better. Median port-to-port latencies of 110 ns are achieved with a distributed deflection routing network that resolves packet contention on-the-fly without the use of optical buffers and maintains the entire payload path in the optical domain.

  8. Application of Remote Power-by-Light Switching in a Simplified BOTDA Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Mikel; Ullan, Angel; Zornoza, Ander; Loayssa, Alayn; Lopez-Amo, Manuel; Lopez-Higuera, Jose Miguel

    2013-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate the use of spatial multiplexing as a means to reduce the costs of distributed sensing networks. We propose a new scheme in which remote power-by-light switching is deployed to scan multiple branches of a distributed sensing network based on Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis (BOTDA) sensors. A proof-of-concept system is assembled with two 5-km sensor fiber branches that are alternatively monitored using a fast remotely controlled and optically powered optical switch. The multiplexed distributed sensor fibers were located 10 km away from the interrogation unit and a Raman pump is used to remotely power the switch. Furthermore, the deployed BOTDA unit uses an alternative configuration that can lead to simplified setups. PMID:24351644

  9. A Scheme to Optimize Flow Routing and Polling Switch Selection of Software Defined Networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan; Li, Lemin; Ren, Jing; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Yangming; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Shizhong

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at minimizing the communication cost for collecting flow information in Software Defined Networks (SDN). Since flow-based information collecting method requires too much communication cost, and switch-based method proposed recently cannot benefit from controlling flow routing, jointly optimize flow routing and polling switch selection is proposed to reduce the communication cost. To this end, joint optimization problem is formulated as an Integer Linear Programming (ILP) model firstly. Since the ILP model is intractable in large size network, we also design an optimal algorithm for the multi-rooted tree topology and an efficient heuristic algorithm for general topology. According to extensive simulations, it is found that our method can save up to 55.76% communication cost compared with the state-of-the-art switch-based scheme.

  10. Simulation and stability analysis of neural network based control scheme for switched linear systems.

    PubMed

    Singh, H P; Sukavanam, N

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a new adaptive neural network based control scheme for switched linear systems with parametric uncertainty and external disturbance. A key feature of this scheme is that the prior information of the possible upper bound of the uncertainty is not required. A feedforward neural network is employed to learn this upper bound. The adaptive learning algorithm is derived from Lyapunov stability analysis so that the system response under arbitrary switching laws is guaranteed uniformly ultimately bounded. A comparative simulation study with robust controller given in [Zhang L, Lu Y, Chen Y, Mastorakis NE. Robust uniformly ultimate boundedness control for uncertain switched linear systems. Computers and Mathematics with Applications 2008; 56: 1709-14] is presented. Copyright © 2011 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A Scheme to Optimize Flow Routing and Polling Switch Selection of Software Defined Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan; Li, Lemin; Ren, Jing; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Yangming; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Shizhong

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at minimizing the communication cost for collecting flow information in Software Defined Networks (SDN). Since flow-based information collecting method requires too much communication cost, and switch-based method proposed recently cannot benefit from controlling flow routing, jointly optimize flow routing and polling switch selection is proposed to reduce the communication cost. To this end, joint optimization problem is formulated as an Integer Linear Programming (ILP) model firstly. Since the ILP model is intractable in large size network, we also design an optimal algorithm for the multi-rooted tree topology and an efficient heuristic algorithm for general topology. According to extensive simulations, it is found that our method can save up to 55.76% communication cost compared with the state-of-the-art switch-based scheme. PMID:26690571

  12. Multiple Path Static Routing Protocols for Packet Switched Networks.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    has not yet been used in routing schemes implemented in operating networks, although there are plans to incorporate this procedure in future routing...rules and procedures used to develop loop-frea! routing scheses, are extensions of techniques used in network graph theory and flow pattern analysis. The...parameters of interest, of a process that resembles the actual bahavior of a specific ’ system. Thus an evaluation of its performance and other important

  13. Cyclic conductance switching in networks of redox-active molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jianhui; Agustsson, Jon S; Wu, Songmei; Schönenberger, Christian; Calame, Michel; Leroux, Yann; Mayor, Marcel; Jeannin, Olivier; Ran, Ying-Fen; Liu, Shi-Xia; Decurtins, Silvio

    2010-03-10

    Redox-active dithiolated tetrathiafulvalene derivatives (TTFdT) were inserted in two-dimensional nanoparticle arrays to build interlinked networks of molecular junctions. Upon oxidation of the TTFdT to the dication state, we observed a conductance increase of the networks by up to 1 order of magnitude. Successive oxidation and reduction cycles demonstrated a clear switching behavior of the molecular junction conductance. These results show the potential of interlinked nanoparticle arrays as chemical sensors.

  14. Confinement and diffusion modulate bistability and stochastic switching in a reaction network with positive feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Mlynarczyk, Paul J.; Pullen, Robert H.; Abel, Steven M.

    2016-01-07

    Positive feedback is a common feature in signal transduction networks and can lead to phenomena such as bistability and signal propagation by domain growth. Physical features of the cellular environment, such as spatial confinement and the mobility of proteins, play important but inadequately understood roles in shaping the behavior of signaling networks. Here, we use stochastic, spatially resolved kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to explore a positive feedback network as a function of system size, system shape, and mobility of molecules. We show that these physical properties can markedly alter characteristics of bistability and stochastic switching when compared with well-mixed simulations. Notably, systems of equal volume but different shapes can exhibit qualitatively different behaviors under otherwise identical conditions. We show that stochastic switching to a state maintained by positive feedback occurs by cluster formation and growth. Additionally, the frequency at which switching occurs depends nontrivially on the diffusion coefficient, which can promote or suppress switching relative to the well-mixed limit. Taken together, the results provide a framework for understanding how confinement and protein mobility influence emergent features of the positive feedback network by modulating molecular concentrations, diffusion-influenced rate parameters, and spatiotemporal correlations between molecules.

  15. Confinement and diffusion modulate bistability and stochastic switching in a reaction network with positive feedback.

    PubMed

    Mlynarczyk, Paul J; Pullen, Robert H; Abel, Steven M

    2016-01-07

    Positive feedback is a common feature in signal transduction networks and can lead to phenomena such as bistability and signal propagation by domain growth. Physical features of the cellular environment, such as spatial confinement and the mobility of proteins, play important but inadequately understood roles in shaping the behavior of signaling networks. Here, we use stochastic, spatially resolved kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to explore a positive feedback network as a function of system size, system shape, and mobility of molecules. We show that these physical properties can markedly alter characteristics of bistability and stochastic switching when compared with well-mixed simulations. Notably, systems of equal volume but different shapes can exhibit qualitatively different behaviors under otherwise identical conditions. We show that stochastic switching to a state maintained by positive feedback occurs by cluster formation and growth. Additionally, the frequency at which switching occurs depends nontrivially on the diffusion coefficient, which can promote or suppress switching relative to the well-mixed limit. Taken together, the results provide a framework for understanding how confinement and protein mobility influence emergent features of the positive feedback network by modulating molecular concentrations, diffusion-influenced rate parameters, and spatiotemporal correlations between molecules.

  16. Confinement and diffusion modulate bistability and stochastic switching in a reaction network with positive feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynarczyk, Paul J.; Pullen, Robert H.; Abel, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Positive feedback is a common feature in signal transduction networks and can lead to phenomena such as bistability and signal propagation by domain growth. Physical features of the cellular environment, such as spatial confinement and the mobility of proteins, play important but inadequately understood roles in shaping the behavior of signaling networks. Here, we use stochastic, spatially resolved kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to explore a positive feedback network as a function of system size, system shape, and mobility of molecules. We show that these physical properties can markedly alter characteristics of bistability and stochastic switching when compared with well-mixed simulations. Notably, systems of equal volume but different shapes can exhibit qualitatively different behaviors under otherwise identical conditions. We show that stochastic switching to a state maintained by positive feedback occurs by cluster formation and growth. Additionally, the frequency at which switching occurs depends nontrivially on the diffusion coefficient, which can promote or suppress switching relative to the well-mixed limit. Taken together, the results provide a framework for understanding how confinement and protein mobility influence emergent features of the positive feedback network by modulating molecular concentrations, diffusion-influenced rate parameters, and spatiotemporal correlations between molecules.

  17. Gene switching rate determines response to extrinsic perturbations in the self-activation transcriptional network motif.

    PubMed

    de Franciscis, Sebastiano; Caravagna, Giulio; Mauri, Giancarlo; d'Onofrio, Alberto

    2016-06-03

    Gene switching dynamics is a major source of randomness in genetic networks, also in the case of large concentrations of the transcription factors. In this work, we consider a common network motif - the positive feedback of a transcription factor on its own synthesis - and assess its response to extrinsic noises perturbing gene deactivation in a variety of settings where the network might operate. These settings are representative of distinct cellular types, abundance of transcription factors and ratio between gene switching and protein synthesis rates. By investigating noise-induced transitions among the different network operative states, our results suggest that gene switching rates are key parameters to shape network response to external perturbations, and that such response depends on the particular biological setting, i.e. the characteristic time scales and protein abundance. These results might have implications on our understanding of irreversible transitions for noise-related phenomena such as cellular differentiation. In addition these evidences suggest to adopt the appropriate mathematical model of the network in order to analyze the system consistently to the reference biological setting.

  18. Gene switching rate determines response to extrinsic perturbations in the self-activation transcriptional network motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Franciscis, Sebastiano; Caravagna, Giulio; Mauri, Giancarlo; D’Onofrio, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Gene switching dynamics is a major source of randomness in genetic networks, also in the case of large concentrations of the transcription factors. In this work, we consider a common network motif - the positive feedback of a transcription factor on its own synthesis - and assess its response to extrinsic noises perturbing gene deactivation in a variety of settings where the network might operate. These settings are representative of distinct cellular types, abundance of transcription factors and ratio between gene switching and protein synthesis rates. By investigating noise-induced transitions among the different network operative states, our results suggest that gene switching rates are key parameters to shape network response to external perturbations, and that such response depends on the particular biological setting, i.e. the characteristic time scales and protein abundance. These results might have implications on our understanding of irreversible transitions for noise-related phenomena such as cellular differentiation. In addition these evidences suggest to adopt the appropriate mathematical model of the network in order to analyze the system consistently to the reference biological setting.

  19. Gene switching rate determines response to extrinsic perturbations in the self-activation transcriptional network motif

    PubMed Central

    de Franciscis, Sebastiano; Caravagna, Giulio; Mauri, Giancarlo; d’Onofrio, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Gene switching dynamics is a major source of randomness in genetic networks, also in the case of large concentrations of the transcription factors. In this work, we consider a common network motif - the positive feedback of a transcription factor on its own synthesis - and assess its response to extrinsic noises perturbing gene deactivation in a variety of settings where the network might operate. These settings are representative of distinct cellular types, abundance of transcription factors and ratio between gene switching and protein synthesis rates. By investigating noise-induced transitions among the different network operative states, our results suggest that gene switching rates are key parameters to shape network response to external perturbations, and that such response depends on the particular biological setting, i.e. the characteristic time scales and protein abundance. These results might have implications on our understanding of irreversible transitions for noise-related phenomena such as cellular differentiation. In addition these evidences suggest to adopt the appropriate mathematical model of the network in order to analyze the system consistently to the reference biological setting. PMID:27256916

  20. Adaptive role switching promotes fairness in networked ultimatum game.

    PubMed

    Wu, Te; Fu, Feng; Zhang, Yanling; Wang, Long

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, mechanisms favoring fair split in the ultimatum game have attracted growing interests because of its practical implications for international bargains. In this game, two players are randomly assigned two different roles respectively to split an offer: the proposer suggests how to split and the responder decides whether or not to accept it. Only when both agree is the offer successfully split; otherwise both get nothing. It is of importance and interest to break the symmetry in role assignment especially when the game is repeatedly played in a heterogeneous population. Here we consider an adaptive role assignment: whenever the split fails, the two players switch their roles probabilistically. The results show that this simple feedback mechanism proves much more effective at promoting fairness than other alternatives (where, for example, the role assignment is based on the number of neighbors).

  1. Demonstration of dynamic point-to-multipoint LSPs in automatic switched optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weiqiang; Wei, Xueqing; Zhang, Guoyin; Jin, Yaohui; Sun, Jun; Guo, Wei; Hu, Weisheng

    2005-11-01

    Automatic Switched Optical Networks, or ASON, is regarded as one promising networking technology for future optical networks. From network operators' perspective, it is well agreed that ASON should provide the following features: fast provisioning, easier network operation, higher network reliability, scalability, simpler planning and design, and multi-vendor inter-operability. Fast provisioning enables ASON to meet the requirements of more dynamic applications such as bandwidth on demand and content distribution. Protection and restoration is crucial because of the extremely high data-rate the network will carry. Mesh type network and fast provisioning capability leave more space for a more reliable and flexible network. Unlike traditional transport networks that are constructed purely for point-to-point connectivity, ASON deployed in regional or metro-area networks needs to provide high connectivity to its clients. And, as a result, the planning and designing problem becomes very complex due to the large number of devices, the variety of interface types and network protocols. It is also important that the network will be able to inter-connect devices from different vendors and provide support to different client signals such as SONET/SDH, Ethernet, IP, ATM and Frame Relay.

  2. Robust control of uncertain nonlinear switched genetic regulatory networks with time delays: A redesign approach.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Hojjatullah; Majd, Vahid Johari

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the problem of robust stability of nonlinear genetic regulatory networks (GRNs) is investigated. The developed method is an integral sliding mode control based redesign for a class of perturbed dissipative switched GRNs with time delays. The control law is redesigned by modifying the dissipativity-based control law that was designed for the unperturbed GRNs with time delays. The switched GRNs are switched from one mode to another based on time, state, etc. Although, the active subsystem is known in any instance, but the switching law and the transition probabilities are not known. The model for each mode is considered affine with matched and unmatched perturbations. The redesigned control law forces the GRN to always remain on the sliding surface and the dissipativity is maintained from the initial time in the presence of the norm-bounded perturbations. The global stability of the perturbed GRNs is maintained if the unperturbed model is globally dissipative. The designed control law for the perturbed GRNs guarantees robust exponential or asymptotic stability of the closed-loop network depending on the type of stability of the unperturbed model. The results are applied to a nonlinear switched GRN, and its convergence to the origin is verified by simulation.

  3. How yawning switches the default-mode network to the attentional network by activating the cerebrospinal fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2014-03-01

    Yawning is a behavior to which little research has been devoted. However, its purpose has not yet been demonstrated and remains controversial. In this article, we propose a new theory involving the brain network that is functional during the resting state, that is, the default mode network. When this network is active, yawning manifests a process of switching to the attentional system through its capacity to increase circulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), thereby increasing clearance of somnogenic factors (prostaglandin D(2), adenosine, and others) accumulating in the cerebrospinal fluid. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Gene regulatory network plasticity predates a switch in function of a conserved transcription regulator

    PubMed Central

    Nocedal, Isabel; Mancera, Eugenio; Johnson, Alexander D

    2017-01-01

    The rewiring of gene regulatory networks can generate phenotypic novelty. It remains an open question, however, how the large number of connections needed to form a novel network arise over evolutionary time. Here, we address this question using the network controlled by the fungal transcription regulator Ndt80. This conserved protein has undergone a dramatic switch in function—from an ancestral role regulating sporulation to a derived role regulating biofilm formation. This switch in function corresponded to a large-scale rewiring of the genes regulated by Ndt80. However, we demonstrate that the Ndt80-target gene connections were undergoing extensive rewiring prior to the switch in Ndt80’s regulatory function. We propose that extensive drift in the Ndt80 regulon allowed for the exploration of alternative network structures without a loss of ancestral function, thereby facilitating the formation of a network with a new function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23250.001 PMID:28327289

  5. Emergent criticality in complex turing B-type atomic switch networks.

    PubMed

    Stieg, Adam Z; Avizienis, Audrius V; Sillin, Henry O; Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Aono, Masakazu; Gimzewski, James K

    2012-01-10

    Recent advances in the neuromorphic operation of atomic switches as individual synapse-like devices demonstrate the ability to process information with both short-term and long-term memorization in a single two terminal junction. Here it is shown that atomic switches can be self-assembled within a highly interconnected network of silver nanowires similar in structure to Turing’s “B-Type unorganized machine”, originally proposed as a randomly connected network of NAND logic gates. In these experimental embodiments,complex networks of coupled atomic switches exhibit emergent criticality similar in nature to previously reported electrical activity of biological brains and neuron assemblies. Rapid fluctuations in electrical conductance display metastability and power law scaling of temporal correlation lengths that are attributed to dynamic reorganization of the interconnected electro-ionic network resulting from induced non-equilibrium thermodynamic instabilities. These collective properties indicate a potential utility for realtime,multi-input processing of distributed sensory data through reservoir computation. We propose these highly coupled, nonlinear electronic networks as an implementable hardware-based platform toward the creation of physically intelligent machines.

  6. The membrane potential waveform of bursting pacemaker neurons is a predictor of their preferred frequency and the network cycle frequency.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hua-an; Nadim, Farzan

    2010-08-11

    Many oscillatory networks involve neurons that exhibit intrinsic rhythmicity but possess a large variety of voltage-gated currents that interact in a complex fashion, making it difficult to determine which factors control frequency. Yet these neurons often have preferred (resonance) frequencies that can be close to the network frequency. Because the preferred frequency results from the dynamics of ionic currents, it can be assumed to depend on parameters that determine the neuron's oscillatory waveform shape. The pyloric network frequency in the crab Cancer borealis is correlated with the preferred frequency of its bursting pacemaker neurons anterior burster and pyloric dilator (PD). We measured the preferred frequency of the PD neuron in voltage clamp, which allows control of the oscillation voltage range and waveforms (sine waves and realistic oscillation waveforms), and showed that (1) the preferred frequency depends on the voltage range of the oscillating voltage waveform; (2) the slope of the waveform near its peak has a strongly negative correlation with the preferred frequency; and (3) correlations between parameters of the PD neuron oscillation waveform and its preferred frequency can be used to predict shifts in the network frequency. As predicted by these results, dynamic clamp shifts of the upper or lower voltage limits of the PD neuron waveform during ongoing oscillations changed the network frequency, consistent with the predictions from the preferred frequency. These results show that the voltage waveform of oscillatory neurons can be predictive of their preferred frequency and thus the network oscillation frequency.

  7. The membrane potential waveform of bursting pacemaker neurons is a predictor of their preferred frequency and the network cycle frequency

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Hua-an; Nadim, Farzan

    2010-01-01

    Many oscillatory networks involve neurons that exhibit intrinsic rhythmicity, but possess a large variety of voltage-gated currents which interact in a complex fashion making it difficult to determine which factors control frequency. Yet, these neurons often have preferred (resonance) frequencies that can be close to the network frequency. Because the preferred frequency results from the dynamics of ionic currents, it can be assumed to depend on parameters that determine the neuron’s oscillatory waveform shape. The pyloric network frequency in the crab Cancer borealis is correlated with the preferred frequency of its bursting pacemaker neurons AB and PD. We measure the preferred frequency of the PD neuron in voltage-clamp, which allows control of the oscillation voltage range and waveforms (sine waves and realistic oscillation waveforms), and showthat1) the preferred frequency depends on the voltage range of the oscillating voltage waveform; 2) the slope of the waveform near its peak has a strongly negative correlation with the preferred frequency; and 3) correlations between parameters of the PD neuron oscillation waveform and its preferred frequency can be used to predict shifts in the network frequency. As predicted by these results, dynamic clamp shifts of the upper or lower voltage limits of the PD neuron waveform during ongoing oscillations changed the network frequency, consistent with the predictions from the preferred frequency. These results show that the voltage waveform of oscillatory neurons can be predictive of their preferred frequency and thus the network oscillation frequency. PMID:20702710

  8. Binary synaptic connections based on memory switching in a-Si:H for artificial neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, A. P.; Lamb, J. L.; Moopenn, A.; Khanna, S. K.

    1987-01-01

    A scheme for nonvolatile associative electronic memory storage with high information storage density is proposed which is based on neural network models and which uses a matrix of two-terminal passive interconnections (synapses). It is noted that the massive parallelism in the architecture would require the ON state of a synaptic connection to be unusually weak (highly resistive). Memory switching using a-Si:H along with ballast resistors patterned from amorphous Ge-metal alloys is investigated for a binary programmable read only memory matrix. The fabrication of a 1600 synapse test array of uniform connection strengths and a-Si:H switching elements is discussed.

  9. Binary synaptic connections based on memory switching in a-Si:H for artificial neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, A. P.; Lamb, J. L.; Moopenn, A.; Khanna, S. K.

    1987-01-01

    A scheme for nonvolatile associative electronic memory storage with high information storage density is proposed which is based on neural network models and which uses a matrix of two-terminal passive interconnections (synapses). It is noted that the massive parallelism in the architecture would require the ON state of a synaptic connection to be unusually weak (highly resistive). Memory switching using a-Si:H along with ballast resistors patterned from amorphous Ge-metal alloys is investigated for a binary programmable read only memory matrix. The fabrication of a 1600 synapse test array of uniform connection strengths and a-Si:H switching elements is discussed.

  10. Agreement Problems in Networks with Directed Graphs and Switching Topology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-02-15

    C–3613. References [1] N. Biggs. Algebraic Graph Theory. Cambridge Tracks in Mathematics. Cambridge University Press , 1974. 15 [2] J. P. Desai, J. P...Springer, 2001. [9] R. A. Horn and C. R. Johnson. Matrix Analysis. Cambridge University Press , 1987. [10] A. Jadbabaie, J. Lin, and S. A. Morse...Networks of Dynamic Agents. Proc. of the American Control Conference, June 2003. [15] F. Paganini , J. Doyle, and S Low. Scalable laws for stable

  11. Synaptic plasticity in neuronal network models can explain patterns of bursting activity seen in temporal lobe epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Kudela, Pawel; Franszczuk, Piotr J; Bergey, Gregory K

    2004-01-01

    High-resolution time-frequency analyses of ictal EEG allow for identification and characterization of ictal patterns. These patterns reflect alterations in the brain network synchrony. It is not clear why seizures undergo these dynamical changes and what mechanisms contribute to or cause these changes. In this work we use neural modeling studies to address these issues. We investigate the role of synaptic plasticity and nonsynaptic neuronal plasticity (firing frequency adaptation) in regulating pattern of neuronal network synchrony. We show that nonsynaptic neuronal plasticity (i.e. calcium dependent afterhyperpolarization in neurons) can regulate the frequency of the dominant rhythm in EEG while synaptic potentiation may be responsible for irregular bursting prior to seizure termination.

  12. Building SDN-Based Agricultural Vehicular Sensor Networks Based on Extended Open vSwitch.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Yan, Siyu; Yang, Fan; Pan, Tian; Liu, Jiang

    2016-01-19

    Software-defined vehicular sensor networks in agriculture, such as autonomous vehicle navigation based on wireless multi-sensor networks, can lead to more efficient precision agriculture. In SDN-based vehicle sensor networks, the data plane is simplified and becomes more efficient by introducing a centralized controller. However, in a wireless environment, the main controller node may leave the sensor network due to the dynamic topology change or the unstable wireless signal, leaving the rest of network devices without control, e.g., a sensor node as a switch may forward packets according to stale rules until the controller updates the flow table entries. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a novel SDN-based vehicular sensor networks architecture which can minimize the performance penalty of controller connection loss. We achieve this by designing a connection state detection and self-learning mechanism. We build prototypes based on extended Open vSwitch and Ryu. The experimental results show that the recovery time from controller connection loss is under 100 ms and it keeps rule updating in real time with a stable throughput. This architecture enhances the survivability and stability of SDN-based vehicular sensor networks in precision agriculture.

