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Sample records for buruli ulcer

  1. The Buruli Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satendra; Basu, Somprakas; Bhartiya, Satyanam Kumar; Shukla, Vijay Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans and can manifest as a simple nodule or as aggressive skin ulcers leading to debilitating osteoarthritis or limb deformity. The disease is more prevalent in those living in remote rural areas, especially in children younger than 15 years. The exact mode of transmission is possibly through traumatic skin lesions contaminated by M ulcerans. IS2404 polymerase chain reaction from ulcer swabs or biopsies is a rapid method for confirmation of BU. In coendemic countries, HIV infection complicates the progression of BU, leading to rapidly spreading osteomyelitis. Treatment is principally medical, with antitubercular drugs, and surgery is utilized for complicated disease. Because of ineffective vaccination, primary prevention is the best option for control of the disease. PMID:26286931

  2. Infection with Mansonella perstans Nematodes in Buruli Ulcer Patients, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Frimpong, Michael; Sarfo, Fred S.; Kretschmer, Birte; Beissner, Marcus; Debrah, Alexander; Ampem-Amoako, Yaw; Abass, Kabiru M.; Thompson, William; Duah, Mabel Sarpong; Abotsi, Justice; Adjei, Ohene; Fleischer, Bernhard; Bretzel, Gisela; Wansbrough-Jones, Mark; Jacobsen, Marc

    2014-01-01

    During August 2010–December 2012, we conducted a study of patients in Ghana who had Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, and found that 23% were co-infected with Mansonella perstans nematodes; 13% of controls also had M. perstans infection. M. perstans co-infection should be considered in the diagnosis and treatment of Buruli ulcer. PMID:24857346

  3. Infection with Mansonella perstans Nematodes in Buruli Ulcer Patients, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Richard O; Frimpong, Michael; Sarfo, Fred S; Kretschmer, Birte; Beissner, Marcus; Debrah, Alexander; Ampem-Amoako, Yaw; Abass, Kabiru M; Thompson, William; Duah, Mabel Sarpong; Abotsi, Justice; Adjei, Ohene; Fleischer, Bernhard; Bretzel, Gisela; Wansbrough-Jones, Mark; Jacobsen, Marc

    2014-06-01

    During August 2010-December 2012, we conducted a study of patients in Ghana who had Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, and found that 23% were co-infected with Mansonella perstans nematodes; 13% of controls also had M. perstans infection. M. perstans co-infection should be considered in the diagnosis and treatment of Buruli ulcer. PMID:24857346

  4. Environmental transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans drives dynamics of Buruli ulcer in endemic regions of Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garchitorena, Andrés; Ngonghala, Calistus N.; Texier, Gaëtan; Landier, Jordi; Eyangoh, Sara; Bonds, Matthew H.; Guégan, Jean-François; Roche, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    Buruli Ulcer is a devastating skin disease caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans. Emergence and distribution of Buruli ulcer cases is clearly linked to aquatic ecosystems, but the specific route of transmission of M. ulcerans to humans remains unclear. Relying on the most detailed field data in space and time on M. ulcerans and Buruli ulcer available today, we assess the relative contribution of two potential transmission routes -environmental and water bug transmission- to the dynamics of Buruli ulcer in two endemic regions of Cameroon. The temporal dynamics of Buruli ulcer incidence are explained by estimating rates of different routes of transmission in mathematical models. Independently, we also estimate statistical models of the different transmission pathways on the spatial distribution of Buruli ulcer. The results of these two independent approaches are corroborative and suggest that environmental transmission pathways explain the temporal and spatial patterns of Buruli ulcer in our endemic areas better than the water bug transmission.

  5. Environmental transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans drives dynamics of Buruli ulcer in endemic regions of Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Garchitorena, Andrés; Ngonghala, Calistus N.; Texier, Gaëtan; Landier, Jordi; Eyangoh, Sara; Bonds, Matthew H.; Guégan, Jean-François; Roche, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Buruli Ulcer is a devastating skin disease caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans. Emergence and distribution of Buruli ulcer cases is clearly linked to aquatic ecosystems, but the specific route of transmission of M. ulcerans to humans remains unclear. Relying on the most detailed field data in space and time on M. ulcerans and Buruli ulcer available today, we assess the relative contribution of two potential transmission routes –environmental and water bug transmission– to the dynamics of Buruli ulcer in two endemic regions of Cameroon. The temporal dynamics of Buruli ulcer incidence are explained by estimating rates of different routes of transmission in mathematical models. Independently, we also estimate statistical models of the different transmission pathways on the spatial distribution of Buruli ulcer. The results of these two independent approaches are corroborative and suggest that environmental transmission pathways explain the temporal and spatial patterns of Buruli ulcer in our endemic areas better than the water bug transmission. PMID:26658922

  6. Buruli Ulcer in Traveler from Suriname, South America, to the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Bouke; de Vries, Henry J.C.; Zeegelaar, Jim E.; Portaels, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    We report Buruli ulcer in a man in the Netherlands. Phenotyping of samples indicate the Buruli pathogen was acquired in Suriname and activated by trauma on return to the Netherlands. Awareness of this disease by clinicians in non–Buruli ulcer–endemic areas is critical for identification. PMID:25695367

  7. [Buruli ulcer--Africa's latest mycobacterial scourge].

    PubMed

    Roupe, Gösta

    2003-11-01

    Buruliulcer is an extensive ulceration usually on the extremities. The ulcer can spread to subcutaneous fat, muscle and even bone causing osteomyelitis and death. It is the the third most common mycobacterial disease in humans after tuberculosis and leprosy. The bacterium grows in still standing water and infects children through small ulcerations in their skin. Mycobacterium ulcerans may also be transmitted by the bite of aquatic bugs (Naucordiae), which harbor the bacterium in their salivary glands. The disease affects poor people in rural, tropical areas where deforestation has led to flooding rivers, stagnant bodies of water and marsh. Benin, Cote d'Ivoire and Ghana in West Africa are seriously hit. Skin transplantation is the treatment of choice. Treatment with antibiotics has been disappointing. PMID:14650033

  8. Metabolomic profiles delineate mycolactone signature in Buruli ulcer disease

    PubMed Central

    Niang, Fatoumata; Sarfo, Fred S.; Frimpong, Michael; Guenin-Macé, Laure; Wansbrough-Jones, Mark; Stinear, Timothy; Phillips, Richard O.; Demangel, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Infection of human skin with Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, is associated with the systemic diffusion of a bacterial macrolide named mycolactone. Patients with progressive disease show alterations in their serum proteome, likely reflecting the inhibition of secreted protein production by mycolactone at the cellular level. Here, we used semi-quantitative metabolomics to characterize metabolic perturbations in serum samples of infected individuals, and human cells exposed to mycolactone. Among the 430 metabolites profiled across 20 patients and 20 healthy endemic controls, there were significant differences in the serum levels of hexoses, steroid hormones, acylcarnitines, purine, heme, bile acids, riboflavin and lysolipids. In parallel, analysis of 292 metabolites in human T cells treated or not with mycolactone showed alterations in hexoses, lysolipids and purine catabolites. Together, these data demonstrate that M. ulcerans infection causes systemic perturbations in the serum metabolome that can be ascribed to mycolactone. Of particular importance to Buruli ulcer pathogenesis is that changes in blood sugar homeostasis in infected patients are mirrored by alterations in hexose metabolism in mycolactone-exposed cells. PMID:26634444

  9. Ecology and Transmission of Buruli Ulcer Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, Richard W.; Walker, Edward D.; Small, Pamela L. C.; Wallace, John R.; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Benbow, M. Eric; Boakye, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    Buruli ulcer is a neglected emerging disease that has recently been reported in some countries as the second most frequent mycobacterial disease in humans after tuberculosis. Cases have been reported from at least 32 countries in Africa (mainly west), Australia, Southeast Asia, China, Central and South America, and the Western Pacific. Large lesions often result in scarring, contractual deformities, amputations, and disabilities, and in Africa, most cases of the disease occur in children between the ages of 4–15 years. This environmental mycobacterium, Mycobacterium ulcerans, is found in communities associated with rivers, swamps, wetlands, and human-linked changes in the aquatic environment, particularly those created as a result of environmental disturbance such as deforestation, dam construction, and agriculture. Buruli ulcer disease is often referred to as the “mysterious disease” because the mode of transmission remains unclear, although several hypotheses have been proposed. The above review reveals that various routes of transmission may occur, varying amongst epidemiological setting and geographic region, and that there may be some role for living agents as reservoirs and as vectors of M. ulcerans, in particular aquatic insects, adult mosquitoes or other biting arthropods. We discuss traditional and non-traditional methods for indicting the roles of living agents as biologically significant reservoirs and/or vectors of pathogens, and suggest an intellectual framework for establishing criteria for transmission. The application of these criteria to the transmission of M. ulcerans presents a significant challenge. PMID:21179505

  10. Land Use, Water Quality, and Incidence of Buruli Ulcer in Gold-Mining Regions of Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagarty, J.; Voegborlo, R.; Smithwick, E. A.; Singha, K.

    2011-12-01

    Buruli ulcer, an emerging bacterial disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, affects populations in many equatorial countries, predominantly in western Africa. Occurring in over thirty countries worldwide, it is the third most common Mycobacterial disease after tuberculosis and leprosy. The disease causes ulcerative lesions and can lead to severe deformity if untreated. While methods of treatment for Buruli ulcer are well known and have a high rate of success, the mode of transmission of Buruli ulcer remains elusive. Multiple hypotheses have been put forward in the search for the vector for this disease. Studies of Buruli ulcer to date seem to conclude that water is, in some way, closely related to the transmission of this disease. In particular, changes in water quality due to changes in land use may contribute to the emergence of Buruli ulcer. We hypothesize that stagnant pools, especially those with low dissolved oxygen and high metals, nitrogen, and phosphorus concentrations, will provide a favorable environment for M. ulcerans growth and transmission. To explore how climate, land use, and soil and water quality interact to create a favorable environment for Buruli ulcer emergence, we explore seasonal and annual variability in rainfall and temperature, land use, and physical and chemical properties of soil and water at five sites within the country: four in the southern part of the country (three Buruli-endemic communities and one control) and one non-endemic community in the north. The southern control accounts for differences between endemic and non-endemic communities with similar land uses and geological setting. The northern community has experienced massive floods in recent years, and we suspect that, due to this, Buruli ulcer may start to appear in the community. Results from groundwater data indicate that aquifer rock type does not strongly correlate with groundwater chemistry and that groundwater chemistry does not relate to incidence of Buruli ulcer

  11. Aquatic invertebrates as unlikely vectors of Buruli ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Benbow, M Eric; Williamson, Heather; Kimbirauskas, Ryan; McIntosh, Mollie D; Kolar, Rebecca; Quaye, Charles; Akpabey, Felix; Boakye, D; Small, Pam; Merritt, Richard W

    2008-08-01

    Buruli ulcer is a necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans and associated with exposure to aquatic habitats. To assess possible transmission of M. ulcerans by aquatic biting insects, we conducted a field examination of biting water bugs (Hemiptera: Naucoridae, Belostomatidae, Nepidae) in 15 disease-endemic and 12 non-disease-endemic areas of Ghana, Africa. From collections of 22,832 invertebrates, we compared composition, abundance, and associated M. ulcerans positivity among sites. Biting hemipterans were rare and represented a small percentage (usually <2%) of invertebrate communities. No significant differences were found in hemipteran abundance or pathogen positivity between disease-endemic and non-disease-endemic sites, and between abundance of biting hemipterans and M. ulcerans positivity. Therefore, although infection through insect bites is possible, little field evidence supports the assumption that biting hemipterans are primary vectors of M. ulcerans.

  12. [Buruli ulcer: hypothetical modes of transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans].

    PubMed

    Rodhain, François

    2012-03-01

    The incidence of Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, has been increasingly rapidly over the past thirty years, particularly in Africa. These extensive necrotic lesions are due to mycolactone, a toxin produced by the bacterium. The mode of Mycobacterium ulcerans transmission is still controversial, and several insect species have been incriminated. Several infected mosquito species have been identified in Australia, while predatory water bugs, particularly belostomatids and naucorids, have been implicated in Africa. Indeed, the bacterium has been detected in these insects' salivary glands, and experimental transmission to mice has been demonstrated, raising the possibility of human transmission by water bug bites. Interestingly, individuals highly exposed to water bug bites tend to be less often infected, indicating that frequent bites by non infected bugs might have a protective effect. Insect-borne transmission would be a minor route of transmission compared to direct transmission via skin trauma.

  13. [Buruli ulcer: hypothetical modes of transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans].

    PubMed

    Rodhain, François

    2012-03-01

    The incidence of Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, has been increasingly rapidly over the past thirty years, particularly in Africa. These extensive necrotic lesions are due to mycolactone, a toxin produced by the bacterium. The mode of Mycobacterium ulcerans transmission is still controversial, and several insect species have been incriminated. Several infected mosquito species have been identified in Australia, while predatory water bugs, particularly belostomatids and naucorids, have been implicated in Africa. Indeed, the bacterium has been detected in these insects' salivary glands, and experimental transmission to mice has been demonstrated, raising the possibility of human transmission by water bug bites. Interestingly, individuals highly exposed to water bug bites tend to be less often infected, indicating that frequent bites by non infected bugs might have a protective effect. Insect-borne transmission would be a minor route of transmission compared to direct transmission via skin trauma. PMID:23472356

  14. Treatment Outcome of Patients with Buruli Ulcer Disease in Togo

    PubMed Central

    Beissner, Marcus; Arens, Nathalie; Wiedemann, Franz; Piten, Ebekalisaï; Kobara, Basile; Bauer, Malkin; Herbinger, Karl-Heinz; Badziklou, Kossi; Banla Kere, Abiba; Löscher, Thomas; Nitschke, Jörg; Bretzel, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    Background Following introduction of antimycobacterial treatment of Buruli ulcer disease (BUD), several clinical studies evaluated treatment outcomes of BUD patients, in particular healing times, secondary lesions and functional limitations. Whereas recurrences were rarely observed, paradoxical reactions and functional limitations frequently occurred. Although systematic BUD control in Togo was established as early as 2007, treatment outcome has not been reviewed to date. Therefore, a pilot project on post-treatment follow-up of BUD patients in Togo aimed to evaluate treatment outcomes and to provide recommendations for optimization of treatment success. Methodology/Principal Findings Out of 199 laboratory confirmed BUD patients, 129 could be enrolled in the study. The lesions of 109 patients (84.5%) were completely healed without any complications, 5 patients (3.9%) had secondary lesions and 15 patients (11.6%) had functional limitations. Edema, category III ulcers >15cm, healing times >180 days and a limitation of movement at time of discharge constituted the main risk factors significantly associated with BUD related functional limitations (P<0.01). Review of all BUD related documentation revealed major shortcomings, in particular concerning medical records on adjuvant surgical and physiotherapeutic treatment. Conclusions/Significance This study presents the first systematic analysis of treatment outcome of BUD patients from Togo. Median times to healing and the absence of recurrences were in line with findings reported by other investigators. The percentage of functional limitations of 11.6% was lower than in other studies, and edema, category III ulcers, healing time >180 days and limitation of movement at discharge constituted the main risk factors for functional limitations in Togolese BUD patients. Standardized treatment plans, patient assessment and follow-up, as well as improved management of medical records are recommended to allow for intensified

  15. [Distribution of Buruli ulcer in the Zè district of Benin].

    PubMed

    Sopoh, G; Victoire, A; Johnson, R C; Barogui, Y; Dossou, A; Van der Werf, T S; Stienstra, Y; Makoutodé, M; Boko, M

    2010-08-01

    The goals of this cross-sectional study conducted in the Zè district of Benin were to determine the overall distribution and prevalence of Buruli ulcer (BU) and to identify environmental and behavioral risk factors. A total of 425 current or previous BU patients from the study district were included. Data was obtained by direct observation, semi-structured interviews, and document review. The main findings can be summarized as follows. The overall prevalence of BU in the Zè district in 2006 was 52 cases per 10000 inhabitants. The prevalence of current and previous cases was 28.1 and 23.9 per 10 000 inhabitants respectively. The distribution of BU within the district was highly variable from one subdistrict to another and from one village to another within the same subdistrict. The subdistricts showing the highest and lowest endemicity were Djigbé with 265 cases per 10 000 inhabitants and Koundokpoé with 3 cases per 10 000 inhabitants respectively. Proximity of the hamlets to water bodies was a risk factor for the disease.

  16. [Mycobacterium ulcerans disease (Buruli ulcer) in Gabon: 2005-2011].

    PubMed

    Bayonne Manou, L S; Portaels, F; Eddyani, M; Book, A U; Vandelannoote, K; de Jong, B C

    2013-01-01

    The first cases of Buruli ulcer (BU) in Gabon were described in the 1960s. Between 2005 and 2011, 301 clinically suspected cases of BU were found in all nine provinces of Gabon, and their lesions sampled for microbiological confirmation. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) found 120 (39.9%) of these lesions positive and 181 (60.1%) negative for Mycobacterium ulcerans. The confirmed cases came mainly from the province of Moyen-Ogooué, particularly from localities along the Ogooué River (n=117; 52.5% of the samples in this province were PCR-positive). The detection rates per 100,000 inhabitants in this province ranged from 94.7 cases in 2005 to 28 in 2007, after an absence of active case-finding in 2006. The final three PCR-positive cases were found in the province of Estuaire. The characteristics of the confirmed BU patients (that is, PCR-positive) were identical to those described in other African countries: most patients were younger than 15 years old, and most lesions were found on both the upper and lower limbs. The group of suspected cases (PCR-negative) differed from the PCR-positive group for patient age (most patients were aged 15 to 49 years), lesion location (more frequently on the lower limbs), and ulceration (more frequent in the suspected cases). Some PCR-negative patients probably had other diseases; this underlines the importance of the differential diagnosis of BU. The cure rate of PCR(-)confirmed cases in our study was 88%; treatment was the antibiotic combination recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). Our study demonstrates that BU is endemic in Gabon and is a public health problem there. Patients consult late with often extensive lesions. Awareness campaigns should be pursued to ensure earlier treatment of patients. The influence of HIV on BU in Gabon also deserves particular attention.

  17. Assessment and Treatment of Pain during Treatment of Buruli Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Barogui, Yves T.; Sopoh, Ghislain; Phillips, Richard O.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Loth, Susanne; Molenbuur, Bouwe; Plantinga, Mirjam; Ranchor, Adelita V.; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2015-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is described as a relatively painless condition; however clinical observations reveal that patients do experience pain during their treatment. Knowledge on current pain assessment and treatment in BU is necessary to develop and implement a future guideline on pain management in BU. Methodology A mixed methods approach was used, consisting of information retrieved from medical records on prescribed pain medication from Ghana and Benin, and semi-structured interviews with health care personnel (HCP) from Ghana on pain perceptions, assessment and treatment. Medical records (n = 149) of patients treated between 2008 and 2012 were collected between November 2012 and August 2013. Interviews (n = 11) were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim and qualitatively analyzed. Principal Findings In 113 (84%) of the 135 included records, pain medication, mostly simple analgesics, was prescribed. In 48% of the prescriptions, an indication was not documented. HCP reported that advanced BU could be painful, especially after wound care and after a skin graft. They reported not be trained in the assessment of mild pain. Pain recognition was perceived as difficult, as patients were said to suppress or to exaggerate pain, and to have different expectations regarding acceptable pain levels. HCP reported a fear of side effects of pain medication, shortage and irregularities in the supply of pain medication, and time constraints among medical doctors for pain management. Conclusions Professionals perceived BU disease as potentially painful, and predominantly focused on severe pain. Our study suggests that pain in BU deserves attention and should be integrated in current treatment. PMID:26402069

  18. Genetic Susceptibility and Predictors of Paradoxical Reactions in Buruli Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Roch Christian; Phillips, Richard O.; van der Veer, Eveline; van Diemen, Cleo; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Buruli ulcer (BU) is the third most frequent mycobacterial disease in immunocompetent persons after tuberculosis and leprosy. During the last decade, eight weeks of antimicrobial treatment has become the standard of care. This treatment may be accompanied by transient clinical deterioration, known as paradoxical reaction. We investigate the incidence and the risks factors associated with paradoxical reaction in BU. Methods The lesion size of participants was assessed by careful palpation and recorded by serial acetate sheet tracings. For every time point, surface area was compared with the previous assessment. All patients received antimicrobial treatment for 8 weeks. Serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, the primary indicator of vitamin D status, was determined in duplex for blood samples at baseline by a radioimmunoassay. We genotyped four polymorphisms in the SLC11A1 gene, previously associated with susceptibility to BU. For testing the association of genetic variants with paradoxical responses, we used a binary logistic regression analysis with the occurrence of a paradoxical response as the dependent variable. Results Paradoxical reaction occurred in 22% of the patients; the reaction was significantly associated with trunk localization (p = .039 by Χ2), larger lesions (p = .021 by Χ2) and genetic factors. The polymorphisms 3’UTR TGTG ins/ins (OR 7.19, p < .001) had a higher risk for developing paradoxical reaction compared to ins/del or del/del polymorphisms. Conclusions Paradoxical reactions are common in BU. They are associated with trunk localization, larger lesions and polymorphisms in the SLC11A1 gene. PMID:27097163

  19. The Incubation Period of Buruli Ulcer (Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection)

    PubMed Central

    Trubiano, Jason A.; Lavender, Caroline J.; Fyfe, Janet A. M.; Bittmann, Simone; Johnson, Paul D. R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Buruli Ulcer (BU) is caused by the environmental microbe Mycobacterium ulcerans. Despite unclear transmission, contact with a BU endemic region is the key known risk factor. In Victoria, Australia, where endemic areas have been carefully mapped, we aimed to estimate the Incubation Period (IP) of BU by interviewing patients who reported defined periods of contact with an endemic area prior to BU diagnosis. Method A retrospective review was undertaken of 408 notifications of BU in Victoria from 2002 to 2012. Telephone interviews using a structured questionnaire and review of notification records were performed. Patients with a single visit exposure to a defined endemic area were included and the period from exposure to disease onset determined (IP). Results We identified 111 of 408 notified patients (27%) who had a residential address outside a known endemic area, of whom 23 (6%) reported a single visit exposure within the previous 24 months. The median age of included patients was 30 years (range: 6 to 73) and 65% were male. 61% had visited the Bellarine Peninsula, currently the most active endemic area. The median time from symptom onset to diagnosis was 71 days (range: 34–204 days). The midpoint of the reported IP range was utilized to calculate a point estimate of the IP for each case. Subsequently, the mean IP for the cohort was calculated at 135 days (IQR: 109–160; CI 95%: 113.9–156), corresponding to 4.5 months or 19.2 weeks. The shortest IP recorded was 32 days and longest 264 days (Figure 1 & 2). IP did not vary for variables investigated. Conclusions The estimated mean IP of BU in Victoria is 135 days (IQR: 109–160 days), 4.5 months. The shortest recorded was IP 34 days and longest 264 days. A greater understanding of BU IP will aid clinical risk assessment and future research. PMID:24098820

  20. Distribution of Mycobacterium ulcerans in Buruli Ulcer Endemic and Non-Endemic Aquatic Sites in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Heather R.; Benbow, Mark E.; Nguyen, Khoa D.; Beachboard, Dia C.; Kimbirauskas, Ryan K.; McIntosh, Mollie D.; Quaye, Charles; Ampadu, Edwin O.; Boakye, Daniel; Merritt, Richard W.; Small, Pamela L. C.

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, is an emerging environmental bacterium in Australia and West Africa. The primary risk factor associated with Buruli ulcer is proximity to slow moving water. Environmental constraints for disease are shown by the absence of infection in arid regions of infected countries. A particularly mysterious aspect of Buruli ulcer is the fact that endemic and non-endemic villages may be only a few kilometers apart within the same watershed. Recent studies suggest that aquatic invertebrate species may serve as reservoirs for M. ulcerans, although transmission pathways remain unknown. Systematic studies of the distribution of M. ulcerans in the environment using standard ecological methods have not been reported. Here we present results from the first study based on random sampling of endemic and non-endemic sites. In this study PCR-based methods, along with biofilm collections, have been used to map the presence of M. ulcerans within 26 aquatic sites in Ghana. Results suggest that M. ulcerans is present in both endemic and non-endemic sites and that variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) profiling can be used to follow chains of transmission from the environment to humans. Our results suggesting that the distribution of M. ulcerans is far broader than the distribution of human disease is characteristic of environmental pathogens. These findings imply that focal demography, along with patterns of human water contact, may play a major role in transmission of Buruli ulcer. PMID:18365034

  1. Methods used in preclinical assessment of anti-Buruli ulcer agents: A global perspective.

    PubMed

    Tsouh, Patrick Valere Fokou; Addo, Phyllis; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Boyom, Fabrice Fekam

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans is the third most common chronic mycobacterial infection in humans. Approximately 5000 cases are reported annually from at least 33 countries around the globe, especially in rural African communities. Even though anti-mycobacterial therapy is often effective for early nodular or ulcerative lesions, surgery is sometimes employed for aiding wound healing and correction of deformities. The usefulness of the antibiotherapy nonetheless is challenged by huge restrictive factors such as high cost, surgical scars and loss of income due to loss of man-hours, and in some instances employment. For these reasons, more effective and safer drugs are urgently needed, and research programs into alternative therapeutics including investigation of natural products should be encouraged. There is the need for appropriate susceptibility testing methods for the evaluation of potency. A number of biological assay methodologies are in current use, ranging from the classical agar and broth dilution assay formats, to radiorespirometric, dye-based, and fluorescent/luminescence reporter assays. Mice, rats, armadillo, guinea pigs, monkeys, grass cutters and lizards have been suggested as animal models for Buruli ulcer. This review presents an overview of in vitro and in vivo susceptibility testing methods developed so far for the determination of anti-Buruli ulcer activity of natural products and derivatives. PMID:25792087

  2. Survey of water bugs in bankim, a new buruli ulcer endemic area in cameroon.

    PubMed

    Ebong, Solange Meyin A; Eyangoh, Sara; Marion, Estelle; Landier, Jordi; Marsollier, Laurent; Guégan, Jean-François; Legall, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Buruli ulcer is a debitliating human skin disease with an unknown transmission mode although epidemiological data link it with swampy areas. Data available suggest that aquatic insects play a role in the dissemination and/or transmission of this disease. However, their biodiversity and biology remain poorly documented. We conducted an entomological survey in Bankim, Cameroon, an area recently described as endemic for Buruli ulcer in order to identify the commonly occurring aquatic bugs and document their relative abundance, diversity, and spatial distribution. Collection of aquatic bugs was realized over a period of one month by daily direct capture in different aquatic environments (streams, ponds, and rivers) and through light traps at night. Globally, the data obtained showed the presence of five families (Belostomatidae, Naucoridae, Nepidae, Notonectidae, and Gerridae), their abundance, distribution and diversity varying according to the type of aquatic environments and light attraction.

  3. Survey of water bugs in bankim, a new buruli ulcer endemic area in cameroon.

    PubMed

    Ebong, Solange Meyin A; Eyangoh, Sara; Marion, Estelle; Landier, Jordi; Marsollier, Laurent; Guégan, Jean-François; Legall, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Buruli ulcer is a debitliating human skin disease with an unknown transmission mode although epidemiological data link it with swampy areas. Data available suggest that aquatic insects play a role in the dissemination and/or transmission of this disease. However, their biodiversity and biology remain poorly documented. We conducted an entomological survey in Bankim, Cameroon, an area recently described as endemic for Buruli ulcer in order to identify the commonly occurring aquatic bugs and document their relative abundance, diversity, and spatial distribution. Collection of aquatic bugs was realized over a period of one month by daily direct capture in different aquatic environments (streams, ponds, and rivers) and through light traps at night. Globally, the data obtained showed the presence of five families (Belostomatidae, Naucoridae, Nepidae, Notonectidae, and Gerridae), their abundance, distribution and diversity varying according to the type of aquatic environments and light attraction. PMID:22666273

  4. Recombinant BCG Expressing Mycobacterium ulcerans Ag85A Imparts Enhanced Protection against Experimental Buruli ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Bryan E.; Hale, Laura P.; Lee, Sunhee

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer, an emerging tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU), is characterized by disfiguring skin necrosis and high morbidity. Relatively little is understood about the mode of transmission, pathogenesis, or host immune responses to MU infection. Due to significant reduction in quality of life for patients with extensive tissue scarring, and that a disproportionately high percentage of those affected are disadvantaged children, a Buruli ulcer vaccine would be greatly beneficial to the worldwide community. Previous studies have shown that mice inoculated with either M. bovis bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG) or a DNA vaccine encoding the M. ulcerans mycolyl transferase, Ag85A (MU-Ag85A), are transiently protected against pathology caused by intradermal challenge with MU. Building upon this principle, we have generated quality-controlled, live-recombinant strains of BCG and M. smegmatis which express the immunodominant MU Ag85A. Priming with rBCG MU-Ag85A followed by an M. smegmatis MU-Ag85A boost strongly induced murine antigen-specific CD4+ T cells and elicited functional IFNγ-producing splenocytes which recognized MU-Ag85A peptide and whole M. ulcerans better than a BCG prime-boost vaccination. Strikingly, mice vaccinated with a single subcutaneous dose of BCG MU-Ag85A or prime-boost displayed significantly enhanced survival, reduced tissue pathology, and lower bacterial load compared to mice vaccinated with BCG. Importantly, this level of superior protection against experimental Buruli ulcer compared to BCG has not previously been achieved. These results suggest that use of BCG as a recombinant vehicle expressing MU antigens represents an effective Buruli ulcer vaccine strategy and warrants further antigen discovery to improve vaccine efficacy. PMID:26393347

  5. Risk Factors for Buruli Ulcer: A Case Control Study in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Pouillot, Régis; Matias, Gonçalo; Wondje, Christelle Mbondji; Portaels, Françoise; Valin, Nadia; Ngos, François; Njikap, Adelaïde; Marsollier, Laurent; Fontanet, Arnaud; Eyangoh, Sara

    2007-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer is an infectious disease involving the skin, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. This disease is associated with areas where the water is slow-flowing or stagnant. However, the exact mechanism of transmission of the bacillus and the development of the disease through human activities is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings A case-control study to identify Buruli ulcer risk factors in Cameroon compared case-patients with community-matched controls on one hand and family-matched controls on the other hand. Risk factors identified by the community-matched study (including 163 pairs) were: having a low level of education, swamp wading, wearing short, lower-body clothing while farming, living near a cocoa plantation or woods, using adhesive bandages when hurt, and using mosquito coils. Protective factors were: using bed nets, washing clothes, and using leaves as traditional treatment or rubbing alcohol when hurt. The family-matched study (including 118 pairs) corroborated the significance of education level, use of bed nets, and treatment with leaves. Conclusions/Significance Covering limbs during farming activities is confirmed as a protective factor guarding against Buruli ulcer disease, but newly identified factors including wound treatment and use of bed nets may provide new insight into the unknown mode of transmission of M. ulcerans or the development of the disease. PMID:18160977

  6. [Community-based approaches in the fight against Buruli ulcer : review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Ndongo, Paule Yolande; Fond-Harmant, Laurence; Deccache, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is an infectious skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. It mainly affects poor communities living close to bodies of water. In the absence of early treatment, this "neglected" disease can cause lasting deformities and may require limb amputation. It is reported in 34 countries and is the third most common mycobacterial disease in immunocompetent patients. Considerable progress has been made in treatment and prevention. The Cotonou Declaration (2009) describes the recommended control strategies. Although effective, current control strategies are limited because they do not take into account all the factors that influence emergence, prevention and cure of the disease. The control of Buruli ulcer mainly depends on intervention on social, cultural and psychosocial factors that influence preventive and self-care behaviour. The health promotion approach requires collaboration with populations in order to perform simultaneous actions on BU factors in the community setting. Although effective on many health problems, health promotion is not applied in the fight against BU due to the absence of action on all factors such as poverty. This article presents a review of the literature on BU strategies and community approaches. 407 relevant articles published in 1998-2013 period were examined. Eleven programmes are based on a top-down approach, which does not include populations in decision-making processes, unlike the bottom-up participatory approaches recommended in health promotion. Three health promotion programmes and 6 community-based participatory approaches were identified and examined. Community participation and empowerment constitute the basis for a community approach in the fight against Buruli ulcer.

  7. Clinical and Laboratory Diagnosis of Buruli Ulcer Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Aboagye, Samuel Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing cutaneous infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Early diagnosis is crucial to prevent morbid effects and misuse of drugs. We review developments in laboratory diagnosis of BU, discuss limitations of available diagnostic methods, and give a perspective on the potential of using aptamers as point-of-care. Methods. Information for this review was searched through PubMed, web of knowledge, and identified data up to December 2015. References from relevant articles and reports from WHO Annual Meeting of the Global Buruli Ulcer initiative were also used. Finally, 59 articles were used. Results. The main laboratory methods for BU diagnosis are microscopy, culture, PCR, and histopathology. Microscopy and PCR are used routinely for diagnosis. PCR targeting IS2404 is the gold standard for laboratory confirmation. Culture remains the only method that detects viable bacilli, used for diagnosing relapse and accrued isolates for epidemiological investigation as well as monitoring drug resistance. Laboratory confirmation is done at centers distant from endemic communities reducing confirmation to a quality assurance. Conclusions. Current efforts aimed at developing point-of-care diagnostics are saddled with major drawbacks; we, however, postulate that selection of aptamers against MU target can be used as point of care. PMID:27413382

  8. A Theoretical Model for the Transmission Dynamics of the Buruli Ulcer with Saturated Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bonyah, Ebenezer; Dontwi, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    The management of the Buruli ulcer (BU) in Africa is often accompanied by limited resources, delays in treatment, and macilent capacity in medical facilities. These challenges limit the number of infected individuals that access medical facilities. While most of the mathematical models with treatment assume a treatment function proportional to the number of infected individuals, in settings with such limitations, this assumption may not be valid. To capture these challenges, a mathematical model of the Buruli ulcer with a saturated treatment function is developed and studied. The model is a coupled system of two submodels for the human population and the environment. We examine the stability of the submodels and carry out numerical simulations. The model analysis is carried out in terms of the reproduction number of the submodel of environmental dynamics. The dynamics of the human population submodel, are found to occur at the steady states of the submodel of environmental dynamics. Sensitivity analysis is carried out on the model parameters and it is observed that the BU epidemic is driven by the dynamics of the environment. The model suggests that more effort should be focused on environmental management. The paper is concluded by discussing the public implications of the results. PMID:25214885

  9. Impact of Mycobacterium ulcerans Biofilm on Transmissibility to Ecological Niches and Buruli Ulcer Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Mary; Korduláková, Jana; Tafelmeyer, Petra; Carbonnelle, Etienne; Aubry, Jacques; Milon, Geneviève; Legras, Pierre; André, Jean-Paul Saint; Leroy, Céline; Cottin, Jane; Guillou, Marie Laure Joly; Reysset, Gilles; Cole, Stewart T

    2007-01-01

    The role of biofilms in the pathogenesis of mycobacterial diseases remains largely unknown. Mycobacterium ulcerans, the etiological agent of Buruli ulcer, a disfiguring disease in humans, adopts a biofilm-like structure in vitro and in vivo, displaying an abundant extracellular matrix (ECM) that harbors vesicles. The composition and structure of the ECM differs from that of the classical matrix found in other bacterial biofilms. More than 80 proteins are present within this extracellular compartment and appear to be involved in stress responses, respiration, and intermediary metabolism. In addition to a large amount of carbohydrates and lipids, ECM is the reservoir of the polyketide toxin mycolactone, the sole virulence factor of M. ulcerans identified to date, and purified vesicles extracted from ECM are highly cytotoxic. ECM confers to the mycobacterium increased resistance to antimicrobial agents, and enhances colonization of insect vectors and mammalian hosts. The results of this study support a model whereby biofilm changes confer selective advantages to M. ulcerans in colonizing various ecological niches successfully, with repercussions for Buruli ulcer pathogenesis. PMID:17480118

  10. Clinical and Laboratory Diagnosis of Buruli Ulcer Disease: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Sakyi, Samuel A; Aboagye, Samuel Y; Darko Otchere, Isaac; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy

    2016-01-01

    Background. Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing cutaneous infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Early diagnosis is crucial to prevent morbid effects and misuse of drugs. We review developments in laboratory diagnosis of BU, discuss limitations of available diagnostic methods, and give a perspective on the potential of using aptamers as point-of-care. Methods. Information for this review was searched through PubMed, web of knowledge, and identified data up to December 2015. References from relevant articles and reports from WHO Annual Meeting of the Global Buruli Ulcer initiative were also used. Finally, 59 articles were used. Results. The main laboratory methods for BU diagnosis are microscopy, culture, PCR, and histopathology. Microscopy and PCR are used routinely for diagnosis. PCR targeting IS2404 is the gold standard for laboratory confirmation. Culture remains the only method that detects viable bacilli, used for diagnosing relapse and accrued isolates for epidemiological investigation as well as monitoring drug resistance. Laboratory confirmation is done at centers distant from endemic communities reducing confirmation to a quality assurance. Conclusions. Current efforts aimed at developing point-of-care diagnostics are saddled with major drawbacks; we, however, postulate that selection of aptamers against MU target can be used as point of care. PMID:27413382

  11. David Barker, Buruli ulcer and the epidemiology of a neglected tropical disease.

    PubMed

    Phillips, D I W

    2015-10-01

    In 1969, David Barker, his wife and four children moved to Uganda to work at Makerere Medical School in the capital Kampala. During the 1960s, Makerere had become a research and teaching centre with an international reputation based on the work of Trowell, Burkitt, Hutt and many others who had pioneered studies explaining the disease patterns in the West Nile area on the basis of the local climate, nutrition and lifestyle. David Barker was funded by the Medical Research Council to carry out research on a poorly understood disease, Buruli ulcer, joining Scottish surgeon Wilson Carswell, who was later to achieve fame as the role model for Dr Garrigan in Giles Foden's novel The Last King of Scotland.

  12. Situated knowledge of pathogenic landscapes in Ghana: Understanding the emergence of Buruli ulcer through qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Tschakert, Petra; Ricciardi, Vincent; Smithwick, Erica; Machado, Mario; Ferring, David; Hausermann, Heidi; Bug, Leah

    2016-02-01

    Successfully addressing neglected tropical diseases requires nuanced understandings of pathogenic landscapes that incorporate situated, contexualized community knowledge. In the case of Buruli ulcer (BU), the role of social science is vital to investigate complex human-environment interactions and navigate different ways of knowing. We analyze a set of qualitative data from our interdisciplinary project on BU in Ghana, drawing from participatory mapping, focus group discussions, semi-structured interviews, and open-ended survey questions to explore how people in endemic and non-endemic areas see themselves embedded in changing environmental and social landscapes. We pay particular attention to landscape disturbance through logging and small-scale alluvial gold mining. The results from our participatory research underscore the holistic nature of BU emergence in landscapes, encapsulated in partial and incomplete local descriptions, the relevance of collective learning to distill complexity, and the potential of rich qualitative data to inform quantitative landscape-disease models.

  13. Situated knowledge of pathogenic landscapes in Ghana: Understanding the emergence of Buruli ulcer through qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Tschakert, Petra; Ricciardi, Vincent; Smithwick, Erica; Machado, Mario; Ferring, David; Hausermann, Heidi; Bug, Leah

    2016-02-01

    Successfully addressing neglected tropical diseases requires nuanced understandings of pathogenic landscapes that incorporate situated, contexualized community knowledge. In the case of Buruli ulcer (BU), the role of social science is vital to investigate complex human-environment interactions and navigate different ways of knowing. We analyze a set of qualitative data from our interdisciplinary project on BU in Ghana, drawing from participatory mapping, focus group discussions, semi-structured interviews, and open-ended survey questions to explore how people in endemic and non-endemic areas see themselves embedded in changing environmental and social landscapes. We pay particular attention to landscape disturbance through logging and small-scale alluvial gold mining. The results from our participatory research underscore the holistic nature of BU emergence in landscapes, encapsulated in partial and incomplete local descriptions, the relevance of collective learning to distill complexity, and the potential of rich qualitative data to inform quantitative landscape-disease models. PMID:26761375

  14. Selamectin Is the Avermectin with the Best Potential for Buruli Ulcer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Scherr, Nicole; Pluschke, Gerd; Thompson, Charles J.; Ramón-García, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis was done to evaluate the potential use of anti-parasitic macrocyclic lactones (including avermectins and milbemycins) for Buruli ulcer (BU) therapy. A panel containing nearly all macrocyclic lactones used in human or in veterinary medicine was analyzed for activity in vitro against clinical isolates of Mycobacterium ulcerans. Milbemycin oxime and selamectin were the most active drugs against M. ulcerans with MIC values from 2 to 8 μg/mL and 2 to 4 μg/mL, respectively. In contrast, ivermectin and moxidectin, which are both in clinical use, showed no significant activity (MIC> 32 μg/mL). Time-kill kinetic assays showed bactericidal activity of selamectin and in vitro pharmacodynamic studies demonstrated exposure-dependent activity. These data together with analyses of published pharmacokinetic information strongly suggest that selamectin is the most promising macrocyclic lactone for BU treatment. PMID:26270480

  15. Spatial Analysis of Anthropogenic Landscape Disturbance and Buruli Ulcer Disease in Benin

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Lindsay P.; Finley, Andrew O.; Benbow, M. Eric; Gronseth, Jenni; Small, Pamela; Johnson, Roch Christian; Sopoh, Ghislain E.; Merritt, Richard M.; Williamson, Heather; Qi, Jiaguo

    2015-01-01

    Background Land use and land cover (LULC) change is one anthropogenic disturbance linked to infectious disease emergence. Current research has focused largely on wildlife and vector-borne zoonotic diseases, neglecting to investigate landscape disturbance and environmental bacterial infections. One example is Buruli ulcer (BU) disease, a necrotizing skin disease caused by the environmental pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU). Empirical and anecdotal observations have linked BU incidence to landscape disturbance, but potential relationships have not been quantified as they relate to land cover configurations. Methodology/Principal Findings A landscape ecological approach utilizing Bayesian hierarchical models with spatial random effects was used to test study hypotheses that land cover configurations indicative of anthropogenic disturbance were related to Buruli ulcer (BU) disease in southern Benin, and that a spatial structure existed for drivers of BU case distribution in the region. A final objective was to generate a continuous, risk map across the study region. Results suggested that villages surrounded by naturally shaped, or undisturbed rather than disturbed, wetland patches at a distance within 1200m were at a higher risk for BU, and study outcomes supported the hypothesis that a spatial structure exists for the drivers behind BU risk in the region. The risk surface corresponded to known BU endemicity in Benin and identified moderate risk areas within the boundary of Togo. Conclusions/Significance This study was a first attempt to link land cover configurations representative of anthropogenic disturbances to BU prevalence. Study results identified several significant variables, including the presence of natural wetland areas, warranting future investigations into these factors at additional spatial and temporal scales. A major contribution of this study included the incorporation of a spatial modeling component that predicted BU rates to new locations

  16. Health-Related Quality of Life Among Persons Living with Buruli Ulcer in Amasaman Community, Ga West District Accra, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Hamzat, Talhatu K.; Boakye-Afram, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This cross-sectional study compared the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of individuals with Buruli ulcer (Focus group) and age-matched apparently healthy peers without the ulcer (Control group) living in Amasaman in the Ga West District, Ghana. Gender pattern in the Health-Related Quality of Life of the Focus group was also investigated. Methodology: Participants comprised of consecutively recruited 84 Focus and 100 Control group subjects. Socio-demographics of all participants and the clinical profile of Focus group subjects were obtained. The Nottingham Health Profile Questionnaire was used to measure the quality of life. Data was analysed using Mann-Whitney U statistic at 0.05 alpha. Results: Focus group had significantly higher scores than Control in all the six (6) domains of the Nottingham Health Profile (p<0.05); no significant difference was observed in the total health score of females compared to males in both the Focus and Control groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: The findings suggest that, Buruli Ulcer impact negatively on the Health-Related Quality of Life of the victims. Aside medical interventions, the quality of life as well as the socio-cultural and economic impacts of Buruli ulcer should be taken in cognizance while planning community-based rehabilitation programmes for those affected. PMID:22489227

  17. Treating Mycobacterium ulcerans disease (Buruli ulcer): from surgery to antibiotics, is the pill mightier than the knife?

    PubMed Central

    Converse, Paul J; Nuermberger, Eric L; Almeida, Deepak V; Grosset, Jacques H

    2011-01-01

    Until 2004, the skin disease known as Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, could only be treated by surgery and skin grafting. Although this worked reasonably well on early lesions typically found in patients in Australia, the strategy was usually impractical on large lesions resulting from diagnostic delay in patients in rural West Africa. Based on promising preclinical studies, treatment trials in West Africa have shown that a combination of rifampin and streptomycin administered daily for 8 weeks can kill M. ulcerans bacilli, arrest the disease, and promote healing without relapse or reduce the extent of surgical excision. Improved treatment options are the focus of research that has increased tremendously since the WHO began its Global Buruli Ulcer Initiative in 1998. PMID:22004037

  18. Occurrence of free-living amoebae in communities of low and high endemicity for Buruli ulcer in southern Benin.

    PubMed

    Eddyani, Miriam; De Jonckheere, Johan F; Durnez, Lies; Suykerbuyk, Patrick; Leirs, Herwig; Portaels, Françoise

    2008-11-01

    Buruli ulcer or Mycobacterium ulcerans disease occurs mainly in areas in proximity to standing or slowly running freshwater, habitats in which free-living amoebae occur. For this reason, a possible link between the habitat of M. ulcerans and free-living amoebae was investigated. Free-living amoebae and mycobacteria were isolated from water and biofilm specimens taken from protected and unprotected sources of water in villages known to have either high or low endemicity for Buruli ulcer in Benin. Amoebae were isolated from 78.8% of samples. A greater proportion of water bodies in areas of high endemicity had amoebae than in areas of low endemicity (83.3% versus 66.7%). Protected sources of water were significantly more likely to contain amoebae in areas of high endemicity than in areas of low endemicity (88.0% versus 11.1%). Several pathogenic free-living amoebae and mycobacteria were isolated. However, no M. ulcerans was isolated and no specimen was positive for IS2404 PCR. Our results show that the study area has a water hygiene problem, which is greater in areas of high Buruli ulcer endemicity than in areas of low endemicity. Our observations indicate that additional studies are required to explore the possible link between free-living amoebae and mycobacteria.

  19. Combined Inflammatory and Metabolic Defects Reflected by Reduced Serum Protein Levels in Patients with Buruli Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Landier, Jordi; Oldenburg, Reid; Frimpong, Michael; Wansbrough-Jones, Mark; Abass, Kabiru; Thompson, William; Forson, Mark; Fontanet, Arnaud; Niang, Fatoumata; Demangel, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Buruli ulcer is a skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans that is spreading in tropical countries, with major public health and economic implications in West Africa. Multi-analyte profiling of serum proteins in patients and endemic controls revealed that Buruli ulcer disease down-regulates the circulating levels of a large array of inflammatory mediators, without impacting on the leukocyte composition of peripheral blood. Notably, several proteins contributing to acute phase reaction, lipid metabolism, coagulation and tissue remodelling were also impacted. Their down-regulation was selective and persisted after the elimination of bacteria with antibiotic therapy. It involved proteins with various functions and origins, suggesting that M. ulcerans infection causes global and chronic defects in the host's protein metabolism. Accordingly, patients had reduced levels of total serum proteins and blood urea, in the absence of signs of malnutrition, or functional failure of liver or kidney. Interestingly, slow healers had deeper metabolic and coagulation defects at the start of antibiotic therapy. In addition to providing novel insight into Buruli ulcer pathogenesis, our study therefore identifies a unique proteomic signature for this disease. PMID:24722524

  20. Occurrence of Free-Living Amoebae in Communities of Low and High Endemicity for Buruli Ulcer in Southern Benin▿

    PubMed Central

    Eddyani, Miriam; De Jonckheere, Johan F.; Durnez, Lies; Suykerbuyk, Patrick; Leirs, Herwig; Portaels, Françoise

    2008-01-01

    Buruli ulcer or Mycobacterium ulcerans disease occurs mainly in areas in proximity to standing or slowly running freshwater, habitats in which free-living amoebae occur. For this reason, a possible link between the habitat of M. ulcerans and free-living amoebae was investigated. Free-living amoebae and mycobacteria were isolated from water and biofilm specimens taken from protected and unprotected sources of water in villages known to have either high or low endemicity for Buruli ulcer in Benin. Amoebae were isolated from 78.8% of samples. A greater proportion of water bodies in areas of high endemicity had amoebae than in areas of low endemicity (83.3% versus 66.7%). Protected sources of water were significantly more likely to contain amoebae in areas of high endemicity than in areas of low endemicity (88.0% versus 11.1%). Several pathogenic free-living amoebae and mycobacteria were isolated. However, no M. ulcerans was isolated and no specimen was positive for IS2404 PCR. Our results show that the study area has a water hygiene problem, which is greater in areas of high Buruli ulcer endemicity than in areas of low endemicity. Our observations indicate that additional studies are required to explore the possible link between free-living amoebae and mycobacteria. PMID:18776024

  1. Secondary Bacterial Infections of Buruli Ulcer Lesions Before and After Chemotherapy with Streptomycin and Rifampicin

    PubMed Central

    Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Kpeli, Grace S.; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Asan-Ampah, Kobina; Quenin-Fosu, Kwabena; Owusu-Mireku, Evelyn; Paintsil, Albert; Lamptey, Isaac; Anku, Benjamin; Kwakye-Maclean, Cynthia; Newman, Mercy; Pluschke, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU), caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans is a chronic necrotizing skin disease. It usually starts with a subcutaneous nodule or plaque containing large clusters of extracellular acid-fast bacilli. Surrounding tissue is destroyed by the cytotoxic macrolide toxin mycolactone produced by microcolonies of M. ulcerans. Skin covering the destroyed subcutaneous fat and soft tissue may eventually break down leading to the formation of large ulcers that progress, if untreated, over months and years. Here we have analyzed the bacterial flora of BU lesions of three different groups of patients before, during and after daily treatment with streptomycin and rifampicin for eight weeks (SR8) and determined drug resistance of the bacteria isolated from the lesions. Before SR8 treatment, more than 60% of the examined BU lesions were infected with other bacteria, with Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa being the most prominent ones. During treatment, 65% of all lesions were still infected, mainly with P. aeruginosa. After completion of SR8 treatment, still more than 75% of lesions clinically suspected to be infected were microbiologically confirmed as infected, mainly with P. aeruginosa or Proteus miriabilis. Drug susceptibility tests revealed especially for S. aureus a high frequency of resistance to the first line drugs used in Ghana. Our results show that secondary infection of BU lesions is common. This could lead to delayed healing and should therefore be further investigated. PMID:23658847

  2. Spatial Distribution of Mycobacterium ulcerans in Buruli Ulcer Lesions: Implications for Laboratory Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Bolz, Miriam; Vogel, Moritz; Bayi, Pierre F.; Bratschi, Martin W.; Sopho, Ghislain Emmanuel; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Um Boock, Alphonse; Junghanss, Thomas; Pluschke, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Background Current laboratory diagnosis of Buruli ulcer (BU) is based on microscopic detection of acid fast bacilli, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), histopathology or cultivation. Insertion sequence (IS) 2404 qPCR, the most sensitive method, is usually only available at reference laboratories. The only currently available point-of-care test, microscopic detection of acid fast bacilli (AFB), has limited sensitivity and specificity. Methodology/ Principal Findings Here we analyzed AFB positive tissue samples (n = 83) for the presence, distribution and amount of AFB. AFB were nearly exclusively present in the subcutis with large extracellular clusters being most frequently (67%) found in plaque lesions. In ulcerative lesions small clusters and dispersed AFB were more common. Beside this, 151 swab samples from 37 BU patients were analyzed by IS2404 qPCR and ZN staining in parallel. The amount of M. ulcerans DNA in extracts from swabs correlated well with the probability of finding AFB in direct smear microscopy, with 56.1% of the samples being positive in both methods and 43.9% being positive only in qPCR. By analyzing three swabs per patient instead of one, the probability to have at least one positive swab increased from 80.2% to 97.1% for qPCR and from 45% to 66.1% for AFB smear examination. Conclusion / Significance Our data show that M. ulcerans bacteria are primarily located in the subcutis of BU lesions, making the retrieval of the deep subcutis mandatory for examination of tissue samples for AFB. When laboratory diagnosis is based on the recommended less invasive collection of swab samples, analysis of three swabs from different areas of ulcerative lesions instead of one increases the sensitivity of both qPCR and of smear microscopy substantially. PMID:27253422

  3. Socio-cultural determinants of timely and delayed treatment of Buruli ulcer: Implications for disease control

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Public health programmes recommend timely medical treatment for Buruli ulcer (BU) infection to prevent pre-ulcer conditions from progressing to ulcers, to minimise surgery, disabilities and the socio-economic impact of BU. Clarifying the role of socio-cultural determinants of timely medical treatment may assist in guiding public health programmes to improve treatment outcomes. This study clarified the role of socio-cultural determinants and health system factors affecting timely medical treatment for BU in an endemic area in Ghana. Methods A semi-structured explanatory model interview based on the explanatory model interview catalogue (EMIC) was administered to 178 BU-affected persons. Based on research evidence, respondents were classified as timely treatment (use of medical treatment 3 months from awareness of disease) and delayed treatment (medical treatment 3 months after onset of disease and failure to use medical treatment). The outcome variable, timely treatment was analysed with cultural epidemiological variables for categories of distress, perceived causes of BU, outside-help and reasons for medical treatment in logistic regression models. The median time for the onset of symptoms to treatment was computed in days. Qualitative phenomenological analysis of respondents’ narratives clarified the meaning, context and dynamic features of the relationship of explanatory variables with timely medical treatment. Results The median time for initiating treatment was 25 days for pre-ulcers, and 204 days for ulcers. Income loss and use of herbalists showed significantly negative associations with timely treatment. Respondents’ use of herbalists was often motivated by the desire for quick recovery in order to continue with work and because herbalists were relatives and easily accessible. However, drinking unclean water was significantly associated with timely treatment and access to health services encouraged timely treatment (OR 8.5, p = 0

  4. Pain Associated with Wound Care Treatment among Buruli Ulcer Patients from Ghana and Benin

    PubMed Central

    Alferink, Marike; de Zeeuw, Janine; Sopoh, Ghislain; Agossadou, Chantal; Abass, Karibu M.; Phillips, Richard O.; Loth, Susanne; Jutten, Emma; Barogui, Yves T.; Stewart, Roy E.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Stienstra, Ymkje; Ranchor, Adelita V.

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. People living in remote areas in tropical Sub Saharan Africa are mostly affected. Wound care is an important component of BU management; this often needs to be extended for months after the initial antibiotic treatment. BU is reported in the literature as being painless, however clinical observations revealed that some patients experienced pain during wound care. This was the first study on pain intensity during and after wound care in BU patients and factors associated with pain. In Ghana and Benin, 52 BU patients above 5 years of age and their relatives were included between December 2012 and May 2014. Information on pain intensity during and after wound care was obtained during two consecutive weeks using the Wong-Baker Pain Scale. Median pain intensity during wound care was in the lower range (Mdn = 2, CV = 1), but severe pain (score > 6) was reported in nearly 30% of the patients. Nevertheless, only one patient received pain medication. Pain declined over time to low scores 2 hours after treatment. Factors associated with higher self-reported pain scores were; male gender, fear prior to treatment, pain during the night prior to treatment, and pain caused by cleaning the wound. The general idea that BU is painless is incorrect for the wound care procedure. This procedural pain deserves attention and appropriate intervention. PMID:26030764

  5. A Genomic Approach to Resolving Relapse versus Reinfection among Four Cases of Buruli Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Eddyani, Miriam; Vandelannoote, Koen; Meehan, Conor J.; Bhuju, Sabin; Porter, Jessica L.; Aguiar, Julia; Seemann, Torsten; Jarek, Michael; Singh, Mahavir; Portaels, Françoise; Stinear, Timothy P.; de Jong, Bouke C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Increased availability of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques allows, for the first time, to distinguish relapses from reinfections in patients with multiple Buruli ulcer (BU) episodes. Methodology We compared the number and location of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified by genomic screening between four pairs of Mycobacterium ulcerans isolates collected at the time of first diagnosis and at recurrence, derived from a collection of almost 5000 well characterized clinical samples from one BU treatment center in Benin. Principal Findings The findings suggest that after surgical treatment—without antibiotics—the second episodes were due to relapse rather than reinfection. Since specific antibiotics were introduced for the treatment of BU, the one patient with a culture available from both disease episodes had M. ulcerans isolates with a genomic distance of 20 SNPs, suggesting the patient was most likely reinfected rather than having a relapse. Conclusions To our knowledge, this study is the first to study recurrences in M. ulcerans using NGS, and to identify exogenous reinfection as causing a recurrence of BU. The occurrence of reinfection highlights the contribution of ongoing exposure to M. ulcerans to disease recurrence, and has implications for vaccine development. PMID:26618509

  6. Locally Confined Clonal Complexes of Mycobacterium ulcerans in Two Buruli Ulcer Endemic Regions of Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, Sarah; Minyem, Jacques C.; Um Boock, Alphonse; Vogel, Moritz; Bayi, Pierre Franklin; Junghanss, Thomas; Brites, Daniela; Harris, Simon R.; Parkhill, Julian; Pluschke, Gerd; Lamelas Cabello, Araceli

    2015-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium ulcerans is the causative agent of the necrotizing skin disease Buruli ulcer (BU), which has been reported from over 30 countries worldwide. The majority of notified patients come from West African countries, such as Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Benin and Cameroon. All clinical isolates of M. ulcerans from these countries are closely related and their genomes differ only in a limited number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a molecular epidemiological study with clinical isolates from patients from two distinct BU endemic regions of Cameroon, the Nyong and the Mapé river basins. Whole genome sequencing of the M. ulcerans strains from these two BU endemic areas revealed the presence of two phylogenetically distinct clonal complexes. The strains from the Nyong river basin were genetically more diverse and less closely related to the M. ulcerans strain circulating in Ghana and Benin than the strains causing BU in the Mapé river basin. Conclusions Our comparative genomic analysis revealed that M. ulcerans clones diversify locally by the accumulation of SNPs. Case isolates coming from more recently emerging BU endemic areas, such as the Mapé river basin, may be less diverse than populations from longer standing disease foci, such as the Nyong river basin. Exchange of strains between distinct endemic areas seems to be rare and local clonal complexes can be easily distinguished by whole genome sequencing. PMID:26046531

  7. Landscape Fragmentation as a Risk Factor for Buruli Ulcer Disease in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianyong; Smithwick, Erica A H

    2016-07-01

    Land cover and its change have been linked to Buruli ulcer (BU), a rapidly emerging tropical disease. However, it is unknown whether landscape structure affects the disease prevalence. To examine the association between landscape pattern and BU presence, we obtained land cover information for 20 villages in southwestern Ghana from high resolution satellite images, and analyzed the landscape pattern surrounding each village. Eight landscape metrics indicated that landscape patterns between BU case and reference villages were different (P < 0.05) at the broad spatial extent examined (4 km). The logistic regression models showed that landscape fragmentation and diversity indices were positively associated with BU presence in a village. Specifically, for each increase in patch density and edge density by 100 units, the likelihood of BU presence in a village increased 2.51 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.36-4.61) and 4.18 (95% CI = 1.63-10.76) times, respectively. The results suggest that increased landscape fragmentation may pose a risk to the emergence of BU.

  8. Buruli Ulcer in Cameroon: The Development and Impact of the National Control Programme

    PubMed Central

    Tabah, Earnest Njih; Nsagha, Dickson Shey; Bissek, Anne-Cécile Zoung-Kanyi; Njamnshi, Alfred Kongnyu; Bratschi, Martin W.; Pluschke, Gerd; Um Boock, Alphonse

    2016-01-01

    Background Cameroon is endemic for Buruli ulcer (BU) and organised institutional BU control began in 2002. The objective was to describe the evolution, achievements and challenges of the national BU control programme (NBUCP) and to make suggestions for scaling up the programme. Methods We analysed collated data on BU from 2001 to 2014 and reviewed activity reports NBUCP in Cameroon. Case-detection rates and key BU control indicators were calculated and plotted on a time scale to determine trends in performance. A linear regression analysis of BU detection rate from 2005–2014 was done. The regression coefficient was tested statistically for the significance in variation of BU detection rate. Principal findings In 14 years of BU control, 3700 cases were notified. The BU detection rate dropped significantly from 3.89 to 1.45 per 100 000 inhabitants. The number of BU endemic health districts rose from two to 64. Five BU diagnostic and treatment centres are functional and two more are planned for 2015. The health system has been strengthened and BU research and education has gained more interest in Cameroon. Conclusion/Significance Although institutional BU control Cameroon only began 30 years after the first cases were reported in 1969, a number of milestones have been attained. These would serve as stepping stones for charting the way forward and improving upon control activities in the country if the major challenge of resource allocation is dealt with. PMID:26760499

  9. Experimental Survival of Mycobacterium ulcerans in Watery Soil, a Potential Source of Buruli Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Tian, Roger D B; Lepidi, Hubert; Nappez, Claude; Drancourt, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The reservoir of Mycobacterium ulcerans causing Buruli ulcer (BU) remains unknown. Here, sterilized watery soil was mixed with 2 × 10(6) colony-forming units (CFU)/g of M. ulcerans Agy99 or M. ulcerans ATCC 33728 and incubated in a microaerophilic atmosphere in the presence of negative controls. Both M. ulcerans strains survived in soil for 4 months with a final inoculum of 300-440 CFU/g. Further, three groups of five mice with and without footpad scarification were exposed to control soil or M. ulcerans-inoculated soil. Although no specific clinical and histopathological lesions were observed in control animals, red spots observed on 8/20 scarified feet in 8/10 challenged mice yielded inflammatory infiltrates and positive real-time polymerase chain reaction detection of M. ulcerans DNA in five mice. BU can be acquired as an inoculation infection with watery soil as a transient source of infection. These experimental observations warrant additional field observations.

  10. Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection (Buruli Ulcer) on the Face: A Comparative Analysis of 13 Clinically Suspected Cases from the Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Phanzu, Delphin M.; Mahema, Roger L.; Suykerbuyk, Patrick; Imposo, Désiré-Hubert B.; Lehman, Linda F.; Nduwamahoro, Elie; Meyers, Wayne M.; Boelaert, Marleen; Portaels, Françoise

    2011-01-01

    We report our experience in managing 13 consecutive clinically suspected cases of Buruli ulcer on the face treated at the hospital of the Institut Médical Evangélique at Kimpese, Democratic Republic of Congo diagnosed during 2003–2007. During specific antibiotherapy, facial edema diminished, thus minimizing the subsequent extent of surgery and severe disfigurations. The following complications were observed: 1) lagophthalmos from scarring in four patients and associated ectropion in three of them; 2) blindness in one eye in one patient; 3) disfiguring exposure of teeth and gums resulting from excision of the left labial commissure that affected speech, drinking, and eating in one patient; and 4) dissemination of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection in three patients. Our study highlights the importance of this clinical presentation of Buruli ulcer, and the need for health workers in disease-endemic areas to be aware of the special challenges management of Buruli ulcer on the face presents. PMID:22144452

  11. Impact of Human Immunodeficiency Virus on the Severity of Buruli Ulcer Disease: Results of a Retrospective Study in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Christinet, Vanessa; Comte, Eric; Ciaffi, Laura; Odermatt, Peter; Serafini, Micaela; Antierens, Annick; Rossel, Ludovic; Nomo, Alain-Bertrand; Nkemenang, Patrick; Tsoungui, Akoa; Delhumeau, Cecile; Calmy, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Background.  Buruli ulcer is the third most common mycobacterial disease after tuberculosis and leprosy and is particularly frequent in rural West and Central Africa. However, the impact of HIV infection on BU severity and prevalence remains unclear. Methods.  This was a retrospective study of data collected at the Akonolinga District Hospital, Cameroon, from January 1, 2002 to March 27, 2013. Human immunodeficiency virus prevalence among BU patients was compared with regional HIV prevalence. Baseline characteristics of BU patients were compared between HIV-negative and HIV-positive patients and according to CD4 cell count strata in the latter group. Buruli ulcer time-to-healing was assessed in different CD4 count strata, and factors associated with BU main lesion size at baseline were identified. Results.  Human immunodeficiency virus prevalence among BU patients was significantly higher than the regional estimated prevalence in each group (children, 4.00% vs 0.68% [P < .001]; men, 17.0% vs 4.7% [P < .001]; women, 36.0% vs 8.0% [P < .001]). Individuals who were HIV positive had a more severe form of BU, with an increased severity in those with a higher level of immunosuppression. Low CD4 cell count was significantly associated with a larger main lesion size (β-coefficient, −0.50; P = .015; 95% confidence interval [CI], −0.91–0.10). Buruli ulcer time-to-healing was more than double in patients with a CD4 cell count below 500 cell/mm3 (hazard ratio, 2.39; P = .001; 95% CI, 1.44–3.98). Conclusion.  Patients who are HIV positive are at higher risk for BU. Human immunodeficiency virus-induced immunosuppression seems to have an impact on BU clinical presentation and disease evolution. PMID:25734094

  12. Local Cellular Immune Responses and Pathogenesis of Buruli Ulcer Lesions in the Experimental Mycobacterium Ulcerans Pig Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Bolz, Miriam; Ruggli, Nicolas; Borel, Nicole; Pluschke, Gerd; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse

    2016-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer is a neglected tropical disease of the skin that is caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans. We recently established an experimental pig (Sus scrofa) infection model for Buruli ulcer to investigate host-pathogen interactions, the efficacy of candidate vaccines and of new treatment options. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we have used the model to study pathogenesis and early host-pathogen interactions in the affected porcine skin upon infection with mycolactone-producing and non-producing M. ulcerans strains. Histopathological analyses of nodular lesions in the porcine skin revealed that six weeks after infection with wild-type M. ulcerans bacteria extracellular acid fast bacilli were surrounded by distinct layers of neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes. Upon ulceration, the necrotic tissue containing the major bacterial burden was sloughing off, leading to the loss of most of the mycobacteria. Compared to wild-type M. ulcerans bacteria, toxin-deficient mutants caused an increased granulomatous cellular infiltration without massive tissue necrosis, and only smaller clusters of acid fast bacilli. Conclusions/Significance In summary, the present study shows that the pathogenesis and early immune response to M. ulcerans infection in the pig is very well reflecting BU disease in humans, making the pig infection model an excellent tool for the profiling of new therapeutic and prophylactic interventions. PMID:27128097

  13. Prevalence of Buruli Ulcer in Akonolinga Health District, Cameroon: Results of a Cross Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Porten, Klaudia; Sailor, Karen; Comte, Eric; Njikap, Adelaide; Sobry, Agnes; Sihom, Francois; Meva'a, Abanda; Eyangoh, Sarah; Myatt, Mark; Nackers, Fabienne; Grais, Rebecca F.