  13. Building SDN-Based Agricultural Vehicular Sensor Networks Based on Extended Open vSwitch

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Yan, Siyu; Yang, Fan; Pan, Tian; Liu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Software-defined vehicular sensor networks in agriculture, such as autonomous vehicle navigation based on wireless multi-sensor networks, can lead to more efficient precision agriculture. In SDN-based vehicle sensor networks, the data plane is simplified and becomes more efficient by introducing a centralized controller. However, in a wireless environment, the main controller node may leave the sensor network due to the dynamic topology change or the unstable wireless signal, leaving the rest of network devices without control, e.g., a sensor node as a switch may forward packets according to stale rules until the controller updates the flow table entries. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a novel SDN-based vehicular sensor networks architecture which can minimize the performance penalty of controller connection loss. We achieve this by designing a connection state detection and self-learning mechanism. We build prototypes based on extended Open vSwitch and Ryu. The experimental results show that the recovery time from controller connection loss is under 100 ms and it keeps rule updating in real time with a stable throughput. This architecture enhances the survivability and stability of SDN-based vehicular sensor networks in precision agriculture. PMID:26797616

  14. Evaluation of solar radio bursts' effect on GPS receiver signal tracking within International GPS Service network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiyu; Gao, Yang; Liu, Zhizhao

    2005-06-01

    The direct interference from solar radio bursts (SRB) has not usually been considered as a potential threat to global positioning system (GPS) signal tracking, since the flux densities of most bursts are below 40,000 solar flux units (sfu), a threat threshold to GPS L1 frequency proposed by Klobuchar et al. (1999). Recent analysis indicated that a much lower threshold should be adopted for codeless or semicodeless dual-frequency GPS receivers. In this investigation, severe signal corruptions were found at dayside International GPS Service GPS receiver stations during a large solar radio burst that accompanied the super flare of 28 October 2003. Almost no GPS L2 signals were tracked during the solar flux peak time for areas near the subsolar point. Correlation analysis was performed between the rate of loss of lock on GPS L2 frequency and solar radio flux density at different bands, and a correlation index as high as 0.75 is revealed in the 1415 MHz solar radiation band, which is located between the two GPS operating frequencies L2 (1227.60 MHz) and L1 (1575.42 MHz). The correlation analysis indicates that GPS signal losses of lock were primarily caused by microwave in-band interference and that the threat threshold of SRB effects on the GPS system should be re-evaluated, since the flux density of the burst at 1415 MHz was just 4,000-12,000 sfu, which is far below the previously proposed threat threshold. The signal-tracking performance of different types of GPS receivers during such a super flare event is also presented.

  15. Application of artificial neural network to search for gravitational-wave signals associated with short gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyungmin; Harry, Ian W.; Hodge, Kari A.; Kim, Young-Min; Lee, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Hyun Kyu; Oh, John J.; Oh, Sang Hoon; Son, Edwin J.

    2015-12-01

    We apply a machine learning algorithm, the artificial neural network, to the search for gravitational-wave signals associated with short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The multi-dimensional samples consisting of data corresponding to the statistical and physical quantities from the coherent search pipeline are fed into the artificial neural network to distinguish simulated gravitational-wave signals from background noise artifacts. Our result shows that the data classification efficiency at a fixed false alarm probability (FAP) is improved by the artificial neural network in comparison to the conventional detection statistic. Specifically, the distance at 50% detection probability at a fixed false positive rate is increased about 8%-14% for the considered waveform models. We also evaluate a few seconds of the gravitational-wave data segment using the trained networks and obtain the FAP. We suggest that the artificial neural network can be a complementary method to the conventional detection statistic for identifying gravitational-wave signals related to the short GRBs.

  16. Shape-Memory Hydrogels: Evolution of Structural Principles To Enable Shape Switching of Hydrophilic Polymer Networks.

    PubMed

    Löwenberg, Candy; Balk, Maria; Wischke, Christian; Behl, Marc; Lendlein, Andreas

    2017-02-15

    The ability of hydrophilic chain segments in polymer networks to strongly interact with water allows the volumetric expansion of the material and formation of a hydrogel. When polymer chain segments undergo reversible hydration depending on environmental conditions, smart hydrogels can be realized, which are able to shrink/swell and thus alter their volume on demand. In contrast, implementing the capacity of hydrogels to switch their shape rather than volume demands more sophisticated chemical approaches and structural concepts. In this Account, the principles of hydrogel network design, incorporation of molecular switches, and hydrogel microstructures are summarized that enable a spatially directed actuation of hydrogels by a shape-memory effect (SME) without major volume alteration. The SME involves an elastic deformation (programming) of samples, which are temporarily fixed by reversible covalent or physical cross-links resulting in a temporary shape. The material can reverse to the original shape when these molecular switches are affected by application of a suitable stimulus. Hydrophobic shape-memory polymers (SMPs), which are established with complex functions including multiple or reversible shape-switching, may provide inspiration for the molecular architecture of shape-memory hydrogels (SMHs), but cannot be identically copied in the world of hydrophilic soft materials. For instance, fixation of the temporary shape requires cross-links to be formed also in an aqueous environment, which may not be realized, for example, by crystalline domains from the hydrophilic main chains as these may dissolve in presence of water. Accordingly, dual-shape hydrogels have evolved, where, for example, hydrophobic crystallizable side chains have been linked into hydrophilic polymer networks to act as temperature-sensitive temporary cross-links. By incorporating a second type of such side chains, triple-shape hydrogels can be realized. Considering the typically given light

  17. Sandia`s network for supercomputing `95: Validating the progress of Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switching

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, T.J.; Vahle, O.; Gossage, S.A.

    1996-04-01

    The Advanced Networking Integration Department at Sandia National Laboratories has used the annual Supercomputing conference sponsored by the IEEE and ACM for the past three years as a forum to demonstrate and focus communication and networking developments. For Supercomputing `95, Sandia elected: to demonstrate the functionality and capability of an AT&T Globeview 20Gbps Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switch, which represents the core of Sandia`s corporate network, to build and utilize a three node 622 megabit per second Paragon network, and to extend the DOD`s ACTS ATM Internet from Sandia, New Mexico to the conference`s show floor in San Diego, California, for video demonstrations. This paper documents those accomplishments, discusses the details of their implementation, and describes how these demonstrations supports Sandia`s overall strategies in ATM networking.

  18. Ground-based gamma-ray burst follow-up efforts: Results of the first two years of the BATSE/COMPTEL/NMSU rapid response network

    SciTech Connect

    The Macho Collaboration

    1996-03-01

    In this paper we describe the capabilities of the BATSE/COMPTEL/NMSU Rapid Response Network and report on results obtained during its first 2 years of operation. This network is a worldwide association of 22 radio and optical observatories that perform follow-up searches of newly discovered gamma-ray burst error boxes by the {ital Compton} {ital Gamma} {ital Ray} {ital Observatory}. During the last 2 years, it has deeply imaged 10 gamma-ray error boxes over time frames from a few hours to a month after burst detection, and it finds no sources that can be associated unambiguously with a gamma-ray burst. {ital We} {ital suggest} {ital that} {ital significant} {ital optical} {ital or} {ital radio} {ital emission} {ital is} {ital not} {ital produced} {ital by} {ital gamma}-{ital ray} {ital bursts} {ital more} {ital than} {ital a} {ital day} {ital after} {ital the} {ital burst}. This result is consistent with recent theoretical models by Katz, Papathanassiou, and Paczy{acute n}ski & Rhoads; however, our hours to days optical response time and radio sensitivity limits allow only a weak constraint to be placed on these models. Based upon this study and other published works, we suggest that future work should concentrate on acquiring deep optical images ({ital m}{ge}12) of small gamma-ray error boxes well within a day of the burst. Ideally, radio observations should begin as soon after the burst as possible, reach a sensitivity of {le}1 mJy, and be continued with occasional images being acquired for at least a month following burst detection. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Astronomical Society.}

  19. Bistability in a Metabolic Network Underpins the De Novo Evolution of Colony Switching in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    PubMed Central

    Gallie, Jenna; Libby, Eric; Bertels, Frederic; Remigi, Philippe; Jendresen, Christian B.; Ferguson, Gayle C.; Desprat, Nicolas; Buffing, Marieke F.; Sauer, Uwe; Beaumont, Hubertus J. E.; Martinussen, Jan; Kilstrup, Mogens; Rainey, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    Phenotype switching is commonly observed in nature. This prevalence has allowed the elucidation of a number of underlying molecular mechanisms. However, little is known about how phenotypic switches arise and function in their early evolutionary stages. The first opportunity to provide empirical insight was delivered by an experiment in which populations of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 evolved, de novo, the ability to switch between two colony phenotypes. Here we unravel the molecular mechanism behind colony switching, revealing how a single nucleotide change in a gene enmeshed in central metabolism (carB) generates such a striking phenotype. We show that colony switching is underpinned by ON/OFF expression of capsules consisting of a colanic acid-like polymer. We use molecular genetics, biochemical analyses, and experimental evolution to establish that capsule switching results from perturbation of the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. Of central importance is a bifurcation point at which uracil triphosphate is partitioned towards either nucleotide metabolism or polymer production. This bifurcation marks a cell-fate decision point whereby cells with relatively high pyrimidine levels favour nucleotide metabolism (capsule OFF), while cells with lower pyrimidine levels divert resources towards polymer biosynthesis (capsule ON). This decision point is present and functional in the wild-type strain. Finally, we present a simple mathematical model demonstrating that the molecular components of the decision point are capable of producing switching. Despite its simple mutational cause, the connection between genotype and phenotype is complex and multidimensional, offering a rare glimpse of how noise in regulatory networks can provide opportunity for evolution. PMID:25763575

  20. Dynamic rewiring of the Drosophila retinal determination network switches its function from selector to differentiation.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Mardelle; Jiang, Yuwei; Sansores-Garcia, Leticia; Jusiak, Barbara; Halder, Georg; Mardon, Graeme

    2013-08-01

    Organ development is directed by selector gene networks. Eye development in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is driven by the highly conserved selector gene network referred to as the "retinal determination gene network," composed of approximately 20 factors, whose core comprises twin of eyeless (toy), eyeless (ey), sine oculis (so), dachshund (dac), and eyes absent (eya). These genes encode transcriptional regulators that are each necessary for normal eye development, and sufficient to direct ectopic eye development when misexpressed. While it is well documented that the downstream genes so, eya, and dac are necessary not only during early growth and determination stages but also during the differentiation phase of retinal development, it remains unknown how the retinal determination gene network terminates its functions in determination and begins to promote differentiation. Here, we identify a switch in the regulation of ey by the downstream retinal determination genes, which is essential for the transition from determination to differentiation. We found that central to the transition is a switch from positive regulation of ey transcription to negative regulation and that both types of regulation require so. Our results suggest a model in which the retinal determination gene network is rewired to end the growth and determination stage of eye development and trigger terminal differentiation. We conclude that changes in the regulatory relationships among members of the retinal determination gene network are a driving force for key transitions in retinal development.

  1. All-optical cross-bar network architecture using TOAD based interferometric switch and designing of reconfigurable logic unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanay

    2011-12-01

    The design of all-optical 2 × 2 Terahertz Optical Asymmetric Demultiplexer (TOAD) based interferometric switch is proposed and described in this manuscript. Numerical simulation has been done to achieve the performance of the switch. Using this 2 × 2 TOAD based switch, cross-bar network architecture is designed. A reconfigurable logic unit is also proposed in this manuscript, which can perform 16-Boolean logical operations.

  2. Analysis of Hybrid Buffering and Retransmission in OBS Networks.

    PubMed

    Vanitha, D Veera; Sabrigiriraj, M

    2015-01-01

    Burst contention is a major problem in the Optical Burst Switching (OBS) networks. Due to inadequate contention resolution techniques, the burst loss is prominent in OBS. In order to resolve contention fiber delay lines, wavelength converters, deflection routing, burst segmentation, and retransmission are used. Each one has its own limitations. In this paper, a new hybrid scheme is proposed which combines buffering and retransmission, which increases the mean number of bursts processed in the system. In this hybrid method, retransmission with controllable arrival and uncontrollable arrival is analyzed. Normally all the bursts reach the first hop and few of them go for second hop to reach destination. After all the bursts reach the destination the server may go for maintenance activity or wait for the arrival of next burst. We model it as a batch arrival single server retrial queue with buffer. Numerical results are analyzed to show the mean number of bursts processed in the system with uncontrollable arrival and controllable arrivals.

  3. Stability analysis for uncertain switched neural networks with time-varying delay.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wenwen; Zeng, Zhigang; Wang, Leimin

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, stability for a class of uncertain switched neural networks with time-varying delay is investigated. By exploring the mode-dependent properties of each subsystem, all the subsystems are categorized into stable and unstable ones. Based on Lyapunov-like function method and average dwell time technique, some delay-dependent sufficient conditions are derived to guarantee the exponential stability of considered uncertain switched neural networks. Compared with general results, our proposed approach distinguishes the stable and unstable subsystems rather than viewing all subsystems as being stable, thus getting less conservative criteria. Finally, two numerical examples are provided to show the validity and the advantages of the obtained results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Projective synchronization of fractional-order memristive neural networks with switching jumps mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lingzhong; Yang, Yongqing; Wang, Fei

    2017-04-01

    This paper investigates the projective synchronization of fractional-order memristor-based neural networks (FMNNs) with switching jumps mismatch and time-varying delays. According to the theory of discontinuous differential system (Filippov) and differential inclusions, a fractional order inequality was introduced. Based on notoriously Barbalat's lemma and Razumikhin-type stability theorem, some projective synchronization criteria of FMNNs are derived. These results extend the previous publications. To illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed results, two numerical examples are presented.

  5. Representational switching by dynamical reorganization of attractor structure in a network model of the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Katori, Yuichi; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro; Saito, Naohiro; Tanji, Jun; Mushiake, Hajime; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2011-11-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays a crucial role in flexible cognitive behavior by representing task relevant information with its working memory. The working memory with sustained neural activity is described as a neural dynamical system composed of multiple attractors, each attractor of which corresponds to an active state of a cell assembly, representing a fragment of information. Recent studies have revealed that the PFC not only represents multiple sets of information but also switches multiple representations and transforms a set of information to another set depending on a given task context. This representational switching between different sets of information is possibly generated endogenously by flexible network dynamics but details of underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here we propose a dynamically reorganizable attractor network model based on certain internal changes in synaptic connectivity, or short-term plasticity. We construct a network model based on a spiking neuron model with dynamical synapses, which can qualitatively reproduce experimentally demonstrated representational switching in the PFC when a monkey was performing a goal-oriented action-planning task. The model holds multiple sets of information that are required for action planning before and after representational switching by reconfiguration of functional cell assemblies. Furthermore, we analyzed population dynamics of this model with a mean field model and show that the changes in cell assemblies' configuration correspond to those in attractor structure that can be viewed as a bifurcation process of the dynamical system. This dynamical reorganization of a neural network could be a key to uncovering the mechanism of flexible information processing in the PFC.

  6. Finite-time consensus for leader-following multi-agent systems over switching network topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Feng-Lan; Zhu, Wei

    2013-11-01

    Finite-time consensus problem of the leader-following multi-agent system under switching network topologies is studied in this paper. Based on the graph theory, matrix theory, homogeneity with dilation, and LaSalle's invariance principle, the control protocol of each agent using local information is designed, and the detailed analysis of the leader-following finite-time consensus is provided. Some examples and simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained theoretical results.

  7. All-fiber optical mode switching based on cascaded mode selective couplers for short-reach MDM networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Fang; Li, Juhao; Wu, Zhongying; Yu, Jinyi; Mo, Qi; Wang, Jianping; He, Yongqi; Chen, Zhangyuan; Li, Zhengbin

    2017-04-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate an all-fiber optical mode switching structure supporting independent switching, exchanging, adding, and dropping functionalities in which each mode can be switched individually. The mode switching structure consists of cascaded mode selective couplers (MSCs) capable of exciting and selecting specific higher order modes in few-mode fibers with high efficiency and one multiport optical switch routing the independent spatial modes to their destinations. The data carried on three different spatial modes can be switched, exchanged, added, and dropped through this all-fiber structure. For this experimental demonstration, optical on-off-keying (OOK) signals at 10-Gb/s carried on three spatial modes are successfully processed with open and clear eye diagrams. The mode switch exhibits power penalties of less than 3.1 dB after through operation, less than 2.7 dB after exchange operation, less than 2.8 dB after switching operation, and less than 1.6 dB after mode adding and dropping operations at the bit-error rate (BER) of 10-3, while all three channels carried on three spatial modes are simultaneously routed. The proposed structure, compatible with current optical switching networks based on single-mode fibers, can potentially be used to expand the switching scalability in advanced and flexible short-reach mode-division multiplexing-based networks.

  8. 20 kA PFN capacitor bank with solid-state switching. [pulse forming network for plasma studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posta, S. J.; Michels, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    A compact high-current pulse-forming network capacitor bank using paralleled silicon controlled rectifiers as switches is described. The maximum charging voltage of the bank is 1kV and maximum load current is 20 kA. The necessary switch equalization criteria and performance with dummy load and an arc plasma generator are described.

  9. Burst packet loss concealment using multiple codebooks and comfort noise for CELP-type speech coders in wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Park, Nam In; Kim, Hong Kook; Jung, Min A; Lee, Seong Ro; Choi, Seung Ho

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a packet loss concealment (PLC) algorithm for CELP-type speech coders is proposed in order to improve the quality of decoded speech under burst packet loss conditions in a wireless sensor network. Conventional receiver-based PLC algorithms in the G.729 speech codec are usually based on speech correlation to reconstruct the decoded speech of lost frames by using parameter information obtained from the previous correctly received frames. However, this approach has difficulty in reconstructing voice onset signals since the parameters such as pitch, linear predictive coding coefficient, and adaptive/fixed codebooks of the previous frames are mostly related to silence frames. Thus, in order to reconstruct speech signals in the voice onset intervals, we propose a multiple codebook-based approach that includes a traditional adaptive codebook and a new random codebook composed of comfort noise. The proposed PLC algorithm is designed as a PLC algorithm for G.729 and its performance is then compared with that of the PLC algorithm currently employed in G.729 via a perceptual evaluation of speech quality, a waveform comparison, and a preference test under different random and burst packet loss conditions. It is shown from the experiments that the proposed PLC algorithm provides significantly better speech quality than the PLC algorithm employed in G.729 under all the test conditions.

  10. Real-time multi-channel monitoring of burst-suppression using neural network technology during pediatric status epilepticus treatment.

    PubMed

    Papadelis, Christos; Ashkezari, Seyedeh Fatemeh Salimi; Doshi, Chiran; Thome-Souza, Sigride; Pearl, Phillip L; Grant, P Ellen; Tasker, Robert C; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2016-08-01

    To develop a real-time monitoring system that has the potential to guide the titration of anesthetic agents in the treatment of pediatric status epilepticus (SE). We analyzed stored multichannel electroencephalographic (EEG) data collected from 12 pediatric patients with generalized SE. EEG recordings were initially segmented in 500ms time-windows. Features characterizing the power, frequency, and entropy of the signal were extracted from each segment. The segments were annotated as bursts (B), suppressions (S), or artifacts (A) by two electroencephalographers. The EEG features together with the annotations were inputted in a three-layer feed forward neural network (NN). The sensitivity and specificity of NNs with different architectures and training algorithms to classify segments into B, S, or A were estimated. The maximum sensitivity (95.96% for B, 89.25% for S, and 75% for A) and specificity (89.36 for B, 96.26% for S, and 99.8% for A) was observed for the NN with 10 nodes in the hidden layer. By using this NN, we designed a real-time system that estimates the burst-suppression index (BSI). Our system provides a reliable real-time estimate of multichannel BSI requiring minimal memory and computation time. The system has the potential to assist intensive care unit attendants in the continuous EEG monitoring. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Scheduling of multimedia traffic for continuous media in packet-switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khil, Ara; Maeng, Seungryoul

    1997-01-01

    Many of multimedia applications in distributed systems should transmit continuous audio/video across networks when clients request. Typically, messages for continuous media in packet-switched networks are split into periodic, different sized packets with deadlines. Since clients request different types services, traffic streams are heterogeneous. Furthermore, since the continuity of continuous media should be preserved, non-preemptive scheduling is preferred in multimedia communications. In this paper, we present a new non-preemptive scheduling algorithm which guarantees the timely delivery of more sets of messages for continuous media on a communication link connected to packet-switched networks. It schedules messages by using a heuristic based on the earliest deadline first (EDF) policy. It can always find a feasible schedule for messages which are schedulable by the EDF algorithm. We also present admission control given as sufficient conditions for a set of messages to be schedulable by our scheduling algorithm for controlling the traffic load on a link. If a new request and the previous messages satisfy these conditions, it accepts the new request. The accepted message transmission is done like the circuit-switched transmission non-preemptively. Finally, we show the improvements in performance of our scheduling algorithm by simulation results.

  12. A Quasi-ARX Neural Network with Switching Mechanism to Adaptive Control of Nonlinear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lan; Cheng, Yu; Hu, Jinglu

    This paper introduces an improved quasi-ARX neural network and discusses its application to adaptive control of nonlinear systems. A switching mechanism is employed to improve the performance of the quasi-ARX neural network prediction model which has linear and nonlinear parts. An adaptive controller for a nonlinear system is established based on the proposed prediction model and some stability analysis of the control system is shown. Simulations are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed method both on stability and accuracy.

  13. Fast Switching of Vertical Alignment Liquid Crystal Cells with Liquid Crystalline Polymer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Jong-In; Kim, Ki-Han; Kim, Jae Chang; Yoon, Tae-Hoon; Woo, Hwa Sung; Shin, Sung Tae; Souk, Jun Hyung

    2009-05-01

    This paper reports on the electro-optic characteristics of vertical alignment (VA) liquid crystal (LC) cells with liquid crystalline polymer networks. Optical bouncing, that occurs during the turn-on of VA cells, can be eliminated by introducing in-cell polymer networks. Furthermore, the turn-off also becomes much faster because of the anchoring effect caused by the anisotropy in the molecular shape of the liquid crystalline polymers. These response times have been found to vary for different LC/prepolymer mixtures. When the concentration of the liquid crystalline prepolymer in the initial LC/prepolymer mixture was 3, 5, or 10 wt %, the response times were measured to be 34, 56, and 87% faster than those of a VA cell with pure LC. These switching behaviors of VA cells with liquid crystalline polymer networks are demonstrated and compared with those using pure LC and with polymer networks made of isotropic prepolymers.

  14. A Switching Approach to Designing Finite-Time Synchronization Controllers of Coupled Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Su, Housheng; Chen, Michael Z Q

    2016-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the finite-time synchronization issue of nonlinear coupled neural networks by designing a new switching pinning controller. For the fixed network topology and control strength, the newly designed controller could optimize the synchronization time by regulating a parameter α (0 ≤ α < 1). The control law presented in this paper covers both continuous controllers and discontinuous ones, which were studied separately in the past. Some criteria are discussed in detail on how to shorten the synchronization time for the strongly connected networks. Finally, the results are generalized to any network topologies containing a directed spanning tree, and one numerical example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  15. Robustness of Consensus Algorithms for Networks with Communication Delays and Switching Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shida, Takanobu; Ohmori, Hiromitsu

    In this paper, we study consensus problems of continuous-time multiagent systems. A multiagent system forms a communication network where each agent receives information from its neighbors. This information is used to obtain the control inputs necessary for achieving consensus. It is assumed that delays exist in communication networks. Communication delays are time dependent and differ for each communication channel. In addition, it is assumed that communication networks have switching topologies, and feedback gains are time varying. Under these assumptions, we show that a network system consisting of first-order agents is bounded and find a condition under which it achieves consensus. Stability is shown by using the Lyapunov theorem. In addition, we extend the consensus algorithm for first-order systems to an output consensus algorithm for high-order systems.

  16. The capability of the existing network of installations for detecting the antineutrino burst from collapsing stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalchukov, F. F.; Ryassny, V. G.; Ryazhskaya, O. G.; Zatsepin, G. T.

    1985-08-01

    As the neutrino fluxes can bring information from the internal layers of the collapsing star, the problem of the neutrino burst detection is of importance for both the direct registering of the collapse itself and the investigation of its dynamics. The main characteristics of the neutrino fluxes have been obtained by simulations. The total neutrino flux energy is estimated as 2.5 x 10 to the 53 to 1.4 x 10 to the 54 erg, the energy of NUE flux being 10 to the 53 erg. Predictions on neutrino energy spectra are quite different. Two models of the collapse will be used: the model by Bowers and Wilson, hereafter BW, and the model by Nadyozhin and Otroschenko (NO). The NUe spectrum in the BW-model reaches the maximum at E maxNU = 8 MeV. Average energy of NUE Enu approx. = 10 MeV. The NO-model gives E maxNu = 10.5 MeV and Enu = 12.6 MeV. The NUE-burst duration is DELTA tauNU = 20s for the NO-model. As the black hole formation is the result of the star collapse in the BW-model, DELTA taunu is taken to be 5s.

  17. The capability of the existing network of installations for detecting the antineutrino burst from collapsing stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalchukov, F. F.; Ryassny, V. G.; Ryazhskaya, O. G.; Zatsepin, G. T.

    1985-01-01

    As the neutrino fluxes can bring information from the internal layers of the collapsing star, the problem of the neutrino burst detection is of importance for both the direct registering of the collapse itself and the investigation of its dynamics. The main characteristics of the neutrino fluxes have been obtained by simulations. The total neutrino flux energy is estimated as 2.5 x 10 to the 53 to 1.4 x 10 to the 54 erg, the energy of NU sub E flux being 10 to the 53 erg. Predictions on neutrino energy spectra are quite different. Two models of the collapse will be used: the model by Bowers and Wilson, hereafter BW, and the model by Nadyozhin and Otroschenko (NO). The NU sub e spectrum in the BW-model reaches the maximum at E max sub NU = 8 MeV. Average energy of NU sub E E sub nu approx. = 10 MeV. The NO-model gives E max sub Nu = 10.5 MeV and E sub nu = 12.6 MeV. The NU sub E-burst duration is DELTA tau sub NU = 20s for the NO-model. As the black hole formation is the result of the star collapse in the BW-model, DELTA tau sub nu is taken to be 5s.

  18. Spin filtering and switching action in a diamond network with magnetic-nonmagnetic atomic distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Biplab; Dutta, Paramita

    2016-09-01

    We propose a simple model quantum network consisting of diamond-shaped plaquettes with deterministic distribution of magnetic and non-magnetic atoms in presence of a uniform external magnetic flux in each plaquette and predict that such a simple model can be a prospective candidate for spin filter as well as flux driven spintronic switch. The orientations and the amplitudes of the substrate magnetic moments play a crucial role in the energy band engineering of the two spin channels which essentially gives us a control over the spin transmission leading to a spin filtering effect. The externally tunable magnetic flux plays an important role in inducing a switch on-switch off effect for both the spin states indicating the behavior like a spintronic switch. Even a correlated disorder configuration in the on-site potentials and in the magnetic moments may lead to disorder-induced spin filtering phenomenon where one of the spin channel gets entirely blocked leaving the other one transmitting over the entire allowed energy regime. All these features are established by evaluating the density of states and the two terminal transmission probabilities using the transfer-matrix formalism within a tight-binding framework. Experimental realization of our theoretical study may be helpful in designing new spintronic devices.

  19. Differentially-charged and sequentially-switched square-wave pulse forming network

    DOEpatents

    North, George G. [Stockton, CA; Vogilin, George E. [Livermore, CA

    1980-04-01

    A pulse forming network for delivering a high-energy square-wave pulse to a load, including a series of inductive-capacitive sections wherein the capacitors are differentially charged higher further from the load. Each charged capacitor is isolated from adjacent sections and the load by means of a normally open switch at the output of each section. The switch between the load and the closest section to the load is closed to begin discharge of the capacitor in that section into the load. During discharge of each capacitor, the voltage thereacross falls to a predetermined potential with respect to the potential across the capacitor in the next adjacent section further from the load. When this potential is reached, it is used to close the switch in the adjacent section further from the load and thereby apply the charge in that section to the load through the adjacent section toward the load. Each successive section further from the load is sequentially switched in this manner to continuously and evenly supply energy to the load over the period of the pulse, with the differentially charged capacitors providing higher potentials away from the load to compensate for the voltage drop across the resistance of each inductor. This arrangement is low in cost and yet provides a high-energy pulse in an acceptable square-wave form.

  20. Differentially-charged and sequentially-switched square-wave pulse forming network

    DOEpatents

    North, G.G.; Vogilin, G.E.

    1980-04-01

    Disclosed is a pulse forming network for delivering a high-energy square-wave pulse to a load, including a series of inductive-capacitive sections wherein the capacitors are differentially charged higher further from the load. Each charged capacitor is isolated from adjacent sections and the load by means of a normally open switch at the output of each section. The switch between the load and the closest section to the load is closed to begin discharge of the capacitor in that section into the load. During discharge of each capacitor, the voltage thereacross falls to a predetermined potential with respect to the potential across the capacitor in the next adjacent section further from the load. When this potential is reached, it is used to close the switch in the adjacent section further from the load and thereby apply the charge in that section to the load through the adjacent section toward the load. Each successive section further from the load is sequentially switched in this manner to continuously and evenly supply energy to the load over the period of the pulse, with the differentially charged capacitors providing higher potentials away from the load to compensate for the voltage drop across the resistance of each inductor. This arrangement is low in cost and yet provides a high-energy pulse in an acceptable square-wave form. 5 figs.

  1. Spin filtering and switching action in a diamond network with magnetic-nonmagnetic atomic distribution

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Biplab; Dutta, Paramita

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple model quantum network consisting of diamond-shaped plaquettes with deterministic distribution of magnetic and non-magnetic atoms in presence of a uniform external magnetic flux in each plaquette and predict that such a simple model can be a prospective candidate for spin filter as well as flux driven spintronic switch. The orientations and the amplitudes of the substrate magnetic moments play a crucial role in the energy band engineering of the two spin channels which essentially gives us a control over the spin transmission leading to a spin filtering effect. The externally tunable magnetic flux plays an important role in inducing a switch on-switch off effect for both the spin states indicating the behavior like a spintronic switch. Even a correlated disorder configuration in the on-site potentials and in the magnetic moments may lead to disorder-induced spin filtering phenomenon where one of the spin channel gets entirely blocked leaving the other one transmitting over the entire allowed energy regime. All these features are established by evaluating the density of states and the two terminal transmission probabilities using the transfer-matrix formalism within a tight-binding framework. Experimental realization of our theoretical study may be helpful in designing new spintronic devices. PMID:27600958

  2. Simultaneous and coordinated rotational switching of all molecular rotors in a network.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Kersell, H; Stefak, R; Echeverria, J; Iancu, V; Perera, U G E; Li, Y; Deshpande, A; Braun, K-F; Joachim, C; Rapenne, G; Hla, S-W

    2016-08-01

    A range of artificial molecular systems has been created that can exhibit controlled linear and rotational motion. In the further development of such systems, a key step is the addition of communication between molecules in a network. Here, we show that a two-dimensional array of dipolar molecular rotors can undergo simultaneous rotational switching when applying an electric field from the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. Several hundred rotors made from porphyrin-based double-decker complexes can be simultaneously rotated when in a hexagonal rotor network on a Cu(111) surface by applying biases above 1 V at 80 K. The phenomenon is observed only in a hexagonal rotor network due to the degeneracy of the ground-state dipole rotational energy barrier of the system. Defects are essential to increase electric torque on the rotor network and to stabilize the switched rotor domains. At low biases and low initial rotator angles, slight reorientations of individual rotors can occur, resulting in the rotator arms pointing in different directions. Analysis reveals that the rotator arm directions are not random, but are coordinated to minimize energy via crosstalk among the rotors through dipolar interactions.

  3. Simultaneous and coordinated rotational switching of all molecular rotors in a network

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Y.; Kersell, H.; Stefak, R.; ...

    2016-05-09

    A range of artificial molecular systems have been created that can exhibit controlled linear and rotational motion. In the development of such systems, a key step is the addition of communication between molecules in a network. Here, we show that a two-dimensional array of dipolar molecular rotors can undergo simultaneous rotational switching by applying an electric field from the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. Several hundred rotors made from porphyrin-based double-decker complexes can be simultaneously rotated when in a hexagonal rotor network on a Cu(111) surface by applying biases above ±1 V at 80 K. The phenomenon is observedmore » only in a hexagonal rotor network due to the degeneracy of the ground state dipole rotational energy barrier of the system. Defects are essential to increase electric torque on the rotor network and to stabilize the switched rotor domains. At low biases and low initial rotator angles, slight reorientations of individual rotors can occur resulting in the rotator arms pointing in different directions. In conclusion, analysis reveals that the rotator arm directions here are not random, but are coordinated to minimize energy via cross talk among the rotors through dipolar interactions.« less

  4. Simultaneous and coordinated rotational switching of all molecular rotors in a network

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Kersell, H.; Stefak, R.; Echeverria, J.; Iancu, V.; Perera, U. G. E.; Li, Y.; Deshpande, A.; Braun, K. -F.; Joachim, C.; Rapenne, G.; Hla, S. -W.

    2016-05-09

    A range of artificial molecular systems have been created that can exhibit controlled linear and rotational motion. In the development of such systems, a key step is the addition of communication between molecules in a network. Here, we show that a two-dimensional array of dipolar molecular rotors can undergo simultaneous rotational switching by applying an electric field from the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. Several hundred rotors made from porphyrin-based double-decker complexes can be simultaneously rotated when in a hexagonal rotor network on a Cu(111) surface by applying biases above ±1 V at 80 K. The phenomenon is observed only in a hexagonal rotor network due to the degeneracy of the ground state dipole rotational energy barrier of the system. Defects are essential to increase electric torque on the rotor network and to stabilize the switched rotor domains. At low biases and low initial rotator angles, slight reorientations of individual rotors can occur resulting in the rotator arms pointing in different directions. In conclusion, analysis reveals that the rotator arm directions here are not random, but are coordinated to minimize energy via cross talk among the rotors through dipolar interactions.

  5. Simultaneous and coordinated rotational switching of all molecular rotors in a network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Kersell, H.; Stefak, R.; Echeverria, J.; Iancu, V.; Perera, U. G. E.; Li, Y.; Deshpande, A.; Braun, K.-F.; Joachim, C.; Rapenne, G.; Hla, S.-W.

    2016-08-01

    A range of artificial molecular systems has been created that can exhibit controlled linear and rotational motion. In the further development of such systems, a key step is the addition of communication between molecules in a network. Here, we show that a two-dimensional array of dipolar molecular rotors can undergo simultaneous rotational switching when applying an electric field from the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. Several hundred rotors made from porphyrin-based double-decker complexes can be simultaneously rotated when in a hexagonal rotor network on a Cu(111) surface by applying biases above 1 V at 80 K. The phenomenon is observed only in a hexagonal rotor network due to the degeneracy of the ground-state dipole rotational energy barrier of the system. Defects are essential to increase electric torque on the rotor network and to stabilize the switched rotor domains. At low biases and low initial rotator angles, slight reorientations of individual rotors can occur, resulting in the rotator arms pointing in different directions. Analysis reveals that the rotator arm directions are not random, but are coordinated to minimize energy via crosstalk among the rotors through dipolar interactions.

  6. Synchronization in a network of delay coupled maps with stochastically switching topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Mayurakshi; Poria, Swarup

    2016-10-01

    The synchronization behavior of delay coupled chaotic smooth unimodal maps over a ring network with stochastic switching of links at every time step is reported in this paper. It is observed that spatiotemporal synchronization never appears for nearest neighbor connections; however, stochastic switching of connections with homogeneous delay $(\\tau)$ is capable of synchronizing the network to homogeneous steady state or periodic orbit or synchronized chaotically oscillating state depending on the delay parameter, stochasticity parameter and map parameters. Linear stability analysis of the synchronized state is done analytically for unit delay and the value of the critical coupling strength, at which the onset of synchronization occurs is determined analytically. The logistic map $rx(1-x)$ (a smooth unimodal map) is chosen for numerical simulation purpose. Synchronized steady state or synchronized period-2 orbit is stabilized for delay $\\tau=1$. On the other hand for delay $\\tau=2$ the network is stabilized to the fixed point of the local map. Numerical simulation results are in good agreement with the analytically obtained linear stability analysis results. Another interesting observation is the existence of synchronized chaos in the network for delay $\\tau>2$. Calculating synchronization error and plotting time series data and Poincare first return map the existence of synchronized chaos is confirmed. The results hold good for other smooth unimodal maps also.

  7. Novel switching design for finite-time stabilization: Applications to memristor-based neural networks with time-varying delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zuo-Wei; Huang, Jian-Hua; Huang, Li-Hong

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a novel switching control design to solve finite-time stabilization issues of a discontinuous or switching dynamical system. In order to proceed with our analysis, we first design two kinds of switching controllers: switching adaptive controller and switching state-feedback controller. Then, we apply the proposed switching control technique to stabilize the states of delayed memristor-based neural networks (DMNNs) in finite time. Based on a famous finite-time stability theorem, the theory of differential inclusion and the generalized Lyapunov functional method, some sufficient conditions are obtained to guarantee the finite-time stabilization control of DMNNs. The feedback functions of our model are allowed to be unbounded, and the upper bounds of the settling time for stabilization are also given. Finally, the validity of designed method and the theoretical results are illustrated by numerical examples.

  8. Optical node for fast packet-switching networks in the KEOPS project: structure and performance aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaroni, Dominique; Lavigne, Bruno; Tran, Tri; Hamon, Laure; Jourdan, Amaury

    1998-10-01

    The future telecommunication network will have to face the dramatic increase of subscribers as well as the increase of the user bandwidth through new services. All-optical packet switching techniques can become a strategic objective to offer on an unique technology a service-transparent network. In this paper, we will describe in detail the structure of an optical packet switching node developed in the framework of the ACTS 043 KEOPS project. An analysis of the key functions will be reported to fulfill system requirements including cascadability. In particular the input synchronization, the Broadcast-and-select switching matrix and the output regenerative interface will be described and physical performance will be assessed through theoretical analysis: quality of the signal, packet jitter and packet power fluctuation. The electronic circuitry for the control of the components of each sub-block will be described. Finally, experimental validations of a 160 Gbit/s throughput node will be reported. In order to complete the analysis, the logical performance in a Bernoulli-type traffic will be regarded. In particular an optimized buffer including a recirculation loop will be studied. Logical performance exhibiting a packet loss rate lower than 10-9 for a 0.8 load and mean packet delay as low as 3 packet slots will be illustrated, thereby demonstrating full compatibility with ATM constraints. Finally, new perspectives in terms of throughput potential through cascading will be drawn.

  9. Ultra-stable optical amplifier technologies for dynamic optical switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, M.; Tsang, K. S.; Man, R.; Puttnam, B. J.; Awaji, Y.; Wada, N.

    2015-01-01

    High-capacity fiber-optic communications are promising technologies to satisfy people's continuously growing demands for bandwidth hungry data services. Multi-wavelength optical circuit switching (OCS) technology is already widely deployed, however, with the limited number of transceivers equipped at each optical node and other constraints, the number of lightpaths which can be established and employed simultaneously in an optical network is restricted. This reduces the utilization efficiency of wavelength resources. Comparing to OCS, dynamic optical switching systems such as optical packet switching (OPS) offer higher efficiency in terms of wavelength resource utilization and have the potential to share more of the wavelength resources on fiber-links between larger numbers of users simultaneously. In such networks, bursty input signals or changes in traffic density may cause optical power surges that can damage optical components or impose gain transients on the signals that impair signal quality. A common approach for reducing gain transients is to employ electrical automatic gain control (AGC) or optical gain-clamping by optical feedback (OFB). AGC may be limited by the speed of the feedback circuit and result in additional transients. Meanwhile OFB can clamp the gain of power varying optical signals without transient but can introduce amplitude fluctuations caused by relaxation oscillations in the lasing cavity for large input power fluctuations. We propose and demonstrate a novel scheme for suppressing the power transients and the relaxation oscillations. This scheme can be utilized in optical amplifiers even if the optical feedback is employed.

  10. Magnetar Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) was launched in June 2008. During the last five years the instrument has observed several hundreds of bursts from 8 confirmed magnetars and 19 events from unconfirmed sources. I will discuss the results of the GBM magnetar burst catalog, expand on the different properties of their diverse source population, and compare these results with the bursting activity of past sources. I will then conclude with thoughts of how these properties fit the magnetar theoretical models.

  11. Solar Radio Burst Data Processing of CALLISTO and Frequency Drift Rate Determination of Solar Radio Burst Detected by CALLISTO Network in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batubara, M.; Manik, T.; Suryana, R.; Lathif, M.; Sitompul, P.; Zamzam, M.; Mumtahana, F.

    2017-03-01

    Space Science Center of Indonesian Institute of Aeronautics and Space called LAPAN has installed several solar radio receivers named CALLISTO in various parts of Indonesia. The equipment has made some solar radio observational data which is indicate solar radio burst since its operation. All of the observational data stored in the file format of Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) which is the raw data. Therefore, it is required a such kind of related data processing to produce a data that can be used for further research. In this paper will discuss how the observational data of CALLISTO could be generated included the information of data format, CALLISTO data processing techniques used in these activities as well as some of the data processing based on data indicating solar radio bursts. As the results, a map of solar radio spectrum as spectrograph profiles and some determinations of frequency drift base on the data will also be discussed in this paper.

  12. Switching networks for realisation of variable DC transformers coupled to rectangular arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, S.

    1982-06-01

    The process by which the structure of a rectangular array with variable interconnections is changed can be described by an equivalent circuit in which a nonvariable array is coupled to the load by means of a variable 'DC transformer' (DCT). This kind of array can be applied in cases in which it is necessary to match the source and the load, when either one or both are composed of identical elements which can be organized into a rectangular array structure. Applications of the considered approach are related to maximum power trackers of photovoltaic systems, voltage multipliers, electric cars, and a special type of DC/AC convertor. A description is presented of the realization of a variable array by means of switching networks using a minimum number of switching elements.

  13. Asynchronous State Estimation for Discrete-Time Switched Complex Networks With Communication Constraints.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Wang, Qing-Guo; Srinivasan, Dipti; Li, Hongyi; Yu, Li

    2017-03-29

    This paper is concerned with the asynchronous state estimation for a class of discrete-time switched complex networks with communication constraints. An asynchronous estimator is designed to overcome the difficulty that each node cannot access to the topology/coupling information. Also, the event-based communication, signal quantization, and the random packet dropout problems are studied due to the limited communication resource. With the help of switched system theory and by resorting to some stochastic system analysis method, a sufficient condition is proposed to guarantee the exponential stability of estimation error system in the mean-square sense and a prescribed $H∞ performance level is also ensured. The characterization of the desired estimator gains is derived in terms of the solution to a convex optimization problem. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed design approach is demonstrated by a simulation example.

  14. Emergence of switch-like behavior in a large family of simple biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Siegal-Gaskins, Dan; Mejia-Guerra, Maria Katherine; Smith, Gregory D; Grotewold, Erich

    2011-05-01

    Bistability plays a central role in the gene regulatory networks (GRNs) controlling many essential biological functions, including cellular differentiation and cell cycle control. However, establishing the network topologies that can exhibit bistability remains a challenge, in part due to the exceedingly large variety of GRNs that exist for even a small number of components. We begin to address this problem by employing chemical reaction network theory in a comprehensive in silico survey to determine the capacity for bistability of more than 40,000 simple networks that can be formed by two transcription factor-coding genes and their associated proteins (assuming only the most elementary biochemical processes). We find that there exist reaction rate constants leading to bistability in ∼90% of these GRN models, including several circuits that do not contain any of the TF cooperativity commonly associated with bistable systems, and the majority of which could only be identified as bistable through an original subnetwork-based analysis. A topological sorting of the two-gene family of networks based on the presence or absence of biochemical reactions reveals eleven minimal bistable networks (i.e., bistable networks that do not contain within them a smaller bistable subnetwork). The large number of previously unknown bistable network topologies suggests that the capacity for switch-like behavior in GRNs arises with relative ease and is not easily lost through network evolution. To highlight the relevance of the systematic application of CRNT to bistable network identification in real biological systems, we integrated publicly available protein-protein interaction, protein-DNA interaction, and gene expression data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and identified several GRNs predicted to behave in a bistable fashion.

  15. Emergence of Switch-Like Behavior in a Large Family of Simple Biochemical Networks

    PubMed Central

    Siegal-Gaskins, Dan; Mejia-Guerra, Maria Katherine; Smith, Gregory D.; Grotewold, Erich

    2011-01-01

    Bistability plays a central role in the gene regulatory networks (GRNs) controlling many essential biological functions, including cellular differentiation and cell cycle control. However, establishing the network topologies that can exhibit bistability remains a challenge, in part due to the exceedingly large variety of GRNs that exist for even a small number of components. We begin to address this problem by employing chemical reaction network theory in a comprehensive in silico survey to determine the capacity for bistability of more than 40,000 simple networks that can be formed by two transcription factor-coding genes and their associated proteins (assuming only the most elementary biochemical processes). We find that there exist reaction rate constants leading to bistability in ∼90% of these GRN models, including several circuits that do not contain any of the TF cooperativity commonly associated with bistable systems, and the majority of which could only be identified as bistable through an original subnetwork-based analysis. A topological sorting of the two-gene family of networks based on the presence or absence of biochemical reactions reveals eleven minimal bistable networks (i.e., bistable networks that do not contain within them a smaller bistable subnetwork). The large number of previously unknown bistable network topologies suggests that the capacity for switch-like behavior in GRNs arises with relative ease and is not easily lost through network evolution. To highlight the relevance of the systematic application of CRNT to bistable network identification in real biological systems, we integrated publicly available protein-protein interaction, protein-DNA interaction, and gene expression data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and identified several GRNs predicted to behave in a bistable fashion. PMID:21589886

  16. Layer-switching cost and optimality in information spreading on multiplex networks

    PubMed Central

    Min, Byungjoon; Gwak, Sang-Hwan; Lee, Nanoom; Goh, K. -I.