    2009-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a chronic, indolent necrotizing disease of the skin and underlying tissues caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, which may result in functional incapacity. In 2002, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) opened a BU programme in Akonolinga Hospital, Cameroon, offering antibiotic treatment, surgery and general medical care. Six hundred patients have been treated in the project to date. However, due to the nature of the disease and its stigmatization, determining the exact prevalence and burden of disease is difficult and current estimates may not reflect the magnitude of the problem. The objectives of this survey were to estimate the prevalence of BU in the health district of Akonolinga, describe the geographic extension of the highly endemic area within the health district, and determine the programme coverage and its geographical distribution. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a cross-sectional population survey using centric systematic area sampling (CSAS). A 15×15 km grid (quadrats of 225 km2) was overlaid on a map of Akonolinga district with its position chosen to maximize the area covered by the survey. Quadrats were selected if more than 50% of the quadrat was inside of the health district. The chiefdom located closest to the centre of each quadrat was selected and Buruli cases were identified using an active case finding strategy (the sensitivity of the strategy was estimated by capture-recapture). WHO-case definitions were used for nodules, plaque, ulcer, oedema and sequelae. Out of a total population of 103,000 inhabitants, 26,679 were surveyed within the twenty quadrats. Sensitivity of the case finding strategy was estimated to be 84% (95%CI 54–97%). The overall prevalence was 0.47% (n = 105) for all cases including sequelae and 0.25% (n = 56) for active stages of the disease. Five quadrats had a high prevalence of >0.6% to 0.9%, 5 a prevalence >0.3% to 0.6% and 10 quadrats <0.3%. The quadrats with the high

  14. Buruli Ulcer Disease and Its Association with Land Cover in Southwestern Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Tschakert, Petra; Klutse, Erasmus; Ferring, David; Ricciardi, Vincent; Hausermann, Heidi; Oppong, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU), one of 17 neglected tropical diseases, is a debilitating skin and soft tissue infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. In tropical Africa, changes in land use and proximity to water have been associated with the disease. This study presents the first analysis of BU at the village level in southwestern Ghana, where prevalence rates are among the highest globally, and explores fine and medium-scale associations with land cover by comparing patterns both within BU clusters and surrounding landscapes. Methodology/Principal Findings We obtained 339 hospital-confirmed BU cases in southwestern Ghana between 2007 and 2010. The clusters of BU were identified using spatial scan statistics and the percentages of six land cover classes were calculated based on Landsat and Rapid Eye imagery for each of 154 villages/towns. The association between BU prevalence and each land cover class was calculated using negative binomial regression models. We found that older people had a significantly higher risk for BU after considering population age structure. BU cases were positively associated with the higher percentage of water and grassland surrounding each village, but negatively associated with the percent of urban. The results also showed that BU was clustered in areas with high percentage of mining activity, suggesting that water and mining play an important and potentially interactive role in BU occurrence. Conclusions/Significance Our study highlights the importance of multiple land use changes along the Offin River, particularly mining and agriculture, which might be associated with BU disease in southwestern Ghana. Our study is the first to use both medium- and high-resolution imagery to assess these changes. We also show that older populations (≥ 60 y) appear to be at higher risk of BU disease than children, once BU data were weighted by population age structures. PMID:26091265

  15. In the case of transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans in buruli ulcer disease Acanthamoeba species stand accused.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M D; Boakye, D A; Mosi, L; Asiedu, K

    2011-03-01

    Buruli ulcer disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans results in extensive destruction of skin and soft tissue and long-term functional disabilities that ultimately require surgery and rehabilitation. The disease is associated with aquatic and swampy environments with the mycobacterium occurring in biofilms, soil, aquatic insects, fish and wildlife however, the mode of transmission to humans remains an enigma. Current transmission ideas including bites from predatory water bugs and mosquitoes, do not explain satisfactorily the spasmodic disease distribution in human populations. Here we argue that Acanthamoeba species are the natural hosts of M. ulcerans and are mainly responsible for disease transmission because; (i) Acanthamoebae are known natural hosts of several microbial pathogens including M. marinum, M. avium and Legionella pneumophila, (ii) culture of slow-to-grow microbial pathogens hosted in nature by Acanthamoeba spp is enhanced when the media is seeded with the protozoa, (iii) acanthamoebae and M. ulcerans share similar bio-ecological and epidemiological settings, (iv) documented evidence that prior growth of L. pneumophila and M. avium in acanthamoebae influences entry mechanisms, intracellular growth and virulence in human monocytes, (v) Acanthamoeba spp also infect humans and cause diseases via routes of openings including broken skin and sites of trauma similar to M. ulcerans and (vi) M. ulcerans is rather a fastidious intracellular organism as recent analysis of the genome indicate. We argue further that temperature plays a significant role in transmission determining the fate of either the intracellular microbe or the host cells. Also, Acanthamoeba-pathogen association has a long evolutionary history because the same set of bacterial genes and gene products e.g. in L. pneumophila are required for survival in both mammalian and protozoan host cells. We suggest that the involvement of Acanthamoeba in the transmission of M. ulcerans to humans better

  16. Application of geographical information system (GIS) technology in the control of Buruli ulcer in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) disease is a chronic debilitating skin disease caused by Mycobacteriumulcerans. It is associated with areas where the water is slow-flowing or stagnant. Policy makers take the necessary strategic and policy decisions especially where to target interventions based on available evidence including spatial distribution of the disease. Unfortunately, there is limited information on the spatial distribution of BU in Ghana. The aim of the study was to use Geographical Information System (GIS) technology to show the spatial distribution and hot spots of BU in Greater Accra and Eastern Regions in Ghana. The information could then be used by decision makers to make the necessary strategic and policy decisions, especially where to target intervention. Methods We conducted a community case search and spatial mapping in two districts in Eastern region (Akuapem South and Suhum- Kraboa-Coaltar) and two districts in Greater Accra region (Ga West and Ga South Municipalities) of Ghana to identify the spatial distribution of BU cases in the communities along the Densu River. These municipalities are already known to the Ministry of Health as having high case load of BU. Structured questionnaires on demographic characteristics, environmental factors and general practices were administered to the cases. Using the E-trex Garmin Geographical Positioning System (GPS), the location of the case patient was marked along with any important attributes of the community. ArcGIS was used to generate maps showing BU distribution and hot spots. Results Two hundred and fifty-seven (257) probable BU patients were enrolled in the study after the case search. These cases and their houses (or homes) were located with the GPS. The GIS maps generated showed a varying distribution of BU in the various communities. We observed clustering of BU patients downstream of the Densu River which had hitherto not been observed. Conclusions There is clustering of BU in areas where the

  17. Spatio-temporal Patterns and Landscape-Associated Risk of Buruli Ulcer in Akonolinga, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Landier, Jordi; Gaudart, Jean; Carolan, Kevin; Lo Seen, Danny; Guégan, Jean-François; Eyangoh, Sara; Fontanet, Arnaud; Texier, Gaëtan

    2014-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is an extensively damaging skin infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, whose transmission mode is still unknown. The focal distribution of BU and the absence of interpersonal transmission suggest a major role of environmental factors, which remain unidentified. This study provides the first description of the spatio-temporal variations of BU in an endemic African region, in Akonolinga, Cameroon. We quantify landscape-associated risk of BU, and reveal local patterns of endemicity. Methodology/Principal Findings From January 2002 to May 2012, 787 new BU cases were recorded in 154 villages of the district of Akonolinga. Incidence per village ranged from 0 (n = 59 villages) to 10.4 cases/1000 person.years (py); median incidence was 0.4 cases/1,000py. Villages neighbouring the Nyong River flood plain near Akonolinga town were identified as the highest risk zone using the SPODT algorithm. We found a decreasing risk with increasing distance to the Nyong and identified 4 time phases with changes in spatial distribution. We classified the villages into 8 groups according to landscape characteristics using principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering. We estimated the incidence ratio (IR) associated with each landscape using a generalised linear model. BU risk was highest in landscapes with abundant wetlands, especially cultivated ones (IR = 15.7, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] = 15.7[4.2–59.2]), and lowest in reference landscape where primary and secondary forest cover was abundant. In intermediate-risk landscapes, risk decreased with agriculture pressure (from IR[95%CI] = 7.9[2.2–28.8] to 2.0[0.6–6.6]). We identified landscapes where endemicity was stable and landscapes where incidence increased with time. Conclusion/Significance Our study on the largest series of BU cases recorded in a single endemic region illustrates the local evolution of BU and identifies the Nyong River as the major driver of BU

  18. Buruli Ulcer Control in a Highly Endemic District in Ghana: Role of Community-Based Surveillance Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Abass, Kabiru Mohammed; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Phillips, Richard O.; Sarfo, Fred S.; Abotsi, Justice; Mireku, Samuel Osei; Thompson, William N.; Asiedu, Kingsley; Stienstra, Ymkje; Klis, Sandor-Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is an infectious skin disease that occurs mainly in West and Central Africa. It can lead to severe disability and stigma because of scarring and contractures. Effective treatment with antibiotics is available, but patients often report to the hospital too late to prevent surgery and the disabling consequences of the disease. In a highly endemic district in Ghana, intensified public health efforts, mainly revolving around training and motivating community-based surveillance volunteers (CBSVs), were implemented. As a result, 70% of cases were reported in the earliest—World Health Organization category I—stage of the disease, potentially minimizing the need for surgery. CBSVs referred more cases in total and more cases in the early stages of the disease than any other source. CBSVs are an important resource in the early detection of BU. PMID:25331802

  19. The impact of community health workers (CHWs) on Buruli ulcer in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Vouking, Marius Zambou; Tamo, Violette Claire; Mbuagbaw, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a cutaneous neglected tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Participation of Community Health Workers (CHWs) is an integral part of the management of BU, yet their impact has not been systematically evaluated in sub-Saharan Africa. METHODS: Our objectives were to summarize the evidence on the impact of CHWs on the control of BU in sub-Saharan Africa by looking at their recruitment, training, non-governmental support and performance. We searched the following electronic databases from January 1998 to July 2012: Medline, EMBASE (Excerpta Medica Database), The Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), WHOLIS (World Health Organization Library Database), LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences) and contacted experts in the field. There were no restrictions to language or publication status. All study designs that could provide the information we sought were eligible, provided the studies were conducted in sub-Saharan Africa. Critical appraisal of all identified citations was done independently by two authors to establish the possible relevance of the articles for inclusion in the review. Of 195 hits, 17 papers met the inclusion criteria. For the management of Buruli Ulcer, CHWs are often recruited from the communities they will serve. Communities play a role in CHW selection. Larger numbers of CHWs are needed in order to improve the detection and management of cases. One of the major obstacles to the control of BU is inadequate and poorly- equipped health facilities in the affected areas. Evidence from this review suggests that CHW programmes can have large impacts on the control of BU in sub-Saharan Africa. Large-scale rigorous studies, including RCTs, are needed to assess whether the CHWs programs promote equity and access. PMID:24009795

  20. Recent advances: role of mycolactone in the pathogenesis and monitoring of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection/Buruli ulcer disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Phillips, Richard; Wansbrough‐Jones, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Summary Infection of subcutaneous tissue with Mycobacterium ulcerans can lead to chronic skin ulceration known as Buruli ulcer. The pathogenesis of this neglected tropical disease is dependent on a lipid‐like toxin, mycolactone, which diffuses through tissue away from the infecting organisms. Since its identification in 1999, this molecule has been intensely studied to elucidate its cytotoxic and immunosuppressive properties. Two recent major advances identifying the underlying molecular targets for mycolactone have been described. First, it can target scaffolding proteins (such as Wiskott Aldrich Syndrome Protein), which control actin dynamics in adherent cells and therefore lead to detachment and cell death by anoikis. Second, it prevents the co‐translational translocation (and therefore production) of many proteins that pass through the endoplasmic reticulum for secretion or placement in cell membranes. These pleiotropic effects underpin the range of cell‐specific functional defects in immune and other cells that contact mycolactone during infection. The dose and duration of mycolactone exposure for these different cells explains tissue necrosis and the paucity of immune cells in the ulcers. This review discusses recent advances in the field, revisits older findings in this context and highlights current developments in structure‐function studies as well as methodology that make mycolactone a promising diagnostic biomarker. PMID:26572803

  1. Cultural Understanding of Wounds, Buruli Ulcers and Their Management at the Obom Sub-district of the Ga South Municipality of the Greater Accra Region of Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Koka, Eric; Okyere, Daniel; Adongo, Philip Baba; Ahorlu, Collins K.

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was conducted with the aim to understand some of the cultural belief systems in the management of wounds and patients practices that could contaminate wounds at the Obom sub-district of the Ga South Municipality of Ghana. Methods This was an ethnographic study using in-depth interviews, Focus Group Discussions and participant observation techniques for data collection. Observations were done on Buruli ulcer patients to document how they integrate local and modern wound management practices in the day-to-day handling of their wounds. Content analysis was done after the data were subjected to thematic coding and representative narratives selected for presentation. Results It was usually believed that wounds were caused by charms or spirits and, therefore, required the attention of a native healer. In instances where some patients’ wounds were dressed in the hospital by clinicians whose condition/age/sex contradict the belief of the patient, the affected often redress the wounds later at home. Some of the materials often used for such wound dressing include urine and concoctions made of charcoal and gunpowder with the belief of driving out evil spirits from the wounds. Conclusion Clinicians must therefore be aware of these cultural beliefs and take them into consideration when managing Buruli ulcer wounds to prevent redressing at home after clinical treatment. This may go a long way to reduce secondary infections that have been observed in Buruli ulcer wounds. PMID:27438292

  2. Experimental Infection of the Pig with Mycobacterium ulcerans: A Novel Model for Studying the Pathogenesis of Buruli Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bolz, Miriam; Ruggli, Nicolas; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Ricklin, Meret E.; Zimmer, Gert; Pluschke, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a slowly progressing, necrotising disease of the skin caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans. Non-ulcerative manifestations are nodules, plaques and oedema, which may progress to ulceration of large parts of the skin. Histopathologically, BU is characterized by coagulative necrosis, fat cell ghosts, epidermal hyperplasia, clusters of extracellular acid fast bacilli (AFB) in the subcutaneous tissue and lack of major inflammatory infiltration. The mode of transmission of BU is not clear and there is only limited information on the early pathogenesis of the disease available. Methodology/Principal Findings For evaluating the potential of the pig as experimental infection model for BU, we infected pigs subcutaneously with different doses of M. ulcerans. The infected skin sites were excised 2.5 or 6.5 weeks after infection and processed for histopathological analysis. With doses of 2×107 and 2×106 colony forming units (CFU) we observed the development of nodular lesions that subsequently progressed to ulcerative or plaque-like lesions. At lower inoculation doses signs of infection found after 2.5 weeks had spontaneously resolved at 6.5 weeks. The observed macroscopic and histopathological changes closely resembled those found in M. ulcerans disease in humans. Conclusion/Significance Our results demonstrate that the pig can be infected with M. ulcerans. Productive infection leads to the development of lesions that closely resemble human BU lesions. The pig infection model therefore has great potential for studying the early pathogenesis of BU and for the development of new therapeutic and prophylactic interventions. PMID:25010421

  3. Adequate Wound Care and Use of Bed Nets as Protective Factors against Buruli Ulcer: Results from a Case Control Study in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Landier, Jordi; Boisier, Pascal; Fotso Piam, Félix; Noumen-Djeunga, Blanbin; Simé, Joseph; Wantong, Fidèle Gaetan; Marsollier, Laurent; Fontanet, Arnaud; Eyangoh, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer is an infectious disease involving the skin, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Its exact transmission mechanism remains unknown. Several arguments indicate a possible role for insects in its transmission. A previous case-control study in the Nyong valley region in central Cameroon showed an unexpected association between bed net use and protection against Buruli ulcer. We investigated whether this association persisted in a newly discovered endemic Buruli ulcer focus in Bankim, northwestern Cameroon. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a case-control study on 77 Buruli ulcer cases and 153 age-, gender- and village-matched controls. Participants were interviewed about their activities and habits. Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis identified systematic use of a bed net (Odds-Ratio (OR) = 0.4, 95% Confidence Interval [95%CI] = [0.2–0.9], p-value (p) = 0.04), cleansing wounds with soap (OR [95%CI] = 0.1 [0.03–0.3], p<0.0001) and growing cassava (OR [95%CI] = 0.3 [0.2–0.7], p = 0.005) as independent protective factors. Independent risk factors were bathing in the Mbam River (OR [95%CI] = 6.9 [1.4–35], p = 0.02) and reporting scratch lesions after insect bites (OR [95%CI] = 2.7 [1.4–5.4], p = 0.004). The proportion of cases that could be prevented by systematic bed net use was 32%, and by adequate wound care was 34%. Conclusions/Significance Our study confirms that two previously identified factors, adequate wound care and bed net use, significantly decreased the risk of Buruli ulcer. These associations withstand generalization to different geographic, climatic and epidemiologic settings. Involvement of insects in the household environment, and the relationship between wound hygiene and M. ulcerans infection should now be investigated. PMID:22087346

  4. The contribution of community health workers to the control of Buruli ulcer in the Ngoantet area, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Vouking, Marius Zambou; Takougang, Innocent; Mbam, Léonard Mbam; Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Tadenfok, Carine Nouboudem; Tamo, Claire Violette

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Buruli ulcer (BU) is a skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. It is the third most common mycobacterial infection after tuberculosis and leprosy. Community Health Workers (CHWs) hold the potential to support patients and their families at the community level. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study to assess the participation of CHWs in the early diagnosis and treatment of BU in Ngoantet, Cameroon. The CHWs performance was measured using: the number of cases referred to the Ngoantet Health Centre, the percentage of accomplished referrals, the percentage of cases referred by CHWs confirmed by the staff of Ngoantet Health Centre. Data was analyzed using Epi-info version 3.4.1. and Microsoft Office Excel 2003. The study focused on 51 CHWs in the Ngoantet health area. Results The referral rate was 95.0%. Most of the suspicious cases (91.5%) referred were confirmed by health workers. Most CHWs (78.4%) declared that they had identified at least one presumptive case of BU infection. Conclusion We conclude that the CHWs can play a key role in scaling up BU control activities using a referral system. This study confirms the role of home visits and inspections in the early detection and treatment of BU. PMID:24711863

  5. Burden and Historical Trend of Buruli Ulcer Prevalence in Selected Communities along the Offin River of Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Ampah, Kobina Assan; Asare, Prince; Binnah, Daniel De-Graft; Maccaulley, Samuel; Opare, William; Röltgen, Katharina; Pluschke, Gerd; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy

    2016-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a neglected tropical skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans with more than two thirds of the global cases reported in West Africa. A nationwide active BU case search conducted in 1999 identified two health districts along the Offin River as two of the three most endemic districts in Ghana. Based on recent anecdotal accounts that transmission is unstable along the Offin River, we conducted from March to June 2013 an exhaustive household survey and active case search in 13 selected communities within a five-kilometer radius along the Offin River. The overall prevalence of BU was 2.3% among the surveyed population of 20,390 inhabitants and 477 of the total 480 cases detected (99.4%) were historical (healed) cases. By estimating the year of occurrence for each case per community and taking into account available passive surveillance records of health facilities and the District Health Directorate, we observed a general trend of continuous emergence of cases in communities located midstream the Offin River whereas downstream communities showed more sporadic patterns. We monitored the incidence of cases after the survey and recorded a cumulative incidence rate of 0.04% for the 13 communities over a 17-month active surveillance period from August 2013 to December 2014. Our data reveal an overall decline in BU incidence along the Offin River similar to the general decline in BU incidence in recent years reported by the World Health Organization for West Africa. PMID:27078028

  6. The puzzle of Buruli ulcer transmission, ethno-ecological history and the end of "love" in the Akonolinga district, Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Giles-Vernick, Tamara; Owona-Ntsama, Joseph; Landier, Jordi; Eyangoh, Sara

    2015-03-01

    The "One World One Health Initiative" has attended little to the priorities, concepts and practices of resource-poor communities confronting disease and the implications of these concerns for its biomedical, ecological and institutional approach to disease surveillance and control. Using the example of Buruli ulcer (BU) and its bacterial etiology, Mycobacterium ulcerans, in south-central Cameroon, we build on debates about the contributions of "local knowledge" and "alternative models" to biomedical knowledge of disease transmission. BU's mode of transmission remains poorly understood. Our approach employs ethno-ecological histories - local understandings of the putative emergence and expansion of a locally important, neglected disease. We develop these histories from 52 individual and small group interviews, group discussions, and participant-observation of daily and seasonal activities, conducted in 2013-2013. These histories offer important clues about past environmental and social change that should guide further ecological, epidemiological research. They highlight a key historical moment (the late 1980s and 1990s); specific ecological transformations; new cultivation practices in unexploited zones that potentially increased exposure to M. ulcerans; and ecological degradation that may have lowered nutritional standards and heightened susceptibility to BU. They also recast transmission, broadening insight into BU and its local analog, atom, by emphasizing the role of social change and economic crisis in its emergence and expansion.

  7. The puzzle of Buruli ulcer transmission, ethno-ecological history and the end of "love" in the Akonolinga district, Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Giles-Vernick, Tamara; Owona-Ntsama, Joseph; Landier, Jordi; Eyangoh, Sara

    2015-03-01

    The "One World One Health Initiative" has attended little to the priorities, concepts and practices of resource-poor communities confronting disease and the implications of these concerns for its biomedical, ecological and institutional approach to disease surveillance and control. Using the example of Buruli ulcer (BU) and its bacterial etiology, Mycobacterium ulcerans, in south-central Cameroon, we build on debates about the contributions of "local knowledge" and "alternative models" to biomedical knowledge of disease transmission. BU's mode of transmission remains poorly understood. Our approach employs ethno-ecological histories - local understandings of the putative emergence and expansion of a locally important, neglected disease. We develop these histories from 52 individual and small group interviews, group discussions, and participant-observation of daily and seasonal activities, conducted in 2013-2013. These histories offer important clues about past environmental and social change that should guide further ecological, epidemiological research. They highlight a key historical moment (the late 1980s and 1990s); specific ecological transformations; new cultivation practices in unexploited zones that potentially increased exposure to M. ulcerans; and ecological degradation that may have lowered nutritional standards and heightened susceptibility to BU. They also recast transmission, broadening insight into BU and its local analog, atom, by emphasizing the role of social change and economic crisis in its emergence and expansion. PMID:24673887

  8. Mycobacterium ulcerans DNA Not Detected in Faecal Samples from Buruli Ulcer Patients: Results of a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sarfo, Fred S.; Lavender, Caroline J.; Fyfe, Janet A. M.; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Stinear, Timothy P.; Phillips, Richard O.

    2011-01-01

    It has recently been shown that in a Buruli ulcer (BU) endemic region of southeastern Australia, significant numbers of possums (native tree-dwelling marsupials) have clinical BU disease. Furthermore, based on quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis, animals with BU lesions (and some without) shed M. ulcerans DNA in their faeces, indicative of bacterial loads of up to 108 organisms/gram. These findings led us to propose that humans might also harbour M. ulcerans in their gastrointestinal tract and shed the bacterium in their faeces. We conducted a pilot study and collected faecal swabs from 26 patients with confirmed BU and 31 healthy household controls. Faecal samples were also collected from 10 healthy controls from non-endemic regions in Ghana. All 67 specimens were negative when tested by IS2404 PCR. The detection sensitivity of this method was ≥104 bacteria per gram (wet-weight) of human faecal material. We conclude that the human gastrointestinal tract is unlikely to be a significant reservoir of M. ulcerans. PMID:21573192

  9. Burden and Historical Trend of Buruli Ulcer Prevalence in Selected Communities along the Offin River of Ghana.

    PubMed

    Ampah, Kobina Assan; Asare, Prince; Binnah, Daniel De-Graft; Maccaulley, Samuel; Opare, William; Röltgen, Katharina; Pluschke, Gerd; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy

    2016-04-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a neglected tropical skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans with more than two thirds of the global cases reported in West Africa. A nationwide active BU case search conducted in 1999 identified two health districts along the Offin River as two of the three most endemic districts in Ghana. Based on recent anecdotal accounts that transmission is unstable along the Offin River, we conducted from March to June 2013 an exhaustive household survey and active case search in 13 selected communities within a five-kilometer radius along the Offin River. The overall prevalence of BU was 2.3% among the surveyed population of 20,390 inhabitants and 477 of the total 480 cases detected (99.4%) were historical (healed) cases. By estimating the year of occurrence for each case per community and taking into account available passive surveillance records of health facilities and the District Health Directorate, we observed a general trend of continuous emergence of cases in communities located midstream the Offin River whereas downstream communities showed more sporadic patterns. We monitored the incidence of cases after the survey and recorded a cumulative incidence rate of 0.04% for the 13 communities over a 17-month active surveillance period from August 2013 to December 2014. Our data reveal an overall decline in BU incidence along the Offin River similar to the general decline in BU incidence in recent years reported by the World Health Organization for West Africa. PMID:27078028

  10. Whole Genome Comparisons Suggest Random Distribution of Mycobacterium ulcerans Genotypes in a Buruli Ulcer Endemic Region of Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Ablordey, Anthony S.; Vandelannoote, Koen; Frimpong, Isaac A.; Ahortor, Evans K.; Amissah, Nana Ama; Eddyani, Miriam; Durnez, Lies; Portaels, Françoise; de Jong, Bouke C.; Leirs, Herwig; Porter, Jessica L.; Mangas, Kirstie M.; Lam, Margaret M. C.; Buultjens, Andrew; Seemann, Torsten; Tobias, Nicholas J.; Stinear, Timothy P.

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to control the spread of Buruli ulcer – an emerging ulcerative skin infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans - have been hampered by our poor understanding of reservoirs and transmission. To help address this issue, we compared whole genomes from 18 clinical M. ulcerans isolates from a 30km2 region within the Asante Akim North District, Ashanti region, Ghana, with 15 other M. ulcerans isolates from elsewhere in Ghana and the surrounding countries of Ivory Coast, Togo, Benin and Nigeria. Contrary to our expectations of finding minor DNA sequence variations among isolates representing a single M. ulcerans circulating genotype, we found instead two distinct genotypes. One genotype was closely related to isolates from neighbouring regions of Amansie West and Densu, consistent with the predicted local endemic clone, but the second genotype (separated by 138 single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs] from other Ghanaian strains) most closely matched M. ulcerans from Nigeria, suggesting another introduction of M. ulcerans to Ghana, perhaps from that country. Both the exotic genotype and the local Ghanaian genotype displayed highly restricted intra-strain genetic variation, with less than 50 SNP differences across a 5.2Mbp core genome within each genotype. Interestingly, there was no discernible spatial clustering of genotypes at the local village scale. Interviews revealed no obvious epidemiological links among BU patients who had been infected with identical M. ulcerans genotypes but lived in geographically separate villages. We conclude that M. ulcerans is spread widely across the region, with multiple genotypes present in any one area. These data give us new perspectives on the behaviour of possible reservoirs and subsequent transmission mechanisms of M. ulcerans. These observations also show for the first time that M. ulcerans can be mobilized, introduced to a new area and then spread within a population. Potential reservoirs of M. ulcerans thus might include

  11. Potential wildlife sentinels for monitoring the endemic spread of human buruli ulcer in South-East australia.

    PubMed

    Carson, Connor; Lavender, Caroline J; Handasyde, Kathrine A; O'Brien, Carolyn R; Hewitt, Nick; Johnson, Paul D R; Fyfe, Janet A M

    2014-01-01

    The last 20 years has seen a significant series of outbreaks of Buruli/Bairnsdale Ulcer (BU), caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, in temperate south-eastern Australia (state of Victoria). Here, the prevailing view of M. ulcerans as an aquatic pathogen has been questioned by recent research identifying native wildlife as potential terrestrial reservoirs of infection; specifically, tree-dwelling common ringtail and brushtail possums. In that previous work, sampling of environmental possum faeces detected a high prevalence of M. ulcerans DNA in established endemic areas for human BU on the Bellarine Peninsula, compared with non-endemic areas. Here, we report research from an emergent BU focus recently identified on the Mornington Peninsula, confirming associations between human BU and the presence of the aetiological agent in possum faeces, detected by real-time PCR targeting M. ulcerans IS2404, IS2606 and KR. Mycobacterium ulcerans DNA was detected in 20/216 (9.3%) ground collected ringtail possum faecal samples and 4/6 (66.6%) brushtail possum faecal samples. The distribution of the PCR positive possum faecal samples and human BU cases was highly focal: there was a significant non-random cluster of 16 M. ulcerans positive possum faecal sample points detected by spatial scan statistics (P<0.0001) within a circle of radius 0.42 km, within which were located the addresses of 6/12 human cases reported from the area to date; moreover, the highest sample PCR signal strength (equivalent to ≥10(6) organisms per gram of faeces) was found in a sample point located within this cluster radius. Corresponding faecal samples collected from closely adjacent BU-free areas were predominantly negative. Possums may be useful sentinels to predict endemic spread of human BU in Victoria, for public health planning. Further research is needed to establish whether spatial associations represent evidence of direct or indirect transmission between possums and humans, and the mechanism by

  12. Community-based study on knowledge, attitude and practice on the mode of transmission, prevention and treatment of the Buruli ulcer in Ga West District, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Renzaho, Andre M N; Woods, Paul V; Ackumey, Mercy M; Harvey, Simon K; Kotin, Jacob

    2007-03-01

    Buruli ulcer disease (BUD), a devastating tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, occurs in more than 80% of the administrative districts of Ghana. To elucidate community perceptions and understanding of the aetiology of BUD, attitudes towards Buruli patients and treatment-seeking behaviours, we conducted a survey with 504 heads of households and seven focus group discussions in Ga West District, Ghana. Although 67% of participants regarded BUD as a health problem, 53% did not know its cause. Sixteen per cent attributed the cause to drinking non-potable water, 8.1% mentioned poor personal hygiene or dirty surroundings, and 5.5% identified swimming or wading in ponds as a risk factor. About 5.2% thought that witchcraft and curses cause BUD, and 71.8% indicated that BU sufferers first seek treatment from herbalists and only refer to the hospital as a last resort. The main reasons were prospects of prolonged hospital stay, cost of transport, loss of earnings and opportunity associated with parents attending their children's hospitalization over extended period, delays in being attended by medical staff, and not knowing the cause of the disease or required treatment. The level of acceptance of BUD sufferers was high in adults but less so in children. The challenge facing health workers is to break the vicious cycle of poor medical outcomes leading to poor attitudes to hospital treatment in the community. Because herbalists are often the first people consulted by those who contract the disease, they need to be trained in early recognition of the pre-ulcerative stage of Buruli lesions. PMID:17313516

  13. Community-based study on knowledge, attitude and practice on the mode of transmission, prevention and treatment of the Buruli ulcer in Ga West District, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Renzaho, Andre M N; Woods, Paul V; Ackumey, Mercy M; Harvey, Simon K; Kotin, Jacob

    2007-03-01

    Buruli ulcer disease (BUD), a devastating tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, occurs in more than 80% of the administrative districts of Ghana. To elucidate community perceptions and understanding of the aetiology of BUD, attitudes towards Buruli patients and treatment-seeking behaviours, we conducted a survey with 504 heads of households and seven focus group discussions in Ga West District, Ghana. Although 67% of participants regarded BUD as a health problem, 53% did not know its cause. Sixteen per cent attributed the cause to drinking non-potable water, 8.1% mentioned poor personal hygiene or dirty surroundings, and 5.5% identified swimming or wading in ponds as a risk factor. About 5.2% thought that witchcraft and curses cause BUD, and 71.8% indicated that BU sufferers first seek treatment from herbalists and only refer to the hospital as a last resort. The main reasons were prospects of prolonged hospital stay, cost of transport, loss of earnings and opportunity associated with parents attending their children's hospitalization over extended period, delays in being attended by medical staff, and not knowing the cause of the disease or required treatment. The level of acceptance of BUD sufferers was high in adults but less so in children. The challenge facing health workers is to break the vicious cycle of poor medical outcomes leading to poor attitudes to hospital treatment in the community. Because herbalists are often the first people consulted by those who contract the disease, they need to be trained in early recognition of the pre-ulcerative stage of Buruli lesions.

  14. Vaccination with the Surface Proteins MUL_2232 and MUL_3720 of Mycobacterium ulcerans Induces Antibodies but Fails to Provide Protection against Buruli Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Bolz, Miriam; Bénard, Angèle; Dreyer, Anita M.; Kerber, Sarah; Vettiger, Andrea; Oehlmann, Wulf; Singh, Mahavir; Duthie, Malcolm S.; Pluschke, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer, caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a chronic ulcerative neglected tropical disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue that is most prevalent in West African countries. M. ulcerans produces a cytotoxic macrolide exotoxin called mycolactone, which causes extensive necrosis of infected subcutaneous tissue and the development of characteristic ulcerative lesions with undermined edges. While cellular immune responses are expected to play a key role against early intracellular stages of M. ulcerans in macrophages, antibody mediated protection might be of major relevance against advanced stages, where bacilli are predominantly found as extracellular clusters. Methodology/Principal Findings To assess whether vaccine induced antibodies against surface antigens of M. ulcerans can protect against Buruli ulcer we formulated two surface vaccine candidate antigens, MUL_2232 and MUL_3720, as recombinant proteins with the synthetic Toll-like receptor 4 agonist glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant-stable emulsion. The candidate vaccines elicited strong antibody responses without a strong bias towards a TH1 type cellular response, as indicated by the IgG2a to IgG1 ratio. Despite the cross-reactivity of the induced antibodies with the native antigens, no significant protection was observed against progression of an experimental M. ulcerans infection in a mouse footpad challenge model. Conclusions Even though vaccine-induced antibodies have the potential to opsonise the extracellular bacilli they do not have a protective effect since infiltrating phagocytes might be killed by mycolactone before reaching the bacteria, as indicated by lack of viable infiltrates in the necrotic infection foci. PMID:26849213

  15. Steps Toward Creating A Therapeutic Community for Inpatients Suffering from Chronic Ulcers: Lessons from Allada Buruli Ulcer Treatment Hospital in Benin

    PubMed Central

    Amoussouhoui, Arnaud Setondji; Johnson, Roch Christian; Sopoh, Ghislain Emmanuel; Agbo, Ines Elvire; Aoulou, Paulin; Houezo, Jean-Gabin; Tingbe-Azalou, Albert; Boyer, Micah; Nichter, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background Reducing social distance between hospital staff and patients and establishing clear lines of communication is a major challenge when providing in-patient care for people afflicted by Buruli ulcer (BU) and chronic ulcers. Research on hospitals as therapeutic communities is virtually non-existent in Africa and is currently being called for by medical anthropologists working in the field of health service and policy planning. This paper describes a pioneering attempt to establish a therapeutic community for patients suffering from BU and other chronic ulcers requiring long term hospital care in Benin. Methods A six-month pilot project was undertaken with the objectives of establishing a therapeutic community and evaluating its impact on practitioner and patient relations. The project was designed and implemented by a team of social scientists working in concert with the current and previous director of a hospital serving patients suffering from advanced stage BU and other chronic ulcers. Qualitative research initially investigated patients’ understanding of their illness and its treatment, identified questions patients had about their hospitalization, and ascertained their level of social support. Newly designed question–answer health education sessions were developed. Following these hospital wide education sessions, open forums were held each week to provide an opportunity for patients and hospital staff to express concerns and render sources of discontent transparent. Patient group representatives then met with hospital staff to problem solve issues in a non-confrontational manner. Psychosocial support for individual patients was provided in a second intervention which took the form of drop-in counseling sessions with social scientists trained to serve as therapy facilitators and culture brokers. Results Interviews with patients revealed that most patients had very little information about the identity of their illness and the duration of their

  16. RNA Aptamer That Specifically Binds to Mycolactone and Serves as a Diagnostic Tool for Diagnosis of Buruli Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Aboagye, Samuel Yaw; Otchere, Isaac Darko; Liao, Albert M.; Caltagirone, Thomas G.; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy

    2016-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a subcutaneous skin disease listed among the neglected tropical diseases by the World Health Organization (WHO). Early case detection and management is very important to reduce morbidity and the accompanied characteristic disfiguring nature of BU. Since diagnosis based on clinical evidence can lead to misdiagnosis, microbiological confirmation is essential to reduce abuse of drugs; since the anti-mycobacterial drugs are also used for TB treatment. The current WHO gold standard PCR method is expensive, requires infrastructure and expertise are usually not available at the peripheral centers where BU cases are managed. Thus one of the main research agendas is to develop methods that can be applied at the point of care. In this study we selected aptamers, which are emerging novel class of detection molecules, for detecting mycolactone, the first to be conducted in a BUD endemic country. Methods Aptamers that bind to mycolactone were isolated by the SELEX process. To measure their affinity and specificity to mycolactone, the selected aptamers were screened by means of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and an enzyme-linked oligonucleotide assay (ELONA). Selected aptamers were assessed by ELONA using swab samples from forty-one suspected BU patients with IS2404 PCR and culture as standard methods. ROC analysis was used to evaluate their accuracy and cutoff-points. Results Five out of the nine selected aptamers bound significantly (p< 0.05) to mycolactone, of these, three were able to distinguish between mycolactone producing mycobacteria, M. marinum (CC240299, Israel) and other bacteria whilst two others also bounded significantly to Mycobacterium smegmatis. Their dissociation constants were in the micro-molar range. At 95% confidence interval, the ROC curve analysis among the aptamers at OD450 ranged from 0.5–0.7. Using this cut-off for the ELONA assay, the aptamers had 100% specificity and sensitivity between 0.0% and 50.0%. The

  17. Buruli ulcer disease prevalence in Benin, West Africa: Associations with land use/cover and the identification of disease clusters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, T.; Benbow, M.E.; Brenden, T.O.; Qi, J.; Johnson, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Buruli ulcer (BU) disease, caused by infection with the environmental mycobacterium M. ulcerans, is an emerging infectious disease in many tropical and sub-tropical countries. Although vectors and modes of transmission remain unknown, it is hypothesized that the transmission of BU disease is associated with human activities in or around aquatic environments, and that characteristics of the landscape (e.g., land use/cover) play a role in mediating BU disease. Several studies performed at relatively small spatial scales (e.g., within a single village or region of a country) support these hypotheses; however, if BU disease is associated with land use/cover characteristics, either through spatial constraints on vector-host dynamics or by mediating human activities, then large-scale (i.e., country-wide) associations should also emerge. The objectives of this study were to (1) investigate associations between BU disease prevalence in villages in Benin, West Africa and surrounding land use/cover patterns and other map-based characteristics, and (2) identify areas with greater and lower than expected prevalence rates (i.e., disease clusters) to assist with the development of prevention and control programs. Results: Our landscape-based models identified low elevation, rural villages surrounded by forest land cover, and located in drainage basins with variable wetness patterns as being associated with higher BU disease prevalence rates. We also identified five spatial disease clusters. Three of the five clusters contained villages with greater than expected prevalence rates and two clusters contained villages with lower than expected prevalence rates. Those villages with greater than expected BU disease prevalence rates spanned a fairly narrow region of south-central Benin. Conclusion: Our analyses suggest that interactions between natural land cover and human alterations to the landscape likely play a role in the dynamics of BU disease. For example

  18. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification for Laboratory Confirmation of Buruli Ulcer Disease—Towards a Point-of-Care Test

    PubMed Central

    Beissner, Marcus; Phillips, Richard Odame; Battke, Florian; Bauer, Malkin; Badziklou, Kossi; Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Maman, Issaka; Rhomberg, Agata; Piten, Ebekalisai; Frimpong, Michael; Huber, Kristina Lydia; Symank, Dominik; Jansson, Moritz; Wiedemann, Franz Xaver; Banla Kere, Abiba; Herbinger, Karl-Heinz; Löscher, Thomas; Bretzel, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    Background As the major burden of Buruli ulcer disease (BUD) occurs in remote rural areas, development of point-of-care (POC) tests is considered a research priority to bring diagnostic services closer to the patients. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), a simple, robust and cost-effective technology, has been selected as a promising POC test candidate. Three BUD-specific LAMP assays are available to date, but various technical challenges still hamper decentralized application. To overcome the requirement of cold-chains for transport and storage of reagents, the aim of this study was to establish a dry-reagent-based LAMP assay (DRB-LAMP) employing lyophilized reagents. Methodology/Principal Findings Following the design of an IS2404 based conventional LAMP (cLAMP) assay suitable to apply lyophilized reagents, a lyophylization protocol for the DRB-LAMP format was developed. Clinical performance of cLAMP was validated through testing of 140 clinical samples from 91 suspected BUD cases by routine assays, i.e. IS2404 dry-reagent-based (DRB) PCR, conventional IS2404 PCR (cPCR), IS2404 qPCR, compared to cLAMP. Whereas qPCR rendered an additional 10% of confirmed cases and samples respectively, case confirmation and positivity rates of DRB-PCR or cPCR (64.84% and 56.43%; 100% concordant results in both assays) and cLAMP (62.64% and 52.86%) were comparable and there was no significant difference between the sensitivity of the assays (DRB PCR and cPCR, 86.76%; cLAMP, 83.82%). Likewise, sensitivity of cLAMP (95.83%) and DRB-LAMP (91.67%) were comparable as determined on a set of 24 samples tested positive in all routine assays. Conclusions/Significance Both LAMP formats constitute equivalent alternatives to conventional PCR techniques. Provided the envisaged availability of field friendly DNA extraction formats, both assays are suitable for decentralized laboratory confirmation of BUD, whereby DRB-LAMP scores with the additional advantage of not requiring cold

  19. Genetic Diversity of PCR-Positive, Culture-Negative and Culture-Positive Mycobacterium ulcerans Isolated from Buruli Ulcer Patients in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Heather; Phillips, Richard; Sarfo, Stephen; Wansbrough-Jones, Mark; Small, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Culture of Mycobacterium ulcerans from Buruli ulcer patients has very low sensitivity. Thus confirmation of M. ulcerans infection is primarily based on PCR directed against IS2404. In this study we compare the genotypes obtained by variable number of tandem repeat analysis of DNA from IS2404-PCR positive cultures with that obtained from IS2404 positive, culture-negative tissue. A significantly greater genetic heterogeneity was found among culture-negative samples compared with that found in cultured strains but a single genotype is over-represented in both sample sets. This study provides evidence that both the focal location of bacteria in a lesion as well as differences in the ability to culture a particular genotype may underlie the low sensitivity of culture. Though preliminary, data from this work also suggests that mycobacteria previously associated with fish disease (M. pseudoshottsii) may be pathogenic for humans. PMID:24520343

  20. Good Quality of Life in Former Buruli Ulcer Patients with Small Lesions: Long-Term Follow-up of the BURULICO Trial

    PubMed Central

    Klis, Sandor; Ranchor, Adelita; Phillips, Richard O.; Abass, Kabiru M.; Tuah, Wilson; Loth, Susanne; Velding, Kristien; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2014-01-01

    Background Buruli Ulcer is a tropical skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, which, due to scarring and contractures can lead to stigma and functional limitations. However, recent advances in treatment, combined with increased public health efforts have the potential to significantly improve disease outcome. Objectives To study the Quality of Life (QoL) of former Buruli Ulcer patients who, in the context of a randomized controlled trial, reported early with small lesions (cross-sectional diameter <10 cm), and received a full course of antibiotic treatment. Methods 127 Participants of the BURULICO drug trial in Ghana were revisited. All former patients aged 16 or older completed the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and the abbreviated World Health Organization Quality of Life scale (WHOQOL-BREF). The WHOQOL-BREF was also administered to 82 matched healthy controls. Those younger than 16 completed the Childrens' Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) only. Results The median (Inter Quartile Range) score on the DLQI was 0 (0–4), indicating good QoL. 85% of former patients indicated no effect, or only a small effect of the disease on their current life. Former patients also indicated good QoL on the physical and psychological domains of the WHOQOL-BREF, and scored significantly higher than healthy controls on these domains. There was a weak correlation between the DLQI and scar size (ρ = 0.32; p<0.001). Conclusions BU patients who report early with small lesions and receive 8 weeks of antimicrobial therapy have a good QoL at long-term follow-up. These findings contrast with the debilitating sequelae often reported in BU, and highlight the importance of early case detection. PMID:25010061

  1. [Micronecta sp (Corixidae) and Diplonychus sp (Belostomatidae), two aquatic Hemiptera hosts and/or potential vectors of Mycobacterium ulcerans (pathogenic agent of Buruli ulcer) in Cote d'Ivoire].

    PubMed

    Doannio, J M C; Konan, K L; Dosso, F N; Koné, A B; Konan, Y L; Sankaré, Y; Ekaza, E; Coulibaly, N D; Odéhouri, K P; Dosso, M; Sess, E D; Marsollier, L; Aubry, J

    2011-02-01

    Buruli ulcer is currently a major public health problem in Côte d'Ivoire. It is a neglected tropical disease closely associated with aquatic environments. Aquatic insects of the Hemiptera order have been implicated in human transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans, the pathogenic agent of Buruli ulcer. The purpose of this preliminary study using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was to evaluate aquatic insects in Sokrogbo, a village in the Tiassalé sanitary district where Buruli ulcer is endemic. Findings identified two water bugs hosting Mycobacterium ulcerans, i.e., one of the Micronecta genus in the Corixidae family and another of the Diplonychus genus in the Belostomatidae family. The PCR technique used revealed the molecular signatures of M. ulcerans in tissue from these two insects. Based on these findings, these two water bugs can be considered as potential hosts and/or vectors of M. ulcerans in the study zone. Unlike Diplonychus sp., this is the first report to describe Micronecta sp as a host of M. ulcerans. Further investigation will be needed to assess the role of these two water bugs in human transmission of M. ulcerans in Côte d'Ivoire.

  2. [Micronecta sp (Corixidae) and Diplonychus sp (Belostomatidae), two aquatic Hemiptera hosts and/or potential vectors of Mycobacterium ulcerans (pathogenic agent of Buruli ulcer) in Cote d'Ivoire].

    PubMed

    Doannio, J M C; Konan, K L; Dosso, F N; Koné, A B; Konan, Y L; Sankaré, Y; Ekaza, E; Coulibaly, N D; Odéhouri, K P; Dosso, M; Sess, E D; Marsollier, L; Aubry, J

    2011-02-01

    Buruli ulcer is currently a major public health problem in Côte d'Ivoire. It is a neglected tropical disease closely associated with aquatic environments. Aquatic insects of the Hemiptera order have been implicated in human transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans, the pathogenic agent of Buruli ulcer. The purpose of this preliminary study using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was to evaluate aquatic insects in Sokrogbo, a village in the Tiassalé sanitary district where Buruli ulcer is endemic. Findings identified two water bugs hosting Mycobacterium ulcerans, i.e., one of the Micronecta genus in the Corixidae family and another of the Diplonychus genus in the Belostomatidae family. The PCR technique used revealed the molecular signatures of M. ulcerans in tissue from these two insects. Based on these findings, these two water bugs can be considered as potential hosts and/or vectors of M. ulcerans in the study zone. Unlike Diplonychus sp., this is the first report to describe Micronecta sp as a host of M. ulcerans. Further investigation will be needed to assess the role of these two water bugs in human transmission of M. ulcerans in Côte d'Ivoire. PMID:21585092

  3. Identification of the Mycobacterium ulcerans Protein MUL_3720 as a Promising Target for the Development of a Diagnostic Test for Buruli Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, Anita; Röltgen, Katharina; Dangy, Jean Pierre; Ruf, Marie Thérèse; Scherr, Nicole; Bolz, Miriam; Tobias, Nicholas Jay; Moes, Charles; Vettiger, Andrea; Stinear, Timothy Paul; Pluschke, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans is a devastating skin disease, occurring mainly in remote West African communities with poor access to health care. Early case detection and subsequent antibiotic treatment are essential to counteract the progression of the characteristic chronic ulcerative lesions. Since the accuracy of clinical BU diagnosis is limited, laboratory reconfirmation is crucial. However, currently available diagnostic techniques with sufficient sensitivity and specificity require infrastructure and resources only accessible at a few reference centres in the African endemic countries. Hence, the development of a simple, rapid, sensitive and specific point-of-care diagnostic tool is one of the major research priorities for BU. In this study, we have identified a previously unknown M. ulcerans protein, MUL_3720, as a promising target for antigen capture-based detection assays. We show that MUL_3720 is highly expressed by M. ulcerans and has no orthologs in other prevalent pathogenic mycobacteria. We generated a panel of anti-MUL_3720 antibodies and used them to confirm a cell wall location for MUL_3720. These antibodies could also specifically detect M. ulcerans in infected human tissue samples as well as in lysates of infected mouse footpads. A bacterial 2-hybrid screen suggested a potential role for MUL_3720 in cell wall biosynthesis pathways. Finally, we demonstrate that a combination of MUL_3720 specific antibody reagents in a sandwich-ELISA format has sufficient sensitivity to make them suitable for the development of antigen capture-based diagnostic tests for BU. PMID:25668636

  4. Economic inequality caused by feedbacks between poverty and the dynamics of a rare tropical disease: the case of Buruli ulcer in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Garchitorena, Andrés; Ngonghala, Calistus N; Guegan, Jean-Francois; Texier, Gaëtan; Bellanger, Martine; Bonds, Matthew; Roche, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) have received increasing attention in recent years by the global heath community, as they cumulatively constitute substantial burdens of disease as well as barriers for economic development. A number of common tropical diseases such as malaria, hookworm or schistosomiasis have well-documented economic impacts. However, much less is known about the population-level impacts of diseases that are rare but associated with high disability burden, which represent a great number of tropical diseases. Using an individual-based model of Buruli ulcer (BU), we demonstrate that, through feedbacks between health and economic status, such NTDs can have a significant impact on the economic structure of human populations even at low incidence levels. While average wealth is only marginally affected by BU, the economic conditions of certain subpopulations are impacted sufficiently to create changes in measurable population-level inequality. A reduction of the disability burden caused by BU can thus maximize the economic growth of the poorest subpopulations and reduce significantly the economic inequalities introduced by the disease in endemic regions.

  5. Beninese Medicinal Plants as a Source of Antimycobacterial Agents: Bioguided Fractionation and In Vitro Activity of Alkaloids Isolated from Holarrhena floribunda Used in Traditional Treatment of Buruli Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Yemoa, Achille; Gbenou, Joachim; Affolabi, Dissou; Moudachirou, Mansourou; Bigot, André; Anagonou, Séverin; Portaels, Françoise; Martin, Anandi; Quetin-Leclercq, Joëlle

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) imposes a serious economic burden on affected households and on health systems that are involved in diagnosing the disease and treating patients. Research is needed to find cost-effective therapies for this costly disease. Plants have always been an important source of new pharmacologically active molecules. Consequently we decided to undertake the study of plants used in traditional treatment of BU in Benin and investigate their antimycobacterial activity as well as their chemical composition. Extracts from forty-four (44) plant species were selected on account of reported traditional uses for the treatment of BU in Benin and were assayed for antimycobacterial activities. Crude hydroethanolic extract from aerial parts of Holarrhena floribunda (G. Don) T. Durand and Schinz was found to have significant antimycobacterial activity against M. ulcerans (MIC = 125 µg/mL). We describe here the identification of four steroidal alkaloids from Mycobacterium ulcerans growth-inhibiting fractions of the alkaloidal extract of the aerial parts of Holarrhena floribunda. Holadysamine was purified in sufficient amount to allow the determination of its MCI (=50 µg/mL). These results give some support to the use of this plant in traditional medicine. PMID:26180813

  6. Beninese Medicinal Plants as a Source of Antimycobacterial Agents: Bioguided Fractionation and In Vitro Activity of Alkaloids Isolated from Holarrhena floribunda Used in Traditional Treatment of Buruli Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Yemoa, Achille; Gbenou, Joachim; Affolabi, Dissou; Moudachirou, Mansourou; Bigot, André; Anagonou, Séverin; Portaels, Françoise; Martin, Anandi; Quetin-Leclercq, Joëlle

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) imposes a serious economic burden on affected households and on health systems that are involved in diagnosing the disease and treating patients. Research is needed to find cost-effective therapies for this costly disease. Plants have always been an important source of new pharmacologically active molecules. Consequently we decided to undertake the study of plants used in traditional treatment of BU in Benin and investigate their antimycobacterial activity as well as their chemical composition. Extracts from forty-four (44) plant species were selected on account of reported traditional uses for the treatment of BU in Benin and were assayed for antimycobacterial activities. Crude hydroethanolic extract from aerial parts of Holarrhena floribunda (G. Don) T. Durand and Schinz was found to have significant antimycobacterial activity against M. ulcerans (MIC = 125 µg/mL). We describe here the identification of four steroidal alkaloids from Mycobacterium ulcerans growth-inhibiting fractions of the alkaloidal extract of the aerial parts of Holarrhena floribunda. Holadysamine was purified in sufficient amount to allow the determination of its MCI (=50 µg/mL). These results give some support to the use of this plant in traditional medicine.

  7. Spatial dependency of Buruli ulcer prevalence on arsenic-enriched domains in Amansie West District, Ghana: implications for arsenic mediation in Mycobacterium ulcerans infection

    PubMed Central

    Duker, Alfred A; Carranza, Emmanuel JM; Hale, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Background In 1998, the World Health Organization recognized Buruli ulcer (BU), a human skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU), as the third most prevalent mycobacterial disease. In Ghana, there have been more than 2000 reported cases in the last ten years; outbreaks have occurred in at least 90 of its 110 administrative districts. In one of the worst affected districts, Amansie West, there are arsenic-enriched surface environments resulting from the oxidation of arsenic-bearing minerals, occurring naturally in mineral deposits. Results Proximity analysis, carried out to determine spatial relationships between BU-affected areas and arsenic-enriched farmlands and arsenic-enriched drainage channels in the Amansie West District, showed that mean BU prevalence in settlements along arsenic-enriched drainages and within arsenic-enriched farmlands is greater than elsewhere. Furthermore, mean BU prevalence is greater along arsenic-enriched drainages than within arsenic-enriched farmlands. Conclusion The results suggest that arsenic in the environment may play a contributory role in MU infection. PMID:15369592

  8. Local Heat Application for the Treatment of Buruli Ulcer: Results of a Phase II Open Label Single Center Non Comparative Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Moritz; Bayi, Pierre F.; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Bratschi, Martin W.; Bolz, Miriam; Um Boock, Alphonse; Zwahlen, Marcel; Pluschke, Gerd; Junghanss, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background. Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease most prevalent among West African children. The causative organism, Mycobacterium ulcerans, is sensitive to temperatures above 37°C. We investigated the safety and efficacy of a local heat application device based on phase change material. Methods. In a phase II open label single center noncomparative clinical trial (ISRCTN 72102977) under GCP standards in Cameroon, laboratory confirmed BU patients received up to 8 weeks of heat treatment. We assessed efficacy based on the endpoints ‘absence of clinical BU specific features’ or ‘wound closure’ within 6 months (“primary cure”), and ‘absence of clinical recurrence within 24 month’ (“definite cure”). Results. Of 53 patients 51 (96%) had ulcerative disease. 62% were classified as World Health Organization category II, 19% each as category I and III. The average lesion size was 45 cm2. Within 6 months after completion of heat treatment 92.4% (49 of 53, 95% confidence interval [CI], 81.8% to 98.0%) achieved cure of their primary lesion. At 24 months follow-up 83.7% (41 of 49, 95% CI, 70.3% to 92.7%) of patients with primary cure remained free of recurrence. Heat treatment was well tolerated; adverse effects were occasional mild local skin reactions. Conclusions. Local thermotherapy is a highly effective, simple, cheap and safe treatment for M. ulcerans disease. It has in particular potential as home-based remedy for BU suspicious lesions at community level where laboratory confirmation is not available. Clinical Trials Registration. ISRCT 72102977. PMID:26486698

  9. A Community Based Study on the Mode of Transmission, Prevention and Treatment of Buruli Ulcers in Southwest Cameroon: Knowledge, Attitude and Practices

    PubMed Central

    Akoachere, Jane-Francis K. T.; Nsai, Frankline S.; Ndip, Roland N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a neglected tropical disease affecting the skin, tissues and in some cases the bones, caused by the environmental pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans (M. ulcerans). Its mode of transmission is still elusive. Delayed treatment may cause irreversible disabilities with consequent social and economic impacts on the victim. Socio-cultural beliefs, practices and attitudes in endemic communities have been shown to influence timely treatment causing disease management, prevention and control a great challenge. An assessment of these factors in endemic localities is important in designing successful intervention strategies. Considering this, we assessed the knowledge, attitude and practices regarding BU in three endemic localities in the South West region, Cameroon to highlight existing misconceptions that need to be addressed to enhance prompt treatment and facilitate effective prevention and control. Methods and Findings A cross-sectional study was executed in three BU endemic health districts. Using qualitative and quantitative approaches we surveyed 320 randomly selected household heads, interviewed BU patients and conducted three focus group discussions (FGDs) to obtain information on awareness, beliefs, treatment, and attitudes towards victims. The influence of socio-demographic factors on these variables was investigated. Results Respondents (84.4%) had a good knowledge of BU though only 65% considered it a health problem while 49.4% believed it is contagious. Socio-demographic factors significantly (P<0.05) influenced awareness of BU, knowledge and practice on treatment and attitudes towards victims. Although the majority of respondents stated the hospital as the place for appropriate treatment, FGDs and some BU victims preferred witchdoctors/herbalists and prayers, and considered the hospital as the last option. We documented beliefs about the disease which could delay treatment. Conclusion Though we are reporting a high level of

  10. Geographic distribution, age pattern and sites of lesions in a cohort of Buruli ulcer patients from the Mapé Basin of Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Bratschi, Martin W; Bolz, Miriam; Minyem, Jacques C; Grize, Leticia; Wantong, Fidèle G; Kerber, Sarah; Njih Tabah, Earnest; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Mou, Ferdinand; Noumen, Djeunga; Um Boock, Alphonse; Pluschke, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU), a neglected tropical disease of the skin, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, occurs most frequently in children in West Africa. Risk factors for BU include proximity to slow flowing water, poor wound care and not wearing protective clothing. Man-made alterations of the environment have been suggested to lead to increased BU incidence. M. ulcerans DNA has been detected in the environment, water bugs and recently also in mosquitoes. Despite these findings, the mode of transmission of BU remains poorly understood and both transmission by insects or direct inoculation from contaminated environment have been suggested. Here, we investigated the BU epidemiology in the Mapé basin of Cameroon where the damming of the Mapé River since 1988 is believed to have increased the incidence of BU. Through a house-by-house survey in spring 2010, which also examined the local population for leprosy and yaws, and continued surveillance thereafter, we identified, till June 2012, altogether 88 RT-PCR positive cases of BU. We found that the age adjusted cumulative incidence of BU was highest in young teenagers and in individuals above the age of 50 and that very young children (<5) were underrepresented among cases. BU lesions clustered around the ankles and at the back of the elbows. This pattern neither matches any of the published mosquito biting site patterns, nor the published distribution of small skin injuries in children, where lesions on the knees are much more frequent. The option of multiple modes of transmission should thus be considered. Analyzing the geographic distribution of cases in the Mapé Dam area revealed a closer association with the Mbam River than with the artificial lake. PMID:23785529

  11. Effectiveness of Routine BCG Vaccination on Buruli Ulcer Disease: A Case-Control Study in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana and Togo

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Richard Odame; Phanzu, Delphin Mavinga; Beissner, Marcus; Badziklou, Kossi; Luzolo, Elysée Kalundieko; Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Halatoko, Wemboo Afiwa; Amoako, Yaw; Frimpong, Michael; Kabiru, Abass Mohammed; Piten, Ebekalisai; Maman, Issaka; Bidjada, Bawimodom; Koba, Adjaho; Awoussi, Koffi Somenou; Kobara, Basile; Nitschke, Jörg; Wiedemann, Franz Xaver; Kere, Abiba Banla; Adjei, Ohene; Löscher, Thomas; Fleischer, Bernhard; Bretzel, Gisela; Herbinger, Karl-Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Background The only available vaccine that could be potentially beneficial against mycobacterial diseases contains live attenuated bovine tuberculosis bacillus (Mycobacterium bovis) also called Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Even though the BCG vaccine is still widely used, results on its effectiveness in preventing mycobacterial diseases are partially contradictory, especially regarding Buruli Ulcer Disease (BUD). The aim of this case-control study is to evaluate the possible protective effect of BCG vaccination on BUD. Methodology The present study was performed in three different countries and sites where BUD is endemic: in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ghana, and Togo from 2010 through 2013. The large study population was comprised of 401 cases with laboratory confirmed BUD and 826 controls, mostly family members or neighbors. Principal Findings After stratification by the three countries, two sexes and four age groups, no significant correlation was found between the presence of BCG scar and BUD status of individuals. Multivariate analysis has shown that the independent variables country (p = 0.31), sex (p = 0.24), age (p = 0.96), and presence of a BCG scar (p = 0.07) did not significantly influence the development of BUD category I or category II/III. Furthermore, the status of BCG vaccination was also not significantly related to duration of BUD or time to healing of lesions. Conclusions In our study, we did not observe significant evidence of a protective effect of routine BCG vaccination on the risk of developing either BUD or severe forms of BUD. Since accurate data on BCG strains used in these three countries were not available, no final conclusion can be drawn on the effectiveness of BCG strain in protecting against BUD. As has been suggested for tuberculosis and leprosy, well-designed prospective studies on different existing BCG vaccine strains are needed also for BUD. PMID:25569674

  12. What Role Do Traditional Beliefs Play in Treatment Seeking and Delay for Buruli Ulcer Disease?–Insights from a Mixed Methods Study in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Peeters Grietens, Koen; Toomer, Elizabeth; Um Boock, Alphonse; Hausmann-Muela, Susanna; Peeters, Hans; Kanobana, Kirezi; Gryseels, Charlotte; Ribera, Joan Muela

    2012-01-01

    Background Victims of Buruli ulcer disease (BUD) frequently report to specialized units at a late stage of the disease. This delay has been associated with local beliefs and a preference for traditional healing linked to a reportedly mystical origin of the disease. We assessed the role beliefs play in determining BUD sufferers’ choice between traditional and biomedical treatments. Methods Anthropological fieldwork was conducted in community and clinical settings in the region of Ayos and Akonolinga in Central Cameroon. The research design consisted of a mixed methods study, triangulating a qualitative strand based on ethnographic research and quantitative data obtained through a survey presented to all patients at the Ayos and Akonolinga hospitals (N = 79) at the time of study and in four endemic communities (N = 73) belonging to the hospitals’ catchment area. Results The analysis of BUD sufferers’ health-seeking behaviour showed extremely complex therapeutic itineraries, including various attempts and failures both in the biomedical and traditional fields. Contrary to expectations, nearly half of all hospital patients attributed their illness to mystical causes, while traditional healers admitted patients they perceived to be infected by natural causes. Moreover, both patients in hospitals and in communities often combined elements of both types of treatments. Ultimately, perceptions regarding the effectiveness of the treatment, the option for local treatment as a cost prevention strategy and the characteristics of the doctor-patient relationship were more determinant for treatment choice than beliefs. Discussion The ascription of delay and treatment choice to beliefs constitutes an over-simplification of BUD health-seeking behaviour and places the responsibility directly on the shoulders of BUD sufferers while potentially neglecting other structural elements. While more efficacious treatment in the biomedical sector is likely to reduce perceived

  13. Geographic Distribution, Age Pattern and Sites of Lesions in a Cohort of Buruli Ulcer Patients from the Mapé Basin of Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Bratschi, Martin W.; Bolz, Miriam; Minyem, Jacques C.; Grize, Leticia; Wantong, Fidèle G.; Kerber, Sarah; Njih Tabah, Earnest; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Mou, Ferdinand; Noumen, Djeunga; Um Boock, Alphonse; Pluschke, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU), a neglected tropical disease of the skin, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, occurs most frequently in children in West Africa. Risk factors for BU include proximity to slow flowing water, poor wound care and not wearing protective clothing. Man-made alterations of the environment have been suggested to lead to increased BU incidence. M. ulcerans DNA has been detected in the environment, water bugs and recently also in mosquitoes. Despite these findings, the mode of transmission of BU remains poorly understood and both transmission by insects or direct inoculation from contaminated environment have been suggested. Here, we investigated the BU epidemiology in the Mapé basin of Cameroon where the damming of the Mapé River since 1988 is believed to have increased the incidence of BU. Through a house-by-house survey in spring 2010, which also examined the local population for leprosy and yaws, and continued surveillance thereafter, we identified, till June 2012, altogether 88 RT-PCR positive cases of BU. We found that the age adjusted cumulative incidence of BU was highest in young teenagers and in individuals above the age of 50 and that very young children (<5) were underrepresented among cases. BU lesions clustered around the ankles and at the back of the elbows. This pattern neither matches any of the published mosquito biting site patterns, nor the published distribution of small skin injuries in children, where lesions on the knees are much more frequent. The option of multiple modes of transmission should thus be considered. Analyzing the geographic distribution of cases in the Mapé Dam area revealed a closer association with the Mbam River than with the artificial lake. PMID:23785529

  14. Household cost of out-patient treatment of Buruli ulcer in Ghana: a case study of Obom in Ga South Municipality

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The economic burden of diseases has become increasingly relevant to policy makers as healthcare expenditure keep rising in the face of limited and competing resources. Buruli ulcer (BU), a neglected but treatable tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, the only known environmental mycobacterium is capable of causing long term disability when left untreated. However, most BU studies have tended to focused on its bacteriology, epidemiology, entomology and other social determinants to the neglect of its economic evaluation. This paper reports estimated the household economic costs of BU and describe the intangible cost suffered by BU patients in an endemic area. Methods Retrospective one year cost data was used. A total of 63 confirmed BU cases were randomly sampled for the study. Economic cost and cost burden of BU were estimated. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to test the robustness of the cost estimates. Intangible cost measured stigmatization, pain, functional limitation and social isolation of children. Results The annual total household economic cost was US$35,915.98, of which about 65% was cost incurred by children with a mean cost of US$521.04. The mean annual household cost was US$570.09. The direct cost was 96% of the total cost. Non-medical cost accounts for about 97% of the direct cost with a mean cost of US$529.27. The mean medical cost was US$18.94. The main cost drivers of the household costs were transportation (78%) and food (12%). Caregivers and adult patients lost a total of 535 productive days seeking care, which gives an indirect cost valued at US$1,378.67 with a mean of US$21.88. A total of 365 school days (about 1 year) were lost by 19 BU patients (mean, 19.2 days). Functional loss and pain were low, and stigma rated moderate. Most children suffering from BU (84%) were socially isolated. Conclusion Household cost burden of out-patient BU ulcer treatment was high. Household cost of BU is therefore essential in the

  15. Socio-Environmental Factors Associated with the Risk of Contracting Buruli Ulcer in Tiassalé, South Côte d’Ivoire: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    N’krumah, Raymond T. A. S.; Koné, Brama; Tiembre, Issaka; Cissé, Guéladio; Pluschke, Gerd; Tanner, Marcel; Utzinger, Jürg

    2016-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a cutaneous infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The exact mode of transmission remains elusive; yet, some studies identified environmental, socio-sanitary, and behavioral risk factors. The purpose of this study was to assess the association of such factors to contracting BU in Tiassalé, south Côte d’Ivoire. Methodology A case-control study was conducted in 2012. Cases were BU patients diagnosed according to clinical definition put forth by the World Health Organization, readily confirmed by IS2404 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis prior to our study and recruited at one of the health centers of the district. Two controls were matched for each control, by age group (to the nearest 5 years), sex, and living community. Participants were interviewed after providing oral witnessed consent, assessing behavioral, environmental, and socio-sanitary factors. Principal Findings A total of 51 incident and prevalent cases and 102 controls were enrolled. Sex ratio (male:female) was 0.9. Median age was 25 years (range: 5–70 years). Regular contact with unprotected surface water (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 6.5; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.1–19.7) and absence of protective equipment during agricultural activities (aOR = 18.5, 95% CI = 5.2–66.7) were identified as the main factors associated with the risk of contracting BU. Etiologic fractions among exposed to both factors were 84.9% and 94.6%, respectively. Good knowledge about the risks that may result in BU (aOR = 0.3, 95% CI = 0.1–0.8) and perception about the disease causes (aOR = 0.1, 95% CI = 0.02–0.3) showed protection against BU with a respective preventive fraction of 70% and 90%. Conclusions/Significance Main risk factors identified in this study were the contact with unprotected water bodies through daily activities and the absence of protective equipment during agricultural activities. An effective strategy to reduce the incidence of BU should

  16. Buruli Ulcer (Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection)

    MedlinePlus

    ... its effectiveness has not been proven by a randomized trial. Since streptomycin is contraindicated in pregnancy, the ... though its effectiveness has not been proven by randomized trial. Morbidity management, disability prevention and rehabilitation Interventions ...