    2016-01-01

    We study a model of information spreading on multiplex networks, in which agents interact through multiple interaction channels (layers), say online vs. offline communication layers, subject to layer-switching cost for transmissions across different interaction layers. The model is characterized by the layer-wise path-dependent transmissibility over a contact, that is dynamically determined dependently on both incoming and outgoing transmission layers. We formulate an analytical framework to deal with such path-dependent transmissibility and demonstrate the nontrivial interplay between the multiplexity and spreading dynamics, including optimality. It is shown that the epidemic threshold and prevalence respond to the layer-switching cost non-monotonically and that the optimal conditions can change in abrupt non-analytic ways, depending also on the densities of network layers and the type of seed infections. Our results elucidate the essential role of multiplexity that its explicit consideration should be crucial for realistic modeling and prediction of spreading phenomena on multiplex social networks in an era of ever-diversifying social interaction layers. PMID:26887527

  17. Multicast contention resolution based on time-frequency joint scheduling in elastic optical switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huanlin; Li, Yuan; Peng, Han; Huang, Jun; Kong, Deqian

    2017-01-01

    Resolving the optical multicast contention in optical switch node is an effective approach to improve the performance of elastic optical multicast switch. An optical node architecture integrating with output shared all-optical Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) network coding technology and shared feedback fiber delay lines (FDLs) buffer is designed. And a time-frequency joint scheduling strategy (TFJSS) is proposed. In TFJSS, the maximal weighted independent set algorithm is used to select the output packets with no overlapping spectrum among the contending multicast packets. The remaining contention packets are compressed by OFDM network coding with all-optical XOR operation. Hence, the contention is avoided in spectrum domain by encoding the contending unicast/multicast packets and changing the carrier frequency of encoded packets. If the network coding cannot successfully resolve the contending packets, the shared feedback FDLs are called to address the contention in time domain. Compared with the existing node architecture and scheduling algorithm, the simulation results show that the proposed architecture and the TFJSS can reduce the packet loss probability with low delay largely.

  18. An adaptive ARQ (Automatic Repeat Request) strategy for packet switching data communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guth, Kurtis J.

    1989-06-01

    Automatic Repeat Request (ARQ) techniques are often used by a packet switching data communication network to provide an error-free communications link between stations. The ARQ technique ensures consistent data quality under varying link conditions. Unfortunately, the information throughput is link dependent and as the noise or interference on the link increases, the throughput decreases. In an effort to improve the throughput on a short range, RF, packet switching data communications network, an adaptive ARQ strategy applied to Stop-and-Wait (SW) protocols was developed. To provide a system designer with flexibility, different adaptive strategies for different system and link conditions were developed. Examples of information transfer between two stations using the adaptive SW protocol are presented. A simulation to compute the throughput efficiency of several adaptive SW protocols was performed. A comparison of the throughput efficiencies of the simulated adaptive SW protocol with the non-adaptive SW protocol showed good gains could be achieved using the adaptive strategy when the networks are subject to high channel bit error rates.

  19. A partial risk-disjoint routing algorithm in automatically switched optical network (ASON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianqing; Lu, Yueming; Ji, Yuefeng

    2006-09-01

    For reasons of survivability, many methods have been introduced to Automatically Switched Optical Network (ASON), such as path protection. In path protection, the protection path is risk-disjoint with the working path, which can improve the survivability of network. The complete risk-disjoint routing algorithm (CRDRA) is the most popular algorithm in protection path selection at present, in which the links sharing same risk with those contained in the working path are pruned away from the available resources when calculating protection path. By using this algorithm, the survivability of network can be enhanced; but the number of connections that can be successfully routed over current network drops. In this paper, a partial risk-disjoint routing algorithm (PRDRA) based on shared risk link group (SRLG) is proposed. In this algorithm, the risk-sharing links are not pruned away but had their weight adjusted to a proper value that is larger than normal value but still comparable. Selecting protection path with PRDRA, improved survivability can be achieved while the number of connections that can be successfully routed over current network is kept from serious decline. Routing simulations have been done over mesh networks to compare the two different algorithms. With the simulation results, a conclusion can be made on the performance of different algorithms.

  20. TCP Context Switching Scheme to Enhance Throughput by Adapting Well to Vertical Handoff in Heterogeneous Wireless Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seok, Woojin; Kim, Sang-Ha

    Vertical handoff is a new type of handoff that is triggered when a mobile node moves over heterogeneous wireless networks with each proving different access bandwidth, transmission latency, and coverage. A mobile node can achieve higher throughput by accessing a higher bandwidth providing wireless network. However, TCP has to experience drastic changes of the bandwidth and the latency due to the vertical handoff which must be recognized as a network congestion, and this degrades end-to-end performance. In this paper, we propose a TCP context switching scheme, named Context-Switching TCP, that maintains TCP variables separately for different types of wireless networks. Through simulations, Context-Switching TCP shows higher performance than TCP SACK for vertical handoff. Especially, it shows much higher performance gain when vertical handoff occurs frequently.

  1. All-optical packet header and payload separation for un-slotted optical packet switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Zhang, Min; Ye, Peida

    2005-11-01

    A novel all-optical header and payload separation technique that can be utilized in un-slotted optical packet switched networks is presented. The technique uses a modified TOAD for packet header extraction with differential modulation scheme and two SOAs that perform a simple XOR operation between the packet and its self-derived header to get the separated payload. The main virtue of this system is simple structure and need not any additional continuous pulses. Through numerical simulations, the operating characteristics of the scheme are illustrated. In addition, the parameters of the system are discussed and designed to optimize the operation performance.

  2. A tri-state optical switch for local area network communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simms, Garfield

    1993-01-01

    This novel structure is a heterojunction phototransistor which can be used as an emitter-detector, and when placed in a quiescent mode, the device becomes a passive transmitter. By varying the voltage bias, this novel device will switch between all three modes of operation. Such a device has broad application in network environments with operation speeds of less than 50 MHz and distances of less than 1 km, e.g. automobiles, airplanes, and intra-instrumentation. During this period, the emission mode for this device was studied and mathematically modeled.

  3. Lag Synchronization of Switched Neural Networks via Neural Activation Function and Applications in Image Encryption.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shiping; Zeng, Zhigang; Huang, Tingwen; Meng, Qinggang; Yao, Wei

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates the problem of global exponential lag synchronization of a class of switched neural networks with time-varying delays via neural activation function and applications in image encryption. The controller is dependent on the output of the system in the case of packed circuits, since it is hard to measure the inner state of the circuits. Thus, it is critical to design the controller based on the neuron activation function. Comparing the results, in this paper, with the existing ones shows that we improve and generalize the results derived in the previous literature. Several examples are also given to illustrate the effectiveness and potential applications in image encryption.

  4. A sweep algorithm for massively parallel simulation of circuit-switched networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaujal, Bruno; Greenberg, Albert G.; Nicol, David M.

    1992-01-01

    A new massively parallel algorithm is presented for simulating large asymmetric circuit-switched networks, controlled by a randomized-routing policy that includes trunk-reservation. A single instruction multiple data (SIMD) implementation is described, and corresponding experiments on a 16384 processor MasPar parallel computer are reported. A multiple instruction multiple data (MIMD) implementation is also described, and corresponding experiments on an Intel IPSC/860 parallel computer, using 16 processors, are reported. By exploiting parallelism, our algorithm increases the possible execution rate of such complex simulations by as much as an order of magnitude.

  5. Probing the timing network: A continuous theta burst stimulation study of temporal categorization.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Juan Carlos; Rocchi, Lorenzo; Jahanshahi, Marjan; Rothwell, John; Merchant, Hugo

    2017-07-25

    Time perception in the millisecond and second ranges is thought to be processed by different neural mechanisms. However, whether there is a sharp boundary between these ranges and whether they are implemented in the same, overlapped or separate brain areas is still not certain. To probe the role of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC), the right supplementary motor area (SMA), and the cerebellum on time perception, we temporarily altered their activity on healthy volunteers on separate sessions using transcranial magnetic stimulation with the continuous Theta Burst Stimulation (cTBS) protocol. A control session was reserved for the stimulation of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1). Before and after stimulation, participants were tested on a temporal categorization task using intervals in the hundreds and thousands of milliseconds ranges, as well as on a pitch categorization task which was used as a further control. We then looked for changes in the Relative Threshold and the Constant Error, which, respectively, reflect participants' sensitivity to interval duration and their accuracy at setting an interval that acts as a boundary between categories. We found that after cTBS in all of the studied regions, the Relative Threshold, but not the Constant Error, was affected and only when hundreds of milliseconds intervals were being categorized. Categorization of thousands of milliseconds intervals and of pitch was not affected. These results suggest that the fronto-cerebellar circuit is particularly involved in the estimation of intervals in the hundreds of milliseconds range. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Consensus problem of networked multi-agent systems with constant communication delay: stochastic switching topology case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinhuan; Xie, Dongmei; Yu, Mei

    2012-09-01

    This article proposes an observer-based control strategy for networked multi-agent systems with constant communication delay and stochastic switching topology. First, using the system transformation method, the mean-square consensus problem of multi-agent systems can be converted into the mean-square stability problem of an equivalent system, and some equivalent conditions concerning the mean-square consensus are presented. Then, an example is given to illustrate that the connection weights should be regarded as the parameters to be designed, since they have a great effect on the mean-square consensus of multi-agent systems. By choosing appropriate connection weights, the mean-square consensus problem can be converted into the mean-square stabilisation problem of N-1 delay systems with stochastic switching signal, whose related observer-based stabilisability criteria can be established in the form of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Furthermore, if the LMIs are feasible, the multi-agent systems achieve mean-square consensus if and only if the union of graphs in the switching topology set has a directed spanning tree. Finally, numerical simulations are given to illustrate our results.

  7. Multistage shuffle networks with shortest path and deflection routing for high performance ATM switching: The open-loop Shuffleout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassi, Sandro; Decina, Maurizio; Giacomazzi, Paolo; Pattavina, Achille

    1994-10-01

    A new class of switching architectures for broadband packet networks, called Shuffleout, is described and analyzed in this paper. Shuffleout is basically an output-queued architecture with a multistage interconnection network built out of unbuffered b x 2b switching elements. Its structure is such that the number of cells that can be concurrently switched from the inlets to each output queue equals the number of stages in the interconnection network. The switching element operates the cell self-routing adopting a shortest path algorithm which, in case of conflict for interstage links, is coupled with deflection routing. This paper presents the basic Shuffleout architecture, called Open-Loop Shuffleout, in which the cells that cross the whole interconnection network without entering the addressed output queues are lost. A different version of this architecture, called Closed-Loop Shuffleout, in which cells are allowed to cross the interconnection network several times before entering the appropriate output queue, is described in a companion paper. The key target of the proposed architecture is coupling the implementation feasibility of a self-routing switch with the desirable traffic performance typical of output queueing.

  8. A time-shift scheduling-enabled optical flow switched network architecture and its performance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaowei; Katsukawa, Yosuke; Tajima, Akio; Araki, Soichiro; Kitayama, Ken-ichi

    2011-12-19

    Optical flow switching (OFS) has been proposed as a simple and cost-effective transport technology for users with large transactions (>1 second). In previous studies, a fast wavelength reservation method was deployed for flow transmission in OFS-based networks. However, reserving a single wavelength for users with small transactions encounters a very common problem: inefficient wavelength utilization. In this paper, a flow transmission cycle is introduced to each wavelength, and each cycle consists of multiple slots, so that flows of different transactions can be multiplexed onto a single wavelength. It is assumed that inter-metropolitan area network (MAN) traffic is transported over wide area network (WAN). A global time-shift scheduling methodology taking into account propagation delays in MAN is designed to avoid potential contentions occurring among different flows which are carried by the same wavelength in WAN. The contributions of this paper are, first it provides a new OFS network architecture which can achieve better throughput and average wavelength utilization performance without losing the feature of simple transport structure provided by OFS; second, it is the first time that issues of how OFS networks are managed and controlled are addressed from a system point of view.

  9. High-performance flat data center network architecture based on scalable and flow-controlled optical switching system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabretta, Nicola; Miao, Wang; Dorren, Harm

    2016-03-01

    Traffic in data centers networks (DCNs) is steadily growing to support various applications and virtualization technologies. Multi-tenancy enabling efficient resource utilization is considered as a key requirement for the next generation DCs resulting from the growing demands for services and applications. Virtualization mechanisms and technologies can leverage statistical multiplexing and fast switch reconfiguration to further extend the DC efficiency and agility. We present a novel high performance flat DCN employing bufferless and distributed fast (sub-microsecond) optical switches with wavelength, space, and time switching operation. The fast optical switches can enhance the performance of the DCNs by providing large-capacity switching capability and efficiently sharing the data plane resources by exploiting statistical multiplexing. Benefiting from the Software-Defined Networking (SDN) control of the optical switches, virtual DCNs can be flexibly created and reconfigured by the DCN provider. Numerical and experimental investigations of the DCN based on the fast optical switches show the successful setup of virtual network slices for intra-data center interconnections. Experimental results to assess the DCN performance in terms of latency and packet loss show less than 10^-5 packet loss and 640ns end-to-end latency with 0.4 load and 16- packet size buffer. Numerical investigation on the performance of the systems when the port number of the optical switch is scaled to 32x32 system indicate that more than 1000 ToRs each with Terabit/s interface can be interconnected providing a Petabit/s capacity. The roadmap to photonic integration of large port optical switches will be also presented.

  10. Modulus synchronization in a network of nonlinear systems with antagonistic interactions and switching topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Shidong

    2016-04-01

    This paper studies the collective behavior in a network of nonlinear systems with antagonistic interactions and switching topologies. The concept of modulus synchronization is introduced to characterize the case that the moduli of corresponding components of the agent (node) states reach a synchronization. The network topologies are modeled by a set of directed signed graphs. When all directed signed graphs are structurally balanced and the nonlinear system satisfies a one-sided Lipschitz condition, by using matrix measure and contraction theory, we show that modulus synchronization can be evaluated by the time average of some matrix measures. These matrices are about the second smallest eigenvalue of undirected graphs corresponding to directed signed graphs. Finally, we present two numerical examples to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  11. Alternatives for the introduction of optical packet switching networks in this internet world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaroni, Dominique

    2001-09-01

    With the emergence of new services mixing data, voice and video, the expected increase of the traffic volume together with the modification of its profile creates a need for a high throughput multimedia network. In addition, quality-of- service (QoS) management is currently widely debated at the convergence between ATM and IP communities. In the meantime, WDM is widely deployed, giving access to large transport capacities together with a new dimension for routing purposes. This paper present alternatives for a multi- service optical network infrastructure in this Internet world, where WDM is used not only to increase the throughput but also to differentiate the traffic, to alleviate contention issues and to provide cost-effective solutions. On the same optical infrastructure under a self-sufficient management yet, would coexist different logical sub-networks where different routing techniques are used according to QoS and client protocol requirements. The main objective is to save on the transport cost by optimizing through packet switching techniques the resource utilization according traffic characteristics, while providing enough flexibility to adapt the resources to the evolution of the demand, and maintaining a high transmission quality, as provided by SONET today. This work, capitalizes on InP-based fast optical switching technologies demonstrated within the European ACTS KEIPS project. In this paper, the network concepts, packet format considerations, preferred routing techniques and system architecture will be reported and illustrated through physical and logical analysis. Finally, t < o introduction scenario will be presented: one for the backbone and one for the metro.

  12. Distinctive topologies of partner-switching signaling networks correlate with their physiological roles

    PubMed Central

    Igoshin, Oleg A.; Brody, Margaret S.; Price, Chester W.; Savageau, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Regulatory networks controlling bacterial gene expression often evolve from common origins and share homologous proteins and similar network motifs. However, when functioning in different physiological contexts, these motifs may be re-arranged with different topologies that significantly affect network performance. Here we analyze two related signaling networks in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis in order to assess the consequences of their different topologies, with the aim of formulating design principles applicable to other systems. These two networks control the activities of the general stress response factor σB and the first sporulation-specific factor σF. Both networks have at their core a “partner-switching” mechanism, in which an anti-sigma factor forms alternate complexes either with the sigma factor, holding it inactive, or with an anti-anti-sigma factor, thereby freeing sigma. However, clear differences in network structure are apparent: the anti-sigma-factor for σF forms a long-lived, “dead-end” complex with its anti-anti-sigma factor and ADP, whereas the genes encoding σB and its network partners lie in a σB-controlled operon, resulting in positive and negative feedback loops. We constructed mathematical models of both networks and examined which features were critical for the performance of each design. The σF model predicts that the self-enhancing formation of the dead-end complex transforms the network into a largely irreversible hysteretic switch; the simulations reported here also demonstrate that hysteresis and slow turn off kinetics are the only two system properties associated with this complex formation. By contrast, the σB model predicts that the positive and negative feedback loops produce graded, reversible behavior with high regulatory capacity and fast response time. Our models demonstrate how alterations in network design result in different system properties that correlate with regulatory demands. These design

  13. Networks of coupled circuits: From a versatile toggle switch to collective coherent behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labavić, Darka; Meyer-Ortmanns, Hildegard

    2014-12-01

    We study the versatile performance of networks of coupled circuits. Each of these circuits is composed of a positive and a negative feedback loop in a motif that is frequently found in genetic and neural networks. When two of these circuits are coupled with mutual repression, the system can function as a toggle switch. The variety of its states can be controlled by two parameters as we demonstrate by a detailed bifurcation analysis. In the bistable regimes, switches between the coexisting attractors can be induced by noise. When we couple larger sets of these units, we numerically observe collective coherent modes of individual fixed-point and limit-cycle behavior. It is there that the monotonic change of a single bifurcation parameter allows one to control the onset and arrest of the synchronized oscillations. This mechanism may play a role in biological applications, in particular, in connection with the segmentation clock. While tuning the bifurcation parameter, also a variety of transient patterns emerges upon approaching the stationary states, in particular, a self-organized pacemaker in a completely uniformly equipped ensemble, so that the symmetry breaking happens dynamically.

  14. Destination-directed, packet-switched architecture for a geostationary communications satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Shalkhauser, Mary JO; Bobinsky, Eric A.; Soni, Nitin J.; Quintana, Jorge A.; Kim, Heechul; Wager, Paul; Vanderaar, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A major goal of the Digital Systems Technology Branch at the NASA Lewis Research Center is to identify and develop critical digital components and technologies that either enable new commercial missions or significantly enhance the performance, cost efficiency, and/or reliability of existing and planned space communications systems. NASA envisions a need for low-data-rate, interactive, direct-to-the-user communications services for data, voice, facsimile, and video conferencing. The network would provide enhanced very-small-aperture terminal (VSAT) communications services and be capable of handling data rates of 64 kbps through 2.048 Mbps in 64-kbps increments. Efforts have concentrated heavily on the space segment; however, the ground segment has been considered concurrently to ensure cost efficiency and realistic operational constraints. The focus of current space segment developments is a flexible, high-throughput, fault-tolerant onboard information-switching processor (ISP) for a geostationary satellite communications network. The Digital Systems Technology Branch is investigating both circuit and packet architectures for the ISP. Destination-directed, packet-switched architectures for geostationary communications satellites are addressed.

  15. Stability Switches of Arbitrary High-Order Consensus in Multiagent Networks with Time Delays

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    High-order consensus seeking, in which individual high-order dynamic agents share a consistent view of the objectives and the world in a distributed manner, finds its potential broad applications in the field of cooperative control. This paper presents stability switches analysis of arbitrary high-order consensus in multiagent networks with time delays. By employing a frequency domain method, we explicitly derive analytical equations that clarify a rigorous connection between the stability of general high-order consensus and the system parameters such as the network topology, communication time-delays, and feedback gains. Particularly, our results provide a general and a fairly precise notion of how increasing communication time-delay causes the stability switches of consensus. Furthermore, under communication constraints, the stability and robustness problems of consensus algorithms up to third order are discussed in details to illustrate our central results. Numerical examples and simulation results for fourth-order consensus are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of our theoretical results. PMID:24109207

  16. Dependence of synchronized bursting activity on medium stirring and the perfusion rate in a cultured network of neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Ryoun; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2016-05-01

    A cultured network of neurons coupled with a multi-electrode-array (MEA) recording system has been a useful platform for investigating various issues in neuroscience and engineering. The neural activity supported by the system can be sensitive to environmental fluctuations, for example, in the medium's nutrient composition, ph, and temperature, and to mechanical disturbances, yet this issue has not been the subject. Especially, a normal practice in maintaining neuronal cell cultures involves an intermittent sequence of medium exchanges, typically at a time interval of a few days, and one such sudden medium exchange is unavoidably accompanied by many unintended disturbances. Here, based on a quantitative time-series analysis of synchronized bursting events, we explicitly demonstrate that such a medium exchange can, indeed, bring a huge change in the existing neural activity. Subsequently, we develop a medium perfusion-stirring system and an ideal protocol that can be used in conjunction with a MEA recording system, providing long-term stability. Specifically, we systematically evaluate the effects of medium stirring and perfusion rates. Unexpectedly, even some vigorous mechanical agitations do not have any impacts on neural activity. On the other hand, too much replenishment ( e.g., 1.8 ml/day for a 1.8-ml dish) of neurobasal medium results in an excitotoxicity.

  17. Thin, Soft, Skin-Mounted Microfluidic Networks with Capillary Bursting Valves for Chrono-Sampling of Sweat.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jungil; Kang, Daeshik; Han, Seungyong; Kim, Sung Bong; Rogers, John A

    2017-03-01

    Systems for time sequential capture of microliter volumes of sweat released from targeted regions of the skin offer the potential to enable analysis of temporal variations in electrolyte balance and biomarker concentration throughout a period of interest. Current methods that rely on absorbent pads taped to the skin do not offer the ease of use in sweat capture needed for quantitative tracking; emerging classes of electronic wearable sweat analysis systems do not directly manage sweat-induced fluid flows for sample isolation. Here, a thin, soft, "skin-like" microfluidic platform is introduced that bonds to the skin to allow for collection and storage of sweat in an interconnected set of microreservoirs. Pressure induced by the sweat glands drives flow through a network of microchannels that incorporates capillary bursting valves designed to open at different pressures, for the purpose of passively guiding sweat through the system in sequential fashion. A representative device recovers 1.8 µL volumes of sweat each from 0.8 min of sweating into a set of separate microreservoirs, collected from 0.03 cm(2) area of skin with approximately five glands, corresponding to a sweat rate of 0.60 µL min(-1) per gland. Human studies demonstrate applications in the accurate chemical analysis of lactate, sodium, and potassium concentrations and their temporal variations.

  18. Investigation of all-optical gain clamped erbium-doped amplifier in the presence of variable burst traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zannin, M.; Mangeni, S.; Taccheo, S.; Ennser, K.; Barlet, P.; Careglio, D.

    2011-03-01

    Optical gain clamping is an all-optical method to control the gain of optical amplifiers. Recent results show that this technique is very robust and reduces impairments in amplification of typical traffic from optical burst (and packets) switching networks, where the traffic profile is very dynamic. Nevertheless, recent results have also shown that interplay between the characteristics of the optical gain clamping optical amplifier (OGC-OA) and particular traffic profiles may induce chaotic behavior caused by resonance in the OGC-OA lasing cavity. The aim of this investigation is to assess the impact of burst duration and inter-arrival time on these chaotic behavior cases. The investigation shows that the resonating frequency in which chaotic variation of the OGC-OA gain occurs is shifted - and even reduced - when the burst duration and inter-arrival time are changed. For this investigation, continuous trains of bursts were used, with fixed burst generation frequency throughout each case considered.

  19. A novel routing algorithm of multi-priority label switch path in MPLS over WDM mesh networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yang; Xu, Zhanqi; Liu, Zengji

    2005-11-01

    An extended layered graph of MPLS over WDM mesh networks is proposed in this paper, in which the label switch path (LSP) with various wavelengths and the limitation of optical transceivers at a routing node are both involved. Label switch paths are classified into different priorities according to each quality of service. The corresponding routing algorithm, differentiating integrated routing algorithm (DIRA), is proposed and studied. The quality of service (QoS) of a label switch path and the optimization of network resources utilization are taken into account comprehensively in DIRA. A comparison of DIRA with the representative optical routing algorithms via simulation shows that it can reduce the blocking probability of delay-constraint LSP and improve the network throughput.

  20. State estimation with guaranteed performance for switching-type fuzzy neural networks in presence of sensor nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yanghui; Zhang, Dan

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigates the state estimation with guaranteed performance for a class of switching fuzzy neural networks. A switching-type fuzzy neural networks (STFNNs) model is proposed which captures external disturbances, sensor nonlinearities, and mode switching phenomenon of the fuzzy neural networks without the Markovian process assumption. For such a model, a state estimation problem is formulated to achieve the guaranteed performance: the estimation error system is exponentially stable with certain decay rate and a prescribed H∞ disturbance attenuation level. A novel sufficient condition for this problem is established using the Lyapunov functional method and the average dwell time approach, and the estimator parameters are explicitly given. A numerical example is presented to show the effectiveness of the developed results.

  1. Earthquke-related variation in Schumann Resonance (SR) spectra and Q-bursts as simulated with a global TDTE Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Williams, E. R.

    2014-12-01

    The monitoring of earthquakes with SR has been reported by Nickolaenko and Hayakawa (Nickolaenko and Hayakawa 2014, 2006, Hayakawa 2005). Despite the presence of many SR observatories globally, the observation of SR anomalies caused by earthquakes is rare. And the physical mechanism for the SR anomaly is not clear. Further attention to methods for observing SR anomalies caused by earthquakes is needed. A simulation approach based on Nelson's 2DTelegraph Equation (TDTE) Network (Nelson, MIT doctoral thesis, 1967) is developed. The Earth-ionosphere cavity is discretized into 24×24 tesserae. This network approach is more flexible than an analytical model, especially for a model with day-night asymmetry. The relation of the magnitude of the anomaly and the geometrical arrangement among source, receiver and disturbed zone is discussed for the uniform model. The perturbed zone size is computed according to the estimated size of the earthquake preparation zone. For example, the radius of the perturbed zone is about 1000km when the earthquake magnitude is about Ms=7.0. The intensity variations for the first four SR modes are compared between perturbed and unperturbed models. In addition, the spectral characteristics at different distances between source and disturbed zone are analysed. Interestingly, the electric field shows different variation than the magnetic field in response to the localized perturbation. For the uniform model with single Q-burst source, when the height of the local ionosphere is decreased, the electric field is increased and reaches nearly 50% in intensity in the perturbed zone in the uniform model. However, in contrast, the magnetic response is far less pronounced. It shows almost no variation. But for multisource excitation, the electric field and magnetic field both show dramatic response which reaches nearly 100% variation for some special modes. And the big variation is not restricted to the perturbed zone. The variations show complicated

  2. All-Optical Label Swapping Strategies for Spectral Amplitude Code Labels in Packet-Switched Optical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Christian

    There is currently much work focused on developing packet-switched optical networks to overcome the limitations of existing optical networks. Switch design for packet-switched optical networks is particularly challenging, in part due to the lack of a practical optical memory system. As a result, optical labels and all-optical label processing have attracted much attention. This thesis examines a crucial label processing component of an optical packet switch, namely the label swapper. In this thesis, three different tabletop topologies for low-cost all-optical swapping of spectral amplitude code labels for packet-switched networks are examined in a proof-of-concept phase. The first uses cross-absorption modulation in an electro-absorption modulator within a semiconductor fiber ring laser (SFRL), the second uses cross-gain modulation (XGM) in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) within an SFRL, and the third makes use of XGM in a SOA as well as injection locking in a Fabry-Perot laser diode for wavelength conversion. The benefits and limitations of each approach as well as future improvements are discussed. Building on these results, a high-performance integrated version of XGM swapper is designed, simulated, and masks are produced for fabrication using indium phosphide technology.

  3. Optimal design of mixed-media packet-switching networks - Routing and capacity assignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, D.; Kuo, F. F.; Kobayashi, H.

    1977-01-01

    This paper considers a mixed-media packet-switched computer communication network which consists of a low-delay terrestrial store-and-forward subnet combined with a low-cost high-bandwidth satellite subnet. We show how to route traffic via ground and/or satellite links by means of static, deterministic procedures and assign capacities to channels subject to a given linear cost such that the network average delay is minimized. Two operational schemes for this network model are investigated: one is a scheme in which the satellite channel is used as a slotted ALOHA channel; the other is a new multiaccess scheme we propose in which whenever a channel collision occurs, retransmission of the involved packets will route through ground links to their destinations. The performance of both schemes is evaluated and compared in terms of cost and average packet delay tradeoffs for some examples. The results offer guidelines for the design and optimal utilization of mixed-media networks.

  4. Optimal design of mixed-media packet-switching networks - Routing and capacity assignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, D.; Kuo, F. F.; Kobayashi, H.

    1977-01-01

    This paper considers a mixed-media packet-switched computer communication network which consists of a low-delay terrestrial store-and-forward subnet combined with a low-cost high-bandwidth satellite subnet. We show how to route traffic via ground and/or satellite links by means of static, deterministic procedures and assign capacities to channels subject to a given linear cost such that the network average delay is minimized. Two operational schemes for this network model are investigated: one is a scheme in which the satellite channel is used as a slotted ALOHA channel; the other is a new multiaccess scheme we propose in which whenever a channel collision occurs, retransmission of the involved packets will route through ground links to their destinations. The performance of both schemes is evaluated and compared in terms of cost and average packet delay tradeoffs for some examples. The results offer guidelines for the design and optimal utilization of mixed-media networks.

  5. Nonblocking photonic switching for P2P self-organized optical concurrent communications network using pseudo-random numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Naoki; Nozaki, Yusuke; Sasaki, Wakao

    2007-02-01

    Peer-to-peer (P2P) optical communication network is presently attracting much attention in the application of smallscale network. We proposed a network element called as a node fabricated by optoelectronics hardware based on the optical bistable devices. These nodes can compose a self-organizing optical network being interconnected with each other. We also proposed an adaptive node with gate function which detects the differences of signal types as to the amplitude modulation (AM) signal in the network and switches their routings. Thus, the adaptive node allows optical P2P concurrent communications between multiple pairs of communicators in the network simultaneously. Moreover, we have proposed in the present work an optical nonblocking operation using the pseudorandom numbers fabricated into the above mentioned adaptive nodes. We have newly considered a switching scheme which identifies such pseudorandom numbers and forms automatically a signal propagation path so that the nodes with the same input pseudorandom numbers are to be linked. Since such a pseudorandom-number based switching may also prevent any irregular interception of established links among nodes, our scheme is proved to be a nonblocking operation. Therefore, this scheme allows multiple signals from input nodes to travel in the network simultaneously via only a single propagation path being established by the self-organized adaptive nodes. We have also demonstrated this switching operation experimentally by fabricating it into our optoelectronics hardware based on the optical bistable devices. As a consequence, nonblocking photonic switching scheme for P2P self-organized optical concurrent communications network has been achieved by our pseudorandom-number based adaptive nodes proposed by the present work.

  6. Magnetic switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirbie, H. C.

    1989-04-01

    Magnetic switching is a pulse compression technique that uses a saturable inductor (reactor) to pass pulses of energy between two capacitors. A high degree of pulse compression can be achieved in a network when several of these simple, magnetically switched circuits are connected in series. Individual inductors are designed to saturate in cascade as a pulse moves along the network. The technique is particularly useful when a single-pulse network must be very reliable or when a multi-pulse network must operate at a high pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Today, magnetic switches trigger spark gaps, sharpen the risetimes of high energy pulses, power large lasers, and drive high PRF linear induction accelerators. This paper will describe the technique of magnetic pulse compression using simple networks and design equations. A brief review of modern magnetic materials and of their role in magnetic switch design will be presented.

  7. Pinning lag synchronization of drive-response complex networks via intermittent control with two different switched periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-an; Ma, Xiaohui; Wen, Xinyu; Sun, Qianlai

    2016-11-01

    This paper develops an intermittent control with two switched periods to study the pinning lag synchronization problem of drive-response complex networks. These two switched periods may have different control rates. By designing appropriate adaptive intermittent pinning controllers and using Lyapunov stability theory, some sufficient conditions for ensuring the lag synchronization between two coupled networks are derived. The minimum number of pinned nodes is determined by node dynamics, coupling strength, inner coupling matrix and a design parameter. Two simple pinning lag synchronization criteria are obtained from the proposed conditions. A numerical example is provided to illustrate the feasibility of the theoretical results.

  8. Intrinsic neuronal properties switch the mode of information transmission in networks.

    PubMed

    Gjorgjieva, Julijana; Mease, Rebecca A; Moody, William J; Fairhall, Adrienne L

    2014-12-01

    Diverse ion channels and their dynamics endow single neurons with complex biophysical properties. These properties determine the heterogeneity of cell types that make up the brain, as constituents of neural circuits tuned to perform highly specific computations. How do biophysical properties of single neurons impact network function? We study a set of biophysical properties that emerge in cortical neurons during the first week of development, eventually allowing these neurons to adaptively scale the gain of their response to the amplitude of the fluctuations they encounter. During the same time period, these same neurons participate in large-scale waves of spontaneously generated electrical activity. We investigate the potential role of experimentally observed changes in intrinsic neuronal properties in determining the ability of cortical networks to propagate waves of activity. We show that such changes can strongly affect the ability of multi-layered feedforward networks to represent and transmit information on multiple timescales. With properties modeled on those observed at early stages of development, neurons are relatively insensitive to rapid fluctuations and tend to fire synchronously in response to wave-like events of large amplitude. Following developmental changes in voltage-dependent conductances, these same neurons become efficient encoders of fast input fluctuations over few layers, but lose the ability to transmit slower, population-wide input variations across many layers. Depending on the neurons' intrinsic properties, noise plays different roles in modulating neuronal input-output curves, which can dramatically impact network transmission. The developmental change in intrinsic properties supports a transformation of a networks function from the propagation of network-wide information to one in which computations are scaled to local activity. This work underscores the significance of simple changes in conductance parameters in governing how neurons

  9. Framework for waveband switching in multigranular optical networks: part I-multigranular cross-connect architectures [Invited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiaojun; Anand, Vishal; Qiao, Chunming

    2006-12-01

    Optical networks using wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) are the foremost solution to the ever-increasing traffic in the Internet backbone. Rapid advances in WDM technology will enable each fiber to carry hundreds or even a thousand wavelengths (using dense-WDM, or DWDM, and ultra-DWDM) of traffic. This, coupled with worldwide fiber deployment, will bring about a tremendous increase in the size of the optical cross-connects, i.e., the number of ports of the wavelength switching elements. Waveband switching (WBS), wherein wavelengths are grouped into bands and switched as a single entity, can reduce the cost and control complexity of switching nodes by minimizing the port count. This paper presents a detailed study on recent advances and open research issues in WBS networks. In this study, we investigate in detail the architecture for various WBS cross-connects and compare them in terms of the number of ports and complexity and also in terms of how flexible they are in adjusting to dynamic traffic. We outline various techniques for grouping wavelengths into bands for the purpose of WBS and show how traditional wavelength routing is different from waveband routing and why techniques developed for wavelength-routed networks (WRNs) cannot be simply applied to WBS networks. We also outline how traffic grooming of subwavelength traffic can be done in WBS networks. In part II of this study [Cao , submitted to J. Opt. Netw.], we study the effect of wavelength conversion on the performance of WBS networks with reconfigurable MG-OXCs. We present an algorithm for waveband grouping in wavelength-convertible networks and evaluate its performance. We also investigate issues related to survivability in WBS networks and show how waveband and wavelength conversion can be used to recover from failures in WBS networks.

  10. Atomic switch networks-nanoarchitectonic design of a complex system for natural computing.

    PubMed

    Demis, E C; Aguilera, R; Sillin, H O; Scharnhorst, K; Sandouk, E J; Aono, M; Stieg, A Z; Gimzewski, J K

    2015-05-22

    Self-organized complex systems are ubiquitous in nature, and the structural complexity of these natural systems can be used as a model to design new classes of functional nanotechnology based on highly interconnected networks of interacting units. Conventional fabrication methods for electronic computing devices are subject to known scaling limits, confining the diversity of possible architectures. This work explores methods of fabricating a self-organized complex device known as an atomic switch network and discusses its potential utility in computing. Through a merger of top-down and bottom-up techniques guided by mathematical and nanoarchitectonic design principles, we have produced functional devices comprising nanoscale elements whose intrinsic nonlinear dynamics and memorization capabilities produce robust patterns of distributed activity and a capacity for nonlinear transformation of input signals when configured in the appropriate network architecture. Their operational characteristics represent a unique potential for hardware implementation of natural computation, specifically in the area of reservoir computing-a burgeoning field that investigates the computational aptitude of complex biologically inspired systems.

  11. Modeling Markov switching ARMA-GARCH neural networks models and an application to forecasting stock returns.

    PubMed

    Bildirici, Melike; Ersin, Özgür

    2014-01-01

    The study has two aims. The first aim is to propose a family of nonlinear GARCH models that incorporate fractional integration and asymmetric power properties to MS-GARCH processes. The second purpose of the study is to augment the MS-GARCH type models with artificial neural networks to benefit from the universal approximation properties to achieve improved forecasting accuracy. Therefore, the proposed Markov-switching MS-ARMA-FIGARCH, APGARCH, and FIAPGARCH processes are further augmented with MLP, Recurrent NN, and Hybrid NN type neural networks. The MS-ARMA-GARCH family and MS-ARMA-GARCH-NN family are utilized for modeling the daily stock returns in an emerging market, the Istanbul Stock Index (ISE100). Forecast accuracy is evaluated in terms of MAE, MSE, and RMSE error criteria and Diebold-Mariano equal forecast accuracy tests. The results suggest that the fractionally integrated and asymmetric power counterparts of Gray's MS-GARCH model provided promising results, while the best results are obtained for their neural network based counterparts. Further, among the models analyzed, the models based on the Hybrid-MLP and Recurrent-NN, the MS-ARMA-FIAPGARCH-HybridMLP, and MS-ARMA-FIAPGARCH-RNN provided the best forecast performances over the baseline single regime GARCH models and further, over the Gray's MS-GARCH model. Therefore, the models are promising for various economic applications.

  12. Modeling Markov Switching ARMA-GARCH Neural Networks Models and an Application to Forecasting Stock Returns

    PubMed Central

    Bildirici, Melike; Ersin, Özgür

    2014-01-01

    The study has two aims. The first aim is to propose a family of nonlinear GARCH models that incorporate fractional integration and asymmetric power properties to MS-GARCH processes. The second purpose of the study is to augment the MS-GARCH type models with artificial neural networks to benefit from the universal approximation properties to achieve improved forecasting accuracy. Therefore, the proposed Markov-switching MS-ARMA-FIGARCH, APGARCH, and FIAPGARCH processes are further augmented with MLP, Recurrent NN, and Hybrid NN type neural networks. The MS-ARMA-GARCH family and MS-ARMA-GARCH-NN family are utilized for modeling the daily stock returns in an emerging market, the Istanbul Stock Index (ISE100). Forecast accuracy is evaluated in terms of MAE, MSE, and RMSE error criteria and Diebold-Mariano equal forecast accuracy tests. The results suggest that the fractionally integrated and asymmetric power counterparts of Gray's MS-GARCH model provided promising results, while the best results are obtained for their neural network based counterparts. Further, among the models analyzed, the models based on the Hybrid-MLP and Recurrent-NN, the MS-ARMA-FIAPGARCH-HybridMLP, and MS-ARMA-FIAPGARCH-RNN provided the best forecast performances over the baseline single regime GARCH models and further, over the Gray's MS-GARCH model. Therefore, the models are promising for various economic applications. PMID:24977200

  13. Collaborative Tracking Control of Dual Linear Switched Reluctance Machines Over Communication Network With Time Delays.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Li; Shi, Yang; Pan, Jianfei; Zhang, Bo; Xu, Gang

    2016-10-11

    This paper investigates the collaborative tracking control for dual linear switched reluctance machines (LSRMs) over a communication network with random time delays. Considering the spatio-temporal constraint relationship of the dual LSRMs in complex industrial processes, the collaborative tracking control scheme is proposed based on the networked motion control method. The stability conditions and the controller design method for the networked dual LSRMs are obtained from the two motors relative position error by using Lyapunov theory and delay systems approach. Four different allocation schemes combined with two kinds of external control signals are applied onto the collaborative tracking control experiment platform of the dual LSRMs to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The maximum steady-state relative position error within 0.104 mm can be achieved under the constant absolute position reference input signal of 3 mm, and the maximum absolute relative position error within ±0.46 mm can be achieved under the sinusoidal reference of 8 mm amplitude and 0.2 Hz.

  14. Entropy Based Detection of DDoS Attacks in Packet Switching Network Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawniczak, Anna T.; Wu, Hao; di Stefano, Bruno

    Distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks are network-wide attacks that cannot be detected or stopped easily. They affect “natural” spatio-temporal packet traffic patterns, i.e. “natural distributions” of packets passing through the routers. Thus, they affect “natural” information entropy profiles, a sort of “fingerprints”, of normal packet traffic. We study if by monitoring information entropy of packet traffic through selected routers one may detect DDoS attacks or anomalous packet traffic in packet switching network (PSN) models. Our simulations show that the considered DDoS attacks of “ping” type cause shifts in information entropy profiles of packet traffic monitored even at small sets of routers and that it is easier to detect these shifts if static routing is used instead of dynamic routing. Thus, network-wide monitoring of information entropy of packet traffic at properly selected routers may provide means for detecting DDoS attacks and other anomalous packet traffics.

  15. Distributed Synchronization in Networks of Agent Systems With Nonlinearities and Random Switchings.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yang; Gao, Huijun; Zou, Wei; Kurths, Jürgen

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, the distributed synchronization problem of networks of agent systems with controllers and nonlinearities subject to Bernoulli switchings is investigated. Controllers and adaptive updating laws injected in each vertex of networks depend on the state information of its neighborhood. Three sets of Bernoulli stochastic variables are introduced to describe the occurrence probabilities of distributed adaptive controllers, updating laws and nonlinearities, respectively. By the Lyapunov functions method, we show that the distributed synchronization of networks composed of agent systems with multiple randomly occurring nonlinearities, multiple randomly occurring controllers, and multiple randomly occurring updating laws can be achieved in mean square under certain criteria. The conditions derived in this paper can be solved by semi-definite programming. Moreover, by mathematical analysis, we find that the coupling strength, the probabilities of the Bernoulli stochastic variables, and the form of nonlinearities have great impacts on the convergence speed and the terminal control strength. The synchronization criteria and the observed phenomena are demonstrated by several numerical simulation examples. In addition, the advantage of distributed adaptive controllers over conventional adaptive controllers is illustrated.

  16. Synchronization Analysis and Design of Coupled Boolean Networks Based on Periodic Switching Sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaguang; Tian, Hui; Wang, Zhanshan; Hou, Yanfang

    2016-12-01

    A novel synchronization analysis method is developed to solve the complete synchronization problem of many Boolean networks (BNs) coupled in the leader-follower configuration. First, an error system is constructed in terms of the algebraic representation using the semitensor product of matrices. Then, the synchronization problem of coupled BNs is converted into a problem whether all the trajectories of the error system are convergent to the zero vector. Second, according to the structure analysis of this error system, which is in the form of a switched system with leader BN states as the switching signal, a necessary and sufficient synchronization condition is derived. An algorithm is developed, which helps to determine as soon as possible whether complete synchronization among coupled BNs is achieved. Finally, a constructive design approach to follower BNs is provided. All of these follower BNs designed by our approach can completely synchronize with a given leader BN from the (Tt+1) th step at most, where Tt is the transient period of the leader BN.

  17. Switching dynamics of single and coupled VO2-based oscillators as elements of neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velichko, Andrey; Belyaev, Maksim; Putrolaynen, Vadim; Pergament, Alexander; Perminov, Valentin

    2017-01-01

    In the present paper, we report on the switching dynamics of both single and coupled VO2-based oscillators, with resistive and capacitive coupling, and explore the capability of their application in oscillatory neural networks. Based on these results, we further select an adequate SPICE model to describe the modes of operation of coupled oscillator circuits. Physical mechanisms influencing the time of forward and reverse electrical switching, that determine the applicability limits of the proposed model, are identified. For the resistive coupling, it is shown that synchronization takes place at a certain value of the coupling resistance, though it is unstable and a synchronization failure occurs periodically. For the capacitive coupling, two synchronization modes, with weak and strong coupling, are found. The transition between these modes is accompanied by chaotic oscillations. A decrease in the width of the spectrum harmonics in the weak-coupling mode, and its increase in the strong-coupling one, is detected. The dependences of frequencies and phase differences of the coupled oscillatory circuits on the coupling capacitance are found. Examples of operation of coupled VO2 oscillators as a central pattern generator are demonstrated.

  18. Bach2 represses plasma cell gene regulatory network in B cells to promote antibody class switch.

    PubMed

    Muto, Akihiko; Ochiai, Kyoko; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Calame, Kathryn L; Ikebe, Dai; Tashiro, Satoshi; Igarashi, Kazuhiko

    2010-12-01

    Two transcription factors, Pax5 and Blimp-1, form a gene regulatory network (GRN) with a double-negative loop, which defines either B-cell (Pax5 high) or plasma cell (Blimp-1 high) status as a binary switch. However, it is unclear how this B-cell GRN registers class switch DNA recombination (CSR), an event that takes place before the terminal differentiation to plasma cells. In the absence of Bach2 encoding a transcription factor required for CSR, mouse splenic B cells more frequently and rapidly expressed Blimp-1 and differentiated to IgM plasma cells as compared with wild-type cells. Genetic loss of Blimp-1 in Bach2(-/-) B cells was sufficient to restore CSR. These data with mathematical modelling of the GRN indicate that Bach2 achieves a time delay in Blimp-1 induction, which inhibits plasma cell differentiation and promotes CSR (Delay-Driven Diversity model for CSR). Reduction in mature B-cell numbers in Bach2(-/-) mice was not rescued by Blimp-1 ablation, indicating that Bach2 regulates B-cell differentiation and function through Blimp-1-dependent and -independent GRNs.

  19. An associative capacitive network based on nanoscale complementary resistive switches for memory-intensive computing.

    PubMed

    Kavehei, Omid; Linn, Eike; Nielen, Lutz; Tappertzhofen, Stefan; Skafidas, Efstratios; Valov, Ilia; Waser, Rainer

    2013-06-07

    We report on the implementation of an Associative Capacitive Network (ACN) based on the nondestructive capacitive readout of two Complementary Resistive Switches (2-CRSs). ACNs are capable of performing a fully parallel search for Hamming distances (i.e. similarity) between input and stored templates. Unlike conventional associative memories where charge retention is a key function and hence, they require frequent refresh cycles, in ACNs, information is retained in a nonvolatile resistive state and normal tasks are carried out through capacitive coupling between input and output nodes. Each device consists of two CRS cells and no selective element is needed, therefore, CMOS circuitry is only required in the periphery, for addressing and read-out. Highly parallel processing, nonvolatility, wide interconnectivity and low-energy consumption are significant advantages of ACNs over conventional and emerging associative memories. These characteristics make ACNs one of the promising candidates for applications in memory-intensive and cognitive computing, switches and routers as binary and ternary Content Addressable Memories (CAMs) and intelligent data processing.