  17. Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... have one. Ulcers can also be caused by anti-inflammatory medicines. Although most people take these medicines without ... may damage the stomach lining and cause ulcers. Anti-inflammatory drugs include aspirin, ibuprofen (one brand name: Motrin), ...

  18. A Cutaneous Ulcer Resulting from Mycobacterium ulcerans—Leishmania braziliensis Coinfection in South America

    PubMed Central

    Mougin, Benjamin; Avenel-Audran, Martine; Hasseine, Lilia; Martin, Ludovic; Cottin, Jane; Pomares, Christelle; Delaunay, Pascal; Marty, Pierre; Ravel, Christophe; Chabasse, Dominique; Abgueguen, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Buruli ulcer is a tropical skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Its mode of transmission is not yet clearly understood. We report here a cutaneous ulcer in a European traveler in South America resulting from a coinfection detected specifically for Mycobacterium ulcerans and Leishmania braziliensis DNA with real-time polymerase chain reaction. This observation of a unique cutaneous ulcer raises the issue about possible modes of transmission of those two pathogens by the same vector. PMID:22049045

  19. Peptic ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    ... I. bleed - peptic ulcer; H. pylori - peptic ulcer; Helicobacter pylori - peptic ulcer ... is infection of the stomach by bacteria called Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori ). Most people with peptic ulcers have ...

  20. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology. PMID:16277953

  1. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology.

  2. [Aphthous ulcers and oral ulcerations].

    PubMed

    Vaillant, Loïc; Samimi, Mahtab

    2016-02-01

    Aphthous ulcers are painful ulcerations located on the mucous membrane, generally in the mouth, less often in the genital area. Three clinical forms of aphthous ulcers have been described: minor aphthous ulcers, herpetiform aphthous ulcers and major aphthous ulcers. Many other conditions presenting with oral bullous or vesiculous lesions orulcerations and erosions can be mistaken for aphthous ulcers. Currently, treatment of aphthous ulcers is palliative and symptomatic. Topical treatments (topical anesthetics, topical steroids and sucralfate) are the first line therapy. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is defined by the recurrence of oral aphthous ulcers at least 4 times per year. RAS is often idiopathic but can be associated with gastro-intestinal diseases (i.e. celiac disease, inflammatory bowel diseases), nutritional deficiencies (iron, folates...), immune disorders (HIV infection, neutropenia) and rare syndromes. Behçet's disease is a chronic, inflammatory, disease whose main clinical feature is recurrent bipolar aphthosis. Colchicine associated with topical treatments constitutes a suitable treatment of most RAS. Thalidomide is the most effective treatment of RAS but its use is limited by frequent adverse effects. Oral ulcers can be related to a wide range of conditions that constitute the differential diagnoses of aphthous ulcers. Oral ulcers are classified into three main groups: acute ulcers with abrupt onset and short duration, recurrent ulcers (mainly due to postherpetic erythema multiforme) and chronic ulcers (with slow onset and insidious progression). Acute oral ulcers are due to trauma, bacterial infections (including acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis), deep fungal infection, gastro-intestinal (namely inflammatory bowel disease) or systemic diseases. Chronic oral ulcers may be drug-induced, or due to benign or malignant tumors. Every oral solitary chronic ulcer should be biopsied to rule out squamous cell carcinoma. A solitary palatal ulcer

  3. Ulcerative Colitis

    MedlinePlus

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a disease that causes inflammation and sores, called ulcers, in the lining of the rectum and colon. ... a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. UC can happen at any age, but it usually ...

  4. Peptic Ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    A peptic ulcer is a sore in the lining of your stomach or your duodenum, the first part of your ... Comes and goes for several days or weeks Peptic ulcers happen when the acids that help you digest ...

  5. [Venous ulcer].

    PubMed

    Böhler, Kornelia

    2016-06-01

    Venous disorders causing a permanent increase in venous pressure are by far the most frequent reason for ulcers of the lower extremity. With a prevalence of 1 % in the general population rising to 4 % in the elderly over 80 and its chronic character, 1 % of healthcare budgets of the western world are spent on treatment of venous ulcers. A thorough investigation of the underlying venous disorder is the prerequisite for a differenciated therapy. This should comprise elimination of venous reflux as well as local wound management. Chronic ulcers can successfully be treated by shave therapy and split skin grafting. Compression therapy is a basic measure not only in venous ulcer treatment but also in prevention of ulcer recurrence. Differential diagnosis which have to be considered are arterial ulcers, vasculitis and neoplasms. PMID:27405863

  6. Ulcerative colitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Inflammatory bowel disease - ulcerative colitis - discharge; Ulcerative proctitis - discharge; Colitis - discharge ... were in the hospital because you have ulcerative colitis. This is a swelling of the inner lining ...

  7. Imported tropical infectious ulcers in travelers.

    PubMed

    Zeegelaar, Jim E; Faber, William R

    2008-01-01

    Skin ulcers are a commonly encountered problem at departments of tropical dermatology in the Western world. Furthermore, the general dermatologist is likely to be consulted more often for imported chronic skin ulcers because of the ever-increasing travel to and from tropical countries. The most common cause of chronic ulceration throughout the world is probably pyoderma. However, in some parts of the world, cutaneous leishmaniasis is one of the most prevalent causes. Mycobacterium ulcerans is an important cause of chronic ulcers in West Africa. Bacterial infections include pyoderma, mycobacterial infections, diphtheria, and anthrax. Pyoderma is caused by Staphylococcus aureus and/or beta-hemolytic streptococci group A. This condition is a common cause of ulcerative skin lesions in tropical countries and is often encountered as a secondary infection in travelers. The diagnosis is often made on clinical grounds. Antibacterial treatment for pyoderma should preferably be based on culture outcome. Floxacillin is generally active against S. aureus and beta-hemolytic streptococci. Infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans, M. marinum, and M. tuberculosis may cause ulcers. Buruli ulcers, which are caused by M. ulcerans, are endemic in foci in West Africa and have been reported as an imported disease in the Western world. Treatment is generally surgical, although a combination of rifampin (rifampicin) and streptomycin may be effective in the early stage. M. marinum causes occasional ulcerating lesions in humans. Treatment regimens consist of combinations containing clarithromycin, rifampin, or ethambutol. Cutaneous tuberculosis is rare in travelers but may be encountered in immigrants from developing countries. Treatment is with multiple drug regimens consisting of isoniazid, ethambutol, pyrazinamide, and rifampin. Cutaneous diphtheria is still endemic in many tropical countries. Cutaneous diphtheria ulcers are nonspecific and erythromycin and penicillin are both effective

  8. Peptic Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a good alternative to NSAIDs for most childhood conditions. Signs and Symptoms Although peptic ulcers are rare in kids, if your child has any of these signs and symptoms, call your doctor: burning pain in the abdomen between the breastbone and the belly button (the ...

  9. [Ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Lopetuso, Loris; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), such as Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic, relapsing inflammatory disorders of the digestive tract resulting from dysregulated immune responses toward environmental factors in genetically predisposed individuals. This review focus on what is the state of the art of UC pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment and how any future findings could drive our clinical practice. PMID:27362722

  10. Venous Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  11. Venous Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Caprini, J A; Partsch, H; Simman, R

    2012-09-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence.

  12. Anti-ulcer Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explains the procedure of ethanol-induced ulcer to check the protective effect of drugs over induced ulcer in rats. Ulcer is defined as the erosion in the lining of the stomach or duodenum and is caused by the disruptions of the gastric mucosal defence and repair systems. Ulceration of stomach is called gastric ulcer and that of duodenum is called duodenal ulcer and together peptic ulcer. In clinical practice, peptic ulcer is one of the most prevalent gastrointestinal disorders, which commonly occurs in developed countries.

  13. In vitro antimicrobial efficacy of a silver-containing wound dressing against mycobacteria associated with atypical skin ulcers.

    PubMed

    Bowler, Philip G; Welsby, Sarah; Towers, Victoria

    2013-08-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans, the etiological agent in Buruli and related ulcers, is a major threat to public health in many tropical countries. Recommended treatment that is accessible and affordable for affected individuals includes surgical debridement and combination antibiotics. The potential benefits in the use of antimicrobial wound dressings has not been demonstrated to date, and consequently the efficacy of a silver-containing absorbent dressing was investigated against a pathogenic wound mycobacterium using stringent in vitro models. The in vitro models were designed to simulate a variety of challenging wound conditions. Mycobacterium fortuitum was used as a fast-growing surrogate for M. ulcerans, a physiologically similar but slower-growing and more significant wound pathogen. Collectively, the studies showed that the silver-containing dressing was bactericidal against M. fortuitum, it maintained killing effect over a prolonged period (7 days) under conditions simulating excessive exudate, and killed an average of 100% of the bacterial population inoculated directly beneath the dressing in a simulated, colonized, shallow wound model. Based on the in vitro data generated in the current research, use of the silver-containing dressing as part of a protocol-of-care in the management of Buruli and related ulcers may help to alleviate wound infection caused by pathogenic mycobacteria, improve quality of life, and provide infection protection in endemic and at-risk regions. .

  14. [Ulcer surgery - what remains?].

    PubMed

    Hölscher, A H; Bollschweiler, E; Mönig, S P

    2006-06-01

    Ulcer surgery today concentrates on the complications of chronic ulcer disease, especially ulcer perforation and endoscopically uncontrollable ulcer bleeding. In this case the laparoscopic or open closure of the gastroduodenal defect or local hemostasis of the bleeding ulcer by laparotomy are the main aims of surgery. Elective operations due to recurrent gastric or duodenal ulcers have become rare. An indication for gastric ulcer resistant to conservative therapy could be persisting suspicion of malignancy whereas in duodenal ulcer gastric outlet obstruction represents a reason for surgery. If these indications are confirmed the classic procedures of gastric resection like Billroth I and Billroth II are performed whereas vagotomy is no longer used. Altogether ulcer surgery has become very safe although it is practiced quite rarely.

  15. Emergency ulcer surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Constance W; Sarosi, George A

    2011-10-01

    The rate of elective surgery for peptic ulcer disease has been declining steadily over the past 3 decades. During this same period, the rate of emergency ulcer surgery rose by 44%. This means that the gastrointestinal surgeon is likely to be called on to manage the emergent complications of peptic ulcer disease without substantial experience in elective peptic ulcer disease surgery. The goal of this review is to familiarize surgeons with our evolving understanding of the pathogenesis, epidemiology, presentation, and management of peptic ulcer disease in the emergency setting, with a focus on peptic ulcer disease-associated bleeding and perforation.

  16. Noninfectious genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Kirshen, Carly; Edwards, Libby

    2015-12-01

    Noninfectious genital ulcers are much more common than ulcers arising from infections. Still, it is important to take a thorough history of sexual activity and a sexual abuse screen. A physical exam should include skin, oral mucosa, nails, hair, vulva, and vaginal mucosa if needed. The differential diagnosis of noninfectious genital ulcers includes: lipschütz ulcers, complex aphthosis, Behçet's syndrome, vulvar metastatic Crohn's disease, hidradenitis suppurativa, pyoderma gangrenosum, pressure ulcers, and malignancies. It is important to come to the correct diagnosis to avoid undue testing, stress, and anxiety in patients experiencing genital ulcerations.

  17. Comparison of Two Assays for Molecular Determination of Rifampin Resistance in Clinical Samples from Patients with Buruli Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Richard Odame; Badziklou, Kossi; Piten, Ebekalisai; Maman, Issaka; Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Huber, Kristina Lydia; Rhomberg, Agata; Symank, Dominik; Wagner, Magdalena; Wiedemann, Franz; Nitschke, Jörg; Banla Kere, Abiba; Herbinger, Karl-Heinz; Adjei, Ohene; Löscher, Thomas; Bretzel, Gisela

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates a novel assay for detecting rifampin resistance in clinical Mycobacterium ulcerans isolates. Although highly susceptible for PCR inhibitors in 50% of the samples tested, the assay was 100% M. ulcerans specific and yielded >98% analyzable sequences with a lower limit of detection of 100 to 200 copies of the target sequence. PMID:24478404

  18. Acute genital ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  19. Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... stomach and duodenum to diagnose or treat disease. Erosion – a very shallow sore, similar to an abrasion ... Ulcer – an open sore. Ulcers are deeper than erosions. Author(s) and Publication Date(s) Sean P. Caufield, MD, ...

  20. Ulcer emergencies (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Peptic ulcers may lead to emergency situations. Severe abdominal pain with or without evidence of bleeding may indicate a perforation of the ulcer through the stomach or duodenum. Vomiting of a substance that resembles coffee grounds, ...

  1. Acute genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-28

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers.

  2. PEPTIC ULCER DISEASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is an ulcerative condition of the stomach or duodenum that may be accompanied by mucosal inflammation. PUD is classified as primary when it occurs in healthy children and as secondary when underlying disorders associated with injury, illness, or drug therapy co-exists. Pri...

  3. Connective Tissue Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, Ganary; Falanga, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue disorders (CTD), which are often also termed collagen vascular diseases, include a number of related inflammatory conditions. Some of these diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), localized scleroderma (morphea variants localized to the skin), Sjogren’s syndrome, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and mixed connective tissue disease. In addition to the systemic manifestations of these diseases, there are a number of cutaneous features that make these conditions recognizable on physical exam. Lower extremity ulcers and digital ulcers are an infrequent but disabling complication of long-standing connective tissue disease. The exact frequency with which these ulcers occur is not known, and the cause of the ulcerations is often multifactorial. Moreover, a challenging component of CTD ulcerations is that there are still no established guidelines for their diagnosis and treatment. The morbidity associated with these ulcerations and their underlying conditions is very substantial. Indeed, these less common but intractable ulcers represent a major medical and economic problem for patients, physicians and nurses, and even well organized multidisciplinary wound healing centers. PMID:23756459

  4. Etiology of venous ulceration.

    PubMed

    Gourdin, F W; Smith, J G

    1993-10-01

    The etiology of venous ulceration is far more complex than Homans' theory of stagnation and hypo-oxygenation. Indeed, studies have shown that flow in lipodermatosclerotic limbs is actually faster than normal. We suggest, therefore, that the terms "stasis dermatitis" and "stasis ulcer" be dropped from medical parlance. The term "lipodermatosclerosis with ulceration" as used by the British, or simply "venous ulcer," would seem more appropriate. Venous hypertension, produced by incompetence of deep and communicating vein valves and thrombosis of segments of the deep system, is closely correlated with the development of venous ulcers. Precisely how this venous hypertension translates into ulceration is unclear. Burnand et al showed that fibrin cuffs are deposited around the capillaries in lipodermatosclerotic limbs. These cuffs may serve as barriers to the diffusion of oxygen, leading to local ischemia and epidermal necrosis. Others suggest that trapped leukocytes in the microcirculation alter capillary permeability by releasing various inflammatory mediators that hasten the flow of fibrinogen across the capillary membrane and promote the formation of fibrin cuffs. Proof of this hypothesis is still lacking, but may eventually come from using radioactive WBC tagging procedures. A synthesis of these two theories may in fact explain the etiology of venous ulceration. PMID:8211332

  5. [Perforated gastroduodenal stress ulcer].

    PubMed

    Melinte, C; Dragomir, Cr

    2006-01-01

    Experimental and clinical data support the role of oxidative stress in the development of gastro-duodenal inflammatory lesions and peptic ulcer. Although quite common, stress ulcer remains a minor concern in the The authors review the literature data and perform a retrospective study on 205 personal cases of gastroduodenal ulcers, diagnosed and operated in the period 1986-2005. Of these, 58 (28.29%) were perforated ulcers, including 4 cases (6.8%) caused by various psychic traumas. All the patients presented symptoms and signs characteristic for perforated ulcer and were undoubtedly of psychogenic cause. The surgical treatment consisted in the closure of the perforation and peritoneal drainage. Besides medical treatment of peptic ulcer disease consisting of antisecretory drugs, antioxidants and sedatives were used. Postoperative follow-up showed a rapid and uneventful recovery in all cases. In conclusion, surgery is the mainstay of treatment in perforated ulcer, but additional stress therapy promotes healing and may reduce postoperative morbidity in cases with certain involvement of psychic trauma.

  6. Nonspecific genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Pandhi, Deepika; Khurana, Ananta

    2014-01-01

    Recent intervention of nonspecific genital ulcers has added refreshing dimensions to genital ulcer disease. It was considered pertinent to dwell on diverse clinical presentation and diagnostic strategies. It seems to possess spectrum. It includes infective causes, Epstein Bar Virus, tuberculosis, Leishmaniasis, HIV/AIDS related ulcers and amoebiasis. Noninfective causes are immunobullous disorders, aphthosis, Behcet's disease (BD), inflammatory bowel disease, lichen planus and lichen sclerosis et atrophicus, drug reactions, premalignant and malignant conditions, pyoderma gangrenosum, and hidradenitis suppurativa. The diagnostic features and treatment option of each disorder are succinctly outlined for ready reference.

  7. Lithium Battery Diaper Ulceration.

    PubMed

    Maridet, Claire; Taïeb, Alain

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of lithium battery diaper ulceration in a 16-month-old girl. Gastrointestinal and ear, nose, and throat lesions after lithium battery ingestion have been reported, but skin involvement has not been reported to our knowledge.

  8. Ulcer and gastritis.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, H

    2007-02-01

    Five papers, discussing important topics related to ulcer and gastritis, have been selected for review here. The papers, which include some excellent systematic reviews and meta-analyses, were published between July 2005 and August 2006.

  9. [Leg ulcer: conservative treatment].

    PubMed

    Fradique, Caldeira; Pupo, Alexandra; Quaresma, Luísa; Palma-Rosa, Ana; Fernandes, Mário; Silva, Gualdino; Almeida, Heitor; Diogo, Cláudia; Pinho, Ana Catarina

    2011-01-01

    During 16 years 202 patients with leg ulcer have been studied prospectively. Whenever possible, cure has been obtained in ambulatory, which was the main objective. Surgery was preferentially made after the cure of the ulcer. From the 202 patients, 166 have made a prolonged follow-up. Cure in ambulatory has been obtained in 91% of the patients. We stress the importance of the direct control of all the treatment by the responsible doctor.

  10. Cushing's ulcer: Further reflections

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, William J.; Bashir, Asif; Dababneh, Haitham; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brain tumors, traumatic head injury, and other intracranial processes including infections, can cause increased intracranial pressure and lead to overstimulation of the vagus nerve. As a result, increased secretion of gastric acid may occur which leads to gastro-duodenal ulcer formation known as Cushing's ulcer. Methods: A review of original records of Dr. Harvey Cushing's patients suffering from gastro-duodenal ulcers was performed followed by a discussion of the available literature. We also reviewed the clinical records of the patients never reported by Cushing to gain his perspective in describing this phenomenon. Dr. Cushing was intrigued to investigate gastro-duodenal ulcers as he lost patients to acute gastrointestinal perforations following successful brain tumor operations. It is indeed ironic that Harvey Cushing developed a gastro-duodenal ulcer in his later years with failing health. Results: Clinically shown by Cushing's Yale Registry, a tumor or lesion can disrupt this circuitry, leading to gastroduodenal ulceration. Cushing said that it was “reasonable to believe that the perforations following posterior fossa cerebellar operations were produced in like fashion by an irritative disturbance either of fiber tracts or vagal centers in the brain stem.” Conclusion: Harvey Cushing's pioneering work depicted in his Yale registry serves as a milestone for continuing research that can further discern this pathway. PMID:25972936

  11. Pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Woodard, Charles R; Buschbacher, Ralph M; Long, William B; Gebhart, Jocelynn H; Ma, Eva K

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this collective review is to outline the predisposing factors in the development of pressure ulcers and to identify a pressure ulcer prevention program. The most frequent sites for pressure ulcers are areas of skin overlying bony prominences. There are four critical factors contributing to the development of pressure ulcers: pressure, shearing forces, friction, and moisture. Pressure is now viewed as the single most important etiologic factor in pressure ulcer formation. Prolonged immobilization, sensory deficit, circulatory disturbances, and poor nutrition have been identified as important risk factors in the development of pressure ulcer formation. Among the clinical assessment scales available, only two, the Braden Scale and Norton Scale, have been tested extensively for reliability and/or validity. The most commonly used risk assessment tools for pressure ulcer formation are computerized pressure monitoring and measurement of laser Doppler skin blood flow. Pressure ulcers can predispose the patient to a variety of complications that include bacteremia, osteomyelitis, squamous cell carcinoma, and sinus tracts. The three components of pressure ulcer prevention that must be considered in any patient include management of incontinence, nutritional support, and pressure relief. The pressure relief program must be individualized for non-weight-bearing individuals as well as those that can bear weight. For those that can not bear weight and passively stand, the RENAISSANCE Mattress Replacement System is recommended for the immobile patient who lies supine on the bed, the stretcher, or operating room table. This alternating pressure system is unique because it has three separate cells that are not interconnected. It is specifically designed so that deflation of each individual cell will reach a ZERO PRESSURE during each alternating pressure cycle. The superiority of this system has been documented by comprehensive clinical studies in which this system

  12. Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis (anticipated pubicstion date - mid-2009) Purpose A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, or bedsore, is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused by pressure, shear, or friction, alone or in combination. (1) Those at risk for developing pressure ulcers include the elderly and critically ill as well as persons with neurological impairments and those who suffer conditions associated with immobility. Pressure ulcers are graded or staged with a 4-point classification system denoting severity. Stage I represents the beginnings of a pressure ulcer and stage IV, the severest grade, consists of full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon, and or muscle. (1) In a 2004 survey of Canadian health care settings, Woodbury and Houghton (2) estimated that the prevalence of pressure ulcers at a stage 1 or greater in Ontario ranged between 13.1% and 53% with nonacute health care settings having the highest prevalence rate (Table 1). Executive Summary Table 1: Prevalence of Pressure Ulcers* Setting Canadian Prevalence,% (95% CI) Ontario Prevalence,Range % (n) Acute care 25 (23.8–26.3) 23.9–29.7 (3418) Nonacute care† 30 (29.3–31.4) 30.0–53.3 (1165) Community care 15 (13.4–16.8) 13.2 (91) Mixed health care‡ 22 (20.9

  13. Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis (anticipated pubicstion date - mid-2009) Purpose A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, or bedsore, is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused by pressure, shear, or friction, alone or in combination. (1) Those at risk for developing pressure ulcers include the elderly and critically ill as well as persons with neurological impairments and those who suffer conditions associated with immobility. Pressure ulcers are graded or staged with a 4-point classification system denoting severity. Stage I represents the beginnings of a pressure ulcer and stage IV, the severest grade, consists of full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon, and or muscle. (1) In a 2004 survey of Canadian health care settings, Woodbury and Houghton (2) estimated that the prevalence of pressure ulcers at a stage 1 or greater in Ontario ranged between 13.1% and 53% with nonacute health care settings having the highest prevalence rate (Table 1). Executive Summary Table 1: Prevalence of Pressure Ulcers* Setting Canadian Prevalence,% (95% CI) Ontario Prevalence,Range % (n) Acute care 25 (23.8–26.3) 23.9–29.7 (3418) Nonacute care† 30 (29.3–31.4) 30.0–53.3 (1165) Community care 15 (13.4–16.8) 13.2 (91) Mixed health care‡ 22 (20.9

  14. Ulcerated tophaceous gout.

    PubMed

    Filanovsky, Michelle Gita; Sukhdeo, Kumar; McNamara, Megan Cunnane

    2015-01-01

    Gout is an inflammatory arthritis characterised by hyperuricemia, which, if poorly controlled, can lead to the development of tophi. We report the case of a 60-year-old Caucasian man with poorly controlled polyarticular tophaceous gout with multiple comorbidities (including renal failure) who presented with tophaceous ulcers of the upper extremity. These ulcers caused extreme pain, requiring chronic opiate medications, and were associated with decreased sensation and reduced ability to move the extremity. His hospital course was complicated by acute kidney injury, haemolytic anaemia and Clostridium difficile infection. He required 1 month of antibiotics and intensive wound care for his ulcers. This case highlights the diagnosis, natural history and management of an unusual complication of hyperuricemia. PMID:26240104

  15. [Peripheral ulcerative keratitis].

    PubMed

    Stamate, Alina-cristina; Avram, Corina Ioana; Malciolu, R; Oprea, S; Zemba, M

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative keratitis is frequently associated with collagen vascular diseases and presents a predilection for peripheral corneal localization, due to the distinct morphologic and immunologic features of the limbal conjunctiva, which provides access for the circulating immune complexes to the peripheral cornea via the capillary network. Deposition of immune complexes in the terminal ends of limbal vessels initiates an immune-mediated vasculitis process, with inflammatory cells and mediators involvement by alteration of the vascular permeability. Peripheral ulcerative keratitis generally correlates with exacerbations of the background autoimmune systemic disease. Associated sceritis, specially the necrotizing form, is usually observed in severe cases, which may evolve in corneal perforation and loss of vision. Although the first-line of treatment in acute phases is represented by systemic administration of corticosteroids, immunosuppressive and cytotoxic agents are necessary for the treatment of peripheral ulcerative keratitis associated with systemic diseases.

  16. [The acute bleeding rectal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Hansen, H

    1985-06-14

    An acute bleeding rectal ulcer was the solitary condition in four patients. The cause of such an ulcer, which always results in heavy arterial bleeding, remains unknown. The source of bleeding is demonstrated by rectoscopy which may at times be difficult because of the large amount of blood in the rectum and the hidden position of the small ulcer. Sclerosing or circumferential suturing of the ulcer provides immediate cessation of bleeding and cure.

  17. [Helicobacter pylori and gastric ulcer].

    PubMed

    Maaroos, H I

    1994-01-01

    In connection with longitudinal ulcer studies and the demonstration of Helicobacter pylori as the main cause of chronic gastritis, new aspects of gastric ulcer recurrences and healing become evident. This extends the possibilities to prognosticate the course of gastric ulcer and to use more effective treatment. PMID:7937016

  18. Peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Kalyanakrishnan; Salinas, Robert C

    2007-10-01

    Peptic ulcer disease usually occurs in the stomach and proximal duodenum. The predominant causes in the United States are infection with Helicobacter pylori and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Symptoms of peptic ulcer disease include epigastric discomfort (specifically, pain relieved by food intake or antacids and pain that causes awakening at night or that occurs between meals), loss of appetite, and weight loss. Older patients and patients with alarm symptoms indicating a complication or malignancy should have prompt endoscopy. Patients taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should discontinue their use. For younger patients with no alarm symptoms, a test-and-treat strategy based on the results of H. pylori testing is recommended. If H. pylori infection is diagnosed, the infection should be eradicated and antisecretory therapy (preferably with a proton pump inhibitor) given for four weeks. Patients with persistent symptoms should be referred for endoscopy. Surgery is indicated if complications develop or if the ulcer is unresponsive to medications. Bleeding is the most common indication for surgery. Administration of proton pump inhibitors and endoscopic therapy control most bleeds. Perforation and gastric outlet obstruction are rare but serious complications. Peritonitis is a surgical emergency requiring patient resuscitation; laparotomy and peritoneal toilet; omental patch placement; and, in selected patients, surgery for ulcer control.

  19. Peptic ulcer in hospital

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, H. Daintree

    1962-01-01

    This study corresponds to an estimated 142,250 admissions for peptic ulcer to the wards of National Health Service hospitals in England and Wales during the two years 1956 and 1957. It presents a picture of the incidence and mortality of complications and surgical treatment throughout England and Wales. PMID:14036965

  20. Management of Chronic Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) conducted a systematic review on interventions used to treat pressure ulcers in order to answer the following questions: Do currently available interventions for the treatment of pressure ulcers increase the healing rate of pressure ulcers compared with standard care, a placebo, or other similar interventions? Within each category of intervention, which one is most effective in promoting the healing of existing pressure ulcers? Background A pressure ulcer is a localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in conjunction with shear and/or friction. Many areas of the body, especially the sacrum and the heel, are prone to the development of pressure ulcers. People with impaired mobility (e.g., stroke or spinal cord injury patients) are most vulnerable to pressure ulcers. Other factors that predispose people to pressure ulcer formation are poor nutrition, poor sensation, urinary and fecal incontinence, and poor overall physical and mental health. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in Ontario has been estimated to range from a median of 22.1% in community settings to a median of 29.9% in nonacute care facilities. Pressure ulcers have been shown to increase the risk of mortality among geriatric patients by

  1. Management of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Fell, John M; Muhammed, Rafeeq; Spray, Chris; Crook, Kay; Russell, Richard K

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) in children is increasing. The range of treatments available has also increased too but around 1 in 4 children still require surgery to control their disease. An up-to-date understanding of treatments is essential for all clinicians involved in the care of UC patients to ensure appropriate and timely treatment while minimising the risk of complications and side effects. PMID:26553909

  2. [Ulcerative colitis? Guidelines 2004].

    PubMed

    Siegmund, B; Zeitz, M

    2005-10-12

    Ulcerative colitis was first described in 1859 from Samuel Wilks, a physician at Guy's hospital in London. The prevalence in the high incidence areas ranges from 80 to 120/100.000/year. Ulcerative colitis is a chronic relapsing or chronic active disease which starts at the rectum and presents with a continuous inflammation. Primarily young adults are affected (20 to 40 years of age) but the disease may present at all ages, from younger than 1 year of life to the 80s. Many series show a secondary peak in incidence in the elderly. In the present review we will focus on the basic principles of the therapy with regard to the variety of disease manifestations. The therapeutic algorithms will be described separately for the induction of remission and the maintenance of remission. The localization of inflammation and disease activity represent crucial factors which have to be considered. With regard to these factors, the therapeutic regimens range from simple local therapy with aminosalicylates to systemic immunosuppressive therapy, which will in extreme cases require the administration of ciclosporin. Since ulcerative colitis is associated with an increased risk in developing colon carcinoma, medical therapy as well as endoscopic surveillance are fundamental in the prevention of carcinoma. In the end an outlook to future therapeutic targets and strategies will be provided. PMID:16245638

  3. Bacteriology of chronic leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lookingbill, D P; Miller, S H; Knowles, R C

    1978-12-01

    The quantitative bacteriology of 13 chronic leg ulcers was sequentially assessed by both swab and biopsy culture techniques, and the effect of either a 10% benzoyl peroxide lotion or placebo lotion was evaluated. There was good correlation between the swab and biopsy culture techniques in 12 of the 17 instances where simultaneous swabs and biopsies were done. Though the benzoyl peroxide did not favorably affect the bacterial flora, ulcer healing did appear to correlate with quantitative bacterial counts. THREE of five ulcers containing fewer than 10(5) organisms per gram of tissue or per centimeter of ulcer surface area healed, while none of eight ulcers containing more than 10(5) organisms healed. Quantitative bacteriological measurements can serve as useful tools in evaluating healing of leg ulcers.

  4. [Peptic ulcer disease and stress].

    PubMed

    Herszényi, László; Juhász, Márk; Mihály, Emese; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2015-08-30

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of peptic ulcer disease revolutionised our views on the etiology and treatment of the disease. This discovery has tempted many experts to conclude that psychological factors and, specifically, stress are unimportant. However, Helicobacter pylori infection alone does not explain fully the incidence and prevalence of peptic ulcer disease. It has been demonstrated that stress can cause peptic ulcer disease even in the absence of Helicobacter pylori infection, supporting a multicausal model of peptic ulcer etiology. Psychological stress among other risk factors can function as a cofactor with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  5. Pressure ulcer management: the importance of nutrition.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, M; Cook, A; Rimmasch, H; Bender, S; Voss, A

    2000-08-01

    Nutrition plays an important role in pressure ulcer prevention and treatment. Nutrition assessment techniques and nutritional interventions for patients at risk for developing a pressure ulcer or who currently have pressure ulcers are essential components of quality patient care.

  6. Sensitivity of PCR Targeting Mycobacterium ulcerans by Use of Fine-Needle Aspirates for Diagnosis of Buruli Ulcer▿

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, R. O.; Sarfo, F. S.; Osei-Sarpong, F.; Boateng, A.; Tetteh, I.; Lartey, A.; Adentwe, E.; Opare, W.; Asiedu, K. B.; Wansbrough-Jones, M.

    2009-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported that the sensitivity of PCR targeting the IS2404 insertion sequence of Mycobacterium ulcerans was 98% when it was applied to 4-mm punch biopsy samples of Buruli lesions. Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is a less traumatic sampling technique for nonulcerated lesions, and we have studied the sensitivity of PCR using FNA samples. Fine-needle aspirates were taken with a 21-gauge needle from 43 patients diagnosed clinically with M. ulcerans disease. Four-millimeter punch biopsies were obtained for microscopy, culture, and PCR targeting the IS2404 insertion sequence. The sensitivity of PCR using samples obtained by FNA was 86% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 72 to 94%) compared with that for PCR using punch biopsy samples. In this study, the sensitivities of culture and microscopy for punch biopsy samples were 44% (95% CI, 29 to 60%) and 26% (95% CI, 14 to 41%), respectively. This demonstrates that PCR on an FNA sample is a viable minimally invasive technique to diagnose M. ulcerans lesions. PMID:19204098

  7. Perforated peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Søreide, Kjetil; Thorsen, Kenneth; Harrison, Ewen M; Bingener, Juliane; Møller, Morten H; Ohene-Yeboah, Michael; Søreide, Jon Arne

    2015-09-26

    Perforated peptic ulcer is a common emergency condition worldwide, with associated mortality rates of up to 30%. A scarcity of high-quality studies about the condition limits the knowledge base for clinical decision making, but a few published randomised trials are available. Although Helicobacter pylori and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are common causes, demographic differences in age, sex, perforation location, and underlying causes exist between countries, and mortality rates also vary. Clinical prediction rules are used, but accuracy varies with study population. Early surgery, either by laparoscopic or open repair, and proper sepsis management are essential for good outcome. Selected patients can be managed non-operatively or with novel endoscopic approaches, but validation of such methods in trials is needed. Quality of care, sepsis care bundles, and postoperative monitoring need further assessment. Adequate trials with low risk of bias are urgently needed to provide better evidence. We summarise the evidence for perforated peptic ulcer management and identify directions for future clinical research.

  8. Differential Diagnosis of Skin Ulcers in a Mycobacterium ulcerans Endemic Area: Data from a Prospective Study in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Toutous Trellu, Laurence; Nkemenang, Patrick; Comte, Eric; Ehounou, Geneviève; Atangana, Paul; Rusch, Barbara; Njih Tabah, Earnest; Etard, Jean-François; Mueller, Yolanda K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical diagnosis of Buruli ulcer (BU) due to Mycobacterium ulcerans can be challenging. We aimed to specify the differential diagnosis of skin lesions in a BU endemic area. Method We conducted a prospective diagnostic study in Akonolinga, Cameroon. Patients presenting with a skin ulcer suspect of BU were included. M. ulcerans was detected using swabs for Ziehl-Neelsen staining, PCR and culture. Skin punch biopsies were taken and reviewed by two histopathologists. Photographs of the lesions were taken and independently reviewed by two dermatologists. Final diagnosis was based on consensus, combining the results of laboratory tests and expert opinion. Results/ Discussion Between October 2011 and December 2013, 327 patients with ulcerative lesions were included. Median age was 37 years (0 to 87), 65% were males, and 19% HIV-positive. BU was considered the final diagnosis for 27% of the lesions, 85% of which had at least one positive laboratory test. Differential diagnoses were vascular lesions (22%), bacterial infections (21%), post-traumatic (8%), fistulated osteomyelitis (6%), neoplasia (5%), inflammatory lesions (3%), hemopathies and other systemic diseases (2%) and others (2%). The proportion of BU was similar between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients (27.0% vs. 26.5%; p = 0.940). Half of children below 15 years of age were diagnosed with BU, compared to 26.8% and 13.9% among individuals 15 to 44 years of age and above, respectively (chi2 p<0.001). Children had more superficial bacterial infections (24.3%) and osteomyelitis (11.4%). Conclusion We described differential diagnosis of skin lesions in a BU endemic area, stratifying results by age and HIV-status. PMID:27074157

  9. Common Questions About Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Raetz, Jaqueline G M; Wick, Keren H

    2015-11-15

    Patients with limited mobility due to physical or cognitive impairment are at risk of pressure ulcers. Primary care physicians should examine at-risk patients because pressure ulcers are often missed in inpatient, outpatient, and long-term care settings. High-risk patients should use advanced static support surfaces to prevent pressure ulcers and air-fluidized beds to treat pressure ulcers. Physicians should document the size and clinical features of ulcers. Cleansing should be done with saline or tap water, while avoiding caustic agents, such as hydrogen peroxide. Dressings should promote a moist, but not wet, wound healing environment. The presence of infection is determined through clinical judgment; if uncertain, a tissue biopsy should be performed. New or worsening pain may indicate infection of a pressure ulcer. When treating patients with pressure ulcers, it is important to keep in mind the patient's psychological, behavioral, and cognitive status. The patient's social, financial, and caregiver resources, as well as goals and long-term prognosis, should also be considered in the treatment plan. PMID:26554282

  10. Stromal vascularization prevents corneal ulceration.

    PubMed

    Conn, H; Berman, M; Kenyon, K; Langer, R; Gage, J

    1980-04-01

    Experiments were performed with a model of focal, thermal-induced ulceration to test the clinical impression that vascularization prevents ulceration of the corneal stroma. Slow-release polymers containing a vasoproliferase agent (tumor angiogenesis factor) were placed in corneal pockets 2 mm central to the limbus of albino rabbits. These polymers elicited blood vessel ingrowth up to the implant. Control eyes received empty polymers which caused minimal to no vessel growth. Polymers were removed, and each cornea received a focal, thermal burn placed just central to the polymer site. All control corneas ulcerated: most (79%) developed deep stromal or perforating ulcers. Only 25% of prevascularized corneas developed stromal ulcers, and none was deep or perforating. After thermal burns, vessels in both groups grew at the same linear rate toward the burned area. There was a direct relationship between the distance separating the nearest blood vessel and the burned area at the time of burning and the maximum depth of stromal ulceration. Thus prevention of or less severe stromal ulceration is correlated with the earlier presence of vessels in the burned area.

  11. Complications of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Milosavljevic, Tomica; Kostić-Milosavljević, Mirjana; Jovanović, Ivan; Krstić, Miodrag

    2011-01-01

    There are four major complications of peptic ulcer disease (PUD): bleeding, perforation, penetration, and obstruction. Complications can occur in patients with peptic ulcer of any etiology. Despite improvements in the medical management and the lower overall incidence of PUD, there are conflicting data about the incidence of potentially life-threatening ulcer complications. There are important time trends embedded within this stable overall rate of complications: the dramatic decline in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (comparing the cohort born from 1900 to 1920 to cohorts born after 1940); an increased use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and an increased rate of ulcer complications related to such drug use, especially in the elderly. As a result of these trends, ulcer complications are on the rise in older patients but on the decline in younger individuals. Hemorrhage is the most frequent PUD complication and its incidence is increasing in comparison to perforation and stenosis. Therapeutic endoscopy is considered the treatment of choice for bleeding ulcers, reducing the need for emergent surgical procedures to 10-20% of the cases. In recent years, besides the success of angiographic embolization, the containment of massive hemorrhage must also be taken into account. Transcatheter arterial embolization is also an effective and safe treatment in patients with duodenal ulcers re-bleeding after therapeutic endoscopy or surgery.

  12. [THERAPEUTIC GUIDE IN VENOUS ULCERS].

    PubMed

    López Herranz, Marta; Bas Caro, Pedro; García Jábega, Rosa Ma; García Carmona, Francisco Javier; Villalta García, Pedro; Postigo Mota, Salvador

    2014-11-01

    The treatment of venous ulcers and wounds in general, is a complex and important public health problem, with personal effects, family and health, without addressing the economic impact includes assistance, care of patients with ulcerative lesions. The increase in life expectancy, driven by improved socio-sanitary conditions that this aging population, facilitates the emergence of chronic diseases may be complicated by the presence of skin ulcers. There is no doubt that the best way to treat a skin ulcer is avoiding to occur, hence the importance of early diagnosis and risk factors act alone them. In relation to venous ulcers is crucial, provide local treatment, act on the cause, because if not, relapse is the norm in this type of injury. Currently, the moist wound healing, is an important step in solving earlier of these chronic wounds. This has meant that the pharmaceutical industry has been involved in researching and creating different types of dressings, having specific activity at different stages of venous ulcer healing, ie inflammatory phase, proliferative and remodeling. The proliferation of these products has been increasing over the years, not surprisingly, are described therapeutic 12 families that are applied in the management, care of these injuries. The fact of existing therapeutic options highlights the ineffectiveness of these products individually. Therefore, the nurse will not forget that the optimal treatment of venous ulcers, necessarily involves choosing the right product for every type and stage of the lesion. In this decision process, strongly influenced by the specific characteristics of each patient and injury, the nurse will take into account a lot of factors when choosing the product, not forgetting that an ulcer is not cured with a single therapeutic element, several products being used throughout the process to evolutionary venous ulcer until complete resolution.

  13. [Golimumab Therapy in Ulcerative Colitis].

    PubMed

    Moon, Won

    2016-02-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory condition of the colon, characterized by diffuse mucosal inflammation and blood-mixed diarrhea. The main treatment has been 5-aminosalicylic acid, steroid, thiopurine, and anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) antibodies including infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab. Golimumab, a new anti-TNF-α agent has been recently approved for patients with moderate to severe ulcerative colitis. Its efficacy and safety has been demonstrated in line with infliximab and adalimumab in preclinical and clinical studies. This review will focus on golimumab therapy in ulcerative colitis.

  14. [Psychological differences between ulcer and non-ulcer dyspeptic patients].

    PubMed

    Slepoy, V; Pezzotto, S; Pedrana, R; Gatto, A; Poletto, L

    1994-01-01

    The existence of differences in the psychological profile of 39 endoscopically evaluated patients with ulcer (U) and non ulcer (NU) dyspepsia were examined. There were 21 U and 18 NU subjects. Cigarette smoking, intake of alcohol, coffee, mate, aspirin and NSAID were recorded, but there were no significant differences between the two groups. Personality traits were determined by the Rorschach Test, considering psychological profile (introversive, extroversive, self-restrained), impulse and emotion control (do not allow their expression, impulsive, adequately conveyed) and level of social adaptation (low, normal, high). U and NU subjects experienced a similar number of potentially stressful life events. However, U patients perceived their events more negatively. Although no one type of "ulcer personality" was found consistently, ulcer patients tended to be more introversive and they had a better social adaptation than NU.

  15. Ulcerative Colitis in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Rukunuzzaman, Md; Karim, A. S. M. Bazlul

    2011-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic idiopathic inflammatory disorder of colon. Frequency of UC is gradually increasing over few years worldwide. Prevalence is 35 to 100/100 000 people in USA, 1% of them are infants. UC develops in a genetically predisposed individual with altered intestinal immune response. An eight-month-old girl presented with loose bloody stool, growth failure, and moderate pallor. The girl was diagnosed as a case of UC by colonoscopy and biopsy. Treatment was thereafter started with immunosuppressive drugs. After initial induction therapy with parenteral steroid and infliximab, the patient is now on remission with azathioprine and mesalamine. UC is rare in Bangladesh, especially in children, and it is rarer during infancy. Several conditions like infective colitis, allergic colitis, Meckel's diverticulitis, Crohn's disease, etc. may mimic the features of UC. So, if a child presents with recurrent bloody diarrhea, UC should be considered as differential diagnosis. PMID:22064342

  16. Pressure ulcer prevention in the community setting.

    PubMed

    Jones, Donna

    Pressure ulcers are associated with reduced quality of life, affecting individuals physically, socially and emotionally. The financial cost to the NHS of preventing and treating such ulcers is substantial. Although largely preventable, pressure ulcers are still common. The Department of Health is committed to eliminating all avoidable pressure ulcers in NHS-provided care. This article explores methods of preventing pressure ulcers, with particular focus on risk assessment, skin inspection, pressure-relieving measures, nutrition and hydration, and patient and carer education.

  17. Nutritional prediction of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Breslow, R A; Bergstrom, N

    1994-11-01

    This article focuses on nutritional risk factors that predict the development of pressure ulcers in hospital and nursing home patients. Cross-sectional studies associate inadequate energy and protein intake; underweight; low triceps skinfold measurement; and low serum albumin, low serum cholesterol, and low hemoglobin levels with pressure ulcers. Prospective studies identify inadequate energy and protein intake, a poor score on the Braden scale (a risk assessment instrument that includes a nutrition component), and possibly low serum albumin level as risk factors for developing a pressure ulcer. Nutritionists should provide a high-energy, high-protein diet for patients at risk of development of pressure ulcers to improve their dietary intake and nutritional status.

  18. [Surgical treatment of peptic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Andrade, Humberto

    2003-01-01

    Despite a decreasing number of operations for ulcer, there are many patients who require definitive treatment. If an operation is required for duodenal ulcer, vagotomy of some type is part of the treatment, and in gastric ulcer resection with or without vagotomy is required. Extended proximal gastric vagotomy can be performed in the majority of patients, excluding those who are unstable or have severe concomitant diseases. In cases of urgent surgery for hemorrhage or perforation, the surgical procedure must be selected individually. Although the role of traditional operations is well established, there is increasing interest in laparoscopic approaches. However, because there is a diminishing of elective surgery for ulcer, it is unlikely that these new procedures may be evaluated as operations were evaluated in the past.

  19. Hyperhomocysteinaemia and chronic venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    de Franciscis, Stefano; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Longo, Paola; Buffone, Gianluca; Molinari, Vincenzo; Stillitano, Domenico M; Gallelli, Luca; Serra, Raffaele

    2015-02-01

    Chronic venous ulceration (CVU) is the major cause of chronic wounds of lower extremities, and is a part of the complex of chronic venous disease. Previous studies have hypothesised that several thrombophilic factors, such as hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy), may be associated with chronic venous ulcers. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of HHcy in patients with venous leg ulcers and the effect of folic acid therapy on wound healing. Eighty-seven patients with venous leg ulcers were enrolled in this study to calculate the prevalence of HHcy in this population. All patients underwent basic treatment for venous ulcer (compression therapy ± surgical procedures). Patients with HHcy (group A) received basic treatment and administered folic acid (1·2 mg/day for 12 months) and patients without HHcy (group B) received only basic treatment. Healing was assessed by means of computerised planimetry analysis. The prevalence of HHcy among patients with chronic venous ulcer enrolled in this study was 62·06%. Healing rate was significantly higher (P < 0·05) in group A patients (78·75%) compared with group B patients (63·33%). This study suggests a close association, statistically significant, between HHcy and CVU. Homocysteine-lowering therapy with folic acid seems to expedite wound healing. Despite these aspects, the exact molecular mechanisms between homocysteine and CVU have not been clearly defined and further studies are needed.

  20. Endoscopic Obliteration for Bleeding Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Zawadzki, J.J. J.; Gajda, A.G. G.; Kamiński, P. Ł.; Lembas, L.; Bielecki, K.

    1997-01-01

    A group of 133 patients treated for bleeding peptic ulcer in our Department, is reviewed. Within several hours of admission, all patients underwent upper gastrointestinal tract gastroscopy and obliteration of the bleeding ulcer. Bleeding gastric ulcers were found in 41 patients, and duodenal ulcers in 92 patients. Patients were classified according to the Forrest scale: IA – 11 patients, IB – 49 patients, IIA – 35 patients, lIB – 40 patients. In 126 (94.7%) patients the bleeding was stopped, and 7 required urgent surgery: 3 patients with gastric ulcer underwent gastrectomy, and 4 with duodenal ulcer – truncal vagotomy with pyloroplasty and had the bleeding site underpinned. Fifty-five patients underwent elective surgery: gastrectomy and vagotomy (18 patients with gastric ulcer), highly selective vagotomy (25 patients with duodenal ulcer) and truncal vagotomy and pyloroplasty (12 patients with duodenal ulcer). None of the patients was observed to have recurrent bleeding. PMID:18493453

  1. Management of Chronic Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) conducted a systematic review on interventions used to treat pressure ulcers in order to answer the following questions: Do currently available interventions for the treatment of pressure ulcers increase the healing rate of pressure ulcers compared with standard care, a placebo, or other similar interventions? Within each category of intervention, which one is most effective in promoting the healing of existing pressure ulcers? Background A pressure ulcer is a localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in conjunction with shear and/or friction. Many areas of the body, especially the sacrum and the heel, are prone to the development of pressure ulcers. People with impaired mobility (e.g., stroke or spinal cord injury patients) are most vulnerable to pressure ulcers. Other factors that predispose people to pressure ulcer formation are poor nutrition, poor sensation, urinary and fecal incontinence, and poor overall physical and mental health. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in Ontario has been estimated to range from a median of 22.1% in community settings to a median of 29.9% in nonacute care facilities. Pressure ulcers have been shown to increase the risk of mortality among geriatric patients by

  2. Perforated peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Søreide, Kjetil; Thorsen, Kenneth; Harrison, Ewen M.; Bingener, Juliane; Møller, Morten H.; Ohene-Yeboah, Michael; Søreide, Jon Arne

    2015-01-01

    Summary Perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) is a frequent emergency condition worldwide with associated mortality up to 30%. A paucity of studies on PPU limits the knowledge base for clinical decision-making, but a few randomised trials are available. While Helicobacter pylori and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are frequent causes of PPU, demographic differences in age, gender, perforation location and aetiology exist between countries, as do mortality rates. Clinical prediction rules are used, but accuracy varies with study population. Early surgery, either by laparoscopic or open repair, and proper sepsis management are essential for good outcome. Selected patients can perhaps be managed non-operatively or with novel endoscopic approaches, but validation in trials is needed. Quality of care, sepsis care-bundles and postoperative monitoring need further evaluation. Adequate trials with low risk of bias are urgently needed for better evidence. Here we summarize the evidence for PPU management and identify directions for future clinical research. PMID:26460663

  3. [Controversies over heel pressure ulcers].

    PubMed

    Rueda López, J

    2013-02-01

    Article whose content was exposed in the workshops of the GNEAUPP Congress, held in Seville in November2012, and which refers to ulcers by pressure on the heels as a location exposed to the analysis. A pressure ulcer is a lesion located in skin I underlying tissue usually over a bone prominence, as a result of the pressure, or pressure in combination with the shears. A number of contributing factors or confounding factors are also associated with ulcers by pressure; the importance of these factors still not been elucidated. The heels are next to the sacred area, parts of the body that most frequently presents ulcers by pressure, The importance of the predisposing factors for ulcers in the sacral area as humidity has been studied in recent years, but in heels, remains one of the most important locations in the extremities, which entails adverse outcomes such as amputation in persons with comorbid diseases like Diabetes Mellitus (DM). The incidence of ulcers on heels in patients with DM and without it, is approximately 19-32%. Everything and be a problem associated with elderly people and chronic pathologies, in acute patients are a problem that this underrated, but not devoid of controversy. In hospitals of treble in 2006, the NPUAP encrypted the incidence of UPPin heels in a 43%; in one systematic review conducted by Reddy et al. (2006) puts revealed that 60% of pressure ulcers is produced. The problem of the UPP in heels is present in all the areas of intervention and particularly in paediatric units intensive care, where the first localization it is the occipital area followed by the heels.

  4. A Real World, Observational Registry of Chronic Wounds and Ulcers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Diabetic Foot; Varicose Ulcer; Pressure Ulcer; Surgical Wound Dehiscence; Vasculitis; Skin Ulcer; Leg Ulcer; Wounds and Injuries; Pyoderma; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Diabetic Neuropathies; Lymphedema; Venous Insufficiency; Diabetes Complications; Amputation Stump

  5. Nutritional care in peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    VOMERO, Nathália Dalcin; COLPO, Elisângela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer is a lesion of the mucosal lining of the upper gastrointestinal tract characterized by an imbalance between aggressive and protective factors of the mucosa, having H. pylori as the main etiologic factor. Dietotherapy is important in the prevention and treatment of this disease. Aim To update nutritional therapy in adults' peptic ulcer. Methods Exploratory review without restrictions with primary sources indexed in Scielo, PubMed, Medline, ISI, and Scopus databases. Results Dietotherapy, as well as caloric distribution, should be adjusted to the patient's needs aiming to normalize the nutritional status and promote healing. Recommended nutrients can be different in the acute phase and in the recovery phase, and there is a greater need of protein and some micronutrients, such as vitamin A, zinc, selenium, and vitamin C in the recovery phase. In addition, some studies have shown that vitamin C has a beneficial effect in eradication of H. pylori. Fibers and probiotics also play a important role in the treatment of peptic ulcer, because they reduce the side effects of antibiotics and help reduce treatment time. Conclusion A balanced diet is vital in the treatment of peptic ulcer, once food can prevent, treat or even alleviate the symptoms involving this pathology. However, there are few papers that innovate dietotherapy; so additional studies addressing more specifically the dietotherapy for treatment of peptic ulcer are necessary. PMID:25626944

  6. Medical management of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Luigi; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    Venous disease is the most common cause of chronic leg ulceration and represents an advanced clinical manifestation of venous insufficiency. Due to their frequency and chronicity, venous ulcers have a high socioeconomic impact, with treatment costs accounting for 1% of the health care budget in Western countries. The evaluation of patients with venous ulcers should include a thorough medical history for prior deep venous thrombosis, assessment for an hypercoagulable state, and a physical examination. Use of the CEAP (clinical, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology) Classification System and the revised Venous Clinical Severity Scoring System is strongly recommended to characterize disease severity and assess response to treatment. This venous condition requires lifestyle modification, with affected individuals performing daily intervals of leg elevation to control edema; use of elastic compression garments; and moderate physical activity, such as walking wearing below-knee elastic stockings. Meticulous skin care, treatment of dermatitis, and prompt treatment of cellulitis are important aspects of medical management. The pharmacology of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers include essentially two medications: pentoxifylline and phlebotropic agents. The micronized purified flavonoid fraction is an effective adjunct to compression therapy in patients with large, chronic ulceration.

  7. Potassium Channelopathies and Gastrointestinal Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jaeyong; Lee, Seung Hun; Giebisch, Gerhard; Wang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Potassium channels and transporters maintain potassium homeostasis and play significant roles in several different biological actions via potassium ion regulation. In previous decades, the key revelations that potassium channels and transporters are involved in the production of gastric acid and the regulation of secretion in the stomach have been recognized. Drugs used to treat peptic ulceration are often potassium transporter inhibitors. It has also been reported that potassium channels are involved in ulcerative colitis. Direct toxicity to the intestines from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been associated with altered potassium channel activities. Several reports have indicated that the long-term use of the antianginal drug Nicorandil, an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel opener, increases the chances of ulceration and perforation from the oral to anal regions throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Several of these drug features provide further insights into the role of potassium channels in the occurrence of ulceration in the GI tract. The purpose of this review is to investigate whether potassium channelopathies are involved in the mechanisms responsible for ulceration that occurs throughout the GI tract. PMID:27784845

  8. Multisystemic Sarcoidosis Presenting as Pretibial Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Baunacke, Anja; Hansel, Gesina

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease of unknown etiology. Up to 30% of patients develop cutaneous manifestations, either specific or nonspecific. Ulcerating sarcoidosis leading to leg ulcers is a rare observation that may lead to confusions with other, more common types of chronic leg ulcers. We report the case of a 45-year-old female patient with chronic multisystemic sarcoidosis presenting with pretibial leg ulcers. Other etiology could be excluded. Histology revealed nonspecific findings. Therefore, the diagnosis of nonspecific leg ulcers in sarcoidosis was confirmed. Treatment consisted of oral prednisolone and good ulcer care. Complete healing was achieved within 6 months. Sarcoidosis is a rare cause of leg ulcers and usually sarcoid granulomas can be found. Our patient illustrates that even in the absence of sarcoid granulomas, leg ulcers can be due to sarcoidosis. PMID:27272316

  9. Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Peptic Ulcer URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  10. Inflammation in chronic venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Raffetto, J D

    2013-03-01

    Chronic venous ulcers (CVUs) occur in approximately 1% of the general population. Risk factors for chronic venous disease (CVD) include heredity, age, female sex and obesity. Although not restricted to the elderly, the prevalence of CVD, especially leg ulcers, increases with age. CVD has a considerable impact on health-care resources. It has been estimated that venous ulcers cause the loss of approximately two million working days and incur treatment costs of approximately $3 billion per year in the USA. Overall, CVD has been estimated to account for 1-3% of the total health-care budgets in countries with developed health-care systems. The pathophysiology of dermal abnormalities in CVU is reflective of a complex interplay that involves sustained venous hypertension, inflammation, changes in microcirculation, cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activation, resulting in altered cellular function and delayed wound healing.

  11. [Genital ulcers--what's new?].

    PubMed

    Abu Raya, Bahaa; Bamberger, Ellen; Srugo, Isaac

    2013-08-01

    The most common infectious causes of genital ulcers are herpes simplex virus and syphilis. However, mixed infections can occur and genital ulcer may increase the risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus. Although the history and physical examination can narrow the differential diagnosis, there is a need for initial routine laboratory testing for the most common pathogens that includes: for syphilis: serologic screening and dark field examination of the lesion; for herpes simplex virus: serology, vial culture and/or polymerase chain reaction. Human immunodeficiency testing is mandatory. Recently, some clinical laboratories adapted the reverse screening algorithm for syphilis (initial treponemal test, and, if positive, followed by non-treponemal test) that may potentially lead to overtreatment. Early and prompt therapy may decrease the risk of transmission of the infectious agent to others. This article reviews the infectious pathogens causing genital ulcers, their unique clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment.

  12. Pradaxa-induced esophageal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Wood, Michele; Shaw, Paul

    2015-10-09

    Pradaxa (dabigatran) is a direct thrombin inhibitor approved for prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. We describe a case of esophageal ulceration associated with Pradaxa administration in a 75-year-old man. The patient reported difficulty swallowing and a burning sensation after taking his first dose of Pradaxa. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed linear ulcerations in the mid-esophagus. Pradaxa was held beginning the day before the EGD. The patient reported that his pain and difficulty swallowing resolved on stopping Pradaxa. Pradaxa is formulated with a tartaric acid excipient to reduce variability in absorption. We hypothesise that the capsule lodged in the patient's esophagus and the tartaric acid may have caused local damage resulting in an esophageal ulcer. It is important to educate patients on proper administration of Pradaxa, to decrease the risk of this rare, but potentially serious adverse event.

  13. [Martorell Hypertensive Ischaemic Leg Ulcer].

    PubMed

    Nobbe, S; Hafner, J

    2015-10-01

    Martorell hypertensive ischaemic leg ulcer (HYTILU) represents an important differential diagnosis of painful leg ulcerations. Stenotic subcutaneous arteriolosclerosis in patients with long-standing arterial hypertension finally leads to skin infarction. The typical histological changes are very similar in Martorell HYTILU and calciphylaxis. This raises the hypothesis that the two entities may have a common pathogenesis. Martorell HYTILU presents as an extremely painful ulcer that is regularly located at the laterodorsal lower leg or at the Achilles tendon. Because of its inflammatory and violaceous wound edges and its tendency to progression, clinicians unaware of the diagnosis Martorell HYTILU might misdiagnose pyoderma gangrenosum or necrotising cutaneous vasculitis start an immunosuppressive treatment and avoid surgical diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Instead, necrosectomy and split skin grafting are the treatment of choice for Martorell HYTILU.

  14. Raynaud, digital ulcers and calcinosis in scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Raynaud, digital ulcers and calcinosis are frequent manifestations of patients with systemic sclerosis. Digital ulcers are seen in more than half of the patients with scleroderma. Hospitalizations, ischemic complications and impairment of hand function are frequently observed in patients with digital ulcers, especially if treatment is delayed. Rapid and intensive treatment escalation in patients with scleroderma and refractory Raynaud's phenomenon is one of the most effective preventive action available in order to avoid the development of digital ulcers and tissue loss.

  15. Preventing Decubitus Ulcers with Cotton Sheeting Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decubitus pressure ulcers are a worldwide health crisis and their prevention and treatment has become a national priority. The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Board estimates that as many as three million people in the United States have pressure ulcers. The causes of the ailment include both extr...