  20. An associative capacitive network based on nanoscale complementary resistive switches for memory-intensive computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavehei, Omid; Linn, Eike; Nielen, Lutz; Tappertzhofen, Stefan; Skafidas, Efstratios; Valov, Ilia; Waser, Rainer

    2013-05-01

    We report on the implementation of an Associative Capacitive Network (ACN) based on the nondestructive capacitive readout of two Complementary Resistive Switches (2-CRSs). ACNs are capable of performing a fully parallel search for Hamming distances (i.e. similarity) between input and stored templates. Unlike conventional associative memories where charge retention is a key function and hence, they require frequent refresh cycles, in ACNs, information is retained in a nonvolatile resistive state and normal tasks are carried out through capacitive coupling between input and output nodes. Each device consists of two CRS cells and no selective element is needed, therefore, CMOS circuitry is only required in the periphery, for addressing and read-out. Highly parallel processing, nonvolatility, wide interconnectivity and low-energy consumption are significant advantages of ACNs over conventional and emerging associative memories. These characteristics make ACNs one of the promising candidates for applications in memory-intensive and cognitive computing, switches and routers as binary and ternary Content Addressable Memories (CAMs) and intelligent data processing.

  1. Multiple-mode reconfigurable electro-optic switching network for optical fiber sensor array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ray T.; Wang, Michael R.; Jannson, Tomasz; Baumbick, Robert

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports the first switching network compatible with multimode fibers. A one-to-many cascaded reconfigurable interconnection was built. A thin glass substrate was used as the guiding medium which provides not only higher coupling efficiency from multimode fiber to waveguide but also better tolerance of phase-matching conditions. Involvement of a total-internal-reflection hologram and multimode waveguide eliminates interface problems between fibers and waveguides. The DCG polymer graft has proven to be reliable from -180 C to +200 C. Survivability of such an electrooptic system in harsh environments is further ensured. LiNbO3 was chosen as the E-O material because of its stability at high temperatures (phase-transition temperature of more than 1000 C) and maturity of E-O device technology. Further theoretical calculation was conducted to provide the optimal interaction length and device capacitance.

  2. H ∞ Cluster Synchronization for a Class of Neutral Complex Dynamical Networks with Markovian Switching

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    H ∞ cluster synchronization problem for a class of neutral complex dynamical networks (NCDNs) with Markovian switching is investigated in this paper. Both the retarded and neutral delays are considered to be interval mode dependent and time varying. The concept of H ∞ cluster synchronization is proposed to quantify the attenuation level of synchronization error dynamics against the exogenous disturbance of the NCDNs. Based on a novel Lyapunov functional, by employing some integral inequalities and the nature of convex combination, mode delay-range-dependent H ∞ cluster synchronization criteria are derived in the form of linear matrix inequalities which depend not only on the disturbance attenuation but also on the initial values of the NCDNs. Finally, numerical examples are given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed theoretical results. PMID:24892088

  3. Novel conditions on exponential stability of a class of delayed neural networks with state-dependent switching.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guodong; Shen, Yi

    2015-11-01

    This paper is concerned with the global exponential stability on a class of delayed neural networks with state-dependent switching. Under the novel conditions, some sufficient criteria ensuring exponential stability of the proposed system are obtained. In particular, the obtained conditions complement and improve earlier publications on conventional neural networks with continuous or discontinuous right-hand side. Numerical simulations are also presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  4. Circuit-switch architecture for a 30/20-GHz FDMA/TDM geostationary satellite communications network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    1992-01-01

    A circuit switching architecture is described for a 30/20 GHz frequency division, multiple access uplink/time division multiplexed downlink (FDMA/TDM) geostationary satellite communications network. Critical subsystems and problem areas are identified and addressed. Work was concentrated primarily on the space segment; however, the ground segment was considered concurrently to ensure cost efficiency and realistic operational constraints.

  5. Circuit-switch architecture for a 30/20-GHz FDMA/TDM geostationary satellite communications network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    1992-01-01

    A circuit-switching architecture is described for a 30/20-GHz frequency-division, multiple-access uplink/time-division-multiplexed downlink (FDMA/TDM) geostationary satellite communications network. Critical subsystems and problem areas are identified and addressed. Work was concentrated primarily on the space segment; however, the ground segment was considered concurrently to ensure cost efficiency and realistic operational constraints.

  6. Destination-directed, packet-switching architecture for 30/20-GHz FDMA/TDM geostationary communications satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Shalkhauser, Mary JO

    1992-01-01

    A destination-directed packet switching architecture for a 30/20-GHz frequency division multiple access/time division multiplexed (FDMA/TDM) geostationary satellite communications network is discussed. Critical subsystems and problem areas are identified and addressed. Efforts have concentrated heavily on the space segment; however, the ground segment has been considered concurrently to ensure cost efficiency and realistic operational constraints.

  7. Destination directed packet switch architecture for a 30/20 GHz FDMA/TDM geostationary communication satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Shalkhauser, Mary JO

    1991-01-01

    Emphasis is on a destination directed packet switching architecture for a 30/20 GHz frequency division multiplex access/time division multiplex (FDMA/TDM) geostationary satellite communication network. Critical subsystems and problem areas are identified and addressed. Efforts have concentrated heavily on the space segment; however, the ground segment was considered concurrently to ensure cost efficiency and realistic operational constraints.

  8. A “Spike-Based” Grammar Underlies Directional Modification in Network Connectivity: Effect on Bursting Activity and Implications for Bio-Hybrids Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zullo, Letizia; Chiappalone, Michela; Martinoia, Sergio; Benfenati, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Developed biological systems are endowed with the ability of interacting with the environment; they sense the external state and react to it by changing their own internal state. Many attempts have been made to build ‘hybrids’ with the ability of perceiving, modifying and reacting to external modifications. Investigation of the rules that govern network changes in a hybrid system may lead to finding effective methods for ‘programming’ the neural tissue toward a desired task. Here we show a new perspective in the use of cortical neuronal cultures from embryonic mouse as a working platform to study targeted synaptic modifications. Differently from the common timing-based methods applied in bio-hybrids robotics, here we evaluated the importance of endogenous spike timing in the information processing. We characterized the influence of a spike-patterned stimulus in determining changes in neuronal synchronization (connectivity strength and precision) of the evoked spiking and bursting activity in the network. We show that tailoring the stimulation pattern upon a neuronal spike timing induces the network to respond stronger and more precisely to the stimulation. Interestingly, the induced modifications are conveyed more consistently in the burst timing. This increase in strength and precision may be a key in the interaction of the network with the external world and may be used to induce directional changes in bio-hybrid systems. PMID:23145147

  9. A network flow model for load balancing in circuit-switched multicomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, Shahid H.

    1993-01-01

    In multicomputers that utilize circuit switching or wormhole routing, communication overhead depends largely on link contention - the variation due to distance between nodes is negligible. This has a major impact on the load balancing problem. In this case, there are some nodes with excess load (sources) and others with deficit load (sinks) and it is required to find a matching of sources to sinks that avoids contention. The problem is made complex by the hardwired routing on currently available machines: the user can control only which nodes communicate but not how the messages are routed. Network flow models of message flow in the mesh and the hypercube were developed to solve this problem. The crucial property of these models is the correspondence between minimum cost flows and correctly routed messages. To solve a given load balancing problem, a minimum cost flow algorithm is applied to the network. This permits one to determine efficiently a maximum contention free matching of sources to sinks which, in turn, tells one how much of the given imbalance can be eliminated without contention.

  10. A network flow model for load balancing in circuit-switched multicomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, Shahid H.

    1990-01-01

    In multicomputers that utilize circuit switching or wormhole routing, communication overhead depends largely on link contention - the variation due to distance between nodes is negligible. This has a major impact on the load balancing problem. In this case, there are some nodes with excess load (sources) and others with deficit load (sinks) and it is required to find a matching of sources to sinks that avoids contention. The problem is made complex by the hardwired routing on currently available machines: the user can control only which nodes communicate but not how the messages are routed. Network flow models of message flow in the mesh and the hypercube were developed to solve this problem. The crucial property of these models is the correspondence between minimum cost flows and correctly routed messages. To solve a given load balancing problem, a minimum cost flow algorithm is applied to the network. This permits one to determine efficiently a maximum contention free matching of sources to sinks which, in turn, tells one how much of the given imbalance can be eliminated without contention.

  11. Wireless Relay Selection in Pocket Switched Networks Based on Spatial Regularity of Human Mobility †

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianhui; Cheng, Xiuzhen; Bi, Jingping; Chen, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Pocket switched networks (PSNs) take advantage of human mobility to deliver data. Investigations on real-world trace data indicate that human mobility shows an obvious spatial regularity: a human being usually visits a few places at high frequencies. These most frequently visited places form the home of a node, which is exploited in this paper to design two HomE based Relay selectiOn (HERO) algorithms. Both algorithms input single data copy into the network at any time. In the basic HERO, only the first node encountered by the source and whose home overlaps a destination’s home is selected as a relay while the enhanced HERO keeps finding more optimal relay that visits the destination’s home with higher probability. The two proposed algorithms only require the relays to exchange the information of their home and/or the visiting frequencies to their home when two nodes meet. As a result, the information update is reduced and there is no global status information that needs to be maintained. This causes light loads on relays because of the low communication cost and storage requirements. Additionally, only simple operations are needed in the two proposed algorithms, resulting in little computation overhead at relays. At last, a theoretical analysis is performed on some key metrics and then the real-world based simulations indicate that the two HERO algorithms are efficient and effective through employing only one or a few relays. PMID:26797609

  12. Synchronization of General Chaotic Neural Networks With Nonuniform Sampling and Packet Missing: A Switched System Approach.

    PubMed

    Lu, Renquan; Shi, Peng; Su, Hongye; Wu, Zheng-Guang; Lu, Jianquan

    2016-12-22

    This paper is concerned with the exponential synchronization issue of general chaotic neural networks subject to nonuniform sampling and control packet missing in the frame of the zero-input strategy. Based on this strategy, we make use of the switched system model to describe the synchronization error system. First, when the missing of control packet does not occur, an exponential stability criterion with less conservatism is established for the resultant synchronization error systems via a superior time-dependent Lyapunov functional and the convex optimization approach. The characteristics induced by nonuniform sampling can be used to the full because of the structure and property of the constructed Lyapunov functional, that is not necessary to be positive definite except sampling times. Then, a criterion is obtained to guarantee that the general chaotic neural networks are synchronous exponentially when the missing of control packet occurs by means of the average dwell-time technique. An explicit expression of the sampled-data static output feedback controller is also gained. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed new design methods is shown via two examples.

  13. Wireless Relay Selection in Pocket Switched Networks Based on Spatial Regularity of Human Mobility.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianhui; Cheng, Xiuzhen; Bi, Jingping; Chen, Biao

    2016-01-18

    Pocket switched networks (PSNs) take advantage of human mobility to deliver data. Investigations on real-world trace data indicate that human mobility shows an obvious spatial regularity: a human being usually visits a few places at high frequencies. These most frequently visited places form the home of a node, which is exploited in this paper to design two HomE based Relay selectiOn (HERO) algorithms. Both algorithms input single data copy into the network at any time. In the basic HERO, only the first node encountered by the source and whose home overlaps a destination's home is selected as a relay while the enhanced HERO keeps finding more optimal relay that visits the destination's home with higher probability. The two proposed algorithms only require the relays to exchange the information of their home and/or the visiting frequencies to their home when two nodes meet. As a result, the information update is reduced and there is no global status information that needs to be maintained. This causes light loads on relays because of the low communication cost and storage requirements. Additionally, only simple operations are needed in the two proposed algorithms, resulting in little computation overhead at relays. At last, a theoretical analysis is performed on some key metrics and then the real-world based simulations indicate that the two HERO algorithms are efficient and effective through employing only one or a few relays.

  14. Resistive Switching Memory of TiO2 Nanowire Networks Grown on Ti Foil by a Single Hydrothermal Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ming; Musselman, Kevin P.; Duley, Walter W.; Zhou, Norman Y.

    2017-04-01

    The resistive switching characteristics of TiO2 nanowire networks directly grown on Ti foil by a single-step hydrothermal technique are discussed in this paper. The Ti foil serves as the supply of Ti atoms for growth of the TiO2 nanowires, making the preparation straightforward. It also acts as a bottom electrode for the device. A top Al electrode was fabricated by e-beam evaporation process. The Al/TiO2 nanowire networks/Ti device fabricated in this way displayed a highly repeatable and electroforming-free bipolar resistive behavior with retention for more than 104 s and an OFF/ON ratio of approximately 70. The switching mechanism of this Al/TiO2 nanowire networks/Ti device is suggested to arise from the migration of oxygen vacancies under applied electric field. This provides a facile way to obtain metal oxide nanowire-based ReRAM device in the future.

  15. A switching multi-scale dynamical network model of EEG/MEG.

    PubMed

    Olier, Iván; Trujillo-Barreto, Nelson J; El-Deredy, Wael

    2013-12-01

    We introduce a new generative model of the Encephalography (EEG/MEG) data, the inversion of which allows for inferring the locations and temporal evolution of the underlying sources as well as their dynamical interactions. The proposed Switching Mesostate Space Model (SMSM) builds on the multi-scale generative model for EEG/MEG by Daunizeau and Friston (2007). SMSM inherits the assumptions that (1) bioelectromagnetic activity is generated by a set of distributed sources, (2) the dynamics of these sources can be modelled as random fluctuations about a small number of mesostates, and (3) the number of mesostates engaged by a cognitive task is small. Additionally, four generalising assumptions are now included: (4) the mesostates interact according to a full Dynamical Causal Network (DCN) that can be estimated; (5) the dynamics of the mesostates can switch between multiple approximately linear operating regimes; (6) each operating regime remains stable over finite periods of time (temporal clusters); and (7) the total number of times the mesostates' dynamics can switch is small. The proposed model adds, therefore, a level of flexibility by accommodating complex brain processes that cannot be characterised by purely linear and stationary Gaussian dynamics. Importantly, the SMSM furnishes a new interpretation of the EEG/MEG data in which the source activity may have multiple discrete modes of behaviour, each with approximately linear dynamics. This is modelled by assuming that the connection strengths of the underlying mesoscopic DCN are time-dependent but piecewise constant, i.e. they can undergo discrete changes over time. A Variational Bayes inversion scheme is derived to estimate all the parameters of the model by maximising a (Negative Free Energy) lower bound on the model evidence. This bound is used to select among different model choices that are defined by the number of mesostates as well as by the number of stationary linear regimes. The full model is compared

  16. Vibration reduction for smart periodic structures via periodic piezoelectric arrays with nonlinear interleaved-switched electronic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Bin; Guyomar, Daniel; Lallart, Mickaël

    2017-01-01

    Smart periodic structures covered by periodically distributed piezoelectric patches have drawn more and more attention in recent years for wave propagation attenuation and corresponding structural vibration suppression. Since piezoelectric materials are special type of energy conversion materials that link mechanical characteristics with electrical characteristics, shunt circuits coupled with such materials play a key role in the wave propagation and/or vibration control performance in smart periodic structures. Conventional shunt circuit designs utilize resistive shunt (R-shunt) and resonant shunt (RL-shunt). More recently, semi-passive nonlinear approaches have also been developed for efficiently controlling the vibrations of such structures. In this paper, an innovative smart periodic beam structure with nonlinear interleaved-switched electric networks based on synchronized switching damping on inductor (SSDI) is proposed and investigated for vibration reduction and wave propagation attenuation. Different from locally resonant band gap mechanism forming narrow band gaps around the desired resonant frequencies, the proposed interleaved electrical networks can induce new broadly low-frequency stop bands and broaden primitive Bragg stop bands by virtue of unique interleaved electrical configurations and the SSDI technique which has the unique feature of realizing automatic impedance adaptation with a small inductance. Finite element modeling of a Timoshenko electromechanical beam structure is also presented for validating dispersion properties of the structure. Both theoretical and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed beam structure not only shows better vibration and wave propagation attenuation than the smart beam structure with independent switched networks, but also has technical simplicity of requiring only half of the number of switches than the independent switched network needs.

  17. WDM network and multicasting protocol strategies.

    PubMed

    Kirci, Pinar; Zaim, Abdul Halim

    2014-01-01

    Optical technology gains extensive attention and ever increasing improvement because of the huge amount of network traffic caused by the growing number of internet users and their rising demands. However, with wavelength division multiplexing (WDM), it is easier to take the advantage of optical networks and optical burst switching (OBS) and to construct WDM networks with low delay rates and better data transparency these technologies are the best choices. Furthermore, multicasting in WDM is an urgent solution for bandwidth-intensive applications. In the paper, a new multicasting protocol with OBS is proposed. The protocol depends on a leaf initiated structure. The network is composed of source, ingress switches, intermediate switches, edge switches, and client nodes. The performance of the protocol is examined with Just Enough Time (JET) and Just In Time (JIT) reservation protocols. Also, the paper involves most of the recent advances about WDM multicasting in optical networks. WDM multicasting in optical networks is given as three common subtitles: Broadcast and-select networks, wavelength-routed networks, and OBS networks. Also, in the paper, multicast routing protocols are briefly summarized and optical burst switched WDM networks are investigated with the proposed multicast schemes.

  18. An efficient Quality of Service (QoS) scheme for all optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Amit Kumar; Kaler, R. S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of providing Quality of Service (QoS) for optical burst switching (OBS) systems. In this paper, an efficient QoS oriented integrated scheme based on Optical Burst/Circuit Switching network architecture has been proposed. The proposed scheme utilizes the modified Just-Enough-Time (JET) protocol and advanced reservation based on Linear Predictive Filter (LPF), which can provide differentiated services for optical burst switching (OBS) network. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme is reasonably better than a First Come First Served (FCFS) protocol in guaranteeing QoS of real-time traffic. Also, the results yield significant delay reduction for time-critical traffic, while maintaining the bandwidth overhead within limits. As a result, the proposed scheme has achieved QoS differentiation in terms of burst loss rate in comparison to conventional schemes.

  19. Microstructure and dynamics of vacancy-induced nanofilamentary switching network in donor doped SrTiO3-x memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nili, Hussein; Ahmed, Taimur; Walia, Sumeet; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Esmaielzadeh Kandjani, Ahmad; Rubanov, Sergey; Kim, Jeeson; Kavehei, Omid; Bansal, Vipul; Bhaskaran, Madhu; Sriram, Sharath

    2016-12-01

    Donor doping of perovskite oxides has emerged as an attractive technique to create high performance and low energy non-volatile analog memories. Here, we examine the origins of improved switching performance and stable multi-state resistive switching in Nb-doped oxygen-deficient amorphous SrTiO3 (Nb:a-STO x ) metal-insulator-metal (MIM) devices. We probe the impact of substitutional dopants (i.e., Nb) in modulating the electronic structure and subsequent switching performance. Temperature stability and bias/time dependence of the switching behavior are used to ascertain the role of substitutional dopants and highlight their utility to modulate volatile and non-volatile behavior in a-STO x devices for adaptive and neuromorphic applications. We utilized a combination of transmission electron microscopy, photoluminescence emission properties, interfacial compositional evaluation, and activation energy measurements to investigate the microstructure of the nanofilamentary network responsible for switching. These results provide important insights into understanding mechanisms that govern the performance of donor-doped perovskite oxide-based memristive devices.

  20. Microstructure and dynamics of vacancy-induced nanofilamentary switching network in donor doped SrTiO3-x memristors.

    PubMed

    Nili, Hussein; Ahmed, Taimur; Walia, Sumeet; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Kandjani, Ahmad Esmaielzadeh; Rubanov, Sergey; Kim, Jeeson; Kavehei, Omid; Bansal, Vipul; Bhaskaran, Madhu; Sriram, Sharath

    2016-12-16

    Donor doping of perovskite oxides has emerged as an attractive technique to create high performance and low energy non-volatile analog memories. Here, we examine the origins of improved switching performance and stable multi-state resistive switching in Nb-doped oxygen-deficient amorphous SrTiO3 (Nb:a-STO x ) metal-insulator-metal (MIM) devices. We probe the impact of substitutional dopants (i.e., Nb) in modulating the electronic structure and subsequent switching performance. Temperature stability and bias/time dependence of the switching behavior are used to ascertain the role of substitutional dopants and highlight their utility to modulate volatile and non-volatile behavior in a-STO x devices for adaptive and neuromorphic applications. We utilized a combination of transmission electron microscopy, photoluminescence emission properties, interfacial compositional evaluation, and activation energy measurements to investigate the microstructure of the nanofilamentary network responsible for switching. These results provide important insights into understanding mechanisms that govern the performance of donor-doped perovskite oxide-based memristive devices.

  1. Possibilities and limitations of space-variant holographic optical elements for switching networks and general interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwider, Johannes; Stork, Wilhelm; Streibl, Norbert; Voelkel, Reinhard

    1990-07-01

    Optical interconnects of arbitrary design require space-variant optics. Planar holographic optical elements (HOE) offer a high flexibility and ease of production. HOE work via diffraction causing chromatic aberrations. This problem becomes serious if semiconductor lasers with poor wavelength stability should be used. Estimates for the number of independent space-variant interconnects their spatial tolerances and their wavelength stability will be considered. 1 . INTRODUC liON Optical interconnects enable the transmission of signals with ultra high frequencies with small crosstalk and rather low waste energy per transmission line. Two fields of application for optical wiring concepts can be discerned i. e. fixed pattern chip to chip (or board to board) interconnects and reconfigurable switching networks or bus systems where the interconnect path is selected out of a number of fixed interconnects by means of e. g. so-called exchange bypass modules (EBM)1''2. 2. INTERCONNECT CONCEPTS A general feature of optical interconnects is the fact that the light has to leave the board/chip-plane in order to give room for the interconnect fabric i. e. the light leaves the board-plane perpendicularly The necessary optical means are: collimating or focussing elements deflectors and beamsplitters(fanout). Gratings or more general holograms seem the most promising optical elements. These elements may be planar and can be configurated in an arbitrary manner. HOE3 can be used for the above mentioned purposes . Efficient HOE can be obtained either by using thick

  2. Universal method for constructing N-port non-blocking optical router based on 2 × 2 optical switch for photonic networks-on-chip.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiaoshan; Zhang, Fanfan; Ji, Ruiqiang; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Lin

    2014-05-19

    We propose a universal method for constructing N-port non-blocking optical router for photonic networks-on-chip, in which all microring (MR) optical switches or Mach-Zehnder (M-Z) optical switches behave as 2 × 2 optical switches. The optical router constructed by the proposed method has minimum optical switches, in which the number of the optical switches is reduced about 50% compared to the reported optical routers based on MR optical switches and more than 30% compared to the reported optical routers based on M-Z optical switches, and therefore is more compact in footprint and more power-efficient. We also present a strict mathematical proof of the non-blocking routing of the proposed N-port optical router.

  3. A Network Flow Model for Load Balancing in Circuit-Switched Multicomputers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    Availability Codes Avail and/or D -ist Special Abstract In multicomputers that utilize circuit switching or wormhole rout- ing, communication overhead...the implementations can be divided into two broad classes: store-and-forward and circuit switching or wormhole routing. There are finer distinctions...heavily on the number of links (the graph theoretic distance) between source and destination. 5.2 Circuit Switching or Wormhole routing For our purposes

  4. Apollo Ring Optical Switch

    SciTech Connect

    Maestas, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    An optical switch was designed, built, and installed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to facilitate the integration of two Apollo computer networks into a single network. This report presents an overview of the optical switch as well as its layout, switch testing procedure and test data, and installation.