  16. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific for rating purposes. Manifest differences in ulcers of the stomach... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section...

  17. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific for rating purposes. Manifest differences in ulcers of the stomach... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section...

  18. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific for rating purposes. Manifest differences in ulcers of the stomach... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section...

  19. Computed tomographic findings in penetrating peptic ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Madrazo, B.L.; Halpert, R.D.; Sandler, M.A.; Pearlberg, J.L.

    1984-12-01

    Four cases of peptic ulcer penetrating the head of the pancreas were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT). Findings common to 3 cases included (a) an ulcer crater, (b) a sinus tract, and (c) enlargement of the head of the pancreas. Unlike other modalities, the inherent spatial resolution of CT allows a convenient diagnosis of this important complication of peptic ulcer disease.

  20. FVB/N Mice Spontaneously Heal Ulcerative Lesions Induced by Mycobacterium ulcerans and Switch M. ulcerans into a Low Mycolactone Producer.

    PubMed

    Marion, Estelle; Jarry, Ulrich; Cano, Camille; Savary, Caroline; Beauvillain, Céline; Robbe-Saule, Marie; Preisser, Laurence; Altare, Frederic; Delneste, Yves; Jeannin, Pascale; Marsollier, Laurent

    2016-03-15

    Buruli ulcer, a debilitating disease, is caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The incidence of this neglected tropical disease is steadily increasing. As a rule, without treatment, skin ulcers occur and a lengthy healing process may be observed associated with severe functional disabilities. Mouse models are already available to study establishment of lesions or evaluation of therapy but a lack of a suitable animal model, mimicking all clinical stages, in particular the healing process, remains an obstacle to understand the pathophysiology of M. ulcerans infection. M. ulcerans was s.c. inoculated in three consanguine mouse strains, that is, BALB/c and C57BL/6, classically used to study mycobacterial infection, and FVB/N. Strikingly, FVB/N mice, although as sensitive as all other mouse strains with respect to M. ulcerans infection, presented a spontaneous healing after the ulcerative phase despite stable bacterial load, and mycolactone toxin was not detected in the healed tissues. The spontaneous healing process was accompanied by an activation of the innate immune system. The adaptive response initiated by FVB/N mice was not involved in the healing process and did not confer protection against M. ulcerans. Our work highlights the importance of innate immune responses to control M. ulcerans infection. This in vivo model of M. ulcerans infection now paves the way for new avenues of research toward the elucidation of critical stages of this disease, such as the characterization of the regulation of mycolactone production, a better understanding of the pathophysiology of M. ulcerans infection, and the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26873988

  1. Recording pressure ulcer risk assessment and incidence.

    PubMed

    Plaskitt, Anne; Heywood, Nicola; Arrowsmith, Michaela

    2015-07-15

    This article reports on the introduction of an innovative computer-based system developed to record and report pressure ulcer risk and incidence at an acute NHS trust. The system was introduced to ensure that all patients have an early pressure ulcer risk assessment, which prompts staff to initiate appropriate management if a pressure ulcer is detected, thereby preventing further patient harm. Initial findings suggest that this electronic process has helped to improve the timeliness and accuracy of data on pressure ulcer risk and incidence. In addition, it has resulted in a reduced number of reported hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

  2. Endoscopic Management of Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min

    2015-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods. PMID:25844337

  3. Endoscopic management of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min; Kim, Byung-Wook

    2015-03-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods.

  4. Experimental ulcerative disease of the colon.

    PubMed

    Watt, J; Marcus, R

    1975-01-01

    The oral administration to guinea-pigs of an aqueous solution of carrageenan derived from the red seaweed, Eucheuma spinosum, provides a useful, readily available experimental model for the study of ulcerative disease of the colon. Two types of ulcerative disease can be produced within a 4-6 week period, viz., ulceration localised mainly to the caecum by using 1% undegraded carrageenan in the drinking fluid, and extensive ulceration involving caecum, colon, and rectum by using 5% degraded carrageenan. Ulceration is probably due to the local action of carrageenan in the bowel. PMID:1202321

  5. FAQs on leg ulcer care.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Irene; King, Brenda; Knight, Susan; Keynes, Milton

    In a webchat on leg ulcer management issues, hosted by Nursing Times, participants raised three key areas of care: the role of healthcare assistants in compression bandaging; reporting and investigating damage caused by compression therapy; and recommendations for dressings to be used under compression. This article discusses each of these in turn.

  6. [Diagnosis of gastric ulcer in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Ashida, Kiyoshi; Fukuchi, Takumi; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2010-11-01

    It is well known that gastric ulcers are most often found at anglus and upper corpus in the elderly. The number of gastric ulcer found at upper corpus hold half of all cases in the elderly patients with bleeding ulcer. Sixty percent of the elderly patients with bleeding ulcer took NSAIDs including low-dose aspirin in authors' hospital. Now it is easy to treat and cure bleeding ulcers due to development of endoscopic hemostasis and antiulcer drugs such as proton pump inhibitor(PPI). However, the elderly patients sometimes result in fatal outcome on bleeding from gastric ulcer. Therefore, it is important to prevent ulcer complications by PPI for the high-risk group such as elderly patients taking NSAIDs.

  7. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers. PMID:1801957

  8. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers.

  9. [The newly occurred and recurrent gastric ulcers after organ-preserving operations for the ulcer disease].

    PubMed

    Todurov, I M; Dibrova, Iu A

    2008-10-01

    The literature data and the results of own investigations on gastric recurrent ulcers occurrence after organpreserving operations performance for the ulcer disease are summarized. The data on gastric recurrent ulcers occurrence rate are adduced. Modern views on possible causes of occurrence, necessary volume and informativity of investigation methods and tactics of treatment are presented. Gastroduodenal motor-evacuation function disorders, duodenogastric reflux and gastric hypersecretion are suggested as a most frequent causes of gastric recurrent ulcers occurrence. The method of operative intervention choice for recurrent gastric ulcer is determined by the cause of its occurrence, as well as the character of ulcer complication and the kind of previous surgical procedure performed.

  10. Endoscopic management of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Laws, H L; McKernan, J B

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article reviews the authors' experience with endoscopic management of duodenal ulcer and ulcers occurring after a previous drainage procedure. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Patients with complications of duodenal ulcer and ulcers occurring after a previous drainage procedure still require surgical management. Virtually all operations for duodenal ulcer include some form of vagotomy. American surgeons in academic centers prefer highly selective vagotomy in suitable candidates. Video-directed laparoscopic and thoracoscopic operations have been done for all complications of duodenal ulcer except for acute hemorrhage. METHODS: The authors have performed laparoscopic operation on eight patients with intractable chronic duodenal ulcer, seven patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease combined with duodenal ulcer, one patient with chronic duodenal ulcer and gastric outlet obstruction, and one patient with acute perforation. Operations performed included omentopexy, anterior seromyotomy plus post truncal vagotomy, and highly selective vagotomy. Seven patients had a simultaneous Nissen fundoplication; and the patient with obstruction underwent concomitant pyloroplasty and vagotomy. Six patients with intestinal ulcers occurring after a previous drainage procedure were treated with thoracoscopic vagotomy. Techniques used are shown. RESULTS: There has been one recurrent ulcer in the laparoscopic group after anterior seromyotomy plus posterior truncal vagotomy. The patient treated by omentopexy for duodenal perforation recovered gastrointestinal function promptly with no further difficulty, but eventually died of primary medical disease. Patients undergoing thoracoscopic vagotomy have all become asymptomatic. Postoperative hospital stay after highly selective vagotomy, anterior seromyotomy plus posterior truncal vagotomy, or thoracoscopic vagotomy was 1-5 days. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic management of duodenal ulcers is feasible. Larger numbers of patients with

  11. Intestinal microbiota and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-11-01

    There is a close relationship between the human host and the intestinal microbiota, which is an assortment of microorganisms, protecting the intestine against colonization by exogenous pathogens. Moreover, the intestinal microbiota play a critical role in providing nutrition and the modulation of host immune homeostasis. Recent reports indicate that some strains of intestinal bacteria are responsible for intestinal ulceration and chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Understanding the interaction of the intestinal microbiota with pathogens and the human host might provide new strategies treating patients with IBD. This review focuses on the important role that the intestinal microbiota plays in maintaining innate immunity in the pathogenesis and etiology of UC and discusses new antibiotic therapies targeting the intestinal microbiota.

  12. Intractable ulcerating enterocolitis of infancy.

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, I R; Risdon, R A; Walker-Smith, J A

    1991-01-01

    Five children (three boys, two girls) presenting in the first year of life with intractable diarrhoea had a number of features in common. All had ulcerating stomatitis, four had partial villous atrophy on small intestinal biopsy, all had colitis characterised by large ulcers with overhanging edges, and four had severe perianal disease; no stool pathogens were detected. Treatment with steroids, sulphasalazine, and azathioprine was unsuccessful. All five required subtotal colectomy. Four were children of consanguinous marriages, two were siblings of Pakistani origin, two were cousins of Arab origin, and the fifth was Portuguese. Although the diagnoses of Behçet's disease and Crohn's disease were considered, it appears that these children represent a distinct inherited condition affecting the whole gastrointestinal tract, particularly the colon. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:2025003

  13. [Digital ulcers in systemic scleroderma].

    PubMed

    Belz, D; Hunzelmann, N; Moinzadeh, P

    2014-11-01

    Digital ulcers (DU's) are one of the main symptoms of systemic scleroderma and occur in approximately 60% of all scleroderma patients. Due to possible complications such as infections, gangrene or amputation, they require regular medical attention and a good wound treatment by doctors and nursing staff. A definition of DU's has not yet been established. In 2009 the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) published guidelines for the treatment of DU's. An improvement of the healing of active ulcers has been described with Iloprost. Bosentan significantly reduced the frequency of occurrence of new DU's. In some small studies PDE-5 inhibitors appear helpful. Further studies with other therapeutic approaches will follow in the next few years. PMID:25336296

  14. [Therapeutic options for pressure ulcers].

    PubMed

    Damert, H-G; Meyer, F; Altmann, S

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this overview is based on remarks on the pathogenesis of and therapy for pressure ulcers and selected but representative cases to demonstrate current options of plastic coverage. As a consequence of the demographic developments, in particular, with regard to the increasing proportion of older patients as well as the advances in modern medicine, the number of multimorbid, geriatric and bedridden patients and of those with prolonged sickbed periods has been steadily growing. Therefore, partly severe manifestations of pressure ulcers at various exposed body regions can be observed in spite of the best preventive intention of care. While in the early stages rather conservative treatment is adequate, surgical intervention might become important and indispensable for a sufficient treatment in advanced stages. To facilitate basic care and to appropriately treat the infectious focus, the methods and procedures of plastic surgery can become relevant. Although there are several options and approaches existing to sanitise and cover defects of pressure ulcers, which are described within the article based on representative cases, preventive measures can still be considered the best approach.

  15. Approach to skin ulcers in older patients.

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide family physicians with an approach to managing skin ulcers in older patients. SOURCES OF INFORMATION: Clinical practice guidelines and best practice guidelines were summarized to describe an evidence-based approach. MAIN MESSAGE; Preventing ulcers is important in frail older patients. Using guidelines can help prevent ulcers in institutions. Clarifying the cause and contributing factors is the first step in management. Pressure and venous ulcers are common in elderly people. Poor nutrition, edema, arterial insufficiency, and anemia often impair wound healing. Adequate debridement is important to decrease risk of infection and to promote healing. There are guidelines for cleaning ulcers. Choice of dressings depends on the circumstances of each wound, but dressings should provide a moist environment. Options for dressings are summarized. CONCLUSION: Family physicians can manage skin ulcers effectively by applying basic principles and using readily available guidelines. PMID:15648380

  16. Engaging patients in pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Hudgell, Lynne; Dalphinis, Julie; Blunt, Chris; Zonouzi, Maryam; Procter, Susan

    2015-05-01

    As patients increasingly care for themselves at home, they require accessible information to enable informed self-care. This article describes the development of an educational electronic application (app) designed for use by patients at risk of pressure ulcers, and their carers. The app can be downloaded to Windows, Android or Apple smartphones or tablets. The app is based on the current pressure ulcer prevention and management guidelines from the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, and is designed to educate patients and carers about how to prevent a pressure ulcer, how to recognise a pressure ulcer, and what to do if they suspect they are developing a pressure ulcer. We hope the app will be used to help with educational conversations among patients, carers and healthcare professionals.

  17. [Orthopaedic footwear against foot ulcers in diabetes].

    PubMed

    Bus, Sicco A

    2014-01-01

    In people with diabetes mellitus, foot ulcers are a major problem because they increase the risk of a foot infection and amputation and reduce quality of life. After a foot ulcer has healed, the risk of recurrence is high. Orthopaedic shoes and orthotics are often prescribed to high risk patients and aim to reduce the mechanical pressure on the plantar surface of the foot. Orthopaedic footwear that is modified to reduce pressure is not much more effective in preventing foot ulcer recurrence than orthopaedic footwear that did not undergo such modification, unless the shoes are worn as recommended. In that case, the risk of ulcer recurrence is reduced by 46%. In patients with a history of ulceration, compliance in wearing orthopaedic shoes at home is low, while these patients walk more inside the house than outside the house. Foot pressure measurements should be part of the prescription and evaluation of orthopaedic footwear for patients at high risk for foot ulceration.

  18. Three cases of Lipschutz vulval ulceration.

    PubMed

    Alés-Fernández, M; Rodríguez-Pichardo, A; García-Bravo, B; Ferrándiz-Pulido, L; Camacho-Martínez, F M

    2010-05-01

    A Lipschütz ulcer or 'ulcus vulvae acutum' is an acute simple ulceration of the vulva or vagina of non-venereal origin which can be associated with lymphadenopathy. Three cases are described with accompanying clinical photographs. Two cases refer to adolescents, one an infant, all without any history of sexual contact. The cases serve to illustrate a little known but potentially important differential diagnosis of vulval ulceration.

  19. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF COMPLICATED GASTRODUODENAL ULCER].

    PubMed

    Lupahltsov, V I

    2016-03-01

    Results of operative treatment of 437 patients with complicated gastroduodenal ulcer were summarized. The modern views on the problem of conservative therapy for gas- troduodenal ulcer were presented. A rational individual approach with a certain terms is necessary for conservative treatment of gastroduodenal ulcer. A real way for improve- ment of the patients treatment results--it is a combination of effective conservative treatment with a timely established indications for a planned operative treatment before dangerous complications occur.

  20. Recurrence of Mooren's ulcer after lamellar keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, P J

    1989-09-01

    A 45-year-old man with unilateral Mooren's ulcer in a quiescent state underwent annular lamellar keratoplasty after corneal rupture due to minor trauma. Postoperatively, he did well until 8 months later when a recurrence of the Mooren's ulceration occurred, involving the central island of the patient's original corneal stroma. The stroma of the lamellar graft was uninvolved. This unusual occurrence lends support to the concept that there is a specific immunologic reaction to the cornea in patients with Mooren's ulcer.

  1. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF COMPLICATED GASTRODUODENAL ULCER].

    PubMed

    Lupahltsov, V I

    2016-03-01

    Results of operative treatment of 437 patients with complicated gastroduodenal ulcer were summarized. The modern views on the problem of conservative therapy for gas- troduodenal ulcer were presented. A rational individual approach with a certain terms is necessary for conservative treatment of gastroduodenal ulcer. A real way for improve- ment of the patients treatment results--it is a combination of effective conservative treatment with a timely established indications for a planned operative treatment before dangerous complications occur. PMID:27514084

  2. A revised risk analysis of stress ulcers in burn patients receiving ulcer prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Hwan; Lee, Jong Ho; Shin, Jae Jun; Cho, Young Soon

    2015-01-01

    Objective Most of the literature about Curling’s ulcer was published from 1960 through 1980. Therefore, an updated study of Curling’s ulcer is needed. We analyzed the risk factors affecting ulcer incidence in burn patients. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of burn patients who were admitted to two burn centers. We collected information about the general characteristics of patients, burn area size, abbreviated burn severity index, whether surgery was performed, endoscopy results, and the total body surface area (TBSA). We performed a multivariate regression analysis predicting development of Curling’s ulcer. Results In total, 135 patients (mean age, 49.5±13.5 years) underwent endoscopy. Endoscopy revealed ulcer in 51 patients: 36 (70.6%) with gastric ulcers, 9 (17.6%) with duodenal ulcers, and 6 (11.8%) with both ulcer types. Burn area, burn depth, epigastric pain, melena, intensive care unit admission, burn area >20% of TBSA, and undergoing surgery for the burn were significantly different between the ulcer and non-ulcer groups. Multivariate analysis showed two independent factors significantly associated with ulcer: epigastric pain (odds ratio [OR]: 4.55, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.74 to 11.90), major burn (TBSA > 20%)(OR: 4.31 ,95% CI: 1.34 to 13.85). Conclusion For burn patients, presence of epigastric pain and major burn with TBSA > 20% showed significant association with ulcer development. PMID:27752605

  3. Pressure ulcer prevention in frail older people.

    PubMed

    Barry, Maree; Nugent, Linda

    2015-12-16

    Pressure ulcers are painful and cause discomfort, have a negative effect on quality of life, and are costly to treat. The incidence and severity of preventable pressure ulcers is an important indicator of quality of care; it is essential that healthcare providers monitor prevalence and incidence rates to ensure that care strategies implemented are effective. Frail older people are at increased risk of developing pressure ulcers. This article discusses the complexities of preventing pressure ulcers in frail older people and emphasises the importance of structured educational programmes that incorporate effective clinical leadership and multidisciplinary teamwork.

  4. Ischemic Gastropathic Ulcer Mimics Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Saleh; Lahav, Ziv; Rmeileh, Ayman Abu; Mizrahi, Meir

    2016-01-01

    Gastric ulcer due to mesenteric ischemia is a rare clinical finding. As a result, few reports of ischemic gastric ulcers have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of ischemic gastropathy is seldom considered in patients presenting with abdominal pain and gastric ulcers. In this case report, we describe a patient with increasing abdominal pain, weight loss, and gastric ulcers, who underwent extensive medical evaluation and whose symptoms were resistant to medical interventions. Finally he was diagnosed with chronic mesenteric ischemia, and his clinical and endoscopic abnormalities resolved after surgical revascularization of both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk. PMID:27579191

  5. Cushing's ulcer: the eponym and his own.

    PubMed

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2011-06-01

    One of the least remembered eponyms associated with Harvey Cushing is "Cushing's ulcer." The basis of this credit is a paper published in 1932 in which Cushing describes patients who postoperatively and unexpectedly died of perforated peptic ulcers. It is one of the first descriptions of a stress ulcer and a treatise on the brain-stomach connection. Harvey Cushing was puzzled by the pathogenesis of these peptic ulcerations and perforations and advanced several theories. The least plausible included the bile-vomiting theory suggesting that hemorrhagic ulceration could be produced by a combination of bile and acid in a patient recovering from the anesthetic. Other theories were stimulation of a parasympathetic center in the diencephalon or a disturbance of vagal centers in the brainstem. Quite surprisingly to Cushing, the Boston Herald implicitly insinuated that Cushing found the cause of ulcers and this claim upset him greatly. It is ironic that Harvey Cushing, in his later years with failing health, developed an ulcer himself. Cushing noted in his correspondence that he felt the agitation over this newspaper clipping caused his later ulcer. The first description of a neurogenic ulcer remains an important medical observation and is a testament to Cushing's broad accomplishments. PMID:21346647

  6. Gastric emptying abnormal in duodenal ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, S.; Heading, R.C.; Taylor, T.V.; Forrest, J.A.; Tothill, P.

    1986-07-01

    To investigate the possibility that an abnormality of gastric emptying exists in duodenal ulcer and to determine if such an abnormality persists after ulcer healing, scintigraphic gastric emptying measurements were undertaken in 16 duodenal ulcer patients before, during, and after therapy with cimetidine; in 12 patients with pernicious anemia, and in 12 control subjects. No difference was detected in the rate or pattern of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer patients before and after ulcer healing with cimetidine compared with controls, but emptying of the solid component of the test meal was more rapid during treatment with the drug. Comparison of emptying patterns obtained in duodenal ulcer subjects during and after cimetidine treatment with those obtained in pernicious anemia patients and controls revealed a similar relationship that was characterized by a tendency for reduction in the normal differentiation between the emptying of solid and liquid from the stomach. The similarity in emptying patterns in these groups of subjects suggests that gastric emptying of solids may be influenced by changes in the volume of gastric secretion. The failure to detect an abnormality of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer subjects before and after ulcer healing calls into question the widespread belief that abnormally rapid gastric emptying is a feature with pathogenetic significance in duodenal ulcer disease.

  7. Gastric cancer detection in gastric ulcer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mountford, R A; Brown, P; Salmon, P R; Alvarenga, C; Neumann, C S; Read, A E

    1980-01-01

    A retrospective study has been performed of all cases of gastric ulcer diagnosed or investigated within the Endoscopy Unit of the Department of Medicine, Bristol, over a three year period (1974-76). The average length of follow-up was two years. Two hundred and sixty five cases of gastric ulcer were studied of which 37 proved to be malignant (14%). Presenting complaints of anorexia, weight loss, nausea and/or vomiting, and multiple (greater than 3) symptoms, were commoner in the malignant ulcer group. Ulcer site and the presence of coexisting duodenal ulceration were largely unhelpful in deciding the status of an ulcer. Malignant ulcers tended to be large (greater than 1 cm diameter). Radiology was highly unreliable in distinguishing benign from malignant ulcers. Visual inspection at endoscopy was more reliable, but associated with a tendency to over-diagnose malignancy. False positive biopsies were uncommon (two cases). Three cases of clinically unsuspected superficial gastric carcinoma were revealed. Repeated endoscopy and biopsy of all gastric ulcers until they are completely healed is advised. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7364322

  8. [Peptic ulcer surgery in the aged].

    PubMed

    Michel, D

    1981-04-01

    Particular problems are discussed in 257 patients over 75 years of age, who were treated for peptic ulcer disease between 1960 and 1979. In elderly patients the peptic ulcer is complicated, often requiring emergency surgery. A special problem in the aged is simultaneous appearance of various sicknesses, which produces further complications. The chosen method of surgery is described and the post-operative period and its general and surgical problems are discussed. The result is a concept of indication for surgery, particularly for the elective operation of chronic ulcers not responding to therapy, before the ulcer becomes complicated. PMID:7227008

  9. Clopidogrel delays gastric ulcer healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiing-Chyuan; Huo, Teh-Ia; Hou, Ming-Chih; Lin, Hsiao-Yi; Li, Chung-Pin; Lin, Han-Chieh; Chang, Full-Young; Lee, Fa-Yauh

    2012-11-15

    Clopidogrel is not safe enough for the gastric mucosa in patients with high risk of peptic ulcer. This study aimed to explore if clopidogrel delays gastric ulcer healing and elucidate the involved mechanisms. Gastric ulcer was induced in rats and the ulcer size, mucosal epithelial cell proliferation of the ulcer margin, expression of growth factors [epidermal growth factor (EGF), basic fibroblast growth factor] and their receptors, and signal transduction pathways for cell proliferation were measured and compared between the clopidogrel-treated group and untreated controls. For the in vitro part, rat gastric mucosal epithelial cell line (RGM-1 cells) was used to establish EGF receptor over-expressed cells. Cell proliferation and molecular change under EGF treatment (10ng/ml) with and without clopidogrel (10(-6)M) were demonstrated. Ulcer size was significantly larger in the clopidogrel-treated group compared to the control and mucosal epithelial cell proliferation of the ulcer margin was significantly decreased in the clopidogrel-treated group (P<0.05). Clopidogrel (2mg and 10mg/kg/day) significantly decreased ulcer-induced gastric epithelial cell proliferation and ulcer-stimulated expressions of EGF receptor and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (PERK) at the ulcer margin (P<0.05). Clopidogrel (10(-6)M) also inhibited EGF-stimulated EGF receptor, PERK expression, and cell proliferation in RGM-1 cells (P<0.05), and caused much less inhibition of EGF-stimulated cell proliferation in EGF receptor over-expressed RGM-1 cells than in RGM-1 cells (22% vs. 32% reduction). In conclusion, clopidogrel delays gastric ulcer healing in rats via inhibiting gastric epithelial cell proliferation, at least by inhibition of the EGF receptor-ERK signal transduction pathway.

  10. Thrombophilia and chronic venous ulceration.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, A W; MacKenzie, R K; Burns, P; Fegan, C

    2002-08-01

    It is known that thrombophilia (TP) is a risk factor for deep venous thrombosis (DVT), and that DVT predisposes to chronic venous ulceration (CVU). However, the relationship between TP and CVU has not been well studied. Review of the literature reveals that the prevalence of TP in CVU patients is high--similar to the prevalence found in patients with a history of DVT. This is despite many patients with CVU having no clear history, or duplex evidence of previous DVT. TP may predispose to CVU by leading to macro- or micro-vascular thrombosis. This association raises several issues regarding the investigation, prevention and management of patients with venous disease.

  11. Triple gastric peptic ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Radojkovic, Milan; Mihajlovic, Suncica; Stojanovic, Miroslav; Stanojevic, Goran; Damnjanovic, Zoran

    2016-03-01

    Patients with advanced or metastatic cancer have compromised nutritional, metabolic, and immune conditions. Nevertheless, little is known about gastroduodenal perforation in cancer patients. Described in the present report is the case of a 41-year old woman with stage IV recurrent laryngeal cancer, who used homeopathic anticancer therapy and who had triple peptic ulcer perforation (PUP) that required surgical repair. Triple gastric PUP is a rare complication. Self-administration of homeopathic anticancer medication should be strongly discouraged when evidence-based data regarding efficacy and toxicity is lacking.

  12. Scleritis and Peripheral Ulcerative Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Galor, Anat; Thorne, Jennifer E.

    2008-01-01

    Scleritis and peripheral ulcerative keratitis (PUK) can present as isolated conditions or as part of a systemic inflammatory or infectious disorder. Both are serious ocular conditions that can result in vision loss and therefore require early diagnosis and treatment. Nearly two-thirds of patients with non-infectious scleritis require systemic glucocorticoid therapy, and one fourth need a glucocorticoid-sparing agent, as well. Essentially all patients with non-infectious PUK require systemic glucocorticoids. Detailed clinical history, thorough physical examination, and thoughtful laboratory evaluations are all important in the exclusion of underlying disorders and extraocular involvement. PMID:18037120

  13. A rapidly fatal palatal ulcer: rhinocerebral mucormycosis.

    PubMed

    Van der Westhuijzen, A J; Grotepass, F W; Wyma, G; Padayachee, A

    1989-07-01

    A case of a patient with a palatal ulcer who was in a diabetic ketoacidotic coma is described. This ulcer proved to be the presenting sign of rhinocerebral mucormycosis. The patient had hemifacial swelling, ocular signs, and gross tissue destruction and died less than 4 weeks after she was first seen.

  14. Symptoms and Causes of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ulcer Disease Next: Diagnosis of Peptic Ulcer Disease Digestive Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients and medical professionals. View the full list of Digestive Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ NIH...Turning Discovery ...

  15. Ulcerative colitis flare with splenic ven thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Huseyin Sancar; Kara, Banu; Citil, Serdal

    2015-01-01

    Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) have an increased risk of thromboembolic events. Here, we present a 28-year-old man with active ulcerative pancolitis presenting via splenic vein thrombosis and left renal superior infarct that was not associated with a surgical procedure.

  16. Diagnosis and management of genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Roett, Michelle A; Mayor, Mejebi T; Uduhiri, Kelechi A

    2012-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus infection and syphilis are the most common causes of genital ulcers in the United States. Other infectious causes include chancroid, lymphogranuloma venereum, granuloma inguinale (donovanosis), secondary bacterial infections, and fungi. Noninfectious etiologies, including sexual trauma, psoriasis, Behçet syndrome, and fixed drug eruptions, can also lead to genital ulcers. Although initial treatment of genital ulcers is generally based on clinical presentation, the following tests should be considered in all patients: serologic tests for syphilis and darkfield microscopy or direct fluorescent antibody testing for Treponema pallidum, culture or polymerase chain reaction test for herpes simplex virus, and culture for Haemophilus ducreyi in settings with a high prevalence of chancroid. No pathogen is identified in up to 25 percent of patients with genital ulcers. The first episode of herpes simplex virus infection is usually treated with seven to 10 days of oral acyclovir (five days for recurrent episodes). Famciclovir and valacyclovir are alternative therapies. One dose of intramuscular penicillin G benzathine is recommended to treat genital ulcers caused by primary syphilis. Treatment options for chancroid include a single dose of intramuscular ceftriaxone or oral azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, or erythromycin. Lymphogranuloma venereum and donovanosis are treated with 21 days of oral doxycycline. Treatment of noninfectious causes of genital ulcers varies by etiology, and ranges from topical wound care for ulcers caused by sexual trauma to consideration of subcutaneous pegylated interferon alfa-2a for ulcers caused by Behçet syndrome.

  17. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section 4.110 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term...

  18. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section 4.110 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term...

  19. Vesicular, ulcerative, and necrotic dermatitis of reptiles.

    PubMed

    Maas, Adolf K

    2013-09-01

    Vesicular, ulcerative, and necrotic dermatologic conditions are common in captive reptiles. Although these conditions have distinct differences histologically, they are commonly sequelae to each other. This article examines the anatomy and physiology of reptile skin; discusses reported causes of vesicular, ulcerative, and necrotic dermatologic conditions; and reviews various management options.

  20. [Multiple and prepyloric ulcers of the stomach].

    PubMed

    Dibrova, Iu A

    2010-01-01

    The literature data and own experience results concerning treatment of relatively rare multiple and prepyloric ulcers were summarized. The peculiarities of functional diagnosis methods of these ulcers are adduced. The tactics of surgical treatment, depending on localization, the complication character and gastric functional state was substantiated.

  1. Probiotics and prebiotics in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Derikx, Lauranne A A P; Dieleman, Levinus A; Hoentjen, Frank

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal microbiota is one of the key players in the etiology of ulcerative colitis. Manipulation of this microflora with probiotics and prebiotics is an attractive strategy in the management of ulcerative colitis. Several intervention studies for both the induction and maintenance of remission in ulcerative colitis patients have been performed. Most of these studies evaluated VSL#3 or E. Coli Nissle 1917 and in general there is evidence for efficacy of these agents for induction and maintenance of remission. However, studies are frequently underpowered, lack a control group, and are very heterogeneous investigating different probiotic strains in different study populations. The absence of well-powered robust randomized placebo-controlled trials impedes the widespread use of probiotics and prebiotics in ulcerative colitis. However, given the promising results that are currently available, probiotics and prebiotics may find their way to the treatment algorithm for ulcerative colitis in the near future. PMID:27048897

  2. Factors precipitating acute ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Puri, A S; Chaubal, C C; Midha, Vandana

    2014-08-01

    Ulcerative colitis is characterized by mucosal inflammation of a variable length of the colon starting from the rectum. The precise etiopathogenesis is unknown but it occurs in genetically susceptible individuals who manifest an abnormal immunological response against gut commensal bacteria. The disease course is-characterized by multiple spontaneous relapses and remissions. Two pathogens namely CMV and C. difficile have been associated with disease exacerbation in specific clinical situations. Whereas C. difficile may produce worsening of the disease in those exposed to broad spectrum antibiotics, CMV reactivation is seen only in patients with moderate to severe steroid refractory disease. The importance of these two super-infections can be gauged by the fact that both the ACG and the ECCO recommend testing for these two pathogens in appropriate clinical situations. The applicability of these guidelines in the Indian scenario has yet to be determined in view of the bacterial and parasitic infections endemic in tropical countries. The guidelines for diagnosis and management of these two super-infections in the presence of ulcerative colitis are discussed in this review. PMID:25735121

  3. Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... stomach is empty. Eating something or taking an antacid medication sometimes makes the pain go away for ... are taken every day for about 2 weeks. Antacids — acid blockers or proton pump inhibitors — are given ...

  4. Diabetic foot ulcers. Pathophysiology, assessment, and therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Bowering, C. K.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review underlying causes of diabetic foot ulceration, provide a practical assessment of patients at risk, and outline an evidence-based approach to therapy for diabetic patients with foot ulcers. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search was conducted for the period from 1979 to 1999 for articles relating to diabetic foot ulcers. Most studies found were case series or small controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Foot ulcers in diabetic patients are common and frequently lead to lower limb amputation unless a prompt, rational, multidisciplinary approach to therapy is taken. Factors that affect development and healing of diabetic patients' foot ulcers include the degree of metabolic control, the presence of ischemia or infection, and continuing trauma to feet from excessive plantar pressure or poorly fitting shoes. Appropriate wound care for diabetic patients addresses these issues and provides optimal local ulcer therapy with débridement of necrotic tissue and provision of a moist wound-healing environment. Therapies that have no known therapeutic value, such as foot soaking and topical antiseptics, can actually be harmful and should be avoided. CONCLUSION: Family physicians are often primary medical contacts for patients with diabetes. Patients should be screened regularly for diabetic foot complications, and preventive measures should be initiated for those at risk of ulceration. PMID:11398715

  5. Corneal ulceration following measles in Nigerian children.

    PubMed Central

    Sandford-Smith, J H; Whittle, H C

    1979-01-01

    Acute corneal ulceration in malnourished children is the commonest cause of childhood blindness in Northern Nigeria and usually develops after measles. Other severe diseases in malnourished children rarely precipitate corneal ulceration. A survey in a school for blind children showed that 69% of the children were blind from corneal disease, and a survey of children with corneal scars showed that at least 42% were caused by ulceration after measles. The clinical appearance of the active ulcers was very varied. The serum retinol-binding protein and prealbumin levels in children with corneal ulcers following measles were below normal, but a group of malnourished children without eye complaints following measles were found to have even lower levels. Thus a specific deficiency of vitamin A does not appear to be the primary cause of these ulcers, though it may be a contributory one. A specific measles keratitis and secondary herpes simplex infectious may be local factors contributing to this ulceration, and there is nearly always a background of protein calorie malnutrition. Racial factors may also be of some significance. PMID:508686

  6. Management of finger ulcers in scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Ward, W A; Van Moore, A

    1995-09-01

    Twelve patients (15 hands) with documented scleroderma and chronic nonhealing digital ulcers were followed for their response to nonoperative and operative treatment. The patients were initially managed with nifedipine, biofeedback, digital xylocaine blockade, and silver sulfadiazine topical ointment and cessation of all vasoconstrictive agents. Ulcerations healed in 6 of 15 hands and remained healed at a 2-year follow-up examination. The remaining nine hands in seven patients failed nonoperative treatment and underwent a palmar digital sympathectomy. These chronic digital ulcerations healed within 6 weeks after surgery. After a 26- to 64-month follow-up period, six of the nine hands remained free of all digital ulcerations. Two patients (three hands) had partial recurrence of the ulceration. Digital sympathectomy can be an effective procedure for treating nonhealing digital ulcers in scleroderma patients after nonoperative treatment has failed. Significant vaso-occlusive disease is likely to be present in these patients, as demonstrated by arteriography. Our initial approach is cessation of all vasoconstricting agents, nifedipine biofeedback, and local antibiotic ointment. Wrist blocks with xylocaine and marcaine are offered if these modalities fail. If these methods do not result in healing of the ulcer within 12 weeks, then digital sympathectomy is considered.

  7. Clinical picture of peptic ulceration diagnosed endoscopically.

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, M C; Holmes, G K; Cockel, R

    1977-01-01

    Clinical features and laboratory data are presented for 100 patients with benign gastric ulceration and 150 patients with duodenal ulceration confirmed endoscopically in a district general hospital unit. Abdominal pain was the commonest indication for endoscopy, but one third of examinations were performed for acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Although the patients were selected by referral for endoscopy their clinical presentation, age, and sex distribution were similar to those reported in previous general surveys. There were no clinical features which clearly distinguished gastric from duodenal ulceration. However, of those with gastric ulceration younger patients more often had distal ulcers and presented with pain, while elderly subjects tended to have high lesser curve involvement and presented with haemorrhage. Moreover, all females presenting with haemorrhage were aged over 50 years, while 6% of males bleeding from gastric ulceration and 40% of males bleeding from duodenal ulceration were under this age. Anaemia when present, except in two premenopausal females, indicated either a recent acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage or a coexistent second diagnosis. PMID:873333

  8. Seasonal behaviour of healed duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A K; Pal, L S

    1998-04-01

    Incidence of peptic ulcer is more in people living at higher altitude and similarly relapse of healed duodenal ulcer is more in winter season. Seasonal behaviour of healed duodenal ulcer with or without maintenance therapy with H2 blockers was studied among subjects residing around Shimla (approximate altitude 7000 feet above mean sea level). Sixty-four subjects of endoscopically healed duodenal ulcer were alternatively advised placebo (32 subjects) and ranitidine 150 mg (32 subjects) at bed time as maintenance therapy for period of one year. Subjects were reviewed endoscopically and evaluated for H pylori by rapid urease test, every months or earlier if symptomatic. Relapse rate was analysed among 60 subjects at the end of one year. Cumulative relapse rate was found 60% in ranitidine group and 100% in placebo group. In ranitidine group percentage of relapse to number of endoscopic examinations was 21.4% throughout the year, but in placebo group during winter and spring season relapse was 87.5% of endoscopic examination whereas 57.2% during summer and fall season. Incidence of duodenal ulcer relapse without maintenance therapy was more in winter and spring season (October to March) as compared to summer and fall (April to September), whereas intermittent seasonal treatment is efficacious in prevention of duodenal ulcer relapse and also improves cost benefit ratio of ulcer treatment.

  9. Liposomes as drug carriers for oral ulcers.

    PubMed

    Harsanyi, B B; Hilchie, J C; Mezei, M

    1986-09-01

    The aim of this study was to test the potential of liposomes as drug carriers to the ulcerated oral mucosa. Radioactive triamcinolone acetonide palmitate (3H-TRMAp) was encapsulated in large multilamellar lipid vesicles and served as the test lotion. 3H-TRMAp in solution served as control. Forty-six hamsters were divided into three groups. In group I, multiple confluent ulcers in both cheek pouches were treated by topical application. In group II, single ulcers on the cheeks were treated by intramucosal injection. In group III, multiple confluent ulcers were produced in the cheek pouch on one side, with a single ulcer in the contralateral cheek pouch; no drug was applied, and the tissues were prepared for histology. Hamsters were killed at three and 24 hours, respectively, after treatment. Pouches were divided into ulcerated and intact adjacent mucosa. Cheeks were divided into ulcerated mucosa and distant mucosa. Drug levels in the four mucosal portions as well as in the blood, liver, spleen, brain, and thalamic region were determined by radioactive tracer technique. At three hours, liposomal drug concentrations were lower than in control animals in the brain and the thalamic region. At 24 hours, liposomal drug values were higher than in control animals in the ulcerated mucosa and lower than in control animals in the thalamic region. Mean drug concentrations in the ulcerated mucosa were higher in group II than group I. The results parallel those of Mezei and Gulasekharam (1980, 1982); liposomes increase local and decrease systemic drug concentration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Lipschutz ulcers: evaluation and management of acute genital ulcers in women.

    PubMed

    Huppert, Jill S

    2010-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers are painful and distressing to women and perplexing to the providers who care for them. The differential diagnosis includes sexually and nonsexually transmitted infections, autoimmune conditions, drug reactions, and local manifestations of systemic illness. However, in many cases, no causative agent is identified, and lesions are classified as idiopathic aphthosis. In the setting of fever and acute onset of genital ulcers in girls and women, the term Lipschutz ulcers has been used to describe ulcers associated with an immunologic reaction to a distant source of infection or inflammation. The aims of this article are to review the differential diagnosis and pathogenesis of acute genital ulcers, to offer an evaluation and classification scheme, and to discuss treatment options for the dermatologist who cares for women and girls with vulvar ulcers.

  11. [Lipschütz acute genital ulcer].

    PubMed

    Kluger, N; Garcia, C; Guillot, B

    2009-10-01

    Lipschütz acute genital ulcer is a rare distinctive cause of nonvenereal acute genital ulcers that occurs particularly in adolescents described in 1913. We report here a typical case that occurred in a 24-year-old virgin woman who developed flu-like symptoms and painful genital ulcers that healed spontaneously within a week and without any infection (Epstein Barr Virus, toxoplasmosis, salmonella). The physiopathogeny remains unknown. However, there are body of evidences pointing out a possible link to several nonvenereal infections, including mainly Epstein-Barr virus acute infection. This rare benign but disabling entity should be known by gynecologists.

  12. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy in diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Jen; Cheng, Jai-Hong; Kuo, Yur-Ren; Schaden, Wolfgang; Mittermayr, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are among the most common foot disorders with ulceration, infection, and gangrene that may ultimately lead to lower extremity amputation. The goals of treatment include the control of diabetes and proper shoe wear. An effective therapy and appropriate foot care are important in wound healing in DFUs. Recently, extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) was reported to significantly promote and accelerate the healing of complex soft tissue wounds as compared to the standard methods of treatment in DFUs. ESWT showed positive results in short-term and long-term outcomes in diabetic patients suffering from foot ulcers. In this article, we review the clinical results of ESWT in DFUs.

  13. [Study of genetic markers of duodenal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Tsimmerman, Ia S; Onosova, E A; Tsimmerman, I Ia

    1989-05-01

    The results of determination of various hereditary predisposition markers in peptic ulcer are given: in the population, in patients with duodenal ulcer and in their siblings (risk group). Of importance for revealing subjects with hereditary predisposition to duodenal ulcer are the clinico-genealogical analysis, determination of the blood group, especially in simultaneous determination of a "secretory status" ("status of non-secretion" of the ABH blood system agglutinogen in the saliva), increase in the mass of parietal cells and, to some extent, of the distinguishing features of dermatoglyphics (in combination with the above markers). Determination of taste sensitivity to phenylthiocarbamide is non-informative. PMID:2770215

  14. [Contact eczema in patients with leg ulcers].

    PubMed

    Degreef, H; Dooms-Goossens, A; Gladys, K

    1986-01-01

    Patients with leg ulcers or varicose eczema suffer much more often from contact eczema due to the local application of pharmaceutical preparations than patients suffering from other dermatological problems (even those of eczematous origin). This contact allergy may concern not only the active ingredient but also the excipient, the preservative, or even the perfume. In all cases of leg ulcers, of varicose eczema, but also of badly healed ulcers, epicutaneous tests should be carried out with all the components of the pharmaceutical preparations concerned. Moreover, the pharmaceutical industry really must perfect non-allergenic preparations.

  15. Diabetic foot ulcers: practical treatment recommendations.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Michael

    2006-01-01

    When treating diabetic foot ulcers it is important to be aware of the natural history of the diabetic foot, which can be divided into five stages: stage 1, a normal foot; stage 2, a high risk foot; stage 3, an ulcerated foot; stage 4, an infected foot; and stage 5, a necrotic foot. This covers the entire spectrum of foot disease but emphasises the development of the foot ulcer as a pivotal event in stage 3, which demands urgent and aggressive management. Diabetic foot care in all stages needs multidisciplinary management to control mechanical, wound, microbiological, vascular, metabolic and educational aspects. Achieving good metabolic control of blood glucose, lipids and blood pressure is important in each stage, as is education to teach proper foot care appropriate for each stage. Ideally, it is important to prevent the development of ulcers in stages 1 and 2. In stage 1, the normal foot, it is important to encourage the use of suitable footwear, and to educate the patient to promote healthy foot care and footwear habits. In stage 2, the foot has developed one or more of the following risk factors for ulceration: neuropathy, ischaemia, deformity, swelling and callus. The majority of deformities can be accommodated in special footwear and as callus is an important precursor of ulceration it should be treated aggressively, especially in the neuropathic foot. In stage 3, ulcers can be divided into two distinct entities: those in the neuropathic foot and those in the neuroischaemic foot. In the neuropathic foot, ulcers commonly develop on the plantar surface of the foot and the toes, and are associated with neglected callus and high plantar pressures. In the neuroischaemic foot, ulcers are commonly seen around the edges of the foot, including the apices of the toes and back of the heel, and are associated with trauma or wearing unsuitable shoes. Ulcers in stage 3 need relief of pressure (mechanical control), sharp debridement and dressings (wound control), and

  16. Drug therapy for ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chang-Tai; Meng, Shu-Yong; Pan, Bo-Rong

    2004-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an inflammatory destructive disease of the large intestine occurred usually in the rectum and lower part of the colon as well as the entire colon. Drug therapy is not the only choice for UC treatment and medical management should be as a comprehensive whole. Azulfidine, Asacol, Pentasa, Dipentum, and Rowasa all contain 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), which is the topical anti-inflammatory ingredient. Pentasa is more commonly used in treating Crohn’s ileitis because Pentasa capsules release more 5-ASA into the small intestine than Asacol tablets. Pentasa can also be used for treating mild to moderate UC. Rowasa enemas are safe and effective in treating ulcerative proctitis and proctosigmoiditis. The sulfa-free 5-ASA agents (Asacol, Pentasa, Dipentum and Rowasa) have fewer side effects than sulfa-containing Azulfidine. In UC patients with moderate to severe disease and in patients who failed to respond to 5-ASA compounds, systemic (oral) corticosteroids should be used. Systemic corticosteroids (prednisone, prednisolone, cortisone, etc.) are potent and fast-acting drugs for treating UC, Crohn’s ileitis and ileocolitis. Systemic corticosteroids are not effective in maintaining remission in patients with UC. Serious side effects can result from prolonged corticosteroid treatment. To minimize side effects, corticosteroids should be gradually reduced as soon as the disease remission is achieved. In patients with corticosteroid-dependent or unresponsive to corticosteroid treatment, surgery or immunomodulator is considered. Immunomodulators used for treating severe UC include azathioprine/6-MP, methotrexate, and cyclosporine. Integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine is safe and effective in maintaining remission in patients with UC. PMID:15285010

  17. Young onset peptic ulcer disease and non-ulcer dyspepsia are separate entities.

    PubMed

    Cederberg, A; Varis, K; Salmi, H A; Sipponen, P; Härkönen, M; Sarna, S

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of peptic ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia in young men were studied in 202 consecutive conscripts who attended Central Military Hospital in Helsinki because of long-standing upper abdominal complaints. Active peptic ulceration (APU) was found in 48 patients, inactive peptic ulcer disease (IPU) was diagnosed in 77 patients, non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) was diagnosed in 52 patients. In 25 cases the reason for symptoms was another disease, and these patients were excluded from the study. A control series (CON) consisted of 30 symptomless healthy young male volunteers. The likelihood of discriminating between peptic ulcer disease and non-ulcer dyspepsia in a young male patient with dyspepsia are indicated by odds ratios (OR) and its 95% confidence limits (CL 95). Active peptic ulcer disease differs from NUD, e.g., by 1) presence of antrum gastritis, OR 41.5 (CL 95: 10.1-171), 2) Helicobacter pylori in the gastric mucosa, OR 31.0 (7.4-130), 3) Lewisa+ phenotype, OR 8.9 (1.7-45.4), 4) serum pepsinogen I (S-PGI) greater than 100 micrograms/l, OR 4.6 (1.7-12.4), 5) non-secretor status, OR 4.3 (1.6-11.6), and 6) O-blood group, OR 3.0 (1.2-7.7). In conclusion, the status of gastroduodenal mucosa, gastric secretion pattern and distribution of some genetic markers in patient series indicate that young onset peptic ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia are two separate entities. Helicobacter-positive antrum gastritis is the best determinant of ulcer risk, but also high S-PGI, Lewisa+ phenotype, non-secretor status and O-blood group are signs of increased risk of peptic ulcer.

  18. Risk factors for healing of duodenal ulcer under antacid treatment: do ulcer patients need individual treatment?

    PubMed

    Massarrat, S; Müller, H G; Schmitz-Moormann, P

    1988-03-01

    In order to identify the risk factors affecting the healing of duodenal ulcer, a clinical trial with effective dose of antacid was carried out in 53 patients. Duration of ulcer history, number of relapses, duration of the last and present relapse, number, duration and severity of pain attacks in the present ulcer relapse, pain radiation to back, vomiting, appetite, smoking habit, intake of analgesics and previous haemorrhage were registered. Number of ulcers, ulcer depth, bublar narrowing, erosions, duodenitis at initial endoscopy and healing of ulcer were assessed by one endoscopist. Basic and peak acid output were measured. The extent of duodenitis on the site opposite the ulcer was determined by histological examination. Sixty per cent of the duodenal ulcers were healed after three weeks. By univariate analysis, the following factors affect the healing; pain radiation to back and pain duration during treatment (p less than 0.001), multiple or deep ulcers, narrowing of duodenal bulb (p less than 0.01), number of pain attacks and poor appetite (p less than 0.05). By the stepwise logistic regression model, the following factors were selected as predictors for healing of duodenal ulcer with 76% correct classification: pain radiation to back (p = 0.002), deep ulcer (p = 0.013), multiple ulcers (p = 0.028). Number of cigarettes/day (p less than 0.007) and male sex (p = 0.036). By this model, the prediction of healing could be accurately assessed in 78% in a new sample. Individual treatment should be carried out on the basis of these factors. PMID:3356359

  19. Pressure ulcer pain: a systematic literature review and national pressure ulcer advisory panel white paper.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Barbara; Langemo, Diane; Cuddigan, Janet

    2009-02-01

    Pain is an ever-present problem in patients with pressure ulcers. As an advocate for persons with pressure ulcers, the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) is concerned about pain. To synthesize available pressure ulcer pain literature, a systematic review was performed of English language literature, specific to human research, 1992 to April 2008, using PubMed and the Cumulative Index in Nursing and Allied Health Literature. Fifteen relevant papers were found; they examined pain assessment tools, topical analgesia for pain management, and/or descriptions of persons with pressure ulcer pain. Studies had small sample sizes and included only adults. The literature established that 1) pressure ulcers cause pain; 2) pain assessment was typically found to be self-reported using different versions of the McGill Pain Questionnaire, Faces Rating Scale, or Visual Analog Scale; 3) pain assessment instruments should be appropriate to patient cognitive level and medical challenges; 4) in some cases, topical medications can ease pain and although information on systemic medication is limited, pain medications have been found to negatively affect appetite; and 5) wound treatment is painful, particularly dressing changes. Research gaps include the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcer pain, the impact of pain on nutrition, and pressure ulcer pain considerations for special groups (eg, children, end-of-life patients, and bariatric patients). The NPUAP presents this white paper as the current scientific know-ledge base on the topic. Research regarding the multidimensional aspects of pressure ulcer pain is strongly recommended.

  20. Small bowel ulcerative lesions are common in elderly NSAIDs users with peptic ulcer bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tsibouris, Panagiotis; Kalantzis, Chissostomos; Apostolopoulos, Periklis; Zalonis, Antonios; Isaacs, Peter Edward Thomas; Hendrickse, Mark; Alexandrakis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency of small bowel ulcerative lesions in patients with peptic ulcer and define the significance of those lesions. METHODS: In our prospective study, 60 consecutive elderly patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding from a peptic ulceration (cases) and 60 matched patients with a non-bleeding peptic ulcer (controls) underwent small bowel capsule endoscopy, after a negative colonoscopy (compulsory in our institution). Controls were evaluated for non-bleeding indications. Known or suspected chronic inflammatory conditions and medication that could harm the gut were excluded. During capsule endoscopy, small bowel ulcerative lesions were counted thoroughly and classified according to Graham classification. Other small bowel lesions were also recorded. Peptic ulcer bleeding was controlled endoscopically, when adequate, proton pump inhibitors were started in both cases and controls, and Helicobacter pylori eradicated whenever present. Both cases and controls were followed up for a year. In case of bleeding recurrence upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was repeated and whenever it remained unexplained it was followed by repeat colonoscopy and capsule endoscopy. RESULTS: Forty (67%) cases and 18 (30%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P = 0.0001), while 22 (37%) cases and 4 (8%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Among non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) consumers, 39 (95%) cases and 17 (33%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P < 0.0001), while 22 (55%) cases and 4 (10%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Small bowel ulcerative lesions were infrequent among patients not consuming NSAIDs. Mean entry hemoglobin was 9.3 (SD = 1.4) g/dL in cases with small bowel ulcerative lesions and 10.5 (SD = 1.3) g/dL in those without (P = 0.002). Cases with small bowel ulcers necessitate more units of packed red blood cells. During their hospitalization, 6 (27%) cases with small bowel ulcers presented

  1. Cure of peptic gastric ulcer associated with eradication of Helicobacter pylori. Finnish Gastric Ulcer Study Group.

    PubMed

    Seppälä, K; Pikkarainen, P; Sipponen, P; Kivilaakso, E; Gormsen, M H

    1995-06-01

    The effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on ulcer healing and the relapse rate were investigated in a multicentre trial of 239 gastric ulcer patients. Patients with H pylori positive gastric ulcer were randomly assigned to one of three groups: (A) 10 days' treatment with metronidazole and eight weeks' treatment with colloidal bismuth subcitrate (CBS) (84 patients); (B) 10 days' treatment with metronidazole placebo and eight weeks with CBS (73 patients); or (C) ranitidine (82 patients). At 12 weeks in 210 patients, gastric ulcer was present in three (9%) of 35 H pylori negative patients, and in 45 (26%) of 175 H pylori positive patients (p < 0.05). Results after one year of follow up were available for 205 patients. Between 12 and 52 weeks, two (7%) ulcer relapses occurred in 29 H pylori negative patients and in 60 (47%) of 128 H pylori positive patients (p < 0.001). After two weeks of open triple therapy (CBS 120 mg four times daily, amoxicillin 500 mg four times daily, and metronidazole 400 mg three times daily), given to the patients with ulcer relapse, only one (an NSAID user) of 55 successfully treated patients had an ulcer relapse during the one year follow up. Healing of gastric ulcer is rapid and recurrence is infrequent after successful H pylori eradication. H pylori eradication changes the natural history of the gastric ulcer disease.

  2. [Pressure ulcer management--Evidence-based interventions].

    PubMed

    Rocha, J A; Miranda, M J; Andrade, M J

    2006-01-01

    Despite improved awareness and quality of care among health care personnel, pressure ulcers prevalence remains high especially in the inpatient setting. Pressure ulcers are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, affecting the quality of life of patients and their caregivers, and significantly increasing direct and indirect healthcare costs. Early risk assessment for developing a pressure ulcer is essential to decide on the appropriate preventive measures and for initiation of a tailored therapeutic approach. Interventions include strategies to reduce extrinsic and intrinsic risk factors associated with tissue ischemia, optimization of patient's nutritional status, and local wound care. This revision intends to review current evidence-based therapeutic interventions in pressure ulcer care, and support implementation of management protocols in an inpatient ward.

  3. Cutaneous leishmaniasis "chiclero's ulcer" in subtropical Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Calvopiña, Manuel; Martinez, Leonardo; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2013-08-01

    An 18-year-old female presented with a severe ulcerative lesion on her right ear of 6 weeks duration. Her right ear was edematous and erythematous with a large, painless ulcerative lesion covering a third of the pinna and satellite papular lesions on the posterior. She was diagnosed with chiclero's ulcer. A skin smear stained with Diff-quik showed abundant Leishmania parasites. Chiclero's ulcer is a rare clinical presentation and is typically severe and difficult to treat. Physicians in Ecuador recommend administering prolonged intramuscular Glucantime. Side effects are common and can be severe resulting in low patient compliance. Because of preferences of the patient and the large volume needed for her weight, we recommended topical treatment with a lotion of Glucantime mixed half and half with white Merthiolate. After applying this lotion to the lesion 3 to 4 times a day for 6 weeks, the lesion healed.

  4. Chronic leg ulcers in Werner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yeong, E K; Yang, C C

    2004-01-01

    We report two siblings suffered from Werner's syndrome, which is a rare premature aging disorder caused by genetic mutations. They developed premature aging during adolescence with loss and graying of hair, short stature, baldness, atrophic skin, thin extremities, flat feet, 'bird' face and cataracts. Multiple chronic ulcers were noted over the feet in both patients. Healing was prolonged because of atrophic subcutaneous tissue, poor perfusion, impaired fibroblast activity and the loss of normal foot architecture. Treatment of the ulcers was challenging, as flap options were limited over the lower third of the leg and skin grafting was not easy as there was a lack of healthy granulations. However, we have successfully closed the ulcers with Integra artificial skin and ultra-thin split thickness skin grafting with the scalp as donor site. The main purpose of this paper is to alert physicians to this syndrome when treatments are being planned for patients with chronic leg ulcers.

  5. Sunitinib induced pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcerations.

    PubMed

    Akanay-Diesel, S; Hoff, N P; Kürle, S; Haes, J; Erhardt, A; Häussinger, D; Schulte, K-W; Bölke, Edwin; Matuschek, C; Budach, W; Gerber, P A; Homey, B

    2011-11-10

    Pyoderma gangrenosum is a non-infectious neutro?philic skin disease commonly associated with underlying systemic diseases. Histopathological and laboratory diagnostics are unspecific in the majority of the cases and the diagnosis is made in accordance with the clinical picture. Here, we report the case of a 69-year old man with progredient pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcerations under treatment with sunitinib due to hepatocellular carcinoma. A conventional ulcer therapy did not lead to a regression of the lesions. Solely cessation of sunitinib therapy resulted in an improvement of the ulcerations. Sunitinib is a multikinase inhibitor that targets the PDGF-α- and ?β-, VEGF-1-3-, KIT-, FLT3-, CSF-1- and RET-receptor, thereby impairing tumour proliferation, pathological angiogenesis and metastasation. Here, we demonstrate that pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcers may represent a serious side effect of sunitinib-based anti-cancer treatment. PMID:22027642

  6. Genital ulcers: their diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Sacks, S L

    1987-08-01

    THIS ARTICLE OFFERS SOME BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF THREE MAJOR CAUSES OF GENITAL ULCERS: syphilis, herpes simplex virus (HSV), and chancroid. The author also discusses differential diagnoses and suggests an approach to treatment.

  7. Pressure ulcers - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... best way to transfer from bed to a wheelchair or chair? If there is leakage of stool ... done to prevent pressure ulcers? If using a wheelchair: How often should someone make sure the wheelchair ...

  8. [The ulcerative form of skin sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Rodionov, A N; Samtsov, A V

    1990-01-01

    A female patient suffering from the ulcerative form of skin sarcoidosis is described and the literature dealing with this problem is reviewed. Peculiar features of this case are described: ulceration of the nodes, which is an extremely rare phenomenon; no involvement of other organs, lungs included, was detectable, which is not typical of ulcerative sarcoidosis; small-nodular elements are parallelled by nodes (Boeck's small-nodular sarcoid and Darier-Roussy's subcutaneous sarcoids) in this patient, this evidencing an uniform pathologic process in the skin and subcutaneous fat. Ulceration in this patient is explained by the development of allergic vasculitis of the immediate hypersensitivity type (leukocytoclastic vasculitis and manifest increase of the level of circulating immune complexes). Prednisolone therapy has resulted in an excellent clinical effect.

  9. Tannins, Peptic Ulcers and Related Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Neyres Zinia Taveira; de Souza Falcão, Heloina; Gomes, Isis Fernandes; de Almeida Leite, Thiago Jose; de Morais Lima, Gedson Rodrigues; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria; Tavares, Josean Fechine; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; de Athayde-Filho, Petrônio Filgueiras; Batista, Leonia Maria

    2012-01-01

    This review of the current literature aims to study correlations between the chemical structure and gastric anti-ulcer activity of tannins. Tannins are used in medicine primarily because of their astringent properties. These properties are due to the fact that tannins react with the tissue proteins with which they come into contact. In gastric ulcers, this tannin-protein complex layer protects the stomach by promoting greater resistance to chemical and mechanical injury or irritation. Moreover, in several experimental models of gastric ulcer, tannins have been shown to present antioxidant activity, promote tissue repair, exhibit anti Helicobacter pylori effects, and they are involved in gastrointestinal tract anti-inflammatory processes. The presence of tannins explains the anti-ulcer effects of many natural products. PMID:22489149

  10. Diabetic foot ulcer: assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Saraogi, Ravi Kant

    2008-02-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer is a rising health problem with rising prevalence of diabetes. It is the most important cause of non-traumatic foot amputations. Diabetic foot ulcers are primarily due to neuropathy and/or ischaemia, and are frequently complicated by infection. Up to 85% of all diabetic foot related problems are preventable through a combination of good foot care and appropriate education for patients and healthcare providers. The holistic care of diabetic foot ulcer patients requires a multidisciplinary team approach. Apart from blood sugar control, treatment of ulcer involves debridement, offloading, appropriate dressings, vascular maintenance and infection control. Use of adjunctive treatments such as various growth factors, skin replacement dressings and vacuum assisted closure will accelerate healing in selected cases.

  11. Sunitinib induced pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcerations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum is a non-infectious neutrophilic skin disease commonly associated with underlying systemic diseases. Histopathological and laboratory diagnostics are unspecific in the majority of the cases and the diagnosis is made in accordance with the clinical picture. Here, we report the case of a 69-year old man with progredient pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcerations under treatment with sunitinib due to hepatocellular carcinoma. A conventional ulcer therapy did not lead to a regression of the lesions. Solely cessation of sunitinib therapy resulted in an improvement of the ulcerations. Sunitinib is a multikinase inhibitor that targets the PDGF-α - and -β-, VEGF-1-3-, KIT-, FLT3-, CSF-1- and RET-receptor, thereby impairing tumour proliferation, pathological angiogenesis and metastasation. Here, we demonstrate that pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcers may represent a serious side effect of sunitinib-based anti-cancer treatment. PMID:22027642

  12. The economics of adalimumab for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Feng

    2015-06-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory disease, characterized by diffuse mucosal inflammation in the colon. Adalimumab, as a TNF-α blocker, offers a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with moderate to severe ulcerative colitis and refractory or intolerant to conventional medications; however, its cost-effectiveness profile has not yet been well established. Future economic evaluations should choose appropriate comparators in the context of target-reimbursement decision making and focus on cost-effectiveness over a long time horizon.

  13. Pressure ulcer prevention: utilizing unlicensed assistive personnel.

    PubMed

    Walker Sewill, Danielle K; Van Sell, Sharon; Kindred, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide education to the RN regarding pressure ulcer prevention and best practice interventions. This investigation focuses on the definition of a pressure ulcer, risk factors for pressure ulcers, and the benefits and importance of using unlicensed assistive personnel to help prevent pressure ulcers. A comprehensive literature review was completed using the Texas Woman's University Library, the Texas Christian University Library, and the World Wide Web. The search engine used was Google. The databases included were CINAHL, Academic Search Complete, Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, and ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Source. The literature was current, defined as from the last 10 years, and the primary language searched was English. Full-text articles from these databases were included as well as print publications from the university collections. The key search terms from the literature review included (a) pressure ulcer, (b) prevention, (c) unlicensed assistive personnel, (d) nursing assistant, (e) theory of nursing knowledge, (f) incidence, (g) prevalence, (h) Braden scale, (i) moisture, and (j) repositioning. Best practice guidelines were reviewed via the Joanna Briggs database, National Guideline Clearinghouse, Cochrane Library, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, and the National Institutes of Health. Literature was synthesized to define evidence-based practices that would justify the use of unlicensed assistive personnel for the prevention and care of pressure ulcers. PMID:20827067

  14. [Round table discussion. Ulcer - vagus - gastrin].

    PubMed

    1976-03-01

    1. Both gastrin and the vagus nerve play a part in the pathogenesis of the duodenal ulcer. Which of these two factors is of greater significance--this problem is still subject to discussion as is the question whether other factors such as duodenal neutralization are more important than hitherto assumed. 2. At this time no reliable and harmless drugs that speed up the healing of duodenal ulcers and prevent relapses are yet available. Candidates for this are H2 receptor blockers, prostaglandines and possibly substances resembling secretin. 3. Only some of the participants considered it necessary to do endoscopic and radiological follow-ups in duodenal ulcers. 4. Proximal gastric vagotomy for the treatment of duodenal ulcers is still undergoing clinical trials. At present this method should only be used by surgeons with a special interest in gastric surgery who also dispose of the technology and the staff for careful postoperative checks on these patients. The advantages of proximal gastric vagotomy consist in sparing truncation, low mortality and good functional results. 5. In gastric ulcers--contrary to duodenal ones--malignancy should always be suspected. If medical treatment does not lead to complete remission within a few months, surgery must be performed. 6. Many surgeons still prefer resection to vagotomy and excision in the management of gastric ulcers.

  15. Giant gastric ulcer penetrating into the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Shintaro; Mori, Hirohito; Nishiyama, Noriko; Kobara, Hideki; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2012-09-01

    A 57-year-old man developed haematemesis and was referred to our institution. His discomfort had begun 3 weeks earlier and localised to the upper abdomen. Abdominal CT showed a defect of gastric mucosa and gastric wall thickening. Oesophagogastroduodenoscopy showed that he had an active gastric ulcer, 40 mm in diameter, on the lesser curvature in the upper third of the corpus and the presence of a pancreatic body at the ulcer base, penetration to the pancreas. Open gastrectomy was performed with a preoperative diagnosis of localised peritonitis caused by penetration of the stomach into the pancreas. Histopathology of resected specimens showed a benign peptic ulcer, 40×40 mm in size, was found on the lesser curvature in the antrum, and this had penetrated through the pancreas. The most serious complications of PUD include haemorrhage, perforation, penetration, and gastric outlet obstruction. Approximately 7% of patients experience perforation, which occurs when an ulcer erodes through the wall and leaks air and digestive contents into the peritoneal cavity. Antral and duodenal ulcers can penetrate into the pancreas. We report a case of gastric ulcer penetrating into the pancreas.

  16. [Vaginal ulceration induced by abuse of tampons].

    PubMed

    Raudrant, D; de Haas, P; Saintfort, P

    1987-01-01

    A large vaginal ulcerated area which came about because super-absorbant tampons had been worn for three years is reported. Cure was obtained when the area was excised and sutured. There was no recurrence after the patient stopped using the tampons. There are 36 cases reported in the literature. Ulceration occurs in young women (25 years), nulliparous or primiparous (79%), who use tampons abnormally during the periods and between the periods (75%). The ulceration is always characteristic in appearance: it is a punched-out area, round or oval in shape, and is situated in the upper third of the vaginal barrel near where the tampon presses on to the vagina. Spontaneous cure occurs in 75% of cases when the tampon is no longer used. Physio-pathological hypotheses as to the causation are given. A suggestion is made as to the relationship between this syndrome and the staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome. The discovery of vaginal ulceration is not usually due to use of menstrual tampons. One has to think of adenosis of the vagina, herpetic ulceration, a syphilitic chancre or cancer, the diagnosis depending a little on the age of the patient. In our case that we report, continuous usage of super-absorbant tampons was accompanied by a large vaginal ulcer. Because of this case we have reviewed the literature about the cases that have been reported and have collected 36 cases.

  17. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David Y

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician’s believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for “surgical disease” or for “Sippy” diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori

  18. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Graham, David Y

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician's believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for "surgical disease" or for "Sippy" diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori-related diseases.

  19. Histological evaluation in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    DeRoche, Tom C; Xiao, Shu-Yuan; Liu, Xiuli

    2014-08-01

    This review summarizes diagnostic problems, challenges and advances in ulcerative colitis (UC). It emphasizes that, although histopathological examination plays a major role in the diagnosis and management of UC, it should always be interpreted in the context of clinical, endoscopic, and radiological findings. Accurate diagnosis requires knowledge of the classic morphological features of UC, as well as a number of atypical pathological presentations that may cause mis-classification of the disease process, either in resection or biopsy specimens. These atypical pathological presentations include rectal sparing and patchiness of disease at initial presentation of UC in pediatric patients or in the setting of medically treated UC, cecal or ascending colon inflammation in left-sided UC, and backwash ileitis in patients with severe ulcerative pancolitis. Loosely formed microgranulomas, with pale foamy histiocytes adjacent to a damaged crypt or eroded surface, should not be interpreted as evidence of Crohn's disease. Indeterminate colitis should only be used in colectomy specimens as a provisional pathological diagnosis. Patients with UC are at risk for the development of dysplasia and carcinoma; optimal outcomes in UC surveillance programs require familiarity with the diagnostic criteria and challenges relating to UC-associated dysplasia and malignancy. Colon biopsy from UC patients should always be evaluated for dysplasia based on cytological and architectural abnormalities. Accurate interpretation and classification of dysplasia in colon biopsy from UC patients as sporadic adenoma or UC-related dysplasia [flat, adenoma-like, or dysplasia-associated lesion or mass (DALM)] requires clinical and endoscopic correlation. Isolated polypoid dysplastic lesions are considered to be sporadic adenoma if occurring outside areas of histologically proven colitis, or adenoma-like dysplasia if occurring in the diseased segment. Recent data suggest that such lesions may be treated

  20. Venous ulceration, fibrinogen and fibrinolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Leach, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of long and short-term venous hypertension upon lymph fibrinogen concentrations was studied in an attempt to explain the peri-capillary deposition of fibrin reported in patients with post-phlebitic syndromes. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of rats and human volunteers was also studied. Both long- and short-term venous hypertension were found to increase fibrinogen transport across the interstitial space by more than 600%. Not only was there evidence of fibrinolytic activity in the lymph but after long-term venous hypertension alpha 2 antiplasmin activity was also detectable. Skin biopsies from the venous hypertensive ankles showed deposition of interstitial fibrin. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of the rat was found to be delayed if the rats were given epsilon amino caproic acid but it could not be increased with stanozolol. In human subjects it was found that patients with lipodermatosclerosis had delayed clot clearance and retarded blood fibrinolytic activity when compared with normal volunteers and patients with uncomplicated varicose veins. The principle cause why tall men are more subject to ulcers than short men, Dr Young conceived to be then length of the column of blood in their veins; which by its pressure, renders the legs less able to recover when hurt by any violence. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:6742738

  1. Susceptibility to decubitus ulcer formation.

    PubMed

    Meijer, J H; Germs, P H; Schneider, H; Ribbe, M W

    1994-03-01

    The hypothesis of blood-flow recovery time after pressure relief was prospectively evaluated as a measure of a patient's susceptibility to develop decubitus ulcers. This blood-flow recovery time was measured using the noninvasive pressure-temperature-time (PTT) method, which uses a 10-minute test-pressure stimulus. The blood-flow response after pressure relief was measured by means of skin-temperature measurements. The evaluation was performed in a group of 109 elderly nursing home patients. A pressure-index was used as a measure for the intensity and duration of pressure and shear forces, to which a patient was exposed, to measure a set of external determinants that are independent of the susceptibility. Both the blood-flow recovery time and the pressure-index were found to correlate significantly with the risk to develop decubitus. A conceptualization of the relationship between the risk, on the one hand, and the susceptibility and the external determinants, on the other hand, is presented, assuming independence (orthogonality) of both sets of determinants. Based on this conceptualization, a three-dimensional risk-relationship was constructed. It is concluded that the blood-flow recovery time can be considered to be a measure for the susceptibility. Further, the conceptualization provides valuable insight into the risk-relationships and forms a base for future research with regard to susceptibility. PMID:8129586

  2. Histological examination of ulcer margin for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with gastric ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Hui; Cheng, Hao-Tsai; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Yu, Li-Kuang; Tsou, Yung-Kuan; Lee, Mu-Shien

    2013-02-01

    Biopsy of ulcer margin is routinely performed to exclude malignancy in patients with gastric ulcers, but its utility in diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection has not yet been fully studied. A cohort of 50 patients with gastric ulcer was prospectively examined. Three tests including histology, rapid urease test, and urea breath test were performed in all patients for diagnosing H pylori infection. Six biopsied specimens from the margin of the gastric ulcer and 1 each specimen from antrum and body of non-ulcer part were obtained for histology using hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) stain. The criterion used for defining H pylori infection was a positive result in at least 2 of the 3 tests. H pylori infection was diagnosed in 27 (54%) of the patients. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of the histological examination of the ulcer margin were 92.6%, 95.7%, 96.2%, 91.7%, and 94%, respectively. The addition of 1 specimen from the antrum or body or a combination of the 2 specimens did not increase the diagnostic yields of those for histological examination of ulcer margin alone. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy for the rapid urease test were 96.3%, 100%, 100%, 95.8%, and 98%, respectively, and the corresponding values for the urea breath test were 88.9%, 87%, 88.9%, 87%, and 88%. We performed Giemsa stain for the 3 patients with false-negative and false-positive results of histological examination of ulcer margin using H&E stain, and all were positive for H pylori infection. In conclusion, histological examination of the ulcer margin using hematoxylin-eosin stain was quite accurate and useful for diagnosing H pylori infection in patients with gastric ulcers. A special stain is required when the diagnosis of H pylori infection is questionable on routine H&E staining.

  3. Vagotomy and double pyloroplasty for peptic ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Hines, J R; Geurkink, R E; Kornmesser, T A; Wikholm, L; Davis, R P

    1975-01-01

    Seventy patients with peptic ulcers (55 duodenal and 15 gastric) were treated by truncal vagotomy and doulbe pyloroplasty during the past four years. Clinical and experimental data as presented lead us to believe that transecting the pylorus twice produces an incontinent pyloric sphincter and a larger gastric outlet than is found in other methods of pyloroplasty. This decreases gastric stasis and has led to a lower ulcer recurrence rate (1.5%). In addition the untoward postoperative sequelae are minimal. The 70 patients treated (for the most pare consecutive cases) exhibited the usual complications of peptic ulcer disease. Thirty-three had intractable pain, 23 bleeding (15 massive), 13 obstruction, and one acute perforation. There were no operative or postoperative deaths and the only serious postoperative complication was unrelated to the double pyloroplasty. During the followup period four patients have died of unrelated diseases. Of the remaining 66 patients one developed a probable recurrent peptic ulcer which has responded to medical management. Four patients have intermittent dumping, three have mild diarrhea and one has failed to gain weight, Constipation and weight gain are more common complaints. It would appear that vagotomy with double pyloroplasty is a safe and effective operation for peptic ulcers and that further clinical trials are warranted. PMID:1119866

  4. Traumatic ulcers and pain during orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Kvam, E; Gjerdet, N R; Bondevik, O

    1987-04-01

    In the present investigation the frequency of oral ulcers and pain in 161 orthodontic patients was recorded. Of all patients, 95% had experienced pain, but 84.5% said that the pain lasted a few days only. About 11% maintained that the treatment was constantly painful. Significantly more patients coming from private clinics complained of pain than those attending treatment at the Department of Orthodontics. About 50% said that activating or changing archwire was most annoying, whereas 28.7% said ulceration and 21% said headgear was the most annoying part of the treatment. According to 75% of the patients, sleeping habits were not influenced. Only eight patients reported truancy, and seven of these had done this only once. Of all patients, 6.2% had requested interim visits. Small wounds caused by the fixed appliance were reported by 75.8% of the patients, and 2.5% had suffered badly from ulceration caused by the fixed appliances. More girls than boys reported ulceration. There was a significant sex difference as regards recurrent aphthous ulceration (RAU). Increase in the frequency of RAU was reported by 23.1% of the girls and 9.6% of the boys while they had fixed appliances.

  5. Invasive mucormycosis in benign gastric ulcer.

    PubMed

    Al-Rikabi, A C; Al-Dohayan, A D; Al-Boukai, A A

    2000-03-01

    Fungal elements are frequently noted overlying the base of chronic peptic ulcers of the stomach and it has been suggested that the fungi enhance the degree of necrosis and that these cases have protracted disease and deeper ulcers with more perforations. It has also been postulated that the number of fungal elements might be increased in the stomach of patients who are receiving potent medications such as H2-receptor antagonists to reduce gastric acidity, but there have not been adequate control studies, and the deleterious effects from the presence of the fungi in these cases have not been substantiated. We present a very rare case of invasive mucormycosis (phycomycosis) occurring in the base of a chronic gastric ulcer in a 55 years old diabetic male. This case was clinically and radiologically been mistaken for a gastric carcinoma. In addition, the ulcer was complicated by perforation and fungal septicemia with subsequent fatal outcome. The clinical, radiological and histopathological features are described together with a literature review of other reported fungal gastric ulcers.

  6. Peptic ulcer in childhood. Psychological factors.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, G N; Gargoulas, A; Papaloukas, A; Marinopoulou, A; Rabavilas, A D

    1979-01-01

    Thirty children (20 girls and 10 boys, aged 6-16 years) with primary peptic ulcers, matched in paris for age, sex and socio-economic standard to a group of 30 ulcer-free controls, were submitted to a structured psychiatric interview, a structured 'present psychiatric state' examination and to personality and intelligence tests. With one exception all patients suffered from duodenal ulcer; 3 male patients had personalities with psychopathic elements, 7 patients had nicknames, 5 suffered from psychiatric disorders, 3 had attempted suicide in the past, and 3 had had homosexual experiences. These parameters were negative in all controls. The patients had lower mean IQ, worse scholastic adaptation, more anxious and overprotective parents, higher frequency of faddiness in food and lower frequency of nail-biting than the controls. Psychotraumatic events had preceded the onset of ulcer symptomatology in 11 cases. The findings are discussed and the contribution of psychological factors in the pathogenesis of childhood peptic ulcer is stressed. PMID:550183

  7. Pathogenesis of foot ulcers and the need for offloading.

    PubMed

    Rathur, H M; Boulton, A J

    2005-04-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration represents a major medical, social and economic problem all over the world. While more than 5% of diabetic patients have a history of foot ulceration, the cumulative lifetime incidence may be as high as 15%. Ethnic differences exist in both ulcer and amputation incidences. Foot ulceration results from the interaction of several contributory factors, the most important of which is neuropathy. The use of the total-contact cast is demonstrated in the treatment of plantar neuropathic ulcers. Histological evidence suggests that pressure relief results in chronic foot ulcers changing their morphological appearance by displaying some features of an acute wound. Thus, repetitive stresses on the insensate foot appear to play a major role in maintaining ulcer chronicity. It is hoped that research activity in foot disease will ultimately result in fewer ulcers and less amputation in diabetes.

  8. Advances in endoscopic imaging in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Pastorelli, Luca; Ishaq, Sauid; Neumann, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Modern strategies for the treatment of ulcerative colitis require more accurate tools for gastrointestinal imaging to better assess mucosal disease activity and long-term prognostic clinical outcomes. Recent advances in gastrointestinal luminal endoscopy are radically changing the role of endoscopy in every-day clinical practice and research trials. Advanced endoscopic imaging techniques including high-definition endoscopes, optical magnification endoscopy, and various chromoendoscopy techniques have remarkably improved endoscopic assessment of ulcerative colitis. More recently, optical biopsy techniques with either endocytoscopy or confocal laser endomicroscopy have shown great potential in predicting several histological changes in real time during ongoing endoscopy. Here, we review current applications of advanced endoscopic imaging techniques in ulcerative colitis and present the most promising upcoming headways in this field. PMID:26365308

  9. [Decubitus ulcer and nutritional status: literature review].

    PubMed

    Castilho, Lillian Dias; Caliri, Maria Helena Larcher

    2005-01-01

    In order to better understand aspects related to the nutritional assessment of patients in risk for pressure ulcers, we reviewed the national and international literature indexed on Medline and LILACS bibliographic databases, from 1987 to 2001. The aim of this research was to investigate the knowledge production on pressure ulcers and nutritional status, as well as to learn about the authors and the publication focus. We concluded that patients in risk for pressure ulcers can be early identified based on nutritional assessment, including biochemical data, anthropometric evaluation, clinical data, diet history and energetic consumption. The alterations are frequent in elderly patients, hospitalized patients, patients with a chronic disease such as a vascular cerebral accident, cancer and spinal cord injury.

  10. Amyloid Goiter Secondary to Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Bunyamin; Koca, Yavuz Savas; Koca, Tugba; Yildiz, Ihsan; Gerek Celikden, Sevda; Ciris, Metin

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse amyloid goiter (AG) is an entity characterized by the deposition of amyloid in the thyroid gland. AG may be associated with either primary or secondary amyloidosis. Secondary amyloidosis is rarely caused by inflammatory bowel diseases. Secondary amyloidosis is relatively more common in the patients with Crohn's disease, whereas it is highly rare in patients with ulcerative colitis. Diffuse amyloid goiter caused by ulcerative colitis is also a rare condition. In the presence of amyloid in the thyroid gland, medullary thyroid cancer should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. Imaging techniques and biochemical tests are not very helpful in the diagnosis of secondary amyloid goiter and the definitive diagnosis is established based on the histopathologic analysis and histochemical staining techniques. In this report, we present a 35-year-old male patient with diffuse amyloid goiter caused by secondary amyloidosis associated with ulcerative colitis. PMID:27051538

  11. Thalidomide for mouth ulcers and wasting.

    PubMed

    Baker, R

    1995-12-01

    Thalidomide (Synovir), noted for causing severe birth defects when taken by pregnant women, can effectively and safely heal serious mouth ulcers (oral aphthous ulcers) in people with HIV infection. Interim results from a study supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) show that ulcers healed in 14 of 23 people taking 200 mg/day oral thalidomide compared to only 1 of 22 people receiving placebo. Celgene Corporation is conducting a multicenter, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study of Synovir for the treatment of wasting syndrome. Participants will receive the drug for free, and will take one of three doses: 10, 50, or 200 mg. Interested parties should call the Healing Alternatives Foundation or the PWA Health group.

  12. Bed posture classification for pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, R; Ostadabbas, S; Faezipour, M; Farshbaf, M; Nourani, M; Tamil, L; Pompeo, M

    2011-01-01

    Pressure ulcer is an age-old problem imposing a huge cost to our health care system. Detecting and keeping record of the patient's posture on bed, help care givers reposition patient more efficiently and reduce the risk of developing pressure ulcer. In this paper, a commercial pressure mapping system is used to create a time-stamped, whole-body pressure map of the patient. An image-based processing algorithm is developed to keep an unobtrusive and informative record of patient's bed posture over time. The experimental results show that proposed algorithm can predict patient's bed posture with up to 97.7% average accuracy. This algorithm could ultimately be used with current support surface technologies to reduce the risk of ulcer development. PMID:22255993

  13. Thyroid storm precipitated by duodenal ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Natsuda, Shoko; Nakashima, Yomi; Horie, Ichiro; Ando, Takao; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare and life-threatening complication of thyrotoxicosis that requires prompt treatment. Thyroid storm is also known to be associated with precipitating events. The simultaneous treatment of thyroid storm and its precipitant, when they are recognized, in a patient is recommended; otherwise such disorders, including thyroid storm, can exacerbate each other. Here we report the case of a thyroid storm patient (a 55-year-old Japanese male) complicated with a perforated duodenal ulcer. The patient was successfully treated with intensive treatment for thyroid storm and a prompt operation. Although it is believed that peptic ulcer rarely coexists with hyperthyroidism, among patients with thyroid storm, perforation of a peptic ulcer has been reported as one of the causes of fatal outcome. We determined that surgical intervention was required in this patient, reported despite ongoing severe thyrotoxicosis, and reported herein a successful outcome.

  14. Diabetic foot ulcer management: the podiatrist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Turns, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic foot complications result from two broad pathologies-neuropathic and neuro-ischaemic feet. It is important for diabetic patients to have at least a yearly review of foot ulcer risk factors, and they should have a corresponding risk classification agreed based on this assessment. Diabetic foot ulcer assessment should include a wound classification tool, which can give an indication of wounds at greater risk of non-healing or amputation. The treatment of diabetic foot ulcers should be part of a comprehensive care plan that should also include treatment of infection, frequent debridement (if deemed appropriate by a skilled specialist clinician), biomechanical offloading, blood glucose control and treatment of comorbidities. Clinicians should base dressing selection on the wound's location, size and depth, amount of exudate, presence of infection or necrosis and the condition of the surrounding tissue.

  15. Treatment of cutaneous ulcers with benzoyl peroxide.

    PubMed Central

    Pace, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    Benzoyl peroxide, a powerful organic oxidizing agent, was applied topically according to a carefully developed technique to cutaneous ulcers of different types. The healing time was shortened greatly by the rapid development of healthy granulation tissue and the quick ingrowth of epithelium. Exceptionally large pressure ulcers with deep cavities, undercut edges and sinus tracts were sucessfully treated, as were stasis ulcers of long duration resistant to all other therapy. There were only 13 treatment failures among the 133 cases. The slow, sustained release of oxygen by benzoyl peroxide was though to be responsible for the success. The only complications were contact irritant dermatitis in 3% and contact allergic dermatitis in 2% of patients treated. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:1000442

  16. [Benzoyl peroxide for the treatment of leg ulcers (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Ramelet, A A; van Melle, G

    1980-01-01

    40 leg ulcers were treated for 6 weeks by application twice a day of a 20% benzoyl peroxide lotion. Each ulcer was regularly measured and its bacterial flora was determined. Therapeutic results were very satisfactory: the average healing rate of the ulcers was 62.8% of the initial wound area after 4 weeks of treatment and 76.5% after 6 weeks of treatment. The bacterial flora of the ulcers changed during treatments, streptococci and staphylococci disappeared. Pseudomonas aeruginosa became abundant.

  17. Gastric ulcer penetrating to liver diagnosed by endoscopic biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Kayacetin, Ertugrul; Kayacetin, Serra

    2004-01-01

    Liver penetration is a rare but serious complication of peptic ulcer disease. Usually the diagnosis is made by operation or autopsy. Clinical and laboratory data were no specific. A 64-year-old man was admitted with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Hepatic penetration was diagnosed as the cause of bleeding. Endoscopy showed a large gastric ulcer with a pseudotumoral mass protruding from the ulcer bed. Definitive diagnosis was established by endoscopic biopsies of the ulcer base. PMID:15188520

  18. Genital ulcers: it is not always simplex ….

    PubMed

    Haidari, G; MacMahon, E; Tong, C Y W; White, J A

    2015-01-01

    Patients with vulval aphthae, also termed Lipschütz ulcers, often present to genitourinary medicine clinics. Typically, these ulcers present as acute, painful, vulval ulcers in young women and adolescents. The aetiology is unknown, and often these ulcers are accompanied by flu-like symptoms. Previous case reports have linked such lesions to acute viral infections such as Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus and influenza A. We report the first case of influenza B virus and adenovirus infections associated with this presentation.

  19. Accuracy of endoscopic ultrasonography for diagnosing ulcerative early gastric cancers.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyungkil; Bang, Byongwook; Kwon, Kyesook; Shin, Youngwoon

    2016-07-01

    Although endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the first-choice imaging modality for predicting the invasion depth of early gastric cancer (EGC), the prediction accuracy of EUS is significantly decreased when EGC is combined with ulceration.The aim of present study was to compare the accuracy of EUS and conventional endoscopy (CE) for determining the depth of EGC. In addition, the various clinic-pathologic factors affecting the diagnostic accuracy of EUS, with a particular focus on endoscopic ulcer shapes, were evaluated.We retrospectively reviewed data from 236 consecutive patients with ulcerative EGC. All patients underwent EUS for estimating tumor invasion depth, followed by either curative surgery or endoscopic treatment. The diagnostic accuracy of EUS and CE was evaluated by comparing the final histologic result of resected specimen. The correlation between accuracy of EUS and characteristics of EGC (tumor size, histology, location in stomach, tumor invasion depth, and endoscopic ulcer shapes) was analyzed. Endoscopic ulcer shapes were classified into 3 groups: definite ulcer, superficial ulcer, and ill-defined ulcer.The overall accuracy of EUS and CE for predicting the invasion depth in ulcerative EGC was 68.6% and 55.5%, respectively. Of the 236 patients, 36 patients were classified as definite ulcers, 98 were superficial ulcers, and 102 were ill-defined ulcers, In univariate analysis, EUS accuracy was associated with invasion depth (P = 0.023), tumor size (P = 0.034), and endoscopic ulcer shapes (P = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, there is a significant association between superficial ulcer in CE and EUS accuracy (odds ratio: 2.977; 95% confidence interval: 1.255-7.064; P = 0.013).The accuracy of EUS for determining tumor invasion depth in ulcerative EGC was superior to that of CE. In addition, ulcer shape was an important factor that affected EUS accuracy. PMID:27472672

  20. Leg ulcers: a new symptom of Blau syndrome?

    PubMed

    Dhondt, Veerle; Hofman, Sarah; Dahan, Karin; Beele, Hilde

    2008-01-01

    Blau syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant condition, typically defined by granulomatous polyarthritis, uveitis and skin eruption. Biopsy specimens demonstrate non-caseating granulomas in all lesions. We present a case of Blau syndrome associated with large recalcitrant leg ulcers. Biopsies taken in the leg ulcers of our patient systematically showed granulomas. Although leg ulcers have not previously been described as a part of Blau syndrome, we assume that the ulcerations in this case form part of Blau syndrome.

  1. Management of patients with ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Laine, Loren; Jensen, Dennis M

    2012-03-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the step-wise management of patients with overt upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Hemodynamic status is first assessed, and resuscitation initiated as needed. Patients are risk-stratified based on features such as hemodynamic status, comorbidities, age, and laboratory tests. Pre-endoscopic erythromycin is considered to increase diagnostic yield at first endoscopy. Pre-endoscopic proton pump inhibitor (PPI) may be considered to decrease the need for endoscopic therapy but does not improve clinical outcomes. Upper endoscopy is generally performed within 24h. The endoscopic features of ulcers direct further management. Patients with active bleeding or non-bleeding visible vessels receive endoscopic therapy (e.g., bipolar electrocoagulation, heater probe, sclerosant, clips) and those with an adherent clot may receive endoscopic therapy; these patients then receive intravenous PPI with a bolus followed by continuous infusion. Patients with flat spots or clean-based ulcers do not require endoscopic therapy or intensive PPI therapy. Recurrent bleeding after endoscopic therapy is treated with a second endoscopic treatment; if bleeding persists or recurs, treatment with surgery or interventional radiology is undertaken. Prevention of recurrent bleeding is based on the etiology of the bleeding ulcer. H. pylori is eradicated and after cure is documented anti-ulcer therapy is generally not given. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are stopped; if they must be resumed low-dose COX-2-selective NSAID plus PPI is used. Patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin should start PPI and generally re-institute aspirin soon after bleeding ceases (within 7 days and ideally 1-3 days). Patients with idiopathic ulcers receive long-term anti-ulcer therapy. PMID:22310222

  2. Management of patients with ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Laine, Loren; Jensen, Dennis M

    2012-03-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the step-wise management of patients with overt upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Hemodynamic status is first assessed, and resuscitation initiated as needed. Patients are risk-stratified based on features such as hemodynamic status, comorbidities, age, and laboratory tests. Pre-endoscopic erythromycin is considered to increase diagnostic yield at first endoscopy. Pre-endoscopic proton pump inhibitor (PPI) may be considered to decrease the need for endoscopic therapy but does not improve clinical outcomes. Upper endoscopy is generally performed within 24h. The endoscopic features of ulcers direct further management. Patients with active bleeding or non-bleeding visible vessels receive endoscopic therapy (e.g., bipolar electrocoagulation, heater probe, sclerosant, clips) and those with an adherent clot may receive endoscopic therapy; these patients then receive intravenous PPI with a bolus followed by continuous infusion. Patients with flat spots or clean-based ulcers do not require endoscopic therapy or intensive PPI therapy. Recurrent bleeding after endoscopic therapy is treated with a second endoscopic treatment; if bleeding persists or recurs, treatment with surgery or interventional radiology is undertaken. Prevention of recurrent bleeding is based on the etiology of the bleeding ulcer. H. pylori is eradicated and after cure is documented anti-ulcer therapy is generally not given. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are stopped; if they must be resumed low-dose COX-2-selective NSAID plus PPI is used. Patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin should start PPI and generally re-institute aspirin soon after bleeding ceases (within 7 days and ideally 1-3 days). Patients with idiopathic ulcers receive long-term anti-ulcer therapy.

  3. Umbilical cord ulceration: An underdiagnosed entity.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Barkha; Roy, Maitrayee; Agarwal, Shipra; Devi, S; Singh, Ashu; Khurana, Nita; Gupta, Sangeeta

    2016-09-01

    Umbilical cord ulceration is a rare condition presenting with sudden fetal bradycardia due to fetal hemorrhage and in most cases leading to intrauterine death. A strong association with intestinal atresia has been reported. Most cases present after 30 weeks of gestation, with preterm labor or rupture of membranes followed by sudden fetal bradycardia. We report two such cases of umbilical cord ulceration and review the available literature. One of the cases interestingly presented at 26 weeks, much earlier than what is reported in the world literature. In view of high perinatal mortality and morbidity, awareness of this condition is mandatory for timely and appropriate management to improve the fetal outcome. PMID:27668202

  4. Hybrid treatment of penetrating aortic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Lara, Juan Antonio Herrero; Martins-Romêo, Daniela de Araújo; Escudero, Carlos Caparrós; Vázquez, Rosa María Lepe; Falcón, María Del Carmen Prieto; Batista, Vinicius Bianchi

    2015-01-01

    Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer is a rare entity with poor prognosis in the setting of acute aortic syndrome. In the literature, cases like the present one, located in the aortic arch, starting with chest pain and evolving with dysphonia, are even rarer. The present report emphasizes the role played by computed tomography in the diagnosis of penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer as well as in the differentiation of this condition from other acute aortic syndromes. Additionally, the authors describe a new therapeutic approach represented by a hybrid endovascular surgical procedure for treatment of the disease.

  5. Umbilical cord ulceration: An underdiagnosed entity

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Barkha; Roy, Maitrayee; Devi, S; Singh, Ashu; Khurana, Nita; Gupta, Sangeeta

    2016-01-01

    Umbilical cord ulceration is a rare condition presenting with sudden fetal bradycardia due to fetal hemorrhage and in most cases leading to intrauterine death. A strong association with intestinal atresia has been reported. Most cases present after 30 weeks of gestation, with preterm labor or rupture of membranes followed by sudden fetal bradycardia. We report two such cases of umbilical cord ulceration and review the available literature. One of the cases interestingly presented at 26 weeks, much earlier than what is reported in the world literature. In view of high perinatal mortality and morbidity, awareness of this condition is mandatory for timely and appropriate management to improve the fetal outcome. PMID:27668202

  6. Umbilical cord ulceration: An underdiagnosed entity

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Barkha; Roy, Maitrayee; Devi, S; Singh, Ashu; Khurana, Nita; Gupta, Sangeeta

    2016-01-01

    Umbilical cord ulceration is a rare condition presenting with sudden fetal bradycardia due to fetal hemorrhage and in most cases leading to intrauterine death. A strong association with intestinal atresia has been reported. Most cases present after 30 weeks of gestation, with preterm labor or rupture of membranes followed by sudden fetal bradycardia. We report two such cases of umbilical cord ulceration and review the available literature. One of the cases interestingly presented at 26 weeks, much earlier than what is reported in the world literature. In view of high perinatal mortality and morbidity, awareness of this condition is mandatory for timely and appropriate management to improve the fetal outcome.

  7. Endoscopic management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yidan; Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the indications, technical aspects, and comparative effectiveness of the endoscopic treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by peptic ulcer. Pre-endoscopic considerations, such as the use of prokinetics and timing of endoscopy, are reviewed. In addition, this article examines aspects of postendoscopic care such as the effectiveness, dosing, and duration of postendoscopic proton-pump inhibitors, Helicobacter pylori testing, and benefits of treatment in terms of preventing rebleeding; and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet agents, and oral anticoagulants, including direct thrombin and Xa inhibitors, following acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

  8. Plantar decubitus ulcers in rats and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Honma, M; Kast, A

    1989-07-01

    A high incidence of plantar decubitus ulcers, 35% in males and 22 or 45% in females, respectively, occurred in rats of two carcinogenicity studies independent of the bedding used, hard or soft wood chips. Among rabbits kept in chrome-plated wire cages, about 2-year-old female breeders suffered from the plantar ulcers, but not their male partners of the same age group. The causes of the foot disease appear to be manifold, however, in our cases the lesions could be prevented in both species by housing on a cage floor made from flattened stainless wire.

  9. Leg ulcer in lepromatous leprosy - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tania Rita Moreno de Oliveira; dos Santos, Talita Suzany Siqueira; Lopes, Ramon Rodrigues de Macedo

    2016-01-01

    In Brazil, leprosy is a widespread infectious and contagious disease. Clinicians and specialists view leprosy broadly as a systemic infection, since, in its manifestations, it mimics many conditions, such as rheumatic, vascular, ENT, neurological and dermatological diseases. There are few studies that characterize the factors associated with ulcers in leprosy. These injuries should be prevented and treated promptly to avoid serious problems like secondary infections, sepsis, carcinomatous degeneration and amputations. We describe a patient with ulcers on his legs, involving late diagnosis of lepromatous leprosy.

  10. Oral ulcer by Sphingomonas paucimobilis: first report.

    PubMed

    Santarelli, A; Mascitti, M; Galeazzi, R; Marziali, A; Busco, F; Procaccini, M

    2016-10-01

    The first case of an oral infection caused by Sphingomonas paucimobilis is reported. A 73-year-old man presented with a gingival ulcer with bone exposure affecting the attached gingiva in the anterior maxillary region. He reported pain during chewing and the presence of fever. Since the first case of S. paucimobilis infection was reported in 1977, involving a leg ulcer, the number of reports related to this organism has been increasing, indicating that the bacterium should be considered an emerging pathogen. It is possible that other non-classical pathogens of the oral cavity may be responsible for infectious lesions, which represents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

  11. Haemophilus ducreyi associated with skin ulcers among children, Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Marks, Michael; Chi, Kai-Hua; Vahi, Ventis; Pillay, Allan; Sokana, Oliver; Pavluck, Alex; Mabey, David C; Chen, Cheng Y; Solomon, Anthony W

    2014-10-01

    During a survey of yaws prevalence in the Solomon Islands, we collected samples from skin ulcers of 41 children. Using PCR, we identified Haemophilus ducreyi infection in 13 (32%) children. PCR-positive and PCR-negative ulcers were phenotypically indistinguishable. Emergence of H. ducreyi as a cause of nongenital ulcers may affect the World Health Organization's yaws eradication program. PMID:25271477

  12. Haemophilus ducreyi Associated with Skin Ulcers among Children, Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Kai-Hua; Vahi, Ventis; Pillay, Allan; Sokana, Oliver; Pavluck, Alex; Mabey, David C.; Chen, Cheng Y.; Solomon, Anthony W.

    2014-01-01

    During a survey of yaws prevalence in the Solomon Islands, we collected samples from skin ulcers of 41 children. Using PCR, we identified Haemophilus ducreyi infection in 13 (32%) children. PCR-positive and PCR-negative ulcers were phenotypically indistinguishable. Emergence of H. ducreyi as a cause of nongenital ulcers may affect the World Health Organization’s yaws eradication program. PMID:25271477

  13. Guilty as charged: bugs and drugs in gastric ulcer.

    PubMed

    Sontag, S J

    1997-08-01

    Gastric ulcer disease remains a cause of hemorrhage, perforation, outlet obstruction, and death. Recent advances in the understanding of peptic ulcer disease indicate that infection with Helicobacter pylori and ingestion of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the cause of almost all gastric and duodenal ulcers. Our therapy, therefore, is in a state of transition: the old acid-suppressive temporary therapy that allows frequent ulcer recurrences and complications is being replaced by curative therapies. The old therapy, by reducing gastric acid secretion or enhancing gastric mucosal defenses, inhibited the cofactors needed for ulcer development. Acid suppression relieved symptoms and healed ulcers, while defense enhancers, such as prostaglandin analogs healed and prevented acute NSAID-induced gastric ulcers. These benefits were maintained, however, only as long as acid-reducing agents or mucosal defense enhancers were continued. On the other hand, curative therapies (such as eradicating H. pylori infection and/or stopping the use of NSAIDs) eliminate the causes of ulcer. Curative combination regimens consisting of antibiotics, ranitidine bismuth citrate, bismuth, and proton pump inhibitors have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. These new regimens can cure benign gastric ulcer. Unfortunately, we cannot always determine which gastric ulcers are benign, and concern about gastric cancer remains. All gastric ulcers therefore still require biopsy and histological examination. With new treatment regimens, the time may be rapidly approaching when ulcer disease will be "history."

  14. The Mycotic Ulcer Treatment Trial

    PubMed Central

    Prajna, N. Venkatesh; Krishnan, Tiruvengada; Mascarenhas, Jeena; Rajaraman, Revathi; Prajna, Lalitha; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Raghavan, Anita; Oldenburg, Catherine E.; Ray, Kathryn J.; Zegans, Michael E.; McLeod, Stephen D.; Porco, Travis C.; Acharya, Nisha R.; Lietman, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare topical natamycin vs voriconazole in the treatment of filamentous fungal keratitis. Methods This phase 3, double-masked, multicenter trial was designed to randomize 368 patients to voriconazole (1%) or natamycin (5%), applied topically every hour while awake until reepithelialization, then 4 times daily for at least 3 weeks. Eligibility included smear-positive filamentous fungal ulcer and visual acuity of 20/40 to 20/400. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was best spectacle-corrected visual acuity at 3 months; secondary outcomes included corneal perforation and/or therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty. Results A total of 940 patients were screened and 323 were enrolled. Causative organisms included Fusarium (128 patients [40%]), Aspergillus (54 patients [17%]), and other filamentous fungi (141 patients [43%]). Natamycin-treated cases had significantly better 3-month best spectacle-corrected visual acuity than voriconazole-treated cases (regression coefficient=−0.18 logMAR; 95% CI, −0.30 to −0.05; P=.006). Natamycin-treated cases were less likely to have perforation or require therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty (odds ratio=0.42; 95% CI, 0.22 to 0.80; P=.009). Fusarium cases fared better with natamycin than with voriconazole (regression coefficient=−0.41 logMAR; 95% CI, −0.61 to −0.20; P<.001; odds ratio for perforation=0.06; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.28; P<.001), while non-Fusarium cases fared similarly (regression coefficient=−0.02 logMAR; 95% CI, −0.17 to 0.13; P=.81; odds ratio for perforation=1.08; 95% CI, 0.48 to 2.43; P=.86). Conclusions Natamycin treatment was associated with significantly better clinical and microbiological outcomes than voriconazole treatment for smear-positive filamentous fungal keratitis, with much of the difference attributable to improved results in Fusarium cases. Application to Clinical Practice Voriconazole should not be used as monotherapy in filamentous keratitis. Trial Registration

  15. The VCU Pressure Ulcer Summit: Collaboration to Operationalize Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcer Prevention Best Practice Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Brindle, C Tod; Creehan, Sue; Black, Joyce; Zimmermann, Deb

    2015-01-01

    This executive summary reports outcomes of an interprofessional collaboration between experts in pressure ulcer prevention, bedside clinicians, regulatory agencies, quality improvement, informatics experts, and professional nursing organizations. The goal of the collaboration was to develop a framework to assist facilities to operationalize best practice recommendations to sustain organizational culture change in hospital-acquired pressure ulcer prevention, to develop a hospital-acquired pressure ulcer severity score, and to address topics related to the unavoidable pressure ulcer. PMID:26010220

  16. Pepsinogen C gene polymorphisms associated with gastric body ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, T; Teramae, N; Hayakumo, T; Yasuda, K; Nakajima, M; Kodama, T; Inokuchi, H; Hayashi, K; Taggart, R T; Kawai, K

    1993-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the association of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) for pepsinogen genes with peptic ulcer disease. Eighty unrelated controls, 61 patients with gastric ulcer, and 57 patients with duodenal ulcer were studied. No genetic polymorphisms for pepsinogen A were detected by EcoRI digestion in Japanese subjects but a 100 base pairs insertion-deletion RFLP for the pepsinogen C gene was observed. The allele frequencies of the large (3.6 kilobase EcoRI fragment) and the small fragment (3.5 kilobase EcoRI fragment) were 80.6% and 19.4% respectively in controls, 55.4% and 44.6% in patients with gastric body ulcer, 79.4% and 20.6% in patients with gastric angular ulcer, 71.4% and 28.6% in patients with gastric antral ulcer, and 75.4% and 24.6% in patients with duodenal ulcer. The allele frequency of the small fragment was significantly higher in patients with gastric body ulcer than in controls and in patients with gastric angular or antral ulcer. The genotypes which possessed the small fragment were significantly more frequent in patients with gastric body ulcer (78.4%) than in controls (33.8%) and in patients with gastric angular or antral ulcer (37.5%). These results suggest that there is a significant association between the genetic polymorphism at the pepsinogen C gene locus and gastric body ulcer, and that the pepsinogen C RFLP is a useful marker of the genetic predisposition to this disorder. These results also indicate genetic heterogeneity of gastric ulcer disease, and suggest that the pepsinogen C RFLP may be a useful subclinical marker to explain the differences in genetic aetiologies of gastric body ulcer and gastric angular or antral ulcer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8098309

  17. Fonsecaea pedrosoi as a rare cause of acute conjunctival ulceration.

    PubMed

    Adibelli, Fatih Mehmet; Karabicak, Nilgun; Akal, Ali; Goncu, Tugba; Yilmaz, Omer Faruk; Bayraktar, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Conjunctival ulceration accompanied with secretion and pain was observed in a 30-year-old male, 3 days after a perforating corneal trauma. Cultures of conjunctival ulcer samples grew Fonsecaea pedrosoi, a major causative agent of chromoblastomycosis that is typically transmitted during trauma. The conjunctival ulcer was successfully treated with amphotericin B, itraconazole, and fluconazole. This case report summarizes the diagnosis and treatment of a conjunctival ulcer due to F. pedrosoi, which is a rare complication of contaminated ocular trauma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of F. pedrosoi causing acute conjunctival ulceration in the literature. PMID:27626154

  18. Cutaneous Ulcers: Treatment Protocols in the Home

    PubMed Central

    McNairn, Noreen

    1979-01-01

    When a systematic, coordinated treatment plan is used, many seemingly refractory ulcers can be treated in the home. Communication between the treatment team, which includes the patient, must be maintained. This article describes the various preventive measures, debriding, cleansing, granulating and epithelializing agents, their modes of action and their methods of application.

  19. Definition and Facts for Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next: Symptoms and Causes of Peptic Ulcer Disease Digestive Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients and medical professionals. View the full list of Digestive Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ NIH...Turning Discovery ...

  20. Perforated peptic ulcer: how to improve outcome?

    PubMed

    Møller, Morten Hylander; Adamsen, Sven; Wøjdemann, Morten; Møller, Ann Merete

    2009-01-01

    Despite the introduction of histamine H2-receptor antagonists, proton-pump inhibitors and the discovery of Helicobacter pylori, both the incidence of emergency surgery for perforated peptic ulcer and the mortality rate for patients undergoing surgery for peptic ulcer perforation have increased. This increase has occurred despite improvements in perioperative treatment and monitoring. To improve the outcome of these patients, it is necessary to investigate the reasons behind this high mortality rate. In this review we evaluate the existing evidence in order to identify significant risk factors with an emphasis on risks that are preventable. A systematic review including randomized studies was carried out. There are a limited number of studies of patients with peptic ulcer perforation. Most of these studies are of low evident status. Only a few randomized, controlled trials have been published. The mortality rate and the extent of postoperative complications are fairly high but the reasons for this have not been thoroughly explained, even though a number of risk factors have been identified. Some of these risk factors can be explained by the septic state of the patient on admission. In order to improve the outcome of patients with peptic ulcer perforation, sepsis needs to be factored into the existing knowledge and treatment.

  1. Significance of Ferritin in Recurrent Oral Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    K., Sumathi; B., Shanthi; Palaneeswari M., Subha; Devi A.J., Manjula

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ferritin is the storage form of iron. Hence, the sensitive test which can be used for diagnosing iron deficiency anaemia is estimation of ferritin in serum. One of the causative factors of oral ulceration is nutritional deficiency, which includes iron also. Aim: To study the meaningful association between recurrent oral ulcer and ferritin. Materials and Methods: Fifty oral ulcer cases which were diagnosed clinically in the ENT Department of Sree Balaji Medical College and Hospital and Twenty Five controls were included in this study. Serum ferritin was estimated by doing a particle enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay for both cases and controls. Results: 66% of cases had decreased ferritin values and 34% had normal values, which was significant. Conclusion: From this study, it can be concluded that it is mandatory to screen oral ulcer patients for iron deficiency anaemia by estimating serum ferritin and it is also advisable for the patients to have iron supplementation on regular basis, along with diet rich in iron in addition to vitamins. PMID:24783067

  2. What's new: Management of venous leg ulcers: Approach to venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Sibbald, R Gary; Phillips, Tania J; Miller, O Fred; Margolis, David J; Marston, William; Woo, Kevin; Romanelli, Marco; Kirsner, Robert S

    2016-04-01

    Leg ulcerations are a common problem, with an estimated prevalence of 1% to 2% in the adult population. Venous leg ulcers are primarily treated in outpatient settings and often are managed by dermatologists. Recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of leg ulcers combined with available evidence-based data will provide an update on this topic. A systematized approach and the judicious use of expensive advanced therapeutics are critical. Specialized arterial and venous studies are most commonly noninvasive. The ankle brachial pressure index can be performed with a handheld Doppler unit at the bedside by most clinicians. The vascular laboratory results and duplex Doppler findings are used to identify segmental defects and potential operative candidates. Studies of the venous system can also predict a subset of patients who may benefit from surgery. Successful leg ulcer management requires an interdisciplinary team to make the correct diagnosis, assess the vascular supply, and identify other modifiable factors to optimize healing. The aim of this continuing medical education article is to provide an update on the management of venous leg ulcers. Part I is focused on the approach to venous ulcer diagnostic testing.

  3. [Radical operative treatment of perforative gastroduodenal ulcer disease].

    PubMed

    Gostishchev, V K; Evseev, M A; Golovin, R A

    2009-01-01

    Data of 363 patients operated on for perforated gastric or duodenal ulcers were analyzed. Immediate and follow-up results were obtained after simple suture plication, Jadd's ulcer excision combined with stem vagotomy and after distal gastric resection. Predictors of the unfavourable outcome were determined. These are: Mannheim peritonitis index >20, surgical risk of IV-V grade, signs of multiple organ failure and symptomatic character of the ulcer. The comparison of long-term results revealed that patients after suture plication experienced the ulcer recurrence in 78,4% and necessity of further operation occurred in 21,5%. Every third patient after stem vagotomy experienced postvagotomic disorders and ulcer recurrence. Primary gastric resection demonstrated the best long-term results concerning ulcer disease. The algorithm of treatment modalities of the perforative ulcer desease was worked. The algorithm is based on stage-by stage determination of indications and contraindications to gastric resection. PMID:19365375

  4. Idiopathic genital ulcers in women infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J; Clark, R A; Watts, D H; Till, M; Arrastia, C; Schuman, P; Cohn, S E; Young, M; Bessen, L; Greenblatt, R; Vogler, M; Swindells, S; Boyer, P

    1996-12-01

    A national survey of investigators caring for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women was undertaken to describe the clinical presentation of idiopathic genital ulcer disease. Patients with negative syphilis and herpes simplex testing and/or negative genital ulcer biopsy were included in this study. Study participants (n = 29) were generally severely immunocompromised (median CD4 cell count was 50/mm3, and 68% had an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome [AIDS]-defining opportunistic process). Thirty-seven percent had coexistent oral ulcers and 19% had their genital ulcer progress to fistula formation (four rectovaginal and one vaginal-perineal). There was generally a favorable response to topical, systemic, and intralesional steroid treatment. This study suggests that idiopathic or probable aphthous genital ulcers in women have similar clinical characteristics to aphthous oroesophageal ulcers. Although infrequent, these genital ulcers can cause severe morbidity. Further research is warranted to better define the pathophysiology and optimal management.

  5. Malnutrition as a Precursor of Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Litchford, Mary D.; Dorner, Becky; Posthauer, Mary Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Numerous studies have reported associations between declining nutrition status and risk for pressure ulcers. Oral eating problems, weight loss, low body weight, undernutrition, and malnutrition are associated with an increased risk for pressure ulcers. Moreover, inadequate nutrient intake and low body weight are associated with slow and nonhealing wounds. However, the biologic significance of deterioration in nutrition status and consistent methodologies to quantify malnutrition and diminished micronutrient stores as predictors of skin breakdown remains controversial. Recent Advances: The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy) and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) Consensus Statement: Characteristics Recommended for the Identification and Documentation of Adult Malnutrition provide a standardized and measureable set of criterion for all health professionals to use to identify malnutrition. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality identified malnutrition as one of the common geriatric syndromes associated with increased risk for institutionalization and mortality that may be impacted by primary and secondary preventions. Critical Issues: The purpose of this article is to examine the Academy/ASPEN consensus statement on characteristics of adult malnutrition in the context of the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP)/European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (EPUAP) Guidelines on the Prevention and Treatment of Pressure Ulcers. Future Directions: Moreover, clinicians, and in particular, registered dietitians have the opportunity to integrate the Characteristics of Malnutrition with the NPUAP/EPUAP 2009 Prevention and Treatment Clinical Practice Guidelines, into clinical assessment and documentation using the Nutrition Care Process. Consensus guidelines will provide consistent research criteria yielding more useful data than presently available. PMID:24761345

  6. Malnutrition as a Precursor of Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Litchford, Mary D; Dorner, Becky; Posthauer, Mary Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Numerous studies have reported associations between declining nutrition status and risk for pressure ulcers. Oral eating problems, weight loss, low body weight, undernutrition, and malnutrition are associated with an increased risk for pressure ulcers. Moreover, inadequate nutrient intake and low body weight are associated with slow and nonhealing wounds. However, the biologic significance of deterioration in nutrition status and consistent methodologies to quantify malnutrition and diminished micronutrient stores as predictors of skin breakdown remains controversial. Recent Advances: The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy) and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) Consensus Statement: Characteristics Recommended for the Identification and Documentation of Adult Malnutrition provide a standardized and measureable set of criterion for all health professionals to use to identify malnutrition. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality identified malnutrition as one of the common geriatric syndromes associated with increased risk for institutionalization and mortality that may be impacted by primary and secondary preventions. Critical Issues: The purpose of this article is to examine the Academy/ASPEN consensus statement on characteristics of adult malnutrition in the context of the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP)/European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (EPUAP) Guidelines on the Prevention and Treatment of Pressure Ulcers. Future Directions: Moreover, clinicians, and in particular, registered dietitians have the opportunity to integrate the Characteristics of Malnutrition with the NPUAP/EPUAP 2009 Prevention and Treatment Clinical Practice Guidelines, into clinical assessment and documentation using the Nutrition Care Process. Consensus guidelines will provide consistent research criteria yielding more useful data than presently available.

  7. The role of nutrition for pressure ulcer management: national pressure ulcer advisory panel, European pressure ulcer advisory panel, and pan pacific pressure injury alliance white paper.

    PubMed

    Posthauer, Mary Ellen; Banks, Merrilyn; Dorner, Becky; Schols, Jos M G A

    2015-04-01

    Nutrition and hydration play an important role in preserving skin and tissue viability and in supporting tissue repair for pressure ulcer (PrU) healing. The majority of research investigating the relationship between nutrition and wounds focuses on PrUs. This white paper reviews the 2014 National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, and Pan Pacific Pressure Injury Alliance Nutrition Guidelines and discusses nutrition strategies for PrU management.

  8. Become the PPUPET Master: Mastering Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment With the Pediatric Pressure Ulcer Prediction and Evaluation Tool (PPUPET).

    PubMed

    Sterken, David J; Mooney, JoAnn; Ropele, Diana; Kett, Alysha; Vander Laan, Karen J

    2015-01-01

    Hospital acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) are serious, debilitating, and preventable complications in all inpatient populations. Despite evidence of the development of pressure ulcers in the pediatric population, minimal research has been done. Based on observations gathered during quarterly HAPU audits, bedside nursing staff recognized trends in pressure ulcer locations that were not captured using current pressure ulcer risk assessment tools. Together, bedside nurses and nursing leadership created and conducted multiple research studies to investigate the validity and reliability of the Pediatric Pressure Ulcer Prediction and Evaluation Tool (PPUPET).

  9. Anti-Ulcer Efficacy of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitor TPPU on Diclofenac-Induced Intestinal Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Sumanta Kumar; Wan, Debin; Yang, Jun; Trindade da Silva, Carlos A.; Morisseau, Christophe; Kodani, Sean D.; Yang, Guang-Yu; Inceoglu, Bora

    2016-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors such as omeprazole (OME) reduce the severity of gastrointestinal (GI) ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) but can also increase the chance of dysbiosis. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that preventive use of a soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor (sEHI) such as TPPU can decrease NSAID-induced ulcers by increasing anti-inflammatory epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Dose- [10, 30, and 100 mg/kg, by mouth (PO)] and time-dependent (6 and 18 hours) ulcerative effects of diclofenac sodium (DCF, an NSAID) were studied in the small intestine of Swiss Webster mice. Dose-dependent effects of TPPU (0.001–0.1 mg/kg per day for 7 days, in drinking water) were evaluated in DCF-induced intestinal toxicity and compared with OME (20 mg/kg, PO). In addition, the effect of treatment was studied on levels of Hb in blood, EETs in plasma, inflammatory markers such as myeloperoxidase (MPO) in intestinal tissue homogenates, and tissue necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in serum. DCF dose dependently induced ulcers that were associated with both a significant (P < 0.05) loss of Hb and an increase in the level of MPO and TNF-α, with severity of ulceration highest at 18 hours. Pretreatment with TPPU dose dependently prevented ulcer formation by DCF, increased the levels of epoxy fatty acids, including EETs, and TPPU’s efficacy was comparable to OME. TPPU significantly (P < 0.05) reversed the effect of DCF on the level of Hb, MPO, and TNF-α. Thus sEHI might be useful in the management of NSAID-induced ulcers. PMID:26989141

  10. Anti-Ulcer Efficacy of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitor TPPU on Diclofenac-Induced Intestinal Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Sumanta Kumar; Wan, Debin; Yang, Jun; Trindade da Silva, Carlos A; Morisseau, Christophe; Kodani, Sean D; Yang, Guang-Yu; Inceoglu, Bora; Hammock, Bruce D

    2016-06-01

    Proton pump inhibitors such as omeprazole (OME) reduce the severity of gastrointestinal (GI) ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) but can also increase the chance of dysbiosis. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that preventive use of a soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor (sEHI) such as TPPU can decrease NSAID-induced ulcers by increasing anti-inflammatory epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Dose- [10, 30, and 100 mg/kg, by mouth (PO)] and time-dependent (6 and 18 hours) ulcerative effects of diclofenac sodium (DCF, an NSAID) were studied in the small intestine of Swiss Webster mice. Dose-dependent effects of TPPU (0.001-0.1 mg/kg per day for 7 days, in drinking water) were evaluated in DCF-induced intestinal toxicity and compared with OME (20 mg/kg, PO). In addition, the effect of treatment was studied on levels of Hb in blood, EETs in plasma, inflammatory markers such as myeloperoxidase (MPO) in intestinal tissue homogenates, and tissue necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in serum. DCF dose dependently induced ulcers that were associated with both a significant (P < 0.05) loss of Hb and an increase in the level of MPO and TNF-α, with severity of ulceration highest at 18 hours. Pretreatment with TPPU dose dependently prevented ulcer formation by DCF, increased the levels of epoxy fatty acids, including EETs, and TPPU's efficacy was comparable to OME. TPPU significantly (P < 0.05) reversed the effect of DCF on the level of Hb, MPO, and TNF-α Thus sEHI might be useful in the management of NSAID-induced ulcers. PMID:26989141

  11. [Bleeding peptic ulcers--how can recurrent bleeding be prevented?].

    PubMed

    Labenz, J; Tillenburg, B; Peitz, U; Stolte, M; Börsch, G

    1995-01-01

    Bleeding is the most frequent complication of peptic ulcer disease. Patients with a previous ulcer hemorrhage have a high risk for future bleeding episodes. Therefore, treatment aiming at ulcer prophylaxis is mandatory. Helicobacter pylori infection, acid/pepsin and intake of Aspirin or NSAIDs are the main causal factors involved in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease. Ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can be cured by gastric acid suppression (e.g. omeprazole) and prevented by withdrawal of the ulcerogenic substances or co-medication with omeprazole or misoprostol. Acid and Helicobacter pylori are necessary, albeit by themselves not sufficient factors in the causal web of the formerly idiopathic, gastritis-associated peptic ulcer disease of the stomach and the duodenum. Maintenance therapy with antisecretory drugs results in a marked decrease of ulcer recurrences and probably further ulcer complications after an index bleeding, but a definite cure of the ulcer disease is not feasible in the majority of patients. The proportion of patients remaining in remission is dependent on the degree of gastric acid suppression. Therefore, potent antisecretory drugs such as the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole should be used if a physician decides to initiate a long-term maintenance therapy. Several studies have demonstrated beyond doubt that cure of Helicobacter pylori eradication resulted in a stable remission of gastric and duodenal ulcer disease. In addition, a true reinfection after apparent eradication of the bacteria has been rarely observed in adults.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Role of Clostridium perfringens in causing abomasal ulcers in buffalo.

    PubMed

    Mashhadi, Ali R Ghadrdan; Ghorbanpour, Masoud; Kamali, Sojdeh; Kohli, Raghu N

    2010-11-15

    In this study, the correlation between abomasal ulcers and presence of Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) was evaluated in 80 (50 affected and 30 non affected) randomly slaughtered buffaloes in Ahvaz slaughterhouse. Immediately after the slaughter, the abomasums was isolated and an incision was made on the wall of it. Then the abomasums were emptied and its interior was washed with water. The inner surface was examined for presence of abnormal lesion. Ulcers from affected and piece of abomasa from non affected buffaloes were cultured. Cultures were also made from contents of all samples and smears were also prepared from affected and non affected tissues. Cultures from content samples (12%) of 50 ulcerated abomasa were positive for C. perfringens while the agents were isolated from 1 content (3.3%) of non ulcerated abomasa. There was no statistical difference between presence of C. perfringens in contents and abomasal ulcers. Totally C. perfringens were isolated from ulcers of 6 (12%) ulcerated and tissues of 3 (10%) non ulcerated cases. Statistical analysis showed no correlation between presences of C. perfringens and abomasal ulcers. There was no statistical difference between sex and age of the affected animals. In conclusion C. perfringens seems not to be solely, a cause ofabomasal ulcers in buffaloes.

  13. Atypical presentation of oral tuberculosis ulcer.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Sumita; Srikant, Natarajan; George, Thomas

    2007-11-01

    Tuberculosis is a chronic infectious disease that can affect any part of the body, including the mouth. An upsurge in the number of tuberculosis cases, with a strong association with HIV infection, has been noted. We present a case of tuberculosis that clinically resembles a malignant chronic ulcer in the retromolar trigone-an uncommon site of occurrence. Histologically, the case demonstrated an atypical epitheloid granuloma with reduced lymphocyte count. The diagnosis of tuberculosis was confirmed following sputum culture of M tuberculosis. Antitubercular therapy improved the patient's condition. Although rare, tuberculosis must be considered as a differential diagnosis in chronic ulcers in the oral region; and its association with HIV must not be overlooked.

  14. Diagnosis of perforated gastric ulcers by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wallstabe, L; Veitt, R; Körner, T

    2002-10-01

    Patients with a perforation of the gastrointestinal tract need fast confirmation of diagnosis and early treatment to improve outcome. Plain abdominal x-ray does not always prove the perforation particularly at early stage. We report about a 62 year-old woman complaining of consistent abdominal pain with sudden onset. Ultrasound was taken as first diagnostic measure, revealing a perforation. The leakage was located in the stomach. Radiography confirmed the pneumoperitoneum without indicating the perforated location. During operation the perforated gastric ulcer was found and sutured. This case report points out the reliability of ultrasound in diagnosing a pneumoperitoneum. Additionally it provides a summary of ultrasound signs seen in perforated gastric and duodenal ulcers and a review of literature.

  15. Ulcerative Colitis: Update on Medical Management.

    PubMed

    Iskandar, Heba N; Dhere, Tanvi; Farraye, Francis A

    2015-11-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease whose pathogenesis is multifactorial and includes influences from genes, the environment, and the gut microbiome. Recent advances in diagnosis and treatment have led to significant improvement in managing the disease. Disease monitoring with the use of therapeutic drug monitoring, stool markers, and assessment of mucosal healing have garnered much attention. The recent approval of vedolizumab for treatment of moderate to severe UC has been a welcome addition. Newer biologics, including those targeting the Janus tyrosine kinase (JAK) pathway, are on the horizon to add to the current armamentarium of anti-TNF alpha and anti-integrin therapies. The recent publication of the SCENIC consensus statement on surveillance and management of dysplasia in UC patients supports the use of chromoendoscopy over random biopsies in detecting dysplasia. This review highlights these recent advances along with others that have been made with ulcerative colitis.

  16. Treatment of ulcers with ablative fractional lasers.

    PubMed

    Morton, Laurel M; Dover, Jeffrey S; Phillips, Tania J; Krakowski, Andrew C; Uebelhoer, Nathan S

    2015-03-01

    Chronic, nonhealing ulcers are a frustrating therapeutic challenge and investigation of innovative therapies continues to be an important research pursuit. One unique and newly applied intervention is the use of ablative fractional lasers. This technology has recently been employed for the treatment of hypertrophic, disfiguring and function-limiting scars, and was first shown to induce healing of chronic wounds in patients with persistent ulcers and erosions within traumatic scars. Recent reports suggest it may be applicable for other types of chronic wounds as well. The mechanism of action for this modality remains to be elucidated but possible factors include laser-induced collagen remodeling, photomicrodebridement and disruption of biofilms, and induction of a proper wound healing cascade.

  17. Crater-Like Ulceration of Aortic Arch.

    PubMed

    Simon, Caterina; Calabrese, Alice; Canu, Gianluca; Merlo, Maurizio; Galletti, Lorenzo

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of a 78-year-old female who presented to our hospital with signs of hemorrhagic shock and breathlessness. A transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated pericardial effusion. Computed tomography of the chest showed a penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer of the aortic arch with an intramural hematoma of the ascending and descending aorta. Endovascular repair with stent-grafting was urgently performed and a pericardial window placement was done to reduce mediastinal bleeding. PMID:26798748

  18. Crater-Like Ulceration of Aortic Arch.

    PubMed

    Simon, Caterina; Calabrese, Alice; Canu, Gianluca; Merlo, Maurizio; Galletti, Lorenzo

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of a 78-year-old female who presented to our hospital with signs of hemorrhagic shock and breathlessness. A transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated pericardial effusion. Computed tomography of the chest showed a penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer of the aortic arch with an intramural hematoma of the ascending and descending aorta. Endovascular repair with stent-grafting was urgently performed and a pericardial window placement was done to reduce mediastinal bleeding.

  19. Corneal ulcer caused by Bipolaris hawaiiensis.

    PubMed

    Anandi, V; Suryawanshi, N B; Koshi, G; Padhye, A A; Ajello, L

    1988-01-01

    Following an injury to the right eye, a corneal ulcer with hypopyon developed in a leprosy patient. Direct examination of the corneal scrapings on three occasions showed septate, branched, dematiaceous hyphal elements. When scrapings were cultured on Sabouraud's glucose and brain heart infusion agars. Bipolaris hawaiiensis was isolated repeatedly. The patient responded successfully to treatment with nystatin ointment, although the central opacity of the cornea remained and visual acuity did not improve.

  20. Corneal ulcer caused by Bipolaris hawaiiensis.

    PubMed

    Anandi, V; Suryawanshi, N B; Koshi, G; Padhye, A A; Ajello, L

    1988-01-01

    Following an injury to the right eye, a corneal ulcer with hypopyon developed in a leprosy patient. Direct examination of the corneal scrapings on three occasions showed septate, branched, dematiaceous hyphal elements. When scrapings were cultured on Sabouraud's glucose and brain heart infusion agars. Bipolaris hawaiiensis was isolated repeatedly. The patient responded successfully to treatment with nystatin ointment, although the central opacity of the cornea remained and visual acuity did not improve. PMID:3236148

  1. A cloudy bag and genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Liesker, J; van Elsacker-Niele, A M; Blanken, R; Halma, C

    2006-05-01

    A 30-year-old patient treated with CCPD presented with genital ulcers and a culture-negative peritonitis. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) was cultured from the effluent and the genital lesions. Primary HSV-2 infection was diagnosed by serology. This is the first documented case of PD peritonitis caused by HSV-2. We speculate that cases of culture-negative PD peritonitis may be due to recurrences of genital herpes.

  2. Recurrent oral ulcers--an overview.

    PubMed

    Gaffar, A

    2001-01-01

    Recurrent oral ulcers (ROUs) are the most common oral mucosal disease. The etiology of ROUs is complex. The factors include mechanical trauma, genetics, stress, smoking, and viral and bacterial infections. Treatment modalities depend on the differential diagnosis of ROUs and could consist of antimicrobial agents, anti-inflammatory agents, immunomodulators, or over-the-counter medications. New therapy available in the form of a coating polymer, Colgate ORABASE Soothe.N.Seal, is clinically proven to provide rapid relief and healing of ROUs.