  5. Switching auditory attention using spatial and non-spatial features recruits different cortical networks.

    PubMed

    Larson, Eric; Lee, Adrian K C

    2014-01-01

    Switching attention between different stimuli of interest based on particular task demands is important in many everyday settings. In audition in particular, switching attention between different speakers of interest that are talking concurrently is often necessary for effective communication. Recently, it has been shown by multiple studies that auditory selective attention suppresses the representation of unwanted streams in auditory cortical areas in favor of the target stream of interest. However, the neural processing that guides this selective attention process is not well understood. Here we investigated the cortical mechanisms involved in switching attention based on two different types of auditory features. By combining magneto- and electro-encephalography (M-EEG) with an anatomical MRI constraint, we examined the cortical dynamics involved in switching auditory attention based on either spatial or pitch features. We designed a paradigm where listeners were cued in the beginning of each trial to switch or maintain attention halfway through the presentation of concurrent target and masker streams. By allowing listeners time to switch during a gap in the continuous target and masker stimuli, we were able to isolate the mechanisms involved in endogenous, top-down attention switching. Our results show a double dissociation between the involvement of right temporoparietal junction (RTPJ) and the left inferior parietal supramarginal part (LIPSP) in tasks requiring listeners to switch attention based on space and pitch features, respectively, suggesting that switching attention based on these features involves at least partially separate processes or behavioral strategies.

  6. Delay-dependent finite-time boundedness of a class of Markovian switching neural networks with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qishui; Cheng, Jun; Zhao, Yuqing

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a novel method is developed for delay-dependent finite-time boundedness of a class of Markovian switching neural networks with time-varying delays. New sufficient condition for stochastic boundness of Markovian jumping neural networks is presented and proved by an newly augmented stochastic Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and novel activation function conditions, the state trajectory remains in a bounded region of the state space over a given finite-time interval. Finally, a numerical example is given to illustrate the efficiency and less conservative of the proposed method.

  7. A Study of Quality of Service Communication for High-Speed Packet-Switching Computer Sub-Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Zhenqian

    1999-01-01

    In this thesis, we analyze various factors that affect quality of service (QoS) communication in high-speed, packet-switching sub-networks. We hypothesize that sub-network-wide bandwidth reservation and guaranteed CPU processing power at endpoint systems for handling data traffic are indispensable to achieving hard end-to-end quality of service. Different bandwidth reservation strategies, traffic characterization schemes, and scheduling algorithms affect the network resources and CPU usage as well as the extent that QoS can be achieved. In order to analyze those factors, we design and implement a communication layer. Our experimental analysis supports our research hypothesis. The Resource ReSerVation Protocol (RSVP) is designed to realize resource reservation. Our analysis of RSVP shows that using RSVP solely is insufficient to provide hard end-to-end quality of service in a high-speed sub-network. Analysis of the IEEE 802.lp protocol also supports the research hypothesis.

  8. Percolation network in resistive switching devices with the structure of silver/amorphous silicon/p-type silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yanhong; Gao, Ping; Bi, Kaifeng; Peng, Wei; Jiang, Xuening; Xu, Hongxia

    2014-01-27

    Conducting pathway of percolation network was identified in resistive switching devices (RSDs) with the structure of silver/amorphous silicon/p-type silicon (Ag/a-Si/p-Si) based on its gradual RESET-process and the stochastic complex impedance spectroscopy characteristics (CIS). The formation of the percolation network is attributed to amounts of nanocrystalline Si particles as well as defect sites embedded in a-Si layer, in which the defect sites supply positions for Ag ions to nucleate and grow. The similar percolation network has been only observed in Ag-Ge-Se based RSD before. This report provides a better understanding for electric properties of RSD based on the percolation network.

  9. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  10. Bistability in the Rac1, PAK, and RhoA Signaling Network Drives Actin Cytoskeleton Dynamics and Cell Motility Switches

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Kate M.; Monsefi, Naser; Dawson, John C.; Degasperi, Andrea; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Volinsky, Natalia; Dobrzyński, Maciej; Birtwistle, Marc R.; Tsyganov, Mikhail A.; Kiyatkin, Anatoly; Kida, Katarzyna; Finch, Andrew J.; Carragher, Neil O.; Kolch, Walter; Nguyen, Lan K.; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Dynamic interactions between RhoA and Rac1, members of the Rho small GTPase family, play a vital role in the control of cell migration. Using predictive mathematical modeling, mass spectrometry-based quantitation of network components, and experimental validation in MDA-MB-231 mesenchymal breast cancer cells, we show that a network containing Rac1, RhoA, and PAK family kinases can produce bistable, switch-like responses to a graded PAK inhibition. Using a small chemical inhibitor of PAK, we demonstrate that cellular RhoA and Rac1 activation levels respond in a history-dependent, bistable manner to PAK inhibition. Consequently, we show that downstream signaling, actin dynamics, and cell migration also behave in a bistable fashion, displaying switches and hysteresis in response to PAK inhibition. Our results demonstrate that PAK is a critical component in the Rac1-RhoA inhibitory crosstalk that governs bistable GTPase activity, cell morphology, and cell migration switches. PMID:27136688

  11. Intermittent θ burst stimulation modulates resting-state functional connectivity in the attention network and promotes behavioral recovery in patients with visual spatial neglect.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lei; Fu, Wei; Zhang, Yanming; Huo, Su; Du, JuBao; Zhu, Lin; Song, Weiqun

    2016-12-07

    Functional connectivity changes in the attention network are viewed as a physiological signature of visual spatial neglect (VSN). The left dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (LDLPFC) is known to initiate and monitor top-down attentional control and dynamically adjust behavioral performance. This study aimed to investigate whether increasing the activity of the LDLPFC through intermittent θ burst stimulation (iTBS) could modulate the resting-state functional connectivity in the attention network and facilitate recovery from VSN. Patients with right hemisphere stroke and VSN were randomly assigned to two groups matched for clinical characteristics and given a 10-day treatment. On each day, all patients underwent visual scanning training and motor function training and received iTBS over the LDLPFC either at 80% resting motor threshold (RMT) or at 40% RMT before the trainings. MRI, the line bisection test, and the star cancelation test were performed before and after treatment. Patients who received iTBS at 80% RMT showed a large-scale reduction in the resting-state functional connectivity extent, largely in the right attention network, and more significant improvement of behavioral performance compared with patients who received iTBS at 40% RMT. These results support that the LDLPFC potentially plays a key role in the modulation of attention networks in neglect. Increasing the activity of the LDPLPFC through iTBS can facilitate recovery from VSN in patients with stroke.

  12. Nuclear weapons effects studies for the 5ESS (trademark) switch. Volume 2. EM (electromagnetic) shielding characteristics of structures. Final report, 1 July 1985-30 September 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchamp, N.A.; Farber, L.; Federico, S.S.

    1986-09-01

    As part of its Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Mitigation Program, the National Communications System (NCS) funded ATandT to study the ability of the ATandT 5ESS(TM) Switch to withstand the potentially disabling effects of EMP from high-altitude nuclear bursts and fallout radiation from distant near-surface bursts. This volume documents the study to characterize the electromagnetic (EM) shielding effectiveness of the trailer used to shelter the test switch during simulated-EMP testing and of central-office buildings in which 5ESS Switches might be housed in the Public Switched Network. The results were used to estimate the attenuated fields incident upon n installed switch and its associated intra-office cabling. Because the building types examined can provide a wide range of EM shielding values, no single set of attenuation curves will suffice to characterize central-office structures.

  13. Coupling between feedback loops in autoregulatory networks affects bistability range, open-loop gain and switching times

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Abhinav; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2012-01-01

    Biochemical regulatory networks governing diverse cellular processes such as stress-response, differentiation and cell cycle often contain coupled feedback loops. We aim to understand how features of feedback architecture, such as the number of loops, the sign of the loops and the type of their coupling, affect network dynamical performance. Specifically, we investigate how bistability range, maximum open-loop gain and switching times of a network with transcriptional positive feedback are affected by additive or multiplicative coupling with another positive or negative feedback loop. We show that a network’s bistability range is positively correlated with its maximum open-loop gain and that both the quantities depend on the sign of the feedback loops and the type of feedback coupling. Moreover, we find that the addition of positive feedback could decrease the bistability range if we control the basal level in the signal-response curves of the two systems. Furthermore, the addition of negative feedback has the capacity to increase the bistability range if its dissociation constant is much lower than that of the positive feedback. We also find that addition of a positive feedback to a bistable network increases robustness of its bistability range, whereas addition of a negative feedback decreases it. Finally, we show that the switching time for a transition from a high to a low steady state increases with the effective fold change in gene regulation. In summary, we show that the effect of coupled feedback loops on the bistability range and switching times depends on the underlying mechanistic details. PMID:23011599

  14. A novel all-optical label processing based on multiple optical orthogonal codes sequences for optical packet switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chongfu; Qiu, Kun; Xu, Bo; Ling, Yun

    2008-05-01

    This paper proposes an all-optical label processing scheme that uses the multiple optical orthogonal codes sequences (MOOCS)-based optical label for optical packet switching (OPS) (MOOCS-OPS) networks. In this scheme, each MOOCS is a permutation or combination of the multiple optical orthogonal codes (MOOC) selected from the multiple-groups optical orthogonal codes (MGOOC). Following a comparison of different optical label processing (OLP) schemes, the principles of MOOCS-OPS network are given and analyzed. Firstly, theoretical analyses are used to prove that MOOCS is able to greatly enlarge the number of available optical labels when compared to the previous single optical orthogonal code (SOOC) for OPS (SOOC-OPS) network. Then, the key units of the MOOCS-based optical label packets, including optical packet generation, optical label erasing, optical label extraction and optical label rewriting etc., are given and studied. These results are used to verify that the proposed MOOCS-OPS scheme is feasible.

  15. Resistance switching in a SiC nanowire/Au nanoparticle network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Y.; Kohno, H.

    2009-07-01

    Resistance switching in a semiconductor nanowire/metal nanoparticle system is demonstrated. SiC nanowires grown on a Si substrate and decorated with Au nanoparticles are measured using W microprobes in a scanning electron microscope, where one probe is grounded and the other is biased. HIGH and LOW states can be toggled by applying a negative or positive pulse voltage. The switching mechanism is attributed to a charge transfer between the SiC nanowires and the Au nanoparticles.

  16. Microring resonator-based diamond optothermal switch: a building block for a quantum computing network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhihong; Faraon, Andrei; Santori, Charles; Acosta, Victor; Beausoleil, Raymond G.

    2013-03-01

    The negatively-charged nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond has motivated many groups building scalable quantum information processors based on diamond photonics. This is owning to the long-lived electronic spin coherence and the capability for spin manipulation and readout of NV centers.1-4 The primitive operation is to create entanglement between two NV centers, based on schemes such as 'atom-photon entanglement' proposed by Cabrillo et al.5To scale this type of scheme beyond two qubits, one important component is an optical switch that allows light emitted from a particular device to be routed to multiple locations. With such a switch, one has choices of routing photons to specified paths and has the benefit of improving the entanglement speed by entangling multiple qubits at the same time. Yield of the existing diamond cavities coupled with NV centers are inevitably low, due to the nature of randomness for NV placement and orientation, variation of spectral stability, and variation of cavity resonance frequency and quality factor. An optical switch provides the capability to tolerate a large fraction of defective devices by routing only to the working devices. Many type of switching devices were built on conventional semiconductor materials with mechanisms from mechanical, thermal switching to carrier injection, photonics crystal, and polymer refractive index tuning .6-8 In this paper, we build an optical-thermal switch on diamond with micro-ring waveguides, mainly for the simplicity of the diamond fabrication. The the switching function was realized by locally tuning the temperature of the diamond waveguides. Switching efficiency of 31% at 'drop' port and 73% at 'through' port were obtained.

  17. Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maughan, George R.; Petitto, Karen R.; McLaughlin, Don

    2001-01-01

    Describes the connectivity features and options of modern campus communication and information system networks, including signal transmission (wire-based and wireless), signal switching, convergence of networks, and network assessment variables, to enable campus leaders to make sound future-oriented decisions. (EV)

  18. Wireless MIMO switching: distributed zero-forcing and MMSE relaying using network coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Miao; Wang, Fanggang; Zhong, Zhangdui

    2013-12-01

    In a switching problem, a one-to-one mapping from the inputs to the outputs is conducted according to a switch pattern, i.e., a permutation matrix. In this paper, we investigate a wireless switching problem, in which a group of single-antenna relays acts together as a multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) switch to carry out distributed precode-and-forward. All users transmit simultaneously to the MIMO switch in the uplink and then the MIMO switch precodes the received signals and broadcasts in the downlink. Ideally, each user could receive its desired signal from one other user with no or little interference from other users. Self-interference is allowed in the received signals, as it can be canceled when each user has the channel gain of its self-interference. We propose two distributed relaying schemes based on two widely adopted criteria, i.e., zero-forcing relaying and minimum mean square error (MMSE) relaying. For the distributed zero-forcing relaying, we further propose a message passing approach, with which the proposed zero-forcing relaying achieves significant throughput gain with little attendant overhead. We also claim that the proposed MMSE relaying achieves even larger throughput at the expense of larger amount of message passing. Simulation results validate the throughput gains of the proposed relaying schemes.

  19. THESEUS: A wavelength division multiplexed/microwave subcarrier multiplexed optical network, its ATM switch applications and device requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Wei

    1997-10-01

    A Terabit Hybrid Electro-optical /underline[Se]lf- routing Ultrafast Switch (THESEUS) has been proposed. It is a self-routing wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) / microwave subcarrier multiplexed (SCM) asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) switch for the multirate ATM networks. It has potential to be extended to a large ATM switch as 1000 x 1000 without internal blocking. Among the advantages of the hybrid implementation are flexibility in service upgrade, relaxed tolerances on optical filtering, protocol simplification and less processing overhead. For a small ATM switch, the subcarrier can be used as output buffers to solve output contention. A mathematical analysis was conducted to evaluate different buffer configurations. A testbed has been successfully constructed. Multirate binary data streams have been switched through the testbed and error free reception ([<]10-9 bit error rate) has been achieved. A simple, intuitive theoretical model has been developed to describe the heterodyne optical beat interference. A new concept of interference time and interference length has been introduced. An experimental confirmation has been conducted. The experimental results match the model very well. It shows that a large portion of optical bandwidth is wasted due to the beat interference. Based on the model, several improvement approaches have been proposed. The photo-generated carrier lifetime of silicon germanium has been measured using time-resolved reflectivity measurement. Via oxygen ion implantation, the carrier lifetime has been reduced to as short as 1 ps, corresponding to 1 THz of photodetector bandwidth. It has also been shown that copper dopants act as recombination centers in the silicon germanium.

  20. A new composite assembly mechanism for supporting QoS in OBS networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Ai-hong; Hu, Fang; Li, Wan-chong

    2014-01-01

    To provide the differential quality of service (QoS) for different classes of packets and reduce the packet loss probability (PLP), a novel priority-based composite assembly scheme for optical burst switching (OBS) networks is proposed. The low and high packet classes are aggregated into a single burst simultaneously, and the highest-priority packets are placed in the middle, while the low-priority packets are at the tail and head of the burst. The priority is lowered gradually from the middle to the ends. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed assembly strategy not only guarantees the integrity of the high-priority bursts, but also significantly reduces the average end-to-end delay of the bursts and the PLP of network. So it can adapt to the flexible network with QoS requirement.

  1. Analysis and modeling of a two-input DC/DC converter with two controlled variables and four switched networks

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, F.D.; Imes, W.G.

    1996-12-31

    Recently, a two-input tri-state DC/DC converter was presented capable of performing solar array peak-power tracking, battery power conditioning, and output voltage regulation all within the same converter structure. At light loads and during periods of low insolation, converter operation will naturally evolve through four linear switched networks. In this paper, the small-signal stability of the tri-state converter is analyzed and a large-signal averaged model is derived capable of predicting the dynamic behavior during and following transitions to and from this fourth state.

  2. All-optical packet header and payload separation based on two TOADs for optical packet switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Zhang, Min; Ye, Peida

    2006-09-01

    We present a novel all-optical header and payload separation technique that can be utilized in Un-Slotted optical packet switched networks. The technique uses two modified TOADs, one is for packet header extraction with differential modulation scheme and the other performs a simple XOR operation between the packet and its self-derived header to get the separated payload. The main virtue of this system is simple structure and low power consumption. Through numerical simulations, the operating characteristics of the scheme are illustrated. In addition, the system parameters are discussed and designed to optimize the performance of the proposed scheme.

  3. Self-Induced Switchings between Multiple Space-Time Patterns on Complex Networks of Excitable Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansmann, Gerrit; Lehnertz, Klaus; Feudel, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    We report on self-induced switchings between multiple distinct space-time patterns in the dynamics of a spatially extended excitable system. These switchings between low-amplitude oscillations, nonlinear waves, and extreme events strongly resemble a random process, although the system is deterministic. We show that a chaotic saddle—which contains all the patterns as well as channel-like structures that mediate the transitions between them—is the backbone of such a pattern-switching dynamics. Our analyses indicate that essential ingredients for the observed phenomena are that the system behaves like an inhomogeneous oscillatory medium that is capable of self-generating spatially localized excitations and that is dominated by short-range connections but also features long-range connections. With our findings, we present an alternative to the well-known ways to obtain self-induced pattern switching, namely, noise-induced attractor hopping, heteroclinic orbits, and adaptation to an external signal. This alternative way can be expected to improve our understanding of pattern switchings in spatially extended natural dynamical systems like the brain and the heart.

  4. Reservation information sharing enhancement for deflection routing in OBS network.

    PubMed

    Gao, Donghui; Zhang, Hanyi; Zhou, Zhiyu

    2005-03-07

    The resource contention problem is critical in Just-Enough-Time (JET) based optical burst switching (OBS) networks. Although deflection routing (DR) reduces the contention probability in some degree, it does not give much improvement under heavy traffic load. This paper analyzed the inducement causing contention in OBS networks, and proposed Resource Information Sharing Enhancement (RISE) scheme. Theoretical analysis shows that this scheme achieves shorter length of the detour path than normal DR. We simulated this scheme on both full mesh network and practical 14-node NSFNET. The simulation results show that it gives at best 2 orders magnitude improvement in reducing the burst contention probability over its previous routing approaches.

  5. The benefits of converged packet/TDM/DWDM switching in metro aggregation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar On, Dror; Voll, Stefan; Au-Yang, Robert

    2012-12-01

    Next generation metro aggregation systems are expected to use integrated lambda, circuit and packet switching platforms. We analyzed a typical Tier 1 aggregation scenario using a converged transport platform offering OTN, MPLS-TP and lambda switching. Vertical integration (multiple transport technologies) and horizontal integration (multiple service types) yielded about one third savings over a traditional L3 over DWDM approach. The number of wavelengths needed was roughly halved. The usage of hybrid interfaces which allow sharing the wavelength between OTN and MPLS services leads to additional savings which will increase as the line rate shifts from 10G to 40G and 100G.

  6. Chimera states in bursting neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Ghosh, Dibakar; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-01-01

    We study the existence of chimera states in pulse-coupled networks of bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with nonlocal, global, and local (nearest neighbor) couplings. Through a linear stability analysis, we discuss the behavior of the stability function in the incoherent (i.e., disorder), coherent, chimera, and multichimera states. Surprisingly, we find that chimera and multichimera states occur even using local nearest neighbor interaction in a network of identical bursting neurons alone. This is in contrast with the existence of chimera states in populations of nonlocally or globally coupled oscillators. A chemical synaptic coupling function is used which plays a key role in the emergence of chimera states in bursting neurons. The existence of chimera, multichimera, coherent, and disordered states is confirmed by means of the recently introduced statistical measures and mean phase velocity.

  7. Hierarchical multiobjective routing model in Multiprotocol Label Switching networks with two service classes - a Pareto archive strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girão-Silva, Rita; Craveirinha, José; Clímaco, João

    2012-05-01

    The article begins by reviewing a two-level hierarchical multicriteria routing model for Multiprotocol Label Switching networks with two service classes (QoS, i.e. with Quality of Service requirements, and Best Effort services) and alternative routing, as well as the foundations of a heuristic resolution approach, previously proposed by the authors. Afterwards a new variant of this heuristic approach, which includes a Pareto archive strategy, is described. In this archive, non-dominated solutions obtained throughout the heuristic are kept. At the end of the main procedure of the heuristic, these solutions are evaluated and a final solution for the routing problem is chosen using a reference point-based approach. The application of this procedure to two test networks will show, with analytic and discrete-event simulation models, that, in certain initial conditions, this approach provides improvements in the final results concerning the top-level objective functions, especially in more 'difficult' situations detected through sensitivity analysis.

  8. All-optical DGD monitor for packet-switched networks based on an integrated active Mach Zehnder interferometer operating as logic XOR gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilar, R.; Martinez, J. M.; Ramos, F.; Marti, J.

    2008-11-01

    An all-optical differential group delay (DGD) monitor for packet-switched networks is proposed. The monitoring approach consists of an integrated active Mach-Zehnder interferometer acting as a logic XOR gate. According to the estimated DGD value, a latching switch is employed to route the input packets "on-the-fly". The simulation results show a successful operation which has been confirmed with the experimental validation of the XOR-based monitoring subsystem.

  9. Cell differentiation modeled via a coupled two-switch regulatory network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schittler, D.; Hasenauer, J.; Allgöwer, F.; Waldherr, S.

    2010-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells can give rise to bone and other tissue cells, but their differentiation still escapes full control. In this paper we address this issue by mathematical modeling. We present a model for a genetic switch determining the cell fate of progenitor cells which can differentiate into osteoblasts (bone cells) or chondrocytes (cartilage cells). The model consists of two switch mechanisms and reproduces the experimentally observed three stable equilibrium states: a progenitor, an osteogenic, and a chondrogenic state. Conventionally, the loss of an intermediate (progenitor) state and the entailed attraction to one of two opposite (differentiated) states is modeled as a result of changing parameters. In our model in contrast, we achieve this by distributing the differentiation process to two functional switch parts acting in concert: one triggering differentiation and the other determining cell fate. Via stability and bifurcation analysis, we investigate the effects of biochemical stimuli associated with different system inputs. We employ our model to generate differentiation scenarios on the single cell as well as on the cell population level. The single cell scenarios allow to reconstruct the switching upon extrinsic signals, whereas the cell population scenarios provide a framework to identify the impact of intrinsic properties and the limiting factors for successful differentiation.

  10. A programming environment to control switching networks based on STC104 packet routing chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, I. C.; Schwendicke, U.; Leich, H.; Medinnis, M.; Koehler, A.; Wegner, P.; Sulanke, K.; Dippel, R.; Gellrich, A.

    1997-02-01

    The software environment used to control a large switching architecture based on SGS-Thomson STC104 (an asynchronous 32-way dynamic packet routing chip) is presented. We are evaluating this switching technology for large scale, real-time parallel systems. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) written as a multi-thread application in Java allows to set the switch configuration and to continuously monitor the state of each link. This GUI connects to a multi-thread server via TCP/IP sockets. The server is running on a PC-Linux system and implements the virtual channel protocol in communicating with the STC104 switching units using the Data Strobe link or the VME bus. Linux I/O drivers to control the Data Strobe link parallel adaptor (STC101) were developed. For each client the server creates a new thread and allocates a new socket for communications. The Java code of the GUI may be transferred to any client using the http protocol providing a user friendly interface to the system with real-time monitoring which is also platform independent.