  3. Immune biomarkers are more accurate in prediction of survival in ulcerated than in non-ulcerated primary melanomas

    PubMed Central

    de Moll, Ellen H.; Fu, Yichun; Qian, Yingzhi; Perkins, Sara H.; Wieder, Shira; Gnjatic, Sacha; Remark, Romain; Bernardo, Sebastian G.; Moskalenko, Marina; Yao, Jonathan; Ferringer, Tammie; Chang, Rui; Chipuk, Jerry; Horst, Basil A.; Birge, Miriam B.; Phelps, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ulcerated melanomas may have a unique biology and microenvironment. We test whether markers of immune infiltration correlate with clinical outcome in ulcerated compared to non-ulcerated primary melanoma tumors. Methods Sixty-two stage II–III cutaneous melanomas, 32 ulcerated and 30 non-ulcerated, were analyzed for tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed for CD2, a marker previously shown to correlate with overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) in this patient population. IHC using antibody, VE1, to BRAF V600E was also performed on a subset of 41 tumors to assess the relationship of BRAF mutation to immune markers. Results We found, using Cox regression models, that the presence of TILs was associated with improved OS (p = 0.034) and RFS (p = 0.002) in ulcerated melanoma tumors, but not in non-ulcerated melanoma (p = 0.632, 0.416). CD2 expression also was correlated with improved OS (p = 0.021) and RFS (p = 0.001) in ulcerated melanoma, but no relationship was seen in non-ulcerated melanoma (p = 0.427, 0.682). In this small population, BRAF status did not correlate with TILs or CD2+ count. Conclusion Our data show that immune markers including TILs and CD2 count correlate more closely with survival in ulcerated melanomas than that in non-ulcerated melanomas. We propose that immune biomarkers may be particularly relevant to ulcerated, as compared to non-ulcerated, melanomas and that this merits study in larger populations. PMID:26076664

  4. Ulcerated lesion of the alveolar ridge.

    PubMed

    Bokmeyer, T J

    1980-10-01

    Histoplasmosis is a generalized fungal infection that is caused by the organism H capsulatum. In the most common disease-producing mechanism, the organism is inhaled and lodges in the lung, where it initiates an inflammatory focus. The peribronchial lymph nodes are subsequently involved, forming a primary complex that may ultimately calcify and become radiographically evident. From the primary complex, dissemination by the bloodstream may lead to colonization elsewhere. In the less frequent disease-producing complex, the organism is introduced directly into the tissue through a break in its continuity. A primary complex is then formed by involvement of the lymph nodes. Dissemination from such a focus is rare. It is generally believed that oral and pharyngeal lesions of the histoplasmosis represent symptoms of a systemic disease and are not a localized form of the disease. Histoplasmosis can occur at all ages; however, it is more often found in infancy and old age, especially in white males. Any area in the oral cavity may be affected; the most common sites are: larynx, tongue, palate, buccal mucosa. gingiva, and pharynx. The most frequently reported symptoms are pain, hoarseness, loss of weight, ulcer, and sore throat. The appearance of the oral and pharyngeal lesions may vary and may manifest as ulcers, nodules, or verrucous plaques. Deep, indurated ulcers are common, accounting for the predominant clinical impression of squamous carcinoma. PMID:6934220

  5. Gastric and duodenal ulcers during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cappell, Mitchell S

    2003-03-01

    The frequency, symptoms, and complication rate of PUD seem to decrease during pregnancy. Yet clinicians often have to treat dyspepsia or pyrosis of undetermined origin during pregnancy because the frequency of pyrosis significantly increases during pregnancy, and clinicians reluctantly perform EGD during pregnancy for pyrosis to differentiate reliably between GERD and PUD. Dyspepsia or pyrosis during pregnancy is initially treated with dietary and lifestyle modifications. If the symptoms do not remit with these modifications, sucralfate or antacids, preferably magnesium-containing or aluminum-containing antacids, should be administered. Histamine2 receptor antagonists are recommended when symptoms are refractory to antacid or sucralfate therapy. Ranitidine seems to be a relatively safe H2 receptor antagonist. If symptoms continue despite H2 receptor antagonist therapy, the patient should be evaluated for possible EGD or PPI therapy. Pregnant women with hemodynamically significant upper gastrointestinal bleeding or other worrisome clinical findings should undergo EGD. Indications for surgery include ulcer perforation, ongoing active bleeding from an ulcer requiring transfusion of six or more units of packed erythrocytes, gastric outlet obstruction refractory to intense medical therapy, and a malignant gastric ulcer without evident metastases.

  6. Health literacy and diabetic foot ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Margolis, David J; Hampton, Michelle; Hoffstad, Ole; Malay, D Scot; Thom, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The adherence by patients to diabetic foot ulcer therapy is often difficult. The goal of this study was to begin to understand how a patient's health literacy affects their foot ulcer management decisions. Initially using a cross-sectional study design, we evaluated diabetics with foot ulcers within 4 weeks of being asked to participate in a longitudinal study. We assessed health literacy using measures of general health literacy, diabetes health literacy, diabetes self-efficacy, and diabetes numeracy. Individuals enrolled in the study had higher health literacy based on the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults [33.8 (SD 2.3) versus 27.3 (SD 9.6); p = 0.009] as compared to individuals who previously declined an invitation to enroll in the study. Furthermore, patients with lower Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults scores had larger (p = 0.04) and older (p = 0.125) wounds (markers for poorer prognosis). Other measures of literacy showed similar results. In conclusion, those with diminished health literacy were less likely to enroll in an investigational study and had wounds that were less likely to heal.

  7. Ulcerative Colitis: A Challenge to Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Parray, Fazl Q; Wani, Mohd L; Malik, Ajaz A; Wani, Shadab N; Bijli, Akram H; Irshad, Ifat; Nayeem-Ul-Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic disease that specifically affects the mucosa of the rectum and colon. Although the etiology of this recurring inflammatory disorder remains essentially unknown, there have been significant advances in identifying the likely genetic and environmental factors that contribute to its pathogenesis. The clinical course of the disease typically manifests with remissions and exacerbations characterized by rectal bleeding and diarrhea. Since ulcerative colitis most commonly affects patients in their youth or early middle age, the disease can have serious long-term local and systemic consequences. There is no specific medical therapy that is curative. Although medical therapy can ameliorate the inflammatory process and control most symptomatic flares, it provides no definitive treatment for the disease. Proctocolectomy or total removal of the colon and rectum provides the only complete cure; however, innovative surgical alternatives have eliminated the need for a permanent ileostomy. The aim of this review is to provide a detailed account of the surgical management of ulcerative colitis. PMID:23189226

  8. Multidisciplinary approaches to the pressure ulcer problem.

    PubMed

    Bogie, Kath M; Ho, Chester H

    2007-10-01

    Multiple factors affect the specific condition and overall clinical profile of individuals at risk for chronic wounds. The complexity of the pressure ulcer problem lends itself to the application of the National Institute of Health Roadmap Initiative that encourages interdisciplinary research and new organizational models. An overview of research studies relevant to telemedicine and neuromuscular electrical stimulation in the care and prevention of pressure ulcers as well as preliminary results of an innovative multidisciplinary skin care team approach to the primary and tertiary prevention of pressure ulcers are encouraging. The team's pilot study results indicate that patients are satisfied with telehealth provision of care; however, literature and experience also suggest that discrepancies in the inter-rater assessment of wounds using digital photography remain, particularly with regard to wound dimension variables assessed (P<0.01). In another endeavor, the skin care team developed a Longitudinal Analysis with Self-Registration statistical algorithm to assess the effects of electrical stimulation; in a preliminary study, this tool documented improvement in gluteus maximus health and resultant ability to withstand pressure. As the number of groups pursuing multidisciplinary research and care increases, so, too, will the evidence base required to address these common, and complex, chronic wounds. PMID:17978412

  9. Medical and surgical treatment of chronic venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Michol A; Qazi, Umair; Bass, Eric; Zenilman, Jonathan; Lazarus, Gerald; Valle, M Frances; Malas, Mahmoud B

    2015-01-01

    Venous ulcer of the lower extremity is a common vascular condition and is associated with decreased quality of life, reduced mobility, and social isolation. Treatment of chronic venous ulcer (CVU) includes compression therapy, debridement of the ulcer when necessary, and wound care. Collagen and antimicrobial dressings can improve the proportion of ulcers healed compared with compression alone. Acellular skin equivalents are not superior to compression, but cellular human skin equivalents can promote more rapid healing, particularly in patients with longstanding ulcers. Current vascular surgical practice is to eliminate documented reflux or obstruction in patients with CVU that have failed a 3-month period of compression dressing, debridement, and local wound care. We found that surgical treatment of the superficial venous system can decrease the time to healing of CVUs compared with compression therapy alone, but does not increase the proportion of ulcers healed. PMID:27113282

  10. Medical and surgical treatment of chronic venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Michol A; Qazi, Umair; Bass, Eric; Zenilman, Jonathan; Lazarus, Gerald; Valle, M Frances; Malas, Mahmoud B

    2015-01-01

    Venous ulcer of the lower extremity is a common vascular condition and is associated with decreased quality of life, reduced mobility, and social isolation. Treatment of chronic venous ulcer (CVU) includes compression therapy, debridement of the ulcer when necessary, and wound care. Collagen and antimicrobial dressings can improve the proportion of ulcers healed compared with compression alone. Acellular skin equivalents are not superior to compression, but cellular human skin equivalents can promote more rapid healing, particularly in patients with longstanding ulcers. Current vascular surgical practice is to eliminate documented reflux or obstruction in patients with CVU that have failed a 3-month period of compression dressing, debridement, and local wound care. We found that surgical treatment of the superficial venous system can decrease the time to healing of CVUs compared with compression therapy alone, but does not increase the proportion of ulcers healed.

  11. [Clinical picture of pure corneal ulcers of different localizations].

    PubMed

    Tarasova, L N; Kudriashova, Iu I

    1999-01-01

    Pure corneal ulcers can be localized at the periphery and in the center. Peripheral ulcers are bilateral in 66% and multifocal in 48% cases. They are combined with local vasculitis of perilimbic vessels of the conjunctiva. In 84% cases the disease occurred in patients with connective tissue and articular diseases. Clinical picture of the peripheral corneal ulcer differs from Mourene's phagodenic ulcer. Central corneal ulcers are bilateral in 40% patients, are associated with primary and secondary "dry eye" syndrome in Sjogren's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic vasculitis, Behçet's disease, and in 18% patients with cicatricial deformation of the conjunctiva after Stevens-Johnson's syndrome, trachoma, and chemical burns of the eyes. Pure corneal ulcers run a chronic relapsing course, complicated in one-fourth of patients by corneal perforation and secondary infections.

  12. Petrolatum versus Resurfix ointment in the treatment of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Kuflik, A; Stillo, J V; Sanders, D; Roland, K; Sweeney, T; Lemke, P M

    2001-02-01

    This study compares the therapeutic effects of a new topically applied, nonprescription medication that has been introduced for re-epithelialization of ulcers and erosions of the skin, with petrolatum in treating pressure ulcers of shallow depth (Stage I and Stage II). A 6-week, randomized, double-blind study was performed on 19 patients with Stage I or Stage II pressure ulcers. The patients received either the new nonprescription medication or petrolatum, which served as a control. After the course of the study, the study ointment effected resolution in a majority of pressure ulcers (9 out of 10), while only one out of three ulcers treated with petrolatum resolved in the same time period. These preliminary results show that the study ointment is a safe and effective treatment for Stage I and II pressure ulcers.

  13. Bipolar aphthosis presenting as mutilating genital ulcers in women.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Somesh; Ajith, C; Malhotra, S; Kumar, Bhushan

    2004-01-01

    Three women with large, mutilating genital ulcers of long duration, destroying almost the lower half of the external genitalia, are reported. They had a history of recurrent oral ulcers as well. All patients had been diagnosed as having 'genital ulcer syndrome' in the past and had been treated with antimicrobials. Histopathology of the biopsy from the margin of the ulcer revealed features of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Considering the history, clinical features and histology, a diagnosis of bipolar aphthosis was made in all patients. All patients responded well to immunosuppressive therapy. The cases are reported because of the presence of genital ulcers of an unusually large size, mutilating character and their close similarity to genital ulcers due to sexually transmitted diseases, especially genital herpes and donovanosis.

  14. Lipschütz [corrected] ulcers--four cases.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Núñez, Almudena; Córdoba, Susana; Romero-Maté, Alberto; Miñano, Román; Sanz, Tatiana; Borbujo, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    A distinctive clinical entity of acute genital ulcers occurring in adolescents, with nonvenereal infectious etiology was described by Lipschütz in 1913. We describe four puberal virgin girls who developed fever and painful genital ulcers. The main causes infectious and noninfectious of ulceration were rejected. Although the etiology is unknown, recent cases related with Epstein-Barr virus acute infection have been reported.

  15. Determinants of mortality among older adults with pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Khor, Hui Min; Tan, Juan; Saedon, Nor Izzati; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul B; Chin, Ai Vyrn; Poi, Philip J H; Tan, Maw Pin

    2014-01-01

    The presence of pressure ulcers imposes a huge burden on the older person's quality of life and significantly increases their risk of dying. The objective of this study was to determine patient characteristics associated with the presence of pressure ulcers and to evaluate the risk factors associated with mortality among older patients with pressure ulcers. A prospective observational study was performed between Oct 2012 and May 2013. Patients with preexisting pressure ulcers on admission and those with hospital acquired pressure ulcers were recruited into the study. Information on patient demographics, functional status, nutritional level, stages of pressure ulcer and their complications were obtained. Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to assess the risk of death in all patients. 76/684 (11.1%) patients had pre-existing pressure ulcers on admission and 30/684 (4.4%) developed pressure ulcers in hospital. There were 68 (66%) deaths by the end of the median follow-up period of 12 (IQR 2.5-14) weeks. Our Cox regression model revealed that nursing home residence (Hazard Ratio, HR=2.33, 95% confidence interval, CI=1.30, 4.17; p=0.005), infected deep pressure ulcers (HR=2.21, 95% CI=1.26, 3.87; p=0.006) and neutrophilia (HR=1.76; 95% CI 1.05, 2.94; p=0.031) were independent predictors of mortality in our elderly patients with pressure ulcers. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in our setting is comparable to previously reported figures in Europe and North America. Mortality in patients with pressure ulcer was high, and was predicted by institutionalization, concurrent infection and high neutrophil counts.

  16. Incidence and management of ulcers in diabetic Charcot feet.

    PubMed

    Larsen, K; Fabrin, J; Holstein, P E

    2001-09-01

    This study followed 115 patients with diabetes--who between them had 140 feet with Charcot's arthropathy--over six to 114 months (median: 48). A total of 43 patients (37%) developed ulcers in 53 feet. Their treatment was multifactorial. An offloading regimen was adopted, with the use of crutches and therapeutic sandals with soft, individually moulded insoles, followed by adjusted or bespoke shoes. Recalcitrant ulcers were treated with surgery in 16 patients (37%). Antibiotics were needed by 21 patients (49%). The incidence of ulceration was 17% per year. The median time interval between the acute component of Charcot's arthropathy and ulcer development was 36 months (range: 0-120 months). In seven patients, the ulcer developed during the acute phase. In 12 patients the ulcers were localised to the rockerbottom deformity in the mid-foot region, but in 31 patients other regions were affected. Dynamic footprint analysis was used to help adjust the offloading shoe/insole on the rockerbottom deformity. Such ulcers took twice as long to heal as other ulcers. Surgical treatment comprised: major amputation (two patients), arthrodesis for unstable ankle (three patients), toe amputations (seven patients), resection of the rockerbottom deformity (one patient) and other revisions (three patients). One patient died with an unhealed ulcer. There is a four-fold risk of ulcers in diabetic Charcot deformity compared with the overall risk of foot ulcers in diabetic feet. Healing was achieved in 40 patients (93%). The surgical intervention rate of 37% in ulcer cases in Charcot feet was low compared with the literature.

  17. [Frequency of the detection of billiary sludge in ulcerative disease].

    PubMed

    Maev, I V; Dicheva, D T; Buragina, T A; Penkina, T V

    2006-01-01

    Patients with gastric and duodenal ulcer, in who never had the typical complaints, and anamnestic data about pathology of biliary system were examined. More than one third of the biliary sludge was found. Finding dates demonatrate an appearence of hypokinetic biliary dysfunction in patients with gastric and duodenal ulcer. The received results indicate the for necessity of obligatory ultrasonic research for the purpose of revealing biliary dysfunctions in patients with gastric ulcer; subsequent dynamic supervision and preservation of pathological changes to prevente cholelithiasis.

  18. Epidemiology of acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Melnick, S L; Roseman, J M; Engel, D; Cogen, R B

    1988-01-01

    In the last 60 years, there have been approximately 50 studies of various suspected risk factors associated with acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis. Two thirds of these studies have been either surveys or case reports; nearly all the rest have been case-control studies. There have been only a few longitudinal and population-based studies, most of which were in high-risk populations. The findings of many studies pertain to gingivitis in general rather than in acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis in particular; the findings of other studies are based on small numbers or solely on case histories without the inclusion of control subjects. There are comparisons between the epidemiology of acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis as it occurs in military populations and the epidemiology of meningococcal meningitis (98-103). Both diseases have been reported in closed communities such as in young recruits away from home and in new surroundings. A temporal trend upward in disease frequency was described for both infections during World War II. Both infections appear to be characterized by low communicability, with no documented transmission by fomites or vectors. Furthermore, active disease in both cases is associated with markedly increased numbers of normally indigenous flora: B. intermedius in the case of acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis and Neisseria meningococcus in the case of epidemic meningococcal meningitis. Risk factors associated with both diseases include crowding, physical fatigue, increased stress, low socioeconomic status, and failure of host defense mechanisms. In general, there is potential for longitudinal studies of young people such as new military recruits and college students who are undergoing the transition from dependence to independence. It is intriguing that these young adults are suddenly at increased risk of this disease in late adolescence when they should be at peak fitness and, just as suddenly, at decreased risk after their

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection and duodenal ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Tytgat, G N; Noach, L A; Rauws, E A

    1993-03-01

    H. pylori is undoubtedly the dominant factor in the multifactorial peptic ulcer diathesis. We should not ignore the other contributing factors but rather try to identify how they interact with the organism and initiate the ulcerative process. The interplay of acid attack and mucosal defence is modulated by genetics, gender, blood group, smoking, age, and various physiologic considerations, which include acid output. These and other considerations probably explain the discrepancy between the high frequency of H. pylori infection in the population and the comparatively small proportion of individuals who develop a DU. Most agents used in DU are aimed at reducing acid secretion and achieve healing by minimizing acid attack. Such treatments, however, have no effect on H. pylori status and do not remedy the underlying gastroduodenitis. The mucosa therefore remains ill and vulnerable. After cessation of acid suppressive therapy, ulcer relapse is likely. Goodwin has likened the inflamed mucosa to a leaking roof, in which temporary dryness (healing) is assured if the rain (acid) is removed but permanent protection can be achieved only by mending the roof through healing of the mucosa. Therefore, therapy that fails to address the role of H. pylori in the causation of the mucosal inflammation, which predisposes to ulceration, is likely to confer only short-term benefit. Eradication of the infection has been shown beyond doubt to markedly alter the natural history of the disease, a number of series showing no recurrence at the end of 1 year, compared with a natural recurrence of > 70%. The economic savings after not only eradication but even suppression of H. pylori in DU disease have been estimated to be enormous. Despite these striking findings indicating H. pylori inflammation as the dominant factor in the DU diathesis and the possibilities of cure after H. pylori eradication, a large proportion of the medical community is still not willing to accept the consequences

  20. A rare location for a common problem: popliteal pressure ulcer.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Kadri; Colak, Ozlem; Goktas, Fethiye B; Sungur, Nezih; Kocer, Ugur

    2016-04-01

    Pressure ulcer is defined as localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in combination with shear. The most frequent sites for pressure ulcers are the occiput, sacrum, ischial tuberosities, trochanters, lateral malleoli and posterior heels. Herein, we present a case of grade III pressure ulcer seen in popliteal region which is an unusual localisation that is rarely seen in the literature. An awareness of this unusual localisation of pressure ulcer is necessary to prevent decrease in quality of life, particularly in the wheelchair-dependent population.

  1. Lipschütz genital ulceration associated with mumps.

    PubMed

    Chanal, Johan; Carlotti, Agnès; Laude, Hélène; Wallet-Faber, Nadège; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Dupin, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Lipschütz ulcers are characterised by a first flare of non-sexually related acute genital ulcers (AGU) occurring in adolescent girls. Epstein-Barr primary infection is the most frequently reported aetiology but other infectious agents are probably implicated. We report the first case of mumps associated with an AGU in a 21-year-old girl. She presented a bilateral parotitis with genital ulcers, and serology confirmed she had mumps. As in our case, most Lipschütz ulcers heal spontaneously within a couple of weeks and the diagnosis should be reconsidered in case of recurrence.

  2. [Dyspepsia, Ulcer Disease – Helicobacter pylori, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease].

    PubMed

    Wirth, Hans-Peter

    2016-06-01

    Prevalence of H. pylori (HP) is declining, whereas reflux disease and the proportion of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAR) to HP-induced ulcers increase. Eradication heals HP-ulcer disease, interrupts cancerous progression and can improve dyspeptic symptoms. NSAR-ulcers heal under proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy but tend to recur after reexposition. Anticoagulants and antiplatlet agents increase the risk additionally. PPI reduces NSAR-ulcer recurrence. Reflux patients with severe inflammation and complications often need long-term therapy. Barrett’s esophagus patients are at risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma.

  3. [Piracetam in combined pathogenetic therapy of recurrent duodenal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Tsimmerman, Ia S; Shchetkin, D I

    2002-01-01

    Duodenal ulcer cure, as a systemic gastroenterologic disease, can be achieved in some patients by the addition of the nootropic drug piracetam to current antisecretory and antihelicobacter therapy. Piracetam corrects vegetative and psychoemotional disorders in duodenal ulcer, normalizes gastric motility, has an antioxidant effect and improves cerebral circulation. An optimal effect on clinico-endoscopic manifestations of recurrent duodenal ulcer was achieved in combination of piracetam with current antisecretory (omeprazole) and antihelicobacter (de-nol, amoxicillin, metronidazole) medicines. Such combination improves both short- and long-term outcomes of duodenal ulcer treatment.

  4. Bridging the theory-practice gap in pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Moore, Zena

    Pressure ulcers are a largely preventable problem, but the incidence can impact negatively on the ability of the health service to deliver effective and quality care. Pressure ulcers commonly occur in the very old, the malnourished and those with acute illness. As pressure ulcers most commonly occur in the hospital setting, this can increase both length of stay and costs to the health service. As a result, prevention and management strategies should be core components in the strategic planning of healthcare services. This article discusses the importance of education and knowledge in pressure ulcers, and the onus of the nurse to put theory into practice in order to prevent this problem. PMID:20852478

  5. Pressure ulcers: a strategic plan to prevent and heal them.

    PubMed

    Levine, J M; Totolos, E

    1995-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are common in frail, disabled, or acutely ill older patients in the home, hospital, or nursing home. Prevention is the most important aspect of pressure ulcer care, and physician and nurse share in this responsibility. A nosocomial pressure ulcer adds significantly to mortality, morbidity, and hospital length-of-stay. Risk factor assessment scales can help identify patients who need prevention efforts, such as pressure relief, incontinence care, and nutritional supplements. When an ulcer does occur, careful documentation is required, including staging, size and depth description, and review of the interdisciplinary care plan. Knowledge of wound biology and cost-effectiveness should guide the choice of wound healing products.

  6. [Dyspepsia, Ulcer Disease – Helicobacter pylori, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease].

    PubMed

    Wirth, Hans-Peter

    2016-06-01

    Prevalence of H. pylori (HP) is declining, whereas reflux disease and the proportion of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAR) to HP-induced ulcers increase. Eradication heals HP-ulcer disease, interrupts cancerous progression and can improve dyspeptic symptoms. NSAR-ulcers heal under proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy but tend to recur after reexposition. Anticoagulants and antiplatlet agents increase the risk additionally. PPI reduces NSAR-ulcer recurrence. Reflux patients with severe inflammation and complications often need long-term therapy. Barrett’s esophagus patients are at risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:27269775

  7. Pressure ulcer-like presacral gummata in a patient with tertiary syphilis.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Koch, André; Abdel-Naser, Mohammed Badawy; Schönlebe, Jacqueline

    2005-03-01

    Pressure ulcers are common among elderly patients. Here, we describe a case of tertiary syphilis with ulcerated gummata, appearing as a possible pressure ulcer. In such a case, wound management has to be accompanied by specific antibiosis to achieve healing.

  8. Impact of facial conformation on canine health: corneal ulceration.

    PubMed

    Packer, Rowena M A; Hendricks, Anke; Burn, Charlotte C

    2015-01-01

    Concern has arisen in recent years that selection for extreme facial morphology in the domestic dog may be leading to an increased frequency of eye disorders. Corneal ulcers are a common and painful eye problem in domestic dogs that can lead to scarring and/or perforation of the cornea, potentially causing blindness. Exaggerated juvenile-like craniofacial conformations and wide eyes have been suspected as risk factors for corneal ulceration. This study aimed to quantify the relationship between corneal ulceration risk and conformational factors including relative eyelid aperture width, brachycephalic (short-muzzled) skull shape, the presence of a nasal fold (wrinkle), and exposed eye-white. A 14 month cross-sectional study of dogs entering a large UK based small animal referral hospital for both corneal ulcers and unrelated disorders was carried out. Dogs were classed as affected if they were diagnosed with a corneal ulcer using fluorescein dye while at the hospital (whether referred for this disorder or not), or if a previous diagnosis of corneal ulcer(s) was documented in the dogs' histories. Of 700 dogs recruited, measured and clinically examined, 31 were affected by corneal ulcers. Most cases were male (71%), small breed dogs (mean± SE weight: 11.4±1.1 kg), with the most commonly diagnosed breed being the Pug. Dogs with nasal folds were nearly five times more likely to be affected by corneal ulcers than those without, and brachycephalic dogs (craniofacial ratio <0.5) were twenty times more likely to be affected than non-brachycephalic dogs. A 10% increase in relative eyelid aperture width more than tripled the ulcer risk. Exposed eye-white was associated with a nearly three times increased risk. The results demonstrate that artificially selecting for these facial characteristics greatly heightens the risk of corneal ulcers, and such selection should thus be discouraged to improve canine welfare.

  9. Impact of Facial Conformation on Canine Health: Corneal Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Rowena M. A.; Hendricks, Anke; Burn, Charlotte C.

    2015-01-01

    Concern has arisen in recent years that selection for extreme facial morphology in the domestic dog may be leading to an increased frequency of eye disorders. Corneal ulcers are a common and painful eye problem in domestic dogs that can lead to scarring and/or perforation of the cornea, potentially causing blindness. Exaggerated juvenile-like craniofacial conformations and wide eyes have been suspected as risk factors for corneal ulceration. This study aimed to quantify the relationship between corneal ulceration risk and conformational factors including relative eyelid aperture width, brachycephalic (short-muzzled) skull shape, the presence of a nasal fold (wrinkle), and exposed eye-white. A 14 month cross-sectional study of dogs entering a large UK based small animal referral hospital for both corneal ulcers and unrelated disorders was carried out. Dogs were classed as affected if they were diagnosed with a corneal ulcer using fluorescein dye while at the hospital (whether referred for this disorder or not), or if a previous diagnosis of corneal ulcer(s) was documented in the dogs’ histories. Of 700 dogs recruited, measured and clinically examined, 31 were affected by corneal ulcers. Most cases were male (71%), small breed dogs (mean± SE weight: 11.4±1.1 kg), with the most commonly diagnosed breed being the Pug. Dogs with nasal folds were nearly five times more likely to be affected by corneal ulcers than those without, and brachycephalic dogs (craniofacial ratio <0.5) were twenty times more likely to be affected than non-brachycephalic dogs. A 10% increase in relative eyelid aperture width more than tripled the ulcer risk. Exposed eye-white was associated with a nearly three times increased risk. The results demonstrate that artificially selecting for these facial characteristics greatly heightens the risk of corneal ulcers, and such selection should thus be discouraged to improve canine welfare. PMID:25969983

  10. Spinal cord injury pressure ulcer treatment: an experience-based approach.

    PubMed

    Sunn, Gabriel

    2014-08-01

    Pressure ulcers continue to impact the lives of spinal cord injury patients severely. Pressure ulcers must be accurately staged according to National Pressure Ulcer Advisory recommendations before treatment design. The first priority in treatment of pressure ulcers is offloading. Intact skin ulcers may be treated with noncontact nonthermal low-frequency ultrasound. Superficial pressure ulcers may be treated with a combination of collagenase and foam dressings. Deeper pressure ulcers warrant negative-pressure wound therapy dressings along with biologic adjuncts to fill in wound depth. Discovery and treatment of osteomyelitis is a high priority when initially evaluating pressure ulcers. Surgical intervention must always be considered.

  11. Study of a Monoclonal Antibody KHK4083 in Moderate Ulcerative Colitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-26

    Ulcerative Colitis; Digestive System Diseases; Colitis, Ulcerative; Colitis; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Inflammatory Bowel Diseases; Intestinal Diseases; Colonic Diseases; Autoimmune Disease; Abdominal Pain

  12. Increased Mortality in Diabetic Foot Ulcer Patients: The Significance of Ulcer Type

    PubMed Central

    Chammas, N. K.; Hill, R. L. R.; Edmonds, M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) patients have a greater than twofold increase in mortality compared with nonulcerated diabetic patients. We investigated (a) cause of death in DFU patients, (b) age at death, and (c) relationship between cause of death and ulcer type. This was an eleven-year retrospective study on DFU patients who attended King's College Hospital Foot Clinic and subsequently died. A control group of nonulcerated diabetic patients was matched for age and type of diabetes mellitus. The cause of death was identified from death certificates (DC) and postmortem (PM) examinations. There were 243 DFU patient deaths during this period. Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) was the major cause of death in 62.5% on PM compared to 45.7% on DC. Mean age at death from IHD on PM was 5 years lower in DFU patients compared to controls (68.2 ± 8.7 years versus 73.1 ± 8.0 years, P = 0.015). IHD as a cause of death at PM was significantly linked to neuropathic foot ulcers (OR 3.064, 95% CI 1.003–9.366, and P = 0.049). Conclusions. IHD is the major cause of premature mortality in DFU patients with the neuropathic foot ulcer patients being at a greater risk. PMID:27213157

  13. Rectal ulcer with an elusive diagnosis: all that ulcers is not Crohn disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A single rectal ulcer is an uncommon finding in children with gastrointestinal disease. Although inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is foremost among the differential diagnoses, a primary immunological defect should not be forgotten. Because of the paucity of literature on the association of rectal ul...

  14. Recurrent oral ulcers--an overview.

    PubMed

    Gaffar, A

    2001-01-01

    Recurrent oral ulcers (ROUs) are the most common oral mucosal disease. The etiology of ROUs is complex. The factors include mechanical trauma, genetics, stress, smoking, and viral and bacterial infections. Treatment modalities depend on the differential diagnosis of ROUs and could consist of antimicrobial agents, anti-inflammatory agents, immunomodulators, or over-the-counter medications. New therapy available in the form of a coating polymer, Colgate ORABASE Soothe.N.Seal, is clinically proven to provide rapid relief and healing of ROUs. PMID:11915640

  15. Colonic biogeography in health and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Aonghus; Lennon, Grainne; Winter, Desmond C; O'Connell, P Ronan

    2016-09-01

    The relevance of biogeography to the distal gut microbiota has been investigated in both health and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), however multiple factors, including sample type and methodology, microbiota characterization and interpersonal variability make the construction of a core model of colonic biogeography challenging. In addition, how phylogenetic classification relates to immunogenicity and whether consistent alterations in the microbiota are associated with ulcerative colitis (UC) remain open questions. This addendum seeks to review the human colonic microbiota in health and UC as currently understood, in the broader context of the human microbiome. PMID:27662587

  16. Pneumorrhachis Secondary to a Sacral Decubitus Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Moayedi, Siamak; Babin, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    An elderly woman with a chronic decubitus sacral ulcer presented to the emergency department with sepsis. A computed tomography of her abdomen showed diffuse gas extending throughout the thoracolumbar spinal canal. Pneumorrhachis is a rare radiographic finding defined as gas within the spinal canal. There are many causes of pneumorrhachis ranging from trauma to infection. In this case the pneumorrhachis was caused by direct spread of gas-forming organisms from vertebral osteomyelitis. Emergency physicians should know about the implication of gas in the spinal canal in the setting of sepsis. PMID:27429699

  17. [Innovations in the treatment of gastroduodenal ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bernier, J J

    1983-05-14

    It has long been known that gastroduodenal ulcers may heal spontaneously; this is the placebo effect in which the healing rate ranges from 20% at 2 weeks to 80% at 8 weeks. Two or three weeks can be gained by using cimetidine or ranitidine, with healing rates of 42% at 2 weeks and 85% at 6 weeks. Ranitidine probably has less side-effects than cimetidine. A new drug, omeprozole, appears to be much more potent but is not yet available. A vagolytic drug with specific affinity to the stomach (pirenzepine), as well as low-dosage bismuth bi-citrate and gastric mucosa protectors (sucralfate) are now returning in force. PMID:6304676

  18. Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease: Implications for College Health Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelphi, A. P.

    1977-01-01

    The author reviews clinical patterns of inflammatory bowel disorders, establishes a perspective for recognizing ulcerative colitis, ulcerative proctitis, and Crohn's disease in relation to other bowel inflammations, and suggests some epidemiologic strategies for studying etiology, pathogenesis, and natural history of the diseases. (MJB)

  19. Pressure ulcers. Nutrition strategies that make a difference.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Teresa

    2002-06-01

    One of the more influential factors associated with pressure ulcer prevention, development, and treatment is nutrition. Both the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS, formerly HCFA) and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) specifically identify nutritional status as a significant risk factor. Three nutrition-focused steps will help you protect patients from the debilitating effects of pressure ulcers.

  20. Lipopolysaccharide induced acute red eye and corneal ulcers.

    PubMed

    Schultz, C L; Morck, D W; McKay, S G; Olson, M E; Buret, A

    1997-01-01

    Using a new animal model, the aims of this study were to assess the role played by purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and neutrophils in the pathogenesis of acute red-eye reactions (ARE) and corneal ulcers. In addition, IL-1 alpha was assessed for its implications in the formation of corneal ulcers. Following corneal abrasion, eyes of rabbits underwent single or double exposures to various doses of LPS from Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Serratia marcescens. This protocol induced ARE symptoms, and their severity depended on the dosage, number of LPS exposures, and type of LPS used (LPS from S. marcescens showing highest virulence). Corneal ulcers were induced by delivering a high dose of Serratia LPS (100 micrograms) followed by a low dose (10 micrograms). Histopathological examination revealed that both ARE and corneal ulceration were associated with prominent neutrophil infiltration. In addition, many lymphocytes and other monocytic cells infiltrated ulcerated ocular tissue. Tear fluids obtained from ulcerated eyes contained high concentrations of a protein recognized by anti-rabbit IL-1 alpha antibodies as demonstrated by immunoblotting studies. The results indicate that LPS can induce ARE and corneal ulceration in the absence of any live bacteria. Moreover, the findings implicate the accumulation of neutrophils and IL-1 alpha-related proteins in the pathogenesis of ARE and corneal ulcers.

  1. Pressure ulcers or moisture lesions: the theatre perspective.

    PubMed

    Rego, A

    2016-04-01

    Pressure ulcers continue to be a cause for concern in the healthcare industry (IHI 2015). Unfortunately older patients are at a greater risk of developing pressure ulcers (Kottner et al 2013); moisture lesions and the presence of other comorbidities could have long term effects on the patient's health and recovery. PMID:27290758

  2. Characteristics of hospitalised US veterans with nosocomial pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Tarnowski Goodell, Teresa; Moskovitz, Zoe

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to describe demographic and clinical characteristics of hospitalised US veterans with nosocomial pressure ulcer (NPU) referred to a certified Wound, Ostomy & Continence Nurse (WOCN). We conducted a retrospective review of electronic records at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center in the northwestern USA. Records of veterans with NPU referred to a WOCN (n = 29) from May 2005 to June 2006 were reviewed. Location and stage of pressure ulcer(s), Braden score on admission and when the ulcer was first noted, day of hospital stay when the ulcer was first noted, medical diagnoses and clinical conditions and events such as surgery, hypoxemia, hypoalbuminemia and hypotension were recorded. Mean age of the patients was 69·8. The most common location was the sacrum/coccyx. Most ulcers were stage 1 when identified. Braden score during admission classified half of the sample at risk, but 81% of Braden scores at ulcer occurrence were <18. Ninety percent of the sample had three or more comorbidities. Over half had died in the 1-14 months after the reviewed hospitalisation. Hospitalised veterans referred for WOCN consultation had multiple risk factors and comorbid conditions, including hypoxemia, serum albumin depletion, anaemia and hypotension. Veterans cared for in Veterans Affairs Medical Centers are known to have multiple health problems, and those in this sample not only had nosocomial pressure ulcer, but also other physiological derangements that may shorten survival.

  3. Acute necrotising ulcerative gingivitis in an immunocompromised young adult.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jessie; Kent, Paul; Lennon, Joshua M; Logan, Latania K

    2015-01-01

    Acute necrotising ulcerative gingivitis is an acute onset disease characterised by ulceration, necrosis, pain and bleeding in gingival surfaces. It is predominantly seen in severely malnourished children and young adults with advanced HIV infection. We present a unique presentation in a young adult with high-grade osteogenic sarcoma.

  4. A case of bacillary angiomatosis presenting as leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Karakaş, M; Baba, M; Homan, S; Akman, A; Acar, M A; Memişoğlu, H R; Gümürdülü, D

    2003-01-01

    We report a 32-year-old immunocompetent man who had multiple leg ulcers caused by bacillary angiomatosis without a history of direct contact with cats. Bacillary angiomatosis should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of leg ulcers in cases of unknown aetiology.

  5. Clinical and microbiologic studies of genital ulcers in Kenyan women.

    PubMed

    Plummer, F A; D'Costa, L J; Nsanze, H; Karasira, P; MacLean, I W; Piot, P; Ronald, A R

    1985-01-01

    The etiology of genital ulcers in women in tropical regions is poorly understood. Eighty-nine women, presenting to a sexually transmitted disease clinic in Nairobi (Kenya) with a primary complaint of genital ulcers, were evaluated prospectively in a clinical and laboratory study. A final etiologic diagnosis was possible for 60 (67%) of the women. Culture for Haemophilus ducreyi was positive for 43 women, eight had secondary syphilis with ulcerated condyloma latum, three had primary syphilis, one had both chancroid and syphilis, two had moniliasis, two had herpetic ulceration, and one had a traumatic ulcer. The clinical characteristics that best distinguished chancroid from secondary syphilis were ulcer excavation and a rough ulcer base. No etiologic diagnosis was established for 29 patients. However, the clinical and epidemiologic features of these patients suggested that they were similar if not identical to the patients with H. ducreyi culture-positive chancroid. Further studies are necessary to determine the etiology of ulcers in females in whom no pathogen was identified.

  6. Management of diabetic foot ulcers: evaluation of case studies.

    PubMed

    Torkington-Stokes, Rachel; Metcalf, Daniel; Bowler, Philip

    2016-08-11

    This article explores local barriers to diabetic foot ulcer healing, and describes the use of a dressing designed to manage exudate, infection and biofilm (AQUACEL® Ag+ dressing (AQAg+)) on recalcitrant diabetic foot ulcers. The authors consider four case studies that demonstrate how managing local barriers to wound healing with antimicrobial and anti-biofilm dressings in protocols of care can improve outcomes for patients.

  7. [AETIOLOGY AND PATHOGENESIS GASTRO-DUODENALES ULCERATIVE LESIONS IN ELDERLY].

    PubMed

    Chernekhovskaya, N E; Povalayev, A V; Layshenko, G A

    2015-01-01

    In review today conceptions of view to aetiology and pathogenesis gastro-duodenales ulcerative lesions in elderly. Atherosclerosis, ischemic disease of the heart and hypertension are reasons of acute ulcers and erosions in elderly. The breaking of microcirculation are very importance.

  8. Anaerobic bacteria and herpes simplex virus in genital ulceration.

    PubMed Central

    Masfari, A N; Kinghorn, G R; Hafiz, S; Barton, I G; Duerden, B I

    1985-01-01

    Of 91 patients with genital ulceration, herpes simplex virus was isolated from 52 (57%) and Haemophilus ducreyi from 12 (13%); none had syphilis. The difference in incidence of other aerobes in patients and controls was not significant. Anaerobes, predominantly Bacteroides spp, were isolated from a large proportion (77%) of men and women patients with ulcers but from few control men. The most common anaerobic species were B asaccharolyticus and B ureolyticus, with fewer isolates of the melaninogenicus/oralis group. The bacterial flora of herpetic and non-herpetic ulcers were similar, but Candida albicans was isolated significantly more often from non-herpetic ulcers. Anaerobic bacteria may contribute to the pathogenesis of genital ulcers. PMID:2984108

  9. Allergic contact dermatitis in venous leg ulcer patients.

    PubMed

    Tavadia, S; Bianchi, J; Dawe, R S; McEvoy, M; Wiggins, E; Hamill, E; Urcelay, M; Strong, A M M; Douglas, W S

    2003-05-01

    Our aim was to determine the frequency and nature of contact sensitivity in venous leg ulcer patients in Lanarkshire. We performed patch testing with the European standard series, antimicrobials and medicaments on 200 patients referred to our leg ulcer clinics. Positive patch tests were found in 136 (68%) patients. Multiple allergies occurred in 102 (51%). The most frequent allergen groups were fragrances (30.5%), antimicrobials (19.5%), topical excipients (19.5%), rubber accelerators (13.5%) and topical corticosteroids (8%). We also found a high prevalence of positive patch tests to Intrasite gel (9.5%) and Hioxyl cream (8.5%), medicaments which are commonly used to treat leg ulcers in our area. Contact sensitivity is common in venous leg ulcer patients and has important implications for patient management. The allergens involved vary depending on local nursing practice. We suggest that all venous leg ulcer patients be patch tested with a locally relevant patch test series.

  10. [A case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with ileocecal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Tetsuyoshi; Saruta, Masayuki; Sawada, Ryoichi; Ide, Daisuke; Arihiro, Seiji; Matsuoka, Mika; Katoh, Tomohiro; Tajiri, Hisao

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and ileocecal ulcer. A 31-year-old man was admitted with chief complaints of decreased body weight and abdominal pain. Colonoscopy revealed a round punched-out ulcer on the ileocecal valve. Initially, we suspected entero-Behçet's disease and simple ulcer as the cause of the ileocecal ulcer. However, after histologic examination of tissue biopsies obtained during colonoscopy, we diagnosed the patient as having cytomegalovirus (CMV) enteritis. Based on the patient's white blood cell depletion and CMV enteritis, we performed a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody test. The test was positive, and the diagnosis of AIDS was established. The number of patients with AIDS has been increasing in Japan; thus, we should consider the possibility of CMV enteritis and AIDS in young adult patients affected by ileocecal ulcer with no notable history.

  11. Pyoderma gangrenosum and ulcerative colitis in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Alese, Olatunji B; Irabor, David O

    2008-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum is a rare inflammatory skin condition, characterized by progressive and recurrent skin ulceration. There may be rapidly enlarging, painful ulcers with undermined edges and a necrotic, hemorrhagic base. Disorders classically associated with pyoderma gangrenosum include rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, paraproteinemia and myeloproliferative disorders. There have been some reports of the occurrence of pyoderma gangrenosum in Africa, and in Nigeria, but only one specifically reported pyoderma gangrenosum in association with ulcerative colitis. We report on a 45-year-old man who presented with pyoderma gangrenosum associated with ulcerative colitis; the second report in Nigeria. The skin lesions were managed with daily honey wound dressings. Oral dapsone and prednisolone were started. The frequency of the bloody diarrhea decreased, and was completely resolved by the second week after admission. The ulcers also showed accelerated healing. The goal of therapy is directed towards the associated systemic disorder, if present.

  12. [Indications for surgical treatment of hard scarring gastric ulcers].

    PubMed

    Durleshter, V M; Korochanskaia, N V; Serikova, S N

    2014-01-01

    It was done the comparative analysis of the morphofunctional state of the upper gastrointestinal tract between 350 patients with effective conservative treatment and 104 patients with hard scarring gastric ulcers. The analysis identified the predictors of ineffective medical treatment and led to deliver the indications for timely surgical treatment. It was identified the next indications for planned organ-preserving surgical treatment of patients with hard scarring gastric ulcers: penetrating and non-healing ulcers with large or gigantic size in case of the adequate medical therapy, high-grade dysplasia and colonic metaplasia of the gastric epithelium in the borders or fundus of the ulcer,ulcers combination with fixed cardio-fundal or fundo-corporal hiatal hernias; hypotonic-hypokinetic type of the gastric and duodenal activity with the development of gastrostasis and pronounced duodenogastric reflux.

  13. Eosinophilic ulcer of the tongue--Case report.

    PubMed

    Didona, Dario; Paolino, Giovanni; Donati, Michele; Didona, Biagio; Calvieri, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic ulcer of the oral mucosa is a rare, self-limiting, chronic and benign lesion of unknown pathogenesis that affects the oral mucosa. We present the case of a 65 year-old Caucasian female with a five month history of a painful ulcer on the lateral side of her tongue. The ulcer was not adhered to the underlying structures and there was no evidence of regional lymph node involvement. Laboratory examinations and X-rays revealed no abnormalities. Topical treatments had been performed without any improvement. Histopathological examination showed an ulcerated surface and mixed inflammatory infiltrate with several eosinophils extending into the mucosa and submucosa. No cellular atypia was observed. Based on the patient-s history and mucosal biopsy, a final diagnosis of eosinophilic ulcer of the oral mucosa was made. PMID:26312683

  14. Spatial distribution of mast cells in chronic venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Abd-El-Aleem, S A; Morgan, C; Ferguson, M W J; McCollum, C N; Ireland, G W

    2005-01-01

    Chronic venous leg ulcers (CVUs) show chronic inflammation but different pathological changes occur in different parts of the ulcer. There is a lack of re-epithelialisation and defective matrix deposition in the ulcer base but epidermal hyperproliferation and increased matrix deposition in the surrounding skin. The role of mast cells in wound healing, inflammation, fibrosis and epidermal hyperproliferation has been extensively studied but less is known about their role in CVUs. In the present study, we investigated the distribution of mast cells in CVUs with specific consideration of the differences between the ulcer base and the skin surrounding the ulcer. Both histochemical and immunohistological methods were used to detect the mast cell marker tryptase in frozen sections of CVU biopsies. Mast cells were counted in the dermis of normal skin, in the ulcer base and in the skin surrounding the ulcer. Double immunofluorescence staining was used to study the location of mast cells in relation to blood vessels. In normal skin few mast cells were seen in the dermis but none in the epidermis. However in CVUs there was a significant increase in intact and degranulated mast cells in the surrounding skin and ulcer edge (184 per field, p<0.003) of CVUs and a significant reduction in the ulcer base (20.5 per field p<0.05) in comparison to normal skin (61 per field). In CVUs mast cells showed a characteristic location near the epithelial basement membrane whilst mast cell granules and phantom cells (mast cells devoid of granules) were predominantly seen in the epidermis. In the dermis, mast cells were seen associated with blood vessels. The marked increase in mast cells in the surrounding skin of CVUs and depletion of mast cells in the ulcer base could implicate mast cell mediators in the pathological changes in CVUs particularly in the epidermal and vascular changes occurring in the surrounding skin.

  15. The VCU Pressure Ulcer Summit-Developing Centers of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence: A Framework for Sustainability.

    PubMed

    Creehan, Sue; Cuddigan, Janet; Gonzales, Dana; Nix, Denise; Padula, William; Pittman, Joyce; Pontieri-Lewis, Vicky; Walden, Christine; Wells, Belinda; Wheeler, Robinetta

    2016-01-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcer occurrences have declined over the past decade as reimbursement policies have changed, evidence-based practice guidelines have been implemented, and quality improvement initiatives have been launched. However, the 2006-2008 Institute for Healthcare Improvement goal of zero pressure ulcers remains difficult to achieve and even more challenging to sustain. Magnet hospitals tend to have lower hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rates than non-Magnet hospitals, yet many non-Magnet hospitals also have robust pressure ulcer prevention programs. Successful programs share commonalities in structure, processes, and outcomes. A national summit of 55 pressure ulcer experts was convened at the Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center in March 2014. The group was divided into 3 focus groups; each was assigned a task to develop a framework describing components of a proposed Magnet-designated Center of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence. Systematic literature reviews, analysis of exemplars, and nominal group process techniques were used to create the framework. This article presents a framework describing the proposed Magnet-designated Centers of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence. Critical attributes of Centers of Excellence are identified and organized according to the 4 domains of the ANCC model for the Magnet Recognition Program: transformational leadership; structural empowerment; exemplary professional practice; and new knowledge innovation and improvements. The structures, processes, and outcome measures necessary to become a proposed Center of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence are discussed. PMID:26808304

  16. The VCU Pressure Ulcer Summit-Developing Centers of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence: A Framework for Sustainability.

    PubMed

    Creehan, Sue; Cuddigan, Janet; Gonzales, Dana; Nix, Denise; Padula, William; Pittman, Joyce; Pontieri-Lewis, Vicky; Walden, Christine; Wells, Belinda; Wheeler, Robinetta

    2016-01-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcer occurrences have declined over the past decade as reimbursement policies have changed, evidence-based practice guidelines have been implemented, and quality improvement initiatives have been launched. However, the 2006-2008 Institute for Healthcare Improvement goal of zero pressure ulcers remains difficult to achieve and even more challenging to sustain. Magnet hospitals tend to have lower hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rates than non-Magnet hospitals, yet many non-Magnet hospitals also have robust pressure ulcer prevention programs. Successful programs share commonalities in structure, processes, and outcomes. A national summit of 55 pressure ulcer experts was convened at the Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center in March 2014. The group was divided into 3 focus groups; each was assigned a task to develop a framework describing components of a proposed Magnet-designated Center of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence. Systematic literature reviews, analysis of exemplars, and nominal group process techniques were used to create the framework. This article presents a framework describing the proposed Magnet-designated Centers of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence. Critical attributes of Centers of Excellence are identified and organized according to the 4 domains of the ANCC model for the Magnet Recognition Program: transformational leadership; structural empowerment; exemplary professional practice; and new knowledge innovation and improvements. The structures, processes, and outcome measures necessary to become a proposed Center of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence are discussed.

  17. Cohort study of atypical pressure ulcers development.

    PubMed

    Jaul, Efraim

    2014-12-01

    Atypical pressure ulcers (APU) are distinguished from common pressure ulcers (PU) with both unusual location and different aetiology. The occurrence and attempts to characterise APU remain unrecognised. The purpose of this cohort study was to analyse the occurrence of atypical location and the circumstances of the causation, and draw attention to the prevention and treatment by a multidisciplinary team. The cohort study spanned three and a half years totalling 174 patients. The unit incorporates two weekly combined staff meetings. One concentrates on wound assessment with treatment decisions made by the physician and nurse, and the other, a multidisciplinary team reviewing all patients and coordinating treatment. The main finding of this study identified APU occurrence rate of 21% within acquired PU over a three and a half year period. Severe spasticity constituted the largest group in this study and the most difficult to cure wounds, located in medial aspects of knees, elbows and palms. Medical devices caused the second largest occurrence of atypical wounds, located in the nape of the neck, penis and nostrils. Bony deformities were the third recognisable atypical wound group located in shoulder blades and upper spine. These three categories are definable and time observable. APU are important to be recognisable, and can be healed as well as being prevented. The prominent role of the multidisciplinary team is primary in identification, prevention and treatment. PMID:23374746

  18. Diagnosis and classification of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Karsten; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Laass, Martin W

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) characterised by superficial mucosal ulceration, rectal bleeding, diarrhoea, and abdominal pain. In contrast to Crohn's disease (CrD), UC is restricted to the colon and the inflammation is limited to the mucosal layer. Classic UC affects the colon in a retrograde and continuous fashion starting from the rectum and extending proximally. Dependent on the anatomic extent of involvement, UC can be classified as proctitis, left-sided colitis, or pancolitis. Inflammatory arthropathies and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are the most common and clinically most important extraintestinal manifestations of UC. The aetiopathogenesis of UC is incompletely understood, but immune-mediated mechanisms are responsible for dysregulated immune responses against intraluminal antigens in genetically predisposed individuals. The diagnosis is based on the history, as well as clinical, radiological, endoscopic and histological features. Autoantibodies, mainly antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) and anti-goblet cell antibodies (GAB) may be helpful in the early diagnosis of UC and in differentiating it from CrD.

  19. [Mental status of patients with ulcer disease].

    PubMed

    Tsimmerman, Ia S; Belousov, F V; Tregubov, L Z

    2004-01-01

    Questionnaire survey has been performed among 100 patients with duodenal ulcer (DU). Character building of these patients when they were children and adolescents was wring in 80 +/- 4 cases (women) and in 88.6 +/- 3.2 cases (men). Most significant negative factors were undercare, hypercare and living in incomplete family. The Leongard's questionnaire distinguishes various accentuations with prevalence of cycloid, epileptoid, emotive and demonstrative; anxiety scale was low. The Gissen personality questionnaire "Ego" confirmed frequent occurrence among DU patients of emotive, hysteroid, epileptoid features with non-flexible type of reaction. By Luscher's test, anxiety was low or moderate. Overall prevalence of personality disorders totalled 29 +/- 4.5 cases, mostly in women. It was proved experimentally that psychosomatic disorders are realized in target organs. In DU these organs were gastrointestinal (36 +/- 5.7 cases). Similar data about involvement of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) were obtained in stress reactions. However, "ulcer personality" was not documented. Support of preferable realization of psychogenic factors action in GIT was obtained with Gissen somatic questionnaire. Operating psychogenic factors and their dynamics were characterized; emotional deprivation was leading. Among psychopathological manifestations, asthenodepressive symptoms prevailed in 76 +/- 4.3 cases. High efficiency of gestalt-psychotherapy and coaxil in the treatment of DU in patients with psychopathological disorders of the neurotic level were found. PMID:15114773

  20. Remote wound monitoring of chronic ulcers.

    PubMed

    Weber, Sonja A; Watermann, Niall; Jossinet, Jacques; Byrne, J Anthony; Chantrey, Jonquille; Alam, Shabana; So, Karen; Bush, Jim; O'Kane, Sharon; McAdams, Eric T

    2010-03-01

    Chronic wounds or ulcers are wounds that do not heal in the usual manner. This type of wound is most common in the elderly and in paraplegic patients with an estimated 1% of the population suffering from leg ulcers and the costs adding up to 4% of the annual National Health Service budget in the U.K. There is an identified need to develop a device capable of remote wound monitoring that enables patients to take charge of their wound management under clinical guidance. A new ¿wound mapping¿ device has been developed, which is based on electrical impedance spectroscopy and involves the multifrequency characterization of the electrical properties of wound tissue under an electrode array. A key feature of the prototype device is the anticipated incorporation of the measuring array into standard commercial occlusive dressings, thereby protecting the wound from interference and contamination, and thus, promoting wound healing, while monitoring the protected wound. Further development is planned including wireless transmission, thus enabling telewound monitoring as described earlier. PMID:20659833

  1. Radical induction theory of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Pravda, Jay

    2005-01-01

    To propose a new pathogenesis called Radical Induction to explain the genesis and progression of ulcerative colitis (UC). UC is an inflammatory bowel disease. Colonic inflammation in UC is mediated by a buildup of white blood cells (WBCs) within the colonic mucosal lining; however, to date there is no answer for why WBCs initially enter the colonic mucosa to begin with. A new pathogenesis termed “Radical Induction Theory” is proposed to explain this and states that excess un-neutralized hydrogen peroxide, produced within colonic epithelial cells as a result of aberrant cellular metabolism, diffuses through cell membranes to the extracellular space where it is converted to the highly damaging hydroxyl radical resulting in oxidative damage to structures comprising the colonic epithelial barrier. Once damaged, the barrier is unable to exclude highly immunogenic fecal bacterial antigens from invading the normally sterile submucosa. This antigenic exposure provokes an initial immune response of WBC infiltration into the colonic mucosa. Once present in the mucosa, WBCs are stimulated to secrete toxins by direct exposure to fecal bacteria leading to mucosal ulceration and bloody diarrhea characteristic of this disease. PMID:15832404

  2. Cohort study of atypical pressure ulcers development.

    PubMed

    Jaul, Efraim

    2014-12-01

    Atypical pressure ulcers (APU) are distinguished from common pressure ulcers (PU) with both unusual location and different aetiology. The occurrence and attempts to characterise APU remain unrecognised. The purpose of this cohort study was to analyse the occurrence of atypical location and the circumstances of the causation, and draw attention to the prevention and treatment by a multidisciplinary team. The cohort study spanned three and a half years totalling 174 patients. The unit incorporates two weekly combined staff meetings. One concentrates on wound assessment with treatment decisions made by the physician and nurse, and the other, a multidisciplinary team reviewing all patients and coordinating treatment. The main finding of this study identified APU occurrence rate of 21% within acquired PU over a three and a half year period. Severe spasticity constituted the largest group in this study and the most difficult to cure wounds, located in medial aspects of knees, elbows and palms. Medical devices caused the second largest occurrence of atypical wounds, located in the nape of the neck, penis and nostrils. Bony deformities were the third recognisable atypical wound group located in shoulder blades and upper spine. These three categories are definable and time observable. APU are important to be recognisable, and can be healed as well as being prevented. The prominent role of the multidisciplinary team is primary in identification, prevention and treatment.

  3. Prolonged ulcerative laryngitis: a new disease entity.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Tzu-Yu

    2011-03-01

    Over the last decade, a new disease entity, prolonged ulcerative laryngitis (PUL), with unique clinical presentation and prolonged disease course, has been recognized. Until now, very few studies dealing with this disease have been reported in the literature. From 1999 to 2008, we analyzed clinical data from a series of 39 PUL patients who were treated with an observational approach without implementing specific treatments. This disease affects adults, predominantly females. The age of patients in our series ranged from 26 to 76 years with a median of 49.5 years. This disease is characterized by ulcers and signs of acute inflammation on the membranous portion of the vocal folds with a prolonged clinical course. The recovery times of patients ranged from 4 to 20 weeks with an average of 9.4 weeks. The data in this study may reflect a natural history of this disease. PUL seems to be a self-limited disease, but the etiology of this disease is unknown. Specific infections or systemic inflammatory processes involving the larynx must be ruled out before diagnosis, and conservative treatments are suggested.

  4. The pathway to foot ulceration in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Boulton, Andrew J M

    2013-09-01

    It should now be possible to achieve a reduction in the incidence of foot ulceration and amputations as knowledge about pathways that result in both these events increases. However, despite the universal use of patient education and the hope of reducing the incidence of ulcers in high-risk patients, there are no appropriately designed large, randomized controlled trials actually confirming that education works. It has been recognized for some years that education as part of a multidisciplinary approach to care of the diabetic foot can help to reduce the incidence of amputations in certain settings. Ultimately, however, a reduction in neuropathic foot problems will only be achieved if we remember that the patients with neuropathic feet have lost their prime warning signal—pain—that ordinarily brings patients to their doctor. Very little training is offered to health care professionals as to how to deal with such patients. Much can be learned about the management of such patients from the treatment of individuals with leprosy: if we are to succeed, we must realize that with loss of pain there is also diminished motivation in the healing of and prevention of injury. PMID:23992891

  5. Plantar Pressure in Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Patients with Active Foot Ulceration, Previous Ulceration and No History of Ulceration: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Malindu Eranga; Crowther, Robert George; Pappas, Elise; Lazzarini, Peter Anthony; Cunningham, Margaret; Sangla, Kunwarjit Singh; Buttner, Petra; Golledge, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Aims Elevated dynamic plantar pressures are a consistent finding in diabetes patients with peripheral neuropathy with implications for plantar foot ulceration. This meta-analysis aimed to compare the plantar pressures of diabetes patients that had peripheral neuropathy and those with neuropathy with active or previous foot ulcers. Methods Published articles were identified from Medline via OVID, CINAHL, SCOPUS, INFORMIT, Cochrane Central EMBASE via OVID and Web of Science via ISI Web of Knowledge bibliographic databases. Observational studies reporting barefoot dynamic plantar pressure in adults with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, where at least one group had a history of plantar foot ulcers were included. Interventional studies, shod plantar pressure studies and studies not published in English were excluded. Overall mean peak plantar pressure (MPP) and pressure time integral (PTI) were primary outcomes. The six secondary outcomes were MPP and PTI at the rear foot, mid foot and fore foot. The protocol of the meta-analysis was published with PROPSERO, (registration number CRD42013004310). Results Eight observational studies were included. Overall MPP and PTI were greater in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients with foot ulceration compared to those without ulceration (standardised mean difference 0.551, 95% CI 0.290–0.811, p<0.001; and 0.762, 95% CI 0.303–1.221, p = 0.001, respectively). Sub-group analyses demonstrated no significant difference in MPP for those with neuropathy with active ulceration compared to those without ulcers. A significant difference in MPP was found for those with neuropathy with a past history of ulceration compared to those without ulcers; (0.467, 95% CI 0.181– 0.753, p = 0.001). Statistical heterogeneity between studies was moderate. Conclusions Plantar pressures appear to be significantly higher in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy with a history of foot ulceration compared to those with diabetic neuropathy

  6. Autoradiographic study on healing process of cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcer in rat. Possible importance of Brunner's glands in ulcer healing

    SciTech Connect

    Fuse, Y.; Tsuchihashi, Y.; Sugihara, H.; Kodama, T.; Takino, T.; Fujita, S.

    1988-09-01

    The healing process of cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcer was studied by (/sup 3/H)thymidine autoradiography. After the development of ulcer in the duodenum, cell proliferation was markedly activated not only in the crypts but also in the Brunner's glands near the ulcer. In the initial stages of ulcer healing, they both contributed to form the surface covering regenerating epithelium. Granulation tissue also proliferated at the base of the ulcer. In later stages of ulcer healing, new crypts were formed in the floor of the ulcer. New villi regenerated from these crypts and Brunner's glands regenerated by proliferation in situ. The ulcer base then was completely covered with new villi and granulation tissue was replaced by dense fibrous connective tissue. The present study suggested that the Brunner's glands, together with the crypts of Lieberkuehn, play an important role in the healing process of cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcer.

  7. Etiology of genital ulcers and prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus coinfection in 10 US cities. The Genital Ulcer Disease Surveillance Group.

    PubMed

    Mertz, K J; Trees, D; Levine, W C; Lewis, J S; Litchfield, B; Pettus, K S; Morse, S A; St Louis, M E; Weiss, J B; Schwebke, J; Dickes, J; Kee, R; Reynolds, J; Hutcheson, D; Green, D; Dyer, I; Richwald, G A; Novotny, J; Weisfuse, I; Goldberg, M; O'Donnell, J A; Knaup, R

    1998-12-01

    To determine the etiology of genital ulcers and to assess the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in ulcer patients in 10 US cities, ulcer and serum specimens were collected from approximately 50 ulcer patients at a sexually transmitted disease clinic in each city. Ulcer specimens were tested using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay to detect Haemophilus ducreyi, Treponema pallidum, and herpes simplex virus (HSV); sera were tested for antibody to HIV. H. ducreyi was detected in ulcer specimens from patients in Memphis (20% of specimens) and Chicago (12%). T. pallidum was detected in ulcer specimens from every city except Los Angeles (median, 9% of specimens; range, 0%-46%). HSV was detected in >/=50% of specimens from all cities except Memphis (42%). HIV seroprevalence in ulcer patients was 6% (range by city, 0%-18%). These data suggest that chancroid is prevalent in some US cities and that persons with genital ulcers should be a focus of HIV prevention activities.

  8. Flexible and rigid casting tape as a novel approach to offloading diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Malone, M; Gannass, A Al; Bowling, F

    2011-07-01

    Offloading diabetic ulceration is a key component to the success in healing ulcers on the plantar aspect of the foot. New advances in offloading techniques allow for differing approaches in sometimes complex diabetic foot pathologies with associated ulceration. This case study looks at the use of flexible and rigid casting technique as part of the treatment in offloading plantar foot ulceration.

  9. Factors Associated With Pressure Ulcers in Individuals With Spina Bifida

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sunkyung; Ward, Elisabeth; Dicianno, Brad E.; Clayton, Gerald H.; Sawin, Kathleen J.; Beierwaltes, Patricia; Thibadeau, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe factors associated with pressure ulcers in individuals with spina bifida (SB) enrolled in the National Spina Bifida Patient Registry (NSBPR). Design Unbalanced longitudinal multicenter cohort study. Setting Nineteen SB clinics. Participants Individuals with SB (N=3153) enrolled in 19 clinic sites that participate in the NSBPR. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Pressure ulcer status (yes/no) at the annual visit between 2009 and 2012. Results Of 3153 total participants, 19% (n=603) reported ulcers at their most recent annual clinic visit. Seven factors–level of lesion, wheelchair use, urinary incontinence, shunt presence, above the knee orthopedic surgery, recent surgery, and male sex–were significantly associated with the presence of pressure ulcers. Of these factors, level of lesion, urinary incontinence, recent surgery, and male sex were included in the final logistic regression model. The 3 adjusting variables–SB type, SB clinic, and age group–were significant in all analyses (all P<.001). Conclusions By adjusting for SB type, SB clinic, and age group, we found that 7 factors–level of lesion, wheelchair use, urinary incontinence, shunt presence, above the knee orthopedic surgery, recent surgery, and male sex–were associated with pressure ulcers. Identifying key factors associated with the onset of pressure ulcers can be incorporated into clinical practice in ways that prevent and enhance treatment of pressure ulcers in the population with SB. PMID:25796136

  10. Conservative management of ulcerated haemangioma--twenty years experience.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anand; Gangopadhyay, Ajay Narayan; Sharma, Shiv Prasad; Kumar, Vijayendra; Gopal, Saroj Chooramani; Gupta, Dinesh Kumar

    2009-02-01

    Ulceration is the most common complication of haemangioma and occurs in 5-15% of cases. The present study was carried out to evaluate the clinical features of ulcerated haemangioma and efficacy of the management protocol adopted by us over a period of 20 years. All patients with ulcerated haemangioma were evaluated on the basis of age at presentation, sex, rural or urban distribution and site of haemangioma. Treatment included application of topical antibiotic and systemic antibiotic and analgesic for pain. The total number of patients was 608. The male to female ratio was 1: 2.28. The rural:urban distribution was 2.43:1. The most common site of involvement was head and neck. Mean age of patients was 5.60 +/- 2.44 months. Mean size of haemangioma and ulceration was 47.30 +/- 20.67 cm(2) and 7.49 +/- 4.52 cm(2), respectively. The mean time for ulcer healing was 40.06 +/- 19.41 days. Ulcer size of more than 10 cm(2) took more time to heal. Response to treatment was satisfactory. Ulcerated haemangioma usually occurs before completion of 1 year of age; hence, every patient with haemangioma needs careful attention. Adequate treatment and regular follow up brings satisfactory response in the patients.

  11. Trends in perforated peptic ulcer: incidence, etiology, treatment, and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Svanes, C

    2000-03-01

    After increasing steeply at the beginning of the twentieth century, ulcer perforation incidence during the last decades has declined in the young and in men, and it has risen among the elderly and in women. These changes can be attributed to a cohort phenomenon: Ulcer perforation risk is particularly common in the cohorts born after the turn of the twentieth century and is less common in previous and succeeding birth cohorts. A decline in total incidence is expected with the death of the high risk cohorts. Most ulcer perforations among subjects < 75 years of age can be attributed to smoking. Subjects with a history of ulcer perforation therefore have poorer long-term survival than the general population, most pronounced for younger generations. About one of four ulcer perforations can be attributed to the use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, a risk factor of particular importance in the elderly. Ulcer perforation was frequently treated by gastric resection in former days, whereas suture, being the first method introduced in 1887, is the method of choice today. The introduction of antibiotics improved the prognosis of ulcer perforation surgery greatly. Postoperative lethality decreased until 1950 but has remained stable since then. Lethality is higher in the elderly and is higher after gastric than after duodenal perforation. The delay before surgical treatment is a strong determinant for lethality, complication rates, and hospital costs. Treatment delay seems to have increased during the last

  12. Pressure-ulcer reduction using low-friction fabric bootees.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Deborah

    At St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, implementation of pressure management measures has reduced the incidence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. There is now a focus on those pressure ulcers still occurring despite these measures, particularly grade 2 ulcers on the heel, which are often attributed to friction and shear. During 2012 and 2013 low friction fabric bootees (Parafricta®) were used on at-risk patients (where possible) to attempt to address this issue. The bootees were first introduced in 2012. There was a decline in heel ulcers of 78% in the 2 years, which accounted for a sizeable portion of the overall decline in all grade 2 pressure ulcers. There was also a substantial change in the ratio of heel to all other grade 2 pressure ulcers, which fell from 0.67 to 0.24. On the basis of heel pressure ulcers avoided, there is an implied net saving to the NHS. The trust concluded that routine use of low-friction fabric bootees made a significant further contribution towards achieving zero harm targets and had done so while providing substantial cost benefits.

  13. Increased Risk of Peptic Ulcers Following a Cholecystectomy for Gallstones.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Huang, Chung-Chien; Kao, Li-Ting; Lin, Herng-Ching; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective cohort study examined the relationship between a cholecystectomy and the subsequent risk of peptic ulcers using a population-based database. Data for this study were retrieved from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. This study included 5209 patients who had undergone a cholecystectomy for gallstones and 15,627 sex- and age-matched comparison patients. We individually tracked each patient for a 5-year period to identify those who subsequently received a diagnosis of peptic ulcers. We found that of the 20,836 sampled patients, 2033 patients (9.76%) received a diagnosis of peptic ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period: 674 from the study group (12.94% of the patients who underwent a cholecystectomy) and 1359 from the comparison group (8.70% of the comparison patients). The stratified Cox proportional hazard regressions showed that the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for peptic ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period was 1.48 (95% CI = 1.34~1.64) for patients who underwent a cholecystectomy than comparison patients. Furthermore, the adjusted HRs of gastric ulcers and duodenal ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period were 1.70 and 1.71, respectively, for patients who underwent a cholecystectomy compared to comparison patients. This study demonstrated a relationship between a cholecystectomy and a subsequent diagnosis of peptic ulcers. PMID:27469240

  14. Increased Risk of Peptic Ulcers Following a Cholecystectomy for Gallstones

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Huang, Chung-Chien; Kao, Li-Ting; Lin, Herng-Ching; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective cohort study examined the relationship between a cholecystectomy and the subsequent risk of peptic ulcers using a population-based database. Data for this study were retrieved from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. This study included 5209 patients who had undergone a cholecystectomy for gallstones and 15,627 sex- and age-matched comparison patients. We individually tracked each patient for a 5-year period to identify those who subsequently received a diagnosis of peptic ulcers. We found that of the 20,836 sampled patients, 2033 patients (9.76%) received a diagnosis of peptic ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period: 674 from the study group (12.94% of the patients who underwent a cholecystectomy) and 1359 from the comparison group (8.70% of the comparison patients). The stratified Cox proportional hazard regressions showed that the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for peptic ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period was 1.48 (95% CI = 1.34~1.64) for patients who underwent a cholecystectomy than comparison patients. Furthermore, the adjusted HRs of gastric ulcers and duodenal ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period were 1.70 and 1.71, respectively, for patients who underwent a cholecystectomy compared to comparison patients. This study demonstrated a relationship between a cholecystectomy and a subsequent diagnosis of peptic ulcers. PMID:27469240

  15. Evaluation of treatment with carboxymethylcellulose on chronic venous ulcers*

    PubMed Central

    Januário, Virginia; de Ávila, Dione Augusto; Penetra, Maria Alice; Sampaio, Ana Luisa Bittencourt; Noronha Neta, Maria Isabel; Cassia, Flavia de Freire; Carneiro, Sueli

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Among the chronic leg ulcers, venous ulcers are the most common and constitute a major burden to public health. Despite all technology available, some patients do not respond to established treatments. In our study, carboxymethylcellulose was tested in the treatment of refractory chronic venous ulcers. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of carboxymethylcellulose 20% on the healing of chronic venous ulcers refractory to conventional treatments. METHODS: This is an analytical, pre-experimental study. Thirty patients were included with refractory venous ulcers, and applied dressings with carboxymethylcellulose 20% for 20 weeks. The analysis was based on measurement of the area of ulcers, performed at the first visit and after the end of the treatment. RESULTS: There was a reduction of 3.9 cm2 of lesion area (p=0.0001), corresponding to 38.8% (p=0.0001). There was no interruption of treatment and no increase in lesion area in any patient. CONCLUSIONS: Carboxymethylcellulose 20% represents a low cost and effective therapeutic alternative for the treatment of refractory chronic venous ulcers. However, controlled studies are necessary to prove its efficacy. PMID:26982773

  16. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in oral aphthous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Birek, C; Grandhi, R; McNeill, K; Singer, D; Ficarra, G; Bowden, G

    1999-05-01

    A causative role for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in the pathogenesis of oral mucosal ulcerations has been suggested previously. We have adopted the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as a rapid and sensitive means to detect H. pylori in swabs of recurrent oral aphthous ulcers and in samples of other oral sites. Of the oral aphthous ulcer samples, 32 (71.8%) were found to be positive, while the saliva and plaque samples (most of them taken from the patients with aphthous ulcers) were consistently negative for H. pylori DNA, as detected by the PCR assay. Only two of the swab samples from the tongue (collected at the time of concurrent, H. pylori-positive oral aphthous ulcers) were found to be positive. The data suggest that H. pylori may be associated frequently with recurrent oral aphthous ulcers, and are consistent with previous studies indicating that saliva and plaque are not likely sources of contamination with this microorganism. There was no apparent correlation with HIV status (infection with human immunodeficiency virus). The possible pathogenic significance of Helicobacter pylori in oral ulcerations is discussed.

  17. Anti-ulcer activity of Ficus religiosa leaf ethanolic extract

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Marslin; Divya, B.; Mary, Revina Ann; Viji, M. M. Hipolith; Kalaichelvan, V. K.; Palanivel, V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the anti-ulcer activity and acute toxicity of Ficus religiosa (F. religiosa) leaf ethanolic extract in animal models. Methods Anti-ulcer activity of F. religiosa ethanolic extract (250 and 500 mg/kg body weight) was studied on stress induced ulcer animal models. Ranitidine was used as standard. The anti-ulcer activity of F. religiosa was evaluated with the help of ulcer area and histopatholgical examination. Preliminary phyto-chemical screening and acute toxicity studies of F. religiosa also carried out. Results Results showed that the extract treatments prevented ulcer area and gastric secretion in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of 2 000 mg/kg extract did not show any acute toxicity in albino mice. Preliminary phytochemical analysis identified the presence of flavonoids in the ethanolic extract of F. religiosa. Conclusions The extract is non-toxic even at relatively high concentrations. The anti-ulcer activity is probably due to the presence of flavanoids. PMID:23836366

  18. Skin blood flow dynamics and its role in pressure ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fuyuan; Burns, Stephanie; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2013-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are a significant healthcare problem affecting the quality of life in wheelchair bounded or bed-ridden people and are a major cost to the healthcare system. Various assessment tools such as the Braden scale have been developed to quantify the risk level of pressure ulcers. These tools have provided an initial guideline on preventing pressure ulcers while additional assessments are needed to improve the outcomes of pressure ulcer prevention. Skin blood flow function that determines the ability of the skin in response to ischemic stress has been proposed to be a good indicator for identifying people at risk of pressure ulcers. Wavelet spectral and nonlinear complexity analyses have been performed to investigate the influences of the metabolic, neurogenic and myogenic activities on microvascular regulation in people with various pathological conditions. These findings have contributed to the understanding of the role of ischemia and viability on the development of pressure ulcers. The purpose of the present review is to provide an introduction of the basic concepts and approaches for the analysis of skin blood flow oscillations, and present an overview of the research results obtained so far. We hope this information may contribute to the development of better clinical guidelines for the prevention of pressure ulcers. PMID:23602509

  19. [Potentialities of transabdominal ultrasound study in the diagnosis of gastric peptic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Gorshkov, A N

    2002-01-01

    The results of examination in 44 patients with gastric peptic ulcer were used to consider the potentialities of a transabdominal ultrasound study in the diagnosis and monitoring of gastric ulcerations. The ultrasound semiotics of gastric ulcers is described in the paper. A role of transabdominal ultrasound study in the algorithm of radiation and instrumental studies of gastric ulcer is defined. The inclusion of this study into the algorithm of diagnosis and monitoring of gastric peptic ulcer will make it possible not only to diagnose gastric ulcerations better, but to follow up their cicatrization. It is expedient to include a transabdominal ultrasound study as one of the diagnostic techniques for gastric peptic ulcer.

  20. [Systematic review of nutritional support in pressure ulcer].

    PubMed

    de Luis, D; Aller, R

    2007-07-01

    Pressure ulcer is an area of localised damage to the skin and underlying tissue caused by pressure, shear, friction and/or combination of these things. Prevalence of this entity is between 3 and 66%, depending of the patients and the pathology. Pressure ulcer is associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. One of the most important risk factors to develop a pressure ulcer is nutritional status. We can use different interventional strategies, first of all (primary intervention) before the patient has developed a ulcer and secondly, the treatment of a established ulcer (secondary prevention). In the most important primary prevention study with 662 patients, two oral nutritional supplements per day were given to the patients. The incidence of pressure ulcer was 40% (118/295) in the interventional group and 48% (181/377) in control group. A relative risk to develop a pressure ulcer with supplementation of 0.83 (CI95%: 0.70 a 0.99). In the studies with secondary prevention, when we analyze in an individual way the different nutrients, zinc has not demonstrated the utility in an independent way. Vitamin C shows contradictory data in two randomized clinical trial with the same dose (500 mg each 12 hours). Recently, some randomized clinical trials have demonstrated an improvement in healing rates with enhanced enteral formulas (zinc, arginine, vitamin C). Oral supplementation without taking account micronutrients decreases risk of pressure ulcer. However, studies of secondary prevention due to heterogeneity have not let clear conclusions. However, enteral enhanced formula could improve ulcer healing.

  1. Pressure ulcer prevention and care: a survey of current practice.

    PubMed

    Sharp, C; Burr, G; Broadbent, M; Cummins, M; Casey, H; Merriman, A

    2000-12-01

    The incidence and management of pressure ulcers in hospitalised patients is an ongoing concern for nurses. Efforts to prevent pressure ulcer development are plagued with inconsistencies and a general lack of best practice guidelines. Establishing current practice approaches to the assessment, prevention and management of pressure ulcers is a necessary first step in the implementation of evidence-based/best practice guidelines. Anecdotal evidence suggested a range of different approaches were being used in a Sydney metropolitan area health service (AHS) to assess patients to identify those at risk, to prevent pressure ulcers and to treat existing ulcers. A collaborative research project was undertaken to examine current practice and to explore the apparent clinical variance. It involved the distribution of a questionnaire to registered nurses working within the AHS (n = 2113) and a review of nursing policy documents in the various hospitals in the health service area. While the overall response rate was satisfactory (40%) many of the returned questionnaires were incomplete. Only 21% (n = 444) of the questionnaires were deemed suitable for analysis. The findings highlight a range of inconsistencies within and across nursing practice domains. Nurses generally do not use a tool to assess pressure ulcer risk potential, but rely on a range of practice procedures and risk indicators to determine risk potential of developing pressure ulcers. Repositioning patients is the most common approach used in an attempt to prevent the development of pressure ulcers, but additional measures are diverse. Most nurses seem to be familiar with modern wound dressings such as hydrocolloids, foams and alginates in the treatment of second and third stage ulceration. However, the care provided by some nurses reflects an adherence to outdated practices, including the use of water filled gloves, povidone iodine and gauze packing.

  2. Role of matrix metalloproteinases in non-healing venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Amato, Bruno; Coretti, Guido; Compagna, Rita; Amato, Maurizio; Buffone, Gianluca; Gigliotti, Diego; Grande, Raffaele; Serra, Raffaele; de Franciscis, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    Chronic venous ulceration (CVU) of the lower limbs is a common condition affecting 1% of the adult population in Western countries, which is burdened with a high complication rate and a marked reduction in the quality of life often due to prolonged healing time. Several metalloproteinases (MMPs) such as MMP-9 together with neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) appear to be involved in the onset and healing phases of venous ulcer, but it is still unclear how many biochemical components are responsible for prolonged healing time in those ulcers. In this study, we evaluate the role of MMP-1 and MMP-8 in long lasting and refractory venous ulcers. In a 2-year period we enroled 45 patients (28 female and 17 male, median age 65) with CVU. The enroled population was divided into two groups: group I were patients with non-healing ulcers (ulcers that had failed to heal for more than 2 months despite appropriate treatments) and group II were patients with healing ulcers (ulcers in healing phases). MMP-1 and MMP-8 were measured in fluids and tissues of healing and non-healing ulcers by means of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot analysis, respectively. In particular the patterns of the collagenases MMP-1 and MMP-8 in healing wounds were distinct, with MMP-8 appearing in significantly greater amounts especially in the non-healing group. Our findings suggest that MMP-1, and MMP-8 are overexpressed in long lasting CVU. Therefore, this dysregulation may represent the main cause of the pathogenesis of non-healing CVU.

  3. [List of diagnostic tests and procedures in leg ulcer].

    PubMed

    Spoljar, Sanja

    2013-10-01

    Many factors contribute to the pathogenesis of leg ulcer. Most patients have venous leg ulcer due to chronic venous insufficiency. Less often, patients have arterial leg ulcer resulting from peripheral arterial occlusive disease, the most common cause of which is arteriosclerosis. Leg ulcer may be of a mixed arteriovenous origin. In diabetic patients, distal symmetric neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease are probably the most important etiologic factors in the development of diabetic leg ulcer. Other causes of chronic leg ulcers are hematologic diseases, autoimmune diseases, genetic defects, infectious diseases, primary skin diseases, cutaneous malignant diseases, use of some medications and therapeutic procedures, and numerous exogenous factors. Diagnosis of leg ulcer is based on medical history, inspection, palpation of skin temperature, palpation of arteries, fascia holes, presence and degree of edema, firm painful cords, and functional testing to assess peripheral occlusive arterial disease or identify superficial and deep venous reflux of the legs. Knowledge of differential diagnosis is essential for ensuring treatment success in patients with leg ulcer. There are many possible etiologic factors of leg ulcers and sometimes, clinical findings are similar. Additional testing should be performed, e.g., serologic testing such as blood count, C-reactive protein, HBA1c, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, differential blood count, total proteins, electrolytes, coagulation parameters, circulating immune complex, cryoglobulins, homocysteins, AT, PAI-1, APC resistance, proteins C and S, paraproteins, ANA, ENA, ANCA, dsDNA, antiphospholipid antibodies, urea, creatinine, blood lipids, vitamins and trace elements. Also, biopsy of the lesion for histopathology, direct immunofluorescence, bacteriology and mycology should be included. Other tests are Raynaud (cold stimulation) test and pathergy test. Device-based diagnostic testing should be performed for future

  4. Role of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Roja

    2015-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a multifactorial and complex disease involving gastric and duodenal ulcers. Despite medical advances, the management of peptic ulcer and its complications remains a challenge, with high morbidity and death rates for the disease. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that, among a broad reach of natural molecules, dietary polyphenols with multiple biological mechanisms of action play a pivotal part in the management of gastric and duodenal ulcers. The current review confirmed that dietary polyphenols possess protective and therapeutic potential in peptic ulcer mediated by: improving cytoprotection, re-epithelialization, neovascularization, and angiogenesis; up-regulating tissue growth factors and prostaglandins; down-regulating anti-angiogenic factors; enhancing endothelial nitric oxide synthase-derived NO; suppressing oxidative mucosal damage; amplifying antioxidant performance, antacid, and anti-secretory activity; increasing endogenous mucosal defensive agents; and blocking Helicobacter pylori colonization associated gastric morphological changes and gastroduodenal inflammation and ulceration. In addition, anti-inflammatory activity due to down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and cellular and intercellular adhesion agents, suppressing leukocyte-endothelium interaction, inhibiting nuclear signaling pathways of inflammatory process, and modulating intracellular transduction and transcription pathways have key roles in the anti-ulcer action of dietary polyphenols. In conclusion, administration of a significant amount of dietary polyphenols in the human diet or as part of dietary supplementation along with conventional treatment can result in perfect security and treatment of peptic ulcer. Further well-designed preclinical and clinical tests are recommended in order to recognize higher levels of evidence for the confirmation of bioefficacy and safety of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer. PMID:26074689

  5. Nebivolol prevents indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    El-Ashmawy, Nahla E; Khedr, Eman G; El-Bahrawy, Hoda A; Selim, Hend M

    2016-07-01

    Gastric ulcer is a very common gastrointestinal disease that may lead to dangerous complications and even death. This study was conducted to evaluate the prophylactic effect of nebivolol against indomethacin [INDO]-induced gastric ulcer. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: normal control, ulcer control (INDO only), omeprazole before INDO and nebivolol before INDO. Each rat to receive nebivolol and omeprazole was given the agent orally (by gavage) daily for 10 days prior to induction of ulcer by oral dosing with INDO. Four hours after INDO treatment, all rats were euthanized and their stomachs obtained for measures of gastric acidity, oxidative stress and inflammatory markers, as well as cytoprotective mediators. The results showed that a single oral dose of INDO (100 mg/kg) induced gastric acidity, an ulcer index of 2900 and significantly increased levels of gastric tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and malondialdehyde (MDA) and significantly decreased levels of gastric prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), glutathione (GSH) and nitric oxide (NO), compared to in normal control counterpart stomachs. Giving nebivolol before INDO corrected the gastric acidity and resulted in a significant increase in GSH, PGE2 and NO and a significant decrease in TNFα and MDA gastric levels, compared to ulcer control values. Results obtained with nebivolol were comparable to those with omeprazole; the preventive index in the nebivolol group was 90.7% compared to 94.5% in rats in the omeprazole group. These studies showed that nebivolol provided a valuable role in preventing gastric ulcers induced by INDO and provided a promise for potentially protecting hypertensive patients from experiencing gastric ulcer. Thus, it is possible that, pending further studies, nebivolol could be used for pre-exposure prophylaxis from gastric ulcer in these patients.

  6. Optimal management of peptic ulcer disease in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Pilotto, Alberto; Franceschi, Marilisa; Maggi, Stefania; Addante, Filomena; Sancarlo, Daniele

    2010-07-01

    Recent data report that the incidence of peptic ulcer is decreasing in the general population; conversely, the rates of gastric and duodenal ulcer hospitalization and mortality remain very high in older patients. Two major factors that might explain this epidemiological feature in the elderly population are the high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and the increasing prescriptions of gastroduodenal damaging drugs, including NSAIDs and/or aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid). The main goals for treating peptic ulcer disease in old age are to reduce recurrence of the disease and to prevent complications, especially bleeding and perforation. The available treatments for peptic ulcer are essentially based on gastric acid suppression with antisecretory drugs and the eradication of H. pylori infection. The aim of this article is to report the available data on clinical efficacy and tolerability of peptic ulcer treatments in elderly patients and provide recommendations for their optimal use in this special population. Proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-based triple therapies for 7 days are highly effective for the cure of H. pylori-positive peptic ulcers as well as for reducing ulcer recurrence. Antisecretory drugs are also the treatment of choice for NSAID- or aspirin-related peptic ulcers and are useful as preventive therapy in chronic users of NSAIDs and low-dose aspirin as antiplatelet therapy. Antisecretory PPI therapy has a favourable tolerability profile in geriatric patients; however, monitoring is suggested in older patients with frequent pulmonary infections, gastrointestinal malabsorption, unexplained chronic diarrhoea, osteoporosis or those taking concomitant cytochrome P450 2C19-metabolized medications. The overall approach to the geriatric patient should include a comprehensive geriatric assessment that ensures multidimensional evaluation of the patient in order to better define the clinical risk of adverse outcomes in the older patient with peptic ulcer and

  7. Role of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Roja

    2015-06-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a multifactorial and complex disease involving gastric and duodenal ulcers. Despite medical advances, the management of peptic ulcer and its complications remains a challenge, with high morbidity and death rates for the disease. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that, among a broad reach of natural molecules, dietary polyphenols with multiple biological mechanisms of action play a pivotal part in the management of gastric and duodenal ulcers. The current review confirmed that dietary polyphenols possess protective and therapeutic potential in peptic ulcer mediated by: improving cytoprotection, re-epithelialization, neovascularization, and angiogenesis; up-regulating tissue growth factors and prostaglandins; down-regulating anti-angiogenic factors; enhancing endothelial nitric oxide synthase-derived NO; suppressing oxidative mucosal damage; amplifying antioxidant performance, antacid, and anti-secretory activity; increasing endogenous mucosal defensive agents; and blocking Helicobacter pylori colonization associated gastric morphological changes and gastroduodenal inflammation and ulceration. In addition, anti-inflammatory activity due to down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and cellular and intercellular adhesion agents, suppressing leukocyte-endothelium interaction, inhibiting nuclear signaling pathways of inflammatory process, and modulating intracellular transduction and transcription pathways have key roles in the anti-ulcer action of dietary polyphenols. In conclusion, administration of a significant amount of dietary polyphenols in the human diet or as part of dietary supplementation along with conventional treatment can result in perfect security and treatment of peptic ulcer. Further well-designed preclinical and clinical tests are recommended in order to recognize higher levels of evidence for the confirmation of bioefficacy and safety of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer.

  8. Gastric ulcer localization: Potential use of in vivo labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pera, A.; Rose, H.; Seavers, R.; Bekerman, C.; Pinsky, S.

    1984-01-01

    A previous work suggests that sucralfate labeled by binding to Tc-99m HSA permits the visualization of gastric ulcers. Potential problems with this technique are: 1) decreased binding of sucralfate to ulcer sites due to the labeling method of binding to exogenous protein (HSA); 2) overlying activity that may obscure identification of the ulcer. Because of these problems we have examined the possibility of direct in vivo Tc-99m labeling of sucralfate after it has already bound to the ulcer. In vitro studies were done to determine the binding of Tc-99m pertechnetate to sucralfate in the presence of tin in HCl solution at pHs comparable to those found in the stomach. Rapid and efficient labeling was achieved with 75-95% of the label bound to sucralfate at 30 minutes. In vivo studies were performed in rabbits with aspirin induced ulcers and in ulcer free human volunteers. The animal studies confirm that orally administered Tc-99m pertechnetate will bind to previously ingested sucralfate and that the labeled material will bind to the ulcers. Tc-99m pertechnetate was also shown to bind well to previously ingested sucralfate in humans. The results suggest that it is possible to label sucralfate in vivo. This method would offer the following advantages: 1) a simpler labeling procedure; 2) the potential of increased sensitivity by delaying the labeling until much of the sucralfate not bound to ulcer has passed, and thus decreasing the activity that remains in the stomach; and also by leaving the protein binding sites of the sucralfate free to interact with the ulcer since no exogenous protein is involved in labeling.

  9. The role of dressings in the prevention of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Julie

    2016-08-11

    Pressure ulceration is a significant global healthcare problem and represents a considerable burden on healthcare resources. Within the literature an increasing number of studies have examined the role prophylactic dressings play in redistributing pressure and helping to protect the skin from the effects of friction and shear. The use of dressings to prevent pressure ulcers may be considered a controversial issue, as previous opinion has been that dressings do not reduce the effects of pressure. This article will critically evaluate the literature to examine the role dressings play in the prevention of pressure ulceration. PMID:27523773

  10. Golimumab: clinical update on its use for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Gilardi, D; Fiorino, G; Allocca, M; Bravatà, I; Danese, S

    2015-03-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF-α agents) have dramatically changed the therapeutical approach to inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. A new anti-TNF drug, golimumab, has recently been approved for patients with moderate to severe ulcerative colitis. Its efficacy has been demonstrated by preclinical and clinical studies and the drug showed an efficacy and safety profile in line with the other anti-TNF agents, such as infliximab and adalimumab. This review gives an overview on golimumab in the treatment of moderate to severe ulcerative colitis.

  11. Managing pressure ulcers and moisture lesions with new hydrocolloid technology.

    PubMed

    Linthwaite, Adele; Bethell, Elaine

    In efforts to reduce the number of avoidable pressure ulcers in a large trust, a number of initiatives have taken place to increase staff awareness about the importance of preventing and treating pressure ulcers and moisture lesions. New documentation, the use of the 'Think Pink' folders and a social media campaign have all proved successful in seeing the number of avoidable pressure ulcers reported within the trust reduce. As part of this initiative an evaluation took place of a new hydrocolloid dressing. This proved effective at reducing healing times, reducing dressing spend and facilitating regular inspection of the affected areas. PMID:27126753

  12. Genital ulcers associated with Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Jerdan, Kimberly; Aronson, Iris; Hernandez, Claudia; Fishman, Patricia M; Groth, John V

    2013-06-01

    Genital ulcerations are a rare clinical finding of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. We present the case of a 16-year-old adolescent girl who reported the onset of diarrhea, headaches, dysuria, and vaginal discharge along with vulvar ulcerations with edema. Laboratory studies revealed a high-quantitative EBV IgG and early antigen as well as a positive IgM antibody for EBV. Although the association between EBV and genital ulcerations is rare, physicians should be aware of this clinical presentation to exclude other infectious entities, to be reassured to accept negative testing, and to quell patient distress or concerns of abuse.

  13. Pseudomonas corneal ulcer. The causative role of contaminated eye cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Reid, F R; Wood, T O

    1979-09-01

    The clinical significance of contaminated ocular cosmetics is illustrated by the case of a 47-year-old woman in whom a Pseudomonas corneal ulcer developed immediately after she sustained minor corneal trauma with a mascara applicator. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cultured from the corneal ulcer and the mascara. In addition to the causative role in acute corneal ulcers, contaminated eye cosmetics contribute to chronic external eye infections. Retail eye cosmetics are typically free of contamination when purchased. The inoculation of the cosmetic occurs during normal use. PMID:112953

  14. Management of Raynaud Phenomenon and Digital Ulcers in Scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Cappelli, Laura; Wigley, Fredrick M

    2015-08-01

    Raynaud phenomenon (RP) and associated digital ischemia can be among the most vexing clinical problems for patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma). Understanding the treatment approach to RP and associated ischemia and how to prevent digital ulcers is important for clinicians caring for these patients. This article reviews the management of RP and digital ischemic ulcers. The magnitude of the problem and pathophysiology of RP are first discussed, with an emphasis on recent advances in understanding of the disease process. Options for the practical pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions for RP and digital ischemic ulcers are detailed. PMID:26210127

  15. Histamine H2 receptor - Involvement in gastric ulceration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, P. A.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Brown, T. H.

    1976-01-01

    The involvement of the H1 and H2 receptors for histamine in the pathogenesis of gastric ulcers was investigated in rats. Metiamide, an H2 receptor antagonist, reliably reduced ulceration produced by stress alone or by a combination of stress and aspirin. In contrast, pyrilamine, which blocks only the H1 receptor, was without effect under these same conditions. The results support the hypothesis that histamine mediates both stress and stress plus aspirin induced ulceration by a mechanism involving the H2 receptor.

  16. Gastritis and Gastric Ulcers in Working Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Michael S.; Williamson, Katherine K.

    2016-01-01

    Gastritis and gastric ulcers are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in canine athletes. Although the majority of scientific work on this condition has been performed in ultraendurance racing sled dogs, this condition has been identified in other canine athletes, including sled dogs competing in shorter events and dogs performing off-leash explosive detection duties. The cause of the syndrome is unknown, but current hypotheses propose a link between exercise-induced hyperthermia and loss of gastric mucosal barrier function as an early event in the pathogenesis. Treatment is focused on prevention of clinical disease using acid secretion inhibitors, such as omeprazole, which has excellent efficacy in controlled clinical studies. PMID:27092307

  17. Probiotics in the Management of Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Chibbar, Richa; Dieleman, Levinus A

    2015-01-01

    Rapid progress has been made to understand the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel diseases and to identify new treatments. Interaction of the gut microbiota on the host inflammatory response has suggested that alternative therapies, such as probiotics, might have a complementary role in treating and preventing disease flares. Multiple probiotics and their formulations have been studied for both the induction and maintenance of remission of ulcerative colitis (UC); however, mainly Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and VSL#3 have been shown to provide significant benefits for the prevention and treatment of mild to moderate UC. Although these data are promising, there is still a paucity of robust, randomized-controlled trials to suggest that probiotics be utilized as part of a standard treatment regimen. With continued research and a movement toward carefully selected, individualized management based on an individual's specific microbiota composition and function, probiotics may become an integral part of tailored therapy for UC. PMID:26447965

  18. Approach to managing diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed Central

    Nesbitt, John A. A.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Of an estimated 1.7 to 2 million Canadians with diabetes, approximately 10% will present each year to their family doctors with plantar ulcers. Nearly 3500 will require major lower extremity amputations. SOURCES OF INFORMATION: Most of the recommendations outlined in this paper are based on level I evidence from excellent bench research and epidemiologic studies. MAIN MESSAGE: Both insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetics develop foot infections. These patients are on average 60 years old and have had diabetes for more than 10 years. Physicians who insist on excellent blood sugar control, provide ongoing patient education on diabetic foot care, prescribe appropriate shoes, and practise an aggressive multidisciplinary approach to wound care can reduce the rate of lower extremity amputations by more than 50%. CONCLUSION: Foot problems remain one of the main challenges associated with diabetes, but family physicians can manage them successfully. PMID:15116801

  19. Improving management of duodenal ulcer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bateson, M. C.; Diffey, B. L.

    1997-01-01

    Audit of treatment of duodenal ulcer disease has allowed management to improve and keep abreast of rapid advances in care. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori was assessed by 14C urea breath test one to two months after anti-Helicobacter therapy. The old triple therapy regime of bismuth, tetracycline and metronidazole for two weeks was found to be toxic and of low effectiveness (82%). Regimes with lansoprazole for one month and antibiotics for one week gave 90-98% success rates. The best success has been with regimes containing both clarithromycin and a nitro-imidazole. There was complete success in 98% of 109 patients given quadruple therapy with lansoprazole 30 mg daily for one month plus tetracycline 500 mg twice daily, clarithromycin 250 mg twice daily and metronidazole 400 mg twice daily for one week. PMID:9519185

  20. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease tissue cytotoxins

    SciTech Connect

    McLaren, L.C.; Gitnick, G.

    1982-06-01

    Bowel-wall tissue filtrates from patients with inflammatory bowel disease produce cytopathic effects in tissue culture. The cytopathic effects inducers have been reported to have the characteristics of a small RNA virus. Clostridium difficile toxin also produces cytopathic effects and has been found in the stools of patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The present study concerns the further characterization of the cytopathic inducers in tissues of inflammatory bowel disease patients. It was found that they are nonsedimentable at 148,000 g for 2 h and resistant to inactivation by UV light. They are proteins that are distinct from C. difficile toxin and are unique cytotoxins which are associated with the early cytopathic effects observed in Riff-free chick embryo and rabbit ileum cell cultures. These results suggest that the early cytopathic effects previously described are not produced by a virus. They do not explain the delayed cytopathic effects seen in rabbit ileum or WI-38 cells.

  1. Gastritis and Gastric Ulcers in Working Dogs.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael S; Williamson, Katherine K

    2016-01-01

    Gastritis and gastric ulcers are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in canine athletes. Although the majority of scientific work on this condition has been performed in ultraendurance racing sled dogs, this condition has been identified in other canine athletes, including sled dogs competing in shorter events and dogs performing off-leash explosive detection duties. The cause of the syndrome is unknown, but current hypotheses propose a link between exercise-induced hyperthermia and loss of gastric mucosal barrier function as an early event in the pathogenesis. Treatment is focused on prevention of clinical disease using acid secretion inhibitors, such as omeprazole, which has excellent efficacy in controlled clinical studies. PMID:27092307

  2. Large leg ulcers due to autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rozin, Alexander P.; Egozi, Dana; Ramon, Yehuda; Toledano, Kohava; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda; Markovits, Doron; Schapira, Daniel; Bergman, Reuven; Melamed, Yehuda; Ullman, Yehuda; Balbir-Gurman, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Large leg ulcers (LLU) may complicate autoimmune diseases. They pose a therapeutic challenge and are often resistant to treatment. To report three cases of autoimmune diseases complicated with LLU. Case Report Case 1. A 55-year old woman presented with long-standing painful LLU due to mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Biopsy from the ulcer edge showed small vessel vasculitis. IV methylprednisolone (MethP) 1 G/day, prednisolone (PR) 1mg/kg, monthly IV cyclophosphamide (CYC), cyclosporine (CyA) 100mg/day, IVIG 125G, ciprofloxacin+IV Iloprost+enoxaparin+aspirin (AAVAA), hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HO), maggot debridement and autologous skin transplantation were performed and the LLU healed. Case 2. A 45-year old women with MCTD developed multiple LLU’s with non-specific inflammation by biopsy. MethP, PR, hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), azathioprine (AZA), CYC, IVIG, AAVAA failed. Treatment for underlying the LLU tibial osteomyelitis and addition of CyA was followed by the LLU healing. Case 3. A 20-year-old man with history of polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) developed painful LLU’s due to small vessel vasculitis (biopsy). MethP, PR 1 mg/kg, CYC, CyA 100 mg/d, AAVAA failed. MRSA sepsis and relapse of systemic PAN developed. IV vancomycin, followed by ciprofloxacin, monthly IVIG (150 g/for 5 days) and infliximab (5 mg/kg) were instituted and the LLU’s healed. Conclusions LLU are extremely resistant to therapy. Combined use of multiple medications and services are needed for healing of LLU due to autoimmune diseases. PMID:21169912

  3. Faecal mucus degrading glycosidases in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, J M; Gallimore, R; Elias, E; Allan, R N; Kennedy, J F

    1985-08-01

    Because the normal faecal flora includes bacteria which can produce mucus-digesting glycosidases, it follows that increased digestion of colonic mucus by these bacterial enzymes could be important in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Faecal activities of potential mucus-degrading glycosidases have therefore been assayed in samples from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and normal controls. The enzymes alpha-D-galactosidase, beta-D-galactosidase, beta-NAc-D-glucosaminidase alpha-L-fucosidase and neuraminidase were assayed. Considerable glycosidase activity was present in most faecal samples. Similar activities of all the enzymes assayed were found in faeces from patients with ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease and normal controls and there was no significant correlation with disease activity. These results imply that relapse of ulcerative colitis is not initiated by increased degradation of colonic mucus by faecal glycosidases but do not exclude a role for bacterial mucus degradation in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. PMID:2991089

  4. Surgical perspectives in peptic ulcer disease and gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Lipof, Tamar; Shapiro, David; Kozol, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    For much of the twentieth century, surgery was frequently the solution for peptic ulcer disease. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of ulcers paralleled the development of potent pharmaceutical therapy. As the surgical world developed parietal cell vagotomy which would minimize the complications of surgery, patients failing medical therapy became rare. Emergent surgery for complicated peptic ulcers has not declined however. The development of proton pump inhibitors and the full understanding of the impact of H pylori has led to a trend towards minimalism in surgical therapy for complicated peptic ulcer disease. In addition to the changes in patient care, these developments have had an impact on the training of surgeons. This article outlines these trends and developments. PMID:16718847

  5. Diabetic foot ulcers: Part I. Pathophysiology and prevention.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Sibbald, R Gary; Mayer, Dieter; Goodman, Laurie; Botros, Mariam; Armstrong, David G; Woo, Kevin; Boeni, Thomas; Ayello, Elizabeth A; Kirsner, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious, life-long condition that is the sixth leading cause of death in North America. Dermatologists frequently encounter patients with diabetes mellitus. Up to 25% of patients with diabetes mellitus will develop diabetic foot ulcers. Foot ulcer patients have an increased risk of amputation and increased mortality rate. The high-risk diabetic foot can be identified with a simplified screening, and subsequent foot ulcers can be prevented. Early recognition of the high-risk foot and timely treatment will save legs and improve patients' quality of life. Peripheral arterial disease, neuropathy, deformity, previous amputation, and infection are the main factors contributing to the development of diabetic foot ulcers. Early recognition of the high-risk foot is imperative to decrease the rates of mortality and morbidity. An interprofessional approach (ie, physicians, nurses, and foot care specialists) is often needed to support patients' needs.

  6. Faecal mucus degrading glycosidases in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, J M; Gallimore, R; Elias, E; Allan, R N; Kennedy, J F

    1985-08-01

    Because the normal faecal flora includes bacteria which can produce mucus-digesting glycosidases, it follows that increased digestion of colonic mucus by these bacterial enzymes could be important in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Faecal activities of potential mucus-degrading glycosidases have therefore been assayed in samples from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and normal controls. The enzymes alpha-D-galactosidase, beta-D-galactosidase, beta-NAc-D-glucosaminidase alpha-L-fucosidase and neuraminidase were assayed. Considerable glycosidase activity was present in most faecal samples. Similar activities of all the enzymes assayed were found in faeces from patients with ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease and normal controls and there was no significant correlation with disease activity. These results imply that relapse of ulcerative colitis is not initiated by increased degradation of colonic mucus by faecal glycosidases but do not exclude a role for bacterial mucus degradation in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis.

  7. Psychosocial factors in peptic ulcer and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Levenstein, Susan

    2002-06-01

    Over the past decade, while gastroenterologists' interest in mind-body interactions in organic disorders dwindled, stronger evidence has linked psychosocial factors with the incidence and recurrence of peptic ulcer and with the course of inflammatory bowel disease. Psychological-behavioral approaches to treatment continue to be disappointing. Psychosocial factors may affect ulcer by increasing duodenal acid load, altering local circulation or motility, intensifying Helicobacter pylori infection, stimulating corticosteroid secretion, and affecting health risk behaviors; possible mechanisms for inflammatory bowel disease include immune deregulation, gut permeability changes, and poor medication adherence. Both belong to the growing category of diseases thought to have an infectious component: for peptic ulcer the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, for inflammatory bowel disease an exaggerated immune response to gut bacteria. Peptic ulcer and inflammatory bowel disease, which present unique interactions among psychological, immunologic, endocrine, infectious, and behavioral factors, are splendid paradigms of the biopsychosocial model.

  8. Relapsed duodenal ulcer after cure of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Miwa, H; Matsushima, H; Terai, T; Tanaka, H; Kawabe, M; Namihisa, A; Watanabe, S; Sato, N

    1998-08-01

    We report a patient--a 42-year-old man--who had suffered from recurrent duodenal ulcer for about 20 years. Successful curative therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection was performed for 2 weeks with new triple omeprazole, anoxicillin, clarithromycin (OAC) treatment in October 1995, and cure of the infection was repeatedly confirmed by histology, culture, and the 13C urea breath test. One month after the curative therapy, recurrence of a small duodenal ulcer was observed and in February another duodenal ulcer and reflux esophagitis occurred, with severe symptoms, despite the continuous administration of ranitidine. None of the examinations to reconfirm cure of the infection revealed the presence of H. pylori. As the patient experienced continual psychological stress and smoked more frequently during the recurrent episode and had not used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, stress and smoking appeared to play important roles in the relapse of duodenal ulcer in this patient after cure of H. pylori infection.

  9. Introducing and auditing a nurse-led leg ulcer service.

    PubMed

    Rotchell, L

    1999-05-01

    Leg ulcers have a significant impact on quality of life, and represent a major treatment cost for health services. Improved healing rates benefit patients and health service provision. Nurse-led clinics provide an appropriate setting for treatment.

  10. [PRINCIPLES OF POSTOPERATIVE DRUG THERAPY OF COMPLICATED DUODENAL ULCERS].

    PubMed

    Denisova, E V; Nazarov, V E

    2015-01-01

    The article highlights the principles of individualized drug therapy of complicated duodenal ulcers in the postoperative period, based on the removal of the pathophysiological changes that occurred after different types of medical or surgical benefits. PMID:26415272

  11. Ileocolonic ulcer treated by endoscopic application of collagen-polyvinylpyrrolidone

    PubMed Central

    de Hoyos Garza, Andrés; Aguilar, Edgar A Esparza; Checa Richards, Griselda

    2007-01-01

    Ulceration is a complication that may occur after an ileocolonic anastomosis. Most of the etiologies remain speculative. The case of a 33-year-old woman with eosinophilic colitis is reported, in whom a colectomy with an ileocolonic anastomosis was performed. After four months, the patient presented with a stenosis in the ileocolonic anastomosis, necessitating surgical restoration. Four weeks later, the patient presented with rectal bleeding, and a colonoscopy showed an ulcer in the anastomosis. Collagen-polyvinylpyrrolidone was applied into and on the surface of the ulcer, and five days later the procedure was repeated. Follow-up endoscopies at seven days and three months showed complete healing of the ulcer and the patient remained without bleeding throughout a further four weeks of follow-up tests. It was concluded that this biological product could be an excellent treatment for these lesions. PMID:17703251

  12. Drug cutaneous side effect: focus on skin ulceration.

    PubMed

    D'Epiro, S; Salvi, M; Luzi, A; Mattozzi, C; Luci, C; Macaluso, L; Marzocca, F; Salvo, V; Cantisani, C; Paolino, G; Calvieri, S; Richetta, A G

    2014-01-01

    Skin ulcers are defined as tissue loss interesting the deeper layers of the dermis and hypodermis, with low tendency to spontaneous healing. They cause disability related to pain, risk of infection and amputation, chronic management, requiring working absence with notably economic burden. The major cause is often related to underlying vascular disease, infections, tumors, autoimmunity, trauma, even if literature occasionally reported several cases of drug inducing skin ulceration. Most of drugs involved are chemotherapy agents and more recently molecular target therapies. Evidences supporting these drugs as the major cause of skin ulcers include delay of onset after therapy initiation, improvement after withdrawal of the drug, recurrence after its reintroduction and, sometimes, simultaneous occurrence of other skin lesions that have previously been reported to be associated with these agents. Attention should be reserved to patients undergoing antineoplastic agents, especially if previously affected by predisposing comorbidities, considering such side effect as possible differential diagnosis for skin ulceration in neoplastic patients. PMID:25203350

  13. Genital ulcers in women: clinical, microbiologic and histopathologic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Christiane Maria Moreira; Giraldo, Paulo César; Gomes, Francis de Assis Moraes; Amaral, Rose; Passos, Mauro Romero Leal; Gonçalves, Ana Katherine da Silveira

    2007-04-01

    Female genital ulcer is a disease that affects a large number of women, and its etiologic diagnosis can be difficult. The disease may increase the risk of acquiring HIV. Genital ulcer may be present in sexually transmitted diseases (STD)--syphilis, chancroid, genital herpes, donovanosis, lymphogranuloma venereum; and other non-STD disorders (NSTD)--Behçet's syndrome, pemphigus, Crohn's disease, erosive lichen planus and others. This study evaluated the clinical-histopathologic-microbiologic characteristics of female genital ulcers. A cross-sectional descriptive prospective study was conducted during a six-month period to investigate the first 53 women without a definitive diagnosis, seeking medical care for genital ulcers at a genital infections outpatient facility in a university hospital. A detailed and specific history was taken, followed by a dermatologic and gynecologic examination. In addition to collecting material from the lesions for microbiologic study, a biopsy of the ulcer was performed for histopathologic investigation. The average age of the patients was 32.7 years, 56.6% had junior high school education and higher education. The most frequent etiology was herpetic lesion, followed by auto-immune ulcers. At the time of their first consultation, around 60% of the women were using inadequate medication that was inconsistent with the final diagnosis. Histologic diagnosis was conclusive in only 26.4% of the patients (14/53). Cure was obtained in 99% of the cases after proper therapy. The female genital ulcers studied were equally distributed between sexually transmitted and non-sexually transmitted causes. Herpes was the most frequent type of genital ulcer, affecting women indiscriminately, mostly between the ages of 20 and 40 years. The etiologic diagnosis of herpetic ulcers is difficult to make even when various diagnostic methods are applied. It is imperative that NSTD should be included in the differential diagnoses of female genital ulcers. The

  14. [Prognostication of gastroduodenal ulcer course complicated by hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Trofimov, M V

    2014-01-01

    Dynamics of the blood serum level of serotonin in the patients, suffering gastroduodenal ulcer, Complicated by hemorrhage, was analyzed. The highest level of serotonin was observed in gastric ulcer, complicated by hemorrhage. These changes correlate with the blood loss severity enhancement, the achievement of a nonstable state of endoscopic hemostasis, high activity of inducible NO-synthase (iNOS) of periulcerative mucosa. The obtained data analysis permits to prognosticate the pathological process course and to improve the program of treatment.

  15. [The differentiated phytotherapy of patients with duodenal peptic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Chernomorets, N N; Seleznev, A V; Revutskiĭ, B I; Alifanova, R E; Kravchenko, Z V; Cherkasskaia, E P

    1992-02-01

    Resulted are analysed of complex treatment of 103 patients with duodenal ulcer. Infusions and concoctions of medicinal plants were used. The regimen of administration and composition of the cocktail from herbs depended on the character of gastric secretion and dyskinesia of the gastroduodenal zone as well as on the presence of concomitant diseases; cholecystitis, gastritis, hepatitis, pancreatitis, enterocolitis. Intragastric drip administration of the concoctions and infusions of medicinal plants favour scarring of duodenal ulcers and reduction of the number and duration of recurrences.

  16. [When to worry about before a vascular chronic leg ulcer?].

    PubMed

    Lazareth, I

    2016-09-01

    Leg ulcers are a chronic condition. Healing can be long for venous ulcers and the risk of complications is significant. Infection is the most severe complication and can occur in the form of easily diagnosed acute bacterial dermohypodermitis that generally responds well to antibiotic treatment if given at an appropriate dose or in the form of localized infection that is more difficult to diagnosis. Indeed, no consensus has been reached in the literature on the clinical criteria to retain for the diagnosis of localized infection. Similarly, the most appropriate treatment remains to be established. Local care would be a logical starting point, followed by systemic antibiotics if this approach is unsuccessful. Individual conditions also should be taken into consideration (immunodepression, severe arteriopathy warranting more rapid use of systemic antibiotics). The second most frequent complication is an allergic reaction to a topical agent used for wound care. The rate of sensitivization in patients with leg ulcers is high (60 %), although the rate is declining with modern dressings. No product can be considered perfectly safe for these polysensitized patients. Dermocorticoid therapy can be very effective. Allergology tests are needed. Certain leg ulcers require special care from diagnosis. An arterial origin must be suspected for deep, or necrotic ulcers. Arterial supply must be explored rapidly, followed by a revascularization procedure when necessary. Highly painful superficial extensive necrotic ulcers due to necrotic angiodermitis require hospital care for skin grafts that will control the antiodermitis and provide pain. Carcinoma should be suspected in cases of leg ulcers with an atypical localization exhibiting excessive budding. A biopsy is mandatory for leg ulcers with an unusual course (absence of healing despite well-conducted care). PMID:27622980

  17. Squamous cell carcinoma developed on chronic venous leg ulcer.

    PubMed

    Sîrbi, Adelina Gabriela; Florea, Marius; Pătraşcu, Virgil; Rotaru, Maria; Mogoş, Dan Gabriel; Georgescu, Claudia Valentina; Mărgăritescu, Nicolae Dragoş

    2015-01-01

    Chronic venous leg ulcers (VLU), especially long-lasting non-healing ulcers, are among the risk factors for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Malignant transformation of a VLU is a rare finding and the relative risk of carcinomatous transformation is quite low (about 5.8). SCC arising in the context of a VLU has a particularly aggressive behavior. A 76-year-old male patient with no relevant medical familial history, with chronic venous insufficiency CEAP C6 for 10 years [recurrent leg ulcers with favorable outcome (healing) after specific local and systemic treatment], showing for about three years one ulcerated lesion located on the anterior upper third of the right calf non-responsive to specific treatment, which subsequently increased their size and merged. Biopsy sample was taken. Histopathology showed epidermal acanthosis, papillomatosis, intense parakeratosis, pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia, dysplasia and moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with areas of acantholysis. Immunohistochemistry (Ki67, EMA, cytokeratin 34βE12 and p63) was performed and all types of immunostaining were moderately to intense positive. Above-knee leg amputation and specific oncologic treatment were proposed as possible curative solutions but the patient refused. Ten months after diagnosis and discharge form the Department of Dermatology, the patient died. Patients with chronic venous leg ulcers and clinically suspicious lesions should be evaluated for malignant transformation of the venous lesion. When diagnosed, malignancy complicating a chronic venous leg ulcer requires a resolute treatment as it may be fatal.

  18. [Incidence of decubitus ulcers in an intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Ignacio García, E; Herreros Rubiales, M; Delgado Pacheco, J; Alvarez Vega, D; Salvador Valencia, H; García Vela, M; Moreno Peralta, J

    1997-01-01

    Decubitus ulcers are an important problem which must be known by health professionals in general and by nurses in particular. Its prevention is one of the basic care in Nursing. This care becomes especially relevant in patients who are admitted into Intensive Care Units. The objectives of the study are to know the incidence rate of patients who develop decubitus ulcers during their stay in the Unit and the proposal to introduce measures aiming to decrease its incidence. In general, the study proves that 17% of patients develop decubitus ulcers during their hospitalization and that 31.8% of patients who are catalogued as risk patients develop ulcers. The preventive measures introduced are the reassessment and application of prevention and treatment of decubitus ulcers protocols, the creation of improvement groups where these problems are approached, perfecting courses about decubitus ulcers, clinical sessions where strategies are unified, graphic divulging measures (notices, etc.) and antiscaric materials such as heelers, small cushions for head support, pillows, etc.

  19. Neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers – evidence-to-practice

    PubMed Central

    Ndip, Agbor; Ebah, Leonard; Mbako, Aloysius

    2012-01-01

    Foot ulcers and their attendant complications are disquietingly high in people with diabetes, a majority of whom have underlying neuropathy. This review examines the evidence base underpinning the prevention and management of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers in order to inform best clinical practice. Since it may be impractical to ask patients not to weight-bear at all, relief of pressure through the use of offloading casting devices remains the mainstay for management of neuropathic ulcers, whilst provision of appropriate footwear is essential in ulcer prevention. Simple non-surgical debridement and application of hydrogels are both effective in preparing the wound bed for healthy granulation and therefore enhancing healing. Initial empirical antibiotic therapy for infected ulcers should cover the most common bacterial flora. There is limited evidence supporting the use of adjunctive therapies such as hyperbaric oxygen and cytokines or growth factors. In selected cases, recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor has been shown to enhance healing; however, its widespread use cannot be advised due to the availability of more cost-effective approaches. While patient education may be beneficial, the evidence base remains thin and conflicting. In conclusion, best management of foot ulcers is achieved by what is taken out of the foot (pressure, callus, infection, and slough) rather than what is put on the foot (adjuvant treatment). PMID:22371655

  20. Neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers - evidence-to-practice.

    PubMed

    Ndip, Agbor; Ebah, Leonard; Mbako, Aloysius

    2012-01-01

    Foot ulcers and their attendant complications are disquietingly high in people with diabetes, a majority of whom have underlying neuropathy. This review examines the evidence base underpinning the prevention and management of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers in order to inform best clinical practice. Since it may be impractical to ask patients not to weight-bear at all, relief of pressure through the use of offloading casting devices remains the mainstay for management of neuropathic ulcers, whilst provision of appropriate footwear is essential in ulcer prevention. Simple non-surgical debridement and application of hydrogels are both effective in preparing the wound bed for healthy granulation and therefore enhancing healing. Initial empirical antibiotic therapy for infected ulcers should cover the most common bacterial flora. There is limited evidence supporting the use of adjunctive therapies such as hyperbaric oxygen and cytokines or growth factors. In selected cases, recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor has been shown to enhance healing; however, its widespread use cannot be advised due to the availability of more cost-effective approaches. While patient education may be beneficial, the evidence base remains thin and conflicting. In conclusion, best management of foot ulcers is achieved by what is taken out of the foot (pressure, callus, infection, and slough) rather than what is put on the foot (adjuvant treatment).

  1. Efficacy of Collagen Particles in Chronic Non Healing Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Yogesh; Kini, U Anand

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Chronic foot ulcers will lead to a significant and prolonged stress to the patients. Pain and discomfort that may be acute or continuous is the usual complaint in chronic non healing ulcers that may even exacerbate with change of the dressings. The end process in any wound healing is wound contracture and scar formation. Collagen plays an important role in this stage of wound healing. Collagen particles were used in chronic non healing ulcer management to prove their efficacy when compared with conventional dressing in a study conducted by us. Objective To compare the healing process in non healing ulcers using collagen particles with those of conventional method of dressing (betadine). Materials and Methods It was a non randomized, prospective study conducted for a period of October 2012 to October 2014 in hospitals belonging to Kasturba medical college. Non concurrent pre and post comparative study; between collagen group and conventional dressing group. A total of 110 patients with chronic ulcers were included; each group comprising 55 patients. Results There was a significant decrease in wound size with a mean difference of 37.29 in experimental group when compared to 14.29 in control group. Conclusion Collagen dressing is effective in management of chronic non healing ulcers when compared to conventional betadine dressing. It heals by forming an early granulation tissue and thus reducing the length of hospital stay. PMID:26266157

  2. Intestinal phase of gastric secretion in patients with duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Kwiecien, N; Obtułowicz, W; Sito, E; Oleksy, J

    1978-04-01

    In 10 healthy subjects and 10 duodenal ulcer patients the intestinal phase of gastric acid secretion was studied by intraduodenal infusion of a 10% liver extract meal (pH 7) at 400 ml/h for three hours. A gastroduodenal double lumen tube with two balloons was used to block the pylorus and to prevent duodenogastric reflux. Gastric acid response to a duodenal meal of liver extract reached a peak at the end of the first hour of infusion of the extract and was then followed by a relatively well-sustained plateau. When the figure was normalised as a percentage of peak response to pentagastrin it was about 45% in healthy subjects and 63% in duodenal ulcer patients. Serum gastrin concentration increased significantly during a duodenal meal of liver extract only in duodenal ulcer patients and not in healthy subjects. The combination of the duodenal meal of liver extract with pentagastrin infusion resulted in a significantly greater increase in acid output in duodenal ulcer patients than in healthy controls. Duodenal perfusion with a liver extract meal in which the pH was gradually decreased caused a pH-dependent reduction in acid output, but not in serum gastrin, both in the duodenal ulcer patients and in healthy subjects. This study shows that the intestinal phase in man results in a potent gastric acid stimulation which is pH-dependent, greatly augmented by pentagastrin, and more vigorous in duodenal ulcer patients than in healthy controls.

  3. Predictive factors for diabetic foot ulceration: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Monteiro-Soares, M; Boyko, E J; Ribeiro, J; Ribeiro, I; Dinis-Ribeiro, M

    2012-10-01

    Improving ability to predict and prevent diabetic foot ulceration is imperative because of the high personal and financial costs of this complication. We therefore conducted a systematic review in order to identify all studies of factors associated with DFU and assess whether available DFU risk stratification systems incorporate those factors of highest potential value. We performed a search in PubMed for studies published through April 2011 that analysed the association between independent variables and DFU. Articles were selected by two investigators-independently and blind to each other. Divergences were solved by a third investigator. A total of 71 studies were included that evaluated the association between diabetic foot ulceration and more than 100 independent variables. The variables most frequently assessed were age, gender, diabetes duration, BMI, HbA(1c) and neuropathy. Diabetic foot ulceration prevalence varied greatly among studies. The majority of the identified variables were assessed by only two or fewer studies. Diabetic neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, foot deformity and previous diabetic foot ulceration or lower extremity amputation - which are the most common variables included in risk stratification systems - were consistently associated with diabetic foot ulceration development. Existing diabetic foot ulceration risk stratification systems often include variables shown repeatedly in the literature to be strongly predictive of this outcome. Improvement of these risk classification systems though is impaired because of deficiencies noted, including a great lack of standardization in outcome definition and variable selection and measurement.

  4. Cure of duodenal ulcer after eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    George, L L; Borody, T J; Andrews, P; Devine, M; Moore-Jones, D; Walton, M; Brandl, S

    1990-08-01

    Eighty-two patients, whose duodenal ulcers were recurrent or resistant to H2-receptor antagonist therapy, were entered in a treatment protocol of ranitidine followed by a four-week "triple therapy" course to eradicate Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection. The triple therapy consisted of colloidal bismuth subcitrate, tetracycline and metronidazole. Duodenal ulcer healed in all 78 patients available for endoscopy and H. pylori infection was shown to be eliminated in 75 patients (96%) at rebiopsy four weeks after cessation of therapy. In these 75 remaining patients the relapse rates for H. pylori infection and duodenal ulcer were studied endoscopically, yearly and at any recurrence of symptoms. At Year 1, 71 of 73 patients remained free of H. pylori infection (HP-negative) and duodenal ulcer. The corresponding figures subsequently were: Year 2, 57/57; Year 3, 34/34; Year 4, 15/15. No duodenal ulcers recurred in HP-negative patients who were followed for up to four years. Two patients of the original cohort of 75 HP-negative patients were HP-positive with endoscopic duodenitis at 12 months, and one at 36 months, but all were without reulceration. Distorted duodenal caps gradually returned to near-normal appearance in 80% of patients by two years. From this four-year follow-up study we conclude that duodenal ulcer disease will not recur provided the patient remains free of H. pylori.

  5. Cure of duodenal ulcer associated with eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Rauws, E A; Tytgat, G N

    1990-05-26

    50 patients with intractable duodenal ulcer were randomly assigned to 4 weeks of treatment with colloidal bismuth subcitrate (CBS) alone (26 patients) or with amoxicillin and metronidazole (24 patients). 5 patients (all on triple therapy) withdrew because of side-effects. In 17 of the 45 patients who completed the treatment, Helicobacter pylori was eradicated, and there was no ulcer relapse during the first 12 months of follow-up. The ulcer relapse rate was significantly higher (17 of 21 [89%]) among patients who remained positive for H pylori. 9 patients who remained positive for H pylori and had ulcer relapses within 6 months of treatment with CBS alone, were subsequently given triple therapy. 7 of the 9 showed H pylori eradication and no relapses within the next 12 months. The 2 patients still H pylori-positive after triple therapy had further ulcer relapses. H pylori eradication, without altering acid output, will become the mainstay of duodenal ulcer treatment because it cures the disease.

  6. Consequences of Helicobacter pylori cure in ulcer patients.

    PubMed

    Labenz, J

    2000-02-01

    In the complex pathogenesis of genuine ulcer disease Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is an essential, although not on its own sufficient, causal factor. Eradication of the infection heals the active ulcer and, in the long term, leads to a drastic reduction in ulcer recurrence and attendant complications. Some patients remain symptomatic even without ulcer recurrence, and in these, pre-existing, exacerbated or induced gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is probably of some significance. Possible causes of ulcer relapse are reinfection, the use of ulcerogenic drugs and persistent gastric hypersecretion. In adults, and probably also in children from the age of six years, H. pylori reinfection is rare, provided that a sensitive and specific test for H. pylori is carried out at the earliest 4 weeks after concluding anti-bacterial treatment. The most common cause of the reappearance of H. pylori is recrudescence - true reinfection hardly ever occurs. The healing of H. pylori-associated ulcer disease improves the patient's quality of life and possibly also life expectancy. Computer-aided calculations, together with a randomized controlled study, have shown not only that individual patients benefit, but that also the health system profits financially. The hypothetical negative effects of H. pylori eradication treatment are still being controversially discussed.

  7. Spontaneous gastrojejunal fistula is a complication of gastric ulcer.

    PubMed

    Culafić, Dorde-M; Matejić, Olivera-D; Dukić, Vladimir-S; Vukcević, Miodrag-D; Kerkez, Mirko-D

    2007-01-21

    Spontaneous gastrojejunal fistula formation is an extremely rare complication of gastric ulcer disease. We report a 77-year old woman who presented with diffuse abdominal pain, weight loss, malaise, nausea, and occasional dark stools. Laboratory tests showed extreme hyposideremic anemia with inflammatory syndrome. In addition, biochemical parameters of malnourishment were presented. Upper endoscopy revealed the patent esophagus along the full length without any pathological changes. Large and deep ulceration with perforation in the small intestine was detected in the posterior gastric wall. The small intestine loop was reached by endoscope through spontaneously developed gastrojejunal fistula. Polytopic biopsies of described ulcerative change were carried out. Histopathologically reepithelialized ulcerous zone was seen in the gastric mucosa. Also, gastrojejunal fistula was visualized after wide opening of hepatogastric and gastrocolic ligament. Jejunal loop 25 cm from ligament of Treitz was attached to mesocolon and posterior gastric wall because of ulcer penetration. Postoperative course was uneventful. Per oral intake started on the 4(th) postoperative day, and the patient was discharged on the 8(th) postoperative day. In summary, this case indicates that persistent symptoms of peptic ulcer disease associated with nutritional disturbances may be caused by gastrojejunal fistula.

  8. Perforated peptic ulcer following gastric bypass for obesity.

    PubMed

    Macgregor, A M; Pickens, N E; Thoburn, E K

    1999-03-01

    Peptic ulcer in the excluded segment of a gastric bypass performed in the management of morbid obesity has only rarely been reported in the literature. The purpose of this study is to review our experience with the condition in a series of 4300 patients who underwent gastric-restrictive surgery between 1978 and 1997. Eleven patients presented with acute perforation of a peptic ulcer in the excluded gastric segment. Nine ulcers were duodenal, one was gastric, and one patient had both gastric and duodenal perforations. The time between primary gastric-restrictive surgery and ulcer perforation varied from 20 days to 12 years. All patients presented with upper abdominal pain. The classical radiological sign of perforated peptic ulcer, free air under the diaphragm, did not occur in any patient. Nine patients were initially treated by primary closure of the perforation with subsequent definitive ulcer therapy by vagotomy, pyloroplasty, or gastrectomy. One case, initially treated elsewhere, was managed by placement of a Malecot catheter through the duodenal perforation, gastrostomy, and peritoneal drainage. One recent case remains symptom-free on H2 blockers after simple closure. There was no mortality. Six cases were previously reported in the literature with a 33 per cent mortality rate.