  11. Numerical solution of the chemical master equation uniqueness and stability of the stationary distribution for chemical networks, and mRNA bursting in a gene network with negative feedback regulation.

    PubMed

    Zeron, E S; Santillán, M

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we introduce a couple of algorithms to compute the stationary probability distribution for the chemical master equation (CME) of arbitrary chemical networks. We further find the conditions guaranteeing the algorithms' convergence and the unity and stability of the stationary distribution. Next, we employ these algorithms to study the mRNA and protein probability distributions in a gene regulatory network subject to negative feedback regulation. In particular, we analyze the influence of the promoter activation/deactivation speed on the shape of such distributions. We find that a reduction of the promoter activation/deactivation speed modifies the shape of those distributions in a way consistent with the phenomenon known as mRNA (or transcription) bursting.

  12. Transitions to Synchrony in Coupled Bursting Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhamala, Mukeshwar; Jirsa, Viktor K.; Ding, Mingzhou

    2004-01-01

    Certain cells in the brain, for example, thalamic neurons during sleep, show spike-burst activity. We study such spike-burst neural activity and the transitions to a synchronized state using a model of coupled bursting neurons. In an electrically coupled network, we show that the increase of coupling strength increases incoherence first and then induces two different transitions to synchronized states, one associated with bursts and the other with spikes. These sequential transitions to synchronized states are determined by the zero crossings of the maximum transverse Lyapunov exponents. These results suggest that synchronization of spike-burst activity is a multi-time-scale phenomenon and burst synchrony is a precursor to spike synchrony.

  13. Magnetic switching

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.; Cook, E.; Hawkins, S.; Poor, S.; Reginato, L.; Schmidt, J.; Smith, M.

    1983-06-01

    The paper discusses the development program in magnetic switching which was aimed at solving the rep-rate and reliability limitations of the ATA spark gaps. The end result has been a prototype physically very similar to the present Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) pulse power unit but vastly superior in performance. This prototype, which is easily adaptable to the existing systems, has achieved a burst rep-rate of 20 kHz and an output voltage of 500 kV. A one-on-one substitution of the existing pulse power module would result in a 100 MeV accelerator. Furthermore, the high efficiency of the magnetic pulse compression stages has allowed CW operation of the prototype at one kilohertz opening up other applications for the pulse power. Performance and design details will be described.

  14. Spatial-spectral flexible optical networking: enabling switching solutions for a simplified and efficient SDM network platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomkos, I.; Zakynthinos, P.; Klonidis, D.; Marom, D.; Sygletos, S.; Ellis, A.; Salvadori, E.; Siracusa, D.; Angelou, M.; Papastergiou, G.; Psaila, N.; Ferran, J. F.; Ben-Ezra, S.; Jimenez, F.; Fernández-Palacios, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    The traffic carried by core optical networks grows at a steady but remarkable pace of 30-40% year-over-year. Optical transmissions and networking advancements continue to satisfy the traffic requirements by delivering the content over the network infrastructure in a cost and energy efficient manner. Such core optical networks serve the information traffic demands in a dynamic way, in response to requirements for shifting of traffics demands, both temporally (day/night) and spatially (business district/residential). However as we are approaching fundamental spectral efficiency limits of singlemode fibers, the scientific community is pursuing recently the development of an innovative, all-optical network architecture introducing the spatial degree of freedom when designing/operating future transport networks. Spacedivision- multiplexing through the use of bundled single mode fibers, and/or multi-core fibers and/or few-mode fibers can offer up to 100-fold capacity increase in future optical networks. The EU INSPACE project is working on the development of a complete spatial-spectral flexible optical networking solution, offering the network ultra-high capacity, flexibility and energy efficiency required to meet the challenges of delivering exponentially growing traffic demands in the internet over the next twenty years. In this paper we will present the motivation and main research activities of the INSPACE consortium towards the realization of the overall project solution.

  15. Destination directed packet switch architecture for a geostationary communication satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, W. D.; Shalkhauser, M. J.; Bobinsky, E. A.; Soni, N. J.; Quintana, J. A.; Kim, H.; Wagner, P.; Vanderaar, M.

    1992-01-01

    A major effort at NASA/Lewis is to identify and develop critical digital technologies and components that enable new commercial missions or significantly improve the performance, cost efficiency, and/or reliability of existing and planned space comunications systems. NASA envisions the need for low data rate, direct to the user communications services, for data, facsimile, voice, and video conferencing. A report that focuses on destination directed packet switching architectures for geostationary communication satellites is presented.

  16. Destination directed packet switch architecture for a geostationary communication satellite network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancic, W. D.; Shalkhauser, M. J.; Bobinsky, E. A.; Soni, N. J.; Quintana, J. A.; Kim, H.; Wagner, P.; Vanderaar, M.

    1992-08-01

    A major effort at NASA/Lewis is to identify and develop critical digital technologies and components that enable new commercial missions or significantly improve the performance, cost efficiency, and/or reliability of existing and planned space comunications systems. NASA envisions the need for low data rate, direct to the user communications services, for data, facsimile, voice, and video conferencing. A report that focuses on destination directed packet switching architectures for geostationary communication satellites is presented.

  17. Destination directed packet switch architecture for a geostationary communication satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, W. D.; Shalkhauser, M. J.; Bobinsky, E. A.; Soni, N. J.; Quintana, J. A.; Kim, H.; Wagner, P.; Vanderaar, M.

    1992-01-01

    A major effort at NASA/Lewis is to identify and develop critical digital technologies and components that enable new commercial missions or significantly improve the performance, cost efficiency, and/or reliability of existing and planned space comunications systems. NASA envisions the need for low data rate, direct to the user communications services, for data, facsimile, voice, and video conferencing. A report that focuses on destination directed packet switching architectures for geostationary communication satellites is presented.

  18. Design of a Multicast Optical Packet Switch Based on Fiber Bragg Grating Technology for Future Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuh-Jiuh; Yeh, Tzuoh-Chyau; Cheng, Shyr-Yuan

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, a non-blocking multicast optical packet switch based on fiber Bragg grating technology with optical output buffers is proposed. Only the header of optical packets is converted to electronic signals to control the fiber Bragg grating array of input ports and the packet payloads should be transparently destined to their output ports so that the proposed switch can reduce electronic interfaces as well as the bit rate. The modulation and the format of packet payloads may be non-standard where packet payloads could also include different wavelengths for increasing the volume of traffic. The advantage is obvious: the proposed switch could transport various types of traffic. An easily implemented architecture which can provide multicast services is also presented. An optical output buffer is designed to queue the packets if more than one incoming packet should reach to the same destination output port or including any waiting packets in optical output buffer that will be sent to the output port at a time slot. For preserving service-packet sequencing and fairness of routing sequence, a priority scheme and a round-robin algorithm are adopted at the optical output buffer. The fiber Bragg grating arrays for both input ports and output ports are designed for routing incoming packets using optical code division multiple access technology.

  19. Shape-dependent control of cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis: switching between attractors in cell regulatory networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, S.; Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    Development of characteristic tissue patterns requires that individual cells be switched locally between different phenotypes or "fates;" while one cell may proliferate, its neighbors may differentiate or die. Recent studies have revealed that local switching between these different gene programs is controlled through interplay between soluble growth factors, insoluble extracellular matrix molecules, and mechanical forces which produce cell shape distortion. Although the precise molecular basis remains unknown, shape-dependent control of cell growth and function appears to be mediated by tension-dependent changes in the actin cytoskeleton. However, the question remains: how can a generalized physical stimulus, such as cell distortion, activate the same set of genes and signaling proteins that are triggered by molecules which bind to specific cell surface receptors. In this article, we use computer simulations based on dynamic Boolean networks to show that the different cell fates that a particular cell can exhibit may represent a preprogrammed set of common end programs or "attractors" which self-organize within the cell's regulatory networks. In this type of dynamic network model of information processing, generalized stimuli (e.g., mechanical forces) and specific molecular cues elicit signals which follow different trajectories, but eventually converge onto one of a small set of common end programs (growth, quiescence, differentiation, apoptosis, etc.). In other words, if cells use this type of information processing system, then control of cell function would involve selection of preexisting (latent) behavioral modes of the cell, rather than instruction by specific binding molecules. Importantly, the results of the computer simulation closely mimic experimental data obtained with living endothelial cells. The major implication of this finding is that current methods used for analysis of cell function that rely on characterization of linear signaling pathways or

  20. Shape-dependent control of cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis: switching between attractors in cell regulatory networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, S.; Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    Development of characteristic tissue patterns requires that individual cells be switched locally between different phenotypes or "fates;" while one cell may proliferate, its neighbors may differentiate or die. Recent studies have revealed that local switching between these different gene programs is controlled through interplay between soluble growth factors, insoluble extracellular matrix molecules, and mechanical forces which produce cell shape distortion. Although the precise molecular basis remains unknown, shape-dependent control of cell growth and function appears to be mediated by tension-dependent changes in the actin cytoskeleton. However, the question remains: how can a generalized physical stimulus, such as cell distortion, activate the same set of genes and signaling proteins that are triggered by molecules which bind to specific cell surface receptors. In this article, we use computer simulations based on dynamic Boolean networks to show that the different cell fates that a particular cell can exhibit may represent a preprogrammed set of common end programs or "attractors" which self-organize within the cell's regulatory networks. In this type of dynamic network model of information processing, generalized stimuli (e.g., mechanical forces) and specific molecular cues elicit signals which follow different trajectories, but eventually converge onto one of a small set of common end programs (growth, quiescence, differentiation, apoptosis, etc.). In other words, if cells use this type of information processing system, then control of cell function would involve selection of preexisting (latent) behavioral modes of the cell, rather than instruction by specific binding molecules. Importantly, the results of the computer simulation closely mimic experimental data obtained with living endothelial cells. The major implication of this finding is that current methods used for analysis of cell function that rely on characterization of linear signaling pathways or

  1. Mean-square exponential input-to-state stability of delayed Cohen-Grossberg neural networks with Markovian switching based on vector Lyapunov functions.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhihong; Liu, Lei; Zhu, Quanxin

    2016-12-01

    This paper studies the mean-square exponential input-to-state stability of delayed Cohen-Grossberg neural networks with Markovian switching. By using the vector Lyapunov function and property of M-matrix, two generalized Halanay inequalities are established. By means of the generalized Halanay inequalities, sufficient conditions are also obtained, which can ensure the exponential input-to-state stability of delayed Cohen-Grossberg neural networks with Markovian switching. Two numerical examples are given to illustrate the efficiency of the derived results.

  2. Design and Demonstration of a 4×4 SFQ Network Switch Prototype System and 10-Gbps Bit-Error-Rate Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Yoshio; Hashimoto, Yoshihito; Yorozu, Shinichi

    We developed a 4×4 SFQ network switch prototype system and demonstrated its operation at 10Gbps. The system's core is composed of two SFQ chips: a 4×4 switch and a 6-channel voltage driver. The 4×4 switch chip contained both a switch fabric (i. e. a data path) and a switch scheduler (i. e. a controller). Both chips were attached to a multichip-module (MCM) carrier, which was then installed in a cryocooled system with 32 10-Gbps ports. Each chip contained about 2100 Josephson junctions on a 5-mm×5-mm die. An NEC standard 2.5-kA/cm2 fabrication process was used for the switch chip. We increased the critical current density to 10kA/cm2 for the driver chip to improve speed while maintaining wide bias margins. MCM implementation enabled us to use a hybrid critical current density technology. Voltage pulses were transferred between two chips through passive transmission lines on the MCM carrier. The cryocooled system was cooled down to about 4K using a two-stage 1-W cryocooler. We correctly operated the whole system at 10Gbps. The switch scheduler, which is driven by an on-chip clock generator, operated at 40GHz. The speed gap between SFQ and room temperature devices was filled by on-chip SFQ FIFO buffers or shift registers. We measured the bit error rate at 10Gbps and found that it was on the order of 10-13 for the 4×4 SFQ switch fabric. In addition, using semiconductor interface circuitry, we built a four-port SFQ Ethernet switch. All the components except for a compressor were installed in a standard 19-inch rack, filling a space 21 U (933.5mm or 36.75 inches) in height. After four personal computers (PCs) were connected to the switch, we have successfully transferred video data between them.

  3. Data-Driven Modeling for UGI Gasification Processes via an Enhanced Genetic BP Neural Network With Link Switches.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shida; Hou, Zhongsheng; Yin, Chenkun

    2016-12-01

    In this brief, an enhanced genetic back-propagation neural network with link switches (EGA-BPNN-LS) is proposed to address a data-driven modeling problem for gasification processes inside United Gas Improvement (UGI) gasifiers. The online-measured temperature of crude gas produced during the gasification processes plays a dominant role in the syngas industry; however, it is difficult to model temperature dynamics via first principles due to the practical complexity of the gasification process, especially as reflected by severe changes in the gas temperature resulting from infrequent manipulations of the gasifier in practice. The proposed data-driven modeling approach, EGA-BPNN-LS, incorporates an NN-LS, an EGA, and the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm. The approach cannot only learn the relationships between the control input and the system output from historical data using an optimized network structure through a combination of EGA and NN-LS but also makes use of the networks gradient information via the LM algorithm. EGA-BPNN-LS is applied to a set of data collected from the field to model the UGI gasification processes, and the effectiveness of EGA-BPNN-LS is verified.

  4. Reversible Local and Global Switching in Multicomponent Supramolecular Networks: Controlled Guest Release and Capture at the Solution/Solid Interface.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shern-Long; Fang, Yuan; Velpula, Gangamallaiah; Cometto, Fernando P; Lingenfelder, Magalí; Müllen, Klaus; Mali, Kunal S; De Feyter, Steven

    2015-12-22

    Dynamically switchable supramolecular systems offer exciting possibilities in building smart surfaces, the structure and thus the function of which can be controlled by using external stimuli. Here we demonstrate an elegant approach where the guest binding ability of a supramolecular surface can be controlled by inducing structural transitions in it. A physisorbed self-assembled network of a simple hydrogen bonding building block is used as a switching platform. We illustrate that the reversible transition between porous and nonporous networks can be accomplished using an electric field or applying a thermal stimulus. These transitions are used to achieve controlled guest release or capture at the solution-solid interface. The electric field and the temperature-mediated methods of guest release are operative at different length scales. While the former triggers the transition and thus guest release at the nanometer scale, the latter is effective over a much larger scale. The flexibility associated with physisorbed self-assembled networks renders this approach an attractive alternative to conventional switchable systems.

  5. Reconfigurable high-speed optical fibre networks: Optical wavelength conversion and switching using VCSELs to eliminate channel collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiyo, Duncan Kiboi; Chabata, T. V.; Kipnoo, E. K. Rotich; Gamatham, R. R. G.; Leitch, A. W. R.; Gibbon, T. B.

    2017-01-01

    We experimentally provide an alternative solution to channel collisions through up-wavelength conversion and switching by using vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). This has been achieved by utilizing purely optical wavelength conversion on VCSELs at the low attenuation, 1550 nm transmission window. The corresponding transmission and bit error-rate (BER) performance evaluation is also presented. In this paper, two 1550 nm VCSELs with 50-150 GHz channel spacing are modulated with a 10 Gb/s NRZ PRBS 27-1 data and their interferences investigated. A channel interference penalty range of 0.15-1.63 dB is incurred for 150-50 GHz channel spacing without transmission. To avoid channel collisions and to minimize high interference penalties, the transmitting VCSEL with data is injected into the side-mode of a slave VCSEL to obtain a new up converted wavelength. A 16 dB extinction ratio of the incoming wavelength is achieved when a 15 dBm transmitting beam is injected into the side-mode of a -4.5 dBm slave VCSEL. At 8.5 Gb/s, a 1.1 dB conversion and a 0.5 dB transmission penalties are realized when the converted wavelength is transmitted over a 24.7 km G.655 fibre. This work offers a low-cost, effective wavelength conversion and channel switching to reduce channel collision probability by reconfiguring channels at the node of networks.

  6. Providing an X25 Interface to the RSRE Pilot Packet Switched Network,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    AO-AiI 417 ROYAL SIGNALS AND.RADAR ESTABLISHMENT MALVERN ( ENGLAND ) F/6 17/2 PROVIDING AN X25 INTERFACE TO THE RSRE PILOT PACKET SWITCHED NE-ETC(UI...level 2 is in fact provided by autonomous micro processor based hardware called ’line units ’ which plug into a PPSN node and communicate with the node...solving this problem an assumption is made that all comme-cially available X25 hosts in Britain will operate to the British Pos*. Office’s Packet

  7. QoS driven routing in packet switched networks of multiple transmission media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamvaclis, C.

    1994-07-01

    This paper discusses the application of Quality of Service (QoS) driven routing on packet-swtiched, heterogeneous networks. It is assumed that the network makes use of multiple transmission media of different types including narrowband radio based media such as those used in military tactical and emergency networks, e.g. ECCM SATCOM, HF radio, etc. A critical problem in the operation of such networks is the volatile performance of the transmission media, compounded by the fact that each transmission medium may respond differently to stress conditions. QoS driven routing provides an effective way to handle transmission media performance fluctuations and optimizing the use of all the available communication resources. QoS driven routing means that packet routes are selected according to a global optimization criterion that takes into account not only network connectivity, but also the application QoS requirements, and the currently available QoS from the network links. A routing architecture is described for implementing QoS driven routing on a connectionless internetwork of multiple transmission media. This architecture is based on the use of civilian networking standards and it is implementable using commercial off-the-shelf equipment.

  8. Costs for switching partners reduce network dynamics but not cooperative behaviour.

    PubMed

    Bednarik, Peter; Fehl, Katrin; Semmann, Dirk

    2014-10-07

    Social networks represent the structuring of interactions between group members. Above all, many interactions are profoundly cooperative in humans and other animals. In accordance with this natural observation, theoretical work demonstrates that certain network structures favour the evolution of cooperation. Yet, recent experimental evidence suggests that static networks do not enhance cooperative behaviour in humans. By contrast, dynamic networks do foster cooperation. However, costs associated with dynamism such as time or resource investments in finding and establishing new partnerships have been neglected so far. Here, we show that human participants are much less likely to break links when costs arise for building new links. Especially, when costs were high, the network was nearly static. Surprisingly, cooperation levels in Prisoner's Dilemma games were not affected by reduced dynamism in social networks. We conclude that the mere potential to quit collaborations is sufficient in humans to reach high levels of cooperative behaviour. Effects of self-structuring processes or assortment on the network played a minor role: participants simply adjusted their cooperative behaviour in response to the threats of losing a partner or of being expelled. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Alternative packet switch architectures for a 30/20 GHz FDMA/TDMA geostationary communication satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stehle, Roy; Ogier, Richard G.

    1995-01-01

    This study has investigated alternatives for realizing a packet-based network switch for deployment on a communication satellite. The emphasis was on the avoidance of contention problems that can occur due to the simultaneous arrival of an excessive number of packets destined for the same downlink dwell. The study was to look ahead, beyond the current Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) capability, to the next generation of satellites. The study has not been limited by currently available technology, but has used university and commercial research efforts as a basis for designs that can be readily constructed and launched within the next five years. Tradeoffs in memory requirement, power requirement, and architecture have been considered as a part of our study.

  10. Alternative packet switch architectures for a 30/20 GHz FDMA/TDMA geostationary communication satellite network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehle, Roy; Ogier, Richard G.

    1995-06-01

    This study has investigated alternatives for realizing a packet-based network switch for deployment on a communication satellite. The emphasis was on the avoidance of contention problems that can occur due to the simultaneous arrival of an excessive number of packets destined for the same downlink dwell. The study was to look ahead, beyond the current Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) capability, to the next generation of satellites. The study has not been limited by currently available technology, but has used university and commercial research efforts as a basis for designs that can be readily constructed and launched within the next five years. Tradeoffs in memory requirement, power requirement, and architecture have been considered as a part of our study.

  11. Synchronization of a Class of Switched Neural Networks with Time-Varying Delays via Nonlinear Feedback Control.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leimin; Shen, Yi; Zhang, Guodong

    2016-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the synchronization problem for a class of switched neural networks (SNNs) with time-varying delays. First, a new crucial lemma which includes and extends the classical exponential stability theorem is constructed. Then by using the lemma, new algebraic criteria of ψ -type synchronization (synchronization with general decay rate) for SNNs are established via the designed nonlinear feedback control. The ψ -type synchronization which is in a general framework is obtained by introducing a ψ -type function. It contains exponential synchronization, polynomial synchronization, and other synchronization as its special cases. The results of this paper are general, and they also complement and extend some previous results. Finally, numerical simulations are carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  12. Flexible transparent memory cell: bipolar resistive switching via indium-tin oxide nanowire networks on a poly(dimethylsiloxane) substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Tian, Zhenhuan; Shang, Geng; Wang, Jiangteng; Li, Yufeng; Yun, Feng

    2016-11-01

    This report describes the fabrication and resistive switching (RS) characteristics of a novel flexible transparent (FT) resistive random access memory (ReRAM) device with a Ag/indium-tin oxide (ITO) nanowire network/ITO capacitor deposited on a PDMS substrate. The transmittance of the device is ˜70% in the visible region, and it exhibits a stable high-resistance state (HRS) to low-resistance state (LRS) ratio (HRS/LRS ratio) in different bending states. The RS characteristics are attributed to the congregate state of oxygen vacancies at different voltages, and the difference between positive and negative bending is mainly contributed by the effect of stress on the conductive layer. The FT-ReRAM can be used as nonvolatile memory element in future flexible transparent devices.

  13. Filtering of Discrete-Time Switched Neural Networks Ensuring Exponential Dissipative and $l_{2}$ - $l_{\\infty }$ Performances.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun Duck; Ahn, Choon Ki; Karimi, Hamid Reza; Lim, Myo Taeg

    2017-10-01

    This paper studies delay-dependent exponential dissipative and l2 - l∞ filtering problems for discrete-time switched neural networks (DSNNs) including time-delayed states. By introducing a novel discrete-time inequality, which is a discrete-time version of the continuous-time Wirtinger-type inequality, we establish new sets of linear matrix inequality (LMI) criteria such that discrete-time filtering error systems are exponentially stable with guaranteed performances in the exponential dissipative and l2 - l∞ senses. The design of the desired exponential dissipative and l2 - l∞ filters for DSNNs can be achieved by solving the proposed sets of LMI conditions. Via numerical simulation results, we show the validity of the desired discrete-time filter design approach.

  14. Localised polymer networks in chiral nematic liquid crystals for high speed photonic switching

    SciTech Connect

    Tartan, Chloe C. E-mail: steve.elston@eng.ox.ac.uk; Salter, Patrick S.; Booth, Martin J.; Morris, Stephen M.; Elston, Steve J. E-mail: steve.elston@eng.ox.ac.uk

    2016-05-14

    Self-assembled periodic structures based upon chiral liquid crystalline materials have significant potential in the field of photonics ranging from fast-switching optoelectronic devices to low-threshold lasers. The flexoelectro-optic effect, which is observed in chiral nematic liquid crystals (LCs) when an electric field is applied perpendicular to the helical axis, has significant potential as it exhibits analogue switching in 10–100 μs. However, the major technological barrier that prohibits the commercial realisation of this electro-optic effect is the requ