  9. Nicorandil associated anal ulcers: an estimate of incidence

    PubMed Central

    Colvin, HS; Barakat, T; Moussa, O; Babu, H; Slaughter, T; Palmer, JG; Hinson, FL

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Nicorandil is a commonly prescribed antianginal medication that has been found to be associated with painful anal ulceration. The incidence of this complication is unknown. We have used the best data available to us to make an estimate of this figure in a health district with a remarkably stable population of approximately 200,000 people. METHODS Using an electronic search of all letters generated from colorectal and gastroenterology clinics as well as endoscopy reports from January 2004 to November 2010, patients with anal ulceration who were taking nicorandil were identified. Other causes of ulceration were excluded by biopsy in the majority of cases. The central hospital and community pharmacy database was interrogated to estimate the number of patients who were prescribed nicorandil over a six-year period (2004-2010). RESULTS A total of 30 patients (24 men, 6 women) with a median age of 79.5 years were identified who fulfilled the criteria of: taking nicorandil; having no other identified cause for anal ulceration; and achieving eventual healing after withdrawal of nicorandil. In the six-year period an estimated mean of 1,379 patients were prescribed nicorandil each year. The mean annual incidence of anal ulcers among nicorandil users is therefore calculated to be in the region of 0.37%. CONCLUSIONS Anal ulceration appears to occur in approximately four in every thousand patients prescribed nicorandil each year. Prescribing physicians should explain the risk of this unpleasant complication to their patients. PMID:22507720

  10. Assessing diabetic foot ulcer development risk with hyperspectral tissue oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Schomacker, Kevin; Pilon, Laurent

    2011-02-01

    Foot ulceration remains a serious health concern for diabetic patients and has a major impact on the cost of diabetes treatment. Early detection and preventive care, such as offloading or improved hygiene, can greatly reduce the risk of further complications. We aim to assess the use of hyperspectral tissue oximetry in predicting the risk of diabetic foot ulcer formation. Tissue oximetry measurements are performed during several visits with hyperspectral imaging of the feet in type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus subjects that are at risk for foot ulceration. The data are retrospectively analyzed at 21 sites that ulcerated during the course of our study and an ulceration prediction index is developed. Then, an image processing algorithm based on this index is implemented. This algorithm is able to predict tissue at risk of ulceration with a sensitivity and specificity of 95 and 80%, respectively, for images taken, on average, 58 days before tissue damage is apparent to the naked eye. Receiver operating characteristic analysis is also performed to give a range of sensitivity/specificity values resulting in a Q-value of 89%.

  11. The healing of gastric ulcers by zinc sulphate.

    PubMed

    Frommer, D J

    1975-11-22

    A double-blind trial of zinc sulphate given by mouth (220 mg, three times a day) and placebo was undertaken in patients with benign gastric ulcers. The drug was given for a three-week period and the healing of the ulcers was estimated from results of barium-meal X-ray films taken immediately before and after this period. There were ten patients taking zinc sulphate and eight patients taking placebo. The two groups of patients were comparable in all respects, including initial ulcer size. Patients taking zinc sulphate had an ulcer healing rate three times that of patients treated with placebo. This difference was significant (P less than 0-05). Complete healing of ulcers occurred more frequently in the patients taking zinc sulphate than in patients treated with placebo. The placebo group contained more patients whose ulcers did not heal at all, than the group taking zinc sulphate. No side effects from zinc sulphate were noted. There was no evidence of zinc deficiency in any of the patients.

  12. [The diagnostic and surgical treatment characteristics in gastric ulcer].

    PubMed

    Prişcu, A; Palade, R; Medlej, A H; Grigoriu, M

    1994-01-01

    The work analyses a number of 283 patients suffering from gastric ulcer, which were hospitalised and operated between 1981-1991. In 64% of cases the surgical treatment decision was an emergency one for major complications of this disease such as: the upper digestive hemorrhage (27%), penetration (22%), perforation (11%), digestive stenosis (4%). In 36% of cases the decision of operation was taken for different reasons: unsatisfactory evolution under the conservatory treatment, the existence of an irreparable anatomic lesion, the recurrent ulcer or the difficulty of differential diagnosis between gastric ulcer and gastric carcinoma. It is important to indicate that the two of the major investigations: the barium transit and the fiber gastroscopy failed in giving a correct relation in 5 to 10% between gastric ulcer and gastric carcinoma. In 87% of patients it was performed the gastric resection type Péan. The lifting of the lesion in 7% of our observations needed the gastric resection on type Pochet. In the gastric ulcers Johnson II type, when the duodenal lesion couldn't be lifted we added to the Hoffmeister-Finsterer gastric resection type with truncal vagotomy. In 9% of patients with perforated or hemorrhagic gastric ulcer, the vital rise was a major one, so we performed only suture the lesion. We registered 3 deaths (1.06%).

  13. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems for therapeutic management of peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Garg, Tarun; Kumar, Animesh; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    A peptic ulcer, stomach ulcer, or gastric ulcer, also known as peptic ulcer disease (PUD), is a very common chronic disorder of the stomach which is mainly caused by damage or impairment of the stomach lining. Various factors such as pepsin, gastric acid, H. pylori, NSAIDs, prostaglandins, mucus, bicarbonate, and blood flow to mucosa play an important role in causing peptic ulcers. In this review article, our main focus is on some important gastroretentive drug delivery systems (GRDDS) (floating, bioadhesive, high density, swellable, raft forming, superporous hydrogel, and magnetic systems) which will be helpful in gastroretention of different dosage forms for treatment of peptic ulcer. GRDDS provides a mean for controlled release of compounds that are absorbed by active transport in the upper intestine. It also enables controlled delivery for paracellularly absorbed drugs without a decrease in bioavailability. The above approaches are specific for targeting and leading to a marked improvement in the quality of life for a large number of patients. In the future, it is expected that they will become of growing significance, finally leading to improved efficiencies of various types of pharmacotherapies.

  14. Potential role of probiotics in the management of gastric ulcer

    PubMed Central

    KHODER, GHALIA; AL-MENHALI, ASMA A.; AL-YASSIR, FARAH; KARAM, SHERIF M.

    2016-01-01

    Gastric ulcer is one of the most common chronic gastrointestinal diseases characterized by a significant defect in the mucosal barrier. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and the frequent long-term use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are major factors involved in gastric ulcer development. Acid inhibitors and antibiotics are commonly used to treat gastric ulcer. However, in the last few decades, the accumulating evidence for resistance to antibiotics and the side effects of antibiotics and acid inhibitors have drawn attention to the possible use of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of gastric ulcer. Probiotics are live microorganisms that when administered in adequate amounts confer health benefits on the host. Currently, the available experimental and clinical studies indicate that probiotics are promising for future applications in the management of gastric ulcers. This review aims to provide an overview of the general health benefits of probiotics on various systemic and gastrointestinal disorders with a special focus on gastric ulcer and the involved cellular and molecular mechanisms: i) Protection of gastric mucosal barrier; ii) upregulation of prostaglandins, mucus, growth factors and anti-inflammatory cytokines; iii) increased cell proliferation to apoptosis ratio; and iv) induction of angiogenesis. Finally, some of the available data on the possible use of probiotics in H. pylori eradication are discussed. PMID:27347010

  15. Diagnostic and Treatment Approaches for Refractory Peptic Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Refractory peptic ulcers are defined as ulcers that do not heal completely after 8 to 12 weeks of standard anti-secretory drug treatment. The most common causes of refractory ulcers are persistent Helicobacter pylori infection and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Simultaneous use of two or more H. pylori diagnostic methods are recommended for increased sensitivity. Serologic tests may be useful for patients currently taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) or for suspected false negative results, as they are not affected by PPI use. NSAID use should be discontinued when possible. Platelet cyclooxygenase activity tests can confirm surreptitious use of NSAIDs or aspirin. Cigarette smoking can delay ulcer healing. Therefore, patients who smoke should be encouraged to quit. Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) is a rare but important cause of refractory gastroduodenal ulcers. Fasting plasma gastrin levels should be checked if ZES is suspected. If an ulcer is refractory despite a full course of standard PPI treatment, the dose should be doubled and administration of another type of PPI considered. PMID:26240800

  16. Assessing diabetic foot ulcer development risk with hyperspectral tissue oximetry.

    PubMed

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Schomacker, Kevin; Pilon, Laurent

    2011-02-01

    Foot ulceration remains a serious health concern for diabetic patients and has a major impact on the cost of diabetes treatment. Early detection and preventive care, such as offloading or improved hygiene, can greatly reduce the risk of further complications. We aim to assess the use of hyperspectral tissue oximetry in predicting the risk of diabetic foot ulcer formation. Tissue oximetry measurements are performed during several visits with hyperspectral imaging of the feet in type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus subjects that are at risk for foot ulceration. The data are retrospectively analyzed at 21 sites that ulcerated during the course of our study and an ulceration prediction index is developed. Then, an image processing algorithm based on this index is implemented. This algorithm is able to predict tissue at risk of ulceration with a sensitivity and specificity of 95 and 80%, respectively, for images taken, on average, 58 days before tissue damage is apparent to the naked eye. Receiver operating characteristic analysis is also performed to give a range of sensitivity/specificity values resulting in a Q-value of 89%.

  17. Helicobacter pylori and gastric or duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    In patients with gastric or duodenal ulcer associated with Helicobacter pylori, treatment of the infection improves healing and prevents complications and recurrences. The drug regimen generally consists of a high-dose proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) such as omeprazole plus antibiotics. Using the standard Prescrire methodology, we conducted a review of the literature in order to determine the standard empirical antibiotic regimen for H. pylori infection in adults with gastric or duodenal ulcer in France. In 2015, due to an increase in H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin, a 7-day course of the PPI + clarithromycin + amoxicillin combination is effective in only about 70% of cases. A Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis of trials involving thousands of patients suggests that prolonging treatment with a PPI + amoxicillin + clarithromycin or a PPI + amoxicillin + metronidazole to 10 or 14 days improves the rate of H. pylori eradication by 5% to 10%. A metanalysis of seven trials including a total of about 1000 patients showed that combination therapy with a PPI + amoxicillin + clarithromycin + metronidazole for 5 days eradicates H. pylori in about 90% of cases, compared to about 80% of cases with a PPI + amoxicillin + clarithromycin given for 7 days. Sequential treatment with amoxicillin for 5 days, followed by clarithromycin + metronidazole for 5 days, has also been tested in thousands of patients. Efficacy and adverse effects were similar to those observed when the same antibiotics were taken simultaneously for 5 days. In randomised trials, replacing clarithromycin or amoxicillin with a fluoroquinolone yielded conflicting results. In 2009, nearly 20% of H. pylori isolates were resistant to levofloxacin in France. Tetracycline has only been evaluated in combination with bismuth. The few available data on doxycycline suggest that its efficacy is similar to that of tetracycline. A fixed-dose combination of bismuth subcitrate potassium + metronidazole

  18. The effects of ulcer size on the wound radius reductions and healing times in neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Zimny, S; Schatz, H; Pfohl, M

    2004-04-01

    The main problems in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers are prolonged wound healing and not necessary amputations, which may sometimes be caused by the impression that the results of conservative treatment are somewhat unpredictable. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ulcer size on the wound radius reduction and healing times using a previously established equation for wound healing in neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers. This prospective study evaluates wound healing in 120 diabetic patients with neuropathic foot ulcers who were grouped according to four different ulcer areas (A 100 150 200 mm (2)). Ulcer healing was assessed by planimetric measurement of the wound area every second week until wound healing. The time course of wound healing in the different groups was compared by the weekly wound radius reduction using the equation R = sqrt A/pi. The average healing time in group A was 70 (95 %-CI 64 - 77) days with a wound radius reduction of 0.42 mm/week (95 %-CI 0.28 - 0.56). In group B the average healing time was 79 (95 %-CI 75 - 82) days and the weekly wound radius reduction was 0.47 mm (95 %-CI 0.45 - 0.49). The average healing time in group C was 85 (95 %-CI 80 - 89) days with a wound radius reduction of 0.53 mm/week (95 %-CI 0.42 - 0.56). In group D the average healing time was 97 (95 %-CI 91 - 103) days. The weekly wound radius reduction was 0.57 mm (95 %-CI 0.49 - 0.81). Wound radius reductions and the time needed for healing are affected by the ulcer area, a measure of ulcer size, in neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers. The calculation of the weekly wound radius reduction for different ulcer areas may be a useful tool in daily clinical practice to identify ulcers who do not respond adequately to the treatment. PMID:15127323

  19. Anti-ulcer activity of ethanol extract of Terminaliapallida Brandis. in Swiss albino rats.

    PubMed

    Gupta, M; Mazumder, U K; Manikandan, L; Bhattacharya, S; Senthilkumar, G P; Suresh, R

    2005-02-28

    Ethanol extract of Terminalia pallida Brandis. (EETP) was evaluated for its anti-ulcer activity against various models of ulcers, such as drug-induced ulcers, histamine-induced ulcers and ethanol-induced ulcers in Swiss albino rats. The EETP at the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg per os (p.o.) exhibited significant protection against ulcers produced by indomethacin, histamine and the effect was comparable to that of the reference drug famotidine (30 mg/kg b.w) orally. The extract also afforded significant protection against ethanol-induced gastric ulceration. Meanwhile, EETP significantly lowered the elevated lipid peroxide level (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS)) and restored the altered glutathione level in ethanol-induced gastric ulceration. The present investigation revealed that the EETP exhibited significant anti-ulcer activity by enhancing antioxidant potential of the gastric mucosa, thereby reducing mucosal damage.

  20. Anti-ulcer activity of ethanol extract of Terminaliapallida Brandis. in Swiss albino rats.

    PubMed

    Gupta, M; Mazumder, U K; Manikandan, L; Bhattacharya, S; Senthilkumar, G P; Suresh, R

    2005-02-28

    Ethanol extract of Terminalia pallida Brandis. (EETP) was evaluated for its anti-ulcer activity against various models of ulcers, such as drug-induced ulcers, histamine-induced ulcers and ethanol-induced ulcers in Swiss albino rats. The EETP at the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg per os (p.o.) exhibited significant protection against ulcers produced by indomethacin, histamine and the effect was comparable to that of the reference drug famotidine (30 mg/kg b.w) orally. The extract also afforded significant protection against ethanol-induced gastric ulceration. Meanwhile, EETP significantly lowered the elevated lipid peroxide level (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS)) and restored the altered glutathione level in ethanol-induced gastric ulceration. The present investigation revealed that the EETP exhibited significant anti-ulcer activity by enhancing antioxidant potential of the gastric mucosa, thereby reducing mucosal damage. PMID:15707782

  1. Helicobacter pylori-negative, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug: negative idiopathic ulcers in Asia.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Katsunori; Kanno, Takeshi; Koike, Tomoyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2014-01-21

    Since the discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in the stomach, the bacteria infection and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) use had been considered to be the 2 main causes of peptic ulcers. However, there have been recent reports of an increase in the proportion of peptic ulcers without these known risk factors; these are termed idiopathic peptic ulcers. Such trend was firstly indicated in 1990s from some reports in North America. In Asia, numerous studies reported that idiopathic ulcers accounted for a small percentage of all ulcers in the 1990s, but in the 2000s, multiple studies reported that the proportion of idiopathic ulcers had reached 10%-30%, indicating that the incidence of idiopathic ulcers in Asia has also been rising in recent years. While a decline in H. pylori infection rates of general population in Asia is seen as the main reason for the increased incidence of idiopathic ulcers, it is also possible that the absolute number of idiopathic ulcer cases has increased. Advanced age, serious systemic complication, and psychological stress are considered to be the potential risk factors for idiopathic ulcers. Management of idiopathic ulcers is challenging, at present, because there is no effective preventative measure against recurrence in contrast with cases of H. pylori-positive ulcers and NSAIDs-induced ulcers. As it is expected that H. pylori infection rates in Asia will decline further in the future, measures to treat idiopathic ulcers will also likely become more important.

  2. Helicobacter pylori-negative, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug: Negative idiopathic ulcers in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Iijima, Katsunori; Kanno, Takeshi; Koike, Tomoyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in the stomach, the bacteria infection and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) use had been considered to be the 2 main causes of peptic ulcers. However, there have been recent reports of an increase in the proportion of peptic ulcers without these known risk factors; these are termed idiopathic peptic ulcers. Such trend was firstly indicated in 1990s from some reports in North America. In Asia, numerous studies reported that idiopathic ulcers accounted for a small percentage of all ulcers in the 1990s, but in the 2000s, multiple studies reported that the proportion of idiopathic ulcers had reached 10%-30%, indicating that the incidence of idiopathic ulcers in Asia has also been rising in recent years. While a decline in H. pylori infection rates of general population in Asia is seen as the main reason for the increased incidence of idiopathic ulcers, it is also possible that the absolute number of idiopathic ulcer cases has increased. Advanced age, serious systemic complication, and psychological stress are considered to be the potential risk factors for idiopathic ulcers. Management of idiopathic ulcers is challenging, at present, because there is no effective preventative measure against recurrence in contrast with cases of H. pylori-positive ulcers and NSAIDs-induced ulcers. As it is expected that H. pylori infection rates in Asia will decline further in the future, measures to treat idiopathic ulcers will also likely become more important. PMID:24574744

  3. L-Theanine healed NSAID-induced gastric ulcer by modulating pro/antioxidant balance in gastric ulcer margin.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sirshendu; Chatterjee, Ananya; Roy, Surmi; Bera, Biswajit; Bandyopadhyay, Sandip K

    2014-10-01

    L-Theanine is a unique non-protein-forming amino acid present in tea [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze]. In the present work, we evaluated the healing effect of L-theanine on NSAID (indomethacin)-induced gastric ulcer. Histology of the stomach tissues revealed maximum ulceration on the third day after indomethacin administration (18 mg/kg, single dose p.o.) which was accompanied by increased lipid peroxidation; protein carbonylation; Th1 cytokine synthesis, and depletion of thiol, mucin, prostaglandin (PG) E, Th2 cytokine synthesis; and total antioxidant status in mice. L-Theanine healed gastric ulcer at a dose of 10 mg/kg b.w. but aggravated the ulcerated condition at a higher dose of 40 mg/kg b.w. At 10 mg/kg b.w., L-theanine significantly alleviated the adverse oxidative effect of indomethacin through enhanced synthesis of PGE2 by modulation of cyclo-oxygenase-1 and 2 [COX-1 and COX-2] expression, Th1/Th2 cytokine balance, and restoration of cellular antioxidant status at the gastric ulcer margin. The present study revealed for the first time the dose-dependent biphasic effect of a natural neuroprotective agent, L-theanine, on gastric ulcer disease.

  4. The predictors of foot ulceration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Firth, Jill; Waxman, Robin; Law, Graham; Nelson, E Andrea; Helliwell, Philip; Siddle, Heidi; Otter, Simon; Butters, Violet; Baker, Lesley; Hryniw, Rosemary; Bradley, Sarah; Loughrey, Lorraine; Alcacer-Pitarch, Begonya; Davies, Samantha; Tranter, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    This study was conducted to determine the predictors of foot ulceration occurring in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) without diabetes. A multi-centre case control study was undertaken; participants were recruited from eight sites (UK). Cases were adults diagnosed with RA (without diabetes) and the presence of a validated foot ulcer, defined as a full thickness skin defect occurring in isolation on / below the midline of the malleoli and requiring > 14 days to heal. Controls met the same criteria but were ulcer naive. Clinical examination included loss of sensation (10g monofilament); ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI); forefoot deformity (Platto); plantar pressures (PressureStat); RA disease activity (36 swollen/tender joint counts) and the presence of vasculitis. History taking included past ulceration/foot surgery; current medication and smoking status. Participants completed the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and Foot Impact Scale. A total of 83 cases with 112 current ulcers and 190 ulcer naïve controls participated. Cases were significantly older (mean age 71 years; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 69-73 vs. 62 years, 60-64) and had longer RA disease duration (mean 22 years; 19-25 vs. 15, 13-17). Univariate analysis showed that risk of ulceration increases with loss of sensation; abnormality of ABPI and foot deformity. Plantar pressures and joint counts were not significant predictors. HAQ score and history of foot surgery were strongly associated with ulceration (odds ratio [OR] = 1.704, 95 % CI 1.274-2.280 and OR = 2.256, 95 % CI 1.294-3.932). Three cases and two controls presented with suspected cutaneous vasculitis. In logistic regression modelling, ABPI (OR = 0.04; 95 % CI, 0.01-0.28) forefoot deformity (OR = 1.14; 95 % CI, 1.08-1.21) and loss of sensation (OR = 1.22; 95 % CI, 1.10-1.36) predicted risk of ulceration. In patients with RA, ABPI, forefoot deformity and loss of sensation predict risk of ulceration

  5. Actinomyces bowdenii ulcerative keratitis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Amanda; Daniels, Joshua B; Wilkie, David A; Lutz, Elizabeth

    2013-09-01

    A 5-year-old spayed female diabetic mixed-breed dog underwent phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation to correct bilateral hypermature cataracts. Two months postsurgery, the patient presented with ulcerative keratitis and multifocal stromal abscessation OD, which was controlled, but never resolved, with topical fluoroquinolone therapy. The patient re-presented 2 months later with a new, raised, white gritty corneal opacity associated with hyperemia, chemosis, and blepharospasm OD. Cytology of the right cornea revealed filamentous bacteria, suggestive of Actinomyces spp. Actinomyces bowdenii was subsequently isolated in pure culture and identified via 16s rDNA sequencing. Actinomyces bowdenii has never before been described as a cause of ocular infection. An immunosuppressed corneal environment likely contributed to this opportunistic Actinomycosis. The infection was not controlled with fluoroquinolone therapy, and the isolate, in vitro, was resistant to three fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, and levofloxacin), which also has not been previously reported for this species of Actinomyces. A superficial keratectomy with conjunctival graft was employed to successfully manage the infection.

  6. Ulcerative Colitis and Immunoglobulin G4

    PubMed Central

    Kuwata, Go; Koizumi, Koichi; Tabata, Taku; Hara, Seiichi; Kuruma, Sawako; Fujiwara, Takashi; Chiba, Kazuro; Egashira, Hideto; Fujiwara, Junko; Arakawa, Takeo; Momma, Kumiko; Horiguchi, Shinichiro

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Ulcerative colitis (UC) is sometimes associated with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). Infiltration of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-positive plasma cells is sometimes detected in the colonic mucosa of AIP or UC patients. This study aimed to clarify the relation between UC and IgG4. Methods Associations with UC were reviewed in 85 AIP patients. IgG4 immunostaining was performed on biopsy specimens from the colonic mucosa of 14 AIP and 32 UC patients. Results UC was confirmed in two cases (type 1 AIP, n=1; suspected type 2 AIP, n=1). Abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells in the colonic mucosa was detected in the case of suspected type 2 AIP with UC and two cases of type 1 AIP without colitis. Abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells was detected in 10 UC cases (IgG4-present, 31%). Although 72% of IgG4-absent UC patients showed mild disease activity, 70% of IgG4-present patients showed moderate to severe disease activity (p<0.05). Conclusions UC is sometimes associated with AIP, but it seems that UC is not a manifestation of IgG4-related disease. Infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells is sometimes detectable in the colonic mucosa of UC patients and is associated with disease activity. PMID:24516698

  7. The care of decubitus ulcers pressure sores.

    PubMed

    Michocki, R J; Lamy, P P

    1976-05-01

    Despite a large volume of literature particularly directed toward treatment, pressure sores (including decubitus ulcers) remain a difficult problem, especially in the nursing home environment. The treatment of pressure sores is somewhat controversial and quite diversified. Selection of a successful therapeutic modality must be preceded by correct evaluation, i.e., whether the sore is superficial or deep, open or closed. The treatment of superficial sores is conservative and directed toward cleanliness, relief of pressure, and exposure to air. Surgical debridement may be indicated. Proteolytic enzymes often are employed as adjunctive therapy, although there are some major drawbacks to their use. The plethora of therapeutic agents suggested for the treatment of deep pressure sores probably is related to the difficulties in achieving success. Surgical debridement is indicated, and proteolytic enzymes are widely used. Possible interactions. and factors leading to the inactivation of these enzymes are discussed, as is the use of various solutions, ointments, gold leaf, oxygen, dry heat, and other adjunctive devices. Of paramount importance in the management of pressure sores is the maintenance of cleanliness and dryness.

  8. Compression therapy of leg ulcers with PAOD.

    PubMed

    Ladwig, Andrea; Haase, Hermann; Bichel, Jens; Schuren, Jan; Jünger, Michael

    2014-05-19

    Objectives: To assess the clinical safety of a new short-stretch 2-layer compression system (3M(tm) Coban(tm) 2 Lite) in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). This system combines a low resting pressure with a high working pressure. Methods: A pilot study was performed in 15 subjects with moderate PAOD, i.e. an ABPI of 0.5-0.8. Co-existing chronic venous insufficiency or leg ulcer was not mandatory. All subjects received the compression system which was reapplied at each study visit (days 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10, 14). The safety parameters were: sub-bandage pressure immediately after application, pressure-related skin damage, hypoxia-related pain, and adverse events. A product comfort questionnaire was completed at the last visit. Results: The average sub-bandage pressure of 30 mmHg defined by the protocol was achieved. No pressure-related skin damage or hypoxia-related pain was found. The reported adverse device effects were as expected for compression therapies, including dry skin and pruritus. The product comfort questionnaire completed by the subjects showed a good tolerability profile. Conclusion: The short-stretch 2-layer compression system (3M(tm) Coban(tm) 2 Lite) was safe and well tolerated in subjects with moderate PAOD. PMID:24843079

  9. [Innovative therapy for leg ulcers: Electrostimulation].

    PubMed

    Maillard, H

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wounds can take a long time to heal despite appropriate therapy based upon aetiology and use of suitable dressings. The success of electrostimulation is based upon the existence within the skin of the endogenous currents involved in the wound healing process. Where skin continuity is broken by a wound, these electrical potentials are short-circuited, resulting in leakage of electrical current. Woundel(®) therapy is the only such treatment currently available in France and is based on the use of continuous pulsed current that generates an electrical field near the endogenous electrical fields. It utilises a console to deliver the electrical impulses, a dressing electrode and a dispersion electrode. The electrode dressing is left on the wound for 3 days, and venous compression bandaging may be applied to the leg, taking care to leave the connector free. Negative polarity stimulates migration of fibroblasts, resulting in elimination of fibrin. Positive polarity causes keratinocyte migration, which in turn leads to epidermisation. Electrostimulation is of recognised utility in the healing of chronic wounds: it has been assigned a high-level recommendation in the European and American guidelines for the treatment of venous ulcers and bedsores with proof level of A. Further, the analgesic effect of electrostimulation has been demonstrated in several studies. Electrostimulation is already well developed in France among wound specialists, but prospective studies are planned so that it may be used at patients' homes.

  10. Relapsing and refractory ulcerative colitis in children.

    PubMed

    Turner, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Approximately half of the children with ulcerative colitis (UC) have refractory, relapsing or steroid-dependent disease. UC in children is more extensive than in adults, presents more often with severe attacks and carries a more aggressive disease course. Therefore, although a step-up approach is usually recommended in UC, aggressive therapy will often be indicated in children since steroid dependency should never be tolerated. It is vital to ensure that in every resistant case, the symptoms are truly related to the inflammatory disease activity and not to other conditions such as poor adherence to treatment, infections, adverse reactions to drugs, irritable bowel syndrome, lactose intolerance, celiac disease and bacterial overgrowth. The clinician should be ready to escalate therapy in a timely manner but only after ensuring optimization of current treatments. Optimization may include, among others, appropriate dosage, utilization of assays that determine thiopurine, calcineurin inhibitors and anti-tumor necrosis factor levels, introduction of combination therapy when indicated (enemas and immunomodulators) and a long enough time for treatment to become effective. Colectomy is always a valid option and should be discussed before major treatment escalations. Experimental therapies can be considered when all else fails and the family prefers to avoid colectomy. The management of refractory and relapsing disease is particularly challenging in children, and this review summarizes the available evidence to guide treatment decisions in this setup. PMID:24969290

  11. Biomechanical modeling to prevent ischial pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Luboz, Vincent; Petrizelli, Marion; Bucki, Marek; Diot, Bruno; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Payan, Yohan

    2014-07-18

    With 300,000 paraplegic persons only in France, ischial pressure ulcers represent a major public health issue. They result from the buttocks׳ soft tissues compression by the bony prominences. Unfortunately, the current clinical techniques, with - in the best case - embedded pressure sensor mats, are insufficient to prevent them because most are due to high internal strains which can occur even with low pressures at the skin surface. Therefore, improving prevention requires using a biomechanical model to estimate internal strains from skin surface pressures. However, the buttocks׳ soft tissues׳ stiffness is still unknown. This paper provides a stiffness sensitivity analysis using a finite element model. Different layers with distinct Neo Hookean materials simulate the skin, fat and muscles. With Young moduli in the range [100-500 kPa], [25-35 kPa], and [80-140 kPa] for the skin, fat, and muscles, respectively, maximum internal strains reach realistic 50 to 60% values. The fat and muscle stiffnesses have an important influence on the strain variations, while skin stiffness is less influent. Simulating different sitting postures and changing the muscle thickness also result in a variation in the internal strains.

  12. Biomechanical modeling to prevent ischial pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Luboz, Vincent; Petrizelli, Marion; Bucki, Marek; Diot, Bruno; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Payan, Yohan

    2014-07-18

    With 300,000 paraplegic persons only in France, ischial pressure ulcers represent a major public health issue. They result from the buttocks׳ soft tissues compression by the bony prominences. Unfortunately, the current clinical techniques, with - in the best case - embedded pressure sensor mats, are insufficient to prevent them because most are due to high internal strains which can occur even with low pressures at the skin surface. Therefore, improving prevention requires using a biomechanical model to estimate internal strains from skin surface pressures. However, the buttocks׳ soft tissues׳ stiffness is still unknown. This paper provides a stiffness sensitivity analysis using a finite element model. Different layers with distinct Neo Hookean materials simulate the skin, fat and muscles. With Young moduli in the range [100-500 kPa], [25-35 kPa], and [80-140 kPa] for the skin, fat, and muscles, respectively, maximum internal strains reach realistic 50 to 60% values. The fat and muscle stiffnesses have an important influence on the strain variations, while skin stiffness is less influent. Simulating different sitting postures and changing the muscle thickness also result in a variation in the internal strains. PMID:24873863

  13. Ulcer Protective Activity of Jatropha gossypiifolia Linn. in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Arumugam Ramamoorthy; Daniel, Epison Prabu; Ilavarasan, Raju; Venkataraman, S.; Vijayakumar, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several synthetic drugs are useful in the treatment of peptic ulcer, but almost of these drugs are used in prolonging time, it may cause several adverse reactions. However, the herbal medicines are more potent to the treatment and minimize the side effects. Objective: To evaluate the methanol extract of Jatropha gossypiifolia Linn. (MEJG) for gastro protective activity against Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Anti-ulcer potency of MEJG (100 and 200 mg/kg, b.w.) was assessed using aspirin (200 mg/kg, p.o.) plus pylorus ligation ulcer model and the parameters studied were ulcer index (UI), gastric juice volume, pH, total acidity, and total acid output. Same extract was studied by ethanol-induced (80%, 5 mL/kg, intragastrically) ulcer model, and the UI and biochemical parameters were studied. Results: The oral administration of MEJG (100 and 200 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.001) attenuated the ulcer score and anti-secretary parameters (such as the volume of gastric content, free acidity, total acidity, and total acid output) in the aspirin plus pylorus ligation rats. The extract also significantly attenuated (P < 0.001) ulcer score in ethanol-induced ulcer model and lipid peroxidation level and significantly increased the level of glutathione peroxides, catalase, and superoxide dismutase activity. The MEJG may possess active constituents such as alkaloids, glycosides, flavonoids, and terpenes, which may play a major role in gastroprotective effect in Wistar rats. Conclusion: The present study provides scientific support for the anti-ulcer activities of extracts of JG and also claimed that antioxidant potential of the extracts. However, substantiates the traditional claims for the usage of this drug in the treatment of gastric ulcer. SUMMARY The methanolic extract of jatropha gossypiifolia Linn. for gastro protective activity against aspirin plus pyloric ligation and ethanol induced ulcer models was studied in Wistar rats. JG shows significantly

  14. STROBE—Radiation Ulcer: An Overlooked Complication of Fluoroscopic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Kai-Che; Yang, Kuo-Chung; Mar, Guang-Yuan; Chen, Lee-Wei; Wu, Chieh-Shan; Lai, Chi-Cheng; Wang, Wen-Hua; Lai, Ping-Chin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract With increasing numbers of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and complex cardiac procedures, higher accumulated radiation dose in patient has been observed. We speculate cardiac catheter intervention induced radiation skin damage is no longer rare. To study the incidence of cardiac fluoroscopic intervention induced radiation ulcer. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of those who received cardiac fluoroscopic intervention in our hospital during 2012 to 2013 for any events of radiation ulcer. Only patients, whose clinical photos were available for reviewing, would be included for further evaluation. The diagnosis of radiation ulcers were made when there is a history of PCI with pictures proven skin ulcers, which presented typical characteristics of radiation injury. Nine patients with radiation ulcer were identified and the incidence was 0.34% (9/2570) per practice and 0.42% (9/2124) per patient. Prolonged procedure time, cumulative multiple procedures, right coronary artery occlusion with chronic total occlusion, obesity, and diabetes are frequent characteristics. The onset interval between the first skin manifestation and the latest radiation exposure varied from 3 weeks to 3 months. The histopathology studies failed to make diagnosis correctly in 5 out of 6 patients. To make thing worse, skin biopsy exacerbated the preexisting radiation dermatitis. Notably, all radiation ulcers were refractory to conventional wound care. Surgical intervention was necessary to heal the wound. Diagnosis of cardiac fluoroscopy intervention induced radiation skin damage is challenging and needs high index of clinical suspicion. Minimizing the radiation exposure by using new approaches is the most important way to prevent this complication. Patient education and a routine postprocedure dermatology follow up are mandatory in high-risk groups for both radiation skin damage and malignancies. This is a retrospective study, thus the true incidence of radiation ulcer

  15. Corneal cross-linking in 9 horses with ulcerative keratitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Corneal ulcers are one of the most common eye problems in the horse and can cause varying degrees of visual impairment. Secondary infection and protease activity causing melting of the corneal stroma are always concerns in patients with corneal ulcers. Corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL), induced by illumination of the corneal stroma with ultraviolet light (UVA) after instillation of riboflavin (vitamin B2) eye drops, introduces crosslinks which stabilize melting corneas, and has been used to successfully treat infectious ulcerative keratitis in human patients. Therefore we decided to study if CXL can be performed in sedated, standing horses with ulcerative keratitis with or without stromal melting. Results Nine horses, aged 1 month to 16 years (median 5 years) were treated with a combination of CXL and medical therapy. Two horses were diagnosed with mycotic, 5 with bacterial and 2 with aseptic ulcerative keratitis. A modified Dresden-protocol for CXL could readily be performed in all 9 horses after sedation. Stromal melting, diagnosed in 4 horses, stopped within 24 h. Eight of nine eyes became fluorescein negative in 13.5 days (median time; range 4–26 days) days after CXL. One horse developed a bacterial conjunctivitis the day after CXL, which was successfully treated with topical antibiotics. One horse with fungal ulcerative keratitis and severe uveitis was enucleated 4 days after treatment due to panophthalmitis. Conclusions CXL can be performed in standing, sedated horses. We did not observe any deleterious effects attributed to riboflavin or UVA irradiation per se during the follow-up, neither in horses with infectious nor aseptic ulcerative keratitis. These data support that CXL can be performed in the standing horse, but further studies are required to compare CXL to conventional medical treatment in equine keratitis and to optimize the CXL protocol in this species. PMID:23803176

  16. Microsurgical Reconstruction of Plantar Ulcers of the Insensate Foot.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Dinesh

    2016-06-01

    Background Plantar, neuropathic, or trophic ulcers are often found in patients with decreased sensation in the foot. These ulcers can be complicated by infection, deformity, and increased patient morbidity. Excision results in wider defects and local tissues are often insufficient for reconstruction Methods Total 26 free flaps were used in 25 patients to reconstruct plantar ulcers between years 2007 and 2013. The etiology included diabetic neuropathy (n = 13), leprosy (n = 3), spinal/peripheral nerve injury (n = 7), spina bifida (n = 1), and peripheral neuropathy (n = 1). The duration of the ulcer ranged from 1 to 18 years. Fifteen patients had associated systemic comorbidities and six had previous attempts. Free flaps used in reconstruction were the anterolateral thigh flap (n = 18), radial artery forearm flap (n = 4), and the gracilis muscle flap (n = 4). Recipient vessels were the posterior tibial artery (end to side) in 19 and the dorsalis pedis artery in 7. Results The average age at presentation was 44.6 years with mean duration of ulcer of 5.8 years predominantly located over weight-bearing areas. Mean size of ulcer was 59.45 cm(2) and mean follow-up period was 48 months. All flaps survived except a partial loss. Average time to resume ambulation was 6 weeks. Three patients had recurrence with mean follow-up of 48 months. Secondary flap reduction and bony resection was done in four. Conclusion Microvascular reconstruction of the sole has advantages of vascularity, adequate tissue, and leaving rest of the foot undisturbed for offloading. Three significant local conditions influencing selection and transfer of the flap include (1) distally located forefoot ulcers, (2) extensive subcutaneous fibrosis secondary to frequent inflammation, and (3) Charcot arthropathy. In our series, the anterolateral thigh flap is our first choice for reconstruction of these defects.

  17. A case series to describe the clinical characteristics of foot ulceration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Siddle, Heidi J; Firth, Jill; Waxman, Robin; Nelson, E Andrea; Helliwell, Philip S

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of foot ulceration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Adults with RA and current foot ulceration but without diabetes were recruited. Clinical examination included assessment of RA disease activity, foot deformity, peripheral vascular disease, neuropathy and plantar pressures. Location, wound characteristics and time to healing were recorded for each ulcer. Participants completed the Health Assessment Questionnaire and Leeds Foot Impact Scale. Thirty-two cases with 52 current ulcers were recruited. Thirteen patients (41%) experienced more than one current ulcer: 5 (16%) had bilateral ulceration, 15 (47%) had previous ulceration at a current ulcer site. The majority (n = 33) of open ulcers were located over the dorsal aspect of the interphalangeal joints (n = 12), plantar aspect of the metatarsophalangeal joints (MTPJs) (n = 12) and medial aspect of first MTPJs (n = 9). In ulcerated limbs (n = 37), ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) was <0.8 in 2 (5%); protective sensation was reduced in 25 (68%) and peak plantar pressures were >6 kg/cm(2) in 6 (16%). Mean ulcer size was 4.84 by 3.29 mm. Most ulcers (n = 42, 81%) were superficial; five (9.6%) were infected. Time to healing was available for 41 ulcers: mean duration was 28 weeks. Three ulcers remained open. In conclusion, foot ulceration in RA is recurrent and multiple ulcers are common. Whilst ulcers are small and shallow, time to achieve healing is slow, posing infection risk. Reduced protective sensation is common in affected patients. The prevalence of arterial disease is low but may be under estimated due to high intolerance of ABPI. PMID:22052587

  18. Evidence-based chronic ulcer care and lower limb outcomes among Pacific Northwest veterans.

    PubMed

    Karavan, Mahsa; Olerud, John; Bouldin, Erin; Taylor, Leslie; Reiber, Gayle E

    2015-09-01

    Evidence-based ulcer care guidelines detail optimal components of care for treatment of ulcers of different etiologies. We investigated the impact of providing specific evidence-based ulcer treatment components on healing outcomes for lower limb ulcers (LLU) among veterans in the Pacific Northwest. Components of evidence-based ulcer care for venous, arterial, diabetic foot ulcers/neuropathic ulcers were abstracted from medical records. The outcome was ulcer healing. Our analysis assessed the relationship between evidence-based ulcer care by etiology, components of care provided, and healing, while accounting for veteran characteristics. A minority of veterans in all three ulcer-etiology groups received the recommended components of evidence-based care in at least 80% of visits. The likelihood of healing improved when assessment for edema and infection were performed on at least 80% of visits (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.20, p = 0.009 and HR = 3.54, p = 0.006, respectively) in patients with venous ulcers. There was no significant association between frequency of care components provided and healing among patients with arterial ulcers. Among patients with diabetic/neuropathic ulcers, the chance of healing increased 2.5-fold when debridement was performed at 80% of visits (p = 0.03), and doubled when ischemia was assessed at the first visit (p = 0.045). Veterans in the Pacific Northwest did not uniformly receive evidence-based ulcer care. Not all evidence-based ulcer care components were significantly associated with healing. At a minimum, clinicians need to address components of ulcer care associated with improved ulcer healing.

  19. Social aspects of chronic duodenal ulcer. A case control study.

    PubMed

    Nasiry, R; Piper, D W

    1983-01-01

    A case-control study of 80 patients with duodenal ulcer and 80 community controls was undertaken to compare these two groups regarding social and environmental factors including socio-economic status, marital status, country of birth, childhood and family factors. An increased risk of duodenal ulcer was associated with status incongruity in males; the male patients, when matched on suburb of residence, having lower status occupations than controls, and when matched on occupational status, tending to have lower educational levels than controls. Being unmarried was associated with an increased risk of duodenal ulcer in females. The number of siblings was also a risk factor in the male patients, those with more than 5 siblings being at an increased risk. Factors not associated with duodenal ulcer included country of birth, childhood happiness, sibling sequence and family stability. In conclusion, the factors associated with chronic duodenal ulcer were found predominantly in adult life and could produce their adverse effects by causing chronic stress which may be more relevant than acute stress as produced by major life events.

  20. Transdermal deferoxamine prevents pressure-induced diabetic ulcers.

    PubMed

    Duscher, Dominik; Neofytou, Evgenios; Wong, Victor W; Maan, Zeshaan N; Rennert, Robert C; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Januszyk, Michael; Rodrigues, Melanie; Malkovskiy, Andrey V; Whitmore, Arnetha J; Walmsley, Graham G; Galvez, Michael G; Whittam, Alexander J; Brownlee, Michael; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2015-01-01

    There is a high mortality in patients with diabetes and severe pressure ulcers. For example, chronic pressure sores of the heels often lead to limb loss in diabetic patients. A major factor underlying this is reduced neovascularization caused by impaired activity of the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). In diabetes, HIF-1α function is compromised by a high glucose-induced and reactive oxygen species-mediated modification of its coactivator p300, leading to impaired HIF-1α transactivation. We examined whether local enhancement of HIF-1α activity would improve diabetic wound healing and minimize the severity of diabetic ulcers. To improve HIF-1α activity we designed a transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) containing the FDA-approved small molecule deferoxamine (DFO), an iron chelator that increases HIF-1α transactivation in diabetes by preventing iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen stress. Applying this TDDS to a pressure-induced ulcer model in diabetic mice, we found that transdermal delivery of DFO significantly improved wound healing. Unexpectedly, prophylactic application of this transdermal delivery system also prevented diabetic ulcer formation. DFO-treated wounds demonstrated increased collagen density, improved neovascularization, and reduction of free radical formation, leading to decreased cell death. These findings suggest that transdermal delivery of DFO provides a targeted means to both prevent ulcer formation and accelerate diabetic wound healing with the potential for rapid clinical translation.

  1. Venous ulcers of the lower limb: Where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Sasanka S.

    2012-01-01

    Venous ulcers are the most common ulcers of the lower limb. It has a high morbidity and results in economic strain both at a personal and at a state level. Chronic venous hypertension either due to primary or secondary venous disease with perforator paucity, destruction or incompetence resulting in reflux is the underlying pathology, but inflammatory reactions mediated through leucocytes, platelet adhesion, formation of pericapillary fibrin cuff, growth factors and macromolecules trapped in tissue result in tissue hypoxia, cell death and ulceration. Duplex scan with colour flow is the most useful investigation for venous disease supplying information about patency, reflux, effects of proximal and distal compression, Valsalva maneuver and effects of muscle contraction. Most venous disease can be managed conservatively by leg elevation and compression bandaging. Drugs of proven benefit in venous disease are pentoxifylline and aspirin, but they work best in conjunction with compression therapy. Once ulceration is chronic or the patient does not respond to or cannot maintain conservative regime, surgical intervention treating the underlying venous hypertension and cover for the ulcer is necessary. The different modalities like sclerotherapy, ligation and stripping of superficial varicose veins, endoscopic subfascial perforator ligation, endovenous laser or radiofrequency ablation have similar long-term results, although short-term recovery is best with radiofrequency and foam sclerotherapy. For deep venous reflux, surgical modalities include repair of incompetent venous valves or transplant or transposition of a competent vein segment with normal valves to replace a post-thrombotic destroyed portion of the deep vein. PMID:23162226

  2. Degrees of acid suppression and ulcer healing: dosage considerations.

    PubMed

    Pounder, R E

    1991-01-01

    The human stomach has a normal circadian rhythm of intragastric acidity characterized by increasing acidity during the day and peaks in the early hours of the morning. Eating causes a transient decrease of intragastric acidity. Acid appears to be the permissive factor in peptic ulcer disease and to be responsible for symptoms; the patient with duodenal ulcer may secrete too much acid. Pharmacological control of gastric acid secretion will speed ulcer healing. Modern regimens, which typically use a bedtime dose of an H2-receptor antagonist, produce a pulse of decreased acidity. Intragastric acidity is decreased during the night and early morning, leaving a normal profile of acidity during the day and early evening. Higher or more frequent doses of an antisecretory agent can produce a more profound decrease of 24-h intragastric acidity. Theoretical problems associated with a sustained or profound decrease of 24-h intragastric acidity include the threat of enteric infection and infestation, potential bacterial overgrowth with possible N-nitrosamine formation, and drug-induced hypergastrinaemia. In light of these potential problems, for the management of simple peptic ulceration, it appears sensible to use the minimum intervention required. Bedtime H2-receptor blockade is one such regimen. The more potent antisecretory regimens can be used for difficult clinical problems such as the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, intractable duodenal ulceration, and severe oesophagitis.

  3. Wound Bed Preparation for Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Mat Saad, Arman Zaharil; Khoo, Teng Lye; Halim, Ahmad Sukari

    2013-01-01

    The escalating incidence of diabetic mellitus has given rise to the increasing problems of chronic diabetic ulcers that confront the practice of medicine. Peripheral vascular disease, neuropathy, and infection contribute to the multifactorial pathogenesis of diabetic ulcers. Approaches to the management of diabetic ulcers should start with an assessment and optimization of the patient's general conditions, followed by considerations of the local and regional factors. This paper aims to address the management strategies for wound bed preparation in chronic diabetic foot ulcers and also emphasizes the importance of preventive measures and future directions. The “TIME” framework in wound bed preparation encompasses tissue management, inflammation and infection control, moisture balance, and epithelial (edge) advancement. Tissue management aims to remove the necrotic tissue burden via various methods of debridement. Infection and inflammation control restores bacterial balance with the reduction of bacterial biofilms. Achieving a moist wound healing environment without excessive wound moisture or dryness will result in moisture balance. Epithelial advancement is promoted via removing the physical and biochemical barriers for migration of epithelium from wound edges. These systematic and holistic approaches will potentiate the healing abilities of the chronic diabetic ulcers, including those that are recalcitrant. PMID:23476800

  4. Ulcerative Granular Cell Tumor: A Clinicopathological and Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    El-Khalawany, Mohamed; Mosbeh, Al-Sadat; Abd-Al Salam, Fatma; Abou-Bakr, Amany

    2011-01-01

    Granular cell tumor (GCT) is uncommonly presented with cutaneous ulcer. We examined the clinicopathological and immunohistochemical features of this ulcerative form in fourteen cases that may raise the awareness of this variant. The study included 11 males and 3 females with a mean age 31.5 ± 7.42 years. All cases were presented with large solitary ulcer with indurated base, elevated border, skin colored margin, and necrotic floor. Twelve lesions were located on the extremities and two lesions on the genital region. Histologically, the lesions showed dermal infiltrate composed of large polygonal cells with granular cytoplasm and characteristic infiltration of the dermal muscles in all cases. Immunostaining showed positive reaction for S100 (14/14), NSE (14/14), CD68 (5/14), and Vimentin (7/14) while HMB45, CK, EMA, and Desmin were negative. We hope that this paper increases the awareness of ulcerative GCT and consider it in the differential diagnosis of ulcerative lesions. PMID:22132340

  5. [Duodenal ulcers caused by chloroquine-proguanil association].

    PubMed

    Roux, X; Imbert, P; Rivière, F; Méchaï, F; Rapp, C

    2010-12-01

    Chloroquine-proguanil association is recommended for prophylaxis against falciparum malaria in countries with a low prevalence of chloroquine resistance. It is usually well tolerated with mild side effects consisting mainly of transient digestive discomfort and buccal manifestations (mouth sores or ulcers). The purpose of this report is to describe a case of duodenal ulcers presenting as epigastric pain with 10-kg weight-loss in a 32-year-old man taking chloroquine-proguanil for malaria prophylaxis during a stay in Haiti. No other causes of duodenal ulcers or weight-loss were found. Chloroquine-proguanil prophylaxis was discontinued and replaced by omeprazole for four weeks. Symptoms improved quickly and full recovery was observed within one month. To our knowledge, the occurrence of duodenal ulcers under chloroquine-proguanil association is quite rare, but possibly severe. Upper digestive endoscopy should be performed if a patient under chloroquine-proguanil develops abdominal pain especially in association with weight-loss. If endoscopy reveals duodenal ulcers, chloroquine-proguanil should be discontinued and replaced by another prophylactic regimen.

  6. Developing eLearning for pressure ulcer prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Rosie; Rodgers, Angela; Welsh, Lynn; McGown, Katrina

    2014-08-12

    The impact of pressure ulcers is psychologically, physically and clinically challenging for both patients and NHS staff. NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde (NHS GGC), in line with the Scottish Best Practice Statement for the Prevention and Management of Pressure Ulcers ( Quality Improvement Scotland, 2009 ), and the NHS Health Improvement Scotland (2011) Preventing Pressure Ulcers Change Package, launched an awareness campaign throughout the organisation in April 2012 and has more recently adopted a 'zero-tolerance' approach to pressure damage. The tissue viability service in NHS GGC recognised that in order to achieve this aim, education of front-line staff is essential. An educational framework for pressure ulcer prevention was developed for all levels of healthcare staff involved in the delivery of patient care. As a means to support the framework, an initiative to develop web-based eLearning modules has been taken forward. This has resulted in the creation of an accessible, cost-effective, stimulating, relevant, and evidence-based education programme designed around the educational needs of all healthcare staff. In conjunction with the organisation's 'top ten tools' for pressure ulcer prevention and management, the modular online education programme addresses the aims of quality improvement and zero tolerance by supporting the provision of safe and effective person-centered care. PMID:25117595

  7. Transdermal deferoxamine prevents pressure-induced diabetic ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Duscher, Dominik; Neofytou, Evgenios; Wong, Victor W.; Maan, Zeshaan N.; Rennert, Robert C.; Januszyk, Michael; Rodrigues, Melanie; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Whitmore, Arnetha J.; Galvez, Michael G.; Whittam, Alexander J.; Brownlee, Michael; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    There is a high mortality in patients with diabetes and severe pressure ulcers. For example, chronic pressure sores of the heels often lead to limb loss in diabetic patients. A major factor underlying this is reduced neovascularization caused by impaired activity of the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). In diabetes, HIF-1α function is compromised by a high glucose-induced and reactive oxygen species-mediated modification of its coactivator p300, leading to impaired HIF-1α transactivation. We examined whether local enhancement of HIF-1α activity would improve diabetic wound healing and minimize the severity of diabetic ulcers. To improve HIF-1α activity we designed a transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) containing the FDA-approved small molecule deferoxamine (DFO), an iron chelator that increases HIF-1α transactivation in diabetes by preventing iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen stress. Applying this TDDS to a pressure-induced ulcer model in diabetic mice, we found that transdermal delivery of DFO significantly improved wound healing. Unexpectedly, prophylactic application of this transdermal delivery system also prevented diabetic ulcer formation. DFO-treated wounds demonstrated increased collagen density, improved neovascularization, and reduction of free radical formation, leading to decreased cell death. These findings suggest that transdermal delivery of DFO provides a targeted means to both prevent ulcer formation and accelerate diabetic wound healing with the potential for rapid clinical translation. PMID:25535360

  8. Wound bed preparation for chronic diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Mat Saad, Arman Zaharil; Khoo, Teng Lye; Halim, Ahmad Sukari

    2013-01-01

    The escalating incidence of diabetic mellitus has given rise to the increasing problems of chronic diabetic ulcers that confront the practice of medicine. Peripheral vascular disease, neuropathy, and infection contribute to the multifactorial pathogenesis of diabetic ulcers. Approaches to the management of diabetic ulcers should start with an assessment and optimization of the patient's general conditions, followed by considerations of the local and regional factors. This paper aims to address the management strategies for wound bed preparation in chronic diabetic foot ulcers and also emphasizes the importance of preventive measures and future directions. The "TIME" framework in wound bed preparation encompasses tissue management, inflammation and infection control, moisture balance, and epithelial (edge) advancement. Tissue management aims to remove the necrotic tissue burden via various methods of debridement. Infection and inflammation control restores bacterial balance with the reduction of bacterial biofilms. Achieving a moist wound healing environment without excessive wound moisture or dryness will result in moisture balance. Epithelial advancement is promoted via removing the physical and biochemical barriers for migration of epithelium from wound edges. These systematic and holistic approaches will potentiate the healing abilities of the chronic diabetic ulcers, including those that are recalcitrant.

  9. Pressure ulcer prevention: the role of the multidisciplinary team.

    PubMed

    Samuriwo, Ray

    Pressure ulcer prevention has long been a priority for health professionals; however, poor pressure-ulcer-related practices like poor documentation continue to be identified. Research has shown that the attitude and behaviour of some nurses towards pressure ulcer prevention are not conducive to the best possible patient outcomes.This article reviews the findings of a Straussian grounded theory study, which sought to ascertain the value that is placed on pressure ulcer prevention by nurses, but also revealed the role that other health professionals in the multidisciplinary team play in the maintenance of skin integrity. The findings of this study which are presented in this paper highlight a number of important issues. Firstly, nurses are expected to know how to prevent and manage pressure ulcers, but in reality they are very reliant on the advice and support of other health professionals to maintain their patients' skin integrity. In addition,the level of support that nurses get from other health professionals in the multidisciplinary varies tremendously. Therefore, nurses in clinical practice need to be proactive in seeking input from other health professionals, as there are many members of the multidisciplinary team who are able to give them the advice and support that they need in prevention and management. PMID:22489336

  10. Pressure ulcers: Current understanding and newer modalities of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the mechanism, symptoms, causes, severity, diagnosis, prevention and present recommendations for surgical as well as non-surgical management of pressure ulcers. Particular focus has been placed on the current understandings and the newer modalities for the treatment of pressure ulcers. The paper also covers the role of nutrition and pressure-release devices such as cushions and mattresses as a part of the treatment algorithm for preventing and quick healing process of these wounds. Pressure ulcers develop primarily from pressure and shear; are progressive in nature and most frequently found in bedridden, chair bound or immobile people. They often develop in people who have been hospitalised for a long time generally for a different problem and increase the overall time as well as cost of hospitalisation that have detrimental effects on patient's quality of life. Loss of sensation compounds the problem manifold, and failure of reactive hyperaemia cycle of the pressure prone area remains the most important aetiopathology. Pressure ulcers are largely preventable in nature, and their management depends on their severity. The available literature about severity of pressure ulcers, their classification and medical care protocols have been described in this paper. The present treatment options include various approaches of cleaning the wound, debridement, optimised dressings, role of antibiotics and reconstructive surgery. The newer treatment options such as negative pressure wound therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, cell therapy have been discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages of current and newer methods have also been described. PMID:25991879

  11. Topical Treatment of Nonhealing Venous Leg Ulcer with Propolis Ointment

    PubMed Central

    Kucharzewski, M.; Kózka, M.; Urbanek, T.

    2013-01-01

    An investigation of effectiveness of topical treatment of nonhealing chronic venous leg ulcers with propolis ointment was conducted. 56 patients were included in the study and randomized into two groups. In group 1, there were 28 patients (ulceration area: 6.9–9.78 cm2) treated by means of topical propolis ointment application and short stretch bandage compression. In group 2, there were 29 patients (ulceration area: 7.2–9.4 cm2) treated by means of Unna boot leg compression without topical propolis treatment. In the study, the efficacy of both treatment methods in patients with resistive venous leg ulcers was compared. The ulceration of patients from group 1 healed completely after 6 weeks of therapy in all cases. In all patients from group 2, the process of healing was longer but successfully completed after 16 weeks of the therapy. We found that an adjunctive propolis ointment treatment increases the efficacy of the short stretch bandage compression stocking, and this combined treatment is more effective than Unna's boot compression alone. PMID:23662121

  12. Managing osteoporosis in ulcerative colitis: Something new?

    PubMed Central

    Piodi, Luca Petruccio; Poloni, Alessandro; Ulivieri, Fabio Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The authors revise the latest evidence in the literature regarding managing of osteoporosis in ulcerative colitis (UC), paying particular attention to the latest tendency of the research concerning the management of bone damage in the patient affected by UC. It is wise to assess vitamin D status in ulcerative colitis patients to recognize who is predisposed to low levels of vitamin D, whose deficiency has to be treated with oral or parenteral vitamin D supplementation. An adequate dietary calcium intake or supplementation and physical activity, if possible, should be guaranteed. Osteoporotic risk factors, such as smoking and excessive alcohol intake, must be avoided. Steroid has to be prescribed at the lowest possible dosage and for the shortest possible time. Moreover, conditions favoring falling have to been minimized, like carpets, low illumination, sedatives assumption, vitamin D deficiency. It is advisable to assess the fracture risk in all UC patient by the fracture assessment risk tool (FRAX® tool), that calculates the ten years risk of fracture for the population aged from 40 to 90 years in many countries of the world. A high risk value could indicate the necessity of treatment, whereas a low risk value suggests a follow-up only. An intermediate risk supports the decision to prescribe bone mineral density (BMD) assessment and a subsequent patient revaluation for treatment. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry bone densitometry can be used not only for BMD measurement, but also to collect data about bone quality by the means of trabecular bone score and hip structural analysis assessment. These two indices could represent a method of interesting perspectives in evaluating bone status in patients affected by diseases like UC, which may present an impairment of bone quality as well as of bone quantity. In literature there is no strong evidence for instituting pharmacological therapy of bone impairment in UC patients for clinical indications other than those that

  13. Severe acute ulcerative colitis: the pediatric perspective.

    PubMed

    Turner, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Many features of pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) are similar to adult-onset disease, but the rate of extensive disease is doubled in children. It is, therefore, not surprising that the admission rate for severe UC is higher in childhood-onset UC, reaching 28% by the age of 16 years. Approximately 30-40% of children will fail corticosteroids and require second-line medical therapy or colectomy. A pediatric UC activity index (PUCAI) score of >65 indicates severe disease and the index can assist in determining the need and timing of second-line medical therapy or colectomy early during the admission. A PUCAI score of >45 points on day 3 identify patients likely to fail corticosteroids (negative predictive value 90-95%), and a score >70 points on day 5 identify patients who will require short-term treatment escalation (positive predicting value 95-100%). Data in children are limited, but it seems that cyclosporine, tacrolimus and infliximab achieve a similar short-term response rate, in the range of 60-80%. Infliximab has the advantage that it may be given for a prolonged period of time while calcineurin inhibitors should not be used for more than 3-4 months, bridging to a thiopurine regimen. Colectomy is indicated in toxic megacolon or in cases refractory to one salvage therapy. The choice of colectomy in other cases should carefully consider its effect on the patient's quality of life, its impact on the physical and emotional development at a critical age of personality development, and its association with a high infertility rate in females undergoing pouch procedure before childbearing age.

  14. Treatment of severe steroid refractory ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Assche, Gert Van; Vermeire, Séverine; Rutgeerts, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Although systemic steroids are highly efficacious in ulcerative colitis (UC), failure to respond to steroids still poses an important challenge to the surgeon and physician alike. Even if the life time risk of a fulminant UC flare is only 20%, this condition is potentially life threatening and should be managed in hospital. If patients fail 3 to 5 d of intravenous corticosteroids and optimal supportive care, they should be considered for any of three options: intravenous cyclosporine (2 mg/kg for 7 d, and serum level controlled), infliximab (5 mg/kg IV, 0-2-6 wk) or total colectomy. The choice between these three options is a medical-surgical decision based on clinical signs, radiological and endoscopic findings and blood analysis (CRP, serum albumin). Between 65 and 85% of patients will initially respond to cyclosporine and avoid colectomy on the short term. Over 5 years only 50% of initial responders avoid colectomy and outcomes are better in patients naive to azathioprine (bridging strategy). The data on infliximab as a medical rescue in fulminant colitis are more limited although the efficacy of this anti tumor necrosis factor (TNF) monoclonal antibody has been demonstrated in a controlled trial. Controlled data on the comparative efficacy of cyclosporine and infliximab are not available at this moment. Both drugs are immunosuppressants and are used in combination with steroids and azathioprine, which infers a risk of serious, even fatal, opportunistic infections. Therefore, patients not responding to these agents within 5-7 d should be considered for colectomy and responders should be closely monitored for infections. PMID:18810767

  15. Treatment with benzoyl peroxide of ulcers on legs within lesions of necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum.

    PubMed

    Hanke, C W; Bergfeld, W F

    1978-09-01

    A lotion of 20% benzoyl peroxide was applied to ulcers on legs from necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum. The ulcers healed rapidly and uneventfully, leaving firm, yellow scars. The efficacy and simplicity of use of topical benzoyl peroxide therapy is discussed.

  16. Late presentation of gastric tube ulcer perforation after oesophageal atresia repair.

    PubMed

    Hazebroek, Eric J; Hazebroek, Frans W J; Leibman, Steven; Smith, Garett S

    2008-07-01

    Ulcer formation in intrathoracic grafts after oesophageal replacement is considered an infrequent complication of the procedure. We present a rare case of a gastric tube ulcer with perforation, more than 30 years after gastric tube interposition for oesophageal atresia.

  17. Mobile health platform for pressure ulcer monitoring with electronic health record integration.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Joel J P C; Pedro, Luís M C C; Vardasca, Tomé; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; Martins, Henrique M G

    2013-12-01

    Pressure ulcers frequently occur in patients with limited mobility, for example, people with advanced age and patients wearing casts or prostheses. Mobile information communication technologies can help implement ulcer care protocols and the monitoring of patients with high risk, thus preventing or improving these conditions. This article presents a mobile pressure ulcer monitoring platform (mULCER), which helps control a patient's ulcer status during all stages of treatment. Beside its stand-alone version, it can be integrated with electronic health record systems as mULCER synchronizes ulcer data with any electronic health record system using HL7 standards. It serves as a tool to integrate nursing care among hospital departments and institutions. mULCER was experimented with in different mobile devices such as LG Optimus One P500, Samsung Galaxy Tab, HTC Magic, Samsung Galaxy S, and Samsung Galaxy i5700, taking into account the user's experience of different screen sizes and processing characteristics.

  18. Ulcer in the basis of Zenker's diverticulum mimicking esophageal malignancy.

    PubMed Central

    Odemis, Bolent; Ataseven, Hilmi; Basar, Omer; Ertugrul, Ibrahim; Yüksel, Osman; Turhan, Nesrin

    2006-01-01

    Complications of Zenker's diverticulum are rare and include ulcer, bleeding and malignancy. Ulcer in the basis of diverticulum is a very rare complication and to date only four cases have been reported in the literature. Herein, we report a new case of ulcer in Zenker's diverticulum mimicking esophageal malignancy presumed to be due to aspirin and/or alcohol consumption. The exact diagnosis was troublesome and needed to perform diagnostic procedures repeatedly. The patient underwent external pharyngoesophageal diverticulectomy. We emphasize that endoscope should be withdrawn if any resistance is encountered during esophageal intubation-even with forward-viewing endoscope-especially when there is a Zenker's diverticulum suspicion and the patient receives ulcerogenic agents. Endoscopic examination should be performed prior to any definitive surgical procedure in all patients with Zenker's diverticulum. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:16895291

  19. [Risk assessment for pressure ulcer in critical patients].

    PubMed

    Gomes, Flávia Sampaio Latini; Bastos, Marisa Antonini Ribeiro; Matozinhos, Fernanda Penido; Temponi, Hanrieti Rotelli; Velásquez-Meléndez, Gustavo

    2011-04-01

    Bedridden patients are in risk to developing pressure ulcers and represent a priority group to be studied to identify this condition. To reach this goal, specific instruments are used to assess this problem. The objective of this study was to analyze the risk factors to developing pressure ulcers in adult patients hospitalized in ICUs. This is a sectional analytical study, in which evaluations were performed on 140 patients, hospitalized in 22 ICUs, using the Braden scale. Results showed that patients hospitalized from 15 days or more showed some level of risk. The highest frequencies of pressure ulcers were found in patients in the following categories: sensorial perception (completely limited), moistness (constantly moist), mobility (completely immobilized), activity (bedridden), nutrition (adequate) and friction and shear (problem). In conclusion, the use of this scale is an important strategy when providing care to patients in intensive treatment.

  20. Assessment of some Herbal Drugs for Prophylaxis of Peptic Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Gohar, Ahmed A; Zaki, Ahmed A

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous (hydrophilic) and chloroform (Lipophilic) extracts of nine medicinal plants currently used in Egyptian traditional medicine to treat some gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorders were tested for their gastro-protective effect against the incidence of peptic ulcer. Indomethacin-induced ulcer in a rat model was used for this testing. Mentha microphylla, Brassica oleracea Capitata (Cabbage), B. oleracea Botrytis (cauliflower) aqueous fraction, Portolaca oleracea polysaccharide fraction, Oreganum marjoranum, Matricaria recutita, Solanum nigrum hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions, in addition to the chloroform fraction of Portolaca oleracea and Cicorium intybus afforded high protection against the incidence of gastric ulcer (~95%). O. syriacum hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions and gum arabic afforded moderate prophylactic effect. L. sicerarea, C. intybus hydrophilic fractions and M. microphylla lipophilic fraction were inactive. Herbs represent excellent resources for cost-effective and readily available gastro-protective remedies without side effects. PMID:25276211